WorldWideScience

Sample records for diameter stress corrosion

  1. Inter granular stress corrosion cracking of Ignalina NPP austenitic piping of outside diameter 325 mm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nedzinskas, L.; Klimasauskas, A.

    2003-01-01

    The Inter Granular Stress Corrosion Cracking (IGSCC) of Ignalina NPP main circulation circuit piping, produced from austenitic stainless steel is presented covering current performances and further 'Ageing Management' related actions and plans as well as experience (lessons learned) on solving IGSCC phenomenon, which is currently under investigations and no yet comprehensive answer how to avoid it. (author)

  2. Analysis of Eddy Current Capabilities for the Detection of Outer Diameter Stress Corrosion Cracking in Small Bore Metallic Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wincheski, Buzz; Williams, Phillip; Simpson, John

    2007-01-01

    The use of eddy current techniques for the detection of outer diameter damage in tubing and many complex aerospace structures often requires the use of an inner diameter probe due to a lack of access to the outside of the part. In small bore structures the probe size and orientation are constrained by the inner diameter of the part, complicating the optimization of the inspection technique. Detection of flaws through a significant remaining wall thickness becomes limited not only by the standard depth of penetration, but also geometrical aspects of the probe. Recently, an orthogonal eddy current probe was developed for detection of such flaws in Space Shuttle Primary Reaction Control System (PRCS) Thrusters. In this case, the detection of deeply buried stress corrosion cracking by an inner diameter eddy current probe was sought. Probe optimization was performed based upon the limiting spatial dimensions, flaw orientation, and required detection sensitivity. Analysis of the probe/flaw interaction was performed through the use of finite and boundary element modeling techniques. Experimental data for the flaw detection capabilities, including a probability of detection study, will be presented along with the simulation data. The results of this work have led to the successful deployment of an inspection system for the detection of stress corrosion cracking in Space Shuttle Primary Reaction Control System (PRCS) Thrusters.

  3. Evaluation of nondestructive evaluation size measurement for integrity assessment of axial outside diameter stress corrosion cracking in steam generator tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joo, Kyung Mun; Hong, Jun Hee

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the initiation of outside diameter stress corrosion cracking (ODSCC) at the tube support plate region of domestic steam generators (SG) with Alloy 600 HTMA tubes has been increasing. As a result, SGs with Alloy 600 HTMA tubes must be replaced early or are scheduled to be replaced prior to their designed lifetime. ODSCC is one of the biggest threats to the integrity of SG tubes. Therefore, the accurate evaluation of tube integrity to determine ODSCC is needed. Eddy current testing (ECT) is conducted periodically, and its results could be input as parameters for evaluating the integrity of SG tubes. The reliability of an ECT inspection system depends on the performance of the inspection technique and ability of the analyst. The detection probability and ECT sizing error of degradation are considered to be the performance indices of a nondestructive evaluation (NDE) system. This paper introduces an optimized evaluation method for ECT, as well as the sizing error, including the analyst performance. This study was based on the results of a round robin program in which 10 inspection analysts from 5 different companies participated. The analysis of ECT sizing results was performed using a linear regression model relating the true defect size data to the measured ECT size data.

  4. External stress-corrosion cracking of a 1.22-m-diameter type 316 stainless steel air valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Thomas J.; Telesman, Jack; Moore, Allan S.; Johnson, Dereck F.; Kuivinen, David E.

    1993-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the cause of the failure of a massive AISI Type 316 stainless steel valve which controlled combustion air to a jet engine test facility. Several through-the-wall cracks were present near welded joints in the valve skirt. The valve had been in outdoor service for 18 years. Samples were taken in the cracked regions for metallographic and chemical analyses. Insulating material and sources of water mist in the vicinity of the failed valve were analyzed for chlorides. A scanning electron microscope was used to determine whether foreign elements were present in a crack. On the basis of the information generated, the failure was characterized as external stress-corrosion cracking. The cracking resulted from a combination of residual tensile stress from welding and the presence of aqueous chlorides. Recommended countermeasures are included.

  5. Corrosion and deposit evaluation in large diameter pipes using radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boateng, A.

    2012-01-01

    The reliability and safety of industrial equipment in the factories and processing industries are substantially influenced by degradation processes such as corrosion, erosion, deposits and blocking of pipes. These might lead to low production, unpredictable and costly shutdowns due to repair and replacement and sometimes combined environmental pollution and risk of personnel injuries. Only periodic inspection for the integrity of pipes and equipment can reduce the risk in connection with other maintenance activities. The research explored two methods of radiographic inspection techniques, the double wall technique and the tangential radiographic technique using Ir-192 for evaluating deposits and corrosion attacks across the inner and outer walls of steel pipes with diameter greater than 150 mm with or without insulation. The application of both techniques was conducted depending on pipe diameter, wall thickness, radiation source (Ir-92) and film combination. The iridium source was positioned perpendicular with respect to the pipe axis projecting the double wall of the pipe on the plated radiographic film. With the tangential radiographic technique, the source was placed tangential to the pipe wall and because of its large diameter, the source was collimated to prevent backscatter and also to focus the beam at the target area of interest. All measurements were performed on special designed test pieces to simulate corrosion attack and deposits on industrial pipes. Pitting corrosion measurements based on Tangential Radiographic Technique were more sophisticated, and therefore magnification factor and correction were used to establish the estimated pit depth on the film. The insulating material used to conserve the thermodynamic properties of the transported media had relatively negligible attenuation coefficient compared to the concrete deposit. The two explored techniques were successful in evaluating corrosion attack and deposit on the walls of the pipe and the risk

  6. Corrosion product film-induced stress facilitates stress corrosion cracking

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Wenwen; Zhang, Zhiliang; Ren, Xuechong; Guan, Yongjun; Su, Yanjing

    2015-01-01

    Finite element analyses were conducted to clarify the role of corrosion product films (CPFs) in stress corrosion cracking (SCC). Flat and U-shaped edge-notched specimens were investigated in terms of the CPF-induced stress in the metallic substrate and the stress in the CPF. For a U-shaped edge-notched specimen, the stress field in front of the notch tip is affected by the Young’s modulus of the CPF and the CPF thickness and notch geometry. The CPF-induced tensile stress in the metallic subst...

  7. Corrosion and deposit determination in large diameter pipes by radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harara, W.

    2006-08-01

    Two steel reference pipes with outer diameters of 8 and 12 inches were machined to make artificial defects on each of them, such as inside and outside steps of different wall thicknesses, inside and outside flat bottomed holes (FBH) of different diameters and depths on steps, flat area (FA), and ground patch (GP). The artificial defect were made to simulate natural corrosion attack as regular corrosion and pitting. The two reference pipes were tested according to tangential radiography technique and double wall single image technique. Tangential radiography technique had been applied using Co-60 radio-isotope to determine the steps thicknesses, the FBH, the remaining wall thickness under the FA, the remaining wall thickness above the GP, and the minimum detectable thickness of the artificial cement deposit on the two reference pipes, with and without insulation. Double wall single image technique had also been applied on the two reference pipes with and without insulation using Ir-192 radio-isotope to measure the flat bottomed holes depths, GP depth, and FA depth by density measurement. The measurement results obtained from the radiographs confirm that, tangential radiography technique can be applied to detect and evaluate the inside and outside regular corrosion attack in the large diameter pipes. It can also be applied to detect and evaluate the outside FBH with depth equal or greater than 10%. Inside 10% FBH and inside 20% FBH can not be detected if their diameters are not larger than certain value related to diameter and wall thickness of the pipe under test. Increasing the film density up to 5 outside the pipe did not provide any detection improvement of 10% and 20% inside FBH. Tangential radiography technique can also be applied to detect and measure the deposit inside the pipes. Double wall technique can be applied as an alternative method of the tangential radiography technique to detect and to evaluate the shallow and small diameter, 10% and 20% inside FBH

  8. Corrosion Product Film-Induced Stress Facilitates Stress Corrosion Cracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenwen; Zhang, Zhiliang; Ren, Xuechong; Guan, Yongjun; Su, Yanjing

    2015-06-11

    Finite element analyses were conducted to clarify the role of corrosion product films (CPFs) in stress corrosion cracking (SCC). Flat and U-shaped edge-notched specimens were investigated in terms of the CPF-induced stress in the metallic substrate and the stress in the CPF. For a U-shaped edge-notched specimen, the stress field in front of the notch tip is affected by the Young's modulus of the CPF and the CPF thickness and notch geometry. The CPF-induced tensile stress in the metallic substrate is superimposed on the applied load to increase the crack tip strain and facilitate localized plasticity deformation. In addition, the stress in the CPF surface contributes to the rupture of the CPFs. The results provide physical insights into the role of CPFs in SCC.

  9. Stress corrosion testing of irradiated cladding tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lunde, L.; Olshausen, K.D.

    1980-01-01

    Samples from two fuel rods with different cladding have been stress corrosion tested by closed-end argon-iodine pressurization at 320 0 C. The fuel rods with stress relieved and recrystallized Zircaloy-2 had received burnups of 10.000 and 20.000 MWd/ton UO 2 , respectively. It was found that the SCC failure stress was unchanged or slightly higher for the irradiated than for the unirradiated control tubes. The tubes failed consistently in the end with the lowest irradiation dose. The diameter increase of the irradiated cladding during the test was 1.1% for the stress-relieved samples and 0.24% for the recrystallized samples. SEM examination revealed no major differences between irradiated and unirradiated cladding. A ''semi-ductile'' fracture zone in recrystallized material is described in some detail. (author)

  10. Stress corrosion of low alloy steel forgings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thornton, D.V.; Mould, P.B.; Patrick, E.C.

    1976-01-01

    The catastrophic failure of a steam turbine rotor disc at Hinkley Point 'A' Power station was shown to have been caused by the growth of a stress corrosion crack to critical dimensions. This failure has promoted great interest in the stress corrosion susceptibility of medium strength low alloy steel forgings in steam environments. Consequently, initiation and growth of stress corrosion cracks of typical disc steels have been investigated in steam and also in water at 95 0 C. Cracking has been shown to occur, predominantly in an intergranular manner, with growth rates of between 10 -9 and 10 -7 mm sec. -1 . It is observed that corrosion pitting and oxide penetration prior to the establishment of a stress corrosion crack in the plain samples. (author)

  11. Role of hydrogen in stress corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louthan, M.R. Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Hydrogen embrittlement has been postulated as a cause of stress corrosion cracking in numerous alloy systems. Such an interrelationship is useful in design considerations because it permits the designer and working engineer to relate the literature from both fields to a potential environmental compatibility problem. The role of hydrogen in stress corrosion of high strength steels is described along with techniques for minimizing the susceptibility to hydrogen stress cracking. (U.S.)

  12. Stress corrosion of alloy 600: mechanism proposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnin, T.

    1993-01-01

    A fissuring model by stress corrosion based on interactions corrosion-plasticity on the fissure top is proposed to describe the generally intergranular bursting of INCONEL 600 in the PWR. The calculation shows, and some observations check experimentally, that a pseudo intergranular cracking bound to the zigzag micro facets formation along the joints may be so that a completely intergranular bursting. This pseudo intergranular mode makes up a signature of the proposed mechanism. It may be suggested that it may exist one continuity mechanism between the trans and intergranular cracking by stress corrosion of ductile cubic centered faces materials. 2 figs

  13. Strain rate effects in stress corrosion cracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parkins, R.N. (Newcastle upon Tyne Univ. (UK). Dept. of Metallurgy and Engineering Materials)

    1990-03-01

    Slow strain rate testing (SSRT) was initially developed as a rapid, ad hoc laboratory method for assessing the propensity for metals an environments to promote stress corrosion cracking. It is now clear, however, that there are good theoretical reasons why strain rate, as opposed to stress per se, will often be the controlling parameter in determining whether or not cracks are nucleated and, if so, are propagated. The synergistic effects of the time dependence of corrosion-related reactions and microplastic strain provide the basis for mechanistic understanding of stress corrosion cracking in high-pressure pipelines and other structures. However, while this may be readily comprehended in the context of laboratory slow strain tests, its extension to service situations may be less apparent. Laboratory work involving realistic stressing conditions, including low-frequency cyclic loading, shows that strain or creep rates give good correlation with thresholds for cracking and with crack growth kinetics.

  14. Seacoast stress corrosion cracking of aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, T. S.; Nelson, E. E.

    1981-01-01

    The stress corrosion cracking resistance of high strength, wrought aluminum alloys in a seacoast atmosphere was investigated and the results were compared with those obtained in laboratory tests. Round tensile specimens taken from the short transverse grain direction of aluminum plate and stressed up to 100 percent of their yield strengths were exposed to the seacoast and to alternate immersion in salt water and synthetic seawater. Maximum exposure periods of one year at the seacoast, 0.3 or 0.7 of a month for alternate immersion in salt water, and three months for synthetic seawater were indicated for aluminum alloys to avoid false indications of stress corrosion cracking failure resulting from pitting. Correlation of the results was very good among the three test media using the selected exposure periods. It is concluded that either of the laboratory test media is suitable for evaluating the stress corrosion cracking performance of aluminum alloys in seacoast atmosphere.

  15. Increased resistance to stress corrosion of aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brummer, S. B.; Cocks, F. H.

    1970-01-01

    Stress corrosion resistance is increased by distorting surface grain-boundary structure and by interrupting the corrosion and stress corrosion. The first is accomplished by machining or shot peening and the second by removal from and later reexposure to the corrosive environment.

  16. A study on stress corrosion cracking of explosive plugged part

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaga, Seiichi; Fujii, Katsuhiro; Yamamoto, Yoshiaki; Sakuma, Koosuke; Hibi, Seiji; Morimoto, Hiroyoshi.

    1986-01-01

    Studies on the stress corrosion cracking of explosive plugged part are conducted. SUS 304 stainless steel is used as testing material. The distribution of residual stress in plug and tube plate after plugging is obtained. The effect of residual stress on the stress corrosion cracking is studied. Residual stress in tube plate near the plug is compressive and stress corrosion cracking dose not occur in the tube plate there, and it occurs on the inner surface of plug because of residual tensile stress in axial direction of the plug. Stress corrosion test in MgCl 2 solution under constant load is conducted. The susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking of the explosive bonded boundary is lower than that of base metal because of greater resistance to plastic deformation. Stress corrosion test in high temperature and high pressure pure water is also conducted by means of static type of autoclave but stress corrosion cracking does not occur under the testing condition used. (author)

  17. Electrochemistry of stress corrosion cracking of brass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seleet, M.M.

    1986-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) susceptibility of pure copper and two brass (copper-zinc alloy) compositions (80/20 and 60/39) was studied in several ammoniacal and nonammoniacal aqueous solutions at open circuit potential, applying a constant load technique. The SCC tests, using tensile stress and loop specimens, showed pure copper to be immune in all solutions tested, the αΒ'-brass (60/39) alloy to be most susceptible to SCC, and the (80/20) alloy to have intermediate SCC susceptibility. The electrochemical tests (corrosion potential and Tafel plots) were utilized to prove the validity of the dissolution mechanism for the SCC propagation in solution with intermediate corrosion rates (∼0.1 2 ). The electrochemical tests were also used to predict the preferential dissolution of zinc (dezincification) in noncomplexing solutions, and the higher dissolution of copper (than that of zinc) in complexing solutions. The formation of intermediate cuprous complexes was detected using a rotating ring disc electrode (RRDE) composed of a brass (80/20) disc and platinum ring, in ammonium chloride-cupric chloride solution. At very low corrosion rates, the stress corrosion cracking (is present) is assumed to operate by the brittle mechanical fracture mechanism in solution where ammonium ions (NH 4 + ) can be generated

  18. Stress corrosion cracking of AISI 321 stainless steel in acidic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of AISI 321 stainless steel in acidic chloride solution was studied by slow strain rate (SSR) ... Stress corrosion cracking; chloride; stainless steel; inhibitor. 1. Introduction. Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) ..... Xi'an Jiaotong University Press) (in Chinese). Huang Y L, Cao C N, Lu M and Lin ...

  19. Kinetic studies of stress-corrosion cracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noronha, P. J.

    1977-01-01

    Use of time-to-failure curves for stress-corrosion cracking processes may lead to incorrect estimates of structural life, if material is strongly dependent upon prestress levels. Technique characterizes kinetics of crackgrowth rates and intermediate arrest times by load-level changes.

  20. Stress Corrosion Cracking of Certain Aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasse, K. R.; Dorward, R. C.

    1983-01-01

    SC resistance of new high-strength alloys tested. Research report describes progress in continuing investigation of stress corrosion (SC) cracking of some aluminum alloys. Objective of program is comparing SC behavior of newer high-strength alloys with established SC-resistant alloy.

  1. Apollo experience report: The problem of stress-corrosion cracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, R. E.

    1973-01-01

    Stress-corrosion cracking has been the most common cause of structural-material failures in the Apollo Program. The frequency of stress-corrosion cracking has been high and the magnitude of the problem, in terms of hardware lost and time and money expended, has been significant. In this report, the significant Apollo Program experiences with stress-corrosion cracking are discussed. The causes of stress-corrosion cracking and the corrective actions are discussed, in terminology familiar to design engineers and management personnel, to show how stress-corrosion cracking can be prevented.

  2. Characterization of Stress Corrosion Cracking Using Laser Ultrasonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-02-15

    Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) is a phenomenon where metals, when subjected to a combination of suitable loads, corrosive environment and susceptible metallurgy, develop crack-clusters that may lead to a failure. Pipeline systems all-over the world ...

  3. Stress-corrosion cracking of titanium alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackburn, M. J.; Feeney, J. A.; Beck, T. R.

    1973-01-01

    In the light of research material published up to May 1970, the current understanding of the experimental variables involved in the stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of titanium and its alloys is reviewed. Following a brief summary of the metallurgy and electrochemistry of titanium alloys, the mechanical, electrochemical, and metallurgical parameters influencing SCC behavior are explored with emphasis on crack growth kinetics. Macro- and microfeatures of fractures are examined, and it is shown that many transgranular SCC failures exhibit morphological and crystallographic features similar to mechanical cleavage failures. Current SCC models are reviewed with respect to their ability to explain the observed SCC behavior of titanium and its alloys. Possible methods for eliminating or minimizing stress corrosion hazards in titanium or titanium alloy components are described.

  4. Role of hydrogen in stress corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehta, M.L.

    1981-01-01

    Electrochemical basis for differentiation between hydrogen embrittlement and active path corrosion or anodic dissolution crack growth mechanisms is examined. The consequences of recently demonstrated acidification in crack tip region irrespective of electrochemical conditions at the bulk surface of the sample are that the hydrogen can evolve within the crack and may be involved in the cracking process. There are basically three aspects of hydrogen involvement in stress corrosion cracking. In dissolution models crack propagation is assumed to be caused by anodic dissolution on the crack tip sustained by cathodic reduction of hydrogen from electrolyte within the crack. In hydrogen induced structural transformation models it is postulated that hydrogen is absorbed locally at the crack tip producing structural changes which facilitate crack propagation. In hydrogen embrittlement models hydrogen is absorbed by stressed metal from proton reduction from the electrolyte within the crack and there is interaction between lattice and hydrogen resulting in embrittlement of material at crack tip facilitating crack propagation. In the present paper, the role of hydrogen in stress corrosion crack growth in high strength steels, austenitic stainless steels, titanium alloys and high strength aluminium alloys is discussed. (author)

  5. Stress-Assisted Corrosion in Boiler Tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Preet M Singh; Steven J Pawel

    2006-05-27

    A number of industrial boilers, including in the pulp and paper industry, needed to replace their lower furnace tubes or decommission many recovery boilers due to stress-assisted corrosion (SAC) on the waterside of boiler tubes. More than half of the power and recovery boilers that have been inspected reveal SAC damage, which portends significant energy and economic impacts. The goal of this project was to clarify the mechanism of stress-assisted corrosion (SAC) of boiler tubes for the purpose of determining key parameters in its mitigation and control. To accomplish this in-situ strain measurements on boiler tubes were made. Boiler water environment was simulated in the laboratory and effects of water chemistry on SAC initiation and growth were evaluated in terms of industrial operations. Results from this project have shown that the dissolved oxygen is single most important factor in SAC initiation on carbon steel samples. Control of dissolved oxygen can be used to mitigate SAC in industrial boilers. Results have also shown that sharp corrosion fatigue and bulbous SAC cracks have similar mechanism but the morphology is different due to availability of oxygen during boiler shutdown conditions. Results are described in the final technical report.

  6. Stress-corrosion cracking in BWR and PWR piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weeks, R.W.

    1983-07-01

    Intergranular stress-corrosion cracking of weld-sensitized wrought stainless steel piping has been an increasingly ubiquitous and expensive problem in boiling-water reactors over the last decade. In recent months, numerous cracks have been found, even in large-diameter lines. A number of potential remedies have been developed. These are directed at providing more resistant materials, reducing weld-induced stresses, or improving the water chemistry. The potential remedies are discussed, along with the capabilities of ultrasonic testing to find and size the cracks and related safety issues. The problem has been much less severe to date in pressurized-water reactors, reflecting the use of different materials and much lower coolant oxygen levels

  7. Design Criteria for Controlling Stress Corrosion Cracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, D. B.

    1987-01-01

    This document sets forth the criteria to be used in the selection of materials for space vehicles and associated equipment and facilities so that failure resulting from stress corrosion will be prevented. The requirements established herein apply to all metallic components proposed for use in space vehicles and other flight hardware, ground support equipment, and facilities for testing. These requirements are applicable not only to items designed and fabricated by MSFC (Marshall Space Flight Center) and its prime contractors, but also to items supplied to the prime contractor by subcontractors and vendors.

  8. Stress corrosion cracking of titanium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Statler, G. R.; Spretnak, J. W.; Beck, F. H.; Fontana, M. G.

    1974-01-01

    The effect of hydrogen on the properties of metals, including titanium and its alloys, was investigated. The basic theories of stress corrosion of titanium alloys are reviewed along with the literature concerned with the effect of absorbed hydrogen on the mechanical properties of metals. Finally, the basic modes of metal fracture and their importance to this study is considered. The experimental work was designed to determine the effects of hydrogen concentration on the critical strain at which plastic instability along pure shear directions occurs. The materials used were titanium alloys Ti-8Al-lMo-lV and Ti-5Al-2.5Sn.

  9. Stress corrosion crack growth rates and general corrosion rates at crack tips of steels in high temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Speidel, M.O.; Magdowski, R.

    1995-01-01

    The maximum stress corrosion crack growth rates for a number of structural materials (steels and nickel alloys) have been measured in 288 C water. Also, the general corrosion rates of these materials have been determined from weight loss experiments in simulated stress corrosion crack tip electrolytes at 288 C. It is shown that the stress corrosion crack growth rates are typically twenty times faster than the general corrosion rates. This correlation holds over five orders of magnitude. It is concluded that strategies to prevent stress corrosion cracking in high temperature aqueous environments might include alloys of higher general corrosion resistance

  10. An overview of materials degradation by stress corrosion in PWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, P. M.

    2004-01-01

    The aging of water cooled and moderated nuclear steam supply systems has given rise to many material corrosion problems of which stress corrosion cracking has proved to be one of the most serious. The aim of this paper is to review some examples of corrosion and particularly stress corrosion problems from the author's experience of interpreting and modelling these phenomena in PWR systems. Examples of stress corrosion cracking in PWR systems described include the major issue of Alloy 600 intergranular cracking in primary PWR coolants, for which it is generally perceived that both adequate life prediction models and remedial measures now exist. Intergranular corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 steam generator tubes that occur in occluded superheated crevices on the secondary side of steam generators due to hide-out and concentration of water borne impurities are also addressed. Rather less extensive or well known examples are discussed such as the stress corrosion cracking of carbon and low alloy steels and of stainless steels in occluded dead-leg situations where it is sometimes difficult to guarantee adequate control of water chemistry, particularly at plant start-up. Reference is also be made to the use of high strength fastener materials in PWR systems as well as to the emerging issue of the effect of high neutron doses on the stress corrosion resistance of core structural components fabricated from austenitic stainless steels. (authors)

  11. Resistance of Some Steels to Stress Corrosion Cracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, T. S.; Nelson, E. E.

    1982-01-01

    Evaluations of stress-corrosion cracking resistance of five high-strength low-alloy steels described in report now available. Steels were heat-treated to various tensile strengths and found to be highly resistant to stress-corrosion cracking.

  12. Corrosion characteristics of unprotected post-tensioning strands under stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the effect of stress condition : and environmental exposure on corrosion of post-tensioned strands during ungrouted periods. : Exposures for periods of up to 4 weeks of stressed, as-received strand placed i...

  13. Alloy SCR-3 resistant to stress corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kowaka, Masamichi; Fujikawa, Hisao; Kobayashi, Taiki

    1977-01-01

    Austenitic stainless steel is used widely because the corrosion resistance, workability and weldability are excellent, but the main fault is the occurrence of stress corrosion cracking in the environment containing chlorides. Inconel 600, most resistant to stress corrosion cracking, is not necessarily safe under some severe condition. In the heat-affected zone of SUS 304 tubes for BWRs, the cases of stress corrosion cracking have occurred. The conventional testing method of stress corrosion cracking using boiling magnesium chloride solution has been problematical because it is widely different from actual environment. The effects of alloying elements on stress corrosion cracking are remarkably different according to the environment. These effects were investigated systematically in high temperature, high pressure water, and as the result, Alloy SCR-3 with excellent stress corrosion cracking resistance was found. The physical constants and the mechanical properties of the SCR-3 are shown. The states of stress corrosion cracking in high temperature, high pressure water containing chlorides and pure water, polythionic acid, sodium phosphate solution and caustic soda of the SCR-3, SUS 304, Inconel 600 and Incoloy 800 are compared and reported. (Kako, I.)

  14. A STUDY OF CORROSION AND STRESS CORROSION CRACKING OF CARBON STEEL NUCLEAR WASTE STORAGE TANKS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BOOMER, K.D.

    2007-01-01

    The Hanford reservation Tank Farms in Washington State has 177 underground storage tanks that contain approximately 50 million gallons of liquid legacy radioactive waste from cold war plutonium production. These tanks will continue to store waste until it is treated and disposed. These nuclear wastes were converted to highly alkaline pH wastes to protect the carbon steel storage tanks from corrosion. However, the carbon steel is still susceptible to localized corrosion and stress corrosion cracking. The waste chemistry varies from tank to tank, and contains various combinations of hydroxide, nitrate, nitrite, chloride, carbonate, aluminate and other species. The effect of each of these species and any synergistic effects on localized corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of carbon steel have been investigated with electrochemical polarization, slow strain rate, and crack growth rate testing. The effect of solution chemistry, pH, temperature and applied potential are all considered and their role in the corrosion behavior will be discussed

  15. Controlling stress corrosion cracking in mechanism components of ground support equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majid, W. A.

    1988-01-01

    The selection of materials for mechanism components used in ground support equipment so that failures resulting from stress corrosion cracking will be prevented is described. A general criteria to be used in designing for resistance to stress corrosion cracking is also provided. Stress corrosion can be defined as combined action of sustained tensile stress and corrosion to cause premature failure of materials. Various aluminum, steels, nickel, titanium and copper alloys, and tempers and corrosive environment are evaluated for stress corrosion cracking.

  16. Stress corrosion in high-strength aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorward, R. C.; Hasse, K. R.

    1980-01-01

    Report describes results of stress-corrosion tests on aluminum alloys 7075, 7475, 7050, and 7049. Tests compare performance of original stress-corrosion-resistant (SCR) aluminum, 7075, with newer, higher-strength SCR alloys. Alloys 7050 and 7049 are found superior in short-transverse cross-corrosion resistance to older 7075 alloy; all alloys are subject to self-loading effect caused by wedging of corrosion products in cracks. Effect causes cracks to continue to grow, even at very-low externally applied loads.

  17. Stress corrosion cracking in the earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, S.; Scholz, C. H.

    1980-01-01

    Two fundamental concepts of fracture mechanics are used to develop a theory of the earthquake mechanism which specifically predicts observed time-dependent rupture phenomena such as slow earthquakes, postseismic rupture growth and afterslip, multiple events, foreshocks, and aftershocks. The theory also predicts that there must be a nucleation stage prior to an earthquake, and suggests a physical mechanism by which one earthquake may trigger another. Investigations show that all earthquakes must be preceded by a quasi-static slip over a portion of the rupture surfaces, although it may be difficult to detect in practice, and a study of delayed multiple events characterizes the strength of some barriers in the earth as having a stress corrosion index of about 24.

  18. Stress Corrosion-Cracking and Corrosion Fatigue Impact of IZ-C17+ Zinc Nickel on 4340 Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-17

    corrosion, cracking, corrosion fatigue impact, zinc-nickel, steel , metallic coating 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18...REPORT NO: NAWCADPAX/TIM-2016/189 STRESS CORROSION-CRACKING AND CORROSION FATIGUE IMPACT OF IZ-C17+ ZINC-NICKEL ON 4340 STEEL by...CORROSION-CRACKING AND CORROSION FATIGUE IMPACT OF IZ-C17+ ZINC-NICKEL ON 4340 STEEL by Craig Matzdorf Charles Lei Matt Stanley

  19. Stress corrosion cracking of Ni base alloys in Pb-contaminated caustic solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Mi Ae; Kim, Dong Jin; Kim, Joung Soo; Kim, Hong Pyo

    2009-01-01

    Steam generator tubes in pressurized water reactors(PWRs) form a pressure boundary between the primary and secondary sides. Austenitic stainless steel was used initially for the tubing, but it was changed to Alloy 600 as the results of corrosion problems. Experiences with Alloy 600 in the late 1960s and early 1970s, in the early high temperature large PWRs, identified numerous corrosion problems. Efforts for the development of a new made and the result was Alloy 690. Since the mid-1980s new and replacement steam generators have used Alloy 690. However, PWRs with Alloy 600 steam generators are still being operated. A lot of problems related to corrosion have been reported in Alloy 600 steam generator tubes of operating nuclear power plants(NPPs), and the outer diameter stress corrosion cracking (ODSCC) and intergranular attack(IGA) which have been occurring in Alloy 600 tubes are known to be the leading causes of PWR steam generator tube plugging in the USA and worldwide. According to Smith and Stratton, Alloy 690 is also reported to be susceptible to stress corrosion cracking and intergranular attack in deaerated (with argon) caustic solutions. It has been reported that contaminated lead in the secondary side cooling water is accumulated in the sludge piled on top of the tube sheet thus accelerating stress corrosion cracking in the SG tubes of NPPs. The detailed mechanism of accelerated stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 and 690 by Pb, however, has yet to be completely understood. It was observed that Pb dissolved in water can produce PbSCC at a Pb concentration as low as 0.1 ppm in these alloys. Lead is known to be one of the most aggressive environmental species that can accumulate in the crevice between the tubes and sludge piled on TTS in steam generators. Many laboratory experiments indicate that the stress corrosion cracking of steam generator tubing materials is accelerated in the presence of lead species in a caustic environment. In order to observe the

  20. Grease Inhibits Stress-Corrosion Cracking In Bearing Race

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beatty, Robert F.; Mcvey, Scott E.

