WorldWideScience

Sample records for diffraction pattern applying

  1. Computer Simulation of Diffraction Patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, N. A.

    1983-01-01

    Describes an Apple computer program (listing available from author) which simulates Fraunhofer and Fresnel diffraction using vector addition techniques (vector chaining) and allows user to experiment with different shaped multiple apertures. Graphics output include vector resultants, phase difference, diffraction patterns, and the Cornu spiral…

  2. Periodically distributed objects with quasicrystalline diffraction pattern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolny, Janusz, E-mail: wolny@fis.agh.edu.pl; Strzalka, Radoslaw [Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, AGH University of Science and Technology, al. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Kuczera, Pawel [Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, AGH University of Science and Technology, al. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Laboratory of Crystallography, ETH Zurich, Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 10, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2015-03-30

    It is possible to construct fully periodically distributed objects with a diffraction pattern identical to the one obtained for quasicrystals. These objects are probability distributions of distances obtained in the statistical approach to aperiodic structures distributed periodically. The diffraction patterns have been derived by using a two-mode Fourier transform—a very powerful method not used in classical crystallography. It is shown that if scaling is present in the structure, this two-mode Fourier transform can be reduced to a regular Fourier transform with appropriately rescaled scattering vectors and added phases. Detailed case studies for model sets 1D Fibonacci chain and 2D Penrose tiling are discussed. Finally, it is shown that crystalline, quasicrystalline, and approximant structures can be treated in the same way.

  3. Diffraction patterns from 7-Angstroms tubular halloysite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eggleton, T.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: The diffraction patterns from 7-Angstroms tubular halloysite are superficially like those from kaolinite. Diffraction from a tubular aggregate of atoms, however, differs from that from a crystal because there is no linear repetition in two of the three conventional crystallographic directions. In tubular halloysite, the tube axis is [010] or [110] and in this direction the unit cell repeats in the normal linear fashion. The x-axis, by contrast, changes direction tangentially around the tube circumference, and there can be no true z-axis, because unit cells in the radial direction do not superimpose, since each successive tubular layer has a larger radius than its predecessor and therefore must contain more unit cells than its predecessor. Because tubular 'crystals' do not have a lattice repeat, use of Bragg 'hkl' indices is not appropriate. In the xy plane, a small area of the structure approximates a flat layer silicate, and hk indices may been used to label diffraction maxima. Similarly, successive 1:1 layers tangential to the tube walls yield a series of apparent 001 diffraction maxima. Measurement of these shows that the d-spacings do not form an exact integral series. The reason for this lies in the curvature of the structure. Calculated electron and powder X-ray diffraction patterns, based on a model of concentric 1:1 layers with no regular relation between them other than the 7.2 Angstroms spacing, closely simulate the observed data. Evidence for the 2-layer structure that is generally accepted may need to be reassessed in the light of these results

  4. Background removal in X-ray fiber diffraction patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Millane, R.P.; Arnott, S.

    1985-01-01

    Background can be a major source of error in measurement of diffracted intensities in fiber diffraction patterns. Errors can be large when poorly oriented less-crystalline specimens give diffraction patterns with little uncontaminated background. A method for estimating and removing a general global background in such cases is described and illustrated with an example. (orig.)

  5. Simulation of the diffraction pattern of one dimensional quasicrystal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In addition, it has been found that each golden mean produces a unique diffraction pattern and that the lower the golden mean the better the diffraction pattern resembles that of a periodic chain. Also the intensity of the central peak was found to decrease as the golden mean increases. However the value of golden mean ...

  6. Lattice constant measurement from electron backscatter diffraction patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saowadee, Nath; Agersted, Karsten; Bowen, Jacob R.

    2017-01-01

    Kikuchi bands in election backscattered diffraction patterns (EBSP) contain information about lattice constants of crystallographic samples that can be extracted via the Bragg equation. An advantage of lattice constant measurement from EBSPs over diffraction (XRD) is the ability to perform local ...

  7. Vector wave diffraction pattern of slits masked by polarizing devices

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This calls for a systematic study of diffraction properties of different apertures using polarization-sensitive devices. In the present paper, we have studied the Fraunhofer diffraction pattern of slits masked by different kinds of polarizing devices which introduce a phase difference between the two orthogonal components of the ...

  8. American Crystallographic Association Project: numerical ratings of powder diffraction patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, G.S.; Snyder, R.L.

    1977-01-01

    At present, nearly 30,000 powder diffraction patterns are available as references. It is proposed that the patterns in this file as well as new patterns submitted for publication be given quantitative quality factors. A simple-to-use figure of merit, F/sub N/, covering both accuracy of d-values and completeness of a pattern was derived. This figure of merit provides the user with a means of rapid evaluation of powder patterns in much the same way that the R-factor does for single-crystal structure determinations. The present F/sub N/ ranking scheme is shown to be superior to de Wolff's M 20 ranking scheme. It is recommended that the latter be discontinued. Guidelines are given on the use and implementation of F/sub N/ rating of powder diffraction patterns

  9. Classification using diffraction patterns for single-particle analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Hongli; Zhang, Kaiming [Department of Biophysics, the Health Science Centre, Peking University, Beijing 100191 (China); Meng, Xing, E-mail: xmeng101@gmail.com [Wadsworth Centre, New York State Department of Health, Albany, New York 12201 (United States)

    2016-05-15

    An alternative method has been assessed; diffraction patterns derived from the single particle data set were used to perform the first round of classification in creating the initial averages for proteins data with symmetrical morphology. The test protein set was a collection of Caenorhabditis elegans small heat shock protein 17 obtained by Cryo EM, which has a tetrahedral (12-fold) symmetry. It is demonstrated that the initial classification on diffraction patterns is workable as well as the real-space classification that is based on the phase contrast. The test results show that the information from diffraction patterns has the enough details to make the initial model faithful. The potential advantage using the alternative method is twofold, the ability to handle the sets with poor signal/noise or/and that break the symmetry properties. - Highlights: • New classification method. • Create the accurate initial model. • Better in handling noisy data.

  10. Classification using diffraction patterns for single-particle analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Hongli; Zhang, Kaiming; Meng, Xing

    2016-01-01

    An alternative method has been assessed; diffraction patterns derived from the single particle data set were used to perform the first round of classification in creating the initial averages for proteins data with symmetrical morphology. The test protein set was a collection of Caenorhabditis elegans small heat shock protein 17 obtained by Cryo EM, which has a tetrahedral (12-fold) symmetry. It is demonstrated that the initial classification on diffraction patterns is workable as well as the real-space classification that is based on the phase contrast. The test results show that the information from diffraction patterns has the enough details to make the initial model faithful. The potential advantage using the alternative method is twofold, the ability to handle the sets with poor signal/noise or/and that break the symmetry properties. - Highlights: • New classification method. • Create the accurate initial model. • Better in handling noisy data.

  11. Development of an ellipse fitting method with which to analyse selected area electron diffraction patterns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, D.R.G., E-mail: dmitchel@uow.edu.au [Electron Microscopy Centre, Australian Institute for Innovative Materials, Innovation Campus, University of Wollongong, North Wollongong, NSW 2500 (Australia); Van den Berg, J.A. [Electron Microscopy Centre, Australian Institute for Innovative Materials, Innovation Campus, University of Wollongong, North Wollongong, NSW 2500 (Australia); Catalyst Fundamentals, Fischer-Tropsch and Syngas Conversion Research, Sasol Technology R & D, Sasolburg 1947 (South Africa)

    2016-01-15

    A software method has been developed which uses ellipse fitting to analyse electron diffraction patterns from polycrystalline materials. The method, which requires minimal user input, can determine the pattern centre and the diameter of diffraction rings with sub-pixel precision. This enables accurate crystallographic information to be obtained in a rapid and consistent manner. Since the method fits ellipses, it can detect, quantify and correct any elliptical distortion introduced by the imaging system. Distortion information derived from polycrystalline patterns as a function of camera length can be subsequently recalled and applied to single crystal patterns, resulting in improved precision and accuracy. The method has been implemented as a plugin for the DigitalMicrograph software by Gatan, and is a freely available via the internet. - Highlights: • A robust ellipse fitting method is developed. • Freely available software for automated diffraction pattern analysis is demonstrated. • Measurement and correction of elliptical distortion is routinely achieved.

  12. Quantitative analysis of crystalline pharmaceuticals in tablets by pattern-fitting procedure using X-ray diffraction pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takehira, Rieko; Momose, Yasunori; Yamamura, Shigeo

    2010-10-15

    A pattern-fitting procedure using an X-ray diffraction pattern was applied to the quantitative analysis of binary system of crystalline pharmaceuticals in tablets. Orthorhombic crystals of isoniazid (INH) and mannitol (MAN) were used for the analysis. Tablets were prepared under various compression pressures using a direct compression method with various compositions of INH and MAN. Assuming that X-ray diffraction pattern of INH-MAN system consists of diffraction intensities from respective crystals, observed diffraction intensities were fitted to analytic expression based on X-ray diffraction theory and separated into two intensities from INH and MAN crystals by a nonlinear least-squares procedure. After separation, the contents of INH were determined by using the optimized normalization constants for INH and MAN. The correction parameter including all the factors that are beyond experimental control was required for quantitative analysis without calibration curve. The pattern-fitting procedure made it possible to determine crystalline phases in the range of 10-90% (w/w) of the INH contents. Further, certain characteristics of the crystals in the tablets, such as the preferred orientation, size of crystallite, and lattice disorder were determined simultaneously. This method can be adopted to analyze compounds whose crystal structures are known. It is a potentially powerful tool for the quantitative phase analysis and characterization of crystals in tablets and powders using X-ray diffraction patterns. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Simulation of the diffraction pattern of one dimensional quasicrystal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of the variation of atomic spacing ratio of a one dimensional quasicrystal material are investigated. The work involves the use of the solid state simulation code, Laue written by Silsbee and Drager. We are able to observe the general features of the diffraction pattern by a quasicrystal. In addition, it has been found ...

  14. Koch fractals in physical optics and their Fraunhofer diffraction patterns

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Horváth, P.; Šmíd, Petr; Vašková, I.; Hrabovský, M.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 121, č. 2 (2010), s. 206-2134 ISSN 0030-4026 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06002 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100522 Keywords : Koch fractal s * Fraunhofer diffraction patterns Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 0.454, year: 2010

  15. Diffractive elements for generating microscale laser beam patterns: a Y2K problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teiwes, Stephan; Krueger, Sven; Wernicke, Guenther K.; Ferstl, Margit

    2000-03-01

    Lasers are widely used in industrial fabrication for engraving, cutting and many other purposes. However, material processing at very small scales is still a matter of concern. Advances in diffractive optics could provide for laser systems that could be used for engraving or cutting of micro-scale patterns at high speeds. In our paper we focus on the design of diffractive elements which can be used for this special application. It is a common desire in material processing to apply 'discrete' as well as 'continuous' beam patterns. Especially, the latter case is difficult to handle as typical micro-scale patterns are characterized by bad band-limitation properties, and as speckles can easily occur in beam patterns. It is shown in this paper that a standard iterative design method usually fails to obtain diffractive elements that generate diffraction patterns with acceptable quality. Insights gained from an analysis of the design problems are used to optimize the iterative design method. We demonstrate applicability and success of our approach by the design of diffractive phase elements that generate a discrete and a continuous 'Y2K' pattern.

  16. X-ray diffraction from ideal mosaic crystals in external fields of certain types. I. Atomic displacements and the corresponding diffraction patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treushnikov, E.N.

    2000-01-01

    The problem of the theoretical description of X-ray diffraction from ideal mosaic crystals under the effect of various external fields has been formulated. Electric, magnetic, electromagnetic, and acoustic perturbations are considered. The atomic displacements in crystals under the effect of external fields and the types of the corresponding diffraction patterns are analyzed for various types of perturbations. The crystal classes are determined in which atomic displacements can be recorded experimentally. Diffraction patterns formed under the effect of various external factors are considered on the basis of the derived dependence of the structure factor on the characteristics of an applied force field

  17. Diffractive and coloured films by laser interferometry patterning

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Peláez, R.J.; Afonso, C.N.; Bulíř, Jiří; Lančok, Ján; Novotný, Michal

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 211, Oct (2012), s. 205-208 ISSN 0257-8972 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100100718; GA ČR GP202/09/P324 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100522 Keywords : laser-patterning * metal * films * nanoparticles * diffraction * colour Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.941, year: 2012

  18. Advancements of diffraction-based overlay metrology for double patterning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; Kritsun, Oleg; Liu, Yongdong; Dasari, Prasad; Weher, Ulrich; Volkman, Catherine; Mazur, Martin; Hu, Jiangtao

    2011-03-01

    As the dimensions of integrated circuit continue to shrink, diffraction based overlay (DBO) technologies have been developed to address the tighter overlay control challenges. Previously data of high accuracy and high precision were reported for litho-etch-litho-etch double patterning (DP) process using normal incidence spectroscopic reflectometry on specially designed targets composed of 1D gratings in x and y directions. Two measurement methods, empirical algorithm (eDBO) using four pads per direction (2x4 target) and modeling based algorithm (mDBO) using two pads per direction (2x2 target) were performed. In this work, we apply DBO techniques to measure overlay errors for a different DP process, litho-freeze-litho-etch process. We explore the possibility of further reducing number of pads in a DBO target using mDBO. For standard targets composed of 1D gratings, we reported results for eDBO 2x4 targets, mDBO 2x2 targets, and mDBO 2x1 target. The results of all three types of targets are comparable in terms of accuracy, dynamic precision, and TIS. TMU (not including tool matching) is less than 0.1nm. In addition, we investigated the possibility of measuring overlay with one single pad that contains 2D gratings. We achieved good correlation to blossom measurements. TMU (not including tool matching) is ~ 0.2nm. To our best knowledge, this is the first time that DBO results are reported on a single pad. eDBO allows quick recipe setup but takes more space and measurement time. Although mDBO needs details of optical properties and modeling, it offers smaller total target size and much faster throughput, which is important in high volume manufacturing environment.

  19. Inversion of convergent-beam electron diffraction patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bird, D.M.; Saunders, M.

    1992-01-01

    The problem of recovering the structure factors that contribute to a zone-axis convergent-beam diffraction pattern is discussed. It is shown that an automated matching procedure that minimizes the sum-of-squares difference between experimental and simulated patterns is effective whether one is refining accurate structure factors in a known crystal or attempting ab initio structure determination. The details of the minimization method are analysed and it is shown that a quasi-Newton method that uses analytically derived gradients is particulary effective when several structure factors are varied. The inversion method for ab initio structure determination is tested on the [110] axis of GaP, using simulated patterns as ideal 'experimental' data. (orig.)

  20. Improved orientation sampling for indexing diffraction patterns of polycrystalline materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Peter Mahler; Schmidt, Søren

    2017-01-01

    to that of optimally distributing points on a four‐dimensional sphere. In doing so, the number of orientation samples needed to achieve a desired indexing accuracy is significantly reduced. Orientation sets at a range of sizes are generated in this way for all Laue groups and are made available online for easy use.......Orientation mapping is a widely used technique for revealing the microstructure of a polycrystalline sample. The crystalline orientation at each point in the sample is determined by analysis of the diffraction pattern, a process known as pattern indexing. A recent development in pattern indexing...... in the presence of noise, it has very high computational requirements. In this article, the computational burden is reduced by developing a method for nearly optimal sampling of orientations. By using the quaternion representation of orientations, it is shown that the optimal sampling problem is equivalent...

  1. Diffraction-based overlay metrology for double patterning technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasari, Prasad; Korlahalli, Rahul; Li, Jie; Smith, Nigel; Kritsun, Oleg; Volkman, Cathy

    2009-03-01

    The extension of optical lithography to 32nm and beyond is made possible by Double Patterning Techniques (DPT) at critical levels of the process flow. The ease of DPT implementation is hindered by increased significance of critical dimension uniformity and overlay errors. Diffraction-based overlay (DBO) has shown to be an effective metrology solution for accurate determination of the overlay errors associated with double patterning [1, 2] processes. In this paper we will report its use in litho-freeze-litho-etch (LFLE) and spacer double patterning technology (SDPT), which are pitch splitting solutions that reduce the significance of overlay errors. Since the control of overlay between various mask/level combinations is critical for fabrication, precise and accurate assessment of errors by advanced metrology techniques such as spectroscopic diffraction based overlay (DBO) and traditional image-based overlay (IBO) using advanced target designs will be reported. A comparison between DBO, IBO and CD-SEM measurements will be reported. . A discussion of TMU requirements for 32nm technology and TMU performance data of LFLE and SDPT targets by different overlay approaches will be presented.

  2. X-ray diffraction patterns of metal aurocyanides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selig, W.S.; Smith, G.S.; Harding, K.K.; Summers, L.J.

    1989-06-01

    Aurocyanides of the following metal cations have been prepared: Ag, Hg(II), Ga, Fe(III), Tl(I), Bi, Pb, Mn(II), Ni, Zn, Cu(II), Cd, In, and Co(II). Most of the aurocyanides are of the type M[Au(CN) 2 ] x where M is the metal cation and x its valence. However, under some conditions mixed aurocyanides containing K may be formed, such as KCo[Au(CN) 2 ] 3 . Only Ag and Hg(II) form aurocyanides which are sufficiently insoluble for the potentiometric determination of the aurocyanide anion. The diffraction patterns of the various aurocyanides are reported. 12 refs., 16 tabs

  3. X-diffraction technique applied for nano system metrology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuznetsov, Alexei Yu.; Machado, Rogerio; Robertis, Eveline de; Campos, Andrea P.C.; Archanjo, Braulio S.; Gomes, Lincoln S.; Achete, Carlos A.

    2009-01-01

    The application of nano materials are fast growing in all industrial sectors, with a strong necessity in nano metrology and normalizing in the nano material area. The great potential of the X-ray diffraction technique in this field is illustrated at the example of metals, metal oxides and pharmaceuticals

  4. Orientation effects on indexing of electron backscatter diffraction patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowell, Matthew M.; Wright, Stuart I.

    2005-01-01

    Automated Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD) has become a well-accepted technique for characterizing the crystallographic orientation aspects of polycrystalline microstructures. At the advent of this technique, it was observed that patterns obtained from grains in certain crystallographic orientations were more difficult for the automated indexing algorithms to accurately identify than patterns from other orientations. The origin of this problem is often similarities between the EBSD pattern of the correct orientation and patterns from other orientations or phases. While practical solutions have been found and implemented, the identification of these problem orientations generally occurs only after running an automated scan, as problem orientations are often readily apparent in the resulting orientation maps. However, such an approach only finds those problem orientations that are present in the scan area. It would be advantageous to identify all regions of orientation space that may present problems for automated indexing prior to initiating an automated scan, and to minimize this space through the optimization of acquisition and indexing parameters. This work presents new methods for identifying regions in orientation space where the reliability of the automated indexing is suspect prior to performing a scan. This methodology is used to characterize the impact of various parameters on the indexing algorithm

  5. Diffraction-based overlay for spacer patterning and double patterning technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byoung Hoon; Park, JeongSu; Lee, Jongsu; Park, Sarohan; Lim, ChangMoon; Yim, Dong-Gyu; Park, Sungki; Ryu, Chan-Ho; Morgan, Stephen; van de Schaar, Maurits; Fuchs, Andreas; Bhattacharyya, Kaustuve

    2011-03-01

    Overlay performance will be increasingly important for Spacer Patterning Technology (SPT) and Double Patterning Technology (DPT) as various Resolution Enhancement Techniques are employed to extend the resolution limits of lithography. Continuous shrinkage of devices makes overlay accuracy one of the most critical issues while overlay performance is completely dependent on exposure tool. Image Based Overlay (IBO) has been used as the mainstream metrology for overlay by the main memory IC companies, but IBO is not suitable for some critical layers due to the poor Tool Induced Shift (TIS) values. Hence new overlay metrology is required to improve the overlay measurement accuracy. Diffraction Based Overlay (DBO) is regarded to be an alternative metrology to IBO for more accurate measurements and reduction of reading errors. Good overlay performances of DBO have been reported in many articles. However applying DBO for SPT and DPT layers poses extra challenges for target design. New vernier designs are considered for different DPT and SPT schemes to meet overlay target in DBO system. In this paper, we optimize the design of the DBO target and the performance of DBO to meet the overlay specification of sub-3x nm devices which are using SPT and DPT processes. We show that the appropriate vernier design yields excellent overlay performance in residual and TIS. The paper also demonstrated the effects of vernier structure on overlay accuracy from SEM analysis.

  6. Time-resolved measurements with streaked diffraction patterns from electrons generated in laser plasma wakefield

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhaohan; Nees, John; Hou, Bixue; Krushelnick, Karl; Thomas, Alec; Beaurepaire, Benoît; Malka, Victor; Faure, Jérôme

    2013-10-01

    Femtosecond bunches of electrons with relativistic to ultra-relativistic energies can be robustly produced in laser plasma wakefield accelerators (LWFA). Scaling the electron energy down to sub-relativistic and MeV level using a millijoule laser system will make such electron source a promising candidate for ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) applications due to the intrinsic short bunch duration and perfect synchronization with the optical pump. Recent results of electron diffraction from a single crystal gold foil, using LWFA electrons driven by 8-mJ, 35-fs laser pulses at 500 Hz, will be presented. The accelerated electrons were collimated with a solenoid magnetic lens. By applying a small-angle tilt to the magnetic lens, the diffraction pattern can be streaked such that the temporal evolution is separated spatially on the detector screen after propagation. The observable time window and achievable temporal resolution are studied in pump-probe measurements of photo-induced heating on the gold foil.

  7. Calculation of Debye-Scherrer diffraction patterns from highly stressed polycrystalline materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacDonald, M. J., E-mail: macdonm@umich.edu [Applied Physics Program, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Vorberger, J. [Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Gamboa, E. J.; Glenzer, S. H.; Fletcher, L. B. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Drake, R. P. [Climate and Space Sciences and Engineering, Applied Physics, and Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

    2016-06-07

    Calculations of Debye-Scherrer diffraction patterns from polycrystalline materials have typically been done in the limit of small deviatoric stresses. Although these methods are well suited for experiments conducted near hydrostatic conditions, more robust models are required to diagnose the large strain anisotropies present in dynamic compression experiments. A method to predict Debye-Scherrer diffraction patterns for arbitrary strains has been presented in the Voigt (iso-strain) limit [Higginbotham, J. Appl. Phys. 115, 174906 (2014)]. Here, we present a method to calculate Debye-Scherrer diffraction patterns from highly stressed polycrystalline samples in the Reuss (iso-stress) limit. This analysis uses elastic constants to calculate lattice strains for all initial crystallite orientations, enabling elastic anisotropy and sample texture effects to be modeled directly. The effects of probing geometry, deviatoric stresses, and sample texture are demonstrated and compared to Voigt limit predictions. An example of shock-compressed polycrystalline diamond is presented to illustrate how this model can be applied and demonstrates the importance of including material strength when interpreting diffraction in dynamic compression experiments.

  8. Multifocus microscopy with precise color multi-phase diffractive optics applied in functional neuronal imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahamsson, Sara; Ilic, Rob; Wisniewski, Jan; Mehl, Brian; Yu, Liya; Chen, Lei; Davanco, Marcelo; Oudjedi, Laura; Fiche, Jean-Bernard; Hajj, Bassam; Jin, Xin; Pulupa, Joan; Cho, Christine; Mir, Mustafa; El Beheiry, Mohamed; Darzacq, Xavier; Nollmann, Marcelo; Dahan, Maxime; Wu, Carl; Lionnet, Timothée; Liddle, J Alexander; Bargmann, Cornelia I

    2016-03-01

    Multifocus microscopy (MFM) allows high-resolution instantaneous three-dimensional (3D) imaging and has been applied to study biological specimens ranging from single molecules inside cells nuclei to entire embryos. We here describe pattern designs and nanofabrication methods for diffractive optics that optimize the light-efficiency of the central optical component of MFM: the diffractive multifocus grating (MFG). We also implement a "precise color" MFM layout with MFGs tailored to individual fluorophores in separate optical arms. The reported advancements enable faster and brighter volumetric time-lapse imaging of biological samples. In live microscopy applications, photon budget is a critical parameter and light-efficiency must be optimized to obtain the fastest possible frame rate while minimizing photodamage. We provide comprehensive descriptions and code for designing diffractive optical devices, and a detailed methods description for nanofabrication of devices. Theoretical efficiencies of reported designs is ≈90% and we have obtained efficiencies of > 80% in MFGs of our own manufacture. We demonstrate the performance of a multi-phase MFG in 3D functional neuronal imaging in living C. elegans.

  9. Translation symmetry of the Fraunhofer diffraction pattern from a polygonal aperture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinogradov, I.R.; Tarlykov, V.A.

    1995-01-01

    The problem of observing the translation symmetry in the Fraunhofer diffraction pattern is treated. The objective of this study is to show that translation symmetry can be observed in the Fraunhofer diffraction pattern if the diffraction aperture can be represented in the form of a set of parallelogram apertures. It is shown that the diffraction field produced by such an aperture can be represented as a system of point sources modulated with an amplitude factor. 10 refs., 2 figs

  10. Relation between the diffraction pattern visibility and dispersion of particle sizes in an ektacytometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikitin, Sergei Yu; Lugovtsov, Andrei E; Priezzhev, A V; Ustinov, V D

    2011-01-01

    We have calculated the angular distribution of the light intensity in the diffraction pattern arising upon scattering of a laser beam on a suspension of red blood cells in an ektacytometer. We have estimated the diffraction pattern visibility in the region of the first diffraction minimum and the first diffraction maximum as a function of particle size variation. It is shown that in this fragment of the diffraction pattern its visibility decreases already twofold in the case of a standard deviation of the particle size from the average value, equal to 8%.

  11. Advanced diffraction-based overlay for double patterning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; Liu, Yongdong; Dasari, Prasad; Hu, Jiangtao; Smith, Nigel; Kritsun, Oleg; Volkman, Catherine

    2010-03-01

    Diffraction based overlay (DBO) technologies have been developed to address the tighter overlay control challenges as the dimensions of integrated circuit continue to shrink. Several studies published recently have demonstrated that the performance of DBO technologies has the potential to meet the overlay metrology budget for 22nm technology node. However, several hurdles must be cleared before DBO can be used in production. One of the major hurdles is that most DBO technologies require specially designed targets that consist of multiple measurement pads, which consume too much space and increase measurement time. A more advanced spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) technology-Mueller Matrix SE (MM-SE) is developed to address the challenge. We use a double patterning sample to demonstrate the potential of MM-SE as a DBO candidate. Sample matrix (the matrix that describes the effects of the sample on the incident optical beam) obtained from MM-SE contains up to 16 elements. We show that the Mueller elements from the off-diagonal 2x2 blocks respond to overlay linearly and are zero when overlay errors are absent. This superior property enables empirical DBO (eDBO) using two pads per direction. Furthermore, the rich information in Mueller matrix and its direct response to overlay make it feasible to extract overlay errors from only one pad per direction using modeling approach (mDBO). We here present the Mueller overlay results using both eDBO and mDBO and compare the results with image-based overlay (IBO) and CD-SEM results. We also report the tool induced shifts (TIS) and dynamic repeatability.

  12. The Effect of the Shape of Atomic Potential on the Diffraction Pattern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We have simulated the diffraction patterns of both periodic and quasiperiodic monatomic chains using the code Laue (written by Silsbee and Drager) and investigated the effects of the shape of the atomic potential. Three fundamental differences between the diffraction patterns of periodic and quasiperiodic monatomic chain ...

  13. Electron diffraction patterns with thermal diffuse scattering maxima around Kikuchi lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karakhanyan, R. K.; Karakhanyan, K. R.

    2011-01-01

    Transmission electron diffraction patterns of silicon with thermal diffuse maxima around Kikuchi lines, which are analogs of the maxima of thermal diffuse electron scattering around point reflections, have been recorded. Diffuse maxima are observed only around Kikuchi lines with indices that are forbidden for the silicon structure. The diffraction conditions for forming these maxima are discussed.

  14. X-ray diffraction patterns of thermally-reduced graphenes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ju, Hae-Mi; Choi, Sung-Ho; Huh, Seung-Hun

    2010-01-01

    Thermally-reduced graphenes (GPs) from graphene oxides (GOs) in the range of 200 - 800 .deg. C have been investigated by using X-ray diffraction (XRD). The temperature-dependent evolutions of the (002) peaks show that exfoliation of GO sheets occurs, along with wrinkling, at ∼200 .deg. C and that high-quality GPs are produced at ∼ 600 .deg. C (GP 600 ). These phenomena are explained by the vaporization of intercalated water molecules and the effective removal of the oxide groups of GO by thermal annealing, respectively. GP 600 exhibited a clean and sharp (002) peak corresponding to an interlayer distance of 3.392 A, which is close to that of conventional graphene (∼3.4 A). The structure of GP 600 is further discussed.

  15. Size effect in X-ray and electron diffraction patterns from hydroxyapatite particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suvorova, E.I.; Buffat, P.-A.

    2001-01-01

    High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), electron microdiffraction, and X-ray diffraction were used to study hydroxyapatite specimens with particle sizes from a few nanometers to several hundreds of nanometers. Diffuse scattering (without clear reflections in transmission diffraction patterns) or strongly broadened peaks in X-ray diffraction patterns are characteristic for agglomerated hydroxyapatite nanocrystals. However, HRTEM and microdiffraction showed that this cannot be considered as an indication of the amorphous state of the matter but rather as the demonstration of size effect and the morphological and structural features of hydroxyapatite nanocrystals

  16. Multiwavelength Absolute Phase Retrieval from Noisy Diffractive Patterns: Wavelength Multiplexing Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Katkovnik

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available We study the problem of multiwavelength absolute phase retrieval from noisy diffraction patterns. The system is lensless with multiwavelength coherent input light beams and random phase masks applied for wavefront modulation. The light beams are formed by light sources radiating all wavelengths simultaneously. A sensor equipped by a Color Filter Array (CFA is used for spectral measurement registration. The developed algorithm targeted on optimal phase retrieval from noisy observations is based on maximum likelihood technique. The algorithm is specified for Poissonian and Gaussian noise distributions. One of the key elements of the algorithm is an original sparse modeling of the multiwavelength complex-valued wavefronts based on the complex-domain block-matching 3D filtering. Presented numerical experiments are restricted to noisy Poissonian observations. They demonstrate that the developed algorithm leads to effective solutions explicitly using the sparsity for noise suppression and enabling accurate reconstruction of absolute phase of high-dynamic range.

  17. Applying and Developing Patterns in Teaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennedsen, Jens; Eriksen, Ole

    2003-01-01

    A community of teachers and researchers within computer science has adopted the idea of patterns and developed a set of pedagogical patterns. These patterns capture best practices in teaching. From our research and teaching practice we have observed that pedagogical patterns are useful...... enriches the notion of pedagogical patterns. Inspired by conditions for learning we identify three values in teaching in the field of engineering-related educations. Further we present a value-based template for guidelines in teaching, causing a better understanding of the patterns and help teachers...

  18. X-ray diffraction patterns and diffracted intensity of Kα spectral lines of He-like ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Arun; Khatri, Indu; Singh, A. K.; Sharma, Rinku; Mohan, Man

    2017-09-01

    In the present paper, we have calculated fine-structure energy levels related to the configurations 1s2s, 1s2p, 1s3s and 1s3p by employing GRASP2K code. We have also computed radiative data for transitions from 1s2p 1 P1o, 1s2p 3 P2o, 1s2p 3 P1o and 1s2s 3S1 to the ground state 1s2. We have made comparisons of our presented energy levels and transition wavelengths with available results compiled by NIST and good agreement is achieved. We have also provided X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns of Kα spectral lines, namely w, x, y and z of Cu XXVIII, Kr XXXV and Mo with diffraction angle and maximum diffracted intensity which is not published elsewhere in the literature. We believe that our presented results may be beneficial in determination of the order parameter, X-ray crystallography, solid-state drug analysis, forensic science, geological and medical applications.

  19. Immobilization of biomolecules onto surfaces according to ultraviolet light diffraction patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjoern Petersen, Steffen; Kold di Gennaro, Ane; Neves-Petersen, Maria Teresa; Skovsen, Esben; Parracino, Antonietta

    2010-01-01

    We developed a method for immobilization of biomolecules onto thiol functionalized surfaces according to UV diffraction patterns. UV light-assisted molecular immobilization proceeds through the formation of free, reactive thiol groups that can bind covalently to thiol reactive surfaces. We demonstrate that, by shaping the pattern of the UV light used to induce molecular immobilization, one can control the pattern of immobilized molecules onto the surface. Using a single-aperture spatial mask, combined with the Fourier transforming property of a focusing lens, we show that submicrometer (0.7 μm) resolved patterns of immobilized prostate-specific antigen biomolecules can be created. If a dual-aperture spatial mask is used, the results differ from the expected Fourier transform pattern of the mask. It appears as a superposition of two diffraction patterns produced by the two apertures, with a fine structured interference pattern superimposed.

  20. Immobilization of biomolecules onto surfaces according to ultraviolet light diffraction patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Steffen B.; Gennaro, Ane Kold Di; Neves Petersen, Teresa

    2010-01-01

    We developed a method for immobilization of biomolecules onto thiol functionalized surfaces according to UV diffraction patterns. UV light-assisted molecular immobilization proceeds through the formation of free, reactive thiol groups that can bind covalently to thiol reactive surfaces. We demons......, with a fine structured interference pattern superimposed. (C) 2010 Optical Society of America...

  1. Coherent Rabi oscillations in a molecular system and sub-diffraction-limited pattern generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao, Zeyang; Al-Amri, M; Zubairy, M Suhail

    2015-01-01

    The resolution of a photolithography and optical imaging system is restricted by the diffraction limit. Coherent Rabi oscillations have been shown to be able to overcome the diffraction limit in a simple two-level atomic system (Z Liao, M Al-amri, and M S Zubairy 2010 Phys. Rev. Lett. 105 183601). In this paper, we numerically calculate the wave packet dynamics of a molecular system interacting with an ultrashort laser pulse and show that coherent Rabi oscillations in a molecular system are also possible. Moreover, a sub-diffraction-limited pattern can be generated in this system by introducing spatially modulated Rabi oscillations. We also discuss several techniques to improve the visibility of the sub-diffraction-limited pattern. Our result may have important applications in super-resolution optical lithography and optical imaging. (paper)

  2. Analysis of the diffraction pattern obtained by the Laue method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riquet, J. par; Bonnet, R.

    1978-01-01

    A computation method is presented which allows a rapid indexing of any unknown spot pattern obtained by back-reflection or transmission Laue methods. The Cartesian coordinates of n spots are measured in an orthonormal frame referred to the photographic film. Two spots 1 and 2 separated by a wide angular distance αsup(m) are carefully chosen. Their indices are assumed to be less than 5. The set (E) of all the pairs of planes (h 1 k 1 l 1 ) and (h 2 k 2 l 2 ) making an angle α close to αsup(m) is then computed. Since the pair of reflecting planes related to spots 1 and 2 belongs to (E), each computed pair of planes is tried, in order to determine the orientation of the crystal and to check whether the coordinates of the (n-2) other spots can be matched to dense planes of indices less than 8. If the uncertainty of the measurements is high or if n is too low, this method gives the possible orientations for the crystal. Plane indices less than 8 have been identified in cubic, tetragonal and orthorhombic crystals. (Auth.)

  3. High resolution electron exit wave reconstruction from a diffraction pattern using Gaussian basis decomposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borisenko, Konstantin B; Kirkland, Angus I

    2014-01-01

    We describe an algorithm to reconstruct the electron exit wave of a weak-phase object from single diffraction pattern. The algorithm uses analytic formulations describing the diffraction intensities through a representation of the object exit wave in a Gaussian basis. The reconstruction is achieved by solving an overdetermined system of non-linear equations using an easily parallelisable global multi-start search with Levenberg-Marquard optimisation and analytic derivatives

  4. Microbeam high-resolution diffraction and x-ray standing wave methods applied to semiconductor structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazimirov, A; Bilderback, D H; Huang, R; Sirenko, A; Ougazzaden, A

    2004-01-01

    A new approach to conditioning x-ray microbeams for high angular resolution x-ray diffraction and scattering techniques is introduced. We combined focusing optics (one-bounce imaging capillary) and post-focusing collimating optics (miniature Si(004) channel-cut crystal) to generate an x-ray microbeam with a size of 10 μm and ultimate angular resolution of 14 μrad. The microbeam was used to analyse the strain in sub-micron thick InGaAsP epitaxial layers grown on an InP(100) substrate by the selective area growth technique in narrow openings between the oxide stripes. For the structures for which the diffraction peaks from the substrate and the film overlap, the x-ray standing wave technique was applied for precise measurements of the strain with a Δd/d resolution of better than 10 -4 . (rapid communication)

  5. Direct integration of the S-matrix applied to rigorous diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iff, W; Lindlein, N; Tishchenko, A V

    2014-01-01

    A novel Fourier method for rigorous diffraction computation at periodic structures is presented. The procedure is based on a differential equation for the S-matrix, which allows direct integration of the S-matrix blocks. This results in a new method in Fourier space, which can be considered as a numerically stable and well-parallelizable alternative to the conventional differential method based on T-matrix integration and subsequent conversions from the T-matrices to S-matrix blocks. Integration of the novel differential equation in implicit manner is expounded. The applicability of the new method is shown on the basis of 1D periodic structures. It is clear however, that the new technique can also be applied to arbitrary 2D periodic or periodized structures. The complexity of the new method is O(N 3 ) similar to the conventional differential method with N being the number of diffraction orders. (fast track communication)

  6. Pattern recognition applied to uranium prospecting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briggs, P L; Press, F [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge (USA). Dept. of Earth and Planetary Sciences

    1977-07-14

    It is stated that pattern recognition techniques provide one way of combining quantitative and descriptive geological data for mineral prospecting. A quantified decision process using computer-selected patterns of geological data has the potential for selecting areas with undiscovered deposits of uranium or other minerals. When a natural resource is mined more rapidly than it is discovered, its continued production becomes increasingly difficult, and it has been noted that, although a considerable uranium reserve may remain in the U.S.A., the discovery rate for uranium is decreasing exponentially with cumulative exploration footage drilled. Pattern recognition methods of organising geological information for prospecting may provide new predictive power, as well as insight into the occurrence of uranium ore deposits. Often the task of prospecting consists of three stages of information processing: (1) collection of data on known ore deposits; (2) noting any regularities common to the known examples of an ore; (3) selection of new exploration targets based on the results of the second stage. A logical pattern recognition algorithm is here described that implements this geological procedure to demonstrate the possibility of building a quantified uranium prospecting guide from diverse geologic data.

  7. Natural quasy-periodic binary structure with focusing property in near field diffraction pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihailescu, Mona

    2010-06-07

    A naturally-inspired phase-only diffractive optical element with a circular symmetry given by a quasi-periodic structure of the phyllotaxis type is presented in this paper. It is generated starting with the characteristic parametric equations which are optimal for the golden angle interval. For some ideal geometrical parameters, the diffracted intensity distribution in near-field has a central closed ring with almost zero intensity inside. Its radius and intensity values depend on the geometry or non-binary phase distribution superposed onto the phyllotaxis geometry. Along propagation axis, the transverse diffraction patterns from the binary-phase diffractive structure exhibit a self-focusing behavior and a rotational motion.

  8. Indexing amyloid peptide diffraction from serial femtosecond crystallography: new algorithms for sparse patterns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brewster, Aaron S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Sawaya, Michael R. [University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1570 (United States); University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1570 (United States); University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1570 (United States); Rodriguez, Jose [University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1570 (United States); University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1570 (United States); Hattne, Johan; Echols, Nathaniel [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); McFarlane, Heather T. [University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1570 (United States); University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1570 (United States); Cascio, Duilio [University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1570 (United States); University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1570 (United States); University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1570 (United States); Adams, Paul D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Eisenberg, David S. [University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1570 (United States); University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1570 (United States); University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1570 (United States); Sauter, Nicholas K., E-mail: nksauter@lbl.gov [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Special methods are required to interpret sparse diffraction patterns collected from peptide crystals at X-ray free-electron lasers. Bragg spots can be indexed from composite-image powder rings, with crystal orientations then deduced from a very limited number of spot positions. Still diffraction patterns from peptide nanocrystals with small unit cells are challenging to index using conventional methods owing to the limited number of spots and the lack of crystal orientation information for individual images. New indexing algorithms have been developed as part of the Computational Crystallography Toolbox (cctbx) to overcome these challenges. Accurate unit-cell information derived from an aggregate data set from thousands of diffraction patterns can be used to determine a crystal orientation matrix for individual images with as few as five reflections. These algorithms are potentially applicable not only to amyloid peptides but also to any set of diffraction patterns with sparse properties, such as low-resolution virus structures or high-throughput screening of still images captured by raster-scanning at synchrotron sources. As a proof of concept for this technique, successful integration of X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) data to 2.5 Å resolution for the amyloid segment GNNQQNY from the Sup35 yeast prion is presented.

  9. A FORTRAN program for an IBM PC compatible computer for calculating kinematical electron diffraction patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skjerpe, P.

    1989-01-01

    This report describes a computer program which is useful in transmission electron microscopy. The program is written in FORTRAN and calculates kinematical electron diffraction patterns in any zone axis from a given crystal structure. Quite large unit cells, containing up to 2250 atoms, can be handled by the program. The program runs on both the Helcules graphic card and the standard IBM CGA card

  10. Gradient pattern analysis applied to galaxy morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, R. R.; de Carvalho, R. R.; Sautter, R. A.; Barchi, P. H.; Stalder, D. H.; Moura, T. C.; Rembold, S. B.; Morell, D. R. F.; Ferreira, N. C.

    2018-06-01

    Gradient pattern analysis (GPA) is a well-established technique for measuring gradient bilateral asymmetries of a square numerical lattice. This paper introduces an improved version of GPA designed for galaxy morphometry. We show the performance of the new method on a selected sample of 54 896 objects from the SDSS-DR7 in common with Galaxy Zoo 1 catalogue. The results suggest that the second gradient moment, G2, has the potential to dramatically improve over more conventional morphometric parameters. It separates early- from late-type galaxies better (˜ 90 per cent) than the CAS system (C˜ 79 per cent, A˜ 50 per cent, S˜ 43 per cent) and a benchmark test shows that it is applicable to hundreds of thousands of galaxies using typical processing systems.

  11. Quantification and differentiation of nuclear tracks in SSNTD by simulation of their diffraction pattern

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palacios, D.; Palacios, F.; Vitoria, T.

    2001-01-01

    An alternative method to count and differentiate nuclear tracks in SSNTD is described. The method is based on the simulation and analysis of Fraunhofer diffraction pattern formed when coherent light passes through tracks of an etched detector. Transformation of the optical system was carried out by a digital procedure of Fourier Transform. Spectral analysis of the radial intensity distribution facilitated to quantify and differentiate tracks for its diameters. The formalism outlined is also applicable to elliptic tracks. Different components of the developed software (TRACKS) are shown. Results obtained by simulation and by the theoretical model gave satisfactory concordance. With the purpose of optimizing the proposed method, technical variants of optic microscopy are discussed. A model that considers the correction for track overlapping was developed and applied. Count error is small when track distribution changes in the field of view. The proposed method can differentiate genuine tracks from defects and anomalies of the detector. Analyzing the influence of illumination conditions and focus of the microscope on track counting and discrimination, the preliminary treatment of images obtained by the CCD camera was established. The proposed method allows, with low cost and operation simplicity, guaranteeing high speed in the obtaining of results, to calculate with good approximation track density in CR-39 detectors and to differentiate the energy of incident ions by track diameters with satisfactory accuracy and precision

  12. Numerical comparison of grid pattern diffraction effects through measurement and modeling with OptiScan software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Ian B.; Densmore, Victor; Bora, Vaibhav; Pieratt, Matthew W.; Hibbard, Douglas L.; Milster, Tom D.

    2011-06-01

    Coatings of various metalized patterns are used for heating and electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding applications. Previous work has focused on macro differences between different types of grids, and has shown good correlation between measurements and analyses of grid diffraction. To advance this work, we have utilized the University of Arizona's OptiScan software, which has been optimized for this application by using the Babinet Principle. When operating on an appropriate computer system, this algorithm produces results hundreds of times faster than standard Fourier-based methods, and allows realistic cases to be modeled for the first time. By using previously published derivations by Exotic Electro-Optics, we compare diffraction performance of repeating and randomized grid patterns with equivalent sheet resistance using numerical performance metrics. Grid patterns of each type are printed on optical substrates and measured energy is compared against modeled energy.

  13. Analysis of Arbitrary Reflector Antennas Applying the Geometrical Theory of Diffraction Together with the Master Points Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Jesús Algar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An efficient approach for the analysis of surface conformed reflector antennas fed arbitrarily is presented. The near field in a large number of sampling points in the aperture of the reflector is obtained applying the Geometrical Theory of Diffraction (GTD. A new technique named Master Points has been developed to reduce the complexity of the ray-tracing computations. The combination of both GTD and Master Points reduces the time requirements of this kind of analysis. To validate the new approach, several reflectors and the effects on the radiation pattern caused by shifting the feed and introducing different obstacles have been considered concerning both simple and complex geometries. The results of these analyses have been compared with the Method of Moments (MoM results.

  14. ZDS - a computer program for analysis of X-ray powder diffraction patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ondrus, P.

    1993-01-01

    The ZDS system creates an integrated environment of procedures for complete and precise analysis of raw powder diffraction patterns. The basis of the ZDS system is a graphic control centre for easy and user-friendly application of all included procedures. It offers a number of application procedures without an interaction with any data base. The program operates either in an automatic or manual mode. The manual mode makes possible specialized applications. The input and output of the data are compatible with Philips and Siemens powder diffraction software. The ZDS system runs with Intel 80286 or 80386-based PC computers with or without math-coprocesor. (orig.)

  15. The crystal structures and powder diffraction patterns of the uranium tellurides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snyder, R.L. (State Univ. of New York, Alfred, NY (USA). Inst. of Ceramic Superconductivity); Nichols, M.C.; Boehme, D.R. (Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (USA))

    1990-10-03

    A critical review of all of the reported structures and powder diffraction patterns in the uranium telluride system has been undertaken. Structures that are correct: Cubic -- UTe: no experimental pattern exists. Retain calculated 15--865. Cubic --U{sub 3}Te{sub 4}: retain the poor quality 12--610 but adopt the pattern calculated here. Cubic U{sub 2}Te{sub 3}: no experimental pattern exists. Adopt pattern calculated here. Orthorhombic UTe{sub 2}: Adopt the new pattern of Boehme et al. Monoclinic {alpha}UTe{sub 3} Adopt the new pattern of Boehme et al. Monoclinic {alpha}UTe{sub 3} Adopt the new pattern of Boehme et al. Orthorhombic {beta}UTe{sub 3}: Adopt pattern calculated here. Orthorhombic UTe{sub 5}: Adopt the new pattern of Boehme et al. Structures in need of refinement: Orthorhombic U{sub 2}Te{sub 3}:Adopt pattern calculated here over 34--807. Hexagonal U{sub 7}Te{sub 12}: Adopt pattern calculated here but retain 24--1368. Orthorhombic UTe{sub 1.78}: Adopt pattern calculated here and retain our modified 21--1404 reported for U{sub 4}Te{sub 7}. Orthorhombic UTe{sub 2.5}: Adopt pattern calculated here. Orthorhombic UTe{sub 3.4}: Accept recent pattern of Boehme et al. Phases for which no structures or reliable patterns exist: Orthorhombic U{sub 3}Te{sub 4}: no published pattern. Tetragonal U{sub 3}Te{sub 5}: three patterns 21--1407, 34--766 and 34--896 exit but all are of very poor quality. Phases which probably do not exist: Tetragonal UTe{sub 1.78}, Tetragonal UTe{sub 2}, Cubic UTe{sub 2} U{sub 3}Te{sub 7}(21--1402), U{sub 3}Te{sub 8}(21--1406).

  16. A Monte Carlo error simulation applied to calibration-free X-ray diffraction phase analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braun, G.E.

    1986-01-01

    Quantitative phase analysis of a system of n phases can be effected without the need for calibration standards provided at least n different mixtures of these phases are available. A series of linear equations relating diffracted X-ray intensities, weight fractions and quantitation factors coupled with mass balance relationships can be solved for the unknown weight fractions and factors. Uncertainties associated with the measured X-ray intensities, owing to counting of random X-ray quanta, are used to estimate the errors in the calculated parameters utilizing a Monte Carlo simulation. The Monte Carlo approach can be generalized and applied to any quantitative X-ray diffraction phase analysis method. Two examples utilizing mixtures of CaCO 3 , Fe 2 O 3 and CaF 2 with an α-SiO 2 (quartz) internal standard illustrate the quantitative method and corresponding error analysis. One example is well conditioned; the other is poorly conditioned and, therefore, very sensitive to errors in the measured intensities. (orig.)

  17. Calculation of diffraction patterns associated with electron irradiation induced amorphization of CuTi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devanathan, R.; Meshii, M.; Sabochik, M.J.

    1990-11-01

    A new approach that uses the multislice method in conjunction with molecular dynamics simulations to study electron irradiation induced amorphisation is presented. Diffraction patterns were calculated for CuTi and found to be more sensitive than the pair correlation function to the structural changes preceding amorphisation. The results from this approach and from a study of long range order are presented. 16 refs., 8 figs

  18. Quantitative analysis of calcined fertilizers by X-ray diffraction patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cekinski, E.

    1987-01-01

    An X-ray diffraction pattern method for quantitative analyses of phosphate fertilizers obtained by calcination of a misture of Anitapolis phosphate concentrate and sodium carbonate is described. The method consists in plotting a calibration curve, using spinel (MgAl 2 O 4 ) as internal standard, of the phases that were formed by calcination, sintetized in laboratory. The tests conducted in order to avail the method accuracy showed good correlation between the obtained data and the real values. (author) [pt

  19. Circular Hough transform diffraction analysis: A software tool for automated measurement of selected area electron diffraction patterns within Digital MicrographTM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, D.R.G.

    2008-01-01

    A software tool (script and plugin) for computing circular Hough transforms (CHT) in Digital Micrograph TM has been developed, for the purpose of automated analysis of selected area electron diffraction patterns (SADPs) of polycrystalline materials. The CHT enables the diffraction pattern centre to be determined with sub-pixel accuracy, regardless of the exposure condition of the transmitted beam or if a beam stop is present. Radii of the diffraction rings can also be accurately measured with sub-pixel precision. If the pattern is calibrated against a known camera length, then d-spacings with an accuracy of better than 1% can be obtained. These measurements require no a priori knowledge of the pattern and very limited user interaction. The accuracy of the CHT is degraded by distortion introduced by the projector lens, and this should be minimised prior to pattern acquisition. A number of optimisations in the CHT software enable rapid processing of patterns; a typical analysis of a 1kx1k image taking just a few minutes. The CHT tool appears robust and is even able to accurately measure SADPs with very incomplete diffraction rings due to texture effects. This software tool is freely downloadable via the Internet

  20. Circular Hough transform diffraction analysis: A software tool for automated measurement of selected area electron diffraction patterns within Digital Micrograph{sup TM}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, D.R.G. [Institute of Materials and Engineering Science, ANSTO, PMB 1, Menai, NSW 2234 (Australia)], E-mail: drm@ansto.gov.au

    2008-03-15

    A software tool (script and plugin) for computing circular Hough transforms (CHT) in Digital Micrograph{sup TM} has been developed, for the purpose of automated analysis of selected area electron diffraction patterns (SADPs) of polycrystalline materials. The CHT enables the diffraction pattern centre to be determined with sub-pixel accuracy, regardless of the exposure condition of the transmitted beam or if a beam stop is present. Radii of the diffraction rings can also be accurately measured with sub-pixel precision. If the pattern is calibrated against a known camera length, then d-spacings with an accuracy of better than 1% can be obtained. These measurements require no a priori knowledge of the pattern and very limited user interaction. The accuracy of the CHT is degraded by distortion introduced by the projector lens, and this should be minimised prior to pattern acquisition. A number of optimisations in the CHT software enable rapid processing of patterns; a typical analysis of a 1kx1k image taking just a few minutes. The CHT tool appears robust and is even able to accurately measure SADPs with very incomplete diffraction rings due to texture effects. This software tool is freely downloadable via the Internet.

  1. Dark-field imaging based on post-processed electron backscatter diffraction patterns of bulk crystalline materials in a scanning electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodusch, Nicolas; Demers, Hendrix; Gauvin, Raynald

    2015-01-01

    Dark-field (DF) images were acquired in the scanning electron microscope with an offline procedure based on electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) patterns (EBSPs). These EBSD-DF images were generated by selecting a particular reflection on the electron backscatter diffraction pattern and by reporting the intensity of one or several pixels around this point at each pixel of the EBSD-DF image. Unlike previous studies, the diffraction information of the sample is the basis of the final image contrast with a pixel scale resolution at the EBSP providing DF imaging in the scanning electron microscope. The offline facility of this technique permits the selection of any diffraction condition available in the diffraction pattern and displaying the corresponding image. The high number of diffraction-based images available allows a better monitoring of deformation structures compared to electron channeling contrast imaging (ECCI) which is generally limited to a few images of the same area. This technique was applied to steel and iron specimens and showed its high capability in describing more rigorously the deformation structures around micro-hardness indents. Due to the offline relation between the reference EBSP and the EBSD-DF images, this new technique will undoubtedly greatly improve our knowledge of deformation mechanism and help to improve our understanding of the ECCI contrast mechanisms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. A deep convolutional neural network to analyze position averaged convergent beam electron diffraction patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, W; LeBeau, J M

    2018-05-01

    We establish a series of deep convolutional neural networks to automatically analyze position averaged convergent beam electron diffraction patterns. The networks first calibrate the zero-order disk size, center position, and rotation without the need for pretreating the data. With the aligned data, additional networks then measure the sample thickness and tilt. The performance of the network is explored as a function of a variety of variables including thickness, tilt, and dose. A methodology to explore the response of the neural network to various pattern features is also presented. Processing patterns at a rate of  ∼ 0.1 s/pattern, the network is shown to be orders of magnitude faster than a brute force method while maintaining accuracy. The approach is thus suitable for automatically processing big, 4D STEM data. We also discuss the generality of the method to other materials/orientations as well as a hybrid approach that combines the features of the neural network with least squares fitting for even more robust analysis. The source code is available at https://github.com/subangstrom/DeepDiffraction. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. X-ray diffraction patterns of single crystals implanted with high-energy light ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieteska, K.

    1998-01-01

    X-ray diffraction patterns of silicon and gallium arsenide single crystals implanted with high-energy protons and α-particles were studied. A various models of lattice parameter changes were analysed. The agreement between the simulation and experiment proves that the lattice parameter depth-distribution can be assumed to be proportional to vacancy distribution obtained by Monte-Carlo method and from the Biersack-Ziegler theory. Most of the X-ray experiments were performed using synchrotron source of X-ray radiation in particular in the case of back-reflection and transmission section topographic methods. The new method of direct determination of the implanted ion ranges was proposed using synchrotron radiation back-reflection section topography. A number of new interference phenomena was revealed and explained. These interferences are important in the applications of diffraction theory in studying of the real structure of implanted layers. (author)

  4. Generation of mask patterns for diffractive optical elements using MathematicaTM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    OShea, D.C.

    1996-01-01

    The generation of binary and grayscale masks used in the fabrication of diffractive optical elements is usually performed using a proprietary piece of software or a computer-aided drafting package. Once the pattern is computed or designed, it must be output to a plotting or imaging system that will produce a reticle plate. This article describes a number of short Mathematica modules that can be used to generate binary and grayscale patterns in a PostScript-compatible format. Approaches to ensure that the patterns are directly related to the function of the element and the design wavelength are discussed. A procedure to preserve the scale of the graphic output when it is transferred to another application is given. Examples of surfaces for a 100 mm effective focal length lens and an Alvarez surface are given. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  5. Strain fields in crystalline solids: prediction and measurement of X- ray diffraction patterns and electron diffraction contrast images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bor, Teunis Cornelis

    2000-01-01

    Lattice imperfections, such as dislocations and misfitting particles, shift and/or broaden X-ray diffraction (XRD) line profiles. Most of the present analysis methods of the shift and broadening of XRD line profiles do not provide the characteristics of lattice imperfections. The main part of this

  6. Complex (Nonstandard) Six-Layer Polytypes of Lizardite Revealed from Oblique-Texture Electron Diffraction Patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhukhlistov, A.P.; Zinchuk, N.N.; Kotel'nikov, D.D.

    2004-01-01

    Association of simple (1T and 3R) and two complex (nonstandard) orthogonal polytypes of the serpentine mineral lizardite from the Catoca kimberlite pipe (West Africa) association is revealed from oblique-texture electron diffraction patterns. A six-layer polytype with an ordered superposition of equally oriented layers (notation 3 2 3 2 3 4 3 4 3 6 3 6 or ++ - -00) belonging to the structural group A and a three-layer (336 or I,I,II) or a six-layer (336366 or I,I,II,I,II,II) polytype with alternating oppositely oriented layers and semi-disordered structure are identified using polytype analysis

  7. The X-ray powder diffraction pattern and lattice parameters of perovskite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, C.J.; Napier, J.G.

    1988-02-01

    The interplanar spacings and intensities of all lines appearing in the X-ray powder diffraction pattern of perovskite have been calculated. Many of the lines occur in groups with a large amount of overlap. As an aid to identifying the lines which are observed, the intensity profiles of the major groups have been plotted. Those lines which are relatively free of overlap and can be identified unambiguously have been used to calculate the lattice parameters, with the results a=5.4424 ± 0.0001 A, b=7.6417 ± 0.0002 A, c=5.3807 ± 0.0001 A

  8. A fully automatic peak-search program for the evaluation of Gauss-shaped diffraction patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauterjung, J.; Will, G.; Hinze, E.

