WorldWideScience

Sample records for diesel aromatic compounds

  1. Hydrogenation of diesel aromatic compounds in supercritical solvent environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.P. Martins

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available Reactions under supercritical conditions have been employed in many processes. Furthermore, an increasing number of commercial reactions have been conducted under supercritical or near critical conditions. These reaction conditions offer several advantages when compared to conditions in conventional catalytic processes in liquid-phase, gas-liquid interface, or even some gas-phase reactions. Basically, a supercritical solvent can diminish the reactant’s transport resistance from the bulk region to the catalyst surface due to enhancement of liquid diffusivity values and better solubility than those in different phases. Another advantage is that supercritical solvents permit prompt and easy changes in intermolecular properties in order to modify reaction parameters, such as conversion or selectivity, or even proceed with the separation of reaction products. Diesel fractions from petroleum frequently have larger than desirable quantities of aromatic compounds. Diesel hydrogenation is intended to decrease these quantities, i.e., to increase the quantity of paraffin present in this petroleum fraction. In this work, the hydrogenation of tetralin was studied as a model reaction for the aromatic hydrogenation process. A conventional gas-liquid-solid catalytic process was compared with that of supercritical carbon dioxide substrate under similar conditions. Additionally, an equilibrium conversion diagram was calculated for this reaction in a wide range of temperature and reactant ratios, so as to optimize the operational conditions and improve the results of subsequent experiments. An increase in the rate of reaction at 493 K in supercritical fluid, as compared to that in the conventional process, was observed.

  2. Bacterial Degradation of Aromatic Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing X. Li

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aromatic compounds are among the most prevalent and persistent pollutants in the environment. Petroleum-contaminated soil and sediment commonly contain a mixture of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs and heterocyclic aromatics. Aromatics derived from industrial activities often have functional groups such as alkyls, halogens and nitro groups. Biodegradation is a major mechanism of removal of organic pollutants from a contaminated site. This review focuses on bacterial degradation pathways of selected aromatic compounds. Catabolic pathways of naphthalene, fluorene, phenanthrene, fluoranthene, pyrene, and benzo[a]pyrene are described in detail. Bacterial catabolism of the heterocycles dibenzofuran, carbazole, dibenzothiophene, and dibenzodioxin is discussed. Bacterial catabolism of alkylated PAHs is summarized, followed by a brief discussion of proteomics and metabolomics as powerful tools for elucidation of biodegradation mechanisms.

  3. Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, L.A. Jr.

    1989-07-18

    Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C[sub 2] to C[sub 10] olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80 C to 500 C, using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene below the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms. 1 fig.

  4. Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A.

    1989-01-01

    Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C.sub.2 to C.sub.10 olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80.degree. C. to 500.degree. C., using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene below the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms.

  5. Dehalogenation of halogenated aromatic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griller, D.; Hawari, J.A.; McPhee, D.J.

    1992-03-03

    A process is disclosed for dehalogenating aromatic halogenated compounds, comprising reacting an alkali metal with the halogenated aromatic material in the presence of a liquid hydrosiloxane until substantially all of the halogen has reacted, leaving the aromatic moiety in non-halogenated form. Preferably a non-halogenated non-aqueous polar solvent or diluent is present during the reaction. The excess alkali metal can be reacted with added termination agent, and excess hydrosiloxane can be precipitated and the solids separated. According to a further aspect of the invention, a kit is provided for carrying out the above dehalogenation process. The kit comprises a container containing alkali metal, a container containing liquid hydrosiloxane, or one container containing both the alkali metal and the hydrosiloxane. The starting material to be dehalogenated, in most applications of the process, will be polychlorinated biphenyls alone or as mixtures with various oils such as transformer oils. The alkali metal may be Li, Na, or K, and the hydrosiloxane should be a liquid miscible with the starting material, preferably a polyorganohydrosiloxane of relatively low molecular weight. Experiments are described to illustrate the process of the invention. It is shown that the process of the invention provides significantly improved dehalogenations at ambient temperatures and may be used for destruction of polychlorinated biphenyls to the point where they can no longer be detected by gas chromatography.

  6. Methods for the nitration of aromatic compounds

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Keith; Alotaibi, Mohammad Hayal; El-Hiti, Gamal A.

    2012-01-01

    According to the invention there is provided a method for the nitration of an aromatic compound including the step of reacting the aromatic compound with nitric acid in the presence of an acid anhydride and an aluminosilicate catalyst, in which the acid anhydride is at least one of: ((CnH2n+1)CO)20, where n is 1 to 4 and the moiety CnH2n+1 can be straight or branched chain; ((CHpClq)CO)20, where p is 0 to 2, q is 1 to 3, and p+q = 3; and oxoiane -2, 5-dione, with the proviso that when the aci...

  7. Chemotaxis of Azospirillum species to aromatic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-de-Victoria, G.; Lovell, C.R. (Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States))

    1993-09-01

    Azospirillum sspeciesare free-living nitrogen fixing bacteria commonly found in soils and in association with plant roots, including important agricultural crops. Rhizosphere colonization my Azospirillum species has been shown to stimulate growth of a variety of plant species. Chemotaxis is one of the properties which may contribute to survival, rhizosphere colonization and the initiation of mutualistic interactions by Azospirillum species. This study evaluates the chemotactic responses of three Azospirillum stains to a variety of aromatic compounds:benzoate, catechol, 4-HB, and PCA. Results indicate that the same aromatic substance can elicit different chemotactic responses from different Azospirillum species, and that Azospirillum can detect aromatic substrates at concentrations similar to those they encounter naturally. 36 refs., 1 fig., 6 tabs.

  8. Aromatic compounds from three Brazilian Lauraceae species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batista, Andrea Nastri de Luca; Batista Junior, Joao Marcos; Lopez, Silvia Noeli; Furlan, Maysa; Cavalheiro, Alberto Jose; Silva, Dulce Helena Siqueira; Bolzani, Vanderlan da Silva [UNESP, Araraquara, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica. Dept. de Quimica Organica; Nunomura, Sergio Massayoshi [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisa da Amazonia (INPA), Manaus, AM (Brazil). Dept. de Produtos Naturais; Yoshida, Massayoshi [Centro de Biotecnologia da Amazonia, Manaus, AM (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    Phytochemical investigations on three Brazilian Lauraceae species from the Cerrado region of Sao Paulo State, Ocotea corymbosa (Meins) Mez., O. elegans Mez. and Persea pyrifolia Nees and Mart. ex Nees resulted in the isolation of flavonoids, an ester of the 4-O-E-caffeoylquinic acid, an aromatic sesquiterpene besides furofuran lignans. This is the first chemical study on the leaves of Ocotea elegans and O. corymbosa as well as the first report of non-volatile compounds from Persea pyrifolia. (author)

  9. Aromatic compounds from three Brazilian Lauraceae species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batista, Andrea Nastri de Luca; Batista Junior, Joao Marcos; Lopez, Silvia Noeli; Furlan, Maysa; Cavalheiro, Alberto Jose; Silva, Dulce Helena Siqueira; Bolzani, Vanderlan da Silva

    2010-01-01

    Phytochemical investigations on three Brazilian Lauraceae species from the Cerrado region of Sao Paulo State, Ocotea corymbosa (Meins) Mez., O. elegans Mez. and Persea pyrifolia Nees and Mart. ex Nees resulted in the isolation of flavonoids, an ester of the 4-O-E-caffeoylquinic acid, an aromatic sesquiterpene besides furofuran lignans. This is the first chemical study on the leaves of Ocotea elegans and O. corymbosa as well as the first report of non-volatile compounds from Persea pyrifolia. (author)

  10. Interstellar Polycyclic Aromatic Compounds and Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudgins, Douglas M.; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Over the past fifteen years, thanks to significant, parallel advancements in observational, experimental, and theoretical techniques, tremendous strides have been made in our understanding of the role polycyclic aromatic compounds (PAC) in the interstellar medium (ISM). Twenty years ago, the notion of an abundant population of large, carbon rich molecules in the ISM was considered preposterous. Today, the unmistakable spectroscopic signatures of PAC - shockingly large molecules by previous interstellar chemistry standards - are recognized throughout the Universe. In this paper, we will examine the interstellar PAC model and its importance to astrophysics, including: (1) the evidence which led to inception of the model; (2) the ensuing laboratory and theoretical studies of the fundamental spectroscopic properties of PAC by which the model has been refined and extended; and (3) a few examples of how the model is being exploited to derive insight into the nature of the interstellar PAC population.

  11. On-line analysis of organic compounds in diesel exhaust using a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobson, B. T.; Alexander, M. L.; Maupin, G. D.; Muntean, G. G.

    2005-08-01

    Chemical ionization mass spectrometry using H3O+ proton transfer in an ion drift tube (PTR-MS) was used to measure volatile organic compound (VOC) concentrations on-line in diesel engine exhaust as a function of engine load. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the PTR-MS instrument as an analytical tool for diesel engine emissions abatement research. Measured sensitivities determined from gas standards were found to agree well with calculated sensitivities for non-polar species. A slight humidity dependent sensitivity was observed for non-polar species, implying that reactions with H+(H2O)2 were important for some organics. The diesel exhaust mass spectra were complex but displayed a pattern of strong ion signals at 14n + 1 (n = 3.8) masses, with a relative ion abundance similar to that obtained from electron impact ionization of alkanes. Laboratory experiments verified that C8-C16 n-alkanes and C8-C13 1-alkenes react with H3O+ in dissociative proton transfer reaction resulting in alkyl cation ion products, primarily m/z 41, 43, 57, 71 and 85. Monitoring the sum of these ion signals may be useful for estimating alkane emissions from unburnt diesel fuel. Alkane fragmentation likely simplified the diesel exhaust mass spectrum and reduced potential mass interferences with isobaric aromatic compounds. Concentrations of aldehydes and ketones dominated those of aromatic species with formaldehyde and acetaldehyde estimated to be the most abundant VOCs in the PTR-MS mass spectrum at all engine loads. The relative abundances of benzene and toluene increased with engine load indicating their pyrogenic origin. The relative abundance of alkanes, aromatics, aldehydes and alcohols was broadly consistent with literature publications of diesel exhaust analysis by gas chromatography. About 75% of the organic ion signal could be assigned. On-line analysis of diesel exhaust using this technology may be valuable tool for diesel engine emission research.

  12. Comparison of carbonyl compounds emissions from diesel engine fueled with biodiesel and diesel

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Chao; Ge, Yunshan; Tan, Jianwei; You, Kewei; Han, Xunkun; Wang, Junfang; You, Qiuwen; Shah, Asad Naeem

    The characteristics of carbonyl compounds emissions were investigated on a direct injection, turbocharged diesel engine fueled with pure biodiesel derived from soybean oil. The gas-phase carbonyls were collected by 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH)-coated silica cartridges from diluted exhaust and analyzed by HPLC with UV detector. A commercial standard mixture including 14 carbonyl compounds was used for quantitative analysis. The experimental results indicate that biodiesel-fueled engine almost has triple carbonyls emissions of diesel-fueled engine. The weighted carbonyls emission of 8-mode test cycle of biodiesel is 90.8 mg (kW h) -1 and that of diesel is 30.7 mg (kW h) -1. The formaldehyde is the most abundant compound of carbonyls for both biodiesel and diesel, taking part for 46.2% and 62.7% respectively. The next most significant compounds are acetaldehyde, acrolein and acetone for both fuels. The engine fueled with biodiesel emits a comparatively high content of propionaldehyde and methacrolein. Biodiesel, as an alternative fuel, has lower specific reactivity (SR) caused by carbonyls compared with diesel. When fueled with biodiesel, carbonyl compounds make more contribution to total hydrocarbon emission.

  13. Protonation sites of aromatic compounds in (+) atmospheric pressure photoionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Hwan; Ahmed, Arif [Dept. of Chemistry, Kyungpoo k National University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    Reaction enthalpy of hydrogen transfer reactions of aromatic compounds has been observed to be greatly affected by the exact location of the protonation site. Therefore, to clearly identify the protonation location, each candidate protonation site for 43 aromatic compounds were theoretically determined and their location was compared with that determined based on experimental MS data. Only the basic nitrogen atom is favorable as a protonation site for pyridine-type aromatic compounds, whereas carbon atoms are preferable for the protonation of pyrrole-type compounds. The most favorable protonation sites for aniline or methylated aniline-type aromatic compounds are either the nitrogen atom in the amine group or the carbon atom at the para-position to the amine group. Like pyrrole-type compounds, aromatic compounds with amine groups also favor protonation at the carbon atom instead of at the nitrogen atom. In addition, hydrocarbons having an anthracene structural motif without heteroatoms produced higher or equal percentages of protonated ions compared to that achieved with molecular ions. The results of this study can be used to improve the analyses of aromatic compounds.

  14. magnetooptical phenomena in microcrystal suspensions of deuterated aromatic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spartakov, A.A.; Tolstoi, N.A. [St. Petersburg State Univ., Peterhof (Russian Federation)

    1995-11-01

    Magnetooptical studies of microcrystal suspensions of aromatic molecules containing polycondensed benzene rings with deuterium atoms substituted for hydrogen atoms showed that the new type of magnetism (aromagnetism) that was found in microcrystals of usual (undeuterated) aromatic compounds cannot be explained by the magnetic ordering of nuclear spins in these microcrystals. 4 refs., 1 fig.

  15. Volatile aromatic compounds in Mexico City atmosphere: levels and source apportionment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mugica, V. [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana - Unidad Azcapotzalco, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Ruiz, M.E. [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Watson, J.; Chow, J. [Desert Research Institute, Reno, Nevada (United States)

    2003-01-01

    Samples of ambient air were simultaneously collected at three different sites of Mexico City in March of 1997 in order to quantify the most abundant volatile aromatic compounds and estimate the source contributions by application of the chemical mass balance model (CMB). Volatile aromatic compounds were around 20% of the total of non-methane hydrocarbons present in morning air samples. The most abundant volatile aromatic species in urban air were toluene and xylenes followed by 1, 2, 4 trimethylbenzene, benzene, ethylbenzene, metaethyltoluene, 1, 3, 5 trimethylbenzene, styrene, n propylbenzene, and isopropylbenzene. Sampling campaigns were carried out at crossroads, a bus station, a parking place, and areas where solvents and petroleum distillates are used, with the objective of determining people's exposure to volatile aromatic compounds. The CMB was applied for estimating the contribution of different sources to the presence of each one of the most abundant aromatic compounds. Motor vehicle exhaust was the main source of all aromatic compounds, especially gasoline exhaust, although diesel exhausts and asphalt operations also accounted for toluene, xylenes, ethylbenzene, propylbenzenes, and styrene. Graphic arts and paint applications had an important impact on the presence of toluene. [Spanish] Se colectaron simultaneamente muestras de aire ambiente en tres sitios de la Ciudad de Mexico durante el mes de marzo de 1997 con el fin de conocer las concentraciones y el origen de compuestos aromaticos utilizando el modelo de balance de masa de especies quimicas (CMB). Los compuestos aromaticos volatiles representaron alrededor del 20% del total de hidrocarburos no metalicos presentes en las muestras matutinas colectadas. Las especies aromaticas volatiles mas abundantes en el ambiente fueron el tolueno y los xilenos, seguidos por 1, 2, 4 trimetilbenceno, benceno, etilbenceno, metaetiltolueno, nporpilbenceno, isopropilbenceno, 1, 3, 5 trimetilbenceno y estireno. Se

  16. Carbonyl compounds emitted by a diesel engine fuelled with diesel and biodiesel-diesel blends: Sampling optimization and emissions profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarieiro, Lílian Lefol Nani; Pereira, Pedro Afonso de Paula; Torres, Ednildo Andrade; da Rocha, Gisele Olimpio; de Andrade, Jailson B.

    Biodiesel is emerging as a renewable fuel, hence becoming a promising alternative to fossil fuels. Biodiesel can form blends with diesel in any ratio, and thus could replace partially, or even totally, diesel fuel in diesel engines what would bring a number of environmental, economical and social advantages. Although a number of studies are available on regulated substances, there is a gap of studies on unregulated substances, such as carbonyl compounds, emitted during the combustion of biodiesel, biodiesel-diesel and/or ethanol-biodiesel-diesel blends. CC is a class of hazardous pollutants known to be participating in photochemical smog formation. In this work a comparison was carried out between the two most widely used CC collection methods: C18 cartridges coated with an acid solution of 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (2,4-DNPH) and impinger bottles filled in 2,4-DNPH solution. Sampling optimization was performed using a 2 2 factorial design tool. Samples were collected from the exhaust emissions of a diesel engine with biodiesel and operated by a steady-state dynamometer. In the central body of factorial design, the average of the sum of CC concentrations collected using impingers was 33.2 ppmV but it was only 6.5 ppmV for C18 cartridges. In addition, the relative standard deviation (RSD) was 4% for impingers and 37% for C18 cartridges. Clearly, the impinger system is able to collect CC more efficiently, with lower error than the C18 cartridge system. Furthermore, propionaldehyde was nearly not sampled by C18 system at all. For these reasons, the impinger system was chosen in our study. The optimized sampling conditions applied throughout this study were: two serially connected impingers each containing 10 mL of 2,4-DNPH solution at a flow rate of 0.2 L min -1 during 5 min. A profile study of the C1-C4 vapor-phase carbonyl compound emissions was obtained from exhaust of pure diesel (B0), pure biodiesel (B100) and biodiesel-diesel mixtures (B2, B5, B10, B20, B50, B

  17. Global simulation of aromatic volatile organic compounds in the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera Perez, David; Taraborrelli, Domenico; Pozzer, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    Among the large number of chemical compounds in the atmosphere, the organic group plays a key role in the tropospheric chemistry. Specifically the subgroup called aromatics is of great interest. Aromatics are the predominant trace gases in urban areas due to high emissions, primarily by vehicle exhausts and fuel evaporation. They are also present in areas where biofuel is used (i.e residential wood burning). Emissions of aromatic compounds are a substantial fraction of the total emissions of the volatile organic compounds (VOC). Impact of aromatics on human health is very important, as they do not only contribute to the ozone formation in the urban environment, but they are also highly toxic themselves, especially in the case of benzene which is able to trigger a range of illness under long exposure, and of nitro-phenols which cause detrimental for humans and vegetation even at very low concentrations. The aim of this work is to assess the atmospheric impacts of aromatic compounds on the global scale. The main goals are: lifetime and budget estimation, mixing ratios distribution, net effect on ozone production and OH loss for the most emitted aromatic compounds (benzene, toluene, xylenes, ethylbenzene, styrene and trimethylbenzenes). For this purpose, we use the numerical chemistry and climate simulation ECHAM/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry (EMAC) model to build the global atmospheric budget for the most emitted and predominant aromatic compounds in the atmosphere. A set of emissions was prepared in order to include biomass burning, vegetation and anthropogenic sources of aromatics into the model. A chemical mechanism based on the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM) was developed to describe the chemical oxidation in the gas phase of these aromatic compounds. MCM have been reduced in terms of number of chemical equation and species in order to make it affordable in a 3D model. Additionally other features have been added, for instance the production of HONO via ortho

  18. Volatile organic compounds emissions from gasoline and diesel powered vehicle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mugica, V [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Vega, E; Sanchez, G; Reyes, E; Arriaga, J. L [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Chow, J; Watson, J; Egami, R [Desert Research Institute, Reno, NV (United States)

    2001-01-01

    In this research, volatile organic compound emissions were characterized from gasoline and diesel vehicles. Sampling campaigns in the Metropolitan Area of Mexico City were designed and carried out in tunnels, crossroads, and truck and bus terminals. The samples were analyzed with gas chromatography getting more than 250 different compounds, being more or less 60 of them the 80% of all the emissions. The most abundant are the two carbon compounds, as a result of the combustion, and compounds related to fuels compositions, like isopentane, xylenes, toluene among others. The profiles obtained in tunnels and crossroads were very similar with the exception of the 3 and 4 carbon compounds, which were found in bigger proportion in the profiles at crossroads. This may probably be due to the blend with the ambient air. The profiles corresponding to trucks and buses have a smaller content of two carbon compounds and a bigger content of xylenes, toluene and ethylbenzene. The variations in the proportions of the compounds allow differentiating the profiles of vehicles using gasoline and diesel. [Spanish] En este trabajo se caracterizaron las emisiones de compuestos organicos volatiles provenientes de vehiculos a gasolina y a diesel. Para ello, se disenaron diversas campanas de muestreo en la zona Metropolitana de la Ciudad de Mexico, en tuneles, cruceros y estaciones de camiones de carga y autobuses. Las muestras se analizaron con cromatografia, de gases obteniendose mas de 250 compuestos distintos, de los cuales aproximadamente 60 corresponden a mas del 80% de las emisiones. Los compuestos mas abundantes son los de dos carbonos, resultado de la combustion, y 4 carbonos que se encontraron en mayor proporcion en los perfiles de cruceros, lo cual se debe probablemente a la mezcla con el aire ambiente. Los perfiles correspondientes a camiones de carga y autobuses tienen un menor contenido de compuestos de dos carbonos y un mayor contenido de xilenos, tolueno y etilbenceno. Estas

  19. On-line Analysis of Organic Compounds in Diesel Exhaust Using a Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jobson, B Tom T.; Alexander, M. Lizabeth; Maupin, Gary D.; Muntean, George G.

    2005-08-01

    Chemical ionization mass spectrometry using H3O+ proton transfer in an ion drift tube (PTR-MS) was used to measure volatile organic compound (VOC) concentrations on-line in diesel engine exhaust as a function on engine load. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the PTR-MS instrument as an analytical tool for diesel engine emissions abatement research. Measured sensitivities determined from gas standards were found to be between 30% and 100% greater than calculated sensitivities. A slight humidity dependent sensitivity was observed for non-polar species, implying that reactions with H+(H2O)2 were important for some organics. The mass spectra of diesel exhaust were complex but displayed a pattern of strong ion signals at 14n+1 (n=3..8) masses, with a relative ion abundance similar to that obtained from electron impact ionization of alkanes. Laboratory experiments verified that C8-C16 n-alkanes and C8-C13 1-alkenes react with H3O+ in dissociative proton transfer reaction resulting in alkyl cation ion products, primarily m/z 41, 43, 57, 71 and 85. Monitoring the sum of these ions signals may be useful for estimating alkane emissions from unburnt diesel fuel. Alkane fragmentation likely simplified the diesel exhaust mass spectrum and reduced potential mass interferences with isobaric aromatic compounds. It is shown that the relative abundances of VOCs changed as a function of engine load. Concentrations of aldehydes and ketones dominated those of aromatic species with formaldehyde and acetaldehyde estimated to be the most abundant VOCs in the PTR-MS mass spectrum at all engine loads. The relative abundances of benzene and toluene increased with engine load indicating their pyrogenic origin. The relative abundance of alkanes, aromatics, aldehydes, and alcohols was broadly consistent with literature publications of diesel exhaust analysis by gas chromatography. About 75% of the organic ion signal could be assigned. On line analysis of diesel exhaust using this

  20. Aromatic Plants as a Source of Bioactive Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panagiota Florou-Paneri

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Aromatic plants, also known as herbs and spices, have been used since antiquity as folk medicine and as preservatives in foods. The best known aromatic plants, such as oregano, rosemary, sage, anise, basil, etc., originate from the Mediterranean area. They contain many biologically active compounds, mainly polyphenolics, which have been found to possess antimicrobial, antioxidant, antiparasitic, antiprotozoal, antifungal, and anti-inflammatory properties. Currently, the demand for these plants and their derivatives has increased because they are natural, eco-friendly and generally recognized as safe products. Therefore, aromatic plants and their extracts have the potential to become new generation substances for human and animal nutrition and health. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of the literature surrounding the in vivo and in vitro use of aromatic plants.

  1. Carbonyl compound emissions from a heavy-duty diesel engine fueled with diesel fuel and ethanol-diesel blend.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Chonglin; Zhao, Zhuang; Lv, Gang; Song, Jinou; Liu, Lidong; Zhao, Ruifen

    2010-05-01

    This paper presents an investigation of the carbonyl emissions from a direct injection heavy-duty diesel engine fueled with pure diesel fuel (DF) and blended fuel containing 15% by volume of ethanol (E/DF). The tests have been conducted under steady-state operating conditions at 1200, 1800, 2600 rpm and idle speed. The experimental results show that acetaldehyde is the most predominant carbonyl, followed by formaldehyde, acrolein, acetone, propionaldehyde and crotonaldehyde, produced from both fuels. The emission factors of total carbonyls vary in the range 13.8-295.9 mg(kWh)(-1) for DF and 17.8-380.2mg(kWh)(-1) for E/DF, respectively. The introduction of ethanol into diesel fuel results in a decrease in acrolein emissions, while the other carbonyls show general increases: at low engine speed (1200 rpm), 0-55% for formaldehyde, 4-44% for acetaldehyde, 38-224% for acetone, and 5-52% for crotonaldehyde; at medium engine speed (1800 rpm), 106-413% for formaldehyde, 4-143% for acetaldehyde, 74-113% for acetone, 114-1216% for propionaldehyde, and 15-163% for crotonaldehyde; at high engine speed (2600 rpm), 36-431% for formaldehyde, 18-61% for acetaldehyde, 22-241% for acetone, and 6-61% for propionaldehyde. A gradual reduction in the brake specific emissions of each carbonyl compound from both fuels is observed with increase in engine load. Among three levels of engine speed employed, both DF and E/DF emit most CBC emissions at high engine speed. On the whole, the presence of ethanol in diesel fuel leads to an increase in aldehyde emissions. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Degradation of aromatic compounds in plants grown under aseptic conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mithaishvili, T.; Ugrekhelidze, D.; Tsereteli, B.; Sadunishvili, T.; Kvesitadze, G. [Durmishidze Inst. of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, Academy of Sciences of Georgia, Tbilisi (Georgia); Scalla, R. [Lab. des Xenobiotiques, INRA, Toulouse (France)

    2005-02-01

    The aim of the work is to investigate the ability of higher plants to absorb and detoxify environmental pollutants - aromatic compounds via aromatic ring cleavage. Transformation of {sup 14}C specifically labelled benzene derivatives, [1-6-{sup 14}C]-nitrobenzene, [1-6-{sup 14}C]-aniline, [1-{sup 14}C]- and [7-{sup 14}C]-benzoic acid, in axenic seedlings of maize (Zea mays L.), kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), pea (Pisum sativum L.) and pumpkin (Cucurbita pepo L.) were studied. After penetration in plants, the above xenobiotics are transformed by oxidative or reductive reactions, conjugation with cell endogenous compounds, and binding to biopolymers. The initial stage of oxidative degradation consists in hydroxylation reactions. The aromatic ring can then be cleaved and degraded into organic acids of the Krebs cycle. Ring cleavage is accompanied by {sup 14}CO{sub 2} evolution. Aromatic ring cleavage in plants has thus been demonstrated for different xenobiotics carrying different substitutions on their benzene ring. Conjugation with low molecular peptides is the main pathway of aromatic xenobiotics detoxification. Peptide conjugates are formed both by the initial xenobiotics (except nitrobenzene) and by intermediate transformation products. The chemical nature of the radioactive fragment and the amino acid composition of peptides participating in conjugation were identified. (orig.)

  3. Global atmospheric budget of simple monocyclic aromatic compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Cabrera-Perez

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The global atmospheric budget and distribution of monocyclic aromatic compounds is estimated, using an atmospheric chemistry general circulation model. Simulation results are evaluated with an ensemble of surface and aircraft observations with the goal of understanding emission, production and removal of these compounds.Anthropogenic emissions provided by the RCP database represent the largest source of aromatics in the model (≃ 23 TgC year−1 and biomass burning from the GFAS inventory the second largest (≃ 5 TgC year−1. The simulated chemical production of aromatics accounts for  ≃ 5 TgC year−1. The atmospheric burden of aromatics sums up to 0.3 TgC. The main removal process of aromatics is photochemical decomposition (≃ 27 TgC  year−1, while wet and dry deposition are responsible for a removal of  ≃ 4 TgC year−1.Simulated mixing ratios at the surface and elsewhere in the troposphere show good spatial and temporal agreement with the observations for benzene, although the model generally underestimates mixing ratios. Toluene is generally well reproduced by the model at the surface, but mixing ratios in the free troposphere are underestimated. Finally, larger discrepancies are found for xylenes: surface mixing ratios are not only overestimated but also a low temporal correlation is found with respect to in situ observations.

  4. Removal of aromatic nitro compounds from water by ozonation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Baozhen; Yin Jun

    1988-01-01

    Experimental studies were carried out on the removal of five species of aromatic nitro hydrocarbons by ozonation. Ultraviolet spectrograms with distinct absorption peaks were plotted for each of them. It has been found that the absorbances of aqueous solutions containing the single compounds mentioned above increase to different extents at the wave lengths ranging from 200 to 230 nanometers with increase of ozone dosages. This is ascribed to the nitrite ions splitting out of the benzene rings and being further oxidized to nitrate ions by ozonation. It has been indicated that the removal of the five species of aromatic nitro compounds by ozonation can well be expressed mathematically by first order reaction equations. Besides, the reaction constants and half-life periods for various species of the tested nitro compounds were calculated at different temperatures and pH. An ozonation effect index (OI) was developed in the study to express the degree of degradation of substrates by ozonation, by means of which the five aromatic nitro hydrocarbons were compared with each other and finally ranked in the following order from greatest to smallest degrees of degradation: p-nitroaniline > nitrobenzene > p-dinitrobenzene > p-nitrotoluene > m-dinitrobenzene. It has also found that the CODm/M ratio increases with ozone doses. This means that some easily degradable intermediates are produced, and increase in concentration with increase of ozone dose in the ozonation process. The mechanisms of removing the five aromatic nitro hydrocarbons are discussed from the viewpoint of orienting effects of substituent groups on the aromatic rings

  5. Ultrasound assisted regioselective sulfonation of aromatic compounds with sulfuric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Ziyauddin S; Deshmukh, Krishna M; Jagtap, Sachin R; Nandurkar, Nitin S; Bhanage, Bhalchandra M

    2009-03-01

    A simple and convenient methodology for selective sulfonation of aromatic compounds using sulfuric acid under sonication is described. The present methodology shows a considerable enhancement in the reaction rate along with improved selectivity compared with the reactions performed under silent conditions. The effect of various parameters such as agitation speed, sulfuric acid concentration, and temperature on reaction system have been investigated and are explained on the basis of ultrasonically generated cavitational effects.

  6. Formation of highly oxygenated organic molecules from aromatic compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Molteni

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Anthropogenic volatile organic compounds (AVOCs often dominate the urban atmosphere and consist to a large degree of aromatic hydrocarbons (ArHCs, such as benzene, toluene, xylenes, and trimethylbenzenes, e.g., from the handling and combustion of fuels. These compounds are important precursors for the formation of secondary organic aerosol. Here we show that the oxidation of aromatics with OH leads to a subsequent autoxidation chain reaction forming highly oxygenated molecules (HOMs with an O : C ratio of up to 1.09. This is exemplified for five single-ring ArHCs (benzene, toluene, o-/m-/p-xylene, mesitylene (1,3,5-trimethylbenzene and ethylbenzene, as well as two conjugated polycyclic ArHCs (naphthalene and biphenyl. We report the elemental composition of the HOMs and show the differences in the oxidation patterns of these ArHCs. A potential pathway for the formation of these HOMs from aromatics is presented and discussed. We hypothesize that AVOCs may contribute substantially to new particle formation events that have been detected in urban areas.

  7. Formation of highly oxygenated organic molecules from aromatic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molteni, Ugo; Bianchi, Federico; Klein, Felix; El Haddad, Imad; Frege, Carla; Rossi, Michel J.; Dommen, Josef; Baltensperger, Urs

    2018-02-01

    Anthropogenic volatile organic compounds (AVOCs) often dominate the urban atmosphere and consist to a large degree of aromatic hydrocarbons (ArHCs), such as benzene, toluene, xylenes, and trimethylbenzenes, e.g., from the handling and combustion of fuels. These compounds are important precursors for the formation of secondary organic aerosol. Here we show that the oxidation of aromatics with OH leads to a subsequent autoxidation chain reaction forming highly oxygenated molecules (HOMs) with an O : C ratio of up to 1.09. This is exemplified for five single-ring ArHCs (benzene, toluene, o-/m-/p-xylene, mesitylene (1,3,5-trimethylbenzene) and ethylbenzene), as well as two conjugated polycyclic ArHCs (naphthalene and biphenyl). We report the elemental composition of the HOMs and show the differences in the oxidation patterns of these ArHCs. A potential pathway for the formation of these HOMs from aromatics is presented and discussed. We hypothesize that AVOCs may contribute substantially to new particle formation events that have been detected in urban areas.

  8. Geochemical markers and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in solvent extracts from diesel engine particulate matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabiańska, Monika; Kozielska, Barbara; Bielaczyc, Piotr; Woodburn, Joseph; Konieczyński, Jan

    2016-04-01

    Exhaust particulate from compression ignition (CI) engines running on engine and chassis dynamometers was studied. Particulate dichloromethane extracts were qualitatively and quantitatively analyzed for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and biomarkers by gas chromatography with flame ionization detector (GC-FID) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). PAH group profiles were made and the PAH group shares according to the number of rings (2 or 3; 4; 5 or more) as well as diagnostic indices were calculated. Values of geochemical ratios of selected biomarkers and alkyl aromatic hydrocarbons were compared with literature values. A geochemical interpretation was carried out using these values and biomarker and alkyl aromatic hydrocarbon distributions. It has been shown that geochemical features are unequivocally connected to the emission of fossil fuels and biofuels burned in CI engines. The effect of the exothermic combustion process is limited to low-molecular-weight compounds, which shows that the applied methodology permits source identification of PAHs coexisting in the particulate emitted.

  9. Characterizing priority polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in particulate matter from diesel and palm oil-based biodiesel B15 combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Nestor Y.; Milquez, Harvey Andrés; Sarmiento, Hugo

    2011-11-01

    A set of 16 priority polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) associated with particulate matter (PM), emitted by a diesel engine fueled with petroleum diesel and a 15%-vol. palm oil methyl ester blend with diesel (B15), were determined. PM was filtered from a sample of the exhaust gas with the engine running at a steady speed and under no load. PAH were extracted from the filters using the Soxhlet technique, with dichloromethane as solvent. The extracts were then analyzed by gas chromatography using a flame ionization detector (FID). No significant difference was found between PM mass collected when fueled with diesel and B15. Ten of the 16 PAH concentrations were not reduced by adding biodiesel: Benz(a)anthracene, benzo(a)pyrene, benzo(b)fluoranthene, chrysene, dibenz(a,h)anthracene, fluoranthene, fluorene, indeno(1,2,3-c,d)pyrene, naphthalene and phenanthrene. The acenaphthene, acenaphthylene and anthracene concentrations were 45%-80% higher when using diesel, whereas those for benzo(k)fluoranthene, benzo(g,h,i)perylene and pyrene were 30%-72% higher when using the B15 blend. Even though the 16 priority-PAH cumulative concentration increased when using the B15 blend, the total toxic equivalent (TEQ) concentration was not different for both fuels.

  10. Structure-reactivity correlation of diesel soot and characterization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and carbonyls in biofuel emissions; Struktur-Reaktivitaets-Korrelation von Dieselruss und Charakterisierung von PAHs und Carbonylen im Abgas von Biokraftstoffen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knauer, Markus

    2009-12-29

    This work reports on the determination of the structure-reactivity correlation of soot using Raman microscopy (RM) and temperature programmed oxidation (TPO), as well as on changes in the emission level of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and carbonyls at the combustion of biofuels. To characterize the reactivity of soot the combustion behaviour of model- and diesel soot has been determined by means of TPO in the presence of oxygen. In this context, spark-discharge soot and graphite powder were applied as model substances, and EURO VI and IV diesel soot as real-diesel soots. The structure of soot samples was investigated by RM and structural changes during the TPO were observed. In order to make a statement about the changes in PAH and carbonyl compound emissions during combustion of biofuels, samples were taken at different engine testbenches. Fossil fuel, biodiesel and vegetable oil were used during this study, as well as fuel mixtures with different biofuel fractions.

  11. BIODEGRADATION OF AROMATIC AMINE COMPOUNDS USING MOVING BED BIOFILM REACTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Delnavaz ، B. Ayati ، H. Ganjidoust

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Three moving bed biofilm reactors were used to treat synthesized wastewater of aromatic amine compounds including aniline, para-diaminobenzene and para-aminophenol that are found in many industrial wastewaters. The reactors with cylindrical shape had an internal diameter and an effective depth of 10 and 60 cm, respectively. The reactors were filled with light expanded clay aggregate as carriers and operated in an aerobic batch and continuous conditions. Evaluation of the reactors' efficiency was done at different retention time of 8, 24, 48 and 72 h with an influent COD from 100 to 3500 mg/L (filling ratio of 50%. The maximum obtained removal efficiencies were 90% (influent COD=2000 mg/L, 87% (influent COD=1000 mg/L and 75% (influent COD=750 mg/L for aniline, para-diaminobenzene and para-aminophenol, respectively. In the study of decrease in filling ratio from 50 to 30 percent, 6% decrease for both para-diaminobenzene and para-aminophenol and 7% increase for aniline degradation were obtained. The removal efficiency was decreased to about 10% after 15 days of continuous loading for each of the above three substrates. In the shock loading test, initially the COD removal rate was decreased in all reactors, but after about 10 days, it has been approached to the previous values. Finally, biodegradability of aromatic amines has been proved by nuclear magnetic resonance system.

  12. Characterization of Toxicologically Relevant Compounds From Diesel Emissions: Phase II

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yost, Douglas M; Schulman, Matthew E; Frame, Edwin A

    2004-01-01

    A light-duty diesel engine fitted with a common-rail fuel injection system was calibrated on several alternative type test fuels to achieve low engine-out oxides of nitrogen (NOx) exhaust emissions...

  13. Gas and Particulate Sampling of Airborne Polycyclic Aromatic Compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lane, D.A.; Gundel, L.A.

    1995-10-01

    The denuder surfaces of the gas and particle (GAP) sampler (developed at the Atmospheric Environment Service of Environment Canada) have been modified by coating with XAD-4 resin, using techniques developed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) for the lower capacity integrated organic vapor/particle sampler (IOVPS). The resulting high capacity integrated organic gas and particle sampler (IOGAPS) has been operated in ambient air at 16.7 L min{sup -1} for a 24-hour period in Berkeley, California, USA. Simultaneous measurements were made at the same collection rate with a conventional sampler that used a filter followed by two sorbent beds. Gas and particle partition measurements were determined for 13 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) ranging from 2-ring to 6-ring species. The IOGAPS indicated a higher particle fraction of these compounds than did the conventional sampler, suggesting that the conventional sampler suffered from 'blow-off' losses from the particles collected on the filter.

  14. Biotechnological production of aromatic compounds of the extended shikimate pathway from renewable biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin-Ho; Wendisch, Volker F

    2017-09-10

    Aromatic chemicals that contain an unsaturated ring with alternating double and single bonds find numerous applications in a wide range of industries, e.g. paper and dye manufacture, as fuel additives, electrical insulation, resins, pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals, in food, feed and cosmetics. Their chemical production is based on petroleum (BTX; benzene, toluene, and xylene), but they can also be obtained from plants by extraction. Due to petroleum depletion, health compliance, or environmental issues such as global warming, the biotechnological production of aromatics from renewable biomass came more and more into focus. Lignin, a complex polymeric aromatic molecule itself, is a natural source of aromatic compounds. Many microorganisms are able to catabolize a plethora of aromatic compounds and interception of these pathways may lead to the biotechnological production of value-added aromatic compounds which will be discussed for Corynebacterium glutamicum. Biosynthesis of aromatic amino acids not only gives rise to l-tryptophan, L-tyrosine and l-phenylalanine, but also to aromatic intermediates such as dehydroshikimate or chorismate from which value-added aromatic compounds can be derived. In this review, we will summarize recent strategies for the biotechnological production of aromatic and related compounds from renewable biomass by Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas putida, C. glutamicum and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In particular, we will focus on metabolic engineering of the extended shikimate pathway. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Volatile Compounds in Dry Dog Foods and Their Influence on Sensory Aromatic Profile

    OpenAIRE

    Koppel, Kadri; Adhikari, Koushik; Donfrancesco, Brizio Di

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine volatile compounds in dry dog foods and their possible influence on sensory aromatic profile. Grain-free dry dog foods were compared to dry dog foods manufactured with grain, but also with different protein sources for their aromatic volatiles. Solid-phase microextraction/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry was used to determine the aromatic compounds present in the headspace of these samples. Partial Least Squares regression was performed to correlate ...

  16. Investigation of Nitro-Organic Compounds in Diesel Engine Exhaust: Final Report, February 2007 - April 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dane, J.; Voorhees, K. J.

    2010-06-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory upgraded its ReFUEL engine and vehicle testing facility to speciate unregulated gas-phase emissions. To complement this capability, the laboratory contracted with the Colorado School of Mines (CSM) to study the effects of soy biodiesel fuel and a diesel particle filter (DPF) on emissions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and nitro-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (NPAH). CSM developed procedures to sample diesel particulate matter (PM) emissions from raw and diluted exhaust, with and without a DPF. They also developed improved procedures for extracting PAH and NPAH from the PM and quantifying them with a gas chromatograph-electron monochromator mass spectrometer. The study found the DPF generally reduced PAH emissions by 1 to 3 orders of magnitude. PAH conversion was lowest for B100, suggesting that PAHs were forming in the DPF. Orders of magnitude reductions were also found for NPAH emissions exiting the DPF.

  17. Predictors of dermal exposures to polycyclic aromatic compounds among hot-mix asphalt paving workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallari, Jennifer M; Osborn, Linda V; Snawder, John E; Kriech, Anthony J; Olsen, Larry D; Herrick, Robert F; McClean, Michael D

    2012-03-01

    The primary objective of this study was to identify the source and work practices that affect dermal exposure to polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs) among hot-mix asphalt (HMA) paving workers. Four workers were recruited from each of three asphalt paving crews (12 workers) and were monitored for three consecutive days over 4 weeks for a total of 12 sampling days per worker (144 worker days). Two sampling weeks were conducted under standard conditions for dermal exposures. The third week included the substitution of biodiesel for diesel oil used to clean tools and equipment and the fourth week included dermal protection through the use of gloves, hat and neck cloth, clean pants, and long-sleeved shirts. Dermal exposure to PACs was quantified using two methods: a passive organic dermal (POD) sampler specifically developed for this study and a sunflower oil hand wash technique. Linear mixed-effects models were used to evaluate predictors of PAC exposures. Dermal exposures measured under all conditions via POD and hand wash were low with most samples for each analyte being below the limit of the detection with the exception of phenanthrene and pyrene. The geometric mean (GM) concentrations of phenanthrene were 0.69 ng cm(-2) on the polypropylene layer of the POD sampler and 1.37 ng cm(-2) in the hand wash sample. The GM concentrations of pyrene were 0.30 ng cm(-2) on the polypropylene layer of the POD sampler and 0.29 ng cm(-2) in the hand wash sample. Both the biodiesel substitution and dermal protection scenarios were effective in reducing dermal exposures. Based on the results of multivariate linear mixed-effects models, increasing frequency of glove use was associated with significant (P paving workers include requiring the use of dermal coverage (e.g. wearing gloves and/or long sleeves), substituting biodiesel for diesel oil as a cleaning agent, and decreasing the HMA application temperature.

  18. Composition of volatile aromatic compounds and minerals of tarhana enriched with cherry laurel (Laurocerasus officinalis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temiz, Hasan; Tarakçı, Zekai

    2017-03-01

    Different concentrations of cherry laurel pulp (0, 5, 10, 15 and 20%) were used to produce tarhana samples. Volatile aromatic compounds and minor mineral content were investigated. Volatile aromatic compounds were analyzed by using GC-MS with SPME fiber and minor mineral values were evaluated with inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometer. The statistical analysis showed that addition of pulp affected volatile aromatic compounds and minor mineral content significantly. Thirty five volatile aromatic compounds were found in tarhana samples. The octanoic acid from acids, benzaldehyde (CAS) phenylmethanal from aldehydes, 6-methyl-5-hepten-2-one from ketones, octadecane (CAS) n -octadecane form terpenes, ethyl caprylate from esters and benzenemethanol (CAS) benzyl alcohol from alcohols had the highest percentage of volatile aromatic compounds. Tarhana samples were rich source of Mn, Cu and Fe content.

  19. High-field FT-ICR-MS and aromaticity equivalent approach for structural identification of water soluble organic compounds (WSOC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harir, Mourad; Yassine, Mahmoud M.; Dabek-Zlotorzynska, Ewa; Hertkorn, Norbert; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe

    2015-04-01

    identification and characterization of aromatic and condensed aromatic compounds in WSOC [2]. We proposed threshold values of Xc≥ 2.5000 and Xc≥ 2.7143 as ambiguous minimum criteria for the presence of aromatic structure and condensed aromatic compounds, respectively. The advantage of employing this parameter is that Xc would have a constant value for each proposed core structure regardless the degree of alkylation, and thus visual representation and structural interpretations of the spectra become advantageous for characterizing and comparing complex samples. Diesel particulate matter (DPM) and two atmospheric aerosols collected in the industrial area affected by biomass burning events were used to study the applicability of the proposed criteria for the improved identification of aromatic and condensed aromatic structures in complex mixtures in the FT-ICR mass spectra. References [1] Koch.BP, Dittmar.T. From mass to structure: an aromaticity index for high-resolution mass data of natural organic matter. Rapid Commun. Mass Spectrom. 2006, 20, 926-932 [2] Yassine.MM, Harir.M, Dabek-Zlotorzynska.E, Schmitt-Kopplin.Ph. Structural characterization of organic aerosol using Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry: Aromaticity equivalent approach. Rapid Commun. Mass Spectrom. 2014. 28. 2445-2454

  20. Effect of fuel composition on poly aromatic hydrocarbons in particulate matter from DI diesel engine; Particulate chu no PAH ni oyobosu nenryo sosei no eikyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, S.; Tatani, T.; Yoshida, H.; Takizawa, H.; Miyoshi, K.; Ikebe, H. [COSMO Research Institute, Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-10-01

    The effect of fuel composition on poly aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in particulate matter from DI diesel engine was investigated by using deeply desulfurized fuel and model fuel which properties are not interrelated. It was found that the deeply desulfurized fuel have effect on reducing PAH emissions. Furthermore, it was suggested that poly aromatics in the fuel affect PAH emissions and the influence of tri-aromatics in the fuel was promoted by the coexistence of mono-aromatics or naphthene. PAH formation scheme from each fuel component was proposed by chemical thermodynamic data. 4 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Exposure of garbage truck drivers and maintenance personnel at a waste handling centre to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons derived from diesel exhaust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuusimäki, Leea; Peltonen, Yrjö; Kyyrö, Eila; Mutanen, Pertti; Peltonen, Kimmo; Savela, Kirsti

    2002-10-01

    Exposure to diesel exhaust was evaluated in summer and winter by measuring vapour and particle phase polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Fifteen PAHs were simultaneously determined from the air samples obtained from truck drivers collecting household waste and maintenance personnel at a waste handling centre. The major compounds analysed from the personal air samples of exposed workers were naphthalene, phenanthrene and fluorene. The total PAH exposure (sum of 15 PAHs) of garbage truck drivers ranged from 71 to 2,660 ng m(-3) and from 68 to 900 ng m-3 in the maintenance work. The exposure of garbage truck drivers to benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) ranged from the mean of 0.03 to 0.3 ng m(-3) whereas no B[a]P in control samples or in those collected from maintenance workers was detected. A statistically significant difference in diesel-derived PAH exposure between the garbage truck drivers and the control group in both seasons (in summer p = 0.0022, degrees of freedom (df) 70.5; and in winter p garbage truck drivers and the maintenance workers (in summer p < 0.0001, df = 50.1; and in winter p < 0.0001, df = 44.2) was obtained.

  2. Fugacity ratio estimations for high-melting rigid aromatic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Noort, Paul C M

    2004-07-01

    Prediction of the environmental fate of organic compounds requires knowledge of their tendency to stay in the gas and water phase. Vapor pressure and aqueous solubility are commonly used descriptors for these processes. Depending on the type of distribution process, values for either the pure solid state or the (subcooled) liquid state have to be used. Values for the (subcooled) liquid state can be calculated from those for the solid state, and vice versa, using the fugacity ratio. Fugacity ratios are usually calculated from the entropy of fusion and the melting point. For polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, chlorobenzenes, chlorodibenzofuranes, and chlorodibenzo(p)dioxins, fugacity ratios calculated using experimental entropies of fusion were systematically less than those obtained from a thermodynamically more rigorous approach using heat capacity data. The deviation was more than 1 order of magnitude at the highest melting point. The use of a universal value for the entropy of fusion of 56 J/molK resulted in either over or underestimation by up to more than 1 order of magnitude. A simple correction factor, based on the melting point only, was derived. This correction factor allowed the fugacity ratios to be estimated from experimental entropies of fusion and melting point with an accuracy better than 0.1-0.2 log units. Copyright 2004 Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Joint toxicity of aromatic compounds to algae and QSAR study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Guanghua; Wang, Chao; Tang, Zhuyun; Guo, Xiaoling

    2007-10-01

    There are often many chemicals coexisting in aquatic ecosystems, and information the joint toxicity of a mixture of organic pollutants on microorganisms is scarce at present. Acute toxicity of aromatic anilines and phenols and their mixtures to alga was determined by the algae inhibition test. The median effective inhibition concentration EC(50) values for single compounds and EC(50mix) values for binary and multiple mixtures were obtained. The joint toxic effects of mixtures were estimated by using mixture toxicity index method. The structural descriptors of the n-octanol/water partition coefficient (log P (mix)) and the frontier orbital energy gap (DeltaE (mix)) for mixtures were calculated. Based on the quantitative structure-activity relationship model for single chemical toxicity log(1/EC(50)) = 0.579log P - 0.783DeltaE + 8.966 (n = 11, r (2) = 0.923), the following two-descriptor model was developed for the toxicity of a mixture: log(1/EC(50mix)) = 0.416log P (mix) - 0.584DeltaE (mix) + 7.530 (n = 27, r (2) = 0.944). This model can be used successfully to predict the toxicity of a mixture, whether binary mixtures in variant toxic ratios (4:1, 2:1, 1:1, 1:2 and 1:4) or multiple mixtures of three or four chemicals at an equitoxic ratio are used as predictors.

  4. Attachment chemistry of aromatic compounds on a Silicon(100) surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksson, Anders; Nishiori, Daiki; Maeda, Hiroaki; Miyachi, Mariko; Yamanoi, Yoshinori; Nishihara, Hiroshi

    2018-03-01

    A mild method was developed for the chemical attachment of aromatic compounds directly onto a hydrogen-terminated Si(100) (H-Si(100)) surface. In the presence of palladium catalyst and base, 4-iodophenylferrocene and a π-conjugated iron complex were attached to H-Si(100) electrodes and hydrogen-terminated silicon nanowires (H-SiNWs), both of which have predominant dihydride species on their surfaces. The reactions were conducted in 1,4-dioxane at 100 °C and the immobilization of both 4-ferrocenylphenyl group and π-conjugated molecular wires were confirmed and quantified by XPS and electrochemical measurements. We reported densely packed monolayer whose surface coverage (Γ), estimated from the electrochemical measurements are in analogue to similar monolayers prepared via thermal or light induced hydrosilylation reactions with alkenes or alkynes. The increase in electrochemical response observed on nanostructured silicon surfaces corresponds well to the increase in surface area, those strongly indicating that this method may be applied for the functionalization of electrodes with a variety of surface topographies.

  5. Gas phase carbonyl compounds in ship emissions: Differences between diesel fuel and heavy fuel oil operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reda, Ahmed A.; Schnelle-Kreis, J.; Orasche, J.; Abbaszade, G.; Lintelmann, J.; Arteaga-Salas, J. M.; Stengel, B.; Rabe, R.; Harndorf, H.; Sippula, O.; Streibel, T.; Zimmermann, R.

    2014-09-01

    Gas phase emission samples of carbonyl compounds (CCs) were collected from a research ship diesel engine at Rostock University, Germany. The ship engine was operated using two different types of fuels, heavy fuel oil (HFO) and diesel fuel (DF). Sampling of CCs was performed from diluted exhaust using cartridges and impingers. Both sampling methods involved the derivatization of CCs with 2,4-Dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH). The CCs-hydrazone derivatives were analyzed by two analytical techniques: High Performance Liquid Chromatography-Diode Array Detector (HPLC-DAD) and Gas Chromatography-Selective Ion Monitoring-Mass Spectrometry (GC-SIM-MS). Analysis of DNPH cartridges by GC-SIM-MS method has resulted in the identification of 19 CCs in both fuel operations. These CCs include ten aliphatic aldehydes (formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, propanal, isobutanal, butanal, isopentanal, pentanal, hexanal, octanal, nonanal), three unsaturated aldehydes (acrolein, methacrolein, crotonaldehyde), three aromatic aldehyde (benzaldehyde, p-tolualdehyde, m,o-molualdehyde), two ketones (acetone, butanone) and one heterocyclic aldehyde (furfural). In general, all CCs under investigation were detected with higher emission factors in HFO than DF. The total carbonyl emission factor was determined and found to be 6050 and 2300 μg MJ-1 for the operation with HFO and DF respectively. Formaldehyde and acetaldehyde were found to be the dominant carbonyls in the gas phase of ship engine emission. Formaldehyde emissions factor varied from 3500 μg MJ-1 in HFO operation to 1540 μg MJ-1 in DF operation, which is 4-30 times higher than those of other carbonyls. Emission profile contribution of CCs showed also a different pattern between HFO and DF operation. The contribution of formaldehyde was found to be 58% of the emission profile of HFO and about 67% of the emission profile of DF. Acetaldehyde showed opposite behavior with higher contribution of 16% in HFO compared to 11% for DF. Heavier carbonyls

  6. Aromatic saturation of distillates. An overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, Barry H.; Donnis, Bjoern B.L.

    1996-01-01

    The saturation of aromatic compounds in distillate fractions and in particular in diesel fuel has received considerable attention in recent years. A high aromatic content is associated with poor fuel quality, giving a low cetane number in diesel fuel and a high smoke point in jet fuel. There is also evidence that particulate emissions in diesel exhaust gases correlate with the aromatic content of the fuel. New legislation has been introduced to limit aromatics in diesel fuel and this has led to new catalyst and process developments for aromatic saturation. This paper gives an overview of these developments. The types of aromatic compounds found in distillate streams are described, and the kinetics of both single (model) compounds and groups of compounds as found in industrial feedstocks are discussed. Both supported metal sulfide and supported noble metal catalysts are used industrially and the paper outlines the role of the active species in these catalysts and compares reaction conditions used for each. The tolerance of different catalyst systems towards sulfur and nitrogen in the feed is dealt with in some detail. Commercial processes employ either single- or dual-stage catalyst systems depending on the nature of the aromatic saturation catalyst. The paper considers the merits of different process configurations. The paper concludes with a brief survey of possible future applications for distillate aromatic saturation catalysts

  7. Multi-Phase Equilibrium and Solubilities of Aromatic Compounds and Inorganic Compounds in Sub- and Supercritical Water: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qinli; Ding, Xin; Du, Bowen; Fang, Tao

    2017-11-02

    Supercritical water oxidation (SCWO), as a novel and efficient technology, has been applied to wastewater treatment processes. The use of phase equilibrium data to optimize process parameters can offer a theoretical guidance for designing SCWO processes and reducing the equipment and operating costs. In this work, high-pressure phase equilibrium data for aromatic compounds+water systems and inorganic compounds+water systems are given. Moreover, thermodynamic models, equations of state (EOS) and empirical and semi-empirical approaches are summarized and evaluated. This paper also lists the existing problems of multi-phase equilibria and solubility studies on aromatic compounds and inorganic compounds in sub- and supercritical water.

  8. Process for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds from petroleum products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Googin, J.M.; Napier, J.M.; Travaglini, M.A.

    1983-09-20

    A process is described for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, e.g., polychlorinated biphenyls, from petroleum products by solvent extraction. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from a petroleum product into a polar solvent by contacting the petroleum product with the polar solvent. The polar solvent is characterized by a high solubility for the extracted halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, a low solubility for the petroleum product and considerable solvent power for polyhydroxy compound. The preferred polar solvent is dimethylformamide. A miscible compound, such as, water or a polyhydroxy compound, is added to the polar extraction solvent to increase the polarity of the polar extraction solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from the highly-polarized mixture of water or polyhydroxy compound and polar extraction solvent into a low polar or nonpolar solvent by contacting the water or polyhydroxy compound-polar solvent mixture with the low polar or nonpolar solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds and the low polar or nonpolar solvent are separated by physical means, e.g., vacuum evaporation. The polar and nonpolar solvents are recovered from recycling. The process can easily be designed for continuous operation. Advantages of the process include that the polar solvent and a major portion of the nonpolar solvent can be recycled, the petroleum products are reclaimable and the cost for disposing of waste containing polychlorinated biphenyls is significantly reduced. 1 fig.

  9. Compound-specific isotope analysis of diesel fuels in a forensic investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhammad, Syahidah A; Frew, Russell D; Hayman, Alan R

    2015-01-01

    Compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) offers great potential as a tool to provide chemical evidence in a forensic investigation. Many attempts to trace environmental oil spills were successful where isotopic values were particularly distinct. However, difficulties arise when a large data set is analyzed and the isotopic differences between samples are subtle. In the present study, discrimination of diesel oils involved in a diesel theft case was carried out to infer the relatedness of the samples to potential source samples. This discriminatory analysis used a suite of hydrocarbon diagnostic indices, alkanes, to generate carbon and hydrogen isotopic data of the compositions of the compounds which were then processed using multivariate statistical analyses to infer the relatedness of the data set. The results from this analysis were put into context by comparing the data with the δ(13)C and δ(2)H of alkanes in commercial diesel samples obtained from various locations in the South Island of New Zealand. Based on the isotopic character of the alkanes, it is suggested that diesel fuels involved in the diesel theft case were distinguishable. This manuscript shows that CSIA when used in tandem with multivariate statistical analysis provide a defensible means to differentiate and source-apportion qualitatively similar oils at the molecular level. This approach was able to overcome confounding challenges posed by the near single-point source of origin, i.e., the very subtle differences in isotopic values between the samples.

  10. Compound-Specific Isotope Analysis of Diesel Fuels in a Forensic Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syahidah Akmal Muhammad

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA offers great potential as a tool to provide chemical evidence in a forensic investigation. Many attempts to trace environmental oil spills were successful where isotopic values were particularly distinct. However, difficulties arise when a large data set is analyzed and the isotopic differences between samples are subtle. In the present study, discrimination of diesel oils involved in a diesel theft case was carried out to infer the relatedness of the samples to potential source samples. This discriminatory analysis used a suite of hydrocarbon diagnostic indices, alkanes, to generate carbon and hydrogen isotopic data of the compositions of the compounds which were then processed using multivariate statistical analyses to infer the relatedness of the data set. The results from this analysis were put into context by comparing the data with the δ13C and δ2H of alkanes in commercial diesel samples obtained from various locations in the South Island of New Zealand. Based on the isotopic character of the alkanes, it is suggested that diesel fuels involved in the diesel theft case were distinguishable. This manuscript shows that CSIA when used in tandem with multivariate statistical analysis provide a defensible means to differentiate and source-apportion qualitatively similar oils at the molecular level. This approach was able to overcome confounding challenges posed by the near single-point source of origin i.e. the very subtle differences in isotopic values between the samples.

  11. Use of heterologous expressed polyketide synthase and small molecule foldases to make aromatic and cyclic compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    A method for producing individual or libraries of tri- to pentadecaketide-derived aromatic compounds of interest by heterologous expression of polyketide synthase and aromatase/cyclase in a recombinant host cell.......A method for producing individual or libraries of tri- to pentadecaketide-derived aromatic compounds of interest by heterologous expression of polyketide synthase and aromatase/cyclase in a recombinant host cell....

  12. Agarotetrol: a source compound for low molecular weight aromatic compounds from agarwood heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamatsu, Sakura; Ito, Michiho

    2018-02-20

    Agarwood is known to generate a distinct fragrance upon heating and is used as both a medicine and a fragrant wood. Low molecular weight aromatic compounds (LACs) such as benzylacetone are emitted from agarwood on heating and have a sedative effect on mice. These are detected exclusively in the headspace vapor of heated agarwood and are absent in the wood itself; hence, some compounds in agarwood are thought to be converted to LACs by the process of heating. In this study, different fractions obtained from agarwood were analyzed to reveal the source compounds of LACs. Some LACs detected in the resinous agarwood were absent from the non-resinous parts and confirmed as characteristic of the resinous parts. The essential oil and hydrosol of agarwood obtained by distillation were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Sesquiterpenes were detected in the essential oil, and sesquiterpenes and a variety of LACs were detected in the hydrosol. A hot water extract of agarwood remaining in the distillation flask after distillation was analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and agarotetrol was found to be the main compound. Purified agarotetrol was heated in a glass vial and its headspace vapor was analyzed by solid-phase microextraction GC-MS. Benzylacetone and other LACs were detected. These results indicate that agarotetrol, a chromone derivative, contributes to the fragrance of agarwood through the generation of LACs upon heating.

  13. Aromatic products from reaction of lignin model compounds with UV-alkaline peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Y.P.; Wallis, A.F.A.; Nguyen, K.L.

    1997-01-01

    A series of guaiacyl and syringyl lignin model compounds and their methylated analogues were reacted with alkaline hydrogen peroxide while irradiating with UV light at 254 nm. The aromatic products obtained were investigated by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Guaiacol, syringol and veratrol gave no detectable aromatic products. However, syringol methyl ether gave small amounts of aromatic products, resulting from ring substitution and methoxyl displacement by hydroxyl radicals. Reaction of vanillin and syringaldehyde gave the Dakin reaction products, methoxy-1,4-hydroquinones, while reaction of their methyl ethers yielded benzoic acids. Acetoguaiacone, acetosyringone and their methyl ethers afforded several hydroxylated aromatic products, but no aromatic products were identified in the reaction mixtures from guaiacylpropane and syringylpropane. In contrast, veratrylpropane gave a mixture from which 17 aromatic hydroxylated compounds were identified. It is concluded that for phenolic lignin model compounds, particularly those possessing electrondonating aromatic ring substituents, ring-cleavage reactions involving superoxide radical anions are dominant, whereas for non-phenolic lignin models, hydroxylation reactions through attack of hydroxyl radicals prevail

  14. Volatile Compounds in Dry Dog Foods and Their Influence on Sensory Aromatic Profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koushik Adhikari

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine volatile compounds in dry dog foods and their possible influence on sensory aromatic profile. Grain-free dry dog foods were compared to dry dog foods manufactured with grain, but also with different protein sources for their aromatic volatiles. Solid-phase microextraction/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry was used to determine the aromatic compounds present in the headspace of these samples. Partial Least Squares regression was performed to correlate the instrumental aromatic data with the descriptive aroma analysis data. A total of 54 aromatic compounds were tentatively identified in the dry dog food samples, with aldehydes and ketones being the most represented organic volatiles group. Grain-added products were on the average higher in total volatiles than grain-free products. Partial Least Squares regression analysis indicated possible connections with sensory aromatic profile and grain-added samples, such as rancid aroma and aldehydes, especially hexanal. The results of this study showed that dry dog foods are products with complex odor characteristics and that grain-free products are less aromatic.

  15. Volatile compounds in dry dog foods and their influence on sensory aromatic profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppel, Kadri; Adhikari, Koushik; Di Donfrancesco, Brizio

    2013-02-27

    The aim of this study was to determine volatile compounds in dry dog foods and their possible influence on sensory aromatic profile. Grain-free dry dog foods were compared to dry dog foods manufactured with grain, but also with different protein sources for their aromatic volatiles. Solid-phase microextraction/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry was used to determine the aromatic compounds present in the headspace of these samples. Partial Least Squares regression was performed to correlate the instrumental aromatic data with the descriptive aroma analysis data. A total of 54 aromatic compounds were tentatively identified in the dry dog food samples, with aldehydes and ketones being the most represented organic volatiles group. Grain-added products were on the average higher in total volatiles than grain-free products. Partial Least Squares regression analysis indicated possible connections with sensory aromatic profile and grain-added samples, such as rancid aroma and aldehydes, especially hexanal. The results of this study showed that dry dog foods are products with complex odor characteristics and that grain-free products are less aromatic.

  16. Aromatic metabolism of filamentous fungi in relation to the presence of aromatic compounds in plant biomass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mäkelä, Miia R; Marinović, Mila; Nousiainen, Paula; Liwanag, April J M; Benoit, Isabelle; Sipilä, Jussi; Hatakka, Annele; de Vries, Ronald P; Hildén, Kristiina S

    2015-01-01

    The biological conversion of plant lignocellulose plays an essential role not only in carbon cycling in terrestrial ecosystems but also is an important part of the production of second generation biofuels and biochemicals. The presence of the recalcitrant aromatic polymer lignin is one of the major

  17. Study on ionizing radiation effects in diesel and crude oil: organic compounds, hydrocarbon, sulfur and nitrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, Luana dos Santos

    2014-01-01

    Petroleum is the most important energy and pollution source in the world, nowadays. New technologies in petrochemical industry aim to minimize energy spending at the process and to reduce pollution products. Sulfur and nitrogen compounds generate environmental problems; the most relevant is air pollution that affects the population health directly. The nuclear technology has been used in environmental protection through pollutants removal by free radicals produced at action of the radiation in water molecule. The objective of this study is to evaluate the radiation effects on oil and diesel, mainly in the hydrocarbons, organic sulfur, and nitrogen compounds. It was studied a molecule model of sulfur, named benzothiophene, diesel and crude oil samples. The samples were irradiated using a Co-60 source, Gammacell type. The total sulfur concentration in the samples was determined by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, and organic compounds were analyzed by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The study of molecular model showed that 95% was degraded at 20 kGy dose rate. Irradiation at 15 kGy of absorbed dose showed some cracking in petrol hydrocarbons, however with higher doses it was observed polymerization and low efficiency of cracking. It was observed that the sulfur compounds from diesel and petroleum was efficiently reduced. The applied doses of 15 kGy and 30 kGy were the most efficient on desulfurization of petroleum, and for diesel the highest variation was observed with 30 kGy and 50 kGy of absorbed dose. The distillation and chromatographic separation using an open column with palladium chloride as stationary phase showed a preferential separation of organic sulfur compounds in petroleum. (author)

  18. Life cycle responses of the midge Chironomus riparius to polycyclic aromatic compound exposure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    León Paumen, M.; Borgman, E.; Kraak, M.H.S.; van Gestel, C.A.M.; Admiraal, W.

    2008-01-01

    During acute exposure, polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs) act mainly by narcosis, but during chronic exposure the same compounds may exert sublethal life cycle effects. The aim of this study was therefore to evaluate the chronic effects of sediment spiked PACs on the emergence of the midge

  19. Chronic toxicity of polycyclic aromatic compounds to the springtail Folsomia candida and the enchytraeid Enchytraeus crypticus.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Droge, S.T.J.; Leon Paumen, M; Bleeker, E.A.J.; Kraak, M.H.S.; van Gestel, C.A.M.

    2006-01-01

    An urgent need exists for incorporating heterocyclic compounds and (bio)transformation products in ecotoxicological test schemes and risk assessment of polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs). The aim of the present study therefore was to determine the chronic effects of (heterocyclic) PACs on two

  20. Synthesis of Heteroaromatic Compounds by Oxidative Aromatization Using an Activated Carbon/Molecular Oxygen System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiko Hayashi

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available A variety of heteroaromatic compounds, such as substituted pyridines, pyrazoles, indoles, 2-substituted imidazoles, 2-substituted imidazoles, 2-arylbenzazoles and pyrimidin-2(1H-ones are synthesized by oxidative aromatization using the activated carbon and molecular oxygen system. Mechanistic study focused on the role of activated carbon in the synthesis of 2-arylbenzazoles is also discussed. In the final section, we will disclose the efficient synthesis of substituted 9,10-anthracenes via oxidative aromatization.

  1. Biodegradation of Various Aromatic Compounds by Enriched Bacterial Cultures: Part A-Monocyclic and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberoi, Akashdeep Singh; Philip, Ligy; Bhallamudi, S Murty

    2015-08-01

    Present study focused on the screening of bacterial consortium for biodegradation of monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (MAH) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Target compounds in the present study were naphthalene, acenaphthene, phenanthrene (PAHs), and benzene (MAH). Microbial consortia enriched with the above target compounds were used in screening experiments. Naphthalene-enriched consortium was found to be the most efficient consortium, based on its substrate degradation rate and its ability to degrade other aromatic pollutants with significantly high efficiency. Substrate degradation rate with naphthalene-enriched culture followed the order benzene > naphthalene > acenaphthene > phenanthrene. Chryseobacterium and Rhodobacter were discerned as the predominant species in naphthalene-enriched culture. They are closely associated to the type strain Chryseobacterium arthrosphaerae and Rhodobacter maris, respectively. Single substrate biodegradation studies with naphthalene (PAH) and benzene (MAH) were carried out using naphthalene-enriched microbial consortium (NAPH). Phenol and 2-hydroxybenzaldehyde were identified as the predominant intermediates during benzene and naphthalene degradation, respectively. Biodegradation of toluene, ethyl benzene, xylene, phenol, and indole by NAPH was also investigated. Monod inhibition model was able to simulate biodegradation kinetics for benzene, whereas multiple substrate biodegradation model was able to simulate biodegradation kinetics for naphthalene.

  2. Environmental diagnostic analysis of ground water bacteria and their involvement in utilization of aromatic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wear, Jr., John Edmund [Wake Forest Univ., Winston-Salem, NC (United States)

    1993-05-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the hypothesis that select functional groups of bacteria from pristine sites have an innate ability to degrade synthetic aromatics that often contaminate groundwater environments,due to exposure to naturally occurring recalcitrant aromatics in their environment. This study demonstrates that subsurface microbial communities are capable of utilizing lignin and humic acid breakdown products. Utilizers of these compounds were found to be present in most all the wells tested. Even the deepest aquifer tested had utilizers present for all six of the aromatics tested. Highest counts for the aromatics tested were observed with the naturally occurring breakdown products of either lignin or humic acid. Carboxylic acids were found to be an important sole carbon source for groundwater bacteria possibly explained by the fact that they are produced by the oxidative cleavage of aromatic ring structures. The carbohydrate sole carbon sources that demonstrated the greatest densities were ones commonly associated with humics. This study indicates that utilization of naturally occurring aromatic compounds in the subsurface is an important nutritional source for groundwater bacteria. In addition, it suggests that adaptation to naturally occurring recalcitrant substrates is the origin of degradative pathways for xenobiotic compounds with analogous structure. This work has important implications for in situ bioremediation as a method of environmental cleanup.

