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Sample records for dietary eicosapentaenoic acid

  1. Dietary intake of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) in children - a workshop report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koletzko, B.; Uauy, R.; Palou, A.; Kok, F.J.; Hornstra, G.; Eilander, A.; Moretti, D.; Osendarp, S.J.M.; Zock, P.L.; Innis, S.

    2010-01-01

    There is controversy whether children should have a dietary supply of preformed long-chain polyunsaturated n-3 fatty acids EPA and DHA. The aims of the workshop were to review evidence for a possible benefit of a preformed EPA and/or DHA supply, of data required to set desirable intakes for children

  2. Dietary intake of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) in children - a workshop report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koletzko, B.; Uauy, R.; Palou, A.; Kok, F.J.; Hornstra, G.; Eilander, A.; Moretti, D.; Osendarp, S.J.M.; Zock, P.L.; Innis, S.

    2010-01-01

    There is controversy whether children should have a dietary supply of preformed long-chain polyunsaturated n-3 fatty acids EPA and DHA. The aims of the workshop were to review evidence for a possible benefit of a preformed EPA and/or DHA supply, of data required to set desirable intakes for children

  3. The influence of dietary concentrations of arachidonic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid at various stages of larval ontogeny on eye migration, pigmentation and prostaglandin content of common sole larvae ( Solea solea L.)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Ivar; Steenfeldt, Svend Jørgen; Banta, G.;

    2008-01-01

    Dietary manipulations of arachidonic acid, ARA and eicosapentaenoic acid, EPA may have an influence on pigmentation in common sole larvae (Solea solea L., Linnaeus 1758) which may be related to a "pigmentation window". This is a specific period in the larval ontogeny where nutritional factors...

  4. The safety assessment of Pythium irregulare as a producer of biomass and eicosapentaenoic acid for use in dietary supplements and food ingredients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lei; Roe, Charles L; Wen, Zhiyou

    2013-09-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6, n-3), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5, n-3), and arachidonic acid (ARA, 20:4 n-6), have multiple beneficial effects on human health and can be used as an important ingredient in dietary supplements, food, feed and pharmaceuticals. A variety of microorganisms has been used for commercial production of these fatty acids. The microorganisms in the Pythium family, particularly Pythium irregulare, are potential EPA producers. The aim of this work is to provide a safety assessment of P. irregulare so that the EPA derived from this species can be potentially used in various commercial applications. The genus Pythium has been widely recognized as a plant pathogen by infecting roots and colonizing the vascular tissues of various plants such as soybeans, corn and various vegetables. However, the majority of the Pythium species (including P. irregulare) have not been reported to infect mammals including humans. The only species among the Pythium family that infects mammals is P. insidiosum. There also have been no reports showing P. irregulare to contain mycotoxins or cause potentially allergenic responses in humans. Based on the safety assessment, we conclude that P. irregulare can be considered a safe source of biomass and EPA-containing oil for use as ingredients in dietary supplements, food, feed and pharmaceuticals.

  5. Eicosapentaenoic Acid Modulates Trichomonas vaginalis Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korosh, Travis; Jordan, Kelsey D; Wu, Ja-Shin; Yarlett, Nigel; Upmacis, Rita K

    2016-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is a sexually transmitted parasite and, while it is often asymptomatic in males, the parasite is associated with disease in both sexes. Metronidazole is an effective treatment for trichomoniasis, but resistant strains have evolved and, thus, it has become necessary to investigate other possible therapies. In this study, we examined the effects of native and oxidized forms of the sodium salts of eicosapentaenoic, docosahexaenoic, and arachidonic acids on T. vaginalis activity. Eicosapentaenoic acid was the most toxic with 190 and 380 μM causing approximately 90% cell death in Casu2 and ATCC 50142 strains, respectively. In contrast, oxidized eicosapentaenoic acid was the least toxic, requiring > 3 mM to inhibit activity, while low levels (10 μM) were associated with increased parasite density. Mass spectrometric analysis of oxidized eicosapentaenoic acid revealed C20 products containing one to six additional oxygen atoms and various degrees of bond saturation. These results indicate that eicosapentaenoic acid has different effects on T. vaginalis survival, depending on whether it is present in the native or oxidized form. A better understanding of lipid metabolism in T. vaginalis may facilitate the design of synthetic fatty acids that are effective for the treatment of metronidazole-resistant T. vaginalis.

  6. Dietary Docosahexaenoic Acid and Eicosapentaenoic Acid Influence Liver Triacylglycerol and Insulin Resistance in Rats Fed a High-Fructose Diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Salim de Castro

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to examine the benefits of different amounts of omega-3 (n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids from fish oil (FO on lipid metabolism, insulin resistance and gene expression in rats fed a high-fructose diet. Male Wistar rats were separated into two groups: Control (C, n = 6 and Fructose (Fr, n = 32, the latter receiving a diet containing 63% by weight fructose for 60 days. After this period, 24 animals from Fr group were allocated to three groups: FrFO2 (n = 8 receiving 63% fructose and 2% FO plus 5% soybean oil; FrFO5 (n = 8 receiving 63% fructose and 5% FO plus 2% soybean oil; and FrFO7 (n = 8 receiving 63% fructose and 7% FO. Animals were fed these diets for 30 days. Fructose led to an increase in liver weight, hepatic and serum triacylglycerol, serum alanine aminotransferase and HOMA1-IR index. These alterations were reversed by 5% and 7% FO. FO had a dose-dependent effect on expression of genes related to hepatic β-oxidation (increased and hepatic lipogenesis (decreased. The group receiving the highest FO amount had increased markers of oxidative stress. It is concluded that n-3 fatty acids may be able to reverse the adverse metabolic effects induced by a high fructose diet.

  7. Effect of the ratio of dietary n-3 fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid on broiler breeder performance, egg quality, and yolk fatty acid composition at different breeder ages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppenol, A; Delezie, E; Aerts, J; Willems, E; Wang, Y; Franssens, L; Everaert, N; Buyse, J

    2014-03-01

    When added to the feed of broiler breeder hens, dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids (FA) can be incorporated into the yolk and therefore become available to the progeny during their early development. The mechanism involved in lipid metabolism and deposition in the egg may be influenced by breeder age. Before the effect of an elevated concentration of certain polyunsaturated FA on the embryo can be investigated, the effect at breeder level and egg quality must be further assessed. The aim of the present experiment was to evaluate the effects of dietary n-6/n-3 ratios and dietary eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5 n-3) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6 n-3) ratios, provided to broiler breeder hens, in terms of their zoo technical performance, egg quality, and yolk FA composition. Starting at 6 wk of age, 640 Ross-308 broiler breeder hens were fed 1 of 4 different diets. The control diet was a basal diet, rich in n-6 FA. The 3 other diets were enriched in n-3 FA, formulated to obtain a different EPA/DHA ratio of 1/1 (EPA = DHA), 1/2 (DHA), or 2/1 (EPA). In fact, after analysis the EPA/DHA ratio was 0.8, 0.4, or 2.1, respectively. Dietary EPA and DHA addition did not affect the performance of the breeder hens, except for egg weight. Egg weight was lower (P < 0.001) for all n-3 treatments. Dietary EPA improved number of eggs laid in the first 2 wk of the production cycle (P = 0.029). The absolute and relative yolk weight of eggs laid by EPA = DHA fed hens was lowest (P = 0.004 and P = 0.025, respectively). The EPA and DHA concentrations in the yolk were highly dependent on dietary EPA and DHA concentrations with a regression coefficient equal to 0.89. It can be concluded that dietary EPA and DHA can be incorporated in the breeder egg yolk to become available for the developing embryo, without compromising the performance and egg quality of the flock.

  8. Biomarker and dietary validation of a Canadian food frequency questionnaire to measure eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acid intakes from whole food, functional food, and nutraceutical sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Ashley C; Hogg, Ryan C; Kishi, Diane M; Stark, Ken D

    2012-07-01

    Canadian dietary sources of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) include marine and non-marine whole foods, functional foods, and nutraceuticals. In the present study, these sources were incorporated into a nutrient-specific, semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) and the ability to measure the EPA and DHA intakes of Canadian adults was assessed. Specifically, the EPA and DHA intakes estimated by FFQ of 78 men and women, 20 to 60 years of age, were compared with EPA and DHA measurements from 3-day food records and measures of EPA and DHA in fasting whole blood. Mean (±standard deviation) and median intakes of EPA+DHA were 0.34±0.34 and 0.21 g/day by FFQ and 0.47±0.71 and 0.13 g/day by food record, with no significant differences between mean intakes (P=0.93). The FFQ provided higher estimates than the food record at low intakes of EPA and DHA and lower estimates at high intakes based on Bland-Altman plots. The FFQ was moderately correlated with food record (r=0.31 to 0.49) and with blood biomarker measures of EPA and DHA (r=0.31 to 0.51). Agreement analysis revealed that 42% of participants were classified in the same and 77% into same or adjacent quartile when EPA and DHA intake was assessed by food record and by FFQ. Similar quartile agreement was found for EPA and DHA intakes by FFQ with blood biomarker EPA and DHA. The range of the validity coefficients, calculated using the method of triads, was 0.43 to 0.71 for FFQ measurement of EPA+DHA. The FFQ is an adequate tool for estimating usual EPA and DHA intakes and ranking Canadian adults by their intakes. Copyright © 2012 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Effect of dietary arachidonic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid on survival, growth and pigmentation in larvae of common sole ( Solea solea L.)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Ivar; Steenfeldt, Svend Jørgen; Hansen, B.W.

    2007-01-01

    reflected dietary composition, neither standard growth nor larval survival were significantly related to the absolute concentrations of ARA, EPA and DHA or their ratios. This suggests low requirements for essential polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) in common sole. Malpigmentation was significantly related...... to increased dietary ARA content. However, pigmentation was not affected by inclusion levels of EPA or DHA when ARA was high. This, and no relation between DHA: EPA or ARA: EPA ratios and pigmentation and only a weak relation to ARA: DHA ratio, advocate for that it is the absolute concentration of ARA...... resulted in a lower growth rate, which suggests that visual aberrations affected prey capture. (C) 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  10. Dietary sesamin and docosahexaenoic and eicosapentaenoic acids synergistically increase the gene expression of enzymes involved in hepatic peroxisomal fatty acid oxidation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arachchige, Premakumara G; Takahashi, Yoko; Ide, Takashi

    2006-03-01

    The interaction of sesamin, one of the most abundant lignans in sesame seed, and highly purified docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) or eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) in the form of ethyl ester in affecting hepatic fatty acid oxidation was examined in rats. In the first experiment, 3 groups of rats were fed with purified experimental diets free of n-3 fatty acid ethyl ester and containing 0%, 0.2%, and 0.4% sesamin (1:1 mixture of sesamin and episesamin), and 2 groups of animals were fed with a 2% DHA ethyl ester diet containing either 0% or 0.2% sesamin. In the second trial, 4 groups of rats were fed with either a 0% or a 2% EPA ethyl ester diet containing 0% or 0.2% sesamin. After 15 days of feeding, DHA and EPA ethyl esters added to a sesamin-free diet little affected the activity and messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of various enzymes involved in fatty acid oxidation. Sesamin increased the activity levels of various hepatic enzymes involved in fatty acid oxidation irrespective of the presence or absence of n-3 fatty acid ethyl ester in diets. However, the diet containing sesamin and DHA or EPA ethyl ester in combination increased many of these parameters synergistically. In particular, the peroxisomal palmitoyl-coenzyme A oxidation rate and acyl-coenzyme A oxidase activity level were much higher in rats fed with sesamin and DHA or EPA in combination than in animals fed with a diet free of n-3 fatty acid ethyl ester and containing sesamin. Analyses of mRNA levels revealed that a diet simultaneously containing sesamin and n-3 fatty acid ethyl ester increased the gene expression of various enzymes involved in peroxisomal fatty acid oxidation in a synergistic manner. However, the combination of sesamin and n-3 fatty acid ethyl esters was ineffective in causing a synergistic increase in mRNA levels of enzymes of mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation, microsomal cytochrome P-450 IV A1, and cytosolic liver-type fatty acid-binding protein. It was concluded that sesamin and DHA or EPA

  11. Effects of dietary eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) supplementation in high-fat fed mice on lipid metabolism and apelin/APJ system in skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, Chantal; Pignalosa, Angelica; Wanecq, Estelle; Rancoule, Chloé; Batut, Aurélie; Deleruyelle, Simon; Lionetti, Lillà; Valet, Philippe; Castan-Laurell, Isabelle

    2013-01-01

    Various studies have shown that eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) has beneficial effects on obesity and associated disorders. Apelin, the ligand of APJ receptor also exerts insulin-sensitizing effects especially by improving muscle metabolism. EPA has been shown to increase apelin production in adipose tissue but its effects in muscle have not been addressed. Thus, the effects of EPA supplementation (36 g/kg EPA) in high-fat diet (HFD) (45% fat, 20% protein, 35% carbohydrate) were studied in mice with focus on muscle lipid metabolism and apelin/APJ expression. Compared with HFD mice, HFD+EPA mice had significantly less weight gain, fat mass, lower blood glucose, insulinemia and hepatic steatosis after 10 weeks of diet. In addition, EPA prevented muscle metabolism alterations since intramuscular triglycerides were decreased and β-oxidation increased. In soleus muscles of HFD+EPA mice, apelin and APJ expression were significantly increased compared to HFD mice. However, plasma apelin concentrations in HFD and HFD+EPA mice were similar. EPA-induced apelin expression was confirmed in differentiated C2C12 myocytes but in this model, apelin secretion was also increased in response to EPA treatment. In conclusion, EPA supplementation in HFD prevents obesity and metabolic alterations in mice, especially in skeletal muscle. Since EPA increases apelin/APJ expression in muscle, apelin may act in a paracrine/autocrine manner to contribute to these benefical effects.

  12. Wheat aleurone polyphenols increase plasma eicosapentaenoic acid in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fayçal Ounnas

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Methods: These studies were designed to assess whether wheat polyphenols (mainly ferulic acid [FA] increased the very-long-chain omega-3 fatty acids (VLC n-3 [eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA] in rats. Wheat aleurone (WA was used as a dietary source of wheat polyphenols. Two experiments were performed; in the first one, the rats were fed WA or control pellets (CP in presence of linseed oil (LO to provide alpha-linolenic acid (ALA, the precursor of VLC n-3. In the second one, the rats were fed WA or CP in presence of control oil (CO without ALA. The concentrations of phenolic acid metabolites in urine were also investigated. Results: The urinary concentration of conjugated FA increased with WA ingestion (p<0.05. Plasma EPA increased by 25% (p<0.05 with WA in the CO group but not in the LO group. In contrast, there was no effect of WA on plasma DHA and omega-6 fatty acids (n-6. Finally, both n-3 and n-6 in the liver remained unchanged by the WA. Conclusion: These results suggest that WA consumption has a significant effect on EPA in plasma without affecting n-6. Subsequent studies are required to examine whether these effects may explain partly the health benefits associated with whole wheat consumption.

  13. Dietary ethyl-eicosapentaenoic acid but not soybean oil reverses central interleukin-1-induced changes in behavior, corticosterone and immune response in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Cai; Leonard, Brian E; Horrobin, David F

    2004-03-01

    Omega (n)-3 and n-6 fatty acids are important membrane components of neurons and immune cells, and related to psychiatric and inflammatory diseases. Increased ratio of n-6/n-3 in the blood has been reported in depressed patients and in students following stress exposure. The n-3 fatty acid, eicosapentaenoic acid (ethyl-EPA) suppresses inflammation and has antidepressant properties. Interleukin (IL)-1beta can stimulate corticosterone secretion, induce anxiety and stress-like behavior and inflammatory responses. This study was to evaluate the effect of diets enriched with coconut oil, ethyl-EPA and soybean oil on central IL-1beta induced stress and anxiety-like behavior, induced changes in the concentration of prostaglandin (PG) E2 and corticosterone and the release of IL-10. Groups of rats were fed with either 5% coconut oil (as control diet), 0.2% EPA with 4.8% coconut oil or 1% EPA with 4% coconut oil and 5% soybean oil for 7 weeks. The central administration of IL-1beta induced sickness, stress and anxiety-like behavior as indicated by a reduction in body weight, decreased time spent, and the number of entries, into the open arms of the elevated plus maze and decreased exploration and entry into the central zone of the "open field" apparatus. IL-1beta also increased PGE2 and corticosterone concentrations and decreased the release of IL-10 from leucocytes. Food enriched with ethyl-EPA but not soybean oil, significantly attenuated most of these changes. These results demonstrate that ethyl-EPA has anti-inflammatory, anti-stress and anti-anxiety effects in rats.

  14. Incorporation and distribution of dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid, arachidonic acid, and eicosapentaenoic acid in cultured human keratinocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Punnonen, K.; Puustinen, T.; Jansen, C.T.

    1986-02-01

    Human keratinocytes in culture were labelled with /sup 14/C-dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid, /sup 14/C-arachidonic acid or /sup 14/C-eicosapentaenoic acid. All three eicosanoid precursor fatty acids were effectively incorporated into the cells. In phospholipids most of the radioactivity was recovered, in neutral lipids a substantial amount, and as free unesterified fatty acids only a minor amount. Most of the radioactivity was found in phosphatidylethanolamine which was also the major phospholipid as measured by phosphorous assay. The incorporation of dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid and arachidonic acid into lipid subfractions was essentially similar. Eicosapentaenoic acid was, however, much less effectively incorporated into phosphatidylinositol + phosphatidylserine and, correspondingly, more effectively into triacylglycerols as compared to the two other precursor fatty acids. Once incorporated, the distribution of all three precursor fatty acids was relatively stable, and only minor amounts of fatty acids were released into the culture medium during short term culture (two days). Our study demonstrates that eicosanoid precursor fatty acids are avidly taken up by human keratinocytes and esterified into membrane lipids. The clinical implication of this finding is that dietary manipulations might be employed to cause changes in the fatty acid composition of keratinocytes.

  15. Increasing levels of two different fish oils lower ruminal biohydrogenation of eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acid in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Dohme, Frigga; Fievez, Veerle; Raes, Katleen; Demeyer, Daniel

    2003-01-01

    International audience; Ruminal biohydrogenation of dietary $n-3$ fatty acids limits any attempt to increase their contents in products of ruminants. The aim of the study was to determine whether total lipolysis, release rate of eicosapentaenoic (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acids (DHA) from triacylglycerols (TG), their biohydrogenation and their accumulation as unesterified fatty acids was affected by the fish oil type (FOa; FOb), inclusion level (12.5, 25, 50, 75, 100 and 125 mg per incubation ...

  16. The omega-3 fatty acid eicosapentaenoic acid is required for normal alcohol response behaviors in C. elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard C Raabe

    Full Text Available Alcohol addiction is a widespread societal problem, for which there are few treatments. There are significant genetic and environmental influences on abuse liability, and understanding these factors will be important for the identification of susceptible individuals and the development of effective pharmacotherapies. In humans, the level of response to alcohol is strongly predictive of subsequent alcohol abuse. Level of response is a combination of counteracting responses to alcohol, the level of sensitivity to the drug and the degree to which tolerance develops during the drug exposure, called acute functional tolerance. We use the simple and well-characterized nervous system of Caenorhabditis elegans to model the acute behavioral effects of ethanol to identify genetic and environmental factors that influence level of response to ethanol. Given the strong molecular conservation between the neurobiological machinery of worms and humans, cellular-level effects of ethanol are likely to be conserved. Increasingly, variation in long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid levels has been implicated in complex neurobiological phenotypes in humans, and we recently found that fatty acid levels modify ethanol responses in worms. Here, we report that 1 eicosapentaenoic acid, an omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid, is required for the development of acute functional tolerance, 2 dietary supplementation of eicosapentaenoic acid is sufficient for acute tolerance, and 3 dietary eicosapentaenoic acid can alter the wild-type response to ethanol. These results suggest that genetic variation influencing long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid levels may be important abuse liability loci, and that dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids may be an important environmental modulator of the behavioral response to ethanol.

  17. Eicosapentaenoic Acid, Arachidonic Acid and Eicosanoid Metabolism in Juvenile Barramundi Lates calcarifer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salini, Michael J; Wade, Nicholas M; Araújo, Bruno C; Turchini, Giovanni M; Glencross, Brett D

    2016-08-01

    A two part experiment was conducted to assess the response of barramundi (Lates calcarifer; initial weight = 10.3 ± 0.03 g; mean ± S.D.) fed one of five diets with varying eicosapentaenoic acid (diets 1, 5, 10, 15 and 20 g/kg) or one of four diets with varying arachidonic acid (1, 6, 12, 18 g/kg) against a fish oil control diet. After 6 weeks of feeding, the addition of EPA or ARA did not impact on growth performance or feed utilisation. Analysis of the whole body fatty acids showed that these reflected those of the diets. The ARA retention demonstrated an inversely related curvilinear response to either EPA or ARA. The calculated marginal utilisation efficiencies of EPA and ARA were high (62.1 and 91.9 % respectively) and a dietary ARA requirement was defined (0.012 g/kg(0.796)/day). The partial cDNA sequences of genes regulating eicosanoid biosynthesis were identified in barramundi tissues, namely cyclooxygenase 1 (Lc COX1a, Lc COX1b), cyclooxygenase 2 (Lc COX2) and lipoxygenase (Lc ALOX-5). Both Lc COX2 and Lc ALOX-5 expression in the liver tissue were elevated in response to increasing dietary ARA, meanwhile expression levels of Lc COX2 and the mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation gene carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (Lc CPT1a) were elevated in the kidney. A low level of EPA increased the expression of Lc COX1b in the liver. Consideration should be given to the EPA to ARA balance for juvenile barramundi in light of nutritionally inducible nature of the cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase enzymes.

  18. Eicosapentaenoic Acid Suppresses the Proliferation of Synoviocytes from Rheumatoid Arthritis

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    Hamaguchi, Masahide; Kawahito, Yutaka; Omoto, Atsushi; Tsubouchi, Yasunori; Kohno, Masataka; Seno, Takahiro; Kadoya, Masatoshi; Yamamoto, Aihiro; Ishino, Hidetaka; Matsuyama, Masahide; Yoshimura, Rikio; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu

    2008-01-01

    Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) is essential for normal cell growth, and may play an important role in inflammatory and autoimmune disorders including rheumatoid arthritis. We investigate that EPA could suppress the proliferation of fibroblast like synoviocytes in vitro. We treated synoviocytes with 1 to 50 µM EPA and measured cell viabilities by the modified MTT assay. We sorted the number of them in sub G1 stage by fluorescence-activated cell sorting caliber. And we stained them by light green or Hoechst 33258, and investigate microscopic appearance. The cell viabilities were decreased at 30 µM, 40 µM, and 50 µM of EPA comparing to 0 µM of EPA. The half maximal concentration of synoviocytes inhibition was approximately 25 µM. At day 1 and day 3, cell number was also decreased at 50 µM EPA comparing to control. FACS caliber indicated the number of synoviocytes in sub G1 stage did not increase in each concentration of EPA. Hoechst staining indicated normal chromatin pattern and no change in a nuclear morphology both in EPA treated synoviocytes and in untreated synoviocytes. These findings suggest that EPA could suppress the proliferation of synoviocytes in vivo dose dependently and time dependently, however, the mechanism is not due to apoptosis. PMID:18818751

  19. Eskimo plasma constituents, dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid inhibit the release of atherogenic mitogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D L; Willis, A L; Nguyen, N; Conner, D; Zahedi, S; Fulks, J

    1989-01-01

    Studies in man and laboratory animals suggest that omega 3 polyunsaturated fatty acid constituents of fish oils have antiatherosclerotic properties. We have studied the effects of several such polyunsaturated fatty acids for ability to modify the in vitro release of mitogens from human platelets. Such mitogens may produce the fibro-proliferative component of atherosclerotic plaques. Both 5,8,11,14,17-eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5 omega 3) and 4,7,10,13,16,19-docosahexaenoic acid (22:6 omega 3), major constituents of fish oils, inhibited adenosine diphosphate-induced aggregation of platelets and the accompanying release of mitogens. These effects are dose dependent. Linolenic acid (18:3 omega 3), the biosynthetic precursor of eicosapentaenoic acid, also inhibited platelet aggregation and mitogen release. Eicosapentaenoic acid also inhibited mitogen release from human monocyte-derived macrophages, which, in vivo, are an additional source of mitogens during atherogenesis. Potent inhibition of human platelet aggregation and mitogen release was also seen with dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid (8,11,14-eicosatrienoic acid 20:3 omega 6), whose levels are reportedly elevated in Eskimos subsisting on marine diets. We conclude that diets that elevate plasma and/or tissue levels of eicosapentaenoic acid, docosahexaenoic acid and dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid precursor gamma-linolenic acid (18:3 omega 6) may exert antiatherosclerotic effects by inhibiting the release of mitogens from platelets and other cells.

  20. Eicosapentaenoic acid inhibits intestinal β-carotene absorption by downregulation of lipid transporter expression via PPAR-α dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashurabad, Purna Chandra; Kondaiah, Palsa; Palika, Ravindranadh; Ghosh, Sudip; Nair, Madhavan K; Raghu, Pullakhandam

    2016-01-15

    The involvement of lipid transporters, the scavenger receptor class B, type I (SR-BI) and Niemann-Pick type C1 Like 1 protein (NPC1L1) in carotenoid absorption is demonstrated in intestinal cells and animal models. Dietary ω-3 fatty acids are known to possess antilipidemic properties, which could be mediated by activation of PPAR family transcription factors. The present study was conducted to determine the effect of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), on intestinal β-carotene absorption. β-carotene uptake in Caco-2/TC7 cells was inhibited by EPA (p intestinal β-carotene absorption by down regulation of SR B1 expression via PPARα dependent mechanism and provide an evidence for dietary modulation of intestinal β-carotene absorption.

  1. Eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid in whole blood are differentially and sex-specifically associated with cardiometabolic risk markers in 8-11-year-old danish children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsgaard, Camilla T.; Eidner, Maj B.; Stark, Ken D.;

    2014-01-01

    n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids improve cardiovascular risk markers in adults. These effects may differ between eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20∶5n-3) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22∶6n-3), but we lack evidence in children. Using baseline data from the OPUS School Meal Study we 1......-day dietary records, physical activity by accelerometry and measured anthropometry, blood pressure, and heart rate. Blood samples were analyzed for whole blood fatty acid composition, cholesterols, triacylglycerol, insulin resistance by the homeostatic model of assessment (HOMA-IR), and inflammatory...

  2. Regulation of inflammatory and lipid metabolism genes by eicosapentaenoic acid-rich oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillies, Peter J; Bhatia, Sujata K; Belcher, Leigh A; Hannon, Daniel B; Thompson, Jerry T; Vanden Heuvel, John P

    2012-08-01

    Omega-3-PUFAs, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), are associated with prevention of various aspects of metabolic syndrome. In the present studies, the effects of oil rich in EPA on gene expression and activation of nuclear receptors was examined and compared with other ω3-PUFAs. The EPA-rich oil (EO) altered the expression of FA metabolism genes in THP-1 cells, including stearoyl CoA desaturase (SCD) and FA desaturase-1 and -2 (FASDS1 and -2). Other ω3-PUFAs resulted in a similar gene expression response for a subset of genes involved in lipid metabolism and inflammation. In reporter assays, EO activated human peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) and PPARβ/γ with minimal effects on PPARγ, liver X receptor, retinoid X receptor, farnesoid X receptor, and retinoid acid receptor γ (RARγ); these effects were similar to that observed for purified EPA. When serum from a 6 week clinical intervention with dietary supplements containing olive oil (control), DHA, or two levels of EPA were applied to THP-1 cells, the expression of SCD and FADS2 decreased in the cells treated with serum from the ω3-PUFA-supplemented individuals. Taken together, these studies indicate regulation of gene expression by EO that is consistent with treating aspects of dyslipidemia and inflammation.

  3. Regulation of inflammatory and lipid metabolism genes by eicosapentaenoic acid-rich oil[S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillies, Peter J.; Bhatia, Sujata K.; Belcher, Leigh A; Hannon, Daniel B.; Thompson, Jerry T.; Vanden Heuvel, John P.

    2012-01-01

    Omega-3-PUFAs, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), are associated with prevention of various aspects of metabolic syndrome. In the present studies, the effects of oil rich in EPA on gene expression and activation of nuclear receptors was examined and compared with other ω3-PUFAs. The EPA-rich oil (EO) altered the expression of FA metabolism genes in THP-1 cells, including stearoyl CoA desaturase (SCD) and FA desaturase-1 and -2 (FASDS1 and -2). Other ω3-PUFAs resulted in a similar gene expression response for a subset of genes involved in lipid metabolism and inflammation. In reporter assays, EO activated human peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) and PPARβ/γ with minimal effects on PPARγ, liver X receptor, retinoid X receptor, farnesoid X receptor, and retinoid acid receptor γ (RARγ); these effects were similar to that observed for purified EPA. When serum from a 6 week clinical intervention with dietary supplements containing olive oil (control), DHA, or two levels of EPA were applied to THP-1 cells, the expression of SCD and FADS2 decreased in the cells treated with serum from the ω3-PUFA-supplemented individuals. Taken together, these studies indicate regulation of gene expression by EO that is consistent with treating aspects of dyslipidemia and inflammation. PMID:22556214

  4. The omega-3 fatty acid eicosapentaenoic acid accelerates disease progression in a model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

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    Ping K Yip

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a progressive fatal neurodegenerative disease characterised by loss of motor neurons that currently has no cure. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, such as eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, have many health benefits including neuroprotective and myoprotective potential. We tested the hypothesis that a high level of dietary EPA could exert beneficial effects in ALS. The dietary exposure to EPA (300 mg/kg/day in a well-established mouse model of ALS expressing the G93A superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1 mutation was initiated at a pre-symptomatic or symptomatic stage, and the disease progression was monitored until the end stage. Daily dietary EPA exposure initiated at the disease onset did not significantly alter disease presentation and progression. In contrast, EPA treatment initiated at the pre-symptomatic stage induced a significantly shorter lifespan. In a separate group of animals sacrificed before the end stage, the tissue analysis showed that the vacuolisation detected in G93A-SOD1 mice was significantly increased by exposure to EPA. Although EPA did not alter motor neurone loss, EPA reversed the significant increase in activated microglia and the astrocytic activation seen in G93A-SOD1 mice. The microglia in the spinal cord of G93A-SOD1 mice treated with EPA showed a significant increase in 4-hydroxy-2-hexenal, a highly toxic aldehydic oxidation product of omega-3 fatty acids. These data show that dietary EPA supplementation in ALS has the potential to worsen the condition and accelerate the disease progression. This suggests that great caution should be exerted when considering dietary omega-3 fatty acid supplements in ALS patients.

  5. Research on Arachidonic Acid and Eicosapentaenoic Acid Anabolic Metabolism in Diasporangium sp.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Chuan-chao; XU Yu-fen; XIA Shun-xiang; ZHAO Mo; YE Yu-cheng

    2010-01-01

    The fatty acids of a strain of Diasporangium sp.had been analyzed by using GC-MS.The fatty acids of twenty mutants were determined.Based on these results,the producing of eicosapentaenoic acid(EPA)supposed via 18∶2,18∶3,20∶3,20∶4 which all belong to ω-6 fatty acids.The ω-3 desaturation was undertaken at arachidonic acid(AA).In addition,mutant strains resulted in enhanced content of AA which could get two times more than initial strain,but no compact on EPA.

  6. Eicosapentaenoic acid regulation of muscle lipid metabolism in vivo and in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), an omega 3 fatty acids exerts potent anti-inflammatory and hypolipidemic effects. We previously reported that mice fed high fat diets supplemented with EPA (HF-EPA) were resistant to diet-induced obesity, inflammation and insulin resistance. Here we further investigate b...

  7. Eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid in whole blood are differentially and sex-specifically associated with cardiometabolic risk markers in 8-11-year-old danish children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsgaard, Camilla T.; Eidner, Maj B.; Stark, Ken D.

    2014-01-01

    ) investigated associations between EPA and DHA in whole blood and early cardiometabolic risk markers in 713 children aged 8-11 years and 2) explored potential mediation through waist circumference and physical activity and potential dietary confounding. We collected data on parental education, pubertal stage, 7......n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids improve cardiovascular risk markers in adults. These effects may differ between eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20∶5n-3) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22∶6n-3), but we lack evidence in children. Using baseline data from the OPUS School Meal Study we 1...

  8. Protective effect of eicosapentaenoic acid on ouabain toxicity in neonatal rat cardiac myocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallaq, H.; Leaf, A. (Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (USA)); Sellmayer, A. (Univ. Munchen, (Germany)); Smith, T.W. (Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA (USA))

    1990-10-01

    Isolated neonatal cardiac myocytes have been utilized as a model for the study of cardiac arrhythmogenic factors. The myocytes respond to the toxic effects of a potent cardiac glycoside, ouabain at 0.1 mM, by an increase in their spontaneous beating rate and a reduction in amplitude of contractions resulting within minutes in a lethal state of contracture. Incubating the isolated myocytes for 3{endash}5 days in culture medium enriched with 5 {mu}M arachidonic acid had no effect on the development of lethal contracture after subsequent exposure to 0.1 mM ouabain. By contrast, incubating the myocytes for 3{endash}5 days with 5 {mu}M eicosapentaenoic acid completely prevented the toxic effects of ouabain at 0.1 mM. No differences in bumetanide-inhibitable {sup 86}Rb flux were observed between the three preparations. However, measurements with fura-2 of cytosolic free calcium levels indicated that control and arachidonic acid-enriched myocytes developed toxic cytosolic calcium concentrations of 845 {plus minus} 29 and 757 {plus minus} 64 nM, respectively, on exposure to 0.1 mM ouabain, whereas in eicosapentaenoic acid-enriched myocytes, physiologic calcium levels were preserved. Incubating the myocytes with eicosapentaenoic acid for 3{endash}5 days resulted in a small reduction of arachidonic acid and a small but significant increase of eicosapentaenoic acid in membrane phospolipids of the myocytes.

  9. THE EFFECTS OF 3G EICOSAPENTAENOIC ACID DAILY ON RECURRENCE OF INTRAUTERINE GROWTH-RETARDATION AND PREGNANCY-INDUCED HYPERTENSION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BULSTRARAMAKERS, MTEW; HUISJES, HJ; VISSER, GHA

    1995-01-01

    Objective To study the effects of addition of 3 g eicosapentaenoic acid daily to the diet, on recurrence rate of intrauterine growth retardation and pregnancy induced hypertension in a high risk population. Design Prospective, double blind, randomised multicentre study, Eicosapentaenoic acid or plac

  10. Combination of intermittent calorie restriction and eicosapentaenoic acid for inhibition of mammary tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Nancy K; Rogozina, Olga P; Seppanen, Christine M; Liao, D Joshua; Cleary, Margot P; Grossmann, Michael E

    2013-06-01

    There are a number of dietary interventions capable of inhibiting mammary tumorigenesis; however, the effectiveness of dietary combinations is largely unexplored. Here, we combined 2 interventions previously shown individually to inhibit mammary tumor development. The first was the use of the omega-3 fatty acid, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and the second was the implementation of calorie restriction. MMTV-Her2/neu mice were used as a model for human breast cancers, which overexpress Her2/neu. Six groups of mice were enrolled. Half were fed a control (Con) diet with 10.1% fat calories from soy oil, whereas the other half consumed a diet with 72% fat calories from EPA. Within each diet, mice were further divided into ad libitum (AL), chronic calorie-restricted (CCR), or intermittent calorie-restricted (ICR) groups. Mammary tumor incidence was lowest in ICR-EPA (15%) and highest in AL-Con mice (87%), whereas AL-EPA, CCR-Con, CCR-EPA, and ICR-Con groups had mammary tumor incidence rates of 63%, 47%, 40%, and 59%, respectively. Survival was effected similarly by the interventions. Consumption of EPA dramatically reduced serum leptin (P < 0.02) and increased serum adiponectin in the AL-EPA mice compared with AL-Con mice (P < 0.001). Both CCR and ICR decreased serum leptin and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) compared with AL mice but not compared with each other. These results illustrate that mammary tumor inhibition is significantly increased when ICR and EPA are combined as compared with either intervention alone. This response may be related to alterations in the balance of serum growth factors and adipokines.

  11. Suppressive actions of eicosapentaenoic acid on lipid droplet formation in 3T3-L1 adipocytes

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    Sinclair Andrew J

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lipid droplet (LD formation and size regulation reflects both lipid influx and efflux, and is central in the regulation of adipocyte metabolism, including adipokine secretion. The length and degree of dietary fatty acid (FA unsaturation is implicated in LD formation and regulation in adipocytes. The aims of this study were to establish the impact of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA; C20:5n-3 in comparison to SFA (STA; stearic acid, C18:0 and MUFA (OLA; oleic acid, C18:1n-9 on 3T3-L1 adipocyte LD formation, regulation of genes central to LD function and adipokine responsiveness. Cells were supplemented with 100 μM FA during 7-day differentiation. Results EPA markedly reduced LD size and total lipid accumulation, suppressing PPARγ, Cidea and D9D/SCD1 genes, distinct from other treatments. These changes were independent of alterations of lipolytic genes, as both EPA and STA similarly elevated LPL and HSL gene expressions. In response to acute lipopolysaccharide exposure, EPA-differentiated adipocytes had distinct improvement in inflammatory response shown by reduction in monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and interleukin-6 and elevation in adiponectin and leptin gene expressions. Conclusions This study demonstrates that EPA differentially modulates adipogenesis and lipid accumulation to suppress LD formation and size. This may be due to suppressed gene expression of key proteins closely associated with LD function. Further analysis is required to determine if EPA exerts a similar influence on LD formation and regulation in-vivo.

  12. Synthesis of docosahexaenoic acid from eicosapentaenoic acid in retina neurons protects photoreceptors from oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simón, María Victoria; Agnolazza, Daniela L; German, Olga Lorena; Garelli, Andrés; Politi, Luis E; Agbaga, Martin-Paul; Anderson, Robert E; Rotstein, Nora P

    2016-03-01

    Oxidative stress is involved in activating photoreceptor death in several retinal degenerations. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), the major polyunsaturated fatty acid in the retina, protects cultured retina photoreceptors from apoptosis induced by oxidative stress and promotes photoreceptor differentiation. Here, we investigated whether eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), a metabolic precursor to DHA, had similar effects and whether retinal neurons could metabolize EPA to DHA. Adding EPA to rat retina neuronal cultures increased opsin expression and protected photoreceptors from apoptosis induced by the oxidants paraquat and hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ). Palmitic, oleic, and arachidonic acids had no protective effect, showing the specificity for DHA. We found that EPA supplementation significantly increased DHA percentage in retinal neurons, but not EPA percentage. Photoreceptors and glial cells expressed Δ6 desaturase (FADS2), which introduces the last double bond in DHA biosynthetic pathway. Pre-treatment of neuronal cultures with CP-24879 hydrochloride, a Δ5/Δ6 desaturase inhibitor, prevented EPA-induced increase in DHA percentage and completely blocked EPA protection and its effect on photoreceptor differentiation. These results suggest that EPA promoted photoreceptor differentiation and rescued photoreceptors from oxidative stress-induced apoptosis through its elongation and desaturation to DHA. Our data show, for the first time, that isolated retinal neurons can synthesize DHA in culture. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), the major polyunsaturated fatty acid in retina photoreceptors, and its precursor, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) have multiple beneficial effects. Here, we show that retina neurons in vitro express the desaturase FADS2 and can synthesize DHA from EPA. Moreover, addition of EPA to these cultures protects photoreceptors from oxidative stress and promotes their differentiation through its metabolization to DHA.

  13. Scientific Opinion on the Tolerable Upper Intake Level of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA and docosapentaenoic acid (DPA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available

    Following a request from the European Commission, the Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies was asked to deliver a scientific opinion on the Tolerable Upper Intake Level (UL of the n-3 LCPUFAs eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA and docosapentaenoic acid (DPA. Available data are insufficient to establish a UL for n-3 LCPUFA (individually or combined for any population group. At observed intake levels, consumption of n-3 LCPUFA has not been associated with adverse effects in healthy children or adults. Long-term supplemental intakes of EPA and DHA combined up to about 5 g/day do not appear to increase the risk of spontaneous bleeding episodes or bleeding complications, or affect glucose homeostasis immune function or lipid peroxidation, provided the oxidative stability of the n-3 LCPUFAs is guaranteed. Supplemental intakes of EPA and DHA combined at doses of 2 6 g/day, and of DHA at doses of 2 4 g/day, induce an increase in LDL-cholesterol concentrations of about 3 % which may not have an adverse effect on cardiovascular disease risk, whereas EPA at doses up to 4 g/day has no significant effect on LDL cholesterol. Supplemental intakes of EPA and DHA combined at doses up to 5 g/day, and supplemental intakes of EPA alone up to 1.8 g/day, do not raise safety concerns for adults. Dietary recommendations for EPA and DHA based on cardiovascular risk considerations for European adults are between 250 and 500 mg/day. Supplemental intakes of DHA alone up to about 1 g/day do not raise safety concerns for the general population. No data are available for DPA when consumed alone. In the majority of the human studies considered, fish oils, also containing DPA in generally unknown (but relatively low amounts, were the source of EPA and DHA.

  14. Eicosapentaenoic Acid Supplementation Changes Fatty Acid Composition and Corrects Endothelial Dysfunction in Hyperlipidemic Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamakawa, Ken; Shimabukuro, Michio; Higa, Namio; Asahi, Tomohiro; Ohba, Kageyuki; Arasaki, Osamu; Higa, Moritake; Oshiro, Yoshito; Yoshida, Hisashi; Higa, Tohru; Saito, Taro; Ueda, Shinichiro; Masuzaki, Hiroaki; Sata, Masataka

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the effects of purified eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) on vascular endothelial function and free fatty acid composition in Japanese hyperlipidemic subjects. In subjects with hyperlipidemia (total cholesterol ≥220 mg/dL and/or triglycerides ≥150 mg/dL), lipid profile and forearm blood flow (FBF) during reactive hyperemia were determined before and 3 months after supplementation with 1800 mg/day EPA. Peak FBF during reactive hyperemia was lower in the hyperlipidemic group than the normolipidemic group. EPA supplementation did not change serum levels of total, HDL, or LDL cholesterol, apolipoproteins, remnant-like particle (RLP) cholesterol, RLP triglycerides, or malondialdehyde-modified LDL cholesterol. EPA supplementation did not change total free fatty acid levels in serum, but changed the fatty acid composition, with increased EPA and decreased linoleic acid, γ-linolenic acid, and dihomo-γ-linolenic acid. EPA supplementation recovered peak FBF after 3 months. Peak FBF recovery was correlated positively with EPA and EPA/arachidonic acid levels and correlated inversely with dihomo-γ-linolenic acid. EPA supplementation restores endothelium-dependent vasodilatation in hyperlipidemic patients despite having no effect on serum cholesterol and triglyceride patterns. These results suggest that EPA supplementation may improve vascular function at least partly via changes in fatty acid composition. PMID:23326753

  15. Eicosapentaenoic Acid Supplementation Changes Fatty Acid Composition and Corrects Endothelial Dysfunction in Hyperlipidemic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Yamakawa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the effects of purified eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA on vascular endothelial function and free fatty acid composition in Japanese hyperlipidemic subjects. In subjects with hyperlipidemia (total cholesterol ≥220 mg/dL and/or triglycerides ≥150 mg/dL, lipid profile and forearm blood flow (FBF during reactive hyperemia were determined before and 3 months after supplementation with 1800 mg/day EPA. Peak FBF during reactive hyperemia was lower in the hyperlipidemic group than the normolipidemic group. EPA supplementation did not change serum levels of total, HDL, or LDL cholesterol, apolipoproteins, remnant-like particle (RLP cholesterol, RLP triglycerides, or malondialdehyde-modified LDL cholesterol. EPA supplementation did not change total free fatty acid levels in serum, but changed the fatty acid composition, with increased EPA and decreased linoleic acid, γ-linolenic acid, and dihomo-γ-linolenic acid. EPA supplementation recovered peak FBF after 3 months. Peak FBF recovery was correlated positively with EPA and EPA/arachidonic acid levels and correlated inversely with dihomo-γ-linolenic acid. EPA supplementation restores endothelium-dependent vasodilatation in hyperlipidemic patients despite having no effect on serum cholesterol and triglyceride patterns. These results suggest that EPA supplementation may improve vascular function at least partly via changes in fatty acid composition.

  16. Serum concentration of eicosapentaenoic acid is associated with cognitive function in patients with coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagi, Shusuke; Hara, Tomoya; Ueno, Rie; Aihara, Ken-ichi; Fukuda, Daiju; Takashima, Akira; Hotchi, Junko; Ise, Takayuki; Yamaguchi, Koji; Tobiume, Takeshi; Iwase, Takashi; Yamada, Hirotsugu; Soeki, Takeshi; Wakatsuki, Tetsuzo; Shimabukuro, Michio; Akaike, Masashi; Sata, Masataka

    2014-12-04

    Recent studies have shown that intake of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) is associated with reduced risk of cognitive impairment and coronary artery disease (CAD); however, it is currently unknown whether reduced serum n-3 PUFA is associated with cognitive impairment in patients with CAD. We retrospectively evaluated cognitive function with the mini-mental state examination (MMSE), serum levels of PUFAs (including eicosapentaenoic acid [EPA], docosahexaenoic acid [DHA], dihomogammalinolenic acid [DGLA], and arachidonic acid [AA]), cardiovascular risk factors (hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetes mellitus, cerebrovascular disease, and history of current/previous smoking), and parameters of cardiac function (left ventricular ejection fraction and brain natriuretic peptide levels) in 146 Japanese CAD patients. The associations between the MMSE scores and the other parameters were evaluated. Pearson correlation analysis showed that EPA (R = 0.25, P <0.01), EPA/AA ratio (R = 0.22, P = 0.01), and left ventricular ejection fraction (R = 0.15, P = 0.04) were positively associated with MMSE score, and that age (R = -0.20, P <0.01) and brain natriuretic peptide levels (R = -0.28, P <0.01) were inversely associated with MMSE score. Multiple regression analysis showed that age (P <0.05) was negatively associated with MMSE score, while EPA (P <0.01) and EPA/AA ratio (P <0.05) were positively associated with MMSE score; however, sex; body mass index; left ventricular ejection fraction; levels of DHA, AA, and DGLA; DHA/AA ratio; brain natriuretic peptide; and presence of hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetes mellitus, cerebrovascular disease, and history of current/previous smoking were statistically excluded. Serum EPA concentration is associated with cognitive function in patients with CAD, suggesting that a low serum EPA level is a risk factor for cognitive impairment independent of cardiac function, including left ventricular ejection fraction. This correlation

  17. Lipase specificity towards eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid depends on substrate structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyberg, Ann-Marie; Adlercreutz, Patrick

    2008-02-01

    The fatty acid specificity of five lipases towards eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) was evaluated in the hydrolysis of fish oil, squid oil and a model system. The model system contained methyl esters of EPA, DHA and palmitic acid. All the investigated lipases discriminated against both EPA and DHA more in the model system than in the natural oils. Thus both EPA and DHA were more easily hydrolysed from a glyceride than from a methyl ester. In the model system, the lipase from Candida rugosa showed the highest discrimination against DHA, while the lipases from Pseudomonas fluorescens and Pseudomonas cepacia discriminated against EPA the most. In a glyceride, the fatty acid specificity of lipases towards EPA and DHA was affected by the positional distribution of the fatty acids and the glyceride structure due to the regiospecificity and triglyceride specificity of the lipase. In the oils, the Pseudomonas lipases also discriminated against EPA the most, while DHA was initially discriminated the most by the lipase from Thermomyces lanuginosus. However, after longer reaction times the enrichment of DHA in the glyceride fraction of the oils was greatest for the lipase from C. rugosa.

  18. Chronic Arachidonic Acid Administration Decreases Docosahexaenoic Acid- and Eicosapentaenoic Acid-Derived Metabolites in Kidneys of Aged Rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masanori Katakura

    Full Text Available Arachidonic acid (ARA metabolites produced by cyclo-oxygenase and lipoxygenase are important mediators maintaining physiological renal function. However, the effects of exogenous ARA on kidney function in vivo remain unknown. This study examined the effects of long-term oral ARA administration on normal renal function as well as inflammation and oxidative stress in aged rats. In addition, we measured levels of renal eicosanoids and docosanoids using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Control or ARA oil (240 mg/kg body weight/day was orally administered to 21-month-old Wistar rats for 13 weeks. Levels of plasma creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines, reactive oxygen species, and lipid peroxidation were not significantly different between the two groups. The ARA concentration in the plasma, kidney, and liver increased in the ARA-administered group. In addition, levels of free-form ARA, prostaglandin E2, and 12- and 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid increased in the ARA-administered group, whereas renal concentration of docosahexaenoic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid decreased in the ARA-administered group. Levels of docosahexaenoic acid-derived protectin D1, eicosapentaenoic acid-derived 5-, and 18-hydroxyeicosapentaenoic acids, and resolvin E2 and E3 decreased in the ARA-administered group. Our results indicate that long-term ARA administration led to no serious adverse reactions under normal conditions and to a decrease in anti-inflammatory docosahexaenoic acid- and eicosapentaenoic acid-derived metabolites in the kidneys of aged rats. These results indicate that there is a possibility of ARA administration having a reducing anti-inflammatory effect on the kidney.

  19. Eicosapentaenoic acid modulates fatty acid metabolism and inflammation in Psammomys obesus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atek-Mebarki, Feriel; Hichami, Aziz; Abdoul-Azize, Souleymane; Bitam, Arezki; Koceïr, Elhadj Ahmed; Khan, Naim Akhtar

    2015-02-01

    The desert gerbil, Psammomys obesus, is a unique polygenic animal model of metabolic syndrome (insulin resistance, obesity and type 2 diabetes), and these pathological conditions resemble to those in human beings. In this study, the animals were fed ad libitum either a natural diet (ND) which contained desertic halophile plants or a standard laboratory diet (STD) or a diet which contained eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), hence, termed as EPA diet (EPAD). In EPAD, 50% of total lipid content was replaced by EPA oil. By employing real-time PCR, we assessed liver expression of key genes involved in fatty acid metabolism such as PPAR-α, SREBP-1c, LXR-α and CHREBP. We also studied the expression of two inflammatory genes, i.e., TNF-α and IL-1β, in liver and adipose tissue of these animals. The STD, considered to be a high caloric diet for this animal, triggered insulin resistance and high lipid levels, along with high hepatic SREBP-1c, LXR-α and CHREBP mRNA expression. TNF-α and IL-1β mRNA were also high in liver of STD fed animals. Feeding EPAD improved plasma glucose, insulin and triacylglycerol levels along with hepatic lipid composition. These observations suggest that EPA exerts beneficial effects in P. obesus.

  20. Production of omega-3 eicosapentaenoic acid by metabolic engineering of Yarrowia lipolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Zhixiong; Sharpe, Pamela L; Hong, Seung-Pyo; Yadav, Narendra S; Xie, Dongming; Short, David R; Damude, Howard G; Rupert, Ross A; Seip, John E; Wang, Jamie; Pollak, Dana W; Bostick, Michael W; Bosak, Melissa D; Macool, Daniel J; Hollerbach, Dieter H; Zhang, Hongxiang; Arcilla, Dennis M; Bledsoe, Sidney A; Croker, Kevin; McCord, Elizabeth F; Tyreus, Bjorn D; Jackson, Ethel N; Zhu, Quinn

    2013-08-01

    The availability of the omega-3 fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is currently limited because they are produced mainly by marine fisheries that cannot keep pace with the demands of the growing market for these products. A sustainable non-animal source of EPA and DHA is needed. Metabolic engineering of the oleaginous yeast Yarrowia lipolytica resulted in a strain that produced EPA at 15% of dry cell weight. The engineered yeast lipid comprises EPA at 56.6% and saturated fatty acids at less than 5% by weight, which are the highest and the lowest percentages, respectively, among known EPA sources. Inactivation of the peroxisome biogenesis gene PEX10 was crucial in obtaining high EPA yields and may increase the yields of other commercially desirable lipid-related products. This technology platform enables the production of lipids with tailored fatty acid compositions and provides a sustainable source of EPA.

  1. Effects of oral eicosapentaenoic acid versus docosahexaenoic acid on human peripheral blood mononuclear cell gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsunoda, Fumiyoshi; Lamon-Fava, Stefania; Asztalos, Bela F; Iyer, Lakshmanan K; Richardson, Kris; Schaefer, Ernst J

    2015-08-01

    Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) have beneficial effects on inflammation and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Our aim was to assess the effect of a six-week supplementation with either olive oil, EPA, or DHA on gene expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Subjects were sampled at baseline and six weeks after receiving either: olive oil 6.0 g/day (n = 16), EPA 1.8 g/day (n = 16), or DHA 1.8 g/day (n = 18). PBMC were subjected to gene expression analysis by microarray with key findings confirmed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR). Plasma phospholipid EPA increased 3 fold in the EPA group, and DHA increased 63% in the DHA group (both p expression in the following pathways: 1) interferon signaling, 2) receptor recognition of bacteria and viruses, 3) G protein signaling, glycolysis and glycolytic shunting, 4) S-adenosyl-l-methionine biosynthesis, and 5) cAMP-mediated signaling including cAMP responsive element protein 1 (CREB1), as well as many other individual genes including hypoxia inducible factor 1, α subunit (HIF1A). The findings for CREB1 and HIF1A were confirmed by Q-PCR analysis. Our data indicate that EPA supplementation was associated with significant effects on gene expression involving the interferon pathway as well as down-regulation of CREB1 and HIF1A, which may relate to its beneficial effect on CVD risk reduction. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Considerations for incorporating eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic omega-3 fatty acids into the military food supply chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Adam; Rice, Harry B

    2014-11-01

    The U.S. military may consider exploring the inclusion of the long-chain omega-3 fatty acids, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), in the diets of active duty military personnel. To be successful, certain challenges must be overcome including determining appropriate dosage, ensuring cost efficiency, and optimizing stability. To increase EPA and DHA intake, the military should consider using one of three strategies, including mandates or recommendations on omega-3 supplement usage, contracts to purchase commercially available foods for distribution in the food supply chain, or direct addition of EPA and DHA into currently consumed foods. This review presents the challenges and strategies and provides potential suggestions to the military to increase the likelihood of success.

  3. Arachidonic and eicosapentaenoic acids in Araucariaceae, a unique feature among seed plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolff Robert L.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available It is generally admitted that seed plants (spermaphytes are unable to synthesize either arachidonic or eicosapentaenoic acids (AA and EPA, the classic essential fatty acids in animals. We give here chromatographic and spectrometric data showing that species from the primitive family Araucariaceae (gymnosperms are able to synthesize AA and/or EPA in their seeds and leaves. Agathis robusta, in particular, contains AA and EPA in small amounts in its seeds, with no D5-unsaturated polymethylene-interrupted fatty acids (D5-UPIFA with 18 carbon atoms, whereas Araucaria spp. contain both AA and C18 D5-UPIFA. In both species, D5-UPIFA with 20 carbon atoms are present as in all other Coniferophytes. All metabolic intermediates necessary for the biosynthesis of AA and/or EPA have been characterized in Araucariaceae seeds. The relevance of these observations is discussed with regard to the phylogeny of Coniferophytes.

  4. Docosahexaenoic Acid and Eicosapentaenoic Acid Did not Alter trans-10,cis-12 Conjugated Linoleic Acid Incorporation into Mice Brain and Eye Lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vemuri, Madhuri; Adkins, Yuriko; Mackey, Bruce E; Kelley, Darshan S

    2017-09-01

    trans 10,cis 12-CLA has been reported to alter fatty acid composition in several non-neurological tissues, but its effects are less known in neurological tissues. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine if CLA supplementation would alter brain and eye fatty acid composition and if those changes could be prevented by concomitant supplementation with docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 22:6n3) or eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA; 20:5n3). Eight-week-old, pathogen-free C57BL/6N female mice (n = 6/group) were fed either the control diet or diets containing 0.5% (w/w) t10,c12-CLA in the presence or absence of either 1.5% DHA or 1.5% EPA for 8 weeks. CLA concentration was significantly (P < 0.05) greater in the eye but not in the brain lipids of the CLA group when compared with the control group. The sums of saturated, monounsaturated, polyunsaturated fatty acids, and n3:n6 ratio did not differ between these two groups for both tissues. The n3:n6 ratio and concentrations of 20:5n3 and 22:5n3 were significantly greater, and those of 20:4n6, 22:4n6, and 22:5n6 were lesser in the CLA + DHA and CLA + EPA groups than in the control and CLA groups for either tissue. DHA concentration was higher in the CLA + DHA group only but not in the CLA + EPA group when compared with the CLA group for both tissues. The dietary fatty acids generally induced similar changes in brain and eye fatty acid concentration and at the concentrations used both DHA and EPA fed individually with CLA were more potent than CLA alone in altering the tissue fatty acid concentration.

  5. EICOSAPENTAENOIC ACID AS ADJUVANT FOR CACHEXIA IN CANCER’S PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soeseno Hadi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Cachexia is a frequent problem in cancer patients associated with mortality and morbidity since it causes death, reduced therapy effectiveness, as well as decreased quality of life. Cachexia emerges from interactions of several factors, namely metabolic effect of cancer cells, factors released by cancer cells, cytokines release from host cell in response to tumors, and side effects of therapies. Combination of these factors contributes to anorexia, decreased body fat and muscle, and weight loss. Unfortunately, there is no gold standard for treatment of cachexia. Several studies found that eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA might improve cancer cachexia. It has potential blocking effects on several cachexia underlying factors. It may reverse weight loss, increase lean body mass, and improve the efficacy of therapy and the quality of life. The objective of this literature review is to describe and give basic understanding of EPA as adjuvant for cancer cachexia.

  6. Differential effects of eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid in promoting the differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murali, Ganesan; Desouza, Cyrus V; Clevenger, Michelle E; Ramalingam, Ramesh; Saraswathi, Viswanathan

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of enrichment with n-3 fatty acids, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), on the differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. Enrichment with DHA but not EPA significantly increased the differentiation markers compared to control differentiated cells. DHA compared to EPA treatment led to a greater increase in adiponectin secretion and, conditioned media collected from DHA treated cells inhibited monocyte migration. Moreover, DHA treatment resulted in inhibition of pro-inflammatory signaling pathways. DHA treated cells predominantly accumulated DHA in phospholipids whereas EPA treatment led to accumulation of both EPA and its elongation product docosapentaenoic acid (DPA), an n-3 fatty acid. Of note, adding DPA to DHA inhibited DHA-induced differentiation. The differential effects of EPA and DHA on preadipocyte differentiation may be due, in part, to differences in their intracellular modification which could impact the type of n-3 fatty acids incorporated into the cells.

  7. Lipase inhibitor orlistat decreases incorporation of eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids in rat tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Hernandez, Cristina; Oliveira, Manuel; Pescia, Grégory; Moulin, Julie; Masserey-Elmelegy, Isabelle; Dionisi, Fabiola; Destaillats, Frédéric

    2010-02-01

    Orlistat is a gastric and pancreatic lipases inhibitor that is often prescribed to obese subjects. Orlistat has been shown to decrease the absorption of biologically important lipophilic micronutrients such as liposoluble vitamins. We hypothesized that long-term administration of orlistat may lower the incorporation of n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFA) in blood lipids and tissues. This hypothesis was tested in rats fed a diet supplemented with fish oil as a source of n-3 LC-PUFA. Male Wistar rats (n = 18) were divided into 3 groups and fed experimental high-fat diets containing fish oil (control diet) or fish oil plus orlistat (200 and 400 mg/kg of diet) over the course of 3 weeks. Fat absorption and the level of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid, among other fatty acids, in red blood cells, plasma, liver, and spleen, were measured at the end of the experimental period. The results show that at 200 mg and 400 mg/kg of diet orlistat lowers fat absorption by 9% (P = .008) and 54% (P = .008). Orlistat given at the higher level induced a reduction of the incorporation of EPA in red blood cell (-45%; P = .006) and in plasma (-34%; P = .026) compared to the control group. Our results confirmed that administration of orlistat reduces incorporation of n-3 LC-PUFA in blood lipids and tissues in a rat model.

  8. The low levels of eicosapentaenoic acid in rat brain phospholipids are maintained via multiple redundant mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chuck T; Domenichiello, Anthony F; Trépanier, Marc-Olivier; Liu, Zhen; Masoodi, Mojgan; Bazinet, Richard P

    2013-09-01

    Brain eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) levels are 250- to 300-fold lower than docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), at least partly, because EPA is rapidly β-oxidized and lost from brain phospholipids. Therefore, we examined if β-oxidation was necessary for maintaining low EPA levels by inhibiting β-oxidation with methyl palmoxirate (MEP). Furthermore, because other metabolic differences between DHA and EPA may also contribute to their vastly different levels, this study aimed to quantify the incorporation and turnover of DHA and EPA into brain phospholipids. Fifteen-week-old rats were subjected to vehicle or MEP prior to a 5 min intravenous infusion of (14)C-palmitate, (14)C-DHA, or (14)C-EPA. MEP reduced the radioactivity of brain aqueous fractions for (14)C-palmitate-, (14)C-EPA-, and (14)C-DHA-infused rats by 74, 54, and 23%, respectively; while it increased the net rate of incorporation of plasma unesterified palmitate into choline glycerophospholipids and phosphatidylinositol and EPA into ethanolamine glycerophospholipids and phosphatidylserine. MEP also increased the synthesis of n-3 docosapentaenoic acid (n-3 DPA) from EPA. Moreover, the recycling of EPA into brain phospholipids was 154-fold lower than DHA. Therefore, the low levels of EPA in the brain are maintained by multiple redundant pathways including β-oxidation, decreased incorporation from plasma unesterified FA pool, elongation/desaturation to n-3 DPA, and lower recycling within brain phospholipids.

  9. Decreased eicosapentaenoic acid levels in acne vulgaris reveals the presence of a proinflammatory state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslan, İbrahim; Özcan, Filiz; Karaarslan, Taner; Kıraç, Ebru; Aslan, Mutay

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to determine circulating levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2), lipoprotein lipase (LPL) and measure circulating protein levels of angiopoietin-like protein 3 (ANGPTL3), ANGPTL4, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in patients with acne vulgaris. Serum from 21 control subjects and 31 acne vulgaris patients were evaluated for levels of arachidonic acid (AA, C20:4n- 6), dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid (DGLA, C20:3n-6), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, C20:5n-3) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, C22:6n-3). PUFA levels were determined by an optimized multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) method using ultra fast-liquid chromatography (UFLC) coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). Lipid profile, routine biochemical and hormone parameters were assayed by standard kit methods Serum EPA levels were significantly decreased while AA/EPA and DGLA/EPA ratio were significantly increased in acne vulgaris patients compared to controls. Serum levels of AA, DGLA and DHA showed no significant difference while activity of sPLA2 and LPL were significantly increased in acne vulgaris compared to controls. Results of this study reveal the presence of a proinflammatory state in acne vulgaris as shown by significantly decreased serum EPA levels and increased activity of sPLA2, AA/EPA and DGLA/EPA ratio. Increased LPL activity in the serum of acne vulgaris patients can be protective through its anti-dyslipidemic actions. This is the first study reporting altered EPA levels and increased sPLA2 activity in acne vulgaris and supports the use of omega-3 fatty acids as adjuvant treatment for acne patients.

  10. Biologic plausibility, cellular effects, and molecular mechanisms of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) in atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borow, Kenneth M; Nelson, John R; Mason, R Preston

    2015-09-01

    Residual cardiovascular (CV) risk remains in dyslipidemic patients despite intensive statin therapy, underscoring the need for additional intervention. Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), an omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid, is incorporated into membrane phospholipids and atherosclerotic plaques and exerts beneficial effects on the pathophysiologic cascade from onset of plaque formation through rupture. Specific salutary actions have been reported relating to endothelial function, oxidative stress, foam cell formation, inflammation, plaque formation/progression, platelet aggregation, thrombus formation, and plaque rupture. EPA also improves atherogenic dyslipidemia characterized by reduction of triglycerides without raising low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Other beneficial effects of EPA include vasodilation, resulting in blood pressure reductions, as well as improved membrane fluidity. EPA's effects are at least additive to those of statins when given as adjunctive therapy. In this review, we present data supporting the biologic plausibility of EPA as an anti-atherosclerotic agent with potential clinical benefit for prevention of CV events, as well as its cellular effects and molecular mechanisms of action. REDUCE-IT is an ongoing, randomized, controlled study evaluating whether the high-purity ethyl ester of EPA (icosapent ethyl) at 4 g/day combined with statin therapy is superior to statin therapy alone for reducing CV events in high-risk patients with mixed dyslipidemia. The results from this study are expected to clarify the role of EPA as adjunctive therapy to a statin for reduction of residual CV risk.

  11. The Effect of Eicosapentaenoic Acid Supplementation on Depression Remission: a Double-Blind Randomized Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karamati

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There is some evidence that omega-3 fatty acids are associated with depression. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of eicosapentaenoic acid(EPA and placebo on mild to moderate depression. Methods: This double-blind randomized clinical trial was conducted on 54 outpatients with mild to moderate depression. Patients were randomly assigned to two groups: receiving EPA supplement or placebo. EPA and placebo groups received two identical capsules per day for 12 weeks. Each capsule contained 500 mg EPA or coconut oil. Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression(HRSD was used to determine the severity of depression at baseline, sixth and twelfth weeks after intervention. Results: Forty two patients(77.8% completed the 12-week intervention. A statistically significant difference was observed in mean scores of HRSD between EPA and placebo groups at the end of the study (P=0.001. Mean scores of HRSD decreased over time in both groups so that the analysis of variance for repeated measurements showed a statistically significant time effect(F=50.55, df=1.32, P<0.0001. Also, a statistically significant treatment effect of EPA compared to placebo was observed over time (treatment*time interaction, F=12.67, df=1.32, P=0.0001. Conclusion: The results of this study showed the efficacy of EPA in treatment of depression, so its use is recommended as an add-on to antidepressant medications in treatment of mild to moderate depression.

  12. Eicosapentaenoic acid inhibits tumour necrosis factor-α-induced lipolysis in murine cultured adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorente-Cebrián, Silvia; Bustos, Matilde; Marti, Amelia; Fernández-Galilea, Marta; Martinez, J Alfredo; Moreno-Aliaga, Maria J

    2012-03-01

    Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) is an omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid with beneficial effects in obesity and insulin resistance. High levels of proinflammatory cytokine tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in obesity promote lipolysis in adipocytes, leading to the development of insulin resistance. Thus, the aims of the present study were to analyze the potential antilipolytic properties of EPA on cytokine-induced lipolysis and to investigate the possible mechanisms involved. The EPA effects on basal and TNF-α-induced lipolysis were determined in both primary rat and 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Treatment of primary rat adipocytes with EPA (100 and 200 μM) significantly decreased basal glycerol release (Plipolysis in a dose-dependent manner (Padipocytes. However, oral supplementation with EPA for 35 days was able to partially reverse the down-regulation of HSL and ATGL messenger RNA observed in retroperitoneal adipose tissue of high-fat-diet-fed rats. These findings suggest that EPA inhibits proinflammatory cytokine-induced lipolysis in adipocytes. This effect might contribute to explain the insulin-sensitizing properties of EPA. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Comparison of eicosapentaenoic acid concentrations in plasma between patients with ischemic stroke and control subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeya, Yoshimori; Fukuyama, Naoto; Kitajima, Waichi; Ogushi, Yoichi; Mori, Hidezo

    2013-01-01

    ω-3 fatty acids, including eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), prevent ischemic stroke. However, the clinical importance of EPA for ischemic stroke and its subtype has not been fully elucidated. In a cross-sectional study, we determined whether ω-3 fatty acids were predictive factors for ischemic stroke. We compared common clinical parameters among 65 patients with ischemic stroke and 65 control subjects. The parameters included blood chemistry data; concentrations of EPA, docosahexaenoic acid, and arachidonic acid (AA); EPA/AA ratio; smoking; alcohol intake; fish consumption more than four times per week; and the incidence of underlying diseases. The comparisons were performed using the Mann-Whitney U test, and multiple logistic regression analysis was applied to the significant factors in the non-parametric test. We also applied the same approach to the ischemic stroke subtypes, cardioembolism and large-artery atherosclerosis. In the multiple logistic regression analysis after the Mann-Whitney U test, a lower EPA concentration was one of the significant risk factors for ischemic stroke, as were a lower body mass index, lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and smoking (sensitivity 0.846, specificity 0.831, positive predictive value 0.833). In the analysis of subtypes, a lower EPA/AA ratio and a lower body mass index were the significant risk factors for cardioembolism (sensitivity 0.800, specificity 0.733, positive predictive value 0.750). However, large-artery atherosclerosis was not related to the EPA concentration or the EPA/AA ratio. In this study, the plasma EPA concentration and the EPA/AA ratio were potential predictive risk factors for ischemic stroke, especially for cardioembolism. Further prospective studies are necessary. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Health Implications of High Dietary Omega-6 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids

    OpenAIRE

    Patterson, E.; Wall, R.; Fitzgerald, G. F.; R. P. Ross; Stanton, C.

    2012-01-01

    Omega-6 (n-6) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) (e.g., arachidonic acid (AA)) and omega-3 (n-3) PUFA (e.g., eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA)) are precursors to potent lipid mediator signalling molecules, termed “eicosanoids,” which have important roles in the regulation of inflammation. In general, eicosanoids derived from n-6 PUFA are proinflammatory while eicosanoids derived from n-3 PUFA are anti-inflammatory. Dietary changes over the past few decades in the intake of n-6 and n-3 PUFA show str...

  15. Apoptotic activity of the marine diatom Cocconeis scutellum and eicosapentaenoic acid in BT20 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nappo, Michela; Berkov, Strahil; Massucco, Carlotta; Di Maria, Valentina; Bastida, Jaume; Codina, Carles; Avila, Conxita; Messina, Patrizia; Zupo, Valerio; Zupo, Simona

    2012-04-01

    The marine diatoms Cocconeis scutellum Ehrenberg (Bacillariophyceae) are known to trigger apoptosis in the androgenic gland of the Mediterranean crustacean Hippolyte inermis Leach (Decapoda), affecting the shrimp's sex reversal. The aim of this study was to evaluate a possible apoptotic effect of extracts and fractions from these microalgae also on human tissues. The chemical profile of C. scutellum was determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and, afterwards, organic extracts and fractions from the diatoms were used to treat to breast cancer BT20 cells. Double labeling with annexin V-FITC and isotonic propidium iodide (PI) along with flow cytometry analysis enabled the evaluate of cell apoptosis and viability, whereas hypotonic PI staining was used to analyze the cell cycle in BT20 lines. The involvement of specific caspases was studied by Western blotting. Results demonstrated that the diethyl ether extract and, in particular, fraction 3, the richest fraction in eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) from the diethyl ether extract, selectively induced apoptosis (up to 89.2% at 1 μg/well of fraction 3) and decreased viability in BT20 cells. The apoptotic effect was displayed in a concentration and time-dependent manner, by activating caspases-8 and 3, and arresting the progression of the cell cycle from S to G2-M phase. EPA alone showed similar apoptotic effects in BT20 cells. The study demonstrates the apoptotic activity of C. scutellum diatoms on breast cancer cells and suggests their potential use as a source of apoptotic compounds.

  16. Effects of Nutritional Factors on the Growth and Heterotrophic Eicosapentaenoic Acid Production of Diatom Nitzschia laevis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Xiaohong; LI Songyao; WANG Chunling; LU Meifang

    2008-01-01

    The effects of several nutritional factors on the growth and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) production of diatom Nitzschia laevis were studied. 4 LDM (quadrupled concentration of the nutrient salt) was the optimal concentration of nutrient salt for the growth and EPA production ofN. laevis. The growth ofN. laevis was inhibited when the glucose concentration was either lower than 10gL-1 or higher than 15gL-1. Both sodium nitrate and urea were good nitrogen sources for the growth and EPA production, while ammonium chloride seriously decreased the dry cell weight (DW) and the EPA content. Silicate seriously influenced the growth of N. laevis. The maximum DW of 2.34gL-1 was obtained in the presence of 150 mgL-1 Na2SiO3·9H2O. The EPA content remained almost the same when the silicate concentration was lower than 150 mgL-1; however, higher silicate concentrations resulted in a steady de- crease of EPA content. Low medium salinity (≤29) did not seem to influence the DW of N. laevis, and high salinity resulted in a decrease of DW. The highest EPA content (4.08%) and yield (110 mgL-1) were observed at the salinity of 36 and 29, respectively.

