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Sample records for diazepam binding inhibitor

  1. Acyl-CoA-binding protein/diazepam-binding inhibitor gene and pseudogenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mandrup, S; Hummel, R; Ravn, S

    1992-01-01

    Acyl-CoA-binding protein (ACBP) is a 10 kDa protein isolated from bovine liver by virtue of its ability to bind and induce the synthesis of medium-chain acyl-CoA esters. Surprisingly, it turned out to be identical to a protein named diazepam-binding Inhibitor (DBI) claimed to be an endogenous mod...

  2. Diazepam-binding inhibitor. A brain neuropeptide present in human spinal fluid: studies in depression, schizophrenia, and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbaccia, M L; Costa, E; Ferrero, P; Guidotti, A; Roy, A; Sunderland, T; Pickar, D; Paul, S M; Goodwin, F K

    1986-12-01

    Diazepam-binding inhibitor is a novel peptide purified to homogeneity from rat and human brain. Diazepam-binding inhibitor is present, though not exclusively, in gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-containing neurons where it is believed to inhibit GABAergic neurotransmission mediated by GABA by binding to the benzodiazepine-GABA receptor complex. Since an impairment of central GABAergic tone has been postulated to be associated with a number of neuropsychiatric disorders, we measured human diazepam-binding inhibitor immunoreactivity in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients suffering from endogenous depression, schizophrenia, and dementia of the Alzheimer's type. Patients with major depression had significantly higher concentrations of human diazepam-binding inhibitor immunoreactivity in CSF when compared with age- and sex-matched normal volunteers, while no difference in CSF diazepam-binding inhibitor immunoreactivity was found in schizophrenics or patients with dementia of the Alzheimer's type when compared with controls. The possibility is discussed that the increased CSF human diazepam-binding inhibitor immunoreactivity observed in depressed patients may represent a functional disinhibition of GABAergic neurotransmission associated with depression.

  3. Cerebrospinal fluid levels of diazepam-binding inhibitor in neurodegenerative disorders with dementia.

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    Ferrarese, C; Appollonio, I; Frigo, M; Meregalli, S; Piolti, R; Tamma, F; Frattola, L

    1990-04-01

    We investigated CSF levels of diazepam-binding inhibitor (DBI), a recently discovered neuropeptide that allosterically modulates GABAergic transmission, in various neurodegenerative disorders with dementia (28 patients with Parkinson's disease, 10 with Alzheimer's disease, 7 with Huntington's chorea). We applied a battery of neuropsychological tests to determine the degree of dementia and to exclude the presence of mood alterations. CSF DBI levels were elevated in parkinsonian subjects with dementia and in patients with Alzheimer's disease, but decreased in Huntington's chorea patients. We hypothesize that modifications of CSF DBI levels may be related to a functional or structural alteration of the GABAergic system.

  4. Diazepam binding inhibitor gene expression: Location in brain and peripheral tissues of rate

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    Alho, H.; Fremeau, R.T. Jr.; Tiedge, H.; Wilcox, J.; Bovolin, P.; Brosius, J.; Roberts, J.L.; Costa, E.

    1988-09-01

    Diazepam binding inhibitor (DBI), an endogenous 10-kDa polypeptide was isolated from rat and human brain by monitoring displacement of radioactive diazepam bound to specific recognition sites in brain synaptic and mitochondrial membranes. The cellular location of DBI mRNA was studied in rat brain and selected peripheral tissues by in situ hybridization histochemistry with a /sup 35/S-labeled single-stranded complementary RNA probe. DBI mRNA was heterogeneously distributed in rat brain, with particularly high levels in the area postrema, the cerebellar cortex, and ependyma of the third ventricle. Intermediate levels were found in the olfactory bulb, pontine nuclei, inferior colliculi, arcuate nucleus, and pineal gland. Relatively low but significant levels of silver grains were observed overlying many mesencephalic and telencephalic areas that have previously been shown to contain numerous DBI-immunoreactive neurons and a high density of central benzodiazepine receptors. In situ hybridizations also revealed high levels of DBI mRNA in the posterior lobe of the pituitary gland, liver, and germinal center of the white pulp of spleen, all tissues that are rich in peripheral benzodiazepine binding sites. The tissue-specific pattern of DBI gene expression described here could be exploited to further understand the physiological function of DBI in the brain and periphery.

  5. Diazepam Binding Inhibitor Promotes Stem Cell Expansion Controlling Environment-Dependent Neurogenesis.

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    Dumitru, Ionut; Neitz, Angela; Alfonso, Julieta; Monyer, Hannah

    2017-04-05

    Plasticity of adult neurogenesis supports adaptation to environmental changes. The identification of molecular mediators that signal these changes to neural progenitors in the niche has remained elusive. Here we report that diazepam binding inhibitor (DBI) is crucial in supporting an adaptive mechanism in response to changes in the environment. We provide evidence that DBI is expressed in stem cells in all neurogenic niches of the postnatal brain. Focusing on the hippocampal subgranular zone (SGZ) and employing multiple genetic manipulations in vivo, we demonstrate that DBI regulates the balance between preserving the stem cell pool and neurogenesis. Specifically, DBI dampens GABA activity in stem cells, thereby sustaining the proproliferative effect of physical exercise and enriched environment. Our data lend credence to the notion that the modulatory effect of DBI constitutes a general mechanism that regulates postnatal neurogenesis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. A cDNA encoding diazepam-binding inhibitor/acyl-CoA-binding protein in Helicoverpa armigera: molecular characterization and expression analysis associated with pupal diapause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ming; Zhang, Tian-Yi; Xu, Wei-Hua

    2005-06-01

    The diazepam binding inhibitor (DBI) or the acyl-CoA-binding protein (ACBP) is a 9-10 kDa highly conserved multifunctional protein that plays important roles in GABA(A) receptor activity regulation, lipid absorption and steroidogenesis in various organisms. To study the functions of DBI/ACBP in insect development or diapause, we cloned the cDNA from Helicoverpa armigera (Har) utilizing rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). By homology search, Har-DBI/ACBP is conserved with the DBI/ACBPs known from other insects. Northern blot analysis showed that DBI/ACBP gene expressed in nonneural and neural tissues. RT-PCR combined Southern blot analysis revealed that DBI/ACBP mRNA in the brain of nondiapause individual was much higher than that in the brain of diapausing insects. At early and middle stages of 6th instar larvae, the level of DBI/ACBP mRNA was higher in the midgut of diapause type than that in nondiapause type and low at late 6th instar larval stage and early pupal stage in both types. In the prothoracic gland (PG), DBI/ACBP expression appeared at a high level at middle and late stages of 6th larval instar in both nondiapause and diapause types, and declined after pupation. In vitro experiments revealed that DBI/ACBP mRNA in PG could be stimulated by synthetic H. armigera diapause hormone (Har-DH), suggesting that Har-DH may stimulate the PG to produce ecdysteroids by the DBI/ACBP signal pathway. By in vitro assay, we also found that FGIN-1-27, which has similar functions to DBI/ACBP in ecdysteroidogenesis, could induce PG ecdysteroidogenesis effectively, suggesting that DBI/ACBP regulates biosynthesis of ecdysteroids in PG. Thus, DBI/ACBP indeed plays a key role in metabolism and development in H. armigera.

  7. Pathogenesis of peroxisomal deficiency disorders (Zellweger syndrome may be mediated by misregulation of the GABAergic system via the diazepam binding inhibitor

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    Breitling Rainer

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Zellweger syndrome (ZS is a fatal inherited disease caused by peroxisome biogenesis deficiency. Patients are characterized by multiple disturbances of lipid metabolism, profound hypotonia and neonatal seizures, and distinct craniofacial malformations. Median live expectancy of ZS patients is less than one year. While the molecular basis of peroxisome biogenesis and metabolism is known in considerable detail, it is unclear how peroxisome deficiency leads to the most severe neurological symptoms. Recent analysis of ZS mouse models has all but invalidated previous hypotheses. Hypothesis We suggest that a regulatory rather than a metabolic defect is responsible for the drastic impairment of brain function in ZS patients. Testing the hypothesis Using microarray analysis we identify diazepam binding inhibitor/acyl-CoA binding protein (DBI as a candidate protein that might be involved in the pathogenic mechanism of ZS. DBI has a dual role as a neuropeptide antagonist of GABA(A receptor signaling in the brain and as a regulator of lipid metabolism. Repression of DBI in ZS patients could result in an overactivation of GABAergic signaling, thus eventually leading to the characteristic hypotonia and seizures. The most important argument for a misregulation of GABA(A in ZS is, however, provided by the striking similarity between ZS and "benzodiazepine embryofetopathy", a malformation syndrome observed after the abuse of GABA(A agonists during pregnancy. Implications of the hypothesis We present a tentative mechanistic model of the effect of DBI misregulation on neuronal function that could explain some of the aspects of the pathology of Zellweger syndrome.

  8. Effect of chronic exposure to methylxanthines on diazepam cerebral binding in female rats and their offsprings.

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    Daval, J L; Vert, P

    1986-06-01

    Caffeine, theophylline or saline were injected daily into female rats during the gestation and lactation periods. Crude synaptosomal membranes were isolated from the brains of offsprings at various stages of development and their ability to specifically bind [3H]diazepam was tested. An other approach consisted of injecting [3H]diazepam into offsprings and cerebral specifically bound diazepam was measured. It was shown that methylxanthines were able to inhibit [3H]diazepam binding by reducing total number of binding sites in the brain of 5- and 15-day-old rats born from treated mothers, with a total recovery of control values at 25 days of age. Moreover, in vivo percentage of cerebral bound diazepam dramatically fell when rats were exposed to methylxanthines in utero and through the mother's milk. Since caffeine and theophylline displace diazepam binding not necessarily in a competitive manner, it is suggested that they could interfere with diazepam as adenosine antagonists.

  9. Clorazepate dipotassium and diazepam in renal insufficiency: serum concentrations and protein binding of diazepam and desmethyldiazepam.

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    Ochs, H R; Rauh, H W; Greenblatt, D J; Kaschell, H J

    1984-01-01

    5 patients with chronic renal failure on maintenance hemodialysis and 5 healthy matched controls received single 20-mg intravenous doses of clorazepate dipotassium. Clearance of pharmacologically active unbound desmethyldiazepam was reduced in renal failure patients as opposed to controls, and free fraction in serum was greater. Since desmethyldiazepam distribution was reduced in renal patients, elimination half-life was actually shorter than in controls (36 vs. 57 h). In 10 dialysis patients receiving chronic diazepam treatment (5-15 mg/day), steady-state concentrations of diazepam (56 ng/ml) and desmethyldiazepam (77 ng/ml) were significantly lower than in age- and weight-matched controls receiving similar doses (189 and 216 ng/ml, respectively). However after correction for the higher free fractions of both compounds in renal patients as opposed to controls, steady-state concentrations of unbound drug were found to be similar between groups. Interpretation of kinetic variables and steady-state serum concentrations of extensively protein-bound drugs requires consideration of alterations in protein binding that may occur in disease states.

  10. Comparison of anticonvulsant tolerance, crosstolerance, and benzodiazepine receptor binding following chronic treatment with diazepam or midazolam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey-Williams, V A; Wu, Y; Rosenberg, H C

    1994-07-01

    In a previous study, rats treated chronically with flurazepam were tolerant to the anticonvulsant action of some benzodiazepines (BZs), but not others (34). To determine if this differential crosstolerance was unique to flurazepam, rats were treated chronically with diazepam or midazolam, and tested for tolerance to the anticonvulsant actions of diazepam, midazolam, clonazepam, and clobazam. Regional benzodiazepine receptor binding in brain was also studied. In contrast to previous findings with flurazepam, 1 week treatment with diazepam or with midazolam did not cause tolerance. Rats treated with diazepam for 3 weeks were tolerant to diazepam, clonazepam, clobazam, and midazolam. In contrast, rats treated 3 weeks with midazolam were tolerant to diazepam and midazolam, but not clobazam or clonazepam. Neither diazepam nor midazolam treatment for 3 weeks altered BZ binding in cerebral cortex, cerebellum, or hippocampus. The effects of chronic BZ treatment depended not only on the BZ given chronically, but also on the BZ used to evaluate these effects, suggesting drug-specific interactions of different BZs with their receptors.

  11. Binding of diazepam, salicylic acid and digitoxin to albumin isolated from fetal and adult serum.

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    Viani, A; Cappiello, M; Pacifici, G M

    1991-01-01

    Albumin was isolated from pooled fetal serum obtained at normal delivery at term and from pooled adult plasma. Albumin isolation was carried out by means of PEG precipitation followed by ion exchange chromatography on DEAE-Sephadex A 50 and then on SP-Sephadex C 50. The binding of diazepam (1 microM), salicylic acid (2 mM) and digitoxin (6 nM) to albumin (40 g/l) was measured by equilibrium dialysis at 37 degrees C. The unbound fraction (mean +/- SD) for fetal and adult albumin of diazepam was 1.86 +/- 0.24 and 1.82 +/- 0.15% (NS), that of digitoxin was 3.18 +/- 0.27 and 3.36 +/- 0.04% (NS) and that of salicylic acid was 11.65 +/- 0.99 and 9.47 +/- 0.75% (p less than 0.05), respectively. With both fetal and adult albumin, a single class of binding sites was observed for diazepam and digitoxin, whereas two classes of binding sites were observed for salicylic acid. The number of binding sites (n, moles of drug per mole of albumin) for fetal and adult albumin was 0.83 and 1.02 for diazepam and 0.014 and 0.018 for digitoxin, respectively. For salicylic acid, n was 1.45 (fetal albumin) and 1.55 (adult albumin) for the higher affinity site, and 3.06 (fetal albumin) and 3.27 (adult albumin) for the lower affinity site. The association constant (Ka, M-1) for diazepam was 1.36 x 10(5) (fetal albumin) and 1.00 x 10(5) (adult albumin) and that for digitoxin was 4.12 x 10(6) (fetal albumin) and 2.7 x 10(6) (adult albumin). For salicylic acid, Ka was 38.4 x 10(3) (fetal albumin) and 35.8 x 10(3) (adult albumin) for the higher affinity site, and 2.7 x 10(3) (fetal albumin) and 4.3 x 10(3) (adult albumin) for the lower affinity site. This work shows that fetal and adult albumin have similar binding properties and corroborates our previous findings with furosemide.

  12. DBI/ACBP loss-of-function does not affect anxiety-like behaviour but reduces anxiolytic responses to diazepam in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Budry, Lionel; Bouyakdan, Khalil; Tobin, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    Diazepam is well known for its anxiolytic properties, which are mediated via activation of the GABAA receptor. Diazepam Binding Inhibitor (DBI), also called acyl-CoA binding protein (ACBP), is a ubiquitously expressed protein originally identified based on its ability to displace diazepam from it...

  13. Multiple benzodiazepine receptors in the ovine brain: ontogenesis, properties, and distribution of /sup 3/H-diazepam binding

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    Villiger, J.W.; Taylor, K.M.; Gluckman, P.D.

    1982-01-01

    Benzodiazepine receptors in the ovine frontal cortex were present at 56 days gestation and developed slowly until 96 days when the number increased rapidly, reaching adult levels by 120 days gestation. Scatchard analysis of 3H-diazepam specifically bound to cortical membranes suggested high (KD approximately equal to 2.0 nM) and low (KD approximately equal to 20.0 nM) affinity benzodiazepine receptors at all stages of development. Whereas the affinity of these receptors for 3H-diazepam did not alter during development, the number of both high and low affinity receptors increased significantly between 56 and 120 days gestation. The number of low affinity receptors were higher in late gestation and early neonatal life than in adulthood. The functional state of these receptors as determined by sensitivity to GABA did not alter during development. However, in the adult, nitrazepam, flunitrazepam, midazolam, and 1-methylisoguanosine were more potent in displacing 3H-diazepam at the low affinity than the high affinity receptor, whereas chlordiazepoxide and diazepam had greater potency at the high affinity binding site. Development of the benzodiazepine receptor in the majority of other brain regions studied occurred primarily after 68 days gestation, as was the case in frontal cortex. In contrast, hindbrain and midbrain benzodiazepine receptors had reached adult levels by 68 days gestation.

  14. DRUG INTERACTIONS WITH DIAZEPAM

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    Zoran Bojanić

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Diazepam is a benzodiazepine derivative with anxyolitic, anticonvulsant, hypnotic, sedative, skeletal muscle relaxant, antitremor, and amnestic activity. It is metabolized in the liver by the cytochrome P (CYP 450 enzyme system. Diazepam is N-demethylated by CYP3A4 and CYP2C19 to the active metabolite N-desmethyldiazepam, and is hydroxylated by CYP3A4 to the active metabolite temazepam. N-desmethyl-diazepam and temazepam are both further metabolized to oxazepam. Concomitant intake of inhibitors or inducers of the CYP isozymes involved in the biotransformation of diazepam may alter plasma concentrations of this drug, although this effect is unlikely to be associated with clinically relevant interactions.The goal of this article was to review the current literature on clinically relevant pharmacokinetic drug interactions with diazepam.A search of MEDLINE and EMBASE was conducted for original research and review articles published in English between January 1971. and May 2011. Among the search terms were drug interactions, diazepam, pharmacokinetics, drug metabolism, and cytochrome P450. Only articles published in peer-reviewed journals were included, and meeting abstracts were excluded. The reference lists of relevant articles were hand-searched for additional publications.Diazepam is substantially sorbed by the plastics in flexible containers, volume control set chambers, and tubings of intravenous administration sets. Manufacturers recommend not mixing with any other drug or solution in syringe or solution, although diazepam is compatible in syringe with cimetidine and ranitidine, and in Y-site with cisatracurium, dobutamine, fentanyl, hydromorphone, methadone, morphine, nafcillin, quinidine gluconate, remifentanil, and sufentanil. Diazepam is compatible with: dextrose 5% in water, Ringers injection, Ringers injection lactated and sodium chloride 0.9%. Emulsified diazepam is compatible with Intralipid and Nutralipid.Diazepam has low potential

  15. DBI/ACBP loss-of-function does not affect anxiety-like behaviour but reduces anxiolytic responses to diazepam in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Budry, Lionel; Bouyakdan, Khalil; Tobin, Stephanie;

    2016-01-01

    -like behaviour and anxiolytic responses to diazepam has not been investigated. To address this question, we assessed anxiety behaviour and anxiolytic responses to diazepam in two complementary loss-of-function mouse models including astrocyte-specific ACBP KO (ACBP(GFAP) KO) and whole-body KO (ACBP KO) mice...... of diazepam during EPM tests. In conclusion, our experiments using genetic ACBP loss-of-function models suggest that endozepines deficiency does not affect anxiety-like behaviour in mice and impairs the anxiolytic action of diazepam.......Diazepam is well known for its anxiolytic properties, which are mediated via activation of the GABAA receptor. Diazepam Binding Inhibitor (DBI), also called acyl-CoA binding protein (ACBP), is a ubiquitously expressed protein originally identified based on its ability to displace diazepam from its...

  16. Acute anxiogenic-like effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are attenuated by the benzodiazepine diazepam in BALB/c mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkett, Melissa A; Shinday, Nina M; Kessler, Eileen J; Meyer, Jerrold S; Ritchie, Sarah; Rowlett, James K

    2011-06-01

    Selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs), which are used commonly to treat anxiety disorders, have characteristic anxiogenic effects following acute administration. Treatment with anxiolytic benzodiazepines (BZs) may reduce these effects, although little is known about potential drug interactions. Our study evaluated acute anxiogenic-like effects of SSRIs, alone and combined with a BZ. Adult male BALB/c mice received fluoxetine (3.0-30.0mg/kg, i.p.) or citalopram (3.0-30.0mg/kg, i.p.) alone or in combination with diazepam (0.3-10.0mg/kg, i.p.), after which they were evaluated with the light/dark and open-field tests for anxiogenesis/anxiolysis. In addition, release of the stress hormone corticosterone was assessed following combined SSRI/BZ administration. In the light/dark and open-field tests, acute SSRIs produced a behavioral profile consistent with anxiogenesis, while diazepam produced an anxiolytic-like profile. Pre-treatment with diazepam (0.3-10mg/kg) reversed the effects of an anxiogenic-like dose of an SSRI (18mg/kg fluoxetine, 30mg/kg citalopram) in both light/dark and open-field tests. Diazepam, fluoxetine or citalopram, and their combination all significantly increased plasma corticosterone levels to the same degree. These findings suggest that a BZ-type drug can attenuate acute anxiogenic-like effects of an SSRI via a mechanism independent of corticosterone regulation.

  17. Diazepam overdose

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... It is in a class of drugs called benzodiazepines. Diazepam overdose occurs when someone takes more than ... Farrell SE, Fatovich TM. Benzodiazepines. In: Shannon MW, Borron SW, ... Clinical Management of Poisoning and Drug Overdose . 4th ed. ...

  18. Acyl-CoA-binding protein/diazepam-binding inhibitor gene and pseudogenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mandrup, S; Hummel, R; Ravn, S

    1992-01-01

    have molecularly cloned and characterized the ACBP/DBI gene family in rat. The rat ACBP/DBI gene family comprises one expressed gene and four processed pseudogenes of which one was shown to exist in two allelic forms. The expressed gene is organized into four exons and three introns....... There is a remarkable correspondence between the structural modules of ACBP/DBI as determined by 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and the exon-intron architecture of the ACBP/DBI gene. Detailed analyses of transcription of the ACBP/DBI gene in brain and liver were performed to map transcription initiation...

  19. {sup 125}I-iomazenil binding shows stress- and/or diazepam-induced reductions in mouse brain. Supporting data for {sup 123}I-iomazenil SPECT study of anxiety disorders

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    Takahashi, Makoto; Odano, Ikuo [Niigata Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine; Fujita, Shozo; Ohkubo, Masaki

    1997-08-01

    Effects of repeated swim stress on the binding of {sup 125}I-iomazenil were examined in the brains of diazepam-treated and non-treated mice. The mice were orally administered diazepam or vehicle (0.5% ethylene glycol) and subjected to daily swim stress (at 20degC for 10 min) for seven consecutive days. The distribution and the amount of {sup 125}I-iomazenil binding were analyzed autoradiographically after in vivo and in vitro binding experiments. Repeated swim stress decreased the in vivo binding in the hippocampus (p<0.05) and cerebral cortex (p<0.05) of vehicle-treated mice but caused no significant changes in diazepam-treated mice. Subchronic treatment with diazepam decreased the in vivo binding approximately 50% in all brain regions examined (p<0.01). The in vitro experiment, however, revealed no significant changes except in the hippocampus, where a small but significant decrease in the binding was observed after subchronic treatment with diazepam (p<0.01). The stress- or diazepam-induced reductions seem to represent alterations in the in vivo environment related to {sup 125}I-iomazenil binding. These results suggest that we can investigate the pathophysiology of stress and anxiety with {sup 123}I-iomazenil SPECT. Care must be taken concerning the effects of benzodiazepines. (author)

  20. Regional GABA concentration and (/sup 3/H)-diazepam binding in rat brain following repeated electroconvulsive shock

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    Bowdler, J.M.; Green, A.R.; Minchin, M.C.W.; Nutt, D.J. (Radcliffe Infirmary, Oxford (UK))

    1983-01-01

    It has been confirmed that 24 hours following a series of electroconvulsive shocks (ECS) given once daily for 10 days (ECS x 10) to rats there is an increase in GABA concentration in the corpus striatum. A similar change was seen after the ECS had been given to rats anaesthetised with halothane, or when 5 ECS were given spread out over 10 days, the rats being anaesthetised during the ECS. A daily convulsion for 10 days elicited by flurothyl exposure resulted in an increased striatal GABA concentration, but also increased the GABA concentration in the hypothalamus, hippocampus and cortex. The increase in striatal GABA concentration was present 24 hours after ECS daily for 5 days or 3 days after ECS daily for 10 days. No change in (/sup 3/H)-diazepam binding was seen in hippocampus, cortex or corpus striatum 24 hours after the last of 10 once daily ECS. The increase in striatal GABA concentration was therefore seen at all times when enhanced monoaminemediated behaviours have been demonstrated following seizures.

  1. Diazepam Rectal

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    ... serious, life-threatening side effects. Do not drink alcohol or use street drugs during your treatment. ... your doctor if you drink large amounts of alcohol or use or have used street ... using diazepam rectal gel, call your doctor.talk to your doctor about ...

  2. [The role of the substantia nigra in the anticonvulsive and antiaggressive effects of diazepam during pharmacological kindling].

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    Shandra, A A; Godlevskiĭ, L S; Mazarati, A M; Makul'kin, R F

    1990-01-01

    The seizure activity was investigated on the model of pharmacological kindling which was induced by repeated picrotoxin injections in the subthreshold dose, after the tryptic fragment of T5 protein-human diazepam binding inhibitor (DBI) (10 micrograms) injection into a reticular part of substantia nigra. An increase in the seizure reaction and suppression of the antiseizure diazepam action were observed. Intranigral DBI injection induced no change in a threshold of "attacks" in rats which were induced through electric shocks delivered to animals with an electrode floor and no changes in antiaggressive diazepam action were observed under such conditions.

  3. Effect of tianeptine on the mRNA expression of diazepam binding inhibitor in the brain of morphine-treated rats%噻萘普汀对吗啡处理大鼠内源性焦虑物质-苯甲二氮(艹卓)结合抑制因子mRNA表达的影响

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    康林; 王雪; 李静; 黄明生

    2004-01-01

    目的:研究抗抑郁药噻萘普汀能否影响吗啡处理大鼠脑内内源性焦虑物质-苯甲二氮(艹卓)结合抑制因子(diazepam bindinginhibitor,DBI)mRNA的表达.方法:15只SD大鼠(四川大学动物实验中心提供),随机进入吗啡+生理盐水组、吗啡+噻萘普汀组和生理盐水组,每组5只.按照剂量递增每12 h给大鼠腹腔注射盐酸吗啡(10~80mg/kg,共10次),每次注射吗啡前0.5 h注射噻萘普汀(15 mg/kg),对照组给予同体积的生理盐水,各组于末次吗啡注射后2h,给与腹腔注射盐酸纳洛酮2mg/kg,促发戒断,2h后处死大鼠,提取脑内总RNA,进行RT-PCR,检测DBI mMRNA的表达.结果:吗啡+噻萘普汀组DBI mRNA表达(0.52±0.08)明显少于吗啡+生理盐水组(0.91±0.08),差异有显著性意义q=15.631 P<0.01);与生理盐水组(0.40±0.06)差异无显著性意义(q=1.992,P>0.05).结论:噻萘普汀能够影响吗啡处理大鼠脑内DBI mRNA的表达.

  4. DBI/ACBP loss-of-function does not affect anxiety-like behaviour but reduces anxiolytic responses to diazepam in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budry, Lionel; Bouyakdan, Khalil; Tobin, Stephanie; Rodaros, Demetra; Marcher, Ann-Britt; Mandrup, Susanne; Fulton, Stephanie; Alquier, Thierry

    2016-10-15

    Diazepam is well known for its anxiolytic properties, which are mediated via activation of the GABAA receptor. Diazepam Binding Inhibitor (DBI), also called acyl-CoA binding protein (ACBP), is a ubiquitously expressed protein originally identified based on its ability to displace diazepam from its binding site on the GABAA receptor. Central administration of ACBP or its cleaved fragment, commonly referred to as endozepines, induces proconflict and anxiety-like behaviour in rodents. For this reason, ACBP is known as an anxiogenic peptide. However, the role of endogenous ACBP in anxiety-like behaviour and anxiolytic responses to diazepam has not been investigated. To address this question, we assessed anxiety behaviour and anxiolytic responses to diazepam in two complementary loss-of-function mouse models including astrocyte-specific ACBP KO (ACBP(GFAP) KO) and whole-body KO (ACBP KO) mice. Male and female ACBP(GFAP) KO and ACBP KO mice do not show significant changes in anxiety-like behaviour compared to control littermates during elevated plus maze (EPM) and open field (OF) tests. Surprisingly, ACBP(GFAP) KO and ACBP KO mice were unresponsive to the anxiolytic effect of a low dose of diazepam during EPM tests. In conclusion, our experiments using genetic ACBP loss-of-function models suggest that endozepines deficiency does not affect anxiety-like behaviour in mice and impairs the anxiolytic action of diazepam.

  5. Pharmacokinetic model for diazepam and its major metabolite desmethyldiazepam following diazepam administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jack, M L; Colburn, W A

    1983-11-01

    A five-compartment open model was used to simulate the blood concentration profiles of diazepam and its metabolite, desmethyldiazepam, following single- and multiple-dose administrations of diazepam. The parameter estimates for diazepam were previously reported literature values. The parameters estimates for the metabolite were calculated from literature values of blood concentrations of desmethyldiazepam following the administration of clorazepate. The five-compartment open model suggests that approximately 50% of the administered diazepam is biotransformed to desmethyldiazepam, and that the elimination profile of the metabolite is not altered by the presence of the drug. The model may also be readily adapted to predict the concentrations of diazepam and desmethyldiazepam in cerebrospinal fluid following the administration of diazepam by simply correcting the blood or plasma concentrations of the drug and metabolite for the degree of plasma protein binding.

  6. Response to diazepam in children with malaria-induced seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikumi, M L; Muchohi, S N; Ohuma, E O; Kokwaro, G O; Newton, C R J C

    2008-12-01

    Malaria infection reduces the binding capacity of benzodiazepine receptors in mice. We studied the efficacy of diazepam terminating seizures in children with falciparum malaria. Diazepam stopped seizures in fewer patients with malaria parasitaemia (chi(2)=3.93, P=0.047) and those with clinical diagnosis of malaria (chi(2)=9.84, P=0.002) compared to those without. However malaria was not identified as an independent risk factor for diazepam's failure to stop seizures in children.

  7. HDAC Inhibitors without an Active Site Zn2+-Binding Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vickers, Chris J.; Olsen, Christian Adam; Leman, Luke J.

    2012-01-01

    Natural and synthetic histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors generally derive their strong binding affinity and high potency from a key functional group that binds to the Zn2+ ion within the enzyme active site. However, this feature is also thought to carry the potential liability of undesirable off......-target interactions with other metalloenzymes. As a step toward mitigating this issue, here, we describe the design, synthesis, and structure−activity characterizations of cyclic α3β-tetrapeptide HDAC inhibitors that lack the presumed indispensable Zn2+-binding group. The lead compounds (e.g., 15 and 26) display good...

  8. The enigmatic drug binding site for sodium channel inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mike, Arpad; Lukacs, Peter

    2010-11-01

    Local anesthetics have been in clinical use since 1884, and different aspects of the local anesthetic binding site have been studied in enormous detail. In spite of all these efforts, some of the most fundamental questions--such as which exact residues constitute the binding site, how many binding sites exist, do local anesthetics share their binding site(s) with other sodium channel inhibitors, and what are the mechanisms of inhibition--are still largely unanswered. We review accumulated data on the "local anesthetic receptor"and discuss controversial points, such as possible mechanisms of inhibition, the possibility of additional binding sites, the orientation of S6 helices, and the internal vs. external position of the anticonvulsant binding site. We describe the four following specific groups of functionally important residues: i) conserved asparagines six residues below the hinge residues; we propose that they are oriented toward the external surface of S6 helices, and have a critical role in the coupling of voltage sensors to gating, ii) residues lining the inner vestibule and constructing the "orthodox" binding site, iii) residues around the outer vestibule, which have been proposed to constitute an alternative external binding site, and iv) residues determining external access for quaternary amine inhibitors, such as QX314. We conclude that sodium channel inhibitors must be heterogenous in terms of binding sites and inhibition mechanisms, and propose that this heterogeneity should be taken into consideration during drug development.

  9. Exploring the inhibitor binding pocket of respiratory complex I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fendel, Uta; Tocilescu, Maja A; Kerscher, Stefan; Brandt, Ulrich

    2008-01-01

    Numerous hydrophobic and amphipathic compounds including several detergents are known to inhibit the ubiquinone reductase reaction of respiratory chain complex I (proton pumping NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase). Guided by the X-ray structure of the peripheral arm of complex I from Thermus thermophilus we have generated a large collection of site-directed mutants in the yeast Yarrowia lipolytica targeting the proposed ubiquinone and inhibitor binding pocket of this huge multiprotein complex at the interface of the 49-kDa and PSST subunits. We could identify a number of residues where mutations changed I(50) values for representatives from all three groups of hydrophobic inhibitors. Many mutations around the domain of the 49-kDa subunit that is homologous to the [NiFe] centre binding region of hydrogenase conferred resistance to DQA (class I/type A) and rotenone (class II/type B) indicating a wider overlap of the binding sites for these two types of inhibitors. In contrast, a region near iron-sulfur cluster N2, where the binding of the n-alkyl-polyoxyethylene-ether detergent C(12)E(8) (type C) was exclusively affected, appeared comparably well separated. Taken together, our data provide structure-based support for the presence of distinct but overlapping binding sites for hydrophobic inhibitors possibly extending into the ubiquinone reduction site of mitochondrial complex I.

  10. Diazepam for Febrile Seizures

    OpenAIRE

    1990-01-01

    The efficacy and side effects of intermittent oral diazepam for the prevention of febrile seizure recurrence were investigated in the Departments of Clinical Pharmacology, Neurosurgery, and Biostatistics, University of Tours, France.

  11. The binding mechanism of a peptidic cyclic serine protease inhibitor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Longguang; Svane, Anna S P; Sørensen, Hans Peter

    2011-01-01

    Serine proteases are classical objects for studies of catalytic and inhibitory mechanisms as well as interesting as therapeutic targets. Since small-molecule serine protease inhibitors generally suffer from specificity problems, peptidic inhibitors, isolated from phage-displayed peptide libraries...... inhibitory mechanism and an unusually high specificity. Using a number of modified variants of upain-1, we characterised the upain-1-urokinase-type plasminogen activator complex using X-ray crystal structure analysis, determined a model of the peptide in solution by NMR spectroscopy, and analysed binding...... kinetics and thermodynamics by surface plasmon resonance and isothermal titration calorimetry. We found that upain-1 changes both main-chain conformation and side-chain orientations as it binds to the protease, in particular its Trp3 residue and the surrounding backbone. The properties of upain-1...

  12. A more robust Boolean model describing inhibitor binding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhaoqian Steven XIE; Chao TANG

    2008-01-01

    From the first application of the Boolean model to the cell cycle regulation network of budding yeast, new regulative pathways have been discovered, par-ticularly in the G1/S transition circuit. This discovery called for finer modeling to study the essential biology, and the resulting outcomes are first introduced in the ar-ticle. A traditional Boolean network model set up for the new G1/S transition circuit shows that it cannot correctly simulate real biology unless the model parameters are fine tuned. The deficiency is caused by an overly coarse-grained description of the inhibitor binding process, which shall be overcome by a two-vector model proposed whose robustness is surveyed using random perturba-tions. Simulations show that the proposed two-vector model is much more robust in describing inhibitor binding processes within the Boolean framework.

  13. Understanding enzymic binding affinity : thermodynamics of binding of benzamidinium chloride inhibitors to trypsin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Talhout, Reinskje

    2003-01-01

    Understanding enzymic binding affinity is of fundamental scientific importance as well as a prerequisite for structure-based drug design. In this study, the interactions of the serine proteinase trypsin with several artificial, benzamidinium-based inhibitors have been studied in aqueous solutions. I

  14. Response to diazepam in children with malaria induced seizures

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Summary Malaria infection reduces the binding capacity of benzodiazepine receptors in mice. We studied the efficacy of diazepam terminating seizures in children with falciparum malaria. Diazepam stopped seizures in fewer patients with malaria parasitaemia (χ 2 = 3.93, P = 0.047) and those with clinical diagnosis of malaria (χ 2 = 9.84, P = 0.002) compared to those without. However malaria was not identified as an independent risk factor for diazepam's failure to stop seizures in children....

  15. Steered molecular dynamics study of inhibitor binding in the internal binding site in dehaloperoxidase-hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhisen; Santos, Andrew P; Zhou, Qing; Liang, Lijun; Wang, Qi; Wu, Tao; Franzen, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    The binding free energy of 4-bromophenol (4-BP), an inhibitor that binds in the internal binding site in dehaloperoxidase-hemoglobin (DHP) was calculated using Molecular Dynamics (MD) methods combined with pulling or umbrella sampling. The effects of systematic changes in the pulling speed, pulling force constant and restraint force constant on the calculated potential of mean force (PMF) are presented in this study. The PMFs calculated using steered molecular dynamics (SMD) were validated by umbrella sampling (US) in the strongly restrained regime. A series of restraint force constants ranging from 1000 down to 5 kJ/(mol nm(2)) were used in SMD simulations. This range was validated using US, however noting that weaker restraints give rise to a broader sampling of configurations. This comparison was further tested by a pulling simulation conducted without any restraints, which was observed to have a value closest to the experimentally measured free energy for binding of 4-BP to DHP based on ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) and resonance Raman spectroscopies. The protein-inhibitor system is well suited for fundamental study of free energy calculations because the DHP protein is relatively small and the inhibitor is quite rigid. Simulation configuration structures are compared to the X-ray crystallography structures of the binding site of 4-BP in the distal pocket above the heme.

  16. Protracted treatment with diazepam increases the turnover of putative endogenous ligands for the benzodiazepine/. beta. -carboline recognition site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyata, M.; Mocchetti, I.; Ferrarese, C.; Guidotti, A.; Costa, E.

    1987-03-01

    DBI (diazepam-binding inhibitor) is a putative neuromodulatory peptide isolated from rat brain that acts on ..gamma..-aminobutyric acid-benzodiazepine-Cl/sup -/ ionosphore receptor complex inducing ..beta..-carboline-like effects. The authors used a cDNA probe complementary to DBI mRNA and a specific antibody for rat DBI to study in rat brain how the dynamic state of DBI can be affected after protected (three times a day for 10 days) treatment with diazepam and chlordiazepoxide by oral gavage. Both the content of DBI and DBI mRNA increased in the cerebellum and cerebral cortex but failed to change in the hippocampus and striatum of rats receiving this protracted benzodiazepine treatment. Acute treatment with diazepam did not affect the dynamic state of brain DBI. An antibody was raised against a biologically active octadecaneuropeptide derived from the tryptic digestion of DBI. The combined HPLC/RIA analysis of rat cerebellar extracts carried out with this antibody showed that multiple molecular forms of the octadecaneuropeptide-like reactivity are present and all of them are increased in rats receiving repeated daily injections of diazepam. It is inferred that tolerance to benzodiazepines in associated with an increase in the turnover rate of DBI, which may be responsible for the ..gamma..-aminobutyric acid receptor desensitization that occurs after protracted benzodiazepine administration.

  17. Comparative binding energy COMBINE analysis for understanding the binding determinants of type II dehydroquinase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peón, Antonio; Coderch, Claire; Gago, Federico; González-Bello, Concepción

    2013-05-01

    Herein we report comparative binding energy (COMBINE) analyses to derive quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models that help rationalize the determinants of binding affinity for inhibitors of type II dehydroquinase (DHQ2), the third enzyme of the shikimic acid pathway. Independent COMBINE models were derived for Helicobacter pylori and Mycobacterium tuberculosis DHQ2, which is an essential enzyme in both these pathogenic bacteria that has no counterpart in human cells. These studies quantify the importance of the hydrogen bonding interactions between the ligands and the water molecule involved in the DHQ2 reaction mechanism. They also highlight important differences in the ligand interactions with the interface pocket close to the active site that could provide guides for future inhibitor design.

  18. [Studies on development of radioimmunoassay for diazepam and it's medicolegal application].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomii, S

    1989-05-01

    A sensitive radioimmunoassay was developed for the determination of diazepam. Detection of diazepam in tissues of rats and in blood from unnatural death victims and traffic accident victims was examined by this procedure. Antisera capable of binding [3H] diazepam were obtained by repeated immunization of rabbits with temazepam (oxydiazepam)-3-hemisuccinate conjugated to bovine serum albumin. The antibody of a 1: 10000 dilution could bind approximately 50% of the added radioactivity. The level at least as low as 1 pg of diazepam could be detected by this procedure. This antibody strictly recognized the existence of the methyl group at the position-1 and of the keto group at the position-2 of the benzodiazepine ring, and was highly specific for temazepam and diazepam among benzodiazepine derivatives. But other benzodiazepine derivatives had no cross-reactivity with this antibody. The distribution of diazepam in biological fluids and tissues of rats 1, 2, 4 and 8 hr after intraperitoneal injection was examined. The level of diazepam in serum, saliva, brain and bone marrow declined within 2 hr, while the level in liver and kidney was maximum 2 hr after administration. The concentration of diazepam in each tissue leveled off 4 hr after administration. Among these results the remarkable finding was that the concentration in the bone marrow is much higher than that in serum, saliva and brain, appearing to be due to a high accumulation of diazepam in this tissue. This result indicates that the bone marrow is a very useful material for the detection of diazepam in skeletonized remains. There ware good correlations (gamma = 0.8595-0.9973) in the concentrations of diazepam between serum, saliva and brain, and bone marrow. Detection of diazepam in blood from unnatural death victims and traffic accident victims were examined. Diazepam was identified in 3 cases of 50 unnatural death victims and in 4 cases of 48 traffic accident victims.

  19. Inhibitor and substrate binding by angiotensin-converting enzyme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Xuemei; Wu, Shanshan; Xu, Dingguo;

    2011-01-01

    . In this work, we propose a model for an ACE Michaelis complex based on two known X-ray structures of inhibitor-enzyme complexes. Specifically, the human testis angiotensin-converting enzyme (tACE) complexed with two clinic drugs were first investigated using a combined quantum mechanical and molecular......Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) is an important zinc-dependent hydrolase responsible for converting the inactive angiotensin I to the vasoconstrictor angiotensin II and for inactivating the vasodilator bradykinin. However, the substrate binding mode of ACE has not been completely understood...... mechanical (QM/MM) approach. The structural parameters obtained from the 550 ps molecular dynamics simulations are in excellent agreement with the X-ray structures, validating the QM/MM approach. Based on these structures, a model for the Michaelis complex was proposed and simulated using the same...

  20. Clobazam and diazepam in anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickels, K; Brown, A S; Cohen, D; Harris, H; Hurowitz, A; Lindenbaum, E J; Ross, H A; Weinstock, R; Wiseman, K; Zal, M

    1981-07-01

    The anxiolytic effects of clobazam, diazepam, and placebo were compared in a 4-wk double-blind study of 159 anxious outpatients, primarily from family practice. Clobazam (30 to 80 mg/day) and diazepam (15 to 40 mg/day) were found to induce similar side effect, primarily sedation, and although both active drugs induced greater clinical improvement than placebo, clobazam induced the largest degree of improvement in most aspects. It was speculated that the relatively high daily dosage of diazepam may have been contributed to these results.

  1. Thermodynamics and kinetics of inhibitor binding to human equilibrative nucleoside transporter subtype-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehan, Shahid; Ashok, Yashwanth; Nanekar, Rahul; Jaakola, Veli-Pekka

    2015-12-15

    Many nucleoside transport inhibitors are in clinical use as anti-cancer, vasodilator and cardioprotective drugs. However, little is known about the binding energetics of these inhibitors to nucleoside transporters (NTs) due to their low endogenous expression levels and difficulties in the biophysical characterization of purified protein with ligands. Here, we present kinetics and thermodynamic analyses of inhibitor binding to the human equilibrative nucleoside transporter-1 (hENT1), also known as SLC29A1. Using a radioligand binding assay, we obtained equilibrium binding and kinetic rate constants of well-known NT inhibitors--[(3)H]nitrobenzylmercaptopurine ribonucleoside ([(3)H]NBMPR), dilazep, and dipyridamole--and the native permeant, adenosine, to hENT1. We observed that the equilibrium binding affinities for all inhibitors decreased whereas, the kinetic rate constants increased with increasing temperature. Furthermore, we found that binding is enthalpy driven and thus, an exothermic reaction, implying that the transporter does not discriminate between its inhibitors and substrates thermodynamically. This predominantly enthalpy-driven binding by four chemically distinct ligands suggests that the transporter may not tolerate diversity in the type of interactions that lead to high affinity binding. Consistent with this, the measured activation energy of [(3)H]NBMPR association was relatively large (20 kcal mol(-1)) suggesting a conformational change upon inhibitor binding. For all three inhibitors the enthalpy (ΔH°) and entropy (ΔS°) contributions to the reaction energetics were determined by van't Hoff analysis to be roughly similar (25-75% ΔG°). Gains in enthalpy with increasing polar surface area of inhibitors suggest that the binding is favored by electrostatic or polar interactions between the ligands and the transporter.

  2. Discovery of MK-8718, an HIV Protease Inhibitor Containing a Novel Morpholine Aspartate Binding Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bungard, Christopher J; Williams, Peter D; Ballard, Jeanine E; Bennett, David J; Beaulieu, Christian; Bahnck-Teets, Carolyn; Carroll, Steve S; Chang, Ronald K; Dubost, David C; Fay, John F; Diamond, Tracy L; Greshock, Thomas J; Hao, Li; Holloway, M Katharine; Felock, Peter J; Gesell, Jennifer J; Su, Hua-Poo; Manikowski, Jesse J; McKay, Daniel J; Miller, Mike; Min, Xu; Molinaro, Carmela; Moradei, Oscar M; Nantermet, Philippe G; Nadeau, Christian; Sanchez, Rosa I; Satyanarayana, Tummanapalli; Shipe, William D; Singh, Sanjay K; Truong, Vouy Linh; Vijayasaradhi, Sivalenka; Wiscount, Catherine M; Vacca, Joseph P; Crane, Sheldon N; McCauley, John A

    2016-07-14

    A novel HIV protease inhibitor was designed using a morpholine core as the aspartate binding group. Analysis of the crystal structure of the initial lead bound to HIV protease enabled optimization of enzyme potency and antiviral activity. This afforded a series of potent orally bioavailable inhibitors of which MK-8718 was identified as a compound with a favorable overall profile.

  3. Synthesis and evaluation of potential inhibitors of human and Escherichia coli histidine triad nucleotide binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardaweel, Sanaa K; Ghosh, Brahma; Wagner, Carston R

    2012-01-01

    Based on recent substrate specificity studies, a series of ribonucleotide based esters and carbamates were synthesized and screened as inhibitors of the phosphoramidases and acyl-AMP hydrolases, Escherichia coli Histidine Triad Nucleotide Binding Protein (ecHinT) and human Histidine Triad Nucleotide Binding Protein 1 (hHint1). Using our established phosphoramidase assay, K(i) values were determined. All compounds exhibited non-competitive inhibition profiles. The carbamate based inhibitors were shown to successfully suppress the Hint1-associated phenotype in E. coli, suggesting that they are permeable intracellular inhibitors of ecHinT.

  4. Microbes bind complement inhibitor factor H via a common site.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Meri

    Full Text Available To cause infections microbes need to evade host defense systems, one of these being the evolutionarily old and important arm of innate immunity, the alternative pathway of complement. It can attack all kinds of targets and is tightly controlled in plasma and on host cells by plasma complement regulator factor H (FH. FH binds simultaneously to host cell surface structures such as heparin or glycosaminoglycans via domain 20 and to the main complement opsonin C3b via domain 19. Many pathogenic microbes protect themselves from complement by recruiting host FH. We analyzed how and why different microbes bind FH via domains 19-20 (FH19-20. We used a selection of FH19-20 point mutants to reveal the binding sites of several microbial proteins and whole microbes (Haemophilus influenzae, Bordetella pertussis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Streptococcus pneumonia, Candida albicans, Borrelia burgdorferi, and Borrelia hermsii. We show that all studied microbes use the same binding region located on one side of domain 20. Binding of FH to the microbial proteins was inhibited with heparin showing that the common microbial binding site overlaps with the heparin site needed for efficient binding of FH to host cells. Surprisingly, the microbial proteins enhanced binding of FH19-20 to C3b and down-regulation of complement activation. We show that this is caused by formation of a tripartite complex between the microbial protein, FH, and C3b. In this study we reveal that seven microbes representing different phyla utilize a common binding site on the domain 20 of FH for complement evasion. Binding via this site not only mimics the glycosaminoglycans of the host cells, but also enhances function of FH on the microbial surfaces via the novel mechanism of tripartite complex formation. This is a unique example of convergent evolution resulting in enhanced immune evasion of important pathogens via utilization of a "superevasion site."

  5. Seeking for Non-Zinc-Binding MMP-2 Inhibitors: Synthesis, Biological Evaluation and Molecular Modelling Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammazzalorso, Alessandra; De Filippis, Barbara; Campestre, Cristina; Laghezza, Antonio; Marrone, Alessandro; Amoroso, Rosa; Tortorella, Paolo; Agamennone, Mariangela

    2016-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are an important family of zinc-containing enzymes with a central role in many physiological and pathological processes. Although several MMP inhibitors have been synthesized over the years, none reached the market because of off-target effects, due to the presence of a zinc binding group in the inhibitor structure. To overcome this problem non-zinc-binding inhibitors (NZIs) have been recently designed. In a previous article, a virtual screening campaign identified some hydroxynaphtyridine and hydroxyquinoline as MMP-2 non-zinc-binding inhibitors. In the present work, simplified analogues of previously-identified hits have been synthesized and tested in enzyme inhibition assays. Docking and molecular dynamics studies were carried out to rationalize the activity data. PMID:27782083

  6. Seeking for Non-Zinc-Binding MMP-2 Inhibitors: Synthesis, Biological Evaluation and Molecular Modelling Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Ammazzalorso

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs are an important family of zinc-containing enzymes with a central role in many physiological and pathological processes. Although several MMP inhibitors have been synthesized over the years, none reached the market because of off-target effects, due to the presence of a zinc binding group in the inhibitor structure. To overcome this problem non-zinc-binding inhibitors (NZIs have been recently designed. In a previous article, a virtual screening campaign identified some hydroxynaphtyridine and hydroxyquinoline as MMP-2 non-zinc-binding inhibitors. In the present work, simplified analogues of previously-identified hits have been synthesized and tested in enzyme inhibition assays. Docking and molecular dynamics studies were carried out to rationalize the activity data.

  7. Relationship between brain serotonin transporter binding, plasma concentration and behavioural effect of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to characterise the relationship between in vivo brain serotonin transporter (SERT) binding, plasma concentration and pharmacological effect of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in mice. Oral administration of fluvoxamine, fluoxetine, paroxetine and sertraline at pharmacologically relevant doses exerted dose- and time-dependent binding activity of brain SERT as revealed by significant increases in KD for specific [3H]paroxetine binding, and the i...

  8. A competitive nucleotide binding inhibitor: in vitro characterization of Rab7 GTPase inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agola, Jacob O; Hong, Lin; Surviladze, Zurab; Ursu, Oleg; Waller, Anna; Strouse, J Jacob; Simpson, Denise S; Schroeder, Chad E; Oprea, Tudor I; Golden, Jennifer E; Aubé, Jeffrey; Buranda, Tione; Sklar, Larry A; Wandinger-Ness, Angela

    2012-06-15

    Mapping the functionality of GTPases through small molecule inhibitors represents an underexplored area in large part due to the lack of suitable compounds. Here we report on the small chemical molecule 2-(benzoylcarbamothioylamino)-5,5-dimethyl-4,7-dihydrothieno[2,3-c]pyran-3-carboxylic acid (PubChem CID 1067700) as an inhibitor of nucleotide binding by Ras-related GTPases. The mechanism of action of this pan-GTPase inhibitor was characterized in the context of the Rab7 GTPase as there are no known inhibitors of Rab GTPases. Bead-based flow cytometry established that CID 1067700 has significant inhibitory potency on Rab7 nucleotide binding with nanomolar inhibitor (K(i)) values and an inhibitory response of ≥97% for BODIPY-GTP and BODIPY-GDP binding. Other tested GTPases exhibited significantly lower responses. The compound behaves as a competitive inhibitor of Rab7 nucleotide binding based on both equilibrium binding and dissociation assays. Molecular docking analyses are compatible with CID 1067700 fitting into the nucleotide binding pocket of the GTP-conformer of Rab7. On the GDP-conformer, the molecule has greater solvent exposure and significantly less protein interaction relative to GDP, offering a molecular rationale for the experimental results. Structural features pertinent to CID 1067700 inhibitory activity have been identified through initial structure-activity analyses and identified a molecular scaffold that may serve in the generation of more selective probes for Rab7 and other GTPases. Taken together, our study has identified the first competitive GTPase inhibitor and demonstrated the potential utility of the compound for dissecting the enzymology of the Rab7 GTPase, as well as serving as a model for other small molecular weight GTPase inhibitors.

  9. Coarse-grained molecular dynamics of ligands binding into protein: The case of HIV-1 protease inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dechang; Liu, Ming S.; Ji, Baohua; Hwang, Kehchih; Huang, Yonggang

    2009-06-01

    Binding dynamics and pathways of ligands or inhibitors to target proteins are challenging both experimental and theoretical biologists. A dynamics understanding of inhibitors interacting with protein is essential for the design of novel potent drugs. In this work we applied a coarse-grained molecular dynamics method for simulating inhibitors entering the binding cavity of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protease (PR). It shows that the coarse-grained dynamics, consistent with the experimental results, can capture the essential molecular dynamics of various inhibitors binding into PR. The primary driving force for the binding processes is the nonbond interaction between inhibitors and PR. The size and topology of inhibitors and the interacting strength between inhibitors and PR have great influence on the binding mode and processes. The interaction strength between the PR and various inhibitors is also analyzed by atomistic molecular mechanics and Poisson-Boltzmann solvation area method.

  10. Small-molecule inhibitor binding to an N-acyl-homoserine lactone synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Jiwoung; Goo, Eunhye; Yu, Sangheon; Choi, Okhee; Lee, Jeehyun; Kim, Jinwoo; Kim, Hongsup; Igarashi, Jun; Suga, Hiroaki; Moon, Jae Sun; Hwang, Ingyu; Rhee, Sangkee

    2011-07-19

    Quorum sensing (QS) controls certain behaviors of bacteria in response to population density. In gram-negative bacteria, QS is often mediated by N-acyl-L-homoserine lactones (acyl-HSLs). Because QS influences the virulence of many pathogenic bacteria, synthetic inhibitors of acyl-HSL synthases might be useful therapeutically for controlling pathogens. However, rational design of a potent QS antagonist has been thwarted by the lack of information concerning the binding interactions between acyl-HSL synthases and their ligands. In the gram-negative bacterium Burkholderia glumae, QS controls virulence, motility, and protein secretion and is mediated by the binding of N-octanoyl-L-HSL (C8-HSL) to its cognate receptor, TofR. C8-HSL is synthesized by the acyl-HSL synthase TofI. In this study, we characterized two previously unknown QS inhibitors identified in a focused library of acyl-HSL analogs. Our functional and X-ray crystal structure analyses show that the first inhibitor, J8-C8, binds to TofI, occupying the binding site for the acyl chain of the TofI cognate substrate, acylated acyl-carrier protein. Moreover, the reaction byproduct, 5'-methylthioadenosine, independently binds to the binding site for a second substrate, S-adenosyl-L-methionine. Closer inspection of the mode of J8-C8 binding to TofI provides a likely molecular basis for the various substrate specificities of acyl-HSL synthases. The second inhibitor, E9C-3oxoC6, competitively inhibits C8-HSL binding to TofR. Our analysis of the binding of an inhibitor and a reaction byproduct to an acyl-HSL synthase may facilitate the design of a new class of QS-inhibiting therapeutic agents.

  11. Computational optimization of AG18051 inhibitor for amyloid-beta binding alcohol dehydrogenase enzyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Alexandra T.; Antunes, Agostinho; Fernandes, Pedro A.; Ramos, Maria J.

    Amyloid-beta (Abeta) binding alcohol dehydrogenase (ABAD) is a multifunctional enzyme involved in maintaining the homeostasis. The enzyme can also mediate some diseases, including genetic diseases, Alzheimer's disease, and possibly some prostate cancers. Potent inhibitors of ABAD might facilitate a better clarification of the functions of the enzyme under normal and pathogenic conditions and might also be used for therapeutic intervention in disease conditions mediated by the enzyme. The AG18051 is the only presently available inhibitor of ABAD. It binds in the active-site cavity of the enzyme and reacts with the NAD+ cofactor to form a covalent adduct. In this work, we use computational methods to perform a rational optimization of the AG18051 inhibitor, through the introduction of chemical substitutions directed to improve the affinity of the inhibitor to the enzyme. The molecular mechanics-Poisson-Boltzmann surface area methodology was used to predict the relative free binding energy of the different modified inhibitor-NAD-enzyme complexes. We show that it is possible to increase significantly the affinity of the inhibitor to the enzyme with small modifications, without changing the overall structure and ADME (absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion) properties of the original inhibitor.

  12. RBI, a one-domain alpha-amylase/trypsin inhibitor with completely independent binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maskos, K; Huber-Wunderlich, M; Glockshuber, R

    1996-11-11

    The bifunctional inhibitor from Ragi (Eleusine coracana Gaertneri) (RBI) is the only member of the alpha-amylase/trypsin inhibitor family that inhibits both trypsin and alpha-amylase. Here, we show that both enzymes simultaneously and independently bind to RBI. The recently solved three-dimensional NMR structure of RBI has revealed that the inhibitor possesses a hitherto unknown fold for serine proteinase and alpha-amylase inhibitors. Despite its different fold, RBI obeys the standard mechanism observed for most protein inhibitors of serine proteinases and is a strong, competitive inhibitor of bovine trypsin (Ki = 1.2 +/- 0.2 nM). RBI is also a competitive inhibitor of porcine alpha-amylase (Ki = 11 +/- 2 nM) when a disaccharide is used as a substrate of alpha-amylase. However, the inhibition mode becomes complex when larger (> or = 7 saccharide units) alpha-amylase substrates are used. A second saccharide binding site on porcine alpha-amylase may enable larger oligosaccharides to displace RBI from its binding site in an intramolecular reaction.

  13. Estimation of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors protein binding degree using chromatographic hydrophobicity data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trbojević-Stanković Jasna

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE inhibitors represent a significant group of drugs primarily used in the treatment of hypertension and congestive heart failure. Objective. Selected ACE inhibitors (enalapril, quinapril, fosinopril, lisinopril, cilazapril were studied in order to establish a fast and easy estimation method of their plasma protein binding degree based on their lipophilicity data. Methods. Chromatographic hydrophobicity data (parameter C0 were obtained on cellulose layers under conditions of normal-phase thin-layer chromatography (NPTLC, using different binary solvent systems. The ACE inhibitors lipophilicity descriptors (logP values were calculated using the software package Virtual Computational Chemistry Laboratory. The ACE inhibitors plasma protein binding data were collected from relevant literature. Results. ACE inhibitors protein binding data varied from negligible (lisinopril to 99% (fosinopril. The calculated lipophilicity descriptors, logPKOWWIN values ranged from -0.94 (lisinopril to 6.61 (fosinopril. Good correlations were established between plasma protein binding values and calculated logPKOWWIN values (R2=0.8026 as well as chromatographic hydrophobicity data, C0 parameters (R2=0.7662. Even though good correlation coefficients (R2 were obtained in both relations, unacceptable probability value with p>0.05 was found in relation between protein binding data and calculated logPKOWWIN values. Subsequently, taking into consideration the request for probability value lower than 0.05, a better relationship was observed between protein binding data and chromatographically obtained hydrophobicity parameters C0 values. Conclusion. Cellulose layers are easily available and cost effective sorbent to assess hydrophobicity. Experimentally obtained data on ACE inhibitors hydrophobicity and plasma protein binding estimation are important parameters in evaluating bioavailability of these drugs. [Projekat Ministarstva

  14. Assessing the binding of cholinesterase inhibitors by docking and molecular dynamics studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, M Rejwan; Sadoqi, Mostafa; Møller, Simon G; Boutajangout, Allal; Mezei, Mihaly

    2017-09-01

    In this report we assessed by docking and molecular dynamics the binding mechanisms of three FDA-approved Alzheimer drugs, inhibitors of the enzyme acetylcholinesterase (AChE): donepezil, galantamine and rivastigmine. Dockings by the softwares Autodock-Vina, PatchDock and Plant reproduced the docked conformations of the inhibitor-enzyme complexes within 2Å of RMSD of the X-ray structure. Free-energy scores show strong affinity of the inhibitors for the enzyme binding pocket. Three independent Molecular Dynamics simulation runs indicated general stability of donepezil, galantamine and rivastigmine in their respective enzyme binding pocket (also referred to as gorge) as well as the tendency to form hydrogen bonds with the water molecules. The binding of rivastigmine in the Torpedo California AChE binding pocket is interesting as it eventually undergoes carbamylation and breaks apart according to the X-ray structure of the complex. Similarity search in the ZINC database and targeted docking on the gorge region of the AChE enzyme gave new putative inhibitor molecules with high predicted binding affinity, suitable for potential biophysical and biological assessments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Structure and binding efficiency relations of QB site inhibitors of photosynthetic reaction centres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husu, Ivan; Magyar, Melinda; Szabó, Tibor; Fiser, Béla; Gómez-Bengoa, Enrique; Nagy, László

    2015-04-01

    Many herbicides employed in agriculture and also some antibiotics bind to a specific site of the reaction centre protein (RC) blocking the photosynthetic electron transport. Crystal structures showed that all these compounds bind at the secondary ubiquinone (QB) site albeit to slightly different places. Different herbicide molecules have different binding affinities (evaluated as inhibition constants, KI, and binding enthalpy values, ΔHbind). The action of inhibitors depends on the following parameters: (i) herbicide molecular structure; (ii) interactions between herbicide and quinone binding site; (iii) protein environment. In our investigations KI and ΔHbind were determined for several inhibitors. Bound herbicide structures were optimized and their intramolecular charge distributions were calculated. Experimental and calculated data were compared to those available from databank crystal structures. We can state that the herbicide inhibition efficiency depends on steric and electronic, i.e. geometry of binding with the protein and molecular charge distribution, respectively. Apolar bulky groups on N-7 atom of the inhibitor molecule (like t-buthyl in terbutryn) are preferable for establishing stronger interactions with QB site, while such substituents are not recommended on N-8. The N-4,7,8 nitrogen atoms maintain a larger electron density so that more effective H-bonds are formed between the inhibitor and the surrounding amino acids of the protein.

  16. Pyrazole-based cathepsin S inhibitors with arylalkynes as P1 binding elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ameriks, Michael K.; Axe, Frank U.; Bembenek, Scott D.; Edwards, James P.; Gu, Yin; Karlsson, Lars; Randal, Mike; Sun, Siquan; Thurmond, Robin L.; Zhu, Jian; (J& J-PRD); (Sunesis)

    2010-01-12

    A crystal structure of 1 bound to a Cys25Ser mutant of cathepsin S helped to elucidate the binding mode of a previously disclosed series of pyrazole-based CatS inhibitors and facilitated the design of a new class of arylalkyne analogs. Optimization of the alkyne and tetrahydropyridine portions of the pharmacophore provided potent CatS inhibitors (IC{sub 50} = 40-300 nM), and an X-ray structure of 32 revealed that the arylalkyne moiety binds in the S1 pocket of the enzyme.

  17. Influence of azide incorporation on binding affinity by small papain inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wammes, Angelique E M; Hendriks, Tom G; Amatdjais-Groenen, Helene I V; Wijdeven, Marloes A; van Hest, Jan C M; van Delft, Floris L; Ritschel, Tina; Rutjes, Floris P J T

    2014-10-15

    In order to develop affinity-based biosensor platforms, appropriate ligands with a functional handle for immobilization onto a biosensor surface are required. To this end, a library of papain inhibitors was designed and synthesized, containing different azide linkers for subsequent immobilization by 'click' chemistry, in this particular case by copper-free, strain-promoted azide-alkyne cycloaddition (SPAAC). Furthermore, a molecular docking study was performed to obtain a better insight as to at which position such azide handles could be tolerated without affecting binding affinity. Although the azide moiety is small, in some cases its introduction strongly influenced the binding affinity. For one class of inhibitors a swapped binding mode was proposed to explain the results. In addition, a specific site for linker introduction was identified, which did not significantly affect the binding affinity.

  18. Resistance Patterns Associated with HCV NS5A Inhibitors Provide Limited Insight into Drug Binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moheshwarnath Issur

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Direct-acting antivirals (DAAs have significantly improved the treatment of infection with the hepatitis C virus. A promising class of novel antiviral agents targets the HCV NS5A protein. The high potency and broad genotypic coverage are favorable properties. NS5A inhibitors are currently assessed in advanced clinical trials in combination with viral polymerase inhibitors and/or viral protease inhibitors. However, the clinical use of NS5A inhibitors is also associated with new challenges. HCV variants with decreased susceptibility to these drugs can emerge and compromise therapy. In this review, we discuss resistance patterns in NS5A with focus prevalence and implications for inhibitor binding.

  19. Inhibitors of serotonin reuptake and specific imipramine binding in human blood plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brusov, O.S.; Fomenko, A.M.; Katasonov, A.B.; Lidemann, R.R.

    1985-12-01

    This paper describes a method of extraction of endogenous inhibitors of specific IMI binding and of 5-HT reuptake, from human blood plasma and the heterogeneity of these compounds is demonstrated. Specific binding was determined as the difference between binding of /sup 3/H-IMI in the absence and in the presence of 50 microM IMI. Under these conditions, specific binding amounted to 70-80% of total binding of /sup 3/H-IMI. It is shown that extract obtained from human blood contains a material which inhibits dose-dependently both 5-HT reuptake and specific binding of /sup 3/H-IMI. Gel-chromatography of extracts of human blood plasma on Biogel P-2 is also shown.

  20. Structure-Based Inhibitor Design for an Enzyme That Binds Different Steriods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu,W.; Zhou, M.; Mazumdar, M.; Azzi, A.; Ghanmi, D.; Luu-The, V.; Labrie, F.; Lin, S.

    2007-01-01

    Human type 5 17{beta}-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase plays a crucial role in local androgen formation in prostate tissue. Several chemicals were synthesized and tested for their ability to inhibit this enzyme, and a series of estradiol derivatives bearing a lactone on the D-ring were found to inhibit its activity efficiently. The crystal structure of the type 5 enzyme in complex with NADP and such a novel inhibitor, EM1404, was determined to a resolution of 1.30 {angstrom}. Significantly more hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic interactions were defined between EM1404 and the enzyme than in the substrate ternary complex. The lactone ring of EM1404 accounts for important interactions with the enzyme, whereas the amide group at the opposite end of the inhibitor contributes to the stability of three protein loops involved in the construction of the substrate binding site. EM1404 has a strong competitive inhibition, with a K{sub i} of 6.9 {+-} 1.4 nM, demonstrating 40 times higher affinity than that of the best inhibitor previously reported. This is observed despite the fact that the inhibitor occupies only part of the binding cavity. Attempts to soak the inhibitor into crystals of the binary complex with NADP were unsuccessful, yielding a structure with a polyethylene glycol fragment occupying the substrate binding site. The relative crystal packing is discussed. Combined studies of small molecule inhibitor synthesis, x-ray crystallography, enzyme inhibition, and molecular modeling make it possible to analyze the plasticity of the substrate binding site of the enzyme, which is essential for developing more potent and specific inhibitors for hormone-dependent cancer therapy.

  1. Synthesis of Sulochrin-125I and Its Binding Affinity as α-Glucosidase Inhibitor using Radioligand Binding Assay (RBA Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Lestari

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Most of diabetics patients have type 2 diabetes mellitus or non insulin dependent diabetes mellitus. Treatment type 2 diabetes mellitus can be done by inhibiting α-glucosidase enzyme which converts carbohydrates into glucose. Sulochrin is one of the potential compounds which can inhibit the function of α-glucosidase enzyme. This study was carried out to obtain data of sulochrin binding with α-glucosidase enzyme as α-glucosidase inhibitor using Radioligand Binding Assay (RBA method. Primary reagent required in RBA method is labeled radioactive ligand (radioligand. In this study, the radioligand was sulochrin-125I and prior to sulochrin-125I synthesis, the sulochrin-I was synthesized. Sulochrin-I and sulochrin-125I were synthesized and their bindings were studied using Radioligand Binding Assay method. Sulochrin-I was synthesized with molecular formula C17H15O7I and molecular weight 457.9940. Sulochrin-125I was synthesized from sulochrin-I by isotope exchange method. From the RBA method, dissociation constant (Kd and maximum binding (Bmax were obtained 26.316 nM and Bmax 9.302 nM respectively. This low Kd indicated that sulochrin was can bind to α-glucosidase

  2. Binding of [alpha, alpha]-Disubstituted Amino Acids to Arginase Suggests New Avenues for Inhibitor Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilies, Monica; Di Costanzo, Luigi; Dowling, Daniel P.; Thorn, Katherine J.; Christianson, David W. (MIT); (Episcopal U); (Rutgers); (Drexel); (Penn)

    2011-10-21

    Arginase is a binuclear manganese metalloenzyme that hydrolyzes L-arginine to form L-ornithine and urea, and aberrant arginase activity is implicated in various diseases such as erectile dysfunction, asthma, atherosclerosis, and cerebral malaria. Accordingly, arginase inhibitors may be therapeutically useful. Continuing our efforts to expand the chemical space of arginase inhibitor design and inspired by the binding of 2-(difluoromethyl)-L-ornithine to human arginase I, we now report the first study of the binding of {alpha},{alpha}-disubstituted amino acids to arginase. Specifically, we report the design, synthesis, and assay of racemic 2-amino-6-borono-2-methylhexanoic acid and racemic 2-amino-6-borono-2-(difluoromethyl)hexanoic acid. X-ray crystal structures of human arginase I and Plasmodium falciparum arginase complexed with these inhibitors reveal the exclusive binding of the L-stereoisomer; the additional {alpha}-substituent of each inhibitor is readily accommodated and makes new intermolecular interactions in the outer active site of each enzyme. Therefore, this work highlights a new region of the protein surface that can be targeted for additional affinity interactions, as well as the first comparative structural insights on inhibitor discrimination between a human and a parasitic arginase.

  3. Binding of natural and synthetic inhibitors to human heat shock protein 90 and their clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrikaitė, Vilma; Matulis, Daumantas

    2011-01-01

    This review describes the recent progress in the field of heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) inhibitor design. Hsp90 is a heat shock protein with a molecular weight of approximately 90 kDa. Hsp90 is considered a good anticancer target because its inhibition leads to inactivation of its numerous client proteins participating in various signaling and other processes involved in cancer progression. Numerous Hsp90 inhibitors-leads currently tested in clinical trials are presented in this review. Furthermore, this review emphasizes the application of biophysical binding assays in the development of Hsp90 inhibitors. The binding of designed lead compounds to various Hsp90 constructs is measured by isothermal titration calorimetry and thermal shift assay. These assays provide a detailed energetic insight of the binding reaction, including the enthalpy, entropy, heat capacity, and the Gibbs free energy. A detailed description of the binding energetics helps to extend our knowledge of structure-activity relationships in the design of more potent inhibitors. The most active compounds are then tested for their absorption, distribution, metabolism, elimination, toxicity, and activity against cancer cell lines.

  4. Diazepam use and progression of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinerman, R A; Brinton, L A; Hoover, R; Fraumeni, J F

    1984-03-01

    The relationship between diazepam and breast cancer was evaluated using data from a case-control study of breast cancer, in which 1075 cases and 1146 controls who were participants in a breast cancer screening program were interviewed. Diazepam use was negatively associated with extent of disease and lymph node involvement, and this effect seemed greatest for long-term users of diazepam. It is not certain to what extent these data reflect an ascertainment bias, an association with the reasons for which the drug was prescribed, or chance. Whatever the explanation, the findings do not support a previous contention that diazepam promotes or accelerates breast cancer growth.

  5. Binding to large enzyme pockets: small-molecule inhibitors of trypanothione reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persch, Elke; Bryson, Steve; Todoroff, Nickolay K; Eberle, Christian; Thelemann, Jonas; Dirdjaja, Natalie; Kaiser, Marcel; Weber, Maria; Derbani, Hassan; Brun, Reto; Schneider, Gisbert; Pai, Emil F; Krauth-Siegel, R Luise; Diederich, François

    2014-08-01

    The causative agents of the parasitic disease human African trypanosomiasis belong to the family of trypanosomatids. These parasitic protozoa exhibit a unique thiol redox metabolism that is based on the flavoenzyme trypanothione reductase (TR). TR was identified as a potential drug target and features a large active site that allows a multitude of possible ligand orientations, which renders rational structure-based inhibitor design highly challenging. Herein we describe the synthesis, binding properties, and kinetic analysis of a new series of small-molecule inhibitors of TR. The conjunction of biological activities, mutation studies, and virtual ligand docking simulations led to the prediction of a binding mode that was confirmed by crystal structure analysis. The crystal structures revealed that the ligands bind to the hydrophobic wall of the so-called "mepacrine binding site". The binding conformation and potency of the inhibitors varied for TR from Trypanosoma brucei and T. cruzi. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Amino Acid Derivatives as New Zinc Binding Groups for the Design of Selective Matrix Metalloproteinase Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariateresa Giustiniano

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A number of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs are important medicinal targets for conditions ranging from rheumatoid arthritis to cardiomyopathy, periodontal disease, liver cirrhosis, multiple sclerosis, and cancer invasion and metastasis, where they showed to have a dual role, inhibiting or promoting important processes involved in the pathology. MMPs contain a zinc (II ion in the protein active site. Small-molecule inhibitors of these metalloproteins are designed to bind directly to the active site metal ions. In an effort to devise new approaches to selective inhibitors, in this paper, we describe the synthesis and preliminary biological evaluation of amino acid derivatives as new zinc binding groups (ZBGs. The incorporation of selected metal-binding functions in more complex biphenyl sulfonamide moieties allowed the identification of one compound able to interact selectively with different MMP enzymatic isoforms.

  7. An overview of the binding models of FGFR tyrosine kinases in complex with small molecule inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Weiyan; Wang, Mixiang; Tian, Xin; Zhang, Xiaojian

    2017-01-27

    The fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) family receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) includes four structurally related members, termed as FGFR1, FGFR2, FGFR3, and FGFR4. Given its intimate role in the progression of several solid tumors, excessive FGFR signaling provides an opportunity for anticancer therapy. Along with extensive pharmacological studies validating the therapeutic potential of targeting the FGFRs for cancer treatment, co-crystal structures of FGFRs/inhibitors are continuously coming up to study the mechanism of actions and explore new inhibitors. Herein, we review the reported co-crystals of FGFRs in complex with the corresponding inhibitors, main focusing our attention on the binding models and the pharmacological activities of the inhibitors.

  8. Discovery of a novel allosteric inhibitor-binding site in ERK5: comparison with the canonical kinase hinge ATP-binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hongming; Tucker, Julie; Wang, Xiaotao; Gavine, Paul R; Phillips, Chris; Augustin, Martin A; Schreiner, Patrick; Steinbacher, Stefan; Preston, Marian; Ogg, Derek

    2016-05-01

    MAP kinases act as an integration point for multiple biochemical signals and are involved in a wide variety of cellular processes such as proliferation, differentiation, regulation of transcription and development. As a member of the MAP kinase family, ERK5 (MAPK7) is involved in the downstream signalling pathways of various cell-surface receptors, including receptor tyrosine kinases and G protein-coupled receptors. In the current study, five structures of the ERK5 kinase domain co-crystallized with ERK5 inhibitors are reported. Interestingly, three of the compounds bind at a novel allosteric binding site in ERK5, while the other two bind at the typical ATP-binding site. Binding of inhibitors at the allosteric site is accompanied by displacement of the P-loop into the ATP-binding site and is shown to be ATP-competitive in an enzymatic assay of ERK5 kinase activity. Kinase selectivity data show that the most potent allosteric inhibitor exhibits superior kinase selectivity compared with the two inhibitors that bind at the canonical ATP-binding site. An analysis of these structures and comparison with both a previously published ERK5-inhibitor complex structure (PDB entry 4b99) and the structures of three other kinases (CDK2, ITK and MEK) in complex with allosteric inhibitors are presented.