  3. Identification and determination of chemical compounds of five aromatic waters from Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Hosseinabadi*

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Herbal aromatic waters are one of the products used in the Iranian traditional medicine. These products have small amount of essential oil. The purpose of this study was to identify the effective substances of herbal aromatic waters by various techniques (GC/FID and GC/MS. It is hoped that with assessment of these compounds by mentioned techniques a suitable way could be found for standardization of the herbal aromatic waters. Methods: Four medicinal plants (Zataria multiflora, Fumaria parviflora, Rosa damascena, and Mentha spicata and aromatic water of Salix aegyptiaca were purchased from Tehran and their aromatic waters were extracted by hydrodistillation. In the next step, the essential oils of these aromatic waters were extracted by n-hexane and injected into GC/FID and GC/MS and chemical compounds were identified. Also, the standard components (thymol, carvone and 2-phenylethanol were injected to GC, separately and calibration curves were drawn. So, the content of the major components was calculated, carefully. Results: The results showed that the essential oil of F. parviflora contained more than 30 compounds. Its main compounds included carvacrol (16.7% and dihydroactinidiolide (13.8%. The essential oil of Salix aegyptiaca had 27 different compounds including 1,4-dimethoxybenzene (33.3% and heptacosane (28.1%. Z. multiflora, M. spicata and R. damascena essential oils contained thymol (0.065 mg/mL, carvone (0.01 mg/mL and 2-phenylethanol (0.015 mg/mL, as the main component, respectively. Conclusion: These results can be helpful for standardization and quality control of aromatic waters used in Iran.

  4. A bacteriophage system for screening and study of biologically active polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and related compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, W T; Harvey, R G; Lin, E J; Weiss, S B

    1977-01-01

    The usefulness of bacterial viruses for detecting substances that are potentially carcinogenic is reexamined as a model system for screening biologically active polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. A modification of the original assay procedure allows one to distinguish between aromatics that can modify the biological activity of infectious nucleic acids directly and those polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons that require metabolic activation by Escherichia coli enzymes. The effect of chemical modification of several different polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, with respect to their biological activity in the phage assay system, is described. Among the 31 different compounds examined, (+/-)-anti-benzo[a]pyrene-7,8-diol-9,10-epoxide was the most potent inhibitor of infectious phage nucleic acid. The (+) and (-) isomers of the above racemic mixture did not differ significantly in their capacity to inhibit phage replication. PMID:323848

  5. Radioluminescence of organic compounds: specific luminescence of condensed aromatic scintillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopes da Silva, J.

    1978-01-01

    The influence of the nature of ionizing particles on the radioluminescence yield of aromatic scintillators is studied. Both prompt and delayed scintillation components are considered. An expression giving the specific luminescence dS/dx as a function of the charge number z and of the incident particle specific energy loss have been derived, following a track model published before, that is consistent with recent conclusions about the nature, evolution and distribution of the primary excitations created by an ionizing particle in the organic scintillator. The good agreement between the theoretical curves derived in this paper and the experimental ones previously reported provided us with a means of evaluating the different parameters included in the proposed expressions. The numerical values of these parameters included in the proposed expressions. The numerical values of these parameters agree with those of other authors and are theoretically discussed and justified [fr

  6. Azoarcus sp. CIB, an anaerobic biodegrader of aromatic compounds shows an endophytic lifestyle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helga Fernández

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Endophytic bacteria that have plant growth promoting traits are of great interest in green biotechnology. The previous thought that the Azoarcus genus comprises bacteria that fit into one of two major eco-physiological groups, either free-living anaerobic biodegraders of aromatic compounds or obligate endophytes unable to degrade aromatics under anaerobic conditions, is revisited here. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Light, confocal and electron microscopy reveal that Azoarcus sp. CIB, a facultative anaerobe β-proteobacterium able to degrade aromatic hydrocarbons under anoxic conditions, is also able to colonize the intercellular spaces of the rice roots. In addition, the strain CIB displays plant growth promoting traits such nitrogen fixation, uptake of insoluble phosphorus and production of indoleacetic acid. Therefore, this work demonstrates by the first time that a free-living bacterium able to degrade aromatic compounds under aerobic and anoxic conditions can share also an endophytic lifestyle. The phylogenetic analyses based on the 16S rDNA and nifH genes confirmed that obligate endophytes of the Azoarcus genus and facultative endophytes, such as Azoarcus sp. CIB, locate into different evolutionary branches. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first report of a bacterium, Azoarcus sp. CIB, able to degrade anaerobically a significant number of aromatic compounds, some of them of great environmental concern, and to colonize the rice as a facultative endophyte. Thus, Azoarcus sp. CIB becomes a suitable candidate for a more sustainable agricultural practice and phytoremediation technology.

  7. Formation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons and Nitrogen Containing Polycyclic Aromatic Compounds in Titan's Atmosphere, the Interstellar Medium and Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landera, Alexander

    2013-12-01

    Several different mechanisms leading to the formation of (substituted) naphthalene and azanaphthalenes were examined using theoretical quantum chemical calculations. As a result, a series of novel synthetic routes to Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) and Nitrogen Containing Polycyclic Aromatic Compounds (N-PACs) have been proposed. On Earth, these aromatic compounds originate from incomplete combustion and are released into our environment, where they are known to be major pollutants, often with carcinogenic properties. In the atmosphere of a Saturn's moon Titan, these PAH and N-PACs are believed to play a critical role in organic haze formation, as well as acting as chemical precursors to biologically relevant molecules. The theoretical calculations were performed by employing the ab initio G3(MP2,CC)/B3LYP/6-311G** method to effectively probe the Potential Energy Surfaces (PES) relevant to the PAH and N-PAC formation. Following the construction of the PES, Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Markus (RRKM) theory was used to evaluate all unimolecular rate constants as a function of collision energy under single-collision conditions. Branching ratios were then evaluated by solving phenomenological rate expressions for the various product concentrations. The most viable pathways to PAH and N-PAC formation were found to be those where the initial attack by the ethynyl (C2H) or cyano (CN) radical toward a unsaturated hydrocarbon molecule led to the formation of an intermediate which could not effectively lose a hydrogen atom. It is not until ring cyclization has occurred, that hydrogen elimination leads to a closed shell product. By quenching the possibility of the initial hydrogen atom elimination, one of the most competitive processes preventing the PAH or N-PAC formation was avoided, and the PAH or N-PAC formation was allowed to proceed. It is concluded that these considerations should be taken into account when attempting to explore any other potential routes towards

  8. Atmospheric chemistry of polycyclic aromatic compounds with special emphasis on nitro derivatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feilberg, A.

    2000-04-01

    Field measurements of polycyclic aromatic compounds (PAC) have been carried out at a semi-rural site and at an urban site. Correlation analyses, PAC indicators, and PAC ratios have been used to evaluate the importance of various sources of nitro-PAHs. A major source of nitro-PAHs is atmospheric transformation of PAHs initiated by OH radicals. Especially during long-range transport (LRT) of air pollution from Central Europe, the nitro-PAH composition in Denmark is dominated by nitro-PAHs formed in the atmosphere. Locally emitted nitro-PAHs are primarily from diesel vehicles. Levels of unsubstituted PAHs can also be strongly elevated in connection with LRT episodes. The ratio of 2-nitrofluoranthene relative to 1-nitropyrene is proposed as a measure of the relative photochemical age of particulate matter. Using this ratio, the relative mutagenicity of particle extracts appears to increase with increasing photochemical age. In connection with the field measurements, a method for measuring nitro-PAHs in particle extracts based on MS-MS detection has been developed. The atmospheric chemistry of nitronaphthalenes has been investigated with a smog chamber system combined with simulation with photochemical kinetics software. A methodology to implement gas-particle partitioning in a model based on chemical kinetics is described. Equilibrium constants (KP) for gas-particle partitioning of 1- and 2-nitronaphthalene have been determined. Mass transfer between the two phases appears to occur on a very short timescale. The gas phase photolysis of the nitronaphthalenes depends upon the molecular conformation. Significantly faster photolysis of 1-nitronaphthalene than of 2-nitronaphthalene is observed. The photochemistry of nitro-PAHs, and to some extent other PAC, associated with organic aerosols, has been studied with model systems simulating organic aerosol material. A number of aerosol constituents, including substituted phenols, benzaldehydes, and oxy-PAHs, are demonstrated to

  9. Diesel fuel stability; Estabilidade de oleo diesel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alves, Marcelo V.; Pinto, Ricardo R.C. [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Zotin, Fatima M.Z. [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), RJ (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    The demand for the reduction of the pollutants emissions by diesel engines has led to the adoption of more advanced injection systems and concern about fuel stability. The degradation of the diesel fuel can happen during storage and distribution, according to the acid-catalysed condensation of aromatic compounds such phenalenones and indolic nitrogenated heterocyclic compounds. These precursors appear in several streams used in diesel fuel formulation. In this study the sediment formation in model and real, aromatic and paraffinic fuels, containing such precursors naturally or by addition was analysed. The fuels were submitted to accelerated (16 hours at 90 deg C) and long term (13 weeks at 43 deg C) storage stability tests. The model fuels responded positively to the storage stability tests with formation of sediments, concluding that these methods can be considered adequate to verify the occurrence of the studied degradation process. The real fuels response was even more due to their chemical complexity, composition and impurities. The formation of sediments showed to be affected by the hydrocarbon distribution of the fuels. (author)

  10. Efficient and Selective Reduction of Aromatic Nitro Compounds to Aromatic Amines by NbCl{sub 5}/Indium System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Byung Woo; Kim, Duckil; Kim, Hyung Min; Kang, Sung Ho [Korea Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    Aromatic amines find applicability in diverse fields including dyes, pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals, and photographic materials. To date, there are a variety of methods, which can be used to convert aromatic nitro compounds to their corresponding amines. Some of them include Cp{sub 2}TiCl{sub 2}/In, Al/NH{sub 4}Cl, (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4}/NaBH{sub 4}, NiCl{sub 2}6H{sub 2}O/In, HI, Sm/I{sub 2}, In/NH{sub 4}Cl, B{sub 4}H{sub 10}/Pd/C, Co{sub 2}(CO){sub 8}/H{sub 2}O and In/HCl. However, most methods still lack the desired chemo-selectivity when other reducible functional groups are present in the nitroarene and often require long reaction times, or harsh reaction conditions. Consequently, efficient and selective methods for the reduction of aromatic nitro compounds continue to be developed. It has been reported that NbCl{sub 5}/Zn system is used as a reagent for reducing sulfoxides, epoxides, and amine N-oxides.12 Because of the close resemblance of indium to zinc in several respects, including first ionization potential, we considered that NbCl{sub 5}/In system can be an efficient reducing agent for the conversion of aromatic nitro compounds to the corresponding amines. Recently, indium metal has attracted much attention for its unique properties such as low toxicity and high stability in water and air compared with other metals. In continuation of our interest in exploring the utility of metal-metal salt system in organic synthesis, we would like to report an efficient and chemo-selective method for the reduction of various aromatic nitro compounds to the corresponding amines by treatment with NbCl{sub 5}/In system (eq. 1). The new reduction system was generated by the addition of indium powder to a stirred solution of niobium(V) chloride in THF under sonication. The generation of low-valent niobium species was examined at room temperature with an excess of indium metal. The observations suggest that this procedure can be applied for the chemo

  11. Computer simulation of the heavy-duty turbo-compounded diesel cycle for studies of engine efficiency and performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assanis, D. N.; Ekchian, J. A.; Heywood, J. B.; Replogle, K. K.

    1984-01-01

    Reductions in heat loss at appropriate points in the diesel engine which result in substantially increased exhaust enthalpy were shown. The concepts for this increased enthalpy are the turbocharged, turbocompounded diesel engine cycle. A computer simulation of the heavy duty turbocharged turbo-compounded diesel engine system was undertaken. This allows the definition of the tradeoffs which are associated with the introduction of ceramic materials in various parts of the total engine system, and the study of system optimization. The basic assumptions and the mathematical relationships used in the simulation of the model engine are described.

  12. Molecular Characterization of Organosulfur Compounds in Biodiesel and Diesel Fuel Secondary Organic Aerosol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blair, Sandra L.; Macmillan, Amanda C.; Drozd, Greg T.; Goldstein, Allen H.; Chu, Rosalie K.; Pasa Tolic, Ljiljana; Shaw, Jared B.; Tolic, Nikola; Lin, Peng; Laskin, Julia; Laskin, Alexander; Nizkorodov, Sergey

    2017-01-03

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA), formed in a process of photooxidization of diesel fuel, biodiesel fuel, and 20% biodiesel fuel/80% diesel fuel mixture, are prepared under high-NOx conditions in the presence and absence of sulfur dioxide (SO2), ammonia (NH3), and relative humidity (RH). The composition of condensed-phase organic compounds in SOA is measured using several analytical techniques including aerosol mass spectrometry (AMS), high-resolution nanospray desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (nano-DESI/HRMS), and ultra high resolution and mass accuracy 21T Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (21T FT-ICR MS). Results demonstrate that sulfuric acid and condensed organosulfur species formed in photooxidation experiments with SO2 are present in the SOA particles. Fewer organosulfur species are formed in the high humidity experiments, performed at RH 90%, in comparison with experiments done under dry conditions. There is a strong overlap of organosulfur species observed in this study with previous field and chamber studies of SOA. Many mass spectrometry peaks of organosulfates (R–OS(O)2OH) in field studies previously designated as biogenic or of unknown origin might have originated from anthropogenic sources, such as photooxidation of hydrocarbons present in diesel and biodiesel fuel.

  13. Occupational Exposure of Diesel Station Workers to BTEX Compounds at a Bus Depot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raeesa Moolla

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Diesel fuel is known to emit pollutants that have a negative impact on environmental and human health. In developing countries like South Africa, attendants are employed to pump fuel for customers at service stations. Attendants refuel vehicles with various octane unleaded fuel, lead-replacement petrol and diesel fuel, on a daily basis. Attendants are at risk to adverse health effects associated with the inhalation of volatile organic compounds released from these fuels. The pollutants released include benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes (BTEX, which are significant due to their high level of toxicity. In this study, a risk assessment of BTEX was conducted at a diesel service station for public buses. Using Radiello passive samplers, it was found that benzene concentrations were above recommended international standards. Due to poor ventilation and high exposure duration, the average benzene concentration over the sampling campaign exceeded the US Environmental Protection Agency’s chronic inhalation exposure reference concentration. Lifetime cancer risk estimation showed that on average there is a 3.78 × 10−4 cancer risk, corresponding to an average chronic daily intake of 1.38 × 10−3 mg/kg/day of benzene exposure. Additionally, there were incidences where individuals were at potential hazard risk of benzene and toluene that may pose non-carcinogenic effects to employees.

  14. Models for the sorption of volatile organic compounds by diesel soot and atmospheric aerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atapattu, Sanka N; Poole, Colin F

    2009-04-01

    The solvation parameter model is used to characterize interactions responsible for the sorption of varied organic compounds by diesel soot and atmospheric aerosols at 15 degrees C and 50% relative humidity. Individual models are obtained for eight aerosol samples characterized as urban, suburban, rural and coastal. Combining the individual aerosol models resulted in a general aerosol model with only a minor loss of modeling power for alkanecarboxylic acids and low-molecular weight alcohols compared with the individual models. A second group of compounds identified as weak nitrogen-containing bases were consistent outliers to all models most likely due to participation in ion-exchange interactions not considered by the models. The diesel soot and atmospheric aerosols exhibit similar characteristics with respect to their sorption interactions although differences in relative magnitude allow the two particle types to be easily distinguished. Sorption interactions are favored by strong dispersion interactions for both particle types. Of note is the strong hydrogen-bond basicity and relatively weak hydrogen-bond acidity of these materials. The particles are quite dipolar/polarizable and slightly electron lone pair repulsive. The sorption properties of the atmospheric aerosols are influenced by the relative humidity, in particular, the aerosols become significantly more hydrogen-bond acidic at high relative humidity most likely due to incorporation of increasing amounts of condensed or film water in the aerosol phase. Dividing the data into training and test sets suggests that the proposed models are capable of estimating distribution constants (log K) to about 0.20 log units for diesel soot (n = 84) and 0.14 log units for the general atmospheric aerosol model (n = 385) where n indicates the number of compounds included in the model.

  15. Experimental investigation on regulated and unregulated emissions of a diesel/methanol compound combustion engine with and without diesel oxidation catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z H; Cheung, C S; Chan, T L; Yao, C D

    2010-01-15

    The use of methanol in combination with diesel fuel is an effective measure to reduce particulate matter (PM) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions from in-use diesel vehicles. In this study, a diesel/methanol compound combustion (DMCC) scheme was proposed and a 4-cylinder naturally-aspirated direct-injection diesel engine modified to operate on the proposed combustion scheme. The effect of DMCC and diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) on the regulated emissions of total hydrocarbons (THC), carbon monoxide (CO), NOx and PM was investigated based on the Japanese 13 Mode test cycle. Certain unregulated emissions, including methane, ethyne, ethene, 1,3-butadiene, BTX (benzene, toluene, xylene), unburned methanol and formaldehyde were also evaluated based on the same test cycle. In addition, the soluble organic fraction (SOF) in the particulate and the particulate number concentration and size distribution were investigated at certain selected modes of operation. The results show that the DMCC scheme can effectively reduce NOx, particulate mass and number concentrations, ethyne, ethene and 1,3-butadiene emissions but significantly increase the emissions of THC, CO, NO(2), BTX, unburned methanol, formaldehyde, and the proportion of SOF in the particles. After the DOC, the emission of THC, CO, NO(2), as well as the unregulated gaseous emissions, can be significantly reduced when the exhaust gas temperature is sufficiently high while the particulate mass concentration is further reduced due to oxidation of the SOF. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Degradation of Chlorinated Aromatic Compounds in UASB Reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Nina; Hendriksen, Hanne Vang; Järvinen, Kimmo T.

    1995-01-01

    Data on anaerobic degradation of chloroaromatic compounds in Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket Reactors (UASB-reactor) are presented and compared. Special attention is given to the metabolic pathways for degradation of chlorinated phenols by granular sludge. Results indicate that PCP can be degraded...... in UASB-reactors via stepwise dechlorination to phenol. Phenol will subsequently be converted to benzoate before ring cleavage. Dechlorination proceeds via different pathways dependent upon the inocula used. Results are further presented on the design of special metabolic pathways in granules which do...

  17. Graphene and graphene nanocomposites for the removal of aromatic organic compounds from the water: systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsores Paixão, Monique; Tadeu Gomes Vianna, Marco; Marques, Marcia

    2018-01-01

    Aromatic organic pollutants are highly toxic to the human and environmental health and are considered as priority pollutants by regulatory agencies. Managing contaminated sites with organic pollutants is one of the major environmental challenges today. Of all technologies that have been proposed to remove contaminants, adsorption is recognized worldwide as an attractive option due to its versatility, wide applicability and economic viability. Recent studies report the use of graphene (GN), a recently carbon nanomaterial, and its derivatives in sorption processes for the removal of aromatic organic compounds. The present review has shown that GN structures are a promising alternative to traditional adsorbent materials, with excellent results in the removal of organic compounds from water, due to their unique structural characteristics and great adsorption capacity for organic compounds. Although, there is still a long way to go until that practical applications can be implemented.

  18. The biological in vitro effect and selectivity of aromatic dicationic compounds on Trypanosoma cruzi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane França da Silva

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma cruzi is a parasite that causes Chagas disease, which affects millions of individuals in endemic areas of Latin America. One hundred years after the discovery of Chagas disease, it is still considered a neglected illness because the available drugs are unsatisfactory. Aromatic compounds represent an important class of DNA minor groove-binding ligands that exhibit potent antimicrobial activity. This study focused on the in vitro activity of 10 aromatic dicationic compounds against bloodstream trypomastigotes and intracellular forms of T. cruzi. Our data demonstrated that these compounds display trypanocidal effects against both forms of the parasite and that seven out of the 10 compounds presented higher anti-parasitic activity against intracellular parasites compared with the bloodstream forms. Additional assays to determine the potential toxicity to mammalian cells showed that the majority of the dicationic compounds did not considerably decrease cellular viability. Fluorescent microscopy analysis demonstrated that although all compounds were localised to a greater extent within the kinetoplast than the nucleus, no correlation could be found between compound activity and kDNA accumulation. The present results stimulate further investigations of this class of compounds for the rational design of new chemotherapeutic agents for Chagas disease.

  19. Interaction of cadmium(2) trifluoroacetate with activated aromatic compounds: a new reaction of direct metallation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boev, V.I.; Denisov, S.P.; Moskalenko, A.I.; Stamova, L.G.; Gulin, A.V.

    2000-01-01

    Interaction of cadmium trifluoroacetate with aniline, 4-bromo-aniline, indole and benzimidazole was studied to develop a simple method for synthesizing cadmium organic compounds by direct electrophilic metallation of aromatic compounds. It is shown that heating of the reagents in anhydrous ethanol for several hours or without a solvent at 100-120 deg C for 5-10 min with subsequent treatment of the reacting mass by sodium chloride involves formation of the relevant cadmium organic compounds. The substances prepared were characterized by the methods of element analysis, IR and 1 H NMR spectroscopy [ru

  20. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and diesel engine emission (elemental carbon) inside a car and a subway train.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fromme, H; Oddoy, A; Piloty, M; Krause, M; Lahrz, T

    1998-06-30

    Significant concentrations of potentially harmful substances can be present in the interior of vehicles. The main sources of PAHs and elemental carbon (EC) inside a car are likely to be combustion emissions, especially from coal and traffic. The same sources can also be important for the interior of a subway train for which there are specific sources in the tunnel system, for example diesel engines. Twice, in summer 1995 and winter 1996 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and diesel motor emission (estimated as elemental carbon) were determined in the interior of a car (a 2-year-old VW Golf with a three-way catalytic converter) and in the passenger compartment of a subway train (below ground). On each sampling day (in total 16 daily measurements in the car and 16 in the subway) the substances were determined in the breathing zone of the passengers from 07:00 h to 16:00 h under different meteorologic conditions (winter- and summertime). The car followed the route of the subway from the western Berlin borough of Spandau to the south-eastern borough of Neukölln, and back. The sampling represented a realistic exposure model for driving in a high traffic and polluted urban area. The electric subway train (also 2 years in use) connected the same parts of Berlin (31 km underground). The mean values obtained during the two measurement periods (summer/winter) inside the car were 1.0 and 3.2 ng/m3 for benzo[a]pyrene, 10.2 and 28.7 ng/m3 for total-measured-PAHs, 14.1 and 8.2 micrograms/m3 for EC and in the subway 0.7 and 4.0 ng/m3 for benzol[a]pyrene, 30.2 and 67.5 ng/m3 for total PAHs, 109 and 6.9 micrograms/m3 for EC. A comparison between subway and car exposures shows significantly higher concentrations of PAHs in the subway train, which can be explained by relatively high concentrations of fluoranthene and pyrene in the subway. So far a satisfactory explanation has not been found, but one source might be the wooden railway ties which were formerly preserved with tar

  1. DEGRADATION OF AROMATIC COMPOUNDS USING MOVING BED BIOFILM REACTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Ayati, H. Ganjidoust, M. Mir Fattah

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available For biological treatment of water, there are many different biofilm systems in use. Examples of them are trickling filters, rotating biological contactors, fixed media submerged biofilters, granular media biofilters and fluidized bed reactors. They all have their advantages and disadvantages. Hence, the Moving Bed Biofilm Reactor process was developed in Norway in the late 1980s and early 1990s to adopt the best features of the activated sludge process as well as those of the biofilter processes, without including the worst. Two cylindrical moving bed biofilm reactors were used in this study working in upflow stream conditions. Experiments have been done in aerobic batch flow regime. Laboratory experiments were conducted at room temperature (23–28C and synthetic wastewater comprising a composition of phenol and hydroquinone in each reactor as the main organic constituents, plus balanced nutrients and alkalinity were used to feed the reactor. The ratio of influent to effluent COD was determined at different retention times. The results indicated that the removal efficiency of each selected compound is affected by the detention time. At low phenol and hydroquinone concentration (from 700 to 1000 mg/L maximum removal efficiency (over 80 % was obtained. By further increasing in COD loading rate up to 3000 mg/L, a decrease in COD removal rate was occurred. In the reactor containing pyrogallol in COD of 1500 mg/L, the removal rate decreased to 10 percent because of its toxicity for microorganisms.

  2. Analysis of preference for carbon source utilization among three strains of aromatic compounds degrading Pseudomonas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karishma, M; Trivedi, Vikas D; Choudhary, Alpa; Mhatre, Akanksha; Kambli, Pranita; Desai, Jinal; Phale, Prashant S

    2015-10-01

    Soil isolates Pseudomonas putida CSV86, Pseudomonas aeruginosa PP4 and Pseudomonas sp. C5pp degrade naphthalene, phthalate isomers and carbaryl, respectively. Strain CSV86 displayed a diauxic growth pattern on phenylpropanoid compounds (veratraldehyde, ferulic acid, vanillin or vanillic acid) plus glucose with a distinct second lag-phase. The glucose concentration in the medium remained constant with higher cell respiration rates on aromatics and maximum protocatechuate 3,4-dioxygenase activity in the first log-phase, which gradually decreased in the second log-phase with concomitant depletion of the glucose. In strains PP4 and C5pp, growth profile and metabolic studies suggest that glucose is utilized in the first log-phase with the repression of utilization of aromatics (phthalate or carbaryl). All three strains utilize benzoate via the catechol 'ortho' ring-cleavage pathway. On benzoate plus glucose, strain CSV86 showed preference for benzoate over glucose in contrast to strains PP4 and C5pp. Additionally, organic acids like succinate were preferred over aromatics in strains PP4 and C5pp, whereas strain CSV86 co-metabolizes them. Preferential utilization of aromatics over glucose and co-metabolism of organic acids and aromatics are found to be unique properties of P. putida CSV86 as compared with strains PP4 and C5pp and this property of strain CSV86 can be exploited for effective bioremediation. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved.

  3. Effect of B20 and Low Aromatic Diesel on Transit Bus NOx Emissions Over Driving Cycles with a Range of Kinetic Intensity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lammert, M. P.; McCormick, R. L.; Sindler, P.; Williams, A.

    2012-10-01

    Oxides of nitrogen (NOx) emissions for transit buses for up to five different fuels and three standard transit duty cycles were compared to establish whether there is a real-world biodiesel NOx increase for transit bus duty cycles and engine calibrations. Six buses representing the majority of the current national transit fleet and including hybrid and selective catalyst reduction systems were tested on a heavy-duty chassis dynamometer with certification diesel, certification B20 blend, low aromatic (California Air Resources Board) diesel, low aromatic B20 blend, and B100 fuels over the Manhattan, Orange County and UDDS test cycles. Engine emissions certification level had the dominant effect on NOx; kinetic intensity was the secondary driving factor. The biodiesel effect on NOx emissions was not statistically significant for most buses and duty cycles for blends with certification diesel, except for a 2008 model year bus. CARB fuel had many more instances of a statistically significant effect of reducing NOx. SCR systems proved effective at reducing NOx to near the detection limit on all duty cycles and fuels, including B100. While offering a fuel economy benefit, a hybrid system significantly increased NOx emissions over a same year bus with a conventional drivetrain and the same engine.

  4. Comparison of pressurized fluid extraction, Soxhlet extraction and sonication for the determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in urban air and diesel exhaust particulate matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rynö, M; Rantanen, L; Papaioannou, E; Konstandopoulos, A G; Koskentalo, T; Savela, K

    2006-04-01

    In order to characterize and compare the chemical composition of diesel particulate matter and ambient air samples collected on filters, different extraction procedures were tested and their extraction efficiencies and recoveries determined. This study is an evaluation of extraction methods using the standard 16 EPA PAHs with HPLC fluorescence analysis. Including LC analysis also GC and MS methods for the determination of PAHs can be used. Soxhlet extraction was compared with ultrasonic agitation and pressurized fluid extraction (PFE) using three solvents to extract PAHs from diesel exhaust and urban air particulates. The selected PAH compounds of soluble organic fractions were analyzed by HPLC with a multiple wavelength shift fluorescence detector. The EPA standard mixture of 16 PAH compounds was used as a standard to identify and quantify diesel exhaust-derived PAHs. The most effective extraction method of those tested was pressurized fluid extraction using dichloromethane as a solvent.

  5. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in exhaust emissions from diesel engines powered by rapeseed oil methylester and heated non-esterified rapeseed oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vojtisek-Lom, Michal; Czerwinski, Jan; Leníček, Jan; Sekyra, Milan; Topinka, Jan

    2012-12-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) of exhaust emissions were studied in four direct-injection turbocharged four-cylinder diesel engines, with power ratings of 90-136 kW. The engines were operated on biodiesel (B-100), a blend of 30% biodiesel in diesel fuel (B-30), and heated rapeseed oil (RO) in two independent laboratories. Diesel particle filters (DPF) and selective catalytic reduction (SCR) systems were used with B-30 and B-100. Concentrations of individual PAHs sampled in different substrates (quartz, borosilicate fiber and fluorocarbon membrane filters, polyurethane foam) were analyzed using different methods. Benzo[a]pyrene toxic equivalents (BaP TEQ) were calculated using different sets of toxic equivalency factors (TEF). Operation on B-100 without aftertreatment devices, compared to diesel fuel, yielded a mean reduction in PAHs of 73%, consistent across engines and among TEF used. A lower PAH reduction was obtained using B-30. The BaP TEQ reductions on DPF were 91-99% using B-100, for one non-catalyzed DPF, and over 99% in all other cases. The BaP TEQ for heated RO were higher than those for B-100 and one half lower to over twice as high as that of diesel fuel. B-100 and RO samples featured, compared to diesel fuel, a relatively high share of higher molecular weight PAH and a relatively low share of lighter PAHs. Using different sets of TEF or different detection methods did not consistently affect the observed effect of fuels on BaP TEQ. The compilation of multiple tests was helpful for discerning emerging patterns. The collection of milligrams of particulate matter per sample was generally needed for quantification of all individual PAHs.

  6. Biodegradation of oil- and creosote-related aromatic compounds under nitrate-reducing conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flyvbjerg, J.; Arvin, E.; Jensen, B.K.; Olsen, S.K.

    1991-01-01

    Oil- and creosote-contaminated groundwater typically contains a complex mixture of phenolic compounds, aromatic hydrocarbons with one to three rings, and nitrogen, sulphur, and oxygen-containing heterocyclic compounds. It is well established that most of these chemicals are easily biodegraded in the presence of oxygen, but comparatively little is known about their biodegradability under anaerobic conditions. However, the past 10 years have seen an increasing interest in the potential of nitrate- reducing bacteria for pollutant destruction. This is because nitrate-reducing redox conditions often exist between the aerobic and strictly anaerobic zones in polluted aquifers, and because the addition of nitrate to contaminated sites would be a feasibly in situ technique due to the low cost and high solubility of this electron acceptor. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the potential for biodegradation of phenols and aromatic hydrocarbons in creosote-contaminated groundwater during nitrate-reducing conditions

  7. Electro-organic Nuclear Oxidation: Methoxylation of Aromatic Compounds at Platinum Electrode

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Sanjeev

    2011-01-01

    The anodic oxidation of aromatic compounds was carried out at controlled potential in the non aqueous methanol-KOH system for the purpose of investigating this type of anodic reaction as a new possible synthetic method. The electroorganic nuclear oxidation was carried out at controlled potential electrolysis in a conventional three electrode cell assembly with platinum plate working as well as counter electrode and saturated calomel electrode as reference electrode. Controlled potential elect...

  8. Using urinary biomarkers of polycyclic aromatic compound exposure to guide exposure-reduction strategies among asphalt paving workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClean, Michael D; Osborn, Linda V; Snawder, John E; Olsen, Larry D; Kriech, Anthony J; Sjödin, Andreas; Li, Zheng; Smith, Jerome P; Sammons, Deborah L; Herrick, Robert F; Cavallari, Jennifer M

    2012-11-01

    Paving workers are exposed to polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs) while working with hot-mix asphalt (HMA). Further characterization of the source and route of these exposures is necessary to guide exposure-reduction strategies. Personal air (n=144), hand-wash (n=144), and urine (n=480) samples were collected from 12 paving workers over 3 workdays during 4 workweeks. Urine samples were collected at preshift, postshift, and bedtime and analyzed for 10 hydroxylated PACs (1-OH-pyrene; 1-, 2-, 3-, 4-OH-phenanthrene; 1-, 2-OH-naphthalene; 2-, 3-, 9-OH-fluorene) by an immunochemical quantification of PACs (I-PACs). The air and hand-wash samples were analyzed for the parent compounds corresponding to the urinary analytes. Using a crossover study design, each of the 4 weeks represented a different exposure scenario: a baseline week (normal conditions), a dermal protection week (protective clothing), a powered air-purifying respirator (PAPR) week, and a biodiesel substitution week (100% biodiesel provided to replace the diesel oil normally used by workers to clean tools and equipment). The urinary analytes were analyzed using linear mixed-effects models. Postshift and bedtime concentrations were significantly higher than preshift concentrations for most urinary biomarkers. Compared with baseline, urinary analytes were reduced during the dermal protection (29% for 1-OH-pyrene, 15% for I-PACs), the PAPR (24% for 1-OH-pyrene, 15% for I-PACs), and the biodiesel substitution (15% for 1-OH-pyrene) weeks. The effect of PACs in air was different by exposure scenario (biodiesel substitution>dermal protection>PAPR and baseline) and was still a significant predictor of most urinary analytes during the week of PAPR use, suggesting that PACs in air were dermally absorbed. The application temperature of HMA was positively associated with urinary measures, such that an increase from the lowest application temperature (121°C) to the highest (154°C) was associated with a 72% increase in

  9. Dramatic Influence of Ionic Liquid and Ultrasound Irradiation on the Electrophilic Sulfinylation of Aromatic Compounds by Sulfinic Esters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Ngoc-Lan Thi; Vo, Hong-Thom; Duus, Fritz

    2017-01-01

    The sulfinylation reaction of aromatic and hetero-aromatic compounds with sulfinic esters as electrophiles has been investigated in different ionic liquids and by means of different Lewis acid salts in order to get moderate to good yields of asymmetrical sulfoxides. Mixtures of 1-butyl-3...

  10. Correlations and adsorption mechanisms of aromatic compounds on a high heat temperature treated bamboo biochar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Kun; Yang, Jingjing; Jiang, Yuan; Wu, Wenhao; Lin, Daohui

    2016-01-01

    Adsorption of aromatic compounds, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, nitrobenzenes, phenols, and anilines, on a bamboo biochar produced at 700 °C (Ba700) was investigated with the mechanism discussion by isotherm fitting using the Polanyi-theory based Dubinin–Ashtakhov (DA) model. Correlations of adsorption capacity (Q 0 ) of organic compounds with their molecular sizes and melting points, as well as correlations of adsorption affinity (E) with their solvatochromic parameters (i.e., π* and α m ), on the biochar, were developed and indicating that adsorption is captured by the pore filling mechanism and derived from the hydrophobic effects of organic compounds and the forming of π-π electron donor-acceptor (EDA) interactions and hydrogen bonding interactions of organic molecules with surface sites of the biochar. The effects of organic molecular sizes and melting points on adsorption capacity are ascribed to the molecular sieving effect and the packing efficiency of the organic molecules in the biochar pores, respectively. These correlations can be used to quantitatively estimate the adsorption of organic compounds on biochars from their commonly physicochemical properties including solvatochromic parameters, melting points and molecular cross-sectional area. The prediction using these correlations is important for assessing the unknown adsorption behaviors of new organic compounds and also helpful to guide the surface modification of biochars and make targeted selection in the environmental applications of biochars as adsorbents. - Highlights: • Adsorption of organic chemicals on biochars are captured by pore filling mechanism. • Adsorption is derived from Van der Waals force, π-π EDA and H-bonding interactions. • Adsorption capacity is negatively correlated with organic molecular sizes/melting points. • Adsorption capacity is restricted by molecular sieving effect and packing efficiency. • Adsorption affinity has a LSER with chemical

  11. A New Aromatic Compound from the Stem Bark of Terminalia catappa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pertuit, David; Mitaine-Offer, Anne-Claire; Miyamoto, Tomofumi; Tanaka, Chiaki; Delemasure, Stéphanie; Dutartre, Patrick; Lacaille-Dubois, Marie-Aleth

    2015-06-01

    A new aromatic compound 3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl-1-O-(4-sulfo)-β-D-glucopyranoside (1), in addition to two triterpenoid saponins (chebuloside II, arjunoglucoside II), two triterpenes (arjunolic acid and 3-betulinic acid) and sitosterol-3-O-β-D-glucopyranoside have been isolated from the barks of Terminalia catappa. Their structures have been established on the basis of spectroscopic techniques (1D/2D NMR) and MS. Their cytotoxicity and antiinflammatory activity, together with the antioxidant capacity of compound 1 were also evaluated.

  12. Electro-organic Nuclear Oxidation: Methoxylation of Aromatic Compounds at Platinum Electrode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjeev Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The anodic oxidation of aromatic compounds was carried out at controlled potential in the non aqueous methanol-KOH system for the purpose of investigating this type of anodic reaction as a new possible synthetic method. The electroorganic nuclear oxidation was carried out at controlled potential electrolysis in a conventional three electrode cell assembly with platinum plate working as well as counter electrode and saturated calomel electrode as reference electrode. Controlled potential electrolysis was carried out in the solvent methanol and the supporting electrolyte in caustic potash. All the spectral and analytical data were found in good agreement with the synthesized compounds.

  13. Relationship between room temperature phosphorescence and deuteration position in a purely aromatic compound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, S.; Totani, K.; Watanabe, T.; Kaji, H.; Vacha, M.

    2014-01-01

    The development of organometallic and purely organic compounds showing room temperature phosphorescence (RTP) has several promising applications. We report a relationship between the phosphorescence characteristics and deuteration position in a purely organic aromatic compound. Hydrogen-deuterium exchange at the carbons where the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital is located is the most effective method to enhance the RTP lifetime and quantum yield. The increase in RTP lifetime comes from a decrease in the Franck-Condon factor while the enhancement of RTP yield is caused by an increase in intersystem crossing from the lowest singlet excited state to the lowest triplet excited state.

  14. Investigation of aromatic compound degradation under atmospheric conditions in the outdoor simulation chamber SAPHIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehr, Sascha; Bohn, Birger; Rohrer, Franz; Tillmann, Ralf; Wegener, Robert; Dorn, Hans-Peter; Häseler, Rolf; Brauers, Theo; Wahner, Andreas

    2010-05-01

    Ozone is produced in the lower troposphere by the OH-initiated photooxidation of volatile organic compounds in the presence of NOx. Aromatic hydrocarbons from anthropogenic sources are a major contributor to the OH-reactivity and thus to ozone formation in urban areas [1]. Moreover, their degradation leads to formation of secondary organic aerosol. Aromatic compounds are therefore important trace constituents with regard to air quality. We will present the results of photooxidation experiments which were conducted in the atmospheric simulation chamber SAPHIR at Forschungszentrum Jülich. The experiments were designed to investigate the degradation mechanisms of benzene and p-xylene, which are among the most abundant aromatics in urban air samples. Benzene and p-xylene were selected because they have high structural symmetry which limits the number of potential isomers of secondary products. The experiments were performed under low-NOx-conditions (≤ 2 ppb). SAPHIR was equipped with instruments for the measurement of the parent aromatics and their major oxidation products, OH radicals, important radical precursors (O3, HONO, HCHO), photolysis frequencies and particulate matter. As shown in previous studies, simulation chamber data from the photooxidation of aromatics cannot be explained satisfactorily with current photochemistry mechanisms. For example the MCMv3.1 tends to overestimate the ozone-concentration and to underestimate the OH-concentration [2]. In this study, we will contrast model calculations with experimental results to check if similar discrepancies can be observed in SAPHIR and how they can be resolved. Based on the results of this preparatory study, further simulation chamber experiments with special emphasis on the radical budget are scheduled in 2010. References: [1] J. G. Calvert, R. Atkinson, K.H. Becker, R.M. Kamens, J.H. Seinfeld, T.J. Wallington, G. Yarwood: The mechanisms of atmospheric oxidation of aromatic hydrocarbons, Oxford University

  15. An Evaluation of Uncertainty Associated to Analytical Measurements of Selected Polycyclic Aromatic Compounds in Ambient Air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrado, A. I.; Garcia, S.; Perez, R. M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an evaluation of uncertainty associated to analytical measurement of eighteen polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs) in ambient air by liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection (HPLC/FD). The study was focused on analyses of PM 1 0, PM 2 .5 and gas phase fractions. Main analytical uncertainty was estimated for eleven polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), four nitro polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (nitro-PAHs) and two hydroxy polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (OH-PAHs) based on the analytical determination, reference material analysis and extraction step. Main contributions reached 15-30% and came from extraction process of real ambient samples, being those for nitro- PAHs the highest (20-30%). Range and mean concentration of PAC mass concentrations measured in gas phase and PM 1 0/PM 2 .5 particle fractions during a full year are also presented. Concentrations of OH-PAHs were about 2-4 orders of magnitude lower than their parent PAHs and comparable to those sparsely reported in literature. (Author)

  16. The formation of quasi-alicyclic rings in alkyl-aromatic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straka, Pavel; Buryan, Petr; Bičáková, Olga

    2018-02-01

    The alkyl side chains of n-alkyl phenols, n-alkyl benzenes and n-alkyl naphthalenes are cyclised, as demonstrated by GC measurements, FTIR spectroscopy and molecular mechanics calculations. Cyclisation occurs due to the intramolecular interaction between an aromatic ring (-δ) and a hydrogen of the terminal methyl group (+δ) of an alkyl chain. In fact, conventional molecules are not aliphatic-aromatic, but quasi-alicyclic-aromatic. With the aromatic molecules formed with a quasi-alicyclic ring, the effect of van der Waals attractive forces increases not only intramolecularly but also intermolecularly. This effect is strong in molecules with propyl and higher alkyl substituents. The increase of intermolecular van der Waals attractive forces results in bi-linearity in the GC retention time of the compounds in question, observed in the dependence of the logarithm of the relative retention time on the number of carbons in a molecule in both polar and nonpolar stationary phases with both capillary and packed columns. The role of van der Waals forces has been demonstrated using the potential energies of covalent and noncovalent interactions for 2-n-alkyl phenols, n-alkyl benzenes and 1-n-alkyl- and 2-n-alkyl naphthalenes.

  17. Purification, partial characterization, and reactivity with aromatic compounds of two laccases from Marasmius quercophilus strain 17.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnet, A M; Criquet, S; Tagger, S; Gil, G; Le Petit, J

    2000-03-01

    Two isozymes of laccase were obtained from an induced liquid culture of Marasmius quercophilus with p-hydroxybenzoic acid as the inducer. Both the constitutive and the induced isozyme have a molecular mass of 60 kDa as determined by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Using isoelectric focusing, we found three isozymes with the constitutive enzyme (pI 4, 4.2, 4.4) and four of the induced form (pI 4.75, 4.85, 4.95, 5.1). We observed certain differences between these two isozymes; the specific activity of the induced isozyme was twice as high, and two optimum pH levels (5 and 6) were observed with the induced isozyme (only one, pH 5, for the constitutive isozyme). However, both of these enzymes have the same thermal stability and the same temperature for their highest activity (80 degrees C). Furthermore, the reactivity of both these enzymes with aromatic compounds was similar. The use of mediators extended the oxidized substrate range of the laccases studied. Various products of degradation were observed, depending on the mediator used. When laccase was used alone, the decrease of the signal corresponding to the aromatic cycle, without any formations of other peaks at different wavelengths, suggested polymerisation of aromatic compounds.

  18. Enhancing trichloroethylene degradation using non-aromatic compounds as growth substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seungjin; Hwang, Jeongmin; Chung, Jinwook; Bae, Wookeun

    2014-06-30

    The effect of non-aromatic compounds on the trichloroethylene (TCE) degradation of toluene-oxidizing bacteria were evaluated using Burkholderia cepacia G4 that expresses toluene 2-monooxygenase and Pseudomonas putida that expresses toluene dioxygenase. TCE degradation rates for B. cepacia G4 and P. putida with toluene alone as growth substrate were 0.144 and 0.123 μg-TCE/mg-protein h, respectively. When glucose, acetate and ethanol were fed as additional growth substrates, those values increased up to 0.196, 0.418 and 0.530 μg-TCE/mg-protein h, respectively for B. cepacia G4 and 0.319, 0.219 and 0.373 μg-TCE/mg-protein h, respectively for P. putida. In particular, the addition of ethanol resulted in a high TCE degradation rate regardless of the initial concentration. The use of a non-aromatic compound as an additional substrate probably enhanced the TCE degradation because of the additional supply of NADH that is consumed in co-metabolic degradation of TCE. Also, it is expected that the addition of a non-aromatic substrate can reduce the necessary dose of toluene and, subsequently, minimize the potential competitive inhibition upon TCE co-metabolism by toluene. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Comparison of UV irradiation and p-fluorphenylaline as selective agents for production of aromatic compounds in plant cell culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quesnel, A.A.; Ellis, B.E.

    1989-01-01

    Resistance to UV irradiation, and to the toxicity of p-fluorophenylalanine, can both be mediateted in plants by enhanced synthesis of aromatic compounds. These selective agents were applied to cell cultures of Nicotiana tabacum, Anchusa officinalis and Catharanthus roseur, and the production of aromatic metabolites in the resulting resistant lines of each species was compared. While Nicotiana and Anchusa cultures responded to each selective agent ith an enhanced accumulation of aromatic compounds, the Catharanthus cultures acquired resistance through other, unknown, mechanisms. Some degree of cross-resistance was observed between cultures selected individually for resistance to each agent (author). 26 refs.; 2 figs.; 1 tab

  20. Reusable and Efficient Polystryrene-supported Acidic Ionic Liquid Catalyst for Mononitration of Aromatic Compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Li Xia; Ling, Qi Long; Liu, Zu Liang; Xing, Xiao Dong; Zhu, Xiao Qin; Meng, Xiao [Nanjing Univ. of Science and Technology, Nanjing (China)

    2012-10-15

    A series of polystyrene-supported 1-(propyl-3-sulfonate)-3-methyl-imidazolium hydrosulfate acidic ionic liquid (PS-[SO{sub 3}H-PMIM][HSO{sub 4}]) catalysts were prepared and tested for mononitration of simple aromatics compounds with nitric acid. It was found that the reactivity of the catalysts increased with increasing [SO{sub 3}HPMIM][HSO{sub 4}] content. The para-selectivity was not only related to the [SO{sub 3}H-PMIM][HSO{sub 4}] content but also the substituent groups in aromatics. A reaction mechanism of nitration over this new catalyst was proposed. The catalytic activity of this catalyst decreased slightly after fifth runs in the synthesis of nitrotoluene.

  1. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH) and Their Genotoxicity in Exhaust Emissions from a Diesel Engine during Extended Low-Load Operation on Diesel and Biodiesel Fuels

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vojtisek-Lom, M.; Pechout, M.; Dittrich, L.; Beránek, V.; Kotek, M.; Schwarz, Jaroslav; Vodička, Petr; Milcová, Alena; Rössnerová, Andrea; Ambrož, Antonín; Topinka, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 109, MAY 2015 (2015), s. 9-18 ISSN 1352-2310 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-01438S Institutional support: RVO:67985858 ; RVO:68378041 Keywords : biodiesel * diesel particulate matter * DNA adducts Subject RIV: DN - Health Impact of the Environment Quality Impact factor: 3.459, year: 2015

  2. Potential aromatic compounds as markers to differentiate between Tuber melanosporum and Tuber indicum truffles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culleré, Laura; Ferreira, Vicente; Venturini, María E; Marco, Pedro; Blanco, Domingo

    2013-11-01

    The Tuber indicum (Chinese truffle) and Tuber melanosporum (Black truffle) species are morphologically very similar but their aromas are very different. The black truffle aroma is much more intense and complex, and it is consequently appreciated more gastronomically. This work tries to determine whether the differences between the aromatic compounds of both species are sufficiently significant so as to apply them to fraud detection. An olfactometric evaluation (GC-O) of T. indicum was carried out for the first time. Eight important odorants were identified. In order of aromatic significance, these were: 1-octen-3-one and 1-octen-3-ol, followed by two ethyl esters (ethyl isobutyrate and ethyl 2-methylbutyrate), 3-methyl-1-butanol, isopropyl acetate, and finally the two sulfides dimethyldisulfide (DMDS) and dimethylsulfide (DMS). A comparison of this aromatic profile with that of T. melanosporum revealed the following differences: T. indicum stood out for the significant aromatic contribution of 1-octen-3-one and 1-octen-3-ol (with modified frequencies (MF%) of 82% and 69%, respectively), while in the case of T. melanosporum both had modified frequencies of less than 30%. Ethyl isobutyrate, ethyl 2-methylbutyrate and isopropyl acetate were also significantly higher, while DMS and DMDS had low MF (30-40%) compared to T. melanosporum (>70%). The volatile profiles of both species were also studied by means of headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME-GC-MS). This showed that the family of C8 compounds (3-octanone, octanal, 1-octen-3-one, 3-octanol and 1-octen-3-ol) is present in T. indicum at much higher levels. The presence of 1-octen-3-ol was higher by a factor of about 100, while 1-octen-3-one was detected in T. indicum only (there was no chromatographic signal in T. melanosporum). As well as showing the greatest chromatographic differences, these two compounds were also the most powerful from the aromatic viewpoint in the T. indicum olfactometry. Therefore

  3. Bioactive compounds derived from the yeast metabolism of aromatic amino acids during alcoholic fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mas, Albert; Guillamon, Jose Manuel; Torija, Maria Jesus; Beltran, Gemma; Cerezo, Ana B; Troncoso, Ana M; Garcia-Parrilla, M Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Metabolites resulting from nitrogen metabolism in yeast are currently found in some fermented beverages such as wine and beer. Their study has recently attracted the attention of researchers. Some metabolites derived from aromatic amino acids are bioactive compounds that can behave as hormones or even mimic their role in humans and may also act as regulators in yeast. Although the metabolic pathways for their formation are well known, the physiological significance is still far from being understood. The understanding of this relevance will be a key element in managing the production of these compounds under controlled conditions, to offer fermented food with specific enrichment in these compounds or even to use the yeast as nutritional complements.

  4. Bioactive Compounds Derived from the Yeast Metabolism of Aromatic Amino Acids during Alcoholic Fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Mas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolites resulting from nitrogen metabolism in yeast are currently found in some fermented beverages such as wine and beer. Their study has recently attracted the attention of researchers. Some metabolites derived from aromatic amino acids are bioactive compounds that can behave as hormones or even mimic their role in humans and may also act as regulators in yeast. Although the metabolic pathways for their formation are well known, the physiological significance is still far from being understood. The understanding of this relevance will be a key element in managing the production of these compounds under controlled conditions, to offer fermented food with specific enrichment in these compounds or even to use the yeast as nutritional complements.

  5. Aromatic compounds from the halotolerant fungal strain of Wallemia sebi PXP-89 in a hypersaline medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xiao-Ping; Wang, Yi; Liu, Pei-Pei; Hong, Kui; Chen, Hao; Yin, Xia; Zhu, Wei-Ming

    2011-06-01

    A new cyclopentanopyridine alkaloid, 3-hydroxy-5-methyl-5,6-dihydro-7H-cyclopenta[b]pyridin-7-one (1), together with 11 known aromatic compounds were isolated from the secondary metabolites of the halotolerant fungal strain Wallemia sebi PXP-89 in 10% NaCl. Their structures including the absolute configurations of (2S,3S)-1-(4-hydroxyphenyl)butane-2,3-diol (2), (2R,3S)-1-(4-hydroxyphenyl)butane-2,3-diol (3), and (S)-3-hydroxy-4-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-2-one (4) were elucidated by spectroscopic analysis and a modified Mosher's method. Compound 1 exhibited antimicrobial activity against Enterobacter aerogenes with a MIC of 76.7 μM. The absolute configurations of compounds 2-4 were determined for the first time.

  6. Analysis and evaluation of compounds from Cichorium intybus aromatic water trade market samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hosseini*

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Cichorium intybus products are one of the best sellers in market Because of their effect on treatment of infection, poisoning, diabetes and allergy. This is the first study about Cichorium intybus market samplephytochemical compounds and the aim of this study was to define a method to recognize the original products. Methods: The sample compounds were extracted by liquid-liquid method and evaluated by GC-MS and compared with the references like Adams 2007. The obtained phytochemical data were analyzed with SPSS and classified by dendrogram method and was compared with the data earned from the standard sample. Results: Forty one compounds were detected. Carvacrol was available in all samples from 1.14 to 39.34%. Also, thymol was present in most of samples from 1.24 to 69.32%. Moreover, we understood that some compounds like pulegone, carvone, carvacrol and piperitenone could be detected in all samples mostly with different percentages. Some linear hydrocarbon was detected in this method along with some other unexpected compounds like cinnamaldehyde. Conclusion: Existence of some impure compounds like: pulegone, carvone, piperitenone and cinnamaldehyde in trade samples showed cleaning of container might not have been proper. Carvacrol and thymol are common compounds to define acceptable standard for Cichorium intybus aromatic water.

  7. National Status and Trends, Benthic Surveillance Project Fluorescent Aromatic Compounds (FAC) Data, 1984-1991, National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Status and Trends (NSandT) Benthic Surveillance Fluorescent Aromatic Compounds (FAC) file reports the trace concentrations of Fluorescent Aromatic...

  8. Predicting adsorption of aromatic compounds by carbon nanotubes based on quantitative structure property relationship principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi-Nasrabadi, Mehdi; Akhoondi, Reza; Pourmortazavi, Seied Mahdi; Ahmadi, Farhad

    2015-11-01

    Quantitative structure property relationship (QSPR) models were developed to predict the adsorption of aromatic compounds by carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Five descriptors chosen by combining self-organizing map and stepwise multiple linear regression (MLR) techniques were used to connect the structure of the studied chemicals with their adsorption descriptor (K∞) using linear and nonlinear modeling techniques. Correlation coefficient (R2) of 0.99 and root-mean square error (RMSE) of 0.29 for multilayered perceptron neural network (MLP-NN) model are signs of the superiority of the developed nonlinear model over MLR model with R2 of 0.93 and RMSE of 0.36. The results of cross-validation test showed the reliability of MLP-NN to predict the K∞ values for the aromatic contaminants. Molar volume and hydrogen bond accepting ability were found to be the factors much influencing the adsorption of the compounds. The developed QSPR, as a neural network based model, could be used to predict the adsorption of organic compounds by CNTs.

  9. Factors that influence the response of the LysR type transcriptional regulators to aromatic compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brzezinski Peter

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The transcriptional regulators DntR, NagR and NtdR have a high sequence identity and belong to the large family of LysR type transcriptional regulators (LTTRs. These three regulators are all involved in regulation of genes identified in pathways for degradation of aromatic compounds. They activate the transcription of these genes in the presence of an inducer, but the inducer specificity profiles are different. Results The results from this study show that NtdR has the broadest inducer specificity, responding to several nitro-aromatic compounds. Mutational studies of residues that differ between DntR, NagR and NtdR suggest that a number of specific residues are involved in the broader inducer specificity of NtdR when compared to DntR and NagR. The inducer response was also investigated as a function of the experimental conditions and a number of parameters such as the growth media, plasmid arrangement of the LTTR-encoding genes, promoter and gfp reporter gene, and the presence of a His6-tag were shown to affect the inducer response in E.coli DH5α. Furthermore, the response upon addition of both salicylate and 4-nitrobenzoate to the growth media was larger than the sum of responses upon addition of each of the compounds, which suggests the presence of a secondary binding site, as previously reported for other LTTRs. Conclusions Optimization of the growth conditions and gene arrangement resulted in improved responses to nitro-aromatic inducers. The data also suggests the presence of a previously unknown secondary binding site in DntR, analogous to that of BenM.

  10. Analysis of a Compound Class with Triplet States Stabilized by Potentially Baird Aromatic [10]Annulenyl Dicationic Rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorner, Kjell; Feixas, Ferran; Ayub, Rabia; Lindh, Roland; Solà, Miquel; Ottosson, Henrik

    2016-02-18

    The low-lying triplet state of a recently published compound (TMTQ) was analyzed quantum chemically in light of suggestions that it is influenced by Baird aromaticity. Two mesomeric structures describe this state: 1) a zwitterionic Baird aromatic structure with a triplet diradical 8π-electron methano[10]annulene (M10A) dicationic ring and 2) a Hückel aromatic with a neutral closed-shell 10π-electron ring. According to charge and spin density distributions, the Hückel aromatic structure dominates the triplet state (the Baird aromatic contributes at most 12 %), and separation of the aromatic fluctuation index (FLU) into α and β electron contributions emphasizes this finding. The small singlet-triplet energy gap is due to Hückel aromaticity of the M10A ring, clarified by comparison to the smaller analogues of TMTQ. Yet, TMTQ and its analogues are Hückel-Baird hybrids allowing for tuning between closed-shell 4n+2 Hückel aromaticity and open-shell 4n Baird aromaticity. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Cyclic compounds of tetracoordinated boron from 5-amino-1,2,4-triazole and aromatic nitriles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorokhov, V.A.; Amamchyan, A.R.; Bochkareva, M.N.; Teslya, I.A.; Starikova, Z.A.

    1987-01-01

    New cyclic compounds of tetracoordinated boron - dialkylboryl-[(1,2,4-triazole-5-yl)-amidinate] from 5-amino-1,2,4-triazole, aromatic nitriles and trialkylborane have been synthesized. It is shown that in dialkylboryl derivatives of 5-amino-1,2,4-triazole forming crystalline dimers, R 2 B (R=Pr, Bu) groups are bonded to circular nitrogen atoms. The X-ray diffraction method was used to determine crystalline and molecular structures of dipropylboryl-[(1,2,4-triazole-5-yl)benzamidinate

  12. Pyridine nucleotide transhydrogenases enable redox balance of Pseudomonas putida during biodegradation of aromatic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikel, Pablo I; Pérez-Pantoja, Danilo; de Lorenzo, Víctor

    2016-10-01

    The metabolic versatility of the soil bacterium Pseudomonas putida is reflected by its ability to execute strong redox reactions (e.g., mono- and di-oxygenations) on aromatic substrates. Biodegradation of aromatics occurs via the pathway encoded in the archetypal TOL plasmid pWW0, yet the effect of running such oxidative route on redox balance against the background metabolism of P. putida remains unexplored. To answer this question, the activity of pyridine nucleotide transhydrogenases (that catalyze the reversible interconversion of NADH and NADPH) was inspected under various physiological and oxidative stress regimes. The genome of P. putida KT2440 encodes a soluble transhydrogenase (SthA) and a membrane-bound, proton-pumping counterpart (PntAB). Mutant strains, lacking sthA and/or pntAB, were subjected to a panoply of genetic, biochemical, phenomic and functional assays in cells grown on customary carbon sources (e.g., citrate) versus difficult-to-degrade aromatic substrates. The results consistently indicated that redox homeostasis is compromised in the transhydrogenases-defective variant, rendering the mutant sensitive to oxidants. This metabolic deficiency was, however, counteracted by an increase in the activity of NADP + -dependent dehydrogenases in central carbon metabolism. Taken together, these observations demonstrate that transhydrogenases enable a redox-adjusting mechanism that comes into play when biodegradation reactions are executed to metabolize unusual carbon compounds. © 2016 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Antioxidant and Anti-Osteoporotic Activities of Aromatic Compounds and Sterols from Hericium erinaceum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hericium erinaceum, commonly called lion’s mane mushroom, is a traditional edible mushroom widely used in culinary applications and herbal medicines in East Asian countries. In this study, a new sterol, cerevisterol 6-cinnamate (6, was isolated from the fruiting bodies of H. erinaceum together with five aromatic compounds 1–5 and five sterols 7–11. The chemical structures of these compounds were elucidated using chemical and physical methods and comparison of HRESIMS, 1D-NMR (1H, 13C, and DEPT and 2D-NMR (COSY, HMQC, HMBC, and NOESY spectra with previously reported data. The antioxidant and anti-osteoporotic activities of extracts and the isolated compounds 1–11 were investigated. All compounds exhibited peroxyl radical-scavenging capacity but only compounds 1, 3, and 4 showed potent reducing capacity. Moreover, compounds 1, 2, 4, and 5 showed moderate effects on cellular antioxidant activity and inhibited the receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL-induced osteoclastic differentiation. These results suggested that H. erinaceum could be utilized in the development of natural antioxidant and anti-osteoporotic nutraceuticals and functional foods.

  14. Bio diesel- the Clean, Green Fuel for Diesel Engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elkareish, S.M.M.

    2004-01-01

    Natural, renewable resources such as vegetable oils, animal fats and recycled restaurant greases can be chemically transformed into clean burning bio diesel fuels (1). Just like petroleum diesel, bio diesel operates in combustion-ignition engines. Blends of up to 20% bio diesel (mixed with petroleum diesel fuels) can be used in nearly all diesel equipment and are compatible with most storage and distribution equipment. Using bio diesel in a conventional diesel engine substantially reduces emissions of unburned hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide, sulphates, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, nitrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and particulate matter. The use of bio diesel has grown dramatically during the last few years. Egypt has a promising experiment in promoting forestation by cultivation of Jatropha plant especially in luxor and many other sites of the country. The first production of the Egyptian Jatropha seeds oil is now under evaluation to produce a cost-competitive bio diesel fuel

  15. Sorption of polar and nonpolar aromatic compounds to four surface soils of eastern China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Ping; Zhu Dongqiang; Zhang Hua; Shi Xin; Sun Huiyu; Dang Fei

    2008-01-01

    Improved predictions on the fate of organic pollutants in surface environments require a better understanding of the underlying sorption mechanisms that control their uptake by soils. In this study, we monitored sorption of nine aromatic compounds with varying physicochemical properties (hydrophobicity, electron-donor/acceptor ability and polarity), including two polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, two chlorobenzenes, two nitroaromatic compounds, dichlobenil, carbaryl and 2,4-dichlorophenol in aqueous suspension of four surface soils of eastern China. The tested soils were characterized with respect to organic carbon (OC) content, black carbon content, mineralogy, morphology and size fraction to assess the role of the diverse soil characteristics in sorption. The results of this study show that not only the solute hydrophobicity and the OC content of soil are important to the retention of organic pollutants, but also the solute molecular structure and the soil nature. - In addition to the hydrophobicity of solute and the organic carbon content of soil, the solute molecular structure and the soil nature also determine the retention of organic pollutants by soils

  16. Polycyclic aromatic and organochlorine compounds in the atmosphere of Northern Ellesmere Island, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, G. W.; Walla, M. D.; Bidleman, T. F.; Barrie, L. A.

    1991-06-01

    In February-April 1988 we collected air samples at Alert in the Canadian Arctic (82.5°N, 62.3°W) to determine the types, concentrations, and vapor-particle relationships for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and oxygenated compounds, Organochlorine (OC) pesticides, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB). Samples were taken using a glass fiber filter-polyurethane foam train and were analyzed by capillary gas chromatography using mass selective and electron capture detection. PAH and oxygenated compounds included dibenzofuran, biphenyl, fluorene, phenanthrene, 9-fluorenone, fluoranthene, benzofluoranthenes, pyrene, chrysene, benzopyrenes, indeno[cd]pyrene, benzo[ghi]perylene, 2-methyl phenanthrene, benz[a]anthracene, and anthracene (given in order of relative abundance, highest to lowest). OC compounds included hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCH), hexachlorobenzene, pentachlorobenzene, PCB, polychlorocamphenes, chlordanes, and the dichlorodiphenyl-trichloroethane (DDT) group (given as above). The concentration ratios of α-HCH/γ-HCH (5.2-9.8) and trans- to cis-chlordane (0.78-1.29) are reported. Compounds having estimated liquid-phase saturation vapor pressure (pL0) ≥ 10-3 Pa at the average sampling temperature (245 K) were almost entirely gaseous. Those from 10-6 ≤ pL0 ≤ 10-3 Pa were distributed between the particle and gas phases, whereas little or no gaseous component was evident for compounds having pL0 ≤ 10-6 Pa. The particle-vapor distribution of PAH and OC compared favorably to the Junge-Pankow model.

  17. Effects of gasoline aromatic content on emissions of volatile organic compounds and aldehydes from a four-stroke motorcycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yung-Chen; Tsai, Jiun-Horng

    2013-01-01

    A new four-stroke carburettor motorcycle engine without any engine adjustments was used to study the impact of fuel aromatic content on the exhaust emissions of organic air pollutants (volatile organic compounds and carbonyls). Three levels of aromatic content, i.e. 15, 25, and 50% (vol.) aromatics mixed with gasoline were tested. The emissions of aromatic fuel were compared with those of commercial unleaded gasoline. The results indicated that the A 15 (15 vol% aromatics in gasoline) fuel exhibited the greatest total organic emission improvement among these three aromatic fuels as compared with commercial gasoline, reaching 59%. The highest emission factors of alkanes, alkenes, and carbonyl groups appeared in the reference fuel (RF) among all of the test fuels. A 15 showed the highest emission reduction in alkanes (73%), aromatics (36%), and carbonyls (28%), as compared to those of the RF. The highest emission reduction ofalkenes was observed when using A25 as fuel. A reduction in fuel aromatic content from 50 to 25 and 15 vol% in gasoline decreased benzene and toluene emissions, but increased the aldehyde emissions. In general, the results showed that the highest emission reductions for the most of measured organic pollutants appeared when using A 15 as the fuel.

  18. Oil distillation wastewaters from aromatic herbs as new natural source of antioxidant compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celano, Rita; Piccinelli, Anna Lisa; Pagano, Imma; Roscigno, Graziana; Campone, Luca; De Falco, Enrica; Russo, Mariateresa; Rastrelli, Luca

    2017-09-01

    Distillation wastewaters (DWWs) are generated during the essential oil steam distillation from aromatic herbs. Despite of growing interest on novel source of natural antioxidant compounds as food additives, studies on DWWs are scarse. Herein, the potential of DWWs produced by the distillation of packaged fresh basil, rosemary and sage wastes was evaluated by chemical and antioxidant characterization. HPLC-DAD-HRMS profiling revealed that DWWs contain water-soluble phenolic compounds, mainly caffeic acid derivatives and flavonoid glycosides, with rosmarinic acid (RA) as predominant components (29-135mg/100mL). DWWs demonstrated high levels of total phenolic compounds (TPC, 152-443mg GAE/100mL) and strong antioxidant capacities, in ORAC, DPPH and ABTS assays (1101-4720, 635-4244 and 571-3145μmol TE/100mL, respectively). Highly significant correlations of TEAC values with TPC and RA contents revealed that phenolic compounds and high RA content were responsible of DWWs antioxidant properties.Thus, DWWs are proposed as a new promising source of natural food additives and/or functional ingredients for cosmetic, nutraceutical and food applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Hydrothermally generated aromatic compounds are consumed by bacteria colonizing in Atlantis II Deep of the Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Yong

    2011-04-28

    Hydrothermal ecosystems have a wide distribution on Earth and many can be found in the basin of the Red Sea. Production of aromatic compounds occurs in a temperature window of 60-150 °C by utilizing organic debris. In the past 50 years, the temperature of the Atlantis II Deep brine pool in the Red Sea has increased from 56 to 68 °C, whereas the temperature at the nearby Discovery Deep brine pool has remained relatively stable at about 44 °C. In this report, we confirmed the presence of aromatic compounds in the Atlantis II brine pool as expected. The presence of the aromatic compounds might have disturbed the microbes in the Atlantis II. To show shifted microbial communities and their metabolisms, we sequenced the metagenomes of the microbes from both brine pools. Classification based on metareads and the 16S rRNA gene sequences from clones showed a strong divergence of dominant bacterial species between the pools. Bacteria capable of aromatic degradation were present in the Atlantis II brine pool. A comparison of the metabolic pathways showed that several aromatic degradation pathways were significantly enriched in the Atlantis II brine pool, suggesting the presence of aromatic compounds. Pathways utilizing metabolites derived from aromatic degradation were also significantly affected. In the Discovery brine pool, the most abundant genes from the microbes were related to sugar metabolism pathways and DNA synthesis and repair, suggesting a different strategy for the utilization of carbon and energy sources between the Discovery brinse pool and the Atlantis II brine pool. © 2011 International Society for Microbial Ecology. All rights reserved.

  20. Remediation of Groundwater Polluted by Aromatic Compounds by Means of Adsorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvana Canzano

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work, an experimental and modeling analysis of the adsorption of four aromatic compounds (i.e., toluene, naphthalene, o-xylene and ethylbenzene onto a commercial activated carbon is carried out. The aim is to assess the suitability of the adsorption process for the treatment of polluted groundwater, also when a multiple contamination is detected. Batch adsorption tests from simulated polluted groundwater are performed in single-compound systems and in two binary systems (i.e., toluene + naphthalene and o-xylene + ethylbenzene, at constant temperature (20 °C and pH (7. Experimental results in single-compound systems reveal that all of the analytes are significantly adsorbed on the tested activated carbon. In particular, toluene and naphthalene adsorption capacities are the highest and of similar value, while for o-xylene and ethylbenzene, the performances are lower. The adsorption of these compounds seems to be influenced by a combined effect of several parameters, such as hydrophobicity, molecule size, structure of the molecule, etc. Experimental results in binary systems show a different behavior of the two systems, which confirms their complexity and explains the interest in these complex adsorption systems. In particular, toluene and naphthalene are mutually competitive, while in the case of o-xylene + ethylbenzene, only the former undergoes competitive effects. The analysis of the entire experimental data set is integrated with a dedicated modeling analysis using the extended Langmuir model. For both single-compound and binary systems, this model provides acceptable results, in particular for low equilibrium concentrations, like those more commonly found in groundwater, and for the compounds involved in adsorptive competitive effects.

  1. Sorption of Aromatic Compounds with Copolymer Sorbent Materials Containing β-Cyclodextrin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee D. Wilson

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Urethane copolymer sorbent materials that incorporate β-cyclodextrin (CD have been prepared and their sorption properties with chlorinated aromatic compounds (i.e., pentachlorophenol, 2,4-dichlorophenol and 2,4-dichlorophenoxy acetic acid have been evaluated. The sorption properties of granular activated carbon (GAC were similarly compared in aqueous solution at variable pH conditions. The sorbents displayed variable BET surface areas as follows: MDI-X copolymers (< 101 m2/g, CDI-X copolymers (< 101 m2/g, and granular activated carbon (GAC ~103 m2/g. The sorption capacities for the copolymers sorbents are listed in descending order, as follows: GAC > CDI-3 copolymer ≈ MDI-3 copolymer. The sorption capacity for the aromatic adsorbates with each sorbent are listed in descending order, as follows: 2,4-dichlorophenol > 2,4-dichlorophenoxy acetic acid > pentachlorophenol. In general, the differences in the sorption properties of the copolymer sorbents with the chlorinated organics were related to the following factors: (i surface area of the sorbent; (ii CD content and accessibility; and (iii and the chemical nature of the sorbent material.

  2. Toxicity of aromatic compounds to Tetrahymena estimated by microcalorimetry and QSAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xi; Zhang Tian; Min Xinmin; Liu Peng

    2010-01-01

    The toxicity of six organic aromatic chemicals to Tetrahymena growth metabolism was studied by microcalorimetry. The growth constant k, inhibitory ratio I, and half-inhibiting concentration IC 50 were calculated. The results suggested that the order of toxicity was aniline > nitrobenzene > chlorobenzene > toluene > benzene > phenol. Based on the molecular descriptors, the QSAR equation is obtained by multiple linear regression analysis: log IC 50 = -3.360 - 1.545 E HOMO - 0.6850 ΔE - 0.3019 log K OW (R = 0.8643, n = 6, s = 0.202, F = 0.739, Sig. = 0.041, R CV 2 =0.624). The equation indicates that the toxic action is a two-step process: the pass of the chemicals through the cell membrane (described by log K OW ) and the electron-transfer reaction of the chemicals with biomolecules (described by E HOMO and ΔE). The substituents on aromatic ring are crucial to the toxicity of the compounds and the reaction between the chemicals and biological macromolecules is important.

