WorldWideScience

Sample records for diarrhoeal disease malnutrition

  1. Adaptation costs for climate change-related cases of diarrhoeal disease, malnutrition, and malaria in 2030

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebi, Kristie L

    2008-01-01

    Background Climate change has begun to negatively affect human health, with larger burdens projected in the future as weather patterns continue to change. The climate change-related health consequences of diarrhoeal diseases, malnutrition, and malaria are projected to pose the largest risks to future populations. Limited work has been done to estimate the costs of adapting to these additional health burdens. Methods The costs of treating diarrhoeal diseases, malnutrition (stunting and wasting only), and malaria in 2030 were estimated under three climate scenarios using (1) the current numbers of cases; (2) the projected relative risks of these diseases in 2030; and (3) current treatment costs. The analysis assumed that the number of annual cases and costs of treatment would remain constant. There was limited consideration of socioeconomic development. Results Under a scenario assuming emissions reductions resulting in stabilization at 750 ppm CO2 equivalent in 2210, the costs of treating diarrhoeal diseases, malnutrition, and malaria in 2030 were estimated to be $4 to 12 billion. This is almost as much as current total annual overseas development assistance for health. Conclusion The investment needs in the health sector to address climate-sensitive health outcomes are large. Additional human and financial resources will be needed to prevent and control the projected increased burden of health outcomes due to climate change. PMID:18803827

  2. Adaptation costs for climate change-related cases of diarrhoeal disease, malnutrition, and malaria in 2030

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebi Kristie L

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Climate change has begun to negatively affect human health, with larger burdens projected in the future as weather patterns continue to change. The climate change-related health consequences of diarrhoeal diseases, malnutrition, and malaria are projected to pose the largest risks to future populations. Limited work has been done to estimate the costs of adapting to these additional health burdens. Methods The costs of treating diarrhoeal diseases, malnutrition (stunting and wasting only, and malaria in 2030 were estimated under three climate scenarios using (1 the current numbers of cases; (2 the projected relative risks of these diseases in 2030; and (3 current treatment costs. The analysis assumed that the number of annual cases and costs of treatment would remain constant. There was limited consideration of socioeconomic development. Results Under a scenario assuming emissions reductions resulting in stabilization at 750 ppm CO2 equivalent in 2210, the costs of treating diarrhoeal diseases, malnutrition, and malaria in 2030 were estimated to be $4 to 12 billion. This is almost as much as current total annual overseas development assistance for health. Conclusion The investment needs in the health sector to address climate-sensitive health outcomes are large. Additional human and financial resources will be needed to prevent and control the projected increased burden of health outcomes due to climate change.

  3. Importance of diarrhoeal disease attributable to unsafe water, sanitation and hygiene in South Africa: An overview of the burden of disease approach

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Steyn, M

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available factor ? 1st = HIV ? 2nd Undernutrition ? 3rd Diarrhoeal disease ? Diseases of poverty ? low birth weight, diarrhoeal diseases, lower respiratory infections, and high protein-energy malnutrition ? 30% of child deaths ? HIV = 40% of child deaths...

  4. Acute Diarrhoeal Diseases Among Preschool Children in Western Maharashtra, India.

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    Mahesh B Tondare , Vaishali V Raje, Satish V Kakade , Madhavi V Rayate

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available "Background: Malnutrition and infectious diseases both occur in the same unfortunate children and together they play a major role in causing the high morbidity and mortality in them. Out of all the childhood illnesses, acute respiratory tract infections, diarrhoeal diseases and malnutrition are the principle causes of illness and death in the developing countries. Acute Diarrhoeal diseases (ADD’s are reported to be the 2nd leading cause of child morbidity and mortality. Objectives: To study the attack rate of Acute Diarrhoeal Disease among pre-school children and to study the socio-demographic variables of pre-school children suffering from Acute Diarrhoeal Disease. Methods: A Longitudinal study was conducted among preschool children (3-5years who were selected from Private pre-primary school of urban area and followed for the period of one year. Mother/guardian/teacher was interviewed by using pre-tested proforma during this period. Results: About 56% of children found suffering from ADD with 0.6 episodes per children per year among private pre-primary school. Higher proportions of ADD affected children were residing in nuclear type of family, belonging to middle socio-economic class, mothers were literate & housewives, born with order >2 compared to non ADD affected children. Conclusion: Maximum number of children from private pre-primary schools suffered with nearly one attack of Acute Diarrhoeal Disease with maternal illiteracy and working mothers found favorable factors. Immunization coverage, EBF and proper weaning play a very important role in prevention of infections."

  5. Focus on acute diarrhoeal disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fabio Baldi; Maria Antonia Bianco; Gerardo Nardone; Alberto Pilotto; Emanuela Zamparo

    2009-01-01

    Diarrhoea is an alteration of normal bowel movement characterized by an increase in the water content,volume, or frequency of stools. Diarrhoea needs to be classified according to the trends over time (acute or chronic) and to the characteristics of the stools (watery, fatty, inflammatory). Secretory diarrhoeas,mostly acute and of viral aetiology in more than 70% of cases, are by far the most important subtype of diarrhoeas in terms of frequency, incidence and mortality (over 2.5 million deaths/year in developing countries). Natural and synthetic opiates such as morphine, codeine, and loperamide which react with endogenous opiates (enkephalins, beta-endorphins,dynorphins) mainly act on intestinal motility and slow down transit. An antidiarrhoeal drug developed in recent years, racecadotril, acts as an enkephalinase inhibitor.Clinical studies have shown that it is just as effective as loperamide in resolving acute diarrhoea but with greater reduction in pain and abdominal distension.Some studies have explored the prevalence of diarrhoea in old age. An epidemiological study carried out in Italy by 133 General Practitioners on 5515 elderly outpatients reported a prevalence of diarrhoea, defined according to the Rome criteria, of 9.1%. Infectious diseases (19%) and drug use (16%) were the most commoncauses of diarrhoea in old age. Regardless of the cause,the treatment of elderly patients with diarrhoea must include rehydration and nutritional support. Every year,more than 50 million tourists travel from industrialized countries to places where hygiene levels are poor. At least 75% of those travelling for short periods mention health problems, and in particular traveller's diarrhoea.

  6. Acute diarrhoeal diseases--an approach to management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sur, Dipika; Bhattacharya, S K

    2006-05-01

    Acute diarrhoeal diseases rank second amongst all infectious diseases as a killer in children below 5 years of age worldwide. Globally, 1.3 billion episodes occur annually, with an average of 2-3 episodes per child per year. The important aetiologic agents of diarrhoea and the guidelines for management are discussed. Management of acute diarrhoea is entirely based on clinical presentation of the cases. It includes assessment of the degree of dehydration clinically, rehydration therapy, feeding during diarrhoea, use of antibiotic(s) in selected cases, micronutrient supplementation and use of probiotics. Assessment of the degree of dehydration should be done following the WHO guidelines. Dehydration can be managed with oral rehydration salt (ORS) solution or intravenous fluids. Recently WHO has recommended a hypo-osmolar ORS solution for the treatment of all cases of acute diarrhoea including cholera. Feeding during and after diarrhoea (for at least 2-3 weeks) prevents malnutrition and growth retardation. Antibiotic therapy is not recommended for the treatmentof diarrhoea routinely. Only cases of severe cholera and bloody diarrhoea (presumably shigellosis) should be treated with a suitable antibiotic. Pilot studies in several countries have shown that zinc supplementation during diarrhoea reduces the severity and duration of the disease as well as antidiarrhoeal and antimicrobial use rate. Probiotics may offer a safe intervention in acute infectious diarrhoea to reduce the duration and severity of the illness.

  7. The global burden of childhood coeliac disease: a neglected component of diarrhoeal mortality?

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    Peter Byass

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Coeliac disease has emerged as an increasingly recognised public health problem over the last half-century, and is now coming to be seen as a global phenomenon, despite a profound lack of globally representative epidemiological data. Since children with coeliac disease commonly present with chronic diarrhoea and malnutrition, diagnosis is often overlooked, particularly in poorer settings where children often fail to thrive and water-borne infectious diarrhoeas are common. This is the first attempt to make global estimates of the burden of coeliac disease in childhood. METHODS: We built a relatively crude model of childhood coeliac disease, incorporating estimates of population prevalence, probability of non-diagnosis, and likelihood of mortality among the undiagnosed across all countries from 1970 to 2010, based around the few available data. All our assumptions are stated in the paper and the model is available as a supplementary file. FINDINGS: Our model suggests that in 2010 there were around 2.2 million children under 5 years of age living with coeliac disease. Among these children there could be 42,000 deaths related to coeliac disease annually. In 2008, deaths related to coeliac disease probably accounted for approximately 4% of all childhood diarrhoeal mortality. CONCLUSIONS: Although coeliac disease may only account for a small proportion of diarrhoeal mortality, these deaths are not preventable by applying normal diarrhoea treatment guidelines, which may even involve gluten-based food supplements. As other causes of diarrhoeal mortality decline, coeliac disease will become a proportionately increasing problem unless consideration is given to trying gluten-free diets for children with chronic diarrhoea and malnutrition.

  8. Diarrhoeal disease outbreak in a rural area of Karnataka

    OpenAIRE

    Bhavana R Hiremath; Shashank K J

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acute diarrhoea is the passage of 3 or more loose or watery stools in the past 24 hours with or without dehydration. Owing to WASH strategy (Water, Sanitation and Hygiene) the burden of diarrheal diseases has seen a tremendous decline over the past 2 decades. Cholera is an acute diarrhoeal infection caused by ingestion of food or water contaminated with the bacterium Vibrio Cholerae. Objectives: 1. To document the factors responsible for the outbreak. 2. To provide recommendations...

  9. Liver disease and malnutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purnak, Tugrul; Yilmaz, Yusuf

    2013-08-01

    Patients with hepatic disorders are exceptionally vulnerable to developing malnutrition because of the key role played by the liver in regulating the nutritional state and the energy balance. Moreover, the presence of chronic liver disorders could reduce the appetite and thus influence the nutrient intake. Poor nutritional status has been shown in various patient groups with hepatic disorders, and particularly in patients with alcoholic cirrhosis who are at high nutritional risk. It is well established that malnourished patients with liver diseases generally have a higher risk of developing adverse clinical outcomes and increased healthcare costs. Nutrition screening with the Subjective Global Assessment and anthropometric measurements are an important first step in the early identification of malnutrition and initiates the whole nutrition care process. It is therefore important for appropriate nutrition policies and protocols to be implemented so that all patients with chronic liver diseases are monitored closely from a nutritional standpoint. Early and evidence-based nutritional interventions are eagerly needed to minimize the nutritional decline associated with chronic liver disorders and ultimately improve the prognosis of such patients. This review includes a comprehensive analysis of methods to identify malnutrition in patients with chronic liver diseases as well as the extent and impact of the malnutrition problem in selected patient populations.

  10. Climate change and diarrhoeal disease: Perspectives for development policies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halsnæs, Kirsten; Føyn, Tullik Helene Ystanes

    2010-01-01

    This paper points to the key role of health in development programmes and illustrates through diarrhoeal diseases as a case example, how climate change can impose increasing risks, which particularly will hit young children and the poor. The increased incidence can both be expected to emerge from...... that can help to reduce these risks. An attempt to start such a process i.e. has been done by the Danish Overseas Development Assistance Programme, Danida, which has conducted a climate screening of programme activities in Bangladesh. The paper presents a number of conclusions from this climate screening...

  11. Diarrhoeal disease outbreak in a rural area of Karnataka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhavana R Hiremath

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute diarrhoea is the passage of 3 or more loose or watery stools in the past 24 hours with or without dehydration. Owing to WASH strategy (Water, Sanitation and Hygiene the burden of diarrheal diseases has seen a tremendous decline over the past 2 decades. Cholera is an acute diarrhoeal infection caused by ingestion of food or water contaminated with the bacterium Vibrio Cholerae. Objectives: 1. To document the factors responsible for the outbreak. 2. To provide recommendations for prevention and control of such outbreaks in future. Methods: After receiving verbal information from district office regarding outbreak of diarrhoeal disease (cholera in a town of Bijapur district, we independently conducted a cross sectional study in the affected area and collected information regarding no. of people affected since the outbreak, their age and sex distribution. A total of 3802 people were interviewed using a predesigned questionnaire on 28th and 29th July, 2012. We also conducted environmental investigation regarding the source of contamination and collected 2 water samples from drinking water source. Results: All the cases were clustered in the five streets, which were consuming water from contaminated two water tanks. A total of 121 cases of diarrhoea were identified affecting 3.18% of the population. Attack rate of cholera was highest (4.5% in 25-34 years age group followed by 4.22% in 15-24 years age group. Attack rates was higher among females (3.4% compared to males (2.9%. Laboratory report stated that water samples were unfit for drinking purpose. V. Cholera (Ogawa serotype was isolated from water sample. Conclusion: Consumption of contaminated water from a newly dug bore-well had led to the diarrhea outbreak. Lack of sanitation and hygiene had worsened the situation.

  12. The epidemiology and aetiology of diarrhoeal disease in infancy in southern Vietnam: a birth cohort study

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    Katherine L. Anders

    2015-06-01

    Conclusions: The minimum incidence of diarrhoeal disease in infants in both urban and semi-rural settings in southern Vietnam was quantified prospectively. A large proportion of laboratory-diagnosed disease was caused by rotavirus and norovirus. These data highlight the unmet need for a rotavirus vaccine in Vietnam and provide evidence of the previously unrecognized burden of norovirus in infants.

  13. Study of prevalence of diarrhoeal diseases amongst under five population

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    Shailesh Sutariya, Nitiben Talsania, Chintul Shah

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute diarrheal disease with its accompanying dehydration has remained a challenging problem to the medical profession and the community in the third world countries especially in the age below five years. The current study was conducted to study the prevalence of diarrheal diseases amongst under five population and the seasonal distribution of diarrheal diseases amongst under five population. It was a longitudinal study conducted among 2408 children under 5 yrs age group including 541 infants. Maximum cases of diarrhea (81.89% were in infants. 90.60% episodes of diarrhea were treated at home with ORS and/or home available fluids. About half of the diarrheal episodes 2798 (46.39% were occurred in monsoon season.

  14. Management of acute diarrhoeal disease at Edendale Hospital: Are standard treatment guidelines followed?

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    Kershinee Reddy

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Diarrhoeal disease (DD is a major cause of childhood mortality in developing countries. In South Africa (SA, it ranks as one of the top five causes of under-5 mortality. Local and global guidelines on the management of acute DD are readily available. The Standard Treatment Guidelines (STGs and Essential Drugs List for Hospital Level Paediatrics are a recognised standard of care for children in SA hospitals. However, children still die from this preventable disease. Objective. To determine whether doctors adhered to standard treatment guidelines when treating children under 5 years of age presenting to Edendale Hospital in Pietermaritzburg, KwaZulu-Natal Province, with acute DD. Methods. The study was a retrospective clinical audit of individual patient records. Results. One hundred and thirty-five patient records were reviewed. Forty-seven percent had a correct nutritional assessment, 41% were correctly assessed for shock and 27% for dehydration. Appropriate investigations were undertaken in 12%. Ninety-seven percent of patients had appropriate fluid plans prescribed. Zinc was prescribed in only 39% of patients, whereas 84% were appropriately not prescribed antibiotics and no patients received anti-diarrhoeal medication. In 90% of patients, the correct post-care patient referral was made, and 47% of caregivers were adequately advised about ongoing care of their children. Conclusion. This study identifies substantial non-adherence to the SA STGs for the management of young children with acute DD.

  15. A cross-sectional study on aetiology of diarrhoeal disease, India

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    S Purwar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Global, regional and national estimates clearly place diarrhoeal diseases as a major, albeit to an extant neglected public health problem. Deaths of children aged <5 years owing to diarrhoea was estimated to be 1.87 million at the global level (uncertainty range from 1.56 to 2.19 million, which is approximately 19% of total child deaths. Objectives: The present report is a cross-sectional study undertaken to estimate the role of various aetiological agents causing diarrhoea in North Karnataka and adjoining areas of Maharashtra and Goa. Methods: Three hundred stool samples were collected from patients seeking health care at KLES Dr. Prabhakar Kore Hospital and Medical Research Centre, Belgaum; and processed for detection of various bacterial, viral and parasitic agents. Results: Bacterial pathogens attributed to 65.7% of diarrhoea cases, followed by viral infection (22%, parasitic infection (16.3% and infection by Candida spp. (5.6%. The study identified Escherichia coli in general and Enteropathogenic E. coli in particular, and Group A Rotavirus to be the most frequently isolated pathogens among diarrhoea patients. Conclusion: The data generated from the current study will help the health officials for better interventional and treatment strategies for diarrhoeal diseases.

  16. Addressing Disease-Related Malnutrition in Healthcare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Maria Isabel; Hegazi, Refaat A.; Diaz-Pizarro Graf, José Ignacio; Gomez-Morales, Gabriel; Fuentes Gutiérrez, Catalina; Goldin, Maria Fernanda; Navas, Angela; Pinzón Espitia, Olga Lucia; Tavares, Gilmária Millere

    2015-01-01

    Alarmingly high rates of disease-related malnutrition have persisted in hospitals of both emerging and industrialized nations over the past 2 decades, despite marked advances in medical care over this same interval. In Latin American hospitals, the numbers are particularly striking; disease-related malnutrition has been reported in nearly 50% of adult patients in Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Costa Rica, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Mexico, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Puerto Rico, Venezuela, and Uruguay. The tolls of disease-related malnutrition are high in both human and financial terms—increased infectious complications, higher incidence of pressure ulcers, longer hospital stays, more frequent readmissions, greater costs of care, and increased risk of death. In an effort to draw attention to malnutrition in Latin American healthcare, a feedM.E. Latin American Study Group was formed to extend the reach and support the educational efforts of the feedM.E. Global Study Group. In this article, the feedM.E. Latin American Study Group shows that malnutrition incurs excessive costs to the healthcare systems, and the study group also presents evidence of how appropriate nutrition care can improve patients’ clinical outcomes and lower healthcare costs. To achieve the benefits of nutrition for health throughout Latin America, the article presents feedM.E.’s simple and effective Nutrition Care Pathway in English and Spanish as a way to facilitate its use. PMID:25883116

  17. A genome-wide association meta-analysis of diarrhoeal disease in young children identifies FUT2 locus and provides plausible biological pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bustamante, Mariona; Standl, Marie; Bassat, Quique

    2016-01-01

    More than a million childhood diarrhoeal episodes occur worldwide each year, and in developed countries a considerable part of them are caused by viral infections. In this study, we aimed to search for genetic variants associated with diarrhoeal disease in young children by meta-analyzing genome-...

  18. Malnutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fats, vitamins, and minerals - you may suffer from malnutrition. Causes of malnutrition include: Lack of specific nutrients in your diet. ... the lack of one vitamin can lead to malnutrition. An unbalanced diet Certain medical problems, such as ...

  19. Impact of oral rehydration and selected public health interventions on reduction of mortality from childhood diarrhoeal diseases in Mexico.

    OpenAIRE

    Gutiérrez, G.; Tapia-Conyer, R.; Guiscafré, H.; Reyes, H; Martínez, H.; Kumate, J.

    1996-01-01

    Reported are the results of an analysis of mortality trends from diarrhoeal diseases among under-5-year-olds in Mexico between 1978 and 1993 in relation to the impact of education, basic sanitation, and selected medical care practices. The study period was divided into three stages; the first pre-dated the widespread application of oral rehydration therapy (ORT); the second, covered the implementation of a nationwide programme promoting ORT; and the third included additional measures, such as...

  20. Impact of oral rehydration and selected public health interventions on reduction of mortality from childhood diarrhoeal diseases in Mexico.

    OpenAIRE

    Gutiérrez, G.; TAPIA-CONYER, R.; Guiscafré, H; Reyes, H; Martínez, H.; Kumate, J

    1996-01-01

    Reported are the results of an analysis of mortality trends from diarrhoeal diseases among under-5-year-olds in Mexico between 1978 and 1993 in relation to the impact of education, basic sanitation, and selected medical care practices. The study period was divided into three stages; the first pre-dated the widespread application of oral rehydration therapy (ORT); the second, covered the implementation of a nationwide programme promoting ORT; and the third included additional measures, such as...

  1. Knowledge, perception, and management skills of mothers with under-five children about diarrhoeal disease in indigenous and resettlement communities in Assosa District, Western Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merga, Nigatu; Alemayehu, Tadesse

    2015-03-01

    As primary caregiver to under-five children in Ethiopia, mothers' knowledge, perception, and management skills are important to minimize the effects of morbidity and mortality associated with diarrhoeal diseases. A community-based comparative cross-sectional study was conducted in Abramo and Megele 37 kebeles (the last administration division) in Assosa district of western Ethiopia in July 2010. Quantitative data were obtained by a structured questionnaire from 232 randomly-selected mothers having children aged less than five years regarding their knowledge, perception, and management. Qualitative data were also collected by arranging four focus group discussions involving mothers from the two communities. The prevalence of diarrhoeal diseases among under-five children was 33.2%, and the knowledge of mothers about the causes, transmission, and prevention of diarrhoea in the study area was 37.5%. The prevalence of diarrhoeal disease was higher in the settlement area whereas mothers' knowledge was better in the indigenous community; 62.9% of mothers were categorized as having good attitude on causes, transmission, and prevention of diarrhoeal disease. Community water source, water storage container, and knowledge of mothers remained a strong predictor of diarrhoeal morbidity after conducting logistic regression analysis (OR=8.4, CI 3.59-31.85; OR=2.2, CI 1.02-4.89; and OR=3.62, CI 1.23-4.71 respectively). Diarrhoeal morbidity was high in the study areas. On the contrary, knowledge and attitude of mothers, recognizing the danger sign of dehydration due to diarrhoea, and the prevention and management of childhood diarrhoeal diseases were not adequate. Information, education and communication strategy may help increase the knowledge and create positive attitude among mothers regarding the cause, prevention, and management of diarrhoea.

  2. [Immunity and malnutrition in alcoholic liver diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hevia Ojanguren, C; Fanjul Cabeza, B; González Vázquez, M I; Linares Rodríguez, A; Rodrigo Sáez, L

    1994-10-01

    Assessment of immunity was performed in 150 patients with alcoholic liver disease (15 steatosis, 30 hepatitis and 105 cirrhosis: 34 in grade A, 34 in grade B and 37 in grade C, according to Child-Pugh classification). This assessment was based on the total lymphocyte count and a delayed hypersensitivity skin multiple test. Likewise, nutritional status of patients was studied using anthropometric and biochemical parameters (triceps skinfold thickness, arm muscle circumference and serum albumin). The association between alcoholic liver disease, malnutrition and immunity was analyzed. The results show that lymphopenia and disorders in cell-mediate immunity were more common in those patients with cirrhosis, increasing the number of anergic patients while the degree of hepatocellular insufficiency worsens (8.8% in grade A, 11.8% in grade B and 32.4% in grade C). Although there where significantly more alterations of delayed cutaneous hypersensitivity in cirrhotics with malnutrition (hypoergy: 55.2% and anergy: 37.9%) than in those well nourished (hypoergy: 23.7% and anergy: 10.5%, p < 0.01), lymphopenia didn't show differences between these groups. We think that immunity mus'nt be considered a parameter in nutritional assessment.

  3. Malnutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the body is permanent, even though you survive. Poverty, natural disasters, political problems, and war can all ... Malnutrition is a significant problem all over the world, especially among children. It is very harmful to ...

  4. Prevalence of malnutrition in Parkinson's disease: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheard, Jamie M; Ash, Susan; Silburn, Peter A; Kerr, Graham K

    2011-09-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) patients may be at higher risk of malnutrition because of the symptoms associated with the disease and the side effects of the medication used to manage it. A decline in nutritional status is associated with many adverse outcomes related to health and quality of life. It is not clear, however, to what extent this population is currently affected by malnutrition. The objective of this review was to systematically assess the methodology and outcomes of studies reporting the prevalence of malnutrition in PD patients. Studies that attempted to classify participants with PD into nutritional risk and/or malnutrition categories using body mass index, weight change, anthropometric measures, and nutritional screening and assessment scores were included. The prevalence of malnutrition ranged from 0% to 24% in PD patients, while 3-60% of PD patients were reported to be at risk of malnutrition. There was a large degree of variation among studies in the methods chosen, the definition of malnutrition using those methods, and the detail in which the methodological protocols were reported. The true extent of malnutrition in the PD population has yet to be accurately quantified. It is important, however, to screen for malnutrition at the time of PD diagnosis.

  5. Alzheimer's Disease in the Danish Malnutrition Period 1999-2007

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sparre-Sørensen, Maja; Kristensen, Gustav David Westergaard

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Several studies published over the last few years have shown that malnutrition is a risk factor for developing and worsening Alzheimer's disease (AD) and that a balanced diet can delay the onset of the disease. During the period from January 1999 to January 2007, a statistically...... significant increase in the number of deaths related to malnutrition was found among the elderly in Denmark. Many more may have been suffering from malnutrition, but not to such a degree that it led to their deaths. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is to examine whether or not the effect of the malnutrition...... from AD associated with the period when the general nutritional state among the elderly in Denmark worsened (from 1999 to 2007). CONCLUSION: The study concludes that the malnutrition period resulted in an excess death rate from Alzheimer's disease. All in all, a total of 345 extra lives were lost...

  6. What increases the risk of malnutrition in Parkinson's disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomic, Svetlana; Pekic, Vlasta; Popijac, Zeljka; Pucic, Tomislav; Petek, Marta; Kuric, Tihana Gilman; Misevic, Sanja; Kramaric, Ruzica Palic

    2017-04-15

    Parkinson's disease (PD) patients are at a higher risk of malnutrition. The prevalence has been estimated to 0-24%, while 3%-60% of PD patients are reported to be at risk of malnutrition. To date, there is no clear explanation for malnutrition in these patients. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of malnutrition and to analyze factors that influence its appearance. The Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA) was used to determine normal nutritional status; at risk of malnutrition; and already malnourished status. The Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) parts III and IV, Hoehn and Yahr scale (H&Y scale), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE), Questionnaire for Impulsive-Compulsive Disorders in Parkinson's Disease-Rating Scale - eating part (QUIP-RS) and Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA) were used to evaluate the factors affecting patient nutritional status. Out of 96 patients, 55,2% were at risk of malnutrition, while 8,3% had already been malnourished. Age, H&Y scale, UPDRS part III, 'off' periods and depression influence negatively on MNA. More patients with 'off' periods were rigor dominant. Thyroid gland hormone therapy was related to malnutrition, while patients with normal nutritional status used ropinirole more often than pramipexole. Factors affecting nutritional status are age, motor symptoms and stage severity, 'off' states, rigidity dominant type with 'off' states, and thyroid hormone replacement therapy. Ropinirole exhibited the possible 'protective' effect against malnutrition.

  7. Factors contributing to malnutrition in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung R; Chung, Sun J; Yoo, Sung-Hee

    2016-04-01

    Our objective in this study was to evaluate the nutritional status and to identify clinical, psychosocial, and nutritional factors contributing to malnutrition in Korean patients with Parkinson's disease. We used a descriptive, cross-sectional study design. Of 102 enrolled patients, 26 (25.5%) were malnourished and 27 (26.5%) were at risk of malnutrition based on Mini-Nutritional Assessment scores. Malnutrition was related to activity of daily living score, Hoehn and Yahr stage, duration of levodopa therapy, Beck Depression Inventory and Spielberger's Anxiety Inventory scores, body weight, body weight at onset of Parkinson's disease, and body mass index. On multiple logistic regression analysis, anxiety score, duration of levodopa therapy, body weight at onset of Parkinson's disease, and loss of body weight were significant factors predicting malnutrition in Parkinson's disease patients. Therefore, nutritional assessment, including psychological evaluation, is required for Parkinson's disease patients to facilitate interdisciplinary nutritional intervention for malnourished patients.

  8. Evaluating next-generation sequencing for direct clinical diagnostics in diarrhoeal disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joensen, Katrine Grimstrup; Engsbro, A L Ø; Lukjancenko, Oksana

    2017-01-01

    . DNA was extracted from faecal samples and sequenced on the Illumina MiSeq system. Species distribution was determined with MGmapper and NGS-based diagnostic prediction was performed based on the relative abundance of pathogenic bacteria and Giardia and detection of pathogen-specific virulence genes....... NGS-based diagnostic results were compared to conventional findings for 55 of the diarrhoeal samples; 38 conventionally positive for bacterial pathogens, two positive for Giardia, four positive for virus and 11 conventionally negative. The NGS-based approach enabled detection of the same bacterial...... pathogens as the classical approach in 34 of the 38 conventionally positive bacterial samples and predicted the responsible pathogens in five of the 11 conventionally negative samples. Overall, the NGS-based approach enabled pathogen detection comparable to conventional diagnostics and the approach has...

  9. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and malnutrition in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehgal, Inderpaul S; Dhooria, Sahajal; Agarwal, Ritesh

    2017-03-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a chronic inflammatory lung disorder characterized by progressive, poorly reversible airflow limitation. In addition to its pulmonary manifestations, COPD is also associated with several systemic expressions including anemia, osteoporosis, coronary artery disease, and malnutrition. In COPD, malnutrition is a consequence of reduced nutritional intake and muscle loss, further compounded by systemic inflammation. In the developing world, malnutrition is a significant problem by itself, even without any systemic illness. It is likely that the occurrence and consequence of malnutrition in COPD may be even more profound in developing countries. In this review, we discuss the relationship between malnutrition and COPD and their overall impact in the developing world. COPD is highly prevalent in developing countries with an estimated 15-43 million patients suffering from COPD. The pooled prevalence of malnutrition in COPD was found to be 47.6% [95% confidence interval (CI), 23.5-71.5%] with the prevalence being higher in acute exacerbations of COPD compared to stable COPD. There is a need for generating good quality evidence from the developing world regarding the prevalence of malnutrition in COPD, the role of nutritional supplementation and its impact on exercise capacity, and overall health-related quality of life in patients with COPD.

  10. Evaluating next-generation sequencing for direct clinical diagnostics in diarrhoeal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joensen, K G; Engsbro, A L Ø; Lukjancenko, O; Kaas, R S; Lund, O; Westh, H; Aarestrup, F M

    2017-03-11

    The accurate microbiological diagnosis of diarrhoea involves numerous laboratory tests and, often, the pathogen is not identified in time to guide clinical management. With next-generation sequencing (NGS) becoming cheaper, it has huge potential in routine diagnostics. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of NGS-based diagnostics through direct sequencing of faecal samples. Fifty-eight clinical faecal samples were obtained from patients with diarrhoea as part of the routine diagnostics at Hvidovre University Hospital, Denmark. Ten samples from healthy individuals were also included. DNA was extracted from faecal samples and sequenced on the Illumina MiSeq system. Species distribution was determined with MGmapper and NGS-based diagnostic prediction was performed based on the relative abundance of pathogenic bacteria and Giardia and detection of pathogen-specific virulence genes. NGS-based diagnostic results were compared to conventional findings for 55 of the diarrhoeal samples; 38 conventionally positive for bacterial pathogens, two positive for Giardia, four positive for virus and 11 conventionally negative. The NGS-based approach enabled detection of the same bacterial pathogens as the classical approach in 34 of the 38 conventionally positive bacterial samples and predicted the responsible pathogens in five of the 11 conventionally negative samples. Overall, the NGS-based approach enabled pathogen detection comparable to conventional diagnostics and the approach has potential to be extended for the detection of all pathogens. At present, however, this approach is too expensive and time-consuming for routine diagnostics.

  11. Evaluation of malnutrition in patients with nervous system disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Feng; Liu, Yao-wen; Wang, Xue-feng; Liu, Guang-wei

    2014-10-01

    Nutritional deficiencies are independent risk factors for adverse outcomes in patients with nervous system disease. Patients with nervous system disease can often become malnourished due to swallowing difficulties or unconsciousness. This malnourishment increases hospitalization duration; average total hospital cost; occurrence of infection, pressure ulcers, and other complications. These problems need to be addressed in the clinic. In this paper, we review the relevant literature, including studies on influencing factors, evaluations, indexes, and methods: Our aim is to understand the current status of malnutrition in patients with nervous system disease and reasons associated with nutritional deficiencies by using malnutrition evaluation methods to assess the risk of nutritional deficiencies in the early stages.

  12. Reduction in morbidity and mortality from childhood diarrhoeal disease after species A rotavirus vaccine introduction in Latin America : a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rishi Desai

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Countries in Latin America were among the first to implement routine vaccination against species A rotavirus (RVA. We evaluate data from Latin America on reductions in gastroenteritis and RVA disease burden following the introduction of RVA vaccine. Published literature was reviewed to identify case-control studies of vaccine effectiveness and population-based studies examining longitudinal trends of diarrhoeal disease reduction after RVA vaccine introduction in Latin American countries. RVA vaccine effectiveness and impact on gastroenteritis mortality and hospitalization rates and RVA hospitalization rates are described. Among middle-income Latin American countries with published data (Mexico, Brazil, El Salvador and Panama, RVA vaccine contributed to a gastroenteritis-associated mortality reduction of 22-41%, a gastroenteritis-associated hospitalization reduction of 17-51% and a RVA hospitalization reduction of 59-81% among children younger than five years of age. In Brazil and El Salvador, case-control studies demonstrated that a full RVA vaccination schedule was 76-85% effective against RVA hospitalization; a lower effectiveness of 46% was seen in Nicaragua, the only low-income country with available data. A growing body of literature offers convincing evidence of "real world" vaccine program successes in Latin American settings, which may be expanded as more countries in the region include RVA vaccine in their immunization programs.

  13. [Disease-related malnutrition and its influence on perioperative outcome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grecu, Irina; Grinţescu, Ioana; Tulbure, D

    2007-01-01

    Disease-related malnutrition is highly prevalent among surgical patients and has important deleterious effects on postoperative outcome: increased complications rate, length of hospital stay, mortality and costs. Malnutrition (equivalent with undernutrition in the surgical patients) can be present already on admission, could rapidly develop or aggravate during hospital stay. The determination of malnutrition in this high-risk group of patients in multifactorial: decreased intake (anorexia, gastrointestinal symptoms, prolonged perioperative fasting) and increased demands (hyper-catabolism due to underlying disease, surgical stress, eventual postoperative complications). The identification of patients at nutritional risk by screening on admission and whenever the patient situation changes throughout hospitalization is the first, mandatory step for developing an accurate nutritional care plan in these patients, in order to positively influence postoperative outcome.

  14. Impact of oral rehydration and selected public health interventions on reduction of mortality from childhood diarrhoeal diseases in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, G; Tapia-Conyer, R; Guiscafré, H; Reyes, H; Martínez, H; Kumate, J

    1996-01-01

    Reported are the results of an analysis of mortality trends from diarrhoeal diseases among under-5-year-olds in Mexico between 1978 and 1993 in relation to the impact of education, basic sanitation, and selected medical care practices. The study period was divided into three stages; the first pre-dated the widespread application of oral rehydration therapy (ORT); the second, covered the implementation of a nationwide programme promoting ORT; and the third included additional measures, such as immunization and improvements in basic sanitation. Mortality rates decreased progressively, at an average of 1.8% per year in the first stage, 6.4% in the second, and 17.8% in the third. The importance of literacy campaigns for women and the promotion of ORT was confirmed. Both of these measures reduced mortality; however, a greater reduction resulted from a massive immunization campaign against measles and improvements in sanitation (expansion of the drainage and piped water systems, improved water chlorination procedure, and effective prohibition of the use of sanitary sewage for vegetable irrigation).

  15. Diarrhoeal disease morbidity in children below 5 years in urban slums of Delhi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatnagar, S; Dosajh, U

    1986-07-01

    To determine the magnitude of morbidity related to diarrhea among children under 5 years of age, a study was carried out in 4 slum areas of Delhi in May-June 1984. Of the 3645 children surveyed, 963 (26.4%) had suffered from 1 or more new episodes of diarrhea in the 2 weeks preceding the survey. This suggests a mean annual incidence of diarrhea in the slums of Delhi of 7.9 episodes/child, with an average duration of 3.9 days/episode. The mean episodes/child/year ranged from a low of 4.1 in Ballimaran to a high of 11.9 in the Seelampur slum. The incidence of diarrhea was highest in chldren 7-12 months of age (13.6 episodes/year). In 24.2% of the diarrhea episodes, the families sought no medical help. 54.5% of cases were treated by private practitioners, 21% were seen at hospitals, and 0.3% were treated with home remedies. Only 20.2% of mothers of children with diarrhea were familiar with oral rehydration therapy, despite the easy accessibility of information about this treatment in the slum areas. Among the mothers with knowledge of oral rehydration, 47.9% used it for all diarrhea episodes, 33.0% used it for selected episodes, and 19.1% had never used it. A higher incidence of diarrhea was found among children living in homes where unfiltered water from handpumps was used for drinking or where residents defecated in open fields. Children with grade 2 or 3 malnutrition also showed a higher incidence of diarrhea. Among the socioeconomic parameters, diarrhea was positively associated with low female income and illiteracy on the part of the mother. Finally, infants who were exclusively breastfed had a lower incidence of diarrhea than those who were receiving supplementary feedings.

  16. Malnutrition in a Sample of Community-Dwelling People with Parkinson’s Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Sheard, Jamie M; Susan Ash; Mellick, George D; Peter A Silburn; Graham K Kerr

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Malnutrition results in poor health outcomes, and people with Parkinson's disease may be more at risk of malnutrition. However, the prevalence of malnutrition in Parkinson's disease is not yet well defined. The aim of this study is to provide an estimate of the extent of malnutrition in community-dwelling people with Parkinson's disease. METHODS: This is a cross-sectional study of people with Parkinson's disease residing within a 2 hour driving radius of Brisbane, Australia. The Su...

  17. Hygiene and sanitation risk factors of diarrhoeal disease among under-five children in Ibadan, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oloruntoba, Elizabeth Omoladun; Folarin, Taiwo Bukola; Ayede, Adejumoke Idowu

    2014-12-01

    Diarrhoea diseases are among the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in under-five-children (U-5C) in Nigeria. Inadequate safe water, sanitation, and hygiene account for the disease burden. Cases of diarrhoea still occur in high proportion in the study area despite government-oriented interventions. To determine the hygiene and sanitation risk factors predisposing U-5C to diarrhoea in Ibadan, Nigeria. Two hundred and twenty pairs of children, matched on age, were recruited as cases and controls over a period of 5 months in Ibadan. Questionnaire and observation checklist were used to obtain information on hygiene practices from caregivers/mothers and sanitation conditions in the households of 30% of the consenting mothers/caregivers. Data were analysed using descriptive and inferential statistics. Caregivers/mothers' mean ages were 31.3 ±7.5 (cases) and 30.6 ±6.0(controls) years. The risk of diarrhoea was significantly higher among children whose mothers did not wash hands with soap before food preparation (OR=3.0, pHygiene and sanitation conditions within households were risk factors for diarrhoea. This study revealed the feasibility of developing and implementing an adequate model to establish intervention priorities in sanitation in Ibadan, Nigeria.

  18. Poverty, malnutrition, underdevelopment and cardiovascular disease: a South African perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Vorster, HH; Kruger, A.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Summary This article explores possible mechanisms to explain the known relationships between poverty, undernutrition, underdevelopment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) in developing countries. Poverty is a multidimensional concept. It is both a cause and consequence of undernutrition. The article shows how malnutrition during pregnancy could lead to low birth-weight babies, who are not only at increased risk of mental and physical underdevelopment, but also ‘programmed’ to be at incre...

  19. Markers of Disease Severity Are Associated with Malnutrition in Parkinson's Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Sheard, Jamie M.; Susan Ash; Mellick, George D.; Silburn, Peter A.; Kerr, Graham K.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In Parkinson's disease (PD), commonly reported risk factors for malnutrition in other populations commonly occur. Few studies have explored which of these factors are of particular importance in malnutrition in PD. The aim was to identify the determinants of nutritional status in people with Parkinson's disease (PWP). METHODS: Community-dwelling PWP (>18 years) were recruited (n = 125; 73M/52F; Mdn 70 years). Self-report assessments included Beck's Depression Inventory (BDI), Spiel...

  20. Protein-energy intake and malnutrition in Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, P; Gee, M; Grace, M; Sherbaniuk, R W; Wensel, R H; Thomson, A B

    1984-12-01

    A detailed nutrient assessment was made of 23 male and 24 female patients with Crohn's disease who entered sequentially into an outpatient clinic. Assessment included 48-hour dietary recall, anthropometric measurements, and biochemical and hematological tests appropriate to characterize protein-energy malnutrition. Approximately 40% of patients had energy intakes equal to only two-thirds of the Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA). Three men and five women had relative body weights less than 85% of standard, but body weight was not correlated with energy intake. Relative body weight was correlated with arm muscle circumference in both male and female patients and with triceps skinfold and total lymphocyte count in women. Although the mean protein intake was greater than 150% of the RDA, evidence of protein malnutrition included low arm muscle circumference in 14% of the men and 15% of the women, low serum albumin concentration in 13% of the women, and low total lymphocyte count in one-half of the patients. The Crohn's disease activity index was correlated significantly with serum albumin, energy intake, and duration of disease in men and with serum ferritin and hemoglobin concentration in women. Thus, a reduced relative body weight or reduced serum albumin was not uncommon in patients with Crohn's disease but did not necessarily occur in those with reduced intakes of protein and energy. However, a low relative body weight may indicate need for further nutritional assessment.

  1. Focus on CSIR research in pollution waste: Added water related diarrhoeal burden due to HIV/AIDS

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Steyn, M

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available urgent attention. While much effort has been done to record the numbers of people dying from diarrhoeal disease, information on the extent of the numbers of people having diarrhoeal disease is sadly lacking. Information on the magnitude...

  2. Economic Burden of Disease-Associated Malnutrition at the State Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goates, Scott; Du, Kristy; Braunschweig, Carol A.; Arensberg, Mary Beth

    2016-01-01

    Background Disease-associated malnutrition has been identified as a prevalent condition, particularly for the elderly, which has often been overlooked in the U.S. healthcare system. The state-level burden of community-based disease-associated malnutrition is unknown and there have been limited efforts by state policy makers to identify, quantify, and address malnutrition. The objective of this study was to examine and quantify the state-level economic burden of disease-associated malnutrition. Methods Direct medical costs of disease-associated malnutrition were calculated for 8 diseases: Stroke, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Coronary Heart Failure, Breast Cancer, Dementia, Musculoskeletal Disorders, Depression, and Colorectal Cancer. National disease and malnutrition prevalence rates were estimated for subgroups defined by age, race, and sex using the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey and the National Health Interview Survey. State prevalence of disease-associated malnutrition was estimated by combining national prevalence estimates with states’ demographic data from the U.S. Census. Direct medical cost for each state was estimated as the increased expenditures incurred as a result of malnutrition. Principal Findings Direct medical costs attributable to disease-associated malnutrition vary among states from an annual cost of $36 per capita in Utah to $65 per capita in Washington, D.C. Nationally the annual cost of disease-associated malnutrition is over $15.5 billion. The elderly bear a disproportionate share of this cost on both the state and national level. Conclusions Additional action is needed to reduce the economic impact of disease-associated malnutrition, particularly at the state level. Nutrition may be a cost-effective way to help address high health care costs. PMID:27655372

  3. Sapovirus prevalence in children less than five years of age hospitalised for diarrhoeal disease in South Africa, 2009-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Nicola; Groome, Michelle J; Murray, Tanya; Nadan, Sandrama; Netshikweta, Rembuluwani; Keddy, Karen H; Poonsamy, Bhavani; Moyes, Jocelyn; Walaza, Sibongile; Kahn, Kathleen; Kuonza, Lazarus; Taylor, Maureen B; Madhi, Shabir A; Cohen, Cheryl

    2016-05-01

    Although sapovirus (SaV) has been detected in 2.2-12.7% of gastroenteritis cases globally, there are limited data on SaV epidemiology. Describe the epidemiology, clinical characteristics and factors associated with SaV gastroenteritis in hospitalised children Sapoviruses were detected in 7.7% (238/3103) of children admitted to hospital and 11.4% (9/79) of deaths. Sapovirus was detected more commonly in children 19-24 months compared toSapoviruses, which are perceived to cause mild diarrhoea, were detected in hospitalised children and diarrhoeal deaths in South Africa. Determinants increasing the odds of SaV included overcrowding and concomitant infections while HIV-infected children with SaV displayed bloody stools, low birth weight and reduced access to proper sanitation. Mitigation strategies against SaV infections include improved sanitation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. CAN MOTHERS CARE FOR ACUTE DIARRHOEAL DISEASE OF THEIR UNDER FIVE CHILDREN EFFECTIVELY AT HOME? A CROSS SECTIONAL STUDY IN SLUM COMMUNITY IN BANKURA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eashin

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND : Diarrhea is one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality in under - five children in developing world like India. WHO & Integrated Management of Neonatal and Childhood Illness ( IMNCI diarrheal management guidelines encourage mothers and caretakers to treat diarrhoea at home by giving ORS and oral rehydration therapy (ORT to reduce the duration , severity , hospitalization , overall medical costs and death . OBJECTIVES : i t o assess the Knowledge , Attitude and Practice (KAP of mothers on home care of acu te diarrhoeal diseases and ii To find out the factors affecting it , if any. MATERIALS AND METHODS : Community based cross - sectional study was conducted for three months duration among 76 mothers of slum - dwelling under five children (2 - 59 months in Bankura . Information about KAP on management of acute diarrhoeal diseases was obtained by interview of mother using schedule based on WHO & IMNCI diarrheal management guidelines. RESULTS: In this study , majority mothers (64.7% of children were of BPL category an d mean schooling years of mothers was 7.97±4.12. Majority of mothers’ knowledge was average (66.2% and favourable attitude was (76.5%. While 72.2% mothers performed average practice ; only 9.3% of mothers performed good practice. Education , occupation and socio - economic status (SES were the influencing factors of KAP on home care of diarrhea. Conclusions : A lot of gap was still present in knowledge , attitude and practice of home management of acute diarrheal diseases in an urban slum of Bankura. Health pro viders are needed to be skilled , motivated to percolate the information to mothers regarding home care of diarrhea.

  5. Clinical and social determinants of diarrhoeal disease in a rural HIV/AIDS clinic, South Africa: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshabela, M; MacPherson, P; Ezard, N; Frean, E; Mashimbye, L; Elliott, J H; Oldenburg, B

    2012-05-01

    Diarrhoeal diseases are a common cause of morbidity and are associated with mortality in HIV-infected populations. Little is known about the contribution of clinical and socio-environmental factors to the risk of diarrhoea in these populations in rural sub-Saharan Africa. We conducted a case-control study of people attending a rural HIV clinic with an episode of diarrhoea in Bushbuckridge, South Africa. Cases were defined as HIV-positive adults with symptoms of diarrhoea before or after initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART). Controls without diarrhoea were randomly selected from clinic attendees. Structured questionnaires and case-file reviews were undertaken to describe clinical and socioenvironmental risk factors. We recruited 103 cases of diarrhoea from 121 patients meeting case definitions. Cases were more likely to be women (P = 0.013), aged over 45 years (P = 0.002), divorced or separated (P = 0.006), have limited formal education (P = 0.003), have inadequate access to sanitation facilities (P = 0.045), have water access limited to less than three days per week (P = 0.032) and not yet initiated on ART (P analysis, diarrhoea remained associated with female gender (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]: 2.02, 95% CI 1.10-3.73), older age (aOR: 6.31, 95% CI 1.50-26.50), limited access to water (aOR: 2.66, 95% CI 1.32-5.35) and pre-ART status (aOR: 5.87, 95% CI 3.05-11.27). Clinical and socio-environmental factors are associated with occurrence of diarrhoeal disease among rural HIV patients in South Africa. Further intervention research is urgently needed, combining community- and clinic-based approaches, to improve access to water, sanitation and ART for rural areas with high HIV prevalence, along with structural interventions to address gender inequities.

  6. The potential of rice to offer solutions for malnutrition and chronic diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dipti, S.S.; Bergman, C.; Indrasari, S.D.; Herath, T.; Hall, R.D.; Lee, H.; Habibi, F.; Zaczuk Bassinello, P.; Graterol, E.; Ferraz, J.; Fitzgerald, M.

    2012-01-01

    It is internationally accepted that malnutrition and chronic diseases in developing countries are key limitations to achieving the Millennium Development Goals. In many developing countries, rice is the primary source of nutrition. In those countries, the major forms of malnutrition are Fe-induced a

  7. Aetiology and factors associated with bacterial diarrhoeal diseases amongst urban refugee children in Eastleigh, Kenya: A case control study

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    Waqo G. Boru

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Kenya is home to over 400 000 refugees from neighbouring countries. There is scanty information about diarrhoea amongst urban refugees in Kenya.Objectives: We investigated the enteric bacteria causing diarrhoea amongst urban refugee children and described the associated factors.Method: During the period of August–December 2010, urban refugee children between the ages of two and five who attended Eastleigh County Council Health Centre were enrolled into the study. Diarrhoeal cases were compared with age-matched children with no diarrhoea (controls. Stool specimens were collected and enteric bacteria isolated. A questionnaire was administered to identify risk factors.Results: A total of 41 cases and 41 controls were enrolled in the study. The age and country of origin were similar for cases and controls. The bacterial isolation rates amongst the cases were: non-pathogenic Escherichia coli 71%, Shigella dysenteriae 2.4%, Shigella flexneri 2.4%, Salmonella paratyphi 5%. For the controls, non-pathogenic E. coli 90% and enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC2.4% were amongst the organisms isolated. All isolates were resistant to amoxicillin; resistance to other antibiotics varied by isolate type. Factors associated independently with diarrhoea included children not washing their hands with soap (aOR 5.9, p < 0.05, neighbour(s having diarrhoea (aOR 39.8, p < 0.05, children not exclusively breastfed for their first 6 months (aOR 7.6, p < 0.05 and children eating food cooked the previous day (aOR 23.8, p = 0.002.Conclusions: Shigella species, Salmonella species and ETEC were found to be responsible for diarrhoea amongst the urban refugee children. Measures to control and guide the use of antibiotics are critical for the prevention of antibiotic resistance. Efforts to improve personal and domestic hygiene, including educational campaigns to promote appropriate handwashing, should be encouraged.

  8. An exploration of spatial patterns of seasonal diarrhoeal morbidity in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, B J J; Alonso, W J; Miller, M A

    2012-07-01

    Studies of temporal and spatial patterns of diarrhoeal disease can suggest putative aetiological agents and environmental or socioeconomic drivers. Here, the seasonal patterns of monthly acute diarrhoeal morbidity in Thailand, where diarrhoeal morbidity is increasing, are explored. Climatic data (2003-2006) and Thai Ministry of Health annual reports (2003-2009) were used to construct a spatially weighted panel regression model. Seasonal patterns of diarrhoeal disease were generally bimodal with aetiological agents peaking at different times of the year. There is a strong association between daily mean temperature and precipitation and the incidence of hospitalization due to acute diarrhoea in Thailand leading to a distinct spatial pattern in the seasonal pattern of diarrhoea. Model performance varied across the country in relation to per capita GDP and population density. While climatic factors are likely to drive the general pattern of diarrhoeal disease in Thailand, the seasonality of diarrhoeal disease is dampened in affluent urban populations.

  9. Disease-related malnutrition in systemic sclerosis: evidences and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codullo, Veronica; Cereda, Emanuele; Crepaldi, Gloria; Cappello, Silvia; Montecucco, Carlomaurizio; Caccialanza, Riccardo; Caporali, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    The present review summarises evidences and provides recommendations for the screening and management of malnutrition in systemic sclerosis (SSc). This complication is frequently under-estimated when assessing patients and this may lead to an impaired estimation of prognosis. The presence of malnutrition is indicated by anthropometric and biohumoral changes reflecting protein stores (low serum prealbumin) and influenced by organ involvement in SSc (skin and the gastrointestinal tract). Patients at high risk of malnutrition or with low prealbumin levels have shown increased mortality risk and, therefore, a nutritional assessment is mandatory in every SSc patient. This screening is especially important as malnutrition represents a potentially modifiable risk factor with nutritional interventions. The pillars of nutritional treatment are also discussed.

  10. Poverty, malnutrition, underdevelopment and cardiovascular disease: a South African perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorster, H H; Kruger, A

    2007-01-01

    This article explores possible mechanisms to explain the known relationships between poverty, undernutrition, underdevelopment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) in developing countries. Poverty is a multidimensional concept. It is both a cause and consequence of undernutrition. The article shows how malnutrition during pregnancy could lead to low birth-weight babies, who are not only at increased risk of mental and physical underdevelopment, but also 'programmed' to be at increased risk of CVD and other non-communicable diseases in adult life. The underdevelopment leads to decreased 'human capital and competence' with an inability to create food security and an enabling environment for self and family to escape poverty and undernutrition in the next generation. It is accepted that a lack of education and knowledge in the poor for primary prevention of CVD through healthy eating patterns and lifestyles, as well as limited access to healthcare services for secondary prevention and treatment contribute to CVD. This article postulates that the link between poverty and CVD in South Africa can be explained by the high prevalence of undernutrition in one- to nine year- old children (9% underweight, 23% stunted and 3% wasted), the high prevalence of overweight and obesity in adults (54.5% in white men and 58.5% in African women) as well as the negative trends in nutrient intakes when Africans (the population group with the largest numbers of poor people) urbanise, acculturate and adopt westernised eating patterns that will increase CVD risk. In conclusion, we plead for a holistic, integrated but transdisciplinary and multisectorial approach to break the vicious circle of poverty and undernutrition for the longterm prevention of CVD.

  11. How effective is good domestic kitchen hygiene at reducing diarrhoeal disease in developed countries? A systematic review and reanalysis of the UK IID study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macdonald Clare

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To assess whether domestic kitchen hygiene is an important contributor to the development of diarrhoea in the developed world. Methods Electronic searches were carried out in October 2006 in EMBASE, MEDLINE, Web of Knowledge, Cochrane central register of clinical trials and CINAHL. All publications, irrespective of study design, assessing food hygiene practices with an outcome measure of diarrhoea were included in the review. All included studies underwent data extraction and the data was subsequently analysed. The analysis was conducted by qualitative synthesis of the results. Given the substantial heterogeneity in study design and outcome measures meta-analysis was not done. In addition the existing dataset of the UK IID study was reanalysed to investigate possible associations between self-reported diarrhoea and variables indicative of poor domestic kitchen hygiene Results Some 14 studies were finally included in subsequent analyses. Of the 14 studies included in this systematic review, 11 were case-control studies, 2 cross-sectional surveys, and 1 RCT. Very few studies identified any significant association with good environmental kitchen hygiene. Although some of the variables in the reanalysis of the UK IID study were statistically significant no obvious trend was seen. Conclusion The balance of the available evidence does not support the hypothesis that poor domestic kitchen hygiene practices are important risk factors for diarrhoeal disease in developed countries.

  12. Malnutrition in pre-dialysis chronic kidney disease patients in a teaching hospital in Southern Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oluseyi, Adejumo; Enajite, Okaka

    2016-03-01

    Malnutrition is a complication in chronic kidney disease (CKD) known to affect quality of life and prognosis although not often diagnosed. It is associated with rapid progression to end stage renal disease (ESRD) and mortality. Early identification and treatment will slow down progression to ESRD and mortality. To determine the prevalence and pattern of malnutrition in pre-dialysis CKD patients in Southern Nigeria. One hundred and twenty consecutive pre-dialysis CKD and 40 control subjects without CKD were studied. Data obtained from participants were demographics, body mass index (BMI), and aetiology of CKD. Indices used to assess presence of malnutrition were low BMI, hypocholesterolaemia and hypoalbuminaemia. Statistical significance was taken at 0.05 level. The mean age of the CKD subjects was 48.8±16.6years with a male: female ratio of 1.7:1. Prevalence of malnutrition in the CKD subjects was 46.7%, higher than 27.5% observed in the controls (p=0.033). Prevalence of malnutrition increased significantly across CKD stages 2 to 5 (p=0.020). It was significantly commoner in elderly patients (p=0.047) but not significantly different between males and females(p=0.188). Malnutrition is common in pre-dialysis CKD patients even in early CKD stages. Prevalence of malnutrition increases with worsening kidney function and increasing age.

  13. Malnutrition in a sample of community-dwelling people with Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamie M Sheard

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Malnutrition results in poor health outcomes, and people with Parkinson's disease may be more at risk of malnutrition. However, the prevalence of malnutrition in Parkinson's disease is not yet well defined. The aim of this study is to provide an estimate of the extent of malnutrition in community-dwelling people with Parkinson's disease. METHODS: This is a cross-sectional study of people with Parkinson's disease residing within a 2 hour driving radius of Brisbane, Australia. The Subjective Global Assessment (SGA and scored Patient Generated Subjective Global Assessment (PG-SGA were used to assess nutritional status. Body weight, standing or knee height, mid-arm circumference and waist circumference were measured. RESULTS: Nineteen (15% of the participants were moderately malnourished (SGA-B. The median PG-SGA score of the SGA-B group was 8 (4-15, significantly higher than the SGA-A group, U = 1860.5, p<.05. The symptoms most influencing intake were loss of appetite, constipation, early satiety and problems swallowing. CONCLUSIONS: As with other populations, malnutrition remains under-recognised and undiagnosed in people with Parkinson's disease. Regular screening of nutritional status in people with Parkinson's disease by health professionals with whom they have regular contact should occur to identify those who may benefit from further nutrition assessment and intervention.

  14. Inflammation-driven malnutrition: a new screening tool predicts outcome in Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Irene; Prager, Matthias; Valentini, Luzia; Büning, Carsten

    2016-09-01

    Malnutrition is a frequent feature in Crohn's disease (CD), affects patient outcome and must be recognised. For chronic inflammatory diseases, recent guidelines recommend the development of combined malnutrition and inflammation risk scores. We aimed to design and evaluate a new screening tool that combines both malnutrition and inflammation parameters that might help predict clinical outcome. In a prospective cohort study, we examined fifty-five patients with CD in remission (Crohn's disease activity index (CDAI) disease activity (CDAI, Harvey-Bradshaw index), inflammation (C-reactive protein (CRP), faecal calprotectin (FC)), malnutrition (BMI, subjective global assessment (SGA), serum albumin, handgrip strength), body composition (bioelectrical impedance analysis) and administered the newly developed 'Malnutrition Inflammation Risk Tool' (MIRT; containing BMI, unintentional weight loss over 3 months and CRP). All parameters were evaluated regarding their ability to predict disease outcome prospectively at 6 months. At baseline, more than one-third of patients showed elevated inflammatory markers despite clinical remission (36·4 % CRP ≥5 mg/l, 41·5 % FC ≥100 µg/g). Prevalence of malnutrition at baseline according to BMI, SGA and serum albumin was 2-16 %. At 6 months, MIRT significantly predicted outcome in numerous nutritional and clinical parameters (SGA, CD-related flares, hospitalisations and surgeries). In contrast, SGA, handgrip strength, BMI, albumin and body composition had no influence on the clinical course. The newly developed MIRT was found to reliably predict clinical outcome in CD patients. This screening tool might be used to facilitate clinical decision making, including treatment of both inflammation and malnutrition in order to prevent complications.

  15. Importance of malnutrition and associated diseases in the management of Zenker's diverticulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucher, S; Breheret, R; Laccourreye, L

    2015-06-01

    To study the impact of malnutrition on a population treated for Zenker's diverticulum and to look for the causes of persistence or recurrence of dysphagia after endoscopic surgery. This retrospective study included 30 patients with Zenker's diverticulum treated by endoscopy. All swallowing disorders and manifestations of malnutrition and postoperative improvement in and/or recurrence of symptoms were noted. Nutritional status was evaluated for 26 patients. Before surgery, 54% suffered from malnutrition, which was severe in 31%; 28.6% of the cases with malnutrition showed postoperative complications, versus 8.3% of cases without baseline malnutrition. Ninety percent of patients (n=27) declared complete resolution of symptoms. Nine patients presented recurrence of dysphagia, including 6 with recurrence of Zenker's diverticulum and 3 with, respectively, inclusion body myopathy, esophageal hypertonia and central disease. Malnutrition should be quantified and treated before and after surgery for Zenker's diverticulum to prevent complications and decrease mortality. Associated pathologies should be systematically screened for, especially in case of recurrence of swallowing disorder without recurrence of Zenker's diverticulum. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Addressing Disease-Related Malnutrition in Healthcare: A Latin American Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Maria Isabel; Hegazi, Refaat A; Diaz-Pizarro Graf, José Ignacio; Gomez-Morales, Gabriel; Fuentes Gutiérrez, Catalina; Goldin, Maria Fernanda; Navas, Angela; Pinzón Espitia, Olga Lucia; Tavares, Gilmária Millere

    2016-03-01

    Alarmingly high rates of disease-related malnutrition have persisted in hospitals of both emerging and industrialized nations over the past 2 decades, despite marked advances in medical care over this same interval. In Latin American hospitals, the numbers are particularly striking; disease-related malnutrition has been reported in nearly 50% of adult patients in Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Costa Rica, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Mexico, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Puerto Rico, Venezuela, and Uruguay. The tolls of disease-related malnutrition are high in both human and financial terms-increased infectious complications, higher incidence of pressure ulcers, longer hospital stays, more frequent readmissions, greater costs of care, and increased risk of death. In an effort to draw attention to malnutrition in Latin American healthcare, a feedM.E. Latin American Study Group was formed to extend the reach and support the educational efforts of the feedM.E. Global Study Group. In this article, the feedM.E. Latin American Study Group shows that malnutrition incurs excessive costs to the healthcare systems, and the study group also presents evidence of how appropriate nutrition care can improve patients' clinical outcomes and lower healthcare costs. To achieve the benefits of nutrition for health throughout Latin America, the article presents feedM.E.'s simple and effective Nutrition Care Pathway in English and Spanish as a way to facilitate its use. © 2015 The Author(s).

  17. Markers of disease severity are associated with malnutrition in Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamie M Sheard

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: In Parkinson's disease (PD, commonly reported risk factors for malnutrition in other populations commonly occur. Few studies have explored which of these factors are of particular importance in malnutrition in PD. The aim was to identify the determinants of nutritional status in people with Parkinson's disease (PWP. METHODS: Community-dwelling PWP (>18 years were recruited (n = 125; 73M/52F; Mdn 70 years. Self-report assessments included Beck's Depression Inventory (BDI, Spielberger Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI, Scales for Outcomes in Parkinson's disease-Autonomic (SCOPA-AUT, Modified Constipation Assessment Scale (MCAS and Freezing of Gait Questionnaire (FOG-Q. Information about age, PD duration, medications, co-morbid conditions and living situation was obtained. Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination (ACE-R, Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS II and UPDRS III were performed. Nutritional status was assessed using the Subjective Global Assessment (SGA as part of the scored Patient-Generated Subjective Global Assessment (PG-SGA. RESULTS: Nineteen (15% were malnourished (SGA-B. Median PG-SGA score was 3. More of the malnourished were elderly (84% vs. 71% and had more severe disease (H&Y: 21% vs. 5%. UPDRS II and UPDRS III scores and levodopa equivalent daily dose (LEDD/body weight (mg/kg were significantly higher in the malnourished (Mdn 18 vs. 15; 20 vs. 15; 10.1 vs. 7.6 respectively. Regression analyses revealed older age at diagnosis, higher LEDD/body weight (mg/kg, greater UPDRS III score, lower STAI score and higher BDI score as significant predictors of malnutrition (SGA-B. Living alone and higher BDI and UPDRS III scores were significant predictors of a higher log-adjusted PG-SGA score. CONCLUSIONS: In this sample of PWP, the rate of malnutrition was higher than that previously reported in the general community. Nutrition screening should occur regularly in those with more severe disease and depression. Community

  18. Malnutrition in end stage liver disease : Who is malnourished?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisman, E.J.

    2017-01-01

    Liver diseases are highly prevalent. While death rates of most other diseases, such as heart disease and cancer, have decreased, standardized mortality rates of liver diseases have increased up to 400% in the last decades. Cirrhosis is the endstage of patients who have chronic progressive liver

  19. Refractory myasthenia gravis, dysphagia and malnutrition: a case report to suggest disease-specific nutritional issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cereda, Emanuele; Beltramolli, Dario; Pedrolli, Carlo; Costa, Antonio

    2009-10-01

    We describe a case of refractory myasthenia gravis with bulbar involvement and the nutritional treatment solutions proposed to treat the associated dysphagia and malnutrition. A 39-y-old woman with refractory myasthenia gravis was referred to our clinical nutrition unit for deteriorating dysphagia and progressive malnutrition. The first-line nutritional approach consisted of dietary counseling and thickened meals. Unfortunately, no adequate oral intake was achieved and an enteral nutrition treatment was proposed. A nasogastric tube was removed after a few days due to local pain and poor quality of life. Despite consistent weight loss and overt malnutrition, the patient refused percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy placement. Neurologic symptoms did not show any improvement but unexpectedly the patient's weight started to increase to previous values. Anamnestic recall revealed that the patient learned by herself how to position the nasogastric tube that is now temporarily used for formula infusion coinciding with neurologic poussés. Current guidelines consider chronic neurologic diseases with associated dysphagia, where refractory myesthania gravis has also been considered, a unique category. Chronic neurogenic dysphagia with high risk of aspiration, long-term inability to obtain adequate oral intakes, and malnutrition are established indications for percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy placement. However, patients may need different forms of nutritional intervention during the course of their illness and choices and indications should contemplate ethical reasons, clinical benefits, minimal risks, and acceptable quality of life. Minimally invasive intermittent enteral nutrition might be considered a possible clue for nutritional management of exacerbating dysphagia.