    1991-01-01

    Coating with suitable grease found to inhibit stress-corrosion cracking in bore of inner race of ball-bearing assembly operating in liquid oxygen. Protects bore and its corner radii from corrosion-initiating and -accelerating substances like moisture and contaminants, which enter during assembly. Operating life extended at low cost, and involves very little extra assembly time.

  1. Fabrication of Inconel 182 weldments with environmentally induced axial stress corrosion cracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, W.L.

    1988-01-01

    Nuclear Regulatory Commission requirements for NDE qualification have been tightened to include qualification on actual cracked specimens, rather than specimens with EDM notches and drilled holes. In the past, the emphasis has been on specimens of type 304 stainless steel with intergranular stress corrosion cracking in weld heat-affected zones. More recently, interdendritic stress corrosion cracking of Inconel 182 welds has been observed in operating BWRs and a need has arisen for laboratory specimens of this type. EPRI has addressed this need in the past with the production of 0.75-in.- and 1.5-in.-thick specimens, but these were relatively small specimens that did not incorporate the geometric considerations associated with large-diameter weldments. To overcome the shortcomings of the earlier specimens, a full-size 28-in.-diameter nozzle-to-recirculation pipe weld mockup will be prepared with environmentally induced interdendritic stress corrosion cracking in the Inconel 182 weldment. The current program consists of three phases: demonstration of the acoustic invisibility of weld-incorporated implants; production of environmental interdendritic stress corrosion cracks in 0.5-in.- and 0.75-in.-thick Inconel 182 weldments; and incorporation of cracked sections of the small specimens into the full-size Inconel 182 weldment between 4-in.-long rings of A508 Class 2 low-alloy steel and type 316L stainless steel. The fabrication of these weldments is described

  2. Stress Corrosion Cracking of Type 304 Stainless Steel

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Louthan, M

    1964-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking of type 304 stainless steel exposed in dilute chloride solutions is being investigated at the Savannah River Laboratory in attempts to develop a fundamental understanding of the phenomenon...

  3. Stress-Corrosion Cracking in Martensitic PH Stainless Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, T.; Nelson, E.

    1984-01-01

    Precipitation-hardening alloys evaluated in marine environment tests. Report describes marine-environment stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) tests of three martensitic precipitation hardening (PH) stainless-steel alloys.

  4. In Situ X-ray Microtomography of Stress Corrosion Cracking and Corrosion Fatigue in Aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sudhanshu S.; Stannard, Tyler J.; Xiao, Xianghui; Chawla, Nikhilesh

    2017-08-01

    Structural materials are subjected to combinations of stress and corrosive environments that work synergistically to cause premature failure. Therefore, studies on the combined effect of stress and corrosive environments on material behavior are required. Existing studies have been performed in two dimensions that are inadequate for full comprehension of the three-dimensional (3D) processes related to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and corrosion-fatigue (CF) behavior. Recently, x-ray synchrotron tomography has evolved as an excellent technique to obtain the microstructure in 3D. Moreover, being nondestructive in nature, x-ray synchrotron tomography is well suited to study the evolution of microstructure with time (4D, or fourth dimension in time). This article presents our recent 4D studies on SCC and CF of Al 7075 alloys using x-ray synchrotron tomography.

  5. Corrosion under stress of AISI 304 steel in thiocyanate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perillo, P.M.; Duffo, G.S.

    1989-01-01

    Corrosion susceptibility under stress of AISI 304 steel sensitized in a sodium thiocyanate solution has been studied and results were compared with those obtained with solutions of thiosulfate and tetrathionate. Sensitized steel type 304 is highly susceptible to corrosion when under intergranular stress (IGSCC) in thiocyanate solutions but the aggressiveness of this anion is less than that of the other sulphur anions studied (thiosulfate and tetrathionate). This work has been partly carried out in the Chemistry Department. (Author) [es

  6. Stress corrosion cracking properties of 15-5PH steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Ferdinand

    1993-01-01

    Unexpected occurrence of failures, due to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of structural components, indicate a need for improved characterization of materials and more advanced analytical procedures for reliably predicting structures performance. Accordingly, the purpose of this study was to determine the stress corrosion susceptibility of 15-5PH steel over a wide range of applied strain rates in a highly corrosive environment. The selected environment for this investigation was a highly acidified sodium chloride (NaCl) aqueous solution. The selected alloy for the study was a 15-5PH steel in the H900 condition. The slow strain rate technique was selected to test the metals specimens.

  7. Standard Practice for Making and Using U-Bend Stress-Corrosion Test Specimens

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers procedures for making and using U-bend specimens for the evaluation of stress-corrosion cracking in metals. The U-bend specimen is generally a rectangular strip which is bent 180° around a predetermined radius and maintained in this constant strain condition during the stress-corrosion test. Bends slightly less than or greater than 180° are sometimes used. Typical U-bend configurations showing several different methods of maintaining the applied stress are shown in Fig. 1. 1.2 U-bend specimens usually contain both elastic and plastic strain. In some cases (for example, very thin sheet or small diameter wire) it is possible to form a U-bend and produce only elastic strain. However, bent-beam (Practice G 39 or direct tension (Practice G 49)) specimens are normally used to study stress-corrosion cracking of strip or sheet under elastic strain only. 1.3 This practice is concerned only with the test specimen and not the environmental aspects of stress-corrosion testing which are discus...

  8. Comparative Stress Corrosion Cracking and General Corrosion Resistance of Annealed and Hardened 440 C Stainless Steel - New Techniques in Stress Corrosion Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendreck, M. J.; Hurless, B. E.; Torres, P. D.; Danford, M. D.

    1998-01-01

    The corrosion and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) characteristics of annealed and hardened 440C stainless steel were evaluated in high humidity and 3.5-percent NaCl solution. Corrosion testing consisted of an evaluation of flat plates, with and without grease, in high humidity, as well as electrochemical testing in 3.5-percent NaCl. Stress corrosion testing consisted of conventional, constant strain, smooth bar testing in high humidity in addition to two relatively new techniques under evaluation at MSFC. These techniques involve either incremental or constant rate increases in the load applied to a precracked SE(B) specimen, monitoring the crack-opening-displacement response for indications of crack growth. The electrochemical corrosion testing demonstrated an order of magnitude greater general corrosion rate in the annealed 440C. All techniques for stress corrosion testing showed substantially better SCC resistance in the annealed material. The efficacy of the new techniques for stress corrosion testing was demonstrated both by the savings in time and the ability to better quantify SCC data.

  9. Stress corrosion cracking of copper canisters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, Fraser (Integrity Corrosion Consulting Limited (Canada)); Newman, Roger (Univ. of Toronto (Canada))

    2010-12-15

    A critical review is presented of the possibility of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of copper canisters in a deep geological repository in the Fennoscandian Shield. Each of the four main mechanisms proposed for the SCC of pure copper are reviewed and the required conditions for cracking compared with the expected environmental and mechanical loading conditions within the repository. Other possible mechanisms are also considered, as are recent studies specifically directed towards the SCC of copper canisters. The aim of the review is to determine if and when during the evolution of the repository environment copper canisters might be susceptible to SCC. Mechanisms that require a degree of oxidation or dissolution are only possible whilst oxidant is present in the repository and then only if other environmental and mechanical loading conditions are satisfied. These constraints are found to limit the period during which the canisters could be susceptible to cracking via film rupture (slip dissolution) or tarnish rupture mechanisms to the first few years after deposition of the canisters, at which time there will be insufficient SCC agent (ammonia, acetate, or nitrite) to support cracking. During the anaerobic phase, the supply of sulphide ions to the free surface will be transport limited by diffusion through the highly compacted bentonite. Therefore, no HS. will enter the crack and cracking by either of these mechanisms during the long term anaerobic phase is not feasible. Cracking via the film-induced cleavage mechanism requires a surface film of specific properties, most often associated with a nano porous structure. Slow rates of dissolution characteristic of processes in the repository will tend to coarsen any nano porous layer. Under some circumstances, a cuprous oxide film could support film-induced cleavage, but there is no evidence that this mechanism would operate in the presence of sulphide during the long-term anaerobic period because copper sulphide

  10. Stress corrosion cracking of copper canisters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, Fraser; Newman, Roger

    2010-12-01

    A critical review is presented of the possibility of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of copper canisters in a deep geological repository in the Fennoscandian Shield. Each of the four main mechanisms proposed for the SCC of pure copper are reviewed and the required conditions for cracking compared with the expected environmental and mechanical loading conditions within the repository. Other possible mechanisms are also considered, as are recent studies specifically directed towards the SCC of copper canisters. The aim of the review is to determine if and when during the evolution of the repository environment copper canisters might be susceptible to SCC. Mechanisms that require a degree of oxidation or dissolution are only possible whilst oxidant is present in the repository and then only if other environmental and mechanical loading conditions are satisfied. These constraints are found to limit the period during which the canisters could be susceptible to cracking via film rupture (slip dissolution) or tarnish rupture mechanisms to the first few years after deposition of the canisters, at which time there will be insufficient SCC agent (ammonia, acetate, or nitrite) to support cracking. During the anaerobic phase, the supply of sulphide ions to the free surface will be transport limited by diffusion through the highly compacted bentonite. Therefore, no HS. will enter the crack and cracking by either of these mechanisms during the long term anaerobic phase is not feasible. Cracking via the film-induced cleavage mechanism requires a surface film of specific properties, most often associated with a nano porous structure. Slow rates of dissolution characteristic of processes in the repository will tend to coarsen any nano porous layer. Under some circumstances, a cuprous oxide film could support film-induced cleavage, but there is no evidence that this mechanism would operate in the presence of sulphide during the long-term anaerobic period because copper sulphide

  11. Simulation of stress corrosion crack growth in steam generator tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, K. I.; Park, J. H.; Joo, J. W.; Shin, E. S.; Kim, H. D.; Chung, H. S.

    2000-01-01

    Stress corrosion crack growth is simulated after assuming a small axial surface crack inside a S/G tube. Internal pressure and residual stresses are considered as applied forces. Stress intensity factors along crack front, variation of crack shape and crack growth rate are obtained and discussed. It is noticed that the aspect ratio of the crack is not depend on the initial crack shape but depend on the residual stress distribution

  12. Axial stress corrosion cracking forming method to metal tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araki, Kumiko

    1998-01-01

    Generally, it is more difficult in a metal tube, to intentionally cause a stress corrosion cracking in axial direction than in circumferential direction. In the present invention, a bevel is formed on a metal tube and welding is conducted in circumferential direction along the bevel, and welding is conducted in axial direction partially to the portion welded in circumferential direction. Namely, a bevel is formed in circumferential direction to an abutting portion of thick-walled metal tubes with each other, welding is conducted in circumferential direction along the bevel, and welding is conducted in axial direction partially to a portion welded in circumferential direction. With such procedures, since tensile stress in the circumferential direction is increased partially at a portion welded in axial direction, stress corrosion cracking is caused in axial direction at the portion. Then, stress corrosion cracking in axial direction can thus be formed on the thick-walled metal tube. (N.H.)

  13. Corrosion and Stress Corrosion Behaviors of Low and Medium Carbon Steels in Agro-Fluid Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayo Samuel AFOLABI

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Investigations were carried out to study critically the corrosion behaviour and Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC of low and medium carbon steels in cassava and cocoa extracts by weight loss measurement and constant extension to fracture method respectively. The results obtained showed that medium carbon steel is more susceptible to corrosion than low carbon steel in both media. SCC is also more in medium carbon steel than low carbon steel in the two media under study. These deductions are due to higher carbon content in medium carbon steel coupled with various aggressive corrosion constituents contained in these media. Hydrogen embrittlement, as well as carbon cracking, is responsible for SCC of these materials in the agro-fluid media.

  14. High temperature and stress corrosion cracking of 310S austenitic stainless steel in wet chloride corrosive environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Pornpibunsompop

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available High temperature corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of 310S austenitic stainless steel in wet chloride environment at a high temperature was investigated. The result showed that high temperature corrosion products mostly consisted of ferrous oxides and chromium oxides. Chloride ions attacked a chromium passive film and strongly reacted with iron and chromium. As a result of metal chlorides being volatized, tunnel of pores inside corrosion layer existed. Intergranular stress corrosion cracking was observed. The oxide originated on surface could act as a crack initiator and a crack propagation would progress along grain boundaries and particularly along tunnel of pores.

  15. Alternate immersion stress corrosion testing of 5083 aluminum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briggs, J.L.; Dringman, M.R.; Hausburg, D.E.; Jackson, R.J.

    1978-01-01

    The stress corrosion susceptibility of Type 5083 aluminum--magnesium alloy in plate form and press-formed shapes was determined in the short transverse direction. C-ring type specimens were exposed to alternate immersion in a sodium chloride solution. The test equipment and procedure, with several innovative features, are described in detail. Statistical test results are listed for seven thermomechanical conditions. A certain processing scheme was shown to yield a work-strengthened part that is not sensitized with respect to stress corrosion cracking

  16. Three-dimensional characterization of stress corrosion cracks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lozano-Perez, S.; Rodrigo, P.; Gontard, Lionel Cervera

    2011-01-01

    the best spatial resolution. To illustrate the power of these techniques, different parts of dominant stress corrosion cracks in Ni-alloys and stainless steels have been reconstructed in 3D. All relevant microstructural features can now be studied in detail and its relative orientation respect......Understanding crack propagation and initiation is fundamental if stress corrosion cracking (SCC) mechanisms are to be understood. However, cracking is a three-dimensional (3D) phenomenon and most characterization techniques are restricted to two-dimensional (2D) observations. In order to overcome...

  17. Stress corrosion cracking evaluation of martensitic precipitation hardening stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, T. S.; Nelson, E. E.

    1980-01-01

    The resistance of the martensitic precipitation hardening stainless steels PH13-8Mo, 15-5PH, and 17-4PH to stress corrosion cracking was investigated. Round tensile and c-ring type specimens taken from several heats of the three alloys were stressed up to 100 percent of their yield strengths and exposed to alternate immersion in salt water, to salt spray, and to a seacoast environment. The results indicate that 15-5PH is highly resistant to stress corrosion cracking in conditions H1000 and H1050 and is moderately resistant in condition H900. The stress corrosion cracking resistance of PH13-8Mo and 17-4PH stainless steels in conditions H1000 and H1050 was sensitive to mill heats and ranged from low to high among the several heats included in the tests. Based on a comparison with data from seacoast environmental tests, it is apparent that alternate immersion in 3.5 percent salt water is not a suitable medium for accelerated stress corrosion testing of these pH stainless steels.

  18. EXPERT PANEL OVERSIGHT COMMITTEE ASSESSMENT OF FY2008 CORROSION AND STRESS CORROSION CRACKING SIMULANT TESTING PROGRAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BOOMER KD

    2009-01-08

    The Expert Panel Oversight Committee (EPOC) has been overseeing the implementation of selected parts of Recommendation III of the final report, Expert Panel workshop for Hanford Site Double-Shell Tank Waste Chemistry Optimization, RPP-RPT-22126. Recommendation III provided four specific requirements necessary for Panel approval of a proposal to revise the chemistry control limits for the Double-Shell Tanks (DSTs). One of the more significant requirements was successful performance of an accelerated stress corrosion cracking (SCC) experimental program. This testing program has evaluated the optimization of the chemistry controls to prevent corrosion in the interstitial liquid and supernatant regions of the DSTs.

  19. Guidelines for controlling stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue of stainless steels: A literature review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohjanne, Pekka; Haenninen, Hannu

    1992-11-01

    Guidelines for obtaining and using Environmentally Assisted Cracking (EAC) test data for stainless steels, which are used in a wide range of industrial applications, are presented. Both fracture mechanics and non fracture mechanics tests and test results for Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) and Corrosion Fatigue (CF) are considered, but the emphasis is on using fracture mechanics as part of an overall strategy (a fracture control plan) to prevent or control EAC in service. Various threshold values for cracking to occur are reviewed based on loading, electrochemistry, solution chemistry, and temperature.

  20. Treatment increases stress-corrosion resistance of aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, A. J.

    1966-01-01

    Overaging during heat treatment of the aluminum alloys immediately followed by moderate plastic deformation, preferably by shock loading achieves near optimum values of both yield strength and resistance to stress corrosion. Similar results may be obtained by substituting a conventional deformation process for the shock loading step.

  1. Reducing Stress-Corrosion Cracking in Bearing Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paton, N. E.; Dennies, D. P.; Lumsden, I., J.b.

    1986-01-01

    Resistance to stress-corrosion cracking in some stainless-steel alloys increased by addition of small amounts of noble metals. 0.75 to 1.00 percent by weight of palladium or platinum added to alloy melt sufficient to improve properties of certain stainless steels so they could be used in manufacture of high-speed bearings.

  2. Statistical model of stress corrosion cracking based on extended ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    APA Group, Level 19, HSBC Building, 580 George Street, Sydney NSW 2000, Australia. E-mail: square17320508@yahoo.com. MS received 14 May 2013; accepted 21 October 2013. DOI: 10.1007/s12043-013-0631-3; ePublication: 1 December 2013. Abstract. The mechanism of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) has been ...

  3. Statistical model of stress corrosion cracking based on extended ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the previous paper ({\\it Pramana – J. Phys.} 81(6), 1009 (2013)), the mechanism of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) based on non-quadratic form of Dirichlet energy was proposed and its statistical features were discussed. Following those results, we discuss here how SCC propagates on pipe wall statistically. It reveals ...

  4. Statistical model of stress corrosion cracking based on extended ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-09-07

    Sep 7, 2016 ... Abstract. In the previous paper (Pramana – J. Phys. 81(6), 1009 (2013)), the mechanism of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) based on non-quadratic form of Dirichlet energy was proposed and its statistical features were discussed. Following those results, we discuss here how SCC propagates on pipe wall ...

  5. Statistical model of stress corrosion cracking based on extended

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The mechanism of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) has been discussed for decades. Here I propose a model of SCC reflecting the feature of fracture in brittle manner based on the variational principle under approximately supposed thermal equilibrium. In that model the functionals are expressed with extended forms of ...

  6. Statistical model of stress corrosion cracking based on extended ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The mechanism of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) has been discussed for decades. Here I propose a model of SCC reflecting the feature of fracture in brittle manner based on the variational principle under approximately supposed thermal equilibrium. In that model the functionals are expressed with extended forms of ...

  7. Statistical model of stress corrosion cracking based on extended ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2013-12-01

    Dec 1, 2013 ... Abstract. The mechanism of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) has been discussed for decades. Here I propose a model of SCC reflecting the feature of fracture in brittle manner based on the vari- ational principle under approximately supposed thermal equilibrium. In that model the functionals are expressed ...

  8. Ambient temperature stress-corrosion cracking of sensitized stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sieradzki, K.; Isaacs, H.S.; Newman, R.C.

    1982-01-01

    Stress-corrosion cracking of sensitized Type 304 steel in low temperature borated water has been observed. The probable role of low levels of chloride ions or sulfur-containing ions is described, including the relationship of the phenomenon to polythionic acid cracking. The mechanism of the sulfur-induced cracking and its usefulness as a test for sensitization are outlined

  9. Stress corrosion cracking mitigation by ultrasound induced cavitation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fong, C.; Lee, Y.C.; Yeh, T.K.

    2014-01-01

    Cavitation is usually considered as a damaging mechanism under erosion corrosion condition. However, if used appropriately, cavitation can be applied as a peening technique for surface stress modification process. The aim of surface stress modification is to alter the stress state of processed surface through direct or indirect thermo-mechanical treatments to reduce cracking problems initiated from surface. Ultrasonic devices are used to generate cavitation bubbles which when collapse will produce high intensity shock waves and high velocity micro-jet streams. The cavitation impact when properly controlled will create plastically deformed compressive layers in nearby surfaces and minimize cracking susceptibility in corrosive environments. This study is to investigate the effectiveness of Ultrasound Induced Cavitation (UIC) technique in surface stress improvement. Ultrasonic cavitation treatment of SS304 stainless steel under pure water is carried out with different controlling parameters. The cavitation impact on SS304 surface is measured in terms of surface roughness, surface strain, hardness, and microstructural characteristics. The in-depth residual stress distribution and crack mitigation effect are also evaluated. Test result indicates ultrasound induced cavitation treatment only has minor effect on surface physical characteristics. The extent of compressive stress produced on top surface exceeds the yield strength and can reach a depth above 150 μm. The maximum surface strain measured is generally below 20%, which is not considered detrimental to accelerate crack initiation. Stress corrosion verification tests show UIC treatment is capable in preventing environmental assisted cracking of stainless steels in severely corrosive conditions. In view of the test results, UIC technique has demonstrated to be a low cost, low contaminating, and effective surface stress improvement technology. (author)

  10. Stress corrosion cracking of duplex stainless steels in caustic solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Ananya

    Duplex stainless steels (DSS) with roughly equal amount of austenite and ferrite phases are being used in industries such as petrochemical, nuclear, pulp and paper mills, de-salination plants, marine environments, and others. However, many DSS grades have been reported to undergo corrosion and stress corrosion cracking in some aggressive environments such as chlorides and sulfide-containing caustic solutions. Although stress corrosion cracking of duplex stainless steels in chloride solution has been investigated and well documented in the literature but the SCC mechanisms for DSS in caustic solutions were not known. Microstructural changes during fabrication processes affect the overall SCC susceptibility of these steels in caustic solutions. Other environmental factors, like pH of the solution, temperature, and resulting electrochemical potential also influence the SCC susceptibility of duplex stainless steels. In this study, the role of material and environmental parameters on corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of duplex stainless steels in caustic solutions were investigated. Changes in the DSS microstructure by different annealing and aging treatments were characterized in terms of changes in the ratio of austenite and ferrite phases, phase morphology and intermetallic precipitation using optical micrography, SEM, EDS, XRD, nano-indentation and microhardness methods. These samples were then tested for general and localized corrosion susceptibility and SCC to understand the underlying mechanisms of crack initiation and propagation in DSS in the above-mentioned environments. Results showed that the austenite phase in the DSS is more susceptible to crack initiation and propagation in caustic solutions, which is different from that in the low pH chloride environment where the ferrite phase is the more susceptible phase. This study also showed that microstructural changes in duplex stainless steels due to different heat treatments could affect their SCC

  11. Study on Corrosion and Stress Corrosion Cracking Behaviors of AZ31 Alloy in Sodium Sulfate Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiuli; Yan, Zhifeng; Liang, Hongyu; Wei, Yinghui

    2017-05-01

    The potentiodynamic polarization test and slow strain rate tensile test were carried out in 3.5 wt.% Na2SO4 solution with different pH values (2, 7, and 12). It was found that the SCC susceptibility of AZ31 magnesium alloy in 3.5 wt.% Na2SO4 solution was deteriorated significantly with the decreasing pH. This was consistent with the electrochemical properties. There were filiform corrosion forms on the specimen surface after slow strain rate tensile test in 3.5 wt.% Na2SO4 solution, which indicated the characteristics of general corrosion. Moreover, there were multiple stress corrosion crack initiation sources. The SCC fracture of AZ31 magnesium alloy in air was a mix type, while it was cleavage fracture in 3.5 wt.% Na2SO4 solution.

  12. Effect of Wall Shear Stress on Corrosion Inhibitor Film Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canto Maya, Christian M.

    In oil and gas production, internal corrosion of pipelines causes the highest incidence of recurring failures. Ensuring the integrity of ageing pipeline infrastructure is an increasingly important requirement. One of the most widely applied methods to reduce internal corrosion rates is the continuous injection of chemicals in very small quantities, called corrosion inhibitors. These chemical substances form thin films at the pipeline internal surface that reduce the magnitude of the cathodic and/or anodic reactions. However, the efficacy of such corrosion inhibitor films can be reduced by different factors such as multiphase flow, due to enhanced shear stress and mass transfer effects, loss of inhibitor due to adsorption on other interfaces such as solid particles, bubbles and droplets entrained by the bulk phase, and due to chemical interaction with other incompatible substances present in the stream. The first part of the present project investigated the electrochemical behavior of two organic corrosion inhibitors (a TOFA/DETA imidazolinium, and an alkylbenzyl dimethyl ammonium chloride), with and without an inorganic salt (sodium thiosulfate), and the resulting enhancement. The second part of the work explored the performance of corrosion inhibitor under multiphase (gas/liquid, solid/liquid) flow. The effect of gas/liquid multiphase flow was investigated using small and large scale apparatus. The small scale tests were conducted using a glass cell and a submersed jet impingement attachment with three different hydrodynamic patterns (water jet, CO 2 bubbles impact, and water vapor cavitation). The large scale experiments were conducted applying different flow loops (hilly terrain and standing slug systems). Measurements of weight loss, linear polarization resistance (LPR), and adsorption mass (using an electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance, EQCM) were used to quantify the effect of wall shear stress on the performance and integrity of corrosion inhibitor

  13. Stress corrosion cracking and dealloying of copper-gold alloy in iodine vapor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galvez, M.F.; Bianchi, G.L.; Galvele, J.R.

    1993-01-01

    The susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking of copper-gold alloy in iodine vapor was studied and the results were analyzed under the scope of the surface mobility stress corrosion cracking mechanism. The copper-gold alloy undergoes stress corrosion cracking in iodine. Copper iodide was responsible of that behavior. The copper-gold alloy shows two processes in parallel: stress corrosion cracking and dealloying. As was predicted by the surface mobility stress corrosion cracking mechanism, the increase in strain rate induces an increase in the crack propagation rate. (Author)

  14. Method of preventing stress corrosion cracks of reactor pipelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oonaka, Noriyuki; Shoji, Saburo; Kikuchi, Eiji; Tanno, Kazuo.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: In a case where, at the time of the transient operation of the reactor, the pH in reactor water and the concentration of oxidants are monitored, and the monitoring signals depart from the reference values or the welding heat affected portions of the pipeline are monitored by a non-destructive detector, and stress corrosion cracks are detected, these portions are protected from corrosion by a cathode current, and the generation and development of cracks are prevented. Method: The concentrations of dissolved oxygen and hydrogen peroxide in reactor water are monitored by a sensitized SUS 304 stainless steel electrode and a silver/silver chloride electrode. When monitoring signals depart from the reference values at temperatures with respect to the natural potential of stainless steel, memorized in the control system, a cathod current is caused to flow to the welding heat affected portions thereby to protect the same from corroding. Furthermore, the welding heat affected portions are monitored by the non-destructive detector, and even when stress corrosion cracks have been detected, the welding heat affected portions are prevented from corroding by a cathode current, thereby to prevent the development of stress corrosion cracks of the primary pipeline system. (Sekiya, K.)

  15. Fuel element failures caused by iodine stress corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Videm, K.; Lunde, L.

    1976-01-01

    Sections of unirradiated cladding tubes were plugged in both ends by mechanical seals and internally pressurized with argon containing iodine. The time to failure and the strain at failure as a function of stress was determined for tubing with different heat treatments. Fully annealed tubes suffer cracking at the lowest stress but exhibit the largest strains at failure. Elementary iodine is not necessary for stress corrosion: small amounts of iodides of zirconium, iron and aluminium can also give cracking. Moisture, however, was found to act as an inhibitor. A deformation threshold exists below which stress corrosion failure does not occur regardless of the exposure time. This deformation limit is lower the harder the tube. The deformation at failure is dependent on the deformation rate and has a minimum at 0.1%/hr. At higher deformation rates the failure deformation increases, but only slightly for hard tubes. Fuel was over-power tested at ramp rates varying between 0.26 to 30 W/cm min. For one series of fuel pins the failure deformations of 0.8% at high ramp rates were in good agreement with predictions based on stress corrosion experiments. For another series of experiments the failure deformation was surprisingly low, about 0.2%. (author)

  16. Electrochemical study of stress corrosion cracking of copper alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malki, Brahim

    1999-01-01

    This work deals with the electrochemical study of stress corrosion of copper alloys in aqueous environment. Selective dissolution and electrochemical oxidation are two key-points of the stress corrosion of these alloys. The first part of this thesis treats of these aspects applied to Cu-Au alloys. Measurements have been performed using classical electrochemical techniques (in potentio-dynamic, potentio-static and galvano-static modes). The conditions of occurrence of an electrochemical noise is analysed using signal processing techniques. The impact on the behavior of Cu 3 Au are discussed. In the second part, the stress corrosion problem is addressed in the case of surface oxide film formation, in particular for Cu-Zn alloys. We have found useful to extend this study to mechanical stress oxidation mechanisms in the presence of an oscillating potential electrochemical system. The aim is to examine the influence of these new electrochemical conditions (galvano-static mode) on the behavior of stressed brass. Finally, the potential distribution at crack tip is calculated in order to compare the different observations [fr

  17. Stress-corrosion mechanisms in silicate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciccotti, Matteo, E-mail: matteo.ciccotti@univ-montp2.f [Laboratoire des Colloides, Verres et Nanomateriaux, UMR 5587, CNRS, Universite Montpellier 2, Montpellier (France)

    2009-11-07

    The present review is intended to revisit the advances and debates in the comprehension of the mechanisms of subcritical crack propagation in silicate glasses almost a century after its initial developments. Glass has inspired the initial insights of Griffith into the origin of brittleness and the ensuing development of modern fracture mechanics. Yet, through the decades the real nature of the fundamental mechanisms of crack propagation in glass has escaped a clear comprehension which could gather general agreement on subtle problems such as the role of plasticity, the role of the glass composition, the environmental condition at the crack tip and its relation to the complex mechanisms of corrosion and leaching. The different processes are analysed here with a special focus on their relevant space and time scales in order to question their domain of action and their contribution in both the kinetic laws and the energetic aspects.

  18. Stress corrosion cracking of a Kori 1 retired steam generator tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, H.P.; Hwang, S.S.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, J. S.; Lim, Y.S.; Joung, M.K.

    2004-01-01

    The present work addressed the evolution trends of the Kori 1 retired steam generators tube degradation such as pitting, primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC), and outer diameter stress corrosion cracking (ODSCC) using the Weibull distribution based on the repair of the tubing and introduced a failure analysis of the pulled out tubes from the Kori 1. A material and condenser replacement in the secondary side and a chemical cleaning of the steam generator changed the Weibull distribution for the pitting. An ingress of sea water through the condenser into the steam generator and an accumulation of chloride in the steam generator induced the pitting. A mechanism of a copper band formation within the corrosion product in a pit is proposed. Pitting seemed to have occurred in an acidic and oxidizing environment between 1978 and early 1990. The Weibull characteristic time and slope for a PWSCC is 25 year and 4.5, respectively. Axial PWSCC was only observed in the R16C35 tube and circumferential PWSCC was only observed in the R11C45 tube at the roll expansion transition. Some tubes that experienced extensive ODSCC rather than PWSCC in the roll transition seemed to be due to the impurities concentrated in the crevice which induce ODSCC, even though the stress in the roll transition of the primary side was higher than that in the secondary side. ODSCC seemed to have occurred in a caustic and slightly oxidizing environment from early 1990 to 1998. (authors)

  19. Effect of cold working and applied stress on the stress corrosion cracking resistance of nickel-chromium-iron alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonezawa, T.; Onimura, K.; Itoh, H.; Saito, I.; Takamatsu, H.; Fujitani, T.