  3. Ring-Hydroxylating Oxygenase database: a database of bacterial aromatic ring-hydroxylating oxygenases in the management of bioremediation and biocatalysis of aromatic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Joydeep; Jana, Tanmoy; Saha, Sudipto; Dutta, Tapan K

    2014-10-01

    Bacterial Rieske-type aromatic ring-hydroxylating oxygenases (RHOs) constitute a large family of enzymes, primarily involved in bioremediation of diverse aromatic compounds in the environment. In the present study, we have designed a manually curated database, Ring-Hydroxylating Oxygenase database (RHObase), which provides comprehensive information on all biochemically characterized bacterial RHOs. It consists of ∼ 1000 entries including 196 oxygenase α-subunits, 153 oxygenase β-subunits, 92 ferredoxins and 110 reductases, distributed among 131 different bacterial strains implementing a total of 318 oxygenation reactions. For each protein, users can get detailed information about its structure and conserved domain(s) with motif signature. RHObase allows users to search a query, based on organism, oxygenase, substrate, or protein structure. In addition, this resource provides analysis tools to perform blast search against RHObase for prediction of putative substrate(s) for the query oxygenase and its phylogenetic affiliation. Furthermore, there is an integrated cheminformatics tool to search for structurally similar compound(s) in the database vis-a-vis RHO(s) capable of transforming those compound(s). Resources in the RHObase and multiple search/display options therein are intended to provide oxygenase-related requisite information to researchers, especially working in the field of environmental microbiology and biocatalysis to attain difficult chemistry of biotechnological importance.

  4. Radiation luminescence of polymers - emission behaviour of aromatic compounds incorporated in synthetic rubbers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawanishi, Shunichi; Hagiwara, Miyuki

    1986-01-01

    For a deep understanding of a radiation protection mechanism of some aromatic compounds on synthetic polymers, their optical emission behavior under electron irradiation was studied. The fluorescence light was led out of an irradiation room through a wave guide and detected by a photomultiplier so that less noisy spectrum was obtained. Acenaphthene or acenaphthylene was added to the synthetic rubbers such as ethylene propylene diene terpolymer, styrene butadiene rubber and cis-1,4-polybutadiene. The intensities of optical emission induced by electron beams changed from polymer to polymer, while those by ultraviolet lights were independent of the kind of polymers. The dependence of emission intensity on polymers under electron irradiation was estimated to show the fact that the radiation excited energy transfers occur from the polymer matrix to the additives and that an efficiency of the energy transfer is dependent on kinds of polymers. (author)

  5. Selective side-chain oxidation of alkyl aromatic compounds catalyzed by cerium modified silver catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beier, Matthias Josef; Schimmoeller, Bjoern; Hansen, Thomas Willum

    2010-01-01

    . In addition, flame-made catalysts were more stable against silver leaching compared to the impregnated catalysts. The structure of the silver catalysts was studied in detail both by X-ray absorption spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy suggesting metallic silver to be required for catalytic......Silver supported on silica effectively catalyzes the aerobic side-chain oxidation of alkyl aromatic compounds under solvent-free conditions. Toluene, p-xylene, ethylbenzene and cumene were investigated as model substrates. Typically, the reaction was performed at ambient pressure; only for toluene...... an elevated pressure was required. Carboxylic acids, such as benzoic acid or p-toluic acid, additionally increased the reaction rate while CeO2 could act both as a promoter and an inhibitor depending on the substrate and the reaction conditions. Silver catalysts were prepared both by standard impregnation...

  6. Determining inhibition effects of some aromatic compounds on peroxidase enzyme purified from white and red cabbage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Öztekin, Aykut, E-mail: aoztekin@agri.edu.tr [Ataturk University, Science Faculty, Department of Chemistry, 25240-Erzurum (Turkey); Agri Ibrahim Cecen University Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Department of Chemistry, 04100-Agri (Turkey); Almaz, Züleyha, E-mail: zturkoglu-2344@hotmail.com [Ataturk University, Science Faculty, Department of Chemistry, 25240-Erzurum (Turkey); Mus Alparslan University Faculty of Sciences, Department of Moleculer Biology, 49250-Mus (Turkey); Özdemir, Hasan, E-mail: hozdemir@atauni.edu.tr [Ataturk University, Science Faculty, Department of Chemistry, 25240-Erzurum (Turkey)

    2016-04-18

    Peroxidases (E.C.1.11.1.7) catalyze the one electron oxidation of wide range of substrates. They are used in synthesis reaction, removal of peroxide from industrial wastes, clinical biochemistry and immunoassays. In this study, the white cabbage (Brassica Oleracea var. capitata f. alba) and red cabbage (Brassica oleracea L. var. capitata f. rubra) peroxidase enzymes were purified for investigation of inhibitory effect of some aromatic compounds on these enzymes. IC{sub 50} values and Ki constants were calculated for the molecules of 6-Amino nicotinic hydrazide, 6-Amino-5-bromo nicotinic hydrazide, 2-Amino-5-hydroxy benzohydrazide, 4-Amino-3-hydroxy benzohydrazide on purified enzymes and inhibition type of these molecules were determined. (This research was supported by Ataturk University. Project Number: BAP-2015/98).

  7. Aromatic Amino Acid-Derived Compounds Induce Morphological Changes and Modulate the Cell Growth of Wine Yeast Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Beatriz; Vázquez, Jennifer; Cullen, Paul J; Mas, Albert; Beltran, Gemma; Torija, María-Jesús

    2018-01-01

    Yeasts secrete a large diversity of compounds during alcoholic fermentation, which affect growth rates and developmental processes, like filamentous growth. Several compounds are produced during aromatic amino acid metabolism, including aromatic alcohols, serotonin, melatonin, and tryptamine. We evaluated the effects of these compounds on growth parameters in 16 different wine yeasts, including non- Saccharomyces wine strains, for which the effects of these compounds have not been well-defined. Serotonin, tryptamine, and tryptophol negatively influenced yeast growth, whereas phenylethanol and tyrosol specifically affected non- Saccharomyces strains. The effects of the aromatic alcohols were observed at concentrations commonly found in wines, suggesting a possible role in microbial interaction during wine fermentation. Additionally, we demonstrated that aromatic alcohols and ethanol are able to affect invasive and pseudohyphal growth in a manner dependent on nutrient availability. Some of these compounds showed strain-specific effects. These findings add to the understanding of the fermentation process and illustrate the diversity of metabolic communication that may occur among related species during metabolic processes.

  8. Aromatic Amino Acid-Derived Compounds Induce Morphological Changes and Modulate the Cell Growth of Wine Yeast Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz González

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Yeasts secrete a large diversity of compounds during alcoholic fermentation, which affect growth rates and developmental processes, like filamentous growth. Several compounds are produced during aromatic amino acid metabolism, including aromatic alcohols, serotonin, melatonin, and tryptamine. We evaluated the effects of these compounds on growth parameters in 16 different wine yeasts, including non-Saccharomyces wine strains, for which the effects of these compounds have not been well-defined. Serotonin, tryptamine, and tryptophol negatively influenced yeast growth, whereas phenylethanol and tyrosol specifically affected non-Saccharomyces strains. The effects of the aromatic alcohols were observed at concentrations commonly found in wines, suggesting a possible role in microbial interaction during wine fermentation. Additionally, we demonstrated that aromatic alcohols and ethanol are able to affect invasive and pseudohyphal growth in a manner dependent on nutrient availability. Some of these compounds showed strain-specific effects. These findings add to the understanding of the fermentation process and illustrate the diversity of metabolic communication that may occur among related species during metabolic processes.

  9. Evaluation of Aromatic Plants and Compounds Used to Fight Multidrug Resistant Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramar Perumal Samy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditional medicine plays a vital role for primary health care in India, where it is widely practiced to treat various ailments. Among those obtained from the healers, 78 medicinal plants were scientifically evaluated for antibacterial activity. Methanol extract of plants (100 μg of residue was tested against the multidrug resistant (MDR Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. Forty-seven plants showed strong activity against Burkholderia pseudomallei (strain TES and KHW and Staphylococcus aureus, of which Tragia involucrata L., Citrus acida Roxb. Hook.f., and Aegle marmelos (L. Correa ex Roxb. showed powerful inhibition of bacteria. Eighteen plants displayed only a moderate effect, while six plants failed to provide any evidence of inhibition against the tested bacteria. Purified compounds showed higher antimicrobial activity than crude extracts. The compounds showed less toxic effect to the human skin fibroblasts (HEPK cells than their corresponding aromatic fractions. Phytochemical screening indicates that the presence of various secondary metabolites may be responsible for this activity. Most of the plant extracts contained high levels of phenolic or polyphenolic compounds and exhibited activity against MDR pathogens. In conclusion, plants are promising agents that deserve further exploration. Lead molecules available from such extracts may serve as potential antimicrobial agents for future drug development to combat diseases caused by the MDR bacterial strains as reported in this study.

  10. Evaluation of aromatic plants and compounds used to fight multidrug resistant infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perumal Samy, Ramar; Manikandan, Jayapal; Al Qahtani, Mohammed

    2013-01-01

    Traditional medicine plays a vital role for primary health care in India, where it is widely practiced to treat various ailments. Among those obtained from the healers, 78 medicinal plants were scientifically evaluated for antibacterial activity. Methanol extract of plants (100  μ g of residue) was tested against the multidrug resistant (MDR) Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. Forty-seven plants showed strong activity against Burkholderia pseudomallei (strain TES and KHW) and Staphylococcus aureus, of which Tragia involucrata L., Citrus acida Roxb. Hook.f., and Aegle marmelos (L.) Correa ex Roxb. showed powerful inhibition of bacteria. Eighteen plants displayed only a moderate effect, while six plants failed to provide any evidence of inhibition against the tested bacteria. Purified compounds showed higher antimicrobial activity than crude extracts. The compounds showed less toxic effect to the human skin fibroblasts (HEPK) cells than their corresponding aromatic fractions. Phytochemical screening indicates that the presence of various secondary metabolites may be responsible for this activity. Most of the plant extracts contained high levels of phenolic or polyphenolic compounds and exhibited activity against MDR pathogens. In conclusion, plants are promising agents that deserve further exploration. Lead molecules available from such extracts may serve as potential antimicrobial agents for future drug development to combat diseases caused by the MDR bacterial strains as reported in this study.

  11. First results from the oil sands passive air monitoring network for polycyclic aromatic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, Jasmin K; Harner, Tom; Su, Ky; Mihele, Cristian; Eng, Anita

    2015-03-03

    Results are reported from an ongoing passive air monitoring study for polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs) in the Athabasca oil sands region in Alberta, Canada. Polyurethane foam (PUF) disk passive air samplers were deployed for consecutive 2-month periods from November 2010 to June 2012 at 17 sites. Samples were analyzed for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), alkylated PAHs, dibenzothiophene and its alkylated derivatives (DBTs). Relative to parent PAHs, alkylated PAHs and DBTs are enriched in bitumen and therefore considered to be petrogenic markers. Concentrations in air were in the range 0.03-210 ng/m(3), 0.15-230 ng/m(3) and 0.01-61 ng/m(3) for ∑PAHs, ∑alkylated PAHs and ΣDBTs, respectively. An exponential decline of the PAC concentrations in air with distance from mining areas and related petrogenic sources was observed. The most significant exponential declines were for the alkylated PAHs and DBTs and attributed to their association with mining-related emissions and near-source deposition, due to their lower volatility and greater association with depositing particles. Seasonal trends in concentrations in air for PACs were not observed for any of the compound classes. However, a forest fire episode during April to July 2011 resulted in greatly elevated PAH levels at all passive sampling locations. Alkylated PAHs and DBTs were not elevated during the forest fire period, supporting their association with petrogenic sources. Based on the results of this study, an "Athabasca PAC profile" is proposed as a potential source marker for the oil sands region. The profile is characterized by ∑PAHs/∑Alkylated PAHs = ∼0.2 and ∑PAHs/∑DBTs = ∼5.

  12. Assessment of occupational exposure to BTEX compounds at a bus diesel-refueling bay: A case study in Johannesburg, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moolla, Raeesa; Curtis, Christopher J; Knight, Jasper

    2015-12-15

    Of increasing concern is pollution by volatile organic compounds, with particular reference to five aromatic hydrocarbons (benzene, toluene, ethyl benzene and two isomeric xylenes; BTEX). These pollutants are classified as hazardous air pollutants. Due to the potential health risks associated with these pollutants, BTEX concentrations were monitored at a bus diesel-refueling bay, in Johannesburg, South Africa, using gas chromatography, coupled with a photo-ionization detector. Results indicate that o-xylene (29-50%) and benzene (13-33%) were found to be the most abundant species of total BTEX at the site. Benzene was within South African occupational limits, but above international occupational exposure limits. On the other hand, occupational concentrations of toluene, ethyl-benzene and xylenes were within national and international occupational limits throughout the monitoring period, based on 8-hour workday weighted averages. Ethyl-benzene and p-xylene concentrations, during winter, correspond to activity at the site, and thus idling of buses during refueling may elevate results. Overall, occupational air quality at the refueling bay is a matter of health concern, especially with regards to benzene exposure, and future reduction strategies are crucial. Discrepancies between national and international limit values merit further investigation to determine whether South African guidelines for benzene are sufficiently precautionary. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. (Liquid + liquid) equilibrium for ternary mixtures of {heptane + aromatic compounds + [EMpy][ESO4]} at T = 298.15 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirkhani, S.A.; Vossoughi, M.; Pazuki, G.R.; Safekordi, A.A.; Heydari, A.; Akbari, J.; Yavari, M.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → This paper reports the LLE data of ternary systems {heptane (1) + aromatic compounds (2) + [EMpy][ESO 4 ] (3)}. → The distribution coefficient and the selectivity were obtained from the experimental data. → The consistency of LLE data was successfully correlated with Othmer-Tobias and Hand equation. - Abstract: (Liquid + liquid) equilibrium (LLE) data for the ternary systems (heptane + toluene + 1-ethyl-3-methylpyridinium ethylsulfate) and (heptane + benzene + 1-ethyl-3-methylpyridinium ethylsulfate) were measured at T = 298.15 K and atmospheric pressure. The selectivity and aromatic distribution coefficients, calculated from the equilibrium data, were used to determine if this ionic liquid can be used as a potential extracting solvent for the separation of aromatic compounds from heptane. The consistency of tie-line data was ascertained by applying the Othmer-Tobias and Hand equations.

  14. Semivolatile organic compound emissions from heavy-duty trucks operating on diesel and bio-diesel fuel blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study measured semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) in particle matter (PM) emitted from three heavy-duty trucks equipped with modern after-treatment technologies. Emissions testing was conducted as described by the George et al. VOC study also presented as part of this se...

  15. Decomposition of volatile organic compounds and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in industrial off-gas by electron beams: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paur, H.R.

    1998-01-01

    The electron beam induced decomposition of volatile organic compounds (e.g. aromatic compounds, esters, chlorinated hydrocarbons) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (e.g. chlorinated dibenzo-dioxins) in industrial off gas has been investigated by several research groups in Germany and Japan. The method was shown to be effective for cleaning the waste gas of a paint factory, the waste air discharged from an automobile tunnel, the off gas cleaning from a groundwater remediation plant and the flue gas of a waste incinerator. The electron beam process achieves high removal efficiencies for volatile organic compounds. Reaction models have been developed, which suggest that the organic compounds are oxidized by hydroxyl radicals. The electron beam process may treat very large off-gas volumes at ambient temperatures and has a low energy consumption. The production of secondary wastes can be avoided or minimized. Compared to conventional methods the investment and operation costs of the process seem to be attractive for selected applications

  16. Comparative chronic toxicity of homo- and heterocyclic aromatic compounds to benthic and terrestrial invertebrates: Generalizations and exceptions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leon Paumen, M.; de Voogt, P.; van Gestel, C.A.M.; Kraak, M.H.S.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to elucidate consistent patterns in chronic polycyclic aromatic compound (PAC) toxicity to soil and sediment inhabiting invertebrates. Therefore we examined our experimental dataset, consisting of twenty-one chronic effect concentrations for two soil invertebrates

  17. Toxicity of eight polycyclic aromatic compounds to red clover (Trifolium pratense), ryegrass (Lolium perenne), and mustard (Sinapsis alba)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sverdrup, L.E.; Krogh, P.H.; Nielsen, T.

    2003-01-01

    The effect of eight polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs) on the seed emergence and early life-stage growth of three terrestrial plants (Sinapsis alba, Trifolium pratense and Lolium perenne) were studied in a greenhouse, using a Danish agricultural soil with an organic carbon content of 1.6%. After...

  18. Toxicity of eight polycyclic aromatic compounds to the red clover (Trifolium pratense), ryegrass (Lolium perenne), and mustard (Sinapsis alba)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sverdrup, L. E.; Krogh, P. H.; Nielsen, T.

    2003-01-01

    The effect of eight polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs) on the seed emergence and early life-stage growth of three terrestrial plants (Sinapsis alba, Trifolium pratense and Lolium perenne) were studied in a greenhouse, using a Danish agricultural soil with an organic carbon content of 1.6%. After...

  19. Comparative study of the addition compounds between lanthanides methane sulfonates (III) and aromatic amino-oxides as ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosario Matos, J. do.

    1989-01-01

    The main goal of this thesis is to further develop the studies on the preparation and characterization of addition compounds obtained from the reaction of lanthanide methane sulfonates and aromatic amino oxides as ligands, pyridine-N-oxides as the picoline-N-oxides (2-pic NO, 3-pic NO and 4-picNO) in order to make a comparative study. (author)

  20. Comparative chronic toxicity of homo- and heterocyclic aromatic compounds to benthic and terrestrial invertebrates: Generalizations and exceptions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    León Paumen, M.; de Voogt, P.; van Gestel, C.A.M.; Kraak, M.H.S.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to elucidate consistent patterns in chronic polycyclic aromatic compound (PAC) toxicity to soil and sediment inhabiting invertebrates. Therefore we examined our experimental dataset, consisting of twenty-one chronic effect concentrations for two soil invertebrates

  1. Advanced Model Compounds for Understanding Acid-Catalyzed Lignin Depolymerization : Identification of Renewable Aromatics and a Lignin-Derived Solvent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lahive, Ciaran W; Deuss, Peter J; Lancefield, Christopher S; Sun, Zhuohua; Cordes, David B; Young, Claire; Tran, Fanny; Slawin, Alexandra M Z; de Vries, Johannes G; Kamer, Paul C J; Westwood, Nicholas J; Barta, Katalin

    2016-01-01

    The development of fundamentally new approaches for lignin depolymerization is challenged by the complexity of this aromatic biopolymer. While overly simplified model compounds often lack relevance to the chemistry of lignin, the direct use of lignin streams poses significant analytical challenges

  2. Single crystal X-ray structural features of aromatic compounds having a pentafluorosulfuranyl (SF5) functional group

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Du, J.; Hua, G.; Beier, Petr; Slawin, A. M. Z.; Woollins, J. D.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 28, č. 3 (2017), s. 723-733 ISSN 1040-0400 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : pentafluorosulfuranyl (SF5) group * aromatic compounds * single crystal X-ray structure * intramolecular interactions * intermolecular interactions Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry OBOR OECD: Organic chemistry Impact factor: 1.582, year: 2016

  3. Studies on in vitro biostability and blood compatibility of polyurethane potting compound based on aromatic polymeric MDI for extracorporeal devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hridya, V K; Jayabalan, M

    2009-12-01

    Polyurethane potting compound based on aromatic isocyanurate of polymeric MDI, poly propylene glycol (PPG400) and trimethylol propane (TMP) has significant favourable properties, good pot life and setting characteristics. The cured potting compound of this formulation has appreciable thermal stability and mechanical properties. In vitro biostability of cured potting compound has been found to be excellent without any significant degradation in simulated physiological media and chemical environment. Studies on blood-material interaction and cytotoxicity reveal in vitro blood compatibility and compatibility with cells of this potting compound.

  4. Life cycle responses of the midge Chironomus riparius to polycyclic aromatic compound exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paumen, Miriam Leon [Department of Aquatic Ecology and Ecotoxicology, Institute of Biodiversity and Ecosystem Dynamics (IBED), University of Amsterdam, Kruislaan 320, 1098 SM Amsterdam (Netherlands)], E-mail: mleon@science.uva.nl; Borgman, Eefje [Department of Aquatic Ecology and Ecotoxicology, Institute of Biodiversity and Ecosystem Dynamics (IBED), University of Amsterdam, Kruislaan 320, 1098 SM Amsterdam (Netherlands)], E-mail: eefje.borgman@student.uva.nl; Kraak, Michiel H.S. [Department of Aquatic Ecology and Ecotoxicology, Institute of Biodiversity and Ecosystem Dynamics (IBED), University of Amsterdam, Kruislaan 320, 1098 SM Amsterdam (Netherlands)], E-mail: castella@science.uva.nl; Gestel, Cornelis A.M. van [Department of Animal Ecology, Institute of Ecological Sciences (IEW), Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, de Boelelaan 1085, 1081 HV Amsterdam (Netherlands)], E-mail: kees.van.gestel@falw.vu.nl; Admiraal, Wim [Department of Aquatic Ecology and Ecotoxicology, Institute of Biodiversity and Ecosystem Dynamics (IBED), University of Amsterdam, Kruislaan 320, 1098 SM Amsterdam (Netherlands)], E-mail: admiraal@science.uva.nl

    2008-03-15

    During acute exposure, polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs) act mainly by narcosis, but during chronic exposure the same compounds may exert sublethal life cycle effects. The aim of this study was therefore to evaluate the chronic effects of sediment spiked PACs on the emergence of the midge Chironomus riparius. Three isomer pairs were selected, and 28-day LC{sub 50} values and 50% emergence times (EMt{sub 50}) were determined. Concentration-response relationships were observed for phenanthrene, acridine, phenanthridine and acridone. Anthracene and phenanthridone had no effect on total emergence, but did cause a delay in emergence. Calculated porewater LC{sub 50} values correlated well with logK{sub ow} values, suggesting narcosis as mode of action. In contrast, effect concentrations for delay in emergence (EMt{sub 50}) deviated from narcosis, suggesting a specific mode of action during chronic exposure. It is concluded that emergence is a powerful endpoint to detect life cycle effects of PACs on a key sediment inhabiting invertebrate. - Emergence of Chironomus riparius is a sensitive endpoint to detect life cycle effects of PACs.

  5. Induced production of brominated aromatic compounds in the alga Ceramium tenuicorne.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlgren, Elin; Enhus, Carolina; Lindqvist, Dennis; Eklund, Britta; Asplund, Lillemor

    2015-11-01

    In the Baltic Sea, high concentrations of toxic brominated aromatic compounds have been detected in all compartments of the marine food web. A growing body of evidence points towards filamentous algae as a natural producer of these chemicals. However, little is known about the effects of environmental factors and life history on algal production of brominated compounds. In this study, several congeners of methoxylated polybrominated diphenyl ethers (MeO-PBDEs), hydroxylated polybrominated diphenyl ethers (OH-PBDEs) and brominated phenols (BPs) were identified in a naturally growing filamentous red algal species (Ceramium tenuicorne) in the Baltic Sea. The identified substances displayed large seasonal variations in the alga with a concentration peak in July. Production of MeO-/OH-PBDEs and BPs by C. tenuicorne was also established in isolated clonal material grown in a controlled laboratory setting. Based on three replicates, herbivory, as well as elevated levels of light and salinity in the culture medium, significantly increased the production of 2,4,6-tribromophenol (2,4,6-TBP). Investigation of differences in production between the isomorphic female, male and diploid clonal life stages of the alga grown in the laboratory revealed a significantly higher production of 2,4,6-TBP in the brackish water female gametophytes, compared to the corresponding marine gametophytes. Even higher concentrations of 2,4,6-TBP were produced by marine male gametophytes and sporophytes.

  6. The relationship between mutagenicity and chemical composition of polycyclic aromatic compounds from coal pyrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wornat, M J; Braun, A G; Hawiger, A; Longwell, J P; Sarofim, A F

    1990-01-01

    The polycyclic aromatic compounds (PAC) produced from the pyrolysis of a bituminous coal at temperatures of 1125 to 1425 degrees K prove to be mutagenic to S. typhimurium, both in the presence and in the absence of postmitochondrial supernatant (PMS) prepared from Aroclor 1254-induced rat liver. Mutagenicity of the PAC samples measured in the absence of PMS exhibits little dependence on pyrolysis temperature; that measured in its presence is higher at the higher pyrolysis temperatures. However, because of the decrease in PAC yield as the temperature is raised, mutagenicity per mass of coal consumed falls with an increase in temperature if measured without PMS (-PMS) and peaks at an intermediate temperature of 1378 degrees K if measured with PMS (+PMS). Using a new chromatographic technique, we have split each coal-derived PAC sample into two fractions: LC1, containing PAC with alkyl and O-containing substitutions and LC2, consisting of unsubstituted PAC. Substituted (LC1) fractions show no significant +PMS mutagenicity, indicating that, as a whole, the alkylated PAC in our coal pyrolysis products are not mutagenic. Only at the higher temperatures do the substituted fractions exhibit significant -PMS mutagenicity, attributed to PAC with carbonyl or etheric functionalities. The extremely low yields of the substituted PAC under the conditions where they show some activity, however, ensure that they contribute little to overall mutagenicity. In contrast to the substituted fractions, the unsubstituted (LC2) fractions display significant mutagenicity under all conditions and appear to be responsible for virtually all of the mutagenicity in these coal-derived PAC samples. In this fraction, -PMS activity is attributed to nitrogen-containing heterocyclic aromatics. PMID:2190813

  7. Reactivity Of Radiolytically-Produced Nitrogen Oxide Radicals Toward Aromatic Compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elias, Gracy

    2010-01-01

    The nitration of aromatic compounds in the gas phase is an important source of toxic, carcinogenic, and mutagenic species in the atmosphere and has therefore received much attention. Gas phase nitration typically occurs by free-radical reactions. Condensed-phase free-radical reactions, and in particular nitrite and nitrate radical chemistry, have been studied far less. These condensed-phase free-radical reactions may be relevant in fog and cloud water in polluted areas, in urban aerosols with low pH, in water treatment using advanced oxidation processes such as electron beam (e-beam) irradiation, and in nuclear waste treatment applications. This study discusses research toward an improved understanding of nitration of aromatic compounds in the condensed phase under conditions conducive to free-radical formation. The results are of benefit in several areas of environmental chemistry, in particular nuclear waste treatment applications. The nitration reactions of anisole and toluene as model compounds were investigated in γ-irradiated acidic nitrate, neutral nitrate, and neutral nitrite solutions. Cs-7SB, 1-(2,2,3,3,-tetrafluoropropoxy)-3-(4-sec-butylphenoxy)-2-propanol, is used as a solvent modifier in the fission product extraction (FPEX) formulation for the extraction of Cs and Sr from dissolved nuclear fuel. The formulation also contains the ligands calix(4)arene-bis-(tert-octylbenzo-crown-6) (BOBCalixC6) for Cs extraction and 4,4(prime),(5(prime))-di-(t-butyldicyclohexano)-18-crown-6 (DtBuCH18C6) for Sr extraction, all in Isopar L, a branched-chain alkane diluent. FPEX solvent has favorable extraction efficiency for Cs and Sr from acidic solution and was investigated at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for changes in extraction efficiency after γ-irradiation. Extraction efficiency decreased after irradiation. The decrease in solvent extraction efficiency was identical for Cs and Sr, even though they are complexed by different ligands. This suggests that

  8. Electron delocalization and aromaticity in low-lying excited states of archetypal organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feixas, Ferran; Vandenbussche, Jelle; Bultinck, Patrick; Matito, Eduard; Solà, Miquel

    2011-12-14

    Aromaticity is a property usually linked to the ground state of stable molecules. Although it is well-known that certain excited states are unquestionably aromatic, the aromaticity of excited states remains rather unexplored. To move one step forward in the comprehension of aromaticity in excited states, in this work we analyze the electron delocalization and aromaticity of a series of low-lying excited states of cyclobutadiene, benzene, and cyclooctatetraene with different multiplicities at the CASSCF level by means of electron delocalization measures. While our results are in agreement with Baird's rule for the aromaticity of the lowest-lying triplet excited state in annulenes having 4nπ-electrons, they do not support Soncini and Fowler's generalization of Baird's rule pointing out that the lowest-lying quintet state of benzene and septet state of cyclooctatetraene are not aromatic.

  9. The development of new materials such MOFs for CO2 capture and alkylation of aromatic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravon, U.

    2010-01-01

    This thesis is a European project TOPCOMBI of 22 partners. More specifically, this work is the result of collaboration between ENI (Italy), ITQ (Spain), Repsol (Spain) and IRCELYON (France). This work consists of 2 different themes which improvements can be obtained by finding new materials tailored to the needs. The global energy demands are and will be constantly rising in the coming years. In order to meet this need, new resources must be found and further optimized. Fossil fuels are among the most used resources in the world. Among this 3, natural gas appears to be the most promising point of view of energy efficiency and ecological impact. However, many gas fields cannot be treated because there are too small or too contaminated to be economically viable. One way to make them attractive is to lower the cost of purification using novel separation techniques such as the PSA system. However, there is no currently effective adsorbent to allow a viable economic cleansing. Today, the alkylation reactions represent a very important economic interest. Industrial processes are typically carried out by homogeneous acid reactions or not. Seeing the new environmental restrictions, some homogeneous catalytic processes must be replaced by heterogeneous catalytic reactions with the same yields. To do this, new materials to acid characters were used: the zeolites. However the small size of pores of these compounds prevents selective alkylation reactions of molecules too large compounds such as poly-aromatic. For twenty years, new microporous crystalline compounds have emerged: the MOFs, Metal Organic Frameworks. These compounds have the characteristic to be obtained with different metal cations and organic ligands. These combinations give a wide variety of these compounds at the level of reactivity, pore volume and pore size. In this work, we tried to get different materials with specific characteristics in order to use them in methods for purification of methane in acid

  10. Construction and Optimization of a Heterologous Pathway for Protocatechuate Catabolism in Escherichia coli Enables Bioconversion of Model Aromatic Compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clarkson, Sonya M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Biosciences Division; Giannone, Richard J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Chemical Sciences Division; Kridelbaugh, Donna M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Biosciences Division; Elkins, James G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Biosciences Division; Guss, Adam M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Biosciences Division; Michener, Joshua K. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Biosciences Division, BioEnergy Science Center; Vieille, Claire [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

    2017-07-21

    The production of biofuels from lignocellulose yields a substantial lignin by-product stream that currently has few applications. Biological conversion of lignin-derived compounds into chemicals and fuels has the potential to improve the economics of lignocellulose-derived biofuels, but few microbes are able both to catabolize lignin-derived aromatic compounds and to generate valuable products. WhileEscherichia colihas been engineered to produce a variety of fuels and chemicals, it is incapable of catabolizing most aromatic compounds. Therefore, we engineeredE. colito catabolize protocatechuate, a common intermediate in lignin degradation, as the sole source of carbon and energy via heterologous expression of a nine-gene pathway fromPseudomonas putidaKT2440. Then, we used experimental evolution to select for mutations that increased growth with protocatechuate more than 2-fold. Increasing the strength of a single ribosome binding site in the heterologous pathway was sufficient to recapitulate the increased growth. After optimization of the core pathway, we extended the pathway to enable catabolism of a second model compound, 4-hydroxybenzoate. These engineered strains will be useful platforms to discover, characterize, and optimize pathways for conversions of lignin-derived aromatics.

    IMPORTANCELignin is a challenging substrate for microbial catabolism due to its polymeric and heterogeneous chemical structure. Therefore, engineering microbes for improved catabolism of lignin-derived aromatic compounds will require the assembly of an entire network of catabolic reactions, including pathways from genetically intractable strains. By constructing defined pathways for aromatic compound degradation in a model host would allow rapid

  11. Trophic transfer of naturally produced brominated aromatic compounds in a Baltic Sea food chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlgren, Elin; Lindqvist, Dennis; Dahlgren, Henrik; Asplund, Lillemor; Lehtilä, Kari

    2016-02-01

    Brominated aromatic compounds (BACs) are widely distributed in the marine environment. Some of these compounds are highly toxic, such as certain hydroxylated polybrominated diphenyl ethers (OH-PBDEs). In addition to anthropogenic emissions through use of BACs as e.g. flame retardants, BACs are natural products formed by marine organisms such as algae, sponges, and cyanobacteria. Little is known of the transfer of BACs from natural producers and further up in the trophic food chain. In this study it was observed that total sum of methoxylated polybrominated diphenyl ethers (MeO-PBDEs) and OH-PBDEs increased in concentration from the filamentous red alga Ceramium tenuicorne, via Gammarus sp. and three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) to perch (Perca fluviatilis). The MeO-PBDEs, which were expected to bioaccumulate, increased in concentration accordingly up to perch, where the levels suddenly dropped dramatically. The opposite pattern was observed for OH-PBDEs, where the concentration exhibited a general trend of decline up the food web, but increased in perch, indicating metabolic demethylation of MeO-PBDEs. Debromination was also indicated to occur when progressing through the food chain resulting in high levels of tetra-brominated MeO-PBDE and OH-PBDE congeners in fish, while some penta- and hexa-brominated congeners were observed to be the dominant products in the alga. As it has been shown that OH-PBDEs are potent disruptors of oxidative phosphorylation and that mixtures of different congener may act synergistically in terms of this toxic mode of action, the high levels of OH-PBDEs detected in perch in this study warrants further investigation into potential effects of these compounds on Baltic wildlife, and monitoring of their levels. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Dramatic Influence of Ionic Liquid and Ultrasound Irradiation on the Electrophilic Sulfinylation of Aromatic Compounds by Sulfinic Esters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ngoc-Lan Thi Nguyen

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The sulfinylation reaction of aromatic and hetero-aromatic compounds with sulfinic esters as electrophiles has been investigated in different ionic liquids and by means of different Lewis acid salts in order to get moderate to good yields of asymmetrical sulfoxides. Mixtures of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride and aluminum chloride were found to be the most efficient and recyclable reaction framework. Ultrasound sonication appeared to be the most useful and green activation method to afford the sulfoxides in yields better than or equivalent to those obtained under the longer-lasting conventional stirring conditions.

  13. Vapor pressure prediction for alkenoic and aromatic organic compounds by a UNIFAC-based group contribution method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asher, William E.; Pankow, James F.

    A UNIFAC-based group contribution method is developed for predicting liquid vapor pressure (pLo) values of organic compounds, including molecules containing C dbnd C bonds. The method is an extension of UNIFAC- pLo.1 as developed by Asher et al. [2002. Estimating the vapor pressures of multi-functional oxygen-containing organic compounds using group contribution methods, Atmospheric Environment 36, 1483-1498] in which C dbnd O is the only type of sp 2-bonded carbon considered. The current work is important due to the widespread interest in the physical behavior of organic compounds with sp 2 carbon-carbon bonds, e.g., alkenes and aromatics. In the context of particulate matter (PM) formation in the atmosphere, condensable molecules of interest that contain sp 2 bonds include initial oxidation products such as 4-oxo-but-2-enoic acid and 2,6-dihydroxybenzoic acid. UNIFAC- pLo.2 as developed here was based on experimentally determined, temperature-dependent pLo data for 39 alkene compounds, 26 aromatic compounds, and 81 saturated compounds. In order to check the method, an independent set of 22 alkene and 40 aromatic compounds with known volatilities was assembled. Vapor pressures for these compounds were estimated using UNIFAC- pLo.2 and the results compared to known values. The UNIFAC- pLo.2 method was found to predict vapor pressure within a factor of 1.8 and this accuracy was equal across the volatility range of the basis set (3×10 -10 - 3×10 -1 atm). The SPARC method [Hilal, S.H., Carreira, L.A., Karickhoff, S.W., 1994. Estimation of chemical reactivity parameters and physical properties of organic molecules using SPARC. In: Murray, P.P.A.J.S. (Ed.), Quantitative Treatments of Solute/Solvent Interactions. Elsevier, Amsterdam] was also used to estimate pLo for the 22 alkene and 40 aromatic compounds in the test set. Comparing the results of SPARC with UNIFAC- pLo.2 shows that the UNIFAC- pLo.2 method was on average 50% more accurate than the SPARC. The combined

  14. The influence of propylene glycol ethers on base diesel properties and emissions from a diesel engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gómez-Cuenca, F.; Gómez-Marín, M.; Folgueras-Díaz, M.B.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Effect of propylene glycol ethers on diesel fuel properties. • Effect of these compounds on diesel engine performance and emissions. • Blends with ⩽4 wt.% of oxygen do not change substantially diesel fuel quality. • Blends with ⩽2.5 wt.% of oxygen reduce CO, HC and NOx emissions, but not smoke. • These compounds are helpful to reach a cleaner combustion in a diesel engine. - Abstract: The oxygenated additives propylene glycol methyl ether (PGME), propylene glycol ethyl ether (PGEE), dipropylene glycol methyl ether (DPGME) were studied to determine their influence on both the base diesel fuel properties and the exhaust emissions from a diesel engine (CO, NOx, unburnt hydrocarbons and smoke). For diesel blends with low oxygen content (⩽4.0 wt.%), the addition of these compounds to base diesel fuel decreases aromatic content, kinematic viscosity, cold filter plugging point and Conradson carbon residue. Also, each compound modifies the distillation curve at temperatures below the corresponding oxygenated compound boiling point, the distillate percentage being increased. The blend cetane number depends on the type of propylene glycol ether added, its molecular weight, and the oxygen content of the fuel. The addition of PGME decreased slightly diesel fuel cetane number, while PGEE and DPGME increased it. Base diesel fuel-propylene glycol ether blends with 1.0 and 2.5 wt.% oxygen contents were used in order to determine the performance of the diesel engine and its emissions at both full and medium loads and different engine speeds (1000, 2500 and 4000 rpm). In general, at full load and in comparison with base diesel fuel, the blends show a slight reduction of oxygen-free specific fuel consumption. CO emissions are reduced appreciably for 2.5 wt.% of oxygen blends, mainly for PGEE and DPGME. NOx emissions are reduced slightly, but not the smoke. Unburnt hydrocarbon emissions decrease at 1000 and 2500 rpm, but not at 4000 rpm. At medium load

  15. Predictors of airborne exposures to polycyclic aromatic compounds and total organic matter among hot-mix asphalt paving workers and influence of work conditions and practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallari, Jennifer M; Osborn, Linda V; Snawder, John E; Kriech, Anthony J; Olsen, Larry D; Herrick, Robert F; McClean, Michael D

    2012-03-01

    We evaluated personal airborne exposures to polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs) and total organic matter (TOM) among hot-mix asphalt (HMA) paving workers. The primary objectives of this study were to identify predictors of airborne PAC exposures, identify PAC exposure sources, and characterize how work practices may affect personal airborne exposure to PACs. Four workers were recruited from each of three asphalt paving crews (12 workers) and were monitored for three consecutive days over 4 weeks for a total of 12 sampling days per worker (144 worker-days). Three sampling weeks were conducted while maintaining standard working conditions with regard to airborne exposures. The fourth week included the substitution of biodiesel for diesel oil used to clean tools and equipment. Linear mixed-effects models were used to evaluate predictors of airborne exposures including weather parameters (air temperature, wind speed, and relative humidity), worksite conditions (HMA application temperature, work rate, asphalt grade, and biodiesel use), and personal factors (minutes sampled, minutes of downtime, and smoking status). Concentrations of the 33 individual PACs measured in personal air samples were generally below detection limits under all conditions with the exception of fluorene [geometric mean (GM) = 65 ng m(-3)], naphthalene (GM = 833 ng m(-3)), phenanthrene (GM = 385 ng m(-3)), and pyrene (GM = 57 ng m(-3)). The summary measures of TOM (GM = 864 μg m(-3)) and four- to six-ring PAC (GM = 0.13 μg m(-3)) were detected in the majority of air samples. Although task was not a predictor of airborne exposures, job site characteristics such as HMA application temperature were found to significantly (P ≤ 0.001) affect summary and individual PAC exposures. Based on the results of multivariate linear mixed-effects models, substituting biodiesel for diesel oil as a cleaning agent was associated with significant (P ≤ 0.01) reductions in TOM, four- to six-ring PACs, and

  16. Influence of particulate trap oxidizers on emission of mutagenic compounds by diesel automobiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, R E; Devillez, G; Smith, L R

    1989-06-01

    Diesel exhaust particles are known to contain mutagenic and carcinogenic chemicals. The aim of this study was to determine whether, and to what extent, catalytic particulate trap oxidizers on light-duty diesel engines may reduce the emission of particle-associated mutagenic chemicals into the environment. Exhaust particles were collected from Mercedes Benz and Volkswagen diesel automobiles, equipped with or without the manufacturer's exhaust traps, while running on a chassis dynamometer under specified load conditions. Exhaust particles were collected from a dilution tunnel onto 20" X 20" Teflon-coated fiberglass filters. Mutagenesis tests of dichloromethane (DCM) extracts of the particles were conducted using the Ames Salmonella bacterial test system. The mutation rate was calculated in terms of histidine revertants per mile of travel during a set of standard test cycles. With both vehicles the traps produced an 87-92% reduction in the total amount of particulate material collected by the filters. There was no significant change in the specific mutagenic activity (revertants per microgram of DCM particle extract) with or without the traps. These studies support the notion that installation of exhaust traps which reduce particulate emission on diesel-powered vehicles will also reduce the emission of particle-associated mutagenic and carcinogenic materials into the environment.

  17. Investigation of MTBE and aromatic compound concentrations at a gas service station.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chi-Wen; Chiang, Song-Bor; Lu, San-Ju

    2005-06-01

    Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) has been used as a fuel additive at levels of 2-11% in Taiwan for the past decade. The purpose of this additive is to enhance the octane, replace the use of lead-based anti-knock gasoline additives and reduce aromatic hydrocarbons. However, it is possible that oxygenated fuel has a potential health impact. To determine the air quality impact of MTBE, measurements were made of ambient MTBE and other gasoline constituents at a service station. Additionally, environmental conditions (wind speed, wind direction, and temperature, etc.) that could affect concentrations of emission constituents were measured. Gas samples were analyzed for target MTBE and volatile organic compounds, e.g., benzene and toluene. Ambient samples were collected using Tenax adsorbent tubes for mass spectrometric analysis at a service station located in Changhua County, Taiwan. The resulting measured ambient air concentrations were compared with Taiwan's regulatory standards for hazardous air pollutants. Subsequently, the factors controlling the formation of high-VOC levels at the service station and in the residential neighborhoods were identified. Additionally, the results can provide the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) of Taiwan with useful information and prompt them to mandate this gas service station to install a refueling vapor recovery system.

  18. Toxicity assessment of volatile organic compounds and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in motorcycle exhaust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chang-Tang; Chen, Bor-Yann

    2008-05-30

    This study investigates the toxicity of various pollutant species from motorcycle exhaust via dose-response analysis and margin of safety using Escherichia coli DH5 alpha. The toxicity evaluation of the major components of motorcycle exhaust volatile organic compounds (VOCs), collected with impinger, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), collected with filter and XAD-2, is essential to determine emission standards for motorcycles. The toxicity of benzene (B), toluene (T), ethyl benzene (E) and xylene (X) was selected for comparison as standard VOCs emitted from motorcycles. In addition, three types of reformulated gasoline (high oxygenate and high benzene content (No. 1), low oxygen and high benzene (No. 2), and low oxygen and low benzene (No. 3) were prepared to reveal combined toxicity of individual compositions. Motorcycle exhaust is significantly more toxic than BTEX due to the highly toxic VOCs generated from incomplete combustion. Overall toxicity evaluation showed that the toxicity, indicated as EC50, was approximately as follows: PAHs>two-stroke engines>four-stroke engines>BTEX.

  19. Rapid microwave hydrothermal synthesis of GaOOH nanorods with photocatalytic activity toward aromatic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Meng; Li Danzhen; Zhang Wenjuan; Fu Xianzhi; Shao Yu; Li Wenjuan; Xiao Guangcan; He Yunhui

    2010-01-01

    GaOOH nanorods were synthesized from Ga(NO 3 ) 3 via a facile microwave hydrothermal method. The obtained sample was characterized by x-ray diffraction, N 2 sorption-desorption, UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, electron spin resonance, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results revealed that the as-synthesized sample was consisted of rod-like particles. It possessed a surface area of 14.3 m 2 g -1 , and a band gap of 4.75 eV. The photocatalytic property of GaOOH nanorods was evaluated by the degradation of aromatic compounds (such as benzene and toluene) in an O 2 gas stream under ultraviolet (UV) light illumination. The results demonstrated that GaOOH nanorods exhibited superior photocatalytic activity and stability as compared to commercial TiO 2 (P25, Degussa Co.) in both benzene and toluene degradation. In the extended (35 h) reaction test toward benzene, GaOOH maintained a high activity, and no obvious deactivation was observed. A possible mechanism of the photocatalysis over GaOOH is proposed.

  20. Toxicity assessment of volatile organic compounds and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in motorcycle exhaust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, C.-T.; Chen, B.-Y.

    2008-01-01

    This study investigates the toxicity of various pollutant species from motorcycle exhaust via dose-response analysis and margin of safety using Escherichia coli DH5α. The toxicity evaluation of the major components of motorcycle exhaust volatile organic compounds (VOCs), collected with impinger, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), collected with filter and XAD-2, is essential to determine emission standards for motorcycles. The toxicity of benzene (B), toluene (T), ethyl benzene (E) and xylene (X) was selected for comparison as standard VOCs emitted from motorcycles. In addition, three types of reformulated gasoline (high oxygenate and high benzene content (No. 1), low oxygen and high benzene (No. 2), and low oxygen and low benzene (No. 3) were prepared to reveal combined toxicity of individual compositions. Motorcycle exhaust is significantly more toxic than BTEX due to the highly toxic VOCs generated from incomplete combustion. Overall toxicity evaluation showed that the toxicity, indicated as EC 50 , was approximately as follows: PAHs > two-stroke engines > four-stroke engines > BTEX

  1. Oil sands development contributes polycyclic aromatic compounds to the Athabasca River and its tributaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Erin N.; Short, Jeffrey W.; Schindler, David W.; Hodson, Peter V.; Ma, Mingsheng; Kwan, Alvin K.; Fortin, Barbra L.

    2009-01-01

    For over a decade, the contribution of oil sands mining and processing to the pollution of the Athabasca River has been controversial. We show that the oil sands development is a greater source of contamination than previously realized. In 2008, within 50 km of oil sands upgrading facilities, the loading to the snowpack of airborne particulates was 11,400 T over 4 months and included 391 kg of polycyclic aromatic compounds (PAC), equivalent to 600 T of bitumen, while 168 kg of dissolved PAC was also deposited. Dissolved PAC concentrations in tributaries to the Athabasca increased from 0.009 μg/L upstream of oil sands development to 0.023 μg/L in winter and to 0.202 μg/L in summer downstream. In the Athabasca, dissolved PAC concentrations were mostly snow, dissolved PAC concentrations were up to 4.8 μg/L, thus, spring snowmelt and washout during rain events are important unknowns. These results indicate that major changes are needed to the way that environmental impacts of oil sands development are monitored and managed. PMID:19995964

  2. Adsorption and correlations of selected aromatic compounds on a KOH-activated carbon with large surface area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kun; Zhu, Lianghong; Yang, Jingjing; Lin, Daohui

    2018-03-15

    Knowledge of adsorption mechanism and behavior of organic compounds by KOH-activated carbons (KOH-ACs) from wastewater is crucial to its environmental application in wastewater treatment as adsorbent. A superior adsorbent, KOH-activated carbon (KOH-AC), with large surface area (3143m 2 /g), total pore volume of 2.03cm 3 /g, relatively low micropore fraction of 53.2%, and having adsorption capacities of organic compounds up to >1000mg/g, was prepared. It is an adsorbent significantly different with common ACs because the molecular sieving effect, widely observed for common ACs, is insignificant for KOH-AC. This difference could be attributed to the lower micropore fraction of KOH-AC than common ACs. A negative relationship of adsorption capacity of 25 aromatic compounds (including phenols, anilines, nitrobenzenes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) with chemical melting point was observed, suggesting that adsorption is dependent on the packing efficiency and stacking density of molecules on KOH-AC. A linear solvation energy relationships of adsorption affinity of 25 aromatic compounds with solute solvatochromic parameters was also observed, that can be used to quantify the contributions of π-π interaction, hydrogen-bonding interaction and hydrophobic effect to adsorption on KOH-AC. Combined with the reported results of adsorption of organic compounds on carbon nanotubes and biochars, it was also observed that external surface area of adsorbents is controlling the packing efficiency and stacking density of molecules on adsorbents and thus affecting adsorption capacity of organic compounds. Moreover, micropore surface area and the fraction of micropores are the adsorbent properties mainly affecting adsorption affinity of organic compounds. The observations and the developed correlations in this study would be helpful in the application of KOH-AC as superior adsorbent by enhancing the understanding of adsorption mechanisms of organic compounds on KOH-AC and by

  3. Aromatic compound emissions from municipal solid waste landfill: Emission factors and their impact on air pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yanjun; Lu, Wenjing; Guo, Hanwen; Ming, Zhongyuan; Wang, Chi; Xu, Sai; Liu, Yanting; Wang, Hongtao

    2016-08-01

    Aromatic compounds (ACs) are major components of volatile organic compounds emitted from municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills. The ACs emissions from the working face of a landfill in Beijing were studied from 2014 to 2015 using a modified wind tunnel system. Emission factors (EFs) of fugitive ACs emissions from the working face of the landfill were proposed according to statistical analyses to cope with their uncertainty. And their impacts on air quality were assessed for the first time. Toluene was the dominant AC with an average emission rate of 38.8 ± 43.0 μg m-2 s-1 (at a sweeping velocity of 0.26 m s-1). An increasing trend in AC emission rates was observed from 12:00 to 18:00 and then peaked at 21:00 (314.3 μg m-2 s-1). The probability density functions (PDFs) of AC emission rates could be classified into three distributions: Gaussian, log-normal, and logistic. EFs of ACs from the working face of the landfill were proposed according to the 95th percentile cumulative emission rates and the wind effects on ACs emissions. The annual ozone formation and secondary organic aerosol formation potential caused by AC emissions from landfills in Beijing were estimated to be 8.86 × 105 kg year-1 and 3.46 × 104 kg year-1, respectively. Toluene, m + p-xylene, and 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene were the most significant contributors to air pollution. Although ACs pollutions from landfills accounts for less percentage (∼0.1%) compared with other anthropogenic sources, their fugitive emissions which cannot be controlled efficiently deserve more attention and further investigation.

  4. Aromatic C-Nitroso Compounds and Their Dimers: A Model for Probing the Reaction Mechanisms in Crystalline Molecular Solids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Biljan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This review is focused on the dimerization and dissociation of aromatic C-nitroso compounds and their dimers, the reactions that could be used as a convenient model for studying the thermal organic solid-state reaction mechanisms. This molecular model is simple because it includes formation or breaking of only one covalent bond between two nitrogen atoms. The crystalline molecular solids of nitroso dimers (azodioxides dissociate by photolysis under the cryogenic conditions, and re-dimerize by slow warming. The thermal re-dimerization reaction is examined under the different topotactic conditions in crystals: disordering, surface defects, and phase transformations. Depending on the conditions, and on the molecular structure, aromatic C-nitroso compounds can associate to form one-dimensional polymeric structures and are able to self-assemble on gold surfaces.

  5. A novel aromatic oil compound inhibits microbial overgrowth on feet: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misner Bill D

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Athlete's Foot (Tinea pedis is a form of ringworm associated with highly contagious yeast-fungi colonies, although they look like bacteria. Foot bacteria overgrowth produces a harmless pungent odor, however, uncontrolled proliferation of yeast-fungi produces small vesicles, fissures, scaling, and maceration with eroded areas between the toes and the plantar surface of the foot, resulting in intense itching, blisters, and cracking. Painful microbial foot infection may prevent athletic participation. Keeping the feet clean and dry with the toenails trimmed reduces the incidence of skin disease of the feet. Wearing sandals in locker and shower rooms prevents intimate contact with the infecting organisms and alleviates most foot-sensitive infections. Enclosing feet in socks and shoes generates a moisture-rich environment that stimulates overgrowth of pungent both aerobic bacteria and infectious yeast-fungi. Suppression of microbial growth may be accomplished by exposing the feet to air to enhance evaporation to reduce moistures' growth-stimulating effect and is often neglected. There is an association between yeast-fungi overgrowths and disabling foot infections. Potent agents virtually exterminate some microbial growth, but the inevitable presence of infection under the nails predicts future infection. Topical antibiotics present a potent approach with the ideal agent being one that removes moisture producing antibacterial-antifungal activity. Severe infection may require costly prescription drugs, salves, and repeated treatment. Methods A 63-y female volunteered to enclose feet in shoes and socks for 48 hours. Aerobic bacteria and yeast-fungi counts were determined by swab sample incubation technique (1 after 48-hours feet enclosure, (2 after washing feet, and (3 after 8-hours socks-shoes exposure to a aromatic oil powder-compound consisting of arrowroot, baking soda, basil oil, tea tree oil, sage oil, and clove oil. Conclusion

  6. Comparison of hot Soxhlet and accelerated solvent extractions with microwave and supercritical fluid extractions for the determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and nitrated derivatives strongly adsorbed on soot collected inside a diesel particulate filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oukebdane, K; Portet-Koltalo, F; Machour, N; Dionnet, F; Desbène, P L

    2010-06-30

    Several methods of extraction were optimized to extract polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), their nitrated derivatives and heavy n-alkanes from a highly adsorptive particulate matter resulting from the combustion of diesel fuel in a diesel engine. This particular carbonaceous particulate matter, collected at high temperatures in cordierite diesel particulate filters (DPF), which are optimized for removing diesel particles from diesel engine exhaust emissions, appeared extremely refractory to extractions using the classical extracting conditions for these pollutants. In particular, the method of accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) is described in detail here. Optimization was performed through experimental design to understand the impact of each factor studied and the factors' possible interactions on the recovery yields. The conventional extraction technique, i.e., Soxhlet extraction, was also carried out, but the lack of quantitative extractions led us to use a more effective approach: hot Soxhlet. It appeared that the extraction of the heaviest PAHs and nitroPAHs by either the optimized ASE or hot Soxhlet processes was far from complete. To enhance recovery yields, we tested original solvent mixtures of aromatic and heteroaromatic solvents. Thereafter, these two extraction techniques were compared to microwave-assisted extraction (MAE) and supercritical fluid extraction (SFE). In every case, the only solvent mixture that permitted quantitative extraction of the heaviest PAHs from the diesel soot was composed of pyridine and diethylamine, which has a strong electron-donor character. Conversely, the extraction of the nitrated PAHs was significantly improved by the use of an electron-acceptor solvent or by introducing a small amount of acetic acid into the pyridine. It was demonstrated that, for many desirable features, no single extraction technique stound out as the best: ASE, MAE or SFE could all challenge hot Soxhlet for favourable extractions

  7. Association and discrimination of diesel fuels using chemometric procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, Lucas J. [Michigan State University, Forensic Science Program, School of Criminal Justice, East Lansing, MI (United States); McIlroy, John W.; Waddell Smith, Ruth [Michigan State University, Forensic Science Program, School of Criminal Justice, East Lansing, MI (United States); Michigan State University, Department of Chemistry, East Lansing, MI (United States); McGuffin, Victoria L. [Michigan State University, Department of Chemistry, East Lansing, MI (United States)

    2009-08-15

    Five neat diesel samples were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and total ion chromatograms as well as extracted ion profiles of the alkane and aromatic compound classes were generated. A retention time alignment algorithm was employed to align chromatograms prior to peak area normalization. Pearson product moment correlation coefficients and principal components analysis were then employed to investigate association and discrimination among the diesel samples. The same procedures were also used to investigate the association of a diesel residue to its neat counterpart. Current limitations in the retention time alignment algorithm and the subsequent effect on the association and discrimination of the diesel samples are discussed. An understanding of these issues is crucial to ensure the accuracy of data interpretation based on such chemometric procedures. (orig.)

  8. ESR-spin trapping studies on the interaction between anthraquinone triplets and aromatic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moger, G.; Rockenbauer, A.; Simon, P.

    1980-01-01

    The ESR spin trapping technique was used for the detection of transient C-centered radicals in the photochemical interaction between triplet anthraquinone and aromatic hydroperoxide and alcohol. (author)

  9. Correlations and adsorption mechanisms of aromatic compounds on biochars produced from various biomass at 700 °C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kun; Jiang, Yuan; Yang, Jingjing; Lin, Daohui

    2018-02-01

    Knowledge of adsorption behavior of organic contaminants on high heat temperature treated biochars is essential for application of biochars as adsorbents in wastewater treatment and soil remediation. In this study, isotherms of 25 aromatic compounds adsorption on biochars pyrolyzed at 700 °C from biomass including wood chips, rice straw, bamboo chips, cellulose, lignin and chitin were investigated to establish correlations between adsorption behavior and physicochemical properties of biochars. Isotherms were well fitted by Polanyi theory-based Dubinin-Ashtakhov (DA) model with three parameters, i.e., adsorption capacity (Q 0 ) and adsorption affinity (E and b). Besides the negative correlation of Q 0 with molecular maximum cross-sectional areas (σ) of organic compounds, positive correlations of Q 0 with total pore volume (V total ) and average diameter of micropore (D) of biochars were observed, indicating that adsorption by biochars is captured by the pore-filling mechanism with molecular sieving effect in biochar pores. Linear solvation energy relationships (LSERs) of adsorption affinity (E) with solvatochromic parameters of organic compounds (i. e., α m and π ∗ ) were established, suggesting that hydrophobic effect, π-π interaction and hydrogen-bonding interaction are the main forces responsible for adsorption. The regression coefficient (π 1 ) and intercept (C) of obtained LSERs are correlated with biochar H/C and R micro , respectively, implying that biochars with higher aromaticity and more micropores have stronger π-π bonding potential and hydrophobic effect potential with aromatic molecule, respectively. However, hydrogen-bonding potential of biochars for organic molecules is not changed significantly with properties of biochars. A negative correlation of b with biochar H/C is also obtained. These correlations could be used to predict the adsorption behavior of organic compounds on high heat temperature treated biochars from various biomass for

  10. Quantitative description of reactions of aromatic compounds with electrphilic reagents. VIII. Analysis of the parameters of the hyperbolic equations describing the effect of substituents on the reactions of aromatic compounds with various reagents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koptyug, V.A.; Salakhutdinov, N.F.; Vasil'ev, V.G.

    1987-01-01

    In previous communications of this series it was shown that linear relationships of the Hammett type cannot secure a description of the effect of substitutents on the rates of electrophilic substitution reactions of aromatic compounds during investigation of the changes in reactivity over a wide range. This is due to the fact that they do not take account of the existence of a limit to the increase in the reaction rate constant and the displacement of the transition state of the reaction toward the initial stage of the reaction between the aromatic molecule and the electrophile on approach to the limiting reaction rates. The possibility of a priori determination of two of the three parameters of the previously proposed hyperbolic equation for the description of electrophilic substitution reactions was examined. The analysis made it possible to extend the applicability limits of the approach significantly

  11. Effects on aerosol size distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from the heavy-duty diesel generator fueled with feedstock palm-biodiesel blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yuan-Chung; Tsai, Cheng-Hsien; Yang, Chi-Ru; Wu, C. H. Jim; Wu, Tzi-Yi; Chang-Chien, Guo-Ping

    Biodiesels are promoted as alternatives to fossil fuels and their applications in diesel engine have been studied extensively. However, the size distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and generator particulate material (GPM) emitted from heavy-duty diesel generator fueled with biodiesel blends has seldom been addressed. Seven different biodiesel blends with volume fractions of biodiesel ranging from 0% to 30% were studied. Experimental results indicate that the mean reductions of sum of PAHi/GPM 0.056-18 (generator particulate material with aerodynamic diameter 0.056-18 μm) and BaP eqi [=(benzo[ a]pyrene equivalent)i]/GPM 0.056-18 of B5, B10, B15, B20, B25 and B30 are (-8.21%, -5.72%), (-36.7%, -29.7%), (-1.25%, 2.32%), (16.2%, 18.6%), (33.4%, 35.0%) and (40.5%, 42.4), respectively, compared with B0. Both PAHi/GPMi and BaP eqi/GPMi in stage 1 (0.056 - 0.166 μm) and stage 2 (0.166 - 0.31 μm) of all test fuels are higher than those in the other stages due to higher specific surface area of smaller particles. It is also observed that there are more highly toxic PAHs in stage 2. It should be noticed that the trend of particle-phase PAH contents is different from the trend of particle-phase PAH concentration and opposite to the trend of total GPM 0.056-18 emission. The differences are due to a higher number of particles with diameters between 0.056 and 0.31 μm. The above results indicate that fuel blends with less than 15% biodiesel would increase PAH content at particle size between 0.056 and 0.31 μm. Therefore, the blending fraction should be between 15% and 30%. Moreover, particle-size control is needed in future emission regulations which would necessitate further improvements in combustion quality. Besides, researches on health effects of biodiesel blends are needed as well.

  12. Experimental study on the particulate matter and nitrogenous compounds from diesel engine retrofitted with DOC+CDPF+SCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunhua; Lou, Diming; Tan, Piqiang; Hu, Zhiyuan

    2018-03-01

    The increasingly stringent emission regulations will mandate the retrofit of after-treatment devices for in-use diesel vehicles, in order to reduce their substantial particulate matter and nitrogen oxides (NOX) emissions. In this paper, a combination of DOC (diesel oxidation catalyst), CDPF (catalytic diesel particulate filter) and SCR (selective catalytic reduction) retrofit for a heavy-duty diesel engine was employed to perform experiment on the engine test bench to evaluate the effects on the particulate matter emissions including particle number (PN), particle mass (PM), particle size distributions and nitrogenous compounds emissions including NOX, nitrogen dioxide (NO2)/NOX, nitrous oxide (N2O) and ammonia (NH3) slip. In addition, the urea injection was also of our concern. The results showed that the DOC+CDPF+SCR retrofit almost had no adverse effect on the engine power and fuel consumption. Under the test loads, the upstream DOC and CDPF reduced the PN and PM by an average of 91.6% and 90.9%, respectively. While the downstream SCR brought about an average decrease of 85% NOX. Both PM and NOX emission factors based on this retrofit were lower than China-Ⅳ limits (ESC), and even lower than China-Ⅴ limits (ESC) at medium and high loads. The DOC and CDPF changed the particle size distributions, leading to the increase in the proportion of accumulation mode particles and the decrease in the percentage of nuclear mode particles. This indicates that the effect of DOC and CDPF on nuclear mode particles was better than that of accumulation mode ones. The upstream DOC could increase the NO2/NOX ratio to 40%, higher NO2/NOX ratio improved the efficiency of CDPF and SCR. Besides, the N2O emission increased by an average of 2.58 times after the retrofit and NH3 slip occurred with the average of 26.7 ppm. The rate of urea injection was roughly equal to 8% of the fuel consumption rate. The DOC+CDPF+SCR retrofit was proved a feasible and effective measurement in terms

  13. Modeling the Distribution of Sulfur Compounds in a Large Two Stroke Diesel Engine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cordtz, Rasmus Lage; Schramm, Jesper; Andreasen, Anders

    2013-01-01

    In many years large low speed marine diesel engines have consumed heavy fuel oils with sulfur contents in the order of 2.5 - 4.5wt%. Present legislations require that the fuel sulfur is reduced and in near future the limit will be 0.5wt% globally. During combustion most of the sulfur is oxidized...... conditions and sulfur feed. This work presents a computational model of a large low speed two-stroke diesel engine where a 0D multi-zone approach including a detailed reaction mechanism is employed in order to investigate in cylinder formation of gaseous SO3 where fuel injection rates are determined using...... to SO2 from which a fraction is further oxidized to SO3. SO3 may combine with H2O and condense as liquid sulfuric acid that promotes corrosive wear on e.g. cylinder liners. To extend engine lifetime and reduce costs for lubrication it is pivotal to identify formation of SO3 with respect to operational...

  14. Study on ionizing radiation effects in diesel and crude oil: organic compounds, hydrocarbon, sulfur and nitrogen; Estudo do efeito da radiacao ionizante em compostos organicos do diesel e do petroleo: hidrocarbonetos, sulfurados e nitrogenados

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, Luana dos Santos

    2014-07-01

    Petroleum is the most important energy and pollution source in the world, nowadays. New technologies in petrochemical industry aim to minimize energy spending at the process and to reduce pollution products. Sulfur and nitrogen compounds generate environmental problems; the most relevant is air pollution that affects the population health directly. The nuclear technology has been used in environmental protection through pollutants removal by free radicals produced at action of the radiation in water molecule. The objective of this study is to evaluate the radiation effects on oil and diesel, mainly in the hydrocarbons, organic sulfur, and nitrogen compounds. It was studied a molecule model of sulfur, named benzothiophene, diesel and crude oil samples. The samples were irradiated using a Co-60 source, Gammacell type. The total sulfur concentration in the samples was determined by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, and organic compounds were analyzed by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The study of molecular model showed that 95% was degraded at 20 kGy dose rate. Irradiation at 15 kGy of absorbed dose showed some cracking in petrol hydrocarbons, however with higher doses it was observed polymerization and low efficiency of cracking. It was observed that the sulfur compounds from diesel and petroleum was efficiently reduced. The applied doses of 15 kGy and 30 kGy were the most efficient on desulfurization of petroleum, and for diesel the highest variation was observed with 30 kGy and 50 kGy of absorbed dose. The distillation and chromatographic separation using an open column with palladium chloride as stationary phase showed a preferential separation of organic sulfur compounds in petroleum. (author)

  15. Mutagenicity of diesel exhaust particles from two fossil and two plant oil fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bünger, J; Müller, M M; Krahl, J; Baum, K; Weigel, A; Hallier, E; Schulz, T G

    2000-09-01

    Particulate matter of diesel engine exhaust from four different fuels was studied for content of polynuclear aromatic compounds and mutagenic effects. Two so-called biodiesel fuels, rapeseed oil methylesters (RME) and soybean oil methylesters (SME), were compared directly with two fossil diesel fuels with the normal (DF) and a low sulfur content (LS-DF). Diesel exhaust particles were sampled on filters from the diluted and cooled exhaust of a test engine at five different speeds and loads. Filters were weighed for total particulate matter, Soxhlet extracted with dichloromethane and the content of insoluble material determined. The soluble organic fraction was analysed for polynuclear aromatic compounds. Mutagenicity was determined using the Salmonella typhimurium/mammalian microsome assay with strains TA98 and TA100. Compared with DF, the exhaust particles of LS-DF, RME and SME contained less insoluble material, which consisted mainly of the carbon cores of diesel exhaust particles. The concentrations of individual polynuclear aromatic compounds varied widely among the different exhaust extracts, but total concentrations of the compounds were approximately double for DF and SME compared with LS-DF and RME. In TA98 significant increases in mutation rates were obtained for the soluble organic fractions of all fuels for engines running at full speed (load modes A and D), but for DF revertants were 2- to 10-fold more frequent as compared with LS-DF, RME and SME. Revertant frequencies for DF and partly for LS-DF were also elevated in TA100, while RME and SME gave no significant increase in mutations. The results indicate that diesel exhaust particles from RME, SME and LS-DF contain less black carbon and total polynuclear aromatic compounds and are significantly less mutagenic in comparison with DF. A high sulfur content of the fuel and high engine speeds (rated power) and loads are associated with an increase in mutagenicity of diesel exhaust particles.

  16. Biliary fluorescent aromatic compounds (FACs) measured by fixed wavelength fluorescence (FF) in several marine fish species from the NW Mediterranean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insausti, David; Carrasson, Maite; Maynou, Francesc; Cartes, Joan E; Solé, Montserrat

    2009-11-01

    The fixed wavelength fluoresce (FF) method was used to estimate the levels of fluorescent aromatic compounds (FACs) in the bile of fourteen fish species of commercial and/or ecological interest. Sampling was carried out in the NW Mediterranean at depths ranging from 50 to 1000 m during four seasonal cruises. During the summer sampling period, some species were also collected from another site (Vilanova fishing grounds) for comparison. Baseline levels of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) naphthalene, phenanthrene, pyrene and benzo[a]pyrene were measured. Some seasonality was observed, with reduced FF levels in summer and no differences among sites, consistent with sediment PAH levels. We discuss our results in relation to fish phylogeny, season, depth, diet, trophic level and swimming capacity. Overall FF levels indicated differences among species; the suprabenthic feeders from shallow and deep communities, and Mullus barbatus in particular, displayed elevated FF values and are potential candidates for additional monitoring studies.

  17. Analytical Procedure Development to Determine Polycyclic Aromatic Compounds in the PM2.5-PM10 Fraction of Atmospheric Aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrado, A. I.; Garcia, S.; Perez, R. M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an optimized and validated analytical methodology for the determination of various polycyclic aromatic compounds in ambient air using liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection. This analysis method was applied to samples obtained during more than one year in an area of Madrid. Selected compounds have included thirteen polycyclic hydrocarbons considered priorities by the EPA, and hydroxylated derivatives, which have been less investigated in air samples by liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection. We have characterized and compared the concentration ranges of compounds identified and studied seasonal and monthly variations. In addition, the techniques have been applied to study multivariate correlations, factor analysis and cluster analysis to extract as much information as possible for interpretation and more complete and accurate characterization of the results and their relationship with meteorological parameters and physicochemical. (Author)

  18. Structure-metabolism relationships inhuman-AOX: Chemical insights from a large database of aza-aromatic and amide compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepri, Susan; Ceccarelli, Martina; Milani, Nicolò; Tortorella, Sara; Cucco, Andrea; Valeri, Aurora; Goracci, Laura; Brink, Andreas; Cruciani, Gabriele

    2017-04-18

    Aldehyde oxidase (AOX) is a metabolic enzyme catalyzing the oxidation of aldehyde and aza-aromatic compounds and the hydrolysis of amides, moieties frequently shared by the majority of drugs. Despite its key role in human metabolism, to date only fragmentary information about the chemical features responsible for AOX susceptibility are reported and only "very local" structure-metabolism relationships based on a small number of similar compounds have been developed. This study reports a more comprehensive coverage of the chemical space of structures with a high risk of AOX phase I metabolism in humans. More than 270 compounds were studied to identify the site of metabolism and the metabolite(s). Both electronic [supported by density functional theory (DFT) calculations] and exposure effects were considered when rationalizing the structure-metabolism relationship.

  19. Polycyclic Aromatic Compounds as Anticancer Agents: Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of Methoxy Dibenzofluorene Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bimal Krishna Banik

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Synthesis of a new methoxy dibenzofluorene through alkylation, cyclodehydration and aromatization in a one-pot operation is achieved for the first time. Using this hydrocarbon, a few derivatives are prepared through aromatic nitration, catalytic hydrogenation, coupling reaction with a side chain and reduction. The benzylic position of this hydrocarbon with the side chain is oxidized and reduced. Some of these derivatives have demonstrated excellent antitumor activities in vitro. This study confirms antitumor activity depends on the structures of the molecules.