    1985-01-01

    Diffraction patterns (X-rays or neutrons) often contain regions of overlapping, unresolved peaks. When using energy-dispersive techniques with solid state detectors the degree of overlap is especially high because of the poor resolution of such detectors. Profile analysis then offers the possibility to overcome, or at least reduce this drawback. In this paper a peak-search program is represented for fully automatic separation of the individual peaks. Only the instrumental parameter fwhm (full width at half-maximum) and the recorded spectrum are required as input for the program. Results are given for orthorhombic MnSO 4 . (orig.)

  9. Contrast of HOLZ lines in energy-filtered convergent-beam electron diffraction patterns from silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehmpfuhl, G.; Krahl, D.; Uchida, Y.

    1995-01-01

    Higher-order Laue-zone (HOLZ) lines were investigated in convergent-beam electron diffraction patterns from silicon near the low-indexed zone axes [100], [110] and [111]. The visibility of these lines depends on the effective structure potentials of the reflections from the first Laue zone depending on their Debye-Waller factor. The contrast of the HOLZ lines is strongly reduced by inelastically scattered electrons. They can be excluded by an imaging Ω filter for energy losses above 2 eV. The diffraction patterns were compared with many-beam calculations. Without absorption, an excellent agreement could be achieved for the [111] and [100] zone axes, while the simulation of the [110] zone-axis pattern needed a calculation with absorption. The reason for this observation is explained in the Bloch-wave picture. Calculations with absorption, however, lead to artefacts in the intensity distribution of the [100] HOLZ pattern. In order to obtain agreement with the experiment, the Debye-Waller factor had to be modified in different ways for the different zone axes. This corresponds to a strong anisotropy of the Debye-Waller factor. To confirm this observation, the temperature dependence of the itensity distributions of the HOLZ patterns was investigated between 50 and 680 K. At room temperature, the parameter D in the Debye-Waller factor exp(-Ds 2 ) was determined as 0.13, 0.26 and 0.55 A 2 for the zone axes [100], [111] and [110], respectively. The reliability of the conclusions is discussed. (orig.)

  10. The effect of pattern overlap on the accuracy of high resolution electron backscatter diffraction measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong, Vivian, E-mail: v.tong13@imperial.ac.uk [Department of Materials, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Jiang, Jun [Department of Materials, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Wilkinson, Angus J. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Britton, T. Ben [Department of Materials, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2015-08-15

    High resolution, cross-correlation-based, electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) measures the variation of elastic strains and lattice rotations from a reference state. Regions near grain boundaries are often of interest but overlap of patterns from the two grains could reduce accuracy of the cross-correlation analysis. To explore this concern, patterns from the interior of two grains have been mixed to simulate the interaction volume crossing a grain boundary so that the effect on the accuracy of the cross correlation results can be tested. It was found that the accuracy of HR-EBSD strain measurements performed in a FEG-SEM on zirconium remains good until the incident beam is less than 18 nm from a grain boundary. A simulated microstructure was used to measure how often pattern overlap occurs at any given EBSD step size, and a simple relation was found linking the probability of overlap with step size. - Highlights: • Pattern overlap occurs at grain boundaries and reduces HR-EBSD accuracy. • A test is devised to measure the accuracy of HR-EBSD in the presence of overlap. • High pass filters can sometimes, but not generally, improve HR-EBSD measurements. • Accuracy of HR-EBSD remains high until the reference pattern intensity is <72%. • 9% of points near a grain boundary will have significant error for 200nm step size in Zircaloy-4.

  11. Diffraction-Enhanced Imaging for studying pattern recognition in cranial ontogeny of bats and marsupials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocha, H.S.; Lopes, R.T.; Pessoa, L.M.; Hoennicke, M.G.; Tirao, G.; Cusatis, C.; Mazzaro, I.; Giles, C.

    2005-01-01

    The key to understanding evolution lies in the elucidation of mechanisms responsible for the observed underlying patterns and in the observation of sequences that emerge from those evolutionary landmarks. The comparative development can be used to access the derivation of form and the homology versus the convergence of evolution features. Phylogenetic and biological homologies are necessary to discern the evolutionary origins of these features. This work examined the patterns of cranial formation in pre-born bat specimens as well as post-born opossum by means of microradiography and Diffraction-Enhanced Radiography (DER) techniques. A direct conversion CCD camera was used to provide micrometer spatial resolution in order to acquire highly detailed density images. This technique allows the observation of structures, in early stages of development, which were impossible to be observed with traditional techniques, such as clearing and staining. Some cranial features have been described for adults in the literature, but the detailed description of the appearance sequence of those features in these species is still unknown and obscure. Microradiography and diffraction-enhanced imaging can improve quality of morphological detail analysis and permit the identification of anatomical landmarks that are useful in comparative studies and are still unknown in both species. In this study, we access evolution features in cranial morphology of bats and marsupials using both X-ray techniques

  12. Diffraction-Enhanced Imaging for studying pattern recognition in cranial ontogeny of bats and marsupials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocha, H.S. [Laboratorio de Instrumentacao Nuclear (LIN), COPPE, UFRJ (Brazil); Lopes, R.T. [Laboratorio de Instrumentacao Nuclear (LIN), COPPE, UFRJ (Brazil)]. E-mail: ricardo@lin.ufrj.br; Pessoa, L.M. [Laboratorio de Mastozoologia, Departamento Zoologia, Instituto de Biologia, UFRJ (Brazil); Hoennicke, M.G. [Laboratorio de Optica de Raios X e Instrumentacao (LORXI) , Departamento de Fisica, UFPR (Brazil); Tirao, G. [Laboratorio de Optica de Raios X e Instrumentacao (LORXI) , Departamento de Fisica, UFPR (Brazil); Faculdad de Mat. Astronomia y Fisica (FAMAF), UNC. Cordoba (Argentina); Cusatis, C. [Laboratorio de Optica de Raios X e Instrumentacao (LORXI) , Departamento de Fisica, UFPR (Brazil); Mazzaro, I. [Laboratorio de Optica de Raios X e Instrumentacao (LORXI) , Departamento de Fisica, UFPR (Brazil); Giles, C. [Laboratorio Nacional de Luz Sincrotron (LNLS)/Laboratorio de Cristalografia Aplicada e Raios X, Instituto de Fisica Gleb Wataghin, UNICAMP (Brazil)

    2005-08-11

    The key to understanding evolution lies in the elucidation of mechanisms responsible for the observed underlying patterns and in the observation of sequences that emerge from those evolutionary landmarks. The comparative development can be used to access the derivation of form and the homology versus the convergence of evolution features. Phylogenetic and biological homologies are necessary to discern the evolutionary origins of these features. This work examined the patterns of cranial formation in pre-born bat specimens as well as post-born opossum by means of microradiography and Diffraction-Enhanced Radiography (DER) techniques. A direct conversion CCD camera was used to provide micrometer spatial resolution in order to acquire highly detailed density images. This technique allows the observation of structures, in early stages of development, which were impossible to be observed with traditional techniques, such as clearing and staining. Some cranial features have been described for adults in the literature, but the detailed description of the appearance sequence of those features in these species is still unknown and obscure. Microradiography and diffraction-enhanced imaging can improve quality of morphological detail analysis and permit the identification of anatomical landmarks that are useful in comparative studies and are still unknown in both species. In this study, we access evolution features in cranial morphology of bats and marsupials using both X-ray techniques.

  13. X-ray diffraction patterns in high-energy proton implanted silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieteska, K.; Dluzewska, K.D.; Wierzchowski, W.; Graeff, W.

    1998-01-01

    Silicon crystals implanted with 1 and 1.6 MeV protons were studied by means of conventional source double-crystal and synchrotron multi-crystal arrangements. Both the rocking curves and series of topographs were recorded in different parallel settings employing different reflections and wavelengths of radiation. A comparison of rocking curves in different regions of implanted areas was performed in synchrotron multi-crystal arrangement with a beam of a very small diameter. The rocking curves exhibited subsidiary interference maxima with increasing periodicity on the low angle side. The plane wave topographs taken at different angular setting revealed characteristic fringes whose number decreased with increasing distance from the main maximum. The fringe pattern did not depend on the direction of the diffraction vector. The number of fringes for equivalent angular distance from the maximum was larger for higher order of reflection. The shape of the rocking curve and other diffraction patterns were reasonably explained assuming the lattice parameter change depth distribution proportional to the profile obtained from the Biersack-Ziegler theory and lateral non-uniformity of ion dose. A good approximation of the experimental results was obtained using numerical integration of the Takagi-Taupin equations. (orig.)

  14. Quantitative EEG Applying the Statistical Recognition Pattern Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engedal, Knut; Snaedal, Jon; Hoegh, Peter

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIM: The aim of this study was to examine the discriminatory power of quantitative EEG (qEEG) applying the statistical pattern recognition (SPR) method to separate Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients from elderly individuals without dementia and from other dementia patients. METHODS...

  15. Fundamental parameters approach applied to focal construct geometry for X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, K.; Evans, P.; Prokopiou, D.; Dicken, A.; Godber, S.; Rogers, J.

    2012-01-01

    A novel geometry for the acquisition of powder X-ray diffraction data, referred to as focal construct geometry (FCG), is presented. Diffraction data obtained by FCG have been shown to possess significantly enhanced intensity due to the hollow tube beam arrangement utilized. In contrast to conventional diffraction, the detector is translated to collect images along a primary axis and record the location of Bragg maxima. These high intensity condensation foci are unique to FCG and appear due to the convergence of Debye cones at single points on the primary axis. This work focuses on a two dimensional, fundamental parameter's approach to simulate experimental data and subsequently aid with interpretation. This convolution method is shown to favorably reproduce the experimental diffractograms and can also accommodate preferred orientation effects in some circumstances.

  16. the effect of the shape of atomic potential on the diffraction pattern of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    mansoor

    potential applications(Lifshitz, 2003). Ferralis et al. (2004) investigatethe diffraction from One- and two dimensional quasicrystalline gratings” using two different approaches (laser diffraction and calculated diffraction method using. Fibonacci series). The work suggested that, laser diffraction allows an inductive approach for.

  17. Classification of glutinous rice (Oryza sativa L.) starches based on X-ray diffraction pattern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Q.; Abe, T.; Ando, H.; Sasahara, T.

    1993-07-01

    This study was carried out to analyse the cultivar variability of the X-ray diffraction pattern of glutinous rice starches. Four peaks in the X-ray diffractograms were identified, i.e. 3b, 4a, 4b and 6a. The four peaks were measured from the base line for 71 cultivars and three M{sub 3} lines which were irradiated by γ-rays at the rates of 10, 20 and 30 kr, respectively. Glutinous rice starches were classified into two types by discriminant analysis based on the values of 3b/4b, 4a/4b and 6a/4b. The X-ray diffraction type of the three cultivars did not change with the cultivation areas of different latitude, while that of eleven cultivars varied. Degree of crystallinity was estimated using the formula, (I{sub max} — I{sub i})/I{sub max} where I{sub max} is the maximum height from background intensity line among cultivars, and I{sub i} represents the four peaks. These ratios indicated that the changes in the order of crystallinity were similar to those with the water content and/or hydration and temperature for gelatinization among and/or within cultivars. (author)

  18. X-ray diffraction from thin films : Size/strain analysis and whole pattern fitting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scardi, P [Trento Univ. (Italy). Dept. of Materials Engineering

    1996-09-01

    Line Profile Analysis (LPA) and whole pattern fitting may be used with success for the characterization of thin films from XRD data collected with the traditional Bragg-Brentano geometry. The size/strain analysis was conducted by an integrated procedure of profile modelling-assisted Fourier analysis, in order to measure the content of lattice imperfections and crystalline domain size along the growth direction in heteroepitaxial thin films. The microstructure of these films is typical of several PVD processes for the production of highly textured and low-defect thin crystalline layers. The same analysis could be conducted on random thin films as well, and in this case it is possible to determine an average crystallite size and shape. As will be shown in the paper, structural and microstructural parameters obtained by these methods may be correlated with thin film properties of technological interest. The whole pattern analysis may be used to obtain the information contained in a wide region of the diffraction pattern. This approach, currently used for the quantitative analysis of phase mixtures in traditional powder samples, was modified to account both for the size/strain effects, according to a simplified LPA, and for the structure of thin films and multi-layer systems. In this way, a detailed analysis based on a structural model for the present phases can be performed considering the real geometry of these samples. In particular, the quantitative phase analysis could be conducted in terms of layer thickness instead of volume or weight fractions.

  19. X-ray diffraction from thin films : Size/strain analysis and whole pattern fitting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scardi, P.

    1996-01-01

    Line Profile Analysis (LPA) and whole pattern fitting may be used with success for the characterization of thin films from XRD data collected with the traditional Bragg-Brentano geometry. The size/strain analysis was conducted by an integrated procedure of profile modelling-assisted Fourier analysis, in order to measure the content of lattice imperfections and crystalline domain size along the growth direction in heteroepitaxial thin films. The microstructure of these films is typical of several PVD processes for the production of highly textured and low-defect thin crystalline layers. The same analysis could be conducted on random thin films as well, and in this case it is possible to determine an average crystallite size and shape. As will be shown in the paper, structural and microstructural parameters obtained by these methods may be correlated with thin film properties of technological interest. The whole pattern analysis may be used to obtain the information contained in a wide region of the diffraction pattern. This approach, currently used for the quantitative analysis of phase mixtures in traditional powder samples, was modified to account both for the size/strain effects, according to a simplified LPA, and for the structure of thin films and multi-layer systems. In this way, a detailed analysis based on a structural model for the present phases can be performed considering the real geometry of these samples. In particular, the quantitative phase analysis could be conducted in terms of layer thickness instead of volume or weight fractions

  20. X-ray diffraction pattern and relative crystallinity of irradiated arrowroot starch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barroso, Aline G.; Garcia, Rafael H.L.; Del Mastro, Nelida L., E-mail: nlmastro@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-11-01

    After cereals, tubers and roots are the major source of starch for food and industrial uses. Arrowroot refers to any plant of the genus Marantha, but the term is most commonly used to describe the easily digested starch obtained from the rhizomes of Marantha arundinacae. The rhizomes of this herbaceous plant contain about 20% of starch. As few studies exist on arrowroot starch, the objective of this preliminary work was to study the X-ray diffraction patterns (XRD) patterns of arrowroot starch when treated by γ-radiation with doses up to 15 kGy in a {sup 60}Co source. The XRD patterns of the arrowroot starch exhibited A-type crystalline arrangements with strong peaks at approximately 15º, 17º, 18º and 23º (2θ). A slight increase of diffractogram peaks intensity was noticed after the irradiation process. The crystallinity index was calculated using Bruker DIFFRAC.EVA version 4.2 software. Relative crystallinity seems to increase with radiation doses, and this effect is more noticeable at low doses. That can be attributed to different radiation sensitivity among the amorphous and crystalline regions of the arrowroot starch molecule. Present results will contribute to elucidate the behavior under radiation treatment of this starchy component increasingly employed by the food industry. (author)

  1. X-ray diffraction pattern and relative crystallinity of irradiated arrowroot starch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barroso, Aline G.; Garcia, Rafael H.L.; Del Mastro, Nelida L.

    2017-01-01

    After cereals, tubers and roots are the major source of starch for food and industrial uses. Arrowroot refers to any plant of the genus Marantha, but the term is most commonly used to describe the easily digested starch obtained from the rhizomes of Marantha arundinacae. The rhizomes of this herbaceous plant contain about 20% of starch. As few studies exist on arrowroot starch, the objective of this preliminary work was to study the X-ray diffraction patterns (XRD) patterns of arrowroot starch when treated by γ-radiation with doses up to 15 kGy in a "6"0Co source. The XRD patterns of the arrowroot starch exhibited A-type crystalline arrangements with strong peaks at approximately 15º, 17º, 18º and 23º (2θ). A slight increase of diffractogram peaks intensity was noticed after the irradiation process. The crystallinity index was calculated using Bruker DIFFRAC.EVA version 4.2 software. Relative crystallinity seems to increase with radiation doses, and this effect is more noticeable at low doses. That can be attributed to different radiation sensitivity among the amorphous and crystalline regions of the arrowroot starch molecule. Present results will contribute to elucidate the behavior under radiation treatment of this starchy component increasingly employed by the food industry. (author)

  2. Extra spots in the electron diffraction patterns of neutron irradiated zirconium and its alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madden, P.K.

    1977-01-01

    Specimens of neutron irradiated zirconium and its alloys were examined in the transmission electron microscope. Groups of extra spots, often exhibiting four-fold symmetry, were observed in thin foil electron diffraction patterns of these specimens. The 'extra-spot' structure, like the expected black-dot/small scale dislocation loop neutron irradiated damage, is approximately 100 A in size. Its nature is uncertain. It may be related to irradiation damage or to some artefact introduced during specimen preparation. If it is the latter, then published irradiation damage defect size distributions and determined irradiation growth strains of other investigators, may require modification. The present inconclusive results indicate that extra-spot structure is likely to consist of oxide particles, but may correspond to hydride precipitation or decoration effects, or even, to electron beam effects. (author)

  3. XaNSoNS: GPU-accelerated simulator of diffraction patterns of nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.S. Neverov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available XaNSoNS is an open source software with GPU support, which simulates X-ray and neutron 1D (or 2D diffraction patterns and pair-distribution functions (PDF for amorphous or crystalline nanoparticles (up to ∼107 atoms of heterogeneous structural content. Among the multiple parameters of the structure the user may specify atomic displacements, site occupancies, molecular displacements and molecular rotations. The software uses general equations nonspecific to crystalline structures to calculate the scattering intensity. It supports four major standards of parallel computing: MPI, OpenMP, Nvidia CUDA and OpenCL, enabling it to run on various architectures, from CPU-based HPCs to consumer-level GPUs.

  4. XaNSoNS: GPU-accelerated simulator of diffraction patterns of nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neverov, V. S.

    XaNSoNS is an open source software with GPU support, which simulates X-ray and neutron 1D (or 2D) diffraction patterns and pair-distribution functions (PDF) for amorphous or crystalline nanoparticles (up to ∼107 atoms) of heterogeneous structural content. Among the multiple parameters of the structure the user may specify atomic displacements, site occupancies, molecular displacements and molecular rotations. The software uses general equations nonspecific to crystalline structures to calculate the scattering intensity. It supports four major standards of parallel computing: MPI, OpenMP, Nvidia CUDA and OpenCL, enabling it to run on various architectures, from CPU-based HPCs to consumer-level GPUs.

  5. Practical considerations in the calculation of orientation distribution functions from electron back-scattered diffraction patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowen, A.W.

    1994-01-01

    Using model data sets for the Brass orientation, the importance of scatter width, angular accuracy and grain size and volume fraction on the sensitivity of the calculated Orientation Distribution Functions have been determined in order to highlight some of the practical considerations needed in the processing of experimental data from individual grain orientation measurements determined by the Electron Back-Scattered Diffraction technique. It is suggested that the most appropriate scatter width can be calculated from the maximum function height versus scatter width curve in order to accommodate variations in texture sharpness. The sensitivity of the ODF to careful sample preparation, mounting and pattern analysis, in order to keep errors in angular accuracy to 1 or less is demonstrated, as is the imperative need to correct for the size of grains, and their volume fractions. (orig.)

  6. Determination of the Projected Atomic Potential by Deconvolution of the Auto-Correlation Function of TEM Electron Nano-Diffraction Patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liberato De Caro

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel method to determine the projected atomic potential of a specimen directly from transmission electron microscopy coherent electron nano-diffraction patterns, overcoming common limitations encountered so far due to the dynamical nature of electron-matter interaction. The projected potential is obtained by deconvolution of the inverse Fourier transform of experimental diffraction patterns rescaled in intensity by using theoretical values of the kinematical atomic scattering factors. This novelty enables the compensation of dynamical effects typical of transmission electron microscopy (TEM experiments on standard specimens with thicknesses up to a few tens of nm. The projected atomic potentials so obtained are averaged on sample regions illuminated by nano-sized electron probes and are in good quantitative agreement with theoretical expectations. Contrary to lens-based microscopy, here the spatial resolution in the retrieved projected atomic potential profiles is related to the finer lattice spacing measured in the electron diffraction pattern. The method has been successfully applied to experimental nano-diffraction data of crystalline centrosymmetric and non-centrosymmetric specimens achieving a resolution of 65 pm.

  7. Multiple x-ray diffraction applied to the study of crystal impurities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardoso, L.P.

    1983-06-01

    The x-ray multiple diffraction technique is used in the study of impurities concentration and localization in the crystal lattice, implemented with the fundamental observation that the impurities cannot be distributed with the same spatial group symmetry of the crystal. This fact could introduce scattered intensity in the crystal reciprocal lattice forbidden nodes. This effect was effectively observed in multiple diffraction diagrams, where a reinforcement of the scattered intensity in the pure crystal is produced, when choosing conveniently the involved reflections. The reflectivity theory was developed in the kinematic case, which take into account the scattering by the impurities atoms, and the analysis showed that, in the first approximation, the impurities can influence both in the allowed and forbidden positions for the pure crystal. (L.C.J.A.)

  8. Reconstruction of Laser-Induced Surface Topography from Electron Backscatter Diffraction Patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Patrick G; Echlin, McLean P; Pollock, Tresa M; De Graef, Marc

    2017-08-01

    We demonstrate that the surface topography of a sample can be reconstructed from electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) patterns collected with a commercial EBSD system. This technique combines the location of the maximum background intensity with a correction from Monte Carlo simulations to determine the local surface normals at each point in an EBSD scan. A surface height map is then reconstructed from the local surface normals. In this study, a Ni sample was machined with a femtosecond laser, which causes the formation of a laser-induced periodic surface structure (LIPSS). The topography of the LIPSS was analyzed using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and reconstructions from EBSD patterns collected at 5 and 20 kV. The LIPSS consisted of a combination of low frequency waviness due to curtaining and high frequency ridges. The morphology of the reconstructed low frequency waviness and high frequency ridges matched the AFM data. The reconstruction technique does not require any modification to existing EBSD systems and so can be particularly useful for measuring topography and its evolution during in situ experiments.

  9. Tensometry technique for X-ray diffraction in applied analysis of welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turibus, S.N.; Caldas, F.C.M.; Miranda, D.M.; Monine, V.I.; Assis, J.T.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the analysis of residual stress introduced in welding process. As the stress in a material can induce damages, it is necessary to have a method to identify this residual stress state. For this it was used the non-destructive X-ray diffraction technique to analyze two plates from A36 steel jointed by metal inert gas (MIG) welding. The stress measurements were made by the sin 2 ψ method in weld region of steel plates including analysis of longitudinal and transverse residual stresses in fusion zone, heat affected zone (HAZ) and base metal. To determine the stress distribution along the depth of the welded material it was used removing of superficial layers made by electropolishing. (author)

  10. Reflectivity and diffraction of X rays applied to organic thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rieutord, Francois

    1987-01-01

    This research thesis reports the study of organic thin films by using X-ray-based technologies, and more particularly X-ray reflectivity. After some recalls on X ray diffraction, and on the fabrication of Langmuir-Blodgett films, the author shows how, by combining three X-ray-based techniques, it is possible to study a volume structure of a thin film. He describes the technique of measurement by X- ray reflexivity, its experimental implementation, and methods for result interpretation. In the next part, the author reports the study of peculiar interference effects which are noticed in reflexivity on Langmuir-Blodgett films, and then describes the nature of these films by correlating results of X ray reflexivity with direct observations performed by electronic microscopy on replica [fr

  11. High quality single shot diffraction patterns using ultrashort megaelectron volt electron beams from a radio frequency photoinjector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Musumeci, P.; Moody, J. T.; Scoby, C. M.; Gutierrez, M. S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, UCLA, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Bender, H. A.; Wilcox, N. S. [National Security Technologies, LLC, Los Alamos Operations, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States)

    2010-01-15

    Single shot diffraction patterns using a 250-fs-long electron beam have been obtained at the UCLA Pegasus laboratory. High quality images with spatial resolution sufficient to distinguish closely spaced peaks in the Debye-Scherrer ring pattern have been recorded by scattering the 1.6 pC 3.5 MeV electron beam generated in the rf photoinjector off a 100-nm-thick Au foil. Dark current and high emittance particles are removed from the beam before sending it onto the diffraction target using a 1 mm diameter collimating hole. These results open the door to the study of irreversible phase transformations by single shot MeV electron diffraction.

  12. High quality single shot diffraction patterns using ultrashort megaelectron volt electron beams from a radio frequency photoinjector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musumeci, P; Moody, J T; Scoby, C M; Gutierrez, M S; Bender, H A; Wilcox, N S

    2010-01-01

    Single shot diffraction patterns using a 250-fs-long electron beam have been obtained at the UCLA Pegasus laboratory. High quality images with spatial resolution sufficient to distinguish closely spaced peaks in the Debye-Scherrer ring pattern have been recorded by scattering the 1.6 pC 3.5 MeV electron beam generated in the rf photoinjector off a 100-nm-thick Au foil. Dark current and high emittance particles are removed from the beam before sending it onto the diffraction target using a 1 mm diameter collimating hole. These results open the door to the study of irreversible phase transformations by single shot MeV electron diffraction.

  13. High quality single shot diffraction patterns using ultrashort megaelectron volt electron beams from a radio frequency photoinjector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musumeci, P.; Moody, J. T.; Scoby, C. M.; Gutierrez, M. S.; Bender, H. A.; Wilcox, N. S.

    2010-01-01

    Single shot diffraction patterns using a 250-fs-long electron beam have been obtained at the UCLA Pegasus laboratory. High quality images with spatial resolution sufficient to distinguish closely spaced peaks in the Debye-Scherrer ring pattern have been recorded by scattering the 1.6 pC 3.5 MeV electron beam generated in the rf photoinjector off a 100-nm-thick Au foil. Dark current and high emittance particles are removed from the beam before sending it onto the diffraction target using a 1 mm diameter collimating hole. These results open the door to the study of irreversible phase transformations by single shot MeV electron diffraction.

  14. Effects of focused ion beam milling on electron backscatter diffraction patterns in strontium titanate and stabilized zirconia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saowadee, Nath; Agersted, Karsten; Bowen, Jacob R.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of focused ion beam (FIB) current and accelerating voltage on electron backscatter diffraction pattern quality of yttria‐stabilized zirconia (YSZ) and Nb‐doped strontium titanate (STN) to optimize data quality and acquisition time for 3D‐EBSD experiments by FIB...

  15. Pattern formation without diffraction matching in optical parametric oscillators with a metamaterial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tassin, Philippe; Van der Sande, Guy; Veretennicoff, Irina; Kockaert, Pascal; Tlidi, Mustapha

    2009-05-25

    We consider a degenerate optical parametric oscillator containing a left-handed material. We show that the inclusion of a left-handed material layer allows for controlling the strength and sign of the diffraction coefficient at either the pump or the signal frequency. Subsequently, we demonstrate the existence of stable dissipative structures without diffraction matching, i.e., without the usual relationship between the diffraction coefficients of the signal and pump fields. Finally, we investigate the size scaling of these light structures with decreasing diffraction strength.

  16. Continuous firefly algorithm applied to PWR core pattern enhancement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poursalehi, N., E-mail: npsalehi@yahoo.com [Engineering Department, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., P.O. Box 1983963113, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zolfaghari, A.; Minuchehr, A.; Moghaddam, H.K. [Engineering Department, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., P.O. Box 1983963113, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    Highlights: ► Numerical results indicate the reliability of CFA for the nuclear reactor LPO. ► The major advantages of CFA are its light computational cost and fast convergence. ► Our experiments demonstrate the ability of CFA to obtain the near optimal loading pattern. -- Abstract: In this research, the new meta-heuristic optimization strategy, firefly algorithm, is developed for the nuclear reactor loading pattern optimization problem. Two main goals in reactor core fuel management optimization are maximizing the core multiplication factor (K{sub eff}) in order to extract the maximum cycle energy and minimizing the power peaking factor due to safety constraints. In this work, we define a multi-objective fitness function according to above goals for the core fuel arrangement enhancement. In order to evaluate and demonstrate the ability of continuous firefly algorithm (CFA) to find the near optimal loading pattern, we developed CFA nodal expansion code (CFANEC) for the fuel management operation. This code consists of two main modules including CFA optimization program and a developed core analysis code implementing nodal expansion method to calculate with coarse meshes by dimensions of fuel assemblies. At first, CFA is applied for the Foxholes test case with continuous variables in order to validate CFA and then for KWU PWR using a decoding strategy for discrete variables. Results indicate the efficiency and relatively fast convergence of CFA in obtaining near optimal loading pattern with respect to considered fitness function. At last, our experience with the CFA confirms that the CFA is easy to implement and reliable.

  17. Continuous firefly algorithm applied to PWR core pattern enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poursalehi, N.; Zolfaghari, A.; Minuchehr, A.; Moghaddam, H.K.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Numerical results indicate the reliability of CFA for the nuclear reactor LPO. ► The major advantages of CFA are its light computational cost and fast convergence. ► Our experiments demonstrate the ability of CFA to obtain the near optimal loading pattern. -- Abstract: In this research, the new meta-heuristic optimization strategy, firefly algorithm, is developed for the nuclear reactor loading pattern optimization problem. Two main goals in reactor core fuel management optimization are maximizing the core multiplication factor (K eff ) in order to extract the maximum cycle energy and minimizing the power peaking factor due to safety constraints. In this work, we define a multi-objective fitness function according to above goals for the core fuel arrangement enhancement. In order to evaluate and demonstrate the ability of continuous firefly algorithm (CFA) to find the near optimal loading pattern, we developed CFA nodal expansion code (CFANEC) for the fuel management operation. This code consists of two main modules including CFA optimization program and a developed core analysis code implementing nodal expansion method to calculate with coarse meshes by dimensions of fuel assemblies. At first, CFA is applied for the Foxholes test case with continuous variables in order to validate CFA and then for KWU PWR using a decoding strategy for discrete variables. Results indicate the efficiency and relatively fast convergence of CFA in obtaining near optimal loading pattern with respect to considered fitness function. At last, our experience with the CFA confirms that the CFA is easy to implement and reliable

  18. Electron backscatter diffraction applied to lithium sheets prepared by broad ion beam milling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodusch, Nicolas; Zaghib, Karim; Gauvin, Raynald

    2015-01-01

    Due to its very low hardness and atomic number, pure lithium cannot be prepared by conventional methods prior to scanning electron microscopy analysis. Here, we report on the characterization of pure lithium metallic sheets used as base electrodes in the lithium-ion battery technology using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and X-ray microanalysis using energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) after the sheet surface was polished by broad argon ion milling (IM). No grinding and polishing were necessary to achieve the sufficiently damage free necessary for surface analysis. Based on EDS results the impurities could be characterized and EBSD revealed the microsctructure and microtexture of this material with accuracy. The beam damage and oxidation/hydration resulting from the intensive use of IM and the transfer of the sample into the microscope chamber was estimated to be effect on the surface temperature. However, a cryo-stage should be used if available during milling to guaranty a heating artefact free surface after the milling process. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. A high-transparency, micro-patternable chip for X-ray diffraction analysis of microcrystals under native growth conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, Thomas D. [University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States); Lyubimov, Artem Y. [Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Ogata, Craig M. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Vo, Huy [Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States); Uervirojnangkoorn, Monarin; Brunger, Axel T., E-mail: brunger@stanford.edu [Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Berger, James M., E-mail: brunger@stanford.edu [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States); University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2015-09-26

    A highly X-ray-transparent, silicon nitride-based device has been designed and fabricated to harvest protein microcrystals for high-resolution X-ray diffraction data collection using microfocus beamlines and XFELs. Microcrystals present a significant impediment to the determination of macromolecular structures by X-ray diffraction methods. Although microfocus synchrotron beamlines and X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) can enable the collection of interpretable diffraction data from microcrystals, there is a need for efficient methods of harvesting small volumes (<2 µl) of microcrystals grown under common laboratory formats and delivering them to an X-ray beam source under native growth conditions. One approach that shows promise in overcoming the challenges intrinsic to microcrystal analysis is to pair so-called ‘fixed-target’ sample-delivery devices with microbeam-based X-ray diffraction methods. However, to record weak diffraction patterns it is necessary to fabricate devices from X-ray-transparent materials that minimize background scattering. Presented here is the design of a new micro-diffraction device consisting of three layers fabricated from silicon nitride, photoresist and polyimide film. The chip features low X-ray scattering and X-ray absorption properties, and uses a customizable blend of hydrophobic and hydrophilic surface patterns to help localize microcrystals to defined regions. Microcrystals in their native growth conditions can be loaded into the chips with a standard pipette, allowing data collection at room temperature. Diffraction data collected from hen egg-white lysozyme microcrystals (10–15 µm) loaded into the chips yielded a complete, high-resolution (<1.6 Å) data set sufficient to determine a high-quality structure by molecular replacement. The features of the chip allow the rapid and user-friendly analysis of microcrystals grown under virtually any laboratory format at microfocus synchrotron beamlines and XFELs.

  20. A high-transparency, micro-patternable chip for X-ray diffraction analysis of microcrystals under native growth conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, Thomas D.; Lyubimov, Artem Y.; Ogata, Craig M.; Vo, Huy; Uervirojnangkoorn, Monarin; Brunger, Axel T.; Berger, James M.

    2015-01-01

    A highly X-ray-transparent, silicon nitride-based device has been designed and fabricated to harvest protein microcrystals for high-resolution X-ray diffraction data collection using microfocus beamlines and XFELs. Microcrystals present a significant impediment to the determination of macromolecular structures by X-ray diffraction methods. Although microfocus synchrotron beamlines and X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) can enable the collection of interpretable diffraction data from microcrystals, there is a need for efficient methods of harvesting small volumes (<2 µl) of microcrystals grown under common laboratory formats and delivering them to an X-ray beam source under native growth conditions. One approach that shows promise in overcoming the challenges intrinsic to microcrystal analysis is to pair so-called ‘fixed-target’ sample-delivery devices with microbeam-based X-ray diffraction methods. However, to record weak diffraction patterns it is necessary to fabricate devices from X-ray-transparent materials that minimize background scattering. Presented here is the design of a new micro-diffraction device consisting of three layers fabricated from silicon nitride, photoresist and polyimide film. The chip features low X-ray scattering and X-ray absorption properties, and uses a customizable blend of hydrophobic and hydrophilic surface patterns to help localize microcrystals to defined regions. Microcrystals in their native growth conditions can be loaded into the chips with a standard pipette, allowing data collection at room temperature. Diffraction data collected from hen egg-white lysozyme microcrystals (10–15 µm) loaded into the chips yielded a complete, high-resolution (<1.6 Å) data set sufficient to determine a high-quality structure by molecular replacement. The features of the chip allow the rapid and user-friendly analysis of microcrystals grown under virtually any laboratory format at microfocus synchrotron beamlines and XFELs

  1. Stress evaluation in thin films: Micro-focus synchrotron X-ray diffraction combined with focused ion beam patterning for d{sub o} evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baimpas, Nikolaos, E-mail: nikolaos.baimpas@eng.ox.ac.uk [University of Oxford, Dept. of Engineering Science (United Kingdom); Le Bourhis, Eric [University of Poitiers, Institut P' , Laboratoire de Physique des Matériaux, Poitiers (France); Eve, Sophie [ENSICAEN, CRISMAT, Caen (France); Thiaudière, Dominique [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L' Orme des Merisiers Saint-Aubin, Paris (France); Hardie, Christopher [University of Oxford, Materials Department (United Kingdom); Korsunsky, Alexander M. [University of Oxford, Dept. of Engineering Science (United Kingdom)

    2013-12-31

    Nanocrystalline metallic coatings of sub-micron thickness are widely used in modern microelectronic applications. In X-ray diffraction experiments to determine both the residual and applied stresses in nanocrystalline coatings, one difficult challenge that comes up invariably is the determination of the strain-free lattice spacing d{sub o}. The present study addresses this challenge by using the focused ion beam (FIB) to generate a built-in strain-free reference by patterning (milling) a 50 × 50 μm{sup 2} region of the coating to produce an array of small stress-relieved “islands” ∼ 0.8 × 0.8 μm{sup 2} each. Transmission X-ray diffraction setup was used for data collection at DIFFABS beamline (Synchrotron SOLEIL, France). A 150 nm-thick multi-layered W–Cu nano-composite thin film on polyimide (Kapton®) substrate was studied. The samples were loaded incrementally using a compact uniaxial loading device, and micro-beam diffraction data were collected on and away from the reference array. It was shown experimentally that the “island” array remained approximately strain free throughout the experiment, providing an on-board d{sub o} lattice spacing reference. The changing lattice spacing d in the coating was also monitored away from the array, to deduce the elastic strain evolution during deformation. The results and their implications are presented and discussed. - Highlights: • In situ deformation study of laminate polycrystalline W–Cu thin films • Focused ion beam (FIB) patterning of an array of “islands” on thin films surface • X-ray diffraction on island-patterned region • Constant strain on “islands” independently of the deformation of the substrate.

  2. Homogeneity characterisation of (U,Gd)O2 sintered pellets by X-ray diffraction powder analysis applying Rietveld method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leyva, Ana G.; Vega, Daniel R.; Trimarco, Veronica G.; Marchi, Daniel E.

    1999-01-01

    The (U,Gd)O 2 sintered pellets are fabricated by different methods. The homogeneity characterisation of Gd content seems to be necessary as a production control to qualify the process and the final product. The micrographic technique is the most common method used to analyse the homogeneity of these samples, this method requires time and expertise to obtain good results. In this paper, we propose an analysis of the X-ray diffraction powder patterns through the Rietveld method, in which the differences between the experimental data and the calculated from a crystalline structure model proposed are evaluated. This result allows to determine the cell parameters, that can be correlated with the Gd concentration, and the existence of other phases with different Gd ratio. (author)

  3. INVESTIGATIONS THE EFFECT OF EOSIN B DYE ON X- RAY DIFFRACTION PATTERN OF SILVER NITRATE DOPED PVP FILMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahasin F. Hadi Al-Kadhemy

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In this research, X-ray diffraction of the powder (PVP polymer, Eosin B dye, and silver nitrate and (EB/PVP, AgNO3/PVP, EB/AgNO3/PVP films have been studied. Casting method is used to prepare homogeneous films on plastic petri dishes. All parameters accounted for the X-ray diffraction; full width half maximum (FWHM, Miller indices (hkl, size of crystalline (D, Specific Surface Area (S and Dislocation Density (δ.The nature of the structural of materials and films will be investigated. The XRD pattern of PVP polymer was amorphous structure with two broader peaks and the Eosin B dye and silver nitrate have crystalline structure. While the mixture between these materials led to appearing some crystalline peaks into XRD pattern of PVP polymer.

  4. The First X-ray Diffraction Patterns of Clay Minerals from Gale Crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bristow, Thomas; Blake, David; Bish, David L.; Vaniman, David; Ming, Douglas W.; Morris, Richard V.; Chipera, Steve; Rampe, Elizabeth B.; Farmer, Jack, D.; Treiman, Allan H; hide

    2013-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Rover, Curiosity spent approx 150 sols at Yellowknife Bay (YKB) studying a section of fluvio-lacustrine sedimentary rocks (with potential indications of volcanic influence), informally known as the Yellowknife Bay formation. YKB lies in a distal region of the Peace Vallis alluvial fan, which extends from the northern rim of Gale Crater toward the dune field at the base of Mt Sharp. Sedimentological and stratigraphic observations are consistent with the Yellowknife Bay formation being part of a distal fan deposit, which could be as young as middle Hesperian to even early Amazonian in age (approx 3.5 to 2.5 Ga). The Yellowknife Bay formation hosts a unit of mudstone called the Sheepbed member. Curiosity obtained powdered rock samples from two drill holes in the Sheepbed Member, named John Klein and Cumberland, and delivered them to instruments in Curiosity. Data from CheMin, a combined X-ray diffraction (XRD)/X-ray fluorescence instrument (XRF), has allowed detailed mineralogical analysis of mudstone powders revealing a clay mineral component of approx 20 wt.% in each sample. The clay minerals are important indicators of paleoenvironmental conditions and sensitive recorders of post-depositional alteration processes. The XRD pattern of John Klein reveals a 021 band consistent with a trioctahedral phyllosilicate. A broad peak at approx 10A with a slight inflexion at approx 12A indicates the presence of 2:1 type clay minerals in the John Klein sample. The trioctahedral nature of the clay minerals, breadth of the basal reflection, and presence of a minor component with larger basal spacing suggests that John Klein contains a trioctahedral smectite (probably saponite), whose interlayer is largely collapsed because of the low-humidity conditions. The XRD patterns show no evidence of corrensite (mixed-layer chlorite/smectite) or chlorite, which are typical diagenetic products of trioctahedral smectites when subjected to burial and heating

  5. Applying Moving Objects Patterns towards Estimating Future Stocks Direction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galal Dahab

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Stock is gaining vast popularity as a strategic investment tool not just by investor bankers, but also by the average worker. Large capitals are being traded within the stock market all around the world, making its impact not only macro economically focused, but also greatly valued taking into consideration its direct social impact. As a result, almost 66% of all American citizens are striving in their respective fields every day, trying to come up with better ways to predict and find patterns in stocks that could enhance their estimation and visualization so as to have the opportunity to take better investment decisions. Given the amount of effort that has been put into enhancing stock prediction techniques, there is still a factor that is almost completely neglected when handling stocks. The factor that has been obsolete for so long is in fact the effect of a correlation existing between stocks of the same index or parent company. This paper proposes a distinct approach for studying the correlation between stocks that belong to the same index by modelling stocks as moving objects to be able to track their movements while considering their relationships. Furthermore, it studies one of the movement techniques applied to moving objects to predict stock movement. The results yielded that both the movement technique and correlation coefficient technique are consistent in directions, with minor variations in values. The variations are attributed to the fact that the movement technique takes into consideration the sibling relationship

  6. Diffraction patterns in Fresnel approximation of periodic objects for a colorimeter of two apertures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes-Reynoso, Jose-German R.; Suarez-Romero, Jose G.; Hurtado-Ramos, Juan B.; Tepichin-Rodriguez, Eduardo; Solorio-Leyva, Juan Carlos

    2004-10-01

    In this work, we present a study of Fresnel diffraction of periodic structures in an optical system of two apertures. This system of two apertures was used successfully for measuring color in textile samples solving the problems of illumination and directionality that present current commercial equipments. However, the system is sensible to the spatial frequency of the periodic sample"s area enclosed in its optical field of view. The study of Fresnel diffraction allows us to establish criteria for geometrical parameters of measurements in order to assure invariance in angular rotations and spatial positions. In this work, we use the theory of partial coherence to calculate the diffraction through two continuous apertures. In the calculation process, we use the concept of point-spread function of the system for partial coherence, in this way we avoid complicated statistical processes commonly used in the partial coherence theory.

  7. High-speed classification of coherent X-ray diffraction patterns on the K computer for high-resolution single biomolecule imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokuhisa, Atsushi [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Arai, Junya [The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Joti, Yasumasa [JASRI, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Ohno, Yoshiyuki; Kameyama, Toyohisa; Yamamoto, Keiji; Hatanaka, Masayuki; Gerofi, Balazs; Shimada, Akio; Kurokawa, Motoyoshi; Shoji, Fumiyoshi [RIKEN Advanced Institute for Computational Science, 7-1-26 Minatojima-minami-machi, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0047 (Japan); Okada, Kensuke [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Sugimoto, Takashi [JASRI, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Yamaga, Mitsuhiro; Tanaka, Ryotaro [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Yokokawa, Mitsuo; Hori, Atsushi [RIKEN Advanced Institute for Computational Science, 7-1-26 Minatojima-minami-machi, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0047 (Japan); Ishikawa, Yutaka, E-mail: ishikawa@is.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp [The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Hatsui, Takaki, E-mail: ishikawa@is.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Go, Nobuhiro [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 8-1-7 Umemidai, Kizugawa, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan)

    2013-11-01

    A code with an algorithm for high-speed classification of X-ray diffraction patterns has been developed. Results obtained for a set of 1 × 10{sup 6} simulated diffraction patterns are also reported. Single-particle coherent X-ray diffraction imaging using an X-ray free-electron laser has the potential to reveal the three-dimensional structure of a biological supra-molecule at sub-nanometer resolution. In order to realise this method, it is necessary to analyze as many as 1 × 10{sup 6} noisy X-ray diffraction patterns, each for an unknown random target orientation. To cope with the severe quantum noise, patterns need to be classified according to their similarities and average similar patterns to improve the signal-to-noise ratio. A high-speed scalable scheme has been developed to carry out classification on the K computer, a 10PFLOPS supercomputer at RIKEN Advanced Institute for Computational Science. It is designed to work on the real-time basis with the experimental diffraction pattern collection at the X-ray free-electron laser facility SACLA so that the result of classification can be feedback for optimizing experimental parameters during the experiment. The present status of our effort developing the system and also a result of application to a set of simulated diffraction patterns is reported. About 1 × 10{sup 6} diffraction patterns were successfully classificatied by running 255 separate 1 h jobs in 385-node mode.

  8. Borehole radar diffraction tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Seong Jun; Kim, Jung Ho; Yi, Myeong Jong; Chung, Seung Hwan; Lee, Hee Il [Korea Institute of Geology Mining and Materials, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-01

    Tomography is widely used as imaging method for determining subsurface structure. Among the reconstruction algorithms for tomographic imaging, travel time tomography is almost applied to imaging subsurface. But isolated small body comparable with the wavelength could not be well recognized by travel time tomography. Other tomographic method are need to improve the imaging process. In the study of this year, diffraction tomography was investigated. The theory for diffraction tomography is based on the 1st-order Born approximation. Multisource holography, which is similar to Kirchihoff migration, is compared with diffraction tomography. To improve 1st-order Born diffraction tomography, two kinds of filter designed from multisource holography and 2-D green function, respectively, applied on the reconstructed image. The algorithm was tested for the numerical modeling data of which algorithm consists of the analytic computation of radar signal in transmitter and receiver regions and 2-D FDM scheme for the propagation of electromagnetic waves in media. The air-filled cavity model to show a typical diffraction pattern was applied to diffraction tomography imaging, and the result shows accurate location and area of cavity. But the calculated object function is not well matched the real object function, because the air-filled cavity model is not satisfied week scattered inhomogeneity for 1st born approximation, and the error term is included in estimating source wavelet from received signals. In spite of the object function error, the diffraction tomography assist for interpretation of subsurface as if conducted with travel time tomography. And the fracture model was tested, 1st born diffraction tomographic image is poor because of limited view angle coverage and violation of week scatter assumption, but the filtered image resolve the fracture somewhat better. The tested diffraction tomography image confirms effectiveness of filter for enhancing resolution. (author). 14

  9. Characterization of monoclinic crystals in tablets by pattern-fitting procedure using X-ray powder diffraction data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamura, Shigeo; Momose, Yasunori

    2003-06-18

    The purpose of this study is to characterize the monoclinic crystals in tablets by using X-ray powder diffraction data and to evaluate the deformation feature of crystals during compression. The monoclinic crystals of acetaminophen and benzoic acid were used as the samples. The observed X-ray diffraction intensities were fitted to the analytic expression, and the fitting parameters, such as the lattice parameters, the peak-width parameters, the preferred orientation parameter and peak asymmetric parameter were optimized by a non-linear least-squares procedure. The Gauss and March distribution functions were used to correct the preferred orientation of crystallites in the tablet. The March function performed better in correcting the modification of diffraction intensity by preferred orientation of crystallites, suggesting that the crystallites in the tablets had fiber texture with axial orientation. Although a broadening of diffraction peaks was observed in acetaminophen tablets with an increase of compression pressure, little broadening was observed in the benzoic tablets. These results suggest that "acetaminophen is a material consolidating by fragmentation of crystalline particles and benzoic acid is a material consolidating by plastic deformation then occurred rearrangement of molecules during compression". A pattern-fitting procedure is the superior method for characterizing the crystalline drugs of monoclinic crystals in the tablets, as well as orthorhombic isoniazid and mannitol crystals reported in the previous paper.

  10. Grip-pattern recognition: Applied to a smart gun

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shang, X.

    2008-01-01

    In our work the verification performance of a biometric recognition system based on grip patterns, as part of a smart gun for use by the police ocers, has been investigated. The biometric features are extracted from a two-dimensional pattern of the pressure, exerted on the grip of a gun by the hand

  11. Analysis of synchrotron X-ray diffraction patterns from fluorotic enamel samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, Ana P.G.; Braz, Delson, E-mail: anapaulagalmeida@gmail.co [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Instrumentacao Nuclear; Colaco, Marcos V.; Barroso, Regina C., E-mail: cely@uerj.b [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; Porto, Isabel M., E-mail: belporto@ig.com.b [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Odontologia; Gerlach, Raquel F., E-mail: rfgerlach@forp.usp.b [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Odontologia; Droppa Junior, Roosevelt, E-mail: rdroppa@lnls.b [Associacao Brasileira de Tecnologia de Luz Sincrotron (ABTLuS), Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    With the introduction of fluoride as the main anticaries agent used in preventive dentistry, and perhaps an increase in fluoride in our food chain, dental fluorosis has become an increasing world-wide problem. Visible signs of fluorosis begin to become obvious on the enamel surface as opacities, implying some porosity in the tissue. The mechanisms that conduct the formation of fluorotic enamel are unknown, but should involve modifications in the basics physical-chemistry reactions of demineralisation and remineralisation of the enamel of the teeth, which is the same reaction of formation of the enamel's hydroxyapatite (HAp) in the maturation phase. The increase of the amount of fluoride inside of the apatite will result in gradual increase of the lattice parameters. The hexagonal symmetry seems to work well with the powder diffraction data, and the crystal structure of HAp is usually described in space group P63/m. The aim of this work is to characterize the healthy and fluorotic enamel in human tooth using technique Synchrotron X-ray diffraction in order to determine the crystal structure and crystallinity of on fluoroapatite (FAp) crystal present in fluoritic enamel. All the scattering profile measurements was carried out at the X-ray diffraction beamline (XRD1) at the National Synchrotron Light Laboratory - LNLS, Campinas, Brazil. (author)

  12. Analysis of synchrotron X-ray diffraction patterns from fluorotic enamel samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, Ana P.G.; Braz, Delson

    2009-01-01

    With the introduction of fluoride as the main anticaries agent used in preventive dentistry, and perhaps an increase in fluoride in our food chain, dental fluorosis has become an increasing world-wide problem. Visible signs of fluorosis begin to become obvious on the enamel surface as opacities, implying some porosity in the tissue. The mechanisms that conduct the formation of fluorotic enamel are unknown, but should involve modifications in the basics physical-chemistry reactions of demineralisation and remineralisation of the enamel of the teeth, which is the same reaction of formation of the enamel's hydroxyapatite (HAp) in the maturation phase. The increase of the amount of fluoride inside of the apatite will result in gradual increase of the lattice parameters. The hexagonal symmetry seems to work well with the powder diffraction data, and the crystal structure of HAp is usually described in space group P63/m. The aim of this work is to characterize the healthy and fluorotic enamel in human tooth using technique Synchrotron X-ray diffraction in order to determine the crystal structure and crystallinity of on fluoroapatite (FAp) crystal present in fluoritic enamel. All the scattering profile measurements was carried out at the X-ray diffraction beamline (XRD1) at the National Synchrotron Light Laboratory - LNLS, Campinas, Brazil. (author)

  13. PABRE-Proj: applying patterns in requirements elicitation

    OpenAIRE

    Palomares Bonache, Cristina; Quer Bosor, Maria Carme; Franch Gutiérrez, Javier

    2013-01-01

    Software requirement patterns have been proposed as a type of artifact for fostering requirements reuse. In this paper, we present PABRE-Proj, a tool aimed at supporting requirements elicitation and specification. Peer Reviewed

  14. Computer x-ray powder diffraction patterns and densities for corundum, aluminium, zirconium, delta-UZr2 and the zirconium hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferguson, I.F.

    1976-11-01

    The computer-calculated X-ray powder diffraction patterns and theoretical densities of α-Al 2 O 3 ; Al; α-Zr; β-Zr; delta-UZr 2 ; γ, delta - and epsilon-zirconium hydrides are presented. Brief comments are given on some of the published X-ray powder diffraction data on these phases. (author)

  15. Humidity control and hydrophilic glue coating applied to mounted protein crystals improves X-ray diffraction experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baba, Seiki; Hoshino, Takeshi; Ito, Len; Kumasaka, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    A new crystal-mounting method has been developed that involves a combination of controlled humid air and polymer glue for crystal coating. This method is particularly useful when applied to fragile protein crystals that are known to be sensitive to subtle changes in their physicochemical environment. Protein crystals are fragile, and it is sometimes difficult to find conditions suitable for handling and cryocooling the crystals before conducting X-ray diffraction experiments. To overcome this issue, a protein crystal-mounting method has been developed that involves a water-soluble polymer and controlled humid air that can adjust the moisture content of a mounted crystal. By coating crystals with polymer glue and exposing them to controlled humid air, the crystals were stable at room temperature and were cryocooled under optimized humidity. Moreover, the glue-coated crystals reproducibly showed gradual transformations of their lattice constants in response to a change in humidity; thus, using this method, a series of isomorphous crystals can be prepared. This technique is valuable when working on fragile protein crystals, including membrane proteins, and will also be useful for multi-crystal data collection

  16. Humidity control and hydrophilic glue coating applied to mounted protein crystals improves X-ray diffraction experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baba, Seiki; Hoshino, Takeshi; Ito, Len; Kumasaka, Takashi, E-mail: kumasaka@spring8.or.jp [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute (JASRI/SPring-8), 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)

    2013-09-01

    A new crystal-mounting method has been developed that involves a combination of controlled humid air and polymer glue for crystal coating. This method is particularly useful when applied to fragile protein crystals that are known to be sensitive to subtle changes in their physicochemical environment. Protein crystals are fragile, and it is sometimes difficult to find conditions suitable for handling and cryocooling the crystals before conducting X-ray diffraction experiments. To overcome this issue, a protein crystal-mounting method has been developed that involves a water-soluble polymer and controlled humid air that can adjust the moisture content of a mounted crystal. By coating crystals with polymer glue and exposing them to controlled humid air, the crystals were stable at room temperature and were cryocooled under optimized humidity. Moreover, the glue-coated crystals reproducibly showed gradual transformations of their lattice constants in response to a change in humidity; thus, using this method, a series of isomorphous crystals can be prepared. This technique is valuable when working on fragile protein crystals, including membrane proteins, and will also be useful for multi-crystal data collection.

  17. Conditional Random Fields for Pattern Recognition Applied to Structured Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Burr

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Pattern recognition uses measurements from an input domain, X, to predict their labels from an output domain, Y. Image analysis is one setting where one might want to infer whether a pixel patch contains an object that is “manmade” (such as a building or “natural” (such as a tree. Suppose the label for a pixel patch is “manmade”; if the label for a nearby pixel patch is then more likely to be “manmade” there is structure in the output domain that can be exploited to improve pattern recognition performance. Modeling P(X is difficult because features between parts of the model are often correlated. Therefore, conditional random fields (CRFs model structured data using the conditional distribution P(Y|X = x, without specifying a model for P(X, and are well suited for applications with dependent features. This paper has two parts. First, we overview CRFs and their application to pattern recognition in structured problems. Our primary examples are image analysis applications in which there is dependence among samples (pixel patches in the output domain. Second, we identify research topics and present numerical examples.

  18. Applying local binary patterns in image clustering problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skorokhod, Nikolai N.; Elizarov, Alexey I.

    2017-11-01

    Due to the fact that the cloudiness plays a critical role in the Earth radiative balance, the study of the distribution of different types of clouds and their movements is relevant. The main sources of such information are artificial satellites that provide data in the form of images. The most commonly used method of solving tasks of processing and classification of images of clouds is based on the description of texture features. The use of a set of local binary patterns is proposed to describe the texture image.

  19. Surface segregation of InGaAs films by the evolution of reflection high-energy electron diffraction patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Xun; Luo Zi-Jiang; Guo Xiang; Zhang Bi-Chan; Shang Lin-Tao; Zhou Qing; Deng Chao-Yong; Ding Zhao

    2012-01-01

    Surface segregation is studied via the evolution of reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) patterns under different values of As 4 BEP for InGaAs films. When the As 4 BEP is set to be zero, the RHEED pattern keeps a 4×3/(n × 3) structure with increasing temperature, and surface segregation takes place until 470 °C. The RHEED pattern develops into a metal-rich (4 × 2) structure as temperature increases to 495 °C. The reason for this is that surface segregation makes the In inside the InGaAs film climb to its surface. With the temperature increasing up to 515 °C, the RHEED pattern turns into a GaAs(2 × 4) structure due to In desorption. While the As 4 BEP comes up to a specific value (1.33 × 10 -4 Pa−1.33 × 10 -3 Pa), the surface temperature can delay the segregation and desorption. We find that As 4 BEP has a big influence on surface desorption, while surface segregation is more strongly dependent on temperature than surface desorption. (condensed matter: structural, mechanical, and thermal properties)

  20. Refractive-index determination of solids from first- and second-order critical diffraction angles of periodic surface patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meichner, Christoph; Kador, Lothar; Schedl, Andreas E.; Neuber, Christian; Kreger, Klaus; Schmidt, Hans-Werner

    2015-01-01

    We present two approaches for measuring the refractive index of transparent solids in the visible spectral range based on diffraction gratings. Both require a small spot with a periodic pattern on the surface of the solid, collimated monochromatic light, and a rotation stage. We demonstrate the methods on a polydimethylsiloxane film (Sylgard ® 184) and compare our data to those obtained with a standard Abbe refractometer at several wavelengths between 489 and 688 nm. The results of our approaches show good agreement with the refractometer data. Possible error sources are analyzed and discussed in detail; they include mainly the linewidth of the laser and/or the angular resolution of the rotation stage. With narrow-band light sources, an angular accuracy of ±0.025 ∘ results in an error of the refractive index of typically ±5 ⋅ 10 −4 . Information on the sample thickness is not required

  1. The transmission diffraction patterns of silicon implanted with high-energy α-particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieteska, K.; Wierzchowski, W.