  17. Icosapent ethyl: Eicosapentaenoic acid concentration and triglyceride-lowering effects across clinical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bays, Harold E; Ballantyne, Christie M; Doyle, Ralph T; Juliano, Rebecca A; Philip, Sephy

    2016-09-01

    Icosapent ethyl is a high-purity prescription form of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) ethyl ester approved at a dose of 4g/day as an adjunct to diet to reduce triglyceride (TG) levels in adult patients with severe (≥500mg/dL) hypertriglyceridemia. This post-hoc exploratory analysis examined the relationship of icosapent ethyl dose with EPA concentrations in plasma and red blood cells (RBCs) across 3 clinical studies-a phase 1 pharmacokinetic study in healthy adult volunteers and 2 pivotal phase 3 studies (MARINE and ANCHOR) in adult patients with hypertriglyceridemia-and examined the relationship between EPA levels and TG-lowering effects in MARINE and ANCHOR. In all 3 studies, icosapent ethyl produced dose-dependent increases in the concentrations of EPA in plasma and RBCs. In both MARINE and ANCHOR, these dose-dependent EPA increases correlated with the degree of TG level lowering (all P170μg/mL and>70μg/mL, respectively. These studies support icosapent ethyl as producing predictable dose-dependent pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics, with TG level lowering dependent upon icosapent ethyl dose and EPA concentrations in plasma and RBCs. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. [Studies on eicosapentaenoic acid production by submersion culture of Cryphecodinium cohnii].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, G; Xu, C S

    2001-03-01

    The effects of the incubation temperature, initial pH of the medium, carbon source and nitrogen source on the production of Crypthecodinium cohnii C98 were studied. Through orthogonal experiments, the optimum culture medium was obtained (g/L): Glucose, 65; Yeast extract, 2.0; KNO3 3.0, KH2PO4 1.0, MgSO4.7H2O 0.6, NaCl 5.8, CaCl2.2H2O 0.1, ZnSO4.7H2O 0.0067, FeCl3.6H2O 0.014, CuSO4.5H2O 0.0004, MnSO4.H2O 0.0002. Under the optimum culture conditions, the microalgae dry cell weight and eicosapentaenoic acid was 18.3 g/L and 0.891 g/L, respectively. The submersion culture process was analysed.

  19. Effects of eicosapentaenoic acid on peri-procedural (type IVa) myocardial infarction following elective coronary stenting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurita, Akiyoshi; Takashima, Hiroaki; Ando, Hirohiko; Kumagai, Soichiro; Waseda, Katsuhisa; Gosho, Masahiko; Amano, Tetsuya

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) on peri-procedural (type IVa) myocardial infarction (MI) following elective percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). We analyzed data from 165 of 178 consecutive patients with stable angina pectoris who underwent de novo successful stent implantation in the native coronary artery. Patients were assigned to receive statin therapy in combination with 1800mg/day of EPA or statin alone. Post-procedural index of microcirculatory resistance (IMR) values were calculated for 30 patients in the EPA group and 32 controls. In the multivariate logistic model, EPA administration, low kidney function, and the presence of slow flow/no reflow were significantly and independently associated with type IVa MI. Post-procedural IMR values were significantly lower in the EPA group [19.8 (6.4, 51.1) vs. 27.8 (8.2, 89.3), p=0.003] compared to the control group. Pre-treatment with EPA in addition to statins significantly reduced the incidence of type IVa MI compared to statin therapy only, which may be attributed to the ability of EPA to reduce microvascular dysfunction induced by PCI. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Combined approach to counteract experimental cancer cachexia: eicosapentaenoic acid and training exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penna, Fabio; Busquets, Silvia; Pin, Fabrizio; Toledo, Miriam; Baccino, Francesco M; López-Soriano, Francisco J; Costelli, Paola; Argilés, Josep M

    2011-06-01

    BACKGROUND: Cancer cachexia is a syndrome characterized by loss of skeletal muscle protein, depletion of lipid stores, anorexia, weakness, and perturbations of the hormonal homeostasis. Despite several therapeutic approaches described in the past, effective interventions countering cancer cachexia are still lacking. METHODS: The present work was aimed to verify the ability of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) to prevent the muscle depletion in Lewis lung carcinoma-bearing mice and to test the ability of endurance exercise training to increase the EPA effect. RESULTS: EPA alone did not prevent the muscle loss induced by tumor growth while the combination with exercise induced a partial rescue of muscle strength and mass. Moreover, the association of EPA and exercise reduced the dramatic PAX-7 accumulation and stimulated the increase of PCG-1 protein. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, the present data suggest that exercise is an effective tool that should be added for combined therapeutic approaches against cancer cachexia. ELECTRONIC SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIAL: The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s13539-011-0028-4) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

  1. Eicosapentaenoic acid improves glycemic control in elderly bedridden patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Susumu; Abe, Takaaki; Nako, Kazuhiro; Okamura, Masashi; Senda, Miho; Sakamoto, Takuya; Ito, Sadayoshi

    2013-01-01

    Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) are ω3-polyunsaturated fatty acids mainly contained in the blue-backed fish oil, and are effective in decreasing the lipids disorder and the cardiovascular incidence among diabetic patients. Moreover, it has been suggested that EPA and DHA may improve the insulin resistance and glucose metabolism. However, the clinical effects of EPA and DHA on glucose metabolism remain unclear. We aimed to clarify the effects of EPA/DHA treatment on glycemic control in type 2 diabetes mellitus. This study was a multicenter prospective randomized controlled trial involving 30 elderly type 2 diabetic patients on a liquid diet. Their exercises were almost zero and the content of their meals was strictly managed and understood well. Therefore, the difference by the individual's life was a minimum. The subjects were divided into two groups: those receiving EPA/DHA-rich liquid diet [EPA/DHA (+)] or liquid diet lacking EPA/DHA [EPA/DHA (-)]. Changes in factors related to glucose and lipid metabolism were assessed after the three-month study. Serum concentrations of EPA rose in EPA/DHA (+), although the levels of DHA and fasting C-peptide remained unchanged in EPA/DHA (+). In addition, there was a significant decline in the fasting plasma glucose (FPG), hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), fasting remnant-like particles and apolipoprotein (apo) B in EPA/DHA (+), compared with the values in EPA/DHA (-). EPA/DHA-rich diet might improve glucose metabolism in elderly type 2 diabetic patients on a liquid diet. This phenomenon may be due to the improved insulin resistance mediated by the rise in serum EPA concentrations.

  2. Omega-3 fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid and their mechanisms of action on apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins in humans: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oscarsson, Jan; Hurt-Camejo, Eva

    2017-08-10

    Epidemiological and genetic studies suggest that elevated triglyceride (TG)-rich lipoprotein levels in the circulation increase the risk of cardiovascular disease. Prescription formulations of omega-3 fatty acids (OM3FAs), mainly eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), reduce plasma TG levels and are approved for the treatment of patients with severe hypertriglyceridemia. Many preclinical studies have investigated the TG-lowering mechanisms of action of OM3FAs, but less is known from clinical studies. We conducted a review, using systematic methodology, of studies in humans assessing the mechanisms of action of EPA and DHA on apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins, including TG-rich lipoproteins and low-density lipoproteins (LDLs). A systematic search of PubMed retrieved 55 articles, of which 30 were used in the review; 35 additional arrticles were also included. In humans, dietary DHA is retroconverted to EPA, while production of DHA from EPA is not observed. Dietary DHA is preferentially esterified into TGs, while EPA is more evenly esterified into TGs, cholesterol esters and phospholipids. The preferential esterification of DHA into TGs likely explains the higher turnover of DHA than EPA in plasma. The main effects of both EPA and DHA are decreased fasting and postprandial serum TG levels, through reduction of hepatic very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL)-TG production. The exact mechanism for reduced VLDL production is not clear but does not include retention of lipids in the liver; rather, increased hepatic fatty acid oxidation is likely. The postprandial reduction in TG levels is caused by increased lipoprotein lipase activity and reduced serum VLDL-TG concentrations, resulting in enhanced chylomicron clearance. Overall, no clear differences between the effects of EPA and DHA on TG levels, or on turnover of TG-rich lipoproteins, have been observed. Effects on LDL are complex and may be influenced by genetics, such as APOE genotype. EPA and

  3. Splenic Immune Response Is Down-Regulated in C57BL/6J Mice Fed Eicosapentaenoic Acid and Docosahexaenoic Acid Enriched High Fat Diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soni, Nikul K.; Ross, Alastair B.; Scheers, Nathalie; Savolainen, Otto I.; Nookaew, Intawat; Gabrielsson, Britt G.; Sandberg, Ann-Sofie

    2017-01-01

    Dietary n-3 fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) are associated with reduction of inflammation, although the mechanisms are poorly understood, especially how the spleen, as a secondary lymphoid organ, is involved. To investigate the effects of EPA and DHA on spleen gene expression, male C57BL/6J mice were fed high fat diets (HFD) differing in fatty acid composition, either based on corn oil (HFD-CO), or CO enriched with 2 g/100 g EPA and DHA (HFD-ED), for eight weeks. Spleen tissue was analyzed using transcriptomics and for fatty acids profiling. Biological processes (BPs) related to the immune response, including T-cell receptor signaling pathway, T-cell differentiation and co-stimulation, myeloid dendritic cell differentiation, antigen presentation and processing, and the toll like receptor pathway were downregulated by HFD-ED compared with control and HFD-CO. These findings were supported by the down-regulation of NF-κB in HFD-ED compared with HFD-CO fed mice. Lower phospholipid arachidonic acid levels in HFD-ED compared with HFD-CO, and control mice suggest attenuation of pathways via prostaglandins and leukotrienes. The HFD-ED also upregulated BPs related to erythropoiesis and hematopoiesis compared with control and HFD-CO fed mice. Our findings suggest that EPA and DHA down-regulate the splenic immune response induced by HFD-CO, supporting earlier work that the spleen is a target organ for the anti-inflammatory effects of these n-3 fatty acids. PMID:28075380

  4. The effects on plasma, red cell and platelet fatty acids of taking 12 g/day of ethyl-eicosapentaenoate for 16 months : dihomogammalinolenic, arachidonic and docosahexaenoic acids and relevance to Inuit metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horrobin, David; Fokkema, M Rebecca; Muskiet, Frits A J

    2003-01-01

    A patient with mantle cell lymphoma took 12g/day of ethyl-eicosapentaenoate for 16 months. Compared to reference values, eicosapentaenoic and docosapentaenoic acids were elevated in plasma, red cells and platelets but docosahexaenoic acid levels were in the normal range. Arachidonic acid levels were

  5. Blood docosahexaenoic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid in vegans: Associations with age and gender and effects of an algal-derived omega-3 fatty acid supplement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarter, Barbara; Kelsey, Kristine S; Schwartz, Todd A; Harris, William S

    2015-04-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that vegetarians and vegans have much lower plasma concentrations of omega-3 fatty acids (i.e., docosahexaenoic and eicosapentaenoic acids) when compared to those who eat fish. The purposes of this study were 1) to define the age and/or sex-specific docosahexaenoic plus eicosapentaenoic acids levels in red blood cell membranes (expressed as a percent of total fatty acids; hereafter the omega-3 index) in long-term vegans, and 2) to determine the effects of a vegetarian omega-3 supplement (254 mg docosahexaenoic plus eicosapentaenoic acids/day for 4 months) on the omega-3 index. A sample (n = 165) of vegans was recruited, and their omega-3 index was determined using a dried blood spot methodology. A subset of 46 subjects with a baseline omega-3 index of vegan cohort, the index was significantly higher in females than males (3.9 ± 1.0% vs. 3.5 ± 1.0%; p = 0.026) and was directly related to age (p for trend = 0.009). The omega-3 index increased from 3.1 ± 0.6% to 4.8 ± 0.8% (p = 0.009) in the supplementation study. We conclude that vegans have low baseline omega-3 levels, but not lower than omnivores who also consume very little docosahexaenoic and eicosapentaenoic acids. The vegans responded robustly to a relatively low dose of a vegetarian omega-3 supplement. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. Evaluation of the hepatic bioconversion of α-linolenic acid (ALA) to eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) in rats fed with oils from chia (Salvia hispánica) or rosa mosqueta (Rosa rubiginosa)

    OpenAIRE

    Tapia O., G.; Valenzuela B., A.; Cornejo Z., P.; Vizcarra, M.; Masson S., L.; Gormáz, J. G.; Valenzuela B., R.

    2012-01-01

    The high dietary intake of n-6 fatty acids in relation to n-3 fatty acids generates health disorders, such as cardiovascular diseases, inflammatory diseases and other chronic diseases. The consumption of fish, which is rich in n-3 fatty acids, is low in Latin America and it is necessary to seek other alternatives, such as chia oil (CO) or rosa mosqueta oil (RMO), which are rich in α-linolenic acid (ALA), the precursor of the n -3 fatty acids, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic ac...

  7. Dietary Crude Lecithin Increases Systemic Availability of Dietary Docosahexaenoic Acid with Combined Intake in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wijk, Nick; Balvers, Martin; Cansev, Mehmet; Maher, Timothy J; Sijben, John W C; Broersen, Laus M

    2016-07-01

    Crude lecithin, a mixture of mainly phospholipids, potentially helps to increase the systemic availability of dietary omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA), such as docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Nevertheless, no clear data exist on the effects of prolonged combined dietary supplementation of DHA and lecithin on RBC and plasma PUFA levels. In the current experiments, levels of DHA and choline, two dietary ingredients that enhance neuronal membrane formation and function, were determined in plasma and red blood cells (RBC) from rats after dietary supplementation of DHA-containing oils with and without concomitant dietary supplementation of crude lecithin for 2-3 weeks. The aim was to provide experimental evidence for the hypothesized additive effects of dietary lecithin (not containing any DHA) on top of dietary DHA on PUFA levels in plasma and RBC. Dietary supplementation of DHA-containing oils, either as vegetable algae oil or as fish oil, increased DHA, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and total n-3 PUFA, and decreased total omega-6 PUFA levels in plasma and RBC, while dietary lecithin supplementation alone did not affect these levels. However, combined dietary supplementation of DHA and lecithin increased the changes induced by DHA supplementation alone. Animals receiving a lecithin-containing diet also had a higher plasma free choline concentration as compared to controls. In conclusion, dietary DHA-containing oils and crude lecithin have synergistic effects on increasing plasma and RBC n-3 PUFA levels, including DHA and EPA. By increasing the systemic availability of dietary DHA, dietary lecithin may increase the efficacy of DHA supplementation when their intake is combined.

  8. Ultraviolet B irradiation induces changes in the distribution and release of arachidonic acid, dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid, and eicosapentaenoic acid in human keratinocytes in culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Punnonen, K.; Puustinen, T.; Jansen, C.T.

    1987-05-01

    There is increasing evidence that derivatives of 20-carbon polyunsaturated fatty acids, the eicosanoids, play an important role in the inflammatory responses of the human skin. To better understand the metabolic fate of fatty acids in the skin, the effect of ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation (280-320 nm) on the distribution and release of /sup 14/C-labeled arachidonic acid, dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid, and eicosapentaenoic acid in human keratinocytes in culture was investigated. Ultraviolet B irradiation induced the release of all three /sup 14/C-labeled fatty acids from the phospholipids, especially from phosphatidylethanolamine, and this was accompanied by increased labeling of the nonphosphorus lipids. This finding suggests that UVB induces a significant liberation of eicosanoid precursor fatty acids from cellular phospholipids, but the liberated fatty acids are largely reincorporated into the nonphosphorus lipids. In conclusion, the present study suggests that not only arachidonic acid but also dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid, and eicosapentaenoic acid might be involved in the UVB irradiation-induced inflammatory reactions of human skin.

  9. Eicosapentaenoic Acid Protects against Palmitic Acid-Induced Endothelial Dysfunction via Activation of the AMPK/eNOS Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Che-Hsin Lee

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have shown that free fatty acids are associated with chronic inflammation, which may be involved in vascular injury. The intake of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA can decrease cardiovascular disease risks, but the protective mechanisms of EPA on endothelial cells remain unclear. In this study, primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs treated with palmitic acid (PA were used to explore the protective effects of EPA. The results revealed that EPA attenuated PA-induced cell death and activation of apoptosis-related proteins, such as caspase-3, p53 and Bax. Additionally, EPA reduced the PA-induced increase in the generation of reactive oxygen species, the activation of NADPH oxidase, and the upregulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS. EPA also restored the PA-mediated reduction of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK phosphorylation. Using AMPK siRNA and the specific inhibitor compound C, we found that EPA restored the PA-mediated inhibitions of eNOS and AKT activities via activation of AMPK. Furthermore, the NF-κB signals that are mediated by p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK were involved in protective effects of EPA. In summary, these results provide new insight into the possible molecular mechanisms by which EPA protects against atherogenesis via the AMPK/eNOS-related pathway.

  10. Dietary omega-3 fatty acids for women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourre, Jean-Marie

    2007-01-01

    This review details the specific needs of women for omega-3 fatty acids, including alpha linoleic acid (ALA) and the very long chain fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Omega-3 fatty acid (dietary or in capsules) ensures that a woman's adipose tissue contains a reserve of these fatty acids for the developing fetus and the breast-fed newborn infant. This ensures the optimal cerebral and cognitive development of the infant. The presence of large quantities of EPA and DHA in the diet slightly lengthens pregnancy, and improves its quality. Human milk contains both ALA and DHA, unlike that of other mammals. Conditions such as diabetes can alter the fatty acid profile of mother's milk, while certain diets, like those of vegetarians, vegans, or even macrobiotic diets, can have the same effect, if they do not include seafood. ALA, DHA and EPA, are important for preventing ischemic cardiovascular disease in women of all ages. Omega-3 fatty acids can help to prevent the development of certain cancers, particularly those of the breast and colon, and possibly of the uterus and the skin, and are likely to reduce the risk of postpartum depression, manic-depressive psychosis, dementias (Alzheimer's disease and others), hypertension, toxemia, diabetes and, to a certain extend, age-related macular degeneration. Omega-3 fatty acids could play a positive role in the prevention of menstrual syndrome and postmenopausal hot flushes. The normal western diet contains little ALA (less than 50% of the RDA). The only adequate sources are rapeseed oil (canola), walnuts and so-called "omega-3" eggs (similar to wild-type or Cretan eggs). The amounts of EPA and DHA in the diet vary greatly from person to person. The only good sources are fish and seafood, together with "omega-3" eggs.

  11. Transport of eicosapentaenoic acid-derived PGE₃, PGF(3α, and TXB₃ by ABCC4.

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    Nobuaki Tanaka

    Full Text Available Eicosapentaenoic acid-derived prostaglandin (PG E3, PGF(3α, and thromboxane (TX B3 are bioactive lipid mediators which have anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory effects. To exert their effects, PGE3, PGF(3α, and TXB3 must be released to the extracellular space from cells, but the release mechanism has been unclear. We therefore investigated the contribution of ATP-binding cassette transporter C4 (ABCC4, which has been known as a prostanoids efflux transporter, to the release of PGE3, PGF(3α, and TXB3.ATP-dependent transport of PGE3, PGF(3α, and TXB3 via ABCC4 was investigated by using inside-out membrane vesicles prepared from ABCC4-overexpressing HEK293 cells. To evaluate the contribution of ABCC4 to the release of PGE3, PGF(3α, and TXB3, we measured the extracellular and intracellular levels of PGE3, PGF(3α, and TXB3 in A549 cells when we used ABCC4 inhibitors (dipyridamole, MK571, and probenecid or ABCC4 siRNAs. The quantification of PGE3, PGF(3α, and TXB3 was performed by using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.The apparent Km values for ABCC4-mediated transport were 2.9±0.1 µM for PGE3, 12.1±1.3 µM for PGF(3α, and 11.9±1.4 µM for TXB3 and the ATP-dependent accumulation of PGE3, PGF(3α, and TXB3 into vesicles was decreased by using typical substrates and inhibitors of ABCC4. ABCC4 inhibitors and ABCC4 knockdown showed the reduction of extracellular/intracellular ratio of PGE3 (40-60% of control and PGF(3α (60-80% of control in A549 cells.Our results suggest that PGE3, PGF(3α, and TXB3 are substrates of ABCC4 and ABCC4 partially contributes to the release of PGE3 and PGF(3α.

  12. The eicosapentaenoic acid metabolite 15-deoxy-δ(12,14-prostaglandin J3 increases adiponectin secretion by adipocytes partly via a PPARγ-dependent mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Lefils-Lacourtablaise

    Full Text Available The intake of ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs, which are abundant in marine fish meat and oil, has been shown to exert many beneficial effects. The mechanisms behind those effects are numerous, including interference with the arachidonic acid cascade that produces pro-inflammatory eicosanoids, formation of novel bioactive lipid mediators, and change in the pattern of secreted adipocytokines. In our study, we show that eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA increases secreted adiponectin from 3T3-L1 adipocytes and in plasma of mice as early as 4 days after initiation of an EPA-rich diet. Using 3T3-L1 adipocytes, we report for the first time that 15-deoxy-δ(12,14-PGJ3 (15d-PGJ3, a product of EPA, also increases the secretion of adiponectin. We demonstrate that the increased adiponectin secretion induced by 15d-PGJ3 is partially peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPAR-γ-mediated. Finally, we show that 3T3-L1 adipocytes can synthesize 15d-PGJ3 from EPA. 15d-PGJ3 was also detected in adipose tissue from EPA-fed mice. Thus, these studies provide a novel mechanism(s for the therapeutic benefits of ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids dietary supplementation.

  13. Associations of obesity with triglycerides and C-reactive protein are attenuated in adults with high red blood cell eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background:N-3 fatty acids are associated with favorable, and obesity with unfavorable, concentrations of chronic disease risk biomarkers.Objective:We examined whether high eicosapentaenoic (EPA) and docosahexaenoic (DHA) acid intakes, measured as percentages of total red blood cell (RBC) fatty acid...

  14. Comparison of the Effect of Eicosapentaenoic Acid and Docosahexaenoic Acid on Fasting Blood Sugar, Triglyceride, and Blood Pressure in Type 2 Diabetic Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Fateme Azizi Soleiman; Shima Jazayeri; Shahriyar Eghtesadi; Mohammadreza Vafa; Mahmoodreza Gohari; Amirkamran Nikoosokhan; Assadolah Rajab; Iraj Heidari; Naseh Pahlavani

    2015-01-01

    Background: It seems that consumption of fish oil results in reduction of cardiovascular diseases risk factor such as triglyceride and blood pressure in diabetic patients. It is not clear which component of fish oil(EPA or DHA) is more important. The aim of this study was to determine and compare the effects of eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid on fasting blood sugar, triglyceride, and blood pressure in type 2 diabetic patients. Material and Methods: The study designed as a tripl...

  15. Effects of eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid on prostate cancer cell migration and invasion induced by tumor-associated macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Chung Li

    Full Text Available Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA are the major n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs in fish oil that decrease the risk of prostate cancer. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs are the main leukocytes of intratumoral infiltration, and increased TAMs correlates with poor prostate cancer prognosis. However, the mechanism of n-3 PUFAs on prostate cancer cell progression induced by TAMs is not well understood. In this study, we investigated the effects of EPA and DHA on modulating of migration and invasion of prostate cancer cells induced by TAMs-like M2-type macrophages. PC-3 prostate cancer cells were pretreated with EPA, DHA, or the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR-γ antagonist, GW9662, before exposure to conditioned medium (CM. CM was derived from M2-polarized THP-1 macrophages. The migratory and invasive abilities of PC-3 cells were evaluated using a coculture system of M2-type macrophages and PC-3 cells. EPA/DHA administration decreased migration and invasion of PC-3 cells. The PPAR-γ DNA-binding activity and cytosolic inhibitory factor κBα (IκBα protein expression increased while the nuclear factor (NF-κB p65 transcriptional activity and nuclear NF-κB p65 protein level decreased in PC-3 cells incubated with CM in the presence of EPA/DHA. Further, EPA/DHA downregulated mRNA expressions of matrix metalloproteinase-9, cyclooxygenase-2, vascular endothelial growth factor, and macrophage colony-stimulating factor. Pretreatment with GW9662 abolished the favorable effects of EPA/DHA on PC-3 cells. These results indicate that EPA/DHA administration reduced migration, invasion and macrophage chemotaxis of PC-3 cells induced by TAM-like M2-type macrophages, which may partly be explained by activation of PPAR-γ and decreased NF-κB p65 transcriptional activity.

  16. DIFFERENTIAL-EFFECTS OF EICOSAPENTAENOIC ACID ON GLYCEROLIPID AND APOLIPOPROTEIN-B METABOLISM IN PRIMARY HUMAN HEPATOCYTES COMPARED TO HEPG2 CELLS AND PRIMARY RAT HEPATOCYTES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LIN, YG; SMIT, MJ; HAVINGA, R; VERKADE, HJ; VONK, RJ; KUIPERS, F

    1995-01-01

    We compared the effects of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and oleic acid (OA) on glycerolipid and apolipoprotein B (apoB) metabolism in primary human hepatocytes, HepG2 cells and primary rat hepatocytes. Cells were incubated for 1 to 5 h with 0.25 mM bovine serum albumin in the absence (control) or

  17. Fish oil, lean tissue, and cancer: is there a role for eicosapentaenoic acid in treating the cancer anorexia/weight loss syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jatoi, Aminah

    2005-07-01

    Eicosapentaenoic acid is an omega-3 fatty acid, a group of fatty acids characterized by a double bond that sits three carbons down from the n terminal of the molecule. Derived from dark, rich fish, eicosapentaenoic acid has received increasing attention as a therapy for the cancer anorexia/weight loss syndrome. Multiple studies, including laboratory and preliminary clinical studies suggest this fish oil derivative may benefit cancer patients. Recently, however, three large comparative studies suggest that eicosapentaenoic acid is relatively ineffective for treating this syndrome. In view of these recent results, the goals of this review are as follows: (1) to provide background on the mandate for further study of the cancer-associated anorexia/weight loss syndrome; (2) to review the preliminary data that have suggested that eicosapentaenoic acid is a promising agent for treating this syndrome; (3) to review the methodology and findings of the more recent, definitive clinical trials; (4) to discuss and speculate on why the earlier positive findings drew conclusions that are discrepant from the results of more recent comparative clinical studies.

  18. Dietary conjugated linoleic acid and long-chain n-3 fatty acids in mammary and prostate cancer protection: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinze, Verónica M; Actis, Adriana B

    2012-02-01

    The role of dietary fatty acids on cancer is still controversial. To examine the current literature on the protective role of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) and marine long-chain fatty acids [eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)] and the risk of breast and prostate cancer, data from 41 case-control and cohort studies and relevant in vitro and animal experiments were included in this 2000-2010 revision. Epidemiological studies on CLA intake or its tissue concentration related to breast and prostate tumorigenesis are not conclusive; EPA and DHA intake have shown important inverse associations just in some studies. Additional research on the analysed association is required.

  19. Combining eicosapentaenoic acid, decosahexaenoic acid and arachidonic acid, using a fully crossed design, affect gene expression and eicosanoid secretion in salmon head kidney cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holen, Elisabeth; He, Juyun; Espe, Marit; Chen, Liqiou; Araujo, Pedro

    2015-08-01

    Future feed for farmed fish are based on untraditional feed ingredients, which will change nutrient profiles compared to traditional feed based on marine ingredients. To understand the impact of oils from different sources on fish health, n-6 and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) were added to salmon head kidney cells, in a fully crossed design, to monitor their individual and combined effects on gene expression. Exposing salmon head kidney cells to single fatty acids, arachidonic acid (AA) or decosahexaenoic acid (DHA), resulted in down-regulation of cell signaling pathway genes and specific fatty acid metabolism genes as well as reduced prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) secretion. Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) had no impact on gene transcription in this study, but reduced the cell secretion of PGE2. The combined effect of AA + EPA resulted in up-regulation of eicosanoid pathway genes and the pro-inflammatory cytokine, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), Bclx (an inducer of apoptosis) and fatty acid translocase (CD36) as well as increased cell secretion of PGE2 into the media. Adding single fatty acids to salmon head kidney cells decreased inflammation markers in this model. The combination AA + EPA acted differently than the rest of the fatty acid combinations by increasing the inflammation markers in these cells. The concentration of fatty acid used in this experiment did not induce any lipid peroxidation responses.

  20. Effect of Eicosapentaenoic Acid on E-type Prostaglandin Synthesis and EP4 Receptor Signaling Human Colorectal Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gillian Hawcroft

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, in the free fatty acid (FFA form, has been demonstrated to reduce adenoma number and size in patients with familial adenomatous polyposis. However, the mechanistic basis of the antineoplastic activity of EPA in the colorectum remains unclear. We tested the hypothesis that EPAFFA negatively modulates synthesis of and signaling by prostaglandin (PG E2 in human colorectal cancer (CRC cells. EPA-FFA induced apoptosis of cyclooxygenase (COX-2-positive human HCA-7 CRC cells in vitro. EPA-FFA in cell culture medium was incorporated rapidly into phospholipid membranes of HCA-7 human CRC cells and acted as a substrate for COX-2, leading to reduced synthesis of PGE2 and generation of PGE3. Alone, PGE3 bound and activated the PGE2 EP4 receptor but with reduced affinity and efficacy compared with its “natural” ligand PGE2. However, in the presence of PGE2, PGE3 acted as an antagonist of EP4 receptor-dependent 3’,5’ cyclic adenosine monophosphate induction in naturally EP4 receptor-positive LoVo human CRC cells and of resistance to apoptosis in HT-29-EP4 human CRC cells overexpressing the EP4 receptor. We conclude that EPA-FFA drives a COX-2dependent “PGE2-to-PGE3 switch” in human CRC cells and that PGE3 acts as a partial agonistat the PGE2 EP4 receptor.

  1. Effect of eicosapentaenoic acid on the expression of ABCG1 gene in the human monocyte THP-1 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Moradi Sarabi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease (CVD is the leading cause of death and disability in developed countries. Atherosclerosis is the major cause of CVD, accounting for about half of the attributed deaths. Cholesterol homeostasis is one of the most important factors in atherosclerosis. ATP-Binding cassette transporters cholesterol. Omega (ω 3 fatty acids are important ligands for regulation of ABC transporters such as ABCG1. Concern has been raised that the low absolute intakes of EPA and high ratios of ω-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-6 PUFA to EPA may predispose some individuals to CVD. Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA is the most abundant ω3 fatty acid in the diet. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of different concentrations of EPA on the expression of ABCG1 gene in the human monocyte THP-1 cells. In this study, THP-1 cells were cultured in RPMI 1640 medium, THP-1 monocytes were then differentiated to macrophages with PMA (phorbol myristic acid and stimulated with 50, 75 and 100 μM of EPA for 24 h at 37°C. We examined the effects of EPA treatment on the expression of ABCG1 gene using Quantitative Real time RT-PCR (qRT-PCR. Our results, indicate that ABCG1 mRNA expression was significantly reduced by 50, 75 and 100 μM EPA fatty acid treatments as compared to the control cells (р = 0.009, р < 0.001 and р = 0.002, respectively. These results suggest that polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs such as EPA have an effect on the cholesterol homeostasis in macrophages, and they can change the expression of ABCG1 gene. It seems that EPA has different effects on gene expression and lipid metabolism.

  2. Effect of eicosapentaenoic acid on the expression of ABCG1 gene in the human monocyte THP-1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi Sarabi, Mostafa; Doosti, Mahmood; Einollahi, Nahid; Hesami, Soroush Shahryar; Dashti, Nasrin

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death and disability in developed countries. Atherosclerosis is the major cause of CVD, accounting for about half of the attributed deaths. Cholesterol homeostasis is one of the most important factors in atherosclerosis. ATP-Binding cassette transporters cholesterol. Omega (ω) 3 fatty acids are important ligands for regulation of ABC transporters such as ABCG1. Concern has been raised that the low absolute intakes of EPA and high ratios of ω-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-6 PUFA) to EPA may predispose some individuals to CVD. Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) is the most abundant ω3 fatty acid in the diet. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of different concentrations of EPA on the expression of ABCG1 gene in the human monocyte THP-1 cells. In this study, THP-1 cells were cultured in RPMI 1640 medium, THP-1 monocytes were then differentiated to macrophages with PMA (phorbol myristic acid) and stimulated with 50, 75 and 100 μM of EPA for 24 h at 37°C. We examined the effects of EPA treatment on the expression of ABCG1 gene using Quantitative Real time RT-PCR (qRT-PCR). Our results, indicate that ABCG1 mRNA expression was significantly reduced by 50, 75 and 100 μM EPA fatty acid treatments as compared to the control cells (р = 0.009, р < 0.001 and р = 0.002, respectively). These results suggest that polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) such as EPA have an effect on the cholesterol homeostasis in macrophages, and they can change the expression of ABCG1 gene. It seems that EPA has different effects on gene expression and lipid metabolism.

  3. Eicosapentaenoic acid reduces membrane fluidity, inhibits cholesterol domain formation, and normalizes bilayer width in atherosclerotic-like model membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, R Preston; Jacob, Robert F; Shrivastava, Sandeep; Sherratt, Samuel C R; Chattopadhyay, Amitabha

    2016-12-01

    Cholesterol crystalline domains characterize atherosclerotic membranes, altering vascular signaling and function. Omega-3 fatty acids reduce membrane lipid peroxidation and subsequent cholesterol domain formation. We evaluated non-peroxidation-mediated effects of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), other TG-lowering agents, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and other long-chain fatty acids on membrane fluidity, bilayer width, and cholesterol domain formation in model membranes. In membranes prepared at 1.5:1 cholesterol-to-phospholipid (C/P) mole ratio (creating pre-existing domains), EPA, glycyrrhizin, arachidonic acid, and alpha linolenic acid promoted the greatest reductions in cholesterol domains (by 65.5%, 54.9%, 46.8%, and 45.2%, respectively) compared to controls; other treatments had modest effects. EPA effects on cholesterol domain formation were dose-dependent. In membranes with 1:1 C/P (predisposing domain formation), DHA, but not EPA, dose-dependently increased membrane fluidity. DHA also induced cholesterol domain formation without affecting temperature-induced changes in-bilayer unit cell periodicity relative to controls (d-space; 57Å-55Å over 15-30°C). Together, these data suggest simultaneous formation of distinct cholesterol-rich ordered domains and cholesterol-poor disordered domains in the presence of DHA. By contrast, EPA had no effect on cholesterol domain formation and produced larger d-space values relative to controls (60Å-57Å; pmembrane bilayer width, membrane fluidity, and cholesterol crystalline domain formation; suggesting omega-3 fatty acids with differing chain length or unsaturation may differentially influence membrane lipid dynamics and structural organization as a result of distinct phospholipid/sterol interactions.

  4. beta-oxidation modulates metabolic competition between eicosapentaenoic acid and arachidonic acid regulating prostaglandin E(2) synthesis in rat hepatocytes-Kupffer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Du, Zhen-Yu; Ma, Tao; Winterthun, Synnøve

    2010-01-01

    and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) for PGE(2) synthesis in a rat hepatocyte-Kupffer cell (HPC/KC) co-culture system when the cellular oxidation capacity was enhanced by exogenous l-carnitine. We demonstrate that in the absence of l-carnitine, 1) beta-oxidation rates of EPA and AA were comparable in HPCs and in KCs; 2) AA...... and not EPA was preferentially incorporated into glycerolipids; and 3) addition of EPA significantly decreased AA-dependent PGE(2) synthesis in HPCs and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression in co-cultured HPCs/KCs. However, enhancing the cellular oxidation capacity by the addition of l-carnitine 1...

  5. Use of biodiesel-derived crude glycerol for producing eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) by the fungus Pythium irregulare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athalye, Sneha K; Garcia, Rafael A; Wen, Zhiyou

    2009-04-01

    Crude glycerol is a major byproduct for the biodiesel industry. Producing value-added products through microbial fermentation on crude glycerol provides opportunities to utilize a large quantity of this byproduct. The objective of this study is to explore the potential of using crude glycerol for producing eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5 n-3) by the fungus Pythium irregulare . When P. irregulare was grown in medium containing 30 g/L crude glycerol and 10 g/L yeast extract, EPA yield and productivity reached 90 mg/L and 14.9 mg/L x day, respectively. Adding pure vegetable oils (flaxseed oil and soybean oil) to the culture greatly enhanced the biomass and the EPA production. This enhancement was due to the oil absorption by the fungal cells and elongation of shorter chain fatty acids (e.g., linoleic acid and alpha-linolenic acid) into longer chain fatty acid (e.g., EPA). The major impurities contained in crude glycerol, soap and methanol, were inhibitory to fungal growth. Soap can be precipitated from the liquid medium through pH adjustment, whereas methanol can be evaporated from the medium during autoclaving. The glycerol-derived fungal biomass contained about 15% lipid, 36% protein, and 40% carbohydrate, with 9% ash. In addition to EPA, the fungal biomass was also rich in the essential amino acids lysine, arginine, and leucine, relative to many common feedstuffs. Elemental analysis by inductively coupled plasma showed that aluminum, calcium, copper, iron, magnesium, manganese, phosphorus, potassium, silicon, sodium, sulfur, and zinc were present in the biomass, whereas no heavy metals (such as mercury and lead) were detected. The results show that it is feasible to use crude glycerol for producing fungal biomass that can serve as EPA-fortified food or feed.

  6. Kinetics of eicosapentaenoic acid in brain, heart and liver of conscious rats fed a high n-3 PUFA containing diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igarashi, Miki; Chang, Lisa; Ma, Kaizong; Rapoport, Stanley I

    2013-01-01

    Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5n-3), a precursor of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), may benefit cardiovascular and brain health. Quantifying EPA's in vivo kinetics might elucidate these effects. [1-(14)C]EPA was infused i.v. for 5min in unanesthetized male rats fed a standard EPA-DHA diet. Plasma and microwaved tissue were analyzed. Kinetic parameters were calculated using our compartmental model. At 5min, 31-48% of labeled EPA in brain and heart was oxidized, 7% in liver. EPA incorporation rates from brain and liver precursor EPA-CoA pools into lipids, mainly phospholipids, were 36 and 2529nmol/s/g×10(-4), insignificant for heart. Deacylation-reacylation half-lives were 22h and 38-128min. Conversion rates to DHA equaled 0.65 and 25.1nmol/s/g×10(-4), respectively. The low brain concentration and incorporation rate and high oxidation of EPA suggest that, if EPA has a beneficial effect in brain, it might result from its suppression of peripheral inflammation and hepatic conversion to bioactive DHA.

  7. Quantitation of alpha-linolenic acid elongation to eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acid as affected by the ratio of n6/n3 fatty acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somoza Veronika

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Conversion of linoleic acid (LA and alpha-linolenic acid (ALA to their higher chain homologues in humans depends on the ratio of ingested n6 and n3 fatty acids. Design and methods In order to determine the most effective ratio with regard to the conversion of ALA to eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, human hepatoma cells were incubated with varying ratios of [13C] labeled linoleic acid ([13C]LA- and alpha-linolenic acid ([13C]ALA-methylesters. Regulative cellular signal transduction pathways involved were studied by determinations of transcript levels of the genes encoding delta-5 desaturase (D5D and delta-6 desaturase (D6D, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα and sterol regulatory element binding protein 1c (SREBP-1c. Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1 (MEK1 and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase 1 (MEKK1 were also examined. Results Maximum conversion was observed in cells incubated with the mixture of [13C]LA/[13C]ALA at a ratio of 1:1, where 0.7% and 17% of the recovered [13C]ALA was converted to DHA and EPA, respectively. Furthermore, differential regulation of enzymes involved in the conversion at the transcript level, dependent on the ratio of administered n6 to n3 fatty acids in human hepatocytes was demonstrated. Conclusion Formation of EPA and DHA was highest at an administered LA/ALA ratio of 1:1, although gene expression of PPARα, SREBP-1c and D5D involved in ALA elongation were higher in the presence of ALA solely. Also, our findings suggest that a diet-induced enhancement of the cell membrane content of highly unsaturated fatty acids is only possible up to a certain level.

  8. COX-2, aspirin and metabolism of arachidonic, eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids and their physiological and clinical significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poorani, R; Bhatt, Anant N; Dwarakanath, B S; Das, Undurti N

    2016-08-15

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are vital for normal growth and development and physiological function of various tissues in humans. PUFAs have immunomodulatory actions in addition to their ability to modulate inflammation, vascular reactivity, neurotransmission and stem cell biology. PUFAs and their metabolites possess both pro- and anti-inflammatory properties that underlie their actions and involvement in several diseases. Aspirin, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), possesses both cyclo-oxygenase (COX) and lipoxygenase (LOX) inhibitory action and enhances the production of anti-inflammatory lipoxin A4 {(called as epi-lipoxin A4, aspirin-triggered lipoxins (ATLs))}. In addition, at low doses aspirin may not interfere with the production of prostacyclin (PGI2). Both lipoxin A4 and PGI2 have vasodilator, platelet anti-aggregator and anti-inflammatory actions that may underlie the beneficial actions of aspirin. Paradoxically, other NSAIDs may not have the same actions as that of aspirin on PUFA metabolism. Similar anti-inflammatory compounds are formed from eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) by the action of aspirin termed as resolvins (from EPA and DHA) and protectins and maresins from DHA. PUFAs: arachidonic acid (AA), EPA and DHA and their various products modulate not only inflammation and immune response but also possess actions on various genes, nuclear factors, cyclic AMP and GMP, G-protein coupled receptors (GPRs), hypothalamic neurotransmitters, hormones, cytokines and enzymes, and interact with nitric oxide, carbon monoxide, and hydrogen sulfide to regulate their formation and action and to form new compounds that have several biological actions. These pleiotropic actions of PUFAs and their metabolites may explain their ability to play a role in several physiological actions and diseases. The big challenge is to harness these actions to prevent and manage clinical conditions.

  9. Usefulness of Icosapent Ethyl (Eicosapentaenoic Acid Ethyl Ester) in Women to Lower Triglyceride Levels (Results from the MARINE and ANCHOR Trials).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosca, Lori; Ballantyne, Christie M; Bays, Harold E; Guyton, John R; Philip, Sephy; Doyle, Ralph T; Juliano, Rebecca A

    2017-02-01

    There are limited data on the efficacy and safety of triglyceride (TG)-lowering agents in women. We conducted subgroup analyses of the effects of icosapent ethyl (a high-purity prescription form of the ethyl ester of the omega-3 fatty acid, eicosapentaenoic acid) on TG levels (primary efficacy variable) and other atherogenic and inflammatory parameters in a total of 215 women with a broad range of TG levels (200-2000 mg/dl) enrolled in two 12-week placebo-controlled trials: MARINE (n = 18; placebo, n = 18) and ANCHOR (n = 91; placebo, n = 88). Icosapent ethyl 4 g/day significantly reduced TG levels from baseline to week 12 versus placebo in both MARINE (-22.7%; p = 0.0327) and ANCHOR (-21.5%; p 500% in eicosapentaenoic acid levels in plasma and red blood cells (all p <0.001). Icosapent ethyl was well tolerated, with adverse-event profiles comparable with findings in the overall studies. In conclusion, icosapent ethyl 4 g/day significantly reduced TG levels and other atherogenic parameters in women without increasing low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels compared with placebo; the clinical implications of these findings are being evaluated in the REDUCtion of Cardiovascular Events With Eicosapentaenoic Acid [EPA]-Intervention Trial (REDUCE-IT) cardiovascular outcomes study. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Enhancing the production of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) from Nannochloropsis oceanica CY2 using innovative photobioreactors with optimal light source arrangements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chun-Yen; Chen, Yu-Chun; Huang, Hsiao-Chen; Ho, Shih-Hsin; Chang, Jo-Shu

    2015-09-01

    Binary combinations of LEDs with four different colors were used as light sources to identify the effects of multiple wavelengths on the production of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) by an isolated microalga Nannochloropsis oceanica CY2. Combining LED-Blue and LED-Red could give the highest EPA productivity of 13.24 mg L(-1) d(-1), which was further enhanced to 14.4 mg L(-1) d(-1) when using semi-batch operations at a 40% medium replacement ratio. A novel photobioreactor with additional immersed light sources improved light penetration efficiency and led to an 38% (0.170-0.235 g L(-1) d(-1)) increase in the microalgae biomass productivity and a 9% decrease in electricity consumption yield of EPA (10.15-9.33 kW-h (g EPA)(-1)) when compared with the control (i.e., without immersed light sources). Operating the immersed LEDs at a flashing-frequency of 9 Hz further lowered the energy consumption yield to 8.87 kW-h (g EPA)(-1).

  11. Cide-a and Cide-c are induced in the progression of hepatic steatosis and inhibited by eicosapentaenoic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinno, Yasutaka; Nakakuki, Masanori; Sato, Ayumi; Kawano, Hiroyuki; Notsu, Tatsuto; Mizuguchi, Kiyoshi; Shimano, Hitoshi

    2010-08-01

    Cide-a and Cide-c belong to the cell death-inducing DNA fragmentation factor-alpha-like effector family. Recent evidences suggest that these proteins may be involved in lipid accumulation in liver and adipose tissues. We confirmed that in the high-fat/high-sucrose diet-induced murine model of hepatic steatosis, the expression levels of the Cide-a and Cide-c genes were markedly and time-dependently increased, but returned to normal levels following improvement of hepatic steatosis by eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) administration. Levels of expression of the Cide-a and Cide-c genes correlated well with plasma ALT. EPA inhibited the promoter activity of the Cide-a gene in vitro. Sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1 (SREBP-1) markedly enhanced the promoter activity of Cide-a, and EPA inhibited the expression of Cide-a mRNA. SREBP-1 and EPA did not affect those of Cide-c. These findings indicate that Cide-a and Cide-c are closely involved in the progression of hepatic steatosis, and that EPA inhibits Cide-a gene expression through SREBP-1 regulation.

  12. Effect of eicosapentaenoic Acid (EPA) and vitamin e on the blood levels of inflammatory markers, antioxidant enzymes, and lipid peroxidation in Iranian basketball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiasvand, R; Djalali, M; Djazayery, Sa; Keshavarz, Sa; Hosseini, M; Askari, Gh; Jani, N; Fardad, N; Fatehi, F

    2010-01-01

    Exercise can change the release of numerous cytokines and modulate their receptor systems. Dietary ω-3 lipids may decrease the levels of inflammatory cytokines and prostaglandins (PGs). Therefore, in this study, we investigated the effects of exercise and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) supplementation, with or without vitamin E, on the blood levels of IL-2, TNF-α, catalase, glutathione reductase, and MDA in male basketball players. Thirty-four well-trained male basketball players were enrolled into the study. Venous blood samples were obtained from all subjects between 5:00 and 6:00 p.m., after intensive endurance exercising for 2 hours, at the baseline and after intervention. Subjects received 2g EPA and/or 400 IU vitamin E or placebo depends on their groups for 6 weeks. There were significant fall (paired t-test) in TNF-α in group1(P< 0.05), and in MDA in group 3 (P<0.05), whereas there were significant increase in glutathione reductase in groups1 and 3 (P< 0.05), and in MDA in group2 (P< 0.05).There were significant differences (Tukey) in glutathione reductase between groups 2 and 3 (P< 0.05), and in IL-2 between groups 1 and other groups (P< 0.01), but there were no significant differences in MDA, CAT, and TNF-α, among groups after 6 week of intervention. Six weeks of EPA+vitamin E supplementation enhances the plasma levels of IL-2 and erythrocytes glutathione reductase, whereas it reduces TNF-α, and 6 weeks of EPA supplementation alone enhances only the serum level of MDA.

  13. The effect of eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acid on protein synthesis and breakdown in murine C2C12 myotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamolrat, Torkamol [Musculoskeletal Research Programme, Institute of Medical Sciences, University of Aberdeen, AB25 2ZD (United Kingdom); Gray, Stuart R., E-mail: s.r.gray@abdn.ac.uk [Musculoskeletal Research Programme, Institute of Medical Sciences, University of Aberdeen, AB25 2ZD (United Kingdom)

    2013-03-22

    Highlights: ► EPA can enhance protein synthesis and retard protein breakdown in muscle cells. ► These effects were concurrent with increases in p70s6k and FOXO3a phosphorylation. ► EPA may be a useful tool in the treatment of muscle wasting conditions. -- Abstract: Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) have been found to stimulate protein synthesis with little information regarding their effects on protein breakdown. Furthermore whether there are distinct effects of EPA and DHA remains to be established. The aim of the current study was to determine the distinct effects of EPA and DHA on protein synthesis, protein breakdown and signalling pathways in C2C12 myotubes. Fully differentiated C2C12 cells were incubated for 24 h with 0.1% ethanol (control), 50 μM EPA or 50 μM DHA prior to experimentation. After serum (4 h) and amino acid (1 h) starvation cells were stimulated with 2 mM L-leucine and protein synthesis measured using {sup 3}H-labelled phenylalanine. Protein breakdown was measured using {sup 3}H-labelled phenylalanine and signalling pathways (Akt, mTOR, p70S6k, 4EBP1, rps6 and FOXO3a) via Western blots. Data revealed that after incubation with EPA protein synthesis was 25% greater (P < 0.05) compared to control cells, with no effect of DHA. Protein breakdown was 22% (P < 0.05) lower, compared to control cells, after incubation with EPA, with no effect of DHA. Analysis of signalling pathways revealed that both EPA and DHA incubation increased (P < 0.05) p70s6k phosphorylation, EPA increased (P < 0.05) FOXO3a phosphorylation, with no alteration in other signalling proteins. The current study has demonstrated distinct effects of EPA and DHA on protein metabolism with EPA showing a greater ability to result in skeletal muscle protein accretion.

  14. Production of eicosapentaenoic acid by mortierella spp on barley spent grain

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Jacobs, A

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available PUFAs convert α- linolenic acid (ALA) into EPA.In this study, the substrate was supplemented with linseed oil (containing approximately 60% ALA) to determine the effect of ALA on growth and PUFA production...

  15. Eicosapentaenoic and Docosahexaenoic Acids Attenuate Progression of Albuminuria in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Coronary Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elajami, Tarec K; Alfaddagh, Abdulhamied; Lakshminarayan, Dharshan; Soliman, Michael; Chandnani, Madhuri; Welty, Francine K

    2017-07-14

    Albuminuria is a marker of inflammation and an independent predictor of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The current study evaluated whether eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) supplementation attenuates progression of albuminuria in subjects with coronary artery disease. Two-hundred sixty-two subjects with stable coronary artery disease were randomized to either Lovaza (1.86 g of EPA and 1.5 g of DHA daily) or no Lovaza (control) for 1 year. Percent change in urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio (ACR) was compared. Mean (SD) age was 63.3 (7.6) years; 17% were women and 30% had type 2 diabetes mellitus. In nondiabetic subjects, no change in urine ACR occurred in either the Lovaza or control groups. In contrast, ACR increased 72.3% (P<0.001) in diabetic subjects not receiving Lovaza, whereas those receiving Lovaza had no change. In diabetic subjects on an angiotensin-converting enzyme-inhibitor or angiotensin-receptor blocker, those receiving Lovaza had no change in urine ACR, whereas those not receiving Lovaza had a 64.2% increase (P<0.001). Change in ACR was directly correlated with change in systolic blood pressure (r=0.394, P=0.01). EPA and DHA supplementation attenuated progression of albuminuria in subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus and coronary artery disease, most of whom were on an angiotensin-converting enzyme-inhibitor or angiotensin-receptor blocker. Thus, EPA and DHA supplementation should be considered as additional therapy to an angiotensin-converting enzyme-inhibitor or angiotensin-receptor blocker in subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus and coronary artery disease. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01624727. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  16. Relationship between coronary flow reserve evaluated by phase-contrast cine cardiovascular magnetic resonance and serum eicosapentaenoic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Long-term intake of long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs), especially eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) is associated with a low risk for cardiovascular disease. Phase-contrast cine cardiovascular magnetic resonance (PC cine CMR) can assess coronary flow reserve (CFR). The present study investigates the relationship between CFR evaluated by PC cine CMR and the serum EPA. Methods We studied 127 patients (male, 116 (91%); mean age, 72.2 ± 7.4 years) with known or suspected coronary artery disease (CAD). X-ray coronary angiography revealed no significant coronary arterial stenoses (defined as luminal diameter reduction ≥50% on quantitative coronary angiogram (QCA) analysis) in all study participants. Breath-hold PC cine CMR images of the coronary sinus (CS) were acquired to assess blood flow of the CS both at rest and during adenosine triphosphate (ATP) infusion. We calculated CFR as CS blood flow during ATP infusion divided by that at rest. Patients were allocated to groups according to whether they had high (n = 64, EPA ≥ 75.8 μg/mL) or low (n = 63, EPA  2.5, which is the previously reported lower limit of normal flow reserve without obstructive CAD. Multivariate analysis revealed that EPA is an independent predictor of CFR > 2.5 (odds ratio, 1.01; 95% confidence interval, 1.00 – 1.02, p = 0.008). Conclusions The serum EPA is significantly correlated with CFR in CAD patients without significant coronary artery stenosis. PMID:24359564

  17. A process for high yield and scaleable recovery of high purity eicosapentaenoic acid esters from microalgae and fish oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belarbi; Molina; Chisti

    2000-04-01

    A low expense process is developed for recovering esterified eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) from microalgae and fish oil. Over 70% of the EPA content in the esterified crude extract of microalgae were recovered at purities exceeding 90%. The recovery scheme utilizes either wet or freeze-dried algal biomass. The process consists of only three main steps: 1) simultaneous extraction and transesterification of the algal biomass; 2) argentated silica gel column chromatography of the crude extract; and 3) removal of pigments by a second column chromatographic step. Argentated silica gel chromatography recovered about 70% of the EPA ester present in the crude fatty ester mixture of fish oil, but at a reduced purity ( approximately 83% pure) compared to the microalgal derived EPA. The optimal loading of the fatty ester mixture on the chromatographic support was about 3% (w/w) but loadings up to 4% did not affect the resolution significantly. The process was scaled up by a factor of nearly 320 by increasing the diameter of the chromatography columns. The elution velocity remained constant. Compared to the green alga Monodus subterraneus, the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum had important advantages as a potential commercial producer of EPA. For a microalgal EPA process to be competitive with fish oil derived EPA, P. tricornutum biomass (2.5% w/w EPA) needs to be obtained at less than $4/kg. If the EPA content in the alga are increased to 3.5%, the biomass may command a somewhat higher price. The quality of microalgal EPA compares favorably with that of the fish oil product. Compared to free fatty acid, EPA ester is more stable in storage. Shelf-life is extended by storing in hexane. The silver contamination in the final purified EPA was negligibly small (<210 ppb).

  18. Differentiating prescription omega-3-acid ethyl esters (P-OM3) from dietary-supplement omega-3 fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunton, Stephen; Collins, Nancy

    2007-05-01

    A reliable means of treating hyper-triglyceridemia is the use of large doses of the omega-3 fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Modest levels of EPA and DHA may be obtained from food, particularly fatty fish. This article is intended to review clinically relevant differences between dietary-supplement omega-3 fatty acids and prescription omega-3-acid ethyl esters (P-OM3). PubMed and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Website were searched for articles published between 1995 and 2007 that contained the terms fish oil, fatty acids, n-3 fatty acids, omega fatty acids, docosahexaenoic acid, or eicosapentaenoic acid. Articles discussing sources, recommended intake, and differences among various formulations of omega-3 fatty acids were selected for review. A limitation to this review is the lack of head-to-head clinical trials using P-OM3 and dietary-supplement omega-3 fatty acids. Many types of nonprescription dietary supplements of omega-3 fatty acids are available; however, the efficacy, quality, and safety of these products are open to question because they are not regulated by the same standards as pharmaceutical agents. P-OM3 is the only omega-3 fatty acid product (Omacor capsules) approved by the US FDA available in the United States as an adjunct to diet to reduce very high (> or = 500 mg/dL) triglyceride levels in adult patients. P-OM3 can be used with confidence by practitioners who want to provide therapeutic doses of omega-3 fatty acids in a preparation that has been documented to be both safe and effective.

  19. Sunflower press cake as a substrate for eicosapentaenoic acid production by representatives of the genus Mortierella

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Jacobs, A

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available ; Mortierella; PUFA; Sunflower press cake a: CSIR Biosciences, P O Box 395, Pretoria, 0001 South Africa; b: University of Stellenbosch, Private Bag x1, Stellenbosch, 7602 South Africa; *Corresponding author: ajacobs@csir.co.za INTRODUCTION... arachidonic acid (ARA, C20:4n6), which has GRAS status (Zeller 2005). Interestingly, it was found that the precursor substrates of ω-3 EPA and ω-6 ARA are in competition for the same desaturase and elongase enzymes (Fig. 1). Also, cultivation conditions can...

  20. A novel halophilic lipase, LipBL, showing high efficiency in the production of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolores Pérez

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Among extremophiles, halophiles are defined as microorganisms adapted to live and thrive in diverse extreme saline environments. These extremophilic microorganisms constitute the source of a number of hydrolases with great biotechnological applications. The interest to use extremozymes from halophiles in industrial applications is their resistance to organic solvents and extreme temperatures. Marinobacter lipolyticus SM19 is a moderately halophilic bacterium, isolated previously from a saline habitat in South Spain, showing lipolytic activity. METHODS AND FINDINGS: A lipolytic enzyme from the halophilic bacterium Marinobacter lipolyticus SM19 was isolated. This enzyme, designated LipBL, was expressed in Escherichia coli. LipBL is a protein of 404 amino acids with a molecular mass of 45.3 kDa and high identity to class C β-lactamases. LipBL was purified and biochemically characterized. The temperature for its maximal activity was 80°C and the pH optimum determined at 25°C was 7.0, showing optimal activity without sodium chloride, while maintaining 20% activity in a wide range of NaCl concentrations. This enzyme exhibited high activity against short-medium length acyl chain substrates, although it also hydrolyzes olive oil and fish oil. The fish oil hydrolysis using LipBL results in an enrichment of free eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, but not docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, relative to its levels present in fish oil. For improving the stability and to be used in industrial processes LipBL was immobilized in different supports. The immobilized derivatives CNBr-activated Sepharose were highly selective towards the release of EPA versus DHA. The enzyme is also active towards different chiral and prochiral esters. Exposure of LipBL to buffer-solvent mixtures showed that the enzyme had remarkable activity and stability in all organic solvents tested. CONCLUSIONS: In this study we isolated, purified, biochemically characterized and immobilized a

  1. Eicosapentaenoic acid increases cytochrome P-450 2J2 gene expression and epoxyeicosatrienoic acid production via peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ in endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dahai; Hirase, Tetsuaki; Nitto, Takeaki; Soma, Masaaki; Node, Koichi

    2009-12-01

    ω-3 fatty acids, such as eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), have beneficial effects on cardiovascular diseases. Cytochrome P-450 (CYP) 2J2 that is expressed in endothelial cells metabolizes arachidonic acids to biologically active epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) that possess anti-inflammatory and anti-thrombotic effects. We studied the effects of EPA and DHA on the expression of CYP 2J2 mRNA by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells and found that EPA, but not DHA, increased the expression of CYP 2J2 mRNA in a dose-dependent and a time-dependent manner. EPA-induced CYP 2J2 expression was significantly inhibited by pretreatment with a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) γ antagonist, GW9662. EPA, but not DHA, caused a significant increase in cellular levels of 11,12-dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acid that is a stable metabolite of 11,12-EET, which was blocked by pretreatment with GW9662. These data demonstrate that EPA increases CYP 2J2 mRNA expression and 11,12-EET production via PPARγ in endothelial cells and indicate a novel protective role of EPA and PPARγ against vascular inflammation.

  2. Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) induced apoptosis in HepG2 cells through ROS–Ca{sup 2+}–JNK mitochondrial pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yuanyuan; Han, Lirong [Key Laboratory of Food Nutrition and Safety, Ministry of Education, College of Food Engineering and Biotechnology, Tianjin University of Science and Technology, No. 29, 13th Avenue, Tianjin Economy Technological Development Area, Tianjin 300457 (China); Qi, Wentao [Academy of State Administration of Grain, No.11 Baiwanzhuang Avenue, Xicheng District, Beijing, 100037 (China); Cheng, Dai; Ma, Xiaolei; Hou, Lihua [Key Laboratory of Food Nutrition and Safety, Ministry of Education, College of Food Engineering and Biotechnology, Tianjin University of Science and Technology, No. 29, 13th Avenue, Tianjin Economy Technological Development Area, Tianjin 300457 (China); Cao, Xiaohong, E-mail: caoxh@tust.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Food Nutrition and Safety, Ministry of Education, College of Food Engineering and Biotechnology, Tianjin University of Science and Technology, No. 29, 13th Avenue, Tianjin Economy Technological Development Area, Tianjin 300457 (China); Wang, Chunling, E-mail: wangchunling@tust.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Food Nutrition and Safety, Ministry of Education, College of Food Engineering and Biotechnology, Tianjin University of Science and Technology, No. 29, 13th Avenue, Tianjin Economy Technological Development Area, Tianjin 300457 (China)

    2015-01-24

    Highlights: • EPA evoked ROS formation, [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub c} accumulation, the opening of MPTP and the phosphorylation of JNK. • EPA-induced [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub c} elevation was depended on production of ROS. • EPA-induced ROS generation, [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub c} increase, and JNK activated caused MPTP opening. • The apoptosis induced by EPA was related to release of cytochrome C through the MPTP. • EPA induced HepG2 cells apoptosis through ROS–Ca{sup 2+}–JNK mitochondrial pathways. - Abstract: Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), a well-known dietary n−3 PUFAS, has been considered to inhibit proliferation of tumor cells. However, the molecular mechanism related to EPA-induced liver cancer cells apoptosis has not been reported. In this study, we investigated the effect of EPA on HepG2 cells proliferation and apoptosis mechanism through mitochondrial pathways. EPA inhibited proliferation of HepG2 cells in a dose-dependent manner and had no significant effect on the cell viability of humor normal liver L-02 cells. It was found that EPA initially evoked ROS formation, leading to [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub c} accumulation and the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP) opening; EPA-induced HepG2 cells apoptosis was inhibited by N-acetylcysteine (NAC, an inhibitor of ROS), 1,2-bis (2-aminophenoxy) ethane-N,N,N′,N′-tetraacetic acid (BAPTA-AM, a chelator of calcium) and CsA (inhibitor of MPTP). The relationship between ROS production, the increase of cytoplasmic Ca and MPTP opening was detected. It seems that ROS may act as an upstream regulator of EPA-induced [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub c} generation, moreover, generation of ROS, overload of mitochondrial [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub c}, and JNK activated cause the opening of MPTP. Western blotting results showed that EPA elevated the phosphorylation status of JNK, processes associated with the ROS generation. Simultaneously, the apoptosis induced by EPA was related to release of cytochrome C from mitochondria to cytoplasm through the MPTP

  3. Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA efficacy for colorectal aberrant crypt foci (ACF: a double-blind randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Higurashi Takuma

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Colorectal cancer (CRC is one of the most commonly occurring neoplasms and a leading cause of cancer death worldwide, and new preventive strategies are needed to lower the burden of this disease. Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, the omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid that is widely used in the treatment of hyperlipidemia and prevention of cardiovascular disease, has recently been suggested to have a suppressive effect on tumorigenesis and cancer cell growth. In CRC chemoprevention trials, in general, the incidence of polyps or of the cancer itself is set as the study endpoint. Although the incidence rate of CRC would be the most reliable endpoint, use of this endpoint would be unsuitable for chemoprevention trials, because of the relatively low occurrence rate of CRC in the general population and the long-term observation period that it would necessitate. Moreover, there is an ethical problem in conducting long-term trials to determine whether a test drug might be effective or harmful. Aberrant crypt foci (ACF, defined as lesions containing crypts that are larger in diameter and stain more darkly with methylene blue than normal crypts, are considered as a reliable surrogate biomarker of CRC. Thus, we devised a prospective randomized controlled trial as a preliminary study prior to a CRC chemoprevention trial to evaluate the chemopreventive effect of EPA against colorectal ACF formation and the safety of this drug, in patients scheduled for polypectomy. Methods This study is a multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized controlled trial to be conducted in patients with both colorectal ACF and colorectal polyps scheduled for polypectomy. Eligible patients shall be recruited for the study and the number of ACF in the rectum counted at the baseline colonoscopy. Then, the participants shall be allocated randomly to either one of two groups, the EPA group and the placebo group. Patients in the EPA group shall receive oral

  4. Icosapent ethyl (eicosapentaenoic acid ethyl ester): Effects on remnant-like particle cholesterol from the MARINE and ANCHOR studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballantyne, Christie M; Bays, Harold E; Philip, Sephy; Doyle, Ralph T; Braeckman, Rene A; Stirtan, William G; Soni, Paresh N; Juliano, Rebecca A

    2016-10-01

    Remnant-like particle cholesterol (RLP-C) is atherogenic and may increase atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease risk. Icosapent ethyl is a high-purity prescription eicosapentaenoic acid ethyl ester (approved as an adjunct to diet to reduce triglyceride [TG] levels in adult patients with TGs ≥500 mg/dL [≥5.65 mmol/L] at 4 g/day). In the MARINE and ANCHOR studies, icosapent ethyl reduced TG and other atherogenic lipid parameter levels without increasing low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels. This exploratory analysis evaluated the effects of icosapent ethyl on calculated and directly measured RLP-C. MARINE (TGs ≥500 and ≤2000 mg/dL [≥5.65 mmol/L and ≤22.6 mmol/L]) and ANCHOR (TGs ≥200 and <500 mg/dL [≥2.26 and <5.65 mmol/L] despite statin-controlled LDL-C) were phase 3, 12-week, double-blind studies that randomized adult patients to icosapent ethyl 4 g/day, 2 g/day, or placebo. This analysis assessed median percent change from baseline to study end in directly measured (immunoseparation assay) RLP-C levels (MARINE, n = 218; ANCHOR, n = 252) and calculated RLP-C levels in the full populations. Icosapent ethyl 4 g/day significantly reduced directly measured RLP-C levels -29.8% (p = 0.004) in MARINE and -25.8% (p = 0.0001) in ANCHOR versus placebo, and also reduced directly measured RLP-C levels to a greater extent in subgroups with higher versus lower baseline TG levels, in patients receiving statins versus no statins (MARINE), and in patients receiving medium/higher-intensity versus lower-intensity statins (ANCHOR). Strong correlations were found between calculated and directly measured RLP-C for baseline, end-of-treatment, and percent change values in ANCHOR and MARINE (0.73-0.92; p < 0.0001 for all). Icosapent ethyl 4 g/day significantly reduced calculated and directly measured RLP-C levels versus placebo in patients with elevated TG levels from the MARINE and ANCHOR studies. Copyright © 2016 The Authors

  5. Can a standard dose of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA supplementation reduce the symptoms of delayed onset of muscle soreness?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Houghton David

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Unaccustomed exercise can result in delayed onset of muscle soreness (DOMS which can affect athletic performance. Although DOMS is a useful tool to identify muscle damage and remodelling, prolonged symptoms of DOMS may be associated with the over-training syndrome. In order to reduce the symptoms of DOMS numerous management strategies have been attempted with no significant effect on DOMS-associated cytokines surge. The present study aimed to investigate the acute and chronic effects of a 2 × 180 mg per day dose of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA on interleukin-6 (IL-6 mediated inflammatory response and symptoms associated with DOMS. Methods Seventeen healthy non-smoking females (age 20.4 ± 2.1 years, height 161.2 ± 8.3 cm and mass 61.48 ± 7.4 kg were randomly assigned to either placebo (N = 10 or EPA (N = 7. Serum IL-6, isometric and isokinetic (concentric and eccentric strength, and rating of perceived exertion (RPE were recorded on four occasions: i-prior to supplementation, ii-immediately after three weeks of supplementation (basal effects, iii-48 hours following a single bout of resistance exercise (acute training response effects, and iv-48 hours following the last of a series of three bouts of resistance exercise (chronic training response effects. Results There was only a group difference in the degree of change in circulating IL-6 levels. In fact, relative to the first baseline, by the third bout of eccentric workout, the EPA group had 103 ± 60% increment in IL-6 levels whereas the placebo group only had 80 ± 26% incremented IL-6 levels (P = 0.020. We also describe a stable multiple linear regression model which included measures of strength and not IL-6 as predictors of RPE scale. Conclusion The present study suggests that in doubling the standard recommended dose of EPA, whilst this may still not be beneficial at ameliorating the symptoms of DOMS, it counter intuitively appears to enhance the cytokine response to

  6. Can a standard dose of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) supplementation reduce the symptoms of delayed onset of muscle soreness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Unaccustomed exercise can result in delayed onset of muscle soreness (DOMS) which can affect athletic performance. Although DOMS is a useful tool to identify muscle damage and remodelling, prolonged symptoms of DOMS may be associated with the over-training syndrome. In order to reduce the symptoms of DOMS numerous management strategies have been attempted with no significant effect on DOMS-associated cytokines surge. The present study aimed to investigate the acute and chronic effects of a 2 × 180 mg per day dose of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) on interleukin-6 (IL-6) mediated inflammatory response and symptoms associated with DOMS. Methods Seventeen healthy non-smoking females (age 20.4 ± 2.1 years, height 161.2 ± 8.3 cm and mass 61.48 ± 7.4 kg) were randomly assigned to either placebo (N = 10) or EPA (N = 7). Serum IL-6, isometric and isokinetic (concentric and eccentric) strength, and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) were recorded on four occasions: i-prior to supplementation, ii-immediately after three weeks of supplementation (basal effects), iii-48 hours following a single bout of resistance exercise (acute training response effects), and iv-48 hours following the last of a series of three bouts of resistance exercise (chronic training response effects). Results There was only a group difference in the degree of change in circulating IL-6 levels. In fact, relative to the first baseline, by the third bout of eccentric workout, the EPA group had 103 ± 60% increment in IL-6 levels whereas the placebo group only had 80 ± 26% incremented IL-6 levels (P = 0.020). We also describe a stable multiple linear regression model which included measures of strength and not IL-6 as predictors of RPE scale. Conclusion The present study suggests that in doubling the standard recommended dose of EPA, whilst this may still not be beneficial at ameliorating the symptoms of DOMS, it counter intuitively appears to enhance the cytokine response to exercise. In a

  7. Impact of dietary fatty acids on muscle composition, liver lipids, milt composition and sperm performance in European eel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Butts, Ian; Baeza, R.; Støttrup, Josianne

    2015-01-01

    of dietary regime on muscle composition, and liver lipids prior to induced maturation, and the resulting sperm composition and performance. To accomplish this fish were reared on three "enhanced" diets and one commercial diet, each with different levels of fatty acids, arachidonic acid (ARA......), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Neutral lipids from the muscle and liver incorporated the majority of the fatty acid profile, while phospholipids incorporated only certain fatty acids. Diet had an effect on the majority of sperm fatty acids, on the total volume of extractable milt...... induced medium milt volumes but had the highest sperm motility. EPA also seems important for sperm quality parameters since diets with higher EPA percentages had a higher volume of milt and higher sperm motility. In conclusion, dietary fatty acids had an influence on fatty acids in the tissues of male eel...

  8. Low plasma eicosapentaenoic acid levels are associated with elevated trait aggression and impulsivity in major depressive disorder with a history of comorbid substance use disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beier, Anne Mette; Lauritzen, Lotte; Galfalvy, Hanga C

    2014-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is associated with low levels of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), holding promise for new perspectives on disease etiology and treatment targets. As aggressive and impulsive behaviors are associated with low omega-3 PUFA levels in some clinical contexts......, we investigated plasma PUFA relationships with trait aggression and impulsivity in patients with MDD. Medication-free MDD patients (n = 48) and healthy volunteers (HV, n = 35) were assessed with the Brown-Goodwin Aggression Inventory. A subset (MDD, n = 39; HV, n = 33) completed the Barratt...... Impulsiveness Scale. Plasma PUFAs eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5n-3), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3), and arachidonic acid (AA, 20:4n-6) were quantified and ln-transformed to mitigate distributional skew. Ln-transformed PUFA (lnPUFA) levels were predictors in regression models, with aggression...