    1992-01-01

    In order to grasp the stress corrosion cracking quantitative resistance of Alloys 600 and 690 in PWR primary water, the authors have studied the effect of cold working and applied stress on the stress corrosion cracking resistance of Alloys 600 and 690, in high temperature water. Stress corrosion cracking tests were conducted at 360 degrees C (633K) in a simulated PWR primary water for about 12,000 hours or 24,000 hours. From the test results, it is concluded that the stress corrosion cracking resistance in the cold worked Alloy 600 at the same applied stress level increases with an increase in cold working ratio, and the cold worked Alloys of thermally treated 690 have the excellent stress corrosion cracking resistance. Further, in this paper, the planning of stress corrosion cracking test for weld joints and weld metal of Alloy 600 is described

  20. Stress corrosion cracking of A515 grade 60 carbon steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, E.L.

    1971-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to evaluate the effect of welding method plate thickness, and subsequent stress relief treatment on the stress corrosion cracking propensity of ASTM A515 Grade 60 carbon steel plate exposed to a 5 M NaNO 3 solution at 190 0 F for eight weeks. It was found that all weld coupons receiving no thermal stress relief treatment cracked within eight weeks; all weld coupons given a vibratory stress relief cracked within eight weeks; two of the eight weld coupons stress relieved at 600 0 F for one hour cracked within eight weeks; none of the weld coupons stress relieved at 1100 0 F for one hour cracked within eight weeks; and that cracking was generally more severe in coupons fabricated from 7/8 inch plate by shielded metal arc welding than it was in coupons fabricated by other welding methods. (U.S.)

  1. Susceptibility to Stress Corrosion Cracking of 254SMO SS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Micheli Lorenzo

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking (SCC of solubilized and sensitized 254SMO SS was studied in sodium chloride, and sodium fluoride solutions at 80 °C and sulfuric acid solutions in presence of sodium chloride at 25 °C. The influence of salt concentration, pH values and the addition of thiosulfate was examined. The susceptibility to SCC was evaluated by Slow Strain Rate Tests (SSRT, at 1.5 x 10-6 s-1 strain rate. The behavior of 254SMO was compared to those of AISI 316L SS and Hastelloy C276. 254SMO showed an excellent resistance to SCC in all conditions, except in the more acidic solutions (pH <= 1 where, in the sensitized conditions, intergranular stress corrosion cracking occurred.

  2. 3-D simulation of intergranular stress corrosion crack interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Y.; Marrow, T.J.; Sherry, A.H.

    2009-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in austenitic stainless steels is a potential failure mechanism, which is result of local grain boundary chromium depletion by carbide precipitation or irradiation-induced segregation. Reliable models of crack nucleation and growth, and their sensitivity to microstructure, are required to underpin lifetime prediction and develop more resistant materials. A model for 3-D IGSCC crack growth has been developed which reproduces the interactions between the microstructure, the mechanical driving force for cracking and the kinetics of crack growth. In this paper, this model is used to investigate the interaction between adjacent initiating cracks, to observe the growth of those cracks before/after coalescence, and examine the sensitivity of short crack behaviour to random variations in microstructure. The model predictions are assessed against experimental observations of short intergranular stress corrosion crack behaviour, obtained by in-situ digital image correlation techniques

  3. Control of welding residual stress for ensuring integrity against fatigue and stress-corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mochizuki, Masahito

    2007-01-01

    The availability of several techniques for residual stress control is discussed in this paper. The effectiveness of these techniques in protecting from fatigue and stress-corrosion cracking is verified by numerical analysis and actual experiment. In-process control during welding for residual stress reduction is easier to apply than using post-weld treatment. As an example, control of the welding pass sequence for multi-pass welding is applied to cruciform joints and butt-joints with an X-shaped groove. However, residual stress improvement is confirmed for post-weld processes. Water jet peening is useful for obtaining a compressive residual stress on the surface, and the tolerance against both fatigue and stress-corrosion cracking is verified. Because cladding with a corrosion-resistant material is also effective for preventing stress-corrosion cracking from a metallurgical perspective, the residual stress at the interface of the base metal is carefully considered. The residual stress of the base metal near the clad edge is confirmed to be within the tolerance of crack generation. Controlling methods both during and after welding processes are found to be effective for ensuring the integrity of welded components

  4. Influence of Thread Root Radius on Maximum Local Stresses at Large Diameter Bolts under Axial Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cojocaru Vasile

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In the thread root area of the threaded bolts submitted to axial loading occur local stresses, higher that nominal stresses calculated for the bolts. These local stresses can generate failure and can reduce the fatigue life of the parts. The paper is focused on the study of the influence of the thread root radius on the maximum local stresses. A large diameter trapezoidal bolt was subjected to a static analysis (axial loading using finite element simulation.

  5. Stresses of steam generator U-tubes affecting stress corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yashima, S.; Ikenaga, H.; Nakamura, K.; Takaba, O.; Uragami, K.; Utsumi, H.

    1982-01-01

    Stress factors affecting U-bend cracking in the steam generators of PWR type reactors are discussed based on the results of stress corrosion cracking tests of Inconel 600 U-bend tube in polythionic acid solution subjected to the actual operating loads

  6. Stress corrosion cracking lifetime prediction of spring screw

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koh, S. K.; Ryu, C. H.

    2004-01-01

    A lifetime prediction of holddown spring screw in nuclear fuel assembly was performed using fracture mechanics approach. The spring screw was designed such that it was capable of sustaining the loads imposed by the initial tensile preload and operational loads. In order to investigate the cause of failure and to predict the stress corrosion cracking life of the screw, a stress analysis of the top nozzle spring assembly was done using finite element analysis. The elastic-plastic finite element analysis showed that the local stresses at the critical regions of head-shank fillet and thread root significantly exceeded than the yield strength of the screw material, resulting in local plastic deformation. Normalized stress intensity factors for PWSCC life prediction was proposed. Primary water stress corrosion cracking life of the Inconel 600 screw was predicted by using integration of the Scott model and resulted in 1.78 years, which was fairly close to the actual service life of the holddown spring screw

  7. Stress corrosion cracking of nuclear reactor pressure vessel and piping steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Speidel, M.O.; Magdowski, R.M.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents an extensive investigation of stress corrosion cracking of nuclear reactor pressure vessel and piping steels exposed to hot water. Experimental fracture mechanics results are compared with data from the literature and other laboratories. Thus a comprehensive overview of the present knowledge concerning stress corrosion crack growth rates is provided. Several sets of data confirm that 'fast' stress corrosion cracks with growth rates between 10 -8 and 10 -7 m/s and threshold stress intensities around 20 MN m -3/2 can occur under certain conditions. However, it appears possible that specific environmental, mechanical and metallurgical conditions which may prevail in reactors can result in significantly lower stress corrosion crack growth rates. The presently known stress corrosion crack growth rate versus stress intensity curves are discussed with emphasis on their usefulness in establishing safety margins against stress corrosion cracking of components in service. Further substantial research efforts would be helpful to provide a data base which permits well founded predictions as to how stress corrosion cracking in pressure vessels and piping can be reliably excluded or tolerated. It is emphasized, however, that the nucleation of stress corrosion cracks (as opposed to their growth) is difficult and may contribute substantially to the stress corrosion free service behaviour of the overwhelming majority of pressure vessels and pipes. (author)

  8. Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slabaugh, W. H.

    1974-01-01

    Presents some materials for use in demonstration and experimentation of corrosion processes, including corrosion stimulation and inhibition. Indicates that basic concepts of electrochemistry, crystal structure, and kinetics can be extended to practical chemistry through corrosion explanation. (CC)

  9. Theoretical aspects of stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 22

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Kwon; Macdonald, Digby D.

    2018-05-01

    Theoretical aspects of the stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 22 in contact with saturated NaCl solution are explored in terms of the Coupled Environment Fracture Model (CEFM), which was calibrated upon available experimental crack growth rate data. Crack growth rate (CGR) was then predicted as a function of stress intensity, electrochemical potential, solution conductivity, temperature, and electrochemical crack length (ECL). From the dependence of the CGR on the ECL and the evolution of a semi-elliptical surface crack in a planar surface under constant loading conditions it is predicted that penetration through the 2.5-cm thick Alloy 22 corrosion resistant layer of the waste package (WP) could occur 32,000 years after nucleation. Accordingly, the crack must nucleate within the first 968,000 years of storage. However, we predict that the Alloy 22 corrosion resistant layer will not be penetrated by SCC within the 10,000-year Intermediate Performance Period, even if a crack nucleates immediately upon placement of the WP in the repository.

  10. Addressing stress corrosion cracking on multi layer pipeline coating systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardy, Scott B.; Marr, James E. [Tuboscope Pipeline Services, Houston, TX (United States); Willmot, Martyn [Jotun Group (Norway); Norman, David [David Norman Corrosion Control, Cornwall (United Kingdom); Khera, Ashish [Allied Engineering, Portland, ME (United States)

    2005-07-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is now recognized by operators worldwide as a significant threat to the safe operation of their pipeline systems. Gas, oil, and refined products lines have all been susceptible to this form of environmentally assisted cracking. As a result, operators and regulators have been incorporating data related to the development and prevalence of SCC into their risk management systems in order that they may effectively address this time-dependant threat. The National Association of Corrosion Engineers (NACE) published the first structured methodology for stress corrosion cracking direct assessment (SCCDA) in 2004 (RP0204-2004). Operators are now beginning to apply the methods outlined in the standard to assess their systems. Research and industry experience have shown that various pipeline coating systems can be more or less effective in preventing the formation and growth of SCC. Newer pipeline coatings, such as multi layer epoxy/extruded polyolefin systems have been widely regarded as effective coating systems to address the threat posed by SCC when they are properly applied. New field studies performed on a pipeline coated with a three layer epoxy/polyethylene system have raised the possibility that operators utilizing these types of coatings may need to reassess how they manage the SCC threat. (author)

  11. Pitting and stress corrosion cracking of stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saithala, Janardhan R.

    An investigation has been performed to determine the pitting resistance of stainless steels and stress corrosion cracking of super duplex stainless steels in water containing chloride ions from 25 - 170°C. The steels studied are 12% Cr, FV520B, FV566, 304L, Uranus65, 2205, Ferallium Alloy 255, and Zeron 100. All these commercial materials used in very significant industrial applications and suffer from pitting and stress corrosion failures. The design of a new experimental setup using an autoclave enabled potentiodynamic polarisation experiments and slow strain rate tests in dilute environments to be conducted at elevated temperatures. The corrosion potentials were controlled using a three electrode cell with computer controlled potentiostat.The experimental programme to determine pitting potentials was designed to simulate the service conditions experienced in most industrial plants and develop mathematical model equations to help a design engineer in material selection decision. Stress corrosion resistance of recently developed Zeron100 was evaluated in dilute environments to propose a mechanism in chloride solutions at high' temperatures useful for the nuclear and power generation industry. Results have shown the significance of the composition of alloying elements across a wide range of stainless steels and its influence on pitting. Nitrogen and molybdenum added to modern duplex stainless steels was found to be unstable at higher temperatures. The fractographic results obtained using the scanning electron microscope (SEM) has given insight in the initiation of pitting in modem duplex and super duplex stainless steels. A mathematical model has been proposed to predict pitting in stainless steels based on the effect of environmental factors (temperature, chloride concentration, and chemical composition). An attempt has been made to identify the mechanism of SCC in Zeron100 super duplex stainless steel.The proposed empirical models have shown good correlation

  12. Stress corrosion cracking of several high strength ferrous and nickel alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, E. E.

    1971-01-01

    The stress corrosion cracking resistance of several high strength ferrous and nickel base alloys has been determined in a sodium chloride solution. Results indicate that under these test conditions Multiphase MP35N, Unitemp L605, Inconel 718, Carpenter 20Cb and 20Cb-3 are highly resistant to stress corrosion cracking. AISI 410 and 431 stainless steels, 18 Ni maraging steel (250 grade) and AISI 4130 steel are susceptible to stress corrosion cracking under some conditions.

  13. Prevention of stress corrosion cracking in nuclear waste storage tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ondrejcin, R.S.

    1983-01-01

    At the Savannah River Plant, stress corrosion of carbon steel storage tanks containing alkaline nitrate radioactive waste is prevented by stress relief and specification of limits on waste composition and temperature. Actual cases of cracking have occurred in the primary steel shell of tanks designed and built before 1960 and were attributed to a combination of high residual stresses from fabrication welding and aggressiveness of fresh wastes from the reactor fuel reprocessing plants. The fresh wastes have the highest concentration of nitrate, which has been shown to be the cracking agent. Also, as the waste solutions age and are reduced in volume by evaporation of water, nitrite and hydroxide ions become more concentrated and inhibit stress corrosion. Thus, by providing a heel of aged evaporated waste in tanks that receive fresh wastes, concentrations of the inhibitor ions are maintained within specific ranges to protect against nitrate cracking. The concentration and temperature range limits to prevent cracking were determined by a series of statistically designed experiments

  14. Corrosion deformation interaction during stress corrosion cracking of alloy 600 in primary water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boursier, J.M.; Noel, D.; Rios, R.; Vaillant, F.; Magnin, T.

    1993-12-01

    In order to study the mechanisms involved in the SCC of Alloy 600 in primary water, the influence of chemical and microstructural parameters was assessed. Recent fractographic examinations performed on fracture surfaces of specimens are presented together with the influence of the environment on the creep rate to the nickel-base alloy. These results lead to the conclusion that intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of Alloy 600 could result from a cleavage-cracking mechanism involving interactions between dissolution/hydrogen adsorption and plasticity. (authors). 20 refs., 10 figs., 5 tabs

  15. Statistical analysis of failure time in stress corrosion cracking of fuel tube in light water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirao, Keiichi; Yamane, Toshimi; Minamino, Yoritoshi

    1991-01-01

    This report is to show how the life due to stress corrosion cracking breakdown of fuel cladding tubes is evaluated by applying the statistical techniques to that examined by a few testing methods. The statistical distribution of the limiting values of constant load stress corrosion cracking life, the statistical analysis by making the probabilistic interpretation of constant load stress corrosion cracking life, and the statistical analysis of stress corrosion cracking life by the slow strain rate test (SSRT) method are described. (K.I.)

  16. Overview of corrosion, corrosion protection, and stress-corrosion cracking of uranium and uranium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koger, J.W.

    1981-01-01

    This paper covers some basic definitions and provides some data. The 51 slides illustrates these definitions, crack initiation and propagation, sources of stress, types of specimens used for SCC, potentiostatic polarization, data for Mulberry and U-Nb alloys, effects of environment, and data for U-0.75 Ti and U-Mo alloys

  17. Preventive effect of shot peening on stress corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okido, Shinobu; Yoshimura, Toshihiko; Enomoto, Kunio; Saito, Hideyo; Morinaka, Ren; Ishikawa, Tetsuya

    2002-01-01

    The effect of shot peening (SP) on stress corrosion cracking (SCC) prevention was evaluated from the viewpoints of crack initiation and propagation. It was found that the residual stress in a Type-304 stainless-steel specimen is changed - from tensile of 300 MPa to compressive of -800 MPa - by shot peening, and the effective SP depth is 0.35 mm. It was also found that the crack initiation and propagation were prevented by shot peening. The mechanism by which the shot peening prevents these phenomena is explained according to the theory of superposition and loading history. That is, the prevention of crack initiation and propagation results from the fact that the compressive residual stress caused by SP decreases the applied load on the crack surface and prevents rupturing of the oxide film on the surface. Moreover, the effects of SCC prevention were shown to be valid when cyclic loading is applied after peening. (author)

  18. Iodine stress-corrosion cracking in irradiated Zircaloy cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattas, R.F.; Yaggee, F.L.; Neimark, L.A.

    1979-01-01

    Irradiated Zircaloy cladding specimens, which had experienced fluences from 0.1 to 6 x 10 21 n/cm 2 (E>0.1 MeV), were gas-pressure tested in an iodine environment to investigate their stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) susceptibility. The test temperatures and hoop stresses ranged from 320 to 360 0 C and 150 to 500 MPa, respectively. The results indicate that irradiation, in general, increases the susceptibility of Zircaloy to iodine SCC. For specimens that experienced fluences >2 x 10 21 n/cm 2 (E>0.1 MeV), the 24-h failure stress was 177+-18 MPa, regardless of the preirradiation metallurgical condition. An analytical model for iodine SCC has been developed which agrees reasonably well with the test results

  19. Effects of residual stress on fatigue strength of small diameter welded pipe joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Tetsuo; Hattori, Takahiro; Nomoto, Toshiharu; Iida, Kunihiro; Sato, Masanobu

    1996-01-01

    A power plant consists of many welded components, therefore, it is essential in establishing the reliability of the power plant to maintain the reliability of all welded components. The fatigue failure caused by mechanical vibrations of small diameter welded joints, which is represented by socket welded joints, is one of the major causes of trouble for the welded parts of the power plant. Here, bending fatigue tests were conducted to investigate the fatigue strength of small diameter socket welded pipe joints. In the most cases of large diameter socket joints, a fatigue crack started from the root of the fillet weld though the stress amplitude at the root was smaller than that at the toe of fillet weld. Additionally, the fatigue strength was affected by the weld bead sequence. The residual stress was considered to be one of the important parameters governing fatigue strength, therefore, its effects were investigated. In several types of pipe joints, the local stress and residual stress distributions were calculated by finite element analysis. The residual stresses were compressive at the toe and tensile at the root of the socket welded joints. Based on these results, the effects of residual stresses on the fatigue strength are discussed for small diameter welded pipe joints in the present work

  20. Combined influence of implant diameter and alveolar ridge width on crestal bone stress: a quantitative approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wonjae; Jang, Yoon-Je; Kyung, Hee-Moon

    2009-01-01

    To quantitatively evaluate the combined influence of implant diameter and alveolar ridge width on crestal bone stress. ITI solid-screw implants, 10 mm in length and 3.3, 4.1, and 4.8 mm in diameter, and the alveolar bone were modeled using axisymmetric finite elements. Four different alveolar ridge geometries were selected for each implant: 5-, 6-, 7-, and 8-mm-wide ridges for the 3.3-mm implants; 6-, 7-, 8-, and 9-mm-wide ridges for the 4.1-mm implants; and 7-, 8-, 9-, and 10-mm-wide ridges for the 4.8-mm implants. A nonaxial oblique load of 100 N was applied at 30 degrees to the implant axis. Regression analysis was used to avoid ambiguity when estimating the peak stress occurring at the coronal contact point between the implant and the crestal bone, ie, the singularity point. Peak stresses were dependent on both implant diameter and alveolar ridge width. Substantially lower stresses were recorded around the implants placed in narrower ridges. A regression analysis may be used to quantify the peak stress at the singularity point. An implant with a diameter that is at least half the ridge width is recommended to reduce the stress concentration in the crestal bone.

  1. Temperature effect on Zircaloy-4 stress corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farina, Silvia B.; Duffo, Gustavo S.; Galvele, Jose R.

    1999-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) susceptibility of Zircaloy-4 alloy in chloride, bromide and iodide solutions with variables as applied electrode potential, deformation rate and temperature have been studied. In those three halide solutions the susceptibility to SCC is only observed at potentials close to pitting potential, the crack propagation rate increases with the increase of deformation rate, and that the temperature has a notable effect only for iodide solutions. For chloride and bromide solutions and temperatures ranging between 20 to 90 C degrees it was not found measurable changes in crack propagation rates. (author)

  2. Irradiation-assisted stress-corrosion cracking in austenitic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Was, G.S.; Andresen, P.L.

    1992-01-01

    Irradiation-assisted stress-corrosion cracking (IASCC) in austentic alloys is a complicated phenomenon that poses a difficult problem for designers and operators of nuclear plants. Because IASCC accelerates the deterioration of various reactor components, it is imperative that it be understood and modeled to maintain reactor safety. Unfortunately, the costs and dangers of gathering data on radiation effects are high, and the phenomenon itself is so complex that it is difficult to enumerate all of the causes. This article reviews current knowledge of IASCC and describes the goals of ongoing work

  3. A contribution to the question of stress-corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steel cladding in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupka, I.; Mrkous, P.

    1977-01-01

    A brief review is presented of the basic types of corrosion damage (uniform corrosion, intergranular corrosion, stress corrosion) and their influence on operational safety are estimated. Corrosion cracking is analyzed of austenitic stainless steel cladding taking into account the adverse impact of coolant and stress (both operational and residual) in a light water reactor primary circuit. Experimental data are given of residual stresses in the stainless steel clad material, as well as their magnitude and distribution after cladding and heat treatment. (author)

  4. 49 CFR 192.929 - What are the requirements for using Direct Assessment for Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCCDA)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Assessment for Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCCDA)? 192.929 Section 192.929 Transportation Other Regulations... requirements for using Direct Assessment for Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCCDA)? (a) Definition. Stress... operator using direct assessment as an integrity assessment method to address stress corrosion cracking in...

  5. AE signal characteristics of the initial Stress Corrosion Crack in the STS 304 pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jae Seong; Kang, Sung Sik; Lee, Bo Young

    2011-01-01

    The stress corrosion crack is one of the life-limiting mechanisms in nuclear power plant conditions. During the operation of a power plant stress corrosion cracks can initiate and grow in dissimilar metal weld pipe joints of primary loop components. In particular, stress corrosion cracking usually occurs when the following three factors exist at the same time; susceptible material, corrosive environment, and tensile stress (including residual stress). Thus, residual stress becomes very critical for stress-corrosion cracking when it is difficult to improve the material corrosivity of the components and their environment under operating conditions. Since the research conducted by Coriou et al., it is well known that Ni-based alloy and stainless steel are susceptible to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in deaerated pure water at high temperature and the SCC is difficult to be reproduced in laboratory. In this study, stress corrosion crack was artificially produced on STS 304 pipe. And a characteristic of the AE (acoustic emission) signal, which is generated at crack initiation time, was investigated

  6. Stress corrosion cracking behavior of Nd:YAG laser-treated aluminum alloy 7075

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yue, T.M.; Yan, L.J.; Chan, C.P.

    2006-01-01

    Nd-YAG laser surface treatment was conducted on 7075-T651 aluminum alloy with the aim of improving the stress corrosion cracking resistance of the alloy. Laser surface treatment was performed under two different gas environments, air and nitrogen. After the laser treatment, coarse constituent particles were removed and fine cellular/dendritic structures had formed. In addition, for the N 2 -treated specimen, an AlN phase was detected. The results of the stress corrosion test showed that after 30 days of immersion, the untreated specimen had been severely attacked by corrosion, with intergranular cracks having formed along the planar grain boundaries of the specimen. For the air-treated specimen, some relatively long stress corrosion cracks and a small number of relatively large corrosion pits were found. The cracks mainly followed the interdendritic boundaries; the fusion boundary was found to be acting as an arrestor to corrosion attacks. In contrast, only few short stress corrosion cracks appeared in the N 2 -treated specimen, indicating an improvement in corrosion initiation resistance. The superior corrosion resistance was attributed to the formation of the AlN phase in the surface of the laser-melted layer, which is an electrical insulator. The electrochemical impedance measurements taken during the stress corrosion test showed that the film resistance of the laser-treated specimens was always higher than that of the untreated specimen, with the N 2 -treated specimen showing the highest resistance

  7. Effect of cold working on the stress corrosion cracking resistance of nickel-chromium-iron alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonezawa, T.; Onimura, K.

    1987-01-01

    In order to grasp the stress corrosion cracking resistance of cold worked nickel base alloys in PWR primary water, the effect of cold working on the stress corrosion cracking resistance of alloys 600, X-750 and 690, in high temperature water, have been studied. Stress corrosion cracking tests were conducted at 360 0 C (633K) in a simulated PWR primary water for about 12,000 hours (43.2Ms). From the test results, it is concluded that the stress corrosion cracking resistance in the cold worked Alloy 600 at the same applied stress level increases with an increase in cold working ratio, and the cold worked alloys of thermally treated 690 and X-750 have excellent stress corrosion cracking resistance. (Author)

  8. EFFECTS OF CHEMISTRY AND OTHER VARIABLES ON CORROSION AND STRESS CORROSION CRACKING IN HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BROWN MH

    2008-11-13

    Laboratory testing was performed to develop a comprehensive understanding of the corrosivity of the tank wastes stored in Double-Shell Tanks using simulants primarily from Tanks 241-AP-105, 241-SY-103 and 241-AW-105. Additional tests were conducted using simulants of the waste stored in 241-AZ-102, 241-SY-101, 241-AN-107, and 241-AY-101. This test program placed particular emphasis on defining the range of tank waste chemistries that do not induce the onset of localized forms of corrosion, particularly pitting and stress corrosion cracking. This document summarizes the key findings of the research program.

  9. EFFECTS OF CHEMISTRY AND OTHER VARIABLES ON CORROSION AND STRESS CORROSION CRACKING IN HANFORD DOUBLE-SHELL TANKS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, M.H.

    2008-01-01

    Laboratory testing was performed to develop a comprehensive understanding of the corrosivity of the tank wastes stored in Double-Shell Tanks using simulants primarily from Tanks 241-AP-105, 241-SY-103 and 241-AW-105. Additional tests were conducted using simulants of the waste stored in 241-AZ-102, 241-SY-101, 241-AN-107, and 241-AY-101. This test program placed particular emphasis on defining the range of tank waste chemistries that do not induce the onset of localized forms of corrosion, particularly pitting and stress corrosion cracking. This document summarizes the key findings of the research program

  10. Quantitative Correlation of 7B04 Aluminum Alloys Pitting Corrosion Morphology Characteristics with Stress Concentration Factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhiguo; Yan, Guangyao; Mu, Zhitao; Li, Xudong

    2018-01-01

    The accelerated pitting corrosion test of 7B04 aluminum alloy specimen was carried out according to the spectrum which simulated airport environment, and the corresponding pitting corrosion damage was obtained and was defined through three parameters A and B and C which respectively denoted the corrosion pit surface length and width and corrosion pit depth. The ratio between three parameters could determine the morphology characteristics of corrosion pits. On this basis the stress concentration factor of typical corrosion pit morphology under certain load conditions was quantitatively analyzed. The research shows that the corrosion pits gradually incline to be ellipse in surface and moderate in depth, and most value of B/A and C/A lies in 1 between 4 and few maximum exceeds 4; The stress concentration factor Kf of corrosion pits is obviously affected by the its morphology, the value of Kf increases with corrosion pits depth increasement under certain corrosion pits surface geometry. Also, the value of Kf decreases with surface width increasement under certain corrosion pits depth. The research conclusion can set theory basis for corrosion fatigue life analysis of aircraft aluminum alloy structure.

  11. Destructive Examinations on Divider Plates from Decommissioned Steam Generators Affected by Superficial Stress Corrosion Cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miloudi, Salem; Firmin, Erwan; Deforge, Damien; Vaillant, François; Lemaire, Emmanuel

    Stress Corrosion Cracking of nickel alloys has been a major concern for all the Nuclear Power Plants over the last forty years. Since 2002, some cases of Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) have been reported on Steam Generator (SG) Divider Plates. However, evidence of propagation following the first detection has never been observed (based on nearly one hundred in-service inspections).

  12. Fracture mechanics study on stress corrosion cracking behavior under corrosive environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Tomoyuki; Tohgo, Keiichiro; Shimamura, Yoshinobu; Ishizuka, Naohiro; Takanashi, Masahiro; Itabashi, Yu; Nakayama, Gen; Sakakibara, Yohei; Hirano, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    This paper deals with applicability of non-linear fracture mechanics to crack growth by stress corrosion cracking (SCC) under large-scale yielding and in a plastically deformed area. Crack growth test by compact tension specimen is carried out to evaluate crack growth rate under small-scale and large-scale yielding conditions. To evaluate the crack growth behavior from a crack initiated in a plastically deformed area, crack growth test is also carried out for a very short pre-crack in a plastically deformed four-point bending specimen. Conventional stress intensity factor (K) and equivalent stress intensity factor (K J ) defined by J integral are used as fracture mechanics parameters which characterize the crack growth rate. On da/dt-K diagram, a data band shows wide scatter, especially the crack growth rate in a plastically deformed area is higher than that under small-scale yielding condition. On the other hand, da/dt-K J diagram exhibits narrower scatter on a data band than da/dt-K diagram. The equivalent stress intensity factor is appropriate for characterization of crack growth rate by SCC under small-scale yielding through large scale yielding conditions and in a plastically deformed area. (author)

  13. A mechanical property and stress corrosion evaluation of Custom 455 stainless steel alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montano, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    The mechanical and stress corrosion properties are presented of vacuum melted Custom 455 stainless steel alloy bar (1.0-inch diameter) and sheet (0.083-inch thick) material aged at 950 F, 1000 F, and 1050 F. Low temperature mechanical properties were determined at temperatures of 80 F, 0 F, -100 F, and -200 F. For all three aging treatments, the ultimate tensile and 0.2 percent offset yield strengths increased with decreasing test temperatures while the elongation held fairly constant down to -100 F and decreased at -200 F. Reduction in Area decreased moderately with decreasing temperature for the longitudinal round (0.250-inch diameter) specimens. Notched tensile strength and charpy V-notched impact strength decreased with decreasing test temperature. For all three aging treatments, no failures were observed in the unstressed specimens or the specimens stressed to 50, 75, and 100 percent of their yield strengths for 180 days of alternate immersion testing in a 3.5 percent NaCl solution. As indicated by the results of tensile tests performed after alternate immersion testing, the mechanical properties of Custom 455 alloy were not affected by stress or exposure under the conditions of the evaluation.

  14. Investigation and evaluation of stress-corrosion cracking in piping of light water reactor plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    In 1975, a Pipe Cracking Study Group, established by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC), reviewed intergranular stress-corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in Bioling Water Reactors (BWRs) and issued a report. During 1978, IGSCC was reported for the first time in large-diameter piping (> 20 in.) in a BWR in Germany. This discovery, together with the reported questions concerning the interpretation of ultrasonic inspections, led to the activation of a new Pipe Crack Study Group (PCSG) by USNRC. The charter of the new PCSG was expanded: (1) to include review of potential for stress-corrosion cracking in Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs) as well as BWRs, (2) to examine operating experience in foreign reactors relevant to IGSCC, and (3) to study five specific questions. The PCSG limited the scope of the study to BWR and PWR piping runs and safe ends attached to the reactor pressure vessel. Not considered were components such as the reactor pressure vessel, pumps, valves, steam generators, large steam turbines, etc. Throughout this report, as well as in the title, the safe ends are arbitrarily defined as piping

  15. In situ TEM study of stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, J.X.; Chu, W.Y.; Wang, Y.B.; Qiao, L.J.