  20. Economic and operational burden associated with malnutrition in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoong, Jian Ming; Ferguson, Maree; Hukins, Craig; Collins, Peter F

    2017-08-01

    Malnutrition is common in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This study aimed to explore its association with all-cause mortality, emergency hospitalisation and subsequently healthcare costs. A prospective cohort observational pilot study was carried out in outpatients with COPD that attended routine respiratory clinics at a large tertiary Australian hospital during 2011. Electronic hospital records and hospital coding was used to determine nutritional status and whether a patient was coded as nourished or malnourished and information on healthcare use and 1-year mortality was recorded. Eight hundred and thirty four patients with COPD attended clinics during 2011, of those 286 went on to be hospitalised during the 12 month follow-up period. Malnourished patients had a significantly higher 1-year mortality (27.7% vs. 12.1%; p = 0.001) and were hospitalised more frequently (1.11 SD 1.24 vs. 1.51 SD 1.43; p = 0.051). Only malnutrition (OR 0.36 95% CI 0.14-0.91; p = 0.032) and emergency hospitalisation rate (OR 1.58 95% CI 1.2-2.1; p = 0.001) were independently associated with 1-year mortality. Length of hospital stay was almost twice the duration in those coded for malnutrition (11.57 SD 10.93 days vs. 6.67 SD 10.2 days; p = 0.003) and at almost double the cost (AUD $23,652 SD $26,472 vs. $12,362 SD $21,865; p = 0.002) than those who were well-nourished. Malnutrition is an independent predictor of 1-year mortality and healthcare use in patients with COPD. Malnourished patients with COPD present both an economic and operational burden. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. The potential of rice to offer solutions for malnutrition and chronic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dipti, Sharifa Sultana; Bergman, Christine; Indrasari, Siti Dewi; Herath, Theja; Hall, Robert; Lee, Hueihong; Habibi, Fatemeh; Bassinello, Priscila Zaczuk; Graterol, Eduardo; Ferraz, Julie P; Fitzgerald, Melissa

    2012-07-02

    It is internationally accepted that malnutrition and chronic diseases in developing countries are key limitations to achieving the Millennium Development Goals. In many developing countries, rice is the primary source of nutrition. In those countries, the major forms of malnutrition are Fe-induced anaemia, Zn deficiency and Vitamin A deficiency, whereas the major chronic disease challenges are Type II diabetes, cardiovascular disease and some cancers. There is a growing corpus of evidence regarding both limitations and opportunities as to how rice could be an effective vehicle by which to tackle key nutrition and health related problems in countries with limited resources. Rice breeding programs are able to focus on developing new varieties carrying enhanced amounts of either Fe, Zn or beta-carotene because of large public investment, and the intuitive link between providing a mineral/vitamin to cure a deficiency in that mineral/vitamin. By contrast, there has been little investment in progressing the development of particular varieties for potential impact on chronic diseases. In this review article we focus on the broad battery of evidence linking rice-related nutritional limitations to their impact on a variety of human health issues. We discuss how rice might offer sometimes even simple solutions to rectifying key problems through targeted biofortification strategies and finally, we draw attention to how recent technological (-omics) developments may facilitate untold new opportunities for more rapidly generating improved rice varieties specifically designed to meet the current and future nutritional needs of a rapidly expanding global population.

  2. Impact of fetal and neonatal malnutrition on the onset of puberty and associated noncommunicable disease risks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas E Connor

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Nicholas E ConnorChild Health Research Foundation Dhaka Shishu Hospital, Dhaka, BangladeshBackground: Fetal and neonatal malnutrition impacts the timing of the onset of puberty. The timing of puberty onset has been shown to be a rough indicator of noncommunicable disease (NCD risk. Recent advances in understanding the various inter-related neurochemical and genetic controls underpinning puberty onset have shed new light on these interesting and important phenomena. These studies have suggested that developmental trajectory is set very early by epigenetic mechanisms that serve to adjust phenotype to environment.Objective: The aims of this article are to review the most recent research into the proximate mechanisms that initiate puberty; to explore how the activation of those mechanisms could be affected by nutritional cues received during fetal and neonatal life; and, finally, to briefly explore the ramifications for public health.Methods: An extensive literature review was performed using PubMed (1950 to September 2010 and Google Scholar (1980 to September 2010 using the search terms “puberty onset”, “perinatal”, and “neonatal malnutrition”. English language, original research, and review articles were examined; pertinent citations from these articles were also assessed.Results: Literature detailing biochemical pathways and evolutionary explanations of human puberty itself led quickly to a noteworthy connection between neonatal malnutrition, puberty onset, and NCD risk. A strong connection was found between maternal malnutrition during critical windows (followed by catch-up growth in childhood and an accelerated onset of puberty. Children subject to early nutritional insult not only are likely to undergo puberty earlier but also show an increase in their risk of developing NCDs in later life. Several authors have suggested that this relationship may show potential as an early proxy indicator of susceptibility to these types of

  3. Celiac Disease in Children with Severe Acute Malnutrition (SAM): A Hospital Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beniwal, Neetu; Ameta, Gaurav; Chahar, Chandra Kumar

    2017-05-01

    To evaluate the prevalence and clinical features of Celiac disease among children with severe acute malnutrition (SAM). This prospective observational study was conducted in PBM Children Hospital, Bikaner from July 2012 through December 2013. All consecutively admitted children with SAM were recruited. All subjects were screened for Celiac disease by serological test for IgA-anti tissue Transglutaminase (IgA tTG) antibodies. All seropositive children underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy for small bowel biopsy for the confirmation. Clinical features of patients with and without celiac disease were compared. The sero-prevalence (IgA tTg positivity) of Celiac disease was found to be 15.38% while prevalence of biopsy confirmed Celiac disease was 14.42% among SAM children. Abdominal distension, diarrhea, anorexia, constipation, pain in abdomen, vitamin deficiencies, edema, clubbing and mouth ulcers were more common in patients of Celiac disease compared to patients without Celiac disease but the difference was statistically significant only for abdominal distension and pain abdomen. There is a high prevalence of Celiac disease in SAM. Screening for Celiac disease (especially in presence of pain abdomen and abdominal distension) should be an essential part of work-up in all children with SAM.

  4. Does Measles Immunization Reduce Diarrhoeal Morbidity

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    Reddaiah V.P

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available Research question: 1. Will measles vaccination reduce the incidence and during of diarrhoeal episodes in children? 2. Will measles vaccination reduce the morbidity load because of diarrhoea? Objectives: 1. To provide measles immunization to rural children 9 to 24 months of age. 2. to study the occurrence of diarrhoeal episodes by domicillary visits every month for a period of 1 year. Design: Longitudinal study. Setting: Rural area in the state of Haryana. Participants: Children between the ages of 9 and 24 months with parental informed consent. Study variables: diarrhoeal episodes per child/year, duration of diarrhoea. Outcome Variable: the difference between the two groups (immunized and non- immunized of attack rate and duration of diarrhoeal episodes. Statistical Analysis: Chi square test. Results: immunization coverage was 75%. Attack rates of diarrhoea in immunized children (1.6/child/year was no different to that in the non- immunized (1.5/child/year. The mean duration of diarrhoea in both groups was 2.3 days. The prevalence diarrhoea in immunized and non-immunized was 3.85 and 3.67 respectively. Conclusion: Measles vaccination has no impact on diarrhoeal morbidity.

  5. Malnutrition and the diseases related to aged%老年相关疾病与营养不良

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒲虹杉

    2013-01-01

    营养不良是老年人常见的临床综合征之一,常与痴呆、卒中、慢性阻塞性肺病、抑郁、帕金森病、心力衰竭等慢性病并存,两者互相影响,互为因果,进而形成恶性循环,使老年病人的感染率和失能率增加、住院时间延长、寿命缩短,增加社会和家庭的负担.本综述旨在从流行病学角度阐明老年病人营养风险评估和干预的重要性.%Malnutrition is a common clinical syndrome in the elderly, accompanied with kinds of diseases related to age, such as dementia, stroke, COPD, depression, PD, heart failure. There is a vicious cycle between malnutrition and diseases related to age. Elderly patients with chronic disease is prone to malnutrition. The malnutrition makes these symptoms difficult to control, downs the quality of life, increases length of stay, shortens the life expectancy and increases the social burden of disease. Nutrition assessment should be done, and nutrition support could be a measure to treat these diseases.

  6. Burden of childhood diseases and malnutrition in a semi-urban slum in southern India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarkar Rajiv

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background India has seen rapid unorganized urbanization in the past few decades. However, the burden of childhood diseases and malnutrition in such populations is difficult to quantify. The morbidity experience of children living in semi-urban slums of a southern Indian city is described. Methods A total of 176 children were recruited pre-weaning from four geographically adjacent, semi-urban slums located in the western outskirts of Vellore, Tamil Nadu for a study on water safety and enteric infections and received either bottled or municipal drinking water based on their area of residence. Children were visited weekly at home and had anthropometry measured monthly until their second birthday. Results A total of 3932 episodes of illness were recorded during the follow-up period, resulting in an incidence of 12.5 illnesses/child-year, with more illness during infancy than in the second year of life. Respiratory, mostly upper respiratory infections, and gastrointestinal illnesses were most common. Approximately one-third of children were stunted at two years of age, and two-thirds had at least one episode of growth failure during the two years of follow up. No differences in morbidity were seen between children who received bottled and municipal water. Conclusions Our study found a high burden of childhood diseases and malnutrition among urban slum dwellers in southern India. Frequent illnesses may adversely impact children’s health and development, besides placing an additional burden on families who need to seek healthcare and find resources to manage illness.

  7. Malnutrition Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AACC products and services. Advertising & Sponsorship: Policy | Opportunities Malnutrition Share this page: Was this page helpful? Overview | Symptoms | Tests | Treatment | Related Pages Tests Malnutrition will often be noticeable to the doctor's trained ...

  8. An instrument for the assessment of diarrhoeal severity based on a longitudinal community-based study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Gwenyth; Peñataro Yori, Pablo; Paredes Olortegui, Maribel; Caulfield, Laura E; Sack, David A; Fischer-Walker, Christa; Black, Robert E; Kosek, Margaret

    2014-01-01

    Objective Diarrhoea is a significant contributer to morbidity and is among the leading causes of death of children living in poverty. As such, the incidence, duration and severity of diarrhoeal episodes in the household are often key variables of interest in a variety of community-based studies. However, there currently exists no means of defining diarrhoeal severity that are (A) specifically designed and adapted for community-based studies, (B) associated with poorer child outcomes and (C) agreed on by the majority of researchers. Clinical severity scores do exist and are used in healthcare settings, but these tend to focus on relatively moderate-to-severe dehydrating and dysenteric disease, require trained observation of the child and, given the variability of access and utilisation of healthcare, fail to sufficiently describe the spectrum of disease in the community setting. Design Longitudinal cohort study. Setting Santa Clara de Nanay, a rural community in the Northern Peruvian Amazon. Participants 442 infants and children 0–72 months of age. Main outcome measures Change in weight over 1-month intervals and change in length/height over 9-month intervals. Results Diarrhoeal episodes with symptoms of fever, anorexia, vomiting, greater number of liquid stools per day and greater number of total stools per day were associated with poorer weight gain compared with episodes without these symptoms. An instrument to measure the severity was constructed based on the duration of these symptoms over the course of a diarrhoeal episode. Conclusions In order to address limitations of existing diarrhoeal severity scores in the context of community-based studies, we propose an instrument comprised of diarrhoea-associated symptoms easily measured by community health workers and based on the association of these symptoms with poorer child growth. This instrument can be used to test the impact of interventions on the burden of diarrhoeal disease. PMID:24907244

  9. The view of European experts regarding health economics for medical nutrition in disease-related malnutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freijer, K; Lenoir-Wijnkoop, I; Russell, C A; Koopmanschap, M A; Kruizenga, H M; Lhachimi, S K; Norman, K; Nuijten, M J C; Schols, J M G A

    2015-05-01

    Health-care systems are currently facing tremendous budget constraints resulting in growing pressure on decision makers and health-care providers to obtain the maximum possible health benefits of the resources available. Choices have to be made, and health economics can help in allocating limited health-care resources among unlimited wants and needs. Attempts to achieve cost reductions often focus on severe pathologies and chronic diseases as they commonly represent high health-care expenditures. In this context, awareness of the considerable financial burden caused by disease-related malnutrition (DRM) is lacking. Possibilities of reducing costs by optimising the management of DRM through medical nutrition will mostly not even be taken into account. During a European expert meeting, the total evaluation of medical nutrition was viewed and discussed. The aim of this meeting was to gain an experts' outline of the key issues relating to the health economic assessment of the use of medical nutrition. This article provides a summary of the observations per discussed item and describes the next steps suggested.

  10. Barriers to nutritional intake in patients with acute hip fracture: time to treat malnutrition as a disease and food as a medicine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Jack; Bauer, Judith; Capra, Sandra; Pulle, Chrys Ranjeev

    2013-06-01

    Inadequate energy and protein intake leads to malnutrition; a clinical disease not without consequence post acute hip fracture. Data detailing malnutrition prevalence, incidence, and intake adequacy varies widely in this patient population. The limited success of reported interventional strategies may result from poorly defined diagnostic criteria, failure to address root causes of inadequate intake, or errors associated with selection bias. This pragmatic study used a sequential, explanatory mixed methods design to identify malnutrition aetiology, prevalence, incidence, intake adequacy, and barriers to intake in a representative sample of 44 acute hip fracture patients (73% female; mean age, 81.7 ± 10.8 years). On admission, malnutrition prevalence was 52.2%. Energy and protein requirements were only met twice in 58 weighed 24 h food records. Mean daily patient energy intake was 2957 kJ (50.9 ± 36.1 kJ·kg(-1)) and mean protein intake was 22.8 g (0.6 ± 0.46 g·kg(-1)). This contributed to a further in-patient malnutrition incidence of 11%. Barriers to intake included patient perceptions that malnutrition and (or) inadequate intake were not a problem, as well as patient and clinician perceptions that treatment for malnutrition was not a priority. Malnutrition needs to be treated as a disease not without consequence, and food should be considered as a medicine after acute hip fracture.

  11. Adolescent health in rural Ghana: A cross-sectional study on the co-occurrence of infectious diseases, malnutrition and cardio-metabolic risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alicke, Marie; Boakye-Appiah, Justice K; Abdul-Jalil, Inusah; Henze, Andrea; van der Giet, Markus; Schulze, Matthias B; Schweigert, Florian J; Mockenhaupt, Frank P; Bedu-Addo, George; Danquah, Ina

    2017-01-01

    In sub-Saharan Africa, infectious diseases and malnutrition constitute the main health problems in children, while adolescents and adults are increasingly facing cardio-metabolic conditions. Among adolescents as the largest population group in this region, we investigated the co-occurrence of infectious diseases, malnutrition and cardio-metabolic risk factors (CRFs), and evaluated demographic, socio-economic and medical risk factors for these entities. In a cross-sectional study among 188 adolescents in rural Ghana, malarial infection, common infectious diseases and Body Mass Index were assessed. We measured ferritin, C-reactive protein, retinol, fasting glucose and blood pressure. Socio-demographic data were documented. We analyzed the proportions (95% confidence interval, CI) and the co-occurrence of infectious diseases (malaria, other common diseases), malnutrition (underweight, stunting, iron deficiency, vitamin A deficiency [VAD]), and CRFs (overweight, obesity, impaired fasting glucose, hypertension). In logistic regression, odds ratios (OR) and 95% CIs were calculated for the associations with socio-demographic factors. In this Ghanaian population (age range, 14.4-15.5 years; males, 50%), the proportions were for infectious diseases 45% (95% CI: 38-52%), for malnutrition 50% (43-57%) and for CRFs 16% (11-21%). Infectious diseases and malnutrition frequently co-existed (28%; 21-34%). Specifically, VAD increased the odds of non-malarial infectious diseases 3-fold (95% CI: 1.03, 10.19). Overlap of CRFs with infectious diseases (6%; 2-9%) or with malnutrition (7%; 3-11%) was also present. Male gender and low socio-economic status increased the odds of infectious diseases and malnutrition, respectively. Malarial infection, chronic malnutrition and VAD remain the predominant health problems among these Ghanaian adolescents. Investigating the relationships with evolving CRFs is warranted.

  12. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and malnutrition: why are we not winning this battle?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferreira Ivone Martins

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To review the mechanisms involved in the origin of malnutrition in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, and to make a systematic review of randomized controlled studies, to clarify the contribution of nutritional supplementation in patients with stable COPD. METHOD: A systematic review of articles published in the field of nutrition, in any language and from several sources, including Medline, Embase, Cinahl, and the Cochrane Registry on COPD, as well as studies presented at congresses in the US and Europe. RESULTS: Studies on nutritional supplementation for more than two weeks showed a very small effect, not reaching statistical significance. A linear regression study found that old age, relative anorexia, and high inflammatory response are associated with non-response to nutritional therapy. CONCLUSION: Currently, there is no evidence that nutritional supplementation is truly effective in patients with COPD. Factors associated with non-response suggest a relationship with the degree of inflammation, including high TNF-alpha levels. Measuring inflammation markers may be useful to determine prognosis and adequate therapy. Treatment with anti-inflammatory cytokines or cytokine inhibitors seems promising for the future.

  13. Evaluation of pharmacological activities, cytotoxicity and phenolic composition of four Maytenus species used in southern African traditional medicine to treat intestinal infections and diarrhoeal diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Aroke Shahid; McGaw, Lyndy J; Eloff, Jacobus N

    2013-05-11

    Microbial infections and resulting inflammation and oxidative stress are common pathogenesis of gastrointestinal tract (GIT) disorders. In South Africa, several species of the genus Maytenus are used in traditional medicine to treat various infectious diseases. Most of the previous work on this genus was focused on nonpolar extracts from the root and bark. In this study, leaf extracts of polar extracts of Maytenus peduncularis, Maytenus procumbens, Maytenus senegalensis and Maytenus undata were evaluated for antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities to determine their efficacy as therapeutic agents in GIT disorders. Phenolic-enriched leaf extracts and fractions were prepared by extracting with acidified 70% methanol and solvent-solvent fractionation. The activities of the fractions against Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli and Enterococcus faecalis as well as clinical isolates of Aspergillus fumigatus, Candida albicans and Cryptococcus neoformans were determined using a serial microplate dilution method. Antioxidant activities were determined using 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS), hydroxyl (OH) radical scavenging and linoleic acid peroxidation inhibitory assays. The phenolic composition as well as the cytotoxicity against Vero cell lines of the crude extracts was evaluated using various standard protocols. The antimicrobial activities were concentrated in the non-polar fractions of hexane, dichloromethane and ethyl acetate (MICs 19-312 μg/ml). The crude extracts and polar fractions (butanol and water) had moderate to poor antimicrobial activity (MICs 312 to above 2500 μg/ml). The crude extracts and polar fractions had good antioxidant activity (EC50 values varied from 1.22 to 607 μg/ml, 1.71 to 312 μg/ml and 23 to 284 μg/ml for DPPH, ABTS and OH respectively. Linoleic acid peroxidation inhibition EC50 values of the crude extracts ranged between 27

  14. Elevated pro-brain natriuretic peptide, troponin T and malnutrition inflammatory score in chronic hemodialysis patients with overt cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimarchi, Hernán; Muryan, Alexis; Campolo-Girard, Vicente; Dicugno, Mariana; Barucca, Nanci; Lombi, Fernando; Young, Pablo; Pomeranz, Vanesa; Forrester, Mariano; Alonso, Mirta; Iriarte, Romina; Díaz, Marisa Luisa; Lindholm, Bengt

    2011-01-01

    We assessed the relationship between pro-brain natriuretic peptide (pro-BNP), troponin T (TropT) and nutritional status. A total of 48 chronic hemodialysis patients were grouped according to the presence [group A (GA); n = 24] or not [group B (GB)] of cardiovascular disease. Compared to GB subjects, GA subjects were older, had been on hemodialysis for a longer period and had higher prevalences of vascular grafts, hypertension and elevated C-reactive protein (CRP) [GA vs. GB: 1.1 (range 0.1-32.9) vs. 0.4 (0-28.1) mg/dl; p = 0.028], malnutrition inflammatory score (MIS) (GA vs. GB: 7.50 vs. 4.00; p = 0.001), pro-BNP [GA vs. GB: 6,760 (601-103,200) vs. 686 (75-83,700) pg/ml; p malnutrition and inflammation were associated with vascular prostheses, while pro-BNP was lower in obese patients. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Treating malnutrition in the community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dera, Merceline; Woodham, Diane

    2016-11-02

    Malnutrition is a clinical and public health problem. It has adverse effects on the physical and psycho-social wellbeing of individuals by predisposing to disease, negatively affecting its outcome and reducing the likelihood of independence. An estimated 3 million people in the UK are affected by malnutrition, most of whom live in the community ( BAPEN, 2011 ). Despite the scale of this problem, it remains under-detected, under-treated, underresourced and often overlooked by those involved in the care of at risks individuals such as the elderly. In most cases malnutrition is a treatable condition that can be managed by optimising food intake and using oral nutritional supplements (ONS) where necessary. The main focus of this article is on the dangers of malnutrition for older people in the community and the use of ONS in the treatment and management of malnutrition.

  16. Malnutrition and infectious disease morbidity among children missed by the childhood immunization program in Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semba, Richard D; de Pee, Saskia; Berger, Sarah G; Martini, Elviyanti; Ricks, Michelle O; Bloem, Martin W

    2007-01-01

    Although it has been thought that child immunization programs may miss the children who are in greatest need, there are little published quantitative data to support this idea. We sought to characterize malnutrition and morbidity among children who are missed by the childhood immunization program in Indonesia. Vaccination and morbidity histories, anthropometry, and other data were collected for 286,500 children, aged 12-59 months, in rural Indonesia. Seventy-three point nine percent of children received complete immunizations (3 doses of diphtheria-pertussis-tetanus, 3 doses of oral poliovirus, and measles), 16.8% had partial coverage (1-6 of 7 vaccine doses), and 9.3% received no vaccines. Of children with complete, partial, and no immunization coverage, respectively, the prevalence of severe underweight (weight-for-age Z score childhood immunizations in rural Indonesia, as missed children are at higher risk of morbidity and mortality.

  17. Effect of nutrition survey 'cleaning criteria' on estimates of malnutrition prevalence and disease burden: secondary data analysis.

    OpenAIRE

    Crowe, S; Seal, A; Grijalva-Eternod, C.; Kerac, M

    2014-01-01

    Tackling childhood malnutrition is a global health priority. A key indicator is the estimated prevalence of malnutrition, measured by nutrition surveys. Most aspects of survey design are standardised, but data ‘cleaning criteria’ are not. These aim to exclude extreme values which may represent measurement or data-entry errors. The effect of different cleaning criteria on malnutrition prevalence estimates was unknown. We applied five commonly used data cleaning criteria (WHO 2006; EPI-Info; WH...

  18. Metabolic changes in malnutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emery, P W

    2005-10-01

    This paper is concerned with malnutrition caused by inadequate intake of all the major nutrients rather than deficiency diseases relating to a single micronutrient. Three common situations are recognised: young children in third world countries with protein-energy malnutrition; adults in the same countries who are chronically adapted to subsisting on marginally inadequate diets; and patients who become malnourished as a result of chronic diseases. In all these situations infectious diseases are often also present, and this complicates the interpretation of biochemical and physiological observations. The metabolic response to starvation is primarily concerned with maintaining a supply of water-soluble substrates to supply energy to the brain. Thus there is an initial rise in metabolic rate, reflecting gluconeogenic activity. As fasting progresses, gluconeogenesis is suppressed to minimise muscle protein breakdown and ketones become the main fuel for the brain. With chronic underfeeding the basal metabolic rate per cell appears to fall, but the mechanistic basis for this is not clear. The main adaptation to chronic energy deficiency is slow growth and low adult body size, although the reduction in energy requirement achieved by this is partially offset by the preservation of the more metabolically active organs at the expense of muscle, which has a lower metabolic rate. The interaction between malnutrition and the metabolic response to trauma has been studied using an animal model. The rise in energy expenditure and urinary nitrogen excretion following surgery were significantly attenuated in malnourished rats, suggesting that malnutrition impairs the ability of the body to mobilise substrates to support inflammatory and reparative processes. However, the healing process in wounded muscle remained unimpaired in malnutrition, suggesting that this process has a high biological priority.

  19. Diagnosing malnutrition.

    OpenAIRE

    Dionigi, R; Dominioni, L; Jemos, V; Cremaschi, R; Monico, R

    1986-01-01

    The measurement of selected anthropometric, biochemical and immunological variables, and clinical judgment can be used to assess nutritional state. Nutritional assessment has three main aims: to define the type and severity of malnutrition; to identify high risk patients; to monitor the efficacy of nutritional support. The problems associated with the various methods to assess the nutritional state and the applications of nutritional assessment in clinical practice are presented and discussed.

  20. The role of serum leptin and tumor necrosis factor-α in malnutrition of male chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Background Leptin is a protein mainly secreted by adipocytes, and the major function of leptin was its role in body weight regulation. It is suggested that increased levels of circulating leptin may contribute to anorexia in pathologic conditions including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Recent studies have provided evidence for a link between leptin and proinflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). This study aimed to explore the role of serum leptin in the malnutrition of COPD patients, and to observe the changes of serum leptin levels during acute exacerbation, also to investigate relationship between leptin and TNF-α. Methods Seventy-two COPD patients and 34 control subjects participated in this study. Seventy-two COPD patients were divided into 3 groups: group COPD IA (patients without malnutrition during acute exacerbation, n=25), group COPD IB (patients without malnutrition during stable disease, n=29), group COPD II (patients with malnutrition during stable disease, n=18). To eliminate the effect of sex differences, all patients and controls were male. Body mass index (BMI), percent ideal body weight (IBW%), triceps skin-fold thickness (TSF), mid-upper arm circumference (MAC), mid-upper arm muscle circumference (MAMC), serum leptin and TNF-α levels, serum prealbumin (PA), serum transferrin (TF), serum albumin (Alb), total lymphocytes count (TLC), forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1), maximal inspiration pressure (MIP) and maximal expiration pressure (MEP) were measured in all participants. Leptin levels were measured by radioimmunoassay. TNF-α levels were measured by ELISA. The between group difference and correlation of these parameters were analyzed. Results Serum leptin levels were significantly lower in group COPD II [(4.07±3.42) ng/ml] than in group COPD IB [(9.72±6.67) ng/ml] and controls [(8.21±5.41) ng/ml] (P<0.05). There was no statistically significant difference in serum leptin levels between

  1. Evaluation of anti-diarrhoeal potential of ethanolic extract of Mimosa pudica leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Saifuddin Khalid

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Diarrhoea is a major public health problem in developing countries and is said to be endemic in many regions of Asia. It is a leading cause of high degree of morbidity and mortality. The anti-diarrhoeal potential of the ethanolic extract of leaves of Mimosa pudica Linn (Mimosaceae has been evaluated using several experimental models in Wistar albino rats. The ethanolic extract inhibited castor oil induced diarrhoea and PGE2 induced enteropooling in rats and has also reduced gastrointestinal motility after charcoal meal administration. The ethanolic extract at 200 and 400 mg/kg was showed significantly inhibited diarrhoea. There was a significant (P<0.001 dose-dependent decrease in the diarrhoea produced by all the three models in rats as compared to the standard drug. The anti-diarrhoeal property may be related to the tannin and flavonoids present in the extract. These results clearly indicated that ethanolic extract of the leaves of Mimosa pudica is effective against diarrhoeal disease

  2. Association of genetic variants of ghrelin, leptin and UCP2 with malnutrition inflammation syndrome and survival in end-stage renal disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Richa; Agrawal, Suraksha; Saxena, Anita; Pandey, Manmohan; Sharma, R K

    2013-11-01

    Malnutrition inflammation syndrome (MIS) is common among ESRD patients. In the present study, we have investigated the association of genetic markers associated with appetite and energy regulation with malnutrition inflammation syndrome among end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. Two hundred and fifty-seven patients on maintenance hemodialysis and 200 normal healthy controls were included in the study. Nutritional assessment was done by subjective global assessment scores (SGA). Genotyping of leptin-2548 G/A (rs7799039), ghrelin Leu72Met (rs696217-408 C/A), Arg51Gln (rs34911341-346 G/A) and uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) 45 bp insertion deletion was done using PCR-RFLP. Levels of leptin and acyl ghrelin were assessed using ELISA. Leptin-2548 AA genotype was associated with twofold higher risk of disease susceptibility while UCP2 insertion-deletion heterozygotes showed protective effect. Ghrelin Gln51Gln and Met72Met genotype were associated with 3.4- and 2.5-fold higher disease susceptibility. The Met72 and Gln51 allele showed 3.3- and 2.1-fold higher susceptibility to malnutrition in severe SGA group. Further, the levels of acyl ghrelin were significantly less in severe category of malnutrition and in poor appetite group. On combined analysis, the group 2 (presence of 3-4 risk alleles) showed 1.5- and twofold higher susceptibility to disease and malnutrition, respectively. On docking analysis, it was observed that higher receptor binding energy was associated with the mutant form of ghrelin (Gln51). Moderate and severe SGA were associated with 2.2- and 4.1-fold higher death hazard. Our study suggests that ghrelin may be major marker contributing to susceptibility to MIS among ESRD patients.

  3. Association between Chronic Obstructive Pumonary Disease and Malnutrition in Elderly%慢性阻塞性肺病与老年人营养不良的关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张桂丽; 邝军

    2011-01-01

    目的:调查慢性阻塞性肺病与老年病人营养不良的关系.方法:运用简易营养评价量表精法评估本院老年住院病人的营养状况,分为营养不良组及营养正常组,运用logistic回归分析营养不良的因素.结果:126名病人被纳入,营养不良组62例,营养正常组64例,共有慢性阻塞性肺病患者54例.多因素分析显示慢性阻塞性肺病、低蛋白血症、卧床及厌食均与老年人营养不良相关.结论:慢性阻塞性肺病是老年人营养不良的危险因素,对其积极预防和治疗,可能预防老年人营养不良的发生和发展.%Objective: To assess the relationship of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease ( COPD ) and malnutrition in elderly.Methods: A retrospective study was undertaken by short form mini-nutrition assessment scale in order to investigate malnutrition among elder inpatients, and logistic regression was employed to analysis the risk factors of malnutrition.Results: 126 patients were enrolled, including 62 patients with malnutrition and 64 with normal nutrition.Multi-factors analysis showed that lower total protein, anorexia, and COPD were associated with malnutrition in elderly.Conclusion: COPD may be an independent risk factor of malnutrition in elderly.

  4. Two components of the new ESPEN diagnostic criteria for malnutrition are independent predictors of lung function in hospitalized patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingadottir, Arora Ros; Beck, Anne Marie; Baldwin, Christine; Weekes, C Elizabeth; Geirsdottir, Olof Gudny; Ramel, Alfons; Gislason, Thorarinn; Gunnarsdottir, Ingibjorg

    2017-06-08

    Low fat free mass index (FFMI) is a component of the ESPEN diagnosis criteria of malnutrition, that only when accompanied with weight loss is considered to be a determinant of malnutrition. Our aims were to assess the prevalence of malnutrition in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) applying the ESPEN criteria, and to examine the ability of different components of the criteria to predict COPD severity, length of stay (LOS), hospital readmissions within 30 days and mortality. Subjects were COPD patients (n = 121) admitted to Landspitali University Hospital from March 2015 to March 2016. Patients were screened for nutritional risk using Icelandic screening tool (ISS) and NRS-2002. Body composition was measured by bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA). Lung function was measured by spirometry. The prevalence of malnutrition according to the ESPEN criteria was 21%. The association between nutritional assessment, applying different components of the ESPEN criteria, and COPD severity was highly significant, with the highest risk being associated with low FFMI OR (95% CI) 4.77 (2.03, 11.20; p 7 days in subjects with low FFMI (OR 2.46 95% CI 0.92, 6.59; p = 0.074) and increased risk of 6 and 9 months' mortality (OR 2.72 95% CI 0.88, 8.39, P = 0.082 and OR 2.72 95% CI 0.94, 7.87, P = 0.065, respectively) in subjects diagnosed as malnourished by the ESPEN criteria. This study describes the prevalence of malnutrition in hospitalized COPD patients using the ESPEN criteria from 2015. Our findings suggest that FFMI could be used independently of weight loss for the diagnosis of malnutrition in COPD patients, although there remain some problems associated with its measurement in the clinical setting. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  5. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD – a new factor that interplays between inflammation, malnutrition, and atherosclerosis in elderly hemodialysis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikolasevic I

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Ivana Mikolasevic,1 Vesna Lukenda,2 Sanjin Racki,1 Sandra Milic,3 Branka Sladoje-Martinovic,1 Lidija Orlic1 1Department of Nephrology, Dialysis and Transplantation, Rijeka University Hospital Center, Rijeka, Croatia; 2Department of Internal Medicine, Dr Josip Bencevic General Hospital, Slavonski Brod, Croatia; 3Department of Gastroenterology, Rijeka University Hospital Center, Rijeka, Croatia Background/aim: In the past decade, in most regions of the world, an increasing number of adults aged 65 years and older were started on renal replacement therapy each year. In contrast to the general population for whom overnutrition or obesity is associated with increased cardiovascular risk, for patients who are maintained on hemodialysis (HD, malnutrition and malnutrition-inflammation complex syndrome are associated with poor outcome. In recent years, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD has been considered to be the liver manifestation of metabolic syndrome, and the development of NAFLD is strongly associated with all components of metabolic syndrome (arterial hypertension, dyslipidemia, obesity, and diabetes mellitus type 2 in the general population. The primary end point of this study was to determine the patient’s survival in relation to nutritional and inflammatory state and the presence or absence of NAFLD. The secondary end point of this analysis was the association among NAFLD and various clinical and laboratory data, with the nutritional and inflammatory state of our elderly HD patients. Methods: Using a single-center, prospective, cohort study design, we followed the progress of 76 patients who were ≥65 years and treated with chronic HD for at least 6 months, at the Department of Nephrology, Dialysis and Transplantation. All patients were followed for a minimum of 18 months or until death. Survival was defined as the time from study initiation to death (or end of study, if still alive.Results: The main findings of our study were a

  6. Hunger and Malnutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... TV, Video Games, and the Internet Hunger and Malnutrition KidsHealth > For Parents > Hunger and Malnutrition Print A ... to meet their needs. What Are Hunger and Malnutrition? Everyone feels hungry at times. Hunger is the ...

  7. HYPOMAGNESAEMIA IN PROTEIN ENERGY MALNUTRITION

    OpenAIRE

    Nagaraj Javali; Shashikala; Nasima Banu; Ramya

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Protein energy malnutrition is one of the leading causes of childhood mortality a nd morbidity in developing countries . (1) It is a global health problem which starts in womb and ends in tomb. Protein energy malnutrition is a disease of multi - deprivation and poverty affecting nearly 150 million children under the age of 5 years in the world. Out of the 120 million children in India, 75 million are estimated to suffer from visible protein en...

  8. Malnutrition in the ICU patient population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Jan; Samaan, Karen

    2014-06-01

    Malnutrition has been identified as a cause for disease as well as a condition resulting from inflammation associated with acute or chronic disease. Malnutrition is common in acute-care settings, occurring in 30% to 50% of hospitalized patients. Inflammation has been associated with malnutrition and malnutrition has been associated with compromised immune status, infection, and increased intensive care unit (ICU) and hospital length of stay. The ICU nurse is in the best position to advocate for appropriate nutritional therapies and facilitate the safe delivery of nutrition.

  9. Association of Increased Serum Leptin with Ameliorated Anemia and Malnutrition in Stage 5 Chronic Kidney Disease Patients after Parathyroidectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yao; Zhang, Jingjing; Yuan, Yanggang; Zha, Xiaoming; Xing, Changying; Shen, Chong; Shen, Zhixiang; Qin, Chao; Zeng, Ming; Yang, Guang; Mao, Huijuan; Zhang, Bo; Yu, Xiangbao; Sun, Bin; Ouyang, Chun; Xu, Xueqiang; Ge, Yifei; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Lina; Cheng, Chen; Yin, Caixia; Zhang, Jing; Chen, Huimin; Ma, Haoyang; Wang, Ningning

    2016-06-16

    Leptin is an adipokine that regulates various metabolism, but its association with secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT), a clinical manifestation of chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD), remains obscure. Parathyroidectomy (PTX) is recommended for severe SHPT patients. Here, the associations between circulating leptin and clinical characteristics in CKD patients were investigated. Effects of PTX on leptin production were analyzed in vivo and in vitro. Controls and CKD patients had approximate serum leptin levels in that a larger proportion of CKD patients with body mass index (BMI) leptin was related to anemia, albumin, and bone metabolism disorders in CKD patients. Lower intact parathyroid hormone (PTH) was related with higher leptin in PTX patients group. Severe SHPT inhibited uremia-enhanced leptin production in 3T3-L1 adipocytes, which was attenuated after PTX. High levels of PTH were found to reduce Akt phosphorylation and leptin production in vitro but high levels of calcium and phosphorus were not. Successful PTX was found to improve anemia and malnutrition in severe SHPT patients, and this was correlated with increased circulating leptin levels via up-regulated Akt signaling in adipocytes. These findings indicated the therapeutic potential of leptin and related target pathway for improving survival and quality of life in CKD.

  10. Prevalence of malnutrition and associated metabolic risk factors for cardiovascular disease in older adults from Northwest Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemán-Mateo, Heliodoro; Esparza-Romero, Julián; Romero, Rene Urquidez; García, Humberto Astiazarán; Pérez Flores, Flavia A; Ochoa Chacón, Blanca V; Valencia, Mauro E

    2008-01-01

    This cross-sectional study assessed the prevalence of malnutrition and several metabolic risk factors for cardiovascular disease in 287 apparently healthy older adults from Northwest Mexico. Also, the impact of overweight and obesity on metabolic risk factors was assessed. Nutritional status was determined using serum albumin levels and anthropometry. Vitamin status was also assessed. Metabolic risk factors for cardiovascular disease were evaluated. The prevalence of undernutrition was 15.3%. Also, vitamin E deficiency was common (18%). On the contrary, 44.9% of men and women were in overweight and 24% were obese. A 50.9% of the older adults had hypertension, 52.6% hypercholesterolemia (HC), 38.3% hypertriglyceridemia (HTG), 26.1% impaired fasting glucose and 26.1% impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). HC and low-density-lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) were significantly more prevalent in women than in men. Mean adjusted values of fasting glucose, high-density-lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C), total cholesterol (TC)/HDL-C ratio > or = 5, triglycerides (TG) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) were significantly higher in subjects with body mass index (BMI) > or = 25.0 kg/m(2). Undernutrition, obesity and vitamin E deficiency, as well as several metabolic risk factors for cardiovascular disease coexisted in this studied group. Overweight and obesity were the most prevalent findings. BMI > or = 25 kg/m(2) was the common factor explaining most of the metabolic abnormalities. However, due to the sample size and the design of the study, the results must be seen with caution and cannot be generalized.

  11. ASSOCIATION BETWEEN MALNUTRITION AND CHRONIC DISEASES AMONG ELDER INPATIENTS%老年住院病人营养不良与慢性疾病的关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王剑峰; 谭云辉; 周庆蓉; 陈德助

    2012-01-01

    [Objective] To evaluate the association between malnutrition and chronic diseases among elder inpatients. [Methods] A retrospective study was undertaken by short form mini-nutrition assessment scale in order to investigate malnutrition among elder inpatients, and Logistic regression was employed to analysis the risk factors of malnutrition. [Results] 148 patients were included. Logistic regression indicated that serum total protein (P a 0.000, OR = 0.870), anorexia (P = 0.018, OR-2.1Q5), dysphagia (P = 0.018, Off = 2.705), and the presence of disease of respiratory system were related to malnutrition in elderly. [ Conclusion j Anorexia, dysphagia, and the presence of disease of respiratory system may be independent risk factors of malnutrition in elderly, while serum total protein may be a protective factor. Therefore, malnutrition will be improved if the reversible risk factors are amendable.%[目的]调查住院老年病人营养不良与慢性疾病的关系.[方法]运用简易营养评价精法评估我院老年科住院老年人的营养不良的状况,选择同期住院营养正常的老年患者作对照,运用Logistic回归分析老年住院患者营养不良的慢性疾病性因素.[结果]共纳入148例患者,多因素分析显示总蛋白(P=0.000,OR=0.870)、厌食(P=0.018,OR=2.705)、吞咽困难(P=0.007,OR=3.743)及存在呼吸系统疾病(P=0.004,OR=3.159)均与住院老年患者营养不良相关.[结论]厌食、吞咽困难及呼吸疾病可能是老年人营养不良的独立危险因素,而较高的总蛋白水平可能有一定的保护作用,对这些因素的纠正/保护,可能预防老年人营养不良的发生.

  12. The aetiology and impact of malnutrition in paediatric inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerasimidis, K; McGrogan, P; Edwards, C A

    2011-08-01

    Disease-associated undernutrition of all types is very common in paediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Recent weight loss remains one of the triad of clinical manifestations and a cornerstone for the diagnosis of Crohn's disease (CD), although significantly fewer patients now present as being underweight. Recent evidence suggests that the introduction of medical treatment will quickly restore body weight, although this does not reflect concomitant changes in body composition. CD children present with features of nutritional cachexia with normal fat stores but depleted lean mass. Poor bone health, delayed puberty and growth failure are additional features that further complicate clinical management. Suboptimal nutritional intake is a main determinant of undernutrition, although activation of the immune system and secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines exert additional independent effects. Biochemically low concentrations of plasma micronutrients are commonly reported in IBD patients, although their interpretation is difficult in the presence of an acute phase response and other indices of body stores adequacy are needed. Anaemia is a common extraintestinal manifestation of the IBD child. Iron-deficient anaemia is the predominant type, with anaemia of chronic disease second. Decreased dietary intake, as a result of decreased appetite and food aversion, is the major cause of undernutrition in paediatric IBD. Altered energy and nutrient requirements, malabsorption and increased gastrointestinal losses are additional factors, although their contribution to undernutrition in paediatric CD needs to be studied further.

  13. Malnutrition in pre-dialysis chronic kidney disease patients in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    trition in the CKD subjects was 46.7%, higher than 27.5% observed in the ... not significantly different between males and females(p=0.188). .... normal renal function, absence of chronic liver disease, ... square with trend was used where categorical variables .... et al.37 There has been observation that loss of muscle.

  14. Modelling the Contributions of Malaria, HIV, Malnutrition and Rainfall to the Decline in Paediatric Invasive Non-typhoidal Salmonella Disease in Malawi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas A Feasey

    Full Text Available Nontyphoidal Salmonellae (NTS are responsible for a huge burden of bloodstream infection in Sub-Saharan African children. Recent reports of a decline in invasive NTS (iNTS disease from Kenya and The Gambia have emphasised an association with malaria control. Following a similar decline in iNTS disease in Malawi, we have used 9 years of continuous longitudinal data to model the interrelationships between iNTS disease, malaria, HIV and malnutrition.Trends in monthly numbers of childhood iNTS disease presenting at Queen's Hospital, Blantyre, Malawi from 2002 to 2010 were reviewed in the context of longitudinal monthly data describing malaria slide-positivity among paediatric febrile admissions, paediatric HIV prevalence, nutritional rehabilitation unit admissions and monthly rainfall over the same 9 years, using structural equation models (SEM.Analysis of 3,105 iNTS episodes identified from 49,093 blood cultures, showed an 11.8% annual decline in iNTS (p < 0.001. SEM analysis produced a stable model with good fit, revealing direct and statistically significant seasonal effects of malaria and malnutrition on the prevalence of iNTS disease. When these data were smoothed to eliminate seasonal cyclic changes, these associations remained strong and there were additional significant effects of HIV prevalence.These data suggest that the overall decline in iNTS disease observed in Malawi is attributable to multiple public health interventions leading to reductions in malaria, HIV and acute malnutrition. Understanding the impacts of public health programmes on iNTS disease is essential to plan and evaluate interventions.

  15. Epigenetic changes caused by intrauterine malnutrition as potential disease mediator and early prevention in developmental stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuoka, Hideoki

    2014-01-01

    Presently, the incidences of noncommunicable diseases (NCD) have been increasing in both low- and middle-income countries worldwidely. Effective long-term and multigeneration interventions to decrease the risk of NCD should be developed and introduced. The environment in utero alters phenotypes mainly through epigenetic mechanisms. The epigenetic changes induced in an unfavorable developmental environment have lifelong effects on cardiovascular and metabolic functions, susceptibility to cardiovascular disease, obesity, and other NCD. Although compared with animals, epigenetic analysis of human specimens is restricted except for peripheral blood, placental, or umbilical specimens, recently, important human studies have been reported concerning the epigenetic analysis of Line 1 gene from the umbilical blood, umbilical RXRα, or the peripheral nuclear cell IGF-2. The birth weight is an indirect marker of in-the-womb nutritional status. The incidence of low-birth-weight infants, weighing less than 2,500 g, has been increasing in Japan. Presently, it is higher than that in the latter half of the 20 s of the Showa era, and is the highest among the OECD countries. This trend suggests that in Japan the intrauterine nutritional status has been deteriorating. We have to change this trend and put much attention on the prepregnancy and pregnancy nutrition for the present and future generations.

  16. The use of oral replacement solutions in the treatment of choleraand other severe diarrhoeal disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sack, R B; Cassells, J; Mitra, R; Merritt, C; Butler, T; Thomas, J; Jacobs, B; Chaudhuri, A; Mondal, A

    1970-01-01

    Despite the progress that has been made in the treatment of cholera, mortality rates from this disease remain high in rural areas where intravenous fluids are not readily available. The authors have therefore conducted controlled studies into the efficacy of a simpler form of maintenance therapy-the administration of glucose-containing electrolyte solutions by mouth. The results obtained from the study of 51 adult patients (36 with cholera and 15 with severe non-cholera diarrhoea) indicate that oral fluids are adequate for maintenance therapy in cholera and severe diarrhoeal disease, and that there is no significant increase in the duration of diarrhoea or in the stool volume in patients receiving such therapy.The addition of a non-specific adsorbent, charcoal, to the fluid led to a significant increase in the volume of diarrhoeal stools and to prolongation of vibrio excretion; its use is therefore not recommended. The use of oral replacement solutions should result in improvement of cholera treatment of adults in rural areas and in a reduction in the cost of treatment.

  17. Dysphagia, malnutrition and gastrointestinal problems in patients with mitochondrial disease caused by the m3243A>G mutation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laat, P. de; Zweers, H.E.; Knuijt, S.; Smeitink, J.A.M.; Wanten, G.J.A.; Janssen, M.C.H.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous research has shown that dysphagia and gastrointestinal problems occur frequently in carriers of the m.3243A>G mutation; however, the exact frequency and severity have not been determined. We hypothesise that adult carriers have an increased risk for malnutrition. METHODS: In

  18. Effect of nutrition survey 'cleaning criteria' on estimates of malnutrition prevalence and disease burden: secondary data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, Sonya; Seal, Andrew; Grijalva-Eternod, Carlos; Kerac, Marko

    2014-01-01

    Tackling childhood malnutrition is a global health priority. A key indicator is the estimated prevalence of malnutrition, measured by nutrition surveys. Most aspects of survey design are standardised, but data 'cleaning criteria' are not. These aim to exclude extreme values which may represent measurement or data-entry errors. The effect of different cleaning criteria on malnutrition prevalence estimates was unknown. We applied five commonly used data cleaning criteria (WHO 2006; EPI-Info; WHO 1995 fixed; WHO 1995 flexible; SMART) to 21 national Demographic and Health Survey datasets. These included a total of 163,228 children, aged 6-59 months. We focused on wasting (low weight-for-height), a key indicator for treatment programmes. Choice of cleaning criteria had a marked effect: SMART were least inclusive, resulting in the lowest reported malnutrition prevalence, while WHO 2006 were most inclusive, resulting in the highest. Across the 21 countries, the proportion of records excluded was 3 to 5 times greater when using SMART compared to WHO 2006 criteria, resulting in differences in the estimated prevalence of total wasting of between 0.5 and 3.8%, and differences in severe wasting of 0.4-3.9%. The magnitude of difference was associated with the standard deviation of the survey sample, a statistic that can reflect both population heterogeneity and data quality. Using these results to estimate case-loads for treatment programmes resulted in large differences for all countries. Wasting prevalence and caseload estimations are strongly influenced by choice of cleaning criterion. Because key policy and programming decisions depend on these statistics, variations in analytical practice could lead to inconsistent and potentially inappropriate implementation of malnutrition treatment programmes. We therefore call for mandatory reporting of cleaning criteria use so that results can be compared and interpreted appropriately. International consensus is urgently needed

  19. Effect of nutrition survey ‘cleaning criteria’ on estimates of malnutrition prevalence and disease burden: secondary data analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonya Crowe

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Tackling childhood malnutrition is a global health priority. A key indicator is the estimated prevalence of malnutrition, measured by nutrition surveys. Most aspects of survey design are standardised, but data ‘cleaning criteria’ are not. These aim to exclude extreme values which may represent measurement or data-entry errors. The effect of different cleaning criteria on malnutrition prevalence estimates was unknown. We applied five commonly used data cleaning criteria (WHO 2006; EPI-Info; WHO 1995 fixed; WHO 1995 flexible; SMART to 21 national Demographic and Health Survey datasets. These included a total of 163,228 children, aged 6–59 months. We focused on wasting (low weight-for-height, a key indicator for treatment programmes. Choice of cleaning criteria had a marked effect: SMART were least inclusive, resulting in the lowest reported malnutrition prevalence, while WHO 2006 were most inclusive, resulting in the highest. Across the 21 countries, the proportion of records excluded was 3 to 5 times greater when using SMART compared to WHO 2006 criteria, resulting in differences in the estimated prevalence of total wasting of between 0.5 and 3.8%, and differences in severe wasting of 0.4–3.9%. The magnitude of difference was associated with the standard deviation of the survey sample, a statistic that can reflect both population heterogeneity and data quality. Using these results to estimate case-loads for treatment programmes resulted in large differences for all countries. Wasting prevalence and caseload estimations are strongly influenced by choice of cleaning criterion. Because key policy and programming decisions depend on these statistics, variations in analytical practice could lead to inconsistent and potentially inappropriate implementation of malnutrition treatment programmes. We therefore call for mandatory reporting of cleaning criteria use so that results can be compared and interpreted appropriately. International consensus

  20. Prediction of malnutrition using modified subjective global assessment-dialysis malnutrition score in patients on hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasantha Janardhan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Malnutrition is widely prevalent among patients on hemodialysis. Malnutrition can be estimated using a fully quantitative scoring system Subjective Global Assessment-Dialysis Malnutrition Score which is simple, reliable and dynamic. The primary objective of the study was to assess the severity of malnutrition in patients with end stage renal disease and undergoing hemodialysis in a tertiary care teaching hospital in Chennai, using Subjective Global Asses sment-Dialysis Malnutrition Score and correlate it with standard indicators of malnutrition like anthropometric and biochemical parameters of the study population by Pearson′s correlation. Anthropometric assessment included height, body weight, triceps skin fold thickness, mid arm circumference, mid arm muscle circumference % and biochemical parameters included serum albumin, transferrin, ferritin, total protein, total cholesterol, blood urea nitrogen and creatinine. Based on the scores, of the 66 patients, 91% were moderately malnourished. There was a significant negative correlation between modified Subjective Global Assessment-Dialysis Malnutrition Score and anthropometric measures such as triceps skin fold thickness, mid arm circumference, mid arm muscle circumference; biochemical markers such as albumin, transferrin and ferritin. The data obtained from this study confirm that a high degree of malnutrition was prevalent in patients on hemodialysis, as shown by anthropometric assessment, biochemical markers of malnutrition and Subjective Global Assessment-Dialysis Malnutrition Score. Nutritional status as determined by Subjective Global Assessment-Dialysis Malnutrition Score is a useful and reliable index for identifying patients at risk for malnutrition and it correlates well with anthropometric and biochemical assessment. may be integrated in regular assessment of malnutrition in patients on maintenance hemodialysis.

  1. Water-borne diseases and extreme weather events in Cambodia: review of impacts and implications of climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Grace I; McIver, Lachlan; Kim, Yoonhee; Hashizume, Masahiro; Iddings, Steven; Chan, Vibol

    2014-12-23

    Cambodia is prone to extreme weather events, especially floods, droughts and typhoons. Climate change is predicted to increase the frequency and intensity of such events. The Cambodian population is highly vulnerable to the impacts of these events due to poverty; malnutrition; agricultural dependence; settlements in flood-prone areas, and public health, governance and technological limitations. Yet little is known about the health impacts of extreme weather events in Cambodia. Given the extremely low adaptive capacity of the population, this is a crucial knowledge gap. A literature review of the health impacts of floods, droughts and typhoons in Cambodia was conducted, with regional and global information reviewed where Cambodia-specific literature was lacking. Water-borne diseases are of particular concern in Cambodia, in the face of extreme weather events and climate change, due to, inter alia, a high pre-existing burden of diseases such as diarrhoeal illness and a lack of improved sanitation infrastructure in rural areas. A time-series analysis under quasi-Poisson distribution was used to evaluate the association between floods and diarrhoeal disease incidence in Cambodian children between 2001 and 2012 in 16 Cambodian provinces. Floods were significantly associated with increased diarrhoeal disease in two provinces, while the analysis conducted suggested a possible protective effect from toilets and piped water. Addressing the specific, local pre-existing vulnerabilities is vital to promoting population health resilience and strengthening adaptive capacity to extreme weather events and climate change in Cambodia.

  2. Water-Borne Diseases and Extreme Weather Events in Cambodia: Review of Impacts and Implications of Climate Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grace I. Davies

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Cambodia is prone to extreme weather events, especially floods, droughts and typhoons. Climate change is predicted to increase the frequency and intensity of such events. The Cambodian population is highly vulnerable to the impacts of these events due to poverty; malnutrition; agricultural dependence; settlements in flood-prone areas, and public health, governance and technological limitations. Yet little is known about the health impacts of extreme weather events in Cambodia. Given the extremely low adaptive capacity of the population, this is a crucial knowledge gap. A literature review of the health impacts of floods, droughts and typhoons in Cambodia was conducted, with regional and global information reviewed where Cambodia-specific literature was lacking. Water-borne diseases are of particular concern in Cambodia, in the face of extreme weather events and climate change, due to, inter alia, a high pre-existing burden of diseases such as diarrhoeal illness and a lack of improved sanitation infrastructure in rural areas. A time-series analysis under quasi-Poisson distribution was used to evaluate the association between floods and diarrhoeal disease incidence in Cambodian children between 2001 and 2012 in 16 Cambodian provinces. Floods were significantly associated with increased diarrhoeal disease in two provinces, while the analysis conducted suggested a possible protective effect from toilets and piped water. Addressing the specific, local pre-existing vulnerabilities is vital to promoting population health resilience and strengthening adaptive capacity to extreme weather events and climate change in Cambodia.

  3. Nutrition Intervention Program and Childhood Malnutrition: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The high prevalence of childhood under‑nutrition in the Niger delta might not ... Keywords: Nutrition intervention program, Childhood malnutrition, Nutrition education,. Niger delta region ..... factors and coronary heart disease. Arch Internal Med.

  4. Assessment of the reliability and consistency of the "malnutrition inflammation score" (MIS) in Mexican adults with chronic kidney disease for diagnosis of protein-energy wasting syndrome (PEW).

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Ortiz, Ailema Janeth; Arce-Santander, Celene Viridiana; Vega-Vega, Olynka; Correa-Rotter, Ricardo; Espinosa-Cuevas, María de Los Angeles

    2014-10-04

    The protein-energy wasting syndrome (PEW) is a condition of malnutrition, inflammation, anorexia and wasting of body reserves resulting from inflammatory and non-inflammatory conditions in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD).One way of assessing PEW, extensively described in the literature, is using the Malnutrition Inflammation Score (MIS). To assess the reliability and consistency of MIS for diagnosis of PEW in Mexican adults with CKD on hemodialysis (HD). Study of diagnostic tests. A sample of 45 adults with CKD on HD were analyzed during the period June-July 2014.The instrument was applied on 2 occasions; the test-retest reliability was calculated using the Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC); the internal consistency of the questionnaire was analyzed using Cronbach's αcoefficient. A weighted Kappa test was used to estimate the validity of the instrument; the result was subsequently compared with the Bilbrey nutritional index (BNI). The reliability of the questionnaires, evaluated in the patient sample, was ICC=0.829.The agreement between MIS observations was considered adequate, k= 0.585 (p MIS has adequate reliability and validity for diagnosing PEW in the population with chronic kidney disease on HD. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  5. Double burden of malnutrition: A silent driver of double burden of disease in low– and middle–income countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Kolcˇic´

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Double burden of malnutrition, characterised by undernutrition among poor children and obesity among deprived adults, is a serious global problem and an important promoter of ‘double burden of disease’ which is currently affecting low– and middle–income countries. Possible ways to reduce this burden is through education on the importance of equilibrium between energy intake and expenditure; ensuring conditions for optimal fetal and early child development; and reducing poverty as one of the main drivers of both undernutrition and obesity, through empowering local communities.

  6. Interleukin-1 in malnutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaskaram, P; Sivakumar, B

    1986-01-01

    The effect of malnutrition on the in vitro production of interleukin-1 by lipopolysaccharide stimulated circulating monocytes has been investigated in children suffering from kwashiorkor and marasmus. The interleukin-1 activity was significantly lower in children with severe malnutrition. Furthermore, macrophages from children with kwashiorkor produced factors that suppressed mouse thymocyte proliferation. These observations show a significant impairment of macrophage function and provide a mechanism for the suppression of cellular immunity in malnutrition. PMID:3082298

  7. Evaluation of malnutrition detected with the Nutritional Risk Screening 2002 (NRS-2002) and the quality of life in hospitalized patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, M; Soylu, M; Kaner, G; İnanç, N; Başmısırlı, E

    2016-01-01

    Patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have impaired quality of life, but the relationship between their nutritional status and quality of life has not been established. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between quality of life and nutritional status in hospitalized COPD patients. Demographic data, quality of life and nutritional status of 90 inpatients with a mean age of 68.76 ± 10.85 years were enrolled in the study. The Nutritional Risk Screening 2002 (NRS-2002) tool was used to evaluate their nutritional status. The quality of life was assessed using the Short Form-36 (SF-36) questionnaire. The correlation analysis was used for the relationship between SF-36 subscales and nutritional status variables. Of the 90 COPD patients included in the study, 54.4 % were men, and 45.6 % were women. Moderate, severe, and very severe COPD were detected in 37.8 %, 38.9 %, and 23.3 % of the patients, respectively. At risk of malnutrition were 55.6 % of the 90 COPD patients, whereas 44.4 % were not. The scores for physical function, physical role functioning, pain, general health, emotional role functioning, vitality, social function, and mental function subscales were lower in the patients at risk of malnutrition (p nutritional status of COPD patients should be an integral part of their clinical treatment plans aiming towards improving their quality of life. Hippokratia 2016, 20(2):147-152.

  8. A matching decomposition of the rural-urban difference in malnutrition in Malawi

    OpenAIRE

    Mussa, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Background Child malnutrition remains widespread in many developing countries. Malnutrition during infancy may substantially increase vulnerability to infection and disease, and the risk of premature death. Malnutrition in children may also lead to permanent effects and to their having diminished health capital later in life as adults. These negative consequences of child malnutrition entail that the reduction of child malnutrition is vital for the social-economic development of countries. Ur...

  9. Malnutrition and health in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Olaf; Krawinkel, Michael

    2005-08-01

    Malnutrition, with its 2 constituents of protein-energy malnutrition and micronutrient deficiencies, continues to be a major health burden in developing countries. It is globally the most important risk factor for illness and death, with hundreds of millions of pregnant women and young children particularly affected. Apart from marasmus and kwashiorkor (the 2 forms of protein- energy malnutrition), deficiencies in iron, iodine, vitamin A and zinc are the main manifestations of malnutrition in developing countries. In these communities, a high prevalence of poor diet and infectious disease regularly unites into a vicious circle. Although treatment protocols for severe malnutrition have in recent years become more efficient, most patients (especially in rural areas) have little or no access to formal health services and are never seen in such settings. Interventions to prevent protein- energy malnutrition range from promoting breast-feeding to food supplementation schemes, whereas micronutrient deficiencies would best be addressed through food-based strategies such as dietary diversification through home gardens and small livestock. The fortification of salt with iodine has been a global success story, but other micronutrient supplementation schemes have yet to reach vulnerable populations sufficiently. To be effective, all such interventions require accompanying nutrition-education campaigns and health interventions. To achieve the hunger- and malnutrition-related Millennium Development Goals, we need to address poverty, which is clearly associated with the insecure supply of food and nutrition.

  10. Malnutrition, Learning, and Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, Merrill S.; Felson, David

    The problems of those children who are chronically malnourished, the cultural environment of malnutrition, and the extent to which children are temporarily or permanently handicapped in learning because of malnutrition are discussed in this booklet. It also describes hunger and its effects on child development. The topics addressed are: definition…

  11. Malnutrition among the elderly.

    OpenAIRE

    Rauscher, C.

    1993-01-01

    Nutrition is a significant determinant of health. Undernutrition presenting as malnutrition is a serious health concern for frail elderly people with many health problems. Understanding the risk factors for malnutrition helps physicians assess and manage the condition. Primary care physicians are in an excellent position to screen, educate, and manage their elderly malnourished patients.

  12. Malnutrition among the elderly.

    OpenAIRE

    1993-01-01

    Nutrition is a significant determinant of health. Undernutrition presenting as malnutrition is a serious health concern for frail elderly people with many health problems. Understanding the risk factors for malnutrition helps physicians assess and manage the condition. Primary care physicians are in an excellent position to screen, educate, and manage their elderly malnourished patients.

  13. Malnutrition in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blades, Mabel

    2013-05-01

    Malnutrition is estimated to cost the UK twice that of obesity every year, but it is still an often overlooked problem. Dr Mabel Blades, a freelance Registered Dietician and Nutritionist, looks at the problems that malnutrition presents and the solutions that we can use to combat it.

  14. Hunger and Malnutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in the world is iron deficiency , which can lead to anemia. continue Who Is at Risk for Malnutrition? All ... and added iron can help prevent iron-deficiency anemia. Malnutrition ... illness, and other factors can lead to a poor appetite, so they may not ...

  15. Assessment of the impact of latrine utilization on diarrhoeal diseases ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    While household access is important, community sanitation coverage is even more important to improve health through the regular use of well-maintained sanitation ... of having latrines had impacted the occurrence of childhood diarrhea.

  16. Climate change and diarrhoeal disease: Perspectives for development policies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halsnæs, Kirsten; Føyn, Tullik Helene Ystanes

    2010-01-01

    higher temperatures and from more extreme events in particularly flooding. The number of people affected is by WHO projected to be approximately 700,000 dead and 22 mill disability adjusted life years in 2030 without climate change, so it is very important to initiate climate change adaptation measures...... related to climate proofing of Danida activities in the water supply and sanitation sector....

  17. demographic factors associated with diarrhoeal disease outcome in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-08-04

    Aug 4, 2016 ... more children than AIDS, malaria and measles com- bined.2,4 In Nigeria, it accounts ... ted through consumption of contaminated food and wa- ter.2 Though there are ... malaria, urinalysis, random blood sugar. Side lab inves-.

  18. Onshore catering increases the risk of diarrhoeal illness amongst cruise ship passengers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugh, R E; Selvey, L; Crome, M; Beers, M

    2001-01-01

    Of 134 Queensland passengers on a cruise, 91 (67.9%) people reported various illnesses including 41 (30.6%) who reported diarrhoeal symptoms. Queensland passengers who ate while onshore at non-Australian ports were significantly more at risk of developing diarrhoeal symptoms than those who did not. Passengers were particularly at risk when they ate onshore while undertaking a tour compared with those who did not undertake this tour. Travellers should be warned of the possibility of contracting diarrhoeal illness from onshore catering.

  19. Interleukin-1 in malnutrition.

    OpenAIRE

    1986-01-01

    The effect of malnutrition on the in vitro production of interleukin-1 by lipopolysaccharide stimulated circulating monocytes has been investigated in children suffering from kwashiorkor and marasmus. The interleukin-1 activity was significantly lower in children with severe malnutrition. Furthermore, macrophages from children with kwashiorkor produced factors that suppressed mouse thymocyte proliferation. These observations show a significant impairment of macrophage function and provide a m...

  20. Anti-pyretic, anti-inflammatory and anti-diarrhoeal properties of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2008-03-18

    Mar 18, 2008 ... for acute toxicity, its anti-pyretic, anti-inflammatory and anti-diarrhoeal effects using ... These results indicate that aqueous extract of F. albida possesses potent anti- ..... to prostaglandin (PG), or make available the substrate for.

  1. Malnutrition factors and treatment progress of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease%慢性阻塞性肺疾病营养不良的因素分析及治疗进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赖天文; 吴斌

    2009-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients usually combine with malnutrition,impact on patients'lung function and immune function.COPD malnutrition is one of the reasons indePendent of the severity of airflow obstruction from the impact of mortality in patients with COPD,and it is an independent risk factor of poor prognosis.%慢性阻塞性肺疾病(chronic obstructive pulmonary disease,COPD)患者常合并营养不良,影响患者的肺功能和免疫功能.COPD营养不良是独立于气流阻塞严重程度之外影响COPD患者预后的原因之一,是COPD预后不良的独立危险因素.