    1995-01-01

    2 mm thick silicon wafers, implanted with 4.8 MeV α-particles are studied by means of transmission section topography and additionally by Lang and double-crystal methods. It was found that all three methods produced a negligible contrast in the symmetric transmission reflection apart from some fragments of the implanted area's boundaries. The interference fringes were observed in the case of asymmetric reflections. The asymmetric section topographs revealed distinct interference fringes, which cannot be explained in terms of simple bicrystal models. In particular, the curvature of these fringes may be interpreted as being due to the change in the implanted ion dose along the beam intersecting the crystal. Some features of the fringe pattern were reproduced by numerical integration of Takagi-Taupin equations. (author)

  2. Classifying and assembling two-dimensional X-ray laser diffraction patterns of a single particle to reconstruct the three-dimensional diffraction intensity function: resolution limit due to the quantum noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokuhisa, Atsushi; Taka, Junichiro; Kono, Hidetoshi; Go, Nobuhiro

    2012-01-01

    A new algorithm is developed for reconstructing the high-resolution three-dimensional diffraction intensity function of a globular biological macromolecule from many quantum-noise-limited two-dimensional X-ray laser diffraction patterns, each for an unknown orientation. The structural resolution is expressed as a function of the incident X-ray intensity and quantities characterizing the target molecule. A new two-step algorithm is developed for reconstructing the three-dimensional diffraction intensity of a globular biological macromolecule from many experimentally measured quantum-noise-limited two-dimensional X-ray laser diffraction patterns, each for an unknown orientation. The first step is classification of the two-dimensional patterns into groups according to the similarity of direction of the incident X-rays with respect to the molecule and an averaging within each group to reduce the noise. The second step is detection of common intersecting circles between the signal-enhanced two-dimensional patterns to identify their mutual location in the three-dimensional wavenumber space. The newly developed algorithm enables one to detect a signal for classification in noisy experimental photon-count data with as low as ∼0.1 photons per effective pixel. The wavenumber of such a limiting pixel determines the attainable structural resolution. From this fact, the resolution limit due to the quantum noise attainable by this new method of analysis as well as two important experimental parameters, the number of two-dimensional patterns to be measured (the load for the detector) and the number of pairs of two-dimensional patterns to be analysed (the load for the computer), are derived as a function of the incident X-ray intensity and quantities characterizing the target molecule

  3. An efficient and novel computation method for simulating diffraction patterns from large-scale coded apertures on large-scale focal plane arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrekenhamer, Abraham; Gottesman, Stephen R.

    2012-10-01

    A novel and memory efficient method for computing diffraction patterns produced on large-scale focal planes by largescale Coded Apertures at wavelengths where diffraction effects are significant has been developed and tested. The scheme, readily implementable on portable computers, overcomes the memory limitations of present state-of-the-art simulation codes such as Zemax. The method consists of first calculating a set of reference complex field (amplitude and phase) patterns on the focal plane produced by a single (reference) central hole, extending to twice the focal plane array size, with one such pattern for each Line-of-Sight (LOS) direction and wavelength in the scene, and with the pattern amplitude corresponding to the square-root of the spectral irradiance from each such LOS direction in the scene at selected wavelengths. Next the set of reference patterns is transformed to generate pattern sets for other holes. The transformation consists of a translational pattern shift corresponding to each hole's position offset and an electrical phase shift corresponding to each hole's position offset and incoming radiance's direction and wavelength. The set of complex patterns for each direction and wavelength is then summed coherently and squared for each detector to yield a set of power patterns unique for each direction and wavelength. Finally the set of power patterns is summed to produce the full waveband diffraction pattern from the scene. With this tool researchers can now efficiently simulate diffraction patterns produced from scenes by large-scale Coded Apertures onto large-scale focal plane arrays to support the development and optimization of coded aperture masks and image reconstruction algorithms.

  4. X-diffraction technique applied for nano system metrology; Tecnica de difracao de raios X aplicada na metrologia de nanossistemas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuznetsov, Alexei Yu.; Machado, Rogerio; Robertis, Eveline de; Campos, Andrea P.C.; Archanjo, Braulio S.; Gomes, Lincoln S.; Achete, Carlos A., E-mail: okuznetsov@inmetro.gov.b [Instituto Nacional de Metrologia, Normalizacao e Qualidade Industrial (DIMAT/INMETRO), Duque de Caxias, RJ (Brazil). Div. de Metrologia de Materiais

    2009-07-01

    The application of nano materials are fast growing in all industrial sectors, with a strong necessity in nano metrology and normalizing in the nano material area. The great potential of the X-ray diffraction technique in this field is illustrated at the example of metals, metal oxides and pharmaceuticals

  5. Submicron resolution X-ray diffraction from periodically patterned GaAs nanorods grown onto Ge[111

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davydok, Anton; Biermanns, Andreas; Pietsch, Ullrich [Solid State Physics, Siegen University (Germany); Grenzer, Joerg [FZ-Dresden Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Paetzelt, Hendrik; Gottschalch, Volker; Bauer, Jens [Solid State Chemistry, University of Leipzig (Germany)

    2009-08-15

    We present high-resolution X-ray diffraction pattern of periodic GaAs nanorods (NRs) ensembles and individual GaAs NRs grown catalyst-free throughout a pre-patterned amorphous SiN{sub x} mask onto Ge[111]B surfaces by selective-area MOVPE method. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report about nano-structure X-ray characterization growth on non-polar substrate. The experiment has been performed at home laboratory and using synchrotron radiation using a micro-sized beam prepared by compound refractive lenses. Due to the non-polar character of the substrate the shapes of NRs appear not uniform and vary between deformed hexagonal and trigonal in symmetry. Because the average diameter of NRs equals the experimental resolution certain cuts through slightly inclined edges or corners of individual NRs with lateral size of about 225 nm could be selected using spatially resolved reciprocal space mapping. (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  6. Recording of X-ray diffraction patterns for the investigation of transient changes in the crystalline structure of materials subjected to the action of shock waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamet, F.; Thomer, G.

    An arrangement including a flash X-ray tube and an image intensifier has been designed and built in order to record X-ray diffraction patterns with exposure times of the order of 100nsec. This arrangement allows Laue patterns (polychromatic radiation) as well as powder patterns (copper K(α) radiation) to be recorded. Examples for record are shown. As an application to the investigation of transient changes in crystalline structures, the Debye-Scherrer patterns of potassium chloride undergoing the dynamic action of shock waves were recorded. The first results achieved are discussed [fr

  7. Classifying and assembling two-dimensional X-ray laser diffraction patterns of a single particle to reconstruct the three-dimensional diffraction intensity function: resolution limit due to the quantum noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokuhisa, Atsushi; Taka, Junichiro; Kono, Hidetoshi; Go, Nobuhiro

    2012-05-01

    A new two-step algorithm is developed for reconstructing the three-dimensional diffraction intensity of a globular biological macromolecule from many experimentally measured quantum-noise-limited two-dimensional X-ray laser diffraction patterns, each for an unknown orientation. The first step is classification of the two-dimensional patterns into groups according to the similarity of direction of the incident X-rays with respect to the molecule and an averaging within each group to reduce the noise. The second step is detection of common intersecting circles between the signal-enhanced two-dimensional patterns to identify their mutual location in the three-dimensional wavenumber space. The newly developed algorithm enables one to detect a signal for classification in noisy experimental photon-count data with as low as ~0.1 photons per effective pixel. The wavenumber of such a limiting pixel determines the attainable structural resolution. From this fact, the resolution limit due to the quantum noise attainable by this new method of analysis as well as two important experimental parameters, the number of two-dimensional patterns to be measured (the load for the detector) and the number of pairs of two-dimensional patterns to be analysed (the load for the computer), are derived as a function of the incident X-ray intensity and quantities characterizing the target molecule. © 2012 International Union of Crystallography

  8. Humidity control and hydrophilic glue coating applied to mounted protein crystals improves X-ray diffraction experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba, Seiki; Hoshino, Takeshi; Ito, Len; Kumasaka, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Protein crystals are fragile, and it is sometimes difficult to find conditions suitable for handling and cryocooling the crystals before conducting X-ray diffraction experiments. To overcome this issue, a protein crystal-mounting method has been developed that involves a water-soluble polymer and controlled humid air that can adjust the moisture content of a mounted crystal. By coating crystals with polymer glue and exposing them to controlled humid air, the crystals were stable at room temperature and were cryocooled under optimized humidity. Moreover, the glue-coated crystals reproducibly showed gradual transformations of their lattice constants in response to a change in humidity; thus, using this method, a series of isomorphous crystals can be prepared. This technique is valuable when working on fragile protein crystals, including membrane proteins, and will also be useful for multi-crystal data collection. PMID:23999307

  9. X-Ray diffraction technique applied to study of residual stresses after welding of duplex stainless steel plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monin, Vladimir Ivanovitch; Assis, Joaquim Teixeira de; Lopes, Ricardo Tadeu; Turibus, Sergio Noleto; Payao Filho, Joao C.

    2014-01-01

    Duplex stainless steel is an example of composite material with approximately equal amounts of austenite and ferrite phases. Difference of physical and mechanical properties of component is additional factor that contributes appearance of residual stresses after welding of duplex steel plates. Measurements of stress distributions in weld region were made by X-ray diffraction method both in ferrite and austenite phases. Duplex Steel plates were joined by GTAW (Gas Tungsten Arc Welding) technology. There were studied longitudinal and transverse stress components in welded butt joint, in heat affected zone (HAZ) and in points of base metal 10 mm from the weld. Residual stresses measured in duplex steel plates jointed by welding are caused by temperature gradients between weld zone and base metal and by difference of thermal expansion coefficients of ferrite and austenite phases. Proposed analytical model allows evaluating of residual stress distribution over the cross section in the weld region. (author)

  10. Median Hetero-Associative Memories Applied to the Categorization of True-Color Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez, Roberto A.; Sossa, Humberto

    Median associative memories (MED-AMs) are a special type of associative memory based on the median operator. This type of associative model has been applied to the restoration of gray scale images and provides better performance than other models, such as morphological associative memories, when the patterns are altered with mixed noise. Despite of his power, MED-AMs have not been applied in problems involving true-color patterns. In this paper we describe how a median hetero-associative memory (MED-HAM) could be applied in problems that involve true-color patterns. A complete study of the behavior of this associative model in the restoration of true-color images is performed using a benchmark of 14400 images altered by different type of noises. Furthermore, we describe how this model can be applied to an image categorization problem.

  11. Diffraction contrast imaging using virtual apertures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gammer, Christoph; Burak Ozdol, V.; Liebscher, Christian H.; Minor, Andrew M.

    2015-01-01

    Two methods on how to obtain the full diffraction information from a sample region and the associated reconstruction of images or diffraction patterns using virtual apertures are demonstrated. In a STEM-based approach, diffraction patterns are recorded for each beam position using a small probe convergence angle. Similarly, a tilt series of TEM dark-field images is acquired. The resulting datasets allow the reconstruction of either electron diffraction patterns, or bright-, dark- or annular dark-field images using virtual apertures. The experimental procedures of both methods are presented in the paper and are applied to a precipitation strengthened and creep deformed ferritic alloy with a complex microstructure. The reconstructed virtual images are compared with conventional TEM images. The major advantage is that arbitrarily shaped virtual apertures generated with image processing software can be designed without facing any physical limitations. In addition, any virtual detector that is specifically designed according to the underlying crystal structure can be created to optimize image contrast. - Highlights: • A dataset containing all structural information of a given position is recorded. • The dataset allows reconstruction of virtual diffraction patterns or images. • Specific virtual apertures are designed to image precipitates in a complex alloy. • Virtual diffraction patterns from arbitrarily small regions can be established. • Using STEM diffraction to record the dataset is more efficient than TEM dark-field

  12. A study of the breakdown of Friedel's law in electron backscatter Kikuchi diffraction patterns: Application to zincblende-type structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baba-Kishi, K.Z.

    1991-01-01

    The breakdown of Friedel's law has been observed in backscatter Kikuchi diffraction patterns (BKDP) obtained in the scanning electron microscope (SEM) from a series of zincblende structures including GaAs, InP, GaSb, CdHgTe and the minerals sphalerite (ZnS), chalcopyrite (CuFeS 2 ) and tetrahedrite (Cu 12 Sb 4 S 13 ). Differences in intensities were observed between the reflections 11anti 1 and 5anti 1anti 1 in InP, GaSb, CdHgTe and sphalerite, thus allowing the non-centrosymmetric point group anti 43 m to be determined. In GaAs, differences in intensities were noted between anti 511 and anti 5anti 11. In chalcopyrite and tetrahedrite, non-equivalent intensities were observed between anti 215 and 2anti 1anti 5 and between 3anti 1anti 2 and 31anti 2, respectively. In addition, BKDPs obtained from chalcopyrite revealed a small displacement at the point where the pair of equivalent reflections anti 406 and 460 intersect within the Kikuchi band 02anti 2. The presence of this displacement together with observation of the breakdown of Friedel's law confirmed the tetragonal point group anti 42m for chalcopyrite. Although the point groups of GaAs, chalcopyrite and tetrahedrite were derived successfully using BKDPs, determination of their space groups proved unsuccessful. The superstructure reflections were invisible because the structure factors are very small. The behaviour of the invisible 200 reflection in GaAs is investigated using many-beam dynamical intensity profiles calculated across the h00 systematic row of reflections. Dynamical intensity profiles calculated across the h00 systematic rows of reflections for Ge, InP and sphalerite are also discussed. (orig.)

  13. Structural refinement and extraction of hydrogen atomic positions in polyoxymethylene crystal based on the first successful measurements of 2-dimensional high-energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction and wide-angle neutron diffraction patterns of hydrogenated and deuterated species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tashiro, Kohji; Hanesaka, Makoto; Ohhara, Takashi; Kurihara, Kazuo; Tamada, Taro; Kuroki, Ryota; Fujiwara, Satoru; Ozeki, Tomoji; Kitano, Toshiaki; Nishu, Takashi; Tanaka, Ichiro; Niimura, Nobuo

    2007-01-01

    2-Dimensional X-ray and neutron diffraction patterns have been successfully measured for deuterated and hydrogenated polyoxymethylene (POM) samples obtained by γ-ray induced solid-state polymerization reaction. More than 700 reflections were collected from the X-ray diffraction data at -150degC by utilizing a high-energy synchrotron X-ray beam at SPring-8, Japan, from which the crystal structure of POM has been refined thoroughly including the extraction of hydrogen atomic positions at clearly seen in the difference Fourier synthesis map. As the first trial the nonuniform (9/5) helical model was analyzed with the reliability factor (R factor) 6.9%. The structural analysis was made also using the X-ray reflections of about 400 observed at room temperature (R 8.8%), and the thermal parameters of constituent atoms were compared between the low and high temperatures to discuss the librational thermal motion of the chains. The 2-dimensional neutron diffraction data, collected for the deuterated and hydrogenated POM samples using an imaging plate system specifically built-up for neutron scattering experiment, have allowed us to pick up the D and H atomic positions clearly in the Fourier synthesis maps. Another possible model, (29/16) helix, which was proposed by several researches, has been also investigated on the basis of the X-ray diffraction data at -150degC. The direct method succeeded in extracting this (29/16) model straightforwardly. The R factor was 8.6%, essentially the same as that of (9/5) helical model. This means that the comparison of the diffraction intensity between the data collected from the full-rotation X-ray diffraction pattern and the intensity calculated for both the (9/5) and (29/16) models cannot be used for the unique determination of the superiority of the model, (9/5) or (29/16) helix. However, we have found the existence of 001 and 002 reflections which give the longer repeating period 55.7 A. Besides there observed a series of meridional

  14. Powder diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, M.

    1995-12-31

    the importance of x-ray powder diffraction as an analytical tool for phase identification of materials was first pointed out by Debye and Scherrer in Germany and, quite independently, by Hull in the US. Three distinct periods of evolution lead to ubiquitous application in many fields of science and technology. In the first period, until the mid-1940`s, applications were and developed covering broad categories of materials including inorganic materials, minerals, ceramics, metals, alloys, organic materials and polymers. During this formative period, the concept of quantitative phase analysis was demonstrated. In the second period there followed the blossoming of technology and commercial instruments became widely used. The history is well summarized by Parrish and by Langford and Loueer. By 1980 there were probably 10,000 powder diffractometers in routine use, making it the most widely used of all x-ray crystallographic instruments. In the third, present, period data bases became firmly established and sophisticated pattern fitting and recognition software made many aspects of powder diffraction analysis routine. High resolution, tunable powder diffractometers were developed at sources of synchrotron radiation. The tunability of the spectrum made it possible to exploit all the subtleties of x-ray spectroscopy in diffraction experiments.

  15. Powder diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hart, M.

    1995-01-01

    The importance of x-ray powder diffraction as an analytical tool for phase identification of materials was first pointed out by Debye and Scherrer in Germany and, quite independently, by Hull in the US. Three distinct periods of evolution lead to ubiquitous application in many fields of science and technology. In the first period, until the mid-1940's, applications were and developed covering broad categories of materials including inorganic materials, minerals, ceramics, metals, alloys, organic materials and polymers. During this formative period, the concept of quantitative phase analysis was demonstrated. In the second period there followed the blossoming of technology and commercial instruments became widely used. The history is well summarized by Parrish and by Langford and Loueer. By 1980 there were probably 10,000 powder diffractometers in routine use, making it the most widely used of all x-ray crystallographic instruments. In the third, present, period data bases became firmly established and sophisticated pattern fitting and recognition software made many aspects of powder diffraction analysis routine. High resolution, tunable powder diffractometers were developed at sources of synchrotron radiation. The tunability of the spectrum made it possible to exploit all the subtleties of x-ray spectroscopy in diffraction experiments

  16. Signature of dislocations and stacking faults of face-centred cubic nanocrystals in coherent X-ray diffraction patterns: a numerical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupraz, Maxime; Beutier, Guillaume; Rodney, David; Mordehai, Dan; Verdier, Marc

    2015-06-01

    Crystal defects induce strong distortions in diffraction patterns. A single defect alone can yield strong and fine features that are observed in high-resolution diffraction experiments such as coherent X-ray diffraction. The case of face-centred cubic nanocrystals is studied numerically and the signatures of typical defects close to Bragg positions are identified. Crystals of a few tens of nanometres are modelled with realistic atomic potentials and 'relaxed' after introduction of well defined defects such as pure screw or edge dislocations, or Frank or prismatic loops. Diffraction patterns calculated in the kinematic approximation reveal various signatures of the defects depending on the Miller indices. They are strongly modified by the dissociation of the dislocations. Selection rules on the Miller indices are provided, to observe the maximum effect of given crystal defects in the initial and relaxed configurations. The effect of several physical and geometrical parameters such as stacking fault energy, crystal shape and defect position are discussed. The method is illustrated on a complex structure resulting from the simulated nanoindentation of a gold nanocrystal.

  17. Diffraction gauging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkens, P.H.

    1978-01-01

    This system of gauging is now being designed to fit on an Excello NC lathe to measure the form, accuracy, and size of external contoured surfaces as they approach the finish machined size. A template profile of the finished workpiece, but 0.003 in. bigger on radius, will be aligned with the workpiece using a reference diameter and face on the machining fixture to leave a gap between the profile of the template and workpiece. A helium--neon laser beam will be projected through this gap using a rotating retroreflector and a fixed laser. The resulting diffraction pattern produced by the laser beam passing through the template to workpiece gap will be reflected and focused on a fixed diode array via a second retroreflector which moves and remains in optical alignment with the first. These retroreflectors will be rotated about a center that will enable the laser beam, which is shaped in a long slit, to scan the template workpiece gap from the pole to the equator of the workpiece. The characteristic diffraction pattern will be detected by the fixed diode array, and the signal levels from this array will be processed in a mini-computer programmed to produce a best fit through the two minima of the diode signals. The separation of the two minima will yield the size of the workpiece to template gap and this information will be presented to the machine tool operator

  18. Analysis of x-ray diffraction pattern and complex plane impedance plot of polypyrrole/titanium dioxide nanocomposite: A simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravikiran, Y. T.; Vijaya Kumari, S. C.

    2013-06-01

    To innovate the properties of Polypyrrole/Titanium dioxide (PPy/TiO2) nanocomposite further, it has been synthesized by chemical polymerization technique. The nanostructure and monoclinic phase of the prepared composite have been confirmed by simulating the X-ray diffraction pattern (XRD). Also, complex plane impedance plot of the composite has been simulated to find equivalent resistance capacitance circuit (RC circuit) and numerical values of R and C have been predicted.

  19. A Dynamic Interval-Valued Intuitionistic Fuzzy Sets Applied to Pattern Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenhua Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present dynamic interval-valued intuitionistic fuzzy sets (DIVIFS, which can improve the recognition accuracy when they are applied to pattern recognition. By analyzing the degree of hesitancy, we propose some DIVIFS models from intuitionistic fuzzy sets (IFS and interval-valued IFS (IVIFS. And then we present a novel ranking condition on the distance of IFS and IVIFS and introduce some distance measures of DIVIFS satisfying the ranking condition. Finally, a pattern recognition example applied to medical diagnosis decision making is given to demonstrate the application of DIVIFS and its distances. The simulation results show that the DIVIFS method is more comprehensive and flexible than the IFS method and the IVIFS method.

  20. The use of pattern decomposition to study the combined X-ray diffraction effects of crystallite size and stacking faults in ex-oxalate zinc oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langford, J.I.; Boultif, A.; Auffredic, J.P.; Louer, D.

    1993-01-01

    The microstructure of ZnO powder, obtained from thermal decomposition of the oxalate and studied previously by electron microscopy and adsorption calorimetry, was investigated by means of X-ray powder diffraction pattern decomposition. A Williamson-Hall plot revealed that some lines were broadened solely due to the effects of crystallite size, whereas other breadths included a contribution due to stacking faults. Spherical and cylindrical models are used to describe the form of the crystallites and procedures are presented for separating 'size' effects from 'mistake' broadening. This leads to estimates of the mean dimensions of the crystallites and the stacking-fault probability. The analysis demonstrates that, with good-quality data for a large number of reflections, a considerable amount of detailed information can be obtained about microstructure. On the other hand, it reveals some of the limitations of current procedures for modelling diffraction line profiles. (orig.)

  1. Correlation between the dielectric constant and X-ray diffraction pattern of Si-O-C thin films with hydrogen bonds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Teresa; Oh, Kyoung Suk; Lee, Kwang-Man; Choi, Chi Kyu

    2004-01-01

    The amorphous structure of organic-inorganic hybrid type Si-O-C thin films was studied using the first principles molecular-dynamics method with density functional techniques. The correlation between the dielectric constant and the degree of amorphous structure in organic-inorganic hybrid type Si-O-C thin films was studied. Si-O-C thin films were deposited by high-density plasma chemical vapor deposition using bis-trimethylsilylmethane and oxygen precursors. As-deposited films and films annealed at 500 deg. C were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD). For quantitative analysis, the X-ray diffraction patterns of the samples were transformed to the radial distribution function (RDF) using Fourier analysis. Hybrid type Si-O-C thin films can be divided into three types using their amorphous structure and the dielectric constant: those with organic, hybrid, and inorganic properties

  2. Abstracts of International Conference on Experimental and Computing Methods in High Resolution Diffraction Applied for Structure Characterization of Modern Materials - HREDAMM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    The conference addressed all aspects of high resolution diffraction. The topics of meeting include advanced experimental diffraction methods and computer data analysis for characterization of modern materials as well as the progress and new achievements in high resolution diffraction (X-ray, electrons, neutrons). Application of these methods for characterization of modern materials are widely presented among the invited, oral and poster contributions

  3. Proton diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Den Besten, J.L.; Jamieson, D.N.; Allen, L.J.

    1998-01-01

    The Lindhard theory on ion channeling in crystals has been widely accepted throughout ion beam analysis for use in simulating such experiments. The simulations use a Monte Carlo method developed by Barret, which utilises the classical 'billiard ball' theory of ions 'bouncing' between planes or tubes of atoms in the crystal. This theory is not valid for 'thin' crystals where the planes or strings of atoms can no longer be assumed to be of infinite proportions. We propose that a theory similar to that used for high energy electron diffraction can be applied to MeV ions, especially protons, in thin crystals to simulate the intensities of transmission channeling and of RBS spectra. The diffraction theory is based on a Bloch wave solution of the Schroedinger equation for an ion passing through the periodic crystal potential. The widely used universal potential for proton-nucleus scattering is used to construct the crystal potential. Absorption due to thermal diffuse scattering is included. Experimental parameters such as convergence angle, beam tilt and scanning directions are considered in our calculations. Comparison between theory and experiment is encouraging and suggests that further work is justified. (authors)

  4. Microstructural analysis in the depth direction of a heteroepitaxial AlN thick film grown on a trench-patterned template by nanobeam X-ray diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shida, K.; Takeuchi, S.; Tohei, T.; Miyake, H.; Hiramatsu, K.; Sumitani, K.; Imai, Y.; Kimura, S.; Sakai, A.

    2018-04-01

    This work quantitatively assessed the three-dimensional distribution of crystal lattice distortions in an epitaxial AlN thick film grown on a trench-patterned template, using nanobeam X-ray diffraction. Position-dependent ω-2θ-φ mapping clearly demonstrated local tilting, spacing and twisting of lattice planes as well as fluctuations in these phenomena on a sub-micrometer scale comparable to the pitch of the trench-and-terrace patterning. Analysis of the crystal lattice distortion in the depth direction was performed using a newly developed method in which the X-ray nanobeam diffracted from the sample surface to specific depths can be selectively detected by employing a Pt wire profiler. This technique generated depth-resolved ω-2θ-φ maps confirming that fluctuations in lattice plane tilting and spacing greatly depend on the dislocation distribution and the history of the AlN epitaxial growth on the trench-patterned structure. It was also found that both fluctuations were reduced on approaching the AlN surface and, in particular, were sharply reduced at specific depths in the terrace regions. These sharp reductions are attributed to the formation of sacrificial zones with degraded crystal quality around the trenches and possibly lead to raising the crystal quality near the surface of the AlN film.

  5. Structure of 3 at.% and 9 at.% Si-doped HfO{sub 2} from combined refinement of X-ray and neutron diffraction patterns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Lili [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, NC 27695 (United States); School of Information Science and Technology, Northwest University, Xi' an 710127 (China); Hou, Dong; Usher, Tedi-Marie; Iamsasri, Thanakorn; Fancher, Chris M.; Forrester, Jennifer S. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, NC 27695 (United States); Nishida, Toshikazu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Florida, FL 32611 (United States); Moghaddam, Saeed [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Florida, FL 32611 (United States); Jones, Jacob L., E-mail: jacobjones@ncsu.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, NC 27695 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    The crystal structure of 3 at.% and 9 at.% Si-doped HfO{sub 2} powder was determined through refinements using X-ray and neutron diffraction patterns. The lattice parameters, atomic positions, dopant occupancy, and the second phase fraction were determined with high precision using a combined full pattern fitting via the Rietveld method. The results show that both 3 at.% and 9 at.% Si-doped HfO{sub 2} powder exhibit the monoclinic crystal structure with P 1 2{sub 1}/c 1 space group. Through the combined refinement, the crystal structure parameters, especially for the positions and occupancies of the lighter atoms, were more precisely determined compared to independent X-ray diffraction refinement. Although the ionic radius of Si{sup 4+} is smaller than Hf{sup 4+}, with increasing Si occupancy, the unit cell volume slightly increases; possible mechanisms for this effect are discussed. Moreover, the refined results provide evidence of the existence of a non-equilibrium phase of Hf{sub x}Si{sub 1−x}O{sub 2}. The second phase (SiO{sub 2}) fraction is determined as 0.17 at.% for 3 at.% Si-doped HfO{sub 2} powders and 1.7 at.% for 9 at.% Si-doped HfO{sub 2} powders. - Highlights: • X-ray and neutron diffraction patterns were used to determine crystal structure. • Results from independent refinements and a combined refinement were compared. • Highly precise structural parameters were obtained by the combined refinement. • Structural data of 3 at.% and 9 at.% Si-doped HfO{sub 2} are provided. • The unit cell volume slightly increases with Si concentration from 3 to 9 at.%.

  6. Diffractive interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Duca, V.; Marage, P.

    1996-08-01

    The general framework of diffractive deep inelastic scattering is introduced and reports given in the session on diffractive interactions at the international workshop on deep-inelastic scattering and related phenomena, Rome, April 1996, are presented. (orig.)

  7. Diffraction theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwkamp, C.J.

    1954-01-01

    A critical review is presented of recent progress in classical diffraction theory. Both scalar and electromagnetic problems are discussed. The report may serve as an introduction to general diffraction theory although the main emphasis is on diffraction by plane obstacles. Various modifications of

  8. Diffraction by disordered polycrystalline fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stroud, W.J.; Millane, R.P.

    1995-01-01

    X-ray diffraction patterns from some polycrystalline fibers show that the constituent microcrystallites are disordered. The relationship between the crystal structure and the diffracted intensities is then quite complicated and depends on the precise kind and degree of disorder present. The effects of disorder on diffracted intensities must be included in structure determinations using diffraction data from such specimens. Theory and algorithms are developed here that allow the full diffraction pattern to be calculated for a disordered polycrystalline fiber made up of helical molecules. The model accommodates various kinds of disorder and includes the effects of finite crystallite size and cylindrical averaging of the diffracted intensities from a fiber. Simulations using these methods show how different kinds, or components, of disorder produce particular diffraction effects. General properties of disordered arrays of helical molecules and their effects on diffraction patterns are described. Implications for structure determination are discussed. (orig.)

  9. Dynamical neutron diffraction by curved crystals in the Laue geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albertini, G.; Melone, S.; Lagomarsino, S.; Mazkedian, S.; Puliti, P.; Rustichelli, F.

    1977-01-01

    The Taupin dynamical theory of X-ray diffraction by deformed crystals which was previously extended to the neutron diffraction by curved crystals in the Bragg geometry, is applied to calculate neutron diffraction patterns in the Laue geometry. The theoretical results are compared with experimental data on curved silicon crystals. The agreement is quite satisfactory. In the second part a simple model recently presented to describe neutron diffraction properties in the Bragg case is extended to the Laue case. The predictions of such a model are in satisfactory agreement with the rigorous theory and the experimental results. (author)

  10. Extended ABCD matrix formalism for the description of femtosecond diffraction patterns; application to femtosecond digital in-line holography with anamorphic optical systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunel, Marc; Shen, Huanhuan; Coetmellec, Sebastien; Lebrun, Denis

    2012-03-10

    We present a new model to predict diffraction patterns of femtosecond pulses through complex optical systems. The model is based on the extension of an ABCD matrix formalism combined with generalized Huygens-Fresnel transforms (already used in the CW regime) to the femtosecond regime. The model is tested to describe femtosecond digital in-line holography experiments realized in situ through a cylindrical Plexiglas pipe. The model allows us to establish analytical relations that link the holographic reconstruction process to the experimental parameters of the pipe and of the incident beam itself. Simulations and experimental results are in good concordance. Femtosecond digital in-line holography is shown to allow significant coherent noise reduction, and this model will be particularly efficient to describe a wide range of optical geometries. More generally, the model developed can be easily used in any experiment where the knowledge of the precise evolution of femtosecond transverse patterns is required.

  11. Identification of intermetallic phases in a eutectic Al-Si casting alloy using electron backscatter diffraction pattern analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kral, M.V.; McIntyre, H.R.; Smillie, M.J.

    2004-01-01

    Intermetallic phases in sand cast eutectic Al-Si alloys were characterized using a combination of SEM, EDS and EBSD pattern analysis. Chinese script α-phase particles were consistent with cubic Al 19 (Fe,Mn) 5 Si 2 . Plate-shaped β-phase particles were consistent with tetragonal Al 3 (Fe,Mn)Si 2

  12. Teaching pattern diversification for optics course: motivate interest, open minds and apply flexibly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yunxin; Wang, Dayong; Rong, Lu; Zhao, Jie

    2015-10-01

    Optics is one of the most important basic courses for college students majoring in Applied Physics in university, which can supply the essential theoretical foundation for the subsequent courses such as Information Optics and Electrodynamics etc.. So Optics course plays a supporting effect in the knowledge frame of the college students. Optics course has its own feature, for one thing, many optical contents cannot be understood directly and easily, for another the optical phenomenon or experiments are interesting and can be displayed intuitively. Considering the above feature, the diversiform teaching patterns are developed to improve the teaching effect. To motivate their interest, students have the chance to visit optical laboratory for both teaching demonstration and science research, and voluntary demonstration of teaching apparatus in class are another approach. Furthermore, digital simulation and experimental design according to the classical knowledge are introduced to the optics course, so students can comprehend and verify the optical principle. Students are encouraged to propose new ideas, and these ideas can be achieved with the help of teachers and the funds support from our university. Besides, some talent students will be invited to join a research group composing by graduate students and teachers. In this group, the students have the chance to touch frontier topics in optics. The diversification of teaching patterns can supply a developing space with the rising gradient for students, which can inspire the interest, open their minds and make them apply flexibly by the participatory and inquiry.

  13. Pattern recognition applied to infrared images for early alerts in fog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucher, Vincent; Marchetti, Mario; Dumoulin, Jean; Cord, Aurélien

    2014-09-01

    Fog conditions are the cause of severe car accidents in western countries because of the poor induced visibility. Its forecast and intensity are still very difficult to predict by weather services. Infrared cameras allow to detect and to identify objects in fog while visibility is too low for eye detection. Over the past years, the implementation of cost effective infrared cameras on some vehicles has enabled such detection. On the other hand pattern recognition algorithms based on Canny filters and Hough transformation are a common tool applied to images. Based on these facts, a joint research program between IFSTTAR and Cerema has been developed to study the benefit of infrared images obtained in a fog tunnel during its natural dissipation. Pattern recognition algorithms have been applied, specifically on road signs which shape is usually associated to a specific meaning (circular for a speed limit, triangle for an alert, …). It has been shown that road signs were detected early enough in images, with respect to images in the visible spectrum, to trigger useful alerts for Advanced Driver Assistance Systems.

  14. Knowledge-Based Trajectory Error Pattern Method Applied to an Active Force Control Scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endra Pitowarno, Musa Mailah, Hishamuddin Jamaluddin

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The active force control (AFC method is known as a robust control scheme that dramatically enhances the performance of a robot arm particularly in compensating the disturbance effects. The main task of the AFC method is to estimate the inertia matrix in the feedback loop to provide the correct (motor torque required to cancel out these disturbances. Several intelligent control schemes have already been introduced to enhance the estimation methods of acquiring the inertia matrix such as those using neural network, iterative learning and fuzzy logic. In this paper, we propose an alternative scheme called Knowledge-Based Trajectory Error Pattern Method (KBTEPM to suppress the trajectory track error of the AFC scheme. The knowledge is developed from the trajectory track error characteristic based on the previous experimental results of the crude approximation method. It produces a unique, new and desirable error pattern when a trajectory command is forced. An experimental study was performed using simulation work on the AFC scheme with KBTEPM applied to a two-planar manipulator in which a set of rule-based algorithm is derived. A number of previous AFC schemes are also reviewed as benchmark. The simulation results show that the AFC-KBTEPM scheme successfully reduces the trajectory track error significantly even in the presence of the introduced disturbances.Key Words:  Active force control, estimated inertia matrix, robot arm, trajectory error pattern, knowledge-based.

  15. Arrangement and Applying of Movement Patterns in the Cerebellum Based on Semi-supervised Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solouki, Saeed; Pooyan, Mohammad

    2016-06-01

    Biological control systems have long been studied as a possible inspiration for the construction of robotic controllers. The cerebellum is known to be involved in the production and learning of smooth, coordinated movements. Therefore, highly regular structure of the cerebellum has been in the core of attention in theoretical and computational modeling. However, most of these models reflect some special features of the cerebellum without regarding the whole motor command computational process. In this paper, we try to make a logical relation between the most significant models of the cerebellum and introduce a new learning strategy to arrange the movement patterns: cerebellar modular arrangement and applying of movement patterns based on semi-supervised learning (CMAPS). We assume here the cerebellum like a big archive of patterns that has an efficient organization to classify and recall them. The main idea is to achieve an optimal use of memory locations by more than just a supervised learning and classification algorithm. Surely, more experimental and physiological researches are needed to confirm our hypothesis.

  16. Can Link Analysis Be Applied to Identify Behavioral Patterns in Train Recorder Data?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strathie, Ailsa; Walker, Guy H

    2016-03-01

    A proof-of-concept analysis was conducted to establish whether link analysis could be applied to data from on-train recorders to detect patterns of behavior that could act as leading indicators of potential safety issues. On-train data recorders capture data about driving behavior on thousands of routine journeys every day and offer a source of untapped data that could be used to offer insights into human behavior. Data from 17 journeys undertaken by six drivers on the same route over a 16-hr period were analyzed using link analysis, and four key metrics were examined: number of links, network density, diameter, and sociometric status. The results established that link analysis can be usefully applied to data captured from on-vehicle recorders. The four metrics revealed key differences in normal driver behavior. These differences have promising construct validity as leading indicators. Link analysis is one method that could be usefully applied to exploit data routinely gathered by on-vehicle data recorders. It facilitates a proactive approach to safety based on leading indicators, offers a clearer understanding of what constitutes normal driving behavior, and identifies trends at the interface of people and systems, which is currently a key area of strategic risk. These research findings have direct applications in the field of transport data monitoring. They offer a means of automatically detecting patterns in driver behavior that could act as leading indicators of problems during operation and that could be used in the proactive monitoring of driver competence, risk management, and even infrastructure design. © 2015, Human Factors and Ergonomics Society.

  17. Entropy criteria applied to pattern selection in systems with free boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkaldy, J. S.

    1985-10-01

    The steady state differential or integral equations which describe patterned dissipative structures, typically to be identified with first order phase transformation morphologies like isothermal pearlites, are invariably degenerate in one or more order parameters (the lamellar spacing in the pearlite case). It is often observed that a different pattern is attained at the steady state for each initial condition (the hysteresis or metastable case). Alternatively, boundary perturbations and internal fluctuations during transition up to, or at the steady state, destroy the path coherence. In this case a statistical ensemble of imperfect patterns often emerges which represents a fluctuating but recognizably patterned and unique average steady state. It is cases like cellular, lamellar pearlite, involving an assembly of individual cell patterns which are regularly perturbed by local fluctuation and growth processes, which concern us here. Such weakly fluctuating nonlinear steady state ensembles can be arranged in a thought experiment so as to evolve as subsystems linking two very large mass-energy reservoirs in isolation. Operating on this discontinuous thermodynamic ideal, Onsager’s principle of maximum path probability for isolated systems, which we interpret as a minimal time correlation function connecting subsystem and baths, identifies the stable steady state at a parametric minimum or maximum (or both) in the dissipation rate. This nonlinear principle is independent of the Principle of Minimum Dissipation which is applicable in the linear regime of irreversible thermodynamics. The statistical argument is equivalent to the weak requirement that the isolated system entropy as a function of time be differentiable to the second order despite the macroscopic pattern fluctuations which occur in the subsystem. This differentiability condition is taken for granted in classical stability theory based on the 2nd Law. The optimal principle as applied to isothermal and

  18. Diffractive DIS: Where are we?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolaev, N.N.

    2001-01-01

    A brief review of the modern QCD theory of diffractive DIS is given. The recent progress has been remarkably rapid, all the principal predictions from the color dipole approach to diffraction - the (Q 2 + m V 2 ) scaling, the pattern of SCHNC, shrinkage of the diffraction cone in hard diffractive DIS, the strong impact of longitudinal gluons in inclusive J/Ψ production at Tevatron - have been confirmed experimentally

  19. Transmission X-ray Diffraction (XRD) Patterns Relevant to the MSL Chemin Amorphous Component: Sulfates And Silicates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, R. V.; Rampe, E. B.; Graff, T. G.; Archer, P. D., Jr.; Le, L.; Ming, D. W.; Sutter, B.

    2015-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) CheMin instrument on the Curiosity rover is a transmission X-ray diffractometer (Co-Kalpha radiation source and a approx.5deg to approx.52deg 2theta range) where the analyzed powder samples are constrained to have discrete particle diameters XRD amorphous component. Estimates of amorphous component abundance, based on the XRD data itself and on mass-balance calculations using APXS data crystalline component chemistry derived from XRD data, martian meteorites, and/or stoichiometry [e.g., 6-9], range from approx.20 wt.% to approx.50 wt.% of bulk sample. The APXSbased calculations show that the amorphous component is rich in volatile elements (esp. SO3) and is not simply primary basaltic glass, which was used as a surrogate to model the broad band in the RN CheMin pattern. For RN, the entire volatile inventory (except minor anhydrite) is assigned to the amorphous component because no volatile-bearing crystalline phases were reported within detection limits [2]. For JK and CB, Fesaponite, basanite, and akaganeite are volatile-bearing crystalline components. Here we report transmission XRD patterns for sulfate and silicate phases relevant to interpretation of MSL-CheMin XRD amorphous components.

  20. Pattern recognition applied to mineral characterization of Brazilian coffees and sugar-cane spirits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, Andrea P.; Santos, Mirian C.; Lemos, Sherlan G.; Ferreira, Marcia M.C.; Nogueira, Ana Rita A.; Nobrega, Joaquim A.

    2005-01-01

    Aluminium, Ca, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Pb, S, Se, Si, Sn, Sr, and Zn were determined in coffee and sugar-cane spirit (cachaca) samples by axial viewing inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP OES). Pattern recognition techniques such as principal component analysis and cluster analysis were applied to data sets in order to characterize samples with relation to their geographical origin and production mode (industrial or homemade and organically or conventionally produced). Attempts to correlate metal ion content with the geographical origin of coffee and the production mode (organic or conventional) of cachaca were not successful. Some differentiation was suggested for the geographical origin of cachaca of three regions (Northeast, Central, and South), and for coffee samples, related to the production mode. Clear separations were only obtained for differentiation between industrial and homemade cachacas, and between instant soluble and roasted coffees

  1. National youth sedentary behavior and physical activity daily patterns using latent class analysis applied to accelerometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evenson, Kelly R; Wen, Fang; Hales, Derek; Herring, Amy H

    2016-05-03

    Applying latent class analysis (LCA) to accelerometry can help elucidated underlying patterns. This study described the patterns of accelerometer-determined sedentary behavior and physical activity among youth by applying LCA to a nationally representative United States (US) sample. Using 2003-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data, 3998 youths 6-17 years wore an ActiGraph 7164 accelerometer for one week, providing > =3 days of wear for > =8 h/day from 6:00 am-midnight. Cutpoints defined sedentary behavior ( = 2296 counts/minute), and vigorous activity (> = 4012 counts/minute). To account for wear time differences, outcomes were expressed as percent of day in a given intensity. LCA was used to classify daily (Monday through Sunday) patterns of average counts/minute, sedentary behavior, light activity, MVPA, and vigorous activity separately. The latent classes were explored overall and by age (6-11, 12-14, 15-17 years), gender, and whether or not youth attended school during measurement. Estimates were weighted to account for the sampling frame. For average counts/minute/day, four classes emerged from least to most active: 40.9% of population (mean 323.5 counts/minute/day), 40.3% (559.6 counts/minute/day), 16.5% (810.0 counts/minute/day), and 2.3% (1132.9 counts/minute/day). For percent of sedentary behavior, four classes emerged: 13.5% of population (mean 544.6 min/day), 30.1% (455.1 min/day), 38.5% (357.7 min/day), and 18.0% (259.2 min/day). For percent of light activity, four classes emerged: 12.3% of population (mean 222.6 min/day), 29.3% (301.7 min/day), 41.8% (384.0 min/day), and 16.6% (455.5 min/day). For percent of MVPA, four classes emerged: 59.9% of population (mean 25.0 min/day), 33.3% (60.9 min/day), 3.1% (89.0 min/day), and 3.6% (109.3 min/day). For percent of vigorous activity, three classes emerged: 76.8% of population (mean 7.1 min/day), 18.5% (23.9 min/day), and 4.7% (47.4 min/day). Classes were developed by age

  2. Phase-Transition-Induced Pattern Formation Applied to Basic Research on Homeopathy: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokornaczyk, Maria Olga; Scherr, Claudia; Bodrova, Natalia Borisovna; Baumgartner, Stephan

    2018-05-16

     Methods based on phase-transition-induced pattern formation (PTPF) are increasingly used in medical research. Frequent application fields are medical diagnosis and basic research in homeopathy. Here, we present a systematic review of experimental studies concerning PTPF-based methods applied to homeopathy research. We also aimed at categorizing the PTPF methods included in this review.  Experimental studies were collected from scientific databases (PubMed, Web of Science, Russian eLibrary) and from experts in the research field in question, following the PRISMA guidelines. The studies were rated according to pre-defined scientific criteria.  The review included 15 experimental studies. We identified seven different PTPF methods applied in 12 experimental models. Among these methods, phase-transition was triggered through evaporation, freezing, or solution, and in most cases led to the formation of crystals. First experimental studies concerning the application of PTPF methods in homeopathic research were performed in the first half of the 20th century; however, they were not continued in the following years. Only in the last decade, different research groups re-launched the idea, introducing new experimental approaches and computerized pattern evaluation techniques. The here-identified PTPF methods are for the first time proposed to be classified as one group of methods based on the same basic physical phenomenon.  Although the number of experimental studies in the area is still rather limited, the long tradition in the application of PTPF methods and the dynamics of the present developments point out the high potential of these methods and indicate that they might meet the demand for scientific methods to study potentized preparations. The Faculty of Homeopathy.

  3. Study of optical Laue diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakravarthy, Giridhar; Allam, Srinivasa Rao; Satyanarayana, S. V. M.; Sharan, Alok

    2014-01-01

    We present the study of the optical diffraction pattern of one and two-dimensional gratings with defects, designed using desktop pc and printed on OHP sheet using laser printer. Gratings so prepared, using novel low cost technique provides good visual aid in teaching. Diffraction pattern of the monochromatic light (632.8nm) from the grating so designed is similar to that of x-ray diffraction pattern of crystal lattice with point defects in one and two-dimensions. Here both optical and x-ray diffractions are Fraunhofer. The information about the crystalline lattice structure and the defect size can be known

  4. Study of optical Laue diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakravarthy, Giridhar, E-mail: cgiridhar84@gmail.com, E-mail: aloksharan@email.com; Allam, Srinivasa Rao, E-mail: cgiridhar84@gmail.com, E-mail: aloksharan@email.com; Satyanarayana, S. V. M., E-mail: cgiridhar84@gmail.com, E-mail: aloksharan@email.com; Sharan, Alok, E-mail: cgiridhar84@gmail.com, E-mail: aloksharan@email.com [Department of Physics, Pondicherry University, Puducherry-605014 (India)

    2014-10-15

    We present the study of the optical diffraction pattern of one and two-dimensional gratings with defects, designed using desktop pc and printed on OHP sheet using laser printer. Gratings so prepared, using novel low cost technique provides good visual aid in teaching. Diffraction pattern of the monochromatic light (632.8nm) from the grating so designed is similar to that of x-ray diffraction pattern of crystal lattice with point defects in one and two-dimensions. Here both optical and x-ray diffractions are Fraunhofer. The information about the crystalline lattice structure and the defect size can be known.

  5. Attractor structure discriminates sleep states: recurrence plot analysis applied to infant breathing patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrill, Philip Ian; Wilson, Stephen James; Suresh, Sadasivam; Cooper, David M; Dakin, Carolyn

    2010-05-01

    Breathing patterns are characteristically different between infant active sleep (AS) and quiet sleep (QS), and statistical quantifications of interbreath interval (IBI) data have previously been used to discriminate between infant sleep states. It has also been identified that breathing patterns are governed by a nonlinear controller. This study aims to investigate whether nonlinear quantifications of infant IBI data are characteristically different between AS and QS, and whether they may be used to discriminate between these infant sleep states. Polysomnograms were obtained from 24 healthy infants at six months of age. Periods of AS and QS were identified, and IBI data extracted. Recurrence quantification analysis (RQA) was applied to each period, and recurrence calculated for a fixed radius in the range of 0-8 in steps of 0.02, and embedding dimensions of 4, 6, 8, and 16. When a threshold classifier was trained, the RQA variable recurrence was able to correctly classify 94.3% of periods in a test dataset. It was concluded that RQA of IBI data is able to accurately discriminate between infant sleep states. This is a promising step toward development of a minimal-channel automatic sleep state classification system.

  6. Electronic speckle-pattern interferometry (ESPI) applied to the study of mechanical behavior of human jaws

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Juan F.; Moreno de las Cuevas, Vincente; Salgueiro, Jose R.; Suarez, David; Fernandez, Paula; Gallas, Mercedes; Blanchard, Alain

    1996-01-01

    The study of the mechanical behavior of the human jaw during chewing is helpful in several specific medical fields that cover the maxillo-facial area. In this work, electronic speckle pattern interferometry has been applied to study dead jaw bones under external stress which simulates the deformations induced during chewing. Fringes obtained after subtraction of two images of the jaw, the image of the relaxed jaw and that of the jaw under stress, give us information about the most stressed zones. The interferometric analysis proposed here is attractive as it can be done in real time with the jaw under progressive stress. Image processing can be applied for improving the quality of fringes. This research can be of help in orthognathic surgery, for example in diagnosis and treatment of fractured jaws, in oral surgery, and in orthodontics because it would help us to know the stress dispersion when we insert an osseointegrated implant or place an orthodontic appliance, respectively. Studying fragments of human jaw some results about its elasticity and flexibility were obtained.

  7. Characterization of breast tissue using energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pani, S.; Cook, E.J.; Horrocks, J.A.; Jones, J.L.; Speller, R.D.

    2010-01-01

    A method for sample characterization using energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction computed tomography (EDXRDCT) is presented. The procedures for extracting diffraction patterns from the data and the corrections applied are discussed. The procedures were applied to the characterization of breast tissue samples, 6 mm in diameter. Comparison with histological sections of the samples confirmed the possibility of grouping the patterns into five families, corresponding to adipose tissue, fibrosis, poorly differentiated cancer, well differentiated cancer and benign tumour.

  8. Applying machine learning to pattern analysis for automated in-design layout optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Jason P.; Fakhry, Moutaz; Pathak, Piyush; Sweis, Jason; Gennari, Frank; Lai, Ya-Chieh

    2018-04-01

    Building on previous work for cataloging unique topological patterns in an integrated circuit physical design, a new process is defined in which a risk scoring methodology is used to rank patterns based on manufacturing risk. Patterns with high risk are then mapped to functionally equivalent patterns with lower risk. The higher risk patterns are then replaced in the design with their lower risk equivalents. The pattern selection and replacement is fully automated and suitable for use for full-chip designs. Results from 14nm product designs show that the approach can identify and replace risk patterns with quantifiable positive impact on the risk score distribution after replacement.

  9. Knowledge fusion: Time series modeling followed by pattern recognition applied to unusual sections of background data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burr, T.; Doak, J.; Howell, J.A.; Martinez, D.; Strittmatter, R.

    1996-03-01

    This report describes work performed during FY 95 for the Knowledge Fusion Project, which by the Department of Energy, Office of Nonproliferation and National Security. The project team selected satellite sensor data as the one main example to which its analysis algorithms would be applied. The specific sensor-fusion problem has many generic features that make it a worthwhile problem to attempt to solve in a general way. The generic problem is to recognize events of interest from multiple time series in a possibly noisy background. By implementing a suite of time series modeling and forecasting methods and using well-chosen alarm criteria, we reduce the number of false alarms. We then further reduce the number of false alarms by analyzing all suspicious sections of data, as judged by the alarm criteria, with pattern recognition methods. This report describes the implementation and application of this two-step process for separating events from unusual background. As a fortunate by-product of this activity, it is possible to gain a better understanding of the natural background

  10. Knowledge fusion: Time series modeling followed by pattern recognition applied to unusual sections of background data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burr, T.; Doak, J.; Howell, J.A.; Martinez, D.; Strittmatter, R.

    1996-03-01

    This report describes work performed during FY 95 for the Knowledge Fusion Project, which by the Department of Energy, Office of Nonproliferation and National Security. The project team selected satellite sensor data as the one main example to which its analysis algorithms would be applied. The specific sensor-fusion problem has many generic features that make it a worthwhile problem to attempt to solve in a general way. The generic problem is to recognize events of interest from multiple time series in a possibly noisy background. By implementing a suite of time series modeling and forecasting methods and using well-chosen alarm criteria, we reduce the number of false alarms. We then further reduce the number of false alarms by analyzing all suspicious sections of data, as judged by the alarm criteria, with pattern recognition methods. This report describes the implementation and application of this two-step process for separating events from unusual background. As a fortunate by-product of this activity, it is possible to gain a better understanding of the natural background.

  11. A University Web Portal redesign applying accessibility patterns. Breaking Down Barriers for Visually Impaired Users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernán Sosa

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Definitely, the WWW and ICTs have become the preferred media for the interaction between society and its citizens, and public and private organizations have today the possibility of deploying their activities through the Web. In particular, university education is a domain where the benefits of these technological resources can strongly contribute in caring for students. However, most university Web portals are inaccessible to their user community (students, professors, and non-teaching staff, between others, since these portals do not take into account the needs of people with different capabilities. In this work, we propose an accessibility pattern driven process to the redesign of university Web portals, aiming to break down barriers for visually impaired users. The approach is implemented to a real case study: the Web portal of Universidad Nacional de la Patagonia Austral (UNPA. The results come from applying accessibility recommendations and evaluation tools (automatic and manual from internationally recognized organizations, to both versions of the Web portal: the original and the redesign one.

  12. 64nm pitch metal1 double patterning metrology: CD and OVL control by SEMCD, image based overlay and diffraction based overlay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducoté, Julien; Dettoni, Florent; Bouyssou, Régis; Le-Gratiet, Bertrand; Carau, Damien; Dezauzier, Christophe

    2015-03-01

    Patterning process control of advanced nodes has required major changes over the last few years. Process control needs of critical patterning levels since 28nm technology node is extremely aggressive showing that metrology accuracy/sensitivity must be finely tuned. The introduction of pitch splitting (Litho-Etch-Litho-Etch) at 14FDSOInm node requires the development of specific metrologies to adopt advanced process control (for CD, overlay and focus corrections). The pitch splitting process leads to final line CD uniformities that are a combination of the CD uniformities of the two exposures, while the space CD uniformities are depending on both CD and OVL variability. In this paper, investigations of CD and OVL process control of 64nm minimum pitch at Metal1 level of 14FDSOI technology, within the double patterning process flow (Litho, hard mask etch, line etch) are presented. Various measurements with SEMCD tools (Hitachi), and overlay tools (KT for Image Based Overlay - IBO, and ASML for Diffraction Based Overlay - DBO) are compared. Metrology targets are embedded within a block instanced several times within the field to perform intra-field process variations characterizations. Specific SEMCD targets were designed for independent measurement of both line CD (A and B) and space CD (A to B and B to A) for each exposure within a single measurement during the DP flow. Based on those measurements correlation between overlay determined with SEMCD and with standard overlay tools can be evaluated. Such correlation at different steps through the DP flow is investigated regarding the metrology type. Process correction models are evaluated with respect to the measurement type and the intra-field sampling.

  13. Phase-only SLM Generating Variable Patterns Applied in Optical Connection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, B H; Wu, L Y; Zhang, J

    2006-01-01

    An adaptive optical communication system is proposed. The system sends spatial information by emitting multiple variable laser beams generated from a programmable diffractive optical element (DOE): phase-only liquid crystal Spatial Light Modulator (SLM). Laser beams carrying signals are programmable by an optimal algorithm based on an iterative Fourier transformation algorithm. The system has the advantage in redundancy of signal by the means of broadcast. It can adaptively seek position and transmit information in parallel

  14. Diffraction dissociation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abarbanel, H.

    1972-01-01

    An attempt is made to analyse the present theoretical situation in the field of diffraction scattering. Two not yet fully answered questions related with a typical diffraction process AB→CD, namely: what is the structure of the transition matrix elements, and what is the structure of the exchange mechanism responsible for the scattering, are formulated and various proposals for answers are reviewed. Interesting general statement that the products (-1)sup(J)P, where J and P are respectively spin and parity, is conserved at each vertex has been discussed. The exchange mechanism in diffractive scattering has been considered using the language of the complex J-plane as the most appropriate. The known facts about the exchange mechanism are recalled and several routs to way out are proposed. The idea to consider the moving pole and associated branch points as like a particle and the associated two and many particle unitarity cuts is described in more details. (S.B.)