    2003-01-01

    A constant deflection device designed for use within a transmission electron microscope (TEM) was used to investigate the change in dislocation configuration ahead of a crack tip during stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of type 310 austenitic stainless steel in a boiling MgCl 2 solution, and the initiation of stress corrosion microcracking. Results showed that crack tip corrosion processes during SCC-enhanced dislocation emission, multiplication and motion. SCC microcracks initiated when the corrosion-enhanced dislocation emission and motion had fully develop. A passive film formed during corrosion of austenitic stainless steel in the boiling MgCl 2 solution generated a tensile stress. During SCC, the additive tensile stress generated at the metal/passive film interface assists the applied stress to enhance dislocation emission and motion

  16. Temperature factors effect on occurrence of stress corrosion cracking of main gas pipeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazarova, M. N.; Akhmetov, R. R.; Krainov, S. A.

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of the article is to analyze and compare the data in order to contribute to the formation of an objective opinion on the issue of the growth of stress corrosion defects of the main gas pipeline. According to available data, a histogram of the dependence of defects due to stress corrosion on the distance from the compressor station was constructed, and graphs of the dependence of the accident density due to stress corrosion in the winter and summer were also plotted. Data on activation energy were collected and analyzed in which occurrence of stress corrosion is most likely constructed, a plot of activation energy versus temperature is plotted, and the process of occurrence of stress corrosion by the example of two different grades of steels under the action of different temperatures was analyzed.

  17. Stress-corrosion crack initiation behavior of carbon steel in simulated BWR environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakanishi, Koki; Tanaka, Yasuhiro; Yoshida, Kazuo; Nakayama, Guen; Akashi, Masatsune

    1994-01-01

    Carbon steels and low-alloy steels are said to possess, even though susceptible to stress-corrosion cracking themselves, conspicuously longer life than weld-sensitized Type 304 stainless steels in actual boiling water reactor (BWR) primary coolant environments of high-temperature, high-purity water containing some dissolved oxygen. This has been examined for a carbon steel pipe material and its weld by conducting uniaxial constant-load tests as a laboratory accelerated test. By statistically analyzing the distribution of stress-corrosion cracking lifetimes and metallographical examining the features of stress-corrosion crack initiation in an SEM, following results have been obtained: (1) the stress-corrosion cracking lifetime obeys the exponential distribution model; (2) stress-corrosion cracks are initiated at the bottom of corrosion pits, and it appears possible to analyze their initiation conditions in terms of stress-intensity calculated regarding the pit as a sharp crack; (3) the microcracks as initiated at the corrosion pit are non-propagative per se, so that it is only when they have grown into a main crack by coalescence with nearby microcracks that steady propagation becomes possible; and (4) both the process of pit initiation and that of microcrack coalescence can be described as a Poisson stochastic process just as for the stainless steels in the same environment, so that the whole process of stress-corrosion crack initiation can be conceived as consisting of these two independent Poisson stochastic processes connected in serial succession

  18. Final report of a coordinated research project on development of protocols for corrosion and deposit evaluation in large diameter pipes by radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    or standards for those particular radiographic tests aimed at quantitatively measuring the remaining wall thickness of corroded pipes, especially in situations of insulated pipes or those operating at high temperatures. Many important decisions are related to this remaining pipe wall thickness. A CRP on validation of protocols for corrosion and deposit determination in small diameter pipes by radiography (CORDEP) was completed in 2000. These results showed that for insulated pipes, only tangential radiography was feasible, since the density measurement method requires complicated simulations. Ir-192 isotope is preferred instead of X-rays to get a better definition in tangential technique. For determining the depth of pits and local corrosion area, the density measurement method was found satisfactory. It was recommended that the research be continued on corrosion and deposit evaluation in large diameter pipes by radiography (> 150 mm). This is a new challenge for many NDT laboratories in developing MS. The CRP on Validation of Protocols for Corrosion and Deposit Evaluation in Large Diameter Pipes by Radiography was implemented from 2002 to 2005, with the participation of twelve countries: Algeria, Canada, Germany, Hungary, India, Iran, Malaysia, Pakistan, Romania, Syrian Arab Republic, Turkey and Uruguay. The CRP aimed to provide practical guidelines and a recommended practice for the monitoring of remaining wall thickness and accumulated deposits in large diameter pipes, a vital need for many industrial installations. Large pipes with a diameter greater than 150 mm with or without insulation are abundantly used in almost all industrial sectors; corrosion in pipes of this diameter is a major industrial problem to which a solution must be found both for financial and safety reasons. The practical guidelines of this CPR will be submitted for approval by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) as a Protocol for Corrosion and Deposit Evaluation in Large

  19. Crack growth and fracture behaviour of stress corrosion cracks of turbine generator steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger; Vahle.

    1989-01-01

    The object of this investigation was the quantifying of the behaviour of cracks which were induced during service under corrosive media. To investigate the influence of stress corrosion crack configurations on stress intensity factor, six different test materials from 2 and 3.5% NiCrMoV and 2% Cr/1% Ni steels were chosen. The stress corrosion cracks were induced at wedge loaded compact tension specimens in a corrosive media in the laboratory. Fracture mechanics tests as well as fatigue crack growth tests were performed at these specimens. All stress corrosion cracks have an intercrystalline path and a crack length longer than 1 mm; they are multiple and have branched cracks tips. The fracture mechanics tests at these stress corrosion cracks induced in the laboratory and during service of components show that their stress intensity factor is 30 to 70% smaller than the stress intensity factor calculated for single straight cracks too. Theoretical calculations arrived to the same results. Crack initiation and growth behaviour under cyclic loading starting from these stress corrosion cracks results in that the load or the stress intensity range ΔK has to be increased three times larger than the ΔK-threshold value to induce crack initiation. The crack growth velocity influenced by multiple crack tips and multiple growing cracks from these crack tips is much lower than the crack growth velocity of a normal fatigue crack (one crack tip). (orig./MM) With 32 figs

  20. Influence of bovine serum albumin in Hanks' solution on the corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of a magnesium alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harandi, Shervin Eslami; Banerjee, Parama Chakraborty; Easton, Christopher D; Singh Raman, R K

    2017-11-01

    It is essential for any temporary implant to possess adequate strength to maintain their mechanical integrity under the synergistic effects of mechanical loading characteristics of human body and the corrosive physiological environment. Such synergistic effects can cause stress corrosion cracking (SCC). The aim of the present study is to investigate the effect of the addition of bovine serum albumin (BSA) to Hanks' solution in corrosion and SCC susceptibility of AZ91D magnesium alloy. The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) results indicated that the addition of BSA increased corrosion resistance of the alloy during the first 48h of immersion and then decreased it rapidly. The energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses indicated adsorption of BSA on the alloy surface during initial hours of immersion. However, with the increasing immersion time, BSA chelated with the corrosion products causing disruption of the protective film; thus, it accelerated the corrosion of the alloy. Both the mechanical data and fractographic evidence have confirmed susceptibility of the alloy to SCC. However, in the presence of BSA, the alloy suffered greater SCC which was attributed to its increased susceptibility towards localized corrosion. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Stress corrosion cracking of nickel base alloys in high temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Speidel, M.O.; Magdoswki, R.

    1993-01-01

    The resistance of nickel base alloys against stress corrosion cracking in high temperature water has been evaluated by measuring the crack growth rates for specific material-environment combinations. For this purpose, fracture mechanics testing techniques have been applied. The materials tested include both, precipitation hardened and solid solution hardened nickel base alloys. The effect of stress intensity on the stress corrosion crack growth rates has been established by measuring complete crack growth curves. In many cases, the effect of stress intensity on the crack growth rate is very small and thus a plateau is observed in the crack growth rate versus stress intensity curves. However, there are clear exceptions to this rule in certain materials and these are pointed out in comparison with data from the literature. The effect of yield strength on stress corrosion crack growth rates has been studied in detail. It is shown how precipitation hardening and particularly how work hardening influence stress corrosion cracking

  2. Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking of austenitic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Was, G.S.; Atzmon, M.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental program has been conducted to determine the mechanism of irradiation-assisted stress-corrosion cracking (IASCC) in austenitic stainless steel. High-energy protons have been used to produce grain boundary segregation and microstructural damage in samples of controlled impurity content. The densities of network dislocations and dislocation loops were determined by transmission electron microscopy and found to resemble those for neutron irradiation under LWR conditions. Grain boundary compositions were determined by in situ fracture and Auger spectroscopy, as well as by scanning transmission electron microscopy. Cr depletion and Ni segregation were observed in all irradiated samples, with the degree of segregation depending on the type and amount of impurities present. P, and to a lesser extent P, impurities were observed to segregate to the grain boundaries. Irradiation was found to increase the susceptibility of ultra-high-purity (UHP), and to a much lesser extent of UHP+P and UHP+S, alloys to intergranular SCC in 288 degree C water at 2 ppm O 2 and 0.5 μS/cm. No intergranular fracture was observed in arcon atmosphere, indicating the important role of corrosion in the embrittlement of irradiated samples. The absence of intergranular fracture in 288 degree C argon and room temperature tests also suggest that the embrittlement is not caused by hydrogen introduced by irradiation. Contrary to common belief, the presence of P impurities led to a significant improvement in IASCC over the ultrahigh purity alloy

  3. Environmental factors influencing stress corrosion cracking in boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weeks, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    The mechanisms of intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of sensitized stainless steels in boiling water reactor (BWR) primary coolant are reviewed, with emphasis on the role the environment plays on both the initiation and propagation processes. Environmental factors discussed include oxygen (corrosion potential), temperature, and dissolved ions in the water and the range of strain rates at which IGSCC occurs. Both crack propagation rates and the range of strain rates at which IGSCC occurs decrease rapidly as temperature is increased above approximately 200 0 C, in essentially the same manner as the solubility of magnetite decreases in acidic solutions. A mechanism of crack propagation is presented base on this observation. To establish water chemistry guidelines for crack-free operation of BWR's containing sensitized stainless steel, more information is needed on the role of absorption of impurities in the surface and deposited oxides and on the interaction between the oxygen and impurity levels required to maintain an electrochemical potential in a range where IGSCC is unlikely to occur. The relative effects of short bursts of impurities and longer term lower concentrations of these same impurities also need to be evaluated

  4. Evaluation of stresses in large diameter, thin walled piping at support locations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryan, B.J.; Flanders, H.E. Jr.; Rawls, G.B. Jr.

    1992-01-01

    The highest stresses in many thin walled piping systems are the local stresses at the pipe supports. These secondary stresses are caused by saddles or other structural discontinuities that restrain pipe ovalization. A static analysis of a thin walled pipe supported on structural steel saddle under dead weight loading is presented. The finite element analysis is performed using a shell model with distributed gravity and hydrostatic pressure loading. Parametric studies on global and local stress are performed to determine the effect of the pipe diameter to thickness ratio. Two aspects of the saddle design are also investigated: the effect of saddle width, and the effect of saddle wrap angle. Additionally, the computed stresses are compared to closed form solutions

  5. Relationship between stress corrosion cracking and low frequency fatigue-corrosion of alloy 600 in PWR primary water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosch, C.

    1998-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking of PWR vessel head adapters is a main problem for nuclear industry. With the aim to better understand the influence of the mechanical parameters on the cracking phenomena (by stress corrosion (SCC) or fatigue corrosion (FC)) of alloy 600 exposed to primary PWR coolant, a parametrical study has been carried out. Crack propagation tests on CT test specimens have been implemented under static loads (stress corrosion tests) or low frequency cyclic loads (fatigue corrosion tests). Results (frequency influence, type of cycles, ratio charge on velocities and propagation modes of cracks) have allowed to characterize the transition domain between the crack phenomena of SCC and FC. With the obtained results, it has been possible too to differentiate the effects due to environmental factors and the effects due to mechanical factors. At last, a quantitative fractographic study and the observations of the microstructure at the tip of crack have led to a better understanding of the transitions of the crack propagation mode between the SCC and the FC. (O.M.)

  6. Relationships between stress corrosion cracking tests and utility operating experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baum, Allen

    1999-10-22

    Several utility steam generator and stress corrosion cracking databases are synthesized with the view of identifying the crevice chemistry that is most consistent with the plant cracking data. Superheated steam and neutral solution environments are found to be inconsistent with the large variations in the observed SCC between different plants, different support plates within a plant, and different crevice locations. While the eddy current response of laboratory tests performed with caustic chemistries approximates the response of the most extensively affected steam generator tubes, the crack propagation kinetics in these tests differ horn plant experience. The observations suggest that there is a gradual conversion of the environment responsible for most steam generator ODSCC from a concentrated, alkaline-forming solution to a progressively more steam-enriched environment.

  7. Stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of 18 Ni maraging steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, T. S.; Nelson, E. E.

    1974-01-01

    The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) resistance of 18Ni maraging steel (grades 200, 250, 300, and 350) was determined in 3.5 percent salt (NaCl) solution, synthetic sea water, high humidity, and outside MSFC atmosphere. All grades of the maraging steel were found to be susceptible to SCC in varying degrees according to their strengths, with the lowest strength steel (grade 200) being the least susceptible and the highest strength steel (grade 350), the most susceptible to SCC. The SCC resistance of 250 grade maraging steel was also evaluated in salt and salt-chromate solutions using fracture mechanics techniques. The threshold value, K sub SCC, was found to be approximately 44 MN/sq m square root m, (40 ksi square root in.) or 40 percent of the K sub Q value.

  8. Surface aspects of pitting and stress corrosion cracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truhan, J. S., Jr.; Hehemann, R. F.

    1977-01-01

    The pitting and stress corrosion cracking of a stable austenitic stainless steel in aqueous chloride environments were investigated using a secondary ion mass spectrometer as the primary experimental technique. The surface concentration of hydrogen, oxygen, the hydroxide, and chloride ion, magnesium or sodium, chromium and nickel were measured as a function of potential in both aqueous sodium chloride and magnesium chloride environments at room temperature and boiling temperatures. It was found that, under anodic conditions, a sharp increase in the chloride concentration was observed to occur for all environmental conditions. The increase may be associated with the formation of an iron chloride complex. Higher localized chloride concentrations at pits and cracks were also detected with an electron microprobe.

  9. Mechanistic differences between transgranular and intergranular stress corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serebrinsky, Santiago A.; Galvele, Jose R.

    2000-01-01

    Constant extension rate tests (CERT or CSRT) with the strain rate (SR) covering a 7 orders of magnitude range were applied to the study of many systems. In particular, the kinetics of SCC were measured via the stress corrosion (SCC) crack propagation rate (CPR). The main experimental findings are: a) increasing SR produces a monotonic (logarithmic) increase in CPR; b) the slopes α in log CPR vs. log SR plots take distinct values depending on the morphology: intergranular (IG) cracks are more steeply accelerated by SR than transgranular (TG), with α lG =0.4 to 0.7 and α TG =0.2 to 0.3; c) an increase in SR only shifts the log CPR vs. potential curves to higher CPR values, without changing its shape. Quantitative evaluation shows that dislocations piled-up at grain boundaries may combine with the surface mobility mechanism to give the experimental results. (author)

  10. The stress corrosion cracking performance of pure zirconium and zirconium alloys in highly oxidizing nitric acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagano, H.; Kajimura, H. [Sumitomo Metal Industries Ltd., Amagasaki, Hyogo (Japan). Central Research Labs.

    1996-05-01

    Zr has been used for many plants dealing with nitric acid due to its high corrosion resistance. However, stress corrosion cracking (SCC) occurrence has recently been reported on Zr immersed in hot nitric acid. Here corrosion performance and countermeasures against SCC of Zr, Zr-Ti and Zr-Ti-Ta alloys in HNO{sub 3} were studied. Ti has good general corrosion and SCC resistance in highly oxidizing HNO{sub 3}, although it is severely attacked in pure HNO{sub 3} at elevated temperatures. Ta is an excellent corrosion resistant material over all concentrations of nitric acid. Alloying Ti and/or Ta into Zr has synergistic effects on improving both the general corrosion and SCC resistance. The optimization of corrosion resistance has been studied in Zr alloys. (Author).

  11. Experimental Study of Laser - enhanced 5A03 Aluminum Alloy and Its Stress Corrosion Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guicheng; Chen, Jing; Pang, Tao

    2018-02-01

    Based on the study of improving the stress corrosion resistance of 5A03 aluminum alloy for ship, this paper mainly studied the tensile test, surface morphology and residual stress under laser shock, high temperature and stress corrosion. It is found that the residual compressive stress and the grain refinement on the surface of the material during the heat strengthening process increase the breaking strength of the sample in the stress corrosion environment. Appropriate high temperature maintenance helps to enhance the effect of deformation strengthening. In the 300°C environment insulation, due to recrystallization of the material, the performance decreased significantly. This study provides an experimental basis for effectively improving the stress corrosion resistance of 5A03 aluminum alloy.

  12. Stress-Corrosion Interactions in Zr-Based Bulk Metallic Glasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petre Flaviu Gostin

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Stress-corrosion interactions in materials may lead to early unpredictable catastrophic failure of structural parts, which can have dramatic effects. In Zr-based bulk metallic glasses, such interactions are particularly important as these have very high yield strength, limited ductility, and are relatively susceptible to localized corrosion in halide-containing aqueous environments. Relevant features of the mechanical and corrosion behavior of Zr-based bulk metallic glasses are described, and an account of knowledge regarding corrosion-deformation interactions gathered from ex situ experimental procedures is provided. Subsequently the literature on key phenomena including hydrogen damage, stress corrosion cracking, and corrosion fatigue is reviewed. Critical factors for such phenomena will be highlighted. The review also presents an outlook for the topic.

  13. Stress corrosion cracking of NiTi in artificial saliva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianqiu; Li, Nianxing; Rao, Guangbin; Han, En-Hou; Ke, Wei

    2007-02-01

    This paper aimed to study the mechanism of the cracking of orthodontic NiTi wire. Two orthodontic NiTi wires were subjected: (1) optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to observe the fracture surface; (2) energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy to determine the composition of the surface product; (3) anodic polarization to remove the surface product. Samples of NiTi alloy were subjected to the constant loading test to study the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of NiTi shape memory alloy in artificial saliva. The results showed that there were three typical areas at the fracture surface of NiTi orthodontic wire. Area '1' was a tool-made notch. Crack initiated from the root of this notch and propagated to form Area '2', which was perpendicular to the wire axis and covered by surface film. This film consisted of Na, K, Cl, P, S and O except Ni and Ti. The cracking process of NiTi alloy under the constant loading test depended on the pH of saliva and applied stress. The crack length was about 262microm, the longest at 300MPa and pH 3.0. A tool-made notch in orthodontic NiTi wires can cause SCC. At high stress and low pH, this NiTi alloy was most sensitive to cracking.

  14. Demonstration through EPR tests of the sensitivity of austeno-ferritic steels to intergranular corrosion and stress corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, Nathalie

    1997-01-01

    Duplex stainless steels can be sensitised to intergranular corrosion and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) under some conditions (heat treatments, welding). The aim of this work is to contribute to the validation of the EPR (Electrochemical Potentiodynamic Reactivation) test in order to determine conditions for normalisation. This method, based on the dissolution of chromium depleted areas due to precipitation of σ-phase, provides a degree of sensitisation to intergranular corrosion. The test is broaden considering the mechanical stress by the way of slow strain rate tests, performed in chloride magnesium and in a solution similar to the EPR solution. A metallurgical study puts on the precipitates and the structural modifications due to welding and heat treatments, in order to make a critical analysis of the EPR test. (author) [fr

  15. Effect of water impurities on stress corrosion cracking in a boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ljungbery, L.G.; Cubicciotti, D

    1985-01-01

    A series of stress corrosion tests, including corrosion potential and water chemistry measurements, has been performed in the Swedish Ringhals-1 boiling water reactor. Tests have been run under reactor start-up and reactor power operation with normal reactor water conditions and with alternate water chemistry in which hydrogen is added to the feedwater to suppress stress corrosion cracking. During one alternate water chemistry test, there was significant intergranular corrosion cracking of sensitized stainless specimens. It is shown that nitrate and sulfate, arising from an accidental resin intrusion, are likely causes. Nitrate increases the oxidizing power of the water, and sulfate enhances cracking under oxidizing conditions. During another test under start-up conditions, enhanced transgranular stress corrosion cracking in low alloy steels and possibly initiation of cracking in a nickel base alloy was observed as a result of resin intrusion into the reactor water. The intrusion produced acid and sulfate, which are believed to enhance hydrogen cracking conditions

  16. Enhanced stress corrosion resistance from steels having a dual-phase austenite-martensite microstructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkatasubramanian, T.V.; Baker, T.J.

    1983-01-01

    A high strength steel with an austenite-martensite duplex microstructure has been produced by extruding nickel coated steel powder. The austenite is present as a continuous network surrounding a high strength martensite. The steel exhibits superior resistance to stress corrosion cracking in 3.5 pct NaCl solution, the effectiveness of the austenite in improving stress corrosion cracking resistance increases as yield strength increases. The austenite reduces the effective stress intensity at the advancing crack tip and at the same time shields the crack tip from the corrosive environment

  17. Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking[1997 Scientific Report of the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moons, F.

    1998-07-01

    The programme on corrosion at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN started in 1996 and focusses on modelling irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking and on developing in-pile electrochemical sensors and diagnostic equipment. The objective of this programme is to predict the behaviour of LWR core internals with respect to IASCC. Progress for 1997 is summarised.

  18. Stress-corrosion susceptibility of highway bridge construction steels. Phase I

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-04-01

    A catalog of steels used in highway bridge construction has been developed. A state-of-the-art survey on the stress-corrosion susceptibility of these steels has been conducted. The types and concentrations of corrosives that can be experienced in the...

  19. stress corrosion cracking response of hand lay-up gry composites

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Obe

    clamp. A constant load was applied for a duration of 100 seconds at 50%, 60%, 70%, 75% and. 80% of the dry laboratory temperature average tensile strength of the GRP composites (about 128. MPa). In each corrosive medium except Methanol there was no observable indication of stress corrosion cracking. Only those ...

  20. Allowing for surface preparation in stress corrosion cracking modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berge, P.; Buisine, D.; Gelpi, A.

    1997-01-01

    When a 600 alloy component is significantly deformed during installation, by welding, rolling, bending, its stress corrosion cracking in Pressurized Water Nuclear Reactor's primary coolant, is significantly changed by the initial surface treatment. Therefore, the crack initiated time may be reduced by several orders of magnitude for certain surfaces preparations. Allowing for cold working of the surface, for which modelling is proposed, depends less on the degree of cold work then on the depths of the hardened layers. Honing hardens the metal over depths of about one micron for vessel head penetrations, for example, and has little influence on subsequent behaviour after the part deforms. On the other hand, coarser turning treatment produces cold worked layers which can reach several tens of microns and can very significantly reduce the initiation time compared to fine honing. So evaluation after depths of hardening is vital on test pieces for interpreting laboratory results as well as on service components for estimating their service life. Suppression by mechanical or chemical treatment of these layers, after deformation, seems to be the most appropriate solution for reducing over-stressing connected with surface treatment carried out before deformation. (author)

  1. Evaluation of local stress for stress corrosion crack initiation by three-dimensional polycrystal model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamaya, Masayuki; Kitamura, Takayuki

    2006-01-01

    In order to understand the initiation behavior of microstructurally small cracks in a stress corrosion cracking condition, it is important to know the tensile normal stress acting on the grain boundary (normal G.B. stress). The local stress in a polycrystalline body is greatly influenced by deformation constraint which is caused by anisotropic and/or inhomogeneous property of each grain. In present study, the local normal G.B. stress on bi- and tri-crystal bodies and a three-dimensional polycrystalline body consisting of 100 grains were evaluated by the finite element method under a remote uniform tensile stress condition. The polycrystalline body was generated by using a Monte Carlo procedure and random orientations were assigned to each grain. It was revealed that the local normal G.B. stress on the polycrystalline body is inhomogeneous under uniform applied stress. The stress tends to be large near the triple points due to the deformation constraint caused by adjacent grains, even though the grain boundary inclination to the load axis has large influence. It was also shown that particular high stress was not observed at corners of the polycrystalline body. (author)

  2. Stress corrosion cracking of an aluminum alloy used in external fixation devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartner, Jacob L; Haggard, Warren O; Ong, Joo L; Bumgardner, Joel D

    2008-08-01

    Treatment for compound and/or comminuted fractures is frequently accomplished via external fixation. To achieve stability, the compositions of external fixators generally include aluminum alloy components due to their high strength-to-weight ratios. These alloys are particularly susceptible to corrosion in chloride environments. There have been several clinical cases of fixator failure in which corrosion was cited as a potential mechanism. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of physiological environments on the corrosion susceptibility of aluminum 7075-T6, since it is used in orthopedic external fixation devices. Electrochemical corrosion curves and alternate immersion stress corrosion cracking tests indicated aluminum 7075-T6 is susceptible to corrosive attack when placed in physiological environments. Pit initiated stress corrosion cracking was the primary form of alloy corrosion, and subsequent fracture, in this study. Anodization of the alloy provided a protective layer, but also caused a decrease in passivity ranges. These data suggest that once the anodization layer is disrupted, accelerated corrosion processes occur. (c) 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Influence of surface treatments on corrosion resistance of stainless steels. Residual stresses in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berge, J. Philippe

    1968-05-01

    In a first part, this research thesis proposes presentation of the definition of a surface condition: chemical characteristics such as passivity and contamination, physical characteristics (obtained through micrographic methods, X ray diffusion, magnetic methods), and micro-geometrical characteristics. The author notably discusses the measurement of characteristics either by appropriate conventional methods or by an original method in the case of passivity. In a second part, the author reports the study of the influence of surface condition on different types of corrosion of stainless steels in chemical environments (corrosion in sulphuric acid, intergranular corrosion, stress corrosion cracking in magnesium chloride, pitting corrosion) and of high temperature oxidation (corrosion in pressurized water, oxidation in dry vapour or in carbon dioxide)

  4. Study and Computer Modelling of Stress corrosion cracking during DET test

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Blahetová, M.; Lasek, S.; Blaheta, Radim

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 48, č. 1 (2005), s. 9-13 ISSN 0474-8484 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30860518 Keywords : stress corrosion cracking * mathematical modelling Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics

  5. Surface preparation for residual stress measurement of an accelerated corrosion tested welded marine steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, Bilal; Fitzpatrick, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    Residual stress measurement is often required for the assessment of structural integrity of components. Measurement of residual stress in corrosion tested specimens is challenging owing to the difficulty of accessing the surface because of the rust layer. This study explored the potential methods for the surface preparation of an ultrasonically-peened and accelerated corrosion tested DH36 marine steel fillet welded specimen to ease the way for subsequent residual stress measurement using neutron diffraction and the contour method. We find that hydroblasting introduces compressive residual stress at the surface that will alter the surface stress to be measured

  6. Laser Peening for Mitigation of Stress Corrosion Cracking at Welds in Marine Aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    and propagate in other alloys systems, such as austenitic Alloys 600, 800, and AISI type 304 stainless steel. Potential zones of susceptibility for...MITIGATION OF STRESS CORROSION CRACKING AT WELDS IN MARINE ALUMINUM by Heather R. Mattern June 2011 Thesis Advisor: Luke N. Brewer...REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED Master’s Thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Laser Peening for Mitigation of Stress Corrosion Cracking at Welds in Marine

  7. A new stress corrosion cracking model for Inconel 600 in PWR media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnin, T.

    1993-01-01

    A model of cracking in corrosion under stress, based on corrosion-plasticity interactions at cracking points, is proposed to describe the generally intergranular breakage of Inconel 600 in PWR medium. It is shown by calculation, and verified experimentally by observations in SEM, that a pseudo-intergranular breakage connected to the formation of micro facets in zigzags along the joints is possible, as well as a completely intergranular breakage. This allows us to assume that a continuity of mechanisms exists between the trans- and intergranular cracking by corrosion under material stress. (author)

  8. Stress corrosion cracking of the tubing materials for nuclear steam generators in an environment containing lead

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyung Mo; Kim, Uh Chul; Lee, Eun Hee; Hwang, Seong Sik

    2004-01-01

    Steam generator tube materials show a high susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in an environment containing lead species and some nuclear power plants currently have degradation problems associated with lead-induced stress corrosion cracking in a caustic solution. Effects of an applied potential on SCC is tested for middle-annealed Alloy 600 specimens since their corrosion potential can be changed when lead oxide coexists with other oxidizing species like copper oxide in the sludge. In addition, all the steam generator tubing materials used for nuclear power plants being operated and currently under construction in Korea are tested in a caustic solution with lead oxide. (author)

  9. The stress corrosion cracking of copper nuclear waste containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, F.; Litke, C.D.; Ikeda, B.M.

    1999-01-01

    The extent of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of copper nuclear waste containers is being predicted on the basis of a 'limited propagation' argument. In this argument, it is accepted that crack initiation may occur, but it is argued that the environmental conditions and material properties required for a through-wall crack to propagate will not be present. In this paper, the effect of one environmental parameter, the supply of oxidant (J ox ), on the crack growth rate is examined. Experiments have been conducted on two grades of Cu in NANO 2 environments using two loading techniques. The supply of oxidant has been varied either electrochemically in bulk solution using different applied current densities or by embedding the loaded test specimens in compacted buffer material containing O 2 as the oxidant. Measured and theoretical crack growth rates as a function of J ox are compared with the predicted oxidant flux to the containers in a disposal vault and an estimate of the maximum crack depth on a container obtained. (author)

  10. Determination of Stress-Corrosion Cracking in Aluminum-Lithium Alloy ML377

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valek, Bryan C.

    1995-01-01

    The use of aluminum-lithium alloys for aerospace applications is currently being studied at NASA Langley Research Center's Metallic Materials Branch. The alloys in question will operate under stress in a corrosive environment. These conditions are ideal for the phenomena of Stress-Corrosion Cracking (SCC) to occur. The test procedure for SCC calls for alternate immersion and breaking load tests. These tests were optimized for the lab equipment and materials available in the Light Alloy lab. Al-Li alloy ML377 specimens were then subjected to alternate immersion and breaking load tests to determine residual strength and resistance to SCC. Corrosion morphology and microstructure were examined under magnification. Data shows that ML377 is highly resistant to stress-corrosion cracking.