  2. End-Stage Kidney Disease:the Relationship of Malnutrition,Volume States and Hypertension%终末期肾脏病:营养不良、容量负荷与高血压的关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐业勤

    2014-01-01

    malnutrition is thought to be the independent risk factor of death in patients with end-stage renal disease. Hypertension is the most common complication of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Salt intake and capacity as the incentive of both is widely recognized,in recent years,study suggests taking salt intake and capacity as the central task. Hypertension is associated with malnutrition.%营养不良被认为是终末期肾脏病患者死亡的独立危险因素,高血压是慢性肾脏病最常见的并发症。盐摄入及容量作为两者的诱因被普遍认可,近年来研究提示以盐摄入及容量为中心,高血压与营养不良可能存在负相关。

  3. Childhood Malnutrition and the Intestinal Microbiome Malnutrition and the microbiome

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Malnutrition contributes to almost half of all deaths in children under the age of 5 years, particularly those who live in resource-constrained areas. Those who survive frequently suffer from long-term sequelae including growth failure and neurodevelopmental impairment. Malnutrition is part of a vicious cycle of impaired immunity, recurrent infections and worsening malnutrition. Recently, alterations in the gut microbiome have also been strongly implicated in childhood malnutrition. It has be...

  4. Malaria, malnutrition, and birthweight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cates, Jordan E.; Unger, Holger W.; Briand, Valerie

    2017-01-01

    were identified by the Maternal Malaria and Malnutrition (M3) initiative using a convenience sampling approach and were eligible for pooling given adequate ethical approval and availability of essential variables. Study-specific adjusted effect estimates were calculated using inverse probability...... be multiplicative interaction between malaria infection at enrollment and low MUAC within studies conducted in Africa; however, this finding was not consistent on the additive scale, when accounting for multiple comparisons, or when using other definitions of malaria and malnutrition. The major limitations...... of the study included availability of only 2 cross-sectional measurements of malaria and the limited availability of ultrasound-based pregnancy dating to assess impacts on preterm birth and fetal growth in all studies.  Conclusions : Pregnant women with malnutrition and malaria infection are at increased risk...

  5. Definition and Measurement of Child Malnutrition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective Child Malnutrition has been defined or described in many ways. To summarize the common points, child malnutrition may be defined as a pathological state resulting from inadequate nutrition, including undernutrition (protein- energy malnutrition) due to insufficient intake of energy and other nutrients; overnutrition (overweight and obesity) due to excessive consumption of energy and other nutrients; deficiency diseases due to insufficient intake of one or more specific nutrients such as vitamins or minerals.   In the assessment of child malnutrition, a large number of measures are available. Among these measuring methods, Z-score, growth charts, weight-for-length index (WLI), height standard weight, body mass index, skin fold thickness and clinical grading diagnosis standard for child malnutrition are selected for discussion. The same set of anthropometry data of a group of preschool children was analyzed by using different methods. The results showed that it was very difficult to determine the nutritional state of children using a single index. For a given group of children, Z-score method is recommended to observe their height, weight and weight for height at the same time in order to have a comprehensive understanding.

  6. Spirulina: The Alga That Can End Malnutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Ripley D.

    1985-01-01

    One approach to eliminating malnutrition worldwide is to grow spirulina in recycled village wastes. Spirulina is a blue-green alga and a natural concentrated food. Spirulina can give poor villages a nutritional food supplement they can grow themselves and can reduce infectious disease at the same time. (Author/RM)

  7. Spirulina: The Alga That Can End Malnutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Ripley D.

    1985-01-01

    One approach to eliminating malnutrition worldwide is to grow spirulina in recycled village wastes. Spirulina is a blue-green alga and a natural concentrated food. Spirulina can give poor villages a nutritional food supplement they can grow themselves and can reduce infectious disease at the same time. (Author/RM)

  8. The effect of malnutrition on norovirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickman, Danielle; Jones, Melissa K; Zhu, Shu; Kirkpatrick, Ericka; Ostrov, David A; Wang, Xiaoyu; Ukhanova, Maria; Sun, Yijun; Mai, Volker; Salemi, Marco; Karst, Stephanie M

    2014-03-04

    Human noroviruses are the primary cause of severe childhood diarrhea in the United States, and they are of particular clinical importance in pediatric populations in the developing world. A major contributing factor to the general increased severity of infectious diseases in these regions is malnutrition-nutritional status shapes host immune responses and the composition of the host intestinal microbiota, both of which can influence the outcome of pathogenic infections. In terms of enteric norovirus infections, mucosal immunity and intestinal microbes are likely to contribute to the infection outcome in substantial ways. We probed these interactions using a murine model of malnutrition and murine norovirus infection. Our results reveal that malnutrition is associated with more severe norovirus infections as defined by weight loss, impaired control of norovirus infections, reduced antiviral antibody responses, loss of protective immunity, and enhanced viral evolution. Moreover, the microbiota is dramatically altered by malnutrition. Interestingly, murine norovirus infection also causes changes in the host microbial composition within the intestine but only in healthy mice. In fact, the infection-associated microbiota resembles the malnutrition-associated microbiota. Collectively, these findings represent an extensive characterization of a new malnutrition model of norovirus infection that will ultimately facilitate elucidation of the nutritionally regulated host parameters that predispose to more severe infections and impaired memory immune responses. In a broad sense, this model may provide insight into the reduced efficacy of oral vaccines in malnourished hosts and the potential for malnourished individuals to act as reservoirs of emergent virus strains. IMPORTANCE Malnourished children in developing countries are susceptible to more severe infections than their healthy counterparts, in particular enteric infections that cause diarrhea. In order to probe the

  9. Impact on diarrhoeal illness of a community educational intervention to improve drinking water quality in rural communities in Puerto Rico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramírez Toro Graciela I

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Waterborne disease is a major risk for small water supplies in rural settings. This study was done to assess the impact of an educational intervention designed to improve water quality and estimate the contribution of water to the incidence of diarrhoeal disease in poor rural communities in Puerto Rico a two-part study was undertaken. Methods An educational intervention was delivered to communities relying on community water supplies. This intervention consisted of student operators and administrators supervising and assisting community members who voluntarily "operate" these systems. These voluntary operators had no previous training and were principally concerned with seeing that some water was delivered. The quality of that water was not something they either understood or addressed. The impact of this intervention was measured through water sampling for standard bacteriological indicators and a frank pathogen. In addition, face-to-face epidemiological studies designed to determine the base-line occurrence of diarrhoeal disease in the communities were conducted. Some 15 months after the intervention a further epidemiological study was conducted in both the intervention communities and in control communities that had not received any intervention. Results Diarrhoeal illness rates over a four week period prior to the intervention were 3.5%. Salmonella was isolated from all of 5 distributed samples prior to intervention and from only 2 of 12 samples after the intervention. In the 15 months follow-up study, illness rates were lower in the intervention compared to control communities (2.5% vs 3.6%% (RR = 0.70, 95%CI 0.43, 1.15, though this was not statistically significant. However, in the final Poisson regression model living in an intervention system (RR = 0.318; 95%CI 0.137 - 0.739 and owning a dog (RR = 0.597, 95%CI 0.145 - 0.962 was negatively associated with illness. Whilst size of system (RR = 1.006, 95%CI 1.001 - 1

  10. Hunger and Malnutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are also not eating properly and are at risk of malnutrition. If you're on a special diet, you need to be careful about eating balanced meals and a variety of foods to get the right nutrients. Vegetarians and vegans, for example, need to make sure ...

  11. Malnutrition and Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakan, Rita

    The characteristics of malnourished children bear a striking resemblance to a number of the known characteristics of "disadvantaged children," e.g. apathy, irritability, sickliness, and a reduced attention span. The combination of malnutrition and the other negative effects of poverty perpetuates a cycle of illness, educational failure, and more…

  12. Malnutrition and dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, Karen

    2016-07-13

    What was the nature of the CPD activity and/or practice-related feedback and/or event or experience in your practice? The CPD article outlined the effects dementia may have on a person's ability to eat and drink safely. It discussed assessment tools to identify patients at risk of malnutrition and management strategies to help maintain nutritional intake.

  13. The immune system in children with malnutrition - a systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rytter, Maren Johanne Heilskov; Kolte, Lilian; Briend, André

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Malnourished children have increased risk of dying, with most deaths caused by infectious diseases. One mechanism behind this may be impaired immune function. However, this immune deficiency of malnutrition has not previously been systematically reviewed. OBJECTIVES: To review...... the scientific literature about immune function in children with malnutrition. METHODS: A systematic literature search was done in PubMed, and additional articles identified in reference lists and by correspondence with experts in the field. The inclusion criteria were studies investigating immune parameters...... in children aged 1-60 months, in relation to malnutrition, defined as wasting, underweight, stunting, or oedematous malnutrition. RESULTS: The literature search yielded 3402 articles, of which 245 met the inclusion criteria. Most were published between 1970 and 1990, and only 33 after 2003. Malnutrition...

  14. The immune system in children with malnutrition - a systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rytter, Maren Johanne Heilskov; Kolte, Lilian; Briend, André;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Malnourished children have increased risk of dying, with most deaths caused by infectious diseases. One mechanism behind this may be impaired immune function. However, this immune deficiency of malnutrition has not previously been systematically reviewed. OBJECTIVES: To review...... the scientific literature about immune function in children with malnutrition. METHODS: A systematic literature search was done in PubMed, and additional articles identified in reference lists and by correspondence with experts in the field. The inclusion criteria were studies investigating immune parameters...... in children aged 1-60 months, in relation to malnutrition, defined as wasting, underweight, stunting, or oedematous malnutrition. RESULTS: The literature search yielded 3402 articles, of which 245 met the inclusion criteria. Most were published between 1970 and 1990, and only 33 after 2003. Malnutrition...

  15. MALNUTRITION IN THE SURGICAL PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andonovska Biljana J.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The term 'malnutrition' is a broad term used to describe any imbalance in the diet. In 2009 it was confirmed that malnutrition is an urgent health problem. The reasons for which malnutrition may develop are different. Loss on cellular, physical and physiological level happens as a consequence of malnutrition. Studies show that in surgical practice there is malnutrition in 50% of patients and that there is an association between inadequate nutritional status and surgical result. It leads to prolonged treatment, increasing of the level of morbidity and mortality, increased hospital costs, etc. Sometimes malnutrition is unrecognised, untreated and worsened in hospitals. For this reason this paper will elaborate: nutrition and a surgical patient, assessment of a nutritional status, assessment of energy requirements, and enteral and parenteral nutrition in order to determine the conditions and procedures that affect the appearance, recognition and treatment of malnutrition.

  16. Brain Natriuretic Peptide and Body Fluid Composition in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease: A Cross-Sectional Study to Evaluate the Relationship between Volume Overload and Malnutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohashi, Yasushi; Saito, Akinobu; Yamazaki, Keisuke; Tai, Reibin; Matsukiyo, Tatsuru; Aikawa, Atsushi; Sakai, Ken

    2016-08-01

    Fluid volume overload occurs in chronic kidney disease (CKD), leading to the compensatory release of natriuretic peptides. However, the elevated cardiac peptides may also be associated with malnutrition as well as volume overload. Body fluid composition was measured in 147 patients with CKD between 2009 and 2015, and its relationship to brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels was examined. Body fluid composition was separated into three components: (a) a water-free mass consisting of muscle, fat, and minerals; (b) intracellular water (ICW) content, and (c) extracellular water (ECW) content. Excess fluid mass was calculated using Chamney's formula. The measured BNP levels in the tertile groups were 10.9 ± 5.4, 36.3 ± 12.5, and 393 ± 542 pg/ml, respectively. Patients in a higher log-transformed BNP level tertile were more likely to be older, to have a higher frequency of cardiac comorbidities, pulse pressure, C-reactive protein levels, and proteinuria, and to have lower serum sodium, kidney function, and serum albumin (p < 0.05). In body fluid composition, decreased body mass was significantly associated with the ECW-to-ICW ratio in relation to the downward ICW slope (r = -0.235, p = 0.004) and was strongly correlated with excess fluid mass (r = -0.701, p < 0.001). The ECW-to-ICW ratio and excess fluid mass was independently associated with the BNP levels. Fluid volume imbalance between intra- and extracellular water regulated by decreased cell mass was independently associated with BNP levels, which may explain the reserve capacity for fluid accumulation in patients with CKD.

  17. Severe acute malnutrition and infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Kelsey D J; Berkley, James A

    2014-01-01

    Severe acute malnutrition (SAM) is associated with increased severity of common infectious diseases, and death amongst children with SAM is almost always as a result of infection. The diagnosis and management of infection are often different in malnourished versus well-nourished children. The objectives of this brief are to outline the evidence underpinning important practical questions relating to the management of infectious diseases in children with SAM and to highlight research gaps. Overall, the evidence base for many aspects covered in this brief is very poor. The brief addresses antimicrobials; antipyretics; tuberculosis; HIV; malaria; pneumonia; diarrhoea; sepsis; measles; urinary tract infection; nosocomial Infections; soil transmitted helminths; skin infections and pharmacology in the context of SAM. The brief is structured into sets of clinical questions, which we hope will maximise the relevance to contemporary practice. PMID:25475887

  18. Childhood Malnutrition and the Intestinal Microbiome Malnutrition and the microbiome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Anne V.; Dinh, Duy M.; Ward, Honorine D.

    2015-01-01

    Malnutrition contributes to almost half of all deaths in children under the age of 5 years, particularly those who live in resource-constrained areas. Those who survive frequently suffer from long-term sequelae including growth failure and neurodevelopmental impairment. Malnutrition is part of a vicious cycle of impaired immunity, recurrent infections and worsening malnutrition. Recently, alterations in the gut microbiome have also been strongly implicated in childhood malnutrition. It has been suggested that malnutrition may delay the normal development of the gut microbiota in early childhood or force it towards an altered composition that lacks the required functions for healthy growth and/or increases the risk for intestinal inflammation. This review addresses our current understanding of the beneficial contributions of gut microbiota to human nutrition (and conversely the potential role of changes in that community to malnutrition), the process of acquiring an intestinal microbiome, potential influences of malnutrition on the developing microbiota and the evidence directly linking alterations in the intestinal microbiome to childhood malnutrition. We review recent studies on the association between alterations in the intestinal microbiome and early childhood malnutrition and discuss them in the context of implications for intervention or prevention of the devastation caused by malnutrition. PMID:25356748

  19. Role of T Cells in Malnutrition and Obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Gerriets, Valerie A.; MacIver, Nancie J.

    2014-01-01

    Nutritional status is critically important for immune cell function. While obesity is characterized by inflammation that promotes metabolic syndrome including cardiovascular disease and insulin resistance, malnutrition can result in immune cell defects and increased risk of mortality from infectious diseases. T cells play an important role in the immune adaptation to both obesity and malnutrition. T cells in obesity have been shown to have an early and critical role in inducing inflammation, ...

  20. Prevention of acute malnutrition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Pee, Saskia; Grais, Rebecca; Fenn, Bridget;

    2015-01-01

    Acute malnutrition is associated with increased morbidity and mortality risk. When episodes are prolonged or frequent, acute malnutrition is also associated with poor growth and development, which contributes to stunting Nutrition-specific and nutrition-sensitive strategies to prevent...... undernutrition during the first 1,000 days from conception to 24 months of age can reduce the risks of wasting, stunting, and micronutrient deficiencies. Under circumstances that exacerbate the underlying causes of undernutrition and increase the incidence of wasting, such as food insecurity related to lean...... seasons or emergencies, or increased incidence of illness, such as diarrhea or measles, additional efforts are required to prevent and treat wasting. Special nutritious foods directly meet the increased nutrient requirements of children at risk for wasting; assistance to vulnerable households, in the form...

  1. Isolation of pathogenic Escherichia coli from stool samples of diarrhoeal patients with history of raw milk consumption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. N. Brahmbhatt

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To detect the occurrence of pathogenic Escherichia coli from stool samples of diarrhoeal patients with history of raw milk consumption and to determine the public health significance of isolates, especially their role in causing human diseases.Materials and Methods: Atotal of 100 stool samples from diarrhoeal patients, with history of raw milk consumption were collected from primary health centres in and around Anand city, under aseptic conditions and a total of 50 raw milk samples were collected from milk vendors, retail shops located in Anand city in sterilized sample bottles. MacConkey broth was used for the enrichment of all the samples and inoculation was done on MacConkey agar and EMB agar was used as the selective media. This was followed by the confirmation of isolates using biochemical tests. For the serotyping,E. coli isolates were sent to the National Salmonella and Escherichia Centre, Central Research Institute (CRI, Kasauli, Himachal Pradesh.Detection of virulence genes was performed using PCR technique.Results: During the present investigation, 26 (52% E. coli isolates from 50 milk samples and 59 (59% E. coli isolates from 100 stool samples were recovered. Out of 85 E. coli isolates sent for serotyping, 74 isolates could be typed which were further distributed into 13 different serogroups O2, O4, O8, O17, O22, O25, O29, O36, O45, O60, O90, O116 and O172, whereas 8 isolates were found untypable and 3 isolates were reported rough isolates. Of the 59 E. coli isolates from stool samples of diarrhoeal patients tested, 15 isolates (25.42% were reported to be positive for stx genes, among that 6 (10.16% were positive for stx1 gene, 9 (15.25% isolates were positive for stx2 gene, while 3 isolates (5.08% were positive for eaeA gene. In this study, 21 E. coliisolates were found to be Shiga toxin producing E. coli (STEC while none of the isolates were positive for the serotype O157. Conclusions: Our present findings indicate that raw

  2. Warts, malnutrition, and sunshine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orozco-Topete, Rocío; Villa, Antonio; Leyva Santiago, Jaime; Scholtes, Christian; Archer-Dubon, Carla; Ysunza, Alberto

    2008-01-01

    Viral warts are common in poor rural settings but their relationship to malnutrition has not been studied. We sought to determine the prevalence of warts in children of two communities in Oaxaca, Mexico, and compared it with their nutritional status. Children from Santa Catarina Yahuio and Santiago Laxopa of the state of Oaxaca were examined. Localization, number, and type of verruca were noted. Date of birth, height, and weight were obtained to determine nutritional status. A total of 213 children (116 girls and 97 boys), 107 in Yahuio and 106 in Laxopa, were studied. Mean age was 10.24 years. Thirty children (14.1%) had warts and 80% (24/30) of these lived in Yahuio (p = 0.0002). Almost half were teenagers. Most lesions were on sun-exposed areas. First degree malnutrition was found in 24.5%; second degree in 23.6% and third degree in 14.2%. A higher frequency of warts than previously reported was found. Malnutrition was prevalent in both groups but did not correlate positively with verruca. Verruca were more frequent in females, adolescents, sun-exposed areas, and higher altitude. We believe that the higher altitude of Yahuio facilitates greater exposure to ultraviolet light-induced immune suppression.

  3. [Maternal malnutrition. The nursing task].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grotestán Liverpool, G; Grant, W A; Ibáñez Peña, E

    1990-01-01

    A retrospective study of 577 patients from urban and periurban areas of Las Tunas municipality is made. These patients were delivered in "Dr. Ernesto Guevara de la Serna" Hospital between January and April 1986, both inclusive; their characteristics included being single pregnancies and not having suffered maternal diseases that influenced fetal growth. The following variables were studied: state of maternal nutrition at implantation, initial weight and weight gain, newborn weight, as well as maternal age and place of residence; these variables were interrelated with the view to know their influence or lack of influence on fetal weight. A survey of 89 of these women is made; they had been classified as malnourished and the purpose of the survey is to analyze their knowledge and views on malnutrition, as well as the instructions received during pregnancy and after delivery. Conclusions are derived and nursing recommendations are made.

  4. HYPOMAGNESAEMIA IN PROTEIN ENERGY MALNUTRITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagaraj Javali

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Protein energy malnutrition is one of the leading causes of childhood mortality a nd morbidity in developing countries . (1 It is a global health problem which starts in womb and ends in tomb. Protein energy malnutrition is a disease of multi - deprivation and poverty affecting nearly 150 million children under the age of 5 years in the world. Out of the 120 million children in India, 75 million are estimated to suffer from visible protein energy malnutrition . (2 Three countries, India, Bangladesh, Pakistan account for half of world’s underweight children despite having just 29 percent of the developing world’s under five popula tion. (3 It is not only an important cause of childhood morbidity and mortality but leads to permanent impairment of physical and possibly of mental growth. Magnesium is essential for bio - energetic reactions controlling fuel oxidation, membrane transport a nd signal transmission contributing to the action of more than 300 enzymes. (4 It is important for membrane stabilization and nerve conduction. Adenosine triphosphate and Guanosine triphosphate (GTP need associated magnesium when they are used by ATPases , cyclases and kinases. However hypomagnesaemia may produce hypokalaemia that only corrects with magnesium therapy (5 Magnesium deficiency may cause grave disturbances including neurologic signs such as twitching, tremors and convulsions (6 Magnesium dec reases calcium uptake by the cells, inhibits smooth muscle contractility, inhibits histamine and acetyl choline release and depresses excitability of smooth muscle fibres. Thus it has bronchodilator and anti - inflammatory properties. (2 Magnesium modulates vasomotor tone, blood pressure and peripheral blood flow. Magnesium deficiency is known to trigger vasoconstriction and enhances vascular endothelial injury . (1, 7 On the other hand ET - 1(endothelin - 1 is a potent vasoconstrictor peptide. Results of a prev ious study showed that the mean

  5. Malnutrition and Gastrointestinal and Respiratory Infections in Children: A Public Health Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Leonor; Cervantes, Elsa; Ortiz, Rocío

    2011-01-01

    Infectious disease is the major cause of morbidity and mortality in developing countries, particularly in children. Increasing evidence suggests that protein-calorie malnutrition is the underlying reason for the increased susceptibility to infections observed in these areas. Moreover, certain infectious diseases also cause malnutrition, which can result in a vicious cycle. Malnutrition and bacterial gastrointestinal and respiratory infections represent a serious public health problem. The increased incidence and severity of infections in malnourished children is largely due to the deterioration of immune function; limited production and/or diminished functional capacity of all cellular components of the immune system have been reported in malnutrition. In this review, we analyze the cyclical relationship between malnutrition, immune response dysfunction, increased susceptibility to infectious disease, and metabolic responses that further alter nutritional status. The consequences of malnutrition are diverse and included: increased susceptibility to infection, impaired child development, increased mortality rate and individuals who come to function in suboptimal ways. PMID:21695035

  6. Malnutrition in South Asia-A Critical Reappraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, Saeed

    2016-10-25

    Malnutrition continues to be a major public health challenge especially in South Asian developing countries. The aim of the present review is to spotlight the magnitude of the prevalence of malnutrition and its dynamics in South Asian region and to suggest potential approaches for the prevention and control of this issue of public health significance. An extensive review of literature, covering malnutrition and its determinants, health and economic consequences and pragmatic preventive strategies was performed on computer based bibliographic databases (PubMed, Google Scholar, Scopus, Medline and Sciencedirect.com ) to retrieve abstracts and full texts for India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka and Nepal. All relevant titles and abstracts were examined and evaluated for malnutrition and its prevalence in South Asia. The results revealed malnutrition to be a major public health problem and a potential cause of high disease burden and mortality in South Asia. Compelling evidence suggests malnutrition to be the leading cause of stunting, wasting and underweight with drastic economic consequences among vulnerable populations. Reduced cognitive performance and low productivity have also been associated with micronutrients malnutrition. Suboptimal breastfeeding, inadequate food supply, micronutrient deficiencies, low household income, poor health care system, increased healthcare costs, illiteracy, unhygienic and substandard living, inappropriate child's care and the caregiver, food insecurity and on top of that vicious cycle of poverty, have been recognized as principal indicators for growing malnutrition prevalence in South Asia. Global organizations, local governments, program managers, NGOs, academia, industry in particular and the society at large need to take up the challenge to completely confiscate malnutrition from the region for economic prosperity and a healthier future.

  7. Malnutrition associated with head and neck cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharifeh Haghjoo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancerous patients, under the chemotherapy or radiotherapy, are at high risk of malnutrition due to the associated complications with the treatment procedures such as chewing problems, dysphagia, nausea etc. Considering the patients’ history of alcohol consumption, smoking or any other diseases and performing several physical examinations are essential in early identification of high-risk patients for nutritional complications, losing unintentional weight and fat free mass. In this review, we tried to briefly explain the risk of malnutrition in patients with head and neck cancers who are undergoing surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Oral nutrition, nasogastric tube and percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy  are different methods of nutritional interventions, which have been compared due to their efficacy in maintaining the patients’ weight. In this study, we reviewed the results obtained in clinical trials about the efficacy of intense nutritional intervention on limiting the chemoradiotherapy-associated complications in patients with head and neck cancers.

  8. Malnutrition Predicts Clinical Outcome in Patients with Neuroendocrine Neoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maasberg, Sebastian; Knappe-Drzikova, Barbora; Vonderbeck, Dorothée; Jann, Henning; Weylandt, Karsten H; Grieser, Christian; Pascher, Andreas; Schefold, Jörg C; Pavel, Marianne; Wiedenmann, Bertram; Sturm, Andreas; Pape, Ulrich-Frank

    2017-01-01

    Malnutrition is a common problem in oncological diseases, influencing treatment outcomes, treatment complications, quality of life and survival. The potential role of malnutrition has not yet been studied systematically in neuroendocrine neoplasms (NEN), which, due to their growing prevalence and additional therapeutic options, provide an increasing clinical challenge to diagnosis and management. The aim of this cross-sectional observational study, which included a long-term follow-up, was therefore to define the prevalence of malnutrition in 203 patients with NEN using various methodological approaches, and to analyse the short- and long-term outcome of malnourished patients. A detailed subgroup analysis was also performed to define risk factors for poorer outcome. When applying malnutrition screening scores, 21-25% of the NEN patients were at risk of or demonstrated manifest malnutrition. This was confirmed by anthropometric measurements, by determination of serum surrogate parameters such as albumin as well as by bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA), particularly phase angle α. The length of hospital stay was significantly longer in malnourished NEN patients, while long-term overall survival was highly significantly reduced. Patients with high-grade (G3) neuroendocrine carcinomas, progressive disease and undergoing chemotherapy were at particular risk of malnutrition associated with a poorer outcome. Multivariate analysis confirmed the important and highly significant role of malnutrition as an independent prognostic factor for NEN besides proliferative capacity (G3 NEC). Malnutrition is therefore an underrecognized problem in NEN patients which should systematically be diagnosed by widely available standard methods such as Nutritional Risk Screening (NRS), serum albumin assessment and BIA, and treated to improve both short- and long-term outcomes. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Risk factors for childhood malnutrition in Roma settlements in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janevic Teresa

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Children living in Roma settlements in Central and Eastern Europe face extreme levels of social exclusion and poverty, but their health status has not been well studied. The objective of this study was to elucidate risk factors for malnutrition in children in Roma settlements in Serbia. Methods Anthropometric and sociodemographic measures were obtained for 1192 Roma children under five living in Roma settlements from the 2005 Serbia Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey. Multiple logistic regression was used to relate family and child characteristics to the odds of stunting, wasting, and underweight. Results The prevalence of stunting, wasting, and underweight was 20.1%, 4.3%, and 8.0%, respectively. Nearly all of the children studied fell into the lowest quintile of wealth for the overall population of Serbia. Children in the lowest quintile of wealth were four times more likely to be stunted compared to those in the highest quintile, followed by those in the second lowest quintile (AOR = 2.1 and lastly by those in the middle quintile (AOR = 1.6. Children who were ever left in the care of an older child were almost twice as likely to stunted as those were not. Children living in urban settlements showed a clear disadvantage with close to three times the likelihood of being wasted compared to those living in rural areas. There was a suggestion that maternal, but not paternal, education was associated with stunting, and maternal literacy was significantly associated with wasting. Whether children were ever breastfed, immunized or had diarrhoeal episodes in the past two weeks did not show strong correlations to children malnutrition status in this Roma population. Conclusions There exists a gradient relationship between household wealth and stunting even within impoverished settlements, indicating that among poor and marginalized populations socioeconomic inequities in child health should be addressed. Other areas on which to focus

  10. Cost Benefit Analysis on Diarrhoeal Diseases Control due to Im- proved Drinking Water in Huaibei Rural Area%淮北农村改建深井为主的小型集中供水控制腹泻病经济效益分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈晓东; 林萍; 承明华; 吕永生; 孙茂成; 陆培林; 孙波; 李进; 沈慧君; 陶炳根; 朱惠刚

    2000-01-01

    Sources of drinking water and amount of drinking water con- sumed were analyzed, among 10092 residents, the diarrhoeal dis- eases (DDs) were collected in 6 villages provided with deep- well tap water and orther 6 control villages using non- centralized wa- ter supply (NCWS) in Huaibei rural area. The results showed that after providing people with tap water from deep - well (TWDW), the amount of drinking water consumed reached the national standard of drinking water quantity to be consumed in ru- ral area and the drinking water quality was much better than that of NCWS. The average lasting time of DDs was 3.01 days. How- ever 43.45% of the patients did not seek medical assistance. After contolhng for confounding factors, the AR% of NCWS for DDs was 59.1%. The results shwed that the ratio of cost for TWDW and the benefit gained from the reduotion of DDs was 1: 5.43.%对两个县6个改水村和6个对照村的供用水方式和 居民饮水与腹泻病进行调查,并对改建集中供水控制腹泻病的 经济效益进行分析。结果表明,改建深井为主的简易集中供水 水量充足,采取鼓励用水的措施,使当地居民人均饮用水量达 到“农村生活饮用水量卫生标准”,同时水质显著高于改水前的 分散式给水,腹泻病人平均生病时间为3.01天,有43.45%的 腹泻病人不就诊。控制混杂因素后,腹泻病归因于饮用非自来 水的AR%达59.1%。用流行病学的经济分析方法进行效益 分析结果改建集中供水的投入与腹泻病减少的经济受益之比 为1:5.43。

  11. Post-Weaning Protein Malnutrition Increases Blood Pressure and Induces Endothelial Dysfunctions in Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Aucelia C S de Belchior; Angeli, Jhuli K.; Thaís de O Faria; Siman, Fabiana D. M.; Edna A Silveira; Eduardo F Meira; da Costa, Carlos P.; Dalton V Vassallo; Alessandra S Padilha

    2012-01-01

    Malnutrition during critical periods in early life may increase the subsequent risk of hypertension and metabolic diseases in adulthood, but the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. We aimed to evaluate the effects of post-weaning protein malnutrition on blood pressure and vascular reactivity in aortic rings (conductance artery) and isolated-perfused tail arteries (resistance artery) from control (fed with Labina®) and post-weaning protein malnutrition rats (offspring that received a diet...

  12. Early Postnatal Protein-Calorie Malnutrition and Cognition: A Review of Human and Animal Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laus, Maria Fernanda; Vales, Lucas Duarte Manhas Ferreira; Costa, Telma Maria Braga; Almeida, Sebastião Sousa

    2011-01-01

    Malnutrition continues to be recognized as the most common and serious form of children’s dietary disease in the developing countries and is one of the principal factors affecting brain development. The purpose of this paper is to review human and animal studies relating malnutrition to cognitive development, focusing in correlational and interventional data, and to provide a discussion of possible mechanisms by which malnutrition affects cognition. PMID:21556206

  13. Early Postnatal Protein-Calorie Malnutrition and Cognition: A Review of Human and Animal Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastião Sousa Almeida

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Malnutrition continues to be recognized as the most common and serious form of children’s dietary disease in the developing countries and is one of the principal factors affecting brain development. The purpose of this paper is to review human and animal studies relating malnutrition to cognitive development, focusing in correlational and interventional data, and to provide a discussion of possible mechanisms by which malnutrition affects cognition.

  14. Strategy to fight against malnutrition in chronic patients with complex health needs

    OpenAIRE

    Burgos, Rosa; Joaquin, Clara; Blay, Carles; Ledesma, Albert; Figueiras, Guadalupe; Pérez-Portabella, Cleofe; Granados, Antonio; Gómez, Mª Dolores; González, Asunción; Sarquella, Esther; Amil, Paloma; Vaqué, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Disease-related malnutrition (DRM) is a prevalent condition amongst older people as well as patients in all healthcare settings around the world. Chronic patients with complex health needs (CPCHN defined as those with complex chronic conditions that involve multiple health requirements, complex social support needs, or both) are especially vulnerable to malnutrition. Malnutrition is associated with increased morbidity, a higher hospital admission and readmission rate, increased needs for soci...

  15. Role of T cells in malnutrition and obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerie A Gerriets

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Nutritional status is critically important for immune cell function. While obesity is characterized by inflammation that promotes metabolic syndrome including cardiovascular disease and insulin resistance, malnutrition can result in immune cell defects and increased risk of mortality from infectious diseases. T cells play an important role in the immune adaptation to both obesity and malnutrition. T cells in obesity have been shown to have an early and critical role in inducing inflammation, accompanying the accumulation of inflammatory macrophages in obese adipose tissue, which are known to promote insulin resistance. How T cells are recruited to adipose tissue and activated in obesity is a topic of considerable interest. Conversely, T cell number is decreased in malnourished individuals, and T cells in the setting of malnutrition have decreased effector function and proliferative capacity. The adipokine leptin, which is secreted in proportion to adipocyte mass, may have a key role in mediating adipocyte-T cell interactions in both obesity and malnutrition, and has been shown to promote effector T cell function and metabolism while inhibiting regulatory T cell proliferation. Additionally, key molecular signals are involved in T cell metabolic adaptation during nutrient stress; among them, the metabolic regulator AMP kinase (AMPK and the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR have critical roles in regulating T cell number, function, and metabolism. In summary, understanding how T cell number and function are altered in obesity and malnutrition will lead to better understanding of and treatment for diseases where nutritional status determines clinical outcome.

  16. 居家军队离退休干部阿尔茨海默病患者营养不足的影响因素%Investigation of Malnutrition in Retired Soldiers Patients with Early Alzheimer's Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐珺杰; 江景娟; 周蕾; 徐乐平

    2016-01-01

    目的:调查居家军队离退休干部阿尔茨海默病患者中营养不足现状并分析其影响因素。方法:采用一般资料调查表、简易营养评价精法量表对83例居家的军队离退休干部阿尔茨海默病患者营养状况进行调查,并与166例健康老年人进行比较,分析导致营养不足的危险因素。结果:阿尔茨海默病患者营养不足的发生率为46.52%,显著高于对照组的10.84%(χ2=43.201,P <0.001);年龄≥75岁、中重度痴呆、病程≥3年、伴有吞咽障碍症状是导致营养不足的危险因素。与营养正常的 AD 患者相比,营养不足的 AD 患者中年龄≥75岁(χ2=11.487, P <0.001)、中重度痴呆(χ2=7.547,P <0.01)、病程≥3年(χ2=4.155,P <0.05)、伴有吞咽障碍症状(χ2=8.763,P<0.01)的比例显著升高。 Logistic 回归分析显示,年龄≥75岁(β=0.826,Waldχ2=7.322,P <0.001)、中重度痴呆(β=0.713,Waldχ2=4.310,P <0.05)、有吞咽障碍症状(β=0.772,Waldχ2=5.306,P <0.01)与营养不足有关联。结论:居家军队离退休干部阿尔茨海默病患者的营养不足发生率高,应加强对其发生危险因素的识别。%Objective :To explore the prevalence of malnutrition in retired soldiers patients with Alzheimer 's disease (AD)and its infulence factors .Methods :AD outpatients of retired soldiers (case group ,n = 83)and matched health re‐tired soldiers(control group ,n = 166)were screened by mini - nutrition assessment for diagnosis of malnutrition and inveatigated by self - made queationaire for analysis of influencing factors .Results :The cases group had a significantly higher prevalence of malnutrition in cases group than that in control group (46 .6% vs 10 .8% ,χ2 = 43 .201 ,P <0 .001) .Age ≥ 75y(χ2 = 11 .487 ,P < 0 .001) ,moderate or severe dementia(χ2 = 7 .547 ,P < 0

  17. Hémodialyse, malnutrition protéino-calorique haemodialysis, protein energy malnutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Mouram

    2012-06-01

    Conclusion: Protein caloric malnutrition is frequent in our patients on maintenance haemodialysis. Early recognition and treatment of malnutrition is essential to improve the outcome of these patients.

  18. Agriculture and malnutrition in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulati, Ashok; Ganesh-Kumar, A; Shreedhar, Ganga; Nandakumar, T

    2012-03-01

    Despite the high and relatively stable overall growth of the economy, India's agriculture sector is underperforming and a vast section of the population remains undernourished. To explore the possible interplay between agricultural performance and malnutrition indicators to see whether states that perform better in agriculture record better nutritional outcomes. Correlation analysis and a simple linear regression model were used to study the relationship between agricultural performance and malnutrition among children under 5 years of age and adults from 15 to 49 years of age at 20 major states using data from the National Family Health Survey-3 for the year 2005/06 and the national accounts. Indicators of the level of agricultural performance or income have a strong and significant negative relationship with indices of undernutrition among adults and children, a result suggesting that improvement of agricultural productivity can be a powerful tool to reduce undernutrition across the vast majority of the population. In addition to agriculture, access to sanitation facilities and women's literacy were also found to be strong factors affecting malnutrition. Access to healthcare for women and child-care practices, in particular breastfeeding within 1 hour after birth, are other important determinants of malnutrition among adults and children. Malnutrition is a multidimensional problem that requires multisectoral interventions. The findings show that improving agricultural performance can have a positive impact on nutritional outcomes. However, improvements in agriculture alone cannot be effective in combating malnutrition if several other mediating factors are not in place. Interventions to improve education, health, sanitation and household infrastructure, and care and feeding practices are critical. Innovative strategies that integrate agriculture and nutrition programs stand a better chance of combating the malnutrition problem.

  19. [Conceptual milestones in the history of protein-energy malnutrition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega-Franco, L

    1999-01-01

    Although the biblical horsemen of hunger, plague and war have proverbially ridden together, the consequences of these adversities, i.e. malnutrition and death, may have been secularly interpreted as natural as life itself. This may be the reason why the first clinical description of what is now known as protein-energy malnutrition, did not appear until the 19th century, in 1865 to be precise. The limited dissemination of this finding, originally written in Spanish, brought about a rediscovery and successful description of the disease in English in 1933. In 1949, one year after their creation, the World Health Organization (WHO) and the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) decided to unify their diagnostic criteria of malnutrition, and endorse further research. The present assay describes some of the major conceptual landmarks in the history of the scientific knowledge of this disease.

  20. Acute Toxicity Investigation and Anti-diarrhoeal Effect of the Chloroform-Methanol Extract of the Leaves of Persea americana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christian E, Odo; Okwesili Fc, Nwodo; Parker E, Joshua; Okechukwu Pc, Ugwu

    2014-01-01

    Persea americana is a plant used by traditional medicine practitioners to treat ailments including diarrhoea and diabetes mellitus in Nigeria. Hence, the chloroform and the methanol fractions of the chloroform-methanol extract of the leaves of P. americana were evaluated for their acute toxicity as well as anti-diarrhoeal effects in Wistar rats to substantiate this claim. The chloroform and methanol fractions [at graded doses of 100 and 200 mg/Kg body weight (b.w) of each] were studied for their anti-diarrhoeal effects in terms of the reductions in the wetness of faeces and the frequency of defaecation of castor oil-induced diarrhoea. To understand the mechanism of their anti-diarrhoeal effects, their actions were further evaluated on castor oil-induced enteropooling (intestinal fluid accumulation). The median lethal dose (LD50) of the methanol fraction was found to be less than 5000 mg/Kg b.w. At the two doses, the chloroform and the methanol fractions showed dose-dependent significant (p americana possesses significant anti-diarrhoeal effect and may be a potent source of anti-diarrhoeal drug(s) in future.

  1. Malnutrition,Nutritional Risks in Retired Soldiers Patients with Early Alzheimer's Disease%军队离退休干部阿尔茨海默病早期患者营养风险的调查

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    江景娟; 周蕾; 徐珺杰; 阎同军; 徐亚金

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To explore the prevalence of malnutrition,nutritional risks in retired soldiers pa-tients with early-stage Alzheimer's disease(AD).Methods:Early AD inpatients of retired soldiers(case group,n=123)and sex,age-matched health retired soldiers(control group,n=248)were screened by nutritional risk screening 2002(NRS2002)for diagnosis of malnutrition,and the cases were also assessed by NRS2002 for nutritional risks evaluation.Results:The cases group had a significantly lower body mass index than that in control group(t=2.170,P<0.05).The prevalence of malnutrition was significantly higher in cases group than in control group(χ2 =35.324,P<0.001).65 cases(52.9%)with nutritional risks were screened in AD patients.Conclusion:The malnutrition or nutritional risks should be recognized as a universal phenomenon even if at the early-stage of Alzheimer's disease.%目的:调查军队离退休干部阿尔茨海默病( AD)早期患者营养不足、营养风险的发生情况。方法:采用营养风险筛查2002(NRS2002),对123例军队离退休干部AD早期患者(患者组)营养不足进行评定,并与248例性别、年龄匹配的健康军队离退休干部(对照组)进行对照;同时采用NRS 2002对AD患者营养风险进行评定。结果:①患者组体重指数显著低于对照组,差异有统计学意义( t=2.170,P<0.05);②患者组营养不足发生率为25.2%(31/123),显著高于对照组的4.4%(11/248),差异有统计学意义(χ2=35.324,P<0.001);③患者组有65例存在营养风险,营养风险发生率为52.9%(65/123)。结论:即使疾病早期,AD患者中营养不足、营养风险也较为普遍。

  2. Chronic radiation enteritis and malnutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Gwilym James; Brooke, Rachael; De Silva, Aminda Niroshan

    2013-07-01

    Radiation enteritis is defined as the loss of absorptive capacity of the intestine following irradiation, which is most commonly seen after radiotherapy for pelvic and abdominal malignancies. It is divided into acute and chronic forms and usually presents with diarrhea and malabsorption. Malnutrition is a common complication of chronic radiation enteritis (CRE). We reviewed the etiology, prevalence, symptoms, diagnosis and management of CRE and CRE with malnutrition in this article. Functional short bowel syndrome as a cause of malnutrition in CRE is also considered. The diagnostic work-up includes serum markers, endoscopy, cross-sectional imaging and the exclusion of alternative diagnoses such as recurrent malignancy. Management options of CRE include dietary manipulation, anti-motility agents, electrolyte correction, probiotics, parenteral nutrition, surgical resection and small bowel transplantation. Treatment may also be required for coexisting conditions including vitamin B12 deficiency, bile acid malabsorption and depression.

  3. Desnutrição, maturação do sistema nervoso central e doenças neuropsiquiátricas Malnutrition, central nervous system maturation and neuropsychiatric diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid Dalira Schweigert

    2009-04-01

    functions. Over and above the metabolic programming induced by fetal malnutrition in order to increase the chances of survival of the fetus in post-natal life, studies point to pre-natal nutritional deficiency as a risk factor for the development of neuropsychiatric diseases. The present review aims to consider aspects of malnutrition in relation to cerebral development, the temporal and functional extension of its impact, as well as establishing correlations with neuropsychiatric diseases, considering articles of periodicals enlisted by Medline from 1962 to 2005. Events arising from early malnutrition display, for the most part, a permanent character to some degree, if not immediate, prospective and compromising of biochemical, physiological and behavioral performance. Despite the apparent delays in the development of neurological parameters, these do not represent mere isolated functional errors, as the ideal inter-relations and connections are influenced, extending the temporal errors of the occurrence of events. The impression of the mark of malnutrition at the level of the genetic code, in extending the horizon of the effects of malnutrition to a multigenerational level, amplifies its effects. Aspects characterized as compensatory mechanisms, while, on the one hand they display an ability to adapt to severe early stress, on the other they may be compromised in the eventuality of additional environmental or emotional stress. Concern with regard to the subliminal or expressive effects of neuropsychiatric diseases on the quality of life consolidate the importance of the development of research aimed at understanding and elucidating the impacts and mechanisms that modulate the effects of malnutrition on neurodevelopment.

  4. New Guidelines for Assessment of Malnutrition in Adults: Obese Critically Ill Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauldin, Kasuen; O'Leary-Kelley, Colleen

    2015-08-01

    Recently released recommendations for detection and documentation of malnutrition in adults in clinical practice define 3 types of malnutrition: starvation related, acute disease or injury related, and chronic disease related. The first 2 are more easily recognized, but the third may be more often unnoticed, particularly in obese patients. Critical care patients tend to be at high risk for malnutrition and thus require a thorough nutritional assessment. Compared with patients of earlier times, intensive care unit patients today tend to be older, have more complex medical and comorbid conditions, and often are obese. Missed or delayed detection of malnutrition in these patients may contribute to increases in hospital morbidity and longer hospital stays. Critical care nurses are in a prime position to screen patients at risk for malnutrition and to work with members of the interprofessional team in implementing nutritional intervention plans.

  5. Complications associated with malnutrition in elective surgical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Complications associated with malnutrition in elective surgical patients in a Malaysian setting. ... Tropical Journal of Pharmaceutical Research ... Purpose: To identify the level of malnutrition and complications observed in Malaysia. Methods: A ...

  6. Environmental factors and children's malnutrition in Ethiopia

    OpenAIRE

    MR. Silva, Patricia

    2005-01-01

    Ethiopia has one of the highest child malnutrition rates in the world. A considerable effort to monitor child malnutrition rates over the last two decades shows that, despite some improvements, approximately half of the children under five are still malnourished. Much of the burden of deaths resulting from malnutrition, estimated to be over half of childhood deaths in developing countries, can be attributed to just mild and moderate malnutrition. Several biological and social economic factors...

  7. Malnutrition: The Wasting of Human Potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Patricia S.

    The paper discusses the prevalence of malnutrition in developing countries and the United States, particularly as it relates to debilitating physical and psychological disorders. Educational, social, and political factors which influence the cycle of malnutrition are described. Research on the relationship between malnutrition and intellectual…

  8. Child Malnutrition and Antenatal Care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Forero-Ramirez; L.F. Gamboa (Luis); A.S. Bedi (Arjun Singh); R.A. Sparrow (Robert)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Objective. To examine the effect of prenatal care (PNC) on the level and distribution of child stunting in three Andean countries—Bolivia, Colombia, and Peru—where expanding access to such care has been an explicit policy intervention to tackle child malnutrition in

  9. Malnutrition in young Pakistani children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirani, Shela Akbar Ali

    2012-01-01

    Pakistan is a developing country with the second highest infant and child mortality rate in South Asia. In this region, malnutrition underlies much of the high infant and under five child morbidity and mortality rates. Although struggle to tackle the issue of malnutrition among young Pakistani children has been going on since many decades, till yet a realistic solution for this growing problem has not been found. This paper aims at reviewing literature to analyse the biological, maternal, socio-cultural, environmental, and politico-economical determinants of malnutrition among young children in Pakistan so that need based interventions can be recommended to prevent and overcome this growing issue. A systematic search of national, regional, and international literature was undertaken from peer-reviewed databases for 1991-2011 including MEDLINE, CINAHL, and PubMed. The search was augmented by reviewing the literature from WHO and UNICEF websites, books, local newspapers, and reference lists of articles thought to be relevant. Determinants of malnutrition among Pakistani children are multiple and are prevalent at the level of individual, family, and community. An analysis of biological, maternal, socio-cultural, environmental, and politico-economical factors indicate that most of these factors are interrelated; therefore, to tackle this issue, there is a need to plan composite interventions at the level of malnourished children, their families, and the Pakistani community.

  10. Malnutrition in Hospitals: It Was, Is Now, and Must Not Remain a Problem!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konturek, Peter C.; Herrmann, Hans J.; Schink, Kristin; Neurath, Markus F.; Zopf, Yurdagül

    2015-01-01

    Background Malnutrition is an under-recognized problem in hospitalized patients. Despite systematic screening, the prevalence of malnutrition in the hospital did not decrease in the last few decades. The aim of our study was to evaluate the prevalence of malnutrition and to determine the explicit daily calorie intake of hospitalized patients, to identify the risk factors of developing malnutrition during hospitalization and the effect on the financial reimbursement according to the German DRG-system. Material/Methods 815 hospitalized patients were included in this study. The detection of malnutrition was based on the nutritional-risk-screening (NRS) and subjective-global-assessment (SGA) scores. A trained investigator recorded the daily calorie and fluid intake of each patient. Furthermore, clinical parameters, and the financial reimbursement were evaluated. Results The prevalence of malnutrition was 53.6% according to the SGA and 44.6% according the NRS. During hospitalization, patients received on average 759.9±546.8 kcal/day. The prevalence of malnutrition was increased in patients with hepatic and gastrointestinal disease and with depression or dementia. The most important risk factors for malnutrition were bed rest and immobility (OR=5.88, 95% CI 2.25–15.4). In 84.5% of patient records, malnutrition was not correctly coded, leading to increased financial losses according to the DRG-system (94.908 Euros). Conclusions Hospitalized patients suffer from inadequate nutritional therapy and the risk for developing malnutrition rises during the hospital stay. The early screening of patients for malnutrition would not only improve management of nutritional therapy but also, with adequate coding, improve financial reimbursement according to the DRG-system. PMID:26431510

  11. Malnutrition is associated with increased mortality in older adults regardless of the cause of death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söderström, Lisa; Rosenblad, Andreas; Thors Adolfsson, Eva; Bergkvist, Leif

    2017-02-01

    Malnutrition predicts preterm death, but whether this is valid irrespective of the cause of death is unknown. The aim of the present study was to determine whether malnutrition is associated with cause-specific mortality in older adults. This cohort study was conducted in Sweden and included 1767 individuals aged ≥65 years admitted to hospital in 2008-2009. On the basis of the Mini Nutritional Assessment instrument, nutritional risk was assessed as well nourished (score 24-30), at risk of malnutrition (score 17-23·5) or malnourished (score malnutrition, and 9·4 % of the participants were malnourished. During a median follow-up of 5·1 years, 839 participants (47·5 %) died. The multiple Cox regression model identified significant associations (hazard ratio (HR)) between malnutrition and risk of malnutrition, respectively, and death due to neoplasms (HR 2·43 and 1·32); mental or behavioural disorders (HR 5·73 and 5·44); diseases of the nervous (HR 4·39 and 2·08), circulatory (HR 1·95 and 1·57) or respiratory system (HR 2·19 and 1·49); and symptoms, signs and abnormal clinical and laboratory findings, not elsewhere classified (HR 2·23 and 1·43). Malnutrition and risk of malnutrition are associated with increased mortality regardless of the cause of death, which emphasises the need for nutritional screening to identify older adults who may require nutritional support in order to avoid preterm death.

  12. Isolation and Characterization of Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) in Paediatric Diarrhoeal Patients by Detection of bfpA gene by PCR and HeLa cell Adherence Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, S; Jhora, S T; Talukder, K A; Azmi, I J

    2015-10-01

    This study has been undertaken to investigate the isolation and identification of EPEC strains from paediatric diarrhoeal patients. The study was carried out in the department of Microbiology, Sir Salimullah Medical College & Mitford Hospital, Bangladesh during January to December, 2011. Total 272 samples were studied. Samples from patients with diarrhoea were collected from two tertiary care hospital. At first Esch. coli were isolated from these specimens using standard microbiological techniques and then EPEC strains were identified on the basis of presence of bundle forming pilus (bfpA) gene. Virulence of EPEC strains were determined by detection of bfpA gene and observing localized adherence (LA) in HeLa cell adherence assay. Esch. coli was isolated and identified from all the 272 samples from patients using standard microbiological techniques. Among 272 samples 20(7.35%) isolates were identified as EPEC on the basis of presence of bfpA gene detected by polymerase chain reaction. EPEC strains were identified from those 240 samples, from which Esch. coli had been isolated only. Out of twenty EPEC strains, 17 strains (85%) showed a pattern of localized adherence in Hela cell adherence assay. EPEC strains can be identified by bfpA gene detection and by adherence assays. HeLa cell adherence assay is the most specific method for detection of EPEC strains which has bfpA gene, responsible for localized adherence (LA) in HeLa cell line. Rapid and reliable detection of EPEC is required for successful microbiological surveillance and for treatment of EPEC mediated diarrhoeal disease.

  13. The need for consistent criteria for identifying malnutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffer, L John

    2009-01-01

    The lack of consistent criteria for diagnosing malnutrition and protein-energy malnutrition (PEM) creates problems in educating medical students and physicians, setting the parameters for observational and controlled clinical trials, and formulating clinical guidelines. There is no validated formal definition of malnutrition (or PEM), and the tools that have been developed to screen for it, or diagnose it, vary in their agreement. I make the following suggestions. First, avoid unqualified use of the term 'malnutrition', as it is ambiguous. Second, carefully distinguish between screening and diagnosis, which have different aims and implications. Third, consider the notion that in medicine the diagnosis of PEM is reached by 'narrative-interpretive' reasoning, which regards the disease as a pathophysiological entity in a specific clinical context. I recommend that the concept of PEM as a disease (not a score) be imbedded in teaching and the practice of medicine, and in the design of clinical trials and the setting of guidelines. Fourth, disagreements in screening-derived risk scores and uncertainty in diagnosis are difficult to avoid, but only in the grey zone. It would be prudent, at least until the greater medical world considers the nutritional paradigm plausible enough to invest in it, to enroll only patients who have unambiguously diagnosed PEM in prospective trials with hard clinical endpoints. Copyright (c) 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Underdevelopment and the political economy of malnutrition and ill health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chossudovsky, M

    1983-01-01

    This article applies Marx's abstract subdivision of social consumption to the prevailing patterns of capital accumulation in the Third World. Built-in scarcities in the availability of necessary consumer goods, alongside patterns of overconsumption and social waste by the upper-income groups, are conducive to conditions of mass poverty, malnutrition, and disease that coexist with small pockets of social privilege and affluence. Malnutrition and ill health must be understood and analyzed in relation to the dual and divided structure of social consumption: necessities of life as opposed to luxury and semi-luxury goods. The relationship between capital accumulation, the distribution of money income, and patterns of malnutrition and ill health is analyzed. It is shown that patterns of malnutrition and ill health are socially differentiated, and the core disease pattern in Third World social formations is discussed in relation to the material and social conditions of life which generate ill health and which underlie particular patterns of peripheral capital accumulation. The study focuses on empirical procedures for analyzing the relationship between levels of money income and levels of calorie and protein intake. An appendix outlines a methodology for estimating undernourishment in urban areas from household budget surveys.

  15. Cachexia, malnutrition, the refeeding syndrome, and lessons from Goldilocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palesty, J Alexander; Dudrick, Stanley J

    2011-06-01

    Cachexia has plagued clinicians for centuries. Although all cachexia is related to malnutrition, cachexia associated with malignant diseases differs from starvation cachexia in that it is more recalcitrant to nutritional therapy. All cachexia responds to judicious nutritional support; however, cancer cachexia worsens autonomously as the disease advances and cannot be arrested or reversed by any known form of nutrition, hormonal, or pharmacologic therapy. Cachexia must be treated cautiously to avoid overfeeding syndrome, which may result in serious or dangerous complications or death.

  16. State of malnutrition in hospitals of Ecuador

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvia Gallegos Espinosa

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Rationale: Hospital malnutrition is a global health problem affecting 30-50% of hospitalized patients. There are no estimates of the size of this problem in Ecuadorian hospitals. Hospital malnutrition might influence the quality of medical assistance provided to hospitalized populations. Objectives: To estimate the current frequency of malnutrition among patients admitted to Ecuadorian public hospitals. Materials and methods: The Ecuadorian Hospital Malnutrition Study was conducted between November 2011 and June 2012 with 5,355 patients (Women. 37.5%; Ages ≥ 60 years. 35.1%; Length of stay ≤ 15 days. 91.2% admitted to 36 public hospitals located in the prominent cities of 22 out of the 24 provinces of the country. Malnutrition frequency was estimated by means of the Subjective Global Assessment survey. Results: Malnutrition affected 37.1% of the surveyed patients. Malnutrition was dependent upon patient's age and education level; as well as the presence of cancer, sepsis, and chronic organic failure. Hospital areas showed different frequencies of hospital malnutrition. Health condition leading to hospital admission influenced negatively upon nutritional status. Malnutrition frequency increased as length of stay prolonged. Conclusions: Malnutrition currently affects an important proportion of patients hospitalized in public health institutions of Ecuador. Policies and actions are urgently required in order to successfully deal with this health problem and thus to ameliorate its negative impact upon quality of medical care

  17. Childhood malnutrition and the intestinal microbiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Anne V; Dinh, Duy M; Ward, Honorine D

    2015-01-01

    Malnutrition contributes to almost half of all deaths in children under the age of 5 y, particularly those who live in resource-constrained areas. Those who survive frequently suffer from long-term sequelae including growth failure and neurodevelopmental impairment. Malnutrition is part of a vicious cycle of impaired immunity, recurrent infections, and worsening malnutrition. Recently, alterations in the gut microbiome have also been strongly implicated in childhood malnutrition. It has been suggested that malnutrition may delay the normal development of the gut microbiota in early childhood or force it toward an altered composition that lacks the required functions for healthy growth and/or increases the risk for intestinal inflammation. This review addresses our current understanding of the beneficial contributions of gut microbiota to human nutrition (and conversely the potential role of changes in that community to malnutrition), the process of acquiring an intestinal microbiome, potential influences of malnutrition on the developing microbiota, and the evidence directly linking alterations in the intestinal microbiome to childhood malnutrition. We review recent studies on the association between alterations in the intestinal microbiome and early childhood malnutrition and discuss them in the context of implications for intervention or prevention of the devastation caused by malnutrition.

  18. Molecular diagnosis of Arcobacter and Campylobacter in diarrhoeal samples among Portuguese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Susana; Júlio, Cláudia; Queiroz, João A; Domingues, Fernanda C; Oleastro, Mónica

    2014-03-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate the prevalence and diversity of Arcobacter and Campylobacter spp. in 298 stool samples of patients with diarrhoea, collected from 22 Portuguese hospitals, between September and November 2012. Detection of Arcobacter and Campylobacter spp. was performed using molecular-based detection techniques, such as real-time fluorescence resonance energy transfer PCR, species-specific PCR, and sequencing of amplified PCR products. Overall, 1.3% of the samples were positive for Arcobacter butzleri and 0.3% for Arcobacter cryaerophilus. Campylobacter spp. were found in 31.9% of diarrhoeic faeces. Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter concisus were the most prevalent species (13.7% and 8.0%, respectively). The prevalence of Arcobacter and Campylobacter spp. was significantly different between children and adults (39.7% versus 22.8%, P = 0.003). We underline the high prevalence of these pathogens in diarrhoeal samples among Portuguese patients, with particular relevance in the paediatric age group.

  19. Genetic characterization of Shigella spp. isolated from diarrhoeal and asymptomatic children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Santanu; Pazhani, Gururaja P; Niyogi, Swapan Kumar; Nataro, James P; Ramamurthy, Thandavarayan

    2014-07-01

    Phenotypic and genetic characteristics of Shigella spp. isolated from diarrhoeal and asymptomatic children aged up to 5 years were analysed in this study. In total, 91 and 17 isolates were identified from diarrhoeal (case) and asymptomatic (control) children, respectively. All the isolates were tested for antimicrobial resistance, the presence of integrons, plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR), virulence-associated genes and Shigella pathogenicity island (SH-PAI). The majority of the Shigella spp. from cases (68.1%) and controls (82.3%) were found to be resistant to fluoroquinolones. Integron carriage was detected more in cases (76.9%) than in controls (35.5%). Atypical class 1 integron was detected exclusively in Shigella flexneri from cases but not from the controls. PMQR genes such as aac(6')-Ib-cr and qnrS1 were detected in 82.4 and 14.3% of the isolates from cases and in 53 and 17.6% in controls, respectively. Shigella isolates from cases as well as from controls were positive for the invasive plasmid antigen H-encoding gene ipaH. The other virulence genes such as virF, sat, setA, setB, sen and ial were detected in Shigella isolates in 80.2, 49.4, 27.4, 27.4, 80.2 and 79.1% of cases and in 64.7, 52.9, 17.6, 17.6, 64.7 and 64.7% of controls, respectively. The entire SH-PAI was detected in S. flexneri serotype 2a from cases and controls. In an isolate from a control child, the SH-PAI was truncated. Integrons, PMQR and virulence-encoding genes were detected more frequently in cases than in controls. In diarrhoea endemic areas, asymptomatic carriers may play a crucial role in the transmission of multidrug-resistant Shigella spp. with all the putative virulence genes.

  20. Post-Weaning Protein Malnutrition Increases Blood Pressure and Induces Endothelial Dysfunctions in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siman, Fabiana D. M.; Silveira, Edna A.; Meira, Eduardo F.; da Costa, Carlos P.; Vassallo, Dalton V.; Padilha, Alessandra S.

    2012-01-01

    Malnutrition during critical periods in early life may increase the subsequent risk of hypertension and metabolic diseases in adulthood, but the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. We aimed to evaluate the effects of post-weaning protein malnutrition on blood pressure and vascular reactivity in aortic rings (conductance artery) and isolated-perfused tail arteries (resistance artery) from control (fed with Labina®) and post-weaning protein malnutrition rats (offspring that received a diet with low protein content for three months). Systolic and diastolic blood pressure and heart rate increased in the post-weaning protein malnutrition rats. In the aortic rings, reactivity to phenylephrine (10−10–3.10−4 M) was similar in both groups. Endothelium removal or L-NAME (10−4 M) incubation increased the response to phenylephrine, but the L-NAME effect was greater in the aortic rings from the post-weaning protein malnutrition rats. The protein expression of the endothelial nitric oxide isoform increased in the aortic rings from the post-weaning protein malnutrition rats. Incubation with apocynin (0.3 mM) reduced the response to phenylephrine in both groups, but this effect was higher in the post-weaning protein malnutrition rats, suggesting an increase of superoxide anion release. In the tail artery of the post-weaning protein malnutrition rats, the vascular reactivity to phenylephrine (0.001–300 µg) and the relaxation to acetylcholine (10−10–10−3 M) were increased. Post-weaning protein malnutrition increases blood pressure and induces vascular dysfunction. Although the vascular reactivity in the aortic rings did not change, an increase in superoxide anion and nitric oxide was observed in the post-weaning protein malnutrition rats. However, in the resistance arteries, the increased vascular reactivity may be a potential mechanism underlying the increased blood pressure observed in this model. PMID:22529948

  1. Post-weaning protein malnutrition increases blood pressure and induces endothelial dysfunctions in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Belchior, Aucelia C S; Angeli, Jhuli K; Faria, Thaís de O; Siman, Fabiana D M; Silveira, Edna A; Meira, Eduardo F; da Costa, Carlos P; Vassallo, Dalton V; Padilha, Alessandra S

    2012-01-01

    Malnutrition during critical periods in early life may increase the subsequent risk of hypertension and metabolic diseases in adulthood, but the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. We aimed to evaluate the effects of post-weaning protein malnutrition on blood pressure and vascular reactivity in aortic rings (conductance artery) and isolated-perfused tail arteries (resistance artery) from control (fed with Labina®) and post-weaning protein malnutrition rats (offspring that received a diet with low protein content for three months). Systolic and diastolic blood pressure and heart rate increased in the post-weaning protein malnutrition rats. In the aortic rings, reactivity to phenylephrine (10(-10)-3.10(-4) M) was similar in both groups. Endothelium removal or L-NAME (10(-4) M) incubation increased the response to phenylephrine, but the L-NAME effect was greater in the aortic rings from the post-weaning protein malnutrition rats. The protein expression of the endothelial nitric oxide isoform increased in the aortic rings from the post-weaning protein malnutrition rats. Incubation with apocynin (0.3 mM) reduced the response to phenylephrine in both groups, but this effect was higher in the post-weaning protein malnutrition rats, suggesting an increase of superoxide anion release. In the tail artery of the post-weaning protein malnutrition rats, the vascular reactivity to phenylephrine (0.001-300 µg) and the relaxation to acetylcholine (10(-10)-10(-3) M) were increased. Post-weaning protein malnutrition increases blood pressure and induces vascular dysfunction. Although the vascular reactivity in the aortic rings did not change, an increase in superoxide anion and nitric oxide was observed in the post-weaning protein malnutrition rats. However, in the resistance arteries, the increased vascular reactivity may be a potential mechanism underlying the increased blood pressure observed in this model.

  2. Post-weaning protein malnutrition increases blood pressure and induces endothelial dysfunctions in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aucelia C S de Belchior

    Full Text Available Malnutrition during critical periods in early life may increase the subsequent risk of hypertension and metabolic diseases in adulthood, but the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. We aimed to evaluate the effects of post-weaning protein malnutrition on blood pressure and vascular reactivity in aortic rings (conductance artery and isolated-perfused tail arteries (resistance artery from control (fed with Labina® and post-weaning protein malnutrition rats (offspring that received a diet with low protein content for three months. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure and heart rate increased in the post-weaning protein malnutrition rats. In the aortic rings, reactivity to phenylephrine (10(-10-3.10(-4 M was similar in both groups. Endothelium removal or L-NAME (10(-4 M incubation increased the response to phenylephrine, but the L-NAME effect was greater in the aortic rings from the post-weaning protein malnutrition rats. The protein expression of the endothelial nitric oxide isoform increased in the aortic rings from the post-weaning protein malnutrition rats. Incubation with apocynin (0.3 mM reduced the response to phenylephrine in both groups, but this effect was higher in the post-weaning protein malnutrition rats, suggesting an increase of superoxide anion release. In the tail artery of the post-weaning protein malnutrition rats, the vascular reactivity to phenylephrine (0.001-300 µg and the relaxation to acetylcholine (10(-10-10(-3 M were increased. Post-weaning protein malnutrition increases blood pressure and induces vascular dysfunction. Although the vascular reactivity in the aortic rings did not change, an increase in superoxide anion and nitric oxide was observed in the post-weaning protein malnutrition rats. However, in the resistance arteries, the increased vascular reactivity may be a potential mechanism underlying the increased blood pressure observed in this model.