  9. Composition of amino acids, fatty acids and dietary fibre monomers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Composition of amino acids, fatty acids and dietary fibre monomers in kernels of ... Nuts are rich in protein and essential amino acids, and have a high energy value ... of protein, especially when combined with foods with high lysine content.

  10. EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA); Scientific Opinion related to the Tolerable Upper Intake Level of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and docosapentaenoic acid (DPA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    Following a request from the European Commission, the Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies was asked to deliver a scientific opinion on the Tolerable Upper Intake Level (UL) of the n-3 LCPUFAs eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and docosapentaenoic acid (DPA...... 6 g/day, and of DHA at doses of 2 4 g/day, induce an increase in LDL-cholesterol concentrations of about 3 % which may not have an adverse effect on cardiovascular disease risk, whereas EPA at doses up to 4 g/day has no significant effect on LDL cholesterol. Supplemental intakes of EPA and DHA...

  11. The omega-3 fatty acid, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, prevents the damaging effects of tumour necrosis factor (TNF-alpha during murine skeletal muscle cell differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pearson Stephen

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA is a ώ-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid with anti-inflammatory and anti-cachetic properties that may have potential benefits with regards to skeletal muscle atrophy conditions where inflammation is present. It is also reported that pathologic levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokine tumour necrosis factor (TNF-α are associated with muscle wasting, exerted through inhibition of myogenic differentiation and enhanced apoptosis. These findings led us to hypothesize that EPA may have a protective effect against skeletal muscle damage induced by the actions of TNF-α. Results The deleterious effects of TNF-α on C2C12 myogenesis were completely inhibited by co-treatment with EPA. Thus, EPA prevented the TNF-mediated loss of MyHC expression and significantly increased myogenic fusion (p p p p p p Conclusion In conclusion, EPA has a protective action against the damaging effects of TNF-α on C2C12 myogenesis. These findings support further investigations of EPA as a potential therapeutic agent during skeletal muscle regeneration following injury.

  12. Comparison of the Effect of Eicosapentaenoic Acid and Docosahexaenoic Acid on Fasting Blood Sugar, Triglyceride, and Blood Pressure in Type 2 Diabetic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fateme Azizi Soleiman

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: It seems that consumption of fish oil results in reduction of cardiovascular diseases risk factor such as triglyceride and blood pressure in diabetic patients. It is not clear which component of fish oil(EPA or DHA is more important. The aim of this study was to determine and compare the effects of eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid on fasting blood sugar, triglyceride, and blood pressure in type 2 diabetic patients. Material and Methods: The study designed as a triple-blind, placebo-controlled trial. 60 diabetic men and women, aged 30-65 years, were randomly assigned to consume 1g/d EPA, DHA, and canola oil for 12 week. Fasting blood sugar, triglyceride, and blood pressure were measured before and after the study. Results were analyzed through repeated measure test. Results:. After 12 weeks of intervention, 23 women and 22 men with a mean ± SD age of 54.9± 8.2 completed the study. In comparison with the changes from baseline, FBS and triglyceride levels didn't differ between groups (P>0.05. SBP and DBP reduced in three groups (P= 0.0015 and P= 0.000 respectively but they didn't differ between groups (P>0.05. Conclusion: Consumption of 1g/d EPA or DHA doesn't have any effect on FBS, triglyceride, SBP and DBP. This study is the first one which has compared fish oil components effects in diabetic patients.

  13. Evaluation of the hepatic bioconversion of α-linolenic acid (ALA to eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA in rats fed with oils from chia (Salvia hispánica or rosa mosqueta (Rosa rubiginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tapia O., G.

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The high dietary intake of n-6 fatty acids in relation to n-3 fatty acids generates health disorders, such as cardiovascular diseases, inflammatory diseases and other chronic diseases. The consumption of fish, which is rich in n-3 fatty acids, is low in Latin America and it is necessary to seek other alternatives, such as chia oil (CO or rosa mosqueta oil (RMO, which are rich in α-linolenic acid (ALA, the precursor of the n -3 fatty acids, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA. This study evaluates the hepatic bioconversion of ALA to EPA and DHA and the damage to the liver (histology and transaminase in Sprague- Dawley rats fed different vegetable oils. Four experimental groups (n = 9 animals each group were fed the following dietary supplements for 21 days: a sunflower oil (SFO, b RMO, c CO d olive oil with fish oil added (EPA and DHA (OO/FO. RMO and CO increased the hepatic levels of ALA, EPA and DHA and decreased the n-6/n-3 ratio compared to SFO (p El elevado aporte en la dieta de ácidos grasos omega- 6, en relación a los ácidos grasos omega-3, genera alteraciones de la salud cardiovascular, inflamación y otras patologías crónicas no transmisibles. Por otro lado, el pescado rico en ácidos grasos omega-3 es de bajo consumo en Latinoamérica, siendo necesario buscar otras alternativas de aporte de ácidos grasos omega-3, como lo son el aceite de chía (CO o el de rosa mosqueta (RMO, ricos en ácido α-linolénico (ALA, que es el precursor de los ácidos grasos omega-3, eicosapentaenoico (EPA y docosahexaenoico (DHA. Este trabajo evaluó en forma preliminar la bioconversión hepática del ALA en EPA y DHA y el daño hepático (histología y transaminasas en ratas Sprague-Dawley alimentadas con diferentes aceites vegetales. Se conformaron cuatro grupos experimentales (n = 9 animales por grupo que recibieron durante 21 días: a aceite de girasol (SFO; b RMO, c CO y d aceite de oliva adicionado de aceite de pescado (EPA

  14. Lipid malnutrition of patients with liver cirrhosis: effect of low intake of dietary lipid on plasma fatty acid composition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okita,Misako

    1989-02-01

    Full Text Available The plasma fatty acid composition of cirrhotic patients and their dietary intake of fatty acids were determined. Significantly lower plasma arachidonic, docosahexaenoic, dihomo-gamma-linolenic and eicosapentaenoic acid levels were observed in cirrhotic patients than in healthy controls. A remarkably low dietary intake of polyunsaturated fatty acids supplied from fish, vegetable oil and pulses was shown in cirrhotic patients. Positive correlations were observed between plasma arachidonic acid concentrations and clearance rate of indocyanine green (KICG (r = 0.826, p less than 0.05 and between dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid levels and cholinesterase activities (r = 0.841, p less than 0.05. From these results, we conclude that a supply of polyunsaturated fatty acids is necessary for the nutritional treatment of patients with liver cirrhosis.

  15. Obtention of highly purified fractions of eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid from sardine oil by silver-resin chromatography. A semipreparative procedure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nieto, S.

    1997-08-01

    Full Text Available Pure fractions of eicosapentaenoic acid (ERA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA were obtained from silver-resin column chromatography of ERA+DHA concentrates obtained from sardine oil. Two types of silver-impregnated resins were assayed; Amberlite IR-118H and Dowex 50 W-HCR-W2.The Amberlite-silver column allows the separation of almost pure fractions (98.5% of ERA, being unable to separate DHA from other polyunsaturated fatty acids. The Dowex-silver column does not separate the ERA from the concentrate but allows the isolation of a highly purified fraction of DHA. The chromatographic procedure described may provide pure forms of two important n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids for nutritional or pharmacological research or as substrates for the obtention of structured lipids.

    Mediante cromatografía en columna utilizando resinas impregnadas con ion plata se separaron fracciones puras de ácido eicosapentaenoico (EPA y ácido docosahexaenoico (DHA a partir de un concentrado de EPA+DHA obtenido de aceite de sardina. Se utilizaron dos tipos de resinas impregnadas con plata: Amberlite-IR 118H y Dowex 50 W-HCR-W2. La columna de Amberlite-plata permite la separación de fracciones casi puras de ERA (98,5%, siendo incapaz de separar el DHA de otros ácidos grasos poliinsaturados. La columna de Dowex-plata no separa el ERA a partir del concentrado, pero permite la obtención de una fracción de DHA de alta pureza. El procedimiento cromatográfico que se describe permite obtener fracciones puras de dos importantes ácidos grasos poliinsaturados de la serie n-3 que pueden ser utilizados para la investigación nutricional o farmacológica, o como sustratos para la obtención de lípidos estructurados.

  16. Effect of eicosapentaenoic acid, an omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid, on UVR-related cancer risk in humans. An assessment of early genotoxic markers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rhodes, L.E.; Shahbakhti, H.; Azurdia, R.M.; Moison, R.M.W.; Steenwinkel, M.J.S.T.; Homburg, M.I.; Dean, M.P.; McArdle, F.; Beijersbergen van Henegouwen, G.M.J.; Epe, B.; Vink, A.A.

    2003-01-01

    Dietary omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFAs) protect against photocarcinogenesis in animals, but prospective human studies are scarce. The mechanism(s) underlying the photoprotection are uncertain, although ω-3 PUFAs may influence oxidative stress. We examined the effect of

  17. Effect of eicosapentaenoic acid, an omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid, on UVR-related cancer risk in humans. An assessment of early genotoxic markers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rhodes, L.E.; Shahbakhti, H.; Azurdia, R.M.; Moison, R.M.W.; Steenwinkel, M.J.S.T.; Homburg, M.I.; Dean, M.P.; McArdle, F.; Beijersbergen van Henegouwen, G.M.J.; Epe, B.; Vink, A.A.

    2003-01-01

    Dietary omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFAs) protect against photocarcinogenesis in animals, but prospective human studies are scarce. The mechanism(s) underlying the photoprotection are uncertain, although ω-3 PUFAs may influence oxidative stress. We examined the effect of supplementatio

  18. Dietary Supplements and Sports Performance: Amino Acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams Melvin

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This is the third in a series of six articles to discuss the major classes of dietary supplements (vitamins; minerals; amino acids; herbs or botanicals; metabolites, constituents/extracts, or combinations. The major focus is on efficacy of such dietary supplements to enhance exercise or sport performance.

  19. Whole-genome single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP marker discovery and association analysis with the eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA content in Larimichthys crocea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shijun Xiao

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Whole-genome single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP markers are valuable genetic resources for the association and conservation studies. Genome-wide SNP development in many teleost species are still challenging because of the genome complexity and the cost of re-sequencing. Genotyping-By-Sequencing (GBS provided an efficient reduced representative method to squeeze cost for SNP detection; however, most of recent GBS applications were reported on plant organisms. In this work, we used an EcoRI-NlaIII based GBS protocol to teleost large yellow croaker, an important commercial fish in China and East-Asia, and reported the first whole-genome SNP development for the species. 69,845 high quality SNP markers that evenly distributed along genome were detected in at least 80% of 500 individuals. Nearly 95% randomly selected genotypes were successfully validated by Sequenom MassARRAY assay. The association studies with the muscle eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA content discovered 39 significant SNP markers, contributing as high up to ∼63% genetic variance that explained by all markers. Functional genes that involved in fat digestion and absorption pathway were identified, such as APOB, CRAT and OSBPL10. Notably, PPT2 Gene, previously identified in the association study of the plasma n-3 and n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid level in human, was re-discovered in large yellow croaker. Our study verified that EcoRI-NlaIII based GBS could produce quality SNP markers in a cost-efficient manner in teleost genome. The developed SNP markers and the EPA and DHA associated SNP loci provided invaluable resources for the population structure, conservation genetics and genomic selection of large yellow croaker and other fish organisms.

  20. Dietary (n-3)-fatty acids, prostaglandins, and prolonged gestation in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Harald S.; Olsen, S.F.

    1988-01-01

    in human urine. Very little is known about the tissue origin as well as the physiologicalfunctions of those prostaglandins, the metabolites of which are quantitated in urine from non-pregnant humans. In pregnant women the increased amount of prostaglandin F2 alpha-metabolites in urine, plasma and amniotic......Prostaglandins, especially prostaglandin F2 alpha, are important regulators in the onset and maintenance of parturition in humans. Inhibition of prostaglandin formation by drugs can prolong gestation in humans. High dietary intake of long chain (n-3)-fatty acids can inhibit formation of many...... arachidonic acid-derived prostaglandins as well as stimulate formation of eicosapentaenoic acid-derived prostaglandins. The latter ones often have lower biological activity than the former ones. The effect of (n-3)-fatty acids on prostaglandin formation has been shown by analysis of prostaglandin metabolites...

  1. Estimation of eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid intakes in pregnant Japanese women without nausea by using a self-administered diet history questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraishi, Mie; Haruna, Megumi; Matsuzaki, Masayo; Murayama, Ryoko; Yatsuki, Yuko; Sasaki, Satoshi

    2013-06-01

    Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) intakes during pregnancy affect fetal development and maternal mental health; therefore, an accurate assessment of EPA and DHA intakes is required. We hypothesized that a self-administered diet history questionnaire (DHQ) that was developed for non-pregnant adults could be used for estimating EPA and DHA intakes in pregnant Japanese women; thus, we evaluated the validity and reproducibility of the DHQ during pregnancy. We recruited 262 healthy participants with singleton pregnancies during their second trimester at a university hospital in Tokyo between June 2010 and July 2011. Plasma concentrations of EPA and DHA were measured as reference values. Fifty-eight women completed the DHQ twice, within a 4- to 5-week period to assess the reproducibility of the results. Among the participants without pregnancy-associated nausea (n = 180), significantly positive correlations were observed between energy-adjusted intakes and plasma concentrations of EPA (r(s) = 0.388), DHA (r(s) = 0.264), and EPA + DHA (r(s) = 0.328). More than 60% of the participants without nausea fell into the same or adjacent quintiles according to energy-adjusted intakes and plasma concentrations of EPA, DHA, and EPA + DHA. Meanwhile, among the participants with nausea, a low correlation for EPA and no correlation for DHA and EPA + DHA were found. Intraclass correlation coefficients for the 2-time DHQ measurements were 0.691 (EPA) and 0.663 (DHA). The results indicate that the DHQ has an acceptable level of validity and reproducibility for assessing EPA, DHA, and EPA + DHA intakes in pregnant Japanese women without nausea. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. High intake of dietary long-chain ω-3 fatty acids is associated with lower blood pressure in children born with low birth weight: NHANES 2003-2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skilton, Michael R; Raitakari, Olli T; Celermajer, David S

    2013-05-01

    Reduced fetal growth is associated with increased systolic blood pressure. Recently, we found an inverse association between serum ω-3 fatty acids and systolic blood pressure in young adults born with impaired fetal growth. We investigated the associations of dietary intake in childhood of the long-chain ω-3 fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid with blood pressure parameters in children born with reduced birth weight. We analyzed data from 3457 children aged 8 to 15 years participating in the continuous National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2003-2004, 2005-2006, and 2007-2008. Dietary intake was assessed by two 24-hour dietary recalls, birth weight by questionnaire, and blood pressure was measured. Systolic blood pressure was 1.1 mm Hg higher in those with reduced (pressure was significantly higher in these children (3.4 mm Hg). In the 354 participants with reduced birth weight, when compared with children with the lowest tertile of intake, those who had the highest tertile of dietary eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid intake had significantly lower systolic blood pressure (-4.9 mm Hg [95% confidence interval, -9.7 to -0.1]) and pulse pressure (-7.7 mm Hg [95% confidence interval, -15.0 to -0.4]). High-dietary intakes of eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid are associated with lower systolic blood pressure and pulse pressure in children born with reduced birth weight. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that long-chain ω-3 fatty acids reduce blood pressure in those with impaired fetal growth.

  3. Dietary fatty acids modulate associations between genetic variants and circulating fatty acids in plasma and erythrocyte membranes: meta-analysis of 9 studies in the CHARGE consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Caren E.; Follis, Jack L.; Nettleton, Jennifer A.; Foy, Millennia; Wu, Jason H.Y.; Ma, Yiyi; Tanaka, Toshiko; Manichakul, Ani W.; Wu, Hongyu; Chu, Audrey Y.; Steffen, Lyn M.; Fornage, Myriam; Mozaffarian, Dariush; Kabagambe, Edmond K.; Ferruci, Luigi; da Chen, Yii-Der I; Rich, Stephen S.; Djoussé, Luc; Ridker, Paul M.; Tang, Weihong; McKnight, Barbara; Tsai, Michael Y.; Bandinelli, Stefania; Rotter, Jerome I.; Hu, Frank B.; Chasman, Daniel I.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Arnett, Donna K.; King, Irena B.; Sun, Qi; Wang, Lu; Lumley, Thomas; Chiuve, Stephanie E.; Siscovick, David S; Ordovás, José M.; Lemaitre, Rozenn N.

    2015-01-01

    Scope Tissue concentrations of omega-3 fatty acids may reduce cardiovascular disease risk, and genetic variants are associated with circulating fatty acids concentrations. Whether dietary fatty acids interact with genetic variants to modify circulating omega-3 fatty acids is unclear. Objective We evaluated interactions between genetic variants and fatty acid intakes for circulating alpha-linoleic acid (ALA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and docosapentaenoic acid (DPA). Methods and Results We conducted meta-analyses (N to 11,668) evaluating interactions between dietary fatty acids and genetic variants (rs174538 and rs174548 in FADS1 (fatty acid desaturase 1), rs7435 in AGPAT3 (1-acyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphate), rs4985167 in PDXDC1 (pyridoxal-dependent decarboxylase domain-containing 1), rs780094 in GCKR (glucokinase regulatory protein) and rs3734398 in ELOVL2 (fatty acid elongase 2)). Stratification by measurement compartment (plasma vs. erthyrocyte) revealed compartment-specific interactions between FADS1 rs174538 and rs174548 and dietary ALA and linoleic acid for DHA and DPA. Conclusion Our findings reinforce earlier reports that genetically-based differences in circulating fatty acids may be partially due to differences in the conversion of fatty acid precursors. Further, fatty acids measurement compartment may modify gene-diet relationships, and considering compartment may improve the detection of gene-fatty acids interactions for circulating fatty acid outcomes. PMID:25626431

  4. Membrane Disordering by Eicosapentaenoic Acid in B Lymphomas Is Reduced by Elongation to Docosapentaenoic Acid as Revealed with Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of Model Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Mitchell; Kinnun, Jacob J; Kosaraju, Rasagna; Leng, Xiaoling; Wassall, Stephen R; Shaikh, Saame Raza

    2016-07-01

    Plasma membrane organization is a mechanistic target of n-3 (ω-3) polyunsaturated fatty acids. Previous studies show that eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA; 20:5n-3) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 22:6n-3) differentially disrupt plasma membrane molecular order to enhance the frequency and function of B lymphocytes. However, it is not known whether EPA and DHA affect the plasma membrane organization of B lymphomas differently to influence their function. We tested whether EPA and DHA had different effects on membrane order in B lymphomas and liposomes and studied their effects on B-lymphoma growth. B lymphomas were treated with 25 μmol EPA, DHA, or serum albumin control/L for 24 h. Membrane order was measured with fluorescence polarization, and cellular fatty acids (FAs) were analyzed with GC. Growth was quantified with a viability assay. (2)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies were conducted on deuterated phospholipid bilayers. Treating Raji, Ramos, and RPMI lymphomas for 24 h with 25 μmol EPA or DHA/L lowered plasma membrane order by 10-40% relative to the control. There were no differences between EPA and DHA on membrane order for the 3 cell lines. FA analyses revealed complex changes in response to EPA or DHA treatment and a large fraction of EPA was converted to docosapentaenoic acid (DPA; 22:5n-3). NMR studies, which were used to understand why EPA and DHA had similiar membrane effects, showed that phospholipids containing DPA, similar to DHA, were more ordered than those containing EPA. Finally, treating B lymphomas with 25 μmol EPA or DHA/L did not increase the frequency of B lymphomas compared with controls. The results establish that 25 μmol EPA and DHA/L equally disrupt membrane order and do not promote B lymphoma growth. The data open a new area of investigation, which is how EPA's conversion to DPA substantially moderates its influence on membrane properties. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

  5. Brain and Liver Headspace Aldehyde Concentration Following Dietary Supplementation with n-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Brian M; Babay, Slim; Malik, Imran

    2015-11-01

    Reactive oxygen species react with unsaturated fatty acids to form a variety of metabolites including aldehydes. Many aldehydes are volatile enough to be detected in headspace gases of blood or cultured cells and in exhaled breath, in particular propanal and hexanal which are derived from omega-3 and omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids, respectively. Aldehydes are therefore potential non-invasive biomarkers of oxidative stress and of various diseases in which oxidative stress is thought to play a role including cancer, cardiovascular disease and diabetes. It is unclear, however, how changes in the abundance of the fatty acid precursors, for example by altered dietary intake, affect aldehyde concentrations. We therefore fed male Wistar rats diets supplemented with either palm oil or a combination of palm oil plus an n-3 fatty acid (alpha-linolenic, eicosapentaenoic, or docosahexaenoic acids) for 4 weeks. Fatty acid analysis revealed large changes in the abundance of both n-3 and n-6 fatty acids in the liver with smaller changes observed in the brain. Despite the altered fatty acid abundance, headspace concentrations of C1-C8 aldehydes, and tissue concentrations of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, did not differ between the 4 dietary groups. Our data suggest that tissue aldehyde concentrations are independent of fatty acid abundance, and further support their use as volatile biomarkers of oxidative stress.

  6. Eicosapentaenoic acid as an add-on to antidepressant medication for co-morbid major depression in patients with diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bot, M; Pouwer, F; Assies, Johanna

    2010-01-01

    . METHODS: In the VU University Medical Center, we conducted a 12-week, placebo-controlled, double-blind, parallel-group intervention study of E-EPA (1g/day) versus placebo in 25 diabetes patients meeting DSM-IV criteria for major depressive disorder, who were already using antidepressant medication......BACKGROUND: Depression is common in individuals with diabetes. The present study is the first randomized controlled trial to test the efficacy of omega-3 ethyl-eicosapentaenoic acid (E-EPA) as adjuvant to antidepressant medication in the treatment of depression in adults with diabetes mellitus....... The primary outcome was severity of depressive symptoms, assessed by the Montgomery Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) at baseline and 12-week follow-up at two-weekly intervals. Blood samples were collected at baseline and at 12-week follow-up to determine EPA levels in erythrocyte membranes. Data were...

  7. Eicosapentaenoic acid as an add-on to antidepressant medication for co-morbid major depression in patients with diabetes mellitus : A randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bot, M.; Pouwer, F.; Assies, J.; Jansen, E. H. J. M.; Diamant, M.; Snoek, F. J.; Beekman, A. T. F.; de Jonge, P.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Depression is common in individuals with diabetes. The present study is the first randomized controlled trial to test the efficacy of omega-3 ethyl-eicosapentaenoic acid (E-EPA) as adjuvant to antidepressant medication in the treatment of depression in adults with diabetes mellitus. Meth

  8. Profiling of Polar Lipids in Marine Oleaginous Diatom Fistulifera solaris JPCC DA0580: Prediction of the Potential Mechanism for Eicosapentaenoic Acid-Incorporation into Triacylglycerol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Liang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The marine oleaginous diatom Fistulifera solaris JPCC DA0580 is a candidate for biodiesel production because of its high lipid productivity. However, the substantial eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA content in this strain would affect the biodiesel quality. On the other hand, EPA is also known as the essential health supplement for humans. EPAs are mainly incorporated into glycerolipids in the microalgal cell instead of the presence as free fatty acids. Therefore, the understanding of the EPA biosynthesis including the incorporation of the EPA into glycerolipids especially triacylglycerol (TAG is fundamental for regulating EPA content for different purposes. In this study, in order to identify the biosynthesis pathway for the EPA-containing TAG species, a lipidomic characterization of the EPA-enriched polar lipids was performed by using direct infusion electrospray ionization (ESI-Q-TRAP-MS and MS/MS analyses. The determination of the fatty acid positional distribution showed that the sn-2 position of all the chloroplast lipids and part of phosphatidylcholine (PC species was occupied by C16 fatty acids. This result suggested the critical role of the chloroplast on the lipid synthesis in F. solaris. Furthermore, the exclusive presence of C18 fatty acids in PC highly indicated the biosynthesis of EPA on PC. Finally, the PC-based acyl-editing and head group exchange processes were proposed to be essential for the incorporation of EPA into TAG and chloroplast lipids.

  9. Palmitic acid-induced apoptosis in pancreatic β-cells is increased by liver X receptor agonist and attenuated by eicosapentaenoate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Huasheng; Zhong, Yuhua; Zhou, Shaobi; Li, Qingdi Quentin

    2011-01-01

    Saturated fatty acids are implicated in the development of diabetes via the impairment of pancreatic islet β-cell viability and function. Liver X receptors (LXRs) and eicosapentaenoate (EPA) are known regulators of fatty acid metabolism. However, their roles in the pathogenesis of diabetes remain incompletely understood. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of EPA and the LXR agonist T0901317 on saturated fatty acid (palmitic acid)-induced apoptosis in the insulinoma β-cell line INS-1, a model for insulin-secreting β-cells. T0901317 significantly promoted palmitic acid-induced apoptotic cell death in the INS-1 cells. Consistent with these results, caspase-3 activity and BAX and sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) mRNA levels were markedly increased in INS-1 cells co-administered palmitic acid and T0901317. The production of reactive oxygen species was considerably higher in the cells cultured concurrently with T0901317 and palmitic acid than in the cells incubated with either agent alone. EPA treatment attenuated the cellular death promoted by palmitic acid and T0901317 in the INS-1 cells, disclosing a possible mediating mechanism involving the inhibition of SREBP-1c. Finally, T0901317 up-regulated the palmitic acid-induced expression of p27(KIP1), transforming growth factor beta 1, and SMAD3 proteins in INS-1 cells. These results demonstrate that palmitic acid-induced apoptosis in β-cells is enhanced by T0901317 via the activation of LXRs and is blocked by EPA via the inhibition of SREBP-1c, suggesting that the regulation of lipogenesis and lipotoxicity affecting pancreatic β-cell viability and insulin production may be a unique strategy for diabetes therapy.

  10. Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Dietary Supplementation Induces Lipid Peroxidation in Normal Dogs

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    John M. Walters

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs have anti-inflammatory effects at low concentrations; however increased dietary consumption may conversely increase susceptibility to oxidation by free radicals. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of PUFAs on selective oxidative injury and inflammatory biomarkers in canine urine and serum. Dogs (n=54 consumed a diet supplemented with 0.5% conjugated linoleic acid/dry matter, 1.0% conjugated linoleic acid/dry matter, or 200 mg/kg docosahexaenoic acid/eicosapentaenoic acid for 21 days. All dogs exhibited significantly increased plasma PUFA concentrations. All dogs had significant elevations in urinary F2a isoprostane concentration, though dogs consuming a diet containing 1.0% conjugated linoleic acid/dry matter had the highest increase (P=.0052. Reduced glutathione concentrations within erythrocytes decreased significantly in all three dietary treatment groups (P=.0108. Treatment with diets containing 1.0% conjugated linoleic acid/dry matter resulted in the greatest increase in oxidant injury. Caution should be exercised when supplementing PUFAs as some types may increase oxidation.

  11. Structured lipids via lipase-catalyzed incorporation of eicosapentaenoic acid into borage (Borago officinalis L.) and evening primrose (Oenothera biennis L.) oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senanayake, S P J Namal; Shahidi, Fereidoon

    2002-01-30

    Enzymatic acidolysis of borage oil (BO) or evening primrose oil (EPO) with eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5n-3; EPA) was studied. Of the six lipases that were tested in the initial screening, nonspecific lipase PS-30 from Pseudomonas sp. resulted in the highest incorporation of EPA into both oils. This enzyme was further studied for the influence of enzyme load, temperature, time, type of organic solvent, and mole ratio of substrates. The products from the acidolysis reaction were analyzed by gas chromatography (GC). The highest incorporation of EPA in both oils occurred at 45-55 degrees C and at 150-250 enzyme activity units. One unit of lipase activity was defined as nanomoles of fatty acids (oleic acid equivalents) produced per minute per gram of enzyme. Time course studies indicated that EPA incorporation was increased up to 26.8 and 25.2% (after 24 h) in BO and EPO, respectively. Among the solvents examined, n-hexane served best for the acidolysis of EPA with both oils. The effect of the mole ratio of oil to EPA was studied from 1:1 to 1:3. As the mole ratio of EPA increased, the incorporation increased from 25.2-26.8 to 37.4-39.9% (after 24 h). The highest EPA incorporations of 39.9 and 37.4% in BO and EPO, respectively, occurred at the stoichiometric mole ratio of 1:3 for oil to EPA.

  12. Changes in plasma chemokine C-C motif ligand 2 levels during treatment with eicosapentaenoic acid predict outcome in patients undergoing surgery for colorectal cancer liver metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpato, Milene; Perry, Sarah L; Marston, Gemma; Ingram, Nicola; Cockbain, Andrew J.; Burghel, Heather; Jake, Mann; Lowes, David; Wilson, Erica; Droop, Alastair; Randerson-Moor, Juliette; Coletta, P Louise; Hull, Mark A

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism of the anti-colorectal cancer (CRC) activity of the omega-3 fatty acid eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) is not understood. We tested the hypothesis that EPA reduces expression of chemokine C-C motif ligand 2 (CCL2), a pro-inflammatory chemokine with known roles in metastasis. We measured CCL2 in clinical samples from a randomized trial of EPA in patients undergoing liver surgery for CRC liver metastasis (LM) and preclinical models. Genome-wide transcriptional profiling of tumors from EPA-treated patients was performed. EPA decreased CCL2 synthesis by CRC cells in a dose-dependent manner. CCL2 was localized to malignant epithelial cells in human CRCLM. EPA did not reduce CCL2 content in human or mouse tumors compare to control. However, EPA treatment was associated with decreased plasma CCL2 levels compared with controls (P=0.04). Reduction in plasma CCL2 following EPA treatment predicted improved disease-free survival (HR 0.32; P=0.003). Lack of ‘CCL2 response’ was associated with a specific CRCLM gene expression signature. In conclusion, reduction in plasma CCL2 in patients with CRCLM treated with EPA predicts better clinical outcome and a specific tumor gene expression profile. Further work is needed to validate CCL2 as a therapeutic response biomarker for omega-3 fatty acid treatment of CRC patients. PMID:27058904

  13. Drosophila Fed ARA and EPA Yields Eicosanoids, 15S-Hydroxy-5Z,8Z, 11Z, 13E-Eicosatetraenoic Acid, and 15S-Hydroxy-5Z,8Z,11Z,13E,17Z-Eicosapentaenoic Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Liangliang; Xin, Xiaoxuan; Zhai, Liang; Shen, Lirong

    2016-04-01

    Drosophila melanogaster has been a widely used as a model system for its powerful genetic tools. However, it remains to be illustrated if Drosophila can be used to examine the biochemical and physiological metabolism of eicosanoids. Thus, the analysis on the metabolism of C20 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) in Drosophila was implemented with high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS). Fatty acid (FA) analysis of the whole body, head, and thorax-abdomen in Drosophila showed C20 PUFA could only be found in Drosophila fed diets supplemented with eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and arachidonic acid (ARA), but not in Drosophila fed base diets. The C20 PUFA were found in abundance in the head. Drosophila fed ARA- and EPA-supplemented diets yielded 15S-hydroxy-5Z,8Z,11Z,13E-eicosatetraenoic acid [15(S)-HETE] and 15S-hydroxy-5Z,8Z,11Z,13E,17Z-eicosapentaenoic acid [15(S)-HEPE], respectively, while other sampled eicosanoids could not be detected. Similar results were obtained by incubating fly tissue supplemented with ARA or EPA. Furthermore, a genome sequence scan indicated that no gene encoding the key enzymes synthesizing eicosanoids were found in Drosophila. These findings demonstrate that Drosophila may possess a special lipid metabolic system, which is different from mammals.

  14. Dietary influences of evening primrose and fish oil on the skin of essential fatty acid-deficient guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapkin, R S; Ziboh, V A; McCullough, J L

    1987-08-01

    There have been reports that certain dietary lipids are capable of regulating cellular inflammation and hyperproliferation. To investigate further the role of dietary manipulation involving gamma-linolenic acid (18:3n-6) and eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5n-3) on hyperproliferative cellular components, the effects of orally administered primrose oil (containing 18:3n-6) and menhaden fish oil (containing 20:5n-3) were tested in a cutaneous system using the essential fatty acid (EFA)-deficient guinea pig fed a hydrogenated coconut oil (HCO) diet. The effects of the dietary crossover regimen were determined on epidermal 1) morphology, 2) DNA synthesis, 3) delta 6- and delta 5-desaturase activities and 4) fatty acid composition of skin and liver lipids. Our results demonstrated that dietary fish oil lacked the capacity to reverse the signs of epidermal hyperproliferation, acanthosis and hypergranulosis that are characteristic of EFA deficiency. In contrast, primrose oil feeding reversed the histological and biochemical signs of hyperproliferation. These results suggest that dietary fish oil, which contains largely the 20:5n-3 fatty acid, lacks EFA-functional properties in the skin. In addition, substitution of HCO with primrose or fish oil after 6 wk revealed incorporation of 18:3n-6 and 20:5n-3 into epidermal lipids, respectively. The significance of these altered epidermal fatty acid profiles is discussed.

  15. Associations between dietary n-6 and n-3 fatty acids and arachidonic acid compositions in plasma and erythrocytes in young and elderly Japanese volunteers

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    Kawabata Terue

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We reported that the compositions of arachidonic acid (ARA in erythrocytes and plasma phospholipids (PL in the elderly were lower than those in the young, though the ARA intake was nearly identical. Objective We further analyzed data in four study groups with different ages and sexes, and determined that the blood ARA levels were affected by the kinds of dietary fatty acids ingested. Methods One hundred and four healthy young and elderly volunteers were recruited. Dietary records together with photographic records from 28 consecutive days were reviewed and the fatty acid composition in plasma lipid fractions and erythrocyte PL was analyzed. Results No correlations for ARA between dietary fatty acids and blood lipid fractions were observed. A significant negative correlation between eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA + docosahexaenoic acid (DHA intake and ARA composition in erythrocyte PL was observed. ARA composition in erythrocyte PL was significantly lower in elderly subjects than in young subjects, because EPA and DHA intake in elderly subjects was higher than in young subjects. However, after removing the effect of dietary EPA+DHA intake, the ARA composition in erythrocyte PL in elderly subjects was significantly lower than that in young subjects. Conclusions Changes in physical conditions with aging influenced the low ARA composition of erythrocyte in elderly subjects in addition to the effects of dietary EPA and DHA.

  16. Effects of dietary fat modification on skeletal muscle fatty acid handling in the metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hees, A M J; Saris, W H M; Hul, G B; Schaper, N C; Timmerman, B E; Lovegrove, J A; Roche, H M; Blaak, E E

    2010-05-01

    In the metabolic syndrome (MetS), increased fat storage in 'nonadipose' tissues such as skeletal muscle may be related to insulin resistance ('lipid overflow' hypothesis). The objective of this study was to examine the effects of dietary fat modification on the capacity of skeletal muscle to handle dietary and endogenous fatty acids (FAs). In total, 29 men with the MetS were randomly assigned to one of four diets for 12 weeks: a high-fat saturated fat diet (HSFA, n=6), a high-fat monounsaturated fat diet (HMUFA, n=7) and two low-fat high-complex carbohydrate diets supplemented with (LFHCCn-3, n=8) or without (LFHCC, n=8) 1.24 g per day docosahexaenoic and eicosapentaenoic acid. Fasting and postprandial skeletal muscle FA handling was examined by measuring arteriovenous concentration differences across the forearm muscle. [(2)H(2)]-palmitate was infused intravenously to label endogenous triacylglycerol (TAG) and free fatty acids in the circulation and subjects received a high-fat mixed meal (2.6 MJ, 61 energy% fat) containing [U-(13)C]-palmitate to label chylomicron-TAG. Postprandial circulating TAG concentrations were significantly lower after dietary intervention in the LFHCCn-3 group compared to the HSFA group (DeltaiAUC -139+/-67 vs 167+/-70 micromol l(-1) min(-1), P=0.009), together with decreased concentrations of [U-(13)C]-labeled TAG, representing dietary FA. Fasting TAG clearance across forearm muscle was decreased on the HSFA diet, whereas no differences were observed in postprandial forearm muscle FA handling between diets. Chronic manipulation of dietary fat quantity and quality did not affect forearm muscle FA handling in men with the MetS. Postprandial TAG concentrations decreased on the LFHCCn-3 diet, which could be (partly) explained by lower concentration of dietary FA in the circulation.

  17. Red Blood Cell Eicosapentaenoic Acid Inversely Relates to MRI-Assessed Carotid Plaque Lipid Core Burden in Elders at High Cardiovascular Risk

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    Núria Bargalló

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Supplemental marine omega-3 eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA has an anti-atherosclerotic effect. Clinical research on EPA supplied by the regular diet and atherosclerosis is scarce. In the framework of the PREvención con DIeta MEDiterránea (PREDIMED trial, we conducted a cross-sectional study in 161 older individuals at high vascular risk grouped into different stages of carotid atherosclerosis severity, including those without ultrasound-detected atheroma plaque (n = 38, with plaques <2.0 mm thick (n = 65, and with plaques ≥2.0 mm (n = 79. The latter were asked to undergo contrast-enhanced 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and were subsequently grouped into absence (n = 31 or presence (n = 27 of MRI-detectable plaque lipid, a main feature of unstable atheroma plaques. We determined the red blood cell (RBC proportion of EPA (a valid marker of long-term EPA intake at enrolment by gas chromatography. In multivariate models, EPA related inversely to MRI-assessed plaque lipid volume, but not to maximum intima-media thickness of internal carotid artery, plaque burden, or MRI-assessed normalized wall index. The inverse association between EPA and plaque lipid content in patients with advanced atherosclerosis supports the notion that this fatty acid might improve cardiovascular health through stabilization of advanced atheroma plaques.

  18. Effects of pure eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids on oxidative stress, inflammation and body fat mass in patients with type 2 diabetes

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    Fatemeh Azizi-Soleiman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: N-3 Fatty acids reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease. Previous studies have shown that they may reduce inflammation, oxidative stress, and fat mass in patients with type 2 diabetes, but the results are inconclusive, due, in part, to type of omega-3 fatty acids used. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of pure eicosapentaenoic (EPA and docosahexaenoic acids (DHA, the two major omega-3 fatty acids, on inflammation, oxidative stress, and fat mass in patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods: Sixty patients with DM-II were randomly allocated to receive daily either ~1 gr EPA or ~1 gr DHA, or a canola oil as placebo for 12 weeks in a randomized triple-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Serum MDA, CRP, body weight, BMI, and fat mass were measured at baseline and after intervention. Results: Forty-five patients with a mean (±SD age of 54.9 ± 8.2 years with BMI of 27.6 ± 4.1 kg/m 2 and fasting blood glucose 96.0 ± 16.2 mg/dl completed the intervention. Neither EPA nor DHA had significant effects on serum FBS, C-reactive protein, body weight, BMI, and fat mass after intervention (P > 0.05. In addition, while MDA increased 18% in the placebo group (P = 0.009, it did not change in the EPA or DHA group (P > 0.05. Conclusions: Twelve weeks of supplementation with 1gr/d EPA or DHA prevent increasing oxidative stress without changing marker of inflammation. This study is the first report demonstrating that neither EPA nor DHA have effects on body fat mass in type 2 diabetic patients.

  19. Activation of the AMP-activated protein kinase by eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5 n-3 improves endothelial function in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Wu

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that the cardiovascular-protective effects of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA may be due, in part, to its ability to stimulate the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK-induced endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS activation. The role of AMPK in EPA-induced eNOS phosphorylation was investigated in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC, in mice deficient of either AMPKα1 or AMPKα2, in eNOS knockout (KO mice, or in Apo-E/AMPKα1 dual KO mice. EPA-treatment of BAEC increased both AMPK-Thr172 phosphorylation and AMPK activity, which was accompanied by increased eNOS phosphorylation, NO release, and upregulation of mitochondrial uncoupling protein-2 (UCP-2. Pharmacologic or genetic inhibition of AMPK abolished EPA-enhanced NO release and eNOS phosphorylation in HUVEC. This effect of EPA was absent in the aortas isolated from either eNOS KO mice or AMPKα1 KO mice fed a high-fat, high-cholesterol (HFHC diet. EPA via upregulation of UCP-2 activates AMPKα1 resulting in increased eNOS phosphorylation and consequent improvement of endothelial function in vivo.

  20. Suppression by eicosapentaenoic acid of oxidized low-density lipoprotein and lysophosphatidylcholine-induced migration in cultured rat vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohno, M; Yasunari, K; Minami, M; Kano, H; Maeda, K; Yoshikawa, J

    2000-05-01

    The migration of medial smooth muscle cells into the intima is proposed to be an initial process of intimal thickening in atherosclerotic lesions. The present study was designed to determine whether pretreatment with the antiatherogenic agent eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) inhibits the migration induced by oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and its major phospholipid component, lysophosphatidylcholine (lyso-PC), in cultured rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) using Boyden's chamber method. The effects of EPA pretreatment on angiotensin II (Ang II)- and platelet-derived growth factor BB (PDGF BB)-induced migration were also examined in these cells. Oxidized LDL and lyso-PC induced migration in a concentration-dependent manner. EPA pretreatment clearly suppressed oxidized LDL (200 microg/mL)- and lyso-PC (10(-5) mol/L)-induced migration between 40 and 160 micromol/L. EPA pretreatment also suppressed Ang 11 (10(-7) mol/L)- and PDGF BB (5 ng/mL)-induced migration at a concentration of 80 and 160 micromol/L. However, in a trypan blue exclusion test, dead cells stained with trypan blue were not found 24 hours after treatment with EPA. These results suggest that EPA suppresses VSMC migration induced by oxidized LDL and lyso-PC, as well as Ang II and PDGF BB. These preliminary data concerning the effects of EPA may partly explain the antiatherosclerotic effects of this agent.

  1. Prostatic and dietary omega-3 fatty acids and prostate cancer progression during active surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreel, Xavier; Allaire, Janie; Léger, Caroline; Caron, André; Labonté, Marie-Ève; Lamarche, Benoît; Julien, Pierre; Desmeules, Patrice; Têtu, Bernard; Fradet, Vincent

    2014-07-01

    The association between omega-3 (ω-3) fatty acids and prostate cancer has been widely studied. However, little is known about the impact of prostate tissue fatty acid content on prostate cancer progression. We hypothesized that compared with the estimated dietary ω-3 fatty acids intake and the ω-3 fatty acids levels measured in red blood cells (RBC), the prostate tissue ω-3 fatty acid content is more strongly related to prostate cancer progression. We present the initial observations from baseline data of a phase II clinical trial conducted in a cohort of 48 untreated men affected with low-risk prostate cancer, managed under active surveillance. These men underwent a first repeat biopsy session within 6 months after the initial diagnosis of low-risk prostate cancer, at which time 29% of the men had progressed from a Gleason score of 6 to a Gleason score of 7. At the first repeat biopsy session, fatty acid levels were assessed with a food-frequency questionnaire, and determined in the RBC and in the prostate tissue biopsy. We found that eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) was associated with a reduced risk of prostate cancer progression when measured directly in the prostate tissue. Thus, this initial interim study analysis suggests that prostate tissue ω-3 fatty acids, especially EPA, may be protective against prostate cancer progression in men with low-risk prostate cancer.

  2. EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA); Scientific Opinion on the substantiation of health claims related to docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and gamma-linolenic acid (GLA) and contribution to normal cognitive function (ID 532) and maintenance, of normal bone (ID 642, 697, 1552) pursuant to Article 13(1) of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    of Article 13 health claims and references that EFSA has received from Member States or directly from stakeholders. The food constituents that are the subjects of the health claims are “omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids (GLA)”, “gamma-linolenic acid + eicosapentaenoic acid (GLA+EPA)”, and “evening primrose oil...... and fish oil”. From the references provided, the Panel assumes that the food constituents that are the subject of the claims are the n-6 fatty acid gamma-linolenic acid (GLA) in evening primrose oil and the n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA......Following a request from the European Commission, the Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies was asked to provide a scientific opinion on a list of health claims pursuant to Article 13 of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006. This opinion addresses the scientific substantiation of health...

  3. Combined effects of dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids and parasite exposure on eicosanoid-related gene expression in an invertebrate model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlotz, Nina; Roulin, Anne; Ebert, Dieter; Martin-Creuzburg, Dominik

    2016-11-01

    Eicosanoids derive from essential polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) and play crucial roles in immunity, development, and reproduction. However, potential links between dietary PUFA supply and eicosanoid biosynthesis are poorly understood, especially in invertebrates. Using Daphnia magna and its bacterial parasite Pasteuria ramosa as model system, we studied the expression of genes coding for key enzymes in eicosanoid biosynthesis and of genes related to oogenesis in response to dietary arachidonic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid in parasite-exposed and non-exposed animals. Gene expression related to cyclooxygenase activity was especially responsive to the dietary PUFA supply and parasite challenge, indicating a role for prostanoid eicosanoids in immunity and reproduction. Vitellogenin gene expression was induced upon parasite exposure in all food treatments, suggesting infection-related interference with the host's reproductive system. Our findings highlight the potential of dietary PUFA to modulate the expression of key enzymes involved in eicosanoid biosynthesis and reproduction and thus underpin the idea that the dietary PUFA supply can influence invertebrate immune functions and host-parasite interactions.

  4. Eicosapentaenoic acid prevents high fat diet-induced metabolic disorders: Genomic and metabolomic analyses of underlying mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Previously our lab demonstrated eicosapenaenoic acid (EPA)'s ability to prevent high-fat (HF) diet-induced obesity by decreasing insulin resistance, glucose intolerance and inflammation. In the current study, we used genomic and metabolomic approaches to further investigate the molecular basis for t...

  5. Nonfeed application of rendered animal proteins for microbial production of eicosapentaenoic acid by the fungus Pythium irregulare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yi; Garcia, Rafael A; Piazza, George J; Wen, Zhiyou

    2011-11-23

    Rendered animal proteins are well suited for animal nutrition applications, but the market is maturing, and there is a need to develop new uses for these products. The objective of this study is to explore the possibility of using animal proteins as a nutrient source for microbial production of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids by the microalga Schizochytrium limacinum and the fungus Pythium irregulare. To be absorbed by the microorganisms, the proteins needed to be hydrolyzed into small peptides and free amino acids. The utility of the protein hydrolysates for microorganisms depended on the hydrolysis method used and the type of microorganism. The enzymatic hydrolysates supported better cell growth performance than the alkali hydrolysates did. P. irregulare displayed better overall growth performance on the experimental hydrolysates compared to S. limacinum. When P. irregulare was grown in medium containing 10 g/L enzymatic hydrolysate derived from meat and bone meal or feather meal, the performance of cell growth, lipid synthesis, and omega-3 fatty acid production was comparable to the that of culture using commercial yeast extract. The fungal biomass derived from the animal proteins had 26-29% lipid, 32-34% protein, 34-39% carbohydrate, and acids for making omega-3-fortified foods or feeds.

  6. Metabolic engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for production of eicosapentaenoic acid, using a novel δ5-desaturase from Paramecium tetraurelia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Andrade Pereira Tavares, Sabina; Grotkjær, Thomas; Obsen, Thomas;

    2011-01-01

    protozoan Paramecium tetraurelia and from the microalgae Ostreococcus tauri and Ostreococcus lucimarinus were identified via a BLAST search, and their substrate preferences and desaturation efficiencies were assayed in a yeast strain producing the ω6 and ω3 fatty acid substrates for Δ5-desaturation. The Δ5...

  7. Eicosapentaenoic Acid Potentiates Brown Thermogenesis through FFAR4-dependent Up-regulation of miR-30b and miR-378.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jiyoung; Okla, Meshail; Erickson, Anjeza; Carr, Timothy; Natarajan, Sathish Kumar; Chung, Soonkyu

    2016-09-23

    Emerging evidence suggests that n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) promote brown adipose tissue thermogenesis. However, the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. Here, we hypothesize that n-3 PUFA promotes brown adipogenesis by modulating miRNAs. To test this hypothesis, murine brown preadipocytes were induced to differentiate the fatty acids of palmitic, oleate, or eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA). The increases of brown-specific signature genes and oxygen consumption rate by EPA were concurrent with up-regulation of miR-30b and 378 but not by oleate or palmitic acid. Next, we hypothesize that free fatty acid receptor 4 (Ffar4), a functional receptor for n-3 PUFA, modulates miR-30b and 378. Treatment of Ffar4 agonist (GW9508) recapitulated the thermogenic activation of EPA by increasing oxygen consumption rate, brown-specific marker genes, and miR-30b and 378, which were abrogated in Ffar4-silenced cells. Intriguingly, addition of the miR-30b mimic was unable to restore EPA-induced Ucp1 expression in Ffar4-depleted cells, implicating that Ffar4 signaling activity is required for up-regulating the brown adipogenic program. Moreover, blockage of miR-30b or 378 by locked nucleic acid inhibitors significantly attenuated Ffar4 as well as brown-specific signature gene expression, suggesting the signaling interplay between Ffar4 and miR-30b/378. The association between miR-30b/378 and brown thermogenesis was also confirmed in fish oil-fed C57/BL6 mice. Interestingly, the Ffar4 agonism-mediated signaling axis of Ffar4-miR-30b/378-Ucp1 was linked with an elevation of cAMP in brown adipocytes, similar to cold-exposed or fish oil-fed brown fat. Taken together, our work identifies a novel function of Ffar4 in modulating brown adipogenesis partly through a mechanism involving cAMP activation and up-regulation of miR-30b and miR-378.

  8. Biological effects of add-on eicosapentaenoic acid supplementation in diabetes mellitus and co-morbid depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mocking, Roel J T; Assies, Johanna; Bot, Mariska;

    2012-01-01

    ) lipoprotein parameters during 12-weeks' follow-up. RESULTS: Besides increases in supplemented α-tocopherol [estimate (95% CI); 3.62 (1.14-6.11) µmol/l; p = 0.006] and plasma and erythrocyte EPA, the intervention did not influence other oxidative stress, inflammatory or one-carbon-cycle parameters compared...... to placebo. HPA-axis reactivity significantly decreased in the EPA-group (N = 12) [AUC(i): -121.93 (-240.20--3.47) min×nmol/l; p = 0.045], not in the placebo-group (N = 12). Furthermore, EPA-supplementation increased erythrocyte and plasma docosapentaenoic acid, and decreased plasma arachidonic acid (AA...

  9. Effect of dietary supplementation with omega-3 fatty acid and gamma-linolenic acid on acne vulgaris: a randomised, double-blind, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jae Yoon; Kwon, Hyuck Hoon; Hong, Jong Soo; Yoon, Ji Young; Park, Mi Sun; Jang, Mi Young; Suh, Dae Hun

    2014-09-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the clinical efficacy, safety, and histological changes induced by dietary omega-3 fatty acid and γ-linoleic acid in acne vulgaris. A 10-week, randomised, controlled parallel dietary intervention study was performed in 45 participants with mild to moderate acne, which were allocated to either an omega-3 fatty acid group (2,000 mg of eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid), a γ-linoleic acid group (borage oil containing 400 mg γ-linoleic acid), or a control group. After 10 weeks of omega-3 fatty acid or γ-linoleic acid supplementation, inflammatory and non-inflammatory acne lesions decreased significantly. Patient subjective assessment of improvement showed a similar result. Heamatoxylin & eosin staining of acne lesions demonstrated reductions in inflammation and immunohistochemical staining intensity for interleukin-8. No severe adverse effect was reported. This study shows for the first time that omega-3 fatty acid and γ-linoleic acid could be used as adjuvant treatments for acne patients.

  10. Dietary Docosahexaenoic Acid and trans-10, cis-12-Conjugated Linoleic Acid Differentially Alter Oxylipin Profiles in Mouse Periuterine Adipose Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adkins, Yuriko; Belda, Benjamin J; Pedersen, Theresa L; Fedor, Dawn M; Mackey, Bruce E; Newman, John W; Kelley, Darshan S

    2017-05-01

    Diets containing high n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) decrease inflammation and the incidence of chronic diseases including cardiovascular disease and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease while trans-fatty acids (TFA) intake increases the incidence of these conditions. Some health benefits of n-3 PUFA are mediated through the impact of their oxygenated metabolites, i.e. oxylipins. The TFA, trans-10, cis-12-conjugated linoleic acid (CLA; 18:2n-6) is associated with adipose tissue (AT) inflammation, oxidative stress, and wasting. We examined the impact of a 4-week feeding of 0, 0.5, and 1.5% docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 22:6n-3) in the presence and absence of 0.5% CLA on AT oxylipin profiles in female C57BL/6N mice. Esterified oxylipins in AT derived from linoleic acid (LNA), alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), arachidonic acid (ARA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), DHA, and putative from CLA were quantified. CLA containing diets reduced AT mass by ~62%. Compared with the control diet, the DHA diet elevated concentrations of EPA-and DHA-derived alcohols and epoxides and LNA-derived alcohols, reduced ARA-derived alcohols, ketones, epoxides, and 6-keto-prostaglandin (PG) F1α (P < 0.05), and had mixed effects on ALA-derived alcohols. Dietary CLA lowered EPA-, DHA-, and ALA-derived epoxides, ARA-derived ketones and epoxides, and ALA-derived alcohols. While dietary CLA induced variable effects in EPA-, DHA-, and LNA-derived alcohols and LNA-derived ketones, it elevated ARA-derived alcohols and PGF1α, PGF2α, and F2-isoprostanes. DHA counteracted CLA-induced effects in 67, 57, 43, and 29% of total DHA-, ARA-, EPA-, and ALA-derived oxylipins, respectively. Thus, CLA elevated proinflammatory oxylipins while DHA increased anti-inflammatory oxylipins and diminished concentration of CLA-induced pro-inflammatory oxylipins in AT.

  11. Eicosapentaenoic acid-enriched phosphatidylcholine isolated from Cucumaria frondosa exhibits anti-hyperglycemic effects via activating phosphoinositide 3-kinase/protein kinase B signal pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shiwei; Xu, Leilei; Shi, Di; Wang, Jingfeng; Wang, Yuming; Lou, Qiaoming; Xue, Changhu

    2014-04-01

    Eicosapentaenoic acid-enriched phosphatidylcholine was isolated from the sea cucumber Cucumaria frondosa (Cucumaria-PC) and its effects on streptozotocin (STZ)-induced hyperglycemic rats were investigated. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into normal control, model control (STZ), low- and high-dose Cucumaria-PC groups (STZ + Cucumaria-PC at 25 and 75 mg/Kg·b·wt, intragastrically, respectively). Blood glucose, insulin, glycogen in liver and gastrocnemius were determined over 60 days. Insulin signaling in the rats' gastrocnemius was determined by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blotting. The results showed that Cucumaria-PC significantly decreased blood glucose level, increased insulin secretion and glycogen synthesis in diabetic rats. RT-PCR analysis revealed that Cucumaria-PC significantly promoted the expressions of glycometabolism-related genes of insulin receptor (IR), insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1), phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), protein kinase B (PKB), and glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) in gastrocnemius. Western blotting assay demonstrated that Cucumaria-PC remarkably enhanced the proteins abundance of IR-β, PI3K, PKB, GLUT4, as well as phosphorylation of Tyr-IR-β, p85-PI3K, Ser473-PKB (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01). These findings suggested that Cucumaria-PC exhibited significant anti-hyperglycemic activities through up-regulating PI3K/PKB signal pathway mediated by insulin. Nutritional supplementation with Cucumaria-PC, if validated for human studies, may offer an adjunctive therapy for diabetes mellitus.

  12. Selective enrichment of Eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5n-3) in N. oceanica CASA CC201 by natural auxin supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udayan, Aswathy; Arumugam, Muthu

    2017-10-01

    The present study aims to evaluate the effect of different concentration of natural auxin, Indole-3 acetic acid (IAA) on growth, lipid yield, PUFA and EPA accumulation in Nannochloropsis oceanica CASA CC201. It was observed that the, treatment with 10ppm concentration of IAA resulted in high cell number 579.5×10(6)cells/ml than the control (215.5×10(6)cells/ml). Treatment with IAA at a concentration of 40ppm gives the highest cellular lipid accumulation of 60.9% DCW than the control 31.05% DCW). Lipid yield is also found to be increased by the addition of 40ppm IAA (319.5mg/L) compared with the control (121.5mg/L). EPA percentage is increased to 10.76% by the addition of 40ppm IAA compared to the control (1.87%). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Dietary polychlorinated biphenyls, long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and incidence of malignant melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donat-Vargas, Carolina; Berglund, Marika; Glynn, Anders; Wolk, Alicja; Åkesson, Agneta

    2017-02-01

    For malignant melanoma, other risk factors aside from sun exposure have been hardly explored. Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs)-mainly from fatty fish- may affect melanogenesis and promote melanoma progression, while long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids seem to exert antineoplastic actions in melanoma cells. We aimed to assess the association of validated estimates of dietary PCB exposure as well as the intake of eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid (EPA-DHA), accounting for sun habits and skin type, with the risk of malignant melanoma in middle-aged and elderly women. We included 20,785 women at baseline in 2009 from the prospective population-based Swedish Mammography Cohort. Validated estimates of dietary PCB exposure and EPA-DHA intake were obtained via a food frequency questionnaire. Incident melanoma cases were ascertained through register-linkage. During 4.5 years of follow-up, we ascertained 67 incident cases of melanoma. After multivariable adjustments, exposure to dietary PCBs was associated with four-fold increased risk of malignant melanoma (hazard ratio [HR], 4.0 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 1.2-13; P for trend = 0.02]), while EPA-DHA intake was associated with 80% lower risk (HR, 0.2 [95% CI, 0.1-0.8; P for trend = 0.03]), comparing the highest exposure tertiles with the lowest. While we found a direct association between dietary PCB exposure and risk of melanoma, EPA-DHA intake showed to have a substantial protective association. Question of benefits and risk from fish consumption is very relevant and further prospective studies in the general population verifying these findings are warranted. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Dietary linoleic acid elevates endogenous 2-AG and anandamide and induces obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvheim, Anita R; Malde, Marian K; Osei-Hyiaman, Douglas; Lin, Yu Hong; Pawlosky, Robert J; Madsen, Lise; Kristiansen, Karsten; Frøyland, Livar; Hibbeln, Joseph R

    2012-10-01

    Suppressing hyperactive endocannabinoid tone is a critical target for reducing obesity. The backbone of both endocannabinoids 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) and anandamide (AEA) is the ω-6 fatty acid arachidonic acid (AA). Here we posited that excessive dietary intake of linoleic acid (LA), the precursor of AA, would induce endocannabinoid hyperactivity and promote obesity. LA was isolated as an independent variable to reflect the dietary increase in LA from 1 percent of energy (en%) to 8 en% occurring in the United States during the 20th century. Mice were fed diets containing 1 en% LA, 8 en% LA, and 8 en% LA + 1 en% eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) + docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) in medium-fat diets (35 en% fat) and high-fat diets (60 en%) for 14 weeks from weaning. Increasing LA from 1 en% to 8 en% elevated AA-phospholipids (PL) in liver and erythrocytes, tripled 2-AG + 1-AG and AEA associated with increased food intake, feed efficiency, and adiposity in mice. Reducing AA-PL by adding 1 en% long-chain ω-3 fats to 8 en% LA diets resulted in metabolic patterns resembling 1 en% LA diets. Selectively reducing LA to 1 en% reversed the obesogenic properties of a 60 en% fat diet. These animal diets modeled 20th century increases of human LA consumption, changes that closely correlate with increasing prevalence rates of obesity. In summary, dietary LA increased tissue AA, and subsequently elevated 2-AG + 1-AG and AEA resulting in the development of diet-induced obesity. The adipogenic effect of LA can be prevented by consuming sufficient EPA and DHA to reduce the AA-PL pool and normalize endocannabinoid tone.

  15. Dietary total fat and fatty acids intake, serum fatty acids and risk of breast cancer: A meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yi; Hou, Lin; Wang, Weijing

    2016-04-15

    Results from prospective cohort studies on the association between dietary total fat and fatty acids intake and risk of breast cancer remain controversial. Pertinent prospective cohort studies were identified by a search of Embase and PubMed from inception to September 2015. Study-specific relative risks (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals were pooled using a random-effect model. Between-study heterogeneity and publication bias were assessed, and sensitivity analysis was conducted. Twenty-four independent studies on dietary total fat and fatty acids intake and seven studies on serum fatty acids were included. The pooled RR of breast cancer for the highest vs. lowest category of dietary total fat intake was 1.10 (1.02-1.19); however, no association was observed in studies adjusting for traditional risk factors of breast cancer. No association was observed between animal fat, vegetable fat, saturated fatty acids (SFA), monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA), polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), n-3 PUFA, n-6 PUFA, eicosapentaenoic acid, docosahexaenoic acid, alpha-linolenic acid, oleic acid, linoleic acid and arachidonic acid and risk of breast cancer. The pooled RRs of breast cancer for the highest vs. lowest category of serum SFA, MUFA, PUFA, n-3 PUFA and n-6 PUFA were 1.00 (0.78-1.28), 1.41 (0.99-2.03), 0.59 (0.27-1.30), 0.81 (0.60-1.10) and 0.84 (0.60-1.18), respectively. Results from this meta-analysis suggested that dietary total fat and fatty acids might be not associated with risk of breast cancer.

  16. Dietary arachidonic acid in perinatal nutrition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, Lotte; Fewtrell, Mary; Agostoni, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    levels in breast milk throughout the world, whereas the level of DHA is highly diet dependent. Autopsy studies show similar diet-dependent variation in brain DHA, whereas AA is little affected by intake. Early intake of DHA has been shown to affect visual development, but the effect of LCPUFA......Arachidonic acid (AA) is supplied together with docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) in infant formulas, but we have limited knowledge about the effects of supplementation with either of these long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) on growth and developmental outcomes. AA is present in similar...... whether the AA/DHA balance could affect allergic and inflammatory outcomes later in life. Disentangling effects of genetic variability and dietary intake on AA and DHA-status and on functional outcomes may be an important step in the process of determining whether AA-intake is of any physiological...

  17. Lipid metabolic dose response to dietary alpha-linolenic acid in monk parrot (Myiopsitta monachus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petzinger, Christina; Heatley, J J; Bailey, Christopher A; Bauer, John E

    2014-03-01

    Monk parrots (Myiopsitta monachus) are susceptible to atherosclerosis, a progressive disease characterized by the formation of plaques in the arteries accompanied by underlying chronic inflammation. The family of n-3 fatty acids, especially eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5n-3, EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (22:6n-3, DHA), have consistently been shown to reduce atherosclerotic risk factors in humans and other mammals. Some avian species have been observed to convert α-linolenic acid (18:3n-3, ALA) to EPA and DHA (Htin et al. in Arch Geflugelk 71:258-266, 2007; Petzinger et al. in J Anim Physiol Anim Nutr, 2013). Therefore, the metabolic effects of including flaxseed oil, as a source of ALA, in the diet at three different levels (low, medium, and high) on the lipid metabolism of Monk parrots was evaluated through measuring plasma total cholesterol (TC), free cholesterol (FC), triacylglycerols (TAG), and phospholipid fatty acids. Feed intake, body weight, and body condition score were also assessed. Thus the dose and possible saturation response of increasing dietary ALA at constant linoleic acid (18:2n-6, LNA) concentration on lipid metabolism in Monk parrots (M. monachus) was evaluated. Calculated esterified cholesterol in addition to plasma TC, FC, and TAG were unaltered by increasing dietary ALA. The high ALA group had elevated levels of plasma phospholipid ALA, EPA, and docosapentaenoic acid (DPAn-3, 22:5n-3). The medium and high ALA groups had suppressed plasma phospholipid 20:2n-6 and adrenic acid (22:4n-6, ADA) compared to the low ALA group. When the present data were combined with data from a previous study (Petzinger et al. in J Anim Physiol Anim Nutr, 2013) a dose response to dietary ALA was observed when LNA was constant. Plasma phospholipid ALA, EPA, DPAn-3, DHA, and total n-3 were positively correlated while 20:2n-6, di-homo-gamma-linoleic acid (20:3n-6Δ7), arachidonic acid (20:4n-6), ADA, and total n-6 were inversely correlated with dietary en% ALA.

  18. Effect of dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids on reproductive output and larval growth of bivalves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, I.E.; Van Duren, L.A.; Herman, P.M.J.

    2003-01-01

    The pre-spawning condition of adult bivalves is influenced by quantity and quality of available food. For bivalves, the essential polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) 20:5(n-3) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) 22:6(n-3) are presumed to determine the nutritional value of alga

  19. Influence of Dietary Acid Load on Exercise Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Applegate, Catherine; Mueller, Mackenzie; Zuniga, Krystle E

    2017-01-04

    Diet composition can affect systemic pH and acid-base regulation, which may in turn influence exercise performance. An acidic environment in the muscle impairs performance and contributes to fatigue; therefore, current trends in sports nutrition place importance on maximizing the alkalinity of the body with ergogenic aids and dietary strategies. This review examines the evidence on the effects of dietary manipulations on acid load and exercise performance. Ten studies that investigated the effect of high versus low dietary acid loads on athletic performance generally identified that low dietary acid loads increased plasma pH, but did not consistently improve exercise performance at maximal or submaximal exercise intensities. In addition, the few studies conducted have several limitations including lack of female subjects and use of exercise tests exclusive to cycling or treadmill running. Although the research does not strongly support a performance benefit from low dietary acid loads, a more alkaline dietary pattern may be beneficial for overall health, as dietary induced acidosis has been associated with greater risk of cardiovascular disease and bone disease. The review includes dietary recommendations for athletes to reduce dietary acid load while still meeting sports nutrition recommendations.

  20. Dietary Fatty Acids and Predementia Syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Solfrizzi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available An increasing body of epidemiological evidence suggests that elevated saturated fatty acids (SFA could have negative effects on age-related cognitive decline (ARCD. Furthermore, a reduction of risk for cognitive decline and mild cognitive impairment (MCI has been found in population samples with elevated fish consumption, and high intake of monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA, particularly n-3 PUFA. However, recent findings from clinical trials with n-3 PUFA supplementation showed efficacy on depressive symptoms in non–Vapolipoprotein E (APOE ε4 carriers, and on cognitive symptoms only in very mild Alzheimer's disease (AD subgroups, MCI patients, and cognitively unimpaired non-APOE ε4 carriers. These data, together with epidemiological evidence, support the idea that n-3 PUFA may play a role in maintaining adequate cognitive functioning in predementia syndromes, but not when the AD process has already taken over. Therefore, at present, no definitive dietary recommendations on fish and unsaturated fatty acids consumption, or lower intake of saturated fat, in relation to the risk for dementia and cognitive decline are possible.

  1. Dietary transfatty acids and cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jinfu; La Vecchia, Carlo; de Groh, Margaret; Negri, Eva; Morrison, Howard; Mery, Les

    2011-11-01

    This study assesses the association between dietary transfatty acid (TFA) intake and the risk of selected cancers. Mailed questionnaires were completed between 1994 and 1997 in eight Canadian provinces by 1182 incident, histologically confirmed cases of the stomach, 1727 of the colon, 1447 of the rectum, 628 of the pancreas, 3341 of the lung, 2362 of the breast, 442 of the ovary, 1799 of the prostate, 686 of the testis, 1345 of the kidney, 1029 of the bladder, 1009 of the brain, 1666 non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, 1069 leukemias, and 5039 population controls. Information on dietary habits and nutrition intake was obtained using a food frequency questionnaire, which provided data on eating habits 2 years before the study. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidenc530e intervals (CI) were derived by unconditional logistic regression to adjust for total energy intake and other potential confounding factors. Dietary TFA were positively associated with the risk of cancers of the colon (OR: 1.38 for the highest vs. the lowest quartile), breast in premenopause (OR: 1.60), and prostate (OR: 1.42). There were a borderline association for pancreas cancer (OR: 1.38; P=0.06). No significant association was observed for cancers of the stomach, rectum, lung, ovary, testis, kidney, bladder, brain, non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, and leukemia, although the ORs for the highest quartile were above unity for all neoplasms considered, except testis. Our findings add evidence that high TFA is associated with an increased risk of various cancers. Thus, a diet low in transfat may play a role in the prevention of several cancers.

  2. Eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid in whole blood are differentially and sex-specifically associated with cardiometabolic risk markers in 8-11-year-old danish children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsgaard, Camilla T.; Eidner, Maj B.; Stark, Ken D.;

    2014-01-01

    ) investigated associations between EPA and DHA in whole blood and early cardiometabolic risk markers in 713 children aged 8-11 years and 2) explored potential mediation through waist circumference and physical activity and potential dietary confounding. We collected data on parental education, pubertal stage, 7...

  3. Prescription n-3 fatty acids, but not eicosapentaenoic acid alone, improve reference memory-related learning ability by increasing brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels in SHR.Cg-Lepr(cp)/NDmcr rats, a metabolic syndrome model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Michio; Inoue, Takayuki; Katakura, Masanori; Tanabe, Yoko; Hossain, Shahdat; Tsuchikura, Satoru; Shido, Osamu

    2013-10-01

    Metabolic syndrome is implicated in the decline of cognitive ability. We investigated whether the prescription n-3 fatty acid administration improves cognitive learning ability in SHR.Cg-Lepr(cp)/NDmcr (SHR-cp) rats, a metabolic syndrome model, in comparison with administration of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, C20:5, n-3) alone. Administration of TAK-085 [highly purified and concentrated n-3 fatty acid formulation containing EPA ethyl ester and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, C22:6, n-3) ethyl ester] at 300 mg/kg body weight per day for 13 weeks reduced the number of reference memory-related errors in SHR-cp rats, but EPA alone had no effect, suggesting that long-term TAK-085 administration improves cognitive learning ability in a rat model of metabolic syndrome. However, the working memory-related errors were not affected in either of the rat groups. TAK-085 and EPA administration increased plasma EPA and DHA levels of SHR-cp rats, associating with an increase in EPA and DHA in the cerebral cortex. The TAK-085 administration decreased the lipid peroxide levels and reactive oxygen species in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus of SHR-cp rats, suggesting that TAK-085 increases antioxidative defenses. Its administration also increased the brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels in the cortical and hippocampal tissues of TAK-085-administered rats. The present study suggests that long-term TAK-085 administration is a possible therapeutic strategy for protecting against metabolic syndrome-induced learning decline.