  9. Comparative anticancer effects of flavonoids and diazepam in cultured cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae-Hyun; Lee, Jae-Tae; Lee, In-Kyu; Ha, Jeoung-Hee

    2008-02-01

    This study examined the comparative anticancer effects of flavonoids and diazepam in the cultured cancer cells. In the SNU-C4 colorectal and MDA-MB-231 breast adenocarcinoma cells, apigenin and fisetin, flavonoids, and diazepam inhibited cancer cell survival concentration and incubation-time dependently. Diazepam consistently inhibited FAS activity, a known anticancer mechanism of flavonoids, in a concentration dependent manner. Unlike diazepam, in highly aggressive breast MDA-MB-231 cells known to have a nuclear/perinuclear located PBR, PK11195, a specific PBR ligand enhanced the proliferation of cells, and the proliferative effect of PK11195 was reversed by an addition of lovastatin, a HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor. Diazepam- and flavonoids-induced cytotoxic activity in both cancer cell lines was not reduced by the addition of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), a chemotherapeutic agent. Like flavonoids, diazepam inhibited the release of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and granulocyte-macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) into supernatants of cultured in the SNU-C4 and MDA-MB-231 cells. In conclusion, this study provided in vitro information on the safe use of sedative in oncologic patients.

  10. Structural and thermodynamic study on aldose reductase: nitro-substituted inhibitors with strong enthalpic binding contribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steuber, Holger; Heine, Andreas; Klebe, Gerhard

    2007-05-04

    To prevent diabetic complications derived from enhanced glucose flux via the polyol pathway the development of aldose reductase inhibitors (ARIs) has been established as a promising therapeutic concept. In order to identify novel lead compounds, a virtual screening (VS) was performed successfully suggesting carboxylate-type inhibitors of sub-micromolar to micromolar affinity. Here, we combine a structural characterization of the binding modes observed by X-ray crystallography with isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) measurements providing insights into the driving forces of inhibitor binding, particularly of the first leads from VS. Characteristic features of this novel inhibitor type include a carboxylate head group connected via an alkyl spacer to a heteroaromatic moiety, which is linked to a further nitro-substituted aromatic portion. The crystal structures of two enzyme-inhibitor complexes have been determined at resolutions of 1.43 A and 1.55 A. Surprisingly, the carboxylic group of the most potent VS lead occupies the catalytic pocket differently compared to the interaction geometry observed in almost all other crystal structures with structurally related ligands and obtained under similar conditions, as an interstitial water molecule is picked up upon ligand binding. The nitro-aromatic moiety of both leads occupies the specificity pocket of the enzyme, however, adopting a different geometry compared to the docking prediction: unexpectedly, the nitro group binds to the bottom of the specificity pocket and provokes remarkable induced-fit adaptations. A peptide group located at the active site orients in such a way that H-bond formation to one nitro group oxygen atom is enabled, whereas a neighbouring tyrosine side-chain performs a slight rotation off from the binding cavity to accommodate the nitro group. Identically constituted ligands, lacking this nitro group, exhibit an affinity drop of one order of magnitude. In addition, thermodynamic data suggest a

  11. Determination of the absolute binding free energies of HIV-1 protease inhibitors using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Son Tung; Nguyen, Minh Tung; Nguyen, Minh Tho

    2017-05-01

    The absolute binding free energy of an inhibitor to HIV-1 Protease (PR) was determined throughout evaluation of the non-bonded interaction energy difference between the two bound and unbound states of the inhibitor and surrounding molecules by the fast pulling of ligand (FPL) process using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) simulations. The calculated free energy difference terms help clarifying the nature of the binding. Theoretical binding affinities are in good correlation with experimental data, with R = 0.89. The paradigm used is able to rank two inhibitors having the maximum difference of ∼1.5 kcal/mol in absolute binding free energies.

  12. Vaginal diazepam use with urogenital pain/pelvic floor dysfunction: serum diazepam levels and efficacy data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrico, Donna J; Peters, Kenneth M

    2011-01-01

    Vaginal diazepam is used off-label for pelvic floor dysfunction and urogenital pain, but serum levels with efficacy have not been reported until now. One clinician evaluated 21 women for overall, levator, and vulvar pain pre- and one-month post-daily diazepam treatment. One-month post-treatment assessments and serum diazepam levels were done; 62% were moderately or markedly improved. Levator examination pain scores were significantly improved, and vulvar pain scores decreased post-treatment. Serum diazepam levels were within normal limits. Vaginal diazepam may be helpful in treating pelvic floor/urogenital pain conditions.

  13. Human 15-LOX-1 active site mutations alter inhibitor binding and decrease potency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Michelle; van Hoorebeke, Christopher; Horn, Thomas; Deschamps, Joshua; Freedman, J Cody; Kalyanaraman, Chakrapani; Jacobson, Matthew P; Holman, Theodore

    2016-11-01

    Human 15-lipoxygenase-1 (h15-LOX-1 or h12/15-LOX) reacts with polyunsaturated fatty acids and produces bioactive lipid derivatives that are implicated in many important human diseases. One such disease is stroke, which is the fifth leading cause of death and the first leading cause of disability in America. The discovery of h15-LOX-1 inhibitors could potentially lead to novel therapeutics in the treatment of stroke, however, little is known about the inhibitor/active site interaction. This study utilizes site-directed mutagenesis, guided in part by molecular modeling, to gain a better structural understanding of inhibitor interactions within the active site. We have generated eight mutants (R402L, R404L, F414I, F414W, E356Q, Q547L, L407A, I417A) of h15-LOX-1 to determine whether these active site residues interact with two h15-LOX-1 inhibitors, ML351 and an ML094 derivative, compound 18. IC50 values and steady-state inhibition kinetics were determined for the eight mutants, with four of the mutants affecting inhibitor potency relative to wild type h15-LOX-1 (F414I, F414W, E356Q and L407A). The data indicate that ML351 and compound 18, bind in a similar manner in the active site to an aromatic pocket close to F414 but have subtle differences in their specific binding modes. This information establishes the binding mode for ML094 and ML351 and will be leveraged to develop next-generation inhibitors.

  14. A diclofenac suppository-nabumetone combination therapy for arthritic pain relief and a monitoring method for the diclofenac binding capacity of HSA site II in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setoguchi, Nao; Takamura, Norito; Fujita, Ken-ichi; Ogata, Kenji; Tokunaga, Jin; Nishio, Toyotaka; Chosa, Etsuo; Arimori, Kazuhiko; Kawai, Keiichi; Yamamoto, Ryuichi

    2013-03-01

    Diclofenac suppository, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), is used widely in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients with severe arthritic pain. As the binding percentage of diclofenac to serum proteins is high, its free (unbound) concentration after rectal administration is low. To increase temporarily the free concentration of diclofenac and to enhance its analgesic effect by inhibiting the protein binding of diclofenac, the analgesic effect of diclofenac was examined before and after the start of an inhibitor administration to RA patients with insufficient control of arthritic pain, and the protein binding capacity of diclofenac was evaluated. Binding experiments were performed by ultrafiltration, and arthritic pain was recorded by the face scale. Free fractions of diazepam and diclofenac were augmented by increasing 6-methoxy-2-naphthylacetic acid (6-MNA; the active metabolite of the NSAID nabumetone) concentrations. The free fraction of diazepam increased after the start of nabumetone administration to RA patients, and arthritic pain relief was observed. These results suggest that 6-MNA has an inhibitory effect on the protein binding of diclofenac and the free fraction of diazepam can be used to evaluate the binding capacity of diclofenac. It is considered that diclofenac suppository-nabumetone combination therapy and the method for protein binding monitoring by diazepam can positively benefit RA patients with insufficient control of arthritic pain.

  15. Caffeine antagonizes diazepam effects in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattila, M J; Palva, E; Savolainen, K

    1982-04-01

    In a double-blind, placebo-controlled study on parallel groups of medical students diazepam 10 mg impaired cognitive skills and caused muscle relaxation. A 250 mg dose of caffeine given in decaffeinated coffee counteracted these better than a 500 mg dose. Subjectively, diazepam exerted a calming effect which was counteracted by caffeine at either at either dose levels.

  16. Natural and synthetic sialic acid-containing inhibitors of influenza virus receptor binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matrosovich, Mikhail; Klenk, Hans-Dieter

    2003-01-01

    Influenza viruses attach to susceptible cells via multivalent interactions of their haemagglutinins with sialyloligosaccharide moieties of cellular glycoconjugates. Soluble macromolecules containing sialic acid from animal sera and mucosal fluids can act as decoy receptors and competitively inhibit virus-mediated haemagglutination and infection. Although a role for these natural inhibitors in the innate anti-influenza immunity is still not clear, studies are in progress on the design of synthetic sialic acid-containing inhibitors of receptor binding which could be used as anti-influenza drugs.

  17. Diazepam inhibits forskolin-stimulated adenylyl cyclase activity in human tumour cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niles, L P; Wang, J

    1999-10-01

    Previous studies have shown that the benzodiazepine agonist, diazepam, suppresses adenylyl cyclase activity in rat brain, via a G protein-coupled benzodiazepine receptor. Since diazepam binding sites are also present in diverse non-neuronal tissues including tumour cells, its effects on adenylyl cyclase activity were examined in membranes from human MCF-7 (breast cancer) and M-6 (melanoma) cells. Diazepam caused a biphasic and concentration-dependent inhibition of forskolin-stimulated adenylyl cyclase activity in MCF-7 membranes. The first phase of inhibition, at picomolar to nanomolar drug concentrations (EC50=5.7 x 10(-12)M), is similar to the receptor mediated phase observed in the rat brain. At micromolar concentrations of diazepam (EC50= 1.8 x 10(-4)M), the steep decrease in adenylyl cyclase activity may involve a direct action on the enzyme itself, as detected previously in rat brain membranes. Diazepam-induced suppression of adenylyl cyclase activity was also detected in M-6 membranes. However, in contrast to MCF-7 findings, only micromolar concentrations of diazepam (EC50=5.2 x 10(-4)M) inhibited enzyme activity in M-6 membranes. These findings suggest that G protein-coupled benzodiazepine receptors, which mediate inhibition of the adenylyl cyclase-cAMP pathway in the brain, are also expressed in MCF-7 cells.

  18. Interaction between cannabinoid compounds and diazepam on anxiety-like behaviour of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naderi, Nima; Haghparast, Abbas; Saber-Tehrani, Ali; Rezaii, Neguine; Alizadeh, Amir-Mohammad; Khani, Abbas; Motamedi, Fereshteh

    2008-03-01

    Previous studies have suggested that cannabinoidergic system is involved in anxiety. However, a complete picture of cannabinoid association in the anxiety is still lacking. In the present study, we investigated the possible interaction between cannabinoidergic and GABAergic systems in the anxiety-like behaviour of mice. Intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of the cannabinoid receptor agonist WIN55212-2 (0.25-5 mg/kg), the endocannabinoid transport inhibitor AM404 (0.25-2 mg/kg) and diazepam (0.25-8 mg/kg) dose dependently exhibited an anxiolytic effect evaluated in terms of increase in the percentage of time spent in the open arms in the elevated plus maze (EPM) test. Administration of certain fixed-ratio combinations (3:1 and 1:1) of WIN55212-2 and diazepam produced a synergistic anxiolytic effect, while the 1:3 combination produced an additive effect. In hole-board test, administration of certain ratios of WIN55212-2-diazepam combination significantly altered the animal behaviour compared to groups that received each drug alone. Co-administration of AM404 (1 and 2 mg/kg) and diazepam (0.5 mg/kg) abolished the anxiolytic effect of the former drug in EPM and the latter in hole-board test, respectively. The combination of an ineffective dose of the fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) inhibitor, URB597 (0.3 mg/kg, i.p.) on anxiety-related responses with an ineffective dose of diazepam (0.25 mg/kg, i.p.) led to a synergistic effect. Co-administration of the CB1 receptor antagonist, AM251 (5 mg/kg) and an effective dose of diazepam (2 mg/kg, i.p.) attenuated diazepam-induced elevation of percentage of time spent in open arm, while lower dose of AM251 (0.5 mg/kg) failed to inhibit diazepam-induced anxiolytic effect. Taken together, the present study showed that co-administration of exogenous cannabinoids and diazepam produce additive or synergistic effect at different combinations. Moreover, it has been shown that enhancement of the function of endocannabinoids could

  19. Switch control pocket inhibitors of p38-MAP kinase. Durable type II inhibitors that do not require binding into the canonical ATP hinge region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Yu Mi; Clare, Michael; Ensinger, Carol L; Hood, Molly M; Lord, John W; Lu, Wei-Ping; Miller, David F; Patt, William C; Smith, Bryan D; Vogeti, Lakshminarayana; Kaufman, Michael D; Petillo, Peter A; Wise, Scott C; Abendroth, Jan; Chun, Lawrence; Clark, Robin; Feese, Michael; Kim, Hidong; Stewart, Lance; Flynn, Daniel L

    2010-10-01

    Switch control pocket inhibitors of p38-alpha kinase are described. Durable type II inhibitors were designed which bind to arginines (Arg67 or Arg70) that function as key residues for mediating phospho-threonine 180 dependant conformational fluxing of p38-alpha from an inactive type II state to an active type I state. Binding to Arg70 in particular led to potent inhibitors, exemplified by DP-802, which also exhibited high kinase selectivity. Binding to Arg70 obviated the requirement for binding into the ATP Hinge region. X-ray crystallography revealed that DP-802 and analogs induce an enhanced type II conformation upon binding to either the unphosphorylated or the doubly phosphorylated form of p38-alpha kinase.

  20. Conformational changes of ovine α-1-proteinase inhibitor: The influence of heparin binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Vivek Kumar; Gowda, Lalitha R.

    2008-11-01

    α-1-Proteinase inhibitor (α-1-PI), the archetypal serpin causes rapid, irreversible stoichiometric inhibition of redundant circulating serine proteases and is associated with emphysema, inflammatory response and maintenance of protease-inhibitor equilibrium in vascular and peri-vascular spaces. A homogenous preparation of heparin octasaccharide binds to ovine and human α-1-PI and enhances their protease inhibitory activity phenomenally. Size-exclusion chromatography and dynamic light scattering experiments reveal that ovine α-1-PI undergoes a decrease in the Stokes' radius upon heparin binding. A strong binding; characterizes this α-1-PI-heparin interaction as revealed by the binding constant ( Kα) 1.98 ± 0.2 × 10 -6 M and 2.1 ± 0.2 × 10 -6 M determined by fluorescence spectroscopy and equilibrium dialysis, respectively. The stoichiometry of heparin binding to ovine α-1-PI was 1.1 ± 0.2:1. The Stern-Volmer constants ( Ksv) for heparin activated ovine and human α-1-PI were found to be 5.13 × 10 -6 M and 5.67 × 10 -6 M, respectively, significantly higher than the native inhibitors. FTIR and CD spectroscopy project the systematic structural reorientations that α-1-PI undergoes upon heparin binding characterized by a decrease in α-helical content and a concomitant increase in β-turn and random coil elements. It is likely that these conformational changes result in the movement of the α-1-PI reactive site loop into an extended structure that is better poised to combat the cognate protease and accelerate the inhibition.

  1. Piracetam and TRH analogues antagonise inhibition by barbiturates, diazepam, melatonin and galanin of human erythrocyte D-glucose transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naftalin, Richard J; Cunningham, Philip; Afzal-Ahmed, Iram

    2004-01-01

    Nootropic drugs increase glucose uptake into anaesthetised brain and into Alzheimer's diseased brain. Thyrotropin-releasing hormone, TRH, which has a chemical structure similar to nootropics increases cerebellar uptake of glucose in murine rolling ataxia. This paper shows that nootropic drugs like piracetam (2-oxo 1 pyrrolidine acetamide) and levetiracetam and neuropeptides like TRH antagonise the inhibition of glucose transport by barbiturates, diazepam, melatonin and endogenous neuropeptide galanin in human erythrocytes in vitro. The potencies of nootropic drugs in opposing scopolamine-induced memory loss correlate with their potencies in antagonising pentobarbital inhibition of erythrocyte glucose transport in vitro (PPiracetam and TRH have no direct effects on net glucose transport, but competitively antagonise hypnotic drug inhibition of glucose transport. Other nootropics, like aniracetam and levetiracetam, while antagonising pentobarbital action, also inhibit glucose transport. Analeptics like bemigride and methamphetamine are more potent inhibitors of glucose transport than antagonists of hypnotic action on glucose transport. There are similarities between amino-acid sequences in human glucose transport protein isoform 1 (GLUT1) and the benzodiazepine-binding domains of GABAA (gamma amino butyric acid) receptor subunits. Mapped on a 3D template of GLUT1, these homologies suggest that the site of diazepam and piracetam interaction is a pocket outside the central hydrophilic pore region. Nootropic pyrrolidone antagonism of hypnotic drug inhibition of glucose transport in vitro may be an analogue of TRH antagonism of galanin-induced narcosis. PMID:15148255

  2. New noncovalent inhibitors of penicillin-binding proteins from penicillin-resistant bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samo Turk

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs are well known and validated targets for antibacterial therapy. The most important clinically used inhibitors of PBPs β-lactams inhibit transpeptidase activity of PBPs by forming a covalent penicilloyl-enzyme complex that blocks the normal transpeptidation reaction; this finally results in bacterial death. In some resistant bacteria the resistance is acquired by active-site distortion of PBPs, which lowers their acylation efficiency for β-lactams. To address this problem we focused our attention to discovery of novel noncovalent inhibitors of PBPs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Our in-house bank of compounds was screened for inhibition of three PBPs from resistant bacteria: PBP2a from Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA, PBP2x from Streptococcus pneumoniae strain 5204, and PBP5fm from Enterococcus faecium strain D63r. Initial hit inhibitor obtained by screening was then used as a starting point for computational similarity searching for structurally related compounds and several new noncovalent inhibitors were discovered. Two compounds had promising inhibitory activities of both PBP2a and PBP2x 5204, and good in-vitro antibacterial activities against a panel of Gram-positive bacterial strains. CONCLUSIONS: We found new noncovalent inhibitors of PBPs which represent important starting points for development of more potent inhibitors of PBPs that can target penicillin-resistant bacteria.

  3. The antiviral drug acyclovir is a slow-binding inhibitor of (D)-amino acid oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katane, Masumi; Matsuda, Satsuki; Saitoh, Yasuaki; Sekine, Masae; Furuchi, Takemitsu; Koyama, Nobuhiro; Nakagome, Izumi; Tomoda, Hiroshi; Hirono, Shuichi; Homma, Hiroshi

    2013-08-20

    d-Amino acid oxidase (DAO) is a degradative enzyme that is stereospecific for d-amino acids, including d-serine and d-alanine, which are believed to be coagonists of the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor. To identify a new class of DAO inhibitor(s) that can be used to elucidate the molecular details of the active site environment of DAO, manifold biologically active compounds of microbial origin and pre-existing drugs were screened for their ability to inhibit DAO activity, and several compounds were identified as candidates. One of these compounds, acyclovir (ACV), a well-known antiviral drug used for the treatment of herpesvirus infections, was characterized and evaluated as a novel DAO inhibitor in vitro. Analysis showed that ACV acts on DAO as a reversible slow-binding inhibitor, and interestingly, the time required to achieve equilibrium between DAO, ACV, and the DAO/ACV complex was highly dependent on temperature. The binding mechanism of ACV to DAO was investigated in detail by several approaches, including kinetic analysis, structural modeling of DAO complexed with ACV, and site-specific mutagenesis of an active site residue postulated to be involved in the binding of ACV. The results confirm that ACV is a novel, active site-directed inhibitor of DAO that can be a valuable tool for investigating the structure-function relationships of DAO, including the molecular details of the active site environment of DAO. In particular, it appears that ACV can serve as an active site probe to study the structural basis of temperature-induced conformational changes of DAO.

  4. Understanding binding affinity : A combined isothermal titration calorimetry/molecular dynamics study of the binding of a series of hydrophobically modified benzamidinium chloride inhibitors to trypsin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Talhout, Reinskje; Villa, Alessandra; Mark, AE; Engberts, JBFN

    2003-01-01

    The binding of a series of p-alkylbenzamidinium chloride inhibitors to the serine proteinase trypsin over a range of temperatures has been studied using isothermal titration (micro)calorimetry and molecular dynamics simulation techniques. The inhibitors have small structural variations at the para

  5. Distinct states of methionyl-tRNA synthetase indicate inhibitor binding by conformational selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Cho Yeow; Kim, Jessica E; Shibata, Sayaka; Ranade, Ranae M; Yu, Mingyan; Liu, Jiyun; Gillespie, J Robert; Buckner, Frederick S; Verlinde, Christophe L M J; Fan, Erkang; Hol, Wim G J

    2012-10-10

    To guide development of new drugs targeting methionyl-tRNA synthetase (MetRS) for treatment of human African trypanosomiasis, crystal structure determinations of Trypanosoma brucei MetRS in complex with its substrate methionine and its intermediate product methionyl-adenylate were followed by those of the enzyme in complex with high-affinity aminoquinolone inhibitors via soaking experiments. Drastic changes in conformation of one of the two enzymes in the asymmetric unit allowed these inhibitors to occupy an enlarged methionine pocket and a new so-called auxiliary pocket. Interestingly, a small low-affinity compound caused the same conformational changes, removed the methionine without occupying the methionine pocket, and occupied the previously not existing auxiliary pocket. Analysis of these structures indicates that the binding of the inhibitors is the result of conformational selection, not induced fit. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Structure and activity of NO synthase inhibitors specific to the L-arginine binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proskuryakov, S Ya; Konoplyannikov, A G; Skvortsov, V G; Mandrugin, A A; Fedoseev, V M

    2005-01-01

    Synthesis of compounds containing a fragment similar to the guanidine group of L-arginine, which is a substrate of nitric oxide synthase (NOS), is the main direction in creating NOS inhibitors. The inhibitory effect of such compounds is caused not only by their competition with the substrate for the L-arginine-binding site and/or oxidizing center of the enzyme (heme) but also by interaction with peptide motifs of the enzyme that influence its dimerization, affinity for cofactors, and interaction with associated proteins. Structures, activities, and relative in vitro and in vivo specificities of various NOS inhibitors (amino acid and non-amino acid) with linear or cyclic structure and containing guanidine, amidine, or isothiuronium group are considered. These properties are mainly analyzed by comparison with effects of the inhibitors on the inducible NOS.

  7. Molecular docking and NMR binding studies to identify novel inhibitors of human phosphomevalonate kinase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boonsri, Pornthip [Chemical Proteomics Facility at Marquette, Department of Chemistry, Marquette University, Milwaukee, WI 53201 (United States); Department of Chemistry, NANOTEC Center of Nanotechnology, National Nanotechnology Center, Faculty of Science, Kasetsart University, Bangkok 10900 (Thailand); Neumann, Terrence S.; Olson, Andrew L.; Cai, Sheng [Chemical Proteomics Facility at Marquette, Department of Chemistry, Marquette University, Milwaukee, WI 53201 (United States); Herdendorf, Timothy J.; Miziorko, Henry M. [Division of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, School of Biological Sciences, University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States); Hannongbua, Supa [Department of Chemistry, NANOTEC Center of Nanotechnology, National Nanotechnology Center, Faculty of Science, Kasetsart University, Bangkok 10900 (Thailand); Sem, Daniel S., E-mail: daniel.sem@cuw.edu [Chemical Proteomics Facility at Marquette, Department of Chemistry, Marquette University, Milwaukee, WI 53201 (United States)

    2013-01-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Natural and synthetic inhibitors of human phosphomevalonate kinase identified. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Virtual screening yielded a hit rate of 15%, with inhibitor K{sub d}'s of 10-60 {mu}M. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NMR studies indicate significant protein conformational changes upon binding. -- Abstract: Phosphomevalonate kinase (PMK) phosphorylates mevalonate-5-phosphate (M5P) in the mevalonate pathway, which is the sole source of isoprenoids and steroids in humans. We have identified new PMK inhibitors with virtual screening, using autodock. Promising hits were verified and their affinity measured using NMR-based {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N heteronuclear single quantum coherence (HSQC) chemical shift perturbation and fluorescence titrations. Chemical shift changes were monitored, plotted, and fitted to obtain dissociation constants (K{sub d}). Tight binding compounds with K{sub d}'s ranging from 6-60 {mu}M were identified. These compounds tended to have significant polarity and negative charge, similar to the natural substrates (M5P and ATP). HSQC cross peak changes suggest that binding induces a global conformational change, such as domain closure. Compounds identified in this study serve as chemical genetic probes of human PMK, to explore pharmacology of the mevalonate pathway, as well as starting points for further drug development.

  8. Impact of Stereochemistry on Ligand Binding: X-ray Crystallographic Analysis of an Epoxide-Based HIV Protease Inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetti, Fabio; Berti, Federico; Campaner, Pietro; Fanfoni, Lidia; Demitri, Nicola; Olajuyigbe, Folasade M; De March, Matteo; Geremia, Silvano

    2014-09-11

    A new pseudopeptide epoxide inhibitor, designed for irreversible binding to HIV protease (HIV-PR), has been synthesized and characterized in solution and in the solid state. However, the crystal structure of the complex obtained by inhibitor-enzyme cocrystallization revealed that a minor isomer, with inverted configuration of the epoxide carbons, has been selected by HIV-PR during crystallization. The structural characterization of the well-ordered pseudopeptide, inserted in the catalytic channel with its epoxide group intact, provides deeper insights into inhibitor binding and HIV-PR stereoselectivity, which aids development of future epoxide-based HIV inhibitors.

  9. Free-energy analysis of enzyme-inhibitor binding: aspartic proteinase-pepstatin complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalra, P; Das, A; Jayaram, B

    2001-01-01

    Expeditious in silico determinations of the free energies of binding of a series of inhibitors to an enzyme are of immense practical value in structure-based drug design efforts. Some recent advances in the field of computational chemistry have rendered a rigorous thermodynamic treatment of biologic molecules feasible, starting from a molecular description of the biomolecule, solvent, and salt. Pursuing the goal of developing and making available a software for assessing binding affinities, we present here a computationally rapid, albeit elaborate, methodology to estimate and analyze the molecular thermodynamics of enzyme-inhibitor binding with crystal structures as the point of departure. The complexes of aspartic proteinases with seven inhibitors have been adopted for this study. The standard free energy of complexation is considered in terms of a thermodynamic cycle of six distinct steps decomposed into a total of 18 well-defined components. The model we employed involves explicit all-atom accounts of the energetics of electrostatic interactions, solvent screening effects, van der Waals components, and cavitation effects of solvation combined with a Debye-Huckel treatment of salt effects. The magnitudes and signs of the various components are estimated using the AMBER parm94 force field, generalized Born theory, and solvent accessibility measures. Estimates of translational and rotational entropy losses on complexation as well as corresponding changes in the vibrational and configurational entropy are also included. The calculated standard free energies of binding at this stage are within an order of magnitude of the observed inhibition constants and necessitate further improvements in the computational protocols to enable quantitative predictions. Some areas such as inclusion of structural adaptation effects, incorporation of site-dependent amino acid pKa shifts, consideration of the dynamics of the active site for fine-tuning the methodology are easily

  10. A small molecule inhibitor of Pot1 binding to telomeric DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altschuler, Sarah E; Croy, Johnny E; Wuttke, Deborah S

    2012-10-01

    Chromosome ends are complex structures, consisting of repetitive DNA sequence terminating in an ssDNA overhang with many associated proteins. Because alteration of the regulation of these ends is a hallmark of cancer, telomeres and telomere maintenance have been prime drug targets. The universally conserved ssDNA overhang is sequence-specifically bound and regulated by Pot1 (protection of telomeres 1), and perturbation of Pot1 function has deleterious effects for proliferating cells. The specificity of the Pot1/ssDNA interaction and the key involvement of this protein in telomere maintenance have suggested directed inhibition of Pot1/ssDNA binding as an efficient means of disrupting telomere function. To explore this idea, we developed a high-throughput time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET) screen for inhibitors of Pot1/ssDNA interaction. We conducted this screen with the DNA-binding subdomain of Schizosaccharomyces pombe Pot1 (Pot1pN), which confers the vast majority of Pot1 sequence-specificity and is highly similar to the first domain of human Pot1 (hPOT1). Screening a library of ∼20 000 compounds yielded a single inhibitor, which we found interacted tightly with sub-micromolar affinity. Furthermore, this compound, subsequently identified as the bis-azo dye Congo red (CR), was able to competitively inhibit hPOT1 binding to telomeric DNA. Isothermal titration calorimetry and NMR chemical shift analysis suggest that CR interacts specifically with the ssDNA-binding cleft of Pot1, and that alteration of this surface disrupts CR binding. The identification of a specific inhibitor of ssDNA interaction establishes a new pathway for targeted telomere disruption.

  11. Characterization of the binding of /sup 3/H-norzimeldine, a 5-HT uptake inhibitor, to rat brain homogenates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, H. (Department of Biochemical Neuropharmacology, Research and Development Laboratories, Astra Laekemedel, Soedertaelje, Sweden)

    1984-01-01

    The binding of radiolabelled norzimeldine, a potent selective 5-HT reuptake inhibitor, to rat brain homogenates is described. /sup 3/H-Norzimeldine binds to a site with high affinity (Ksub(D) = 10.5 nM) in a saturable manner (Bsub(max) = 15.4 pmol/g wet weight in the cerebral cortex). The number of binding sites in the various regions of the brain parallels the capacity of the 5-HT reuptake mechanism. Drugs that inhibit the reuptake of 5-HT are also potent inhibitors of the /sup 3/H-norzimeldine binding, as are the tricyclic antidepressants, which are non-specific inhibitors of the noradrenaline and the 5-HT reuptake. Lesioning experiments using DSP4 (a NA neurotoxin) and p-chloroamphetamine (a 5-HT neurotoxin) suggest that the binding site is located on the presynaptic 5-HT nerve terminal, although a small component of the binding may be to noradrenergic uptake sites as well.

  12. Key Structures and Interactions for Binding of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Protein Kinase B Inhibitors from Molecular Dynamics Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punkvang, Auradee; Kamsri, Pharit; Saparpakorn, Patchreenart; Hannongbua, Supa; Wolschann, Peter; Irle, Stephan; Pungpo, Pornpan

    2015-07-01

    Substituted aminopyrimidine inhibitors have recently been introduced as antituberculosis agents. These inhibitors show impressive activity against protein kinase B, a Ser/Thr protein kinase that is essential for cell growth of M. tuberculosis. However, up to now, X-ray structures of the protein kinase B enzyme complexes with the substituted aminopyrimidine inhibitors are currently unavailable. Consequently, structural details of their binding modes are questionable, prohibiting the structural-based design of more potent protein kinase B inhibitors in the future. Here, molecular dynamics simulations, in conjunction with molecular mechanics/Poisson-Boltzmann surface area binding free-energy analysis, were employed to gain insight into the complex structures of the protein kinase B inhibitors and their binding energetics. The complex structures obtained by the molecular dynamics simulations show binding free energies in good agreement with experiment. The detailed analysis of molecular dynamics results shows that Glu93, Val95, and Leu17 are key residues responsible to the binding of the protein kinase B inhibitors. The aminopyrazole group and the pyrimidine core are the crucial moieties of substituted aminopyrimidine inhibitors for interaction with the key residues. Our results provide a structural concept that can be used as a guide for the future design of protein kinase B inhibitors with highly increased antagonistic activity.

  13. Structure-based drug design enables conversion of a DFG-in binding CSF-1R kinase inhibitor to a DFG-out binding mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, Marvin J; Pelc, Matthew; Kamtekar, Satwik; Day, Jacqueline; Poda, Gennadiy I; Hall, Molly K; Michener, Marshall L; Reitz, Beverly A; Mathis, Karl J; Pierce, Betsy S; Parikh, Mihir D; Mischke, Deborah A; Long, Scott A; Parlow, John J; Anderson, David R; Thorarensen, Atli

    2010-03-01

    The work described herein demonstrates the utility of structure-based drug design (SBDD) in shifting the binding mode of an HTS hit from a DFG-in to a DFG-out binding mode resulting in a class of novel potent CSF-1R kinase inhibitors suitable for lead development.

  14. Structure-based drug design enables conversion of a DFG-in binding CSF-1R kinase inhibitor to a DFG-out binding mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyers, Marvin J.; Pelc, Matthew; Kamtekar, Satwik; Day, Jacqueline; Poda, Gennadiy I.; Hall, Molly K.; Michener, Marshall L.; Reitz, Beverly A.; Mathis, Karl J.; Pierce, Betsy S.; Parikh, Mihir D.; Mischke, Deborah A.; Long, Scott A.; Parlow, John J.; Anderson, David R.; Thorarensen, Atli (Pfizer)

    2010-08-11

    The work described herein demonstrates the utility of structure-based drug design (SBDD) in shifting the binding mode of an HTS hit from a DFG-in to a DFG-out binding mode resulting in a class of novel potent CSF-1R kinase inhibitors suitable for lead development.

  15. Diazepam

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... assisted therapy (MAT) drugs used to treat opioid addiction and dependence. FDA is also evaluating whether labeling ... can cause false results in urine tests for sugar using Clinistix and Diastix. Diabetic patients should use ...

  16. Deposition of diazepam and its metabolites in hair following a single dose of diazepam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Xin; Johansen, Sys Stybe; Zhang, Yurong

    2017-01-01

    Only sporadic data are available on hair concentrations of diazepam and some of its metabolites (nordazepam, oxazepam, and temazepam) following a single controlled dose. The aim of this study was to investigate the deposition of diazepam and its metabolites in human hair after eight healthy...... volunteers (four women and four men, ages 24-26, East Asian) consumed 10 mg of diazepam. Hair was collected from all volunteers 1 month after exposure, and also 2 months post-exposure from men and 10 months post-exposure from women. Diazepam and the complete metabolite profile, including oxazepam glucuronide...... no differences by gender in the amounts of diazepam or metabolites found. The concentration of the main metabolite nordazepam was consistently higher than that of diazepam at both 1 and 2 months after consumption. Oxazepam and temazepam traces were found in some volunteers' hair, but the glucuronides were...

  17. Efecto del Diazepam sobre el desarrollo fetal

    OpenAIRE

    2001-01-01

    El diazepam se absorbe rápida y completamente después de la administración oral y atraviesa la barrera placentaria; su tasa de penetración en el tejido placentario es de 31,5% a las 4 horas, su vida media es prolongada y la existencia de metabolitos activos hace que su efecto sea acumulativo. Este trabajo se realizó en un modelo in vivo, usando 10 mg/Kg/día de diazepam intramuscular, en donde se estudió el efecto del diazepam sobre el desarrollo fetal, utilizando un modelo experimental en el ...

  18. Thermodynamics parameters for binding of halogenated benzotriazole inhibitors of human protein kinase CK2α.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winiewska, Maria; Kucińska, Katarzyna; Makowska, Małgorzata; Poznański, Jarosław; Shugar, David

    2015-10-01

    The interaction of human CK2α (hCK2α) with nine halogenated benzotriazoles, TBBt and its analogues representing all possible patterns of halogenation on the benzene ring of benzotriazole, was studied by biophysical methods. Thermal stability of protein-ligand complexes, monitored by calorimetric (DSC) and optical (DSF) methods, showed that the increase in the mid-point temperature for unfolding of protein-ligand complexes (i.e. potency of ligand binding to hCK2α) follow the inhibitory activities determined by biochemical assays. The dissociation constant for the ATP-hCK2α complex was estimated with the aid of microscale thermophoresis (MST) as 4.3±1.8 μM, and MST-derived dissociation constants determined for halogenated benzotriazoles, when converted according to known ATP concentrations, perfectly reconstruct IC50 values determined by the biochemical assays. Ligand-dependent quenching of tyrosine fluorescence, together with molecular modeling and DSC-derived heats of unfolding, support the hypothesis that halogenated benzotriazoles bind in at least two alternative orientations, and those that are efficient hCK2α inhibitors bind in the orientation which TBBt adopts in its complex with maize CK2α. DSC-derived apparent heat for ligand binding (ΔΔHbind) is driven by intermolecular electrostatic interactions between Lys68 and the triazole ring of the ligand, as indicated by a good correlation between ΔΔHbind and ligand pKa. Overall results, additionally supported by molecular modeling, confirm that a balance of hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions contribute predominantly (~40 kJ/mol), relative to possible intermolecular halogen/hydrogen bonding (less than 10 kJ/mol), in binding of halogenated benzotriazoles to the ATP-binding site of hCK2α. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Inhibitors of Protein Kinases.

  19. Comparison of Oral and Intravenous Diazepam Sedation for Periodontal Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    1987-01-01

    Intravenous and oral diazepam were evaluated as to their effectiveness in conscious sedation during two similar surgical episodes. Ten patients, six females and four males, from 30 to 60 years of age were included in the study. Patients received either 10 mg oral diazepam and saline intravenous injection or oral placebo and 10 mg intravenous (IV) diazepam at each trial. Half the patients received the oral diazepam first and the other half received the IV diazepam first. Patients were not info...

  20. Diverse modes of binding in structures of Leishmania majorN-myristoyltransferase with selective inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James A. Brannigan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The leishmaniases are a spectrum of global diseases of poverty associated with immune dysfunction and are the cause of high morbidity. Despite the long history of these diseases, no effective vaccine is available and the currently used drugs are variously compromised by moderate efficacy, complex side effects and the emergence of resistance. It is therefore widely accepted that new therapies are needed. N-Myristoyltransferase (NMT has been validated pre-clinically as a target for the treatment of fungal and parasitic infections. In a previously reported high-throughput screening program, a number of hit compounds with activity against NMT from Leishmania donovani have been identified. Here, high-resolution crystal structures of representative compounds from four hit series in ternary complexes with myristoyl-CoA and NMT from the closely related L. major are reported. The structures reveal that the inhibitors associate with the peptide-binding groove at a site adjacent to the bound myristoyl-CoA and the catalytic α-carboxylate of Leu421. Each inhibitor makes extensive apolar contacts as well as a small number of polar contacts with the protein. Remarkably, the compounds exploit different features of the peptide-binding groove and collectively occupy a substantial volume of this pocket, suggesting that there is potential for the design of chimaeric inhibitors with significantly enhanced binding. Despite the high conservation of the active sites of the parasite and human NMTs, the inhibitors act selectively over the host enzyme. The role of conformational flexibility in the side chain of Tyr217 in conferring selectivity is discussed.

  1. Determination of human serum alpha1-acid glycoprotein and albumin binding of various marketed and preclinical kinase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zsila, Ferenc; Fitos, Ilona; Bencze, Gyula; Kéri, György; Orfi, László

    2009-01-01

    There are about 380 protein kinase inhibitors in drug development as of today and 15 drugs have been marketed already for the treatment of cancer. This time 139 validated kinase targets are in the focus of drug research of pharmaceutical companies and big efforts are made for the development of new, druglike kinase inhibitors. Plasma protein binding is an important factor of the ADME profiling of a drug compound. Human serum albumin (HSA) and alpha(1)-acid glycoprotein (AAG) are the most relevant drug carriers in blood plasma. Since previous literature data indicated that AAG is the principal plasma binding component of some kinase inhibitors the present work focuses on the comprehensive evaluation of AAG binding of a series of marketed and experimental kinase inhibitors by using circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy approach. HSA binding was also evaluated by affinity chromatography. Protein binding interactions of twenty-six kinase inhibitors are characterized. The contribution of AAG and HSA binding data to the pharmacokinetic profiles of the investigated therapeutic agents is discussed. Structural, biological and drug binding properties of AAG as well as the applicability of the CD method in studying drug-protein binding interactions are also briefly reviewed.

  2. Three classes of inhibitors share a common binding domain in mitochondrial complex I (NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okun, J G; Lümmen, P; Brandt, U

    1999-01-29

    We have developed two independent methods to measure equilibrium binding of inhibitors to membrane-bound and partially purified NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) to characterize the binding sites for the great variety of hydrophobic compounds acting on this large and complicated enzyme. Taking advantage of a partial quench of fluorescence upon binding of the fenazaquin-type inhibitor 2-decyl-4-quinazolinyl amine to complex I in bovine submitochondrial particles, we determined a Kd of 17 +/- 3 nM and one binding site per complex I. Equilibrium binding studies with [3H]dihydrorotenone and the aminopyrimidine [3H]AE F119209 (4(cis-4-[3H]isopropyl cyclohexylamino)-5-chloro-6-ethyl pyrimidine) using partially purified complex I from Musca domestica exhibited little unspecific binding and allowed reliable determination of dissociation constants. Competition experiments consistently demonstrated that all tested hydrophobic inhibitors of complex I share a common binding domain with partially overlapping sites. Although the rotenone site overlaps with both the piericidin A and the capsaicin site, the latter two sites do not overlap. This is in contrast to the interpretation of enzyme kinetics that have previously been used to define three classes of complex I inhibitors. The existence of only one large inhibitor binding pocket in the hydrophobic part of complex I is discussed in the light of possible mechanisms of proton translocation.

  3. Determining the binding mode and binding affinity constant of tyrosine kinase inhibitor PD153035 to DNA using optical tweezers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Chih-Ming [School of Dental Technology, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Research Center for Biomedical Implants and Microsurgery Devices, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Department of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30043, Taiwan (China); Lee, Yuarn-Jang [Section of Infectious Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Wang, Wei-Ting [School of Dental Technology, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Institute of Biomedical Materials and Engineering, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Research Center for Biomedical Implants and Microsurgery Devices, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Hsu, Chien-Ting [Institute of Biomedical Materials and Engineering, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Research Center for Biomedical Implants and Microsurgery Devices, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Tsai, Jing-Shin [School of Dental Technology, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Institute of Biomedical Materials and Engineering, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Research Center for Biomedical Implants and Microsurgery Devices, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Wu, Chien-Ming [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30043, Taiwan (China); Ou, Keng-Liang [Institute of Biomedical Materials and Engineering, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Research Center for Biomedical Implants and Microsurgery Devices, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); and others

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} PD153035 is a DNA intercalator and intercalation occurs only under very low salt concentration. {yields} The minimum distance between adjacent bound PD153035 {approx} 11 bp. {yields} Binding affinity constant for PD153035 is 1.18({+-}0.09) x 10{sup 4} (1/M). {yields} The change of binding free energy of PD153035-DNA interaction is -5.49 kcal mol{sup -1} at 23 {+-} 0.5 {sup o}C. -- Abstract: Accurately predicting binding affinity constant (K{sub A}) is highly required to determine the binding energetics of the driving forces in drug-DNA interactions. Recently, PD153035, brominated anilinoquinazoline, has been reported to be not only a highly selective inhibitor of epidermal growth factor receptor but also a DNA intercalator. Here, we use a dual-trap optical tweezers to determining K{sub A} for PD153035, where K{sub A} is determined from the changes in B-form contour length (L) of PD153035-DNA complex. Here, L is fitted using a modified wormlike chain model. We found that a noticeable increment in L in 1 mM sodium cacodylate was exhibited. Furthermore, our results showed that K{sub A} = 1.18({+-}0.09) x 10{sup 4} (1/M) at 23 {+-} 0.5 {sup o}C and the minimum distance between adjacent bound PD153035 {approx} 11 bp. We anticipate that by using this approach we can determine the complete thermodynamic profiles due to the presence of DNA intercalators.

  4. Is There Consistency between the Binding Affinity and Inhibitory Potential of Natural Polyphenols as α-amylase Inhibitors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wei; Shao, Rong; Xiao, Jianbo

    2016-07-26

    The inhibitory potential of natural polyphenols for α-amylases has attracted great interests among researchers. The structure-affinity properties of natural polyphenols binding to α-amylase and the structure-activity relationship of dietary polyphenols inhibiting α-amylase were deeply investigated. There is a lack of consistency between the structure-affinity relationship and the structure-activity relationship of natural polyphenols as α-amylase inhibitors. Is it consistent between the binding affinity and inhibitory potential of natural polyphenols as with α-amylase inhibitors? It was found that the consistency between the binding affinity and inhibitory potential of natural polyphenols as with α-amylase inhibitors is not equivocal. For example, there is no consistency between the binding affinity and the inhibitory potential of quercetin and its glycosides as α-amylase inhibitors. However, catechins with higher α-amylase inhibitory potential exhibited higher affinity with α-amylase.

  5. Three Classes of Inhibitors Share a Common Binding Domain in Mitochondrial Complex I (NADH:Ubiquinone Oxidoreductase)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jürgen G. Okun; Peter Lümmen; Ulrich Brandt

    1999-01-01

    .... Taking advantage of a partial quench of fluorescence upon binding of the fenazaquin-type inhibitor 2-decyl-4-quinazolinyl amine to complex I in bovine submitochondrial particles, we determined a K d of 17 Â...

  6. Molecular Determinants Underlying Binding Specificities of the ABL Kinase Inhibitors: Combining Alanine Scanning of Binding Hot Spots with Network Analysis of Residue Interactions and Coevolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Tse

    Full Text Available Quantifying binding specificity and drug resistance of protein kinase inhibitors is of fundamental importance and remains highly challenging due to complex interplay of structural and thermodynamic factors. In this work, molecular simulations and computational alanine scanning are combined with the network-based approaches to characterize molecular determinants underlying binding specificities of the ABL kinase inhibitors. The proposed theoretical framework unveiled a relationship between ligand binding and inhibitor-mediated changes in the residue interaction networks. By using topological parameters, we have described the organization of the residue interaction networks and networks of coevolving residues in the ABL kinase structures. This analysis has shown that functionally critical regulatory residues can simultaneously embody strong coevolutionary signal and high network centrality with a propensity to be energetic hot spots for drug binding. We have found that selective (Nilotinib and promiscuous (Bosutinib, Dasatinib kinase inhibitors can use their energetic hot spots to differentially modulate stability of the residue interaction networks, thus inhibiting or promoting conformational equilibrium between inactive and active states. According to our results, Nilotinib binding may induce a significant network-bridging effect and enhance centrality of the hot spot residues that stabilize structural environment favored by the specific kinase form. In contrast, Bosutinib and Dasatinib can incur modest changes in the residue interaction network in which ligand binding is primarily coupled only with the identity of the gate-keeper residue. These factors may promote structural adaptability of the active kinase states in binding with these promiscuous inhibitors. Our results have related ligand-induced changes in the residue interaction networks with drug resistance effects, showing that network robustness may be compromised by targeted mutations

  7. Identification and analysis of hepatitis C virus NS3 helicase inhibitors using nucleic acid binding assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Sourav; Hanson, Alicia M; Shadrick, William R; Ndjomou, Jean; Sweeney, Noreena L; Hernandez, John J; Bartczak, Diana; Li, Kelin; Frankowski, Kevin J; Heck, Julie A; Arnold, Leggy A; Schoenen, Frank J; Frick, David N

    2012-09-01

    Typical assays used to discover and analyze small molecules that inhibit the hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS3 helicase yield few hits and are often confounded by compound interference. Oligonucleotide binding assays are examined here as an alternative. After comparing fluorescence polarization (FP), homogeneous time-resolved fluorescence (HTRF®; Cisbio) and AlphaScreen® (Perkin Elmer) assays, an FP-based assay was chosen to screen Sigma's Library of Pharmacologically Active Compounds (LOPAC) for compounds that inhibit NS3-DNA complex formation. Four LOPAC compounds inhibited the FP-based assay: aurintricarboxylic acid (ATA) (IC50=1.4 μM), suramin sodium salt (IC50=3.6 μM), NF 023 hydrate (IC50=6.2 μM) and tyrphostin AG 538 (IC50=3.6 μM). All but AG 538 inhibited helicase-catalyzed strand separation, and all but NF 023 inhibited replication of subgenomic HCV replicons. A counterscreen using Escherichia coli single-stranded DNA binding protein (SSB) revealed that none of the new HCV helicase inhibitors were specific for NS3h. However, when the SSB-based assay was used to analyze derivatives of another non-specific helicase inhibitor, the main component of the dye primuline, it revealed that some primuline derivatives (e.g. PubChem CID50930730) are up to 30-fold more specific for HCV NS3h than similarly potent HCV helicase inhibitors.

  8. Novel Triazole-Quinoline Derivatives as Selective Dual Binding Site Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susimaire P. Mantoani

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD is the most prevalent neurodegenerative disorder worldwide. Currently, the only strategy for palliative treatment of AD is to inhibit acetylcholinesterase (AChE in order to increase the concentration of acetylcholine in the synaptic cleft. Evidence indicates that AChE also interacts with the β-amyloid (Aβ protein, acting as a chaperone and increasing the number and neurotoxicity of Aβ fibrils. It is known that AChE has two binding sites: the peripheral site, responsible for the interactions with Aβ, and the catalytic site, related with acetylcholine hydrolysis. In this work, we reported the synthesis and biological evaluation of a library of new tacrine-donepezil hybrids, as a potential dual binding site AChE inhibitor, containing a triazole-quinoline system. The synthesis of hybrids was performed in four steps using the click chemistry strategy. These compounds were evaluated as hAChE and hBChE inhibitors, and some derivatives showed IC50 values in the micro-molar range and were remarkably selective towards hAChE. Kinetic assays and molecular modeling studies confirm that these compounds block both catalytic and peripheral AChE sites. These results are quite interesting since the triazole-quinoline system is a new structural scaffold for AChE inhibitors. Furthermore, the synthetic approach is very efficient for the preparation of target compounds, allowing a further fruitful new chemical library optimization.

  9. Impact of Reducing Complement Inhibitor Binding on the Immunogenicity of Native Neisseria meningitidis Outer Membrane Vesicles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helene Daniels-Treffandier

    Full Text Available Neisseria meningitidis recruits host human complement inhibitors to its surface to down-regulate complement activation and enhance survival in blood. We have investigated whether such complement inhibitor binding occurs after vaccination with native outer membrane vesicles (nOMVs, and limits immunogenicity of such vaccines. To this end, nOMVs reactogenic lipopolysaccharide was detoxified by deletion of the lpxl1 gene (nOMVlpxl1. nOMVs unable to bind human complement factor H (hfH were generated by additional deletions of the genes encoding factor H binding protein (fHbp and neisserial surface protein A (NspA (nOMVdis. Antibody responses elicited in mice with nOMVdis were compared to those elicited with nOMVlpxl1 in the presence of hfH. Results demonstrate that the administration of human fH to mice immunized with fHbp containing OMVlpxl1 decreased immunogenicity against fHbp (but not against the OMV as a whole. The majority of the OMV-induced bactericidal immune response (OMVlpxl1 or OMVdis was versus PorA. Despite a considerable reduction of hfH binding to nOMVdis, and the absence of the vaccine antigen fHbp, immunogenicity in mice was not different from nOMVlpxl1, in the absence or presence of hfH (serum bactericidal titers of 1:64 vs 1:128 after one dose in the nOMVdis and nOMVlpxl1-immunized groups respectively. Therefore, partial inhibition of fH binding did not enhance immunity in this model.

  10. Binding properties of ferrocene-glutathione conjugates as inhibitors and sensors for glutathione S-transferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martos-Maldonado, Manuel C; Casas-Solvas, Juan M; Téllez-Sanz, Ramiro; Mesa-Valle, Concepción; Quesada-Soriano, Indalecio; García-Maroto, Federico; Vargas-Berenguel, Antonio; García-Fuentes, Luís

    2012-02-01

    The binding properties of two electroactive glutathione-ferrocene conjugates that consist in glutathione attached to one or both of the cyclopentadienyl rings of ferrocene (GSFc and GSFcSG), to Schistosoma japonica glutathione S-transferase (SjGST) were studied by spectroscopy fluorescence, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). Such ferrocene conjugates resulted to be competitive inhibitors of glutathione S-transferase with an increased binding affinity relative to the natural substrate glutathione (GSH). We found that the conjugate having two glutathione units (GSFcSG) exhibits an affinity for SjGST approximately two orders of magnitude higher than GSH. Furthermore, it shows negative cooperativity with the affinity for the second binding site two orders of magnitude lower than that for the first one. We propose that the reason for such negative cooperativity is steric since, i) the obtained thermodynamic parameters do not indicate profound conformational changes upon GSFcSG binding and ii) docking studies have shown that, when bound, part of the first bound ligand invades the second site due to its large size. In addition, voltammetric measurements show a strong decrease of the peak current upon binding of ferrocene-glutathione conjugates to SjGST and provide very similar K values than those obtained by ITC. Moreover, the sensing ability, expressed by the sensitivity parameter shows that GSFcSG is much more sensitive than GSFc, for the detection of SjGST.

  11. Substituent effects on the binding of natural product anthocyanidin inhibitors to influenza neuraminidase with mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaminathan, Kavya; Müller, Patrick; Downard, Kevin M

    2014-05-30

    The binding of three closely related anthocyanins within the 430-cavity of influenza neuraminidase is studied using a combination of mass spectrometry and molecular docking. Despite their similar structures, which differ only in the number and position of the hydroxyl substituents on the phenyl group attached to the chromenylium ring, subtle differences in their binding characteristics are revealed by mass spectrometry and molecular docking that are in accord with their inhibitory properties by neuraminidase inhibition assays. The cyanidin and delphinidin, with the greatest number of hydroxyl groups, bind more strongly and are better inhibitors than pelargonidin that contains a lone hydroxyl group at the 4' position. The study demonstrates, for the first time, the sensitivity of the mass spectrometry based approach for investigating the molecular basis and relative affinity of antiviral inhibitors, with subtly different structures, to their target protein. It has broader application for the screening of other protein interactions more generally with reasonable high-throughput. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Compound list: diazepam [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available diazepam DZP 00023 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/in_vitro/dia...zepam.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vitro/dia...zepam.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Single/dia...-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Repeat/diazepam.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Repeat.zip ...

  13. Thermodynamic parameters for binding of some halogenated inhibitors of human protein kinase CK2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winiewska, Maria; Makowska, Małgorzata [Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics PAS, Warszawa (Poland); Maj, Piotr [Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics PAS, Warszawa (Poland); Nencki Institute of Experimental Biology PAS, Warszawa (Poland); Wielechowska, Monika; Bretner, Maria [Warsaw University of Technology, Faculty of Chemistry, Warszawa (Poland); Poznański, Jarosław, E-mail: jarek@ibb.waw.pl [Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics PAS, Warszawa (Poland); Shugar, David [Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics PAS, Warszawa (Poland)

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • Two new compounds being potential human CK2a inhibitors are studied. • Their IC50 values were determined in vitro. • The heats of binding and kbind were estimated using DSC. • The increased stability of protein–ligand complexes was followed by fluorescence. • Methylated TBBt derivative (MeBr3Br) is almost as active as TBBt. - Abstract: The interaction of human CK2α with a series of tetrabromobenzotriazole (TBBt) and tetrabromobenzimidazole (TBBz) analogs, in which one of the bromine atoms proximal to the triazole/imidazole ring is replaced by a methyl group, was studied by biochemical (IC{sub 50}) and biophysical methods (thermal stability of protein–ligand complex monitored by DSC and fluorescence). Two newly synthesized tri-bromo derivatives display inhibitory activity comparable to that of the reference compounds, TBBt and TBBz, respectively. DSC analysis of the stability of protein–ligand complexes shows that the heat of ligand binding (H{sub bind}) is driven by intermolecular electrostatic interactions involving the triazole/imidazole ring, as indicated by a strong correlation between H{sub bind} and ligand pK{sub a}. Screening, based on fluorescence-monitored thermal unfolding of protein–ligand complexes, gave comparable results, clearly identifying ligands that most strongly bind to the protein. Overall results, additionally supported by molecular modeling, confirm that a balance of hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions contribute predominantly, relative to possible intermolecular halogen bonding, in binding of the ligands to the CK2α ATP-binding site.

  14. Binding site residues control inhibitor selectivity in the human norepinephrine transporter but not in the human dopamine transporter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jacob; Ringsted, Kristoffer B; Bang-Andersen, Benny

    2015-01-01

    . Changing the six diverging residues in the central binding site of NET to the complementary residues in DAT transferred a DAT-like pharmacology to NET, showing that non-conserved binding site residues in NET are critical determinants for inhibitor selectivity. In contrast, changing the equivalent residues...

  15. Aggrecanase-2 inhibitors based on the acylthiosemicarbazide zinc-binding group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maingot, Lucie; Elbakali, Jamal; Dumont, Julie; Bosc, Damien; Cousaert, Nicolas; Urban, Agathe; Deglane, Gaelle; Villoutreix, Bruno; Nagase, Hideaki; Sperandio, Olivier; Leroux, Florence; Deprez, Benoit; Deprez-Poulain, Rebecca

    2013-11-01

    Osteoarthritis is a disabling disease characterized by the articular cartilage breakdown. Aggrecanases are potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of this pathology. At the starting point of this project, an acylthiosemicarbazide was discovered to inhibit aggrecanase-2. The acylthiosemicarbazide Zn binding group is also a convenient linker for library synthesis. A focused library of 920 analogs was thus prepared and screened to establish structure-activity relationships. The modification of the acylthiosemicarbazide was also explored. This strategy combining library design and discrete compounds synthesis yielded inhibitor 35, that is highly selective for aggrecanases over a panel of metalloproteases and inhibits the degradation of native fully glycosylated aggrecan. A docking study generated binding conformations explaining the structure-activity relationships.

  16. Binding of ACE-inhibitors to in vitro and patient-derived amyloid-β fibril models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhavaraju, Manikanthan; Phillips, Malachi; Bowman, Deborah; Aceves-Hernandez, Juan M.; Hansmann, Ulrich H. E.

    2016-01-01

    Currently, no drugs exist that can prevent or reverse Alzheimer's disease, a neurodegenerative disease associated with the presence, in the brain, of plaques that are composed of β-amyloid (Aβ) peptides. Recent studies suggest that angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, a set of drugs used to treat hypertension, may inhibit amyloid formation in vitro. In the present study, we investigate through computer simulations the binding of ACE inhibitors to patient-derived Aβ fibrils and contrast it with that of ACE inhibitors binding to in vitro generated fibrils. The binding affinities of the ACE inhibitors are compared with that of Congo red, a dye that is used to identify amyloid structures and that is known to be a weak inhibitor of Aβ aggregation. We find that ACE inhibitors have a lower binding affinity to the patient-derived fibrils than to in vitro generated ones. For patient-derived fibrils, their binding affinities are even lower than that of Congo red. Our observations raise doubts on the hypothesis that these drugs inhibit fibril formation in Alzheimer patients by interacting directly with the amyloids.

  17. Characterization of the subunit structure of the maize tonoplast ATPase. Immunological and inhibitor binding studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandala, S; Taiz, L

    1986-09-25

    Gradient purified preparations of the maize 400-kDa tonoplast ATPase are enriched in two major polypeptides, 72 and 62 kDa. Polyclonal antibodies were prepared against these two putative subunits after elution from sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis gel slices and against the solubilized native enzyme. Antibodies to both the 72- and 62-kDa polypeptides cross-reacted with similar bands on immunoblots of a tonoplast-enriched fraction from barley, while only the 72-kDa antibodies cross-reacted with tonoplast and tonoplast ATPase preparations from Neurospora. Antibodies to the 72-kDa polypeptide and the native enzyme both strongly inhibited enzyme activity, but the 62-kDa antibody was without effect. The identity and function of the subunits was further probed using radiolabeled covalent inhibitors of the tonoplast ATPase, 7-chloro-4-nitro[14C]benzo-2-oxa-1,3-diazole ([14C]NBD-Cl) and N,N'-[14C]dicyclohexylcarbodiimide ([14C]DCCD). [14C]NBD-Cl preferentially labeled the 72-kDa polypeptide, and labeling was prevented by ATP. [14C]DCCD, an inhibitor of the proton channel portion of the mitochondrial ATPase, bound to a 16-kDa polypeptide. Venturicidin blocked binding to the mitochondrial 8-kDa polypeptide but did not affect binding to the tonoplast 16-kDa polypeptide. Taken together, the results implicate the 72-kDa polypeptide as the catalytic subunit of the tonoplast ATPase. The DCCD-binding 16-kDa polypeptide may comprise the proton channel. The presence of nucleotide-binding sites on the 62-kDa polypeptide suggests that it may function as a regulatory subunit.

  18. Study on the drug resistance and the binding mode of HIV-1 integrase with LCA inhibitor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU; JianPing; CHANG; Shan; CHEN; WeiZu; WANG; CunXin

    2007-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) integrase (IN) is an essential enzyme in the lifecycle of this virus and also an important target for the study of anti-HIV drugs. The binding mode of the wild type IN core domain and its G140S mutant with L-Chicoric acid (LCA) inhibitor were investigated by using multiple conformation molecular docking and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. Based on the binding modes, the drug resistance mechanism was explored for the G140S mutant of IN with LCA. The results indicate that the binding site of the G140S mutant of IN core domain with LCA is different from that of the core domain of the wild type IN, which leads to the partial loss of inhibition potency of LCA. The flexibility of the IN functional loop region and the interactions between Mg2+ ion and the three key residues (i.e., D64, D116, E152) stimulate the biological operation of IN. The drug resistance also lies in several other important effects, such as the repulsion between LCA and E152 in the G140S mutant core domain, the weakening of K159 binding with LCA and Y143 pointing to the pocket of the G140S mutant. All of the above simulation results agree well with experimental data, which provide us with some helpful information for designing the drug of anti-HIV based on the structure of IN.

  19. Jack bean urease: the effect of active-site binding inhibitors on the reactivity of enzyme thiol groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krajewska, Barbara; Zaborska, Wiesława

    2007-10-01

    In view of the complexity of the role of the active site flap cysteine in the urease catalysis, in this work we studied how the presence of typical active-site binding inhibitors of urease, phenylphosphorodiamidate (PPD), acetohydroxamic acid (AHA), boric acid and fluoride, affects the reactivity of enzyme thiol groups, the active site flap thiol in particular. For that the inhibitor-urease complexes were prepared with excess inhibitors and had their thiol groups titrated with DTNB. The effects observed were analyzed in terms of the structures of the inhibitor-urease complexes reported in the literature. We found that the effectiveness in preventing the active site cysteine from the modification by disulfides, varied among the inhibitors studied, even though they all bind to the active site. The variations were accounted for by different extents of geometrical distortion in the active site that the inhibitors introduced upon binding, leaving the flap either open in AHA-, boric acid- and fluoride-inhibited urease, like in the native enzyme or closed in PPD-inhibited urease. Among the inhibitors, only PPD was found to be able to thoroughly protect the flap cysteines from the further reaction with disulfides, this apparently resulting from the closed conformation of the flap. Accordingly, in practical terms PPD may be regarded as the most suitable inhibitor for active-site protection experiments in inhibition studies of urease.

  20. Temporary diazepam responsive apneic attacks and congenital myasthenic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yis, Uluç; Kurul, Semra Hiz; Oztura, Ibrahim; Ozden, Omer; Akinci, Gülçin; Dirik, Eray

    2009-07-01

    Congenital myasthenic syndromes are a genetically and phenotypically heterogeneous group of hereditary disorders affecting neuromuscular junction. Mutations in the gene encoding choline acetyltransferase cause presynaptic defects. The missense mutation I336T has been identified in Turkish population, and most of the cases carrying this mutation present with exercise-induced fatigability and ptosis. Although apneic attacks occur in these cases during febrile illness in childhood, the number of reported respiratory distress episodes during infancy is scarce. Another important feature of these cases is that response to esterase inhibitors is satisfactory. We present a case of congenital myasthenic syndrome with I336T choline acetyltransferase mutation who presented with numerous attacks of respiratory distress in the infancy period. Interestingly, the patient had myopathic findings on electromyography and diazepam decreased severity of apneic attacks. There was also no improvement with esterase inhibitors.

  1. Computational studies on the binding mechanism between triazolone inhibitors and Chk1 by molecular docking and molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Min; Ma, Shuying; Tian, Yueli; Zhang, Xiaoyun; Lv, Wenjuan; Zhai, Honglin

    2015-01-01

    Chk1, a serine/threonine protein kinase that participates in transducing DNA damage signals, is an attractive target due to its involvement in tumor initiation and progression. As a novel Chk1 inhibitor, the triazolone's bioactivity mechanism is not clear. In this study, we carried out an integrated computational study that combines molecular docking, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, and binding free energy calculations to identify the key factors necessary for the bioactivities. With the aim of discerning the structural features that affect the inhibitory activity of triazolones, MK-8776, a Chk1 inhibitor that reached the clinical stage, was also used as a reference for simulations. A comparative analysis of the triazolone inhibitors at the molecular level offers valuable insight into the structural and energetic properties. A general feature is that all the studied inhibitors bind in the pocket characterized by residues Leu14, Val22, Ala35, Glu84, Tyr85, Cys86, and Leu136 of Chk1. Moreover, introducing hydrophobic groups into triazolone inhibitors is favorable for binding to Chk1, which is corroborated by residue Leu136 with a relatively large difference in the contribution between MK-8776 and five triazolones to the total binding free energies. A hydrogen bond between the polar hydrogen atoms at R1 and Cys86 can facilitate proper placement of the inhibitor in the binding pocket of Chk1 that favors binding. However, the introduction of hydrophilic groups into the R2 position diminishes binding affinity. The information provided by this research is of benefit for further rational design of novel promising inhibitors of Chk1.

  2. A high-throughput, nonisotopic, competitive binding assay for kinases using nonselective inhibitor probes (ED-NSIP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vainshtein, Inna; Silveria, Scott; Kaul, Poonam; Rouhani, Riaz; Eglen, Richard M; Wang, John

    2002-12-01

    A novel competitive binding assay for protein kinase inhibitors has been developed for high-throughput screening (HTS). Unlike functional kinase assays, which are based on detection of substrate phosphorylation by the enzyme, this novel method directly measures the binding potency of compounds to the kinase ATP binding site through competition with a conjugated binding probe. The binding interaction is coupled to a signal amplification system based on complementation of beta-galactosidase enzyme fragments, a homogeneous, nonisotopic assay technology platform developed by DiscoveRx Corp. In the present study, staurosporine, a potent, nonselective kinase inhibitor, was chemically conjugated to a small fragment of beta-galactosidase (termed ED-SS). This was used as the binding probe to the kinase ATP binding pocket. The binding potencies of several inhibitors with diverse structures were assessed by displacement of ED-SS from the kinase. The assay format was specifically evaluated with GSK3alpha, an enzyme previously screened in a radioactive kinase assay (i.e., measurement of [(33)P]-gamma-ATP incorporation into the kinase peptide substrate). Under optimized assay conditions, nonconjugated staurosporine inhibited ED-SS binding in a concentration-dependent manner with an apparent potency (IC(50)) of 11 nM, which was similar to the IC(50) value determined in a radioactive assay. Furthermore, 9 kinase inhibitors with diverse structures, previously identified from chemical compound library screening, were screened using the competitive binding assay. The potencies in the binding assay were in very good agreement with those obtained previously in the isotopic functional activity assay. The binding assay was adapted for automated HTS using selected compound libraries in a 384-well microtiter plate format. The HTS assay was observed to be highly robust and reproducible (Z' factors > 0.7) with high interassay precision (R(2) > 0.96). Interference of compounds with the beta

  3. Development and binding characteristics of phosphonate inhibitors of SplA protease from Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burchacka, Ewa; Zdzalik, Michal; Niemczyk, Justyna-Stec; Pustelny, Katarzyna; Popowicz, Grzegorz; Wladyka, Benedykt; Dubin, Adam; Potempa, Jan; Sienczyk, Marcin; Dubin, Grzegorz; Oleksyszyn, Jozef

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is responsible for a variety of human infections, including life-threatening, systemic conditions. Secreted proteome, including a range of proteases, constitutes the major virulence factor of the bacterium. However, the functions of individual enzymes, in particular SplA protease, remain poorly characterized. Here, we report development of specific inhibitors of SplA protease. The design, synthesis, and activity of a series of α-aminoalkylphosphonate diaryl esters and their peptidyl derivatives are described. Potent inhibitors of SplA are reported, which may facilitate future investigation of physiological function of the protease. The binding modes of the high-affinity compounds Cbz-PheP-(OC6H4−4-SO2CH3)2 and Suc-Val-Pro-PheP-(OC6H5)2 are revealed by high-resolution crystal structures of complexes with the protease. Surprisingly, the binding mode of both compounds deviates from previously characterized canonical interaction of α-aminoalkylphosphonate peptidyl derivatives and family S1 serine proteases. PMID:24375505

  4. Dual Binding Site and Selective Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitors Derived from Integrated Pharmacophore Models and Sequential Virtual Screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shikhar Gupta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we have employed in silico methodology combining double pharmacophore based screening, molecular docking, and ADME/T filtering to identify dual binding site acetylcholinesterase inhibitors that can preferentially inhibit acetylcholinesterase and simultaneously inhibit the butyrylcholinesterase also but in the lesser extent than acetylcholinesterase. 3D-pharmacophore models of AChE and BuChE enzyme inhibitors have been developed from xanthostigmine derivatives through HypoGen and validated using test set, Fischer’s randomization technique. The best acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase inhibitors pharmacophore hypotheses Hypo1_A and Hypo1_B, with high correlation coefficient of 0.96 and 0.94, respectively, were used as 3D query for screening the Zinc database. The screened hits were then subjected to the ADME/T and molecular docking study to prioritise the compounds. Finally, 18 compounds were identified as potential leads against AChE enzyme, showing good predicted activities and promising ADME/T properties.

  5. Structural and functional insights into the HIV-1 maturation inhibitor binding pocket.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kayoko Waki

    Full Text Available Processing of the Gag precursor protein by the viral protease during particle release triggers virion maturation, an essential step in the virus replication cycle. The first-in-class HIV-1 maturation inhibitor dimethylsuccinyl betulinic acid [PA-457 or bevirimat (BVM] blocks HIV-1 maturation by inhibiting the cleavage of the capsid-spacer peptide 1 (CA-SP1 intermediate to mature CA. A structurally distinct molecule, PF-46396, was recently reported to have a similar mode of action to that of BVM. Because of the structural dissimilarity between BVM and PF-46396, we hypothesized that the two compounds might interact differentially with the putative maturation inhibitor-binding pocket in Gag. To test this hypothesis, PF-46396 resistance was selected for in vitro. Resistance mutations were identified in three regions of Gag: around the CA-SP1 cleavage site where BVM resistance maps, at CA amino acid 201, and in the CA major homology region (MHR. The MHR mutants are profoundly PF-46396-dependent in Gag assembly and release and virus replication. The severe defect exhibited by the inhibitor-dependent MHR mutants in the absence of the compound is also corrected by a second-site compensatory change far downstream in SP1, suggesting structural and functional cross-talk between the HIV-1 CA MHR and SP1. When PF-46396 and BVM were both present in infected cells they exhibited mutually antagonistic behavior. Together, these results identify Gag residues that line the maturation inhibitor-binding pocket and suggest that BVM and PF-46396 interact differentially with this putative pocket. These findings provide novel insights into the structure-function relationship between the CA MHR and SP1, two domains of Gag that are critical to both assembly and maturation. The highly conserved nature of the MHR across all orthoretroviridae suggests that these findings will be broadly relevant to retroviral assembly. Finally, the results presented here provide a framework

  6. Structural and functional insights into the HIV-1 maturation inhibitor binding pocket.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waki, Kayoko; Durell, Stewart R; Soheilian, Ferri; Nagashima, Kunio; Butler, Scott L; Freed, Eric O

    2012-01-01

    Processing of the Gag precursor protein by the viral protease during particle release triggers virion maturation, an essential step in the virus replication cycle. The first-in-class HIV-1 maturation inhibitor dimethylsuccinyl betulinic acid [PA-457 or bevirimat (BVM)] blocks HIV-1 maturation by inhibiting the cleavage of the capsid-spacer peptide 1 (CA-SP1) intermediate to mature CA. A structurally distinct molecule, PF-46396, was recently reported to have a similar mode of action to that of BVM. Because of the structural dissimilarity between BVM and PF-46396, we hypothesized that the two compounds might interact differentially with the putative maturation inhibitor-binding pocket in Gag. To test this hypothesis, PF-46396 resistance was selected for in vitro. Resistance mutations were identified in three regions of Gag: around the CA-SP1 cleavage site where BVM resistance maps, at CA amino acid 201, and in the CA major homology region (MHR). The MHR mutants are profoundly PF-46396-dependent in Gag assembly and release and virus replication. The severe defect exhibited by the inhibitor-dependent MHR mutants in the absence of the compound is also corrected by a second-site compensatory change far downstream in SP1, suggesting structural and functional cross-talk between the HIV-1 CA MHR and SP1. When PF-46396 and BVM were both present in infected cells they exhibited mutually antagonistic behavior. Together, these results identify Gag residues that line the maturation inhibitor-binding pocket and suggest that BVM and PF-46396 interact differentially with this putative pocket. These findings provide novel insights into the structure-function relationship between the CA MHR and SP1, two domains of Gag that are critical to both assembly and maturation. The highly conserved nature of the MHR across all orthoretroviridae suggests that these findings will be broadly relevant to retroviral assembly. Finally, the results presented here provide a framework for increased

  7. High-throughput screening for novel inhibitors of Neisseria gonorrhoeae penicillin-binding protein 2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alena Fedarovich

    Full Text Available The increasing prevalence of N. gonorrhoeae strains exhibiting decreased susceptibility to third-generation cephalosporins and the recent isolation of two distinct strains with high-level resistance to cefixime or ceftriaxone heralds the possible demise of β-lactam antibiotics as effective treatments for gonorrhea. To identify new compounds that inhibit penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs, which are proven targets for β-lactam antibiotics, we developed a high-throughput assay that uses fluorescence polarization (FP to distinguish the fluorescent penicillin, Bocillin-FL, in free or PBP-bound form. This assay was used to screen a 50,000 compound library for potential inhibitors of N. gonorrhoeae PBP 2, and 32 compounds were identified that exhibited >50% inhibition of Bocillin-FL binding to PBP 2. These included a cephalosporin that provided validation of the assay. After elimination of compounds that failed to exhibit concentration-dependent inhibition, the antimicrobial activity of the remaining 24 was tested. Of these, 7 showed antimicrobial activity against susceptible and penicillin- or cephalosporin-resistant strains of N. gonorrhoeae. In molecular docking simulations using the crystal structure of PBP 2, two of these inhibitors docked into the active site of the enzyme and each mediate interactions with the active site serine nucleophile. This study demonstrates the validity of a FP-based assay to find novel inhibitors of PBPs and paves the way for more comprehensive high-throughput screening against highly resistant strains of N. gonorrhoeae. It also provides a set of lead compounds for optimization of anti-gonococcal agents.

  8. Conformational Dynamics and Binding Free Energies of Inhibitors of BACE-1: From the Perspective of Protonation Equilibria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Olivia Kim

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available BACE-1 is the β-secretase responsible for the initial amyloidogenesis in Alzheimer's disease, catalyzing hydrolytic cleavage of substrate in a pH-sensitive manner. The catalytic mechanism of BACE-1 requires water-mediated proton transfer from aspartyl dyad to the substrate, as well as structural flexibility in the flap region. Thus, the coupling of protonation and conformational equilibria is essential to a full in silico characterization of BACE-1. In this work, we perform constant pH replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations on both apo BACE-1 and five BACE-1-inhibitor complexes to examine the effect of pH on dynamics and inhibitor binding properties of BACE-1. In our simulations, we find that solution pH controls the conformational flexibility of apo BACE-1, whereas bound inhibitors largely limit the motions of the holo enzyme at all levels of pH. The microscopic pKa values of titratable residues in BACE-1 including its aspartyl dyad are computed and compared between apo and inhibitor-bound states. Changes in protonation between the apo and holo forms suggest a thermodynamic linkage between binding of inhibitors and protons localized at the dyad. Utilizing our recently developed computational protocol applying the binding polynomial formalism to the constant pH molecular dynamics (CpHMD framework, we are able to obtain the pH-dependent binding free energy profiles for various BACE-1-inhibitor complexes. Our results highlight the importance of correctly addressing the binding-induced protonation changes in protein-ligand systems where binding accompanies a net proton transfer. This work comprises the first application of our CpHMD-based free energy computational method to protein-ligand complexes and illustrates the value of CpHMD as an all-purpose tool for obtaining pH-dependent dynamics and binding free energies of biological systems.