  15. Electron diffraction from carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin, L-C

    2006-01-01

    The properties of a carbon nanotube are dependent on its atomic structure. The atomic structure of a carbon nanotube can be defined by specifying its chiral indices (u, v), that specify its perimeter vector (chiral vector), with which the diameter and helicity are also determined. The fine electron beam available in a modern transmission electron microscope (TEM) offers a unique probe to reveal the atomic structure of individual nanotubes. This review covers two aspects related to the use of the electron probe in the TEM for the study of carbon nanotubes: (a) to understand the electron diffraction phenomena for inter-pretation of the electron diffraction patterns of carbon nanotubes and (b) to obtain the chiral indices (u, v), of the carbon nanotubes from the electron diffraction patterns. For a nanotube of a given structure, the electron scattering amplitude from the carbon nanotube is first described analytically in closed form using the helical diffraction theory. From a known structure as given by the chiral indices (u, v), its electron diffraction pattern can be calculated and understood. The reverse problem, i.e. assignment of the chiral indices from an electron diffraction pattern of a carbon nanotube, is approached from the relationship between the electron scattering intensity distribution and the chiral indices (u, v). We show that electron diffraction patterns can provide an accurate and unambiguous assignment of the chiral indices of carbon nanotubes. The chiral indices (u, v) can be read indiscriminately with a high accuracy from the intensity distribution on the principal layer lines in an electron diffraction pattern. The symmetry properties of electron diffraction from carbon nanotubes and the electron diffraction from deformed carbon nanotubes are also discussed in detail. It is shown that 2mm symmetry is always preserved for single-walled carbon nanotubes, but it can break down for multiwalled carbon nanotubes under some special circumstances

  16. Diffraction attraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1986-01-01

    Elastic scattering – when colliding particles 'bounce' off each other like billiard balls – has always had a special interest for high energy physicists. While its simplicity makes for deep analogies with classical ideas like diffraction, its jbtle details also test our understanding of the intricate inner mechanisms which drive particle interactions. With a new stock of elastic scattering data now available thanks to experiments at the CERN proton-antiproton Collider, and with studies at higher energies imminent or planned, some seventy physicists gathered in the magnificent chateau at Blois, France, for a 'Workshop on Elastic and Diffractive Scattering at the Collider and Beyond'

  17. Diffractive scattering

    CERN Document Server

    De Wolf, E.A.

    2002-01-01

    We discuss basic concepts and properties of diffractive phenomena in soft hadron collisions and in deep-inelastic scattering at low Bjorken-x. The paper is not a review of the rapidly developing field but presents an attempt to show in simple terms the close inter-relationship between the dynamics of high-energy hadronic and deep-inelastic diffraction. Using the saturation model of Golec-Biernat and Wusthoff as an example, a simple explanation of geometrical scaling is presented. The relation between the QCD anomalous multiplicity dimension and the Pomeron intercept is discussed.

  18. Diffractive Scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolf, E.A. de

    2002-01-01

    We discuss basic concepts and properties of diffractive phenomena in soft hadron collisions and in deep-inelastic scattering at low Bjorken - x. The paper is not a review of the rapidly developing field but presents an attempt to show in simple terms the close inter-relationship between the dynamics of high-energy hadronic and deep-inelastic diffraction. Using the saturation model of Golec-Biernat and Wuesthoff as an example, a simple explanation of geometrical scaling is presented. The relation between the QCD anomalous multiplicity dimension and the Pomeron intercept is discussed. (author)

  19. Diffraction attraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1986-03-15

    Elastic scattering – when colliding particles 'bounce' off each other like billiard balls – has always had a special interest for high energy physicists. While its simplicity makes for deep analogies with classical ideas like diffraction, its jbtle details also test our understanding of the intricate inner mechanisms which drive particle interactions. With a new stock of elastic scattering data now available thanks to experiments at the CERN proton-antiproton Collider, and with studies at higher energies imminent or planned, some seventy physicists gathered in the magnificent chateau at Blois, France, for a 'Workshop on Elastic and Diffractive Scattering at the Collider and Beyond'.

  20. Duality in diffraction dissociations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santoro, Alberto.

    1977-01-01

    Diffractive dissociations (aN→a*πN) are naturally explained and a model that accounts for the three-variable correlation (mass-transfer-Jackson angle correlation) is presented. This model takes into account the three possible exchanges: t (pion), u(a*) and s(a) channel exchanger. The physical consequences of the model are: a strong mass-slope correlation due to the zeros of the amplitude, a factorization of diffractive dissociations (factorization of the Pomeron), the possibility of extending this model to double diffractive dissociation and diffraction by nuclei. This model was applied to the NN→NπN reaction. Using the usual parameters of the Deck model, a comparison is made with experiments for all available distributions. the strong slope of the peak at 1400 MeV is naturally explained [fr

  1. Coherent 3D nanostructure of γ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}: Simulation of whole X-ray powder diffraction pattern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pakharukova, V.P., E-mail: verapakh@catalysis.ru [Boreskov Institute of Catalysis SB RAS, Pr. Lavrentieva 5, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Pirogova Street 2, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Research and Educational Center for Energy Efficient Catalysis, Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Yatsenko, D.A. [Boreskov Institute of Catalysis SB RAS, Pr. Lavrentieva 5, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Pirogova Street 2, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Gerasimov, E. Yu.; Shalygin, A.S.; Martyanov, O.N.; Tsybulya, S.V. [Boreskov Institute of Catalysis SB RAS, Pr. Lavrentieva 5, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Pirogova Street 2, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Research and Educational Center for Energy Efficient Catalysis, Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation)

    2017-02-15

    The structure and nanostructure features of nanocrystalline γ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} obtained by dehydration of boehmite with anisotropic platelet-shaped particles were investigated. The original models of 3D coherent nanostructure of γ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} were constructed. The models of nanostructured γ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles were first confirmed by a direct simulation of powder X–Ray diffraction (XRD) patterns using the Debye Scattering Equation (DSE) with assistance of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) study. The average crystal structure of γ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} was shown to be tetragonally distorted. The experimental results revealed that thin γ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} platelets were heterogeneous on a nanometer scale and nanometer-sized building blocks were separated by partially coherent interfaces. The XRD simulation results showed that a specific packing of the primary crystalline blocks in the nanostructured γ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles with formation of planar defects on (001), (100), and (101) planes nicely accounted for pronounced diffuse scattering, anisotropic peak broadening and peak shifts in the experimental XRD pattern. The identified planar defects in cation sublattice seem to be described as filling cation non-spinel sites in existing crystallographic models of γ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} structure. The overall findings provided an insight into the complex nanostructure, which is intrinsic to the metastable γ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} oxide. - Highlights: • Thin plate-like crystallites of γ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} were obtained. • Models of 3D coherent nanostructure of γ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} were constructed. • Models were verified by simulating XRD patterns using the Debye Scattering Equation. • Specific broadening of XRD peaks was explained in terms of planar defects. • Primary crystalline blocks in γ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} are separated by partially coherent interfaces.

  2. Comparison of multivariate preprocessing techniques as applied to electronic tongue based pattern classification for black tea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palit, Mousumi; Tudu, Bipan; Bhattacharyya, Nabarun; Dutta, Ankur; Dutta, Pallab Kumar; Jana, Arun; Bandyopadhyay, Rajib; Chatterjee, Anutosh

    2010-01-01

    In an electronic tongue, preprocessing on raw data precedes pattern analysis and choice of the appropriate preprocessing technique is crucial for the performance of the pattern classifier. While attempting to classify different grades of black tea using a voltammetric electronic tongue, different preprocessing techniques have been explored and a comparison of their performances is presented in this paper. The preprocessing techniques are compared first by a quantitative measurement of separability followed by principle component analysis; and then two different supervised pattern recognition models based on neural networks are used to evaluate the performance of the preprocessing techniques.

  3. Applying Learning Analytics to Explore the Effects of Motivation on Online Students' Reading Behavioral Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jerry Chih-Yuan; Lin, Che-Tsun; Chou, Chien

    2018-01-01

    This study aims to apply a sequential analysis to explore the effect of learning motivation on online reading behavioral patterns. The study's participants consisted of 160 graduate students who were classified into three group types: low reading duration with low motivation, low reading duration with high motivation, and high reading duration…

  4. A feasibility study of low-order harmonics expansion applied to loading pattern search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaohong, Z.; Dong, L.; Tao, W. [Shanghai Jiao Tong Univ., 1954 Hua Shan Road, Shanghai, 200030 (China); Chao, Y. A. [Westinghouse Electric Company, P. O. Box 355, Pittsburgh, PA 15230-0355 (United States)

    2006-07-01

    Despite significant progress in core loading pattern search methods over years, there still remains the issue of large computing workload and the need for improving the speed of evaluating loading pattern candidates during the search process. This paper focuses on improving the computing speed for loading pattern evaluation, rather than the method of searching for the patterns. A low order harmonics expansion method for flux distribution representation is proposed for fast LP evaluation application. The novel feature of the method is the separation of the short range local perturbation effect from the long range global tilt effect. The latter effect can be captured by low order harmonics expansion. Demonstration examples are presented to show that even for extremely large perturbations induced by fuel shuffling the proposed method can accurately calculate the flux distribution for the LP with very minimal computation. (authors)

  5. Quantitative phase analysis by neutron diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chang Hee; Song, Su Ho; Lee, Jin Ho; Shim, Hae Seop [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1999-06-01

    This study is to apply quantitative phase analysis (QPA) by neutron diffraction to the round robin samples provided by the International Union of Crystallography(IUCr). We measured neutron diffraction patterns for mixed samples which have several different weight percentages and their unique characteristic features. Neutron diffraction method has been known to be superior to its complementary methods such as X-ray or Synchrotron, but it is still accepted as highly reliable under limited conditions or samples. Neutron diffraction has strong capability especially on oxides due to its scattering cross-section of the oxygen and it can become a more strong tool for analysis on the industrial materials with this quantitative phase analysis techniques. By doing this study, we hope not only to do one of instrument performance tests on our HRPD but also to improve our ability on the analysis of neutron diffraction data by comparing our QPA results with others from any advanced reactor facilities. 14 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs. (Author)

  6. Tensometry technique for X-ray diffraction in applied analysis of welding; Tensometria por tecnica de difracao de raios X aplicada na analise de soldagens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turibus, S.N.; Caldas, F.C.M.; Miranda, D.M.; Monine, V.I.; Assis, J.T., E-mail: snturibus@iprj.uerj.b [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (IPRJ/UERJ), Nova Friburgo, RJ (Brazil). Inst. Politecnico

    2010-07-01

    This paper presents the analysis of residual stress introduced in welding process. As the stress in a material can induce damages, it is necessary to have a method to identify this residual stress state. For this it was used the non-destructive X-ray diffraction technique to analyze two plates from A36 steel jointed by metal inert gas (MIG) welding. The stress measurements were made by the sin{sup 2{psi}} method in weld region of steel plates including analysis of longitudinal and transverse residual stresses in fusion zone, heat affected zone (HAZ) and base metal. To determine the stress distribution along the depth of the welded material it was used removing of superficial layers made by electropolishing. (author)

  7. Applying a Machine Learning Technique to Classification of Japanese Pressure Patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Kimura

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available In climate research, pressure patterns are often very important. When a climatologists need to know the days of a specific pressure pattern, for example "low pressure in Western areas of Japan and high pressure in Eastern areas of Japan (Japanese winter-type weather," they have to visually check a huge number of surface weather charts. To overcome this problem, we propose an automatic classification system using a support vector machine (SVM, which is a machine-learning method. We attempted to classify pressure patterns into two classes: "winter type" and "non-winter type". For both training datasets and test datasets, we used the JRA-25 dataset from 1981 to 2000. An experimental evaluation showed that our method obtained a greater than 0.8 F-measure. We noted that variations in results were based on differences in training datasets.

  8. Coherent diffraction microscopy at SPring-8: instrumentation, data acquisition and data analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Rui; Salha, Sara; Raines, Kevin S.; Jiang, Huaidong; Chen, Chien-Chun; Takahashi, Yukio; Kohmura, Yoshiki; Nishino, Yoshinori; Song, Changyong; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Miao, Jianwei

    2011-01-01

    An instrumentation and data analysis review of coherent diffraction microscopy at SPring-8 is given. This work will be of interest to those who want to apply coherent diffraction imaging to studies of materials science and biological samples. Since the first demonstration of coherent diffraction microscopy in 1999, this lensless imaging technique has been experimentally refined by continued developments. Here, instrumentation and experimental procedures for measuring oversampled diffraction patterns from non-crystalline specimens using an undulator beamline (BL29XUL) at SPring-8 are presented. In addition, detailed post-experimental data analysis is provided that yields high-quality image reconstructions. As the acquisition of high-quality diffraction patterns is at least as important as the phase-retrieval procedure to guarantee successful image reconstructions, this work will be of interest for those who want to apply this imaging technique to materials science and biological samples

  9. Pattern recognition and data mining software based on artificial neural networks applied to proton transfer in aqueous environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tahat Amani; Marti Jordi; Khwaldeh Ali; Tahat Kaher

    2014-01-01

    In computational physics proton transfer phenomena could be viewed as pattern classification problems based on a set of input features allowing classification of the proton motion into two categories: transfer ‘occurred’ and transfer ‘not occurred’. The goal of this paper is to evaluate the use of artificial neural networks in the classification of proton transfer events, based on the feed-forward back propagation neural network, used as a classifier to distinguish between the two transfer cases. In this paper, we use a new developed data mining and pattern recognition tool for automating, controlling, and drawing charts of the output data of an Empirical Valence Bond existing code. The study analyzes the need for pattern recognition in aqueous proton transfer processes and how the learning approach in error back propagation (multilayer perceptron algorithms) could be satisfactorily employed in the present case. We present a tool for pattern recognition and validate the code including a real physical case study. The results of applying the artificial neural networks methodology to crowd patterns based upon selected physical properties (e.g., temperature, density) show the abilities of the network to learn proton transfer patterns corresponding to properties of the aqueous environments, which is in turn proved to be fully compatible with previous proton transfer studies. (condensed matter: structural, mechanical, and thermal properties)

  10. X-ray diffraction 2 - diffraction principles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Connor, B.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: The computation of powder diffraction intensities is based on the principle that the powder pattern comprises the summation of the intensity contributions from each of the crystallites (or single crystals) in the material. Therefore, it is of value for powder diffractionists to appreciate the form of the expression for calculating single crystal diffraction pattern intensities. This knowledge is especially important for Rietveld analysis practitioners in terms of the (i) mathematics of the method and (ii) retrieving single crystal structure data from the literature. We consider the integrated intensity from a small single crystal being rotated at velocity ω through the Bragg angle θ for reflection (hkl).... I(hkl) = [l o /ω]. [e 4 /m 2 c 4 ]. [λ 3 δV F(hkl) 2 /υ 2 ].[(1+cos 2 2θ)/2sin2θ] where e, m and c are the usual fundamental constants; λ is the x-ray wavelength, δV is the crystallite volume; F(hkl) is the structure factor; υ is the unit cell volume; and (1+cos 2 θ)/2sin2θ] is the Lorentz-polarisation factor for an unpolarised incident beam. The expression does not include a contribution for extinction. The influence of factors λ, δV, F(hkl) and υ on the intensities should be appreciated by powder diffractionists, especially the structure factor, F(hkl), which is responsible for the fingerprint nature of diffraction patterns, such as the rise and fall of intensity from peak to peak. The structure factor expression represents the summation of the scattered waves from each of the j scattering centres (i e atoms) in the unit cell: F(hkl) Σ f j exp[2πi (h.x j +k.y i +l. z i )] T j . Symbol f is the scattering factor (representing the atom-type scattering efficiency); (x, y, z) are the fractional position coordinates of atom j within the unit cell; and T is the thermal vibration factor for the atom given by: T j = 8π 2 2 > sin 2 θ/λ 2 with 2 > being the mean-square vibration amplitude of the atom (assumed to be isotropic). The

  11. Blazed Grating Resonance Conditions and Diffraction Efficiency Optical Transfer Function

    KAUST Repository

    Stegenburgs, Edgars

    2017-01-08

    We introduce a general approach to study diffraction harmonics or resonances and resonance conditions for blazed reflecting gratings providing knowledge of fundamental diffraction pattern and qualitative understanding of predicting parameters for the most efficient diffraction.

  12. Blazed Grating Resonance Conditions and Diffraction Efficiency Optical Transfer Function

    KAUST Repository

    Stegenburgs, Edgars; Alias, Mohd Sharizal B.; Ng, Tien Khee; Ooi, Boon S.

    2017-01-01

    We introduce a general approach to study diffraction harmonics or resonances and resonance conditions for blazed reflecting gratings providing knowledge of fundamental diffraction pattern and qualitative understanding of predicting parameters for the most efficient diffraction.

  13. An Approach for Pattern Recognition of EEG Applied in Prosthetic Hand Drive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Dong Zhang

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available For controlling the prosthetic hand by only electroencephalogram (EEG, it has become the hot spot in robotics research to set up a direct communication and control channel between human brain and prosthetic hand. In this paper, the EEG signal is analyzed based on multi-complicated hand activities. And then, two methods of EEG pattern recognition are investigated, a neural prosthesis hand system driven by BCI is set up, which can complete four kinds of actions (arm’s free state, arm movement, hand crawl, hand open. Through several times of off-line and on-line experiments, the result shows that the neural prosthesis hand system driven by BCI is reasonable and feasible, the C-support vector classifiers-based method is better than BP neural network on the EEG pattern recognition for multi-complicated hand activities.

  14. Applying acoustic telemetry to understand contaminant exposure and bioaccumulation patterns in mobile fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Matthew D; van der Meulen, Dylan E; Brodie, Stephanie; Cadiou, Gwenaël; Knott, Nathan A

    2018-06-01

    Contamination in urbanised estuaries presents a risk to human health, and to the viability of populations of exploited species. Assessing animal movements in relation to contaminated areas may help to explain patterns in bioaccumulation, and assist in the effective management of health risks associated with consumption of exploited species. Using polychlorinated dibenzodioxin and polychlorinated dibenzofuran (PCDD/Fs) contamination in Sydney Harbour estuary as a case study, we present a study that links movement patterns resolved using acoustic telemetry to the accumulation of contaminants in mobile fish on a multi-species basis. Fifty-four individuals across six exploited species (Sea Mullet Mugil cephalus; Luderick Girella tricuspidata; Yellowfin Bream Acanthopagrus australis; Silver Trevally Pseudocaranx georgianus; Mulloway Argyrosomus japonicus; Yellowtail Kingfish Seriola lalandi) were tagged with acoustic transmitters, and their movements tracked for up to 3years. There was substantial inter-specific variation in fish distribution along the estuary. The proportion of distribution that overlapped with contaminated areas explained 84-98% of the inter-specific variation in lipid-standardised biota PCDD/F concentration. There was some seasonal variation in distribution along the estuary, but movement patterns indicated that Sea Mullet, Yellowfin Bream, Silver Trevally, and Mulloway were likely to be exposed to contaminated areas during the period of gonadal maturation. Acoustic telemetry allows examination of spatial and temporal patterns in exposure to contamination. When used alongside biota sampling and testing, this offers a powerful approach to assess exposure, bioaccumulation, and potential risks faced by different species, as well as human health risks associated with their consumption. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. User Activity Recognition in Smart Homes Using Pattern Clustering Applied to Temporal ANN Algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourobou, Serge Thomas Mickala; Yoo, Younghwan

    2015-05-21

    This paper discusses the possibility of recognizing and predicting user activities in the IoT (Internet of Things) based smart environment. The activity recognition is usually done through two steps: activity pattern clustering and activity type decision. Although many related works have been suggested, they had some limited performance because they focused only on one part between the two steps. This paper tries to find the best combination of a pattern clustering method and an activity decision algorithm among various existing works. For the first step, in order to classify so varied and complex user activities, we use a relevant and efficient unsupervised learning method called the K-pattern clustering algorithm. In the second step, the training of smart environment for recognizing and predicting user activities inside his/her personal space is done by utilizing the artificial neural network based on the Allen's temporal relations. The experimental results show that our combined method provides the higher recognition accuracy for various activities, as compared with other data mining classification algorithms. Furthermore, it is more appropriate for a dynamic environment like an IoT based smart home.

  16. User Activity Recognition in Smart Homes Using Pattern Clustering Applied to Temporal ANN Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serge Thomas Mickala Bourobou

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the possibility of recognizing and predicting user activities in the IoT (Internet of Things based smart environment. The activity recognition is usually done through two steps: activity pattern clustering and activity type decision. Although many related works have been suggested, they had some limited performance because they focused only on one part between the two steps. This paper tries to find the best combination of a pattern clustering method and an activity decision algorithm among various existing works. For the first step, in order to classify so varied and complex user activities, we use a relevant and efficient unsupervised learning method called the K-pattern clustering algorithm. In the second step, the training of smart environment for recognizing and predicting user activities inside his/her personal space is done by utilizing the artificial neural network based on the Allen’s temporal relations. The experimental results show that our combined method provides the higher recognition accuracy for various activities, as compared with other data mining classification algorithms. Furthermore, it is more appropriate for a dynamic environment like an IoT based smart home.

  17. Data processing software suite SITENNO for coherent X-ray diffraction imaging using the X-ray free-electron laser SACLA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekiguchi, Yuki; Oroguchi, Tomotaka; Takayama, Yuki; Nakasako, Masayoshi

    2014-01-01

    The software suite SITENNO is developed for processing diffraction data collected in coherent X-ray diffraction imaging experiments of non-crystalline particles using an X-ray free-electron laser. Coherent X-ray diffraction imaging is a promising technique for visualizing the structures of non-crystalline particles with dimensions of micrometers to sub-micrometers. Recently, X-ray free-electron laser sources have enabled efficient experiments in the ‘diffraction before destruction’ scheme. Diffraction experiments have been conducted at SPring-8 Angstrom Compact free-electron LAser (SACLA) using the custom-made diffraction apparatus KOTOBUKI-1 and two multiport CCD detectors. In the experiments, ten thousands of single-shot diffraction patterns can be collected within several hours. Then, diffraction patterns with significant levels of intensity suitable for structural analysis must be found, direct-beam positions in diffraction patterns determined, diffraction patterns from the two CCD detectors merged, and phase-retrieval calculations for structural analyses performed. A software suite named SITENNO has been developed to semi-automatically apply the four-step processing to a huge number of diffraction data. Here, details of the algorithm used in the suite are described and the performance for approximately 9000 diffraction patterns collected from cuboid-shaped copper oxide particles reported. Using the SITENNO suite, it is possible to conduct experiments with data processing immediately after the data collection, and to characterize the size distribution and internal structures of the non-crystalline particles

  18. Optimization of the temporal pattern of applied dose for a single fraction of radiation: Implications for radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altman, Michael B.

    The increasing prevalence of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) as a treatment modality has led to a renewed interest in the potential for interaction between prolonged treatment time, as frequently associated with IMRT, and the underlying radiobiology of the irradiated tissue. A particularly relevant aspect of radiobiology is cell repair capacity, which influences cell survival, and thus directly relates to the ability to control tumors and spare normal tissues. For a single fraction of radiation, the linear quadratic (LQ) model is commonly used to relate the radiation dose to the fraction of cells surviving. The LQ model implies a dependence on two time-related factors which correlate to radiobiological effects: the duration of radiation application, and the functional form of how the dose is applied over that time (the "temporal pattern of applied dose"). Although the former has been well studied, the latter has not. Thus, the goal of this research is to investigate the impact of the temporal pattern of applied dose on the survival of human cells and to explore how the manipulation of this temporal dose pattern may be incorporated into an IMRT-based radiation therapy treatment planning scheme. The hypothesis is that the temporal pattern of applied dose in a single fraction of radiation can be optimized to maximize or minimize cell kill. Furthermore, techniques which utilize this effect could have clinical ramifications. In situations where increased cell kill is desirable, such as tumor control, or limiting the degree of cell kill is important, such as the sparing of normal tissue, temporal sequences of dose which maximize or minimize cell kill (temporally "optimized" sequences) may provide greater benefit than current clinically used radiation patterns. In the first part of this work, an LQ-based modeling analysis of effects of the temporal pattern of dose on cell kill is performed. Through this, patterns are identified for maximizing cell kill for a

  19. Applying Evidence-Based Medicine in Telehealth: An Interactive Pattern Recognition Approximation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Fernández-Llatas

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Born in the early nineteen nineties, evidence-based medicine (EBM is a paradigm intended to promote the integration of biomedical evidence into the physicians daily practice. This paradigm requires the continuous study of diseases to provide the best scientific knowledge for supporting physicians in their diagnosis and treatments in a close way. Within this paradigm, usually, health experts create and publish clinical guidelines, which provide holistic guidance for the care for a certain disease. The creation of these clinical guidelines requires hard iterative processes in which each iteration supposes scientific progress in the knowledge of the disease. To perform this guidance through telehealth, the use of formal clinical guidelines will allow the building of care processes that can be interpreted and executed directly by computers. In addition, the formalization of clinical guidelines allows for the possibility to build automatic methods, using pattern recognition techniques, to estimate the proper models, as well as the mathematical models for optimizing the iterative cycle for the continuous improvement of the guidelines. However, to ensure the efficiency of the system, it is necessary to build a probabilistic model of the problem. In this paper, an interactive pattern recognition approach to support professionals in evidence-based medicine is formalized.

  20. Diffraction efficiency enhancement of femtosecond laser-engraved diffraction gratings due to CO2 laser polishing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Hun-Kook; Jung, Deok; Sohn, Ik-Bu; Noh, Young-Chul; Lee, Yong-Tak; Kim, Jin-Tae; Ahsan, Shamim

    2014-01-01

    This research demonstrates laser-assisted fabrication of high-efficiency diffraction gratings in fused-silica glass samples. Initially, femtosecond laser pulses are used to engrave diffraction gratings on the glass surfaces. Then, these micro-patterned glass samples undergo CO 2 laser polishing process. unpolished diffraction gratings encoded in the glass samples show an overall diffraction efficiency of 18.1%. diffraction gratings imprinted on the glass samples and then polished four times by using a CO 2 laser beam attain a diffraction efficiency of 32.7%. We also investigate the diffraction patterns of the diffraction gratings encoded on fused-silica glass surfaces. The proposed CO 2 laser polishing technique shows great potential in patterning high-efficiency diffraction gratings on the surfaces of various transparent materials.

  1. Undergraduate Experiment with Fractal Diffraction Gratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsoriu, Juan A.; Furlan, Walter D.; Pons, Amparo; Barreiro, Juan C.; Gimenez, Marcos H.

    2011-01-01

    We present a simple diffraction experiment with fractal gratings based on the triadic Cantor set. Diffraction by fractals is proposed as a motivating strategy for students of optics in the potential applications of optical processing. Fraunhofer diffraction patterns are obtained using standard equipment present in most undergraduate physics…

  2. Quantitative multiphase analysis of archaeological bronzes by neutron diffraction

    CERN Document Server

    Siano, S; Celli, M; Pini, R; Salimbeni, R; Zoppi, M; Kockelmann, W A; Iozzo, M; Miccio, M; Moze, O

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, we report the first investigation on the potentials of neutron diffraction to characterize archaeological bronze artifacts. The preliminary feasibility of phase and structural analysis was demonstrated on standardised specimens with a typical bronze alloy composition. These were realised through different hardening and annealing cycles, simulating possible ancient working techniques. The Bragg peak widths that resulted were strictly dependent on the working treatment, thus providing an important analytical element to investigate ancient making techniques. The diagnostic criteria developed on the standardised specimens were then applied to study two Etruscan museum pieces. Quantitative multiphase analysis by Rietveld refinement of the diffraction patterns was successfully demonstrated. Furthermore, the analysis of patterns associated with different artifact elements also yielded evidence for some peculiar perspective of the neutron diffraction diagnostics in archeometric applications. (orig.)

  3. Connectivity strategies for higher-order neural networks applied to pattern recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spirkovska, Lilly; Reid, Max B.

    1990-01-01

    Different strategies for non-fully connected HONNs (higher-order neural networks) are discussed, showing that by using such strategies an input field of 128 x 128 pixels can be attained while still achieving in-plane rotation and translation-invariant recognition. These techniques allow HONNs to be used with the larger input scenes required for practical pattern-recognition applications. The number of interconnections that must be stored has been reduced by a factor of approximately 200,000 in a T/C case and about 2000 in a Space Shuttle/F-18 case by using regional connectivity. Third-order networks have been simulated using several connection strategies. The method found to work best is regional connectivity. The main advantages of this strategy are the following: (1) it considers features of various scales within the image and thus gets a better sample of what the image looks like; (2) it is invariant to shape-preserving geometric transformations, such as translation and rotation; (3) the connections are predetermined so that no extra computations are necessary during run time; and (4) it does not require any extra storage for recording which connections were formed.

  4. Applied Swarm-based medicine: collecting decision trees for patterns of algorithms analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panje, Cédric M; Glatzer, Markus; von Rappard, Joscha; Rothermundt, Christian; Hundsberger, Thomas; Zumstein, Valentin; Plasswilm, Ludwig; Putora, Paul Martin

    2017-08-16

    The objective consensus methodology has recently been applied in consensus finding in several studies on medical decision-making among clinical experts or guidelines. The main advantages of this method are an automated analysis and comparison of treatment algorithms of the participating centers which can be performed anonymously. Based on the experience from completed consensus analyses, the main steps for the successful implementation of the objective consensus methodology were identified and discussed among the main investigators. The following steps for the successful collection and conversion of decision trees were identified and defined in detail: problem definition, population selection, draft input collection, tree conversion, criteria adaptation, problem re-evaluation, results distribution and refinement, tree finalisation, and analysis. This manuscript provides information on the main steps for successful collection of decision trees and summarizes important aspects at each point of the analysis.

  5. When holography meets coherent diffraction imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latychevskaia, Tatiana; Longchamp, Jean-Nicolas; Fink, Hans-Werner

    2012-12-17

    phase problem can be solved in a fast and unambiguous manner. We demonstrate the reconstruction of various diffraction patterns of objects recorded with visible light as well as with low-energy electrons. Although we have demonstrated our HCDI method using laser light and low-energy electrons, it can also be applied to any other coherent radiation such as X-rays or high-energy electrons.

  6. Neutron diffraction studies of magnetic ordering in superconducting ErNi2B2C and TmNi2B2C in an applied magnetic field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, Katrine Nørgaard

    The field-induced magnetic structures of ErNi2B2C and TmNi2B2C in are especially interesting because the field suppresses the superconducting order parameter and therefore the magnetic properties can be studied while varying the strength ofsuperconductivity. ErNi2B2C: For magnetic fields along all.......483,0,0). The appearance of the QN phase wasinitially believed to be caused by the suppression of superconductivity. This suppression should make it favorable to create a magnetic order with a Q-vector determined by the maximum in the magnetic susceptibility at the Fermi surface nesting vector QN.The phase diagram...... three symmetry directions, the observed magnetic structures have a period corresponding to the Fermi surface nesting structure. The phase diagrams present all the observed magnetic structures.Two results remain unresolved: 1. When applying the magnetic field along [010], the minority domain (QNB = (0,Q...

  7. Applying the X-ray diffraction analysis for estimating the height and width of nanorods in low symmetry crystal multiphase materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhtari, Ali; Soleimanian, Vishtasb; Dehkordi, Hamed Aleebrahim; Dastafkan, Kamran

    2017-11-01

    In this work the potential of Rietveld refinement procedure is used to study the shape and size of non-spherical nanocrystallites. The main advantages of this approach are that not only it can successfully extend to all nanomaterials with different crystal symmetries but also it can evaluate the various phases of multiple materials comparing to electron microscopy methods. Therefore, between seven crystal systems, the formulation of monoclinic and hexagonal crystals is developed. This procedure is applied for the mixture of sodium carbonate and zinc oxide nanocrystallites at different fractions of doped gadolinium oxide. It is found that the crystallites of sodium carbonate and zinc oxide have the rod and ellipsoidal shapes, respectively. The microstructure results are compared with the results of scanning electron microscopy imaging. Good agreement is achieved between the results of scanning electron microscopy and Rietveld methods.

  8. Tolerance analysis on diffraction efficiency and polychromatic integral diffraction efficiency for harmonic diffractive optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Mao

    2016-10-01

    In this dissertation, the mathematical model of effect of manufacturing errors including microstructure relative height error and relative width error on diffraction efficiency for the harmonic diffractive optical elements (HDEs) is set up. According to the expression of the phase delay and diffraction efficiency of the HDEs, the expression of diffraction efficiency of refraction and diffractive optical element with the microstructure height and periodic width errors in fabrication process is presented in this paper. Furthermore, the effect of manufacturing errors on diffraction efficiency for the harmonic diffractive optical elements is studied, and diffraction efficiency change is analyzed as the relative microstructure height-error in the same and in the opposite sign as well as relative width-error in the same and in the opposite sign. Example including infrared wavelength with materials GE has been discussed in this paper. Two kinds of manufacturing errors applied in 3.7 4.3um middle infrared and 8.7-11.5um far infrared optical system which results in diffraction efficiency and PIDE of HDEs are studied. The analysis results can be used for manufacturing error control in micro-structure height and periodic width. Results can be used for HDEs processing.

  9. Releasing Pattern of Applied Phosphorus and Distribution Change of Phosphorus Fractions in the Acid Upland Soils with Successive Resin Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arief Hartono

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The releasing pattern of applied P in the acid upland soils and the soil properties influencing the pattern were studied. Surface horizons of six acid upland soils from Sumatra, Java and Kalimantan were used in this study. The releasing pattern of applied P (300 mg P kg-1 of these soils were studied by successive resin extraction. P fractionation was conducted to evaluate which fractions released P to the soil solution after successive resin extraction. The cumulative of resin-Pinorganic (Pi release of soils was fitted to the first order kinetic. Regression analyses using factor scores obtained from the previous principal components analyses was applied to determine soil properties influencing P releasing pattern. The results suggested that the maximum P release was significantly (P < 0.05 increased by acidity plus 1.4 nm mineral-related factor (PC2 i.e. exchangeable Al and 1.4 nm minerals (smectite and vermiculite and decreased by oxide related factor (PC1 i.e. aluminum (Al plus 1/2 iron (Fe (by ammonium oxalate, crystalline Al and Fe oxides, cation exchange capacity, and clay content. P fractionation analysis after successive resin extraction showed that both labile and less labile in the form of NaHCO3-Pi and NaOH-Pi fractions, respectively, can be transformed into resin-Pi when in the most labile resin-Pi is depleted. Most of P released in high oxides soils were from NaOH-Pi fraction while in low oxides soils were from NaHCO3-Pi. P release from the former fraction resulted in the maximum P release lower than that of the latter one. When NaHCO3-Pi was high, NaOH-Pi was relatively more stable than NaHCO3-Pi despite resin-Pi removal. NaHCO3-Pi and NaOH-Pi are very important P fractions in replenishing resin-Pi in these acid upland soils.

  10. Redis applied design patterns

    CERN Document Server

    Chinnachamy, Arun

    2014-01-01

    This book is for developers who are already proficient in programming and capable of designing systems using traditional databases, but are new to Redis. It is assumed that you understand the basics of Redis and are familiar with the various data structures. You are also expected to be proficient in one or more programming languages through which you want to use Redis.

  11. The influence of applying additional weight to the affected leg on gait patterns during aquatic treadmill walking in people poststroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Taeyou; Lee, Dokyeong; Charalambous, Charalambos; Vrongistinos, Konstantinos

    2010-01-01

    Jung T, Lee D, Charalambous C, Vrongistinos K. The influence of applying additional weight to the affected leg on gait patterns during aquatic treadmill walking in people poststroke. To investigate how the application of additional weights to the affected leg influences gait patterns of people poststroke during aquatic treadmill walking. Comparative gait analysis. University-based aquatic therapy center. Community-dwelling volunteers (n=22) with chronic hemiparesis caused by stroke. Not applicable. Spatiotemporal and kinematic gait parameters. The use of an ankle weight showed an increase in the stance phase percentage of gait cycle (3%, P=.015) when compared with no weight. However, the difference was not significant after a Bonferroni adjustment was applied for a more stringent statistical analysis. No significant differences were found in cadence and stride length. The use of an ankle weight showed a significant decrease of the peak hip flexion (7.9%, P=.001) of the affected limb as compared with no weight condition. This decrease was marked as the reduction of unwanted limb flotation because people poststroke typically show excessive hip flexion of the paretic leg in the late swing phase followed by fluctuating hip movements during aquatic treadmill walking. The frontal and transverse plane hip motions did not show any significant differences but displayed a trend of a decrease in the peak hip abduction during the swing phase with additional weights. The use of additional weight did not alter sagittal plane kinematics of the knee and ankle joints. The use of applied weight on the affected limb can reduce unwanted limb flotation on the paretic side during aquatic treadmill walking. It can also assist the stance stability by increasing the stance phase percentage closer to 60% of gait cycle. Both findings can contribute to the development of more efficient motor patterns in gait training for people poststroke. The use of a cuff weight does not seem to reduce the

  12. Prospect for application of compact accelerator-based neutron source to neutron engineering diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeda, Yoshimasa, E-mail: yoshimasa.ikeda@riken.jp [Center for Advanced Photonics, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Taketani, Atsushi; Takamura, Masato; Sunaga, Hideyuki [Center for Advanced Photonics, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Kumagai, Masayoshi [Faculty of Engineering, Tokyo City University, Setagaya, Tokyo 158-8857 (Japan); Oba, Yojiro [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Kumatori, Osaka 590-0494 (Japan); Otake, Yoshie [Center for Advanced Photonics, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Suzuki, Hiroshi [Materials Sciences Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan)

    2016-10-11

    A compact accelerator-based neutron source has been lately discussed on engineering applications such as transmission imaging and small angle scattering as well as reflectometry. However, nobody considers using it for neutron diffraction experiment because of its low neutron flux. In this study, therefore, the neutron diffraction experiments are carried out using Riken Accelerator-driven Compact Neutron Source (RANS), to clarify the capability of the compact neutron source for neutron engineering diffraction. The diffraction pattern from a ferritic steel was successfully measured by suitable arrangement of the optical system to reduce the background noise, and it was confirmed that the recognizable diffraction pattern can be measured by a large sampling volume with 10 mm in cubic for an acceptable measurement time, i.e. 10 min. The minimum resolution of the 110 reflection for RANS is approximately 2.5% at 8 μs of the proton pulse width, which is insufficient to perform the strain measurement by neutron diffraction. The moderation time width at the wavelength corresponding to the 110 reflection is estimated to be approximately 30 μs, which is the most dominant factor to determine the resolution. Therefore, refinements of the moderator system to decrease the moderation time by decreasing a thickness of the moderator or by applying the decoupler system or application of the angular dispersive neutron diffraction technique are important to improve the resolution of the diffraction experiment using the compact neutron source. In contrast, the texture evolution due to plastic deformation was successfully observed by measuring a change in the diffraction peak intensity by RANS. Furthermore, the volume fraction of the austenitic phase in the dual phase mock specimen was also successfully evaluated by fitting the diffraction pattern using a Rietveld code. Consequently, RANS has been proved to be capable for neutron engineering diffraction aiming for the easy access

  13. Teaching Fraunhofer diffraction via experimental and simulated images in the laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peinado, Alba; Vidal, Josep; Escalera, Juan Carlos; Lizana, Angel; Campos, Juan; Yzuel, Maria

    2012-10-01

    Diffraction is an important phenomenon introduced to Physics university students in a subject of Fundamentals of Optics. In addition, in the Physics Degree syllabus of the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, there is an elective subject in Applied Optics. In this subject, diverse diffraction concepts are discussed in-depth from different points of view: theory, experiments in the laboratory and computing exercises. In this work, we have focused on the process of teaching Fraunhofer diffraction through laboratory training. Our approach involves students working in small groups. They visualize and acquire some important diffraction patterns with a CCD camera, such as those produced by a slit, a circular aperture or a grating. First, each group calibrates the CCD camera, that is to say, they obtain the relation between the distances in the diffraction plane in millimeters and in the computer screen in pixels. Afterwards, they measure the significant distances in the diffraction patterns and using the appropriate diffraction formalism, they calculate the size of the analyzed apertures. Concomitantly, students grasp the convolution theorem in the Fourier domain by analyzing the diffraction of 2-D gratings of elemental apertures. Finally, the learners use a specific software to simulate diffraction patterns of different apertures. They can control several parameters: shape, size and number of apertures, 1-D or 2-D gratings, wavelength, focal lens or pixel size.Therefore, the program allows them to reproduce the images obtained experimentally, and generate others by changingcertain parameters. This software has been created in our research group, and it is freely distributed to the students in order to help their learning of diffraction. We have observed that these hands on experiments help students to consolidate their theoretical knowledge of diffraction in a pedagogical and stimulating learning process.

  14. Undergraduate experiment with fractal diffraction gratings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monsoriu, Juan A; Furlan, Walter D; Pons, Amparo; Barreiro, Juan C; Gimenez, Marcos H

    2011-01-01

    We present a simple diffraction experiment with fractal gratings based on the triadic Cantor set. Diffraction by fractals is proposed as a motivating strategy for students of optics in the potential applications of optical processing. Fraunhofer diffraction patterns are obtained using standard equipment present in most undergraduate physics laboratories and compared with those obtained with conventional periodic gratings. It is shown that fractal gratings produce self-similar diffraction patterns which can be evaluated analytically. Good agreement is obtained between experimental and numerical results.

  15. High-resolution electrical resistivity tomography applied to patterned ground, Wedel Jarlsberg Land, south-west Spitsbergen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Kasprzak

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This article presents results of two-dimensional electrical resistivity tomography (ERT applied to three types of patterned ground in Wedel-Jarlsberg Land (Svalbard, carried out in late July 2012. The structures investigated include sorted circles, non-sorted polygons and a net with sorted coarser material. ERT was used to recognize the internal ground structure, the shape of permafrost table below the active layer and the geometric relationships between permafrost, ground layering and surface patterns. Results of inversion modelling indicate that the permafrost table occurs at a depth of 0.5–1 m in a mountain valley and 1–2.5 m on raised marine terraces. The permafrost table was nearly planar beneath non-sorted deposits and wavy beneath sorted materials. The mutual relationships between the permafrost table and the shape of a stone circle are different from those typically presented in literature. Ground structure beneath the net with sorted coarser materials is complex as implied in convective models. In non-sorted polygons, the imaging failed to reveal vertical structures between them.

  16. LEED (Low Energy Electron Diffraction)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aberdam, M.

    1973-01-01

    The various types of systems studied by LEED, and for which the geometry of diffraction patterns is exploited, are reviewed, intensity profiles being another source of information. Two representative approaches of the scattering phenomenon are examined; the band structure theory and the T matrix approach [fr

  17. A method of combining STEM image with parallel beam diffraction and electron-optical conditions for diffractive imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Haifeng; Nelson, Chris

    2007-01-01

    We describe a method of combining STEM imaging functionalities with nanoarea parallel beam electron diffraction on a modern TEM. This facilitates the search for individual particles whose diffraction patterns are needed for diffractive imaging or structural studies of nanoparticles. This also lays out a base for 3D diffraction data collection

  18. New imaging technique based on diffraction of a focused x-ray beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazimirov, A [Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS), Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Kohn, V G [Russian Research Center ' Kurchatov Institute, 123182 Moscow (Russian Federation); Cai, Z-H [Advanced Photon Source, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)], E-mail: ayk7@cornell.edu

    2009-01-07

    We present first experimental results from a new diffraction depth-sensitive imaging technique. It is based on the diffraction of a focused x-ray beam from a crystalline sample and recording the intensity pattern on a high-resolution CCD detector positioned at a focal plane. Structural non-uniformity inside the sample results in a region of enhanced intensity in the diffraction pattern. The technique was applied to study silicon-on-insulator thin layers of various thicknesses which revealed a complex strain profile within the layers. A circular Fresnel zone plate was used as a focusing optic. Incoherent diffuse scattering spreads out of the diffraction plane and results in intensity recorded outside of the focal spot providing a new approach to separately register x-rays scattered coherently and incoherently from the sample. (fast track communication)

  19. Nonlinear diffraction from a virtual beam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saltiel, Solomon M.; Neshev, Dragomir N.; Krolikowski, Wieslaw

    2010-01-01

    We observe experimentally a novel type of nonlinear diffraction in the process of two-wave mixing on a nonlinear quadratic grating.We demonstrate that when the nonlinear grating is illuminated simultaneously by two noncollinear beams, a second-harmonic diffraction pattern is generated by a virtual...... beam propagating along the bisector of the two pump beams. The observed iffraction phenomena is a purely nonlinear effect that has no analogue in linear diffraction...

  20. Diffraction limit of refractive compound lens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolchevsky, N.N.; Petrov, P.V.

    2015-01-01

    A compound X-ray and neutron lenses is an array of lenses with a common axis. The resolution limited by aberration and by diffraction. Diffraction limit comes from theory based on absorption aperture of the compound refractive lenses. Beam passing through transparent lenses form Airy pattern. Results of calculation of diffraction resolution limit for non-transparent X-ray and neutron lenses are discussed. (authors)

  1. Diffraction of radiation from channelled charged particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baryshevskij, V.G.; Grubich, A.O.; Dubovskaya, I.Ya.

    1978-01-01

    An explicit expression for cross-section and radiation spectrum at diffraction is calculated. It is shown that photons emitted by channelled particles form a typical diffraction pattern which contains information about the crystal structure. It is also shown that the change of the longitudinal energy of the particle caused by the radiation braking becomes important when the particle energy is increased. (author)

  2. Developments in diffraction databases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenkins, R.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: There are a number of databases available to the diffraction community. Two of the more important of these are the Powder Diffraction File (PDF) maintained by the International Centre for Diffraction Data (ICDD), and the Inorganic Crystal Structure Database (ICSD) maintained by Fachsinformationzentrum (FIZ, Karlsruhe). In application, the PDF has been used as an indispensable tool in phase identification and identification of unknowns. The ICSD database has extensive and explicit reference to the structures of compounds: atomic coordinates, space group and even thermal vibration parameters. A similar database, but for organic compounds, is maintained by the Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre. These databases are often used as independent sources of information. However, little thought has been given on how to exploit the combined properties of structural database tools. A recently completed agreement between ICDD and FIZ, plus ICDD and Cambridge, provides a first step in complementary use of the PDF and the ICSD databases. The focus of this paper (as indicated below) is to examine ways of exploiting the combined properties of both databases. In 1996, there were approximately 76,000 entries in the PDF and approximately 43,000 entries in the ICSD database. The ICSD database has now been used to calculate entries in the PDF. Thus, to derive d-spacing and peak intensity data requires the synthesis of full diffraction patterns, i.e., we use the structural data in the ICSD database and then add instrumental resolution information. The combined data from PDF and ICSD can be effectively used in many ways. For example, we can calculate PDF data for an ideally random crystal distribution and also in the absence of preferred orientation. Again, we can use systematic studies of intermediate members in solid solutions series to help produce reliable quantitative phase analyses. In some cases, we can study how solid solution properties vary with composition and

  3. Diffraction efficiency enhancement of femtosecond laser-engraved diffraction gratings due to CO{sub 2} laser polishing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hun-Kook [Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Deok; Sohn, Ik-Bu; Noh, Young-Chul; Lee, Yong-Tak [Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jin-Tae [Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Ahsan, Shamim [Khulna University, Khulna (Bangladesh)

    2014-11-15

    This research demonstrates laser-assisted fabrication of high-efficiency diffraction gratings in fused-silica glass samples. Initially, femtosecond laser pulses are used to engrave diffraction gratings on the glass surfaces. Then, these micro-patterned glass samples undergo CO{sub 2} laser polishing process. unpolished diffraction gratings encoded in the glass samples show an overall diffraction efficiency of 18.1%. diffraction gratings imprinted on the glass samples and then polished four times by using a CO{sub 2} laser beam attain a diffraction efficiency of 32.7%. We also investigate the diffraction patterns of the diffraction gratings encoded on fused-silica glass surfaces. The proposed CO{sub 2} laser polishing technique shows great potential in patterning high-efficiency diffraction gratings on the surfaces of various transparent materials.

  4. Diffractive production off nuclei-shadow of hadronic bremsstrahlung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bialas, A.; Czyz, W.

    1974-01-01

    Diffractive production on nuclei is calculated using as an input a specific model for diffractive production on nucleons. In this model diffractive production is described as a shadow of non-diffractive multiple production of particles. The mechanism for non-diffractive production is taken to be hadronic bremsstrahlung of independently produced clusters. It is shown that such a model naturally explains the strikingly simple pattern of absorption observed in coherent production on nuclei. Possible generalizations of these results are indicated. (author)

  5. Mineralogical applications of electron diffraction. 1. Theory and techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Malcolm; Christ, C.L.

    1958-01-01

    The small wavelengths used in electron-diffraction experiments and the thinness of the crystals necessary for the transmission of the electron beam combine to require a somewhat different diffraction geometry for the interpretation of electron-diffraction patterns than is used in the interpretation of X-ray diffraction patterns. This geometry, based on the reciprocal lattice concept and geometrical construction of Ewald, needed for the interpretation.

  6. Diffraction coherence in optics

    CERN Document Server

    Françon, M; Green, L L

    2013-01-01

    Diffraction: Coherence in Optics presents a detailed account of the course on Fraunhofer diffraction phenomena, studied at the Faculty of Science in Paris. The publication first elaborates on Huygens' principle and diffraction phenomena for a monochromatic point source and diffraction by an aperture of simple form. Discussions focus on diffraction at infinity and at a finite distance, simplified expressions for the field, calculation of the path difference, diffraction by a rectangular aperture, narrow slit, and circular aperture, and distribution of luminous flux in the airy spot. The book th

  7. X-ray diffraction pattern and morphology of superconducting Nb/sub 3/Sn layer grown on a polycrystalline Nb substrate of (111) main texture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glowacki, B [Politechnika Wroclawska (Poland)

    1983-01-16

    A study is presented on structure and crystallographic orientation of Nb/sub 3/Sn layers formed in the process of interaction of polycrystalline Nb substrate with Cu/sub 0.2/Sn/sub 0.8/ solution at 980 /sup 0/C. Grain structure characterization of Nb/sub 3/Sn layers has been carried out with scanning electron microscopy and TV automatic image analysis. The superconducting layer is divided into a fine-grained FG and coarse-grained CG zone. The X-ray patterns of FG and CG zones did not differ from one another and were the same as in randomly oriented Nb/sub 3/Sn polycrystalline powder.

  8. Birefringent coherent diffraction imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpov, Dmitry; dos Santos Rolo, Tomy; Rich, Hannah; Kryuchkov, Yuriy; Kiefer, Boris; Fohtung, E.

    2016-10-01

    Directional dependence of the index of refraction contains a wealth of information about anisotropic optical properties in semiconducting and insulating materials. Here we present a novel high-resolution lens-less technique that uses birefringence as a contrast mechanism to map the index of refraction and dielectric permittivity in optically anisotropic materials. We applied this approach successfully to a liquid crystal polymer film using polarized light from helium neon laser. This approach is scalable to imaging with diffraction-limited resolution, a prospect rapidly becoming a reality in view of emergent brilliant X-ray sources. Applications of this novel imaging technique are in disruptive technologies, including novel electronic devices, in which both charge and spin carry information as in multiferroic materials and photonic materials such as light modulators and optical storage.

  9. Axial channeling in electron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichimiya, A.; Lehmpfuhl, G.

    1978-01-01

    Kossel patterns from Silicon and Niobium were obtained with a convergent electron beam. An intensity maximum in the direction of the zone axes [001] and [111] of Nb was interpreted as axial channeling. The intensity distribution in Kossel patterns was calculated by means of the Bloch wave picture of the dynamical theory of electron diffraction. Particularly zone axis patterns were calculated for different substance-energy combinations and they were compared with experimental observations. The intensity distribution in the calculated Kossel patterns was very sensitive to the model of absorption and it was found that a treatment of the absorption close to the model of Humphreys and Hirsch [Phil. Mag. 18, 115 (1968)] gave the best agreement with the experimental observations. Furthermore it is shown which Bloch waves are important for the intensity distribution in the Kossel patterns, how they are absorbed and how they change with energy. (orig.) [de

  10. Phase behavior in diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Checon, A.

    1983-01-01

    Theoretical formulation of a straight edge diffraction shows a phase difference of π/2 between the incoming and diffracted waves. Experiments using two straight edges do not confirm the π/2 difference but suggest that the incoming wave is in phase with the wave diffracted into the shadowed region of the edge and out of phase by a factor of π with the wave diffracted into the illuminated region. (Author) [pt

  11. Applying multilevel model to the relationship of dietary patterns and colorectal cancer: an ongoing case-control study in Córdoba, Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pou, Sonia Alejandra; Díaz, María del Pilar; Osella, Alberto Rubén

    2012-09-01

    Scientific literature has consistently shown the effects of certain diets on health but regional variations of dietary habits, and their relationship colorectal cancer (CRC) has been poorly studied in Argentina. Our aims were to identify dietary patterns and estimate their effect on CRC occurrence and to quantify the association between family history of CRC and CRC occurrence by applying multilevel models to estimate and interpret measures of variation. Principal components factor analysis was performed to identify dietary patterns that were then used in a multilevel logistic regression applied to an ongoing case-control data about dietary exposure and CRC occurrence taking into account familiar clustering. Three dietary patterns were identified: "Southern Cone pattern" (red meat, wine, and starchy vegetables), "High-sugar drinks pattern", and "Prudent pattern". The study considered 41 cases and 95 controls. There was a significant promoting effects on CRC of "Southern Cone" (OR 1.5, 95%CI 1.0-2.2) and "High-sugar drinks" (OR 3.8, 95%CI 2.0-7.1) patterns, whereas "Prudent pattern" (OR 0.3, 95%CI 0.2-0.4) showed a significant protective effect at third tertile level. BMI, use of NSAIDs, and to have medical insurance showed significant effects. Variance of the random effect of family history of CRC was highly significant. This novel approach for Argentina showed that Southern Cone and High-sugar drinks patterns were associated with a higher risk of CRC, whereas the Prudent pattern showed a protective effect. There was a significant clustering effect of family history of CRC.

  12. Multivariate temporal pattern analysis applied to the study of rat behavior in the elevated plus maze: methodological and conceptual highlights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casarrubea, M; Magnusson, M S; Roy, V; Arabo, A; Sorbera, F; Santangelo, A; Faulisi, F; Crescimanno, G

    2014-08-30

    Aim of this article is to illustrate the application of a multivariate approach known as t-pattern analysis in the study of rat behavior in elevated plus maze. By means of this multivariate approach, significant relationships among behavioral events in the course of time can be described. Both quantitative and t-pattern analyses were utilized to analyze data obtained from fifteen male Wistar rats following a trial 1-trial 2 protocol. In trial 2, in comparison with the initial exposure, mean occurrences of behavioral elements performed in protected zones of the maze showed a significant increase counterbalanced by a significant decrease of mean occurrences of behavioral elements in unprotected zones. Multivariate t-pattern analysis, in trial 1, revealed the presence of 134 t-patterns of different composition. In trial 2, the temporal structure of behavior become more simple, being present only 32 different t-patterns. Behavioral strings and stripes (i.e. graphical representation of each t-pattern onset) of all t-patterns were presented both for trial 1 and trial 2 as well. Finally, percent distributions in the three zones of the maze show a clear-cut increase of t-patterns in closed arm and a significant reduction in the remaining zones. Results show that previous experience deeply modifies the temporal structure of rat behavior in the elevated plus maze. In addition, this article, by highlighting several conceptual, methodological and illustrative aspects on the utilization of t-pattern analysis, could represent a useful background to employ such a refined approach in the study of rat behavior in elevated plus maze. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. MODELING OF PATTERN FORMING PROCESS OF AUTOMATIC RADIO DIRECTION FINDER OF PHASE VHF IN THE DEVELOPMENT ENVIRONMENT OF LabVIEW APPLIED PROGRAMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. K. Aslanov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the article is developed the model demonstrating the forming process of pattern of antenna system of aerodrome quasidopler automatic radiodirection-finder station in the development environment of LabVIEW applied programs of National Instrument company. 

  14. Diffraction of polarized light on periodic structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bukanina, V; Divakov, D; Tyutyunnik, A; Hohlov, A

    2012-01-01

    Periodic structures as photonic crystals are widely used in modern laser devices, communication technologies and for creating various beam splitters and filters. Diffraction gratings are applied for creating 3D television sets, DVD and Blu-ray drives and reflective structures (Berkley mirror). It is important to simulate diffraction on such structures to design optical systems with predetermined properties based on photonic crystals and diffraction gratings. Methods of simulating diffraction on periodic structures uses theory of Floquet-Bloch and rigorous coupled-wave analysis (RCWA). Current work is dedicated to analysis of photonic band gaps and simulating diffraction on one-dimensional binary diffraction grating using RCWA. The Maxwell's equations for isotropic media and constitutive relations based on the cgs system were used as a model.

  15. Development of splitting convergent beam electron diffraction (SCBED)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houdellier, Florent, E-mail: Florent.Houdellier@cemes.fr [CEMES-CNRS, 29 Rue Jeanne Marvig, 31055 Toulouse (France); Röder, Falk [CEMES-CNRS, 29 Rue Jeanne Marvig, 31055 Toulouse (France); Triebenberg Lab, Institut für Strukturphysik, Technische Universität Dresden, D-01062 Dresden (Germany); Snoeck, Etienne [CEMES-CNRS, 29 Rue Jeanne Marvig, 31055 Toulouse (France)

    2015-12-15

    Using a combination of condenser electrostatic biprism with dedicated electron optic conditions for sample illumination, we were able to split a convergent beam electron probe focused on the sample in two half focused probes without introducing any tilt between them. As a consequence, a combined convergent beam electron diffraction pattern is obtained in the back focal plane of the objective lens arising from two different sample areas, which could be analyzed in a single pattern. This splitting convergent beam electron diffraction (SCBED) pattern has been tested first on a well-characterized test sample of Si/SiGe multilayers epitaxially grown on a Si substrate. The SCBED pattern contains information from the strained area, which exhibits HOLZ lines broadening induced by surface relaxation, with fine HOLZ lines observed in the unstrained reference part of the sample. These patterns have been analyzed quantitatively using both parts of the SCBED transmitted disk. The fine HOLZ line positions are used to determine the precise acceleration voltage of the microscope while the perturbed HOLZ rocking curves in the stained area are compared to dynamical simulated ones. The combination of these two information leads to a precise evaluation of the sample strain state. Finally, several SCBED setups are proposed to tackle fundamental physics questions as well as applied materials science ones and demonstrate how SCBED has the potential to greatly expand the range of applications of electron diffraction and electron holography. - Highlights: • Using a condenser biprism, we split the CBED pattern in two half-CBED disks. • We have determined the electron optical conditions used to perform various SCBED. • We propose new applications possible for this new SCBED configuration.