  4. Hybrid striped bass feeds based on fish oil, beef tallow, and eicosapentaenoic acid/docosahexaenoic acid supplements: Insight regarding fish oil sparing and demand for -3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowzer, J; Jackson, C; Trushenski, J

    2016-03-01

    Previous research suggests that saturated (SFA) and monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA) rich lipids, including beef tallow, can make utilization or diet-to-tissue transfer of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFA) more efficient. We hypothesized that using beef tallow as an alternative to fish oil may effectively reduce the LC-PUFA demand of hybrid striped bass × and allow for greater fish oil sparing. Accordingly, we evaluated growth performance and tissue fatty acid profiles of juvenile fish (23.7 ± 0.3 g) fed diets containing menhaden fish oil (considered an ideal source of LC-PUFA for this taxon), beef tallow (BEEF ONLY), or beef tallow amended with purified sources of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and/or docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) to achieve levels corresponding to 50 or 100% of those observed in the FISH ONLY feed. Diets were randomly assigned to quadruplicate tanks of fish ( = 4; 10 fish/tank), and fish were fed assigned diets to apparent satiation once daily for 10 wk. Survival (98-100%) was equivalent among treatments, but weight gain (117-180%), specific growth rate (1.1-1.5% BW/d), feed intake (1.4-1.8% BW/d), thermal growth coefficient (0.50-0.70), and feed conversion ratio (FCR; 1.1-1.4, DM basis) varied. Except for FCR, no differences were observed between the FISH ONLY and BEEF ONLY treatments, but performance was generally numerically superior among fish fed the diets containing beef tallow supplemented with DHA at the 100% or both EPA and DHA at the 50% or 100% level. Tissue fatty acid composition was significantly distorted in favor among fish fed the beef tallow-based feeds; however, profile distortion was most overt in peripheral tissues. Results suggest that beef tallow may be used as a primary lipid source in practical diets for hybrid striped bass, but performance may be improved by supplementation with LC-PUFA, particularly DHA. Furthermore, our results suggest that -3 LC-PUFA requirements reported for hybrid striped bass may not be

  5. Sources and Bioactive Properties of Conjugated Dietary Fatty Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennessy, Alan A; Ross, Paul R; Fitzgerald, Gerald F; Stanton, Catherine

    2016-04-01

    The group of conjugated fatty acids known as conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) isomers have been extensively studied with regard to their bioactive potential in treating some of the most prominent human health malignancies. However, CLA isomers are not the only group of potentially bioactive conjugated fatty acids currently undergoing study. In this regard, isomers of conjugated α-linolenic acid, conjugated nonadecadienoic acid and conjugated eicosapentaenoic acid, to name but a few, have undergone experimental assessment. These studies have indicated many of these conjugated fatty acid isomers commonly possess anti-carcinogenic, anti-adipogenic, anti-inflammatory and immune modulating properties, a number of which will be discussed in this review. The mechanisms through which these bioactivities are mediated have not yet been fully elucidated. However, existing evidence indicates that these fatty acids may play a role in modulating the expression of several oncogenes, cell cycle regulators, and genes associated with energy metabolism. Despite such bioactive potential, interest in these conjugated fatty acids has remained low relative to the CLA isomers. This may be partly attributed to the relatively recent emergence of these fatty acids as bioactives, but also due to a lack of awareness regarding sources from which they can be produced. In this review, we will also highlight the common sources of these conjugated fatty acids, including plants, algae, microbes and chemosynthesis.

  6. Immunomodulation by dietary long chain omega-3 fatty acids and the potential for adverse health outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenton, Jenifer I; Hord, Norman G; Ghosh, Sanjoy; Gurzell, Eric A

    2013-01-01

    Recommendations to consume fish for prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD), along with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved generally recognized as safe (GRAS) status for long chain omega-3 fatty acids, may have had the unanticipated consequence of encouraging long-chain omega-3 (ω-3) fatty acid [(eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)] supplementation and fortification practices. While there is evidence supporting a protective role for EPA/DHA supplementation in reducing sudden cardiac events, the safety and efficacy of supplementation with LCω-3PUFA in the context of other disease outcomes is unclear. Recent studies of bacterial, viral, and fungal infections in animal models of infectious disease demonstrate that LCω-3PUFA intake dampens immunity and alters pathogen clearance and can result in reduced survival. The same physiological properties of EPA/DHA that are responsible for the amelioration of inflammation associated with chronic cardiovascular pathology or autoimmune states, may impair pathogen clearance during acute infections by decreasing host resistance or interfere with tumor surveillance resulting in adverse health outcomes. Recent observations that high serum LCω-3PUFA levels are associated with higher risk of prostate cancer and atrial fibrillation raise concern for adverse outcomes. Given the widespread use of supplements and fortification of common food items with LCω-3PUFA, this review focuses on the immunomodulatory effects of the dietary LCω-3PUFAs, EPA and DHA, the mechanistic basis for potential negative health outcomes, and calls for biomarker development and validation as rational first steps towards setting recommended dietary intake levels.

  7. The triglyceride-lowering effects of a modest dose of docosahexaenoic acid alone versus in combination with low dose eicosapentaenoic acid in patients with coronary artery disease and elevated triglycerides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwellenbach, Lisa J; Olson, Kari L; McConnell, Karen J; Stolcpart, Ryan S; Nash, James D; Merenich, John A

    2006-12-01

    Hypertriglyceridemia is a risk factor for coronary artery disease (CAD). The American Heart Association recommends 1000 mg of omega-3 fatty acids, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), daily for cardioprotection and higher doses for triglyceride-lowering in patients with CAD. This was a prospective, randomized, double-blind study comparing DHA to DHA + EPA in patients with CAD and triglycerides greater than 200 mg/dL. Subjects were randomized to either 1000 mg of DHA or 1252 mg of DHA + EPA for eight weeks. Baseline and eight-week laboratories were drawn to assess changes in the fasting lipid profile. The primary objective was to evaluate the change in triglycerides between the two groups at eight weeks. A total of 116 subjects were enrolled; 57 in the DHA group and 59 in the DHA + EPA group. Baseline characteristics were similar between groups. The mean age was 69.4 +/- 9.1 years and 70.7% were male. Triglycerides decreased by an average of 21.8% in the DHA group (p triglyceride goal (less than 150 mg/dL) compared to the DHA + EPA group (24.6% versus 10.2%, p triglycerides in patients with CAD. There do not appear to be significant differences in triglyceride-lowering between DHA only and DHA + EPA combination products when dosing is based on DHA.

  8. Dietary alpha-tocopherol affects tissue vitamin e and malondialdehyde levels but does not change antioxidant enzymes and fatty acid composition in farmed Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faizan, Mohammad; Stubhaug, Ingunn; Menoyo, David; Esatbeyoglu, Tuba; Wagner, Anika E; Struksnæs, Gunvor; Koppe, Wolfgang; Rimbach, Gerald

    2013-01-01

    In this study the effect of increasing dietary alpha tocopherol on vitamin E tissue concentrations, lipid peroxidation (malondialdehyde), antioxidant enzymes, and fatty acid composition has been investigated in farmed Atlantic salmon. To this end fish (initial body weight ~ 193 g, n = 70 per group) were fed diets based on fish oil (27.5 %), fish meal (15.0 %), wheat gluten (20.6 %), and soy protein concentrate (24.0 %) for 14 weeks. Diets were supplemented with 0 (negative control), 150, and 400 mg/kg vitamin E as all-rac alpha-tocopheryl acetate. Dietary vitamin E did not affect feed conversion efficiency ratio but significantly (p level. Furthermore, we observed an antagonistic interaction between alpha- and gamma-tocopherol in plasma at the highest supplementation level, since high dietary alpha-tocopherol reduced plasma gamma-tocopherol concentrations. Liver antioxidant enzymes, including glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase, remained largely unchanged in response to dietary alpha-tocopherol. Dietary alpha-tocopherol did not affect eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid concentrations in salmon fillet. Present data suggest that alpha-tocopherol supplementations beyond dietary recommendations may further improve flesh quality and nutritional value of Atlantic salmon fillet as far as malondialdehyde and vitamin E concentrations are concerned.

  9. A high-fat, high-oleic diet, but not a high-fat, saturated diet, reduces hepatic alpha-linolenic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid content in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Considerable research centers upon the role of linoleic acid (LNA; 18:2n6) as a competitive inhibitor of a-linolenic (ALA; 18:3n3) metabolism; however, little data exist as to the impact of saturated fatty acids (SFA) and monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) on ALA metabolism. We tested the hypothesi...

  10. A Dietary Treatment Improves Cerebral Blood Flow and Brain Connectivity in Aging apoE4 Mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiesmann, M.; Zerbi, V.; Jansen, D.; Haast, R.; Lutjohann, D.; Broersen, L.M.; Heerschap, A.; Kiliaan, A.J.

    2016-01-01

    APOE epsilon4 (apoE4) polymorphism is the main genetic determinant of sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD). A dietary approach (Fortasyn) including docosahexaenoic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid, uridine, choline, phospholipids, folic acid, vitamins B12, B6, C, and E, and selenium has been proposed for di

  11. Influence of dietary docosahexaenoic acid in combination with other long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids on expression of biosynthesis genes and phospholipid fatty acid compositions in tissues of post-smolt Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betancor, Mónica B; Howarth, Fraser J E; Glencross, Brett D; Tocher, Douglas R

    2014-01-01

    To investigate interactions of dietary LC-PUFA, a dose-response study with a range of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 22:6n-3) levels (1 g kg(-1), 5 g kg(-1), 10 g kg(-1), 15 g kg(-1) and 20 g kg(-1)) was performed with post-smolts (111 ± 2.6g; mean ± S.D.) over a nine-week feeding period. Additional diets included 10 g kg(-1) DHA in combination with 10 g kg(-1) of either eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA; 20:5n-3) or arachidonic acid (ARA; 20:4n-6), and a diet containing 5 g kg(-1) each of DHA and EPA. The liver, brain, head kidney and gill were collected at the conclusion of the trial, and lipid and fatty acid compositions were determined as well as expression of genes of LC-PUFA biosynthesis. Total lipid content and class composition were largely unaffected by changes in dietary LC-PUFA. However, phospholipid (PL) fatty acid compositions generally reflected that of the diet, although the response varied between tissues. The liver most strongly reflected diet, followed by the head kidney. In both tissues increasing dietary DHA led to significantly increased DHA in PL and inclusion of EPA or ARA led to higher levels of these fatty acids. The brain showed the most conserved composition and gene expression profile, with increased dietary LC-PUFA resulting in only minor changes in PL fatty acids. Dietary LC-PUFA significantly affected the expression of Δ6 and Δ5 desaturases, Elovl 2, 4 and 5, and SREBPs although this varied between tissues with greatest effects observed in the liver followed by the head kidney, similar to PL fatty acid compositions.

  12. Margarines fortified with α-linolenic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid, or docosahexaenoic acid alter the fatty acid composition of erythrocytes but do not affect the antioxidant status of healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egert, Sarah; Lindenmeier, Michael; Harnack, Kerstin; Krome, Katharina; Erbersdobler, Helmut F; Wahrburg, Ursel; Somoza, Veronika

    2012-09-01

    We aimed to investigate the effects of increased intake of α-linolenic acid (ALA), EPA, or DHA incorporated into a food matrix on the fatty acid composition of erythrocytes and on biomarkers of oxidant/antioxidant status. To this end, a controlled dietary study was conducted in 74 healthy men and women. The participants were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 interventions in which margarines fortified with either 10 weight percent ALA, EPA, or DHA ethyl esters replaced their normal spread for 6 wk. The total intakes of ALA, EPA, and DHA were 4.4, 2.2, and 2.3 g/d, respectively. Consuming EPA increased the erythrocyte proportion of EPA (394%) and the omega-3 index (sum of EPA and DHA, 38%). Consumption of DHA increased erythrocyte DHA (91%), the omega-3 index (98%), and EPA (137%). The omega-3 index increased to a significantly greater extent in the DHA group than in the EPA group. ALA did not increase erythrocyte EPA or the omega-3 index. We found no change in plasma uric acid or antioxidant capacity in any of the groups. Plasma malondialdehyde (MDA) increased with the EPA and DHA interventions. All 3 interventions decreased erythrocyte linoleic acid hydroperoxides but did not affect their MDA concentrations. In conclusion, the intake of both isolated EPA and DHA incorporated into margarine resulted in an enhanced incorporation of EPA and DHA into erythrocytes. Our findings indicate that DHA is quantitatively superior to EPA in view of the EPA+DHA tissue incorporation and also that 4 g/d ALA is not sufficient to increase the omega-3 index over a 6-wk period.

  13. Eicosapentaenoic acid free fatty acid prevents and suppresses colonic neoplasia in colitis-associated colorectal cancer acting on Notch signaling and gut microbiota

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piazzi, G.; Argenio, D' G.; Prossomariti, A.; Lembo, V.; Mazzone, G.; Candela, M.; Biagi, E.; Brigidi, P.; Vitaglione, P.; Fogliano, V.; Angelo and others, D' L.

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases are associated with increased risk of developing colitis-associated colorectal cancer (CAC). Epidemiological data show that the consumption of ¿-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (¿-3 PUFAs) decreases the risk of sporadic colorectal cancer (CRC). Importantly, recent data have

  14. DIETARY FOOD FORTIFIED WITH OROTIC ACID AND LIVER FUNCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yohanes Buang

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The effects of dietary food fortified with orotic acid (1.0% on liver function were studied in rats. The rats fed withorotic acid promoted liver triglyceride content markedly, that was 5-fold higher than that of the control. The livermalondialdehyde (MDA content increased by 10%, but the gluthation peroxidase (GSH-Px activity decreased by 50%.The serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST and alanine aminotransferase (ALT activities increased by 25% and 30%,respectively. Therefore, the decreased GSH-Px activity was associated with the promotions of AST, ALT, and the liverMDA levels. In conclusion: dietary orotic acid promotes lipid peroxidation but reduces the rate of the antioxidantenzyme. Therefore, dietary food fortified with orotic acid attenuates the liver function.

  15. Relationship between Fecal Content of Fatty Acids and Cyclooxygenase mRNA Expression and Fatty Acid Composition in Duodenal Biopsies, Serum Lipoproteins, and Dietary Fat in Colectomized Familial Adenomatous Polyposis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Almendingen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A few familial adenomatous polyposis studies have focused upon faecal sterols and bile acids but none has analysed the fecal content of fatty acids. We report here findings of an observational study on 29 colectomized familial adenomatous polyposis patients that describe the fecal content of fatty acids, and relate this to the proportions of fatty acids and levels of cyclooxygenase mRNA expression in duodenal biopsies, levels of serum lipoproteins, and diet. In the ileostomy group separately (n=12, the fecal content of arachidonic acid was correlated negatively to the proportions of eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid in duodenal biopsies. Total serum-cholesterol was negatively correlated to the fecal content of saturates and monounsaturates. The fecal palmitoleic acid/palmitic acid ratio was positively correlated to the levels of cyclooxygease-2 expression in duodenal biopsies.In the ileal-pouch-anal anastomosis group separately (n=17, significant correlations were found between the fecal contents of oleic acid, linoleic acid, and alpha-linolenic acid, and the proportions of myristic acid, oleic acid and eicosaenoic acid in duodenal biopsies. Dietary monounsaturates were positively correlated to different fecal fatty acids. Future studies should focus on molecular mechanisms relevant to fatty acid metabolism, inflammation, and angiogenesis, in addition to nutrition.

  16. Dietary intakes and food sources of fatty acids in Guatemalan schoolchildren: A cross-sectional study

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bermudez, Odilia I.

    2010-04-23

    Abstract Background Consumption of healthy diets that contribute with adequate amounts of fat and fatty acids is needed for children. Among Guatemalan children, there is little information about fat intakes. Therefore, the present study sought to assess intakes of dietary fats and examine food sources of those fats in Guatemalan children. Methods The study subjects consisted of a convenience sample of 449 third- and fourth-grade schoolchildren (8-10 y), attending public or private schools in Quetzaltenango City, Guatemala. Dietary data was obtained by means of a single pictorial 24-h record. Results The percentages of total energy (%E) from total fat, saturated fat (SFA) and monounsaturated fat (MUFA) reached 29%E for total fat and 10%E for each SFA and MUFA, without gender differences. %E from fats in high vs. low-socio economic status (SES) children were significantly higher for boys, but not for girls, for total fat (p = 0.002) and SFA (p < 0.001). Large proportions of the children had low levels of intakes of some fatty acids (FA), particularly for n-3 FA, with >97% of all groups consuming less than 1%E from this fats. Fried eggs, sweet rolls, whole milk and cheese were main sources of total fat and, SFA. Whole milk and sweet bread were important sources of n-3 FA for high- and low-SES boys and girls, respectively. Fried plantain was the main source of n-3 FA for girls in the high-SES group. Fried fish, seafood soup, and shrimp, consumed only by boys in low amounts, were sources of eicosapentaenoic (EPA) and docosahexaenoic (DHA) acids, which may explain the low intakes of these nutrients. Conclusions α-linolenic acid, EPA and DHA were the most limiting fatty acids in diets of Guatemalan schoolchildren, which could be partially explained by the low consumption of sources of these nutrients, particularly fish and seafood (for EPA and DHA). This population will benefit from a higher consumption of culturally acceptable foods that are rich in these limiting

  17. Dietary uptake of omega-3 fatty acids in mouse tissue studied by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjövall, Peter; Rossmeisl, Martin; Hanrieder, Jörg; Kuda, Ondrej; Kopecky, Jan; Bryhn, Morten

    2015-07-01

    Dietary intake of omega-3 fatty acids is associated with considerable health benefits, including the prevention of metabolic disorders such as cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. Furthermore, incorporation of the main omega-3 fatty acids, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), at the systemic level has been found to be more efficient when these fatty acids are supplied in the form of marine phospholipids compared to triglycerides. In this work, the uptake of omega-3 fatty acids and their incorporation in specific lipids were studied in adipose, skeletal muscle, and liver tissues of mice given high-fat diets with or without omega-3 supplements in the form of phospholipids or triglycerides using time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS). The results demonstrate significant uptake of EPA and DHA, and the incorporation of these fatty acids in specific lipid molecules, in all three tissue types in response to the dietary omega-3 supplements. Moreover, the results indicate reduced concentrations of arachidonic acid (AA) and depletion of lipids containing AA in tissue samples from mice given supplementary omega-3, as compared to the control mice. The effect on the lipid composition, in particular the DHA uptake and AA depletion, was found to be significantly stronger when the omega-3 supplement was supplied in the form of phospholipids, as compared to triglycerides. TOF-SIMS was found to be a useful technique for screening the lipid composition and simultaneously obtaining the spatial distributions of various lipid classes on tissue surfaces.

  18. A rapid method for determining arachidonic:eicosapentaenoic acid ratios in whole blood lipids: correlation with erythrocyte membrane ratios and validation in a large Italian population of various ages and pathologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corsetto Paola

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Omega-3 and -6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA, are important for good health conditions. They are present in membrane phospholipids. The ratio of total n-6:n-3 LCPUFA and arachidonic acid:eicosapentaenoic acid (AA and EPA, should not exceed 5:1. Increased intake of n-6 and decreased consumption of n-3 has resulted in much higher, ca 10/15:1 ratio in RBC fatty acids with the possible appearance of a pathological "scenario". The determination of RBC phospholipid LCPUFA contents and ratios is the method of choice for assessing fatty acid status but it is labour intensive and time consuming. Aims of the study [i] To describe and validate a rapid method, suitable for large scale population studies, for total blood fatty acid assay; [ii] to verify a possible correlation between total n-6:n-3 ratio and AA:EPA ratios in RBC phospholipids and in whole-blood total lipids, [iii] to assess usefulness of these ratio as biomarkers of LCPUFA status. Methods 1 Healthy volunteers and patients with various pathologies were recruited. 2 Fatty acid analyses by GC of methyl esters from directly derivatized whole blood total lipids and from RBC phospholipids were performed on fasting blood samples from 1432 subjects categorised according to their age, sex and any existing pathologies. AA:EPA ratio and the total n-6:n-3 ratio were determined. Results AA:EPA ratio is a more sensitive and reliable index for determining changes in total blood fatty acid and it is correlated with the ratio derived from extracted RBC phospholipids. Conclusions The described AA:EPA ratio is a simple, rapid and reliable method for determining n-3 fatty acid status.

  19. Effects of Two Dietary Lipid Sources at Two Levels on the Survival, Growth and Fatty Acid Composition of the Giant Freshwater Prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii

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    Young Chul kim

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A 10 week feeding trial was conducted to investigate dietary crude palm oil (CPO or squid liver oil (SLO, at 3.5% (low or 9.5% (high as a 2 × 2 factorial design on survival, growth and whole body fatty acid composition of the giant freshwater prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii.  Growth performance was lowest and highest for prawns fed the CPO-low and SLO-high diets, respectively.  While prawns fed the CPO-high diet had lower growth than those fed the SLO-low diet, no significant differences were detected.  Significant interactions were found for oleic acid, arachidonic acid, n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA and n-3/n-6 PUFA, while long chain PUFA, eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid of the prawns were significantly lower when fed the CPO-based diets.  Lower growth of M. rosenbergii fed the CPO-based diets may be related to less favorable fatty acid ratios and/ or lowered digestibility but higher dietary CPO can help mitigate this. 

  20. Neuraminidase inhibition of Dietary chlorogenic acids and derivatives - potential antivirals from dietary sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamaleldin Elsadig Karar, Mohamed; Matei, Marius-Febi; Jaiswal, Rakesh; Illenberger, Susanne; Kuhnert, Nikolai

    2016-04-01

    Plants rich in chlorogenic acids (CGAs), caffeic acids and their derivatives have been found to exert antiviral effects against influenza virus neuroaminidase. In this study several dietary naturally occurring chlorogenic acids, phenolic acids and derivatives were screened for their inhibitory activity against neuroaminidases (NAs) from C. perfringens, H5N1 and recombinant H5N1 (N-His)-Tag using a fluorometric assay. There was no significant difference in inhibition between the different NA enzymes. The enzyme inhibition results indicated that chlorogenic acids and selected derivatives, exhibited high activities against NAs. It seems that the catechol group from caffeic acid was important for the activity. Dietary CGA therefore show promise as potential antiviral agents. However, caffeoyl quinic acids show low bioavailibility and are intensly metabolized by the gut micro flora, only low nM concentrations are observed in plasma and urine, therefore a systemic antiviral effect of these compounds is unlikely. Nevertheless, gut floral metabolites with a catechol moiety or structurally related dietary phenolics with a catechol moiety might serve as interesting compounds for future investigations.

  1. 隐甲藻深层培养产生二十碳五烯酸的研究%Studies on Eicosapentaenoic Acid Production by Submersion Culture of Cryphecodinium cohnii

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨革; 徐承水

    2001-01-01

    @@ 二十碳五烯酸( C20 : 5, Eicosapentaenoic acid,简称EPA)是一种重要的ω-3系列人体必需多不饱和脂肪酸( Polyun-saturated fatty acids,PUFA)[1~2].自从Dyerberge等人报道了二十碳五烯酸对防止和治疗血栓、关节硬化、抗炎症、抗癌、促进脑组织发育等方面具有明显效果以来,人们对它的营养和医药价值及生产方法进行了广泛的研究[3~6].目前,二十碳五烯酸主要来源于深海鱼油,但其产量不稳定,纯化工艺复杂且含有难以消除的鱼腥味,难以满足市场的需求.

  2. Dietary fatty acids and cardiovascular disease risk in observational studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Praagman, Jaike

    2017-01-01

    Dietary fat is a valuable component of the diet and essential for the human body. Over time it has become clear that certain types of fat(ty acids) are also potentially harmful for our health. For example, we know from intervention studies that saturated fat and trans-fat have unfavourable effects

  3. Dietary acid load and risk of hypertension : the Rotterdam Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engberink, Marielle F.; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Brink, Elizabeth J.; van Baak, Marleen A.; van Rooij, Frank J. A.; Hofman, Albert; Witteman, Jacqueline C. M.; Geleijnse, Johanna M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Mild metabolic acidosis, which can be caused by diet, may result in elevated blood pressure (BP). Objective: The objective was to examine whether dietary acid load was associated with incident hypertension in a cohort of older Dutch adults from the Rotterdam Study. Design: The analyses i

  4. Dietary acid load and risk of hypertension: The Rotterdam study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.F. Engberink (Marielle); S.J.L. Bakker (Stephan); E.J. Brink (Elizabeth); M.A. van Baak (Marleen); F.J.A. van Rooij (Frank); A. Hofman (Albert); J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline); J.M. Geleijnse (Marianne)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Mild metabolic acidosis, which can be caused by diet, may result in elevated blood pressure (BP). Objective: The objective was to examine whether dietary acid load was associated with incident hypertension in a cohort of older Dutch adults from the Rotterdam Study. Design: Th

  5. Dietary acid load and risk of hypertension: The Rotterdam study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engberink, M.F.; Bakker, S.J.L.; Brink, E.J.; Baak, M.A. van; Rooij, F.J.A. van; Hofman, A.; Witteman, J.C.M.; Geleijnse, J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Mild metabolic acidosis, which can be caused by diet, may result in elevated blood pressure (BP). Objective: The objective was to examine whether dietary acid load was associated with incident hypertension in a cohort of older Dutch adults from the Rotterdam Study. Design: The analyses i

  6. Dietary acid load and risk of hypertension : the Rotterdam Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engberink, Marielle F.; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Brink, Elizabeth J.; van Baak, Marleen A.; van Rooij, Frank J. A.; Hofman, Albert; Witteman, Jacqueline C. M.; Geleijnse, Johanna M.

    Background: Mild metabolic acidosis, which can be caused by diet, may result in elevated blood pressure (BP). Objective: The objective was to examine whether dietary acid load was associated with incident hypertension in a cohort of older Dutch adults from the Rotterdam Study. Design: The analyses

  7. Dietary intakes and food sources of fat and fatty acids in Guatemalan schoolchildren: A cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doak Colleen

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Consumption of healthy diets that contribute with adequate amounts of fat and fatty acids is needed for children. Among Guatemalan children, there is little information about fat intakes. Therefore, the present study sought to assess intakes of dietary fats and examine food sources of those fats in Guatemalan children. Methods The study subjects consisted of a convenience sample of 449 third- and fourth-grade schoolchildren (8-10 y, attending public or private schools in Quetzaltenango City, Guatemala. Dietary data was obtained by means of a single pictorial 24-h record. Results The percentages of total energy (%E from total fat, saturated fat (SFA and monounsaturated fat (MUFA reached 29%E for total fat and 10%E for each SFA and MUFA, without gender differences. %E from fats in high vs. low-socio economic status (SES children were significantly higher for boys, but not for girls, for total fat (p = 0.002 and SFA (p 97% of all groups consuming less than 1%E from this fats. Fried eggs, sweet rolls, whole milk and cheese were main sources of total fat and, SFA. Whole milk and sweet bread were important sources of n-3 FA for high- and low-SES boys and girls, respectively. Fried plantain was the main source of n-3 FA for girls in the high-SES group. Fried fish, seafood soup, and shrimp, consumed only by boys in low amounts, were sources of eicosapentaenoic (EPA and docosahexaenoic (DHA acids, which may explain the low intakes of these nutrients. Conclusions α-linolenic acid, EPA and DHA were the most limiting fatty acids in diets of Guatemalan schoolchildren, which could be partially explained by the low consumption of sources of these nutrients, particularly fish and seafood (for EPA and DHA. This population will benefit from a higher consumption of culturally acceptable foods that are rich in these limiting nutrients.

  8. Dietary monounsaturated fatty acids intake and risk of skin photoaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Latreille

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Intake of monounsaturated fatty acids has been reported to reduce oxidative stress, insulin resistance and related inflammatory processes and may thus protect from skin photoaging. The objective of this study was to investigate the association between the risk of photoaging, monounsaturated fatty acids intake and the sources of monounsaturated fatty acids. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A cross sectional study was conducted within the framework of the SUVIMAX cohort. The survey included 1264 women and 1655 men aged between 45 and 60 years old. Dietary monounsaturated fatty acids intakes were estimated by dietary source through at least ten 24-h diet records completed during the first 2.5 years of the follow-up period. Severity of facial skin photoaging was graded by trained investigators at baseline during a clinical examination using a 6-grade scale illustrated by photographs. A lower risk of severe photoaging was associated with higher intakes of monounsaturated fatty acids from olive oil in both sexes. Strikingly, no association was found with intake of monounsaturated fatty acids from animal sources whether from dairy products, meat or processed meat. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings support the beneficial effect of dietary olive oil or healthy diet habits associated with olive oil consumption on the severity of facial photoaging.

  9. Dietary fatty acids affecting hepatic metabolism and atherosclerosis - mechanisms unravelled using a proteomics approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez Gutierrez, G.; Roos, B. de

    2009-07-01

    Dietary fatty acids play an important role in the aetiology of coronary heart disease. The effects of dietary fatty acids on lipoprotein metabolism are well described, but additional or alternative mechanisms relating to potential influence on coronary heart disease are not known. This review describes how proteomics techniques have been used to identify proteins that are differentially regulated by dietary fatty acids. Such proteins may reveal pathways by which dietary fatty acids influence disease risk. (Author) 40 refs.

  10. Dietary omega-3 fatty acid intake and cardiovascular risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psota, Tricia L; Gebauer, Sarah K; Kris-Etherton, Penny

    2006-08-21

    Dietary omega-3 fatty acids decrease the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Both epidemiologic and interventional studies have demonstrated beneficial effects of omega-3 fatty acids on many CVD end points, including all CVD (defined as all coronary artery disease [CAD], fatal and nonfatal myocardial infarction [MI], and stroke combined), all CAD, fatal and nonfatal MI, stroke, sudden cardiac death, and all-cause mortality. Much of the evidence comes from studies with fish oil and fish; to a lesser extent, data relate to plant-derived omega-3 fatty acids. Cardioprotective benefits have been observed with daily consumption of as little as 25 to 57 g (approximately 1 to 2 oz) of fish high in omega-3 fatty acids, an intake equivalent to >or=1 fish meal weekly or even monthly, with greater intakes decreasing risk further in a dose-dependent manner, up to about 5 servings per week. Fish, including farm-raised fish and their wild counterparts, are the major dietary sources of the longer-chain omega-3 fatty acids. Sources of plant-derived omega-3 fatty acids include flaxseed, flaxseed oil, walnuts, canola oil, and soybean oil. Because of the remarkable cardioprotective effects of omega-3 fatty acids, consumption of food sources that provide omega-3 fatty acids--especially the longer-chain fatty acids (>or=20 carbons) from marine sources--should be increased in the diet to decrease CVD risk significantly.

  11. Effects of dietary fatty acids on the production and quality of eggs and larvae of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua L.)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røjbek, Maria; Støttrup, Josianne; Jacobsen, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    Cultivated Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) entering their first year of gamete maturation were fed diets with different levels of arachidonic acid (ARA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) for 6.5 months prior to commencement of spawning. Gravid females were stripped three times: at the beginning, peak...

  12. Glutamic Acid – the Main Dietary Amino Acid – and Blood Pressure: The INTERMAP Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamler, Jeremiah; Brown, Ian J; Daviglus, Martha L; Chan, Queenie; Kesteloot, Hugo; Ueshima, Hirotsugu; Zhao, Liancheng; Elliott, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Background Data are available indicating an independent inverse relationship of dietary vegetable protein to the blood pressure (BP) of individuals. Here we assess whether BP is associated with glutamic acid intake (the predominant dietary amino acid, especially in vegetable protein) and with each of four other amino acids higher relatively in vegetable than animal protein (proline, phenylalanine, serine, cystine). Methods and Results Cross-sectional epidemiological study; 4,680 persons ages 40–59 -- 17 random population samples in China, Japan, U.K., U.S.A.; BP measurement 8 times at 4 visits; dietary data (83 nutrients, 18 amino acids) from 4 standardized multi-pass 24-hour dietary recalls and 2 timed 24-hour urine collections. Dietary glutamic acid (percent of total protein intake) was inversely related to BP. Across multivariate regression models (Model 1 controlled for age, gender, sample, through Model 5 controlled for 16 non-nutrient and nutrient possible confounders) estimated average BP differences associated with glutamic acid intake higher by 4.72% total dietary protein (2 s.d.) were −1.5 to −3.0 mm Hg systolic and −1.0 to −1.6 mm Hg diastolic (Z-values −2.15 to −5.11). Results were similar for the glutamic acid-BP relationship with each other amino acid also in the model, e.g., with control for 15 variables plus proline, systolic/diastolic pressure differences −2.7/−2.0 (Z −2.51, −2.82). In these 2-amino acid models, higher intake (2 s.d.) of each other amino acid was associated with small BP differences and Z-values. Conclusions Dietary glutamic acid may have independent BP lowering effects, possibly contributing to the inverse relation of vegetable protein to BP. PMID:19581495

  13. Metabolomics of dietary fatty acid restriction in patients with phenylketonuria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrike Mütze

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Patients with phenylketonuria (PKU have to follow a lifelong phenylalanine restricted diet. This type of diet markedly reduces the intake of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids especially long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFA. Long-chain saturated fatty acids are substrates of mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation for acetyl-CoA production. LC-PUFA are discussed to affect inflammatory and haemostaseological processes in health and disease. The influence of the long term PKU diet on fatty acid metabolism with a special focus on platelet eicosanoid metabolism has been investigated in the study presented here. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: 12 children with PKU under good metabolic control and 8 healthy controls were included. Activated fatty acids (acylcarnitines C6-C18 in dried blood and the cholesterol metabolism in serum were analyzed by liquid chromatographic tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS. Fatty acid composition of plasma glycerophospholipids was determined by gas chromatography. LC-PUFA metabolites were analyzed in supernatants by LC-MS/MS before and after platelet activation and aggregation using a standardized protocol. Patients with PKU had significantly lower free carnitine and lower activated fatty acids in dried blood compared to controls. Phytosterols as marker of cholesterol (re- absorption were not influenced by the dietary fatty acid restriction. Fatty acid composition in glycerophospholipids was comparable to that of healthy controls. However, patients with PKU showed significantly increased concentrations of y-linolenic acid (C18:3n-6 a precursor of arachidonic acid. In the PKU patients significantly higher platelet counts were observed. After activation with collagen platelet aggregation and thromboxane B(2 and thromboxane B(3 release did not differ from that of healthy controls. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Long-term dietary fatty acid restriction influenced the intermediates of mitochondrial beta

  14. Modulatory Effects of Dietary Amino Acids on Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajagopal, Senthilkumar; Sangam, Supraj Raja; Singh, Shubham; Joginapally, Venkateswara Rao

    2016-01-01

    Proteins are playing a vital role in maintaining the cellular integrity and function, as well as for brain cells. Protein intake and supplementation of individual amino acids can affect the brain functioning and mental health, and many of the neurotransmitters in the brain are made from amino acids. The amino acid supplementation has been found to reduce symptoms, as they are converted into neurotransmitters which in turn extenuate the mental disorders. The biosynthesis of amino acids in the brain is regulated by the concentration of amino acids in plasma. The brain diseases such as depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and Alzheimer's (AD), Parkinson's (PD), and Huntington's diseases (HD) are the most common mental disorders that are currently widespread in numerous countries. The intricate biochemical and molecular machinery contributing to the neurological disorders is still unknown, and in this chapter, we revealed the involvement of dietary amino acids on neurological diseases.

  15. Dietary trans-fatty acids and metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdzisław Kochan

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Trans-fatty acids (TFAs, products of partial hydrogenation of vegetable oils, have become more prevalent in our diet since the 1960s, when they replaced animal fats. TFAs also occur naturally in meat and dairy products from ruminants. There is growing evidence that dietary trans-fatty acids may increase the risk of metabolic syndrome. Several studies have demonstrated adverse effects of TFAs on plasma lipids and lipoproteins. In dietary trials, trans-fatty acids have been shown to raise the total cholesterol/HDL cholesterol ratio and Lp(a levels in blood. Moreover, a high intake of TFAs has been associated with an increased risk of coronary heart disease. Prospective cohort studies have shown that dietary trans-fatty acids promote abdominal obesity and weight gain. In addition, it appears that TFA consumption may be associated with the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. The documented adverse health effects of TFAs emphasise the importance of efforts to reduce the content of partially hydrogenated vegetable oils in foods.

  16. Production of highly unsaturated fatty acids using agro-processing by-products

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Jacobs, A

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available ) such as eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) are essential to regulate the immune, cardiovascular, digestive and neurological systems in mammals. These fatty acids have to be included in mammal and fish diets. The main aim dietary source of HUFA is marine fish oil...

  17. Dietary preferences of weaned piglets offered diets containing organic acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. PARTANEN

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available A preference test and a performance trial were carried out to examine weaned piglets’ feed intake response to diets containing either lactic acid,formic acid,calcium formate,or sodium benzoate (8 g kg-1 feed.In Experiment 1, throughout a 21-d post-weaning period,30 entire litters (306 piglets weaned at the age of 30 d were allowed to choose between two organic-acid-supplemented diets. All of the four different organic-acid-supplemented diets were tested in pairs against each other,and the six possible combinations were lactic acid +formic acid,lactic acid +calcium formate,lactic acid + sodium benzoate,formic acid +calcium formate,formic acid +sodium benzoate,and calcium for-mate +sodium benzoate.Piglets preferred diets supplemented with sodium benzoate to ones supplemented with formic acid or calcium formate.The acceptability of diets supplemented with lactic acid,formic acid,or calcium formate was similar.In Experiment 2,until the age of 58 d,60 piglets from 10 litters weaned at the age of 28 or 38 d were fed non-acidified diets or ones supplemented with lactic acid,formic acid,calcium formate,or sodium benzoate.Feed consumption did not differ between piglets fed non-acidified and those fed organic-acid-supplemented diets. Growth performance was reduced by dietary calcium formate supplementation, while the performance of piglets fed other organic-acid-supplemented diets did not differ significantly from those fed the non-acidified control diet.The frequency of post-weaning diarrhoea was highest in piglets fed diets supplemented with calcium formate and lowest in piglets fed diets supplemented with formic acid.;

  18. Histone Deacetylase Inhibition and Dietary Short-Chain Fatty Acids

    OpenAIRE

    Licciardi, Paul V.; Ververis, Katherine; Karagiannis, Tom C.

    2011-01-01

    Changes in diet can also have dramatic effects on the composition of gut microbiota. Commensal bacteria of the gastrointestinal tract are critical regulators of health and disease by protecting against pathogen encounter whilst also maintaining immune tolerance to certain allergens. Moreover, consumption of fibre and vegetables typical of a non-Western diet generates substantial quantities of short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) which have potent anti-inflammatory properties. Dietary interventions...

  19. Supplementation with Eicosapentaenoic Omega-3 Fatty Acid Does Not Influence Serum Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor in Diabetes Mellitus Patients with Major Depression : A Randomized Controlled Pilot Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bot, Mariska; Pouwer, Francois; Assies, Johanna; Jansen, Eugene H. J. M.; Beekman, Aartjan T. F.; de Jonge, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Background: Low brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels are observed in both depressed and diabetes patients. Animal research has shown that omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids increase BDNF levels. In this exploratory randomized double-blind placebo-controlled study in diabetes patients wit

  20. Dietary arachidonic acid in perinatal nutrition: a commentary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauritzen, Lotte; Fewtrell, Mary; Agostoni, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Arachidonic acid (AA) is supplied together with docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) in infant formulas, but we have limited knowledge about the effects of supplementation with either of these long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) on growth and developmental outcomes. AA is present in similar levels in breast milk throughout the world, whereas the level of DHA is highly diet dependent. Autopsy studies show similar diet-dependent variation in brain DHA, whereas AA is little affected by intake. Early intake of DHA has been shown to affect visual development, but the effect of LCPUFA on neurodevelopment remains to be established. Few studies have found any functional difference between infants supplemented with DHA alone compared to DHA+AA, but some studies show neurodevelopmental advantages in breast-fed infants of mothers supplemented with n-3 LCPUFA alone. It also remains to be established whether the AA/DHA balance could affect allergic and inflammatory outcomes later in life. Disentangling effects of genetic variability and dietary intake on AA and DHA-status and on functional outcomes may be an important step in the process of determining whether AA-intake is of any physiological or clinical importance. However, based on the current evidence we hypothesize that dietary AA plays a minor role on growth and development relative to the impact of dietary DHA.

  1. Supplementation with eicosapentaenoic omega-3 fatty acid does not influence serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor in diabetes mellitus patients with major depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bot, Mariska; Pouwer, Francois; Assies, Johanna

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Low brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels are observed in both depressed and diabetes patients. Animal research has shown that omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids increase BDNF levels. In this exploratory randomized double-blind placebo-controlled study in diabetes patients...... severity were not significantly associated (Spearman's ρ = -0.115, p = 0.593). CONCLUSION: Our study does not provide evidence that supplementation with E-EPA improves BDNF levels in depressed diabetes patients already using antidepressants....

  2. Dietary supplementation of polyunsaturated fatty acids in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deline, Marshall L; Vrablik, Tracy L; Watts, Jennifer L

    2013-11-29

    Fatty acids are essential for numerous cellular functions. They serve as efficient energy storage molecules, make up the hydrophobic core of membranes, and participate in various signaling pathways. Caenorhabditis elegans synthesizes all of the enzymes necessary to produce a range of omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids. This, combined with the simple anatomy and range of available genetic tools, make it an attractive model to study fatty acid function. In order to investigate the genetic pathways that mediate the physiological effects of dietary fatty acids, we have developed a method to supplement the C. elegans diet with unsaturated fatty acids. Supplementation is an effective means to alter the fatty acid composition of worms and can also be used to rescue defects in fatty acid-deficient mutants. Our method uses nematode growth medium agar (NGM) supplemented with fatty acid sodium salts. The fatty acids in the supplemented plates become incorporated into the membranes of the bacterial food source, which is then taken up by the C. elegans that feed on the supplemented bacteria. We also describe a gas chromatography protocol to monitor the changes in fatty acid composition that occur in supplemented worms. This is an efficient way to supplement the diets of both large and small populations of C. elegans, allowing for a range of applications for this method.

  3. Higher Dietary Acidity is Associated with Lower Bone Mineral Density in Postmenopausal Iranian Women, Independent of Dietary Calcium Intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shariati-Bafghi, Seyedeh-Elaheh; Nosrat-Mirshekarlou, Elaheh; Karamati, Mohsen; Rashidkhani, Bahram

    2014-01-01

    Findings of studies on the link between dietary acid-base balance and bone mass are relatively mixed. We examined the association between dietary acid-base balance and bone mineral density (BMD) in a sample of Iranian women, hypothesizing that a higher dietary acidity would be inversely associated with BMD, even when dietary calcium intake is adequate. In this cross-sectional study, lumbar spine and femoral neck BMDs of 151 postmenopausal women aged 50-85 years were measured using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Dietary intakes were assessed using a validated food frequency questionnaire. Renal net acid excretion (RNAE), an estimate of acid-base balance, was then calculated indirectly from the diet using the formulae of Remer (based on dietary intakes of protein, phosphorus, potassium, and magnesium; RNAERemer) and Frassetto (based on dietary intakes of protein and potassium; RNAEFrassetto), and was energy adjusted by the residual method. After adjusting for potential confounders, multivariable adjusted means of the lumbar spine BMD of women in the highest tertiles of RNAERemer and RNAEFrassetto were significantly lower than those in the lowest tertiles (for RNAERemer: mean difference -0.084 g/cm2; P=0.007 and for RNAEFrassetto: mean difference -0.088 g/cm2; P=0.004). Similar results were observed in a subgroup analysis of subjects with dietary calcium intake of >800 mg/day. In conclusion, a higher RNAE (i. e. more dietary acidity), which is associated with greater intake of acid-generating foods and lower intake of alkali-generating foods, may be involved in deteriorating the bone health of postmenopausal Iranian women, even in the context of adequate dietary calcium intake.

  4. DIETARY ADENINE ALLEVIATES FATTY LIVER INDUCED BY OROTIC ACID

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yohanes Buang

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The effects of dietary adenine in fatty liver induced by orotic acid (OA were studied. Rats were paired-fed 1% OA-supplemented diets with/or without 0.25% adenine or a diet without OA for 10 days. Serum lipid profiles were measured using enzyme assay kits. Lipids of liver tissues were extracted and liver lipid contents were determined. A peach of liver was prepared to determine the activities of fatty acid synthase (FAS and fatty acid β-oxidation. The results showed that liver TG content of OA-fed rats increased markedly in comparison to basal group.  However, the addition of adenine to the diet reversed promotion of liver TG content to basal level. It was also found that FAS activities decreased. Furthermore, these diets reversed the inhibition of fatty acid β-oxidation to basal level and induced the serum lipid levels secretion. Therefore, the alleviation of fatty liver in OA-treated rats given dietary adenine is associated with the inhibition of FAS activities accompanied with the promotion of mitochondrial fatty acid β-oxidation and the promotion of serum lipid secretion from the hepatic tissue into the bloodstream.

  5. Short-term supplementation of low-dose gamma-linolenic acid (GLA), alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), or GLA plus ALA does not augment LCP omega 3 status of Dutch vegans to an appreciable extent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fokkema, M R; Brouwer, D A; Hasperhoven, M B; Martini, I A; Muskiet, F A

    2000-01-01

    Vegans do not consume meat and fish and have therefore low intakes of long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCP). They may consequently have little negative feedback inhibition from dietary LCP on conversion of alpha -linolenic acid (ALA) to the LCP omega 3 eicosapentaenoic (EPA) and docosahexaeno

  6. Short-term supplementation of low-dose gamma-linolenic acid (GLA), alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), or GLA plus ALA does not augment LCP omega 3 status of Dutch vegans to an appreciable extent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fokkema, M R; Brouwer, D A; Hasperhoven, M B; Martini, I A; Muskiet, F A

    2000-01-01

    Vegans do not consume meat and fish and have therefore low intakes of long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCP). They may consequently have little negative feedback inhibition from dietary LCP on conversion of alpha -linolenic acid (ALA) to the LCP omega 3 eicosapentaenoic (EPA) and

  7. Effects of dietary n-3 highly unsaturated fatty acids (HUFAs) on growth, fatty acid profiles, antioxidant capacity and immunity of sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus (Selenka).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Haibo; Gao, Qinfeng; Dong, Shuanglin; Zhou, Jishu; Ye, Zhi; Lan, Ying

    2016-07-01

    The present study was conducted to understand the effects of dietary n-3 highly unsaturated fatty acids (HUFAs) on growth, fatty acid profiles, antioxidant capacity and the immunity of sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus (Selenka). Five experimental diets were prepared, containing graded levels of n-3 HUFAs (0.46%, 0.85%, 1.25%, 1.61% and 1.95%, respectively), and the 0.46% group was used as control group. The specific growth rates, fatty acid profiles, activities and gene expression of antioxidative enzymes and lysozyme of the sea cucumbers that were fed with the 5 experimental diets were determined. The results showed that the specific growth rate of sea cucumbers in all the treatment groups significantly increased compared to the control group (P sea cucumbers. The contents of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA; 20:5n-3) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 22:6n-3) in the body wall of the sea cucumbers gradually increased with the increasing levels of n-3 HUFAs in the diets. The suitable supplement of n-3 HUFAs in diets improved the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) of sea cucumbers by up-regulating the expression of SOD and CAT mRNA in sea cucumbers. However, excess n-3 HUFAs in diets caused lipid peroxidation, inhibited the expression of lysozyme (LSZ) mRNA and decreased the activities of LSZ in sea cucumbers. In summary, the suitable supplement levels of n-3 HUFAs in diets of sea cucumbers A. japonicus were estimated between 0.85% and 1.25% considering the growth performance, cost and the indicators of antioxidant capacity and immunity.

  8. Raisin dietary fiber composition and in vitro bile acid binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camire, Mary E; Dougherty, Michael P

    2003-01-29

    Raisins are dried grapes that are popular shelf-stable snacks. Three commercially important types of raisins were studied: sun-dried (natural), artificially dried (dipped), and sulfur dioxide-treated (golden) raisins. Dietary fiber composition was analyzed by AACC method 32-25. Polysaccharides were hydrolyzed, and the resulting sugars were analyzed by colorimetric and gas chomatographic methods. Fructans were measured with a colorimetric kit assay. Total dietary fiber values agreed with published values, with pectins and neutral polysaccharides of mannose and glucose residues predominating. Dipped raisins had over 8% fructans. No fructans were found in fresh grapes. Raisin types varied in their ability to bind bile acids in vitro. Coarsely chopped raisins bound more bile than did finely chopped or whole raisins.

  9. Effect of eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acid on resting and exercise-induced inflammatory and oxidative stress biomarkers: a randomized, placebo controlled, cross-over study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galpin Andrew J

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of the present investigation was to determine the effects of EPA/DHA supplementation on resting and exercise-induced inflammation and oxidative stress in exercise-trained men. Fourteen men supplemented with 2224 mg EPA+2208 mg DHA and a placebo for 6 weeks in a random order, double blind cross-over design (with an 8 week washout prior to performing a 60 minute treadmill climb using a weighted pack. Blood was collected pre and post exercise and analyzed for a variety of oxidative stress and inflammatory biomarkers. Blood lactate, muscle soreness, and creatine kinase activity were also measured. Results Treatment with EPA/DHA resulted in a significant increase in blood levels of both EPA (18 ± 2 μmol·L-1 vs. 143 ± 23 μmol·L-1; p -1 vs. 157 ± 13 μmol·L-1; p 0.05. There was a mild increase in oxidative stress in response to exercise (XO and H2O2 (p Conclusion EPA/DHA supplementation increases blood levels of these fatty acids and results in decreased resting levels of inflammatory biomarkers in exercise-trained men, but does not appear necessary for exercise-induced attenuation in either inflammation or oxidative stress. This may be due to the finding that trained men exhibit a minimal increase in both inflammation and oxidative stress in response to moderate duration (60 minute aerobic exercise.

  10. Induction of lipid oxidation by polyunsaturated fatty acids of marine origin in small intestine of mice fed a high-fat diet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schothorst, van E.M.; Flachs, P.; Franssen-Hal, van N.L.W.; Kuda, O.; Bunschoten, A.; Molthoff, J.W.; Vink, C.; Hooiveld, G.J.E.J.; Kopecky, J.; Keijer, J.

    2009-01-01

    Background. Dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), in particular the long chain marine fatty acids docosahexaenoic (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic (EPA), are linked to many health benefits in humans and in animal models. Little is known of the molecular response to DHA and EPA of the small intestine

  11. Scientific Opinion on Dietary Reference Values for pantothenic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Following a request from the European Commission, the Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA derived Dietary Reference Values (DRVs for pantothenic acid. Pantothenic acid is a water-soluble vitamin, which is a component of coenzyme A (CoA and acyl-carrier proteins. Pantothenic acid is ubiquitous and deficiency is rare. There are no suitable biomarkers that can be used to derive the requirement for pantothenic acid. Data available on pantothenic acid intakes and health consequences are very limited and cannot be used to derive DRVs for pantothenic acid. As there is insufficient evidence available to derive an Average Requirement and a Population Reference Intake, an Adequate Intake (AI is proposed. The setting of AIs is based on observed pantothenic acid intakes with a mixed diet and the apparent absence of signs of deficiency in the EU, suggesting that current intake levels are adequate. The AI for adults is set at 5 mg/day. The AI for adults also applies to pregnant women. For lactating women, an AI of 7 mg/day is proposed, to compensate for pantothenic acid losses through breast milk. For infants over six months, an AI of 3 mg/day is proposed by extrapolating from the pantothenic acid intake of exclusively breast-fed infants aged zero to six months, using allometric scaling and reference body weight for each age group, in order to account for the role of pantothenic acid in energy metabolism. The AI for children and adolescents is set at 4 and 5 mg/day, respectively, based on observed intakes in the EU.

  12. Topical Formulation Comprising Fatty Acid Extract from Cod Liver Oil: Development, Evaluation and Stability Studies

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a pharmaceutical formulation containing fatty acid extract rich in free omega-3 fatty acids such as eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid for topical use. Although the health benefits of cod liver oil and other fish oils taken orally as a dietary supplement have been acknowledged and exploited, it is clear that their use can be extended further to cover their antibacterial properties. In vitro evaluation showed that 20% (v/v) fatty acid extrac...

  13. Evaluación de la eficacia de un suplemento oral en polvo enriquecido con ácido eicosapentaenoico en un grupo de pacientes con cáncer Efficacy evaluation of an oral powder supplement enriched with eicosapentaenoic acid in cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Gómez-Candela

    2011-12-01

    a month a bonus of 600 kcal/ day to their regular diet with an oral powder supplement enriched with eicosapentaenoic acid (1.5 g (RSI or with a standard liquid supplement (RE. The following data were collected at baseline and after one month: the Patient-Generated Subjective Global Assessment (pg-SGA, anthropometric measurements (skin folds, circumferences and bioimpedance, dietary parameters (3-day food record, biochemical and inflammatory parameters (basic biochemistry, cytokines, prealbumin and Reactive C Protein. Quality of life was evaluated using the SF-36 questionnaire. At the end, scales were used to asses sensory perception, tolerance and satiety induced by the products and motivation to eat. Results: 40 patients completed the study. After intervention, anthropometric parameters do not change and prealbumin values increased significantly in both groups (RSI 16.11 ± 5.66 mg/dl vs. 19.81 ± 6.75 mg/dl p < 0.05 and RE 6.13 ± 16.55 mg/dl vs. 19.03 ± 5.47 mg / dl p < 0.05. RSI group significantly decreased interferon gamma (INF-γ values (0.99 ± 0.95 vs. 0.65 ± 0.92 pg/ml, p < 0.05. In contrast, RE group increased INF-γ after intervention (1.62 ± 1 27 vs. 2.2 ± 3.19 pg/ml, p < 0.05. There were no significant differences in hunger, appetite, satiety and intake capacity in both groups. The SF-36 scores improved in both groups. Conclusions: Supplementation based on an oral powder formula enriched with 1.5g EPA during one month in cancer patients improved certain inflammatory parameters. This product may be a novel and valuable option to be added to the nutritional intervention strategies used for cancer patients.

  14. Dietary non-esterified oleic Acid decreases the jejunal levels of anorectic N-acylethanolamines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diep, Thi Ai; Madsen, Andreas N; Krogh-Hansen, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    mice respond to dietary fat (olive oil) by reducing levels of anorectic NAEs, and 3) whether dietary non-esterified oleic acid also can decrease levels of anorectic NAEs in mice. We are searching for the fat sensor in the intestine, which mediates the decreased levels of anorectic NAEs. METHODS: Male...... of anorectic NAEs in mice. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that the down-regulation of the jejunal level of anorectic NAEs by dietary fat is not restricted to rats, and that the fatty acid component oleic acid, in dietary olive oil may be sufficient to mediate this regulation. Thus, a fatty acid sensor may...

  15. Dietary non-esterified oleic Acid decreases the jejunal levels of anorectic N-acylethanolamines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diep, Thi Ai; Madsen, Andreas N; Krogh-Hansen, Sandra;

    2014-01-01

    mice respond to dietary fat (olive oil) by reducing levels of anorectic NAEs, and 3) whether dietary non-esterified oleic acid also can decrease levels of anorectic NAEs in mice. We are searching for the fat sensor in the intestine, which mediates the decreased levels of anorectic NAEs. METHODS: Male...... of anorectic NAEs in mice. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that the down-regulation of the jejunal level of anorectic NAEs by dietary fat is not restricted to rats, and that the fatty acid component oleic acid, in dietary olive oil may be sufficient to mediate this regulation. Thus, a fatty acid sensor may...

  16. The effect of dietary fat level and quality on plasma lipoprotein lipids and plasma fatty acids in normocholesterolemic subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, K; Johnson, L; O'Dea, K; Sinclair, A J

    1994-02-01

    This study examined the effect on the plasma lipids and plasma phospholipid and cholesteryl ester fatty acids of changing froma typical western diet to a very low fat (VLF) vegetarian diet containing one egg/day. The effect of the addition of saturated, monounsaturated or polyunsaturated fat (PUFA) to the VLF diet was also examined. Three groups of 10 subjects (6 women, 4 men) were fed the VLF diet (10% energy as fat) for two weeks, and then in the next two weeks the dietary fat in each group was increased by 10% energy/week using butter, olive oil or safflower oil. The fat replaced dietary carbohydrate. The VLF diet reduced both the low density lipoprotein (LDL)- and high density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol levels; addition of the monounsaturated fats and PUFA increased the HDL-cholesterol levels, whereas butter increased the cholesterol levels in both the LDL- and HDL-fractions. The VLF diet led to significant reductions in the proportion of linoleic acid (18:2 omega 6) and eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5 omega 3) and to increases in palmitoleic (16:1), eicosatrienoic (20:3 omega 6) and arachidonic acids (20:4 omega 6) in both phospholipids and cholesteryl esters. Addition of butter reversed the changes seen on the VLF diet, with the exception of 16:1, which remained elevated. Addition of olive oil resulted in a significant rise in the proportion of 18:1 and significant decreases in all omega 3 PUFA except 22:6 compared with the usual diet. The addition of safflower oil resulted in significant increases in 18:2 and 20:4 omega 6 and significant decreases in 18:1, 20:5 omega 3 and 22:5 omega 3. These results indicate that the reduction of saturated fat content of the diet (unsaturated fat, reduced the total plasma cholesterol levels by approximately 12% in normocholesterolemic subjects. Although the VLF vegetarian diet reduced both LDL- and HDL-cholesterol levels, the long-term effects of VLF diets are unlikely to be deleterious since populations which habitually

  17. Screening and identification of dietary oils and unsaturated fatty acids in inhibiting inflammatory prostaglandin E2 signaling in fat stromal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruan Diana

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The molecular mechanisms of dietary oils (such as fish oil and unsaturated fatty acids, which are widely used by the public for anti-inflammation and vascular protection, have not been settled yet. In this study, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2-mediated calcium signaling was used to screen dietary oils and eight unsaturated fatty acids for identification of their anti-inflammatory mechanisms. Isolated fat/stromal cells expressing endogenous PGE2 receptors and an HEK293 cell line specifically expressing the recombinant human PGE2 receptor subtype-1 (EP1 were cultured and used in live cell calcium signaling assays. The different dietary oils and unsaturated fatty acids were used to affect cell signaling under the specific stimulation of a pathological amount of inflammatory PGE2. Results It was identified that fish oil best inhibited the PGE2 signaling in the primary cultured stromal cells. Second, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, found in abundance in fish oil, was identified as a key factor of inhibition of PGE2 signaling. Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, another major fatty acid found in fish oil and tested in this study was found to have small effect on EP1 signaling. The study suggested one of the four PGE2 subtype receptors, EP1 as the key target for the fish oil and DHA target. These findings were further confirmed by using the recombinant EP1 expressed in HEK293 cells as a target. Conclusion This study demonstrated the new mechanism behind the positive effects of dietary fish oils in inhibiting inflammation originates from the rich concentration of DHA, which can directly inhibit the inflammatory EP1-mediated PGE2 receptor signaling, and that the inflammatory response stimulated by PGE2 in the fat stromal cells, which directly related to metabolic diseases, could be down regulated by fish oil and DHA. These findings also provided direct evidence to support the use of dietary oils and unsaturated fatty acids for protection against heart

  18. Dietary fatty acids and the stress response of fish : arachidonic acid in seabream and tilapia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anholt, Rogier Daniël van

    2004-01-01

    A key factor in the production of fish in commercial aquaculture is the optimization of the artificial diets, not only to achieve optimal growth, but also to maximize fish health. Evidence is accumulating that dietary lipids, particularly the fatty acid composition, can have a direct effect on the f

  19. Relationship of estimated dietary intake of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids from fish with peripheral nerve function after adjusting for mercury exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi; Goodrich, Jaclyn M.; Werner, Robert; Gillespie, Brenda; Basu, Niladri; Franzblau, Alfred

    2013-01-01

    Background Some clinical studies have suggested that ingestion of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) has neuroprotective effects on peripheral nerve function. However, few epidemiological studies have examined the effect of dietary n-3 PUFA intake from fish consumption on peripheral nerve function, and none have controlled for co-occurrence of methylmercury exposure from fish consumption. Objectives We evaluated the effect of estimated dietary n-3 PUFA intake on peripheral nerve function after adjusting for biomarkers of methylmercury and elemental mercury in a convenience sample of 515 dental professionals. Methods We measured sensory nerve conduction (peak latency and amplitude) of the median, ulnar and sural nerves and total mercury concentrations in hair and urine samples. We estimated daily intake (mg/day) of the total n-3 PUFA, n-3 docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and n-3 eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) based on a self-administrated fish consumption frequency questionnaire. We also collected information on mercury exposure, demographics and other covariates. Results The estimated median intakes of total n-3 PUFA, n-3 EPA, and n-3 DHA were 447, 105, and 179 mg/day, respectively. The mean mercury concentrations in urine (1.05μg/L) and hair (0.49μg/g) were not significantly different from the US general population. We found no consistent association between n-3 PUFA intake and sensory nerve conduction after adjusting for mercury concentrations in hair and urine although some positive associations were observed with the sural nerve. Conclusions In a convenience sample of dental professionals, we found little evidence suggesting that dietary intake of n-3 PUFAs from fish has any impact on peripheral nerve function after adjustment for methylmercury exposure from fish and elemental mercury exposure from dental amalgam. PMID:23538138

  20. Lipotoxicity: Effects of Dietary Saturated and Transfatty Acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Débora Estadella

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The ingestion of excessive amounts of saturated fatty acids (SFAs and transfatty acids (TFAs is considered to be a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, and obesity. The focus of this paper was to elucidate the influence of dietary SFA and TFA intake on the promotion of lipotoxicity to the liver and cardiovascular, endothelial, and gut microbiota systems, as well as on insulin resistance and endoplasmic reticulum stress. The saturated and transfatty acids favor a proinflammatory state leading to insulin resistance. These fatty acids can be involved in several inflammatory pathways, contributing to disease progression in chronic inflammation, autoimmunity, allergy, cancer, atherosclerosis, hypertension, and heart hypertrophy as well as other metabolic and degenerative diseases. As a consequence, lipotoxicity may occur in several target organs by direct effects, represented by inflammation pathways, and through indirect effects, including an important alteration in the gut microbiota associated with endotoxemia. Interactions between these pathways may perpetuate a feedback process that exacerbates an inflammatory state. The importance of lifestyle modification, including an improved diet, is recommended as a strategy for treatment of these diseases.

  1. Biochemical and dietary factors of uric acid stone formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinchieri, Alberto; Montanari, Emanuele

    2017-02-28

    The aim of this study was to compare the clinical characteristics of "pure" uric acid renal stone formers (UA-RSFs) with that of mixed uric acid/calcium oxalate stone formers (UC-RSFs) and to identify which urinary and dietary risk factors predispose to their formation. A total of 136 UA-RSFs and 115 UC-RSFs were extracted from our database of renal stone formers. A control group of 60 subjects without history of renal stones was considered for comparison. Data from serum chemistries, 24-h urine collections and 24-h dietary recalls were considered. UA-RSFs had a significantly (p = 0.001) higher body mass index (26.3 ± 3.6 kg/m(2)) than UC-RSFs, whereas body mass index of UA-RSFs was higher but not significantly than in controls (24.6 ± 4.7) (p = 0.108). The mean urinary pH was significantly lower in UA-RSFs (5.57 ± 0.58) and UC-RSFs (5.71 ± 0.56) compared with controls (5.83 ± 0.29) (p = 0.007). No difference of daily urinary uric acid excretion was observed in the three groups (p = 0.902). Daily urinary calcium excretion was significantly (p = 0.018) higher in UC-RSFs (224 ± 149 mg/day) than UA-RSFs (179 ± 115) whereas no significant difference was observed with controls (181 ± 89). UA-RSFs tend to have a lower uric acid fractional excretion (0.083 ± 0.045% vs 0.107+/-0.165; p = 0.120) and had significantly higher serum uric acid (5.33 ± 1.66 vs 4.78 ± 1.44 mg/dl; p = 0.007) than UC-RSFs. The mean energy, carbohydrate and vitamin C intakes were higher in UA-SFs (1987 ± 683 kcal, 272 ± 91 g, 112 ± 72 mg) and UC-SFs (1836 ± 74 kcal, 265 ± 117, 140 ± 118) with respect to controls (1474 ± 601, 188 ± 84, 76 ± 53) (p = 0.000). UA-RSFs should be differentiated from UC-RSFs as they present lower urinary pH, lower uric acid fractional excretion and higher serum uric acid. On the contrary, patients with UC-RSFs show urinary risk factors

  2. What Is the Most Effective Way of Increasing the Bioavailability of Dietary Long Chain Omega-3 Fatty Acids--Daily vs. Weekly Administration of Fish Oil?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemifard, Samaneh; Sinclair, Andrew J; Kaur, Gunveen; Lewandowski, Paul; Turchini, Giovanni M

    2015-07-10

    The recommendations on the intake of long chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 LC-PUFA) vary from eating oily fish ("once to twice per week") to consuming specified daily amounts of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) ("250-500 mg per day"). It is not known if there is a difference in the uptake/bioavailability between regular daily consumption of supplementsvs. consuming fish once or twice per week. In this study, the bioavailability of a daily dose of n-3 LC-PUFA (Constant treatment), representing supplements, vs. a large weekly dose of n-3 LC-PUFA (Spike treatment), representing consuming once or twice per week, was assessed. Six-week old healthy male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed either a Constant treatment, a Spike treatment or Control treatment (no n-3 LC-PUFA), for six weeks. The whole body, tissues and faeces were analysed for fatty acid content. The results showed that the major metabolic fate of the n-3 LC-PUFA (EPA+docosapentaenoic acid (DPA) + DHA) was towards catabolism (β-oxidation) accounting for over 70% of total dietary intake, whereas deposition accounted less than 25% of total dietary intake. It was found that significantly more n-3 LC-PUFA were β-oxidised when originating from the Constant treatment (84% of dose), compared with the Spike treatment (75% of dose). Conversely, it was found that significantly more n-3 LC-PUFA were deposited when originating from the Spike treatment (23% of dose), than from the Constant treatment (15% of dose). These unexpected findings show that a large dose of n-3 LC-PUFA once per week is more effective in increasing whole body n-3 LC-PUFA content in rats compared with a smaller dose delivered daily.

  3. Effect of dietary fat sources on fatty acid deposition and lipid metabolism in broiler chickens

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Smink, W; Gerrits, W.J.J; Hovenier, R; Geelen, M.J.H; Verstegen, M.W.A; Beynen, A.C

    2010-01-01

    The hypothesis tested was that dietary vegetable fats rich in saturated fatty acids, when compared with a vegetable oil rich in linoleic acid, increase fat deposition in broiler chickens and affect...

  4. 花生四烯酸、二十二碳六烯酸和二十碳五烯酸在炎症中的作用概述%Roles of arachidonic acid, docosahexaenoic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid in inflammation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柳泽深; 姜悦; 陈峰

    2016-01-01

    心脑血管疾病、肿瘤、糖尿病、神经系统疾病、自身免疫等疾病严重危害着人类的生命和健康,并消耗着大量医疗资源。事实上,很多疾病发生和发展的背后都伴随着炎症反应,炎症是众多疾病的病理基础,甚至是导致这些疾病的诱因。炎症本身是机体的防御性反应,但过度的炎症反应和长期慢性炎症会损害机体的稳态。炎症的调节和控制由炎症介质介导,花生四烯酸(arachidonic acid, AA)、二十二碳六烯酸(docosahexaenoic acid, DHA)和二十碳五烯酸(eicosapentaenoic acid, EPA)等长链多不饱和脂肪酸(long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, LC-PUFAs)的衍生物是一类重要的调控炎症的介质。炎性细胞间的交流和细胞内信号传递与LC-PUFAs有关。AA经环氧酶和脂氧合酶合成的类二十烷酸主要起促炎作用,但有的也有抗炎作用。DHA和EPA在体内起抗炎作用,由它们合成的消退素(resolvins, Rvs)和保护素(protectin, PD)是重要的抗炎活性物质。DHA和EPA还可以干扰炎性细胞内信号传导途径来抑制炎症反应。本文从炎症与疾病的关系、LC-PUFAs的衍生物及其促炎和抗炎机制等方面综述了AA、DHA和EPA在炎症中的作用。%ABSTRACT:Cardiovascular disease, cancer, diabetes, neurological diseases and autoimmune disease are major threat to human health and long life, and a large amount of medical resources are consumed on the treatment of these diseases. In fact, the progression of these diseases is pointed out to be accompanied by inflammatory response, and inflammation is regarded as pathological basis of many diseases. Normally inflammation itself is a defensive reaction of body, but excessive inflammatory response and chronic inflammation can damage organ homeostasis. On the other side, regulation and control of inflammation can be mediated by inflammatory mediators. It is indicated that derivatives of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids

  5. Dietary Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids and Inflammation: The Role of Phospholipid Biosynthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Sordillo, Lorraine M.; William Raphael

    2013-01-01

    The composition of fatty acids in the diets of both human and domestic animal species can regulate inflammation through the biosynthesis of potent lipid mediators. The substrates for lipid mediator biosynthesis are derived primarily from membrane phospholipids and reflect dietary fatty acid intake. Inflammation can be exacerbated with intake of certain dietary fatty acids, such as some ω-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), and subsequent incorporation into membrane phospholipids. Inflammati...

  6. Dietary protein deficiency affects n-3 and n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids hepatic storage and very low density lipoprotein transport in rats on different diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouziane, M; Prost, J; Belleville, J

    1994-04-01

    Fatty livers and the similarity between the skin lesions in kwashiorkor and those described in experimental essential fatty acid (EFA) deficiency have led to the hypothesis that protein and EFA deficiencies may both occur in chronic malnutrition. The relationship between serum very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) and hepatic lipid composition was studied after 28 d of protein depletion to determine the interactions between dietary protein levels and EFA availability. Rats were fed purified diets containing 20 or 2% casein and 5% fat as either soybean oil rich in EFA, or salmon oil rich in eicosapentaenoic (EPA) and docosahexaenoic (DHA) acids, or hydrogenated coconut oil poor in EFA. Animals were divided into six groups, SOC (20% casein + 5% soybean oil), SOd (2% casein + 5% soybean oil), COC (20% casein + 5% hydrogenated coconut oil), COd (2% casein + 5% hydrogenated coconut oil), SAC (20% casein + 5% salmon oil) and SAd (2% casein + 5% salmon oil). After 28 d, liver steatosis and reduced VLDL-phospholipid contents (P oil diets and lower with the hydrogenated coconut oil diets. Furthermore, independent of the oil in the diet, protein deficiency decreased linoleic and arachidonic acids in VLDL phospholipids. Conversely, despite decreased proportions of EPA at low protein levels, DHA levels remained higher in rats fed salmon oil diets.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Dietary conjugated linoleic acids decrease leptin in porcine adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Giancamillo, Alessia; Rossi, Raffaella; Vitari, Francesca; Pastorelli, Grazia; Corino, Carlo; Domeneghini, Cinzia

    2009-10-01

    We investigated the effects of dietary conjugated linoleic acids (CLA) on white adipose tissue (WAT) in heavy pigs. Twelve pigs were assigned to 1 of 2 groups supplemented with either 0 or 0.75% of a CLA preparation (isomeric mixture) and were slaughtered at 159 +/- 2.3 kg live weight. Their subcutaneous WAT was analyzed by both chemical and microanatomical methods. The WAT of CLA-fed pigs tended to have a higher protein content (P = 0.064) and smaller adipocytes (P = 0.053) than that of control (CTR) pigs. The number of proliferating preadipocytes tended to be greater (P = 0.076) in pigs fed CLA, whereas the number of apoptotic adipocytes was greater (P leptin (Ob) expression was lower (P = 0.048) in adipocytes from treated pigs and Western blot quantification of Ob revealed lower levels (P tissue.

  8. Dietary branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) and tumor growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, W.; Baron, L.; Baron, P.; White, F.; Banks, W.L. Jr.

    1986-03-05

    The effects of high dietary BCAA on tumor growth was examined in adult male Fischer 344 rats inoculated with 10/sup 6/ viable MCA fibrosarcoma cells. Ten days after tumor inoculation, when tumors were of palpable size, rats were divided into two groups at random. The experimental(E) group was fed the AIN-76 diet supplemented with 4X the BCAA content of diet casein and the control(C) group was fed the AIN-76 made isonitrogenous with the E diet by glutamic acid supplementation. Five rats from each group were killed at days 0,3,6, and 9. Rats were injected with /sup 14/C-Tyrosine and /sup 3/H-Thymidine i.p. (2 and 4 uCi/100g BW, respectively) an hour before they were killed. The incorporation of /sup 14/C and /sup 3/H into the acid insoluble fraction of the tumor tissues samples were measured. Single cell suspension of tumor were prepared for cell cycle kinetics analysis using a Coulter EPICS IV flow microflorometer. The percentage of normal and hyperdiploid cells were analyzed. Results showed that both tumor size and weight were doubled at each time point the rats were killed. At day 0, the /sup 3/H and /sup 14/C incorporation were 32 +/- 10dpm and 27 +/- 4dpm/mg tumor, respectively. The /sup 3/H incorporation dropped in both diet groups at days 6 and 9 but the /sup 14/C incorporation showed a decrease only at day 9. These changes were statistically significant, P>0.05. No difference in the tumor growth parameters used in this study can be attributed to the high dietary BCAA.