  20. Reaction of bromine and chlorine with phenolic compounds and natural organic matter extracts--Electrophilic aromatic substitution and oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criquet, Justine; Rodriguez, Eva M; Allard, Sebastien; Wellauer, Sven; Salhi, Elisabeth; Joll, Cynthia A; von Gunten, Urs

    2015-11-15

    Phenolic compounds are known structural moieties of natural organic matter (NOM), and their reactivity is a key parameter for understanding the reactivity of NOM and the disinfection by-product formation during oxidative water treatment. In this study, species-specific and/or apparent second order rate constants and mechanisms for the reactions of bromine and chlorine have been determined for various phenolic compounds (phenol, resorcinol, catechol, hydroquinone, phloroglucinol, bisphenol A, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, gallic acid, hesperetin and tannic acid) and flavone. The reactivity of bromine with phenolic compounds is very high, with apparent second order rate constants at pH 7 in the range of 10(4) to 10(7) M(-1) s(-1). The highest value was recorded for the reaction between HOBr and the fully deprotonated resorcinol (k = 2.1 × 10(9) M(-1) s(-1)). The reactivity of phenolic compounds is enhanced by the activating character of the phenolic substituents, e.g. further hydroxyl groups. With the data set from this study, the ratio between the species-specific rate constants for the reactions of chlorine versus bromine with phenolic compounds was confirmed to be about 3000. Phenolic compounds react with bromine or chlorine either by oxidation (electron transfer, ET) or electrophilic aromatic substitution (EAS) processes. The dominant process mainly depends on the relative position of the hydroxyl substituents and the possibility of quinone formation. While phenol, p-hydroxybenzoic acid and bisphenol A undergo EAS, hydroquinone, catechol, gallic acid and tannic acid, with hydroxyl substituents in ortho or para positions, react with bromine by ET leading to quantitative formation of the corresponding quinones. Some compounds (e.g. phloroglucinol) show both partial oxidation and partial electrophilic aromatic substitution and the ratio observed for the pathways depends on the pH. For the reaction of six NOM extracts with bromine, electrophilic aromatic substitution

  1. SiRNAs conjugated with aromatic compounds induce RISC-mediated antisense strand selection and strong gene-silencing activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubo, Takanori, E-mail: kubo-t@yasuda-u.ac.jp [Faculty of Pharmacy, Yasuda Women' s University, 6-13-1 Yasuhigashi, Asaminami-ku, Hiroshima 731-0153 (Japan); Yanagihara, Kazuyoshi [Faculty of Pharmacy, Yasuda Women' s University, 6-13-1 Yasuhigashi, Asaminami-ku, Hiroshima 731-0153 (Japan); Division of Genetics, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan); Takei, Yoshifumi [Department of Biochemistry, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, 65 Tsurumi-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Mihara, Keichiro [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Research Institute for Radiation Biology and Medicine, Hiroshima University, 1-2-3 Kasumi, Minami-ku, Hiroshima 734-8553 (Japan); Sato, Yuichiro; Seyama, Toshio [Faculty of Pharmacy, Yasuda Women' s University, 6-13-1 Yasuhigashi, Asaminami-ku, Hiroshima 731-0153 (Japan)

    2012-10-05

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SiRNAs conjugated with aromatic compounds (Ar-siRNAs) at 5 Prime -sense strand were synthesized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ar-siRNAs increased resistance against nuclease degradation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ar-siRNAs were thermodynamically stable compared with the unmodified siRNA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High levels of cellular uptake and cytoplasmic localization were found. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Strong gene-silencing efficacy was exhibited in the Ar-siRNAs. -- Abstract: Short interference RNA (siRNA) is a powerful tool for suppressing gene expression in mammalian cells. In this study, we focused on the development of siRNAs conjugated with aromatic compounds in order to improve the potency of RNAi and thus to overcome several problems with siRNAs, such as cellular delivery and nuclease stability. The siRNAs conjugated with phenyl, hydroxyphenyl, naphthyl, and pyrenyl derivatives showed strong resistance to nuclease degradation, and were thermodynamically stable compared with unmodified siRNA. A high level of membrane permeability in HeLa cells was also observed. Moreover, these siRNAs exhibited enhanced RNAi efficacy, which exceeded that of locked nucleic acid (LNA)-modified siRNAs, against exogenous Renilla luciferase in HeLa cells. In particular, abundant cytoplasmic localization and strong gene-silencing efficacy were found in the siRNAs conjugated with phenyl and hydroxyphenyl derivatives. The novel siRNAs conjugated with aromatic compounds are promising candidates for a new generation of modified siRNAs that can solve many of the problems associated with RNAi technology.

  2. Comparative study of aromatic compounds in fruit wines from raspberry, strawberry, and mulberry in central Shaanxi area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiming Feng

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although grape wines have firmly dominated the production and consumption markets of fruit wines, raspberry, strawberry, and mulberry have been utilized to make wines because of their joyful aroma and high contents of polyphenolic phytochemicals and essential fatty acids. However, little is known about aromatic compounds of the wines produced from these three fruits. Methods: The aromatic composition of fruit wines produced from raspberry, strawberry, mulberry, and red grape was analyzed by GC-MS. Odor activity values (OAVs and relative odor contributions (ROCs were used to estimate the sensory contribution of the aromatic compounds to the overall flavor of the wines. Results: In strawberry, raspberry, and mulberry wines, 27, 30, and 31 odorants were detected, respectively. Alcohols formed the most abundant group, followed by esters and acids. The grape wine contained a wider variety (16 types of alcohols, and 4-methyl-2-pentanol and 2,3-butanediol were not present in the three fruit wines. The quantity of esters in raspberry (1.54% and mulberry wines (2.08% were higher than those of strawberry wine (0.78%, and mulberry wine contained more types of esters. There were no significant differences of acids between the three fruit wines and the control wine. In addition, 2-heptanone, 2-octanone, 2-nonanone, and 2-undecanone were unique to raspberry wine, and nonanal was present only in mulberry wine. The indistinguishable aroma of the three fruit wines was attributed to the dominance of fruity and floral odor components derived from ethyl esters of fatty acids and their contributions to the global aroma of the three fruit wines. Conclusion: The present study demonstrated that there were significant differences in the volatile components of fruit wines made from raspberry, strawberry, and mulberry. The aroma compounds were more abundant in the raspberry and mulberry wines than in the strawberry wine, but the quality of strawberry wine was

  3. Methanogenic degradation of (amino)aromatic compounds by anaerobic microbial communities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linkova, Y.V.; Stams, A.J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Degradation of a range of aromatic substrates by anaerobic microbial communities was studied. Active methanogenic microbial communities decomposing aminoaromatic acids and azo dyes into CH4 and CO2 were isolated. Products of primary conversion were found to be 2-hydroxybenzyl and benzyl alcohols

  4. The contribution of polyhydroxyl aromatic compounds to tetramethylammonium hydroxide lignin-based proxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Filley, T.R.; Nierop, K.G.J.; Wang, Y.

    2006-01-01

    A problem inherent in analytical procedures where thermochemolyis or pyrolysis is coupled with in situ methylation by tetramethylammonium hydroxide is the inability to determine if an observed aromatic methoxyl group was originally present as a hydroxyl or a methoxyl functionality. This analytical

  5. Microwave-Accelerated Iodination of Some Aromatic Amines, Using Urea-Hydrogen Peroxide Addition Compound (UHP as the Oxidant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lech Skulski

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available A fast and simple method for the oxidative iodination of some aromatic amines, under microwave irradiation, is reported, using diiodine and the the strongly Hbonded urea-hydrogen peroxide addition compound (H2NCONH2···H2O2, UHP as the oxidant. The reactions were carried out in boiling CHCl3 under a reflux condenser to afford, within 10 minutes, the purified monoiodinated products in 40-80% yields.

  6. Synthesis and phtoluminescence study of Microporous Metal Organic Frameworks (MMOFs) for sensing and detection of nitroexplosives and aromatic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramanik, Sanhita

    Due to the increased terrorist activity worldwide and the use of modern bombs in those attacks, the development of a new method capable of rapidly and cost-efficiently detecting trace vapor of explosives is highly desirable. Chemical explosives composed of a diverse group of compounds, including nitroaromatics, nitramines, nitrate esters as well as some inorganic/organic nitrates and peroxides. Current methodologies include use of well trained dogs and sophisticated instrumentation such as gas chromatography coupled with a mass spectrometer, nuclear quadruple resonance, ionization mass spectrometry (IMS). These methods are highly sensitive and selective, but often expensive, not always easily accessible, and require intense training for operation. As a complementary method, chemical sensors can provide new ways to the rapid detection of ultra trace explosives, and can be easily incorporated into inexpensive and portable microelectronic devices. Fluorescence based sensors utilizing conjugated polymers have attracted enormous attention in the recent years for their excellent performance. In this thesis, a systematic study was performed in a series of luminescent MMOFs and their behavior upon exposure to the vapor of different analytes. For example, [Zn2(oba)2(bpy)]·DMA, one of the MMOFs made of paddle-wheel SBU, selectively responds to nitroaromatics (with electron-withdrawing groups) and other aromatic compounds, like benzene, toluene (with electron-donating groups) via fluorescent quenching and enhancement respectively. The study also shows that nitro-containing non-aromatic analytes (nitroaliphatics) make negligible effect on the fluorescence of [Zn2(oba)2(bpy)]·DMA . The results demonstrate the exceptional ability of this particular MMOF to selectively detect explosives of different types (e.g. aromatic DNT vs. non-aromatic or aliphatic DMNB). Another series of highly luminescent MMOFs made of the same metal center (Zn) and similar ligands (bpdc, bpy, 2,2'dmbpy

  7. A field experiment for the anaerobic biotransformation of aromatic hydrocarbon compounds at Seal Beach, California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinhard, M.; Wills, L.E.; Ball, H.A.; Harmon, T.

    1991-01-01

    Biotransformation of aromatic hydrocarbons under anaerobic conditions is of interest because dissolved oxygen is rapidly consumed in groundwater contaminant plumes of hydrocarbon fuel. Anaerobic biotransformation of aromatic hydrocarbons has been demonstrated under different redox regimes including nitrate-reducing iron-reducing and fermentative-methanogenic conditions. Recently, laboratory evidence has been obtained for the degradation of alkylbenzenes including toluene under sulfate-reducing conditions. The long-term objective of this study is to determine transformation rates under the conditions of the Seal Beach site, and second to explore the feasibility of inducing nitrate- and sulfate-reducing conditions and fermentative-methanogenic conditions in field bioreactors. Both laboratory studies and field studies in bioreactors are being conducted. This paper reports on the experimental design of the bioreactors and initial results

  8. Cu(II AND Zn(II COMPLEX COMPOUNDS WITH BIGUANIDES AROMATIC DERIVATIVES. SYNTHESIS, CHARACTERIZATION, BIOLOGICAL ACTIVITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ticuţa Negreanu-Pîrjol

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we report the synthesis, physical-chemical characterization and antimicrobial activity of some new complex compounds of hetero-aromatic biguanides ligands, chlorhexidine base (CHX and chlorhexidine diacetate (CHXac2 with metallic ions Cu(II and Zn(II, in different molar ratio. The synthesized complexes were characterized by elemental chemical analysis and differential thermal analysis. The stereochemistry of the metallic ions was determined by infrared spectra, UV-Vis, EPR spectroscopy and magnetic susceptibility in the aim to establish the complexes structures. The biological activity of the new complex compounds was identified in solid technique by measuring minimum inhibition diameter of bacterial and fungal culture, against three standard pathogen strains, Escherichia coli ATCC 25922, Staphilococcus aureus ATCC 25923 and Candida albicans ATCC 10231. The results show an increased specific antimicrobial activity for the complexes chlorhexidine:Cu(II 1:1 and 1:2 compared with the one of the Zn(II complexes.

  9. Solvothermal synthesis of CdIn2S4 photocatalyst for selective photosynthesis of organic aromatic compounds under visible light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Cancan; Ye, Xiangju; Zhang, Jinghu; Zhang, Jinfeng; Zhang, Sujuan; Meng, Sugang; Fu, Xianliang; Chen, Shifu

    2017-02-09

    Ternary chalcogenide semiconductor, cadmium indium sulfide (CdIn 2 S 4 ), was prepared by a simple solvothermal method using ethylene glycol as a solvent, as well as indium chloride tetrahydrate (InCl 3 . 4H 2 O), cadmium nitrate tetrahydrate [Cd(NO 3 ) 2 . 4H 2 O], and thiacetamide (TAA) as precursors. The resulted sample was subject to a series of characterizations. It is the first time to use CdIn 2 S 4 sample as a visible light-driven photocatalyst for simultaneous selective redox transformation of organic aromatic compounds. The results indicate that the as-synthesized CdIn 2 S 4 photocatalyst not only has excellent photocatalytic performance compared with pure In 2 S 3 and CdS for the selective oxidation of aromatic alcohols in an oxygen environment, but also shows high photocatalytic redox activities under nitrogen atmosphere. A possible mechanism for the photocatalytic redox reaction in the coupled system was proposed. It is hoped that our current work could extend the applications of CdIn 2 S 4 photocatalyst and provide new insights for selective transformations of organic compounds.

  10. SiRNAs conjugated with aromatic compounds induce RISC-mediated antisense strand selection and strong gene-silencing activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Takanori; Yanagihara, Kazuyoshi; Takei, Yoshifumi; Mihara, Keichiro; Sato, Yuichiro; Seyama, Toshio

    2012-10-05

    Short interference RNA (siRNA) is a powerful tool for suppressing gene expression in mammalian cells. In this study, we focused on the development of siRNAs conjugated with aromatic compounds in order to improve the potency of RNAi and thus to overcome several problems with siRNAs, such as cellular delivery and nuclease stability. The siRNAs conjugated with phenyl, hydroxyphenyl, naphthyl, and pyrenyl derivatives showed strong resistance to nuclease degradation, and were thermodynamically stable compared with unmodified siRNA. A high level of membrane permeability in HeLa cells was also observed. Moreover, these siRNAs exhibited enhanced RNAi efficacy, which exceeded that of locked nucleic acid (LNA)-modified siRNAs, against exogenous Renilla luciferase in HeLa cells. In particular, abundant cytoplasmic localization and strong gene-silencing efficacy were found in the siRNAs conjugated with phenyl and hydroxyphenyl derivatives. The novel siRNAs conjugated with aromatic compounds are promising candidates for a new generation of modified siRNAs that can solve many of the problems associated with RNAi technology. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Formation of chemical compounds from irradiated mixtures of aromatic hydrocarbons and nitrogen oxides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Besemer, A.C.

    1982-01-01

    The paper describes the analysis of products of the photochemical degradation of toluene and toluene-14C in smog chamber experiments. Compounds identified included methylglyoxal, possibly the recently postulated butenedial and other carbonyl compounds. The main product of photochemical degradation

  12. Synthesis, structure, and properties of compounds with a chalcogen-nitrogen bond. VIII. N-sulfonylaryltellurimides - effective catalysts for the condensation of aromatic aldehydes with sulfonamides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naddaka, V.I.; Anavesyan, K.V.; Cherkinskaya, M.L.; Minkin, V.I.

    1988-08-20

    N-Sulfonyldiaryltellurimides and diaryl telluroxides are effective catalysts in the synthesis of N-sulfonylazomethines from aromatic aldehydes and sulfonamides. The catalytic activity of these compounds in the investigated. The reaction is based on the reaction of the aromatic aldehydes with the N-sulfonyldiaryltellurimides, leading to the formation of N-sulfonylazomethines and diaryl telluroxides. The latter in turn react with the sulfonamides, giving the tellurimides, and this gives rise to the cyclic nature of the processes.

  13. Accelerated oxygen consumption by catecholamines in the presence of aromatic nitro and nitroso compounds. Implications and neurotoxicity of nitro compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sridhar, K.

    1981-01-01

    The interactions of catecholamines with nitro and nitroso compounds are studied in view of the possible involvement of catecholamine type neurotransmitters in neurotoxicity caused by hypoxic cell sensitizers. The data reported suggest that neurotoxicity of nitro compounds may be due to depletion of oxygen, catecholamines and ascorbate in nerve tissue with concomitant generation of toxic species such as hydroxyl, hydronitroxyl and superoxide free radicals as well as nitroso and quinonoid derivatives. 5 references, 1 figure

  14. Production of Monomeric Aromatic Compounds from Oil Palm Empty Fruit Bunch Fiber Lignin by Chemical and Enzymatic Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Ling Tang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, oil palm empty fruit bunch (OPEFBF was pretreated with alkali, and lignin was extracted for further degradation into lower molecular weight phenolic compounds using enzymes and chemical means. Efficiency of monomeric aromatic compounds production from OPEFBF lignin via chemical (nitrobenzene versus oxygen and enzymatic [cutinase versus manganese peroxidase (MnP] approaches was investigated. The effects of sodium hydroxide concentration (2, 5, and 10% wt. and reaction time (30, 90, and 180 minutes on the yield of aromatic compounds were studied. The results obtained indicated that nitrobenzene oxidation produced the highest yield (333.17±49.44 ppm hydroxybenzoic acid, 5.67±0.25 ppm p-hydroxybenzaldehyde, 25.57±1.64 ppm vanillic acid, 168.68±23.23 ppm vanillin, 75.44±6.71 ppm syringic acid, 815.26±41.77 ppm syringaldehyde, 15.21±2.19 ppm p-coumaric acid, and 44.75±3.40 ppm ferulic acid, among the tested methods. High sodium hydroxide concentration (10% wt. was needed to promote efficient nitrobenzene oxidation. However, less severe oxidation condition was preferred to preserve the hydroxycinnamic acids (p-coumaric acid and ferulic acid. Cutinase-catalyzed hydrolysis was found to be more efficient than MnP-catalyzed oxidation in the production of aromatic compounds. By hydrolyzed 8% wt. of lignin with 0.625 mL cutinase g−1 lignin at pH 8 and 55°C for 24 hours, about 642.83±14.45 ppm hydroxybenzoic acid, 70.19±3.31 ppm syringaldehyde, 22.80±1.04 ppm vanillin, 27.06±1.20 ppm p-coumaric acid, and 50.19±2.23 ppm ferulic acid were produced.

  15. Recent Progress in the Development of Diesel Surrogate Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitz, W J; Mueller, C J

    2009-12-09

    There has been much recent progress in the area of surrogate fuels for diesel. In the last few years, experiments and modeling have been performed on higher molecular weight components of relevance to diesel fuel such as n-hexadecane (n-cetane) and 2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethylnonane (iso-cetane). Chemical kinetic models have been developed for all the n-alkanes up to 16 carbon atoms. Also, there has been much experimental and modeling work on lower molecular weight surrogate components such as n-decane and n-dodecane that are most relevant to jet fuel surrogates, but are also relevant to diesel surrogates where simulation of the full boiling point range is desired. For two-ring compounds, experimental work on decalin and tetralin recently has been published. For multi-component surrogate fuel mixtures, recent work on modeling of these mixtures and comparisons to real diesel fuel is reviewed. Detailed chemical kinetic models for surrogate fuels are very large in size. Significant progress also has been made in improving the mechanism reduction tools that are needed to make these large models practicable in multi-dimensional reacting flow simulations of diesel combustion. Nevertheless, major research gaps remain. In the case of iso-alkanes, there are experiments and modeling work on only one of relevance to diesel: iso-cetane. Also, the iso-alkanes in diesel are lightly branched and no detailed chemical kinetic models or experimental investigations are available for such compounds. More components are needed to fill out the iso-alkane boiling point range. For the aromatic class of compounds, there has been no new work for compounds in the boiling point range of diesel. Most of the new work has been on alkyl aromatics that are of the range C7 to C8, below the C10 to C20 range that is needed. For the chemical class of cycloalkanes, experiments and modeling on higher molecular weight components are warranted. Finally for multi-component surrogates needed to treat real

  16. PAH, BTEX, carbonyl compound, black-carbon, NO2 and ultrafine particle dynamometer bench emissions for Euro 4 and Euro 5 diesel and gasoline passenger cars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis, Cédric; Liu, Yao; Tassel, Patrick; Perret, Pascal; Chaumond, Agnès; André, Michel

    2016-09-01

    Although implementing Diesel particulate filters (DPF) and other novel aftertreatment technologies makes it possible to achieve significant reductions in particle mass emissions, it may induce the release of ultrafine particles and emissions of many other unregulated compounds. This paper focuses on (i) ultrafine particles, black carbon, BTEX, PAH, carbonyl compounds, and NO2 emissions from Euro 4 and Euro 5 Diesel and gasoline passenger cars, (ii) the influence of driving conditions (e.g., cold start, urban, rural and motorway conditions), and (iii) the impact of additive and catalysed DPF devices on vehicle emissions. Chassis dynamometer tests were conducted on four Euro 5 vehicles and two Euro 4 vehicles: gasoline vehicles with and without direct injection system and Diesel vehicles equipped with additive and catalysed particulate filters. The results showed that compared to hot-start cycles, cold-start urban cycles increased all pollutant emissions by a factor of two. The sole exception was NO2, which was reduced by a factor of 1.3-6. Particulate and black carbon emissions from the gasoline engines were significantly higher than those from the Diesel engines equipped with DPF. Moreover, the catalysed DPF emitted about 3-10 times more carbonyl compounds and particles than additive DPF, respectively, during urban driving cycles, while the additive DPF vehicles emitted 2 and 5 times more BTEX and carbonyl compounds during motorway driving cycles. Regarding particle number distribution, the motorway driving cycle induced the emission of particles smaller in diameter (mode at 15 nm) than the urban cold-start cycle (mode at 80-100 nm). The results showed a clear positive correlation between particle, black carbon, and BTEX emissions, and a negative correlation between particles and NO2.

  17. Modified solution calorimetry approach for determination of vaporization and sublimation enthalpies of branched-chain aliphatic and alkyl aromatic compounds at T = 298.15 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varfolomeev, Mikhail A.; Novikov, Vladimir B.; Nagrimanov, Ruslan N.; Solomonov, Boris N.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Solution enthalpies of 18 branching-chain alkyl aromatic and aliphatic compounds in cyclohexane were measured. • Group contributions to the enthalpy of solvation due to branching and substitution in carbon chain were evaluated. • Modified solution calorimetry based approach for determination of vaporization/sublimation enthalpies was proposed. • This approach provides vaporization/sublimation enthalpies directly at T = 298.15 K. • Vaporization/sublimation enthalpies of 35 branched-chain alkyl aromatic and aliphatic compounds were determined. - Abstract: The enthalpies of solution, solvation and vaporization/sublimation are interrelated values combined in the simplest thermodynamic circle. Hence, experimental determination of vaporization/sublimation enthalpy can be substituted by experimentally simpler determination of solution enthalpy when solvation enthalpy is known. Previously it was found that solvation enthalpies of a wide range of unbranched aliphatic and aromatic solutes in saturated hydrocarbons are in good linear correlation with their molar refraction values. This allows to estimate the vaporization/sublimation enthalpy of any unbranched organic compound from its solution enthalpy in saturated hydrocarbon and molar refraction. In the present work this approach was modified for determination of vaporization/sublimation enthalpy of branched-chain alkyl aromatic and aliphatic compounds. Group contributions to the enthalpy of solvation due to the branching of carbon chain were evaluated. Enthalpies of solution at infinite dilution of 18 branched-chain aliphatic and alkyl aromatic compounds were measured at T = 298.15 K. Vaporization/sublimation enthalpies for 35 branched aliphatic and alkyl aromatic compounds were determined by using modified solution calorimetry approach. These values are in good agreement with available literature data on vaporization/sublimation enthalpies obtained by conventional methods.

  18. Significance of cytochrome P450 system responses and levels of bile fluorescent aromatic compounds in marine wildlife following oil spills

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, R.F.; Anderson, J.W.

    2005-01-01

    The relationships among cytochrome P450 induction in marine wildlife species, levels of fluorescent aromatic compounds (FAC) in their bile, the chemical composition of the inducing compounds, the significance of the exposure pathway, and any resulting injury, as a consequence of exposure to crude oil following a spill, are reviewed. Fish collected after oil spills often show increases in cytochrome P450 system activity, cytochrome P4501A (CYP1A) and bile fluorescent aromatic compounds (FAC), that are correlated with exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in the oil. There is also some evidence for increases in bile FAC and induction of cytochrome P450 in marine birds and mammals after oil spills. However, when observed, increases in these exposure indicators are transitory and generally decrease to background levels within one year after the exposure. Laboratory studies have shown induction of cytochrome P450 systems occurs after exposure of fish to crude oil in water, sediment or food. Most of the PAH found in crude oil (dominantly 2- and 3-ring PAH) are not strong inducers of cytochrome P450. Exposure to the 4-ring chrysenes or the photooxidized products of the PAH may account for the cytochrome P450 responses in fish collected from oil-spill sites. The contribution of non-spill background PAH, particularly combustion-derived (pyrogenic) PAH, to bile FAC and cytochrome P450 system responses can be confounding and needs to be considered when evaluating oil spill effects. The ubiquity of pyrogenic PAH makes it important to fully characterize all sources of PAH, including PAH from natural resources, e.g. retene, in oil spill studies. In addition, such parameters as species, sex, age, ambient temperature and season need to be taken into account. While increases in fish bile FAC and cytochrome P450 system responses, can together, be sensitive general indicators of PAH exposure after an oil spill, there is little unequivocal evidence to suggest a linkage to

  19. Superficial distribution of aromatic compounds and geomicrobiology of sediments from Suruí Mangrove, Guanabara Bay, RJ, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz F. Fontana

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The distribution of selected aromatic compounds and microbiology were assessed in superficial sediments from Suruí Mangrove, Guanabara Bay. Samples were collected at 23 stations, and particle size, organic matter, aromatic compounds, microbiology activity, biopolymers, and topography were determined. The concentration of aromatic compounds was distributed in patches over the entire mangrove, and their highest total concentration was determinated in the mangrove's central area. Particle size differed from most mangroves in that Suruí Mangrove has chernies on the edges and in front of the mangrove, and sand across the whole surface, which hampers the relationship between particle size and hydrocarbons. An average @ 10% p/p of organic matter was obtained, and biopolymers presented high concentrations, especially in the central and back areas of the mangrove. The biopolymers were distributed in high concentrations. The presence of fine sediments is an important factor in hydrocarbon accumulation. With high concentration of organic matter and biopolymers, and the topography with chernies and roots protecting the mangrove, calmer areas are created with the deposition of material transported by wave action. Compared to global distributions, concentrations of aromatic compounds in Suruí Mangrove may be classified from moderate to high, showing that the studied area is highly impacted.A distribuição de compostos aromáticos selecionados e a microbiologia foram avaliados em sedimentos superficiais do Manguezal de Suruí, Baía de Guanabara. Amostras foram coletadas em 23 pontos e determinados a granulometria, matéria orgânica, compostos aromáticos, atividade microbiológica, biopolímeros e a topografia. A concentração dos compostos aromáticos foi distribuída em manchas por todo o manguezal e sua concentração total mais elevada foi encontrada na área central do manguezal. A granulometria diferiu da maioria dos manguezais, uma vez que no

  20. Oriented Decoration in Metal-Functionalized Ordered Mesoporous Silicas and Their Catalytic Applications in the Oxidation of Aromatic Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shijian Zhou

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Ordered mesoporous silicas (OMSs attract considerable attention due to their advanced structural properties. However, for the pristine silica materials, the inert property greatly inhibits their catalytic applications. Thus, to contribute to the versatile surface of OMSs, different metal active sites, including acidic/basic sites and redox sites, have been introduced into specific locations (mesoporous channels and framework of OMSs and the metal-functionalized ordered mesoporous silicas (MOMSs show great potential in the catalytic applications. In this review, we first present the categories of metal active sites. Then, the synthesized processes of MOMSs are thoroughly discussed, in which the metal active sites would be introduced with the assistance of organic groups into the specific locations of OMSs. In addition, the structural morphologies of OMSs are elaborated and the catalytic applications of MOMSs in the oxidation of aromatic compounds are illustrated in detail. Finally, the prospects for the future development in this field are proposed.

  1. Threshold detection of aromatic compounds in wine with an electronic nose and a human sensory panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, José Pedro; Lozano, Jesús; Aleixandre, Manuel; Arroyo, Teresa; Cabellos, Juan Mariano; Gil, Mar; del Carmen Horrillo, Maria

    2009-05-01

    An electronic nose (e-nose) based on thin film semiconductor sensors has been developed in order to compare the performance with a trained human sensory panel. The panel had 25 members and was trained to detect concentration thresholds of some compounds of interest present in wine. Typical red wine compounds such as whiskylactone and white wine compounds such as 3-methyl butanol were measured at different concentrations starting from the detection threshold found in literature (in the micrograms to milligrams per liter range). Pattern recognition methods (principal component analisys and neural networks) were used to process the data. The results showed that the performance of the e-nose for threshold detection was much better than the human panel. The compounds were detected by the e-nose at concentrations up to ten times lower than the panel. Moreover the e-nose was able to identify correctly each concentration level therefore quantitative applications are devised for this system.

  2. Examining spatial patterns in polycyclic aromatic compounds measured in stream macroinvertebrates near a small subarctic oil and gas operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korosi, J B; Eickmeyer, D C; Chin, K S; Palmer, M J; Kimpe, L E; Blais, J M

    2016-03-01

    The Cameron River runs through a small, remote petrochemical development in the Cameron Hills (Northwest Territories, Canada). In order to evaluate the exposure of aquatic biota to contaminants from oil and gas activities, we measured polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs) in macroinvertebrates collected from sites and tributaries along the Cameron River, including upstream and downstream of the development, and sites located near drilled wells (developed). Macroinvertebrate tissue PAC burdens ranged from 0.2-2.8 μg g(-1) lipid for unsubstituted compounds, and from 4.2-63.2 μg g(-1) lipid for alkylated compounds, relatively low compared to similar studies from more industrialized regions in North America. There was no significant difference in tissue PAC burdens between upstream, downstream, or developed sites (p = 0.12), although alkyl PACs in five out of seven developed sites were higher than the regional average. Petrogenic PACs were dominant in most samples, including alkyl fluorines, alkyl phenanthrene/anthracenes, and alkyl dibenzothiophenes. Minimal changes in PAC composition in macroinvertebrate tissues were detected along the Cameron River, with the exception of the two sites furthest downstream that had high concentrations of C3-C4 naphthalene. Overall, our results suggest that oil and gas development in the Cameron Hills has not resulted in substantial increases in PAC bioaccumulation in stream macroinvertebrates, although the potential that alkyl naphthalenes are being transported downstream from the development warrants further attention.

  3. Volatile organic compounds in a residential and commercial urban area with a diesel, compressed natural gas and oxygenated gasoline vehicular fleet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Eduardo Monteiro; Arbilla, Graciela; Gatti, Luciana Vanni

    2010-02-01

    Air samples were collected in a typical residential and commercial area in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, where buses and trucks use diesel and light duty vehicles use compressed natural gas, ethanol, and gasohol (gasoline blended with ethanol) as fuel. A total of 66 C3-C12 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were identified. The most abundant compounds, on a mass concentration basis, included propane, isobutane, i-pentane, m,p-xylene, 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene, toluene, styrene, ethylbenzene, isopropylbenzene, o-xylene and 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene. Two VOCs photochemical reactivity rankings are presented: one involves reaction with OH and the other involves production of ozone.

  4. Enhancement of protocatechuate decarboxylase activity for the effective production of muconate from lignin-related aromatic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonoki, Tomonori; Morooka, Miyuki; Sakamoto, Kimitoshi; Otsuka, Yuichiro; Nakamura, Masaya; Jellison, Jody; Goodell, Barry

    2014-12-20

    The decarboxylation reaction of protocatechuate has been described as a bottleneck and a rate-limiting step in cis,cis-muconate (ccMA) bioproduction from renewable feedstocks such as sugar. Because sugars are already in high demand in the development of many bio-based products, our work focuses on improving protocatechuate decarboxylase (Pdc) activity and ccMA production in particular, from lignin-related aromatic compounds. We previously had transformed an Escherichia coli strain using aroY, which had been used as a protocatechuate decarboxylase encoding gene from Klebsiella pneumoniae subsp. pneumoniae A170-40, and inserted other required genes from Pseudomonas putida KT2440, to allow the production of ccMA from vanillin. This recombinant strain produced ccMA from vanillin, however the Pdc reaction step remained a bottleneck during incubation. In the current study, we identify a way to increase protocatechuate decarboxylase activity in E. coli through enzyme production involving both aroY and kpdB; the latter which encodes for the B subunit of 4-hydroxybenzoate decarboxylase. This permits expression of Pdc activity at a level approximately 14-fold greater than the strain with aroY only. The expression level of AroY increased, apparently as a function of the co-expression of AroY and KpdB. Our results also imply that ccMA may inhibit vanillate demethylation, a reaction step that is rate limiting for efficient ccMA production from lignin-related aromatic compounds, so even though ccMA production may be enhanced, other challenges to overcome vanilate demethylation inhibition still remain.

  5. Recent Progress in the Development of Diesel Surrogate Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitz, W J

    2009-09-04

    There has been much recent progress in the area of surrogate fuels for diesel. In the last few years, experiments and modeling have been performed on higher molecular weight components of relevance to diesel fuel such as n-hexadecane (n-cetane) and 2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethylnonane (iso-cetane). Chemical kinetic models have been developed for all the n-alkanes up to 16 carbon atoms. Also, there has been much experimental and modeling work on lower molecular weight surrogate components such as n-decane and do-decane which are most relevant to jet fuel surrogates, but are also relevant to diesel surrogates where simulation of the full boiling point range is desired. For the cycloalkanes, experimental work on decalin and tetralin recently has been published. For multi-component surrogate fuel mixtures, recent work on modeling of these mixtures and comparisons to real diesel fuel is reviewed. Detailed chemical kinetic models for surrogate fuels are very large in size. Significant progress also has been made in improving the mechanism reduction tools that are needed to make these large models practicable in multidimensional reacting flow simulations of diesel combustion. Nevertheless, major research gaps remain. In the case of iso-alkanes, there are experiments and modeling work on only one of relevance to diesel: iso-cetane. Also, the iso-alkanes in diesel are lightly branched and no detailed chemical kinetic models or experimental investigations are available for such compounds. More components are needed to fill out the iso-alkane boiling point range. For the aromatic class of compounds, there has been no new work for compounds in the boiling point range of diesel. Most of the new work has been on alkyl aromatics that are of the range C7 to C8, below the C10 to C20 range that is needed. For the chemical class of cycloalkanes, experiments and modeling on higher molecular weight components are warranted. Finally for multi-component surrogates needed to treat real diesel

  6. [FTIR detection of unregulated emissions from a diesel engine with biodiesel fuel].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Pi-qiang; Hu, Zhi-yuan; Lou, Di-ming

    2012-02-01

    Biodiesel, as one of the most promising alternative fuels, has received more attention because of limited fossil fuels. A comparison of biodiesel and petroleum diesel fuel is discussed as regards engine unregulated exhaust emissions. A diesel fuel, a pure biodiesel fuel, and fuel with 20% V/V biodiesel blend ratio were tested without engine modification The present study examines six typical unregulated emissions by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) method: formaldehyde (HCHO), acetaldehyde (C2 H4 O), acetone (C3 H6 O), toluene (C7 H8), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and carbon dioxide (CO2). The results show addition of biodiesel fuel increases the formaldehyde emission, and B20 fuel has little change, but the formaldehyde emission of pure biodiesel shows a clear trend of addition. Compared with the pure diesel fuel, the acetaldehyde of B20 fuel has a distinct decrease, and the acetaldehyde emission of pure biodiesel is lower than that of the pure diesel fuel at low and middle engine loads, but higher at high engine load. The acetone emission is very low, and increases for B20 and pure biodiesel fuels as compared to diesel fuel. Compared with the diesel fuel, the toluene and sulfur dioxide values of the engine show a distinct decrease with biodiesel blend ratio increasing. It is clear that the biodiesel could reduce aromatic compounds and emissions of diesel engines. The carbon dioxide emission of pure biodiesel has a little lower value than diesel, showing that the biodiesel benefits control of greenhouse gas.

  7. N,N'-Dithiobisphthalimide, a disulfide aromatic compound, is a potent spermicide agent in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florez, Martha; Díaz, Emilce S; Brito, Iván; González, Jorge; Morales, Patricio

    2011-12-01

    Several studies have shown that users of vaginal preparations containing nonoxynol-9 (N-9) are at a high risk for sexually transmitted diseases, including HIV. Therefore, there is a great interest in identifying compounds that can specifically inhibit sperm without damaging the vaginal lining, possess a powerful spermicide activity, and can be used in contraceptive vaginal preparations to replace N-9. In this work, we studied the spermostatic and/or spermicidal activity of five non-detergent, disulfide compounds on human sperm, HeLa cells, and Lactobacillus acidophilus. The motility and viability of human sperm in semen and culture medium was evaluated after treatment with different concentrations of the disulfide compounds (2.5 - 100 µM). In addition, we evaluated the cytotoxic effect on HeLa cells and L. acidophilus. We identified compound 101, N,N'-dithiobisphthalimide (No. CAS 7764-30-9), as the most effective molecule. It has a half maximal effective concentration (EC(50)) of 8 µM and a minimum effective concentration (defined as the concentration that immobilizes 100 percent of the sperm in 20 sec) of 24 µM. At these concentrations, compound 101 does not affect the viability of the sperm, HeLa cells, or L. acidophilus. Our results indicate that dithiobisphthalimide has a potent spermostatic, irreversible effect with no toxic effects on HeLa cells and L. acidophilus.

  8. Degradation of specific aromatic compounds migrating from PEXpipes into drinking water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryssel, Sune Thyge; Arvin, Erik; Lützhøft, Hans-Christian Holten

    2015-01-01

    Nine specific compounds identified to migrate from polyethylene (PE) and cross-linked polyethylene (PEX) to drinking water were investigated for their degradation in drinking water. Three sample types were studied: field samples (collected at consumer taps), PEX pipe water extractions, and water...... derived NVOC. Furthermore, the degradation in drinking water from four different locations with three different water works was similar. In conclusion, eight out of the nine compounds studied would e if being released from the pipes - reach consumers with only minor concentration decrease during water...

  9. Escherichia coli as a potential hydrocarbon conversion microorganism. Oxidation of aliphatic and aromatic compounds by recombinant E. coli in two-liquid phase (aqueous-organic) systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Favre-Bulle, Olivier

    1992-01-01

    The increased interest in the study of hydrocarbon utilizing microorganisms in recent years has been stimulated by the possibility of using their monooxygenases in the selective oxidation of aliphatic and aromatic compounds. As an example, long chain (>C16) n-alkanes are converted to dicarboxylic

  10. Highly Active and Specific Tyrosine Ammonia-Lyases from Diverse Origins Enable Enhanced Production of Aromatic Compounds in Bacteria and Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jendresen, Christian Bille; Stahlhut, Steen Gustav; Li, Mingji

    2015-01-01

    Phenylalanine and tyrosine ammonia-lyases form cinnamic acid and p-coumaric acid, which are precursors of a wide range of aromatic compounds of biotechnological interest. Lack of highly active and specific tyrosine ammonia-lyases has previously been a limitation in metabolic engineering approaches...

  11. Effectiveness of Liquid-Liquid Extraction, Solid Phase Extraction, and Headspace Technique for Determination of Some Volatile Water-Soluble Compounds of Rose Aromatic Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canbay, Hale Seçilmiş

    2017-01-01

    Steam distillation is used to isolate scent of rose flowers. Rose aromatic water is commonly used in European cuisine and aromatherapy besides its use in cosmetic industry for its lovely scent. In this study, three different sampling techniques, liquid-liquid extraction (LLE), headspace technique (HS), and solid phase extraction (SPE), were compared for the analysis of volatile water-soluble compounds in commercial rose aromatic water. Some volatile water-soluble compounds of rose aromatic water were also analyzed by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS). In any case, it was concluded that one of the solid phase extraction methods led to higher recoveries for 2-phenylethyl alcohol (PEA) in the rose aromatic water than the liquid-liquid extraction and headspace technique. Liquid-liquid extraction method provided higher recovery ratios for citronellol, nerol, and geraniol than others. Ideal linear correlation coefficient values were observed by GCMS for quantitative analysis of volatile compounds ( r 2 ≥ 0.999). Optimized methods showed acceptable repeatability (RSDs 95%). For compounds such as α -pinene, linalool, β -caryophyllene, α -humulene, methyl eugenol, and eugenol, the best recovery values were obtained with LLE and SPE.

  12. Biological responses to dioxin-like compounds and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in eelpout Zoarces viviparus. Contributions to an integrated environmental assessment approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tairova, Zhanna

    This PhD project attempts to link exposure to environmentally persistent organic pollutants (POPs) such as dioxin-like compounds (DLCs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) to effects in the marine fish eelpout Zoarces viviparus by combining different in vivo and in vitro biomarkers in both...

  13. Effectiveness of Liquid-Liquid Extraction, Solid Phase Extraction, and Headspace Technique for Determination of Some Volatile Water-Soluble Compounds of Rose Aromatic Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hale Seçilmiş Canbay

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Steam distillation is used to isolate scent of rose flowers. Rose aromatic water is commonly used in European cuisine and aromatherapy besides its use in cosmetic industry for its lovely scent. In this study, three different sampling techniques, liquid-liquid extraction (LLE, headspace technique (HS, and solid phase extraction (SPE, were compared for the analysis of volatile water-soluble compounds in commercial rose aromatic water. Some volatile water-soluble compounds of rose aromatic water were also analyzed by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS. In any case, it was concluded that one of the solid phase extraction methods led to higher recoveries for 2-phenylethyl alcohol (PEA in the rose aromatic water than the liquid-liquid extraction and headspace technique. Liquid-liquid extraction method provided higher recovery ratios for citronellol, nerol, and geraniol than others. Ideal linear correlation coefficient values were observed by GCMS for quantitative analysis of volatile compounds (r2≥0.999. Optimized methods showed acceptable repeatability (RSDs 95%. For compounds such as α-pinene, linalool, β-caryophyllene, α-humulene, methyl eugenol, and eugenol, the best recovery values were obtained with LLE and SPE.

  14. Greener Friedel-Crafts Acylation using Microwave-enhanced reactivity of Bismuth Triflate in the Friedel-Crafts Benzoylation of Aromatic Compounds with Benzoic Anhydride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tran, Phuong Hoang; Nguyen, Hai Truong; Hansen, Poul Erik

    2017-01-01

    An efficient and facile bismuth trifluoromethanesulfonate-catalyzed benzoylation of aromatic compounds using benzoic anhydride under solvent-free microwave irradiation has been developed. The microwave-assisted Friedel-Crafts benzoylation results in good yields within short reaction times. Bismuth...

  15. The pollution characteristics of odor, volatile organochlorinated compounds and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons emitted from plastic waste recycling plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Chung-Jung; Chen, Mei-Lien; Chang, Keng-Fu; Chang, Fu-Kuei; Mao, I-Fang

    2009-02-01

    Plastic waste treatment trends toward recycling in many countries; however, the melting process in the facilities which adopt material recycling method for treating plastic waste may emit toxicants and cause sensory annoyance. The objectives of this study were to analyze the pollution characteristics of the emissions from the plastic waste recycling plants, particularly in harmful volatile organochlorinated compounds, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), odor levels and critical odorants. Ten large recycling plants were selected for analysis of odor concentration (OC), volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and PAHs inside and outside the plants using olfactometry, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and high performance liquid chromatography-fluorescence detector, respectively. The olfactometric results showed that the melting processes used for treating polyethylene/polypropylene (PE/PP) and polyvinyl chloride (PVC) plastic waste significantly produced malodor, and the odor levels at downwind boundaries were 100-229 OC, which all exceeded Taiwan's EPA standard of 50 OC. Toluene, ethylbenzene, 4-methyl-2-pentanone, methyl methacrylate and acrolein accounted for most odors compared to numerous VOCs. Sixteen organochlorinated compounds were measured in the ambient air emitted from the PVC plastic waste recycling plant and total concentrations were 245-553 microg m(-3); most were vinyl chloride, chloroform and trichloroethylene. Concentrations of PAHs inside the PE/PP plant were 8.97-252.16 ng m(-3), in which the maximum level were 20-fold higher than the levels detected from boundaries. Most of these recycling plants simply used filter to treat the melting fumes, and this could not efficiently eliminate the gaseous compounds and malodor. Improved exhaust air pollution control were strongly recommended in these industries.

  16. Rhodium-catalyzed direct ortho C-N bond formation of aromatic azo compounds with azides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hao; Yu, Yang; Hong, Xiaohu; Tan, Qitao; Xu, Bin

    2014-04-04

    An efficient rhodium-catalyzed regioselective C-N bond formation of azo compounds in good to excellent yields through C-H bond functionalization using azides as the nitrogen source was developed. Alkyl, aryl, and sulfonyl azides could be efficiently assembled in this reaction with excellent functional group tolerance.

  17. Diesel oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oil ... Diesel oil ... Diesel oil poisoning can cause symptoms in many parts of the body. EYES, EARS, NOSE, AND THROAT Loss of ... most dangerous effects of hydrocarbon (such as diesel oil) poisoning are due to inhaling the fumes. NERVOUS ...

  18. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in exhaust emissions from diesel engines powered by rapeseed oil methylester and heated non-esterified rapeseed oil

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vojtíšek-Lom, M.; Czerwinski, J.; Leníček, J.; Sekyra, M.; Topinka, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 60, 14 JUNE (2012), s. 253-261 ISSN 1352-2310 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP503/11/0142 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GA101/08/1717; GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0568; project MEDETOX(XE) LIFE10ENV/CZ/651 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390703 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : diesel engine * diesel emissions * particulate matter Subject RIV: DN - Health Impact of the Environment Quality Impact factor: 3.110, year: 2012

  19. Effect of biofilm formation by Oenococcus oeni on malolactic fermentation and the release of aromatic compounds in wine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre eBastard

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The winemaking process involves the alcoholic fermentation of must, often followed by malolactic fermentation. The latter, mainly carried out by the lactic acid bacterium Oenococcus oeni, is used to improve wine quality when acidity reduction is required. Moreover, it prevents microbial spoilage and improves the wine’s organoleptic profile. Prior observations showed that O. oeni is able to resist several months in harsh wine conditions when adhered on oak barrels. Since biofilm is a prevailing microbial lifestyle in natural environments, the capacity of O. oeni to form biofilms was investigated on winemaking material such as stainless steel and oak chips. Scanning Electron Microscopy and Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy showed that O. oeni was able to adhere to these surfaces and form spatially organized microcolonies embedded in extracellular substances. To assess the competitive advantage of this mode of life in wine, the properties of biofilm and planktonic cells were compared after inoculation in a fermented must (pH 3.5 or 3.2 and 12% ethanol The results indicated that the biofilm culture of O. oeni conferred (i increased tolerance to wine stress, and (ii functional performance with effective malolactic activities. Relative gene expression focusing on stress genes and genes involved in EPS synthesis was investigated in a mature biofilm and emphasized the role of the matrix in increased biofilm resistance.As oak is commonly used in wine aging, we focused on the O. oeni biofilm on this material and its contribution to the development of wine color and the release of aromatic compounds. Analytical chromatography was used to target the main oak aging compounds such as vanillin, gaiacol, eugenol, whisky-lactones and furfural. The results reveal that O. oeni biofilm developed on oak can modulate the wood-wine transfer of volatile aromatic compounds during malolactic fermentation and aging by decreasing furfural, gaiacol and eugenol in

  20. Effect of Biofilm Formation by Oenococcus oeni on Malolactic Fermentation and the Release of Aromatic Compounds in Wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastard, Alexandre; Coelho, Christian; Briandet, Romain; Canette, Alexis; Gougeon, Régis; Alexandre, Hervé; Guzzo, Jean; Weidmann, Stéphanie

    2016-01-01

    The winemaking process involves the alcoholic fermentation of must, often followed by malolactic fermentation (MLF). The latter, mainly carried out by the lactic acid bacterium Oenococcus oeni, is used to improve wine quality when acidity reduction is required. Moreover, it prevents microbial spoilage and improves the wine's organoleptic profile. Prior observations showed that O. oeni is able to resist several months in harsh wine conditions when adhered on oak barrels. Since biofilm is a prevailing microbial lifestyle in natural environments, the capacity of O. oeni to form biofilms was investigated on winemaking material such as stainless steel and oak chips. Scanning Electron Microscopy and Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy showed that O. oeni was able to adhere to these surfaces and form spatially organized microcolonies embedded in extracellular substances. To assess the competitive advantage of this mode of life in wine, the properties of biofilm and planktonic cells were compared after inoculation in a fermented must (pH 3.5 or 3.2 and 12% ethanol) The results indicated that the biofilm culture of O. oeni conferred (i) increased tolerance to wine stress, and (ii) functional performance with effective malolactic activities. Relative gene expression focusing on stress genes and genes involved in EPS synthesis was investigated in a mature biofilm and emphasized the role of the matrix in increased biofilm resistance. As oak is commonly used in wine aging, we focused on the O. oeni biofilm on this material and its contribution to the development of wine color and the release of aromatic compounds. Analytical chromatography was used to target the main oak aging compounds such as vanillin, gaiacol, eugenol, whisky-lactones, and furfural. The results reveal that O. oeni biofilm developed on oak can modulate the wood-wine transfer of volatile aromatic compounds during MLF and aging by decreasing furfural, gaiacol, and eugenol in particular. This work showed that O

  1. Harnessing eugenol as a substrate for production of aromatic compounds with recombinant strains of Amycolatopsis sp. HR167.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overhage, Jörg; Steinbüchel, Alexander; Priefert, Horst

    2006-09-18

    To harness eugenol as cheap substrate for the biotechnological production of aromatic compounds, the vanillyl alcohol oxidase gene (vaoA) from Penicillium simplicissimum CBS 170.90 was cloned in an expression vector suitable for Gram-positive bacteria and expressed in the vanillin-tolerant Gram-positive strain Amycolatopsis sp. HR167. Recombinant strains harboring hybrid plasmid pRLE6SKvaom exhibited a specific vanillyl alcohol oxidase activity of 1.1U/g protein. Moreover, this strain had gained the ability to grow on eugenol as sole carbon source. The intermediates coniferyl alcohol, coniferyl aldehyde, ferulic acid, guajacol, and vanillic acid were detected as excreted compounds during growth on eugenol, whereas vanillin could only be detected in trace amounts. Resting cells of Amycolatopsis sp. HR167 (pRLE6SKvaom) produced coniferyl alcohol from eugenol with a maximum conversion rate of about 2.3 mmol/h/l of culture, and a maximum coniferyl alcohol concentration of 4.7 g/1 was obtained after 16 h biotransformation without further optimization. Beside coniferyl alcohol, traces of coniferyl aldehyde and ferulic acid were also detected.

  2. Effects of fuels, engine load and exhaust after-treatment on diesel engine SVOC emissions and development of SVOC profiles for receptor modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lei; Bohac, Stanislav V.; Chernyak, Sergei M.; Batterman, Stuart A.

    2015-01-01

    Diesel exhaust emissions contain numerous semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) for which emission information is limited, especially for idling conditions, new fuels and the new after-treatment systems. This study investigates exhaust emissions of particulate matter (PM), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), nitro-PAHs (NPAHs), and sterane and hopane petroleum biomarkers from a heavy-duty (6.4 L) diesel engine at various loads (idle, 600 and 900 kPa BMEP), with three types of fuel (ultra-low sulfur diesel or ULSD, Swedish low aromatic diesel, and neat soybean biodiesel), and with and without a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) and diesel particulate filter (DPF). Swedish diesel and biodiesel reduced emissions of PM2.5, Σ15PAHs, Σ11NPAHs, Σ5Hopanes and Σ6Steranes, and biodiesel resulted in the larger reductions. However, idling emissions increased for benzo[k]fluoranthene (Swedish diesel), 5-nitroacenaphthene (biodiesel) and PM2.5 (biodiesel), a significant result given the attention to exposures from idling vehicles and the toxicity of high-molecular-weight PAHs and NPAHs. The DOC + DPF combination reduced PM2.5 and SVOC emissions during DPF loading (>99% reduction) and DPF regeneration (83–99%). The toxicity of diesel exhaust, in terms of the estimated carcinogenic risk, was greatly reduced using Swedish diesel, biodiesel fuels and the DOC + DPF. PAH profiles showed high abundances of three and four ring compounds as well as naphthalene; NPAH profiles were dominated by nitro-naphthalenes, 1-nitropyrene and 9-nitroanthracene. Both the emission rate and the composition of diesel exhaust depended strongly on fuel type, engine load and after-treatment system. The emissions data and chemical profiles presented are relevant to the development of emission inventories and exposure and risk assessments. PMID:25709535

  3. Effects of fuels, engine load and exhaust after-treatment on diesel engine SVOC emissions and development of SVOC profiles for receptor modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lei; Bohac, Stanislav V; Chernyak, Sergei M; Batterman, Stuart A

    2015-02-01

    Diesel exhaust emissions contain numerous semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) for which emission information is limited, especially for idling conditions, new fuels and the new after-treatment systems. This study investigates exhaust emissions of particulate matter (PM), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), nitro-PAHs (NPAHs), and sterane and hopane petroleum biomarkers from a heavy-duty (6.4 L) diesel engine at various loads (idle, 600 and 900 kPa BMEP), with three types of fuel (ultra-low sulfur diesel or ULSD, Swedish low aromatic diesel, and neat soybean biodiesel), and with and without a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) and diesel particulate filter (DPF). Swedish diesel and biodiesel reduced emissions of PM 2.5 , Σ 15 PAHs, Σ 11 NPAHs, Σ 5 Hopanes and Σ 6 Steranes, and biodiesel resulted in the larger reductions. However, idling emissions increased for benzo[k]fluoranthene (Swedish diesel), 5-nitroacenaphthene (biodiesel) and PM 2.5 (biodiesel), a significant result given the attention to exposures from idling vehicles and the toxicity of high-molecular-weight PAHs and NPAHs. The DOC + DPF combination reduced PM 2.5 and SVOC emissions during DPF loading (>99% reduction) and DPF regeneration (83-99%). The toxicity of diesel exhaust, in terms of the estimated carcinogenic risk, was greatly reduced using Swedish diesel, biodiesel fuels and the DOC + DPF. PAH profiles showed high abundances of three and four ring compounds as well as naphthalene; NPAH profiles were dominated by nitro-naphthalenes, 1-nitropyrene and 9-nitroanthracene. Both the emission rate and the composition of diesel exhaust depended strongly on fuel type, engine load and after-treatment system. The emissions data and chemical profiles presented are relevant to the development of emission inventories and exposure and risk assessments.

  4. Chapter 3. Determination of semivolatile organic compounds and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in solids by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaugg, Steven D.; Burkhardt, Mark R.; Burbank, Teresa L.; Olson, Mary C.; Iverson, Jana L.; Schroeder, Michael P.

    2006-01-01

    A method for the determination of 38 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and semivolatile organic compounds in solid samples is described. Samples are extracted using a pressurized solvent extraction system. The compounds of interest are extracted from the solid sample twice at 13,800 kilopascals; first at 120 degrees Celsius using a water/isopropyl alcohol mixture (50:50, volume-to-volume ratio), and then the sample is extracted at 200 degrees Celsius using a water/isopropyl alcohol mixture (80:20, volume-to-volume ratio). The compounds are isolated using disposable solid-phase extraction (SPE) cartridges containing divinylbenzene-vinylpyrrolidone copolymer resin. The cartridges are dried with nitrogen gas, and then sorbed compounds are eluted from the SPE material using a dichloromethane/diethyl ether mixture (80:20, volume-to-volume ratio) and passed through a sodium sulfate/Florisil SPE cartridge to remove residual water and to further clean up the extract. The concentrated extract is solvent exchanged into ethyl acetate and the solvent volume reduced to 0.5 milliliter. Internal standard compounds are added prior to analysis by capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Comparisons of PAH data for 28 sediment samples extracted by Soxhlet and the accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) method described in this report produced similar results. Extraction of PAH compounds from standard reference material using this method also compared favorably with Soxhlet extraction. The recoveries of PAHs less than molecular weight 202 (pyrene or fluoranthene) are higher by up to 20 percent using this ASE method, whereas the recoveries of PAHs greater than or equal to molecular weight 202 are equivalent. This ASE method of sample extraction of solids has advantages over conventional Soxhlet extraction by increasing automation of the extraction process, reducing extraction time, and using less solvent. Extract cleanup also is greatly simplified because SPE replaces

  5. Development and optimization of methods for the radiofluorination of aromatic compounds with specific, high fluorine-18 activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franken, K.

    1987-06-01

    The positron emitter fluorine-18 (T 1/2 = 110 min) is an ideal radionuclide for analogue tracers in positron emission tomography (PET). In this study the production of the electrophilic species [ 18 F]-F 2 , [ 18 F]-CH 3 CO 2 F and to some extent [ 18 F]-XeF 2 has been optimized with respect to yield and specific activity. Selectivity and reactivity of these species have been studied in simple aromatic model compounds. Fluorine was produced via the 20 Ne(d,α) 18 F reaction. The effect of target material, dimensions, amount of carrier (F 2 ), pressure, beam current and irradiation time was studied. Reactivity of [ 18 F]-F 2 and [ 18 F]-CH 3 CO 2 F with respect to hydrogen subsitution was systematically studied in a series of benzene derivatives (C 6 H 5 X, X = CF 3 , I, Br, CL, F, H, CH 3 , OCH 3 , OH) in various solvents (CHCl 3 , CFCl 3 , CH 3 CN, CH 3 OH, CF 3 COOH). The radiochemical yield of 18 F-for-H-substitution in the aromatic ring increased with increasing acceptor number (AN) of the solvent. The electrophilic nature of both fluorination agents was confirmed by a Hammett plot. As expected, [ 18 F]-CH 3 CO 2 F showed a higher selectivity than [ 18 F]-F 2 . Direct radiofluorination with [ 18 F]-F 2 and [ 18 F]-CH 3 CO 2 F was successfully applied to the biomolecules phenylalanine, tyrosine and DOPA. As potential methods for no-carrier-added (n.c.a.) radiofluorination some less common dediazoniation reactions were also studied. (orig./RB) [de

  6. Analysis of the interaction of polycyclic aromatic compounds in a model organism: integration of genotoxic and histopathological effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Pereira

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Due to their toxicity, especially their carcinogenic potential, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs are considered priority in biomonitoring programmes. Many of these compounds are listed through the European Water Framework Directive as priority pollutants. Benzo(bfluoranthene (B[b]F, considered potentially carcinogenic, and phenanthrene (Phe, non-carcinogenic, are two common PAHs in coastal waters and own distinct proprieties that are reflected in their mechanisms of toxicity. Still, their interaction effects onto the aquatic biota remain largely unknown. This work aimed to analyze the genotoxic effects caused by the interaction of B[b]F and Phe and their relation to histopathological alterations in the liver. The model organism was the seabass Dicentrarchus labrax, an important coastal species for fisheries and aquaculture. For the purpose, fish were injected with the two compounds (5 µg/g fish ww, isolated or in mixture, and incubated for 24h. The results only revealed minor clastogenic and aneugenic alterations, determined through erythrocytic nuclear abnormalities. On the other hand, the Comet assay showed significant DNA strand breakage in the individuals injected with B[b]F and the combination of the two compounds. On the contrary, Phe failed to cause significant genotoxic effects. Significant hepatic histopathological alterations were also found in animals injected with B[b]F, relating especially to inflammation-related responses. Overall, the results indicate no significant additive effect between B[b]F and Phe, under the current experimental conditions. Nonetheless, the seabass revealed to be sensitive to exposure to B[b]F (a higher molecular weight PAH, likely due to more efficient bioactivation of the pollutant (yielded genotoxic metabolites and reactive oxygen species, when compared to Phe. It is of paramount importance to understand the long-term interaction effects between PAHs under ecologically-relevant scenarios, since

  7. Patterns of pi-electron delocalization in aromatic and antiaromatic organic compounds in the light of Hückel's 4n + 2 rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feixas, Ferran; Matito, Eduard; Solà, Miquel; Poater, Jordi

    2010-07-14

    The total pi-electron delocalization of a series of classical aromatic and antiaromatic organic compounds is separated into ortho (1,2), meta (1,3), para (1,4), and successive contributions (the so-called delocalization crossed terms) and the changes that take place in these crossed terms when two electrons are added or removed are analyzed. Our results show that these changes follow a similar alternation pattern in all cases. The patterns found represent a kind of electronic footprints that makes it possible to discern between aromatic and antiaromatic systems.

  8. Effects of aromatic compounds on the production of bacterial nanocellulose by Gluconacetobacter xylinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuo; Winestrand, Sandra; Guo, Xiang; Chen, Lin; Hong, Feng; Jönsson, Leif J

    2014-04-30

    Bacterial cellulose (BC) is a polymeric nanostructured fibrillar network produced by certain microorganisms, principally Gluconacetobacter xylinus. BC has a great potential of application in many fields. Lignocellulosic biomass has been investigated as a cost-effective feedstock for BC production through pretreatment and hydrolysis. It is well known that detoxification of lignocellulosic hydrolysates may be required to achieve efficient production of BC. Recent results suggest that phenolic compounds contribute to the inhibition of G. xylinus. However, very little is known about the effect on G. xylinus of specific lignocellulose-derived inhibitors. In this study, the inhibitory effects of four phenolic model compounds (coniferyl aldehyde, ferulic acid, vanillin and 4-hydroxybenzoic acid) on the growth of G. xylinus, the pH of the culture medium, and the production of BC were investigated in detail. The stability of the phenolics in the bacterial cultures was investigated and the main bioconversion products were identified and quantified. Coniferyl aldehyde was the most potent inhibitor, followed by vanillin, ferulic acid, and 4-hydroxybenzoic acid. There was no BC produced even with coniferyl aldehyde concentrations as low as 2 mM. Vanillin displayed a negative effect on the bacteria and when the vanillin concentration was raised to 2.5 mM the volumetric yield of BC decreased to ~40% of that obtained in control medium without inhibitors. The phenolic acids, ferulic acid and 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, showed almost no toxic effects when less than 2.5 mM. The bacterial cultures oxidized coniferyl aldehyde to ferulic acid with a yield of up to 81%. Vanillin was reduced to vanillyl alcohol with a yield of up to 80%. This is the first investigation of the effect of specific phenolics on the production of BC by G. xylinus, and is also the first demonstration of the ability of G. xylinus to convert phenolic compounds. This study gives a better understanding of how

  9. Oxidation of heteroleptic diarylpalladium compounds with tert-butyl hydroperoxide. Substituent effects in aromatic oxidation reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koten, G. van; Valk, J.-M.; Boersma, J.

    1996-01-01

    A series of heteroleptic diarylpalladium compounds, containing both a naphthyl (1-C10H6CH2NMe2-2 or 1-C10H5CH2NMe2-2-Me-3) and a phenyl (1-C6H4CH2NMe2-2 or 1-C6H3CH2NMe2-2-Me-x, x = 3, 5, 6) monoanionic C,N-bidentate ligand, was reacted with tert-butyl hydroperoxide (TBHP) to give selective oxygen

  10. Peroxynitrite scavenging activities of aromatic compounds isolated from Konnyaku, Amorphophallus konjac K.Koch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niwa, Tatsuya; Murakami, Kazushi; Ohtake, Tetsuro; Etoh, Hideo; Shimizu, Atsushi; Shimizu, Yasuo; Kato, Yoji; Tanaka, Hitoshi

    2002-06-01

    (+/-)-5,5'-Dimethoxysesamin, erythrinasinate, indole-3-carbaldehyde, (7R,8S)-dihydrodehydrodiconiferyl alcohol 9-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside, cis- and trans-N-(p-coumaroyl)serotonin, serotonin, 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid, and 3,4-dihydroxybenzaldehyde have been found in tobiko, a food by-product, and evaluation of their peroxynitrite scavenging activities has been done. Among these compounds, serotonin, trans-N-(p-coumaroyl)serotonin, 3,4-dihydroxybenzaldehyde, and 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid showed stronger activities than that of BHT (butylated hydroxytoluene) at 200 microM.

  11. Long-term performance and stability of a continuous granular airlift reactor treating a high-strength wastewater containing a mixture of aromatic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramos, Carlos; Suárez-Ojeda, María Eugenia; Carrera, Julián, E-mail: julian.carrera@uab.cat

    2016-02-13

    Highlights: • Aerobic biodegradation of a mixture of aromatics is feasible in a granular reactor. • Applied organic loading rate is a key parameter for an optimal reactor performance. • Stable mature aerobic granules were maintained 400 days in a continuous reactor. • Sphingobium, Cytophaga and Comamonas were the main genera in the aerobic granules. - Abstract: Continuous feeding operation of an airlift reactor and its inoculation with mature aerobic granules allowed the successful treatment of a mixture of aromatic compounds (p-nitrophenol, o-cresol and phenol). Complete biodegradation of p-nitrophenol, o-cresol, phenol and their metabolic intermediates was achieved at an organic loading rate of 0.61 g COD L{sup −1} d{sup −1}. Stable granulation was obtained throughout the long-term operation (400 days) achieving an average granule size of 2.0 ± 1 mm and a sludge volumetric index of 26 ± 1 mL g{sup −1} TSS. The identified genera in the aerobic granular biomass were heterotrophic bacteria able to consume aromatic compounds. Therefore, the continuous feeding regimen and the exposure of aerobic granules to a mixture of aromatic compounds make possible to obtain good granulation and high removal efficiency.

  12. Dibasic Ammonium Phosphate Application Enhances Aromatic Compound Concentration in Bog Bilberry Syrup Wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shao-Yang; Li, Yi-Qing; Li, Teng; Yang, Hang-Yu; Ren, Jie; Zhang, Bo-Lin; Zhu, Bao-Qing

    2016-12-29

    A nitrogen deficiency always causes bog bilberry syrup wine to have a poor sensory feature. This study investigated the effect of nitrogen source addition on volatile compounds during bog bilberry syrup wine fermentation. The syrup was supplemented with 60, 90, 120 or 150 mg/L dibasic ammonium phosphate (DAP) before fermentation. Results showed that an increase of DAP amounts accelerated fermentation rate, increased alcohol content, and decreased sugar level. Total phenol and total flavonoid content were also enhanced with the increase of DAP amounts. A total of 91 volatile compounds were detected in the wine and their concentrations were significantly enhanced with the increase of DAP. Ethyl acetate, isoamyl acetate, phenethyl acetate, ethyl butanoate, ethyl hexanoate, ethyl octanoate, ethyl decanoate, isobutanol, isoamyl alcohol, levo -2,3-butanediol, 2-phenylethanol, meso -2,3-butanediol, isobutyric acid, hexanoic acid, and octanoic acid exhibited a significant increase of their odor activity value (OAV) with the increase of DAP amounts. Bog bilberry syrup wine possessed fruity, fatty, and caramel flavors as its major aroma, whereas a balsamic note was the least present. The increase of DAP amounts significantly improved the global aroma attributes, thereby indicating that DAP supplementation could promote wine fermentation performance and enhance the sensory quality of bog bilberry syrup wine.

  13. Aromatic fluorine compounds. X. The 2,3- and 2,6-difluoropyridines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finger, G.C.; Starr, L.D.; Roe, A.; Link, W.J.

    1962-01-01

    The preparation of difluoropyridines by the Schiemann reaction was investigated. 2-Amino-6-fluoropyridine (IIIa), necessary for the synthesis of 2,6-difluoropyridine (IVa) by the Schiemann reaction, was conveniently prepared by the Curtius degradation of 6-fluoropicolinic hydrazide (IIa) and by the Hofmann reaction on 6-fluoropicolinamide (IId). Since an ??-fluorine on a pyridine nucleus is preferentially replaced by hydrazine when it is either adjacent to or opposite a carbomethoxy group, the hydrazides necessary for the synthesis of 3-amino-2- and 6-fluoropyridine could not be prepared. These amines were prepared from the appropriate 2-fluoropyridinecarboxamide by the Hofmann reaction. The preparation of difluoropyridines was successful with two of the aminofluoropyridines and led to the following new compounds: 2,3-difluoro(IVb) and 2,6-difluoropyridine (IVa).

  14. Diversity of culturable nocardioform actinomycetes from wastewater treatment plants in Spain and their role in the biodegradability of aromatic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soler, Albert; García-Hernández, Jorge; Zornoza, Andrés; Alonso, José Luis

    2018-01-01

    Currently, municipal and industrial wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) are mainly focusing on reduction of biological oxygen demand and on the removal of nutrients. However, there are microorganisms that interfere with the process. In this environment, there is a large diversity of microorganisms that have not been studied in detail and that could provide real and practical solutions to the foaming problems. Among such microorganisms, Gram-positive actinomycete bacteria are of special interest because they are known for producing secondary metabolites as well as chemically diverse compounds and for their capacity to degrade recalcitrant pollutants. Three different media were chosen to isolate actinomycetes from 28 WWTPs in Spain. A total of 189 activated sludge samples were collected; 126 strains were isolated and identified to belong to 1 suborder, i.e. Corynebacterineae, and 7 genera, i.e. Corynebacterium, Dietzia, Gordonia, Mycobacterium, Rhodococcus, Tsukamurella and Williamsia. Furthermore, 71 strains were capable of biodegrading at least 1 aromatic product, and that 27 of them amplified for catA gene. The results of this research help us understand the complexity of the foam-forming microbial populations in Spain and it shows that WWTPs can be a good source of microorganisms that can degrade phenol or naphthalene.

  15. Investigating roles of organic and inorganic soil components in sorption of polar and nonpolar aromatic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi Xin; Ji Liangliang [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse/School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Jiangsu 210093 (China); Zhu Dongqiang, E-mail: zhud@nju.edu.c [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse/School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Jiangsu 210093 (China)

    2010-01-15

    The main objective of the present study was to assess the roles of various soil components in sorption of organic compounds differing in polarity. Removal of the whole soil organic matter decreased sorption by approximately 86% for nonpolar 1,3,5-trichlorobenzene (TCB), but only 34-54% for highly polar 1,3,5-trinitrobenzene (TNB); however, removal of the extractable humic/fulvic acids did not much affect sorption of the two sorbates. With normalization of solute hydrophobicity, TNB exhibits several orders of magnitude stronger sorption compared with TCB to maize burn residue (black carbon), extracted humic acid and Na{sup +}-saturated montmorillonite clay, suggesting specific sorptive interactions for TNB with the individual model soil components. It was proposed that sorption of TCB to the bulk soil was dominated by hydrophobic partition to the condensed, non-extractable fraction of organic matters (humin/kerogen and black carbon), while interactions with soil clay minerals were an important additional factor for sorption of TNB. - Soil humin and black carbon play a predominant role in sorption of 1,3,5-trichlorobenzene, while polar interactions with soil clay minerals are an important additional factor for sorption of 1,3,5-trinitrobenzene.

  16. Investigating roles of organic and inorganic soil components in sorption of polar and nonpolar aromatic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xin; Ji, Liangliang; Zhu, Dongqiang

    2010-01-01

    The main objective of the present study was to assess the roles of various soil components in sorption of organic compounds differing in polarity. Removal of the whole soil organic matter decreased sorption by approximately 86% for nonpolar 1,3,5-trichlorobenzene (TCB), but only 34-54% for highly polar 1,3,5-trinitrobenzene (TNB); however, removal of the extractable humic/fulvic acids did not much affect sorption of the two sorbates. With normalization of solute hydrophobicity, TNB exhibits several orders of magnitude stronger sorption compared with TCB to maize burn residue (black carbon), extracted humic acid and Na(+)-saturated montmorillonite clay, suggesting specific sorptive interactions for TNB with the individual model soil components. It was proposed that sorption of TCB to the bulk soil was dominated by hydrophobic partition to the condensed, non-extractable fraction of organic matters (humin/kerogen and black carbon), while interactions with soil clay minerals were an important additional factor for sorption of TNB.

  17. Biotransformation of chlorinated aliphatic solvents in the presence of aromatic compounds under methanogenic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, L.N.; Grbic-Galic, D.