  16. Spider diffraction: a comparison of curved and straight legs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, J.L.

    1984-01-01

    It has been known for some time that, if curved legs rather than the usual straight ones are used in the spider that supports the secondary optics in certain telescopes, the visible diffraction effect is reduced. Fraunhofer theory is used to calculate the diffraction effects due to the curved leg spider. Calculated and photographic diffraction patterns are compared for straight and curved leg spiders

  17. Diffraction at TOTEM

    OpenAIRE

    Giani, S; Niewiadomski, H; Antchev, G; Aspell, P; Avati, V; Bagliesi, M G; Berardi, V; Berretti, M; Besta, M; Bozzo, M; Brücken, E; Buzzo, A; Cafagna, F; Calicchio, M; Catanesi, M G

    2010-01-01

    The primary objective of the TOTEM experiment at the LHC is the measurement of the total proton-proton cross section with the luminosity-independent method and the study of elastic proton-proton cross-section over a wide |t|-range. In addition TOTEM also performs a comprehensive study of diffraction, spanning from cross-section measurements of individual diffractive processes to the analysis of their event topologies. Hard diffraction will be studied in collaboration with CMS taking advantage...

  18. Diffraction at TOTEM

    OpenAIRE

    Antchev, G.; Aspell, P.; Avati, V.; Bagliesi, M.G.; Berardi, V.; Berretti, M.; Bottigli, U.; Bozzo, M.; Brucken, E.; Buzzo, A.; Cafagna, F.; Calicchio, M.; Catanesi, M.G.; Catastini, P.L.; Cecchi, R.

    2008-01-01

    The TOTEM experiment at the LHC measures the total proton-proton cross section with the luminosity-independent method and the elastic proton-proton cross-section over a wide |t|-range. It also performs a comprehensive study of diffraction, spanning from cross-section measurements of individual diffractive processes to the analysis of their event topologies. Hard diffraction will be studied in collaboration with CMS taking advantage of the large common rapidity coverage for charged and neutral...

  19. Industrial applications of neutron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felcher, G.P.

    1989-01-01

    Neutron diffraction (or, to be more general, neutron scattering) is a most versatile and universal tool, which has been widely employed to probe the structure, the dynamics and the magnetism of condensed matter. Traditionally used for fundamental research in solid state physics, this technique more recently has been applied to problems of immediate industrial interest, as illustrated in examples covering the main fields of endeavour. 14 refs., 14 figs

  20. Diffraction dissociation and elastic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verebryusov, V.S.; Ponomarev, L.A.; Smorodinskaya, N.Ya.

    1987-01-01

    In the framework of Regge scheme with supercritical pomeron a model is suggested for the NN-scattering amplitude which takes into account the contribution introduced to the intermediate state by diffraction dissociation (DD) processes. The DD amplitude is written in terms of the Deck model which has been previously applied to describing the main DD features. The calculated NN cross sections are compared with those obtained experimentally. Theoretical predictions for higher energy are presented

  1. Applying machine learning methods for characterization of hexagonal prisms from their 2D scattering patterns - an investigation using modelled scattering data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salawu, Emmanuel Oluwatobi; Hesse, Evelyn; Stopford, Chris; Davey, Neil; Sun, Yi

    2017-11-01

    Better understanding and characterization of cloud particles, whose properties and distributions affect climate and weather, are essential for the understanding of present climate and climate change. Since imaging cloud probes have limitations of optical resolution, especially for small particles (with diameter < 25 μm), instruments like the Small Ice Detector (SID) probes, which capture high-resolution spatial light scattering patterns from individual particles down to 1 μm in size, have been developed. In this work, we have proposed a method using Machine Learning techniques to estimate simulated particles' orientation-averaged projected sizes (PAD) and aspect ratio from their 2D scattering patterns. The two-dimensional light scattering patterns (2DLSP) of hexagonal prisms are computed using the Ray Tracing with Diffraction on Facets (RTDF) model. The 2DLSP cover the same angular range as the SID probes. We generated 2DLSP for 162 hexagonal prisms at 133 orientations for each. In a first step, the 2DLSP were transformed into rotation-invariant Zernike moments (ZMs), which are particularly suitable for analyses of pattern symmetry. Then we used ZMs, summed intensities, and root mean square contrast as inputs to the advanced Machine Learning methods. We created one random forests classifier for predicting prism orientation, 133 orientation-specific (OS) support vector classification models for predicting the prism aspect-ratios, 133 OS support vector regression models for estimating prism sizes, and another 133 OS Support Vector Regression (SVR) models for estimating the size PADs. We have achieved a high accuracy of 0.99 in predicting prism aspect ratios, and a low value of normalized mean square error of 0.004 for estimating the particle's size and size PADs.

  2. Emergence of Fresnel diffraction zones in gravitational lensing by a cosmic string

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernández-Núñez, Isabel [Departament de Física Quàntica i Astrofísica, Facultat de Física, Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franquès 1, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Institut de Ciències del Cosmos (ICCUB), Facultat de Física, Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franquès 1, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Bulashenko, Oleg, E-mail: oleg.bulashenko@ub.edu [Departament de Física Quàntica i Astrofísica, Facultat de Física, Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franquès 1, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2017-06-09

    The possibility to detect cosmic strings – topological defects of early Universe, by means of wave effects in gravitational lensing is discussed. To find the optimal observation conditions, we define the hyperbolic-shaped Fresnel observation zones associated with the diffraction maxima and analyse the frequency patterns of wave amplification corresponding to different alignments. In particular, we show that diffraction of gravitational waves by the string may lead to significant amplification at cosmological distances. The wave properties we found are quite different from what one would expect, for instance, from light scattered off a thin wire or slit, since a cosmic string, as a topological defect, gives no shadow at all. - Highlights: • Interference and diffraction of gravitational waves by a cosmic string are studied. • Uniform asymptotic theory of diffraction is applied for a finite distance source. • Hyperbolic-shaped Fresnel observation zones associated with maxima of diffraction. • Frequency patterns modulated by diffraction for different string alignments are given. • The method is applicable to condensed-matter defects and other types of waves.

  3. Truncation in diffraction pattern analysis. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delhez, R.; Keijser, T.H. de; Mittemeijer, E.J.; Langford, J.I.

    1986-01-01

    An evaluation of the concept of a line profile is provoked by truncation of the range of intensity measurement in practice. The measured truncated line profile can be considered either as part of the total intensity distribution which peaks at or near the reciprocal-lattice points (approach 1), or as part of a component line profile which is confined to a single reciprocal-lattice point (approach 2). Some false conceptions in line-profile analysis can then be avoided and recipes can be developed for the extrapolation of the tails of the truncated line profile. Fourier analysis of line profiles, according to the first approach, implies a Fourier series development of the total intensity distribution defined within [l - 1/2, l + 1/2] (l indicates the node considered in reciprocal space); the second approach implies a Fourier transformation of the component line profile defined within [ - ∞, + ∞]. Exact descriptions of size broadening are provided by both approaches, whereas combined size and strain broadening can only be evaluated adequately within the first approach. Straightforward methods are given for obtaining truncation-corrected values for the average crystallite size. (orig.)

  4. Amorphouslike diffraction pattern in solid metallic titanium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Y.; Fang, Y.Z.; Kikegawa, T.

    2005-01-01

    to the alpha-beta-omega triple point in the P-T phase diagram. Amorphous Ti has been found to be thermally stable up to 1250 degrees C for at least 3 min at some pressures. By analyzing the conditions for producing amorphous elemental Zr and Ti, we observed a multi-phase-point amorphization phenomenon...

  5. Constellation of phase singularities in a speckle-like pattern for optical vortex metrology applied to biological kinematic analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Wei; Qiao, Yu; Ishijima, Reika

    2008-01-01

    A novel technique for biological kinematic analysis is proposed that makes use of the pseudophase singularities in a complex signal generated from a speckle-like pattern. In addition to the information about the locations and the anisotropic core structures of the pseudophase singularities, we al...... are presented, which demonstrate the validity of the proposed technique. (c) 2008 Optical Society of America....

  6. Engineering related neutron diffraction measurements probing strains, texture and microstructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clausen, Bjorn [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Brown, Donald W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tome, Carlos N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Balogh, Levente [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Vogel, Sven C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Neutron diffraction has been used for engineering applications for nearly three decades. The basis of the technique is powder diffraction following Bragg's Law. From the measured diffraction patterns information about internal, or residual, strain can be deduced from the peak positions, texture information can be extracted from the peak intensities, and finally the peak widths can provide information about the microstructure, e.g. dislocation densities and grain sizes. The strains are measured directly from changes in lattice parameters, however, in many cases it is non-trivial to determine macroscopic values of stress or strain from the measured data. The effects of intergranular strains must be considered, and combining the neutron diffraction measurements with polycrystal deformation modeling has proven invaluable in determining the overall stress and strain values of interest in designing and dimensioning engineering components. Furthelmore, the combined use of measurements and modeling has provided a tool for elucidating basic material properties, such as critical resolved shear stresses for the active deformation modes and their evolution as a function of applied deformation.

  7. Diffraction by m-bonacci gratings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monsoriu, Juan A; Giménez, Marcos H; Furlan, Walter D; Barreiro, Juan C; Saavedra, Genaro

    2015-01-01

    We present a simple diffraction experiment with m-bonacci gratings as a new interesting generalization of the Fibonacci ones. Diffraction by these non-conventional structures is proposed as a motivational strategy to introduce students to basic research activities. The Fraunhofer diffraction patterns are obtained with the standard equipment present in most undergraduate physics labs and are compared with those obtained with regular periodic gratings. We show that m-bonacci gratings produce discrete Fraunhofer patterns characterized by a set of diffraction peaks which positions are related to the concept of a generalized golden mean. A very good agreement is obtained between experimental and numerical results and the students’ feedback is discussed. (paper)

  8. Appearance of maxima of combined type in Moessbauer diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolpakov, A.V.; Ovchinnikova, E.N.; Kuz'min, R.N.

    1978-01-01

    An appearance of Bragg maxima in the Moessbauer diffraction pattern due to a combined hyperfine interaction on nuclei in a crystal is discussed. By a combined interaction one means presence on the nuclei of a magnetic field and tensor of electric field gradient. The structure RFe 2 R=Pu, Np, V, Zr, Tm) is considered. It has been shown that when a scattering system is in fields of several actions with various symmetries, the diffraction pattern is not an additive superposition of diffraction patterns of magnetic and electric quadrupole scatterings. In this case the diffraction patterns of magnetic and electric quadrupole scatterings. In this case the diffraction spectra have maxima forbidden by the extinction laws in diffraction in the presence of only a magnetic field or only electric quadrupole interaction

  9. Visible diffraction from quasi-crystalline arrays of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Timothy P.; Butt, Haider; Wilkinson, Timothy D.; Amaratunga, Gehan A. J.

    2015-08-01

    Large area arrays of vertically-aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) are patterned in a quasi-crystalline Penrose tile arrangement through electron beam lithography definition of Ni catalyst dots and subsequent nanotube growth by plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition. When illuminated with a 532 nm laser beam high-quality and remarkable diffraction patterns are seen. The diffraction is well matched to theoretical calculations which assume apertures to be present at the location of the VACNTs for transmitted light. The results show that VACNTs act as diffractive elements in reflection and can be used as spatially phased arrays for producing tailored diffraction patterns.

  10. Ultrafast electron diffraction using an ultracold source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. W. van Mourik

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The study of structural dynamics of complex macromolecular crystals using electrons requires bunches of sufficient coherence and charge. We present diffraction patterns from graphite, obtained with bunches from an ultracold electron source, based on femtosecond near-threshold photoionization of a laser-cooled atomic gas. By varying the photoionization wavelength, we change the effective source temperature from 300 K to 10 K, resulting in a concomitant change in the width of the diffraction peaks, which is consistent with independently measured source parameters. This constitutes a direct measurement of the beam coherence of this ultracold source and confirms its suitability for protein crystal diffraction.

  11. Accurate Charge Densities from Powder Diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bindzus, Niels; Wahlberg, Nanna; Becker, Jacob

    Synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction has in recent years advanced to a level, where it has become realistic to probe extremely subtle electronic features. Compared to single-crystal diffraction, it may be superior for simple, high-symmetry crystals owing to negligible extinction effects and minimal...... peak overlap. Additionally, it offers the opportunity for collecting data on a single scale. For charge densities studies, the critical task is to recover accurate and bias-free structure factors from the diffraction pattern. This is the focal point of the present study, scrutinizing the performance...

  12. Observables of QCD diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mieskolainen, Mikael; Orava, Risto

    2017-03-01

    A new combinatorial vector space measurement model is introduced for soft QCD diffraction. The model independent mathematical construction resolves experimental complications; the theoretical framework of the approach includes the Good-Walker view of diffraction, Regge phenomenology together with AGK cutting rules and random fluctuations.

  13. Bragg's Law diffraction simulations for electron backscatter diffraction analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kacher, Josh; Landon, Colin; Adams, Brent L.; Fullwood, David

    2009-01-01

    In 2006, Angus Wilkinson introduced a cross-correlation-based electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) texture analysis system capable of measuring lattice rotations and elastic strains to high resolution. A variation of the cross-correlation method is introduced using Bragg's Law-based simulated EBSD patterns as strain free reference patterns that facilitates the use of the cross-correlation method with polycrystalline materials. The lattice state is found by comparing simulated patterns to collected patterns at a number of regions on the pattern using the cross-correlation function and calculating the deformation from the measured shifts of each region. A new pattern can be simulated at the deformed state, and the process can be iterated a number of times to converge on the absolute lattice state. By analyzing an iteratively rotated single crystal silicon sample and recovering the rotation, this method is shown to have an angular resolution of ∼0.04 o and an elastic strain resolution of ∼7e-4. As an example of applications, elastic strain and curvature measurements are used to estimate the dislocation density in a single grain of a compressed polycrystalline Mg-based AZ91 alloy.

  14. Detailed semantic analyses of human error incidents occurring at nuclear power plants. Extraction of periodical transition of error occurrence patterns by applying multivariate analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirotsu, Yuko; Suzuki, Kunihiko; Takano, Kenichi; Kojima, Mitsuhiro

    2000-01-01

    It is essential for preventing the recurrence of human error incidents to analyze and evaluate them with the emphasis on human factor. Detailed and structured analyses of all incidents at domestic nuclear power plants (NPPs) reported during last 31 years have been conducted based on J-HPES, in which total 193 human error cases are identified. Results obtained by the analyses have been stored into the J-HPES database. In the previous study, by applying multivariate analysis to above case studies, it was suggested that there were several occurrence patterns identified of how errors occur at NPPs. It was also clarified that the causes related to each human error are different depending on age of their occurrence. This paper described the obtained results in respects of periodical transition of human error occurrence patterns. By applying multivariate analysis to the above data, it was suggested there were two types of error occurrence patterns as to each human error type. First type is common occurrence patterns, not depending on the age, and second type is the one influenced by periodical characteristics. (author)

  15. Diffraction. Powder, amorphous, liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sosnowska, I.M.

    1999-01-01

    Neutron powder diffraction is a unique tool to observe all possible diffraction effects appearing in crystal. High-resolution neutron diffractometers have to be used in this study. Analysis of the magnetic structure of polycrystalline materials requires the use of high-resolution neutron diffraction in the range of large interplanar distances. As distinguished from the double axis diffractometers (DAS), which show high resolution only at small interplanar distances, TOF (time-of-flight) diffractometry offers the best resolution at large interplanar distances. (K.A.)

  16. Non-diffractive waves

    CERN Document Server

    Hernandez-Figueroa, Hugo E; Recami, Erasmo

    2013-01-01

    This continuation and extension of the successful book ""Localized Waves"" by the same editors brings together leading researchers in non-diffractive waves to cover the most important results in their field and as such is the first to present the current state.The well-balanced presentation of theory and experiments guides readers through the background of different types of non-diffractive waves, their generation, propagation, and possible applications. The authors include a historical account of the development of the field, and cover different types of non-diffractive waves, including Airy

  17. Interpretation of the shape of electron diffraction spots from small polyhedral crystals by means of the crystal shape amplitude

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neumann, W.; Hofmeister, H.; Heydenreich, J.; Komrska, J.

    1988-01-01

    The influence of the crystal shape on the fine structure of transmission electron diffraction (TED) patterns described by the crystal shape amplitude is discussed. A general algebraic expression for the crystal shape amplitude of any crystal polyhedron is used for computing the intensity distribution of TED reflections. The computer simulation method is applied to the analysis of the fine structure of TED patterns of small gold and palladium crystals having octahedral and tetrahedral habits. (orig.)

  18. Submicron X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacDowell, Alastair; Celestre, Richard; Tamura, Nobumichi; Spolenak, Ralph; Valek, Bryan; Brown, Walter; Bravman, John; Padmore, Howard; Batterman, Boris; Patel, Jamshed

    2000-01-01

    At the Advanced Light Source in Berkeley the authors have instrumented a beam line that is devoted exclusively to x-ray micro diffraction problems. By micro diffraction they mean those classes of problems in Physics and Materials Science that require x-ray beam sizes in the sub-micron range. The instrument is for instance, capable of probing a sub-micron size volume inside micron sized aluminum metal grains buried under a silicon dioxide insulating layer. The resulting Laue pattern is collected on a large area CCD detector and automatically indexed to yield the grain orientation and deviatoric (distortional) strain tensor of this sub-micron volume. A four-crystal monochromator is then inserted into the beam, which allows monochromatic light to illuminate the same part of the sample. Measurement of diffracted photon energy allows for the determination of d spacings. The combination of white and monochromatic beam measurements allow for the determination of the total strain/stress tensor (6 components) inside each sub-micron sized illuminated volume of the sample

  19. Diffraction analysis of the microstructure of materials

    CERN Document Server

    Scardi, Paolo

    2004-01-01

    Diffraction Analysis of the Microstructure of Materials provides an overview of diffraction methods applied to the analysis of the microstructure of materials. Since crystallite size and the presence of lattice defects have a decisive influence on the properties of many engineering materials, information about this microstructure is of vital importance in developing and assessing materials for practical applications. The most powerful and usually non-destructive evaluation techniques available are X-ray and neutron diffraction. The book details, among other things, diffraction-line broadening methods for determining crystallite size and atomic-scale strain due, e.g. to dislocations, and methods for the analysis of residual (macroscale) stress. The book assumes only a basic knowledge of solid-state physics and supplies readers sufficient information to apply the methods themselves.

  20. Diffraction enhanced x-ray imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomlinson, W.; Zhong, Z.; Johnston, R.E.; Sayers, D.

    1997-09-01

    Diffraction enhanced imaging (DEI) is a new x-ray radiographic imaging modality using synchrotron x-rays which produces images of thick absorbing objects that are almost completely free of scatter. They show dramatically improved contrast over standard imaging applied to the same phantoms. The contrast is based not only on attenuation but also the refraction and diffraction properties of the sample. The diffraction component and the apparent absorption component (absorption plus extinction contrast) can each be determined independently. This imaging method may improve the image quality for medical applications such as mammography

  1. High energy diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, C.

    1995-11-01

    Recent experiments on total hadronic cross sections are reviewed together with results on photo- and electroproduction of vector mesons. New data on diffractive deep inelastic scattering shed light on the nature of the pomeron. (orig.)

  2. Diffraction at TOTEM

    CERN Document Server

    Antchev, G.; Avati, V.; Bagliesi, M.G.; Berardi, V.; Berretti, M.; Bottigli, U.; Bozzo, M.; Brucken, E.; Buzzo, A.; Cafagna, F.; Calicchio, M.; Catanesi, M.G.; Catastini, P.L.; Cecchi, R.; Ciocci, M.A.; Deile, M.; Dimovasili, E.; Eggert, K.; Eremin, V.; Ferro, F.; Garcia, F.; Giani, S.; Greco, V.; Heino, J.; Hilden, T.; Kaspar, J.; Kopal, J.; Kundrat, V.; Kurvinen, K.; Lami, S.; Latino, G.; Lauhakangas, R.; Lippmaa, E.; Lokajicek, M.; Lo Vetere, M.; Lucas Rodriguez, F.; Macri, M.; Magazzu, G.; Meucci, M.; Minutoli, S.; Niewiadomski, H.; Noschis, E.; Notarnicola, G.; Oliveri, E.; Oljemark, F.; Orava, R.; Oriunno, M.; Osterberg, K.; Palazzi, P.; Pedreschi, E.; Petajajarvi, J.; Quinto, M.; Radermacher, E.; Radicioni, E.; Ravotti, F.; Rella, G.; Robutti, E.; Ropelewski, L.; Ruggiero, G.; Rummel, A.; Saarikko, H.; Sanguinetti, G.; Santroni, A.; Scribano, A.; Sette, G.; Snoeys, W.; Spinella, F.; Squillacioti, P.; Ster, A.; Taylor, C.; Trummal, A.; Turini, N.; Whitmore, J.; Wu, J.

    2009-01-01

    The TOTEM experiment at the LHC measures the total proton-proton cross section with the luminosity-independent method and the elastic proton-proton cross-section over a wide |t|-range. It also performs a comprehensive study of diffraction, spanning from cross-section measurements of individual diffractive processes to the analysis of their event topologies. Hard diffraction will be studied in collaboration with CMS taking advantage of the large common rapidity coverage for charged and neutral particle detection and the large variety of trigger possibilities even at large luminosities. TOTEM will take data under all LHC beam conditions including standard high luminosity runs to maximize its physics reach. This contribution describes the main features of the TOTEM physics programme including measurements to be made in the early LHC runs. In addition, a novel scheme to extend the diffractive proton acceptance for high luminosity runs by installing proton detectors at IP3 is described.

  3. Diffraction at TOTEM

    CERN Document Server

    Giani, S; Antchev, G; Aspell, P; Avati, V; Bagliesi, M G; Berardi, V; Berretti, M; Besta, M; Bozzo, M; Brücken, E; Buzzo, A; Cafagna, F; Calicchio, M; Catanesi, M G; Cecchi, R; Ciocci, M A; Dadel, P; Deile, M; Dimovasili, E; Eggert, K; Eremin, V; Ferro, F; Fiergolski, A; García, F; Greco, V; Grzanka, L; Heino, J; Hildén, T; Kaspar, J; Kopal, J; Kundrát, V; Kurvinen, K; Lami, S; Latino, G; Lauhakangas, R; Leszko, R; Lippmaa, E; Lokajícek, M; Lo Vetere, M; Lucas Rodriguez, F; Macrí, M; Magazzù, G; Meucci, M; Minutoli, S; Notarnicola, G; Oliveri, E; Oljemark, F; Orava, R; Oriunno, M; Österberg, K; Pedreschi, E; Petäjäjärvi, J; Prochazka, J; Quinto, M; Radermacher, E; Radicioni, E; Ravotti, F; Rella, G; Robutti, E; Ropelewski, L; Rostkowski, M; Ruggiero, G; Rummel, A; Saarikko, H; Sanguinetti, G; Santroni, A; Scribano, A; Sette, G; Snoeys, W; Spinella, F; Ster, A; Taylor, C; Trummal, A; Turini, N; Whitmore, J; Wu, J; Zalewski, M

    2010-01-01

    The primary objective of the TOTEM experiment at the LHC is the measurement of the total proton-proton cross section with the luminosity-independent method and the study of elastic proton-proton cross-section over a wide |t|-range. In addition TOTEM also performs a comprehensive study of diffraction, spanning from cross-section measurements of individual diffractive processes to the analysis of their event topologies. Hard diffraction will be studied in collaboration with CMS taking advantage of the large common rapidity coverage for charged and neutral particle detection and the large variety of trigger possibilities even at large luminosities. TOTEM will take data under all LHC beam conditions including standard high luminosity runs to maximise its physics reach. This contribution describes the main features of the TOTEM diffractive physics programme including measurements to be made in the early LHC runs.

  4. DIFFRACTION SYNCHRONIZATION OF LASERS,

    Science.gov (United States)

    semiconductor lasers while suppressing parasitic generation in the plane of the mirror. The diffraction coupling coefficient of open resonators is calculated, and the stability conditions of the synchronized system is determined.

  5. When fast atom diffraction turns 3D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zugarramurdi, Asier; Borisov, Andrei G.

    2013-01-01

    Fast atom diffraction at surfaces (FAD) in grazing incidence geometry is characterized by the slow motion in the direction perpendicular to the surface and fast motion parallel to the surface plane along a low index direction. It is established experimentally that for the typical surfaces the FAD reveals the 2D diffraction patterns associated with exchange of the reciprocal lattice vector perpendicular to the direction of fast motion. The reciprocal lattice vector exchange along the direction of fast motion is negligible. The usual approximation made in the description of the experimental data is then to assume that the effective potential leading to the diffraction results from the averaging of the 3D surface potential along the atomic strings forming the axial channel. In this work we use full quantum wave packet propagation calculations to study theoretically the possibility to observe the 3D diffraction in FAD experiments. We show that for the surfaces with large unit cell, such as can be the case for reconstructed or vicinal surfaces, the 3D diffraction can be observed. The reciprocal lattice vector exchange along the direction of fast motion leads to several Laue circles in the diffraction pattern

  6. The dynamics of diffracted rays in foams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tufaile, A., E-mail: tufaile@usp.br; Tufaile, A.P.B.

    2015-12-18

    We have studied some aspects of the optics of the light scattering in foams. This paper describes the difference between rays and diffracted rays from the point of view of geometrical theory of diffraction. We have represented some bifurcations of light rays using dynamical systems. Based on our observations of foams, we created a solid optical device. The interference patterns of light scattering in foams forming Airy fringes were explored observing the pattern named as the eye of Horus. In the cases we examine, these Airy fringes are associated with light scattering in curved surfaces, while the halo formation is related to the law of edge diffraction. We are proposing a Pohl interferometer using a three-sided bubble/Plateau border system. - Highlights: • We obtained halos scattering light in foams. • We model the light scattering in foams using the geometrical theory of diffraction. • We examine the difference between rays and the diffracted rays. • We developed optical devices for diffracted rays.

  7. Porphyrin pattern and methemoglobin levels in Columba livia applied to assess toxicological risk by air pollution in urban areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicolo, Matteo; Tringali, Maria; Orsi, Federica; Santagostino, Angela

    2009-11-01

    The study has explored two conservative biomarkers, porphyrin pattern in guano and methemoglobin levels in blood of Columba livia, in order to assay their potential use for monitoring toxic effects induced by exposure to urban air pollution. Fieldwork was conducted between October 2003 and June 2005 in the city of Milan, Italy, by sampling the pigeons in different areas almost twice a week. Six air contaminants, CO, PM10, NO(2), O(3), SO(2), and C(6)H(6), plus polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in fine particles, temperature, and UV index, were considered. Protoporphyrins from pigeon excreta sampled outdoors were always higher than in indoor animals, particularly in winter. A positive correlation (p urban air showed significant differences from season to season but only in summer and autumn did the outdoor pigeons show higher values than indoor animals. In summer, a regression model with a positive correlation between O(3) and benzene was determined (p urban air pollution as well as for detecting complex interactions between contaminants in the urban air pollutant mixture was discussed.

  8. Small area estimation of obesity prevalence and dietary patterns: a model applied to Rio de Janeiro city, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cataife, Guido

    2014-03-01

    We propose the use of previously developed small area estimation techniques to monitor obesity and dietary habits in developing countries and apply the model to Rio de Janeiro city. We estimate obesity prevalence rates at the Census Tract through a combinatorial optimization spatial microsimulation model that matches body mass index and socio-demographic data in Brazil's 2008-9 family expenditure survey with Census 2010 socio-demographic data. Obesity ranges from 8% to 25% in most areas and affects the poor almost as much as the rich. Male and female obesity rates are uncorrelated at the small area level. The model is an effective tool to understand the complexity of the problem and to aid in policy design. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Diffraction from the perspective of the spatial coherence wavelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castaneda, R.; Carrasquilla-Alvarez, J.; Garcia-Sucerquia, J.

    2005-10-01

    The diffraction of spatially partially coherent optical fields is analysed by using two concepts recently introduced by the authors: the spatial coherence wavelets and the effective diffracting aperture. Within this framework, the intimate link between the spatial properties of the optical field and the aperture's edges in the diffraction phenomena is studied. New insight is proposed in regard to the diffraction in the Fresnel - Fraunhofer approximation. Our ideas are supported by numerical calculations and analysis of the diffraction patterns obtained when an optical field with adjustable spatial coherence impinges upon a circular aperture (author)

  10. Feasibility of applying the life history calendar in a population of chronic opioid users to identify patterns of drug use and addiction treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fikowski, Jill; Marchand, Kirsten; Palis, Heather; Oviedo-Joekes, Eugenia

    2014-01-01

    Uncovering patterns of drug use and treatment access is essential to improving treatment for opioid dependence. The life history calendar (LHC) could be a valuable instrument for capturing time-sensitive data on lifetime patterns of drug use and addiction treatment. This study describes the methodology applied when collecting data using the LHC in a sample of individuals with long-term opioid dependence and aims to identify specific factors that impact the feasibility of administering the LHC interview. In this study, the LHC allowed important events such as births, intimate relationships, housing, or incarcerations to become reference points for recalling details surrounding drug use and treatment access. The paper concludes that the administration of the LHC was a resource-intensive process and required special attention to interviewer training and experience with the study population. These factors should be considered and integrated into study plans by researchers using the LHC in addiction research.

  11. Elementary kinetic modelling applied to solid oxide fuel cell pattern anodes and a direct flame fuel cell system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogler, Marcel

    2009-05-27

    In the course of this thesis a model for the prediction of polarisation characteristics of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) was developed. The model is based on an elementary kinetic description of electrochemical reactions and the fundamental conservation principles of mass and energy. The model allows to predict the current-voltage relation of an SOFC and offers ideal possibilities for model validation. The aim of this thesis is the identification of rate-limiting processes and the determination of the elementary pathway during charge transfer. The numerical simulation of experiments with model anodes allowed to identify a hydrogen transfer to be the most probable charge-transfer reaction and revealed the influence of diffusive transport. Applying the hydrogen oxidation kinetics to the direct flame fuel cell system (DFFC) showed that electrochemical oxidation of CO is possible based on the same mechanism. Based on the quantification of loss processes in the DFFC system, improvements on cell design, predicting 80% increase of efficiency, were proposed. (orig.)

  12. X-ray diffraction identification of clay minerals by microcomputer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, S.; Imasava, F.J.

    1988-01-01

    The identification of clay minerals by X-ray powder diffraction are done by searching an unknown pattern with a file of standard X-ray diffraction patterns. For this searching done by hand is necessary a long time. This paper shows a program in ''Basic'' language to be utilized in microcomputers for the math of the unknown pattern, using the high velocity of comparison of the microcomputer. A few minutes are used for the match. (author) [pt

  13. Digital diffraction analysis enables low-cost molecular diagnostics on a smartphone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Hyungsoon; Castro, Cesar M; Shao, Huilin; Liong, Monty; Song, Jun; Pathania, Divya; Fexon, Lioubov; Min, Changwook; Avila-Wallace, Maria; Zurkiya, Omar; Rho, Junsung; Magaoay, Brady; Tambouret, Rosemary H; Pivovarov, Misha; Weissleder, Ralph; Lee, Hakho

    2015-05-05

    The widespread distribution of smartphones, with their integrated sensors and communication capabilities, makes them an ideal platform for point-of-care (POC) diagnosis, especially in resource-limited settings. Molecular diagnostics, however, have been difficult to implement in smartphones. We herein report a diffraction-based approach that enables molecular and cellular diagnostics. The D3 (digital diffraction diagnosis) system uses microbeads to generate unique diffraction patterns which can be acquired by smartphones and processed by a remote server. We applied the D3 platform to screen for precancerous or cancerous cells in cervical specimens and to detect human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA. The D3 assay generated readouts within 45 min and showed excellent agreement with gold-standard pathology or HPV testing, respectively. This approach could have favorable global health applications where medical access is limited or when pathology bottlenecks challenge prompt diagnostic readouts.

  14. Diffraction. Single crystal, magnetic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heger, G.

    1999-01-01

    The analysis of crystal structure and magnetic ordering is usually based on diffraction phenomena caused by the interaction of matter with X-rays, neutrons, or electrons. Complementary information is achieved due to the different character of X-rays, neutrons and electrons, and hence their different interactions with matter and further practical aspects. X-ray diffraction using conventional laboratory equipment and/or synchrotron installations is the most important method for structure analyses. The purpose of this paper is to discuss special cases, for which, in addition to this indispensable part, neutrons are required to solve structural problems. Even though the huge intensity of modern synchrotron sources allows in principle the study of magnetic X-ray scattering the investigation of magnetic structures is still one of the most important applications of neutron diffraction. (K.A.)

  15. Diffraction in nuclear scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wojciechowski, H.

    1986-01-01

    The elastic scattering amplitudes for charged and neutral particles have been decomposed into diffractive and refractive parts by splitting the nuclear elastic scattering matrix elements into components responsible for these effects. It has been shown that the pure geometrical diffractive effect which carries no information about the nuclear interaction is always predominant at forward angle of elastic angular distributions. This fact suggests that for strongly absorbed particles only elastic cross section at backward angles, i.e. the refractive cross section, can give us basic information about the central nuclear potential. 12 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab. (author)

  16. Dynamics from diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodwin, Andrew L.; Tucker, Matthew G.; Cope, Elizabeth R.; Dove, Martin T.; Keen, David A.

    2006-01-01

    We explore the possibility that detailed dynamical information might be extracted from powder diffraction data. Our focus is a recently reported technique that employs statistical analysis of atomistic configurations to calculate dynamical properties from neutron total scattering data. We show that it is possible to access the phonon dispersion of low-frequency modes using such an approach, without constraining the results in terms of some pre-defined dynamical model. The high-frequency regions of the phonon spectrum are found to be less well preserved in the diffraction data

  17. X-ray diffraction imaging of material microstructures

    KAUST Repository

    Varga, Laszlo

    2016-10-20

    Various examples are provided for x-ray imaging of the microstructure of materials. In one example, a system for non-destructive material testing includes an x-ray source configured to generate a beam spot on a test item; a grid detector configured to receive x- rays diffracted from the test object; and a computing device configured to determine a microstructure image based at least in part upon a diffraction pattern of the x-rays diffracted from the test object. In another example, a method for determining a microstructure of a material includes illuminating a beam spot on the material with a beam of incident x-rays; detecting, with a grid detector, x-rays diffracted from the material; and determining, by a computing device, a microstructure image based at least in part upon a diffraction pattern of the x-rays diffracted from the material.

  18. Diffraction at collider energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frankfurt, L.L.

    1992-01-01

    Lessons with ''soft'' hadron physics to explain (a) feasibility to observe and to investigate color transparency, color opacity effects at colliders; (b) significant probability and specific features of hard diffractive processes; (c) feasibility to investigate components of parton wave functions of hadrons with minimal number of constituents. This new physics would be more important with increase of collision energy

  19. Diffraction through partial identity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blum, W.

    1981-06-01

    A model of diffraction dissociation is proposed in which the quantum-mechanical interference between the incoming and the outgoing wave determines the cross-section. This interference occurs due to the finite life-time of the excited state. (orig.)

  20. Diffractive optics for industrial and commercial applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turunen, J. [Joensuu Univ. (Finland); Wyrowski, F. [eds.] [Jena Univ. (Germany)

    1997-12-31

    The following topics were dealt with: diffractive optics, diffraction gratings, optical system design with diffractive optics, continuous-relief diffractive lenses and microlens arrays, diffractive bifocal intraocular lenses, diffractive laser resonators, diffractive optics for semiconductor lasers, diffractive elements for optical image processing, photorefractive crystals in optical measurement systems, subwavelenth-structured elements, security applications, diffractive optics for solar cells, holographic microlithography. 999 refs.

  1. Coherent Diffractive Imaging at LCLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Joachim

    2010-03-01

    Soft x-ray FEL light sources produce ultrafast x-ray pulses with outstanding high peak brilliance. This might enable the structure determination of proteins that cannot be crystallized. The deposited energy would destroy the molecules completely, but owing to the short pulses the destruction will ideally only happen after the termination of the pulse. In order to address the many challenges that we face in attempting molecular diffraction, we have carried out experiments in coherent diffraction from protein nanocrystals at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at SLAC. The periodicity of these objects gives us much higher scattering signals than uncrystallized proteins would. The crystals are filtered to sizes less than 2 micron, and delivered to the pulsed X-ray beam in a liquid jet. The effects of pulse duration and fluence on the high-resolution structure of the crystals have been studied. Diffraction patterns are recorded at a repetition rate of 30 Hz with pnCCD detectors. This allows us to take 108,000 images per hour. With 2-mega-pixel-detectors this gives a data-rate of more than 400 GB per hour. The automated sorting and evaluation of hundreds of thousands images is another challenge of this kind of experiments. Preliminary results will be presented on our first LCLS experiments. This work was carried out as part of a collaboration, for which Henry Chapman is the spokesperson. The collaboration consists of CFEL DESY, Arizona State University, SLAC, Uppsala University, LLNL, The University of Melbourne, LBNL, the Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, and the Max Planck Advanced Study Group (ASG) at the CFEL. The experiments were carried out using the CAMP apparatus, which was designed and built by the Max Planck ASG at CFEL. The LCLS is operated by Stanford University on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  2. Novel myopic refractive correction with transepithelial very high-fluence collagen cross-linking applied in a customized pattern: early clinical results of a feasibility study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanellopoulos AJ

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Anastasios John Kanellopoulos LaserVision.gr Institute, Athens, Greece, and New York Medical School, New York, NY, USA Background: The purpose of this study is to report the safety and efficacy of a new application of collagen cross-linking using a novel device to achieve predictable refractive myopic changes in virgin corneas. Methods: Four cases were treated with a novel device employing very high-fluence collagen cross-linking applied in a myopic pattern. Prior to treatment, riboflavin solution was applied to the intact epithelium. The collagen cross-linking device was then engaged for a total of 12 J/cm2, to be applied transepithelially in a predetermined pattern. Cornea clarity, corneal keratometry, and corneal topography were evaluated by both Placido disc and Scheimpflug imaging, along with cornea anterior segment optical coherence tomography and endothelial cell counts. Results: An average of 2.3 diopters was achieved in the first week in all four cases treated with the very high-fluence myopic collagen cross-linking intervention. There was a slight regression to 1.44 diopters at 1 month, which remained stable at 6-month follow-up. The mean keratometry change was from 44.90 diopters to 43.46 diopters. There was no significant change in endothelial cell counts or corneal clarity. There was some mild change in epithelial thickness distribution, with the treated area showing a slight but homogeneous reduction in mean thickness from 52 µm to 44 µm. Conclusion: This report describes the novel application of very high-fluence collagen cross-linking with a predictable well defined myopic refractive (flattening corneal effect. This technique has the advantages of essentially no postoperative morbidity, immediate visual rehabilitation, and the potential for tapering until the desired result is achieved. Keywords: myopia, refractive correction, high-fluence collagen cross-linking, clinical results

  3. Neutron-diffraction measurements of stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holden, T.M.

    1995-01-01

    Experiments on bent steam-generator tubing have shown that different diffraction peaks, (1 1 1) or (0 0 2), give different results for the sign and magnitude of the stress and strain. From an engineering standpoint, the macroscopic stress field cannot be both positive and negative in the same volume, so this difference must be due to intergranular effects superposed on the macroscopic stress field. Uniaxial tensile test experiments with applied stresses beyond the 0.2% offset yield stress, help to understand this anomaly, by demonstrating the different strain response to applied stress along different crystallographic axes.When Zr-alloys are cooled from elevated temperatures, thermal stresses always develop, so that it is difficult to obtain a stress-free lattice spacing from which residual strains may be derived. From measurements of the temperature dependence of lattice spacing, the temperature at which the thermal stresses vanish may be found. From the lattice spacing at this temperature the stress-free lattice spacings at room temperature can be obtained readily.To interpret the measured strains in terms of macroscopic stress fields it is necessary to know the diffraction elastic constants. Neutron diffraction measurements of the diffraction elastic constants in a ferritic steel for the [1 1 0], [0 0 2] and [2 2 2] crystallographic axes, in directions parallel and perpendicular to the applied stress are compared with theoretical diffraction elastic constants. (orig.)

  4. Encapsulation process for diffraction gratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratzsch, Stephan; Kley, Ernst-Bernhard; Tünnermann, Andreas; Szeghalmi, Adriana

    2015-07-13

    Encapsulation of grating structures facilitates an improvement of the optical functionality and/or adds mechanical stability to the fragile structure. Here, we introduce novel encapsulation process of nanoscale patterns based on atomic layer deposition and micro structuring. The overall size of the encapsulated structured surface area is only restricted by the size of the available microstructuring and coating devices; thus, overcoming inherent limitations of existing bonding processes concerning cleanliness, roughness, and curvature of the components. Finally, the process is demonstrated for a transmission grating. The encapsulated grating has 97.5% transmission efficiency in the -1st diffraction order for TM-polarized light, and is being limited by the experimental grating parameters as confirmed by rigorous coupled wave analysis.

  5. Contribution to diffraction theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chako, N.

    1966-11-01

    In a first part, we have given a general and detailed treatment of the modern theory of diffraction. The rigorous theory is formulated as a boundary value problem of the wave equation or Maxwell equations. However, up to the present time, such a program of treating diffraction by optical systems, even for simple optical instruments, has not been realized due to the complicated character of the boundary conditions. The recent developments show clearly the nature of the approximation of the classical theories originally due to Fresnel and Young, later formulated in a rigorous manner by Kirchhoff and Rubinowicz, respectively and, at the same time the insufficiency of these theories in explaining a number of diffraction phenomena. Furthermore, we have made a study of the limitations of the approximate theories and the recent attempts to improve these. The second part is devoted to a general mathematical treatment of the theory of diffraction of optical systems including aberrations. After a general and specific analysis of geometrical and wave aberrations along classical and modern (Nijboer) lines, we have been able to evaluate the diffraction integrals representing the image field at any point in image space explicitly, when the aberrations are small. Our formulas are the generalisations of all anterior results obtained by previous investigators. Moreover, we have discussed the Zernike-Nijboer theory of aberration and generalised it not only for rotational systems, but also for non-symmetric systems as well, including the case of non circular apertures. The extension to non-circular apertures is done by introducing orthogonal functions or polynomials over such aperture shapes. So far the results are valid for small aberrations, that is to say, where the deformation of the real wave front emerging from the optical system is less than a wave length of light or of the electromagnetic wave from the ideal wave front. If the aberrations are large, then one must employ the

  6. Determination of patterns of interplanar distances starting from crystalline parameters for the Cyber computer of the ININ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macias B, L.R.

    1991-03-01

    In this report a program in Fortran language that reproduces the pattern of the Joint Committee on Powder Diffraction Standards is presented and that it can be applied to identify non well-known samples such as in those that only by means of articles or other sources the values of the parameters of the elementary cell are lightly known and by this way the correspondent diffraction pattern can be accurately generated. (Author)

  7. Report from the neutron diffraction work group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-08-01

    This progress report of the neutron diffraction group at the Hahn Meitner Institute in Berlin comprises the following contributions: Three-dimensional critical properties of CsNiF 3 around the Neel point; Spin waves in CsNiF 3 with an applied magnetic field; Solitons in CsNiF 3 : Their experimental evidence and their thermodynamics; Neutron diffraction study of DAG at very low temperatures and in external magnetic field; Neutron diffraction investigation of tricritical behaviour in DyPO 4 ; Crystalline modifications and structural phase transitions of NaOH; Gitterdynamik von Cerhydrid; Investigation of the ferroelectric-ferroelastic phase transition in KH 2 PO 4 and RbH 2 PO 4 by means of γ-ray diffractometry; A γ-ray diffractometer for systematic measurements of absolute structure factors; Electron density in pyrite by combined γ-ray and neutron diffraction measurements: Thermal parameters from short wavelength neutron data; Accurate determination of temperature parameters from neutron diffraction data: Direct observation of the thermal diffuse scattering from silicon using perfect crystals; A Compton spectrometer for momentum density studies using 412 keV γ-radiation; Investigation of the electronic structure of Niobiumhydrides by means of gamma-ray Compton scattering; Interpretation of Compton profile data in position space; High resolution neutron scattering measurements on single crystals using a horizontally bent monochromator and a multidetecter; Statistical analysis of neutron diffraction studies of proteins. (orig.) [de

  8. X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Einstein, J.R.; Wei, C.H.

    1982-01-01

    We have been interested in structural elucidation by x-ray diffraction of compounds of biological interest. Understanding exactly how atoms are arranged in three-dimensional arrays as molecules can help explain the relationship between structure and functions. The species investigated may vary in size and shape; our recent studies included such diverse substances as antischistosomal drugs, a complex of cadmium with nucleic acid base, nitrate salts of adenine, and proteins

  9. Design and fabrication of diffractive optical elements with MATLAB

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bhattacharya, Shanti (Professor in Optics); Vijayakumar, Anand

    2017-01-01

    ... their diffraction patterns using MATLAB. The fundamentals of fabrication techniques such as photolithography, electron beam lithography, and focused ion beam lithography with basic instructions for the beginner are presented...

  10. Adaptable Diffraction Gratings With Wavefront Transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iazikov, Dmitri; Mossberg, Thomas W.; Greiner, Christoph M.

    2010-01-01

    Diffraction gratings are optical components with regular patterns of grooves, which angularly disperse incoming light by wavelength. Traditional diffraction gratings have static planar, concave, or convex surfaces. However, if they could be made so that they can change the surface curvature at will, then they would be able to focus on particular segments, self-calibrate, or perform fine adjustments. This innovation creates a diffraction grating on a deformable surface. This surface could be bent at will, resulting in a dynamic wavefront transformation. This allows for self-calibration, compensation for aberrations, enhancing image resolution in a particular area, or performing multiple scans using different wavelengths. A dynamic grating gives scientists a new ability to explore wavefronts from a variety of viewpoints.

  11. AIC-based diffraction stacking for local earthquake locations at the Sumatran Fault (Indonesia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriyana, Andri; Bauer, Klaus; Muksin, Umar; Weber, Michael

    2018-05-01

    We present a new workflow for the localization of seismic events which is based on a diffraction stacking approach. In order to address the effects from complex source radiation patterns, we suggest to compute diffraction stacking from a characteristic function (CF) instead of stacking the original waveform data. A new CF, which is called in the following mAIC (modified from Akaike Information Criterion) is proposed. We demonstrate that both P- and S-wave onsets can be detected accurately. To avoid cross-talk between P and S waves due to inaccurate velocity models, we separate the P and S waves from the mAIC function by making use of polarization attributes. Then, the final image function is represented by the largest eigenvalue as a result of the covariance analysis between P- and S-image functions. Results from synthetic experiments show that the proposed diffraction stacking provides reliable results. The workflow of the diffraction stacking method was finally applied to local earthquake data from Sumatra, Indonesia. Recordings from a temporary network of 42 stations deployed for nine months around the Tarutung pull-apart basin were analysed. The seismic event locations resulting from the diffraction stacking method align along a segment of the Sumatran Fault. A more complex distribution of seismicity is imaged within and around the Tarutung basin. Two lineaments striking N-S were found in the centre of the Tarutung basin which support independent results from structural geology.

  12. ENDIX. A computer program to simulate energy dispersive X-ray and synchrotron powder diffraction diagrams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hovestreydt, E.; Karlsruhe Univ.; Parthe, E.; Benedict, U.

    1987-01-01

    A Fortran 77 computer program is described which allows the simulation of energy dispersive X-ray and synchrotron powder diffraction diagrams. The input consists of structural data (space group, unit cell dimensions, atomic positional and displacement parameters) and information on the experimental conditions (chosen Bragg angle, type of X-ray tube and applied voltage or operating power of synchrotron radiation source). The output consists of the normalized intensities of the diffraction lines, listed by increasing energy (in keV), and of an optional intensity-energy plot. The intensities are calculated with due consideration of the wave-length dependence of both the anomalous dispersion and the absorption coefficients. For a better agreement between observed and calculated spectra provision is made to optionally superimpose, on the calculated diffraction line spectrum, all additional lines such as fluorescence and emission lines and escape peaks. The different effects which have been considered in the simulation are discussed in some detail. A sample calculation of the energy dispersive powder diffraction pattern of UPt 3 (Ni 3 Sn structure type) is given. Warning: the user of ENDIX should be aware that for a successful application it is necessary to adapt the program to correspond to the actual experimental conditions. Even then, due to the only approximately known values of certain functions, the agreement between observed and calculated intensities will not be as good as for angle dispersive diffraction methods

  13. Rietveld analysis, powder diffraction and cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, V.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Phase quantification of cement is essential in its industrial use, however many methods are inaccurate and/or time consuming. Powder diffraction is one of the more accurate techniques used for quantitative phase analysis of cement. There has been an increase in the use of Rietveld refinement and powder diffraction for the analysis and phase quantification of cement and its components in recent years. The complex nature of cement components, existence of solid solutions, polymorphic variation of phases and overlapping phase peaks in diffraction patterns makes phase quantification of cements by powder diffraction difficult. The main phase in cement is alite, a solid solution of tricalcium silicate. Tricalcium silicate has been found to exist in seven modifications in three crystal systems, including triclinic, monoclinic, and rhombohedral structures. Hence, phase quantification of cements using Rietveld methods usually involves the simultaneous modelling of several tricalcium silicate structures to fit the complex alite phase. An industry ordinary Portland cement, industry and standard clinker, and a synthetic tricalcium silicate were characterised using neutron, laboratory x-ray and synchrotron powder diffraction. Diffraction patterns were analysed using full-profile Rietveld refinement. This enabled comparison of x-ray, neutron and synchrotron data for phase quantification of the cement and examination of the tricalcium silicate. Excellent Rietveld fits were achieved, however the results showed that the quantitative phase analysis results differed for some phases in the same clinker sample between various data sources. This presentation will give a short introduction about cement components including polymorphism, followed by the presentation of some problems in phase quantification of cements and the role of Rietveld refinement in solving these problems. Copyright (2002) Australian X-ray Analytical Association Inc

  14. Atomic resolution three-dimensional electron diffraction microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miao Jianwei; Ohsuna, Tetsu; Terasaki, Osamu; Hodgson, Keith O.; O'Keefe, Michael A.

    2002-01-01

    We report the development of a novel form of diffraction-based 3D microscopy to overcome resolution barriers inherent in high-resolution electron microscopy and tomography. By combining coherent electron diffraction with the oversampling phasing method, we show that the 3D structure of a nanocrystal can be determined ab initio at a resolution of 1 Angstrom from 29 simulated noisy diffraction patterns. This new form of microscopy can be used to image the 3D structures of nanocrystals and noncrystalline samples, with resolution limited only by the quality of sample diffraction

  15. Multiorder nonlinear diffraction in frequency doubling processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saltiel, Solomon M.; Neshev, Dragomir N.; Krolikowski, Wieslaw

    2009-01-01

    We analyze experimentally light scattering from 2 nonlinear gratings and observe two types of second-harmonic frequency-scattering processes. The first process is identified as Raman–Nath type nonlinear diffraction that is explained by applying only transverse phase-matching conditions. The angular...... position of this type of diffraction is defined by the ratio of the second-harmonic wavelength and the grating period. In contrast, the second type of nonlinear scattering process is explained by the longitudinal phase matching only, being insensitive to the nonlinear grating...

  16. Neutron diffraction studies of magnetic ordering in superconducting ErNi{sub 2}B{sub 2}C and TmNi{sub 2}B{sub 2}C in an applied magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toft, K.N

    2004-01-01

    The field-induced magnetic structures of ErNi{sub 2}B{sub 2}C and TmNi{sub 2}B{sub 2}C in are especially interesting because the field suppresses the superconducting order parameter and therefore the magnetic properties can be studied while varying the strength of superconductivity. ErNi{sub 2}B{sub 2}C: For magnetic fields along all three symmetry directions, the observed magnetic structures have a period corresponding to the Fermi surface nesting structure. The phase diagrams present all the observed magnetic structures. Two results remain unresolved: 1. When applying the magnetic field along [010], the minority domain (Q{sub N}{sup B} = (0,Q,0) with moments perpendicular to the field) shows no signs of hysteresis. I expected it to be a meta-stable state, which would be gradually suppressed by a magnetic field, and when decreasing the field it would not reappear until some small field of approximately 0.1 T. 2. When the field is applied along [110], the magnetic structure rotates a small angle of 0.5 degrees away from the symmetry direction. TmNi{sub 2}B{sub 2}C: A magnetic field applied in the [100] direction suppresses the zero field magnetic structure Q{sub F} = (0.094,0.094,0) (T{sub N} = 1.6 K), in favor of the Fermi surface nesting structure Q{sub N} = (0.483,0,0). The appearance of the Q{sub N} phase was initially believed to be caused by the suppression of superconductivity. This suppression should make it favorable to create a magnetic order with a Q-vector determined by the maximum in the magnetic susceptibility at the Fermi surface nesting vector Q{sub N}. The phase diagram for the magnetic structures is presented, however several properties of the Q{sub N} magnetic structure cannot be explained within any known models. Quadrupolar ordering is suggested as a possible candidate for explaining these features of the Q{sub N} structure. (au)

  17. Angular criterion for distinguishing between Fraunhofer and Fresnel diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medina, Francisco F.; Garcia-Sucerquia, Jorge; Castaneda, Roman; Matteucci, Giorgio

    2003-03-01

    The distinction between Fresnel and Fraunhofer diffraction is a crucial condition for the accurate analysis of diffracting structures. In this paper we propose a criterion based on the angle subtended by the first zero of the diffraction pattern from the center of the diffracting aperture. The determination of the zero of the diffraction pattern is the crucial point for assuring the precision of the criterion. It mainly depends on the dynamical range of the detector. Therefore, the applicability of adequate thresholds for different detector types is discussed. The criterion is also generalized by expressing it in terms of the number of Fresnel zones delimited by the aperture. Simulations are reported for illustrating the feasibility of the criterion. (author)

  18. X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vries, J.L. de.

    1976-01-01

    The seventh edition of Philips' Review of literature on X-ray diffraction begins with a list of conference proceedings on the subject, organised by the Philips' organisation at regular intervals in various European countries. This is followed by a list of bulletins. The bibliography is divided according to the equipment (cameras, diffractometers, monochromators) and its applications. The applications are subdivided into sections for high/low temperature and pressure, effects due to the equipment, small angle scattering and a part for stress, texture and phase analyses of metals and quantitative analysis of minerals

  19. Quantitative measurement of phase variation amplitude of ultrasonic diffraction grating based on diffraction spectral analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Meiyan, E-mail: yphantomohive@gmail.com; Zeng, Yingzhi; Huang, Zuohua, E-mail: zuohuah@163.com [Laboratory of Quantum Engineering and Quantum Materials, School of Physics and Telecommunication Engineering, South China Normal University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510006 (China)

    2014-09-15

    A new method based on diffraction spectral analysis is proposed for the quantitative measurement of the phase variation amplitude of an ultrasonic diffraction grating. For a traveling wave, the phase variation amplitude of the grating depends on the intensity of the zeroth- and first-order diffraction waves. By contrast, for a standing wave, this amplitude depends on the intensity of the zeroth-, first-, and second-order diffraction waves. The proposed method is verified experimentally. The measured phase variation amplitude ranges from 0 to 2π, with a relative error of approximately 5%. A nearly linear relation exists between the phase variation amplitude and driving voltage. Our proposed method can also be applied to ordinary sinusoidal phase grating.

  20. High Pressure X-Ray Diffraction Studies on Nanocrystalline Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palosz, B.; Stelmakh, S.; Grzanka, E.; Gierlotka, S.; Pielaszek, R.; Bismayer, U.; Werner, S.; Palosz, W.

    2003-01-01

    Application of in situ high pressure powder diffraction technique for examination of specific structural properties of nanocrystals based on the experimental data of SiC nanocrystalline powders of 2 to 30 nrn diameter in diameter is presented. Limitations and capabilities of the experimental techniques themselves and methods of diffraction data elaboration applied to nanocrystals with very small dimensions (nanoparticles of different grain size.

  1. Diffractive flat panel solar concentrators of a novel design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Jong, T.M.; de Boer, D.K.G.; Bastiaansen, C.W.M.

    2016-01-01

    A novel design for a flat panel solar concentrator is presented which is based on a light guide with a grating applied on top that diffracts light into total internal reflection. By combining geometrical and diffractive optics the geometrical concentration ratio is optimized according to the

  2. A pseudospectral collocation time-domain method for diffractive optics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dinesen, P.G.; Hesthaven, J.S.; Lynov, Jens-Peter

    2000-01-01

    We present a pseudospectral method for the analysis of diffractive optical elements. The method computes a direct time-domain solution of Maxwell's equations and is applied to solving wave propagation in 2D diffractive optical elements. (C) 2000 IMACS. Published by Elsevier Science B.V. All rights...