  9. Effects of different fatty acids and dietary lipids on adiponectin gene expression in 3T3-L1 cells and C57BL/6J mice adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, Allain Amador; Oyama, Lila Missae; de Oliveira, Cristiane; Pisani, Luciana Pelegrini; Ribeiro, Eliane Beraldi; Silveira, Vera Lucia Flor; Oller do Nascimento, Cláudia Maria

    2008-01-01

    Obesity is positively correlated to dietary lipid intake, and the type of lipid may play a causal role in the development of obesity-related pathologies. A major protein secreted by adipose tissue is adiponectin, which has antiatherogenic and antidiabetic properties. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of four different high-fat diets (enriched with soybean oil, fish oil, coconut oil, or lard) on adiponectin gene expression and secretion by the white adipose tissue (WAT) of mice fed on a selected diet for either 2 (acute treatment) or 60 days (chronic treatment). Additionally, 3T3-L1 adipocytes were treated for 48 h with six different fatty acids: palmitic, linoleic, eicosapentaenoic (EPA), docosahexaenoic (DHA), lauric, or oleic acid. Serum adiponectin concentration was reduced in the soybean-, coconut-, and lard-enriched diets in both groups. Adiponectin gene expression was lower in retroperitoneal WAT after acute treatment with all diets. The same reduction in levels of adiponectin gene expression was observed in epididymal adipose tissue of animals chronically fed soybean and coconut diets and in 3T3-L1 cells treated with palmitic, linoleic, EPA, and DHA acids. These results indicate that the intake of certain fatty acids may affect serum adiponectin levels in mice and adiponectin gene expression in mouse WAT and 3T3-L1 adipocytes. The effects appear to be time dependent and depot specific. It is postulated that the downregulation of adiponectin expression by dietary enrichment with soybean oil or coconut oil may contribute to the development of insulin resistance and atherosclerosis.

  10. Correlations between Fruit, Vegetables, Fish, Vitamins, and Fatty Acids Estimated by Web-Based Nonconsecutive Dietary Records and Respective Biomarkers of Nutritional Status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassale, Camille; Castetbon, Katia; Laporte, François; Deschamps, Valérie; Vernay, Michel; Camilleri, Géraldine M; Faure, Patrice; Hercberg, Serge; Galan, Pilar; Kesse-Guyot, Emmanuelle

    2016-03-01

    It is of major importance to measure the validity of self-reported dietary intake using web-based instruments before applying them in large-scale studies. This study aimed to validate self-reported intake of fish, fruit and vegetables, and selected micronutrient intakes assessed by a web-based self-administered dietary record tool used in the NutriNet-Santé prospective cohort study, against the following concentration biomarkers: plasma beta carotene, vitamin C, and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids. One hundred ninety-eight adult volunteers (103 men and 95 women, mean age=50.5 years) were included in the protocol: they completed 3 nonconsecutive-day dietary records and two blood samples were drawn 3 weeks apart. The study was conducted in the area of Paris, France, between October 2012 and May 2013. Reported fish, fruit and vegetables, and selected micronutrient intakes and plasma beta carotene, vitamin C, and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid levels were compared. Simple and adjusted Spearman's rank correlation coefficients were estimated after de-attenuation for intra-individual variation. Regarding food groups in men, adjusted correlations ranged from 0.20 for vegetables and plasma vitamin C to 0.49 for fruits and plasma vitamin C, and from 0.40 for fish and plasma c20:5 n-3 (eicosapentaenoic acid [EPA]) to 0.55 for fish and plasma c22:6 n-3 (docosahexaenoic acid). In women, correlations ranged from 0.13 (nonsignificant) for vegetables and plasma vitamin C to 0.41 for fruits and vegetables and plasma beta carotene, and from 0.27 for fatty fish and EPA to 0.54 for fish and EPA+docosahexaenoic acid. Regarding micronutrients, adjusted correlations ranged from 0.36 (EPA) to 0.58 (vitamin C) in men and from 0.32 (vitamin C) to 0.38 (EPA) in women. The findings suggest that three nonconsecutive web-based dietary records provide reasonable estimates of true intake of fruits, vegetables, fish, beta carotene, vitamin C, and n-3 fatty acids. Along with other validation

  11. Dietary monounsaturated fatty acids are protective against metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillingham, Leah G; Harris-Janz, Sydney; Jones, Peter J H

    2011-03-01

    Over 50 years of research has sought to define the role dietary fat plays in cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. Although optimal dietary fat quantity has been keenly pursued over past decades, attention has recently centered on the value of dietary fat quality. The purpose of the present review is to provide a critical assessment of the current body of evidence surrounding efficacy of dietary monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) for reduction of traditional risk factors defining metabolic syndrome (MetS) and CVD. Due to existing and emerging research on health attributes of MUFA rich diets, and to the low prevalence of chronic disease in populations consuming MUFA rich Mediterranean diets, national dietary guidelines are increasingly recommending dietary MUFA, primarily at the expense of saturated fatty acids (SFA). Consumption of dietary MUFA promotes healthy blood lipid profiles, mediates blood pressure, improves insulin sensitivity and regulates glucose levels. Moreover, provocative newer data suggest a role for preferential oxidation and metabolism of dietary MUFA, influencing body composition and ameliorating the risk of obesity. Mounting epidemiological and human clinical trial data continue to demonstrate the cardioprotective activity of the MUFA content of dietary fat. As the debate on the optimal fatty acid composition of the diet continues, the benefit of increasing MUFA intakes, particularly as a substitute for dietary SFA, deserves considerable attention.

  12. The Relationship between Dietary Fatty Acids and Inflammatory Genes on the Obese Phenotype and Serum Lipids

    OpenAIRE

    Yael T. Joffe; Malcolm Collins; Goedecke, Julia H.

    2013-01-01

    Obesity, a chronic low-grade inflammatory condition is associated with the development of many comorbidities including dyslipidemia. This review examines interactions between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in the inflammatory genes tumor necrosis alpha (TNFA) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) and dietary fatty acids, and their relationship with obesity and serum lipid levels. In summary, dietary fatty acids, in particular saturated fatty acids and the omega-3 and omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty a...

  13. Dietary fish oil replacement by linseed oil: Effect on growth, nutrient utilization, tissue fatty acid composition and desaturase gene expression in silver barb (Puntius gonionotus) fingerlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Madhusmita; Saha, Ashis; Pradhan, Avinash; Samanta, Mrinal; Giri, Shiba Shankar

    2017-03-01

    Silver barb (Puntius gonionotus) is considered a promising medium carp species for freshwater aquaculture in Asia. This study in silver barb was carried out to evaluate the effects of total or partial substitution of dietary fish oil (FO) with linseed oil (LO) on growth, nutrient utilization, whole-body composition, muscle and liver fatty acid composition. Fish (12.1±0.4g of initial body weight) were fed for 60days with five experimental iso-proteinous, iso-lipidic and iso-caloric diets in which FO (control diet) was replaced by 33.3%, 50%, 66.7% and 100% LO. Final weight, weight gain, percent weight gain, SGR decreased linearly (p0.05) affect the feed conversion ratio (FCR), protein efficiency ratio (PER) and whole body proximate composition. Furthermore, enhanced level of LO increased α-linolenic acid (ALA; 18:3n3) and linoleic acid (LA; 18:2n6) and decreased eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA; 20:5n3) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 22:6n3) in muscle and liver. To understand the molecular mechanism of long chain-polyunsaturated fatty acid (LC-PUFA) biosynthesis, we cloned and characterized the fatty acyl Δ6 desaturase (Δ6 fad) cDNA and investigated its expression in various organs/tissues following replacement of FO with LO in the diet. The full-length Δ6 fad cDNA was 2056bp encoding 444 amino acids and was widely expressed in various organs/tissues. Replacement of FO with LO increased the expression of Δ6 fad mRNA in liver, muscle and intestine but no significant difference was found in the brain. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Trans fatty acids in dietary fats and oils from 14 European countries : the TRANSFAIR study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aro, A.; Amelsvoort, J. van; Becker, W.; Erp-Baart, M.A. van; Kafatos, A.; Leth, T.; Poppel, G. van

    1998-01-01

    The fatty acid composition of dietary fats and oils from 14 European countries was analyzed with particular emphasis on isomerictransfatty acids. The proportion oftransfatty acids in typical soft margarines and low-fat spreads ranged between 0.1 and 17% of total fatty acids and that ofcis-unsaturate

  15. Trans fatty acids in dietary fats and oils from 14 European countries : the TRANSFAIR study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aro, A.; Amelsvoort, J. van; Becker, W.; Erp-Baart, M.A. van; Kafatos, A.; Leth, T.; Poppel, G. van

    1998-01-01

    The fatty acid composition of dietary fats and oils from 14 European countries was analyzed with particular emphasis on isomerictransfatty acids. The proportion oftransfatty acids in typical soft margarines and low-fat spreads ranged between 0.1 and 17% of total fatty acids and that ofcis-unsaturate

  16. Potential for dietary ω-3 fatty acids to prevent nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and reduce the risk of primary liver cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jump, Donald B; Depner, Christopher M; Tripathy, Sasmita; Lytle, Kelli A

    2015-11-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has increased in parallel with central obesity, and its prevalence is anticipated to increase as the obesity epidemic remains unabated. NAFLD is now the most common cause of chronic liver disease in developed countries and is defined as excessive lipid accumulation in the liver, that is, hepatosteatosis. NAFLD ranges in severity from benign fatty liver to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), and NASH is characterized by hepatic injury, inflammation, oxidative stress, and fibrosis. NASH can progress to cirrhosis, and cirrhosis is a risk factor for primary hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The prevention of NASH will lower the risk of cirrhosis and NASH-associated HCC. Our studies have focused on NASH prevention. We developed a model of NASH by using mice with the LDL cholesterol receptor gene ablated fed the Western diet (WD). The WD induces a NASH phenotype in these mice that is similar to that seen in humans and includes robust induction of hepatic steatosis, inflammation, oxidative stress, and fibrosis. With the use of transcriptomic, lipidomic, and metabolomic approaches, we examined the capacity of 2 dietary ω-3 (n-3) polyunsaturated fatty acids, eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5ω-3; EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (22:6ω-3; DHA), to prevent WD-induced NASH. Dietary DHA was superior to EPA at attenuating WD-induced changes in plasma lipids and hepatic injury and at reversing WD effects on hepatic metabolism, oxidative stress, and fibrosis. The outcome of these studies suggests that DHA may be useful in preventing NASH and reducing the risk of HCC. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  17. The Current Role of Omega-3 Fatty Acids in the Management of Atrial Fibrillation

    OpenAIRE

    Christou, Georgios A.; Konstantinos A. Christou; Panagiotis Korantzopoulos; Rizos, Evangelos C.; Nikas, Dimitrios N.; Goudevenos, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The main dietary source of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA) is fish, which contains eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). In the present manuscript, we aimed to review the current evidence regarding the clinical role of n-3 PUFA in the prevention of atrial fibrillation (AF) and the possible underlying mechanisms. Methods: A literature search based on PubMed listings was performed using “Omega-3 fatty acids” and “atrial fibrilation” as key search...

  18. Dietary unsaturated fatty acids differently affect catecholamine handling by adrenal chromaffin cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Andreia; Correia, Gustavo; Coelho, Marisa; Araújo, João Ricardo; Pinho, Maria João; Teixeira, Ana Luisa; Medeiros, Rui; Ribeiro, Laura

    2015-05-01

    Catecholamines (CA) play an important role in cardiovascular (CDV) disease risk. Namely, noradrenaline (NA) levels positively correlate whereas adrenaline (AD) levels negatively correlate with obesity and/or CDV disease. Western diets, which are tipically rich in Ω-6 fatty acids (FAs) and deficient in Ω-3 FAs, may contribute to the development of obesity, type 2 diabetes and/or coronary artery disease. Taking this into consideration and the fact that our group has already described that saturated FAs affect catecholamine handling by adrenal chromaffin cells, this work aimed to investigate the effect of unsaturated FAs upon catecholamine handling in the same model. Our results showed that chronic exposure to unsaturated FAs differently modulated CA cellular content and release, regardless of both FA series and number of carbon atoms. Namely, the Ω-6 arachidonic and linoleic acids, based on their effect on CA release and cellular content, seemed to impair NA and AD vesicular transport, whereas γ-linolenic acid selectively impaired AD synthesis and release. Within the Ω-9 FAs, oleic acid was devoid of effect, and elaidic acid behaved similarly to γ-linolenic acid. Eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids (Ω-3 series) impaired the synthesis and release of both NA and AD. These results deserve attention and future development, namely, in what concerns the mechanisms involved and correlative effects in vivo.

  19. The impact of different dietary sources of marine polyunsaturated fatty acids on the fatty acid composition of rat brain, liver and red blood cells.

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    There is a general consensus that the physiological activity of fish oil can be ascribable to eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5n-3) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3). However, the form in which they are introduced in diet might affect the rate of incorporation in tissue. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) of different marine origin and the incorporation of EPA and DHA in rat brain, liver and red blood cells (RBC). ...

  20. Dietary acid load and risk of hypertension: The Rotterdam Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engberink, M.F.; Bakker, S.J.L.; Brink, E.J.; Baak, van M.A.; Rooij, van F.J.A.; Hofman, A.; Witteman, J.C.M.; Geleijnse, J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Mild metabolic acidosis, which can be caused by diet, may result in elevated blood pressure (BP). Design: The analyses included 2241 participants aged =55 y who were free of hypertension at baseline (1990–1993) and who had complete dietary and BP data. Dietary data were obtained from a 1

  1. Systematic review of the association between dietary acid load, alkaline water and cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fenton, Tanis R; Huang, Tian

    2016-01-01

    .... A systematic review was conducted on published and grey literature separately for randomised intervention and observational studies with either varying acid-base dietary intakes and/or alkaline water...

  2. The effects of dietary supplementation with n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, G L; Faarvang, K L; Thomsen, B S

    1992-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE: To determine the effect of dietary supplementation with n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA) on disease variables in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. DESIGN: Multicenter, randomized, placebo controlled, double blind. SETTING: Three Danish hospital Departments of Rheumato...

  3. Dietary Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids and Inflammation: The Role of Phospholipid Biosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raphael, William; Sordillo, Lorraine M.

    2013-01-01

    The composition of fatty acids in the diets of both human and domestic animal species can regulate inflammation through the biosynthesis of potent lipid mediators. The substrates for lipid mediator biosynthesis are derived primarily from membrane phospholipids and reflect dietary fatty acid intake. Inflammation can be exacerbated with intake of certain dietary fatty acids, such as some ω-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), and subsequent incorporation into membrane phospholipids. Inflammation, however, can be resolved with ingestion of other fatty acids, such as ω-3 PUFA. The influence of dietary PUFA on phospholipid composition is influenced by factors that control phospholipid biosynthesis within cellular membranes, such as preferential incorporation of some fatty acids, competition between newly ingested PUFA and fatty acids released from stores such as adipose, and the impacts of carbohydrate metabolism and physiological state. The objective of this review is to explain these factors as potential obstacles to manipulating PUFA composition of tissue phospholipids by specific dietary fatty acids. A better understanding of the factors that influence how dietary fatty acids can be incorporated into phospholipids may lead to nutritional intervention strategies that optimize health. PMID:24152446

  4. Dietary Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids and Inflammation: The Role of Phospholipid Biosynthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorraine M. Sordillo

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The composition of fatty acids in the diets of both human and domestic animal species can regulate inflammation through the biosynthesis of potent lipid mediators. The substrates for lipid mediator biosynthesis are derived primarily from membrane phospholipids and reflect dietary fatty acid intake. Inflammation can be exacerbated with intake of certain dietary fatty acids, such as some ω-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA, and subsequent incorporation into membrane phospholipids. Inflammation, however, can be resolved with ingestion of other fatty acids, such as ω-3 PUFA. The influence of dietary PUFA on phospholipid composition is influenced by factors that control phospholipid biosynthesis within cellular membranes, such as preferential incorporation of some fatty acids, competition between newly ingested PUFA and fatty acids released from stores such as adipose, and the impacts of carbohydrate metabolism and physiological state. The objective of this review is to explain these factors as potential obstacles to manipulating PUFA composition of tissue phospholipids by specific dietary fatty acids. A better understanding of the factors that influence how dietary fatty acids can be incorporated into phospholipids may lead to nutritional intervention strategies that optimize health.

  5. 4-Hydroxy hexenal derived from dietary n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids induces anti-oxidative enzyme heme oxygenase-1 in multiple organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Fumiyuki; Morino, Katsutaro; Ugi, Satoshi; Ishikado, Atsushi; Kondo, Keiko; Sato, Daisuke; Konno, Shiho; Nemoto, Ken-ichi; Kusunoki, Chisato; Sekine, Osamu; Sunagawa, Akihiro; Kawamura, Masanori; Inoue, Noriko; Nishio, Yoshihiko; Maegawa, Hiroshi

    2014-01-17

    It has recently been reported that expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) plays a protective role against many diseases. Furthermore, n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) were shown to induce HO-1 expression in several cells in vitro, and in a few cases also in vivo. However, very few reports have demonstrated that n-3 PUFAs induce HO-1 in vivo. In this study, we examined the effect of fish-oil dietary supplementation on the distribution of fatty acids and their peroxidative metabolites and on the expression of HO-1 in multiple tissues (liver, kidney, heart, lung, spleen, intestine, skeletal muscle, white adipose, brown adipose, brain, aorta, and plasma) of C57BL/6 mice. Mice were divided into 4 groups, and fed a control, safflower-oil, and fish-oil diet for 3 weeks. One group was fed a fish-oil diet for just 1 week. The concentration of fatty acids, 4-hydroxy hexenal (4-HHE), and 4-hydroxy nonenal (4-HNE), and the expression of HO-1 mRNA were measured in the same tissues. We found that the concentration of 4-HHE (a product of n-3 PUFAs peroxidation) and expression of HO-1 mRNA were significantly increased after fish-oil treatment in most tissues. In addition, these increases were paralleled by an increase in the level of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) but not eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) in each tissue. These results are consistent with our previous results showing that DHA induces HO-1 expression through 4-HHE in vascular endothelial cells. In conclusion, we hypothesize that the HO-1-mediated protective effect of the fish oil diet may be through production of 4-HHE from DHA but not EPA in various tissues. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Effect of dietary fat sources on fatty acid deposition and lipid metabolism in broiler chickens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smink, W.; Gerrits, W.J.J.; Hovenier, R.; Geelen, M.J.H.; Verstegen, M.W.A.; Beynen, A.C.

    2010-01-01

    The hypothesis tested was that dietary vegetable fats rich in saturated fatty acids, when compared with a vegetable oil rich in linoleic acid, increase fat deposition in broiler chickens and affect synthesis or oxidation, or both, of individual fatty acids. Diets with native sunflower oil (SO), a

  7. Effect of dietary fat sources on fatty acid deposition and lipid metabolism in broiler chickens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smink, W.; Gerrits, W.J.J.; Hovenier, R.; Geelen, M.J.H.; Verstegen, M.W.A.; Beynen, A.C.

    2010-01-01

    The hypothesis tested was that dietary vegetable fats rich in saturated fatty acids, when compared with a vegetable oil rich in linoleic acid, increase fat deposition in broiler chickens and affect synthesis or oxidation, or both, of individual fatty acids. Diets with native sunflower oil (SO), a 50

  8. Dietary stearic acid leads to a reduction of visceral adipose tissue in athymic nude mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Che Shen

    Full Text Available Stearic acid (C18:0 is a long chain dietary saturated fatty acid that has been shown to reduce metastatic tumor burden. Based on preliminary observations and the growing evidence that visceral fat is related to metastasis and decreased survival, we hypothesized that dietary stearic acid may reduce visceral fat. Athymic nude mice, which are used in models of human breast cancer metastasis, were fed a stearic acid, linoleic acid (safflower oil, or oleic acid (corn oil enriched diet or a low fat diet ad libitum. Total body weight did not differ significantly between dietary groups over the course of the experiment. However visceral fat was reduced by ∼70% in the stearic acid fed group compared to other diets. In contrast total body fat was only slightly reduced in the stearic acid diet fed mice when measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry and quantitative magnetic resonance. Lean body mass was increased in the stearic acid fed group compared to all other groups by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Dietary stearic acid significantly reduced serum glucose compared to all other diets and increased monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1 compared to the low fat control. The low fat control diet had increased serum leptin compared to all other diets. To investigate possible mechanisms whereby stearic acid reduced visceral fat we used 3T3L1 fibroblasts/preadipocytes. Stearic acid had no direct effects on the process of differentiation or on the viability of mature adipocytes. However, unlike oleic acid and linoleic acid, stearic acid caused increased apoptosis (programmed cell death and cytotoxicity in preadipocytes. The apoptosis was, at least in part, due to increased caspase-3 activity and was associated with decreased cellular inhibitor of apoptosis protein-2 (cIAP2 and increased Bax gene expression. In conclusion, dietary stearic acid leads to dramatically reduced visceral fat likely by causing the apoptosis of preadipocytes.

  9. Effect of dietary sesamin on metabolic fate of an exogenous linolelaidic acid in perfused rat liver

    OpenAIRE

    Fukuda, Nobuhiro; Zhang, Lei; Kodama, Masaki; Sakono, Masanobu; Ide, Takashi; Yamamoto, Kyosuke; Sugano, Michihiro

    1999-01-01

    To estimate the relative significance of exogenous and endogenous fatty acid substrates in decreasing hepatic triacylglycerol secretion after sesamin feeding, livers from rats fed diets supplemented with and without sesamin (sesamin : episesamin, 1:1, w/w) were perfused in the presence and absence of an exogenous di-trans isomer of linoleic acid (linolelaidic acid, trans,trans-9,12-octadecadienoic acid). Both exogenous trans fatty acid and dietary sesamin, as compared with respective controls...

  10. Potential role of dietary n-3 fatty acids in the prevention of dementia and macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Elizabeth J; Schaefer, Ernst J

    2006-06-01

    Dementia and age-related macular degeneration (AMD) are major causes of disability in the elderly. n-3 Fatty acids, particularly docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), are highly concentrated in brain and retinal tissue and may prevent or delay the progression of dementia and AMD. Low dietary intakes and plasma concentrations have been reported to be associated with dementia, cognitive decline, and AMD risk. The major dietary sources of DHA are fish and fish oils, although dietary supplements are available. At this point, it is not possible to make firm recommendations regarding n-3 fatty acids and the prevention of dementia and AMD. Our own unpublished observations from the Framingham Heart Study suggest that > or =180 mg/d of dietary DHA (approximately 2.7 fish servings/wk) is associated with an approximately 50% reduction in dementia risk. At least this amount of DHA is generally found in one commercially available 1-g fish oil capsule given daily.

  11. Dietary phenolic acids and ascorbic acid: Influence on acid-catalyzed nitrosative chemistry in the presence and absence of lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combet, Emilie; El Mesmari, Aziza; Preston, Tom; Crozier, Alan; McColl, Kenneth E L

    2010-03-15

    Acid-catalyzed nitrosation and production of potentially carcinogenic nitrosative species is focused at the gastroesophageal junction, where salivary nitrite, derived from dietary nitrate, encounters the gastric juice. Ascorbic acid provides protection by converting nitrosative species to nitric oxide (NO). However, NO may diffuse into adjacent lipid, where it reacts with O(2) to re-form nitrosative species and N-nitrosocompounds (NOC). In this way, ascorbic acid promotes acid nitrosation. Using a novel benchtop model representing the gastroesophageal junction, this study aimed to clarify the action of a range of water-soluble antioxidants on the nitrosative mechanisms in the presence or absence of lipids. Caffeic, ferulic, gallic, or chlorogenic and ascorbic acids were added individually to simulated gastric juice containing secondary amines, with or without lipid. NO and O(2) levels were monitored by electrochemical detection. NOC were measured in both aqueous and lipid phases by gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. In the absence of lipids, all antioxidants tested inhibited nitrosation, ranging from 35.9 + or - 7.4% with gallic acid to 93 + or - 0.6% with ferulic acid. In the presence of lipids, the impact of each antioxidant on nitrosation was inversely correlated with the levels of NO they generated (R(2) = 0.95, pascorbic acid promoted nitrosation, whereas ferulic and caffeic acids markedly inhibited nitrosation.

  12. Effect of sex, dietary glycerol or dietary fat during late fattening, on fatty acid composition and positional distribution of fatty acids within the triglyceride in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura, J; Cambero, M I; Cámara, L; Loriente, C; Mateos, G G; López-Bote, C J

    2015-11-01

    The effect of sex, source of saturated fat (lard v. palm oil) and glycerol inclusion in the fattening diet on composition and fatty acid positional distribution in the triglyceride molecule was studied in pigs from 78 to 110 kg BW. Average daily gain and carcass characteristics, including ham and loin weight, were not affected by dietary treatment but sex affected backfat depth (P dietary glycerol increased lean content in gilts but not in barrows (P Dietary fat did not affect total SFA or PUFA concentrations of the IMF but the subcutaneous total MUFA concentration tended to be higher (P = 0.079) in pigs fed lard than in pigs fed palm oil. Dietary glycerol increased total MUFA and C18:1n-9 concentration in the IMF and increased total MUFA and decreased C18:2n-6, C18:3n-3 and total PUFA concentrations in the SF. The data indicate that altering the fatty acid composition of the triglyceride molecule at the 2-position, by dietary intervention during the fattening phase, is very limited.

  13. Position of the academy of nutrition and dietetics: dietary fatty acids for healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannice, Gretchen; Rasmussen, Heather

    2014-01-01

    It is the position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (the Academy) that dietary fat for the healthy adult population should provide 20% to 35% of energy, with an increased consumption of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and limited intake of saturated and trans fats. The Academy recommends a food-based approach through a diet that includes regular consumption of fatty fish, nuts and seeds, lean meats and poultry, low-fat dairy products, vegetables, fruits, whole grains, and legumes. These recommendations are made within the context of rapidly evolving science delineating the influence of dietary fat and specific fatty acids on human health. In addition to fat as a valuable and calorically dense macronutrient with a central role in supplying essential nutrition and supporting healthy body weight, evidence on individual fatty acids and fatty acid groups is emerging as a key factor in nutrition and health. Small variations in the structure of fatty acids within broader categories of fatty acids, such as polyunsaturated and saturated, appear to elicit different physiological functions. The Academy recognizes that scientific knowledge about the effects of dietary fats on human health is young and takes a prudent approach in recommending an increase in fatty acids that benefit health and a reduction in fatty acids shown to increase risk of disease. Registered dietitian nutritionists are uniquely positioned to translate fat and fatty acid research into practical and effective dietary recommendations. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Periodontal disease: modulation of the inflammatory cascade by dietary n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sculley, D V

    2014-06-01

    Periodontal disease, including gingivitis and periodontitis, is caused by the interaction between pathogenic bacteria and the host immune system. The ensuing oxidative stress and inflammatory cascade result in the destruction of gingival tissue, alveolar bone and periodontal ligament. This article reviews the underlying mechanisms and host-bacteria interactions responsible for periodontal disease and evidence that nutritional supplementation with fish oil may provide a protective effect. Historical investigations of diet and disease have highlighted an inverse relationship between ingestion of fish oil, which is high in n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, and the incidence of typical inflammatory diseases such as arthritis and coronary heart disease. Ingestion of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, such as docosahexaenoic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid, results in their incorporation into membrane phospholipids, which can alter eicosanoid production after stimulation during the immune response. These eicosanoids promote a reduction in chronic inflammation, which has led to the proposal that fish oil is a possible modulator of inflammation and may reduce the severity of periodontal diseases. Tentative animal and human studies have provided an indication of this effect. Further human investigation is needed to establish the protective effects of fish oil in relation to periodontal disease.

  15. Cancer Risk and Eicosanoid Production: Interaction between the Protective Effect of Long Chain Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Intake and Genotype

    OpenAIRE

    Georgia Lenihan-Geels; Karen S. Bishop; Ferguson, Lynnette R

    2016-01-01

    Dietary inclusion of fish and fish supplements as a means to improve cancer prognosis and prevent tumour growth is largely controversial. Long chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCn-3 PUFA), eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid, may modulate the production of inflammatory eicosanoids, thereby influencing local inflammatory status, which is important in cancer development. Although in vitro studies have demonstrated inhibition of tumour cell growth and proliferation by LCn-3 ...

  16. Allometric scaling of dietary linoleic acid on changes in tissue arachidonic acid using human equivalent diets in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Whelan Jay

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is hypothesized that dietary linoleic acid (LA promotes chronic and acute diseases in humans by enriching tissues with arachidonic acid (AA, its downstream metabolite, and dietary studies with rodents have been useful for validation. However, levels of LA in research diets of rodents, as published in the literature, are notoriously erratic making interspecies comparisons unreliable. Therefore, the ability to extrapolate the biological effects of dietary LA from experimental rodents to humans necessitates an allometric scaling model that is rooted within a human equivalent context. Methods To determine the physiological response of dietary LA on tissue AA, a mathematical model for extrapolating nutrients based on energy was used, as opposed to differences in body weight. C57BL/6J mice were divided into 9 groups fed a background diet equivalent to that of the US diet (% energy with supplemental doses of LA or AA. Changes in the phospholipid fatty acid compositions were monitored in plasma and erythrocytes and compared to data from humans supplemented with equivalent doses of LA or AA. Results Increasing dietary LA had little effect on tissue AA, while supplementing diets with AA significantly increased tissue AA levels, importantly recapitulating results from human trials. Conclusions Thus, interspecies comparisons for dietary LA between rodents and humans can be achieved when rodents are provided human equivalent doses based on differences in metabolic activity as defined by energy consumption.

  17. Dietary amino acids and the risk of hypertension in a Dutch older population: The Rotterdam Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W. Altorf-van der Kuil (Wieke); M.F. Engberink (Marielle); M. de Neve (Melissa); F.J.A. van Rooij (Frank); A. Hofman (Albert); P. van 't Veer (Pieter); J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline); O.H. Franco (Oscar); J.M. Geleijnse (Marianne)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Inverse associations between dietary protein and hypertension have been reported, which may be attributed to specific amino acids. Objective: We examined whether the intake of glutamic acid, arginine, cysteine, lysine, or tyrosine was associated with blood pressure (BP)

  18. Dietary amino acids and the risk of hypertension in a Dutch older population: the Rotterdam Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Altorf-van der Kuil, W.; Engberink, M.F.; Neve, De M.; Rooij, van F.J.A.; Hofman, M.K.; Veer, van 't P.; Witteman, J.C.M.; Franco, O.H.; Geleijnse, J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Inverse associations between dietary protein and hypertension have been reported, which may be attributed to specific amino acids. Objective: We examined whether the intake of glutamic acid, arginine, cysteine, lysine, or tyrosine was associated with blood pressure (BP) levels (n = 3086)

  19. Effects of dietary intake of red palm oil on fatty acid composition and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of dietary intake of red palm oil on fatty acid composition and lipid profiles in ... Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. ... and triglycerides as well as accumulation of saturated fatty acids in the liver of the experimental rats.

  20. Dietary trans fatty acids increase serum cholesterylester transfer protein activity in man

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. van Tol (Arie); J.P. Zock; T. van Gent (Teus); L. Scheek (Leo); M.B. Katan (Martijn)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractThe average diet may provide some 8–10 g/day of unsaturated fatty acids with a trans double bond. Previous studies showed that dietary trans fatty acids may simultaneously raise low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and reduce high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol. Human plasma

  1. Dietary trans fatty acids increase serum cholesterylester transfer protein activity in man.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tol, van A.; Zock, P.L.; Gent, van T.; Scheek, L.M.; Katan, M.B.

    1995-01-01

    The average diet may provide some 8–10 g/day of unsaturated fatty acids with a trans double bond. Previous studies showed that dietary trans fatty acids may simultaneously raise low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and reduce high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol. Human plasma contains a p

  2. Modulation of the chicken immune cell function by dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sijben, J.W.C.

    2002-01-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) possess a wide range of biological properties, including immunomodulation. The amount, type, and ratio of dietary PUFA determine the types of fatty acids that are incorporated into immune cell membranes. Consequently, the physiological properties of immune cells an

  3. Effect of dietary elaidic versus vaccenic acid on blood and liver lipids in the hamster

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.W. Meijer (G.); A. van Tol (Arie); Th.J.C. van Berkel (Theo); J.T.M. Weststrate

    2001-01-01

    textabstractMale hamsters (30 per group) were fed five different semi-purified diets ad libitum. The diets, containing 30% of energy (en%) as fat, differed in their dietary fat composition (specified fatty acids exchanged at 10 en%) and were fed for 4 weeks. The five fatty acids compared in mixed tr

  4. Dietary fatty acids and risk factors for coronary heart disease: controlled studies in healthy volunteers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zock, P.L.

    1995-01-01

    High levels of LDL cholesterol, blood pressure and Lp(a), and low levels of HDL cholesterol increase the risk for coronary heart disease (CHD). This thesis describes the effects of dietary fatty acids on these risk factors. In each of three trials we fed diets with tailored fatty acid composition to

  5. The dietary fatty acids of patients with coronary artery disease and controls in Curacao - Implications for primary and secondary prevention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, DAJ; vanderDijs, FPL; Leerink, CB; Steward, HN; Kroon, TAJ; Suverkropp, GHJ; Romer, JWP; vanDoormaal, JJ; Muskiet, FAJ

    1997-01-01

    Patients with coronary artery disease are advised to augment their dietary linoleic acid intakes at the expense of saturated fatty acids. We investigated whether the dietary linoleic acid intake of 57 patients with coronary artery disease (47 males, 10 females; ages 61 +/- 10 years) in Curacao is hi

  6. Dietary protein, physiological condition and metabolic amino acid utilisation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijs, P.J.M.

    1993-01-01

    This thesis describes the investigated effects of the level of dietary protein intake and the physiological condition of the animal on the percental oxidation of leucine. This measure reflects which part of the free leucine pool was used for protein and energy metabolism. The employed technique cons

  7. The confusion about dietary fatty acids recommendations for CHD prevention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kromhout, D.; Geleijnse, J.M.; Menotti, A.; Jacobs, D.R.

    2011-01-01

    A recent meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies has not found an association between dietary saturated fat intake and CHD incidence. This funnelled the discussion about the importance of the recommendation to lower the intake of saturated fat for the prevention of CHD. At the same time a

  8. The confusion about dietary fatty acids recommendations for CHD prevention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kromhout, D.; Geleijnse, J.M.; Menotti, A.; Jacobs, D.R.

    2011-01-01

    A recent meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies has not found an association between dietary saturated fat intake and CHD incidence. This funnelled the discussion about the importance of the recommendation to lower the intake of saturated fat for the prevention of CHD. At the same time a docume

  9. Dietary protein, physiological condition and metabolic amino acid utilisation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijs, P.J.M.

    1993-01-01

    This thesis describes the investigated effects of the level of dietary protein intake and the physiological condition of the animal on the percental oxidation of leucine. This measure reflects which part of the free leucine pool was used for protein and energy metabolism. The employed

  10. Sex differences in the relationship of dietary fatty acids to cognitive measures in American children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Will eLassek

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Because the first neurons evolved in an environment high in the n-3 (omega-3 fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, this fatty acid became a major component of neural structure and function and makes up 10% of the dry weight of the human brain. Since n-3 fatty acids must come from the diet, this suggests a possible positive role for dietary n-3 fatty acids in cognition and a possible negative role for n-6 fatty acids, which compete with n-3 for access to critical enzymes. Because human females must provide DHA for the growth of the unusually large brains of their offspring from maternal fat stored during childhood, their need for DHA is especially great. We used stepwise regression to determine whether particular dietary fatty acids and other nutrients were related to cognitive performance in over 4000 American children aged 6 to 16 from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III; a variety of possible biological, social and environmental risk factors were statistically controlled. In this context the only dietary factors related to cognitive performance were n-3 and n-6 fatty acids. Dietary n-3 fatty acids were positively related to cognitive test scores in male and female children, while n-6 showed the reverse relationship, significantly so in females. In female children the positive effects of n-3 intake were twice as strong as in males and exceeded the negative effects of lead exposure. This suggests that increasing dietary intake of n-3 and decreasing n-6 fatty acids may have cognitive benefits in children, especially in females.

  11. The role of dietary acid load and mild metabolic acidosis in insulin resistance in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Rebecca S; Kozan, Pinar; Samocha-Bonet, Dorit

    2016-05-01

    Type 2 diabetes is increasingly being recognised as a global health crisis (World Health Organisation). Insulin resistance is closely associated with obesity and precedes the development of type 2 diabetes. However, there is now increasing evidence to suggest that diet itself may independently be associated with type 2 diabetes risk. A diet with a high acid load (or high potential renal net acid load, PRAL) can result in a decrease in pH towards the lower end of the normal physiological range, which may in turn lead to the development of insulin resistance. Conversely, reducing dietary acid load (the so called 'alkaline diet') may be protective and prevent the onset of type 2 diabetes. Here, we explore the influence of dietary acid load on the development of mild metabolic acidosis and induction of insulin resistance. Whilst large prospective cohort studies link high dietary acid load or low serum bicarbonate with the development of type 2 diabetes, the effect of a diet with a low acid (or high alkaline) load remains unclear. Further interventional studies are required to investigate the influence of dietary composition on the body's acid/base balance, insulin resistance and incidence of type 2 diabetes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  12. Composicao quimica, perfil de acidos graxos e quantificacao dos acidos ƒ¿-linolenico, eicosapentaenoico e docosahexaenoico em visceras de tilapias (Oreochromis niloticus = Percentual composition, fatty acids and quantification of the LNA (Alfa-Linolenic, EPA (Eicosapentaenoic and DHA (Docosahexaenoic acids in visceras of Nile Tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilson Evelázio de Souza

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Foi avaliada a composição química de vísceras de tilápias (Oreochromis niloticus criadas em cativeiro Os teores de umidade, cinza, proteína bruta e lipídios totais foram de 64,4%; 1,3%; 6,3% e 18,0%, respectivamente, caracterizando alta concentração de lipídiostotais em relação a outros resíduos de peixes. Foram identificados 49 ácidos graxos, sendo majoritários os ácidos: oléico, (32,8%, seguido do palmítico, (19,9% e linoléico, (18,2%. As razões entre n-6/n-3 e ácidos poliinsaturados/saturados foram de 5,5 e 0,9, respectivamente. As quantificações dos ácidos graxos alfa-linolênico, eicosapentaenóico e docosahexaenóico, em mg/g de lipídios totais, foram de 10,4, 1,4 e 9,3, respectivamente. O elevado teor de lipídios totais das vísceras contribuiu significativamente para as quantidadesde ácidos graxos n-3. Todos os parâmetros analisados foram satisfatórios sob o ponto de vista nutricional e neste sentido as vísceras de tilápias poderão ser utilizadaa para alimentar peixes ou outros animais.The chemical composition was evaluated in visceras of tilapias raised in captivity. The moisture, ash, crude protein and total lipids contents were 64.4%; 1.3%; 6.3% and 18.0%, respectively, characterizing high total lipids concentration in relation other residues of fish. Forty nine fatty acids were detected, the major fatty acids were oleic (32.8%, palmitic (19.9% and linoleic-1 (18.2% and oleic (9.4%. The ratio n-6/n-3 and polyunsaturated/saturated fatty acids, showed the values 5.5 and 0.9, respectively. The quantifications of alfa-linolenic, eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids (in mg/g of total lipids, were 10.4, 1.4 and 0.3, respectively. The higher contents of total lipids in visceras contributed significantly for amounts of n-3 fatty acids. All the parameters analyzed were shown nutritional value satisfactory in this sense visceras of tilapias can be used in the feed of fish and other animal.

  13. Symbiotic essential amino acids provisioning in the American cockroach, Periplaneta americana (Linnaeus under various dietary conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul A. Ayayee

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Insect gut microbes have been shown to provide nutrients such as essential amino acids (EAAs to their hosts. How this symbiotic nutrient provisioning tracks with the host’s demand is not well understood. In this study, we investigated microbial essential amino acid (EAA provisioning in omnivorous American cockroaches (Periplaneta americana, fed low-quality (LQD and comparatively higher-quality dog food (DF diets using carbon stable isotope ratios of EAAs (δ13CEAA. We assessed non-dietary EAA input, quantified as isotopic offsets (Δ13C between cockroach (δ13CCockroach EAA and dietary (δ13CDietary EAA EAAs, and subsequently determined biosynthetic origins of non-dietary EAAs in cockroaches using 13C-fingerprinting with dietary and representative bacterial and fungal δ13CEAA. Investigation of biosynthetic origins of de novo non-dietary EAAs indicated bacterial origins of EAA in cockroach appendage samples, and a mixture of fungal and bacterial EAA origins in gut filtrate samples for both LQD and DF-fed groups. We attribute the bacteria-derived EAAs in cockroach appendages to provisioning by the fat body residing obligate endosymbiont, Blattabacterium and gut-residing bacteria. The mixed signatures of gut filtrate samples are attributed to the presence of unassimilated dietary, as well as gut microbial (bacterial and fungal EAAs. This study highlights the potential impacts of dietary quality on symbiotic EAA provisioning and the need for further studies investigating the interplay between host EAA demands, host dietary quality and symbiotic EAA provisioning in response to dietary sufficiency or deficiency.

  14. Industrial Trans Fatty Acid and Serum Cholesterol: The Allowable Dietary Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Takeuchi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Trans fatty acid (TFA from partially hydrogenated oil is regarded as the worst dietary fatty acid per gram due to its role in coronary heart disease. TFA consumption is decreasing worldwide, but some but not all observational studies indicate that TFA intake has little relevance to serum cholesterol levels in populations with low TFA intake (<1% E [percentage of total energy intake], dietary level of TFAs, but also the composition of dietary fats simultaneously consumed, that is, saturated and unsaturated fatty acids. These fatty acids strengthen or counteract the adverse effect of TFAs on serum cholesterol levels. In this review we describe the complex situation of the cardiovascular effects of industrial TFAs. The relationship between dietary industrial TFAs and concentration of plasma cholesterol should be evaluated from the viewpoint of dietary patterns rather than TFAs alone.

  15. Impact of the dietary fatty acid intake on C-reactive protein levels in US adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazidi, Mohsen; Gao, Hong-Kai; Vatanparast, Hassan; Kengne, Andre Pascal

    2017-02-01

    Growing evidence suggests that the effects of diet on cardiovascular disease (CVD) occur through mechanisms involving subclinical inflammation. We assessed whether reported dietary fatty acid intake correlates with a serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) concentration in a population-based sample of US men and women.In this cross-sectional analysis, participants were selected from the US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) and restricted to those with available data on dietary intake, biochemical and anthropometric measurements from 2001 to 2010. All statistical analyses accounted for the survey design and sample weights by using SPSS Complex Samples v22.0 (IBM Corp, Armonk, NY).Of the 17,689 participants analyzed, 8607 (48.3%) were men. The mean age was 45.8 years in the overall sample, 44.9 years in men, and 46.5 years in women (P = 0.047). The age-, race-, and sex-adjusted mean dietary intakes of total polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), PUFAs 18:2 (octadecadienoic), and PUFAs 18:3 (octadecatrienoic) monotonically decreased across hs-CRP quartiles (P < 0.001), whereas dietary cholesterol increased across hs-CRP quartiles (P < 0.001)This study provides further evidence of an association between fatty acid intake and subclinical inflammation markers. hs-CRP concentrations are likely modulated by dietary fatty acid intake. However, the causality of this association needs to be demonstrated in clinical trials.

  16. The relationship between dietary fatty acids and inflammatory genes on the obese phenotype and serum lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joffe, Yael T; Collins, Malcolm; Goedecke, Julia H

    2013-05-21

    Obesity, a chronic low-grade inflammatory condition is associated with the development of many comorbidities including dyslipidemia. This review examines interactions between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in the inflammatory genes tumor necrosis alpha (TNFA) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) and dietary fatty acids, and their relationship with obesity and serum lipid levels. In summary, dietary fatty acids, in particular saturated fatty acids and the omega-3 and omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids, impact the expression of the cytokine genes TNFA and IL-6, and alter TNFα and IL-6 production. In addition, sequence variants in these genes have also been shown to alter their gene expression and plasma levels, and are associated with obesity, measures of adiposity and serum lipid concentrations. When interactions between dietary fatty acids and TNFA and IL-6 SNPs on obesity and serum lipid were analyzed, both the quantity and quality of dietary fatty acids modulated the relationship between TNFA and IL-6 SNPs on obesity and serum lipid profiles, thereby impacting the association between phenotype and genotype. Researching these diet-gene interactions more extensively, and understanding the role of ethnicity as a confounder in these relationships, may contribute to a better understanding of the inter-individual variability in the obese phenotype.

  17. Dietary fatty acids were not independently associated with lipoprotein subclasses in elderly women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaghehband, Fatemeh Ramezan; Lankinen, Maria; Värri, Miika; Sirola, Joonas; Kröger, Heikki; Erkkilä, Arja T

    2017-07-01

    Dietary fatty acids are known to affect serum lipoproteins; however, little is known about the associations between consumption of dietary fatty acids and lipoprotein subclasses. In this study, we hypothesized that there is an association between dietary fatty acids and lipoprotein subclasses and investigated the cross-sectional association of dietary fat intake with subclasses of lipoproteins in elderly women. Altogether, 547 women (aged ≥65 years) who were part of OSTPRE cohort participated. Dietary intake was assessed by 3-day food records, lifestyle, and health information obtained through self-administrated questionnaires, and lipoprotein subclasses were determined by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. To analyze the associations between fatty acids and lipoprotein subclasses, we used Pearson and Spearman correlation coefficients and the analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) test with, adjustment for physical activity, body mass index, age, smoking status, and intake of lipid-lowering drugs. There were significant correlations between saturated fatty acids (SFA; % of energy) and concentrations of large, medium, and small low-density lipoproteins (LDL); total cholesterol in large, medium, and small LDL; and phospholipids in large, medium, and small LDL, after correction for multiple testing. After adjustment for covariates, the higher intake of SFA was associated with smaller size of LDL particles (P = .04, ANCOVA) and lower amount of triglycerides in small very low-density lipoproteins (P = .046, ANCOVA). However, these associations did not remain significant after correction for multiple testing. In conclusion, high intake of SFA may be associated with the size of LDL particles, but the results do not support significant, independent associations between dietary fatty acids and lipoprotein subclasses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of dietary (n-3 highly unsaturated fatty acids on growth and survival of fat snook (Centropomus parallelus, Pisces: Centropomidae larvae during first feeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.E.B. Seiffert

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available The effect of rotifers, Brachionus rotundiformis (S-type, fed three different diets: A (rotifer fed Nannochloropsis oculata, B (rotifer fed N. oculata and baker's yeast, 1:1, and C (rotifer fed N. oculata and baker's yeast, 1:1, and enriched with Selcoâ, was evaluated based on the survival, growth and swim bladder inflation rate of fat snook larvae. Rotifers of treatment A had higher levels (4.58 mg/g dry weight of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA than B (1.81 mg/g dry weight, and similar levels (0.04 and 0.06 mg/g dry weight, respectively of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA. Rotifers of treatment C had the highest levels of EPA (13.2 mg/g dry weight and DHA (6.08 mg/g dry weight. Fat snook eggs were obtained by spawning induction with human chorionic gonadotropin. Thirty hours after hatching, 30 larvae/liter were stocked in black cylindric-conical tanks (36-liter capacity. After 14 days of culture, there were no significant differences among treatments. Mean standard length was 3.13 mm for treatment A, 3.17 mm for B, and 3.39 mm for C. Mean survival rates were very low (2.7% for treatment A, 2.3% for B, and 1.8% for C. Swim bladder inflation rates were 34.7% for treatment A, 27.1% for B, and 11.9% for C. The lack of differences in growth and survival among treatments showed that the improvement of the dietary value of rotifer may not have been sufficient to solve the problem of larval rearing. Some other factor, probably pertaining to the quality of the larvae, may have negatively influenced survival.

  19. Trans Fatty Acids: Their Chemical Structures, Formation and Dietary Intake

    OpenAIRE

    O. Daglioglu; Tasan, M.

    2005-01-01

    Trans fatty acids are unsaturated fatty acids with at least a double bond in trans configuration or geometry.The double-bond angle of the trans fatty acids is smaller than the cis isomeric configuration and the acylchain is more linear, resulting in a more rigid molecule with different physical properties such as a highermelting point and greater thermodynamic stability. These appear in dairy fat because of ruminal activity, andin hydrogenated oils. Trans unsaturated fatty acids are solid fat...

  20. Estimates of Total Dietary Folic Acid Intake in the Australian Population Following Mandatory Folic Acid Fortification of Bread

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacinta Dugbaza

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mandatory folic acid fortification of wheat flour for making bread was implemented in Australia in September 2009, to improve the dietary folate status of women of child-bearing age, and help reduce the incidence of neural tube defects in the population. This paper presents estimates of folic acid intake in the target population and other subgroups of the Australian population following implementation of the mandatory folic acid fortification standard. In June/July 2010 one hundred samples from seven bread categories were purchased from around the country and individually analysed for the amount of folic acid they contained. A modification to the triple enzyme microbiological method was used to measure folic acid in the individual bread samples. The folic acid analytical values together with national food consumption data were used to generate estimates of the population’s folic acid intake from fortified foods. Food Standards Australia New Zealand’s (FSANZ custom-built dietary modelling program (DIAMOND was used for the estimates. The mean amount of folic acid found in white bread was 200 μg/100 g which demonstrated that folic-acid-fortified wheat flour was used to bake the bread. The intake estimates indicated an increase in mean folic acid intake of 159 μg per day for the target group. Other sub-groups of the population also showed increases in estimated mean daily intake of folic acid.

  1. Florets of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.): potential new sources of dietary fiber and phenolic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Qiang; Cui, Jun; Li, Hang; Liu, Jia; Zhao, Guohua

    2013-04-10

    Ray florets (Rf) and disc florets (Df) are agricultural byproducts of sunflower seeds. Their nutrition-related compounds were determined. The dietary fiber contents in Rf and Df were 42.90 mg/100 g and 58.97 mg/100 g. In both florets, palmitic, linoleic, and linolenic acids were identified as the three most abundant fatty acids, and the saturated ones constitute approximately two-thirds (w/w) of the total fatty acids. Lysine was the limiting amino acid in both florets by World Health Organization standards. Sixteen phenolic compounds, nine free and eight bound, mainly depsides, were identified in florets by RP-HPLC-DAD/ESI-TOF-MS. The free and bound phenolic compounds in Df were higher than in Rf. 1,5-di-O-caffeoylquinic acid was the predominant free phenolic compound in both florets. The present study revealed that the florets of sunflower are rich sources of dietary fiber, Fe, and phenols.

  2. Effect of dietary arsonic acids on performance characteristics of swine waste anaerobic digesters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brumm, M.C.; Sutton, A.L.; Jones, D.D.

    1980-01-01

    A completely random design experiment was conducted to determine the effect of dietary arsonic acids on the performance of laboratory swine waste anaerobic digesters. Fortified corn-soybean meal diets containing no arsonic acids (control), 100 ppm arsanilic acid or 75 ppm roxarsone were fed to growing-finishing pigs. Fresh waste (including urine) from all treatments were collected daily for 74 days and loaded at a rate of 2.4 kg volatile solids/cubic meter into nine 25-L anaerobic digesters heated to 34 degrees with continuous agitation and total gas collection. After a 60-day acclimation period, daily gas production and composition and nutrient composition data were obtained from the anaerobic digesters. Inclusion of the arsonic acids in swine diets reduced dry matter and volatile solids content. Dietary arsonic acids also increased NH4+-N. Alky. was high in all the digesters; however, arsonic acids decreased alky. Dietary arsonic acids reduced the ratio of CH4 to CO2 in the gas compared to the control. Significant amounts of As accumulated in the digesters. Alcohol, ethanol, and propanol concentrations were increased by roxarsone, and arsanilic acid increased the PrCO2H concentrations over the percentage in both the roxarsone and control digesters.

  3. Analysis of the effect of dietary protected organic acid blend on lactating sows and their piglets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subramaniam Mohana Devi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effects of blends of dietary protected organic acid supplementation on growth performance, nutrient digestibility, blood profiles, faecal microflora, and gas emission on sows and piglets with emphasis on their modes of action to improve pig performance. A total of 12 sows with an average initial body weight (BW of 252.40±11.7 kg were used in this trial. Growth performance, blood profiles, and nutrient digestibility of sows and piglets fed protected organic acid were evaluated. The dietary treatments included a basal diet (CON; CON + 0.1% protected organic acid; and CON + 0.2% protected organic acid. The BW and back fat of sows was checked four days prior to farrowing and at the weaning day to calculate BW loss and back fat loss during that period. Inclusion of 0.2% protected organic acid provided a greater digestibility than CON diets throughout the experimental period in lactating sows. Dietary supplementation with 0.2% protected organic acid led to a higher white blood cell and lymphocyte concentration than CON treatment in sucking piglets. Immunoglobulin G concentration observed was greater in protected organic acid groups in lactating sow and sucking piglets. Increased faecal Lactobacillus counts with decreased E. coli concentrations were observed with the diets of protected organic acid fed to lactating sows. The E. coli counts were decreased in weaning piglets. The faecal H2S contents were decreased in 0.2% protected organic acid diets during farrowing on day 1. Dietary supplementation with protected organic acid blends beneficially affects the nutrient digestibility, ileal noxious gas (NH3 and H2S emission, as well as intestinal microbial balance in lactating sows.

  4. Dietary long-chain fatty acids and carbohydrate biomarker evaluation in a controlled feeding study in participants from the Women's Health Initiative cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiaoling; Huang, Ying; Neuhouser, Marian L; Tinker, Lesley F; Vitolins, Mara Z; Prentice, Ross L; Lampe, Johanna W

    2017-06-01

    Background: Biomarkers of macronutrient intake are lacking. Controlled human feeding studies that preserve the normal variation in nutrient and food consumption are necessary for the development and validation of robust nutritional biomarkers.Objective: We aimed to assess the utility of serum phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) as biomarkers of dietary intakes of fatty acids, total fat, and carbohydrate.Design: We used an individualized controlled feeding study in which 153 postmenopausal women from the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) were provided with a 2-wk controlled diet that mimicked each individual's habitual food intake. A total of 41 PLFAs were measured with the use of gas chromatography in end-of-feeding-period fasting serum samples and expressed in both relative and absolute concentrations. R(2) values (percentages of variation explained) from linear regressions of (ln-transformed) consumed fatty acids (individual, groups, and broad categories) on (ln-transformed) corresponding measures of serum PLFAs alone and together with selected participant-related variables (age, race/ethnicity, body mass index, season of study participation, education level, and estimated energy intake from doubly labeled water) were used for evaluation against established urinary recovery biomarkers of energy and protein intake as benchmarks. Models to predict intakes of other nutrients were also explored.Results: Intakes of eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid achieved the benchmark of R(2) > 36% with or without covariates. When all 41 serum PLFAs and participant-related covariates were initially included in the model for selection, cross-validated R(2) achieved >36% for consumed total carbohydrate (grams per day), total saturated fatty acids (SFAs), percentage of energy from SFAs, and total trans fatty acids with serum PLFAs in both relative and absolute concentrations.Conclusions: Serum PLFA biomarkers perform similarly to established energy and protein urinary recovery

  5. Dietary Supplementation of Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids in Caenorhabditis elegans

    OpenAIRE

    Deline, Marshall L.; Vrablik, Tracy L.; Watts, Jennifer L.

    2013-01-01

    Fatty acids are essential for numerous cellular functions. They serve as efficient energy storage molecules, make up the hydrophobic core of membranes, and participate in various signaling pathways. Caenorhabditis elegans synthesizes all of the enzymes necessary to produce a range of omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids. This, combined with the simple anatomy and range of available genetic tools, make it an attractive model to study fatty acid function. In order to investigate the genetic pathways...

  6. Dietary Hyaluronic Acid Migrates into the Skin of Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariko Oe

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyaluronic acid is a constituent of the skin and helps to maintain hydration. The oral intake of hyaluronic acid increases water in the horny layer as demonstrated by human trials, but in vivo kinetics has not been shown. This study confirmed the absorption, migration, and excretion of 14C-labeled hyaluronic acid (14C-hyaluronic acid. 14C-hyaluronic acid was orally or intravenously administered to male SD rats aged 7 to 8 weeks. Plasma radioactivity after oral administration showed the highest level 8 hours after administration, and orally administered 14C-hyaluronic acid was found in the blood. Approximately 90% of 14C-hyaluronic acid was absorbed from the digestive tract and used as an energy source or a structural constituent of tissues based on tests of the urine, feces, expired air, and cadaver up to 168 hours (one week after administration. The autoradiographic results suggested that radioactivity was distributed systematically and then reduced over time. The radioactivity was higher in the skin than in the blood at 24 and 96 hours after administration. The results show the possibility that orally administered hyaluronic acid migrated into the skin. No excessive accumulation was observed and more than 90% of the hyaluronic acid was excreted in expired air or urine.

  7. Dietary reference intakes for DHA and EPA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kris-Etherton, Penny M; Grieger, Jessica A; Etherton, Terry D

    2009-01-01

    Various organizations worldwide have made dietary recommendations for eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and fish intake that are primarily for coronary disease risk reduction and triglyceride (TG) lowering. Recommendations also have been made for DHA intake for pregnant women, infants, and vegetarians/vegans. A Dietary Reference Intake (DRI), specifically, an Adequate Intake (AI), has been set for alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) by the Institute of Medicine (IOM) of The National Academies. This amount is based on an intake that supports normal growth and neural development and results in no nutrient deficiency. Although there is no DRI for EPA and DHA, the National Academies have recommended that approximately 10% of the Acceptable Macronutrient Distribution Range (AMDR) for ALA can be consumed as EPA and/or DHA. This recommendation represents current mean intake for EPA and DHA in the United States ( approximately 100mg/day), which is much lower than what many groups worldwide are currently recommending. Global recommendations for long-chain omega-3 fatty acids underscore the pressing need to establish DRIs for DHA and EPA because DRIs are recognized as the "official" standard by which federal agencies issue dietary guidance or policy directives for the health and well-being of individuals in the United States and Canada. Because of the many health benefits of DHA and EPA, it is important and timely that the National Academies establish DRIs for the individual long-chain (20 carbons or greater) omega-3 fatty acids.

  8. Effect of Dietary Conjugated Linoleic Acid Supplementation on Early Inflammatory Responses during Cutaneous Wound Healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na-Young Park

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory response is considered the most important period that regulates the entire healing process. Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA, a class of linoleic acid positional and geometric isomers, is well known for its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. We hypothesized that dietary CLA supplementation accelerates cutaneous wound healing by regulating antioxidant and anti-inflammatory functions. To investigate wound closure rates and inflammatory responses, we used a full-thickness excisional wound model after 2-week treatments with control, 0.5%, or 1% CLA-supplemented diet. Mice fed dietary CLA supplementation had reduced levels of oxidative stress and inflammatory markers. Moreover, the wound closure rate was improved significantly in mice fed a 1% CLA-supplemented diet during early stage of wound healing (inflammatory stage. We conclude that dietary CLA supplementation enhances the early stage of cutaneous wound healing as a result of modulating oxidative stress and inflammatory responses.

  9. Regulation of intestinal IgA responses by dietary palmitic acid and its metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunisawa, Jun; Hashimoto, Eri; Inoue, Asuka; Nagasawa, Risa; Suzuki, Yuji; Ishikawa, Izumi; Shikata, Shiori; Arita, Makoto; Aoki, Junken; Kiyono, Hiroshi

    2014-08-15

    Enhancement of intestinal IgA responses is a primary strategy in the development of oral vaccine. Dietary fatty acids are known to regulate host immune responses. In this study, we show that dietary palmitic acid (PA) and its metabolites enhance intestinal IgA responses. Intestinal IgA production was increased in mice maintained on a PA-enriched diet. These mice also showed increased intestinal IgA responses against orally immunized Ag, without any effect on serum Ab responses. We found that PA directly stimulates plasma cells to produce Ab. In addition, mice receiving a PA-enriched diet had increased numbers of IgA-producing plasma cells in the large intestine; this effect was abolished when serine palmitoyltransferase was inhibited. These findings suggest that dietary PA regulates intestinal IgA responses and has the potential to be a diet-derived mucosal adjuvant.

  10. Transition of maternal dietary n-3 fatty acids from the yolk to the liver of broiler breeder progeny via the residual yolk sac.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppenol, Astrid; Buyse, Johan; Everaert, Nadia; Willems, Els; Wang, Yufeng; Franssens, Lies; Delezie, Evelyne

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the transfer of maternal dietary fatty acids (FA) from the yolk to the developing offspring, with special emphasis on n-3 FA eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Six hundred forty Ross 308 breeders were housed from 6 to 58 wk of age in 16 pens resulting in 4 replicates per dietary treatment. They were fed 1 of 4 diets: a basal diet, rich in n-6 FA (CON), or an n-3 FA enriched diet formulated to obtain an EPA/DHA ratio of 1/1 (EPA=DHA), 1/2 (DHA), or 2/1 (EPA). At 28, 43, and 58 wk of age, 20 eggs per treatment were collected and analyzed for FA composition. At these same breeder ages, 600 fertilized eggs per treatment were incubated. At hatch the residual yolks of 25 chicks per treatment were collected and analyzed for FA composition. At every hatch, 180 chicks per treatment were raised under standard conditions and livers were sampled at d 1, 14, 28, and 38 d for FA analysis. Concentrations of EPA in the yolk and residual yolk of eggs laid by EPA-fed breeders were highest, next-to-highest for EPA=DHA-fed breeders, next-to-lowest for DHA-fed breeders, and lowest in those laid by control hens, reflecting the inclusion levels in the maternal diets. Yolk and residual yolk DHA concentrations, however, were not only elevated due to DHA supplementation, compared with the control diet, but also due to EPA supplementation. Offspring hepatic EPA concentrations were elevated until d 28 in all n-3 enriched groups, whereas hepatic DHA concentrations were only affected by EPA=DHA and DHA supplementation at d 1. No differences were found in hepatic DHA concentrations at later offspring ages. Considering the role of EPA and DHA in early development and growth, the maternal supply of these n-3 FA might improve offspring health and performance.

  11. Dietary Buglossoides Arvensis Oil Increases Circulating n-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids in a Dose-Dependent Manner and Enhances Lipopolysaccharide-Stimulated Whole Blood Interleukin-10-A Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefort, Natalie; LeBlanc, Rémi; Surette, Marc E

    2017-03-10

    Buglossoides arvensis (Ahiflower) oil is a dietary oil rich in stearidonic acid (20% SDA; 18:4 n-3). The present randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial investigated the effects of three Ahiflower oil dosages on omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) content of plasma and mononuclear cells (MCs) and of the highest Ahiflower dosage on stimulated cytokine production in blood. Healthy subjects (n = 88) consumed 9.7 mL per day for 28 days of 100% high oleic sunflower oil (HOSO); 30% Ahiflower oil (Ahi) + 70% HOSO; 60% Ahi + 40% HOSO; and 100% Ahi. No clinically significant changes in blood and urine chemistries, blood lipid profiles, hepatic and renal function tests nor hematology were measured. Linear mixed models (repeated measures design) probed for differences in time, and time × treatment interactions. Amongst significant changes, plasma and MC eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5 n-3) levels increased from baseline at day 28 in all Ahiflower groups (p interleukin-10 (IL-10) was increased in the 100% Ahiflower oil group compared to 100% HOSO group (p < 0.05). IL-10 production was also increased in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated M2-differentiated THP-1 macrophage-like cells in the presence of 20:4 n-3 or EPA (p < 0.05). Overall; this indicates that the consumption of Ahiflower oil is associated with an anti-inflammatory phenotype in healthy subjects.

  12. Dietary trans fatty acids and cardiovascular disease risk: past and present.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenstein, Alice H

    2014-08-01

    Dietary trans double bond containing fatty acids have been associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. There are two main sources of dietary trans fatty acids: meat and dairy fats, and partially hydrogenated fats. Because of a number of factors, including changes in federal labeling requirements for packaged foods, and local bans and grassroots pressure on the use of partially hydrogenated fat, trans fat intake has declined in recent years. Similar to saturated fatty acids, trans fatty acids increase plasma low density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol concentrations. In contrast to saturated fatty acids, trans fatty acids do not increase high density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol concentrations. These differences have been attributed to lipoprotein catabolic rate rather than production rate. When reported, effects of partially hydrogenated fat on glucose homeostasis, C-reactive protein, blood pressure, and LDL oxidation are modest. Although at this time some issues remain unresolved regarding trans fatty acids and CVD risk factors other than plasma lipoprotein concentrations, they should not affect the final dietary recommendation to limit intake.

  13. Growth Performance, Meat Quality and Fatty Acid Metabolism Response of Growing Meat Rabbits to Dietary Linoleic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. G. Li

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available An experiment was conducted to determine the effects of different amounts of dietary linoleic acid (LA on growth performance, serum biochemical traits, meat quality, fatty acids composition of muscle and liver, acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC and carnitine palmitoyl transferase 1 (CPT 1 mRNA expression in the liver of 9 wks old to 13 wks old growing meat rabbits. One hundred and fifty 9 wks old meat rabbits were allocated to individual cages and randomly divided into five groups. Animals in each group were fed with a diet with the following LA addition concentrations: 0, 3, 6, 9 and 12 g/kg diet (as-fed basis and LA concentrations were 0.84, 1.21, 1.34, 1.61 and 1.80% in the diet, respectively. The results showed as follows: the dietary LA levels significantly affected muscle color of LL included a* and b* of experimental rabbits (p<0.05. The linear effect of LA on serum high density lipoprotein cholesterol was obtained (p = 0.0119. The saturated fatty acids (SFAs and monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs contents of LL decreased and the polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs content of LL increased with dietary LA increase (p<0.0001. The PUFA n-6 content and PUFA n-3 content in the LL was significantly affected by the dietary LA levels (p<0.01, p<0.05. The MUFAs content in the liver decreased and the PUFAs contents in the liver increased with dietary LA increase (p<0.0001. The PUFA n-6 content and the PUFA n-6/n-3 ratio in the liver increased and PUFA n-3 content in the liver decreased with dietary LA increase (p<0.01. The linear effect of LA on CPT 1 mRNA expression in the liver was obtained (p = 0.0081. In summary, dietary LA addition had significant effects on liver and muscle fatty acid composition (increased PUFAs of 9 wks old to 13 wks old growing meat rabbits, but had little effects on growth performance, meat physical traits and mRNA expression of liver relative enzyme of experimental rabbits.

  14. Dietary conjugated linoleic acid reciprocally modifies ketogenesis and lipid secretion by the rat liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakono, M; Miyanaga, F; Kawahara, S; Yamauchi, K; Fukuda, N; Watanabe, K; Iwata, T; Sugano, M

    1999-09-01

    The effects of dietary conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) and linoleic acid (LA) on ketone body production and lipid secretion were compared in isolated perfused rat liver. After feeding the 1% CLA diet for 2 wk, the concentration of post-perfused liver cholesterol was significantly reduced by CLA feeding, whereas that of triacylglycerol remained unchanged. Livers from CLA-fed rats produced significantly more ketone bodies; and the ratio of beta-hydroxybutyrate to acetoacetate, an index of mitochondrial redox potential, tended to be consistently higher in the liver perfusate. Conversely, cumulative secretions of triacylglycerol and cholesterol were consistently lower in the livers of rats fed CLA, and the reduction in the latter was statistically significant. Thus dietary CLA appeared to exert its hypolipidemic effect at least in part through an enhanced beta-oxidation of fatty acids at the expense of esterification of fatty acid in the liver.

  15. Dietary Fatty Acids and Temperature Modulate Mitochondrial Function and Longevity in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rand, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Fluctuations in temperature and resource availability are conditions many organisms contend with in nature. Specific dietary nutrients such as fatty acids play an essential role in reproduction, cold adaptation, and metabolism in a variety of organisms. The present study characterizes how temperature and diet interact to modulate Drosophila physiology and life span. Flies were raised on media containing specific saturated, monounsaturated, or polyunsaturated fatty acids supplements at low concentrations and were placed in varied thermal environments. We found that dietary long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids improve chill coma recovery and modulate mitochondrial function. Additionally, monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acid food supplements were detrimental to life span regardless of temperature, and antioxidants were able to partially rescue this effect. This study provides insight into environmental modulation of Drosophila physiology and life span. PMID:25910846

  16. Effect of dietary cis and trans fatty acids on serum lipoprotein(a) levels in humans.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mensink, R.P.; Zock, P.L.; Katan, M.B.; Hornstra, G.

    1992-01-01

    Serum lipoprotein[a] (Lp[a]) is a strong risk factor for coronary heart disease. We therefore examined the effect of dietary fatty acid composition on serum Lp[a] levels in three strictly controlled experiments with healthy normocholesterolemic men and women. In Expt. I, 58 subjects consumed a contr

  17. Developmental response of the beneficial predator Podisus maculiventris to change in dietary ascorbic acid concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    We report here the effects of ascorbic acid concentrations (0.07, 0.3, 3.0 and 30.0 g/L) in artificial diets on growth rates, adult weights, fecundity and survival of the predatory stink bug, Podisus maculiventris. Overall, a dietary level of 3.0 g/L gave the shortest developmental times over both ...

  18. Dietary n-3 fatty acids promote arrhythmias during acute regional myocardial ischemia in isolated pig hearts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coronel, R.; Wilms-Schopman, F.J.G.; Ruijter, den H.M.; Belterman, C.N.; Schumacher, C.A.; Opthof, T.; Hovernier, R.; Lemmens, A.G.; Terpstra, A.H.M.; Katan, M.B.; Zock, P.L.

    2007-01-01

    Objective Dietary supplementation with fish oil-derived n-3 fatty acids reduces mortality in patients with myocardial infarction, but may have adverse effects in angina patients. The underlying electrophysiologic mechanisms are poorly understood. We studied the arrhythmias and the electrophysiologic

  19. Dietary fatty acids affecting hepatic metabolism and atherosclerosis - mechanisms unravelled using a proteomics approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodríguez Gutiérrez, Guillermo

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Dietary fatty acids play an important role in the aetiology of coronary heart disease. The effects of dietary fatty acids on lipoprotein metabolism are well described, but additional or alternative mechanisms relating to potential influence on coronary heart disease are not known. This review describes how proteomics techniques have been used to identify proteins that are differentially regulated by dietary fatty acids. Such proteins may reveal pathways by which dietary fatty acids influence disease risk.Los ácidos grasos de la dieta cumplen un importante papel en la etiología de las enfermedades coronarias. A pesar de estar bien descrito el efecto de dichos ácidos grasos sobre el metabolismo lipoproteíco, no se conocen mecanismos alternativos que relacionen su influencia sobre posibles enfermedades coronarias. En esta revisión se describe el uso de técnicas proteómicas para la identificación de proteínas diferencialmente reguladas por dichos ácidos grasos. Tales proteínas pueden revelar rutas metabólicas implicadas en el riesgo de enfermedades y reguladas por los ácidos grasos de la dieta.

  20. Dietary n-3 fatty acids promote arrhythmias during acute regional myocardial ischemia in isolated pig hearts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coronel, R.; Wilms-Schopman, F.J.G.; Ruijter, den H.M.; Belterman, C.N.; Schumacher, C.A.; Opthof, T.; Hovernier, R.; Lemmens, A.G.; Terpstra, A.H.M.; Katan, M.B.; Zock, P.L.

    2007-01-01

    Objective Dietary supplementation with fish oil-derived n-3 fatty acids reduces mortality in patients with myocardial infarction, but may have adverse effects in angina patients. The underlying electrophysiologic mechanisms are poorly understood. We studied the arrhythmias and the electrophysiologic

  1. Dietary unsaturated fatty acids affect the mammary gland integrity and health in lactating dairy cows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mach Casellas, N.; Baal, van J.; Kruijt, L.; Jacobs, A.A.A.; Smits, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Information about the effects of unsaturated fatty acids (UFA) supplementation on the health and integrity of the mammary gland in lactating dairy cows is lacking. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the effects of unprotected dietary UFA on the global expression pattern of

  2. Dietary free fatty acids form alkaline phosphatase-enriched microdomains in the intestinal brush border membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Gert H; Rasmussen, Karina; Niels-Christiansen, Lise-Lotte

    2011-01-01

    the brush border, and from work by others it is known that fat absorption is accompanied by a rise in serum AP and secretion of surfactant-like particles from enterocytes. We propose that these physiological processes may be triggered by the sequestering of dietary free fatty acids in lipid raft...