  11. Environmental stress-corrosion cracking of fiberglass: lessons learned from failures in the chemical industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, T J; Kytömaa, H K; Smith, T R

    2007-04-11

    Fiberglass reinforced plastic (FRP) composite materials are often used to construct tanks, piping, scrubbers, beams, grating, and other components for use in corrosive environments. While FRP typically offers superior and cost effective corrosion resistance relative to other construction materials, the glass fibers traditionally used to provide the structural strength of the FRP can be susceptible to attack by the corrosive environment. The structural integrity of traditional FRP components in corrosive environments is usually dependent on the integrity of a corrosion-resistant barrier, such as a resin-rich layer containing corrosion resistant glass fibers. Without adequate protection, FRP components can fail under loads well below their design by an environmental stress-corrosion cracking (ESCC) mechanism when simultaneously exposed to mechanical stress and a corrosive chemical environment. Failure of these components can result in significant releases of hazardous substances into plants and the environment. In this paper, we present two case studies where fiberglass components failed due to ESCC at small chemical manufacturing facilities. As is often typical, the small chemical manufacturing facilities relied largely on FRP component suppliers to determine materials appropriate for the specific process environment and to repair damaged in-service components. We discuss the lessons learned from these incidents and precautions companies should take when interfacing with suppliers and other parties during the specification, design, construction, and repair of FRP components in order to prevent similar failures and chemical releases from occurring in the future.

  12. Xylem diameter changes during osmotic stress, desiccation and freezing in Pinus sylvestris and Populus tremula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lintunen, Anna; Lindfors, Lauri; Nikinmaa, Eero; Hölttä, Teemu

    2017-04-01

    Trees experience low apoplastic water potential frequently in most environments. Low apoplastic water potential increases the risk of embolism formation in xylem conduits and creates dehydration stress for the living cells. We studied the magnitude and rate of xylem diameter change in response to decreasing apoplastic water potential and the role of living parenchyma cells in it to better understand xylem diameter changes in different environmental conditions. We compared responses of control and heat-injured xylem of Pinus sylvestris (L.) and Populus tremula (L.) branches to decreasing apoplastic water potential created by osmotic stress, desiccation and freezing. It was shown that xylem in control branches shrank more in response to decreasing apoplastic water potential in comparison with the samples that were preheated to damage living xylem parenchyma. By manipulating the osmotic pressure of the xylem sap, we observed xylem shrinkage due to decreasing apoplastic water potential even in the absence of water tension within the conduits. These results indicate that decreasing apoplastic water potential led to withdrawal of intracellular water from the xylem parenchyma, causing tissue shrinkage. The amount of xylem shrinkage per decrease in apoplastic water potential was higher during osmotic stress or desiccation compared with freezing. During desiccation, xylem diameter shrinkage involved both dehydration-related shrinkage of xylem parenchyma and water tension-induced shrinkage of conduits, whereas dehydration-related shrinkage of xylem parenchyma was accompanied by swelling of apoplastic ice during freezing. It was also shown that the exchange of water between symplast and apoplast within xylem is clearly faster than previously reported between the phloem and the xylem. Time constant of xylem shrinkage was 40 and 2 times higher during osmotic stress than during freezing stress in P. sylvestris and P. tremula, respectively. Finally, it was concluded that the

  13. Assessment of crevice corrosion and hydrogen-induced stress-corrosion cracks in titanium-carbon steel composite overpack for geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakayama, G.; Nakamura, N.; Fukaya, Y.; Akashi, M.; Ueda, H.

    2003-01-01

    Overpacks for high-level radioactive waste (HLW) must be reliable for geological disposal for as long as 1000-10 000 years. From a study of parameters such as the critical potential for initiation of crevice corrosion, E R,CREV and the free corrosion potential E sp in neutral aqueous environments it is concluded that composite overpacks composed of a corrosion resistant Ti alloy (Ti-0.06 Pd, or Ti-Gr.17) outer layer and a carbon steel inner layer should never be subject to crevice corrosion and hydrogen-induced stress corrosion cracking when stored deep underground environments. Hydrogen-induced stress corrosion cracking has been shown not to occur in alloys exposed to conditions of disposal based according to results based on accelerated constant current tests and constant load tests. (authors)

  14. Monte Carlo simulation of stress corrosion cracking on smooth surface under non-uniform stress condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Hiromitsu; Tohgo, Keiichiro; Shimamura, Yoshinobu; Nakayama, Guen; Hirano, Takashi

    2008-01-01

    A Monte Carlo simulation model for the process of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in structural metal materials under non-uniform stress condition has been proposed. The possible number of crack initiations is set for given space and initiation times for all cracks are assigned random numbers based on exponential distributions depending on stress level. Sites and lengths of the cracks are assigned by random numbers based on uniform distribution and normal distribution, respectively. Coalescence of cracks and subcritical crack growth are determined based on the fracture mechanics concept. Through the SCC process in the model, the influence of semi-elliptical surface cracks is taken into consideration. SCC simulations were carried out on a smooth surface under two kinds of non-uniform stress conditions such as residual stress distribution around a weld line. Multiple parallel cracks and multiple cracks along narrow high stress region were obtained depending on the stress distributions, respectively. Simulation results exhibit the applicability of the model to describe the SCC behavior observed in real structures. (author)

  15. Localized corrosion and stress corrosion cracking behavior of austenitic stainless steel weldments containing retained ferrite. Annual progress report, June 1, 1978--March 31, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savage, W.F.; Duquette, D.J.

    1979-03-01

    Localized corrosion and stress corrosion cracking experiments have been performed on single phase 304 stainless steel alloys and autogeneous weldments containing retained delta ferrite as a second phase. The results of the pitting experiments show that the pressure of delta ferrite decreases localized corrosion resistance with pits initiating preferentially at delta ferrite--gamma austenite interphase boundaries. This increased susceptibility is reversible with elevated temperature heat treatments which revert the metastable ferrite phase to the equilibrium austenite phase

  16. FY17 Status Report: Research on Stress Corrosion Cracking of SNF Interim Storage Canisters.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schindelholz, Eric John [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bryan, Charles R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Alexander, Christopher L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-09-01

    This progress report describes work done in FY17 at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) to assess the localized corrosion performance of container/cask materials used in the interim storage of spent nuclear fuel (SNF). Of particular concern is stress corrosion cracking (SCC), by which a through-wall crack could potentially form in a canister outer wall over time intervals that are shorter than possible dry storage times. Work in FY17 refined our understanding of the chemical and physical environment on canister surfaces, and evaluated the relationship between chemical and physical environment and the form and extent of corrosion that occurs. The SNL corrosion work focused predominantly on pitting corrosion, a necessary precursor for SCC, and process of pit-to-crack transition; it has been carried out in collaboration with university partners. SNL is collaborating with several university partners to investigate SCC crack growth experimentally, providing guidance for design and interpretation of experiments.

  17. Stress corrosion cracking of Zircaloy-4 in non-aqueous iodine solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez Sanchez, Andrea V.

    2006-01-01

    In the present work the susceptibility to intergranular attack and stress corrosion cracking of Zircaloy-4 in different iodine alcoholic solutions was studied. The influence of different variables such as the molecular weight of the alcohols, the water content of the solutions, the alcohol type (primary, secondary or tertiary) and the temperature was evaluated. To determine the susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking the slow strain rate technique was used. Specimens of Zircaloy-4 were also exposed between 0.5 and 300 hours to the solutions without applied stress to evaluate the susceptibility to intergranular attack. The electrochemical behavior of the material in the corrosive media was studied by potentiodynamic polarization tests. It was determined that the active species responsible for the stress corrosion cracking of Zircaloy-4 in iodine alcoholic solutions is a molecular complex between the alcohol and iodine. The intergranular attack precedes the 'true' stress corrosion cracking phenomenon (which is associated to the transgranular propagation of the crack) and it is controlled by the diffusion of the active specie to the tip of the crack. Water acts as inhibitor to intergranular attack. Except for methanolic solutions, the minimum water content necessary to inhibit stress corrosion cracking was determined. This critical water content decreases when increasing the molecular weight of the alcohol. An explanation for this behavior is proposed. The susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking also depends on the type of the alcohol used as solvent. The temperature dependence of the crack propagation rate is in agreement with a thermal activated process, and the activation energy is consistent with a process controlled by the volume diffusion of the active species. (author) [es

  18. Ultrasonic inspection reliability for intergranular stress corrosion cracks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heasler, P G; Taylor, T T; Spanner, J C; Doctor, S R; Deffenbaugh, J D [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA)

    1990-07-01

    A pipe inspection round robin entitled Mini-Round Robin'' was conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory from May 1985 through October 1985. The research was sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research under a program entitled Evaluation and Improvement of NDE Reliability for Inservice Inspection of Light Water Reactors.'' The Mini-Round Robin (MRR) measured the intergranular stress corrosion (GSC) crack detection and sizing capabilities of inservice inspection (ISI) inspectors that had passed the requirements of IEB 83-02 and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) sizing training course. The MRR data base was compared with an earlier Pipe Inspection Round Robin (PIRR) that had measured the performance of inservice inspection prior to 1982. Comparison of the MRR and PIRR data bases indicates no significant change in the inspection capability for detecting IGSCC. Also, when comparing detection of long and short cracks, no difference in detection capability was measured. An improvement in the ability to differentiate between shallow and deeper IGSCC was found when the MRR sizing capability was compared with an earlier sizing round robin conducted by the EPRI. In addition to the pipe inspection round robin, a human factors study was conducted in conjunction with the Mini-Round Robin. The most important result of the human factors study is that the Relative Operating Characteristics (ROC) curves provide a better methodology for describing inspector performance than only probability of detection (POD) or single-point crack/no crack data. 6 refs., 55 figs., 18 tabs.

  19. Standard practice for preparation and use of Bent-Beam stress-corrosion test specimens

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers procedures for designing, preparing, and using bent-beam stress-corrosion specimens. 1.2 Different specimen configurations are given for use with different product forms, such as sheet or plate. This practice applicable to specimens of any metal that are stressed to levels less than the elastic limit of the material, and therefore, the applied stress can be accurately calculated or measured (see Note 1). Stress calculations by this practice are not applicable to plastically stressed specimens. Note 1—It is the nature of these practices that only the applied stress can be calculated. Since stress-corrosion cracking is a function of the total stress, for critical applications and proper interpretation of results, the residual stress (before applying external stress) or the total elastic stress (after applying external stress) should be determined by appropriate nondestructive methods, such as X-ray diffraction (1). 1.3 Test procedures are given for stress-corrosion testing by ex...

  20. Corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goel, V.S.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a conference on alloy corrosion cracking. Topics considered at the conference included the effect of niobium addition on intergranular stress corrosion cracking, corrosion-fatigue cracking in fossil-fueled-boilers, fracture toughness, fracture modes, hydrogen-induced thresholds, electrochemical and hydrogen permeation studies, the effect of seawater on fatigue crack propagation of wells for offshore structures, the corrosion fatigue of carbon steels in seawater, and stress corrosion cracking and the mechanical strength of alloy 600

  1. The importance of the strain rate and creep on the stress corrosion cracking mechanisms and models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aly, Omar F.; Mattar Neto, Miguel; Schvartzman, Monica M.A.M.

    2011-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking is a nuclear, power, petrochemical, and other industries equipment and components (like pressure vessels, nozzles, tubes, accessories) life degradation mode, involving fragile fracture. The stress corrosion cracking failures can produce serious accidents, and incidents which can put on risk the safety, reliability, and efficiency of many plants. These failures are of very complex prediction. The stress corrosion cracking mechanisms are based on three kinds of factors: microstructural, mechanical and environmental. Concerning the mechanical factors, various authors prefer to consider the crack tip strain rate rather than stress, as a decisive factor which contributes to the process: this parameter is directly influenced by the creep strain rate of the material. Based on two KAPL-Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory experimental studies in SSRT (slow strain rate test) and CL (constant load) test, for prediction of primary water stress corrosion cracking in nickel based alloys, it has done a data compilation of the film rupture mechanism parameters, for modeling PWSCC of Alloy 600 and discussed the importance of the strain rate and the creep on the stress corrosion cracking mechanisms and models. As derived from this study, a simple theoretical model is proposed, and it is showed that the crack growth rate estimated with Brazilian tests results with Alloy 600 in SSRT, are according with the KAPL ones and other published literature. (author)

  2. Influence of texture on iodine-induced stress corrosion cracking of Zircaloy-4 cladding tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuster, I.; Lemaignan, C.

    1992-01-01

    The specific study was carried out to measure the influence of texture on the behaviour of Zircaloy-4 under iodine-induced stress corrosion cracking. The aim was to determine the relative effects of various metallurgical parameters involved in fuel rod fracture by pellet-clad interaction (PCI). Cladding tubes of different geometries were manufactured from a given Zircaloy-4 ingot. In this way tubes with different textures were obtained. Rings from these tubes were then subjected to slow tensile tests in an inert atmosphere and in an iodine vapour atmosphere. The sensitivity of the tubes to stress corrosion cracking is quantified by the loss of ductility of fracture between the tests in each atmosphere. Combined with the findings of other studies, the results showed that: (a) Texture has a strong effect on the stress corrosion cracking behaviour of Zircaloy-4, (b) the mechanical properties do not have any bearing on the material behaviour under stress corrosion cracking, and that the better behaviour of a recrystallized material - compared to the same material in a stress-relieved state - can be explained solely by the texture effect, (c) texture is a more important parameter than chemical composition of Zircaloy-4, on condition that this composition remains within the ASTM specification. The conflict between the various mechanisms involved in stress corrosion crack propagation may explain these observations. Preliminary extrapolation of these conclusions to the irradiated material shows that a more specific study is needed using appropriate parameters. (orig.)

  3. The influence of nitrogen, phosphorus, sulphur and nickel on the stress corrosion cracking of austenitic Fe-Ni-Cr alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cihal, V.

    1985-01-01

    From the results of the stress corrosion cracking tests it is evident that austenitic alloys with a phosphorus content 0.01% causes a strong increase in stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of alloys with a nickel content in the range 33 to 38%. With a nickel content of approx. 35%, an increase of nitrogen concentration to approx. 0.15% also produces a significant effect on stress corrosion cracking susceptibility. A sulphur content up to 0.033% does not produce a significant effect on stress corrosion cracking. (author)

  4. Localized corrosion and stress-corrosion cracking behavior of stainless steel weldments. Annual progress report, June 1, 1980-February 28, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savage, W.F.; Duquette, D.J.

    1980-02-01

    Pitting corrosion experiments were conducted on 308L stainless steel as a function of alloy microstructure (% delta ferrite) in acidified water-methanol solutions. Slow strain rate stress corrosion cracking studies were performed on single-phase and duplex 304 stainless steels as functions of solution chemistry, temperature, and sensitization

  5. The influence of molybdenum on stress corrosion in Ultra Low Carbon Steels with copper addition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mazur

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The influence of molybdenum content on the process of stress corrosion of ultra-low carbon structural steels with the addition of copper HSLA (High Strength Low Alloy was analyzed. The study was conducted for steels after heat treatment consisting of quenching andfollowing tempering at 600°C and it was obtained microstructure of the tempered martensite laths with copper precipitates and the phaseLaves Fe2Mo type. It was found strong influence of Laves phase precipitate on the grain boundaries of retained austenite on rate anddevelopment of stress corrosion processes. The lowest corrosion resistance was obtained for W3 steel characterized by high contents ofmolybdenum (2.94% Mo which should be connected with the intensity precipitate processes of Fe2Mo phase. For steels W1 and W2which contents molybdenum equals 1.02% and 1.88%, respectively were obtained similar courses of corrosive cracking.

  6. Stress field determination in an alloy 600 stress corrosion crack specimen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rassineux, B.; Labbe, T.

    1995-05-01

    In the context of EDF studies on stress corrosion cracking rates in the Alloy 600 steam generators tubes, we studied the influence of strain hardened surface layers on the different stages of cracking for a tensile smooth specimen (TLT). The stress field was notably assessed to try and explain the slow/rapid-propagation change observed beyond the strain hardened layers. The main difficulty is to simulate in a finite element model the inner and outer surfaces of these strain hardened layers, produced by the final manufacturing stages of SG tubes which have not been heat treated. In the model, the strain hardening is introduced by simulating a multi-layer material. Residual stresses are simulated by an equivalent fictitious thermomechanical calculation, realigned with respect to X-ray measurements. The strain hardening introduction method was validated by an analytical calculation giving identical results. Stress field evolution induced by specimen tensile loading were studied using an elastoplastic 2D finite element calculations performed with the Aster Code. The stress profile obtained after load at 660 MPa shows no stress discontinuity at the boundary between the strain hardened layer and the rest of the tube. So we propose that a complementary calculation be performed, taking into account the multi-cracked state of the strain hardened zones by means of a damage variable. In fact, this state could induce stress redistribution in the un-cracked area, which would perhaps provide an explanation of the crack-ground rate change beyond the strain hardened zone. The calculations also evidence the harmful effects of plastic strains on a strain hardened layer due to the initial state of the tube (not heat-treated), to grit blasting or to shot peening. The initial compressive stress condition of this surface layer becomes, after plastic strain, a tensile stress condition. These results are confirmed by laboratory test. (author). 10 refs., 18 figs., 9 tabs., 2 appends

  7. Design and fabrication of an apparatus to study stress corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buscarlet, Carol

    1977-01-01

    In this research thesis, the author first gives a large overview of tests methods of stress corrosion cracking: definition and generalities, stress corrosion cracking in the laboratory (test methods with imposed deformation, load or strain rate, theories of hydrogen embrittlement, of adsorption, of film breaking, and electrochemical theories), stress corrosion cracking in alkaline environment (in light water reactors, of austenitic stainless steels), and conventional tests on polycrystals and monocrystals of stainless steels in sodium hydroxide. The next parts address the core of this research, i.e. the design of an autoclave containing a tensile apparatus, the fabrication of this apparatus, the stress application device, the sample environment, pressurization, control and command, preliminary tests in a melt salt, and the first cracking tests [fr

  8. Stress corrosion in austenitic stainless steel tube of a heat exchanger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaves, R.; Wolynec, S.

    1984-01-01

    A case history of premature failure in a heat exchanger used to warm up the black liquor with water vapor in a pulp and paper plant is presented. Stress corrosion cracking did occur just after 48 hours of operation at the broaching region of AISI 304 strainless steel tubes. The cracks were initiated at the inner surface in contact with the black liquor. The stress corrosion was ascribed to high residual stresses introduced during broaching operation and to a strong alcaline environment at temperatures around 135 0 C. (Author) [pt

  9. A preliminary mechanical property and stress corrosion evaluation of VIM-VAR work strengthened and direct aged Inconel 718 bar material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montano, J. W.

    1987-01-01

    This report presents a preliminary mechanical property and stress corrosion evaluation of double melted (vacuum induction melted (VIM), and vacuum arc remelted (VAR)), solution treated, work strengthened and direct aged Inconel 718 alloy bar (5.50 in. (13.97 cm) diameter). Two sets of tensile specimens, one direct single aged and the other direct double aged, were tested at ambient temperature in both the longitudinal and transverse directions. Longitudinal tensile and yield strengths in excess of 200 ksi (1378.96 MPa) and 168 ksi (1158.33 MPa), respectively, were realized at ambient temperature, for the direct double aged specimen. No failures occurred in the single or double edged longitudinal and transverse tensile specimens stressed to 75 and 100 percent of their respective yield strengths and exposed to a salt fog environment for 180 days. Tensile tests performed after the stress corrosion test showed no mechanical property degradation.

  10. Contribution to surface physicochemical factors to stress corrosion resistance in stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gras, Jean-Marie

    1974-01-01

    The author of this research thesis first presents and discusses the various aspects of stress corrosion cracking of Fe-Cr-Ni alloys of high purity: experimental conditions (alloy elaboration, sample preparation), corrosion results (Schaeffer diagram, crack morphology, intergranular corrosion), influence of addition elements in ferritic alloys. He reports an electrochemical study of stainless steels in magnesium chloride (experimental conditions, influence of metallurgic and environmental parameters on polarization resistance, current-voltage curves), and an analytical study of layers formed in the magnesium chloride

  11. ''C-ring'' stress corrosion cracking scoping experiment for Zircaloy spent fuel cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, H.D.

    1986-03-01

    This document describes the purpose and execution of the stress corrosion cracking scoping experiment using ''C-ring'' cladding specimens. The design and operation of the ''C-ring'' stressing apparatus is described and discussed. The experimental procedures and post-experiment sample evaluation are described

  12. The Effects of Post Diameter on Stress Distribution in Maxillary Central Incisor, A Three Dimensional Finite Element Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Monzavi

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Currently there are three recognized theories about the diameter of prepared dowel space in endodontically treated teeth. Diameter of the dowel is commonly contributed to the root fracture.Purpose: This study used a 3 dimensional (3D finite element method to predict stress distribution in endodontically treated central maxillary tooth with cast post and core with various post diameter according to three philosophies about post diameter (Conservational,Proportional, Preservational.Materials and Methods: In this study three 3D models of central maxillary incisors with different post diameter were created and depend on the size of post called narrow, medium and thick model with post diameter of 1.1mm, 1.7 mm and 2.6 mm of in (CEJrespectively. A load of 100 N was applied to cingulum fossa from lingual direction with 45-degree angle to long axis of tooth and maximum tensile, compressive and Von Misses stresses and their distribution in dentin and post was studied.Results: The post in narrow, medium and thick models produced a similar magnitude of tensile, compressive and Von Misses stresses in dentin. Stress distribution was also similar in all models. Peak stresses in dentin were slightly decreased when post diameter increased from narrow to thick model. In all models peak tensile stresses in dentin occurred in the coronally one third of the lingual surface of the root, whereas peak compressive stresseswere evident in the coronal one third of the facial surface of the root.Conclusion: There were not significant differences stress distribution pattern and magnitude in dentin between the three theories of post diameter.

  13. Stress corrosion cracking of turbine disc steels: a study of mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gras, J.M.; Vaillant, F.; Dordonat, M.; Dury, J.P.

    1993-06-01

    Stress corrosion cracking was found to affect shrunk-on discs of 900 MW-EDF turbines. Investigations revealed that intergranular cracking occurred in high-stress confined locations, where concentrations of pollutants resulting from some assembling operations could take place (MoS 2 sometimes used as a lubricant, carbonated compounds with chloride as in paint marks). Laboratory tests allowed to assess the chemical conditions (pH, electrochemical potential, pollutants) responsible for the stress corrosion cracking of NiCrMo V-steels. Three main E-pH fields were found to favour stress corrosion cracking, whose boundaries may be dependant on the anionic species. The crack growth rates in these conditions were measured at 95 and 130 deg C, and compared to the observed average measurements from service. The most likely mechanism seems to involve molybdic acid, as a result of thermal decomposition of MoS 2 or generated by general corrosion of Mo-containing steel. Cracks might also have been initiated by carbonated compounds. The relevance of classical models to stress corrosion cracking of disc steel was discussed with respect to electrochemical behaviour. (authors). 15 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  14. Stress-corrosion cracks behavior under underground disposal environment of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isei, Takehiro; Seto, Masahiro; Ogata, Yuji; Wada, Yuji; Utagawa, Manabu; Kosugi, Masayuki

    2000-01-01

    This study is composed by two sub-theme of study on stress-corrosion cracking under an environment of disposal on radioactive wastes and control technique on microscopic crack around the disposal cavity, and aims at experimental elucidation on forming mechanism of stress-corrosion cracking phenomenon on rocks and establishment of its control technique. In 1998 fiscal year, together with an investigation on effect of temperature on fracture toughness and on stress-corrosion cracks performance of sedimentary rocks (sandy rocks), an investigation on limit of the stress-corrosion cracking by addition of chemicals and on crack growth in a rock by in-situ observation using SEM were carried out. As a result, it was formed that fracture toughness of rocks reduced at more than 100 centigrade of temperature, that a region showing an equilibrium between water supply to crack end and crack speed appeared definitely, that a limit of stress-corrosion cracking appeared by addition of chemicals, and that as a result of observing crack advancement of saturated rock by in-situ observation of crack growth using SEM, a process zone was formed at the front of main crack due to grain boundary fracture. (G.K.)

  15. The relative stress-corrosion-cracking susceptibility of candidate aluminum-lithium alloys for aerospace applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzo, P. P.

    1982-01-01

    Stress corrosion tests of Al-Li-Cu powder metallurgy alloys are described. Alloys investigated were Al-2.6% Li-1.4% and Al-2.6% Li-1.4% Cu-1.6% Mg. The base properties of the alloys were characterized. Process, heat treatment, and size/orientational effects on the tensile and fracture behavior were investigated. Metallurgical and electrochemical conditions are identified which provide reproducible and controlled parameters for stress corrosion evaluation. Preliminary stress corrosion test results are reported. Both Al-Li-Cu alloys appear more susceptible to stress corrosion crack initiation than 7075-T6 aluminum, with the magnesium bearing alloy being the most susceptible. Tests to determine the threshold stress intensity for the base and magnesium bearing alloys are underway. Twelve each, bolt loaded DCB type specimens are under test (120 days) and limited crack growth in these precracked specimens has been observed. General corrosion in the aqueous sodium chloride environment is thought to be obscuring results through crack tip blunting.

  16. An accurately controllable imitative stress corrosion cracking for electromagnetic nondestructive testing and evaluations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yusa, Noritaka; Uchimoto, Tetsuya; Takagi, Toshiyuki; Hashizume, Hidetoshi

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We propose a method to simulate stress corrosion cracking. ► The method offers nondestructive signals similar to those of actual cracking. ► Visual and eddy current examinations validate the method. - Abstract: This study proposes a simple and cost-effective approach to fabricate an artificial flaw that is identical to stress corrosion cracking especially from the viewpoint of electromagnetic nondestructive evaluations. The key idea of the approach is to embed a partially-bonded region inside a material by bonding together surfaces that have grooves. The region is regarded as an area of uniform non-zero conductivity from an electromagnetic nondestructive point of view, and thus simulates the characteristics of stress corrosion cracking. Since the grooves are introduced using electro-discharge machining, one can control the profile of the imitative stress corrosion cracking accurately. After numerical simulation to evaluate the spatial resolution of conventional eddy current testing, six specimens made of type 316L austenitic stainless steel were fabricated on the basis of the results of the simulations. Visual and eddy current examinations were carried out to demonstrate that the artificial flaws well simulated the characteristics of actual stress corrosion cracking. Subsequent destructive test confirmed that the bonding did not change the depth profiles of the artificial flaw.

  17. Stress analysis in bone tissue around single implants with different diameters and veneering materials: a 3-D finite element study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago Junior, Joel Ferreira; Pellizzer, Eduardo Piza; Verri, Fellippo Ramos; de Carvalho, Paulo Sérgio Perri

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the stress distribution on bone tissue with a single prosthesis supported by implants of large and conventional diameter and presenting different veneering materials using the 3-D finite element method. Sixteen models were fabricated to reproduce a bone block with implants, using two diameters (3.75×10 mm and 5.00×10 mm), four different veneering materials (composite resin, acrylic resin, porcelain, and NiCr crown), and two loads (axial (200 N) and oblique (100 N)). For data analysis, the maximum principal stress and von Mises criterion were used. For the axial load, the cortical bone in all models did not exhibit significant differences, and the trabecular bone presented higher tensile stress with reduced implant diameter. For the oblique load, the cortical bone presented a significant increase in tensile stress on the same side as the loading for smaller implant diameters. The trabecular bone showed a similar but more discreet trend. There was no difference in bone tissue with different veneering materials. The veneering material did not influence the stress distribution in the supporting tissues of single implant-supported prostheses. The large-diameter implants improved the transference of occlusal loads to bone tissue and decreased stress mainly under oblique loads. Oblique loading was more detrimental to distribution stresses than axial loading. © 2013.

  18. Simulated Service and Stress Corrosion Cracking Testing for Friction Stir Welded Spun Form Domes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Thomas J.; Torres, Pablo D.; Caratus, Andrei A.; Curreri, Peter A.

    2010-01-01

    Damage tolerance testing development was required to help qualify a new spin forming dome fabrication process for the Ares 1 program at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). One challenge of the testing was due to the compound curvature of the dome. The testing was developed on a sub-scale dome with a diameter of approximately 40 inches. The simulated service testing performed was based on the EQTP1102 Rev L 2195 Aluminum Lot Acceptance Simulated Service Test and Analysis Procedure generated by Lockheed Martin for the Space Shuttle External Fuel Tank. This testing is performed on a specimen with an induced flaw of elliptical shape generated by Electrical Discharge Machining (EDM) and subsequent fatigue cycling for crack propagation to a predetermined length and depth. The specimen is then loaded in tension at a constant rate of displacement at room temperature until fracture occurs while recording load and strain. An identical specimen with a similar flaw is then proof tested at room temperature to imminent failure based on the critical offset strain achieved by the previous fracture test. If the specimen survives the proof, it is then subjected to cryogenic cycling with loads that are a percentage of the proof load performed at room temperature. If all cryogenic cycles are successful, the specimen is loaded in tension to failure at the end of the test. This standard was generated for flat plate, so a method of translating this to a specimen of compound curvature was required. This was accomplished by fabricating a fixture that maintained the curvature of the specimen rigidly with the exception of approximately one-half inch in the center of the specimen containing the induced flaw. This in conjunction with placing the center of the specimen in the center of the load train allowed for successful testing with a minimal amount of bending introduced into the system. Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) tests were performed using the typical double beam assembly and with 4

  19. Corrosion of metals exposed to 25% magnesium chloride solution and tensile stress: Field and laboratory studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianming Shi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of chemicals for snow and ice control operations is a common practice for improving the safety and mobility of roadways in cold climate, but brings significant concerns over their risks including the corrosive effects on transportation infrastructure and motor vehicles. The vast majority of existing studies and methods to test the deicer corrosivity have been restricted to laboratory environments and unstressed metals, which may not reliably simulate actual service conditions. As such, we report a case study in which stainless steel SS 304 (unstressed and externally tensile stressed, aluminum (Al 1100 and low carbon steel (C1010 coupons were exposed to 25% MgCl2 under field conditions for six weeks. A new corrosion test-bed was developed in Montana to accelerate the field exposure to this deicer. To further investigate the observed effect of tensile stress on the corrosion of stainless steel, SS 304 (unstressed and externally stressed coupons were exposed to 25% MgCl2 solution under the laboratory conditions. The C 1010 exhibited the highest percentage of rust area and suffered the most weight loss as a result of field exposure and MgCl2 sprays. In terms of ultimate tensile strength, the Al 1100 coupons saw the greatest reduction and the unstressed and externally stressed SS 304 coupons saw the least. The ability of MgCl2 to penetrate deep into the matrix of aluminum alloy poses great risk to such structural material. Tensile stressed SS 304 suffered more corrosion than unstressed SS 304 in both the field and laboratory conditions. Results from this case study may shed new light on the deicer corrosion issue and help develop improved field testing methods to evaluate the deicer corrosivity to metals in service.