  3. Child malnutrition and deprivation--observations in Guatemala and Costa Rica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata, L J

    1980-01-01

    Traditional populations consisting of small tribal groups living in close contact with nature may be virtually free from endemic malnutrition owing to the relative absence of infectious diseases. Transition toward modern ways of life and population growth, leading to crowding and underdevelopment, favours endemic malnutrition due to the interaction of malnutrition and infection. Although important features of the traditional culture--breast-feeding, protective child rearing--may remain intact, they are not enough, and such populations exhibit high rates of infectious disease, malnutrition and premature death. In modern industrialized societies, malnutrition often appears related to child abuse and neglect. Organic and metabolic forms are observed but social pathology appears to be the main determinant of most malnutrition observed. Prevention and control of malnutrition requires improvement of the environment and interventions applied in a holistic manner. Emphasis should be given to education and maternal technology, and to promotion of mother-infant interactions, breast-feeding, adequate weaning procedures and detection of factors that may lead to child deprivation and abuse. Improvement is feasible for most developing nations if social forces become conscious of the needed changes, but positive elements of traditinal culture should be preserved.

  4. Screening for Malnutrition in Older People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyonnet, Sophie; Rolland, Yves

    2015-08-01

    Malnutrition risk increases with age and level of care. Despite significant medical advances, malnutrition remains a significant and highly prevalent public health problem of developed countries. Earlier identification and appropriate nutrition support may help to reverse or halt the malnutrition trajectory and the negative outcomes associated with poor nutritional status. A nutrition screening process is recommended to help detect people with protein-energy malnutrition (PEM) or at malnutrition risk. Evidence supports that oral nutritional supplements and dietary counseling can increase dietary intake and improve quality of life in elderly with PEM or at malnutrition risk. This article examines nutritional screening and assessment tools designated for older adults. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Assessment of neurodisability and malnutrition in children in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladstone, Melissa; Mallewa, Mac; Alusine Jalloh, Alhaji; Voskuijl, Wieger; Postels, Douglas; Groce, Nora; Kerac, Marko; Molyneux, Elizabeth

    2014-03-01

    Neurodevelopmental delay, neurodisability, and malnutrition interact to contribute a significant burden of disease in global settings. Assessments which are well integrated with plans of management or advice are most likely to improve outcomes. Assessment tools used in clinical research and programming to evaluate outcomes include developmental and cognitive tools that vary in complexity, sensitivity, and validity as well as the target age of assessment. Few tools have been used to measure socioemotional outcomes and fewer to assess the disabled child with malnutrition. There is a paucity of tools used clinically which actually provide families and professionals with advice to improve outcomes. Brain imaging, electroencephalography, audiology, and visual assessment can also be used to assess the effect of malnutrition on brain structure and function. The interaction of neurodisability and malnutrition is powerful, and both need to be considered when assessing children. Without an integrated approach to assessment and management, we will not support children and families to reach their best potential outcomes. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. 微型营养评价法在老年心血管疾病住院患者营养不良风险评价中的应用%Application of mini-nutritional assessment in malnutrition risk evaluation of elderly inpatient with cardiovascular disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨国莉; 赵喜兰; 黎明

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the application of the mini nutritional assessment (MNA)in the malnutrition risk eval-uation of elderly inpatients with cardiovascular disease(CVD).Methods The MNA method was adopted to detect the MNA scores in 316 elderly inpatients with CVD.The inpatient′s nutritional status was evaluated according to the MNA scores.Results Among 316 cases,52 cases(16.46%)were malnutrition,60 cases (18.99%)had the malnutrition risk and 204 cases (64.56%)were in a good nutritional status;the occurrence rate of malnutrition and malnutrition risk in the female elderly patients were higher than those in the male patients,the differences were statistically significant(P 0.05);the occurrence rate of malnutrition and malnutrition risk in the rural patients were higher than those in the patients lived in city,the differences were statistically significant(P <0.05).Conclusion Elderly inpatients with CVD have the higher prevalence of the malnutrition risk,the MNA can be applied in elderly inpatients with CVD for conduc-ting the nutritional status monitoring and early screening the malnutrition risk.%目的:探讨微型营养评价法(MNA)在老年心血管疾病(CVD)住院患者营养不良风险评价中的应用。方法运用 MNA 法测定316例老年 CVD 住院患者的 MNA 总分,根据 MNA 总分 评 估 患 者 营 养 状 况。结果营养不良组52例(16.46%),营养不良风险组60例(18.99%),营养状况良好组204例(64.56%);女性老年患者营养风险及营养不良发生率均高于男性患者,差异有统计学意义(P <0.01);高龄患者(≥80岁)营养风险及营养不良发生率均高于低龄患者(60~<80岁),但差异无统计学意义(P >0.05);农村患者营养风险及营养不良发生率均高于城镇居住患者,且差异有统计学意义(P <0.05)。结论老年 CVD 患者营养不良风险发生率较高,可在老年 CVD

  7. Prevalence Of Early Childhood Malnutrition And Influencing Factors ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    therefore, to asses the prevalence of malnutrition and the factors influencing the ... childhood malnutrition in Kabarole District and other areas in Uganda, and ..... Jitta JJ, Migadde M and J Mudusu Determinants of Malnutrition in under-fives.

  8. 慢性肾脏病患者蛋白质-能量营养不良研究进展%Advances in protein energy malnutrition in patients with chronic kidney disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    严艳; 汪年松

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of malnutrition among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) constantly increases despite the development of health care and dialysis techniques.New nutritional targets for CKD patients upon maintenance treatment have been developed.Before dialysis,evidences have shown that a long-term nutritional care plan,with a control of protein intake,can effectively correct metabolic disorders including proteinuria and acidosis.During the maintenance dialysis,the optimal protein and energy intakes have been recently challenged.The new classification of nutritional disorders in CKD patients may help the easily identification of protein-energy wasting.%尽管临床治疗水平和透析技术不断提高,但慢性肾脏病(CKD)患者营养不良的发生率仍然逐年上升.近年来,透析前和透析阶段的CKD患者营养目标领域取得一些进展.在透析前阶段,充足的证据显示限制蛋白摄入的长期营养治疗方案可有效纠正蛋白尿、酸中毒等多种代谢异常.维持性透析阶段,现有的蛋白质能量摄入的目标逐渐受到质疑.新颁布的CKD患者蛋白质一能量消耗的诊断标准将有助于医生更轻易地识别早期的蛋白质能量消耗.

  9. Can mothers safely prepare labon-gur salt-sugar solution after demonstration in a diarrhoeal hospital?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Islam, M A; Kofoed, Poul-Erik; Begum, S

    1992-01-01

    Home-based salt-sugar solution (SSS) prepared with labon (locally produced sea salt) and gur (unrefined brown sugar) has been recommended as a cheap, locally available and a simple tool to prevent and treat diarrhoeal dehydration. Preparation of labon-gur SSS is demonstrated to the patients...... and the attendants at ICDDR, Bangladesh. To evaluate performances, 150 mothers were asked to measure labon and gur by finger pinch and first method and 100 mothers measured half a seer of water to prepare labon-gur SSS, shortly after the demonstration sessions. 4.0% of the samples exceeded the upper safety limit...... this knowledge. Our study suggests that demonstration of home-based SSS in a diarrhoeal hospital may positively affect health education and that health personnel should actively participate in increasing health awareness....

  10. Socioeconomic inequality in malnutrition in developing countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Van de Poel (Ellen); A.R. Hosseinpoor (Ahmad); N. Speybroeck (Niko); T.G.M. van Ourti (Tom); J. Vega (Jeanette)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractObjective: The objectives of this study were to report on socioeconomic inequality in childhood malnutrition in the developing world, to provide evidence for an association between socioeconomic inequality and the average level of malnutrition, and to draw attention to different patterns

  11. Identifying Protein-Calorie Malnutrition Workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Susan S.; Barker, Ellen M.

    Instructional materials are provided for a workshop to enable participants to assist in identifying patients at risk with protein-calorie malnutrition and in corrrecting this nutritional deficiency. Representative topics are nutrients; protein, mineral, and vitamin sources, functions, and deficiency symptoms; malnutrition; nutritional deficiency…

  12. Malnutrition, liver damage, and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasso, P

    1981-01-01

    There is no clear indication that malnutrition, per se, is a principal cause of cancer in man, but the prevalence of liver cancer in areas where malnutrition exists supports this hypothesis. Liver damage and liver cancer have been induced in laboratory rats by diets consisting of peanut meal and proteins deficient in some essential amino acids. However, liver damage, but not cancer, was produced when the diets contained no peanut meal but consisted of a mixture of amino acids deficient in methionine and cysteine, so that it is possible that aflatoxin, a contaminant of peanut meal, may have been responsible for the malignancies seen in the earlier experiments. Liver cancer developes in a high proportion of mice allowed to feed ad libitum or given a diet containing a high proportion of fat (groundnut oil) or protein (casein). Dietary restriction reduced the incidences of this cancer. This findings lends some support to current thinking that diet may be a factor in the development of cancer in man.

  13. Nutritional assessment and screening for malnutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoist, S; Brouquet, A

    2015-08-01

    Malnutrition can be detected in up to 50% of patients with gastrointestinal cancer. Although malnutrition reflects the severity of cancer, it is important to underline that anticancer treatments including surgery likely increase the severity of malnutrition. Additionally, malnutrition is associated with an increased risk of perioperative morbidity and mortality. Nutritional assessment should be a part of pre-treatment work up of gastrointestinal cancer patients because nutritional support has been shown to limit the negative impact of malnutrition on perioperative outcome. The objective of these practice guidelines is to address the following questions regarding nutritional screening in gastrointestinal cancer patients: who should benefit from nutritional assessment, when nutritional assessment should be proposed, how nutritional assessment should be carried out and why nutritional assessment is indicated. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Decomposition of childhood malnutrition in Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunil, Thankam S; Sagna, Marguerite

    2015-10-01

    Childhood malnutrition is a major problem in developing countries, and in Cambodia, it is estimated that approximately 42% of the children are stunted, which is considered to be very high. In the present study, we examined the effects of proximate and socio-economic determinants on childhood malnutrition in Cambodia. In addition, we examined the effects of the changes in these proximate determinants on childhood malnutrition between 2000 and 2005. Our analytical approach included descriptive, logistic regression and decomposition analyses. Separate analyses are estimated for 2000 and 2005 survey. The primary component of the difference in stunting is attributable to the rates component, indicating that the decrease of stunting is due mainly to the decrease in stunting rates between 2000 and 2005. While majority of the differences in childhood malnutrition between 2000 and 2005 can be attributed to differences in the distribution of malnutrition determinants between 2000 and 2005, differences in their effects also showed some significance. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Prolonged breast feeding, diarrhoeal disease, and survival of children in Guinea-Bissau

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølbak, K; Gottschau, A; Aaby, P

    1994-01-01

    was higher in weaned children than in partially breast fed children, both in 1 year olds (relative risk 1.41; 95% confidence interval 1.23 to 1.62) and in 2 year olds (1.67; 1.29 to 2.15). The mean duration of an episode of diarrhoea was 5.3 days in breast fed children compared with 6.3 days in weaned...

  16. Evaluation of clinical, laboratory, and electrophoretic profiles for diagnosis of malnutrition in hospitalized dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei Kelliton Fabretti

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Malnutrition is a major factor associated with increased rates of mortality and readmission, longer hospital stays, and greater health care spending. Recognizing malnourished or at-risk animals allows for nutritional intervention and improved prognosis. This study evaluated the association between clinical, laboratory, and electrophoretic variables and the nutritional status (NS of hospitalized dogs in order to generate a profile of the sick dog and to facilitate the diagnosis of malnutrition. We divided 215 dogs into groups according to the severity of the underlying disease and we determined the clinical NS based on the assessment of the body condition score and the muscle mass score. The NS was classified as clinically well nourished, clinical moderate malnutrition, or clinical severe malnutrition. Statistical analyses were conducted by using the chi-square test or Fisher’s exact test; the Kruskal-Wallis test was used for continuous variables. A strong association was found between malnutrition and the severity of the underlying disease. In hospitalized dogs, low body mass index values, anemia, low hemoglobin concentrations, high fibrinogen concentrations, decreased albumin fraction, and increased gamma-globulin fraction (in electrophoresis were associated with malnutrition, reinforcing the classification of poor NS. However, the skin and coat characteristics, the total number of lymphocytes, blood glucose, cholesterol, and total protein concentration were not found to be good predictors of NS.

  17. 慢性阻塞性肺疾病稳定期营养不良与血瘀证的相关性研究%Study on the Correlation between Malnutrition and Blood-Stasis Syndrome of Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease in Stable Phase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡蔚斌; 陈兆群; 李嘉勉

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Our study aimed to investigate the relationship between Blood-Stasis syndrome and malnutrition of COPD patients in stable phase, and to provide some new evidences of TCM measure to prevent and combat the disease. Furthermore, the TCM pathological mechanisms of malnutrition in COPD patients were expected to be elucidated. Method: Data of 96 cases from out-patient or in-patient were included to be analyzed by using Chi-square test. Result: Patients of Blood-Stasis syndrome seemed to be easier in risking of malnutrition or in suffering from malnutrition. Conclusion: Blood-Stasis was the prominent TCM syndrome element of COPD in stable phase, and it played an important role in causing malnutrition. Thus, curing the Blood-Stasis syndrome is important in improving the nutritional status of COPD patients in stable phase.%目的:旨在探讨COPD稳定期营养不良与血瘀证之间的关系,进而以期进一步的阐明COPD稳定期营养不良发生的中医机制,并为防治干预COPD稳定期营养不良提供一定的依据。方法:共纳入符合标准的门诊或住院96份病例,统计其血瘀证评分及营养状态评分,并对两者做x2检验。结果:通过分析发现存在营养不良风险及存在营养不良的患者其存在血瘀证的人数要高(P<0.05),血瘀与营养不良发生存在一定的关系。结论:血瘀是影响慢性阻塞性肺疾病稳定期营养状态的重要因素,对慢性阻塞性肺疾病稳定期营养不良的治疗过程应考虑对血瘀证的干预。

  18. Burden of Malnutrition in a Tertiary Care Hospital in Baguio City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosemarie J. Dominguez

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to determine prevalence, risk factors, and prognostic impact of malnutrition. Nutritional state was assessed by Subjective Global Assessment (SGA and body mass index (BMI. Risk factors for malnutrition and effect of malnutrition on morbidity, mortality, and length of hospital stay were analyzed. Prevalence of malnutrition on admission and on discharge was 73%. Risk factors significantly associated with malnutrition were severity of primary diagnosis (odds ratio [OR] = 3.42, 95% confidence interval [CI] = [2.26, 5.18], p < .0001, age (p < .001, and presence of comorbidities (OR = 1.67, 95% CI = [1.13, 2.46], p < .013. Malnourished patients had longer hospital stay (5.1 ± 4.9 days, p < .0001 and higher risk of dying (OR = 6.38, 95% CI = [1.14, 135.80], p < .030, and were more likely to be confined for more than 7 days (OR = 4.20, 95% CI = [1.89, 9.34], p < .001. The study concludes that malnutrition is prevalent on admission and discharge. Malnourished patients are older, suffer more serious disease, and have comorbidities. Complications risk is higher if malnourished.

  19. The prevalence of malnutrition and its related factors among the elderly of Bojnourd, 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyyed Hamid Nabavi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nutrition plays a very important role in the health and disease of the elderly, and malnutrition is an obstacle to increasing the quality of life of the elderly. This study was conducted to assess malnutrition and its related factors among the elderly of Bojnourd in 2014. Methods: This study was descriptive cross-sectional. The study population included all the elderly of Bojnourd, among whom 120 elderly were recruited by cluster sampling method. Data were collected using interviews, observation and questionnaires by referring to the homes, hospitals and elderly care centers. In this study, Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA was used. Data analysis was performed by chi-square test. Results: The mean age of elderly was 71.73±9.70 years. 56.7% of the samples were men and 43.3% were women. 30% of the elderly had a good nutrition, 62.2% of them were at the risk of the malnutrition and 7.5% were malnourished. The results showed that mal malnutrition significantly more seen in female gender, low level of education, smoking single status, staying in nursing home than those hospitalized or are active in community, but no significant difference was reported between age and socioeconomic status. Conclusion: Given the high prevalence of malnutrition in the elderly, and possibility of malnutrition among the elderly, further attempts are required to be made to improve the quality of life and to reduce illness and disability in this population.

  20. The immune system in children with malnutrition--a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maren Johanne Heilskov Rytter

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Malnourished children have increased risk of dying, with most deaths caused by infectious diseases. One mechanism behind this may be impaired immune function. However, this immune deficiency of malnutrition has not previously been systematically reviewed. OBJECTIVES: To review the scientific literature about immune function in children with malnutrition. METHODS: A systematic literature search was done in PubMed, and additional articles identified in reference lists and by correspondence with experts in the field. The inclusion criteria were studies investigating immune parameters in children aged 1-60 months, in relation to malnutrition, defined as wasting, underweight, stunting, or oedematous malnutrition. RESULTS: The literature search yielded 3402 articles, of which 245 met the inclusion criteria. Most were published between 1970 and 1990, and only 33 after 2003. Malnutrition is associated with impaired gut-barrier function, reduced exocrine secretion of protective substances, and low levels of plasma complement. Lymphatic tissue, particularly the thymus, undergoes atrophy, and delayed-type hypersensitivity responses are reduced. Levels of antibodies produced after vaccination are reduced in severely malnourished children, but intact in moderate malnutrition. Cytokine patterns are skewed towards a Th2-response. Other immune parameters seem intact or elevated: leukocyte and lymphocyte counts are unaffected, and levels of immunoglobulins, particularly immunoglobulin A, are high. The acute phase response appears intact, and sometimes present in the absence of clinical infection. Limitations to the studies include their observational and often cross-sectional design and frequent confounding by infections in the children studied. CONCLUSION: The immunological alterations associated with malnutrition in children may contribute to increased mortality. However, the underlying mechanisms are still inadequately understood, as well as why

  1. Malnutrition risk predicts surgical outcomes in patients undergoing gastrointestinal operations: Results of a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Judy W C; Wu, Arthur H W; Lee, Michelle W K; Lau, So-ying; Lam, Pui-shan; Lau, Wai-shan; Kwok, Sam S S; Kwan, Rosa Y H; Lam, Cheuk-fan; Tam, Chun-kit; Lee, Suk-on

    2015-08-01

    Patients undergoing gastrointestinal operations are at risk of malnutrition which may increase the chance of adverse surgical outcomes. This prospective study aimed at correlating nutritional status of patients having gastrointestinal operations with their short-term surgical outcomes captured by a territory-wide Surgical Outcomes Monitoring and Improvement Program. The preoperative malnutrition risk of Chinese adult patients undergoing elective/emergency ultra-major/major gastrointestinal operations in two surgical departments over a 12-month period were assessed by Chinese version of Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool. Their perioperative risk factors and clinical outcomes, including length of hospital stay, mortality and morbidity, were retrieved from the above mentioned program. Correlation of malnutrition risk with clinical outcomes was assessed by logistic regression analysis after controlling for known confounders. 943 patients (58% male; mean age 65.9 ± 14.8 years) underwent gastrointestinal operations (40.3% emergency operation; 52.7% ultra-major procedures; 66.9% bowel resections) had analyzable data. 15.8% and 17.1% of patients were at medium and high risk of malnutrition, respectively. Malnutrition risk score according to the screening tool was an independent predictor of length of hospital stay, 30-day mortality, 60-day mortality and minor medical complications. Similar correlations were found for various sub-scores of malnutrition risk. Weight loss sub-score was predictive of 30-day mortality, 60-day mortality and minor medical complications. Body mass index was predictive of mortality (30- and 60- day) whereas the acute disease sub-score was predictive of length of hospital stay. Preoperative malnutrition was an important predictor of poor clinical outcomes in patients undergoing gastrointestinal operations in Hong Kong. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  2. [Hospital malnutrition: relation between the hospital length of stay and the rate of early readmissions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo Támer, Gabriela; Ruiz López, María Dolores; Pérez de la Cruz, Antonio Jesús

    2009-03-21

    In hospitalized patients, malnutrition ranges between 30% and 55% and is associated with a higher rate of complications, prolonged hospitalization and increased cost of health services. Despite this, there is no awareness of the clinical and economic implications involving hospital malnutrition and its treatment. We analyzed the relationship between hospital malnutrition, average length of stay and early readmissions. It is a prospective and dynamic cohort study, in which patients were observed from the time of their admission and throughout their hospitalization on a weekly basis. The selection was carried out using a systematic random method. Patients were all older than 18 and admitted to the services with an average stay 5 days. It was decided that a patient had malnutrition when some anthropometric (biceps circumference, tricipital, abdominal and subscapular skinfold thickness) or biochemical (albumin, prealbumin, and transferrin) parameter was below normal values. Early readmission was defined as a patient's return to hospital in a period standard deviation (X +/- SD) and frequency (%). Intergroup comparisons by Student's t test and chi(2), remain significant to P risk and confidence intervals (CI) were applied to malnourished cohorts, with a significance level of 95%. The study included 817 patients (50.9 +/- 18.5 years), 62.9% men and 37.1% women. 45.9% (n = 375) of patients were malnourished, and malnutrition was most common in those with digestive diseases (22.5%), neoplasm (20.8%), circulatory (16.5%) and respiratory pathologies (11.6%). The average stay (hospital and services) and the premature readmission rate were higher in patients admitted to hospital with malnutrition. Nearly half of the patients presented some degree of malnutrition when they were admitted, increasing hospital stay and premature readmission rate. The high prevalence and incidence of malnutrition requires suggestions to develop mechanisms to determine its real scope and programs to

  3. Malnutrition and vaccination in developing countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prendergast, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    Malnutrition contributes to an estimated 45% of deaths among children under 5 years of age in developing countries, predominantly due to infections. Malnourished children therefore stand to benefit hugely from vaccination, but malnutrition has been described as the most common immunodeficiency globally, suggesting that they may not be able to respond effectively to vaccines. The immunology of malnutrition remains poorly characterized, but is associated with impairments in mucosal barrier integrity, and innate and adaptive immune dysfunction. Despite this, the majority of malnourished children can mount a protective immune response following vaccination, although the timing, quality and duration of responses may be impaired. This paper reviews the evidence for vaccine immunogenicity in malnourished children, discusses the importance of vaccination in prevention of malnutrition and highlights evidence gaps in our current knowledge. PMID:25964453

  4. Malnutrition and associated factors in elderly hospitalized.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara-Pulido, A; Guevara-Cruz, M

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the frequency of malnutrition and associated factors in patients over 65 years of age in a hospital. We conducted an observational, crosssectional and descriptive study. Department of Nutritional Support, Hospital Medica Sur, Mexico, we evaluated patients over 65 years of age within the first 24 hours of admission. We evaluated 769 patients, 49% of whom were women and 51% were men, with an average age of 75.3 ± 7.7 years. Among the patients evaluated, 53.6% exhibited an altered nutritional state. In addition, 9% were diagnosed as obese and 15% as overweight. Their risk of malnutrition was determined to be 22.5%, and at the time of admission, 7% were malnourished. The prevalence of malnutrition in hospitalized patients over 65 years of age was high. Thus, the early diagnosis of patients who are at risk for malnutrition or who are malnourished is essential and allows for prompt treatment.

  5. New Mexico Campaigns Against Hunger and Malnutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubin, Shami

    1972-01-01

    Describes the nutritional needs of individuals in New Mexico, and the efforts of the Nutrition Improvement Program (NIP) of the University of New Mexico School of Medicine at Albuquerque to remove hunger and malnutrition. (DM)

  6. Malnutrition in Patients with Acute Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stella D. Bouziana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is a devastating event that carries a potential for long-term disability. Malnutrition is frequently observed in patients with stroke, and dysphagia contributes to malnutrition risk. During both the acute phase of stroke and rehabilitation, specific nutritional interventions in the context of a multidisciplinary team effort can enhance the recovery of neurocognitive function. Early identification and management of malnutrition with dietary modifications or specific therapeutic strategies to ensure adequate nutritional intake should receive more attention, since poor nutritional status appears to exacerbate brain damage and to contribute to adverse outcome. The main purpose of nutritional intervention should be the prevention or treatment of complications resulting from energy-protein deficit. This paper reviews the evaluation and management of malnutrition and the use of specialized nutrition support in patients with stroke. Emphasis is given to enteral tube and oral feeding and to strategies to wean from tube feeding.

  7. Malnutrition in Patients with Acute Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouziana, Stella D.; Tziomalos, Konstantinos

    2011-01-01

    Stroke is a devastating event that carries a potential for long-term disability. Malnutrition is frequently observed in patients with stroke, and dysphagia contributes to malnutrition risk. During both the acute phase of stroke and rehabilitation, specific nutritional interventions in the context of a multidisciplinary team effort can enhance the recovery of neurocognitive function. Early identification and management of malnutrition with dietary modifications or specific therapeutic strategies to ensure adequate nutritional intake should receive more attention, since poor nutritional status appears to exacerbate brain damage and to contribute to adverse outcome. The main purpose of nutritional intervention should be the prevention or treatment of complications resulting from energy-protein deficit. This paper reviews the evaluation and management of malnutrition and the use of specialized nutrition support in patients with stroke. Emphasis is given to enteral tube and oral feeding and to strategies to wean from tube feeding. PMID:22254136

  8. Serum analyte levels in children: relationship with malnutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noreen Samad

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Malnutrition is the cellular imbalancing among the supply of energy and nutrients which are essential for maintenance, growth and particular functions. It becomes a major cause of mortality of children less than five years of age. The aim of present study to evaluate the serum analytes such as electrolyte (sodium (Na+, potassium (K+ and calcium (Ca+, creatinine and blood components in malnourished than healthy children. We had collected the data of 300 malnourished children (100 marasmus, 100 kwashiorkorand, 100 healthy children with age 6-36 months from Children complex Hospital Multan, Pakistan. Data was analyzed by Paired sample t-test by SPSS software. Then socio-demographic data of their mothers was also collected. The result showed that level of Na+ and creatinine was high whereas, the levels of K+ and Ca+ were lower in both Marasmus and Kwashiorkor than control subjects. The levels of leukocytes, platelets and hemoglobin (Hb were decreased in both diseases. Erythrocytes (RBCs level was decreased in Marasmus while increased in Kwashiorkor. It is concluded that inadequate feeding practices, birth order, poverty, illiterate mothers, low nutritional quality of meals responsible for malnutrition. Feasible strategies are needed to address the dietary inadequacies and chronic malnutrition of rural infants.

  9. Prevalence of malnutrition in various political, economic, and geographic settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klek, Stanislaw; Krznaric, Zeljko; Gundogdu, Riza Haldun; Chourdakis, Michael; Kekstas, Gintautas; Jakobson, Triin; Paluszkiewicz, Piotr; Vranesic Bender, Darija; Uyar, Mehmet; Demirag, Kubilay; Poulia, Kalliopi Anna; Klimasauskas, Andrius; Starkopf, Joel; Galas, Aleksander

    2015-02-01

    Disease-related malnutrition (DRM) represents a critical public health concern. Therefore, Fight Against Malnutrition (FAM) should be a state priority, but the degree to which this is true appears to differ considerably among European countries. The aim of this study was to put the problem into perspective by comparing the prevalence of malnutrition in countries from opposite parts of the continent. Six countries-Croatia, Estonia, Greece, Lithuania, Poland, and Turkey-participated in the study. A short questionnaire was used to assess DRM: its prevalence, the current situation in hospitals, regulations for reimbursement, and general healthcare circumstances. Data from ESPEN's NutritionDay 2006 were used to broaden the perspective. At admission in October 2012, 4068 patients were assessed. The study was performed in 160 hospitals and 225 units with 9143 beds. The highest proportions of patients with 3 or more points on the Nutritional Risk Screening 2002 were observed in Estonia (80.4%) and Turkey (39.4%), whereas the lowest were in Lithuania (14.2%). The provision of nutrition support was best in Turkey (39.4% required intervention, 34.4% received intervention) and Poland (21.9% and 27.8%, respectively). Nutrition support teams (NSTs) are active in some countries, whereas in others they virtually do not exist. The prevalence of malnutrition was quite high in some countries, and the nutrition approach differed among them. It could be the result of the lack of reimbursement, inactive or nonexistent NSTs, and low nutrition awareness. Those facts confirmed that the continuation of FAM activities is necessary. © 2013 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  10. Malnutrition-Inflammation Score in Hemodialysis Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Behrooz Ebrahimzadehkor; Atamohammad Dorri; Abdolhamed Yapan-Gharavi

    2014-01-01

    Background: Malnutrition is a prevalent complication in patients on maintenance hemodialysis. Malnutrition-inflammation score (MIS), comprehensive nutritional assessment tool, as the reference standard was used to examine protein-energy wasting (PEW) and inflammation in hemodialysis patients. Materials and Methods: In this descriptive- analytical study, 48 hemodialysis patients were selected with random sampling. All the patients were interviewed and the MIS of the patients was recorded. T...

  11. Malnutrition prevalence in hospitalized elderly diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Sanz París

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background & aims: Malnutrition prevalence is unknown among elderly patients with diabetes mellitus. Our objectives were to determine malnutrition prevalence in elderly in patients with diabetes, and to describe their impact on prognosis. Methods: An observational multicenter study was conducted in 35 Spanish hospitals. Malnutrition was assessed with the Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA tool. Patients were followed until discharge. Results: 1,090 subjects were included (78 ± 7.1 years; 50% males. 39.1% had risk of malnutrition, and 21.2% malnutrition. A 15.5% of the malnourished subjects and 31.9 % of those at risk had a BMI ≥ 30 kg/m². In multivariate analysis, female gender (OR = 1.38; 95% CI: 1.19-1.11, age (OR = 1.04; 95% CI: 1.02-1.06 and presence of diabetic complications (OR = 1.97; 95% CI: 1.52-2.56 were associated with malnutrition. Length of stay (LOS was longer in at-risk and malnourished patients than in well-nourished (12.7 ± 9.9 and 15.7 ± 12.8 days vs 10.7 ± 9.9 days; p < 0.0001. After adjustment by age and gender, MNA score (OR = 0.895; 95% CI 0.814-0.985 and albumin (OR = 0.441; 95% CI 0.212-0.915 were associated with mortality. MNA score was associated with the probability of home discharge (OR = 1.150; 95% CI 1.084-1.219. Conclusion: A high prevalence of malnutrition among elderly in patients with diabetes was observed, regardless of BMI. Malnutrition, albumin, and MNA score were related to LOS, mortality and home discharge.

  12. Socioeconomic inequalities of child malnutrition in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Pulok, Mohammad Habibullah; Sabah, Md Nasim-Us Sabah; Enemark, Ulrika

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: This study investigates how socioeconomic status and demographic factors determine child malnutrition as well as how these determinants account for socioeconomic inequality in child malnutrition during the period of 2007-2011 in Bangladesh. Methods: The dataset of this study originates from two cross sectional rounds (2007 and 2011) of the Bangladesh Demographic and Health Survey (BDHS). We use standard ordinary least square (OLS) models to estimate the determinants of chi...

  13. Ineffective breathing pattern related to malnutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Openbrier, D R; Covey, M

    1987-03-01

    This article has highlighted the problem of malnutrition in the stable COPD patient and the critically ill, hypercatabolic patient, and has reviewed resultant mechanisms which influence the alteration of breathing pattern. These complex patients present a challenge for the nurse. Table 1 briefly summarizes the manifestations of malnutrition, goals, interventions and expected outcomes of the nursing diagnosis, ineffective breathing pattern related to malnutrition. The goal of the interventions is to modify the cause (malnutrition) of the nursing diagnosis (altered breathing pattern). The success of the interventions will lead to the achievement of expected outcome As expected outcomes are achieved, relief of signs and symptoms related to the nursing diagnosis will occur. The nurse caring for the patient with actual or potential malnutrition must be knowledgeable about the physiology of malnutrition and effect on breathing pattern. It is essential that the nurse assess and provide appropriate nutritional support and evaluate progress toward expected outcomes. In the event that expected outcomes are not achieved, reassessment with modification of interventions is necessary. Nurses play a key role in the total health care delivery to these complex patients. Further study will strengthen the research base of nursing interventions.

  14. Cirrhosis and malnutrition: assessment and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verslype, C; Cassiman, D

    2010-01-01

    Malnutrition, characterized by protein and energy deficiency, is considered the most prevalent complication of liver disease. The pathofysiology includes reduced food intake, maldigestion and malabsorption but also avoidable iatrogenic factors, such as prescribed fasting, frequent paracenteses and "liver-diets" poor in fat and protein. Liver insufficiency corresponds to a state of accelerated starvation. The diminished glucose tolerance and low glycogen stores in cirrhotic patients result in a reduced availability of glucose as energy source. The prevalence of undernutrition depends upon the severity of the liver insufficiency and the method of nutritional assessment. The aim of the nutritional plan is to realize a sufficient oral diet which includes enough proteins and calories. Several extra calorie supplements are indicated to surmount the lack of available glucose. The evidence in support of branched chain amino acid supplements is limited. Salt intake should be moderately restricted in case of ascites. Nasogastric tube feeding is indicated when patients are unable to maintain an adequate oral intake. In case tube feeding is not possible, total parenteral nutrition may be necessary to maintain an anabolic state.

  15. Anemia in severe acute malnutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Neha; Chandra, Jagdish; Pemde, Harish; Singh, Varinder

    2014-04-01

    India has the highest prevalence of severe acute malnutrition (SAM). Severe anemia is one of the comorbidities responsible for increased mortality in severely malnourished children, yet it has not received the attention it should. The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence and type of anemia and to evaluate the possible etiologies for severe anemia, in these children. A cross-sectional study of patients with SAM in a tertiary care hospital in northern India over a period of 12 mo from Sept. 1, 2010 to Aug. 31, 2011 was conducted. We observed the prevalence of severe anemia (hemoglobin anemia, number of patients requiring blood transfusion, hematologic profile of mothers, nature of feeding, duration of exclusive breastfeeding, and the demographic profile of these patients. Included in the study were 131 cases of SAM. The age group varied between 6 and to 59 mo. Of patients with SAM, 67.3% had severe anemia; 13.8% had moderate anemia. Of these patients, 25% required packed red blood cell transfusion. The most common type of anemia was microcytic (38.6%) followed by megaloblastic (30.5%). A high incidence of severe anemia in SAM with a large proportion (25%) requiring blood transfusion is a pointer toward nutritional anemia being a very common comorbidity of SAM requiring hospital admission. Because megaloblastic anemia closely followed microcytic anemia, supplementation with vitamin B12 in addition to iron and folic acid would be recommended. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Severity of diarrhea and malnutrition among under five-year-old children in rural Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferdous, Farzana; Das, Sumon K; Ahmed, Shahnawaz; Farzana, Fahmida D; Latham, Jonathan R; Chisti, Mohammod J; Ud-Din, Abu I M S; Azmi, Ishrat J; Talukder, Kaisar A; Faruque, Abu S G

    2013-08-01

    Enteric pathogens are commonly associated with diarrhea among malnourished children. This study aimed to determine the association between the severity of diarrheal illnesses and malnutrition among under 5-year-old children. During 2010 and 2011, we studied 2,324 under 5-year-old diarrheal children with mild disease (MD) and moderate-to-severe disease (MSD) attending a hospital in Bangladesh. Children with MSD were more likely to be malnourished compared with children with MD (35% versus 24%, P household income (1.71 [1.42, 2.07]). Childhood malnutrition was associated with dysentery and dehydrating diarrhea.

  17. Phase II trial of isotonic fluid resuscitation in Kenyan children with severe malnutrition and hypovolaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boga Mwanamvua

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Children with severe malnutrition who develop shock have a high mortality. Contrary to contemporaneous paediatric practice, current guidelines recommend use of low dose hypotonic fluid resuscitation (half-strength Darrows/5% dextrose (HSD/5D. We evaluated the safety and efficacy of this guideline compared to resuscitation with a standard isotonic solution. Methods A Phase II randomised controlled, safety and efficacy trial in Kenyan children aged over 6 months with severe malnutrition and shock including children with severe dehydration/shock and presumptive septic shock (non-diarrhoeal shock. Eligible children were randomised to HSD/5D or Ringer's Lactate (RL. A maximum of two boluses of 15 ml/kg of HSD/5D were given over two hours (as recommended by guidelines while those randomised to RL received 10 ml/kg aliquots half hourly (maximum 40 ml/kg. Primary endpoint was resolution of shock at 8 and 24 hours. Secondary outcomes included resolution of acidosis, adverse events and mortality. Results 61 children were enrolled: 41 had shock and severe dehydrating diarrhoea, 20 had presumptive septic shock; 69% had decompensated shock. By 8 hours response to volume resuscitation was poor with shock persisting in most children:-HSD/5D 15/22 (68% and RL14/25 (52%, p = 0.39. Oliguria was more prevalent at 8 hours in the HSD/5D group, 9/22 (41%, compared to RL-3/25 (12%, p = 0.02. Mortality was high, HSD/5D-15/26(58% and RL 13/29(45%; p = 0.42. Most deaths occurred within 48 hours of admission. Neither pulmonary oedema nor cardiogenic failure was detected. Conclusions Outcome was universally poor characterised by persistence of shock, oliguria and high case fatality. Isotonic fluid was associated with modest improvement in shock and survival when compared to HSD/5D but inconclusive due to the limitations of design and effectiveness of either resuscitation strategy. Although isotonic fluid resuscitation did not result in cardiogenic heart

  18. Malnutrition as a Precursor of Pressure Ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litchford, Mary D; Dorner, Becky; Posthauer, Mary Ellen

    2014-01-01

    Significance: Numerous studies have reported associations between declining nutrition status and risk for pressure ulcers. Oral eating problems, weight loss, low body weight, undernutrition, and malnutrition are associated with an increased risk for pressure ulcers. Moreover, inadequate nutrient intake and low body weight are associated with slow and nonhealing wounds. However, the biologic significance of deterioration in nutrition status and consistent methodologies to quantify malnutrition and diminished micronutrient stores as predictors of skin breakdown remains controversial. Recent Advances: The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (Academy) and the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (ASPEN) Consensus Statement: Characteristics Recommended for the Identification and Documentation of Adult Malnutrition provide a standardized and measureable set of criterion for all health professionals to use to identify malnutrition. The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality identified malnutrition as one of the common geriatric syndromes associated with increased risk for institutionalization and mortality that may be impacted by primary and secondary preventions. Critical Issues: The purpose of this article is to examine the Academy/ASPEN consensus statement on characteristics of adult malnutrition in the context of the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel (NPUAP)/European Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel (EPUAP) Guidelines on the Prevention and Treatment of Pressure Ulcers. Future Directions: Moreover, clinicians, and in particular, registered dietitians have the opportunity to integrate the Characteristics of Malnutrition with the NPUAP/EPUAP 2009 Prevention and Treatment Clinical Practice Guidelines, into clinical assessment and documentation using the Nutrition Care Process. Consensus guidelines will provide consistent research criteria yielding more useful data than presently available.

  19. Malnutrition in cardiac surgery: food for thought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chermesh, Irit; Hajos, Jonathan; Mashiach, Tatiana; Bozhko, Masha; Shani, Liran; Nir, Rony-Reuven; Bolotin, Gil

    2014-04-01

    Undernourished patients treated in general surgery departments suffer from prolonged and complicated hospitalizations, and higher mortality rates compared with well nourished patients. Pivotal information regarding patients' nutritional status and its effect on clinical outcome is lacking for cardiac surgery patients. We investigated the prevalence of malnutrition risk and its association with 30-day hospital mortality and postoperative complications. Four hundred and three patients who underwent cardiac surgery during 2008 and were screened with the Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool (MUST) on admission were enrolled. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses compared the association of high and low risk for malnutrition with length of hospitalization (LOS), in-hospital and 30-day mortality, and postoperative complications. Almost 20% of the patients were found to be at high risk for malnutrition. Univariate analyses revealed higher in-hospital mortality rates (p = 0.03) and greater incidence of LOS and antibiotic treatment longer than 21 days (p = 0.002 and p = 0.04, respectively), vasopressor treatment longer than 11 days (p = 0.02), and positive blood cultures (p = 0.02) in patients belonging to the high-risk MUST group. Incorporation of the MUST in a multivariate model with the European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation (EuroSCORE) significantly improved postoperative complications prediction, as well as in-hospital and 30-day mortality, compared with the EuroSCORE alone. Malnutrition is prevalent in patients undergoing cardiac surgery, associated with higher postoperative mortality and morbidity. Preoperative MUST screening has emerged as highly relevant for enabling early diagnosis of patients at malnutrition risk, predicting postoperative mortality and morbidity, thus promoting well timed treatment. Prospective studies are needed to explore whether intervention can decrease malnutrition risk.

  20. Hospital Malnutrition Related to Fasting and Underfeeding: Is It an Ethical Issue?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenas Moya, Diego; Plascencia Gaitán, Alejandra; Ornelas Camacho, Denisse; Arenas Márquez, Humberto

    2016-06-01

    Hospital malnutrition is a relevant clinical issue present in about 50% of patients that is associated with increased morbidity, mortality, and cost of care. Because of the relation of malnutrition with chronic and acute inflammatory processes secondary to disease, nutrition therapy is considered an important medical treatment. However, there is little discussion about the impact of another critical issue related to hospital malnutrition, that is, lack of appropriate food or nutrition therapy given to the patients. Unnecessary fasting practices and the use of inappropriate nutrition prescriptions result in underfeeding that can be a related or direct cause of hospital malnutrition, independent of disease or inflammatory state. Suboptimal prescription of oral, enteral, and parenteral nutrition should be analyzed and discussed from an ethical perspective since this practice has the potential to harm patients. In addition, absence or inadequate provision of nutrition may present barriers for improved patient outcomes and could be prevented by simply recognizing lack of knowledge, skills, or experience in nutrition and entrusting nutrition prescription to interdisciplinary teams with clinicians well prepared in nutrition sciences. This article reviews potential barriers to the prevention or treatment of hospital malnutrition and proposes specific actions that can help clinicians to overcome and implement optimal nutrition not just as medical therapy but also as a basic comfort care that may help patients nutritionally, clinically, physically, and emotionally. © 2016 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  1. The effect of loneliness on malnutrition in elderly population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramic, Enisa; Pranjic, Nurka; Batic-Mujanovic, Olivera; Karic, Enisa; Alibasic, Esad; Alic, Alma

    2011-01-01

    The clinical and epidemiological data show that proper nutrition plays an important role in maintaining health and combating the danger of developing some chronic diseases in the elderly population. Nutrition is an important factor in many physiological and pathological changes that accompany the aging process. More than 50% of elderly patients are suffering from malnutrition which is information that concerns. Due to various factors, older people are potentially vulnerable groups at risk of malnutrition. Loneliness, isolation from society and neglect of parents by children is a big problem to many people in old age. To determine differences in nutritional status of elderly people living alone compared to those who live in family surroundings. The study was conducted in the municipality of Tuzla in 2009-2010, in outpatient family medicine Simin Han. The survey covered a total of 200 elderly subjects (age >65 years). Subject group consisted of 45% of people living alone, and 55% control group consisted of elderly patients who live in traditional family surroundings. Questionnaires used in this study are General geriatric assessment questionnaire and Mini nutritional status. The average age (+/- SD) was 75.4 +/- 6.2 years in subject group, while the same in the control group was 74.9 +/- 5.6 years. In subject group significantly more patients are on the verge of poverty. There are significant differences in the classification of financial status, according to the groups (p = 0.043). Members of subject groups have significantly lower BMI categories (p = 0.03) compared with the control group. In our study, people who live alone are at increased risk of malnutrition (p = 0030), have reduced the number of daily meals, significantly lower daily intake of protein, fruits and vegetables in the diet in relation to persons living in a family environment. Significantly more patients with loss of appetite live alone. According to the existence of self-reported food problems

  2. Prevalence and characteristics associated with malnutrition at hospitalization among patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in Brazil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carine S Andrade

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Brazil's National STD/AIDS Program is considered a model of success worldwide. However, AIDS-associated malnutrition continues in subgroups of Brazilian patients despite access to free highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART. We aimed to identify the prevalence of malnutrition and associated factors among patients hospitalized with AIDS. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional nutritional assessment among 127 adults hospitalized with AIDS in Brazil's third largest city. Using anthropometric measurements, we determined the prevalence of malnutrition (body mass index <18.5 kg/m2 at hospitalization. Prevalence ratios of malnutrition by demographic, socioeconomic, and clinical conditions were estimated using log-binomial regression. RESULTS: One-third of participants were first informed of their HIV disease during the current hospitalization and recent treatment interruption was common (71% among those on HAART. Forty-three percent were malnourished and 35% had severe weight loss at admission. Patient characteristics independently associated with malnutrition were older age (2% increased prevalence for each year; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0-4% and very low daily per capita household income. Living on malnutrition by 2.01 (95% CI 1.06-3.81, 1.75 (95% CI 0.92-3.35 and 1.42 (95% CI 0.76-2.65 times, respectively, compared to ≥USD 10.00 per day. Chronic diarrhea was marginally associated with malnutrition (RR 1.42; 95% CI 0.99-2.04. Overall, 16% of the patients died during hospitalization. We observed a trend toward higher in-hospital case fatality among malnourished patients (22% vs. 12% for patients with and without malnutrition, respectively; chi square P = 0.14. CONCLUSIONS: Unacceptably high rates of malnutrition persist in Brazilians hospitalized with AIDS and our results reinforce the importance of nutritional evaluations in these patients. Improved

  3. Malnutrition affects quality of life in gastroenterology patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kristina Norman; Henriette Kirchner; Herbert Lochs; Matthias Pirlich

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the association between malnutrition and quality of life in patients with benign gastrointestinal disease.METHODS: Two hundred patients (104 wellnourished and 96 malnourished) were assessed according to the Subjective Global Assessment, anthropometric measurements and bioelectrical impedance analysis. Quality of life was determined with the validated Medical Outcomes Study 36-item Short-Form General Health Survey (SF 36). Muscle function was assessed by hand grip strength and peak flow.RESULTS: Body mass index, body cell mass, arm muscle area and hand grip strength were significantly lower in the malnourished patients. Quality of life was generally lower when compared to norm values. Seven out of eight quality of life scales (excluding bodily pain) were significantly reduced in the malnourished patients. Comparing patients with liver cirrhosis and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), patients with IBD experienced significantly lower values in the perception of bodily pain, social functioning and mental health. Malnourished liver cirrhotics suffered reductions in more scales (six out of eight) than malnourished IBD patients did (four out of eight).CONCLUSION: Quality of life is generally low in benign gastrointestinal disease and is further reduced in patients who are classified as malnourished. It appears that liver cirrhosis patients experience a higher quality of life than IBD patients do, but the impact of malnutrition seems to be greater in liver cirrhosis than in IBD.

  4. Evaluation of malnutrition in orthopaedic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Michael Brian; Yi, Paul Hyunsoo; Thomas, Charlotte F; Garcia, Jane; Della Valle, Craig J

    2014-03-01

    Malnutrition can increase the risk of surgical site infection in both elective spine surgery and total joint arthroplasty. Obesity and diabetes are common comorbid conditions in patients who are malnourished. Despite the relatively high incidence of nutritional disorders among patients undergoing elective orthopaedic surgery, the evaluation and management of malnutrition is not generally well understood by practicing orthopaedic surgeons. Serologic parameters such as total lymphocyte count, albumin level, prealbumin level, and transferrin level have all been used as markers for nutrition status. In addition, anthropometric measurements, such as calf and arm muscle circumference or triceps skinfold, and standardized scoring systems, such as the Rainey-MacDonald nutritional index, the Mini Nutritional Assessment, and institution-specific nutritional scoring tools, are useful to define malnutrition. Preoperative nutrition assessment and optimization of nutritional parameters, including tight glucose control, normalization of serum albumin, and safe weight loss, may reduce the risk of perioperative complications, including infection.

  5. Prevalence of malnutrition in general surgical patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoun, J P; Baroudi, J; Geahchan, N

    1993-01-01

    The possibility of protein-calorie malnutrition (PCM) was studied on one hundred consecutive patients admitted to the department of surgery at the Saint Georges Hospital, Beirut, during the months of April and June 1991, regardless of age, sex and socio-economic status. Data was completed on 94 of those cases. Multiple parameters were studied, including measurements of triceps and subscapular skinfold thickness, mid-arm muscle circumference, percent weight loss, creatinine height index, serum albumin and transferrin levels and total lymphocyte count. We found a prevalence of 81%, 65%, 53% and 31% of PCM, if one, two, three or at least four abnormal parameters are used respectively, to assess malnutrition. Defining malnutrition as the presence of at least three abnormal parameters, we conclude that 53% of the patients, on admission to the department of surgery, had evidence of PCM. Further studies are required to assess the impact of this prevalence on length of stay, morbidity and mortality.

  6. Crusade against Malnutrition: Nutrition Education Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elizabeth, K E

    2016-03-01

    A holistic approach in assessment and plan for intervention in childhood malnutrition is the need of the hour. This is in the context of nutrition education program (NEP), undertaken under the National IAP action plan, 2015. In the crusade against malnutrition, an ABCDEFQ assessment scale is recommended, with aspects covering anthropometric, biochemical, clinical, dietary, ecological/epidemiological, functional parameters and quality of life. In the dietary assessment, a scoring system based on the ten interventions related to infant and young child feeding (IYCF) practices recommended by UNICEF and the food frequency table score are incorporated. In the evaluation of quality of life and plan for intervention, a tool called IMPACT (IAP Malnutrition Proactive Assessment: A Comprehensive Tool) is proposed.

  7. Malnutrition among children in Southern Ethiopia: Levels and risk ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Malnutrition among children in Southern Ethiopia: Levels and risk factors. ... Ethiopian Journal of Health Development ... Both bivariate and multivariate techniques were employed in order to identify risk factors of child malnutrition. The results ...

  8. Malnutrition treatment to become a core competency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, Claire; Ashworth, Ann; Annan, Reginald; Jackson, Alan A

    2012-05-01

    The International Pediatric Association has resolved that the identification and treatment of severe malnutrition should be a core competency for paediatricians and related health professionals worldwide. The Resolution is in response to the urgent need to reduce deaths and disability among young children. The Resolution has implications for the training of doctors, nurses and other health workers as current curricula are often insufficient to confer competency. Results of a survey of national paediatric societies suggest that training institutions need assistance in teaching about malnutrition treatment. Formation of national multidisciplinary teams for advocacy, strategic planning and action are proposed and it is anticipated that paediatricians will play a major role.

  9. Chronic Malnutrition Among Infants of Varanasi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nanda S

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Research question: What is the nutritional status of infants in Varanasi? Objectives: To find out the magnitude of PEM among infants of Varanasi district. Study design: Cross-sectional. Setting: Urban slum and rural areas. Participants: 360 infants. Study variables: Age, height (length, weight. Outcome variables: Protein Energy Malnutrition. Statistical analysis: Simple proportions; Chi- square test. Results: As per the height for age criteria; only 10.56% of infants were stunted (<90% of reference standard and according to Seoane Latham classification; 44.96%, 6.05% and 4.03% were suffering from acute malnutrition and nutritional dwarfing respectively (90% of reference standard as entry point

  10. Malnutrition needs identifying in the community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, Carolyn

    A recent survey found that in the UK, more than one in three adults are malnourished on admission to hospital or care homes, and one in five are malnourished on admission to mental health units. The Nutrition Screening Week report supported by the British Association of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition was conducted to establish the prevalence of malnutrition in the UK. Data was collected from hospitals, care homes and mental health units. Empowering healthcare staff to recognise existing skills they have in this area and ensuring reporting mechanisms are used and followed up may help to tackle malnutrition in individuals.

  11. Malnutrition in rectal cancer patients receiving preoperative chemoradiotherapy is common and associated with treatment tolerability and anastomotic leakage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamano, Tomoki; Yoshimura, Mie; Kobayashi, Masayoshi; Beppu, Naohito; Hamanaka, Michiko; Babaya, Akihito; Tsukamoto, Kiyoshi; Noda, Masafumi; Matsubara, Nagahide; Tomita, Naohiro

    2016-04-01

    This study assessed the incidence of malnutrition caused by preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in rectal cancer patients, which is seemingly underestimated; however, malnutrition affects treatment tolerability, postoperative complications, including anastomotic leakage (AL), and oncological outcomes. Between January 2008 and December 2014, 54 consecutive patients with T3-4, N0-2, M0-1 resectable rectal cancer received CRT comprising 45 Gy radiotherapy and S-1 alone or with irinotecan for 5 weeks and then underwent curative surgery with diverting or permanent stomas 6-8 weeks after CRT. We assessed malnutrition after completion of CRT (5-6 weeks after CRT start date) and at surgery (11-14 weeks after CRT start date), defining weight loss as ≥5 % of pre-CRT weight; this definition differs from commonly used criteria for adverse events. We evaluated the incidence of malnutrition associated with CRT and influence of malnutrition on treatment tolerability, AL, and disease-free survival (DFS). We also assessed the influence of CRT on the rate of postoperative complications by comparing the study group with 61 patients who had undergone excision with diverting or permanent stomas alone. Malnutrition was observed in 51 % of patients after CRT and in 29 % at surgery. Malnutrition after CRT was associated with treatment tolerability, and malnutrition at surgery was significantly associated with AL, which significantly influenced DFS in stage 1-3 patients. Malnutrition caused by CRT is common and is associated with treatment tolerability and AL. Nutritional assessment and support seem indispensable for the rectal cancer patients receiving CRT.

  12. Childhood Malnutrition In China: Change Of Inequality In A Decade

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    A concentration index methodology to analyze the inequality in childhood malnutrition in China is outlined. Height-for-age z score is used as a measure of childhood malnutrition. Using household survey data from nine Chinese provinces, it is found that per-capita household income, household head's education, urban residence and access to a bus stop reduced malnutrition. Child's age had a nonlinear effect on the malnutrition status. Income growth and access to public transportation reduced the...

  13. Progressive changes in the plasma metabolome during malnutrition in juvenile pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Pingping; Stanstrup, Jan; Thymann, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Severe acute malnutrition (SAM) is one of the leading nutrition-related causes of death in children under five years of age. The clinical features of SAM are well documented, but a comprehensive understanding of the development from a normal physiological state to SAM is lacking. Characterising...... the temporal metabolomic change may help to understand the disease progression and to define nutritional rehabilitation strategies. Using a piglet model we hypothesized that a progressing degree of malnutrition induces marked plasma metabolite changes. Four week-old weaned pigs were fed a nutrient...

  14. High burden of protein-energy malnutrition in Nigeria: beyond the health care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubesie, Ac; Ibeziakor, Ns

    2012-01-01

    There is still a high burden of protein-energy malnutrition in Nigeria. The severe forms of the disease are usually associated with high level of mortality even in the tertiary health facilities. To review the cost-effective health promotional strategies at community levels that could aid prevention, early detection, and prompt treatment of protein-energy malnutrition. The strategy used for locating articles used for this review was to search databases like Google, Google scholar, relevant electronic journals from the universities' libraries, including PubMed and Scirus, Medline, Cochrane library and WHO's Hinari. We believe that strategies beyond the health care setting have potential of significantly reducing the morbidity and mortality associated with protein-energy malnutrition in Nigeria.

  15. Undernutrition, risk of malnutrition and obesity in gastroenterological patients: A multicenter study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Massimiliano Rizzi; Silvia Mazzuoli; Nunzia Regano; Rosa Inguaggiato; Margherita Bianco; Gioacchino Leandro; Elisabetta Bugianesi; Donatella Noè; Nicoletta Orzes; Paolo Pallini; Maria Letizia Petroni; Gianni Testino; Francesco William Guglielmi

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the prevalence of undernutrition, risk of malnutrition and obesity in the Italian gastroenterological population. METHODS: The Italian Hospital Gastroenterology Association conducted an observational, cross-sectional multicenter study. Weight, weight loss, and body mass index were evaluated. Undernutrition was defined as unintentional weight loss > 10% in the last threesix months. Values of Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool(MUST) > 2, NRS-2002 > 3, and Mini Nutritional Assessment(MNA) from 17 to 25 identified risk of malnutrition in outpatients, inpatients and elderly patients, respectively. A body mass index ≥ 30 indicated obesity. Gastrointestinal pathologies were categorized into acute, chronic and neoplastic diseases. RESULTS: A total of 513 patients participated in the study. The prevalence of undernutrition was 4.6% in outpatients and 19.6% in inpatients. Moreover, undernutrition was present in 4.3% of the gastrointestinal patients with chronic disease, 11.0% of those with acute disease, and 17.6% of those with cancer. The risk of malnutrition increased progressively and significantly in chronic, acute and neoplastic gastrointestinal diseases in inpatients and the elderly population. Logistical regression analysis confirmed that cancer was a risk factor for undernutrition(OR = 2.7; 95%CI: 1.2-6.44, P = 0.02). Obesity and overweight were more frequent in outpatients. CONCLUSION: More than 63% of outpatients and 80% of inpatients in gastroenterological centers suffered from significant changes in body composition and required specific nutritional competence and treatment.

  16. Malnutrition, Learning and Intellectual Development: Research and Remediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricciuti, Henry N.

    After a discussion of the problem of malnutrition and its effect on intellectual development, this paper concentrates on the study of protein-calorie malnutrition in infants and children as it occurs in postnatal and subsequent development. An overview and summary of the principal investigations on the relationship of malnutrition to intellectual…

  17. Tackling the increasing problem of malnutrition in older persons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Marjolein; Volkert, D.; Corish, C.; Geisler, C.; Groot, de C.P.G.M.; Cruz-Jentoft, A.J.; Lohrmann, C.; O'Connor, E.M.; Schindler, K.; Schueren, van der D.E.

    2017-01-01

    In order to tackle the increasing problem of malnutrition (i.e. protein-energy malnutrition) in the older population, the Joint Action Malnutrition in the Elderly (MaNuEL) Knowledge Hub has been recently launched as part of the Strategic Research Agenda of the Joint Programming Initiative (JPI) A

  18. Protein calorie malnutrition, nutritional intervention and personalized cancer care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangadharan, Anju; Choi, Sung Eun; Hassan, Ahmed; Ayoub, Nehad M.; Durante, Gina; Balwani, Sakshi; Kim, Young Hee; Pecora, Andrew; Goy, Andre; Suh, K. Stephen

    2017-01-01

    Cancer patients often experience weight loss caused by protein calorie malnutrition (PCM) during the course of the disease or treatment. PCM is expressed as severe if the patient has two or more of the following characteristics: obvious significant muscle wasting, loss of subcutaneous fat; nutritional intake of 2% in 1 week, 5% in 1 month, or 7.5% in 3 months. Cancer anorexia-cachexia syndrome (CACS) is a multifactorial condition of advanced PCM associated with underlying illness (in this case cancer) and is characterized by loss of muscle with or without loss of fat mass. Cachexia is defined as weight loss of more than 5% of body weight in 12 months or less in the presence of chronic disease. Hence with a chronic illness on board even a small amount of weight loss can open the door to cachexia. These nutritional challenges can lead to severe morbidity and mortality in cancer patients. In the clinic, the application of personalized medicine and the ability to withstand the toxic effects of anti-cancer therapies can be optimized when the patient is in nutritional homeostasis and is free of anorexia and cachexia. Routine assessment of nutritional status and appropriate intervention are essential components of the effort to alleviate effects of malnutrition on quality of life and survival of patients. PMID:28177923

  19. Application of a score system to evaluate the risk of malnutrition in a multiple hospital setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background An increased but unpredictable risk of malnutrition is associated with hospitalization, especially in children with chronic diseases. We investigated the applicability of Screening Tool for Risk of Impaired Nutritional Status and Growth (STRONGkids), an instrument proposed to estimate the risk of malnutrition in hospitalized children. We also evaluated the role of age and co-morbidities as risk for malnutrition. Methods The STRONGkids consists of 4 items providing a score that classifies a patient in low, moderate, high risk for malnutrition. A prospective observational multi-centre study was performed in 12 Italian hospitals. Children 1–18 years consecutively admitted and otherwise unselected were enrolled. Their STRONGkids score was obtained and compared with the actual nutritional status expressed as BMI and Height for Age SD-score. Results Of 144 children (75 males, mean age 6.5 ± 4.5 years), 52 (36%) had an underlying chronic disease. According to STRONGkids, 46 (32%) children were at low risk, 76 (53%) at moderate risk and 22 (15%) at high risk for malnutrition. The latter had significantly lower Height for Age values (mean SD value -1.07 ± 2.08; p = 0.008) and BMI values (mean SD-values -0.79 ± 2.09; p = 0.0021) in comparison to other groups. However, only 29 children were actually malnourished. Conclusions The STRONGkids is easy to administer. It is highly sensitive but not specific. It may be used as a very preliminary screening tool to be integrated with other clinical data in order to reliably predict the risk of malnutrition. PMID:24373709

  20. Protein metabolism in severe childhood malnutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    The major clinical syndromes of severe childhood malnutrition (SCM) are marasmus (non-oedematous SCM), kwashiorkor and marasmic-kwashiorkor (oedematous SCM). Whereas treatment of marasmus is straightforward and the associated mortality is low, kwashiorkor and marasmic-kwashiorkor are difficult to tr...

  1. Malnutrition screening in acutely unwell elderly inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Yogesh; Miller, Michelle; Shahi, Rashmi; Hakendorf, Paul; Horwood, Chris; Thompson, Campbell

    2016-10-13

    The rate of malnutrition among hospitalised elderly patients in Australia is 42.3%. Malnutrition is known to lead to significant adverse outcomes for the patients and increase hospital costs through increased use of resources. This study assessed nutrition screening adequacy and investigated factors associated with missed opportunity to diagnose malnutrition. A prospective cross-sectional study involving 205 general medical patients aged ≥60 years admitted acutely in a tertiary hospital over a period of 1 year. Patients who were not given initial nutritional screening were noted and all patients underwent nutritional assessment. The researchers assessed demographic data and performed univariate analysis of factors responsible for missed nutritional screening. Only 99 patients (49.5%) were screened for malnutrition and 100 (50.3%) missed initial nutritional screening (data incomplete for 6 patients). Of those screened, more were malnourished (n=64; 61.5%) than those not screened (n=40; 38.5%), pmalnutrition; these include apparently adequate nutritional status, lower staff to patient ratios and outlier ward locations. Ensuring consistent nutrition screening with appropriate therapeutic interventions for patients and educational interventions for staff could pay dividends not only in terms of improved patient health but also in terms of hospital reimbursement.

  2. Dermatosis in children with oedematous malnutrition (Kwashiorkor)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heilskov, S; Rytter, M; Vestergaard, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Children with oedematous malnutrition, known as kwashiorkor, may develop a characteristic skin lesion, named 'Dermatosis of Kwashiorkor' (DoK). Only a few studies have been concerned with this condition, and the reason for the development of DoK remains unexplained. This study review the existing...

  3. To the limit of extreme malnutrition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frølich, Jacob; Buskbjerg, Camilla Viola; Støving, Rene K

    2016-01-01

    Extreme malnutrition with body mass index (BMI) as low as 10 kg/m(2) is not uncommon in anorexia nervosa, with survival enabled through complex metabolic adaptations. In contrast, outcomes from hunger strikes and famines are usually fatal after weight loss to about 40% below expected body weight,...

  4. Implications of malnutrition in the surgical patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, J L; Gertner, M H; Buzby, G P; Goodhart, G L; Rosato, E F

    1979-02-01

    The substantial prevalence of malnutrition in the hospitalized patient population has only been recently recognized. Preoperative nutritional and immunological assessment was performed prospectively on admission in 64 consecutive surgical patients. Factors measured included weight loss, triceps skinfold, midarm muscle circumference, creatinine-height index, serum albumin level, serum transferrin level, total lymphocyte count, serum complement level, serum immunoelectrophoresis, lymphocyte T rosettes formation, neutrophil migration, and delayed hypersensitivity. Using these criteria for malnutrition, 97% of the patients had at least one abnormal measurement and 35% had at least three abnormal measurements. Patients were monitored for complications during their hospital course. Serum albumin level, serum transferrin level, and delayed hypersensitivity reactions were the only accurate prognostic indicators of postoperative morbidity and mortality. Substantial unrecognized malnutrition exists in the surgical patient population. An isolated indicator of malnutrition should be interpreted with caution. The visceral protein compartment (serum albumin and serum transferrin levels and delayed hypersensitivity) is the most accurate prognostic indicator of postoperative morbidity and mortality. Perioperative nutritional support may reduce operative morbidity and mortality in the malnourished operative candidate.

  5. Malnutrition in older persons: underestimated, underdiagnosed and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    implemented a social protection system to improve access to food and provide for living ... non-resilience with limited reserve capacity in major organ systems”12 and is ... to eat, an approach that is often all that is required.16,19,20. Older persons ... should be the first mandatory step to identify malnutrition when following the ...

  6. Malnutrition and mealtime ambiance in nursing homes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijs, K.A.N.D.; Graaf, de C.; Staveren, van W.A.; Groot, de C.P.G.M.