  3. Spontaneous gallstone formation in deer mice: interaction of cholesterol, bile acids, and dietary fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginnett, Dorothy A; Theis, Jerold H; Kaneko, J Jerry

    2003-01-01

    A study of the physiologic and ecologic factors involved in a spontaneous seasonal gallstone cycle of deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus gambelii) was conducted at the Tulelake National Wildlife Refuge (California, USA) from March 1991 to June 1992. The specific hypothesis examined was whether or not seasonal increases in dietary fiber intake provides the necessary conditions for a solubility defect, or supersaturation mechanism, resulting in precipitation of cholesterol gallstones. Results indicated that in addition to the seasonal gallstone prevalence cycle, these deer mice exhibit significant seasonal cycling in serum cholesterol, serum bile acids, fecal bile acids, and diet composition. These physiologic and dietary cycles were phase-advanced 3 mo over the gallstone prevalence cycle, indicating an approximate 3 mo time period for gallstone formation under field conditions. Further, seasonal dietary fiber (plant material and seeds) was positively correlated with both serum cholesterol and the fecal bile acids. This suggests that in wild deer mice, variations in dietary fiber may significantly affect the resorption of bile acids, thereby providing a potential physiologic and nutritional mechanism for spontaneous cholesterol gallstone formation.

  4. Serum hs-CRP varies with dietary cholesterol, but not dietary fatty acid intake in individuals free of any history of cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazidi, M; Heidari-Bakavoli, A; Khayyatzadeh, S S; Azarpazhooh, M R; Nematy, M; Safarian, M; Esmaeili, H; Parizadeh, S M R; Ghayour-Mobarhan, M; Kengne, A P; Ferns, G A

    2016-12-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate whether serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) concentration varies with dietary fatty acid intake in Iranian adults free of any history of cardiovascular disease (CVD). This cross-sectional study involved 8105 adults (3142 men) aged 35-65 years. Dietary intake was assessed using 24-h dietary recalls. The relationship between anthropometric, cardiometabolic risk factors and dietary data and serum hs-CRP was assessed using SPSS software. Median crude dietary saturated fat decreased across hs-CRP quarters (P =0.009 for linear trend), whereas energy-adjusted total fat (P =0.017), trans-fat (P =0.016), monounsaturated fatty acids (P =0.030) and cholesterol (P =0.005) monotonically increased, with some evidence of statistical interactions by gender. In conclusion, serum hs-CRP concentrations were associated with some components of dietary fatty acid intake in our population of individuals without CVD, suggesting that dietary fat intake could be associated with subclinical inflammation.

  5. Repletion of branched chain amino acids reverses mTORC1 signaling but not improved metabolism during dietary protein dilution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maida, Adriano; Chan, Jessica S K; Sjøberg, Kim Anker

    2017-01-01

    dietary dilution of specific amino acids (AAs) is also required. Circulating branched chain amino acids (BCAAs) are sensitive to protein intake, elevated in the serum of obese humans and mice and thought to promote insulin resistance. We tested whether replenishment of dietary BCAAs to an AA-diluted (AAD......) diet is sufficient to reverse the glucoregulatory benefits of dietary PD. METHODS: We conducted AA profiling of serum from healthy humans and lean and high fat-fed or New Zealand obese (NZO) mice following dietary PD. We fed wildtype and NZO mice one of three amino acid defined diets: control, total......, while elevated in serum from hyperphagic NZO, were consistently reduced by dietary PD in humans and murine models. Repletion of dietary BCAAs modestly attenuated insulin sensitivity and metabolic efficiency in wildtype mice but did not restore hyperglycemia in NZO mice. While hepatic markers of the ISR...

  6. Erythrocyte levels compared with reported dietary intake of marine n-3 fatty acids in pregnant women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, S.F.; Hansen, H.S.; Sandstrom, B.;

    1995-01-01

    dietary self- administered questionnaire and interview, with fatty acids measured in erythrocyte phospholipids. Daily intake (g/d) and nutrient density of marine n-3 fatty acids (mg/MJ) correlated with the n-3 fatty acid: arachidonic acid ratio (FA-ratio) with correlation coefficients of 0.48 and 0.......54 respectively. In a linear regression model with three frequency questions about marine sandwiches, marine cooked meals and fish oil as explanatory variables, and the FA-ratio as dependent variable, the multiple correlation coefficient was 0.46. Conclusions from the study were (1) levels of erythrocyte fatty...

  7. Effect of dietary selenium and omega-3 fatty acids on muscle composition and quality in broilers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hetland Harald

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human health may be improved if dietary intakes of selenium and omega-3 fatty acids are increased. Consumption of broiler meat is increasing, and the meat content of selenium and omega-3 fatty acids are affected by the composition of broiler feed. A two-way analyses of variance was used to study the effect of feed containing omega-3 rich plant oils and selenium enriched yeast on broiler meat composition, antioxidation- and sensory parameters. Four different wheat-based dietary treatments supplemented with 5% rapeseed oil or 4% rapeseed oil plus 1% linseed oil, and either 0.50 mg selenium or 0.84 mg selenium (organic form per kg diet was fed to newly hatched broilers for 22 days. Results The different dietary treatments gave distinct different concentrations of selenium and fatty acids in thigh muscle; one percent linseed oil in the diet increased the concentration of the omega-3 fatty acids 18:3, 20:5 and 22:5, and 0.84 mg selenium per kg diet gave muscle selenium concentration at the same level as is in fish muscle (0.39 mg/kg muscle. The high selenium intake also resulted in increased concentration of the long-chain omega-3 fatty acids EPA (20:5, DPA (22:5 and DHA (22:6, thus it may be speculated if high dietary selenium might have a role in increasing the concentration of EPA, DPA and DHA in tissues after intake of plant oils contning omega-3 fatty acids. Conclusion Moderate modifications of broiler feed may give a healthier broiler meat, having increased content of selenium and omega-3 fatty acids. High intakes of selenium (organic form may increase the concentration of very long-chain omega-3 fatty acids in muscle.

  8. Study of the effects of dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids: Molecular mechanisms involved in intestinal inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Knoch, Bianca; Matthew P.G. Barnett; McNabb, Warren C.; Roy, Nicole C.

    2009-01-01

    The use of «omic» techniques in combination with model systems and molecular tools allows to understand how foods and food components act on metabolic pathways to regulate transcriptional processes. Polyunsaturated fatty acids have distinctive nutritional and metabolic effects because they give rise to lipid mediated products and affect the expression of various genes involved in intestinal inflammation. The present review focuses on the molecular effects of dietary polyunsaturated fatty acid...

  9. Baseline dietary glutamic acid intake and the risk of colorectal cancer: The Rotterdam study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viana Veloso, Gilson G; Franco, Oscar H; Ruiter, Rikje; de Keyser, Catherina E; Hofman, Albert; Stricker, Bruno C; Kiefte-de Jong, Jessica C

    2016-03-15

    Animal studies have shown that glutamine supplementation may decrease colon carcinogenesis, but any relation with glutamine or its precursors has not been studied in humans. The primary aim of this study was to assess whether dietary glutamic acid intake was associated with colorectal cancer (CRC) risk in community-dwelling adults. A secondary aim was to evaluate whether the association could be modified by the body mass index (BMI). This study was embedded in the Rotterdam study, which included a prospective cohort from 1990 onward that consisted of 5362 subjects who were 55 years old or older and were free of CRC at the baseline. Glutamic acid was calculated as a percentage of the total protein intake with a validated food frequency questionnaire at the baseline. Incident cases of CRC were pathology-based. During follow-up, 242 subjects developed CRC. Baseline dietary glutamic acid intake was significantly associated with a lower risk of developing CRC (hazard ratio [HR] per percent increase in glutamic acid of protein, 0.78; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.62-0.99). After stratification for BMI, the risk reduction for CRC by dietary glutamic acid was 42% for participants with a BMI ≤ 25 kg/m(2) (HR per percent increase in glutamic acid of protein, 0.58; 95% CI, 0.40-0.85), whereas no association was found in participants with a BMI > 25 kg/m(2) (HR per percent increase in glutamic acid of protein, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.73-1.31). Our data suggest that baseline dietary glutamic acid intake is associated with a lower risk of developing CRC, but this association may be mainly present in nonoverweight subjects. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  10. Six Tissue Transcriptomics Reveals Specific Immune Suppression in Spleen by Dietary Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara L Svahn

    Full Text Available Dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA are suggested to modulate immune function, but the effects of dietary fatty acids composition on gene expression patterns in immune organs have not been fully characterized. In the current study we investigated how dietary fatty acids composition affects the total transcriptome profile, and especially, immune related genes in two immune organs, spleen (SPL and bone marrow cells (BMC. Four tissues with metabolic function, skeletal muscle (SKM, white adipose tissue (WAT, brown adipose tissue (BAT, and liver (LIV, were investigated as a comparison. Following 8 weeks on low fat diet (LFD, high fat diet (HFD rich in saturated fatty acids (HFD-S, or HFD rich in PUFA (HFD-P, tissue transcriptomics were analyzed by microarray and metabolic health assessed by fasting blood glucose level, HOMA-IR index, oral glucose tolerance test as well as quantification of crown-like structures in WAT. HFD-P corrected the metabolic phenotype induced by HFD-S. Interestingly, SKM and BMC were relatively inert to the diets, whereas the two adipose tissues (WAT and BAT were mainly affected by HFD per se (both HFD-S and HFD-P. In particular, WAT gene expression was driven closer to that of the immune organs SPL and BMC by HFDs. The LIV exhibited different responses to both of the HFDs. Surprisingly, the spleen showed a major response to HFD-P (82 genes differed from LFD, mostly immune genes, while it was not affected at all by HFD-S (0 genes differed from LFD. In conclusion, the quantity and composition of dietary fatty acids affected the transcriptome in distinct manners in different organs. Remarkably, dietary PUFA, but not saturated fat, prompted a specific regulation of immune related genes in the spleen, opening the possibility that PUFA can regulate immune function by influencing gene expression in this organ.

  11. Impact of dietary aromatic amino acids on osteoclastic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Refaey, Mona El; Zhong, Qing; Ding, Ke-Hong; Shi, Xing-Ming; Xu, Jianrui; Bollag, Wendy B; Hill, William D; Chutkan, Norman; Robbins, Richard; Nadeau, Hugh; Johnson, Maribeth; Hamrick, Mark W; Isales, Carlos M

    2014-08-01

    We had shown that aromatic amino acid (phenylalanine, tyrosine, and tryptophan) supplementation prevented bone loss in an aging C57BL/6 mice model. In vivo results from the markers of bone breakdown suggested an inhibition of osteoclastic activity or differentiation. To assess osteoclastic differentiation, we examined the effects of aromatic amino acids on early /structural markers as vitronectin receptor, calcitonin receptor, and carbonic anhydrase II as well as, late/functional differentiation markers; cathepsin K and matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9). Our data demonstrate that the aromatic amino acids down-regulated early and late osteoclastic differentiation markers as measured by real time PCR. Our data also suggest a link between the vitronectin receptor and the secreted cathepsin K that both showed consistent effects to the aromatic amino acid treatment. However, the non-attachment related proteins, calcitonin receptor, and carbonic anhydrase II, demonstrated less consistent effects in response to treatment. Our data are consistent with aromatic amino acids down-regulating osteoclastic differentiation by suppressing remodeling gene expression thus contributing initially to the net increase in bone mass seen in vivo.

  12. Impact of the dietary fatty acid intake on C-reactive protein levels in US adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazidi, Mohsen; Gao, Hong-Kai; Vatanparast, Hassan; Kengne, Andre Pascal

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Growing evidence suggests that the effects of diet on cardiovascular disease (CVD) occur through mechanisms involving subclinical inflammation. We assessed whether reported dietary fatty acid intake correlates with a serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) concentration in a population-based sample of US men and women. In this cross-sectional analysis, participants were selected from the US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) and restricted to those with available data on dietary intake, biochemical and anthropometric measurements from 2001 to 2010. All statistical analyses accounted for the survey design and sample weights by using SPSS Complex Samples v22.0 (IBM Corp, Armonk, NY). Of the 17,689 participants analyzed, 8607 (48.3%) were men. The mean age was 45.8 years in the overall sample, 44.9 years in men, and 46.5 years in women (P = 0.047). The age-, race-, and sex-adjusted mean dietary intakes of total polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), PUFAs 18:2 (octadecadienoic), and PUFAs 18:3 (octadecatrienoic) monotonically decreased across hs-CRP quartiles (P hs-CRP quartiles (P hs-CRP concentrations are likely modulated by dietary fatty acid intake. However, the causality of this association needs to be demonstrated in clinical trials. PMID:28207502

  13. Dietary fatty acids in metabolic syndrome, diabetes and cardiovascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cascio, Giuseppe; Schiera, Gabriella; Di Liegro, Italia

    2012-01-01

    In the last few decades, the prevalence of overweight and essential obesity has been undergoing a fast and progressive worldwide increase. Obesity has been in turn linked to type II diabetes, with the total number of diabetic patients worryingly increasing, in the last fifteen years, suggesting a pandemic phenomenon. At the same time, an increase in the prevalence of cardiovascular diseases has been also recorded. Increasing evidence suggests that the diet is involved in such escalation. In particular, the progressive globalization of food industry allowed massive supply, at a relatively low price, of a great variety of pre-packed food and bakery products, with very high energy content. Most of this food contains high amounts of saturated fatty acids (SFA) and of hydrogenated or trans fatty acids (TFA), that probably represent the prominent risk factors in the diet. Herein we will report diffusion and possible impact on health of such molecules, with reference to coronary heart disease, insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome and diabetes. We will also discuss the cellular and molecular mechanisms of action of fatty acids and fatty acid-derivatives which have been involved either in promoting or in preventing human pathologies. Free fatty acids (FFA) are not indeed only essential fuels for the organism. They also act as ligands for both membrane and nuclear receptors involved in different signaling pathways. Notably, some of these pathways can induce cell stress and apoptosis. Most important, FFA can affect glucose-induced insulin secretion and activate β-cell death. These events can be at least in part counteracted by polyunsaturated fatty acids.

  14. Dietary ascorbic acid and subsequent change in body weight and waist circumference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Sofus C; Angquist, Lars; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer Singh

    2014-01-01

    (∆BW) and waist circumference (∆WC). METHODS: A total of 7,569 participants' from MONICA, the Diet Cancer and Health study and the INTER99 study were included in the study. We combined 50 obesity associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in four genetic scores: a score of all SNPs and a score...... in anthropometry, and whether such associations may depend on genetic predisposition to obesity. Hence, we examined whether dietary ascorbic acid, possibly in interaction with the genetic predisposition to a high BMI, WC or waist-hip ratio adjusted for BMI (WHR), associates with subsequent annual changes in weight......BACKGROUND: Cross-sectional data suggests that a low level of plasma ascorbic acid positively associates with both Body Mass Index (BMI) and Waist Circumference (WC). This leads to questions about a possible relationship between dietary intake of ascorbic acid and subsequent changes...

  15. Nitrogen in dietary glutamate is utilized exclusively for the synthesis of amino acids in the rat intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Hidehiro; Kawamata, Yasuko; Kuwahara, Tomomi; Torii, Kunio; Sakai, Ryosei

    2013-01-01

    Although previous studies have shown that virtually the entire carbon skeleton of dietary glutamate (glutamate-C) is metabolized in the gut for energy production and amino acid synthesis, little is known regarding the fate of dietary glutamate nitrogen (glutamate-N). In this study, we hypothesized that dietary glutamate-N is an effective nitrogen source for amino acid synthesis and investigated the fate of dietary glutamate-N using [(15)N]glutamate. Fischer male rats were given hourly meals containing [U-(13)C]- or [(15)N]glutamate. The concentration and isotopic enrichment of several amino acids were measured after 0-9 h of feeding, and the net release of each amino acid into the portal vein was calculated. Most of the dietary glutamate-C was metabolized into CO(2), lactate, or alanine (56, 13, and 12% of the dietary input, respectively) in the portal drained viscera (PDV). Most of the glutamate-N was utilized for the synthesis of other amino acids such as alanine and citrulline (75 and 3% of dietary input, respectively) in the PDV, and only minor amounts were released into the portal vein in the form of ammonia and glutamate (2 and 3% of the dietary input, respectively). Substantial incorporation of (15)N into systemic amino acids such as alanine, glutamine, and proline, amino acids of the urea cycle, and branched-chain amino acids was also evident. These results provide quantitative evidence that dietary glutamate-N distributes extensively to amino acids synthesized in the PDV and, consequently, to circulating amino acids.

  16. Influence of dietary conjugated linoleic acid (CLA and L-Lysine on heavy pigs performances and meat quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Corino

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA refers to a group of positional and geometric fatty acid isomers derived from linoleic acid. Dietary CLA supplementation has been shown to increase feed efficiency and may reduce body fat content in swine as recently reviewed by Corino et al., (2005. There was only one research conducted in heavy pig in which the authors did not observed any significant effect of dietary CLA on growth performances and lean tissue (Corino et al., 2003.

  17. Effect of dietary fatty acid composition on substrate utilization and body weight maintenance in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Sridevi; Cooper, Jamie A

    2014-04-01

    Dietary fat content is a primary factor associated with the increase in global obesity rates. There is a delay in achieving fat balance following exposure to a high-fat (HF) diet (≥ 40% of total energy from fat) and fat balance is closely linked to energy balance. Exercise has been shown to improve this rate of adaptation to a HF diet. Recently, however, the role of dietary fatty acid composition on energy and macronutrient balance has come into question. We chose studies that compared monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA), polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), and saturated fatty acids (SFA). We have reviewed studies that measured diet-induced thermogenesis (DIT), energy expenditure (EE), or fat oxidation (FOx) in response to a HF meal challenge, or long-term dietary intervention comparing these fatty acids. While single-meal studies show that SFA induce lower DIT and FOx compared to unsaturated fats, the effect of the degree of unsaturation (MUFA vs. PUFA) appears to yet be determined. Long-term dietary interventions also support the notion that unsaturated fats induce greater EE, DIT, and/or FOx versus SFA and that a high MUFA diet induces more weight loss compared to a high SFA diet. Sex and BMI status also affect the metabolic responses to different fatty acids; however, more research in these areas is warranted. SFA are likely more obesigenic than MUFA, and PUFA. The unsaturated fats appear to be more metabolically beneficial, specifically MUFA ≥ PUFA > SFA, as evidenced by the higher DIT and FOx following HF meals or diets.

  18. Biochemical and physiological bases for utilization of dietary amino acids by young Pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei, Reza; Wang, Weiwei; Wu, Zhenlong; Dai, Zhaolai; Wang, Junjun; Wu, Guoyao

    2013-02-27

    Protein is quantitatively the most expensive nutrient in swine diets. Hence it is imperative to understand the physiological roles played by amino acids in growth, development, lactation, reproduction, and health of pigs to improve their protein nutrition and reduce the costs of pork production. Due to incomplete knowledge of amino acid biochemistry and nutrition, it was traditionally assumed that neonatal, post-weaning, growing-finishing, and gestating pigs could synthesize sufficient amounts of all "nutritionally nonessential amino acids" (NEAA) to support maximum production performance. Therefore, over the past 50 years, much emphasis has been placed on dietary requirements of nutritionally essential amino acids as building blocks for tissue proteins. However, a large body of literature shows that NEAA, particularly glutamine, glutamate, arginine and proline regulate physiological functions via cell signaling pathways, such as mammalian target of rapamycin, AMP-activated protein kinase, extracellular signal-related kinase, Jun kinase, mitogen-activated protein kinase, and NEAA-derived gaseous molecules (e.g., nitric oxide, carbon monoxide, and hydrogen sulfide). Available evidence shows that under current feeding programs, only 70% and 55% of dietary amino acids are deposited as tissue proteins in 14-day-old sow-reared piglets and in 30-day-old pigs weaned at 21 days of age, respectively. Therefore, there is an urgent need to understand the roles and dietary requirements of NEAA in swine nutrition. This review highlights the basic biochemistry and physiology of absorption and utilization of amino acids in young pigs to enhance the efficacy of utilization of dietary protein and to minimize excretion of nitrogenous wastes from the body.

  19. Effect of dietary conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) on carcass quality ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    mdenli

    linoleic acid (CLA) on carcass characteristics, serum lipid variables and histopathological ... were not detected in any breast tissues collected from the broiler carcasses. ... There are four different aflatoxins produced by these fungi, AFB1, B2, G1 and ..... Experimental studies on aflatoxin B1 and M1 deposition and clearance.

  20. Dietary deficiency of essential amino acids rapidly induces cessation of the rat estrous cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narita, Kazumi; Nagao, Kenji; Bannai, Makoto; Ichimaru, Toru; Nakano, Sayako; Murata, Takuya; Higuchi, Takashi; Takahashi, Michio

    2011-01-01

    Reproductive functions are regulated by the sophisticated coordination between the neuronal and endocrine systems and are sustained by a proper nutritional environment. Female reproductive function is vulnerable to effects from dietary restrictions, suggesting a transient adaptation that prioritizes individual survival over reproduction until a possible future opportunity for satiation. This adaptation could also partially explain the existence of amenorrhea in women with anorexia nervosa. Because amino acid nutritional conditions other than caloric restriction uniquely alters amino acid metabolism and affect the hormonal levels of organisms, we hypothesized that the supply of essential amino acids in the diet plays a pivotal role in the maintenance of the female reproductive system. To test this hypothesis, we examined ovulatory cyclicity in female rats under diets that were deficient in threonine, lysine, tryptophan, methionine or valine. Ovulatory cyclicity was monitored by daily cytological evaluations of vaginal smears. After continuous feeding of the deficient diet, a persistent diestrus or anovulatory state was induced most quickly by the valine-deficient diet and most slowly by the lysine-deficient diet. A decline in the systemic insulin-like growth factor 1 level was associated with a dietary amino acid deficiency. Furthermore, a paired group of rats that were fed an isocaloric diet with balanced amino acids maintained normal estrous cyclicity. These disturbances of the estrous cycle by amino acid deficiency were quickly reversed by the consumption of a normal diet. The continuous anovulatory state in this study is not attributable to a decrease in caloric intake but to an imbalance in the dietary amino acid composition. With a shortage of well-balanced amino acid sources, reproduction becomes risky for both the mother and the fetus. It could be viewed as an adaptation to the diet, diverting resources away from reproduction and reallocating them to

  1. A REVIEW ON ACID BASE STATUS IN DAIRY COWS: IMPLICATIONS OF DIETARY CATION-ANION BALANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Afzaal, M. Nisa, M. A. Khan and M. Sarwar

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available The acid base status of a dairy cow is maintained within a narrow range. The key mechanisms involving blood, cells and lungs, perform this function. Although other minerals have an impact on acid base metabolism, the minerals used in dietary cation-anion balance (DCAB namely sodium (Na, potassium (K and chloride (Cl have the greatest effect. Hence, acid base status implicates other biological functions of dairy cows. Low DCAB prepartum reduces the incidence of milk fever and increases the productivity by simmering down the severity of hypocalcaemia. High DCAB diets have proved to increase dry mater and water intake and production and to mitigate the effects of heat stress.

  2. Effects of dietary conjugated linoleic acids on cellular immune response of piglets after cyclosporin A injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y X; Zhu, K Y; Liu, Y L; Jiang, D F

    2016-10-01

    The present study investigated the effects of dietary conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) on the cellular immune response of piglets after cyclosporin A (CsA) treatment. The experimental study had a 2×2 factorial design, and the main factors consisted of diets (0% or 2% CLA) and immunosuppression treatments (CsA or saline injection). CsA injection significantly increased feed : gain (F : G) of piglets (P<0.05); however, dietary CLA significantly decreased F : G of piglets (P<0.05). Dietary CLA partly ameliorated the deterioration of the feed conversion rate caused by CsA treatment (P<0.01). CsA treatment significantly decreased the percentages of CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes in the thymus (P<0.01). Dietary CLA increased the percentages of CD4+ CD8+ double-positive and CD8+ single-positive T lymphocytes in the thymus (P<0.05), and had the trend to inhibit the decrease of CD4+ T lymphocytes in the thymus after CsA injection (P=0.07). CsA treatment significantly depleted the peripheral blood CD3+, CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes (P<0.01). Dietary CLA significantly increased the number of peripheral blood CD8+ T lymphocytes and interleukin-2 (IL-2) production (P<0.05), and inhibited the decreases of peripheral blood CD3+, CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes counts (P<0.01) as well as IL-2 production (P<0.05) after CsA treatment. Dietary CLA partly rescued the decrease of lymphocyte proliferation after CsA injection (P<0.05). In summary, dietary CLA effectively ameliorated CsA-induced cellular immunosuppression in piglets.

  3. Fatty Acids Composition of Vegetable Oils and Its Contribution to Dietary Energy Intake and Dependence of Cardiovascular Mortality on Dietary Intake of Fatty Acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Orsavova

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Characterizations of fatty acids composition in % of total methylester of fatty acids (FAMEs of fourteen vegetable oils—safflower, grape, silybum marianum, hemp, sunflower, wheat germ, pumpkin seed, sesame, rice bran, almond, rapeseed, peanut, olive, and coconut oil—were obtained by using gas chromatography (GC. Saturated (SFA, monounsaturated (MUFA and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA, palmitic acid (C16:0; 4.6%–20.0%, oleic acid (C18:1; 6.2%–71.1% and linoleic acid (C18:2; 1.6%–79%, respectively, were found predominant. The nutritional aspect of analyzed oils was evaluated by determination of the energy contribution of SFAs (19.4%–695.7% ERDI, PUFAs (10.6%–786.8% ERDI, n-3 FAs (4.4%–117.1% ERDI and n-6 FAs (1.8%–959.2% ERDI, expressed in % ERDI of 1 g oil to energy recommended dietary intakes (ERDI for total fat (ERDI—37.7 kJ/g. The significant relationship between the reported data of total fat, SFAs, MUFAs and PUFAs intakes (% ERDI for adults and mortality caused by coronary heart diseases (CHD and cardiovascular diseases (CVD in twelve countries has not been confirmed by Spearman’s correlations.

  4. Ruminal Biohydrogenation Pattern of Poly-Unsaturated Fatty Acid as Influenced by Dietary Tannin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anuraga Jayanegara

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Large amounts of polyunsaturated fatty acids undergo transformation processes in the rumen through microbial biohydrogenation to form fatty acids with higher saturation degree. The respective process explains the high content of saturated fatty acids in products of ruminants and the potential risk of consumers’ health by consuming such products. Various nutritional approaches have been attempted to modulate biohydrogenation process in order to obtain healthier fatty acid profile from consumers’ perspective. The present paper is aimed to review the influence of dietary tannin, a naturally produced plant secondary compound, on the pattern of polyunsaturated fatty acids biohydrogenation occurring in the rumen. The effect of tannin on some key fatty acids involved in biohydrogenation process is presented together with the underlying mechanisms, particularly from up-to-date research results. Accordingly, different form of tannin as well as different level of the application are also discussed.

  5. Dietary omega-3 fatty acids modulate large-scale systems organization in the rhesus macaque brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grayson, David S; Kroenke, Christopher D; Neuringer, Martha; Fair, Damien A

    2014-02-01

    Omega-3 fatty acids are essential for healthy brain and retinal development and have been implicated in a variety of neurodevelopmental disorders. This study used resting-state functional connectivity MRI to define the large-scale organization of the rhesus macaque brain and changes associated with differences in lifetime ω-3 fatty acid intake. Monkeys fed docosahexaenoic acid, the long-chain ω-3 fatty acid abundant in neural membranes, had cortical modular organization resembling the healthy human brain. In contrast, those with low levels of dietary ω-3 fatty acids had decreased functional connectivity within the early visual pathway and throughout higher-order associational cortex and showed impairment of distributed cortical networks. Our findings illustrate the similarity in modular cortical organization between the healthy human and macaque brain and support the notion that ω-3 fatty acids play a crucial role in developing and/or maintaining distributed, large-scale brain systems, including those essential for normal cognitive function.

  6. Growth Response and Fatty Acid Composition of Juvenile Procambarus clarkii Fed Different Sources of Dietary Lipid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEN Xiao-bo; KU Yao-mei; ZHOU Kai-ya

    2003-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to evaluate the effects of feeding various sources of dietary lipidon weight gain, feed conversion, survival and fatty acid composition of juvenile red swamp crawfish, Procam-barus clarkii. Six semi-purified diets containing vitamin-free casein, defatted soybean meal, 0.5% cholinechloride, 0.5 % glycine and 0.5 % cholesterol were supplemented with 6.0 % of either anchovy oil, linseed oil,soybean oil, rapeseed oil, safflower oil or pork lard. Each diet was fed to crawfish (3.07±0.21 g averageweight) in three replicate aquaria for 60 days. Survival rate, weight gain and feed conversion were best forcrawfish fed the diet containing anchovy oil. Crawfish fed the linseed oil diet had the second highest weightgain, followed by crawfish on soybean oil, repaseed oil, safflower oil and pork lard diets, respectively. Feedconversion values were a reflection of weight gain. Results showed that both n-6 and n-3 fatty acids are dietaryessential for juvenile Procambarus clarkii, although n-3 fatty acids promoted faster growth than n-6. Howev-er, highly unsaturated fatty acids (HUFA) (20 : 5n-3 and 22 : 6n-3) had better growth-promoting effect than18 : 3n-3, due probably to the limited ability of crawfish to bioconvert fatty acids to polyenoic forms of longerchain length. The fatty acid composition of the crawfish generally reflected that of the dietary lipids, especial-ly for the diets containing unsaturated fatty acids.

  7. Determination of the uronic acid composition of seaweed dietary fibre by HPLC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Machado, D I; López-Cervantes, J; López-Hernández, J; Paseiro-Losada, P; Simal-Lozano, J

    2004-03-01

    A high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) method is described for determination of the ratio of beta-d-mannuronic acid to alpha-l-guluronic acid (M/G ratio) in dietary fibre of edible seaweeds. Total dietary fibre (TDF) content was determined gravimetrically. The TDF fraction was hydrolysed with 12 m and 1 m H(2)SO(4), then neutralized with AG 4 x 4 resin. The uronic acids were separated in a Tracer Extrasil SAX 5 micro m column (25 cm x 4 mm) at 35 degrees C, with 2 mm KH(2)PO(4) containing 5% methanol as mobile phase at a fl ow rate of 1.5 mL/min. The detection wavelength was UV 210 nm. The chromatographic identifications of beta-d-mannuronic acid and alpha-l-guluronic acid were confirmed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). The method precision was 1.4% for beta-d-mannuronic acid and 3.5% for alpha-l-guluronic acid. The method was used to determine M/G ratio in canned seaweeds (Saccorhiza polyschides and Himanthalia elongata) and in dried seaweeds (H. elongata, Laminaria ochroleuca, Undaria pinnatifida, Palmaria sp. and Porphyra sp.).

  8. A pilot, short-term dietary manipulation of branched chain amino acids has modest influence on fasting levels of branched chain amino acids

    OpenAIRE

    Cavallaro, Nicole Landa; Garry, Jamie; Shi, Xu; Gerszten, Robert E.; Anderson, Ellen J.; Walford, Geoffrey A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Elevated fasting levels of branched chain amino acids (BCAAs: valine, isoleucine, leucine) in venous blood are associated with a variety of metabolic impairments, including increased risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Fasting BCAA levels are influenced by non-dietary factors. However, it is unknown whether fasting BCAAs can be altered through manipulation of dietary intake alone. Objective: To test whether a specific dietary intervention, using differences in BCAA intake, alters fasti...

  9. An Investigation into the Association between DNA Damage and Dietary Fatty Acid in Men with Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen S. Bishop

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is a growing problem in New Zealand and worldwide, as populations adopt a Western style dietary pattern. In particular, dietary fat is believed to be associated with oxidative stress, which in turn may be associated with cancer risk and development. In addition, DNA damage is associated with the risk of various cancers, and is regarded as an ideal biomarker for the assessment of the influence of foods on cancer. In the study presented here, 20 men with prostate cancer adhered to a modified Mediterranean style diet for three months. Dietary records, blood fatty acid levels, prostate specific antigen, C-reactive protein and DNA damage were assessed pre- and post-intervention. DNA damage was inversely correlated with dietary adherence (p = 0.013 and whole blood monounsaturated fatty acids (p = 0.009 and oleic acid (p = 0.020. DNA damage was positively correlated with the intake of dairy products (p = 0.043, red meat (p = 0.007 and whole blood omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (p = 0.015. Both the source and type of dietary fat changed significantly over the course of the dietary intervention. Levels of DNA damage were correlated with various dietary fat sources and types of dietary fat.

  10. Infantile Refsum Disease: Influence of Dietary Treatment on Plasma Phytanic Acid Levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sá, Maria João Nabais; Rocha, Júlio C; Almeida, Manuela F; Carmona, Carla; Martins, Esmeralda; Miranda, Vasco; Coutinho, Miguel; Ferreira, Rita; Pacheco, Sara; Laranjeira, Francisco; Ribeiro, Isaura; Fortuna, Ana Maria; Lacerda, Lúcia

    2016-01-01

    Infantile Refsum disease (IRD) is one of the less severe of Zellweger spectrum disorders (ZSDs), a group of peroxisomal biogenesis disorders resulting from a generalized peroxisomal function impairment. Increased plasma levels of very long chain fatty acids (VLCFA) and phytanic acid are biomarkers used in IRD diagnosis. Furthermore, an increased plasma level of phytanic acid is known to be associated with neurologic damage. Treatment of IRD is symptomatic and multidisciplinary.The authors report a 3-year-old child, born from consanguineous parents, who presented with developmental delay, retinitis pigmentosa, sensorineural deafness and craniofacial dysmorphisms. While the relative level of plasma C26:0 was slightly increased, other VLCFA were normal. Thus, a detailed characterization of the phenotype was essential to point to a ZSD. Repeatedly increased levels of plasma VLCFA, along with phytanic acid and pristanic acid, deficient dihydroxyacetone phosphate acyltransferase activity in fibroblasts and identification of the homozygous pathogenic mutation c.2528G>A (p.Gly843Asp) in the PEX1 gene, confirmed this diagnosis. Nutritional advice and follow-up was proposed aiming phytanic acid dietary intake reduction. During dietary treatment, plasma levels of phytanic acid decreased to normal, and the patient's development evaluation showed slow progressive acquisition of new competences.This case report highlights the relevance of considering a ZSD in any child with developmental delay who manifests hearing and visual impairment and of performing a systematic biochemical investigation, when plasma VLCFA are mildly increased. During dietary intervention, a biochemical improvement was observed, and the long-term clinical effect of this approach needs to be evaluated.

  11. Dietary Effect of Iranian Native Turkey Breast Meat Saturated Fatty Acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramin Salamatdoustnobar

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This experiment was conducted to determine the effect of dietary Canola oil (unsaturated oil of on breast meat Saturated Fatty Acids (SFA percentage. Ninety male Iranian native turkey were randomly distributed into three experimental treatments to determine of the amount canola oil fatty acids deposited in raw chicken tissues. These diets were isonitrogenous and isoenergetic were given to broiler chickens throughout a 20 wk growth period. Meat fatty acids profiles with Gas Chromatography (GC technique were measured. Data was analyzed with one way ANOVA and means compared with Duncan test. According to results Saturated fatty acids for breast meat significantly (p<0.05 from 40.7854% reached to 32.977 and 32.642% for experimental treatment and this status increased unsaturated fatty acid content.

  12. Dietary essential fatty acids, vitamin E, and Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, L L; O'Dougherty, M M; Wright, F S; Bobulski, R J; Horrocks, L A

    1986-09-01

    Twenty patients with type I Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease received dietary supplementation with the essential fatty acids (EFA), linoleic and gamma-linolenic acids, and vitamin E. A 3-month blinded trial of placebo (paraffin oil and vitamin E, 81.6 IU/d) was followed by 1 year of 3 grams daily of EFA and vitamin E. Serum fatty acid values doubled, but total esterified fatty acid proportions did not change. Arachidonic acid proportions correlated with the amount of prostaglandin-mediated lymphocyte suppression measured at the same times. Improvement demonstrated at the end of the placebo period by neuropsychological tests and neurologic examination was maintained during the 1 year of EFA supplementation. This effect may reflect a membrane stabilization benefit of vitamin E.

  13. Dietary sources of omega 3 fatty acids: public health risks and benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tur, J A; Bibiloni, M M; Sureda, A; Pons, A

    2012-06-01

    Omega 3 fatty acids can be obtained from several sources, and should be added to the daily diet to enjoy a good health and to prevent many diseases. Worldwide, general population use omega-3 fatty acid supplements and enriched foods to get and maintain adequate amounts of these fatty acids. The aim of this paper was to review main scientific evidence regarding the public health risks and benefits of the dietary sources of omega-3 fatty acids. A systematic literature search was performed, and one hundred and forty-five articles were included in the results for their methodological quality. The literature described benefits and risks of algal, fish oil, plant, enriched dairy products, animal-derived food, krill oil, and seal oil omega-3 fatty acids.

  14. Dietary Fatty Acids and Immune Response to Food-Borne Bacterial Infections

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Functional innate and acquired immune responses are required to protect the host from pathogenic bacterial infections. Modulation of host immune functions may have beneficial or deleterious effects on disease outcome. Different types of dietary fatty acids have been shown to have variable effects on bacterial clearance and disease outcome through suppression or activation of immune responses. Therefore, we have chosen to review research across experimental models and food sources on the effec...

  15. Oxidation of dietary stearic, oleic, and linoleic acids in growing pigs follows a biphasic pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruininx, Erik; van den Borne, Joost; van Heugten, Eric; van Milgen, Jaap; Verstegen, Martin; Gerrits, Walter

    2011-09-01

    We used the pig as a model to assess the effects of dietary fat content and composition on nutrient oxidation and energy partitioning in positive energy balance. Pigs weighing 25 kg were assigned to either: 1) a low fat-high starch diet, or 2) a high saturated-fat diet, or 3) a high unsaturated-fat diet. In the high-fat treatments, 20% starch was iso-energetically replaced by 10.8% lard or 10.2% soybean oil, respectively. For 7 d, pigs were fed twice daily at a rate of 1200 kJ digestible energy · kg(-0.75) · d(-1). Oral bolus doses of [U-(13)C] glucose, [U-(13)C] α-linoleate, [U-(13)C] stearate, and [U-(13)C] oleate were administered on d 1, 2, 4, and 6, respectively, and (13)CO(2) production was measured. Protein and fat deposition were measured for 7 d. Fractional oxidation of fatty acids from the low-fat diet was lower than from the high-fat diets. Within diets, the saturated [U-(13)C] stearate was oxidized less than the unsaturated [U-(13)C] oleate and [U-(13)C] linoleate. For the high unsaturated-fat diet, oxidation of [U-(13)C] oleate was higher than that of [U-(13)C] linoleate. In general, recovery of (13)CO(2) from labeled fatty acids rose within 2 h after ingestion but peaked around the next meal. This peak was induced by an increased energy expenditure that was likely related to increased eating activity. In conclusion, oxidation of dietary fatty acids in growing pigs depends on the inclusion level and composition of dietary fat. Moreover, our data suggest that the most recently ingested fatty acids are preferred substrates for oxidation when the direct supply of dietary nutrients has decreased and ATP requirements increase.

  16. Current issues in determining dietary protein and amino-acid requirements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pencharz, P; Jahoor, F; Kurpad, A

    2014-01-01

    Pregnancy and the first two years of life are periods of rapid growth and yet the knowledge of requirements for protein and dietary indispensable amino acids is very limited. The development of carbon oxidation methods opens the way to studies that should fill these important gaps in knowledge.Eu.......European Journal of Clinical Nutrition advance online publication, 15 January 2014; doi:10.1038/ejcn.2013.297....

  17. Dietary docosahexaenoic acid alleviates autistic-like behaviors resulting from maternal immune activation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiser, Michael J; Mucha, Brittany; Denheyer, Heather; Atkinson, Devon; Schanz, Norman; Vassiliou, Evros; Benno, Robert H

    2016-03-01

    The prevalence of autism spectrum disorders over the last several decades has risen at an alarming rate. Factors such as broadened clinical definitions and increased parental age only partially account for this precipitous increase, suggesting that recent changes in environmental factors may also be responsible. One such factor could be the dramatic decrease in consumption of anti-inflammatory dietary omega-3 (n-3) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) relative to the amount of pro-inflammatory omega-6 (n-6) PUFAs and saturated fats in the Western diet. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is the principle n-3 PUFA found in neural tissue and is important for optimal brain development, especially during late gestation when DHA rapidly and preferentially accumulates in the brain. In this study, we tested whether supplementation of a low n-3 PUFA diet with DHA throughout development could improve measures related to autism in a mouse model of maternal immune activation. We found that dietary DHA protected offspring from the deleterious effects of gestational exposure to the viral mimetic polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidilic acid on behavioral measures of autism and subsequent adulthood immune system reactivity. These data suggest that elevated dietary levels of DHA, especially during pregnancy and nursing, may help protect normal neurodevelopment from the potentially adverse consequences of environmental insults like maternal infection.

  18. Interaction of dietary fatty acids with tumour necrosis factor family cytokines during colon inflammation and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmanová, Jiřina; Straková, Nicol; Vaculová, Alena Hyršlová; Tylichová, Zuzana; Safaříková, Barbora; Skender, Belma; Kozubík, Alois

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal homeostasis is precisely regulated by a number of endogenous regulatory molecules but significantly influenced by dietary compounds. Malfunction of this system may result in chronic inflammation and cancer. Dietary essential n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and short-chain fatty acid butyrate produced from fibre display anti-inflammatory and anticancer activities. Both compounds were shown to modulate the production and activities of TNF family cytokines. Cytokines from the TNF family (TNF- α, TRAIL, and FasL) have potent inflammatory activities and can also regulate apoptosis, which plays an important role in cancer development. The results of our own research showed enhancement of apoptosis in colon cancer cells by a combination of either docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) or butyrate with TNF family cytokines, especially by promotion of the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway and modulation of NF κ B activity. This review is focused mainly on the interaction of dietary PUFAs and butyrate with these cytokines during colon inflammation and cancer development. We summarised recent knowledge about the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in such effects and outcomes for intestinal cell behaviour and pathologies. Finally, the possible application for the prevention and therapy of colon inflammation and cancer is also outlined.

  19. Dietary conjugated linoleic acid modify gene expression in liver, muscles, and fat tissues of finishing pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tous, N; Theil, P K; Lauridsen, C; Lizardo, R; Vilà, B; Esteve-Garcia, E

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate underlying mechanisms of dietary conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) on lipid metabolism in various tissues of pigs. Sixteen gilts (73 ± 3 kg) were fed a control (containing sunflower oil) or an experimental diet in which 4% of sunflower oil was replaced by CLA, and slaughtered at an average BW of 117 ± 4.9 kg. Transcription of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ), fatty acid synthase (FAS), sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP1), acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), lipoprotein lipase (LPL), delta-6-desaturase (D6D), and stearoyl CoA desaturase (SCD) were determined by real-time PCR in longissimus thoracis (LT) and semimembranosus (SM) muscles, LT subcutaneous and SM intermuscular fat, and in the liver. Fatty acid (FA) composition was analyzed using gas chromatography in these tissues, except for SM intermuscular fat. Dietary CLA increased PPARγ in LT muscle (P tissues studied (P muscle and liver (SREBP1, both P muscle and reduced (P muscle and intermuscular fat. Saturated FA were increased in all studied tissues (P tissue-specific way by CLA. It was concluded that dietary CLA affected transcription of genes and fat metabolism in a tissue-specific manner.

  20. Interaction of Dietary Fatty Acids with Tumour Necrosis Factor Family Cytokines during Colon Inflammation and Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiřina Hofmanová

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal homeostasis is precisely regulated by a number of endogenous regulatory molecules but significantly influenced by dietary compounds. Malfunction of this system may result in chronic inflammation and cancer. Dietary essential n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs and short-chain fatty acid butyrate produced from fibre display anti-inflammatory and anticancer activities. Both compounds were shown to modulate the production and activities of TNF family cytokines. Cytokines from the TNF family (TNF-α, TRAIL, and FasL have potent inflammatory activities and can also regulate apoptosis, which plays an important role in cancer development. The results of our own research showed enhancement of apoptosis in colon cancer cells by a combination of either docosahexaenoic acid (DHA or butyrate with TNF family cytokines, especially by promotion of the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway and modulation of NFκB activity. This review is focused mainly on the interaction of dietary PUFAs and butyrate with these cytokines during colon inflammation and cancer development. We summarised recent knowledge about the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in such effects and outcomes for intestinal cell behaviour and pathologies. Finally, the possible application for the prevention and therapy of colon inflammation and cancer is also outlined.

  1. Docosahexaenoic acid and human brain development: evidence that a dietary supply is needed for optimal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenna, J Thomas; Carlson, Susan E

    2014-12-01

    Humans evolved a uniquely large brain among terrestrial mammals. Brain and nervous tissue is rich in the omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Docosahexaenoic acid is required for lower and high order functions in humans because of understood and emerging molecular mechanisms. Among brain components that depend on dietary components, DHA is limiting because its synthesis from terrestrial plant food precursors is low but its utilization when consumed in diet is very efficient. Negligible DHA is found in terrestrial plants, but in contrast, DHA is plentiful at the shoreline where it is made by single-celled organisms and plants, and in the seas supports development of very large marine mammal brains. Modern human brains accumulate DHA up to age 18, most aggressively from about half-way through gestation to about two years of age. Studies in modern humans and non-human primates show that modern infants consuming infant formulas that include only DHA precursors have lower DHA levels than for those with a source of preformed DHA. Functional measures show that infants consuming preformed DHA have improved visual and cognitive function. Dietary preformed DHA in the breast milk of modern mothers supports many-fold greater breast milk DHA than is found in the breast milk of vegans, a phenomenon linked to consumption of shore-based foods. Most current evidence suggests that the DHA-rich human brain required an ample and sustained source of dietary DHA to reach its full potential.

  2. Dietary acid load and chronic kidney disease in elderly adults: Protein and potassium intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Byung-Joon; Chang, Yoosoo; Ryu, Seungho; Kim, Eun Mi; Lee, Mi Yeon; Hyun, Young Youl; Lee, Kyu-Beck

    2017-01-01

    Dietary net endogenous acid production (NEAP), which represents total dietary load of nonvolatile acid, may affect kidney function. Estimated NEAP (eNEAP) is calculated indirectly by the ratio of protein and potassium intake. A few studies are available assessing the association between eNEAP and chronic kidney disease (CKD), and its relation to dietary protein and potassium intake in the elderly. A total 1,369 community-dwelling elderly Koreans in the Kangbuk Samsung Cohort Study (KSCS) were evaluated using a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) and comprehensive health examination. We evaluated the association between eNEAP and the CKD. We also examined their relation to protein and potassium intake. eNEAP was correlated with potassium intake (r = -0.410, P < 0.001), but was not correlated with protein intake (r = -0.004, P = 0.879). In a full multivariate adjustment for sociodemographic factors, dietary factors, and comorbidities, the participants with higher eNEAP quartiles (Q2, Q3, Q4) had higher odds of CKD compared to the lowest eNEAP quartile (Q1); OR (95% CI) were 1.47 (0.78-2.72), 1.66 (0.85-3.23), and 2.30 (1.16-4.60) respectively (P for trend = 0.019). The odds of CKD decreased for participants with higher potassium intake quartiles (Q2, Q3, Q4) compared to the lowest potassium intake quartile (Q1); OR (95% CI) were 0.52 (0.28-0.95), 0.50 (0.26-0.96), and 0.50 (0.21-0.99) respectively (P for trend = 0.050). Protein intake was not associated with CKD. The association between eNEAP and CKD was similar in subgroup analysis. Dietary acid load was associated with CKD. Among the nutrients related to dietary acid load, potassium intake was negatively associated with CKD, but protein intake was not associated with CKD in elderly adults.

  3. Dietary palmitic acid influences LDL-mediated lymphocyte proliferation differently to other mono- and polyunsaturated fatty acids in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinahones, F J; Gómez-Zumaquero, J M; Monzón, A; Rojo-Martínez, G; Pareja, A; Morcillo, S; Cardona, F; Olveira, G; Soriguer, F

    2004-10-01

    Recent studies suggest that the biological effects of saturated fatty acids depend on the length of their chain. We compared the effect of diets containing different fatty acids on plasma lipids and lymphocyte proliferation in the presence of lovastatin and with increasing amounts of LDL. Lymphocytes from rats fed with a diet rich in palmitic acid had a greater lymphocyte proliferation capacity than those from rats fed with diets rich in oleic acid, linoleic acid, or fish oil. This effect was maintained when small amounts of polyunsaturatwed fatty acids (PUFA; sunflower oil) were added to the palmitic acid diet. LDL receptor activity, measured by the capacity of lovastatin to revert the inhibition of lymphocyte proliferation with increasing amounts of LDL in the medium, was greater in the rats fed with palmitic acid, and was similar to the other groups when small amounts of PUFA were added. All the groups had similar levels of plasma cholesterol, but the LDL levels were significantly lower in the group fed with palmitic acid plus PUFA. The highest HDL-cholesterol (HDLc) levels were found in the palmitic acid group and the lowest LDL-cholesterol (LDLc)/HDLc ratio in the palmitic acid plus PUFA group. These results suggest that diets rich in palmitic acid do not raise total cholesterol, but reduce LDLc or keep it normal, and raise HDLc levels. This effect may be partly due to an increase in LDL receptor activity. The inclusion of small amounts of PUFA in the diet rich in palmitic acid substantially modified the LDL receptor response in the lymphocytes, suggesting that the proportion of different families of dietary fatty acids may be more important than the individual amount of each in absolute terms to explain their effects on plasma lipids and lipoproteins.

  4. Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Trigger Cell Cycle Arrest and Induce Apoptosis in Human Neuroblastoma LA-N-1 Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Wai Wing So; Wai Nam Liu; Kwok Nam Leung

    2015-01-01

    Omega-3 (n-3) fatty acids are dietary long-chain fatty acids with an array of health benefits. Previous research has demonstrated the growth-inhibitory effect of n-3 fatty acids on different cancer cell lines in vitro, yet their anti-tumor effects and underlying action mechanisms on human neuroblastoma LA-N-1 cells have not yet been reported. In this study, we showed that docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) exhibited time- and concentration-dependent anti-proliferative ...

  5. Dietary potential renal Acid load in venezuelan children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Sayers, Mayerling; Bernal, Jennifer; López, Michelle

    2015-05-01

    Objetivo: Determinar y analizar la carga acida potencial renal de la dieta (Potential Renal Acid Load PRAL) y el patron de alimentacion de ninos entre 1 a 6 anos aparentemente sanos. Métodos: Se seleccionaron segun conveniencia a padres de 52 ninos asistentes a una consulta de ninos sanos. La calidad de la dieta y el patron de alimentacion se evaluo mediante un recordatorio de 24 horas y un cuestionario de frecuencia de alimentos. Se calculo la ingesta de macronutrientes y grupos de alimentos, como carnes, lacteos, frutas y verduras. La ingesta de nutrientes se comparo con las recomendaciones de energia y nutrientes. El PRAL se determino segun el metodo de Remer y Manz, para determinar la carga acida de la dieta. Se aplico estadistica descriptiva y correlaciones entre el PRAL, nutrientes y grupos de alimentos. Resultados: La ingesta de proteinas, de leche y de carnes fue elevada, mientras que la ingesta de rutas y hortalizas fue baja. El PRAL fue positivo en 92% de los ninos, se asocio con mayor ingesta de energia, proteinas, grasas, carne y lacteos. La ingesta de proteinas fue > 2,5 g/kg/ dia en 46,2% de los ninos. Los grupos de alimentos con mayor desequilibrio debido a exceso fueron la carne y los productos lacteos, mientras que por deficit fue el grupo de frutas y hortalizas. Conclusión: La dieta se caracteriza por una elevada carga de acido o PRAL, lo que aumenta el riesgo de acidosis sistemica y sus consecuencias metabolicas.

  6. Dietary stearic acid and risk of cardiovascular disease: intake, sources, digestion, and absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kris-Etherton, Penny M; Griel, Amy E; Psota, Tricia L; Gebauer, Sarah K; Zhang, Jun; Etherton, Terry D

    2005-12-01

    Individual FA have diverse biological effects, some of which affect the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). In the context of food-based dietary guidance designed to reduce CVD risk, fat and FA recommendations focus on reducing saturated FA (SFA) and trans FA (TFA), and ensuring an adequate intake of unsaturated FA. Because stearic acid shares many physical properties with the other long-chain SFA but has different physiological effects, it is being evaluated as a substitute for TFA in food manufacturing. For stearic acid to become the primary replacement for TFA, it is essential that its physical properties and biological effects be well understood.

  7. Interaction of dietary high-oleic-acid sunflower hulls and different fat sources in broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viveros, A; Ortiz, L T; Rodríguez, M L; Rebolé, A; Alzueta, C; Arija, I; Centeno, C; Brenes, A

    2009-01-01

    The effect of dietary fat sources (high-oleic-acid sunflower seeds, HOASS; palm oil, PO; and high-oleic-acid sunflower oil, HOASO) and high-oleic-acid sunflower hulls (HOAS hulls; 40 g/kg of diet) on performance, digestive organ size, fat digestibility, and fatty acid profile in abdominal fat and blood serum parameters was evaluated in chickens (from 1 to 21 d of age). Bird performance and digestive organ size were not affected by either dietary fat source or sunflower hull supplementation. Fat digestibility in birds fed diets enriched (HOASS and HOASO) in monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) was increased compared with those fed the PO diet. The addition of sunflower hulls did not modify fat digestibility. The fatty acids pattern of abdominal fat reflected the dietary fat profile. The greatest concentrations of C16:0 and C18:0 were found in birds fed PO diets. The C18:1n-9 content was increased in birds that received HOASS and HOASO diets compared with those fed PO diets. The greatest content of C18:2n-6 was observed in birds fed HOASS diets. The ratio of polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) to MUFA was significantly increased in birds fed PO diets compared with those fed HOASS or HOASO diets. The addition of sunflower hulls to the diets resulted in a decrease of C18:2n-6 and PUFA concentrations and PUFA:MUFA ratio in abdominal fat. Dietary fat sources and sunflower hulls modify blood triglycerides and serum lipoproteins. A decrease in triglyceride concentrations was observed in birds fed HOASS diets compared with those fed PO and HOASO diets. The greatest concentrations of serum high density, very low density (VLDL), and low density lipoproteins were found in birds receiving HOASO, PO, and HOASS diets, respectively. The addition of sunflower hulls to the diets caused an increase of serum triglycerides and VLDL concentrations. The MUFA-enriched diets had lower triglyceride and VLDL concentrations than did diets rich in saturated fatty acids. However, the sunflower hull

  8. Perinatal Dietary Choline Deficiency in Sows Influences Concentrations of Choline Metabolites, Fatty Acids, and Amino Acids in Milk throughout Lactation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudd, Austin T; Alexander, Lindsey S; Johnson, Stacey K; Getty, Caitlyn M; Malysheva, Olga V; Caudill, Marie A; Dilger, Ryan N

    2016-11-01

    Choline is essential for synthesis of phospholipids, neurodevelopment, and DNA methylation. It is unknown whether dietary perinatal choline deficiency affects maternal milk composition. We examined whether perinatal maternal dietary choline deficiency influences porcine-milk composition. Yorkshire sows were fed choline-deficient (CD) or choline-sufficient (CS) gestation diets [544 or 1887 mg choline/kg dry matter (DM), respectively] from 65 d before to 48 h after parturition and then fed lactation diets (517 or 1591 mg choline/kg DM, respectively) through day 19 of lactation. Milk was collected from 7 sows fed each diet at days 0 (colostrum), 7-9 (mature milk), and 17-19 (preweaning) of lactation. Sow plasma was collected 65 d before and 19 d after parturition. Milk was analyzed for choline metabolite, fatty acid (FA), and amino acid composition. All outcomes were analyzed to assess main and interactive effects of choline intake and time. Plasma choline metabolites did not differ before treatment, but free choline, betaine, and dimethylglycine concentrations were lower in CD-fed than in CS-fed sows at day 19 of lactation (interaction; P deficiency induces alterations in plasma choline metabolites that are evident at the end of lactation. Betaine and select FAs in milk are sensitive to maternal dietary choline deficiency and day of lactation. Alterations in concentrations of these nutrients may affect early-life neonatal development. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

  9. Effects of Dietary Garlic Extracts on Whole Body Amino Acid and Fatty Acid Composition, Muscle Free Amino Acid Profiles and Blood Plasma Changes in Juvenile Sterlet Sturgeon,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Hoon Lee

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available A series of studies were carried out to investigate the supplemental effects of dietary garlic extracts (GE on whole body amino acids, whole body and muscle free amino acids, fatty acid composition and blood plasma changes in 6 month old juvenile sterlet sturgeon (Acipenser ruthenus. In the first experiment, fish with an average body weight of 59.6 g were randomly allotted to each of 10 tanks (two groups of five replicates, 20 fish/tank and fed diets with (0.5% or without (control GE respectively, at the level of 2% of fish body weight per day for 5 wks. Whole body amino acid composition between the GE and control groups were not different (p>0.05. Among free amino acids in muscle, L-glutamic acid, L-alanine, L-valine, L-leucine and L-phenylalanine were significantly (p0.05 were noticed at 12 h (74.6 vs 73.0. Plasma insulin concentrations (μIU/ml between the two groups were significantly (p<0.05 different at 1 (10.56 vs 5.06 and 24 h (32.56 vs 2.96 after feeding. The present results suggested that dietary garlic extracts could increase dietary glucose utilization through the insulin secretion, which result in improved fish body quality and feed utilization by juvenile sterlet sturgeon.

  10. Dietary oleic acid increases m2 macrophages in the mesenteric adipose tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Camell

    Full Text Available Several studies have implicated fatty-acids as inflammatory regulators, suggesting that there may be a direct role for common dietary fatty-acids in regulating innate immune cells. In humans, a single high-fat meal increases systemic cytokines and leukocytes. In mice, short term high-fat feeding increases adipose tissue (AT leukocytes and alters the inflammatory profile of AT macrophages. We have seen that short term high fat feeding to C57BL/6J male mice increases palmitic and oleic acid within AT depots, but oleic acid increase is highest in the mesenteric AT (MAT. In vitro, oleic acid increases M2 macrophage markers (CD206, MGL1, and ARG1 in a murine macrophage cell line, while addition of palmitic acid is able to inhibit that increase. Three day supplementation of a chow diet, with oleic acid, induced an increase in M2 macrophage markers in the MAT, but not in the epididymal AT. We tested whether increases in M2 macrophages occur during short term ad lib feeding of a high fat diet, containing oleic acid. Experiments revealed two distinct populations of macrophages were altered by a three day high milk-fat diet. One population, phenotypically intermediate for F4/80, showed diet-induced increases in CD206, an anti-inflammatory marker characteristic of M2 macrophages intrinsic to the AT. Evidence for a second population, phenotypically F4/80(HICD11b(HI macrophages, showed increased association with the MAT following short term feeding that is dependent on the adhesion molecule, ICAM-1. Collectively, we have shown that short term feeding of a high-fat diet changes two population of macrophages, and that dietary oleic acid is responsible for increases in M2 macrophage polarization.

  11. Transport of citrate across renal brush border membrane: effects of dietary acid and alkali loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenkins, A.D.; Dousa, T.P.; Smith, L.H.

    1985-10-01

    Dietary acid or alkali loading was given to rats by providing 150 mM NH4Cl or 150 mM NaHCO3 in place of drinking water for 6 days; control animals received 150 mM NaCl. After 6 days, the citrate clearance was 0.04 +/- 0.01 ml/min (mean +/- SE) in the acid-loaded group, 0.9 +/- 0.1 ml/min in the control group, and 2.5 +/- 0.2 ml/min in the alkali-loaded group. At the end of the experiment, the rats were killed, and the Na gradient-dependent citrate uptake was measured in brush border membrane (BBM) vesicles prepared from each group. At 0.3 min, the ( UC)citrate uptake was 198 +/- 8 pmol/mg protein (mean +/- SE) in the acid-loaded group, 94 +/- 16 pmol/mg protein in the control group, and 94 +/- 13 pmol/mg protein in the alkali-loaded group. The rate of Na -independent (NaCl in medium replaced by KCl) ( UC)-citrate uptake by BBM vesicles was the same for acid-loaded, control, and alkali-loaded animals. Thus, the increased capacity of the proximal tubular BBM to transport citrate from the tubular lumen into the cell interior may be an important factor that contributes to decreased urinary citrate in the presence of metabolic acidosis induced by chronic dietary acid loading.

  12. Dietary Fatty Acids and Their Potential for Controlling Metabolic Diseases Through Activation of FFA4/GPR120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulven, Trond; Christiansen, Elisabeth

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that the amount and type of ingested fat impacts the development of obesity and metabolic diseases, but the potential for beneficial effects from fat has received less attention. It is becoming clear that the composition of the individual fatty acids in diet is important. Besides acting as precursors of potent signaling molecules, dietary fatty acids act directly on intracellular and cell surface receptors. The free fatty acid receptor 4 (FFA4, previously GPR120) is linked to the regulation of body weight, inflammation, and insulin resistance and represents a potential target for the treatment of metabolic disorders, including type 2 diabetes and obesity. In this review, we discuss the various types of dietary fatty acids, the link between FFA4 and metabolic diseases, the potential effects of the individual fatty acids on health, and the ability of fatty acids to activate FFA4. We also discuss the possibility of dietary schemes that implement activation of FFA4.

  13. Dietary alpha-Lipoic Acid Alters Piglet Neurodevelopment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Austin T Mudd

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Alpha-lipoic acid (a-LA is an antioxidant shown to ameliorate age-associated impairments of brain and cardiovascular function. Human milk is known to have high antioxidant capacity, however the role of antioxidants in the developing brain is largely uncharacterized. This exploratory study aimed to examine the dose response effects of a-LA on piglet growth and neurodevelopment. Methods: Beginning at 2 d of age, 31 male pigs received one of three diets: control (CONT [0 mg a-LA/100g], low a-LA (LOW [120 mg a-LA/100g], or high a-LA (HIGH [240 mg a-LA/100g]. From 14 to 28 d of age, pigs were subjected to spatial T-maze assessment and macrostructural and microstructural neuroimaging procedures were performed at 31 d of age.Results: No differences due to diet were observed for bodyweight gain or intestinal weight and length. Spatial T-maze assessment did not reveal learning differences due to diet in proportion of correct choices or latency to choice measures. Diffusion tensor imaging revealed decreased (P = 0.01 fractional anisotropy (FA in the internal capsule of HIGH fed pigs compared with both the CONT (P < 0.01 and LOW (P = 0.03 fed pigs, which were not different from one another. Analysis of axial diffusivity (AD within the internal capsule revealed a main effect of diet (P < 0.01 in which HIGH fed piglets exhibited smaller (P < 0.01 rates of diffusion compared with CONT piglets, but HIGH fed piglets were not different (P = 0.12 than LOW fed piglets. Tract-based spatial statistics, a comparison of FA values along white matter tracts, revealed 1,650 voxels where CONT piglets exhibited higher (P < 0.05 values compared with HIGH fed piglets. Conclusion: The lack of differences in intestinal and bodyweight measures among piglets indicate a-LA supplementation does not impact overall growth, regardless of concentration. Additionally, no observed differences between CONT and LOW fed piglets in behavior and neuroimaging measures indicate a

  14. Dietary exposure estimates for the food preservatives benzoic acid and sorbic acid in the total diet in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Min-Pei; Lien, Keng-Wen; Wu, Chiu-Hua; Ni, Shih-Pei; Huang, Hui-Ying; Hsieh, Dennis P H

    2015-02-25

    The purpose was to assess the health risk to general consumers in Taiwan associated with dietary intake of benzoic acid and sorbic acid by conducting a total diet study (TDS). The hazard index (HI) in percent acceptable daily intake (%ADI) of benzoic acid and sorbic acid for eight exposure groups classified by age were calculated. In high-intake consumers, the highest HI of benzoic acid was 54.1%ADI for males aged 1-2 years old at the 95th percentile, whereas for females, the HI was 61.7%ADI for aged over 66 years old. The highest HI of sorbic acid for male and female consumers aged 3-6 years old at the 95th percentile were 14.0%ADI and 12.2%ADI, respectively. These results indicate that the use of benzoic acid and sorbic acid as preservatives at the current level of use in the Taiwanese diet does not constitute a public health and safety concern.

  15. Systematic review of the association between dietary acid load, alkaline water and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenton, Tanis R; Huang, Tian

    2016-06-13

    To evaluate the evidence for a causal relationship between dietary acid/alkaline and alkaline water for the aetiology and treatment of cancer. A systematic review was conducted on published and grey literature separately for randomised intervention and observational studies with either varying acid-base dietary intakes and/or alkaline water with any cancer outcome or for cancer treatment. Incidence of cancer and outcomes of cancer treatment. 8278 citations were identified, and 252 abstracts were reviewed; 1 study met the inclusion criteria and was included in this systematic review. No randomised trials were located. No studies were located that examined dietary acid or alkaline or alkaline water for cancer treatment. The included study was a cohort study with a low risk of bias. This study revealed no association between the diet acid load with bladder cancer (OR=1.15: 95% CI 0.86 to 1.55, p=0.36). No association was found even among long-term smokers (OR=1.72: 95% CI 0.96 to 3.10, p=0.08). Despite the promotion of the alkaline diet and alkaline water by the media and salespeople, there is almost no actual research to either support or disprove these ideas. This systematic review of the literature revealed a lack of evidence for or against diet acid load and/or alkaline water for the initiation or treatment of cancer. Promotion of alkaline diet and alkaline water to the public for cancer prevention or treatment is not justified. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  16. The effect of Iron Folic Acid Supplementation and Dietary Iron Intake in High Schools Female Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: Iron deficiency is one of the major public health problems imposing significant effect on the body and mind which has negative impacts on humans’ capability of. Increasing demand of the body, inadequate intake and decrease of absorbency are the major causes of anemia among teenage girls. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of dietary iron folic acid supplementation and dietary iron intake in high school girls. Methods: The present cross-sectional study was conducted on sixty female high school students at grade one and three in Yasuj, Iran. Biochemical markers of iron status were measured beforehand and afterwards of folic acid supplementation for 16 weeks. Food consumption patterns and iron intake were determined by frequency questionnaires. Data were analyzed using chi-square test, t-test by means of N4 analysis software. Results: Anemia, iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia in grade one were 9.7%, 32.3% and 9.9% respectively, in addition to in grade three were 19.4% , 41.9% and 3.2% respectively. After iron folic acid supplementation, these indicators were 9.7%, 16.1% and 3.3% in grade one and in grade three were 9.7%, 22.6%, 0.0% respectively. Conclusion: Overall, it appeared that weekly iron folic acid supplementation in duration of 16 weeks per year, with dietary modification, could improve the indices of blood in high school girls. Key words: Anemia, iron deficiency, iron deficiency anemia, iron folic acid supplementation

  17. Urine acidification and mineral metabolism in growing pigs feddiets supplemented with dietary methionine and benzoic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Jan Værum; Fernández, José Adalberto; Eriksen, Jørgen

    2010-01-01

    Benzoic acid (BA) reduces pH of urine and thereby reduces the emission of ammonia and possibly also odorous sulphur-compounds from slurry. The effect of BA on mineral metabolism in growing pigs is not clear. The objective was therefore to study the effect of BA and methionine (Met) as a sulphur (S...... d adaptation period and a 7 d period with collection of faeces and urine. Benzoic acid was metabolized into hippuric acid which reduced urinary pH by 0.8 pH units (P ... apparent digestibility was not (P = 0.58) affected by BA, but on the 1% Met diets, S excretion into urine was reduced (P = 0.006) by BA. In conclusion, both BA and Met supplementation increased P and Ca apparent digestibility and decreased urinary pH. The increased acid load provided through dietary BA did...

  18. Relationships among dietary fiber components and the digestibility of energy, dietary fiber, and amino acids, and energy content of 9 corn co-products fed to growing pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    An experiment was conducted to determine the best fitting dietary fiber (DF) assay to predict digestibility of energy, DF, and amnio acids, and energy value of 9 corn co-products: conventional corn bran (CB-NS; 37.0% total non-starch polysaccharides (NSP)), corn bran with solubles (CBS; 17.1% NSP), ...

  19. Ethyl-eicosapentaenoate modulates changes in neurochemistry and brain lipids induced by parkinsonian neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium in mouse brain slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, QingJia; Luchtman, Dirk W; El Bahh, Bouchaib; Zidichouski, Jeffrey A; Yang, Jun; Song, Cai

    2010-12-15

    Evidence suggests a link between Parkinson's disease and the dietary intake of omega (n)-3 and n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). Presently, we investigated whether an acute dose of parkinsonian neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP(+)) affects brain n-3 and n-6 PUFA content and expression of fatty acid metabolic enzymes cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in brain slices from C57Bl/6 mice. Furthermore, we investigated whether feeding a diet of n-3 PUFA ethyl-eicosapentaenoate (E-EPA) to these mice can attenuate the MPP(+) induced changes in brain PUFA content and expression of cPLA2 and COX-2, and attenuate MPP(+) induced changes in neurotransmitters and metabolites and apoptotic markers, bax, bcl-2 and caspase-3. MPP(+) increased brain content of n-6 PUFAs linoleic acid and arachidonic acid, and increased the mRNA expression of cPLA2. MPP(+) also depleted striatal dopamine levels and increased dopamine turnover, and depleted noradrenaline levels in the frontal cortex. The neurotoxin induced increases in bax, bcl-2 and caspase-3 mRNA expression that approached significance. E-EPA by itself increased brain n-3 content, including EPA and docosapentaenoic acid (C22:5, n-3), and increased cortical dopamine. More importantly, E-EPA attenuated the MPP(+) induced increase in n-6 fatty acids content, partially attenuated the striatal dopaminergic turnover, and prevented the increases of pro-apoptotic bax and caspase-3 mRNAs. In conclusion, increases in n-6 PUFAs in the acute stage of exposure to parkinsonian neurotoxins may promote pro-inflammatory conditions. EPA may provide modest beneficial effects in Parkinson's disease, but further investigation is warranted.

  20. Fatty acid-induced changes in vascular reactivity in healthy adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christon, Raymond; Marette, André; Badeau, Mylène; Bourgoin, Frédéric; Mélançon, Sébastien; Bachelard, Hélène

    2005-12-01

    Dietary fatty acids (FAs) are known to modulate endothelial dysfunction, which is the first stage of atherosclerosis. However, their exact role in this initial phase is still unclear. The effects of isolated or combined (by 2) purified FAs from the main FA families were studied on the vascular response of isolated thoracic aorta in healthy rats to get a better understanding of the mechanisms of action of dietary FAs in regulating vascular endothelial function. Cumulative contraction curves to phenylephrine and relaxation curves to carbachol and then to sodium nitroprusside were obtained in the absence or presence of the FAs studied allowing endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent ability of the smooth muscle to relax to be assessed in each experimental group. The endothelium-dependent vasodilator response to carbachol was lowered by eicosapentaenoic acid, whereas it was not altered either by docosahexaenoic acid alone or by combined eicosapentaenoic acid-docosahexaenoic acid, oleic acid, or stearic acid, and it was increased by linoleic acid (LA). A decreased phenylephrine-induced contraction was observed after incubation with arachidonic acid and with stearic acid. On the other hand, the endothelium-dependent relaxation was reduced by the addition of combined LA-arachidonic acid and LA-oleic acid. In conclusion, these data point out the differential effects of different types of FAs and of FAs alone vs combined on vascular reactivity. The complex nature of these effects could be partially linked to metabolic specificities of endothelial cells and to interactions between some FAs.