  20. Influence of stress corrosion on the mechanical properties of laser-welded titanium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Assis Ferreira, Nancy; Senna, Plinio Mendes; do Lago, Dalva Cristina Baptista; de Senna, Lilian Ferreira; Sampaio-Filho, Helio Rodrigues

    2016-03-01

    Whether laser-welded (LW) titanium can resist the stress corrosion produced by the combination of fluoride ions and stress in the oral environment is unknown. The purpose of this in vitro study was to investigate the influence of stress corrosion on the mechanical properties of LW titanium. Twenty-seven titanium bars (25×2 mm) with a circular cross-section were cut in half and laser-welded, while another 27 nonwelded (NW) bars were used as the control. Thirty bars were submitted to a flexural load of 480 N at 1 Hz and immersed in artificial saliva at pH 6 (S1) or in 1000 ppm fluoride-containing saliva at pH 6.0 (S2) or 2.0 (S3) at room temperature for up to 4000 cycles. After the stress corrosion simulation, the tensile strength and Vickers microhardness were determined (n=5). Twelve LW and NW bars were submitted to the corrosion immersion test media for 51 days (n=2) to determine polarization curves (n=2) in an artificial saliva media. The corroded surface was examined with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The combination of fluoride and low pH significantly decreased the tensile strength of LW (PStress corrosion did not affect the hardness of LW or NW (P>.05). NW bars immersed in S3 exhibited progressive surface dissolution, while LW bars spontaneously fractured at the welded area after 25 days of immersion in the same medium. SEM images demonstrated pitting corrosion without the presence of cracks in both groups immersed in S3. Stress corrosion caused by acidic fluoride-containing saliva and flexural load cycling decreased the tensile strength and hardness of LW titanium bars. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Stress corrosion evaluation on stainless steel 304 pipes in Laguna Verde Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arganis J, C.R.

    1996-01-01

    Inside the frame of the project IAEA/MEX-41044 'Stress corrosion as a starting event of accidents in nuclear plants', and of the institutional project IA-252 under the same name, it was required from the Laguna Verde Nuclear Plant, material equivalent to the one employed in the piping of the primary recycling system. Laguna Verde Nuclear Plant granted two tracks of tubes, that could be used to substitute the ones that are in operation, as is the tube SA-358TP304 CL-QC with transversal welding, designated as ER-316-LQA. According to the report entitles 'Revision of the operational experience related to corrosion in the nuclear plants' it was found that the stress corrosion is the principal mechanism of corrosion present in the nuclear plants. Previous records indicate that sensitized stainless steels are resistant to stress corrosion in testings of constant loading in sea water (3.5% of chlorides approximately) to 80 Centigrade and to 80% of the limit of conveyance and that a solution of 22% of NaCl to 90 Centigrade, produces cracking due to stress corrosion in highly sensitized steels, in tests of speed of slow extension (SSRT), to a speed of 1x10 -6 s -1 . Daniels reports that there is a direct relation between the speed limit of detection of the SSRT test and the concentration of chlorides, for stainless steels tested to 100 Centigrade. The minimum detection speed of susceptibility to stress corrosion for solution to 20% of NaCl, is of 1x10 -7 s -1 . Taking into account these considerations, the employment of a solution with 22% of NaCl to 90 Centigrade to a speed of 1x10 -6 s -1 seems a good choice for the evaluation of stainless steel. (Author)

  2. Inhibition of stress corrosion cracking of alloy 600 in 10% NaOH solutions with and with lead oxide at 315 C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hur, D.H.; Kim, J.S.; Baek, J.S.; Kim, J.G.

    2002-01-01

    Alloy 600 steam generator tube materials have experienced various degradations by corrosion such as stress corrosion cracking (SCC) on the inner and outer diameter surface of tube, intergranular attack and pitting, and by mechanical damage such as fretting-wear and fatigue. These tube degradations not only increase the costs for tube inspection, maintenance and repair but also reduce the operation safety and the efficiency of plants. Therefore, the methodologies have been extensively developed to mitigate them. The addition of inhibitors to the coolant is a feasible method to mitigate tube degradations in operating plants. In this paper, a new inhibitor is proposed to mitigate the secondary side stress corrosion cracking of alloy 600 tubes. The effect of inhibitors on the electrochemical behavior and the stress corrosion cracking resistance of alloy 600 was evaluated in 10% sodium hydroxide solution with and without lead oxide at 315 C. The specimens of a C-ring type for stress corrosion cracking test were polarized at 150 mV above the corrosion potential for 120 hours without and with inhibitors such as titanium oxide, titanium boride, cerium boride. The chemical compositions of the films formed on the crack tip in the C-ring specimens were analyzed using a scanning Auger electron spectroscopy. The cerium boride, the most effective inhibitors, was observed to decrease the crack propagation rate more than a factor of three compared with that obtained in pure 10% NaOH solution. Furthermore, no SCC was observed in lead contaminated 10% NaOH solution by the addition of the cerium boride. (authors)

  3. Time exposure studies on stress corrosion cracking of aluminum 2014-T6, 2219-T87, 2014-T651, 7075-T651, and titanium 6Al-4V

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrell, J.

    1973-01-01

    The effect of a constant applied stress in crack initiation of aluminum 2014-T6, 2219-T87, 2014-T651, 7075-T651 and titanium 6Al-4V has been investigated. Aluminum c-ring specimens (1-inch diameter) and u-band titanium samples were exposed continuously to a 3.5% NaCl solution (pH 7) and organic fluids of ethyl, methyl, and iso-propyl alcohol (reagent purity), and demineralized distilled water. Corrosive action was observed to begin during the first and second day of constant exposure as evidenced by accumulation of hydrogen bubbles on the surface of stressed aluminum samples. However, titanium stressed specimens showed no reactions to its environment. Results of this investigation seems to suggest that aluminum 2014-T6, aluminum 7075-T651 and aluminum 2014-T651 are susceptible to stress corrosion cracking in chloride solution (NaCl), while aluminum 2219-T87 seem to resist stress corrosion cracking in sodium chloride at three levels of stress (25%, 50%, and 75% Y.S.). In organic fluids of methyl, ethyl, and iso-propyl alcohol, 2014-T6 and 7075-T651 did not fail by SCC; but 2014-T651 was susceptible to SCC in methly alcohol, but resistant in ethyl alcohol, iso-propyl alcohol and demineralized distilled water.

  4. Effects of metallurgical factors on stress corrosion cracking of Ni-base alloys in high temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonezawa, T.; Sasaguri, N.; Onimura, K.

    1988-01-01

    Nickel-base Alloy 600 is the principal material used for the steam generator tubes of PWRs. Generally, this alloy has been proven to be satisfactory for this application, however when it is subjected to extremely high stress level in PWR primary water, it may suffer from stress corrosion cracking. The authors have systematically studied the effects of test temperature and such metallurgical factors as cold working, chemical composition and heat treatment on the stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 in high temperature water, and also on that of Alloy 690 which is a promising material for the tubes and may provide improved crrosion resistance for steam generators. The test materials, the stress corrosion cracking test and the test results are reported. When the test temperature was raise, the stress corrosion cracking of the nickel-base alloys was accelerated. The time of stress corrosion cracking occurrence decreased with increasing applied stress, and it occurred at the stress level higher than the 0.2 % offset proof stress of Alloy 600. In Alloy 690, stress corrosion cracking was not observed at such stress level. Cold worked Alloy 600 showed higher resistance to stress corrosion cracking than the annealed alloy. (Kako, I.)

  5. Does Physical Fitness Buffer the Relationship between Psychosocial Stress, Retinal Vessel Diameters, and Blood Pressure among Primary Schoolchildren?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Markus; Endes, Katharina; Herrmann, Christian; Colledge, Flora; Brand, Serge; Donath, Lars; Faude, Oliver; Pühse, Uwe; Hanssen, Henner; Zahner, Lukas

    2016-01-01

    Background . Strong evidence exists showing that psychosocial stress plays an important part in the development of cardiovascular diseases. Because physical inactivity is associated with less favourable retinal vessel diameter and blood pressure profiles, this study explores whether physical fitness is able to buffer the negative effects of psychosocial stress on retinal vessel diameters and blood pressure in young children. Methods . 325 primary schoolchildren (51% girls, M age = 7.28 years) took part in this cross-sectional research project. Retinal arteriolar diameters, retinal venular diameters, arteriolar to venular ratio, and systolic and diastolic blood pressure were assessed in all children. Interactions terms between physical fitness (performance in the 20 m shuttle run test) and four indicators of psychosocial stress (parental reports of critical life events, family, peer and school stress) were tested in a series of hierarchical regression analyses. Results . Critical life events and family, peer, and school-related stress were only weakly associated with retinal vessel diameters and blood pressure. No support was found for a stress-buffering effect of physical fitness. Conclusion . More research is needed with different age groups to find out if and from what age physical fitness can protect against arteriolar vessel narrowing and the occurrence of other cardiovascular disease risk factors.

  6. Stress Corrosion Cracking Behavior of LD10 Aluminum Alloy in UDMH and N2O4 propellant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Youhong; Chang, Xinlong; Liu, Wanlei

    2018-03-01

    The LD10 aluminum alloy double cantilever beam specimens were corroded under the conditions of Unsymmetric Uimethyl Hydrazine (UDMH), Dinitrogen Tetroxide (N2O4), and 3.5% NaCl environment. The crack propagation behavior of the aluminum alloy in different corrosion environment was analyzed. The stress corrosion cracking behavior of aluminum alloy in N2O4 is relatively slight and there are not evident stress corrosion phenomenons founded in UDMH.

  7. The contribution of activated processes to Q. [stress corrosion cracking in seismic wave attenuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spetzler, H. A.; Getting, I. C.; Swanson, P. L.

    1980-01-01

    The possible role of activated processes in seismic attenuation is investigated. In this study, a solid is modeled by a parallel and series configuration of dashpots and springs. The contribution of stress and temperature activated processes to the long term dissipative behavior of this system is analyzed. Data from brittle rock deformation experiments suggest that one such process, stress corrosion cracking, may make a significant contribution to the attenuation factor, Q, especially for long period oscillations under significant tectonic stress.

  8. Stress Corrosion Evaluation of Various Metallic Materials for the International Space Station Water Recycling System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, P. D.

    2015-01-01

    A stress corrosion evaluation was performed on Inconel 625, Hastelloy C276, titanium commercially pure (TiCP), Ti-6Al-4V, Ti-6Al-4V extra low interstitial, and Cronidur 30 steel as a consequence of a change in formulation of the pretreatment for processing the urine in the International Space Station Environmental Control and Life Support System Urine Processing Assembly from a sulfuric acid-based to a phosphoric acid-based solution. The first five listed were found resistant to stress corrosion in the pretreatment and brine. However, some of the Cronidur 30 specimens experienced reduction in load-carrying ability.

  9. Observations of intergranular stress corrosion cracking in a grain-mapped polycrystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, A; Johnson, G; Engelberg, D; Ludwig, W; Marrow, J

    2008-07-18

    Nondestructive three-dimensional mapping of grain shape, crystallographic orientation, and grain boundary geometry by diffraction contrast tomography (DCT) provides opportunities for the study of the interaction between intergranular stress corrosion cracking and microstructure. A stress corrosion crack was grown through a volume of sensitized austenitic stainless steel mapped with DCT and observed in situ by synchrotron tomography. Several sensitization-resistant crack-bridging boundaries were identified, and although they have special geometric properties, they are not the twin variant boundaries usually maximized during grain boundary engineering.

  10. Utilization of the molecular dynamic to study the effect of hydrogen in the stress corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnoux, P.

    2007-01-01

    Many microscopic and theoretical models of stress corrosion have been proposed, in particularly to explain the grain boundary cracking of stainless steels and nickel base. In this work calculus of molecular dynamic have been used to propose a mechanism of stress corrosion at the atomic scale. The author aims to reproduce, by molecular dynamic, the mechanism of an open crack in irradiated stainless steel in PWR reactor and show that the growth of the oxide at the crack back produce hydrogen. (A.L.B.)

  11. Effect of heat treatment conditions on stress corrosion cracking resistance of alloy X-750 in high temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonezawa, Toshio; Onimura, Kichiro; Sakamoto, Naruo; Sasaguri, Nobuya; Susukida, Hiroshi; Nakata, Hidenori.

    1984-01-01

    In order to improve the resistance of the Alloy X-750 in high temperature and high purity water, the authors investigated the influence of heat treatment condition on the stress corrosion cracking resistance of the alloy. This paper describes results of the stress corrosion cracking test and some discussion on the mechanism of the stress corrosion cracking of Alloy X-750 in deaerated high temperature water. The following results were obtained. (1) The stress corrosion cracking resistance of Alloy X-750 in deaerated high temperature water remarkably depended upon the heat treatment condition. The materials solution heat treated and aged within temperature ranges from 1065 to 1100 0 C and from 704 to 732 0 C, respectively, have a good resistance to the stress corrosion cracking in deaerated high temperature water. Especially, water cooling after the solution heat treatment gives an excellent resistance to the stress corrosion cracking in deaerated high temperature water. (2) Any correlations were not observed between the stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of Alloy X-750 in deaerated high temperature water and grain boundary chromium depleted zones, precipitate free zones and the grain boundary segregation of impurity elements and so on. It appears that there are good correlations between the stress corrosion cracking resistance of the alloy in the environment and the kinds, morphology and coherency of precipitates along the grain boundaries. (author)

  12. In-vitro characterization of stress corrosion cracking of aluminium-free magnesium alloys for temporary bio-implant applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Lokesh; Singh Raman, R K; Hofstetter, Joelle; Uggowitzer, Peter J

    2014-09-01

    The complex interaction between physiological stresses and corrosive human body fluid may cause premature failure of metallic biomaterials due to the phenomenon of stress corrosion cracking. In this study, the susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking of biodegradable and aluminium-free magnesium alloys ZX50, WZ21 and WE43 was investigated by slow strain rate tensile testing in a simulated human body fluid. Slow strain rate tensile testing results indicated that each alloy was susceptible to stress corrosion cracking, and this was confirmed by fractographic features of transgranular and/or intergranular cracking. However, the variation in alloy susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking is explained on the basis of their electrochemical and microstructural characteristics. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Corrosion Behavior of the Stressed Sensitized Austenitic Stainless Steels of High Nitrogen Content in Seawater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Almubarak

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to study the effect of high nitrogen content on corrosion behavior of austenitic stainless steels in seawater under severe conditions such as tensile stresses and existence of sensitization in the structure. A constant tensile stress has been applied to sensitized specimens types 304, 316L, 304LN, 304NH, and 316NH stainless steels. Microstructure investigation revealed various degrees of stress corrosion cracking. SCC was severe in type 304, moderate in types 316L and 304LN, and very slight in types 304NH and 316NH. The electrochemical polarization curves showed an obvious second current peak for the sensitized alloys which indicated the existence of second phase in the structure and the presence of intergranular stress corrosion cracking. EPR test provided a rapid and efficient nondestructive testing method for showing passivity, degree of sensitization and determining IGSCC for stainless steels in seawater. A significant conclusion was obtained that austenitic stainless steels of high nitrogen content corrode at a much slower rate increase pitting resistance and offer an excellent resistance to stress corrosion cracking in seawater.

  14. SEM observations on stress corrosion cracking of commercially pure titanium in a topical fluoride solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Könönen, M H; Lavonius, E T; Kivilahti, J K

    1995-07-01

    OBJECTIVES. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether commercially pure titanium is susceptible to stress corrosion cracking/hydrogen embrittlement in a topical fluoride solution used in preventive dentistry. Thin electropolished titanium test specimens were previously cold-rolled or cold-rolled and annealed before testing. For the stress corrosion tests, the U-shaped specimens of both treatment types were stressed into a radius of curvature of 30 mm. Then, the bent part was placed in the fluoride solution at 37 degrees C for 1, 5, 10, and 20 d. The effects of the fluoride solution on cold-rolled and annealed titanium were studied using a scanning electron microscope. In addition, mechanically fractured surfaces of cold-rolled titanium specimens exposed and not exposed to the fluoride solution were examined by SEM. A qualitative evaluation of the surfaces was conducted. Narrow cracks were observed in cold-rolled specimens following exposure to the fluoride solution for 5 d. The cracks were associated with branching, a characteristic of stress corrosion cracking. The cold-rolled specimen exposed to the fluoride solution exhibited a brittle fracture. In contrast, the fracture mode of the unexposed specimen was ductile in nature. Topical fluoride solutions can cause stress corrosion cracking of commercially pure titanium.

  15. Fatigue failure in polysilicon not due to simple stress corrosion cracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, H; Ballarini, R; Bellante, J J; Heuer, A H

    2002-11-08

    In the absence of a corrosive environment, brittle materials such as silicon should be immune to cyclic fatigue. However, fatigue effects are well known in micrometer-sized polycrystalline silicon (polysilicon) samples tested in air. To investigate the origins of this phenomenon in polysilicon, we developed a fixed-grip fracture mechanics microspecimen but could find no evidence of static stress corrosion cracking. The environmental sensitivity of the fatigue resistance was also investigated under cyclic loading. For low-cycle fatigue, the behavior is independent of the ambient conditions, whether air or vacuum, but is strongly influenced by the ratio of compressive to tensile stresses experienced during each cycle. The fatigue damage most likely originates from contact stresses at processing-related surface asperities; subcritical crack growth then ensues during further cyclic loading. The lower far-field stresses involved in high-cycle fatigue induce reduced levels of fatigue damage. Under these conditions, a corrosive ambient such as laboratory air exacerbates the fatigue process. Without cyclic loading, polysilicon does not undergo stress corrosion cracking.

  16. Stress Corrosion Cracking Behavior of X80 Pipeline Steel in Acid Soil Environment with SRB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dan; Xie, Fei; Wu, Ming; Liu, Guangxin; Zong, Yue; Li, Xue

    2017-06-01

    Self-designed experimental device was adopted to ensure the normal growth of sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in sterile simulated Yingtan soil solution. Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of X80 pipeline steel in simulated acid soil environment was investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, slow strain rate test, and scanning electron microscope. Results show that the presence of SRB could promote stress corrosion cracking susceptibility. In a growth cycle, polarization resistance first presents a decrease and subsequently an increase, which is inversely proportional to the quantities of SRB. At 8 days of growth, SRB reach their largest quantity of 1.42 × 103 cells/g. The corrosion behavior is most serious at this time point, and the SCC mechanism is hydrogen embrittlement. In other SRB growth stages, the SCC mechanism of X80 steel is anodic dissolution. With the increasing SRB quantities, X80 steel is largely prone to SCC behavior, and the effect of hydrogen is considerably obvious.

  17. Effects of laser shock peening on stress corrosion behavior of 7075 aluminum alloy laser welded joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, J.T., E-mail: jiasqq1225@126.com [School of Mechanical Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); School of Materials Engineering, Jiangsu University of Technology, Changzhou 213001 (China); Zhang, Y.K. [School of Mechanical Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); School of Mechanical Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 211189 (China); Chen, J.F.; Zhou, J.Y.; Ge, M.Z.; Lu, Y.L.; Li, X.L. [School of Materials Engineering, Jiangsu University of Technology, Changzhou 213001 (China)

    2015-10-28

    7075 aluminum alloy weldments were processed by an intensive process known as laser shock peening (LSP), meanwhile its stress corrosion behaviors were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and slow strain rate tensile (SSRT) tests. Results showed that the effect of LSP on corrosion behavior of the joint was fairly useful and obvious. With LSP, the elongation, time of fracture and static toughness after the SSRT test were improved by 11.13%, 20% and 100%, respectively. At the same time, the location of the fracture also changed. LSP led to a transition of the fracture type from transgranular to intergranular The reasons for these enhancements of the joint on corrosion behavior were caused by microstructure, residual stress, micro-hardness, and fracture appearance.

  18. Solvent effects on stress corrosion cracking of zirconium and Zircaloy-4 in iodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farina, Silvia B.; Duffo, Gustavo S.; Galvele, Jose R.

    2000-01-01

    Localized corrosion (pitting, intergranular attack and stress corrosion cracking) of Zircaloy-4 and its principal component, zirconium, was investigated in solutions of iodine in different alcohols (methanol, ethanol, 1-propanol, 1-butanol, 1-pentanol and 1-octanol). Intergranular attack was found in all of the solutions tested, and the attack velocity increases when the size of the alcohol molecule decreases. In some cases it was found that intergranular attack is accompanied by pitting. Slow strain-rate experiments showed that the propagation rate of stress corrosion cracks also depends on the size of the solvent molecule. From these results it may be inferred that the cause of the variation in the velocity is the steric hindrance of the alcohol molecules. The surface mobility SCC mechanism may account for these results. (author)

  19. Quantitative characterization of initiation and propagation in stress corrosion cracking. An approach of a phenomenological model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raquet, O.

    1994-01-01

    A purely phenomenological study of stress corrosion cracking was performed using the couple Z2CN 18.10 (304L) austenitic stainless steel/boiling MgCl 2 aqueous solution. The exploitation of the morphological information (shape of the cracks and size distribution) available after constant elongation rate tests led to the proposal of an analytical expression of the crack initiation and growth rates. This representation allowed to quantitatively characterize the influence of the applied strain rate as well as the effect of corrosion inhibitors on the crack initiation and propagation phases. It can be used in the search for the stress corrosion cracking mechanisms as a 'riddle' for the determination of the rate controlling steps. As a matter of fact, no mechanistic hypothesis has been used for its development. (author)

  20. Combined Effect of Alternating Current Interference and Cathodic Protection on Pitting Corrosion and Stress Corrosion Cracking Behavior of X70 Pipeline Steel in Near-Neutral pH Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liwei Wang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Influence of alternating current (AC on pitting corrosion and stress corrosion cracking (SCC behavior of X70 pipeline steel in the near-neutral pH environment under cathodic protection (CP was investigated. Both corrosion and SCC are inhibited by −0.775 VSCE CP without AC interference. With the superimposition of AC current (1–10 mA/cm2, the direct current (DC potential shifts negatively under the CP of −0.775 VSCE and the cathodic DC current decreases and shifts to the anodic direction. Under the CP potential of −0.95 VSCE and −1.2 VSCE, the applied AC current promotes the cathodic reaction and leads to the positive shift of DC potential and increase of cathodic current. Local anodic dissolution occurs attributing to the generated anodic current transients in the positive half-cycle of the AC current, resulting in the initiation of corrosion pits (0.6–2 μm in diameter. AC enhances the SCC susceptibility of X70 steel under −0.775 VSCE CP, attributing to the promotion of anodic dissolution and hydrogen evolution. Even an AC current as low as 1 mA/cm2 can enhance the SCC susceptibility.

  1. Combined Effect of Alternating Current Interference and Cathodic Protection on Pitting Corrosion and Stress Corrosion Cracking Behavior of X70 Pipeline Steel in Near-Neutral pH Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liwei; Cheng, Lianjun; Li, Junru; Zhu, Zhifu; Bai, Shuowei; Cui, Zhongyu

    2018-03-22

    Influence of alternating current (AC) on pitting corrosion and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of X70 pipeline steel in the near-neutral pH environment under cathodic protection (CP) was investigated. Both corrosion and SCC are inhibited by -0.775 V SCE CP without AC interference. With the superimposition of AC current (1-10 mA/cm²), the direct current (DC) potential shifts negatively under the CP of -0.775 V SCE and the cathodic DC current decreases and shifts to the anodic direction. Under the CP potential of -0.95 V SCE and -1.2 V SCE , the applied AC current promotes the cathodic reaction and leads to the positive shift of DC potential and increase of cathodic current. Local anodic dissolution occurs attributing to the generated anodic current transients in the positive half-cycle of the AC current, resulting in the initiation of corrosion pits (0.6-2 μm in diameter). AC enhances the SCC susceptibility of X70 steel under -0.775 V SCE CP, attributing to the promotion of anodic dissolution and hydrogen evolution. Even an AC current as low as 1 mA/cm² can enhance the SCC susceptibility.

  2. The stress corrosion resistance and the cryogenic temperature mechanical properties of annealed Nitronic 60 bar material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montano, J. W. L.

    1977-01-01

    Ambient and cryogenic temperature mechanical properties and the ambient temperature stress corrosion properties of annealed, straightened, and centerless ground Nitronic 60 stainless steel alloy bar material are presented. The mechanical properties of longitudinal specimens were evaluated at test temperatures from ambient to liquid hydrogen. The tensile test data indicated increasing strength with decreasing temperature to -196 C. Below liquid nitrogen temperature the smooth tensile and notched tensile strengths decreased slightly while the elongation and reduction of area decreased drastically. The Charpy V-notched impact energy decreased steadily with decreasing test temperature. Stress corrosion tests were performed on longitudinal tensile specimens and transverse C-ring specimens exposed to: alternate immersion in a 3.5% NaCl bath; humidity cabinet; and a 5% salt spray atmosphere. The longitudinal tensile specimens experienced no corrosive attack. Approximately 3/4 of the transverse C-rings exposed to alternate immersion and to salt spray experienced a pitting attack on the top and bottom ends. Additional stress corrosion tests were performed on transverse tensile specimens. No failures occurred in the 90% stressed specimens exposed for 90 days in the alternate immersion and salt spray environments

  3. Thermomechanical processing of 5083 aluminum to increase strength without increasing susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edstrom, C.M.; Blakeslee, J.J.

    1980-01-01

    5083 aluminium with 25% cold work must be processed above 215 0 C or below 70 0 C to avoid forming continuous precipitate in the grain boundaries which makes the material susceptible to stress corrosion cracking. Time at temperature above 215 0 C should be held to minimum (less than 30 min) to retain some strength from the 25% cold work

  4. Stress corrosion of the alloy U-7.5 Nb-2.5 Zr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lepoutre, D.; Nomine, A.M.; Miannay, D.

    1983-09-01

    Oxide formed on U-7.5 Nb-2.5 Zr at room temperature during stress corrosion cracking in oxygen is identical to the natural oxide of the alloy. It is formed by UO 2 with Nb and Zr and is associated with an increased Nb content at the interface. This oxide would be responsible for cracking [fr

  5. Overlapping double etch technique for evaluation of metallic alloys to stress corrosion cracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steeves, Arthur F.; Stewart, James C.

    1981-01-01

    A double overlapping etch zone technique for evaluation of the resistance of metallic alloys to stress corrosion cracking. The technique involves evaluating the metallic alloy along the line of demarcation between an overlapping double etch zone and single etch zone formed on the metallic alloy surface.

  6. Stress Corrosion Cracking Behavior of Hardening-Treated 13Cr Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Li-Bin; Ishitake, Hisamitsu; Izumi, Sakae; Shiokawa, Kunio; Yamashita, Mitsuo; Sakai, Yoshihiro

    2018-03-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of the hardening-treated materials of 13Cr stainless steel was examined with SSRT tests and constant load tests. In the simulated geothermal water and even in the test water without addition of impurities, the hardening-treated materials showed a brittle intergranular fracture due to the sensitization, which was caused by the present hardening-treatments.

  7. Is the early fragmentation of intrauterine devices caused by stress corrosion cracking?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereda, M D; Farina, S B; Fernández Lorenzo, M

    2009-10-01

    Copper wire is the main component of a type of intrauterine device used as a contraceptive. Its contraceptive effect is attributed to the copper ions released as a result of the dissolution of copper in the uterus. Even though 10-year intrauterine device life is estimated on the basis of the dissolution rate of copper measured in vivo and in vitro, some cases of breakdown or fragmentation of the copper wire after short periods of insertion (2-3 months) have been reported. Due to the possible existence of residual stresses as a consequence of the manufacturing process, stress corrosion cracking has been previously proposed as an explanation for the early ruptures. In the present work, the susceptibility of copper wires to stress corrosion cracking in simulated uterine fluids was investigated. Results indicate that early ruptures should not be attributed to stress corrosion cracking. They could be explained by considering the increase in corrosion rate under certain conditions (pH decrease during infections; changes in the concentration of organic components along the menstrual cycle; etc.) that reduces the wire section leading to the rupture of the specimen by overloading.

  8. Stress corrosion of very high purity stainless steels in alkaline media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hechmat-Dehcordi, Ebrahim

    1981-01-01

    This research thesis reports the study of stress corrosion resistance of stainless steels in caustic environments. It notably concerns the electronuclear industrial sector, the production of soda by electrolysis, and the preparation of hydrogen as energy vector. After a presentation of the experimental conditions, the author highlights the influence of purity on stress corrosion cracking of 20Cr-25Ni-type austenitic alloys. The specific action of a high number of addition metallic and non-metallic elements has been studied. Stress corrosion tests have been also performed in autoclave on austeno-ferritic (21 to 25 pc Cr - 6 to 10 pc Ni) as well as ferritic (26 pc Cr) grades. The author reports the study of electrochemical properties of stainless steel in soda by means of potentiostatic techniques with an application of Pourbaix thermodynamic equilibrium diagrams, and the study of the chemical composition of passivation thin layers by Auger spectroscopy. He more particularly studies the influence of electrode potential and of some addition elements on the chemical characteristics of oxides developed at the surface of austenite. Then, the author tries to establish correlations between strain hardening microstructure of the various steels and their sensitivity to stress corrosion [fr

  9. Fatigue surviving, fracture resistance, shear stress and finite element analysis of glass fiber posts with different diameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wandscher, Vinícius Felipe; Bergoli, César Dalmolin; de Oliveira, Ariele Freitas; Kaizer, Osvaldo Bazzan; Souto Borges, Alexandre Luiz; Limberguer, Inácio da Fontoura; Valandro, Luiz Felipe

    2015-03-01

    This study evaluated the shear stress presented in glass fiber posts with parallel fiber (0°) and different coronal diameters under fatigue, fracture resistance and FEA. 160 glass-fiber posts (N=160) with eight different coronal diameters were used (DT=double tapered, number of the post=coronal diameter and W=Wider - fiber post with coronal diameter wider than the conventional): DT1.4; DT1.8W; DT1.6; DT2W; DT1.8; DT2.2W; DT2; DT2.2. Eighty posts were submitted to mechanical cycling (3×10(6) cycles; inclination: 45°; load: 50N; frequency: 4Hz; temperature: 37°C) to assess the surviving under intermittent loading and other eighty posts were submitted to fracture resistance testing (resistance [N] and shear-stress [MPa] values were obtained). The eight posts types were 3D modeled (Rhinoceros 4.0) and the shear-stress (MPa) evaluated using FEA (Ansys 13.0). One-way ANOVA showed statistically differences to fracture resistance (DT2.2W and DT2.2 showed higher values) and shear stress values (DT1.4 showed lower values). Only the DT1.4 fiber posts failed after mechanical cycling. FEA showed similar values of shear stress between the groups and these values were similar to those obtained by shear stress testing. The failure analysis showed that 95% of specimens failed by shear. Posts with parallel fiber (0°) may suffer fractures when an oblique shear load is applied on the structure; except the thinner group, greater coronal diameters promoted the same shear stresses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Ultrasonic pattern recognition study of intergranular stress corrosion cracks vs. weld crown reflectors in SS piping. Interim report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, J.L.; Singh, G.P.