  9. Design of multiligand inhibitors for the swine flu H1N1 neuraminidase binding site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narayanan MM

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Manoj M Narayanan,1,2 Chandrasekhar B Nair,2 Shilpa K Sanjeeva,2 PV Subba Rao,2 Phani K Pullela,1,2 Colin J Barrow11Centre for Chemistry and Biotechnology, Deakin University, Geelong, VIC, Australia; 2Bigtec Pvt Ltd, Rajajinagar, Bangalore, IndiaAbstract: Viral neuraminidase inhibitors such as oseltamivir and zanamivir prevent early virus multiplication by blocking sialic acid cleavage on host cells. These drugs are effective for the treatment of a variety of influenza subtypes, including swine flu (H1N1. The binding site for these drugs is well established and they were designed based on computational docking studies. We show here that some common natural products have moderate inhibitory activity for H1N1 neuraminidase under docking studies. Significantly, docking studies using AutoDock for biligand and triligand forms of these compounds (camphor, menthol, and methyl salicylate linked via methylene bridges indicate that they may bind in combination with high affinity to the H1N1 neuraminidase active site. These results also indicate that chemically linked biligands and triligands of these natural products could provide a new class of drug leads for the prevention and treatment of influenza. This study also highlights the need for a multiligand docking algorithm to understand better the mode of action of natural products, wherein multiple active ingredients are present.Keywords: neuraminidase, influenza, H1N1, multiligand, binding energy, molecular docking, virus

  10. Exploring NMR ensembles of calcium binding proteins: Perspectives to design inhibitors of protein-protein interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craescu Constantin T

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Disrupting protein-protein interactions by small organic molecules is nowadays a promising strategy employed to block protein targets involved in different pathologies. However, structural changes occurring at the binding interfaces make difficult drug discovery processes using structure-based drug design/virtual screening approaches. Here we focused on two homologous calcium binding proteins, calmodulin and human centrin 2, involved in different cellular functions via protein-protein interactions, and known to undergo important conformational changes upon ligand binding. Results In order to find suitable protein conformations of calmodulin and centrin for further structure-based drug design/virtual screening, we performed in silico structural/energetic analysis and molecular docking of terphenyl (a mimicking alpha-helical molecule known to inhibit protein-protein interactions of calmodulin into X-ray and NMR ensembles of calmodulin and centrin. We employed several scoring methods in order to find the best protein conformations. Our results show that docking on NMR structures of calmodulin and centrin can be very helpful to take into account conformational changes occurring at protein-protein interfaces. Conclusions NMR structures of protein-protein complexes nowadays available could efficiently be exploited for further structure-based drug design/virtual screening processes employed to design small molecule inhibitors of protein-protein interactions.

  11. Protein arginine deiminase 2 binds calcium in an ordered fashion: implications for inhibitor design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slade, Daniel J; Fang, Pengfei; Dreyton, Christina J; Zhang, Ying; Fuhrmann, Jakob; Rempel, Don; Bax, Benjamin D; Coonrod, Scott A; Lewis, Huw D; Guo, Min; Gross, Michael L; Thompson, Paul R

    2015-04-17

    Protein arginine deiminases (PADs) are calcium-dependent histone-modifying enzymes whose activity is dysregulated in inflammatory diseases and cancer. PAD2 functions as an Estrogen Receptor (ER) coactivator in breast cancer cells via the citrullination of histone tail arginine residues at ER binding sites. Although an attractive therapeutic target, the mechanisms that regulate PAD2 activity are largely unknown, especially the detailed role of how calcium facilitates enzyme activation. To gain insights into these regulatory processes, we determined the first structures of PAD2 (27 in total), and through calcium-titrations by X-ray crystallography, determined the order of binding and affinity for the six calcium ions that bind and activate this enzyme. These structures also identified several PAD2 regulatory elements, including a calcium switch that controls proper positioning of the catalytic cysteine residue, and a novel active site shielding mechanism. Additional biochemical and mass-spectrometry-based hydrogen/deuterium exchange studies support these structural findings. The identification of multiple intermediate calcium-bound structures along the PAD2 activation pathway provides critical insights that will aid the development of allosteric inhibitors targeting the PADs.

  12. The binding mode of second-generation sulfonamide inhibitors of MurD: clues for rational design of potent MurD inhibitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihael Simčič

    Full Text Available A series of optimized sulfonamide derivatives was recently reported as novel inhibitors of UDP-N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine:D-glutamate ligase (MurD. These are based on naphthalene-N-sulfonyl-D-glutamic acid and have the D-glutamic acid replaced with rigidified mimetics. Here we have defined the binding site of these novel ligands to MurD using (1H/(13C heteronuclear single quantum correlation. The MurD protein was selectively (13C-labeled on the methyl groups of Ile (δ1 only, Leu and Val, and was isolated and purified. Crucial Ile, Leu and Val methyl groups in the vicinity of the ligand binding site were identified by comparison of chemical shift perturbation patterns among the ligands with various structural elements and known binding modes. The conformational and dynamic properties of the bound ligands and their binding interactions were examined using the transferred nuclear Overhauser effect and saturation transfer difference. In addition, the binding mode of these novel inhibitors was thoroughly examined using unrestrained molecular dynamics simulations. Our results reveal the complex dynamic behavior of ligand-MurD complexes and its influence on ligand-enzyme contacts. We further present important findings for the rational design of potent Mur ligase inhibitors.

  13. The possible effect of diazepam on cancer development and growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horrobin, D F; Trosko, J E

    1981-01-01

    Diazepam has the characteristics of a tumour promoter in a number of in vitro systems. The effect is apparent at concentrations of diazepam which are clinically relevant. Diazepam also accelerated tumour growth in two different experimental animal cancers. Tranquillizer use was found to be greater in women with metastatic breast cancer at the time of diagnosis than in those without metastases. Further evaluation of the possible effects of diazepam and related drugs on human and animal cancers is urgently required.

  14. Diazepam and the risk of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, D W; Shapiro, S; Slone, D; Rosenberg, L; Helmrich, S P; Miettinen, O S; Stolley, P D; Levy, M; Schottenfeld, D

    1982-03-06

    The relation of breast cancer to diazepam use was evaluated in a case-control study of 1236 women with breast cancer and 728 control subjects with other malignancies. Compared to women who never used diazepam, the relative risk for women who used the drug at least 4 days per week for at least 6 months was estimated to be 0.9, with 95% confidence limits of 0.5 and 1.6. There was no apparent association for recent use, or for use in the distant past, although confidence intervals were fairly wide in these categories. The results were not explained by various potential confounding factors, including the major risk factors for breast cancer. The findings suggest that regular diazepam use does not increase the risk of breast cancer relative to other cancers.

  15. Dopamine D3 receptor knock-out mice exhibit increased behavioral sensitivity to the anxiolytic drug diazepam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leggio, Gian Marco; Micale, Vincenzo; Le Foll, Bernard; Mazzola, Carmen; Nobrega, José N; Drago, Filippo

    2011-04-01

    Dopamine D(3) receptors (DRsD3) seem to have a pivotal role in mood disorders. Using the elevated plus maze (EPM) and the novelty-induced grooming test (NGT), we assessed the responses of DRD3-deficient (D(3)(-/-)) mice to the acute treatment (different testing time) with the anxiolytic drug, diazepam. D(3)(-/-) mice treated with diazepam (0.1 or 0.5mg/kg) exhibited a better behavioral response in the EPM than their wild type (WT). Furthermore, in D(3)(-/-) mice, but not in WT, 1mg/kg diazepam induced anxiolytic effects at all testing times. The contribution of DRsD3 in the anxiolytic effects of diazepam was confirmed by similar results obtained in EPM by using the selective DRD3 antagonist U99194A (10mg/kg) in combination with diazepam, in WT animals. D(3)(-/-) mice treated with diazepam (all doses), also showed a decrease in grooming behavior. However, the [(3)H]flunitrazepam autoradiographic analysis revealed no significant changes in D(3)(-/-) mice compared to WT, suggesting that if γ-aminobutyric acid receptor GABA(A) changes are involved, they do not occur at the level of binding to benzodiazepine site. These data suggest that D(3)(-/-) mice exhibit low baseline anxiety levels and provide the evidence that the DRD3 is involved in the modulation of benzodiazepine anxiolytic effects.

  16. Investigations on Binding Pattern of Kinase Inhibitors with PPARγ: Molecular Docking, Molecular Dynamic Simulations, and Free Energy Calculation Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazumder, Mohit; Das, Umashankar; Gourinath, Samudrala

    2017-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) is a potential target for the treatment of several disorders. In view of several FDA approved kinase inhibitors, in the current study, we have investigated the interaction of selected kinase inhibitors with PPARγ using computational modeling, docking, and molecular dynamics simulations (MDS). The docked conformations and MDS studies suggest that the selected KIs interact with PPARγ in the ligand binding domain (LBD) with high positive predictive values. Hence, we have for the first time shown the plausible binding of KIs in the PPARγ ligand binding site. The results obtained from these in silico investigations warrant further evaluation of kinase inhibitors as PPARγ ligands in vitro and in vivo.

  17. Synthesis and evaluation of boronic acids as inhibitors of Penicillin Binding Proteins of classes A, B and C.

    OpenAIRE

    Zervosen, Astrid; Bouillez, André; Herman, Alexandre; Amoroso, Ana Maria; Joris, Bernard; Sauvage, Eric; Charlier, Paulette; Luxen, André

    2012-01-01

    In response to the widespread use of beta-lactam antibiotics bacteria have evolved drug resistance mechanisms that include the production of resistant Penicillin Binding Proteins (PBPs). Boronic acids are potent beta-lactamase inhibitors and have been shown to display some specificity for soluble transpeptidases and PBPs, but their potential as inhibitors of the latter enzymes is yet to be widely explored. Recently, a (2,6-dimethoxybenzamido)methylboronic acid was identified as being a potent...

  18. Dynamics of the substrate binding pocket in the presence of an inhibitor covalently attached to a fungal lipase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, G H; Jensen, M O; Bywater, R P

    2001-08-01

    To gain insight into the mobility of the occupied ligand-binding pocket of the Rhizomucor miehei lipase we have conducted a rigorous molecular dynamics analysis. The covalently attached inhibitor, ethylhexylphosphonate, was employed as a mimic of the putative tetrahedral intermediate in the esterolytic reaction. Our results show that in this lipase, ligand recognition is influenced by the flexibility of the binding pocket, a feature that is common to many other enzymes. Several regions around the active site were found to move significantly to adapt to the inhibitor. These motions are correlated to the flexibility of the inhibitor. In particular, the hexyl chain of the inhibitor shows considerable mobility, and adjacent residues in the binding cleft accommodate to this flexibility. Pronounced fluctuations in the binding pocket induced by the flexibility of the inhibitor are observed in the hinge region F79-S82, the active site loop region W88-V95 and the protein regions P209-F215/H257-Y260. The flexibility in the regions F79-S82 and H257-Y260, where the shorter ethyl chain is located, indicates that additional space in this binding cleft region is available for accommodating a larger moiety. Fluctuations in the region W88-V95 and P209-F215 are due to the relatively short flexible hexyl carbon chain. This part of the binding pocket could be stiffened by the presence of a longer carbon chain. Though the inhibitor is covalently attached through the phosphonate moiety, interaction of the remainder of the molecule and the enzyme are determined by hydrophobic interactions, where the Van der Waals energies are approximately 25% lower than the electrostatic contributions.

  19. Cardiovascular effects of diazepam and chlordiazepoxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniell, H B

    1975-05-01

    In open-chest dog preparations i.v. administration of diazepam and chlordiazepoxide caused increases in coronary blood flow and cardiac output while reducing blood pressure, heart rate, and myocardial contractile force. The decrease in force was independent of the alteration in coronary flow. Arterial--coronary sinus oxygen difference narrowed and myocardial oxygen consumption decreased. These data show that both diazepam and chlordiazepoxide exert an oxygen conserving action along with an increase in myocardial oxygen delivery and suggest that these drugs may be of benefit to the patient with coronary insufficiency by a direct effect on the cardiovascular system as well as through CNS-mediated antianxiety effects.

  20. On the binding mode of urease active site inhibitors: A density functional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leopoldini, M.; Marino, T.; Russo, N.; Toscano, M.

    The way with which boric acid, a rapid reversible competitive inhibitor, binds the urease active site was explored at density functional B3LYP level of theory. The catalytic core of the enzyme was simulated by two models of different size. In both cases, amino acid residues belonging to the inner and to the outer coordination spheres of nickel ions were replaced by smaller molecular species. Contrary to the experimental indication that attributes the inhibitory ability of this acid to the lack of a nucleophilic attack by the enzyme to the boron atom, we instead found that another possibility exists based on the presence of a strong covalent sigma bond between boron and urease that we think can be hardly broken to allow any course of the reaction.

  1. Novel gaseous ethylene binding inhibitor prevents ethylene effects in potted flowering plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serek, M.; Reid, M.S. (Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Environmental Horticulture); Sisler, E.C. (North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry)

    1994-11-01

    A 6-hour fumigation of flowering Begonia xelatior hybrida Fotsch. Najada' and Rosa', B. xtuberhybrida Voss. Non-Stop', Kalanchoe blossfeldiana Poelln. Tropicana', and Rosa hybrida L. Victory Parade' plants with 1-MCP, (formerly designated as SIS-X), a gaseous nonreversible ethylene binding inhibitor, strongly inhibited exogenous ethylene effects such as bud and flower drop, leaf abscission, and accelerated flower senescence. The inhibitory effects of 1-MCP increased linearly with concentration, and at 20 nl-liter[sup [minus]1] this compound gave equal protection to that afforded by spraying the plants with a 0.5 STS mM solution. Chemical names used: 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP), silver thiosulfate (STS).

  2. Novel glyoxalase-I inhibitors possessing a “zinc-binding feature” as potential anticancer agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Balas, Qosay A; Hassan, Mohammad A; Al-Shar’i, Nizar A; Mhaidat, Nizar M; Almaaytah, Ammar M; Al-Mahasneh, Fatima M; Isawi, Israa H

    2016-01-01

    Background The glyoxalase system including two thiol-dependent enzymes, glyoxalase I (Glo-I) and glyoxalase II, plays an important role in a ubiquitous metabolic pathway involved in cellular detoxification of cytotoxic 2-oxoaldehydes. Tumor cells have high glycolytic activity, leading to increased cellular levels of these toxic metabolites. The increased activity of the detoxification system in cancerous cells makes this pathway a viable target for developing novel anticancer agents. In this study, we examined the potential utility of non-glutathione-based inhibitors of the Glo-I enzyme as novel anticancer drugs. Methods Computer-aided drug design techniques, such as customized pharmacophoric features, virtual screening, and flexible docking, were used to achieve the project goals. Retrieved hits were extensively filtered and subsequently docked into the active site of the enzyme. The biological activities of retrieved hits were assessed using an in vitro assay against Glo-I. Results Since Glo-I is a zinc metalloenzyme, a customized Zn-binding pharmacophoric feature was used to search for selective inhibitors via virtual screening of a small-molecule database. Seven hits were selected, purchased, and biologically evaluated. Three of the seven hits inhibited Glo-I activity, the most effective of which exerted 76.4% inhibition at a concentration of 25 µM. Conclusion We successfully identified a potential Glo-I inhibitor that can serve as a lead compound for further optimization. Moreover, our in silico and experimental results were highly correlated. Hence, the docking protocol adopted in this study may be efficiently employed in future optimization steps. PMID:27574401

  3. Pharmacological studies on synthetic flavonoids: comparison with diazepam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griebel, G; Perrault, G; Tan, S; Schoemaker, H; Sanger, D J

    1999-07-01

    The present experiments compared the central BZ-omega binding characteristics and pharmacological profiles of two synthetic flavonoids (6-bromoflavone and 6-bromo-3'-nitroflavone) with those of the benzodiazepine (BZ) diazepam. In vitro experiments showed that while diazepam displaced [3H]flumazenil binding to the GABA(A) receptor in membranes from rat cerebellum and spinal cord, two brain areas enriched in the BZ-omega1 and BZ-omega2 receptor subtypes, with nearly equivalent half maximally effective concentrations, 6-bromo-3'-nitroflavone was somewhat more potent in displacing [3H]flumazenil binding to membranes from rat cerebellum (IC50 = 31 nM) than from spinal cord (IC50 = 120 nM), indicating selectivity for the BZ-omega1 receptor subtype. 6-Bromoflavone displayed weak (IC50 = 970 nM) affinity for the BZ-omega1 and no affinity for the BZ-omega2 (IC50 > 1000 nM) receptor subtypes. Diazepam, but not the synthetic flavonoids increased the latency to clonic seizures produced by isoniazid, thereby indicating that neither 6-bromoflavone nor 6-bromo-3'-nitroflavone display detectable intrinsic activity at GABA(A) receptors in vivo. Results from two conflict tests in rats showed that 6-bromoflavone (3-10 mg/kg) and 6-bromo-3'-nitroflavone (0.3-1 mg/kg) elicited anxiolytic-like activity in the punished drinking test, while both drugs were inactive in the punished lever pressing test. The positive effects displayed by the synthetic flavonoids in the punished drinking procedure were smaller than that of diazepam and were not antagonized by the BZ receptor antagonist flumazenil. In two models of exploratory activity, 6-bromoflavone (3-30 mg/kg) and 6-bromo-3'-nitroflavone (0.3-1 mg/kg) produced anxiolytic-like effects in the rat elevated plus-maze test, whereas both compounds failed to modify the behavior of mice in the light/dark test over a wide dose-range. The effects in the elevated plus-maze were antagonized by flumazenil. In the mouse defense test battery, where mice

  4. Remodeling a DNA-binding protein as a specific in vivo inhibitor of bacterial secretin PulD

    OpenAIRE

    Mouratou, Barbara; Schaeffer, Francis; Guilvout, Ingrid; Tello-Manigne, Diana; Pugsley, Anthony P.; Alzari, Pedro M.; Pecorari, Frédéric

    2007-01-01

    We engineered a class of proteins that binds selected polypeptides with high specificity and affinity. Use of the protein scaffold of Sac7d, belonging to a protein family that binds various ligands, overcomes limitations inherent in the use of antibodies as intracellular inhibitors: it lacks disulfide bridges, is small and stable, and can be produced in large amounts. An in vitro combinatorial/selection approach generated specific, high-affinity (up to 140 pM) binders against bacterial outer ...

  5. Novel glyoxalase-I inhibitors possessing a “zinc-binding feature” as potential anticancer agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Balas QA

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Qosay A Al-Balas,1 Mohammad A Hassan,1 Nizar A Al-Shar’i,1 Nizar M Mhaidat,2 Ammar M Almaaytah,3 Fatima M Al-Mahasneh,1 Israa H Isawi1 1Department of Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmacognosy, 2Department of Clinical Pharmacy, 3Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Jordan University of Science and Technology, Irbid, Jordan Background: The glyoxalase system including two thiol-dependent enzymes, glyoxalase I (Glo-I and glyoxalase II, plays an important role in a ubiquitous metabolic pathway involved in cellular detoxification of cytotoxic 2-oxoaldehydes. Tumor cells have high glycolytic activity, leading to increased cellular levels of these toxic metabolites. The increased activity of the detoxification system in cancerous cells makes this pathway a viable target for developing novel anticancer agents. In this study, we examined the potential utility of non-glutathione-based inhibitors of the Glo-I enzyme as novel anticancer drugs.Methods: Computer-aided drug design techniques, such as customized pharmacophoric features, virtual screening, and flexible docking, were used to achieve the project goals. Retrieved hits were extensively filtered and subsequently docked into the active site of the enzyme. The biological activities of retrieved hits were assessed using an in vitro assay against Glo-I.Results: Since Glo-I is a zinc metalloenzyme, a customized Zn-binding pharmacophoric feature was used to search for selective inhibitors via virtual screening of a small-molecule database. Seven hits were selected, purchased, and biologically evaluated. Three of the seven hits inhibited Glo-I activity, the most effective of which exerted 76.4% inhibition at a concentration of 25 µM.Conclusion: We successfully identified a potential Glo-I inhibitor that can serve as a lead compound for further optimization. Moreover, our in silico and experimental results were highly correlated. Hence, the docking protocol adopted in this study may

  6. Effects of glycine, beta-alanine and diazepam upon morphine-tolerant-dependent mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, E; Tamayo, L

    1980-05-01

    The effects in mice of glycine, beta-alanine and diazepam on the analgesic response to morphine, on the intensity of tolerance and on the physical dependence on the analgesic have been examined. The two amino acids increased the analgesic response to morphine in a dose-related manner. However, both compounds were ineffective in the analgesic test (hot plate) when administered without morphine. Diazepam was ineffective in the analgesic test and it did not alter morphine analgesia, except when administered in a high dose which decreased and analgesic response. Glycine, either in single or repeated doses, did not modify tolerance to morphine, whereas beta-alanine induced a dose-related partial antagonism, which promptly reached a plateau. Diazepam induced a small decrease in the intensity of tolerance to the analgesic. The abstinence syndrome to morphine, induced by naloxone administration to primed mice, was reduced by single doses of glycine or beta-alanine. Diazepam behaved as a weak inhibitor of the abstinence syndrome when administered at a high dose. The potentiation of morphine analgesia and the antagonism of the abstinence syndrome induced by the amino acids may be related to their hyperpolarizing action in the c.n. system. The effects of beta-alanine on morphine tolerance cannot be explained by the same mechanism.

  7. RO 15-1788 antagonises the central effects of diazepam in man without altering diazepam bioavailability.

    OpenAIRE

    1982-01-01

    1 In a double-blind, placebo controlled study, the efficacy of Ro 15-1788, a new benzodiazepine antagonist, in blocking the cognitive, psychomotor and subjective effects of diazepam, was investigated in a group of six healthy male volunteers. 2 The central effects of orally administered diazepam (40 mg) were most pronounced 1 h after dosing and persisted for 9 h with decreasing severity. 3 Concurrent oral administration of Ro 15-1788 (200 mg) completely prevented the impairment in cognitive a...

  8. HIV protease inhibitors act as competitive inhibitors of the cytoplasmic glucose binding site of GLUTs with differing affinities for GLUT1 and GLUT4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard C Hresko

    Full Text Available The clinical use of several first generation HIV protease inhibitors (PIs is associated with the development of insulin resistance. Indinavir has been shown to act as a potent reversible noncompetitive inhibitor of zero-trans glucose influx via direct interaction with the insulin responsive facilitative glucose transporter GLUT4. Newer drugs within this class have differing effects on insulin sensitivity in treated patients. GLUTs are known to contain two distinct glucose-binding sites that are located on opposite sides of the lipid bilayer. To determine whether interference with the cytoplasmic glucose binding site is responsible for differential effects of PIs on glucose transport, intact intracellular membrane vesicles containing GLUT1 and GLUT4, which have an inverted transporter orientation relative to the plasma membrane, were isolated from 3T3-L1 adipocytes. The binding of biotinylated ATB-BMPA, a membrane impermeable bis-mannose containing photolabel, was determined in the presence of indinavir, ritonavir, atazanavir, tipranavir, and cytochalasin b. Zero-trans 2-deoxyglucose transport was measured in both 3T3-L1 fibroblasts and primary rat adipocytes acutely exposed to these compounds. PI inhibition of glucose transport correlated strongly with the PI inhibition of ATB-BMPA/transporter binding. At therapeutically relevant concentrations, ritonavir was not selective for GLUT4 over GLUT1. Indinavir was found to act as a competitive inhibitor of the cytoplasmic glucose binding site of GLUT4 with a K(I of 8.2 µM. These data establish biotinylated ATB-BMPA as an effective probe to quantify accessibility of the endofacial glucose-binding site in GLUTs and reveal that the ability of PIs to block this site differs among drugs within this class. This provides mechanistic insight into the basis for the clinical variation in drug-related metabolic toxicity.

  9. Immunological properties of prolactin and studies on a gonadotropin binding inhibitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Y.S.

    1985-01-01

    The physiological role of prolactin in horses has not yet been well defined. With the availability of highly purified ePRL for inducing antibody formation in rabbits and for radiolabeling with Na/sup 125/I, a very sensitive (0.4-0.6 ng/ml) and highly specific homologous RIA for ePRL was developed. A heterologous RIA using /sup 125/I-labeled ovine PRL and anti-ePRL antiserum was also developed and compared to the homologous RIA for ePRL. Of the two systems, it is concluded that this homologous RIA system is more suitable and more reliable for measuring prolactin concentration in horse serum samples. Until now, biochemical information on PRL has not been available for reptilian species. Sea turtle (Chelonia mydas) prolactin was purified from pituitary extracts by selective precipitation, DEAE-cellulose chromatography and gel filtration. Similar to other species of PRL, sea turtle PRL is a 22,000-24,000 daltons protein and contains a high content of glutamic acid, aspartic acid, serine and leucine, the N-terminal amino acid residue. Gonadotropin (FSH) binding inhibitor was partially purified from sheep testes by ammonium sulfate fractionation and ion exchange chromatography. The FSH-BI (molecular weight: 50,000 daltons, estimated by gel filtration) contains a protein moiety necessary for binding inhibitory activity. The inhibition of the binding of /sup 125/I-labeled ovine FSH to its receptor by the FSH-BI is not competitive. Both in vivo and in vitro biological studies of FSH-BI preparations in rats indicated various effects on FSH and LH activities at the gonadal level. These findings suggest a physiological role for FSH-BI in the regulation of reproduction.

  10. The involvement of noradrenergic mechanisms in the suppressive effects of diazepam on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity in female rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Švob Štrac, Dubravka; Muck-Šeler, Dorotea; Pivac, Nela

    2012-01-01

    Aim To elucidate the involvement of noradrenergic system in the mechanism by which diazepam suppresses basal hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity. Methods Plasma corticosterone and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) levels were determined in female rats treated with diazepam alone, as well as with diazepam in combination with clonidine (α2-adrenoreceptor agonist), yohimbine (α2-adrenoreceptor antagonist), alpha-methyl-p-tyrosine (α-MPT, an inhibitor of catecholamine synthesis), or reserpine (a catecholamine depleting drug) and yohimbine. Results Diazepam administered in a dose of 2.0 mg/kg suppressed basal HPA axis activity, ie, decreased plasma corticosterone and ACTH levels. Pretreatment with clonidine or yohimbine failed to affect basal plasma corticosterone and ACTH concentrations, but abolished diazepam-induced inhibition of the HPA axis activity. Pretreatment with α-MPT, or with a combination of reserpine and yohimbine, increased plasma corticosterone and ACTH levels and prevented diazepam-induced inhibition of the HPA axis activity. Conclusion The results suggest that α2-adrenoreceptors activity, as well as intact presynaptic noradrenergic function, are required for the suppressive effect of diazepam on the HPA axis activity. PMID:22661134

  11. Binding characteristics of thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor to streptococcal surface collagen-like proteins A and B

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seron, Mercedes Valls; Plug, Tom; Marquart, J. Arnoud; Marx, Pauline F.; Herwald, Heiko; de Groot, Philip G.; Meijers, Joost C. M.

    2011-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is the causative agent in a wide range of diseases in humans. Thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFI) binds to collagen-like proteins ScIA and ScIB at the surface of S. pyogenes. Activation of TAFI at this surface redirects inflammation from a transient to chronic s

  12. [Application of aspartic acid as a non-specific binding inhibitor in the enrichment of phosphopeptides with titanium dioxide].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Ming; Bi, Wei; Lu, Zhuang; Song, Lina; Jia, Wei; Zhang, Yangjun; Qian, Xiaohong; Cai, Yun

    2010-02-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) is one of metal oxides widely used for phosphopeptide enrichment in phosphoproteomic research nowadays. However it can bind to some non-phosphorylated peptides containing one or more aspartic acid residues and/or glutamic acid residues. These non-phosphorylated peptides can be eluted along with phosphorylated peptides and cause the reduction of the selectivity. Conventional inhibitors for the non-specific binding of non-phosphorylated peptides can often contaminate the ion source of mass spectrometry and therefore their applications are limited in liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). In this study, aspartic acid was reported as a novel non-specific binding inhibitor for phosphopeptide enrichment by titanium dioxide. Firstly, the tryptic peptide mixtures of 3 and 9 standard proteins were used for the comparison of the enrichment efficiency of titanium dioxide. The effects with the presence of aspartic acid, glutamic acid and no-inhibitor in the enrichment systems were compared separately. The results showed that aspartic acid can greatly improve the selectivity of titanium dioxide for phosphopeptide enrichment. Then, aspartic acid was used for the enrichment of tryptic peptide mixture of C57BL/6J mouse liver lysate and good results were also obtained which demonstrated that aspartic acid was a promising non-specific binding inhibitor for complex biological samples. Besides, no contamination in the ion source occurred during the mass spectrometric analysis.

  13. Functional recruitment of human complement inhibitor C4B-binding protein to outer membrane protein Rck of Salmonella.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek K Ho

    Full Text Available Resistance to complement mediated killing, or serum resistance, is a common trait of pathogenic bacteria. Rck is a 17 kDa outer membrane protein encoded on the virulence plasmid of Salmonella enterica serovars Typhimurium and Enteritidis. When expressed in either E. coli or S. enterica Typhimurium, Rck confers LPS-independent serum resistance as well as the ability to bind to and invade mammalian cells. Having recently shown that Rck binds the inhibitor of the alternative pathway of complement, factor H (fH, we hypothesized that Rck can also bind the inhibitor of the classical and lectin pathways, C4b-binding protein (C4BP. Using flow cytometry and direct binding assays, we demonstrate that E. coli expressing Rck binds C4BP from heat-inactivated serum and by using the purified protein. No binding was detected in the absence of Rck expression. C4BP bound to Rck is functional, as we observed factor I-mediated cleavage of C4b in cofactor assays. In competition assays, binding of radiolabeled C4BP to Rck was reduced by increasing concentrations of unlabeled protein. No effect was observed by increasing heparin or salt concentrations, suggesting mainly non-ionic interactions. Reduced binding of C4BP mutants lacking complement control protein domains (CCPs 7 or 8 was observed compared to wt C4BP, suggesting that these CCPs are involved in Rck binding. While these findings are restricted to Rck expression in E. coli, these data suggest that C4BP binding may be an additional mechanism of Rck-mediated complement resistance.

  14. Discovery of selective inhibitors of tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 2 by targeting the enzyme DNA-binding cleft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossmann, Bradley R; Abdelmalak, Monica; Lopez, Sophia; Tender, Gabrielle; Yan, Chunli; Pommier, Yves; Marchand, Christophe; Ivanov, Ivaylo

    2016-07-15

    Tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 2 (TDP2) processes protein/DNA adducts resulting from abortive DNA topoisomerase II (Top2) activity. TDP2 inhibition could provide synergism with the Top2 poison class of chemotherapeutics. By virtual screening of the NCI diversity small molecule database, we identified selective TDP2 inhibitors and experimentally verified their selective inhibitory activity. Three inhibitors exhibited low-micromolar IC50 values. Molecular dynamics simulations revealed a common binding mode for these inhibitors, involving association to the TDP2 DNA-binding cleft. MM-PBSA per-residue energy decomposition identified important interactions of the compounds with specific TDP2 residues. These interactions could provide new avenues for synthetic optimization of these scaffolds.

  15. Implications of binding mode and active site flexibility for inhibitor potency against the salicylate synthase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Gamma; Manos-Turvey, Alexandra; O'Connor, Patrick D; Johnston, Jodie M; Evans, Genevieve L; Baker, Edward N; Payne, Richard J; Lott, J Shaun; Bulloch, Esther M M

    2012-06-19

    MbtI is the salicylate synthase that catalyzes the first committed step in the synthesis of the iron chelating compound mycobactin in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We previously developed a series of aromatic inhibitors against MbtI based on the reaction intermediate for this enzyme, isochorismate. The most potent of these inhibitors had hydrophobic substituents, ranging in size from a methyl to a phenyl group, appended to the terminal alkene of the enolpyruvyl group. These compounds exhibited low micromolar inhibition constants against MbtI and were at least an order of magnitude more potent than the parental compound for the series, which carries a native enolpyruvyl group. In this study, we sought to understand how the substituted enolpyruvyl group confers greater potency, by determining cocrystal structures of MbtI with six inhibitors from the series. A switch in binding mode at the MbtI active site is observed for inhibitors carrying a substituted enolpyruvyl group, relative to the parental compound. Computational studies suggest that the change in binding mode, and higher potency, is due to the effect of the substituents on the conformational landscape of the core inhibitor structure. The crystal structures and fluorescence-based thermal shift assays indicate that substituents larger than a methyl group are accommodated in the MbtI active site through significant but localized flexibility in the peptide backbone. These findings have implications for the design of improved inhibitors of MbtI, as well as other chorismate-utilizing enzymes from this family.

  16. Probing ligand-binding modes and binding mechanisms of benzoxazole-based amide inhibitors with soluble epoxide hydrolase by molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hang; Zhang, Ying; Li, Liang; Han, Ju-Guang

    2012-08-30

    Soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) has become a new therapeutic target for treating a variety of human diseases. The inhibition of human sEH hydrolase activity was studied by molecular docking and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation techniques. A set of six benzoxazole-based amide inhibitors binding to sEH has been studied through molecular docking, MD simulation, free energy calculations, and energy decomposition analysis. On the basis of molecular mechanics-generalized Born/surface area (MM-GB/SA) computation and normal-mode analysis (NMA), the obtained results indicate that the rank of calculated binding free energies (ΔΔGTOT) of these inhibitors is in excellent agreement with that of experimental bioactivity data (IC50). The correlation coefficient (r(2)) between the predicted ΔΔGTOT and IC50 is 0.88. van der Waals energies are the largest component of the total energies, and the entropy changes play an indispensable role in determining the ΔΔGTOT. Rational binding modes were discussed and determined by the docking results and binding free energies. The free energy decomposition of each residue reveals that the residue Trp334 dominates the most binding free energies among all residues and that the activities for these molecules to the sEH are not decided by hydrogen bonds or a certain residue but by the common effect of multiple side chains in the active site.

  17. Presence of a low molecular weight endogenous inhibitor on 3H-muscimol binding in synaptic membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneda, Yukio; Kuriyama, Kinya

    1980-06-01

    The specific binding of 3H-muscimol to synaptic membrane preparations obtained from the rat brain has been thought to reflect the association of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), a potential candidate as an inhibitory neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system (CNS), with its synaptic receptors1,2. Treatment of synaptic membranes with Triton X-100 significantly increases the specific binding of 3H-muscimol2. Several reports also indicate the presence of endogenous substances, such as GABA3, acidic protein4 and phosphatidylethanolamine5, which inhibit Na-independent binding of 3H-GABA in the synaptic membranous fractions from the rat brain. We report here that in the supernatant obtained from Triton-treated synaptic membranes there exists a new type of endogenous inhibitor of 3H-muscimol binding which is apparently different from the inhibitory substances described previously3-5. The new inhibitor has a low molecular weight (MW) and probably originated from neurones rather than glial cells. We have termed this endogenous inhibitor the GABA receptor binding inhibitory factor (GRIF).

  18. Comparative analyses of lipoprotein lipase, hepatic lipase, and endothelial lipase, and their binding properties with known inhibitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziyun Wang

    Full Text Available The triglyceride lipase gene subfamily plays a central role in lipid and lipoprotein metabolism. There are three members of this subfamily: lipoprotein lipase, hepatic lipase, and endothelial lipase. Although these lipases are implicated in the pathophysiology of hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis, their structures have not been fully solved. In the current study, we established homology models of these three lipases, and carried out analysis of their activity sites. In addition, we investigated the kinetic characteristics for the catalytic residues using a molecular dynamics simulation strategy. To elucidate the molecular interactions and determine potential key residues involved in the binding to lipase inhibitors, we analyzed the binding pockets and binding poses of known inhibitors of the three lipases. We identified the spatial consensus catalytic triad "Ser-Asp-His", a characteristic motif in all three lipases. Furthermore, we found that the spatial characteristics of the binding pockets of the lipase molecules play a key role in ligand recognition, binding poses, and affinities. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report that systematically builds homology models of all the triglyceride lipase gene subfamily members. Our data provide novel insights into the molecular structures of lipases and their structure-function relationship, and thus provides groundwork for functional probe design towards lipase-based therapeutic inhibitors for the treatment of hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis.

  19. Kinetic analysis of ligand binding to the Ehrlich cell nucleoside transporter: Pharmacological characterization of allosteric interactions with the sup 3 Hnitrobenzylthioinosine binding site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammond, J.R. (Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Western Ontario, London (Canada))

    1991-06-01

    Kinetic analysis of the binding of {sup 3}Hnitrobenzylthioinosine ({sup 3}H NBMPR) to Ehrlich ascites tumor cell plasma membranes was conducted in the presence and absence of a variety of nucleoside transport inhibitors and substrates. The association of {sup 3}H NBMPR with Ehrlich cell membranes occurred in two distinct phases, possibly reflecting functional conformation changes in the {sup 3}HNBMPR binding site/nucleoside transporter complex. Inhibitors of the equilibrium binding of {sup 3}HNBMPR, tested at submaximal inhibitory concentrations, generally decreased the rate of association of {sup 3}HNBMPR, but the magnitude of this effect varied significantly with the agent tested. Adenosine and diazepam had relatively minor effects on the association rate, whereas dipyridamole and mioflazine slowed the rate dramatically. Inhibitors of nucleoside transport also decreased the rate of dissociation of {sup 3}HNBMPR, with an order of potency significantly different from their relative potencies as inhibitors of the equilibrium binding of {sup 3}HNBMPR. Dilazep, dipyridamole, and mioflazine were effective inhibitors of both {sup 3}HNBMPR dissociation and equilibrium binding. The lidoflazine analogue R75231, on the other hand, had no effect on the rate of dissociation of {sup 3}HNBMPR at concentrations below 300 microM, even though it was one of the most potent inhibitors of {sup 3}HNBMPR binding tested (Ki less than 100 nM). In contrast, a series of natural substrates for the nucleoside transport system enhanced the rate of dissociation of {sup 3}HNBMPR with an order of effectiveness that paralleled their relative affinities for the permeant site of the transporter. The most effective enhancers of {sup 3}HNBMPR dissociation, however, were the benzodiazepines diazepam, chlordiazepoxide, and triazolam.

  20. Oxazin-5-Ones as a Novel Class of Penicillin Binding Protein Inhibitors: Design, Synthesis and Structure Activity Relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onoabedje, Efeturi Abraham; Ibezim, Akachukwu; Okafor, Sunday Nwankwor; Onoabedje, Ufuoma Shalom; Okoro, Uchechukwu Chris

    2016-01-01

    Penicillin binding proteins (PBPs) are normal constituents of bacterial which are absent in mammalian cells. The theoretical binding modes of known oxazin-5-ones toward the protein were used as a guide to synthesis new inhibitors. Structural studies of protein-ligand complexes revealed that conformational discrepancies of the derivatives in the protein’s binding site gave rise to the variation in their inhibition constant which ranged from 68.58 μM to 2.04 mM. Biological assay results further confirmed the antibiotic potencies of the studied compounds. Although the outcome of biological screening does not parallel computational predictions, the results obtained from both methods suggest that the oxazin-5-one derivatives are potential PBP inhibitors, hence interesting antibiotic lead agents. PMID:27749913

  1. Possible role for water dissociation in the slow binding of phosphorus-containing transition-state-analogue inhibitors of thermolysin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, P A; Marlowe, C K

    1987-12-29

    A number of phosphonamidate and phosphonate tripeptide analogues have been studied as transition-state-analogue inhibitors of the zinc endopeptidase thermolysin. Those with the form Cbz-GlyP(Y)Leu-X [ZGP(Y)LX, X = NH2 or amino acid, Y = NH or O linkage] are potent (Ki = 9-760 nM for X = NH, 9-660 microM for X = O) but otherwise ordinary in their binding behavior, with second-order rate constants for association (kon) greater than 10(5) M-1 s-1. Those with the form Cbz-XP(Y)-Leu-Ala [ZXP(Y)LA,XP = alpha-substituted phosphorus amino acid analogue] are similarly potent (Ki for ZFPLA = 68 pM) but slow binding (kon less than or equal to 1300 M-1 s-1). Several kinetic mechanisms for slow binding behavior are considered, including two-step processes and those that require prior isomerization of inhibitor or enzyme to a rare form. The association rates of ZFPLA and ZFP(O)LA are first order in inhibitor concentration up to 1-2 mM, indicating that any loose complex along the binding pathway must have a dissociation constant above this value. The crystallographic investigation described in the preceding paper [Holden, H. M., Tronrud, D. E., Monzingo, A. F., Weaver, L. H., & Matthews, B. W. (1987) Biochemistry (preceding paper in this issue)] identifies a specific water molecule in the active site that may hinder binding of the alpha-substituted inhibitors. The implication of this observation for a mechanism for slow binding is discussed.

  2. Translocator protein (18 kDa) mediates the pro-growth effects of diazepam on Ehrlich tumor cells in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, M; Ferraz-de-Paula, V; Pinheiro, M L; Ribeiro, A; Quinteiro-Filho, W M; Rone, M B; Martinez-Arguelles, D B; Dagli, M L Z; Papadopoulos, V; Palermo-Neto, J

    2010-01-25

    The Translocator Protein (TSPO), previously known as the peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor, is a ubiquitous drug- and cholesterol-binding protein that is up regulated in several types of cancer cells. TSPO drug ligands (e.g., diazepam) induce or inhibit tumor cell proliferation, depending on the dose and tissue origin. We have previously shown that TSPO is expressed in Ehrlich tumor cells and that diazepam increases proliferation of these cells in vitro. Here, we investigated the in vivo effects of diazepam on Ehrlich tumor growth and the role of TSPO in mediating this process. Oral administration of diazepam to mice (3.0mg/kg/day for 7 days) produced plasma and ascitic fluid drug concentrations of 83.83 and 54.12 nM, respectively. Diazepam increased Ehrlich tumor growth, likely due to its ability to increase tumor cell proliferation and Reactive Oxygen Species production. Radioligand binding assays and nucleotide sequencing revealed that Ehrlich tumor cell TSPO had the same pharmacological and biochemical properties as TSPO described in other tumor cells. The estimated K(d) for PK 11195 in Ehrlich tumor cells was 0.44 nM and 8.70 nM (low and high binding site, respectively). Structurally diverse TSPO drug ligands with exclusive affinity for TSPO (i.e., 4-chlordiazepam, Ro5-4864, and isoquinoline-carboxamide PK 11195) also increased Ehrlich tumor growth. However, clonazepam, a GABA(A)-specific ligand with no affinity for TSPO, failed to do so. Taken together, these data suggest that diazepam induces in vivo Ehrlich tumor growth in a TSPO-dependent manner.

  3. Fluoride inhibition of Klebsiella aerogenes urease: mechanistic implications of a pseudo-uncompetitive, slow-binding inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, M J; Hausinger, R P

    2000-05-09

    Klebsiella aerogenes urease uses a dinuclear nickel active site to catalyze the hydrolysis of urea. Here, we describe the steady-state and pre-steady-state kinetics of urease inhibition by fluoride. Urease is slowly inhibited by fluoride in both the presence and absence of substrate. Steady-state rate studies yield parallel double-reciprocal plots; however, we show that fluoride interaction with urease is not compatible with classical uncompetitive inhibition. Rather, we propose that fluoride binds to an enzyme state (E) that is in equilibrium with resting enzyme (E) and produced during catalysis. Fluoride binding rates are directly proportional to inhibitor concentration. Substrate reduces both the rate of fluoride binding to urease and the rate of fluoride dissociation from the complex, consistent with urea binding to E and E.F in addition to E. Fluoride inhibition is pH-dependent due to a protonation event linked to fluoride dissociation. Fluoride binding is pH-independent, suggesting that fluoride anion, not HF, is the actual inhibitor. We assess the kinetic results in terms of the known protein crystal structure and evaluate possible molecular interpretations for the structure of the E state, the site of fluoride binding, and the factors associated with fluoride release. Finally, we note that the apparent uncompetitive inhibition by fluoride as reported for several other metalloenzymes may need to be reinterpreted in terms of fluoride interaction with the corresponding E states.

  4. Active site binding modes of inhibitors of Staphylococcus aureus mevalonate diphosphate decarboxylase from docking and molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addo, James K; Skaff, D Andrew; Miziorko, Henry M

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial mevalonate diphosphate decarboxylase (MDD) is an attractive therapeutic target for antibacterial drug development. In this work, we discuss a combined docking and molecular dynamics strategy toward inhibitor binding to bacterial MDD. The docking parameters utilized in this study were first validated with observations for the inhibitors 6-fluoromevalonate diphosphate (FMVAPP) and diphosphoglycolylproline (DPGP) using existing structures for the Staphylococcus epidermidis enzyme. The validated docking protocol was then used to predict structures of the inhibitors bound to Staphylococcus aureus MDD using the unliganded crystal structure of Staphylococcus aureus MDD. We also investigated a possible interactions improvement by combining this docking method with molecular dynamics simulations. Thus, the predicted docking structures were analyzed in a molecular dynamics trajectory to generate dynamic models and reinforce the predicted binding modes. FMVAPP is predicted to make more extensive contacts with S. aureus MDD, forming stable hydrogen bonds with Arg144, Arg193, Lys21, Ser107, and Tyr18, as well as making stable hydrophobic interactions with Tyr18, Trp19, and Met196. The differences in predicted binding are supported by experimentally determined Ki values of 0.23 ± 0.02 and 34 ± 8 μM, for FMVAPP and DPGP, respectively. The structural information coupled with the kinetic characterization obtained from this study should be useful in defining the requirements for inhibition as well as in guiding the selection of active compounds for inhibitor optimization.

  5. Dual roles of F123 in protein homodimerization and inhibitor binding to biotin protein ligase from Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares da Costa, Tatiana P; Yap, Min Y; Perugini, Matthew A; Wallace, John C; Abell, Andrew D; Wilce, Matthew C J; Polyak, Steven W; Booker, Grant W

    2014-01-01

    Protein biotinylation is catalysed by biotin protein ligase (BPL). The most characterized BPL is from Escherichia coli where it functions as both a biotin ligase and a homodimeric transcriptional repressor. Here we investigated another bifunctional BPL from the clinically important Staphylococcus aureus (SaBPL). Unliganded SaBPL (apo) exists in a dimer-monomer equilibrium at low micromolar concentrations - a stark contrast to E. coli BPL (EcBPL) that is monomeric under the same conditions. EMSA and SAXS analysis demonstrated that dimeric apo SaBPL adopted a conformation that was competent to bind DNA and necessary for it to function as a transcription factor. The SaBPL dimer-monomer dissociation constant was 5.8-fold tighter when binding the inhibitor biotin acetylene, but unchanged with biotin. F123, located in the dimer interface, was critical for homodimerization. Inhibition studies together with surface plasmon resonance analyses revealed a strong correlation between inhibitor potency and slow dissociation kinetics. A 24-fold difference in Ki values for these two enzymes was explained by differences in enzyme:inhibitor dissociation rates. Substitution of F123 in SaBPL and its equivalent in EcBPL altered both inhibitor potency and dissociation. Hence, F123 in SaBPL has novel roles in both protein dimerization and ligand-binding that have not been reported in EcBPL.

  6. Molecular dynamics simulation of tryptophan hydroxylase-1: binding modes and free energy analysis to phenylalanine derivative inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Hao; Huang, Wei; He, Gu; Peng, Cheng; Wu, Fengbo; Ouyang, Liang

    2013-05-10

    Serotonin is a neurotransmitter that modulates many central and peripheral functions. Tryptophan hydroxylase-1 (TPH1) is a key enzyme of serotonin synthesis. In the current study, the interaction mechanism of phenylalanine derivative TPH1 inhibitors was investigated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, free energy calculations, free energy decomposition analysis and computational alanine scanning. The predicted binding free energies of these complexes are consistent with the experimental data. The analysis of the individual energy terms indicates that although the van der Waals and electrostatics interaction contributions are important in distinguishing the binding affinities of these inhibitors, the electrostatic contribution plays a more crucial role in that. Moreover, it is observed that different configurations of the naphthalene substituent could form different binding patterns with protein, yet lead to similar inhibitory potency. The combination of different molecular modeling techniques is an efficient way to interpret the interaction mechanism of inhibitors and our work could provide valuable information for the TPH1 inhibitor design in the future.

  7. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Tryptophan Hydroxylase-1: Binding Modes and Free Energy Analysis to Phenylalanine Derivative Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Ouyang

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Serotonin is a neurotransmitter that modulates many central and peripheral functions. Tryptophan hydroxylase-1 (TPH1 is a key enzyme of serotonin synthesis. In the current study, the interaction mechanism of phenylalanine derivative TPH1 inhibitors was investigated using molecular dynamics (MD simulations, free energy calculations, free energy decomposition analysis and computational alanine scanning. The predicted binding free energies of these complexes are consistent with the experimental data. The analysis of the individual energy terms indicates that although the van der Waals and electrostatics interaction contributions are important in distinguishing the binding affinities of these inhibitors, the electrostatic contribution plays a more crucial role in that. Moreover, it is observed that different configurations of the naphthalene substituent could form different binding patterns with protein, yet lead to similar inhibitory potency. The combination of different molecular modeling techniques is an efficient way to interpret the interaction mechanism of inhibitors and our work could provide valuable information for the TPH1 inhibitor design in the future.

  8. Structure of a small-molecule inhibitor complexed with GlmU from Haemophilus influenzae reveals an allosteric binding site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mochalkin, Igor; Lightle, Sandra; Narasimhan, Lakshmi; Bornemeier, Dirk; Melnick, Michael; VanderRoest, Steven; McDowell, Laura (Pfizer)

    2008-04-02

    N-Acetylglucosamine-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GlmU) is an essential enzyme in aminosugars metabolism and an attractive target for antibiotic drug discovery. GlmU catalyzes the formation of uridine-diphospho-N-acetylglucosamine (UDP-GlcNAc), an important precursor in the peptidoglycan and lipopolisaccharide biosynthesis in both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. Here we disclose a 1.9 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of a synthetic small-molecule inhibitor of GlmU from Haemophilus influenzae (hiGlmU). The compound was identified through a high-throughput screening (HTS) configured to detect inhibitors that target the uridyltransferase active site of hiGlmU. The original HTS hit exhibited a modest micromolar potency (IC{sub 50} - 18 {mu}M in a racemic mixture) against hiGlmU and no activity against Staphylococcus aureus GlmU (saGlmU). The determined crystal structure indicated that the inhibitor occupies an allosteric site adjacent to the GlcNAc-1-P substrate-binding region. Analysis of the mechanistic model of the uridyltransferase reaction suggests that the binding of this allosteric inhibitor prevents structural rearrangements that are required for the enzymatic reaction, thus providing a basis for structure-guided design of a new class of mechanism-based inhibitors of GlmU.

  9. L1198F Mutation Resensitizes Crizotinib to ALK by Altering the Conformation of Inhibitor and ATP Binding Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian; Sun, Rong; Wu, Yuehong; Song, Mingzhu; Li, Jia; Yang, Qianye; Chen, Xiaoyi; Bao, Jinku; Zhao, Qi

    2017-02-24

    The efficacy of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) positive non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treatment with small molecule inhibitors is greatly challenged by acquired resistance. A recent study reported the newest generation inhibitor resistant mutation L1198F led to the resensitization to crizotinib, which is the first Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved drug for the treatment of ALK-positive NSCLC. It is of great importance to understand how this extremely rare event occurred for the purpose of overcoming the acquired resistance of such inhibitors. In this study, we exploited molecular dynamics (MD) simulation to dissect the molecular mechanisms. Our MD results revealed that L1198F mutation of ALK resulted in the conformational change at the inhibitor site and altered the binding affinity of ALK to crizotinib and lorlatinib. L1198F mutation also affected the autoactivation of ALK as supported by the identification of His1124 and Tyr1278 as critical amino acids involved in ATP binding and phosphorylation. Our findings are valuable for designing more specific and potent inhibitors for the treatment of ALK-positive NSCLC and other types of cancer.

  10. L1198F Mutation Resensitizes Crizotinib to ALK by Altering the Conformation of Inhibitor and ATP Binding Sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Li

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The efficacy of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK positive non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC treatment with small molecule inhibitors is greatly challenged by acquired resistance. A recent study reported the newest generation inhibitor resistant mutation L1198F led to the resensitization to crizotinib, which is the first Food and Drug Administration (FDA approved drug for the treatment of ALK-positive NSCLC. It is of great importance to understand how this extremely rare event occurred for the purpose of overcoming the acquired resistance of such inhibitors. In this study, we exploited molecular dynamics (MD simulation to dissect the molecular mechanisms. Our MD results revealed that L1198F mutation of ALK resulted in the conformational change at the inhibitor site and altered the binding affinity of ALK to crizotinib and lorlatinib. L1198F mutation also affected the autoactivation of ALK as supported by the identification of His1124 and Tyr1278 as critical amino acids involved in ATP binding and phosphorylation. Our findings are valuable for designing more specific and potent inhibitors for the treatment of ALK-positive NSCLC and other types of cancer.

  11. Identifying New Drug Targets for Potent Phospholipase D Inhibitors: Combining Sequence Alignment, Molecular Docking, and Enzyme Activity/Binding Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djakpa, Helene; Kulkarni, Aditya; Barrows-Murphy, Scheneque; Miller, Greg; Zhou, Weihong; Cho, Hyejin; Török, Béla; Stieglitz, Kimberly

    2016-05-01

    Phospholipase D enzymes cleave phospholipid substrates generating choline and phosphatidic acid. Phospholipase D from Streptomyces chromofuscus is a non-HKD (histidine, lysine, and aspartic acid) phospholipase D as the enzyme is more similar to members of the diverse family of metallo-phosphodiesterase/phosphatase enzymes than phospholipase D enzymes with active site HKD repeats. A highly efficient library of phospholipase D inhibitors based on 1,3-disubstituted-4-amino-pyrazolopyrimidine core structure was utilized to evaluate the inhibition of purified S. chromofuscus phospholipase D. The molecules exhibited inhibition of phospholipase D activity (IC50 ) in the nanomolar range with monomeric substrate diC4 PC and micromolar range with phospholipid micelles and vesicles. Binding studies with vesicle substrate and phospholipase D strongly indicate that these inhibitors directly block enzyme vesicle binding. Following these compelling results as a starting point, sequence searches and alignments with S. chromofuscus phospholipase D have identified potential new drug targets. Using AutoDock, inhibitors were docked into the enzymes selected from sequence searches and alignments (when 3D co-ordinates were available) and results analyzed to develop next-generation inhibitors for new targets. In vitro enzyme activity assays with several human phosphatases demonstrated that the predictive protocol was accurate. The strategy of combining sequence comparison, docking, and high-throughput screening assays has helped to identify new drug targets and provided some insight into how to make potential inhibitors more specific to desired targets.

  12. Identification of a better Homo sapiens Class II HDAC inhibitor through binding energy calculations and descriptor analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tambunan, Usman Sumo Friend; Wulandari, Evi Kristin

    2010-10-15

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are the most common on sexually transmitted viruses in the world. HPVs are responsible for a large spectrum of deseases, both benign and malignant. The certain types of HPV are involved in the development of cervical cancer. In attemps to find additional drugs in the treatment of cervical cancer, inhibitors of the histone deacetylases (HDAC) have received much attention due to their low cytotoxic profiles and the E6/E7 oncogene function of human papilomavirus can be completely by passed by HDAC inhibition. The histone deacetylase inhibitors can induce growth arrest, differentiation and apoptosis of cancer cells. HDAC class I and class II are considered the main targets for cancer. Therefore, the six HDACs class II was modeled and about two inhibitors (SAHA and TSA) were docked using AutoDock4.2, to each of the inhibitor in order to identify the pharmacological properties. Based on the results of docking, SAHA and TSA were able to bind with zinc ion in HDACs models as a drug target. SAHA was satisfied almost all the properties i.e., binding affinity, the Drug-Likeness value and Drug Score with 70% oral bioavailability and the carbonyl group of these compound fits well into the active site of the target where the zinc is present. Hence, SAHA could be developed as potential inhibitors of class II HDACs and valuable cervical cancer drug candidate.

  13. Identification of berberine as a direct thrombin inhibitor from traditional Chinese medicine through structural, functional and binding studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xing; Zhang, Yuxin; Yang, Ying; Wu, Xia; Fan, Hantian; Qiao, Yanjiang

    2017-03-01

    Thrombin acts as a key enzyme in the blood coagulation cascade and represents a potential drug target for the treatment of several cardiovascular diseases. The aim of this study was to identify small-molecule direct thrombin inhibitors from herbs used in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). A pharmacophore model and molecular docking were utilized to virtually screen a library of chemicals contained in compositions of traditional Chinese herbs, and these analyses were followed by in vitro bioassay validation and binding studies. Berberine (BBR) was first confirmed as a thrombin inhibitor using an enzymatic assay. The BBR IC50 value for thrombin inhibition was 2.92 μM. Direct binding studies using surface plasmon resonance demonstrated that BBR directly interacted with thrombin with a KD value of 16.39 μM. Competitive binding assay indicated that BBR could bind to the same argartroban/thrombin interaction site. A platelet aggregation assay demonstrated that BBR had the ability to inhibit thrombin-induced platelet aggregation in washed platelets samples. This study proved that BBR is a direct thrombin inhibitor that has activity in inhibiting thrombin-induced platelet aggregation. BBR may be a potential candidate for the development of safe and effective thrombin-inhibiting drugs.

  14. Antagonism of the anxiolytic action of diazepam and chlordiazepoxide by the novel imidazopyridines, EMD 39593 and EMD 41717.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skolnick, P; Paul, S; Crawley, J; Lewin, E; Lippa, A; Clody, D; Irmscher, K; Saiko, O; Minck, K O

    1983-04-08

    The imidazopyridines EMD 35993 and EMD 41717 antagonized the anticonflict actions of diazepam and chlordiazepoxide in rodent models which are predictive for anxiolytic action in man. In contrast to other described benzodiazepine antagonists, these compounds did not antagonize either the anticonvulsant or muscle relaxant properties of either benzodiazepine. Both EMD 39593 and EMD 41717 competitively inhibit the binding of [3H]diazepam to brain membranes, but do not exhibit regional differences in potency. These observations suggest that both EMD 39593 and EMD 41717 display some selectivity in antagonizing the anxiolytic properties of benzodiazepines, and as such may be useful tools in identifying neuronal substrates of anxiety.

  15. Discovery of pyrrolidine-based β-secretase inhibitors: lead advancement through conformational design for maintenance of ligand binding efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachel, Shawn J; Steele, Thomas G; Petrocchi, Alessia; Haugabook, Sharie J; McGaughey, Georgia; Katharine Holloway, M; Allison, Timothy; Munshi, Sanjeev; Zuck, Paul; Colussi, Dennis; Tugasheva, Katherine; Wolfe, Abigail; Graham, Samuel L; Vacca, Joseph P

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a novel series of pyrrolidine derived BACE-1 inhibitors. The potency of the weak initial lead structure was enhanced using library-based SAR methods. The series was then further advanced by rational design while maintaining a minimal ligand binding efficiency threshold. Ultimately, the co-crystal structure was obtained revealing that these inhibitors interacted with the enzyme in a unique fashion. In all, the potency of the series was enhanced by 4 orders of magnitude from the HTS lead with concomitant increases in physical properties needed for series advancement. The progression of these developments in a systematic fashion is described.

  16. Non-hinge-binding pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidines as potent B-Raf kinase inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, Dan M.; Torres, Nancy; Dutia, Minu; Powell, Dennis; Ciszewski, Greg; Gopalsamy, Ariamala; Levin, Jeremy I.; Kim, Kyung-Hee; Xu, Weixin; Wilhelm, James; Hu, YongBo; Collins, Karen; Feldberg, Larry; Kim, Steven; Frommer, Eileen; Wojciechowicz, Donald; Mallon, Robert; (Wyeth)

    2010-11-19

    As part of our research effort to discover B-Raf kinase inhibitors, we prepared a series of C-3 substituted N-(3-(pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidin-7-yl)phenyl)-3-(trifluoromethyl)benzamides. X-ray crystallography studies revealed that one of the more potent inhibitors (10n) bound to B-Raf kinase without forming a hinge-binding hydrogen bond. With basic amine residues appended to C-3 aryl residues, cellular activity and solubility were enhanced over previously described compounds of this class.

  17. Potentiation of ifosfamide toxicity by chlordiazepoxide, diazepam and oxazepam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furusawa, S; Fujimura, T; Sasaki, K; Takayanagi, Y

    1989-12-01

    The effects of chlordiazepoxide, diazepam and oxazepam on the lethal toxicity and metabolic activation of ifosfamide were investigated in mice. Ifosfamide was administered 24 h after the final injection of chlordiazepoxide, diazepam or oxazepam (100 mg/kg/d for 3 d, i.p.). The prior administration of chlordiazepoxide, diazepam or oxazepam enhanced the toxicity of ifosfamide (778 mg/kg, i.p.) during observation for 6 d after the administration of ifosfamide. In chlordiazepoxide-, diazepam- or oxazepam-treated mice, a higher concentration of active metabolite in the plasma after the administration of ifosfamide (200 or 600 mg/kg, i.p.) was observed as compared with that in mice treated with ifosfamide alone. On the other hand, chlordizepoxide, diazepam or oxazepam markedly enhanced the activity of ifosfamide oxidase in the liver microsomes. These results suggest that the potentiation of ifosfamide toxicity is due to stimulation of the metabolic activation of ifosfamide by chlordizepoxide, diazepam and oxazepam.

  18. Midazolam-induced acute dystonia reversed by diazepam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Komur

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Midazolam can induce acute dystonia in childhood. We report the development of acute dystonia in a 6-year-old girl after receiving midazolam as a sedative. Dystonic contractions persisted despite flumazenil and biperiden lactate injections and the patient was treated with diazepam. Acute dystonia was rapidly abolished after the administration of diazepam intravenously. Diazepam may be an effective treatment option in patients who are unresponsive to flumazenil.

  19. Midazolam-induced acute dystonia reversed by diazepam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komur, Mustafa; Arslankoylu, Ali Ertug; Okuyaz, Cetin

    2012-07-01

    Midazolam can induce acute dystonia in childhood. We report the development of acute dystonia in a 6-year-old girl after receiving midazolam as a sedative. Dystonic contractions persisted despite flumazenil and biperiden lactate injections and the patient was treated with diazepam. Acute dystonia was rapidly abolished after the administration of diazepam intravenously. Diazepam may be an effective treatment option in patients who are unresponsive to flumazenil.

  20. Midazolam-induced acute dystonia reversed by diazepam

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Midazolam can induce acute dystonia in childhood. We report the development of acute dystonia in a 6-year-old girl after receiving midazolam as a sedative. Dystonic contractions persisted despite flumazenil and biperiden lactate injections and the patient was treated with diazepam. Acute dystonia was rapidly abolished after the administration of diazepam intravenously. Diazepam may be an effective treatment option in patients who are unresponsive to flumazenil.

  1. An induced pocket for the binding of potent fusion inhibitor CL-385319 with H5N1 influenza virus hemagglutinin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Runming Li

    Full Text Available The influenza glycoprotein hemagglutinin (HA plays crucial roles in the early stage of virus infection, including receptor binding and membrane fusion. Therefore, HA is a potential target for developing anti-influenza drugs. Recently, we characterized a novel inhibitor of highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza virus, CL-385319, which specifically inhibits HA-mediated viral entry. Studies presented here identified the critical binding residues for CL-385319, which clustered in the stem region of the HA trimer by site-directed mutagenesis. Extensive computational simulations, including molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulations, molecular mechanics generalized Born surface area (MM_GBSA calculations, charge density and Laplacian calculations, have been carried out to uncover the detailed molecular mechanism that underlies the binding of CL-385319 to H5N1 influenza virus HA. It was found that the recognition and binding of CL-385319 to HA proceeds by a process of "induced fit" whereby the binding pocket is formed during their interaction. Occupation of this pocket by CL-385319 stabilizes the neutral pH structure of hemagglutinin, thus inhibiting the conformational rearrangements required for membrane fusion. This "induced fit" pocket may be a target for structure-based design of more potent influenza fusion inhibitors.

  2. Crystal Structure of 12-Lipoxygenase Catalytic-Domain-Inhibitor Complex Identifies a Substrate-Binding Channel for Catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Shu; Mueser, Timothy C.; Marnett, Lawrence J.; Funk, Jr., Max O. (Toledo); (Vanderbilt)

    2014-10-02

    Lipoxygenases are critical enzymes in the biosynthesis of families of bioactive lipids including compounds with important roles in the initiation and resolution of inflammation and in associated diseases such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer. Crystals diffracting to high resolution (1.9 {angstrom}) were obtained for a complex between the catalytic domain of leukocyte 12-lipoxygenase and the isoform-specific inhibitor, 4-(2-oxapentadeca-4-yne)phenylpropanoic acid (OPP). In the three-dimensional structure of the complex, the inhibitor occupied a new U-shaped channel open at one end to the surface of the protein and extending past the redox-active iron site that is essential for catalysis. In models, the channel accommodated arachidonic acid, defining the binding site for the substrate of the catalyzed reaction. There was a void adjacent to the OPP binding site connecting to the surface of the enzyme and providing a plausible access channel for the other substrate, oxygen.

  3. Ab initio molecular simulations for proposing novel peptide inhibitors blocking the ligand-binding pocket of urokinase receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizushima, Tatsuroh; Sugimoto, Takuya; Kasumi, Tomoyo; Araki, Kohta; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Kurita, Noriyuki

    2014-06-01

    Recent biochemical experiments have revealed that a variety of proteases play important roles in cancer invasion and metastasis. Among these proteases, urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) is particularly important, since its specific binding to the receptor (uPAR) existing on the surface of a cancer cell is considered to be a trigger for cancer invasion. It is thus expected that the blocking of the binding can inhibit cancer invasion in the cancer patients and improve their prognosis dramatically. To develop a potent inhibitor for the binding, many types of peptides of amino acids were produced and their effect on the cancer invasion was investigated in the previous biochemical experiments. On the other hand, our previous ab initio molecular simulations have clarified that some amino acid residues of uPA play important roles in the specific binding between uPA and uPAR. In the present study, we propose some peptides composed of these important residues and investigate the specific interactions and the binding affinity between uPAR and the peptides at an electronic level, using ab initio molecular simulations. Base on the results simulated, we elucidate which peptide can bind more strongly to uPAR and propose a novel potent peptide which can inhibit the binding between uPAR and uPA efficiently.

  4. Examination of the Addictive and Behavioral Properties of Fatty Acid Binding Protein Inhibitor SBFI26

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panayotis eThanos

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract:The therapeutic properties of cannabinoids have been well demonstrated but are overshadowed by such adverse effects as cognitive and motor dysfunction, as well as their potential for addiction. Recent research on the natural lipid ligands of cannabinoid receptors, also known as endocannabinoids, have shed light on the mechanisms of intracellular transport of the endocannabinoid anandamide by fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs and subsequent catabolism by fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH. These findings facilitated the recent development of SBFI26, a pharmacological inhibitor of epidermal- and brain-specific FABP5 and FABP7, which effectively increases anandamide signaling. The goal of this study was to examine this compound for any possible rewarding and addictive properties as well as effects on locomotor activity, working / recognition memory, and propensity for sociability and preference for social novelty given its recently reported anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties. Male C57BL mice were split into four treatment groups and conditioned with 5.0 mg/kg, 20.0 mg/kg, 40.0 mg/kg SBFI26 or vehicle during a conditioned placed preference (CPP paradigm. Following CPP, mice underwent a battery of behavioral tests (open field, novel object recognition (NOR, and social interaction (SI and novelty (SN paired with acute SBFI26 administration. Results showed that SBFI26 did not produce conditioned placed preference or conditioned place aversion regardless of dose, and did not induce any differences in locomotor and exploratory activity during CPP or SBFI26-paired open field activity. We also observed no differences between treatment groups in NOR, SI, and SN. In conclusion, as SBFI26 was shown previously by our group to have significant analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties, here we show that it does not pose a risk of dependence or motor and cognitive impairment under the conditions tested.

  5. Heparin-binding Hemagglutinin of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Is an Inhibitor of Autophagy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Qing; Li, Zhi; Zhou, Shan; Zhang, Qian; Zhou, Lei; Fu, Xiaorui; Yang, Liu; Ma, Yueyun; Hao, Xiaoke

    2017-01-01

    Airway epithelial cell is often the initial site of attack by pathogens, and cell death is commonly caused by internalization of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). However, the mechanism of interaction between epithelial cells and Mtb is not well understood. In this study, we investigated the role of the heparin-binding hemagglutinin (HBHA) protein of Mtb in the function of epithelial cells. In particular, the autophagy of A549 cells was determined based on microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 alpha (LC3) activity. Autophagosome formation was detected by Monodansylcadaverine (MDC) staining and immune fluorescence staining of LC3. Autophagy could be significantly suppressed by HBHA protein. In addition, the LDH assay results showed that HBHA treatment could induce death on A549 cells. To explore the form of cell death, we detected the activity of caspase-3 and LDH release of A549 cells in the presence or absence of caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK. Results demonstrated that HBHA treatment could induce apoptosis of A549 cells. To further confirm these results, we constructed the recombinant Mycobacterium smegmatis (MS) expressing HBHA (rMS-HBHA) and explored the influence of rMS-HBHA on the function of A549 cells. rMS-HBHA infection significantly inhibited LC3 expression and the maturation of autophagosomes in A549 cells. Subsequently, we infected A549 cells with MS and detected the viability of intracellular MS by CFU counts. rMS-HBHA showed higher survival and replication capacity in A549 cells than those of the wild-type MS. Finally, infection of A549 cells with rMS-HBHA caused further apoptosis. These findings suggested that rMS-HBHA could inhibit autophagy, promote its survival and replication within A549 cells, and subsequently induce apoptosis on infected cells to facilitate infection.

  6. A matrix-focused structure-activity and binding site flexibility study of quinolinol inhibitors of botulinum neurotoxin serotype A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrell, William A; Vieira, Rebecca C; Ensel, Susan M; Montgomery, Vicki; Guernieri, Rebecca; Eccard, Vanessa S; Campbell, Yvette; Roxas-Duncan, Virginia; Cardellina, John H; Webb, Robert P; Smith, Leonard A

    2017-02-01

    Our initial discovery of 8-hydroxyquinoline inhibitors of BoNT/A and separation/testing of enantiomers of one of the more active leads indicated considerable flexibility in the binding site. We designed a limited study to investigate this flexibility and probe structure-activity relationships; utilizing the Betti reaction, a 36 compound matrix of quinolinol BoNT/A LC inhibitors was developed using three 8-hydroxyquinolines, three heteroaromatic amines, and four substituted benzaldehydes. This study has revealed some of the most effective quinolinol-based BoNT/A inhibitors to date, with 7 compounds displaying IC50 values ⩽1μM and 11 effective at ⩽2μM in an ex vivo assay.

  7. Discovery, SAR, and X-ray Binding Mode Study of BCATm Inhibitors from a Novel DNA-Encoded Library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Hongfeng; Zhou, Jingye; Sundersingh, Flora S; Summerfield, Jennifer; Somers, Don; Messer, Jeffrey A; Satz, Alexander L; Ancellin, Nicolas; Arico-Muendel, Christopher C; Sargent Bedard, Katie L; Beljean, Arthur; Belyanskaya, Svetlana L; Bingham, Ryan; Smith, Sarah E; Boursier, Eric; Carter, Paul; Centrella, Paolo A; Clark, Matthew A; Chung, Chun-Wa; Davie, Christopher P; Delorey, Jennifer L; Ding, Yun; Franklin, G Joseph; Grady, LaShadric C; Herry, Kenny; Hobbs, Clare; Kollmann, Christopher S; Morgan, Barry A; Pothier Kaushansky, Laura J; Zhou, Quan

    2015-08-13

    As a potential target for obesity, human BCATm was screened against more than 14 billion DNA encoded compounds of distinct scaffolds followed by off-DNA synthesis and activity confirmation. As a consequence, several series of BCATm inhibitors were discovered. One representative compound (R)-3-((1-(5-bromothiophene-2-carbonyl)pyrrolidin-3-yl)oxy)-N-methyl-2'-(methylsulfonamido)-[1,1'-biphenyl]-4-carboxamide (15e) from a novel compound library synthesized via on-DNA Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling showed BCATm inhibitory activity with IC50 = 2.0 μM. A protein crystal structure of 15e revealed that it binds to BCATm within the catalytic site adjacent to the PLP cofactor. The identification of this novel inhibitor series plus the establishment of a BCATm protein structure provided a good starting point for future structure-based discovery of BCATm inhibitors.

  8. In silico investigation of new binding pocket for mitogen activated kinase kinase (MEK): Development of new promising inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yari, Hamed; Ganjalikhany, Mohamad Reza; Sadegh, Hamidreza

    2015-12-01

    It has been previously shown that the inhibition of mitogen activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) contributes to apoptosis and suppression of different cancer cells. Correspondingly, a number of MEK1/2 inhibitors have been designed and evaluated since 2001. However, they did not satisfy essential pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) properties thus, almost most of them were terminated in pre-clinical or clinical studies. This study aims to design new specific MEK1/2 inhibitors with improved PK/PD profiles to be used as alternative cancer medications. In first part of this study, a comprehensive screening, for the first time, was done on well-known MEK1/2 inhibitors using a number of computational programs such as AutoDock Tools 4.2 (ADT) and AutoDock Vina. Therefore a valuable training dataset as well as a reliable pharmacophore model were provided which were then used to design new inhibitors. According to the results of training dataset, Trametinib was determined as the best inhibitor provided, so far. So, Trametinib was used as the lead structure to design new inhibitors in this study. In second part of this investigation, a set of new allosteric MEK1/2 inhibitors were designed significantly improving the binding energy as well as the ADMET properties, suggesting more specific and stable ligand-receptor complexes. Consequently, the structures 14 and 15 of our inhibitors, as the most potent structures, are great substituents for Trametinib to be used and evaluated in clinical trials as alternative cancer drugs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Comparisons of Prostate Cancer Inhibitors Abiraterone and TOK-001 Binding with CYP17A1 through Molecular Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Xiao

    2015-01-01

    However, biology-driven inhibitor development of prostate cancer is poorly elucidated. The aims of this study are to address structural differences at atomic-level between CYP17A1 and inhibitors i.e., abiraterone and TOK-001, and further investigate the effect of point mutation of CYP17A1 on the active site stability and the local interactions that are hydrophobic interaction and hydrogen bonding throughout molecular dynamics (MD simulation. After performing multiple comparisons among four different complexes across CYP17A1 and inhibitors, interestingly TOK-001 oriented toward the active pocket and formed larger volume with I-helix of CYP17A1 than abiraterone, whereas abiraterone showed tighter binding and more active site stability. Considering on the effect of hydrophobic interaction and hydrogen bonding between abiraterone and CYP17A1, the key residues of Phe114, Ile371, Val482, and Asn202 were identified. This contributes into tight binding interactions; however abiraterone is effectively weakened along with the global conformation mobility increased in A105L mutation. Surprisingly, overall conformation of the CYP17A1 remained stable when bound to TOK-001. This basic knowledge can guide future experiments on design of efficient inhibitors for CYP17A1, which provides theoretical basis of androgen-dependent disease therapy.