  1. Dietary omega-3 Fatty acids and psychiatry: mood, behaviour, stress, depression, dementia and aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourre, J M

    2005-01-01

    In view of the high omega-3 poly unsaturated fatty acid content of the brain, it is evident that these fats are involved in brain biochemistry, physiology and functioning; and thus in some neuropsychiatric diseases and in the cognitive decline of ageing. Though omega-3 fatty acids (from fatty fish in the human diet) appear effective in the prevention of stress, their role as regulator of mood and of libido is a matter for discussion pending experimental proof in animal and human models. Dietary omega-3 fatty acids play a role in the prevention of some disorders including depression, as well as in dementia, particularly Alzheimer's disease. Their direct role in major depression, bipolar disorder (manic-depressive disease) and schizophrenia is not yet established. Their deficiency can prevent the renewal of membranes, and thus accelerate cerebral ageing; none the less, the respective roles of the vascular component on one hand (where the omega-3's are active) and the cerebral parenchyma itself on the other, have not yet been clearly resolved. The role of omega-3 in certain diseases such as dyslexia and autism is suggested. In fact, omega-3 fatty acids participated in the first coherent experimental demonstration of the effect of dietary substances (nutrients) on the structure and function of the brain. Experiments were first of all carried out one x-vivo cultured brain cells (1), then on in vivo brain cells(2), finally on physiochemical, biochemical, physiological, neurosensory, and behavioural parameters (3). These findings indicated that the nature of poly unsaturated fatty acids(in particular omega-3) present in formula milks for infants (both premature and term) determines the visual, cerebral,and intellectual abilities, as described in a recent review (4). Indeed,the insufficient dietary supply of omega-3 fatty acids in today's French and occidental diet raises the problem of how to correct dietary habits so that the consumer will select foods that are genuinely

  2. Effect of dietary phytic acid on performance and nutrient uptake in the small intestine of piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woyengo, T A; Weihrauch, D; Nyachoti, C M

    2012-02-01

    An experiment was conducted with piglets to determine the effect of dietary phytic acid supplementation on performance, electrophysiological properties of jejunum mounted in Ussing chambers, sodium-dependent glucose transporter 1 (SGLT1) protein expression in jejunum, and plasma glucose and Na concentrations. Sixteen piglets with an average initial BW of 7.40 ± 0.36 kg were randomly assigned to 2 experimental diets with 8 piglets per diet. The diets were casein-cornstarch-based and were either unsupplemented or supplemented with 2% phytic acid (as Na phytate). The basal diet was formulated to meet the recommendation of NRC (1998) for energy, AA, minerals, and vitamins for piglets. The experiment lasted for 21 d, and at the end, BW gain and feed consumption were determined, and blood samples were collected for determination of plasma glucose and Na concentrations. The piglets were then euthanized to determine jejunal electrophysiological properties (transmural potential difference and short-circuit current) and SGLT1 protein expression. Phytic acid supplementation reduced ADG (P = 0.002), ADFI (P = 0.017), and G:F (P = 0.001) from 316.1 to 198.2 g, 437.4 to 360.3 g, and 0.721 to 0.539 g/g, respectively. Phytic acid supplementation also tended to reduce (P = 0.088) potential difference (-3.80 vs. -2.23 mV) and reduced (P = 0.023) short-circuit current from 8.07 to 0.1 μA/cm(2). However, phytic acid supplementation did not affect SGLT1 protein, and blood plasma glucose and Na concentrations. In conclusion, dietary phytic acid reduced growth performance and transmural short-circuit current in the jejunum of piglets. The reduced transmural short-circuit current in the jejunum by phytic acid implies reduced active Na transport in the jejunum by the phytic acid. Therefore, it seems that dietary phytic acid reduces growth performance of pigs partly through reduced capacity of the small intestine to absorb Na.

  3. Effect of dietary supplementation with amino acids on boar sperm quality and fertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Hong-Jun; Wu, De; Xu, Sheng-Yu; Li, Qiang; Fang, Zheng-Feng; Che, Lian-Qiang; Wu, Cai-Mei; Xu, Xue-Yu; Lin, Yan

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of dietary supplementation with amino acids on sperm quality and fertility rates after insemination with boar semen. Twelve Yorkshire boars were paired by age and allocated to one of two dietary treatments composed of total lysine levels of 0.64% (T1) and 0.96% (T2), with the lysine: methionine: threonine: tryptophan: valine ratio in the diets set to 100:27:73:19:69 through the addition of synthetic amino acids. Semen was collected twice weekly (phase 1, 1-12 wk); every other day (phase 2, 13-16 wk); twice weekly (phase 3, 17-26 wk); and daily (phase 4, 27-28 wk). Semen was collected from boars during phase 3 and used to inseminate 64 multiparous sows. Our results showed that sperm concentration and total sperm cells were greater in boars in T2 than in boars in T1 in phases 2 and 4 (Pamino acid concentrations in seminal plasma increased in T2 boars (Pamino acids improves sperm quality, and subsequently increases fertilization capacity and the number of live piglets.

  4. Dietary Gut Microbial Metabolites, Short-chain Fatty Acids, and Host Metabolic Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayu Kasubuchi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available During feeding, the gut microbiota contributes to the host energy acquisition and metabolic regulation thereby influencing the development of metabolic disorders such as obesity and diabetes. Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs such as acetate, butyrate, and propionate, which are produced by gut microbial fermentation of dietary fiber, are recognized as essential host energy sources and act as signal transduction molecules via G-protein coupled receptors (FFAR2, FFAR3, OLFR78, GPR109A and as epigenetic regulators of gene expression by the inhibition of histone deacetylase (HDAC. Recent evidence suggests that dietary fiber and the gut microbial-derived SCFAs exert multiple beneficial effects on the host energy metabolism not only by improving the intestinal environment, but also by directly affecting various host peripheral tissues. In this review, we summarize the roles of gut microbial SCFAs in the host energy regulation and present an overview of the current understanding of its physiological functions.

  5. Dietary structured lipids for post-weaning piglets: fat digestibility, nitrogen retention and fatty acid profiles of tissues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Straarup, Ellen Marie; Danielsen, V.; Høy, Carl-Erik

    2006-01-01

    In four groups of post-weaning piglets the effects of triacylglycerol structure and fatty acid profiles of four dietary fats on apparent faecal nutrient digestibility, nitrogen retention and fatty acid profiles of platelet and erythrocyte membranes, liver, adipose tissue and skeletal muscle were...... to the third week in the groups R1 and R2. Fatty acid profiles in platelet and erythrocyte membranes and in tissues reflected the fatty acid profile of the dietary fat, except for medium-chain fatty acids, which were only found in low proportions, indicating that 10:0 was mainly used as an energy source....... examined. Dietary fats included as 10% (w/w) of the diets were two structured fats of rapeseed oil interesterified with tridecanoin (R1) or coconut oil (R2), respectively, one mixture of rapeseed oil and coconut oil (R3) and rapeseed oil as control (R4). Faeces and urine from piglets weaned at 28 days...

  6. The fat of the matter: how dietary fatty acids can affect exercise performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Barbara J; McWilliams, Scott R

    2014-11-01

    Fatty-acid composition of fat stores affects exercise performance in a variety of vertebrates although few such studies focus on flying vertebrates such as migratory birds, which are exceptional exercisers. We first discuss the natural variation in quality of fat available in natural foods eaten by migratory birds and their behavioral preferences for specific fatty acids in these foods. We then outline three proposed hypotheses for how dietary fatty acids can affect exercise performance, and some of the evidence to date that pertains to these hypotheses with special emphasis on the exercise performance of migratory birds. In theory, selectively feeding on certain long-chain unsaturated fatty acids may be advantageous because (1) such fatty acids may be metabolized more quickly and may stimulate key facets of aerobic metabolism (fuel hypothesis); (2) such fatty acids may affect composition and key functions of lipid-rich cell membranes (membrane hypothesis); and (3) such fatty acids may directly act as signaling molecules (signal hypothesis). Testing these hypotheses requires cleverly designed experiments that can distinguish between them by demonstrating that certain fatty acids stimulate oxidative capacity, including gene expression and activity of key oxidative enzymes, and that this stimulation changes during exercise. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Long-term effect of dietary α-linolenic acid or decosahexaenoic acid on incorporation of decosahexaenoic acid in membranes and its influence on rat heart in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate whether long-term intake of dietary alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), supplied as whole grain-extruded linseed, can increase endogenous production of n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (FAs) in healthy adult rats and influence the heart rate (HR) and adrenergic response in the same way as docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)-rich diets. DHA enrichment was evaluated using FA analysis of tissue phospholipids after 8, 16, 24, and 32 wk of feeding in male Wistar...

  8. Current Evidence Supporting the Link Between Dietary Fatty Acids and Cardiovascular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammad, Shatha; Pu, Shuaihua; Jones, Peter J

    2016-05-01

    Lack of consensus exists pertaining to the scientific evidence regarding effects of various dietary fatty acids on cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. The objective of this article is to review current evidence concerning cardiovascular health effects of the main dietary fatty acid types; namely, trans (TFA), saturated (SFA), polyunsaturated (PUFA; n-3 PUFA and n-6 PUFA), and monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA). Accumulating evidence shows negative health impacts of TFA and SFA; both may increase CVD risk. Policies have been proposed to reduce TFA and SFA consumption to less than 1 and 7 % of energy intake, respectively. Cardiovascular health might be promoted by replacing SFA and TFA with n-6 PUFA, n-3 PUFA, or MUFA; however, the optimal amount of PUFA or MUFA that can be used to replace SFA and TFA has not been defined yet. Evidence suggests of the potential importance of restricting n-6 PUFA up to 10 % of energy and obtaining an n-6/n-3 ratio as close as possible to unity, along with a particular emphasis on consuming adequate amounts of essential fatty acids. The latest evidence shows cardioprotective effects of MUFA-rich diets, especially when MUFA are supplemented with essential fatty acids; namely, docosahexaenoic acid. MUFA has been newly suggested to be involved in regulating fat oxidation, energy metabolism, appetite sensations, weight maintenance, and cholesterol metabolism. These favorable effects might implicate MUFA as the preferable choice to substitute for other fatty acids, especially given the declaration of its safety for up to 20 % of total energy.

  9. Dietary sea cucumber cerebroside alleviates orotic acid-induced excess hepatic adipopexis in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Bei

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is a prevalent chronic liver disease in industrialized countries. The present study was undertaken to explore the preventive effect of dietary sea cucumber cerebroside (SCC extracted from Acaudina molpadioides in fatty liver rats. Methods Male Wistar rats were randomly divided into four groups including normal control group, NAFLD model group, and two SCC-treated groups with SCC at 0.006% and 0.03% respectively. The fatty liver model was established by administration of 1% orotic acid (OA to the rats. After 10d, serum and hepatic lipid levels were detected. And the serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT and aspartate aminotransferase (AST activities were also determined. Besides, to gain the potential mechanism, the changes of key enzymes and gene expressions related to the hepatic lipid metabolism were measured. Results Dietary SCC at the level of 0.006% and 0.03% ameliorated the hepatic lipid accumulation in fatty liver rats. SCC administration elevated the serum triglyceride (TG level and the ALT, AST activities in OA-fed rats. The activities of hepatic lipogenic enzymes including fatty acid synthase (FAS, malic enzyme (ME and glucose-6-phosphatedehydrogenase (G6PDH were inhibited by SCC treatment. And the gene expressions of FAS, ME, G6PDH and sterol-regulatory element binding protein (SREBP-1c were also reduced in rats fed SCC. However, dietary SCC didn't affect the activity and mRNA expression of carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT in liver. Besides, suppression of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP activity was observed in SCC-feeding rats. Conclusions These results suggested that dietary SCC could attenuate hepatic steatosis due to its inhibition of hepatic lipogenic gene expression and enzyme activity and the enhancement of TG secretion from liver.

  10. Suppressive effect of viscous dietary fiber on elevations of uric acid in serum and urine induced by dietary RNA in rats is associated with strength of viscosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koguchi, Takashi; Nakajima, Hisao; Koguchi, Hiromi; Wada, Masahiro; Yamamoto, Yuji; Innami, Satoshi; Maekawa, Akio; Tadokoro, Tadahiro

    2003-10-01

    This study was performed to clarify how dietary fiber (DF) with different viscosities would be associated with dietary RNA metabolism. Male Wistar strain rats, four weeks old, were fed diets containing a 3% (w/w) yeast RNA and a 5% (w/w) viscous DF for five days. Viscosity of DF samples used, in order of strength, were xanthan gum (XG) > guar gum (GG) > locust bean gum (LBG) > karaya gum (KG) > pectin (PE) = arabic gum (AG) > CM-cellulose (CMC) = inulin (IN). The serum uric acid concentration in the viscous DF groups significantly decreased as compared with that in the cellulose (CL) group. The urinary excretions of uric acid and allantoin in the respective groups given AG, GG, IN, KG, PE, and XG were significantly suppressed as compared with those in the CL group. The fecal RNA excretion was markedly increased in the IN, KG, PE, and XG groups in comparison to the CL group. The DF with high viscosity significantly suppressed RNA digestion by RNase A and decreased uptakes of 14C-labeled adenosine and adenosine 5'-monophosphate (5'-AMP) in rat jejunum. The results reveal that the suppressive effect of DF on elevation of serum uric acid concentration induced by dietary RNA in rats is associated with the strength of DF viscosity. The mechanism by which this is accomplished is suggested to be attributed to the inhibitions of digestion for dietary RNA and/or absorption of the hydrolyzed compounds.

  11. Dietary fatty acids and immune response to food-borne bacterial infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Lisa M; Balan, Kannan V; Babu, Uma S

    2013-05-22

    Functional innate and acquired immune responses are required to protect the host from pathogenic bacterial infections. Modulation of host immune functions may have beneficial or deleterious effects on disease outcome. Different types of dietary fatty acids have been shown to have variable effects on bacterial clearance and disease outcome through suppression or activation of immune responses. Therefore, we have chosen to review research across experimental models and food sources on the effects of commonly consumed fatty acids on the most common food-borne pathogens, including Salmonella sp., Campylobacter sp., Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli, Shigella sp., Listeria monocytogenes, and Staphylococcus aureus. Altogether, the compilation of literature suggests that no single fatty acid is an answer for protection from all food-borne pathogens, and further research is necessary to determine the best approach to improve disease outcomes.

  12. Dietary (n-3)-fatty acids, prostaglandins, and prolonged gestation in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Harald S.; Olsen, S.F.

    1988-01-01

    Prostaglandins, especially prostaglandin F2 alpha, are important regulators in the onset and maintenance of parturition in humans. Inhibition of prostaglandin formation by drugs can prolong gestation in humans. High dietary intake of long chain (n-3)-fatty acids can inhibit formation of many...... in human urine. Very little is known about the tissue origin as well as the physiologicalfunctions of those prostaglandins, the metabolites of which are quantitated in urine from non-pregnant humans. In pregnant women the increased amount of prostaglandin F2 alpha-metabolites in urine, plasma and amniotic...... chain (n-3)-fatty acids. We have hypothesized that a high intake of long chain (n-3)-fatty acids prolongs gestation in humans by interfering with uterine prostaglandin formation, possibly by inhibiting formation of prostaglandin F2 alpha and prostaglandin E2. Preliminary results of an epidemiological...

  13. Regulation of skeletal muscle insulin action in relation to dietary fatty acids and gender

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høeg, Louise Dalgas

    or dietary fatty acid quality and/or chain-length, 3) to investigate molecular mechanisms underlying lipid-induced insulin resistance. Results from studies provided in this thesis showed that insulin stimulated glucose uptake in skeletal muscle was higher in women than in matched men. When increasing fatty......-body level compared with men. After consuming a hypercaloric fat-rich diet (80 E%) enriched in unsaturated fatty acids for three days, reduced insulin stimulated whole-body (20%) and skeletal muscle glucose uptake (28%) were observed in men compared with a isocaloric control diet. After consuming a fat...... that insulin sensitivity was influenced by quality and chain-length of fatty acids rather than energy surplus per se. The lipid-induced reduction in skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity was observed without changes in the proximal insulin signaling cascade. The lipid-induced decrease in insulin sensitivity...

  14. Effect of dietary fatty acid supplements, varying in fatty acid composition, on milk fat secretion in dairy cattle fed diets supplemented to less than 3% total fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoffel, C M; Crump, P M; Armentano, L E

    2015-01-01

    Dietary fatty acids can affect both milk fat yield and fatty acid (FA) composition. This relationship is well established when the dietary level of FA exceeds 3% of diet dry matter (DM). We could find no reports directly examining the effects of dietary FA profile on milk fat at levels below 3%. Twenty-four primiparous and 36 multiparous lactating cows were paired by production (1 high with 1 low, within parity) to form 30 experimental units. Pairs were fed 6 diets in five 6×6 balanced Latin squares with 21-d periods, and data were collected during the last 5d of each period. Two control diets were fed: a corn control diet (CC; 29% corn silage, 16% alfalfa silage, 19% corn grain, and 8% distillers grain on a DM basis) containing 1.8% FA; and a low-oil control diet (LOC; 9% corn silage, 35% alfalfa silage, 20% food-grade corn starch, and 8% corn gluten feed on a DM basis) containing 1.2% FA. A portion of the food-grade corn starch in LOC was replaced with 4 different FA supplements to create the 4 treatment diets. Treatments were 1.7% (DM basis) of a 50:50 blend of corn oil and high-linoleic safflower oil (LO), 1.7% high-oleic sunflower oil (OO), 1.7% palm oil (PO), or 1.8% calcium salts of palm fatty acids (PFA). The resultant diets were thus enriched in linoleic (LO), oleic (OO), or palmitic acid (PO and PFA). Dietary treatments did not affect dry matter intake. Addition of any of the fat sources to LOC resulted in increased milk yield, but milk fat yields and milk FA composition were variable for the different treatments. The LO treatment resulted in lower milk fat yield, fat concentration, and C16:0 yield but increased both trans-10 C18:1 and trans-10,cis-12 C18:2 yields compared with the other added FA treatments. Diets PO and PFA resulted in increased milk C16:0 yield and decreased total milk C18 yield compared with OO. Regression analysis revealed a negative coefficient for dietary linoleic acid content over basal (LOC) for both milk short-chain FA yield and

  15. Effect of dietary linseed on the nutritional value and quality of pork and pork products: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corino, Carlo; Rossi, Raffaella; Cannata, Susanna; Ratti, Sabrina

    2014-12-01

    Nutritional quality of pork is a significant factor for consumers' health. Feeding n-3 PUFA to pigs, using linseed, improves pork nutritional quality. A meta-analysis involving 1006 pigs reported in 24 publications was carried out to assess the effects of dietary linseed on alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), docosapentaenoic acid (DPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) content in muscle and adipose tissue. Data showed positive effects of n-3 PUFA on muscle fatty acid composition: ALA+137%, EPA+188%, DPA+51% and DHA+12%. Same results were observed in adipose tissue: ALA+297%, EPA+149%, DPA+88% and DHA+18%. A positive correlation between dietary treatment and ALA and EPA content in muscle (Pnutritional pork quality, raising the n-3 PUFA content in muscle and adipose tissue.

  16. Effect of dietary docosahexaenoic acid on lipogenesis and lipolysis in black sea bream, Acanthopagrus schlegeli

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JI Hong; OM Ahamd Daud; YOSHIMATSU Takao; UMINO Testuya; NAKAGAWA Heisuke; FURUHASHI Makoto; SAKAMOTO Shuichi

    2007-01-01

    Hatchery-reared juvenile black sea breams are characterized by a low level of highly unsaturated fatty acids in their bodies, as compared with wild fish. To assess the effect of docosahaxaenoic acid (DHA) on lipogenic and lipolysis enzymes, one-year fish were reared on a casein-based purified diet and a DHA fortified diet (1.5% DHA ethyl ester/kg diet) for 60 d, followed with a period of 55 d for starvation. Dietary DHA was effectively incorporated into the fish body. Fortification of DHA depressed activities of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and NADP-isocitrate dehydrogenase as lipogenic enzymes in the hepatopancreas and intraperitoneal fat body. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase as lipolysis enzyme in the hepatopancreas was active in the DHA fortified fish. Starvation after feeding experiment induced increased carnitine palmitoyltransferase activity in both control and DHA fortified fish and the activity remained higher in the DHA fortified fish, while the monoenes were selectively consumed prior to highly unsaturated fatty acids. These results indicated that dietary DHA depressed lipogenesis and activated lipolysis.

  17. Comparison of microwave oven and convection oven for acid hydrolysis of dietary fiber polysaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, B W

    1998-01-01

    Hydrolysis of dietary fiber polysaccharides (DFP) is an integral part of any enzymatic-chemical method for dietary fiber analysis. Residues obtained after enzyme treatments of fiber-containing foods are usually suspended in 12 M sulfuric acid and kept at or slightly above ambient temperature for at least 1 h, and then the mixtures are diluted with deionized water to a final concentration of 1 M or 2 M acid, followed by heating at 100 degrees C in a water bath or convection oven for 1 or 2 h. Under these hydrolytic conditions, some degradation of the released monosaccharides generally takes place over the duration of hydrolysis. We investigated the feasibility of using microwave energy as a heat source to reduce time and minimize degradation. Preliminary tests were done on the well-characterized soy polysaccharide Fibrim. With a microwave digestion system equipped with temperature and pressure monitors and control lines, optimum settings of power (5%, 75%), time (up to 3 min and 30 s), temperature (35 degrees-55 degrees C), and pressure (45-65 psi) were determined for different foods depending on the residue weight and volume of acid. Results were comparable for microwave oven and convection oven hydrolysis of DFP from 5 foods with good correlations for neutral sugar values; r2 = 0.997 for arabinose, 0.925 for galactose, 0.981 for glucose, 0.969 for mannose, and 0.990 for xylose.

  18. Biliary lipid, bile acid composition, and dietary correlations in Micmac Indian women. A population study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, C N; Johnston, J L; McCarthy, S; Field, C A

    1981-01-01

    The precursor state for cholesterol gallstone formation is cholesterol-saturated bile. We studied a high-risk group for cholesterol gallstones to determine whether dietary variables affect bile cholesterol. Bile samples were analyzed from 46 Micmac Indian women without gallstones and 13 with gallstones for molar percentage cholesterol (MPC) and bile acid composition. The data were analyzed by multiple regression analysis with MPC as the dependent variable and the dietary variables, obtained from four consecutive-day food records, and biliary bile acid composition as the independent variables. In the 46 women without gallstones, obesity, calorie range/calorie intake, and iron and calcium intake were, in their order of importance, significant factors. In normal weight subjects (ponderal index > 12.5) relative obesity was still a significant correlate. Obesity and iron intake were positive correlates while calorie range/calorie intake and calcium intake varied inversely. When the effect of obesity was controlled, these factors were still significant in this group, as they were in the gallstone group. In addition, the duration of overnight fast obtained by history, together with the proportions of deoxycholic and chenodeoxycholic acids in bile were correlates of the biliary molar percentage cholesterol.

  19. Amino Acid Medical Foods Provide a High Dietary Acid Load and Increase Urinary Excretion of Renal Net Acid, Calcium, and Magnesium Compared with Glycomacropeptide Medical Foods in Phenylketonuria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bridget M. Stroup

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Skeletal fragility is a complication of phenylketonuria (PKU. A diet containing amino acids compared with glycomacropeptide reduces bone size and strength in mice. Objective. We tested the hypothesis that amino acid medical foods (AA-MF provide a high dietary acid load, subsequently increasing urinary excretion of renal net acid, calcium, and magnesium, compared to glycomacropeptide medical foods (GMP-MF. Design. In a crossover design, 8 participants with PKU (16–35 y provided food records and 24-hr urine samples after consuming a low-Phe diet in combination with AA-MF and GMP-MF for 1–3 wks. We calculated potential renal acid load (PRAL of AA-MF and GMP-MF and determined bone mineral density (BMD measurements using dual X-ray absorptiometry. Results. AA-MF provided 1.5–2.5-fold higher PRAL and resulted in 3-fold greater renal net acid excretion compared to GMP-MF (p=0.002. Dietary protein, calcium, and magnesium intake were similar. GMP-MF significantly reduced urinary excretion of calcium by 40% (p=0.012 and magnesium by 30% (p=0.029. Two participants had low BMD-for-age and trabecular bone scores, indicating microarchitectural degradation. Urinary calcium with AA-MF negatively correlated with L1–L4 BMD. Conclusion. Compared to GMP-MF, AA-MF increase dietary acid load, subsequently increasing urinary calcium and magnesium excretion, and likely contributing to skeletal fragility in PKU. The trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01428258.

  20. Influence of dietary fatty acids on endocannabinoid and N-acylethanolamine levels in rat brain, liver and small intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Artmann, Andreas; Petersen, Gitte; Hellgren, Lars

    2008-01-01

    acid in brain, jejunum and liver. The OA-diet increased brain levels of anandamide and oleoylethanolamide (not 2-arachidonoylglycerol) without changing tissue fatty acid composition. The same diet increased oleoylethanolamide in liver. All five dietary fats decreased oleoylethanolamide in jejunum...... (AA)) on tissue levels of 2-arachidonoylglycerol, anandamide, oleoylethanolamide, palmitoylethanolamide, stearoylethanolamide, linoleoylethanolamide, eicosapentaenoylethanolamide, docosahexaenoylethanolamide and tissue fatty acid composition. The LA-diet increased linoleoylethanolamide and linoleic...... without changing levels of anandamide, suggesting that dietary fat may have an orexigenic effect. The AA-diet increased anandamide and 2-arachidonoylglycerol in jejunum without effect on liver. The FO-diet decreased liver levels of all N-acylethanolamines (except eicosapentaenoylethanolamide...

  1. Dietary conjugated linoleic acid modify gene expression in liver, muscles, and fat tissues of finishing pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tous, Nuria; Theil, Peter Kappel; Lauridsen, Charlotte

    2012-01-01

    in these tissues, except for SM intermuscular fat. Dietary CLA increased PPARγ in LT muscle (P fat. Transcription of genes related to FA synthesis was reduced by CLA in SM muscle and liver (SREBP1......, both P muscle and reduced (P increased (P muscle and intermuscular fat. Saturated FA were increased in all studied tissues (P ... (LPL), delta-6-desaturase (D6D), and stearoyl CoA desaturase (SCD) were determined by real-time PCR in longissimus thoracis (LT) and semimembranosus (SM) muscles, LT subcutaneous and SM intermuscular fat, and in the liver. Fatty acid (FA) composition was analyzed using gas chromatography...

  2. Changes in short-chain fatty acid plasma profile incurred by dietary fiber composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Knud Erik Bach; Jørgensen, Henry Johs. Høgh; Theil, Peter Kappel

    2016-01-01

    Pigs were used as model for humans to study the impact of dietary fiber (DF), the main substrate for microbial fermentation, on plasma profile of short-chain fatty acids (SCFA; acetate, propionate, and butyrate). Six female pigs fitted with catheters in the portal vein and mesenteric artery...... higher net absorption of butyrate (2.4–4.0 vs. 1.6 mmol/h; P changing the fermentable substrate from predominantly cellulose to arabinoxylan-rich materials resulted in an altered SCFA uptake profile....

  3. Potent Inhibitory Effect of Chinese Dietary Spices on Fatty Acid Synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Bing; Liang, Yan; Sun, Xuebing; Liu, Xiaoxin; Tian, Weixi; Ma, Xiaofeng

    2015-09-01

    Dietary spices have been adopted in cooking since ancient times to enhance flavor and also as food preservatives and disease remedies. In China, the use of spices and other aromatic plants as food flavoring is an integral part of dietary behavior, but relatively little is known about their functions. Fatty acid synthase (FAS) has been recognized as a remedy target, and its inhibitors might be applied in disease treatment. The present work was designed to assess the inhibitory activities on FAS of spices extracts in Chinese menu. The in vitro inhibitory activities on FAS of 22 extracts of spices were assessed by spectrophotometrically monitoring oxidation of NADPH at 340 nm. Results showed that 20 spices extracts (90.9 %) exhibited inhibitory activities on FAS, with half inhibition concentration (IC(50)) values ranging from 1.72 to 810.7 μg/ml. Among them, seven spices showed strong inhibitory effect with IC(50) values lower than 10 μg/ml. These findings suggest that a large proportion of the dietary spices studied possess promising inhibitory activities on FAS, and subsequently might be applied in the treatment of obesity and obesity-related human diseases.

  4. How dietary arachidonic- and docosahexaenoic- acid rich oils differentially affect the murine hepatic transcriptome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberts Matthew A

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Herein, we expand our previous work on the effects of long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFA on the murine hepatic transcriptome using novel statistical and bioinformatic approaches for evaluating microarray data. The analyses focuses on key differences in the transcriptomic response that will influence metabolism following consumption of FUNG (rich in 20:4n6, FISH (rich in 20:5n3, 22:5n3, and 22:6n3 and COMB, the combination of the two. Results Using a variance-stabilized F-statistic, 371 probe sets (out of 13 K probe sets in the Affymetrix Mu11K chip set were changed by dietary treatment (P Conclusion Distinct transcriptomic, signaling cascades, and predicted affects on murine liver metabolism have been elucidated for 20:4n6-rich dietary oils, 22:6n3-rich oils, and a surprisingly distinct set of genes were affected by the combination of the two. Our results emphasize that the balance of dietary n6 and n3 LC-PUFA provided for infants and in nutritional and neutraceutical applications could have profoundly different affects on metabolism and cell signaling, beyond that previously recognized.

  5. The dietary branched chain amino acid requirements of hybrid striped bass(Morone chrysops x M. saxatilis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The requirements for branched chain amino acids (BCAAs) are unknown in hybrid striped bass and necessary for formulating efficient and nutritious diets. Moreover, the dietary balance among these three amino acids can substantially influence the performance of meat animals fed those diets. The diet...

  6. Effect of dietary starch or micro algae supplementation on rumen fermentation and milk fatty acid composition of dairy cows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boeckaert, C.; Vlaeminck, B.; Dijkstra, J.; Issa-Zacharia, A.; Nespen, van T.; Straalen, van W.; Fievez, V.

    2008-01-01

    Two experiments with rumen-fistulated dairy cows were conducted to evaluate the effects of feeding docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; C22:6 n-3)-enriched diets or diets provoking a decreased rumen pH on milk fatty acid composition. In the first experiment, dietary treatments were tested during 21-d experime

  7. Food for thought: dietary changes in essential fatty acid ratios and the increase in autism spectrum disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elst, K. van; Bruining, H.; Birtoli, B.; Terreaux, C.; Buitelaar, J.; Kas, M.J.

    2014-01-01

    The last decades have shown a spectacular and partially unexplained rise in the prevalence of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). This rise in ASD seems to parallel changes in the dietary composition of fatty acids. This change is marked by the replacement of cholesterol by omega-6 (n-6) fatty acids in

  8. Dietary Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Alter Fatty Acid Composition of Lipids and CYP2E1 Expression in Rat Liver Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksymchuk, Oksana; Shysh, Angela; Chashchyn, Mykola; Moibenko, Olexyi

    2016-07-21

    Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are used for the treatment and prevention of numerous pathologies in humans. As recently found, PUFAs play significantly protective roles in liver, cardiovascular system and kidney. They also are widely used in total parenteral nutrition. We evaluated the effect of omega-3 PUFA consumption on liver fatty acid composition and the expression of CYP2E1, one of the key enzymes in detoxification and prooxidant systems of liver cells. To estimate the oxidative stress in liver tissue, the antioxidant status and the level of lipid peroxidation were determined in a rodent model. Animals were divided into two groups: control (n = 10) and experimental (n = 10). Epadol-containing omega-3 PUFA fish oil capsules were administered to Wistar rats within 4 weeks (0.1 mL/100 g b.w./day). The consumption of omega-3 PUFAs resulted in changes of fatty acid composition of liver tissue. A significant increase was detected in the α-linolenic, eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acid content (5.1-, 16-, and 1.3-fold, respectively, p omega-3:omega-6 ratio. Consumption of omega-3 PUFAs led to a 3-fold (p < 0.05) increase in CYP2E1 content, which could entail enhanced Nrf2 expression levels and increases in the HO-1 content in rat liver. The alteration in CYP2E1 expression did not have an impact on the level of lipid peroxidation and on the prooxidant/antioxidant balance.

  9. Effects of dietary methionine on feed utilization, plasma amino acid profiles and gene expression in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rolland, Marine

    (EAA) compared to dietary requirements. Supplementation with amino acids in crystalline from (CAA) is a common practice to balance the dietary amino acid profile to achieve high growth performances. However, complete substitution of fish meal using plant proteins and CAAs often results in poorer growth...... are presented in Paper I and show that the protein source itself (fish meal or plant based) does not affect the plasma EAA profiles, but rather that plasma EAA levels reflect the dietary level. Supplementation with histidine, lysine and threonine in crystalline form to a plant based diet was, on the other hand...... as an apparent “accumulation” in the plasma, compared to fish fed similar dietary level but in protein bound form. The study further showed that the nitrogen excretion resulting from feeding an AA deficient diet was higher than for the fish meal control diet. Supplementation of the plant meal diet...

  10. Conversion of α-linolenic acid to long-chain omega-3 fatty acid derivatives and alterations of HDL density subfractions and plasma lipids with dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids in Monk parrots (Myiopsitta monachus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petzinger, C; Larner, C; Heatley, J J; Bailey, C A; MacFarlane, R D; Bauer, J E

    2014-04-01

    The effect of α-linolenic acid from a flaxseed (FLX)-enriched diet on plasma lipid and fatty acid metabolism and possible atherosclerosis risk factors was studied in Monk parrots (Myiopsitta monachus). Twenty-four Monk parrots were randomly assigned to diets containing either 10% ground SUNs or 10% ground FLXs. Feed intake was calculated daily. Blood samples, body condition scores and body weights were obtained at -5 weeks, day 0, 7, 14, 28, 42 and 70. Plasma samples were analysed for total cholesterol, free cholesterol, triacylglycerols and lipoproteins. Phospholipid subfraction fatty acid profiles were determined. By day 70, the FLX group had significantly higher plasma phospholipid fatty acids including 18:3n-3 (α-linolenic acid), 20:5n-3 (eicosapentaenoic acid) and 22:6n-3 (docosahexaenoic acid). The sunflower group had significantly higher plasma phospholipid levels of 20:4n-6 (arachidonic acid). By day 70, the high-density lipoprotein (HDL) peak shifted resulting in significantly different HDL peak densities between the two experimental groups (1.097 g/ml FLX group and 1.095 g/ml SUN group, p = 0.028). The plasma fatty acid results indicate that Monk parrots can readily convert α-linolenic acid to the long-chain omega-3 derivatives including docosahexaenoic acid and reduce 20:4n-6 accumulation in plasma phospholipids. The reason for a shift in the HDL peak density is unknown at this time.

  11. Clinical overview of effects of dietary long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids during the perinatal period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholtz, Susan A; Colombo, John; Carlson, Susan E

    2013-01-01

    The current report provides a brief background introducing 30 years of research on long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFA) and infant development, but focuses mainly on challenges for future studies. Infants fed formulas containing only vegetable fats were found to have lower docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3) and arachidonic acid (20:4n-6) status than infants fed human milk. Studies soon focused on efforts to improve LC-PUFA status and evaluate functions suggested by early primate studies of DHA deficiency. Despite evidence for the importance of these fatty acids for development, particularly DHA, several recent meta-analyses conclude dietary supplementation does not enhance development. Future studies should employ (1) more finely grained measures of brain development as opposed to global measures, and (2) tests that evaluate development later in childhood when children are able to be tested on more complex behaviors (if found effective these would also be evidence of early brain programming). (3) Studies are needed to understand the cause of high variability in transfer of DHA to the fetus. (4) Finally, the role of single-nucleotide polymorphisms of the fatty acid desaturase genes 1 and 2 of mother and infant needs study to determine how they affect requirements for these fatty acids by the fetus/infant.

  12. Docosahexaenoic acid synthesis from alpha-linolenic acid is inhibited by diets high in polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, R A; Neumann, M A; Lien, E L; Boyd, K A; Tu, W C

    2013-01-01

    The conversion of the plant-derived omega-3 (n-3) α-linolenic acid (ALA, 18:3n-3) to the long-chain eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5n-3) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3) can be increased by ALA sufficient diets compared to ALA deficient diets. Diets containing ALA above an optimal level result in no further increase in DHA levels in animals and humans. The present study evaluates means of maximizing plasma DHA accumulation by systematically varying both linoleic acid (LA, 18:2n-6) and ALA dietary level. Weanling rats were fed one of 54 diets for three weeks. The diets varied in the percentage of energy (en%) of LA (0.07-17.1 en%) and ALA (0.02-12.1 en%) by manipulating both the fat content and the balance of vegetable oils. The peak of plasma phospholipid DHA (>8% total fatty acids) was attained as a result of feeding a narrow dietary range of 1-3 en% ALA and 1-2 en% LA but was suppressed to basal levels (∼2% total fatty acids) at dietary intakes of total polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) above 3 en%. We conclude it is possible to enhance the DHA status of rats fed diets containing ALA as the only source of n-3 fatty acids but only when the level of dietary PUFA is low (<3 en%).

  13. Effect of dietary vegetable oils on the fatty acid profile of plasma lipoproteins in dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Bello-Pérez, Einar; Íñiguez-González, Gonzalo; Cancino-Padilla, Nathaly; Loor, Juan J; Garnsworthy, Philip C

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the effect of dietary supplementation of soybean oil (SO) and hydrogenated palm oil (HPO) on the transport of fatty acids (FA) within plasma lipoproteins in lactating and non-lactating cows. Three lactating and three non-lactating Holstein cows were used in two different 3 × 3 Latin square experiments that included three periods of 21 d. Dietary treatments for lactating cows consisted of a basal diet (control; no fat supplement) and fat-supplemented diets containing SO (500 g/d per cow) or HPO (500 g/d per cow). For non-lactating cows, dietary treatments consisted of a basal diet (control; no fat supplement) and fat-supplemented diets containing SO (170 g/d per cow) or HPO (170 g/d per cow). Compared with the control and SO diet, HPO addition increased (p lipoprotein (HDL). Total saturated FA were increased (p lipoprotein (VLDL). In non-lactating cows, the concentration of C18:0 was increased (p lipoprotein. Overall, it was found that distribution and transport of FA within the bovine plasma lipoproteins may be influenced by chain length and degree of unsaturation of dietary lipids. Also, the distribution of individual FA isomers such as C18:1trans-11 and C18:2cis-9,trans-11 may vary depending on the physiological state of the cow (lactating or non-lactating), and are increased in plasma (lactating cows) and the HDL (non-lactating cows) when cows are fed SO.

  14. Experimental evaluation of fatty acid profiles as a technique to determine dietary composition in benthic elasmobranchs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckmann, Crystal L; Mitchell, James G; Seuront, Laurent; Stone, David A J; Huveneers, Charlie

    2013-01-01

    Fatty acid (FA) analysis is a tool for dietary investigation that complements traditional stomach content analyses. Controlled feeding experiments were used to determine the extent to which the FA composition of diet is reflected in the liver and muscle tissue of the Port Jackson shark Heterodontus portusjacksoni. Over 10 wk, two groups of sharks were fed prawns or squid, which have distinct FA profiles. The percentage of total FA was significantly different for shark liver and muscle tissue when comparing controls with prawn- and squid-fed sharks. Compared with experimentally fed sharks, control shark muscle and liver had higher levels of 18:1n-9 and 20:2n-9. When comparing prawn- and squid-fed sharks, only liver tissue showed a significant difference in FA profiles. The livers of prawn-fed sharks were comparatively higher in 18:1n-7, 22:5n-3, 20:0, and 18:1n-9, while the squid-fed sharks had higher levels of 16:0 and 22:6n-3. These FAs in shark liver tissue were all reflective of higher amounts in their respective dietary items, demonstrating the conservative transfer of FA from diet to liver tissue. This study shows that liver and muscle FA profiles can be used as indicators of dietary change through the comparison of controls and fed sharks. The timescale of this study may not have been sufficient for capturing the integration of FA into muscle tissue because only liver FA profiles were useful to distinguish between sharks fed different diets. These findings have important implications for sampling design where FA profiles are used to infer dietary preferences.

  15. Retinal pigment epithelial acid lipase activity and lipoprotein receptors: effects of dietary omega-3 fatty acids.

    OpenAIRE

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: To show that fish oil-derived omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, delivered to the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) by circulating low-density lipoproteins (LDL), enhance already considerable RPE lysosomal acid lipase activity, providing for more efficient hydrolysis of intralysosomal RPE lipids, an effect that may help prevent development of age-related macular degeneration (ARMD). METHODS: Colorimetric biochemical and histochemical techniques were used to demonstrate RPE acid lipa...

  16. Dietary conjugated linoleic acid supplementation of laying hens: effects on egg fatty acid composition and quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Franchini

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA is a common term for a group of positional and geometric isomers of linoleic acid; the most commonly found in natural products is cis-9, trans-11-octadecanoic acid. Naturally occurring CLA is produced as an intermediate product of microbial metabolism of linoleic acid in the rumen. For this reason the CLA concentration is higher in ruminant products, such as milk, cheese and meat compared to products derived from monogastrics, particularly chicken meat and egg yolk. Recent investigations suggest that CLA have anticarcinogenic properties, antiatherosclerotic and antioxidant activity (Ip et al., 1995; Nicolosi et al., 1997; Du et al., 2001...

  17. Influence of dietary grape pomace combined with linseed oil on fatty acid profile and milk composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manso, T; Gallardo, B; Salvá, A; Guerra-Rivas, C; Mantecón, A R; Lavín, P; de la Fuente, M A

    2016-02-01

    Grape pomace is a by-product resulting from the winery industry that is rich in phenolic compounds. It could play a role as an antioxidant and, owing to its high fiber concentration, it would be an alternative ingredient to partially replace forage in the diet of small ruminants. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of dietary supplementation of vitamin E or different doses of grape pomace associated with linseed oil on milk fatty acid profile, composition, and yield. Forty-eight Churra ewes were fed with experimental diets consisting of a total mixed ration (TMR) containing 2.7% [on a dry matter (DM) basis] of linseed oil, forage, and concentrate at a 40:60 ratio. Ewes were assigned to 1 of 4 treatments: control (without grape pomace), vitamin E (with 500 mg/kg of TMR of vitamin E), grape pomace-5 (5 g/100 g of TMR of DM of grape pomace), and grape pomace-10 (10 g/100 g of TMR of DM of grape pomace). Experimental diets did not affect DM intake and milk yield and composition. The vitamin E supplementation had only a moderate effect on milk concentration of fatty acids (increase in α-linolenic acid and 16:0 and decrease in cis-9 18:1). Grape pomace supplementation did not affect the percentages of total saturated, monounsaturated, and polyunsaturated fatty acids. Levels of α-linolenic acid reached about 1% of total fatty acids as a consequence of the presence of linseed oil in the diets, were not modified with vitamin E, and remained unaltered in grape pomace-5 and -10 treatments. Linoleic acid was increased by the highest dose of grape pomace, but this ingredient did not modify the cis-9,trans-11 18:2 milk fat content. The concentration of total odd- and branched-chain fatty acids did not diminish in grape pomace-5 and pomace-10 treatments. The presence of grape residue did not modified the trans-11 18:1 and trans-10 18:1 contents, which might indicate that, under the conditions assayed, this winery by-product would not alter the pathways of

  18. Dietary conjugated linoleic acids increase intramuscular fat deposition and decrease subcutaneous fat deposition in Yellow Breed × Simmental cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haibo; Dong, Xianwen; Wang, Zhisheng; Zhou, Aiming; Peng, Quanhui; Zou, Huawei; Xue, Bai; Wang, Lizhi

    2016-04-01

    This study was conducted to estimate the effect of dietary conjugated linoleic acids (CLA) on intramuscular and subcutaneous fat deposition in Yellow Breed × Simmental cattle. The experiment was conducted for 60 days. The results showed that the average backfat thickness, (testicles + kidney + pelvic) fat percentage and subcutaneous fat percentage in dietary CLA were significantly lower than in the control group, while intramuscular the fat percentage was significantly higher. Compared to the control group, the Longissimus muscle enzyme activities of lipoprotein lipase (LPL), fatty acid synthase (FAS) and acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACC) in dietary CLA and the subcutaneous fat enzyme activities of LPL, hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) and carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 (CPT-1) were significantly increased. Similarly, compared to the control group, the Longissimus muscle sterol regulatory element binding protein 1 (SREBP-1), FAS, stearoyl-coenzyme A desaturase (SCD), ACC, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), heart fatty-acid binding protein (H-FABP) and LPL gene expression in dietary CLA were significant increased, as were the subcutaneous fat of PPARγ, H-FABP, LPL, CPT-1 and HSL in dietary CLA. These results indicated that dietary CLA increases IMF deposition mainly by the up-regulation of lipogenic gene expression, while decreasing subcutaneous fat deposition mainly by the up-regulation of lipolytic gene expression.

  19. Insulin Signaling in Liver and Adipose Tissues in Periparturient Dairy Cows Supplemented with Dietary Nicotinic Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Asako; Kenéz, Ákos; Locher, Lena; Meyer, Ulrich; Dänicke, Sven; Rehage, Jürgen; Huber, Korinna

    2016-01-01

    The glucose homeostasis in dairy cattle is very well controlled, in line with the metabolic adaptation during the periparturient period. Former studies showed that nicotinic acid (NA) lowered plasma non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) concentrations and increased insulin sensitivity in dairy cows. Thus, the purpose of this study was to investigate whether the expression of proteins involved in hepatic and adipose insulin signaling and protein expression of hepatic glucose transporter 2 (GLUT2) were affected by dietary NA and dietary concentrate intake in periparturient dairy cows. Twenty pluriparous German Holstein cows were fed with the same diet from about 21 days before the expected calving date (d-21) to calving. After calving, cows were randomly assigned in 4 groups and fed with diets different in concentrate proportion ("HC" with 60:40% or "LC" with 30:70% concentrate-to-roughage ratio) and supplemented with NA (24 g/day) (NA) or without (CON) until d21. Biopsy samples were taken from the liver, subcutaneous (SCAT) and retroperitoneal (RPAT) adipose tissues at d-21 and d21. Protein expression of insulin signaling molecules (insulin receptor (INSR), phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K), protein kinase Cζ (PKCζ)) and hepatic GLUT2 was measured by Western Blotting. The ratio of protein expression at d21/at d-21 was calculated and statistically evaluated for the effects of time and diet. Cows in HC had significantly higher dietary energy intake than cows in LC. In RPAT a decrease in PI3K and PKCζ expression was found in all groups, irrespectively of diet. In the liver, the GLUT2 expression was significantly lower in cows in NA compared with cows in CON. In conclusion, insulin signaling might be decreased in RPAT over time without any effect of diet. NA was able to modulate hepatic GLUT2 expression, but its physiological role is unclear.

  20. Dietary supplementation with 5-aminolevulinic acid modulates growth performance and inflammatory responses in broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, K; Matsushita, K; Takahashi, K; Aoki, M; Fuziwara, J; Miyanari, S; Kamada, T

    2012-07-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of dietary supplementation with 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) on the immune system, inflammatory response, and growth performance of broiler chickens. The levels of cluster of differentiation 3 (CD3) mRNA in the spleens of chickens gradually increased with dietary 5-ALA concentration, while the expression levels of interleukin (IL)-2 decreased. Mitogen-induced proliferation of splenic mononuclear cells and blood mononuclear cell phagocytosis in chickens fed 0.001 and 0.01% 5-ALA-supplemented diets were significantly greater than in chickens fed a basal diet (control). Plasma thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) concentration gradually increased along with 5-ALA supplement concentration. These results provide the first evidence that the use of dietary 0.001 and 0.01% 5-ALA supplementation induces the T-cell immune system via mild oxidative stress in chickens. Three hours after Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide-induced immune stimulation, the levels of mRNA encoding pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor-like ligand 1A (TL1A), in chickens fed a 0.001% 5-ALA-supplemented diet were significantly lower than those in chickens exposed to other treatments. The plasma caeruloplasmin concentration in chickens fed a 0.001% 5-ALA-supplemented diet was significantly lower than in controls or in chickens fed diets supplemented with other concentrations of 5-ALA 24 h after injection of LPS. In addition, BW at 21 and 50 d of age was significantly higher in chickens fed a 0.001% 5-ALA-supplemented diet than in control chickens. The findings suggest that supplementation of diets with 0.001% 5-ALA could prevent the catabolic changes induced by immunological stimulation. These results show that 5-ALA might be useful as an immunomodulator to stimulate T-cells via mild oxidative stress in growing broiler chickens, thereby improving the growth performance.

  1. Generation and dietary modulation of anti-inflammatory electrophilic omega-3 fatty acid derivatives.

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    Chiara Cipollina

    Full Text Available Dietary ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs decrease cardiovascular risk via suppression of inflammation. The generation of electrophilic α,β-unsaturated ketone derivatives of the ω-3 PUFAs docosahexaenoic acid (DHA and docosapentaenoic acid (DPA in activated human macrophages is catalyzed by cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2. These derivatives are potent pleiotropic anti-inflammatory signaling mediators that act via mechanisms including the activation of Nrf2-dependent phase 2 gene expression and suppression of pro-inflammatory NF-κB-driven gene expression. Herein, the endogenous generation of ω-3 PUFAs electrophilic ketone derivatives and their hydroxy precursors was evaluated in human neutrophils. In addition, their dietary modulation was assessed through a randomized clinical trial.Endogenous generation of electrophilic omega-3 PUFAs and their hydroxy precursors was evaluated by mass spectrometry in neutrophils isolated from healthy subjects, both at baseline and upon stimulation with calcium ionophore. For the clinical trial, participants were healthy adults 30-55 years of age with a reported EPA+DHA consumption of ≤300 mg/day randomly assigned to parallel groups receiving daily oil capsule supplements for a period of 4 months containing either 1.4 g of EPA+DHA (active condition, n = 24 or identical appearing soybean oil (control condition, n = 21. Participants and laboratory technicians remained blinded to treatment assignments.5-lypoxygenase-dependent endogenous generation of 7-oxo-DHA, 7-oxo-DPA and 5-oxo-EPA and their hydroxy precursors is reported in human neutrophils stimulated with calcium ionophore and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA. Dietary EPA+DHA supplementation significantly increased the formation of 7-oxo-DHA and 5-oxo-EPA, with no significant modulation of arachidonic acid (AA metabolite levels.The endogenous detection of these electrophilic ω-3 fatty acid ketone derivatives supports the precept that the

  2. Omega-3 Fatty Acids in the Management of Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejada, Silvia; Martorell, Miquel; Capó, Xavier; Tur, Josep A; Pons, Antoni; Sureda, Antoni

    2016-01-01

    Omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids are polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) with multiple double bonds. Linolenic and alpha-linolenic acids are omega-6 and omega-3 PUFAs, precursors for the synthesis of long-chain PUFAs (LC-PUFAs), such as arachidonic acid (omega-6 PUFA), and eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids (omega-3 PUFAs). The three most important omega-3 fatty acids are alpha-linolenic, eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids, which cannot be synthesized in enough amounts by the body, and therefore they must be supplied by the diet. Omega-3 fatty acids are essential for the correct functioning of the organism and participate in many physiological processes in the brain. Epilepsy is a common and heterogeneous chronic brain disorder characterized by recurrent epileptic seizures leading to neuropsychiatric disabilities. The prevalence of epilepsy is high achieving about 1% of the general population. There is evidence suggesting that omega-3 fatty acids may have neuroprotective and anticonvulsant effects and, accordingly, may have a potential use in the treatment of epilepsy. In the present review, the potential use of omega-3 fatty acids in the treatment of epilepsy, and the possible proposed mechanisms of action are discussed. The present article summarizes the recent knowledge of the potential protective role of dietary omega-3 fatty acids in epilepsy.

  3. Visual attention in infant monkeys: effects of dietary fatty acids and age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisbick, S; Neuringer, M; Gohl, E; Wald, R; Anderson, G J

    1997-05-01

    Effects of dietary essential fatty acids on visual attention were explored longitudinally in infant rhesus monkeys with a visual paired-comparison paradigm. Sets of primate faces and of patterns were presented at Weeks 2, 5, 9, and 13 to 9 infants deficient in omega-3 fatty acids and 8 fed a standard nursery diet. Familiarization to 1 member of each pair preceded simultaneous presentation of both stimuli. Infants fed the deficient diet showed longer individual looks in both immediate and 24-hr tests. Duration of looks decreased with age to familiar but not to novel stimuli. The proportion of time looking at the novel stimulus (% novel) increased with age but was not affected by diet. Look duration and % novel were differentially affected and may reflect different underlying processes.

  4. Dietary omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids induce plasminogen activator activity and DNA damage in rabbit spermatozoa.

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    Kokoli, A N; Lavrentiadou, S N; Zervos, I A; Tsantarliotou, M P; Georgiadis, M P; Nikolaidis, E A; Botsoglou, N; Boscos, C M; Taitzoglou, I A

    2017-02-20

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect(s) of dietary omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFA) on rabbit semen. Adult rabbit bucks were assigned to two groups that were given two diets, a standard diet (control) and a diet supplemented with ω-3 PUFA. Sperm samples were collected from all bucks with the use of an artificial vagina in 20-day intervals, for a total period of 120 days. The enrichment of membranes in ω-3 PUFA was manifested by the elevation of the 22:5 ω-3 (docosapentaenoic acid [DPA]) levels within 40 days. This increase in DPA content did not affect semen characteristics (i.e., concentration, motility and viability). However, it was associated with the induction of lipid peroxidation in spermatozoa, as determined on the basis of the malondialdehyde content. Lipid peroxidation was associated with DNA fragmentation in ω-3 PUFA-enriched spermatozoa and a concomitant increase in plasminogen activator (PA) activity. The effects of ω-3 PUFA on sperm cells were evident within 40 days of ω-3 PUFA dietary intake and exhibited peack values on day 120. Our findings suggest that an ω-3 PUFA-rich diet may not affect semen characteristics; however, it may have a negative impact on the oxidative status and DNA integrity of the spermatozoa, which was associated with an induction of PAs activity.

  5. Docosahexaenoic acid dietary supplementation enhances the effects of exercise on synaptic plasticity and cognition.

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    Wu, A; Ying, Z; Gomez-Pinilla, F

    2008-08-26

    Omega-3 fatty acids (i.e. docosahexaenoic acid; DHA), similar to exercise, improve cognitive function, promote neuroplasticity, and protect against neurological lesion. In this study, we investigated a possible synergistic action between DHA dietary supplementation and voluntary exercise on modulating synaptic plasticity and cognition. Rats received DHA dietary supplementation (1.25% DHA) with or without voluntary exercise for 12 days. We found that the DHA-enriched diet significantly increased spatial learning ability, and these effects were enhanced by exercise. The DHA-enriched diet increased levels of pro-brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and mature BDNF, whereas the additional application of exercise boosted the levels of both. Furthermore, the levels of the activated forms of CREB and synapsin I were incremented by the DHA-enriched diet with greater elevation by the concurrent application of exercise. While the DHA diet reduced hippocampal oxidized protein levels, a combination of a DHA diet and exercise resulted in a greater reduction rate. The levels of activated forms of hippocampal Akt and CaMKII were increased by the DHA-enriched diet, and with even greater elevation by a combination of diet and exercise. Akt and CaMKII signaling are crucial step by which BDNF exerts its action on synaptic plasticity and learning and memory. These results indicate that the DHA diet enhanced the effects of exercise on cognition and BDNF-related synaptic plasticity, a capacity that may be used to promote mental health and reduce risk of neurological disorders.

  6. A human model of dietary saturated fatty acid induced insulin resistance.

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    Koska, Juraj; Ozias, Marlies K; Deer, James; Kurtz, Julie; Salbe, Arline D; Harman, S Mitchell; Reaven, Peter D

    2016-11-01

    Increased consumption of high-fat diets is associated with the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Current models to study the mechanisms of high-fat diet-induced IR in humans are limited by their long duration or low efficacy. In the present study we developed and characterized an acute dietary model of saturated fatty acid-enriched diet induced insulin resistance. High caloric diets enriched with saturated fatty acids (SFA) or carbohydrates (CARB) were evaluated in subjects with normal and impaired glucose tolerance (NGT or IGT). Both diets were compared to a standard eucaloric American Heart Association (AHA) control diet in a series of crossover studies. Whole body insulin resistance was estimated as steady state plasma glucose (SSPG) concentrations during the last 30min of a 3-h insulin suppression test. SSPG was increased after a 24-h SFA diet (by 83±74% vs. control, n=38) in the entire cohort, which was comprised of participants with NGT (92±82%, n=22) or IGT (65±55%, n=16) (all pinsulin resistance in both NGT and IGT subjects. Insulin resistance persisted overnight after the last SFA meal and was attenuated by one day of a healthy diet. This model offers opportunities for identifying early mechanisms and potential treatments of dietary saturated fat induced insulin resistance. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Assessment on proximate composition, dietary fiber, phytic acid and protein hydrolysis of germinated Ecuatorian brown rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cáceres, Patricio J; Martínez-Villaluenga, Cristina; Amigo, Lourdes; Frias, Juana

    2014-09-01

    Germinated brown rice (GBR) is considered healthier than brown rice (BR) but its nutritive value has been hardly studied. Since nutritive quality of GBR depends on genetic diversity and germination conditions, six Ecuadorian BR varieties were germinated at 28 and 34 ºC for 48 and 96 h in darkness and proximate composition, dietary fiber fractions, phytic acid content as well as degree of protein hydrolysis and peptide content were studied. Protein, lipids, ash and available carbohydrate ranged 7.3-10.4%, 2.0-4.0%, 0.8-1.5% and 71.6 to 84.0%, respectively, in GBR seedlings. Total dietary fiber increased during germination (6.1-13.6%), with a large proportion of insoluble fraction, while phytic acid was reduced noticeably. In general, protein hydrolysis occurred during germination was more accused at 28 ºC for 48 h. These results suggest that GBR can be consumed directly as nutritive staple food for a large population worldwide contributing to their nutritional requirements.

  8. The effect of dietary modulation of sulfur amino acids on cystathionine β synthase-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruger, Warren D; Gupta, Sapna

    2016-01-01

    Cystathionine β synthase (CBS) is a key enzyme in the methionine and cysteine metabolic pathway, acting as a metabolic gatekeeper to regulate the flow of fixed sulfur from methionine to cysteine. Mutations in the CBS gene cause clinical CBS deficiency, a disease characterized by elevated plasma total homocysteine (tHcy) and methionine and decreased plasma cysteine. The treatment goal for CBS-deficient patients is to normalize the metabolic values of these three metabolites using a combination of vitamin therapy and dietary manipulation. To better understand the effectiveness of nutritional treatment strategies, we have performed a series of long-term dietary manipulation studies using our previously developed Tg-I278T Cbs(-/-) mouse model of CBS deficiency and sibling Tg-I278T Cbs(+/-) controls. Tg-I278T Cbs(-/-) mice have undetectable levels of CBS activity, extremely elevated plasma tHcy, modestly elevated plasma methionine, and low plasma cysteine. They exhibit several easily assayable phenotypes, including osteoporosis, loss of fat mass, reduced life span, and facial alopecia. The diets used in these studies differed in the amounts of sulfur amino acids or sulfur amino acid precursors. In this review, we will discuss our findings and their relevance to CBS deficiency and the concept of gene-diet interaction. © 2015 New York Academy of Sciences.

  9. Dietary Fatty Acids and Changes in Blood Lipids during Adolescence: The Role of Substituting Nutrient Intakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Carla; Buyken, Anette; Koletzko, Sibylle; von Berg, Andrea; Berdel, Dietrich; Schikowski, Tamara; Koletzko, Berthold; Heinrich, Joachim; Standl, Marie

    2017-02-11

    The relevance of dietary fatty acids (FA) for blood lipids should be assessed in the context of substituting nutrients. Such evidence is lacking for adolescents. This study describes prospective associations of dietary FA with changes in serum lipids during adolescence, and considers the theoretical isocaloric replacements of saturated FA (SFA) with other FA or carbohydrates (CHO). Children from the GINIplus and LISAplus birth cohorts, with data on FA intakes (at age 10 years) and serum lipids (at age 10 and 15 years), were included (n = 1398). Associations of SFA, monounsaturated FA (MUFA), n-3 polyunsaturated FA (n-3 PUFA) and n-6 PUFA, with changes in low-density lipoprotein (LDL), high-density lipoprotein (HDL), triglycerides (TAG), and total cholesterol to HDL ratio (TOTAL:HDL), were assessed by linear regression. Substitution models assessed isocaloric replacements of SFA with MUFA, n-3 PUFA, n-6 PUFA or CHO. Higher SFA intakes were associated with decreasing TAG. No associations were observed for fatty acid intakes with LDL, HDL or TOTAL:HDL. In females, replacing SFA with CHO was associated with increasing LDL, TAG and TOTAL:HDL. Our findings confirm observations in adults, although sex-specific determinants seem relevant in our adolescent population. Overlooking the nutrient context when limiting SFA intakes might have detrimental consequences appreciable as early as adolescence.

  10. The effect of dietary supplementation of salts of organic acid on production performance of laying hens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahiya, Ravinder; Berwal, Raj Singh; Sihag, Sajjan; Patil, Chandrashekhar Santosh; Lalit

    2016-01-01

    Aim: An experiment was conducted to evaluate the effect of supplementing different levels of salts of organic acid in the laying hen’s diet on their production performance and egg quality parameters during a period of 16-week. Materials and Methods: A total of 140 white leghorn laying hens at 24 weeks of age were randomly distributed to seven dietary treatment groups, i.e. T1 (control), T2 (0.5% sodium-butyrate), T3 (1.0% sodium-butyrate), T4 (1.5% sodium-butyrate), T5 (0.5% calcium-propionate), T6 (1.0% calcium-propionate) and T7 (1.5% calcium-propionate) consisting of 5 replications of 4 birds each in each treatment and housed in individual cages from 24 to 40 weeks of age. Feed intake, percent hen-day egg production, egg weight, egg mass production, feed conversion ratio (FCR), and economics of supplementation of salts of organic acids in layers’ ration were evaluated. Results: The dietary supplementation of salts of organic acids did not significantly affect the feed intake (g/day/hen) and body weight gain (g). Different levels of supplementation significantly (phen-day egg production and egg mass production) as compared to control group. FCR in terms of feed intake (kg) per dozen eggs was lowest (1.83±0.05) in T4 and feed intake (kg) per kg egg mass was lowest (2.87±0.05) in T5 as comparison to control (T1) group. Salts of organic acids supplementation resulted in significant (play, egg weight, and FCR. From economical point of view, egg production was more profitable at 0.5% level of sodium butyrate and 0.5% level of calcium propionate which reduced the feed cost per dozen eggs and per kg egg mass production without affecting the egg quality. PMID:28096625

  11. An increase in dietary n-3 fatty acids decreases a marker of bone resorption in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilpert Kirsten F

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Human, animal, and in vitro research indicates a beneficial effect of appropriate amounts of omega-3 (n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA on bone health. This is the first controlled feeding study in humans to evaluate the effect of dietary plant-derived n-3 PUFA on bone turnover, assessed by serum concentrations of N-telopeptides (NTx and bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BSAP. Subjects (n = 23 consumed each diet for 6 weeks in a randomized, 3-period crossover design: 1 Average American Diet (AAD; [34% total fat, 13% saturated fatty acids (SFA, 13% monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA, 9% PUFA (7.7% LA, 0.8% ALA], 2 Linoleic Acid Diet (LA; [37% total fat, 9% SFA, 12% MUFA, 16% PUFA (12.6% LA, 3.6% ALA], and 3 α-Linolenic Acid Diet (ALA; [38% total fat, 8% SFA, 12% MUFA, 17% PUFA (10.5% LA, 6.5% ALA]. Walnuts and flaxseed oil were the predominant sources of ALA. NTx levels were significantly lower following the ALA diet (13.20 ± 1.21 nM BCE, relative to the AAD (15.59 ± 1.21 nM BCE (p

  12. Dietary essential fatty acids and gender-specific behavioral responses in cranially irradiated rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkin, T David; Wollan, Michael O; Anderson, Stacy L; Gaston, Robert; Meyer, William; Fuemmeler, Bernard F; Holloway, Frank A; Martin, Rex E

    2006-09-01

    Specific memory deficits, reduced intellectual processing speed, and a variety of social and behavioral problems have been implicated as long-term effects of cranial radiation therapy (CRT). These deficits are thought to be related to changes in brain cytology and structure associated with microvascular aberrations. N-3 fatty acids may serve as protectants in pediatric patients who receive CRT for brain tumors. Timed-pregnant rat dams were fed one of four diets that were identical in all respects, except for their essential fatty acid content. The dams were placed on these diets at the beginning of the third trimester of gestation and their pups remained on them throughout the study. The rats' behavioral response as judged by acoustic startle response (ASR) and neurocognitive response (performance in a radial maze, RM) were evaluated in relation to diet, gender, and CRT. The following hypotheses were tested: (1) female rats will show greater CRT-induced neurocognitive and behavioral deficits; (2) dietary n-3 fatty acids will diminish CRT-induced neurocognitive and behavioral deficits; (3) gender-specific differences would be dampened by n-3 fatty acids in the diet. All three hypotheses were partially supported. These findings are discussed in light of the potential neuroprotective effects of n-3 fatty acids.

  13. Suppression of muscle protein turnover and amino acid degradation by dietary protein deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawa, N. E. Jr; Goldberg, A. L.

    1992-01-01

    To define the adaptations that conserve amino acids and muscle protein when dietary protein intake is inadequate, rats (60-70 g final wt) were fed a normal or protein-deficient (PD) diet (18 or 1% lactalbumin), and their muscles were studied in vitro. After 7 days on the PD diet, both protein degradation and synthesis fell 30-40% in skeletal muscles and atria. This fall in proteolysis did not result from reduced amino acid supply to the muscle and preceded any clear decrease in plasma amino acids. Oxidation of branched-chain amino acids, glutamine and alanine synthesis, and uptake of alpha-aminoisobutyrate also fell by 30-50% in muscles and adipose tissue of PD rats. After 1 day on the PD diet, muscle protein synthesis and amino acid uptake decreased by 25-40%, and after 3 days proteolysis and leucine oxidation fell 30-45%. Upon refeeding with the normal diet, protein synthesis also rose more rapidly (+30% by 1 day) than proteolysis, which increased significantly after 3 days (+60%). These different time courses suggest distinct endocrine signals for these responses. The high rate of protein synthesis and low rate of proteolysis during the first 3 days of refeeding a normal diet to PD rats contributes to the rapid weight gain ("catch-up growth") of such animals.

  14. Effects of dietary gamma-linolenic acid and docosahexaenoic acid with paclitaxel on the treatment of mice mammary carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamran Rakhshan

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Breast cancer is one of the most important causes of death in women. One of the various gene expression involved in breast cancer is human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2/neu gene expression increases. Factors of dietary affect on regulation of hormone secretion and the rate of breast cancer. One of these factors is amount and type of fats in diet. Gamma-linolenic acid (GLA and Docosah-exaenoic acid (DHA are members of poly unsaturated fatty acids. In this study, effects of dietary GLA and DHA alone or together with paclitaxel on treatment of mice mammary carcinoma has been evaluated.Methods: Thirty female balb/c mice were divided in six groups randomly. Carcinoma-tous mass induced by tumor implantation method. Spontaneous breast adenocarcinoma of mice were used as tumor stock. The tumors of these mice were removed aseptically, dissected into 0.5 cm3 pieces. These pieces were transplanted subcutaneously into their right flank. GLA and DHA added to the mice diet two week prior to tumor implanta-tion. At the end of intervention, tumors were removed and HER2 gene expression was measured. The weight of animal and tumor volume measured weekly.Results: It was not significant change in the weight of animals that consumed DHA and DHA with taxol. Tumor volume in those groups that received corn oil with taxol (P<0.01, DHA (P<0.05 and DHA with taxol (P<0.001 showed significant decrease in comparison with control group. HER2 gene expression in DHA with taxol decreased significantly in comparison with control group (P<0.05.Conclusion: Consumption of DHA oil with taxol causes decrease the volume of carcin-oma mass. The future studies with large number of sample is needed to support this finding.

  15. Detailed transcriptomics analysis of the effect of dietary fatty acids on gene expression in the heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiadi, Anastasia; Boekschoten, Mark V; Müller, Michael; Kersten, Sander

    2012-03-19

    Fatty acids comprise the primary energy source for the heart and are mainly taken up via hydrolysis of circulating triglyceride-rich lipoproteins. While most of the fatty acids entering the cardiomyocyte are oxidized, a small portion is involved in altering gene transcription to modulate cardiometabolic functions. So far, no in vivo model has been developed enabling study of the transcriptional effects of specific fatty acids in the intact heart. In the present study, mice were given a single oral dose of synthetic triglycerides composed of one single fatty acid. Hearts were collected 6 h thereafter and used for whole genome gene expression profiling. Experiments were conducted in wild-type and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)α-/- mice to allow exploration of the specific contribution of PPARα. It was found that: 1) C18:3 had the most pronounced effect on cardiac gene expression. 2) The largest similarity in gene regulation was observed between C18:2 and C18:3. Large similarity was also observed between PPARα agonist Wy14643 and C22:6. 3) Many genes were regulated by one particular treatment only. Genes regulated by one particular treatment showed large functional divergence. 4) The majority of genes responding to fatty acid treatment were regulated in a PPARα-dependent manner, emphasizing the importance of PPARα in mediating transcriptional regulation by fatty acids in the heart. 5) Several genes were robustly regulated by all or many of the fatty acids studied, mostly representing well-described targets of PPARs (e.g., Acot1, Angptl4, Ucp3) but also including Zbtb16/PLZF, a transcription factor crucial for natural killer T cell function. 6) Deletion and activation of PPARα had a major effect on expression of numerous genes involved in metabolism and immunity. Our analysis demonstrates the marked impact of dietary fatty acids on gene regulation in the heart via PPARα.

  16. Effect of dietary n-3 fatty acids supplementation on fatty acid metabolism in atorvastatin-administered SHR.Cg-Lepr(cp)/NDmcr rats, a metabolic syndrome model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Mamun, Abdullah; Hashimoto, Michio; Katakura, Masanori; Tanabe, Yoko; Tsuchikura, Satoru; Hossain, Shahdat; Shido, Osamu

    2017-01-01

    The effects of cholesterol-lowering statins, which substantially benefit future cardiovascular events, on fatty acid metabolism have remained largely obscured. In this study, we investigated the effects of atorvastatin on fatty acid metabolism together with the effects of TAK-085 containing highly purified eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) ethyl ester on atorvastatin-induced n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid lowering in SHR.Cg-Lepr(cp)/NDmcr (SHRcp) rats, as a metabolic syndrome model. Supplementation with 10mg/kg body weight/day of atorvastatin for 17 weeks significantly decreased plasma total cholesterol and very low density lipoprotein cholesterol. Atorvastatin alone caused a subtle change in fatty acid composition particularly of EPA and DHA in the plasma, liver or erythrocyte membranes. However, the TAK-085 consistently increased both the levels of EPA and DHA in the plasma, liver and erythrocyte membranes. After confirming the reduction of plasma total cholesterol, 300mg/kg body weight/day of TAK-085 was continuously administered for another 6 weeks. Supplementation with TAK-085 did not decrease plasma total cholesterol but significantly increased the EPA and DHA levels in both the plasma and liver compared with rats administered atorvastatin only. Supplementation with atorvastatin alone significantly decreased sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c, Δ5- and Δ6-desaturases, elongase-5, and stearoyl-coenzyme A (CoA) desaturase-2 levels and increased 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase mRNA expression in the liver compared with control rats. TAK-085 supplementation significantly increased stearoyl-CoA desaturase-2 mRNA expression. These results suggest that long-term supplementation with atorvastatin decreases the EPA and DHA levels by inhibiting the desaturation and elongation of n-3 fatty acid metabolism, while TAK-085 supplementation effectively replenishes this effect in SHRcp rat liver.