    1993-01-01

    Transformation of carbon tetrachloride (CT) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) was studied under methanogenic conditions, in the presence or absence of toluene, ethylbenzene, phenol, and benzoate. Microbial inoculate for the experiments were derived from three groundwater aquifers contaminated by jet fuel or creosote. CT and PCE were reductively dechlorinated in all the examined castes (CT to chloroform [CF]; PCE to trichloroethylene [TCE], trans-1,2-dichloroethylene [DCE], and vinyl chloride [VC]). In the aquifer microcosms, the electron donors used for the reductive transformations were most likely the unidentified organic compounds present on aquifer solids, or storage materials in microorganisms. Alternatively, molecular hydrogen from the anaerobic incubator atmosphere could have been used. The addition of benzoate caused a decrease in rates of dechlorination if benzoate was transformed. Phenol and ethylbenzene were not degraded and did not influence the transformation of CT or PCE. Toluene, in most of the studied cases, had no influence on reductive dechlorination of either CT or PCE. Only in microcosms derived from a JP-4 jet fuel-contaminated aquifer did the anaerobic degradation of toluene occur simultaneously with reductive dechlorination of PCE, suggesting that toluene might possibly have been used as an electron donor for reductive transformation of chlorinated solvents

  18. Adsorption and Oxidation of Aromatic Amines on Metal(II Hexacyanocobaltate(III Complexes: Implication for Oligomerization of Exotic Aromatic Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachana Sharma

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Based on the hypothesis on the presence of double metal cyanides in the primordial oceans, a series of nano-sized metal(II hexacyanocobaltate(III (MHCCo with the general formula: M3[Co(CN6]2•xH2O (where M = Zn, Fe, Ni and Mn has been synthesized. Surface interaction of aromatic amines, namely aniline, 4-chloroaniline, 4-methylaniline and 4-methoxyaniline with MHCCo particles has been carried out at the concentration range of 100–400 μM at pH~7.0. The percentage binding of aromatic amines on MHCCo surface was found to be in the range of 84%–44%. The trend in adsorption was in accordance to the relative basicity of the studied amines. At the experimental pH, amines reacted rapidly with the surface of the iron(II hexacyanocobaltate, producing colored products that were analyzed by Gas Chromatography Mass Spectroscopy (GC-MS. GC-MS analysis of the colored products demonstrated the formation of dimers of the studied aromatic amines. Surface interaction of aromatic amines with MHCCo was studied by Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR spectroscopy and Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM. The change in amine characteristic frequencies, as observed by FT-IR, suggests that interaction took place through the NH2 group on amines with metal ions of hexacyanocobaltate complexes. FE-SEM studies revealed the adherence of 4-methoxyaniline on zinc hexacyanocobaltate particles surface. We proposed that MHCCo might have been formed under the conditions on primitive Earth and may be regarded as an important candidate for concentrating organic molecules through the adsorption process.

  19. Noticeable facilitation of the bismuth-mediated Barbier-type allylation of aromatic carbonyl compounds under solvent-free conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Shinobu; Hayashi, Nobuyuki; Suzuki, Hitomi

    2003-06-21

    When milled together with bismuth shot in the presence of allyl halide, aromatic aldehydes readily underwent a Barbier-type allylation to afford the corresponding homoallyl alcohols in good yield. In contrast to the failure in solution reaction, aromatic ketones also underwent allylic carbonyl addition under solvent-free conditions to give the expected tertiary homoallyl alcohols in moderate to good yield.

  20. Structure–property relationships of ‘safe’ aromatic oil based passenger car tire tread rubber compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rathi, Akansha; Hernández, M.; Dierkes, Wilma K.; Bergmann, C.; Noordermeer, Jacobus W.M.; Trimbach, J.; Blume, Anke

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the effect of Treated Distillate Aromatic Extract (TDAE) was investigated in medium styrene/high vinyl solution styrene butadiene rubber (S-SBR) and high cis-polybutadiene rubber (BR). Three properties were evaluated: (i) molecular structure (polarity/aromaticity), (ii) molecular

  1. Evaluation of Emissions Bio diesel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez Maroto, J. J.; Dorronsoro Arenal, J. L.; Rojas Garcia, E.; Perez Pastor, R.; Garcia Alonso, S.

    2007-01-01

    The generation of energy from vegetal products is one of the possibilities to our reach in order to reduce the atmospheric pollution. Particularly, the use of bio diesel in internal combustion engines can be one of the best options. The finest particles emitted by the combustion engines are easily breathable and on them different substances can be absorbed presumably toxic, between which it is possible to emphasize the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), by its demonstrated carcinogen character. In this work, it is studied on the one hand, the characteristics that can present the aerosol of emission in a diesel engine with a maximum power of 97 kW, working without load to 600 rpm, using as combustible mixtures of bio diesel and diesel in different proportions. On the other hand, the evolution that takes place in the concentration of PAHs in emission particles, according to the percentage of bio diesel used in the combustible mixture. (Author) 9 refs

  2. Evaluation of Emissions Bio diesel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez Maroto, J. J.; Dorronsoro Arenal, J. L.; Rojas Garcia, E.; Perez Pastor, R.; Garcia Alonso, S.

    2007-09-27

    The generation of energy from vegetal products is one of the possibilities to our reach in order to reduce the atmospheric pollution. Particularly, the use of bio diesel in internal combustion engines can be one of the best options. The finest particles emitted by the combustion engines are easily breathable and on them different substances can be absorbed presumably toxic, between which it is possible to emphasize the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), by its demonstrated carcinogen character. In this work, it is studied on the one hand, the characteristics that can present the aerosol of emission in a diesel engine with a maximum power of 97 kW, working without load to 600 rpm, using as combustible mixtures of bio diesel and diesel in different proportions. On the other hand, the evolution that takes place in the concentration of PAHs in emission particles, according to the percentage of bio diesel used in the combustible mixture. (Author) 9 refs.

  3. Comparison of different exhaustive and biomimetic extraction techniques for chemical and biological analysis of polycyclic aromatic compounds in river sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulze, Tobias [Free Univ. Berlin (Germany). Dept. of Earth Sciences, Hydrogeology; Seiler, Thomas B.; Hollert, Henner [RWTH Aachen Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Ecosystem Analysis; Streck, Georg [UFZ Helmholtz-Centre for Environmental Research, Leipzig (Germany). Dept. of Effect-Directed Analysis; Braunbeck, Thomas

    2012-10-15

    The importance of the bioaccessible fractions of particle-bound contaminants is a key feature for the assessment of their likely risks to the aquatic environment. The present study investigated the extractability and potential toxicity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in river sediments. This study combined chemical with bioanalytical tools to establish a more in-depth insight into the relationship between the extractability of sediment contaminants, the chemodynamic properties of each extraction approach, and resulting toxicity. Sediment samples were treated with different extraction methods, namely Soxhlet extraction with acetone (SOX), membrane dialysis extraction (MDE) with n-hexane, ultrasonic extraction with acetone (USE), and extraction with (2-hydroxpropyl)-{beta}-cyclodextrin (HBCD). The extracts were analyzed for PAHs using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and tested using the neutral red retention assay and the ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) induction assay with the permanent fish cell line RTL-W1. The SOX and MDE approaches were comparable in their extraction power regarding PAHs and their cytotoxicity. However, the EROD activity differed between SOX and MDE, possibly due to retardation effects of the polyethylene membrane used in MDE. Thus, macromolecular components of the sediment were not extracted and therefore did not contribute to toxicity. HBCD extraction provided 3.4 % of the total PAH content in the sediments and might be an appropriate approach to predict the bioaccessible fraction. USE showed an extraction power between the HBCD approach and the MDE as well as SOX and MDE method. Hence, USE is neither appropriate for exhaustive extraction nor for biomimetic extraction. MDE and SOX have been approved for the exhaustive extraction of PAHs from sediments for a worst case assessment of effect potentials. The influence of the low-density polyethylene membrane and the experimental conditions on the diffusion of compounds with

  4. Innovative method of direct determination of the content of paraffins, naphthenes, aromatics and sulfur compounds by capillary high-resolution gas chromatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Baizhumanova

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Based on determination of individual Hydrocarbon (paraffins, naphthenes, aromatics and Sulphur components of fuels and their mixture on the thin bonded of absorber (the stationary phase is a 100-metre silica capillary column, containing 0.5μm film thickness of bonded dimethylpolysiloxane phase by means of the selective solvents (mobile phase combined with technique of ionization of separated compounds by Flame Ionization Detector (FID and Sulphur Chemiluminescence Detector (SCD.

  5. Development of multi-component diesel surrogate fuel models – Part I: Validation of reduced mechanisms of diesel fuel constituents in 0-D kinetic simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poon, Hiew Mun; Pang, Kar Mun; Ng, Hoon Kiat

    2016-01-01

    In the present work, development and validation of reduced chemical kinetic mechanisms for several different hydrocarbons are performed. These hydrocarbons are potential representative for practical diesel fuel constituents. n-Hexadecane (HXN), 2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethylnonane (HMN), cyclohexane...... (CHX) and toluene are selected to represent straight-alkane, branched-alkane, cyclo-alkane and aromatic compounds in the diesel fuel. A five-stage chemical kinetic mechanism reduction scheme formulated in the previous work is applied to develop the reduced HMN and CHX models based on their respective...... mechanisms is achieved for ignition delay (ID) and species concentration predictions under both auto-ignition and JSR conditions, with a maximum relative error of 40%. In addition, the reduced models are further validated against the JSR experimental results for each diesel fuel constituents. The surrogate...

  6. A computer simulation of the turbocharged turbo compounded diesel engine system: A description of the thermodynamic and heat transfer models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assanis, D. N.; Ekchian, J. E.; Frank, R. M.; Heywood, J. B.

    1985-01-01

    A computer simulation of the turbocharged turbocompounded direct-injection diesel engine system was developed in order to study the performance characteristics of the total system as major design parameters and materials are varied. Quasi-steady flow models of the compressor, turbines, manifolds, intercooler, and ducting are coupled with a multicylinder reciprocator diesel model, where each cylinder undergoes the same thermodynamic cycle. The master cylinder model describes the reciprocator intake, compression, combustion and exhaust processes in sufficient detail to define the mass and energy transfers in each subsystem of the total engine system. Appropriate thermal loading models relate the heat flow through critical system components to material properties and design details. From this information, the simulation predicts the performance gains, and assesses the system design trade-offs which would result from the introduction of selected heat transfer reduction materials in key system components, over a range of operating conditions.

  7. Mesoionic Compounds

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    property has been used to determine whether a compound is aromatic or not. Mesoionic compounds are structurally very different from ben- zenoid compounds, but they fulfill most of the criteria of aroma- ticity and form a part of a variety of aromatic compounds, which can be classified as follows. A) Benzenoid Compounds.

  8. Investigation of engine performance and emissions of a diesel engine with a blend of marine gas oil and synthetic diesel fuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabi, Md Nurun; Hustad, Johan Einar

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates diesel engine performance and exhaust emissions with marine gas oil (MGO) and a blend of MGO and synthetic diesel fuel. Ten per cent by volume of Fischer-Tropsch (FT), a synthetic diesel fuel, was added to MGO to investigate its influence on the diesel engine performance and emissions. The blended fuel was termed as FT10 fuel, while the neat (100 vol%) MGO was termed as MGO fuel. The experiments were conducted with a fourstroke, six-cylinder, turbocharged, direct injection, Scania DC 1102 diesel engine. It is interesting to note that all emissions including smoke (filter smoke number), total particulate matter (TPM), carbon monoxide (CO), total unburned hydrocarbon (THC), oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and engine noise were reduced with FT10 fuel compared with the MGO fuel. Diesel fine particle number and mass emissions were measured with an electrical low pressure impactor. Like other exhaust emissions, significant reductions in fine particles and mass emissions were observed with the FT10 fuel. The reduction was due to absence of sulphur and aromatic compounds in the FT fuel. In-cylinder gas pressure and engine thermal efficiency were identical for both FT10 and MGO fuels.

  9. Has Alberta oil sands development altered delivery of polycyclic aromatic compounds to the Peace-Athabasca Delta?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland I Hall

    Full Text Available The extent to which Alberta oil sands mining and upgrading operations have enhanced delivery of bitumen-derived contaminants via the Athabasca River and atmosphere to the Peace-Athabasca Delta (200 km to the north is a pivotal question that has generated national and international concern. Accounts of rare health disorders in residents of Fort Chipewyan and deformed fish in downstream ecosystems provided impetus for several recent expert-panel assessments regarding the societal and environmental consequences of this multi-billion-dollar industry. Deciphering relative contributions of natural versus industrial processes on downstream supply of polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs has been identified as a critical knowledge gap. But, this remains a formidable scientific challenge because loading from natural processes remains unknown. And, industrial activity occurs in the same locations as the natural bitumen deposits, which potentially confounds contemporary upstream-downstream comparisons of contaminant levels.Based on analyses of lake sediment cores, we provide evidence that the Athabasca Delta has been a natural repository of PACs carried by the Athabasca River for at least the past two centuries. We detect no measureable increase in the concentration and proportion of river-transported bitumen-associated indicator PACs in sediments deposited in a flood-prone lake since onset of oil sands development. Results also reveal no evidence that industrial activity has contributed measurably to sedimentary concentration of PACs supplied by atmospheric transport.Findings suggest that natural erosion of exposed bitumen in banks of the Athabasca River and its tributaries is a major process delivering PACs to the Athabasca Delta, and the spring freshet is a key period for contaminant mobilization and transport. This baseline environmental information is essential for informed management of natural resources and human-health concerns by provincial and

  10. The aromatic volatile organic compounds toluene, benzene and styrene induce COX-2 and prostaglandins in human lung epithelial cells via oxidative stress and p38 MAPK activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mögel, Iljana; Baumann, Sven; Böhme, Alexander; Kohajda, Tibor; von Bergen, Martin; Simon, Jan-Christoph; Lehmann, Irina

    2011-10-28

    Toluene, benzene and styrene are volatile organic compounds (VOCs) widely distributed in the environment. Tobacco smoke, traffic exposure and solvents used for paints, rubber and adhesives are known sources for these compounds. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether toluene, benzene and styrene can induce inflammatory reactions in lung cells and to characterize possible underlying mechanisms. A previous study gave evidence that expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is upregulated following exposure to the aromatic VOC chlorobenzene. Here, we investigated the effects of the aromatics toluene, benzene and styrene on human lung cells, with emphasis on COX-2, the rate-limiting enzyme of the prostaglandin pathway. In addition, we studied the potential role of oxidative stress and p38 MAPK activation in the toluene/benzene/styrene-dependent COX-2 induction. Following exposure to the aromatic compounds the expression level of COX-2 increased markedly. In addition, prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) and prostaglandin F(2α) (PGF(2α)), major products of the COX enzyme, were found to be upregulated in response to toluene, benzene or styrene exposure. Furthermore, we observed an activation of p38 MAPK resulting from aromatic VOC exposure. Treatment of the cells with a specific p38 inhibitor (SB203580) or the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) was able to prevent the toluene/benzene/styrene-dependent COX-2 activation, and subsequent increased PGE(2) and PGF(2α) secretion. These results suggest that toluene, benzene and styrene induce production and secretion of PGE(2) and PGF(2α) in lung epithelial cells via p38 MAPK and COX-2 activation in a redox sensitive manner. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Coutilization of glucose and glycerol enhances the production of aromatic compounds in an Escherichia coli strain lacking the phosphoenolpyruvate: carbohydrate phosphotransferase system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bolívar Francisco G

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Escherichia coli strains lacking the phosphoenolpyruvate: carbohydrate phosphotransferase system (PTS are capable of coutilizing glucose and other carbon sources due to the absence of catabolite repression by glucose. In these strains, the lack of this important regulatory and transport system allows the coexistence of glycolytic and gluconeogenic pathways. Strains lacking PTS have been constructed with the goal of canalizing part of the phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP not consumed in glucose transport to the aromatic pathway. The deletion of the ptsHIcrr operon inactivates PTS causing poor growth on this sugar; nonetheless, fast growing mutants on glucose have been isolated (PB12 strain. However, there are no reported studies concerning the growth potential of a PTS- strain in mixtures of different carbon sources to enhance the production of aromatics compounds. Results PB12 strain is capable of coutilizing mixtures of glucose-arabinose, glucose-gluconate and glucose-glycerol. This capacity increases its specific growth rate (μ given that this strain metabolizes more moles of carbon source per unit time. The presence of plasmids pRW300aroGfbr and pCLtktA reduces the μ of strain PB12 in all mixtures of carbon sources, but enhances the productivity and yield of aromatic compounds, especially in the glucose-glycerol mixture, as compared to glucose or glycerol cultures. No acetate was detected in the glycerol and the glucose-glycerol batch fermentations. Conclusion Due to the lack of catabolite repression, PB12 strain carrying multicopy plasmids containing tktA and aroGfbr genes is capable of coutilizing glucose and other carbon sources; this capacity, reduces its μ but increases the production of aromatic compounds.

  12. Clean Diesel

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Clean Diesel Program offers DERA funding in the form of grants and rebates as well as other support for projects that protect human health and improve air quality by reducing harmful emissions from diesel engines.

  13. The formation of aromatics and PAH's in laminar flames

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marinov, N M; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

    1999-01-01

    The formation of aromatics and PAH's is an important problem in combustion. These compounds are believed to contribute to the formation of soot whose emission from diesel engines is regulated widely throughout the industrial world. Additionally, the United States Environmental Protection Agency regulates the emission of many aromatics and PAH species from stationary industrial burners, under the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments. The above emission regulations have created much interest in understanding how these species are formed in combustion systems. Much previous work has been done on aromatics and PAH's. The work is too extensive to review here, but is reviewed in Reference 1. A few recent developments are highlighted here. McEnally, Pfefferle and coworkers have studied aromatic, PAH and soot formation in a variety of non-premixed flames with hydrocarbon additives[2-4]. They found additives that contain a C5 ring increase the concentration of aromatics and soot[4]. Howard and coworkers have studied the formation of aromatic and PAH's in low pressure, premixed, laminar hydrocarbon flames. They found the cyclopentadienyl radical to be a key species in naphthalene formation in a fuel-rich, benzene/Ar/O2 flame[5

  14. Metabolic responses of Rhodococcus erythropolis PR4 grown on diesel oil and various hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laczi, Krisztián; Kis, Ágnes; Horváth, Balázs; Maróti, Gergely; Hegedüs, Botond; Perei, Katalin; Rákhely, Gábor

    2015-11-01

    Rhodococcus erythropolis PR4 is able to degrade diesel oil, normal-, iso- and cycloparaffins and aromatic compounds. The complete DNA content of the strain was previously sequenced and numerous oxygenase genes were identified. In order to identify the key elements participating in biodegradation of various hydrocarbons, we performed a comparative whole transcriptome analysis of cells grown on hexadecane, diesel oil and acetate. The transcriptomic data for the most prominent genes were validated by RT-qPCR. The expression of two genes coding for alkane-1-monooxygenase enzymes was highly upregulated in the presence of hydrocarbon substrates. The transcription of eight phylogenetically diverse cytochrome P450 (cyp) genes was upregulated in the presence of diesel oil. The transcript levels of various oxygenase genes were determined in cells grown in an artificial mixture, containing hexadecane, cycloparaffin and aromatic compounds and six cyp genes were induced by this hydrocarbon mixture. Five of them were not upregulated by linear and branched hydrocarbons. The expression of fatty acid synthase I genes was downregulated by hydrocarbon substrates, indicating the utilization of external alkanes for fatty acid synthesis. Moreover, the transcription of genes involved in siderophore synthesis, iron transport and exopolysaccharide biosynthesis was also upregulated, indicating their important role in hydrocarbon metabolism. Based on the results, complex metabolic response profiles were established for cells grown on various hydrocarbons. Our results represent a functional annotation of a rhodococcal genome, provide deeper insight into molecular events in diesel/hydrocarbon utilization and suggest novel target genes for environmental monitoring projects.

  15. Emission comparison of urban bus engine fueled with diesel oil and 'biodiesel' blend

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turrio-Baldassarri, Luigi; Battistelli, Chiara L.; Conti, Luigi; Crebelli, Riccardo; De Berardis, Barbara; Iamiceli, Anna Laura; Gambino, Michele; Iannaccone, Sabato

    2004-01-01

    The chemical and toxicological characteristics of emissions from an urban bus engine fueled with diesel and biodiesel blend were studied. Exhaust gases were produced by a turbocharged EURO 2 heavy-duty diesel engine, operating in steady-state conditions on the European test 13 mode cycle (ECE R49). Regulated and unregulated pollutants, such as carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and nitrated derivatives (nitro-PAHs), carbonyl compounds and light aromatic hydrocarbons were quantified. Mutagenicity of the emissions was evaluated by the Salmonella typhimurium/mammalian microsome assay. The effect of the fuels under study on the size distribution of particulate matter (PM) was also evaluated. The use of biodiesel blend seems to result in small reductions of emissions of most of the aromatic and polyaromatic compounds; these differences, however, have no statistical significance at 95% confidence level. Formaldehyde, on the other hand, has a statistically significant increase of 18% with biodiesel blend. In vitro toxicological assays show an overall similar mutagenic potency and genotoxic profile for diesel and biodiesel blend emissions. The electron microscopy analysis indicates that PM for both fuels has the same chemical composition, morphology, shape and granulometric spectrum, with most of the particles in the range 0.06-0.3 μm

  16. Rudolph Diesel

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education. Rudolph Diesel. Articles written in Resonance – Journal of Science Education. Volume 17 Issue 4 April 2012 pp 406-424 Classics. Diesel's Rational Heat Motor · Rudolph Diesel · More Details Fulltext PDF ...

  17. (Liquid + liquid) equilibrium at T = 298.15 K for ternary mixtures of alkane + aromatic compounds + imidazolium-based ionic liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domínguez, Irene; Requejo, Patricia F.; Canosa, José; Domínguez, Ángeles

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The LLE ternary phase diagrams with 2 imidazolium-based ionic liquids were measured. • The LLE data were experimental determined at T = 298.15 K and p = 1 atm. • Mixtures of (octane or nonane) and (benzene or toluene or ethylbenzene) were studied. • LLE experimental data were correlated with NRTL and UNIQUAC thermodynamic models. - Abstract: Ionic liquids, with their unique and tunable properties, can be an advantageous alternative as extractive solvents in separation processes involving systems containing aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons. In this work, (liquid + liquid) equilibrium (LLE) data for the ternary systems {nonane (1) + benzene (2) + 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, [BMim][NTf 2 ] (3)}, {octane (1) + benzene (2) + 1-methyl-3-propylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, [PMim][NTf 2 ] (3)}, and {nonane (1) + aromatic compound (benzene or toluene or ethylbenzene) (2) + [PMim][NTf 2 ] (3)} were determined at T = 298.15 K and atmospheric pressure. Selectivity and solute distribution ratio, derived from the equilibrium data, were used to determine if this ionic liquid can be considered as a potential solvent for the separation of aromatic compounds (benzene, toluene, and ethylbenzene) from alkanes (octane and nonane). The experimental data were satisfactorily correlated with NRTL and UNIQUAC models

  18. One step processing for future diesel specifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brierley, G.R.

    1997-01-01

    The trend in diesel fuel specifications is to limit the sulfur level to less than 0.05 wt- per cent. Many regions have also specified that diesel fuels must have lower aromatic levels, higher cetane numbers, and lower distillation end points. These changes will require significant refinery investment to meet the new diesel fuel specifications. The changes may also significantly affect the value of synthetic crude stocks. UOP has developed a new hydroprocessing catalyst which makes it possible to meet the new diesel specifications in one single processing step and at minimal cost. The catalyst saturates aromatics while opening ring structures at the same time. By selectively cracking heavy components into the diesel range with minimal cracking to gas or naphtha, heavier feedstocks can be upgraded to diesel, and refinery diesel yield can be augmented. Synthetic crude distillate is often high in aromatics and low in cetane number. This new UOP hydroprocessing system will allow synthetic crude producers and refiners to produce diesel fuels with higher cetane numbers, high-quality distillate blendstocks and distillate fuels. 26 figs

  19. Structure–metabolism relationships in human-AOX: Chemical insights from a large database of aza-aromatic and amide compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceccarelli, Martina; Milani, Nicolò; Tortorella, Sara; Cucco, Andrea; Goracci, Laura; Brink, Andreas; Cruciani, Gabriele

    2017-01-01

    Aldehyde oxidase (AOX) is a metabolic enzyme catalyzing the oxidation of aldehyde and aza-aromatic compounds and the hydrolysis of amides, moieties frequently shared by the majority of drugs. Despite its key role in human metabolism, to date only fragmentary information about the chemical features responsible for AOX susceptibility are reported and only “very local” structure–metabolism relationships based on a small number of similar compounds have been developed. This study reports a more comprehensive coverage of the chemical space of structures with a high risk of AOX phase I metabolism in humans. More than 270 compounds were studied to identify the site of metabolism and the metabolite(s). Both electronic [supported by density functional theory (DFT) calculations] and exposure effects were considered when rationalizing the structure–metabolism relationship. PMID:28373537

  20. Structure–property relationships of ‘safe’ aromatic oil based passenger car tire tread rubber compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rathi, Akansha; Hernández, M.; Dierkes, Wilma K.; Bergmann, C.; Trimbach, J.; Blume, Anke

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the effect of TDAE-oil was investigated in functionalized, medium styrene/high vinyl solution styrene butadiene rubber (FsS-SBR) and high cispolybutadiene rubber (BR). Three properties were evaluated: (i) molecular structure (polarity/aromaticity), (ii) molecular weight and (iii)

  1. Rapid determination of the aromatic compounds methyl-anthranilate, 2'-aminoacetophenone and furaneol by GC-MS: Method validation and characterization of grape derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prudêncio Dutra, Maria da Conceição; de Souza, Joyce Fagundes; Viana, Arão Cardoso; de Oliveira, Débora; Pereira, Giuliano Elias; Dos Santos Lima, Marcos

    2018-05-01

    A methodology for the rapid determination of the aromatic compounds methyl anthranilate (MA), 2'-aminoacetophenone (2-AAP) and furaneol by GC-MS was validated and used to characterize grape juice and wine elaborated with the new Brazilian grape varieties cultivated in northeastern Brazil, and Brazilian grape nectars. The method presented linearity (R 2  ˃ 0.9952), good accuracy (CV furaneol in the aroma of grape juice and wines elaborated with the new Brazilian grape varieties. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Use of C-13 nuclear magnetic resonance to assess fossil fuel biodegradation: fate of (1-C-13)acenaphthene in cresosote polycyclic aromatic compound mixtures degraded by bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selifonov, S.A.; Chapman, P.J.; Akkerman, S.B.; Gurst, J.E.; Bortiatynski, J.M.; Nanny, M.A.; Hatcher, P.G. [Maxygen Inc., Santa Clara, CA (United States)

    1998-04-01

    (1-C-13)acenaphthene, a tracer compound with a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-active nucleus at the C-1 position, has been employed in conjunction with a standard broad-band-decoupled C-13-NMR spectroscopy technique to study the biodegradation of acenaphthene by various bacterial cultures degrading aromatic hydrocarbons of creosote. The study demonstrates the value of the stable isotope labelling approach and its ability to reveal incomplete mineralization even when as little as 2 to 3% of the substrate is incompletely oxidized, yielding products of partial transformation. The approach outlined may prove useful in assessing bioremediation performance.

  3. Componentes voláteis do café torrado. Parte II. Compostos alifáticos, alicíclicos e aromáticos Volatile components in roasted coffee. Part II. Aliphatic, alicyclic and aromatic compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Felipe Alves Moreira

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available This review is about the aliphatic, alicyclic and aromatic compounds (non-heterocyclic compounds that are present in the volatile fractions of roasted coffees. Herein, the contents, aroma precursors and the sensorial properties of volatile phenols, aldehydes, ketones, alcohols, ethers, hydrocarbons, carboxylic acids, anhydrides, esters, lactones, amines and sulphur compounds are discussed. Special attention is given to the compounds of these groups that are actually important to the final aroma of roasted coffees.

  4. Far infrared (terahertz) spectroscopy of a series of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and application to structure interpretation of asphaltenes and related compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cataldo, Franco; Angelini, Giancarlo; García-Hernández, D. A.; Manchado, Arturo

    2013-07-01

    A series of 33 different polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were studied by far infrared spectroscopy (terahertz spectroscopy) in the spectral range comprised between 600 and 50 cm-1. In addition to common PAHs like naphthalene, anthracene, phenanthrene, fluoranthene, picene, pyrene, benzo[α]pyrene, and perylene, also quite unusual PAHs were studied like tetracene, pentacene, acenaphtene, acenaphtylene, triphenylene, and decacyclene. A series of alkylated naphthalenes and anthracenes were studied as well as methypyrene. Partially or totally hydrogenated PAHs were also object of the present investigation, ranging from tetrahydronaphthalene (tetralin) to decahydronaphthalene (decalin), 9,10-dihydroanthracene, 9,10-dihydrophenanthrene, hexahydropyrene, and dodecahydrotriphenylene. Finally, the large and quite rare PAHs coronene, quaterrylene, hexabenzocoronene, and dicoronylene were studied by far infrared spectroscopy. The resulting reference spectra were used in the interpretation of the chemical structure of asphaltenes (as extracted from a heavy petroleum fraction and from bitumen), the chemical structures of other petroleum fractions known as DAE (distillate aromatic extract) and RAE (residual aromatic extract), and a possible interpretation of components of the chemical structure of anthracite coal. Asphaltenes, heavy petroleum fractions, and coal were proposed as model compounds for the interpretation of the emission spectra of certain proto-planetary nebulae (PPNe) with a good matching in the mid infrared between the band pattern of the PPNe emission spectra and the spectra of these oil fractions or coal. Although this study was finalized in an astrochemical context, it may find application also in the petroleum and coal chemistry.

  5. Simulating secondary organic aerosol from missing diesel-related intermediate-volatility organic compound emissions during the Clean Air for London (ClearfLo campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Ots

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We present high-resolution (5 km  ×  5 km atmospheric chemical transport model (ACTM simulations of the impact of newly estimated traffic-related emissions on secondary organic aerosol (SOA formation over the UK for 2012. Our simulations include additional diesel-related intermediate-volatility organic compound (IVOC emissions derived directly from comprehensive field measurements at an urban background site in London during the 2012 Clean Air for London (ClearfLo campaign. Our IVOC emissions are added proportionally to VOC emissions, as opposed to proportionally to primary organic aerosol (POA as has been done by previous ACTM studies seeking to simulate the effects of these missing emissions. Modelled concentrations are evaluated against hourly and daily measurements of organic aerosol (OA components derived from aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS measurements also made during the ClearfLo campaign at three sites in the London area. According to the model simulations, diesel-related IVOCs can explain on average  ∼  30 % of the annual SOA in and around London. Furthermore, the 90th percentile of modelled daily SOA concentrations for the whole year is 3.8 µg m−3, constituting a notable addition to total particulate matter. More measurements of these precursors (currently not included in official emissions inventories is recommended. During the period of concurrent measurements, SOA concentrations at the Detling rural background location east of London were greater than at the central London location. The model shows that this was caused by an intense pollution plume with a strong gradient of imported SOA passing over the rural location. This demonstrates the value of modelling for supporting the interpretation of measurements taken at different sites or for short durations.

  6. Flash pyrolysis of adsorbed aromatic organic acids on carbonate minerals: Assessing the impact of mineralogy for the identification of organic compounds in extraterrestrial bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafar, R.

    2017-12-01

    The relationship between minerals and organics is an essential factor in comprehending the origin of life on extraterrestrial bodies. So far organic molecules have been detected on meteorites, comets, interstellar medium and interplanetary dust particles. While on Mars, organic molecules may also be present as indicated by the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite on the Curiosity Rover in Martian sediments. Minerals including hydrated phyllosilicate, carbonate, and sulfate minerals have been confirmed in carbonaceous chondrites. The presence of phyllosilicate minerals on Mars has been indicated by in situ elemental analysis by the Viking Landers, remote sensing infrared observations and the presence of smectites in meteorites. Likewise, the presence of carbonate minerals on the surface of Mars has been indicated by both Phoenix Lander and Spirit Rover. Considering the fact that both mineral and organic matter are present on the surface of extraterrestrial bodies including Mars, a comprehensive work is required to understand the interaction of minerals with specific organic compounds. The adsorption of the organic molecule at water/mineral surface is a key process of concentrating organic molecules on the surface of minerals. Carboxylic acids are abundantly observed in extraterrestrial material such as meteorites and interstellar space. It is highly suspected that carboxylic acids are also present on Mars due to the average organic carbon infall rate of 108 kg/yr. Further aromatic organic acids have also been observed in carbonaceous chondrite meteorites. This work presents the adsorption of an aromatic carboxylic acid at the water/calcite interface and characterization of the products formed after adsorption via on-line pyrolysis. Adsorption and online pyrolysis results are used to gain insight into adsorbed aromatic organic acid-calcite interaction. Adsorption and online pyrolysis results are related to the interpretation of organic compounds identified

  7. Aromatic compound in different peach cultivars and effect of preservatives on the final aroma of cooked fruits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bavcon-Kralj Mojca

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In our study, we were used four yellow-fleshed peach cultivars ‟Royal Glory‟, „Redhaven", 'Maria Marta' and 'Norman', during two-year period. The characterization of aromatic constituents of investigated cultivars was done using headspace solid phase micro-extraction (HS-SPME. The intention was to make implicit discrimination between cultivars by analysis of components present in all cultivars during two-year period. Also, the impact of added preservatives (Na-benzoate and citric acid on the final aroma of cooked peaches was studied. The cultivars' differences and the impact of preservatives (Na-benzoate and citric acid were statistically evaluated. Multiple discriminant analysis of peaches‟ aromatic profile was used to segregate investigated peach cultivars. Although they were very similar, the cultivars were segregated by two discriminant function, function 1 (which accounted for 56.9% of this peach model and function 2 (31.7%. The use of preservatives had also an important impact on the aromatic profile of cooked peaches. The statistical analysis indicated that from 57 identified volatiles, 40 volatiles showed statistically significant difference regarding the way of preservation. The main negative impact had Na-benzoate compared to control or samples preserved with citric acid.

  8. Mitigation of PAH and nitro-PAH emissions from nonroad diesel engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z Gerald; Wall, John C; Ottinger, Nathan A; McGuffin, Dana

    2015-03-17

    More stringent emission requirements for nonroad diesel engines introduced with U.S. Tier 4 Final and Euro Stage IV and V regulations have spurred the development of exhaust aftertreatment technologies. In this study, several aftertreatment configurations consisting of diesel oxidation catalysts (DOC), diesel particulate filters (DPF), Cu zeolite-, and vanadium-based selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts, and ammonia oxidation (AMOX) catalysts are evaluated using both Nonroad Transient (NRTC) and Steady (8-mode NRSC) Cycles in order to understand both component and system-level effects of diesel aftertreatment on emissions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and their nitrated derivatives (nitro-PAH). Emissions are reported for four configurations including engine-out, DOC+CuZ-SCR+AMOX, V-SCR+AMOX, and DOC+DPF+CuZ-SCR+AMOX. Mechanisms responsible for the reduction, and, in some cases, the formation of PAH and nitro-PAH compounds are discussed in detail, and suggestions are provided to minimize the formation of nitro-PAH compounds through aftertreatment design optimizations. Potency equivalency factors (PEFs) developed by the California Environmental Protection Agency are then applied to determine the impact of aftertreatment on PAH-derived exhaust toxicity. Finally, a comprehensive set of exhaust emissions including criteria pollutants, NO2, total hydrocarbons (THC), n-alkanes, branched alkanes, saturated cycloalkanes, aromatics, aldehydes, hopanes and steranes, and metals is provided, and the overall efficacy of the aftertreatment configurations is described. This detailed summary of emissions from a current nonroad diesel engine equipped with advanced aftertreatment can be used to more accurately model the impact of anthropogenic emissions on the atmosphere.

  9. Physicochemical and toxicological characteristics of particulate matter emitted from a non-road diesel engine: comparative evaluation of biodiesel-diesel and butanol-diesel blends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhi-Hui; Balasubramanian, Rajasekhar

    2014-01-15

    Combustion experiments were conducted to evaluate the effects of using blends of ultralow sulfur diesel (ULSD) with biodiesel or n-butanol on physicochemical and toxicological characteristics of particulate emissions from a non-road diesel engine. The results indicated that compared to ULSD, both the blended fuels could effectively reduce the particulate mass and elemental carbon emissions, with butanol being more effective than biodiesel. The proportion of organic carbon and volatile organic compounds in particles increased for both blended fuels. However, biodiesel blended fuels showed lower total particle-phase polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) emissions. The total number emissions of particles ≤560nm in diameter decreased gradually for the butanol blended fuels, but increased significantly for the biodiesel blended fuels. Both the blended fuels indicated lower soot ignition temperature and activation energy. All the particle extracts showed a decline in cell viability with the increased dose. However, the change in cell viability among test fuels is not statistically significant different with the exception of DB-4 (biodiesel-diesel blend containing 4% oxygen) used at 75% engine load. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Emissions databases for polycyclic aromatic compounds in the Canadian Athabasca oil sands region - development using current knowledge and evaluation with passive sampling and air dispersion modelling data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Xin; Cheng, Irene; Yang, Fuquan; Horb, Erin; Zhang, Leiming; Harner, Tom

    2018-03-01

    Two speciated and spatially resolved emissions databases for polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs) in the Athabasca oil sands region (AOSR) were developed. The first database was derived from volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions data provided by the Cumulative Environmental Management Association (CEMA) and the second database was derived from additional data collected within the Joint Canada-Alberta Oil Sands Monitoring (JOSM) program. CALPUFF modelling results for atmospheric polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), alkylated PAHs, and dibenzothiophenes (DBTs), obtained using each of the emissions databases, are presented and compared with measurements from a passive air monitoring network. The JOSM-derived emissions resulted in better model-measurement agreement in the total PAH concentrations and for most PAH species concentrations compared to results using CEMA-derived emissions. At local sites near oil sands mines, the percent error of the model compared to observations decreased from 30 % using the CEMA-derived emissions to 17 % using the JOSM-derived emissions. The improvement at local sites was likely attributed to the inclusion of updated tailings pond emissions estimated from JOSM activities. In either the CEMA-derived or JOSM-derived emissions scenario, the model underestimated PAH concentrations by a factor of 3 at remote locations. Potential reasons for the disagreement include forest fire emissions, re-emissions of previously deposited PAHs, and long-range transport not considered in the model. Alkylated PAH and DBT concentrations were also significantly underestimated. The CALPUFF model is expected to predict higher concentrations because of the limited chemistry and deposition modelling. Thus the model underestimation of PACs is likely due to gaps in the emissions database for these compounds and uncertainties in the methodology for estimating the emissions. Future work is required that focuses on improving the PAC emissions estimation and

  11. Planar limit-assisted structural interpretation of saturates/aromatics/resins/asphaltenes fractionated crude oil compounds observed by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yunju; Kim, Young Hwan; Kim, Sunghwan

    2011-08-01

    Planar limits, defined as lines generated by connecting maximum double-bond equivalence (DBE) values at given carbon numbers, are proposed as a means of predicting and understanding the molecular structure of compounds in crude oil. The slopes and y-intercepts of the lines are determined by the DBE/carbon number ratios of functional groups defining the planar limits. For example, the planar limit generated by a serial addition of saturated cyclic rings has a slope of 0.25. The planar limit formed by the linear and nonlinear addition of benzene rings yields lines with slopes of 0.75 and 1, respectively. The y-intercepts of these lines were determined by additional functional groups added within a series of molecules. Plots of DBE versus carbon number for S(1) class compounds observed by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR MS) showed that saturates/aromatics/resins/asphaltenes (SARA) fractions exhibited unique slopes and y-intercepts. The slope of the planar limit observed from a saturates fraction matched well with the slope of a planar limit generated by the serial addition of saturated cyclic rings. The slopes of planar limits of aromatics and resins fractions were very similar to that obtained from the linear addition of benzene rings. Finally, the slope of the asphaltenes fraction was almost identical to the slope obtained from the nonlinear addition of benzene rings. Simulated and experimental data show that SARA fractions exhibit different molecular structure characteristics. On the basis of the slope and y-intercept of the planar limit, the structures of molecules in SARA fractions were predicted and suggested. The use of planar limits for structural interpretation is not limited to crude oil compounds but can also be used to study other organic mixtures such as humic substances or metabolites.

  12. Emissions databases for polycyclic aromatic compounds in the Canadian Athabasca oil sands region – development using current knowledge and evaluation with passive sampling and air dispersion modelling data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Qiu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Two speciated and spatially resolved emissions databases for polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs in the Athabasca oil sands region (AOSR were developed. The first database was derived from volatile organic compound (VOC emissions data provided by the Cumulative Environmental Management Association (CEMA and the second database was derived from additional data collected within the Joint Canada–Alberta Oil Sands Monitoring (JOSM program. CALPUFF modelling results for atmospheric polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs, alkylated PAHs, and dibenzothiophenes (DBTs, obtained using each of the emissions databases, are presented and compared with measurements from a passive air monitoring network. The JOSM-derived emissions resulted in better model–measurement agreement in the total PAH concentrations and for most PAH species concentrations compared to results using CEMA-derived emissions. At local sites near oil sands mines, the percent error of the model compared to observations decreased from 30 % using the CEMA-derived emissions to 17 % using the JOSM-derived emissions. The improvement at local sites was likely attributed to the inclusion of updated tailings pond emissions estimated from JOSM activities. In either the CEMA-derived or JOSM-derived emissions scenario, the model underestimated PAH concentrations by a factor of 3 at remote locations. Potential reasons for the disagreement include forest fire emissions, re-emissions of previously deposited PAHs, and long-range transport not considered in the model. Alkylated PAH and DBT concentrations were also significantly underestimated. The CALPUFF model is expected to predict higher concentrations because of the limited chemistry and deposition modelling. Thus the model underestimation of PACs is likely due to gaps in the emissions database for these compounds and uncertainties in the methodology for estimating the emissions. Future work is required that focuses on improving the PAC

  13. Bioremediation of PAH-contamined soils: Consequences on formation and degradation of polar-polycyclic aromatic compounds and microbial community abundance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biache, Coralie; Ouali, Salma; Cébron, Aurélie; Lorgeoux, Catherine; Colombano, Stéfan; Faure, Pierre

    2017-05-05

    A bioslurry batch experiment was carried out over five months on three polycyclic aromatic compound (PAC) contaminated soils to study the PAC (PAH and polar-PAC) behavior during soil incubation and to evaluate the impact of PAC contamination on the abundance of microbial communities and functional PAH-degrading populations. Organic matter characteristics and reactivity, assessed through solvent extractable organic matter and PAC contents, and soil organic matter mineralization were monitored during 5 months. Total bacteria and fungi, and PAH-ring hydroxylating dioxygenase genes were quantified. Results showed that PAHs and polar-PACs were degraded with different degradation dynamics. Differences in degradation rates were observed among the three soils depending on PAH distribution and availability. Overall, low molecular weight compounds were preferentially degraded. Degradation selectivity between isomers and structurally similar compounds was observed which could be used to check the efficiency of bioremediation processes. Bacterial communities were dominant over fungi and were most likely responsible for PAC degradation. Abundance of PAH-degrading bacteria increased during incubations, but their proportion in the bacterial communities tended to decrease. The accumulation of some oxygenated-PACs during the bioslurry experiment underlines the necessity to monitor these compounds during application of remediation treatment on PAH contaminated soils. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Far infrared (terahertz) spectroscopy of a series of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and application to structure interpretation of asphaltenes and related compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cataldo, Franco; Angelini, Giancarlo; García-Hernández, D Aníbal; Manchado, Arturo

    2013-07-01

    A series of 33 different polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were studied by far infrared spectroscopy (terahertz spectroscopy) in the spectral range comprised between 600 and 50 cm(-1). In addition to common PAHs like naphthalene, anthracene, phenanthrene, fluoranthene, picene, pyrene, benzo[α]pyrene, and perylene, also quite unusual PAHs were studied like tetracene, pentacene, acenaphtene, acenaphtylene, triphenylene, and decacyclene. A series of alkylated naphthalenes and anthracenes were studied as well as methypyrene. Partially or totally hydrogenated PAHs were also object of the present investigation, ranging from tetrahydronaphthalene (tetralin) to decahydronaphthalene (decalin), 9,10-dihydroanthracene, 9,10-dihydrophenanthrene, hexahydropyrene, and dodecahydrotriphenylene. Finally, the large and quite rare PAHs coronene, quaterrylene, hexabenzocoronene, and dicoronylene were studied by far infrared spectroscopy. The resulting reference spectra were used in the interpretation of the chemical structure of asphaltenes (as extracted from a heavy petroleum fraction and from bitumen), the chemical structures of other petroleum fractions known as DAE (distillate aromatic extract) and RAE (residual aromatic extract), and a possible interpretation of components of the chemical structure of anthracite coal. Asphaltenes, heavy petroleum fractions, and coal were proposed as model compounds for the interpretation of the emission spectra of certain proto-planetary nebulae (PPNe) with a good matching in the mid infrared between the band pattern of the PPNe emission spectra and the spectra of these oil fractions or coal. Although this study was finalized in an astrochemical context, it may find application also in the petroleum and coal chemistry. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Formation and emission of organic pollutants from diesel engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertoli, C.; Ciajolo, A.; D'Anna, A.; Barbella, R.

    1993-01-01

    The emission of soot and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) from diesel engines results from the competition between oxidative and pyrolytic routes which the fuel takes in the unsteady, heterogeneous conditions of the diesel combustion process. In-cylinder sampling and analysis of particulate (soot and condensed hydrocarbon species), light hydrocarbons and gaseous inorganic species were carried out in two locations of a single cylinder direct injection diesel engine by means of a fast sampling valve in order to follow the behaviour of a diesel fuel during the engine cycle. The effect of fuel quality (volatility, aromatic content, cetane number) and air/fuel mass feed ratio on soot, PAH, and light and heavy hydrocarbons was also investigated by direct sampling and chemical analysis of the exhausts emitted from a direct injection diesel engine (D.I.) and an indirect injection diesel engine (I.D.I.)

  16. Adsorbed States of phosphonate derivatives of N-heterocyclic aromatic compounds, imidazole, thiazole, and pyridine on colloidal silver: comparison with a silver electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podstawka, Edyta; Olszewski, Tomasz K; Boduszek, Bogdan; Proniewicz, Leonard M

    2009-09-03

    Here, we report a systematic surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) study of the structures of phosphonate derivatives of the N-heterocyclic aromatic compounds imidazole (ImMeP ([hydroxy(1H-imidazol-5-yl)methyl]phosphonic acid) and (ImMe)(2)P (bis[hydroxy-(1H-imidazol-4-yl)-methyl]phosphinic acid)), thiazole (BAThMeP (butylaminothiazol-2-yl-methyl)phosphonic acid) and BzAThMeP (benzylaminothiazol-2-yl-methyl)phosphonic acid)), and pyridine ((PyMe)(2)P (bis[(hydroxypyridin-3-yl-methyl)]phosphinic acid)) adsorbed on nanometer-sized colloidal particles. We compared these structures to those on a roughened silver electrode surface to determine the relationship between the adsorption strength and the geometry. For example, we showed that all of these biomolecules interact with the colloidal surface through aromatic rings. However, for BzAThMeP, a preferential interaction between the benzene ring and the colloidal silver surface is observed more so than that between the thiazole ring and this substrate. The PC(OH)C fragment does not take part in the adsorption process, and the phosphonate moiety of ImMeP and (ImMe)(2)P, being removed from the surface, only assists in this process.

  17. Pollution characteristics of volatile organic compounds, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and phthalate esters emitted from plastic wastes recycling granulation plants in Xingtan Town, South China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, De-Yin; Zhou, Shun-Gui; Hong, Wei; Feng, Wei-Feng; Tao, Liang

    2013-06-01

    With the aim to investigate the main pollution characteristics of exhaust gases emitted from plastic waste recycling granulation plants, mainly volatile organic compounds (VOCs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and phthalate esters (PAEs) were analyzed in Xingtan Town, the largest distribution center of plastic waste recycling in China. Both inside and outside the plants, the total concentrations of volatile monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (MAHs), PAHs and PAEs ranged from 2000 to 3000 μg m-3, 450 to 1200 ng m-3, and 200 to 1200 ng m-3, respectively. Their concentration levels inside the plants were higher than those outside the plants, and PAHs and PAEs were mainly distributed in the gas-phase. Notably, highly toxic benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) could be detected inside the plants, and harmful PAEs could be detected not only inside but also outside the plants, although PAEs are non-volatile. The exhaust gas composition and concentration were related to the plastic feedstock and granulation temperature.

  18. Impact of fuels on diesel exhaust emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westerholm, R.

    1991-09-01

    This report presents an investigation of the emissions from eight diesel fuels with different sulphur and aromatic content. A bus and a truck were used in the investigation. Chemical analysis and biological testing have been performed. The aim of this project was to find a 'good' diesel fuel which can be used in urban areas. Seven of the fuels were meant to be such fuels. It has been confirmed in this study that there exists a quantifiable relationship between the variables of the diesel fuel blends and the variables of the chemical emissions and their biological effects. 119 figs., 12 tabs., approx. 100 refs

  19. Strong room-temperature chemiresistive effect of TiO2 nanowires to nitro-aromatic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Danling; Chen, Antao; Zhang, Qifeng; Cao, Guozhong

    2011-05-01

    Nanostructured TiO2 thin films are found to be highly responsive to trace vapors of common nitro-explosives at room temperature. Thin films of TiO2 nanowires, made with high yield hydrothermal synthesis, present very reliable sensing characteristics to nitro-aromatic molecules with high sensitivity and fast response at ambient condition. The detection limit of 2, 4-dinitrotoluene (DNT) vapor at room temperature could reach up to 3ppb. The experimental results indicate titania nanowires as a novel chemical sensor to explosive gas have a great commercial potential due to its unique advantages: high sensitivity, rapid response and recovery, small size suitable for intergration with microelectronics and low fabrication cost. Experimental results and a theoretical model are presented.

  20. Analysis of Naturally Occurring Phenolic Compounds in Aromatic Plants by RP-HPLC Coupled to Diode Array Detector (DAD and GC-MS after Silylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charalampos Proestos

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The following aromatic plants of Greek origin, Origanum dictamnus (dictamus, Eucalyptus globulus (eucalyptus, Origanum vulgare L. (oregano, Mellisa officinalis L. (balm mint and Sideritis cretica (mountain tea, were examined for the content of phenolic substances. Reversed phase HPLC coupled to diode array detector (DAD was used for the analysis of the plant extracts. The gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method (GC-MS was also used for identification of phenolic compounds after silylation. The most abundant phenolic acids were: gallic acid (1.5–2.6 mg/100 g dry sample, ferulic acid (0.34–6.9 mg/100 g dry sample and caffeic acid (1.0–13.8 mg/100 g dry sample. (+-Catechin and (−-epicatechin were the main flavonoids identified in oregano and mountain tea. Quercetin was detected only in eucalyptus and mountain tea.

  1. Soil microbial toxicity of eight polycyclic aromatic compounds: effects on nitrification, the genetic diversity of bacteria, and the total number of protozoans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sverdrup, Line Emilie; Ekelund, Flemming; Krogh, Paul Henning

    2002-01-01

    Eight polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs) were tested for their toxic effect on the soil nitrification process, bacterial genetic diversity, and the total number of protozoans (naked amoebae and heterotrophic flagellates). After four weeks of exposure in a well-characterized agricultural soil......, toxic effects were evaluated by comparison to uncontaminated control soils. All PACs affected the nitrification process, and the calculated no-observed-effect concentrations (NOECs) for nitrification were 79 mg/kg for pyrene, 24 mg/kg for fluoranthene, 26 mg/kg for phenanthrene, 72 mg/kg for fluorene......, 23 mg/kg for carbazole, 22 mg/kg for dibenzothiophene, 75 mg/kg for dibenzofuran, and 1,100 mg/kg for acridine. For all substances but acridine, nitrification was the most sensitive of the three toxicity indicators evaluated. No effect of the tested substances on bacterial diversity was found...

  2. An efficient nitration of light alkanes and the alkyl side-chain of aromatic compounds with nitrogen dioxide and nitric acid catalyzed by N-hydroxyphthalimide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiwaki, Yoshiki; Sakaguchi, Satoshi; Ishii, Yasutaka

    2002-08-09

    Nitration of light alkanes and the alkyl side-chain of aromatic compounds with NO(2) and HNO(3) was successfully achieved by the use of N-hydroxyphthalimide (NHPI) as a catalyst under relatively mild conditions. For example, the nitration of propane with NO(2) catalyzed by NHPI at 100 degrees C for 14 h gave 2-nitropropane in good yield without formation of 1-nitropropane and cleaved products such as nitroethane and nitromethane. Various aliphatic nitroalkanes, which are difficult to prepare by conventional methods, could be selectively obtained by means of the present methodology by using NHPI as the key catalyst. In addition, the side-chain nitration of alkylbenzenes such as toluene was selectively carried out to lead to alpha-nitrotoluene without the ring nitration. The present reaction provides an efficient selective method for the nitration of light alkanes and alkylbenzenes, which has been very difficult to carry out so far.

  3. Soil microbial toxicity of eight polycyclic aromatic compounds: effects on nitrification, the genetic diversity of bacteria, and the total number of protozoans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sverdrup, Line Emilie; Ekelund, Flemming; Krogh, Paul Henning

    2002-01-01

    Eight polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs) were tested for their toxic effect on the soil nitrification process, bacterial genetic diversity, and the total number of protozoans (naked amoebae and heterotrophic flagellates). After four weeks of exposure in a well-characterized agricultural soil......, toxic effects were evaluated by comparison to uncontaminated control soils. All PACs affected the nitrification process, and the calculated no-observed-effect concentrations (NOECs) for nitrification were 79 mg/kg for pyrene, 24 mg/kg for fluoranthene, 26 mg/kg for phenanthrene, 72 mg/kg for fluorene...... mg/kg. For effects on nitrification, toxicity (NOEC values) expressed as soil pore-water concentrations (log10(micromol/L)) showed a significant inverse relationship with lipophilicity (log octanol-water partition coefficient) of the substances (r2 = 0.69, p = 0.011, n = 8). This finding could...

  4. Batch and flow photochemical benzannulations based on the reaction of ynamides and diazo ketones. Application to the synthesis of polycyclic aromatic and heteroaromatic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willumstad, Thomas P; Haze, Olesya; Mak, Xiao Yin; Lam, Tin Yiu; Wang, Yu-Pu; Danheiser, Rick L

    2013-11-15

    Highly substituted polycyclic aromatic and heteroaromatic compounds are produced via a two-stage tandem benzannulation/cyclization strategy. The initial benzannulation step proceeds via a pericyclic cascade mechanism triggered by thermal or photochemical Wolff rearrangement of a diazo ketone. The photochemical process can be performed using a continuous flow reactor which facilitates carrying out reactions on a large scale and minimizes the time required for photolysis. Carbomethoxy ynamides as well as more ketenophilic bis-silyl ynamines and N-sulfonyl and N-phosphoryl ynamides serve as the reaction partner in the benzannulation step. In the second stage of the strategy, RCM generates benzofused nitrogen heterocycles, and various heterocyclization processes furnish highly substituted and polycyclic indoles of types that were not available by using the previous cyclobutenone-based version of the tandem strategy.

  5. Estimating the physicochemical properties of polyhalogenated aromatic and aliphatic compounds using UPPER: part 1. Boiling point and melting point.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Admire, Brittany; Lian, Bo; Yalkowsky, Samuel H

    2015-01-01

    The UPPER (Unified Physicochemical Property Estimation Relationships) model uses enthalpic and entropic parameters to estimate 20 biologically relevant properties of organic compounds. The model has been validated by Lian and Yalkowsky on a data set of 700 hydrocarbons. The aim of this work is to expand the UPPER model to estimate the boiling and melting points of polyhalogenated compounds. In this work, 19 new group descriptors are defined and used to predict the transition temperatures of an additional 1288 compounds. The boiling points of 808 and the melting points of 742 polyhalogenated compounds are predicted with average absolute errors of 13.56 K and 25.85 K, respectively. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Phenol-oxidizing enzyme expression in Lentinula edodes by the addition of sawdust extract, aromatic compounds, or copper in liquid culture media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanesaka, Eiji; Takeda, Hironori; Yoshida, Motonobu

    2013-01-01

    This study examined how the addition of a sawdust extract from Castanopsis cuspidata, several aromatic compounds, and copper affected the expression of a phenol-oxidizing enzyme in the white-rot basidiomycete, Lentinula edodes. Compared to liquid media that had not been supplemented with sawdust extract (MYPG), MYPG containing low (MYPG-S100) or high (MYPG-S500) concentrations of sawdust extract had a marked effect on the promotion of mycelial growth. No manganese peroxidase (MnP) production was observed in either MYPG or MYPG-S100 media until 35 days after inoculation. However, MnP production was enhanced by culture in MYPG-S500, with a marked increase observed suddenly at 14 days after inoculation. Northern blot analysis revealed that the transcription of the lemnp2 gene coding extracellular MnP was initially observed at detectable levels at day 10 after the initial inoculation of MYPG-S500, increasing gradually thereafter until days 22-25. However, laccase (Lcc) production was not observed in any of the media until 35 days after inoculation. Addition of 10 mM aromatic compounds - 1,2-benzenediol, 2-methoxyphenol, hydroquinone, and 4-anisidine--into the MYPG-S500 medium completely inhibited MnP production and did not enhance any Lcc production. While the addition of 1 or 2 mM Cu2+ (CuSO4 x 5H2O) to MYPG-S500 medium completely inhibited MnP production, this Cu2+ addition caused a marked increase in Lcc production at 17 and 6 days after the addition, respectively.

  7. Fiber-optic-based chemical sensors for in-situ measurement of metals and aromatic organic compounds in seawater and soil systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Stephen H.; Inman, Scott; Theriault, Gregory A.; Cooper, Stafford S.; Malone, Philip G.; Shimizu, Yasuhiro; Lurk, Paul W.

    1990-08-01

    Use of UV-visibletransmitting optical fibers for real-time, remote, in situfluorescencemeasurementsof chemical constituents in environmental samples is described. In order to improve the capability of fluorescence techniques for resoMng complex mixtures we have deVelOped a fiber optic-based system that uses a pulsed nrogen laser to induce fluorescence and a time-gated linear photodiode array coupled to a spectrograph for measuring resutting emisalon spectra This permfts rapid extraction of both spectral information and temporal data (fluorescence decay times). The performance of the system for monftoring aromatic hydrocarbons directly in seawater over a bare-ended" fiber optic cable is discussed. Techniques for extending the Capability to determination of metals and other non-fluorescing compounds are presented. A system in which a fluorogenic indicator molecule for metal ions is constantly renewed at the sensing end of the fiber is described that (1)exhibits very fast response times (1 second) and (2)eliminates problems of reversibility common with immobilized indicators. Presently, the pulsed-laser/photodiode fiber optic system is being adapted to a truck-mounted cone penetrometer system for characterizing the distribution of chemical contaminants at hazardous waste sites. The system can push a 35.7 mm diameter rod up to 50 m into the sI at a rate of approximately 2 cm/sec. The penetrometer probe tip will be equipped with sapphire viewing windows that permft one fiber to screen for aromatic orgarc compounds and a fluorogeruc indicator release system that can be used with a second fiber for trace metal screening.

  8. Matrix assisted ionization: new aromatic and nonaromatic matrix compounds producing multiply charged lipid, peptide, and protein ions in the positive and negative mode observed directly from surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Inutan, Ellen D; Wang, Beixi; Lietz, Christopher B; Green, Daniel R; Manly, Cory D; Richards, Alicia L; Marshall, Darrell D; Lingenfelter, Steven; Ren, Yue; Trimpin, Sarah

    2012-10-01

    Matrix assisted inlet ionization (MAII) is a method in which a matrix:analyte mixture produces mass spectra nearly identical to electrospray ionization without the application of a voltage or the use of a laser as is required in laserspray ionization (LSI), a subset of MAII. In MAII, the sample is introduced by, for example, tapping particles of dried matrix:analyte into the inlet of the mass spectrometer and, therefore, permits the study of conditions pertinent to the formation of multiply charged ions without the need of absorption at a laser wavelength. Crucial for the production of highly charged ions are desolvation conditions to remove matrix molecules from charged matrix:analyte clusters. Important factors affecting desolvation include heat, vacuum, collisions with gases and surfaces, and even radio frequency fields. Other parameters affecting multiply charged ion production is sample preparation, including pH and solvent composition. Here, findings from over 100 compounds found to produce multiply charged analyte ions using MAII with the inlet tube set at 450 °C are presented. Of the compounds tested, many have -OH or -NH(2) functionality, but several have neither (e.g., anthracene), nor aromaticity or conjugation. Binary matrices are shown to be applicable for LSI and solvent-free sample preparation can be applied to solubility restricted compounds, and matrix compounds too volatile to allow drying from common solvents. Our findings suggest that the physical properties of the matrix such as its morphology after evaporation of the solvent, its propensity to evaporate/sublime, and its acidity are more important than its structure and functional groups.

  9. Matrix Assisted Ionization: New Aromatic and Nonaromatic Matrix Compounds Producing Multiply Charged Lipid, Peptide, and Protein Ions in the Positive and Negative Mode Observed Directly from Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Inutan, Ellen D.; Wang, Beixi; Lietz, Christopher B.; Green, Daniel R.; Manly, Cory D.; Richards, Alicia L.; Marshall, Darrell D.; Lingenfelter, Steven; Ren, Yue; Trimpin, Sarah

    2012-10-01

    Matrix assisted inlet ionization (MAII) is a method in which a matrix:analyte mixture produces mass spectra nearly identical to electrospray ionization without the application of a voltage or the use of a laser as is required in laserspray ionization (LSI), a subset of MAII. In MAII, the sample is introduced by, for example, tapping particles of dried matrix:analyte into the inlet of the mass spectrometer and, therefore, permits the study of conditions pertinent to the formation of multiply charged ions without the need of absorption at a laser wavelength. Crucial for the production of highly charged ions are desolvation conditions to remove matrix molecules from charged matrix:analyte clusters. Important factors affecting desolvation include heat, vacuum, collisions with gases and surfaces, and even radio frequency fields. Other parameters affecting multiply charged ion production is sample preparation, including pH and solvent composition. Here, findings from over 100 compounds found to produce multiply charged analyte ions using MAII with the inlet tube set at 450 °C are presented. Of the compounds tested, many have -OH or -NH2 functionality, but several have neither (e.g., anthracene), nor aromaticity or conjugation. Binary matrices are shown to be applicable for LSI and solvent-free sample preparation can be applied to solubility restricted compounds, and matrix compounds too volatile to allow drying from common solvents. Our findings suggest that the physical properties of the matrix such as its morphology after evaporation of the solvent, its propensity to evaporate/sublime, and its acidity are more important than its structure and functional groups.

  10. Determination of octanol-water partition coefficients of polar polycyclic aromatic compounds (N-PAC) by high performance liquid chromatography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helweg, C.; Nielsen, T.; Hansen, P.E.

    1997-01-01

    using a Diol column with an eluent of 35 % MeOH and 65 % water. The results indicate that the Diol column, in reversed phase mode, is able to form hydrogen bonds with a solute. Different LFERs between retention and log K-ow was found for polar and nonpolar compounds. In general log K-ow increased...

  11. Characterization of aromatic organosulfur model compounds relevant to fossil fuels by using atmospheric pressure chemical ionization with CS2 and high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Weijuan; Sheng, Huaming; Jin, Chunfen; Riedeman, James S; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I

    2016-04-15

    The chemistry of desulfurization involved in processing crude oil is greatly dependent on the forms of sulfur in the oil. Sulfur exists in different chemical bonding environments in fossil fuels, including those in thiophenes and benzothiophenes, thiols, sulfides, and disulfides. In this study, the fragmentation behavior of the molecular ions of 17 aromatic organosulfur compounds with various functionalities was systematically investigated by using high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry. Multiple-stage tandem mass spectrometric experiments were carried out using a linear quadrupole ion trap (LQIT) equipped with an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) source. (+)APCI/CS2 was used to generate stable dominant molecular ions for all the compounds studied except for three sulfides that also showed abundant fragment ions. The LQIT coupled with an orbitrap mass spectrometer was used for elemental composition analysis, which facilitated the identification of the neutral molecules lost during fragmentation. The characteristic fragment ions generated in MS(2) and MS(3) experiments provide clues for the chemical bonding environment of sulfur atoms in the examined compounds. Upon collision-induced dissociation (CID), the molecular ions can lose the sulfur atom in a variety of ways, including as S (32 Da), HS(•) (33 Da), H2 S (34 Da), CS (44 Da), (•) CHS (45 Da) and CH2 S (46 Da). These neutral fragments are not only indicative of the presence of sulfur, but also of the type of sulfur present in the compound. Generally, losses of HS(•) and H2 S were found to be associated with compounds containing saturated sulfur functionalities, while losses of S, CS and (•) CHS were more common for heteroaromatic sulfur compounds. High-resolution tandem mass spectrometry with APCI/CS2 ionization is a viable approach to determining the types of organosulfur compounds. It can potentially be applied to analysis of complex mixtures, which is beneficial to improving the

  12. Additive effects of CuSO4 and aromatic compounds on laccase production by Pleurotus sajor-caju PS-2001 using sucrose as a carbon source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Bettin

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Laccase enzymes are now commercially available, and a laccase/mediator combination is currently marketed for indigo dye bleaching in textile manufacturing; replacing traditional chemical-based processes with enzymatic technology reduces the need for effluent treatment. However, an inexpensive source of these enzymes will be needed to enable wider application of this technology. In the present work, the main objective was to increase laccase production by the mushroom Pleurotus sajor-caju strain PS-2001 grown on sucrose derived from sugar cane, one of most economical carbon sources known, by the addition of compounds that are known to affect laccase production. High laccase activities (45-62 U mL-1 were obtained with additions of syringaldazine, benzoic acid, gallic acid, and vanillin. When CuSO4 was used in conjunction with these aromatic compounds, the levels of laccase activity were further improved, reaching 58-80 U mL-1. These laccase activities indicate the potential of this strain as an enzyme producer, which has also been detected in media containing glucose, but with activity lower than that observed with sucrose.

  13. Occurrence, distribution and health risk from polycyclic aromatic compounds (PAHs, oxygenated-PAHs and azaarenes) in street dust from a major West African Metropolis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandowe, Benjamin A Musa; Nkansah, Marian Asantewah

    2016-05-15

    Scientific evidence suggests that the burden of disease on urban residents of sub-Saharan African Countries is increasing, partly as a result of exposure to elevated concentrations of toxic environmental chemicals. However, characterization of the levels, composition pattern and sources of polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs) in environmental samples from African cities is still lacking. This study measured the PAHs, oxygenated-PAHs (OPAHs) and azaarene (AZAs) content of street dusts collected from Kumasi, Ghana (a major metropolis located in the tropical forest zone of West Africa). The ∑Alkyl+parent-PAHs, ∑OPAHs and ∑AZAs concentration in street dust averaged 2570 ng g(-1) (range: 181-7600 ng g(-1)), 833 ng g(-1) (57-4200 ng g(-1)) and 73 ng g(-1) (3.3-240 ng g(-1)), respectively. The concentrations of ∑Alkyl+parent-PAHs were strongly correlated (n=25) with ∑OPAHs (r=0.96, p10(-6) indicating high risk of contracting cancer from exposure to street dust from Kumasi. The contribution of OPAHs, AZAs, and alkyl-PAHs in street dust to cancer risk could not be quantified because of lack of toxicity equivalency factors for these compounds; however this could be significant because of their high concentration and known higher toxicity of some polar PACs and alkyl-PAHs than their related parent-PAHs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Characterization of Rhizobium naphthalenivorans sp. nov. with special emphasis on aromatic compound degradation and multilocus sequence analysis of housekeeping genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiya, Shinichi; Rubaba, Owen; Yoshida, Naoko; Yamada, Takeshi; Hiraishi, Akira

    2012-01-01

    Three strains of aerobic chemoorganotrophic naphthalene-degrading bacteria (designated TSY03b(T), TSY04, and TSW01) isolated from sediment of a polychlorinated-dioxin-transforming microcosm were characterized. These strains had Gram-negative-stained, rod-shaped cells measuring 0.6‒0.9 μm in width and 1.2‒3.0 μm in length and were motile by means of peritrichous flagella. Naphthalene was utilized as the sole carbon and energy source, and the transcription of a putative aromatic-ring hydroxylating gene was inducible by naphthalene. The major component of cellular fatty acids was summed feature 8 (C18:1ω7c and/or C18:1ω6c), and significant proportions of C18:0 and C19:0 cyclo ω8cis were also found. The major respiratory quinone was ubiquinone-10. The G+C content of the DNA was 60.3‒60.9 mol%. Phylogenetic analyses by studying sequence information on the housekeeping atpD, dnaK, glnII, gyrB, and recA genes as well as on 16S rRNA genes and the 16S-23S rDNA internal transcribed spacer region revealed that the strains grouped with members of the genus Rhizobium, with Rhizobium selenitireducens as their closest relative but formed a distinct lineage at the species level. This was confirmed by genomic DNA-DNA hybridization studies. These phenotypic, genotypic, and phylogenetic data strongly suggest that our isolates should be classified under a novel species of the genus Rhizobium. Thus, we propose the name Rhizobium naphthalenivorans sp. nov. to accommodate the novel isolates. The type strain is TSY03b(T) (= NBRC 107585T = KCTC 23252T).

  15. Chromatography mass spectrometry and its use in identification in the radiolysis products of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and organic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibadov, N.A.; Suleymanov, B.A.

    2010-01-01

    Full text : Increased attention to the environment is the result of dramatically increased human activity, which in turn is caused by the rapid growth of population of the planet. Extremely powerful tool for control of pollution of different environmental objects - Chromatographic methods to analyze complex mixtures of components. This work is devoted to methods of gas chromatography - mass - spectroscopy and its use in identifying the pollutants of natural environments. Devices that allow obtaining the mass spectra are called mass spectrometers. Sensitivity of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (typically 10-6-10-9 g) determined by the sensitivity of the mass spectrometer detector. Its essence lies in the fact that the recording of chromatograms is not the full ion current and the most characteristic ions of the substance. With varying degrees of probability in the water identified over 100 individual organic compounds, including PHs. The method of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry identified compounds in natural waters, soils, soil and sediments.

  16. Sediment contamination of residential streams in the metropolitan kansas city area, USA: Part I. distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon and pesticide-related compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, J.; Huggins, D.; Welker, G.; Dias, J.R.; Ingersoll, C.G.; Murowchick, J.B.