    2009-01-01

    Inadequate nutritional intake is the predominant cause of malnutrition in older persons. It is one of the most common and devastating conditions in nursing home residents. It is multifactorial and treatment or nutrition care plans should try to address the main causes. Such plans often include means

  7. Moringa : The herbal gold to combat malnutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ram Chand Dhakar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This document is aimed to describing the potential benefits of the Moringa tree as a nutrient. Moringa tree can be utilized in treating the malnutrition in a local and cost-effective manner. Malnutrition causes a great deal of human suffering and is associated with more than half of all deaths of children worldwide. Malnutrition severely affects the socio-economic development of a nation because a work force that is stunted both mentally and physically may have a reduced work capacity. Thus nutrition plays an important role in the reproduction of poverty from one generation to the next. Not only is the Moringa oleifera tree extraordinary in that all parts of the tree are edible, but the most amazing aspect of the tree is its exceptionally high nutritional value. The leaves of the Moringa tree are an excellent source of vitamin A, vitamin B vitamin C and other minerals. The leaves are also an outstanding source of calcium, protein, potassium and iron. The content of amino acids such as methionine and cystine is also high. Carbohydrates, fats and phosphorous content are low making this one of the finest plant foods to be found. Present review focuses on the potential benefits of Moringa oleifera in treatment of malnutrition.

  8. Malnutrition, functional ability and mortality among older people aged ⩾ 60 years: a 7-year longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naseer, M; Forssell, H; Fagerström, C

    2016-03-01

    This study aimed to assess the association between risk of malnutrition and 7-year mortality, controlling for functional ability, socio-demographics, lifestyle behavior and diseases, and investigate the interaction between risk of malnutrition and functional ability on the risk of mortality. A longitudinal study on home-living and special-housing residents aged ⩾ 60 years was conducted. Of 2312 randomly invited participants, 1402 responded and 1203 provided information on both nutritional status and functional ability. The risk of malnutrition was estimated by the occurrence of at least one anthropometric measure (BMI, MAC and CC) below cut-off in addition to the presence of at least one subjective measure (decreased food intake, weight loss and eating difficulty). At baseline, 8.6% of subjects were at risk of malnutrition and during the 7-year follow-up 34.6% subjects died. The risk of malnutrition was independently associated with 7-year mortality (hazard ratio (HR) 1.84, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.28-2.65). Additional independent predictors were dementia (HR 2.76, 95% CI 1.85-4.10), activity of daily living (ADL) dependence (HR 2.08, 95% CI 1.62-2.67), heart disease (HR 1.44, 95% CI 1.16-1.78), diabetes (HR 1.41, 95% CI 1.03-1.93) and older age (HR 1.09, 95% CI 1.07-1.10). Moreover, the risk of malnutrition and ADL dependence in combination predicted the poorest survival rate (18.7%, Pmalnutrition significantly increases the risk of mortality in older people. Moreover, risk of malnutrition and ADL dependence together explain a significantly poorer survival rate; however, the importance of this interaction decreased in the multivariable model and risk of malnutrition and ADL dependence independently explained a significant risk of mortality.

  9. Clinical characteristics of senile patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease complicated with pulmonary infections and malnutrition and analysis of risk factors%老年慢性阻塞性肺疾病伴肺部感染患者营养不良的临床特点及危险因素分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵一文; 陈灏

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To explore the clinical characteristics of the senile patients with chronic obstructive pulmo-nary disease (COPD) complicated with pulmonary infections and malnutrition and analyze the risk factors so as to provide basis for clinical diagnosis and treatment and reduce the incidence of malnutrition .METHODS The clinical data of 130 cases of senile COPD patients complicated with pulmonary infections and malnutrition who were treated in the respiratory department from Dec 2009 to Dec 2012 were retrospectively analyzed ,then the subjects were screened according to the diagnostic standard of pulmonary infections complicated with malnutrition ,and the clini-cal characteristics and the risk factors were observed . RESULTS Of 130 cases of patients , the malnutrition occurred in 70 cases with the incidence rate of 53 .8% ,and the anorexia ,progressive loss of weight ,and atrophy of muscle tissue were the main clinical manifestations .The multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that the partial pressure of arterial oxygen ,forced expiratory volume at the first second /forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC) ,and anorexia were the high-risk factors .CONCLUSION The pulmonary infections in the senile COPD patients interact and restrict each other ,and it is necessary for the hospital to take effective prevention counter-measures aiming at the corresponding risk factors .%目的:探讨老年慢性阻塞性肺疾病伴肺部感染患者营养不良的临床特点及危险因素,为临床诊疗提供依据,以降低营养不良的发生率。方法选取2009年12月-2012年12月在呼吸科治疗的130例老年慢性阻塞性肺疾病伴肺部感染住院患者临床资料进行回顾性分析,按照肺部感染营养不良的诊断标准进行筛选,分析其临床特点并根据病情进行危险因素分析。结果130例患者中符合营养不良的为70例,发生率为53.8%;且老年慢性阻塞性肺疾病伴肺部感染营养不良以厌食

  10. Study on the leptin receptor gene Gln223Arg polymorphism in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease accompanied by malnutrition%慢性阻塞性肺疾病伴营养不良患者瘦素受体基因Gln223Arg多态性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈鹤峰; 李向阳; 缪应新; 甘洁民; 洪慰麟; 周瑾

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨瘦素受体基因Gln223Arg多态性与慢性阻塞性肺疾病伴营养不良的关系.方法 观察158例COPD临床稳定期老年患者及108例健康对照者,并根据体重指数(BMI)、理想体重百分比(NW%)、三头肌皮皱厚度(TSF)、上臂中点臂围(MAC)、血清白蛋白(ALB)、总淋巴细胞(LYM)等营养参数,将COPD组分为营养不良组(COPD1组)66例,COPD非营养不良组(COPD2组)92例.用酶联免疫吸附试验(ELISA)法测定血清瘦素水平,采用聚合酶链式反应及连接酶检测反应方法(PCR-LDR)测定158例COPD患者与108例对照组的瘦素受体基因Gln223Arg多态性的基因型.结果 COPD营养不良组Gln223Arg基因型GG、GA及从的频率分别为0.924、0.061和0.015,G和A等位基因频率分别为0.955和0.045; COPD非营养不良组Gln223Arg基因型GG、GA及AA的频率分别为0.783、0.206和0.011,G和A等位基因频率分别为0.886和0.114;对照组Gln223Arg基因型GG、GA及AA的频率分别为0.769、0.222和0.009,G和A等位基因频率分别0.88和0.12; COPD 1组Gln223Arg基因型及等位基因频率与COPD2组和对照组比较差异有显著性;COPD 2组和对照组比较差异无显著性.不同基因表型血清瘦素水平GG型低于A/G型+AA型(40.08+17.53 ng/mL vs 44.35±16.95 ng/mL),但差异无统计学意义.结论 瘦素受体基因Gln223Arg多态性可能与COPD营养不良有关.%Objective To investigate the relationship between leptin receptor gene Gln223Arg polymorphism and malnutrition of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Methods 158 elderly patients wilh COPD in stable stage and 10S normal controls were studied. Nutritional parameters, including body mass index (BMI), percentage of normal body mass (NM%), triceps skin-fold thickness (TSF), mid-upper arm circumference (MAC), serum album (ALB), total lymphocyte counts (LYM) in all cases, were evaluated, respectively. COPD patients were divided into malnutrition group (group 1) and non-malnutrition

  11. Protein-calorie malnutrition in a community hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willard, M D; Gilsdorf, R B; Price, R A

    1980-05-02

    An assessment of protein-calorie status was performed on 200 consecutive adult nonobstetric admissions to a private hospital from two group family practices. Anthropometric measurements, serum albumin level, and total lymphocyte count were determined at admission and weekly if the patient remained in the hospital. Nonnutritional factors affecting muscle protein stores and serum albumin level were taken into account. A total of 63 patients (31.5%) were found to be malnourished. The most common conditions associated with decreased protein stores were hypoxic cardiopulmonary disease, gastrointestinal disease, neuromuscular or arthritic impairment, organic brain syndrome, and febrile illness. Although nonnutritional factors accounted for many instances of protein depletion, expecially milder degrees of depletion, nevertheless protein calorie malnutrition was highly prevalent in this population.

  12. Malnutrition in Sub-Saharan Africa: burden, causes and prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bain, Luchuo Engelbert; Awah, Paschal Kum; Geraldine, Ngia; Kindong, Njem Peter; Sigal, Yelena; Bernard, Nsah; Tanjeko, Ajime Tom

    2013-01-01

    Malnutrition is estimated to contribute to more than one third of all child deaths, although it is rarely listed as the direct cause. Contributing to more than half of deaths in children worldwide; child malnutrition was associated with 54% of deaths in children in developing countries in 2001. Poverty remains the major contributor to this ill. The vicious cycle of poverty, disease and illness aggravates this situation. Grooming undernourished children causes children to start life at mentally sub optimal levels. This becomes a serious developmental threat. Lack of education especially amongst women disadvantages children, especially as far as healthy practices like breastfeeding and child healthy foods are concerned. Adverse climatic conditions have also played significant roles like droughts, poor soils and deforestation. Sociocultural barriers are major hindrances in some communities, with female children usually being the most affected. Corruption and lack of government interest and investment are key players that must be addressed to solve this problem. A multisectorial approach is vital in tackling this problem. Improvement in government policy, fight against corruption, adopting a horizontal approach in implementing programmes at community level must be recognized. Genetically modified foods to increase food production and to survive adverse climatic conditions could be gateways in solving these problems. Socio cultural peculiarities of each community are an essential base line consideration for the implementation of any nutrition health promotion programs.

  13. Taking action against malnutrition in Asian healthcare settings: an initiative of a Northeast Asia Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashiguchi, Takashi; Arai, Hidenori; Claytor, Ling Hui; Kuzuya, Masafumi; Kotani, Joji; Lee, Shyh-Dye; Michel, Jean-Pierre; Nogami, Tetsushi; Peng, Nanhai

    2017-03-01

    Malnutrition is common in Asia, especially among people who are critically ill and/or older. Study results from China, Japan, and Taiwan show that malnutrition or risk of malnutrition is found in up to 30% of communitydwelling people and as much as 50% of patients admitted to hospitals-with prevalence even higher among those older than 70 years. In Asia, malnutrition takes substantial tolls on health, physical function, and wellbeing of people affected, and it adds huge financial burdens to healthcare systems. Attention to nutrition, including protein intake, can help prevent or delay disease- and age-related disabilities and can speed recovery from illness or surgery. Despite compelling evidence and professional guidelines on appropriate nutrition care in hospital and community settings, patients' malnutrition is often overlooked and under-treated in Asian healthcare, as it is worldwide. Since the problem of malnutrition continues to grow as many Asian populations become increasingly "gray", it is important to take action now. A medical education (feedM.E.) Global Study Group developed a strategy to facilitate best-practice hospital nutrition care: screen-intervene-supervene. As members of a newly formed feedM.E. Northeast Asia Study Group, we endorse this care strategy, guiding clinicians to screen each patient's nutritional status upon hospital admission or at initiation of care, intervene promptly when nutrition care is needed, and supervene or follow-up routinely with adjustment and reinforcement of nutrition care plans, including post-discharge. To encourage best-practice nutrition in Asian patient care settings, our paper includes a simple, stepwise Nutrition Care Pathway (NCP) in multiple languages.

  14. Supplementary treatment effects of Liujunzitang on patients with end-stage renal disease combined with malnutrition%六君子汤对终末期肾病合并营养不良患者的补充治疗作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于明; 皋月娟; 袁红

    2015-01-01

    目的::探讨六君子汤对终末期肾病( ESRD)合并营养不良患者的补充作用。方法:对ESRD合并营养不良48例患者给予六君子汤治疗,每日1剂,分2次服,每次100 ml。30 d为1个疗程,连续观察2个疗程。监测治疗前后白蛋白、前白蛋白、转铁蛋白水平;进行营养评估( SGA);观察患者厌食、乏力及皮肤瘙痒等临床症状的缓解情况。结果:治疗后患者的白蛋白、前白蛋白和转铁蛋白水平有明显提高( P<0.01);治疗前AC、TSF、AMC值均为最小,随着治疗的进展,患者的各项指标均有提高;SGA评分营养不良总发生率降低;患者厌食、乏力症状有改善。结论:在充分透析的同时六君子汤对ESRD合并营养不良患者有较好疗效,可作为补充治疗。%Objective:To investigate supplementary effects of Liujunzitang on patients with end-stage renal disease ( ESRD) combined with malnutrition. Methods: Liujunzitang was administered to 48 malnourished ESRD patients, one dose per day, served with two times, each time 100 ml. Treatment course was 60 days with 30 days as a course. The levels of albumin, prealbumin and transferrin before and after the treatment were monitored. The subjective global assessment ( SGA) was performed. The remissions of clinical symptoms of anorexia, fatigue and itch skin were observed. Results: The levels of albumin, prealbumin and transferrin were significantly increased, respectively (P<0. 01) after the treatment. Before the treatment, the values of AC, TSF and AMC were mini_mum;however, they increased with the treatment. The incidence rate of malnutrition was decreased according to SGA score. The symptoms of anorexia and fatigue were alleviated. Conclusions: Liujunzitang has a good effect on the patients with ESRD combined with malnutrition and can be used as a supplementary treatment.

  15. Severity of Diarrhea and Malnutrition among Under Five-Year-Old Children in Rural Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Ferdous, Farzana; Sumon K. Das; Ahmed, Shahnawaz; Farzana, Fahmida D.; Latham, Jonathan R.; Chisti, Mohammod J.; Ud-Din, Abu I. M. S.; Ishrat J Azmi; Talukder, Kaisar A.; Faruque, Abu S.G.

    2013-01-01

    Enteric pathogens are commonly associated with diarrhea among malnourished children. This study aimed to determine the association between the severity of diarrheal illnesses and malnutrition among under 5-year-old children. During 2010 and 2011, we studied 2,324 under 5-year-old diarrheal children with mild disease (MD) and moderate-to-severe disease (MSD) attending a hospital in Bangladesh. Children with MSD were more likely to be malnourished compared with children with MD (35% versus 24%,...

  16. Child malnutrition, infrastructure and income in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgardo A Ayala-Gaytán

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Explain the variation in child malnutrition (CM, understood as low height for age (0 to 5 years old for the period 1999-2006. Materials and methods. State estimations of child malnutrition and several indicators of subjacent probable causes of CM were employed, such as poverty indices, state product per capita, women scholar attainment and access to health and the sewage system. Panel data regression analysis with fixed and random effects were used to analyze the data. Results. The results indicate that the lack to access to health and sewage systems and poverty worsen CM, whereas women education helps to diminish CM. Conclusion. The study shows that infrastructure variables explain a significant part of the recent variation in DI across Mexican states, and that economic growth is not a sufficient condition to diminish DI.

  17. [Child malnutrition, infrastructure and income in Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala-Gaytán, Edgardo A; Díaz Durán-Hernández, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Explain the variation in child malnutrition (CM), understood as low height for age (0 to 5 years old) for the period 1999-2006. State estimations of child malnutrition and several indicators of subjacent probable causes of CM were employed, such as poverty indices, state product per capita, women scholar attainment and access to health and the sewage system. Panel data regression analysis with fixed and random effects were used to analyze the data. The results indicate that the lack to access to health and sewage systems and poverty worsen CM, whereas women education helps to diminish CM. The study shows that infrastructure variables explain a significant part of the recent variation in DI across Mexican states, and that economic growth is not a sufficient condition to diminish DI.

  18. Elder insecurities: poverty, hunger, and malnutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellman, N S; Weddle, D O; Kranz, S; Brain, C T

    1997-10-01

    Between 8% and 16% (2.5 to 4.9 million) of the elder population have experienced food insecurity within a 6-month period. Federal programs to combat food insecurity reach only one-third of needy elders. While hunger and poverty are linked directly to malnutrition, the multifaceted nature of elderly malnutrition cuts across all economic, racial, and ethnic groups. Malnourished patients experience 2 to 20 times more complications, have up to 100% longer hospital stays, and compile hospital costs $2,000 to $10,000 higher per stay. Dietitians can advocate routine nutrition screening to target elders at highest risk and lobby for expansion of appropriate nutrition services in home, community, and institutional settings.

  19. Maternal profiles and social determinants of malnutrition and the MDGs: What have we learnt?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tette, Edem M A; Sifah, Eric K; Nartey, Edmund T; Nuro-Ameyaw, Peter; Tete-Donkor, Pricilla; Biritwum, Richard B

    2016-03-02

    Maternal socio-demographic and health profiles are important determinants of malnutrition in children. In the 1990s, malnutrition was associated with low-birth-weight, young mothers and low maternal socio-economic status at Princess Marie Louise Children's Hospital (PML). It is not known how this has changed by efforts to achieve the Millennium Development Goals. We examined socio-demographic and health profiles of mothers of children with acute malnutrition and those without the condition to identify risk factors for malnutrition and focus on preventive efforts. An unmatched case-control study was conducted in 2013 at PML, the largest facility for treating malnourished children in Ghana in 2013. Mothers of children with moderate and severe acute malnutrition were compared with mothers of well-nourished children. Weight-for-height was used to classify malnutrition. Record forms and a semi-structured questionnaire were used for data collection. An analysis was done with Stata 11.0 software. Altogether, 371 mothers were studied consisting of 182 mothers of malnourished children and 189 mothers of well-nourished children. Mothers of malnourished children were more likely to be unmarried or cohabiting, have lower family incomes, HIV infection and chronic disease. They were less likely to stay with or provide alternative care for their child. Awareness and use of social services, health insurance and a cash transfer programme were low. A remarkable reduction in the number of malnourished children occurred when families earned more than $250 USD a month. Over-nutrition was present in both groups of mothers. Low family income, unmarried status and type of child care were the main social determinants of malnutrition. There appears to be a reduction in the number of other poor socio-demographic characteristics in both the study and control groups compared to results from a previous study at the same centre, probably because of efforts toward attaining the MDGs. These

  20. Incidence and recognition of malnutrition in hospital.

    OpenAIRE

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To determine incidence of malnutrition among patients on admission to hospital, to monitor their changes in nutritional status during stay, and to determine awareness of nutrition in different clinical units. DESIGN--Prospective study of consecutive admissions. SETTING--Acute teaching hospital. SUBJECTS--500 patients admitted to hospital: 100 each from general surgery, general medicine, respiratory medicine, orthopaedic surgery, and medicine for the elderly. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES-...

  1. [The war against malnutrition in rural areas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sall, G

    1990-04-01

    This article analyzes the interaction between nutritional factors and growth rates in Senegal from data collected at the pediatric unit at the CHU Hospital in Dakar. In Senegal, as in most of Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) children grow rapidly between 6-36 months because of good nutrition. The problems cited during the survey that have led to malnutrition among infants and children are: 1) the lack of education of mothers; 2) demographic factors (many pregnancies and polygamy); 3) maldistribution of f ood especially when children eat from the same bowl as adults; 4) the lack of diversification in food given to infants after 5 months; 5) special foods considered taboos (eggs, dried fish, some vegetables) limits children's consumption of a balanced diet; 6) abusive malnutritional publicity campaigns that encourage mothers to purchase imported milk and food products; 7) high poverty level of most malnourished children due to the parents unemployment, and 8) the lack of immunization and medical surveillance. These factors explain what happens to most SSA children after beginning the 16 month when the lack of adequate and diversified nutrition causes retardation in their growth rates. The prevalence of marasmus is responsible for 50% of all deaths in Dakar due to malnutrition. The intervention of special foods such as "Ladylac" "Ferelin" and the "rouye-complet" form Dakar's Institute of Food Technology have had positive results in producing nutritional rehabilitation. However, the price remains a problem because the majority of the people are so poor. Recommendations to win the war against child malnutrition includes: 1) nutritional and health programs aimed at the literacy levels of Senegalese families; 2) controls on polygamy; 3) a policy on family planning; 4) increasing family revenues and the availability of local infant products; 5) improvement in the health system and inclusion of nutritional education in the training of health workers.

  2. Update on chronic complex patient malnutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez Hernández, Julia

    2017-05-08

    The Scientific Committee of the Sociedad Española de Nutrición Parenteral y Enteral (SENPE) and the Nutricia Advanced Medical Nutrition company began this Course some years ago, and now, it is a referent course in the multidisciplinary training of Clinical Nutrition. With this issue we review the advances in Clinical Nutrition in different situations and, this year, the topic is the malnutrition in chronic complex patients.

  3. Protein malnutrition impairs the immune response and influences the severity of infection in a hamster model of chronic visceral leishmaniasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugenia Carrillo

    Full Text Available Leishmaniasis remains one of the world's most devastating neglected tropical diseases. It mainly affects developing countries, where it often co-exists with chronic malnutrition, one of the main risk factors for developing the disease. Few studies have been published, however, on the relationship between leishmaniasis progression and malnutrition. The present paper reports the influence of protein malnutrition on the immune response and visceral disease development in adult hamsters infected with Leishmania infantum fed either standard or low protein diets. The low protein diet induced severe malnutrition in these animals, and upon infection with L. infantum 33% had severe visceral leishmaniasis compared to only 8% of animals fed the standard diet. The infected, malnourished animals showed notable leukocyte depletion, mild specific antibody responses, impairment of lymphoproliferation, presence of parasites in blood (16.67% of the hamsters and significant increase of the splenic parasite burden. Animals fed standard diet suffered agranulocytosis and monocytopenia, but showed stronger specific immune responses and had lower parasite loads than their malnourished counterparts. The present results show that protein malnutrition promotes visceral leishmaniasis and provide clues regarding the mechanisms underlying the impairment of the immune system.

  4. Malnutrition and infection: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomons, Noel W

    2007-10-01

    The original Scrimshaw, Taylor and Gordon conceptual framework for the interaction of nutrition and infection has well served the scientific community for almost half a century. At its core is the notion of synergistic (mutually reinforcing) and antagonistic (mutually nullifying) influences of the malnourished state on infectious conditions and vice versa. Research on a series of advancing fronts, however, has allowed the incorporation of both relevant public health issues (parasitosis, emerging infectious diseases, obesity and overweight, etc.) and advancing science (molecular immunology, oxidation biology, multiple micronutrient deficiencies, etc.). The present review is an interpretative update on close to 50 years of demographic and epidemiological evolution in the field of human nutrition and the implications for the interaction in the context of microbiological and immunological developments on the infectious side of the dialectic.

  5. Malnutrition and depression in the institutionalised elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smoliner, Christine; Norman, Kristina; Wagner, Karl-Heinz; Hartig, Wolfgang; Lochs, Herbert; Pirlich, Matthias

    2009-12-01

    Malnutrition and depression are highly prevalent in the institutionalised elderly and can lead to unfavourable outcomes. The aim of the present study was to assess associations between nutritional status and depressive symptoms and to explore their impact on self-caring capacity and quality of life (QoL) in elderly nursing-home residents (NHR). We conducted a cross-sectional study with 114 NHR (eighty-six female) with a mean age of 84.6 (sd 9.1) years. Nutritional status was assessed with the Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA). Depressive symptoms were rated with the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS). Self-caring capacity was measured with the Barthel index (BI) and QoL was assessed with the short-form thirty-six-item (SF-36) questionnaire. Of the NHR, twenty-six (22.8 %) were malnourished according to the MNA and sixty-six (57.9 %) were at nutritional risk. Of the residents, seventy-five could be assessed with the GDS, whereof sixteen (21.3 %) had major and twenty-six (34.7 %) had minor depressive symptoms. GDS scores tended to be higher in patients with impaired nutritional status (5.4 (sd 3.6) in well-nourished subjects and 6.9 (sd 3.2) in residents with malnutrition or at risk of malnutrition). The MNA correlated significantly with the GDS (r - 0.313; P = 0.006) and the GDS emerged as the only independent risk factor for malnutrition in a multiple regression analysis, whereas age, sex, care level, number of prescriptions and self-caring capacity had no influence. The BI was not reduced in patients with a high GDS. QoL was affected in malnourished residents as well as in study participants with depressive symptoms. The results of the present study point towards an association between malnutrition and depressive symptoms. However, the relationship is complex and it remains unclear whether depression in NHR is the cause or consequence of impaired nutritional status. Further studies are needed to identify the direction of this relationship and to assess the effect of

  6. Malnutrition screening by Mini-Nutritional Assessment and Short-Form Mini-Nutritional Assessment in patients with Alzheimer's disease%微型营养评定法和微型营养评定简表在老年痴呆患者营养筛查中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张彩华; 徐奕; 朱宏霞

    2010-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the applicability of Mini-Nutritional Assessment(MNA),Short-Form Mini-Nutritional Assessment(MNA-SF)in the malnutrition screening of patients with Alzheimer's disease(AD).Methods MNA and MNA-SF were performed in 267 AD patients.The correlation between the screening results were compared.Results According to MNA,the rates of malnutrition,potential malnutrition,and normal nutritional status were 59.7%,20.9%,and 19.4%,respectively.The sensitivity was 73.4%and the specificity was 60.1%.According to MNA-SF,the rates of malnutrition and normal nutritional status were 70.4%and 29.6%.The sensitivity was 50.6%and the specificity was 92.4%.The screening results of these two tools were significantly correlated(r=0.924,P<0.01).Conclusions MNA and MNA-SF are reliable tools for evaluating the nutritional status of AD patients.While MNA-SF is more convenient and feasible,the combination of these two tools may be helpful.%目的 采用微型营养评定法(MNA)和微型营养评定简表(MNA-SF)对老年痴呆患者营养状况进行筛查,比较两者的适用性.方法 对267例老年痴呆患者应用MNA和MNA-SF进行营养筛查,测量人体学指标和实验事指标,分析两者的相关性.结果 根据MNA值评定营养不良者占59.7%,潜在营养不良者占20.9%,营养正常者占19.4%;营养不良评价敏感性73.4%,特异性60.1%.根据MNA-SF值评定营养不良者占70.4%,营养正常者占29.6%;营养不良评定敏感性50.6%,特异性92.4%.MNA法和MNA-SF法具有高度相关性(r=0.924,P<0.01).结论 老年痴呆患者营养不良的发生率高,两种方法联合评定提高了老年痴呆患者营养不良患者的检出率,是筛查老年痴呆患者营养不良的有效方法.

  7. The Graz Malnutrition Screening (GMS): a new hospital screening tool for malnutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roller, Regina E; Eglseer, Doris; Eisenberger, Anna; Wirnsberger, Gerhard H

    2016-02-28

    Despite the significant impact of malnutrition in hospitalised patients, it is often not identified by clinical staff in daily practice. To improve nutritional support in hospitals, standardised routine nutritional screening is essential. The Graz Malnutrition Screening (GMS) tool was developed for the purpose of malnutrition risk screening in a large hospital setting involving different departments. It was the aim of the present study to validate the GMS against Nutritional Risk Screening (NRS) and Mini Nutritional Assessment-short form (MNA-sf) in a randomised blinded manner. A total of 404 randomly selected patients admitted to the internal, surgical and orthopaedic wards of the University Hospital Graz were screened in a blinded manner by different raters. Concurrent validity was determined by comparing the GMS with the NRS and in older patients (70+ years) with the MNA-sf additionally. According to GMS, 31·9 or 28·5% of the admitted patients were categorised as at 'risk of malnutrition' (depending on the rater). According to the reference standard of NRS, 24·5% of the patients suffered from malnutrition. Pearson's r values of 0·78 compared with the NRS and 0·84 compared with the MNA showed strong positive correlations. Results of accuracy (0·85), sensitivity (0·94), specificity (0·77), positive predictive value (0·76) and negative predictive value (0·95) of GMS were also very high. Cohen's κ for internal consistency of the GMS was 0·82. GMS proves to be a valid and reliable instrument for the detection of malnutrition in adult patients in acute-care hospitals.

  8. Frecuencia y factores de riesgo asociados a desnutrición de niños con cardiopatía congénita Frequency and risk factors associated with malnutrition among children with congenital heart disease in a cardiology hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Angel Villasís-Keever

    2001-08-01

    más común en niños más pequeños y con cardiopatías cianógenas. Se necesitan programas orientados a las familias para prevenir y disminuir la desnutricion en estos niños. El texto completo en inglés de este artículo está disponible en: http://www.insp.mx/salud/index.htmlObjectives. To assess the frequency and risk factors of malnutrition among children with congenital heart disease (CHD. Material and methods. Between August 1997 and May 1998, a cross-sectional survey was conducted among 244 children, at the congenital heart disease ward of the Cardiology Hospital, National Medical Center "Siglo XXI", Mexican Institute of Social Security, in Mexico City. Study subjects were male and female children younger than 17 years, diagnosed with CHD and without any other congenital malformation. Weight/Age (W/A, Height/Age (H/A and Weight/Height (W/H were used to measure nutritional status; Z scores greater than -2 was the case definition of malnutrition. Risk factors investigated were age, sex, perinatal history, dietary factors and nutritional supplementation, socioeconomic status, and family composition and functionality. Four CHD groups were studied: acyanotic with and without pulmonary hypertension (APH, AWPH and, cyanotic with and without pulmonary hypertension (CPH, CWPH. Statistical analysis consisted of the chi-squared, Mann Whitney's U, and Kruskal-Wallis tests. Confounding variables were controlled for with a logistic regression model; odds ratios (OR and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI were calculated. Results. APH was the most frequent CHD (62.7%, followed by CWPH (15.6%, AWPH (11.5%, and CPH (10.2%. Malnutrition was identified in 40.9% children with the W/A index, in 24.6% with the H/A index; and in 31.1% with the W/H index. Infants and the CPH group had the worst nutritional status. Risk factors associated with malnutrition were: having a cyanotic CHD (OR 2.54; 95%CI, 0.98-6.58, lack of nutritional supplementation (OR 2.38; 95%CI, 1.06-5.34, and a

  9. Malnutrition and epilepsy: a two-way relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crepin, Sabrina; Godet, Bertrand; Chassain, Benoît; Preux, Pierre-Marie; Desport, Jean-Claude

    2009-06-01

    A link between malnutrition and epilepsy has been suspected for many years. Different aspects of the question were studied with a review of previous published data. Several studies performed on animal models or humans highlight the possible adverse effects of malnutrition in the onset of seizures. Protein-energy, electrolyte, vitamin or trace element deficiencies may be involved. Conversely, several determinants of epilepsy could lead to malnutrition: food taboos and social exclusion in developing countries as well as some adverse effects of antiepileptic treatments. Two different hypotheses exist as a vicious circle: malnutrition predisposing to epilepsy or epilepsy predisposing to malnutrition. A better understanding of these interactions is necessary. In the mean time, malnutrition has to be prevented and treated.

  10. Prevalence, profile and predictors of malnutrition in children with congenital heart defects: a case–control observational study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okoromah, Christy A N; Ekure, Ekanem N; Lesi, Foluso E A; Okunowo, Wahab O; Tijani, Bolande O; Okeiyi, Jonathan C

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the prevalence, profile and predictors of severe malnutrition in children with congenital heart defects (CHDs). Design Case–control, observational study. Setting Tertiary teaching hospital in Lagos, Nigeria (March 2006 to March 2008). Participants Children aged 3–192 months with uncorrected symptomatic CHD and healthy controls, frequency matched for age and sex. Main outcome measures Prevalence of malnutrition based on WHO/National Center for Health Statistics/Centers for Disease Control and Prevention z score ≤−2; weight for age, weight for height/length and height for age; proportions of underweight, wasting and stunting in cases and controls, and in acyanotic and cyanotic CHD; and predictors of malnutrition using multivariate logistic analysis. Results 90.4% of cases and 21.1% of controls had malnutrition (p=0.0001), and 61.2% and 2.6%, respectively, had severe malnutrition (p=0.0001). Wasting, stunting and underweight were identified in 41.1%, 28.8% and 20.5%, and 2.6%, 3.9% and 14.5% of cases and controls, respectively. Wasting was significantly higher (58.3%) in acyanotic CHD (p=0.0001), and stunting (68.0%) in cyanotic CHD (p=0.0001). Age at weaning was significantly lower in cases than controls (3.24±0.88 and 7.04±3.04 months, respectively; p=0.0001) and in acyanotic than cyanotic CHD (2.14±0.33 and 5.33±1.22 months, respectively; p=0.004). Predictors of malnutrition in CHD were anaemia, moderate to severe congestive heart failure (CHF), poor dietary intake of fat and prolonged unoperated disease. Conclusion Severe malnutrition in association with anaemia and moderate to severe CHF is highly prevalent in CHD preoperatively in these children. Early weaning may be a marker of feeding difficulties in heart failure. PMID:21266339

  11. Effect of diffusely adherent Escherichia coli strains isolated from diarrhoeal patients and healthy carriers on IL-8 secretion and tight junction barrier integrity of Caco-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanimoto, Yoshihiko; Arikawa, Kentaro; Nishikawa, Yoshikazu

    2013-03-15

    The pathogenesis of diffusely adherent Escherichia coli (DAEC) remains to be elucidated. Previously, we found that afimbrial adhesin gene (afa)-positive motile DAEC strains isolated from patients with diarrhoea induce high levels of IL-8 secretion in Caco-2 cells via toll-like receptor 5 (TLR-5), while non-motile strains did not. The aim of this study was to compare virulence properties, including the phylogenetic groups, afa subtypes, IL-8 secretion levels, and the effects on tight junctions, of DAEC strains isolated from healthy persons with those isolated from patients with diarrhoea. Induction of IL-8 secretion in Caco-2 cells was examined for a total of 36 afa-positive strains: 19 from diarrhoeal patients and 17 from healthy carriers. Irrespective of the source, all strains were classified into the phylogenetic group B2 or D, with the exception of two strains. All 7 motile strains isolated from diarrhoeal patients induced high levels of IL-8 secretion, while only 6 of 15 motile strains from healthy carriers induced IL-8 secretion to the same levels as the diarrhoeal strains. We speculated that additional virulence factors other than afa and motility cause the loosening of tight junctions that allows flagellin to reach TLR-5 located on the basolateral side of the epithelium. However, no differences in the TER and dextran permeability were observed between cells infected with diarrhoeal strains and those from healthy persons. Thus, diarrhoeagenic DAEC seems to possess additional factors, in addition to adhesin and flagellin, which can induce high IL-8 secretion.

  12. Nutritional Supplementation of Children with Moderate Acute Malnutrition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabiansen, Christian

    Background Moderate acute malnutrition (MAM), defined as moderate wasting or low mid-upper arm circumference (MUAC), is widespread among children in low-income countries. Children with MAM are at immediate risk of mortality and morbidity or deterioration into severe acute malnutrition. Children...... presented in this thesis may have immediate relevance for malnutrition programs. First, it is recommended to use LNS supplements in children with MAM. Secondly, it is recommended to admit children

  13. Malnutrition and Dental Caries: A Review of the Literature

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    Protein-energy malnutrition occurs when there are deficiencies in protein, energy foods or both, relative to a body's needs. This paper reviews the association of early childhood malnutrition with: (1) dental caries, (2) enamel hypoplasia, (3) salivary gland hypofunction, and (4) delayed eruption. Studies suggest that caries of the primary dentition is associated with early childhood malnutrition, though the effect on caries of the permanent dentition has essentially not been studied. Enamel ...

  14. The Effect of Malnutrition on Protein Glycosylation in Children

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The goal of this study was to evaluate the effect of protein energy malnutrition on protein glycosylation by investigating transferrin isoform pattern and its relationship to the degree of malnutrition and the biochemical markers of nutritional status in children. Methods: Forty one children with mild (n=23) and severely/moderately (n=18) acute malnutrition and 29 controls were enrolled in the study. Serum transferrin isoforms were determined by isoelectric focusing electrophoresis...

  15. Malnutrition risk factors among the elderly from the US-Mexico border: the "one thousand" study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Tadeo, A; Wall-Medrano, A; Gaytan-Vidaña, M E; Campos, A; Ornelas-Contreras, M; Novelo-Huerta, H I

    2012-05-01

    The Mexican population is aging, which makes the fact that there is no regional information on the health of the elderly, including those in the northern region of the country. To examine nutritional, functional, and cognitive impairments, as well as depression, in non-institutionalized elderly Mexicans along Mexico's northern border. Observational, descriptive and cross-sectional study. Demographic and anthropometric measurements were screened and the following scales were applied among 760 elderly individuals in Chihuahua, Mexico: Katz index (for activities of daily living, ADL), the Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA), the Yesavage (depression), and the Pffeifer (cognitive decline). 7% prevalence of malnutrition, a 18% prevalence of functional disability, a 44% prevalence of depressive symptoms, a 33% prevalence of cognitive impairment, and a risk of disease in almost half the population, without differences between genders. Malnutrition, functional disability, and cognitive impairment increased with age (P malnutrition 3.0, 2.9 and 1.4 times (P malnutrition, functional disability, depression and cognitive impairment are higher than those reported previously and are closely related to one another, so detecting alterations in primary care is important in order to improve quality of life and reduce complications.

  16. Severe protein-calorie malnutrition in two brothers due to abuse by starvation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barroso, Marcela Montenegro Braga; Salvador, Luiza Martins; Fagundes, Ulysses

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To describe the case of two siblings with severe protein-calorie malnutrition due to abuse by starvation. Cases description: The two patients were simultaneously referred to the Hospital Municipal, where they were admitted to the Pediatric Gastroenterology clinic of a university hospital for diagnostic investigation of the cause of severe malnutrition and screening tests for Celiac Disease, Cystic Fibrosis and Environmental enteropathy among others. The exams were all normal, and after detailed research on the interactions of this family, we reached the conclusion that the malnutrition was due to abuse by starvation. The children spent approximately two months in the hospital, receiving a high-protein and high-calorie diet, with significant nutritional recovery. Comments: Abuse by starvation, although rare, should always be considered of as one of the causes of child malnutrition and pediatrician should be aware of the child's development, as well as the family interactions, to prevent more severe nutritional and emotional consequences in the future. PMID:27452429

  17. Aortic banding in rat as a model to investigate malnutrition associated with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Héliès-Toussaint, Cécile; Moinard, Christophe; Rasmusen, Carole; Tabbi-Anneni, Imène; Cynober, Luc; Grynberg, Alain

    2005-05-01

    Heart failure is a severe pathology, which has displayed a dramatic increase in the occurrence of patients with chronic heart disease in developed countries, as a result of increases in the population's average age and in survival time. This pathology is associated with severe malnutrition, which worsens the prognosis. Although the cachexia associated with chronic heart failure is a well-known complication, there is no reference animal model of malnutrition related to heart failure. This study was designed to evaluate the nutritional status of rats in a model of loss of cardiac function obtained by ascending aortic banding. Cardiac overload led to the development of cardiac hypertrophy, which decompensates to heart failure, with increased brain natriuretic peptide levels. The rats displayed hepatic dysfunction and an associated renal hypotrophy and renal failure, evidenced by the alteration in renal function markers such as citrullinemia, creatininemia, and uremia. Malnutrition has been evidenced by the alteration of protein and amino acid metabolism. A muscular atrophy with decreased protein content and increased amino acid concentrations in both plasma and muscle was observed. These rats with heart failure displayed a multiorgan failure and malnutrition, which reflected the clinical situation of human chronic heart failure.

  18. Causes, assessment and treatment of malnutrition in older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Helen

    2017-02-28

    Malnutrition is a growing problem in the UK with as many as 14% of people aged over 65 at risk. It is of particular concern in care homes where more than one third of residents are undernourished. Weight loss is not the only symptom of malnourishment and nurses should examine any changes to a person's health and well-being to identify causes. Regular monitoring of patients' risk of malnutrition through use of screening assessments, such as the Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool, ensures undernourishment is identified early. As the population ages, it is more important than ever that the implications of malnutrition are recognised and addressed.

  19. Limitation of communal latrines in changing the prevalence of parasites and diarrhoeal attack rate in Dhaka Peri-urban slums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, M U

    1987-01-01

    A study of the effects of communal latrines on diarrhoeal incidence and parasite prevalence rates was conducted in 1983 at Tongi, which had five communal Oxfam latrines with a manual flushing system for 924 people; and at Kalsi, which had 39 open fit latrines for 823 people. Inhabitants' stool samples were tested initially and also after twelve months to see the reinfection rates. All inhabitants were dewormed with pyrantel, and were visited weekly to obtain diarrhoea histories. In both communities, there were high prevalence rates of roundworm, hookworm, Trichuris trichiura, Entamoeba histolytica, Giardia lambia and Strongyloides stercoralis. Following the dewormings, the prevalence rates of roundworm, hookworm and Trichuris infection came down significantly, in both areas. The prevalence or reinfection rates remained identical in both communities. There was also no difference in diarrhoea incidence rate for the two areas. It is found that keeping all other variables unchanged, use of communal latrines, without strict disposal of everyone's excreta, does not affect parasite prevalence and diarrhoea rates. People must be educated about the use of communal latrines and the safe disposal of all excreta, including that of children.

  20. Intellectual abilities and protein-energy malnutrition : acute malnutrition VS. chronic undernutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoorweg, J.C.; Stanfield, J.P.; Brozek, J.

    1979-01-01

    Three groups of Ugandan children (20 in each group) and one comparison group of 20 children were examined between 11 and 17 years of age. The children in the first three groups had suffered from energy-protein malnutrition 10 to 16 years previously when they were hospitalised at different ages

  1. Intellectual abilities and protein-energy malnutrition : acute malnutrition VS. chronic undernutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoorweg, J.C.; Stanfield, J.P.; Brozek, J.

    1979-01-01

    Three groups of Ugandan children (20 in each group) and one comparison group of 20 children were examined between 11 and 17 years of age. The children in the first three groups had suffered from energy-protein malnutrition 10 to 16 years previously when they were hospitalised at different ages (betw

  2. Malnutrition Matters in Canadian Hospitalized Patients: Malnutrition Risk in Hospitalized Patients in a Tertiary Care Center Using the Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Adam; Wu, Thomas; Bricknell, Ryan; Muqtadir, Zack; Armstrong, David

    2015-10-01

    Malnutrition is common in Canadian hospitalized patients, yet system-wide malnutrition screening is not mandatory in Canada. Our goal was to define the point prevalence of malnutrition risk at a major tertiary care center in Hamilton, Ontario, using the Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool (MUST) to determine feasibility of hospital-wide screening in the Canadian context. After research ethics approval was obtained, we arranged for a clinical nutrition support team to conduct the MUST screening on all inpatients at Hamilton Health Sciences, Juravinski site, a large academic acute care hospital. A total of 315 patients were included (female, n = 160 [51%]; male, n = 155 [49%]; average age, 71 years). We identified 31% at high risk for malnutrition and 14% at medium risk, keeping with reported rates of malnutrition in the literature. Survey of dietitians and interns indicated that the MUST was easy to use and perform and that they had support of their unit supervisors. All respondents thought that the screen was useful and they wanted to repeat it. The MUST is an easy and efficient way to define point prevalence of malnutrition risk in Canadian hospitalized patients. Moving to system-wide nutritional screening will bring about the best practices in nutrition care with the involvement of key stakeholders and decision makers. Nutritional screening will allow us to utilize nutrition resources more efficiently, engage administrators in addressing shortfalls in nutrition care, and form a baseline for which to measure the efficacy of future nutritional interventions. © 2015 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  3. Content validity across methods of malnutrition assessment in patients with cancer is limited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sealy, Martine J.; Nijholt, Willemke; Stuiver, Martijn M.; van der Berg, Marit M.; Roodenburg, Jan L. N.; Schans, van der Cees P.; Ottery, Faith D.; Jager-Wittenaar, Harriet

    Objective: To identify malnutrition assessment methods in cancer patients and assess their content validity based on internationally accepted definitions for malnutrition. Study Design and Setting: Systematic review of studies in cancer patients that operationalized malnutrition as a variable,

  4. Content validity across methods of malnutrition assessment in patients with cancer is limited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sealy, Martine J.; Nijholt, Willemke; Stuiver, Martijn M.; van der Berg, Marit M.; Roodenburg, Jan L. N.; Schans, van der Cees P.; Ottery, Faith D.; Jager-Wittenaar, Harriet

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To identify malnutrition assessment methods in cancer patients and assess their content validity based on internationally accepted definitions for malnutrition. Study Design and Setting: Systematic review of studies in cancer patients that operationalized malnutrition as a variable, publi

  5. Reverse triiodothyronine in protein energy malnutrition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hafiez, A.A.; Abdel-Salam, E.; Abbas, E.Z.; Halawa, F.A.; El-Hefnawy, N. (Cairo Univ. (Egypt))

    1984-08-01

    Serum levels of thyroxine (T/sub 4/), triiodothyronine (T/sub 3/), reverse triiodothyronine (rT/sub 3/) and thyrotropin (TSH) were determined in cases of kwashiorkor and marasmus. Decreased levels of T/sub 4/ and T/sub 3/, and increased levels of rT/sub 3/ with no change in TSH were obtained. Thus in infants suffering from protein energy malnutrition there is a state of thyroid dysfunction as well as a shift in the peripheral T/sub 4/ metabolism being converted to the inert rT/sub 3/ rather than to the physiologically active T/sub 3/.

  6. Tackling malnutrition: a systematic review of 15-year research evidence from INDEPTH health and demographic surveillance systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, Samuelina S; Nyide, Bongiwe; Soura, Abdramane Bassiahi; Kahn, Kathleen; Weston, Mark; Sankoh, Osman

    2015-01-01

    Nutrition is the intake of food in relation to the body's dietary needs. Malnutrition results from the intake of inadequate or excess food. This can lead to reduced immunity, increased susceptibility to disease, impaired physical and mental development, and reduced productivity. To perform a systematic review to assess research conducted by the International Network for the Demographic Evaluation of Populations and their Health (INDEPTH) of health and demographic surveillance systems (HDSSs) over a 15-year period on malnutrition, its determinants, the effects of under and over nutrition, and intervention research on malnutrition in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Relevant publication titles were uploaded onto the Zotero research tool from different databases (60% from PubMed). Using the keywords 'nutrition', 'malnutrition', 'over and under nutrition', we selected publications that were based only on data generated through the longitudinal HDSS platform. All titles and abstracts were screened to determine inclusion eligibility and full articles were independently assessed according to inclusion/exclusion criteria. For inclusion in this study, papers had to cover research on at least one of the following topics: the problem of malnutrition, its determinants, its effects, and intervention research on malnutrition. One hundred and forty eight papers were identified and reviewed, and 67 were selected for this study. The INDEPTH research identified rising levels of overweight and obesity, sometimes in the same settings as under-nutrition. Urbanisation appears to be protective against under-nutrition, but it heightens the risk of obesity. Appropriately timed breastfeeding interventions were protective against malnutrition. Although INDEPTH has expanded the global knowledge base on nutrition, many questions remain unresolved. There is a need for more investment in nutrition research in LMICs in order to generate evidence to inform policies in these settings.

  7. Post-Weaning Protein Malnutrition in the Rat Produces Short and Long Term Metabolic Impairment, in Contrast to Earlier and Later Periods

    OpenAIRE

    del Carmen Miñana-Solis, María; Escobar, Carolina

    2008-01-01

    Malnutrition during gestation and lactation modifies metabolic strategies and leads to metabolic disease in adult life. Studies in human populations suggest that malnutrition during infancy may also induce long term metabolic disorders. The present study investigated if post-weaning and a late period of development might be sensitive for long term metabolic impairment. Hereto male Wistar rats were malnourished with a low protein diet (6%), during gestation and lactation (MGL), from weaning to...

  8. The association between malaria and malnutrition among under-five children in Shashogo District, Southern Ethiopia: a case-control study

    OpenAIRE

    Gone, Terefe; Lemango, Fiseha; Eliso, Endale; Yohannes, Samuel; Yohannes, Tadele

    2017-01-01

    Background Recent studies have presented conflicting findings about whether malaria is associated with an increased or decreased risk of malnutrition. Therefore, assessing the relationship between these two disastrous diseases in the most vulnerable groups, such as in children aged below 5 years (under-five children), may lead to the discovery of new low-cost and effective aides to current methods of malnutrition prevention in malaria-endemic areas. Therefore, this study was conducted to asse...

  9. Malnutrition and Risk of Structural Brain Changes Seen on Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de van der Schueren, Marian A E; Lonterman-Monasch, Sabine; van der Flier, Wiesje M; Kramer, Mark H; Maier, Andrea B; Muller, Majon

    2016-12-01

    To study the associations between protein energy malnutrition, micronutrient malnutrition, brain atrophy, and cerebrovascular lesions. Cross-sectional. Geriatric outpatient clinic. Older adults (N = 475; mean age 80 ± 7). Nutritional status was assessed using the Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA) and according to serum micronutrient levels (vitamins B1, B6, B12, D; folic acid). White matter hyperintensities (WMHs), global cortical brain atrophy, and medial temporal lobe atrophy on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were rated using visual rating scales. Logistic regression analyses were performed to assess associations between the three MNA categories (malnutrition (MNA = 17-23.5). Participants at risk of malnutrition (odds ratio (OR) = 1.93, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.01-3.71) or who were malnourished (OR = 2.80, 95% CI = 1.19-6.60) had a greater probability of having severe WMHs independent of age and sex than those with adequate nutritional status. Results remained significant after further adjustments for cognitive function, depressive symptoms, cardiovascular risk factors, history of cardiovascular disease, smoking and alcohol use, and micronutrient levels. Lower vitamin B1 (OR = 1.51, 95% CI = 1.11-2.08) and B12 (OR = 1.45, 95% CI = 1.02-2.04) levels were also related to greater risk of severe WMHs, independent of age and sex. Results remained significant after additional adjustments. MNA and vitamin levels were not associated with measures of brain atrophy. Malnutrition and lower vitamin B1 and B12 levels were independently associated with greater risk of WMHs. Underlying mechanisms need to be further clarified, and whether nutritional interventions can modify these findings also needs to be studied. © 2016, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2016, The American Geriatrics Society.

  10. Malnutrition in Healthy Individuals Results in Increased Mixed Cytokine Profiles, Altered Neutrophil Subsets and Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takele, Y; Adem, E; Getahun, M; Tajebe, F; Kiflie, A; Hailu, A; Raynes, J; Mengesha, B; Ayele, T A; Shkedy, Z; Lemma, M; Diro, E; Toulza, F; Modolell, M; Munder, M; Müller, I; Kropf, P

    2016-01-01

    Malnutrition is commonly associated with increased infectious disease susceptibility and severity. Whereas malnutrition might enhance the incidence of disease as well as its severity, active infection can in turn exacerbate malnutrition. Therefore, in a malnourished individual suffering from a severe infection, it is not possible to determine the contribution of the pre-existing malnutrition and/or the infection itself to increased disease severity. In the current study we focussed on two groups of malnourished, but otherwise healthy individuals: moderately malnourished (BMI: 18.4-16.5) and severely malnourished (BMI <16.5) and compared several immune parameters with those of individuals with a normal BMI (≥18.5). Our results show a similar haematological profile in all three groups, as well as a similar ratio of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. We found significant correlations between low BMI and increased levels of T helper (Th) 1 (Interferon (IFN)-γ, (interleukin (IL)-2, IL-12), Th2 (IL-4, IL-5, IL-13), as well as IL-10, IL-33 and tumor necrosis factor-α, but not IL-8 or C reactive protein. The activities of arginase, an enzyme associated with immunosuppression, were similar in plasma, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and neutrophils from all groups and no differences in the expression levels of CD3ζ, a marker of T cell activation, were observed in CD4+ and CD8+T cells. Furthermore, whereas the capacity of neutrophils from the malnourished groups to phagocytose particles was not impaired, their capacity to produce reactive oxygen species was impaired. Finally we evaluated the frequency of a subpopulation of low-density neutrophils and show that they are significantly increased in the malnourished individuals. These differences were more pronounced in the severely malnourished group. In summary, our results show that even in the absence of apparent infections, healthy malnourished individuals display dysfunctional immune responses that might contribute to

  11. Comparison of different nutritional assessments in detecting malnutrition among gastric cancer patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Seung; Wan; Ryu; In; Ho; Kim

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the prevalence of preoperative and postoperative malnutrition and the relationships between objective and subjective nutritional assessment of gastric cancer patients. METHODS: From October 2005 to July 2006, we studied 80 patients with no evidence of recurrent disease and no loss to follow-up after curative surgery for gastric cancer. In this group, 9 patients underwent total gastrectomy and 71 patients subtotal gastrectomy. At admission, 6 and 12 mo after surgery, the patients were assess...

  12. Senior Health: How to Prevent and Detect Malnutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healthy Lifestyle Caregivers Malnutrition is a serious senior health issue. Know the warning signs and how to help an older loved one avoid ... nutrient-rich diet for an older loved one. Malnutrition in older adults can lead to various health ...

  13. Malnutrition among Preschool-Aged Autistic Children in Oman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Farsi, Yahya M.; Al-Sharbati, Marwan M.; Waly, Mostafa I.; Al-Farsi, Omar A.; Al Shafaee, Mohammed A.; Deth, Richard C.

    2011-01-01

    To assess prevalence of malnutrition indicators among preschool children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) a cross-sectional study was conducted among 128 Omani autistic children 3-5 years of age. Based on standardized z-scores, the overall prevalence of malnutrition was 9.2 per 100 preschool ASD children (95% CI 4.1, 11.6). The most common type…

  14. 5994 Volume 12 No. 2 April 2012 CHILD MALNUTRITION AND ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2012-04-02

    Apr 2, 2012 ... *Corresponding author e-mail: sakhilek@yahoo.co.uk. 1. Department of Community ... Child malnutrition and mortality status in Swaziland. Malnutrition is an .... children. About 50% of the Swazi women aged 15 - 49 years are overweight, whereas ... management and increased physical activity. In order to ...

  15. Not by Bread Alone: Reversing the Effects of Childhood Malnutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, David K.; Greeley, Sharon

    1988-01-01

    Investigates three central findings in human malnutrition research: (1) behavioral changes in infants and young children are observable outcomes of malnutrition; (2) non-nutritional factors in the environment affect child development; (3) nutritional supplementation with a consistent and varied regimen of stimulation hold potential for reversing…

  16. Malnutrition among Preschool-Aged Autistic Children in Oman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Farsi, Yahya M.; Al-Sharbati, Marwan M.; Waly, Mostafa I.; Al-Farsi, Omar A.; Al Shafaee, Mohammed A.; Deth, Richard C.

    2011-01-01

    To assess prevalence of malnutrition indicators among preschool children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) a cross-sectional study was conducted among 128 Omani autistic children 3-5 years of age. Based on standardized z-scores, the overall prevalence of malnutrition was 9.2 per 100 preschool ASD children (95% CI 4.1, 11.6). The most common type…

  17. Pediatric Malnutrition: Putting the New Definition and Standards Into Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer, Stacey S; Juarez, Marisa D; Vega, Molly W; Canada, Nicki L

    2015-10-01

    In recent years, much effort has been directed at redefining malnutrition in the pediatric population to include the acute clinical population in addition to the more traditional ambulatory populations. In 2013, an expert panel convened to perform a critical review of available literature to craft a new approach to malnutrition. Closely thereafter, the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition published recommended indicators for the identification and documentation of malnutrition in pediatric populations. The purpose of this article is to review the domains within the new definition of malnutrition in pediatric practice, describe populations in which the recommended indicators for identification and management are problematic in clinical practice, give case studies that apply the new definition, and finally describe the implementation of a malnutrition identification program within a large tertiary care children's hospital. © 2015 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  18. In-Patient Treatment of Severe Acute Malnutrition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rytter, Maren Johanne Heilskov

    Severe acute malnutrition is a serious health problem among children in low-income countries. Particularly malnourished children requiring in-hospital treatment are at high risk of dying. This dissertation investigates possible reasons for this high mortality, by following a group of 120 children...... during their in-hospital treatment of severe acute malnutrition at Mwanamugimu Nutrition Unit in Kampala, Uganda. We assessed how malnutrition affected the children’s immune system, by measuring the size of their thymus gland with ultrasound. We examined characteristics of children with the serious form...... of malnutrition, Kwashiorkor, where the children develop oedema. Finally, we explored symptoms, findings or treatments given that were associated with a higher risk of death in the children. Hopefully, these findings may contribute to improving the treatment offered to children with severe acute malnutrition....

  19. Cardiac Dysfunction in a Porcine Model of Pediatric Malnutrition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabiansen, Christian; Lykke, Mikkel; Hother, Anne-Louise

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Half a million children die annually of severe acute malnutrition and cardiac dysfunction may contribute to the mortality. However, cardiac function remains poorly examined in cases of severe acute malnutrition. OBJECTIVE: To determine malnutrition-induced echocardiographic disturbances...... and longitudinal changes in plasma pro-atrial natriuretic peptide and cardiac troponin-T in a pediatric porcine model. METHODS AND RESULTS: Five-week old piglets (Duroc-x-Danish Landrace-x-Yorkshire) were fed a nutritionally inadequate maize-flour diet to induce malnutrition (MAIZE, n = 12) or a reference diet...... groups. The myocardial performance index was 86% higher in MAIZE vs AGE-REF (pMalnutrition associates with cardiac dysfunction in a pediatric porcine model by increased myocardial performance index and pro-atrial natriuretic peptide...

  20. In-Patient Treatment of Severe Acute Malnutrition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rytter, Maren Johanne Heilskov

    Severe acute malnutrition is a serious health problem among children in low-income countries. Particularly malnourished children requiring in-hospital treatment are at high risk of dying. This dissertation investigates possible reasons for this high mortality, by following a group of 120 children...... of malnutrition, Kwashiorkor, where the children develop oedema. Finally, we explored symptoms, findings or treatments given that were associated with a higher risk of death in the children. Hopefully, these findings may contribute to improving the treatment offered to children with severe acute malnutrition....... during their in-hospital treatment of severe acute malnutrition at Mwanamugimu Nutrition Unit in Kampala, Uganda. We assessed how malnutrition affected the children’s immune system, by measuring the size of their thymus gland with ultrasound. We examined characteristics of children with the serious form...

  1. Malnutrition among hospitalized patients in King Khalid University Hospital, Riyadh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bani, I A; Al-Kanhal, M A

    1998-09-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine the incidence of malnutrition among hospitalized patients. A cross-sectional study of patients were evaluated for findings suggestive of protein calorie malnutrition (PCM). Hundred and sixty patients admitted to the medical and surgical wards over a period of five months were studied. Anthropometrics and biochemical measurements were used. Nutrition status was calculated based on some nutrition parameters weight for height, midarm, circumference, serum albumin and total lymphocyte count. Anthropometric measurements, weight for height and midarm circumference reflected malnutrition (PCM) of 33.8% and 30% respectively. The overall prevalence of obesity was 21%. A higher proportion (23.9%) of medical cases were found to be obese compared to surgical cases (19.7%). If malnutrition can be documented on hospital admission, attempts can be made to reverse malnutrition in the high risk patients.

  2. Malnutrition among hospitalized patients in King Khalid university hospital, Riyadh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bani Ibrahim

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was undertaken to determine the incidence of malnutrition among hospitalized patients. A cross-sectional study of patients were evaluated for findings suggestive of protein calorie malnutrition (PCM. Hundred and sixty patients admitted to the medical and surgical wards over a period of five months were studied. Anthropometrics and biochemical measurements were used. Nutrition status was calculated based on some nutrition parameters weight for height, midarm, circumference, serum albumin and total lymphocyte count. Anthropometric measurements, weight for height and midarm circumference reflected malnutrition (PCM of 33.8% and 30% respectively. The overall prevalence of obesity was 21%. A higher proportion (23.9% of medical cases were found to be obese compared to surgical cases (19.7%. If malnutrition can be documented on hospital admission, attempts can be made to reverse malnutrition in the high risk patients.

  3. Food-borne diseases - the challenges of 20 years ago still persist while new ones continue to emerge.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Newell, D.G.; Koopmans, M.; Verhoef, L.; Duizer, E.; Aidara-Kane, A.; Sprong, H.; Opsteegh, M.; Langelaar, M.; Threfall, J.; Scheutz, F.; van der Giessen, J.; Kruse, H.

    2010-01-01

    The burden of diseases caused by food-borne pathogens remains largely unknown. Importantly data indicating trends in food-borne infectious intestinal disease is limited to a few industrialised countries, and even fewer pathogens. It has been predicted that the importance of diarrhoeal disease, mainl

  4. Food-borne diseases - the challenges of 20 years ago still persist while new ones continue to emerge.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Newell, D.G.; Koopmans, M.; Verhoef, L.; Duizer, E.; Aidara-Kane, A.; Sprong, H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/222364815; Opsteegh, M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/31149305X; Langelaar, M.; Threfall, J.; Scheutz, F.; van der Giessen, J.; Kruse, H.

    2010-01-01

    The burden of diseases caused by food-borne pathogens remains largely unknown. Importantly data indicating trends in food-borne infectious intestinal disease is limited to a few industrialised countries, and even fewer pathogens. It has been predicted that the importance of diarrhoeal disease,

  5. Food-borne diseases - the challenges of 20 years ago still persist while new ones continue to emerge.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Newell, D.G.; Koopmans, M.; Verhoef, L.; Duizer, E.; Aidara-Kane, A.; Sprong, H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/222364815; Opsteegh, M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/31149305X; Langelaar, M.; Threfall, J.; Scheutz, F.; van der Giessen, J.; Kruse, H.

    2010-01-01

    The burden of diseases caused by food-borne pathogens remains largely unknown. Importantly data indicating trends in food-borne infectious intestinal disease is limited to a few industrialised countries, and even fewer pathogens. It has been predicted that the importance of diarrhoeal disease, mainl

  6. Protein energy malnutrition during vaccination has limited influence on vaccine efficacy but abolishes immunity if administered during Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoang, Truc; Agger, Else Marie; Cassidy, Joseph P

    2015-01-01

    Protein energy malnutrition (PEM) increases susceptibility to infectious diseases, including tuberculosis (TB), but it is not clear how PEM influences vaccine-promoted immunity to TB. We demonstrate that PEM during low-level steady-state TB infection in a mouse model results in rapid relapse...

  7. Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli carrying supplementary virulence genes are an important cause of moderate to severe diarrhoeal disease in Mexico.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Patzi-Vargas

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli (DEC cause acute and persistent diarrhoea worldwide, but little is known about their epidemiology in Mexico. We determined the prevalence of bacterial enteropathogens in 831 children with acute diarrhoea over a four-year period in Yucatan, Mexico. Six DEC supplementary virulence genes (SVG, mainly associated with enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC, were sought in 3100 E. coli isolates. DEC was the most common bacterial enteropathogen (28%, surpassing Salmonella (12% and Shigella (9%. Predominant DEC groups were diffusely adherent E. coli (DAEC (35%, EAEC (24%, and enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC (19%. Among children with DEC infections, 14% had severe illness mainly caused by EPEC (26% and DAEC (18%; 30% had moderate diarrhoea mainly caused by DAEC (36%, mixed DEC infections (33% and EAEC (32%. DAEC was most prevalent during spring, while ETEC, EAEC and EPEC predominated in summer. EAEC was more frequent in children 6-24 months old than in those younger than 6 months of age (P = 0.008, OR = 4.2, 95% CI, 1.3-13.9. The presence of SVG dispersin, (aatA, dispersin-translocator (aatA, enteroaggregative heat-stable toxin 1 (astA, plasmid encoded toxin (pet, cytolethal distending toxin (cdt was higher in DEC than non-DEC strains, (36% vs 26%, P <0.0001, OR = 1.5, 95% CI, 1.3-1.8. 98% of EAEC-infected children harboured strains with SVG; 85% carried the aap-aatA gene combination, and 33% of these also carried astA. 28% of both EPEC and ETEC, and 6% of DAEC patients had strains with SVG. 54% of EPEC patients carried pet-positive strains alone or in combination with astA; only this DEC group harboured cdt-positive isolates. All ETEC patients carried astA- or astA-aap-positive strains. astA and aap were the most common SVG in DAEC (3% and 2% and non-DEC strains (21% and 13%. DEC carrying SVG are an important cause of moderate to severe bacterial diarrhoea in Mexican children.

  8. Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli carrying supplementary virulence genes are an important cause of moderate to severe diarrhoeal disease in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patzi-Vargas, Sandra; Zaidi, Mussaret Bano; Perez-Martinez, Iza; León-Cen, Magda; Michel-Ayala, Alba; Chaussabel, Damien; Estrada-Garcia, Teresa

    2015-03-01

    Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli (DEC) cause acute and persistent diarrhoea worldwide, but little is known about their epidemiology in Mexico. We determined the prevalence of bacterial enteropathogens in 831 children with acute diarrhoea over a four-year period in Yucatan, Mexico. Six DEC supplementary virulence genes (SVG), mainly associated with enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC), were sought in 3100 E. coli isolates. DEC was the most common bacterial enteropathogen (28%), surpassing Salmonella (12%) and Shigella (9%). Predominant DEC groups were diffusely adherent E. coli (DAEC) (35%), EAEC (24%), and enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) (19%). Among children with DEC infections, 14% had severe illness mainly caused by EPEC (26%) and DAEC (18%); 30% had moderate diarrhoea mainly caused by DAEC (36%), mixed DEC infections (33%) and EAEC (32%). DAEC was most prevalent during spring, while ETEC, EAEC and EPEC predominated in summer. EAEC was more frequent in children 6-24 months old than in those younger than 6 months of age (P = 0.008, OR = 4.2, 95% CI, 1.3-13.9). The presence of SVG dispersin, (aatA), dispersin-translocator (aatA), enteroaggregative heat-stable toxin 1 (astA), plasmid encoded toxin (pet), cytolethal distending toxin (cdt) was higher in DEC than non-DEC strains, (36% vs 26%, P DAEC patients had strains with SVG. 54% of EPEC patients carried pet-positive strains alone or in combination with astA; only this DEC group harboured cdt-positive isolates. All ETEC patients carried astA- or astA-aap-positive strains. astA and aap were the most common SVG in DAEC (3% and 2%) and non-DEC strains (21% and 13%). DEC carrying SVG are an important cause of moderate to severe bacterial diarrhoea in Mexican children.