  3. Photonic crystal and photonic quasicrystal patterned in PDMS surfaces and their effect on LED radiation properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suslik, Lubos [Dept. of Physics, Faculty of Electrical Engineering, University of Zilina, Univerzitna 1, 010 26, Zilina (Slovakia); Pudis, Dusan, E-mail: pudis@fyzika.uniza.sk [Dept. of Physics, Faculty of Electrical Engineering, University of Zilina, Univerzitna 1, 010 26, Zilina (Slovakia); Goraus, Matej [Dept. of Physics, Faculty of Electrical Engineering, University of Zilina, Univerzitna 1, 010 26, Zilina (Slovakia); Nolte, Rainer [Fakultät für Maschinenbau FG Lichttechnik Ilmenau University of Technology, Ilmenau (Germany); Kovac, Jaroslav [Inst. of Electronics and Photonics, Slovak University of Technology, Ilkovicova 3, 812 19, Bratislava (Slovakia); Durisova, Jana; Gaso, Peter [Dept. of Physics, Faculty of Electrical Engineering, University of Zilina, Univerzitna 1, 010 26, Zilina (Slovakia); Hronec, Pavol [Inst. of Electronics and Photonics, Slovak University of Technology, Ilkovicova 3, 812 19, Bratislava (Slovakia); Schaaf, Peter [Chair Materials for Electronics, Institute of Materials Engineering and Institute of Micro- and Nanotechnologies MacroNano, TU Ilmenau, Gustav-Kirchhoff-Str. 5, 98693 Ilmenau (Germany)

    2017-02-15

    Graphical abstract: Photonic quasicrystal patterned in the surface of polydimethylsiloxane membrane (left) and radiation pattern of light emitting diode with patterned membrane applied in the surface (right). - Highlights: • We presented fabrication technique of PDMS membranes with patterned surface by photonic crystal (PhC) and photonic quasi-crystal (PQC). • Presented technique is effective for preparation PhC and PQC PDMS membranes easily implementing in the LED chip. • From the goniophotometer measurements, the membranes document effective angular emission due to the diffraction on patterned surfaces. • 12 fold symmetry PQC structure shows homogeneous radiation pattern, while the 2 fold symmetry of square PhC shows evident diffraction lobes. - Abstract: We present results of fabrication and implementation of thin polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membranes with patterned surface for the light emitting diode (LED). PDMS membranes were patterned by using the interference lithography in combination with embossing technique. Two-dimensional photonic crystal and photonic quasicrystal structures with different period were patterned in the surface of thin PDMS membranes with depth up to 550 nm. Patterned PDMS membranes placed on the LED chip effectively diffracted light and increased angular emission of LED radiation pattern. We presented effective technique for fabrication of patterned PDMS membranes, which could modify the emission properties of optoelectronic devices and can be applied directly on surface LEDs and small optical devices.

  4. Diffraction by DNA, carbon nanotubes and other helical nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucas, Amand A; Lambin, Philippe

    2005-01-01

    This review discusses the diffraction patterns of x-rays or electrons scattered by fibres of helical biological molecules and by carbon nanotubes (CNTs) from the unified point of view of the Fourier-Bessel transform of an atomic helix. This paper is intended for scientists who are not professional crystallographers. X-ray fibre diffraction patterns of Pauling's protein α-helix and of Crick and Pauling's protein coiled-coil are revisited. This is followed by a non-technical comparison between the historic x-ray diffraction patterns of the A and B conformations of DNA, which were crucial for the discovery of the double helix. The qualitative analysis of the diffraction images is supported by novel optical simulation experiments designed to pinpoint the gross structural informational content of the patterns. The spectacular helical structure of the tobacco mosaic virus determined by Rosalind Franklin and co-workers will then be described as an early example of the great power of x-ray crystallography in determining the structure of a large biomolecular edifice. After these mostly historical and didactic case studies, this paper will consider electron diffraction and transmission electron microscopy of CNTs of great current interest, focusing particularly on recent data obtained for single-wall, double-wall and scrolled nanotubes. Several points of convergence between the interpretations of the diffraction patterns of biological helices and CNTs will be emphasized

  5. Development of Kossel micro-diffraction for strain and stress analysis at the micrometer scale: applications to crystalline materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouscaud, D.

    2012-01-01

    X-ray diffraction is a non-destructive method frequently used in materials science to analyse the stress state at a macroscopic scale. Due to the growing complexity of new materials and their applications, it is necessary to know the strain and stress state at a lower scale. Thus, a Kossel micro-diffraction experimental set-up was developed inside a scanning electron microscope. It allows to obtain the crystallographic orientation as well as the strains and stresses within a volume of a few cubic micrometers. Some experiments were also performed using a synchrotron radiation. An experimental procedure was developed to optimize the acquisition of Kossel line patterns and their post-processing. The stress calculation from Kossel patterns was validated by comparing the stress state of single crystals during in situ mechanical loading, obtained by Kossel micro-diffraction and with classical diffraction methods. Then Kossel micro-diffraction was applied to polycrystalline samples by gradually decreasing the grain size. Intergranular stress heterogeneities were for example measured in an interstitial-free steel. Experiments were finally carried out in thin layer samples representative of microelectronic components. (author)

  6. Observation of diffraction effects in positron channeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palathingal, J.C.; Peng, J.P.; Lynn, K.G.; Wu, X.Y.; Schultz, P.J.

    1994-01-01

    An experimental investigation of positron channeling was made with a high-angular resolution apparatus, employing positrons of kinetic energy 1 MeV, derived from the Brookhaven National Laboratory Dynamitron. The pattern of transmission through a Si (100) single crystal of thickness 0.245 μm was investigated for a number of major planes. The authors have observed for the first time, in excellent detail, the fine structure of the channeling pattern expected to arise from the particle diffraction effects, theoretically explainable in terms of the quantum-mechanical many-beam calculations

  7. Diffraction and Unitarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dremin, I. M.

    I begin with a tribute to V.N. Gribov and then come to a particular problem which would be of interest for him. His first paper on reggeology was devoted to elastic scatterings of hadrons. Here, using the unitarity relation in combination with experimental data about the elastic scattering in the diffraction cone, I show how the shape and the darkness of the interaction region of colliding protons change with the increase of their energies. In particular, the collisions become fully absorptive at small impact parameters at LHC energies that results in some special features of inelastic processes as well. The possible evolution with increasing energy of the shape from the dark core at the LHC to the fully transparent one at higher energies is discussed. It implies that the terminology of the black disk would be replaced by the black torus.

  8. Towards automated diffraction tomography: Part I-Data acquisition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolb, U.; Gorelik, T.; Kuebel, C.; Otten, M.T.; Hubert, D.

    2007-01-01

    The ultimate aim of electron diffraction data collection for structure analysis is to sample the reciprocal space as accurately as possible to obtain a high-quality data set for crystal structure determination. Besides a more precise lattice parameter determination, fine sampling is expected to deliver superior data on reflection intensities, which is crucial for subsequent structure analysis. Traditionally, three-dimensional (3D) diffraction data are collected by manually tilting a crystal around a selected crystallographic axis and recording a set of diffraction patterns (a tilt series) at various crystallographic zones. In a second step, diffraction data from these zones are combined into a 3D data set and analyzed to yield the desired structure information. Data collection can also be performed automatically, with the recent advances in tomography acquisition providing a suitable basis. An experimental software module has been developed for the Tecnai microscope for such an automated diffraction pattern collection while tilting around the goniometer axis. The module combines STEM imaging with diffraction pattern acquisition in nanodiffraction mode. It allows automated recording of diffraction tilt series from nanoparticles with a size down to 5 nm

  9. Powder diffraction from a continuous microjet of submicrometer protein crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, D A; Chapman, H N; Deponte, D; Doak, R B; Fromme, P; Hembree, G; Hunter, M; Marchesini, S; Schmidt, K; Spence, J; Starodub, D; Weierstall, U

    2008-11-01

    Atomic-resolution structures from small proteins have recently been determined from high-quality powder diffraction patterns using a combination of stereochemical restraints and Rietveld refinement [Von Dreele (2007), J. Appl. Cryst. 40, 133-143; Margiolaki et al. (2007), J. Am. Chem. Soc. 129, 11865-11871]. While powder diffraction data have been obtained from batch samples of small crystal-suspensions, which are exposed to X-rays for long periods of time and undergo significant radiation damage, the proof-of-concept that protein powder diffraction data from nanocrystals of a membrane protein can be obtained using a continuous microjet is shown. This flow-focusing aerojet has been developed to deliver a solution of hydrated protein nanocrystals to an X-ray beam for diffraction analysis. This method requires neither the crushing of larger polycrystalline samples nor any techniques to avoid radiation damage such as cryocooling. Apparatus to record protein powder diffraction in this manner has been commissioned, and in this paper the first powder diffraction patterns from a membrane protein, photosystem I, with crystallite sizes of less than 500 nm are presented. These preliminary patterns show the lowest-order reflections, which agree quantitatively with theoretical calculations of the powder profile. The results also serve to test our aerojet injector system, with future application to femtosecond diffraction in free-electron X-ray laser schemes, and for serial crystallography using a single-file beam of aligned hydrated molecules.

  10. The geometrical theory of diffraction for axially symmetric reflectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rusch, W.; Sørensen, O.

    1975-01-01

    The geometrical theory of diffraction (GTD) (cf. [1], for example) may be applied advantageously to many axially symmetric reflector antenna geometries. The material in this communication presents analytical, computational, and experimental results for commonly encountered reflector geometries...

  11. Boundary diffraction wave integrals for diffraction modeling of external occulters

    OpenAIRE

    Cady, E.

    2012-01-01

    An occulter is a large diffracting screen which may be flown in conjunction with a telescope to image extrasolar planets. The edge is shaped to minimize the diffracted light in a region beyond the occulter, and a telescope may be placed in this dark shadow to view an extrasolar system with the starlight removed. Errors in position, orientation, and shape of the occulter will diffract additional light into this region, and a challenge of modeling an occulter system is to accurately and quickly...

  12. A Simple Diffraction Experiment Using Banana Stem as a Natural Grating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aji, Mahardika Prasetya; Karunawan, Jotti; Chasanah, Widyastuti Rochimatun; Nursuhud, Puji Iman; Wiguna, Pradita Ajeng; Sulhadi

    2017-01-01

    A simple diffraction experiment was designed using banana stem as natural grating. Coherent beams of lasers with wavelengths of 632.8 nm and 532 nm that pass through banana stem produce periodic diffraction patterns on a screen. The diffraction experiments were able to measure the distances between the slit of the banana stem, i.e. d = (28.76 ±…

  13. Diffraction radiation from relativistic particles

    CERN Document Server

    Potylitsyn, Alexander Petrovich; Strikhanov, Mikhail Nikolaevich; Tishchenko, Alexey Alexandrovich

    2010-01-01

    This book deals with diffraction radiation, which implies the boundary problems of electromagnetic radiation theory. Diffraction radiation is generated when a charged particle moves in a vacuum near a target edge. Diffraction radiation of non-relativistic particles is widely used to design intense emitters in the cm wavelength range. Diffraction radiation from relativistic charged particles is important for noninvasive beam diagnostics and design of free electron lasers based on Smith-Purcell radiation which is diffraction radiation from periodic structures. Different analytical models of diffraction radiation and results of recent experimental studies are presented in this book. The book may also serve as guide to classical electrodynamics applications in beam physics and electrodynamics. It can be of great use for young researchers to develop skills and for experienced scientists to obtain new results.

  14. Diffraction radiation from relativistic particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potylitsyn, Alexander Petrovich; Ryazanov, Mikhail Ivanovich; Strikhanov, Mikhail Nikolaevich; Tishchenko, Alexey Alexandrovich

    2010-01-01

    This book deals with diffraction radiation, which implies the boundary problems of electromagnetic radiation theory. Diffraction radiation is generated when a charged particle moves in a vacuum near a target edge. Diffraction radiation of non-relativistic particles is widely used to design intense emitters in the cm wavelength range. Diffraction radiation from relativistic charged particles is important for noninvasive beam diagnostics and design of free electron lasers based on Smith-Purcell radiation which is diffraction radiation from periodic structures. Different analytical models of diffraction radiation and results of recent experimental studies are presented in this book. The book may also serve as guide to classical electrodynamics applications in beam physics and electrodynamics. It can be of great use for young researchers to develop skills and for experienced scientists to obtain new results. (orig.)

  15. Complex Networks Dynamics Based on Events-Phase Synchronization and Intensity Correlation Applied to The Anomaly Patterns and Extremes in The Tropical African Climate System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oluoch, K.; Marwan, N.; Trauth, M.; Loew, A.; Kurths, J.

    2012-04-01

    The African continent lie almost entirely within the tropics and as such its (tropical) climate systems are predominantly governed by the heterogeneous, spatial and temporal variability of the Hadley and Walker circulations. The variabilities in these meridional and zonal circulations lead to intensification or suppression of the intensities, durations and frequencies of the Inter-tropical Convergence Zone (ICTZ) migration, trade winds and subtropical high-pressure regions and the continental monsoons. The above features play a central role in determining the African rainfall spatial and temporal variability patterns. The current understanding of these climate features and their influence on the rainfall patterns is not sufficiently understood. Like many real-world systems, atmospheric-oceanic processes exhibit non-linear properties that can be better explored using non-linear (NL) methods of time-series analysis. Over the recent years, the complex network approach has evolved as a powerful new player in understanding spatio-temporal dynamics and evolution of complex systems. Together with NL techniques, it is continuing to find new applications in many areas of science and technology including climate research. We would like to use these two powerful methods to understand the spatial structure and dynamics of African rainfall anomaly patterns and extremes. The method of event synchronization (ES) developed by Quiroga et al., 2002 and first applied to climate networks by Malik et al., 2011 looks at correlations with a dynamic time lag and as such, it is a more intuitive way to correlate a complex and heterogeneous system like climate networks than a fixed time delay most commonly used. On the other hand, the short comings of ES is its lack of vigorous test statistics for the significance level of the correlations, and the fact that only the events' time indices are synchronized while all information about how the relative intensities propagate within network

  16. CMS results on hard diffraction

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00107098

    2013-01-01

    In these proceedings we present CMS results on hard diffraction. Diffractive dijet production in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$=7 TeV is discussed. The cross section for dijet production is presented as a function of $\\tilde{\\xi}$, representing the fractional momentum loss of the scattered proton in single-diffractive events. The observation of W and Z boson production in events with a large pseudo-rapidity gap is also presented.

  17. A new approach of quantum mechanics for neutron single-slit diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Xiangyao; Yang Jinghai; Liu Xiaojing; Wang Li; Liu Bing; Fan Xihui; Guo Yiqing

    2007-01-01

    Phenomena of electron, neutron, atomic and molecular diffraction have been studied in many experiments, and these experiments are explained by many theoretical works. We study neutron single-slit diffraction with a quantum mechanical approach. It is found that the obvious diffraction patterns can be obtained when the single slit width a is in the range of 3λ-60λ. We also find a new quantum effect of the thickness of single-slit which can make a large impact on the diffraction pattern. The new quantum effect predicted in our work can be tested by the neutron single-slit diffraction experiment. (authors)

  18. International Centre for Diffraction Data (ICDD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubbard, C.R.; O'Connor, B.H.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The ICDD is a not-for-profit organisation comprising approximately 300 of the world's leading x-ray scientists. It is dedicated to collecting, editing, publishing and distributing powder diffraction data for the identification of crystalline materials. The membership of the ICDD consists of worldwide representation from academe, government and industry. It is our mission to continue as the world centre for quality x-ray powder diffraction data to meet the needs of the technical community. Through the combined efforts of the members and its staff of 40 at ICDD Headquarters, the organisation serves the x-ray analysis community (i) by producing the ICDD Powder Diffraction File (PDF) and other data base products for materials characterisation; (ii) through x-ray analysis education programs and conference management (including the Denver X-ray Conference); and (iii) through philanthropic initiatives such as scholarship support for postgraduate students working in the field. The current Release 2001 of the PDF (PDF-2) contains 87,500 measured patterns and 49,000 patterns calculated from the ICSD database. The number of PDF patterns in this latest release has increased by approximately 3,000, including some 2,500 measured patterns. The quality of the database is being continuously improved through the organisation's Grant-in-Aid program whereby diffractionists around the world contribute to the measurement of patterns for new materials and to the improvement of existing PDF data. The organisation is devoting much attention to the needs of the bioscience community. The database will soon feature a much-expanded set of patterns for organic, polymer, pharmaceutical and biomaterials. The ICDD is about to release a relational database (RDB) version of the PDF (PDF-4) which will give users a very sophisticated tool for data mining. The PDF-4 will provide a quantum leap in data mining techniques, and will soon lead to the PDF being cross-linked to other diffraction

  19. Causal aspects of diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, G.N.

    1981-01-01

    The analysis is directed at a causal description of photon diffraction, which is explained in terms of a wave exerting real forces and providing actual guidance to each quantum of energy. An undulatory PSI wave is associated with each photon, and this wave is assumed to imply more than an informative probability function, so that it actually carries real energy, in much the same way as does an electro-magnetic wave. Whether or not it may be in some way related to the electromagnetic wave is left as a matter of on-going concern. A novel application of the concept of a minimum energy configuration is utilized; that is, a system of energy quanta seeks out relative positions and orientations of least mutual energy, much as an electron seeks its Bohr radius as a position of least mutual energy. Thus the concept implies more a guiding interaction of the PSI waves than an interfering cancellation of these waves. Similar concepts have been suggested by L. de Broglie and D. Bohm

  20. Gluon radiation in diffractive electroproduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchmueller, W.; McDermott, M.F.; Hebecker, A.

    1996-07-01

    Order α s -correlations to the diffractive structure functions F L D and F 2 D at large Q 2 and small x are evaluated in the semiclassical approach, where the initial proton is treated as a classical colour field. The diffractive final state contains a fast gluon in addition to a quark-antiquark pair. Two of these partons may have large transverse momentum. Our calculations lead to an intuitive picture of deep-inelastic diffractive processes which is very similar to Bjorken's aligned-jet model. Both diffractive structure functions contain leading twist contributions from high-p perpendicular to jets. (orig.)

  1. Automated grain mapping using wide angle convergent beam electron diffraction in transmission electron microscope for nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vineet

    2011-12-01

    The grain size statistics, commonly derived from the grain map of a material sample, are important microstructure characteristics that greatly influence its properties. The grain map for nanomaterials is usually obtained manually by visual inspection of the transmission electron microscope (TEM) micrographs because automated methods do not perform satisfactorily. While the visual inspection method provides reliable results, it is a labor intensive process and is often prone to human errors. In this article, an automated grain mapping method is developed using TEM diffraction patterns. The presented method uses wide angle convergent beam diffraction in the TEM. The automated technique was applied on a platinum thin film sample to obtain the grain map and subsequently derive grain size statistics from it. The grain size statistics obtained with the automated method were found in good agreement with the visual inspection method.

  2. Nanostructure Diffraction Gratings for Integrated Spectroscopy and Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Junpeng (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    The present disclosure pertains to metal or dielectric nanostructures of the subwavelength scale within the grating lines of optical diffraction gratings. The nanostructures have surface plasmon resonances or non-plasmon optical resonances. A linear photodetector array is used to capture the resonance spectra from one of the diffraction orders. The combined nanostructure super-grating and photodetector array eliminates the use of external optical spectrometers for measuring surface plasmon or optical resonance frequency shift caused by the presence of chemical and biological agents. The nanostructure super-gratings can be used for building integrated surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectrometers. The nanostructures within the diffraction grating lines enhance Raman scattering signal light while the diffraction grating pattern of the nanostructures diffracts Raman scattering light to different directions of propagation according to their wavelengths. Therefore, the nanostructure super-gratings allows for the use of a photodetector array to capture the surface enhanced Raman scattering spectra.

  3. Three-dimensional Bragg diffraction in growth-disordered opals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baryshev, A. V.; Kaplyanskii, Alexander A.; Kosobukin, Vladimir A.; Limonov, M. F.; Samusev, K. B.; Usvyat, D. E.

    2003-06-01

    After artificial opals as well as opal-based infilled and inverted composites are considered to be promising representatives of photonic crystal materials. Earlier, photonic stop gaps in opals were studied mainly in transmission or specular reflection geometries corresponding to "one-dimensional" Bragg diffraction. On the contrary, this work was aimed at observing the typical patterns of optical Bragg diffraction in which phenomenon opal crystal structure acts as a three-dimensional diffraction grating. Although our experiments were performed for artificial opals possessing unavoidable imperfections a well-pronounced diffraction peaks were observed characteristic of a crystal structure. Each of the diffraction maxima reveals a photonic stop gap in the specified direction, while the spectral width of the peak is a measure of the photonic stop gap width.

  4. An engineered design of a diffractive mask for high precision astrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennison, Kaitlin; Ammons, S. Mark; Garrel, Vincent; Marin, Eduardo; Sivo, Gaetano; Bendek, Eduardo; Guyon, Oliver

    2016-07-01

    AutoCAD, Zemax Optic Studio 15, and Interactive Data Language (IDL) with the Proper Library are used to computationally model and test a diffractive mask (DiM) suitable for use in the Gemini Multi-Conjugate Adaptive Optics System (GeMS) on the Gemini South Telescope. Systematic errors in telescope imagery are produced when the light travels through the adaptive optics system of the telescope. DiM is a transparent, flat optic with a pattern of miniscule dots lithographically applied to it. It is added ahead of the adaptive optics system in the telescope in order to produce diffraction spots that will encode systematic errors in the optics after it. Once these errors are encoded, they can be corrected for. DiM will allow for more accurate measurements in astrometry and thus improve exoplanet detection. The mechanics and physical attributes of the DiM are modeled in AutoCAD. Zemax models the ray propagation of point sources of light through the telescope. IDL and Proper simulate the wavefront and image results of the telescope. Aberrations are added to the Zemax and IDL models to test how the diffraction spots from the DiM change in the final images. Based on the Zemax and IDL results, the diffraction spots are able to encode the systematic aberrations.

  5. Diffractive optics and nanophotonics resolution below the diffraction limit

    CERN Document Server

    Minin, Igor

    2016-01-01

    In this book the authors present several examples of techniques used to overcome the Abby diffraction limit using flat and 3D diffractive optical elements, photonic crystal lenses, photonic jets, and surface plasmon diffractive optics. The structures discussed can be used in the microwave and THz range and also as scaled models for optical frequencies. Such nano-optical microlenses can be integrated, for example, into existing semiconductor heterostructure platforms for next-generation optoelectronic applications. Chapter 1 considers flat diffractive lenses and innovative 3D radiating structures including a conical millimeter-wave Fresnel zone plate (FZP) lens proposed for subwavelength focusing. In chapter 2 the subwavelength focusing properties of diffractive photonic crystal lenses are considered and it is shown that at least three different types of photonic crystal lens are possible.  With the aim of achieving subwavelength focusing, in chapter 3 an alternative mechanism to produce photonic jets at Tera...

  6. rf streak camera based ultrafast relativistic electron diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musumeci, P; Moody, J T; Scoby, C M; Gutierrez, M S; Tran, T

    2009-01-01

    We theoretically and experimentally investigate the possibility of using a rf streak camera to time resolve in a single shot structural changes at the sub-100 fs time scale via relativistic electron diffraction. We experimentally tested this novel concept at the UCLA Pegasus rf photoinjector. Time-resolved diffraction patterns from thin Al foil are recorded. Averaging over 50 shots is required in order to get statistics sufficient to uncover a variation in time of the diffraction patterns. In the absence of an external pump laser, this is explained as due to the energy chirp on the beam out of the electron gun. With further improvements to the electron source, rf streak camera based ultrafast electron diffraction has the potential to yield truly single shot measurements of ultrafast processes.

  7. Fabrication of Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotube or Zinc Oxide Nanorod Arrays for Optical Diffraction Gratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong; Kim, Sun Il; Cho, Seong-Ho; Hwang, Sungwoo; Lee, Young Hee; Hur, Jaehyun

    2015-11-01

    We report on new fabrication methods for a transparent, hierarchical, and patterned electrode comprised of either carbon nanotubes or zinc oxide nanorods. Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes or zinc oxide nanorod arrays were fabricated by either chemical vapor deposition or hydrothermal growth, in combination with photolithography. A transparent conductive graphene layer or zinc oxide seed layer was employed as the transparent electrode. On the patterned surface defined using photoresist, the vertically grown carbon nanotubes or zinc oxides could produce a concentrated electric field under applied DC voltage. This periodic electric field was used to align liquid crystal molecules in localized areas within the optical cell, effectively modulating the refractive index. Depending on the material and morphology of these patterned electrodes, the diffraction efficiency presented different behavior. From this study, we established the relationship between the hierarchical structure of the different electrodes and their efficiency for modulating the refractive index. We believe that this study will pave a new path for future optoelectronic applications.

  8. Time-resolved Neutron Powder Diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pannetier, J.

    1986-01-01

    The use of a high-flux neutron source together with a large position sensitive detector (PSD) allows a powder diffraction pattern to be recorded at a time-scale of a few minutes so that crystalline systems under non-equilibrium conditions may now conveniently be investigated. This introduces a new dimension into powder diffraction (the time and transient phenomena like heterogeneous chemical reactions can now be easily studied. The instrumental parameters relevant for the design of such time-dependent experiments are briefly surveyed and the current limits of the method are discussed. The applications are illustrated by two kinds of experiment in the field of inorganic solid state chemistry: true kinetic studies of heterogeneous chemical reactions and thermodiffractometry experiments

  9. Laser diffraction analysis of colloidal crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sogami, Ikuo S.; Shinohara, Tadatomi; Yoshiyama, Tsuyoshi [Kyoto Sangyo Univ., Department of Physics, Kyoto (Japan)

    2001-10-01

    Laser diffraction analysis is made on crystallization in salt-free aqueous suspensions of highly-charged colloidal particles for semi-dilute specimens of concentration 0.1-10.0 vol%. Kossel diffraction patterns which represent faithfully accurate information on lattice symmetries in the suspensions enable us to investigate the time evolution of colloidal crystals. The results show that the crystallization proceeds by way of the following intermediate phase transitions: two-dimensional hcp structure {yields} random layer structure {yields} layer structure with one sliding degree of freedom {yields} stacking disorder structure {yields} stacking structure with multivariant periodicity {yields} fcc twin structure with twin plane (111) {yields} normal fcc structure {yields} bcc twin structure with twin plane (11-bar2) or (1-bar12) {yields} normal bcc structure. For concentrated suspensions (>2 vol %), the phase transition ceases to proceed at the normal fcc structure. (author)

  10. Laser diffraction analysis of colloidal crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sogami, Ikuo S.; Shinohara, Tadatomi; Yoshiyama, Tsuyoshi

    2001-01-01

    Laser diffraction analysis is made on crystallization in salt-free aqueous suspensions of highly-charged colloidal particles for semi-dilute specimens of concentration 0.1-10.0 vol%. Kossel diffraction patterns which represent faithfully accurate information on lattice symmetries in the suspensions enable us to investigate the time evolution of colloidal crystals. The results show that the crystallization proceeds by way of the following intermediate phase transitions: two-dimensional hcp structure → random layer structure → layer structure with one sliding degree of freedom → stacking disorder structure → stacking structure with multivariant periodicity → fcc twin structure with twin plane (111) → normal fcc structure → bcc twin structure with twin plane (11-bar2) or (1-bar12) → normal bcc structure. For concentrated suspensions (>2 vol %), the phase transition ceases to proceed at the normal fcc structure. (author)

  11. Quantum diffraction and interference of spatially correlated photon pairs and its Fourier-optical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Ryosuke; Edamatsu, Keiichi; Itoh, Tadashi

    2006-01-01

    We present one- and two-photon diffraction and interference experiments involving parametric down-converted photon pairs. By controlling the divergence of the pump beam in parametric down-conversion, the diffraction-interference pattern produced by an object changes from a quantum (perfectly correlated) case to a classical (uncorrelated) one. The observed diffraction and interference patterns are accurately reproduced by Fourier-optical analysis taking into account the quantum spatial correlation. We show that the relation between the spatial correlation and the object size plays a crucial role in the formation of both one- and two-photon diffraction-interference patterns

  12. Experimental technique of stress analyses by neutron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Guangai; Chen, Bo; Huang, Chaoqiang

    2009-09-01

    The structures and main components of neutron diffraction stress analyses spectrometer, SALSA, as well as functions and parameters of each components are presented. The technical characteristic and structure parameters of SALSA are described. Based on these aspects, the choice of gauge volume, method of positioning sample, determination of diffraction plane and measurement of zero stress do are discussed. Combined with the practical experiments, the basic experimental measurement and the related settings are introduced, including the adjustments of components, pattern scattering, data recording and checking etc. The above can be an instruction for stress analyses experiments by neutron diffraction and neutron stress spectrometer construction. (authors)

  13. Quantitative analysis of phases by x-ray diffraction and thermogravimetry in Cuban phosphorite ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casanova Gomez, Abdel; Martinez Montalvo, Asor; Cilano Campos, Guillermo; Arostegui Aguirre, Miladys; Ferreiro Fernandez, Adalyz; Alonso Perez, Jose A.

    2016-01-01

    Phases analysis is performed by instrumental techniques X - ray diffraction and Thermal Analysis in two groups of samples of Cuban minerals carriers'phosphorus, candidates to reference materials. To this end, the variant of structural refinement of the diffraction pattern in the form of adjustment profile is applied, using the Full prof program of Juan Rodriguez-Carvajal. This analysis is the first step to develop the standard specification of these resources and classify them as phosphate rock and / or phospharite from their mass content. The statistical evaluation of the uncertainty of the quantitative analysis (standard deviation) was carried out in ten replicate samples of phosphate rock and eight of phosphate from the field Trinidad de Guedes. The qualitative phase analysis reflected the following phase composition: carbonate fluoroapatite (CFA), Calcite, Quartz and Halloysite (present only in the clayey granular phosphorite ore; FGA). By the method of setting pattern powder diffraction profile, the quantitative phase composition is reported in the sample FGA: 87 (2) % of CFA, 4 (1) % of Calcite, 1% Quartz, and 8 (3) % Halloysite. For granular limestone ore (FGC), the following contents were obtained: 87 (3) % Calcite, 8 (3) % of CFA and 5 (1) % Quartz: The obtained values are corroborated by Thermogravimetric Analysis (TG) through the calculation of the mass content of the thermally active phases (Calcite and CFA) in the range (27-10000 0 C), confirming the validity of the results of XRD. (Author)

  14. Revisit to diffraction anomalous fine structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawaguchi, T.; Fukuda, K.; Tokuda, K.; Shimada, K.; Ichitsubo, T.; Oishi, M.; Mizuki, J.; Matsubara, E.

    2014-01-01

    The diffraction anomalous fine structure method has been revisited by applying this measurement technique to polycrystalline samples and using an analytical method with the logarithmic dispersion relation. The diffraction anomalous fine structure (DAFS) method that is a spectroscopic analysis combined with resonant X-ray diffraction enables the determination of the valence state and local structure of a selected element at a specific crystalline site and/or phase. This method has been improved by using a polycrystalline sample, channel-cut monochromator optics with an undulator synchrotron radiation source, an area detector and direct determination of resonant terms with a logarithmic dispersion relation. This study makes the DAFS method more convenient and saves a large amount of measurement time in comparison with the conventional DAFS method with a single crystal. The improved DAFS method has been applied to some model samples, Ni foil and Fe 3 O 4 powder, to demonstrate the validity of the measurement and the analysis of the present DAFS method

  15. Analysis of XFEL serial diffraction data from individual crystalline fibrils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David H. Wojtas

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Serial diffraction data collected at the Linac Coherent Light Source from crystalline amyloid fibrils delivered in a liquid jet show that the fibrils are well oriented in the jet. At low fibril concentrations, diffraction patterns are recorded from single fibrils; these patterns are weak and contain only a few reflections. Methods are developed for determining the orientation of patterns in reciprocal space and merging them in three dimensions. This allows the individual structure amplitudes to be calculated, thus overcoming the limitations of orientation and cylindrical averaging in conventional fibre diffraction analysis. The advantages of this technique should allow structural studies of fibrous systems in biology that are inaccessible using existing techniques.

  16. Phasor analysis of binary diffraction gratings with different fill factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MartInez, Antonio; Sanchez-Lopez, Ma del Mar; Moreno, Ignacio

    2007-01-01

    In this work, we present a simple analysis of binary diffraction gratings with different slit widths relative to the grating period. The analysis is based on a simple phasor technique directly derived from the Huygens principle. By introducing a slit phasor and a grating phasor, the intensity of the diffracted orders and the grating's resolving power can be easily obtained without applying the usual Fourier transform operations required for these calculations. The proposed phasor technique is mathematically equivalent to the Fourier transform calculation of the diffraction order amplitude, and it can be useful to explain binary diffraction gratings in a simple manner in introductory physics courses. This theoretical analysis is illustrated with experimental results using a liquid crystal device to display diffraction gratings with different fill factors

  17. Phasor analysis of binary diffraction gratings with different fill factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MartInez, Antonio [Departamento de Ciencia de Materiales, Optica y TecnologIa Electronica, Universidad Miguel Hernandez, 03202 Elche (Spain); Sanchez-Lopez, Ma del Mar [Instituto de BioingenierIa y Departamento de Fisica y Arquitectura de Computadores, Universidad Miguel Hernandez, 03202 Elche (Spain); Moreno, Ignacio [Departamento de Ciencia de Materiales, Optica y TecnologIa Electronica, Universidad Miguel Hernandez, 03202 Elche (Spain)

    2007-09-11

    In this work, we present a simple analysis of binary diffraction gratings with different slit widths relative to the grating period. The analysis is based on a simple phasor technique directly derived from the Huygens principle. By introducing a slit phasor and a grating phasor, the intensity of the diffracted orders and the grating's resolving power can be easily obtained without applying the usual Fourier transform operations required for these calculations. The proposed phasor technique is mathematically equivalent to the Fourier transform calculation of the diffraction order amplitude, and it can be useful to explain binary diffraction gratings in a simple manner in introductory physics courses. This theoretical analysis is illustrated with experimental results using a liquid crystal device to display diffraction gratings with different fill factors.

  18. Development and application of Darwin X-ray diffraction theory for structure and chemical composition determination in multilayered crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wojcik, M.; Gaca, J.; Turos, A.; Strupinski, W.

    2000-01-01

    The method of investigation of the chemical composition for quaternary heterostructures has been developed. To this end X-ray high resolution diffractometry and RBS methods were applied. This method consists in finding a best fit between experimental diffraction pattern and theoretical one calculated, employing Darwin dynamical diffraction theory for a given model of heterostructure. This procedure was applied to determine the chemical profile in the growth direction for InGaAsP/InP superlattices that were grown by MOCVD technology on 001 InP substrate. The relations between the chemical composition of In x Ga 1-x As y P 1-y layer, its lattice parameter, optoelectronic properties and growth conditions were found. (author)

  19. Determination of patterns of interplanar distances starting from crystalline parameters for the Cyber computer of the ININ; Determinacion de patrones de distancias interplanares a partir de parametros cristalinos para la computadora Cyber del ININ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macias B, L.R

    1991-03-15

    In this report a program in Fortran language that reproduces the pattern of the Joint Committee on Powder Diffraction Standards is presented and that it can be applied to identify non well-known samples such as in those that only by means of articles or other sources the values of the parameters of the elementary cell are lightly known and by this way the correspondent diffraction pattern can be accurately generated. (Author)

  20. Three-dimensional diffraction of a thin metallic cylinder illuminated in conical incidence: application to diameter estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miguel Sanchez-Brea, Luis; Javier Salgado-Remacha, Francisco

    2008-01-01

    We present a model to determine the far-field diffraction pattern of a metallic cylinder of infinite length when it is illuminated in oblique incidence. This model is based on the Helmholtz-Kirchhoff integral using the Beckmann conditions for reflection. It considers the three-dimensional nature of the diffracting object as well as the material of which the cylinder is made. This model shows that the diffraction orders are placed in a cone of light. The amplitude at the far field can be divided into three terms: the first term accounts for Babinet's principle, that is, the contribution of the cylinder projection; the second term accounts for the three dimensionality of the cylinder; and the third term accounts for the material of which the cylinder is made. This model is applied to the diameter estimation of the cylinder. Since the amplitude of the Babinet contribution is much larger than the light reflected by the surface, the cylinder diameter can be obtained in a simple way. With this approximation, the locations of the diffraction minima do not vary when the cylinder is inclined. On the other hand, when the reflected light is considered the location of the minima and, hence, the estimation of the diameter, varies. Also, a modification of the diffraction minima is produced by the material of which the cylinder is made. Experimental results are also obtained that corroborate the theoretical approach

  1. Diffraction by an immersed elastic wedge

    CERN Document Server

    Croisille, Jean-Pierre

    1999-01-01

    This monograph presents the mathematical description and numerical computation of the high-frequency diffracted wave by an immersed elastic wave with normal incidence. The mathematical analysis is based on the explicit description of the principal symbol of the pseudo-differential operator connected with the coupled linear problem elasticity/fluid by the wedge interface. This description is subsequently used to derive an accurate numerical computation of diffraction diagrams for different incoming waves in the fluid, and for different wedge angles. The method can be applied to any problem of coupled waves by a wedge interface. This work is of interest for any researcher concerned with high frequency wave scattering, especially mathematicians, acousticians, engineers.

  2. Grazing incidence diffraction : A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilles, B [LTPCM, ENSEEG. St. Martin d` Heres. (France)

    1996-09-01

    Different Grazing Incidence Diffraction (GID) methods for the analysis of thin films and multilayer structures are reviewed in three sections: the reflectivity is developed in the first one, which includes the non-specular diffuse scattering. The second one is devoted to the extremely asymmetric Bragg diffraction and the third one to the in-plane Bragg diffraction. Analytical formulations of the scattered intensities are developed for each geometry, in the framework of the kinetical analysis as well as the dynamical theory. Experimental examples are given to illustrate the quantitative possibility of the GID techniques.

  3. Diffraction dissociation at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenkovszky, Laszlo [Bogolyubov Institute for Theoretical Physics (BITP), Ukrainian National Academy of Sciences 14-b, Metrolohichna str., Kiev, 03680, Ukraine and Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences 1525 Budapest, POB 49 (Hungary); Orava, Risto [Institute of Physics, Division of Elementary Particle Physics, P.O. Box 64 (Gustaf Haellstroeminkatu 2a), FI-00014 University of Helsinki, Finland and CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Salii, Andrii [Bogolyubov Institute for Theoretical Physics (BITP), Ukrainian National Academy of Sciences 14-b, Metrolohichna str., Kiev, 03680 (Ukraine)

    2013-04-15

    We report on recent calculations of low missing mass single (SD) and double (DD) diffractive dissociation at LHC energies. The calculations are based on a dual-Regge model, dominated by a single Pomeron exchange. The diffractively excited states lie on the nucleon trajectory N*, appended by the isolated Roper resonance. Detailed predictions for the squared momentum transfer and missing mass dependence of the differential and integrated single-and double diffraction dissociation in the kinematical range of present and future LHC measurements are given.

  4. Diffraction dissociation at the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenkovszky, László; Orava, Risto; Salii, Andrii

    2013-01-01

    We report on recent calculations of low missing mass single (SD) and double (DD) diffractive dissociation at LHC energies. The calculations are based on a dual-Regge model, dominated by a single Pomeron exchange. The diffractively excited states lie on the nucleon trajectory N*, appended by the isolated Roper resonance. Detailed predictions for the squared momentum transfer and missing mass dependence of the differential and integrated single-and double diffraction dissociation in the kinematical range of present and future LHC measurements are given.

  5. The diffractive achromat full spectrum computational imaging with diffractive optics

    KAUST Repository

    Peng, Yifan

    2016-07-11

    Diffractive optical elements (DOEs) have recently drawn great attention in computational imaging because they can drastically reduce the size and weight of imaging devices compared to their refractive counterparts. However, the inherent strong dispersion is a tremendous obstacle that limits the use of DOEs in full spectrum imaging, causing unacceptable loss of color fidelity in the images. In particular, metamerism introduces a data dependency in the image blur, which has been neglected in computational imaging methods so far. We introduce both a diffractive achromat based on computational optimization, as well as a corresponding algorithm for correction of residual aberrations. Using this approach, we demonstrate high fidelity color diffractive-only imaging over the full visible spectrum. In the optical design, the height profile of a diffractive lens is optimized to balance the focusing contributions of different wavelengths for a specific focal length. The spectral point spread functions (PSFs) become nearly identical to each other, creating approximately spectrally invariant blur kernels. This property guarantees good color preservation in the captured image and facilitates the correction of residual aberrations in our fast two-step deconvolution without additional color priors. We demonstrate our design of diffractive achromat on a 0.5mm ultrathin substrate by photolithography techniques. Experimental results show that our achromatic diffractive lens produces high color fidelity and better image quality in the full visible spectrum. © 2016 ACM.

  6. NIST/Sandia/ICDD Electron Diffraction Database: A Database for Phase Identification by Electron Diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, M J; Chambers, W F; Melgaard, D; Himes, V L; Stalick, J K; Mighell, A D

    1989-01-01

    A new database containing crystallographic and chemical information designed especially for application to electron diffraction search/match and related problems has been developed. The new database was derived from two well-established x-ray diffraction databases, the JCPDS Powder Diffraction File and NBS CRYSTAL DATA, and incorporates 2 years of experience with an earlier version. It contains 71,142 entries, with space group and unit cell data for 59,612 of those. Unit cell and space group information were used, where available, to calculate patterns consisting of all allowed reflections with d -spacings greater than 0.8 A for ~ 59,000 of the entries. Calculated patterns are used in the database in preference to experimental x-ray data when both are available, since experimental x-ray data sometimes omits high d -spacing data which falls at low diffraction angles. Intensity data are not given when calculated spacings are used. A search scheme using chemistry and r -spacing (reciprocal d -spacing) has been developed. Other potentially searchable data in this new database include space group, Pearson symbol, unit cell edge lengths, reduced cell edge length, and reduced cell volume. Compound and/or mineral names, formulas, and journal references are included in the output, as well as pointers to corresponding entries in NBS CRYSTAL DATA and the Powder Diffraction File where more complete information may be obtained. Atom positions are not given. Rudimentary search software has been written to implement a chemistry and r -spacing bit map search. With typical data, a full search through ~ 71,000 compounds takes 10~20 seconds on a PDP 11/23-RL02 system.

  7. Dictionary Indexing of Electron Channeling Patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Saransh; De Graef, Marc

    2017-02-01

    The dictionary-based approach to the indexing of diffraction patterns is applied to electron channeling patterns (ECPs). The main ingredients of the dictionary method are introduced, including the generalized forward projector (GFP), the relevant detector model, and a scheme to uniformly sample orientation space using the "cubochoric" representation. The GFP is used to compute an ECP "master" pattern. Derivative free optimization algorithms, including the Nelder-Mead simplex and the bound optimization by quadratic approximation are used to determine the correct detector parameters and to refine the orientation obtained from the dictionary approach. The indexing method is applied to poly-silicon and shows excellent agreement with the calibrated values. Finally, it is shown that the method results in a mean disorientation error of 1.0° with 0.5° SD for a range of detector parameters.

  8. Multi-order nonlinear diffraction in second harmonic generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saltiel, S. M.; Neshev, D.; Krolikowski, Wieslaw

    We analyze the emission patterns in the process of second harmonic (SH) generation in χ(2) nonlinear gratings and identify for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, the evidence of Raman-Nath type nonlinear diffraction in frequency doubling processes.......We analyze the emission patterns in the process of second harmonic (SH) generation in χ(2) nonlinear gratings and identify for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, the evidence of Raman-Nath type nonlinear diffraction in frequency doubling processes....

  9. DNA hydration studied by neutron fiber diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuller, W.; Forsyth, V.T.; Mahendrasingam, A.; Langan, P.; Pigram, W.J. [Keele Univ. (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1994-12-31

    The development of neutron high angle fiber diffraction to investigate the location of water around the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) double-helix is described. The power of the technique is illustrated by its application to the D and A conformations of DNA using the single crystal diffractometer, D19, at the Institute Laue-Langevin, Grenoble and the time of flight diffractometer, SXD, at the Rutherford Appleton ISIS Spallation Neutron Source. These studies show the existence of bound water closely associated with the DNA. The patterns of hydration in these two DNA conformations are quite distinct and are compared to those observed in X-ray single crystal studies of two-stranded oligodeoxynucleotides. Information on the location of water around the DNA double-helix from the neutron fiber diffraction studies is combined with that on the location of alkali metal cations from complementary X-ray high angle fiber diffraction studies at the Daresbury Laboratory SRS using synchrotron radiation. These analyses emphasize the importance of viewing DNA, water and ions as a single system with specific interactions between the three components and provide a basis for understanding the effect of changes in the concentration of water and ions in inducing conformations] transitions in the DNA double-helix.

  10. Neutron diffraction from holographic gratings in PMMA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Havermeyer, F.; Kraetzig, E.; Rupp, R.A.; Schubert, D.W.

    1999-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. By definition photorefractive materials change the refractive index for light under the action of light. Using the spatially modulated light intensity pattern from the interference of two plane waves, volume phase gratings with accurately defined spacings can be produced. Depending on the material there are many physical origins for these gratings, but in most cases they are linked to a density modulation and, consequently, to a refractive index grating for neutrons. By diffraction of light or neutrons from such gratings even small refractive index changes down to Δn ∼ 10 -7 - 10 -9 can be measured. In our photopolymer system PMMA/MMA (poly(methyl methacrylate) with a content of 10-20% of the residual monomer methyl methacrylate) inhomogeneous illumination leads to local post-polymerisation processes of the residual monomer. The resulting light-optical refractive index grating is caused by the modulation of the monomer/polymer ratio as well as by the modulation of the total density. Only by the unique combination of methods for light and neutron diffraction, available at HOLONS (Holography and Neutron Scattering, instrument at the GKSS research centre), both contributions can be separated. We discuss the angular dependence of the neutron diffraction efficiency for weakly and strongly (efficiencies up to 60% have been achieved) modulated gratings and propose a simple model for the evaluation of the gratings. (author)

  11. DNA hydration studied by neutron fiber diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuller, W.; Forsyth, V.T.; Mahendrasingam, A.; Langan, P.; Pigram, W.J.

    1994-01-01

    The development of neutron high angle fiber diffraction to investigate the location of water around the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) double-helix is described. The power of the technique is illustrated by its application to the D and A conformations of DNA using the single crystal diffractometer, D19, at the Institute Laue-Langevin, Grenoble and the time of flight diffractometer, SXD, at the Rutherford Appleton ISIS Spallation Neutron Source. These studies show the existence of bound water closely associated with the DNA. The patterns of hydration in these two DNA conformations are quite distinct and are compared to those observed in X-ray single crystal studies of two-stranded oligodeoxynucleotides. Information on the location of water around the DNA double-helix from the neutron fiber diffraction studies is combined with that on the location of alkali metal cations from complementary X-ray high angle fiber diffraction studies at the Daresbury Laboratory SRS using synchrotron radiation. These analyses emphasize the importance of viewing DNA, water and ions as a single system with specific interactions between the three components and provide a basis for understanding the effect of changes in the concentration of water and ions in inducing conformations] transitions in the DNA double-helix

  12. Specialization Patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz, Ulrik Pagh; Lawall, Julia Laetitia; Consel, Charles

    2000-01-01

    Design patterns offer many advantages for software development, but can introduce inefficiency into the final program. Program specialization can eliminate such overheads, but is most effective when targeted by the user to specific bottlenecks. Consequently, we propose that these concepts...... are complementary. Program specialization can optimize programs written using design patterns, and design patterns provide information about the program structure that can guide specialization. Concretely, we propose specialization patterns, which describe how to apply program specialization to optimize uses...... of design patterns. In this paper, we analyze the specialization opportunities provided by specific uses of design patterns. Based on the analysis of each design pattern, we define the associated specialization pattern. These specialization opportunities can be declared using the specialization classes...

  13. Neutron diffraction studies of glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, A.C.

    1987-01-01

    A survey is given of the application of neutron diffraction to structural studies of oxide and halide glasses. As with crystalline materials, neutron and X-ray diffraction are the major structural probes for glasses and other amorphous solids, particularly in respect of intermediate range order. The glasses discussed mostly have structures which are dominated by a network in which the bonding is predominantly covalent. The examples discussed demonstrate the power of the neutron diffraction technique in the investigation of the structures of inorganic glasses. The best modern diffraction experiments are capable of providing accurate data with high real space resolution, which if used correctly, are an extremely fine filter for the various structural models proposed in the literature. 42 refs

  14. Diffraction at a Straight Edge

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 20; Issue 5. Diffraction at a Straight Edge: A Gem from Sommerfeld's Work in Classical Physics. Rajaram Nityananda. General Article Volume 20 Issue 5 May 2015 pp 389-400 ...

  15. Neutron Powder Diffraction in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tellgren, R.

    1986-01-01

    Neutron powder diffraction in Sweden has developed around the research reactor R2 in Studsvik. The article describes this facility and presents a historical review of research results obtained. It also gives some ideas of plans for future development

  16. Tomography with energy dispersive diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, S. R.; Okasinski, J. S.; Woods, R.; Baldwin, J.; Madden, T.; Quaranta, O.; Rumaiz, A.; Kuczewski, T.; Mead, J.; Krings, T.; Siddons, P.; Miceli, A.; Almer, J. D.

    2017-09-01

    X-ray diffraction can be used as the signal for tomographic reconstruction and provides a cross-sectional map of the crystallographic phases and related quantities. Diffraction tomography has been developed over the last decade using monochromatic x-radiation and an area detector. This paper reports tomographic reconstruction with polychromatic radiation and an energy sensitive detector array. The energy dispersive diffraction (EDD) geometry, the instrumentation and the reconstruction process are described and related to the expected resolution. Results of EDD tomography are presented for two samples containing hydroxyapatite (hAp). The first is a 3D-printed sample with an elliptical crosssection and contains synthetic hAp. The second is a human second metacarpal bone from the Roman-era cemetery at Ancaster, UK and contains bio-hAp which may have been altered by diagenesis. Reconstructions with different diffraction peaks are compared. Prospects for future EDD tomography are also discussed.

  17. Diffraction at a Straight Edge

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    teaching and understanding physics. ... and mathematical footing, using electromagnetic theory and the proper ... this article, we will use the word diffraction to cover all experiments ..... PES Institute of Technology. Campus ... communication!)

  18. Experimental studies of diffractive phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cool, R.L.

    1984-01-01

    The coherent inelastic scattering process, usually called inclusive diffraction dissociation, is discussed. Topics include: t and M/sub x/ dependence, factorization, finite mass sum rule and charged particle multiplicities. 6 references, 14 figures

  19. Wavelet-based feature extraction applied to small-angle x-ray scattering patterns from breast tissue: a tool for differentiating between tissue types

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falzon, G; Pearson, S; Murison, R; Hall, C; Siu, K; Evans, A; Rogers, K; Lewis, R

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports on the application of wavelet decomposition to small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) patterns from human breast tissue produced by a synchrotron source. The pixel intensities of SAXS patterns of normal, benign and malignant tissue types were transformed into wavelet coefficients. Statistical analysis found significant differences between the wavelet coefficients describing the patterns produced by different tissue types. These differences were then correlated with position in the image and have been linked to the supra-molecular structural changes that occur in breast tissue in the presence of disease. Specifically, results indicate that there are significant differences between healthy and diseased tissues in the wavelet coefficients that describe the peaks produced by the axial d-spacing of collagen. These differences suggest that a useful classification tool could be based upon the spectral information within the axial peaks

  20. Diffractive production and hadron structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nussinov, S.; Szwed, J.

    1979-01-01

    Analysis of diffractive production on nuclei implied cross sections of the diffractively produced system on nucleons which are smaller than the corresponding projectile nucleon cross sections. A natural explanation for this feature is provided in the Good-Walker coherent production formalism. A specific realization of the Good-Walker formalism stated in terms of quarks and connecting electric flux tubes and some ensuing consequences are also discussed briefly. (Auth.)

  1. CONFERENCE: Elastic and diffractive scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, Alan

    1989-09-15

    Elastic scattering, when particles appear to 'bounce' off each other, and the related phenomena of diffractive scattering are currently less fashionable than the study of hard scattering processes. However this could change rapidly if unexpected results from the UA4 experiment at the CERN Collider are confirmed and their implications tested. These questions were highlighted at the third 'Blois Workshop' on Elastic and Diffractive Scattering, held early in May on the Evanston campus of Northwestern University, near Chicago.

  2. Theoretical review of diffractive phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golec-Biernat, K.

    2005-01-01

    We review QCD based descriptions of diffractive deep inelastic scattering emphasising the role of models with parton saturation. These models provide natural explanation of such experimentally observed facts as the constant ratio of σ diff /σ tot as a function of the Bjorken variable x, and Regge factorization of diffractive parton distributions. The Ingelman-Schlein model and the soft color interaction model are also presented

  3. The Diffraction Response Interpolation Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Søren Kragh; Wilhjelm, Jens Erik; Pedersen, Peder C.

    1998-01-01

    Computer modeling of the output voltage in a pulse-echo system is computationally very demanding, particularly whenconsidering reflector surfaces of arbitrary geometry. A new, efficient computational tool, the diffraction response interpolationmethod (DRIM), for modeling of reflectors in a fluid...... medium, is presented. The DRIM is based on the velocity potential impulseresponse method, adapted to pulse-echo applications by the use of acoustical reciprocity. Specifically, the DRIM operates bydividing the reflector surface into planar elements, finding the diffraction response at the corners...

  4. Diffractive flat panel solar concentrators of a novel design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Ties M; de Boer, Dick K G; Bastiaansen, Cees W M

    2016-07-11

    A novel design for a flat panel solar concentrator is presented which is based on a light guide with a grating applied on top that diffracts light into total internal reflection. By combining geometrical and diffractive optics the geometrical concentration ratio is optimized according to the principles of nonimaging optics, while the thickness of the device is minimized due to the use of total internal reflection.

  5. Theory of time-resolved inelastic x-ray diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenz, Ulf; Møller, Klaus Braagaard; Henriksen, Niels Engholm

    2010-01-01

    Starting from a general theory of time-resolved x-ray scattering, we derive a convenient expression for the diffraction signal based on a careful analysis of the relevant inelastic scattering processes. We demonstrate that the resulting inelastic limit applies to a wider variety of experimental...... conditions than similar, previously derived formulas, and it directly allows the application of selection rules when interpreting diffraction signals. Furthermore, we present a simple extension to systems simultaneously illuminated by x rays and a laser beam....

  6. Diffractive optical elements written by photodeposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baal-Zedaka, I.; Hava, S.; Mirchin, N.; Margolin, R.; Zagon, M.; Lapsker, I.; Azoulay, J.; Peled, A.

    2003-01-01

    In this work direct laser writing of diffractive optical elements (DOE) by photodeposition (PD) of amorphous selenium (a-Se) from colloid solutions has been investigated. We used a computer controlled laser scanner for patterning thin film micro-profiles creating thus planar optical elements by direct beam writing on surfaces immersed in a liquid phase PD cell. The laser employed was an argon ion laser at 488 nm wavelength, with powers up to 55 mW, for writing typically 25-250 μm wide lines of 200 nm thickness at rates of about 150 μm/s. Various elements made of photodeposited thin films on polymethyl-methacrylate (PMMA) substrates were produced for prototyping microlenses, linear grating arrays, cylindrical and circular profiled DOE patterns

  7. Reaching (sub-)micrometer resolution of photo-immobilized proteins using diffracted light beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovsen, Esben; Neves Petersen, Teresa; Petersen, Steffen B.

    2008-01-01

    , with dimensions as small as a few micrometers. The ultimate size of the immobilized spots is dependent on the focal area of the UV beam. The technology involves light induced formation of free, reactive thiol groups in molecules containing aromatic residues nearby disulphide bridges. It is not only limited...... to immobilizing molecules according to conventional patterns like microarrays, as any bitmap motif can virtually be used a template for patterning. We now show that molecules (proteins) can be immobilized on a surface with any arbitrary pattern according to diffraction patterns of light. The pattern of photo......-immobilized proteins reproduces the diffraction pattern of light expected with the optical setup. Immobilising biomolecules according to diffraction patterns of light will allow achievement of smaller patterns with higher resolution. The flexibility of this new technology leads to any patterns of photo...

  8. Suppressing Ghost Diffraction in E-Beam-Written Gratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Daniel; Backlund, Johan

    2009-01-01

    A modified scheme for electron-beam (E-beam) writing used in the fabrication of convex or concave diffraction gratings makes it possible to suppress the ghost diffraction heretofore exhibited by such gratings. Ghost diffraction is a spurious component of diffraction caused by a spurious component of grating periodicity as described below. The ghost diffraction orders appear between the main diffraction orders and are typically more intense than is the diffuse scattering from the grating. At such high intensity, ghost diffraction is the dominant source of degradation of grating performance. The pattern of a convex or concave grating is established by electron-beam writing in a resist material coating a substrate that has the desired convex or concave shape. Unfortunately, as a result of the characteristics of electrostatic deflectors used to control the electron beam, it is possible to expose only a small field - typically between 0.5 and 1.0 mm wide - at a given fixed position of the electron gun relative to the substrate. To make a grating larger than the field size, it is necessary to move the substrate to make it possible to write fields centered at different positions, so that the larger area is synthesized by "stitching" the exposed fields.

  9. High temperature neutron diffraction study of LaPO4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, S.K.; Mittal, R.; Ningthoujam, R.S.; Vatsa, R.K.; Hansen, T.

    2016-01-01

    We report high temperature powder neutron diffractions study in LaPO 4 using high-flux D20 neutron diffractometer in the Institut Laue-Langevin, France. The measurements were carried out in high resolution mode (incident neutron wavelength 1.36 A) at various temperature upto 900°C. CarefuI inspection of temperature dependence of diffraction data showed appearance and disappearance of certain Bragg's reflections above 1273 K. It is a signature of structural phase transition. Rietveld refinement of the powder diffraction data revealed that diffraction patterns at and above 800°C could be indexed using the monoclinic structure with P21/n space group. Detail analysis for identify the water molecules is under investigation. (author)

  10. Reconstructing an icosahedral virus from single-particle diffraction experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldin, D. K.; Poon, H.-C.; Schwander, P.; Uddin, M.; Schmidt, M.

    2011-08-01

    The first experimental data from single-particle scattering experiments from free electron lasers (FELs) are now becoming available. The first such experiments are being performed on relatively large objects such as viruses, which produce relatively low-resolution, low-noise diffraction patterns in so-called ``diffract-and-destroy'' experiments. We describe a very simple test on the angular correlations of measured diffraction data to determine if the scattering is from an icosahedral particle. If this is confirmed, the efficient algorithm proposed can then combine diffraction data from multiple shots of particles in random unknown orientations to generate a full 3D image of the icosahedral particle. We demonstrate this with a simulation for the satellite tobacco necrosis virus (STNV), the atomic coordinates of whose asymmetric unit is given in Protein Data Bank entry 2BUK.