    2010-01-01

    This is the first part of a study that evaluates the influence of nonpoint-source contaminants on the sediment quality of five streams within the metropolitan Kansas City area, central United States. Surficial sediment was collected in 2003 from 29 sites along five streams with watersheds that extend from the core of the metropolitan area to its development fringe. Sediment was analyzed for 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), 3 common polychlorinated biphenyl mixtures (Aroclors), and 25 pesticide-related compounds of eight chemical classes. Multiple PAHs were detected at more than 50% of the sites, and concentrations of total PAHs ranged from 290 to 82,150 ??g/kg (dry weight). The concentration and frequency of detection of PAHs increased with increasing urbanization of the residential watersheds. Four- and five-ring PAH compounds predominated the PAH composition (73-100%), especially fluoranthene and pyrene. The PAH composition profiles along with the diagnostic isomer ratios [e.g., anthracene/(anthracene + phenanthrene), 0.16 ?? 0.03; fluoranthene/(fluoranthene + pyrene), 0.55 ?? 0.01)] indicate that pyrogenic sources (i.e., coal-tar-related operations or materials and traffic-related particles) may be common PAH contributors to these residential streams. Historical-use organochlorine insecticides and their degradates dominated the occurrences of pesticide-related compounds, with chlordane and dieldrin detected in over or nearly 50% of the samples. The occurrence of these historical organic compounds was associated with past urban applications, which may continue to be nonpoint sources replenishing local streams. Concentrations of low molecular weight (LMW; two or three rings) and high molecular weight (HMW; four to six rings) PAHs covaried along individual streams but showed dissimilar distribution patterns between the streams, while the historical pesticide-related compounds generally increased in concentration downstream. Correlations were noted

  17. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in oysters and sediments from the Yatsushiro Sea, Japan: comparison of potential risks among PAHs, dioxins and dioxin-like compounds in benthic organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakata, Haruhiko; Uehara, Kiriko; Goto, Yuta; Fukumura, Miki; Shimasaki, Hideyuki; Takikawa, Kiyoshi; Miyawaki, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were analyzed in oysters collected from 18 stations in the Yatsushiro Sea, western Japan. PAHs were detected in all samples analyzed, and the highest concentration (mean 230 ng/g wet weight) was found in oysters from Tanoura Bay. The high molecular weight PAHs to low molecular weight PAHs ratios in oysters from Tanoura Bay were higher than at other stations. Sediment samples collected from 42 stations in Tanoura Bay were analyzed for PAHs to understand their concentrations and distribution. Higher concentrations were found in sediment samples at two stations in the southern inner bay (mean 30,200 ng/g dry weight), which were approximately two orders of magnitude higher than at a reference site. These observations strongly suggest severe contamination and significant sources of PAHs in Tanoura Bay. Dioxins and dioxin-like compounds (PCDFs, and non- and mono-ortho coplanar PCBs) were analyzed in sediments from eight stations in Tanoura Bay. The concentrations were comparable to, or lower than, at the reference sites, suggesting that there are no specific sources of these compounds in this bay. PAH, dioxins and dioxin-like compounds DR-CALUX relative potencies (REP) were applied to the sediment concentrations to evaluate the potential for toxicological effects on benthic organisms. PAHs made the highest contribution to the total REP concentration, supplying 99% of the total REP, followed by PCDDs (0.18%), PCDFs (0.04%), and PCBs (<0.001%). In this area, PAHs appear to be the most important Ah receptor binding chemicals for potential toxicity to benthic species. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Diesel with low sulfur content and high cetane number produced by two stages hydrotreating procedures; Diesel com baixos teores de enxofre e alto numero de cetano a partir de hidrotratamento em dois estagios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zotin, J.L.; Pacheco, M.E.; Souza, V.P.; Belato, D.; Silva, R.M.S. [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas (CENPES)

    2004-07-01

    According to the Brazilian specifications for diesel, lower sulfur content and higher cetane number can be expected in the near future, leading to an increased capacity of hydrotreating processes. PETROBRAS has proved technology for hydrotreating processes with 8 high pressure single stage units in operation. However, the production of ultra low sulfur diesel with high cetane number may require two stages processes, with conventional hydrotreating in the first step and deep aromatic saturation (HDA), with increase in the cetane number, in the second one. In this approach, noble metal catalysts, which are more active for hydrogenation but more sensitive to sulfur and nitrogen poisoning, can be used in the second stage. In the present work, the 2 stages approach was studied for maximizing cetane number of Brazilian gasoils. The influence of operating variables and the inhibition effect by sulfur and nitrogen were analyzed. Diesel with sulfur content below 10 ppm and high aromatic conversions at relatively mild conditions were obtained with noble metal catalysts, with a cetane number increase up to 6 points in the second stage. Sulfur compounds have a stronger inhibition effect than basic nitrogen compounds on hydrogenation reaction rates, but a synergetic effect was observed when both contaminants were present in high concentrations. (author)

  19. Recycling used palm oil and used engine oil to produce white bio oil, bio petroleum diesel and heavy fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-abbas, Mustafa Hamid; Ibrahim, Wan Aini Wan; Sanagi, Mohd. Marsin

    2012-09-01

    Recycling waste materials produced in our daily life is considered as an additional resource of a wide range of materials and it conserves the environment. Used engine oil and used cooking oil are two oils disposed off in large quantities as a by-product of our daily life. This study aims at providing white bio oil, bio petroleum diesel and heavy fuel from the disposed oils. Toxic organic materials suspected to be present in the used engine oil were separated using vacuum column chromatography to reduce the time needed for the separation process and to avoid solvent usage. The compounds separated were detected by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and found to contain toxic aromatic carboxylic acids. Used cooking oils (thermally cracked from usage) were collected and separated by vacuum column chromatography. White bio oil produced was examined by GC-MS. The white bio oil consists of non-toxic hydrocarbons and is found to be a good alternative to white mineral oil which is significantly used in food industry, cosmetics and drugs with the risk of containing polycyclic aromatic compounds which are carcinogenic and toxic. Different portions of the used cooking oil and used engine were mixed to produce several blends for use as heavy oil fuels. White bio oil was used to produce bio petroleum diesel by blending it with petroleum diesel and kerosene. The bio petroleum diesel produced passed the PETRONAS flash point and viscosity specification test. The heat of combustion of the two blends of heavy fuel produced was measured and one of the blends was burned to demonstrate its burning ability. Higher heat of combustion was obtained from the blend containing greater proportion of used engine oil. This study has provided a successful recycled alternative for white bio oil, bio petroleum fuel and diesel which can be an energy source.

  20. SOA Formation form the NO3 radicals Chemistry of Isoprene, Monoterpenes, Sesquiterpenes, Biogenic Oxygenated Compounds, and Aromatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleindienst, T. E.; Jaoui, M.; Docherty, K.; Corse, E.; Offenberg, J. H.; Lewandowski, M.

    2011-12-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are oxidized in the atmosphere primarily by hydroxyl radicals (OH) during daylight hours but also by nitrate radicals (NO3) during overnight, photochemically inactive periods. While reactions with OH have received considerable attention with regard to gas-phase reaction products and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation, less is known about the mechanisms and products resulting from nighttime NO3 reactions despite their potential for SOA formation. To date, there have been limited studies on the chemical characteristics of aerosol reaction products formed from VOCs oxidation with NO3, and few SOA reaction products have been identified. Nighttime reactions have nevertheless been incorporated into some air quality models despite the limited information available and substantial uncertainties which still exist. The National Exposure Research Laboratory of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency recently undertook an integrated laboratory research effort to better understand the contribution of NO3 reactions to nighttime SOA formation. Isoprene, methacrolein, a-pinene, b-pinene, d-limonene, b-caryophyllene, farnesene, a-humulene, 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol, toluene, m-xylene, and naphthalene were reacted with NO3 under a wide range of conditions in a series of separate photochemical reaction chamber experiments. These hydrocarbons are thought to contribute to ambient SOA formation. NO3 was formed through thermal decomposition of N2O5. The yield, physical characteristics, and composition of SOA formed in each experiment was analyzed by a suite of instruments including a scanning mobility particle sizer, a Sunset Labs semi continuous EC-OC monitor, a volatility differential mobility analyzer, a direct insertion probe-mass spectrometer, a high resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer, and a gas-chromatography-mass spectrometer. To understand the relative contributions of nighttime versus daytime VOCs reactions, a similar

  1. Carbonyl Emissions from Gasoline and Diesel Motor Vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Destaillats, Hugo; Jakober, Chris A.; Robert, Michael A.; Riddle, Sarah G.; Destaillats, Hugo; Charles, M. Judith; Green, Peter G.; Kleeman, Michael J.

    2007-12-01

    Carbonyls from gasoline powered light-duty vehicles (LDVs) and heavy-duty diesel powered vehicles (HDDVs) operated on chassis dynamometers were measured using an annular denuder-quartz filter-polyurethane foam sampler with O-(2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzyl)hydroxylamine derivatization and chromatography-mass spectrometry analyses. Two internal standards were utilized based on carbonyl recovery, 4-fluorobenzaldehyde for_C8 compounds. Gas- and particle-phase emissions for 39 aliphatic and 20 aromatic carbonyls ranged from 0.1 ? 2000 ?g/L fuel for LDVs and 1.8 - 27000 mu g/L fuel for HDDVs. Gas-phase species accounted for 81-95percent of the total carbonyls from LDVs and 86-88percent from HDDVs. Particulate carbonyls emitted from a HDDV under realistic driving conditions were similar to concentrations measured in a diesel particulate matter (PM) standard reference material. Carbonyls accounted for 19percent of particulate organic carbon (POC) emissions from low-emission LDVs and 37percent of POC emissions from three-way catalyst equipped LDVs. This identifies carbonyls as one of the largest classes of compounds in LDV PM emissions. The carbonyl fraction of HDDV POC was lower, 3.3-3.9percent depending upon operational conditions. Partitioning analysis indicates the carbonyls had not achieved equilibrium between the gas- and particle-phase under the dilution factors of 126-584 used in the current study.

  2. Rudolf Diesel

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 17; Issue 4. Rudolf Diesel - The Rational Inventor of a Heat Engine. Tilottama Shrinivasa. Article-in-a-Box Volume 17 Issue 4 April 2012 pp 319-320. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  3. Heat capacities of aqueous polar aromatic compounds over a wide range of conditions. Part I: phenol, cresols, aniline, and toluidines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Censky, Miroslav; Hnedkovsky, Lubomir; Majer, Vladimir

    2005-01-01

    The heat capacities of dilute aqueous solutions of phenol (hydroxybenzene), three cresols (2-, 3- and 4-methylhydroxybenzene), aniline (aminobenzene) and three toluidines (2-, 3- and 4-methylaminobenzene) were determined using a modified flow Picker-type high temperature calorimeter. The measurements were performed at temperatures between (303 and 623) K or 573 K for compounds containing hydroxy or amino group, respectively, and at several pressures up to 30 MPa. Standard heat capacities (partial molar heat capacities at infinite dilution) obtained from the experimental data exhibit a strong increase with temperature above 500 K consistent with the evolution of the standard volumes reported earlier. The data for aqueous phenol were used for testing several semiempiric models proposed for description of the standard thermodynamic properties of aqueous solutes. Their ability to reproduce the temperature and pressure dependence of standard heat capacities and to extrapolate towards higher conditions were examined

  4. An investigation of the primary species formed in pulse irradiated nitro-aromatic compounds in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van der Linde, H.J.; Schulte-Frohlinde, D.; Schworer, F.

    1976-12-01

    The ring-structured compounds containing nitrogen are of considerable importance in radiation chemistry and radiation biology, inasmuch as they form the basis of many nucleic acids, proteins and other biological molecules. The pulse radiolysis of aqueous solutions of nitrobenzene, nitrophenol and nitroaniline was investigated in order to obtain more information of the primary processes which occur in these systems. By making use of various scavengers, and by changing the pH of the solutions, it was possible to study the reactions of electrons, hydrogen atoms and hydroxyl radicals with the compounds mentioned. The spectra were analysed kinetically, and reaction-rate constants were determined for the formation and decay of the intermediates. The in situ radiolysis and photolysis ESR techniques were used in an effort to detect the primarily formed intermediates. With the possible exception of nitrobenzene, no cyclohexadienyl-type radical was observed, but it was found that semiquinone radicals are formed in nitrobenzene in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. A reaction scheme to explain this finding is proposed. The formation of HNO 2 was studied by means of the electrical-conductivity method. It was found that the group NO 2 -group is eliminated not only in the case of nitrophenol, but also in the cases of nitrobenzene and nitroaniline. The reaction-rate constants for the NO 2 -elimination step was determined in the various cases and, by making use of the mobilities of the different ions, the HNO 2 yield was calculated. The values obtained were in good agreement with results obtained by determining the yield of the NO 2 -ion by means of an analytical method [af

  5. Strong mutagenic effects of diesel engine emissions using vegetable oil as fuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bünger, Jürgen; Krahl, Jürgen; Munack, Axel; Ruschel, Yvonne; Schröder, Olaf; Emmert, Birgit; Westphal, Götz; Müller, Michael; Hallier, Ernst; Brüning, Thomas

    2007-08-01

    Diesel engine emissions (DEE) are classified as probably carcinogenic to humans. In recent years every effort was made to reduce DEE and their content of carcinogenic and mutagenic polycyclic aromatic compounds. Since 1995 we observed an appreciable reduction of mutagenicity of DEE driven by reformulated or newly designed fuels in several studies. Recently, the use of rapeseed oil as fuel for diesel engines is rapidly growing among German transportation businesses and agriculture due to economic reasons. We compared the mutagenic effects of DEE from two different batches of rapeseed oil (RSO) with rapeseed methyl ester (RME, biodiesel), natural gas derived synthetic fuel (gas-to-liquid, GTL), and a reference diesel fuel (DF). The test engine was a heavy-duty truck diesel running the European Stationary Cycle. Particulate matter from the exhaust was sampled onto PTFE-coated glass fibre filters and extracted with dichloromethane in a soxhlet apparatus. The gas phase constituents were sampled as condensates. The mutagenicity of the particle extracts and the condensates was tested using the Salmonella typhimurium/mammalian microsome assay with tester strains TA98 and TA100. Compared to DF the two RSO qualities significantly increased the mutagenic effects of the particle extracts by factors of 9.7 up to 59 in tester strain TA98 and of 5.4 up to 22.3 in tester strain TA100, respectively. The condensates of the RSO fuels caused an up to factor 13.5 stronger mutagenicity than the reference fuel. RME extracts had a moderate but significant higher mutagenic response in assays of TA98 with metabolic activation and TA100 without metabolic activation. GTL samples did not differ significantly from DF. In conclusion, the strong increase of mutagenicity using RSO as diesel fuel compared to the reference DF and other fuels causes deep concern on future usage of this biologic resource as a replacement of established diesel fuels.

  6. Influence of extraction methodologies on the analysis of five major volatile aromatic compounds of citronella grass (Cymbopogon nardus) and lemongrass (Cymbopogon citratus) grown in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanthai, Saksit; Prachakoll, Sujitra; Ruangviriyachai, Chalerm; Luthria, Devanand L

    2012-01-01

    This paper deals with the systematic comparison of extraction of major volatile aromatic compounds (VACs) of citronella grass and lemongrass by classical microhydrodistillation (MHD), as well as modern accelerated solvent extraction (ASE). Sixteen VACs were identified by GC/MS. GC-flame ionization detection was used for the quantification of five VACs (citronellal, citronellol, geraniol, citral, and eugenol) to compare the extraction efficiency of the two different methods. Linear range, LOD, and LOQ were calculated for the five VACs. Intraday and interday precisions for the analysis of VACs were determined for each sample. The extraction recovery, as calculated by a spiking experiment with known standards of VACs, by ASE and MHD ranged from 64.9 to 91.2% and 74.3 to 95.2%, respectively. The extraction efficiency of the VACs was compared for three solvents of varying polarities (hexane, dichloromethane, and methanol), seven different temperatures (ranging from 40 to 160 degrees C, with a gradual increment of 20 degrees C), five time periods (from 1 to 10 min), and three cycles (1, 2, and 3 repeated extractions). Optimum extraction yields of VACs were obtained when extractions were carried out for 7 min with dichloromethane and two extraction cycles at 120 degrees C. The results showed that the ASE technique is more efficient than MHD, as it results in improved yields and significant reduction in extraction time with automated extraction capabilities.

  7. Seasonal variations and sources of atmospheric polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and organochlorine compounds in a high-altitude city: Evidence from four-year observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Ping; Wang, Xiaoping; Sheng, Jiujiang; Wang, Hailong; Yuan, Xiaohua; He, Yuanqing; Qian, Yun; Yao, Tandong

    2018-02-01

    Lijiang is a high-altitude city located on the eastern fringe of the Tibetan Plateau, with complex seasonal atmospheric circulations (i.e. westerly wind, Indian Monsoon, and East Asia Monsoon). Very few previous studies have focused on seasonal variations and sources of organic pollutants in Lijiang. In this study, a four-year air campaign from June 2009 to July 2013 was conducted to investigate the temporal trends and the sources of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and organochlorine compounds [including organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs)]. The atmospheric PAH concentrations in winter are 2-3 times of those in summer, probably because of the combined result of enhanced local emission and long-range atmospheric transport (LRAT) during winter. Traffic pollution was the primary local source of PAHs, while biomass burning is the dominant LRAT source. Different from PAHs, OCPs and PCBs mainly underwent LRAT to reach Lijiang. The peak concentrations of most of OCPs occurred in pre-monsoon season and winter, which are carried by air masses from Myanmar and India through westerly winds. As compared with other sites of the Tibetan Plateau, without the direct barrier of the Himalaya, Lijiang is easily contaminated by the incursion of polluted air masses.

  8. Remarkable effect of halogenation of aromatic compounds on efficiency of nanowire formation through polymerization/crosslinking by high-energy single particle irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horio, Akifumi; Sakurai, Tsuneaki; Kayama, Kazuto; Lakshmi, G. B. V. S.; Kumar Avasthi, Devesh; Sugimoto, Masaki; Yamaki, Tetsuya; Chiba, Atsuya; Saito, Yuichi; Seki, Shu

    2018-01-01

    Irradiation of high-energy ion particles on organic films induced solid-state polymerization and crosslinking reactions of the materials along the ion trajectories, resulting in the formation of insoluble uniform nanowires with a precise diameter. The nanowires were isolated by the development process i.e. the irradiated film was immersed in organic solvents, and their morphology was visualized by atomic force microscopy. The target organic materials are 4-vinyltriphenylamine, poly(4-vinyltriphenylamine), and polystyrene derivatives with/without the partial substitutions by halogen atoms. It was found that 4-vinyltriphenylamines, in spite of their small molecular sizes, afforded nanowires more clearly than poly(4-vinyltriphenylamine)s. Moreover, the efficiency of demonstrated polymerization/crosslinking reactions obviously depends on the substituted halogen atom species. The averaged diameters of nanowires from bromo- or iodo- substituted 4-vinyltriphenylamine (9.3 and 9.4 nm, respectively) were larger than that obtained from simple 4-vinyltriphenylamine (6.8 nm). The remarkable effect of halogenation of aromatic compounds on the efficiency of the radiation-induced reactions was also observed for polystyrene derivatives. This contrast was considered to originate from the sum of the efficiency of elementary reactions including dissociative electron attachment.

  9. Fuel and Fuel Additive Registration Testing of Ethanol-Diesel Blend for O2Diesel, Inc.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fanick, E. R.

    2004-02-01

    O2 Diesel Inc. (formerly AAE Technologies Inc.) tested a heavy duty engine with O2Diesel (diesel fuel with 7.7% ethanol and additives) for regulated emissions and speciation of vapor-phase and semi-volatile hydrocarbon compounds. This testing was performed in support of EPA requirements for registering designated fuels and fuel additives as stipulated by sections 211(b) and 211(e) of the Clean Air Act.

  10. Characterizing baseline concentrations, proportions, and processes controlling deposition of river-transported bitumen-associated polycyclic aromatic compounds at a floodplain lake (Slave River Delta, Northwest Territories, Canada).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmes, Matthew C; Wiklund, Johan A; Van Opstal, Stacey R; Wolfe, Brent B; Hall, Roland I

    2016-05-01

    Inadequate knowledge of baseline conditions challenges ability for monitoring programs to detect pollution in rivers, especially where there are natural sources of contaminants. Here, we use paleolimnological data from a flood-prone lake ("SD2", informal name) in the Slave River Delta (SRD, Canada), ∼ 500 km downstream of the Alberta oil sands development and the bitumen-rich McMurray Formation to identify baseline concentrations and proportions of "river-transported bitumen-associated indicator polycyclic aromatic compounds" (indicator PACs; Hall et al. 2012) and processes responsible for their deposition. Results show that indicator PACs are deposited in SD2 by Slave River floodwaters in concentrations that are 45 % lower than those in sediments of "PAD31compounds", a lake upstream in the Athabasca Delta that receives Athabasca River floodwaters. Lower concentrations at SD2 are likely a consequence of sediment retention upstream as well as dilution by sediment influx from the Peace River. In addition, relations with organic matter content reveal that flood events dilute concentrations of indicator PACs in SD2 because the lake receives high-energy floods and the lake sediments are predominantly inorganic. This contrasts with PAD31 where floodwaters increase indicator PAC concentrations in the lake sediments, and concentrations are diluted during low flood influence intervals due to increased deposition of lacustrine organic matter. Results also show no significant differences in concentrations and proportions of indicator PACs between pre- (1967) and post- (1980s and 1990 s) oil sands development high flood influence intervals (t = 1.188, P = 0.279, d.f. = 6.136), signifying that they are delivered to the SRD by natural processes. Although we cannot assess potential changes in indicator PACs during the past decade, baseline concentrations and proportions can be used to enhance ongoing monitoring efforts.

  11. On Benzene and Aromaticity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    intuition, deduction and simple experimentation also need to be retold. The creativity of scientists has an appeal that transcends the subject. Chemistry of aromatic compounds provides ample opportunities for the teacher to cover many of the above aspects. One can move from almost trivial questions to those that require ...

  12. Graphenes – Aromatic Giants

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Srimath

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (often abbreviated as PAH) are an important class of organic compounds. Students learn about them in any course on organic chemistry. The best known representatives are benzene (which, in fact, is cyclic, not polycy- clic), naphthalene, anthracene, phenanthrene and pyrene. Today.

  13. An empirical, quantitative approach to predict the reactivity of some substituted aromatic compounds towards reactive radical species (Cl2-*, Br2-*, *NO2, SO3-*, SO4-*) in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minero, Claudio; Maurino, Valter; Pelizzetti, Ezio; Vione, Davide

    2006-07-01

    The Hammett approach, applied to the reaction of various classes of aromatic compounds with the radicals Cl2-*, Br2-*, *NO2, SO3-*, and SO4-* yielded good predictive models, supported by high values of the correlation coefficient r2 in the case of phenols with Cl2-* and of phenolates with *NO2 and SO3-*. Lower but statistically significant correlation coefficients could be obtained for benzoates with Cl2-*, phenolates with Br2-*, and benzoates and anisoles with SO4-*.

  14. EFFECTS OF ETHANOL BLENDED DIESEL FUEL ON EXHAUST EMISSIONS FROM A DIESEL ENGINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özer CAN

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Diesel engine emissions can be improved by adding organic oxygenated compounds to the No. 2 diesel fuel. In this study, effects of 10 % and 15 % (in volume ethanol addition to Diesel No. 2 on exhaust emissions from an indirect injection turbocharged diesel engine running at different engine speeds and loads were investigated. Experimental results showed that the ethanol addition reduced CO, soot and SO2 emissions, although it caused some increase in NOx emission and some power reductions due to lower heating value of ethanol. Improvements on emissions were more significant at full load rather than at partial loads.

  15. Use of Fluorinated Compounds To Detect Aromatic Metabolites from m-Cresol in a Methanogenic Consortium: Evidence for a Demethylation Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Londry, Kathleen L.; Fedorak, Phillip M.

    1993-01-01

    Anaerobic sewage sludge was used to enrich a methanogenic m-cresol-degrading consortium. 6-Fluoro-3-methylphenol was synthesized and added to subcultures of the consortium with m-cresol. This caused the accumulation of 4-hydroxy-2-methylbenzoic acid. In a separate experiment, the addition of 3-fluorobenzoic acid caused the transient accumulation of 4-hydroxybenzoic acid. Inhibition with bromoethanesulfonic acid caused the accumulation of benzoic acid. Thus, the proposed degradation pathway was m-cresol → 4-hydroxy-2-methylbenzoic acid → 4-hydroxybenzoic acid → benzoic acid. The m-cresol-degrading consortium was able to convert exogenous 4-hydroxybenzoic acid and benzoic acid to methane. In addition, for each metabolite of m-cresol identified, the corresponding fluorinated metabolite was detected, giving the following sequence: 6-fluoro-3-methylphenol → 5-fluoro-4-hydroxy-2-methylbenzoic acid → 3-fluoro-4-hydroxybenzoic acid → 3-fluorobenzoic acid. The second step in each of these pathways is a novel demethylation which was rate limiting. This demethylation reaction would likely facilitate the transformation of the methyl group to methane, which is consistent with the results of a previous study that showed that the methyl carbon of m-[methyl-14C]cresol was recovered predominantly as [14C]methane (D. J. Roberts, P. M. Fedorak, and S. E. Hrudey, Can. J. Microbiol. 33:335-338, 1987). The final aromatic compound in the proposed route for m-cresol metabolism was benzoic acid, and its detection in these cultures merges the pathway for the methanogenic degradation of m-cresol with those for the anaerobic metabolism of many phenols. PMID:16348996

  16. Effects of fuel properties and oxidation catalyst on diesel exhaust emissions; Keiyu seijo oyobi sanka shokubai no diesel haishutsu gas eno eikyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aihara, S.; Morihisa, H.; Tamanouchi, M.; Araki, H.; Yamada, S. [Petroleum Energy Center, Advanced Technology and Research Institute, Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-10-01

    Effects of fuel properties (T90 and Poly-Aromatic Hydrocarbons: PAH) and oxidation catalyst on diesel exhaust emissions were studied using three DI diesel engines and two diesel passenger cars. (IDI engine) PM emissions were found to increase as T90 and PAH increased and could be decreased considerably for each fuel if an oxidation catalyst was installed. 5 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Emissions of toxic pollutants from compressed natural gas and low sulfur diesel-fueled heavy-duty transit buses tested over multiple driving cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kado, Norman Y; Okamoto, Robert A; Kuzmicky, Paul A; Kobayashi, Reiko; Ayala, Alberto; Gebel, Michael E; Rieger, Paul L; Maddox, Christine; Zafonte, Leo

    2005-10-01

    The number of heavy-duty vehicles using alternative fuels such as compressed natural gas (CNG) and new low-sulfur diesel fuel formulations and equipped with after-treatment devices are projected to increase. However, few peer-reviewed studies have characterized the emissions of particulate matter (PM) and other toxic compounds from these vehicles. In this study, chemical and biological analyses were used to characterize the identifiable toxic air pollutants emitted from both CNG and low-sulfur-diesel-fueled heavy-duty transit buses tested on a chassis dynamometer over three transient driving cycles and a steady-state cruise condition. The CNG bus had no after-treatment, and the diesel bus was tested first equipped with an oxidation catalyst (OC) and then with a catalyzed diesel particulate filter (DPF). Emissions were analyzed for PM, volatile organic compounds (VOCs; determined on-site), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and mutagenic activity. The 2000 model year CNG-fueled vehicle had the highest emissions of 1,3-butadiene, benzene, and carbonyls (e.g., formaldehyde) of the three vehicle configurations tested in this study. The 1998 model year diesel bus equipped with an OC and fueled with low-sulfur diesel had the highest emission rates of PM and PAHs. The highest specific mutagenic activities (revertants/microg PM, or potency) and the highest mutagen emission rates (revertants/mi) were from the CNG bus in strain TA98 tested over the New York Bus (NYB) driving cycle. The 1998 model year diesel bus with DPF had the lowest VOCs, PAH, and mutagenic activity emission. In general, the NYB driving cycle had the highest emission rates (g/mi), and the Urban Dynamometer Driving Schedule (UDDS) had the lowest emission rates for all toxics tested over the three transient test cycles investigated. Also, transient emissions were, in general, higher than steady-state emissions. The emissions of toxic compounds from an in-use CNG transit bus (without an oxidation

  18. One-year study of polycyclic aromatic compounds at an urban site in Grenoble (France): Seasonal variations, gas/particle partitioning and cancer risk estimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomaz, Sophie [Institut National de l' Environnement industriel et des RISques (INERIS), Parc Technologique Alata BP2, 60550 Verneuil en Halatte (France); CNRS, EPOC, UMR 5805, F-33405 Talence Cedex (France); Université de Bordeaux, EPOC, UMR 5805, F-33405, Talence Cedex (France); Shahpoury, Pourya [Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Multiphase Chemistry Department, Mainz (Germany); Jaffrezo, Jean-Luc [Laboratoire de Glaciologie et Géophysiques de l' Environnement (LGGE), Université de Grenoble-Alpes/CNRS, Grenoble (France); Lammel, Gerhard [Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Multiphase Chemistry Department, Mainz (Germany); Masaryk University, Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment, Brno (Czech Republic); Perraudin, Emilie; Villenave, Eric [CNRS, EPOC, UMR 5805, F-33405 Talence Cedex (France); Université de Bordeaux, EPOC, UMR 5805, F-33405, Talence Cedex (France); Albinet, Alexandre, E-mail: alexandre.albinet@gmail.com [Institut National de l' Environnement industriel et des RISques (INERIS), Parc Technologique Alata BP2, 60550 Verneuil en Halatte (France)

    2016-09-15

    21 PAHs, 27 oxy-PAHs and 32 nitro-PAHs were measured every third day over a year in both gaseous (G) and particulate PM{sub 10} (P) phases in ambient air of Grenoble (France). Mean total concentrations (G + P) of PAHs and oxy-PAHs were in the same range and about 10 ng m{sup −3}. Nitro-PAHs were 50 to 100 times less concentrated averaging 100 pg m{sup −3}. Polycyclic aromatic compound (PAC) concentrations were 5 to 7 times higher in “cold” period (October to March) than in “warm” period (April to September). Seasonal variations may be explained by higher primary emissions from residential heating, especially biomass burning in “cold” season. Meteorological conditions and influence of the geomorphology around Grenoble, with the formation of thermal inversion layers leading to the stagnation of pollutants, were additional key parameters. Maximum individual PAC concentrations were observed during two PM{sub 10} pollution events in December and February–March. Chemical processes and secondary formation of oxy- and nitro-PAH were probably enhanced by the accumulation of the pollutants during these events. PAC gas/particle partitioning depended on compound molecular weight and vapour pressure. Gas/particle partitioning of oxy- and nitro-PAHs were evaluated using a multi-phase poly-parameter linear free energy relationship model. The PAC cancer risk was assessed using toxic equivalency factors available in the literature (19 PAHs, 10 nitro-PAHs and 1 oxy-PAH). Overall, particle-bound PACs contributed about 76% of the cancer risk. While PAHs accounted for most of the total PAC cancer risk, oxy- and nitro-PAHs could account for up to 24%. The risk quantification across substance classes is limited by toxicological data availability. - Highlights: • The most comprehensive study about PAH, nitro- and oxy-PAH in ambient air. • 80 species studied in gaseous and particle phases over a year at French urban site. • Concentration seasonality governed by

  19. An Evaluation of Uncertainty Associated to Analytical Measurements of Selected Polycyclic Aromatic Compounds in Ambient Air; Estudio sobre las Incertidumbres Asociadas al Metodo de Determinacion de PAC's Seleccionados en Muestras de Aire Ambiente

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrado, A. I.; Garcia, S.; Perez, R. M.

    2013-06-01

    This paper presents an evaluation of uncertainty associated to analytical measurement of eighteen polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs) in ambient air by liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection (HPLC/FD). The study was focused on analyses of PM{sub 1}0, PM{sub 2}.5 and gas phase fractions. Main analytical uncertainty was estimated for eleven polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), four nitro polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (nitro-PAHs) and two hydroxy polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (OH-PAHs) based on the analytical determination, reference material analysis and extraction step. Main contributions reached 15-30% and came from extraction process of real ambient samples, being those for nitro- PAHs the highest (20-30%). Range and mean concentration of PAC mass concentrations measured in gas phase and PM{sub 1}0/PM{sub 2}.5 particle fractions during a full year are also presented. Concentrations of OH-PAHs were about 2-4 orders of magnitude lower than their parent PAHs and comparable to those sparsely reported in literature. (Author) 7 refs.

  20. Control of diesel gaseous and particulate emissions with a tube-type wet electrostatic precipitator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiyasitpanich, Phirun; Keener, Tim C; Lu, Mingming; Liang, Fuyan; Khang, Soon-Jai

    2008-10-01

    In this study, experiments were performed with a bench-scale tube-type wet electrostatic precipitator (wESPs) to investigate its effectiveness for the removal of mass- and number-based diesel particulate matter (DPM), hydrocarbons (HCs), carbon monoxide (CO), and oxides of nitrogen (NOx) from diesel exhaust emissions. The concentration of ozone (O3) present in the exhaust that underwent a nonthermal plasma treatment process inside the wESP was also measured. A nonroad diesel generator operating at varying load conditions was used as a stationary diesel emission source. The DPM mass analysis was conducted by means of isokinetic sampling and the DPM mass concentration was determined by a gravimetric method. An electrical low-pressure impactor (ELPI) was used to quantify the DPM number concentration. The HC compounds, n-alkanes, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were collected on a moisture-free quartz filter together with a PUF/XAD/PUF cartridge and extracted in dichloromethane with sonication. Gas chromatography (GC)/mass spectroscopy (MS) was used to determine HC concentrations in the extracted solution. A calibrated gas combustion analyzer (Testo 350) and an O3 analyzer were used for quantifying the inlet and outlet concentrations of CO and NOx (nitric oxide [NO] + nitrogen dioxide [NO2]), and O3 in the diesel exhaust stream. The wESP was capable of removing approximately 67-86% of mass- and number-based DPM at a 100% exhaust volumetric flow rate generated from 0- to 75-kW engine loads. At 75-kW engine load, increasing gas residence time from approximately 0.1 to 0.4 sec led to a significant increase of DPM removal efficiency from approximately 67 to more than 90%. The removal of n-alkanes, 16 PAHs, and CO in the wESP ranged from 31 to 57% and 5 to 38%, respectively. The use of the wESP did not significantly affect NOx concentration in diesel exhaust. The O3 concentration in diesel exhaust was measured to be less than 1 ppm. The main mechanisms

  1. Isolation and Characterization of Phenanthrene Degrading Bacteria from Diesel Fuel-Contaminated Antarctic Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Gran-Scheuch

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Antarctica is an attractive target for human exploration and scientific investigation, however the negative effects of human activity on this continent are long lasting and can have serious consequences on the native ecosystem. Various areas of Antarctica have been contaminated with diesel fuel, which contains harmful compounds such as heavy metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH. Bioremediation of PAHs by the activity of microorganisms is an ecological, economical, and safe decontamination approach. Since the introduction of foreign organisms into the Antarctica is prohibited, it is key to discover native bacteria that can be used for diesel bioremediation. By following the degradation of the PAH phenanthrene, we isolated 53 PAH metabolizing bacteria from diesel contaminated Antarctic soil samples, with three of these isolates exhibiting a high phenanthrene degrading capacity. In particular, the Sphingobium xenophagum D43FB isolate showed the highest phenanthrene degradation ability, generating up to 95% degradation of initial phenanthrene. D43FB can also degrade phenanthrene in the presence of its usual co-pollutant, the heavy metal cadmium, and showed the ability to grow using diesel-fuel as a sole carbon source. Microtiter plate assays and SEM analysis revealed that S. xenophagum D43FB exhibits the ability to form biofilms and can directly adhere to phenanthrene crystals. Genome sequencing analysis also revealed the presence of several genes involved in PAH degradation and heavy metal resistance in the D43FB genome. Altogether, these results demonstrate that S. xenophagum D43FB shows promising potential for its application in the bioremediation of diesel fuel contaminated-Antarctic ecosystems.

  2. Substrate specific hydrolysis of aromatic and aromatic-aliphatic esters in orchid tissue cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Mironowicz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We found that tissue cultures of higher plants were able, similarly as microorganisms, to transform low-molecular-weight chemical compounds. In tissue cultures of orchids (Cymbidium 'Saint Pierre' and Dendrobium phalaenopsis acetates of phenols and aromatic-aliphatic alcohols were hydrolyzed, whereas methyl esters of aromatic and aromatic-aliphatic acids did not undergo this reaction. Acetates of racemic aromatic-aliphatic alcohols were hydrolyzed with distinct enantiospecificity.

  3. Production, characterization and fuel properties of alternative diesel fuel from pyrolysis of waste plastic grocery bags

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyrolysis of HDPE waste grocery bags followed by distillation resulted in a liquid hydrocarbon mixture that consisted of saturated aliphatic paraffins (96.8%), aliphatic olefins (2.6%), and aromatics (0.6%) that corresponded to the boiling range of conventional petroleum diesel fuel (#1 diesel 182–2...

  4. Phytoremediation of subarctic soil contaminated with diesel fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmroth, M.R.T.; Puhakka, J.A. [Tampere University of Technology (Finland). Institute of Environmental Engineering and Biotechnology; Pichtel, J. [Ball State University, Muncie, IN (United States). Natural Resources and Environmental Management

    2002-09-01

    The effects of several plant species, native to northern latitudes, and different soil amendments, on diesel fuel removal from soil were studied. Plant treatments included Scots Pine (Pinus sylvestris), Poplar (Populus deltoides x Wettsteinii), a grass mixture (Red fescue, Festuca rubra; Smooth meadowgrass, Poa pratensis and Perennial ryegrass, Lolium perenne) and a legume mixture (White clover, Trifolium repens and Pea, Pisum sativum). Soil amendments included NPK fertiliser, a compost extract and a microbial enrichment culture. Diesel fuel disappeared more rapidly in the legume treatment than in other plant treatments. The presence of poplar and pine enhanced removal of diesel fuel, but removal under grass was similar to that with no vegetation. Soil amendments did not enhance diesel fuel removal significantly. Grass roots accumulated diesel-range compounds. This study showed that utilisation of selected plants accelerates removal of diesel fuel in soil and may serve as a viable, low-cost remedial technology for diesel-contaminated soils in subarctic regions. (author)

  5. Emissions from mesoscale in-situ oil (diesel) fires: the Mobile 1994 experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fingas, M.; Ackerman, F.; Lambert, P.; Zhendi, W.; Nelson, R.; Goldthorp, M. [Environment Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Emergencies Science Div.; Mullin, J.; Hannon, L. [Minerals Management Service, Herndon, VA (United States); Wang, D.; Steenkammer, A. [Environment Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Pollution Measurement Div.; Schuetz, S. [REAC/Weston, Edison, NJ (United States); Turpin, R.; Campagna, P. [Environmental Protection Agency, Edison, NJ (United States); Graham, L. [Environment Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Mobile Sources Emissions Div.; Hiltabrand, R. [Coast Guard, Groton, CT (United States). Marine Fire and Safety Research Div.

    1996-09-01

    The various aspects of in-situ burning of diesel oil were studied in a series of three mesoscale burns. The burn was conducted in a 15 X 15 m steel pan with an outer berm filled with salt water pumped from Mobile Bay. The diesel fuel which was released and floated on 0.6 metre of water, was ignited and left to burn for about 25 minutes, after-which the water under the burns was analyzed. Four downwind ground stations were set up to conduct extensive sampling and monitoring of the smoke plumes in order to determine their emissions. Particulate samples from the air were analysed for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs); these were found to be lower in the soot than in the starting oil. Particulates in the air were found to be greater than recommended exposure levels only up to 100 metres downwind at ground level. The study showed that diesel burns produced about 4 times more particulate matter than a similar-sized crude oil burn. The particulate matter was distributed exponentially downwind from the fire. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were measured using multiple gas chromatographic techniques. The results of 148 substance analyses were presented. 6 refs., 32 tabs., 12 figs.

  6. Diesel engines: environmental impact and control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, A C; Cackette, T A

    2001-06-01

    The diesel engine is the most efficient prime mover commonly available today. Diesel engines move a large portion of the world's goods, power much of the world's equipment, and generate electricity more economically than any other device in their size range. But the diesel is one of the largest contributors to environmental pollution problems worldwide, and will remain so, with large increases expected in vehicle population and vehicle miles traveled (VMT) causing ever-increasing global emissions. Diesel emissions contribute to the development of cancer; cardiovascular and respiratory health effects; pollution of air, water, and soil; soiling; reductions in visibility; and global climate change. Where instituted, control programs have been effective in reducing diesel fleet emissions. Fuel changes, such as reduced sulfur and aromatics content, have resulted in immediate improvements across the entire diesel on- and off-road fleet, and promise more improvements with future control. In the United States, for example, 49-state (non-California) off-road diesel fuel sulfur content is 10 times higher than that of national on-road diesel fuel. Significantly reducing this sulfur content would reduce secondary particulate matter (PM) formation and allow the use of control technologies that have proven effective in the on-road arena. The use of essentially zero-sulfur fuels, such as natural gas, in heavy-duty applications is also expected to continue. Technology changes, such as engine modifications, exhaust gas recirculation, and catalytic aftertreatment, take longer to fully implement, due to slow fleet turnover. However, they eventually result in significant emission reductions and will be continued on an ever-widening basis in the United States and worldwide. New technologies, such as hybrids and fuel cells, show significant promise in reducing emissions from sources currently dominated by diesel use. Lastly, the turnover of trucks and especially off-road equipment is

  7. Emissions from diesel engines using fatty acid methyl esters from different vegetable oils as blends and pure fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schröder, O; Munack, A; Schaak, J; Pabst, C; Schmidt, L; Bünger, J; Krahl, J

    2012-01-01

    Biodiesel is used as a neat fuel as well as in blends with mineral diesel fuel. Because of the limited availability of fossil resources, an increase of biogenic compounds in fuels is desired. To achieve this goal, next to rapeseed oil, other sustainably produced vegetable oils can be used as raw materials. These raw materials influence the fuel properties as well as the emissions. To investigate the environmental impact of the exhaust gas, it is necessary to determine regulated and non-regulated exhaust gas components. In detail, emissions of aldehydes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), as well as mutagenicity in the Ames test are of special interest. In this paper emission measurements on a Euro III engine OM 906 of Mercedes-Benz are presented. As fuel vegetable oil methyl esters from various sources and reference diesel fuel were used as well as blends of the vegetable oil methyl esters with diesel fuel. PAH were sampled according to VDI Guideline 3872. The sampling procedure of carbonyls was accomplished using DNPH cartridges coupled with potassium iodide cartridges. The carbon monoxide and hydrocarbon emissions of the tested methyl esters show advantages over DF. The particle mass emissions of methyl esters were likewise lower than those of DF, only linseed oil methyl ester showed higher particle mass emissions. A disadvantage is the use of biodiesel with respect to emissions of nitrogen oxides. They increased depending on the type of methyl ester by 10% to 30%. Emissions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and the results of mutagenicity tests correlate with those of the PM measurements, at which for palm oil methyl ester next to coconut oil methyl ester the lowest emissions were detected. From these results one can formulate a clear link between the iodine number of the ester and the emission behaviour. For blends of biodiesel and diesel fuel, emissions changed linearly with the proportion of biodiesel. However, especially in the non

  8. Clean Diesel National Grants

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Funding Assistance Program administers competitive grants for clean diesel projects. The Diesel Emissions Reduction Act (DERA) appropriates funds for these projects. Publication numbers: EPA-420-B-13-025 and EPA-420-P-11-001.

  9. Clean Diesel Tribal Grants

    Science.gov (United States)

    The DERA Tribal Program awards clean diesel grants specifically for tribal nations. The Diesel Emissions Reduction Act (DERA) appropriates funds for these projects. Publication Numbers: EPA-420-B-13-025 and EPA-420-P-11-001.

  10. [Effects of fuel properties on the performance of a typical Euro IV diesel engine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen-miao; Wang, Jian-xin; Shuai, Shi-jin

    2008-09-01

    With the purpose of establishing diesel fuel standard for China National 4th Emission Standard, as one part of Beijing "Auto-Oil" programme, engine performance test has been done on a typical Euro IV diesel engine using eight diesel fuels with different fuel properties. Test results show that, fuel properties has little effect on power, fuel consumption, and in-cylinder combustion process of tested Euro IV diesel engine; sulfate in PM and gaseous SO2 emissions increase linearly with diesel sulfur content increase; cetane number increase cause BSFC and PM reduce and NOx increase; T90 decrease cause NOx reduce while PM shows trend of reduce. Prediction equations of tested Euro IV diesel engine's ESC cycle NOx and PM emissions before SCR response to diesel fuel sulfur content, cetane number, T90 and aromatics have been obtained using linear regression method on the base of test results.

  11. Diesel Vehicle Maintenance Competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braswell, Robert; And Others

    Designed to provide a model set of competencies, this manual presents tasks which were identified by employers, employees, and teachers as important in a postsecondary diesel vehicle maintenance curriculum. The tasks are divided into seven major component areas of instruction: chassis and suspension, diesel engines, diesel fuel, electrical,…

  12. Effects of ethylene glycol ethers on diesel fuel properties and emissions in a diesel engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez-Cuenca, F.; Gomez-Marin, M. [Compania Logistica de Hidrocarburos (CLH), Central Laboratory, Mendez Alvaro 44, 28045 Madrid (Spain); Folgueras-Diaz, M.B., E-mail: belenfd@uniovi.es [Department of Energy, University of Oviedo, Independencia 13, 33004 Oviedo (Spain)

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: {yields} Effect of ethylene glycol ethers on diesel fuel properties. {yields} Effect of ethylene glycol ethers on diesel engine specific consumption and emissions. {yields} Blends with {<=}4 wt.% of oxygen do not change substantially diesel fuel quality. {yields} Blends with 1 and 2.5 wt.% of oxygen reduce CO and HC emissions, but not smoke. - Abstract: The effect of ethylene glycol ethers on both the diesel fuel characteristics and the exhaust emissions (CO, NO{sub x}, smoke and hydrocarbons) from a diesel engine was studied. The ethers used were monoethylene glycol ethyl ether (EGEE), monoethylene glycol butyl ether (EGBE), diethylene glycol ethyl ether (DEGEE). The above effect was studied in two forms: first by determining the modification of base diesel fuel properties by using blends with oxygen concentration around 4 wt.%, and second by determining the emission reductions for blends with low oxygen content (1 wt.%) and with 2.5 wt.% of oxygen content. The addition of DEGEE enhances base diesel fuel cetane number, but EGEE and EGBE decrease it. For concentrations of {>=}4 wt.% of oxygen, EGEE and diesel fuel can show immiscibility problems at low temperatures ({<=}0 {sup o}C). Also, every oxygenated compound, according to its boiling point, modifies the distillation curve at low temperatures and the distillate percentage increases. These compounds have a positive effect on diesel fuel lubricity, and slightly decrease its viscosity. Blends with 1 and 2.5 wt.% oxygen concentrations were used in order to determine their influence on emissions at both full and medium loads and different engine speeds. Generally, all compounds help to reduce CO, and hydrocarbon emissions, but not smoke. The best results were obtained for blends with 2.5 wt.% of oxygen. At this concentration, the additive efficiency in decreasing order was EGEE > DEGEE > EGBE for CO emissions and DGEE > EGEE > EGBE for hydrocarbon emissions. For NO{sub x}, both its behaviour and the

  13. Use of 13C nuclear magnetic resonance to assess fossil fuel biodegradation: fate of [1-13C]acenaphthene in creosote polycyclic aromatic compound mixtures degraded by bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selifonov, S A; Chapman, P J; Akkerman, S B; Gurst, J E; Bortiatynski, J M; Nanny, M A; Hatcher, P G

    1998-04-01

    [1-13C]acenaphthene, a tracer compound with a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-active nucleus at the C-1 position, has been employed in conjunction with a standard broad-band-decoupled 13C-NMR spectroscopy technique to study the biodegradation of acenaphthene by various bacterial cultures degrading aromatic hydrocarbons of creosote. Site-specific labeling at the benzylic position of acenaphthene allows 13C-NMR detection of chemical changes due to initial oxidations catalyzed by bacterial enzymes of aromatic hydrocarbon catabolism. Biodegradation of [1-13C]acenaphthene in the presence of naphthalene or creosote polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs) was examined with an undefined mixed bacterial culture (established by enrichment on creosote PACs) and with isolates of individual naphthalene- and phenanthrene-degrading strains from this culture. From 13C-NMR spectra of extractable materials obtained in time course biodegradation experiments under optimized conditions, a number of signals were assigned to accumulated products such as 1-acenaphthenol, 1-acenaphthenone, acenaphthene-1,2-diol and naphthalene 1,8-dicarboxylic acid, formed by benzylic oxidation of acenaphthene and subsequent reactions. Limited degradation of acenaphthene could be attributed to its oxidation by naphthalene 1,2-dioxygenase or related dioxygenases, indicative of certain limitations of the undefined mixed culture with respect to acenaphthene catabolism. Coinoculation of the mixed culture with cells of acenaphthene-grown strain Pseudomonas sp. strain A2279 mitigated the accumulation of partial transformation products and resulted in more complete degradation of acenaphthene. This study demonstrates the value of the stable isotope labeling approach and its ability to reveal incomplete mineralization even when as little as 2 to 3% of the substrate is incompletely oxidized, yielding products of partial transformation. The approach outlined may prove useful in assessing bioremediation performance.

  14. Use of 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance To Assess Fossil Fuel Biodegradation: Fate of [1-13C]Acenaphthene in Creosote Polycyclic Aromatic Compound Mixtures Degraded by Bacteria†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selifonov, Sergey A.; Chapman, Peter J.; Akkerman, Simon B.; Gurst, Jerome E.; Bortiatynski, Jacqueline M.; Nanny, Mark A.; Hatcher, Patrick G.

    1998-01-01

    [1-13C]acenaphthene, a tracer compound with a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-active nucleus at the C-1 position, has been employed in conjunction with a standard broad-band-decoupled 13C-NMR spectroscopy technique to study the biodegradation of acenaphthene by various bacterial cultures degrading aromatic hydrocarbons of creosote. Site-specific labeling at the benzylic position of acenaphthene allows 13C-NMR detection of chemical changes due to initial oxidations catalyzed by bacterial enzymes of aromatic hydrocarbon catabolism. Biodegradation of [1-13C]acenaphthene in the presence of naphthalene or creosote polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs) was examined with an undefined mixed bacterial culture (established by enrichment on creosote PACs) and with isolates of individual naphthalene- and phenanthrene-degrading strains from this culture. From 13C-NMR spectra of extractable materials obtained in time course biodegradation experiments under optimized conditions, a number of signals were assigned to accumulated products such as 1-acenaphthenol, 1-acenaphthenone, acenaphthene-1,2-diol and naphthalene 1,8-dicarboxylic acid, formed by benzylic oxidation of acenaphthene and subsequent reactions. Limited degradation of acenaphthene could be attributed to its oxidation by naphthalene 1,2-dioxygenase or related dioxygenases, indicative of certain limitations of the undefined mixed culture with respect to acenaphthene catabolism. Coinoculation of the mixed culture with cells of acenaphthene-grown strain Pseudomonas sp. strain A2279 mitigated the accumulation of partial transformation products and resulted in more complete degradation of acenaphthene. This study demonstrates the value of the stable isotope labeling approach and its ability to reveal incomplete mineralization even when as little as 2 to 3% of the substrate is incompletely oxidized, yielding products of partial transformation. The approach outlined may prove useful in assessing bioremediation performance

  15. Chromatographic selectivity of poly(alkyl methacrylate-co-divinylbenzene) monolithic columns for polar aromatic compounds by pressure-driven capillary liquid chromatography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Shu-Ling; Wang, Chih-Chieh; Fuh, Ming-Ren, E-mail: msfuh@scu.edu.tw

    2016-10-05

    In this study, divinylbenzene (DVB) was used as the cross-linker to prepare alkyl methacrylate (AlMA) monoliths for incorporating π-π interactions between the aromatic analytes and AlMA-DVB monolithic stationary phases in capillary LC analysis. Various AlMA/DVB ratios were investigated to prepare a series of 30% AlMA-DVB monolithic stationary phases in fused-silica capillaries (250-μm i.d.). The physical properties (such as porosity, permeability, and column efficiency) of the synthesized AlMA-DVB monolithic columns were investigated for characterization. Isocratic elution of phenol derivatives was first employed to evaluate the suitability of the prepared AlMA-DVB columns for small molecule separation. The run-to-run (0.16–1.20%, RSD; n = 3) and column-to-column (0.26–2.95%, RSD; n = 3) repeatabilities on retention times were also examined using the selected AlMA-DVB monolithic columns. The π-π interactions between the aromatic ring and the DVB-based stationary phase offered better recognition on polar analytes with aromatic moieties, which resulted in better separation resolution of aromatic analytes on the AlMA-DVB monolithic columns. In order to demonstrate the capability of potential environmental and/or food safety applications, eight phenylurea herbicides with single benzene ring and seven sulfonamide antibiotics with polyaromatic moieties were analyzed using the selected AlMA-DVB monolithic columns. - Highlights: • First investigation on chromatographic selectivity of AlMA-DVB monolithic columns. • Good run-to-run/column-to-column repeatability (<3%) on AlMA-DVB monolithic columns. • Efficient separation of phenylurea herbicides and sulfonamides on AlMA-DVB columns.

  16. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor-mediated and genotoxic effects of fractionated extract of standard reference diesel exhaust particle material in pulmonary, liver and prostate cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pálková, Lenka; Vondráček, Jan; Trilecová, Lenka; Ciganek, Miroslav; Pěnčíková, Kateřina; Neča, Jiří; Milcová, Alena; Topinka, Jan; Machala, Miroslav

    2015-04-01

    Diesel exhaust particles (DEP) and the associated complex mixtures of organic pollutants, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), or their derivatives, have been suggested to exert deleterious effects on human health. We used a set of defined cellular models representing liver, lung and prostate tissues, in order to compare non-genotoxic and genotoxic effects of crude and fractionated extract of a standard reference DEP material - SRM 1650b. We focused on the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-mediated activity, modulation of cell proliferation, formation of DNA adducts, oxidative DNA damage, and induction of DNA damage responses, including evaluation of apoptosis, and phosphorylation of p53 tumor suppressor and checkpoint kinases (Chk). Both PAHs and the polar aromatic compounds contributed to the AhR-mediated activity of DEP-associated organic pollutants. The principal identified AhR agonists included benzo[k]fluoranthene, indeno[1,2,3-c,d]pyrene, chrysene and several non-priority PAHs, including benzochrysenes and methylated PAHs. In contrast to PAHs, polar compounds contributed more significantly to overall formation of DNA adducts associated with phosphorylation of p53, Chk1 or Chk2, and partly with apoptosis. Therefore, more attention should be paid to identification of DEP-associated polar organic compounds, contributing to the AhR activation and cytotoxic/genotoxic effects of complex airborne mixtures of organic contaminants produced by diesel engines. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Green energy: Water-containing acetone–butanol–ethanol diesel blends fueled in diesel engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Yu-Cheng; Lee, Wen-Jhy; Lin, Sheng-Lun; Wang, Lin-Chi

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Water-containing ABE solution (W-ABE) in the diesel is a stable fuel blends. • W-ABE can enhance the energy efficiency of diesel engine and act as a green energy. • W-ABE can reduce the PM, NOx, and PAH emissions very significantly. • The W-ABE can be manufactured from waste bio-mass without competition with food. • The W-ABE can be produced without dehydration process and no surfactant addition. - Abstract: Acetone–Butanol–Ethanol (ABE) is considered a “green” energy resource because it emits less carbon than many other fuels and is produced from biomass that is non-edible. To simulate the use of ABE fermentation products without dehydration and no addition of surfactants, a series of water-containing ABE-diesel blends were investigated. By integrating the diesel engine generator (DEG) and diesel engine dynamometer (DED) results, it was found that a diesel emulsion with 20 vol.% ABE-solution and 0.5 vol.% water (ABE20W0.5) enhanced the brake thermal efficiencies (BTE) by 3.26–8.56%. In addition, the emissions of particulate matter (PM), nitrogen oxides (NOx), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and the toxicity equivalency of PAHs (BaP eq ) were reduced by 5.82–61.6%, 3.69–16.4%, 0.699–31.1%, and 2.58–40.2%, respectively, when compared to regular diesel. These benefits resulted from micro-explosion mechanisms, which were caused by water-in-oil droplets, the greater ABE oxygen content, and the cooling effect that is caused by the high vaporization heat of water-containing ABE. Consequently, ABE20W0.5, which is produced by environmentally benign processes (without dehydration and no addition of surfactants), can be a good alternative to diesel because it can improve energy efficiency and reduce pollutant emissions

  18. Aromatic graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, D. K., E-mail: gour.netai@gmail.com [Department of Metallurgical and Material Science Engineering, National Institute of Technology Durgapur-713209, West Bengal (India); Sahoo, S., E-mail: sukadevsahoo@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, National Institute of Technology Durgapur-713209, West Bengal (India)

    2016-04-13

    In recent years graphene attracts the scientific and engineering communities due to its outstanding electronic, thermal, mechanical and optical properties and many potential applications. Recently, Popov et al. [1] have studied the properties of graphene and proved that it is aromatic but without fragrance. In this paper, we present a theory to prepare graphene with fragrance. This can be used as scented pencils, perfumes, room and car fresheners, cosmetics and many other useful household substances.

  19. Aromatic graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, D. K.; Sahoo, S.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years graphene attracts the scientific and engineering communities due to its outstanding electronic, thermal, mechanical and optical properties and many potential applications. Recently, Popov et al. [1] have studied the properties of graphene and proved that it is aromatic but without fragrance. In this paper, we present a theory to prepare graphene with fragrance. This can be used as scented pencils, perfumes, room and car fresheners, cosmetics and many other useful household substances.

  20. Egyptian And International Automotive Diesel. Fuels: Specifications Meeting Challenges To Refining Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zayed, A.M.; EI Shamy, A.A.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a brief summary and comparison of Egyptian automotive diesel fuel to the international one. Recent legislation all over the world, requiring further reduction in sulfur, aromatics, T 90 and T 95 and increasing cetane value of the transportation diesel fuels, presents numerous technical and economic challenges to the refiners. While refiners grapple with these challenges, they will also face pressure from the increased demand of transportation diesel fuel and tighter capital restrictions. Overcome of these challenges makes a fair competition. A comparison of the Egyptian automotive diesel fuel and the international one will be a guide to locally and globally facing these challenges

  1. Biodegradation of diesel/biodiesel blends in saturated sand microcosms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lisiecki, Piotr; Chrzanowski, Łukasz; Szulc, Alicja

    2014-01-01

    is commercial biodiesel blend) augmented with a bacterial consortium of petroleum degraders. The biodegradation kinetics for blends were evaluated based on measuring the amount of emitted CO2 after 578 days. Subsequently, the residual aromatic and aliphatic fractions were separated and determined by employing......The aim of the study was to evaluate the biodegradation extent of both aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbon fractions in saturated sandy microcosm spiked with diesel/biodiesel blends (D, B10, B20, B30, B40, B50, B60, B70, B80, B90 and B100, where D is commercial petroleum diesel fuel and B...... GC-FID and GC _ GC–TOF-MS. Additionally, the influence of biodiesel-amendment on the community dynamics was assessed based on the results of real-time PCR analyzes. Our results suggest that the biodegradation extents of both aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbon were uninfluenced by the addition...

  2. Investigation and Modelling of Diesel Hydrotreating Reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, Rasmus Risum

    This project consists of a series of studies, that are related to hydrotreating of diesel. Hy- drotreating is an important refinery process, in which the oil stream is upgraded to meet the required environmental specifications and physical properties. Although hydrotreating is a ma- ture technology...... it has received increased attention within the last decade due to tightened legislations regarding the sulfur content, e.g. the demand for Ultra Low Sulfur Diesel (ULSD) with a maximum sulfur content of as low as 10 ppm S has increased. The process is complex, as the performance of a hydrotreating...... due to a stronger adsorption on hydrogenation sites. Since feeds used in the hydrotreating process, usually gas-oils, are complex mixtures with a large number of compounds, analysis of the reactions of individual compounds can be difficult. In this work a model-diesel feed consisting of 13 different...

  3. New perspectives for advanced automobile diesel engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tozzi, L.; Sekar, R.; Kamo, R.; Wood, J. C.

    1983-01-01

    Computer simulation results are presented for advanced automobile diesel engine performance. Four critical factors for performance enhancement were identified: (1) part load preheating and exhaust gas energy recovery, (2) fast heat release combustion process, (3) reduction in friction, and (4) air handling system efficiency. Four different technology levels were considered in the analysis. Simulation results are compared in terms of brake specific fuel consumption and vehicle fuel economy in km/liter (miles per gallon). Major critical performance sensitivity areas are: (1) combustion process, (2) expander and compressor efficiency, and (3) part load preheating and compound system. When compared to the state of the art direct injection, cooled, automobile diesel engine, the advanced adiabatic compound engine concept showed the unique potential of doubling the fuel economy. Other important performance criteria such as acceleration, emissions, reliability, durability and multifuel capability are comparable to or better than current passenger car diesel engines.

  4. Dieselization in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kågeson, Per

    2013-01-01

    In Sweden the market share of diesel cars grew from below 10 per cent in 2005 to 62 per cent in 2011 despite a closing gap between pump prices on diesel oil and gasoline, and diesel cars being less favored than ethanol and biogas cars in terms of tax cuts and other subsidies offered to “environment cars”. The most important factor behind the dieselization was probably the market entrance of a number of low-consuming models. Towards the end of the period a growing number of diesel models were able to meet the 120 g CO 2 threshold applicable to “environment cars” that cannot use ethanol or biogas. This helped such models increase their share of the diesel car market from zero to 41 per cent. Dieselization appears to have had only a minor effect on annual distances driven. The higher average annual mileage of diesel cars is probably to a large extent a result of a self-selection bias. However, the Swedish diesel car fleet is young, and the direct rebound effect stemming from a lower variable driving cost may show up more clearly as the fleet gets older based on the assumption that second owners are more fuel price sensitive than first owners. - Highlights: ► This paper tries to explain the fast dieselization of the new Swedish car fleet. ► It identifies changes in supply and the impact of tax benefits. ► Finally it studies the impact on the annual average mileage

  5. Support acidity influence in NiMoS (Nickel and Molybdenum) catalyst for Marlim diesel; Influencia da acidez do suport de catalisadores NiMoS (Niquel e Molibidenio) no hidrotratamento de diesel Marlim

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferraz, Sheila Guimaraes de Almeida; Zotin, Jose Luiz; Jesus, Anderson Gomes de; Santos, Bruno Martins; Medeiros, Marcus Vinicius Costa [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas (CENPES)

    2008-07-01

    The specification of diesel points to the reduction of the sulfur content, of the final boiling point, of the density range and increase of the cetane number. These two last properties are directly related with the ability of the hydrotreating catalytic system in promoting the hydrogenation of aromatic structures and ring opening of the naphthenic compounds, which are both associated to low cetane number. In such way, more acidic catalysts, able to promote the cracking of naphthenic structures, should be evaluated for the diesel HDT. Three bifunctional NiMo catalysts with the same metal content, different acidity and similar active phase dispersion were prepared using alumina, silica-alumina and alumina-Y zeolite as supports. These catalysts were evaluated in a micro-reactor unit for diesel HDT aiming to correlate their activity with the support acidity. The alumina and alumina-zeolite supported catalysts presented better performance than the one supported on silica-alumina. NiMo/alumina-zeolite showed higher cetane and density improvement, associated with a slight decrease in the initial boiling point. (author)

  6. Accurate spectroscopy of polycyclic aromatic compounds: from the rotational spectrum of fluoren-9-one in the millimeter wave region to its infrared spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maris, Assimo; Calabrese, Camilla; Melandri, Sonia; Blanco, Susana

    2015-01-14

    The rotational spectrum of fluoren-9-one, a small oxygenated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, has been recorded and assigned in the 52-74.4 GHz region. The determined small negative value of the inertia defect (-0.3 u Å(2)) has been explained in terms of vibrational-rotational coupling constants calculated at the B3LYP/cc-pVTZ level of theory. Vibrational anharmonic analysis together with second-order vibrational perturbation theory approximation was applied both to fluorenone and its reduced form, fluorene, to predict the mid- and near-infrared spectra. The data presented here give precise indication on the fluorenone ground state structure, allow for an accurate spectral characterization in the millimeter wave and infrared regions, and hopefully will facilitate extensive radio astronomical searches with large radio telescopes.

  7. Panorama 2016 - Diesel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monnier, Gaetan; Ivanic, Tanja; Alazard-Toux, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    Diesel vehicles have been the focus of recent national and world news coverage. This solution, with greater overall efficiency than spark emission engines (gasoline, LPG and natural gas), remains an essential aspect of road freight transport. Diesel has even gained a significant share of the light vehicle market in certain regions of the world. However, diesel is currently the focus of numerous controversies and has been condemned for its negative impact on air quality. (authors)

  8. Chemical composition and heterogeneous reactivity of soot generated in the combustion of diesel and GTL (Gas-to-Liquid) fuels and amorphous carbon Printex U with NO2 and CF3COOH gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia, A.; Salgado, S.; Martín, P.; Villanueva, F.; García-Contreras, R.; Cabañas, B.

    2018-03-01

    The heterogeneous reactions of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and trifluoroacetic acid (CF3COOH) with soot produced by diesel and GTL (gas-to-liquid) fuels were investigated using a Knudsen flow reactor with mass spectrometry as a detection system for gas phase species. Soot was generated with a 4 cylinder diesel engine working under steady-state like urban operation mode. Heterogeneous reaction of the mentioned gases with a commercial carbon, Printex U, used as reference, was also analyzed. The initial and the steady-state uptake coefficients, γ0 and γss, respectively, were measured indicating that GTL soot reacts faster than diesel soot and Printex U carbon for NO2 gas reactant. According to the number of reacted molecules on the surface, Printex U soot presents more reducing sites than diesel and GTL soot. Initial uptake coefficients for GTL and diesel soot for the reaction with CF3COOH gas reactant are very similar and no clear conclusions can be obtained related to the initial reactivity. The number of reacted molecules calculated for CF3COOH reactions shows values two orders of magnitude higher than the corresponding to NO2 reactions, indicating a greater presence of basic functionalities in the soot surfaces. More information of the surface composition has been obtained using Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform Spectroscopy (DRIFTS) before and after the reaction of soot samples with gas reactants. As conclusion, the interface of diesel and GTL soot before reaction mainly consists of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), nitro-compounds as well as ether functionalities. After reaction with gas reactant, it was observed that PAHs and nitro-compounds remain on the soot surface and new spectral bands such as carbonyl groups (carboxylic acids, aldehydes, esters and ketones) are observed. Physical properties of soot from both fuels studied such as BET surface isotherm and SEM analysis were also developed and related to the observed reactivity.

  9. Is Gamma Radiation Suitable to Preserve Phenolic Compounds and to Decontaminate Mycotoxins in Aromatic Plants? A Case-Study with Aloysia citrodora Paláu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliana Pereira

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to determine the effect of gamma radiation on the preservation of phenolic compounds and on decontamination of dry herbs in terms of ochratoxin A (OTA and aflatoxin B1 (AFB1, using Aloysia citrodora Paláu as a case study. For this purpose, artificially contaminated dry leaves were submitted to gamma radiation at different doses (1, 5, and 10 kGy; at dose rate of 1.7 kGy/h. Phenolic compounds were analysed by HPLC-DAD-ESI/MS and mycotoxin levels were determined by HPLC-fluorescence. Eleven phenolic compounds were identified in the samples and despite the apparent degradation of some compounds (namely verbasoside, 1 and 10 kGy doses point to a preservation of the majority of the compounds. The mean mycotoxin reduction varied between 5.3% and 9.6% for OTA and from 4.9% to 5.2% for AFB1. It was not observed a significant effect of the irradiation treatments on mycotoxin levels, and a slight degradation of the phenolic compounds in the irradiated samples was observed.

  10. Is Gamma Radiation Suitable to Preserve Phenolic Compounds and to Decontaminate Mycotoxins in Aromatic Plants? A Case-Study with Aloysia citrodora Paláu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Eliana; Barros, Lillian; Antonio, Amilcar L; Cabo Verde, Sandra; Santos-Buelga, Celestino; Ferreira, Isabel C F R; Rodrigues, Paula

    2017-02-23

    This study aimed to determine the effect of gamma radiation on the preservation of phenolic compounds and on decontamination of dry herbs in terms of ochratoxin A (OTA) and aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), using Aloysia citrodora Paláu as a case study. For this purpose, artificially contaminated dry leaves were submitted to gamma radiation at different doses (1, 5, and 10 kGy; at dose rate of 1.7 kGy/h). Phenolic compounds were analysed by HPLC-DAD-ESI/MS and mycotoxin levels were determined by HPLC-fluorescence. Eleven phenolic compounds were identified in the samples and despite the apparent degradation of some compounds (namely verbasoside), 1 and 10 kGy doses point to a preservation of the majority of the compounds. The mean mycotoxin reduction varied between 5.3% and 9.6% for OTA and from 4.9% to 5.2% for AFB1. It was not observed a significant effect of the irradiation treatments on mycotoxin levels, and a slight degradation of the phenolic compounds in the irradiated samples was observed.

  11. Micellar Enhanced Ultrafiltration for the Removal of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs Mixtures in Underground Contaminated Water in Oman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Aoudia

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In an attempt to analyze polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs in diesel contaminated underground water in Oman (Rustaq, Gas chromatography-Mass spectrometry was first used to determine the different concentrations in a standard mixture containing 16 PAHs. Retention time and calibration curves were obtained for all aromatic compounds and were used to identify a given analyte as well as its concentration in the contaminated underground water. Micellar enhanced ultrafiltration (MEUF was then used to treat standard aqueous solution of PAHs at low concentration (~ 1 ppb using an edible nonionic surfactant (Tween 80. The totality of the mixture components was completely rejected. Within the experimental detection limit (± 0.01 ppb, the residual PAH concentrations were less than 0.01 ppb in accord with the allowed concentrations in drinking water. Likewise, excellent rejections of PAHs in MEUF treatment of diesel contaminated underground water at an Omani site (Rustaq were observed. The concentration of PAHs was reduced to less than 0.01 ppb, the accepted limit for the most toxic member of the PAH group (benzo(apyrene.

  12. Influence of physical and chemical characteristics of diesel fuels and exhaust emissions on biological effects of particle extracts: a multivariate statistical analysis of ten diesel fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjögren, M; Li, H; Banner, C; Rafter, J; Westerholm, R; Rannug, U

    1996-01-01

    The emission of diesel exhaust particulates is associated with potentially severe biological effects, e.g., cancer. The aim of the present study was to apply multivariate statistical methods to identify factors that affect the biological potency of these exhausts. Ten diesel fuels were analyzed regarding physical and chemical characteristics. Particulate exhaust emissions were sampled after combustion of these fuels on two makes of heavy duty diesel engines. Particle extracts were chemically analyzed and tested for mutagenicity in the Ames test. Also, the potency of the extracts to competitively inhibit the binding of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) to the Ah receptor was assessed. Relationships between fuel characteristics and biological effects of the extracts were studied, using partial least squares regression (PLS). The most influential chemical fuel parameters included the contents of sulfur, certain polycyclic aromatic compounds (PAC), and naphthenes. Density and flash point were positively correlated with genotoxic potency. Cetane number and upper distillation curve points were negatively correlated with both mutagenicity and Ah receptor affinity. Between 61% and 70% of the biological response data could be explained by the measured chemical and physical factors of the fuels. By PLS modeling of extract data versus the biological response data, 66% of the genotoxicity could be explained, by 41% of the chemical variation. The most important variables, associated with both mutagenicity and Ah receptor affinity, included 1-nitropyrene, particle bound nitrate, indeno[1,2,3-cd]pyrene, and emitted mass of particles. S9-requiring mutagenicity was highly correlated with certain PAC, whereas S9-independent mutagenicity was better correlated with nitrates and 1-nitropyrene. The emission of sulfates also showed a correlation both with the emission of particles and with the biological effects. The results indicate that fuels with biologically less hazardous

  13. Increase of diesel car raises health risk in spite of recent development in engine technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leem, Jong Han; Jang, Young-Kee

    2014-01-01

    Diesel exhaust particles (DEP) contain elemental carbon, organic compounds including Polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), metals, and other trace compounds. Diesel exhaust is complex mixture of thousands of chemicals. Over forty air contaminants are recognized as toxicants, such as carcinogens. Most diesel exhaust particles have aerodynamic diameters falling within a range of 0.1 to 0.25 μm. DEP was classified as a definite human carcinogen (group 1) by the International Agency for Research on Cancer at 2012 based on recently sufficient epidemiological evidence for lung cancer. Significant decreases in DEP and other diesel exhaust constituents will not be evident immediately, and outworn diesel car having longer mileage still threatens health of people in spite of recent remarkable development in diesel engine technology. Policy change in South Korea, such as introduction of diesel taxi, may raise health risk of air pollution in metropolitan area with these limitations of diesel engine. To protect people against DEP in South Korea, progressive strategies are needed, including disallowance of diesel taxi, more strict regulation of diesel engine emission, obligatory diesel particulate filter attachment in outworn diesel car, and close monitoring about health effects of DEP.