  9. Aetiology-Specific Estimates of the Global and Regional Incidence and Mortality of Diarrhoeal Diseases Commonly Transmitted through Food

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pires, Sara Monteiro; Fischer-Walker, Christa L; Lanata, Claudio F

    2015-01-01

    ,000 (95% UI 472,000-802,000) deaths worldwide in 2010. The largest number of cases were caused by norovirus (677 million; 95% UI 468-1,153 million), enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) (233 million; 95% UI 154-380 million), Shigella spp. (188 million; 95% UI 94-379 million) and Giardia lamblia (179...... million; 95% UI 125-263); the largest number of deaths were caused by norovirus (213,515; 95% UI 171,783-266,561), enteropathogenic E. coli (121,455; 95% UI 103,657-143,348), ETEC (73,041; 95% UI 55,474-96,984) and Shigella (64,993; 95% UI 48,966-92,357). There were marked regional differences...

  10. EFFECTS OF THE EL NINO AND AMBIENT TEMPERATURE ON HOSPITAL ADMISSIONS FOR DIARRHOEAL DISEASES IN PERUVIAN CHILDREN. (R824995)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  11. Effects of Malnutrition on Left Ventricular Mass in a North-Malagasy Children Population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Di Gioia

    Full Text Available Malnutrition among children population of less developed countries is a major health problem. Inadequate food intake and infectious diseases are combined to increase further the prevalence. Malnourishment brings to muscle cells loss with development of cardiac complications, like arrhythmias, cardiomyopathy and sudden death. In developed countries, malnutrition has generally a different etiology, like chronic diseases. The aim of our study was to investigate the correlation between malnutrition and left ventricular mass in an African children population.313 children were studied, in the region of Antsiranana, Madagascar, with age ranging from 4 to 16 years old (mean 7,8 ± 3 years. A clinical and echocardiographic evaluation was performed with annotation of anthropometric and left ventricle parameters. Malnutrition was defined as a body mass index (BMI value age- and sex-specific of 16, 17 and 18,5 at the age of 18, or under the 15th percentile. Left ventricle mass was indexed by height2.7 (LVMI.We identified a very high prevalence of children malnutrition: 124 children, according to BMI values, and 100 children under the 15th percentile. LVMI values have shown to be increased in proportion to BMI percentiles ranging from 29,8 ± 10,8 g/m2.7 in the malnutrition group to 45 ± 15,1 g/m2.7 in >95th percentile group. LVMI values in children < 15th BMI percentile were significantly lower compared to normal nutritional status (29,8 ± 10,8 g/m2,7 vs. 32,9 ± 12,1 g/m2,7, p = 0.02. Also with BMI values evaluation, malnourished children showed statistically lower values of LVMI (29,3 ± 10,1 g/m2,7 vs. 33,6 ± 12,5 g/m2,7, p = 0.001.In African children population, the malnourishment status is correlated with cardiac muscle mass decrease, which appears to be reduced in proportion to the decrease in body size.

  12. Some Aspects of Communicable and Non-Communicable Diseases in Pacific Island Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gani, Azmat

    2009-01-01

    This study provides an overview of the incidence of the communicable and non-communicable diseases in Pacific Island countries. Available health statistics confirms that children continue to die annually due to neonatal causes, diarrhoeal diseases, pneumonia and measles. The adult population in several countries reveals presence and emergence of…

  13. Some Aspects of Communicable and Non-Communicable Diseases in Pacific Island Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gani, Azmat

    2009-01-01

    This study provides an overview of the incidence of the communicable and non-communicable diseases in Pacific Island countries. Available health statistics confirms that children continue to die annually due to neonatal causes, diarrhoeal diseases, pneumonia and measles. The adult population in several countries reveals presence and emergence of…

  14. Association of malnutrition with nosocomial infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorse, G J; Messner, R L; Stephens, N D

    1989-05-01

    To study the association of malnutrition with nosocomial infection in a general medical and surgical inpatient population, we retrospectively compared 45 patients with nosocomial infection to 45 uninfected control patients, matched using several nonnutritional variables known to predispose to nosocomial infection. Univariate and multivariate analyses were done. Poor nutritional score (derived from serum albumin, total lymphocyte count, and unintentional body weight loss), unintentional body weight loss, low serum albumin level at both time of admission and the first nosocomial infection, and worsening in the nutritional score and serum albumin from admission to the first nosocomial infection were associated with the development of nosocomial infection. Nutritional factors were more abnormal in subgroups of patients with nosocomial pneumonia, urinary tract infection, wound infection, and bacteremia than in controls. The findings suggest that further study of correlations between nutritional factors and nosocomial infections is needed.

  15. HIV and Malnutrition: Effects on Immune System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shalini Duggal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available HIV or human immunodeficiency virus infection has assumed worldwide proportions and importance in just a span of 25 years. Continuous research is being done in many parts of the world regarding its treatment and vaccine development, and a lot of money has flown into this. However, fully understanding the mechanisms of immune depletion has still not been possible. The focus has also been on improving the quality of life of people living with HIV/AIDS through education, counselling, and nutritional support. Malnutrition further reduces the capacity of the body to fight this infection by compromising various immune parameters. Knowledge of essential components of nutrition and incorporating them in the management goes a long way in improving quality of life and better survival in HIV-infected patients.

  16. Social dimension of malnutrition, notes for discussion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwar Manrique

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This article describes and constructs an argument concerning the social effects of malnutrition, by reviewing reports and articles in the nutritional situation in Colombia and the world, to finally address the nutritional status in Boyacá. The theme is developed considering nutrition as a field in influencing social, cultural, religious, historical, political and economic, that affect populations when there is no adequate scientific and social processes, to ensure access and adequate food resources due to poverty, lack of programs to ensure food security and sovereignty, high unemployment, looking mainly affected children, pregnant women and the elderly, preventing them from developing their full human potential.

  17. ANTI DIARRHOEAL ACTIVITY OF A POLYHERBAL FORMULATION IN VARIOUS ANIMAL MODELS OF DIARRHOEA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta Kunal

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Diarrhea is a condition where there is an increase in defecation of a person. The subject passes watery stools. Diarrhea affects many people in developed and developing countries. Millions of people die each year due to this disease. Keeping this in mind World Health Organization encourage studies on diarrhea which include research on traditional herbal medicine. Kutaja parpati vati is a licensed polyherbal formulation which are known to be anti diarrheal in nature. But no scientific report is available for its combined anti diarrheal potential. Hence, the present study is aimed to investigate the anti diarrheal activity of the licensed polyherbal formulation Kutaja parpati vati. In this study castor oil induced diarrhea and enteropooling models were used on male wistar rats. High and low doses of the polyherbal offered significant dose dependent protection in diarrheal conditions. It significantly reduced watery diarrhea and intestinal contents conditions. Standard drug used was loperamide. Hence we can conclude that Kutaja parpati vati possesses anti diarrheal properties and the drug look promising in the treatment of diarrhea.

  18. Effects of protein malnutrition on oxidative status in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feoli, Ana M; Siqueira, Ionara R; Almeida, Lúcia; Tramontina, Ana C; Vanzella, Cláudia; Sbaraini, Sabrina; Schweigert, Ingrid D; Netto, Carlos A; Perry, Marcos L S; Gonçalves, Carlos A

    2006-02-01

    This study evaluated the effects of protein malnutrition on oxidative status in rat brain areas. We investigated various parameters of oxidative status, free radical content (dichlorofluorescein formation), indexes of damage to lipid (thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances assay), and protein damage (tryptophan and tyrosine content) in addition to total antioxidant reactivity levels and antioxidant enzyme activities of superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and catalase in different cerebral regions (cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellum) from rats subjected to prenatal and postnatal protein malnutrition (control 25% casein and protein malnutrition 7% casein). Protein malnutrition altered various parameters of oxidative stress, especially damage to macromolecules. Free radical content was unchanged by protein malnutrition. There was an increase in levels of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, the index of lipid peroxidation, in the cerebellum and cerebral cortex (P brain structures (P malnutrition increased oxidative damage to lipids and proteins from the studied brain areas. These results may be an indication of an important mechanism for changes in brain development that are caused by protein malnutrition.

  19. Comparison of the Application Effect of Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool and Nutritional Risk Screening 2002 in Hospitalized Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease%营养不良通用筛查工具和营养风险筛查2002在炎症性肠病住院患者中应用效果的比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张允; 李惠玲; 童淑萍

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare the application effect of Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool (MUST)and Nutritional Risk Screening 2002(NRS2002)in hospitalized patients with inflammatory bowel disease.Methods Totally 9 3 cases were selected and the patients ’nutritional risk was assessed with MUST and NRS 2002,an all data were compared.Results The screening results of the two groups showed that the consistency of the two tools was good (kappa value=0.876,P<0.01),and the disease severity and incidence of nutritional risk were positively correlated.Except TLC,body mass index,mid-arm muscle circ-umference,abdominal girth,triceps skin fold thickness,sulfmethemoglobin,albumin and pre albumin of no or low nutritional risk group were higher than the those of having nutritional risk group (all P<0.01). Conclusion The screening result of the two tools has good consistency.Traditional nutrition indicators are relatively sensitive indicators used in nutrition risk screening of hospitalized patients of inflammatory bowel disease.%目的:比较营养不良通用筛查工具(malnutrition universal screening tools,MUST)和营养风险筛查2002(nutritional risk screening 2002,NRS2002)在炎症性肠病(inflammatory bowel disease,IBD)住院患者中的应用效果.方法选择2014年1-7月常州市3所三级甲等医院收治的 IBD患者93例,分别应用 MUST和 NRS2002对其进行营养风险筛查并比较.结果MUST和 NRS2002对 IBD患者的筛查结果显示,两种方法的营养筛查结果一致性较好(Kappa=0.876,P<0.001),IBD患者的疾病严重程度与营养风险发生率呈正相关;除TLC外,无或低危营养风险组的身体质量指数、上臂肌围、腹围、肱三头肌皮褶厚度、红蛋白、白蛋白和前白蛋白均高于有或中高危营养风险组,差异均有统计学意义(均P<0.01).结论 MUST 和NRS2002对 IBD住院患者的营养风险筛查结果有良好的一致性,疾病严重程度与营养风险发生率存在相关性

  20. Malnutrition, cachexia and nutritional intervention: when much becomes too much

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serena Rianda

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Disease-associated malnutrition, also defined as cachexia, is a complex syndrome characterised by the progressive deterioration of nutritional status resulting from the combined effects of reduced appetite and food intake, and profound changes in host metabolism. Cachexia has been repeatedly demonstrated to represent a negative prognostic factor for patients suffering from acute and chronic diseases, including cancer. In oncology patients, early diagnosis of cachexia and timely nutritional intervention have been demonstrated not only to prevent further deterioration of nutritional status, but also to increase quality of life and survival when integrated in a multiprofessional and multidisciplinary approach. However, nutritional therapy is associated to the possible development of complications, which may be fatal. Therefore, nutritional therapy in severely malnourished patients should be cautiously prescribed by experts in the field, who should develop a monitoring program to early detect complications and to maximise the clinical efficacy.Here we describe a cancer patient affected by refeeding syndrome, who was fortunately early diagnosed and properly treated.

  1. Burden of Malnutrition in a Tertiary Care Hospital in Baguio City

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study is to determine prevalence, risk factors, and prognostic impact of malnutrition. Nutritional state was assessed by Subjective Global Assessment (SGA) and body mass index (BMI). Risk factors for malnutrition and effect of malnutrition on morbidity, mortality, and length of hospital stay were analyzed. Prevalence of malnutrition on admission and on discharge was 73%. Risk factors significantly...

  2. Assessment of risk factors and test performance on malnutrition prevalence at admission using four different screening tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josefina Olivares

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background & aims: Malnutrition is very common in patients when admitted to the hospital. The aim of the present study was: a to determine the prevalence of malnutrition at admission in a tertiary care hospital and identify risk factors for malnutrition, and b to test the sensitivity and specificity of different screening tests for malnutrition compared to subjective global assessment (SGA. Methods: We conducted a prospective study at 24h of admission in order to assess malnutrition in 537 adult subjects (56.4% males, mean age of 61.3±17.7 years using 4 different screening tools: mininutritional assessment short form (MNA-SF, nutritional risk screening 2002 (NRS2002, malnutrition universal screening tool (MUST, and SGA. Anthropometrics and comorbidities were registered. Results: The overall rate of undernutrition was 47.3%. Specific rates were 54.2% in patients > 65y vs.40.7% 65y (OR 2.10 CI 95% 1.19-3.93 p = 0.011, medicine department (OR 3.58 CI 95% 1.93-6.62 p < 0.001 for SGA (AUC 0.96; lung disease (OR 3.34 CI 95% 1.45-7.73 p = 0.005, medicine department (OR 2.55 CI 95%1.09-5.98 p = 0.032 for NRS 2002 (AUC 0.97. Recent unintentional weight loss was a common factor. Conclusions: Undernourishment at hospital admission is frequent. Comorbidities may contribute to the presence of undernutrition at admission. Nonetheless, SGA, NRS2002, MNA-SF or MUST can be used in our setting.

  3. INCIDENCE OF, AND RISK FACTORS FOR, MALNUTRITION AMONG CHILDREN AGED 5-7 YEARS IN SOUTH INDIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeyaseelan, Visalakshi; Jeyaseelan, Lakshmanan; Yadav, Bijesh

    2016-05-01

    Protein-energy malnutrition is a major health problem contributing to the burden of disease in developing countries. The aim of this study was to assess the incidence of, and risk factors for, malnutrition among school-going children in south India. A total of 2496 children aged 5-7 years from rural and urban areas of south India were recruited in 1982 and followed up for malnutrition over a period of 9 years. Their body heights and weights were measured every six months and socio-demographic factors such as mother's education and father's education and relevant household characteristics and hygiene practices collected. Body mass index and height-for-age z-scores were used to determine children's levels of underweight and stunting, respectively, classified as normal, mild/moderate or severe. Risk factor analysis was done for pre-pubertal ages only using Generalized Estimating Equations with cumulative odds assumption. There was a significant difference between male and female children in the incidence of severe underweight and stunting (6.4% and 4.2% respectively). Children in households with no separate kitchen had 1.3 (1.0-1.6) times higher odds of being severely underweight (p=0.044) compared with those with a kitchen. Children without a toilet facility had significantly higher odds of severe underweight compared with those who did. Children with illiterate parents had higher odds of severe stunting than those with literate parents. In conclusion, the prevalence of malnutrition among these south Indian children has not changed over the years, and the incidence of severe malnutrition was highest in children when they were at pubertal age. The risk factors for stunting were mostly poverty-related, and those for underweight were mostly hygiene-related. Adolescent children in south India should be screened periodically at school for malnutrition and provided with nutritional intervention if necessary.

  4. Tackling malnutrition: a systematic review of 15-year research evidence from INDEPTH health and demographic surveillance systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuelina S. Arthur

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nutrition is the intake of food in relation to the body's dietary needs. Malnutrition results from the intake of inadequate or excess food. This can lead to reduced immunity, increased susceptibility to disease, impaired physical and mental development, and reduced productivity. Objective: To perform a systematic review to assess research conducted by the International Network for the Demographic Evaluation of Populations and their Health (INDEPTH of health and demographic surveillance systems (HDSSs over a 15-year period on malnutrition, its determinants, the effects of under and over nutrition, and intervention research on malnutrition in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs. Methods: Relevant publication titles were uploaded onto the Zotero research tool from different databases (60% from PubMed. Using the keywords ‘nutrition’, ‘malnutrition’, ‘over and under nutrition’, we selected publications that were based only on data generated through the longitudinal HDSS platform. All titles and abstracts were screened to determine inclusion eligibility and full articles were independently assessed according to inclusion/exclusion criteria. For inclusion in this study, papers had to cover research on at least one of the following topics: the problem of malnutrition, its determinants, its effects, and intervention research on malnutrition. One hundred and forty eight papers were identified and reviewed, and 67 were selected for this study. Results: The INDEPTH research identified rising levels of overweight and obesity, sometimes in the same settings as under-nutrition. Urbanisation appears to be protective against under-nutrition, but it heightens the risk of obesity. Appropriately timed breastfeeding interventions were protective against malnutrition. Conclusions: Although INDEPTH has expanded the global knowledge base on nutrition, many questions remain unresolved. There is a need for more investment in nutrition research

  5. 营养护理对血液透析治疗终末期肾病患者营养不良及生活质量的影响%Effect of Nutritional Care on the Quality of Life in Patients with End-stage Renal Disease and Malnutrition Underwent Hemodialysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李玉辉

    2015-01-01

    Objective To study the clinical effect of nutritional care on patients with end-stage renal disease underwent hemodialysis. Methods A study was carried out in 88 cases with end-stage renal disease admitted in our hospital. The patients were randomly divided into the observation group and the control group with 44 cases in each. The control group were treated by the usual care, and the observation group were given the nutritional care intervention based on the usual care. And the changes in nutritional status and quality of life after intervention were compared between the two groups. Results Two groups were given different nursing regimen. Compared with the control group, the observation group had better improvement in malnutrition, higher scores of physiological function, emotional function, cognitive function, social function, mental health and role function and the grand average, with statistically significant difference (P<0.05). Conclusion For end-stage renal disease patients, nutritional care can effectively improve the malnutrition and reduce the infection rate and enhance the prognosis and quality of life.%目的探讨终末期肾病行血液透析治疗患者给予营养护理措施的临床效果。方法整群选取该院收治的88例终末期肾病患者展开研究,随机将其分为观察组和对照组,每组44例;对照组行常规护理措施,观察组在常规护理基础上行营养护理干预措施,观察观察组与对照组预后的营养状况及生活质量变化情况。结果两组患者给予不同的护理方案,观察组营养不良改善效果优于对照组,且观察组患者的生理职能评分、情绪职能评分、认知职能评分、社会职能评分、心理健康评分、角色职能评分及总评均比对照组高,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论终末期肾病患者行营养护理措施能有效改善患者存在的营养不良情况,降低感染率,从而提升患者预后生活质量。

  6. Cardiac dysfunction in a porcine model of pediatric malnutrition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabiansen, Christian; Lykke, Mikkel; Nielsen, Anne-Louise Hother;

    2015-01-01

    and longitudinal changes in plasma pro-atrial natriuretic peptide and cardiac troponin-T in a pediatric porcine model. METHODS AND RESULTS: Five-week old piglets (Duroc-x-Danish Landrace-x-Yorkshire) were fed a nutritionally inadequate maize-flour diet to induce malnutrition (MAIZE, n = 12) or a reference diet......BACKGROUND: Half a million children die annually of severe acute malnutrition and cardiac dysfunction may contribute to the mortality. However, cardiac function remains poorly examined in cases of severe acute malnutrition. OBJECTIVE: To determine malnutrition-induced echocardiographic disturbances...... (AGE-REF, n = 12) for 7 weeks. Outcomes were compared to a weight-matched reference group (WEIGHT-REF, n = 8). Pro-atrial natriuretic peptide and cardiac troponin-T were measured weekly. Plasma pro-atrial natriuretic peptide decreased in both MAIZE and AGE-REF during the first 3 weeks but increased...

  7. Agricultural productivity, malnutrition and human health in sub ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Agricultural productivity, malnutrition and human health in sub-Saharan Africa: A review. ... keep animals with low genetic merit, employ crude implements and primitive ... involved in procurement and distribution of improved agricultural inputs.

  8. Prevalence of hematological abnormalities and malnutrition in HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-10-11

    Oct 11, 2013 ... case definitions) and malnutrition in HIV‑infected children receiving care at the ... on highly active antiretroviral therapy treatment and had advanced HIV ..... Art # 35. Available from: http://www.pediatriconcall.com/fordoctor/.

  9. Implications of malnutrition and diagnosis-related groups (DRGs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delhey, D M; Anderson, E J; Laramee, S H

    1989-10-01

    The implications of malnutrition on the Medicare Prospective Payment System of diagnosis-related groups (DRGs) were examined in 185 Medicare patients, aged 65 to 69 years, admitted to an acute-care tertiary hospital. Upon admission, patients were classified as malnourished if they were below the acceptable level in at least two of four parameters: serum albumin concentration, total lymphocyte count, percent ideal body weight, and percent weight loss. On the basis of that criterion, 8.6% (no. = 16) of the 185 patients were classified as malnourished. Although patients were classified as malnourished, malnutrition was among several comorbidity and complication (CC) factors, and, therefore, coding for malnutrition in any of these cases would not have increased hospital reimbursement. If malnutrition had been the only CC factor, hospital reimbursement would have been enhanced.

  10. The effect of malnutrition on patients undergoing elective joint arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ronald; Greenky, Max; Kerr, Glenn J; Austin, Matthew S; Parvizi, Javad

    2013-09-01

    Malnutrition has been linked to serious complications in patients undergoing elective total joint arthroplasty (TJA). This study prospectively evaluated 2,161 patients undergoing elective TJA for malnutrition as defined by either an abnormal serum albumin or transferrin. The overall incidence of malnutrition was 8.5% (184 of 2,161) and the rate of overall complications in the malnourished group was 12% as compared to 2.9% in patients with normal parameters (PMalnutrition predicted serious complications involving hematoma formation, infection, renal and cardiac complications. Obesity, defined by a body mass index (BMI) of 30kg/m(2) was present in 42.9% of malnourished patients with a significantly higher complication rate in this cohort. Malnutrition remains prevalent in patients >55years-old undergoing TJA and is associated with a significant increase in post-operative complications.

  11. Prevalence of intestinal helminths, anemia, and malnutrition in Paucartambo, Peru

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cabada, Miguel M; Goodrich, Mary R; Graham, Brittany; Villanueva-Meyer, Pablo G; Deichsel, Emily L; Lopez, Martha; Arque, Eulogia; Clinton White, Jr, A

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the prevalence of soil-transmitted helminth infections, anemia, and malnutrition among children in the Paucartambo province of Cusco region, Peru, in light of demographic, socio-economic...

  12. VOLUME OVERLOAD IS ASSOCIATED WITH MALNUTRITION IN PERITONEAL DIALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Joo Cha

    2012-06-01

    Volume overload is associated with malnutrition and seems to be an independent predictor of mortality in PD population. Further study should evaluate the effects of intervention of volume control in PD patients.

  13. Child malnutrition and mortality in Swaziland: Situation analysis of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Child malnutrition and mortality in Swaziland: Situation analysis of the ... is a major confounding factor for child morbidity and mortality in developing countries. ... and nutrition knowledge, insufficient human resources in child health care; ...

  14. socio-economic risk factors for severe protein energy malnutrition ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    2000-09-01

    Sep 1, 2000 ... Request for reprints to: Professor J. K. Tumwine, Department of Paediatrics and Child Health, ... severe forms of protein energy malnutrition among children ... were administered to the mothers or caretakers by one of us.

  15. Mapping of nutrition and sectoral policies addressing malnutrition in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirado, María Cristina; Galicia, Luis; Husby, Hannah M; Lopez, Jaime; Olamendi, Stephania; Pia Chaparro, Maria; González, María A; Grajeda, Rubén

    2016-08-01

    To map existing policies addressing malnutrition in all its forms in Latin America and identify gaps in enabling environments supporting the five priority lines of action outlined in the World Health Organization Comprehensive Implementation Plan on Maternal, Infant and Young Child Nutrition (CIP) approved in 2014. This descriptive study consisted of a systematic Internet search for and mapping of publicly available nutrition-related and sectoral policies already in place to address malnutrition in all its forms in 18 Latin American countries (Argentina, Belize, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, and Uruguay). The policies were described in documents retrieved from the websites of ministries of health, education, agriculture, labor, and development; the national congress; and other government agencies. All 18 countries had relevant policies to address malnutrition, especially undernutrition and micronutrient deficiencies, but only a few had policies to address overweight and obesity. Nutrition actions were incorporated in food and nutrition security and social protection policies in all 18 countries, and were part of education, environment, agricultural, development, and/or employment policies in some countries. Information on human and financial resources assigned to nutrition was not available through the search strategies used in the study. All 18 countries included in this review had established enabling environments to support CIP implementation. However, each of the 18 countries needs to develop integrated policies for the promotion of nutrition and prevention of noncommunicable diseases through cross-sector involvement and multi-stakeholder collaboration.

  16. [Protein catabolism and malnutrition in liver cirrhosis - impact of oral nutritional therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, K; Valentini, L; Lochs, H; Pirlich, M

    2010-07-01

    Malnutrition with loss of muscle is common in patients with liver cirrhosis and has negative impact on morbidity and mortality. The aetiology of malnutrition is multifactorial and includes inflammation, early onset of gluconeogenesis due to impaired glycogen storage and sometimes hypermetabolism. Reduced nutritional intake, however, plays the most important role in the pathogenesis of malnutrition. There is, however, ample evidence that nutritional intake and therapy are inadequate in liver cirrhosis although studies have clearly shown that dietary counselling and nutritional therapy with oral supplements improve intake in these patients. Protein requirement is considered to be increased in liver cirrhosis and high protein intake has been shown to be well tolerated and associated with an improvement of liver function and nutritional status. Protein intolerance on the other hand is uncommon and hepatic encephalopathy can thus rarely be attributed to high protein consumption. Recommendations for general protein restriction must therefore be considered obsolete and rather a risk factor for an impaired clinical outcome. Furthermore, the administration of late evening meals is highly beneficial in patients with liver disease since the rapid onset of the overnight catabolic state is counteracted. The serum concentration of branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) is decreased in patients with liver cirrhosis and long-term supplementation of BCAA has been shown to improve nutritional status and prolong event-free survival and quality of life.

  17. Hartnup disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerajani Hemangi

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available A rare case of Hartnup disease is presented - the patient being an 11 year old school girl suffering from a typically pellagroid rash in the absence of any other signs of malnutrition. No accompanying neurological or psychiatric features are seen, but electro-encephalography revealed abnormal baseline activity. Investigations and management are detailed and the literature on Hartnup disease reviewed.

  18. Correlation between malnutrition and prognosis of hepatitis A in Uygur children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Jian

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective To analyze the correlation between malnutrition and prognosis in Uyghur pediatric patients with hepatitis A in Hetian of Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region, China. Methods The clinical data of 342 children with hepatitis A admitted to the Infectious Disease Hospital of Hetian from January 2014 to May 2015 were retrospectively analyzed and the patients were divided into malnutrition group with 136 patients and normal nutrition group with 206 patients according to the Z-scores. The data of complete blood count, liver function test, biochemical indices, blood lipids, blood coagulation, and hospitalization days and costs were compared between the two groups. Comparison of categorical data between the two groups was made by chi-square test and comparison of continuous data between the two groups was made by t test. Results Compared with the normal nutrition group, the malnutrition group had significantly lower values of breastfeeding rate, hemoglobin, mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular hemoglobin, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration, serum iron, serum ferritin, glucose, serum albumin, and plasma thromboplastin antecedent but higher values of alanine transaminase, total bilirubin, total bile acid, cholesterol, and hospitalization days and costs (P<0.05. Conclusion Compared with the normal nutrition pediatric patients with hepatitis A, the malnutrition pediatric patients with hepatitis A have more severe iron deficiency anemia, hepatic damage, and abnormal metabolism of carbohydrates and fatty acids, so their recovery time is longer and the hospitalization costs are higher. To effectively protect Uygur children, hepatitis A vaccination in due course and the children′s growth and development monitoring are recommended.

  19. Food insecurity and malnutrition in Chinese elementary school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xiuhua; Gao, Xiang; Tang, Wenjing; Mao, Xuanxia; Huang, Jingyan; Cai, Wei

    2015-09-28

    It has been shown that food insecurity is associated with poor diet quality and unfavourable health outcomes. However, little is known about the potential effects of food insecurity on the overall malnutrition status among children. In this study, we investigated the prevalence of food insecurity among 1583 elementary school students, aged 6-14 years, living in Chinese rural areas and examined its association with four malnutrition signs, including rickets sequelae, anaemia, stunting and wasting. Information on food security was collected via questionnaires. Rickets sequelae were assessed by an experienced paediatrician during the interview. Anaemia was determined by the WHO Hb thresholds adjusted by the local altitude. Weight and height were measured during the interview. Stunting and wasting were then evaluated according to WHO child growth standards (2007). We examined the association between food insecurity and the number of malnutrition signs (total number = 4), and the likelihood of having severe malnutrition (presence of 3+ signs), after adjusting for potential confounders, such as age, social-economic status and dietary intakes. During the previous 12 months, the overall prevalence of food insecurity was 6.1% in the entire studied population and 16.3% in participants with severe malnutrition. Participants with food insecurity had a slightly higher number of malnutrition signs (1.14 v. 0.96; P=0.043) relative to those who were food secure, after adjusting for potential confounders. Food insecurity was also associated with increased likelihood of having severe malnutrition (adjusted OR 3.08; 95% CI 1.47, 6.46; P=0.003). In conclusion, food insecurity is significantly associated with malnutrition among Chinese children in this community.

  20. Malnutrition among hospitalized patients in King Khalid university hospital, Riyadh

    OpenAIRE

    Bani Ibrahim; Al-Kanhal Mohammad

    1998-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine the incidence of malnutrition among hospitalized patients. A cross-sectional study of patients were evaluated for findings suggestive of protein calorie malnutrition (PCM). Hundred and sixty patients admitted to the medical and surgical wards over a period of five months were studied. Anthropometrics and biochemical measurements were used. Nutrition status was calculated based on some nutrition parameters weight for height, midarm, circumference, ...

  1. TO STUDY PH DISORDERS IN SEVERE ACUTE MALNUTRITION

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study pH disorders in severe acute malnutrition. DESIGN: A prospective, cohort, observational study. SETTING: Severe malnutrition treatment unit in a tertiary level care hospital in central India. PARTICIPANTS: 202 children between 6 to 60 months of age. METHODOLOGY: Radial artery sample was taken at admission which was analyzed by automated blood gas analyzer; results were studied and correlated with nutritional status at discharge/outcome. STATISTICAL ANALY...

  2. Prevalence of malnutrition in a tertiary care hospital in India

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Malnutrition adversely affects clinical outcome of hospitalized patients. This observational prospective study was done to assess the prevalence of malnutrition and its grade among patients admitted in a mixed intensive care unit (ICU) of a tertiary care hospital in order to help devise a comprehensive nutrition program for the malnourished. Materials and Methods: A total of 500 sequential patients admitted to the ICU were screened on admission over a year period for malnutritio...

  3. Malnutrition in Children below 6 Years in Nalgonda District, Telangana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amrita N Shamanewadi

    2016-04-01

    Results: Out of 933, there were 493 females and 440 males. Prevalence of Overall malnutrition for underweight, stunting and wasting was found to be 56.59%, 62.59% and 25.72% respectively. Conclusion: It is concluded that there is a high prevalence of Mal-nutrition in the selected area and hence health education and nu-tritional intervention are needed on urgent basis. " [Natl J Community Med 2016; 7(4.000: 257-261

  4. The relationship between mother-child in marasmus type malnutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Inés Restrepo Vásquez

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This reflection aims to describe some theoretical reflections about the features that appear in the mother / son / food relational dynamic. It presents the research projects that are so far on the relationship between malnutrition and psychological aspects that accompany it. The chosen method in order to select the literature used the following search criteria: papers published between 2001 and 2011. It was used word-phrases: (Malnutrition, (marasmus, (marasmus type malnutrition and psychological and (mother / child relationship and malnutrition. As search facilities: Electronic databases (Ebsco, Medline, PubMed, SciELO, Embase. Priority was given to research work at national and local levels. Only those works which explicitly use the concept of malnutrition / stagnation / mother son bond were considerate. Also it was identified the most prominent authors in the field, and it was conducted exchanges with specialists on the field. Results show that so far there is no recent work related to this specific subject, except the work done by the doctor and psychoanalyst Rene Spitz in 1945. Conclusions: In this absence of research papers and given the particular phenomenon of marasmus type malnutrition, unacceptable as a problem that affects children’s mental health; there is the urge to create investigative actions that favor the construction of new intervention mechanisms for this complex reality.

  5. Length-free near infrared measurement of newborn malnutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafa, Fatin Hamimi; Bek, Emily J.; Huvanandana, Jacqueline; Jones, Peter W.; Carberry, Angela E.; Jeffery, Heather E.; Jin, Craig T.; McEwan, Alistair L.

    2016-11-01

    Under-nutrition in neonates can cause immediate mortality, impaired cognitive development and early onset adult disease. Body fat percentage measured using air-displacement-plethysmography has been found to better indicate under-nutrition than conventional birth weight percentiles. However, air-displacement-plethysmography equipment is expensive and non-portable, so is not suited for use in developing communities where the burden is often the greatest. We proposed a new body fat measurement technique using a length-free model with near-infrared spectroscopy measurements on a single site of the body - the thigh. To remove the need for length measurement, we developed a model with five discrete wavelengths and a sex parameter. The model was developed using air-displacement-plethysmography measurements in 52 neonates within 48 hours of birth. We identified instrumentation required in a low-cost LED-based screening device and incorporated a receptor device that can increase the amount of light collected. This near-infrared method may be suitable as a low cost screening tool for detecting body fat levels and monitoring nutritional interventions for malnutrition in neonates and young children in resource-constrained communities.

  6. The effectiveness of nutritional interventions in malnutrition and cachexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Christine

    2015-11-01

    Cancer is a common diagnosis and leading cause of death worldwide. Amounts of weight loss vary but it is associated with considerable morbidity, poorer quality of life and reduced survival. Nutritional intervention has the potential to maximise response to treatment and improve functioning and quality of life. The aim of this paper was to review the evidence for oral nutritional interventions in the management of weight loss in patients with cancer. Comparison of studies of nutritional support interventions in people with cancer is complicated by variations in understanding of what constitutes a compromised nutritional status. There are similarities and differences between definitions of both malnutrition and cachexia and studies of oral nutritional interventions have failed to use standard criteria at study inclusion contributing to heterogeneity amongst studies. Meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials has suggested limited evidence of benefit to nutritional and clinical outcomes but some improvements to aspects of quality of life. The presence of cachexia in patients with cancer might explain the limited efficacy of simple oral nutritional interventions, which lack a component designed to address metabolic abnormalities associated with cachexia. Novel strategies combining nutritional support with therapeutic agents designed to down-regulate the metabolic aberrations have failed to demonstrate consistent benefits and the results of multimodal treatments combining several interventions are awaited. There is a need for intervention studies recruiting patients early in the disease course, which underlines the need for definitions which predict poor outcome and hence allow early recognition of vulnerable patients.

  7. The Arid Melancholy-Netherton Syndrome With Protein Energy Malnutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Pramod Ajit; Pandey, Neha

    2016-01-01

    Netherton Syndrome (NS) is a rare autosomal recessive hereditary ichthyosiform disease with a classical triad comprising of an ichthyosiform dermatosis, hair shaft abnormalities and atopic diathesis. There is a mutation in a gene named Serine Protease Inhibitor Kazal type-5 (SPINK5); a new type of serine protease inhibitor involved in the regulation of skin barrier formation and immunity. Skin manifestations include, Ichthyosis Linearis Circumflexa (ILC), polycyclic and serpiginous, erythematous plaques with characteristic migratory, double-edged scale at the margins, or Congenital Ichthyosiform Erythroderma (CIE). Most of the patients have elevated immunoglobulin class E (IgE) and show atopic manifestations. Hair shaft abnormalities like pili torti and/or trichorrhexis nodosa, trichorrhexis invaginata, are seen. Here, we report a rare case of Netherton Syndrome having ILC and trichorrhexis nodosa with protein energy malnutrition in a five-year-old school going girl. She belonged to a poor socio-economic background and was worried about her physical appearance due to her skin lesions, causing psychosocial morbidity to her. PMID:27190931

  8. [Long-term follow-up of nosocomial rotavirus infections at the Infectious Diseases Clinic of the Medical School Hospital in Plzen (1987-1994)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazdiora, P; Táborská, J; Svecová, M

    1996-09-01

    The authors evaluated in 1987-1994 the incidence of nosocomial rotavirus infections during hospitalization in 1718 junior children, 450 senior children and adults admitted with diarrhoeal diseases. Rotavirus infection was revealed in 6.2 and 1.3% of the patients resp. During hospitalization the rotaviruses were the most frequent causal agent of nosocomial infections. Hospital infection was contracted regardless of the initial diagnosis most frequently by patients aged 0-12 months. The majority of nosocomial rotavirus infections was associated with symptoms of diarrhoeal disease, on average symptomatic infections prolonged the hospitalization period by 4.2 days. The authors discuss the possibility to influence the incidence of these infections.

  9. Six simple questions to detect malnutrition or malnutrition risk in elderly women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Gómez, Tranquilina; Cortés, Ernesto; Palazón-Bru, Antonio; Peñarrieta-de Córdova, Isabel; Gil-Guillén, Vicente Francisco; Ferrer-Diego, Rosa María

    2015-01-01

    Of the numerous instruments available to detect nutritional risk, the most widely used is the Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA), but it takes 15-20 min to complete and its systematic administration in primary care units is not feasible in practice. We developed a tool to evaluate malnutrition risk that can be completed more rapidly using just clinical variables. Between 2008 and 2013, we conducted a cross-sectional study of 418 women aged ≥60 years from Mexico. Our outcome was positive MNA and our secondary variables included were: physical activity, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, educational level, dentition, psychological problems, living arrangements, history of falls, age and the number of tablets taken daily. The sample was divided randomly into two groups: construction and validation. Construction: a risk table was constructed to estimate the likelihood of the outcome, and risk groups were formed. the area under the ROC curve (AUC) was calculated and we compared the expected and the observed outcomes. The following risk factors were identified: physical activity, hypertension, diabetes, dentition, psychological problems and living with the family. The AUC was 0.77 (95% CI [0.68-0.86], p malnutrition screening test for use in elderly women. The test is based on six very simple, quick and easy-to-evaluate questions, enabling the MNA to be reserved for confirmation. However, it should be used with caution until validation studies have been performed in other geographical areas.

  10. The chemical bases of the various AIDS epidemics: recreational drugs, anti-viral chemotherapy and malnutrition

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Peter Duesberg; Claus Koehnlein; David Rasnick

    2003-06-01

    In 1981 a new epidemic of about two-dozen heterogeneous diseases began to strike non-randomly growing numbers of male homosexuals and mostly male intravenous drug users in the US and Europe. Assuming immunodeficiency as the common denominator the US Centers for Disease Control (CDC) termed the epidemic, AIDS, for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. From 1981–1984 leading researchers including those from the CDC proposed that recreational drug use was the cause of AIDS, because of exact correlations and of drug-specific diseases. However, in 1984 US government researchers proposed that a virus, now termed human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), is the cause of the non-random epidemics of the US and Europe but also of a new, sexually random epidemic in Africa. The virus-AIDS hypothesis was instantly accepted, but it is burdened with numerous paradoxes, none of which could be resolved by 2003: Why is there no HIV in most AIDS patients, only antibodies against it? Why would HIV take 10 years from infection to AIDS? Why is AIDS not self-limiting via antiviral immunity? Why is there no vaccine against AIDS? Why is AIDS in the US and Europe not random like other viral epidemics? Why did AIDS not rise and then decline exponentially owing to antiviral immunity like all other viral epidemics? Why is AIDS not contagious? Why would only HIV carriers get AIDS who use either recreational or anti-HIV drugs or are subject to malnutrition? Why is the mortality of HIV-antibody-positives treated with anti-HIV drugs 7–9%, but that of all (mostly untreated) HIV-positives globally is only 1.4%? Here we propose that AIDS is a collection of chemical epidemics, caused by recreational drugs, anti-HIV drugs, and malnutrition. According to this hypothesis AIDS is not contagious, not immunogenic, not treatable by vaccines or antiviral drugs, and HIV is just a passenger virus. The hypothesis explains why AIDS epidemics strike non-randomly if caused by drugs and randomly if caused by

  11. The chemical bases of the various AIDS epidemics: recreational drugs, anti-viral chemotherapy and malnutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duesberg, Peter; Koehnlein, Claus; Rasnick, David

    2003-06-01

    In 1981 a new epidemic of about two-dozen heterogeneous diseases began to strike non-randomly growing numbers of male homosexuals and mostly male intravenous drug users in the US and Europe. Assuming immunodeficiency as the common denominator the US Centers for Disease Control (CDC) termed the epidemic, AIDS, for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. From 1981-1984 leading researchers including those from the CDC proposed that recreational drug use was the cause of AIDS, because of exact correlations and of drug-specific diseases. However, in 1984 US government researchers proposed that a virus, now termed human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), is the cause of the non-random epidemics of the US and Europe but also of a new, sexually random epidemic in Africa. The virus-AIDS hypothesis was instantly accepted, but it is burdened with numerous paradoxes, none of which could be resolved by 2003: Why is there no HIV in most AIDS patients, only antibodies against it? Why would HIV take 10 years from infection to AIDS? Why is AIDS not self-limiting via antiviral immunity? Why is there no vaccine against AIDS? Why is AIDS in the US and Europe not random like other viral epidemics? Why did AIDS not rise and then decline exponentially owing to antiviral immunity like all other viral epidemics? Why is AIDS not contagious? Why would only HIV carriers get AIDS who use either recreational or anti-HIV drugs or are subject to malnutrition? Why is the mortality of HIV-antibody-positives treated with anti-HIV drugs 7-9%, but that of all (mostly untreated) HIV-positives globally is only 1.4%? Here we propose that AIDS is a collection of chemical epidemics, caused by recreational drugs, anti-HIV drugs, and malnutrition. According to this hypothesis AIDS is not contagious, not immunogenic, not treatable by vaccines or antiviral drugs, and HIV is just a passenger virus. The hypothesis explains why AIDS epidemics strike non-randomly if caused by drugs and randomly if caused by malnutrition

  12. Update on the prevalence of malnutrition among children in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khor, Geok Lin

    2003-12-01

    Approximately 70.0% of the world's malnourished children live in Asia, resulting in the region having the highest concentration of childhood malnutrition. About half of the preschool children are malnourished ranging from 16.0% in the People's Republic of China to 64.0% in Bangladesh. Prevalence of stunting and underweight are high especially in South Asia where one in every two preschool children is stunted. Besides protein-energy malnutrition, Asian children also suffer from micronutrient deficiency. Iron deficiency anaemia affects 40.0-50.0% of preschool and primary school children. Nearly half of all vitamin A deficiency and xeropthalmia in the world occurs in South and Southeast Asia, with large numbers of cases in India (35.3 million), Indonesia (12.6 million) and China (11.4 million). Another major micronutrient problem in the region is iodine deficiency disorders, which result in high goiter rates as manifested in India, Pakistan and parts of Indonesia. While under-nutrition problem persists, overweight problem in children has emerged in Asia, including Taiwan, Singapore and urban China and Malaysia. The etiology of childhood malnutrition is complex involving interactions of multiple determinants that include biological, cultural and socio-economic influences. Protein-energy malnutrition and micronutrient deficiency leading to early growth failure often can be traced to poor maternal nutritional and health care before and during pregnancy, resulting in intrauterine growth retardation and children born with low birth weight. While significant progress has been achieved over the past 30 years in reducing the proportion of malnourished children in developing countries, nonetheless, malnutrition persists affecting large numbers of children. The socio-economic cost of the malnutrition burden to the individual, family and country is high resulting in lower cognitive outcomes in children and lower adult productivity. Interventions that are cost-effective and

  13. Dairy food supplementation may reduce malnutrition risk in institutionalised elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iuliano, Sandra; Poon, Shirley; Wang, Xiaofang; Bui, Minh; Seeman, Ego

    2017-01-01

    Malnutrition in institutionalised elderly increases morbidity and care costs. Meat and dairy foods are high-quality protein sources so adequate intakes may reduce malnutrition risk. We aimed to determine whether inadequate intakes of meat and dairy foods contribute to malnutrition in institutionalised elderly. This cross-sectional study involved 215 elderly residents (70·2 % females, mean age 85·8 years) from twenty-one aged-care facilities in Melbourne, Australia. Dietary intake was assessed using observed plate waste. Food groups and serving sizes were based on the Australian Guide to Healthy Eating. Nutrient content was analysed using a computerised nutrient analysis software (Xyris). Malnutrition risk was assessed using the Mini Nutrition Assessment (MNA) tool; a score between 24 and 30 indicates normal nutritional status. Data were analysed using robust regression. Mean MNA score was 21·6 (sd 2·7). In total, 68 % of residents were malnourished or at risk of malnutrition (MNA score≤23·5). Protein intake was 87 (sd 28) % of the Australian recommended dietary intake (RDI). Consumption averaged 1 serving each of dairy foods and meat daily. Number of dairy and meat servings related to proportion of protein RDI (both P24 points). Provision of meat and dairy foods did not meet recommended levels. On the basis of current dietary intakes in aged-care residents, increasing consumption of dairy foods to the recommended four servings daily ensures protein adequacy and may reduce malnutrition risk in institutionalised elderly, and so reduce risk of comorbidities and costs associated with malnutrition.

  14. Diagnostic criteria for malnutrition - An ESPEN Consensus Statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cederholm, T; Bosaeus, I; Barazzoni, R; Bauer, J; Van Gossum, A; Klek, S; Muscaritoli, M; Nyulasi, I; Ockenga, J; Schneider, S M; de van der Schueren, M A E; Singer, P

    2015-06-01

    To provide a consensus-based minimum set of criteria for the diagnosis of malnutrition to be applied independent of clinical setting and aetiology, and to unify international terminology. The European Society of Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism (ESPEN) appointed a group of clinical scientists to perform a modified Delphi process, encompassing e-mail communications, face-to-face meetings, in group questionnaires and ballots, as well as a ballot for the ESPEN membership. First, ESPEN recommends that subjects at risk of malnutrition are identified by validated screening tools, and should be assessed and treated accordingly. Risk of malnutrition should have its own ICD Code. Second, a unanimous consensus was reached to advocate two options for the diagnosis of malnutrition. Option one requires body mass index (BMI, kg/m(2)) malnutrition. Option two requires the combined finding of unintentional weight loss (mandatory) and at least one of either reduced BMI or a low fat free mass index (FFMI). Weight loss could be either >10% of habitual weight indefinite of time, or >5% over 3 months. Reduced BMI is 75% agreed; i.e. indicated ≥7 on a 10-graded scale of acceptance, to this definition. In individuals identified by screening as at risk of malnutrition, the diagnosis of malnutrition should be based on either a low BMI (<18.5 kg/m(2)), or on the combined finding of weight loss together with either reduced BMI (age-specific) or a low FFMI using sex-specific cut-offs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  15. Reduction in childhood malnutrition in Vietnam from 1990 to 2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Nguyen Cong; Tuyen, Le Danh; Ngoc, Tran Xuan; Duong, Phan Hoai; Khoi, Ha Huy

    2007-01-01

    Reduction in childhood malnutrition in Vietnam between 1990 and 2004 was assessed using data from 5 national surveys. The prevalence of malnutrition, including stunting, declined significantly for underweight from 45% in 1990 to 26.6% in 2004. While the average reduction was 1.3% per year in the period from 1990 to 2000, it was 1.8% per year in the period from 2000 to 2004. The prevalence of stunting declined from 56.5% in 1990 to 30.7% in 2004, with an average reduction of 2% per year in the period from 1990 to 2000 and 1.5% per year in the period from 2000 to 2004. There were clear differences in the decrease in malnutrition prevalence between urban, rural and mountainous areas, the reduction being highest in the urban regions and lowest in the mountainous areas. Regression analysis showed that the nutrition status of the child is positively related to better household living conditions and to the educational level of the father, but not the mother. Stunting is higher in children whose parents are farmers and higher in households with more children. Stunting prevalence is lower in households with safe water access and hygienic toilets. In future , the dramatic reduction is childhood malnutrition as seen in the period 1990 to 2004 might not continue. More comprehensive apptoaches will be needed to lower childhood malnutrition in Vietnam further.

  16. [Understanding the pathophysiology of malnutrition for better treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bandt, J-P

    2015-09-01

    Malnutrition results from an imbalance between intake and protein-energy requirements resulting in tissue losses with adverse functional consequences. However, it would be better to speak of "states of malnutrition" rather than "malnutrition". Indeed, the mechanisms involved associate, with varying degrees, intake deficiency and increased needs with different clinical consequences. Adaptation to nutrient deficiency aims at establishing lasting saving conditions by promoting optimization of energy reserve utilization while preserving protein pool. This is achieved by reducing basal metabolism (low T3), by decreasing the secretion of anabolic factors and moderately increasing catabolic hormones. Unlike the previous process, the metabolic response to injury or stress, which will sometime induce major increase in requirements, will have as immediate purpose the defense of the organism. The body will draw sometime substantially in its protein pool to produce the glucose required for example by the immune cells. Stress response stems from both an endocrine response, and an immuno-inflammatory one with the important role of pro-inflammatory cytokines released in response to pathogens and more recently alarmins in response to endogenous stress in the inflammatory phenomena of the stress response and in the resulting malnutrition state. Treatment of these malnutrition conditions will thus differ: promoting anabolism in one case and fighting resistance to anabolism and hypercatabolism in the other. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. The effect of childhood malnutrition on externalizing behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianghong; Raine, Adrian

    2006-10-01

    Childhood externalizing behavior (aggression, hyperactivity, and conduct disorder) has been increasingly viewed as a public health problem because of its etiology and outcome. The association between malnutrition and externalizing behavior has begun to receive attention. This review summarizes recent empirical findings on malnutrition as a risk factor for the development of externalizing behavior, with an emphasis on micronutrient deficiency, and explores brain dysfunction as a possible mechanism. Externalizing behavior is associated with both macromalnutrition (e.g. protein) and micromalnutrition (e.g. iron and zinc). Both prenatal and postnatal malnutrition is implicated. The long-term effects of malnutrition on behavior could be reversible. The effects of docosahexaenoic acid/omega-3 long-chain essential fatty acid on externalizing behavior are more mixed. From animal and human findings, it is hypothesized that malnutrition impairs neurocognitive functioning by reducing neurons, alternating neurotransmitter functioning, and increasing neurotoxicity, and that such neurocognitive impairments predispose to externalizing behavior. Different lines of evidence support the view that poor nutrition contributes to the development of child behavior problems. More randomized, controlled trials that manipulate nutritional intake and evaluate behavior in children are needed to evaluate the etiological role of nutrition in externalizing behavior in order to inform intervention and prevention efforts.

  18. Epidemiological evaluation regarding the role of cystic fibrosis as a risk factor for child malnutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florescu, Laura; Paduraru, Dana Teodora Anton; Mîndru, Dana Elena; Temneanu, Oana Raluea; Petrariu, F D; Matei, Mioara Calipsoana

    2014-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most common monogenic autosomal recessive disorder with progressive chronic evolution which is potentially lethal. Poor growth is a characteristic of children suffering from cystic fibrosis. A poor nutritional status is an independent risk factor for inadequate survival in cystic fibrosis and is associated with disease complications. The appropriate nutritional management is an important part of the treatment so that the patient with cystic fibrosis can achieve normal growth and development and maintain the best possible health status. A balanced diet supplemented with snacks high in fat and calories is necessary to increase the caloric intake in children with cystic fibrosis. Children with cystic fibrosis have higher caloric needs than healthy children of the same age and sex. Malnutrition in CF is multifactorial. Cystic fibrosis is a complex multisystem disorder affecting mainly the gastrointestinal tract and respiratory system. In the past, malnutrition was an inevitable consequence of disease progression, leading to poor growth, impaired respiratory muscle function, decreased exercise tolerance and immunological impairment. A positive association between body weight and height and survival has been widely reported. The energy requirements of patients with CF vary widely and generally increase with age and disease severity. Cystic fibrosis remains a paediatric disorder which is often underdiagnosed but which, if therapeutically managed properly (by means of drug therapy as well as by appropriate physiotherapy techniques), can lead to improved quality of life and, thus, to a bigger life expectancy.

  19. Six simple questions to detect malnutrition or malnutrition risk in elderly women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tranquilina Gutiérrez-Gómez

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Of the numerous instruments available to detect nutritional risk, the most widely used is the Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA, but it takes 15–20 min to complete and its systematic administration in primary care units is not feasible in practice. We developed a tool to evaluate malnutrition risk that can be completed more rapidly using just clinical variables. Between 2008 and 2013, we conducted a cross-sectional study of 418 women aged ≥60 years from Mexico. Our outcome was positive MNA and our secondary variables included were: physical activity, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, educational level, dentition, psychological problems, living arrangements, history of falls, age and the number of tablets taken daily. The sample was divided randomly into two groups: construction and validation. Construction: a risk table was constructed to estimate the likelihood of the outcome, and risk groups were formed. Validation: the area under the ROC curve (AUC was calculated and we compared the expected and the observed outcomes. The following risk factors were identified: physical activity, hypertension, diabetes, dentition, psychological problems and living with the family. The AUC was 0.77 (95% CI [0.68–0.86], p < 0.001. No differences were found between the expected and the observed outcomes (p = 0.902. This study presents a new malnutrition screening test for use in elderly women. The test is based on six very simple, quick and easy-to-evaluate questions, enabling the MNA to be reserved for confirmation. However, it should be used with caution until validation studies have been performed in other geographical areas.

  20. Tackling malnutrition: a systematic review of 15-year research evidence from INDEPTH health and demographic surveillance systems

    OpenAIRE

    Arthur, Samuelina S.; Bongiwe Nyide; Abdramane Bassiahi Soura; Kathleen Kahn; Mark Weston; Osman Sankoh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Nutrition is the intake of food in relation to the body's dietary needs. Malnutrition results from the intake of inadequate or excess food. This can lead to reduced immunity, increased susceptibility to disease, impaired physical and mental development, and reduced productivity. Objective: To perform a systematic review to assess research conducted by the International Network for the Demographic Evaluation of Populations and their Health (INDEPTH) of health and demographic survei...

  1. Probiotics and gut health: A special focus on liver diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Gratz, Silvia Wilson; Mykkanen, Hannu; El-Nezami, Hani S.

    2010-01-01

    Probiotic bacteria have well-established beneficial effects in the management of diarrhoeal diseases. Newer evidence suggests that probiotics have the potential to reduce the risk of developing inflammatory bowel diseases and intestinal bacterial overgrowth after gut surgery. In liver health, the main benefits of probiotics might occur through preventing the production and/or uptake of lipopolysaccharides in the gut, and therefore reducing levels of low-grade inflammation. Specific immune sti...

  2. The study of malnutrition in elderly people of Kurdistan in 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahimi Z

    2012-06-01

    Conclusion: This study seems to take care intervention programs extensively by the health authorities and policymakers to prevent malnutrition in all age groups, especially the elderly appears necessary. Keywords: Elderly - Malnutrition - BMI

  3. Malnutrition, eating difficulties and feeding dependence in a stroke rehabilitation centre

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poels, Bas; Brinkman-Zijlker, HG; Dijkstra, PU; Postema, K

    Purpose. To analyse prevalence of malnutrition, eating difficulties and feeding dependence in stroke rehabilitation patients because little is known about these prevalence's. Stroke patients have an increased risk for developing eating difficulties, feeding dependence and malnutrition because of

  4. Body Composition Monitor Assessing Malnutrition in the Hemodialysis Population Independently Predicts Mortality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosenberger, Jaroslav; Kissova, Viera; Majernikova, Maria; Straussova, Zuzana; Boldizsar, Jan

    Objective: Malnutrition is a known predictor of mortality in the general and hemodialysis populations. However, diagnosing malnutrition in dialysis patients remains problematic. Body composition monitoring (BCM) is currently used mainly for assessing overhydratation in hemodialysis patients, but it

  5. Cost-effectiveness of an interdisciplinary intervention in geriatric inpatients to prevent malnutrition.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijpkema, G.; Adang, E.M.M.; Dicke, H.C.; Naber, A.H.J.; Swart, B.J.M. de; Disselhorst, L.; Goluke-Willemse, G.; Olde Rikkert, M.G.M.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In order to reduce protein-energy malnutrition in older people during hospitalisation an early interdisciplinary intervention is needed. We developed a protocol which includes screening for malnutrition, dysphagia and dehydration on admission, followed by immediate interventions. OBJECTI

  6. Risk factors of malnutrition among preschool children in Terengganu, Malaysia: a case control study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wong, Hui Jie; Moy, Foong Ming; Nair, Sulochana

    2014-01-01

    Childhood malnutrition is a multi-dimensional problem. An increase in household income is not sufficient to reduce childhood malnutrition if children are deprived of food security, education, access to water, sanitation and health services...

  7. Malnutrition, eating difficulties and feeding dependence in a stroke rehabilitation centre

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poels, Bas; Brinkman-Zijlker, HG; Dijkstra, PU; Postema, K

    2006-01-01

    Purpose. To analyse prevalence of malnutrition, eating difficulties and feeding dependence in stroke rehabilitation patients because little is known about these prevalence's. Stroke patients have an increased risk for developing eating difficulties, feeding dependence and malnutrition because of the

  8. Body Composition Monitor Assessing Malnutrition in the Hemodialysis Population Independently Predicts Mortality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosenberger, Jaroslav; Kissova, Viera; Majernikova, Maria; Straussova, Zuzana; Boldizsar, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Malnutrition is a known predictor of mortality in the general and hemodialysis populations. However, diagnosing malnutrition in dialysis patients remains problematic. Body composition monitoring (BCM) is currently used mainly for assessing overhydratation in hemodialysis patients, but it

  9. Malnutrition and hospital prognosis in the alcoholic patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bienia, R; Ratcliff, S; Barbour, G L; Kummer, M

    1982-01-01

    The nutritional status of 65 alcoholic patients admitted to the Medical Service of a Veterans Administration Hospital was evaluated and compared to that 87 nonalcoholic patients admitted during the same period of time. There was no statistical difference in the prevalence of malnutrition in the alcoholic population (36.9%) when compared to the nonalcoholic population (43.7%). The death rate and incidence of infection were similar in both populations as was the prevalence of anemia, depressed total lymphocyte count, and skin test anergy. Malnutrition, however, correlated with an increased death rate and incidence of infection, regardless of whether the patient was an alcoholic or not.

  10. STUDY OF SEVERE MALNUTRITION IN PRESCHOOL CHILDREN OF MELGHAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meena Shelgaonkar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available i                Introduction:Melghat - tribal block of villages (with 87.5% tribal population in Maharashtra, (India unfortunately is known for malnutrition among children, despite lots of efforts taken by Govt. and NGOs.ii              Rationale: The study was conducted to examine the causes of malnutrition and awareness about consequences of malnutrition as a part of Post-graduate thesis.iii            Objective:Tocompare the status and causes of malnutrition in children below age five in Intervention and Control Villages in Melghat over a period of 2 months.iv             Materials and Methods: A questionnaire based survey method was used by selecting ten villages out of 40 using lottery method where MAHAN, Melghat is already working. Selected ten villages were from Intervention and Control groups (five each. In Intervention villages health and nutritional education awareness programs were conducted while in control group government programs such as 21 day care for severely malnourished children were going on but no health and nutritional education programs. Children’s weight, heights were taken and also general information like mothers educational status was collected in both groups by visiting all families. The data was analyzed for status of malnutrition in preschool children from these families and awareness about nutrition in mothers.v               Results:Status of malnutrition in preschool children was lower in Intervention villages (66.0 % as compared to that of Control villages (73.0 %, while prevalence was higher among the children whose mothers were illiterate. Malnutrition was higher in girls (70.5 %, 77.1 % as compared to that of boys (61.4 %, 68.7 % in both groups.vi             Conclusion: The analysis of study data from tenvillages suggested thatproper health and nutritional education about feeding is lacking in mothers. To reduce this childhood

  11. Dissonant health transition in the states of Mexico, 1990-2013: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Dantés, Héctor; Fullman, Nancy; Lamadrid-Figueroa, Héctor; Cahuana-Hurtado, Lucero; Darney, Blair; Avila-Burgos, Leticia; Correa-Rotter, Ricardo; Rivera, Juan A; Barquera, Simon; González-Pier, Eduardo; Aburto-Soto, Tania; de Castro, Elga Filipa Amorin; Barrientos-Gutiérrez, Tonatiuh; Basto-Abreu, Ana C; Batis, Carolina; Borges, Guilherme; Campos-Nonato, Ismael; Campuzano-Rincón, Julio C; de Jesús Cantoral-Preciado, Alejandra; Contreras-Manzano, Alejandra G; Cuevas-Nasu, Lucia; de la Cruz-Gongora, Vanessa V; Diaz-Ortega, Jose L; de Lourdes García-García, María; Garcia-Guerra, Armando; de Cossío, Teresita González; González-Castell, Luz D; Heredia-Pi, Ileana; Hijar-Medina, Marta C; Jauregui, Alejandra; Jimenez-Corona, Aida; Lopez-Olmedo, Nancy; Magis-Rodríguez, Carlos; Medina-Garcia, Catalina; Medina-Mora, Maria E; Mejia-Rodriguez, Fabiola; Montañez, Julio C; Montero, Pablo; Montoya, Alejandra; Moreno-Banda, Grea L; Pedroza-Tobías, Andrea; Pérez-Padilla, Rogelio; Quezada, Amado D; Richardson-López-Collada, Vesta L; Riojas-Rodríguez, Horacio; Ríos Blancas, Maria J; Razo-Garcia, Christian; Mendoza, Martha P Romero; Sánchez-Pimienta, Tania G; Sánchez-Romero, Luz M; Schilmann, Astrid; Servan-Mori, Edson; Shamah-Levy, Teresa; Téllez-Rojo, Martha M; Texcalac-Sangrador, José L; Wang, Haidong; Vos, Theo; Forouzanfar, Mohammad H; Naghavi, Mohsen; Lopez, Alan D; Murray, Christopher J L; Lozano, Rafael

    2016-11-12

    negligible improvements were observed since 2000. For many states, this trend corresponded with rising YLL rates from interpersonal violence and chronic kidney disease. Nationally, age-standardised YLL rates for diarrhoeal diseases and protein-energy malnutrition markedly decreased, ranking Mexico well above comparator countries. However, amid Mexico's progress against communicable diseases, chronic kidney disease burden rapidly climbed, with age-standardised YLL and DALY rates increasing more than 130% by 2013. For women, DALY rates from breast cancer also increased since 1990, rising 12·1% (4·6-23·1%). In 2013, the leading five causes of DALYs were diabetes, ischaemic heart disease, chronic kidney disease, low back and neck pain, and depressive disorders; the latter three were not among the leading five causes in 1990, further underscoring Mexico's rapid epidemiological transition. Leading risk factors for disease burden in 1990, such as undernutrition, were replaced by high fasting plasma glucose and high body-mass index by 2013. Attributable burden due to dietary risks also increased, accounting for more than 10% of DALYs in 2013. Mexico achieved sizeable reductions in burden due to several causes, such as diarrhoeal diseases, and risks factors, such as undernutrition and poor sanitation, which were mainly associated with maternal and child health interventions. Yet rising adult mortality rates from chronic kidney disease, diabetes, cirrhosis, and, since 2000, interpersonal violence drove deteriorating health outcomes, particularly in men. Although state inequalities from communicable diseases narrowed over time, non-communicable diseases and injury burdens varied markedly at local levels. The dissonance with which Mexico and its 32 states are experiencing epidemiological transitions might strain health-system responsiveness and performance, which stresses the importance of timely, evidence-informed health policies and programmes linked to the health needs of each

  12. The correlation of C-reactive protein level with malnutrition and cardiovascular disease in peritoneal dialysis patients%腹膜透析患者C反应蛋白水平与营养不良及心血管疾病的相关性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高小夏; 潘家荣; 邹芸; 刘华

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨腹膜透析(continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis,CAPD)患者C反应蛋白水平的改变及炎症反应与营养不良及心血管疾病的关系. 方法 检测健康对照者、尿毒症非透析患者和持续性非卧床腹膜透析(CAPD)患者C反应蛋白(CRP),血清白蛋白(Alb),血红蛋白(Hb),血清铁蛋白(SF),血清前白蛋白(PA)等指标.并根据CAPD患者CRP水平将其分为正常组(CRP< 10mg/L),异常组(CRP>10mg/L),观察2组之间的差别. 结果 尿毒症非透析组和CAPD组CRP水平均高于对照组[(12.14±5.92) mg/L与(13.92±4.67) mg/L比(5.37±2.15) mg/L,t=8.16,t=12.95,P<0.001],CAPD组CRP水平高于尿毒症非透析组[(13.92±4.67) mg/L比(12.14±5.92)mg/L,t=2.70,P<0.01].CAPD患者CRP水平与营养不良指标Alb,Hb,PA成负相关,有统计学意义(r=0.44,P=0.007;r=-0.57,P=0.002;r=0.36,P=0.010),CRP水平与改良定量的整体营养评估(MQSGA)呈正相关,有统计学意义(r =0.26,P=0.048).CAPD患者CRP水平升高组的心血管疾病发生率高于CRP正常组(x2=3.86,P<0.05),CRP水平与心脏超声检查指标左房内径(LAD)、左室舒张末内径(LVDd)、室间隔厚度(IVST)、左室后壁后度(LVPWT)呈正相关(r=0.315,P=0.028;r=0.252,P=0.049; r=0.297,P=0.035; r=0.349,P=0.020)有统计学意义,与左室射血分数(LVEF)呈负相关(r=-0.281,P=0.041),有统计学意义. 结论 CAPD患者存在CRP水平升高的炎症反应,且高于尿毒症非透析患者,CAPD患者营养不良及心血管疾病与慢性炎症状态相关.%Objective To discuss the correlation of C-reactive protein (CRP) with malnutrition and cardiovascular diseases in peritoneal dialysis patients. Method C-reaction protein (CRP), serum albumin (Alb), hemoglobin (Hb), serum ferritin (SF), and serum prealbumin (PA) were assayed in healthy control subjects, uremic patients without dialysis, and continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) patients. The CAPD patients were then divided into CAPD normal group (CRP l0

  13. Nutritional Screening of Older Adults : Risk Factors for and Consequences of Malnutrition

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Aims The overall aim of this thesis was to extend current knowledge about the prevalence of malnutrition, to identify possible risk factors for development of malnutrition, and to describe the consequences of malnutrition in relation to all-cause and cause-specific mortality among older adults admitted to hospital. Methods The prevalence of malnutrition was estimated in a cohort of 1771 older adults (≥65 years) who were admitted to a Swedish hospital during 2008–2009 (15 months) and screened ...