  10. Molecular modeling study on the allosteric inhibition mechanism of HIV-1 integrase by LEDGF/p75 binding site inhibitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiwei Xue

    Full Text Available HIV-1 integrase (IN is essential for the integration of viral DNA into the host genome and an attractive therapeutic target for developing antiretroviral inhibitors. LEDGINs are a class of allosteric inhibitors targeting LEDGF/p75 binding site of HIV-1 IN. Yet, the detailed binding mode and allosteric inhibition mechanism of LEDGINs to HIV-1 IN is only partially understood, which hinders the structure-based design of more potent anti-HIV agents. A molecular modeling study combining molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulation, and binding free energy calculation were performed to investigate the interaction details of HIV-1 IN catalytic core domain (CCD with two recently discovered LEDGINs BI-1001 and CX14442, as well as the LEDGF/p75 protein. Simulation results demonstrated the hydrophobic domain of BI-1001 and CX14442 engages one subunit of HIV-1 IN CCD dimer through hydrophobic interactions, and the hydrophilic group forms hydrogen bonds with HIV-1 IN CCD residues from other subunit. CX14442 has a larger tert-butyl group than the methyl of BI-1001, and forms better interactions with the highly hydrophobic binding pocket of HIV-1 IN CCD dimer interface, which can explain the stronger affinity of CX14442 than BI-1001. Analysis of the binding mode of LEDGF/p75 with HIV-1 IN CCD reveals that the LEDGF/p75 integrase binding domain residues Ile365, Asp366, Phe406 and Val408 have significant contributions to the binding of the LEDGF/p75 to HIV1-IN. Remarkably, we found that binding of BI-1001 and CX14442 to HIV-1 IN CCD induced the structural rearrangements of the 140 s loop and oration displacements of the side chains of the three conserved catalytic residues Asp64, Asp116, and Glu152 located at the active site. These results we obtained will be valuable not only for understanding the allosteric inhibition mechanism of LEDGINs but also for the rational design of allosteric inhibitors of HIV-1 IN targeting LEDGF/p75 binding site.

  11. Irreversible inhibitors of the 3C protease of Coxsackie virus through templated assembly of protein-binding fragments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Daniel; Kaczmarska, Zuzanna; Arkona, Christoph; Schulz, Robert; Tauber, Carolin; Wolber, Gerhard; Hilgenfeld, Rolf; Coll, Miquel; Rademann, Jörg

    2016-09-01

    Small-molecule fragments binding to biomacromolecules can be starting points for the development of drugs, but are often difficult to detect due to low affinities. Here we present a strategy that identifies protein-binding fragments through their potential to induce the target-guided formation of covalently bound, irreversible enzyme inhibitors. A protein-binding nucleophile reacts reversibly with a bis-electrophilic warhead, thereby positioning the second electrophile in close proximity of the active site of a viral protease, resulting in the covalent de-activation of the enzyme. The concept is implemented for Coxsackie virus B3 3C protease, a pharmacological target against enteroviral infections. Using an aldehyde-epoxide as bis-electrophile, active fragment combinations are validated through measuring the protein inactivation rate and by detecting covalent protein modification in mass spectrometry. The structure of one enzyme-inhibitor complex is determined by X-ray crystallography. The presented warhead activation assay provides potent non-peptidic, broad-spectrum inhibitors of enteroviral proteases.

  12. Structural Comparison, Substrate Specificity, and Inhibitor Binding of AGPase Small Subunit from Monocot and Dicot: Present Insight and Future Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kishore Sarma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase is the first rate limiting enzyme of starch biosynthesis pathway and has been exploited as the target for greater starch yield in several plants. The structure-function analysis and substrate binding specificity of AGPase have provided enormous potential for understanding the role of specific amino acid or motifs responsible for allosteric regulation and catalytic mechanisms, which facilitate the engineering of AGPases. We report the three-dimensional structure, substrate, and inhibitor binding specificity of AGPase small subunit from different monocot and dicot crop plants. Both monocot and dicot subunits were found to exploit similar interactions with the substrate and inhibitor molecule as in the case of their closest homologue potato tuber AGPase small subunit. Comparative sequence and structural analysis followed by molecular docking and electrostatic surface potential analysis reveal that rearrangements of secondary structure elements, substrate, and inhibitor binding residues are strongly conserved and follow common folding pattern and orientation within monocot and dicot displaying a similar mode of allosteric regulation and catalytic mechanism. The results from this study along with site-directed mutagenesis complemented by molecular dynamics simulation will shed more light on increasing the starch content of crop plants to ensure the food security worldwide.

  13. Variations in the binding pocket of an inhibitor of the bacterial division protein FtsZ across genotypes and species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Miguel

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The recent increase in antibiotic resistance in pathogenic bacteria calls for new approaches to drug-target selection and drug development. Targeting the mechanisms of action of proteins involved in bacterial cell division bypasses problems associated with increasingly ineffective variants of older antibiotics; to this end, the essential bacterial cytoskeletal protein FtsZ is a promising target. Recent work on its allosteric inhibitor, PC190723, revealed in vitro activity on Staphylococcus aureus FtsZ and in vivo antimicrobial activities. However, the mechanism of drug action and its effect on FtsZ in other bacterial species are unclear. Here, we examine the structural environment of the PC190723 binding pocket using PocketFEATURE, a statistical method that scores the similarity between pairs of small-molecule binding sites based on 3D structure information about the local microenvironment, and molecular dynamics (MD simulations. We observed that species and nucleotide-binding state have significant impacts on the structural properties of the binding site, with substantially disparate microenvironments for bacterial species not from the Staphylococcus genus. Based on PocketFEATURE analysis of MD simulations of S. aureus FtsZ bound to GTP or with mutations that are known to confer PC190723 resistance, we predict that PC190723 strongly prefers to bind Staphylococcus FtsZ in the nucleotide-bound state. Furthermore, MD simulations of an FtsZ dimer indicated that polymerization may enhance PC190723 binding. Taken together, our results demonstrate that a drug-binding pocket can vary significantly across species, genetic perturbations, and in different polymerization states, yielding important information for the further development of FtsZ inhibitors.

  14. Comparative efficacy of Diazepam, Ketamine, and Diazepam-Ketamine combination for sedation or anesthesia in cockerel chickens

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The comparative efficacy of Diazepam, Ketamine, and Ketamine-Diazepam combination was assessed in adult chickens. The chickens (n=30) were divided into three equal groups (G-1, G-2 and G-3), and were administered with Diazepam dosed at 0.5 mg/kg body weight (b.wt.), Ketamine HCL dosed at 20 mg/kg b.wt., and Ketamine HCL (dosed at 10 mg/kg b.wt.) combined with Diazepam (dosed at 2 mg/kg b.wt.) through intramuscular (IM) route. The means of induction period, duration of sedation or anesthesia, ...

  15. Protein C inhibitor (PCI) binds to phosphatidylserine exposing cells with implications in the phagocytosis of apoptotic cells and activated platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieger, Daniela; Assinger, Alice; Einfinger, Katrin; Sokolikova, Barbora; Geiger, Margarethe

    2014-01-01

    Protein C Inhibitor (PCI) is a secreted serine protease inhibitor, belonging to the family of serpins. In addition to activated protein C PCI inactivates several other proteases of the coagulation and fibrinolytic systems, suggesting a regulatory role in hemostasis. Glycosaminoglycans and certain negatively charged phospholipids, like phosphatidylserine, bind to PCI and modulate its activity. Phosphatidylerine (PS) is exposed on the surface of apoptotic cells and known as a phagocytosis marker. We hypothesized that PCI might bind to PS exposed on apoptotic cells and thereby influence their removal by phagocytosis. Using Jurkat T-lymphocytes and U937 myeloid cells, we show here that PCI binds to apoptotic cells to a similar extent at the same sites as Annexin V, but in a different manner as compared to live cells (defined spots on ∼10-30% of cells). PCI dose dependently decreased phagocytosis of apoptotic Jurkat cells by U937 macrophages. Moreover, the phagocytosis of PS exposing, activated platelets by human blood derived monocytes declined in the presence of PCI. In U937 cells the expression of PCI as well as the surface binding of PCI increased with time of phorbol ester treatment/macrophage differentiation. The results of this study suggest a role of PCI not only for the function and/or maturation of macrophages, but also as a negative regulator of apoptotic cell and activated platelets removal.

  16. Protein C inhibitor (PCI binds to phosphatidylserine exposing cells with implications in the phagocytosis of apoptotic cells and activated platelets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Rieger

    Full Text Available Protein C Inhibitor (PCI is a secreted serine protease inhibitor, belonging to the family of serpins. In addition to activated protein C PCI inactivates several other proteases of the coagulation and fibrinolytic systems, suggesting a regulatory role in hemostasis. Glycosaminoglycans and certain negatively charged phospholipids, like phosphatidylserine, bind to PCI and modulate its activity. Phosphatidylerine (PS is exposed on the surface of apoptotic cells and known as a phagocytosis marker. We hypothesized that PCI might bind to PS exposed on apoptotic cells and thereby influence their removal by phagocytosis. Using Jurkat T-lymphocytes and U937 myeloid cells, we show here that PCI binds to apoptotic cells to a similar extent at the same sites as Annexin V, but in a different manner as compared to live cells (defined spots on ∼10-30% of cells. PCI dose dependently decreased phagocytosis of apoptotic Jurkat cells by U937 macrophages. Moreover, the phagocytosis of PS exposing, activated platelets by human blood derived monocytes declined in the presence of PCI. In U937 cells the expression of PCI as well as the surface binding of PCI increased with time of phorbol ester treatment/macrophage differentiation. The results of this study suggest a role of PCI not only for the function and/or maturation of macrophages, but also as a negative regulator of apoptotic cell and activated platelets removal.

  17. Discovery of New E-Selectin Inhibitors by Virtual Screening, Fluorescence Binding Assays, and STD NMR Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barra, Pabla A; Jiménez, Verónica A; Gavin, José A; Daranas, Antonio H; Alderete, Joel B

    2016-05-06

    E-selectin is an endothelial protein that participates in the adhesion of metastatic cancer cells, and is therefore a relevant target for antitumor therapeutic intervention. In this work, virtual screening was used to identify new E-selectin inhibitors from a subset of drug-like molecules retrieved from the ZINC database, including the physiological ligand sLe(x) as reference structure (PDB ID: 1G1T). Four hits were chosen and subjected to molecular dynamics simulations and fluorescence binding assays, which led to the determination of experimental dissociation constants between 333 and 1012 μm. The candidate with the highest affinity was studied by saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR experiments and complete relaxation and conformational exchange matrix analysis of saturation transfer (CORCEMA-ST), aimed at identifying the preferable binding mode with E-selectin. Our results revealed that this new inhibitor binds more strongly than sLe(x) in the E-selectin binding site, in good agreement with simulation predictions. These properties will prove valuable for the future design of drugs that target E-selectin. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Application of robotics to steady state enzyme kinetics: analysis of tight-binding inhibitors of dipeptidyl peptidase IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Aiying; Huang, Yanting; Taunk, Prakash; Magnin, David R; Ghosh, Krishnendu; Robertson, James G

    2003-10-15

    Using available commercial robotics and instrumentation, we developed a fully automated and rigorous steady state enzyme kinetic assay for dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP IV; E.C. 3.4.14.5). The automated assay was validated with isoleucyl thiazolidide, a potent inhibitor of DPP IV with K(is)=110nM. Signal window analysis indicated that the assay had a 98% probability of detecting an inhibitor yielding 15% inhibition, with a predicted false positive rate of 0.13%. A mechanistic inhibition version of the automated assay was validated with isoleucyl 4-cyanothiazolidide, a very potent inhibitor of DPP IV. Isoleucyl 4-cyanothiazolidide was a competitive inhibitor of purified porcine DPP IV with K(is)=1 nM. Similar K(is) values were obtained for purified rat DPP IV and for DPP IV activity in human plasma from normal and diabetic donors. The pH dependence of K(is) for isoleucyl 4-cyanothiazolidide yielded a bell-shaped profile, with pK(a)=5.0 and pK(b)=7.6. To date, over 100,000 data points have been generated in profiling targeted compound libraries and in the analysis of tight-binding inhibitors of DPP IV. The data also show that robotic analysis is capable of producing full mechanistic inhibition analysis in a timely fashion to support drug discovery.

  19. Synthesis and evaluation of boronic acids as inhibitors of Penicillin Binding Proteins of classes A, B and C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zervosen, Astrid; Bouillez, André; Herman, Alexandre; Amoroso, Ana; Joris, Bernard; Sauvage, Eric; Charlier, Paulette; Luxen, André

    2012-06-15

    In response to the widespread use of β-lactam antibiotics bacteria have evolved drug resistance mechanisms that include the production of resistant Penicillin Binding Proteins (PBPs). Boronic acids are potent β-lactamase inhibitors and have been shown to display some specificity for soluble transpeptidases and PBPs, but their potential as inhibitors of the latter enzymes is yet to be widely explored. Recently, a (2,6-dimethoxybenzamido)methylboronic acid was identified as being a potent inhibitor of Actinomadura sp. R39 transpeptidase (IC(50): 1.3 μM). In this work, we synthesized and studied the potential of a number of acylaminomethylboronic acids as inhibitors of PBPs from different classes. Several derivatives inhibited PBPs of classes A, B and C from penicillin sensitive strains. The (2-nitrobenzamido)methylboronic acid was identified as a good inhibitor of a class A PBP (PBP1b from Streptococcus pneumoniae, IC(50) = 26 μM), a class B PBP (PBP2xR6 from Streptococcus pneumoniae, IC(50) = 138 μM) and a class C PBP (R39 from Actinomadura sp., IC(50) = 0.6 μM). This work opens new avenues towards the development of molecules that inhibit PBPs, and eventually display bactericidal effects, on distinct bacterial species. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The Mode of Inhibitor Binding to Peptidyl-tRNA Hydrolase: Binding Studies and Structure Determination of Unbound and Bound Peptidyl-tRNA Hydrolase from Acinetobacter baumannii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, Sanket; Singh, Nagendra; Yamini, Shavait; Singh, Avinash; Sinha, Mau; Arora, Ashish; Kaur, Punit; Sharma, Sujata; Singh, Tej P.

    2013-01-01

    The incidences of infections caused by an aerobic Gram-negative bacterium, Acinetobacter baumannii are very common in hospital environments. It usually causes soft tissue infections including urinary tract infections and pneumonia. It is difficult to treat due to acquired resistance to available antibiotics is well known. In order to design specific inhibitors against one of the important enzymes, peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase from Acinetobacter baumannii, we have determined its three-dimensional structure. Peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase (AbPth) is involved in recycling of peptidyl-tRNAs which are produced in the cell as a result of premature termination of translation process. We have also determined the structures of two complexes of AbPth with cytidine and uridine. AbPth was cloned, expressed and crystallized in unbound and in two bound states with cytidine and uridine. The binding studies carried out using fluorescence spectroscopic and surface plasmon resonance techniques revealed that both cytidine and uridine bound to AbPth at nanomolar concentrations. The structure determinations of the complexes revealed that both ligands were located in the active site cleft of AbPth. The introduction of ligands to AbPth caused a significant widening of the entrance gate to the active site region and in the process of binding, it expelled several water molecules from the active site. As a result of interactions with protein atoms, the ligands caused conformational changes in several residues to attain the induced tight fittings. Such a binding capability of this protein makes it a versatile molecule for hydrolysis of peptidyl-tRNAs having variable peptide sequences. These are the first studies that revealed the mode of inhibitor binding in Peptidyl-tRNA hydrolases which will facilitate the structure based ligand design. PMID:23844024

  1. The mode of inhibitor binding to peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase: binding studies and structure determination of unbound and bound peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase from Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanket Kaushik

    Full Text Available The incidences of infections caused by an aerobic Gram-negative bacterium, Acinetobacter baumannii are very common in hospital environments. It usually causes soft tissue infections including urinary tract infections and pneumonia. It is difficult to treat due to acquired resistance to available antibiotics is well known. In order to design specific inhibitors against one of the important enzymes, peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase from Acinetobacter baumannii, we have determined its three-dimensional structure. Peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase (AbPth is involved in recycling of peptidyl-tRNAs which are produced in the cell as a result of premature termination of translation process. We have also determined the structures of two complexes of AbPth with cytidine and uridine. AbPth was cloned, expressed and crystallized in unbound and in two bound states with cytidine and uridine. The binding studies carried out using fluorescence spectroscopic and surface plasmon resonance techniques revealed that both cytidine and uridine bound to AbPth at nanomolar concentrations. The structure determinations of the complexes revealed that both ligands were located in the active site cleft of AbPth. The introduction of ligands to AbPth caused a significant widening of the entrance gate to the active site region and in the process of binding, it expelled several water molecules from the active site. As a result of interactions with protein atoms, the ligands caused conformational changes in several residues to attain the induced tight fittings. Such a binding capability of this protein makes it a versatile molecule for hydrolysis of peptidyl-tRNAs having variable peptide sequences. These are the first studies that revealed the mode of inhibitor binding in Peptidyl-tRNA hydrolases which will facilitate the structure based ligand design.

  2. Developmental immunotoxicity of Diazepam in prenatally exposed weanling Wistar rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loveren H van; Piersma AH; Jong WH de; Waal EJ de; LPI; LEO; LGM

    1999-01-01

    A prenatal developmental toxicity study was conducted in rats receiving the pharmaceutical Diazepam from gestation days 14 to 20. Reports from the literature claim that Diazepam has impaired the immune function in the offspring of rats receiving treatment during the third trimester of gestation. Dia

  3. Benzimidazole inhibitors of the protein kinase CHK2: Clarification of the binding mode by flexible side chain docking and protein–ligand crystallography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matijssen, Cornelis; Silva-Santisteban, M. Cris; Westwood, Isaac M.; Siddique, Samerene; Choi, Vanessa; Sheldrake, Peter; van Montfort, Rob L.M.; Blagg, Julian

    2012-01-01

    Two closely related binding modes have previously been proposed for the ATP-competitive benzimidazole class of checkpoint kinase 2 (CHK2) inhibitors; however, neither binding mode is entirely consistent with the reported SAR. Unconstrained rigid docking of benzimidazole ligands into representative CHK2 protein crystal structures reveals an alternative binding mode involving a water-mediated interaction with the hinge region; docking which incorporates protein side chain flexibility for selected residues in the ATP binding site resulted in a refinement of the water-mediated hinge binding mode that is consistent with observed SAR. The flexible docking results are in good agreement with the crystal structures of four exemplar benzimidazole ligands bound to CHK2 which unambiguously confirmed the binding mode of these inhibitors, including the water-mediated interaction with the hinge region, and which is significantly different from binding modes previously postulated in the literature. PMID:23058106

  4. Kinetic and structural insights into the binding of histone deacetylase 1 and 2 (HDAC1, 2) inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Florence F; Weïwer, Michel; Steinbacher, Stefan; Schomburg, Adrian; Reinemer, Peter; Gale, Jennifer P; Campbell, Arthur J; Fisher, Stewart L; Zhao, Wen-Ning; Reis, Surya A; Hennig, Krista M; Thomas, Méryl; Müller, Peter; Jefson, Martin R; Fass, Daniel M; Haggarty, Stephen J; Zhang, Yan-Ling; Holson, Edward B

    2016-09-15

    The structure-activity and structure-kinetic relationships of a series of novel and selective ortho-aminoanilide inhibitors of histone deacetylases (HDACs) 1 and 2 are described. Different kinetic and thermodynamic selectivity profiles were obtained by varying the moiety occupying an 11Å channel leading to the Zn(2+) catalytic pocket of HDACs 1 and 2, two paralogs with a high degree of structural similarity. The design of these novel inhibitors was informed by two ligand-bound crystal structures of truncated hHDAC2. BRD4884 and BRD7232 possess kinetic selectivity for HDAC1 versus HDAC2. We demonstrate that the binding kinetics of HDAC inhibitors can be tuned for individual isoforms in order to modulate target residence time while retaining functional activity and increased histone H4K12 and H3K9 acetylation in primary mouse neuronal cell culture assays. These chromatin modifiers, with tuned binding kinetic profiles, can be used to define the relation between target engagement requirements and the pharmacodynamic response of HDACs in different disease applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. ADMET, Docking studies & binding energy calculations of some Novel ACE - inhibitors for the treatment of Diabetic Nephropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gade Deepak Reddy

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic Nephropathy (DN is one of the major complications of diabetes mellitus, representing the leading of cause of chronic renal disease and a major cause of morbidity and mortality in both type 1 and type 2 diabetic patients. The Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System (RAAS has been implicated in the pathophysiology of DN, and suggests a therapeutic target for blocking this system. Therefore, inhibition of RAAS plays a crucial role in the treatment of DN and therapeutic intervention mostly involves administration of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE inhibitors and angiotensin AT1 receptor blockers. In this current study, we have used computational methods to design 37 novel ACE-inhibitors and evaluated them for the interaction with the enzyme ACE through insilico analysis. The obtained results were compared with the standard drug enalapril to find out the potential inhibitors. Here we report that ligand 4 exhibited strongest inhibitory activity among all. All the analogs are also screened for their ADME & Toxicity profiles using insilico tools and ligand 9 is having better binding affinity next to ligand 4, and also having better ADMET profile when compared to that of ligand 4. Post docking calculations were also performed for the docked complexes in order to identify the individual ligand binding energies by employing Multi-Ligand Bimolecular Association with Energetics (Embrace

  6. De novo design of protein kinase inhibitors by in silico identification of hinge region-binding fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urich, Robert; Wishart, Grant; Kiczun, Michael; Richters, André; Tidten-Luksch, Naomi; Rauh, Daniel; Sherborne, Brad; Wyatt, Paul G; Brenk, Ruth

    2013-05-17

    Protein kinases constitute an attractive family of enzyme targets with high relevance to cell and disease biology. Small molecule inhibitors are powerful tools to dissect and elucidate the function of kinases in chemical biology research and to serve as potential starting points for drug discovery. However, the discovery and development of novel inhibitors remains challenging. Here, we describe a structure-based de novo design approach that generates novel, hinge-binding fragments that are synthetically feasible and can be elaborated to small molecule libraries. Starting from commercially available compounds, core fragments were extracted, filtered for pharmacophoric properties compatible with hinge-region binding, and docked into a panel of protein kinases. Fragments with a high consensus score were subsequently short-listed for synthesis. Application of this strategy led to a number of core fragments with no previously reported activity against kinases. Small libraries around the core fragments were synthesized, and representative compounds were tested against a large panel of protein kinases and subjected to co-crystallization experiments. Each of the tested compounds was active against at least one kinase, but not all kinases in the panel were inhibited. A number of compounds showed high ligand efficiencies for therapeutically relevant kinases; among them were MAPKAP-K3, SRPK1, SGK1, TAK1, and GCK for which only few inhibitors are reported in the literature.

  7. Computational Studies of Difference in Binding Modes of Peptide and Non-Peptide Inhibitors to MDM2/MDMX Based on Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuxin Zhang

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Inhibition of p53-MDM2/MDMX interaction is considered to be a promising strategy for anticancer drug design to activate wild-type p53 in tumors. We carry out molecular dynamics (MD simulations to study the binding mechanisms of peptide and non-peptide inhibitors to MDM2/MDMX. The rank of binding free energies calculated by molecular mechanics generalized Born surface area (MM-GBSA method agrees with one of the experimental values. The results suggest that van der Waals energy drives two kinds of inhibitors to MDM2/MDMX. We also find that the peptide inhibitors can produce more interaction contacts with MDM2/MDMX than the non-peptide inhibitors. Binding mode predictions based on the inhibitor-residue interactions show that the π–π, CH–π and CH–CH interactions dominated by shape complimentarity, govern the binding of the inhibitors in the hydrophobic cleft of MDM2/MDMX. Our studies confirm the residue Tyr99 in MDMX can generate a steric clash with the inhibitors due to energy and structure. This finding may theoretically provide help to develop potent dual-specific or MDMX inhibitors.

  8. Tolerance to and Withdrawal from Anticonvulsant Action of Diazepam: Role of Nitric Oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nidhi, Gupta; Bhargava, V K.; Pandhi, P

    2000-08-01

    Tolerance to the anticonvulsant action of diazepam as a result of central nervous system adaptation limits its use in epilepsy. In Wistar rats, diazepam 5 mg/kg ip twice daily produced tolerance to its anticonvulsant action in 6 days. Abrupt withdrawal caused hyperexcitability. Tolerance manifested as a decrease in seizure threshold to near-control values, while withdrawal hyperexcitability was evidenced by a significant decrease in seizure threshold below the control value. This effect was seen both in the "same group design" and "separate group design." L-Arginine (a donor of nitric oxide) and N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine (an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase) were given in doses of 150 and 8 mg/kg, respectively, on Days 1, 3, and 6 along with diazepam in the same group design. Their role in preventing the development of tolerance to the anticonvulsant effect was seen on Days 1, 3, and 6. Withdrawal hyperexcitability was seen on Days 1, 2, and 4 after cessation of drug therapy. Both electroshock and pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) infusion were used as models of epilepsy, and seizure thresholds were determined. The up and down method of A. W. Kimball, W. T. Burnett, and G. D. Doherty (Radiat Res 1957;7:1-12) was used to determine the seizure threshold in cases of electroshock-induced seizures. L-Arginine, when administered with diazepam, was found to inhibit tolerance as well as withdrawal hyperexcitability. N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine did not prevent the development of tolerance or withdrawal hyperexcitability in the electroshock model, while in the PTZ model inhibition of nitric synthesis prevented withdrawal hyperexcitability but had no effect on the development of tolerance.

  9. Binding Energy Calculation of Patchouli Alcohol Isomer Cyclooxygenase Complexes Suggested as COX-1/COX-2 Selective Inhibitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sentot Joko Raharjo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To understand the structural features that dictate the selectivity of the two isoforms of the prostaglandin H2 synthase (PGHS/COX, the three-dimensional (3D structure of COX-1/COX-2 was assessed by means of binding energy calculation of virtual molecular dynamic with using ligand alpha-Patchouli alcohol isomers. Molecular interaction studies with COX-1 and COX-2 were done using the molecular docking tools by Hex 8.0. Interactions were further visualized by using Discovery Studio Client 3.5 software tool. The binding energy of molecular interaction was calculated by AMBER12 and Virtual Molecular Dynamic 1.9.1 software. The analysis of the alpha-Patchouli alcohol isomer compounds showed that all alpha-Patchouli alcohol isomers were suggested as inhibitor of COX-1 and COX-2. Collectively, the scoring binding energy calculation (with PBSA Model Solvent of alpha-Patchouli alcohol isomer compounds (CID442384, CID6432585, CID3080622, CID10955174, and CID56928117 was suggested as candidate for a selective COX-1 inhibitor and CID521903 as nonselective COX-1/COX-2.

  10. Data for proteomic analysis of ATP-binding proteins and kinase inhibitor target proteins using an ATP probe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Adachi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Interactions between ATP and ATP-binding proteins (ATPome are common and are required for most cellular processes. Thus, it is clearly important to identify and quantify these interactions for understanding basic cellular mechanisms and the pathogenesis of various diseases. We used an ATP competition assay (competition between ATP and acyl-ATP probes that enabled us to distinguish specific ATP-binding proteins from non-specific proteins (Adachi et al., 2014 [1]. As a result, we identified 539 proteins, including 178 novel ATP-binding protein candidates. We also established an ATPome selectivity profiling method for kinase inhibitors using our cataloged ATPome list. Normally only kinome selectivity is profiled in selectivity profiling of kinase inhibitors. In this data, we expand the profiled targets from the kinome to the ATPome through performance of ATPome selectivity profiling and obtained target profiles of staurosporine and (S-crizotinib. The data accompanying the manuscript on this approach (Adachi et al., 2014 [1] have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001200.

  11. 6-alkylsalicylates are selective Tip60 inhibitors and target the acetyl-CoA binding site

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghizzoni, Massimo; Wu, Jiang; Gao, Tielong; Haisma, Hidde J.; Dekker, Frank J.; Zheng, Y. George

    2012-01-01

    Histone acetyltransferases are important enzymes that regulate various cellular functions, such as epigenetic control of DNA transcription. Development of HAT inhibitors with high selectivity and potency will provide powerful mechanistic tools for the elucidation of the biological functions of HATs

  12. The prototype HIV-1 maturation inhibitor, bevirimat, binds to the CA-SP1 cleavage site in immature Gag particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen Albert T

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bevirimat, the prototype Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1 maturation inhibitor, is highly potent in cell culture and efficacious in HIV-1 infected patients. In contrast to inhibitors that target the active site of the viral protease, bevirimat specifically inhibits a single cleavage event, the final processing step for the Gag precursor where p25 (CA-SP1 is cleaved to p24 (CA and SP1. Results In this study, photoaffinity analogs of bevirimat and mass spectrometry were employed to map the binding site of bevirimat to Gag within immature virus-like particles. Bevirimat analogs were found to crosslink to sequences overlapping, or proximal to, the CA-SP1 cleavage site, consistent with previous biochemical data on the effect of bevirimat on Gag processing and with genetic data from resistance mutations, in a region predicted by NMR and mutational studies to have α-helical character. Unexpectedly, a second region of interaction was found within the Major Homology Region (MHR. Extensive prior genetic evidence suggests that the MHR is critical for virus assembly. Conclusions This is the first demonstration of a direct interaction between the maturation inhibitor, bevirimat, and its target, Gag. Information gained from this study sheds light on the mechanisms by which the virus develops resistance to this class of drug and may aid in the design of next-generation maturation inhibitors.

  13. The prototype HIV-1 maturation inhibitor, bevirimat, binds to the CA-SP1 cleavage site in immature Gag particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Bevirimat, the prototype Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1) maturation inhibitor, is highly potent in cell culture and efficacious in HIV-1 infected patients. In contrast to inhibitors that target the active site of the viral protease, bevirimat specifically inhibits a single cleavage event, the final processing step for the Gag precursor where p25 (CA-SP1) is cleaved to p24 (CA) and SP1. Results In this study, photoaffinity analogs of bevirimat and mass spectrometry were employed to map the binding site of bevirimat to Gag within immature virus-like particles. Bevirimat analogs were found to crosslink to sequences overlapping, or proximal to, the CA-SP1 cleavage site, consistent with previous biochemical data on the effect of bevirimat on Gag processing and with genetic data from resistance mutations, in a region predicted by NMR and mutational studies to have α-helical character. Unexpectedly, a second region of interaction was found within the Major Homology Region (MHR). Extensive prior genetic evidence suggests that the MHR is critical for virus assembly. Conclusions This is the first demonstration of a direct interaction between the maturation inhibitor, bevirimat, and its target, Gag. Information gained from this study sheds light on the mechanisms by which the virus develops resistance to this class of drug and may aid in the design of next-generation maturation inhibitors. PMID:22151792

  14. Alpha-amylase inhibitor, CS-1036 binds to serum amylase in a concentration-dependent and saturable manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Tomohiro; Kaneno-Urasaki, Yoko; Ito, Takashi; Kimura, Takako; Matsushima, Nobuko; Okabe, Hiromi; Yamasaki, Atsushi; Izumi, Takashi

    2014-03-01

    (2R,3R,4R)-4-hydroxy-2-(hydroxymethyl)pyrrolidin-3-yl 4-O-(6-deoxy-β-D-glucopyranosyl)-α-D-glucopyranoside (CS-1036), which is an α-amylase inhibitor, exhibited biphasic and sustained elimination with a long t1/2 (18.4-30.0 hours) in rats and monkeys, but exhibited a short t1/2 (3.7-7.9 hours) in humans. To clarify the species differences in the t1/2, the plasma protein binding of CS-1036 was evaluated by ultrafiltration. A concentration-dependent and saturable plasma protein binding of CS-1036 was observed in rats and monkeys with the dissociation rate constant (KD) of 8.95 and 27.2 nM, and maximal binding capacity (Bmax) of 52.8 and 22.1 nM, respectively. By the assessments of the recombinant amylase and immunoprecipitation, the major binding protein of CS-1036 in rats was identified as salivary amylase (KD 5.64 nM). CS-1036 also showed concentration-dependent and saturable binding to human salivary and pancreatic amylase, with similar binding affinity in rats. However, the protein binding of CS-1036 was constant in human plasma (≤10.2%) due to the lower serum amylase level compared with rats and monkeys. From the calculation of the unbound fraction (fu) in plasma based on in vitro KD and Bmax, the dose-dependent increase in fu after oral administration is speculated to lead to a dose-dependent increase in total body clearance and a high area under the curve/dose at lower doses, such as 0.3 mg/kg in rats.

  15. Acylguanidine inhibitors of beta-secretase: optimization of the pyrrole ring substituents extending into the S1' substrate binding pocket.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Lee D; Cole, Derek C; Stock, Joseph R; Sukhdeo, Mohani N; Ellingboe, John W; Cowling, Rebecca; Jin, Guixian; Manas, Eric S; Fan, Kristi Y; Malamas, Michael S; Harrison, Boyd L; Jacobsen, Steve; Chopra, Rajiv; Lohse, Peter A; Moore, William J; O'Donnell, Mary-Margaret; Hu, Yun; Robichaud, Albert J; Turner, M James; Wagner, Erik; Bard, Jonathan

    2008-01-15

    The proteolytic enzyme beta-secretase (BACE-1) produces amyloid beta (Abeta) peptide, the primary constituent of neurofibrillary plaques, implicated in Alzheimer's disease, by cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein. A small molecule inhibitor of BACE-1, (diaminomethylene)-2,5-diphenyl-1H-pyrrole-1-acetamide (1, BACE-1 IC(50)=3.7 microM), was recently described, representing a new small molecule lead. Initial SAR investigation demonstrated the potential of accessing the nearby S(3) and S(1)(') substrate binding pockets of the BACE-1 enzyme by building substituents off one of the phenyl substituents and guanidinyl functional group. We report here the optimization of guanidinyl functional group substituents on 1, leading to potent submicromolar BACE-1 inhibitors.

  16. Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of small molecule inhibitors of CD4-gp120 binding based on virtual screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalonde, Judith M; Elban, Mark A; Courter, Joel R; Sugawara, Akihiro; Soeta, Takahiro; Madani, Navid; Princiotto, Amy M; Kwon, Young Do; Kwong, Peter D; Schön, Arne; Freire, Ernesto; Sodroski, Joseph; Smith, Amos B

    2011-01-01

    The low-molecular-weight compound JRC-II-191 inhibits infection of HIV-1 by blocking the binding of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp120 to the CD4 receptor and is therefore an important lead in the development of a potent viral entry inhibitor. Reported here is the use of two orthogonal screening methods, gold docking and ROCS shape-based similarity searching, to identify amine-building blocks that, when conjugated to the core scaffold, yield novel analogs that maintain similar affinity for gp120. Use of this computational approach to expand SAR produced analogs of equal inhibitory activity but with diverse capacity to enhance viral infection. The novel analogs provide additional lead scaffolds for the development of HIV-1 entry inhibitors that employ protein-ligand interactions in the vestibule of gp120 Phe 43 cavity.

  17. Synthesis of a selective inhibitor of a fucose binding bacterial lectin from Burkholderia ambifaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richichi, Barbara; Imberty, Anne; Gillon, Emilie; Bosco, Rosa; Sutkeviciute, Ieva; Fieschi, Franck; Nativi, Cristina

    2013-06-28

    Burkholderia ambifaria is a bacterium member of the Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC), a closely related group of Gram-negative bacteria responsible for "cepacia syndrome" in immunocompromised patients. B. ambifaria produces BambL, a fucose-binding lectin that displays fine specificity to human fucosylated epitopes. Here, we report the first example of a synthetic ligand able to selectively bind, in the micromolar range, the pathogen-lectin BambL. The synthetic routes for the preparation of the α conformationally constrained fucoside are described, focusing on a totally diastereoselective inverse electron demand [4 + 2] Diels-Alder reaction. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) demonstrated that this compound binds to the pathogen-associated lectin BambL with an affinity comparable to that of natural fucose-containing oligosaccharides. No binding was observed by LecB, a fucose-binding lectin from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and the differences in affinity between the two lectins could be rationalized by modeling. Furthermore, SPR analyses showed that this fucomimetic does not bind to the human fucose-binding lectin DC-SIGN, thus supporting the selective binding profile towards B. ambifaria lectin.

  18. Active site - a site of binding of affinity inhibitors in baker's yeast inorganic pyrophosphatase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svyato, I.E.; Sklyankina, V.A.; Avaeva, S.M.

    1986-03-20

    The interaction of the enzyme-substrate complex with methyl phosphate, O-phosphoethanolamine, O-phosphopropanolamine, N-acetylphosphoserine, and phosphoglyolic acid, as well as pyrophosphatase, modified by monoesters of phosphoric acid, with pyrophosphate and tripolyphosphate, was investigated. It was shown that the enzyme containing the substrate in the active site does not react with monophosphates, but modified pyrophosphatase entirely retains the ability to bind polyanions to the regulatory site. It is concluded that the inactivation of baker's yeast inorganic pyrophosphatase by monoesters of phosphoric acid, which are affinity inhibitors of it, is the result of modification of the active site of the enzyme.

  19. DIAZEPAM IN PEDIATRIC CONVULSION MANAGEMENT: RECTAL VS INTRAVENOUS ADMINISTRATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T MAHMOUDIAN

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Convulsion is a dangerous occurrence in pediatric disease that requires immediately intervention. It is one of the common causes of referring children to emergency room and must be controlled as soon as possible for prevention of systemic complications and the brain damages. We compared the effect of intravenous (IV versus rectal diazepam in control of convulsion in children.
    Methods. Study group included eighty patients with seizure (from 3 months to 12 years old. Forty patients received rectal diazepam and other ones received diazepam intravenously.
    Results. The convulsion was controlled with rectal diazepam in less than 5 minutes (N diazepam less than 2 minutes and this method was not difficult even for parents.
    Discussion. Control of convulsion less than one minute has no relation to the route of diazepam administration. The important factors for control of seizure are dose of diazepam and the prompt use of it after seizure.

  20. Molecular docking guided structure based design of symmetrical N,N'-disubstituted urea/thiourea as HIV-1 gp120-CD4 binding inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivan, Sree Kanth; Vangala, Radhika; Manga, Vijjulatha

    2013-08-01

    Induced fit molecular docking studies were performed on BMS-806 derivatives reported as small molecule inhibitors of HIV-1 gp120-CD4 binding. Comprehensive study of protein-ligand interactions guided in identification and design of novel symmetrical N,N'-disubstituted urea and thiourea as HIV-1 gp120-CD4 binding inhibitors. These molecules were synthesized in aqueous medium using microwave irradiation. Synthesized molecules were screened for their inhibitory ability by HIV-1 gp120-CD4 capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Designed compounds were found to inhibit HIV-1 gp120-CD4 binding in micromolar (0.013-0.247 μM) concentrations.

  1. Sourcing the affinity of flavonoids for the glycogen phosphorylase inhibitor site via crystallography, kinetics and QM/MM-PBSA binding studies: comparison of chrysin and flavopiridol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsitsanou, Katerina E; Hayes, Joseph M; Keramioti, Maria; Mamais, Michalis; Oikonomakos, Nikos G; Kato, Atsushi; Leonidas, Demetres D; Zographos, Spyros E

    2013-11-01

    Flavonoids have been discovered as novel inhibitors of glycogen phosphorylase (GP), a target to control hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes. To elucidate the mechanism of inhibition, we have determined the crystal structure of the GPb-chrysin complex at 1.9 Å resolution. Chrysin is accommodated at the inhibitor site intercalating between the aromatic side chains of Phe285 and Tyr613 through π-stacking interactions. Chrysin binds to GPb approximately 15 times weaker (Ki=19.01 μM) than flavopiridol (Ki=1.24 μM), exclusively at the inhibitor site, and both inhibitors display similar behavior with respect to AMP. To identify the source of flavopiridols' stronger affinity, molecular docking with Glide and postdocking binding free energy calculations using QM/MM-PBSA have been performed and compared. Whereas docking failed to correctly rank inhibitor binding conformations, the QM/MM-PBSA method employing M06-2X/6-31+G to model the π-stacking interactions correctly reproduced the experimental results. Flavopiridols' greater binding affinity is sourced to favorable interactions of the cationic 4-hydroxypiperidin-1-yl substituent with GPb, with desolvation effects limited by the substituent conformation adopted in the crystallographic complex. Further successful predictions using QM/MM-PBSA for the flavonoid quercetagetin (which binds at the allosteric site) leads us to propose the methodology as a useful and inexpensive tool to predict flavonoid binding. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Anti-tumor agent calixarene 0118 targets human galectin-1 as an allosteric inhibitor of carbohydrate binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dings, Ruud P.M.; Miller, Michelle C.; Nesmelova, Irina; Astorgues-Xerri, Lucile; Kumar, Nigam; Serova, Maria; Chen, Xuimei; Raymond, Eric; Hoye, Thomas R.; Mayo, Kevin H.

    2012-01-01

    Calix[4]arene compound 0118 is an angiostatic agent that inhibits tumor growth in mice. Although 0118 is a topomimetic of galectin-1-targeting angiostatic amphipathic peptide anginex, we had yet to prove that 0118 targets galectin-1. Galectin-1 is involved in pathological disorders like tumor endothelial cell adhesion and migration and therefore presents a relevant target for therapeutic intervention against cancer. Here, 15N-1H HSQC NMR spectroscopy demonstrates that 0118 indeed targets galectin-1 at a site away from the lectin’s carbohydrate binding site, and thereby attenuates lactose binding to the lectin. Flow cytometry and agglutination assays show that 0118 attenuates binding of galectin-1 to cell surface glycans, and the inhibition of cell proliferation by 0118 is found to be correlated with the cellular expression of the lectin. In general, our data indicate that 0118 targets galectin-1 as an allosteric inhibitor of glycan/carbohydrate binding. This work contributes to the clinical development of anti-tumor calixarene compound 0118. PMID:22575017

  3. Real time enzyme inhibition assays provide insights into differences in binding of neuraminidase inhibitors to wild type and mutant influenza viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Barrett

    Full Text Available The influenza neuraminidase (NA inhibitors zanamivir, oseltamivir and peramivir were all designed based on the knowledge that the transition state analogue of the cleaved sialic acid, 2-deoxy,2,3-dehydro N-acetyl neuraminic acid (DANA was a weak inhibitor of NA. While DANA bound rapidly to the NA, modifications leading to the improved potency of these new inhibitors also conferred a time dependent or slow binding phenotype. Many mutations in the NA leading to decreased susceptibility result in loss of slow binding, hence this is a phenotypic marker of many but not all resistant NAs. We present here a simplified approach to determine whether an inhibitor is fast or slow binding by extending the endpoint fluorescent enzyme inhibition assay to a real time assay and monitoring the changes in IC(50s with time. We carried out two reactions, one with a 30 min preincubation with inhibitor and the second without. The enzymatic reaction was started via addition of substrate and IC(50s were calculated after each 10 min interval up to 60 min. Results showed that without preincubation IC(50s for the wild type viruses started high and although they decreased continuously over the 60 min reaction time the final IC(50s remained higher than for pre-incubated samples. These results indicate a slow equilibrium of association and dissociation and are consistent with slow binding of the inhibitors. In contrast, for viruses with decreased susceptibility, preincubation had minimal effect on the IC(50s, consistent with fast binding. Therefore this modified assay provides additional phenotypic information about the rate of inhibitor binding in addition to the IC(50, and critically demonstrates the differential effect of incubation times on the IC(50 and K(i values of wild type and mutant viruses for each of the inhibitors.

  4. Diazepam and Its Effects on Psychophysiological Measures of Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-04-01

    to the benzodoazepines. Chlordiazepoxide , nitrazepam, oxazepam, and diazepam have generally been found to impair psy- chomotor skills, depress critical...RFAML-TR-95-926 UNC LASIIE F365-E--011F 615 ML MENhhhhhh T .2 13 N 1. It. %MbIMW~dbdSb AFAMRL-TR-85-036 (0 DIAZEPAM AND ITS EFFECTS ON...Performance " Test Battery ° Diazepam / Evoked Response " Valium - Behavioral Measures ABSTRACT iContinue on reverse if necessary and identify by oI

  5. Cooperative binding mode of the inhibitors of R6K replication, pi dimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, Lisa M; Filutowicz, Marcin

    2008-03-28

    The replication initiator protein, pi, plays an essential role in the initiation of plasmid R6K replication. Both monomers and dimers of pi bind to iterons in the gamma origin of plasmid R6K, yet monomers facilitate open complex formation, while dimers, the predominant form in the cell, do not. Consequently, pi monomers activate replication, while pi dimers inhibit replication. Recently, it was shown that the monomeric form of pi binds multiple tandem iterons in a strongly cooperative fashion, which might explain how monomers outcompete dimers for replication initiation when plasmid copy number and pi supply are low. Here, we examine cooperative binding of pi dimers and explore the role that these interactions may have in the inactivation of gamma origin. To examine pi dimer/iteron interactions in the absence of competing pi monomer/iteron interactions using wild-type pi, constructs were made with key base changes to each iteron that eliminate pi monomer binding yet have no impact on pi dimer binding. Our results indicate that, in the absence of pi monomers, pi dimers bind with greater cooperativity to alternate iterons than to adjacent iterons, thus preferentially leaving intervening iterons unbound and the origin unsaturated. We discuss new insights into plasmid replication control by pi dimers.

  6. Comparative efficacy of Diazepam, Ketamine, and Diazepam-Ketamine combination for sedation or anesthesia in cockerel chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Abdullahi Mahmud

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The comparative efficacy of Diazepam, Ketamine, and Ketamine-Diazepam combination was assessed in adult chickens. The chickens (n=30 were divided into three equal groups (G-1, G-2 and G-3, and were administered with Diazepam dosed at 0.5 mg/kg body weight (b.wt., Ketamine HCL dosed at 20 mg/kg b.wt., and Ketamine HCL (dosed at 10 mg/kg b.wt. combined with Diazepam (dosed at 2 mg/kg b.wt. through intramuscular (IM route. The means of induction period, duration of sedation or anesthesia, full recovery period and duration of analgesia were significantly (p≤0.05 differed among the groups. Also, the clinical and hematological parameters measured before and after the sedation or anesthesia within the groups were found to be differed significantly (p≤0.05 from each other. It was concluded that Diazepam dosed at 0.5 mg/kg b.wt. (IM can be used in cockerels. However, combination of Ketamine (at 10 mg/kg IM-Diazepam (at 2 mg/kg b.wt. IM is preferably recommended as this combination is comparatively safer, and minimizes the pains elicited from the surgical procedure of using Diazepam alone.

  7. Binding of carbohydrates and protein inhibitors to the surface of alpha-amylases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bozonnet, Sophie; Bønsager, Birgit Christine; Kramhoft, B.

    2005-01-01

    This review on barley alpha-amylases 1 (AMY1) and 2 (AMY2) addresses rational mutations at distal subsites to the catalytic site, polysaccharide hydrolysis, and interactions with proteinaceous inhibitors. Subsite mapping of barley alpha-amylases revealed 6 glycone and 4 aglycone substrate subsite...

  8. Influence of azide incorporation on binding affinity by small papain inhibitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wammes, A.E.; Hendriks, T.G.; Amatdjais-Groenen, H.I.; Wijdeven, M.A.; Hest, J.C.M. van; Delft, F.L. van; Ritschel, T.; Rutjes, F.P.J.T.

    2014-01-01

    In order to develop affinity-based biosensor platforms, appropriate ligands with a functional handle for immobilization onto a biosensor surface are required. To this end, a library of papain inhibitors was designed and synthesized, containing different azide linkers for subsequent immobilization by

  9. Binding of carbohydrates and protein inhibitors to the surface of alpha-amylases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bozonnet, Sophie; Bønsager, Birgit Christine; Kramhoft, B.

    2005-01-01

    This review on barley alpha-amylases 1 (AMY1) and 2 (AMY2) addresses rational mutations at distal subsites to the catalytic site, polysaccharide hydrolysis, and interactions with proteinaceous inhibitors. Subsite mapping of barley alpha-amylases revealed 6 glycone and 4 aglycone substrate subsite...

  10. Dissection of Conformationally Restricted Inhibitors Binding to a β-Glucosidase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gloster, Tracey M.; Madsen, Robert; Davies, Gideon J.

    2006-01-01

    Glycosidase inhibition, important in the quest for highly potent and specific drugs, can be achieved by mimicking the oxocarbenium ion-like transition-state species that form during the catalytic mechanism. Castanospermine and calystegine B2 are potent inhibitors that are conformationally restric...

  11. Evolutionary Limitation and Opportunities for Developing tRNA Synthetase Inhibitors with 5-Binding-Mode Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengfei Fang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs are enzymes that catalyze the transfer of amino acids to their cognate tRNAs as building blocks for translation. Each of the aaRS families plays a pivotal role in protein biosynthesis and is indispensable for cell growth and survival. In addition, aaRSs in higher species have evolved important non-translational functions. These translational and non-translational functions of aaRS are attractive for developing antibacterial, antifungal, and antiparasitic agents and for treating other human diseases. The interplay between amino acids, tRNA, ATP, EF-Tu and non-canonical binding partners, had shaped each family with distinct pattern of key sites for regulation, with characters varying among species across the path of evolution. These sporadic variations in the aaRSs offer great opportunity to target these essential enzymes for therapy. Up to this day, growing numbers of aaRS inhibitors have been discovered and developed. Here, we summarize the latest developments and structural studies of aaRS inhibitors, and classify them with distinct binding modes into five categories.

  12. Novel hinge-binding motifs for Janus kinase 3 inhibitors: a comprehensive structure-activity relationship study on tofacitinib bioisosteres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehringer, Matthias; Forster, Michael; Pfaffenrot, Ellen; Bauer, Silke M; Laufer, Stefan A

    2014-11-01

    The Janus kinases (JAKs) are a family of cytosolic tyrosine kinases crucially involved in cytokine signaling. JAKs have been demonstrated to be valid targets in the treatment of inflammatory and myeloproliferative disorders, and two inhibitors, tofacitinib and ruxolitinib, recently received their marketing authorization. Despite this success, selectivity within the JAK family remains a major issue. Both approved compounds share a common 7H-pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidine hinge binding motif, and little is known about modifications tolerated at this heterocyclic core. In the current study, a library of tofacitinib bioisosteres was prepared and tested against JAK3. The compounds possessed the tofacitinib piperidinyl side chain, whereas the hinge binding motif was replaced by a variety of heterocycles mimicking its pharmacophore. In view of the promising expectations obtained from molecular modeling, most of the compounds proved to be poorly active. However, strategies for restoring activity within this series of novel chemotypes were discovered and crucial structure-activity relationships were deduced. The compounds presented may serve as starting point for developing novel JAK inhibitors and as a valuable training set for in silico models.

  13. Discovery of small-molecule inhibitors selectively targeting the DNA-binding domain of the human androgen receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huifang; Ban, Fuqiang; Dalal, Kush; Leblanc, Eric; Frewin, Kate; Ma, Dennis; Adomat, Hans; Rennie, Paul S; Cherkasov, Artem

    2014-08-14

    The human androgen receptor (AR) is considered as a master regulator in the development and progression of prostate cancer (PCa). As resistance to clinically used anti-AR drugs remains a major challenge for the treatment of advanced PCa, there is a pressing need for new anti-AR therapeutic avenues. In this study, we identified a binding site on the DNA binding domain (DBD) of the receptor and utilized virtual screening to discover a set of micromolar hits for the target. Through further exploration of the most potent hit (1), a structural analogue (6) was identified demonstrating 10-fold improved anti-AR potency. Further optimization resulted in a more potent synthetic analogue (25) with anti-AR potency comparable to a newly FDA-approved drug Enzalutamide. Site-directed mutagenesis demonstrated that the developed inhibitors do interact with the intended target site. Importantly, the AR DBD inhibitors could effectively inhibit the growth of Enzalutamide-resistant cells as well as block the transcriptional activity of constitutively active AR splice variants, such as V7.

  14. Molecular Recognition of the Catalytic Zinc(II) Ion in MMP-13: Structure-Based Evolution of an Allosteric Inhibitor to Dual Binding Mode Inhibitors with Improved Lipophilic Ligand Efficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Thomas; Riedl, Rainer

    2016-03-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a class of zinc dependent endopeptidases which play a crucial role in a multitude of severe diseases such as cancer and osteoarthritis. We employed MMP-13 as the target enzyme for the structure-based design and synthesis of inhibitors able to recognize the catalytic zinc ion in addition to an allosteric binding site in order to increase the affinity of the ligand. Guided by molecular modeling, we optimized an initial allosteric inhibitor by addition of linker fragments and weak zinc binders for recognition of the catalytic center. Furthermore we improved the lipophilic ligand efficiency (LLE) of the initial inhibitor by adding appropriate zinc binding fragments to lower the clogP values of the inhibitors, while maintaining their potency. All synthesized inhibitors showed elevated affinity compared to the initial hit, also most of the novel inhibitors displayed better LLE. Derivatives with carboxylic acids as the zinc binding fragments turned out to be the most potent inhibitors (compound 3 (ZHAWOC5077): IC50 = 134 nM) whereas acyl sulfonamides showed the best lipophilic ligand efficiencies (compound 18 (ZHAWOC5135): LLE = 2.91).

  15. HIV-1 IN strand transfer chelating inhibitors: a focus on metal binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacchi, Alessia; Carcelli, Mauro; Compari, Carlotta; Fisicaro, Emilia; Pala, Nicolino; Rispoli, Gabriele; Rogolino, Dominga; Sanchez, Tino W; Sechi, Mario; Neamati, Nouri

    2011-04-01

    Most active and selective strand transfer HIV-1 integrase (IN) inhibitors contain chelating functional groups that are crucial feature for the inhibition of the catalytic activities of the enzyme. In particular, diketo acids and their derivatives can coordinate one or two metal ions within the catalytic core of the enzyme. The present work is intended as a contribution to elucidate the mechanism of action of the HIV-IN inhibitors by studying the coordinative features of H₂L¹ (L-708,906), an important member of the diketo acids family of inhibitors, and H₂L₂, a model for S-1360, another potent IN inhibitor. Magnesium(II) and manganese(II) complexes of H₂L¹ and H₂L² were isolated and fully characterized in solution and in the solid state. The crystal structures of the manganese complex [Mn(HL₂)₂(CH₃OH)₂]·2CH₃OH were solved by X-ray diffraction analysis. Moreover, the speciation models for H₂L₂ with magnesium(II) and manganese(II) ions were performed and the formation constants of the complexes were measured. M(HL₂)₂ (M = Mg²+, Mn²+) was the most abundant species in solution at physiological pH. All the synthesized compounds were tested for their anti-IN activity, showing good results both for the ligand and the corresponding complexes. From analysis of the speciation models and of the biological data we can conclude that coordination of both metal cofactors could not be strictly necessary and that inhibitors can act as complexes and not only as free ligands.

  16. Chemical Editing of Macrocyclic Natural Products and Kinetic Profiling Reveal Slow, Tight-Binding Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors with Picomolar Affinities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitir, Betül; Maolanon, Alex R; Ohm, Ragnhild G; Colaço, Ana R; Fristrup, Peter; Madsen, Andreas S; Olsen, Christian A

    2017-09-26

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are validated targets for treatment of certain cancer types and play numerous regulatory roles in biology, ranging from epigenetics to metabolism. Small molecules are highly important as tool compounds for probing these mechanisms as well as for the development of new medicines. Therefore, detailed mechanistic information and precise characterization of the chemical probes used to investigate the effects of HDAC enzymes are vital. We interrogated Nature's arsenal of macrocyclic nonribosomal peptide HDAC inhibitors by chemical synthesis and evaluation of more than 30 natural products and analogues. This furnished surprising trends in binding affinities for the various macrocycles, which were then exploited for the design of highly potent class I and IIb HDAC inhibitors. Furthermore, thorough kinetic investigation revealed unexpected inhibitory mechanisms of important tool compounds as well as the approved drug Istodax (romidepsin). This work provides novel inhibitors with varying potencies, selectivity profiles, and mechanisms of inhibition and, importantly, affords insight into known tool compounds that will improve the interpretation of their effects in biology and medicine.

  17. Design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of substrate-competitive inhibitors of C-terminal Binding Protein (CtBP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korwar, Sudha; Morris, Benjamin L; Parikh, Hardik I; Coover, Robert A; Doughty, Tyler W; Love, Ian M; Hilbert, Brendan J; Royer, William E; Kellogg, Glen E; Grossman, Steven R; Ellis, Keith C

    2016-06-15

    C-terminal Binding Protein (CtBP) is a transcriptional co-regulator that downregulates the expression of many tumor-suppressor genes. Utilizing a crystal structure of CtBP with its substrate 4-methylthio-2-oxobutyric acid (MTOB) and NAD(+) as a guide, we have designed, synthesized, and tested a series of small molecule inhibitors of CtBP. From our first round of compounds, we identified 2-(hydroxyimino)-3-phenylpropanoic acid as a potent CtBP inhibitor (IC50=0.24μM). A structure-activity relationship study of this compound further identified the 4-chloro- (IC50=0.18μM) and 3-chloro- (IC50=0.17μM) analogues as additional potent CtBP inhibitors. Evaluation of the hydroxyimine analogues in a short-term cell growth/viability assay showed that the 4-chloro- and 3-chloro-analogues are 2-fold and 4-fold more potent, respectively, than the MTOB control. A functional cellular assay using a CtBP-specific transcriptional readout revealed that the 4-chloro- and 3-chloro-hydroxyimine analogues were able to block CtBP transcriptional repression activity. This data suggests that substrate-competitive inhibition of CtBP dehydrogenase activity is a potential mechanism to reactivate tumor-suppressor gene expression as a therapeutic strategy for cancer.

  18. Computational Characterization and Prediction of Estrogen Receptor Coactivator Binding Site Inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennion, B J; Kulp, K S; Cosman, M; Lightstone, F C

    2005-08-26

    Many carcinogens have been shown to cause tissue specific tumors in animal models. The mechanism for this specificity has not been fully elucidated and is usually attributed to differences in organ metabolism. For heterocyclic amines, potent carcinogens that are formed in well-done meat, the ability to either bind to the estrogen receptor and activate or inhibit an estrogenic response will have a major impact on carcinogenicity. Here we describe our work with the human estrogen receptor alpha (hERa) and the mutagenic/carcinogenic heterocyclic amines PhIP, MeIQx, IFP, and the hydroxylated metabolite of PhIP, N2-hydroxy-PhIP. We found that PhIP, in contrast to the other heterocyclic amines, increased cell-proliferation in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells and activated the hERa receptor. We show mechanistic data supporting this activation both computationally by homology modeling and docking, and by NMR confirmation that PhIP binds with the ligand binding domain (LBD). This binding competes with estradiol (E2) in the native E2 binding cavity of the receptor. We also find that other heterocyclic amines and N2-hydroxy-PhIP inhibit ER activation presumably by binding into another cavity on the LBD. Moreover, molecular dynamics simulations of inhibitory heterocyclic amines reveal a disruption of the surface of the receptor protein involved with protein-protein signaling. We therefore propose that the mechanism for the tissue specific carcinogenicity seen in the rat breast tumors and the presumptive human breast cancer associated with the consumption of well-done meat maybe mediated by this receptor activation.

  19. Dissecting the Binding between Glutamine Synthetase and Its Two Natively Unfolded Protein Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantoja-Uceda, David; Neira, José L; Saelices, Lorena; Robles-Rengel, Rocío; Florencio, Francisco J; Muro-Pastor, M Isabel; Santoro, Jorge

    2016-06-21

    Ammonium is incorporated into carbon skeletons by the sequential action of glutamine synthetase (GS) and glutamate synthase (GOGAT) in cyanobacteria. The activity of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 GS type I is controlled by protein-protein interactions with two intrinsically disordered inactivating factors (IFs): the 65-residue (IF7) and the 149-residue one (IF17). In this work, we studied both IF7 and IF17 by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and we described their binding to GS by using NMR and biolayer interferometry. We assigned the backbone nuclei of all residues of IF7. Analyses of chemical shifts and the (15)N-{(1)H} NOEs at two field strengths suggest that IF7 region Thr3-Arg13 and a few residues around Ser27 and Phe41 populated helical conformations (although the percentage is smaller around Phe41). The two-dimensional (1)H-(15)N HSQC and CON experiments suggest that IF17 populated several conformations. We followed the binding between GS and IF7 by NMR at physiological pH, and the residues interacting first with IF7 were Gln6 and Ser27, belonging to those regions that appeared to be ordered in the isolated protein. We also determined the kon values and koff values for the binding of both IF7 and IF17 to GS, where the GS protein was bound to a biosensor. The measurements of the kinetic constants for the binding of IF7 to GS suggest that: (i) binding does not follow a kinetic two-state model ([Formula: see text]), (ii) there is a strong electrostatic component in the determined kon, and (iii) the binding is not diffusion-limited.

  20. Clobazam single or divided dose against diazepam in anxiety neurosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Channabasavanna, S M; Pinto Pereira, L M

    1986-01-01

    One-hundred-and-fifteen patients diagnosed as anxiety neurotics randomly received in a double blind study 20 mg clobazam (Frisium) as a single nightly dose (37 patients) or 10 mg b.d. (38 patients) or diazepam 5 mg b.d. (40 patients) for six weeks, followed by two weeks on placebo. Both the single and divided doses of clobazam were therapeutically equivalent to diazepam. After drug withdrawal, all three treatment groups continued to improve. Patients on clobazam showed better motor performance than the diazepam series. Patients on clobazam divided dose performed significantly better than those on diazepam. Minor side-effects occurred in all patients. From the results clobazam as a single dose of 20 mg has good anxiolysis without any hungover effect.

  1. Fluoxetine and diazepam acutely modulate stress induced-behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacomini, Ana Cristina V V; Abreu, Murilo S; Giacomini, Luidia V; Siebel, Anna M; Zimerman, Fernanda F; Rambo, Cassiano L; Mocelin, Ricieri; Bonan, Carla D; Piato, Angelo L; Barcellos, Leonardo J G

    2016-01-01

    Drug residue contamination in aquatic ecosystems has been studied extensively, but the behavioral effects exerted by the presence of these drugs are not well known. Here, we investigated the effects of acute stress on anxiety, memory, social interaction, and aggressiveness in zebrafish exposed to fluoxetine and diazepam at concentrations that disrupt the hypothalamic-pituitary-interrenal (HPI) axis. Stress increased the locomotor activity and time spent in the bottom area of the tank (novel tank). Fluoxetine and diazepam prevented these behaviors. We also observed that stress and fluoxetine and diazepam exposures decreased social interaction. Stress also increased aggressive behavior, which was not reversed by fluoxetine or diazepam. These data suggest that the presence of these drugs in aquatic ecosystems causes significant behavioral alterations in fish.

  2. X-ray crystal structures of Enterococcus faecalis thymidylate synthase with folate binding site inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalano, Alessia; Luciani, Rosaria; Carocci, Alessia; Cortesi, Debora; Pozzi, Cecilia; Borsari, Chiara; Ferrari, Stefania; Mangani, Stefano

    2016-11-10

    Infections caused by Enterococcus faecalis (Ef) represent nowadays a relevant health problem. We selected Thymidylate synthase (TS) from this organism as a potential specific target for antibacterial therapy. We have previously demonstrated that species-specific inhibition of the protein can be achieved despite the relatively high structural similarity among bacterial TSs and human TS. We had previously obtained the EfTS crystal structure of the protein in complex with the metabolite 5-formyl-tetrahydrofolate (5-FTHF) suggesting the protein role as metabolite reservoir; however, protein-inhibitors complexes were still missing. In the present work we identified some inhibitors bearing the phthalimidic core from our in-house library and we performed crystallographic screening towards EfTS. We obtained two X-ray crystallographic structures: the first with a weak phthalimidic inhibitor bound in one subunit and 5-hydroxymethylene-6-hydrofolic acid (5-HMHF) in the other subunit; a second X-ray structure complex with methotrexate. The structural information achieved confirm the role of EfTS as an enzyme involved in the folate pool system and provide a structural basis for structure-based drug design.

  3. Diazepam or midazolam for orotracheal intubation in the ICU?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lísia Gehrke

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to compare clinical and cost effectiveness of midazolam and diazepam for urgent intubation. Methods: patients admitted to the Central ICU of the Santa Casa Hospital Complex in Porto Alegre, over the age of 18 years, undergoing urgent intubation during 6 months were eligible. Patients were randomized in a single-blinded manner to either intravenous diazepam or midazolam. Diazepam was given as a 5 mg intravenous bolus followed by aliquots of 5 mg each minute. Midazolam was given as an intravenous bolus of 5 mg with further aliquots of 2.5 mg each minute. Ramsay sedation scale 5-6 was considered adequate sedation. We recorded time and required doses to reach adequate sedation and duration of sedation. Results: thirty four patients were randomized, but one patient in the diazepam group was excluded because data were lost. Both groups were similar in terms of illness severity and demographics. Time for adequate sedation was shorter (132 ± 87 sec vs. 224 ± 117 sec, p = 0.016 but duration of sedation was similar (86 ± 67 min vs. 88 ± 50 min, p = 0.936 for diazepam in comparison to midazolam. Total drug dose to reach adequate sedation after either drugs was similar (10.0 [10.0-12.5] mg vs. 15.0 [10.0-17.5] mg, p = 0.248. Arterial pressure and sedation intensity reduced similarly overtime with both drugs. Cost of sedation was lower for diazepam than for midazolam (1.4[1.4-1.8] vs. 13.9[9.4-16.2] reais, p <0.001. Conclusions: intubation using intravenous diazepam and midazolam is effective and well tolerated. Sedation with diazepam is associated to a quicker sedation time and to lower costs.

  4. Possible underlying influence of p38MAPK and NF-κB in the diminished anti-anxiety effect of diazepam in stressed mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Vipin; Gilhotra, Ritu; Dhingra, Dinesh; Gilhotra, Neeraj

    2011-01-01

    The present study was designed to explore the possible nitriergic influence and role of p38MAPK and NF-κB in the diminished anti-anxiety effect of diazepam in stressed mice, using the elevated plus maze and light/dark box to assess anxiety. Immobilization stress for 6 h enhanced an anxiety-like behavior and increased plasma nitrite levels in mice. Diazepam (2 mg/kg, i.p.) produced an anti-anxiety effect in unstressed mice, but could not produce any change in anxiety levels of stressed mice. SB-203580 (2 mg/kg, i.p.), a specific inhibitor of p38MAPK, per se produced a significant antianxiety-like activity in stressed mice. Administration of a combination of SB-203580 (2 mg/kg, i.p.) and diazepam (2 mg/kg) in stressed mice produced a significantly higher antianxiety-like activity than that produced by SB-203580 alone. Pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC), an inhibitor of the activation of NF-κB, per se produced a significant antianxiety-like activity in stressed mice. Combination of PDTC and diazepam also served to produce a higher significant antianxiety-like activity in stressed mice than that produced by PDTC alone. Diazepam could not produce any change in plasma nitrite levels in both unstressed and stressed mice. Both SB-203580 (2 mg/kg, i.p.) and PDTC (100 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly decreased plasma nitrite levels in stressed mice. The observations indicate that the diminished anti-anxiety effect of diazepam in stressed mice may involve strong nitriergic influence and may further be p38MAPK- and NF-κB-dependent.

  5. Molecular dynamics of Mycobacterium tuberculosis KasA: implications for inhibitor and substrate binding and consequences for drug design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Benjamin; Kisker, Caroline; Sotriffer, Christoph A.

    2011-11-01

    Inhibition of the production of fatty acids as essential components of the mycobacterial cell wall has been an established way of fighting tuberculosis for decades. However, increasing resistances and an outdated medical treatment call for the validation of new targets involved in this crucial pathway. In this regard, the β-ketoacyl ACP synthase KasA is a promising enzyme. In this study, three molecular dynamics simulations based on the wildtype crystal structures of inhibitor bound and unbound KasA were performed in order to investigate the flexibility and conformational space of this target. We present an exhaustive analysis of the binding-site flexibility and representative pocket conformations that may serve as new starting points for structure-based drug design. We also revealed a mechanism which may account for the comparatively low binding affinity of thiolactomycin. Furthermore, we examined the behavior of water molecules within the binding pocket and provide recommendations how to handle them in the drug design process. Finally, we analyzed the dynamics of a channel that accommodates the long-chain fatty acid substrates and, thereby, propose a mechanism of substrate access to this channel and how products are most likely released.

  6. Structure based design towards the identification of novel binding sites and inhibitors for the chikungunya virus envelope proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashad, Adel A; Keller, Paul A

    2013-07-01

    Chikungunya virus is an emerging arbovirus that is widespread in tropical regions and is spreading quickly to temperate climates with recent epidemics in Africa, Asia, Europe and the Americas. It is having an increasingly major impact on humans with potentially life-threatening and debilitating arthritis. Thus far, neither vaccines nor medications are available to treat or control the virus and therefore, the development of medicinal chemistry is a vital and immediate issue that needs to be addressed. The viral envelope proteins play a major role during infection through mediation of binding and fusion with the infected cell surfaces. The possible binding target sites of the chikungunya virus envelope proteins have not previously been investigated; we describe here for the first time the identification of novel sites for potential binding on the chikungunya glycoprotein complexes and the identification of possible antagonists for these sites through virtual screening using two successive docking scores; FRED docking for fast precise screening, with the top hits then subjected to a ranking scoring using the AUTODOCK algorithm. Both the immature and the mature forms of the chikungunya envelope proteins were included in the study to increase the probability of finding positive and reliable hits. Some small molecules have been identified as good in silico chikungunya virus envelope proteins inhibitors and these could be good templates for drug design targeting this virus.

  7. Novel bis-(-)-nor-meptazinol derivatives act as dual binding site AChE inhibitors with metal-complexing property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wei; Li, Juan; Qiu, Zhuibai; Xia, Zheng; Li, Wei; Yu, Lining; Chen, Hailin; Chen, Jianxing; Chen, Yan; Hu, Zhuqin; Zhou, Wei; Shao, Biyun; Cui, Yongyao; Xie, Qiong; Chen, Hongzhuan

    2012-10-01

    The strategy of dual binding site acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition along with metal chelation may represent a promising direction for multi-targeted interventions in the pathophysiological processes of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In the present study, two derivatives (ZLA and ZLB) of a potent dual binding site AChE inhibitor bis-(-)-nor-meptazinol (bis-MEP) were designed and synthesized by introducing metal chelating pharmacophores into the middle chain of bis-MEP. They could inhibit human AChE activity with IC(50) values of 9.63μM (for ZLA) and 8.64μM (for ZLB), and prevent AChE-induced amyloid-β (Aβ) aggregation with IC(50) values of 49.1μM (for ZLA) and 55.3μM (for ZLB). In parallel, molecular docking analysis showed that they are capable of interacting with both the catalytic and peripheral anionic sites of AChE. Furthermore, they exhibited abilities to complex metal ions such as Cu(II) and Zn(II), and inhibit Aβ aggregation triggered by these metals. Collectively, these results suggest that ZLA and ZLB may act as dual binding site AChEIs with metal-chelating potency, and may be potential leads of value for further study on disease-modifying treatment of AD.

  8. Modulating the function of ATP-binding cassette subfamily G member 2 (ABCG2) with inhibitor cabozantinib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guan-Nan; Zhang, Yun-Kai; Wang, Yi-Jun; Barbuti, Anna Maria; Zhu, Xi-Jun; Yu, Xin-Yue; Wen, Ai-Wen; Wurpel, John N D; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2017-01-25

    Cabozantinib (XL184) is a small molecule tyrosine kinase receptor inhibitor, which targets c-Met and VEGFR2. Cabozantinib has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration to treat advanced medullary thyroid cancer and renal cell carcinoma. In the present study, we evaluated the ability of cabozantinib to modulate the function of the ATP-binding cassette subfamily G member 2 (ABCG2) by sensitizing cells that are resistant to ABCG2 substrate antineoplastic drugs. We used a drug-selected resistant cell line H460/MX20 and three ABCG2 stable transfected cell lines ABCG2-482-R2, ABCG2-482-G2, and ABCG2-482-T7, which overexpress ABCG2. Cabozantinib, at non-toxic concentrations (3 or 5μM), sensitized the ABCG2-overexpressing cells to mitoxantrone, SN-38, and topotecan. Our results indicate that cabozantinib reverses ABCG2-mediated multidrug resistance by antagonizing the drug efflux function of the ABCG2 transporter instead of downregulating its expression. The molecular docking analysis indicates that cabozantinib binds to the drug-binding site of the ABCG2 transporter. Overall, our findings demonstrate that cabozantinib inhibits the ABCG2 transporter function and consequently enhances the effect of the antineoplastic agents that are substrates of ABCG2. Cabozantinib may be a useful agent in anticancer treatment regimens for patients who are resistant to ABCG2 substrate drugs.

  9. Contribution of explicit solvent effects to the binding affinity of small-molecule inhibitors in blood coagulation factor serine proteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, Robert; Salam, Noeris K; Shelley, John; Farid, Ramy; Friesner, Richard A; Sherman, Woody

    2011-06-06

    The prevention of blood coagulation is important in treating thromboembolic disorders, and several serine proteases involved in the coagulation cascade have been classified as pharmaceutically relevant. Whereas structure-based drug design has contributed to the development of some serine protease inhibitors, traditional computational methods have not been able to fully describe structure-activity relationships (SAR). Here, we study the SAR for a number of serine proteases by using a method that calculates the thermodynamic properties (enthalpy and entropy) of the water that solvates the active site. We show that the displacement of water from specific subpockets (such as S1-4 and the ester binding pocket) of the active site by the ligand can govern potency, especially for cases in which small chemical changes (i.e., a methyl group or halogen) result in a substantial increase in potency. Furthermore, we describe how relative binding free energies can be estimated by combining the water displacement energy with complementary terms from an implicit solvent molecular mechanics description binding.

  10. Metabolism of ATP-binding cassette drug transporter inhibitors: complicating factor for multidrug resistance.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cnubben, N.H.; Wortelboer, H.M.; Zanden, J.J. van; Rietjens, I.M.; Bladeren, P.J. van

    2005-01-01

    Membrane transport proteins belonging to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) family of transport proteins play a central role in the defence of organisms against toxic compounds, including anticancer drugs. However, for compounds that are designed to display a toxic effect, this defence system diminishes

  11. Human mannose-binding lectin inhibitor prevents Shiga toxin-induced renal injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ozaki, Masayuki; Kang, Yulin; Tan, Ying Siow

    2016-01-01

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome caused by Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC HUS) is a worldwide endemic problem, and its pathophysiology is not fully elucidated. Here we tested whether the mannose-binding lectin (MBL2), an initiating factor of lectin complement pathway activation, plays a cr...

  12. Anti-Hemagglutinin Antibody Derived Lead Peptides for Inhibitors of Influenza Virus Binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Memczak

    Full Text Available Antibodies against spike proteins of influenza are used as a tool for characterization of viruses and therapeutic approaches. However, development, production and quality control of antibodies is expensive and time consuming. To circumvent these difficulties, three peptides were derived from complementarity determining regions of an antibody heavy chain against influenza A spike glycoprotein. Their binding properties were studied experimentally, and by molecular dynamics simulations. Two peptide candidates showed binding to influenza A/Aichi/2/68 H3N2. One of them, termed PeB, with the highest affinity prevented binding to and infection of target cells in the micromolar region without any cytotoxic effect. PeB matches best the conserved receptor binding site of hemagglutinin. PeB bound also to other medical relevant influenza strains, such as human-pathogenic A/California/7/2009 H1N1, and avian-pathogenic A/Mute Swan/Rostock/R901/2006 H7N1. Strategies to improve the affinity and to adapt specificity are discussed and exemplified by a double amino acid substituted peptide, obtained by substitutional analysis. The peptides and their derivatives are of great potential for drug development as well as biosensing.