  14. Catalytic ring opening of cyclic hydrocarbons in diesel fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calemma, V.; Ferrari, M. [Eni S.p.A., San Donato Milanese (Italy). R and M Div.; Rabl, S.; Haas, A.; Santi, D.; Weitkamp, J. [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Chemical Technology

    2013-11-01

    An approach for high-aromatic streams upgrading, allowing to meet future diesel quality standards, is saturation of the aromatic structures followed by the selective breaking of endocyclic C-C bonds of naphthenic structures so formed to produce alkanes with the same number of carbon atoms as the starting molecule ('selective ring opening, SRO'). Although theoretically, SRO is a promising route for upgrading low-value feeds to high-quality products, in practice, it continues to be a challenge owing to its complex chemistry. Product characteristics, do not only depend on the composition of the feed, but also on the operating conditions and the nature of the catalyst. Very recently, novel catalysts ('HIgh-PErformance Ring Opening Catalysts, HIPEROCs') were developed which allow a very selective ring opening of the model compound decalin to paraffins without degradation of the carbon number. The hydroconversion of dearomatized Light Cycle Oil (DeAr-LCO) over the abovementioned catalysts resulted in a remarkable change of the chemical structure of the feed with a strong decrease of naphthenic structures with two or more condensed rings and a concomitant increase of alkyl-substituted cyclohexanes and open-chain alkanes. The changes occurring in the chemical structures of feedstock during hydroconversion resulted in a remarkable increase of the Cetane Index of the products up to 11 units. In the present contribution, we examine the main factors affecting activity and selectivity of SRO catalysts in the light of the recent literature dealing with the subject and we report on the recent advances in hydroconversion of refinery cuts such as DeAr- LCO over HIPEROCs. (orig.)

  15. Ultrasound-assisted dynamic extraction of valuable compounds from aromatic plants and flowers as compared with steam distillation and superheated liquid extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roldán-Gutiérrez, Jannat M; Ruiz-Jiménez, J; Luque de Castro, M D

    2008-06-15

    A method for the extraction of valuable compounds from plants and flowers (viz. laurel, rosemary, thyme, oregano and tuberose) is proposed. The dynamic approach allows go-and-backward circulation of the extractant (ethanol) through the solid sample subjected to the action of an ultrasound probe (thus reducing sample amount and avoiding overpressure). A multivariate optimisation study and application of the optimum values of the variables to kinetics studies show that 10 min is sufficient to obtain extraction efficiencies that greatly surpass those provided by steam distillation for essential oils or superheated liquid extraction for these oils and other valuable compounds, with lower costs and higher quality of the extract. The extraction time of the proposed method is 176-165 min shorter than steam distillation and 31-20 min shorter than superheated liquid extraction, depending on the target compound.

  16. Is gamma radiation suitable to preserve phenolic compounds and to decontaminate mycotoxins in aromatic plants? A case-study with aloysia citrodora paláu

    OpenAIRE

    Pereira, Eliana; Barros, Lillian; Antonio, Amilcar L.; Cabo Verde, Sandra; Santos-Buelga, Celestino; Ferreira, Isabel C.F.R.; Rodrigues, Paula

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the effect of gamma radiation on the preservation of phenolic compounds and on decontamination of dry herbs in terms of ochratoxin A (OTA) and aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), using Aloysia citrodora Paláu as a case study. For this purpose, artificially contaminated dry leaves were submitted to gamma radiation at different doses (1, 5, and 10 kGy; at dose rate of 1.7 kGy/h). Phenolic compounds were analysed by HPLC-DAD-ESI/MS and mycotoxin levels were determined by HPLC-fluo...

  17. Quantifying aromaticity with electron delocalisation measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feixas, Ferran; Matito, Eduard; Poater, Jordi; Solà, Miquel

    2015-09-21

    Aromaticity cannot be measured directly by any physical or chemical experiment because it is not a well-defined magnitude. Its quantification is done indirectly from the measure of different properties that are usually found in aromatic compounds such as bond length equalisation, energetic stabilisation, and particular magnetic behaviour associated with induced ring currents. These properties have been used to set up the myriad of structural-, energetic-, and magnetic-based indices of aromaticity known to date. The cyclic delocalisation of mobile electrons in two or three dimensions is probably one of the key aspects that characterise aromatic compounds. However, it has not been until the last decade that electron delocalisation measures have been widely employed to quantify aromaticity. Some of these new indicators of aromaticity such as the PDI, FLU, ING, and INB were defined in our group. In this paper, we review the different existing descriptors of aromaticity that are based on electron delocalisation properties, we compare their performance with indices based on other properties, and we summarise a number of applications of electronic-based indices for the analysis of aromaticity in interesting chemical problems.

  18. Phenological Patterns and Preferences for Aromatic Compounds by Male Euglossine Bees (Hymenoptera, Apidae) in Two Coastal Ecosystems of the Brazilian Atlantic Forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha-Filho, L C; Garófalo, C A

    2014-02-01

    In order to investigate phenological patterns and seasonal and geographic variations in the preference for fragrances of Euglossini males, monthly sampling was carried out from August 2007 to July 2009 in two coastal areas of Atlantic Forest in Ubatuba, northern coast of the state of São Paulo. Fourteen aromatic baits were used, 3 of them in the first year (August 2007 to July 2008) and the other 11 in the second year (August 2008 to July 2009). A total of 1,475 individuals from 22 species were collected. The highest frequency of the individuals of the majority of the sampled species occurred in the hot/super-humid season. However, Eulaema cingulata (Fabricius) showed peaks of abundance in the cold/less-humid season on Anchieta Island. Seasonal variation in fragrance choice by males was not registered. Males of El. cingulata showed preference for β-ionone on Anchieta Island and for benzyl acetate in the Picinguaba region, characterizing the single example of geographic variation in preference for scent baits we recorded.

  19. Fundamentals of Diesel Engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marine Corps Inst., Washington, DC.

    This student guide, one of a series of correspondence training courses designed to improve the job performance of members of the Marine Corps, deals with the fundamentals of diesel engine mechanics. Addressed in the three individual units of the course are the following topics: basic principles of diesel mechanics; principles, mechanics, and…

  20. Volatile organic compounds over Eastern Himalaya, India: temporal variation and source characterization using Positive Matrix Factorization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, C.; Chatterjee, A.; Majumdar, D.; Ghosh, S. K.; Srivastava, A.; Raha, S.

    2014-12-01

    A first ever study on the characterization of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) has been made over a Himalayan high altitude station in India. A total of 18 VOCs (mono aromatics-BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylene), non-BTEX substituted aromatics and halocarbon) have been measured over Darjeeling (27.01° N, 88.15° E, 2200 m a.s.l.) in the eastern Himalaya in India during the period of July 2011-June 2012. The annual average concentration of the sum of 18 target VOCs (TVOC) was 376.3 ± 857.2 μg m-3. Monoaromatics had the highest contribution (72%) followed by other substituted aromatics (22%) and halocarbon (6%) compounds. Toluene was the most abundant VOC in the atmosphere of Darjeeling with the contribution of ~37% to TVOC followed by benzene (~21%), ethylbenzene (~9%) and xylenes (~6%). TVOC concentrations were highest during the postmonsoon season with minimum solar radiation and lowest during the premonsoon season with maximum solar radiation. Anthropogenic activities related mainly to tourists like diesel and gasoline emissions, biomass and coal burning, use of solvent and solid waste emissions were almost equal in both the seasons. Seasonal variation in TVOCs over Darjeeling was mainly governed by the incoming solar radiation rather than the emission sources. Source apportionment study using Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) model indicated that major fraction of (~60%) TVOC were contributed by diesel and gasoline exhausts followed by solvent evaporation (18%) and other sources. Diesel exhaust was also found to have the maximum potential in tropospheric ozone formation. The atmospheric loading of BTEX over Darjeeling was found to be comparable with several Indian metro cities and much higher than other cities around the world.

  1. Pressurized liquid extraction using water/isopropanol coupled with solid-phase extraction cleanup for semivolatile organic compounds, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), and alkylated PAH homolog groups in sediment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhardt, M.R.; Zaugg, S.D.; Burbank, T.L.; Olson, M.C.; Iverson, J.L.

    2005-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are recognized as environmentally relevant for their potential adverse effects on human and ecosystem health. This paper describes a method to determine the distribution of PAH and alkylated homolog groups in sediment samples. Pressurized liquid extraction (PLE), coupled with solid-phase extraction (SPE) cleanup, was developed to decrease sample preparation time, to reduce solvent consumption, and to minimize background interferences for full-scan GC-MS analysis. Recoveries from spiked Ottawa sand, environmental stream sediment, and commercially available topsoil, fortified at 1.5-15 ??g per compound, averaged 94.6 ?? 7.8%, 90.7 ?? 5.8% and 92.8 ?? 12.8%, respectively. Initial method detection limits for single-component compounds ranged from 20 to 302 ??g/kg, based on 25 g samples. Results from 28 environmental sediment samples, excluding homologs, show 35 of 41 compounds (85.4%) were detected in at least one sample with concentrations ranging from 20 to 100,000 ??g/kg. The most frequently detected compound, 2,6-dimethylnaphthalene, was detected in 23 of the 28 (82%) environmental samples with a concentration ranging from 15 to 907 ??g/kg. The results from the 28 environmental sediment samples for the homolog series showed that 27 of 28 (96%) samples had at least one homolog series present at concentrations ranging from 20 to 89,000 ??g/kg. The most frequently detected homolog series, C2-alkylated naphthalene, was detected in 26 of the 28 (93%) environmental samples with a concentration ranging from 25 to 3900 ??g/kg. Results for a standard reference material using dichloromethane Soxhlet-based extraction also are compared. ?? 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Synthesis and spectroscopic identification of a new series of 2-iminothia-zolidin-4-one compounds from aromatic heterocyclic primary amines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azeez, Hashim J.; Bahram, Roshna

    2017-09-01

    The present work describes the synthesis and spectroscopic characterization some new 2-imino-thiazolidin-4-one derivatives along with study of their antibacterial activities. The synthesis steps have been classified into three main parts as follows: The first part of this work included preparation of the starting material 2-amino-4-(substitutedphenyl)- 1,3-thiazole during the reaction of thiourea with substituted acetophenone in the presence of iodine. The second part was the synthesis of 2-chloroacetamido-4-(substitutedphenyl)-1,3-thiazole, which has been achieved by the reaction of heterocyclic amine which readily underwent nucleophilic substitution reaction with chloroacetyl chloride in benzene. The third part involved synthesized intermediate compounds, which easily undergo cyclization reaction and result in the formation of a new series of desired products 2-imino-3-[4-(substitutedphenyl)-1,3-thiazol-2-yl] thiazolidin-4-ones. The structures of the synthesized compounds were assigned on the basis of the spectral data such as IR, 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR and 13C-DEPT-135 spectra, which showed the expected frequencies and signals. Finally, the synthesized compounds were screened against two types of bacteria both Escherichia coli G (-ve) and Staphylococcus aureus G (+ve) microorganisms. The results revealed that most tested compounds were showed medium to high activity against both types of test organisms of bacteria especially against E-coli.

  3. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Air and their Toxic Potency

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Among the urban air pollutants, polycyclic aromatic hydrocar- bons (P AHs) are a large group of over 100 different chemical compounds with 2 to 7 aromatic rings. Large quantities of such compounds are released into environment by various human activities. Recently PAHs in the environment have become.

  4. Approach for energy saving and pollution reducing by fueling diesel engines with emulsified biosolution/ biodiesel/diesel blends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yuan-Chung; Lee, Wen-Jhy; Chao, How-Ran; Wang, Shu-Li; Tsou, Tsui-Chun; Chang-Chien, Guo-Ping; Tsai, Perng-Jy

    2008-05-15

    The developments of both biodiesel and emulsified diesel are being driven by the need for reducing emissions from diesel engines and saving energy. Artificial chemical additives are also being used in diesel engines for increasing their combustion efficiencies. But the effects associated with the use of emulsified additive/biodiesel/diesel blends in diesel engines have never been assessed. In this research, the premium diesel fuel (PDF) was used as the reference fuel. A soy-biodiesel was selected as the test biodiesel. A biosolution made of 96.5 wt % natural organic enzyme-7F (NOE-7F) and 3.5 wt % water (NOE-7F water) was used as the fuel additive. By adding additional 1 vol % of surfactant into the fuel blend, a nanotechnology was used to form emulsified biosolution/soy-biodiesel/PDF blends for fueling the diesel engine. We found that the emulsified biosolution/soy-biodiesel/PDF blends did not separate after being kept motionless for 30 days. The above stability suggests that the above combinations are suitable for diesel engines as alternative fuels. Particularly, we found that the emulsified biosolution/soy-biodiesel/PDF blends did have the advantage in saving energy and reducing the emissions of both particulate matters (PM) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from diesel engines as compared with PDF, soy-biodiesel/PDF blends, and emulsified soy-biodiesel/ PDF blends. The results obtained from this study will provide useful approaches for reducing the petroleum reliance, pollution, and global warming. However, it should be noted that NO(x) emissions were not measured in the present study which warrants the need for future investigation.

  5. Over 100-year sedimentary record of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and organochlorine compounds (OCs) in the continental shelf of the East China Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yizhi; Wang, Xinhong; Wu, Yuling; Li, Yongyu; Ya, Miaolei

    2016-12-01

    Historical records of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were analyzed in two dated sediment cores (DH05 and DH11) collected from the continental shelf of the East China Sea (ECS) to investigate the influence of anthropogenic activities on marine sediment over the past century. The concentrations and fluxes of 15 PAHs were in the range of 28.6-96.5 ng g -1 and 7.6-35.2 ng cm -2 yr -1 in DH05 (1920s-2009), 18.8-76.4 ng g -1 and 13.9-30.9 ng cm -2 yr -1 in DH11 (1860s-2009). The sedimentary records of PAHs in the two cores generally reflected the economic development and energy consumption change in China. Identification of sources suggested that PAHs in ECS were predominantly from petrogenic origin and various combustion sources. A change of source from low- and moderate-temperature combustion to high-temperature combustion process was observed. Although a production ban of technical HCH and DDT was imposed in China in 1983, their sedimentary fluxes display increasing trends or strong rebounds from 1980s to 1990s as recorded in the core profiles. High proportions of DDD + DDE and γ-HCH suggested those OCPs mainly derived from early residuals. Temporal trends of PCBs presented relative high levels from 1970s to 1980s and high proportions of PCB congeners with 3-6 chlorines atoms indicated industrial sources. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Evaluation of the performance of a passive sampler in the monitoring of benzene and other volatile aromatic compounds in urban and indoor sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertoni, G.; Tappa, R.; Allegrini, I.

    1999-01-01

    Laboratory and field tests have been performed on a new passive device, properly designed for the collection of volatile organic compounds from ambient air on an active charcoal layer. Tests performed in order to determine accuracy and precision, response linearity and employment limits show that this device may be helpful in long and medium-time determinations of BTX (benzene, toluene and xylenes) in the atmosphere. The sampler is optimised for a four weeks sampling in open air [it

  7. Identification of key aromatic compounds in Congou black tea by PLSR with variable importance of projection scores and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry/gas chromatography-olfactometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Shihong; Lu, Changqi; Li, Meifeng; Ye, Yulong; Wei, Xu; Tong, Huarong

    2018-04-13

    Gas chromatography-olfactometry (GC-O) is the most frequently used method to estimate the sensory contribution of single odorant, but disregards the interactions between volatiles. In order to select the key volatiles responsible for the aroma attributes of Congou black tea (Camellia sinensis), instrumental, sensory and multivariate statistical approaches were applied. By sensory analysis, nine panelists developed 8 descriptors, namely, floral, sweet, fruity, green, roasted, oil, spicy, and off-odor. Linalool, (E)-furan linalool oxide, (Z)-pyran linalool oxide, methyl salicylate, β-myrcene, phenylethyl alcohol which identified from the most representative samples by GC-O procedure, were the essential aroma-active compounds in the formation of basic Congou black tea aroma. In addition, 136 volatiles were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), among which 55 compounds were determined as the key factors for the six sensory attributes by partial least-square regression (PLSR) with variable importance of projection (VIP) scores. Our results demonstrated that HS-SPME/GC-MS/GC-O was a fast approach for isolation and quantification aroma-active compounds. PLSR method was also considered to be a useful tool in selecting important variables for sensory attributes. These two strategies allowed us to comprehensively evaluate the sensorial contribution of single volatile from different perspectives, can be applied to related products for comprehensive quality control. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  8. FTIR analysis of surface functionalities on particulate matter produced by off-road diesel engines operating on diesel and biofuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popovicheva, Olga B; Kireeva, Elena D; Shonija, Natalia K; Vojtisek-Lom, Michal; Schwarz, Jaroslav

    2015-03-01

    Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy is applied as a powerful analytic technique for the evaluation of the chemical composition of combustion aerosols emitted by off-road engines fuelled by diesel and biofuels. Particles produced by burning diesel, heated rapeseed oil (RO), RO with ethylhexylnitrate, and heated palm oil were sampled from exhausts of representative in-use diesel engines. Multicomponent composition of diesel and biofuel particles reveal the chemistry related to a variety of functional groups containing carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, sulfur, and nitrogen. The most intensive functionalities of diesel particles are saturated C-C-H and unsaturated C=C-H aliphatic groups in alkanes and alkenes, aromatic C=C and C=C-H groups in polyaromatics, as well as sulfates and nitrated ions. The distinguished features of biofuel particles were carbonyl C=O groups in carboxylic acids, ketones, aldehydes, esters, and lactones. NO2, C-N and -NH groups in nitrocompounds and amines are found to dominate biofuel particles. Group identification is confirmed by complementary measurements of organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon, and water-soluble ion species. The relationship between infrared bands of polar oxygenated and non-polar aliphatic functionalities indicates the higher extent of the surface oxidation of biofuel particles. Findings provide functional markers of organic surface structure of off-road diesel emission, allowing for a better evaluation of relation between engine, fuel, operation condition, and particle composition, thus improving the quantification of environmental impacts of alternative energy source emissions.

  9. Use of water containing acetone–butanol–ethanol for NOx-PM (nitrogen oxide-particulate matter) trade-off in the diesel engine fueled with biodiesel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Yu-Cheng; Lee, Wen-Jhy; Wu, Tser Son; Wu, Chang-Yu; Chen, Shui-Jen

    2014-01-01

    Fuel blends that contain biodiesel are known to produce greater NO x (nitrogen oxide) emissions in diesel engine exhaust than regular diesel, and this is one of the key barriers to the wider adoption of biodiesel as an alternative fuel. In this study, a water-containing ABE (acetone–butanol–ethanol) solution, which simulates products that are produced from biomass fermentation without dehydration processing, was tested as a biodiesel-diesel blend additive to lower NO x emissions from diesel engines. The energy efficiency and the PM (particulate matter) and PAHs (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) emissions were investigated and compared under various operating conditions. Although biodiesel had greater NO x emissions, the blends that contained 25% of the water-containing ABE solution had significantly lower NO x (4.30–30.7%), PM (10.9–63.1%), and PAH (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon) emissions (26.7–67.6%) than the biodiesel–diesel blends and regular diesel, respectively. In addition, the energy efficiency of this new blend was 0.372–7.88% higher with respect to both the biodiesel–diesel blends and regular diesel. Because dehydration and surfactant addition are not necessary, the application of ABE–biodiesel–diesel blends can simplify fuel production processes, reduce energy consumption, and lower pollutant emissions, meaning that the ABE–biodiesel–diesel blend is a promising green fuel. - Highlights: • Water-containing ABE (acetone–butanol–ethanol)–biodiesel–diesel was tested in a diesel engine. • The addition of ABE to biodiesel–diesel blends can enhance the energy efficiency. • The addition of ABE can solve the problem of NO x -PM (nitrogen oxide-particulate matter) trade-off when using biodiesel. • PAHs (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) can be further reduced by adding ABE in biodiesel–diesel blends. • Fuel production was simplified due to the acceptance of water in ABE

  10. Bioremediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH compounds: (acenaphthene and fluorene in water using indigenous bacterial species isolated from the Diep and Plankenburg rivers, Western Cape, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oluwadara Oluwaseun Alegbeleye

    Full Text Available Abstract This study was conducted to investigate the occurrence of PAH degrading microorganisms in two river systems in the Western Cape, South Africa and their ability to degrade two PAH compounds: acenaphthene and fluorene. A total of 19 bacterial isolates were obtained from the Diep and Plankenburg rivers among which four were identified as acenaphthene and fluorene degrading isolates. In simulated batch scale experiments, the optimum temperature for efficient degradation of both compounds was determined in a shaking incubator after 14 days, testing at 25 °C, 30 °C, 35 °C, 37 °C, 38 °C, 40 °C and 45 °C followed by experiments in a Stirred Tank Bioreactor using optimum temperature profiles from the batch experiment results. All experiments were run without the addition of supplements, bulking agents, biosurfactants or any other form of biostimulants. Results showed that Raoultella ornithinolytica, Serratia marcescens, Bacillus megaterium and Aeromonas hydrophila efficiently degraded both compounds at 37 °C, 37 °C, 30 °C and 35 °C respectively. The degradation of fluorene was more efficient and rapid compared to that of acenaphthene and degradation at Stirred Tank Bioreactor scale was more efficient for all treatments. Raoultella ornithinolytica, Serratia marcescens, Bacillus megaterium and Aeromonas hydrophila degraded a mean total of 98.60%, 95.70%, 90.20% and 99.90% acenaphthene, respectively and 99.90%, 97.90%, 98.40% and 99.50% fluorene, respectively. The PAH degrading microorganisms isolated during this study significantly reduced the concentrations of acenaphthene and fluorene and may be used on a larger, commercial scale to bioremediate PAH contaminated river systems.

  11. Catalytic diesel particulate filters reduce the in vitro estrogenic activity of diesel exhaust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wenger, Daniela; Gerecke, Andreas C.; Heeb, Norbert V. [Laboratory for Analytical Chemistry, Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Testing and Research, Duebendorf (Switzerland); Naegeli, Hanspeter [University of Zurich-Vetsuisse, Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Zurich (Switzerland); Zenobi, Renato [ETH Zurich, Department of Chemistry and Applied Biosciences, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2008-04-15

    An in vitro reporter gene assay based on human breast cancer T47D cells (ER-CALUX {sup registered}) was applied to examine the ability of diesel exhaust to induce or inhibit estrogen receptor (ER)-mediated gene expression. Exhaust from a heavy-duty diesel engine was either treated by iron- or copper/iron-catalyzed diesel particulate filters (DPFs) or studied as unfiltered exhaust. Collected samples included particle-bound and semivolatile constituents of diesel exhaust. Our findings show that all of the samples contained compounds that were able to induce ER-mediated gene expression as well as compounds that suppressed the activity of the endogenous hormone 17{beta}-estradiol (E2). Estrogenic activity prevailed over antiestrogenic activity. We found an overall ER-mediated activity of 1.63 {+-} 0.31 ng E2 CALUX equivalents (E2-CEQs) per m{sup 3} of unfiltered exhaust. In filtered exhaust, we measured 0.74 {+-} 0.07 (iron-catalyzed DPF) and 0.55 {+-} 0.09 ng E2-CEQ m{sup -3} (copper/iron-catalyzed DPF), corresponding to reductions in estrogenic activity of 55 and 66%, respectively. Our study demonstrates that both catalytic DPFs lowered the ER-mediated endocrine-disrupting potential of diesel exhaust. (orig.)

  12. POSSIBILITIES TO USE NATURAL EXTRACTS FROM MEDICINAL AND AROMATIC PLANTS (MAP LIKE BOTANICAL REPELLENT OR INSECTICIDE COMPOUNDS AGAINST PEST INSECTS IN ECOLOGICAL CROPS (II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina IONESCU-MĂLĂNCUŞ

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Botanical insecticides have long been touted as attractive alternatives to synthetic chemical insecticides for pest management because botanicals reputedly pose little threat to the environment or to human health. The body of scientific literature documenting bioactivity of plant derivatives to arthropods pests continues to expand i.e. repellents based on essential oils extracted from Chenopodium ambrosioides, Eucalyptus saligna, Rosmarinus officinalis to mosquitoes, or cinnamon oil, sandalwood oil and turmeric oil are previously reported as insect repellents evaluatede in the laboratory conditions. With the constantly increasing problems of insecticide resistance and increasing public concerns regarding pesticide safety, new, safer active ingredients are becoming necessary to replace existing compounds on the market. The present study carried out in the period 2010-2012 comprises a review of two insect repellents, followed by some new research conducted in our laboratory on plant-derived insect repellents. The two alkaloids tested against the Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata Say in laboratory conditions was obtained by water and alchohol extraction from two vegetal species, Cichorium intybus L. (Asterales:Asteraceae and Delphinium consolida L. (Ranales:Ranunculaceae. The tests carried out in laboratory and field experimentally plots under cages permit to evaluate several other compounds for repellent activity of lacctucin alkaloids.

  13. Identification of hepatic metabolites of two highly carcinogenic polycyclic aza-aromatic compounds, 7,9-dimethylbenz[c]acridine and 7,10-dimethylbenz[c]acridine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Y; Duke, C C; Holder, G M

    1995-03-01

    The hepatic microsomal metabolites of the highly carcinogenic dimethylbenzacridines, 7,9-dimethylbenz[c]acridine (7,9-DMBAC), and 7,10-dimethylbenz[c]acridine (7,10-DMBAC) were obtained with preparations from 3-methylcholanthrene-pretreated rats. Metabolites were separated by reversed-phase HPLC and characterized using UV spectral data and chemical ionization-mass spectrometry after trimethylsilylation and GC. Comparisons with products formed in the presence of the epoxide hydrolase inhibitor, 1,1,1-trichloropropane 2,3-oxide and with those formed from the three synthetic alcohol derivatives of each parent compound, aided the assignment of firm or tentative structures to 16 products from 7,9-DMBAC found in 22 reversed-phase chromatographic peaks, and for 17 products of 7,10-DMBAC found in 19 chromatographic peaks. The more abundant metabolites were derived from oxidation of the methyl groups. Other metabolites were dihydrodiols, epoxides, phenols and secondary metabolites. The 9-methyl group prevented dihydrodiol formation at the 8,9-position from 7,9-DMBAC, and for each carcinogen, the 3,4-dihydrodiol was formed. As well, 3,4-dihydrodiols of methyl oxidized compounds were found.

  14. Biomonitoring of diesel exhaust-exposed workers. DNA and hemoglobin adducts and urinary 1-hydroxypyrene as markers of exposure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Per Sabro; Andreassen, Åshild; Farmer, Peter B.

    1996-01-01

    Diesel exhaust-exposed workers have been shown to have an increased risk of lung cancer. A battery of biomarkers were evaluated for their ability to assess differences in exposure to genotoxic compounds in bus garage workers and mechanics and controls. Lymphocyte DNA adducts were analyzed using...... correlated with HPU but not with DNA adducts. The levels of HPU in urine were 0.11 micromol/mol creatinine compared to 0.05 in controls. All three assays applied were sensitive enough to evaluate a low level of exposure to environmental pollutants, with postlabelling and GC-MS as the most sensitive assays....... The study indicated that skin absorption of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) might be an important factor to consider when studying PAH exposure from air pollution sources....

  15. The use of tyre pyrolysis oil in diesel engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murugan, S; Ramaswamy, M C; Nagarajan, G

    2008-12-01

    Tests have been carried out to evaluate the performance, emission, and combustion characteristics of a single cylinder direct injection diesel engine fueled with 10%, 30%, and 50% of tyre pyrolysis oil (TPO) blended with diesel fuel (DF). The TPO was derived from waste automobile tyres through vacuum pyrolysis. The combustion parameters such as heat release rate, cylinder peak pressure, and maximum rate of pressure rise also analysed. Results showed that the brake thermal efficiency of the engine fueled with TPO-DF blends increased with an increase in blend concentration and reduction of DF concentration. NO(x), HC, CO, and smoke emissions were found to be higher at higher loads due to the high aromatic content and longer ignition delay. The cylinder peak pressure increased from 71 bars to 74 bars. The ignition delays were longer than with DF. It is concluded that it is possible to use tyre pyrolysis oil in diesel engines as an alternate fuel in the future.

  16. MOLECULAR BASIS OF BIODEGRADATION OF CHLOROAROMATIC COMPOUNDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chlorinated aromatic hydrocarbons are widely used in industry and agriculture, and comprise the bulk of environmental pollutants. Although simple aromatic compounds are biodegradable by a variety of degradative pathways, their halogenated counterparts are more resistant to bacter...

  17. Sulfur tolerant zeolite supported platinum catalysts for aromatics hydrogenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergem, Haakon

    1997-12-31

    The increased demand for transportation fuels at the expence of heavier fuel oil has forced the refinery industry to expand their conversion capacity with hydrotreating as one of the key processes. A shift towards more diesel powered vehicles along with tightening fuel regulations demanding cleaner fuels has lead to increasing interest in catalytic processes for the manufacturing of such environmentally acceptable fuels. This provides the motivation for this thesis. Its main objective was to study possible catalysts active for desulfurization, hydrogenation, and ring-opening of aromatics all in the presence of sulfur. A close examination of the physical properties and kinetical behaviour of the chosen catalysts has been performed. A high pressure reactor setup was designed and built for activity measurements. Zeolite supported platinum catalysts were prepared and both the metal and acid functions were characterized utilizing various experimental techniques. Hydrogenation of toluene was used as a model reaction and the effect of sulfur adsorption on the activity and kinetic behaviour of the catalysts was investigated. The catalyst samples showed hydrogenation activities comparable to a commercial Pt/Al2O3 catalyst. There were no clear differences in the effect of the various sulfur compounds studied. Platinum supported on zeolite Y gave considerably more sulfur tolerant catalysts compared to Al2O3 as support. 155 refs., 58 figs., 36 tabs.

  18. Radium in diesel oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulich, J.

    1977-05-01

    In order to determine the addition of radon and radium to the air in mines, originatiny from the combustion of petroleum, measurements of the content of radium in diesel oil have been performed. Knowing the radium content theradon content can easily be calculated. The procedures used for the chemical analysis of radium is desribed. The ash remaining after combustion of the diesel oil is soluted in water and radium is precipiated as sulphate. The radium is detected by a ZnS (Ag) detector. The diesel oils from different petroleum companies contained between o.019-0.5pCi radium - 226. The conclution is that the consumption of diesel oils in motors used in mines does not contribute to the radium - 226 content at the air move than permissible according to norms.(K.K.)

  19. Influence of fuel properties, nitrogen oxides, and exhaust treatment by an oxidation catalytic converter on the mutagenicity of diesel engine emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bünger, Jürgen; Krahl, Jürgen; Weigel, Andreas; Schröder, Olaf; Brüning, Thomas; Müller, Michael; Hallier, Ernst; Westphal, Götz

    2006-08-01

    Particle emissions of diesel engines (DEP) content polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) these compounds cause a strong mutagenicity of solvent extracts of DEP. We investigated the influence of fuel properties, nitrogen oxides (NO( x )), and an oxidation catalytic converter (OCC) on the mutagenic effects of DEP. The engine was fuelled with common diesel fuel (DF), low-sulphur diesel fuel (LSDF), rapeseed oil methyl ester (RME), and soybean oil methyl ester (SME) and run at five different load modes in two series with and without installation of an OCC in the exhaust pipe. Particles from the cooled and diluted exhaust were sampled onto glass fibre filters and extracted with dichloromethane in a soxhlet apparatus. The mutagenicity of the extracts was tested using the Salmonella typhimurium/mammalian microsome assay with tester strains TA98 and TA100. Without OCC the number of revertant colonies was lower in extracts of LSDF than in extracts of DF. The lowest numbers of revertant colonies were induced by the plant oil derived fuels. In three load modes, operation with the OCC led to a reduction of the mutagenicity. However, direct mutagenic effects under heavy duty conditions (load mode A) were significantly increased for RME (TA98, TA100) and SME (TA98). A consistent but not significant increase in direct mutagenicity was observed for DF and LSDF at load mode A, and for DF at idling (load mode E) when emissions were treated with the OCC. These results raise concern over the use of oxidation catalytic converters with diesel engines. We hypothesise that the OCC increases formation of direct acting mutagens under certain conditions by the reaction of NO( x ) with PAH resulting in the formation of nitrated-PAH. Most of these compounds are powerful direct acting mutagens.

  20. Adsorption of polar, nonpolar, and substituted aromatics to colloidal graphene oxide nanoparticles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Fang; Haftka, Joris J H; Sinnige, Theo L.; Hermens, Joop L M; Chen, Wei

    2014-01-01

    We conducted batch adsorption experiments to understand the adsorptive properties of colloidal graphene oxide nanoparticles (GONPs) for a range of environmentally relevant aromatics and substituted aromatics, including model nonpolar compounds (pyrene, phenanthrene, naphthalene, and

  1. Experimental study and kinetic modeling of the thermal degradation of aromatic volatile organic compounds (benzene, toluene and xylene-para) in methane flames; Etude experimentale et modelisation cinetique de la degradation thermique des composes organiques volatils aromatiques benzenes, toluene et para-xylene dans des flammes de methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dupont, L.

    2001-02-01

    This study treats of the thermal degradation of a family of aromatic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in laminar premixed methane flames at low pressure. The experimental influence of benzene, toluene and xylene-para on the structure of a reference methane flame has been studied. The molar fraction profiles of the stable and reactive, aliphatic, aromatic and cyclic species have been established by the coupling of the molecular beam sampling/mass spectroscopy technique with the gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy technique. Temperature profiles have been measured using a covered thermocouple. A detailed kinetic mechanism of oxidation of these compounds in flame conditions has been developed. Different available sub-mechanisms have been used as references: the GDF-Kin 1.0 model for the oxidation of methane and the models of Tan and Franck (1996) and of Lindstedt and Maurice (1996) in the case of benzene and toluene. In the case of para-xylene, a model has been developed because no mechanisms was available in the literature. These different mechanisms have been refined, completed or adjusted by comparing the experimental results with those obtained by kinetic modeling. The complete kinetic mechanism, comprising 156 chemical species involved in 1072 reactions allows to reproduce all the experimental observations in a satisfactory manner. The kinetic analysis of reactions velocity has permitted to determine oxidation kinetic schemes for benzene, toluene, xylene-para and for the cyclopentadienyl radical, main species at the origin of the rupture of the aromatic cycle. Reactions of recombination with the methyl radicals formed during methane oxidation, of the different aromatic or aliphatic radicals created during the oxidation of aromatics, play an important role and lead to the formation of several aromatic pollutants (ethyl-benzene for instance) or aliphatic pollutants (butadiene or penta-diene for instance) in flames. (J.S.)

  2. Effects of particulate oxidation catalyst on unregulated pollutant emission and toxicity characteristics from heavy-duty diesel engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xiangyu; Ge, Yunshan; Ma, Chaochen; Tan, Jianwei

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of particulate oxidation catalyst (POC) on unregulated pollutant emission and toxicity characteristics, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), volatile organic compounds (VOCs), soot, soluble organic fractions (SOF) and sulphate emissions emitted from a heavy-duty diesel engine retrofitted with a POC were investigated on a diesel bench. The particulate matter (PM) in the exhaust was collected by Teflon membrane, and the PAHs and VOCs were analysed by a gas chromatography/mass spectrometer (GC/MS). The results indicate that the POC exhibits good performance on the emission control of VOCs, PAHs and PM. The POC and the diesel particulate filters (DPF) both show a good performance on reducing the VOCs emission. Though the brake-specific emission (BSE) reductions of the total PAHs by the POC were lower than those by the DPF, the POC still removed almost more than 50% of the total PAHs emission. After the engine was retrofitted with the POC, the reductions of the PM mass, SOF and soot emissions were 45.2-89.0%, 7.8-97.7% and 41.7-93.3%, respectively. The sulphate emissions decreased at low and medium loads, whereas at high load, the results were contrary. The PAHs emissions were decreased by 32.4-69.1%, and the contributions of the PAH compounds were affected by the POC, as well as by load level. The benzo[a]pyrene equivalent (BaPeq) of PAHs emissions were reduced by 35.9-97.6% with the POC. The VOCs emissions were reduced by 21.8-94.1% with the POC, and the reduction was more evident under high load.

  3. Characteristics of particulate emissions from a diesel generator fueled with varying blends of biodiesel and fossil diesel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Jen-Hsiung; Chen, Shui-Jen; Huang, Kuo-Lin; Lee, Wen-Jhy; Kuo, Wen-Chien; Lin, Wen-Yinn

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the particulate matter (PM), particle-bound carbons, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) emitted from a diesel-engine generator fuelled with blends of pure fossil diesel oil (D100) and varying percentages of waste-edible-oil biodiesel (W10, 10 vol %; W20, 20 vol %; W30, 30 vol %; and W50, 50 vol %) under generator loads of 0, 1.5, and 3 kW. On average, the PM emission factors of all blends was 30.5 % (range, 13.7-52.3 %) lower than that of D100 under the tested loads. Substituting pure fossil diesel oil with varying percentages of waste-edible-oil biodiesel reduced emissions of particle-bound total carbon (TC) and elemental carbon (EC). The W20 blend had the lowest particle-bound organic carbon (OC) emissions. Notably, W10, W20, and W30 also had lower Total-PAH emissions and lower total equivalent toxicity (Total-BaP(eq)) compared to D100. Additionally, the brake-specific fuel consumption of the generator correlated positively with the ratio of waste-edible-oil biodiesel to pure fossil diesel. However, generator energy efficiency correlated negatively with the ratio of waste-edible-oil biodiesel to pure fossil diesel.

  4. AUTOMOTIVE DIESEL MAINTENANCE. PROGRAM OUTLINE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human Engineering Inst., Cleveland, OH.

    INFORMATIONAL TOPICS COVERED IN THE TEXT MATERIALS AND SELF-INSTRUCTIONAL BRANCH PROGRAMED TRAINING FILMS FOR A 2-YEAR, 55 MODULE PROGRAM IN AUTOMOTIVE DIESEL MAINTENANCE ARE GIVEN. THE 30 MODULES FOR "AUTOMOTIVE DIESEL MAINTENANCE 1" ARE AVAILABLE AS VT 005 655 - VT 005 684, AND THE 25 MODULES FOR "AUTOMOTIVE DIESEL MAINTENANCE 2" ARE AVAILABLE…

  5. Continuous group and electron-count rules in aromaticity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pradeep Kumar

    2018-02-07

    Feb 7, 2018 ... ues of aromatic indexes, like rig current and resonance energy do differ for benzene and toluene. As soon as aromaticity in inorganic compounds had started to sur- face, a search for similar electron count rules like Hückel rule also started. For example, when fullerene was dis- covered and found to have ...

  6. C-Nucleosides Derived from Simple Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    OpenAIRE

    Chaudhuri, Narayan C.; Ren, Rex X.-F.; Kool, Eric T.

    1997-01-01

    We describe the synthesis, structure and DNA incorporation of a class of novel aromatic C-deoxynucleosides in which benzenes and larger polycyclic aromatics serve as DNA base analogs. Novel approaches have been developed for glycosidic bond formation and for epimenzation of the anomeric substitutents to β-configuration, and we describe some of the properties of such compounds in DNA.

  7. Reducing emissions from diesel combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    This paper contains information dealing with engine design to reduce emissions and improve or maintain fuel economy. Topics include: Observation of High Pressure Fuel Spray with Laser Light Sheet Method; Determination of Engine Cylinder Pressures from Crankshaft Speed Fluctuations; Combustion Similarity for Different Size Diesel Engines: Theoretical Prediction and Experimental Results; Prediction of Diesel Engine Particulate Emission During Transient Cycles; Characteristics and Combustibility of Particulate Matter; Dual-Fuel Diesel Engine Using Butane; Measurement of Flame Temperature Distribution in D.I. Diesel Engine with High Pressure Fuel Injection: and Combustion in a Small DI Diesel Engine at Starting

  8. Diesel Emissions Quantifier (DEQ)

    Science.gov (United States)

    .The Diesel Emissions Quantifier (Quantifier) is an interactive tool to estimate emission reductions and cost effectiveness. Publications EPA-420-F-13-008a (420f13008a), EPA-420-B-10-035 (420b10023), EPA-420-B-10-034 (420b10034)

  9. Diesel Engine Mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foutes, William A.

    Written in student performance terms, this curriculum guide on diesel engine repair is divided into the following eight sections: an orientation to the occupational field and instructional program; instruction in operating principles; instruction in engine components; instruction in auxiliary systems; instruction in fuel systems; instruction in…

  10. Diesel Engine Technician

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tech Directions, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Diesel engine technicians maintain and repair the engines that power transportation equipment such as heavy trucks, trains, buses, and locomotives. Some technicians work mainly on farm machines, ships, compressors, and pumps. Others work mostly on construction equipment such as cranes, power shovels, bulldozers, and paving machines. This article…

  11. Diesel sisustab / Jenni Juurinen

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Juurinen, Jenni

    2007-01-01

    Renzo Rosso poolt 1978. a. Itaalias asutatud rõivafirma Diesel sisustas 2007. a. kevadel Stay Inn-projekti raames katusekorteri Helsingi kesklinnas. Diesili kujundaja Vesa Kemppainen. Sisustuses on kasutatud peamiselt soome mööblit ja seintel eksponeeritud soome noorte kunstnike taieseid. Autoreid: Harri Koskinen (voodi), Thomas Pedersen (Stingrey kiiktool), Jenni Hiltunen (maalid)

  12. Study on Emission and Performance of Diesel Engine Using Castor Biodiesel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Saiful Islam

    2014-01-01

    performance of diesel engine using the castor biodiesel and its blend with diesel from 0% to 40% by volume. The acid-based catalyzed transesterification system was used to produce castor biodiesel and the highest yield of 82.5% was obtained under the optimized condition. The FTIR spectrum of castor biodiesel indicates the presence of C=O and C–O functional groups, which is due to the ester compound in biodiesel. The smoke emission test revealed that B40 (biodiesel blend with 40% biodiesel and 60% diesel had the least black smoke compared to the conventional diesel. Diesel engine performance test indicated that the specific fuel consumption of biodiesel blend was increased sufficiently when the blending ratio was optimized. Thus, the reduction in exhaust emissions and reduction in brake-specific fuel consumption made the blends of caster seed oil (B20 a suitable alternative fuel for diesel and could help in controlling air pollution.

  13. Fate and biodegradability of sulfonated aromatic amines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, N.C.G.; Leeuwen, van A.; Voorthuizen, van E.M.; Slenders, P.; Prenafeta, F.X.; Temmink, H.; Lettinga, G.; Field, J.A.

    2005-01-01

    Ten sulfonated aromatic amines were tested for their aerobic and anaerobic biodegradability and toxicity potential in a variety of environmental inocula. Of all the compounds tested, only two aminobenzenesulfonic acid (ABS) isomers, 2- and 4-ABS, were degraded. The observed degradation occurred only

  14. Solid phase microextraction: measurement of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in Dhaka City air pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussam, A; Alauddin, M; Khan, A H; Chowdhury, D; Bibi, H; Bhattacharjee, M; Sultana, S

    2002-08-01

    A solid phase microextraction (SPME) technique was applied for the sampling of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in ambient air polluted by two stroke autorickshaw engines and automobile exhausts in Dhaka city, Bangladesh. Analysis was carried out by capillary gas chromatography (GC) and GC-mass spectrometry (MS). The methodology was tested by insitu sampling of an aromatic hydrocarbon mixture gas standard with a precision of +/-5% and an average accuracy of 1-20%. The accuracy for total VOCs concentration measurement was about 7%. VOC's in ambient air were collected by exposing the SPME fiber at four locations in Dhaka city. The chromatograms showed signature similar to that of unburned gasoline (petrol) and weathered diesel containing more than 200 organic compounds; some of these compounds were positively identified. These are normal hydrocarbons pentane (n-C5H2) through nonacosane (n-C29H60), aromatic hydrocarbons: benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, n-propylbenzene, n-butylbenzene, 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene, xylenes, and 1-isocyanato-3-methoxybenzene. Two samples collected near an autorickshaw station contained 783000 and 1479000 microg/m3 of VOCs. In particular, the concentration of toluene was 50-100 times higher than the threshold limiting value of 2000 microg/m3. Two other samples collected on street median showed 135000 microg/m3 and 180000 microg/m3 of total VOCs. The method detection limit of the technique for most semi-volatile organic compounds was 1 microg/m3.

  15. Emissions from Diesel and Gasoline Vehicles Fuelled by Fischer-Tropsch Fuels and Similar Fuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Ulrik; Lundorff, Peter; Ivarsson, Anders

    2007-01-01

    The described investigation was carried out under the umbrella of IEA Advanced Motor Fuels Agreement. The purpose was to evaluate the emissions of carbon monoxide (CO), unburned hydrocarbons (HC), nitrogen oxides (NOx), particulate matter (PM) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) from...... vehicles fuelled by Fischer Tropsch (FT) based diesel and gasoline fuel, compared to the emissions from ordinary diesel and gasoline. The comparison for diesel fuels was based on a literature review, whereas the gasoline comparison had to be based on our own experiments, since almost no references were...... and an alkylate fuel (Aspen), which was taken to be the ultimate formula of FT gasoline. FT based diesel generally showed good emission performance, whereas the FT based gasoline not necessary lead to lower emissions. On the other hand, the Aspen fuel did show many advantages for the emissions from the gasoline...

  16. Biodiesel and Cold Temperature Effects on Speciated Mobile Source Air Toxics from Modern Diesel Trucks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speciated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) with a particular focus on mobile source air toxics (MSATs) were measured in diesel exhaust from three heavy-duty trucks equipped with modern aftertreatment technologies. Emissions testing was conducted on a temperature controlled chass...

  17. Biodiesel and Cold Temperature Effect on Speciated Mobile Source Air Toxics from Modern Diesel Trucks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speciated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) with a particular focus on mobile source air toxics (MSATs) were measured in diesel exhaust from three heavy-duty trucks equipped with modern aftertreatment technologies. Emissions testing was conducted on a temperature controlled chass...

  18. Hybrid technologies for the remediation of Diesel fuel polluted soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pazos, M.; Alcantara, M.T.; Rosales, E.; Sanroman, M.A. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Vigo (Spain)

    2011-12-15

    Diesel fuel may be released into soil due to anthropogenic activities, such as accidental spills or leaks in underground storage tanks or pipelines. Since diesel fuel is mainly composed of hydrophobic organic compounds, it has low water solubility. Therefore, treating contaminated areas with conventional techniques is difficult. In this study, electrokinetic treatment of soil contaminated with diesel fuel was carried out. Two different hybrid approaches to pollutant removal were tested. A surfactant was used as a processing fluid during electrokinetic treatment to increase desorption and the solubility of diesel fuel. Additionally, a hybrid technology combining a Fenton reaction and electrokinetic remediation (EK-Fenton) was tested in an attempt to generate favorable in situ degradation of pollutants. The efficiency of each treatment was determined based on diesel fuel removal. After 30 days of treatment, the highest removal of diesel fuel was found to be achieved with the EK-Fenton process. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  19. Spatial variation in diesel-related elemental and organic PM2.5 components during workweek hours across a downtown core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunno, Brett J; Shmool, Jessie L C; Michanowicz, Drew R; Tripathy, Sheila; Chubb, Lauren G; Kinnee, Ellen; Cambal, Leah; Roper, Courtney; Clougherty, Jane E

    2016-12-15

    Capturing intra-urban variation in diesel-related pollution exposures remains a challenge, given its complex chemical mix, and relatively few well-characterized ambient-air tracers for the multiple diesel sources in densely-populated urban areas. To capture fine-scale spatial resolution (50×50m grid cells) in diesel-related pollution, we used geographic information systems (GIS) to systematically allocate 36 sampling sites across downtown Pittsburgh, PA, USA (2.8km 2 ), cross-stratifying to disentangle source impacts (i.e., truck density, bus route frequency, total traffic density). For buses, outbound and inbound trips per week were summed by route and a kernel density was calculated across sites. Programmable monitors collected fine particulate matter (PM 2.5 ) samples specific to workweek hours (Monday-Friday, 7 am-7 pm), summer and winter 2013. Integrated filters were analyzed for black carbon (BC), elemental carbon (EC), organic carbon (OC), elemental constituents, and diesel-related organic compounds [i.e., polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), hopanes, steranes]. To our knowledge, no studies have collected this suite of pollutants with such high sampling density, with the ability to capture spatial patterns during specific hours of interest. We hypothesized that we would find substantial spatial variation for each pollutant and significant associations with key sources (e.g. diesel and gasoline vehicles), with higher concentrations near the center of this small downtown core. Using a forward stepwise approach, we developed seasonal land use regression (LUR) models for PM 2.5 , BC, total EC, OC, PAHs, hopanes, steranes, aluminum (Al), calcium (Ca), and iron (Fe). Within this small domain, greater concentration differences were observed in most pollutants across sites, on average, than between seasons. Higher PM 2.5 and BC concentrations were found in the downtown core compared to the boundaries. PAHs, hopanes, and steranes displayed different spatial

  20. Graphenes–Aromatic Giants

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Graphenes - Aromatic Giants. Ivan Gutman Boris Furtula. Volume 16 Issue 12 December 2011 pp 1238-1245. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/016/12/1238-1245. Keywords. Graphenes; polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons; polyphenyls; condensed benzenes.

  1. PM, carbon, and PAH emissions from a diesel generator fuelled with soy-biodiesel blends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, Jen-Hsiung; Chen, Shui-Jen; Huang, Kuo-Lin; Lin, Yuan-Chung; Lee, Wen-Jhy; Lin, Chih-Chung; Lin, Wen-Yinn

    2010-01-01

    Biodiesels have received increasing attention as alternative fuels for diesel engines and generators. This study investigates the emissions of particulate matter (PM), total carbon (TC), e.g., organic/elemental carbons, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from a diesel generator fuelled with soy-biodiesel blends. Among the tested diesel blends (B0, B10 (10 vol% soy-biodiesel), B20, and B50), B20 exhibited the lowest PM emission concentration despite the loads (except the 5 kW case), whereas B10 displayed lower PM emission factors when operating at 0 and 10 kW than the other fuel blends. The emission concentrations or factors of EC, OC, and TC were the lowest when B10 or B20 was used regardless of the loading. Under all tested loads, the average concentrations of total-PAHs emitted from the generator using the B10 and B20 were lower (by 38% and 28%, respectively) than those using pure petroleum diesel fuel (B0), while the emission factors of total-PAHs decreased with an increasing ratio of biodiesel to premium diesel. With an increasing loading, although the brake specific fuel consumption decreased, the energy efficiency increased despite the bio/petroleum diesel ratio. Therefore, soy-biodiesel is promising for use as an alternative fuel for diesel generators to increase energy efficiency and reduce the PM, carbon, and PAH emissions.

  2. Persistent organic pollutants and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in penguins of the genus Pygoscelis in Admiralty Bay - An Antarctic specially managed area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montone, Rosalinda C; Taniguchi, Satie; Colabuono, Fernanda I; Martins, César C; Cipro, Caio Vinícius Z; Barroso, Hileia S; da Silva, Josilene; Bícego, Márcia C; Weber, Rolf R

    2016-05-15

    Persistent organic pollutants were assessed in fat samples of the Gentoo (Pygoscelis papua), Chinstrap (Pygoscelis antarcticus) and Adélie (Pygoscelis adeliae) penguins collected during the austral summers of 2005/06 and 2006/07 in Admiralty Bay, King George Island, Antarctica. The predominant organic pollutants were PCB (114 to 1115), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) (60.1 to 238.7), HCB (penguins. Chicks of all three species showed similar profiles of PCB congeners, with predominance of lower chlorinated compounds. The distribution of PAHs was similar in all birds, with a predominance of naphthalene and alkyl-naphthalene, which are the main constituents of arctic diesel fuel. These data contribute to the monitoring of the continued exposure to organic pollutants in the Antarctic biota. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Analytical Procedure Development to Determine Polycyclic Aromatic Compounds in the PM{sub 2}.5-PM{sub 1}0 Fraction of Atmospheric Aerosols; Desarrollo de una Metodologia Analitica para la Determinacion de Compuestos Aromaticos Policiclicos en las Fracciones PM{sub 2}.5-PM{sub 1}0 del Aerosol Atmosferico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrado, A. I.; Garcia, S.; Perez, R. M.

    2013-06-01

    This paper presents an optimized and validated analytical methodology for the determination of various polycyclic aromatic compounds in ambient air using liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection. This analysis method was applied to samples obtained during more than one year in an area of Madrid. Selected compounds have included thirteen polycyclic hydrocarbons considered priorities by the EPA, and hydroxylated derivatives, which have been less investigated in air samples by liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection. We have characterized and compared the concentration ranges of compounds identified and studied seasonal and monthly variations. In addition, the techniques have been applied to study multivariate correlations, factor analysis and cluster analysis to extract as much information as possible for interpretation and more complete and accurate characterization of the results and their relationship with meteorological parameters and physicochemical. (Author) 50 refs.

  4. Using GC×GC-ToF-MS to characterise SVOC from diesel exhaust emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, M. S.; Ramadhas, A. S.; Stark, C. P.; Liu, D.; Xu, H.; Harrison, R. M.

    2014-12-01

    Despite intensive research over the last 20 years, a number of major research questions remain concerning the sources and properties of road traffic-generated particulate matter. There are major knowledge gaps concerning the composition of primary vehicle exhaust aerosol, and its contribution to secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. These uncertainties relate especially to the semi-volatile component of the particles. Semi-Volatile Organic Compounds (SVOC) are compounds which partition directly between the gas and aerosol phases under ambient conditions, and include compounds with saturation concentrations roughly between 0.1 and 104 μg m-3. The SVOC in engine exhaust are typically hydrocarbons in the C15-C35 range. They are largely uncharacterised, other than the n-alkanes, because they are unresolved by traditional gas chromatography and form a large hump in the chromatogram referred to as Unresolved Complex Mixture (UCM). In this study, samples were collected from the exhaust of a diesel engine with and without abatement devices fitted. Engine exhaust was diluted with air and collected using both filter and impaction (MOUDI), to resolve total mass and size resolved mass respectively. Particle size distribution was evaluated by sampling simultaneously with a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS). 2D Gas-Chromatography Time-of-Flight Mass-Spectrometry (GC×GC-ToF-MS) was exploited to characterise and quantify the composition of SVOC from the exhaust emission. The SVOC was observed to contain predominantly n-alkanes, alkyl-cyclohexanes and aromatics; similar to both fresh lubricating oil and fuel. Preliminary results indicate that the contribution of diesel fuel to the exhaust SVOC composition is dominant at high speeds, and a more pronounced contribution from lubricating oil is observed at low speeds. Differences were also observed in the SVOC composition when using different fuel types, engine lubricants, starting temperatures and collecting samples with

  5. Carbonyl emissions in diesel and biodiesel exhaust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado Corrêa, Sérgio; Arbilla, Graciela

    With the use of biodiesel in clear growth, it is important to quantify any potential emission benefits or liabilities of this fuel. Several researches are available concerning the regulated emissions of biodiesel/diesel blends, but there is a lack of information about non-regulated emissions. In a previous paper [Corrêa, S.M., Arbilla, G., 2006. Emissões de formaldeído e acetaldeído de misturas biodiesel/diesel. Periódico Tchê Química, 3, 54-68], the emissions of aromatic hydrocarbons were reported. In this work, seven carbonyl emissions (formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acrolein, acetone, propionaldehyde, butyraldehyde, and benzaldehyde) were evaluated by a heavy-duty diesel engine fueled with pure diesel (D) and biodiesel blends (v/v) of 2% (B2), 5% (B5), 10% (B10), and 20% (B20). The tests were conducted using a six cylinder heavy-duty engine, typical of the Brazilian fleet of urban buses, in a steady-state condition under 1000, 1500, and 2000 rpm. The exhaust gases were diluted nearly 20 times and the carbonyls were sampled with SiO 2-C18 cartridges, impregnated with acid solution of 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine. The chemical analyses were performed by high performance liquid chromatography using UV detection. Using average values for the three modes of operation (1000, 1500, and 2000 rpm) benzaldehyde showed a reduction on the emission (-3.4% for B2, -5.3% for B5, -5.7% for B10, and -6.9% for B20) and all other carbonyls showed a significative increase: 2.6, 7.3, 17.6, and 35.5% for formaldehyde; 1.4, 2.5, 5.4, and 15.8% for acetaldehyde; 2.1, 5.4, 11.1, and 22.0% for acrolein+acetone; 0.8, 2.7, 4.6, and 10.0% for propionaldehyde; 3.3, 7.8, 16.0, and 26.0% for butyraldehyde.

  6. Diesel autothermal reforming with hydrogen peroxide for low-oxygen environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Gwangwoo; Lee, Sangho; Bae, Joongmyeon

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The concept of diesel reforming using hydrogen peroxide was newly proposed. • Characteristics of hydrogen peroxide was experimentally investigated. • Thermodynamically possible operating conditions were analyzed. • Catalytic performance of Ni–Ru/CGO for various diesel compounds was evaluated. • Long-term testing was successfully conducted using Korean commercial diesel. - Abstract: To operate fuel cells effectively in low-oxygen environments, such as in submarines and unmanned underwater vehicles, a hydrogen source with high hydrogen storage density is required. In this paper, diesel autothermal reforming (ATR) with hydrogen peroxide as an alternative oxidant is proposed as a hydrogen production method. Diesel fuel has higher hydrogen density than metal hydrides or other hydrocarbons. In addition, hydrogen peroxide can decompose into steam and oxygen, which are required for diesel ATR. Moreover, both diesel fuel and hydrogen peroxide are liquid states, enabling easy storage for submarine applications. Hydrogen peroxide exhibited the same characteristics as steam and oxygen when used as an oxidant in diesel reforming when pre-decomposition method was used. The thermodynamically calculated operating conditions were a steam-to-carbon ratio (SCR) of 3.0, an oxygen-to-carbon ratio (OCR) of 0.5, and temperatures below 700 °C to account for safety issues associated with hydrogen peroxide use and exothermic reactions. Catalytic activity and stability tests over Ni–Ru (19.5–0.5 wt.%)/Ce 0.9 Gd 0.1 O 2−x were conducted using various diesel compounds. Furthermore, long-term diesel ATR tests were conducted for 200 h using Korean commercial diesel. The degradation rate was 3.67%/100 h without the production of ethylene

  7. High atmosphere–ocean exchange of semivolatile aromatic hydrocarbons

    KAUST Repository

    González-Gaya, Belén

    2016-05-16

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and other semivolatile aromatic-like compounds, are an important and ubiquitous fraction of organic matter in the environment. The occurrence of semivolatile aromatic hydrocarbons is due to anthropogenic sources such as incomplete combustion of fossil fuels or oil spills, and other biogenic sources. However, their global transport, fate and relevance for the carbon cycle have been poorly assessed, especially in terms of fluxes. Here we report a global assessment of the occurrence and atmosphere-ocean fluxes of 64 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons analysed in paired atmospheric and seawater samples from the tropical and subtropical Atlantic, Pacific and Indian oceans. The global atmospheric input of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons to the global ocean is estimated at 0.09 Tg per month, four times greater than the input from the Deepwater Horizon spill. Moreover, the environmental concentrations of total semivolatile aromatic-like compounds were 10 2 -10 3 times higher than those of the targeted polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, with a relevant contribution of an aromatic unresolved complex mixture. These concentrations drive a large global deposition of carbon, estimated at 400 Tg C yr -1, around 15% of the oceanic CO2 uptake. © 2016 Macmillan Publishers Limited.

  8. Diesel characterization by high-resolution mass spectrometry - gas chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldrich, C.A

    1998-01-01

    High-resolution mass spectrometry-gas chromatography is combined with the HC22 method in order to obtain detailed information about the chemical composition of diesel and the distribution of different compound types in terms of its final boiling temperature from a single analysis. The total time elapsed from sample injection and signal processing to obtain final results is 90 minutes. This fact makes this methodology a new and very important tool for the decision making process concerning the most suitable final boiling temperature and the type of treatment of the product in order to obtain diesel that fulfills the international standards. The consistency and repeatability of the experimental results are demonstrated

  9. Utilization of Variable Consumption Biofuel in Diesel Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markov, V. A.; Kamaltdinov, V. G.; Savastenko, A. A.

    2018-01-01

    The depletion of oil fields and the deteriorating environmental situation leads to the need for the search of new alternative sources of energy. Actuality of the article due to the need for greater use of the alternative fuels in internal combustion engines is necessary. The advantages of vegetables origin fuels using as engine fuels are shown. Diesel engine operation on mixtures of petroleum diesel and rapeseed oil is researched. A fuel delivery system of mixture biofuel with a control system of the fuel compound is considered. The results of the system experimental researches of fuel delivery of mixture biofuel are led.

  10. Parametric performance of a turbojet engine combustor using jet A and A diesel fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butze, H. F.; Humenik, F. M.

    1979-01-01

    The performance of a single-can JT8D combustor was evaluated with Jet A and a high-aromatic diesel fuel over a parametric range of combustor-inlet conditions. Performance parameters investigated were combustion efficiency, emissions of CO, unburned hydrocarbons, and NOx, as well as liner temperatures and smoke. At all conditions the use of diesel fuel instead of Jet A resulted in increases in smoke numbers and liner temperatures; gaseous emissions, on the other hand, did not differ significantly between the two fuels.

  11. BIOMarkers for occupational diesel exhaust exposure monitoring (BIOMODEM)--a study in underground mining

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheepers, P T J; Coggon, D; Knudsen, Lisbeth E.

    2002-01-01

    Methods for the assessment of exposures to diesel exhaust were evaluated, including various biomarkers of internal exposure and early biological effects. The impact of possible biomarkers of susceptibility was also explored. Underground workers (drivers of diesel-powered excavators) at an oil shale...... mine in Estonia were compared with surface workers. Personal exposures to particle-associated 1-nitropyrene (NP) were some eight times higher underground than on the surface. Underground miners were also occupationally exposed to benzene and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, as indicated by excretion...

  12. Chemical characterization of the acid alteration of diesel fuel: Non-targeted analysis by two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled with time-of-flight mass spectrometry with tile-based Fisher ratio and combinatorial threshold determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Brendon A; Pinkerton, David K; Wright, Bob W; Synovec, Robert E

    2016-04-01

    The illicit chemical alteration of petroleum fuels is of keen interest, particularly to regulatory agencies that set fuel specifications, or taxes/credits based on those specifications. One type of alteration is the reaction of diesel fuel with concentrated sulfuric acid. Such reactions are known to subtly alter the chemical composition of the fuel, particularly the aromatic species native to the fuel. Comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC×GC-TOFMS) is well suited for the analysis of diesel fuel, but may provide the analyst with an overwhelming amount of data, particularly in sample-class comparison experiments comprised of many samples. Tile-based Fisher-ratio (F-ratio) analysis reduces the abundance of data in a GC×GC-TOFMS experiment to only the peaks which significantly distinguish the unaltered and acid altered sample classes. Three samples of diesel fuel from differently branded filling stations were each altered to discover chemical features, i.e., analyte peaks, which were consistently changed by the acid reaction. Using different fuels prioritizes the discovery of features likely to be robust to the variation present between fuel samples and may consequently be useful in determining whether an unknown sample has been acid altered. The subsequent analysis confirmed that aromatic species are removed by the acid alteration, with the degree of removal consistent with predicted reactivity toward electrophilic aromatic sulfonation. Additionally, we observed that alkenes and alkynes were also removed from the fuel, and that sulfur dioxide or compounds that degrade to sulfur dioxide are generated by the acid alteration. In addition to applying the previously reported tile-based F-ratio method, this report also expands null distribution analysis to algorithmically determine an F-ratio threshold to confidently select only the features which are sufficiently class-distinguishing. When applied to the acid

  13. Chemical characterization of the acid alteration of diesel fuel: Non-targeted analysis by two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled with time-of-flight mass spectrometry with tile-based Fisher ratio and combinatorial threshold determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parsons, Brendon A.; Pinkerton, David K.; Wright, Bob W.; Synovec, Robert E.

    2016-04-01

    The illicit chemical alteration of petroleum fuels is of scientific interest, particularly to regulatory agencies which set fuel specifications, or excises based on those specifications. One type of alteration is the reaction of diesel fuel with concentrated sulfuric acid. Such reactions are known to subtly alter the chemical composition of the fuel, particularly the aromatic species native to the fuel. Comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC × GC–TOFMS) is ideally suited for the analysis of diesel fuel, but may provide the analyst with an overwhelming amount of data, particularly in sample-class comparison experiments comprised of many samples. The tile-based Fisher-ratio (F-ratio) method reduces the abundance of data in a GC × GC–TOFMS experiment to only the peaks which significantly distinguish the unaltered and acid altered sample classes. Three samples of diesel fuel from different filling stations were each altered to discover chemical features, i.e., analyte peaks, which were consistently changed by the acid reaction. Using different fuels prioritizes the discovery of features which are likely to be robust to the variation present between fuel samples and which will consequently be useful in determining whether an unknown sample has been acid altered. The subsequent analysis confirmed that aromatic species are removed by the acid alteration, with the degree of removal consistent with predicted reactivity toward electrophilic aromatic sulfonation. Additionally, we observed that alkenes and alkynes were also removed from the fuel, and that sulfur dioxide or compounds that degrade to sulfur dioxide are generated by the acid alteration. In addition to applying the previously reported tile-based F-ratio method, this report also expands null distribution analysis to algorithmically determine an F-ratio threshold to confidently select only the features which are sufficiently class-distinguishing. When

  14. Production of Renewable Diesel Fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Vegetable oils have been investigated as a way to provide a renewable source for diesel fuel. A successful approach to using : vegetable oils in diesel engines has been transesterification of the oils with simple alcohols to produce mono-alkyl esters...

  15. The Evolution of Diesel Engines

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The origin of diesel engines is intimately related to the history of .... history of technology. Industry applauded by taking to the manu- facture of diesel engines in various sizes. Many of them continue to do so to this day, more than a century later. ... now called computers, could be used to simulate the air-cycle in the cylinder ...

  16. Diesel and gas engines: evolution facing new regulations; Moteurs diesel et gaz: evolution face aux nouvelles reglementations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daverat, Ph. [Bergetat Monnoyeur (France)

    1997-12-31

    This paper analyzes the influence of new pollution regulations on the new design of diesel and gas engines with the example of Caterpillar`s experience, one of the leaders of diesel and gas engines manufacturers worldwide. The technical problems to solve are introduced first (reduction of NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2}, CO, unburned compounds and dusts), and then the evolution of engines and of exhaust gas treatment systems are described (fuel injection systems, combustion and ignition control, sensors, catalytic conversion and filtering systems). (J.S.)

  17. Scanning electron-microscopic and X-ray-microanalytic observation of diesel-emission particles associated with mutagenicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakashima, K.; Yoshitsugu, K.; Tokiwa, H.; Fukuoka Environmental Research Center

    1983-01-01

    The particles formed by diesel combustion, which may contain various mutagenic chemicals like polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), are analyzed in their morphology by scanning electron microscopy; their sulfur content is detected by X-ray microanalysis, and mutagenicity is tested with a Salmonella typhimurium bioassay. The authors find a close correlation between sulfur content and mutagenicity of PAH. (Auth.)

  18. Alternative Diesel from Waste Plastics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stella Bezergianni

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The long term ambition of energy security and solidarity, coupled with the environmental concerns of problematic waste accumulation, is addressed via the proposed waste-to-fuel technology. Plastic waste is converted into automotive diesel fuel via a two-step thermochemical process based on pyrolysis and hydrotreatment. Plastic waste was pyrolyzed in a South East Asia plant rendering pyrolysis oil, which mostly consisted of middle-distillate (naphtha and diesel hydrocarbons. The diesel fraction (170–370 °C was fractionated, and its further upgrade was assessed in a hydroprocessing pilot plant at the Centre for Research and Technology Hellas (CERTH in Greece. The final fuel was evaluated with respect to the diesel fuel quality specifications EN 590, which characterized it as a promising alternative diesel pool component with excellent ignition quality characteristics and low back end volatility.

  19. Effect of biodiesel fuel on "real-world", nonroad heavy duty diesel engine particulate matter emissions, composition and cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Nathan; Lombard, Melissa; Jensen, Kirk R; Kelley, Patrick; Pratt, Tara; Traviss, Nora

    2017-05-15

    Biodiesel is regarded by many as a "greener" alternative fuel to petroleum diesel with potentially lower health risk. However, recent studies examining biodiesel particulate matter (PM) characteristics and health effects are contradictive, and typically utilize PM generated by passenger car engines in laboratory settings. There is a critical need to analyze diesel and biodiesel PM generated in a "real-world" setting where heavy duty-diesel (HDD) engines and commercially purchased fuel are utilized. This study compares the mass concentrations, chemical composition and cytotoxicity of real-world PM from combustion of both petroleum diesel and a waste grease 20% biodiesel blend (B20) at a community recycling center operating HDD nonroad equipment. PM was analyzed for metals, elemental/organic carbon (EC/OC), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and nitro-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (N-PAHs). Cytotoxicity in a human lung epithelial cell line (BEAS-2B) following 24h exposure to the real-world particles was also evaluated. On average, higher concentrations for both EC and OC were measured in diesel PM. B20 PM contained significantly higher levels of Cu and Mo whereas diesel PM contained significantly higher concentrations of Pb. Principal component analysis determined Mo, Cu, and Ni were the metals with the greatest loading factor, suggesting a unique pattern related to the B20 fuel source. Total PAH concentration during diesel fuel use was 1.9 times higher than during B20 operations; however, total N-PAH concentration was 3.3 times higher during B20 use. Diesel PM cytotoxicity was 8.5 times higher than B20 PM (pengine sources of metals, PAH and N-PAH species, comparing tailpipe PM vs. PM collected inside the equipment cabin. Results suggest PM generated from burning petroleum diesel in nonroad engines may be more harmful to human health, but the links between exposure, composition and toxicity are not straightforward. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  20. 150 years of Rudolf Diesel; 150 Jahre Rudolf Diesel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basshuysen, R. van; Siebenpfeiffer, W. (eds.)

    2008-03-15

    'My engine is still making great progress', Rudolf Diesel wrote in a letter to his wife on 3 July 1895. The fact that Diesel's statement still holds true can be seen every day on our roads and at sea. But it is equally true that the idea of this eccentric and doubter who wanted to dedicate himself with an over-inflated self-belief to the welfare of humanity, needed a certain time to take a form that others could recognise in order to continuously refine this life's work. Diesel himself did not live to see most of the milestones that were repeatedly set thanks to his engine. It was not until 23 years after his unexplained death in 1913 that people were able to buy the first passenger car to be equipped with a diesel engine - with a top speed of 90 km/h. Today, diesel cars can easily reach speeds of up to 300 km/h, and even if there is little point in such excessive speeds outside racetracks like Le Mans, they are nevertheless clear evidence of the incredible evolution of the noisy, smoky truck engine to a high-tech racing power unit, from the ear-splitting rattle of the pre-chamber diesel to the highly refined, soot-free, common-rail diesel engine of today. The Publisher hopes you enjoy reading this unique progress report. (orig.)