  11. X-ray diffraction microtomography using synchrotron radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Barroso, R C; Jesus, E F O; Oliveira, L F

    2001-01-01

    The X-ray diffraction computed tomography technique is based on the interference phenomena of the coherent scatter. For low-momentum transfer, it is most probable that the scattering interaction will be coherent. A selective discrimination of a given element in a scanned specimen can be realized by fixing the Bragg angle which produces an interference peak and then, to carry out the computed tomography in the standard mode. The image reconstructed exalts the presence of this element with respect to other ones in a sample. This work reports the feasibility of a non-destructive synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction imaging technique. This research was performed at the X-ray Diffraction beam line of the National Synchrotron Light Laboratory (LNLS) in Brazil. The coherent scattering properties of different tissue and bone substitute materials were evaluated. Furthermore, diffraction patterns of some polycrystalline solids were studied due to industrial and environmental human exposure to these metals. The obtai...

  12. Three-dimensional x-ray diffraction detection and visualization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allahkarami, Masoud; Hanan, Jay C

    2014-01-01

    A new method of sensing and analyzing three-dimensional (3D) x-ray diffraction (XRD) cones was introduced. Using a two-dimensional area detector, a sequence of frames was collected while moving the detector away from the sample with small equally spaced steps and keeping all other parameters constant. A 3D dataset was created from the subsequent frames. The 3D x-ray diffraction (XRD 3 ) pattern contains far more information than a one-dimensional profile collected with the conventional diffractometer and 2D x-ray diffraction (XRD 2 ). The present work discusses some fundamentals about XRD 3 , such as the data collection method, 3D visualization, diffraction data interpretation and potential applications of XRD 3 . (paper)

  13. Single photon energy dispersive x-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higginbotham, Andrew; Patel, Shamim; Ciricosta, Orlando; Suggit, Matthew J.; Wark, Justin S.; Hawreliak, James A.; Collins, Gilbert W.; Coppari, Federica; Eggert, Jon H.; Tang, Henry

    2014-01-01

    With the pressure range accessible to laser driven compression experiments on solid material rising rapidly, new challenges in the diagnosis of samples in harsh laser environments are emerging. When driving to TPa pressures (conditions highly relevant to planetary interiors), traditional x-ray diffraction techniques are plagued by increased sources of background and noise, as well as a potential reduction in signal. In this paper we present a new diffraction diagnostic designed to record x-ray diffraction in low signal-to-noise environments. By utilising single photon counting techniques we demonstrate the ability to record diffraction patterns on nanosecond timescales, and subsequently separate, photon-by-photon, signal from background. In doing this, we mitigate many of the issues surrounding the use of high intensity lasers to drive samples to extremes of pressure, allowing for structural information to be obtained in a regime which is currently largely unexplored

  14. Single photon energy dispersive x-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higginbotham, Andrew; Patel, Shamim; Ciricosta, Orlando; Suggit, Matthew J.; Wark, Justin S. [Department of Physics, Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Hawreliak, James A.; Collins, Gilbert W.; Coppari, Federica; Eggert, Jon H. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Tang, Henry [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    With the pressure range accessible to laser driven compression experiments on solid material rising rapidly, new challenges in the diagnosis of samples in harsh laser environments are emerging. When driving to TPa pressures (conditions highly relevant to planetary interiors), traditional x-ray diffraction techniques are plagued by increased sources of background and noise, as well as a potential reduction in signal. In this paper we present a new diffraction diagnostic designed to record x-ray diffraction in low signal-to-noise environments. By utilising single photon counting techniques we demonstrate the ability to record diffraction patterns on nanosecond timescales, and subsequently separate, photon-by-photon, signal from background. In doing this, we mitigate many of the issues surrounding the use of high intensity lasers to drive samples to extremes of pressure, allowing for structural information to be obtained in a regime which is currently largely unexplored.

  15. Optimizing disk registration algorithms for nanobeam electron diffraction strain mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pekin, Thomas C. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, USA 94720 (United States); National Center for Electron Microscopy, Molecular Foundry, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, USA 94720 (United States); Gammer, Christoph [Erich Schmid Institute of Materials Science, Jahnstrasse 12, Leoben, Austria 8700 (Austria); Ciston, Jim [National Center for Electron Microscopy, Molecular Foundry, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, USA 94720 (United States); Minor, Andrew M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, USA 94720 (United States); National Center for Electron Microscopy, Molecular Foundry, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, USA 94720 (United States); Ophus, Colin, E-mail: cophus@gmail.com [National Center for Electron Microscopy, Molecular Foundry, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, USA 94720 (United States)

    2017-05-15

    Scanning nanobeam electron diffraction strain mapping is a technique by which the positions of diffracted disks sampled at the nanoscale over a crystalline sample can be used to reconstruct a strain map over a large area. However, it is important that the disk positions are measured accurately, as their positions relative to a reference are directly used to calculate strain. In this study, we compare several correlation methods using both simulated and experimental data in order to directly probe susceptibility to measurement error due to non-uniform diffracted disk illumination structure. We found that prefiltering the diffraction patterns with a Sobel filter before performing cross correlation or performing a square-root magnitude weighted phase correlation returned the best results when inner disk structure was present. We have tested these methods both on simulated datasets, and experimental data from unstrained silicon as well as a twin grain boundary in 304 stainless steel.

  16. An automatic control unit for A neutron diffraction crystal spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adib, M.; Abbas, Y.; Mostafa, M.; Hamouda, I.

    1982-01-01

    An automatic transistorized unit has been designed and constructed to control the operation of the double axis crystal spectrometer installed in front of one of the horizontal channels of the ET-RR-1 reactor. The function of the automatic unit is to store the diffracted neutrons at a certain angle with respect to the direction of the incident neutron beam in a selected channel of a 1024-multichannel analyzer for a certain preadjusted time period. AT the end of this time period the unit rotates the spectrometer's arm to another angle, selects the next channel of the MCA and provides the measurement of the diffracted neutron for the same time period. Such a sequence is repeated automatically over all angles required for the neutron diffraction pattern of the sample under investigation. As a result, the stored information at the MCA provides the neutron diffraction pattern as a function of channel number, where each channel corresponds to a certain scattering angle. The stored distribution at MCA can be obtained through the analyzer read out unit. The designed automatic unit has the possibility of providing the neutron diffraction pattern using a 6-digit scaler and a printer

  17. Automatic control unit for A neutron diffraction crystal spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adib, M.; Abbas, Y.; Mostafa, M.; Hamouda, I.

    1982-01-01

    An automatic transistorized unit has been designed and constructed to control the operation of the double axis crystal spectrometer installed in front of one of the horizontal channels of the ET-RR-1 reactor. The function of the automatic unit is to store the diffracted neutrons at a certain angle with respect to the direction of the incident neutron beam in a selected channel of a 1024-multichannel analyzer for a certain preadjusted time period. AT the end of this time period the unit rotates the spectrometer's arm to another angle, selects the next channel of the MCA and provides the measurement of the diffracted neutron for the same time period. Such a sequence is repeated automatically over all angles required for the neutron diffraction pattern of the sample under investigation. As a result, the stored information at the MCA provides the neutron diffraction pattern as a function of channel number, where each channel corresponds to a certain scattering angle. The stored distribution at MCA can be obtained through the analyzer read out unit. The designed automatic unit has the possibility of providing the neutron diffraction pattern using a 6-digit scaler and a printer.

  18. Time-resolved diffraction studies of muscle using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harford, Jeffrey; Squire, John

    1997-01-01

    Muscle contraction is one of those biological phenomena that we can all appreciate in our everyday lives. Sometimes it is when we are resting quietly and are aware of our heartbeat. At other times it may be when we are exerting ourselves and become short of breath, or when we exercise for a long period and our muscles start to ache. The way in which muscles produce force has exercised the minds of philosophers and scientists at least since the days of Erasistratus in the third century BC. Nowadays, of course, we know a very great deal about muscle structure, physiology and biochemistry, but we still do not know exactly what the molecular process is that produces movement. An ideal way of probing this process would be to be able to obtain signals from the relevant molecules as they actually go through their normal force-generating routine in an active muscle. The spatial dimensions involved are in the region of 1-50 nm, thus precluding the use of light microscopy, and the time regime is microseconds to milliseconds. Techniques with the appropriate spatial resolution might be electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction, but electron microscopy cannot yet be carried out on living tissue. X-ray diffraction methods can clearly have the right sort of spatial resolution, but what about recording diffraction patterns in the very short times involved (say 1 ms)? It is here that the high flux from synchrotron storage rings comes into its own. Using synchrotron radiation from, say, the SRS at the CCLRC Daresbury Laboratory it is possible to record x-ray diffraction patterns from living muscles in the millisecond time regime and to follow how these diffraction patterns change as the muscles go through typical contraction cycles. Unfortunately, x-ray diffraction is not a direct imaging method; the observed distribution of diffracted intensity needs to be interpreted in some way to give useful information on the spatial relationships of the force-generating molecules. This review

  19. High throughput screening of ligand binding to macromolecules using high resolution powder diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von Dreele, Robert B.; D'Amico, Kevin

    2006-10-31

    A process is provided for the high throughput screening of binding of ligands to macromolecules using high resolution powder diffraction data including producing a first sample slurry of a selected polycrystalline macromolecule material and a solvent, producing a second sample slurry of a selected polycrystalline macromolecule material, one or more ligands and the solvent, obtaining a high resolution powder diffraction pattern on each of said first sample slurry and the second sample slurry, and, comparing the high resolution powder diffraction pattern of the first sample slurry and the high resolution powder diffraction pattern of the second sample slurry whereby a difference in the high resolution powder diffraction patterns of the first sample slurry and the second sample slurry provides a positive indication for the formation of a complex between the selected polycrystalline macromolecule material and at least one of the one or more ligands.

  20. Relativistic electron diffraction at the UCLA Pegasus photoinjector laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Musumeci, P. [UCLA Department of Physics and Astronomy, 475 Portola Plaza, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547 (United States)], E-mail: musumeci@physics.ucla.edu; Moody, J.T.; Scoby, C.M. [UCLA Department of Physics and Astronomy, 475 Portola Plaza, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547 (United States)

    2008-10-15

    Electron diffraction holds the promise to yield real-time resolution of atomic motion in an easily accessible environment like a university laboratory at a fraction of the cost of fourth-generation X-ray sources. Currently the limit in time-resolution for conventional electron diffraction is set by how short an electron pulse can be made. A very promising solution to maintain the highest possible beam intensity without excessive pulse broadening from space charge effects is to increase the electron energy to the MeV level where relativistic effects significantly reduce the space charge forces. Rf photoinjectors can in principle deliver up to 10{sup 7}-10{sup 8} electrons packed in bunches of {approx}100-fs length, allowing an unprecedented time resolution and enabling the study of irreversible phenomena by single-shot diffraction patterns. The use of rf photoinjectors as sources for ultrafast electron diffraction has been recently at the center of various theoretical and experimental studies. The UCLA Pegasus laboratory, commissioned in early 2007 as an advanced photoinjector facility, is the only operating system in the country, which has recently demonstrated electron diffraction using a relativistic beam from an rf photoinjector. Due to the use of a state-of-the-art ultrashort photoinjector driver laser system, the beam has been measured to be sub-100-fs long, at least a factor of 5 better than what measured in previous relativistic electron diffraction setups. Moreover, diffraction patterns from various metal targets (titanium and aluminum) have been obtained using the Pegasus beam. One of the main laboratory goals in the near future is to fully develop the rf photoinjector-based ultrafast electron diffraction technique with particular attention to the optimization of the working point of the photoinjector in a low-charge ultrashort pulse regime, and to the development of suitable beam diagnostics.

  1. Relativistic electron diffraction at the UCLA Pegasus photoinjector laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musumeci, P.; Moody, J.T.; Scoby, C.M.

    2008-01-01

    Electron diffraction holds the promise to yield real-time resolution of atomic motion in an easily accessible environment like a university laboratory at a fraction of the cost of fourth-generation X-ray sources. Currently the limit in time-resolution for conventional electron diffraction is set by how short an electron pulse can be made. A very promising solution to maintain the highest possible beam intensity without excessive pulse broadening from space charge effects is to increase the electron energy to the MeV level where relativistic effects significantly reduce the space charge forces. Rf photoinjectors can in principle deliver up to 10 7 -10 8 electrons packed in bunches of ∼100-fs length, allowing an unprecedented time resolution and enabling the study of irreversible phenomena by single-shot diffraction patterns. The use of rf photoinjectors as sources for ultrafast electron diffraction has been recently at the center of various theoretical and experimental studies. The UCLA Pegasus laboratory, commissioned in early 2007 as an advanced photoinjector facility, is the only operating system in the country, which has recently demonstrated electron diffraction using a relativistic beam from an rf photoinjector. Due to the use of a state-of-the-art ultrashort photoinjector driver laser system, the beam has been measured to be sub-100-fs long, at least a factor of 5 better than what measured in previous relativistic electron diffraction setups. Moreover, diffraction patterns from various metal targets (titanium and aluminum) have been obtained using the Pegasus beam. One of the main laboratory goals in the near future is to fully develop the rf photoinjector-based ultrafast electron diffraction technique with particular attention to the optimization of the working point of the photoinjector in a low-charge ultrashort pulse regime, and to the development of suitable beam diagnostics

  2. Relativistic electron diffraction at the UCLA Pegasus photoinjector laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musumeci, P; Moody, J T; Scoby, C M

    2008-10-01

    Electron diffraction holds the promise to yield real-time resolution of atomic motion in an easily accessible environment like a university laboratory at a fraction of the cost of fourth-generation X-ray sources. Currently the limit in time-resolution for conventional electron diffraction is set by how short an electron pulse can be made. A very promising solution to maintain the highest possible beam intensity without excessive pulse broadening from space charge effects is to increase the electron energy to the MeV level where relativistic effects significantly reduce the space charge forces. Rf photoinjectors can in principle deliver up to 10(7)-10(8) electrons packed in bunches of approximately 100-fs length, allowing an unprecedented time resolution and enabling the study of irreversible phenomena by single-shot diffraction patterns. The use of rf photoinjectors as sources for ultrafast electron diffraction has been recently at the center of various theoretical and experimental studies. The UCLA Pegasus laboratory, commissioned in early 2007 as an advanced photoinjector facility, is the only operating system in the country, which has recently demonstrated electron diffraction using a relativistic beam from an rf photoinjector. Due to the use of a state-of-the-art ultrashort photoinjector driver laser system, the beam has been measured to be sub-100-fs long, at least a factor of 5 better than what measured in previous relativistic electron diffraction setups. Moreover, diffraction patterns from various metal targets (titanium and aluminum) have been obtained using the Pegasus beam. One of the main laboratory goals in the near future is to fully develop the rf photoinjector-based ultrafast electron diffraction technique with particular attention to the optimization of the working point of the photoinjector in a low-charge ultrashort pulse regime, and to the development of suitable beam diagnostics.

  3. Analysis and interpretation of diffraction data from complex, anisotropic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutuncu, Goknur

    Most materials are elastically anisotropic and exhibit additional anisotropy beyond elastic deformation. For instance, in ferroelectric materials the main inelastic deformation mode is via domains, which are highly anisotropic crystallographic features. To quantify this anisotropy of ferroelectrics, advanced X-ray and neutron diffraction methods were employed. Extensive sets of data were collected from tetragonal BaTiO3, PZT and other ferroelectric ceramics. Data analysis was challenging due to the complex constitutive behavior of these materials. To quantify the elastic strain and texture evolution in ferroelectrics under loading, a number of data analysis techniques such as the single peak and Rietveld methods were used and their advantages and disadvantages compared. It was observed that the single peak analysis fails at low peak intensities especially after domain switching while the Rietveld method does not account for lattice strain anisotropy although it overcomes the low intensity problem via whole pattern analysis. To better account for strain anisotropy the constant stress (Reuss) approximation was employed within the Rietveld method and new formulations to estimate lattice strain were proposed. Along the way, new approaches for handling highly anisotropic lattice strain data were also developed and applied. All of the ceramics studied exhibited significant changes in their crystallographic texture after loading indicating non-180° domain switching. For a full interpretation of domain switching the spherical harmonics method was employed in Rietveld. A procedure for simultaneous refinement of multiple data sets was established for a complete texture analysis. To further interpret diffraction data, a solid mechanics model based on the self-consistent approach was used in calculating lattice strain and texture evolution during the loading of a polycrystalline ferroelectric. The model estimates both the macroscopic average response of a specimen and its hkl

  4. Hair treatment process providing dispersed colors by light diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Richard Matthew Charles; Lamartine, Bruce Carvell; Orler, E. Bruce; Song, Shuangqi

    2015-12-22

    A hair treatment process for providing dispersed colors by light diffraction including (a) coating the hair with a material comprising a polymer, (b) pressing the hair with a pressing device including one or more surfaces, and (c) forming a secondary nanostructured surface pattern on the hair that is complementary to the primary nanostructured surface pattern on the one or more surfaces of the pressing device. The secondary nanostructured surface pattern diffracts light into dispersed colors that are visible on the hair. The section of the hair is pressed with the pressing device for from about 1 to 55 seconds. The polymer has a glass transition temperature from about 55.degree. C. to about 90.degree. C. The one or more surfaces include a primary nanostructured surface pattern.

  5. Neutron diffraction and oxide research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, B.; Howard, C.J.; Kennedy, B.J.

    1999-01-01

    Oxide compounds form a large class of interesting materials that have a diverse range of mechanical and electronic properties. This diversity and its commercial implications has had a significant impact on physics research. This is particularly evident in the fields of superconductivity magnetoresistivity and ferroelectricity, where discoveries in the last 15 years have given rise to significant shifts in research activities. Historically, oxides have been studied for many years, but it is only recently that significant effort has been diverted to the study of oxide materials for their application to mechanical and electronic devices. An important property of such materials is the atomic structure, for the determination of which diffraction techniques are ideally suited. Recent examples of structure determinations using neutron diffraction in oxide based systems are high temperature superconductors, where oxygen defects are a key factor. Here, neutron diffraction played a major role in determining the effect of oxygen on the superconducting properties. Similarly, neutron diffraction has enjoyed much success in the determination of the structures of the manganate based colossal magnetoresistive (CMR) materials. In both these cases the structure plays a pivotal role in determining theoretical models of the electronic properties. The neutron scattering group at ANSTO has investigated several oxide systems using neutron powder diffraction. Two such systems are presented in this paper; the zirconia-based materials that are used as engineering materials, and the perovskite-based oxides that include the well known cuprate superconductors and the manganate CMR materials

  6. Highlighting material structure with transmission electron diffraction correlation coefficient maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, Ákos K; Rauch, Edgar F; Lábár, János L

    2016-04-01

    Correlation coefficient maps are constructed by computing the differences between neighboring diffraction patterns collected in a transmission electron microscope in scanning mode. The maps are shown to highlight material structural features like grain boundaries, second phase particles or dislocations. The inclination of the inner crystal interfaces are directly deduced from the resulting contrast. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. High-energy particle diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barone, V.; Predazzi, E.

    2002-01-01

    This monograph gives a comprehensive and up-to-date overview of soft and hard diffraction processes in strong interaction physics. The first part covers the general formalism (the optical analogy, the eikonal picture, high-energy kinematics, S-matrix theory) and soft hadron-hadron scattering (including the Regge theory) in a complete and mature presentation. It can be used as a textbook in particle physics classes. The remainder of the book is devoted to the 'new diffraction': the pomeron in QCD, low-x physics, diffractive deep inelastic scattering and related processes, jet production etc. It presents recent results and experimental findings and their phenomenological interpretations. This part addresses graduate students as well as researchers. (orig.)

  8. Diffraction of high energy electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourret, A.

    1981-10-01

    The diffraction of electrons by a crystal is examined to study its structure. As the electron-substance interaction is strong, it must be treated in a dynamic manner. Using the N waves theory and physical optics the base equations giving the wave at the outlet are deduced for a perfect crystal and their equivalence is shown. The more complex case of an imperfect crystal is then envisaged in these two approaches. In both cases, only the diffraction of high energy electrons ( > 50 KeV) are considered since in the diffraction of slow electrons back scattering cannot be ignored. Taking into account an increasingly greater number of beams, through fast calculations computer techniques, enables images to be simulated in very varied conditions. The general use of the Fast Fourier Transform has given a clear cut practical advantage to the multi-layer method [fr

  9. Hard diffraction and rapidity gaps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandt, A.

    1995-09-01

    The field of hard diffraction, which studies events with a rapidity gap and a hard scattering, has expanded dramatically recently. A review of new results from CDF, D OE, H1 and ZEUS will be given. These results include diffractive jet production, deep-inelastic scattering in large rapidity gap events, rapidity gaps between high transverse energy jets, and a search for diffractive W-boson production. The combination of these results gives new insight into the exchanged object, believed to be the pomeron. The results axe consistent with factorization and with a hard pomeron that contains both quarks and gluons. There is also evidence for the exchange of a strongly interacting color singlet in high momentum transfer (36 2 ) events

  10. Spatiotemporal optical pulse transformation by a resonant diffraction grating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golovastikov, N. V.; Bykov, D. A., E-mail: bykovd@gmail.com; Doskolovich, L. L., E-mail: leonid@smr.ru; Soifer, V. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Image Processing Systems Institute (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-15

    The diffraction of a spatiotemporal optical pulse by a resonant diffraction grating is considered. The pulse diffraction is described in terms of the signal (the spatiotemporal incident pulse envelope) passage through a linear system. An analytic approximation in the form of a rational function of two variables corresponding to the angular and spatial frequencies has been obtained for the transfer function of the system. A hyperbolic partial differential equation describing the general form of the incident pulse envelope transformation upon diffraction by a resonant diffraction grating has been derived from the transfer function. A solution of this equation has been obtained for the case of normal incidence of a pulse with a central frequency lying near the guided-mode resonance of a diffraction structure. The presented results of numerical simulations of pulse diffraction by a resonant grating show profound changes in the pulse envelope shape that closely correspond to the proposed theoretical description. The results of the paper can be applied in creating new devices for optical pulse shape transformation, in optical information processing problems, and analog optical computations.

  11. Diffraction enhanced kinetic depth X-ray imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dicken, A.

    An increasing number of fields would benefit from a single analytical probe that can characterise bulk objects that vary in morphology and/or material composition. These fields include security screening, medicine and material science. In this study the X-ray region is shown to be an effective probe for the characterisation of materials. The most prominent analytical techniques that utilise X-radiation are reviewed. The study then focuses on methods of amalgamating the three dimensional power of kinetic depth X-ray (KDFX) imaging with the materials discrimination of angular dispersive X-ray diffraction (ADXRD), thus providing KDEX with a much needed material specific counterpart. A knowledge of the sample position is essential for the correct interpretation of diffraction signatures. Two different sensor geometries (i.e. circumferential and linear) that are able to collect end interpret multiple unknown material diffraction patterns and attribute them to their respective loci within an inspection volume are investigated. The circumferential and linear detector geometries are hypothesised, simulated and then tested in an experimental setting with the later demonstrating a greater ability at discerning between mixed diffraction patterns produced by differing materials. Factors known to confound the linear diffraction method such as sample thickness and radiation energy have been explored and quantified with a possible means of mitigation being identified (i.e. via increasing the sample to detector distance). A series of diffraction patterns (following the linear diffraction approach) were obtained from a single phantom object that was simultaneously interrogated via KDEX imaging. Areas containing diffraction signatures matched from a threat library have been highlighted in the KDEX imagery via colour encoding and match index is inferred by intensity. This union is the first example of its kind and is called diffraction enhanced KDEX imagery. Finally an additional

  12. Application of modified analytical function for approximation and computer simulation of diffraction profile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marrero, S. I.; Turibus, S. N.; Assis, J. T. De; Monin, V. I.

    2011-01-01

    Data processing of the most of diffraction experiments is based on determination of diffraction line position and measurement of broadening of diffraction profile. High precision and digitalisation of these procedures can be resolved by approximation of experimental diffraction profiles by analytical functions. There are various functions for these purposes both simples, like Gauss function, but no suitable for wild range of experimental profiles and good approximating functions but complicated for practice using, like Vougt or PersonVII functions. Proposed analytical function is modified Cauchy function which uses two variable parameters allowing describing any experimental diffraction profile. In the presented paper modified function was applied for approximation of diffraction lines of steels after various physical and mechanical treatments and simulation of diffraction profiles applied for study of stress gradients and distortions of crystal structure. (Author)

  13. Reflector modelization in neutronic and optimization methods applied to fuel loading pattern; Modelisation du reflecteur en neutronique et methodes d`optimisation appliquees aux plans de rechargement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Argaud, J P

    1995-12-01

    I Physical description of P.W.R nuclear core can be handled by multigroup neutronic diffusion model. We are interested in two problems, using the same approach for the optimization aspect. To deal with some differences between calculations and measurements, the question of their reduction is then introduced. A reflector parameters identification from core measurements is then purposed, the reflector being at the present time the less known part of core diffusion model. This approach conducts to study the reflector model, in particular by an analysis of its transport origin. It leads finally to a new model of reflector described by boundary operators using an integral formulation on the core/reflector interface. That is on this new model that a parameter identification formulation of calculations-measurements differences reduction is given, using an adjoint state formulation to minimize errors by a gradient method. Furthermore, nuclear fuel reload of P.W.R core needs an optimal distribution of fuel assemblies, namely a loading pattern. This combinatorial optimization problem is then expressed as a cost function minimization, the cost function describing the power spatial distribution. Various methods (linear programming, simulated annealing,...), used to solve this problem, are detailed, given in particular a practical search example. A new approach is then proposed, using the gradient of the cost function to direct the search in the patterns discrete space. Final results of complete patterns search trials are presented, and compared to those obtained by other methods. In particular the results are obtained very quickly. (author). 81 refs., 55 figs., 5 appends.

  14. Anthropometric geography applied to the analysis of socioeconomic disparities: cohort trends and spatial patterns of height and robustness in 20th-century Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camara, Antonio D; Roman, Joan Garcia

    2015-11-01

    Anthropometrics have been widely used to study the influence of environmental factors on health and nutritional status. In contrast, anthropometric geography has not often been employed to approximate the dynamics of spatial disparities associated with socioeconomic and demographic changes. Spain exhibited intense disparity and change during the middle decades of the 20 th century, with the result that the life courses of the corresponding cohorts were associated with diverse environmental conditions. This was also true of the Spanish territories. This paper presents insights concerning the relationship between socioeconomic changes and living conditions by combining the analysis of cohort trends and the anthropometric cartography of height and physical build. This analysis is conducted for Spanish male cohorts born 1934-1973 that were recorded in the Spanish military statistics. This information is interpreted in light of region-level data on GDP and infant mortality. Our results show an anthropometric convergence across regions that, nevertheless, did not substantially modify the spatial patterns of robustness, featuring primarily robust northeastern regions and weak Central-Southern regions. These patterns persisted until the 1990s (cohorts born during the 1970s). For the most part, anthropometric disparities were associated with socioeconomic disparities, although the former lessened over time to a greater extent than the latter. Interestingly, the various anthropometric indicators utilized here do not point to the same conclusions. Some discrepancies between height and robustness patterns have been found that moderate the statements from the analysis of cohort height alone regarding the level and evolution of living conditions across Spanish regions.

  15. Small area analysis using micro-diffraction techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goehner, Raymond P.; Tissot, Ralph G. Jr.; Michael, Joseph R.

    2000-01-01

    An overall trend toward smaller electronic packages and devices makes it increasingly important and difficult to obtain meaningful diffraction information from small areas. X-ray micro-diffraction, electron back-scattered diffraction (EBSD) and Kossel are micro-diffraction techniques used for crystallographic analysis including texture, phase identification and strain measurements. X-ray micro-diffraction primarily is used for phase analysis and residual strain measurements. X-ray micro-diffraction primarily is used for phase analysis and residual strain measurements of areas between 10 microm to 100 microm. For areas this small glass capillary optics are used for producing a usable collimated x-ray beam. These optics are designed to reflect x-rays below the critical angle therefore allowing for larger solid acceptance angle at the x-ray source resulting in brighter smaller x-ray beams. The determination of residual strain using micro-diffraction techniques is very important to the semiconductor industry. Residual stresses have caused voiding of the interconnect metal which then destroys electrical continuity. Being able to determine the residual stress helps industry to predict failures from the aging effects of interconnects due to this stress voiding. Stress measurements would be impossible using a conventional x-ray diffractometer; however, utilizing a 30 microm glass capillary these small areas are readily assessable for analysis. Kossel produces a wide angle diffraction pattern from fluorescent x-rays generated in the sample by an e-beam in a SEM. This technique can yield very precise lattice parameters for determining strain. Fig. 2 shows a Kossel pattern from a Ni specimen. Phase analysis on small areas is also possible using an energy dispersive spectrometer (EBSD) and x-ray micro-diffraction techniques. EBSD has the advantage of allowing the user to observe the area of interest using the excellent imaging capabilities of the SEM. An EDS detector has been

  16. Light diffraction through a feather

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pérez García, Hugo;

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We have used a feather to study light diffraction, in a qualitative as well as in a quantitative manner. Experimental measurement of the separation between the bright spots obtained with a laser pointer allowed the determination of the space between feather's barbs and barbules. The results we have obtained agree satisfactorily with those corresponding to a typical feather. Due to the kind of materials, the related concepts and the experimental results, this activity becomes an excellent didactic resource suitable for studying diffraction, both in introductory undergraduate as well as in secondary school physics courses.

  17. CONFERENCE: Elastic and diffractive scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, Alan

    1989-01-01

    Elastic scattering, when particles appear to 'bounce' off each other, and the related phenomena of diffractive scattering are currently less fashionable than the study of hard scattering processes. However this could change rapidly if unexpected results from the UA4 experiment at the CERN Collider are confirmed and their implications tested. These questions were highlighted at the third 'Blois Workshop' on Elastic and Diffractive Scattering, held early in May on the Evanston campus of Northwestern University, near Chicago

  18. Dynamical theory of neutron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sears, V.F.

    1978-01-01

    We present a review of the dynamical theory of neutron diffraction by macroscopic bodies which provides the theoretical basis for the study of neutron optics. We consider both the theory of dispersion, in which it is shown that the coherent wave in the medium satisfies a macroscopic one-body Schroedinger equation, and the theory of reflection, refraction, and diffraction in which the above equation is solved for a number of special cases of interest. The theory is illustrated with the help of experimental results obtained over the past 10 years by a number of new techniques such as neutron gravity refractometry. Pendelloesung interference, and neutron interferometry. (author)

  19. Diffractive dissociation and new quarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, A.R.

    1983-04-01

    We argue that the chiral limit of QCD can be identified with the strong (diffractive dissociation) coupling limit of reggeon field theory. Critical Pomeron scaling at high energy must then be directly related to an infra-red fixed-point of massless QCD and so requires a large number of flavors. This gives a direct argument that the emergence of diffraction-peak scaling, KNO scaling etc. at anti p-p colliders are evidence of a substantial quark structure still to be discovered

  20. Genetic Algorithm with Maximum-Minimum Crossover (GA-MMC) Applied in Optimization of Radiation Pattern Control of Phased-Array Radars for Rocket Tracking Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Leonardo W. T.; Barros, Vitor F.; Silva, Sandro G.

    2014-01-01

    In launching operations, Rocket Tracking Systems (RTS) process the trajectory data obtained by radar sensors. In order to improve functionality and maintenance, radars can be upgraded by replacing antennas with parabolic reflectors (PRs) with phased arrays (PAs). These arrays enable the electronic control of the radiation pattern by adjusting the signal supplied to each radiating element. However, in projects of phased array radars (PARs), the modeling of the problem is subject to various combinations of excitation signals producing a complex optimization problem. In this case, it is possible to calculate the problem solutions with optimization methods such as genetic algorithms (GAs). For this, the Genetic Algorithm with Maximum-Minimum Crossover (GA-MMC) method was developed to control the radiation pattern of PAs. The GA-MMC uses a reconfigurable algorithm with multiple objectives, differentiated coding and a new crossover genetic operator. This operator has a different approach from the conventional one, because it performs the crossover of the fittest individuals with the least fit individuals in order to enhance the genetic diversity. Thus, GA-MMC was successful in more than 90% of the tests for each application, increased the fitness of the final population by more than 20% and reduced the premature convergence. PMID:25196013

  1. X-ray diffraction analysis of InAs nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davydok, Anton

    2013-01-01

    Semiconductor nanowires have attracted great interest as building blocks for future electronic and optoelectronic devices. The variability of the growth process opens the opportunity to control and combine the various properties tailoring for specific application. It was shown that the electrical and optical characteristics of the nanowires are strongly connected with their structure. Despite intensive research in this field, the growth process is still not fully understood. In particular, extensive real structure investigations are required. Most of the reports dedicated on the structural researches are based on the results of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) or transmission electron microscopy (TEM). SEM provides an image of the surface with nanostructures and is mainly used to describe the morphology of the sample, but it does not bring information about the internal structure, phase composition and defect structure. At the same time, the internal structure can be examined by TEM down to atomic scale. TEM image of good quality are very expensive due to the efforts in sample preparation and in localisation of a single object. All these aspects make the statistical structural analysis difficult. In the present work, X-ray diffraction analysis has been applied for structural investigation of InAs nanowires grown by different techniques. Using various X-ray diffraction geometries, the nanowire systems were investigated in terms of the lattice parameters, phase composition, strains and displacement fields and stacking defects. In particular, realizing grazing incidence diffraction and controlling the penetration depth of X-ray beam, we characterized sample series grown by Au-assisted metal organic phase epitaxy on GaAs [111]B substrate with different growth time. According to the results of SEM and X-ray investigations, a model of the growth process has been proposed. A more detailed analysis was performed on InAs nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on

  2. Semiclassical perturbation theory for diffraction in heavy atom surface scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miret-Artés, Salvador; Daon, Shauli; Pollak, Eli

    2012-05-28

    The semiclassical perturbation theory formalism of Hubbard and Miller [J. Chem. Phys. 78, 1801 (1983)] for atom surface scattering is used to explore the possibility of observation of heavy atom diffractive scattering. In the limit of vanishing ℏ the semiclassical theory is shown to reduce to the classical perturbation theory. The quantum diffraction pattern is sensitive to the characteristics of the beam of incoming particles. Necessary conditions for observation of quantum diffraction are derived for the angular width of the incoming beam. An analytic expression for the angular distribution as a function of the angular and momentum variance of the incoming beam is obtained. We show both analytically and through some numerical results that increasing the angular width of the incident beam leads to decoherence of the quantum diffraction peaks and one approaches the classical limit. However, the incoherence of the beam in the parallel direction does not destroy the diffraction pattern. We consider the specific example of Ar atoms scattered from a rigid LiF(100) surface.

  3. CMS results on soft diffraction

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00086121

    2013-01-01

    We present measurements of soft single- and double-diffractive cross sections, as well as of forward rapidity gap cross sections at 7 TeV at the LHC, and compare the results to other measurements and to theoretical predictions implemented in various Monte Carlo simulations.

  4. A QCD analysis of ZEUS diffractive data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Magill, S. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (US)] (and others)

    2009-11-15

    ZEUS inclusive diffractive cross-section measurements have been used in a DGLAP next-to-leading-order QCD analysis to extract the diffractive parton distribution functions. Data on diffractive dijet production in deep inelastic scattering have also been included to constrain the gluon density. Predictions based on the extracted parton densities are compared to diffractive charm and dijet photoproduction data. (orig.)

  5. A QCD analysis of ZEUS diffractive data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Magill, S.

    2009-11-01

    ZEUS inclusive diffractive cross-section measurements have been used in a DGLAP next-to-leading-order QCD analysis to extract the diffractive parton distribution functions. Data on diffractive dijet production in deep inelastic scattering have also been included to constrain the gluon density. Predictions based on the extracted parton densities are compared to diffractive charm and dijet photoproduction data. (orig.)

  6. Electro-optic diffraction grating tuned laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, R.S.

    1975-01-01

    An electro-optic diffraction grating tuned laser comprising a laser medium, output mirror, retro-reflective grating and an electro-optic diffraction grating beam deflector positioned between the laser medium and the reflective diffraction grating is described. An optional angle multiplier may be used between the electro-optic diffraction grating and the reflective grating. (auth)

  7. Bragg's Law diffraction simulations for electron backscatter diffraction analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kacher, Josh, E-mail: jkacherbyu@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Brigham Young University, 455B Crabtree Technology Building, Provo, UT 84602 (United States); Landon, Colin; Adams, Brent L.; Fullwood, David [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Brigham Young University, 455B Crabtree Technology Building, Provo, UT 84602 (United States)

    2009-08-15

    In 2006, Angus Wilkinson introduced a cross-correlation-based electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) texture analysis system capable of measuring lattice rotations and elastic strains to high resolution. A variation of the cross-correlation method is introduced using Bragg's Law-based simulated EBSD patterns as strain free reference patterns that facilitates the use of the cross-correlation method with polycrystalline materials. The lattice state is found by comparing simulated patterns to collected patterns at a number of regions on the pattern using the cross-correlation function and calculating the deformation from the measured shifts of each region. A new pattern can be simulated at the deformed state, and the process can be iterated a number of times to converge on the absolute lattice state. By analyzing an iteratively rotated single crystal silicon sample and recovering the rotation, this method is shown to have an angular resolution of {approx}0.04{sup o} and an elastic strain resolution of {approx}7e-4. As an example of applications, elastic strain and curvature measurements are used to estimate the dislocation density in a single grain of a compressed polycrystalline Mg-based AZ91 alloy.

  8. In-situ high-energy X-ray diffraction and batch Rietveld refinement of phase changes in titanium aluminides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitfield, R.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: We have used the Rietveld refinement method for the analysis of high-energy X-ray power diffraction for quantitatve phase analysis. This method has the advantage of being able to model the multiple phases appearing in the diffraction pattern and tell us about the composition of the phases of a sample as we change the temperature. It has been applied to various TiAl compounds allowing us to follow in detail the phase transitions of the intermetallics when heated to around 1400 0 Cand subsequently cooled. Small amounts of additives like V, Cr and Gd as well as signatures from different production processes can be seen to have an effect on the phase transitions. With increasing temperature we can see the evolution of the unit cell due to thermal expansion, chemical segregation and the relative proportion of phase changes

  9. Renormalized multiple-scattering theory of photoelectron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biagini, M.

    1993-01-01

    The current multiple-scattering cluster techniques for the calculation of x-ray photoelectron and Auger-electron diffraction patterns consume much computer time in the intermediate-energy range (200--1000 eV); in fact, because of the large value of the electron mean free path and of the large forward-scattering amplitude at such energies, the electron samples a relatively large portion of the crystal, so that the number of paths to be considered becomes dramatically high. An alternative method is developed in the present paper: instead of calculating the individual contribution from each single path, the scattering matrix of each plane parallel to the surface is calculated with a renormalization process that calculates every scattering event in the plane up to infinite order. Similarly the scattering between two planes is calculated up to infinite order, and the double-plane scattering matrix is introduced. The process may then be applied to the calculation of a larger set of atomic layers. The advantage of the method is that a relatively small number of internuclear vectors have been used to obtain convergence in the calculation

  10. Crystallized solids characterization by X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broll, N.

    1996-01-01

    This work deals with the crystallized solids characterization by X-ray diffraction. The powders diffraction principle is described. Then are given the different powders diffraction experimental methods. An X-ray diffraction device is essentially constituted of three parts: the X-rays source, the sample and the detector. The source is usually constituted by an X-rays tube whereas the sample can be fixed on a photographic chamber or put on a goniometer. The different photographic chambers which can be used (Debye-Scherrer, Seeman-Bohlin and Guinier) are described. The powders diffractometer the most used is a Bragg-Brentano focusing diffractometer because it allows to obtain very sharp spectral lines and an important diffracted intensity. The detectors which are the mainly used are the scintillation counters. The most important use in powders diffractometry is the identification of the different phases of a sample. The phases identification consists to compare the unknown sample spectrum at those of standard materials indexed until now. Two methods exist at present. They are explained and their limits in the phases search are given. Another use of the X-ray diffraction is the quantitative analysis. It consists to determine the concentrations of each crystal phases of a sample. The principles of these quantitative methods are given. The lattice parameters of a polycrystal material can be determined from its X-ray pattern too with a very high precision. The way to index powders patterns is given. The residual stresses of materials can also be estimated. The principle of this measured method is explained. It is at last possible to study from an X-ray pattern, the material grain orientations during the different steps of preparation and working. (O.M.). 13 refs., 19 figs., 1 tab

  11. Big Data Usage Patterns in the Health Care Domain: A Use Case Driven Approach Applied to the Assessment of Vaccination Benefits and Risks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liyanage, H.; Liaw, S-T.; Kuziemsky, C.; Mold, F.; Krause, P.; Fleming, D.; Jones, S.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Generally benefits and risks of vaccines can be determined from studies carried out as part of regulatory compliance, followed by surveillance of routine data; however there are some rarer and more long term events that require new methods. Big data generated by increasingly affordable personalised computing, and from pervasive computing devices is rapidly growing and low cost, high volume, cloud computing makes the processing of these data inexpensive. Objective To describe how big data and related analytical methods might be applied to assess the benefits and risks of vaccines. Method: We reviewed the literature on the use of big data to improve health, applied to generic vaccine use cases, that illustrate benefits and risks of vaccination. We defined a use case as the interaction between a user and an information system to achieve a goal. We used flu vaccination and pre-school childhood immunisation as exemplars. Results We reviewed three big data use cases relevant to assessing vaccine benefits and risks: (i) Big data processing using crowd-sourcing, distributed big data processing, and predictive analytics, (ii) Data integration from heterogeneous big data sources, e.g. the increasing range of devices in the “internet of things”, and (iii) Real-time monitoring for the direct monitoring of epidemics as well as vaccine effects via social media and other data sources. Conclusions Big data raises new ethical dilemmas, though its analysis methods can bring complementary real-time capabilities for monitoring epidemics and assessing vaccine benefit-risk balance. PMID:25123718

  12. Diffraction efficiency calculations of polarization diffraction gratings with surface relief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazarova, D.; Sharlandjiev, P.; Berberova, N.; Blagoeva, B.; Stoykova, E.; Nedelchev, L.

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, we evaluate the optical response of a stack of two diffraction gratings of equal one-dimensional periodicity. The first one is a surface-relief grating structure; the second, a volume polarization grating. This model is based on our experimental results from polarization holographic recordings in azopolymer films. We used films of commercially available azopolymer (poly[1-[4-(3-carboxy-4-hydroxyphenylazo) benzenesulfonamido]-1,2-ethanediyl, sodium salt]), shortly denoted as PAZO. During the recording process, a polarization grating in the volume of the material and a relief grating on the film surface are formed simultaneously. In order to evaluate numerically the optical response of this “hybrid” diffraction structure, we used the rigorous coupled-wave approach (RCWA). It yields stable numerical solutions of Maxwell’s vector equations using the algebraic eigenvalue method.

  13. Digital diffractive optics: Have diffractive optics entered mainstream industry yet?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kress, Bernard; Hejmadi, Vic

    2010-05-01

    When a new technology is integrated into industry commodity products and consumer electronic devices, and sold worldwide in retail stores, it is usually understood that this technology has then entered the realm of mainstream technology and therefore mainstream industry. Such a leap however does not come cheap, as it has a double edge sword effect: first it becomes democratized and thus massively developed by numerous companies for various applications, but also it becomes a commodity, and thus gets under tremendous pressure to cut down its production and integration costs while not sacrificing to performance. We will show, based on numerous examples extracted from recent industry history, that the field of Diffractive Optics is about to undergo such a major transformation. Such a move has many impacts on all facets of digital diffractive optics technology, from the optical design houses to the micro-optics foundries (for both mastering and volume replication), to the final product integrators or contract manufacturers. The main causes of such a transformation are, as they have been for many other technologies in industry, successive technological bubbles which have carried and lifted up diffractive optics technology within the last decades. These various technological bubbles have been triggered either by real industry needs or by virtual investment hype. Both of these causes will be discussed in the paper. The adjective ""digital"" in "digital diffractive optics" does not refer only, as it is done in digital electronics, to the digital functionality of the element (digital signal processing), but rather to the digital way they are designed (by a digital computer) and fabricated (as wafer level optics using digital masking techniques). However, we can still trace a very strong similarity between the emergence of micro-electronics from analog electronics half a century ago, and the emergence of digital optics from conventional optics today.

  14. A review and reassessment of diffraction, scattering, and shadows in electrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Matthew J.; Sorensen, Christopher M.

    2018-05-01

    The concepts of diffraction and scattering are well known and considered fundamental in optics and other wave phenomena. For any type of wave, one way to define diffraction is the spreading of waves, i.e., no change in the average propagation direction, while scattering is the deflection of waves with a clear change of propagation direction. However, the terms "diffraction" and "scattering" are often used interchangeably, and hence, a clear distinction between the two is difficult to find. This review considers electromagnetic waves and retains the simple definition that diffraction is the spreading of waves but demonstrates that all diffraction patterns are the result of scattering. It is shown that for electromagnetic waves, the "diffracted" wave from an object is the Ewald-Oseen extinction wave in the far-field zone. The intensity distribution of this wave yields what is commonly called the diffraction pattern. Moreover, this is the same Ewald-Oseen wave that cancels the incident wave inside the object and thereafter continues to do so immediately behind the object to create a shadow. If the object is much wider than the beam but has a hole, e.g., a screen with an aperture, the Ewald-Oseen extinction wave creates the shadow behind the screen and the incident light that passes through the aperture creates the diffraction pattern. This point of view also illustrates Babinet's principle. Thus, it is the Ewald-Oseen extinction theorem that binds together diffraction, scattering, and shadows.

  15. Diffraction experiments of argon or helium on polluted surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berthier, J.P.; Constans, A.; Daury, G.; Lostis, P.

    1975-01-01

    Scattering patterns of molecular beams of argon or helium from metal surfaces (bulk metal or thin films) are reported. The pressure in the scattering chamber is about 10 -6 torr. So, the surfaces are polluted. Diffraction peaks are observed which can be interpreted very well by assuming that nitrogen, oxygen or carbon atoms are adsorbed of the surface. On the other hand, diffraction peaks from a silicon crystal have been observed which can be reproduced very well by using silicon crystal lattice. These experiments are not interpreted accurately, but show that molecular reflection can be used for some surface studies [fr

  16. Ultrafast molecular imaging by laser-induced electron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, M.; Nguyen-Dang, T. T.; Cornaggia, C.; Saugout, S.; Charron, E.; Keller, A.; Atabek, O.

    2011-01-01

    We address the feasibility of imaging geometric and orbital structures of a polyatomic molecule on an attosecond time scale using the laser-induced electron diffraction (LIED) technique. We present numerical results for the highest molecular orbitals of the CO 2 molecule excited by a near-infrared few-cycle laser pulse. The molecular geometry (bond lengths) is determined within 3% of accuracy from a diffraction pattern which also reflects the nodal properties of the initial molecular orbital. Robustness of the structure determination is discussed with respect to vibrational and rotational motions with a complete interpretation of the laser-induced mechanisms.

  17. Symmetry, stability, and diffraction properties of icosahedral crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bak, P.

    1985-01-01

    In a remarkable experiment on an Mn-Al alloy, Shechtman et al. observed a diffraction spectrum with icosahedral symmetry. This is inconsistent with discrete translational invariance since the symmetry includes a five-fold axis. In this paper, it is shown that the crystallography and diffraction pattern can be described by a six-dimensional space group. The crystal structure in 3d is obtained as a cut along a 3d hyperplane in a regular 6d crystal. Displacements of the 6d crystal along 6 orthogonal directions define 6 continuous symmetries for the icosahedral crystal, three of which are phase symmetries describing internal rearrangements of the atoms

  18. X-ray powder diffraction data on miscellaneous lanthanide compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferguson, I.F.; Hughes, T.E.

    1978-08-01

    Recent work on neutron absorbing materials has produced various new X-ray diffraction powder patterns of compounds of the lanthanides. Various inconsistencies in previously published data have been noted, and accurate measurements have been made of the lattice parameters of the rare earth oxides Sm 2 0 3 , Eu 2 0 3 , Gd 2 0 3 which have the monoclinic rare earth type B- structure, as well as Eu0. These data are recorded for reference. The optimum conditions for obtaining X-ray powder diffraction data from europium compounds are also noted. (author)

  19. Highlighting material structure with transmission electron diffraction correlation coefficient maps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiss, Ákos K.; Rauch, Edgar F.; Lábár, János L.

    2016-01-01

    Correlation coefficient maps are constructed by computing the differences between neighboring diffraction patterns collected in a transmission electron microscope in scanning mode. The maps are shown to highlight material structural features like grain boundaries, second phase particles or dislocations. The inclination of the inner crystal interfaces are directly deduced from the resulting contrast. - Highlights: • We propose a novel technique to image the structure of polycrystalline TEM-samples. • Correlation coefficients maps highlights the evolution of the diffracting signal. • 3D views of grain boundaries are provided for nano-particles or polycrystals.

  20. Fourier diffraction theorem for diffusion-based thermal tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baddour, Natalie

    2006-01-01

    There has been much recent interest in thermal imaging as a method of non-destructive testing and for non-invasive medical imaging. The basic idea of applying heat or cold to an area and observing the resulting temperature change with an infrared camera has led to the development of rapid and relatively inexpensive inspection systems. However, the main drawback to date has been that such an approach provides mainly qualitative results. In order to advance the quantitative results that are possible via thermal imaging, there is interest in applying techniques and algorithms from conventional tomography. Many tomography algorithms are based on the Fourier diffraction theorem, which is inapplicable to thermal imaging without suitable modification to account for the attenuative nature of thermal waves. In this paper, the Fourier diffraction theorem for thermal tomography is derived and discussed. The intent is for this thermal-diffusion based Fourier diffraction theorem to form the basis of tomographic reconstruction algorithms for quantitative thermal imaging

  1. Acoustic non-diffracting Airy beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Zhou; Guo, Xiasheng; Tu, Juan; Ma, Qingyu; Wu, Junru; Zhang, Dong

    2015-01-01

    The acoustic non-diffracting Airy beam as its optical counterpart has unique features of self-bending and self-healing. The complexity of most current designs handicaps its applications. A simple design of an acoustic source capable of generating multi-frequency and broad-band acoustic Airy beam has been theoretically demonstrated by numerical simulations. In the design, a piston transducer is corrugated to induce spatial phase variation for transducing the Airy function. The piston's surface is grooved in a pattern that the width of each groove corresponds to the half wavelength of Airy function. The resulted frequency characteristics and its dependence on the size of the piston source are also discussed. This simple design may promote the wide applications of acoustic Airy beam particularly in the field of medical ultrasound

  2. Paraconsistents artificial neural networks applied to the study of mutational patterns of the F subtype of the viral strains of HIV-1 to antiretroviral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PAULO C.C. DOS SANTOS

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The high variability of HIV-1 as well as the lack of efficient repair mechanisms during the stages of viral replication, contribute to the rapid emergence of HIV-1 strains resistant to antiretroviral drugs. The selective pressure exerted by the drug leads to fixation of mutations capable of imparting varying degrees of resistance. The presence of these mutations is one of the most important factors in the failure of therapeutic response to medications. Thus, it is of critical to understand the resistance patterns and mechanisms associated with them, allowing the choice of an appropriate therapeutic scheme, which considers the frequency, and other characteristics of mutations. Utilizing Paraconsistents Artificial Neural Networks, seated in Paraconsistent Annotated Logic Et which has the capability of measuring uncertainties and inconsistencies, we have achieved levels of agreement above 90% when compared to the methodology proposed with the current methodology used to classify HIV-1 subtypes. The results demonstrate that Paraconsistents Artificial Neural Networks can serve as a promising tool of analysis.

  3. Report of the Working Group on Diffractive Phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartel, W.; Bartels, J.W.

    1994-01-01

    The discussions in the working group on diffractive processes were structured according to a scheme, in which first the experimental basis was specified followed by a presentation of theoretical papers and a general exchange of views on diffractive phenomena. Since diffraction is observed in many different channels, a common session was organised with participants from other working groups, in particular from the photoproduction and DIS community. A total of about 20 individual contributions were presented including those of the common discussion. Not all of them will be included in the proceedings. Some speakers had contributions to different sessions and submitted only one summary paper, others presented ideas for future analysis and are still working and others were too busy to finish the write up before the deadline. Diffractive phenomena observed at HERA were presented by T. Greenshaw of H1 and T. Docker from the ZEUS collaboration. The DO results on diffraction may be looked up in G. Forden's contribution to the proceedings. Further experimental results relevant to the topic ran be found in papers by M. Costa and S. Levonian issued in the photoproduction subsection. Experimentally it is not always easy to identify diffractive processes because pion and ordinary Regge exchange contributions are also present. This question is addressed in G. Levman's paper. New ideas to exploit a similarity between gluon - and Pomeron exchange were discussed by H. Kowalski, and G. Knies proposed a thrust analysis for diffractive events. In both cases work is going on which is not yet ready for a publication. (i. Ingelman reviewed existing Mt. Carlo programs on diffractive processes like POMPYT, RAPGAP and a program based on the Nikolaev - Zakharov approach to diffraction. These programs are well documented and need no further description in these proceedings. The same argument applies to V. Fadins talk, who reviewed published results on higher order corrections to the BFKL

  4. Diffractive generalized phase contrast for adaptive phase imaging and optical security

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palima, Darwin; Glückstad, Jesper

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the properties of Generalized Phase Contrast (GPC) when the input phase modulation is implemented using diffractive gratings. In GPC applications for patterned illumination, the use of a dynamic diffractive optical element for encoding the GPC input phase allows for onthe- fly optimiza...... security applications and can be used to create phasebased information channels for enhanced information security....

  5. Energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction beamline at Indus-2 synchrotron ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    An energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction beamline has been designed, developed and commissioned at BL-11 bending magnet port of the Indian synchrotron source, Indus-2. The performance of this beamline has been benchmarked by measuring diffraction patterns from various elemental metals and standard inorganic ...

  6. In-situ X-ray diffraction : a useful tool to investigate hydride-formation reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Notten, P.H.L.; Daams, J.L.C.; Veirman, de A.E.M.; Staals, A.A.

    1994-01-01

    A high-pressure X-ray diffraction (XRD) cell has been designed which allowed us to study simultaneously hydrogen absorption/desorption isotherms and XRD powder diffraction patterns on (de)hydrided intermetallic compounds. The hydride formation reaction was investigated in the case of LaNi5 under

  7. X-Ray Diffraction and the Discovery of the Structure of DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crouse, David T.

    2007-01-01

    A method is described for teaching the analysis of X-ray diffraction of DNA through a series of steps utilizing the original methods used by James Watson, Francis Crick, Maurice Wilkins and Rosalind Franklin. The X-ray diffraction pattern led to the conclusion of the basic helical structure of DNA and its dimensions while basic chemical principles…

  8. Detection of boiling by Piety's on-line PSD-pattern recognition algorithm applied to neutron noise signals in the SAPHIR reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiekerman, G.

    1988-09-01

    A partial blockage of the cooling channels of a fuel element in a swimming pool reactor could lead to vapour generation and to burn-out. To detect such anomalies, a pattern recognition algorithm based on power spectra density (PSD) proposed by Piety was further developed and implemented on a PDP 11/23 for on-line applications. This algorithm identifies anomalies by measuring the PSD on the process signal and comparing them with a standard baseline previously formed. Up to 8 decision discriminants help to recognize spectral changes due to anomalies. In our application, to detect boiling as quickly as possible with sufficient sensitivity, Piety's algorithm was modified using overlapped Fast-Fourier-Transform-Processing and the averaging of the PSDs over a large sample of preceding instantaneous PSDs. This processing allows high sensitivity in detecting weak disturbances without reducing response time. The algorithm was tested with simulation-of-boiling experiments where nitrogen in a cooling channel of a mock-up of a fuel element was injected. Void fractions higher than 30 % in the channel can be detected. In the case of boiling, it is believed that this limit is lower because collapsing bubbles could give rise to stronger fluctuations. The algorithm was also tested with a boiling experiment where the reactor coolant flow was actually reduced. The results showed that the discriminant D5 of Piety's algorithm based on neutron noise obtained from the existing neutron chambers of the reactor control system could sensitively recognize boiling. The detection time amounts to 7-30 s depending on the strength of the disturbances. Other events, which arise during a normal reactor run like scrams, removal of isotope elements without scramming or control rod movements and which could lead to false alarms, can be distinguished from boiling. 49 refs., 104 figs., 5 tabs

  9. Neutron diffraction on pulsed sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aksenov, V.L.; Balagurov, A.M.

    2016-01-01

    The possibilities currently offered and major scientific problems solved by time-of-flight neutron diffraction are reviewed. The reasons for the rapid development of the method over the last two decades has been mainly the emergence of third generation pulsed sources with a MW time-averaged power and advances in neutron-optical devices and detector systems. The paper discusses some historical aspects of time-of-flight neutron diffraction and examines the contribution to this method by F.L.Shapiro whose 100th birth anniversary was celebrated in 2015. The state of the art with respect to neutron sources for studies on output beams is reviewed in a special section. [ru

  10. Neutron diffraction and Vitamin E

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harroun, T A; Marquardt, D; Katsaras, J; Atkinson, J, E-mail: tharroun@brocku.ca

    2010-11-01

    It is generally accepted that neutron diffraction from model membrane systems is an effective biophysical technique for determining membrane structure. Here we describe an example of how deuterium labelling can elucidate the location of specific membrane soluble molecules, including a brief discussion of the technique itself. We show that deuterium labelled {alpha}-tocopherol sits upright in the bilayer, as might be expected, but at very different locations within the bilayer, depending on the degree of lipid chain unsaturation.