  17. Effects of Dietary Acid Load on Exercise Metabolism and Anaerobic Exercise Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan L. Caciano, Cynthia L. Inman, Elizabeth E. Gockel-Blessing, Edward P. Weiss

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Dietary acid load, quantified as the potential renal acid load (PRAL of the diet, affects systemic pH and acid-base regulation. In a previous cross-sectional study, we reported that a low dietary PRAL (i.e. alkaline promoting diet is associated with higher respiratory exchange ratio (RER values during maximal exercise. The purpose of the present study was to confirm the previous findings with a short-term dietary intervention study. Additionally, we sought to determine if changes in PRAL affects submaximal exercise RER (as a reflection of substrate utilization and anaerobic exercise performance. Subjects underwent a graded treadmill exercise test (GXT to exhaustion and an anaerobic exercise performance test on two occasions, once after following a low-PRAL diet and on a separate occasion, after a high-PRAL diet. The diets were continued as long as needed to achieve an alkaline or acid fasted morning urine pH, respectively, with all being 4-9 days in duration. RER was measured during the GXT with indirect calorimetry. The anaerobic performance test was a running time-to-exhaustion test lasting 1-4 min. Maximal exercise RER was lower in the low-PRAL trial compared to the high-PRAL trial (1.10 ± 0.02 vs. 1.20 ± 0.05, p = 0.037. The low-PRAL diet also resulted in a 21% greater time to exhaustion during anaerobic exercise (2.56 ± 0.36 vs. 2.11 ± 0.31 sec, p = 0.044 and a strong tendency for lower RER values during submaximal exercise at 70% VO2max (0.88 ± 0.02 vs. 0.96 ± 0.04, p = 0.060. Contrary to our expectations, a short-term low-PRAL (alkaline promoting diet resulted in lower RER values during maximal-intensity exercise. However, the low-PRAL diet also increased anaerobic exercise time to exhaustion and appears to have shifted submaximal exercise substrate utilization to favor lipid oxidation and spare carbohydrate, both of which would be considered favorable effects in the context of exercise performance.

  18. Original Research: Effect of various dietary fats on fatty acid profile in duck liver: Efficient conversion of short-chain to long-chain omega-3 fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi; Du, Xue; Shen, Jianliang; Lu, Lizhi; Wang, Weiqun

    2017-01-01

    Omega-3 fatty acids, especially long-chain omega-3 fatty acids, have been associated with potential health benefits for chronic disease prevention. Our previous studies found that dietary omega-3 fatty acids could accumulate in the meat and eggs in a duck model. This study was to reveal the effects of various dietary fats on fatty acid profile and conversion of omega-3 fatty acids in duck liver. Female Shan Partridge Ducks were randomly assigned to five dietary treatments, each consisting of 6 replicates of 30 birds. The experimental diets substituted the basal diet by 2% of flaxseed oil, rapeseed oil, beef tallow, or fish oil, respectively. In addition, a dose response study was further conducted for flaxseed and fish oil diets at 0.5%, 1%, and 2%, respectively. At the end of the five-week treatment, fatty acids were extracted from the liver samples and analyzed by GC-FID. As expected, the total omega-3 fatty acids and the ratio of total omega-3/omega-6 significantly increased in both flaxseed and fish oil groups when compared with the control diet. No significant change of total saturated fatty acids or omega-3 fatty acids was found in both rapeseed and beef tallow groups. The dose response study further indicated that 59-81% of the short-chain omega-3 ALA in flaxseed oil-fed group was efficiently converted to long-chain DHA in the duck liver, whereas 1% of dietary flaxseed oil could produce an equivalent level of DHA as 0.5% of dietary fish oil. The more omega-3 fatty acids, the less omega-6 fatty acids in the duck liver. Taken together, this study showed the fatty acid profiling in the duck liver after various dietary fat consumption, provided insight into a dose response change of omega-3 fatty acids, indicated an efficient conversion of short- to long-chain omega-3 fatty acid, and suggested alternative long-chain omega-3 fatty acid-enriched duck products for human health benefits.

  19. Influence of dietary magnesium on mineral, ascorbic acid and glutathione concentrations in tissues of a freshwater fish, the common carp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabrowska, H; Dabrowski, K

    1990-01-01

    Supplementation with dietary Mg at a minimum level of 0.06% seems to be essential to prevent the hypercalcinosis of the kidney and hepatopancreas in a fish, the common carp. Mg deficiency appears to have no effect on the Mg level in kidneys and hepatic tissue, whereas the Fe level in those tissues was significantly diminished by increasing dietary Mg supplementation up to 3.2 g.kg-1. Both hypercalcinosis and accumulation of Fe in soft tissues were more pronounced in fish offered diets high in protein (44%) compared to fish on low dietary protein (25%). The ascorbic acid in the hepatopancreas and kidney was greatly depleted in fish fed the high-protein diets, and this depletion did not correlate with the dietary Mg level nor with a high level of tissue Ca. However, the increased Ca concentration in the kidney coincided with the greatest depletion of ascorbate in fish fed a high-protein diet. The concentration of ascorbate in the brain was much less affected by a low level of vitamin C in the diets than in other tissues. Depletion of ascorbate in soft tissues did not correspond to fish growth but might be rather related to the metabolic rate imposed by the dietary nutrients. It is suggested that the Mg and ascorbic acid requirements in the carp are considerably elevated by the increased dietary protein level.

  20. Trans fatty acid contents in selected dietary fats in the Estonian market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meremäe, Kadrin; Roasto, Mati; Kuusik, Sirje; Ots, Meelis; Henno, Merike

    2012-08-01

    In response to public concern, this study assessed the fatty acid (FA) composition of blended spreads, margarines and shortenings in the Estonian retail market in 2011. Special attention was paid to the trans fatty acids (TFA) composition. The changes in these characteristics of selected dietary fats in the market over recent years are also presented. Twenty-six edible fat brands, available in the Estonian retail market in 2011, were purchased and FA compositions were analyzed by chromatography. Saturated fatty acids (SFA) were the dominant group of FAs for all blended spreads (49.6 to 65.8%), and for the majority of shortenings (from 21.1 to 54.6%). Cis monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) were the dominant group of FAs for the majority of margarines, ranging from 25.3% to 50.5%. The total TFA for blended spreads varied from 1.18% to 9.08%, for margarines from 0.04% to 34.96% and for shortenings from 0.14% to 39.50%. Octadecenoic (C18:1) isomers were the main TFA found. Compared to 2008/2009, the industrially produced TFA (IP-TFA) content in several of the dietary fat brands was much reduced in 2011. This voluntary reformulation was probably a response to consumer demand associated with a public health campaign directed against IP-TFA in Estonian foods, and were mainly achieved by replacing TFA with SFA C12:0-C16:0. Present paper is directed toward public health related institutions and food industries producing foods with potentially high contents of trans fatty acids (TFA). According to the public concern TFA content in domestic blended spreads has declined significantly over the past 3 y in Estonia. The reduction in the TFA content was achieved by replacing TFA with saturated fatty acids (SFA) (C12:0-C16:0). To shift food composition toward healthier product formulations, mandatory labeling of the sum of IP-TFA and SFA (C12:0-C16:0) was recommended. © 2012 Institute of Food Technologists®

  1. Estimation of the dietary essential amino acid requirements of colliroja Astyanax fasciatus by using the ideal protein concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Massamitu Furuya

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Colliroja, Astyanax fasciatus, is a new aquaculture species, and information on its dietary essential amino acid requirements is lacking. The whole body composition of 120 farmed fish (16.2 ± 8.8 g was determined to estimate the dietary essential amino acid requirement based on the ideal protein concept ((each essential amino acid/lysine x100, and the findings were correlated to the whole body essential amino acid content of Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus. The dietary essential amino acids, including cysteine and tyrosine, accounted for 5.46, 4.62, 1.16, 3.28, 5.63, 2.01, 2.59, 2.84, 4.66, 3.39, 0.65, and 3.51% of the total protein for lysine, arginine, histidine, isoleucine, leucine, methionine, methionine+tyrosine, phenylalanine, phenylalanine+tyrosine, threonine, tryptophan, and valine, respectively. There were positive linear and high correlations (r = 0.971 between the whole body amino acid profiles of colliroja and Nile tilapia. Thus, the whole body amino acid profile of colliroja might be used to estimate accurately the essential amino acid requirement.

  2. Chronic dietary administration of valproic acid protects neurons of the rat nucleus basalis magnocellularis from ibotenic acid neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eleuteri, Simona; Monti, Barbara; Brignani, Sara; Contestabile, Antonio

    2009-02-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) has been used for many years as a drug of choice for epilepsy and mood disorders. Recently, evidence has been proposed for a wide spectrum of actions of this drug, including antitumoral and neuroprotective properties. Valproic acid-mediated neuroprotection in vivo has been so far demonstrated in a limited number of experimental models. In this study, we have tested the neuroprotective potential of chronic (4 + 1 weeks) dietary administration of VPA on degeneration of cholinergic and GABAergic neurons of the rat nucleus basalis magnocellularis (NBM), injected with the excitotoxin, ibotenic acid (IBO), an animal models that is relevant for Alzheimer's disease-like neurodegeneration. We show that VPA treatment significantly protects both cholinergic and GABAergic neurons present in the injected area from the excitotoxic insult. A significant level of neuroprotection, in particular, is exerted towards the cholinergic neurons of the NBM projecting to the cortex, as demonstrated by the substantially higher levels of cholinergic markers maintained in the target cortical area of VPA-treated rats after IBO injection in the NBM. We further show that chronic VPA administration results in increased acetylation of histone H3 in brain, consistent with the histone deacetylase inhibitory action of VPA and putatively linked to a neuroprotective action of the drug mediated at the epigenetic level.

  3. Does Short-Term Dietary Omega-3 Fatty Acid Supplementation Influence Brain Hippocampus Gene Expression of Zinc Transporter-3?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Farhana Ahmad Sopian

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Dietary omega-3 fatty acids have been recognized to improve brain cognitive function. Deficiency leads to dysfunctional zinc metabolism associated with learning and memory impairment. The objective of this study is to explore the effect of short-term dietary omega-3 fatty acids on hippocampus gene expression at the molecular level in relation to spatial recognition memory in mice. A total of 24 male BALB/c mice were randomly divided into four groups and fed a standard pellet as a control group (CTL, n = 6, standard pellet added with 10% (w/w fish oil (FO, n = 6, 10% (w/w soybean oil (SO, n = 6 and 10% (w/w butter (BT, n = 6. After 3 weeks on the treatment diets, spatial-recognition memory was tested on a Y-maze. The hippocampus gene expression was determined using a real-time PCR. The results showed that 3 weeks of dietary omega-3 fatty acid supplementation improved cognitive performance along with the up-regulation of α-synuclein, calmodulin and transthyretin genes expression. In addition, dietary omega-3 fatty acid deficiency increased the level of ZnT3 gene and subsequently reduced cognitive performance in mice. These results indicate that the increased the ZnT3 levels caused by the deficiency of omega-3 fatty acids produced an abnormal zinc metabolism that in turn impaired the brain cognitive performance in mice.

  4. Vascular dysfunction induced in offspring by maternal dietary fat involves altered arterial polyunsaturated fatty acid biosynthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J Kelsall

    Full Text Available Nutrition during development affects risk of future cardiovascular disease. Relatively little is known about whether the amount and type of fat in the maternal diet affect vascular function in the offspring. To investigate this, pregnant and lactating rats were fed either 7%(w/w or 21%(w/w fat enriched in either 18:2n-6, trans fatty acids, saturated fatty acids, or fish oil. Their offspring were fed 4%(w/w soybean oil from weaning until day 77. Type and amount of maternal dietary fat altered acetylcholine (ACh-mediated vaso-relaxation in offspring aortae and mesenteric arteries, contingent on sex. Amount, but not type, of maternal dietary fat altered phenylephrine (Pe-induced vasoconstriction in these arteries. Maternal 21% fat diet decreased 20:4n-6 concentration in offspring aortae. We investigated the role of Δ6 and Δ5 desaturases, showing that their inhibition in aortae and mesenteric arteries reduced vasoconstriction, but not vaso-relaxation, and the synthesis of specific pro-constriction eicosanoids. Removal of the aortic endothelium did not alter the effect of inhibition of Δ6 and Δ5 desaturases on Pe-mediated vasoconstriction. Thus arterial smooth muscle 20:4n-6 biosynthesis de novo appears to be important for Pe-mediated vasoconstriction. Next we studied genes encoding these desaturases, finding that maternal 21% fat reduced Fads2 mRNA expression and increased Fads1 in offspring aortae, indicating dysregulation of 20:4n-6 biosynthesis. Methylation at CpG -394 bp 5' to the Fads2 transcription start site predicted its expression. This locus was hypermethylated in offspring of dams fed 21% fat. Pe treatment of aortae for 10 minutes increased Fads2, but not Fads1, mRNA expression (76%; P<0.05. This suggests that Fads2 may be an immediate early gene in the response of aortae to Pe. Thus both amount and type of maternal dietary fat induce altered regulation of vascular tone in offspring though differential effects on vaso-relaxation, and

  5. Dietary fatty acid composition affects aminopeptidase activities in the testes of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arechaga, Garbiñe; Prieto, Isabel; Segarra, Ana B; Alba, Francisco; Ruiz-Larrea, María B; Ruiz-Sanz, José I; de Gasparo, Marc; Ramirez, Manuel

    2002-04-01

    The autocrine/paracrine control mechanisms of local factors, such as the renin-angiotensin system and the thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH), seem to play a relevant role in testicular physiology. It has been proposed that dietary fat composition influences male reproductive function modifying the cholesterol-phospholipid composition of testicular plasma membranes. Modifications in the composition and physical properties of the membranes may lead to alterations in the activities of membrane-bound (M-B) enzymes. We have previously demonstrated that cholesterol and steroid hormones affect aminopeptidase (AP) activities. Dietary fatty acids with different degrees of saturation modified AP activities in the serum of mice and an olive oil supplemented diet influenced the AP activities in the testes of mice. We hypothesized that the modification of dietary fat composition may affect angiotensin- [glutamyl-AP (GluAP), aspartyl-AP (AspAP)] and TRH- [pyroglutamyl-AP (pGluAP)] degrading activities in the testis. In this study, we investigated the effect of diets supplemented with sunflower oil (SFO), fish oil (FO), olive oil (OO), lard (L) or coconut oil (CO) on soluble (Sol) and M-B GluAP, AspAP and pGluAP in mice testis, using arylamides as substrates. Sol GluAP activity did not show differences among groups. However, Sol AspAP and Sol pGluAP progressively decreased with the degree of saturation of the fatty acid used in the diet. In contrast, M-B GluAP progressively increased with the degree of saturation of the fatty acid used in the diet. For M-B AspAP activity, mice fed diets containing FO showed significantly higher levels than those fed diets containing SFO, OO and L but not those containing CO. For M-B pGluAP activity, the highest levels were observed for mice fed diets containing FO and OO. The present data suggest that the type of fat used in the diet may influence the autocrine/paracrine functions of locally synthesized angiotensin peptides and TRH in the testis

  6. Dietary Protein and Amino Acid Supplementation in Inflammatory Bowel Disease Course: What Impact on the Colonic Mucosa?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal-Lletjós, Sandra; Beaumont, Martin; Tomé, Daniel; Benamouzig, Robert; Blachier, François; Lan, Annaïg

    2017-03-21

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), after disease onset, typically progress in two cyclically repeated phases, namely inflammatory flare and remission, with possible nutritional status impairment. Some evidence, either from epidemiological, clinical, and experimental studies indicate that the quantity and the quality of dietary protein consumption and amino acid supplementation may differently influence the IBD course according to the disease phases. For instance, although the dietary protein needs for mucosal healing after an inflammatory episode remain undetermined, there is evidence that amino acids derived from dietary proteins display beneficial effects on this process, serving as building blocks for macromolecule synthesis in the wounded mucosal area, energy substrates, and/or precursors of bioactive metabolites. However, an excessive amount of dietary proteins may result in an increased intestinal production of potentially deleterious bacterial metabolites. This could possibly affect epithelial repair as several of these bacterial metabolites are known to inhibit colonic epithelial cell respiration, cell proliferation, and/or to affect barrier function. In this review, we present the available evidence about the impact of the amount of dietary proteins and supplementary amino acids on IBD onset and progression, with a focus on the effects reported in the colon.

  7. Dietary Protein and Amino Acid Supplementation in Inflammatory Bowel Disease Course: What Impact on the Colonic Mucosa?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal-Lletjós, Sandra; Beaumont, Martin; Tomé, Daniel; Benamouzig, Robert; Blachier, François; Lan, Annaïg

    2017-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), after disease onset, typically progress in two cyclically repeated phases, namely inflammatory flare and remission, with possible nutritional status impairment. Some evidence, either from epidemiological, clinical, and experimental studies indicate that the quantity and the quality of dietary protein consumption and amino acid supplementation may differently influence the IBD course according to the disease phases. For instance, although the dietary protein needs for mucosal healing after an inflammatory episode remain undetermined, there is evidence that amino acids derived from dietary proteins display beneficial effects on this process, serving as building blocks for macromolecule synthesis in the wounded mucosal area, energy substrates, and/or precursors of bioactive metabolites. However, an excessive amount of dietary proteins may result in an increased intestinal production of potentially deleterious bacterial metabolites. This could possibly affect epithelial repair as several of these bacterial metabolites are known to inhibit colonic epithelial cell respiration, cell proliferation, and/or to affect barrier function. In this review, we present the available evidence about the impact of the amount of dietary proteins and supplementary amino acids on IBD onset and progression, with a focus on the effects reported in the colon. PMID:28335546

  8. Dietary amino acids fed in free form and as protein components do not differently affects postprandial plasma insulin, glucagon, growth hormone and corticosterone responses in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nolles, J.A.; Straten, van E.M.E.; Bremer, B.I.; Koopmanschap, R.E.; Verstegen, M.W.A.; Schreurs, V.V.A.M.

    2006-01-01

    This study examined, whether the postprandial fate of dietary amino acids from different amino acid sources is regulated by the responses of insulin, glucagon, corticosterone and growth hormone (GH). Male Wistar rats were cannulated in the vena jugularis and assigned to dietary groups. The diets con

  9. Dietary structured triacylglycerols containing docosahexaenoic acid given from birth affect visual and auditory performance and tissue fatty acid profiles of rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, M. M.; Lund, S. P.; Simonsen, L.;

    1998-01-01

    To examine whether it is possible to enhance the level of 22:6(n-3) in the central nervous system, newborn rats were fed dietary supplements containing oils with either specific or random triacylglycerol structure, but similar concentrations of polyunsaturated fatty acids. In the specific...... in metabolism of fatty acids resulting from their position in the dietary triacylglycerol molecule. The higher levers of 22:6(n-3) were accompanied by significantly lower levels of the long-chain (n-6) polyunsaturated fatty acids compared with the reference group. The fatty acid profiles, including the level...... of 22:6(n-3), in the retina phospholipids were not affected by the three different diets apart from a lower level of 20:4(n-6) in rats fed the experimental diets, indicating a strong tendency to maintain a high level of 22:6(n-3) in the retina. The changes in the fatty acid profiles did not result...

  10. Peripartum responses of dairy cows to prepartal feeding level and dietary fatty acid source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayirli, A; Keisler, D H; Doepel, L; Petit, Hélène

    2011-02-01

    This experiment was conducted to investigate the effect of feeding level and oilseed supplementation during the close-up dry period on energy balance (EB), hepatic lipidosis, metabolic status, and productivity in early lactation. Seventy-seven Holstein cows were blocked according to parity and expected calving date and then assigned randomly to 1 of 6 treatments in a 2 × 3 factorial allocation with 2 feeding levels: ad libitum (AL) or 30% feed restriction (FR), and 3 dietary fatty acid sources: canola seed, linola seed, or flaxseed at 8% of dietary dry matter (DM), to enrich the rations with oleic, linoleic, or linolenic acids, respectively during the last 4 wk of gestation. After parturition, all cows were fed a common lactation diet. Cows fed AL lost less body weight (-2.9 vs. -6.0%) and body condition score (+0.67 vs. -2.30%), and consequently were in more positive EB (+4.6 vs. -0.3 Mcal) during the prepartum period than cows subjected to FR. Postpartum, FR cows lost less body weight (-9.7 vs. -12.4%) and experienced less severe negative EB (-4.5 vs. -7.0 Mcal) than AL cows. Cows fed AL had higher plasma insulin (6.8 vs. 4.4 μIU/mL) and lower nonesterified fatty acid concentrations (436 vs. 570 mEq/mL) during the close-up period than cows subjected to FR. Cows fed AL tended to have lower liver glycogen content in early lactation than cows subjected to FR (4.4 vs. 2.9 % of DM) [corrected], but had similar triglyceride content (13.1 ± 1.2 μg/g of DM). Fatty acid source did not influence response variables. In conclusion, eliminating intake depression by FR during the close-up period had positive carryover effects on EB and metabolic status during early lactation, but feeding linoleic and linolenic acids via unprotected oilseeds only had negligible effects on peripartum responses.

  11. Fatty acid dietary intake and the risk of ischaemic stroke: a multicentre case-control study. UFA Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, S; Celani, M G; Righetti, E; Caruso, A; De Medio, G; Trovarelli, G; Romoli, S; Stragliotto, E; Spizzichino, L

    1997-06-01

    A low dietary intake of unsaturated fatty acids has been found in male patients with stroke as compared with controls in Italy, and a high consumption of meat has been associated with an increased risk of stroke in Australia. We present a case-control study, comparing the unsaturated and saturated fatty acids content of red cell membranes (which reflects the dietary intake of saturated and unsaturated fats) in 89 patients with ischaemic stroke and 89 controls matched for age and sex. In univariate analysis, besides hypertension, atrial fibrillation, ischaemic changes in ECG and hypercholesterolaemia, stroke patients showed a lower level of oleic acid (P = 0.000), but a higher level of eicosatrienoic acid (P = 0.009). Conditional logistic regression (dependent variable; being a case) showed that the best model included atrial fibrillation, hypertension, oleic acid and eicosatrienoic acids. These results confirm a possible protective role of unsaturated fatty acids against vascular diseases; however, we did not find any difference in the content of omega3 acids, which have been considered in the past to protect against coronary heart disease. We conclude that the preceding diet of patients with ischaemic stroke may be poor in unsaturated fatty acids (namely, oleic acid), and this defect is independent of other vascular risk factors. Only further studies will show whether changes in diet and/or supplement of unsaturated fatty acids might reduce the incidence of ischaemic stroke.

  12. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), a fundamental fatty acid for the brain: New dietary sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echeverría, Francisca; Valenzuela, Rodrigo; Catalina Hernandez-Rodas, María; Valenzuela, Alfonso

    2017-09-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid (C22: 6n-3, DHA) is a long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid of marine origin fundamental for the formation and function of the nervous system, particularly the brain and the retina of humans. It has been proposed a remarkable role of DHA during human evolution, mainly on the growth and development of the brain. Currently, DHA is considered a critical nutrient during pregnancy and breastfeeding due their active participation in the development of the nervous system in early life. DHA and specifically one of its derivatives known as neuroprotectin D-1 (NPD-1), has neuroprotective properties against brain aging, neurodegenerative diseases and injury caused after brain ischemia-reperfusion episodes. This paper discusses the importance of DHA in the human brain given its relevance in the development of the tissue and as neuroprotective agent. It is also included a critical view about the ways to supply this noble fatty acid to the population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Transfer of dietary fatty acids from butyric acid fortified canola oil into the meat of broilers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Rapaccini

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The literature reported positive beneficial effects of butyric acid and canola oil on production performance traits of broiler chickens. Three hundred hybrid Ross 708 (150 males and 150 females were randomly allotted to 10 pens per treatment with 5 males and 5 females per pen. Ten pens were administered a diet supplemented with soybean oil (control, ten pens the same basal diet but supplemented with a blend of mono-, di-, tri-glyceride of butyric acid added to soybean oil (T1 and ten pens the same basal diet supplemented with a mix of soybean and canola oil containing butyrate (T2. No differences in final body weight, dressing percentage, liver and thigh weight were found be- tween groups. The T2 birds showed the highest feed/gain ratio (P<0.05. The control group showed the highest value for breast weight while the highest quantity of abdominal fat was in T2 carcasses. Fatty acid profile was significantly influenced by the presence of oil supplements, not only quantitatively but also qualitatively.

  14. Way toward "dietary pesticides": molecular investigation of insecticidal action of caffeic acid against Helicoverpa armigera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, R S; Wagh, T P; Sharma, N; Mulani, F A; Sonavane, U; Thulasiram, H V; Joshi, R; Gupta, V S; Giri, A P

    2014-11-12

    Bioprospecting of natural molecules is essential to overcome serious environmental issues and pesticide resistance in insects. Here we are reporting insights into insecticidal activity of a plant natural phenol. In silico and in vitro screening of multiple molecules supported by in vivo validations suggested that caffeic acid (CA) is a potent inhibitor of Helicoverpa armigera gut proteases. Protease activity and gene expression were altered in CA-fed larvae. The structure-activity relationship of CA highlighted that all the functional groups are crucial for inhibition of protease activity. Biophysical studies and molecular dynamic simulations revealed that sequential binding of multiple CA molecules induces conformational changes in the protease(s) and thus lead to a significant decline in their activity. CA treatment significantly inhibits the insect's detoxification enzymes, thus intensifying the insecticidal effect. Our findings suggest that CA can be implicated as a potent insecticidal molecule and explored for the development of effective dietary pesticides.

  15. Effects of step-wise increases in dietary carbohydrate on circulating saturated Fatty acids and palmitoleic Acid in adults with metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volk, Brittanie M; Kunces, Laura J; Freidenreich, Daniel J; Kupchak, Brian R; Saenz, Catherine; Artistizabal, Juan C; Fernandez, Maria Luz; Bruno, Richard S; Maresh, Carl M; Kraemer, William J; Phinney, Stephen D; Volek, Jeff S

    2014-01-01

    Recent meta-analyses have found no association between heart disease and dietary saturated fat; however, higher proportions of plasma saturated fatty acids (SFA) predict greater risk for developing type-2 diabetes and heart disease. These observations suggest a disconnect between dietary saturated fat and plasma SFA, but few controlled feeding studies have specifically examined how varying saturated fat intake across a broad range affects circulating SFA levels. Sixteen adults with metabolic syndrome (age 44.9±9.9 yr, BMI 37.9±6.3 kg/m2) were fed six 3-wk diets that progressively increased carbohydrate (from 47 to 346 g/day) with concomitant decreases in total and saturated fat. Despite a distinct increase in saturated fat intake from baseline to the low-carbohydrate diet (46 to 84 g/day), and then a gradual decrease in saturated fat to 32 g/day at the highest carbohydrate phase, there were no significant changes in the proportion of total SFA in any plasma lipid fractions. Whereas plasma saturated fat remained relatively stable, the proportion of palmitoleic acid in plasma triglyceride and cholesteryl ester was significantly and uniformly reduced as carbohydrate intake decreased, and then gradually increased as dietary carbohydrate was re-introduced. The results show that dietary and plasma saturated fat are not related, and that increasing dietary carbohydrate across a range of intakes promotes incremental increases in plasma palmitoleic acid, a biomarker consistently associated with adverse health outcomes.

  16. Modulation of phorbol ester-elicited events in mouse epidermis by dietary n-3 and n-6 fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belury, M A; Leyton, J; Patrick, K E; Cumberland, A G; Locniskar, M; Fischer, S M

    1991-09-01

    Because arachidonic acid-derived eicosanoids are potent modulators of hyperproliferation and inflammation during skin tumor promotion with the phorbol ester, 12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) (17, 18), it was hypothesized that dietary modification of epidermal fatty acids might modulate TPA-induced biochemical events in mouse skin. Semipurified diets containing 10% total fat composed of corn oil (CO) or a combination of CO and menhaden oil (MO) or coconut oil (CT) were fed to SENCAR mice for 4 weeks. Fatty acid composition of epidermal phospholipids generally reflected fatty acid composition of dietary oils fed to the mice. Since fatty acid-derived eicosanoids are thought to be essential in tumorigenesis, we compared the effects of dietary fats on prostaglandin E (PGE) production in epidermis treated with a single dose of TPA. TPA-induced PGE production in mouse epidermis from mice fed the MO diet was significantly reduced compared to PGE production in epidermal homogenates from mice fed the CO or CT diets. Type of dietary fats did not appear to modulate TPA-induced vascular permeability, however hyperplasia was slightly elevated in skins of mice fed MO. The subcellular distribution of protein kinase C, the plasma membrane receptor for TPA predominantly located in the cytosol (80%), was altered in epidermis from mice fed the MO diet compared to preparations from mice fed CO or CT diets which exhibited normal protein kinase C distribution. Our results suggest that n-3 rich dietary lipids modulate TPA-elicited events in mouse skin to a greater extent than diets containing higher proportions of saturated or n-6 fatty acids.

  17. Effects of dietary pantothenic acid on growth, intestinal function, anti-oxidative status and fatty acids synthesis of juvenile blunt snout bream Megalobrama amblycephala.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Qian

    Full Text Available Four groups of juvenile Megalobrama amblycephala were fed three times daily with six semi-purified diets containing 3.39 (PA unsupplied diet, 10.54, 19.28, 31.04, 48.38 and 59.72 mg kg(-1 calcium D-pantothenate. The results showed that survival rate, final weight, specific growth rate, protein efficiency ratio and nitrogen retention efficiency all increased significantly (P<0.01 as dietary PA levels increased from 3.39 to 19.28 mg kg(-1, whereas the opposite was true for feed conversion ratio. Whole-body crude protein increased as dietary PA levels increased, while the opposite pattern was found for the crude lipid content. Intestinal α-amylase, lipase, protease, Na+-K+-ATPase, alkaline phosphatase and gamma-glutamyl transferase activities were all elevated in fish fed PA-supplemented diets. Hepatic catalase activities improved with increases in dietary PA, while the opposite was true for malondialdehyde contents. The liver PA concentration and coenzyme A content rose significantly (P<0.01, up to 31.04 mg kg(-1, with increasing dietary PA levels and then plateaued. The percentage of hepatic saturated fatty acids increased significantly (P<0.01 as dietary PA levels increased, while the percentages of monounsaturated fatty acids and polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA decreased as dietary PA increased. Fish fed diets containing 19.28 and 31.04 mg kg(-1 PA exhibited higher (P<0.01 docosahexaenoic acid and PUFA percentages in muscle than those fed with other diets. The expression of the gene encoding pantothenate kinase was significantly up-regulated (P<0.01 in fish fed PA-supplemented diets. Hepatic Acetyl-CoA carboxylase α, fatty acid synthetase, stearoyl regulatory element-binding protein 1 and X receptor α genes all increased significantly (P<0.01 as dietary PA levels increased from 3.39 to 31.04 mg kg(-1. Based on broken-line regression analyses of weight gain, liver CoA concentrations and PA contents against dietary PA levels, the optimal

  18. Incorporation of a dietary omega 3 fatty acid impairs murine macrophage responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana L Bonilla

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Beside their health benefits, dietary omega 3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA might impair host resistance to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb by creating an immunosuppressive environment. We hypothesized that incorporation of n-3 PUFA suppresses activation of macrophage antimycobacterial responses and favors bacterial growth, in part, by modulating the IFNgamma-mediated signaling pathway. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Murine macrophage-like J774A.1 cells were incubated with bovine serum albumin (BSA-conjugated docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 22:6n-3 or BSA alone, activated with recombinant IFNgamma, and infected with a virulent strain (H37Rv of M. tuberculosis. The fatty acid composition of macrophage membranes was modified significantly by DHA treatment. DHA-treated macrophages were less effective in controlling intracellular mycobacteria and showed impaired oxidative metabolism and reduced phagolysosome maturation. Incorporation of DHA resulted in defective macrophage activation, as characterized by reduced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNFalpha, IL-6 and MCP-1, and lower expression of co-stimulatory molecules (CD40 and CD86. DHA treatment impaired STAT1 phosphorylation and colocalization of the IFNgamma receptor with lipid rafts, without affecting surface expression of IFNgamma receptor. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We conclude that DHA reduces the ability of J774A.1 cells to control M. tuberculosis in response to activation by IFNgamma, by modulation of IFNgamma receptor signaling and function, suggesting that n-3 PUFA-enriched diets may have a detrimental effect on host immunity to tuberculosis.

  19. Branched chain fatty acid content of United States retail cow's milk and implications for dietary intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ran-Ressler, R R; Sim, D; O'Donnell-Megaro, A M; Bauman, D E; Barbano, D M; Brenna, J T

    2011-07-01

    Branched chain fatty acids (BCFA) have recently been shown to be a major component of the normal human newborn gastrointestinal tract and have long been known to be a component of human milk. Ruminant food products are major sources of fat in the American diet, but there are no studies of milkfat BCFA content in retail milk. We report here the profile and concentrations of BCFA in a representative sampling of retail milk in the 48 contiguous United States (US), and their estimated intake in the American diet. Conventionally produced whole fluid milk samples were obtained from 56 processing plants across the contiguous 48 states. Retail milk samples contain exclusively iso- and anteiso-BCFA with 14-18 carbons. BCFA were 2.05 ± 0.14%, w/w of milkfat fatty acids (mean ± SD), and anteiso-BCFA comprised more than half this total. Based on these data and USDA food availability data, the average per capita BCFA intake of Americans is estimated to be about 220 mg/d from dairy; if current dietary recommendations were followed, BCFA intake would be about 400 mg/d. Adding intake from beef consumption, these estimates rise to approximately 400 and 575 mg/d, respectively. These results indicate that BCFA intake is a substantial fraction of daily fat intake, in amounts exceeding those of many bioactive fatty acids.

  20. Dietary fatty acid metabolism of brown adipose tissue in cold-acclimated men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blondin, Denis P.; Tingelstad, Hans C.; Noll, Christophe; Frisch, Frédérique; Phoenix, Serge; Guérin, Brigitte; Turcotte, Éric E; Richard, Denis; Haman, François; Carpentier, André C.

    2017-01-01

    In rodents, brown adipose tissue (BAT) plays an important role in producing heat to defend against the cold and can metabolize large amounts of dietary fatty acids (DFA). The role of BAT in DFA metabolism in humans is unknown. Here we show that mild cold stimulation (18 °C) results in a significantly greater fractional DFA extraction by BAT relative to skeletal muscle and white adipose tissue in non-cold-acclimated men given a standard liquid meal containing the long-chain fatty acid PET tracer, 14(R,S)-[18F]-fluoro-6-thia-heptadecanoic acid (18FTHA). However, the net contribution of BAT to systemic DFA clearance is comparatively small. Despite a 4-week cold acclimation increasing BAT oxidative metabolism 2.6-fold, BAT DFA uptake does not increase further. These findings show that cold-stimulated BAT can contribute to the clearance of DFA from circulation but its contribution is not as significant as the heart, liver, skeletal muscles or white adipose tissues. PMID:28134339

  1. Dietary Conjugated Linoleic Acid (CLA) increases milk yield without losing body weight in lactating sows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sung-Hoon; Joo, Young-Kuk; Lee, Jin-Woo; Ha, Young-Joo; Yeo, Joon-Mo; Kim, Wan-Young

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of dietary conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) on the performance of lactating sows and piglets as well as the immunity of piglets suckling from sows fed CLA. Eighteen multiparous Duroc sows with an average body weight (BW) of 232.0 ± 6.38 kg were randomly selected and assigned to two dietary treatments (n = 9 for each treatment), control (no CLA addition) and 1% CLA supplementation. For the control diet, CLA was replaced with soybean oil. Experimental diets were fed to sows during a 28-day lactation period. Litter size for each sow was standardized to nine piglets by cross-fostering within 24 hours after birth. Sow milk and blood samples were taken from sows and piglets after 21 and 27 days of lactation, respectively. Loss of BW was significantly (p sows fed control diet compared to sows fed CLA diet. Piglet weights at weaning and weight gain during suckling were significantly (p sows fed CLA compared to sows fed control diet. Serum non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA) and urea nitrogen concentrations were significantly (p sows fed CLA than in sows fed soybean oil. IgG concentrations of the groups supplemented with CLA increased by 49% in sow serum (p Sows fed CLA showed an increase of 10% in milk yield compared with sows fed soybean oil (p sows fed CLA than in sows fed soybean oil. Solid-not-fat yield was significantly (p sows supplemented with CLA than in sows fed control diet and also protein-to-fat ratio in milk was significantly (p sows fed CLA compared with the control group. The results show that CLA supplementation to sows increased milk yield without losing BW during lactation, whereas soybean oil supplementation resulted in severe BW loss.

  2. Reducing the Dietary Acid Load: How a More Alkaline Diet Benefits Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passey, Caroline

    2017-05-01

    It has been proposed that a low-protein diet will slow progression of chronic kidney disease although studies have not always supported this belief. The accepted practice is that 60% to 70% of protein comes from high biological value (HBV) protein, but this limits patient choice and patients struggle to follow the diet. When a diet with only 30% HBV protein was trialed, there was a significant increase in serum bicarbonate, and patients preferred the diet. The dietary advice given in predialysis clinics was changed. HBV protein was restricted to approximately 50% of total protein, bread and cereal foods were allowed freely, and fruits and vegetables (F&V) were encouraged. Patients who followed the diet have seen a slowing of progression and occasionally regression of their renal function. Both observations and scientific literature indicate that this is because of a reduction in the acid content of the diet. When foods are metabolized, most proteins produce acid, and most F&V produce alkali. A typical 21(st)-century diet produces 50 to 100 mEq H(+) per day which the kidney is challenged to excrete. Acid is excreted with phosphate and is limited to about 45 mEq H(+) per day. With chronic kidney disease, this falls progressively to below 20 mEq H(+) per day. Historically, ammonium excretion was believed to be excretion of acid (NH3(+) + H(+) → NH4(+)), but it is now understood to be a by-product in the neutralization of acid by glutamine. The remaining acid is neutralized or stored within the body. Bone and muscle are lost in order to neutralize the acid. Acid also accumulates within cells, and serum bicarbonate falls. The author postulates that reducing the acid load through a low-protein diet with greater use of vegetable proteins and increased F&V intake will slow progression or occasionally improve renal function while maintaining the nutritional status of the individual. Copyright © 2016 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  3. p-Coumaric acid, a common dietary polyphenol, protects cadmium chloride-induced nephrotoxicity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navaneethan, Dhanalakshmi; Rasool, Mahaboobkhan

    2014-03-01

    The present study was conducted to elucidate the protective role of p-coumaric acid, a common dietary polyphenol against cadmium induced nephrotoxicity in rats. For the purpose of comparison, a standard reference drug silymarin (50 mg/kg b. wt) was used. In this experiment, the animals were divided into four groups, with each consisting of six animals. The animals in Group I animals received saline and served as a control group and those in Group II received cadmium chloride (3 mg/kg b. wt) subcutaneously once daily for 3 weeks, but Group III and IV animals received cadmium chloride followed by p-coumaric acid (100 mg/kg b. wt, oral) and silymarin (50 mg/kg b. wt, oral), respectively, daily for 3 weeks. At the end of the treatment, the animals were sacrificed, and the blood and kidney samples were collected. The results obtained in this study revealed the fact that the levels of lipid peroxidation, lysosomal enzymes, glycoprotein, cadmium and metallothionein were increased in the cadmium chloride alone treated rats and antioxidant status was found to be decreased, when compared to the control group. The levels of kidney functional markers (urea, uric acid and creatinine) were also found to be abnormal in serum and urine of cadmium chloride alone treated rats. On the other hand, the administration of p-coumaric acid along with cadmium chloride significantly protected the biochemical alterations as observed in the cadmium chloride alone treated rats as evidenced by histopathology. Thus, the oral administration of p-coumaric acid significantly protected the cadmium-induced nephrotoxicity in rats.

  4. Dietary intakes of glutamic acid and glycine are associated with stroke mortality in Japanese adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, Chisato; Wada, Keiko; Tamura, Takashi; Kawachi, Toshiaki; Konishi, Kie; Tsuji, Michiko; Nakamura, Kozue

    2015-04-01

    Dietary intakes of glutamic acid and glycine have been reported to be associated with blood pressure. However, the link between intakes of these amino acids and stroke has not been studied. We aimed to examine the association between glutamic acid and glycine intakes and the risk of mortality from stroke in a population-based cohort study in Japan. The analyses included 29,079 residents (13,355 men and 15,724 women) of Takayama City, Japan, who were aged 35-101 y and enrolled in 1992. Their body mass index ranged from 9.9 to 57.4 kg/m(2). Their diets were assessed by a validated food frequency questionnaire. Deaths from stroke were ascertained over 16 y. During follow-up, 677 deaths from stroke (328 men and 349 women) were identified. A high intake of glutamic acid in terms of a percentage of total protein was significantly associated with a decreased risk of mortality from total stroke in women after controlling for covariates; the HR (95% CI) for the highest vs. lowest quartile was 0.72 (0.53, 0.98; P-trend: 0.03). Glycine intake was significantly associated with an increased risk of mortality from total and ischemic stroke in men without history of hypertension at baseline; the HRs (95% CIs) for the highest vs. lowest tertile were 1.60 (0.97, 2.51; P-trend: 0.03) and 1.88 (1.01, 3.52; P-trend: 0.02), respectively. There was no association between animal or vegetable protein intake and mortality from total and any subtype of stroke. The data suggest that glutamic acid and glycine intakes may be associated with risk of stroke mortality. Given that this is an initial observation, our results need to be confirmed. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  5. Hypocoagulant and lipid-lowering effects of dietary n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids with unchanged platelet activation in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwenhuys, C.M.A.; Béguin, S.; Offermans, R.F.G.; Emeis, J.J.; Hornstra, G.; Heemskerk, J.W.M.

    1998-01-01

    We investigated the effects of dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) on blood lipids and processes that determine hemostatic potential: platelet activation, coagulation, and fibrinolysis. For 8 to 10 weeks, Wistar rats were fed a high-fat diet containing various amounts (2% to 16%) of n-3 PUFA

  6. Reducing dietary intake of linoleic acid of mouse dams during lactation increases offspring brain n-3 LCPUFA content

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schipper, L.; Oosting, A.; Scheurink, A J W; van Dijk, G.; van der Bee, E. M.

    Omega (n-)3 and n-6 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) accumulation in the infant brain after birth is strongly driven by dietary supply of n-3 and n-6 LCPUFAs and their C18 precursors through breast milk or infant formula. n-3 LCPUFA accretion is associated with positive effects on

  7. Hypocoagulant and lipid-lowering effects of dietary n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids with unchanged platelet activation in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwenhuys, C.M.A.; Béguin, S.; Offermans, R.F.G.; Emeis, J.J.; Hornstra, G.; Heemskerk, J.W.M.

    1998-01-01

    We investigated the effects of dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) on blood lipids and processes that determine hemostatic potential: platelet activation, coagulation, and fibrinolysis. For 8 to 10 weeks, Wistar rats were fed a high-fat diet containing various amounts (2% to 16%) of n-3

  8. Ideal amino acid profile and dietary lysine specification for broiler chickens of 20 to 40 days of age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mack, S.; Bercovici, D.; Groote, G. de; Leclercq, B.; Lippens, M.; Pack, M.; Schutte, J.B.; Cauwenberghe, S. van

    1999-01-01

    1. The aim of the study was to determine the ideal ratio of the essential amino acids lysine (Lys), methionine (Met), threonine (Thr), tryptophan (Trp), arginine (Arg), valine (Val) and isoleucine (Ile) and to assess the required dietary lysine concentration for optimum performance in broiler chicke

  9. Dietary supplementation with methylseleninic acid, but not selenomethionine, reduces spontaneous metastasis of Lewis lung carcinoma in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    The present study investigated the effects of dietary supplementation with methylseleninic acid (MSeA), in comparison with selenomethionine (SeMet), on spontaneous metastasis of Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) in male C57BL/6 mice using intramuscular and subcutaneous injection models. Mice were fed AIN9...

  10. Alteration of gene expression in mammary gland tissue of dairy cows in response to dietary unsaturated fatty acids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mach Casellas, N.; Jacobs, A.A.A.; Kruijt, L.; Baal, van J.; Smits, M.C.J.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of unprotected dietary unsaturated fatty acids (UFA) from different plant oils on gene expression in the mammary gland of grazing dairy cows. Milk composition and gene expression in the mammary gland tissue were evaluated in grazing dairy cows suppl

  11. Alteration of gene expression in mammary gland tissue of dairy cows in response to dietary unsaturated fatty acids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mach Casellas, N.; Jacobs, A.A.A.; Kruijt, L.; Baal, van J.; Smits, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of supplementing unprotected dietary unsaturated fatty acids (UFAs) from different plant oils on gene expression in the mammary gland of grazing dairy cows. A total of 28 Holstein–Friesian dairy cows in mid-lactation were blocked according to parity

  12. DIETARY EFFECTS OF MAGNESIUM ON HISTAMINE METABOLISM AND URINE ACIDITY IN DOMESTIC FELINES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah K. Martin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium deficiency has been associated with increased histamine production in rats. Limitation of Mg with acidifying foods is common practice for management of urinary tract health in domestic cats. Nine healthy adult female shorthair cats were used in a 3 period random crossover experiment with fixed treatment sequences to test the effects of dietary Mg (0.06, 0.12 and 0.18% DM on histamine in blood and urine. The dry-extruded test foods were fed in sufficient amounts to maintain ideal body weight and obtain a target urine pH of 6.3. Each experimental period was preceded by a 7d wash out period, in which the 0.06% Mg food was fed, followed by a 14d feeding period of the appropriate food. Two 24 h total urine collections were performed (d13: Acidified, d14: Un-acidified; immediately iced and blood was collected on d14. Dry matter intake (p≥0.13 and BW (p≥0.13 were not affected by treatment. Plasma Mg concentration increased linearly with increasing dietary Mg (0.54, 0.56, 0.58 mM; p = 0.001. In contrast, plasma concentrations of threonine, histidine and tryptophan were lower in cats fed 0.12% Mg compare with 0.06 or 0.18% Mg (quadratic, p≤0.03. Urine output (p≥0.17, pH (p≥0.55, NH3 (p≥0.21 and titratable acidity of urine (p≥0.14 were similar across treatments. Urinary histamine excretion responded quadratically (p = 0.02 to treatment (3483, 3369, 3986 ng/d, whereas urinary histamine: Creatinine (p≥0.43 and plasma histamine concentration (p≥0.55 were unaffected. Differences were not detected among treatments in total histamine, cellular + noncellular histamine, (p≥0.11 or antigen-induced (p≥0.21 histamine release in whole blood. These data indicate that dietary Mg concentration, from 0.06-0.18%, does not affect urinary acidity or circulating histamine concentrations, however, supplying Mg at 0.18% may increase urinary histamine excretion.

  13. Effects of microalgal polyunsaturated fatty acid oil on body weight and lipid accumulation in the liver of C57BL/6 mice fed a high fat diet

    OpenAIRE

    Go, Ryeo-Eun; Hwang, Kyung-A; Park, Geon-Tae; Lee, Hae-Miru; Lee, Geum-A.; Kim, Cho-Won; Jeon, So-Ye; Seo, Jeong-Woo; Hong, Won-Kyung; Choi, Kyung-Chul

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), which are abundant in marine fish oils, have recently received global attention for their prominent anti-obesogenic effects. Among PUFAs, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA; 20:5n-3) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 22:6n-3), which are n-3 long-chain PUFAs widely referred to as omega-3 oils, were reported to prevent the development of obesity in rodents and humans. In the present study, we evaluated the anti-obesity effects of microalgal oil on high...

  14. Dietary omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids alter the fatty acid composition of hepatic and plasma bioactive lipids in C57BL/6 mice: a lipidomic approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kayode A Balogun

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Omega (n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA are converted to bioactive lipid components that are important mediators in metabolic and physiological pathways; however, which bioactive compounds are metabolically active, and their mechanisms of action are still not clear. We investigated using lipidomic techniques, the effects of diets high in n-3 PUFA on the fatty acid composition of various bioactive lipids in plasma and liver. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Female C57BL/6 mice were fed semi-purified diets (20% w/w fat containing varying amounts of n-3 PUFA before mating, during gestation and lactation, and until weaning. Male offspring were continued on their mothers' diets for 16 weeks. Hepatic and plasma lipids were extracted in the presence of non-naturally occurring internal standards, and tandem electrospray ionization mass spectrometry methods were used to measure the fatty acyl compositions. There was no significant difference in total concentrations of phospholipids in both groups. However, there was a significantly higher concentration of eicosapentaenoic acid containing phosphatidylcholine (PC, lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC, and cholesteryl esters (CE (p < 0.01 in the high n-3 PUFA group compared to the low n-3 PUFA group in both liver and plasma. Plasma and liver from the high n-3 PUFA group also had a higher concentration of free n-3 PUFA (p < 0.05. There were no significant differences in plasma concentrations of different fatty acyl species of phosphatidylethanolamine, triglycerides, sphingomyelin and ceramides. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings reveal for the first time that a diet high in n-3 PUFA caused enrichment of n-3 PUFA in PC, LPC, CE and free fatty acids in the plasma and liver of C57BL/6 mice. PC, LPC, and unesterified free n-3 PUFA are important bioactive lipids, thus altering their fatty acyl composition will have important metabolic and physiological roles.

  15. Dietary carbohydrate restriction induces a unique metabolic state positively affecting atherogenic dyslipidemia, fatty acid partitioning, and metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volek, Jeff S; Fernandez, Maria Luz; Feinman, Richard D; Phinney, Stephen D

    2008-09-01

    Abnormal fatty acid metabolism and dyslipidemia play an intimate role in the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular diseases. The availability of glucose and insulin predominate as upstream regulatory elements that operate through a collection of transcription factors to partition lipids toward anabolic pathways. The unraveling of the details of these cellular events has proceeded rapidly, but their physiologic relevance to lifestyle modification has been largely ignored. Here we highlight the role of dietary input, specifically carbohydrate intake, in the mechanism of metabolic regulation germane to metabolic syndrome. The key principle is that carbohydrate, directly or indirectly through the effect of insulin, controls the disposition of excess dietary nutrients. Dietary carbohydrate modulates lipolysis, lipoprotein assembly and processing and affects the relation between dietary intake of saturated fat intake and circulating levels. Several of these processes are the subject of intense investigation at the cellular level. We see the need to integrate these cellular mechanisms with results from low-carbohydrate diet trials that have shown reduced cardiovascular risk through improvement in hepatic, intravascular, and peripheral processing of lipoproteins, alterations in fatty acid composition, and reductions in other cardiovascular risk factors, notably inflammation. From the current state of the literature, however, low-carbohydrate diets are grounded in basic metabolic principles and the data suggest that some form of carbohydrate restriction is a candidate to be the preferred dietary strategy for cardiovascular health beyond weight regulation.

  16. Effects of dietary folic acid level and symbiotic folate production on fitness and development in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blatch, Sydella A; Meyer, Kyle W; Harrison, Jon F

    2010-01-01

    Folic acid is a vitamin for probably all animals. When converted to folate forms, it is used in DNA synthesis and amino acid metabolism. Literature suggests insects must consume folates, folates do not affect others, is a toxin for some, and that a few insects synthesize it. It has been reported that Drosophila melanogaster does not consistently need dietary folate because it can synthesize it. This seems unlikely since animals generally lack this ability. More likely, folates thought to have been made by the fly came from microbial symbionts. We aimed to clarify how dietary folic acid affects fitness and development in fruit flies and whether flies may receive folates from microbial symbionts. We found larvae were more viable and developed faster with increasing dietary folic acid, with the surprising exception that larvae fed nearly-zero folic acid developed faster. Their body folate levels did not significantly differ from those that consumed up to 600 times more folic acid. However, these flies fed little folate only achieved normal body folate levels and development times when antibiotics were excluded from the diet. When flies consumed near-zero folates with antibiotics, their body folate levels decreased and development was prolonged. An assay for the endosymbiont Wolbachia in flies used to generate the experimental flies did not show presence of these bacteria. Our data suggest D. melanogaster can harbor unknown bacterial symbiont(s) that provide essential folates to their host when it is scarce in the diet, allowing the fruit fly to maintain growth and development.

  17. Effect of tailored dietary guidance for pregnant women on nutritional status: a double-cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haruna, Megumi; Shiraishi, Mie; Matsuzaki, Masayo; Yatsuki, Yuko; Yeo, SeonAe

    2016-11-29

    This double cohort study aimed to evaluate the effect of tailored dietary guidance for pregnant women on dietary intake, nutritional status, and infant birth weight. Healthy pregnant women were recruited at an antenatal clinic during two phases over 2 years. The historical controls were analyzed a year prior to the intervention group. In both groups, data were collected at 19-26 gestational weeks (baseline) and at 34-37 gestational weeks (outcome measurement). The intervention included the following: (a) assessments of maternal dietary nutritional intake using the brief self-administered diet history questionnaire, (b) individual feedback based on the assessments of maternal nutritional status, (c) tailored guidance for a healthy diet, (d) original cooking recipes, and (e) goal sharing. Mann-Whitney U test was used to compare the outcome data between the groups. Of the 378 eligible women, 309 women had follow-up questionnaire data. Blood samples were obtained from 202 women. Despite a lack of improvement in reported dietary intake, plasma eicosapentaenoic acid (p = .002), docosahexaenoic acid (p dietary intake might partially contribute to improved nutrition in pregnant women. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Total dietary fiber determined as neutral sugar residues, uronic acid residues, and Klason lignin (the Uppsala method): collaborative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theander, O; Aman, P; Westerlund, E; Andersson, R; Pettersson, D

    1995-01-01

    A joint AOAC/American Association of Cereal Chemists (AACC) collaborative study was conducted to determine by the Uppsala method the dietary fiber content and its composition in various foods. The method includes preparation of a residue by treatment with thermostable alpha-amylase and amyloglucosidase and then ethanol precipitation of solubilized dietary fiber components while leaving low-molecular weight carbohydrates in solution. After acid hydrolysis of residue, neutral polysaccharide residues are determined as alditol acetates by gas-liquid chromatography, uronic acid residues are determined by colorimetry, and ash-free acid-insoluble residue (Klason lignin) is determined gravimetrically. Total dietary fiber, including enzyme-resistant starch, is calculated as the sum of nonstarch polysaccharide residues and Klason lignin. Nine laboratories completed the study, analyzing in duplicate 8 unknown dried products that included 4 cereal products, green peas, potato fiber, carrots, and apples. Total dietary fiber contents of products tested ranged from 4.6 to 84.3%, with an average RSDR value of 8.4% (range, 4.8-11.1%). Total neutral polysaccharide residues ranged from 3.8 to 64.1%, with an average RSDR value of 7.5% (range, 5.4-10.5%). Individual neutral sugars (rhamnose, arabinose, xylose, mannose, galactose, and glucose) and uronic acid residues present at more than 1% generally had good RSDR values (3.3-22.8%), whereas, as expected for Klason lignin, only the wheat bran sample with a high content (16%) had an excellent RSDR value (5.0%). The gas chromatographic-colorimetric-gravimetric method (Uppsala method) for determination of total dietary fiber (as neutral sugar residues, uronic acid residues, and Klason lignin) has been adopted first action by AOAC INTERNATIONAL.

  19. Effects of Dietary Soybean Stachyose and Phytic Acid on Gene Expressions of Serine Proteases in Japanese Flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MI Haifeng; MAI Kangsen; ZHANG Wenbing; WU Chenglong; CAI Yinghua

    2011-01-01

    Soybean stachyose (SBS) and phytic acid (PA) are anti-nutritional factors (ANF) which have deleterious effects on the growth and digestibility in fish.The present research studied the effects of dietary SBS and PA on the expression of three serine protease genes in the liver of Japanese flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus).These genes are trypsinogen 1 (poTRY),elastase 1 (poEL) and chymotrypsinogen 1 (poCTRY).Eight artificial diets with graded levels of supplemented ANFs were formulated to 4 levels of SBS (0.00,0.40,0.80 and 1.50%),4 levels of PA (0.00,0.20,0.40 and 0.80),respectively.Japanese flounder (initial weight 2.45 g±0.01 g)were fed with these diets for 10 weeks with three replications per treatment.At the end of 10 weeks,supplementation of 0.40% of dietary SBS or PA significantly increased the gene expression ofpoTRY and poCTRY (P<0.05).The same level of dietary SBS significantly decreased the gene expression of poEL.In comparison with the control group (ANF-free),dietary PA (0.2% and 0.8%)significantly decreased the gene expression ofpoTRY,poCTRY and poEL (P<0.05).However,excessive supplement of dietary SBS (1.5%) has no significant effects on these gene expressions (P>0.05).These results suggested that dietary SBS and dietary PA could directly affect the serine protease genes at the transcriptional level in Japanese flounder,and these genes' expression was more sensitive to dietary PA than to SBS under the current experimental conditions.

  20. Neuroprotective Actions of Dietary Choline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Krzysztof Blusztajn

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Choline is an essential nutrient for humans. It is a precursor of membrane phospholipids (e.g., phosphatidylcholine (PC, the neurotransmitter acetylcholine, and via betaine, the methyl group donor S-adenosylmethionine. High choline intake during gestation and early postnatal development in rat and mouse models improves cognitive function in adulthood, prevents age-related memory decline, and protects the brain from the neuropathological changes associated with Alzheimer’s disease (AD, and neurological damage associated with epilepsy, fetal alcohol syndrome, and inherited conditions such as Down and Rett syndromes. These effects of choline are correlated with modifications in histone and DNA methylation in brain, and with alterations in the expression of genes that encode proteins important for learning and memory processing, suggesting a possible epigenomic mechanism of action. Dietary choline intake in the adult may also influence cognitive function via an effect on PC containing eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids; polyunsaturated species of PC whose levels are reduced in brains from AD patients, and is associated with higher memory performance, and resistance to cognitive decline.

  1. Rumen odd and branched chain fatty acids in relation to in vitro rumen volatile fatty acid productions and dietary characteristics of incubated substrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlaeminck, B.; Fievez, V.; Laar, van H.; Demeyer, D.

    2004-01-01

    A first aim of this batch in vitro experiment (21 h) was to use changes in odd and branched chain fatty acid (OBCFA) patterns to suggest shifts in microbial populations, associated with four types of incubated whole dairy cow diets. Principal component analysis suggested higher dietary starch increa

  2. Dietary Amino Acid Deficiency Reduces the Utilization of Amino Acids for Growth in Growing Pigs after a Period of Poor Health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoek, van de E.; Jansman, A.J.M.; Borne, van den J.J.G.C.; Peet-Schwering, van der C.M.C.; Beers-Schreurs, van H.M.G.; Gerrits, W.J.J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: During immune system activation, partitioning of amino acids (AAs) changes between protein gain and use by the immune system. Objective: We determined the effects of health status and dietary AA deficiency on nitrogen retention and AA utilization in pigs. Methods: Barrows (55 d of age)

  3. Supplementation with the omega-3 docosahexaenoic acid: influence on the lipid composition and fatty acid profile of human milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliana Aparecida Fagundes Queiroz Bortolozo

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study assessed the impact of supplementing the diet of women during pregnancy and lactation with fish oil containing the omega-3 fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid, and its influence on the composition of human milk. METHODS: The sample comprised 60 women aged 18 to 38 years with appropriate dietary pattern, all of them healthy and nonsmokers. The intervention consisted of a daily supplementation with fish oil capsules that corresponded to a daily intake of 315mg of docosahexaenoic acid and 80mg of eicosapentaenoic acid during the third trimester of pregnancy and the first three months postpartum. The total fat content and fatty acid profile of their milk were determined by creamatocrit and gas chromatography. Descriptive statistics were used for data analysis and the significance level was set at p<0.05. RESULTS: There was no statistical difference between the fat contents of the study (fish oil capsules and control (capsules containing corn starch as filler groups. However, the milk of women taking fish oil contained higher docosahexaenoic and eicosapentaenoic acid levels 30 and 60 days after delivery. These results demonstrate that high omega-3 intake can influence its concentration in human milk. CONCLUSIONS: Given the importance of docosahexaenoic acid in the neonatal period, it is appropriate for pregnant and breastfeeding women to supplement on long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, which may be done by adding fish oil to the regular diet.

  4. Influence of dietary conjugated linoleic acid on growth, fatty acid composition and hepatic lipogenesis in large yellow croaker (Pseudosciaena crocea R.)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhan-yu ZHAO; Tian-xing WU; Hong-gang TANG; Ji-ze ZHANG

    2008-01-01

    We examined the effects of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) on growth, fatty acid composition and enzyme activity of fatty acid oxidation in the liver of large yellow croaker. We divided 1600 fish (average initial weight 150 g) into 4 groups and reared them in 8 cages. Four dietary treatments were formulated to contain 0%, 1%, 2% and 4% (w/w) CLA, respectively. The fish were fed for 10 weeks ad libitum twice daily. We found that the dietary CLA had no effect on growth, biometric parameters and whole body proximate (P>0.05), but showed some significant effects on the fatty acid composition in both muscle and the liver.The activities oflipogenic enzymes were slightly depressed in fish fed with increasing levels of CLA when compared with control (P>0.05). Dietary CLA supplementation had no effects on liver lipid content, but significantly increased the contents of saturated fatty acids (SFA) and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) (P<0.05) and decreased monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA) content in both muscle and the liver. Dietary CLA inclusion resulted in significant increases of the biologically active cis-9, trans-11 and trans-10, cis-12 isomers in both tissues (P<0.05). The total accumulation of CLA was higher in the liver (3.83%, w/w) than in muscle (3.77%, w/w) when fed with 4% (w/w) CLA. This study demonstrates that large yellow croakers are capable of absorbing and depositing CLA and long-chain n-3 PUFA in the liver and muscle, showing that this species fed with CLA could be an important human food source for these healthful fatty acids.

  5. Trans-11 vaccenic acid dietary supplementation induces hypolipidemic effects in JCR:LA-cp rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ye; Lu, Jing; Ruth, Megan R; Goruk, Sue D; Reaney, Martin J; Glimm, David R; Vine, Donna F; Field, Catherine J; Proctor, Spencer D

    2008-11-01

    Trans-11 vaccenic acid [VA; 18:1(n-9)] is a positional and geometric isomer of oleic acid and is the precursor to conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) in humans. Despite VA being the predominant trans monoene in ruminant-derived lipids, very little is known about its nutritional bioactivity, particularly in conditions of chronic metabolic disorders, including obesity, insulin resistance, and/or dyslipidemia. The aim of this study was to assess the potential of VA to improve dyslipidemia, insulin sensitivity, or inflammatory status in obese and insulin-resistant JCR:LA-cp rats. The obese rats and age-matched lean littermates were fed a control diet or a control diet supplemented with 1.5% (wt:wt) VA for a period of 3 wk. The incorporation of VA and subsequent conversion to CLA in triglyceride was measured in adipose tissue. Glucose and insulin metabolism were assessed via a conscious adapted meal tolerance test procedure. Plasma lipids as well as serum inflammatory cytokine concentrations were measured by commercially available assays. VA supplementation did not result in any observable adverse health effects in either lean or obese JCR:LA-cp rats. After 3 wk of feeding, body weight, food intake, and glucose/insulin metabolism did not differ between VA-supplemented and control groups. The incorporation of VA and CLA into adipose triglycerides in obese rats fed VA increased by 1.5-fold and 6.5-fold, respectively, compared with obese rats fed the control diet. The most striking effect was a 40% decrease (P JCR:LA-cp rats. In contrast, dietary VA had substantial hypo-triglyceridemic effects, suggesting a new bioactivity of this fatty acid that is typically found in ruminant-derived food products.

  6. The effects of trans-fatty acids on TAG regulation in mice depend on dietary unsaturated fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saín, Juliana; González, Marcela Aída; Lavandera, Jimena Verónica; Scalerandi, María Victoria; Bernal, Claudio Adrián

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of trans-fatty acids (TFA) on liver and serum TAG regulation in mice fed diets containing different proportions of n-3, n-6 and n-9 unsaturated fatty acids (UFA) from olive (O), maize (C) or rapeseed (R) oils partially substituted or not with TFA (Ot, Ct and Rt, respectively). Male CF1 mice were fed (30 d) one of these diets. The effects of the partial substitution (1 %, w/w) of different UFA with TFA on the activity and expression of hepatic enzymes involved in lipogenesis and fatty acids oxidation were evaluated, as well as their transcription factor expressions. Some of the mechanisms involved in the serum TAG regulation, hepatic VLDL rich in TAG (VLDL-TAG) secretion rate and lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity were assessed. In liver, TFA induced an increase in TAG content in the Ot and Rt groups, and this effect was associated with an imbalance between lipogenesis and β-oxidation. In the Ot group, exacerbated lipogenesis may be one of the mechanisms responsible for the liver steatosis induced by TFA, whereas in Rt it has been related to a decreased β-oxidation, compared with their respective controls. The enhanced hepatic VLDL-TAG secretion in the Ot and Rt groups was compensated with a differential removal of TAG by LPL enzyme in extrahepatic tissues, leading to unchanged serum TAG levels. In brief, the effects of low levels of TFA on liver and serum TAG regulation in mice depend on the dietary proportions of n-3, n-6 and n-9 UFA.

  7. The influence of dietary fish oil vs. sunflower oil on the fatty acid composition of plasma cholesteryl-esters in healthy, adult cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plantinga, E A; Beynen, A C

    2003-12-01

    The question addressed was whether the fatty acid composition of plasma cholesteryl esters (CEs) in cats reflects the intake of fatty acids. Diets containing either fish oil or sunflower oil were fed to six healthy, adult cats in a cross-over trial. The dry cat foods contained approximately 18.5% crude fat, of which two-third was in the form of the variable oil. Blood samples were collected at the end of each 4-week feeding period, and the fatty acid composition of plasma CEs and plasma concentrations of lipoproteins were determined. Consumption of the diet with fish oil was associated with significantly greater proportions of eicosapentaenoic acid, arachidonic acid, alpha-linolenic acid, oleic acid, palmitic acid and myristic acid in plasma CEs. The intake of fish oil instead of sunflower oil reduced the percentage of linoleic acid in CEs. The plasma concentrations of total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, phospholipids and triglycerides were not affected by fish oil vs. sunflower oil feeding.

  8. Effects of dietary fiber from wheat, corn, and soy hull bran on excretion of fecal bile acids in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, E W; Emken, E A; Klevay, L M; Sandstead, H H

    1981-06-01

    Effects of dietary fiber on bile acid excretion and fecal bile acid concentration have been studied for seven subjects fed 26 g of either soft white wheat bran, corn bran, soybean hulls, or hard red spring wheat bran. Results indicate that even in a controlled study using a metabolic word, individual subject variation has a major impact on fecal bile acid excretion. This observation has not been fully appreciated in previous human studies. No significant change in the composition of fecal bile acids could be associated with the decrease in serum lipid levels previously reported. A method for the isolation and quantitation of fecal bile acids is described which does not require purification by thin-layer chromatography. A preliminary study of lyophilized fecal samples stored at -10 to -30 degrees C showed very little or no change in bile acid content. Samples stored at room temperatures for 11 months showed a substantial reduction in bile acid content.

  9. A Pilot Study: Effects of Dietary Supplementation with α-Linolenic Acid-Enriched Perilla Seed Oil on Bronchial Asthma

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    Kozo Ashida

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available N-3 fatty acids, such as fish oil, have been reported to have some beneficial effects in patients with bronchial asthma. The effects of dietary supplementation with perilla seed oil rich in a-linolenic acid (α-LNA, parent n-3 fatty acid, were studied in five patients with asthma. The symptoms of asthma and mean peak flow rates (PFR both early in the morning and in the evening were improved 2 weeks after dietary supplementation and the increases in PFR were significant (P<0.05. The generation of leukotriene B4 (LTB4 by peripheral leukocytes stimulated with the Ca2+ ionophore A23187 was significantly suppressed from 77.6 to 41.6 ng/5Xl06 cells by dietary supplementation (P<0.05. The generation of leukotriene C4 (LTC4 by leukocytes was also significantly suppressed from 64.0 to 38.8 ng/5x106 cells after supplementation with perilla seed oil (P<0.05. These results suggest that dietary supplementation with perilla seed oil is beneficial for the treatment of asthma.

  10. Branched Chain Fatty Acids (BCFA) in the neonatal gut, and estimated dietary intake in infancy and adulthood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ran-Ressler, Rinat R.; Glahn, Raymond P; Bae, SangEun; Brenna, J. Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Branched chain fatty acids (BCFA) are primarily saturated fatty acids (FA) with a methyl branch, usually near the terminal methyl group. BCFA are abundant in bacteria, skin, and vernix caseosa but have seldom been studied with respect to human nutrition. They are constituents of the term newborn infant gut lumen, being swallowed as vernix particulate components of amniotic fluid in the last trimester of normal pregnancy. We recently showed that BCFA protect against Necrotizing Enterocolitis (NEC) in the rat pup model. Dietary BCFA at levels similar to those found in human vernix reduced NEC incidence by more than 50%, increased the abundance of BCFA-containing bacteria, and increased the expression of ileal anti-inflammatory IL-10. The few published reports of BCFA in human milk enable an estimate that breast fed infants consume 19 mg BCFA per 100ml milk. Dietary BCFA consumption from milkfat and other ruminant products, the main sources of dietary BCFA, is more than 400 mg BCFA per day in adult Americans. This estimate exceeds by several fold the average dietary intake of bioactive FA, such as docosahexaenoic acid. BCFA are bioactive, abundant but neglected components of the human food supply. PMID:24107503

  11. Dietary Acid-Base Balance in Adolescent Sprint Athletes: A Follow-up Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Clarys

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Sprinters are advised to include additional protein sources in their diet. Basal metabolism and vigorous physical activities generate hydrogen ions that need to be buffered. The present follow-up study estimates the dietary potential renal acid load (PRAL and net endogenous acid production (NEAP in adolescent sprint athletes. Seven-day food diaries and anthropometrics of 60 adolescent sprint athletes (mean age at start 14.7 ± 1.9 years were collected every six months over a three year period. Comparisons were made between athletes with a negative (PRAL(− versus positive PRAL (PRAL(+. For the entire sample, mean PRAL values of up to 6 mEq/day were slightly positive despite a relatively high protein intake of around 1.5 g/kg. The NEAP ranging between 42 and 46 mEq/day remained stable during the study period. Athletes with a PRAL(− (−8 to −10 mEq/day consumed significantly more fruit and fruit juice than athletes with a PRAL(+ (+9 to 14 mEq/day. Athletes with a PRAL(+ did not consume more meat, fish and poultry than athletes with a PRAL(−. Grains and dairy products were only discriminative between the two groups on one measurement occasion. Lowering the PRAL can be obtained by increasing the consumption of potatoes, fruits, vegetables and vegetable soup.

  12. Consequences of PPARα Invalidation on Glutathione Synthesis: Interactions with Dietary Fatty Acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najoua Guelzim

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Glutathione (GSH derives from cysteine and plays a key role in redox status. GSH synthesis is determined mainly by cysteine availability and γ-glutamate cysteine ligase (γGCL activity. Because PPARα activation is known to control the metabolism of certain amino acids, GSH synthesis from cysteine and related metabolisms were explored in wild-type (WT and PPARα-null (KO mice, fed diets containing either saturated (COCO diet or 18 : 3 n-3, LIN diet. In mice fed the COCO diet, but not in those fed the LIN diet, PPARα deficiency enhanced hepatic GSH content and γGCL activity, superoxide dismutase 2 mRNA levels, and plasma uric acid concentration, suggesting an oxidative stress. In addition, in WT mice, the LIN diet increased the hepatic GSH pool, without effect on γGCL activity, or change in target gene expression, which rules out a direct effect of PPARα. This suggests that dietary 18 : 3 n-3 may regulate GSH metabolism and thus mitigate the deleterious effects of PPARα deficiency on redox status, without direct PPARα activation.

  13. Dietary fiber, organic acids and minerals in selected wild edible fruits of Mozambique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magaia, Telma; Uamusse, Amália; Sjöholm, Ingegerd; Skog, Kerstin

    2013-12-01

    The harvesting, utilization and marketing of indigenous fruits and nuts have been central to the livelihoods of the majority of rural communities in African countries. In this study we report on the content of