  13. A model of peptide triazole entry inhibitor binding to HIV-1 gp120 and the mechanism of bridging sheet disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emileh, Ali; Tuzer, Ferit; Yeh, Herman; Umashankara, Muddegowda; Moreira, Diogo R M; Lalonde, Judith M; Bewley, Carole A; Abrams, Cameron F; Chaiken, Irwin M

    2013-04-02

    Peptide triazole (PT) entry inhibitors prevent HIV-1 infection by blocking the binding of viral gp120 to both the HIV-1 receptor and the coreceptor on target cells. Here, we used all-atom explicit solvent molecular dynamics (MD) to propose a model for the encounter complex of the peptide triazoles with gp120. Saturation transfer difference nuclear magnetic resonance (STD NMR) and single-site mutagenesis experiments were performed to test the simulation results. We found that docking of the peptide to a conserved patch of residues lining the "F43 pocket" of gp120 in a bridging sheet naïve gp120 conformation of the glycoprotein led to a stable complex. This pose prevents formation of the bridging sheet minidomain, which is required for receptor-coreceptor binding, providing a mechanistic basis for dual-site antagonism of this class of inhibitors. Burial of the peptide triazole at the gp120 inner domain-outer domain interface significantly contributed to complex stability and rationalizes the significant contribution of hydrophobic triazole groups to peptide potency. Both the simulation model and STD NMR experiments suggest that the I-X-W [where X is (2S,4S)-4-(4-phenyl-1H-1,2,3-triazol-1-yl)pyrrolidine] tripartite hydrophobic motif in the peptide is the major contributor of contacts at the gp120-PT interface. Because the model predicts that the peptide Trp side chain hydrogen bonding with gp120 S375 contributes to the stability of the PT-gp120 complex, we tested this prediction through analysis of peptide binding to gp120 mutant S375A. The results showed that a peptide triazole KR21 inhibits S375A with 20-fold less potency than WT, consistent with predictions of the model. Overall, the PT-gp120 model provides a starting point for both the rational design of higher-affinity peptide triazoles and the development of structure-minimized entry inhibitors that can trap gp120 into an inactive conformation and prevent infection.

  14. Metalloprotein-inhibitor binding: human carbonic anhydrase II as a model for probing metal-ligand interactions in a metalloprotein active site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, David P; Hann, Zachary S; Cohen, Seth M

    2013-11-01

    An ever-increasing number of metalloproteins are being discovered that play essential roles in physiological processes. Inhibitors of these proteins have significant potential for the treatment of human disease, but clinical success of these compounds has been limited. Herein, zinc(II)-dependent metalloprotein inhibitors in clinical use are reviewed, and the potential for using novel metal-binding groups (MBGs) in the design of these inhibitors is discussed. By using human carbonic anhydrase II as a model system, the nuances of MBG-metal interactions in the context of a protein environment can be probed. Understanding how metal coordination influences inhibitor binding may help in the design of new therapeutics targeting metalloproteins.

  15. Wheat and barley allergens associated with baker's asthma. Glycosylated subunits of the alpha-amylase-inhibitor family have enhanced IgE-binding capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Monge, R; Gomez, L; Barber, D; Lopez-Otin, C; Armentia, A; Salcedo, G

    1992-01-15

    A 16 kDa protein, designated CM16*, which strongly binds IgE from baker's-asthma patients has been identified as a glycosylated form of the previously reported WTAI-CM16, which is a subunit of the wheat tetrameric alpha-amylase inhibitor. A glycosylated form (CMb*) of BTAI-CMb, the equivalent inhibitor subunit from barley, has been also found to have significantly enhanced IgE-binding capacity. In all, 14 purified members of the alpha-amylase/trypsin-inhibitor family showed very different IgE-binding capacities when tested by a dot-blot assay. The glycosylated components CM16*, CMb* and the previously described non-glycosylated 14.5 kDa allergen from barley (renamed BMAI-1) were found to be the strongest allergens.

  16. COMPARATIVE EFFECTS OF DIAZEPAM INFUSION AND DIVIDED DOSES OF DIAZEPAM ON THE TREATMENT OF ABSENCE STATUS EPILEPTICUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Karimzadeh

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available AbstractObjectiveAbsence status epilepticus (ASE is a common form of nonconvulsive status epilepcticus. It is  characterized by loss of consciousness with spike and wave discharges in EEG simultaneously. The most effective treatment of ASE is diazepam, either infusion or in divided doses; the former is more expensive since patients must be admitted in an Intensive Care Unit. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the efficacy of diazepam infusion and parenteral diazepam in divided doses in the treatment of ASE.Materials & MethodsThis randomized controlled clinical trial, enrolled 20 patients with absence status epilepticus. Diagnosis was made based on the clinical manifestations and electroencephalogram (EEG. Prior to treatment, all patients underwent EEG and imaging. Patients were randomized to receive 0.2 mg/kg/h diazepam infusion or 0.2 mg/kg in six daily doses. Clinical and EEG improvements were considered to be optimal responses.ResultsOf the 20 patients studied, 13 (65% were boys and the remaining 7(35% were girls. There were no differences between the two groups regarding age and sex (non-significant. Following treatments after 48 hours, 1 week and 1 month respectively, clinical improvement in previous problems (loss of consciousness, ataxia, behavior and speech problems and EEGs was similar in both groups (p=1. There were controlled seizures in 18 (90%, abnormal CT scans in 5 (25%, abnormal EEGs after treatments in 6 (30% cases; however no significant differences were seen between the two groups.ConclusionThis study demonstrates that there are no significant differences between treatments of ASE with diazepam infusion and parenteral diazepam in divided doses. Treatment of ASE, with divided doses of diazepam is easier, less expensive and patients do not require to be hospitalized in an Intensive Care unit.Keywords:Status epilepticus, Diazepam, Absence

  17. Identification and analysis of hepatitis C virus NS3 helicase inhibitors using nucleic acid binding assays

    OpenAIRE

    Mukherjee, Sourav; Alicia M Hanson; Shadrick, William R.; Ndjomou, Jean; Sweeney, Noreena L.; Hernandez, John J.; Bartczak, Diana; Li, Kelin; Frankowski, Kevin J.; Heck, Julie A.; Arnold, Leggy A.; Schoenen, Frank J.; Frick, David N.

    2012-01-01

    Typical assays used to discover and analyze small molecules that inhibit the hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS3 helicase yield few hits and are often confounded by compound interference. Oligonucleotide binding assays are examined here as an alternative. After comparing fluorescence polarization (FP), homogeneous time-resolved fluorescence (HTRF®; Cisbio) and AlphaScreen® (Perkin Elmer) assays, an FP-based assay was chosen to screen Sigma’s Library of Pharmacologically Active Compounds (LOPAC) for c...

  18. IC 50-to-K i: a web-based tool for converting IC 50 to K i values for inhibitors of enzyme activity and ligand binding

    OpenAIRE

    Cer, R. Z.; Mudunuri, U.; Stephens, R.; Lebeda, F. J.

    2009-01-01

    A new web-server tool estimates K i values from experimentally determined IC 50 values for inhibitors of enzymes and of binding reactions between macromolecules (e.g. proteins, polynucleic acids) and ligands. This converter was developed to enable end users to help gauge the quality of the underlying assumptions used in these calculations which depend on the type of mechanism of inhibitor action and the concentrations of the interacting molecular species. Additional calculations are performed...

  19. Evaluation of plasma diazepam and nordiazepam concentrations following administration of diazepam intravenously or via suppository per rectum in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Probst, Curtis W; Thomas, William B; Moyers, Tamberlyn D; Martin, Tomas; Cox, Sherry

    2013-04-01

    To evaluate the pharmacokinetics of diazepam administered per rectum via compounded (ie, not commercially available) suppositories and determine whether a dose of 2 mg/kg in this formulation would result in plasma concentrations shown to be effective for control of status epilepticus or cluster seizures (ie, 150 to 300 ng/mL) in dogs within a clinically useful interval (10 to 15 minutes). 6 healthy mixed-breed dogs. Dogs were randomly assigned to 2 groups of 3 dogs each in a crossover-design study. Diazepam (2 mg/kg) was administered IV or via suppository per rectum, and blood samples were collected at predetermined time points. Following a 6- or 7-day washout period, each group received the alternate treatment. Plasma concentrations of diazepam and nordiazepam were analyzed via reversed phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Plasma concentrations of diazepam and nordiazepam exceeded the targeted range ≤ 3 minutes after IV administration in all dogs. After suppository administration, targeted concentrations of diazepam were not detected in any dogs, and targeted concentrations of nordiazepam were detected after 90 minutes (n = 2 dogs) or 120 minutes (3) or were not achieved (1). On the basis of these results, administration of 2 mg of diazepam/kg via the compounded suppositories used in the present study cannot be recommended for emergency treatment of seizures in dogs.

  20. Intermittent prophylaxis of recurrent febrile seizures with clobazam versus diazepam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattar, S; Saha, S K; Parveen, F; Banu, L A; Momen, A; Ahmed, A U; Quddush, M R; Karim, M M; Begum, S A; Haque, M A; Hoque, M R

    2014-10-01

    Febrile seizures are the most common type of seizure among children that can be prevented by using prophylactic drugs like Clobazam and Diazepam. The present prospective study was conducted in the Department of Pediatrics, Mymensingh Medical College Hospital and Community Based Medical College Hospital, Bangladesh over a period of 1 year from July 2012 to June 2013 to compare the effectiveness of intermittent Clobazam versus Diazepam therapy in preventing the recurrence of febrile seizures and assessed adverse effects of each drug. A total of 65 patients (32 children administered Clobazam and rest 33 children received Diazepam) of simple and complex febrile seizures aged 6 months to 5 years of both sexes were the study population. Data were collected by interview of the patients, clinical examination and laboratory investigations using the research instrument. Data were analyzed by using Chi-square (χ2) Test, Student's 't' Test and Fisher's Exact Test. For all analytical tests, the level of significance was set at 0.05 and pfebrile convulsion during the follow up period. From the data adverse effects within 3 and 6 months experienced by the patient's drowsiness, sedation and ataxia were higher in Diazepam group than those in Clobazam group. However, within 9 months lethargy and irritability were somewhat higher in Clobazam group than those in Diazepam group. The mean duration of hospitalization was significantly higher in Diazepam group compared to Clobazam group (6.0±1.0 vs. 4.6±0.08 days, Pfebrile seizures in Diazepam group had a history of recurrent seizures, whereas 3(9.4%) of 32 children in the Clobazam group. The risks of recurrent febrile seizure in the Diazepam group was 2.6 times greater compared to those in the Clobazam group (P=0.186). The result indicates that Clobazam is safe, efficacious, requires less frequent dosing and has less adverse effects such as drowsiness, sedation, ataxia and irritability as compared to Diazepam. So, Clobazam may be an

  1. Repositioning of Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors as Antagonists of ATP-Binding Cassette Transporters in Anticancer Drug Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Jun Wang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The phenomenon of multidrug resistance (MDR has attenuated the efficacy of anticancer drugs and the possibility of successful cancer chemotherapy. ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporters play an essential role in mediating MDR in cancer cells by increasing efflux of drugs from cancer cells, hence reducing the intracellular accumulation of chemotherapeutic drugs. Interestingly, small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs, such as AST1306, lapatinib, linsitinib, masitinib, motesanib, nilotinib, telatinib and WHI-P154, have been found to have the capability to overcome anticancer drug resistance by inhibiting ABC transporters in recent years. This review will focus on some of the latest and clinical developments with ABC transporters, TKIs and anticancer drug resistance.

  2. Assessing the Performance of Metadynamics and Path Variables in Predicting the Binding Free Energies of p38 Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saladino, G; Gauthier, L; Bianciotto, M; Gervasio, F L

    2012-04-10

    The accurate yet efficient evaluation of the free energy profiles of ligand-target association is a long sought goal in rational drug design. Methods that calculate the free energy along realistic association pathways, such as metadynamics, have been shown to provide reliable profiles, while accounting properly for solvation and target flexibility. However, these approaches usually require prohibitive computational resources and expert human intervention. Here, we show how multiple walkers metadynamics, when performed with optimal path collective variables (PCV), provides in a predetermined amount of computer time an accurate set of free energy profiles for a series of p38 inhibitors. The chosen test set, spanning a wide range of activity, is a challenging benchmark, both for computational methods and for human intuition, as the correct order for the binding affinity cannot be easily guessed. An excellent ranking of the ligands was obtained with minimal human assistance, an important step toward a fully automated pharmaceutical work-flow.

  3. Using Homology Modeling, Molecular Dynamics and Molecular Docking Techniques to Identify Inhibitor Binding Regions of Somatostatin Receptor 1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LAN Hai-nan; WANG Yue-xi; ZHENG Ming-zhu; HAN Wei-wei; ZHENG Xin

    2013-01-01

    The G protein coupled receptor(GPCR),one of the members in the superfamily,which consists of thousands of integral membrane proteins,exerts a wide variety of physiological functions and responses to a large portion of the drug targets.The 3D structure of somatostatin receptor 1(SSTR1) was modeled and refined by means of homology modeling and molecular dynamics simulation.This model was assessed by Verify-3D and Vadar,which confirmed the reliability of the refined model.The interaction between the inhibitor cysteamine,somatostatin(SST) and SSTRI was investigated by a molecular docking program,Affinity.The binding module not only showed the crucial residues involved in the interaction,but also provided important information about the interaction between SSTR1 on the one hand and ligands on the other,which might be the significant evidence for the structure-based design.

  4. In silico binding analysis and SAR elucidations of newly designed benzopyrazine analogs as potent inhibitors of thymidine phosphorylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, Muhammad; Ismail, Nor Hadiani; Imran, Syahrul; Rahim, Fazal; Wadood, Abdul; Al Muqarrabun, Laode Muhammad Ramadhan; Khan, Khalid Mohammed; Ghufran, Mehreen; Ali, Muhammad

    2016-10-01

    Thymidine phosphorylase (TP) is up regulated in wide variety of solid tumors and therefore presents a remarkable target for drug discovery in cancer. A novel class of extremely potent TPase inhibitors based on benzopyrazine (1-28) has been developed and evaluated against thymidine phosphorylase enzyme. Out of these twenty-eight analogs eleven (11) compounds 1, 4, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 24 and 28 showed potent thymidine phosphorylase inhibitory potentials with IC50 values ranged between 3.20±0.30 and 37.60±1.15μM when compared with the standard 7-Deazaxanthine (IC50=38.68±4.42μM). Structure-activity relationship was established and molecular docking studies were performed to determine the binding interactions of these newly synthesized compounds. Current studies have revealed that these compounds established stronger hydrogen bonding networks with active site residues as compare to the standard compound 7DX.

  5. Interactions of human P-glycoprotein transport substrates and inhibitors at the drug binding domain: Functional and molecular docking analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadioglu, Onat; Saeed, Mohamed E M; Valoti, Massimo; Frosini, Maria; Sgaragli, Giampietro; Efferth, Thomas

    2016-03-15

    Rhodamine 123 (R123) transport substrate sensitizes P-glycoprotein (P-gp) to inhibition by compound 2c (cis-cis) N,N-bis(cyclohexanolamine)aryl ester isomer in a concentration-dependent manner in human MDR1-gene transfected mouse T-lymphoma L5178 cells as shown previously. By contrast, epirubicin (EPI) concentration changes left unaltered 2c IC50 values of EPI efflux. To clarify this discrepancy, defined molecular docking (DMD) analyses of 12 N,N-bis(cyclohexanolamine)aryl esters, the highly flexible aryl ester analog 4, and several P-gp substrate/non-substrate inhibitors were performed on human P-gp drug- or nucleotide-binding domains (DBD or NBD). DMD measurements yielded lowest binding energy (LBE, kcal/mol) values (mean ± SD) ranging from -11.8 ± 0.54 (valspodar) to -3.98 ± 0.01 (4). Lys234, Ser952 and Tyr953 residues formed H-bonds with most of the compounds. Only 2c docked also at ATP binding site (LBE value of -6.9 ± 0.30 kcal/mol). Inhibition of P-gp-mediated R123 efflux by 12 N,N-bis(cyclohexanolamine)aryl esters and 4 significantly correlated with LBE values. DMD analysis of EPI, (3)H-1EPI, (3)H-2EPI, (14)C-1EPI, (14)C-2EPI, R123 and 2c before and after previous docking of each of them indicated that pre-docking of either 2c or EPI significantly reduced LBE of both EPI and R123, and that of both (3)H-2EPI and (14)C-2EPI, respectively. Since the clusters of DBD amino acid residues interacting with EPI were different, if EPI docked alone or after pre-docking of EPI or 2c, the existence of alternative secondary binding site for EPI on P-gp is credible. In conclusion, 2c may allocate the drug-binding pocket and reduce strong binding of EPI and R123 in agreement with P-gp inhibition experiments, where 2c reduced efflux of EPI and R123.

  6. Characterization of binding and inhibitory properties of TAK-063, a novel phosphodiesterase 10A inhibitor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akina Harada

    Full Text Available Phosphodiesterase 10A (PDE10A inhibition is a novel and promising approach for the treatment of central nervous system disorders such as schizophrenia and Huntington's disease. A novel PDE10A inhibitor, TAK-063 [1-[2-fluoro-4-(1H-pyrazol-1-ylphenyl]-5-methoxy-3-(1-phenyl-1H-pyrazol-5-yl-pyridazin-4(1H-one] has shown high inhibitory activity and selectivity for human recombinant PDE10A2 in vitro; the half-maximal inhibitory concentration was 0.30 nM, and selectivity over other phosphodiesterases (PDEs was more than 15000-fold. TAK-063 at 10 µM did not show more than 50% inhibition or stimulation of 91 enzymes or receptors except for PDEs. In vitro autoradiography (ARG studies using rat brain sections revealed that [3H]TAK-063 selectively accumulated in the caudate putamen (CPu, nucleus accumbens (NAc, globus pallidus, substantia nigra, and striatonigral projection, where PDE10A is highly expressed. This [3H]TAK-063 accumulation was almost entirely blocked by an excess amount of MP-10, a PDE10A selective inhibitor, and the accumulation was not observed in brain slices of Pde10a-knockout mice. In rat brain sections, [3H]TAK-063 bound to a single high-affinity site with mean ± SEM dissociation constants of 7.2 ± 1.2 and 2.6 ± 0.5 nM for the CPu and NAc shell, respectively. Orally administered [14C]TAK-063 selectively accumulated in PDE10A expressing brain regions in an in vivo ARG study in rats. Striatal PDE10A occupancy by TAK-063 in vivo was measured using T-773 as a tracer and a dose of 0.88 mg/kg (p.o. was calculated to produce 50% occupancy in rats. Translational studies with TAK-063 and other PDE10A inhibitors such as those presented here will help us better understand the pharmacological profile of this class of potential central nervous system drugs.

  7. Structure-Based Design of a Novel SMYD3 Inhibitor that Bridges the SAM-and MEKK2-Binding Pockets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Aller, Glenn S; Graves, Alan P; Elkins, Patricia A; Bonnette, William G; McDevitt, Patrick J; Zappacosta, Francesca; Annan, Roland S; Dean, Tony W; Su, Dai-Shi; Carpenter, Christopher L; Mohammad, Helai P; Kruger, Ryan G

    2016-05-03

    SMYD3 is a lysine methyltransferase overexpressed in colorectal, breast, prostate, and hepatocellular tumors, and has been implicated as an oncogene in human malignancies. Methylation of MEKK2 by SMYD3 is important for regulation of the MEK/ERK pathway, suggesting the possibility of selectively targeting SMYD3 in RAS-driven cancers. Structural and kinetic characterization of SMYD3 was undertaken leading to a co-crystal structure of SMYD3 with a MEKK2-peptide substrate bound, and the observation that SMYD3 follows a partially processive mechanism. These insights allowed for the design of GSK2807, a potent and selective, SAM-competitive inhibitor of SMYD3 (Ki = 14 nM). A high-resolution crystal structure reveals that GSK2807 bridges the gap between the SAM-binding pocket and the substrate lysine tunnel of SMYD3. Taken together, our data demonstrate that small-molecule inhibitors of SMYD3 can be designed to prevent methylation of MEKK2 and these could have potential use as anticancer therapeutics.

  8. Rye inhibitors of animal alpha-amylases show different specificities, aggregative properties and IgE-binding capacities than their homologues from wheat and barley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Casado, G; Sánchez-Monge, R; López-Otín, C; Salcedo, G

    1994-09-01

    Three new members of the alpha-amylase/trypsin-inhibitor family of cereal endosperm have been isolated from rye. N-terminal amino acid sequence comparison revealed that two of the purified proteins were the rye homologues of the barley monomeric inhibitor (BMAI-1) previously described, while the other rye protein corresponded to one of the subunits of the barley and wheat heterotetrameric inhibitors. However, the inhibitory specificities (active against human salivary alpha-amylase), aggregative behaviours (mainly as dimeric forms) and IgE-binding capacities (not recognized by sera from allergic patients) of the rye inhibitors were clearly different from those of their wheat and barley counterparts. These results indicate that homologous inhibitors may have distinctive properties in different cereal species.

  9. N-acylhydrazone inhibitors of influenza virus PA endonuclease with versatile metal binding modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carcelli, Mauro; Rogolino, Dominga; Gatti, Anna; de Luca, Laura; Sechi, Mario; Kumar, Gyanendra; White, Stephen W.; Stevaert, Annelies; Naesens, Lieve

    2016-08-01

    Influenza virus PA endonuclease has recently emerged as an attractive target for the development of novel antiviral therapeutics. This is an enzyme with divalent metal ion(s) (Mg2+ or Mn2+) in its catalytic site: chelation of these metal cofactors is an attractive strategy to inhibit enzymatic activity. Here we report the activity of a series of N-acylhydrazones in an enzymatic assay with PA-Nter endonuclease, as well as in cell-based influenza vRNP reconstitution and virus yield assays. Several N-acylhydrazones were found to have promising anti-influenza activity in the low micromolar concentration range and good selectivity. Computational docking studies are carried on to investigate the key features that determine inhibition of the endonuclease enzyme by N-acylhydrazones. Moreover, we here describe the crystal structure of PA-Nter in complex with one of the most active inhibitors, revealing its interactions within the protein’s active site.

  10. Brain targeted transcranial route of drug delivery of diazepam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pathirana W

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The term transcranial route means the brain targeted transfer of drug molecules across the cranium through the layers of the skin and skin appendages of the head, arteries and veins of the skin of the head, the cranial bones along with the diploe, the cranial bone sutures, the meninges and specifically through the emissary veins. The administration of drugs through the scalp in ayurvedic system for the diseases associated with the brain was evaluated with a view to develop a novel targeted route for central nervous system drugs. It is expected to circumvent the systemic side effects of oral route. Diazepam was dissolved in an oil medium and applied on scalp as practiced in the ayurvedic system. Thirty rats were tested on the rotating rotarod for muscle relaxant effect of diazepam. Five groups of rats tested were the control, diazepam i.v. injected (280 µg/0.1 ml group, two groups treated with transcranial diazepam oil solution (1.5 mg/0.2 ml and the transcranial blank vehicle treated groups. Holding time in triplicate for each rat on the rotating rotarod was measured. The holding times following each treatment was statistically compared (one-way ANOVA. The pooled average times for the control, diazepam i.v. injected, diazepam oil solution transcranial treated two groups and the blank vehicle treated groups were 35.45, 4.73, 16.5, 15.39 and 33.23 seconds respectively. The two groups subjected to the brain targeted transcranial route showed a statistically significant decrease (50% drop in the holding time against the control group indicating the centrally acting muscle relaxant effect due to absorption of diazepam into the brain through the proposed route.

  11. Rational Design of Highly Potent and Slow-Binding Cytochrome bc1 Inhibitor as Fungicide by Computational Substitution Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Ge-Fei; Yang, Sheng-Gang; Huang, Wei; Wang, Le; Shen, Yan-Qing; Tu, Wen-Long; Li, Hui; Huang, Li-Shar; Wu, Jia-Wei; Berry, Edward A.; Yang, Guang-Fu

    2015-01-01

    Hit to lead (H2L) optimization is a key step for drug and agrochemical discovery. A critical challenge for H2L optimization is the low efficiency due to the lack of predictive method with high accuracy. We described a new computational method called Computational Substitution Optimization (CSO) that has allowed us to rapidly identify compounds with cytochrome bc1 complex inhibitory activity in the nanomolar and subnanomolar range. The comprehensively optimized candidate has proved to be a slow binding inhibitor of bc1 complex, ~73-fold more potent (Ki = 4.1 nM) than the best commercial fungicide azoxystrobin (AZ; Ki = 297.6 nM) and shows excellent in vivo fungicidal activity against downy mildew and powdery mildew disease. The excellent correlation between experimental and calculated binding free-energy shifts together with further crystallographic analysis confirmed the prediction accuracy of CSO method. To the best of our knowledge, CSO is a new computational approach to substitution-scanning mutagenesis of ligand and could be used as a general strategy of H2L optimisation in drug and agrochemical design.

  12. VP40 of the Ebola Virus as a Target for EboV Therapy: Comprehensive Conformational and Inhibitor Binding Landscape from Accelerated Molecular Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balmith, Marissa; Soliman, Mahmoud E S

    2017-03-01

    The first account of the dynamic features of the loop region of VP40 of the Ebola virus was studied using accelerated molecular dynamics simulations and reported herein. Among the proteins of the Ebola virus, the matrix protein (VP40) plays a significant role in the virus lifecycle thereby making it a promising therapeutic target. Of interest is the newly elucidated N-terminal domain loop region of VP40 comprising residues K127, T129, and N130 which when mutated to alanine have demonstrated an unrecognized role for N-terminal domain-plasma membrane interaction for efficient VP40-plasma membrane localization, oligomerization, matrix assembly, and egress. The molecular understanding of the conformational features of VP40 in complex with a known inhibitor still remains elusive. Using accelerated molecular dynamics approaches, we conducted a comparative study on VP40 apo and bound systems to understand the conformational features of VP40 at the molecular level and to determine the effect of inhibitor binding with the aid of a number of post-dynamic analytical tools. Significant features were seen in the presence of an inhibitor as per molecular mechanics/generalized born surface area binding free energy calculations. Results revealed that inhibitor binding to VP40 reduces the flexibility and mobility of the protein as supported by root mean square fluctuation and root mean square deviation calculations. The study revealed a characteristic "twisting" motion and coiling of the loop region of VP40 accompanied by conformational changes in the dimer interface upon inhibitor binding. We believe that results presented in this study will ultimately provide useful insight into the binding landscape of VP40 which could assist researchers in the discovery of potent Ebola virus inhibitors for anti-Ebola therapies.

  13. Differential effects of two chronic diazepam treatment regimes on withdrawal anxiety and AMPA receptor characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Claire; Pratt, Judith A

    2006-03-01

    Withdrawal from chronic benzodiazepines is associated with increased anxiety and seizure susceptibility. Neuroadaptive changes in neural activity occur in limbo-cortical structures although changes at the level of the GABA(A) receptor do not provide an adequate explanation for these functional changes. We have employed two diazepam treatment regimes known to produce differing effects on withdrawal aversion in the rat and examined whether withdrawal-induced anxiety was accompanied by changes in AMPA receptor characteristics. Rats were given 28 days treatment with diazepam by the intraperitoneal (i.p.) route (5 mg/kg) and the subcutaneous (s.c.) route (15 mg/kg). Withdrawal anxiety in the elevated plus maze was evident in the group withdrawn from chronic s.c. diazepam (relatively more stable plasma levels) but not from the chronic i.p. group (fluctuating daily plasma levels). In the brains of these rats, withdrawal anxiety was accompanied by increased [3H]Ro48 8587 binding in the hippocampus and thalamus, and decreased GluR1 and GluR2 subunit mRNA expression in the amygdala (GluR1 and GluR2) and cortex (GluR1). The pattern of changes was different in the chronic i.p. group where in contrast to the chronic s.c. group, there was reduced [3H]Ro48 8587 binding in the hippocampus and no alterations in GluR1 and GluR2 subunit expression in the amygdala. While both groups showed reduced GluR1 mRNA subunit expression in the cortex overall, only the agranular insular cortex exhibited marked reductions following chronic i.p. diazepam. Striatal GluR2 mRNA expression was increased in the i.p. group but not the s.c. group. Taken together, these data are consistent with differential neuroadaptive processes in AMPA receptor plasticity being important in withdrawal from chronic benzodiazepines. Moreover, these processes may differ both at a regional and receptor function level according to the behavioral manifestations of withdrawal.

  14. Conformational landscape of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase non-nucleoside inhibitor binding pocket: lessons for inhibitor design from a cluster analysis of many crystal structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paris, Kristina A; Haq, Omar; Felts, Anthony K; Das, Kalyan; Arnold, Eddy; Levy, Ronald M

    2009-10-22

    Clustering of 99 available X-ray crystal structures of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) at the flexible non-nucleoside inhibitor binding pocket (NNIBP) provides information about features of the conformational landscape for binding non-nucleoside inhibitors (NNRTIs), including effects of mutation and crystal forms. The ensemble of NNIBP conformations is separated into eight discrete clusters based primarily on the position of the functionally important primer grip, the displacement of which is believed to be one of the mechanisms of inhibition of RT. Two of these clusters are populated by structures in which the primer grip exhibits novel conformations that differ from the predominant cluster by over 4 A and are induced by the unique inhibitors capravirine and rilpivirine/TMC278. This work identifies a new conformation of the NNIBP that may be used to design NNRTIs. It can also be used to guide more complete exploration of the NNIBP free energy landscape using advanced sampling techniques.

  15. Thermodynamics of binding of a sulfonamide inhibitor to metal-mutated carbonic anhydrase as studied by affinity capillary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Yosuke; Hoshino, Hitoshi; Iki, Nobuhiko

    2015-09-01

    By affinity capillary electrophoresis (ACE), the thermodynamic binding constants of a sulfonamide (SA) inhibitor to bovine carbonic anhydrase II (CA) and metal mutated variants (M-CAs) were evaluated. 1-(4-Aminosulfonylphenylazo)-2-naphthol-6,8-disulfonate was used as the SA in the electrophoretic buffer for ACE. The Scatchard analysis of the dependence of the electrophoretic mobility of native CA on the SA concentration provided the binding constant to be Kb=(2.29±0.05)×10(6) M(-1) (at pH8.4, 25°C). On the other hand, apoCA showed far smaller value [Kb=(3.76±0.14)×10(2) M(-1)], suggesting that the coordination of SA to the Zn(II) center controlled the binding thermodynamics. The ACE of M-CAs showed the same behaviors as native CA but with different Kb values. For example, Co-CA adopting the same tetrahedral coordination geometry as native CA exhibited the largest Kb value [(2.55±0.05)×10(6) M(-1)] among the M-CAs. In contrast, Mn- and Ni-CA, which adopted the octahedral coordination geometry, had Kb values that were about two orders of magnitude lower. Because the hydrophobic cavity of CA around the active center pre-organized the orientation of SA, thereby fixing the ligating NH(-) moiety to the apex of the tetrahedron supported by three basal His3 of CA, metals such as Zn and Co at the center of M-CA gave the most stable CA-SA complex. However, pre-organization was not favored for octahedral geometry. Thus, pre-organization of SA was the key to facilitating the tetrahedral coordination geometry of the Zn(II) active center of CA.

  16. Crystal structures and inhibitor binding properties of plant class V chitinases: the cycad enzyme exhibits unique structural and functional features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umemoto, Naoyuki; Kanda, Yuka; Ohnuma, Takayuki; Osawa, Takuo; Numata, Tomoyuki; Sakuda, Shohei; Taira, Toki; Fukamizo, Tamo

    2015-04-01

    A class V (glycoside hydrolase family 18) chitinase from the cycad Cycas revoluta (CrChiA) is a plant chitinase that has been reported to possess efficient transglycosylation (TG) activity. We solved the crystal structure of CrChiA, and compared it with those of class V chitinases from Nicotiana tabacum (NtChiV) and Arabidopsis thaliana (AtChiC), which do not efficiently catalyze the TG reaction. All three chitinases had a similar (α/β)8 barrel fold with an (α + β) insertion domain. In the acceptor binding site (+1, +2 and +3) of CrChiA, the Trp168 side chain was found to stack face-to-face with the +3 sugar. However, this interaction was not found in the identical regions of NtChiV and AtChiC. In the DxDxE motif, which is essential for catalysis, the carboxyl group of the middle Asp (Asp117) was always oriented toward the catalytic acid Glu119 in CrChiA, whereas the corresponding Asp in NtChiV and AtChiC was oriented toward the first Asp. These structural features of CrChiA appear to be responsible for the efficient TG activity. When binding of the inhibitor allosamidin was evaluated using isothermal titration calorimetry, the changes in binding free energy of the three chitinases were found to be similar to each other, i.e. between -9.5 and -9.8 kcal mol(-1) . However, solvation and conformational entropy changes in CrChiA were markedly different from those in NtChiV and AtChiC, but similar to those of chitinase A from Serratia marcescens (SmChiA), which also exhibits significant TG activity. These results provide insight into the molecular mechanism underlying the TG reaction and the molecular evolution from bacterial chitinases to plant class V chitinases.

  17. Central and peripheral benzodiazepine receptors in rat brain and platelets: effects of treatment with diazepam and clobazam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkin, J G; Thompson, G G; Scobie, G; Brodie, M J

    1992-09-01

    Tolerance to the effects of benzodiazepines (BZ) may be mediated by changes in benzodiazepine receptors (BZRs). Peripheral BZRs (in brain and platelets) and central BZRs (in brain) were measured in rats following intraperitoneal administration of diazepam and clobazam each for 4 and 12 days. BZRs were measured by binding assays using [3H] PK 11195 (peripheral) and [3H] flunitrazepam (central) as radioligands. Diazepam, but not clobazam, increased peripheral BZR numbers in platelets (both P < 0.005), but not in brain, after 4 and 12 days' treatment compared with appropriate controls. Neither drug altered central BZR affinities or numbers in rat brain. BZ effects on peripheral BZRs in platelets cannot be extrapolated to predict changes in brain receptors, either peripheral or central.

  18. COMPARATIVE EFFECTS OF DIAZEPAM INFUSION AND DIVIDED DOSES OF DIAZEPAM ON THE TREATMENT OF ABSENCE STATUS EPILEPTICUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Afshar khas

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveAbsence status epilepticus (ASE is a common form of nonconvulsive status epilepcticus. It is characterized by loss of consciousness with spike and wave discharges in EEG simultaneously. The most effective treatment of ASE is diazepam, either infusion or in divided doses; the former is more expensive since patients must be admitted in an Intensive Care Unit. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the efficacy of diazepam infusion and parenteral diazepam in divided doses in the treatment of ASE.Materials & MethodsThis randomized controlled clinical trial, enrolled 20 patients with absence status epilepticus. Diagnosis was made based on the clinical manifestations and electroencephalogram (EEG. Prior to treatment, all patients underwent EEG and imaging. Patients were randomized to receive 0.2 mg/kg/h diazepam infusion or 0.2 mg/kg in six daily doses. Clinical and EEG improvements were considered to be optimal responses.ResultsOf the 20 patients studied, 13 (65% were boys and the remaining 7(35% were girls. There were no differences between the two groups regarding age and sex (non-significant. Following treatments after 48 hours, 1 week and 1 month respectively, clinical improvement in previous problems (loss of consciousness, ataxia, behavior and speech problems and EEGs was similar in both groups (p=1. There were controlled seizures in 18 (90%, abnormal CT scans in 5 (25%, abnormal EEGs after treatments in 6 (30% cases; however no significant differences were seen between the two groups.ConclusionThis study demonstrates that there are no significant differences between treatments of ASE with diazepam infusion and parenteral diazepam in divided doses. Treatment of ASE, with divided doses of diazepam is easier, less expensive and patients do not require to be hospitalized in an Intensive Care unit.

  19. Feline hepatic biotransformation of diazepam: Differences between cats and dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Beusekom, Cyrina D; van den Heuvel, Jeroen J M W; Koenderink, Jan B; Russel, Frans G M; Schrickx, Johannes A

    2015-12-01

    In contrast to humans and dogs, diazepam has been reported to induce severe hepatic side effects in cats, particularly after repeated dosing. With the aim to elucidate the mechanisms underlying this apparent sensitivity of cats to drug-induced liver injury, in a series of in vitro experiments, the feline-specific biotransformation of diazepam was studied with liver microsomes obtained from cats and dogs and the possible inhibition of the bile salt export pump (Bsep) was measured in isolated membrane vesicles overexpressing feline and canine Bsep. In line with previous in vivo studies, the phase I metabolites nordiazepam, temazepam and oxazepam were measurable in microsomal incubations, although enzyme velocity of demethylases and hydroxylases differed significantly between cats and dogs. In cats, the main metabolite was temazepam, which also could be glucuronidated. In contrast to dogs, no other glucuronidated metabolites could be observed. In addition, in the membrane vesicles an inhibition of the transport of the Bsep substrate taurocholic acid could be observed in the presence of diazepam and its metabolites. It was concluded that both mechanisms, the slow biotransformation of diazepam as well the inhibition of the bile acid efflux that results in an accumulation of bile acids in the hepatocytes, seem to contribute to the liver injury observed in cats following repetitive treatment with diazepam. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. A comparative study of diazepam levels in bone marrow versus serum, saliva and brain tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takatori, T; Tomii, S; Terazawa, K; Nagao, M; Kanamori, M; Tomaru, Y

    1991-01-01

    The distribution of diazepam in biological fluids and tissues of rats was examined 1, 2, 4 and 8 h after intraperitoneal administration by using a radioimmunoassay with specific anti-diazepam antibody. The diazepam levels in serum, saliva, brain and bone marrow decreased over a period of 2 h and levelled off 4 h after administration. The diazepam concentration in bone marrow was much higher than in serum, saliva and brain, suggesting an accumulation of diazepam in this tissue. This indicates that bone marrow could be a very useful material for the detection of diazepam in skeletonized remains. The diazepam concentrations in bone marrow, serum, saliva and brain showed a linear relationship (r = 0.860-0.997), indicating that a valid estimate of diazepam concentration in blood can be made from bone marrow samples.

  1. PEROXISOME PROLIFERATOR-ACTIVATED RECEPTORα (PPARα) AGONISTS DIFFERENTIALLY REGULATE INHIBITOR OF DNA BINDING (ID2) EXPRESSION IN RODENTS AND HUMAN CELLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract Inhibitor of DNA binding (Id2) is a member of the helix-loop-helix (HLH) transcription factor family whose members play important roles in cell differentiation and proliferation. Id2 has been linked to the development of cardiovascular diseases since thiazolidinediones,...

  2. Strength of hydrogen bond network takes crucial roles in the dissociation process of inhibitors from the HIV-1 protease binding pocket.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dechang Li

    Full Text Available To understand the underlying mechanisms of significant differences in dissociation rate constant among different inhibitors for HIV-1 protease, we performed steered molecular dynamics (SMD simulations to analyze the entire dissociation processes of inhibitors from the binding pocket of protease at atomistic details. We found that the strength of hydrogen bond network between inhibitor and the protease takes crucial roles in the dissociation process. We showed that the hydrogen bond network in the cyclic urea inhibitors AHA001/XK263 is less stable than that of the approved inhibitor ABT538 because of their large differences in the structures of the networks. In the cyclic urea inhibitor bound complex, the hydrogen bonds often distribute at the flap tips and the active site. In contrast, there are additional accessorial hydrogen bonds formed at the lateral sides of the flaps and the active site in the ABT538 bound complex, which take crucial roles in stabilizing the hydrogen bond network. In addition, the water molecule W301 also plays important roles in stabilizing the hydrogen bond network through its flexible movement by acting as a collision buffer and helping the rebinding of hydrogen bonds at the flap tips. Because of its high stability, the hydrogen bond network of ABT538 complex can work together with the hydrophobic clusters to resist the dissociation, resulting in much lower dissociation rate constant than those of cyclic urea inhibitor complexes. This study may provide useful guidelines for design of novel potent inhibitors with optimized interactions.

  3. Strength of hydrogen bond network takes crucial roles in the dissociation process of inhibitors from the HIV-1 protease binding pocket.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dechang; Ji, Baohua; Hwang, Keh-Chih; Huang, Yonggang

    2011-01-01

    To understand the underlying mechanisms of significant differences in dissociation rate constant among different inhibitors for HIV-1 protease, we performed steered molecular dynamics (SMD) simulations to analyze the entire dissociation processes of inhibitors from the binding pocket of protease at atomistic details. We found that the strength of hydrogen bond network between inhibitor and the protease takes crucial roles in the dissociation process. We showed that the hydrogen bond network in the cyclic urea inhibitors AHA001/XK263 is less stable than that of the approved inhibitor ABT538 because of their large differences in the structures of the networks. In the cyclic urea inhibitor bound complex, the hydrogen bonds often distribute at the flap tips and the active site. In contrast, there are additional accessorial hydrogen bonds formed at the lateral sides of the flaps and the active site in the ABT538 bound complex, which take crucial roles in stabilizing the hydrogen bond network. In addition, the water molecule W301 also plays important roles in stabilizing the hydrogen bond network through its flexible movement by acting as a collision buffer and helping the rebinding of hydrogen bonds at the flap tips. Because of its high stability, the hydrogen bond network of ABT538 complex can work together with the hydrophobic clusters to resist the dissociation, resulting in much lower dissociation rate constant than those of cyclic urea inhibitor complexes. This study may provide useful guidelines for design of novel potent inhibitors with optimized interactions.

  4. Energetics of dendrimer binding to HIV-1 gp120-CD4 complex and mechanismic aspects of its role as an entry-inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saurabh, Suman; Sahoo, Anil Kumar; Maiti, Prabal K.

    2016-10-01

    Experiments and computational studies have established that de-protonated dendrimers (SPL7013 and PAMAM) act as entry-inhibitors of HIV. SPL7013 based Vivagel is currently under clinical development. The dendrimer binds to gp120 in the gp120-CD4 complex, destabilizes it by breaking key contacts between gp120 and CD4 and prevents viral entry into target cells. In this work, we provide molecular details and energetics of the formation of the SPL7013-gp120-CD4 ternary complex and decipher modes of action of the dendrimer in preventing viral entry. It is also known from experiments that the dendrimer binds weakly to gp120 that is not bound to CD4. It binds even more weakly to the CD4-binding region of gp120 and thus cannot directly block gp120-CD4 complexation. In this work, we examine the feasibility of dendrimer binding to the gp120-binding region of CD4 and directly blocking gp120-CD4 complex formation. We find that the process of the dendrimer binding to CD4 can compete with gp120-CD4 binding due to comparable free energy change for the two processes, thus creating a possibility for the dendrimer to directly block gp120-CD4 complexation by binding to the gp120-binding region of CD4.

  5. Hemolytic and antimalarial effects of tight-binding glyoxalase 1 inhibitors on the host-parasite unit of erythrocytes infected with Plasmodium falciparum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cletus A. Wezena

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Glyoxalases prevent the formation of advanced glycation end products by converting glycolysis-derived methylglyoxal to d-lactate with the help of glutathione. Vander Jagt and colleagues previously showed that erythrocytes release about thirty times more d-lactate after infection with the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. Functional glyoxalases in the host-parasite unit might therefore be crucial for parasite survival. Here, we determined the antimalarial and hemolytic activity of two tight-binding glyoxalase inhibitors using infected and uninfected erythrocytes. In addition, we synthesized and analyzed a set of diester derivates of both tight-binding inhibitors resulting in up to threefold lower IC50 values and an altered methemoglobin formation and hemolytic activity depending on the type of ester. Inhibitor treatments of uninfected erythrocytes revealed an extremely slow inactivation of the host cell glyoxalase, irrespective of inhibitor modifications, and a potential dispensability of the host cell enzyme for parasite survival. Our study highlights the benefits and drawbacks of different esterifications of glutathione-derived inhibitors and demonstrates the suitability of glyoxalase inhibitors as a tool for deciphering the relevance and mode of action of different glyoxalase systems in a host-parasite unit.

  6. Using docking and alchemical free energy approach to determine the binding mechanism of eEF2K inhibitors and prioritizing the compound synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiantao; Edupuganti, Ramakrishna; Tavares, Clint D J; Dalby, Kevin N; Ren, Pengyu

    2015-01-01

    A-484954 is a known eEF2K inhibitor with submicromolar IC50 potency. However, the binding mechanism and the crystal structure of the kinase remains unknown. Here, we employ a homology eEF2K model, docking and alchemical free energy simulations to probe the binding mechanism of eEF2K, and in turn, guide the optimization of potential lead compounds. The inhibitor was docked into the ATP-binding site of a homology model first. Three different binding poses, hypothesis 1, 2, and 3, were obtained and subsequently applied to molecular dynamics (MD) based alchemical free energy simulations. The calculated relative binding free energy of the analogs of A-484954 using the binding pose of hypothesis 1 show a good correlation with the experimental IC50 values, yielding an r (2) coefficient of 0.96 after removing an outlier (compound 5). Calculations using another two poses show little correlation with experimental data, (r (2) of less than 0.5 with or without removing any outliers). Based on hypothesis 1, the calculated relative free energy suggests that bigger cyclic groups, at R1 e.g., cyclobutyl and cyclopentyl promote more favorable binding than smaller groups, such as cyclopropyl and hydrogen. Moreover, this study also demonstrates the ability of the alchemical free energy approach in combination with docking and homology modeling to prioritize compound synthesis. This can be an effective means of facilitating structure-based drug design when crystal structures are not available.

  7. Curcumin binds in silico to anti-cancer drug target enzyme MMP-3 (human stromelysin-1) with affinity comparable to two known inhibitors of the enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerah, Ahmed; Hobani, Yahya; Kumar, B Vinod; Bidwai, Anil

    2015-01-01

    In silico interaction of curcumin with the enzyme MMP-3 (human stromelysin-1) was studied by molecular docking using AutoDock 4.2 as the docking software application. AutoDock 4.2 software serves as a valid and acceptable docking application to study the interactions of small compounds with proteins. Interactions of curcumin with MMP-3 were compared to those of two known inhibitors of the enzyme, PBSA and MPPT. The calculated free energy of binding (ΔG binding) shows that curcumin binds with affinity comparable to or better than the two known inhibitors. Binding interactions of curcumin with active site residues of the enzyme are also predicted. Curcumin appears to bind in an extendended conformation making extensive VDW contacts in the active site of the enzyme. Hydrogen bonding and pi-pi interactions with key active site residues is also observed. Thus, curcumin can be considered as a good lead compound in the development of new inhibitors of MMP-3 which is a potential target of anticancer drugs. The results of these studies can serve as a starting point for further computational and experimental studies.

  8. Effects of clorazepate, diazepam, lorazepam, and placebo on human memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healey, M; Pickens, R; Meisch, R; McKenna, T

    1983-12-01

    Healthy adults (N = 10) were given oral doses of lorazepam (1 and 2 mg), diazepam (5 and 10 mg), clorazepate (7.5 and 15 mg), or placebo and tested 30, 60, 90, and 120 minutes later on a word-recall memory task. All subjects received each drug dose once and placebo twice in randomized order at weekly intervals. Testing was double-blind. Lorazepam was found to have a significantly greater effect on memory than placebo. Diazepam and clorazepate did not differ significantly from placebo in their effect on word recall. High doses of lorazepam produced more pronounced memory effects than did low doses; neither diazepam nor clorazepate was found to exert a dose-related effect on memory.

  9. Characterization of Promiscuous Binding of Phosphor Ligands to Breast-Cancer-Gene 1 (BRCA1) C-Terminal (BRCT): Molecular Dynamics, Free Energy, Entropy and Inhibitor Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Wanli; Huang, Yu-Ming M; Kizhake, Smitha; Natarajan, Amarnath; Chang, Chia-En A

    2016-08-01

    Inhibition of the protein-protein interaction (PPI) mediated by breast-cancer-gene 1 C-terminal (BRCT) is an attractive strategy to sensitize breast and ovarian cancers to chemotherapeutic agents that induce DNA damage. Such inhibitors could also be used for studies to understand the role of this PPI in DNA damage response. However, design of BRCT inhibitors is challenging because of the inherent flexibility associated with this domain. Several studies identified short phosphopeptides as tight BRCT binders. Here we investigated the thermodynamic properties of 18 phosphopeptides or peptide with phosphate mimic and three compounds with phosphate groups binding to BRCT to understand promiscuous molecular recognition and guide inhibitor design. We performed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate the interactions between inhibitors and BRCT and their dynamic behavior in the free and bound states. MD simulations revealed the key role of loops in altering the shape and size of the binding site to fit various ligands. The mining minima (M2) method was used for calculating binding free energy to explore the driving forces and the fine balance between configuration entropy loss and enthalpy gain. We designed a rigidified ligand, which showed unfavorable experimental binding affinity due to weakened enthalpy. This was because it lacked the ability to rearrange itself upon binding. Investigation of another phosphate group containing compound, C1, suggested that the entropy loss can be reduced by preventing significant narrowing of the energy well and introducing multiple new compound conformations in the bound states. From our computations, we designed an analog of C1 that introduced new intermolecular interactions to strengthen attractions while maintaining small entropic penalty. This study shows that flexible compounds do not always encounter larger entropy penalty, compared with other more rigid binders, and highlights a new strategy for inhibitor design.

  10. Stress-induced changes in histaminergic system: effects of diazepam and amitriptyline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghi, P; Ferretti, C; Blengio, M; Portaleone, P

    1995-05-01

    The involvement of the histaminergic system in the regulation of weak stress was studied in rats. The parameters examined were the brain receptors and corticosterone (CS) plasma levels. The benzodiazepine diazepam [(2 mg/kg intraperitoneally (IP)] influenced neither foot-shock-induced changes in CS levels nor [3H]-histamine [(3H)-HA] binding site constants, whereas the tricyclic antidepressive amitriptyline (10 mg/kg IP) partially counteracted a plasma CS increase and prevented changes in [3H]-HA binding in the stressed rat brain. These observations are in agreement with the known activities of amitriptyline on monoaminergic metabolism and receptors. Moreover, these data provide further experimental evidence of the functional role of the central histaminergic system in organized stress response.

  11. Cardanol-derived AChE inhibitors: Towards the development of dual binding derivatives for Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemes, Laís Flávia Nunes; de Andrade Ramos, Giselle; de Oliveira, Andressa Souza; da Silva, Fernanda Motta R; de Castro Couto, Gina; da Silva Boni, Marina; Guimarães, Marcos Jorge R; Souza, Isis Nem O; Bartolini, Manuela; Andrisano, Vincenza; do Nascimento Nogueira, Patrícia Coelho; Silveira, Edilberto Rocha; Brand, Guilherme D; Soukup, Ondřej; Korábečný, Jan; Romeiro, Nelilma C; Castro, Newton G; Bolognesi, Maria Laura; Romeiro, Luiz Antonio Soares

    2016-01-27

    Cardanol is a phenolic lipid component of cashew nut shell liquid (CNSL), obtained as the byproduct of cashew nut food processing. Being a waste product, it has attracted much attention as a precursor for the production of high-value chemicals, including drugs. On the basis of these findings and in connection with our previous studies on cardanol derivatives as acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors, we designed a novel series of analogues by including a protonable amino moiety belonging to different systems. Properly addressed docking studies suggested that the proposed structural modifications would allow the new molecules to interact with both the catalytic active site (CAS) and the peripheral anionic site (PAS) of AChE, thus being able to act as dual binding inhibitors. To disclose whether the new molecules showed the desired profile, they were first tested for their cholinesterase inhibitory activity towards EeAChE and eqBuChE. Compound 26, bearing an N-ethyl-N-(2-methoxybenzyl)amine moiety, showed the highest inhibitory activity against EeAChE, with a promising IC50 of 6.6 μM, and a similar inhibition profile of the human isoform (IC50 = 5.7 μM). As another positive feature, most of the derivatives did not show appreciable toxicity against HT-29 cells, up to a concentration of 100 μM, which indicates drug-conform behavior. Also, compound 26 is capable of crossing the blood-brain barrier (BBB), as predicted by a PAMPA-BBB assay. Collectively, the data suggest that the approach to obtain potential anti-Alzheimer drugs from CNSL is worth of further pursuit and development.

  12. 1,1-Difluoroethyl-substituted triazolothienopyrimidines as inhibitors of a human urea transport protein (UT-B): new analogs and binding model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y; Esteva-Font, C; Yao, C; Phuan, P W; Verkman, A S; Anderson, M O

    2013-06-01

    The kidney urea transport protein UT-B is an attractive target for the development of small-molecule inhibitors with a novel diuretic ('urearetic') action. Previously, two compounds in the triazolothienopyrimidine scaffold (1a and 1c) were reported as UT-B inhibitors. Compound 1c incorporates a 1,1-difluoroethyl group, which affords improved microsomal stability when compared to the corresponding ethyl-substituted compound 1a. Here, a small focused library (4a-4f) was developed around lead inhibitor 1c to investigate the requirement of an amidine-linked thiophene in the inhibitor scaffold. Two compounds (4a and 4b) with nanomolar inhibitory potency (IC50≈40 nM) were synthesized. Computational docking of lead structure 1c and 4a-4f into a homology model of the UT-B cytoplasmic surface suggested binding with the core heterocycle buried deep into the hydrophobic pore region of the protein.

  13. CLOBAZAM SINGLE OR DIVIDED DOSE AGAINST DIAZEPAM IN ANXIETY NEUROSIS

    OpenAIRE

    1986-01-01

    SUMMARY One-hundred-and-fifteen patients diagnosed as anxiety neurotics randomly received in a double blind study 20 mg clobazam (Frisium) as a single nightly dose (37 patients) or 10 mg b.d. (38 patients) or diazepam 5 mg b.d. (40 patients) for six weeks, followed by two weeks on placebo. Both the single and divided doses of clobazam were therapeutically equivalent to diazepam. After drug withdrawal, all three treatment groups continued to improve. Patients on clobazam showed better motor pe...

  14. Phenobarbital versus diazepam for delirium tremens--a retrospective study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjermø, Ida; Anderson, John Erik; Fink-Jensen, Anders;

    2010-01-01

    Delirium tremens (DT) is a severe and potentially fatal condition that may occur during withdrawal from chronic alcohol intoxication. The purpose of the present study was to compare the effects and the rates of complications of phenobarbital and diazepam treatment in DT.......Delirium tremens (DT) is a severe and potentially fatal condition that may occur during withdrawal from chronic alcohol intoxication. The purpose of the present study was to compare the effects and the rates of complications of phenobarbital and diazepam treatment in DT....

  15. Small-Molecule Fusion Inhibitors Bind the pH-Sensing Stable Signal Peptide-GP2 Subunit Interface of the Lassa Virus Envelope Glycoprotein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, Sundaresh; Whitby, Landon R.; Casquilho-Gray, Hedi E.; York, Joanne; Boger, Dale L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Arenavirus species are responsible for severe life-threatening hemorrhagic fevers in western Africa and South America. Without effective antiviral therapies or vaccines, these viruses pose serious public health and biodefense concerns. Chemically distinct small-molecule inhibitors of arenavirus entry have recently been identified and shown to act on the arenavirus envelope glycoprotein (GPC) to prevent membrane fusion. In the tripartite GPC complex, pH-dependent membrane fusion is triggered through a poorly understood interaction between the stable signal peptide (SSP) and the transmembrane fusion subunit GP2, and our genetic studies have suggested that these small-molecule inhibitors act at this interface to antagonize fusion activation. Here, we have designed and synthesized photoaffinity derivatives of the 4-acyl-1,6-dialkylpiperazin-2-one class of fusion inhibitors and demonstrate specific labeling of both the SSP and GP2 subunits in a native-like Lassa virus (LASV) GPC trimer expressed in insect cells. Photoaddition is competed by the parental inhibitor and other chemically distinct compounds active against LASV, but not those specific to New World arenaviruses. These studies provide direct physical evidence that these inhibitors bind at the SSP-GP2 interface. We also find that GPC containing the uncleaved GP1-GP2 precursor is not susceptible to photo-cross-linking, suggesting that proteolytic maturation is accompanied by conformational changes at this site. Detailed mapping of residues modified by the photoaffinity adducts may provide insight to guide the further development of these promising lead compounds as potential therapeutic agents to treat Lassa hemorrhagic fever. IMPORTANCE Hemorrhagic fever arenaviruses cause lethal infections in humans and, in the absence of licensed vaccines or specific antiviral therapies, are recognized to pose significant threats to public health and biodefense. Lead small-molecule inhibitors that target the

  16. Identification of inhibitors that target dual-specificity phosphatase 5 provide new insights into the binding requirements for the two phosphate pockets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Terrence S; Span, Elise A; Kalous, Kelsey S; Bongard, Robert; Gastonguay, Adam; Lepley, Michael A; Kutty, Raman G; Nayak, Jaladhi; Bohl, Chris; Lange, Rachel G; Sarker, Majher I; Talipov, Marat R; Rathore, Rajendra; Ramchandran, Ramani; Sem, Daniel S

    2015-08-19

    Dual-specificity phosphatase-5 (DUSP5) plays a central role in vascular development and disease. We present a p-nitrophenol phosphate (pNPP) based enzymatic assay to screen for inhibitors of the phosphatase domain of DUSP5. pNPP is a mimic of the phosphorylated tyrosine on the ERK2 substrate (pERK2) and binds the DUSP5 phosphatase domain with a Km of 7.6 ± 0.4 mM. Docking followed by inhibitor verification using the pNPP assay identified a series of polysulfonated aromatic inhibitors that occupy the DUSP5 active site in the region that is likely occupied by the dual-phosphorylated ERK2 substrate tripeptide (pThr-Glu-pTyr). Secondary assays were performed with full length DUSP5 with ERK2 as substrate. The most potent inhibitor has a naphthalene trisulfonate (NTS) core. A search for similar compounds in a drug database identified suramin, a dimerized form of NTS. While suramin appears to be a potent and competitive inhibitor (25 ± 5 μM), binding to the DUSP5 phosphatase domain more tightly than the monomeric ligands of which it is comprised, it also aggregates. Further ligand-based screening, based on a pharmacophore derived from the 7 Å separation of sulfonates on inhibitors and on sulfates present in the DUSP5 crystal structure, identified a disulfonated and phenolic naphthalene inhibitor (CSD (3) _2320) with IC₅₀ of 33 μM that is similar to NTS and does not aggregate. The new DUSP5 inhibitors we identify in this study typically have sulfonates 7 Å apart, likely positioning them where the two phosphates of the substrate peptide (pThr-Glu-pTyr) bind, with one inhibitor also positioning a phenolic hydroxyl where the water nucleophile may reside. Polysulfonated aromatic compounds do not commonly appear in drugs and have a tendency to aggregate. One FDA-approved polysulfonated drug, suramin, inhibits DUSP5 and also aggregates. Docking and modeling studies presented herein identify polysulfonated aromatic inhibitors that do not aggregate, and provide

  17. Binding mode analyses and pharmacophore model development for stilbene derivatives as a novel and competitive class of α-glucosidase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yuno; Kim, Songmi; Kim, Jun Young; Arooj, Mahreen; Kim, Siu; Hwang, Swan; Kim, Byeong-Woo; Park, Ki Hun; Lee, Keun Woo

    2014-01-01

    Stilbene urea derivatives as a novel and competitive class of non-glycosidic α-glucosidase inhibitors are effective for the treatment of type II diabetes and obesity. The main purposes of our molecular modeling study are to explore the most suitable binding poses of stilbene derivatives with analyzing the binding affinity differences and finally to develop a pharmacophore model which would represents critical features responsible for α-glucosidase inhibitory activity. Three-dimensional structure of S. cerevisiae α-glucosidase was built by homology modeling method and the structure was used for the molecular docking study to find out the initial binding mode of compound 12, which is the most highly active one. The initial structure was subjected to molecular dynamics (MD) simulations for protein structure adjustment at compound 12-bound state. Based on the adjusted conformation, the more reasonable binding modes of the stilbene urea derivatives were obtained from molecular docking and MD simulations. The binding mode of the derivatives was validated by correlation analysis between experimental Ki value and interaction energy. Our results revealed that the binding modes of the potent inhibitors were engaged with important hydrogen bond, hydrophobic, and π-interactions. With the validated compound 12-bound structure obtained from combining approach of docking and MD simulation, a proper four featured pharmacophore model was generated. It was also validated by comparison of fit values with the Ki values. Thus, these results will be helpful for understanding the relationship between binding mode and bioactivity and for designing better inhibitors from stilbene derivatives.

  18. Computational analysis of BACE1-ligand complex crystal structures and linear discriminant analysis for identification of BACE1 inhibitors with anti P-glycoprotein binding property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoharan, Prabu; Chennoju, Kiranmai; Ghoshal, Nanda

    2017-01-12

    More than 100 years of research on Alzheimer's disease didn't yield a potential cure for this dreadful disease. Poor Blood Brain Barrier (BBB) permeability and P-glycoprotein binding of BACE1 inhibitors are the major causes for the failure of these molecules during clinical trials. The design of BACE1 inhibitors with a balance of sufficient affinity to the binding site and little or no interaction with P-glycoproteins is indispensable. Identification and understanding of protein-ligand interactions are essential for ligand optimization process. Structure-based drug design (SBDD) efforts led to a steady accumulation of BACE1-ligand crystal complexes in the PDB. This study focuses on analyses of 153 BACE1-ligand complexes for the direct contacts (hydrogen bonds and weak interactions) observed between protein and ligand and indirect contacts (water-mediated hydrogen bonds), observed in BACE1-ligand complex crystal structures. Intraligand hydrogen bonds were analyzed, with focus on ligand P-glycoprotein efflux. The interactions are dissected specific to subsites in the active site and discussed. The observed protein-ligand and intraligand interactions were used to develop the linear discriminant model for the identification of BACE1 inhibitors with less or no P-glycoprotein binding property. Excellent statistical results and model's ability to correctly predict a new data-set with an accuracy of 92% is achieved. The results are retrospectively analyzed to give input for the design of potential BACE1 inhibitors.

  19. Febrifugine analogues as Leishmania donovani trypanothione reductase inhibitors: binding energy analysis assisted by molecular docking, ADMET and molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Rajan Kumar; Kumbhar, Bajarang Vasant; Srivastava, Shubham; Malik, Ruchi; Sundar, Shyam; Kunwar, Ambarish; Prajapati, Vijay Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis affects people from 70 countries worldwide, mostly from Indian, African and south American continent. The increasing resistance to antimonial, miltefosine and frequent toxicity of amphotericin B drives an urgent need to develop an antileishmanial drug with excellent efficacy and safety profile. In this study we have docked series of febrifugine analogues (n = 8813) against trypanothione reductase in three sequential docking modes. Extra precision docking resulted into 108 ligands showing better docking score as compared to two reference ligand. Furthermore, 108 febrifugine analogues and reference inhibitor clomipramine were subjected to ADMET, QikProp and molecular mechanics, the generalized born model and solvent accessibility study to ensure the toxicity caused by compounds and binding-free energy, respectively. Two best ligands (FFG7 and FFG2) qualifying above screening parameters were further subjected to molecular dynamics simulation. Conducting these studies, here we confirmed that 6-chloro-3-[3-(3-hydroxy-2-piperidyl)-2-oxo-propyl]-7-(4-pyridyl) quinazolin-4-one can be potential drug candidate to fight against Leishmania donovani parasites.

  20. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptorα Agonists Differentially Regulate Inhibitor of DNA Binding Expression in Rodents and Human Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María del Carmen González

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Inhibitor of DNA binding (Id2 is a helix-loop-helix (HLH transcription factor that participates in cell differentiation and proliferation. Id2 has been linked to the development of cardiovascular diseases since thiazolidinediones, antidiabetic agents and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR gamma agonists, have been reported to diminish Id2 expression in human cells. We hypothesized that PPARα activators may also alter Id2 expression. Fenofibrate diminished hepatic Id2 expression in both late pregnant and unmated rats. In 24 hour fasted rats, Id2 expression was decreased under conditions known to activate PPARα. In order to determine whether the fibrate effects were mediated by PPARα, wild-type mice and PPARα-null mice were treated with Wy-14,643 (WY. WY reduced Id2 expression in wild-type mice without an effect in PPARα-null mice. In contrast, fenofibrate induced Id2 expression after 24 hours of treatment in human hepatocarcinoma cells (HepG2. MK-886, a PPARα antagonist, did not block fenofibrate-induced activation of Id2 expression, suggesting a PPARα-independent effect was involved. These findings confirm that Id2 is a gene responsive to PPARα agonists. Like other genes (apolipoprotein A-I, apolipoprotein A-V, the opposite directional transcriptional effect in rodents and a human cell line further emphasizes that PPARα agonists have different effects in rodents and humans.

  1. Contribution of Inhibitor of DNA Binding/Differentiation-3 and Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals to Pathophysiological Aspects of Chronic Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Avecilla

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The overwhelming increase in the global incidence of obesity and its associated complications such as insulin resistance, atherosclerosis, pulmonary disease, and degenerative disorders including dementia constitutes a serious public health problem. The Inhibitor of DNA Binding/Differentiation-3 (ID3, a member of the ID family of transcriptional regulators, has been shown to play a role in adipogenesis and therefore ID3 may influence obesity and metabolic health in response to environmental factors. This review will highlight the current understanding of how ID3 may contribute to complex chronic diseases via metabolic perturbations. Based on the increasing number of reports that suggest chronic exposure to and accumulation of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs within the human body are associated with metabolic disorders, we will also consider the impact of these chemicals on ID3. Improved understanding of the ID3 pathways by which exposure to EDCs can potentiate complex chronic diseases in populations with metabolic disorders (obesity, metabolic syndrome, and glucose intolerance will likely provide useful knowledge in the prevention and control of complex chronic diseases associated with exposure to environmental pollutants.

  2. Hypomethylation of DNA-binding inhibitor 4 serves as a potential biomarker in distinguishing acquired tamoxifen-refractory breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yonghui; Zhang, Bin; Fang, Jing; Cao, Xuchen

    2015-01-01

    To explore the methylation status of DNA-binding inhibitor 4 (ID4) in tamoxifen-refractory (TR) breast cancer. From January 2012 to December 2014, breast cancer patients managed by radical mastectomy previously and receiving tamoxifen treatment for at least 12 months were enrolled. According to the response to tamoxifen, patients were divided into TR group and tamoxifen-sensitive (TS) group. Genomic DNA was isolated from fasting venous blood, and methylight technique was applied to determine the methylation status of ID4. 43 patients with TS breast cancer and 31 patients with TR breast cancer were enrolled. No significant difference between groups was observed in term of patients' characteristics, such as age (P=0.693), progesterone receptor (P=0.970), menopausal status (P=0.784) and histological type (P=0.537), while the stage of cancer in TR group was significantly higher than TS group (Pset at 6.8% in survival analysis, log-rank test indicated the risk of disease progression was comparable between patients with ID4 hypermethylation or hypomethylation (P=0.287). ID4 hypomethylation is present in TR breast cancer, and it may serve as a potential biomarker in distinguishing TR breast cancer. However, the results need further validation in larger studies.

  3. Acquired resistance to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors in cancer cells is mediated by loss of IGF-binding proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guix, Marta; Faber, Anthony C.; Wang, Shizhen Emily; Olivares, Maria Graciela; Song, Youngchul; Qu, Sherman; Rinehart, Cammie; Seidel, Brenda; Yee, Douglas; Arteaga, Carlos L.; Engelman, Jeffrey A.

    2008-01-01

    Although some cancers are initially sensitive to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), resistance invariably develops. We investigated mechanisms of acquired resistance to the EGFR TKI gefitinib by generating gefitinib-resistant (GR) A431 squamous cancer cells. In GR cells, gefitinib reduced phosphorylation of EGFR, ErbB-3, and Erk but not Akt. These cells also showed hyperphosphorylation of the IGFI receptor (IGFIR) and constitutive association of IRS-1 with PI3K. Inhibition of IGFIR signaling disrupted the association of IRS-1 with PI3K and restored the ability of gefitinib to downregulate PI3K/Akt signaling and to inhibit GR cell growth. Gene expression analyses revealed that GR cells exhibited markedly reduced IGF-binding protein 3 (IGFBP-3) and IGFBP-4 RNA. Addition of recombinant IGFBP-3 restored the ability of gefitinib to downregulate PI3K/Akt signaling and to inhibit cell growth. Finally, gefitinib treatment of mice with A431 xenografts in combination with an IGFIR-specific monoclonal antibody prevented tumor recurrence, whereas each drug given alone was unable to do so. These data suggest that loss of expression of IGFBPs in tumor cells treated with EGFR TKIs derepresses IGFIR signaling, which in turn mediates resistance to EGFR antagonists. Moreover, combined therapeutic inhibition of EGFR and IGFIR may abrogate this acquired mechanism of drug resistance and is thus worthy of prospective clinical investigation. PMID:18568074

  4. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptorα agonists differentially regulate inhibitor of DNA binding expression in rodents and human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, María Del Carmen; Corton, J Christopher; Acero, Nuria; Muñoz-Mingarro, Dolores; Quirós, Yolanda; Alvarez-Millán, Juan José; Herrera, Emilio; Bocos, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Inhibitor of DNA binding (Id2) is a helix-loop-helix (HLH) transcription factor that participates in cell differentiation and proliferation. Id2 has been linked to the development of cardiovascular diseases since thiazolidinediones, antidiabetic agents and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) gamma agonists, have been reported to diminish Id2 expression in human cells. We hypothesized that PPARα activators may also alter Id2 expression. Fenofibrate diminished hepatic Id2 expression in both late pregnant and unmated rats. In 24 hour fasted rats, Id2 expression was decreased under conditions known to activate PPARα. In order to determine whether the fibrate effects were mediated by PPARα, wild-type mice and PPARα-null mice were treated with Wy-14,643 (WY). WY reduced Id2 expression in wild-type mice without an effect in PPARα-null mice. In contrast, fenofibrate induced Id2 expression after 24 hours of treatment in human hepatocarcinoma cells (HepG2). MK-886, a PPARα antagonist, did not block fenofibrate-induced activation of Id2 expression, suggesting a PPARα-independent effect was involved. These findings confirm that Id2 is a gene responsive to PPARα agonists. Like other genes (apolipoprotein A-I, apolipoprotein A-V), the opposite directional transcriptional effect in rodents and a human cell line further emphasizes that PPARα agonists have different effects in rodents and humans.

  5. Computational Studies of a Mechanism for Binding and Drug Resistance in the Wild Type and Four Mutations of HIV-1 Protease with a GRL-0519 Inhibitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guodong Hu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Drug resistance of mutations in HIV-1 protease (PR is the most severe challenge to the long-term efficacy of HIV-1 PR inhibitor in highly active antiretroviral therapy. To elucidate the molecular mechanism of drug resistance associated with mutations (D30N, I50V, I54M, and V82A and inhibitor (GRL-0519 complexes, we have performed five molecular dynamics (MD simulations and calculated the binding free energies using the molecular mechanics Poisson–Boltzmann surface area (MM-PBSA method. The ranking of calculated binding free energies is in accordance with the experimental data. The free energy spectra of each residue and inhibitor interaction for all complexes show a similar binding model. Analysis based on the MD trajectories and contribution of each residues show that groups R2 and R3 mainly contribute van der Waals energies, while groups R1 and R4 contribute electrostatic interaction by hydrogen bonds. The drug resistance of D30N can be attributed to the decline in binding affinity of residues 28 and 29. The size of Val50 is smaller than Ile50 causes the residue to move, especially in chain A. The stable hydrophobic core, including the side chain of Ile54 in the wild type (WT complex, became unstable in I54M because the side chain of Met54 is flexible with two alternative conformations. The binding affinity of Ala82 in V82A decreases relative to Val82 in WT. The present study could provide important guidance for the design of a potent new drug resisting the mutation inhibitors.

  6. Sex differences in diazepam effects and parvalbumin-positive GABA neurons in trait anxiety Long Evans rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravenelle, Rebecca; Neugebauer, Nichole M; Niedzielak, Timothy; Donaldson, S Tiffany

    2014-08-15

    In clinical populations, prevalence rates for a number of anxiety disorders differ between males and females and gonadal hormones are thought to contribute to these differences. While these hormones have been shown to modulate the anxiolytic effects of the benzodiazepine agonist diazepam in some models, findings are inconsistent. Here, we tested for sex differences in response to anxiogenic stimuli following a 30-min diazepam (1.0mg/kg) pre-treatment in male and female rats showing high (HAn) and low (LAn) anxiety-like behavior on the elevated plus maze. Acute diazepam administration resulted in decreased anxiety-like behavior only in HAn males as demonstrated by a significant increase in percent open arm time in the elevated plus maze (EPM). Immunohistochemical analysis for parvalbumin (PV; a calcium-binding protein that selectively stains GABAergic neurons) in central amygdala (CeA), caudate putamen (CPu) and the hippocampus indicated the number of GABAergic interneurons in these areas differed across sex and anxiety trait. In the CPu, females had significantly more PV-immunoreactive (IR) cells than males, and LAn females had greater PV-IR neurons than HAn females. In the CeA, males displayed an increased number of PV-IR neurons compared to females, with no differences found between LAn and HAn. Further, trait differences were evident in the CA2 region of the hippocampus, regardless of sex. Taken together, these data suggest that gonadal hormones and trait anxiety may influence the sensitivity to the anti-anxiety effects of diazepam and these differences may be due in part to the distribution of GABA-containing interneurons.

  7. Kinome-wide Selectivity Profiling of ATP-competitive Mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) Inhibitors and Characterization of Their Binding Kinetics*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qingsong; Kirubakaran, Sivapriya; Hur, Wooyoung; Niepel, Mario; Westover, Kenneth; Thoreen, Carson C.; Wang, Jinhua; Ni, Jing; Patricelli, Matthew P.; Vogel, Kurt; Riddle, Steve; Waller, David L.; Traynor, Ryan; Sanda, Takaomi; Zhao, Zheng; Kang, Seong A.; Zhao, Jean; Look, A. Thomas; Sorger, Peter K.; Sabatini, David M.; Gray, Nathanael S.

    2012-01-01

    An intensive recent effort to develop ATP-competitive mTOR inhibitors has resulted in several potent and selective molecules such as Torin1, PP242, KU63794, and WYE354. These inhibitors are being widely used as pharmacological probes of mTOR-dependent biology. To determine the potency and specificity of these agents, we have undertaken a systematic kinome-wide effort to profile their selectivity and potency using chemical proteomics and assays for enzymatic activity, protein binding, and disruption of cellular signaling. Enzymatic and cellular assays revealed that all four compounds are potent inhibitors of mTORC1 and mTORC2, with Torin1 exhibiting ∼20-fold greater potency for inhibition of Thr-389 phosphorylation on S6 kinases (EC50 = 2 nm) relative to other inhibitors. In vitro biochemical profiling at 10 μm revealed binding of PP242 to numerous kinases, although WYE354 and KU63794 bound only to p38 kinases and PI3K isoforms and Torin1 to ataxia telangiectasia mutated, ATM and Rad3-related protein, and DNA-PK. Analysis of these protein targets in cellular assays did not reveal any off-target activities for Torin1, WYE354, and KU63794 at concentrations below 1 μm but did show that PP242 efficiently inhibited the RET receptor (EC50, 42 nm) and JAK1/2/3 kinases (EC50, 780 nm). In addition, Torin1 displayed unusually slow kinetics for inhibition of the mTORC1/2 complex, a property likely to contribute to the pharmacology of this inhibitor. Our results demonstrated that, with the exception of PP242, available ATP-competitive compounds are highly selective mTOR inhibitors when applied to cells at concentrations below 1 μm and that the compounds may represent a starting point for medicinal chemistry efforts aimed at developing inhibitors of other PI3K kinase-related kinases. PMID:22223645

  8. Global slowing of network oscillations in mouse neocortex by diazepam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheffzük, Claudia; Kukushka, Valeriy I; Vyssotski, Alexei L; Draguhn, Andreas; Tort, Adriano B L; Brankačk, Jurij

    2013-02-01

    Benzodiazepines have a broad spectrum of clinical applications including sedation, anti-anxiety, and anticonvulsive therapy. At the cellular level, benzodiazepines are allosteric modulators of GABA(A) receptors; they increase the efficacy of inhibition in neuronal networks by prolonging the duration of inhibitory postsynaptic potentials. This mechanism of action predicts that benzodiazepines reduce the frequency of inhibition-driven network oscillations, consistent with observations from human and animal EEG. However, most of existing data are restricted to frequency bands below ∼30 Hz. Recent data suggest that faster cortical network rhythms are critically involved in several behavioral and cognitive tasks. We therefore analyzed diazepam effects on a large range of cortical network oscillations in freely moving mice, including theta (4-12 Hz), gamma (40-100 Hz) and fast gamma (120-160 Hz) oscillations. We also investigated diazepam effects over the coupling between theta phase and the amplitude fast oscillations. We report that diazepam causes a global slowing of oscillatory activity in all frequency domains. Oscillation power was changed differently for each frequency domain, with characteristic differences between active wakefulness, slow-wave sleep and REM sleep. Cross-frequency coupling strength, in contrast, was mostly unaffected by diazepam. Such state- and frequency-dependent actions of benzodiazepines on cortical network oscillations may be relevant for their specific cognitive effects. They also underline the strong interaction between local network oscillations and global brain states.