  14. Prevalence of hospital malnutrition among cardiac patients: results from six nutrition screening tools

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Malnutrition is highly prevalent among hospitalized patients, ranging from 30% to 50% depending on the patient population and the criteria used for diagnosis. Identifying early those who are malnourished and at risk of malnutrition and intervening at an early stage will improve patients overall prognosis and will reduce the costs to the state. Even though cardiac patients are at risk of malnutrition, data on the prevalence of malnutrition among cardiology inpatients is limited. The aim of the...

  15. Predictors of mortality in dialysis patients: Association between malnutrition, inflammation and atherosclerosis (Mia syndrome)

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    Introduction Numerous recent studies have shown increased comorbidity and mortality in dialysis patients with malnutrition. Protein-energy malnutrition with muscle wasting occurs in a large proportion of patients with chronic renal failure and is, in addition to atherosclerosis, a strong risk factor for mortality in patients undergoing dialysis. Malnutrition is also associated with increased cardiovascular mortality in dialysis patients. Pathogenic factors of malnutrition in dialysis patients...

  16. Risk factors of malnutrition among the elderly living in rural areas

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. The problem of malnutrition increases with age and according to epidemiological data the risk of malnutrition affected almost 5–10% of the elderly population. Early identification and treatment of malnutrition among the elderly can reduce or prevent from hospitalization, reduce complications, decrease mortality and improve quality of life. The aim of the present study was to assess the nutritional habits and to evaluate the risk factors of malnutrition am...

  17. Malnutrition in Hospitals: It Was, Is Now, and Must Not Remain a Problem!

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Background Malnutrition is an under-recognized problem in hospitalized patients. Despite systematic screening, the prevalence of malnutrition in the hospital did not decrease in the last few decades. The aim of our study was to evaluate the prevalence of malnutrition and to determine the explicit daily calorie intake of hospitalized patients, to identify the risk factors of developing malnutrition during hospitalization and the effect on the financial reimbursement according to the German DRG...

  18. Prevalence of Malnutrition and Associated Factors among Children in Rural Ethiopia

    OpenAIRE

    Neima Endris; Henok Asefa; Lamessa Dube

    2017-01-01

    Background. Child malnutrition continues to be the leading public health problem in developing countries. In Ethiopia, malnutrition is a leading cause of child illness and death. Recently the composite index of anthropometric failure (CIAF) has been implemented to measure the prevalence of malnutrition. This index presents a more complete picture compared with the previous conventional indices. In this study, CIAF was used to determine the prevalence of malnutrition among children aged 0–59 m...

  19. Association between socioeconomic status of mothers, food security, food safety practices and the double burden of malnutrition in the Lalitpur district, Nepal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarki, Mahesh; Robertson, Aileen; Parlesak, Alexandr

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The prevalence of childhood overweight and obesity is increasing in low-and middle income countries such as Nepal. At the same time, high prevalence of chronic undernutrition persists leading to a double burden of malnutrition. AIM: To identify associations between the socioeconomic...... with either HAZ or the BAZ. CONCLUSION: The education level of mothers seems to be relevant to help reduce the double burden of malnutrition at least in some regions of Nepal. This should be taken into consideration when designing programmes to prevent both chronic undernutrition and non-communicable diseases....

  20. Physicians' perceptions regarding the detection and management of malnutrition in Canadian hospitals: results of a Canadian Malnutrition Task Force survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duerksen, Donald R; Keller, Heather H; Vesnaver, Elisabeth; Allard, Johane P; Bernier, Paule; Gramlich, Leah; Payette, Hélène; Laporte, Manon; Jeejeebhoy, Khursheed

    2015-05-01

    Since malnutrition is common in Canadian hospitals, physicians frequently encounter patients with significantly impaired nutrition status. The objective of this study was to determine physician attitudes and perceptions regarding the detection and management of malnutrition in Canadian hospitals. A survey based on a previously developed questionnaire that focused on guidelines for nutrition support of hospitalized patients was completed by Canadian physicians working on wards in the 18 hospitals participating in the Canadian Malnutrition Task Force study. Data were analyzed descriptively and according to ward (medical vs surgical) and hospital type (academic vs community). The survey was completed by 428 of the 1220 physicians who were provided with a questionnaire and asked to participate (response rate 35%). While physicians believe that nutrition assessment should be performed at admission (364/419 [87%]), during hospitalization (363/421 [86%]), and at discharge (327/418 [78%]), most felt that this was not being done on a regular basis (admission, 140/423 [33%]; during hospitalization, 175/423 [41%]; at discharge, 121/424 [29%]). Similarly there was a gap between what was perceived to be the ideal management of hospital-related malnutrition and current practices. Physicians felt that the team's nutrition education and use of dietetic resources could be increased, and although their nutrition knowledge was limited, they felt that hospital-associated malnutrition was very relevant to the care they provided. A multidisciplinary team is needed to address hospital malnutrition, and educational strategies that target physicians are needed to promote better detection and management throughout the hospital stay. © 2014 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  1. Hunger, U.S.A.: A Report by the Citizens' Board of Inquiry into Hunger and Malnutrition in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1968

    The findings of the Citizen's Board of Inquiry are that: (1) hunger and malnutrition affect millions of Americans and are increasing in severity each year; (2) infant deaths, organic brain damage, retarded growth and learning rates, increased vulnerability to disease, withdrawal, apathy, alienation, frustration, and violence result from hunger and…

  2. Gut microbiota in children hospitalized with oedematous and non-oedematous severe acute malnutrition in Uganda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Kia Hee Schultz; Wiese, Maria; Rytter, Maren Johanne Heilskov;

    2016-01-01

    of malnutrition in children remains largely unknown, but gut microbiota (GM) dysbiosis has recently been linked to oedematous malnutrition. In the present study we aimed to assess whether GM composition differed between Ugandan children suffering from either oedematous or non-oedematous malnutrition. METHODOLOGY...

  3. High prevalence of malnutrition among patients with solid non-hematological tumors as found by using skinfold and circumference measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Garófolo

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Malnutrition in cancer patients has many causes. Nutritional status is usually assessed from weight/height indices. These present limitations for the nutritional assessment of cancer patients: their weights include tumor mass, and lean mass changes are not reflected in weight/height indices. The objective was to evaluate differences between two anthropometric methods and compare deficits, in non-hematological tumor patients and hematological disease patients. DESIGN AND SETTING: Cross-sectional study at Instituto de Oncologia Pediátrica, Universidade Federal de São Paulo. METHODS: Children and adolescents were evaluated between March 1998 and January 2000. Traditional anthropometric measurements were obtained in the first month of treatment (induction therapy, by weight-for-height (W/H using z-scores index for children and body mass index (BMI for adolescents. Body composition evaluations consisted of specific anthropometric measurements: triceps skinfold thickness (TSFT, mid-upper arm circumference (MUAC and arm muscle circumference (AMC. Data were analyzed to compare nutritional assessment methods for diagnosing malnutrition prevalence. The chi-squared test was used for comparative analyses between tumor patients and hematological disease patients. RESULTS: Analysis was done on 127 patients with complete data. Higher percentages of deficits were found among tumor patients, by W/H z-scores or BMI and by MUAC and AMC. Higher percentages of deficits were shown by TSFT (40.2% and MUAC (35.4% than by W/H z-scores or BMI (18.9%. CONCLUSION: Non-hematological tumor patients presented higher malnutrition prevalence than did hematological disease patients. Body composition measurements by TSFT and MUAC detected more patients with malnutrition than did W/H or BMI.

  4. Lentil and Kale: Complementary Nutrient-Rich Whole Food Sources to Combat Micronutrient and Calorie Malnutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan Migliozzi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Lentil (Lens culinaris Medik. is a nutritious food and a staple for millions of people. Not only are lentils a good source of energy, they also contain a range of micronutrients and prebiotic carbohydrates. Kale (Brassica oleracea v. acephala has been considered as a health food, but its full range of benefits and composition has not been extensively studied. Recent studies suggest that foods are enrich in prebiotic carbohydrates and dietary fiber that can potentially reduce risks of non-communicable diseases, including obesity, cancer, heart disease, and diabetes. Lentil and kale added to a cereal-based diet would enhance intakes of essential minerals and vitamins to combat micronutrient malnutrition. This review provides an overview of lentil and kale as a complementary nutrient-rich whole food source to combat global malnutrition and calorie issues. In addition, prebiotic carbohydrate profiles and the genetic potential of these crops for further micronutrient enrichment are briefly discussed with respect to developing sustainable and nutritious food systems.

  5. Lentil and Kale: Complementary Nutrient-Rich Whole Food Sources to Combat Micronutrient and Calorie Malnutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliozzi, Megan; Thavarajah, Dil; Thavarajah, Pushparajah; Smith, Powell

    2015-11-11

    Lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) is a nutritious food and a staple for millions of people. Not only are lentils a good source of energy, they also contain a range of micronutrients and prebiotic carbohydrates. Kale (Brassica oleracea v. acephala) has been considered as a health food, but its full range of benefits and composition has not been extensively studied. Recent studies suggest that foods are enrich in prebiotic carbohydrates and dietary fiber that can potentially reduce risks of non-communicable diseases, including obesity, cancer, heart disease, and diabetes. Lentil and kale added to a cereal-based diet would enhance intakes of essential minerals and vitamins to combat micronutrient malnutrition. This review provides an overview of lentil and kale as a complementary nutrient-rich whole food source to combat global malnutrition and calorie issues. In addition, prebiotic carbohydrate profiles and the genetic potential of these crops for further micronutrient enrichment are briefly discussed with respect to developing sustainable and nutritious food systems.

  6. Prevalence of malnutrition in subjects over 65 years of age in the Community of Madrid: the DREAM + 65 Study

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    Cristina Cuerda

    Full Text Available Introduction: Disease-related malnutrition (DRM is a frequent community healthcare problem that predominantly affects adults over 65 years of age and increases morbidity and mortality rates, while also decreasing quality of life. Objective: To study the prevalence of DRM in adults over 65 in different community healthcare centres belonging to the Regional Social Welfare Service of the Community of Madrid. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study in 33 community healthcare centres in Madrid (6 primary healthcare centres (PC, 9 care centres for the elderly (CE, 9 hospitals (H and 9 nursing homes (NH selected by means of multistage sampling. The variables studied were age, sex, level of dependence according to the Red Cross disability scale, reason for admission and underlying disease, habitat (urban-periurban-rural and geographical distribution (north-centre-south. The Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA-screening was employed as a nutritional screening tool in all the centres. In the case of patients with positive screening (at risk-malnutrition, the MNA-assessment was carried out. Statistical analysis was conducted with the SPSS 21.0 package and included descriptive statistics, Chi-square test and Fisher's exact test, one-way ANOVA, Kruskal-Wallis test and univariate and multivariate binary logistic regression analysis (LR. Statistical significance was considered to be p < 0.05. Results: A total of 1,103 subjects were recruited (275 PC, 278 CE, 281 H, 269 NH, mean age 79.5 ± 8.4 years (41.2% were males and 58.8% females. The subjects from H and NH had a higher degree of disability (p < 0.001. The overall prevalence of DRM was 10%, 23.3% being at risk of malnutrition, with differences among the 4 types of community healthcare centres (p < 0.001. The univariate LR analysis showed significant differences in the prevalence of malnutrition according to age, sex, degree of dependence, type of community healthcare centre, habitat and geographical

  7. Protein Malnutrition Modifies Innate Immunity and Gene Expression by Intestinal Epithelial Cells and Human Rotavirus Infection in Neonatal Gnotobiotic Pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paim, Francine C.; Kandasamy, Sukumar; Alhamo, Moyasar A.; Fischer, David D.; Langel, Stephanie N.; Deblais, Loic; Kumar, Anand; Chepngeno, Juliet; Shao, Lulu; Huang, Huang-Chi; Candelero-Rueda, Rosario A.; Rajashekara, Gireesh

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Malnutrition affects millions of children in developing countries, compromising immunity and contributing to increased rates of death from infectious diseases. Rotavirus is a major etiological agent of childhood diarrhea in developing countries, where malnutrition is prevalent. However, the interactions between the two and their combined effects on immune and intestinal functions are poorly understood. In this study, we used neonatal gnotobiotic (Gn) pigs transplanted with the fecal microbiota of a healthy 2-month-old infant (HIFM) and fed protein-deficient or -sufficient bovine milk diets. Protein deficiency induced hypoproteinemia, hypoalbuminemia, hypoglycemia, stunting, and generalized edema in Gn pigs, as observed in protein-malnourished children. Irrespective of the diet, human rotavirus (HRV) infection early, at HIFM posttransplantation day 3 (PTD3), resulted in adverse health effects and higher mortality rates (45 to 75%) than later HRV infection (PTD10). Protein malnutrition exacerbated HRV infection and affected the morphology and function of the small intestinal epithelial barrier. In pigs infected with HRV at PTD10, there was a uniform decrease in the function and/or frequencies of natural killer cells, plasmacytoid dendritic cells, and CD103+ and apoptotic mononuclear cells and altered gene expression profiles of intestinal epithelial cells (chromogranin A, mucin 2, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, SRY-Box 9, and villin). Thus, we have established the first HIFM-transplanted neonatal pig model that recapitulates major aspects of protein malnutrition in children and can be used to evaluate physiologically relevant interventions. Our findings provide an explanation of why nutrient-rich diets alone may lack efficacy in malnourished children. IMPORTANCE Malnutrition and rotavirus infection, prevalent in developing countries, individually and in combination, affect the health of millions of children, compromising their immunity and increasing

  8. Clinical features of severe malnutrition at the pediatric ward of Dr. Pirngadi Hospital Medan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barus, S T; Rani, R; Lubis, N U; Hamid, E D; Tarigan, S

    1990-01-01

    A retrospective study on severe malnutrition concerning children hospitalized at the Pediatric ward of Dr. Pirngadi Hospital, Medan from January 1 to December 31, 1988 was conducted. Patients less than five years old were included in this study. The purpose of this study was to know the incidence of severe malnutrition, its symptoms and signs, the immunization status, feeding pattern and socio-economic factors. Out of the 3370 hospitalized patients, 2453 (72.78%) were children under five years old. Of these, 312 (12%) suffered from severe malnutrition. It consisted of marasmus 131 (41.9%), marasmic kwashiorkor 94 (30.1%) and kwashiorkor 87 (27.8%). The highest incidence was found in the age group of 0-2 years (58%). Clinical manifestation of marasmus were old man face (131 or 100%), muscular hypotrophy (118 or 71.9%) and decreased subcutaneous fat (116 or 71.1%) in marasmic kwashiorkor children 46 or 50% had their hair easily picked out, 45 or 46.3% showed hyperpigmentation and 48 or 52% had pretibial edema in the kwashiorkor group 29 or 63% had moon face, 52 or 60.4% showed crazy pavement dermatosis, 77 or 51.3% had hepatomegaly and 87 or 48% pretebial edema. Moon face was seen in 29 (63%), crazy Pavement Dermatosis in 52 (60.4%), hepatomegaly in 77 (51.3%), and pretebial edema in 87 (48%) of kwashiorkor cases. The accompanying diseases were mostly diarrhea (95%) and bronchopneumonia (22%). Immunization status showed that BCG comprised 50.6%, while DPT III and OPV III in 13.7% and 10.5% respectively and measles only 0.64%. More than half (59.6%) of them were breast-fed up to 6 months.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Prevalence of Malnutrition in Children under 6 Years in Sistan and Baluchestan Province, Iran

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    Mansour Karajibani

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The present study was conducted in rural area of Sistan and Baluchestan province, south-east of Iran with aim of determine the prevalence of underweight, stunting, wasting, overweight and obesity among children. Materials and Methods: One thousand five hundred seventy Children were selected from all children less than 6 years covered by healthy and treatment centers of rural area in Sistan and Baluchestan province. Body weight and height were measured using standard methods. Determination of malnutrition performed based on WHO, National Center for Health Statistics and Center for Disease Control and Prevention (NCHS and CDC standard. The indices nutritional status was assessed by Z- Score. Results: The result showed that, based on NCHS and WHO standard: 21.1% and 19.4%, 28.2% and 32.1%, 7.5% and 9.4% of children were underweight, stunted and wasted respectively. The peak of malnutrition based on stunting was more than underweight and wasting. According to CDC standard, the prevalence of underweight, overweight and obesity was 27.8%, 4.2% and 4.1% respectively. The most rate of overweight and obesity was 7.1% and 5% in children aged 3 years using CDC cut-off and also lowest rate of overweight and obesity were 1.5% and 0% in children aged 5 years. Conclusion: This study revealed, underweight, stunting and wasting represents different processes of malnutrition which have different risk factors. However, it might be replaced by overweight as children grow to adolescence. Nevertheless, overweight and obesity are not major problem in the children.

  10. Prevalence of hematological abnormalities and malnutrition in HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-10-11

    Oct 11, 2013 ... Background: Hematological abnormalities such as anemia, ... Results: There were 67 HIV positive children: 34 males and 33 females, ... as micronutrient malnutrition (iron and folate deficiencies), ... used: Age between 18 and 59 months, diagnosis of HIV ... Using the WHO stratification for age‑related CD4.

  11. Qualitative Study of Malnutrition in People with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franssen, Janine J. L.; Maaskant, Marian A.; van Schrojenstein Lantman-de Valk, Henny M. J.

    2011-01-01

    The prevalence of underweight status is relatively high in persons with intellectual disabilities. However, it is not clear whether this is due to malnourishment. The authors sought to examine the awareness and knowledge of physicians, dieticians, and direct care staff regarding malnutrition in people with intellectual disabilities. They also…

  12. Challenges of estimating the annual caseload of severe acute malnutrition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deconinck, Hedwig; Pesonen, Anaïs; Hallarou, Mahaman

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Reliable prospective estimates of annual severe acute malnutrition (SAM) caseloads for treatment are needed for policy decisions and planning of quality services in the context of competing public health priorities and limited resources. This paper compares the reliability of SAM...

  13. Circular Migration and Young Child Malnutrition in Guatemala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teller, Charles H.; Butz, William P.

    This paper examined the relationship between temporary migration and childhood malnutrition in Guatemala and questioned whether migration patterns or low socioeconomic status produced a special risk group. The study emphasized policy implications of high priorities placed on population redistribution in Latin American governments and the…

  14. Energy balance and malnutrition in institutionalized elderly people

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, de C.P.G.M.; Staveren, van W.A.

    2002-01-01

    Screening tools and more extensive assessment methods have signaled that malnutrition is common in institutionalized elderly. There are multiple factors - physiologic and non-physiologic - which hereby increase the risk of negative energy balance leading to weight loss and subsequent undesirable out

  15. The double burden of malnutrition: obesity and iron deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cepeda López, A.C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The world faces a “double burden” of malnutrition; this is true especially in transition countries like Mexico. The co-existence of obesity and iron deficiency (ID) within a person has been clearly demonstrated in several studies but the mechanisms linking

  16. Impaired glucose absorption in children with severe malnutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bandsma, Robert H. J.; Spoelstra, Martijn N.; Mari, Andrea; Mendel, Marijke; van Rheenen, Patrick F.; Senga, Edward; van Dijk, Theo; Heikens, Geert Tom

    2011-01-01

    Objective To quantify intestinal glucose absorption in children with two types of severe malnutrition, kwashiorkor and marasmus, compared with healthy children. Study design Children with kwashiorkor (n = 6) and marasmus (n = 9) and control subjects (n = 3) received a primed (13 mg/kg), constant inf

  17. Malnutrition in lung cancer: incidence, prognostic implications, and pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisner, D L

    1982-01-01

    Malnutrition and weight loss are common in patients with lung cancer. Weight loss is an independent prognostic factor for survival in lung cancer treatment studies. Metabolic disturbances probably play a dominant role in weight loss in these patients rather than reduced food intake. The identification of the pertinent etiologic metabolic abnormalities and development of specific therapeutic intervention should be goals for future research.

  18. Impaired Bile Acid Homeostasis in Children with Severe Acute Malnutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Ling; Voskuijl, Wieger; Mouzaki, Marialena; Groen, Albert K.; Alexander, Jennifer; Bourdon, Celine; Wang, Alice; Versloot, Christian J.; Di Giovanni, Valeria; Wanders, Ronald J. A.; Bandsma, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Objective Severe acute malnutrition (SAM) is a major cause of mortality in children under 5 years and is associated with hepatic steatosis. Bile acids are synthesized in the liver and participate in dietary fat digestion, regulation of energy expenditure, and immune responses. The aim of this work

  19. Impaired glucose absorption in children with severe malnutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bandsma, Robert H. J.; Spoelstra, Martijn N.; Mari, Andrea; Mendel, Marijke; van Rheenen, Patrick F.; Senga, Edward; van Dijk, Theo; Heikens, Geert Tom

    Objective To quantify intestinal glucose absorption in children with two types of severe malnutrition, kwashiorkor and marasmus, compared with healthy children. Study design Children with kwashiorkor (n = 6) and marasmus (n = 9) and control subjects (n = 3) received a primed (13 mg/kg), constant

  20. Malnutrition, dehydration, and ancillary feeding options in dysphagia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Via, Michael A; Mechanick, Jeffrey I

    2013-12-01

    Patients with dysphagia are at high risk for malnutrition. Several strategies may be used to address the nutritional needs of these patients. Dietary modification, the addition of oral supplements, or the use of nutritional support in the form of enteral tube feeds or parenteral nutrition infusions can greatly impact the overall health of the patient.

  1. The double burden of malnutrition: obesity and iron deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cepeda López, A.C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The world faces a “double burden” of malnutrition; this is true especially in transition countries like Mexico. The co-existence of obesity and iron deficiency (ID) within a person has been clearly demonstrated in several studies but the mechanisms linking th

  2. Malnutrition and Mother-Infant Asynchrony: Slow Mental Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Maria Clotilde Rossetti

    1978-01-01

    Suggests an explanation for the link between environment, malnutrition, and rate of mental development in children. It is argued that biological factors and difficult socioeconomic conditions interact to slow mental development by undermining the establishment and maintenance of a "syntonic,""synchronic," and "reciprocal" relationship between the…

  3. Prevalence of malnutrition in a tertiary care hospital in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrashish Chakravarty

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Malnutrition adversely affects clinical outcome of hospitalized patients. This observational prospective study was done to assess the prevalence of malnutrition and its grade among patients admitted in a mixed intensive care unit (ICU of a tertiary care hospital in order to help devise a comprehensive nutrition program for the malnourished. Materials and Methods: A total of 500 sequential patients admitted to the ICU were screened on admission over a year period for malnutrition using the Subjective Global Nutritional Assessment (SGNA score. Distribution of the degree of malnutrition according to co-morbidities was also documented. Results: Of the total, 198 (39.6% patients were malnourished, including one patient qualifying as severely malnourished; 68% patients were male, however, there was no statistically significant difference between nutrition status between sexes. Hypertension, diabetes, and cancer were the three most commonly encountered co-morbidities among the malnourished. A total of 86% of all cancer patients admitted were malnourished against only 12% of trauma patients. Conclusion: This study showed that almost two-fifth of the patients admitted were malnourished in this tertiary care hospital and that there is an urgent need to develop a comprehensive nutritional care program in many such Indian ICUs.

  4. Malnutrition and Income: Are We Being Misled? (A Dissenting View).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuftan, Claudio

    This paper takes issue with most evidence in the literature on poverty that attempts to show that increasing household income alone is not enough to significantly combat malnutrition in impoverished areas of the world. It reviews these claims in the literature and argues that the cut-off points for poverty lines taken to measure the significance…

  5. Malnutrition and child feeding practices in Western Samoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, A A

    1977-12-01

    Mild protein-calorie malnutrition is common in Western Samoa. Severe protein-calorie malnutrition is also an important cause of death in infants and toddlers, and anemia is frequently found in small children. This paper investigates child feeding practices because of its possible relationship with the occurrence of severe early malnutrition. Data on infant and toddler feeding practices were collected from 90 mothers from the town of Apia and 38 mothers from the island is Savai'i. Average age of mothers in Apia was 29.0 years and in Savai'i, 30 years. Most belonged to the low income group. Average interval between births in Apia was 22.3 months, in Savai'i, 25.7 months. The proportion of bottlefed children was much lower in Savai'i than in urban Apia, 28.2 vs. 57.9%. 31.3% of Apian mothers weaned their last child abruptly compared with 41.6% of Savai'i mothers. In Apia, weaning foods consisted of milk, meat, and other protein-rich foods; in Savai'i, taro, orange leaf tea, rice, and other were the main weaning foods. Generally, semisolids were not introduced before the child was more than 6 months of age. Some mothers in Savai'i appeared to give their children monotonous diet. A number of cultural taboos appear to affect the children's diet as well as that of pregnant and lactating mothers. Many women believed in them and would not eat or do certain things. Overall, it appears that many of the mothers are ignorant about the nutritional needs of their children. Almost 7% of the 0-5 year old children suffered from borderline malnutrition. 9% of the total number of admissions during the period October 1968 to April 1972 were malnourished children. The increase in borderline malnutrition and severe malnutrition among the children towards the end of the 1st year is attributed mainly to the late introduction of semisolid and solid foods. Other causes of malnutrition include lack of money, especially in urban areas, large families, changes in the diet because of higher

  6. Risk factors associated with malnutrition in one-year-old children living in the Peruvian Amazon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serene A Joseph

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Children under two years of age are in the most critical window for growth and development. As mobility increases, this time period also coincides with first exposure to soil-transmitted helminth (STH infections in tropical and sub-tropical environments. The association between malnutrition and STH infection, however, has been understudied in this vulnerable age group.A nested cross-sectional survey was conducted in 12 and 13-month old children participating in a deworming trial in Iquitos, an STH-endemic area of the Peruvian Amazon. An extensive socio-demo-epi questionnaire was administered to the child's parent. Length and weight were measured, and the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development were administered to measure cognition, language, and fine motor development. Stool specimens were collected to determine the presence of STH. The association between malnutrition (i.e. stunting and underweight and STH infection, and other child, maternal, and household characteristics, was analyzed using multivariable Poisson regression. A total of 1760 children were recruited between September 2011 and June 2012. Baseline data showed a prevalence of stunting and underweight of 24.2% and 8.6%, respectively. In a subgroup of 880 randomly-allocated children whose specimens were analyzed by the Kato-Katz method, the prevalence of any STH infection was 14.5%. Risk factors for stunting in these 880 children included infection with at least one STH species (aRR = 1.37; 95% CI 1.01, 1.86 and a lower development score (aRR = 0.97; 95% CI: 0.95, 0.99. A lower development score was also a significant risk factor for underweight (aRR = 0.92; 95% CI: 0.89, 0.95.The high prevalence of malnutrition, particularly stunting, and its association with STH infection and lower developmental attainment in early preschool-age children is of concern. Emphasis should be placed on determining the most cost-effective, integrated interventions to reduce disease

  7. Protein-energy malnutrition is frequent and precocious in children with cri du chat syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefranc, Violaine; de Luca, Arnaud; Hankard, Régis

    2016-05-01

    Protein-energy malnutrition (PEM) is poorly reported in cri du chat syndrome (CDCS) (OMIM #123450), a genetic disease that causes developmental delay and global growth retardation. The objective was to determine the nutritional status at different ages in children with CDCS and factors associated with PEM. A questionnaire focused on growth and nutritional care was sent to 190 families. Among 36 analyzable questionnaires, growth and nutritional indices compatible with PEM occurred in 47% of patients: 19% before 6 months of age, 24% between 6-12 months and 34% after 12 months. Eight patients received enteral feeding. Speech therapy for swallowing education was performed more often in malnourished children (63% vs. 22%, P < 0.02). PEM is frequent and occurs early in this disease, requiring closed nutritional monitoring.

  8. Contribution of malnutrition and malaria to anemia in children in rural communities of Edo state, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Favour Osazuwa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : The most common cause of anemia is an iron deficiency; however, the condition may also be caused by deficiencies in folate, vitamin B 12 and protein. Some anemia is not caused by nutritional factors, but by congenital factors and parasitic diseases such as malaria. Aim: This study attempted to estimate the prevalence of anemia among children in three rural communities of the Ovia North East Local government area, and to determine whether its cause was nutritional or could be attributed to malaria. Patients and Methods: A total of 316 children between the ages of 1 and 15 years were included in the study. Children were examined for malaria parasites by microscopy. The World Health Organization (WHO age-adjusted cut-off for hemoglobin was used to classify anemia. Results: 38.6% of the children were anemic, with hemoglobin levels lower than 11g/dL, although parasite prevalence and density were low. Malnutrition was patent; 37.0% of the children were stunted, 19.3% wasted and 44.0% underweight. Serum ferritin was more sensitive than hemoglobin concentration in detecting anemic children. Anemia was also significantly higher in the Evbuomore village school than in the Ekosodin and Isiohor villages (P0.001. Conclusion: Anemia detected in this population may be due more to malnutrition than to malaria.

  9. Contribution of malnutrition and malaria to anemia in children in rural communities of Edo state, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oguntade Michael Ayo

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The most common cause of anemia is an iron deficiency; however, the condition may also be caused by deficiencies in folate, vitamin B12 and protein. Some anemia is not caused by nutritional factors, but by congenital factors and parasitic diseases such as malaria. Aim: This study attempted to estimate the prevalence of anemia among children in three rural communities of the Ovia North East Local government area, and to determine whether its cause was nutritional or could be attributed to malaria. Patients and Methods: A total of 316 children between the ages of 1 and 15 years were included in the study. Children were examined for malaria parasites by microscopy. The World Health Organization (WHO age-adjusted cut-off for hemoglobin was used to classify anemia. Results: 38.6% of the children were anemic, with hemoglobin levels lower than 11g/dL, although parasite prevalence and density were low. Malnutrition was patent; 37.0% of the children were stunted, 19.3% wasted and 44.0% underweight. Serum ferritin was more sensitive than hemoglobin concentration in detecting anemic children. Anemia was also significantly higher in the Evbuomore village school than in the Ekosodin and Isiohor villages (P<0.001. Conclusion: Anemia detected in this population may be due more to malnutrition than to malaria.

  10. Health insurance or subsidy has universal advantage for management of hospital malnutrition unrelated to GDP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klek, Stanislaw; Chourdakis, Michael; Abosaleh, Dima Abdulqudos; Amestoy, Alejandra; Baik, Hyun Wook; Baptista, Gertrudis; Barazzoni, Rocco; Fukushima, Ryoji; Hartono, Josef; Jayawardena, Ranil; Garcia, Rafael Jimenez; Krznaric, Zeljko; Nyulasi, Ibolya; Parallada, Gabriela; Francisco, Eliza Mei Perez; Panisic-Sekeljic, Marina; Perman, Mario; Prins, Arina; Del Rio Requejo, Isabel Martinez; Reddy, Ravinder; Singer, Pierre; Sioson, Marianna; Ukleja, Andrew; Vartanian, Carla; Fuentes, Nicolas Velasco; Waitzberg, Dan Linetzky; Zoungrana, Steve Leonce; Galas, Aleksander

    2017-03-01

    Protein-energy and micronutrient malnutrition are global public health problems which, when not prevented and severe, require medical management by clinicians with nutrition expertise, preferably as a collectively skilled team, especially when disease-related. This study aimed to investigate barriers and facilitators of clinical nutrition services (CNS), especially the use of oral, enteral (EN) and parenteral (PN) nutrition in institutional and home settings. An international survey was performed between January and December 2014 in twenty-six countries from all continents. Electronic questionnaires were distributed to 28 representatives of clinical nutrition (PEN) societies, 27 of whom responded. The questionnaire comprised questions regarding a country's economy, reimbursement for CNS, education about and the use of EN and PN. The prevalence of malnutrition was not related to gross domestic product (GDP) at purchasing power parity (PPP) per capita (p=0.186). EN and PN were used in all countries surveyed (100%), but to different extents. Reimbursement of neither EN nor PN use depended on GDP, but was associated with increased use of EN and PN in hospitals (p=0.035), although not evident for home or chronic care facilities. The size of GDP did not affect the use of EN (p=0.256), but it mattered for PN (p=0.019). A worldwide survey by nutrition support societies did not find a link between national economic performance and the implementation of medical nutrition services. Reimbursement for CNS, available through health insurance systems, is a factor in effective nutrition management.

  11. Clinical indications for plasma protein assays: transthyretin (prealbumin) in inflammation and malnutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myron Johnson, A; Merlini, Giampaolo; Sheldon, Joanna; Ichihara, Kiyoshi

    2007-01-01

    A large number of circumstances are associated with reduced serum concentrations of transthyretin (TTR), or prealbumin. The most common of these is the acute phase response, which may be due to inflammation, malignancy, trauma, or many other disorders. Some studies have shown a decrease in hospital stay with nutritional therapy based on TTR concentrations, but many recent studies have shown that concentrations of albumin, transferrin, and transthyretin correlate with severity of the underlying disease rather than with anthropometric indicators of hypo- or malnutrition. There are few if any conditions in which the concentration of this protein by itself is more helpful in diagnosis, prognosis, or follow up than are other clinical findings. In the majority of cases, the serum concentration of C-reactive protein is adequate for detection and monitoring of acute phase responses and for prognosis. Although over diagnosis and treatment of presumed protein energy malnutrition is probably not detrimental to most patients, the failure to detect other causes of decreased concentrations (such as serious bacterial infections or malignancy) of the so-called visceral or hepatic proteins could possibly result in increased morbidity or even mortality. In addition to these caveats, assays for TTR have a relatively high level of uncertainty ("imprecision"). Clinical evaluation--history and physical examination--should remain the mainstay of nutritional assessment.

  12. Anemia, renal dysfunction and malnutrition associated with heart failure in patients with valvulopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Wysllenny Nascimento de; Araújo, Cristiane Maria Sá de; Silva, Silvia Alves da; Petribú, Marina de Moraes Vasconcelos

    2010-06-01

    Valvular disease can course with heart failure (HF), anemia and renal dysfunction (RD), increasing the nutritional risk and worsening patient prognosis. To evaluate the prevalence of anemia and RD in patients with valvulopathy with or without HF, as well as establish a correlation with the nutritional status. A total of 104 patients admitted at the Clinic of Valvulopathy of PROCAPE/UPE, during the period of Aug-Oct/2008. The data were obtained from the nutritional and medical follow-up files. The collected variables were: sex, age, nutritional status according to the body mass index (BMI), presence of HF, anemia and RD. Anemia was considered when hemoglobin values were prevalence of anemia and RD was 71.1% and 68.8%, and 48.1% and 60.0%, in patients with and without HF, respectively, with a statistically significant difference for anemia (p = 0.022). Of the patients, 48.1% were eutrophic, 26.9% had excess weight and 25.0% presented some degree of malnutrition. The patients with HF presented a higher frequency of low weight (p = 0.020). The nutritional status was not associated with anemia (p = 0.117), but it was associated with RD, with renal function being decreased more often in patients with low weight (p = 0.000). When the prevalence of malnutrition, anemia and RD was compared between patients with and without HF, it showed statistical significance.

  13. Eating disorders: a situation of malnutrition with peculiar changes in the immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcos, A

    2000-03-01

    Eating disorders, such as anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa, are significant public health concerns for a great deal of the population, and thus are even considered to be epidemics. These syndromes have a common aim: the pursuit of a desirable and extremely low weight, which is obviously very far from the ideal body weight. Therefore, these patients show abnormal food behavior, leading to a situation of malnutrition. Nutrients play an important role in the development and functionality of the immune system. Thus, the assessment of immunological parameters acquires great interest as a useful tool to evaluate the nutritional status of these patients. In addition, it is very well known that a depleted immune system as a consequence of malnutrition is linked to an increased susceptibility to infections. However, an extensive literature has pointed out that anorexic patients, even though severely malnourished, are relatively free from infectious diseases. As the immune system is altered by distorted food behaviors, such as in case of eating disorders, the awareness of the characteristics of other systems involved in these pathologies, and therefore altered, would be very helpful for the understanding of the mechanisms triggered in these syndromes. In fact, the interactions among the immune system and the remaining systems in eating disorders are beginning to be studied. Finally, the main goal is to limit the evolution of these illnesses through an early diagnosis and appropriate therapy to subsequently get a constant and definitive cure for the patients.

  14. Mortality, malnutrition, and atherosclerosis in ESRD: what is the role of interleukin-6?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenvinkel, Peter; Barany, Peter; Heimbürger, Olof; Pecoits-Filho, Roberto; Lindholm, Bengt

    2002-05-01

    There is growing evidence that increased plasma concentrations of CRP strongly predict cardiovascular death in both non-renal and renal patient populations. The interleukin-6 (IL-6) system activity, which is the major mediator of the acute phase response, is often markedly up-regulated in uremic patients and has also been shown to predict outcome. This raises the issue of whether or not IL-6 per se may contribute to increased mortality from malnutrition and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in uremic patients. The causes of elevated IL-6 levels in the uremic circulation are not fully understood, although a number of factors prevalent in uremic patients, such as hypertension, adiposity, infections, and chronic heart failure may all contribute. However, factors associated with the dialysis procedure, such as bioincompatibility and non-sterile dialysate, may stimulate IL-6 production. Furthermore, available evidence suggests that genetic factors may also have an impact on circulating plasma IL-6 levels. We advance the hypothesis that IL-6 may play a central role in the genesis of inflammatory-driven malnutrition and that it may be regarded as a significant proatherogenic cytokine. This hypothesis may provide a rationale to test if targeted anti-cytokine therapy may be one way to combat the unacceptable high cardiovascular mortality rate among dialysis patients.

  15. World health dilemmas: Orphan and rare diseases, orphan drugs and orphan patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontoghiorghe, Christina N; Andreou, Nicholas; Constantinou, Katerina; Kontoghiorghes, George J

    2014-01-01

    According to global annual estimates hunger/malnutrition is the major cause of death (36 of 62 million). Cardiovascular diseases and cancer (5.44 of 13.43 million) are the major causes of death in developed countries, while lower respiratory tract infections, human immunodeficiency virus infection/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, diarrhoeal disease, malaria and tuberculosis (10.88 of 27.12 million) are the major causes of death in developing countries with more than 70% of deaths occurring in children. The majority of approximately 800 million people with other rare diseases, including 100000 children born with thalassaemia annually receive no treatment. There are major ethical dilemmas in dealing with global health issues such as poverty and the treatment of orphan and rare diseases. Of approximately 50000 drugs about 10% are orphan drugs, with annual sales of the latter approaching 100 billion USD. In comparison, the annual revenue in 2009 from the top 12 pharmaceutical companies in Western countries was 445 billion USD and the top drug, atorvastatin, reached 100 billion USD. In the same year, the total government expenditure for health in the developing countries was 410 billion USD with only 6%-7% having been received as aid from developed countries. Drugs cost the National Health Service in the United Kingdom more than 20 billion USD or 10% of the annual health budget. Uncontrollable drug prices and marketing policies affect global health budgets, clinical practice, patient safety and survival. Fines of 5.3 billion USD were imposed on two pharmaceutical companies in the United States, the regulatory authority in France was replaced and clinicians were charged with bribery in order to overcome recent illegal practises affecting patient care. High expenditure for drug development is mainly related to marketing costs. However, only 2 million USD was spent developing the drug deferiprone (L1) for thalassaemia up to the stage of multicentre clinical trials. The

  16. Triple trouble : tuberculosis, HIV infection and malnutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lettow, Monique Hendrika Elizabeth van

    2005-01-01

    Tuberculosis has emerged as the second commonest cause of death from infectious disease worldwide, after HIV/AIDS, killing nearly 2 million people each year. Most cases occur in less-developed countries. The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is the greatest single risk factor for the development of

  17. Triple trouble : tuberculosis, HIV infection and malnutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lettow, Monique Hendrika Elizabeth van

    2005-01-01

    Tuberculosis has emerged as the second commonest cause of death from infectious disease worldwide, after HIV/AIDS, killing nearly 2 million people each year. Most cases occur in less-developed countries. The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is the greatest single risk factor for the development of

  18. Exploring the paradox: double burden of malnutrition in rural South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth W. Kimani-Murage

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: This article is a review of the PhD thesis by Elizabeth Kimani-Murage that explores the double burden of malnutrition in rural South Africa. This is in the context of a worryingly rapid increase in obesity and obesity-related diseases in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs including South Africa, and in the wake of on-going nutrition transition and lifestyle changes in these countries. Objective: To understand the profiles of malnutrition among children and adolescents in a poor, high HIV prevalent, transitional society in a middle-income country. Methods: A cross-sectional growth survey was conducted in 2007 targeting 4,000 children and adolescents aged 1–20 years. In addition, HIV testing was carried out on children aged 1–5 years and Tanner pubertal assessment among adolescents aged 9–20 years. Results: The study shows stunting at an early age and adolescent obesity, particularly among girls, that co-exists in the same socio-geographic population. The study also shows that HIV is an independent modifiable risk factor for poor nutritional outcomes in children and makes a significant contribution to nutritional outcomes at the individual level. Significant predictors of undernutrition at an early age, documented at individual, household, and community levels, include child's HIV status, age and birth weight, maternal age, age of household head, and area of residence. Significant predictors of overweight/obesity and risk for metabolic disease during adolescence, documented at individual and household levels include child's age, sex, and pubertal development, household-level food security, socio-economic status, and household head's highest education level. Conclusions: The combination of early stunting and adolescent obesity raises critical concerns in the wake of the rising public health importance of metabolic diseases in LMICs. This is because, both paediatric obesity and adult short stature are risk factors for

  19. Cardiac Dysfunction in a Porcine Model of Pediatric Malnutrition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Fabiansen

    Full Text Available Half a million children die annually of severe acute malnutrition and cardiac dysfunction may contribute to the mortality. However, cardiac function remains poorly examined in cases of severe acute malnutrition.To determine malnutrition-induced echocardiographic disturbances and longitudinal changes in plasma pro-atrial natriuretic peptide and cardiac troponin-T in a pediatric porcine model.Five-week old piglets (Duroc-x-Danish Landrace-x-Yorkshire were fed a nutritionally inadequate maize-flour diet to induce malnutrition (MAIZE, n = 12 or a reference diet (AGE-REF, n = 12 for 7 weeks. Outcomes were compared to a weight-matched reference group (WEIGHT-REF, n = 8. Pro-atrial natriuretic peptide and cardiac troponin-T were measured weekly. Plasma pro-atrial natriuretic peptide decreased in both MAIZE and AGE-REF during the first 3 weeks but increased markedly in MAIZE relative to AGE-REF during week 5-7 (p ≤ 0.001. There was overall no difference in plasma cardiac troponin-T between groups. However, further analysis revealed that release of cardiac troponin-T in plasma was more frequent in AGE-REF compared with MAIZE (OR: 4.8; 95%CI: 1.2-19.7; p = 0.03. However, when release occurred, cardiac troponin-T concentration was 6.9-fold higher (95%CI: 3.0-15.9; p < 0.001 in MAIZE compared to AGE-REF. At week 7, the mean body weight in MAIZE was lower than AGE-REF (8.3 vs 32.4 kg, p < 0.001, whereas heart-weight relative to body-weight was similar across the three groups. The myocardial performance index was 86% higher in MAIZE vs AGE-REF (p < 0.001 and 27% higher in MAIZE vs WEIGHT-REF (p = 0.025.Malnutrition associates with cardiac dysfunction in a pediatric porcine model by increased myocardial performance index and pro-atrial natriuretic peptide and it associates with cardiac injury by elevated cardiac troponin-T. Clinical studies are needed to see if the same applies for children suffering from malnutrition.

  20. Comparison of PG-SGA, SGA and body-composition measurement in detecting malnutrition among newly diagnosed lung cancer patients in stage IIIB/IV and benign conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rong; Wu, Jing; Ma, Meili; Pei, Jun; Song, Yiyi; Zhang, Xueyan; Han, Baohui

    2011-09-01

    Assessment tools and body-composition measurements are useful in diagnosing malnutrition. Which one is better for lung disease patients is unclear. The objectives of the present study are: to assess relationships between different methods of nutritional measurements in lung diseases patients; to determine which one is better in diagnosing malnutrition for lung disease patients; and to determine whether lung cancer patients can be differentiated from benign lung disease patients using different measurements. A total of 96 newly diagnosed primary lung cancer patients in stage IIIB/IV and 52 benign lung disease patients nutritional status were assessed according to the SGA, the scored PG-SGA, and serum albumin, prealbumin, transferrin, hemoglobin, total lymphocyte count, body mass index (BMI), and weight. A total of 40% of lung cancer patients were severely malnourished, with men or elder having a higher rate of malnutrition. Significantly lower values of weight, BMI, total lymphocyte count, transferrin, prealbumin and serum albumin were found for them. Age, sex, weight, weight half year ago and prealbumin are in the regression equation to predict them. For benign lung disease patients, 21.2% were severely malnourished with significantly lower values of weight and transferrin. Age and prealbumin are in the equation to predict severely malnourished benign lung disease patients. The highest receiver operation characteristic area under the curve was found for the PG-SGA score, BMI and weight. PG-SGA global rating, age and iron-transferring protein are in the equation for predicting disease status. The SGA and PG-SGA are appropriate for identifying malnutrition in lung disease patients. Lung cancer patients can be differentiated from benign conditions by PG-SGA.

  1. Impaired Bile Acid Homeostasis in Children with Severe Acute Malnutrition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Zhang

    Full Text Available Severe acute malnutrition (SAM is a major cause of mortality in children under 5 years and is associated with hepatic steatosis. Bile acids are synthesized in the liver and participate in dietary fat digestion, regulation of energy expenditure, and immune responses. The aim of this work was to investigate whether SAM is associated with clinically relevant changes in bile acid homeostasis.An initial discovery cohort with 5 healthy controls and 22 SAM-patients was used to identify altered bile acid homeostasis. A follow up cohort of 40 SAM-patients were then studied on admission and 3 days after clinical stabilization to assess recovery in bile acid metabolism. Recruited children were 6-60 months old and admitted for SAM in Malawi. Clinical characteristics, feces and blood were collected on admission and prior to discharge. Bile acids, 7α-hydroxy-4-cholesten-3-one (C4 and FGF-19 were quantified.On admission, total serum bile acids were higher in children with SAM than in healthy controls and glycine-conjugates accounted for most of this accumulation with median and interquartile range (IQR of 24.6 μmol/L [8.6-47.7] compared to 1.9 μmol/L [1.7-3.3] (p = 0.01 in controls. Total serum bile acid concentrations did not decrease prior to discharge. On admission, fecal conjugated bile acids were lower and secondary bile acids higher at admission compared to pre- discharge, suggesting increased bacterial conversion. FGF19 (Fibroblast growth factor 19, a marker of intestinal bile acid signaling, was higher on admission and was associated with decreased C4 concentrations as a marker of bile acid synthesis. Upon recovery, fecal calprotectin, a marker of intestinal inflammation, was lower.SAM is associated with increased serum bile acid levels despite reduced synthesis rates. In SAM, there tends to be increased deconjugation of bile acids and conversion from primary to secondary bile acids, which may contribute to the development of liver disease.

  2. Evidence-based recommendations for addressing malnutrition in health care: an updated strategy from the feedM.E. Global Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, M Isabel T D; Hegazi, Refaat A; Higashiguchi, Takashi; Michel, Jean-Pierre; Reddy, B Ravinder; Tappenden, Kelly A; Uyar, Mehmet; Muscaritoli, Maurizio

    2014-08-01

    The prevalence of malnutrition ranges up to 50% among patients in hospitals worldwide, and disease-related malnutrition is all too common in long-term and other health care settings as well. Regrettably, the numbers have not improved over the past decade. The consequences of malnutrition are serious, including increased complications (pressure ulcers, infections, falls), longer hospital stays, more frequent readmissions, increased costs of care, and higher risk of mortality. Yet disease-related malnutrition still goes unrecognized and undertreated. To help improve nutrition care around the world, the feedM.E. (Medical Education) Global Study Group, including members from Asia, Europe, the Middle East, and North and South America, defines a Nutrition Care Pathway that is simple and can be tailored for use in varied health care settings. The Pathway recommends screen, intervene, and supervene: screen patients' nutrition status on admission or initiation of care, intervene promptly when needed, and supervene or follow-up routinely with adjustment and reinforcement of nutrition care plans. This article is a call-to-action for health caregivers worldwide to increase attention to nutrition care.

  3. Serum pregnancy-associated plasma protein A correlates with inflammation and malnutrition in patients treated with maintenance hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazur-Laskowska, Małgorzata; Bała-Błądzińska, Agnieszka; Zegartowska, Paulina; Dumnicka, Paulina; Ząbek-Adamska, Anna; Kapusta, Maria; Maleszka, Aleksandra; Maziarz, Barbara; Kuźniewski, Marek; Kuśnierz-Cabala, Beata

    2015-01-01

    Advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD) leads to complications such as anemia, electrolyte abnormalities, bone and mineral disorder, and malnutrition-inflammation-atherosclerosis (MIA) syndrome, that result in high cardiovascu- lar mortality. One of the biomarkers associated with inflammation and cardiovascular events is pregnancy-associated plasma protein A (PAPP-A). The aim of the study was to measure serum PAPP-A in hemodialyzed CKD patients, and to investigate its correlations with the laboratory markers of the complications. We enrolled 78 consecutive stable adult CKD patients treated with maintenance hemodialysis for median period of 60 months. PAPP-A concentrations were measured with by electrochemiluminescence immunoassay. Average serum PAPP-A in hemodialyzed patients was almost two times higher than the upper reference limit. It positively correlated with N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), serum sodium, and the markers of inflammation and malnutrition. In conclusion, serum PAPP-A seems a useful biomarker associated with cardiovascular dysfunction, inflammatory state and malnutrition in hemodialysis patients.

  4. Rheumatoid cachexia and other nutritional alterations in rheumatologic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurtado-Torres, Gilberto Fabián; González-Baranda, Lourdes Larisa; Abud-Mendoza, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of nutritional alterations in rheumatologic diseases ranges from 4 to 95%, depending on the detection method used. Formerly described as the single term rheumatoid cachexia, nutritional alterations can currently be grouped and subdivided based on the physiopathological mechanisms involved: chronic disease-related inflammatory conditions (cachexia), malnutrition associated to acute malnutrition inflammatory conditions (protein-caloric malnutrition) and starvation-related malnutrition. Clinical manifestations of malnutrition associated to rheumatic diseases vary from the patient with low weight or overweight and obesity; with lean body mass depletion as well as functional repercussions, and impact of quality of life as a common denominator. Additionally, the associated increase in body fat mass increases the risk for cardiovascular morbidity. A multidisciplinary approach towards rheumatic diseases should include aspects oriented towards prevention, early identification, diagnosis and correction of nutritional alterations.

  5. Role of malnutrition and parasite infections in the spatial variation in children's anaemia risk in northern Angola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares Magalhães, Ricardo J; Langa, Antonio; Pedro, João Mário; Sousa-Figueiredo, José Carlos; Clements, Archie C A; Vaz Nery, Susana

    2013-05-01

    Anaemia is known to have an impact on child development and mortality and is a severe public health problem in most countries in sub-Saharan Africa. We investigated the consistency between ecological and individual-level approaches to anaemia mapping by building spatial anaemia models for children aged ≤15 years using different modelling approaches. We aimed to (i) quantify the role of malnutrition, malaria, Schistosoma haematobium and soil-transmitted helminths (STHs) in anaemia endemicity; and (ii) develop a high resolution predictive risk map of anaemia for the municipality of Dande in northern Angola. We used parasitological survey data for children aged ≤15 years to build Bayesian geostatistical models of malaria (PfPR≤15), S. haematobium, Ascaris lumbricoides and Trichuris trichiura and predict small-scale spatial variations in these infections. Malnutrition, PfPR≤15, and S. haematobium infections were significantly associated with anaemia risk. An estimated 12.5%, 15.6% and 9.8% of anaemia cases could be averted by treating malnutrition, malaria and S. haematobium, respectively. Spatial clusters of high risk of anaemia (>86%) were identified. Using an individual-level approach to anaemia mapping at a small spatial scale, we found that anaemia in children aged ≤15 years is highly heterogeneous and that malnutrition and parasitic infections are important contributors to the spatial variation in anaemia risk. The results presented in this study can help inform the integration of the current provincial malaria control programme with ancillary micronutrient supplementation and control of neglected tropical diseases such as urogenital schistosomiasis and STH infections.

  6. Malnutrition in infancy as a susceptibility factor for temporal lobe epilepsy in adulthood induced by the pilocarpine experimental model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral, Francisco Romero; Priel, Margareth Rose; Silva Araujo, Bruno Henrique; Brito Torres, Laila; de Lima, Eliangela; Gurgel do Vale, Tiago; Pereira, Felipe; Alves de Amorim, Henrique; Abrão Cavalheiro, Esper; Amado Scerni, Débora; Naffah-Mazzacoratti, Maria da Graça

    2011-01-01

    Malnutrition during the earliest stages of life may result in innumerable brain problems. Moreover, this condition could increase the chances of developing neurological diseases, such as epilepsy. We analyzed the effects of early-life malnutrition on susceptibility to epileptic seizures induced by the pilocarpine model of epilepsy. Wistar rat pups were kept on a starvation regimen from day 1 to day 21 after birth. At day 60, 16 animals (8 = well-nourished; 8 = malnourished) were exposed to the pilocarpine experimental model of epilepsy. Age-matched well-nourished (n = 8) and malnourished (n = 8) rats were used as controls. Animals were video-monitored over 9 weeks. The following behavioral parameters were evaluated: first seizure threshold (acute period of the pilocarpine model); status epilepticus (SE) latency; first spontaneous seizure latency (silent period), and spontaneous seizure frequency during the chronic phase. The cell and mossy fiber sprouting (MFS) density were evaluated in the hippocampal formation. Our results showed that the malnourished animals required a lower pilocarpine dose in order to develop SE (200 mg/kg), lower latency to reach SE, less time for the first spontaneous seizure and higher seizure frequency, when compared to well-nourished pilocarpine rats. Histopathological findings revealed a significant cell density reduction in the CA1 region and intense MFS among the malnourished animals. Our data indicate that early malnutrition greatly influences susceptibility to seizures and behavioral manifestations in adult life. These findings suggest that malnutrition in infancy reduces the threshold for epilepsy and promotes alterations in the brain that persist into adult life. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Role of malnutrition and parasite infections in the spatial variation in children’s anaemia risk in northern Angola

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo J. Soares Magalhães

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Anaemia is known to have an impact on child development and mortality and is a severe public health problem in most countries in sub-Saharan Africa. We investigated the consistency between ecological and individual-level approaches to anaemia mapping by building spatial anaemia models for children aged ≤15 years using different modelling approaches. We aimed to (i quantify the role of malnutrition, malaria, Schistosoma haematobium and soil-transmitted helminths (STHs in anaemia endemicity; and (ii develop a high resolution predictive risk map of anaemia for the municipality of Dande in northern Angola. We used parasitological survey data for children aged ≤15 years to build Bayesian geostatistical models of malaria (PfPR≤15, S. haematobium, Ascaris lumbricoides and Trichuris trichiura and predict small-scale spatial variations in these infections. Malnutrition, PfPR≤15, and S. haematobium infections were significantly associated with anaemia risk. An estimated 12.5%, 15.6% and 9.8% of anaemia cases could be averted by treating malnutrition, malaria and S. haematobium, respectively. Spatial clusters of high risk of anaemia (>86% were identified. Using an individual-level approach to anaemia mapping at a small spatial scale, we found that anaemia in children aged ≤15 years is highly heterogeneous and that malnutrition and parasitic infections are important contributors to the spatial variation in anaemia risk. The results presented in this study can help inform the integration of the current provincial malaria control programme with ancillary micronutrient supplementation and control of neglected tropical diseases such as urogenital schistosomiasis and STH infections.

  8. Acute malnutrition and under-5 mortality, northeastern part of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espié, Emmanuelle; Pujol, Carme Roure; Masferrer, Maria; Saint-Sauveur, Jean-François; Urrutia, Pedro Pablo Palma; Grais, Rebecca F

    2011-10-01

    We assessed the prevalence of childhood acute malnutrition and under-five mortality rate (U5MR) in Darbhanga district, India, using a two-stage 49-cluster household survey. A total of 1379 households comprising 8473 people were interviewed. During a 90-day recall period, U5MR was 0.5 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.2-1.4] per 10,000 per day. The prevalence of global acute malnutrition among 1405 children aged 6-59 months was 15.4% (NCHS) and 19.4% (2006 WHO references). This survey suggests that in Darbhanga district, the population is in a borderline food crisis with few food resources. Appropriate strategies should be developed to improve the overall nutritional and health status of children.

  9. Changes during aging and their association with malnutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shilpa Amarya, MSc

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The aging process involves changes in physiological, pathological, social, and psychological conditions of a person. Nutrition is an important element of health among the elderly, and it affects the whole process of aging. The prevalence of malnutrition is increasing in this population and is associated with a decline in functional status, impaired muscle function, decreased bone mass, immune dysfunction, anemia, reduced cognitive function, poor wound healing, delayed recovery from surgery, higher hospital readmission rates, and mortality. Due to changing socioeconomic environment, elderly people are often left alone to fend for themselves to maintain their health, which may interfere with the maintenance of a good nutritional status. Regular diagnosis of malnutrition among older patients increases the need for more education regarding nutritional status in older patients, and the purpose of this article is to provide information with an educational overview of essential nutritional aspect associated with changes in aging.

  10. Severe acute malnutrition in very low birth weight preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enweronu-Laryea, Christabel C; Aryee, Irene N A; Adei, Eunice A P

    2012-05-01

    Malnutrition in preterm low birth weight infants has adverse long-term metabolic, growth, and neurodevelopmental effects. In the past 3 decades, parenteral nutrition, enriched preterm formula, and fortification of human milk have been used to alleviate these adverse effects. Unfortified human breast milk does not provide sufficient nutrients for the growth and development of preterm infants at the volumes recommended; however, it is usually the only source of nutrition available for such infants in low-resource countries. Many newborns, including very low birth weight infants, are surviving in these countries because of concerted efforts to achieve the fourth millennium development goal. These efforts have not addressed the nutrition needs of sick preterm very low birth weight infants. The authors report 3 cases of severe acute malnutrition in very low birth weight newborns and suggest possible interventions.

  11. Capacity-building in the management of moderate acute malnutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Alan; Ashworth, Ann

    2015-03-01

    Evidence from low- and middle-income countries indicates that although there is a willingness to prevent and treat malnutrition at scale, there is very limited capacity to achieve this. Three broad areas of concern are human resources and the quality of services; management systems and supplies; and demand side factors. This paper focuses on building human resources in the context of preventing and managing malnutrition. Training should provide several options and approaches suitable for different settings and focus on core competencies. Preservice training should be the main focus of training, while in-service training should be used for continuing medical education and refresher training. Communities of Practice, in which national and international health professionals come together to deepen their knowledge and pool their skills to pursue a common ambition, are seen as one way forward to building the necessary human resources for scaling up training.

  12. Determinants of chronic malnutrition among preschool children in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Azizur; Chowdhury, Soma

    2007-03-01

    This study investigated the impact of some socioeconomic, demographic and health and community factors on chronic malnutrition or stunting in Bangladeshi children aged less than 5 years. The analysis revealed that the overall prevalence of stunting was 44%, of which 18% of children were severely stunted, and the demographic characteristics appeared to be the most significant factors for chronic malnutrition. Multinomial logistic regression analysis showed that parents' education, household economic status, media exposure, number of under-5 children, place of delivery, child's age, birth order, months of breast-feeding, birth size, mother's BMI, mother's height, age of household head, measles vaccine, supplementation of diet with liquids and regional differentials were significantly associated with severe as well as moderate stunting.

  13. Possible role of the microbiome in the development of acute malnutrition and implications for food-based strategies to prevent and treat acute malnutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    A pattern of changes in the microbiome composition have been observed in the normal maturation of the human gut. Perturbations from this pattern have been described in malnourished humans and reproduced in animal models of severe malnutrition. Treatment and prevention of malnutrition in the future m...

  14. Malnutrition in Geriatric Rehabilitation: Prevalence, Patient Outcomes, and Criterion Validity of the Scored Patient-Generated Subjective Global Assessment and the Mini Nutritional Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Skye; Young, Adrienne; Bauer, Judith; Isenring, Elizabeth

    2016-05-01

    Accurate identification and management of malnutrition is essential so that patient outcomes can be improved and resources used efficaciously. In malnourished older adults admitted to rehabilitation: 1) report the prevalence, health and aged care use, and mortality of malnourished older adults; 2) determine and compare the criterion (concurrent and predictive) validity of the Scored Patient-Generated Subjective Global Assessment (PG-SGA) and the Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA) in diagnosing malnutrition; and 3) identify the Scored PG-SGA score cut-off value associated with malnutrition. Observational, prospective cohort. Participants were 57 older adults (65 years and older; mean±standard deviation age=79.1±7.3 years) from two rural rehabilitation units in New South Wales, Australia. Scored PG-SGA; MNA; and the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Health Related Problems, 10th revision, Australian Modification (ICD-10-AM) classification of malnutrition were compared to establish concurrent validity and report malnutrition prevalence. Length of stay, discharge location, rehospitalization, admission to a residential aged care facility, and mortality were measured to report health-related outcomes and to establish predictive validity. Malnutrition prevalence varied according to assessment tool (ICD-10-AM: 46%; Scored PG-SGA: 53%; MNA: 28%). Using the ICD-10-AM as the reference standard, the Scored PG-SGA ratings (sensitivity 100%, specificity 87%) and score (sensitivity 92%, specificity 84%, ROC AUC [receiver operating characteristics area under the curve]=0.910±0.038) showed strong concurrent validity, and the MNA had moderate concurrent validity (sensitivity 58%, specificity 97%, receiver operating characteristics area under the curve=0.854±0.052). The Scored PG-SGA rating, Scored PG-SGA score, and MNA showed good predictive validity. Malnutrition can increase the risk of longer rehospitalization length of stay, admission to a residential

  15. Vegetation change, malnutrition and violence in the Horn of Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowhani, P.; Degomme, O.; Linderman, M.; Guha-Sapir, D.; Lambin, E.

    2008-12-01

    In certain circumstances, climate change in association with a broad range of social factors may increase the risk of famines and subsequently, violent conflict. The impacts of climate change on society will be experienced both through changes in mean conditions over long time periods and through increases in extreme events. Recent studies have shown the historical effects of long term climate change on societies and the importance of short term climatic triggers on armed conflict. However, most of these studies are at the state level ignoring local conditions. Here we use detailed information extracted from wide-swath satellite data (MODIS) to analyze the impact of climate variability change on malnutrition and violent conflict. More specifically, we perform multivariate logistic regression analysis in order to explain the geographical distribution of malnutrition and conflict in the Horn of Africa on a sub-national level. This region, constituted by several unstable and poor states, has been affected by droughts, floods, famines, and violence in the past few years. Three commonly used nutrition and mortality indicators are used to characterize the health situation (CE-DAT database). To map violence we use the georeferenced Armed Conflicts dataset developed by the Center for the Study of Civil War. Explanatory variables include several socio-economic variables and environmental variables characterizing land degradation, vegetation activity, and interannual variability in land-surface conditions. First results show that interannual variability in land-surface conditions is associated with malnutrition but not with armed conflict. Furthermore, land degradation seems not to be associated with either malnutrition or armed conflict.

  16. The Nutrition Transition and Indicators of Child Malnutrition

    OpenAIRE

    Kimenju, Simon C.; Qaim, Matin

    2014-01-01

    We analyze how the nutrition transition affects child malnutrition in developing countries. It is often assumed that the nutrition transition affects child weight but not child growth, which could be one reason why child underweight decreases faster than child stunting. But these effects have hardly been analyzed empirically. Our cross-country panel regressions show that the nutrition transition reduces child underweight, while no consistent effect on child overweight is found. Against common...

  17. Socioeconomic factors associated with severe acute malnutrition in Jamaica

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, Debbie S; Younger-Coleman, Novie; Lyew-Ayee, Parris; Greene, Lisa-Gaye; Michael S Boyne; Forrester, Terrence E.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Severe acute malnutrition (SAM) is an important risk factor for illness and death globally, contributing to more than half of deaths in children worldwide. We hypothesized that SAM is positively correlated to poverty, low educational attainment, major crime and higher mean soil concentrations of lead, cadmium and arsenic. Methods We reviewed admission records of infants admitted with a diagnosis of SAM over 14 years (2000?2013) in Jamaica. Poverty index, educational attainment, maj...