  1. Sixth international wind-diesel workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    At a workshop on hybrid wind/diesel power generation systems, papers were presented on international research programs, demonstration projects, wind/diesel deployment strategies and requirements, wind/diesel market development and economics, wind turbine design requirements, and wind/diesel models and analytical tools. Separate abstracts have been prepared for 11 papers from this workshop

  2. Sixth international wind-diesel workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-01-01

    At a workshop on hybrid wind/diesel power generation systems, papers were presented on international research programs, demonstration projects, wind/diesel deployment strategies and requirements, wind/diesel market development and economics, wind turbine design requirements, and wind/diesel models and analytical tools. Separate abstracts have been prepared for 11 papers from this workshop.

  3. Microbial Degradation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons and Characterization of Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikilili, P. V.; Chirwa, E. M. N.

    2010-01-01

    Biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons was studied. Naphthalene was used as a model compound to represent these compounds. Low initial concentrations of naphthalene in a range of 30-60 mg/L were completely degraded after incubation for 15 hrs by consortia from a landfill soil while consortia from minewater took more that 29 hrs to reach complete degradation.

  4. Birds and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albers, P.H.

    2006-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are present throughout the global environment and are produced naturally and by activities of humans. Effects of PAH on birds have been determined by studies employing egg injection, egg immersion, egg shell application, single and multiple oral doses, subcutaneous injection, and chemical analysis of field-collected eggs and tissue. The four-to six-ring aromatic compounds are the most toxic to embryos, young birds, and adult birds. For embryos, effects include death, developmental abnormalities, and a variety of cellular and biochemical responses. For adult and young birds, effects include reduced egg production and hatching, increased clutch or brood abandonment, reduced growth, increased organweights, and a variety of biochemical responses. Trophic level accumulation is unlikely. Environmental exposure to PAH in areas of high human population or habitats affected by recent petroleum spills might be sufficient to adversely affect reproduction. Evidence of long-term effects of elevated concentrations of environmental PAH on bird populations is very limited and the mechanisms of effect are unclear.

  5. Quality characteristics of alternative diesel from hydrotreatment of used frying oils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karonis, Dimitrios; Chilari, Despina [National Technical Univ. of Athens (Greece). Lab. of Fuels Technology and Lubricants; Bezergianni, Stella [Center for Research and Technology Hellas (CERTH), Thessaloniki (Greece). Lab. of Environmental Fuels and Hydrocarbons (LEFH)

    2013-06-01

    This paper examines the properties of alternative diesel fuel that is derived from the hydrotreatment of used frying oils (UFO). Used frying oil is a difficult feedstock for biodiesel production. The hydrotreating of UFO converts triglycerides mainly into normal paraffins in the diesel fuel range. The results obtained show that the use of hydrotreated UFO has many advantages in comparison conventional diesel. Particularly, this renewable fuel has an excellent cetane number and cetane index (> 90) justified from its paraffinic character. Furthermore, this finding complies with the lower value of density in comparison to diesel, reinforcing the paraffinic nature of this fuel, comprising straight chain alkanes and negligible content of aromatic hydrocarbons in its composition. Due to the hydrotreating, these fuels do not contain olefinic bonds, therefore they are resistant to oxidation, permitting long term storage abilities. Despite these benefits, there are some considerations from the use of HFOs. Hydrotreating is a process which successfully removes heteroatoms such as S, N, O and eliminates the existence of double unstable bonds, rendering to fuel appreciable characteristics. Unfortunately, these high ignition quality oils suffer from lower lubricity and worse cold flow properties in comparison to diesel, making their use during winter period inevitable. These problems could be addressed by blending hydrotreated UFO with regular diesel. A compromise should be found in order to promote a renewable fuel with lower cetane number but with much better lubricity in order to meet the EN 590 European Standard regarding the main quality characteristics of the final fuel. (orig.)

  6. Safety in the Chemical Laboratory: Nitric Acid, Nitrates, and Nitro Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bretherick, Leslie

    1989-01-01

    Discussed are the potential hazards associated with nitric acid, inorganic and organic nitrate salts, alkyl nitrates, acyl nitrates, aliphatic nitro compounds, aromatic nitro compounds, and nitration reactions. (CW)

  7. Development of high temperature liquid lubricants for low-heat rejection heavy duty diesel engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiczynski, T.A.; Marolewski, T.A.

    1993-03-01

    Objective was to develop a liquid lubricant that will allow advanced diesel engines to operate at top ring reversal temperatures approaching 500 C and lubricant sump temperatures approaching 250 C. Base stock screening showed that aromatic esters and diesters has the lowest deposit level, compared to polyol esters, poly-alpha-olefins, or refined mineral oil of comparable viscosity. Classical aryl and alkyl ZDP antiwear additives are ineffective in reducing wear with aromatic esters; the phosphate ester was a much better antiwear additive, and polyol esters are more amenable to ZDP treatment. Zeolites and clays were evaluated for filtration.

  8. Development of a diesel substitute fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiter, Anton; Mair-Zelenka, Philipp [Graz Univ. of Technology (Austria). Inst. of Chemical Engineering and Environmental Technology; Zeymer, Marc [OMV Refining and Marketing GmbH, Vienna (Austria). MRDI-D Product Development and Innovation

    2013-06-01

    Substitute fuels composed of few real chemical compounds are an alternative characterisation approach for conventional fuels as opposed to the traditional pseudo-component method. With the algorithm proposed in this paper the generation of such substitutes will be facilitated and well-established thermodynamic methods can be applied for physical property-data prediction. Based on some quality criteria like true boiling-point curve, liquid density, C/H ratio, or cloud point of a target fuel a surrogate which meets these properties is determined by fitting its composition. The application and capabilities of the algorithm developed are demonstrated by means of an exemplary diesel substitute fuel. The substitute mixture obtained can be generated and used for evaluation of property-prediction methods. Furthermore this approach can help to understand the effects of mixing fossil fuels with biogenic compounds. (orig.)

  9. A poluição gerada por máquinas de combustão interna movidas à diesel - a questão dos particulados. Estratégias atuais para a redução e controle das emissões e tendências futuras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Braun Silvana

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The exhaust emissions of vehicles greatly contribute to environmental pollution. Diesel engines are extremely fuel-efficient. However, the exhaust compounds emitted by diesel engines are both a health hazard and a nuisance to the public. This paper gives an overview of the emission control of particulates from diesel exhaust compounds. The worldwide emission standards are summarized. Possible devices for reducing diesel pollutants are discussed. It is clear that after-treatment devices are necessary. Catalytic converters that collect particulates from diesel exhaust and promote the catalytic burn-off are examined. Finally, recent trends in diesel particulate emission control by novel catalysts are presented.

  10. Superconductivity in aromatic hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubozono, Yoshihiro, E-mail: kubozono@cc.okayama-u.ac.jp [Research Laboratory for Surface Science, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Research Center of New Functional Materials for Energy Production, Storage and Transport, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency, ACT-C, Kawaguchi 332-0012 (Japan); Goto, Hidenori; Jabuchi, Taihei [Research Laboratory for Surface Science, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Yokoya, Takayoshi [Research Laboratory for Surface Science, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Research Center of New Functional Materials for Energy Production, Storage and Transport, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Kambe, Takashi [Department of Physics, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Sakai, Yusuke; Izumi, Masanari; Zheng, Lu; Hamao, Shino; Nguyen, Huyen L.T. [Research Laboratory for Surface Science, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Sakata, Masafumi; Kagayama, Tomoko; Shimizu, Katsuya [Center of Science and Technology under Extreme Conditions, Osaka University, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Aromatic superconductor is one of core research subjects in superconductivity. Superconductivity is observed in certain metal-doped aromatic hydrocarbons. Some serious problems to be solved exist for future advancement of the research. This article shows the present status of aromatic superconductors. - Abstract: ‘Aromatic hydrocarbon’ implies an organic molecule that satisfies the (4n + 2) π-electron rule and consists of benzene rings. Doping solid aromatic hydrocarbons with metals provides the superconductivity. The first discovery of such superconductivity was made for K-doped picene (K{sub x}picene, five benzene rings). Its superconducting transition temperatures (T{sub c}’s) were 7 and 18 K. Recently, we found a new superconducting K{sub x}picene phase with a T{sub c} as high as 14 K, so we now know that K{sub x}picene possesses multiple superconducting phases. Besides K{sub x}picene, we discovered new superconductors such as Rb{sub x}picene and Ca{sub x}picene. A most serious problem is that the shielding fraction is ⩽15% for K{sub x}picene and Rb{sub x}picene, and it is often ∼1% for other superconductors. Such low shielding fractions have made it difficult to determine the crystal structures of superconducting phases. Nevertheless, many research groups have expended a great deal of effort to make high quality hydrocarbon superconductors in the five years since the discovery of hydrocarbon superconductivity. At the present stage, superconductivity is observed in certain metal-doped aromatic hydrocarbons (picene, phenanthrene and dibenzopentacene), but the shielding fraction remains stubbornly low. The highest priority research area is to prepare aromatic superconductors with a high superconducting volume-fraction. Despite these difficulties, aromatic superconductivity is still a core research target and presents interesting and potentially breakthrough challenges, such as the positive pressure dependence of T{sub c} that is clearly

  11. Diesel spray characterization; Dieselmoottorin polttoainesuihkujen ominaisuudet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitkaenen, J.; Turunen, R.; Paloposki, T.; Rantanen, P.; Virolainen, T. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Otaniemi (Finland). Internal Combustion Engine Lab.

    1997-10-01

    Fuel injection of diesel engines will be studied using large-scale models of fuel injectors. The advantage of large-scale models is that the measurement of large-scale diesel sprays will be easier than the measurement of actual sprays. The objective is to study the break-up mechanism of diesel sprays and to measure drop size distributions in the inner part of the spray. The results will be used in the development of diesel engines and diesel fuels. (orig.)

  12. Practical testing of diesel generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angle, C.W.; Meyer, S.P.

    1985-01-01

    The testing of diesel generators is a very important facet of the safe operation of nuclear power plants. Improper testing can lead to increased failures and unavailability of the engines resulting in a reduced safety factor for a nuclear plant. For a testing program to be successful it must be well planned and effectively implemented. In addition, inspections and maintenance activities also impact diesel generator availability. This paper describes elements of a suggested diesel generator testing program as well as some of the pitfalls to be avoided

  13. Particulate matter from both heavy fuel oil and diesel fuel shipping emissions show strong biological effects on human lung cells at realistic and comparable in vitro exposure conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Oeder

    Full Text Available Ship engine emissions are important with regard to lung and cardiovascular diseases especially in coastal regions worldwide. Known cellular responses to combustion particles include oxidative stress and inflammatory signalling.To provide a molecular link between the chemical and physical characteristics of ship emission particles and the cellular responses they elicit and to identify potentially harmful fractions in shipping emission aerosols.Through an air-liquid interface exposure system, we exposed human lung cells under realistic in vitro conditions to exhaust fumes from a ship engine running on either common heavy fuel oil (HFO or cleaner-burning diesel fuel (DF. Advanced chemical analyses of the exhaust aerosols were combined with transcriptional, proteomic and metabolomic profiling including isotope labelling methods to characterise the lung cell responses.The HFO emissions contained high concentrations of toxic compounds such as metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, and were higher in particle mass. These compounds were lower in DF emissions, which in turn had higher concentrations of elemental carbon ("soot". Common cellular reactions included cellular stress responses and endocytosis. Reactions to HFO emissions were dominated by oxidative stress and inflammatory responses, whereas DF emissions induced generally a broader biological response than HFO emissions and affected essential cellular pathways such as energy metabolism, protein synthesis, and chromatin modification.Despite a lower content of known toxic compounds, combustion particles from the clean shipping fuel DF influenced several essential pathways of lung cell metabolism more strongly than particles from the unrefined fuel HFO. This might be attributable to a higher soot content in DF. Thus the role of diesel soot, which is a known carcinogen in acute air pollution-induced health effects should be further investigated. For the use of HFO and DF we recommend a

  14. Particulate Matter from Both Heavy Fuel Oil and Diesel Fuel Shipping Emissions Show Strong Biological Effects on Human Lung Cells at Realistic and Comparable In Vitro Exposure Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilger, Marco; Paur, Hanns-Rudolf; Schlager, Christoph; Mülhopt, Sonja; Diabaté, Silvia; Weiss, Carsten; Stengel, Benjamin; Rabe, Rom; Harndorf, Horst; Torvela, Tiina; Jokiniemi, Jorma K.; Hirvonen, Maija-Riitta; Schmidt-Weber, Carsten; Traidl-Hoffmann, Claudia; BéruBé, Kelly A.; Wlodarczyk, Anna J.; Prytherch, Zoë; Michalke, Bernhard; Krebs, Tobias; Prévôt, André S. H.; Kelbg, Michael; Tiggesbäumker, Josef; Karg, Erwin; Jakobi, Gert; Scholtes, Sorana; Schnelle-Kreis, Jürgen; Lintelmann, Jutta; Matuschek, Georg; Sklorz, Martin; Klingbeil, Sophie; Orasche, Jürgen; Richthammer, Patrick; Müller, Laarnie; Elsasser, Michael; Reda, Ahmed; Gröger, Thomas; Weggler, Benedikt; Schwemer, Theo; Czech, Hendryk; Rüger, Christopher P.; Abbaszade, Gülcin; Radischat, Christian; Hiller, Karsten; Buters, Jeroen T. M.; Dittmar, Gunnar; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Background Ship engine emissions are important with regard to lung and cardiovascular diseases especially in coastal regions worldwide. Known cellular responses to combustion particles include oxidative stress and inflammatory signalling. Objectives To provide a molecular link between the chemical and physical characteristics of ship emission particles and the cellular responses they elicit and to identify potentially harmful fractions in shipping emission aerosols. Methods Through an air-liquid interface exposure system, we exposed human lung cells under realistic in vitro conditions to exhaust fumes from a ship engine running on either common heavy fuel oil (HFO) or cleaner-burning diesel fuel (DF). Advanced chemical analyses of the exhaust aerosols were combined with transcriptional, proteomic and metabolomic profiling including isotope labelling methods to characterise the lung cell responses. Results The HFO emissions contained high concentrations of toxic compounds such as metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, and were higher in particle mass. These compounds were lower in DF emissions, which in turn had higher concentrations of elemental carbon (“soot”). Common cellular reactions included cellular stress responses and endocytosis. Reactions to HFO emissions were dominated by oxidative stress and inflammatory responses, whereas DF emissions induced generally a broader biological response than HFO emissions and affected essential cellular pathways such as energy metabolism, protein synthesis, and chromatin modification. Conclusions Despite a lower content of known toxic compounds, combustion particles from the clean shipping fuel DF influenced several essential pathways of lung cell metabolism more strongly than particles from the unrefined fuel HFO. This might be attributable to a higher soot content in DF. Thus the role of diesel soot, which is a known carcinogen in acute air pollution-induced health effects should be further investigated. For the

  15. Push-pull vs captodative aromaticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shainyan, Bagrat A; Fettke, Anja; Kleinpeter, Erich

    2008-10-30

    Vinylogs of fulvalenes with cyclopropenyl and cyclopentadienyl moieties attached either to different carbon atoms ( c-C 3H 2CHCHC 5H 4- c, 7) or to the same carbon atom [XC( c-C 3H 2)( c-C 5H 4), 10] [X = CH 2; C(CN) 2; C(NH 2) 2; C(OCH 2) 2; O; c-C 3H 2; c-C 5H 4; SiH 2; CCl 2] of the double bond inserted between the two rings are examined theoretically at the B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) level. Both types of compounds are shown to possess aromaticity, which was called "push-pull" and "captodative" aromaticity, respectively. For the captodative mesoionic structures XC( c-C 3H 2)( c-C 5H 4), the presence of both the two aromatic moieties and the CC double bond is the necessary and sufficient condition for their existence as energetic minima on the potential energy surface. Aromatic stabilization energy (ASE) was assessed by the use of homodesmotic reactions and heats of hydrogenation. Spatial magnetic criteria (through space NMR shieldings, TSNMRS) of the two types of vinylogous fulvalenes 7 and 10 have been calculated by the GIAO perturbation method employing the nucleus independent chemical shift (NICS) concept of Paul von Rague Schleyer, and visualized as iso-chemical-shielding surfaces (ICSS) of various sizes and directions. TSNMRS values can be successfully employed to visualize and quantify the partial push-pull and captodative aromaticity of both the three- and five-membered ring moieties. In addition, the push -pull effect in compounds 7 and 10 could be quantified by the occupation quotient pi* CC/pi CC of the double bond inserted between the two rings.

  16. Aromatization of 16alpha-hydroxyandrostenedione by human placental microsomes: effect of preincubation with suicide substrates of androstenedione aromatization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numazawa, Mitsuteru; Tachibana, Mii; Mutsumi, Ayako; Yoshimura, Akiko; Osawa, Yoshio

    2002-06-01

    Estrogen synthase (aromatase) catalyzes the aromatization of androstenedione (AD) as well as 16alpha-hydroxyandrostenedione (16alpha-OHAD) leading to estrone and estriol, respectively. We found that several steroid analogs including 4-hydroxyandrostenedione (1), 6-oxoandrostenedione (6-oxoAD, 2) and its 19-hydroxy analog (3), 10beta-acetoxyestr-5-ene-7,17-dione (4), androst-5-ene-4,7,17-trione (5), and 17alpha-ethynyl-19-norteststerone (6), which are known suicide inactivators of AD aromatization, are not effective in inactivating 16alpha-OHAD aromatization in a time-dependent manner. The compounds were tested with the use of human placental microsomes and 1beta-tritiated-16alpha-OHAD as the substrate. The results of the tritium water method of 16alpha-OHAD aromatization was confirmed by the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method of estriol formation. The 1beta-tritiated-AD was used to measure AD aromatization as a positive control for these experiments. The compounds were tested at concentrations up to 40-fold higher than the K(i)'s determined for inhibition of AD aromatization. These studies suggest that differences exist in the binding site structures responsible for aromatization of 16alpha-OHAD and AD.

  17. Catalytic synthesis of diesel from syngas: Theoretical and practical aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalid, N.; Saeed, M.M.

    2013-01-01

    The world energy needs have been increasing tremendously resulting in the depletion of the resources of fossil fuel and increase in the prices of crude oil. To meet the required needs or decrease the dependency at least in parts, the attention of the scientists is being focused on the generation of alternate sources for the diesel fuel and other valued products. The catalytic based Fisher-Tropsch process for the generation of liquid chemicals, specially the diesel fuels from syngas is gaining attention since the products formed are of relatively low cost, high quality and environmental friendly due to low aromaticity and sulphur contents. Two main characteristics of the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) are the unavoidable production of a wide range of hydrocarbon products (olefins, paraffins, and oxygenated products) and the liberation of large amount of heat from the highly exothermic synthesis reactions. FT synthesis products are influenced by various factors like temperature and pressure of syngas, nature of the catalyst, and the type of reactors. All these parameters are discussed by focusing special attention to the synthesis of cobalt catalyst for the production of diesel fuel. (author)

  18. Diesel Engine Tribology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Christian Kim

    Recent years have seen an increase in the wear rate of engine bearings, subsequently followed by bearing failure, for the large two-stroke diesel engines used for ship propulsion. Here, the engine bearings include main, big end and crosshead bearings, with the bearing type used being the journal...... bearing, belonging to the class of ‘hydrodynamic bearings’. This implies that the load carrying capacity is generated by a relative movement of the involved components, i.e. avelocity-driven operation. For the engine application, the velocity stems from the engine RPM. However, to comply with the latest...... emission requirements as well as attempting to minimise fuel expenses, the engine speed has been lowered together with an increase in the engine mean pressure which in terms lead to larger bearing loads. With worsened operating conditions from two sides, the encountered problems are understandable...

  19. Biodegradation and corrosion behavior of manganese oxidizer Bacillus cereus ACE4 in diesel transporting pipeline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajasekar, A.; Ganesh Babu, T.; Karutha Pandian, S.; Maruthamuthu, S.; Palaniswamy, N.; Rajendran, A.

    2007-01-01

    The degradation problem of petroleum products arises since hydrocarbon acts as an excellent food source for a wide variety of microorganisms. Microbial activity leads to unacceptable level of turbidity, corrosion of pipeline and souring of stored product. The present study emphasizes the role of Bacillus cereus ACE4 on degradation of diesel and its influence on corrosion of API 5LX steel. A demonstrating bacterial strain ACE4 was isolated from corrosion products and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis showed that it has more than 99% similarity with B. cereus. The biodegradation and corrosion studies revealed that B. cereus degraded the aliphatic protons and aromatic protons in diesel and is capable of oxidizing ferrous/manganese into oxides. This is the first report that discloses the involvement of manganese oxidizer B. cereus ACE4 on biodegradation of diesel and its influence on corrosion in a tropical country pipeline

  20. Emissions from Diesel and Gasoline Vehicles Fuelled by Fischer-Tropsch Fuels and Similar Fuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Ulrik; Lundorff, Peter; Ivarsson, Anders

    2007-01-01

    The described investigation was carried out under the umbrella of IEA Advanced Motor Fuels Agreement. The purpose was to evaluate the emissions of carbon monoxide (CO), unburned hydrocarbons (HC), nitrogen oxides (NOx), particulate matter (PM) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) from...... vehicles fuelled by Fischer Tropsch (FT) based diesel and gasoline fuel, compared to the emissions from ordinary diesel and gasoline. The comparison for diesel fuels was based on a literature review, whereas the gasoline comparison had to be based on our own experiments, since almost no references were...... found in this field. In this context measurement according to the Federal Test Procedure (FTP) and the New European Driving Cycle (NEDC) were carried out on a chassis dynamometer with a directly injected gasoline vehicle. Experiments were carried out with a reference fuel, a fuel based 70% on FT...

  1. Detection of catabolic genes in indigenous microbial consortia isolated from a diesel-contaminated soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milcic-Terzic, J.; Saval, S.; Lopez-Vidal, Y.; Vrvic, M.M.

    2001-01-01

    Bioremediation is often used for in situ remediation of petroleum-contaminated sites. The primary focus of this study was on understanding the indigenous microbial community which can survive in contaminated environment and is responsible for the degradation. Diesel, toluene and naphthalene-degrading microbial consortia were isolated from diesel-contaminated soil by growing on selective hydrocarbon substrates. The presence and frequency of the catabolic genes responsible for aromatic hydrocarbon biodegradation (xylE, ndoB) within the isolated consortia were screened using polymerase chain reaction PCR and DNA-DNA colony hybridization. The diesel DNA-extract possessed both the xylE catabolic gene for toluene, and the nah catabolic gene for polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon degradation. The toluene DNA-extract possessed only the xylE catabolic gene, while the naphthalene DNA-extract only the ndoB gene. Restriction enzyme analysis with HaeIII indicated similar restriction patterns for the xylE gene fragment between toluene DNA-extract and a type strain, Pseudomonas putida ATCC 23973. A substantial proportion (74%) of the colonies from the diesel-consortium possessed the xylE gene, and the ndoB gene (78%), while a minority (29%) of the toluene-consortium harbored the xylE gene. 59% of the colonies from the naphthalene-consortium had the ndoB gene, and did not have the xylE gene. These results indicate that the microbial population has been naturally enriched in organisms carrying genes for aromatic hydrocarbon degradation and that significant aromatic biodegradative potential exists at the site. Characterization of the population genotype constitutes a molecular diagnosis which permits the determination of the catabolic potential of the site to degrade the contaminant present. (author)

  2. Pro-aromatic and anti-aromatic π-conjugated molecules: an irresistible wish to be diradicals

    KAUST Repository

    Zeng, Zebing

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 The Royal Society of Chemistry. Aromaticity is an important concept to understand the stability and physical properties of π-conjugated molecules. Recent studies on pro-aromatic and anti-aromatic molecules revealed their irresistible tendency to become diradicals in the ground state. Diradical character thus becomes another very important concept and it is fundamentally correlated to the physical (optical, electronic and magnetic) properties and chemical reactivity of most of the organic optoelectronic materials. Molecules with distinctive diradical character show unique properties which are very different from those of traditional closed-shell π-conjugated systems, and thus they have many potential applications in organic electronics, spintronics, non-linear optics and energy storage. This critical review first introduces the fundamental electronic structure of Kekulé diradicals within the concepts of anti-aromaticity and pro-aromaticity in the context of Hückel aromaticity and diradical character. Then recent research studies on various stable/persistent diradicaloids based on pro-aromatic and anti-aromatic compounds are summarized and discussed with regard to their synthetic chemistry, physical properties, structure-property relationships and potential material applications. A summary and personal perspective is given at the end.

  3. Microbial degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkering, F.; Breure, A.M.; Andel, J.G. van

    1992-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are hazardous compounds originating from oil, tar, creosote, or from incomplete combustion of fossil fuels. Application of biotechnological techniques for remediation of polluted soils from PAH demonstrated that the high molecular compounds are degraded very slowly, and that the residual concentration of PAH often is too high to permit application of the treated soil. Investigations were started to establish process parameters for optimal biodegradation of PAH. The aim is to achieve a relation between the physical properties of PAH and the biodegradation kinetics in different matrices, in order to identify applicability of biotechnological cleanup methods for waste streams and polluted soil. (orig.) [de

  4. Numerical Simulation of PAHs Formation and Effect of Operating Conditions in DI-Diesel Engines Based on a Comprehensive Chemical Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bei-Jing Zhong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional numerical simulations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH formation in a Chaochai 6102bzl direct injection diesel engine are performed. n-Heptane is chosen as the fuel. A detailed mechanism, which includes 108 species and 572 elementary reactions that describe n-heptane oxidation and PAH formation, is proposed. A reduced kinetic mechanism, with only 86 reactions and 57 species, is developed and incorporated into computational fluid dynamics (CFD software for the numerical simulations. Results show that PAHs, which were mostly deposited at the bottom of the diesel combustion chamber wall, first increased and then decreased with the increase in diesel crank angle. Furthermore, the diesel engine operating conditions (intake vortex intensity, intake air pressure, fuel injection advance angle, diesel load, and engine speed had a significant effect on PAH formation.

  5. Modeling Diesel Engine Injector Flows

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Heister, S

    2001-01-01

    Models have been developed to assess flow fields inside diesel injector orifice passages in order to increase our understanding of the spray formation process which governs performance and emissions in these engines...

  6. Noise Optimization in Diesel Engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Narayan

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Euro 6 norms emphasize on reduction of emissions from the engines. New injection methods are being adopted for homogenous mixture formation in diesel engines. During steady state conditions homogenous combustion gave noise levels in lower frequencies. In this work noise produced in a 440 cc diesel engine has been investigated. The engine was run under various operating conditions varying various injection parameters.

  7. Diesel engine management systems and components

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    This reference book provides a comprehensive insight into todays diesel injection systems and electronic control. It focusses on minimizing emissions and exhaust-gas treatment. Innovations by Bosch in the field of diesel-injection technology have made a significant contribution to the diesel boom. Calls for lower fuel consumption, reduced exhaust-gas emissions and quiet engines are making greater demands on the engine and fuel-injection systems. Contents History of the diesel engine.- Areas of use for diesel engines.- Basic principles of the diesel engine.- Fuels: Diesel fuel.- Fuels: Alternative fuels.- Cylinder-charge control systems.- Basic principles of diesel fuel-injection.- Overview of diesel fuel-injection systems.- Fuel supply to the low pressure stage.- Overview of discrete cylinder systems.- Unit injector system.- Unit pump system.- Overview of common-rail systems.- High pressure components of the common-rail system.- Injection nozzles.- Nozzle holders.- High pressure lines.- Start assist systems.-...

  8. On Benzene and Aromaticity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 3; Issue 4. On Benzene and Aromaticity History and Some Folklore. M V Bhatt. General Article Volume 3 Issue 4 April 1998 pp 88-93. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/003/04/0088-0093 ...

  9. COMPARISON OF CLEAN DIESEL BUSES TO CNG BUSES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowell, D.; Parsley, W.; Bush,C; Zupo, D.

    2003-08-24

    Using previously published data on regulated and unregulated emissions, this paper will compare the environmental performance of current generation transit buses operated on compressed natural gas (CNG) to current generation transit buses operated on ultra low sulfur diesel fuel (ULSD) and incorporating diesel particulate filters (DPF). Unregulated emissions evaluated include toxic compounds associated with adverse health effects (carbonyl, PAH, NPAH, benzene) as well as PM particle count and size distribution. For all regulated and unregulated emissions, both technologies are shown to be comparable. DPF equipped diesel buses and CNG buses have virtually identical levels of PM mass emissions and particle number emissions. DPF-equipped diesel buses have lower HC and CO emissions and lower emissions of toxic substances such as benzene, carbonyls and PAHs than CNG buses. CNG buses have lower NOx emissions than DPF-equipped buses, though CNG bus NOx emissions are shown to be much more variable. In addition, this paper will compare the capital and operating costs of CNG and DPF-equipped buses. The cost comparison is primarily based on the experience of MTA New York City Transit in operating CNG buses since 1995 and DPF-equipped buses fueled with ULSD since 2001. Published data on the experience of other large transit agencies in operating CNG buses is used to validate the NYCT experience. The incremental cost (compared to ''baseline'' diesel) of operating a typical 200-bus depot is shown to be six times higher for CNG buses than for ''clean diesel'' buses. The contributors to this increased cost for CNG buses are almost equally split between increased capital costs for purchase of buses and installation of fueling infrastructure, and increased operating costs for purchase of fuel, bus maintenance, and fuel station maintenance.

  10. The unique aromatic catabolic genes in sphingomonads degrading polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinyakong, Onruthai; Habe, Hiroshi; Omori, Toshio

    2003-02-01

    Many members of the sphingomonad genus isolated from different geological areas can degrade a wide variety of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and related compounds. These sphingomonads such as Sphingobium yanoikuyae strain B1, Novosphingobium aromaticivorans strain F199, and Sphingobium sp. strain P2 have been found to possess a unique group of genes for aromatic degradation, which are distantly related with those in pseudomonads and other genera reported so far both in sequence homology and gene organization. Genes for aromatics degradation in these sphingomonads are complexly arranged; the genes necessary for one degradation pathway are scattered through several clusters. These aromatic catabolic gene clusters seem to be conserved among many other sphingomonads such as Sphingobium yanoikuyae strain Q1, Sphingomonas paucimobilis strain TNE12, S. paucimobilis strain EPA505, Sphingobium agrestis strain HV3, and Sphingomonas chungbukensis strain DJ77. Furthermore, some genes for naphthalenesulfonate degradation found in Sphingomonas xenophaga strain BN6 also share a high sequence homology with their homologues found in these sphingomonads. On the other hand, protocatechuic catabolic gene clusters found in fluorene-degrading Sphingomonas sp. strain LB126 appear to be more closely related with those previously found in lignin-degrading S. paucimobilis SYK-6 than the genes in this group of sphingomonads. This review summarizes the information on the distribution of these strains and relationships among their aromatic catabolic genes.

  11. Development and optimisation of a novel three-way extraction technique based on a combination of Soxhlet extraction, membrane assisted solvent extraction and a molecularly imprinted polymer using sludge polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons as model compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ncube, Somandla; Lekoto, Goitsemang; Cukrowska, Ewa; Chimuka, Luke

    2018-02-01

    A novel technique that integrates extraction and clean-up into a single step format is reported as part of the search for new sample preparation techniques in the analysis of persistent organic pollutants from complex samples. This was achieved by combining the extraction efficiency of the Soxhlet extractor, the selectivity of a size exclusion membrane and the specificity of a molecularly imprinted polymer for the extraction of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from wastewater sludge followed by quantitation using gas chromatography with time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The approach is described as the Soxhlet extraction membrane-assisted solvent extraction molecularly imprinted polymer technique. This technique was optimised for various parameters such as extraction solvent, reflux time and membrane acceptor phase. The applicability of the developed technique was optimised using a wastewater sludge certified reference material and then tested on real wastewater sludge samples. The method detection limits ranged from 0.14 to 12.86 ng/g with relative standard deviation values for the extraction of the 16 US-EPA priority polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from wastewater sludge samples ranging from 0.78 to 18%. The extraction process was therefore reproducible and showed remarkable selectivity. The developed technique is a promising prospect that can be applied in the analysis of organic pollutants from complex solid samples. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. On the performance of some aromaticity indices: a critical assessment using a test set.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feixas, Ferran; Matito, Eduard; Poater, Jordi; Solà, Miquel

    2008-07-30

    Aromaticity is a central chemical concept widely used in modern chemistry for the interpretation of molecular structure, stability, reactivity, and magnetic properties of many compounds. As such, its reliable prediction is an important task of computational chemistry. In recent years, many methods to quantify aromaticity based on different physicochemical properties of molecules have been proposed. However, the nonobservable nature of aromaticity makes difficult to assess the performance of the numerous existing indices. In the present work, we introduce a series of fifteen aromaticity tests that can be used to analyze the advantages and drawbacks of a group of aromaticity descriptors. On the basis of the results obtained for a set of ten indicators of aromaticity, we conclude that indices based on the study of electron delocalization in aromatic species are the most accurate among those examined in this work. (c) 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Comput Chem, 2008.

  13. Advanced Automotive Diesel Assessment Program, executive summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    The objectives of this analytical study were: to select one advanced automotive diesel engine (AAD) concept which would increase the tank mileage of a 3,000 pound passenger car from the present 35 mpg to at least 52 mpg; to identify long term component research and development work required to bring the selected concept to fruition; and to prepare a development strategy that will bring the selected concept to a prototype testing phase. Cummins Engine Company has completed this study. The selected concept is a 4 stroke cycle, direct injection, spark assisted, advanced adiabatic diesel engine with positive displacement compounding plus expander and part load air preheating. The engine does not use a liquid coolant nor liquid lubricants. It is a 4 cylinder, in-line, 77 mm bore x 77 mm stroke, 1.434 liters displacement engine weighing 300 lb, and rated at 70 BHP at 3000 rpm. Installation dimensions are 621 mm length x 589 mm width x 479 mm height (24.4 inch x 22 inch x 18.9 inch).

  14. Bismaleimide compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Johnnie E.; Jamieson, Donald R.

    1986-01-14

    Bismaleimides of the formula ##STR1## wherein R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 each independently is H, C.sub.1-4 -alkyl, C.sub.1-4 -alkoxy, C1 or Br, or R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 together form a fused 6-membered hydrocarbon aromatic ring, with the proviso that R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 are not t-butyl or t-butoxy; X is O, S or Se; n is 1-3; and the alkylene bridging group, optionally, is substituted by 1-3 methyl groups or by fluorine, form polybismaleimide resins which have valuable physical properties. Uniquely, these compounds permit extended cure times, i.e., they remain fluid for a time sufficient to permit the formation of a homogeneous melt prior to curing.

  15. Aromatics Oxidation and Soot Formation in Flames

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard, J. B.; Richter, H.

    2005-03-29

    This project is concerned with the kinetics and mechanisms of aromatics oxidation and the growth process to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) of increasing size, soot and fullerenes formation in flames. The overall objective of the experimental aromatics oxidation work is to extend the set of available data by measuring concentration profiles for decomposition intermediates such as phenyl, cyclopentadienyl, phenoxy or indenyl radicals which could not be measured with molecular-beam mass spectrometry to permit further refinement and testing of benzene oxidation mechanisms. The focus includes PAH radicals which are thought to play a major role in the soot formation process while their concentrations are in many cases too low to permit measurement with conventional mass spectrometry. The radical species measurements are used in critical testing and improvement of a kinetic model describing benzene oxidation and PAH growth. Thermodynamic property data of selected species are determined computationally, for instance using density functional theory (DFT). Potential energy surfaces are explored in order to identify additional reaction pathways. The ultimate goal is to understand the conversion of high molecular weight compounds to nascent soot particles, to assess the roles of planar and curved PAH and relationships between soot and fullerenes formation. The specific aims are to characterize both the high molecular weight compounds involved in the nucleation of soot particles and the structure of soot including internal nanoscale features indicative of contributions of planar and/or curved PAH to particle inception.

  16. Silicone elastomers with aromatic voltage stabilizers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    A Razak, Aliff Hisyam; Skov, Anne Ladegaard

    A method to synthesise a polydimethylsiloxane-polyphenylmethylsiloxane (PDMS-PPMS) copolymer with electron-trapping effects has been developed utilising a quickhydrosilylation reaction at ambient temperature and crosslinking via hydrosilylation by a vinyl-functional crosslinker. The mechanism...... of electron-trapping by aromatic compounds grafted to silicone backbones in a crosslinked PDMS is illustrated in Fig. 1. The electrical breakdown strength, the storage modulus and the loss modulus of the elastomer were investigated, as well as the excitation energy from the collision between electron carriers...... and benzene rings in PDMS-PPMS copolymer was measured by UV-vis spectroscopy. The developed elastomers were inherently soft with enhanced electrical breakdown strength due to delocalized pi-electrons of aromatic rings attached to the silicone backbone. The dielectric relative permittivity of PDMS...

  17. A Critical Assessment of the Performance of Magnetic and Electronic Indices of Aromaticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miquel Solà

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The lack of reference aromatic systems in the realm of inorganic aromatic compounds makes the evaluation of aromaticity in all-metal and semimetal clusters a difficult task. To date, calculation of nucleus-independent chemical shifts (NICS has been the most widely used method to discuss aromaticity in these systems. In the first part of this work, we briefly review our previous studies, showing some pitfalls of the NICS indicator of aromaticity in organic molecules. Then, we refer to our study on the performance of some aromaticity indices in a series of 15 aromaticity tests, which can be used to analyze the advantages and drawbacks of aromaticity descriptors. It is shown that indices based on the study of electron delocalization are the most accurate among those analyzed in the series of proposed tests, while NICS(1zz and NICS(0πzz present the best behavior among NICS indices. In the second part, we discuss the use of NICS and electronic multicenter indices (MCI in inorganic clusters. In particular, we evaluate the aromaticity of two series of all-metal and semimetal clusters with predictable aromaticity trends by means of NICS and MCI. Results show that the expected trends are generally better reproduced by MCI than NICS. It is concluded that NICS(0π and NICS(0πzz are the kind of NICS that perform the best among the different NICS indices analyzed for the studied series of inorganic compounds.

  18. The Adlard Coles book of diesel engines

    CERN Document Server

    Bartlett, Tim

    2013-01-01

    In clear, jargon-free English The Adlard Coles Book of Diesel Engines explains how a diesel engine works,and how to look after it, and takes into account developments inengine technology. Includes helpful tables and troubleshooting checklists.

  19. OXIDATIVE DNA DAMAGE IN DIESEL BUS MECHANICS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rationale: Diesel exposure has been associated with adverse health effects, including susceptibility to asthma, allergy and cancer. Previous epidemiological studies demonstrated increased cancer incidence among workers exposed to diesel. This is likely due to oxid...

  20. Six-Membered Aromatic Polyazides: Synthesis and Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergei V. Chapyshev

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Aromatic polyazides are widely used as starting materials in organic synthesis and photochemical studies, as well as photoresists in microelectronics and as cross-linking agents in polymer chemistry. Some aromatic polyazides possess high antitumor activity, while many others are of considerable interest as high-energy materials and precursors of high-spin nitrenes and C3N4 carbon nitride nanomaterials. The use of aromatic polyazides in click-reactions may be a new promising direction in the design of various supramolecular systems possessing interesting chemical, physical and biological properties. This review is devoted to the synthesis, properties and applications of six-membered aromatic compounds containing three and more azido groups in the ring.

  1. Deep desulfurization of diesel via peroxide oxidation using phosphotungstic acid as phase transfer catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sachdeva, T.O.; Pant, K.K.

    2010-01-01

    High sulfur level in diesel fuel has been identified as a major contributor to air pollutant in term of sulfur dioxide (SO x ) through diesel fueled vehicles. The main aim of the present work is to develop a promising methodology for ultra deep desulfurization of diesel fuel using oxidation followed by phase transfer of oxidized sulfur. Experiments were carried out in a batch reactor using n-decane as the model diesel compound and also using commercial diesel feedstock. To remove sulfur tetraoctylammonium bromide, phosphotungstic acid, and hydrogen peroxide were used as phase transfer agent, catalyst and oxidant respectively. The percent sulfur removal increases with increasing the initial concentration of sulfur in fuel and with increasing the reaction temperature. Similar trends were observed when commercial diesel was used to carry out desulfurization studies. The amphiphilic catalyst serves as a catalyst and also as an emulsifying agent to stabilize the emulsion droplets. The effects of temperature, agitation speed, quantity of catalyst and the phase transfer agent were studied to estimate the optimal conditions for the reactions. The sulfur removal from a commercial diesel by phase transfer catalysis has been found effective and removal efficiency was more than 98%. Kinetic experiments carried out for the desulfurization revealed that the sulfur removal results are best fitted to a pseudo first order kinetics and the apparent activation energy of desulfurization was 30.6 kJ/mol. (author)

  2. Aspen Simulation of Diesel-Biodiesel Blends Combustion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pérez-Sánchez Armando

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel is a fuel produced by transesterification of vegetable oils or animal fats, which currently is gaining attention as a diesel substitute. It represents an opportunity to reduce CO2, SO2, CO, HC, PAH and PM emissions and contributes to the diversification of fuels in Mexico's energetic matrix. The results of the simulation of the combustion process are presented in this paper with reference to an engine specification KUBOTA D600-B, operated with diesel-biodiesel blends. The physicochemical properties of the compounds and the operating conditions of equipment were developed using the simulator Aspen® and supplementary information. The main aspects of the engine working conditions were considered such as diesel-biodiesel ratio, air/fuel mixture, temperature of the combustion gases and heat load. Diesel physicochemical specifications were taken from reports of PEMEX and SENER. Methyl esters corresponding to the transesterification of fatty acids that comprise castor oil were regarded as representative molecules of biodiesel obtained from chromatographic analysis. The results include CO2, water vapor, combustion efficiency, power and lower calorific value of fuels.

  3. Sensory evaluation of black instant coffee beverage with some volatile compounds present in aromatic oil from roasted coffee Análise sensorial de bebida preparada com café instantâneo com alguns compostos voláteis presentes no óleo aromático de café torrado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Lopes de Oliveira

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The oil obtained from Brazilian roasted coffee by supercritical CO2 extraction shows considerable aromatic properties, mainly composed by five aromatic compounds, 2-methylpyrazine; 2-furfurylalcohol, 2,5-dimethylpyrazine; γ-butyrolactone and 2-furfurylacetate. Sensory analyses were used to verify the influence of a mixture of these important classes of aromatic coffee compounds (pyrazines, furans and lactones and of the roasted coffee aromatic oil on the coffee aroma and flavour of black instant freeze and spray-dried coffee beverages. In the acceptance evaluation of the aroma, the samples prepared with freeze-dried instant coffee without the mixture of volatile compounds (sample 4 were not significantly different from the freeze-dried instant coffee in which the aromatic coffee oil was added (sample 5 and from the sample prepared with freeze-dried coffee in which the mixture of the five volatile was added (sample 3, coincidentally from the same drying process. Therefore, sample (3 did not differ from samples prepared with spray dried instant coffee without (sample 1 and to which (sample 2 the mixture of volatile was added. Therefore, with respect to this attribute, the addition of this mixture did not interfere in this drink acceptance. Taking into consideration the flavor, samples prepared with freeze-dried instant coffee in which the aromatic coffee oil was added (5 and the samples with (3 and without (4 the mixture of the five volatile was added did not differ significantly, however sample (4 did not differ from samples (1 and (2. Regarding this attribute, the addition of the aromatic oil of roasted coffee or a mixture of volatile in samples of freeze-dried instant coffee had a better acceptance than those dried by spray dryer (1 and (2. Thus, the enrichment of drinks with the aromatic oil of roasted coffee, or even with the mixture of the five components did not influence the consumer acceptance with respect to the aroma, but exerts

  4. Photodissociation of aromatic azides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budyka, M. F.

    2008-08-01

    Quantitative data on the photochemical activity of aromatic azides and on the mechanism and kinetics of azido group photodissociation are analysed and described systematically for the first time. The results of quantum chemical calculations of the azide structure in the ground and lower electronically excited states and the potential energy surfaces along the reaction coordinate of the N-N2 bond dissociation are considered.

  5. Fischer-Tropsch-synthesis fuels as diesel engine fuel - Fuel of the future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsson, Erik [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Thermo and Fluid Dynamics

    2000-04-01

    The Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) catalytic conversion process can be used to synthesize diesel fuels from a variety of feedstocks, including coal, natural gas and biomass. Synthetic diesel fuels can have very low sulfur and aromatic content, and excellent auto ignition characteristics. Moreover, Fischer-Tropsch diesel fuels may also be economically competitive with regular diesel fuel if produced in large volumes. The aim of this investigation is to reveal and analyze the effects of F-T fuels on a research diesel engine performance. Previous engine laboratory tests indicate that F-T fuels are promising alternative fuels because they can be used in unmodified diesel engines, and substantial quantitative exhaust emission reductions can be reached. Also substantial qualitative reductions, e.g. reduction of the number of hazardous chemicals and reduction of the concentration of hazardous chemicals in the exhausts may be realised. Since the engine performance is closely related to in-cylinder processes, a detailed thermodynamic analysis has been performed revealing the real thermochemistry history. The experimental results have shown that F-T fuels have a beneficial effect not only on the emission levels, but also on other energetic parameters of the engine. Heat release analysis have shown that ignition delay, cylinder peak pressure, heat release gradient and indicated efficiency are affected as well. Two different mixtures of FT-fuels with variation in carbon chain branching and, to a certain extent, variation in chain length were tested and their results were compared with those obtained from conventional fuel (MK1). The selected optimized F-T fuels mixture were further tested according to the 13 mode ECE R49 test cycle and were found as good competitive alternative diesel fuels.

  6. Composition and comparative toxicity of particulate matter emitted from a diesel and biodiesel fuelled CRDI engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangwar, Jitendra N.; Gupta, Tarun; Agarwal, Avinash K.

    2012-01-01

    There is a global concern about adverse health effects of particulate matter (PM) originating from diesel engine exhaust. In the current study, parametric investigations were carried out using a CRDI (Common Rail Direct Injection) diesel engine operated at different loads at two different engine speeds (1800 and 2400 rpm), employing diesel and 20% biodiesel blends (B20) produced from Karanja oil. A partial flow dilution tunnel was employed to collect and measure the mass of the primary particulates from diesel and biodiesel blend collected on a 47 mm quartz substrate. The collected PM (particulate matter) was subjected to chemical analyses in order to assess the amount of Benzene Soluble Organic Fraction (BSOF) and trace metals using Inductively Coupled Plasma-Optical Emission Spectrometer (ICP-OES). For both diesel and biodiesel, BSOF results showed decreasing levels with increasing engine load. B20 showed higher BSOF as compared to those measured with diesel. The concentration of different trace metals analyzed also showed decreasing trends with increasing engine loads. In addition, real-time measurements for Organic Carbon (OC), Elemental Carbon (EC) and total particle-bound Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) were carried out on the primary engine exhaust coming out of the partial flow dilution tunnel. Analysis of OC/EC data suggested that the ratio of OC to EC decreases with corresponding increase in engine load for both fuels. A peak in PAH concentration was observed at 60% engine load at 1800 rpm and 20% engine load at 2400 rpm engine speeds almost identical for both kinds of fuels. Comparison of chemical components of PM emitted from this CRDI engine provides new insight in terms of PM toxicity for B20 vis-a-vis diesel.

  7. A probabilistic maintenance model for diesel engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathirana, Shan; Abeygunawardane, Saranga Kumudu

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, a probabilistic maintenance model is developed for inspection based preventive maintenance of diesel engines based on the practical model concepts discussed in the literature. Developed model is solved using real data obtained from inspection and maintenance histories of diesel engines and experts' views. Reliability indices and costs were calculated for the present maintenance policy of diesel engines. A sensitivity analysis is conducted to observe the effect of inspection based preventive maintenance on the life cycle cost of diesel engines.

  8. Method development for trace analysis of heteroaromatic compounds in contaminated groundwater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Sys Stybe; Hansen, Asger B.; Mosbæk, Hans

    1996-01-01

    Water analysis,environmental analysis,extraction methods,aromatic compounds,heteroaromatic compounds,creosote,dichloromethane,diethyl ether,pentane......Water analysis,environmental analysis,extraction methods,aromatic compounds,heteroaromatic compounds,creosote,dichloromethane,diethyl ether,pentane...

  9. Emissions of PCDD/Fs, PCBs, and PAHs from legacy on-road heavy-duty diesel engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laroo, Christopher A; Schenk, Charles R; Sanchez, L James; McDonald, Joseph; Smith, Peter L

    2012-11-01

    Exhaust emissions of seventeen 2,3,7,8-substituted polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin/furan (PCDD/F) congeners, tetra-octa PCDD/F homologues, 12 WHO 2005 polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners, mono-nona chlorinated biphenyl homologues, and 19 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from three legacy diesel engines were investigated. The three engines tested were a 1985 model year GM 6.2J-series engine, a 1987 model year Detroit Diesel Corporation 6V92 engine, and a 1993 model year Cummins L10 engine. Results were compared to United States' mobile source inventory for on-road diesel engines, as well as historic and modern diesel engine emission values. The test fuel contained chlorine at 9.8 ppm which is 1.5 orders of magnitude above what is found in current diesel fuel and 3900 ppm sulfur to simulate fuels that would have been available when these engines were produced. Results indicate PCDD/F emissions of 13.1, 7.1, and 13.6 pg International Toxic Equivalency (I-TEQ)L(-1) fuel consumed for the three engines respectively, where non-detects are equal to zero. This compares with a United States' mobile source on-road diesel engine inventory value of 946 pg I-TEQL(-1) fuel consumed and 1.28 pg I-TEQL(-1) fuel consumed for modern engines equipped with a catalyzed diesel particle filter and urea selective catalytic reduction. PCB emissions are 2 orders of magnitude greater than modern diesel engines. PAH results are representative of engines from this era based on historical values and are 3-4 orders of magnitude greater than modern diesel engines. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Assessment of energy performance and air pollutant emissions in a diesel engine generator fueled with water-containing ethanol-biodiesel-diesel blend of fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Wen-Jhy; Liu, Yi-Cheng; Mwangi, Francis Kimani; Chen, Wei-Hsin; Lin, Sheng-Lun; Fukushima, Yasuhiro; Liao, Chao-Ning; Wang, Lin-Chi

    2011-01-01

    Biomass based oxygenated fuels have been identified as possible replacement of fossil fuel due to pollutant emission reduction and decrease in over-reliance on fossil fuel energy. In this study, 4 v% water-containing ethanol was mixed with (65-90%) diesel using (5-30%) biodiesel (BD) and 1 v% butanol as stabilizer and co-solvent respectively. The fuels were tested against those of biodiesel-diesel fuel blends to investigate the effect of addition of water-containing ethanol for their energy efficiencies and pollutant emissions in a diesel-fueled engine generator. Experimental results indicated that the fuel blend mix containing 4 v% of water-containing ethanol, 1 v% butanol and 5-30 v% of biodiesel yielded stable blends after 30 days standing. BD1041 blend of fuel, which composed of 10 v% biodiesel, 4 v% of water-containing ethanol and 1 v% butanol demonstrated -0.45 to 1.6% increase in brake-specific fuel consumption (BSFC, mL kW -1 h -1 ) as compared to conventional diesel. The better engine performance of BD1041 was as a result of complete combustion, and lower reaction temperature based on the water cooling effect, which reduced emissions to 2.8-6.0% for NO x , 12.6-23.7% particulate matter (PM), 20.4-23.8% total polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and 30.8-42.9% total BaPeq between idle mode and 3.2 kW power output of the diesel engine generator. The study indicated that blending diesel with water-containing ethanol could achieve the goal of more green sustainability. -- Highlights: → Water-containing ethanol was mixed with diesel using biodiesel and butanol as stabilizer and co-solvent, respectively. → Fuel blends with 4 v% water-containing ethanol, 1 v% butanol, 5-30 v% biodiesel and conventional diesel yielded a stable blended fuel after more than 30 days. → Due to more complete combustion and water quench effect, target fuel BD1041 was gave good energy performance and significant reduction of PM, NO x , total PAH and total BaPeq emissions.

  11. Characterization of the Rhodococcus sp. MK1 strain and its pilot application for bioremediation of diesel oil-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kis, Ágnes Erdeiné; Laczi, Krisztián; Zsíros, Szilvia; Kós, Péter; Tengölics, Roland; Bounedjoum, Naila; Kovács, Tamás; Rákhely, Gábor; Perei, Katalin

    2017-12-01

    Petroleum hydrocarbons and derivatives are widespread contaminants in both aquifers and soil, their elimination is in the primary focus of environmental studies. Microorganisms are key components in biological removal of pollutants. Strains capable to utilize hydrocarbons usually appear at the contaminated sites, but their metabolic activities are often restricted by the lack of nutrients and/or they can only utilize one or two components of a mixture. We isolated a novel Rhodococcus sp. MK1 strain capable to degrade the components of diesel oil simultaneously. The draft genome of the strain was determined and besides the chromosome, the presence of one plasmid could be revealed. Numerous routes for oxidation of aliphatic and aromatic compounds were identified. The strain was tested in ex situ applications aiming to compare alternative solutions for microbial degradation of hydrocarbons. The results of bioaugmentation and biostimulation experiments clearly demonstrated that - in certain cases - the indigenous microbial community could be exploited for bioremediation of oil-contaminated soils. Biostimulation seems to be efficient for removal of aged contaminations at lower concentration range, whereas bioaugmentation is necessary for the treatment of freshly and highly polluted sites.

  12. Characterization and concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in emissions from different heating systems in Damascus, Syria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkurdi, Farouk; Karabet, François; Dimashki, Marwan

    2014-04-01

    Traffic has long been recognized as the major contributor to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emissions to the urban atmosphere. Stationary combustion sources, including residential space heating systems, are also a major contributor to PAH emissions. The aim of this study was to determine the profile and concentration of PAHs in stack flue gas emissions from different kinds of space heaters in order to increase the understanding of the scale of the PAH pollution problem caused by this source. This study set out to first assess the characteristics of PAHs and their corresponding benzo[a]pyrene equivalent emissions from a few types of domestic heaters and central heating systems to the urban atmosphere. The study, enabled for the first time, the characterization of PAHs in stationary combustion sources in the city of Damascus, Syria. Nine different types of heating systems were selected with respect to age, design, and type of fuel burned. The concentrations of 15 individual PAH compounds in the stack flue gas were determined in the extracts of the collected samples using high-performance liquid chromatography system (HPLC) equipped with ultraviolet-visible and fluorescence detectors. In general, older domestic wood stoves caused considerably higher PAH emissions than modern domestic heaters burning diesel oil. The average concentration of ΣPAH (sum of 15 compounds) in emissions from all types of studied heating systems ranged between 43 ± 0.4 and 316 ± 1.4 μg/m(3). Values of total benzo[a]pyrene equivalent ranged between 0.61 and 15.41 μg/m(3).

  13. Receptor modelling study of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alghamdi, Mansour A. [Department of Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Meteorology, Environment and Arid Land Agriculture, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia); Alam, Mohammed S., E-mail: m.s.alam@bham.ac.uk [Division of Environmental Health and Risk Management, School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Yin, Jianxin; Stark, Christopher; Jang, Eunhwa [Division of Environmental Health and Risk Management, School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Harrison, Roy M., E-mail: r.m.harrison@bham.ac.uk [Department of Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Meteorology, Environment and Arid Land Agriculture, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia); Division of Environmental Health and Risk Management, School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Shamy, Magdy; Khoder, Mamdouh I.; Shabbaj, Ibrahim I. [Department of Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Meteorology, Environment and Arid Land Agriculture, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia)

    2015-02-15

    Measurements of 14 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) have been made in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, with a view to establishing the concentrations in this major city, and quantifying the contributions of major sources. Particulate and vapour forms have been sampled and analysed separately. The concentrations are compared to measurements from other sites in the Middle Eastern region and are towards the lower end of the range, being far lower than concentrations reported from Riyadh (Saudi Arabia), Assiut (Egypt) and Tehran (Iran) but broadly similar to those measured in Damascus (Syria) and higher than those measured in Kuwait. The partitioning between vapour and particle phases is similar to that in data from Egypt and China, but with many compounds showing a higher particle-associated percentage than in Birmingham (UK) possibly reflecting a higher concentration of airborne particulate matter in the former countries. Concentrations in Jeddah were significantly higher at a site close to the oil refinery and a site close to a major ring road than at a suburban site to the north of the city. Application of positive matrix factorisation to the pooled data elicited three factors accounting respectively for 17%, 33% and 50% of the measured sum of PAH and these are interpreted as arising from gasoline vehicles, industrial sources, particularly the oil refinery, and to diesel/fuel oil combustion. - Highlights: • Measurements of 14 PAH compounds in vapour and particulate phases at three sites. • Comparison of concentrations across Jeddah and Middle Eastern regions. • Application of positive matrix factorisation to identify possible sources.

  14. Photocatalytic oxidation of aromatic amines using MnO2@g ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    An efficient and direct oxidation of aromatic amines to aromatic azo-compounds has been achieved using a MnO2@g-C3N4 catalyst under visible light as a source of energy at room temperature Prepared for submission to the journal, Advanced Materials Letters.

  15. Photocatalytic oxidation of aromatic amines using MnO2@g-C3N4

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — An efficient and direct oxidation of aromatic amines to aromatic azo-compounds has been achieved using a MnO2@g-C3N4 catalyst under visible light as a source of...

  16. Dependent failures of diesel generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mankamo, T.; Pulkkinen, U.

    1982-01-01

    This survey of dependent failures (common-cause failures) is based on the data of diesel generator failures in U. S. nuclear power plants as reported in Licensee Event Reports. Failures were classified into random and potentially dependent failures. All failures due to design errors, manufacturing or installation errors, maintenance errors, or deviations in the operational environment were classified as potentially dependent failures.The statistical dependence between failures was estimated from the relative portion of multiple failures. Results confirm the earlier view of the significance of statistical dependence, a strong dependence on the age of the diesel generator was found in each failure class excluding random failures and maintenance errors, which had a nearly constant frequency independent of diesel generator age

  17. Clean Coal Diesel Demonstration Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert Wilson

    2006-10-31

    A Clean Coal Diesel project was undertaken to demonstrate a new Clean Coal Technology that offers technical, economic and environmental advantages over conventional power generating methods. This innovative technology (developed to the prototype stage in an earlier DOE project completed in 1992) enables utilization of pre-processed clean coal fuel in large-bore, medium-speed, diesel engines. The diesel engines are conventional modern engines in many respects, except they are specially fitted with hardened parts to be compatible with the traces of abrasive ash in the coal-slurry fuel. Industrial and Municipal power generating applications in the 10 to 100 megawatt size range are the target applications. There are hundreds of such reciprocating engine power-plants operating throughout the world today on natural gas and/or heavy fuel oil.

  18. Variability in onset of ECG changes indicative of ischemia after exposure to whole vs filtered diesel exhaust in hypertensive rats. Insight on mechanism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diesel exhaust (DE) is a complex mixture of gases including C02, O2, N02, CO, aldehydes, benzene, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) as well as highly respirable particulate matter. DE is a significant component of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) air pollution, which its...

  19. Metabolism and Biomarkers of Heterocyclic Aromatic Amines in Molecular Epidemiology Studies: Lessons Learned from Aromatic Amines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Aromatic amines and heterocyclic aromatic amines (HAAs) are structurally related classes of carcinogens that are formed during the combustion of tobacco or during the high-temperature cooking of meats. Both classes of procarcinogens undergo metabolic activation by N-hydroxylation of the exocyclic amine group, to produce a common proposed intermediate, the arylnitrenium ion, which is the critical metabolite implicated in toxicity and DNA damage. However, the biochemistry and chemical properties of these compounds are distinct and different biomarkers of aromatic amines and HAAs have been developed for human biomonitoring studies. Hemoglobin adducts have been extensively used as biomarkers to monitor occupational and environmental exposures to a number of aromatic amines; however, HAAs do not form hemoglobin adducts at appreciable levels and other biomarkers have been sought. A number of epidemiologic studies that have investigated dietary consumption of well-done meat in relation to various tumor sites reported a positive association between cancer risk and well-done meat consumption, although some studies have shown no associations between well-done meat and cancer risk. A major limiting factor in most epidemiological studies is the uncertainty in quantitative estimates of chronic exposure to HAAs and, thus, the association of HAAs formed in cooked meat and cancer risk has been difficult to establish. There is a critical need to establish long-term biomarkers of HAAs that can be implemented in molecular epidemioIogy studies. In this review article, we highlight and contrast the biochemistry of several prototypical carcinogenic aromatic amines and HAAs to which humans are chronically exposed. The biochemical properties and the impact of polymorphisms of the major xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes on the biological effects of these chemicals are examined. Lastly, the analytical approaches that have been successfully employed to biomonitor aromatic amines and HAAs, and

  20. Resettable regime of diesel lubrication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nechaev E. P.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A new method of engine oil saturation by microelements has been presented in the paper; it has been tested on vessels of the fishing fleet and in conditions of prolonged operation in the coastal diesel-engine power plants. The paper considers the results of performance tests of the most common diesel power plants of 6ЧН 25/34 type with the tribochemical reductant oil (TRO apparatus providing tribochemical lubrication. During comparative trials of two diesels the samples of lubricating oil m-10B2 and m-10 have been periodically collected and subjected to spectral analysis. In the samples the number of the following key microelements has been determined: iron (Fe, aluminum (Al, zinc (Zn, sodium (Na, barium (Ba, calcium (Ca, tin (Sn, phosphorus (P, potassium (K, sulfur (S, chlorine (Cl, silicon (Si. During the operation the processes of microelements' extraction and destruction in diesel motor oils evaluated by the relevant coefficients have been clearly manifested. Analyzing the obtained experimental data it should be noted that in both experiments the total balance of the controlled 15 trace elements has been balanced and approached within 1640.5–1650.3 g/t. And the greater measure refers to conventional oil. Stabilization and improvement of physical and chemical properties of motor oil in operation of a diesel engine is possible from the authors' viewpoint only in the tribochemical lubrication mode using the TRO apparatus and created hydrodynamic module – dispersant. The past performance tests suggest the possibility of use as a lubricant the conventional (pure oil under actual operating conditions. When in the tribochemical mode of diesel engine lubrication it has been established that in conventional (pure oil the oily medium has been formed with a spectrum of microelements equivalent to engine oil filler.

  1. Naturally occurring antifungal aromatic esters and amides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, M.S.; Shahnaz; Tabassum, S.; Ogunwande, I.A.; Pervez, M.K.

    2010-01-01

    During the search of antifungal natural products from terrestrial plants, a new long chained aromatic ester named grandiflorate along with spatazoate from Portulaca grandiflora and N-[2-methoxy-2-(4-methoxyphenyl) ethyl]-trans-cinnamide and aegeline from Solanum erianthum of Nigeria were isolated and tested against six fungal species. The known constituents have not been reported so far from mentioned investigated plants. Structures of the isolated compounds were elucidated with the aid of spectroscopic techniques including two dimensional NMR experiments. Among the compounds, the esters found more potent than amides against Candida albicans and Aspergillus flavus. The new compound grandiflorate gave response against all tested fungal species while aegeline was found to give lowest inhibition during this study. (author)

  2. Reeds diesel engine troubleshooting handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Pickthall, Barry

    2013-01-01

    Most diesel engines will develop a problem at some point in their lives, but armed with the right knowledge a skipper needn't worry. The Reeds Diesel Engine Troubleshooting Handbook is a compact, pocket-sized guide to finding solutions to all of the most common engine problems, and many of the less common ones too. The perfect format for quick reference on board, this book will help skippers fix troublesome engines themselves, avoiding costly engineer fees if the problem is simple to sort out, or enabling an emergency patch-up for a more serious problem until they can get back to port. Each to

  3. An experimental investigation of PAH emissions from a heavy duty diesel engine fuelled with biodiesel and its blend

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, A. N.; Shan, G.E.Y.; Wei, T.J.; Hua, L.Z.

    2008-01-01

    For the comparison of emission of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from diesel biodiesel and its 20% blend with diesel, and their carcinogenic potencies, an experimental study has been conducted on a turbocharged, intercooled and direct injection diesel engine. Total PAHs (solid and gas) from diesel, B20 and B100 at low load were more than those at high loads. Total PAH emissions from the test fuels at the rated speed were more than those at maximum torque speed. Benzo[a] pyrene (BaP) brake specific emission of biodiesel is less than that of diesel. LMW-PAH emissions for the test fuels are all higher than those of MMW and HMW PAH. Biodiesel and B20 reduce both the total Benzo[a] pyrene equivalent concentration (BaP/sub eq/) and the total mean-PAHs as compared to commercial diesel fuel. BSFC of the engine increased but its brake power decreased in the cases of B20 and biodiesel. (author)

  4. Contorted polycyclic aromatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Melissa; Zhong, Yu; Wu, Ying; Schenck, Christine; Ng, Fay; Steigerwald, Michael; Xiao, Shengxiong; Nuckolls, Colin

    2015-02-17

    CONSPECTUS: This Account describes a body of research in the design, synthesis, and assembly of molecular materials made from strained polycyclic aromatic molecules. The strain in the molecular subunits severely distorts the aromatic molecules away from planarity. We coined the term "contorted aromatics" to describe this class of molecules. Using these molecules, we demonstrate that the curved pi-surfaces are useful as subunits to make self-assembled electronic materials. We have created and continue to study two broad classes of these "contorted aromatics": discs and ribbons. The figure that accompanies this conspectus displays the three-dimensional surfaces of a selection of these "contorted aromatics". The disc-shaped contorted molecules have well-defined conformations that create concave pi-surfaces. When these disc-shaped molecules are substituted with hydrocarbon side chains, they self-assemble into columnar superstructures. Depending on the hydrocarbon substitution, they form either liquid crystalline films or macroscopic cables. In both cases, the columnar structures are photoconductive and form p-type, hole- transporting materials in field effect transistor devices. This columnar motif is robust, allowing us to form monolayers of these columns attached to the surface of dielectrics such as silicon oxide. We use ultrathin point contacts made from individual single-walled carbon nanotubes that are separated by a few nanometers to probe the electronic properties of short stacks of a few contorted discs. We find that these materials have high mobility and can sense electron-deficient aromatic molecules. The concave surfaces of these disc-shaped contorted molecules form ideal receptors for the molecular recognition and assembly with spherical molecules such as fullerenes. These interfaces resemble ball-and-socket joints, where the fullerene nests itself in the concave surface of the contorted disc. The tightness of the binding between the two partners can be

  5. Ex-situ bioremediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in sewage sludge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Jens Ejbye; Larsen, S.B.; Karakashev, Dimitar Borisov

    2008-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are naturally occurring organic compounds. As a result of anthropogenic activities, PAH concentration has increased in the environment considerably. PAH are regarded as environmental pollutants because they have toxic, mutagenic and carcinogenic effects on l...

  6. Metabolic Engineering Strategies for the Optimization of Medicinal and Aromatic Plants : Expectations and Realities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kayser, O.; Baricevic, D; Novak, J; Pank, F

    2010-01-01

    In recent years classic genetic and molecular biology strategies (Bioballistics, Agrobacterium tumefaciens transformation, recombinant enzymes) for production of natural compounds or even breeding of medicinal and aromatic plants have expanded and improved productivity of plant-derived fine

  7. Susceptibility of eastern oyster early life stages to road surface polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are a class of chemical compounds that are mostly : anthropogenic in nature, and they can become persistent organic contaminants in aquatic : ecosystems. Runoff from impervious surfaces is one of the many ways ...

  8. Aromatic molecules as spintronic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ojeda, J. H., E-mail: judith.ojeda@uptc.edu.co [Instituto de Alta investigación, Universidad de Tarapacá, Casilla 7D Arica (Chile); Grupo de Física de Materiales, Universidad Pedagógica y Tecnológica de Colombia, Tunja (Colombia); Orellana, P. A. [Departamento de Física, Universidad Técnica Federico Santa María, Casilla 110-V, Valparaíso (Chile); Laroze, D. [Instituto de Alta investigación, Universidad de Tarapacá, Casilla 7D Arica (Chile)

    2014-03-14

    In this paper, we study the spin-dependent electron transport through aromatic molecular chains attached to two semi-infinite leads. We model this system taking into account different geometrical configurations which are all characterized by a tight binding Hamiltonian. Based on the Green's function approach with a Landauer formalism, we find spin-dependent transport in short aromatic molecules by applying external magnetic fields. Additionally, we find that the magnetoresistance of aromatic molecules can reach different values, which are dependent on the variations in the applied magnetic field, length of the molecules, and the interactions between the contacts and the aromatic molecule.

  9. The aromatic and polyphenolic composition of Roman camomile tea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnat, A; Carnat, A P; Fraisse, D; Ricoux, L; Lamaison, J L

    2004-01-01

    The qualitative and quantitative composition of the main aromatic and polyphenolic constituents of infusion from Chamaemelum nobile flowers was examined. The camomile tea contained a large amount of polyphenolic compounds (340 mg/l), the most important being chamaemeloside (155 mg/l). Only traces of essential oil were recovered in tea (7 mg/l).

  10. Regioselective nitration of aromatic substrates in zeolite cages

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    meet market demand, Choudary et al have achieved a zeolite-based methodology for the nitration of aromatic compounds.13 They have carried out nitration of toluene with various zeolite catalysts and zeolite beta of different Si/Al ratios. Zeolite beta has proved to be the best catalyst among the zeolites used in terms of ...

  11. Performance of bio fuels in diesel engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nunez I, Manuel L; Prada V, Laura P

    2007-01-01

    This paper shows the preliminary results of pilot plant tests developed in oil catalytic hydrotreating process, where the crude palm oil or a mixture of crude palm oil and mineral diesel is treated with an injection of 99% pure hydrogen flux, in a fixed bed reactor at high pressures and temperatures, in a presence of Nickel Molybdenum catalyst supported on alumina bed. The main product of this process is a fuel (bio diesel) which has the same or better properties than the diesel obtained by petroleum refining. It has been made some performance fuel tests in diesel engine? with good results in terms of power, torque and fuel consumption, without any changes in engine configuration. Considering the characteristics of the Catalytic hydrotreated bio diesel compare to conventional diesel, both fuels have similar distillation range? however, bio diesel has better flash point, cetane index and thermal stability. Gas fuels (methane, ethane, and propane) CO 2 and water are the secondary products of the process.

  12. The Evolution of Diesel Engines

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 17; Issue 4. The Evolution of Diesel Engines. U Shrinivasa. General Article Volume 17 Issue 4 April 2012 pp 365-377. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/017/04/0365-0377. Keywords.

  13. Cleaning the Diesel Engine Emissions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Budde

    This paper examines how technologies for cleaning of diesel emission from road vehicles can be supported by facilitating a technology push in the Danish automotive emission control industry. The European commission is at present preparing legislation for the euro 5 emission standard (to be enforc...

  14. Diesel Mechanics: Scope and Sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nashville - Davidson County Metropolitan Public Schools, TN.

    This scope and sequence guide, developed for a diesel mechanics vocational education program, represents an initial step in the development of a systemwide articulated curriculum sequence for all vocational programs within the Metropolitan Nashville Public School System. It was developed as a result of needs expressed by teachers, parents, and the…

  15. Coal-fired diesel generator