  11. High-energy diffraction microscopy at the advanced photon source

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lienert, U.; Li, S. F.; Hefferan, C. M.

    2011-01-01

    The status of the High Energy Diffraction Microscopy (HEDM) program at the 1-ID beam line of the Advanced Photon Source is reported. HEDM applies high energy synchrotron radiation for the grain and sub-grain scale structural and mechanical characterization of polycrystalline bulk materials in situ...

  12. Diffraction Techniques in Structural Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egli, Martin

    2016-01-01

    A detailed understanding of chemical and biological function and the mechanisms underlying the molecular activities ultimately requires atomic-resolution structural data. Diffraction-based techniques such as single-crystal X-ray crystallography, electron microscopy, and neutron diffraction are well established and they have paved the road to the stunning successes of modern-day structural biology. The major advances achieved in the last 20 years in all aspects of structural research, including sample preparation, crystallization, the construction of synchrotron and spallation sources, phasing approaches, and high-speed computing and visualization, now provide specialists and nonspecialists alike with a steady flow of molecular images of unprecedented detail. The present unit combines a general overview of diffraction methods with a detailed description of the process of a single-crystal X-ray structure determination experiment, from chemical synthesis or expression to phasing and refinement, analysis, and quality control. For novices it may serve as a stepping-stone to more in-depth treatises of the individual topics. Readers relying on structural information for interpreting functional data may find it a useful consumer guide. PMID:27248784

  13. Neutron diffraction and lattice defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamaguchi, Yoshikazu

    1974-01-01

    Study on lattice defects by neutron diffraction technique is described. Wave length of neutron wave is longer than that of X-ray, and absorption cross-section is small. Number of defects observed by ESR is up to several defects, and the number studied with electron microscopes is more than 100. Information obtained by neutron diffraction concerns the number of defects between these two ranges. For practical analysis, several probable models are selected from the data of ESR or electron microscopes, and most probable one is determined by calculation. Then, defect concentration is obtained from scattering cross section. It is possible to measure elastic scattering exclusively by neutron diffraction. Minimum detectable concentration estimated is about 0.5% and 10 20 - 10 21 defects per unit volume. A chopper and a time of flight system are used as a measuring system. Cold neutrons are obtained from the neutron sources inserted into reactors. Examples of measurements by using similar equipments to PTNS-I system of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute are presented. Interstitial concentration in the graphite irradiated by fast neutrons is shown. Defects in irradiated MgO were also investigated by measuring scattering cross section. Study of defects in Ge was made by measuring total cross section, and model analysis was performed in comparison with various models. (Kato, T.)

  14. Diamond-anvil cell for radial x-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chesnut, G N; Schiferl, D; Streetman, B D; Anderson, W W

    2006-01-01

    We have designed a new diamond-anvil cell capable of radial x-ray diffraction to pressures of a few hundred GPa. The diffraction geometry allows access to multiple angles of Ψ, which is the angle between each reciprocal lattice vector g(hkl) and the compression axis of the cell. At the 'magic angle', Ψ∼54.7 0 , the effects of deviatoric stresses on the interplanar spacings, d(hkl), are significantly reduced. Because the systematic errors, which are different for each d(hkl), are significantly reduced, the crystal structures and the derived equations of state can be determined reliably. At other values of Ψ, the effects of deviatoric stresses on the diffraction pattern could eventually be used to determine elastic constants

  15. Diffraction-amalgamated grain boundary tracking for mapping 3D crystallographic orientation and strain fields during plastic deformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toda, Hiroyuki; Kamiko, Takanobu; Tanabe, Yasuto; Kobayashi, Masakazu; Leclere, D.J.; Uesugi, Kentaro; Takeuchi, Akihisa; Hirayama, Kyosuke

    2016-01-01

    By amalgamating the X-ray diffraction technique with the grain boundary tracking technique, a novel method, diffraction-amalgamated grain boundary tracking (DAGT), has been developed. DAGT is a non-destructive in-situ analysis technique for characterising bulk materials, which can be applied up to near the point of fracture. It provides information about local crystal orientations and detailed grain morphologies in three dimensions, together with high-density strain mapping inside grains. As it obtains the grain morphologies by utilising X-ray imaging instead of X-ray diffraction, which latter is typically vulnerable to plastic deformation, DAGT is a fairly robust technique for analysing plastically deforming materials. Texture evolution and localised deformation behaviours have here been successfully characterised in Al–Cu alloys, during tensile deformation of 27% in applied strain. The characteristic rotation behaviours of grains were identified, and attributed to the effects of interaction with adjacent grains on the basis of the 3D local orientation and plastic strain distributions. It has also been revealed that 3D strain distribution in grains is highly heterogeneous, which is not explained by known mechanisms such as simple incompatibility with adjacent grains or strain percolation through soft grains. It has been clarified that groups consisting of a few adjacent grains may deform coordinately, especially in shear and lateral deformation, and the characteristic deformation pattern is thereby formed on a mesoscopic scale.

  16. Interpretation of small-angle diffraction experiments on opal-like photonic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlow, F.; Muldarisnur, M.; Sharifi, P.; Zabel, H.

    2011-08-01

    Comprehensive structural information on artificial opals involving the deviations from the strongly dominating face-centered cubic structure is still missing. Recent structure investigations with neutrons and synchrotron sources have shown a high degree of order but also a number of unexpected scattering features. Here, we point out that the exclusion of the allowed 002-type diffraction peaks by a small atomic form factor is not obvious and that surface scattering has to be included as a possible source for the diffraction peaks. Our neutron diffraction data indicate that surface scattering is the main reason for the smallest-angle peaks in the diffraction patterns.

  17. Fourier-Based Diffraction Analysis of Live Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnes, Jenny; Hastings, Harold M; Raley-Susman, Kathleen M; Alivisatos, Clara; Warner, Adam; Hulsey-Vincent, Miranda

    2017-09-13

    This manuscript describes how to classify nematodes using temporal far-field diffraction signatures. A single C. elegans is suspended in a water column inside an optical cuvette. A 632 nm continuous wave HeNe laser is directed through the cuvette using front surface mirrors. A significant distance of at least 20-30 cm traveled after the light passes through the cuvette ensures a useful far-field (Fraunhofer) diffraction pattern. The diffraction pattern changes in real time as the nematode swims within the laser beam. The photodiode is placed off-center in the diffraction pattern. The voltage signal from the photodiode is observed in real time and recorded using a digital oscilloscope. This process is repeated for 139 wild type and 108 "roller" C. elegans. Wild type worms exhibit a rapid oscillation pattern in solution. The "roller" worms have a mutation in a key component of the cuticle that interferes with smooth locomotion. Time intervals that are not free of saturation and inactivity are discarded. It is practical to divide each average by its maximum to compare relative intensities. The signal for each worm is Fourier transformed so that the frequency pattern for each worm emerges. The signal for each type of worm is averaged. The averaged Fourier spectra for the wild type and the "roller" C. elegans are distinctly different and reveal that the dynamic worm shapes of the two different worm strains can be distinguished using Fourier analysis. The Fourier spectra of each worm strain match an approximate model using two different binary worm shapes that correspond to locomotory moments. The envelope of the averaged frequency distribution for actual and modeled worms confirms the model matches the data. This method can serve as a baseline for Fourier analysis for many microscopic species, as every microorganism will have its unique Fourier spectrum.

  18. Graphics of diffraction spectra for PC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macias B, L.R.

    1991-09-01

    The materials can be studied by means of diffraction if these are crystalline; of the type of study will depend the technique to apply, the first step is the obtaining of a digital register that allows to build the corresponding spectra. The digital register should have well-known the initial and final angular data. The main objective of this work, is starting of a digital register of data or an arrangement CPSi type (counts per second measured by the detection system) generated by means of the diffractometer, to create the graph of the corresponding spectra in visual form in the screen of a microcomputer and if is required, to obtain the graph in printed form by means of the same computer program for microcomputer. (Author)

  19. Light Diffraction by Large Amplitude Ultrasonic Waves in Liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Laszlo; Cantrell, John H.; Yost, William T.

    2016-01-01

    Light diffraction from ultrasound, which can be used to investigate nonlinear acoustic phenomena in liquids, is reported for wave amplitudes larger than that typically reported in the literature. Large amplitude waves result in waveform distortion due to the nonlinearity of the medium that generates harmonics and produces asymmetries in the light diffraction pattern. For standing waves with amplitudes above a threshold value, subharmonics are generated in addition to the harmonics and produce additional diffraction orders of the incident light. With increasing drive amplitude above the threshold a cascade of period-doubling subharmonics are generated, terminating in a region characterized by a random, incoherent (chaotic) diffraction pattern. To explain the experimental results a toy model is introduced, which is derived from traveling wave solutions of the nonlinear wave equation corresponding to the fundamental and second harmonic standing waves. The toy model reduces the nonlinear partial differential equation to a mathematically more tractable nonlinear ordinary differential equation. The model predicts the experimentally observed cascade of period-doubling subharmonics terminating in chaos that occurs with increasing drive amplitudes above the threshold value. The calculated threshold amplitude is consistent with the value estimated from the experimental data.

  20. Diffractive dijet and W production in CDF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goulianos, K.

    1998-01-01

    Results on diffractive dijet and W-boson production from CDF are reviewed and compared with predictions based on factorization of the diffractive structure function of the proton measured in deep inelastic scattering at HERA

  1. A theoretical overview on single hard diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wuesthoff, M.

    1996-01-01

    The concept of the Pomeron structure function and its application in Single Hard Diffraction at hadron colliders and in diffractive Deep Inelastic Scattering is critically reviewed. Some alternative approaches are briefly surveyed with a focus on QCD inspired models

  2. Self-diffraction and Z-scan studies in organic dye doped thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madhana Sundari, R.; Palanisamy, P.K.

    2006-01-01

    Self-diffraction in Acid Red 87 (eosin Y) dye doped thin films is studied using argon ion laser (514.5 nm). Growth of self-diffraction grating is monitored by measuring intensities of various diffraction orders. This study has resulted in the observation of phase variation between the contributing beams in any diffracted order. This change of phase is measured at various stages of grating formation. Due to self-phase modulation, circular concentric rings pattern is obtained in the far field. The observed fluctuation in this pattern may be due to the phase variation between the contributing beams in any diffracted order. Z-scan technique is used to study the optical non-linearity of the sample

  3. Crystallite Size and Microstrain Measurement of Cathode Material after Mechanical Milling using Neutron Diffraction Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Fajar

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The measurements of neutron diffraction patterns of commercially product and 10 hour mechanically milled cathode material lithium cobaltites (LiCoO2 have been performed. Rietveld analysis using FullProf does not show the change of crystal structure due to milling process, but the diffraction pattern has a lower intensity and the diffraction-line was broadening. The results of line-broadening study on milled sample using Rietveld methods detected that the microstrain was occurred in the sample with value 0.127080(35 % and the average crystallite size was 424.78(20 Å.

  4. An experiment in diffractive physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santoro, Alberto

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this talk is to show one of the next future experiment in diffractive Physics which will be installed at the DO experiment at Tevatron/Fermilab for run II, and the importance for Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) as the theory of the strong interactions. The apparatus that we have developed is the Forward Proton Detector (FPD) to be introduced on the beam line of the Tevatron at both sides of the DO detector. The FPD is composed by a set of Roman Pots as we will see in the text below

  5. Magnetic structures: neutron diffraction studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouree-Vigneron, F.

    1990-01-01

    Neutron diffraction is often an unequivocal method for determining magnetic structures. Here we present some typical examples, stressing the sequence through experiments, data analysis, interpretation and modelisation. Two series of compounds are chosen: Tb Ni 2 Ge 2 and RBe 13 (R = Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er). Depending on the nature of the elements, the magnetic structures produced can be commensurate, incommensurate or even show a transition between two such phases as a function of temperature. A model, taking magnetic exchange and anisotropy into account, will be presented in the case of commensurate-incommensurate magnetic transitions in RBe 13

  6. Hard scattering and a diffractive trigger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, E.L.; Collins, J.C.; Soper, D.E.; Sterman, G.

    1986-02-01

    Conclusions concerning the properties of hard scattering in diffractively produced systems are summarized. One motivation for studying diffractive hard scattering is to investigate the interface between Regge theory and perturbative QCD. Another is to see whether diffractive triggering can result in an improvement in the signal-to-background ratio of measurements of production of very heavy quarks. 5 refs

  7. Diffractive optical elements for space communication terminals

    OpenAIRE

    Herzig, Hans-Peter; Ehbets, Peter; Teijido, Juan M.; Weible, Kenneth J.; Heimbeck, Hans-Joerg

    2007-01-01

    The potential of diffractive optical elements for advanced laser communication terminals has been investigated. Applications include beam shaping of high- power laser diode arrays, optical filter elements for position detection and hybrid (refractive/diffractive) elements. In addition, we present a design example of a miniaturized terminal including diffractive optics.

  8. Applied physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    The Physics Division research program that is dedicated primarily to applied research goals involves the interaction of energetic particles with solids. This applied research is carried out in conjunction with the basic research studies from which it evolved

  9. Nuclear dynamical diffraction using synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Dennis Eugene [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1993-05-01

    The scattering of synchrotron radiation by nuclei is extensively explored in this thesis. From the multipole electric field expansion resulting from time-dependent nonrelativistic perturbation theory, a dynamical scattering theory is constructed. This theory is shown, in the many particle limit, to be equivalent to the semi-classical approach where a quantum mechanical scattering amplitude is used in the Maxwell inhomogeneous wave equation. The Moessbauer specimen whose low-lying energy levels were probed is a ferromagnetic lattice of 57Fe embedded in a yttrium iron garnet (YIG) crystal matrix. The hyperfine fields in YIG thin films were studied at low and room temperature using time-resolved quantum beat spectroscopy. Nuclear hyperfine structure quantum beats were measured using a fast plastic scintillator coincidence photodetector and associated electronics having a time resolution of 2.5 nsec. The variation of the quantum beat patterns near the Bragg [0 0 2] diffraction peak gave a Lamb-Moessbauer factor of 8.2±0.4. Exploring characteristic dynamical features in the higher order YIG [0 0 10] reflection revealed that one of the YIG crystals had bifurcated into two different layers. The dynamics of nuclear superradiance was explored. This phenomenon includes the radiative speedup exhibited by a collective state of particles, and, in striking concurrence, resonance frequency shifts. A speedup of a factor of 4 in the total decay rate and a beat frequency shift of 11/2 natural resonance linewidths were observed. Nuclear resonance scattering was also found to be a useful way of performing angular interferometry experiments, and it was used to observe the phase shift of a rotated quantum state. On the whole, nuclear dynamical diffraction theory has superbly explained many of the fascinating features of resonant magnetic dipole radiation scattered by a lattice of nuclei.

  10. Nuclear dynamical diffraction using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, D.E.

    1993-05-01

    The scattering of synchrotron radiation by nuclei is extensively explored in this thesis. From the multipole electric field expansion resulting from time-dependent nonrelativistic perturbation theory, a dynamical scattering theory is constructed. This theory is shown, in the many particle limit, to be equivalent to the semi-classical approach where a quantum mechanical scattering amplitude is used in the Maxwell inhomogeneous wave equation. The Moessbauer specimen whose low-lying energy levels were probed is a ferromagnetic lattice of 57 Fe embedded in a yttrium iron garnet (YIG) crystal matrix. The hyperfine fields in YIG thin films were studied at low and room temperature using time-resolved quantum beat spectroscopy. Nuclear hyperfine structure quantum beats were measured using a fast plastic scintillator coincidence photodetector and associated electronics having a time resolution of 2.5 nsec. The variation of the quantum beat patterns near the Bragg [0 0 2] diffraction peak gave a Lamb-Moessbauer factor of 8.2±0.4. Exploring characteristic dynamical features in the higher order YIG [0 0 10] reflection revealed that one of the YIG crystals had bifurcated into two different layers. The dynamics of nuclear superradiance was explored. This phenomenon includes the radiative speedup exhibited by a collective state of particles, and, in striking concurrence, resonance frequency shifts. A speedup of a factor of 4 in the total decay rate and a beat frequency shift of 1 1/2 natural resonance linewidths were observed. Nuclear resonance scattering was also found to be a useful way of performing angular interferometry experiments, and it was used to observe the phase shift of a rotated quantum state. On the whole, nuclear dynamical diffraction theory has superbly explained many of the fascinating features of resonant magnetic dipole radiation scattered by a lattice of nuclei

  11. Electronic diffraction tomography by Green's functions and singular values decompositions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayer, A.

    2001-01-01

    An inverse scattering technique is developed to enable a three-dimensional sample reconstruction from the diffraction figures obtained for different sample orientations by electronic projection microscopy, thus performing a diffraction tomography. In its Green's-functions formulation, this technique takes account of all orders of diffraction by performing an iterative reconstruction of the wave function on the observation screen and in the sample. In a final step, these quantities enable a reconstruction of the potential-energy distribution, which is assumed real valued. The method relies on the use of singular values decomposition techniques, thus providing the best least-squares solutions and enabling a reduction of noise. The technique is applied to the analysis of a three-dimensional nanometric sample that is observed in Fresnel conditions with an electron energy of 40 eV. The algorithm turns out to provide results with a mean relative error around 3% and to be stable against random noise

  12. Profiling pleural effusion cells by a diffraction imaging method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Qaysi, Safaa; Hong, Heng; Wen, Yuhua; Lu, Jun Q.; Feng, Yuanming; Hu, Xin-Hua

    2018-02-01

    Assay of cells in pleural effusion (PE) is an important means of disease diagnosis. Conventional cytology of effusion samples, however, has low sensitivity and depends heavily on the expertise of cytopathologists. We applied a polarization diffraction imaging flow cytometry method on effusion cells to investigate their features. Diffraction imaging of the PE cell samples has been performed on 6000 to 12000 cells for each effusion cell sample of three patients. After prescreening to remove images by cellular debris and aggregated non-cellular particles, the image textures were extracted with a gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) algorithm. The distribution of the imaged cells in the GLCM parameters space was analyzed by a Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM) to determine the number of clusters among the effusion cells. These results yield insight on textural features of diffraction images and related cellular morphology in effusion samples and can be used toward the development of a label-free method for effusion cells assay.

  13. Astrophysical targets of the Fresnel diffractive imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koechlin, L.; Deba, P.; Raksasataya, T.

    2017-11-01

    The Fresnel Diffractive imager is an innovative concept of distributed space telescope, for high resolution (milli arc-seconds) spectro-imaging in the IR, visible and UV domains. This paper presents its optical principle and the science that can be done on potential astrophysical targets. The novelty lies in the primary optics: a binary Fresnel array, akin to a binary Fresnel zone plate. The main interest of this approach is the relaxed manufacturing and positioning constraints. While having the resolution and imaging capabilities of lens or mirrors of equivalent size, no optical material is involved in the focusing process: just vacuum. A Fresnel array consists of millions void subapertures punched into a large and thin opaque membrane, that focus light by diffraction into a compact and highly contrasted image. The positioning law of the aperture edges drives the image quality and contrast. This optical concept allows larger and lighter apertures than solid state optics, aiming to high angular resolution and high dynamic range imaging, in particular for UV applications. Diffraction focusing implies very long focal distances, up to dozens of kilometers, which requires at least a two-vessel formation flying in space. The first spacecraft, "the Fresnel Array spacecraft", holds the large punched foil: the Fresnel Array. The second, the "Receiver spacecraft" holds the field optics and focal instrumentation. A chromatism correction feature enables moderately large (20%) relative wavebands, and fields of a few to a dozen arc seconds. This Fresnel imager is adapted to high contrast stellar environments: dust disks, close companions and (we hope) exoplanets. Specific to the particular grid-like pattern of the primary focusing zone plate, is the very high dynamic range achieved in the images, in the case of compact objects. Large stellar photospheres may also be mapped with Fresnel arrays of a few meters opertaing in the UV. Larger and more complex fields can be imaged with

  14. Dynamical diffraction in periodic multilayers

    CERN Document Server

    Sears, V F

    1997-01-01

    Exact reflectivity curves are calculated numerically for various periodic multilayers using the optical matrix method in order to test the dynamical theory of diffraction. The theory is generally valid for values of the bilayer thickness d up to about 100 A. For somewhat larger values of d, where the theory begins to break down, the initial discrepancy is in the phase of the oscillations in the wings of the peaks. For very large values of d, where the first-order Bragg peak approaches the edge of the mirror reflection, two general types of multilayers can be distinguished. In the first (typified in the present work by Ni/Ti), there is a large (30% or more) reduction in the actual value of the critical wave vector for total reflection while, in the second (typified here by Fe/Ge), there is very little reduction (3 % or so). The origin of these two very different types of behavior is explained. It is also shown that, within the dynamical theory of diffraction, the change in the position of the center of the Dar...

  15. ATALANTA: a multicomponent pulsed neutron diffraction analysis code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benham, M.J.; Ross, D.K.

    1986-01-01

    The analysis of powder diffraction patterns from metal hydrogen systems present certain problems which have been addressed in a restructured profile analysis program. The heart of this program, ATALANTA, is a routine which locates and processes small sections of the data field to which a minimal number of Bragg peaks contribute intensity. The analysis of a three component test data set is presented in order to demonstrate the method. (author)

  16. Overlay improvement methods with diffraction based overlay and integrated metrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Young-Sun; Kim, Sunny; Shin, Ju Hee; Choi, Young Sin; Yun, Sang Ho; Kim, Young Hoon; Shin, Si Woo; Kong, Jeong Heung; Kang, Young Seog; Ha, Hun Hwan

    2015-03-01

    To accord with new requirement of securing more overlay margin, not only the optical overlay measurement is faced with the technical limitations to represent cell pattern's behavior, but also the larger measurement samples are inevitable for minimizing statistical errors and better estimation of circumstance in a lot. From these reasons, diffraction based overlay (DBO) and integrated metrology (IM) were mainly proposed as new approaches for overlay enhancement in this paper.

  17. On the extension of the Fermi-Watson Theorem to high energy diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malecki, A.; Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Frascati

    1995-12-01

    The Fermi-Watson theorem, established for low energy reactions and then applied to high energy collision, is revisited. Its use for the processes of inelastic diffraction is discussed. The theorem turns out to be valid in the case inclusive cross-section of diffractive transition

  18. The analysis of powder diffraction data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David, W.I.F.; Harrison, W.T.A.

    1986-01-01

    The paper reviews neutron powder diffraction data analysis, with emphasis on the structural aspects of powder diffraction and the future possibilities afforded by the latest generation of very high resolution neutron and x-ray powder diffractometers. Traditional x-ray powder diffraction techniques are outlined. Structural studies by powder diffraction are discussed with respect to the Rietveld method, and a case study in the Rietveld refinement method and developments of the Rietveld method are described. Finally studies using high resolution powder diffraction at the Spallation Neutron Source, ISIS at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory are summarized. (U.K.)

  19. Enhancing core-diffracted arrivals by supervirtual interferometry

    KAUST Repository

    Bharadwaj, P.

    2013-12-03

    A supervirtual interferometry (SVI) method is presented that can enhance the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of core diffracted waveforms by as much as O( √ N), where N is the number of inline receivers that record the core-mantle boundary (CMB) diffractions from more than one event. Here, the events are chosen to be approximately inline with the receivers along the same great circle. Results with synthetic and teleseismic data recorded by USArray stations demonstrate that formerly unusable records with low SNR can be transformed to high SNR records with clearly visible CMB diffractions. Another benefit is that SVI allows for the recording of a virtual earthquake at stations not deployed during the time of the earthquake. This means that portable arrays such as USArray can extend the aperture of one recorded earthquake from the West coast to the East coast, even though the teleseism might have only been recorded during theWest coast deployment. In summary, SVI applied to teleseismic data can significantly enlarge the catalogue of usable records both in SNR and available aperture for analysing CMB diffractions. A potential drawback of this method is that it generally provides the correct kinematics of CMB diffractions, but does not necessarily preserve correct amplitude information. © The Authors 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Royal Astronomical Society.

  20. A new theory for X-ray diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fewster, Paul F

    2014-05-01

    This article proposes a new theory of X-ray scattering that has particular relevance to powder diffraction. The underlying concept of this theory is that the scattering from a crystal or crystallite is distributed throughout space: this leads to the effect that enhanced scatter can be observed at the `Bragg position' even if the `Bragg condition' is not satisfied. The scatter from a single crystal or crystallite, in any fixed orientation, has the fascinating property of contributing simultaneously to many `Bragg positions'. It also explains why diffraction peaks are obtained from samples with very few crystallites, which cannot be explained with the conventional theory. The intensity ratios for an Si powder sample are predicted with greater accuracy and the temperature factors are more realistic. Another consequence is that this new theory predicts a reliability in the intensity measurements which agrees much more closely with experimental observations compared to conventional theory that is based on `Bragg-type' scatter. The role of dynamical effects (extinction etc.) is discussed and how they are suppressed with diffuse scattering. An alternative explanation for the Lorentz factor is presented that is more general and based on the capture volume in diffraction space. This theory, when applied to the scattering from powders, will evaluate the full scattering profile, including peak widths and the `background'. The theory should provide an increased understanding of the reliability of powder diffraction measurements, and may also have wider implications for the analysis of powder diffraction data, by increasing the accuracy of intensities predicted from structural models.

  1. Generalized diffraction-stack migration and filtering of coherent noise

    KAUST Repository

    Zhan, Ge

    2014-01-27

    We reformulate the equation of reverse-time migration so that it can be interpreted as summing data along a series of hyperbola-like curves, each one representing a different type of event such as a reflection or multiple. This is a generalization of the familiar diffraction-stack migration algorithm where the migration image at a point is computed by the sum of trace amplitudes along an appropriate hyperbola-like curve. Instead of summing along the curve associated with the primary reflection, the sum is over all scattering events and so this method is named generalized diffraction-stack migration. This formulation leads to filters that can be applied to the generalized diffraction-stack migration operator to mitigate coherent migration artefacts due to, e.g., crosstalk and aliasing. Results with both synthetic and field data show that generalized diffraction-stack migration images have fewer artefacts than those computed by the standard reverse-time migration algorithm. The main drawback is that generalized diffraction-stack migration is much more memory intensive and I/O limited than the standard reverse-time migration method. © 2014 European Association of Geoscientists & Engineers.

  2. Local, atomic-level elastic strain measurements of metallic glass thin films by electron diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebner, C. [Physics of Nanostructured Materials, Faculty of Physics, University of Vienna, Boltzmanngasse 5, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Sarkar, R. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, School for Engineering of Matter Transport and Energy, Arizona State University, Tempe 85287 (United States); Rajagopalan, J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, School for Engineering of Matter Transport and Energy, Arizona State University, Tempe 85287 (United States); Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, School for Engineering of Matter Transport and Energy, Arizona State University, Tempe 85287 (United States); Rentenberger, C., E-mail: christian.rentenberger@univie.ac.at [Physics of Nanostructured Materials, Faculty of Physics, University of Vienna, Boltzmanngasse 5, 1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2016-06-15

    A novel technique is used to measure the atomic-level elastic strain tensor of amorphous materials by tracking geometric changes of the first diffuse ring of selected area electron diffraction patterns (SAD). An automatic procedure, which includes locating the centre and fitting an ellipse to the diffuse ring with sub-pixel precision is developed for extracting the 2-dimensional strain tensor from the SAD patterns. Using this technique, atomic-level principal strains from micrometre-sized regions of freestanding amorphous Ti{sub 0.45}Al{sub 0.55} thin films were measured during in-situ TEM tensile deformation. The thin films were deformed using MEMS based testing stages that allow simultaneous measurement of the macroscopic stress and strain. The calculated atomic-level principal strains show a linear dependence on the applied stress, and good correspondence with the measured macroscopic strains. The calculated Poisson’s ratio of 0.23 is reasonable for brittle metallic glasses. The technique yields a strain accuracy of about 1×10{sup −4} and shows the potential to obtain localized strain profiles/maps of amorphous thin film samples. - Highlights: • A TEM method to measure elastic strain in metallic glass films is proposed. • Method is based on tracking geometric changes in TEM diffraction patterns. • An automatic procedure is developed for extracting the local strain tensor. • Atomic-level strain in amorphous TiAl film was analysed during in-situ deformation. • Capability of the method to obtain micrometer scale strain profiles/maps is shown.

  3. Applied architecture patterns on the Microsoft platform

    CERN Document Server

    Dovgal, Andre; Noriskin, Gregor

    2014-01-01

    Presented in a scenario-driven tutorial way, we lead you through fictitious example problems and present you with the best solutions. This book is intended for architects, developers, and managers who need to improve their knowledge of the Microsoft application platform. This book will appeal to anyone, especially consultants, who want to get up to speed on selecting the most appropriate platform for a particular problem. A good understanding of the general Windows platform and development technologies would be helpful.

  4. Diffractive heavy quark production in AA collisions at the LHC at NLO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, M. M.; Ducati, M. B. Gay; Machado, M. V. T.

    2011-07-01

    The single and double diffractive cross sections for heavy quarks production are evaluated at NLO accuracy for hadronic and heavy ion collisions at the LHC. Diffractive charm and bottom production is the main subject of this work, providing predictions for CaCa, PbPb and pPb collisions. The hard diffraction formalism is considered using the Ingelman-Schlein model where a recent parametrization for the Pomeron structure function (DPDF) is applied. Absorptive corrections are taken into account as well. The diffractive ratios are estimated and theoretical uncertainties are discussed. Comparison with competing production channels is also presented.

  5. Reducing aberration effect of Fourier transform lens by modifying Fourier spectrum of diffractive optical element in beam shaping optical system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fang; Zhu, Jing; Song, Qiang; Yue, Weirui; Liu, Jingdan; Wang, Jian; Situ, Guohai; Huang, Huijie

    2015-10-20

    In general, Fourier transform lenses are considered as ideal in the design algorithms of diffractive optical elements (DOEs). However, the inherent aberrations of a real Fourier transform lens disturb the far field pattern. The difference between the generated pattern and the expected design will impact the system performance. Therefore, a method for modifying the Fourier spectrum of DOEs without introducing other optical elements to reduce the aberration effect of the Fourier transform lens is proposed. By applying this method, beam shaping performance is improved markedly for the optical system with a real Fourier transform lens. The experiments carried out with a commercial Fourier transform lens give evidence for this method. The method is capable of reducing the system complexity as well as improving its performance.

  6. Diffractive X-Ray Telescopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skinner, G.K.; Skinner, G.K

    2010-01-01

    Diffractive X-ray telescopes using zone plates, phase Fresnel lenses, or related optical elements have the potential to provide astronomers with true imaging capability with resolution several orders of magnitude better than available in any other waveband. Lenses that would be relatively easy to fabricate could have an angular resolution of the order of micro arc seconds or even better, that would allow, for example, imaging of the distorted spacetime in the immediate vicinity of the supermassive black holes in the center of active galaxies What then is precluding their immediate adoption Extremely long focal lengths, very limited bandwidth, and difficulty stabilizing the image are the main problems. The history and status of the development of such lenses is reviewed here and the prospects for managing the challenges that they present are discussed atmospheric absorption

  7. X-ray and Neutron Diffraction in the Study of Organic Crystalline Hydrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina Fucke

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available A review. Diffraction methods are a powerful tool to investigate the crystal structure of organic compounds in general and their hydrates in particular. The laboratory standard technique of single crystal X-ray diffraction gives information about the molecular conformation, packing and hydrogen bonding in the crystal structure, while powder X-ray diffraction on bulk material can trace hydration/dehydration processes and phase transitions under non-ambient conditions. Neutron diffraction is a valuable complementary technique to X-ray diffraction and gives highly accurate hydrogen atom positions due to the interaction of the radiation with the atomic nuclei. Although not yet often applied to organic hydrates, neutron single crystal and neutron powder diffraction give precise structural data on hydrogen bonding networks which will help explain why hydrates form in the first place.

  8. Application of ray tracing towards a correction for refracting effects in computed tomography with diffracting sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, A.H.

    1983-01-01

    Ray tracing methods are investigated in forward and inverse processes and applied for image restoration and resolution enhancement in computed tomography with diffracting sources. Within the geometrical optics approximation for a given refractive field, a mathematical model for the forward propagation and inverse reconstruction process is presented. For a finite set of rays in a discrete image representation, an algebraic reconstruction technique is derived which is analogous to the inverse process for a continuum of rays. The geometrical theory of diffraction is invoked to describe ray patterns arising from the introduction of object discontinuity surfaces. We have compared the performance of existing recursive ray tracing techniques for the reconstruction of objects exhibiting discontinuity boundaries. A novel ray tracing and reconstruction technique is presented which enjoys significant computational savings over traditional implementations incorporating tedious ray linking procedures. Simulation studies illustrate the macro-structural distortion and loss of fine resolution when ray refraction is unaccounted for. Restoration and resolution enhancement is achieved with a recursive ray tracing approach. Successful experimental studies with tissue equivalent phantoms are presented. The comparison of simulation and experimental results demonstrated the reasonable assumption of the geometrical optics approximation. Simulation results for larger refractive deviations are encouraging

  9. Foucault imaging and small-angle electron diffraction in controlled external magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Hiroshi; Kotani, Atsuhiro; Harada, Ken; Ishii, Yui; Mori, Shigeo

    2016-12-01

    We report a method for acquiring Foucault images and small-angle electron diffraction patterns in external magnetic fields using a conventional transmission electron microscope without any modification. In the electron optical system that we have constructed, external magnetic fields parallel to the optical axis can be controlled using the objective lens pole piece under weak excitation conditions in the Foucault mode and the diffraction mode. We observe two ferromagnetic perovskite-type manganese oxides, La 0.7 Sr 0.3 MnO 3 (LSMO) and Nd 0.5 Sr 0.5 MnO 3 , in order to visualize magnetic domains and their magnetic responses to external magnetic fields. In rhombohedral-structured LSMO, pinning of magnetic domain walls at crystallographic twin boundaries was found to have a strong influence on the generation of new magnetic domains in external applied magnetic fields. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. A standardless method of quantitative ceramic analysis using X-ray powder diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazumdar, S.

    1999-01-01

    A new procedure using X-ray powder diffraction data for quantitative estimation of the crystalline as well as the amorphous phase in ceramics is described. Classification of the crystalline and amorphous X-ray scattering was achieved by comparison of the slopes at two successive points of the powder pattern at scattering angles at which the crystalline and amorphous phases superimpose. If the second slope exceeds the first by a stipulated value, the intensity is taken as crystalline; otherwise the scattering is considered as amorphous. Crystalline phase analysis is obtained by linear programming techniques using the concept that each observed X-ray diffraction peak has contributions from n component phases, the proportionate analysis of which is required. The method does not require the measurement of calibration data for use as an internal standard, but knowledge of the approximate crystal structure of each phase of interest in the mixture is necessary. The technique is also helpful in qualitative analysis because each suspected phase is characterized by the probability that it will be present when a reflection zone is considered in which the suspected crystalline phase could contribute. The amorphous phases are determined prior to the crystalline ones. The method is applied to ceramic materials and some results are presented. (orig.)

  11. Theoretical study of the properties of X-ray diffraction moiré fringes. I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshimura, Jun-ichi

    2015-01-01

    A detailed and comprehensive theoretical description of X-ray diffraction moiré fringes for a bicrystal specimen is given on the basis of a calculation by plane-wave dynamical diffraction theory, where the effect of the Pendellösung intensity oscillation on the moiré pattern is explained in detail. A detailed and comprehensive theoretical description of X-ray diffraction moiré fringes for a bicrystal specimen is given on the basis of a calculation by plane-wave dynamical diffraction theory. Firstly, prior to discussing the main subject of the paper, a previous article [Yoshimura (1997 ▸). Acta Cryst. A53, 810–812] on the two-dimensionality of diffraction moiré patterns is restated on a thorough calculation of the moiré interference phase. Then, the properties of moiré fringes derived from the above theory are explained for the case of a plane-wave diffraction image, where the significant effect of Pendellösung intensity oscillation on the moiré pattern when the crystal is strained is described in detail with theoretically simulated moiré images. Although such plane-wave moiré images are not widely observed in a nearly pure form, knowledge of their properties is essential for the understanding of diffraction moiré fringes in general

  12. Applied Electromagnetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamashita, H; Marinova, I; Cingoski, V [eds.

    2002-07-01

    These proceedings contain papers relating to the 3rd Japanese-Bulgarian-Macedonian Joint Seminar on Applied Electromagnetics. Included are the following groups: Numerical Methods I; Electrical and Mechanical System Analysis and Simulations; Inverse Problems and Optimizations; Software Methodology; Numerical Methods II; Applied Electromagnetics.

  13. Applied Electromagnetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, H.; Marinova, I.; Cingoski, V.

    2002-01-01

    These proceedings contain papers relating to the 3rd Japanese-Bulgarian-Macedonian Joint Seminar on Applied Electromagnetics. Included are the following groups: Numerical Methods I; Electrical and Mechanical System Analysis and Simulations; Inverse Problems and Optimizations; Software Methodology; Numerical Methods II; Applied Electromagnetics

  14. Rietveld analysis using powder diffraction data with anomalous scattering effect obtained by focused beam flat sample method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Masahiko, E-mail: masahiko@spring8.or.jp; Katsuya, Yoshio, E-mail: katsuya@spring8.or.jp; Sakata, Osami, E-mail: SAKATA.Osami@nims.go.jp [Synchrotron X-ray Station at SPring-8, National Institute for Materials Science 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)

    2016-07-27

    Focused-beam flat-sample method (FFM) is a new trial for synchrotron powder diffraction method, which is a combination of beam focusing optics, flat shape powder sample and area detectors. The method has advantages for X-ray diffraction experiments applying anomalous scattering effect (anomalous diffraction), because of 1. Absorption correction without approximation, 2. High intensity X-rays of focused incident beams and high signal noise ratio of diffracted X-rays 3. Rapid data collection with area detectors. We applied the FFM to anomalous diffraction experiments and collected synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction data of CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (inverse spinel structure) using X-rays near Fe K absorption edge, which can distinguish Co and Fe by anomalous scattering effect. We conducted Rietveld analyses with the obtained powder diffraction data and successfully determined the distribution of Co and Fe ions in CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} crystal structure.

  15. Rietveld analysis using powder diffraction data with anomalous scattering effect obtained by focused beam flat sample method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Masahiko; Katsuya, Yoshio; Sakata, Osami

    2016-01-01

    Focused-beam flat-sample method (FFM) is a new trial for synchrotron powder diffraction method, which is a combination of beam focusing optics, flat shape powder sample and area detectors. The method has advantages for X-ray diffraction experiments applying anomalous scattering effect (anomalous diffraction), because of 1. Absorption correction without approximation, 2. High intensity X-rays of focused incident beams and high signal noise ratio of diffracted X-rays 3. Rapid data collection with area detectors. We applied the FFM to anomalous diffraction experiments and collected synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction data of CoFe_2O_4 (inverse spinel structure) using X-rays near Fe K absorption edge, which can distinguish Co and Fe by anomalous scattering effect. We conducted Rietveld analyses with the obtained powder diffraction data and successfully determined the distribution of Co and Fe ions in CoFe_2O_4 crystal structure.

  16. MacDUST - a powder diffraction package developed for the ''ADONE'' high resolution diffraction station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burattini, E.; Cappuccio, G.; Maistrelli, P.; Simeoni, S.

    1993-01-01

    A High Resolution Powder Diffraction Station (PO.DI.STA.) was installed at the beginning of 1991 on the ADONE-Wiggler magnet beam line. The station and the first powder diffraction spectra, collected with synchrotron radiation, were presented at the EPDIC-1 Conference. More details can also be found in. For this station, a very sophisticated software package ''MacDUST'' has been developed on an Apple Macintosh computer, using the Microsoft QuickBASIC compiler. It allows very easy and comfortable operations by means of a graphical user interface environment, typical of the Macintosh system. The package consists of five major programs. The main program, MacDIFF, performs all the graphic operations on the experimental data, including zooming, overlapping, cursor scanning and editing of patterns, control of output operations to printers and HPGL plotters. It also includes several analysis routines for data smoothing, a first derivative peak search algorithm, two background subtraction routines and two profile fitting programs: one based on the simplex method and the other on the Marquardt modification of a least-square algorithm. MacPDF and MacRIC are both dedicated to phase identification. The first program is an archive manager for searching, displaying and printing phase records; MacRIC is a graphic aided search-match program based on the Hanawalt algorithm. Mac3-DIM is a plot program, useful, e.g., for representing kinetics three dimensionally. MacRIET is a Macintosh version of the well known Rietveld refinement program. This version, besides conventional structure refinements, also allows the determination of micro structural parameters, i.e. micro strain and crystallite size. The program can also be used to simulate a pattern, once the structure of the compound is known. Taking advantage of the very intuitive Macintosh graphic user interface, through dialog and alert boxes, the program allows straightforward introduction and modification of the structure

  17. A 3D implementation of ray tracing combined with diffraction on facets: Verification and a potential application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarke, Adrian J.M.; Hesse, Evelyn; Ulanowski, Zbigniew; Kaye, Paul H.

    2006-01-01

    A 3D implementation of a new model of light scattering applicable to dielectric faceted objects is introduced. The model combines standard geometric optics with diffraction on individual facets. It can be applied to any faceted geometry. The model adds no significant computational overheads to classical geometric optics yet provides much improved results. Initial results for long hexagonal columns are compared to SVM and appear favourable. 2D scattering patterns are calculated for a hexagonal column in a fixed orientation and compared to those created by ice analogue crystals in the laboratory with close agreement. The comparison includes the observation of a guided wave propagating along the length of the column. The new model is then applied to a selection of geometries to illustrate how it could be used to aid particle characterization, particularly in the case of cirrus ice

  18. Primordial black hole detection through diffractive microlensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naderi, T.; Mehrabi, A.; Rahvar, S.

    2018-05-01

    Recent observations of gravitational waves motivate investigations for the existence of primordial black holes (PBHs). We propose the observation of gravitational microlensing of distant quasars for the range of infrared to the submillimeter wavelengths by sublunar PBHs as lenses. The advantage of observations in the longer wavelengths, comparable to the Schwarzschild radius of the lens (i.e., Rsch≃λ ) is the detection of the wave optics features of the gravitational microlensing. The observation of diffraction pattern in the microlensing light curve of a quasar can break the degeneracy between the lens parameters and determine directly the lens mass as well as the distance of the lens from the observer. We estimate the wave optics optical-depth, also calculate the rate of ˜0.1 to ˜0.3 event per year per a quasar, assuming that hundred percent of dark matter is made of sublunar PBHs. Also, we propose a long-term survey of quasars with the cadence of almost one hour to few days to resolve the wave optics features of the light curves to discover PBHs and determine the fraction of dark matter made of sublunar PBHs as well as their mass function.

  19. Photoelectron diffraction and holography: Present status and future prospects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fadley, C.S. [California Univ., Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Thevuthasan, S. [California Univ., Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics; Kaduwela, A.P. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1993-07-01

    Photoelectron diffraction and photoelectron holography, a newly developed variant of it, can provide a rich range of information concerning surface structure. These methods are sensitive to atomic type, chemical state, and spin state. The theoretical prediction of diffraction patterns is also well developed at both the single scattering and multiple scattering levels, and quantitative fits of experiment to theory can lead to structures with accuracies in the {plus_minus}0.03 {Angstrom} range. Direct structural information can also be derived from forward scattering in scanned-angle measurements at higher energies, path length differences contained in scanned-energy data at lower energies, and holographic inversions of data sets spanning some region in angle and energy space. Diffraction can also affect average photoelectron emission depths. Circular dichroism in core-level emission can be fruitfully interpreted in terms of photoelectron diffraction theory, as can measurements with spin-resolved core-spectra, and studies of surface magnetic structures and phase transitions should be possible with these methods. Synchrotron radiation is a key element of fully utilizing these techniques.

  20. Profile analysis of neutron powder diffraction data at ISIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David, W.I.F.; Ibberson, R.M.; Matthewman, J.C.

    1992-05-01

    The aim of this manual is to document the current suite of time-of-flight neutron powder diffraction profile refinement programs available to ISIS users. Aspects of data collation and normalisation specific to the individual diffraction instruments are dealt with elsewhere. It will be assumed the user has produced a suitable data file (.DAT file) containing the profile data consisting of point by point values of the corrected diffraction profile across the pattern. The analysis of neutron powder diffraction data at ISIS by profile refinement utilises a suite of ''in-house'' written and supported programs based on the Cambridge Crystallography Subroutine Library (CCSL). A quick scan through the CCSL manual will give the user a general feel for the procedure to adopt in the use of the library and hence of the profile codes. The instructions documented in this handbook are complementary to those in the more specialist CCSL manual, and consequently go into no great detail regarding technical details of any of the CCSL routines. The programs may be run from each individual user account, for example [USER01], once the appropriate login procedure has been set-up by the instrument scientists. The programs are mostly activated by one line commands and only a basic knowledge of a VAX editor should be required; details can be found in the ''VAX primer'' available from Computer Support. (Author)

  1. A Dictionary Approach to Electron Backscatter Diffraction Indexing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu H; Park, Se Un; Wei, Dennis; Newstadt, Greg; Jackson, Michael A; Simmons, Jeff P; De Graef, Marc; Hero, Alfred O

    2015-06-01

    We propose a framework for indexing of grain and subgrain structures in electron backscatter diffraction patterns of polycrystalline materials. We discretize the domain of a dynamical forward model onto a dense grid of orientations, producing a dictionary of patterns. For each measured pattern, we identify the most similar patterns in the dictionary, and identify boundaries, detect anomalies, and index crystal orientations. The statistical distribution of these closest matches is used in an unsupervised binary decision tree (DT) classifier to identify grain boundaries and anomalous regions. The DT classifies a pattern as an anomaly if it has an abnormally low similarity to any pattern in the dictionary. It classifies a pixel as being near a grain boundary if the highly ranked patterns in the dictionary differ significantly over the pixel's neighborhood. Indexing is accomplished by computing the mean orientation of the closest matches to each pattern. The mean orientation is estimated using a maximum likelihood approach that models the orientation distribution as a mixture of Von Mises-Fisher distributions over the quaternionic three sphere. The proposed dictionary matching approach permits segmentation, anomaly detection, and indexing to be performed in a unified manner with the additional benefit of uncertainty quantification.

  2. Synchrotron diffraction characterization of nanostructured KY3F10:Tb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichikawa, Rodrigo U.; Teixeira, Maria I.; Ranieri, Izilda M.; Martinez, Luis G.; Linhares, Horacio M.S.M.D.; Turrillas, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Nanostructured rare-earth fluorides materials are being intensively studied recently due to their potential applications in high-dose dosimetry. Particularly, nanostructured Tb-doped KY 3 F 10 has shown satisfactory results to be used in this area. In the present work, the structure and microstructure of KY 3 F 10 :Tb was investigated by means of X-ray synchrotron diffraction. One of the samples was analyzed as synthesized and another after a heat treatment. Rietveld refinement of synchrotron diffraction data was applied to obtain cell parameters, atomic positions and atomic displacement factors and the results were compared to values found in literature. X-ray line profile analysis methods were applied to determine mean crystallite sizes and their distribution. (author)

  3. Inelastic nucleon diffraction at high energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goggi, G.

    1975-01-01

    Experiments carried out at ISR and at FNAL which have yielded a substantial amount of data on double diffraction processes, which were unambiguously indentified and measured and which provide new tools to study the dynamical properties shared by different classes of diffractive reactions are identified. In this review interest is focused on the experimental aspects of inclusive and exclusive results both on single and double diffraction and on the problems arising from their comparison. Problems covered include; inclusive and semi-inclusive diffraction, multiparticle inclusive studies, single-particle inclusive studies, resonance region, high mass region, exclusive single diffractive reactions, mass spectra, cross sections, t-dependence, decay angular properties, and double diffraction. (U.K.)

  4. Essays in applied microeconometrics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cervený, Jakub

    2017-01-01

    Duration analysis has been widely used in the applied economic research since the late 1970s. The framework allows to examine the duration of time intervals and the rate of transition across a set of states over time. Many economic behaviors follow a similar pattern, such as transition from the

  5. Theory of edge diffraction in electromagnetics

    CERN Document Server

    Ufimtsev, Pyotr

    2009-01-01

    This book is an essential resource for researchers involved in designing antennas and RCS calculations. It is also useful for students studying high frequency diffraction techniques. It contains basic original ideas of the Physical Theory of Diffraction (PTD), examples of its practical application, and its validation by the mathematical theory of diffraction. The derived analytic expressions are convenient for numerical calculations and clearly illustrate the physical structure of the scattered field.

  6. Diffractive variable beam splitter: optimal design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghi, R; Cincotti, G; Santarsiero, M

    2000-01-01

    The analytical expression of the phase profile of the optimum diffractive beam splitter with an arbitrary power ratio between the two output beams is derived. The phase function is obtained by an analytical optimization procedure such that the diffraction efficiency of the resulting optical element is the highest for an actual device. Comparisons are presented with the efficiency of a diffractive beam splitter specified by a sawtooth phase function and with the pertinent theoretical upper bound for this type of element.

  7. Theory of hard diffraction and rapidity gaps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Duca, V.

    1995-06-01

    In this talk we review the models describing the hard diffractive production of jets or more generally high-mass states in presence of rapidity gaps in hadron-hadron and lepton-hadron collisions. By rapidity gaps we mean regions on the lego plot in (pseudo)-rapidity and azimuthal angle where no hadrons are produced, between the jet(s) and an elastically scattered hadron (single hard diffraction) or between two jets (double hard diffraction). (orig.)

  8. High-energy electron diffraction and microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Peng, L M; Whelan, M J

    2011-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive introduction to high energy electron diffraction and elastic and inelastic scattering of high energy electrons, with particular emphasis on applications to modern electron microscopy. Starting from a survey of fundamental phenomena, the authors introduce the most important concepts underlying modern understanding of high energy electron diffraction. Dynamical diffraction in transmission (THEED) and reflection (RHEED) geometries is treated using ageneral matrix theory, where computer programs and worked examples are provided to illustrate the concepts and to f

  9. Twenty years of diffraction at the Tevatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goulianos, K.; Rockefeller U.

    2005-01-01

    Results on diffractive particle interactions from the Fermilab Tevatron (bar p)p collider are placed in perspective through a QCD inspired phenomenological approach, which exploits scaling and factorization properties observed in data. The results discussed are those obtained by the CDF Collaboration from a comprehensive set of single, double, and multigap soft and hard diffraction processes studied during the twenty year period since 1985, when the CDF diffractive program was proposed and the first Blois Workshop was held

  10. Theory of hard diffraction and rapidity gaps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Duca, V.

    1996-01-01

    In this talk we review the models describing the hard diffractive production of jets or more generally high-mass states in presence of rapidity gaps in hadron-hadron and lepton-hadron collisions. By rapidity gaps we mean regions on the lego plot in (pseudo)-rapidity and azimuthal angle where no hadrons are produced, between the jet(s) and an elastically scattered hadron (single hard diffraction) or between two jets (double hard diffraction). copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  11. Statistical description of multipion production in diffractive hadronic reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gagnon, R.

    1980-01-01

    A statistical model in which higher-multiplicity enhancements are generated from lower ones in a completely determined fashion is presented. Full account is taken of isospin and G-parity conservation as well as the finite width of the produced resonances. It is applied to diffractive dissociation on nucleon and deuteron targets, for which multipion mass distributions and relative cross sections are calculated. Agreement with available experimental data is seen to be excellent

  12. X-ray diffraction and measurement of residual stresses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeder, G.; Lebrun, J.L.; Corcaud, L.

    1977-01-01

    X-ray diffraction technique is a non destructive method for measuring the residual stresses in mechanical parts. This method, called sin 2 PSI method is investigated. It is applied to the measurement of elastic constants in different directions of crystals of Zr alloy (Zircaloy 4) and Ti alloy (TA6V). Stresses in TA6V sheets welded by TIG and electron beam processes are also studied [fr

  13. Caching Patterns and Implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Octavian Paul ROTARU

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Repetitious access to remote resources, usually data, constitutes a bottleneck for many software systems. Caching is a technique that can drastically improve the performance of any database application, by avoiding multiple read operations for the same data. This paper addresses the caching problems from a pattern perspective. Both Caching and caching strategies, like primed and on demand, are presented as patterns and a pattern-based flexible caching implementation is proposed.The Caching pattern provides method of expensive resources reacquisition circumvention. Primed Cache pattern is applied in situations in which the set of required resources, or at least a part of it, can be predicted, while Demand Cache pattern is applied whenever the resources set required cannot be predicted or is unfeasible to be buffered.The advantages and disadvantages of all the caching patterns presented are also discussed, and the lessons learned are applied in the implementation of the pattern-based flexible caching solution proposed.

  14. Neutron magnetic multiple diffraction in a natural magnetite crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazzocchi, V.L.; Parente, C.B.R.

    1988-09-01

    Neutron multiple diffraction has been employed in the study of the magnetism in magnetite (Fe 3 O 4 ). Magnetite has a crystallographic structure of an inverted spinel with tetrahedral A sites occupied solely by trivalent Fe 3+ ions and octahedral B sites occupied both by divalent Fe 2+ ions and the remaining Fe 3+ ions in random distribution. At room temperature magnetite is a Neel A-B ferrimagnet where the ions on the A, B sites are coupled antiferromagneticaly. This coupling disappears at T sup c approx. or approx.= 580 0 C. Employing a natural single crystal of magnetite experimental neutron multiple diffraction patterns were obtained for the primary reflection 111 at room temperature and 703 0 C. This reflection is almost entirely magnetic in origin resulting in 'Aufhellung' patterns below T c and mixed 'Aufhellung-Umweganregung' patterns above T c . Theoretical patterns were calculated employing the iterative method for the approximation of intensities by a Taylor series and compared to the experimental results. (author) [pt

  15. Diffractive charm and jet production at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savin, Alexander A.

    2003-01-01

    A new high precision inclusive measurement of the diffractive production of D* ± (2010) mesons in deep inelastic scattering (DIS) in the kinematic region Q 2 >1.5 GeV 2 , 0.02 IP 2 2 , 165 2 , χ IP < 0.03 are presented. Diffractive parton densities extracted using a NLO DGLAP QCD fit are used for comparisons with diffractive DIS and PHP dijet and open charm cross sections at HERA and the Tevatron, thus testing the factorization properties of hard diffraction

  16. Diffractive interactions of hadrons at high energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goulianos, K.

    1982-01-01

    Elastic scattering, inclusive single diffraction dissociation and total cross section results are reviewed, with emphasis on the inter-relationship among the parameters that characterize these processes

  17. Applied superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Newhouse, Vernon L

    1975-01-01

    Applied Superconductivity, Volume II, is part of a two-volume series on applied superconductivity. The first volume dealt with electronic applications and radiation detection, and contains a chapter on liquid helium refrigeration. The present volume discusses magnets, electromechanical applications, accelerators, and microwave and rf devices. The book opens with a chapter on high-field superconducting magnets, covering applications and magnet design. Subsequent chapters discuss superconductive machinery such as superconductive bearings and motors; rf superconducting devices; and future prospec

  18. X-ray diffraction measurement of residual stress in sol-gel grown lead zirconate titanate thick films on nickel-based super alloy substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoshyarmanesh, Hamidreza; Nehzat, Naser; Salehi, Mehdi [Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghodsi, Mojtaba [Sultan Qaboos University, Muscat (Oman)

    2015-02-15

    Residual compressive stress of Pb(Zr{sub 0.52}Ti{sub 0.48})O{sub 3} thick films was investigated using residual strains derived from X-ray diffraction patterns. Sin{sup 2}ψ method was applied for the 5, 10 and 15 μm sol-gel derived thick films annealed at 700 .deg. C for 1 hr as high frequency structural health monitoring square-shape transducers of 10 x10 mm, deposited onto the curved nickel-based super alloy substrates. A triaxial model was proposed based on piezoelectric constitutive equations, and Bragg's law at a large diffraction angle (∼89°) was utilized considering the electromechanical coupling factor as well as elastic, dielectric and piezoelectric constants. Thickness variations led to a significant change in residual stress magnitudes delineated from more-accurate triaxial model compared to small angle plane-stress results not considering the piezoelectric coupling effects.

  19. A general method for baseline-removal in ultrafast electron powder diffraction data using the dual-tree complex wavelet transform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent P. René de Cotret

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The general problem of background subtraction in ultrafast electron powder diffraction (UEPD is presented with a focus on the diffraction patterns obtained from materials of moderately complex structure which contain many overlapping peaks and effectively no scattering vector regions that can be considered exclusively background. We compare the performance of background subtraction algorithms based on discrete and dual-tree complex (DTCWT wavelet transforms when applied to simulated UEPD data on the M1–R phase transition in VO2 with a time-varying background. We find that the DTCWT approach is capable of extracting intensities that are accurate to better than 2% across the whole range of scattering vector simulated, effectively independent of delay time. A Python package is available.

  20. Conical diffraction as a versatile building block to implement new imaging modalities for superresolution in fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallet, Clément; Caron, Julien; Oddos, Stephane; Tinevez, Jean-Yves; Moisan, Lionel; Sirat, Gabriel Y.; Braitbart, Philippe O.; Shorte, Spencer L.

    2014-08-01

    We present a new technology for super-resolution fluorescence imaging, based on conical diffraction. Conical diffraction is a linear, singular phenomenon taking place when a polarized beam is diffracted through a biaxial crystal. The illumination patterns generated by conical diffraction are more compact than the classical Gaussian beam; we use them to generate a super-resolution imaging modality. Conical Diffraction Microscopy (CODIM) resolution enhancement can be achieved with any type of objective on any kind of sample preparation and standard fluorophores. Conical diffraction can be used in multiple fashion to create new and disruptive technologies for super-resolution microscopy. This paper will focus on the first one that has been implemented and give a glimpse at what the future of microscopy using conical diffraction could be.