  18. Surrogate nutrition markers, malnutrition, and adequacy of nutrition support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seres, David S

    2005-06-01

    Surrogate nutrition markers are used to assess adequacy of nourishment and to define malnutrition despite evidence that fails to link nourishment, surrogate markers, and outcomes. Markers such as serum levels of albumin, prealbumin, transferrin, and IGF-1 and delayed hypersensitivity and total lymphocyte count may be valid to help stratify risk. However, it is not appropriate to consider these as markers of adequacy of nourishment in the sick patient.

  19. Prevention of Malnutrition in Children, Slimming Yesterday, Obesity Today

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Sharafi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The future of any nation depends on how its children's care, According to their likely future health needs of the adult population model for healthy living and wealth has increased. One of the most pressing health diet. This study is done to aimed investigate the factors influencing malnutrition in children in the past for weight loss and weight gain can be seen today.   Methods and Methods: Related articles referring to achieve in the field of databases to Google scholar, Pub Med, proquest, SID, Magiran, Springer Link,… and studies until 2013 with the key words malnutrition, child, obesity and examine their English.   Results: In the past, malnutrition was associated with weight loss, but for now he has to weight gain and obesity. Childhood obesity is emerging as a phenomenon caused health problems in childhood and adolescence, including hyperlipidemia, obstructive sleep apnea, early puberty, diabetes, hypertension and cardiovascular. In addition to the health problems of obese children will benefit from the social and psychological problems such as anxiety, fewer friends, loss of confidence, lower education, and fewer chances for marriage.... Overweight in children can be caused by poor eating habits and low activity, which is affected by the parents and the family environment.   Conclusions: Since the patterns learned in childhood affect all life on lifestyle, understand the causes of obesity and to eliminate or reduce them and reinforce the correct patterns of feeding Through education and the incidence is somewhat reduced, especially for parents to deal with this phenomenon.   Keywords: Child,Malnutrition, Obesity    

  20. [In-hospital malnutrition: indications of postoperative evolution].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farré Rovira, R; Frasquet Pons, I; Ibor Pica, J F

    1998-01-01

    A significant percentage of the patients admitted to our hospitals show signs of malnutrition that are neither detected nor treated and often become more severe during the hospital stay. This malnutrition can contribute to the loss of some important functions as, for instance the capacity for immune response and healing. In this study we use several simple, economical parameters to evaluate the nutritional status upon admittance and upon leaving the hospital of all the patients who in the course of a year occupied four randomly chosen beds in a general surgery ward at a county hospital in the Valencian Community. The results show that hospitalization reduced the number of over weight patients, duplicated the number of hypoalbuminemics and triplicated the number of people with body weight and body mass index (BMI) below normal levels. In patients over 40 hospitalization decrease the values of all the parameters studied, whereas in younger subjects only the weight, the BMI and serum albumin values were affected. Fifty seven percent of the patients suffer some kind of postoperative complication and this incidence is higher among patients with malnutrition upon admittance. The most common complication is the nosocomial pneumonia and urine infection. The nutritional parameters that best predict possible postoperative complications are low values of serum albumin, total lymphocyte count, tricipital fat skin fold and arm circumference. In general, postoperative complications show only a slight positive correlation with the length of the hospital stay, but the longer the stay is the worst the nutritional status becomes.

  1. Prevalence of malnutrition and associated factors in hemodialysis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Tereza Vaz de Souza Freitas

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the prevalence of malnutrition and associated factors in hemodialysis patients. METHODS: This is a cross-sectional study of 344 hemodialysis patients from Goiânia, Goiás aged 18 years or more. The dependent variable, malnutrition, was investigated by the Subjective Global Assessment. The independent variables included socioeconomic, demographic, and lifestyle data, clinical history, and energy and protein intakes. The patients underwent anthropometric measurements and laboratory tests. Multiple Poisson regression determined the associated factors (p60 months (PR=1.08, 95%CI=1.01-1.16, Kt/V>1.2 (RP=1.12, 95%CI=1.03-1.22, calorie intake <35 kcal/kg/day (PR=1.22, 95%CI=1.10-1.34, and normalized protein nitrogen appearance <1.0 g/kg/day (PR=1.13, 95%CI=1.05-1.21. CONCLUSION: The prevalence of malnutrition in this population was high, corroborating the literature. The prevalence was higher in patients aged less than 29 years and those with low family income, longer hemodialysis vintage, higher Kt/V, and inadequate protein and calorie intakes. Strategies to reverse this situation should include more nutritional care.

  2. Auditory brainstem potentials in children with protein energy malnutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odabaş, Dursun; Caksen, Hüseyin; Sar, Sakir; Tombul, Temel; Kisli, Mesude; Tuncer, Oğuz; Yuca, Köksal; Yilmaz, Cahide

    2005-07-01

    In this study, auditory brainstem potentials (ABPs) were studied in children with protein energy malnutrition (PEM) to determine the effects of PEM on the developing brain in children. A total of 31 children, aged 3-36 months with moderate/severe PEM and 25 healthy children, aged 3-48 months were included in the study. Nutritional status of the children was assessed by the Gomez classification. Recordings of ABPs were performed by using Nihon Kohden Neuropack 2 device. Of 31 children, 22 (71%) had severe malnutrition, 9 (29%) had moderate malnutrition. Additionally, 8 (26%) and 9 (29%) children had iron deficiency anemia and hypoalbuminemi, respectively. There were significant differences in the mean latencies of the waves I-V on the right and left ears and in the mean interpeak latencies (IPLs) of the waves III-V and I-V on the right ear between the study and control groups (Pmalnutrition and iron deficiency anemia. We think that more extensive studies should be performed to determine whether or not there was a relationship between these parameters.

  3. Metabolic acidosis and malnutrition-inflammation complex syndrome in chronic renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Mehrotra, Rajnish; Fouque, Denis; Kopple, Joel D

    2004-01-01

    Metabolic acidosis, a common condition in patients with renal failure, may be linked to protein-energy malnutrition (PEM) and inflammation, together also known as malnutrition-inflammation complex syndrome (MICS). Methods of serum bicarbonate measurement may misrepresent the true bicarbonate level, since the total serum carbon dioxide measurement usually overestimates the serum bicarbonate concentration. Moreover, the air transportation of blood samples to distant laboratories may lead to erroneous readings. In patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) or end-stage renal disease (ESRD), a significant number of endocrine, musculoskeletal, and metabolic abnormalities are believed to result from acidemia. Metabolic acidosis may be related to PEM and MICS due to an increased protein catabolism, decreased protein synthesis, endocrine abnormalities including insulin resistance, decreased serum leptin level, and inflammation among individuals with renal failure. Evidence suggests that the catabolic effects of metabolic acidosis may result from an increased activity of the adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-dependent ubiquitin-proteasome and branched-chain keto acid dehydrogenase. In contrast to the metabolic studies, many epidemiologic studies in maintenance dialysis patients have indicated a paradoxically inverse association between mildly decreased serum bicarbonate and improved markers of protein-energy nutritional state. Hence metabolic acidosis may be considered as yet another element of the reverse epidemiology in ESRD patients. Interventional studies have yielded inconsistent results in CKD and ESRD patients, although in peritoneal dialysis patients, mitigating acidemia appears to more consistently improve nutritional status and reduce hospitalizations. Large-scale, prospective randomized interventional studies are needed to ascertain the potential benefits of correcting acidemia in malnourished and/or inflamed CKD and maintenance hemodialysis patients. Until then, all

  4. Health status correlates of malnutrition in the polish elderly population - Results of the Polsenior Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzyminska-Siemaszko, R; Chudek, J; Suwalska, A; Lewandowicz, M; Mossakowska, M; Kroll-Balcerzak, R; Wizner, B; Tobis, S; Mehr, K; Wieczorowska-Tobis, K

    2016-11-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze health-related factors associated with poor nutritional status (PNS) of a representative group of Polish older people, based on data from the PolSenior project (the first nation-wide study of Polish senior citizens). Nutritional status was assessed in 3751 community-dwelling older people (1770 females, mean age: 77.4±8.0 years) using the Mini Nutritional Assessment - Short Form. Elements of comprehensive geriatric assessment (cognitive and mood screening), selected medical data were analyzed in relation to the nutritional status. These were: the number of medications, the number of chronic diseases, selected diseases potentially related to malnutrition (anaemia, stroke, peptic ulcer, Parkinson's disease, cancer - past or present), total edentulism, use of dentures, and chronic pain. PNS was observed in 44.2% of participants. Female sex [OR 1.72, 95% Cl (1.45-2.04)], advanced age [OR 2.16 (1.80-2.58)], symptoms of depression [OR 11.52 (9.24-14.38)], cognitive impairment [OR 1.52 (1.20-1.93], multimorbidity [OR 1.27 (1.04-1.57)], anaemia [OR 1.80 (1.41-2.29)] and total edentulism [OR 1.26 (1.06-1.49)] were independently correlated with PNS. PNS in Polish elderly population is strongly related to the occurrence of symptoms of depression. People in advanced age with symptoms of depression, cognitive impairment, multimorbidity, anaemia and total edentulism should be screened and monitored for early symptoms of malnutrition.

  5. Cachexia: clinical features when inflammation drives malnutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laviano, Alessandro; Koverech, Angela; Mari, Alessia

    2015-11-01

    Cachexia is a clinically relevant syndrome which impacts on quality of life, morbidity and mortality of patients suffering from acute and chronic diseases. The hallmark of cachexia is muscle loss, which is triggered by disease-associated inflammatory response. Cachexia is a continuum and therefore a staging system is needed. Initially, a three-stage system (i.e. pre-cachexia, cachexia and refractory cachexia) was proposed. More recent evidence supports the use of a five-stage classification system, based on patient's BMI and severity of weight loss, to better predict clinical outcome. Also, large clinical trials in cancer patients demonstrated that cachexia emerging during chemotherapy has greater influence on survival than weight loss at baseline. Therefore, becoming widely accepted is the importance of routinely monitoring patients' nutritional status to detect early changes and diagnose cachexia in its early phases. Although cachexia is associated with the presence of anabolic resistance, it has been shown that sustained yet physiological hyperaminoacidaemia, as well as the use of specific nutrients, is able to overcome impaired protein synthesis and revert catabolism. More importantly, clinical evidence demonstrates that preservation of nutritional status during chemotherapy or improvement of body weight after weight loss is associated with longer survival in cancer patients.

  6. Probiotics and gut health:A special focus on liver diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Silvia; Wilson; Gratz; Hannu; Mykkanen; Hani; S; El-Nezami

    2010-01-01

    Probiotic bacteria have well-established beneficial ef-fects in the management of diarrhoeal diseases.Newer evidence suggests that probiotics have the potential to reduce the risk of developing inflammatory bowel diseases and intestinal bacterial overgrowth after gut surgery.In liver health,the main benefits of probiotics might occur through preventing the production and/or uptake of lipopolysaccharides in the gut,and therefore reducing levels of low-grade inflammation.Specific immune stimulation by probiot...

  7. Nutrition and malnutrition in elderly patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Tozzuoli

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Protein-energy undernutrition is a very common problem among elderly patients. It is promoted by age-related decreases in the basal metabolic rate, physiological change in body composition, progressive dysphagia, physical and/or cognitive impairments, depression, socioeconomic factors, effects of drugs on absorption and utilization of nutrients, and other factors. Several studies suggest that nutritional support can lower the risk of adverse outcomes among undernourished elderly patients. Monitoring food intake in patients with dysphagia may be useful in deciding between oral supplementation or artificial nutrition. The decision to provide nutritional support and the route to be used will depend on the clinical conditions of the patient, the severity of the dysphagia, the expected course of any underlying diseases, and several other patient-specific considerations. In geriatric patients, the main objectives of this type of therapy are usually the maintenance of function and improvement of the quality of life.

  8. UMANG – AN EMERGENCY CAMPAIGN TO ADDRESS MALNUTRITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grana Pu Selvi Gnanaraj

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: World Vision India with its existence in across the country implemented the emergency feeding program for the children with underweight in 53 area development sites spread across 15 states of the country. Rationale: Since more than 40% of the children were found to be underweight through our assessment process, we implemented this community based feeding program as an emergency response to children with malnutrition. Objective: To rehabilitate the malnourished children and sensitise the community on feeding, caring and health seeking practices. Material and Methods: Considering the high prevalence of underweight children, we initiated the program ‘UMANG’ (Urgent Management and Action for Nutritional growth on a campaign mode with the involvement of various stakeholders. Malnourished children for this program were selected through a community based screening program. This was a 90 day community based feeding program for the malnourished children conducted either in the anganwadi center or a common place. Underweight children (moderate and severe and their mothers/care takers attended this program with their contribution from backyard nutrition garden or local market and were taught to prepare a nutritious menu using locally available low cost food materials. Mothers were also sensitised on health seeking, caring and feeding practices to prevent future incidence of malnutrition. The families of the malnourished children were also supported with nutrition (backyard garden, economic development assistance to improve food diversity at the household level. Results: About 50858 malnourished children (54 per cent moderate and 46 per cent severe were enrolled in UMANG[1]. On comparing the baseline (1st day and endline figures (90th day 38.5 per cent of the children have graduated to normal from moderate and severe underweight. In addition UMANG had spin off benefits such as increase in anganwadi attendance, community based growth

  9. Behaviour of postnatally growth-impaired mice during malnutrition and after partial weight recovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huber, Reinhard C.; Kolb, Andreas F.; Lillico, Simon

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Early malnutrition is a highly prevalent condition in developing countries. Different rodent models of postnatal early malnutrition have been used to approach the subject experimentally, inducing early malnutrition by maternal malnutrition, temporal maternal separation, manipulation...... of litter size or the surgical nipple ligation to impair lactation. Studies on the behaviour of (previously) malnourished animals using animal models have produced sometimes contradictory results regarding the effects of early postnatal malnutrition and have been criticized for introducing potential...... confounding factors. The present paper is a first report on the behavioural effects of early malnutrition induced by an alternative approach: mice nursed by a-casein-deficient knockout dams showed a severe growth delay during early development and substantial catch-up growth after weaning when compared...

  10. Gut Microbiota in Children Hospitalized with Oedematous and Non-Oedematous Severe Acute Malnutrition in Uganda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Kia Hee Schultz; Wiese, Maria; Rytter, Maren Johanne Heilskov

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Severe acute malnutrition (SAM) among children remains a major health problem in many developing countries. SAM manifests in both an oedematous and a non-oedematous form, with oedematous malnutrition in its most severe form also known as kwashiorkor. The pathogenesis of both types...... of malnutrition in children remains largely unknown, but gut microbiota (GM) dysbiosis has recently been linked to oedematous malnutrition. In the present study we aimed to assess whether GM composition differed between Ugandan children suffering from either oedematous or non-oedematous malnutrition. METHODOLOGY......-encoded 16S rRNA gene-targeted high throughput amplicon sequencing. Alpha and beta diversity measures were determined along with ANOVA mean relative abundance and G-test of independence followed by comparisons between groups. Of the 87 SAM children included, 62% suffered from oedematous malnutrition, 66...

  11. Validity of the malnutrition screening tool for older adults at high risk of hospital readmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Min-Lin; Courtney, Mary D; Shortridge-Baggett, Lillie M; Finlayson, Kathleen; Isenring, Elisabeth A

    2012-06-01

    Malnutrition is a serious problem in older adults, particularly for those at risk of hospital readmission. The essential step in managing malnutrition is early identification using a valid nutrition screening tool. The purpose of this study was to validate the Malnutrition Screening Tool (MST) in older adults at high risk of hospital readmission. Two RNs administered the MST to identify malnutrition risk and compared it with the comprehensive Subjective Global Assessment (SGA) to assess nutritional status for patients 65 and older who had at least one risk factor for hospital readmission. The MST demonstrates substantial sensitivity, specificity, and agreement with the SGA. These findings indicate that nursing staff can use the MST as a valid tool for routine screening and rescreening to identify patients at risk of malnutrition. Use of the MST may prevent hospital-acquired malnutrition in acute hospitalized older adults at high risk of readmission.

  12. Cognitive impairment as a mediator in the developmental pathway from infant malnutrition to adolescent depressive symptoms in Barbadian youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waber, Deborah P; Eaglesfield, David; Fitzmaurice, Garrett M; Bryce, Cyralene; Harrison, Robert H; Galler, Janina R

    2011-04-01

    Depressive symptoms are elevated in adolescents who experienced significant malnutrition early in life. Early malnutrition can also have a significant impact on cognitive functioning, presumably because of the adverse impact of the malnutrition on the very young brain. In the context of a developmental cascade model, we tested the hypothesis that the association between early malnutrition and adolescent depressive symptoms is mediated by the cognitive impairment that ensues from the malnutrition. We evaluated Barbadian youth (N = 57) hospitalized for moderate to severe protein-energy malnutrition in the first year of life and healthy controls (N = 60) longitudinally. The primary hypothesis was tested by multiple regression models. After adjusting for covariates, early malnutrition predicted both cognitive functioning in childhood (IQ, p malnutrition and depressive symptoms in adolescence (p malnutrition and depressive symptoms in adolescence is small.

  13. A rare cause of malnutrition: Intestinal tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ömer Yılmaz

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Extrapulmonary manifestations of tuberculosis are an uncommon. Intestinal tuberculosis (ITB is rare, but it remains a life-threatening disease unless diagnosed. Due to the lack of specific signs and symptoms, diagnosis of ITB can be difficult. A 27-year-old Turkish woman was admitted to our clinic with a 6-month history of abdominal pain, fever and weight loss. Colonoscopy was performed. At colonoscopy, there was detected in the mucosal lesions in the terminal ileum and caecum. On colonoscopy, deformed ileocaecal valve, strictures in caecum and terminal ileum, mucosal nodules were detected. Multiple biopsy specimens were taken from the active lesion. The diagnosis was made by demonstration of acid-fast bacilli and epithelioid cell granulomas in the colonoscopic biopsy specimens. The lesion was diagnosed as ITB. Quadruple therapy with anti-TBC drugs for 1 year was ordered. The patient was discharged from hospital two months without any other complications. Intestinal TB is a treatable and curable illness.

  14. Childhood Malnutrition in Egypt using Geoadditive Gaussian and Latent Variable Models

    OpenAIRE

    Khatab, Khaled

    2010-01-01

    Major progress has been made over the last 30 years in reducing the prevalence of malnutrition amongst children less than 5 years of age in developing countries. However, approximately 27% of children under the age of 5 in these countries are still malnourished. This work focuses on the childhood malnutrition in one of the biggest developing countries, Egypt. This study examined the association between bio-demographic and socioeconomic determinants and the malnutrition problem in children les...

  15. Mealtime habits and meal provision are associated with malnutrition among elderly patients admitted to hospital

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Background & aims: Large-scale studies performed in hospitals with the validated Mini Nutritional Assessment tool (MNA) are scarce. However, factors associated with malnutrition are important for identifying individuals at risk. The aims of the present study were to estimate the prevalence of malnutrition and to examine the association between mealtime habits, meal provision, and malnutrition among elderly patients admitted to hospital. Methods: This cross-sectional study included patient...

  16. The implication of protein malnutrition on cardiovascular control systems in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Fernanda C.; de Menezes, Rodrigo C.; Chianca, Deoclécio A.

    2015-01-01

    The malnutrition in early life is associated with metabolic changes and cardiovascular impairment in adulthood. Deficient protein intake-mediated hypertension has been observed in clinical and experimental studies. In rats, protein malnutrition also increases the blood pressure and enhances heart rate and sympathetic activity. In this review, we discuss the effects of post-weaning protein malnutrition on the resting mean arterial pressure and heart rate and their variabilities, cardiovascular...

  17. Increased Susceptibility to Metabolic Alterations in Young Adult Females Exposed to Early Malnutrition

    OpenAIRE

    del Carmen Miñana-Solis, María; Escobar, Carolina

    2006-01-01

    Early malnutrition during gestation and lactation modifies growth and metabolism permanently. Follow up studies using a nutritional rehabilitation protocol have reported that early malnourished rats exhibit hyperglycemia and/or hyperinsulinemia, suggesting that the effects of early malnutrition are permanent and produce a “programming” effect on metabolism. Deleterious effects have mainly been observed when early-malnutrition is followed by a high-carbohydrate or a high-fat diet. The aim of t...

  18. Increased Susceptibility to Metabolic Alterations in Young Adult Females Exposed to Early Malnutrition

    OpenAIRE

    María del Carmen Miñana-Solis, Carolina Escobar

    2007-01-01

    Early malnutrition during gestation and lactation modifies growth and metabolism permanently. Follow up studies using a nutritional rehabilitation protocol have reported that early malnourished rats exhibit hyperglycemia and/or hyperinsulinemia, suggesting that the effects of early malnutrition are permanent and produce a “programming” effect on metabolism. Deleterious effects have mainly been observed when early-malnutrition is followed by a high-carbohydrate or a high-fat diet. ...

  19. The prevalence and consequences of malnutrition risk in elderly Albanian intensive care unit patients

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Many investigators have reported rising numbers of elderly patients admitted to the intensive care units (ICUs). The aim of the study was to estimate the prevalence of malnutrition risk in the ICU by comparing the prevalence of malnutrition between older adults (aged 65 years and above) and adults (aged 18–64 years), and to examine the negative consequences associated with risk of malnutrition in older adults. Materials and methods A prospective cohort study in the ICU of the Universi...

  20. Detection of nosocomial malnutrition is improved in Amazon region by a standard clinical nutrition education program

    OpenAIRE

    Acuna, K.; Pires, C; Santos, G.; Hashimoto, R.; Pinheiro, L.; MAZUY, N.; Machado, A; OHVEIRA, C.; CAMLLO, M.; WISMANN, R.; Lima, M.; COSTA-MATOS, A.; D. L. Waitzberg; Cruz, T

    2008-01-01

    Background: In Brazil hospital malnutrition is highly prevalent. physician awareness of malnutrition is low, and nutrition therapy is underprescribed. One alternative to approach this problem is to educate health care providers in clinical nutrition. The present study aims to evaluate the effect of an intensive education course given to health care professionals and students on the diagnosis ability concerning to hospital malnutrition. Materials and methods: An intervention study based on a c...

  1. Malnutrition in Joint Arthroplasty: Prospective Study Indicates Risk of Unplanned ICU Admission

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Background: Malnutrition has been linked to poor outcomes after elective joint arthroplasty, but the risk of unplanned postoperative intensive care unit (ICU) admission in malnourished arthroplasty patients is unknown. Methods: 1098 patients were followed as part of a prospective risk stratification program at a tertiary, high-volume arthroplasty center. Chronic malnutrition was defined as preoperative albumin Results: The overall incidence of malnutrition was 16.9% (primary and revision arth...

  2. Intake of Dietary Supplements and Malnutrition in Patients in Intensive Care Unit

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Background: Malnutrition is prevalent among patients hospitalized in Intensive Care Units (ICUs) and causes various complications. Dietary supplementation to provide appropriate nutritional support may reduce the malnutrition and complications through improvement in nutritional status. This study was carried out to assess the association between dietary supplementation and malnutrition among patients in ICUs. Methods: A case-control study was conducted on 180 male patients aged 20-60 year...

  3. Socioeconomic inequalities of child malnutrition in Bangladesh during 2007-2011

    OpenAIRE

    Pulok, Mohammad Habibullah; Sabah, Md Nasim-Us Sabah; Enemark, Ulrika

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates how socioeconomic status and demographic factors determine child malnutrition as well as how these factors account for socioeconomic inequality in child malnutrition over 2007-2011 in Bangladesh. The dataset of this study originates from two cross sectional rounds (2007 and 2011) of the Bangladesh Demographic and Health Survey (BDHS). This study uses standard ordinary least square (OLS) models to estimate the determinants of child malnutrition. This study then employs...

  4. Risk factors of malnutrition among preschool children in Terengganu, Malaysia: a case control study

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, Hui Jie; Moy, Foong Ming; Nair, Sulochana

    2014-01-01

    Background Childhood malnutrition is a multi-dimensional problem. An increase in household income is not sufficient to reduce childhood malnutrition if children are deprived of food security, education, access to water, sanitation and health services. The aim of this study is to identify the characteristics of malnourished children below five years of age and to ascertain the risk factors of childhood malnutrition in a state in Malaysia. Methods A case control study was conducted in the mater...

  5. Possible Causes of Malnutrition in Melghat, a Tribal Region of Maharashtra, India

    OpenAIRE

    Birdi, Tannaz J.; Joshi, Sujay; Kotian, Shrati; Shah, Shimoni

    2014-01-01

    Melghat, situated in Amravati District of Maharashtra, India is a tribal region with amongst the highest numbers of malnutrition cases. This paper focuses on possible causes of malnutrition in the Dharni block of Melghat. Quantitative survey recorded the existing burden of malnutrition, kitchen garden (KG) practices, Public Distribution System, food provisioning, Anganwadi services and hygiene/sanitation in the community. Additionally a qualitative study was undertaken to understand the commu...

  6. Serum carnitine as an independent biomarker of malnutrition in patients with impaired oral intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamoto, Junichi; Honda, Akira; Miyamoto, Yasunori; Miyazaki, Teruo; Murakami, Masashi; Saito, Yoshifumi; Ikegami, Tadashi; Miyamoto, Jiro; Matsuzaki, Yasushi

    2014-11-01

    Carnitine is a vitamin-like compound that plays important roles in fatty acid β-oxidation and the control of the mitochondrial coenzyme A/acetyl-CoA ratio. However, carnitine is not added to ordinary enteral nutrition or total parenteral nutrition. In this study, we determined the serum carnitine concentrations in subjects receiving ordinary enteral nutrition (EN) or total parenteral nutrition (TPN) and in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases to compare its levels with those of other nutritional markers. Serum samples obtained from 11 EN and 11 TPN patients and 82 healthy controls were examined. In addition, 10 Crohn's disease and 10 ulcerative colitis patients with malnutrition who were barely able to ingest an ordinary diet were also evaluated. Carnitine and its derivatives were quantified using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The carnitine concentrations in EN and TPN subjects were significantly lower compared with those of the control subjects. Neither the serum albumin nor the total cholesterol level was correlated with the carnitine concentration, although a significant positive correlation was found between the serum albumin and total cholesterol levels. Indeed, patients with CD and UC showed significantly reduced serum albumin and/or total cholesterol levels, but their carnitine concentrations remained normal. In conclusion, only a complete blockade of an ordinary diet, such as EN or TPN, caused a reduction in the serum carnitine concentration. Serum carnitine may be an independent biomarker of malnutrition, and its supplementation is needed in EN and TPN subjects even if their serum albumin and total cholesterol levels are normal.

  7. Deuterium dilution technique for body composition assessment: resolving methodological issues in children with moderate acute malnutrition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabiansen, Christian; Yaméogo, Charles W; Devi, Sarita

    2017-01-01

    Childhood malnutrition is highly prevalent and associated with high mortality risk. In observational and interventional studies among malnourished children, body composition is increasingly recognised as a key outcome. The deuterium dilution technique has generated high-quality data on body...... composition in studies of infants and young children in several settings, but its feasibility and accuracy in children suffering from moderate acute malnutrition requires further study. Prior to a large nutritional intervention trial among children with moderate acute malnutrition, we conducted pilot work...... quality when using the deuterium dilution technique in malnutrition studies in field conditions, and may encourage a wider use of isotope techniques....

  8. Malnutrition and the presence of intestinal parasites in children from the poorest municipalities of Mexico

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gutierrez-Jimenez, Javier; Torres-Sanchez, Maria G C; Fajardo-Martinez, Leamsi P; Schlie-Guzman, Maria A; Luna-Cazares, Lorena M; Gonzalez-Esquinca, Alma R; Guerrero-Fuentes, Salvador; Vidal, Jorge E

    2013-01-01

    .... To begin identifying the infectious agents, our work determined the prevalence of intestinal parasites as well as malnutrition in children from Chiapas's three most impoverished municipalities...

  9. Nutritional care; do process and structure indicators influence malnutrition prevalence over time?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijers, Judith M M; Tan, Frans; Schols, Jos M G A; Halfens, Ruud J G

    2014-06-01

    To date, no information is available about the effect of structural and process factors of nutritional care on the prevalence of malnutrition over time in the long-term care sector. This study analyzes the trend of malnutrition prevalence rates between 2007 and 2011 in the long-term care sector, and the related effects of(1) process indicators such as nutritional screening and treatment and 2) structural indicators (guideline, protocol or nutritional screening policy). From 2007 to 2011, the Dutch National Prevalence Measurement of Care Problems (LPZ) was performed in Dutch long-term care organizations using a standardized questionnaire involving measurements at institutional, ward and resident level. The data were analyzed by mixed-linear regression for longitudinal data. Presence of malnutrition was assessed by BMI, undesired weight loss and nutritional intake. Seventy-four care homes were included (26,101 residents). The malnutrition prevalence trend significantly decreased (P effects analysis only the interacted process indicators nutritional screening and oral nutritional supplementation (ONS) were significant in influencing malnutrition prevalence rates over time. Structural indicators had no impact on the malnutrition prevalence over time. In conclusion, over time a lower prevalence of malnutrition is associated with a higher degree of nutritional screening. As might be expected, a higher prevalence of malnutrition is associated with higher use of ONS. Structural nutritional screening is an important intervention to tackle the problem of malnutrition in the long term care sector.

  10. Prevalence of factors associated with malnutrition among acute geriatric patients in Norway: a cross-sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Ellisiv Lærum; Brovold, Therese; Bergland, Astrid; Bye, Asta

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Data on acute geriatric patients' nutritional status are lacking, and the associations among physical function, sarcopenia, health status and nutritional status are not sufficiently investigated in this population. The aims of this study are to investigate (1) nutritional status and sarcopenia in a group of acute geriatric patients, (2) the association between nutritional status, physical function and sarcopenia in acute geriatric patients, controlling for health status. Design A cross-sectional study. Setting Two acute geriatric hospital wards in Norway. Participants This study included 120 patients with a mean age of 82.6±8 years. The following inclusion criteria were used: age ≥65 years and admitted to an acute geriatric ward. The exclusion criteria included terminal illness, Mini-Mental State Examination Sarcopenia was diagnosed using the mid-arm muscle circumference, gait speed and grip strength, in accordance with the EWGSOP algorithm. Diseases are organised by organ system classification. Results On the basis of the MNA classification, nearly one in two patients were at risk of malnutrition, while one in four were malnourished. Sarcopenia was present in 30% of the patients. A multivariate linear regression model was estimated and showed significant independent associations between SPPB score (β 0.64, 95% CI 0.38 to 0.90), sarcopenia (β −3.3, 95% CI −4.9 to −1.7), pulmonary disease (β −2.1, 95% CI −3.7 to −0.46), cancer (β −1.7, 95% CI −3.4 to −0.033) and nutritional status. Conclusions Our study shows a high prevalence of risk of malnutrition, malnutrition and sarcopenia. Further, the results indicate that a low total SPPB score, sarcopenia, cancer and pulmonary disease are significantly associated with declines in nutritional status, as measured by the MNA, in acute geriatric patients. PMID:27601491

  11. Prevalence of clostridium difficile toxin in diarrhoeal stool samples of patients from a general hospital in Eastern province, Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sue Elizabeth Shajan, Mohammed Faisal Hashim, Michael A

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Clostridium difficile is anaerobic spore- forming bacillus, produces two major toxins (Tcd A and Tcd B. Disease caused by toxigenic C.difficile (Tcd varies from mild diarrhea to fulminant disease and death. Aims and Objectives: – This study describes the prevalence of C.difficile toxins (CDT in stool samples from in patients and outpatients of all age groups. Materials and Methods:- A total of 146 samples were examined from 2011 to 2012 were analyzed for the presence of CDT tests, DNA amplification test, and the stool samples were cultured anaerobically on CCFA selective medium for growth- Morphology, identification and other tests. The patient’s details are collected from the medical records. Results: - Out of 146 specimens, only 20 (13.7% were positive for C.difficile toxins. Male and female were 12 (60% and 8(40% respectively, with the majority of them aged between 16 to 71 years. Majority of them were from out patient units (n = 5, 25% with rest from intensive care units (n = 3, 15%, male medical ward (n =3, 15% and surgical wards (n = 1, 5%. All the CDT positive patients had history of prior antibiotic usage before the detection of toxin. Mean duration of antibiotic usage was a 16.75 (±12.75 days, and the mean duration of diarrhea was 4.21 (±4.85 days, 16 patients had underlying medical illness, like hypertension, diabetic mellitus etc; Stool with pus cells and occult blood test was positive among that 18 patients were positive for CDT. The hospitalized patient duration was 20.96 (±16.25 days. Conclusion: – The detection of CDT in the diagnosis of CDI requires vigilance by both clinician and microbiologist to look out for possible infected patients. Antibiotic usage is a known risk factor; thus restricted use of antibiotics may results the reduction of CDI.

  12. Malnutrition negatively impacts the quality of life of patients with cirrhosis: An observational study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas-Loureiro, Gabriela; Servín-Caamaño, Alfredo; Pérez-Reyes, Elizabeth; Servín-Abad, Luis; Higuera-de la Tijera, Fátima

    2017-01-01

    AIM To verify how malnutrition is related to health-related quality of life (HRQL) impairment in patients with cirrhosis. METHODS Data was retrospectively abstracted from medical records and obtained by direct interview. We included patients with cirrhosis from any etiology, evaluated at the Liver Clinic from Gastroenterology Department in a tertiary healthcare center, from June 2014 to June 2016. Child-Pugh score, data about complications, and demographic, clinical and anthropometric characteristics of patients were obtained. Nutritional status was evaluated by the Subjective Global Assessment (SGA). HRQL was evaluated through the Chronic Liver Disease Questionnaire. Patients were requested to assess their global HRQL with the following code: 0 = impairment of HRQL, when it was compared with other healthy subjects; 1 = good HRQL, if it was similar to the quality of life of other healthy subjects. To compare the primary outcome between malnourished and well-nourished groups, the χ2 test, Fisher’s exact test or Student’s t-test were used, based on the variable type. Associations between predictor variables and deterioration of HRQL were determined by calculating the hazard ratio and 95% confidence interval using Cox proportional hazards regression. RESULTS A total of 127 patients with cirrhosis were included, and the mean age was 54.1 ± 12.3 years-old. According to Child-Pugh scoring, 25 (19.7%) were classified as A (compensated), 76 (59.8%) as B, and 26 (20.5%) as C (B/C = decompensated). According to SGA, 58 (45.7%) patients were classified as well-nourished. Sixty-nine patients identified HRQL as good, and 76 patients (59.8%) perceived impairment of their HRQL. Multivariate analysis to determine associations between predictor variables and self-perception of an impairment of HRQL found strong association with malnutrition (P < 0.0001). The most important impaired characteristics in malnourished patients were: Presence of body pain, dyspnea on exertion with

  13. Systemic inflammation, growth factors, and linear growth in the setting of infection and malnutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBoer, Mark D; Scharf, Rebecca J; Leite, Alvaro M; Férrer, Alessandra; Havt, Alexandre; Pinkerton, Relana; Lima, Aldo A; Guerrant, Richard L

    2017-01-01

    Deficits in weight gain and linear growth are seen frequently among children in areas where malnutrition and recurrent infections are common. Although both inflammation and malnutrition can result in growth hormone (GH) resistance, the interrelationships of infection, inflammation, and growth deficits in developing areas remain unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate relationships between low levels of systemic inflammation, growth factors, and anthropometry in a case-control cohort of underweight and normal weight children in northern Brazil. We evaluated data from 147 children ages 6 to 24 mo evaluated in the MAL-ED (Interactions of Malnutrition and Enteric Disease) case-control study following recruitment from a nutrition clinic for impoverished families in Fortaleza, Brazil. We used nonparametric tests and linear regression to evaluate relationships between current symptoms of infections (assessed by questionnaire), systemic inflammation (assessed by high-sensitivity C-reactive protein [hsCRP]), the GH insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) axis, and measures of anthropometry. All models were adjusted for age and sex. Children with recent symptoms of diarrhea, cough, and fever (compared with those without symptoms) had higher hsCRP levels; those with recent diarrhea and fever also had lower IGF-1 and higher GH levels. Stool myeloperoxidase was positively associated with serum hsCRP. hsCRP was in turn positively associated with GH and negatively associated with IGF-1 and IGF-binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3), suggesting a state of GH resistance. After adjustment for hsCRP, IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 were positively and GH was negatively associated with Z scores for height and weight. Infection and inflammation were linked to evidence of GH resistance, whereas levels of GH, IGF-1, and IGFBP-3 were associated with growth indices independent of hsCRP. These data implicate complex interrelationships between infection, nutritional status, GH axis, and linear growth in

  14. Case report of 5 siblings: malnutrition? Rickets? DiGeorge syndrome? Developmental delay?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harris William

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Parents of six children are facing a trial on charges of aggravated manslaughter in the care a 5 1/2 month old infant who died suddenly and neglect of their four older children for causing them to be malnourished by feeding them all an exclusively raw foods vegan diet. Both parents declined plea bargains and plan to defend themselves in court. Case presentation The fifth child born to a married couple was breast-fed until 2 1/2 months. Subsequently, the parents fed the baby an exclusively raw foods diet prepared in a blender at home. The four older children, ages 18 months – 6 1/2 years also ate an exclusively raw foods vegan diet. None of the four older children had significant previous injuries or serious illnesses. At autopsy, the infant weighed 3180 mg (6.99 pounds and appeared emaciated. The thymus gland was absent and parathyroid glands were not located. The lungs were "congested." DiGeorge anomaly cannot be ruled out from these findings. Although, the coroner ruled that "malnutrition" was the sole cause of death, malnutrition, according to the World Health Organization definition, cannot be diagnosed in this infant. Compared with standard growth charts, the older children fell 2.1–4.1 standard deviations below the mean for North American children in height and weight. Labs were normal except for a low cholesterol level in all and a low prealbumin in one of three children tested. Therefore, malnutrition cannot be diagnosed in these children. The pediatrician diagnosed rickets in the four-year-old. However, chest x-rays were normal in all and long bone x-rays showed minimal changes in one child – no sign of rickets. The clinical diagnosis of rickets was not confirmed by the Center for Disease Control's criteria. A psychologist diagnosed the 18-month-old as developmentally delayed to the level of a 15-month-old, but this diagnosis is questionable. Conclusion The raw foods vegan diet and possibly inherited small

  15. Cognitive development in children with chronic protein energy malnutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandramouli B A

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malnutrition is associated with both structural and functional pathology of the brain. A wide range of cognitive deficits has been reported in malnourished children. Effect of chronic protein energy malnutrition (PEM causing stunting and wasting in children could also affect the ongoing development of higher cognitive processes during childhood (>5 years of age. The present study examined the effect of stunted growth on the rate of development of cognitive processes using neuropsychological measures. Methods Twenty children identified as malnourished and twenty as adequately nourished in the age groups of 5–7 years and 8–10 years were examined. NIMHANS neuropsychological battery for children sensitive to the effects of brain dysfunction and age related improvement was employed. The battery consisted of tests of motor speed, attention, visuospatial ability, executive functions, comprehension and learning and memory Results Development of cognitive processes appeared to be governed by both age and nutritional status. Malnourished children performed poor on tests of attention, working memory, learning and memory and visuospatial ability except on the test of motor speed and coordination. Age related improvement was not observed on tests of design fluency, working memory, visual construction, learning and memory in malnourished children. However, age related improvement was observed on tests of attention, visual perception, and verbal comprehension in malnourished children even though the performance was deficient as compared to the performance level of adequately nourished children. Conclusion Chronic protein energy malnutrition (stunting affects the ongoing development of higher cognitive processes during childhood years rather than merely showing a generalized cognitive impairment. Stunting could result in slowing in the age related improvement in certain and not all higher order cognitive processes and may also result in

  16. Socioeconomic factors associated with severe acute malnutrition in Jamaica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Debbie S; Younger-Coleman, Novie; Lyew-Ayee, Parris; Greene, Lisa-Gaye; Boyne, Michael S; Forrester, Terrence E

    2017-01-01

    Severe acute malnutrition (SAM) is an important risk factor for illness and death globally, contributing to more than half of deaths in children worldwide. We hypothesized that SAM is positively correlated to poverty, low educational attainment, major crime and higher mean soil concentrations of lead, cadmium and arsenic. We reviewed admission records of infants admitted with a diagnosis of SAM over 14 years (2000-2013) in Jamaica. Poverty index, educational attainment, major crime and environmental heavy metal exposure were represented in a Geographic Information System (GIS). Cases of SAM were grouped by community and the number of cases per community/year correlated to socioeconomic variables and geochemistry data for the relevant year. 375 cases of SAM were mapped across 204 urban and rural communities in Jamaica. The mean age at admission was 9 months (range 1-45 months) and 57% were male. SAM had a positive correlation with major crime (r = 0.53; P poverty index. For every one unit increase in the number of crimes reported, the rate of occurrence of SAM cases increased by 1.01% [Incidence rate ratio (IRR) = 1.01 (95% CI = 1.006-1.014); P Pcorrelation between levels of heavy metals and the prevalence of malnutrition. Major crime has an independent positive association with severe acute malnutrition in Jamaican infants. This could suggest that SAM and major crime might have similar sociological origins or that criminality at the community level may be indicative of reduced income opportunities with the attendant increase in poor nutrition in the home.

  17. Socioeconomic factors associated with severe acute malnutrition in Jamaica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Debbie S.; Younger-Coleman, Novie; Lyew-Ayee, Parris; Greene, Lisa-Gaye; Boyne, Michael S.; Forrester, Terrence E.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Severe acute malnutrition (SAM) is an important risk factor for illness and death globally, contributing to more than half of deaths in children worldwide. We hypothesized that SAM is positively correlated to poverty, low educational attainment, major crime and higher mean soil concentrations of lead, cadmium and arsenic. Methods We reviewed admission records of infants admitted with a diagnosis of SAM over 14 years (2000–2013) in Jamaica. Poverty index, educational attainment, major crime and environmental heavy metal exposure were represented in a Geographic Information System (GIS). Cases of SAM were grouped by community and the number of cases per community/year correlated to socioeconomic variables and geochemistry data for the relevant year. Results 375 cases of SAM were mapped across 204 urban and rural communities in Jamaica. The mean age at admission was 9 months (range 1–45 months) and 57% were male. SAM had a positive correlation with major crime (r = 0.53; P < 0.001), but not with educational attainment or the poverty index. For every one unit increase in the number of crimes reported, the rate of occurrence of SAM cases increased by 1.01% [Incidence rate ratio (IRR) = 1.01 (95% CI = 1.006–1.014); P P<0.001]. The geochemistry data yielded no correlation between levels of heavy metals and the prevalence of malnutrition. Conclusion Major crime has an independent positive association with severe acute malnutrition in Jamaican infants. This could suggest that SAM and major crime might have similar sociological origins or that criminality at the community level may be indicative of reduced income opportunities with the attendant increase in poor nutrition in the home. PMID:28291805

  18. Socio-cultural determinants of infant malnutrition in Cameroon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pemunta, Ngambouk Vitalis; Fubah, Mathias Alubafi

    2015-07-01

    This study seeks to explore and explain the socio-cultural factors responsible for the incidence of infant malnutrition in Cameroon with particular emphasis on northern Cameroon where it is most accentuated. It combines quantitative data drawn from the 1991, 1998, 2004 and 2011 Cameroon Demographic and Health Surveys, as well as a literature review of publications by the WHO and UNICEF. This is further complemented with qualitative data from various regions of Cameroon, partly from a national ethnographic study on the ethno-medical causes of infertility in Cameroon conducted between 1999 and 2000. Whereas socio-cultural factors related to child feeding and maternal health (breast-feeding, food taboos and representations of the colostrum as dangerous for infants) are widespread throughout Cameroon, poverty-related factors (lack of education for mothers, natural disaster, unprecedented influx of refugees, inaccessibility and inequity in the distribution of health care services) are pervasive in northern Cameroon. This conjunction of factors accounts for the higher incidence of infant malnutrition and mortality in northern Cameroon. The study suggests the need for women's empowerment and for health care personnel in transcultural situations to understand local cultural beliefs, practices and sentiments before initiating change efforts in infant feeding practices and maternal health. Biomedical services should be tailored to the social and cultural needs of the target population--particularly women--since beliefs and practices underpin therapeutic recourse. Whereas infant diarrhoea might be believed to be the result of sexual contact, in reality, it is caused by unhygienic conditions. Similarly, weaning foods aimed at transmitting ethnic identity might not meet a child's age-specific food needs and might instead give rise to malnutrition.

  19. Both Exocrine Pancreatic Insufficiency and Signs of Pancreatic Inflammation Are Prevalent in Children with Complicated Severe Acute Malnutrition : An Observational Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartels, Rosalie H.; Meyer, Sophie L.; Stehmann, Tijs A.; Bourdon, Celine; Bandsma, Robert H. J.; Voskuijl, Wieger P.

    Objectives To assess whether pancreatic function is impaired in children with severe acute malnutrition, is different between edematous vs nonedematous malnutrition, and improves by nutritional rehabilitation. Study design We followed 89 children with severe acute malnutrition admitted to Queen

  20. Optimal screening of children with acute malnutrition requires a change in current WHO guidelines as MUAC and WHZ identify different patient groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laillou, Arnaud; Prak, Sophonneary; de Groot, Richard;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Timely treatment of acute malnutrition in children 500,000 deaths annually. Screening at community level is essential to identify children with malnutrition. Current WHO guidelines for community screening for malnutrition recommend a Mid Upper Arm...

  1. Children Malnutrition in Mazahua Communities with Transnational Male Migration

    OpenAIRE

    Diego Acosta, Lilliana; Viczcarra Bordi., Ivonne

    2009-01-01

    The objective was to evaluate the prevalence of malnutrition in children aged 1-5 years according to gender in transnational male migration and non-migration households in two communities of the Mazahua region in the State of Mexico. The sample studied was 534 children from one to five years old (50.4% boys and 49.6% girls). The nutritional condition was evaluated based on weight/age, weight/height and height/age, indicators recommended by the Mexican Official Norm NOM-031-SSA2-1999 (Secretar...

  2. Effects of food price shocks on child malnutrition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hussain, M. Azhar; Arndt, Thomas Channing; Salvucci, Vincenzo;

    2016-01-01

    A propitiously timed household survey carried out in Mozambique over the period 2008/2009 permits us to study the relationship between shifts in food prices and child nutrition status in a low income setting. We focus on weight-for-height and weight-for-age in different survey quarters...... characterized by very different food price inflation rates. Using propensity score matching techniques, we find that these nutrition measures, which are sensitive in the short run, improve significantly in the fourth quarter of the survey, when the inflation rate for basic food products is low, compared...... production year, as substantially increasing malnutrition amongst under-five children in Mozambique....

  3. Assesment of Malnutrition in Hospitalized in Iran and Newzeland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Moeeni

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hospitalized children are often at increased risk of nutritional impairment at or during admission.   Objectives: The aims of this study were to (1 define the nutritional state of hospitalized children with comparison to healthy children in two different countries and (2 compare and contrast three nutritional risk screening (NRS tools for hospitalized children in terms of the ease of completion and the validity of scores with comparison to current nutritional status.   Materials and Methods: Children admitted to two paediatric teaching hospitals located in Iran and New Zealand were enrolled, along with healthy control children from the same communities. Nutritional state was assessed by anthropometry and classified as moderate/severe malnutrition according to WHO criteria. Three NRS tools (Screening Tool for the Assessment of Malnutrition (STAMP, Screening Tool for Risk On Nutritional status and Growth (STRONGkids and Paediatric Yorkhill Malnutrition Score (PYMS were applied to all inpatients and patients classified from low to high risk.   Results: 281 inpatients and 262 controls were recruited in the two countries. The prevalence of moderate/severe under-nutrition in the Iranian inpatient group was 25.2% versus 3% in the control group, respectively (P=0.0001. The rate of under-nutrition in NZ inpatients was 9.9% versus 3.7% in the community group (P=0.04.  In contrast, the prevalence of overweight/obesity in the Iranian control group was 22% compared to just 2.5% in the inpatient group (P=0.04, while there was no difference between the two groups in NZ (P=1.0. NRS tools were able to identify most of the malnourished patients in the medium to high risk groups in both countries.   Conclusion: Hospitalized children have higher rates of under-nutrition than healthy children from the same community. The three NRS tools were able to identify children at nutritional risk, but with differing utility. STRONGkids appeared to be the

  4. [Estimates of the prevalence of child malnutrition in Brazilian municipalities in 2006].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benício, Maria Helena D'Aquino; Martins, Ana Paula Bortoletto; Venancio, Sonia Isoyama; Barros, Aluísio Jardim Dornellas de

    2013-06-01

    To estimate the prevalence of malnutrition in children for all Brazilian municipalities. A multilevel logistic regression model was used to estimate the individual probability of malnutrition in 5,507 Brazilian municipalities in 2006, in terms of predictive factors grouped according to hierarchical levels. The response variable was child malnutrition (children aged from six to 59 months with height for age and sex below -2 z-scores, according to the World Health Organization standard). The predictive variables were determinants of malnutrition measured similarly by the National Demographics and Health Survey-2006 and the Sample from the 2000 Demographic Census. At level 1 (individual): sex and age, level 2 (household): socioeconomic variables, water and indoor plumbing, urban or rural area and level 3 (municipal): location of the municipality and coverage of the Family Health Strategy (FHS) in 2006. The study detected a statistically significant chance of malnutrition in male children, those living in households with two or more individuals per room, those belonging to the lowest quintiles of the socioeconomic score, those with three or more children under five in the household, those with no access to running water or located in the North. There was a negative dose-response association between FHS coverage and the chance of malnutrition (p = 0.007). FHS coverage in the municipality equal to or greater than 70% showed a 45% reduction in the chance of infant malnutrition. Estimates of the prevalence of child malnutrition show that most of the cities have the risk of malnutrition under control, very low or low. Risks of greater magnitude exist only in 158 municipalities in the North Region. Childhood malnutrition as a public health problem is concentrated in the cities of the North region, where FHS coverage is lower. A protective effect of FHS in relation to child malnutrition was found in the country as a whole, irrespective of other determinants of the problem.

  5. Does malnutrition influence outcome in children undergoing congenital heart surgery in a developing country?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva M. Marwali

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Most children undergoing cardiac surgery forcongenital heart disease (CHD in developing countries aremalnourished. Malnutrition is known as a co-morbidity factorthat might predict and influence outcomes after surgery.Objectives To evaluate the effect of malnutrition and otherassociated risk factors on post-operative outcomes in childrenwith CHDs underwent cardiac surgery.Methods We conducted a retrospective cohort study in a singlecenter tertiary pediatric cardiac intensive care unit (PCICUin Indonesia. Our cohort included all children between 5 and36 months of age undergoing congenital heart surgery withcardiopulmonary bypass from November 2011 until February2014. Outcomes measured were the length of intubation and thelength of ICU stay. Variables for potential influence investigatedwere the nutritional status, age, gender, type of cardiac anomaly(acyanotic vs. cyanotic, Aristotle score, cardiopulmonary bypasstime, aortic cross-clamp time, and Pediatric Risk of Mortality(PRISM III score.Results Out of 249 patients included, 147 (59% showedmalnourishment on admission. Malnourished patients weresignificantly younger in age, presented with an acyanotic heartdefects, and had higher PRISM III score. Additionally, they alsohad a longer mechanical ventilation time and ICU stay thanthose with a normal nutritional status. After adjusting for variousvariables using a multiple logistic regression model it could bedemonstrated that a higher Z-score for weight to age was asignificant protective factor for the intubation time of more than29 hours with an odds ratio of 0.66 (95% CI 0.48 to 0.92, P =0.012. Non-malnourished patients had a 49% significantly higherchance for extubation with a hazard ratio of 1.49 (95% CI 1.12to 1.99, P= 0.007.Conclusion Malnourishment is clearly associated in a linearfashion with longer mechanical ventilation and ICU stay. As one ofsignificant and potentially treatable co-morbidity factors, preventionof malnourishment

  6. Developmental changes in content of glial marker proteins in rats exposed to protein malnutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feoli, Ana Maria; Leite, Marina C; Tramontina, Ana Carolina; Tramontina, Francine; Posser, Thais; Rodrigues, Letícia; Swarowsky, Alessandra; Quincozes-Santos, André; Leal, Rodrigo B; Gottfried, Carmem; Perry, Marcos Luiz; Gonçalves, Carlos-Alberto

    2008-01-02

    Pre- and postnatal protein malnutrition (PMN) adversely affects the developing brain in numerous ways, but only a few studies have investigated specific glial parameters. This study aimed to evaluate specific glial changes of rats exposed to pre and postnatal PMN, based on glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and S100B immunocontents as well as glutamine synthetase (GS), in cerebral cortex, hippocampus, cerebellum and cerebrospinal fluid, on the 2nd, 15th and 60th postnatal days. We found increases in GFAP, S100B and GS in the cerebral cortex at birth, suggesting an astrogliosis. Hippocampus and cerebellum also exhibited this profile at birth. However, a significant interaction between age and diet in postnatal life was observed only in the S100B of the cerebral cortex. No changes in the content of GFAP and S100B and GS activity were found on the 60th postnatal day in malnourished rats. In contrast, following an increase in the levels of S100B in the cerebrospinal fluid, during the early developmental stages, levels remained elevated on the 60th postnatal day. Our data support the concept of astrogliosis at birth, induced by PMN, and involve extracellular-regulated kinase activation. Specific alterations in cerebral cortex emphasize the regional vulnerability of the brain to malnutrition; some alterations were observed only at birth (e.g. GFAP); others were observed on the 2nd and 15th post-natal days (e.g. ERK phosphorylation). Taken together, transient and persistent alterations (e.g. elevated extracellular levels of S100B) suggest some brain damage or a risk of brain diseases in rats exposed to PMN.

  7. Toward Food Policy for the Dual Burden of Malnutrition: An Exploratory Policy Space Analysis in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thow, Anne Marie; Kadiyala, Suneetha; Khandelwal, Shweta; Menon, Purnima; Downs, Shauna; Reddy, K Srinath

    2016-06-16

    There is global consensus that a strong policy response is essential for addressing the dual burden of malnutrition. However, policy makers in low- and middle-income countries may perceive a conflict between food supply policies to combat persistent undernutrition and more recent recommendations for policies addressing rising rates of diet-related noncommunicable diseases (NCDs). This article explores the potential to use policy space analysis to identify food supply policy opportunities for addressing both undernutrition and diet-related NCDs and to support improved policy coherence. We conducted an exploratory policy space analysis to identify opportunities and constraints for integrated nutrition policy with respect to the food supply in India, where a dual burden of malnutrition has been well documented. We conducted a review of food supply policies and 27 key informant interviews (16 with stakeholders active in India's national nutrition policy space, and 11 with policy makers and experts in food supply policy). The analysis suggests several opportunities for an integrated food supply policy agenda, including targeting common foods of concern (such as highly processed foods) and foods that present common benefits (such as fruits and vegetables), and scaling up existing small-scale policy initiatives that support the availability of nutrient-rich foods. Challenges include policy inertia and competing priorities within the economic sector. This scoping study indicates that the policy space analysis framework used here can help to identify specific, contextually appropriate policy options and strategies for strengthening public health nutrition policy within sectors responsible for food supply policy. © The Author(s) 2016.

  8. The Prevalence of Malnutrition and Obesity in Schoolchildren in the Southeast Anatolia Region of Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İsmail Hamdi KARA

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of malnutrition, obesity andoverweight, calculated by body mass index (BMI, in elementary school children in theSoutheast Anatolia Region of Turkey. Method: This research is a cross-sectional epidemiological study and elementary schoolchildren with aged 7-16 years were included randomly by layered random sampling method. Atotal of selected 20 schools and 1912 students filled the questionnaires in Diyarbakır and MardinCity Centers. A questionnaire included questions related to the educational and professionalstatus of parents, siblings, household conditions, children’s demographic characteristics andbody mass indexes, body weight and heights was applied to each student. Determined BMIswere classified according to the percentile values of Center for Disease Control and Prevention(CDC-US growth charts and International Obesity Task Force (IOTF.Results: Mean age of 1040 boys (52,3% and 872 girls (47,7%, totally 1912 students was10,8±2,4 years and mean BMI was 17,6±2,8 kg/m2. According to CDC classification, 7,2% ofmale students were categorized as “underweight”, 12,3% of them as “overweight”, and 3,4%of them as “obese” whereas 5,5% of them were categorized as “overweight” and 0,6% of themas “obese” according to IOTF classification. In female students, 8,4% were categorized as“underweight”, 11,1% “overweight”, and 3,3% as “obese” according to CDC classificationwhereas 5,2% were categorized as “overweight” and 1,2% “obese” according to IOTF. Theprevalences were not between boys and girls (p>0.05. Conclusion: In school children in the Southeast Anatolia Region, one of the most importanthealth problems was malnutrition; however prevalances of overweight and obesity had alsononignorable levels.

  9. A case of phrynoderma in a patient with Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobos, Gabriela; Cornejo, Christine; McMahon, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Phrynoderma is a type of follicular hyperkeratosis associated with nutritional deficiencies. It is rarely seen in developed countries, although cases have been reported in patients with severe malnutrition or malabsorption secondary to various causes. This report describes a 19-year-old patient with poorly controlled Crohn's disease and malnutrition who developed the characteristic hyperkeratotic papules and plaques on his trunk and extremities in the setting of low serum vitamin A levels. To our knowledge, there are no reports of phrynoderma associated with Crohn's disease. It is likely that our patient's low vitamin A level and subsequent phrynoderma was the result of increased Crohn's disease activity and malnutrition.

  10. Malnutrition and the disproportional burden on the poor: the case of Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vega Jeanette

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malnutrition is a major public health and development concern in the developing world and in poor communities within these regions. Understanding the nature and determinants of socioeconomic inequality in malnutrition is essential in contemplating the health of populations in developing countries and in targeting resources appropriately to raise the health of the poor and most vulnerable groups. Methods This paper uses a concentration index to summarize inequality in children's height-for-age z-scores in Ghana across the entire socioeconomic distribution and decomposes this inequality into different contributing factors. Data is used from the Ghana 2003 Demographic and Health Survey. Results The results show that malnutrition is related to poverty, maternal education, health care and family planning and regional characteristics. Socioeconomic inequality in malnutrition is mainly associated with poverty, health care use and regional disparities. Although average malnutrition is higher using the new growth standards recently released by the World Health Organization, socioeconomic inequality and the associated factors are robust to the change of reference population. Conclusion Child malnutrition in Ghana is a multisectoral problem. The factors associated with average malnutrition rates are not necessarily the same as those associated with socioeconomic inequality in malnutrition.

  11. Malnutrition and the disproportional burden on the poor: The case of Ghana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Van de Poel (Ellen); A.R. Hosseinpoor (Ahmad); C. Jehu-Appiah (Caroline); J. Vega (Jeanette); N. Speybroeck (Niko)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractBackground. Malnutrition is a major public health and development concern in the developing world and in poor communities within these regions. Understanding the nature and determinants of socioeconomic inequality in malnutrition is essential in contemplating the health of populations in

  12. A Study of Oxidative Stress Biomarkers and Effect of Oral Antioxidant Supplementation in Severe Acute Malnutrition

    OpenAIRE

    Ghone, Rahul A.; Suryakar, Adinath N.; Kulhalli, P. M.; Bhagat, Sonali S.; Padalkar, Ramchandra K.; Karnik, Aarti C.; Hundekar, Prakash S.; Sangle, D. A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Malnutrition represents one of the most severe health problems in India. Free radicals play an important role in immunological response, which induces the oxidative surplus in severe acute malnutrition. Severe dietary deficiency of nutrients leads to increased oxidative stress in cellular compartments.

  13. Predictors of oedema among children hospitalized with severe acute malnutrition in Jimma University Hospital, Ethiopia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Girma, Tsinuel; Kæstel, Pernille; Mølgaard, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Severe acute malnutrition has two main clinical manifestations, i.e., oedematous and non-oedematous. However, factors of oedema are not well established.......Severe acute malnutrition has two main clinical manifestations, i.e., oedematous and non-oedematous. However, factors of oedema are not well established....

  14. Home-based therapy for severe acute malnutrition with ready-to-use food

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severe acute malnutrition is a devastating condition afflicting children under 5 years in many developing countries, but concentrated in sub-Saharan Africa. This paper examines the development of home-based lipid-nutrient therapeutic foods for the treatment of acute malnutrition in sub-Saharan Afric...

  15. Pilot study using wheat bran to mitigate malnutrition and enteric pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Child malnutrition is a complex global problem, of which lack of food is only one component. Enteric pathogens and malnutrition work in a cyclic manner to depress a child’s intestinal immunity, while decreasing nutrient absorption. This cycle leads to stunting, wasting, and death. Often malnourished...

  16. To what extent do structural quality indicators of (nutritional) care influence malnutrition prevalence in nursing homes?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Nie-Visser, Noemi C.; Meijers, Judith M.; Schols, J.M.G.A.; Lohrmann, Christa; Spreeuwenberg, Marieke; Halfens, Ruud J.

    2015-01-01

    Background & aims Many residents in European healthcare institutions are malnourished, with reported malnutrition prevalence rates of up to 60%. Due to the negative effects of malnutrition it is important to optimize the quality of nutritional care. If structural quality indicators of nutritional

  17. Malnutrition and the disproportional burden on the poor: The case of Ghana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Van de Poel (Ellen); A.R. Hosseinpoor (Ahmad); C. Jehu-Appiah (Caroline); J. Vega (Jeanette); N. Speybroeck (Niko)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractBackground. Malnutrition is a major public health and development concern in the developing world and in poor communities within these regions. Understanding the nature and determinants of socioeconomic inequality in malnutrition is essential in contemplating the health of populations in

  18. Risk Factors for Malnutrition among Older Adults in the Emergency Department: A Multicenter Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burks, Collin E; Jones, Christopher W; Braz, Valerie A; Swor, Robert A; Richmond, Natalie L; Hwang, Kay S; Hollowell, Allison G; Weaver, Mark A; Platts-Mills, Timothy F

    2017-08-01

    Among older adults, malnutrition is common, often missed by healthcare providers, and influences recovery from illness or injury. To identify modifiable risk factors associated with malnutrition in older patients. Prospective cross-sectional multicenter study. 3 EDs in the South, Northeast, and Midwest. Non-critically ill, English-speaking adults aged ≥65 years. Random time block sampling was used to enroll patients. The ED interview assessed malnutrition using the Mini Nutritional Assessment Short-Form. Food insecurity and poor oral health were assessed using validated measures. Other risk factors examined included depressive symptoms, limited mobility, lack of transportation, loneliness, and medication side effects, qualified by whether the patient reported the risk factor affected their diet. The population attributable risk proportion (PARP) for malnutrition was estimated for each risk factor. In our sample (n = 252), the prevalence of malnutrition was 12%. Patient characteristics associated with malnutrition included not having a college degree, being admitted to the hospital, and residence in an assisted living facility. Of the risk factors examined, the PARPs for malnutrition were highest for poor oral health (54%; 95% CI 16%, 78%), food insecurity (14%; 95% CI 3%, 31%), and lack of transportation affecting diet (12%; 95% CI 3%, 28%). Results of this observational study identify multiple modifiable factors associated with the problem of malnutrition in older adults. © 2017, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2017, The American Geriatrics Society.

  19. Association of the oral health impact profile with malnutrition risk in Spanish elders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Montoya, J A; Ponce, G; Sánchez Lara, I; Barrios, R; Llodra, J C; Bravo, M

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine any relationship between oral health-related quality of life (OHR-QoL) and malnutrition risk in the elderly using the oral health impact profile (OHIP). We studied 250 institutionalized elderly people, 162 females and 88 males, with and without teeth. Data were gathered on: general health; oral health; malnutrition risk, measured with the Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA); and OHR-QoL, evaluated with the OHIP. A multivariate binary logistic regression model was constructed with malnutrition presence/risk as dependent variable. Mean age was 82.7 ± 8.2 years. Malnutrition or malnutrition risk was shown by 36.8% of the sample. OHIP was associated with malnutrition/risk after adjustment for age, sex, functional status, and mild dementia diagnosis. Malnutrition/risk was 3.43-fold more likely in participants with OHIP-reported "problems" than in those with none. The conclusion of the study was that OHIP-measured OHR-QoL is associated with malnutrition risk.

  20. The role of anthropometry in the assessment of malnutrition in the hospitalized frail elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lansey, S; Waslien, C; Mulvihill, M; Fillit, H

    1993-01-01

    Although common among the hospitalized frail elderly, malnutrition is often unrecognized by clinicians, and its identification is fought with difficulty due to inadequate nutritional assessment methods and standards. This study compared the use of percent ideal body weight (%IBW) and anthropometry in the assessment of malnutrition in the hospitalized frail elderly. Approximaty 45% of patients studied had at least two anthropometric measurements below the 5th percentile, a level reflecting severe malnutrition. However, only 28% of patients were found to be less than 90% IBW, a level reflecting only mild to severe changes in body weight. Serum albumin was below normal (total lymphocyte count was below normal (malnutrition, anthropometry appeared more sensitive than %IBW as a measure of malnutrition in the hospitalized frail elderly. Furthermore, acute illness causes changes in commonly employed blood measures which make them unreliable in the assessment of malnutrition in this population. Anthropometry may prove to be the most stable, easily performed, and sensitive measure of malnutrition in the hospitalized frail elderly. However, further studies are clearly needed, including the development of appropriate anthropometric reference standards for the very old, a population that commonly suffers malnutrition.