  9. Intranasal midazolam vs rectal diazepam in acute childhood seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Madhumita; Kalra, Veena; Gulati, Sheffali

    2006-05-01

    One hundred eighty-eight seizure episodes in 46 children were randomly assigned to receive treatment with rectal diazepam and intranasal midazolam with doses of 0.3 mg/kg body weight and 0.2 mg/kg body weight, respectively. Efficacy of the drugs was assessed by drug administration time and seizure cessation time. Heart rate, blood pressure, respiratory rate, and oxygen saturation were measured before and after 5, 10, and 30 minutes following administration of the drugs in both groups. Mean time from arrival of doctor to drug administration was 68.3 +/- 55.12 seconds in the diazepam group and 50.6 +/- 14.1 seconds in the midazolam group (P = 0.002). Mean time from drug administration to cessation of seizure was significantly less in the midazolam group than the diazepam group (P = 0.005). Mean heart rate and blood pressure did not vary significantly between the two drug groups. However, mean respiratory rate and oxygen saturation differed significantly between the two drug groups at 5, 10, and 30 minutes after drug administration. Intranasal midazolam is preferable to rectal diazepam in the treatment of acute seizures in children. Its administration is easy, it has rapid onset of action, has no significant effect on respiration and oxygen saturation, and is socially acceptable.

  10. Feline hepatic biotransformation of diazepam: Differences between cats and dogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beusekom, Cyrina D; van den Heuvel, Jeroen J M W; Russel, Frans G M; Schrickx, Johannes A

    2015-01-01

    In contrast to humans and dogs, diazepam has been reported to induce severe hepatic side effects in cats, particularly after repeated dosing. With the aim to elucidate the mechanisms underlying this apparent sensitivity of cats to drug-induced liver injury, in a series of in vitro experiments, the

  11. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies of diazepam, temazepam and ceftriaxone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahman, N.A.M.

    1988-01-01

    Diazepam is a widely used drug in the management of anxiety and convulsion. Young, mature and senescent male Fischer 344 rats were injected with 180 {mu}g/kg body weight of {sup 14}C-diazepam and the brain levels of the drug and its active metabolites were determined by HPLC and reverse isotope dilution techniques. During the two hours after injection, the areas under the brain level-time curves (AUCs) of diazepam, N-desmethyldiazepam and temazepam were greater in senescent rats than in mature and young rats. Temazepam, an active metabolite of diazepam, is used as a hypnotic. Brain exposure to the behaviorally active dose of temazepam during the initial two hours after its iv administration was studied in young, mature and senescent rats. Similar brain levels in young and old rats indicated the possible existence of a level in brain above which temazepam impaired passive-avoidance acquisition. Ceftriaxone is a new cephalosporin antibiotic with a relatively long half-life. In male Sprague-Dawley rats, ethanol administration did not affect the pharmacokinetic parameters of ceftriaxone.

  12. Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry Reveals Specific Changes in the Local Flexibility of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor 1 upon Binding to the Somatomedin B Domain of Vitronectin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trelle, Morten Beck; Hirschberg, Daniel; Jansson, Anna

    2012-01-01

    and increases the thermal stability of the protein dramatically. We have used hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry to assess the inherent structural flexibility of PAI-1 and to monitor the changes induced by SMB binding. Our data show that the PAI-1 core consisting of β-sheet B is rather protected......The native fold of plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) represents an active metastable conformation that spontaneously converts to an inactive latent form. Binding of the somatomedin B domain (SMB) of the endogenous cofactor vitronectin to PAI-1 delays the transition to the latent state...... against exchange with the solvent, while the remainder of the molecule is more dynamic. SMB binding causes a pronounced and widespread stabilization of PAI-1 that is not confined to the binding interface with SMB. We further explored the local structural flexibility in a mutationally stabilized PAI-1...

  13. Trp[superscript 2313]-His[superscript 2315] of Factor VIII C2 Domain Is Involved in Membrane Binding Structure of a Complex Between the C[subscript 2] Domain and an Inhibitor of Membrane Binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Zhuo; Lin, Lin; Yuan, Cai; Nicolaes, Gerry A.F.; Chen, Liqing; Meehan, Edward J.; Furie, Bruce; Furie, Barbara; Huang, Mingdong (Harvard-Med); (UAH); (Maastricht); (Chinese Aca. Sci.)

    2010-11-03

    Factor VIII (FVIII) plays a critical role in blood coagulation by forming the tenase complex with factor IXa and calcium ions on a membrane surface containing negatively charged phospholipids. The tenase complex activates factor X during blood coagulation. The carboxyl-terminal C2 domain of FVIII is the main membrane-binding and von Willebrand factor-binding region of the protein. Mutations of FVIII cause hemophilia A, whereas elevation of FVIII activity is a risk factor for thromboembolic diseases. The C2 domain-membrane interaction has been proposed as a target of intervention for regulation of blood coagulation. A number of molecules that interrupt FVIII or factor V (FV) binding to cell membranes have been identified through high throughput screening or structure-based design. We report crystal structures of the FVIII C2 domain under three new crystallization conditions, and a high resolution (1.15 {angstrom}) crystal structure of the FVIII C2 domain bound to a small molecular inhibitor. The latter structure shows that the inhibitor binds to the surface of an exposed {beta}-strand of the C2 domain, Trp{sup 2313}-His{sup 2315}. This result indicates that the Trp{sup 2313}-His{sup 2315} segment is an important constituent of the membrane-binding motif and provides a model to understand the molecular mechanism of the C2 domain membrane interaction.

  14. Discovery of inhibitors of aberrant gene transcription from Libraries of DNA binding molecules: inhibition of LEF-1-mediated gene transcription and oncogenic transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stover, James S; Shi, Jin; Jin, Wei; Vogt, Peter K; Boger, Dale L

    2009-03-11

    The screening of a >9000 compound library of synthetic DNA binding molecules for selective binding to the consensus sequence of the transcription factor LEF-1 followed by assessment of the candidate compounds in a series of assays that characterized functional activity (disruption of DNA-LEF-1 binding) at the intended target and site (inhibition of intracellular LEF-1-mediated gene transcription) resulting in a desired phenotypic cellular change (inhibit LEF-1-driven cell transformation) provided two lead compounds: lefmycin-1 and lefmycin-2. The sequence of screens defining the approach assures that activity in the final functional assay may be directly related to the inhibition of gene transcription and DNA binding properties of the identified molecules. Central to the implementation of this generalized approach to the discovery of DNA binding small molecule inhibitors of gene transcription was (1) the use of a technically nondemanding fluorescent intercalator displacement (FID) assay for initial assessment of the DNA binding affinity and selectivity of a library of compounds for any sequence of interest, and (2) the technology used to prepare a sufficiently large library of DNA binding compounds.

  15. Interactions outside the proteinase-binding loop contribute significantly to the inhibition of activated coagulation factor XII by its canonical inhibitor from corn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korneeva, Vera A; Trubetskov, Mikhail M; Korshunova, Alena V; Lushchekina, Sofya V; Kolyadko, Vladimir N; Sergienko, Olga V; Lunin, Vladimir G; Panteleev, Mikhail A; Ataullakhanov, Fazoil I

    2014-05-16

    Activated factor XII (FXIIa) is selectively inhibited by corn Hageman factor inhibitor (CHFI) among other plasma proteases. CHFI is considered a canonical serine protease inhibitor that interacts with FXIIa through its protease-binding loop. Here we examined whether the protease-binding loop alone is sufficient for the selective inhibition of serine proteases or whether other regions of a canonical inhibitor are involved. Six CHFI mutants lacking different N- and C-terminal portions were generated. CHFI-234, which lacks the first and fifth disulfide bonds and 11 and 19 amino acid residues at the N and C termini, respectively, exhibited no significant changes in FXIIa inhibition (Ki = 3.2 ± 0.4 nm). CHFI-123, which lacks 34 amino acid residues at the C terminus and the fourth and fifth disulfide bridges, inhibited FXIIa with a Ki of 116 ± 16 nm. To exclude interactions outside the FXIIa active site, a synthetic cyclic peptide was tested. The peptide contained residues 20-45 (Protein Data Bank code 1BEA), and a C29D substitution was included to avoid unwanted disulfide bond formation between unpaired cysteines. Surprisingly, the isolated protease-binding loop failed to inhibit FXIIa but retained partial inhibition of trypsin (Ki = 11.7 ± 1.2 μm) and activated factor XI (Ki = 94 ± 11 μm). Full-length CHFI inhibited trypsin with a Ki of 1.3 ± 0.2 nm and activated factor XI with a Ki of 5.4 ± 0.2 μm. Our results suggest that the protease-binding loop is not sufficient for the interaction between FXIIa and CHFI; other regions of the inhibitor also contribute to specific inhibition.

  16. Anorectic activities of serotonin uptake inhibitors: correlation with their potencies at inhibiting serotonin uptake in vivo and /sup 3/H-mazindol binding in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angel, I.; Taranger, M.A.; Claustre, Y.; Scatton, B.; Langer, S.Z.

    1988-01-01

    The mechanism of anorectic action of several serotonin uptake inhibitors was investigated by comparing their anorectic potencies with several biochemical and pharmacological properties and in reference to the novel compound SL 81.0385. The anorectic effect of the potent serotonin uptake inhibitor SL 81.0385 was potentiated by pretreatment with 5-hydroxytryptophan and blocked by the serotonin receptor antagonist metergoline. A good correlation was obtained between the ED/sub 50/ values of anorectic action and the ED/sub 50/ values of serotonin uptake inhibition in vivo (but not in vitro) for several specific serotonin uptake inhibitors. Most of the drugs tested displaced (/sup 3/H)-mazindol from its binding to the anorectic recognition site in the hypothalamus, except the pro-drug zimelidine which was inactive. Excluding zimelidine, a good correlation was obtained between the affinities of these drugs for (/sup 3/H)-mazindol binding and their anorectic action indicating that their anorectic activity may be associated with an effect mediated through this site. Taken together these results suggest that the anorectic action of serotonin uptake inhibitors is directly associated to their ability to inhibit serotonin uptake and thus increasing the synaptic levels of serotonin. The interactions of these drugs with the anorectic recognition site labelled with (/sup 3/H)-mazindol is discussed in connection with the serotonergic regulation of carbohydrate intake.

  17. Discovery of a Small-Molecule Inhibitor of Protein-MicroRNA Interaction Using Binding Assay with a Site-Specifically Labeled Lin28.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Donghyun; Byun, Wan Gi; Koo, Ja Young; Park, Hankum; Park, Seung Bum

    2016-10-07

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate gene expression by targeting protein-coding transcripts that are involved in various cellular processes. Thus, miRNA biogenesis has been recognized as a novel therapeutic target. Especially, the let-7 miRNA family is well-known for its tumor suppressor functions and is downregulated in many cancer cells. Lin28 protein binds to let-7 miRNA precursors to inhibit their maturation. Herein, we developed a FRET-based, high-throughput screening system to identify small-molecule inhibitors of the Lin28-let-7 interaction. We employed unnatural amino acid mutagenesis and bioorthogonal chemistry for the site-specific fluorescent labeling of Lin28, which ensures the robustness and reliability of the FRET-based protein-miRNA binding assay. Using this direct binding assay, we identified an inhibitor of the oncogenic Lin28-let-7 interaction. The inhibitor enhanced the production of let-7 miRNAs in Lin28-expressing cancer cells and reduced the level of let-7 target oncogene products.

  18. High-throughput screening for small-molecule inhibitors of LARG-stimulated RhoA nucleotide binding via a novel fluorescence polarization assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evelyn, Chris R; Ferng, Timothy; Rojas, Rafael J; Larsen, Martha J; Sondek, John; Neubig, Richard R

    2009-02-01

    Guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) stimulate guanine nucleotide exchange and the subsequent activation of Rho-family proteins in response to extracellular stimuli acting upon cytokine, tyrosine kinase, adhesion, integrin, and G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Upon Rho activation, several downstream events occur, such as morphological and cytoskeletal changes, motility, growth, survival, and gene transcription. The leukemia-associated RhoGEF (LARG) is a member of the regulators of G-protein signaling homology domain (RH) family of GEFs originally identified as a result of chromosomal translocation in acute myeloid leukemia. Using a novel fluorescence polarization guanine nucleotide-binding assay using BODIPY-Texas Red-GTPgammaS (BODIPY-TR-GTPgammaS), the authors performed a 10,000-compound high-throughput screen for inhibitors of LARG-stimulated RhoA nucleotide binding. Five compounds identified from the high-throughput screen were confirmed in a nonfluorescent radioactive guanine nucleotide-binding assay measuring LARG-stimulated [( 35)S] GTPgammaS binding to RhoA, thus ruling out nonspecific fluorescent effects. All 5 compounds selectively inhibited LARG-stimulated RhoA [( 35)S] GTPgammaS binding but had little to no effect on RhoA or Galpha( o) [(35)S] GTPgammaS binding. Therefore, these 5 compounds should serve as promising starting points for the development of small-molecule inhibitors of LARG-mediated nucleotide exchange as both pharmacological tools and therapeutics. In addition, the fluorescence polarization guanine nucleotide-binding assay described here should serve as a useful approach for both high-throughput screening and general biological applications.

  19. STRUCTURAL AND FUNCTIONAL ASPECTS OF ACYL-COENZYME A BINDING PROTEINS (ACBPs: A COMPREHENSIVE REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richa Arya

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available ACBP was originally identified as a mammalian diazepam binding inhibitor – a neuropeptide that has the ability to inhibit diazepam binding to the �-aminobutyric acid (GABA receptor (Guidotti et al., 1983. Typically, ACBPs are small (~10 kDa cytosolic proteins (Burton et al., 2005. However, a number of hybrid ACBPs are reported that are fused with ankyrin repeats, such as ACBP1 and ACBP2 in Arabidopsis thaliana (Chye et al., 1999; Li and Chye, 2003. Other functional domains, such as the human peroxisomal �3/ �2-enoyl-CoA isomerase (Geisbrecht et al., 1999, or any non-functional/ uncharacterized domain are also cited. ACBP predominantly functions as an intracellular acyl-CoA transporter and pool former, and is critical to lipid metabolism in cells (Gossett et al., 1996; Knudsen et al., 2000; Schroeder et al., 1998. Impaired lipid metabolism and other cellular functions in humans arising out of ACBP defects thus need to be explored. ACBP has only been reported in eukaryotes, not in prokaryotes, except for a few pathogenic eubacteria that might have acquired ACBP from eukaryotic hosts via lateral gene transfer (Burton et al., 2005. Whole genome sequences of several prokaryotes and pathogens being available currently, it is worthwhile to extend search for ACBPs beyond eukaryotes as well, to explore their potential as drug targets, given their essential role in lipid metabolism. As a prelude to such investigations, the current review summarizes available knowledge of ACBPs and outlines the scope of future research.

  20. Structural analysis of ARC-type inhibitor (ARC-1034) binding to protein kinase A catalytic subunit and rational design of bisubstrate analogue inhibitors of basophilic protein kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavogina, Darja; Lust, Marje; Viil, Indrek; König, Norbert; Raidaru, Gerda; Rogozina, Jevgenia; Enkvist, Erki; Uri, Asko; Bossemeyer, Dirk

    2009-01-22

    The crystal structure of a complex of the catalytic subunit (type alpha) of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA C alpha) with ARC-type inhibitor (ARC-1034), the presumed lead scaffold of previously reported adenosine-oligo-arginine conjugate-based (ARC-type) inhibitors, was solved. Structural elements important for interaction with the kinase were established with specifically modified derivatives of the lead compound. On the basis of this knowledge, a new generation of inhibitors, conjugates of adenosine-4'-dehydroxymethyl-4'-carboxylic acid moiety and oligo(D-arginine), was developed with inhibitory constants well into the subnanomolar range. The structural determinants of selectivity of the new compounds were established in assays with ROCK-II and PKBgamma.

  1. Diazepam pharmacokinetics after nasal drop and atomized nasal administration in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musulin, S E; Mariani, C L; Papich, M G

    2011-02-01

    The standard of care for emergency therapy of seizures in veterinary patients is intravenous (i.v.) administration of benzodiazepines, although rectal administration of diazepam is often recommended for out-of-hospital situations, or when i.v. access has not been established. However, both of these routes have potential limitations. This study investigated the pharmacokinetics of diazepam following i.v., intranasal (i.n.) drop and atomized nasal administration in dogs. Six dogs were administered diazepam (0.5 mg/kg) via all three routes following a randomized block design. Plasma samples were collected and concentrations of diazepam and its active metabolites, oxazepam and desmethyldiazepam were quantified with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Mean diazepam concentrations >300 ng/mL were reached within 5 min in both i.n. groups. Diazepam was converted into its metabolites within 5 and 10 min, respectively, after i.v. and i.n. administration. The half lives of the metabolites were longer than that of the parent drug after both routes of administration. The bioavailability of diazepam after i.n. drop and atomized nasal administration was 42% and 41%, respectively. These values exceed previously published bioavailability data for rectal administration of diazepam in dogs. This study confirms that i.n. administration of diazepam yields rapid anticonvulsant concentrations of diazepam in the dog before a hepatic first-pass effect.

  2. Acquisition of complement inhibitor serine protease factor I and its cofactors C4b-binding protein and factor H by Prevotella intermedia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Malm

    Full Text Available Infection with the Gram-negative pathogen Prevotella intermedia gives rise to periodontitis and a growing number of studies implies an association of P. intermedia with rheumatoid arthritis. The serine protease Factor I (FI is the central inhibitor of complement degrading complement components C3b and C4b in the presence of cofactors such as C4b-binding protein (C4BP and Factor H (FH. Yet, the significance of complement inhibitor acquisition in P. intermedia infection and FI binding by Gram-negative pathogens has not been addressed. Here we show that P. intermedia isolates bound purified FI as well as FI directly from heat-inactivated human serum. FI bound to bacteria retained its serine protease activity as shown in degradation experiments with (125I-labeled C4b. Since FI requires cofactors for its activity we also investigated the binding of purified cofactors C4BP and FH and found acquisition of both proteins, which retained their activity in FI mediated degradation of C3b and C4b. We propose that FI binding by P. intermedia represents a new mechanism contributing to complement evasion by a Gram-negative bacterial pathogen associated with chronic diseases.

  3. Analysis of binding properties and specificity through identification of the interface forming residues (IFR for serine proteases in silico docked to different inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    da Silveira Carlos H

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Enzymes belonging to the same super family of proteins in general operate on variety of substrates and are inhibited by wide selection of inhibitors. In this work our main objective was to expand the scope of studies that consider only the catalytic and binding pocket amino acids while analyzing enzyme specificity and instead, include a wider category which we have named the Interface Forming Residues (IFR. We were motivated to identify those amino acids with decreased accessibility to solvent after docking of different types of inhibitors to sub classes of serine proteases and then create a table (matrix of all amino acid positions at the interface as well as their respective occupancies. Our goal is to establish a platform for analysis of the relationship between IFR characteristics and binding properties/specificity for bi-molecular complexes. Results We propose a novel method for describing binding properties and delineating serine proteases specificity by compiling an exhaustive table of interface forming residues (IFR for serine proteases and their inhibitors. Currently, the Protein Data Bank (PDB does not contain all the data that our analysis would require. Therefore, an in silico approach was designed for building corresponding complexes The IFRs are obtained by "rigid body docking" among 70 structurally aligned, sequence wise non-redundant, serine protease structures with 3 inhibitors: bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI, ecotine and ovomucoid third domain inhibitor. The table (matrix of all amino acid positions at the interface and their respective occupancy is created. We also developed a new computational protocol for predicting IFRs for those complexes which were not deciphered experimentally so far, achieving accuracy of at least 0.97. Conclusions The serine proteases interfaces prefer polar (including glycine residues (with some exceptions. Charged residues were found to be uniquely prevalent at the

  4. Analysis of binding properties and specificity through identification of the interface forming residues (IFR) for serine proteases in silico docked to different inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Cristina; Togawa, Roberto C; Neshich, Izabella A P; Mazoni, Ivan; Mancini, Adauto L; Minardi, Raquel C de Melo; da Silveira, Carlos H; Jardine, José G; Santoro, Marcelo M; Neshich, Goran

    2010-10-20

    Enzymes belonging to the same super family of proteins in general operate on variety of substrates and are inhibited by wide selection of inhibitors. In this work our main objective was to expand the scope of studies that consider only the catalytic and binding pocket amino acids while analyzing enzyme specificity and instead, include a wider category which we have named the Interface Forming Residues (IFR). We were motivated to identify those amino acids with decreased accessibility to solvent after docking of different types of inhibitors to sub classes of serine proteases and then create a table (matrix) of all amino acid positions at the interface as well as their respective occupancies. Our goal is to establish a platform for analysis of the relationship between IFR characteristics and binding properties/specificity for bi-molecular complexes. We propose a novel method for describing binding properties and delineating serine proteases specificity by compiling an exhaustive table of interface forming residues (IFR) for serine proteases and their inhibitors. Currently, the Protein Data Bank (PDB) does not contain all the data that our analysis would require. Therefore, an in silico approach was designed for building corresponding complexes. The IFRs are obtained by "rigid body docking" among 70 structurally aligned, sequence wise non-redundant, serine protease structures with 3 inhibitors: bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI), ecotine and ovomucoid third domain inhibitor. The table (matrix) of all amino acid positions at the interface and their respective occupancy is created. We also developed a new computational protocol for predicting IFRs for those complexes which were not deciphered experimentally so far, achieving accuracy of at least 0.97. The serine proteases interfaces prefer polar (including glycine) residues (with some exceptions). Charged residues were found to be uniquely prevalent at the interfaces between the "miscellaneous-virus" subfamily

  5. 2-(4-Carbonylphenyl)benzoxazole inhibitors of CETP: attenuation of hERG binding and improved HDLc-raising efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweis, Ramzi F; Hunt, Julianne A; Sinclair, Peter J; Chen, Ying; Eveland, Suzanne S; Guo, Qiu; Hyland, Sheryl A; Milot, Denise P; Cumiskey, Anne-Marie; Latham, Melanie; Rosa, Raymond; Peterson, Larry; Sparrow, Carl P; Anderson, Matt S

    2011-05-01

    The development of 2-phenylbenzoxazoles as inhibitors of cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) is described. Efforts focused on finding suitable replacements for the central piperidine with the aim of reducing hERG binding: a main liability of our benchmark benzoxazole (1a). Replacement of the piperidine with a cyclohexyl group successfully attenuated hERG binding, but was accompanied by reduced in vivo efficacy. The approach of substituting a piperidine moiety with an oxazolidinone also attenuated hERG binding. Further refinement of this latter scaffold via SAR at the pyridine terminus and methyl branching on the oxazolidinone led to compounds 7e and 7f, which raised HDLc by 33 and 27mg/dl, respectively, in our transgenic mouse PD model and without the hERG liability of previous series.

  6. Hypnosis versus diazepam for embryo transfer: a randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catoire, Patrick; Delaunay, Laurent; Dannappel, Thomas; Baracchini, Dominique; Marcadet-Fredet, Sabine; Moreau, Olivier; Pacaud, Luc; Przyrowski, Daniel; Marret, Emmanuel

    2013-04-01

    Levitas et al. (2006) showed in a cohort study that hypnosis during embryo transfer (ET) increased pregnancy ratio by 76%. In order to evaluate hypnosis during ET in a general population, the authors performed a randomized prospective controlled study comparing diazepam (usual premedication) administered before ET plus muscle relaxation versus hypnosis plus placebo in 94 patients. Additionally, the authors studied anxiety pre and post ET. Anxiety scores were not different in the two groups before and after ET. No difference in pregnancy and birth ratio was found in the two groups. Hypnosis during ET is as effective as diazepam in terms of pregnancy ratio and anxiolytic effects, but with fewer side effects and should be routinely available.

  7. βCCT, an antagonist selective for α(1)GABA(A) receptors, reverses diazepam withdrawal-induced anxiety in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divljaković, Jovana; Milić, Marija; Namjoshi, Ojas A; Tiruveedhula, Veera V; Timić, Tamara; Cook, James M; Savić, Miroslav M

    2013-02-01

    The abrupt discontinuation of prolonged benzodiazepine treatment elicits a withdrawal syndrome with increased anxiety as a major symptom. The neural mechanisms underlying benzodiazepine physical dependence are still insufficiently understood. Flumazenil, the non-selective antagonist of the benzodiazepine binding site of GABA(A) receptors was capable of preventing and reversing the increased anxiety during benzodiazepine withdrawal in animals and humans in some, but not all studies. On the other hand, a number of data suggest that GABA(A) receptors containing α(1) subunits are critically involved in processes developing during prolonged use of benzodiazepines, such are tolerance to sedative effects, liability to physical dependence and addiction. Hence, we investigated in the elevated plus maze the level of anxiety 24 h following 21 days of diazepam treatment and the influence of flumazenil or a preferential α(1)-subunit selective antagonist βCCt on diazepam withdrawal syndrome in rats. Abrupt cessation of protracted once-daily intraperitoneal administration of 2 mg/kg diazepam induced a withdrawal syndrome, measured by increased anxiety-like behavior in the elevated plus maze 24 h after treatment cessation. Acute challenge with either flumazenil (10mg/kg) or βCCt (1.25, 5 and 20 mg/kg) alleviated the diazepam withdrawal-induced anxiety. Moreover, both antagonists induced an anxiolytic-like response close, though not identical, to that seen with acute administration of diazepam. These findings imply that the mechanism by which antagonism at GABA(A) receptors may reverse the withdrawal-induced anxiety involves the α(1) subunit and prompt further studies aimed at linking the changes in behavior with possible adaptive changes in subunit expression and function of GABA(A) receptors.

  8. Client Proteins and Small Molecule Inhibitors Display Distinct Binding Preferences for Constitutive and Stress-Induced HSP90 Isoforms and Their Conformationally Restricted Mutants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas L Prince

    Full Text Available The two cytosolic/nuclear isoforms of the molecular chaperone HSP90, stress-inducible HSP90α and constitutively expressed HSP90β, fold, assemble and maintain the three-dimensional structure of numerous client proteins. Because many HSP90 clients are important in cancer, several HSP90 inhibitors have been evaluated in the clinic. However, little is known concerning possible unique isoform or conformational preferences of either individual HSP90 clients or inhibitors. In this report, we compare the relative interaction strength of both HSP90α and HSP90β with the transcription factors HSF1 and HIF1α, the kinases ERBB2 and MET, the E3-ubiquitin ligases KEAP1 and RHOBTB2, and the HSP90 inhibitors geldanamycin and ganetespib. We observed unexpected differences in relative client and drug preferences for the two HSP90 isoforms, with HSP90α binding each client protein with greater apparent affinity compared to HSP90β, while HSP90β bound each inhibitor with greater relative interaction strength compared to HSP90α. Stable HSP90 interaction was associated with reduced client activity. Using a defined set of HSP90 conformational mutants, we found that some clients interact strongly with a single, ATP-stabilized HSP90 conformation, only transiently populated during the dynamic HSP90 chaperone cycle, while other clients interact equally with multiple HSP90 conformations. These data suggest different functional requirements among HSP90 clientele that, for some clients, are likely to be ATP-independent. Lastly, the two inhibitors examined, although sharing the same binding site, were differentially able to access distinct HSP90 conformational states.

  9. Computational study on the inhibitor binding mode and allosteric regulation mechanism in hepatitis C virus NS3/4A protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiwei Xue

    Full Text Available HCV NS3/4A protein is an attractive therapeutic target responsible for harboring serine protease and RNA helicase activities during the viral replication. Small molecules binding at the interface between the protease and helicase domains can stabilize the closed conformation of the protein and thus block the catalytic function of HCV NS3/4A protein via an allosteric regulation mechanism. But the detailed mechanism remains elusive. Here, we aimed to provide some insight into the inhibitor binding mode and allosteric regulation mechanism of HCV NS3/4A protein by using computational methods. Four simulation systems were investigated. They include: apo state of HCV NS3/4A protein, HCV NS3/4A protein in complex with an allosteric inhibitor and the truncated form of the above two systems. The molecular dynamics simulation results indicate HCV NS3/4A protein in complex with the allosteric inhibitor 4VA adopts a closed conformation (inactive state, while the truncated apo protein adopts an open conformation (active state. Further residue interaction network analysis suggests the communication of the domain-domain interface play an important role in the transition from closed to open conformation of HCV NS3/4A protein. However, the inhibitor stabilizes the closed conformation through interaction with several key residues from both the protease and helicase domains, including His57, Asp79, Asp81, Asp168, Met485, Cys525 and Asp527, which blocks the information communication between the functional domains interface. Finally, a dynamic model about the allosteric regulation and conformational changes of HCV NS3/4A protein was proposed and could provide fundamental insights into the allosteric mechanism of HCV NS3/4A protein function regulation and design of new potent inhibitors.

  10. Homo-timeric structural model of human microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1 and characterization of its substrate/inhibitor binding interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Li; Kurumbail, Ravi G.; Frazier, Ronald B.; Davies, Michael S.; Fujiwara, Hideji; Weinberg, Robin A.; Gierse, James K.; Caspers, Nicole; Carter, Jeffrey S.; McDonald, Joseph J.; Moore, William M.; Vazquez, Michael L.

    2009-01-01

    Inducible, microsomal prostaglandin E synthase 1 (mPGES-1), the terminal enzyme in the prostaglandin (PG) biosynthetic pathway, constitutes a promising therapeutic target for the development of new anti-inflammatory drugs. To elucidate structure-function relationships and to enable structure-based design, an mPGES-1 homology model was developed using the three-dimensional structure of the closest homologue of the MAPEG family (Membrane Associated Proteins in Eicosanoid and Glutathione metabolism), mGST-1. The ensuing model of mPGES-1 is a homo-trimer, with each monomer consisting of four membrane-spanning segments. Extensive structure refinement revealed an inter-monomer salt bridge (K26-E77) as well as inter-helical interactions within each monomer, including polar hydrogen bonds (e.g. T78-R110-T129) and hydrophobic π-stacking (F82-F103-F106), all contributing to the overall stability of the homo-trimer of mPGES-1. Catalytic co-factor glutathione (GSH) was docked into the mPGES-1 model by flexible optimization of both the ligand and the protein conformations, starting from the initial location ascertained from the mGST-1 structure. Possible binding site for the substrate, prostaglandin H2 (PGH2), was identified by systematically probing the refined molecular structure of mPGES-1. A binding model was generated by induced fit docking of PGH2 in the presence of GSH. The homology model prescribes three potential inhibitor binding sites per mPGES-1 trimer. This was further confirmed experimentally by equilibrium dialysis study which generated a binding stoichiometric ratio of approximately three inhibitor molecules to three mPGES-1 monomers. The structural model that we have derived could serve as a useful tool for structure-guided design of inhibitors for this emergently important therapeutic target.

  11. DIAZEPAM IN PEDIATRIC CONVULSION MANAGEMENT: RECTAL VS INTRAVENOUS ADMINISTRATION

    OpenAIRE

    T MAHMOUDIAN

    2000-01-01

    Introduction. Convulsion is a dangerous occurrence in pediatric disease that requires immediately intervention. It is one of the common causes of referring children to emergency room and must be controlled as soon as possible for prevention of systemic complications and the brain damages. We compared the effect of intravenous (IV) versus rectal diazepam in control of convulsion in c...

  12. Medetomidine--ketamine--diazepam anesthesia in the rabbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mero, M; Vainionpää, S; Vasenius, J; Vihtonen, K; Rokkanen, P

    1989-01-01

    Orthopaedic operations were performed in 340 rabbits when developing biodegradable rods for the fixation of fractures. The rabbits were anaesthesized by injecting medetomidine combined with ketamine and diazepam (MKD) subcutaneously. The mortality due to the anaesthesia was zero. Arterial blood gas analyses showed a moderate decrease in the haemoglobin oxygen saturation and compensated respiratory acidosis, which was well tolerated by the animals. It is concluded that MKD anaesthesia is well suited for orthopaedic operations in the rabbit.

  13. [Pro-aggressive effect of diazepam in male mice with repeated experience of aggression].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigor'eva, A E; Smagin, D A; Bondar', N P; Galiamina, A G; Kudriavtseva, N N

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have reported that repeated experience of aggression is attended with the development of increased anxiety in male mice. The paper aimed to investigate effect of anxiolytic, diazepam, on the level of anxiety and aggression in these animals. The drug was chronically administrated for two weeks at the process of aggression experience acquisition. It was shown that diazepam decreased anxiety but didn't influence aggression level assessed by total time of attacks. However, diazepam decreased demonstration of aggressive grooming in part of aggressive males. Group of diazepam-treated aggressive males which displayed aggressive grooming didn't differ in level of anxiety and aggression in saline-treated male mice. Diazepam had anxiolytic and pro-aggressive effects in male mice without demonstrating aggressive grooming. Thus, we can conclude that anxiolytic effect of diazepam is accompanied with increased aggression as side effect in some male mice which have repeated experience of aggression.

  14. Pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic effects of flumazenil and theophylline application in rats acutely intoxicated by diazepam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šegrt Zoran

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. The majority of symptoms and signs of acute diazepam poisoning are the consequence of its sedative effect on the CNS affecting selectively polisynaptic routes by stimulating inhibitory action of GABA. The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of combined application of theophylline and flumazenil on sedation and impaired motor function activity in acute diazepam poisoning in rats. Methods. Male Wistar rats were divided in four main groups and treated as follows: group I - with increasing doses of diazepam in order to produce the highest level of sedation and motor activity impairment; group II - diazepam + different doses of flumazenil; group III - diazepam + different doses of theophylline; group IV - diazepam + combined application of theophylline and flumazenil. Concentrations of diazepam and its metabolites were measured with LC-MS. The experiment was performed on a commercial apparatus for spontaneous motor-activity registration (LKBFarad, Sweden. Assessment of diazepam- induced neurotoxic effects and effects after theophylline and flumazenil application was performed with rotarod test on a commercial apparatus (Automatic treadmill for rats, Ugo Basile, Italy. Results. Diazepam in doses of 10 mg/kg and 15 mg/kg produced long-time and reproducible pharmacodynamic effects. Single application of flumazenil or theophylline antagonized effects of diazepam, but not completely. Combined application of flumazenile and theophylline resulted in best effects on diazepaminduced impairment of motoric activity and sedation. As a result of theopylline application there was better elimination of diazepam and its metabolites. Conclusion. Combined application of flumazenil and theophylline resulted in the best antidotal effects in the treatment of diazepam poisoned rats. These effects are a result of different mechanisms of their action, longer half-life of theophylline in relation to that of flumezenil and presumably the

  15. Biliary excretion of diazepam in rats: influence of the route of administration and dosage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, R; Plaa, G L

    1981-01-01

    The biliary excretion of diazepam metabolites was found in rats. Equivalent dosages of diazepam were administered orally and intraperitoneally. The biliary excretion was dose-dependent and was greater following intraperitoneal administration. After intravenous administration, a greater percentage of the diazepam dosage administered was excreted into the bile. Repetitive intravenous administrations yielded results which approached those observed after intraperitoneally administered dosages given as a bolus.

  16. [Rectal anaesthesia with diazepam added to ketamine for preschool child (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postel, J P; Brille, P; Starobinsky, E; Buffet, J P; Milhaud, A

    1981-01-01

    The authors relate their experience of 61 rectal anesthesias with ketamine (10 mg/kg) and diazepam (0.25-0.5 mg/kg). Rectal anesthesia is well accepted by children who are afraid of percutaneous injection. When ketamine is used alone, they obtained only 76 p. cent good result. When diazepam is associated, good results arise to 95 p. cent. Diazepam added to ketamine allows surface surgery during 10 to 15 minutes.

  17. Clorazepate: double blind crossover comparison of a single nightly dose with diazepam thrice daily in anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnus, R V; Dean, B C; Curry, S H

    1977-10-01

    In a double blind cross-over study in 40 patients with mild to moderate anxiety, clorazepate 15 mg at bedtime was as effective as diazepam on global rating and slightly superior on target symptom assessment. There was a significantly higher incidence and frequency of side effects during diazepam treatment. Occurrence of side effect related to plasma diazepam, and anxiolytic effect related to plasma nordiazepam. These results are discussed in relation to convenience of the single dose regimen and psychomotor performance.

  18. Effect of calcium on anxiolytic activity of diazepam and verapamil in rats

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the role of calcium in anxiety and its effect on anxiolytic activity of diazepam and verapamil. Materials and Methods: Study was conducted using female albino rats in light and dark arena; a nonconflicting animal experimental model for anxiety. Animals were divided into six groups with six animals in each group. Test drugs, calcium gluconate (10 mg/kg), diazepam (1 mg/kg), verapamil (5 mg/kg), calcium + diazepam, and calcium + verapamil were administered i...

  19. HMG-CoA Reductase Inhibitors Bind to PPARα to Upregulate Neurotrophin Expression in the Brain and Improve Memory in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Avik; Jana, Malabendu; Kundu, Madhuchhanda; Corbett, Grant T; Rangaswamy, Suresh B; Mishra, Rama K; Luan, Chi-Hao; Gonzalez, Frank J; Pahan, Kalipada

    2015-08-01

    Neurotrophins are important for neuronal health and function. Here, statins, inhibitors of HMG-CoA reductase and cholesterol lowering drugs, were found to stimulate expression of neurotrophins in brain cells independent of the mevalonate pathway. Time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) analyses, computer-derived simulation, site-directed mutagenesis, thermal shift assay, and de novo binding followed by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) demonstrates that statins serve as ligands of PPARα and that Leu331 and Tyr 334 residues of PPARα are important for statin binding. Upon binding, statins upregulate neurotrophins via PPARα-mediated transcriptional activation of cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB). Accordingly, simvastatin increases CREB and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the hippocampus of Ppara null mice receiving full-length lentiviral PPARα, but not L331M/Y334D statin-binding domain-mutated lentiviral PPARα. This study identifies statins as ligands of PPARα, describes neurotrophic function of statins via the PPARα-CREB pathway, and analyzes the importance of PPARα in the therapeutic success of simvastatin in an animal model of Alzheimer's disease.

  20. The versatile binding mode of transition-state analogue inhibitors of tyrosinase towards dicopper(II) model complexes: experimental and theoretical investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orio, Maylis; Bochot, Constance; Dubois, Carole; Gellon, Gisèle; Hardré, Renaud; Jamet, Hélène; Luneau, Dominique; Philouze, Christian; Réglier, Marius; Serratrice, Guy; Belle, Catherine

    2011-11-25

    We describe 2-mercaptopyridine-N-oxide (HSPNO) as a new and efficient competitive inhibitor of mushroom tyrosinase (K(IC) =3.7 μM). Binding studies of HSPNO and 2-hydroxypyridine-N-oxide (HOPNO) on dinuclear copper(II) complexes [Cu(2)(BPMP)(μ-OH)](ClO(4))(2) (1; HBPMP=2,6-bis[bis(2-pyridylmethyl)aminomethyl]-4-methylphenol) and [Cu(2)(BPEP)(μ-OH)](ClO(4))(2)) (2; HBPEP=2,6-bis{bis[2-(2-pyridyl)ethyl]aminomethyl}-4-methylphenol), known to be functional models for the tyrosinase diphenolase activity, have been performed. A combination of structural data, spectroscopic studies, and DFT calculations evidenced the adaptable binding mode (bridging versus chelating) of HOPNO in relation to the geometry and chelate size of the dicopper center. For comparison, binding studies of HSPNO and kojic acid (5-hydroxy-2-(hydroxymethyl)-4-pyrone) on dinuclear complexes were performed. A theoretical approach has been developed and validated on HOPNO adducts to compare the binding mode on the model complexes. It has been applied for HSPNO and kojic acid. Although results for HSPNO were in line with those obtained with HOPNO, thus reflecting their chemical similarity, we showed that the bridging mode was the most preferential binding mode for kojic acid on both complexes.

  1. Assessment of pharmacokinetics and tolerability of intranasal diazepam relative to rectal gel in healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henney, Herbert R; Sperling, Michael R; Rabinowicz, Adrian L; Bream, Gary; Carrazana, Enrique J

    2014-09-01

    Diazepam rectal gel (RG) is currently the only approved rescue therapy for outpatient management of seizure clusters in the United States. There is an unmet medical need for an alternative rescue therapy for seizure clusters that is effective, and more convenient to administer with a socially acceptable method of delivery. An intranasal diazepam formulation has been developed, and this study evaluates the tolerability and bioavailability of diazepam nasal spray (NS) relative to an equivalent dose of diazepam-RG in healthy adults. Twenty-four healthy adults were enrolled in a phase 1, open-label, 3-period crossover study. Plasma diazepam and metabolite concentrations were measured by serial sampling. Dose proportionality for 5- and 20-mg intranasal doses and the bioavailability of 20mg diazepam-NS relative to 20mg diazepam-RG were assessed by maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) and systemic exposure parameters (AUC0-∞ and AUC0-24). The mean Cmax values for 20mg diazepam-NS and 20mg diazepam-RG were 378 ± 106 and 328 ± 152 ng/mL, achieved at 1.0 and 1.5h, respectively. Subjects administered intranasal and rectal gel formulations experienced nasal and rectal leakage, respectively. Diazepam absorption following intranasal administration was consistent but 3 subjects with diazepam-RG had low plasma drug levels at the earliest assessment of 5 min, due to poor retention, and were excluded from analysis. Excluding them, the treatment ratios (20mg diazepam-NS:20mg diazepam-RG) and 90% confidence intervals for diazepam Cmax and AUC0-24 were 0.98 (0.85-1.14) and 0.89 (0.80-0.98), respectively, suggesting that the bioavailability was comparable between the two formulations. Dose proportionality was observed between the lowest and highest dose-strengths of intranasal formulation. Both intranasal and rectal treatments were well tolerated with mild to moderate adverse events. Results suggest that a single-dose of 20mg diazepam-NS is tolerable and comparable in bioavailability

  2. Evaluation of Prophylactic and Therapeutic Effects of Silymarin on Diazepam-Induced Hepatotoxicity in Cats

    OpenAIRE

    Bahman Mosallanejad; Reza Avizeh; Hossien Najafzadeh

    2011-01-01

    Problem statement: Diazepam is commonly administered for seizure control and appetite stimulant in cats. Cats may develop acute fatal hepatic necrosis after receiving oral diazepam for several days. The aim of this study was to detect the protective action of silymarin on diazepam-induced hepatotoxicity in cats. Approach: About 25 healthy cats were randomly allotted to five equal groups. Animals in Group A were given diazepam (repeated dose 2.5 mg kg-1, p.o. q 12 h for 4 days); Group B consis...

  3. Maintenance time of sedative effects after an intravenous infusion of diazepam:A guide for endoscopy using diazepam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Takahisa Furuta; Mutsuhiro Ikuma; Akira Hishida; Kyoichi Ohashi; Mitsushige Sugimoto; Akiko Nakamura; Naohito Shirai; Shingen Misaka; Shinya Uchida; Hiroshi Watanabe; Takashi Ishizaki

    2008-01-01

    AIM:To examine whether the sedative effects assessed by psychomotor tests would depend on the cytochrome P450(CYP)2C19 genotypes after an infusion regimen of diazepam commonly used for gastrointestinal endoscopy in Japan.METHODS:Fifteen healthy Japanese volunteers consisting of three different CYP2C19 genotype groups underwent a critical flicker fusion test,an eye movement analysis and a postural sway test as a test for physical sedative effects,and a visual analog scale(VAS)symptom assessment method as a test for mental sedative effects during the 336 h period after the intravenous infusion of diazepam(5 mg).RESULTS:The physical sedative effects assessed by the critical flicker test continued for 1h(t values of 5 min,30 min and 60 min later:4.35,5.00 and 3.19,respectively)and those by the moving radial area of a postural sway test continued for 3h(t values of 5 h,30 h,60 min and 3 h later:-4.05,-3.42,-2.17 and -2.58,respectively),which changed significantly compared with the baseline level before infusion(P<0.05).On the other hand,the mental sedative effects by the VAS method improved within 1 h.The CYP2C19 genotype-dependent differences in the postinfusion sedative effects were not observed in any of the four psychomotor function tests.CONCLUSION:With the psychomotor tests,the objective sedative effects of diazepam continued for 1 h to 3 h irrespective of CYP2C19 genotype status and the subjective sedative symptoms improved within 1 h.Up to 3 h of clinical care appears to be required after the infusion of diazepam,although patients feel subjectively improved.(C)2008 The W3G Press,All rights reserved.

  4. Profilaxia intermitente na convulsão febril com diazepam via oral Intermittent prophylaxis in febrile seizures with oral diazepam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilisa M. Guerreiro

    1992-06-01

    Full Text Available Apresentamos a profilaxia intermitente com diazepam via oral como opção de tratamento para convulsão febril. Justificamos essa proposta diante dos importantes efeitos colaterais que ocorrem com as duas medicações classicamente usadas na profilaxia contínua (fenobarbital e valproato. Foram tratados 19 pacientes. Obtivemos resultados favoráveis, pois apenas um caso apresentou recorrência de convulsão febril em vigência de dose adequada do diazepam. Houve efeitos colaterais transitórios em 36,8% da nossa casuística.Intermittent prophylaxis with oral diazepam is presented as an optional treatment for febrile seizures. This proposition is justified by the severe side effects of the currently used chronic anticonvulsant drug therapy in febrile seizures (phenobarbital and valproate. Nineteen patients aged between 3 months and 5 years were treated. They had either simple or complex febrile seizures. Sixteen patients, had at least one prognostic factor for recurrence of febrile seizures: first febrile seizure before 15 months of age, positive family history for epilepsy or febrile seizures, occurrence of a complex febrile seizure or abnormal neurological examination. Three patients had none, (cases 8, 12 and 13. We recommended 2.5mg b.i.d. for children younger than 12 months, 5mg b.i.d. for children older than 12 months and younger than 3 years, and 7.5 b.i.d. for children older than 3 years. The results showed that only one patient had febrile convulsions while taking adequate diazepam dosage. Transient side effects occurred in 36.8% of the cases.

  5. IC50-to-Ki: a web-based tool for converting IC50 to Ki values for inhibitors of enzyme activity and ligand binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cer, R Z; Mudunuri, U; Stephens, R; Lebeda, F J

    2009-07-01

    A new web-server tool estimates K(i) values from experimentally determined IC(50) values for inhibitors of enzymes and of binding reactions between macromolecules (e.g. proteins, polynucleic acids) and ligands. This converter was developed to enable end users to help gauge the quality of the underlying assumptions used in these calculations which depend on the type of mechanism of inhibitor action and the concentrations of the interacting molecular species. Additional calculations are performed for nonclassical, tightly bound inhibitors of enzyme-substrate or of macromolecule-ligand systems in which free, rather than total concentrations of the reacting species are required. Required user-defined input values include the total enzyme (or another target molecule) and substrate (or ligand) concentrations, the K(m) of the enzyme-substrate (or the K(d) of the target-ligand) reaction, and the IC(50) value. Assumptions and caveats for these calculations are discussed along with examples taken from the literature. The host database for this converter contains kinetic constants and other data for inhibitors of the proteolytic clostridial neurotoxins (http://botdb.abcc.ncifcrf.gov/toxin/kiConverter.jsp).

  6. Binding of complement inhibitor C4b-binding protein to a highly virulent Streptococcus pyogenes M1 strain is mediated by protein H and enhances adhesion to and invasion of endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermert, David; Weckel, Antonin; Agarwal, Vaibhav; Frick, Inga-Maria; Björck, Lars; Blom, Anna M

    2013-11-08

    Streptococcus pyogenes AP1, a strain of the highly virulent M1 serotype, uses exclusively protein H to bind the complement inhibitor C4b-binding protein (C4BP). We found a strong correlation between the ability of AP1 and its isogenic mutants lacking protein H to inhibit opsonization with complement C3b and binding of C4BP. C4BP bound to immobilized protein H or AP1 bacteria retained its cofactor activity for degradation of (125)I-C4b. Furthermore, C4b deposited from serum onto AP1 bacterial surfaces was processed into C4c/C4d fragments, which did not occur on strains unable to bind C4BP. Recombinant C4BP mutants, which (i) lack certain CCP domains or (ii) have mutations in single aa as well as (iii) mutants with additional aa between different CCP domains were used to determine that the binding is mainly mediated by a patch of positively charged amino acid residues at the interface of domains CCP1 and CCP2. Using recombinant protein H fragments, we narrowed down the binding site to the N-terminal domain A. With a peptide microarray, we identified one single 18-amino acid-long peptide comprising residues 92-109, which specifically bound C4BP. Biacore was used to determine KD = 6 × 10(-7) M between protein H and a single subunit of C4BP. C4BP binding also correlated with elevated levels of adhesion and invasion to endothelial cells. Taken together, we identified the molecular basis of C4BP-protein H interaction and found that it is not only important for decreased opsonization but also for invasion of endothelial cells by S. pyogenes.

  7. Crystal Structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv AldR (Rv2779c), a Regulator of the ald Gene: DNA BINDING AND IDENTIFICATION OF SMALL MOLECULE INHIBITORS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Abhishek; Shree, Sonal; Pandey, Sarvesh Kumar; Tripathi, Rama Pati; Ramachandran, Ravishankar

    2016-06-03

    Here we report the crystal structure of M. tuberculosis AldR (Rv2779c) showing that the N-terminal DNA-binding domains are swapped, forming a dimer, and four dimers are assembled into an octamer through crystal symmetry. The C-terminal domain is involved in oligomeric interactions that stabilize the oligomer, and it contains the effector-binding sites. The latter sites are 30-60% larger compared with homologs like MtbFFRP (Rv3291c) and can consequently accommodate larger molecules. MtbAldR binds to the region upstream to the ald gene that is highly up-regulated in nutrient-starved tuberculosis models and codes for l-alanine dehydrogenase (MtbAld; Rv2780). Further, the MtbAldR-DNA complex is inhibited upon binding of Ala, Tyr, Trp and Asp to the protein. Studies involving a ligand-binding site G131T mutant show that the mutant forms a DNA complex that cannot be inhibited by adding the amino acids. Comparative studies suggest that binding of the amino acids changes the relative spatial disposition of the DNA-binding domains and thereby disrupt the protein-DNA complex. Finally, we identified small molecules, including a tetrahydroquinoline carbonitrile derivative (S010-0261), that inhibit the MtbAldR-DNA complex. The latter molecules represent the very first inhibitors of a feast/famine regulatory protein from any source and set the stage for exploring MtbAldR as a potential anti-tuberculosis target.

  8. Matrix metalloproteinase-10 (MMP-10) interaction with tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases TIMP-1 and TIMP-2: binding studies and crystal structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batra, Jyotica; Robinson, Jessica; Soares, Alexei S; Fields, Alan P; Radisky, Derek C; Radisky, Evette S

    2012-05-04

    Matrix metalloproteinase 10 (MMP-10, stromelysin-2) is a secreted metalloproteinase with functions in skeletal development, wound healing, and vascular remodeling; its overexpression is also implicated in lung tumorigenesis and tumor progression. To understand the regulation of MMP-10 by tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs), we have assessed equilibrium inhibition constants (K(i)) of putative physiological inhibitors TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 for the active catalytic domain of human MMP-10 (MMP-10cd) using multiple kinetic approaches. We find that TIMP-1 inhibits the MMP-10cd with a K(i) of 1.1 × 10(-9) M; this interaction is 10-fold weaker than the inhibition of the similar MMP-3 (stromelysin-1) catalytic domain (MMP-3cd) by TIMP-1. TIMP-2 inhibits the MMP-10cd with a K(i) of 5.8 × 10(-9) M, which is again 10-fold weaker than the inhibition of MMP-3cd by this inhibitor (K(i) = 5.5 × 10(-10) M). We solved the x-ray crystal structure of TIMP-1 bound to the MMP-10cd at 1.9 Å resolution; the structure was solved by molecular replacement and refined with an R-factor of 0.215 (R(free) = 0.266). Comparing our structure of MMP-10cd·TIMP-1 with the previously solved structure of MMP-3cd·TIMP-1 (Protein Data Bank entry 1UEA), we see substantial differences at the binding interface that provide insight into the differential binding of stromelysin family members to TIMP-1. This structural information may ultimately assist in the design of more selective TIMP-based inhibitors tailored for specificity toward individual members of the stromelysin family, with potential therapeutic applications.

  9. Exploring the molecular basis for selective binding of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Asp kinase toward its natural substrates and feedback inhibitors: a docking and molecular dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaitanya, M; Babajan, B; Anuradha, C M; Naveen, M; Rajasekhar, C; Madhusudana, P; Kumar, Chitta Suresh

    2010-08-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is still a major public health problem, compounded by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-TB co-infection and recent emergence of multidrug-resistant (MDR) and extensively drug resistant (XDR)-TB. In this context, aspartokinase of mycobacterium tuberculosis has drawn attention for designing novel anti-TB drugs. Asp kinase is an enzyme responsible for the synthesis of 4-phospho-L-aspartate from L-aspartate and involved in the branched biosynthetic pathway leading to the synthesis of amino acids lysine, threonine, methionine and isoleucine. An intermediate of lysine biosynthetic branch, mesodiaminopimelate is also a component of the peptidoglycan which is a component of bacterial cell wall. To interfere with the production of all these amino acids and cell wall, it is possible to inhibit Asp kinase activity. This can be achieved using Asp kinase inhibitors. In order to design novel Asp kinase inhibitors as effective anti-TB drugs, it is necessary to have an understanding of the binding sites of Asp kinase. As no crystal structure of the enzyme has yet been published, we built a homology model of Asp kinase using the crystallized Asp kinase from M. Jannaschii, as template structures (2HMF and 3C1M). After the molecular dynamics refinement, the optimized homology model was assessed as a reliable structure by PROCHECK, ERRAT, WHAT-IF, PROSA2003 and VERIFY-3D. The results of molecular docking studies with natural substrates, products and feedback inhibitors are in agreement with the published data and showed that ACT domain plays an important role in binding to ligands. Based on the docking conformations, pharmacophore model can be developed by probing the common features of ligands. By analyzing the results, ACT domain architecture, certain key residues that are responsible for binding to feedback inhibitors and natural substrates were identified. This would be very helpful in understanding the blockade mechanism of Asp kinase and providing insights

  10. Usefulness of competitive inhibitors of protein binding for improving the pharmacokinetics of {sup 186}Re-MAG3-conjugated bisphosphonate ({sup 186}Re-MAG3-HBP), an agent for treatment of painful bone metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, Kazuma [Kyoto University, Department of Patho-Functional Bioanalysis, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto (Japan)]|[Kanazawa University, Advanced Science Research Center, Kanazawa (Japan); Mukai, Takahiro [Kyoto University, Department of Patho-Functional Bioanalysis, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto (Japan)]|[Kyushu University, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Fukuoka (Japan); Kawai, Keiichi [Kanazawa University, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kanazawa (Japan)]|[University of Fukui, Biomedical Imaging Research Center, Yoshida, Fukui (Japan); Takamura, Norito [Kyushu University of Health and Welfare, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Nobeoka (Japan); Hanaoka, Hirofumi; Saji, Hideo [Kyoto University, Department of Patho-Functional Bioanalysis, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto (Japan); Hashimoto, Kazuyuki [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki (Japan); Shiba, Kazuhiro; Mori, Hirofumi [Kanazawa University, Advanced Science Research Center, Kanazawa (Japan)

    2009-01-15

    We have developed a {sup 186}Re-mercaptoacetylglycylglycylglycine complex-conjugated bisphosphonate ({sup 186}Re-MAG3-HBP) for the treatment of painful bone metastases. We assumed competitive inhibitors of protein binding to be useful for procuring a favorable biodistribution of {sup 186}Re-MAG3-HBP for the palliation of bone pain because it has been reported that the concurrent administration of {sup 99m}Tc-MAG3 and drugs with high affinity for serum protein produced competitive displacement at specific binding sites and enhanced total clearance and tissue distribution. The displacement effects of several protein-binding inhibitors on the protein binding of {sup 186}Re-MAG3-HBP were investigated. Biodistribution experiments were performed by intravenously administering {sup 186}Re-MAG3-HBP into rats with ceftriaxone as a competitive protein-binding inhibitor or saline. The protein binding of {sup 186}Re-MAG3-HBP in rat serum, human serum, and a human serum albumin solution was significantly decreased by the addition of ceftriaxone, which has high affinity for binding site I on serum albumin. In the biodistribution experiments, pretreatment with ceftriaxone enhanced the clearance of the radioactivity of {sup 186}Re-MAG3-HBP in blood and nontarget tissues but had no effect on accumulation in bone. The findings suggested that the use of protein-binding competitive inhibitors would be effective in improving the pharmacokinetics of radiopharmaceuticals with high affinity for serum protein. (orig.)

  11. Interaction between wheat alpha-amylase/trypsin bi-functional inhibitor and mammalian digestive enzymes: Kinetic, equilibrium and structural characterization of binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuccioloni, Massimiliano; Mozzicafreddo, Matteo; Ali, Ishtiaq; Bonfili, Laura; Cecarini, Valentina; Eleuteri, Anna Maria; Angeletti, Mauro

    2016-12-15

    Alpha-amylase/trypsin bi-functional inhibitors (ATIs) are non-gluten protein components of wheat and other cereals that can hypersensitise the human gastrointestinal tract, eventually causing enteropathies in predisposed individuals. These inhibitory proteins can act both directly by targeting specific pro-inflammatory receptors, and indirectly by impairing the activity of digestive enzymes, the latter event causing the accumulation of undigested peptides with potential immunogenic properties. Herein, according to a concerted approach based on in vitro and in silico methods we characterized kinetics, equilibrium parameters and modes of binding of the complexes formed between wheat ATI and two representative mammalian digestive enzymes, namely trypsin and alpha-amylase. Interestingly, we demonstrated ATI to target both enzymes with independent binding sites and with moderately high affinity.

  12. On the inhibitor effects of bergamot juice flavonoids binding to the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGR) enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leopoldini, Monica; Malaj, Naim; Toscano, Marirosa; Sindona, Giovanni; Russo, Nino

    2010-10-13

    Density functional theory was applied to study the binding mode of new flavonoids as possible inhibitors of the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGR), an enzyme that catalyzes the four-electron reduction of HMGCoA to mevalonate, the committed step in the biosynthesis of sterols. The investigated flavonoid conjugates brutieridin and melitidin were recently quantified in the bergamot fruit extracts and identified to be structural analogues of statins, lipids concentration lowering drugs that inhibit HMGR. Computations allowed us to perform a detailed analysis of the geometrical and electronic features affecting the binding of these compounds, as well as that of the excellent simvastatin drug, to the active site of the enzyme and to give better insight into the inhibition process.

  13. In silico modification of Zn2+ binding group of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) by organoselenium compounds as Homo sapiens class II HDAC inhibitor of cervical cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumo Friend Tambunan, Usman; Bakri, Ridla; Aditya Parikesit, Arli; Ariyani, Titin; Dyah Puspitasari, Ratih; Kerami, Djati

    2016-02-01

    Cervical cancer is the most common cancer in women, and ranks seventh of all cancers worldwide, with 529000 cases in 2008 and more than 85% cases occur in developing countries. One way to treat this cancer is through the inhibition of HDAC enzymes which play a strategic role in the regulation of gene expression. Suberoyl Anilide Hydroxamic Acid (SAHA) or Vorinostat is a drug which commercially available to treat the cancer, but still has some side effects. This research present in silico SAHA modification in Zinc Binding Group (ZBG) by organoselenium compound to get ligands which less side effect. From molecular docking simulation, and interaction analysis, there are five best ligands, namely CC27, HA27, HB28, IB25, and KA7. These five ligands have better binding affinity than the standards, and also have interaction with Zn2+ cofactor of inhibited HDAC enzymes. This research is expected to produce more potent HDAC inhibitor as novel drug for cervical cancer treatment.

  14. A reduced-amide inhibitor of Pin1 binds in a conformation resembling a twisted-amide transition state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guoyan G; Zhang, Yan; Mercedes-Camacho, Ana Y; Etzkorn, Felicia A

    2011-11-08

    The mechanism of the cell cycle regulatory peptidyl prolyl isomerase (PPIase), Pin1, was investigated using reduced-amide inhibitors designed to mimic the twisted-amide transition state. Inhibitors, R-pSer-Ψ[CH(2)N]-Pro-2-(indol-3-yl)ethylamine, 1 [R = fluorenylmethoxycarbonyl (Fmoc)] and 2 (R = Ac), of Pin1 were synthesized and bioassayed. Inhibitor 1 had an IC(50) value of 6.3 μM, which is 4.5-fold better for Pin1 than our comparable ground-state analogue, a cis-amide alkene isostere-containing inhibitor. The change of Fmoc to Ac in 2 improved aqueous solubility for structural determination and resulted in an IC(50) value of 12 μM. The X-ray structure of the complex of 2 bound to Pin1 was determined to 1.76 Å resolution. The structure revealed that the reduced amide adopted a conformation similar to the proposed twisted-amide transition state of Pin1, with a trans-pyrrolidine conformation of the prolyl ring. A similar conformation of substrate would be destabilized relative to the planar amide conformation. Three additional reduced amides, with Thr replacing Ser and l- or d-pipecolate (Pip) replacing Pro, were slightly weaker inhibitors of Pin1.

  15. In vitro resistance selections for Plasmodium falciparum dihydroorotate dehydrogenase inhibitors give mutants with multiple point mutations in the drug-binding site and altered growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Leila S; Gamo, Francisco Javier; Lafuente-Monasterio, Maria José; Singh, Onkar M P; Rowland, Paul; Wiegand, Roger C; Wirth, Dyann F

    2014-06-27

    Malaria is a preventable and treatable disease; yet half of the world's population lives at risk of infection, and an estimated 660,000 people die of malaria-related causes every year. Rising drug resistance threatens to make malaria untreatable, necessitating both the discovery of new antimalarial agents and the development of strategies to identify and suppress the emergence and spread of drug resistance. We focused on in-development dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH) inhibitors. Characterizing resistance pathways for antimalarial agents not yet in clinical use will increase our understanding of the potential for resistance. We identified resistance mechanisms of Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) DHODH inhibitors via in vitro resistance selections. We found 11 point mutations in the PfDHODH target. Target gene amplification and unknown mechanisms also contributed to resistance, albeit to a lesser extent. These mutant parasites were often hypersensitive to other PfDHODH inhibitors, which immediately suggested a novel combination therapy approach to preventing resistance. Indeed, a combination of wild-type and mutant-type selective inhibitors led to resistance far less often than either drug alone. The effects of point mutations in PfDHODH were corroborated with purified recombinant wild-type and mutant-type PfDHODH proteins, which showed the same trends in drug response as the cognate cell lines. Comparative growth assays demonstrated that two mutant parasites grew less robustly than their wild-type parent, and the purified protein of those mutants showed a decrease in catalytic efficiency, thereby suggesting a reason for the diminished growth rate. Co-crystallography of PfDHODH with three inhibitors suggested that hydrophobic interactions are important for drug binding and selectivity.

  16. Regulation of granulosa cell cocaine and amphetamine regulated transcript (CART) binding and effect of CART signaling inhibitor on granulosa cell estradiol production during dominant follicle selection in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folger, Joseph K; Jimenez-Krassel, Fermin; Ireland, James J; Lv, Lihua; Smith, George W

    2013-12-01

    We previously established a potential role for cocaine and amphetamine regulated transcript (CARTPT) in dominant follicle selection in cattle. CARTPT expression is elevated in subordinate versus dominant follicles, and treatment with the mature form of the CARTPT peptide (CART) decreases follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH)-stimulated granulosa cell estradiol production in vitro and follicular fluid estradiol and granulosa cell CYP19A1 mRNA in vivo. However, mechanisms that regulate granulosa cell CART responsiveness are not understood. In this study, we investigated hormonal regulation of granulosa cell CART-binding sites in vitro and temporal regulation of granulosa cell CART-binding sites in bovine follicles collected at specific stages of a follicular wave. We also determined the effect of inhibition of CART receptor signaling in vivo on estradiol production in future subordinate follicles. Granulosa cell CART binding in vitro was increased by FSH, and this induction was blocked by estrogen receptor antagonist treatment. In follicles collected in vivo at specific stages of a follicular wave, granulosa cell CART binding in the F2 (second largest), future subordinate follicle increased during dominant follicle selection. Injection into the F2 follicle (at onset of diameter deviation) of an inhibitor of the o/i subclass of G proteins (previously shown to block CART actions in vitro) resulted in increased follicular fluid estradiol concentrations in vivo. Collectively, results demonstrate hormonal regulation of granulosa cell CART binding in vitro and temporal regulation of CART binding in subordinate follicles during dominant follicle selection. Results also suggest that CART signaling may help suppress estradiol-producing capacity of the F2 (subordinate) follicle during this time period.

  17. The S-enantiomer of R,S-citalopram, increases inhibitor binding to the human serotonin transporter by an allosteric mechanism. Comparison with other serotonin transporter inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Fenghua; Larsen, Mads Breum; Sánchez, Connie

    2005-01-01

    The interaction of the S- and R-enantiomers (escitalopram and R-citalopram) of citalopram, with high- and low-affinity binding sites in COS-1 cell membranes expressing human SERT (hSERT) were investigated. Escitalopram affinity for hSERT and its 5-HT uptake inhibitory potency was in the nanomolar...... range and approximately 40-fold more potent than R-citalopram. Escitalopram considerably stabilised the [3H]-escitalopram/SERT complex via an allosteric effect at a low-affinity binding site. The stereoselectivity between escitalopram and R-citalopram was approximately 3:1 for the [3H]-escitalopram....../hSERT complex. The combined effect of escitalopram and R-citalopram was additive. Paroxetine and sertraline mainly stabilised the [3H]-paroxetine/hSERT complex. Fluoxetine, duloxetine and venlafaxine have only minor effects. 5-HT stabilised the [125I]-RTI-55, [3H]-MADAM, [3H]-paroxetine, [3H]-fluoxetine and [3H...

  18. Effect of diazepam on calcium translocation during physiological muscle fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, C P; Narayan, S R

    1984-10-01

    Stimulation of frog sartorius muscle at 1 Hz leads to an initial positive staircase during the first 120 twitches and is followed by a negative staircase. There is a net calcium influx into two distinct compartments within the muscle during the positive staircase. The two compartments are separated by measuring the calcium extracted from muscles soaked in strontium-Ringer for 15 min and the calcium remaining in the muscle. A net gain of extractable Ca++ (0.32 mumol/g wet wt.) and residual Ca++ (0.18 mumol/g) is observed during positive staircase. A loss in residual Ca++, a gain in extractable Ca++ and a net loss of Ca++ (0.09 mumol/g) to the bathing medium occur during the period preceding physiological muscle fatigue (60 to 120 twitches). Diazepam (EC50, 5.6 X 10(-6) M) causes a marked reduction in the latent period and increases the rate constant 2.6 times the control value for physiological muscle fatigue. A net loss of 0.31 mumol/g of Ca++ to the bathing medium occurs during the interval between 60 and 120 twitches. Diazepam increases net Ca++ efflux 3.5-fold during this interval when compared to control muscles. Diazepam does not affect the Ca++ gained during the positive staircase but accelerates the loss of calcium from the residual and the extractable compartments during the initial phase of physiological muscle fatigue. Physiological muscle fatigue is attributed to an accumulation of calcium in the transverse tubular network and an uncoupling of the muscle action potential from contraction.

  19. Effect of diazepam on kidney function and histological structure of white rat’s kidney

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Putu Gede Martha Setiawan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of NAPZA (Narcotics, Alcohol, Psychotropic, and other addictive substances in Indonesia keeps increasing. One type of frequently used NAPZAs is diazepam. Diazepam is a kind of sedative-hypnotics drug which belongs to benzodiazepine. The objective of this study was to determine kidney function by examining the level of urine ureum and creatinine also histological structure in rat after treated with diazepam. Rats were divided into one control group and three diazepam treatment groups which were solvent control (PEG 1%, treatment I (62.25 mg/kg BW, treatment II (83 mg/kg BW, and treatment III (124.5 mg/kg BW of diazepam. These doses were based on LD50 in human. Rat urine was taken on the D0, D7, D14, D21, and D28. The ureum level was examined by ureumse-GLDH method and the creatinine level was analyzed by Jaffe method. The histological section was made by paraffin method with Hematoxylin and Eosin (HE staining. Results showed that diazepam given to rat for 28 days led the increase of urine ureum and creatinine levels compare to control group. Furthermore, histological damages of the kidney also detected including cellular injuries, both reversible and irreversible injuries, congestion, hemorrhage, and glomerular damage. In conclusion, the use of diazepam for 28 days affected kidney function in rat. Key words: diazepam, ureum, creatinine, kidney.

  20. Comparison of anticonvulsant effects of clorazepate dipotassium and diazepam. Four week anticonvulsant study in Rhesus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotnikoff, N P; O'Brien, G S

    1974-02-01

    Clorazepate dipotassium and diazepam were administered daily for the first 5 days of each week to Rhesus monkeys at equimolar doses and challanged once a week with a convulsant dose of pentylenetetrazol. Clorazepate exhibited sustained anticonvulsant activity throughout the second, third, and fourth weeks while diazepam was effective only during the second and third weeks.

  1. Oxytocin enhances the inhibitory effects of diazepam in the rat central medial amygdala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viviani, D; Terrettaz, T; Magara, F; Stoop, R

    2010-01-01

    Oxytocin is a neuropeptide that can reduce neophobia and improve social affiliation. In vitro, oxytocin induces a massive release of GABA from neurons in the lateral division of the central amygdala which results in inhibition of a subpopulation of peripherally projecting neurons in the medial division of the central amygdala (CeM). Common anxiolytics, such as diazepam, act as allosteric modulators of GABA(A) receptors. Because oxytocin and diazepam act on GABAergic transmission, it is possible that oxytocin can potentiate the inhibitory effects of diazepam if both exert their pre, - respectively postsynaptic effects on the same inhibitory circuit in the central amygdala. We found that in CeM neurons in which diazepam increased the inhibitory postsynaptic current (IPSC) decay time, TGOT (a specific oxytocin receptor agonist) increased IPSC frequency. Combined application of diazepam and TGOT resulted in generation of IPSCs with increased frequency, decay times as well as amplitudes. While individual saturating concentrations of TGOT and diazepam each decreased spontaneous spiking frequency of CeM neurons to similar extent, co-application of the two was still able to cause a significantly larger decrease. These findings show that oxytocin and diazepam act on different components of the same GABAergic circuit in the central amygdala and that oxytocin can facilitate diazepam effects when used in combination. This raises the possibility that neuropeptides could be clinically used in combination with currently used anxiolytic treatments to improve their therapeutic efficacy.

  2. Effect of calcium on anxiolytic activity of diazepam and verapamil in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiremath Sharanabasayyaswamy

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze the role of calcium in anxiety and its effect on anxiolytic activity of diazepam and verapamil. Materials and Methods: Study was conducted using female albino rats in light and dark arena; a nonconflicting animal experimental model for anxiety. Animals were divided into six groups with six animals in each group. Test drugs, calcium gluconate (10 mg/kg, diazepam (1 mg/kg, verapamil (5 mg/kg, calcium + diazepam, and calcium + verapamil were administered intraperitoneally. Percentage of time spent in light arena and number of entries into light arena were the two parameters observed for 5 min after 30 min of drug administration. ANOVA test was used for statistical analysis. Results: Compared to the control group, diazepam group, and calcium group, only calcium + diazepam group showed considerable increase in mean percentage of time spent in light arena. However, this increase was statistically insignificant. In the case of total number of entries into light arena, animals in calcium + diazepam group showed statistically significant increase in total number of entries into light arena when compared to calcium group and diazepam group. Conclusion: Results of the study suggest that calcium may enhance the anxiolytic activity of diazepam, but has no effect on anxiolytic activity of verapamil.

  3. Diazepam withdrawal responses measured in the social interaction test of anxiety and their reversal by baclofen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    File, S E; Mabbutt, P S; Andrews, N

    1991-01-01

    After 21 days of treatment with diazepam (0.5 or 2 mg/kg/day) rats were tolerant to the effects of diazepam to increase social interaction in the low light unfamiliar test condition of the social interaction test of anxiety. When they were tested 24 h after the last of 21 injections they showed significant decreases in social interaction, indicating an anxiogenic withdrawal response. However, the social interaction scores of rats tested 48 h after withdrawal from diazepam treatment were no longer different from those of the control group. The decreased social interaction, indicating increased anxiety, detected 24 h after withdrawal of diazepam (21 daily injections of 0.5 or 2 mg/kg), could be reversed by the usual daily diazepam dose (0.5 or 2 mg/kg, respectively) or by baclofen (0.5 or 1 mg/kg). Baclofen (2 mg/kg) was sedative in both control treated and diazepam-dependent rats, but was ineffective at reversing the decrease in social interaction seen after diazepam withdrawal. Possible sites of action mediating these effects of baclofen are discussed, and it is suggested that either post-synaptic GABAB sites in the hippocampus are involved or that the reversal of the decreased social interaction detected on withdrawal of diazepam treatment is due to a baclofen-mediated inhibition of 5-HT release in the hippocampus.

  4. A comparison of calcium antagonists and diazepam in reducing ethanol withdrawal tremors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bone, G H; Majchrowicz, E; Martin, P R; Linnoila, M; Nutt, D J

    1989-01-01

    The calcium antagonists nimodipine and dantrolene were compared with diazepam in an animal model of tolerance and physical dependence upon ethanol. Nimodipine and dantrolene were both effective in suppressing withdrawal tremors but diazepam was clearly superior to both agents. These results suggest that the ethanol withdrawal syndrome is only partially mediated by increased calcium flux.

  5. Paying the Price of Desolvation in Solvent-Exposed Protein Pockets: Impact of Distal Solubilizing Groups on Affinity and Binding Thermodynamics in a Series of Thermolysin Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Jonathan; Krimmer, Stefan G; Heine, Andreas; Klebe, Gerhard

    2017-07-13

    In lead optimization, open, solvent-exposed protein pockets are often disregarded as prospective binding sites. Because of bulk-solvent proximity, researchers are instead enticed to attach charged polar groups at inhibitor scaffolds to improve solubility and pharmacokinetic properties. It is rarely considered that solvent effects from water reorganization in the first hydration shell of protein-ligand complexes can have a significant impact on binding. We investigate the thermodynamic fingerprint of thermolysin inhibitors featuring terminal charged ammonium groups that are gradually pulled from a distal, solvent-exposed position into the flat, bowl-shaped S2' pocket. Even for the most remote attachment, costs for partial desolvation of the polar group next to the protein-solvent interface are difficult to compensate by interactions with the protein or surrounding water molecules. Through direct comparison with hydrophobic analogues, a significant 180-fold affinity loss was recorded, which questions popular strategies to attach polar ligand-solubilizing groups at the exposed terminus of substituents accommodated in flat open pockets.