    1978-09-01

    Pattern recognition techniques for discriminating between geometrical and crack reflector signals obtained during ultrasonic inspection of weld zone in Type 304 austenitic stainless steel piping have been applied to one set of data. Seven welds from four different 4-in diameter pipe specimens containing intergranular stress corrosion cracking (supplied by the GE pipe laboratory through SwRI) were examined ultrasonically. Geometrical reflectors considered in this feasibility study were crown type reflectors only, since they were readily available in the pipe specimens. The ultrasonic inspection was conducted in a pulse-echo mode using a 1.5 MHz nominal center frequency, 3/8-in diameter transducer mounted on a plexiglass shoe with a 45 0 refracted transverse wave. A version of the Southwest Research Institute pipe weld examination code was used for recording data. Ultrasonic signals were digitized and stored for further analysis. One hundred fifty-five indications were recorded from seven different welds, four of which were examined from both sides, and three from only one side. The ultrasonic data were correlated with dye penetration tests and ultrasonic examination conducted by SwRI in order to obtain correct training information. The data naturally fell into two categories, cracks and crowns (geometric reflectors). A total of 107 crown indications and 40 intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) indications were further analyzed. The pattern recognition analysis indicated that an IGSCC indication was discriminated from a crown indication in about 98% of the cases. The success of the pattern recognition algorithm employed in this study demonstrates the applicability of this technique for solving such important problems as discrimination between IGSCC and geometric reflectors in 304 stainless steel pipe welds. Additional work on other kinds of geometric reflectors is required to establish an overall confidence level in reflector classification analysis

  11. Stress Corrosion Cracking of Steel and Aluminum in Sodium Hydroxide: Field Failure and Laboratory Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Prawoto

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Through an investigation of the field failure analysis and laboratory experiment, a study on (stress corrosion cracking SCC behavior of steel and aluminum was performed. All samples were extracted from known operating conditions from the field failures. Similar but accelerated laboratory test was subsequently conducted in such a way as to mimic the field failures. The crack depth and behavior of the SCC were then analyzed after the laboratory test and the mechanism of stress corrosion cracking was studied. The results show that for the same given stress relative to ultimate tensile strength, the susceptibility to SCC is greatly influenced by heat treatment. Furthermore, it was also concluded that when expressed relative to the (ultimate tensile strength UTS, aluminum has similar level of SCC susceptibility to that of steel, although with respect to the same absolute value of applied stress, aluminum is more susceptible to SCC in sodium hydroxide environment than steel.

  12. Study on the fabrication of the Stress Corrosion Crack by vapor pressure in the Alloy 600 Pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jae Seong; An, Ju Seon; Hwang, Woong Ki; Lee, Bo Young

    2010-01-01

    The stress corrosion crack is one of the life-limiting mechanisms in nuclear power plant conditions. During the operation of a power plant stress corrosion cracks can initiate and grow in dissimilar metal weld pipe joints of primary loop components. In particular, stress corrosion cracking usually occurs when the following three factors exist at the same time; susceptible material, corrosive environment, and tensile stress (including residual stress). Thus, residual stress becomes very critical for stress-corrosion cracking when it is difficult to improve the material corrosivity of the components and their environment under operating conditions. Since the research conducted by Coriou et al., it is well known that Ni-based alloy is susceptible to stress corrosion cracking(SCC) in deaerated pure water at high temperature and the SCC is difficult to be reproduced in laboratory. The aim of this study was to fulfill the need by developing an artificial SCC manufacturing method, which would produce realistic SCC in the Alloy 600 pipe

  13. Effect of Ultrasonic Peening and Accelerated Corrosion Exposure on the Residual Stress Distribution in Welded Marine Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Bilal; Fitzpatrick, Michael E.

    2015-03-01

    Specimens of DH36 marine steel were prepared with welded attachments. Residual stress measurements were made on the samples as-welded, following an ultrasonic peening treatment, and following accelerated corrosion exposure after ultrasonic peening. Neutron diffraction and the contour method were used for determining the residual stress profiles. The welding introduces tensile near-surface residual stress, approaching the material yield strength, and the ultrasonic peening overlays this with a compressive residual stress. Material removal by corrosion decreases the peak surface compressive stress slightly, by removal of a layer of stressed material, but does not cause significant redistribution of the residual stress profile.

  14. Stress corrosion cracking of zirconium and its alloys in halogenide solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farina, Silvia B.

    2001-01-01

    A doctoral thesis developed at the corrosion labs in CNEA a few years ago showed that zirconium and Zircaloy-4 were susceptible to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in chloride aqueous solutions at potentials above the pitting potential. However, the nature of the phenomenon was not elucidated. On the other hand, references about the subject were scarce and contradictory. The development of new SCC models, in particular, the surface mobility SCC mechanism suggested a review of zirconium and Zircaloy-4 SCC in halogenide aqueous solutions. This mechanism predicts that zirconium should be susceptible to SCC not only in chloride solutions but also in bromide and iodide solutions due to the low melting point of the surface compounds formed by the interaction between the metal and the environment. The present work was aimed to determine the conditions under which SCC takes place and the mechanism operating during this process. For that purpose, the effect of electrochemical potential, strain rate and temperature on the SCC susceptibility of both, zirconium and Zircaloy-4 in chloride, bromide and iodide solutions was investigated. It was observed that those materials undergo stress corrosion cracking only at potentials higher than the breakdown potential. The crack velocity increased slightly with the applied potential, and the strain rate had an accelerating effect on the crack propagation rate. In both materials two steps were found during cracking. The first one was characterized as intergranular attack assisted by stress due to an anodic dissolution process. This step is followed by a transition to a transgranular mode of propagation, which was considered as the 'true' stress corrosion cracking step. The intergranular attack is the rate-determining step due to the fact that the transgranular propagation rate is higher than the intergranular propagation rate. Several stress corrosion cracking mechanisms were analyzed to explain the transgranular cracking. The predictions

  15. Influence of residual stresses and loading frequencies on corrosion fatigue crack growth behavior of weldments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitsunai, Y.; Tanaka, M.; Yoshihisa, E.

    1998-04-01

    The effect of residual stresses and loading frequencies on corrosion fatigue crack growth behavior under synthetic seawater with a free corrosion potential was examined using center-cracked tension (CCT) and single edge-cracked tension (SECT) specimens machined from mild steel butt-welded joints and the parent material. A series of fatigue crack growth tests were carried out with a sinusoidal loading wave form at a stress ratio of 0.05 with a loading frequency of 0.017 to 6.7 Hz. The results show that the crack growth resistance of a weld metal in the SECT specimen is higher than that in the CCT specimen regardless of testing conditions. The discrepancy is attributed to the differences in residual stress distribution at the crack tip in the two specimen geometries. The crack growth rate of the weld metal in the CCT specimen in seawater increased with decreasing loading frequency. The acceleration of the crack growth rate may be related to the occurrence of brittle striation or cleavage due to hydrogen embrittlement. It was found that the corrosion fatigue crack growth rate of a welded joint with tensile residual stress can be predicted using the effective stress intensity factor range, which takes into account both the residual stress and the loading frequency effects.

  16. Stress Corrosion Cracking of an Austenitic Stainless Steel in Nitrite-Containing Chloride Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. K. Singh Raman

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the susceptibility of 316L stainless steel to stress corrosion cracking (SCC in a nitrite-containing chloride solution. Slow strain rate testing (SSRT in 30 wt. % MgCl2 solution established SCC susceptibility, as evidenced by post-SSRT fractography. Addition of nitrite to the chloride solution, which is reported to have inhibitive influence on corrosion of stainless steels, was found to increase SCC susceptibility. The susceptibility was also found to increase with nitrite concentration. This behaviour is explained on the basis of the passivation and pitting characteristics of 316L steel in chloride solution.

  17. Stress Corrosion Cracking of an Austenitic Stainless Steel in Nitrite-Containing Chloride Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, R K Singh; Siew, Wai Hoong

    2014-12-05

    This article describes the susceptibility of 316L stainless steel to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in a nitrite-containing chloride solution. Slow strain rate testing (SSRT) in 30 wt. % MgCl₂ solution established SCC susceptibility, as evidenced by post-SSRT fractography. Addition of nitrite to the chloride solution, which is reported to have inhibitive influence on corrosion of stainless steels, was found to increase SCC susceptibility. The susceptibility was also found to increase with nitrite concentration. This behaviour is explained on the basis of the passivation and pitting characteristics of 316L steel in chloride solution.

  18. Study of alloy 600'S stress corrosion cracking mechanisms in high temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rios, R.

    1994-06-01

    In order to better understand the mechanisms involved in Alloy 600's stress corrosion cracking in PWR environment, laboratory tests were performed. The influence of parameters pertinent to the mechanisms was studies : hydrogen and oxygen overpressures, local chemical composition, microstructure. The results show that neither hydrogen nor dissolution/oxidation, despite their respective roles in the process, are sufficient to account for experimental facts. SEM observation of micro-cleavage facets on specimens' fracture surfaces leads to pay attention to a new mechanism of corrosion/plasticity interactions. (author). 113 refs., 73 figs., 15 tabs., 4 annexes

  19. Study of alloy 600 (NC15Fe) stress corrosion cracking mechanisms in high temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rios, Richard

    1993-01-01

    In order to better understand the mechanisms involved in Alloy 600's stress corrosion cracking in PWR environment, laboratory tests were performed. The influence of parameters pertinent to the mechanisms was studies: hydrogen and oxygen overpressures, local chemical composition, microstructure. The results show that neither hydrogen nor dissolution/oxidation, despite their respective roles in the process, are sufficient to account for experimental facts. SEM observation of micro-cleavage facets on specimens' fracture surfaces leads to pay attention to a new mechanism of corrosion/plasticity interactions. (author) [fr

  20. Cluster analysis of stress corrosion mechanisms for steel wires used in bridge cables through acoustic emission particle swarm optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dongsheng; Yang, Wei; Zhang, Wenyao

    2017-05-01

    Stress corrosion is the major failure type of bridge cable damage. The acoustic emission (AE) technique was applied to monitor the stress corrosion process of steel wires used in bridge cable structures. The damage evolution of stress corrosion in bridge cables was obtained according to the AE characteristic parameter figure. A particle swarm optimization cluster method was developed to determine the relationship between the AE signal and stress corrosion mechanisms. Results indicate that the main AE sources of stress corrosion in bridge cables included four types: passive film breakdown and detachment of the corrosion product, crack initiation, crack extension, and cable fracture. By analyzing different types of clustering data, the mean value of each damage pattern's AE characteristic parameters was determined. Different corrosion damage source AE waveforms and the peak frequency were extracted. AE particle swarm optimization cluster analysis based on principal component analysis was also proposed. This method can completely distinguish the four types of damage sources and simplifies the determination of the evolution process of corrosion damage and broken wire signals. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Effects of Ultrasonic Nanocrystal Surface Modification on the Residual Stress, Microstructure, and Corrosion Resistance of 304 Stainless Steel Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Chang; Telang, Abhishek; Gill, Amrinder; Wen, Xingshuo; Mannava, Seetha R.; Qian, Dong; Vasudevan, Vijay K.

    2018-01-01

    In this study, ultrasonic nanocrystal surface modification (UNSM) of 304 stainless steel welds was carried out. UNSM effectively eliminates the tensile stress generated during welding and imparts beneficial compressive residual stresses. In addition, UNSM can effectively refine the grains and increase hardness in the near-surface region. Corrosion tests in boiling MgCl2 solution demonstrate that UNSM can significantly improve the corrosion resistance due to the compressive residual stresses and changes in the near-surface microstructure.

  2. Effects of Ultrasonic Nanocrystal Surface Modification on the Residual Stress, Microstructure, and Corrosion Resistance of 304 Stainless Steel Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Chang; Telang, Abhishek; Gill, Amrinder; Wen, Xingshuo; Mannava, Seetha R.; Qian, Dong; Vasudevan, Vijay K.

    2018-03-01

    In this study, ultrasonic nanocrystal surface modification (UNSM) of 304 stainless steel welds was carried out. UNSM effectively eliminates the tensile stress generated during welding and imparts beneficial compressive residual stresses. In addition, UNSM can effectively refine the grains and increase hardness in the near-surface region. Corrosion tests in boiling MgCl2 solution demonstrate that UNSM can significantly improve the corrosion resistance due to the compressive residual stresses and changes in the near-surface microstructure.

  3. Effect of applied stress on chloride induced external stress corrosion cracking of type 304 stainless steel in air atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashibara, Hitoshi; Mayuzumi, Masami; Mizutani, Yoshihiro; Tani, Jun-ichi

    2006-01-01

    Austenitic stainless steels (SS) are widely used in various components of chemical plants, nuclear power plants, etc, because of the superior mechanical property and general corrosion resistance. However, it is also well known that austenitic stainless steels are susceptible to localized corrosion in the environments containing chloride ions, and several equipment in the plants built in coastal area has been suffering from chloride induced external stress corrosion cracking (ESCC). Hence, for the establishment of the countermeasures it is very important to clarify the factors governing ESCC process from the view points of stress, material and environmental conditions. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of applied stress on ESCC of type 304 stainless steel. ESCC tests were conducted on type 304 SS specimens, which were fabricated from a cold rolled plate, by a uniaxial constant load method using springs. After loading, droplets of synthetic sea water were put on the gage section of specimen and dried, and then the specimens were placed in a chamber with a constant temperature of 353 K and a relative humidity of 35%. The test specimens after the test were observed by a scanning electron microscope to measure the crack length and depth. No clear difference was found in the maximum values of the average crack propagation rate (crack depth divided by test time) among the applied stress conditions. In addition, most of ESCC were initiated from the bottom or periphery of pits under the low applied stress condition (0.5σ 0.2 ). (author)

  4. Stress corrosion cracking of alloy 182 weld in a PWR water environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, Luciana Iglesias Lourenco; Schvartzman, Monica Maria de Abreu Mendonca; Quinan, Marco Antonio Dutra; Soares, Antonio Edicleto Gomes; Piva, Stephano P.T.

    2011-01-01

    The weld used to connect two different metals is known as dissimilar metal welds (DMW). In the nuclear power plant, this weld is used to join stainless steel nipples to low alloy carbon steel components on the nuclear pressurized water reactor (PWR). In most cases, nickel alloys are used to joint these materials. These alloys are known to accommodate the differences in composition and thermal expansion of the two materials. The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is a phenomenon that occurs in nuclear power plants metallic components where susceptibility materials are subjected to the simultaneously effect of mechanical stress and an aggressive media with different compositions. SCC is one of degradation process that gradually introduces damage of components, change their characteristics with the operation time. The nickel alloy 600, and their weld metals (nickel alloys 82 and 182), originally selected due to its high corrosion resistance, it exhibit after long operation period (20 years), susceptibility to the SCC. This study presents a comparative work between the SCC in the Alloy 182 filler metal weld in two different temperatures (303 deg C and 325 deg C) in primary water. The susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking was assessed using the slow strain rate tensile (SSRT) test. The results of the SSRT tests indicated that SCC is a thermally-activated mechanism and that brittle fracture caused by the corrosion process was observed at 325 deg C. (author)

  5. Stress-corrosion behavior of aluminum-lithium alloys in aqueous salt environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzo, P. P.; Galvin, R. P.; Nelson, H. G.

    1984-01-01

    The stress corrosion susceptibility of two powder metallurgy (P/M) alloys, Al-Li-Cu and Al-Li-Cu-Mg; two mechanically attrited (M/A) alloys, Al-Li-Cu and Al-Li-Mg; and two wrought, ingot alloys, X-2020 and AA7475, are compared. Time-dependent fracture in an aqueous sodium chloride environment under alternate immersion condition was found to vary significantly between alloys. The stress corrosion behavior of the two powder metallurgy processed alloys was studied in detail under conditions of crack initiation, static crack growth, and fatigue crack growth. A variety of stress corrosion tests were performed including smooth surface, time-to-failure tests; potentiostatic tests on smooth surfaces exposed to constant applied strain rates; and fracture mechanics-type tests under static and cyclic loads. Both alloys show surface pitting and subsequent intergranular corrosion. Pitting is more severe in the magnesium-bearing alloy and is associated with stringer particles strung along the extrusion direction as a result of P/M processing.

  6. Stress-corrosion behavior of aluminum-lithium alloys in aqueous environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzo, P. P.; Galvin, R. P.; Nelson, H. G.

    1983-01-01

    The stress corrosion susceptibility of two powder metallurgy (P/M) alloys, Al-Li-Cu and Al-Li-Cu-Mg two mechanically attrited (M/A) alloys, Al-Li-Cu and Al-Li-Mg; and two wrought, ingot alloys, X-2020 and AA7475, are compared. Time-dependent fracture in an aqueous sodium chloride environment under alternate immersion condition was found to vary significantly between alloys. The stress corrosion behavior of the two powder metallurgy processed alloys was studied in detail under conditions of crack initiation, static crack growth, and fatigue crack growth. A variety of stress corrosion tests were performed including smooth surface, time-to-failure tests; potentiostatic tests on smooth surfaces exposed to constant applied strain rates; and fracture mechanics-type tests under static and cyclic loads. Both alloys show surface pitting and subsequent intergranular corrosion. Pitting is more severe in the magnesium-bearing alloy and is associated with stringer particles strung along the extrusion direction as a result of P/M processing.

  7. Influence of Scandium Addition on Stress Corrosion Cracking Susceptibility of Al-Zn-Mg Alloy in Different Corrosive Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaoming Li

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Stress corrosion cracking (SCC susceptibilities of Al-Zn-Mg alloys without and with Scandium addition were evaluated in 3.5% NaCl solution at different pH and different strain rate, using slow strain rate test technique. The results indicate that Sc addition reduces grain size and width of precipitation free zones, and transforms grain boundary precipitates from continuous distribution into interrupted distribution by inhibiting recrystallization. In solution at pH 1, pH 3 and pH 7, Sc addition reduces the degree of localized corrosion of alloy surface and SCC susceptibility of Al-Zn-Mg alloy. However, in solution at pH 10 and pH 12, grain refinement significantly promotes the diffusion of hydrogen atoms into matrix, thus Sc addition increases SCC susceptibility of Al-Zn-Mg alloy. Under different strain rate conditions, Sc addition can all reduce SCC susceptibility of Al-Zn-Mg alloy in solution at pH 1, pH 3 and pH 7, and can all increase SCC susceptibility of Al-Zn-Mg alloy in solution at pH 10 and pH 12. As a result, Sc modified Al-Zn-Mg alloy in practical applications should be avoided in alkaline environments.

  8. Preliminary assessment of stress corrosion cracking of nickel based alloy 182 in nuclear reactor environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, Luciana Iglesias Lourenco; Bracarense, Alexandre Queiroz; Schvartzman, Monica Maria de Abreu Mendonca; Quinan, Marco Antonio Dutra

    2010-01-01

    Stress corrosion crack (SCC) in a primary circuit of a nuclear pressurized water reactor consists of a degradation process in which aggressive media, stress and material susceptibility are present. Over the last thirty years, SCC has been observed in dissimilar metal welds. This study presents a comparative work between the SCC in the alloy 182 filler metal weld in two different hydrogen concentrations (25 e 50 cm 3 H 2 /kg H 2 O) in primary water. The susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking was assessed using the slow strain rate tensile (SSRT) test. The results of the SSRT test indicated that the material is more susceptible to SCC at 25 cm 3 H 2 /kg H 2 O. (author)

  9. Standard practice for making and using precracked double beam stress corrosion specimens

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2000-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers procedures for fabricating, preparing, and using precracked double beam stress corrosion test specimens. This specimen configuration was formerly designated the double cantilever beam (DCB) specimen. Guidelines are given for methods of exposure and inspection. 1.2 The precracked double beam specimen, as described in this practice, is applicable for evaluation of a wide variety of metals exposed to corrosive environments. It is particularly suited to evaluation of products having a highly directional grain structure, such as rolled plate, forgings, and extrusions, when stressed in the short transverse direction. 1.3 The precracked double beam specimen may be stressed in constant displacement by bolt or wedge loading or in constant load by use of proof rings or dead weight loading. The precracked double beam specimen is amenable to exposure to aqueous or other liquid solutions by specimen immersion or by periodic dropwise addition of solution to the crack tip, or exposure to the atmos...

  10. Diffusion-coupled cohesive interface simulations of stress corrosion intergranular cracking in polycrystalline materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pu, Chao; Gao, Yanfei; Wang, Yanli; Sham, T. -L.

    2017-09-01

    To study the stress corrosion intergranular cracking mechanism, a diffusion-coupled cohesive zone model (CZM) is proposed for the simulation of the stress-assisted diffusional process along grain boundaries and the mechanical response of grain boundary sliding and separation. This simulation methodology considers the synergistic effects of impurity diffusion driven by pressure gradient and degradation of grain boundary strength by impurity concentration. The diffusion-coupled CZM is combined with crystal plasticity finite element model (CPFEM) to simulate intergranular fracture of polycrystalline material under corrosive environment. Significant heterogeneity of the stress field and extensive impurity accumulation is observed at grain boundaries and junction points. Deformation mechanism maps are constructed with respect to the grain boundary degradation factor and applied strain rate, which dictate the transition from internal to near-surface intergranular fracture modes under various strain amplitudes and grain sizes.

  11. Applied methods for mitigation of damage by stress corrosion in BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez C, R.; Diaz S, A.; Gachuz M, M.; Arganis J, C.

    1998-01-01

    The Boiling Water nuclear Reactors (BWR) have presented stress corrosion problems, mainly in components and pipes of the primary system, provoking negative impacts in the performance of energy generator plants, as well as the increasing in the radiation exposure to personnel involucred. This problem has caused development of research programs, which are guided to find solution alternatives for the phenomena control. Among results of greater relevance the control for the reactor water chemistry stands out particularly in the impurities concentration and oxidation of radiolysis products; as well as the supervision in the materials selection and the stresses levels reduction. The present work presents the methods which can be applied to diminish the problems of stress corrosion in BWR reactors. (Author)

  12. Evaluation of the stress corrosion cracking resistance of several high strength low alloy steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, T. S.; Nelson, E. E.

    1980-01-01

    The stress corrosion cracking resistance was studied for high strength alloy steels 4130, 4340, for H-11 at selected strength levels, and for D6AC and HY140 at a single strength. Round tensile and C-ring type specimens were stressed up to 100 percent of their yield strengths and exposed to alternate immersion in salt water, salt spray, the atmosphere at Marshall Space Flight Center, and the seacoast at Kennedy Space Center. Under the test conditions, 4130 and 4340 steels heat treated to a tensile strength of 1240 MPa (180 ksi), H-11 and D6AC heat treated to a tensile strength of 1450 MPa (210 ksi), and HY140 (1020 MPa, 148 ksi) are resistant to stress corrosion cracking because failures were not encountered at stress levels up to 75 percent of their yield strengths. A maximum exposure period of one month for alternate immersion in salt water or salt spray and three months for seacoast is indicated for alloy steel to avoid false indications of stress corrosion cracking because of failure resulting from severe pitting.

  13. Irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking of low carbon stainless steel in BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayuzumi, Masami

    2008-01-01

    Some examples and characteristics of old intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) and the improvement methods are described. Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of low carbon stainless steel in the core shroud and major piping of BWR has been reported since 1990. Most parts of them start at the transgranular stress corrosion cracking (TGSCC) and progress to IGSCC. The shape of crack is originated by the residual tensile stress that depends on welding and mechanical processing. The chromium-deficient layer was not observed. The crack progressed from the parent materials to the deposited metal with low content of ferrite. SCC crack growth rates of type SUS316 were 1/10 of type SUS304 stainless steel. The countermeasures of SCC of low carbon stainless steel to control its generation and progressing are stated. Method for SCC of major piping can include the introduction heating stress improvement (IHSI) and narrow gap edge welding. Methods for SCC of shroud include the laser peening, water jet peening, and polish processing. (S.Y.)

  14. Effect of Stress on Corrosion at Crack Tip on Pipeline Steel in a Near-Neutral pH Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yao; Cheng, Y. Frank

    2016-11-01

    In this work, the local corrosion at crack tip on an API 5L X46 pipeline steel specimens was investigated under various applied loads in a near-neutral pH solution. Electrochemical measurements, including potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, combined with micro-electrochemical technique and surface characterization, were conducted to investigate the effect of stress on local anodic solution of the steel at the crack tip. The stress corrosion cracking of the steel was dominated by an anodic dissolution mechanism, while the effect of hydrogen was negligible. The applied load (stress) increased the corrosion rate at the crack tip, contributing to crack propagation. The deposit of corrosion products at the crack tip could protect somewhat from further corrosion. At sufficiently large applied loads such as 740 N in the work, it was possible to generate separated cathode and anode, further accelerating the crack growth.

  15. Stress Corrosion Cracking of ZEK100 Magnesium Alloy for Automotive Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Xin; Shi, Chao; Zavadil, Renata

    ZEK100 magnesium alloy has attracted considerable interest for automotive body structure applications in light-weight vehicles due to its excellent formability at room temperature. However, the intrinsic tendency of magnesium alloys to corrode under wet conditions has been a concern. Reports on the corrosion resistance and, in particular, the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) susceptibility of ZEK100 under automotive service conditions have been scarce. In this work, the SCC of ZEK100 magnesium alloy was characterized by slow strain rate testing method. The effects of microstructure and corrosion environment on the SCC resistance of the alloy have been investigated. The results represent outcomes from a US-Canada-China collaborative research and development project — Magnesium Front End Research and Development (MFERD) currently underway.

  16. Role of pH on the stress corrosion cracking of titanium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khokhar, M. I.; Beck, F. H.; Fontana, M. G.

    1973-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) experiments were conducted on Ti-8-1-1 wire specimens in hydrochloric and sulfuric acids of variable pH in order to determine the effect of pH on the susceptibility to cracking. The alloy exhibited increasing susceptibility with decreasing pH. By varying the applied potential, it was observed that susceptibility zones exist both in the cathodic and the anodic ranges. In the cathodic range, susceptibility also increased with decreasing applied potential. Corrosion potential-time data in hydrochloric acid (pH 1.7) and sulfuric acid (pH 1.7) indicate that chloride ions lower the corrosion potential of the specimen which, in turn, increases the susceptibility.

  17. Evaluation of design parameters of dental implant shape, diameter and length on stress distribution: a finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed Ibrahim, M; Thulasingam, C; Nasser, K S G A; Balaji, V; Rajakumar, M; Rupkumar, P

    2011-09-01

    The aim was to evaluate the design parameters of dental implants shape, diameter and length on stress distribution by finite element analysis (FEA).The objectives of the study was to compare the influence of stress distribution in the implants of screw-vent tapered and parallel design by varying the implant diameter with a standard implant length. Six dental implant models have been simulated three-dimensionally. The influence of diameter and length on stress distribution was evaluated by Group I: for screw-vent tapered design (Zimmer Dental Implant Carlsbad, CA, USA) (1) Dental implant model with diameter 3.7 mm and length 13 mm. (2) Dental implant model with diameter 4.1 mm and length 13 mm. (3) Dental implant model with diameter 4.7 mm and length 13 mm. Group II: for parallel design (Zimmer Dental Implant Carlsbad, CA, USA) (4) Dental implant model with diameter 3.7 mm and length 13 mm. (5) Dental implant model with diameter 4.1 mm and length 13 mm. (6) Dental implant model with diameter 4.7 mm and length 13 mm. The 3-D model of the implant was created in the pro-e wildfire 4.0 software by giving various commands. This model was imported to the ANSYS software through IGES (initial graphic exchange specification) file for further analysis. All six models were loaded with a force of 17.1, 114.6 and 23.4 N in a lingual, an axial and disto-mesial direction respectively, simulating average masticatory force in a natural oblique direction, to analyze the stress distribution on these implants. The increase in implant diameter in Group I and Group II from 3.7 to 4.1 mm and from 4.1 to 4.7 mm with constant 13 mm length for screw-vent tapered and parallel design implant resulted in a reduction in maximum value of Von Mises stress in the bone surrounding the implant was statistically significant at 5% level done by student "t" test. The overall maximum value of Von Mises stress was decreased in parallel design implant diameter of 4.7 mm with constant

  18. Localized corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of candidate materials for high-level radioactive waste disposal containers in the US: A literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farmer, J.C.; McCright, R.D.

    1988-01-01

    Container materials may undergo any of several modes of degradation in this environment, including: undesirable phase transformations due to lack of phase stability; atmospheric oxidation; general aqueous corrosion; pitting; crevice corrosion; intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC); and transgranular stress corrosion cracking (TGSCC). This paper is an analysis of data from the literature relevant to the pitting, crevice corrosion, and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of these alloys. Though all three austenitic candidates have demonstrated pitting and crevice corrosion in chloride-containing environments, Alloy 825 has the greatest resistance to these forms of localized attack. Both types 304L and 316L stainless steels are susceptible to SCC in acidic chloride media. In contrast, SCC has not been documented for Alloy 825 under comparable conditions. Gamma irradiation has been found to enhance SCC of Types 304 and 304L stainless steels, but it has no detectable effect on the resistance of Alloy 825 to SCC. Furthermore, while microbiologically induced corrosion effects have been observed for 300-series stainless steels, nickel-based alloys such as Alloy 825 seem to be immune to such problems. Of the copper-based alloys, CDA 715 has the best overall resistance to localized attack. Its resistance to pitting is comparable to that of CDA 613 and superior to that of CDA 102. Observed rates of dealloying in CDA 715 are less than those observed in CDA 613 by orders of magnitude. The resistance of CDA 715 to SCC in tarnishing ammonical environments is comparable to that of CDA 102 and superior to that of CDA 613. Its resistance to SCC in nontarnishing ammonical environments is comparable to that of CDA 613 and superior to that of CDA 102. 22 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs

  19. Stress Corrosion Behavior of Low-temperature Liquid-Nitrided 316 Austenitic Stainless Steel in a Sour Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiangfeng; Wang, Jun; Fan, Hongyuan; Yan, Jing; Duan, Lian; Gu, Tan; Xian, Guang; Sun, Lan; Wang, Danqi

    2018-01-01

    Low-temperature nitridation is a widely used surface heat treatment. Low-temperature liquid nitridation was applied to 316 austenitic stainless steel and an S-phase (expanded austenite) layer was achieved on the alloy surface. The effect of the S-phase layer on corrosion resistance and stress corrosion cracking was investigated in a sour environment. When a bending stress of 164 MPa (80 pct yield stress, YS) was applied, no macroscopic corrosion cracking and pits were observed on the nitrided samples and the S-phase layer stayed intact. Although no macroscopic corrosion cracking was observed on the non-nitrided samples under 205 MPa (100 pct YS), some pits were formed on the alloy surface. This could be attributed to the high stresses and hardness, and the excellent corrosion resistance of the S-phase layer introduced by low-temperature nitridation. Supersaturated nitrogen atoms in the S-phase layer can effectively prevent the decrease in pH of the corrosive medium and accelerate the alloy repassivation kinetics. However, when the bending stress was increased to 205 and 246 MPa (100 pct YS, 120 pct YS), macroscopic cracks were observed in the presence of both tensile stress and a corrosive medium.