  6. Identification of Tight-Binding Plasmepsin II and Falcipain 2 Inhibitors in Aqueous Extracts of Marine Invertebrates by the Combination of Enzymatic and Interaction-Based Assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas-Sarduy, Emir; Guerra, Yasel; Covaleda Cortés, Giovanni; Avilés, Francesc Xavier; Chávez Planes, María A.

    2017-01-01

    Natural products from marine origin constitute a very promising and underexplored source of interesting compounds for modern biotechnological and pharmaceutical industries. However, their evaluation is quite challenging and requires specifically designed assays to reliably identify the compounds of interest in a highly heterogeneous and interfering context. In the present study, we describe a general strategy for the confident identification of tight-binding protease inhibitors in the aqueous extracts of 62 Cuban marine invertebrates, using Plasmodium falciparum hemoglobinases Plasmepsin II and Falcipain 2 as model enzymes. To this end, we first developed a screening strategy that combined enzymatic with interaction-based assays and then validated screening conditions using five reference extracts. Interferences were evaluated and minimized. The results from the massive screening of such extracts, the validation of several hits by a variety of interaction-based assays and the purification and functional characterization of PhPI, a multifunctional and reversible tight-binding inhibitor for Plasmepsin II and Falcipain 2 from the gorgonian Plexaura homomalla, are presented. PMID:28430158

  7. Discovery of the first small molecule inhibitor of human DDX3 specifically designed to target the RNA binding site: towards the next generation HIV-1 inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radi, Marco; Falchi, Federico; Garbelli, Anna; Samuele, Alberta; Bernardo, Vincenzo; Paolucci, Stefania; Baldanti, Fausto; Schenone, Silvia; Manetti, Fabrizio; Maga, Giovanni; Botta, Maurizio

    2012-03-01

    Efficacy of currently approved anti-HIV drugs is hampered by mutations of the viral enzymes, leading invariably to drug resistance and chemotherapy failure. Recent data suggest that cellular co-factors also represent useful targets for anti-HIV therapy. Here we describe the identification of the first small molecules specifically designed to inhibit the HIV-1 replication by targeting the RNA binding site of the human DEAD-Box RNA helicase DDX3. Optimization of a easily synthetically accessible hit (1) identified by application of a high-throughput docking approach afforded the promising compounds 6 and 8 which proved to inhibit both the helicase and ATPase activity of DDX3 and to reduce the viral load of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) infected with HIV-1.

  8. A double-blind comparison of alprazolam, diazepam and placebo in the treatment of anxious out-patients

    OpenAIRE

    1985-01-01

    1 In a double-blind 28-day comparison of alprazolam, diazepam and placebo, alprazolam 1.5-3 mg/day was of equivalent anxiolytic effect to 15-30 mg diazepam/day and there was some evidence of antidepressant activity by alprazolam, but not diazepam, in neurotic depression. No serious side-effects or laboratory abnormalities were encountered.

  9. Comparison of current docking tools for the simulation of inhibitor binding by the transmembrane domain of the sarco/endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lape, Michael; Elam, Christopher; Paula, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Inhibitors of the transmembrane protein sarco/endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA) are invaluable tools for the study of the enzyme’s physiological functions and they have been recognized as a promising new class of anticancer agents. For the discovery of novel enzyme inhibitors, small molecule docking for virtual screens of large compound libraries has become increasingly important. Since the performance of various docking routines varies considerably, depending on the target and the chemical nature of the ligand, we critically evaluated the performance of four frequently used programs – GOLD, AutoDock, Surflex-Dock, and FRED – for the docking of SERCA inhibitors based on the structures of thapsigargin, di-tert-butylhydroquinone, and cyclopiazonic acid. Evaluation criteria were docking accuracy using crystal structures as references, docking reproducibility, and correlation between docking scores and known bioactivities. The best overall results were obtained by GOLD and FRED. Docking runs with conformationally flexible binding sites produced no significant improvement of the results. PMID:20167416

  10. Inhibitors incorporating zinc-binding groups target the GlcNAc-PI de-N-acetylase in Trypanosoma brucei, the causative agent of African sleeping sickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelwahab, Nuha Z; Crossman, Arthur T; Sullivan, Lauren; Ferguson, Michael A J; Urbaniak, Michael D

    2012-03-01

    Disruption of glycosylphosphatidylinositol biosynthesis is genetically and chemically validated as a drug target against the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei, the causative agent of African sleeping sickness. The N-acetylglucosamine-phosphatidylinositol de-N-acetylase (deNAc) is a zinc metalloenzyme responsible for the second step of glycosylphosphatidylinositol biosynthesis. We recently reported the synthesis of eight deoxy-2-C-branched monosaccharides containing carboxylic acid, hydroxamic acid, or N-hydroxyurea substituents at the C2 position that may act as zinc-binding groups. Here, we describe the synthesis of a glucocyclitol-phospholipid incorporating a hydroxamic acid moiety and report the biochemical evaluation of the monosaccharides and the glucocyclitol-phospholipid as inhibitors of the trypanosome deNAc in the cell-free system and against recombinant enzyme. Monosaccharides with carboxylic acid or hydroxamic acid substituents were found to be the inhibitors of the trypanosome deNAc with IC(50) values 0.1-1.5mM and the glucocyclitol-phospholipid was found to be a dual inhibitor of the deNAc and the α1-4-mannose transferase with an apparent IC(50)= 19±0.5μm. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  11. Using thermodynamic integration MD simulation to compute relative protein-ligand binding free energy of a GSK3β kinase inhibitor and its analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hsing-Chou; Hsu, Wen-Chi; Liu, An-Lun; Hsu, Chia-Jen; Sun, Ying-Chieh

    2014-06-01

    Thermodynamic integration molecular dynamics simulation was used to investigate how TI-MD simulation preforms in reproducing relative protein-ligand binding free energy of a pair of analogous GSK3β kinase inhibitors of available experimental data (see Fig. 1), and to predict the affinity for other analogs. The computation for the pair gave a ΔΔG of 1.0 kcal/mol, which was in reasonably good agreement with the experimental value of -0.1 kcal/mol. The error bar was estimated at 0.5 kcal/mol. Subsequently, we employed the same protocol to proceed with simulations to find analogous inhibitors with a stronger affinity. Four analogs with a substitution at one site inside the binding pocket were the first to be tried, but no significant enhancement in affinity was found. Subsequent simulations for another 7 analogs was focused on substitutions at the benzene ring of another site, which gave two analogs (analogs 9 and 10) with ΔΔG values of -0.6 and -0.8 kcal/mol, respectively. Both analogs had a OH group at the meta position and another OH group at the ortho position at the other side of the benzene ring, as shown in Table 3. To explore further, another 4 analogs with this characteristic were investigated. Three analogs with ΔΔG values of -2.2, -1.7 and -1.2 kcal/mol, respectively, were found. Hydrogen bond analysis suggested that the additional hydrogen bonds of the added OH groups with Gln185 and/or Asn64, which did not appear in the reference inhibitor or as an analog with one substitution only in the examined cases, were the main contributors to an enhanced affinity. A prediction for better inhibitors should interest experimentalists of enzyme and/or cell assays. Analysis of the interactions between GSK3β kinase and the investigated analogs will be useful in the design of GSK3β kinase inhibitors for compounds of this class. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Efficacy of sublingual lorazepam versus intrarectal diazepam for prolonged convulsions in Sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malu, Célestin Kaputu Kalala; Kahamba, Daniel Mukeba; Walker, Timothy David; Mukampunga, Caritas; Musalu, Eric Mafuta; Kokolomani, Jacques; Mayamba, Richard Mukendi Kavulu; Wilmshurst, Jo M; Dubru, Jean-Marie; Misson, Jean-Paul

    2014-07-01

    In Sub-Saharan Africa, intrarectal diazepam is the first-line anticonvulsant mostly used in children. We aimed to assess this standard care against sublingual lorazepam, a medication potentially as effective and safe, but easier to administer. A randomized controlled trial was conducted in the pediatric emergency departments of 9 hospitals. A total of 436 children aged 5 months to 10 years with convulsions persisting for more than 5 minutes were assigned to receive intrarectal diazepam (0.5 mg/kg, n = 202) or sublingual lorazepam (0.1 mg/kg, n = 234). Sublingual lorazepam stopped seizures within 10 minutes of administration in 56% of children compared with intrarectal diazepam in 79% (P efficacious in stopping pediatric seizures than intrarectal diazepam, and intrarectal diazepam should thus be preferred as a first-line medication in this setting.

  13. Safety and efficacy of diazepam autoinjector for the management of epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verrotti, Alberto; Milioni, Maddalena; Zaccara, Gaetano

    2015-02-01

    Benzodiazepines represent the first choice treatment of acute repetitive seizures, and diazepam is one of the main drugs administered to epileptic patients in the prehospital setting. Currently, Diazepam rectal gel is the only approved therapy for the outpatient management of seizures, but there is a growing need for alternative medications for terminating seizures that may be not only safe and effective but also socially acceptable. According to this, the autoinjector device appears to be a promising tool for the treatment of acute repetitive seizures. Recent studies comparing diazepam autoinjector (AI) with placebo suggest that diazepam AI could be a safe and effective option to treat acute repetitive seizures when administered by trained caregivers in outpatient settings. However, additional studies comparing diazepam AI with a standard treatment are necessary to define possible added benefits of this technique.

  14. Structural Insights into Linear Tri-ubiquitin Recognition by A20-Binding Inhibitor of NF-κB, ABIN-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shan-Meng; Lin, Su-Chang; Hong, Jhen-Yi; Su, Tsung-Wei; Kuo, Bai-Jiun; Chang, Wei-Hsin; Tu, Yi-Fan; Lo, Yu-Chih

    2017-01-03

    Recognition of linear polyubiquitin by specific ubiquitin-binding proteins plays an important role in mediating nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling. A20 binding proteins, ABINs, recognize linear polyubiquitin and A20 through UBAN and AHD1, respectively, for the inhibition of NF-κB activation. Here we report the crystal structure of the AHD1-UBAN fragment of ABIN2 in complex with linear tri-ubiquitin, which reveals a 2:1 stoichiometry of the complex. Structural analyses together with mutagenesis, pull-down, and isothermal titration calorimetry assays show that the hABIN2:tri-ubiquitin interaction is mainly through the primary ubiquitin-binding site, and also through the secondary ubiquitin-binding site under a high local protein concentration. Surprisingly, three ubiquitin units could form a right-handed helical trimer to bridge two ABIN2 dimers. The residues around the M1-linkage are crucial for ABIN2 to recognize tri-ubiquitin. The tri-ubiquitin bridging two ABIN2 dimers model suggests a possible higher-order signaling complex assembled between M1-linked polyubiquitinated proteins, ubiquitin-binding proteins, and effector signaling proteins in signal transduction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A randomized controlled trial of intranasal-midazolam versus intravenous-diazepam for acute childhood seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakker, Arpita; Shanbag, Preeti

    2013-02-01

    The objective of this study is to compare the safety and efficacy of midazolam given intranasally with diazepam given intravenously in the treatment of acute childhood seizures. A randomized controlled study was conducted in a pediatric emergency department in a tertiary general hospital. Fifty children aged from 1 month to 12 years presenting with acute seizures of at least 10 min duration were enrolled during a 12 month period. Intranasal midazolam (0.2 mg/kg) and intravenous diazepam (0.3 mg/kg) were administered. The main outcome measures were interval between arrival at hospital and starting treatment and interval between arrival at hospital and cessation of seizures. Intranasal midazolam and intravenous diazepam were equally effective. Overall 18 of 27 seizures were controlled with midazolam and 15 of 23 with diazepam. The mean interval between arrival at hospital and starting treatment was significantly shorter in the midazolam group [3.37 min (SD 2.46)] as compared to the diazepam group [14.13 min (SD 3.39)]. The mean interval between cessation of seizures and arrival at hospital was significantly shorter in the midazolam group [6.67 min (SD 3.12)] as compared to the diazepam group [17.18 min (SD 5.09)]. The mean interval between control of seizures and administration of the drug was shorter in the diazepam group [2.67 min (SD 2.31)] as compared to the midazolam group [3.01 min (SD 2.79)]. No significant side effects were observed in either group. Seizures were controlled more quickly with intravenous diazepam than with intranasal midazolam. Midazolam was as safe and effective as diazepam. The overall interval between arrival at hospital and cessation of seizures was shorter with intranasal midazolam than with intravenous diazepam. The intranasal route can be possibly used not only in medical centres, but with appropriate instruction by the parents of children with acute seizures at home.

  16. Binding of an octylglucoside detergent molecule in the second substrate (S2) site of LeuT establishes an inhibitor-bound conformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quick, Matthias; Winther, Anne-Marie Lund; Shi, Lei; Nissen, Poul; Weinstein, Harel; Javitch, Jonathan A

    2009-04-07

    The first crystal structure of the neurotransmitter/sodium symporter homolog LeuT revealed an occluded binding pocket containing leucine and 2 Na(+); later structures showed tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) in an extracellular vestibule approximately 11 A above the bound leucine and 2 Na(+). We recently found this region to be a second binding (S2) site and that binding of substrate to this site triggers Na(+)-coupled substrate symport. Here, we show a profound inhibitory effect of n-octyl-beta-d-glucopyranoside (OG), the detergent used for LeuT crystallization, on substrate binding to the S2 site. In parallel, we determined at 2.8 A the structure of LeuT-E290S, a mutant that, like LeuT-WT, binds 2 substrate molecules. This structure was similar to that of WT and clearly revealed an OG molecule in the S2 site. We also observed electron density at the S2 site in LeuT-WT crystals, and this also was accounted for by an OG molecule in that site. Computational analyses, based on the available crystal structures of LeuT, indicated the nature of structural arrangements in the extracellular region of LeuT that differentiate the actions of substrates from inhibitors bound in the S2 site. We conclude that the current LeuT crystal structures, all of which have been solved in OG, represent functionally blocked forms of the transporter, whereas a substrate bound in the S2 site will promote a different state that is essential for Na(+)-coupled symport.

  17. Binding mode characterization of NBD series CD4-mimetic HIV-1 entry inhibitors by X-ray structure and resistance study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curreli, Francesca; Kwon, Young Do; Zhang, Hongtao; Yang, Yongping; Scacalossi, Daniel; Kwong, Peter D; Debnath, Asim K

    2014-09-01

    We previously identified two small-molecule CD4 mimetics--NBD-556 and NBD-557--and synthesized a series of NBD compounds that resulted in improved neutralization activity in a single-cycle HIV-1 infectivity assay. For the current investigation, we selected several of the most active compounds and assessed their antiviral activity on a panel of 53 reference HIV-1 Env pseudoviruses representing diverse clades of clinical isolates. The selected compounds inhibited tested clades with low-micromolar potencies. Mechanism studies indicated that they act as CD4 agonists, a potentially unfavorable therapeutic trait, in that they can bind to the gp120 envelope glycoprotein and initiate a similar physiological response as CD4. However, one of the compounds, NBD-09027, exhibited reduced agonist properties, in both functional and biophysical studies. To understand the binding mode of these inhibitors, we first generated HIV-1-resistant mutants, assessed their behavior with NBD compounds, and determined the X-ray structures of two inhibitors, NBD-09027 and NBD-10007, in complex with the HIV-1 gp120 core at ∼2-Å resolution. Both studies confirmed that the NBD compounds bind similarly to NBD-556 and NBD-557 by inserting their hydrophobic groups into the Phe43 cavity of gp120. The basic nitrogen of the piperidine ring is located in close proximity to D368 of gp120 but it does not form any H-bond or salt bridge, a likely explanation for their nonoptimal antagonist properties. The results reveal the structural and biological character of the NBD series of CD4 mimetics and identify ways to reduce their agonist properties and convert them to antagonists. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  18. TROSY NMR with a 52 kDa sugar transport protein and the binding of a small-molecule inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalverda, Arnout P; Gowdy, James; Thompson, Gary S; Homans, Steve W; Henderson, Peter J F; Patching, Simon G

    2014-06-01

    Using the sugar transport protein, GalP, from Escherichia coli, which is a homologue of human GLUT transporters, we have overcome the challenges for achieving high-resolution [(15)N-(1)H]- and [(13)C-(1)H]-methyl-TROSY NMR spectra with a 52 kDa membrane protein that putatively has 12 transmembrane-spanning α-helices and used the spectra to detect inhibitor binding. The protein reconstituted in DDM detergent micelles retained structural and functional integrity for at least 48 h at a temperature of 25 °C as demonstrated by circular dichroism spectroscopy and fluorescence measurements of ligand binding, respectively. Selective labelling of tryptophan residues reproducibly gave 12 resolved signals for tryptophan (15)N backbone positions and also resolved signals for (15)N side-chain positions. For improved sensitivity isoleucine, leucine and valine (ILV) methyl-labelled protein was prepared, which produced unexpectedly well resolved [(13)C-(1)H]-methyl-TROSY spectra showing clear signals for the majority of methyl groups. The GalP/GLUT inhibitor forskolin was added to the ILV-labelled sample inducing a pronounced chemical shift change in one Ile residue and more subtle changes in other methyl groups. This work demonstrates that high-resolution TROSY NMR spectra can be achieved with large complex α-helical membrane proteins without the use of elevated temperatures. This is a prerequisite to applying further labelling strategies and NMR experiments for measurement of dynamics, structure elucidation and use of the spectra to screen ligand binding.

  19. Molecular dynamics and MM/GBSA-integrated protocol probing the correlation between biological activities and binding free energies of HIV-1 TAR RNA inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peddi, Saikiran Reddy; Sivan, Sree Kanth; Manga, Vijjulatha

    2017-02-01

    The interaction of HIV-1 transactivator protein Tat with its cognate transactivation response (TAR) RNA has emerged as a promising target for developing antiviral compounds and treating HIV infection, since it is a crucial step for efficient transcription and replication. In the present study, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and MM/GBSA calculations have been performed on a series of neamine derivatives in order to estimate appropriate MD simulation time for acceptable correlation between ΔGbind and experimental pIC50 values. Initially, all inhibitors were docked into the active site of HIV-1 TAR RNA. Later to explore various conformations and examine the docking results, MD simulations were carried out. Finally, binding free energies were calculated using MM/GBSA method and were correlated with experimental pIC50 values at different time scales (0-1 to 0-10 ns). From this study, it is clear that in case of neamine derivatives as simulation time increased the correlation between binding free energy and experimental pIC50 values increased correspondingly. Therefore, the binding energies which can be interpreted at longer simulation times can be used to predict the bioactivity of new neamine derivatives. Moreover, in this work, we have identified some plausible critical nucleotide interactions with neamine derivatives that are responsible for potent inhibitory activity. Furthermore, we also provide some insights into a new class of oxadiazole-based back bone cyclic peptides designed by incorporating the structural features of neamine derivatives. On the whole, this approach can provide a valuable guidance for designing new potent inhibitors and modify the existing compounds targeting HIV-1 TAR RNA.

  20. 7-Methoxytacrine-p-Anisidine Hybrids as Novel Dual Binding Site Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitors for Alzheimer’s Disease Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Korabecny

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD is a debilitating progressive neurodegenerative disorder that ultimately leads to the patient’s death. Despite the fact that novel pharmacological approaches endeavoring to block the neurodegenerative process are still emerging, none of them have reached use in clinical practice yet. Thus, palliative treatment represented by acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (AChEIs and memantine are still the only therapeutics used. Following the multi-target directed ligands (MTDLs strategy, herein we describe the synthesis, biological evaluation and docking studies for novel 7-methoxytacrine-p-anisidine hybrids designed to purposely target both cholinesterases and the amyloid cascade. Indeed, the novel derivatives proved to be effective non-specific cholinesterase inhibitors showing non-competitive AChE inhibition patterns. This compounds’ behavior was confirmed in the subsequent molecular modeling studies.

  1. A human fatty acid synthase inhibitor binds β-ketoacyl reductase in the keto-substrate site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardwicke, Mary Ann; Rendina, Alan R; Williams, Shawn P; Moore, Michael L; Wang, Liping; Krueger, Julie A; Plant, Ramona N; Totoritis, Rachel D; Zhang, Guofeng; Briand, Jacques; Burkhart, William A; Brown, Kristin K; Parrish, Cynthia A

    2014-09-01

    Human fatty acid synthase (hFAS) is a complex, multifunctional enzyme that is solely responsible for the de novo synthesis of long chain fatty acids. hFAS is highly expressed in a number of cancers, with low expression observed in most normal tissues. Although normal tissues tend to obtain fatty acids from the diet, tumor tissues rely on de novo fatty acid synthesis, making hFAS an attractive metabolic target for the treatment of cancer. We describe here the identification of GSK2194069, a potent and specific inhibitor of the β-ketoacyl reductase (KR) activity of hFAS; the characterization of its enzymatic and cellular mechanism of action; and its inhibition of human tumor cell growth. We also present the design of a new protein construct suitable for crystallography, which resulted in what is to our knowledge the first co-crystal structure of the human KR domain and includes a bound inhibitor.

  2. Kinetic characterization of factor Xa binding using a quenched fluorescent substrate based on the reactive site of factor Xa inhibitor from Bauhinia ungulata seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva, M L V; Andrade, S A; Juliano, M A; Sallai, R C; Torquato, R J; Sampaio, M U; Pott, V J; Sampaio, C A M

    2003-07-01

    The specific Kunitz Bauhinia ungulata factor Xa inhibitor (BuXI) and the Bauhinia variegata trypsin inhibitor (BvTI) blocked the activity of trypsin, chymotrypsin, plasmin, plasma kallikrein and factor XIIa, and factor Xa inhibition was achieved only by BuXI (K(i) 14 nM). BuXI and BvTI are highly homologous (70%). The major differences are the methionine residues at BuXI reactive site, which are involved in the inhibition, since the oxidized protein no longer inhibits factor Xa but maintains the trypsin inhibition. Quenched fluorescent substrates based on the reactive site sequence of the inhibitors were synthesized and the kinetic parameters of the hydrolysis were determined using factor Xa and trypsin. The catalytic efficiency k(cat)/K(m) 4.3 x 10(7) M(-1)sec(>-1) for Abz-VMIAALPRTMFIQ-EDDnp (lead peptide) hydrolysis by factor Xa was 10(4)-fold higher than that of Boc-Ile-Glu-Gly-Arg-AMC, widely used as factor Xa substrate. Lengthening of the substrate changed its susceptibility to factor Xa hydrolysis. Both methionine residues in the substrate influence the binding to factor Xa. Serine replacement of threonine (P(1)') decreases the catalytic efficiency by four orders of magnitude. Factor Xa did not hydrolyze the substrate containing the reactive site sequence of BvTI, that inhibits trypsin inhibitor but not factor Xa. Abz-VMIAALPRTMFIQ-EDDnp prolonged both the prothrombin time and the activated partial thromboplastin time, and the other modified substrates used in this experiment altered blood-clotting assays.

  3. Dual Exosite-binding Inhibitors of Insulin-degrading Enzyme Challenge Its Role as the Primary Mediator of Insulin Clearance in Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durham, Timothy B; Toth, James L; Klimkowski, Valentine J; Cao, Julia X C; Siesky, Angela M; Alexander-Chacko, Jesline; Wu, Ginger Y; Dixon, Jeffrey T; McGee, James E; Wang, Yong; Guo, Sherry Y; Cavitt, Rachel Nicole; Schindler, John; Thibodeaux, Stefan J; Calvert, Nathan A; Coghlan, Michael J; Sindelar, Dana K; Christe, Michael; Kiselyov, Vladislav V; Michael, M Dodson; Sloop, Kyle W

    2015-08-14

    Insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE, insulysin) is the best characterized catabolic enzyme implicated in proteolysis of insulin. Recently, a peptide inhibitor of IDE has been shown to affect levels of insulin, amylin, and glucagon in vivo. However, IDE(-/-) mice display variable phenotypes relating to fasting plasma insulin levels, glucose tolerance, and insulin sensitivity depending on the cohort and age of animals. Here, we interrogated the importance of IDE-mediated catabolism on insulin clearance in vivo. Using a structure-based design, we linked two newly identified ligands binding at unique IDE exosites together to construct a potent series of novel inhibitors. These compounds do not interact with the catalytic zinc of the protease. Because one of these inhibitors (NTE-1) was determined to have pharmacokinetic properties sufficient to sustain plasma levels >50 times its IDE IC50 value, studies in rodents were conducted. In oral glucose tolerance tests with diet-induced obese mice, NTE-1 treatment improved the glucose excursion. Yet in insulin tolerance tests and euglycemic clamp experiments, NTE-1 did not enhance insulin action or increase plasma insulin levels. Importantly, IDE inhibition with NTE-1 did result in elevated plasma amylin levels, suggesting the in vivo role of IDE action on amylin may be more significant than an effect on insulin. Furthermore, using the inhibitors described in this report, we demonstrate that in HEK cells IDE has little impact on insulin clearance. In total, evidence from our studies supports a minimal role for IDE in insulin metabolism in vivo and suggests IDE may be more important in helping regulate amylin clearance.

  4. Exploration of the nicotinamide-binding site of the tankyrases, identifying 3-arylisoquinolin-1-ones as potent and selective inhibitors in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paine, Helen A; Nathubhai, Amit; Woon, Esther C Y; Sunderland, Peter T; Wood, Pauline J; Mahon, Mary F; Lloyd, Matthew D; Thompson, Andrew S; Haikarainen, Teemu; Narwal, Mohit; Lehtiö, Lari; Threadgill, Michael D

    2015-09-01

    Tankyrases-1 and -2 (TNKS-1 and TNKS-2) have three cellular roles which make them important targets in cancer. Using NAD(+) as a substrate, they poly(ADP-ribosyl)ate TRF1 (regulating lengths of telomeres), NuMA (facilitating mitosis) and axin (in wnt/β-catenin signalling). Using molecular modelling and the structure of the weak inhibitor 5-aminoiso quinolin-1-one, 3-aryl-5-substituted-isoquinolin-1-ones were designed as inhibitors to explore the structure-activity relationships (SARs) for binding and to define the shape of a hydrophobic cavity in the active site. 5-Amino-3-arylisoquinolinones were synthesised by Suzuki-Miyaura coupling of arylboronic acids to 3-bromo-1-methoxy-5-nitro-isoquinoline, reduction and O-demethylation. 3-Aryl-5-methylisoquinolin-1-ones, 3-aryl-5-fluoroisoquinolin-1-ones and 3-aryl-5-methoxyisoquinolin-1-ones were accessed by deprotonation of 3-substituted-N,N,2-trimethylbenzamides and quench with an appropriate benzonitrile. SAR around the isoquinolinone core showed that aryl was required at the 3-position, optimally with a para-substituent. Small meta-substituents were tolerated but groups in the ortho-positions reduced or abolished activity. This was not due to lack of coplanarity of the rings, as shown by the potency of 4,5-dimethyl-3-phenylisoquinolin-1-one. Methyl and methoxy were optimal at the 5-position. SAR was rationalised by modelling and by crystal structures of examples with TNKS-2. The 3-aryl unit was located in a large hydrophobic cavity and the para-substituents projected into a tunnel leading to the exterior. Potency against TNKS-1 paralleled potency against TNKS-2. Most inhibitors were highly selective for TNKSs over PARP-1 and PARP-2. A range of highly potent and selective inhibitors is now available for cellular studies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Post-exposure administration of diazepam combined with soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibition stops seizures and modulates neuroinflammation in a murine model of acute TETS intoxication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vito, Stephen T., E-mail: stvito@ucdavis.edu [Department of Entomology, College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Austin, Adam T., E-mail: aaustin@ucdavis.edu [Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, University of California-Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA 95817 (United States); Banks, Christopher N., E-mail: Christopher.Banks@oehha.ca.gov [Department of Molecular Biosciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Inceoglu, Bora, E-mail: abinceoglu@ucdavis.edu [Department of Entomology, College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Bruun, Donald A., E-mail: dabruun@ucdavis.edu [Department of Molecular Biosciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Zolkowska, Dorota, E-mail: dzolkowska@gmail.com [Department of Neurology, School of Medicine, University of California-Davis, Sacramento, CA 95817 (United States); Tancredi, Daniel J., E-mail: djtancredi@ucdavis.edu [Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, University of California-Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA 95817 (United States); Rogawski, Michael A., E-mail: rogawski@ucdavis.edu [Department of Neurology, School of Medicine, University of California-Davis, Sacramento, CA 95817 (United States); Hammock, Bruce D., E-mail: bdhammock@ucdavis.edu [Department of Entomology, College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Lein, Pamela J., E-mail: pjlein@ucdavis.edu [Department of Molecular Biosciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Tetramethylenedisulfotetramine (TETS) is a potent convulsant poison for which there is currently no approved antidote. The convulsant action of TETS is thought to be mediated by inhibition of type A gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor (GABA{sub A}R) function. We, therefore, investigated the effects of post-exposure administration of diazepam, a GABA{sub A}R positive allosteric modulator, on seizure activity, death and neuroinflammation in adult male Swiss mice injected with a lethal dose of TETS (0.15 mg/kg, ip). Administration of a high dose of diazepam (5 mg/kg, ip) immediately following the second clonic seizure (approximately 20 min post-TETS injection) effectively prevented progression to tonic seizures and death. However, this treatment did not prevent persistent reactive astrogliosis and microglial activation, as determined by GFAP and Iba-1 immunoreactivity and microglial cell morphology. Inhibition of soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) has been shown to exert potent anti-inflammatory effects and to increase survival in mice intoxicated with other GABA{sub A}R antagonists. The sEH inhibitor TUPS (1 mg/kg, ip) administered immediately after the second clonic seizure did not protect TETS-intoxicated animals from tonic seizures or death. Combined administration of diazepam (5 mg/kg, ip) and TUPS (1 mg/kg, ip, starting 1 h after diazepam and repeated every 24 h) prevented TETS-induced lethality and influenced signs of neuroinflammation in some brain regions. Significantly decreased microglial activation and enhanced reactive astrogliosis were observed in the hippocampus, with no changes in the cortex. Combining an agent that targets specific anti-inflammatory mechanisms with a traditional antiseizure drug may enhance treatment outcome in TETS intoxication. - Highlights: • Acute TETS intoxication causes delayed and persistent neuroinflammation. • Diazepam given post-TETS prevents lethal tonic seizures but not neuroinflammation. • A soluble epoxide hydrolase

  6. High affinity ligands for 'diazepam-insensitive' benzodiazepine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, G; Skolnick, P

    1992-01-14

    Structurally diverse compounds have been shown to possess high affinities for benzodiazepine receptors in their 'diazepam-sensitive' (DS) conformations. In contrast, only the imidazobenzodiazepinone Ro 15-4513 has been shown to exhibit a high affinity for the 'diazepam-insensitive' (DI) conformation of benzodiazepine receptors. We examined a series of 1,4-diazepines containing one or more annelated ring systems for their affinities at DI and DS benzodiazepine receptors, several 1,4-diazepinone carboxylates including Ro 19-4603, Ro 16-6028 and Ro 15-3505 were found to possess high affinities (Ki approximately 2.6-20 nM) for DI. Nonetheless, among the ligands examined, Ro 15-4513 was the only substance with a DI/DS potency ratio approximately 1; other substances had ratios ranging from 13 to greater than 1000. Ligands with high to moderate affinities at DI were previously classified as partial agonists, antagonists, or partial inverse agonists at DS benzodiazepine receptors, but behaved as 'GABA neutral' (antagonist) substances at DI. The identification of several additional high affinity ligands at DI benzodiazepine receptors may be helpful in elucidating the pharmacological and physiological importance of these sites.

  7. Binding of the Respiratory Chain Inhibitor Antimycin to theMitochondrial bc1 Complex: A New Crystal Structure Reveals an AlteredIntramolecular Hydrogen-Bonding Pattern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Li-shar; Cobessi, David; Tung, Eric Y.; Berry, Edward A.

    2005-05-10

    Antimycin A (antimycin), one of the first known and most potent inhibitors of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, binds to the quinone reduction site of the cytochrome bc1 complex.Structure-activity-relationship studies have shown that the N-formylamino-salicyl-amide group is responsible for most of the binding specificity, and suggested that a low pKa for the phenolic OH group and an intramolecular H-bond between that OH and the carbonyl O of the salicylamide linkage are important. Two previous X-ray structures of antimycin bound to vertebrate bc1 complex gave conflicting results. A new structure reported here of the bovine mitochondrial bc1 complex at 2.28Angstrom resolution with antimycin bound, allows us for the first time to reliably describe the binding of antimycin and shows that the intramolecular hydrogen bond described in solution and in the small-molecule structure is replaced by one involving the NH rather than carbonyl O of the amide linkage, with rotation of the amide group relative to the aromatic ring. The phenolic OH and formylamino N form H-bonds with conserved Asp228 of cyt b, and the formylamino O H-bonds via a water molecule to Lys227. A strong density the right size and shape for a diatomic molecule is found between the other side of the dilactone ring and the alpha-A helix.

  8. Molecular Probing of the HPV-16 E6 Protein Alpha Helix Binding Groove with Small Molecule Inhibitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Rietz

    Full Text Available The human papillomavirus (HPV HPV E6 protein has emerged as a central oncoprotein in HPV-associated cancers in which sustained expression is required for tumor progression. A majority of the E6 protein interactions within the human proteome use an alpha-helix groove interface for binding. The UBE3A/E6AP HECT domain ubiquitin ligase binds E6 at this helix-groove interface. This enables formation of a trimeric complex with p53, resulting in destruction of this tumor suppressor. While recent x-ray crystal structures are useful, examples of small molecule probes that can modulate protein interactions at this interface are limited. To develop insights useful for potential structure-based design of ligands for HPV E6, a series of 2,6-disubstituted benzopyranones were prepared and tested as competitive antagonists of E6-E6AP helix-groove interactions. These small molecule probes were used in both binding and functional assays to evaluate recognition features of the E6 protein. Evidence for an ionic functional group interaction within the helix groove was implicated by the structure-activity among the highest affinity ligands. The molecular topographies of these protein-ligand interactions were evaluated by comparing the binding and activities of single amino acid E6 mutants with the results of molecular dynamic simulations. A group of arginine residues that form a rim-cap over the E6 helix groove offer compensatory roles in binding and recognition of the small molecule probes. The flexibility and impact on the overall helix-groove shape dictated by these residues offer new insights for structure-based targeting of HPV E6.

  9. Inhibition of diazepam and gamma-aminobutyric acid of depolarization-induced release of (/sup 14/C)cysteine sulfinate and (/sup 3/H)glutamate in rat hippocampal slices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baba, A.; Okumura, S.; Mizuo, H.; Iwata, H.

    1983-01-01

    Effects of diazepam and gamma-aminobutyric acid-related compounds on the release of (/sup 14/C)cysteine sulfinate and (/sup 3/H)glutamate from preloaded hippocampal slices of rat brain were examined by a superfusion method. Diazepam markedly inhibited the release of cysteine sulfinate and glutamate evoked either by high K/sup +/ or veratridine without affecting that of other neurotransmitter candidates, e.g., gamma-aminobutyric acid, acetylcholine, noradrenaline, and dopamine; IC50 values for the release of cysteine sulfinate and glutamate were about 20 and 7 microM, respectively. gamma-Aminobutyric acid (1 to 10 microM) and muscimol (100 microM) significantly reduced high K+-stimulated release of glutamate. Bicuculline, which had no effect on the release at a concentration of 50 microM by itself, antagonized the inhibitor effects of diazepam and gamma-aminobutyric acid on glutamate release. Similar results were obtained with the release of cysteine sulfinate except that a high concentration (100 microM) of gamma-aminobutyric acid was required for the inhibition. These results indicate the modulation by gamma-aminobutyric acid innervation of the release of excitatory amino acids in rat hippocampal formation, and also suggest that some of the pharmacological effects of diazepam may be a consequence of inhibition of excitatory amino acid transmission.

  10. Identification of benzimidazole diamides as selective inhibitors of the nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 2 (NOD2 signaling pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J Rickard

    Full Text Available NOD2 is an intracellular pattern recognition receptor that assembles with receptor-interacting protein (RIP-2 kinase in response to the presence of bacterial muramyl dipeptide (MDP in the host cell cytoplasm, thereby inducing signals leading to the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. The dysregulation of NOD2 signaling has been associated with various inflammatory disorders suggesting that small-molecule inhibitors of this signaling complex may have therapeutic utility. To identify inhibitors of the NOD2 signaling pathway, we utilized a cell-based screening approach and identified a benzimidazole diamide compound designated GSK669 that selectively inhibited an MDP-stimulated, NOD2-mediated IL-8 response without directly inhibiting RIP2 kinase activity. Moreover, GSK669 failed to inhibit cytokine production in response to the activation of Toll-like receptor (TLR-2, tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR-1 and closely related NOD1, all of which share common downstream components with the NOD2 signaling pathway. While the inhibitors blocked MDP-induced NOD2 responses, they failed to block signaling induced by NOD2 over-expression or single stranded RNA, suggesting specificity for the MDP-induced signaling complex and activator-dependent differences in NOD2 signaling. Investigation of structure-activity relationship allowed the identification of more potent analogs that maintained NOD2 selectivity. The largest boost in activity was achieved by N-methylation of the C2-ethyl amide group. These findings demonstrate that the NOD2 signaling pathway is amenable to modulation by small molecules that do not target RIP2 kinase activity. The compounds we identified should prove useful tools to investigate the importance of NOD2 in various inflammatory processes and may have potential clinical utility.

  11. Identification of Benzimidazole Diamides as Selective Inhibitors of the Nucleotide-Binding Oligomerization Domain 2 (NOD2) Signaling Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickard, David J.; Sehon, Clark A.; Kasparcova, Viera; Kallal, Lorena A.; Zeng, Xin; Montoute, Monica N.; Chordia, Tushar; Poore, Derek D.; Li, Hu; Wu, Zining; Eidam, Patrick M.; Haile, Pamela A.; Yu, Jong; Emery, John G.; Marquis, Robert W.; Gough, Peter J.; Bertin, John

    2013-01-01

    NOD2 is an intracellular pattern recognition receptor that assembles with receptor-interacting protein (RIP)-2 kinase in response to the presence of bacterial muramyl dipeptide (MDP) in the host cell cytoplasm, thereby inducing signals leading to the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. The dysregulation of NOD2 signaling has been associated with various inflammatory disorders suggesting that small-molecule inhibitors of this signaling complex may have therapeutic utility. To identify inhibitors of the NOD2 signaling pathway, we utilized a cell-based screening approach and identified a benzimidazole diamide compound designated GSK669 that selectively inhibited an MDP-stimulated, NOD2-mediated IL-8 response without directly inhibiting RIP2 kinase activity. Moreover, GSK669 failed to inhibit cytokine production in response to the activation of Toll-like receptor (TLR)-2, tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR)-1 and closely related NOD1, all of which share common downstream components with the NOD2 signaling pathway. While the inhibitors blocked MDP-induced NOD2 responses, they failed to block signaling induced by NOD2 over-expression or single stranded RNA, suggesting specificity for the MDP-induced signaling complex and activator-dependent differences in NOD2 signaling. Investigation of structure-activity relationship allowed the identification of more potent analogs that maintained NOD2 selectivity. The largest boost in activity was achieved by N-methylation of the C2-ethyl amide group. These findings demonstrate that the NOD2 signaling pathway is amenable to modulation by small molecules that do not target RIP2 kinase activity. The compounds we identified should prove useful tools to investigate the importance of NOD2 in various inflammatory processes and may have potential clinical utility. PMID:23936340

  12. Importance of the Extracellular Loop 4 in the Human Serotonin Transporter for Inhibitor Binding and Substrate Translocation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rannversson, Hafsteinn; Wilson, Pamela; Kristensen, Kristina

    2015-01-01

    is connected to both sides of the membrane by permeation pathways, of which only one is accessible at a time. The coordinated conformational changes in SERT associated with substrate translocation are not fully understood. Here, we have identified a Leu to Glu mutation at position 406 (L406E......) in the extracellular loop 4 (EL4) of human SERT, which induced a remarkable gain-of-potency (up to >40-fold) for a range of SERT inhibitors. The effects were highly specific for L406E relative to six other mutations in the same position, including the closely related L406D mutation, showing that the effects induced...

  13. Triplatin, a platelet aggregation inhibitor from the salivary gland of the triatomine vector of Chagas disease, binds to TXA(2) but does not interact with glycoprotein PVI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Dongying; Assumpção, Teresa C F; Li, Yuan; Andersen, John F; Ribeiro, José; Francischetti, Ivo M B

    2012-01-01

    Salivary glands from haematophagous animals express a notable diversity of negative modulators of platelet function. Triplatin is an inhibitor of collagen-induced platelet aggregation which has been described as an antagonist of glycoprotein VI (GPVI). Because triplatin displays sequence homology to members of the lipocalin family of proteins, we investigated whether triplatin mechanism of action could be explained by interaction with pro-haemostatic prostaglandins. Our results demonstrate that triplatin inhibits platelet aggregation induced by low doses of collagen, thromboxane A2 (TXA(2)) mimetic (U46619), and arachidonic acid (AA). On the other hand, it does not inhibit platelet aggregation by convulxin, PMA, or low-dose ADP. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) revealed that triplatin binds AA, cTXA(2), TXB(2), U46619 or prostaglandin (PG)H(2) mimetic (U51605). Consistent with its ligand specificity, triplatin induces relaxation of rat aorta contracted with U46619. Triplatin also interacts with PGF(2α) and PGJ(2), but not with leukotrienes, AA or biogenic amines. Surface plasmon resonance experiments failed to demonstrate interaction of triplatin with GPVI; it also did to inhibit platelet adhesion to fibrillar or soluble collagen. Because triplatin displays sequence similarity to apolipoprotein D (ApoD) - a lipocalin associated with high-density lipoprotein, ApoD was tested as a putative TXA(2)-binding molecule. ITC failed to demonstrate binding of ApoD to all prostanoids described above, or to AA. Furthermore, ApoD was devoid of inhibitory properties towards platelets activation by AA, collagen, or U46619. In conclusion, triplatin mechanism of action has been elucidated without ambiguity as a novel TXA(2)- and PGF(2α)- binding protein. It conceivably blocks platelet aggregation and vasoconstriction, thus contributing to successful blood feeding at the vector-host interface.

  14. Novel bis-(−)-nor-meptazinol derivatives act as dual binding site AChE inhibitors with metal-complexing property

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Wei [Department of Medicinal Chemistry, School of Pharmacy, Fudan University, 826 Zhangheng Road, Shanghai 200032 (China); NPFPC Key Laboratory of Contraceptives and Devices, Shanghai Institute of Planned Parenthood Research, 2140 Xietu Road, Shanghai 200032 (China); Li, Juan [Department of Pharmacology, Institute of Medical Sciences, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, 280 South Chongqing Road, Shanghai 200025 (China); Qiu, Zhuibai [Department of Medicinal Chemistry, School of Pharmacy, Fudan University, 826 Zhangheng Road, Shanghai 200032 (China); Xia, Zheng [Department of Pharmacology, Institute of Medical Sciences, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, 280 South Chongqing Road, Shanghai 200025 (China); Li, Wei [Department of Medicinal Chemistry, School of Pharmacy, Fudan University, 826 Zhangheng Road, Shanghai 200032 (China); Yu, Lining; Chen, Hailin; Chen, Jianxing [NPFPC Key Laboratory of Contraceptives and Devices, Shanghai Institute of Planned Parenthood Research, 2140 Xietu Road, Shanghai 200032 (China); Chen, Yan; Hu, Zhuqin; Zhou, Wei; Shao, Biyun; Cui, Yongyao [Department of Pharmacology, Institute of Medical Sciences, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, 280 South Chongqing Road, Shanghai 200025 (China); Xie, Qiong, E-mail: xiejoanxq@gmail.com [Department of Medicinal Chemistry, School of Pharmacy, Fudan University, 826 Zhangheng Road, Shanghai 200032 (China); Chen, Hongzhuan, E-mail: yaoli@shsmu.edu.cn [Department of Pharmacology, Institute of Medical Sciences, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, 280 South Chongqing Road, Shanghai 200025 (China)

    2012-10-01

    The strategy of dual binding site acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition along with metal chelation may represent a promising direction for multi-targeted interventions in the pathophysiological processes of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In the present study, two derivatives (ZLA and ZLB) of a potent dual binding site AChE inhibitor bis-(−)-nor-meptazinol (bis-MEP) were designed and synthesized by introducing metal chelating pharmacophores into the middle chain of bis-MEP. They could inhibit human AChE activity with IC{sub 50} values of 9.63 μM (for ZLA) and 8.64 μM (for ZLB), and prevent AChE-induced amyloid-β (Aβ) aggregation with IC{sub 50} values of 49.1 μM (for ZLA) and 55.3 μM (for ZLB). In parallel, molecular docking analysis showed that they are capable of interacting with both the catalytic and peripheral anionic sites of AChE. Furthermore, they exhibited abilities to complex metal ions such as Cu(II) and Zn(II), and inhibit Aβ aggregation triggered by these metals. Collectively, these results suggest that ZLA and ZLB may act as dual binding site AChEIs with metal-chelating potency, and may be potential leads of value for further study on disease-modifying treatment of AD. -- Highlights: ► Two novel bis-(−)-nor-meptazinol derivatives are designed and synthesized. ► ZLA and ZLB may act as dual binding site AChEIs with metal-chelating potency. ► They are potential leads for disease-modifying treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

  15. Intravenous sodium valproate versus diazepam infusion for the control of refractory status epilepticus in children: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Vishal; Singhi, Pratibha; Singhi, Sunit

    2007-10-01

    An open-label, randomized controlled study was conducted at a tertiary care teaching hospital to compare efficacy and safety of intravenous sodium valproate versus diazepam infusion for control of refractory status epilepticus. Forty children with refractory status epilepticus were randomized to receive either intravenous sodium valproate or diazepam infusion. Refractory status epilepticus was controlled in 80% of the valproate and 85% of the diazepam patients. The median time to control refractory status epilepticus was less in the valproate group (5 minutes) than the diazepam group (17 minutes; P diazepam group 60% required ventilation and 50% developed hypotension after starting diazepam infusion. No adverse effects on liver functions were seen with valproate. It is concluded that intravenous sodium valproate is an effective alternative to diazepam infusion in controlling refractory status epilepticus in children and is free of respiratory depression and hypotension.

  16. Monomerization of viral entry inhibitor griffithsin elucidates the relationship between multivalent binding to carbohydrates and anti-HIV activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulaei, Tinoush; Shenoy, Shilpa R; Giomarelli, Barbara; Thomas, Cheryl; McMahon, James B; Dauter, Zbigniew; O'Keefe, Barry R; Wlodawer, Alexander

    2010-09-08

    Mutations were introduced to the domain-swapped homodimer of the antiviral lectin griffithsin (GRFT). Whereas several single and double mutants remained dimeric, insertion of either two or four amino acids at the dimerization interface resulted in a monomeric form of the protein (mGRFT). Monomeric character of the modified proteins was confirmed by sedimentation equilibrium ultracentrifugation and by their high resolution X-ray crystal structures, whereas their binding to carbohydrates was assessed by isothermal titration calorimetry. Cell-based antiviral activity assays utilizing different variants of mGRFT indicated that the monomeric form of the lectin had greatly reduced activity against HIV-1, suggesting that the antiviral activity of GRFT stems from crosslinking and aggregation of viral particles via multivalent interactions between GRFT and oligosaccharides present on HIV envelope glycoproteins. Atomic resolution crystal structure of a complex between mGRFT and nonamannoside revealed that a single mGRFT molecule binds to two different nonamannoside molecules through all three carbohydrate-binding sites present on the monomer.

  17. Parenteral midazolam is superior to diazepam for treatment of prehospital seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemency, Brian M; Ott, Jamie A; Tanski, Christopher T; Bart, Joseph A; Lindstrom, Heather A

    2015-01-01

    Diazepam and midazolam are commonly used by paramedics to treat seizures. A period of drug scarcity was used as an opportunity to compare their effectiveness in treating prehospital seizures. A retrospective chart review of a single, large, commercial agency during a 29-month period was performed. The period included alternating shortages of both medications. Ambulances were stocked with either diazepam or midazolam based on availability of the drugs. Adult patients who received at least 1 parenteral dose of diazepam or midazolam for treatment of seizures were included. The regional prehospital protocol recommended 5 mg intravenous (IV) diazepam, 5 mg intramuscular (IM) diazepam, 5 mg IM midazolam, or 2.5 mg IV midazolam. Medication effectiveness was compared with respect to the primary end point: cessation of seizure without repeat seizure during the prehospital encounter. A total of 440 study subjects received 577 administrations of diazepam or midazolam and met the study criteria. The subjects were 52% male, with a mean age of 48 (range 18-94) years. A total of 237 subjects received 329 doses of diazepam, 64 (27%) were treated with first-dose IM. A total of 203 subjects received 248 doses of midazolam; 71 (35%) were treated with first-dose IM. Seizure stopped and did not recur in 49% of subjects after parenteral diazepam and 65% of subjects after parenteral midazolam (p = 0.002). Diazepam and midazolam exhibited similar first dose success for IV administration (58 vs. 62%; p = 0.294). Age, gender, seizure history, hypoglycemia, the presence of trauma, time to first administration, prehospital contact time, and frequency of IM administration were similar between groups. For parenteral administration, midazolam demonstrated superior first-dose seizure suppression. This study demonstrates how periods of drug scarcity can be utilized to study prehospital medication effectiveness.

  18. A computational analysis of the binding mode of closantel as inhibitor of the Onchocerca volvulus chitinase: insights on macrofilaricidal drug design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura-Cabrera, Aldo; Bocanegra-García, Virgilio; Lizarazo-Ortega, Cristian; Guo, Xianwu; Correa-Basurto, José; Rodríguez-Pérez, Mario A.

    2011-12-01

    Onchocerciasis is a leading cause of blindness with at least 37 million people infected and more than 120 million people at risk of contracting the disease; most (99%) of this population, threatened by infection, live in Africa. The drug of choice for mass treatment is the microfilaricidal Mectizan® (ivermectin); it does not kill the adult stages of the parasite at the standard dose which is a single annual dose aimed at disease control. However, multiple treatments a year with ivermectin have effects on adult worms. The discovery of new therapeutic targets and drugs directed towards the killing of the adult parasites are thus urgently needed. The chitinase of filarial nematodes is a new drug target due to its essential function in the metabolism and molting of the parasite. Closantel is a potent and specific inhibitor of chitinase of Onchocerca volvulus (OvCHT1) and other filarial chitinases. However, the binding mode and specificity of closantel towards OvCHT1 remain unknown. In the absence of a crystallographic structure of OvCHT1, we developed a homology model of OvCHT1 using the currently available X-ray structures of human chitinases as templates. Energy minimization and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of the model led to a high quality of 3D structure of OvCHIT1. A flexible docking study using closantel as the ligand on the binding site of OvCHIT1 and human chitinases was performed and demonstrated the differences in the closantel binding mode between OvCHIT1 and human chitinase. Furthermore, molecular dynamics simulations and free-energy calculation were employed to determine and compare the detailed binding mode of closantel with OvCHT1 and the structure of human chitinase. This comparative study allowed identification of structural features and properties responsible for differences in the computationally predicted closantel binding modes. The homology model and the closantel binding mode reported herein might help guide the rational development of

  19. Use of molecular modeling, docking, and 3D-QSAR studies for the determination of the binding mode of benzofuran-3-yl-(indol-3-yl)maleimides as GSK-3beta inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ki Hwan; Gaisina, Irina; Gallier, Franck; Holzle, Denise; Blond, Sylvie Y; Mesecar, Andrew; Kozikowski, Alan P

    2009-12-01

    Molecular modeling and docking studies along with three-dimensional quantitative structure relationships (3D-QSAR) studies have been used to determine the correct binding mode of glycogen synthase kinase 3beta (GSK-3beta) inhibitors. The approaches of comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) and comparative molecular similarity index analysis (CoMSIA) are used for the 3D-QSAR of 51 substituted benzofuran-3-yl-(indol-3-yl)maleimides as GSK-3beta inhibitors. Two binding modes of the inhibitors to the binding site of GSK-3beta are investigated. The binding mode 1 yielded better 3D-QSAR correlations using both CoMFA and CoMSIA methodologies. The three-component CoMFA model from the steric and electrostatic fields for the experimentally determined pIC(50) values has the following statistics: R(2)(cv) = 0.386 nd SE(cv) = 0.854 for the cross-validation, and R(2) = 0.811 and SE = 0.474 for the fitted correlation. F (3,47) = 67.034, and probability of R(2) = 0 (3,47) = 0.000. The binding mode suggested by the results of this study is consistent with the preliminary results of X-ray crystal structures of inhibitor-bound GSK-3beta. The 3D-QSAR models were used for the estimation of the inhibitory potency of two additional compounds.

  20. Use of Molecular Modelling, Docking, and 3D-QSAR Studies for the Determination of the Binding Mode of 3-Benzofuranyl-4-indolyl-maleimides as GSK-3β Inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ki Hwan; Gaisina, Irina; Gallier, Franck; Holzle, Denise; Blond, Sylvie Y.; Mesecar, Andrew; Kozikowski, Alan P.

    2010-01-01

    Molecular modelling and docking studies along with three-dimensional quantitative structure relationships (3D-QSAR) studies have been used to determine the correct binding mode of glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK-3β) inhibitors. The approaches of Comparative Molecular Field Analysis (CoMFA) and Comparative Molecular Similarity Index Analysis (CoMSIA) are used for the 3D-QSAR of 51 substituted 3-benzofuranyl-4-indolyl-maleimides as GSK-3β inhibitors. Two binding modes of the inhibitors to the binding site of GSK-3β are investigated. The binding mode 1 yielded better 3D-QSAR correlations using both CoMFA and CoMSIA methodologies. The three-component CoMFA model from the steric and electrostatic fields for the experimentally determined pIC50 values has the following statistics: R2(cv) = 0.386 and SE(cv) = 0.854 for the cross-validation, and R2 = 0.811 and SE = 0.474 for the fitted correlation. F (3,47) = 67.034, and Probability.of R2 = 0 (3,47) = 0.000. The binding mode suggested by the results of this study is consistent with the preliminary results of X-ray crystal structures of inhibitor-bound GSK-3β. The 3D-QSAR models were used for the estimation of the inhibitory potency of two additional compounds. PMID:19440740

  1. Small molecule inhibitor of antigen binding and presentation by HLA-DR2b as a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Niannian; Somanaboeina, Animesh; Dixit, Aakanksha; Kawamura, Kazuyuki; Hayward, Neil J; Self, Christopher; Olson, Gary L; Forsthuber, Thomas G

    2013-11-15

    The strong association of HLA-DR2b (DRB1*1501) with multiple sclerosis (MS) suggests this molecule as prime target for specific immunotherapy. Inhibition of HLA-DR2b-restricted myelin-specific T cells has the potential to selectively prevent CNS pathology mediated by these MHC molecules without undesired global immunosuppression. In this study, we report development of a highly selective small molecule inhibitor of peptide binding and presentation by HLA-DR2b. PV-267, the candidate molecule used in these studies, inhibited cytokine production and proliferation of myelin-specific HLA-DR2b-restricted T cells. PV-267 had no significant effect on T cell responses mediated by other MHC class II molecules, including HLA-DR1, -DR4, or -DR9. Importantly, PV-267 did not induce nonspecific immune activation of human PBMC. Lastly, PV-267 showed treatment efficacy both in preventing experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and in treating established disease. The results suggest that blocking the MS-associated HLA-DR2b allele with small molecule inhibitors may be a promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of MS.

  2. Investigating the position of the hairpin loop in New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase, NDM-1, during catalysis and inhibitor binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aitha, Mahesh; Moller, Abraham J; Sahu, Indra D; Horitani, Masaki; Tierney, David L; Crowder, Michael W

    2016-03-01

    In an effort to examine the relative position of a hairpin loop in New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase, NDM-1, during catalysis, rapid freeze quench double electron electron resonance (RFQ-DEER) spectroscopy was used. A doubly-labeled mutant of NDM-1, which had one spin label on the invariant loop at position 69 and another label at position 235, was prepared and characterized. The reaction of the doubly spin labeled mutant with chromacef was freeze quenched at 500μs and 10ms. DEER results showed that the average distance between labels decreased by 4Å in the 500μs quenched sample and by 2Å in the 10ms quenched sample, as compared to the distance in the unreacted enzyme, although the peaks corresponding to distance distributions were very broad. DEER spectra with the doubly spin labeled enzyme with two inhibitors showed that the distance between the loop residue at position 69 and the spin label at position 235 does not change upon inhibitor binding. This study suggests that the hairpin loop in NDM-1 moves over the metal ion during the catalysis and then moves back to its original position after hydrolysis, which is consistent with a previous hypothesis based on NMR solution studies on a related metallo-β-lactamase. This study also demonstrates that this loop motion occurs in the millisecond time domain.

  3. Tankyrase Inhibitors Stimulate the Ability of Tankyrases to Bind Axin and Drive Assembly of β-Catenin Degradation-Competent Axin Puncta.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estefania Martino-Echarri

    Full Text Available Activation of the wnt signaling pathway is a major cause of colon cancer development. Tankyrase inhibitors (TNKSi have recently been developed to block the wnt pathway by increasing axin levels to promote degradation of the wnt-regulator β-catenin. TNKSi bind to the PARP (poly(ADPribose polymerase catalytic region of tankyrases (TNKS, preventing the PARylation of TNKS and axin that normally control axin levels through ubiquitination and degradation. TNKSi treatment of APC-mutant SW480 colorectal cancer cells can induce axin puncta which act as sites for assembly of β-catenin degradation complexes, however this process is poorly understood. Using this model system, we found that siRNA knockdown of TNKSs 1 and 2 actually blocked the ability of TNKSi drugs to induce axin puncta, revealing that puncta formation requires both the expression and the inactivation of TNKS. Immunoprecipitation assays showed that treatment of cells with TNKSi caused a strong increase in the formation of axin-TNKS complexes, correlating with an increase in insoluble or aggregated forms of TNKS/axin. The efficacy of TNKSi was antagonized by proteasome inhibitors, which stabilized the PARylated form of TNKS1 and reduced TNKSi-mediated assembly of axin-TNKS complexes and puncta. We hypothesise that TNKSi act to stimulate TNKS oligomerization and assembly of the TNKS-axin scaffold that form puncta. These new insights may help in optimising the future application of TNKSi in anticancer drug design.

  4. Induction of Covalently Crosslinked p62 Oligomers with Reduced Binding to Polyubiquitinated Proteins by the Autophagy Inhibitor Verteporfin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Donohue

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a cellular catabolic process responsible for the degradation of cytoplasmic constituents, including organelles and long-lived proteins, that helps maintain cellular homeostasis and protect against various cellular stresses. Verteporfin is a benzoporphyrin derivative used clinically in photodynamic therapy to treat macular degeneration. Verteporfin was recently found to inhibit autophagosome formation by an unknown mechanism that does not require exposure to light. We report that verteporfin directly targets and modifies p62, a scaffold and adaptor protein that binds both polyubiquitinated proteins destined for degradation and LC3 on autophagosomal membranes. Western blotting experiments revealed that exposure of cells or purified p62 to verteporfin causes the formation of covalently crosslinked p62 oligomers by a mechanism involving low-level singlet oxygen production. Rose bengal, a singlet oxygen producer structurally unrelated to verteporfin, also produced crosslinked p62 oligomers and inhibited autophagosome formation. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated that crosslinked p62 oligomers retain their ability to bind to LC3 but show defective binding to polyubiquitinated proteins. Mutations in the p62 PB1 domain that abolish self-oligomerization also abolished crosslinked oligomer formation. Interestingly, small amounts of crosslinked p62 oligomers were detected in untreated cells, and other groups noted the accumulation of p62 forms with reduced SDS-PAGE mobility in cellular and animal models of oxidative stress and aging. These data indicate that p62 is particularly susceptible to oxidative crosslinking and lead us to propose a model whereby oxidized crosslinked p62 oligomers generated rapidly by drugs like verteporfin or over time during the aging process interfere with autophagy.

  5. Induction of Covalently Crosslinked p62 Oligomers with Reduced Binding to Polyubiquitinated Proteins by the Autophagy Inhibitor Verteporfin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donohue, Elizabeth; Balgi, Aruna D; Komatsu, Masaaki; Roberge, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy is a cellular catabolic process responsible for the degradation of cytoplasmic constituents, including organelles and long-lived proteins, that helps maintain cellular homeostasis and protect against various cellular stresses. Verteporfin is a benzoporphyrin derivative used clinically in photodynamic therapy to treat macular degeneration. Verteporfin was recently found to inhibit autophagosome formation by an unknown mechanism that does not require exposure to light. We report that verteporfin directly targets and modifies p62, a scaffold and adaptor protein that binds both polyubiquitinated proteins destined for degradation and LC3 on autophagosomal membranes. Western blotting experiments revealed that exposure of cells or purified p62 to verteporfin causes the formation of covalently crosslinked p62 oligomers by a mechanism involving low-level singlet oxygen production. Rose bengal, a singlet oxygen producer structurally unrelated to verteporfin, also produced crosslinked p62 oligomers and inhibited autophagosome formation. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated that crosslinked p62 oligomers retain their ability to bind to LC3 but show defective binding to polyubiquitinated proteins. Mutations in the p62 PB1 domain that abolish self-oligomerization also abolished crosslinked oligomer formation. Interestingly, small amounts of crosslinked p62 oligomers were detected in untreated cells, and other groups noted the accumulation of p62 forms with reduced SDS-PAGE mobility in cellular and animal models of oxidative stress and aging. These data indicate that p62 is particularly susceptible to oxidative crosslinking and lead us to propose a model whereby oxidized crosslinked p62 oligomers generated rapidly by drugs like verteporfin or over time during the aging process interfere with autophagy.

  6. Selective human enterovirus and rhinovirus inhibitors: An overview of capsid-binding and protease-inhibiting molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Shin-Ru; Chen, Shu-Jen; Hakimelahi, Gholam Hossein; Liu, Hsing-Jang; Tseng, Chen-Tso; Shia, Kak-Shan

    2004-07-01

    The absence of effective vaccines for most viral infections highlights an urgent necessity for the design and development of effective antiviral drugs. Due to the advancement in virology since the late 1980s, several key events in the viral life cycle have been well delineated and a number of molecular targets have been validated, culminating in the emergence of many new antiviral drugs in recent years. Inhibitors against enteroviruses and rhinoviruses, responsible for about half of the human common colds, are currently under active investigation. Agents targeted at either viral protein 1 (VP1), a relatively conserved capsid structure mediating viral adsorption/uncoating process, or 3C protease, which is highly conserved among different serotypes and essential for viral replication, are of great potential to become antipicornavirus drugs.

  7. Chlordiazepoxide and diazepam induced mouse killing by rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leaf, R C; Wnek, D J; Gay, P E; Corcia, R M; Lamon, S

    1975-10-14

    Chlordiazepoxide HCl, at dose levels from 2.5 mg/kg to 80 mg/kg, significantly increased the low base rates of mouse killing (3-9%) observed in large samples (N = 100/dose) of Holtzman strain albino male rats. Maximal killing rates were obtained at doses from 7.5 mg/kg to 20 mg/kg. Diazepam was equally effective, and several times more potent than chlordiazepoxide. Pentobarbital did not increase killing. Killing induced by chlordiazepoxide was blocked by d-amphetamine SO4, but not by l-amphetamine, at dose levels similar to those that block undrugged killing in this strain (ED50 = 1.5 mg/kg). Unlike pilocarpine-induced killing, the effects of chlordiazepoxide were not increased or decreased significantly by either peripherally or centrally active anticholinergic drugs, over wide dose ranges of these agents; nor were the effects of chlordiazepoxide increased by repeated daily administration.

  8. Diazepam influences urinary bioindicator of occupational toluene exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, Alberto Thalison; Albuquerque, Ana Carolina Campos; Lepera, José Salvador; Martins, Isarita

    2016-12-01

    In the present study, we investigated the influence of diazepam (DZP) on the excretion of TOL by examining their urinary metabolites, hippuric acid (HA) and ortho-cresol (o-C). Male Wistar rats were exposed to TOL (20ppm) in a nose-only exposure chamber (6h/day, 5days/week for 6 weeks) with simultaneous administration of DZP (10mg/kg/day). Urinary o-C levels were determined by GC-MS, while HA, creatinine (CR), DZP and its metabolite, nordiazepam, were analysed by HPLC-DAD. The results of a Mann-Whitney U test showed that DZP influenced the urinary excretion of o-C (ptoluene exposure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Exploring the Molecular Basis for Selective Binding of Homoserine Dehydrogenase from Mycobacterium leprae TN toward Inhibitors: A Virtual Screening Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Dongling; Wang, Dongmei; Min, Weihong; Han, Weiwei

    2014-01-01

    Homoserine dehydrogenase (HSD) from Mycobacterium leprae TN is an antifungal target for antifungal properties including efficacy against the human pathogen. The 3D structure of HSD has been firmly established by homology modeling methods. Using the template, homoserine dehydrogenase from Thiobacillus denitrificans (PDB Id 3MTJ), a sequence identity of 40% was found and molecular dynamics simulation was used to optimize a reliable structure. The substrate and co-factor-binding regions in HSD were identified. In order to determine the important residues of the substrate (l-aspartate semialdehyde (l-ASA)) binding, the ASA was docked to the protein; Thr163, Asp198, and Glu192 may be important because they form a hydrogen bond with HSD through AutoDock 4.2 software. After use of a virtual screening technique of HSD, the four top-scoring docking hits all seemed to cation–π ion pair with the key recognition residue Lys107, and Lys207. These ligands therefore seemed to be new chemotypes for HSD. Our results may be helpful for further experimental investigations. PMID:24469317

  10. Exploring the Molecular Basis for Selective Binding of Homoserine Dehydrogenase from Mycobacterium leprae TN toward Inhibitors: A Virtual Screening Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongling Zhan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Homoserine dehydrogenase (HSD from Mycobacterium leprae TN is an antifungal target for antifungal properties including efficacy against the human pathogen. The 3D structure of HSD has been firmly established by homology modeling methods. Using the template, homoserine dehydrogenase from Thiobacillus denitrificans (PDB Id 3MTJ, a sequence identity of 40% was found and molecular dynamics simulation was used to optimize a reliable structure. The substrate and co-factor-binding regions in HSD were identified. In order to determine the important residues of the substrate (l-aspartate semialdehyde (l-ASA binding, the ASA was docked to the protein; Thr163, Asp198, and Glu192 may be important because they form a hydrogen bond with HSD through AutoDock 4.2 software. neuraminidaseAfter use of a virtual screening technique of HSD, the four top-scoring docking hits all seemed to cation–π ion pair with the key recognition residue Lys107, and Lys207. These ligands therefore seemed to be new chemotypes for HSD. Our results may be helpful for further experimental investigations.

  11. Exploring the molecular basis for selective binding of homoserine dehydrogenase from Mycobacterium leprae TN toward inhibitors: a virtual screening study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Dongling; Wang, Dongmei; Min, Weihong; Han, Weiwei

    2014-01-24

    Homoserine dehydrogenase (HSD) from Mycobacterium leprae TN is an antifungal target for antifungal properties including efficacy against the human pathogen. The 3D structure of HSD has been firmly established by homology modeling methods. Using the template, homoserine dehydrogenase from Thiobacillus denitrificans (PDB Id 3MTJ), a sequence identity of 40% was found and molecular dynamics simulation was used to optimize a reliable structure. The substrate and co-factor-binding regions in HSD were identified. In order to determine the important residues of the substrate (L-aspartate semialdehyde (L-ASA)) binding, the ASA was docked to the protein; Thr163, Asp198, and Glu192 may be important because they form a hydrogen bond with HSD through AutoDock 4.2 software. neuraminidaseAfter use of a virtual screening technique of HSD, the four top-scoring docking hits all seemed to cation-π ion pair with the key recognition residue Lys107, and Lys207. These ligands therefore seemed to be new chemotypes for HSD. Our results may be helpful for further experimental investigations.

  12. Acid-base properties and solubility of pindolol, diazepam and chlordiazepoxide in SDS micelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Castro, B; Domingues, V; Gameiro, P; Lima, J L; Oliveira, A; Reis, S

    1999-09-30

    The effect of sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) on the acid-base properties and on the solubility of a beta-blocker (pindolol) and of two benzodiazepines (diazepam and chlordiazepoxide) has been assessed. The study was performed by potentiometric and spectrophotometric determinations of the acidity constants and by spectrophotometric evaluation of the solubilities of the pharmaceutical drugs in aqueous solution and in solutions to which was added SDS with concentrations below and above the critical micelle concentration (cmc), at 25 degrees C and at an ionic strength 0.1 M (NaCl). The effect of the organized assemblies on the pKa values was quantified by the application of two theoretical models that differ in the inclusion of ionic exchange between positively charged species in solution. These models have allowed the determination of the binding constants for drug/micelle and yielded values in good agreement with those obtained by the solubility method, and in addition provide a more detailed picture of the effect of drug charge on its partition. The results can be taken to evidence different interaction modes of the drugs with the SDS micelles.

  13. Evaluation of substrate and inhibitor binding to yeast and human isoprenylcysteine carboxyl methyltransferases (Icmts) using biotinylated benzophenone-containing photoaffinity probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahne, Kalub; Vervacke, Jeffrey S; Shrestha, Liza; Donelson, James L; Gibbs, Richard A; Distefano, Mark D; Hrycyna, Christine A

    2012-06-22

    Isoprenylcysteine carboxyl methyltransferases (Icmts) are a class of integral membrane protein methyltransferases localized to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane in eukaryotes. The Icmts from human (hIcmt) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Ste14p) catalyze the α-carboxyl methyl esterification step in the post-translational processing of CaaX proteins, including the yeast a-factor mating pheromones and both human and yeast Ras proteins. Herein, we evaluated synthetic analogs of two well-characterized Icmt substrates, N-acetyl-S-farnesyl-L-cysteine (AFC) and the yeast a-factor peptide mating pheromone, that contain photoactive benzophenone moieties in either the lipid or peptide portion of the molecule. The AFC based-compounds were substrates for both hIcmt and Ste14p, whereas the a-factor analogs were only substrates for Ste14p. However, the a-factor analogs were found to be micromolar inhibitors of hIcmt. Together, these data suggest that the Icmt substrate binding site is dependent upon features in both the isoprenyl moiety and upstream amino acid composition. Furthermore, these data suggest that hIcmt and Ste14p have overlapping, yet distinct, substrate specificities. Photocrosslinking and neutravidin-agarose capture experiments with these analogs revealed that both hIcmt and Ste14p were specifically photolabeled to varying degrees with all of the compounds tested. Our data suggest that these analogs will be useful for the future identification of the Icmt substrate binding sites.

  14. Quinolyl analogues of norlobelane: novel potent inhibitors of [(3)H]dihydrotetrabenazine binding and [(3)H]dopamine uptake at the vesicular monoamine transporter-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Derong; Nickell, Justin R; Dwoskin, Linda P; Crooks, Peter A

    2015-07-01

    We have previously shown that quinolyl moieties are attractive structural replacements for the phenyl groups in lobelane. These quinolyl analogues had improved water-solubility over lobelane and retained the potent vesicular monoamine transporter-2 (VMAT-2) inhibitory properties of the parent compound, with quinlobelane (4) exhibiting potent inhibition of uptake at VMAT-2 (Ki=51nM). However, the VMAT-2 inhibitory properties of quinolyl analogues of norlobelane, which is equipotent with lobeline as an inhibitor of [(3)H]dopamine (DA) uptake at VMAT-2, have not been reported. In the current communication, we describe the synthesis of some novel des-methyl quinolyl analogues of lobelane that exhibit greater affinity (Ki=178-647nM) for the dihydrotetrabenazine binding site located on VMAT-2 compared with lobelane (Ki=970nM), norlobelane (Ki=2310nM) and quinlobelane (Ki=2640nM). The most potent compounds, 14 and 15, also exhibited inhibition of [(3)H]DA uptake at VMAT-2 (Ki=42nM) which was comparable to both lobelane (Ki=45nM) and norlobelane (Ki=43nM). Results reveal that binding affinity at VMAT-2 serves as an accurate predictor of inhibition of the function of VMAT-2 for the majority of these analogues. These novel analogues are under consideration for further development as treatments for methamphetamine abuse.

  15. A sucrose-binding site provides a lead towards an isoform-specific inhibitor of the cancer-associated enzyme carbonic anhydrase IX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinard, Melissa A; Aggarwal, Mayank; Mahon, Brian P; Tu, Chingkuang; McKenna, Robert

    2015-10-01

    Human carbonic anhydrase (CA; EC 4.2.1.1) isoform IX (CA IX) is an extracellular zinc metalloenzyme that catalyzes the reversible hydration of CO2 to HCO3(-), thereby playing a role in pH regulation. The majority of normal functioning cells exhibit low-level expression of CA IX. However, in cancer cells CA IX is upregulated as a consequence of a metabolic transition known as the Warburg effect. The upregulation of CA IX for cancer progression has drawn interest in it being a potential therapeutic target. CA IX is a transmembrane protein, and its purification, yield and crystallization have proven challenging to structure-based drug design, whereas the closely related cytosolic soluble isoform CA II can be expressed and crystallized with ease. Therefore, we have utilized structural alignments and site-directed mutagenesis to engineer a CA II that mimics the active site of CA IX. In this paper, the X-ray crystal structure of this CA IX mimic in complex with sucrose is presented and has been refined to a resolution of 1.5 Å, an Rcryst of 18.0% and an Rfree of 21.2%. The binding of sucrose at the entrance to the active site of the CA IX mimic, and not CA II, in a non-inhibitory mechanism provides a novel carbohydrate moiety binding site that could be further exploited to design isoform-specific inhibitors of CA IX.

  16. Binding mode of CA074, a specific irreversible inhibitor, to bovine cathepsin B as determined by X-ray crystal analysis of the complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, A; Hara, T; Tomoo, K; Ishida, T; Fujii, T; Hata, Y; Murata, M; Kitamura, K

    1997-05-01

    The binding mode of CA074 [N-(L-3-trans-propylcarbamoyl-oxirane-2-carbonyl)-L-isoleucyl-L-pr oline], a specific irreversible inhibitor, to bovine spleen cathepsin B was elucidated by X-ray crystal structure analysis of the complex at 2.2 A resolution (conventional R=0.185). Inconsistently with our model used for the development of CA074, the L-isoleucyl-L-proline and propylcarbamoyl moieties are located at the S' and S subsites, respectively. This unexpected binding is primarily due to (i) similar extended chain conformations (due to the same S configurations) at the oxirane C2 and C3 atoms of CA074 and (ii) the just fit formation of double hydrogen bonds between the carboxyl oxygens of L-proline and the imidazole nitrogens of His-110 and His-111 residues (these residues are missing in papain, the tertiary structure of which was used for the design of CA074). The oxirane C3 atom possessing the P' substituent is covalently bound to the Cys-29 Sgamma atom (C3-Sgamma=1.79 A) and the S configuration is maintained. The present result will provide useful information for characterizing the substrate-specificity of cathepsin B.

  17. No significant effects of single intravenous, single oral and subchronic oral administration of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors on striatal [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT binding in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knol, R.J.J.; Booij, J. [University of Amsterdam, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Graduate School of Neurosciences, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bruin, K. de; Eck-Smit, B.L.F. van [University of Amsterdam, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2008-03-15

    [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT SPECT is a valuable diagnostic tool to discriminate Lewy body dementia from Alzheimer's dementia. To date, however, it is uncertain whether the frequently used acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (AChEIs) by demented patients, have an effect on [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT binding to dopamine transporters (DATs). Earlier animal studies showed a decline of DAT availability after acute intravenous injection of AChEIs. The aim of this study was to investigate effects of single intravenous, single oral and subchronic oral administration of AChEIs on DAT availability in the rat brain as measured by [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT. Biodistribution studies were performed in Wistar rats (n = 5-16 per group). Before [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT injection, rats were injected intravenously with a single dose of the AChEI rivastigmine (2.5 mg/kg body weight) or donepezil (0.5 mg/kg), the DAT-blocker methylphenidate (10 mg/kg) or saline. A second group was orally treated with a single dose of rivastigmine or donepezil (2.5 mg/kg), methylphenidate (10 mg/kg) or saline before injection of [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT. Studies were also performed in rats that were orally treated during 14 consecutive days with either rivastigmine (1 mg/kg daily), donepezil (1.5 mg/kg daily), methylphenidate (2.5 mg/kg) or saline. Brain parts were assayed in a gamma counter, and specific striatum/cerebellum ratios were calculated for the [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT binding to DATs. No significant effects of either single intravenous, single oral or subchronic oral administration of AChEIs on striatal FP-CIT binding could be detected. Single pretreatment with methylphenidate resulted in an expected significantly lower striatal FP-CIT binding. We conclude that in rats, single intravenous and single or subchronic oral administration of the tested AChEIs does not lead to an important alteration of [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT binding to striatal DATs. Therefore, it is unlikely that these drugs will induce large effects on the interpretation of

  18. Comparative study of the binding pockets of mammalian proprotein convertases and its implications for the design of specific small molecule inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Tian, Wu Jianhua

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Proprotein convertases are enzymes that proteolytically cleave protein precursors in the secretory pathway to yield functional proteins. Seven mammalian subtilisin/Kex2p-like proprotein convertases have been identified: furin, PC1, PC2, PC4, PACE4, PC5 and PC7. The binding pockets of all seven proprotein convertases are evolutionarily conserved and highly similar. Among the seven proprotein convertases, the furin cleavage site motif has recently been characterized as a 20-residue motif that includes one core region P6-P2´ inside the furin binding pocket. This study extended this information by examining the 3D structural environment of the furin binding pocket surrounding the core region P6-P2´ of furin substrates. The physical properties of mutations in the binding pockets of the other six mammalian proprotein convertases were compared. The results suggest that: 1 mutations at two positions, Glu230 and Glu257, change the overall density of the negative charge of the binding pockets, and govern the substrate specificities of mammalian proprotein convertases; 2 two proprotein convertases (PC1 and PC2 may have reduced sensitivity for positively charged residues at substrate position P5 or P6, whereas the substrate specificities of three proprotein convertases (furin, PACE4, and PC5 are similar to each other. This finding led to a novel design of a short peptide pattern for small molecule inhibitors: [K/R]-X-V-X-K-R. Compared with the widely used small molecule dec-RVKR-cmk that inhibits all seven proprotein convertases, a finely-tuned derivative of the short peptide pattern [K/R]-X-V-X-K-R may have the potential to more effectively inhibit five of the proprotein convertases (furin, PC4, PACE4, PC5 and PC7 compared to the remaining two (PC1 and PC2. The results not only provide insights into the molecular evolution of enzyme function in the proprotein convertase family, but will also aid the study of the functional redundancy of proprotein

  19. Discovery of membrane active benzimidazole quinolones-based topoisomerase inhibitors as potential DNA-binding antimicrobial agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ling; Addla, Dinesh; Ponmani, Jeyakkumar; Wang, Ao; Xie, Dan; Wang, Ya-Nan; Zhang, Shao-Lin; Geng, Rong-Xia; Cai, Gui-Xin; Li, Shuo; Zhou, Cheng-He

    2016-03-23

    A series of novel benzimidazole quinolones as potential antimicrobial agents were designed and synthesized. Most of the prepared compounds exhibited good or even stronger antimicrobial activities in comparison with reference drugs. The most potent compound 15m was membrane active and did not trigger the development of resistance in bacteria. It not only inhibited the formation of biofilms but also disrupted the established Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli biofilms. It was able to inhibit the relaxation activity of E. coli topoisomerase IV at 10 μM concentration. Moreover, this compound also showed low toxicity against mammalian cells. Molecular modeling and experimental investigation of compound 15m with DNA suggested that this compound could effectively bind with DNA to form a steady 15m-DNA complex which might further block DNA replication to exert the powerful bioactivities.

  20. CD6 and Syntaxin Binding Protein 6 Variants and Response to Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha Inhibitors in Danish Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krintel, Sophine B.; Essioux, Laurent; Wool, Assaf; Johansen, Julia S.; Schreiber, Ehud; Zekharya, Tomer; Akiva, Pinchas; Østergaard, Mikkel; Hetland, Merete L.

    2012-01-01

    Background TNFα inhibitor therapy has greatly improved the treatment of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, however at least 30% do not respond. We aimed to investigate insertions and deletions (INDELS) associated with response to TNFα inhibitors in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methodology and Principal Findings In the DANBIO Registry we identified 237 TNFα inhibitor naïve patients with RA (81% women; median age 56 years; disease duration 6 years) who initiated treatment with infliximab (n = 160), adalimumab (n = 56) or etanercept (n = 21) between 1999 and 2008 according to national treatment guidelines. Clinical response was assessed at week 26 using EULAR response criteria. Based on literature, we selected 213 INDELS potentially related to RA and treatment response using the GeneVa® (Compugen) in silico database of 350,000 genetic variations in the human genome. Genomic segments were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and genotyped by Sanger sequencing or fragment analysis. We tested the association between genotypes and EULAR good response versus no response, and EULAR good response versus moderate/no response using Fisher’s exact test. At baseline the median DAS28 was 5.1. At week 26, 68 (29%) patients were EULAR good responders, while 81 (34%) and 88 (37%) patients were moderate and non-responders, respectively. A 19 base pair insertion within the CD6 gene was associated with EULAR good response vs. no response (OR = 4.43, 95% CI: 1.99–10.09, p = 7.211×10−5) and with EULAR good response vs. moderate/no response (OR = 4.54, 95% CI: 2.29–8.99, p = 3.336×10−6). A microsatellite within the syntaxin binding protein 6 (STXBP6) was associated with EULAR good response vs. no response (OR = 4.01, 95% CI: 1.92–8.49, p = 5.067×10−5). Conclusion Genetic variations within CD6 and STXBP6 may influence response to TNFα inhibitors in patients with RA. PMID:22685579

  1. Comparison of triazolam, diazepam, and placebo as outpatient oral premedication for endodontic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrich, D G; Lundgren, J P; Dionne, R A; Nicoll, B K; Hutter, J W

    1997-03-01

    Triazolam and diazepam were compared as oral antianxiety agents in a randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical study of 79 endodontic patients with elevated anxiety regarding endodontic treatment. Patients who scored > or = 10 on the Corah Dental Anxiety Survey received oral formulations of triazolam (0.25 mg), diazepam (5 mg), or placebo. Before, during, and after the endodontic procedure, patients completed psychomotor tests and anxiety scales, and were evaluated for 24-h postoperative recall. In comparison with diazepam and placebo, triazolam was significantly better for decreased anxiety (p events (p adverse effects were noted with either drug. These findings suggest that orally administered triazolam (0.25 mg) is a safe and more effective anxiolytic agent than diazepam (5.0 mg) for endodontic patients.

  2. Comparative efficacy of lormetazepam (Noctamid) and diazepam (Valium) in 100 out-patients with insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sastre y Hernández, M S; Hentschel, H D; Fichte, K

    1981-01-01

    Lormetazepam (Noctamid) at a dosage of 1 mg was compared with diazepam (Valium) at a dosage of 5 mg in a 7-day double-blind study. The study involved fifty patients in the lormetazepam group and fifty patients in the diazepam group. All the patients were suffering from sleep disorders as a concomitant symptom of general diseases. Lormatazepam was significantly better than diazepam in the: -Reduction of the time taken to fall asleep (p less than 0.05) -Prolongation of the duration of uninterrupted sleep (p less than 0.05) -Reduction of the frequency of awakening (p less than 0.05). Lormetazepam displayed no hang-over effects or other side-effects and, in this respect too, was significantly superior to diazepam (p less than 0.05).

  3. Plasma concentrations and clinical effects after single oral doses of prazepam, clorazepate, and diazepam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shader, R I; Pary, R J; Harmatz, J S; Allison, S; Locniskar, A; Greenblatt, D J

    1984-10-01

    In a double-blind parallel-group pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic study, 31 healthy volunteers received single oral doses of prazepam (10 mg), clorazepate (7.5 mg), or diazepam (5 mg). Appearance in plasma of diazepam and of desmethyldiazepam was rapid after administration of diazepam and clorazepate, respectively, with peak plasma concentrations reached within an average of 1 hour. After oral prazepam, however, desmethyldiazepam appeared in blood slowly, with the highest mean concentration at 6 hours postdosage. Clinical self-ratings of fatigue and of "feeling spacey" were significantly different among groups, with changes over baseline being more marked with clorazepate and diazepam than with prazepam. Thus, differences in absorption rate of orally administered benzodiazepines can lead to differences in the intensity of single-dose effects, despite administration of doses that are equivalent in terms of long-term anxiolytic efficacy.

  4. The efficacy of diazepam in enhancing motor function in children with spastic cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Anna; Mathew, M C; Thomas, Molly; Antonisamy, B

    2005-04-01

    Muscle spasm and hypertonia limit mobility in children with spastic cerebral palsy. This double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized controlled clinical trial studies the clinical efficacy of a low dose of diazepam in enhancing movement in children with spastic cerebral palsy. One hundred and eighty children fulfilled the criteria and were randomly allocated to receive one of two doses of diazepam or placebo at bedtime; 173 completed the study. There was a significant reduction of hypertonia, improvement in the range of passive movement, and an increase in spontaneous movement in the children who received diazepam. There was no report of daytime drowsiness. In developing countries, where cost factors often determine choice of drug, diazepam is a cheap and effective way of relieving spasm and stiffness, optimizing physical therapy and facilitating movement in children with spasticity.

  5. Diazepam and its metabolites in the mothers' and newborns' hair as a biomarker of prenatal exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senczuk-Przybylowska, M; Florek, E; Piekoszewski, W; Merritt, T A; Lechowicz, E; Mazela, J; Kulza, M; Breborowicz, G H; Krzyscin, M; Markwitz, W; Miechowicz, I

    2013-08-01

    Pregnant women are exposed to benzodiazepines for therapeutic purposes during gestation. The goal of this study was to evaluate prenatal exposure to benzodiazepines. Time of exposure during course of pregnancy is a significant aspect of fetal exposure to drugs. Benzodiazepine concentration assay in hair of mothers and newborns exposed prenatally to these drugs was performed in the studies. Development, validation and evaluation of benzodiazepine determination method in mothers and their newborns enables assessment of health risks for the child and implementation of adequate therapeutic procedures. We used A LC-ESI-MS/MS method that allowed determination of diazepam (the main benzodiazepine used by pregnant women was diazepam) and its metabolites (nordazepam, oxazepam) in hair of mothers and newborns. LOQ 10 pg/mg of hair was used in the study. concentration of nordazepam was higher than parent drug (diazepam) and higher in newborns' hair when compared to mothers'. The mean concentrations of diazepam in mothers' hair were 31.6±36.0 and 34.1±42.4 pg/mg in the second and third trimester of pregnancy respectively. The mean concentration of diazepam in newborns' hair was higher and reached levels of 53.3±36.5 pg/mg. The mean concentration of nordazepam in the mothers' hair corresponding to the second and third trimester was 52.9±48.1 and 89.9±122.8 pg/mg, respectively. Nordazepam in the newborns' hair was detected at the mean level of 108.1±144.2 pg/mg. It was concluded that diazepam and nordazepam are permanently incorporated into the hair structure. Presence of diazepam and its metabolites in newborn's hair confirms that these benzodiazepines permeate placental barrier. Segmental analysis of mothers' hair enabled the assessment of drug administration time. Diazepam and its metabolites determined in hair of newborns may serve as biomarkers of prenatal exposure to these drugs. The performed LC-MS/MS analysis was accurate enough to determine even low concentrations

  6. Drug binding properties of neonatal albumin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodersen, R; Honoré, B

    1989-01-01

    Neonatal and adult albumin was isolated by gel chromatography on Sephacryl S-300, from adult and umbilical cord serum, respectively. Binding of monoacetyl-diamino-diphenyl sulfone, warfarin, sulfamethizole, and diazepam was studied by means of equilibrium dialysis and the binding data were analyzed...... by the method of several acceptable fitted curves. It was found that the binding affinity to neonatal albumin is less than to adult albumin for monoacetyl-diamino-diphenyl sulfone and warfarin. Sulfamethizole binding to the neonatal protein is similarly reduced when more than one molecule of the drug is bound...

  7. Pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic effects of flumazenil and theophylline application in rats acutely intoxicated by diazepam

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Background/Aim. The majority of symptoms and signs of acute diazepam poisoning are the consequence of its sedative effect on the CNS affecting selectively polisynaptic routes by stimulating inhibitory action of GABA. The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of combined application of theophylline and flumazenil on sedation and impaired motor function activity in acute diazepam poisoning in rats. Methods. Male Wistar rats were divided in four main groups and treated as follows: ...

  8. Low dose X-irradiation mitigates diazepam induced depression in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Amandeep; Singla, Neha; Dhawan, D K

    2016-10-01

    Depression is considered as one of the most prevalent health ailments. Various anti-depressant drugs have been used to provide succour to this ailment, but with little success and rather have resulted in many side effects. On the other hand, low dose of ionizing radiations are reported to exhibit many beneficial effects on human body by stimulating various biological processes. The present study was conducted to investigate the beneficial effects of low doses of X-rays, if any, during diazepam induced depression in rats. Female Sprague Dawley rats were segregated into four different groups viz: Normal control, Diazepam treated, X-irradiated and Diazepam + X-irradiated. Depression model was created in rats by subjecting them to diazepam treatment at a dosage of 2 mg/kg b.wt./day for 3 weeks. The skulls of animals belonging to X-irradiated and Diazepam + X-irradiated rats were X-irradiated with a single fraction of 0.5 Gy, given twice a day for 3 days, thereby delivered dose of 3 Gy. Diazepam treated animals showed significant alterations in the neurobehavior and neuro-histoarchitecture, which were improved after X-irradiation. Further, diazepam exposure significantly decreased the levels of neurotransmitters and acetylcholinesterase activity, but increased the monoamine oxidase activity in brain. Interestingly, X-rays exposure to diazepam treated rats increased the levels of neurotransmitters, acetylcholinesterase activity and decreased the monoamine oxidase activity. Further, depressed rats also showed increased oxidative stress with altered antioxidant parameters, which were normalized on X-rays exposure. The present study, suggests that low dose of ionizing radiations, shall prove to be an effective intervention and a novel therapy in controlling depression and possibly other brain related disorders.

  9. Effect of diazepam on anxiety, sexual motivation, and blood testosterone in anxious male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amikishieva, A V; Semendyaeva, S N

    2005-12-01

    The effects of diazepam on anxious behavior, sexual motivation, and blood level of testosterone in the presence of a female were studied in male mice with elevated anxiety. Diazepam produced an anxiolytic effect in novel environment, but was ineffective during social contacts. The drug potentiated the primary sexual interest, but failed to correct exhaustion of sexual motivation. The drug produced no effect on blood testosterone.

  10. Solubility of diazepam and prazepam in aqueous non-ionic surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moro, M E; Velazquez, M M; Cachaza, J M; Rodriguez, L J

    1986-04-01

    The solubility of diazepam and prazepam in aqueous polyoxyethylen-10-dodecanol, polyoxyethylen-23-dodecanol and polyoxyethylen-20-hexadecanol, has been determined at 25.0 degrees C. Diazepam seems to achieve a higher micellar penetration than prazepam, in spite of an expected smaller hydrophobic character. Thermodynamic interpretation of the micellar solutions is carried out using the regular solutions approach. A surfactant-independent relation between solubilities of both drugs has been derived.

  11. Progressive encephalopathy with cerebral oedema and infarctions associated with valproate and diazepam overdose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupasinghe, J; Jasinarachchi, M

    2011-05-01

    Valproic Acid (VPA) in overdose is known to cause encephalopathy with or without cerebral odema, hyperammonaemia, hepatotoxicity, bone marrow suppression and non gap acidosis. Most of these conditions are reversible. We report a 45-year-old man who suffered permanent disability from the non reversible effects of cerebral odema and infarctions associated with Valproate overdose which would have been aggravated by Diazepam. This patient's presentation emphasizes the role of early detection and therapy of cerebral odema in Valproate and Diazepam overdose.

  12. 4,6-Substituted-1,3,5-triazin-2(1H)-ones as monocyclic catalytic inhibitors of human DNA topoisomerase IIα targeting the ATP binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogorelčnik, Barbara; Janežič, Matej; Sosič, Izidor; Gobec, Stanislav; Solmajer, Tom; Perdih, Andrej

    2015-08-01

    Human DNA topoisomerase IIα (htIIα) is a validated target for the development of novel anticancer agents. Starting from our discovered 4-amino-1,3,5-triazine inhibitors of htIIα, we investigated a library of 2,4,6-trisubstituted-1,3,5-triazines for novel inhibitors that bind to the htIIα ATP binding site using a combination of structure-based and ligand-based pharmacophore models and molecular docking. 4,6-substituted-1,3,5-triazin-2(1H)-ones 8, 9 and 14 were identified as novel inhibitors with activity comparable to the established drug etoposide (1). Compound 8 inhibits the htIIα decatenation in a superior fashion to etoposide. Cleavage assays demonstrated that selected compounds 8 and 14 do not act as poisons and antagonize the poison effect of etoposide. Microscale thermophoresis (MST) confirmed binding of compound 8 to the htIIα ATPase domain and compound 14 effectively inhibits the htIIα mediated ATP hydrolysis. The molecular dynamics simulation study provides further insight into the molecular recognition. The 4,6-disubstituted-1,3,5-triazin-2(1H)-ones represent the first validated monocyclic class of catalytic inhibitors that bind to the to the htIIα ATPase domain.

  13. The High Affinity Binding Site on Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) for the Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor-related Protein (LRP1) Is Composed of Four Basic Residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gettins, Peter G W; Dolmer, Klavs

    2016-01-08

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) is a serpin inhibitor of the plasminogen activators urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and tissue plasminogen activator, which binds tightly to the clearance and signaling receptor low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) in both proteinase-complexed and uncomplexed forms. Binding sites for PAI-1 within LRP1 have been localized to CR clusters II and IV. Within cluster II, there is a strong preference for the triple CR domain fragment CR456. Previous mutagenesis studies to identify the binding site on PAI-1 for LRP1 have given conflicting results or implied small binding contributions incompatible with the high affinity PAI-1/LRP1 interaction. Using a highly sensitive solution fluorescence assay, we have examined binding of CR456 to arginine and lysine variants of PAI-1 and definitively identified the binding site as composed of four basic residues, Lys-69, Arg-76, Lys-80, and Lys-88. These are highly conserved among mammalian PAI-1s. Individual mutations result in a 13-800-fold increase in Kd values. We present evidence that binding involves engagement of CR4 by Lys-88, CR5 by Arg-76 and Lys-80, and CR6 by Lys-69, with the strongest interactions to CR5 and CR6. Collectively, the individual binding contributions account quantitatively for the overall PAI-1/LRP1 affinity. We propose that the greater efficiency of PAI-1·uPA complex binding and clearance by LRP1, compared with PAI-1 alone, is due solely to simultaneous binding of the uPA moiety in the complex to its receptor, thereby making binding of the PAI-1 moiety to LRP1 a two-dimensional surface-localized association.

  14. Preferential reduction of binding of sup 125 I-iodopindolol to beta-1 adrenoceptors in the amygdala of rat after antidepressant treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ordway, G.A.; Gambarana, C.; Tejani-Butt, S.M.; Areso, P.; Hauptmann, M.; Frazer, A. (Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Philadelphia, PA (USA))

    1991-05-01

    This study utilized quantitative receptor autoradiography to examine the effects of repeated administration of antidepressants to rats on the binding of the beta adrenoceptor antagonist, {sup 125}I-iodopindolol ({sup 125}I-IPIN) to either beta-1 or beta-2 adrenoceptors in various regions of brain. Antidepressants were selected to represent various chemical and pharmacological classes including tricyclic compounds (desipramine and protriptyline), monoamine oxidase inhibitors (clorgyline, phenelzine and tranylcypromine), atypical antidepressants (mianserin and trazodone) and selective inhibitors of the uptake of serotonin (citalopram and sertraline). Additionally, rats were treated with various psychotropic drugs that lack antidepressant efficacy (cocaine, deprenyl, diazepam and haloperidol). Repeated treatment of rats with desipramine, protriptyline, clorgyline, phenelzine, tranylcypromine or mianserin reduced the binding of {sup 125}I-IPIN to beta-1 adrenoceptors in many brain areas. Only in the basolateral and lateral nuclei of the amygdala did all six of these antidepressants significantly reduce {sup 125}I-IPIN binding to beta-1 adrenoceptors. In these amygdaloid nuclei, the magnitude of the reduction in the binding of {sup 125}I-IPIN caused by each of these drugs was comparable to or greater than the reduction in binding produced in any other region of brain. Reductions of binding of {sup 125}I-IPIN after antidepressant treatments were not consistently observed in the cortex, the area of brain examined most often in homogenate binding studies. Only the monoamine oxidase inhibitors caused reductions in the binding of {sup 125}I-IPIN to beta-2 adrenoceptors, and this effect was generally localized to the amygdala and hypothalamus.

  15. [Effect of diazepam on delayed nausea and vomiting caused by anticancer agents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, F Z; Zhang, J Q; Qiao, X M; Mao, Y C; Meng, F Y; Liu, H J; Hui, S; Zhu, F X; Shu, W; Hong, J

    1998-02-01

    We conducted an evaluation of the usefulness of antiemetics (5-Hydroxy-tryptamine 3 receptor antagonism, 5HT3RA) combined with diazepam for delayed nausea and vomiting due to anticancer agents in 17 patients with various malignancies (such as lung Ca, breast Ca, esophagus Ca, gastric Ca, colon Ca, and non Hodgkin's disease) for whom chemotherapy was performed with different regimens in the Dept. of Oncologic Chemotherapy, People's Hospital, Beijing Medical University. Antiemetics (5HT3RA) combined with diazepam were given only to cases that had symptoms of nausea and vomiting induced by anticancer agents in the 1st course and invalidity with antiemetics (5HT3RA) alone in this study. Antiemetic (5HT3RA) agents + Dexamethasone were dosed before chemotherapy and also diazepam 5 mg orally after 24 hours (namely, when nausea was observed). Nausea was reduced and vomiting decreased after the antiemetic treatment with 5HT3RA + Dexamethasone and diazepam. These results indicated that 5HT3RA and diazepam combination therapies were more effective than 5HT3 RA + Dexamethasone alone for delayed nausea and vomiting. Further, the antiemetics had characters that a short adminiter time, few times and a take not over dose. The only side effect related to this antiemetic therapy was light somnolence. Antiemetics combined with diazepam might be a useful therapy against delayed nausea and vomiting induced by anticancer agents.

  16. RP-HPLC estimation of imipramine hydrochloride and diazepam in tablets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Srikantha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple and rapid reversed phase-high performance liquid chromatographic method was developed for simultaneous determination of imipramine hydrochloride and diazepam in pharmaceutical formulations. The elution was done in isocratic mode utilizing a mobile phase consisting of methanol:water:0.1M sodium acetate (30:50:20 v/v/v on Chromosil C18 column with a flow rate of 1.0 ml/min and with detection at 243 nm. The measured retention time was 3.33±0.02 min for imipramine hydrochloride and 4.64±0.02 min for diazepam. Linearity was measured in the range 25-150 μg/ml for imipramine hydrochloride (r 2 =0.999 and in the range 5-30 μg/ml for diazepam (r 2 =0.9994, respectively. The limits of detection and quantitation were 0.03 and 0.1 μg/ml for imipramine hydrochloride and 0.02 and 0.07 μg/ml for diazepam. Satisfactory validation was also obtained from recovery (100.95-101.52% for imipramine hydrochloride and 99.47-100.33% for diazepam studies, intraday and interday precision (<2% and robustness results. The reported method was the first study of these drugs in combination and could be employed for routine quantitative determination of imipramine hydrochloride and diazepam in tablets.

  17. Effects of diazepam on BOLD activation during the processing of aversive faces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del-Ben, Cristina M; Ferreira, Cesar A Q; Sanchez, Tiago A; Alves-Neto, Wolme C; Guapo, Vinicius G; de Araujo, Draulio B; Graeff, Frederico G

    2012-04-01

    This study aimed to measure, using fMRI, the effect of diazepam on the haemodynamic response to emotional faces. Twelve healthy male volunteers (mean age = 24.83 ± 3.16 years), were evaluated in a randomized, balanced-order, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover design. Diazepam (10 mg) or placebo was given 1 h before the neuroimaging acquisition. In a blocked design covert face emotional task, subjects were presented with neutral (A) and aversive (B) (angry or fearful) faces. Participants were also submitted to an explicit emotional face recognition task, and subjective anxiety was evaluated throughout the procedures. Diazepam attenuated the activation of right amygdala and right orbitofrontal cortex and enhanced the activation of right anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) to fearful faces. In contrast, diazepam enhanced the activation of posterior left insula and attenuated the activation of bilateral ACC to angry faces. In the behavioural task, diazepam impaired the recognition of fear in female faces. Under the action of diazepam, volunteers were less anxious at the end of the experimental session. These results suggest that benzodiazepines can differentially modulate brain activation to aversive stimuli, depending on the stimulus features and indicate a role of amygdala and insula in the anxiolytic action of benzodiazepines.

  18. Effects of environmental exposure to diazepam on the reproductive behavior of fathead minnow, Pimephales promelas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzi, Varenka; Choe, Ree; Schlenk, Daniel

    2016-05-01

    Pharmaceutical drugs are continuously discharged into the aquatic environment primarily through wastewater discharge; therefore, their possible effects on wildlife is a reason of concern. Diazepam is a widely prescribed benzodiazepine drug used to treat insomnia and anxiety disorders, and it has been found in wastewater effluents worldwide. The present study tested the effects of diazepam on fecundity and the reproductive behavior of the fathead minnow, Pimephales promelas, a fish that exhibits male parental care. Sexually mature fathead minnows were housed at a ratio of one male and two females per tank and exposed to nominal (measured) concentrations of 0, 0.1 (0.14 ± 0.06), 1.0 (1.04 ± 0.15), 10 (13.4 ± 1.5) µg L(-1) for 21 days. Fish receiving the low diazepam treatment had significantly larger clutches than fish receiving the highest concentration but neither were different from controls. Diazepam exposure was not associated with a significant change in fertilization rate, hatchability or time to hatch, but a trend toward a higher number of eggs/day was observed in fish exposed to the low diazepam concentration relative to those exposed to the medium concentration. There were no significant differences in any of the behaviors analyzed when responses were averaged over time. The results showed that exposure to diazepam at concentrations as high as 13 µg L(-1) did not significantly impact the reproductive behavior of fathead minnow.

  19. Oxime amides as a novel zinc binding group in histone deacetylase inhibitors: synthesis, biological activity, and computational evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botta, Cinzia B; Cabri, Walter; Cini, Elena; De Cesare, Lucia; Fattorusso, Caterina; Giannini, Giuseppe; Persico, Marco; Petrella, Antonello; Rondinelli, Francesca; Rodriquez, Manuela; Russo, Adele; Taddei, Maurizio

    2011-04-14

    Several oxime containing molecules, characterized by a SAHA-like structure, were explored to select a potentially new biasing binding element for the zinc in HDAC catalytic site. All compounds were evaluated for their in vitro inhibitory activity against the 11 human HDACs isoforms. After identification of a "hit" molecule, a programmed variation at the cap group and at the linker was carried out in order to increase HDAC inhibition and/or paralogue selectivity. Some of the new derivatives showed increased activity against a number of HDAC isoforms, even if their overall activity range is still far from the inhibition values reported for SAHA. Moreover, different from what was reported for their hydroxamic acid analogues the new α-oxime amide derivatives do not select between class I and class II HDACs; rather they target specific isoforms in each class. These somehow contradictory results were finally rationalized by a computational assisted SAR, which gave us the chance to understand how the oxime derivatives interact with the catalytic site and justify the observed activity profile.

  20. In vitro metabolism of fipronil by human and rat cytochrome P450 and its interactions with testosterone and diazepam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jun; Amin Usmani, K; Hodgson, Ernest; Rose, Randy L

    2004-04-15

    Fipronil (5-amino-1-[2,6-dichloro-4-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]-4-[(trifluoromethyl)sulfinyl]-1H-pyrazole-3-carbonitrile) is a highly active, broad spectrum insecticide from the phenyl pyrazole family, which targets the gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA) receptor. Although fipronil is presently widely used as an insecticide and acaricide, little information is available with respect to its metabolic fate and disposition in mammals. This study was designed to investigate the in vitro human metabolism of fipronil and to examine possible metabolic interactions that fipronil may have with other substrates. Fipronil was incubated with human liver microsomes (HLM) and several recombinant cytochrome P450 (CYP) isoforms obtained from BD Biosciences. HPLC was used for metabolite identification and quantification. Fipronil sulfone was the predominant metabolite via CYP oxidation. The K(m) and V(max) values for human liver microsomes are 27.2 microM and 0.11 nmol/mg proteinmin, respectively; for rat liver microsomes (RLM) the K(m) and V(max) are 19.9 microM and 0.39 nmol/mg proteinmin, respectively. CYP3A4 is the major isoform responsible for fipronil oxidation in humans while CYP2C19 is considerably less active. Other human CYP isoforms have minimal or no activity toward fipronil. Co-expression of cytochrome b(5) (b(5)) is essential for CYP3A4 to manifest high activity toward fipronil. Ketoconazole, a specific inhibitor of CYP3A4, inhibits 78% of the HLM activity toward fipronil at a concentration of 2 microM. Oxidative activity toward fipronil in 19 single-donor HLMs correlated well with their ability to oxidize testosterone. The interactions of fipronil and other CYP3A4 substrates, such as testosterone and diazepam, were also investigated. Fipronil metabolism was activated by testosterone in HLM but not in CYP3A4 Supersomes. Testosterone 6beta-hydroxylation in HLM was inhibited by fipronil. Fipronil inhibited diazepam demethylation but had little effect on diazepam hydroxylation

  1. Mechanistic Insights into the Binding of Class IIa HDAC Inhibitors toward Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type-2: A 3D-QSAR and Pharmacophore Modeling Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Siddharth; Goyal, Sukriti; Somvanshi, Pallavi; Grover, Abhinav

    2017-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA-2) type-2 is a rare neurological disorder among the nine polyglutamine disorders, mainly caused by polyQ (CAG) trinucleotide repeats expansion within gene coding ataxin-2 protein. The expanded trinucleotide repeats within the ataxin-2 protein sequesters transcriptional cofactors i.e., CREB-binding protein (CBP), Ataxin-2 binding protein 1 (A2BP1) leading to a state of hypo-acetylation and transcriptional repression. Histone de-acetylases inhibitors (HDACi) have been reported to restore transcriptional balance through inhibition of class IIa HDAC's, that leads to an increased acetylation and transcription as demonstrated through in-vivo studies on mouse models of Huntington's. In this study, 61 di-aryl cyclo-propanehydroxamic acid derivatives were used for developing three dimensional (3D) QSAR and pharmacophore models. These models were then employed for screening and selection of anti-ataxia compounds. The chosen QSAR model was observed to be statistically robust with correlation coefficient (r2) value of 0.6774, cross-validated correlation coefficient (q2) of 0.6157 and co-relation coefficient for external test set (pred_r2) of 0.7570. A high F-test value of 77.7093 signified the robustness of the model. Two potential drug leads ZINC 00608101 (SEI) and ZINC 00329110 (ACI) were selected after a coalesce procedure of pharmacophore based screening using the pharmacophore model ADDRR.20 and structural analysis using molecular docking and dynamics simulations. The pharmacophore and the 3D-QSAR model generated were further validated for their screening and prediction ability using the enrichment factor (EF), goodness of hit (GH), and receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve analysis. The compounds SEI and ACI exhibited a docking score of −10.097 and −9.182 kcal/mol, respectively. An evaluation of binding conformation of ligand-bound protein complexes was performed with MD simulations for a time period of 30 ns along with free

  2. Mechanistic Insights into the Binding of Class IIa HDAC Inhibitors toward Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type-2: A 3D-QSAR and Pharmacophore Modeling Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Siddharth; Goyal, Sukriti; Somvanshi, Pallavi; Grover, Abhinav

    2016-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA-2) type-2 is a rare neurological disorder among the nine polyglutamine disorders, mainly caused by polyQ (CAG) trinucleotide repeats expansion within gene coding ataxin-2 protein. The expanded trinucleotide repeats within the ataxin-2 protein sequesters transcriptional cofactors i.e., CREB-binding protein (CBP), Ataxin-2 binding protein 1 (A2BP1) leading to a state of hypo-acetylation and transcriptional repression. Histone de-acetylases inhibitors (HDACi) have been reported to restore transcriptional balance through inhibition of class IIa HDAC's, that leads to an increased acetylation and transcription as demonstrated through in-vivo studies on mouse models of Huntington's. In this study, 61 di-aryl cyclo-propanehydroxamic acid derivatives were used for developing three dimensional (3D) QSAR and pharmacophore models. These models were then employed for screening and selection of anti-ataxia compounds. The chosen QSAR model was observed to be statistically robust with correlation coefficient (r(2)) value of 0.6774, cross-validated correlation coefficient (q(2)) of 0.6157 and co-relation coefficient for external test set (pred_r(2)) of 0.7570. A high F-test value of 77.7093 signified the robustness of the model. Two potential drug leads ZINC 00608101 (SEI) and ZINC 00329110 (ACI) were selected after a coalesce procedure of pharmacophore based screening using the pharmacophore model ADDRR.20 and structural analysis using molecular docking and dynamics simulations. The pharmacophore and the 3D-QSAR model generated were further validated for their screening and prediction ability using the enrichment factor (EF), goodness of hit (GH), and receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve analysis. The compounds SEI and ACI exhibited a docking score of -10.097 and -9.182 kcal/mol, respectively. An evaluation of binding conformation of ligand-bound protein complexes was performed with MD simulations for a time period of 30 ns along with free

  3. Human mannose-binding lectin inhibitor prevents myocardial injury and arterial thrombogenesis in a novel animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, Vasile I; Tan, Ying S; McClure, Erin E; La Bonte, Laura R; Zou, Chenhui; Gorsuch, William B; Stahl, Gregory L

    2015-02-01

    Myocardial infarction and coagulation disorders are leading causes of disability and death in the world. An important role of the lectin complement pathway in myocardial infarction and coagulation has been demonstrated in mice genetically deficient in lectin complement pathway proteins. However, these studies are limited to comparisons between wild-type and deficient mice and lack the ability to examine reversal/inhibition of injury after disease establishment. We developed a novel mouse that expresses functional human mannose-binding lectin (MBL) 2 under the control of Mbl1 promoter. Serum MBL2 concentrations averaged approximately 3 μg/mL in MBL2(+/+)Mbl1(-/-)Mbl2(-/-) [MBL2 knock in (KI)] mice. Serum MBL2 level in MBL2 KI mice significantly increased after 7 (8 μg/mL) or 14 (9 μg/mL) days of hyperglycemia compared to normoglycemic mice (P < 0.001). Monoclonal antibody 3F8 inhibited C3 deposition on mannan-coated plates in MBL2 KI, but not wild-type, mice. Myocardial ischemia/reperfusion in MBL2 KI mice revealed that 3F8 preserved cardiac function and decreased infarct size and fibrin deposition in a time-dependent manner. Furthermore, 3F8 prevented ferric chloride-induced occlusive arterial thrombogenesis in vivo. MBL2 KI mice represent a novel animal model that can be used to study the lectin complement pathway in acute and chronic models of human disease. Furthermore, these novel mice demonstrate the therapeutic window for MBL2 inhibition for effective treatment of disease and its complications.

  4. Benzodiazepine effect of {sup 125}I-iomazenil-benzodiazepine receptor binding and serum corticosterone level in a rat model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukumitsu, Nobuyoshi [Proton Medical Research Center, University of Tsukuba, Ibaragi, 305-8575 (Japan)]. E-mail: gzl13162@nifty.ne.jp; Ogi, Shigeyuki [Department of Radiology, Jikei University School of Medicine, Tokyo, 105-8461 (Japan); Uchiyama, Mayuki [Department of Radiology, Jikei University School of Medicine, Tokyo, 105-8461 (Japan); Mori, Yutaka [Department of Radiology, Jikei University School of Medicine, Tokyo, 105-8461 (Japan)

    2005-01-01

    To test the change in free or unoccupied benzodiazepine receptor (BZR) density in response to diazepam, we investigated {sup 125}I-iomazenil ({sup 125}I-IMZ) binding and serum corticosterone levels in a rat model. Wistar male rats, which received psychological stress using a communication box for 5 days, were divided into two groups according to the amount of administered diazepam: no diazepam [D (0)] group and 10 mg/kg per day [D (10)] group of 12 rats each. The standardized uptake value (SUV) of {sup 125}I-IMZ of the D (10) group were significantly lower (P<.05) than those of the D (0) group in the frontal, parietal and temporal cortices, globus pallidus, hippocampus, amygdala and hypothalamus. The serum corticosterone level ratio in the D (10) group was significantly lower than that in the D (0) group (P<.05). From the change in serum corticosterone levels, diazepam attenuated the psychological stress produced by the physical stress to animals in adjacent compartments. From the reduced binding of {sup 125}I-IMZ, it is clear that diazepam competed with endogenous ligand for the free BZR sites, and the frontal, parietal and temporal cortices, globus pallidus, hippocampus, amygdala and hypothalamus are important areas in which {sup 125}I-IMZ binding is strongly affected by administration of diazepam.

  5. Competitive binding experiments can reduce the false positive results of affinity-based ultrafiltration-HPLC: A case study for identification of potent xanthine oxidase inhibitors from Perilla frutescens extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiqiang; Kwon, Shin Hwa; Hwang, Seung Hwan; Kang, Young-Hee; Lee, Jae-Yong; Lim, Soon Sung

    2017-03-24

    The purpose of this study was to assess the possibility of using competitive binding experiments with ultrafiltration-HPLC analysis to identify potent xanthine oxidase (XO) inhibitors from the Perilla frutescens extract as an attempt to reduce the number of false positive results. To isolate the enzyme-ligand complex from unbound compounds, the P. frutescens extract was either incubated in the absence of XO, in the presence of XO, or with the active site blocked XO before the ultrafiltration was performed. Allopurinaol was used as the XO active site blocker. The unbound compounds were subjected to HPLC analysis. The degree of total binding (TBD) and degree of specific binding (SBD) of each compound were calculated using the peak areas. TBD represents the binding affinities of compounds from the P. frutescens extract for the XO binding site. SBD represents the XO competitive binding between allopurinol and ligands from the extract samples. Two criteria were applied to select putative targets that could help avoid false positives. These include TBD>30% and SBD>10%. Using that approach, kaempferol-3-O-rutinoside, rosmarinic acid, methyl-rosmarinic acid, apigenin, and 4',5,7-trimethoxyflavone were identified, from total 11 compounds, as potent XO inhibitors. Finally, apigenin, 4',5,7-trimethoxyflavone, and luteolin were XO inhibitors verified through an XO inhibition assay and structural simulation of the complex. These results showed that the newly developed strategy has the advantage that the number of targets identified via ultrafiltration-HPLC can be narrowed from many false positives. However, not all false positives can be eliminated with this approach. Some potent inhibitors might also be excluded with the use of this method. The limitations of this method are also discussed herein. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Effect of diazepam on temporomandibular joints in rats with increased occlusal vertical dimension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroba, S R; Desjardins, M P; Nani, B D; Ferreira, L E N; Rossi, A C; Santos, F A; Venâncio, P C; Aguiar, F H B; Groppo, F C

    2014-05-01

    Anxiolytic agents, mainly benzodiazepines, have been used to treat symptomatic disorders of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Our aim was to evaluate the effect of diazepam on the TMJ of rats with increased occlusal vertical dimension (iOVD). Forty male rats were randomly assigned to 4 groups: control rats were given sham iOVD plus saline solution daily for 7 days. The first experimental group was given sham iOVD plus diazepam 2.5mg/kg/intramuscularly daily for 7 days (diazepam alone group); the second had iOVD induced in molars for 7 days plus saline daily for 7 days (iOVD alone group); and the third had iOVD induced in molars for 7 days plus diazepam 2.5mg/kg/intramuscularly daily for 7 days (iOVD plus diazepam group). At the end of each experiment the animals were killed and their bilateral TMJs were removed, randomly stained with haematoxylin and eosin and sirius-red, and immunoassayed. The thickness of condylar cartilage and of fibrous, proliferating, mature, and hypertrophic layers, number of collagen fibres, and the articular area were measured. Proinflammatory cytokines (interleukin (IL)-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α) were also measured. ANOVA and Tukey's tests or the Kruskal-Wallis test were used to compare data among groups (α=5%). Condylar cartilage was thicker in the control group than in the other groups, the diazepam alone group being thicker than the other 2 experimental groups. There were fewer collagen fibres in the 2 groups given diazepam than in the other 2 groups, and there were no significant differences in the area of cartilage among groups. The controls had lower concentrations of all cytokines (p<0.05) than the 3 experimental groups, except for IL-6. Both iOVD groups had higher concentrations of IL-1α, IL-1β, and IL-6 than the diazepam alone group. Diazepam alone was associated with increased concentrations of all cytokines except IL-6. We conclude that both iOVD and diazepam induced significant changes in rats

  7. Binding of upstream stimulatory factor 1 to the E-box regulates the 4G/5G polymorphism-dependent plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 expression in mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhongcai; Jhun, Bongsook; Jung, Sandy Y; Oh, Chad K

    2008-04-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1 is a key regulator of the fibrinolytic system. PAI-1 levels are markedly elevated in the asthmatic airways. The 4G/5G polymorphism of the PAI-1 gene is associated with allergic asthma. To characterize the mechanisms of the 4G/5G-dependent PAI-1 expression in mast cells (MCs), a major source of PAI-1 and key effector cells in asthma. Transcription of PAI-1 was assessed by transiently transfecting human MC line (HMC-1) cells with the luciferase-tagged PAI-1 promoters containing the 4G or 5G allele (4G-PAI-1 or 5G-PAI-1 promoter). Upstream stimulatory factor (USF)-1 and the E-box interactions were studied by electrophoretic mobility shift assays and supershift assays. Expression of USF-1 was determined by Western blot analysis. The 4G-PAI-1 promoter has higher promoter activity than the 5G-PAI-1 promoter in stimulated HMC-1 cells, and the E-box adjacent to the 4G/5G site (E-4G/5G) regulates the genotype-specific PAI-1 transcription. USF-1 binds to the E-4G with greater affinity than to the E-5G. USF-1 level is increased in HMC-1 cells after stimulation, and elevated USF-1 enhances PAI-1 transcription. Overexpression of wild-type USF-1 or dominant-negative USF remedies the 4G/5G-dependent PAI-1 transcription. Binding of USF-1 to the E-4G/5G regulates the 4G/5G polymorphism-dependent PAI-1 expression in MCs.

  8. Simplagrin, a platelet aggregation inhibitor from Simulium nigrimanum salivary glands specifically binds to the Von Willebrand factor receptor in collagen and inhibits carotid thrombus formation in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrezza C Chagas

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Among the several challenges faced by bloodsucking arthropods, the vertebrate hemostatic response against blood loss represents an important barrier to efficient blood feeding. Here we report the first inhibitor of collagen-induced platelet aggregation derived from the salivary glands of a black fly (Simulium nigrimanum, named Simplagrin.Simplagrin was expressed in mammalian cells and purified by affinity-and size-exclusion chromatography. Light-scattering studies showed that Simplagrin has an elongated monomeric form with a hydrodynamic radius of 5.6 nm. Simplagrin binds to collagen (type I-VI with high affinity (2-15 nM, and this interaction does not involve any significant conformational change as determined by circular dichroism spectroscopy. Simplagrin-collagen interaction is both entropically and enthalpically driven with a large negative ΔG, indicating that this interaction is favorable and occurs spontaneously. Simplagrin specifically inhibits von Willebrand factor interaction with collagen type III and completely blocks platelet adhesion to collagen under flow conditions at high shear rates; however, Simplagrin failed to block glycoprotein VI and Iα2β1 interaction to collagen. Simplagrin binds to RGQOGVMGF peptide with an affinity (K(D 11 nM similar to that of Simplagrin for collagen. Furthermore, Simplagrin prevents laser-induced carotid thrombus formation in vivo without significant bleeding in mice and could be useful as an antithrombotic agent in thrombosis related disease.Our results support the orthology of the Aegyptin clade in bloodsucking Nematocera and the hypothesis of a faster evolutionary rate of salivary function of proteins from blood feeding arthropods.

  9. Structures of Human Cyctochrome P450 2E1: Insights Into the Binding of Inhibitors And Both Small Molecular Weight And Fatty Acid Substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porubsky, P.R.; Meneely, K.M.; Scott, E.E.

    2009-05-21

    Human microsomal cytochrome P-450 2E1 (CYP2E1) monooxygenates >70 low molecular weight xenobiotic compounds, as well as much larger endogenous fatty acid signaling molecules such as arachidonic acid. In the process, CYP2E1 can generate toxic or carcinogenic compounds, as occurs with acetaminophen overdose, nitrosamines in cigarette smoke, and reactive oxygen species from uncoupled catalysis. Thus, the diverse roles that CYP2E1 has in normal physiology, toxicity, and drug metabolism are related to its ability to metabolize diverse classes of ligands, but the structural basis for this was previously unknown. Structures of human CYP2E1 have been solved to 2.2 {angstrom} for an indazole complex and 2.6 {angstrom} for a 4-methylpyrazole complex. Both inhibitors bind to the heme iron and hydrogen bond to Thr{sup 303} within the active site. Complementing its small molecular weight substrates, the hydrophobic CYP2E1 active site is the smallest yet observed for a human cytochrome P-450. The CYP2E1 active site also has two adjacent voids: one enclosed above the I helix and the other forming a channel to the protein surface. Minor repositioning of the Phe{sup 478} aromatic ring that separates the active site and access channel would allow the carboxylate of fatty acid substrates to interact with conserved {sup 216}QXXNN{sup 220} residues in the access channel while positioning the hydrocarbon terminus in the active site, consistent with experimentally observed {omega}-1 hydroxylation of saturated fatty acids. Thus, these structures provide insights into the ability of CYP2E1 to effectively bind and metabolize both small molecule substrates and fatty acids.

  10. Sex and estrous cycle influence diazepam effects on anxiety and memory: Possible role of progesterone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Anatildes Feitosa; Sousa, Diego Silveira; Medeiros, André Macêdo; Macêdo, Priscila Tavares; Leão, Anderson Henrique; Ribeiro, Alessandra Mussi; Izídio, Geison Souza; Silva, Regina Helena

    2016-10-03

    Studies with rodents and humans show the relationship between female sex hormones and cognitive/emotional tasks. However, despite the greater incidence of anxiety disorders in women, the data are still inconclusive regarding the mechanisms related to this phenomenon. We evaluated the effects of a classical anxiolytic/amnestic drug (diazepam; DZP) on female (at different estrous cycle phases) and male rats tested in the plus-maze discriminative avoidance task (PMDAT), that allows the concomitant evaluation of memory and anxiety-like behavior. Further, in order to investigate the role of progesterone and its metabolites in the effects of DZP in the PMDAT, female rats were pre-treated with the progesterone receptor antagonist mifepristone or the 5-alpha-reductase inhibitor finasteride. The main findings were: (1) DZP caused memory impairment and anxiolysis in both sexes, but only the highest dose induced the anxiolytic effect in females; (2) females in proestrus did not present the amnestic and anxiolytic effects of DZP (at 2.0 and 4.0mg/kg, respectively) and (3) the co-administration of mifepristone reestablished both amnestic and anxiolytic effects of DZP, while finasteride reinstated the amnestic effect in proestrus female rats. These results suggest that changes in the endogenous levels of progesterone and its metabolites are important in the modulation of emotional/cognitive behavior in female rats. Based on the influence on different aspects of DZP action, the mechanisms related to this modulation are probably linked to GABAergic transmission, but this point remains to be investigated. Further, the variation in therapeutic and adverse effects of DZP depending on sex and hormonal state is of great relevance considering the higher prevalence of anxiety disorders in women.

  11. Comparison of the binding specificity of two bacterial metalloproteases, LasB of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and ZapA of Proteus mirabilis, using N-alpha mercaptoamide template-based inhibitor analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, Louise; Cathcart, George R; Ceri, Howard; Walker, Brian; Gilmore, Brendan F

    2012-06-01

    The metalloproteases ZapA of Proteus mirabilis and LasB of Pseudomonas aeruginosa are known to be virulence factors their respective opportunistic bacterial pathogens, and are members of the structurally related serralysin and thermolysin families of bacterial metalloproteases respectively. Secreted at the site of infection, these proteases play a key role in the infection process, contributing to tissue destruction and processing of components of the host immune system. Inhibition of these virulence factors may therefore represent an antimicrobial strategy, attenuating the virulence of the infecting pathogen. Previously we have screened a library of N-alpha mercaptoamide dipeptide inhibitors against both ZapA and LasB, with the aim of mapping the S1' binding site of the enzymes, revealing both striking similarities and important differences in their binding preferences. Here we report the design, synthesis, and screening of several inhibitor analogues, based on two parent inhibitors from the original library. The results have allowed for further characterization of the ZapA and LasB active site binding pockets, and have highlighted the possibility for development of broad-spectrum bacterial protease inhibitors, effective against enzymes of the thermolysin and serralysin metalloprotease families. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Discovery of dihydroxylated 2,4-diphenyl-6-thiophen-2-yl-pyridine as a non-intercalative DNA-binding topoisomerase II-specific catalytic inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Kyu-Yeon; Kwon, Hanbyeol; Park, So-Eun; Lee, Eunyoung; Karki, Radha; Thapa, Pritam; Lee, Jun-Ho; Lee, Eung-Seok; Kwon, Youngjoo

    2014-06-10

    We describe our rationale for designing specific catalytic inhibitors of topoisomerase II (topo II) over topoisomerase I (topo I). Based on 3D-QSAR studies of previously published dihydroxylated 2,4-diphenyl-6-aryl pyridine derivatives, 9 novel dihydroxylated 2,4-diphenyl-6-thiophen-2-yl pyridine compounds were designed, synthesized, and their biological activities were evaluated. These compounds have 2-thienyl ring substituted on the R(3) group on the pyridine ring and they all showed excellent specificity toward topo II compared to topo I. In vitro experiments were performed for compound 13 to determine the mechanism of action for this series of compounds. Compound 13 inhibited topoisomerase II specifically by non-intercalative binding to DNA and did not stabilize enzyme-cleavable DNA complex. Compound 13 efficiently inhibited cell viability, cell migration, and induced G1 arrest. Also from 3D-QSAR studies, the results were compared with other previously published dihydroxylated 2,4-diphenyl-6-aryl pyridine derivatives to explain the structure-activity relationships.

  13. Evidence against oppositional and pharmacokinetic mechanisms of tolerance to diazepam's sedative effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, C; File, S E; Berry, D

    1996-09-23

    Acute administration of diazepam (2 mg/kg i.p.) to rats decreased the number of head-dips, locomotor activity and the number of rears made in the holeboard apparatus, indicating sedative effects. After daily treatment for 7 days with diazepam (2 mg/kg) tolerance developed to all these behavioural effects, despite serum concentrations of diazepam and N-desmethyldiazepam significantly higher than those following acute treatment. After 7 drug-free recovery days the rats were quite unresponsive to a probe dose of diazepam (2 mg/kg) and although there was a gradual recovery of responsiveness to diazepam, the reduction in rears still did not reach the level of the acute group even after 21 drug-free days. There was evidence for pharmacokinetic changes when probe doses of diazepam were given after 7, 14 or 21 recovery days. Lower levels of diazepam and higher levels of N-desmethyldiazepam than following an acute dose to the drug-naïve group were detected, indicating that the chronic treatment had resulted in a persistently enhanced rate of N-demethylation. It is argued that these changes do not fully account for the reduced responsiveness to the probe doses, and nor can they account for the gradual return of response over the 3-week recovery period. There were no detectable scrum concentrations of either compound 24 h after the end of the chronic treatment. However, no rebound increases in behavioural responses were detected at any time-point in withdrawal. Thus, the mechanism underlying this behavioural tolerance was not oppositional in nature. It is suggested that a situation-independent learned behavioural strategy is the most likely mechanism for the observed tolerance.

  14. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 channels modulate the anxiolytic effect of diazepam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manna, Shyamshree S S; Umathe, Sudhir N

    2011-11-24

    The present study investigated the interaction between the vanilloid and GABAergic systems on anxiety. Swiss mice were subjected to social interaction test, an animal model for assessing anxiety-related behavior, after intracerebroventricular administration of capsaicin, (TRPV1 agonist) or capsazepine, (TRPV1 antagonist) either alone or in combination with traditional anxiolytic drug, diazepam. Results showed that capsaicin (1, 10, and 100 μg/mouse) decreased the interaction time exhibiting an anxiogenic-like response, while capsazepine (10, and 100 μg/mouse) produced anxiolytic-like response similar to that of diazepam (0.25-4 mg/kg, i.p). Prior administration of capsaicin at a dose, inactive per se (0.1 μg/mouse) attenuated the anxiolytic effect of diazepam, whereas, co-administration of capsazepine and diazepam both in their sub-effective as well as effective doses exhibited significant anxiolytic-like effect. Interestingly, the combined treatment of diazepam (2mg/kg) and capsazepine (100μg/mouse) produced no sedative or locomotor deficit effects. On the contrary, a higher dose of diazepam (>2mg/kg) alone was found to be a sedative or locomotor depressant, indicating that the anxiolytic effect of diazepam, at least in part involve TRPV1 receptor. Morever, capsazepine pretreatment blocked the anxiogenic effect of capsaicin (1, and 100 μg/mouse). Taken together, these findings suggest that blockade of TRPV1 might be a functional tool to prevent the risks associated with the long-term use of benzodiazepines.

  15. Gamma-aminobutyric acid-modulated benzodiazepine binding sites in bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lummis, S.C.R.; Johnston, G.A.R. (Univ. of Sydney, New South Wales (Australia)); Nicoletti, G. (Royal Melbourne Inst. of Tech. (Australia)); Holan, G. (CSIRO, Melbourne (Australia))

    1991-01-01

    Benzodiazepine binding sites, which were once considered to exist only in higher vertebrates, are here demonstrated in the bacteria E. coli. The bacterial ({sup 3}H)diazepam binding sites are modulated by GABA; the modulation is dose dependent and is reduced at high concentrations. The most potent competitors of E.Coli ({sup 3}H)diazepam binding are those that are active in displacing ({sup 3}H)benzodiazepines from vertebrate peripheral benzodiazepine binding sites. These vertebrate sites are not modulated by GABA, in contrast to vertebrate neuronal benzodiazepine binding sites. The E.coli benzodiazepine binding sites therefore differ from both classes of vertebrate benzodiazepine binding sites; however the ligand spectrum and GABA-modulatory properties of the E.coli sites are similar to those found in insects. This intermediate type of receptor in lower species suggests a precursor for at least one class of vertebrate benzodiazepine binding sites may have existed.

  16. CD6 and syntaxin binding protein 6 variants and response to tumor necrosis factor alpha inhibitors in Danish patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krintel, Sophine B; Essioux, Laurent; Wool, Assaf;

    2012-01-01

    TNFα inhibitor therapy has greatly improved the treatment of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, however at least 30% do not respond. We aimed to investigate insertions and deletions (INDELS) associated with response to TNFα inhibitors in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA)....

  17. Specificity of binding of the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein to different conformational states of the clade E serpins plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and proteinase nexin-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Jan K; Dolmer, Klavs; Gettins, Peter G W

    2009-07-03

    The low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP) is the principal clearance receptor for serpins and serpin-proteinase complexes. The ligand binding regions of LRP consist of clusters of cysteine-rich approximately 40-residue complement-like repeats (CR), with cluster II being the principal ligand-binding region. To better understand the specificity of binding at different sites within the cluster and the ability of LRP to discriminate in vivo between uncomplexed and proteinase-complexed serpins, we have systematically examined the affinities of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) and proteinase nexin-1 (PN-1) in their native, cleaved, and proteinase-complexed states to (CR)(2) and (CR)(3) fragments of LRP cluster II. A consistent blue shift of the CR domain tryptophan fluorescence suggested a common mode of serpin binding, involving lysines on the serpin engaging the acidic region around the calcium binding site of the CR domain. High affinity binding of non-proteinase-complexed PAI-1 and PN-1 occurred to all fragments containing three CR domains (3-59 nm) and most that contain only two CR domains, although binding energies to different (CR)(3) fragments differed by up to 18% for PAI-1 and 9% for PN-1. No detectable difference in affinity was seen between native and cleaved serpin. However, the presence of proteinase in complex with the serpin enhanced affinity modestly and presumably nonspecifically. This may be sufficient to give preferential binding of such complexes in vivo at the relevant physiological concentrations.

  18. Hyoscine versus diazepam for the management of true vertigo in the emergency department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Kariman

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study was a double-blind clinical trial to compare the efficiency of hysocine and diazepam in vertigo treatment. Eligible patients (n=69 were randomly divided into 2 groups of 5 mg hyoscine and 10 mg diazepam. Severity of vertigo was measured in supine and sitting position, and while turning the head. Vertigo severity was assessed before, and 1 and 2 hours after administration of the drug. Treatment success rate of diazepam in relieving vertigo in different positions varied between 88.9 and 100%, while this rate was 31.2–73.5% in hyoscine treatment group (p<0.01. Prescription of diazepam led to complete relief of vertigo in 40–63% of the patients, while this rate was only 2.6–12.5% in hyoscine treatment group (p<0.001. It is likely that diazepam is a better option than hyoscine for management of true vertigo in patients presenting to the emergency department.

  19. Psychosomatic disorders in general practice: comparisons of treatment with flupenthixol, diazepam and sulpiride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, C; Vranckx, C; Elgen, K

    1985-01-01

    One hundred and thirteen patients diagnosed as suffering from one of four common psychosomatic syndromes (psychogenic headache, cardiac neurosis, functional disturbance of the colon, or pruritus) were treated by two groups of general practitioners with flupenthixol or diazepam or sulpiride. Flupenthixol was compared with diazepam in 58 patients in one group of Belgian practices, and with sulpiride in 55 patients in another group of practices and assessed over a 4-week period for therapeutic response and adverse effects. Flupenthixol was given in a dosage of 0.5 to 2 mg a day, diazepam in a dosage of 2.5 to 10 mg a day and sulpiride 100 to 200 mg a day, in identical capsules. In the flupenthixol/diazepam comparison, there were 7 drop-outs (3 flupenthixol, 4 diazepam). Marked or moderate reduction in global assessment of illness occurred in both treatment groups, but there was no significant difference in the therapeutic effect of the two drugs. The incidence of side-effects was low and similar in the two groups. In the flupenthixol/sulpiride comparison, there were 10 drop-outs (7 flupenthixol, 3 sulpiride). A significant reduction in symptoms occurred in both treatment groups, but this was more rapid in the flupenthixol group. Side-effects were infrequent and mild in both groups.

  20. Stabilization of Human Serum Albumin against Urea Denaturation by Diazepam and Ketoprofen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoharan, Pralad; Wong, Yin H; Tayyab, Saad

    2015-01-01

    Stabilizing effect of diazepam and ketoprofen, Sudlow's site II markers on human serum albumin (HSA) against urea denaturation was studied using fluorescence spectroscopy. The two-step, three-state urea transition of HSA was transformed into a single-step, two-state transition with the abolishment of the intermediate state along with a shift of the transition curve towards higher urea concentrations in the presence of diazepam or ketoprofen. Interestingly, a greater shift in the transition curve of HSA was observed in the presence of ketoprofen compared to diazepam. A comparison of the intrinsic fluorescence and three-dimensional fluorescence spectra of HSA and partially-denatured HSAs, obtained in the absence and the presence of diazepam or ketoprofen suggested significant retention of native-like conformation in the partially-denatured states of HSA in the presence of Sudlow's site II markers. Taken together, all these results suggested stabilization of HSA in the presence of diazepam or ketoprofen, being greater in the presence of ketoprofen.

  1. Repeated anticonvulsant testing: contingent tolerance to diazepam and clobazam in kindled rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tietz, E I

    1992-04-01

    The acute anticonvulsant efficacy of diazepam (1.5 mg/kg, i.p.) was evaluated by repeated test injection in kindled rats subcutaneously implanted with diazepam-filled or empty silastic tubes for 3 weeks. Tolerance developed to acute test injections in both diazepam- and sham-implanted rats. Tolerance developed to a lesser extent in another group of diazepam-implanted rats which did not receive acute intermittent anticonvulsant tests. The hypothesis that contingent tolerance had developed to the anticonvulsant actions of benzodiazepines (diazepam, 1.5 mg/kg, i.p. and clobazam, 10 mg/kg, i.p.) in kindled rats given acute intermittent injections was investigated using a 'before-after' design. Significant contingent tolerance developed in rats which received intermittent benzodiazepine treatment before, but not after, amygdala stimulation. Tolerance developed to different extents depending on the seizure measure evaluated (forelimb clonus duration, amygdala afterdischarge duration, motor seizure latency and duration, and seizure stage). Contingent tolerance to both benzodiazepines developed at a similar rate. The findings suggest that contingent tolerance may contribute a sizeable component to the overall functional benzodiazepine tolerance measured in long-term anticonvulsant drug studies in kindled rats. Several questions regarding contingent tolerance phenomena are posed and the implications of these findings for studies using repeated anticonvulsant testing are discussed.

  2. A Comparison of Buccal Midazolam and Intravenous Diazepam for the Acute Treatment of Seizures in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ghofrani

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of the present study is to compare efficacy and safety of buccal midazolam with intravenous diazepam in control of seizures in Iranian children.Methods: This is a randomized clinical trial. 92 patients with acute seizures, ranging from 6 months to 14 years were randomly assigned to receive either buccal midazolam (32 cases or intravenous diazepam (60 cases at the emergency department of a children's hospital. The primary outcome of this study was cessation of visible seizure activity within 5 minutes from administration of the first dosage. The second dosage was used in case the seizure remained uncontrolled 5 minutes after the first one.Findings: In the midazolam group, 22 (68.8% patients were relieved from seizures in 10 minutes.Meanwhile, diazepam controlled the episodes of 42 (70% patients within 10 minutes. The difference was,however, not statistically significant (P=0.9. The mean time required to control the convulsive episodes after administration of medications was not statistically significant (P=0.09. No significant side effects were observed in either group. Nevertheless, the risk of respiratory failure in intravenous diazepam is greater than in buccal midazolam.Conclusion: Buccal midazolam is as effective as and safer than intravenous diazepam in control of seizures.

  3. [Effects of diazepam on mixed anxiety/depression state in male mice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galiamina, A G; Smagin, D A; Kovalenko, I L; Bondar', N P; Kudriavtseva, N N

    2013-11-01

    Chronic social defeat stress in daily agonistic interactions leads to the development of mixed anxiety/depression state in male mice. This paper aimed to study the effects of chronic diazepam treatment on the psychoemotional state of these animals. Diazepam (0.5 mg/kg, i/p, Polfa Tarchomin S. A.) or saline was chronically injected into male mice for two weeks on the background of continuing agonistic interactions (preventive treatment) or into male mice with mixed anxiety/depression state after stopping of social confrontations (therapeutic treatment). Then, the animals were studied in the partition, plus-maze and Porsolt' tests, estimating the levels of communicativeness, anxiety and depressiveness, respectively. Preventive diazepam treatment had a weak protective anxiolytic and pro-depressive effect. The therapeutic diazepam treatment didn't influence on the anxiety and depression-like state. Chronic diazepam was ineffective for the treatment of the mixed anxiety/depression state in male mice. Different effects ofdiazepam on anxiety and depression-like states under preventive treatment confirmed our conclusion shown earlier about the independent development of these pathologies at least in our experimental paradigm.

  4. Evaluation of anxiolytic effect and withdrawal anxiety in chronic intermittent diazepam treatment in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Açikmeşe, Bariş; Haznedar, Seçil; Hatipoğlu, Iclal; Enginar, Nurhan

    2012-04-01

    This study evaluated the effect of intermittent administration in the development of dependence to diazepam in chronic use of the drug. Gabapentin was used to provide an anxiolytic effect on drug-free days. During a 28-day treatment schedule, rats were given diazepam (15 mg/kg) once daily continuously, or intermittently with saline or gabapentin (50 mg/kg) on days 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25. Anxiety-like behavior was assessed on days 10 and 30 using the elevated plus-maze test and novelty-induced grooming test. Contrary to continuous administration, intermittent diazepam did not provide anxiolytic-like activity on day 10; instead, it prevented withdrawal anxiety on day 30. Gabapentin produced anxiolytic-like effects during the withdrawal period, but not on day 10. These results suggest that intermittent administration of diazepam (given either alone or alternatively with a drug possessing anxiolytic activity) may be of value in preventing the development of physical dependence during the chronic use of the drug. However, further studies are needed to demonstrate that this protocol could effectively produce anxiolytic activity on diazepam-free days.

  5. Urinary Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase-2 (TIMP-2 • Insulin-Like Growth Factor-Binding Protein 7 (IGFBP7 Predicts Adverse Outcome in Pediatric Acute Kidney Injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens H Westhoff

    Full Text Available The G1 cell cycle inhibitors tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 (TIMP-2 and insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 7 (IGFBP7 have been identified as promising biomarkers for the prediction of adverse outcomes including renal replacement therapy (RRT and mortality in critically ill adult patients who develop acute kidney injury (AKI. However, the prognostic value of urinary TIMP-2 and IGFBP7 in neonatal and pediatric AKI for adverse outcome has not been investigated yet.The product of the urinary concentration of TIMP-2 and IGFBP7 ([TIMP-2]•[IGFBP7] was assessed by a commercially available immunoassay (NephroCheck™ in a prospective cohort study in 133 subjects aged 0-18 years including 46 patients with established AKI according to pRIFLE criteria, 27 patients without AKI (non-AKI group I and 60 apparently healthy neonates and children (non-AKI group II. AKI etiologies were: dehydration/hypovolemia (n = 7, hemodynamic instability (n = 7, perinatal asphyxia (n = 9, septic shock (n = 7, typical hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS; n = 5, interstitial nephritis (n = 5, vasculitis (n = 4, nephrotoxic injury (n = 1 and renal vein thrombosis (n = 1.When AKI patients were classified into pRIFLE criteria, 6/46 (13% patients fulfilled the criteria for the category "Risk", 13/46 (28% for "Injury", 26/46 (57% for "Failure" and 1/46 (2% for "Loss". Patients in the "Failure" stage had a median 3.7-fold higher urinary [TIMP-2]•[IGFBP7] compared to non-AKI subjects (P<0.001. When analyzed for AKI etiology, highest [TIMP-2]•[IGFBP7] values were found in patients with septic shock (P<0.001 vs. non-AKI I+II. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve analyses in the AKI group revealed good performance of [TIMP-2]•[IGFBP7] in predicting 30-day (area under the curve (AUC 0.79; 95% CI, 0.61-0.97 and 3-month mortality (AUC 0.84; 95% CI, 0.67-0.99 and moderate performance in predicting RRT (AUC 0.67; 95% CI, 0.50-0.84.This study shows that urinary [TIMP

  6. Synthesis of 3-deuterated diazepam and nordiazepam 4-oxides and their use in the synthesis of other 3-deuterated derivatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, S.K.; Tang, R.; Quanlong Pu [Uniformed Services Univ. of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD (United States). Dept. of Medicine

    1996-08-01

    The protons at 3-positions of diazepam 4-oxide and nordiazepam 4-oxide underwent an efficient deuterium exchange via keto-enol tautomerism in deuterated alkaline methanol. The 3-dideuterated 4-oxides were each used as a starting material to synthesize 3-monodeuterated oxazepam and its 3-acetate, 3-monodeuterated temazepam and its 3-acetate, and 3-dideuterated diazepam and nordiazepam. (author).

  7. Interleukin-1 receptor is a target for adjunctive control of diazepam-refractory status epilepticus in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zheng-Hao; Wang, Yi; Tao, An-Feng; Yu, Jie; Wang, Xiao-Yu; Zu, Yun-Yun; Zhang, Shi-Hong; Chen, Zhong

    2016-07-22

    Proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) may accumulate in the brain during status epilepticus, but whether it contributes to the progressive refractoriness of SE remains unclear. By using a kainic acid-induced SE mice model, we tested whether pharmacological blockade or knock-out of interleukin-1 receptor type 1 (IL-1R1) could influence the diazepam-refractory phenomenon of prolonged SE. We confirmed diazepam failed to terminate prolonged SE (allowed to continue for 40min before diazepam administration). The expression level of IL-1β in the hippocampus during prolonged SE was significantly higher than that of baseline. Interestingly, prolonged SE was not diazepam-refractory in IL-1R1 knock-out mice. Moreover, administration of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RA) combined with diazepam terminated established prolonged SE, while IL-1RA alone is not capable to terminate prolonged SE. On the contrary, administration of recombinant human IL-1β weakens the efficacy of diazepam by prolonging its latency to terminate non-prolonged SE. Thus, the present study provides direct evidence that accumulated IL-1β contributed to the diazepam refractoriness of prolonged SE, and suggests that interleukin-1 receptor is a target for adjunctive control of diazepam-refractory SE.

  8. Binding of Pro-Gly-Pro at the active site of leukotriene A4 hydrolase/aminopeptidase and development of an epoxide hydrolase selective inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stsiapanava, Alena; Olsson, Ulrika; Wan, Min; Kleinschmidt, Thea; Rutishauser, Dorothea; Zubarev, Roman A.; Samuelsson, Bengt; Rinaldo-Matthis, Agnes; Haeggström, Jesper Z.

    2014-01-01

    Leukotriene (LT) A4 hydrolase/aminopeptidase (LTA4H) is a bifunctional zinc metalloenzyme that catalyzes the committed step in the formation of the proinflammatory mediator LTB4. Recently, the chemotactic tripeptide Pro-Gly-Pro was identified as an endogenous aminopeptidase substrate for LTA4 hydrolase. Here, we determined the crystal structure of LTA4 hydrolase in complex with a Pro-Gly-Pro analog at 1.72 Å. From the structure, which includes the catalytic water, and mass spectrometric analysis of enzymatic hydrolysis products of Pro-Gly-Pro, it could be inferred that LTA4 hydrolase cleaves at the N terminus of the palindromic tripeptide. Furthermore, we designed a small molecule, 4-(4-benzylphenyl)thiazol-2-amine, denoted ARM1, that inhibits LTB4 synthesis in human neutrophils (IC50 of ∼0.5 μM) and conversion of LTA4 into LTB4 by purified LTA4H with a Ki of 2.3 μM. In contrast, 50- to 100-fold higher concentrations of ARM1 did not significantly affect hydrolysis of Pro-Gly-Pro. A 1.62-Å crystal structure of LTA4 hydrolase in a dual complex with ARM1 and the Pro-Gly-Pro analog revealed that ARM1 binds in the hydrophobic pocket that accommodates the ω-end of LTA4, distant from the aminopeptidase active site, thus providing a molecular basis for its inhibitory profile. Hence, ARM1 selectively blocks conversion of LTA4 into LTB4, although sparing the enzyme’s anti-inflammatory aminopeptidase activity (i.e., degradation and inactivation of Pro-Gly-Pro). ARM1 represents a new class of LTA4 hydrolase inhibitor that holds promise for improved anti-inflammatory properties. PMID:24591641

  9. Smad mediated regulation of inhibitor of DNA binding 2 and its role in phenotypic maintenance of human renal proximal tubule epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mangalakumar Veerasamy

    Full Text Available The basic-Helix-Loop-Helix family (bHLH of transcriptional factors plays a major role in regulating cellular proliferation, differentiation and phenotype maintenance. The downregulation of one of the members of bHLH family protein, inhibitor of DNA binding 2 (Id2 has been shown to induce de-differentiation of epithelial cells. Opposing regulators of epithelial/mesenchymal phenotype in renal proximal tubule epithelial cells (PTEC, TGFβ1 and BMP7 also have counter-regulatory effects in models of renal fibrosis. We investigated the regulation of Id2 by these growth factors in human PTECs and its implication in the expression of markers of epithelial versus myofibroblastic phenotype. Cellular Id2 levels were reduced by TGFβ1 treatment; this was prevented by co-incubation with BMP7. BMP7 alone increased cellular levels of Id2. TGFβ1 and BMP7 regulated Id2 through Smad2/3 and Smad1/5 dependent mechanisms respectively. TGFβ1 mediated Id2 suppression was essential for α-SMA induction in PTECs. Although Id2 over-expression prevented α-SMA induction, it did not prevent E-cadherin loss under the influence of TGFβ1. This suggests that the loss of gate keeper function of E-cadherin alone may not necessarily result in complete EMT and further transcriptional re-programming is essential to attain mesenchymal phenotype. Although BMP7 abolished TGFβ1 mediated α-SMA expression by restoring Id2 levels, the loss of Id2 was not sufficient to induce α-SMA expression even in the context of reduced E-cadherin expression. Hence, a reduction in Id2 is critical for TGFβ1-induced α-SMA expression in this model of human PTECs but is not sufficient in it self to induce α-SMA even in the context of reduced E-cadherin.

  10. [Prescription for diazepam 5 mg tablets in Vestfold 1989 and 1995].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otterstad, H K; Sundene, G

    1996-04-30

    During the last five years, the prescription of tranquillizers has been reduced by 26% in Vestfold County compared with 19% in the country as a whole. This is probably a result of two initiatives: a common strategy to reduce prescription in the county, and monitoring prescription rate of the individual general practitioners. We examined the prescription of diazepam 5 mg tablets and found a reduction of more than 30% from 1989 to 1995. The reduction was greatest among the younger age groups and decreased with increasing age. The most probable reason for this pattern is a more restrictive attitude among general practitioners towards using diazepam to treat the young and middle-aged. The results for 1995 show that women still receive about 60% more diazepam than men, and women aged 70-79 years receive 117% more than women aged 40-49 years.

  11. Effects of chlordiazepoxide and diazepam on feeding performance in a food-preference test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, S J

    1980-01-01

    Chlordiazepoxide (5 and 10 mg/kg) and diazepam (2.5 mg/kg) reduced the latency to eat and enhanced feeding response to familiar food in a food-preference test. The increased feeding response resulted from an increased frequency of individual eating episodes (bouts) without significant change in the episode duration. Experiment II indicated that this facilitatory action of the two drugs was not dependent on the presence of principal novelty cues in the food-preference test. Diazepam (5 mg/kg), in contrast, enhanced the feeding responses to novel food in the food preference test. Experiment III demonstrated that although diazepam can counteract induced food neophobia, its facilitory action on the response to novel foods may be mediated by a mechanism which can operate independently of food neophobia.