  20. A Parameter Sensitivity Analysis of the Effect of Rebar Corrosion on the Stress Field in the Surrounding Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangyuan Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Rebar corrosion results in a change in the stress field in the surrounding concrete, which in turn accelerates the deterioration of the concrete structure. In addition to the protective layer, the compressive stress under which concrete is prestressed also affects the effect of corrosion-induced rebar expansion on the stress field in the concrete. The present study simulates the effect of corrosion-induced rebar expansion on the stress field in the concrete using the finite element method (FEM by applying a virtual radial displacement to the product of corrosion-induced rebar expansion. Based on an analysis of the effect of multiple rebars on the stress field in ordinary concrete, stress distribution in the protective layer of the concrete is determined. Afterward, the locations where there is damage to the surface concrete caused by rebar corrosion are determined. After verifying the feasibility of the FEM analysis, the effect of corrosion-induced ordinary rebar expansion in a typical prestressed concrete segment is determined by analyzing the characteristics of corrosion-induced rebar expansion occurring in various prestressed concrete specimens.

  1. Cooperative tests on crack initiation and crack propagation in stress corrosion environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Takao; Iwadate, Tadao; Ebara, Ryuichiro; Umeyama, Yoshio; Yokobori, Takeo.

    1992-01-01

    In order to ensure the safety of machinery and structures in corrosive environment, the development of corrosion resistant materials and the research on the techniques of evaluating materials in corrosive environment have been carried out. At present, the life due to crack development is discussed by fracture mechanics, and the evaluation of life in corrosive environment can be done with a certain degree of accuracy. In order to collect the unified data which become the base of life evaluation, the standardization of the testing method is desirable. This cooperative tests were carried out for the purpose of collecting the information on the life evaluation techniques in stress corrosion environment. As the object, the large LP turbine rotors for nuclear power generation were taken up, and the tests on the crack initiation and crack propagation were carried out. As the test environment, the accelerated test in 38% NaOH + 0.01% CuO aqueous solution on ASTM A470 3% Ni-Cr-Mo-V steel was carried out. The results are reported. (K.I.)

  2. Kinetics of the intergranular stress corrosion of AlCu alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rota, A.; Boehni, H.

    1989-01-01

    A new experimental method for the investigation of stress corrosion cracking mechanisms in thin sheets is presented: Using the foil penetration technique, the growth kinetics of the intergranular corrosion of age-hardened Al-Cu alloys have been measured in the unstressed condition and under various constant uniaxial tensile stresses. A pure binary Al-4wt%Cu alloy and a commercial AA 2024 alloy, both tempered to maximum susceptibility to intergranular corrosion, have been tested in aqueous chloride solutions under potentiostatic control. All measurements have been carried out on various sheet thicknesses between 0.2 and 1.0 mm under tensile stresses ranging from 0 to 88% of the 0.2% proof stress. A significant reduction of the penetration times by factors between 2 and 10, compared to the results for unstressed specimens, has been observed for all applied stress levels in systems where only small numbers of cracks are growing simultaneously. In systems with large numbers of cracks or complete crack networks, no influence of stress on the crack growth kinetics was found. The discussion of these results shows that all, even the highest observed mean crack growth rates can be explained by pure anodic dissolution of the grain boundary regions at the crack tips. The increase of the dissolution current density at the crack tips by tensile stresses is due to the widening of the crack, which reduces the integral ohmic resistance of the system and improves the mass transport conditions between the crack and the bulk electrolyte. The widening of the cracks depends on the stress distribution in the whole specimen cross section and not on the stress intensity at the crack tips. 23 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab

  3. Mitigating the Risk of Stress Corrosion of Austenitic Stainless Steels in Advanced Gas Cooled Reactor Boilers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bull, A.; Owen, J.; Quirk, G.; G, Lewis; Rudge, A.; Woolsey, I.S.

    2012-09-01

    Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactors (AGRs) operated in the UK by EDF Energy have once-through boilers, which deliver superheated steam at high temperature (∼500 deg. C) and pressure (∼150 bar) to the HP turbine. The boilers have either a serpentine or helical geometry for the tubing of the main heat transfer sections of the boiler and each individual tube is fabricated from mild steel, 9%Cr1%Mo and Type 316 austenitic stainless steel tubing. Type 316 austenitic stainless steel is used for the secondary (final) superheater and steam tailpipe sections of the boiler, which, during normal operation, should operate under dry, superheated steam conditions. This is achieved by maintaining a specified margin of superheat at the upper transition joint (UTJ) between the 9%Cr1%Mo primary superheater and the Type 316 secondary superheater sections of the boiler. Operating in this mode should eliminate the possibility of stress corrosion cracking of the Type 316 tube material on-load. In recent years, however, AGRs have suffered a variety of operational problems with their boilers that have made it difficult to maintain the specified superheat margin at the UTJ. In the case of helical boilers, the combined effects of carbon deposition on the gas side and oxide deposition on the waterside of the tubing have resulted in an increasing number of austenitic tubes operating with less than the specified superheat margin at the UTJ and hence the possibility of wetting the austenitic section of the boiler. Some units with serpentine boilers have suffered creep-fatigue damage of the high temperature sections of the boiler, which currently necessitates capping the steam outlet temperature to prevent further damage. The reduction in steam outlet temperature has meant that there is an increased risk of operation with less than the specified superheat margin at the UTJ and hence stress corrosion cracking of the austenitic sections of the boiler. In order to establish the risk of stress

  4. Aqueous stress-corrosion cracking of high-toughness D6AC steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbreath, W. P.; Adamson, M. J.

    1976-01-01

    The crack growth behavior of D6AC steel as a function of stress intensity, stress and corrosion history, and test technique, under sustained load in filtered natural seawater, 3.3 per cent sodium chloride solution, and distilled water, was investigated. Reported investigations of D6AC were considered in terms of the present study with emphasis on thermal treatment, specimen configuration, fracture toughness, crack-growth rates, initiation period, and threshold. Both threshold and growth kinetics were found to be relatively insensitive to these test parameters. The apparent incubation period was dependent on technique, both detection sensitivity and precracking stress intensity level.

  5. Analysis of the distribution of stress and deformation in single implant-supported prosthetic units in implants of different diameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Salvatore MANNARINO

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction When stress and strain levels in the bone-implant system exceed It's capacity, a mechanical fatigue occurs, resulting in collapse and loss of osseointegration. Objective Analyze biomechanical behavior in single implant-supported prosthesis with implants of different diameters in the posterior mandible. Material and method Three different finite element models of Cone-Morse implants with the same height were created, varying the diameter (3.3 mm, 4.1 mm and 4.8 mm. The mandibular first molar area was the location of the implant, with It´s component and overlying prosthetic crown. The jawbone was composed of cortical and cancellous bone. Refined mesh of 0.5 mm was created in the critical interfaces to be analyzed. The loading of the models was performed at the point of occlusal contact with an occlusal load of 400 N. Result Maximum stress and strain occurred in the cervical regions of the implants in all groups, either in the implants or in components as well as in the analysis of cortical bone. The greater the diameter, the lower the stress and strain found in the implant. The 3.3 mm group had the highest strain in peri-implant cortical bone, and the 4.1 mm group had the smallest deformation, significantly lower than in the 4.8 mm group. Conclusion Although the biggest implant diameter (4.8 mm appears to have lower values of stress and strain, the group of intermediate implant diameter (4.1 mm showed less deformation rate in the cortical peri-implant bone. Therefore it is concluded that the 4.1 mm implant platform presented a more biomechanically effective peri-implant bone maintenance.

  6. Evaluation of the cracking by stress corrosion in nuclear reactor environments type BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arganis J, C. R.

    2010-01-01

    The stress corrosion cracking susceptibility was studied in sensitized, solution annealed 304 steel, and in 304-L welded with a heat treatment that simulated the radiation induced segregation, by the slow strain rate test technique, in a similar environment of a boiling water reactor (BWR), 288 C, 8 MPa, low conductivity and a electrochemical corrosion potential near 200 mV. vs. standard hydrogen electrode (She). The electrochemical noise technique was used for the detection of the initiation and propagation of the cracking. The steels were characterized by metallographic studies with optical and scanning electronic microscopy and by the electrochemical potentiodynamic reactivation of single loop and double loop. In all the cases, the steels present delta ferrite. The slow strain rate tests showed that the 304 steel in the solution annealed condition is susceptible to transgranular stress corrosion cracking (TGSCC), such as in a normalized condition showed granulated. In the sensitized condition the steel showed intergranular stress corrosion cracking, followed by a transition to TGSCC. The electrochemical noise time series showed that is possible associated different time sequences to different modes of cracking and that is possible detect sequentially cracking events, it is means, one after other, supported by the fractographic studies by scanning electron microscopy. The parameter that can distinguish between the different modes of cracking is the re passivation rate, obtained by the current decay rate -n- in the current transients. This is due that the re passivation rate is a function of the microstructure and the sensitization. Other statistic parameters like the localized index, Kurtosis, Skew, produce results that are related with mixed corrosion. (Author)

  7. Laboratory results of stress corrosion cracking of steam generator tubes in a complex environment - An update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horner, Olivier; Pavageau, Ellen-Mary; Vaillant, Francois; Bouvier, Odile de

    2004-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking occurs in the flow-restricted areas on the secondary side of steam generator tubes of Pressured Water Reactors (PWR), where water pollutants are likely to concentrate. Chemical analyses carried out during the shutdowns gave some insight into the chemical composition of these areas, which has evolved during these last years (i.e. less sodium as pollutants). It has been modeled in laboratory by tests in two different typical environments: the sodium hydroxide and the sulfate environments. These models satisfactorily describe the secondary side corrosion of steam generator tubes for old plant units. Furthermore, a third typical environment - the complex environment - which corresponds to an All Volatile Treatment (AVT) environment containing alumina, silica, phosphate and acetic acid has been recently studied. This particular environment satisfactorily reproduces the composition of the deposits observed on the surface of the steam generator tubes as well as the degradation of the tubes. A review of the recent laboratory results obtained by considering the complex environment are presented here. Several tests have been carried out in order to study initiation and propagation of secondary side corrosion cracking for some selected materials in such an environment. 600 Thermally Treated (TT) alloy reveals to be less sensitive to secondary side corrosion cracking than 600 Mill Annealed (MA) alloy. Finally, the influence of some related factors like stress, temperature and environmental factors are discussed. (authors)

  8. Phenomena of the ionic transport in the stress corrosion of metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gravano, S.M.

    1986-07-01

    For the study of electrochemical conditions of propagation, a model which calculates the concentrations and potential profiles inside cracks or localized corrosion cavities, was developed. Considering transport by difussion and migration it was applied to pure metals (Zn, Fe) in solutions where pitting occurs (NaCl or Na2SO4, with borate buffer), and also extended to systems where stress corrosion cracking is present, such as Cu and yellow brass in NaNO2. Physical bases of the 'constant intermediate elongation rate technique' to predict stress corrosion cracking susceptibility was analized, studying by mathematical models: 1) dissolution current, that should be the result of superposition of repassivation transients on the fresh metal, exposed to corrosive medium by strain, with the same rate of that of a static specimen; 2) ohmic drop, that in some systems could be quite important and it must be considered in the overpotential evaluation; and 3) metallic ion concentration that, instead of what happens in a crack, never attains saturation in the analized cases. For repassivation transient according to the crak propagation models proposed by Scully and Ford it was found that, at the tip of the crack, it is unlikely that the same repassivation transients occur as in the constant intermediate elongation rate experiments. (M.E.L.)

  9. Manufacturing method for intragranular stress corrosion cracking-induced test specimen for stainless steel pipeline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Futagawa, Kiyoshi.

    1994-01-01

    In a manufacturing step for intragranular stress corrosion cracking-induced for stainless steel pipelines, pipe are abutted against with each other and welded, and a heat affected portion is applied with a sensitizing heat treatment. Further, a crevice jig is attached near the heat affected portion at the inner surface of the pipe and kept in a chlorine ion added water under high temperature and high pressure at a predetermined period of time. If tap water is used instead of purified water for C.P.T. test in a step of forming sample of IGSCC (intergranular stress corrosion cracking), since the chlorine ion concentration in the tap water is relatively high, TGSCC (intragranular stress corrosion crackings caused in all of the samples. A heat input and an interlayer temperature are determined for the material of stainless pipe having a carbon content of more than 0.05% so that the welding residual stress on the inner surface is applied as tension. The condition for the heat treatment is determined as, for example, 500degC x 24hr, and the samples are kept under water at high temperature and high pressure applied with chlorine ions for 500 to 200hours. As a result, since samples of TGSCC can be formed by utilizing the manufacturing step for IGSCC, there is no requirement for providing devices for applying environmental factors separately. (N.H.)

  10. Simulated Service and Stress Corrosion Cracking Testing for Friction Stir Welded Spun Formed Domes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Thomas J.; Torres, Pablo D.; Caratus, Andrei A.; Curreri, Peter A.

    2010-01-01

    Simulated service testing (SST) development was required to help qualify a new 2195 aluminum lithium (Al-Li) alloy spin forming dome fabrication process for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Exploration Development Technology Program. The application for the technology is to produce high strength low weight tank components for NASA s next generation launch vehicles. Since plate material is not currently manufactured large enough to fabricate these domes, two plates are joined by means of friction stir welding. The plates are then pre-contour machined to near final thicknesses allowing for a thicker weld land and anticipating the level of stretch induced by the spin forming process. The welded plates are then placed in a spin forming tool and hot stretched using a trace method producing incremental contours. Finally the dome receives a room temperature contour stretch to final dimensions, heat treatment, quenching, and artificial aging to emulate a T-8 condition of temper. Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) tests were also performed by alternate immersion in a sodium chloride (NaCl) solution using the typical double beam assembly and with 4-point loaded specimens and use of bent-beam stress-corrosion test specimens under alternate immersion conditions. In addition, experiments were conducted to determine the threshold stress intensity factor for SCC (K(sub ISCC)) which to our knowledge has not been determined previously for Al-Li 2195 alloy. The successful simulated service and stress corrosion testing helped to provide confidence to continue to Ares 1 scale dome fabrication

  11. RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN DEFORMATIONS AND STRESSES AT CONTACT ZONE OF FLAT-STRESSED COMPOSITE ELEMENT, WHICH WAS SUBJECTED CORROSION DAMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitaly I. Kolchunov

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available  A computational model of deformation of a flat-stressed reinforced-concrete composite element in the contact zone is proposed. Deformation equations takes the form of the relationships between the final increments  of stresses and deformations for a corrosion-damaged reinforced concrete element with intersecting cracks. Coefficients of flexibility matrix of the element are obtained. These coefficients take into account the long-term deformation,  corrosion damages and concentrated shear, when intersecting cracks appear in the contact zone of the composite element. The solution to reinforced-concrete beam of composite section is given. The computational results are compared with the experimental data for such structures.

  12. Three-dimensional finite element analysis of stress distribution in composite resin cores with fiber posts of varying diameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Kazuhiko; Ino, Teruno; Iwase, Naoki; Shimizu, Eitaroh; Suzuki, Megumi; Satoh, Goh; Ohkawa, Shuji; Fujisawa, Masanori

    2008-01-01

    Using three-dimensional finite element analysis (3D-FEA), stress distributions in the remaining radicular tooth structure were investigated under the condition of varying diameters of fiber post for fiber post-reinforced composite resin cores (fiber post and core) in maxillary central incisors. Four 3D-FEA models were constructed: (1) fiber post (ø1.2, ø1.4, and ø1.6 mm) and composite resin core; and (2) gold-cast post and core. Maximum stresses in the tooth structure for fiber post and core were higher than that for gold-cast post and core. In the former models, stresses in the tooth structure as well as in the composite resin were slightly reduced with increase in fiber post diameter. These results thus suggested that to reduce stress in the remaining radicular tooth with a large coronal defect, it is recommended to accompany a composite resin core with a fiber post of a large diameter.

  13. Mitigation of stress corrosion cracking in pressurized water reactor (PWR) piping systems using the mechanical stress improvement process (MSIPR) or underwater laser beam welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rick, Grendys; Marc, Piccolino; Cunthia, Pezze; Badlani, Manu

    2009-01-01

    A current issue facing pressurized water reactors (PWRs) is primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) of bi metallic welds. PWSCC in a PWR requires the presence of a susceptible material, an aggressive environment and a tensile stress of significant magnitude. Reducing the potential for SCC can be accomplished by eliminating any of these three elements. In the U.S., mitigation of susceptible material in the pressurizer nozzle locations has largely been completed via the structural weld overlay (SWOL) process or NuVision Engineering's Mechanical Stress Improvement Process (MSIP R) , depending on inspectability. The next most susceptible locations in Westinghouse designed power plants are the Reactor Vessel (RV) hot leg nozzle welds. However, a full SWOL Process for RV nozzles is time consuming and has a high likelihood of in process weld repairs. Therefore, Westinghouse provides two distinctive methods to mitigate susceptible material for the RV nozzle locations depending on nozzle access and utility preference. These methods are the MSIP and the Underwater Laser Beam Welding (ULBW) process. MSIP applies a load to the outside diameter of the pipe adjacent to the weld, imposing plastic strains during compression that are not reversed after unloading, thus eliminating the tensile stress component of SCC. Recently, Westinghouse and NuVision successfully applied MSIP on all eight RV nozzles at the Salem Unit 1 power plant. Another option to mitigate SCC in RV nozzles is to place a barrier between the susceptible material and the aggressive environment. The ULBW process applies a weld inlay onto the inside pipe diameter. The deposited weld metal (Alloy 52M) is resistant to PWSCC and acts as a barrier to prevent primary water from contacting the susceptible material. This paper provides information on the approval and acceptance bases for MSIP, its recent application on RV nozzles and an update on ULBW development

  14. Analytical assessment for stress corrosion fatigue of CANDU fuel elements under load following conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horhoianu, Grigore; Ionescu, Drags; Pauna, Eduard

    2012-01-01

    When nuclear power reactors are operated in a load following (LF) mode, the nuclear fuel may be subjected to step changes in power on weekly, daily, or even hourly basis, depending on the grid's needs. Two load following tests performed in TRIGA Research Reactor of Institute for Nuclear Research (INR) Pitesti were simulated with finite elements computer codes in order to evaluate Stress Corrosion Fatigue (SCF) of the sheath arising from expansion and contraction of the pellets in the corrosive environment. The 3D finite element analyses show that the cyclic strains give highly multiaxial stresses in the sheath at ridge region. This paper summarizes the results of the analytical assessment for SCF and their relation to CANDU fuel performance in LF tests conditions. (orig.)

  15. Stress Corrosion Crack Growth of Alloy 52M in Simulated PWR Primary Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toloczko, M. B.; Olszta, M. J.; Bruemmer, S. M.

    Crack-growth experiments have been performed on five different alloy 52M welds in simulated PWR primary water at 350°C or 360°C. The alloy 52M test matrix included V-groove and narrow-gap welds, an overlay on alloy 182, and an inlay on alloy 82. For the overlay and inlay materials, crack growth rates are reported only on the alloy 52M weld well beyond the dilution zone. In one of the narrow gap welds, the crack path was oriented to pass through a distribution of pre-existing weld cracks and their influence on stress-corrosion behavior is evaluated. Intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) is observed in several alloy 52M welds, however propagation rates remain below 5x10-9 mm/s in all cases. Comparisons will be made to our previous SCC measurements on alloy 152 and 52 welds.

  16. Embrittlement and anodic process in stress corrosion cracking: study of the influent micro-mechanical parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tinnes, J.Ph.

    2006-11-01

    We study the influence of local mechanical parameters on crack propagation in Stress Corrosion Cracking, at the scale of the microstructure. Two systems are compared: the CuAl 9 Ni 3 Fe 2 copper-aluminium alloy in synthetic sea water under cathodic polarization, where the crack propagation mechanism is related to strain-assisted anodic dissolution, and the 316L austenitic stainless steel in MgCl 2 solution, where embrittlement mechanisms related to hydrogen effects prevail. We use micro-notched tensile specimen that allow to study isolated short cracks. These experiments are modelled by means of finite elements calculations, and further characterized by Electron Back scattered Diffraction (EBSD) in the case of the 316L alloy. In terms of the local mechanical parameters that control propagation, fundamental differences are outlined between the two systems. They are discussed from the viewpoint of the available models of Stress Corrosion Cracking. (author)

  17. Service experience and stress corrosion of Inconel 600 bellows expansion joints in turbine steam environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, L.D.; Michael, S.T.; Pement, F.W.

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss the service history of Inconel 600 expansion bellows, to illustrate a typical case of failure, propose S.C.C. mechanisms, and to rationalize the most probable mechanism. Inconel 600 is fully resistant to high-purity power plant steam (720 deg F maximum) for on-going service lifetimes which greatly exceed the incubation periods which are reported or postulated in the literature for delayed stress corrosion cracking in high-purity water tests (630-660 deg F). The only observed stress corrosion environments which are sufficiently rapidly deleterious to be consistent with failure lifetimes are molten NaOH in superheated steam or a very concentrated aqueous caustic solution containing silica contamination. (author)

  18. A study of iodine induced stress corrosion cracking of zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Qian; Ti Zhongxin; Pan Ying; Li Cong; Peng; Xiaoming

    2003-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of the various zirconium alloys was studied by axial tensile testing in an inert (argon) environment with different iodine concentration at 300 degree C, 350 degree C and 400 degree C. Creep tests of the samples of different orientations (L-T, T-L) were performed at 350 degree C. The testing loads were selected as those typically used in SCC tests in a series of steps. The characterizations of the SCC fractures have been observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The microstructures of the material have been examined by transmission electron microscope (TEM) and optical microscope. The textures of zirconium alloys have been determined by X-ray diffractometer. The influences of the material state, test temperature, iodine concentration and creep on iodine-induced stress corrosion cracking behavior have been discussed. (authors)

  19. Effects of Grain Boundary Morphologies on Stress Corrosion Cracking of Alloy 600

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim H.P.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Effects of grain boundary morphologies on stress corrosion cracking (SCC of Alloy 600 have been studied in 40% NaOH at 315°C using C-ring specimens. The configuration of the grain boundary and the intergranular carbide density were controlled by heat treatment. SCC tests were performed at +150 mV above the corrosion potential. The specimen with a serrated grain boundary showed higher SCC resistance than that with a straight grain boundary. This appears to be caused by the fact that the specimen with the serrated grain boundary has longer SCC path. SCC resistance also increased with intergranular carbide density probably due to enhanced relaxation of stress at intergranular carbide.

  20. Standard practice for preparation and use of direct tension stress-corrosion test specimens

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1985-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers procedures for designing, preparing, and using ASTM standard tension test specimens for investigating susceptibility to stress-corrosion cracking. Axially loaded specimens may be stressed quantitatively with equipment for application of either a constant load, constant strain, or with a continuously increasing strain. 1.2 Tension test specimens are adaptable for testing a wide variety of product forms as well as parts joined by welding, riveting, or various other methods. 1.3 The exposure of specimens in a corrosive environment is treated only briefly because other standards are being prepared to deal with this aspect. Meanwhile, the investigator is referred to Practices G35, G36, G37, and G44, and to ASTM Special Technical Publication 425 (1).

  1. Aqueous chloride stress corrosion cracking of titanium - A comparison with environmental hydrogen embrittlement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, H. G.

    1974-01-01

    The physical characteristics of stress corrosion cracking of titanium in an aqueous chloride environment are compared with those of embrittlement of titanium by a gaseous hydrogen environment in an effort to help contribute to the understanding of the possible role of hydrogen in the complex stress corrosion cracking process. Based on previous studies, the two forms of embrittlement are shown to be similar at low hydrogen pressures (100 N/sq m) but dissimilar at higher hydrogen pressures. In an effort to quantify this comparison, tests were conducted in an aqueous chloride solution using the same material and test techniques as had previously been employed in a gaseous hydrogen environment. The results of these tests strongly support models based on hydrogen as the embrittling species in an aqueous chloride environment.

  2. Detection of stress corrosion cracking on the surface of stainless steel plate by DC-PDM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Hiroki; Tada, Naoya; Uchida, Makoto

    2010-01-01

    In order to examine the applicability of the direct-current potential difference method to detection of stress corrosion cracking, the potential difference was measured on the surface of stainless steel plates with simulated cracking. Potential difference was measured near the cracking and at the points distant from the crack to evaluate the degree of increase in the potential difference by the crack. The potential difference near the cracking area was higher than that in the other area. The normalized potential difference, which is the ratio of potential difference near the cracking to that far from the area, was 1.03 to 1.50. The result suggests that stress corrosion cracking was able to be detected by direct-current potential difference method. (author)

  3. Stress corrosion cracking resistance of aluminum alloy 7000 series after two-step aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jegdić Bore V.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of one step-and a new (short two-step aging on the resistance to stress corrosion cracking of an aluminum alloy 7000 series was investigated, using slow strain rate test and fracture mechanics method. Aging level in the tested alloy was evaluated by means of scanning electron microscopy and measurements of electrical resistivity. It was shown that the alloy after the new two-step aging is significantly more resistant to stress corrosion cracking. Values of tensile properties and fracture toughness are similar for both thermal states. Processes that take place at the crack tip have been considered. The effect of the testing solution temperature on the crack growth rate on the plateau was determined. Two values of the apparent activation energy were obtained. These values correspond to different processes that control crack growth rate on the plateau at higher and lower temperatures. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR 34028 i br. TR 34016

  4. Stress Corrosion Evaluation of Nitinol 60 for the International Space Station Water Recycling System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, P. D.

    2016-01-01

    A stress corrosion cracking (SCC) evaluation of Nitinol 60 was performed because this alloy is considered a candidate bearing material for the Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS), specifically in the Urine Processing Assembly of the International Space Station. An SCC evaluation that preceded this one during the 2013-2014 timeframe included various alloys: Inconel 625, Hastelloy C-276, titanium (Ti) commercially pure (CP), Ti 6Al-4V, extra-low interstitial (ELI) Ti 6Al-4V, and Cronidur 30. In that evaluation, most specimens were exposed for a year. The results of that evaluation were published in NASA/TM-2015-218206, entitled "Stress Corrosion Evaluation of Various Metallic Materials for the International Space Station Water Recycling System,"1 available at the NASA Scientific and Technical Information program web page: http://www.sti.nasa.gov. Nitinol 60 was added to the test program in 2014.

  5. A countermeasure for external stress corrosion cracking in piping components by means of residual stress improvement on the outer surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Yasuhiro; Umemoto, Tadahiro

    1988-01-01

    Many techniques have been proposed as countermeasures for the External Stress Corrosion Cracking (ESCC) on austenitic stainless steel piping caused by sea salt particles. However, not one seems perfect. The method proposed here is an expansion of IHSI (Induction Heating Stress Improvement) which has been successfully implemented in many nuclear power plants as a remedy for Intergranular Stress Corrossion Cracking. The proposed method named EIHSI (External IHSI) can make the residual stress compressive on the outer surface of the piping components. In order to confirm the effectiveness of EIHSI, one series of tests were conducted on a weld joint between the pipe flange and the straight pipe. The measured residual stresses and also the results of the cracking test revealed that EIHSI is a superior method to suppress the ESCC. The outline of EIHSI and the verification tests are presented in this paper. (author)

  6. Intergranular stress corrosion in soldered joints of stainless steel 304

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamora R, L.

    1994-01-01

    The intergranular stress cracking of welded joints of austenitic stainless steel, AISI 304, is a serious problem in BWR type reactors. It is associated with the simultaneous presence of three factors; stress, a critical media and sensibilization (DOS). EPR technique was used in order to verify the sensibilization degree in the base metal, and the zone affected by heat and welding material. The characterization of material was done. The objective of this work is the study of microstructure and the evaluation of EPR technique used for the determination of DOS in a welded plate of austenitic stainless steel AISI 304. (Author)

  7. Corrosion Fatigue Crack Growth Behavior at Notched Hole in 7075 T6 Under Different Biaxial Stress Ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-18

    types such as torsion , bending , and rotation [34]. Fatigue in metals begins at surface locations with concentrated stress. It first begins with...31]. When these different factors failure modes are combined , the failure occurs sooner. Corrosion fatigue (CF) occurs when the crack generated by...corrosive environment [20, 22]. In other words, the metals used to construct aircraft undergo harsh combinations of stress in the form of loadings and are

  8. Fundamental aspects of stress corrosion cracking of copper relevant to the Swedish deep geologic repository concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhaskaran, Ganesh; Carcea, Anatolie; Ulaganathan, Jagan; Wang, Shengchun; Huang, Yin; Newman, Roger C. [Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry, Univ. of Toronto, Toronto (Canada)

    2013-03-15

    Phosphorus-doped oxygen-free copper will be used as the outer barrier in canisters that will contain spent nuclear fuel in the proposed Swedish underground repository. The possibility of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is a concern, in view of isolated reports of cracking or intergranular corrosion of pure copper in sulfide solutions. This concern was addressed in the present work using copper tensile specimens provided by SKB. Methods included slow strain rate testing, constant strain tensile testing, electrochemical and surface analytical studies of corrosion products, and electron backscatter diffraction analysis of grain orientation effects on corrosion. The base solutions were prepared from NaCl or synthetic sea water with addition of varying amounts of sodium sulfide at room temperature and 80 degree Celsius. No SCC was found in any of the testing, for a range of sulfide concentrations from 5-50 mM at room temperature or 8 C, including tests where small anodic or cathodic potential displacements were applied from the open-circuit (corrosion) potential. Neither was SCC found in constant-strain immersion testing with very large strain. The Cu2S corrosion product is generally very coarse, fragile, and easily spalled off in severe corrosion environments, i.e. high sulfide concentration, high temperature, less perfect de aeration, etc. But it could also consist of very fine grains, relatively compact and adherent, on particular grain orientations when it was formed on an electro polished surface in a very well-deaerated solution. These orientations have not yet been identified statistically, although some preference for thin, adherent films was noted on orientations close to (100). The notion that the corrosion reaction is always controlled by inward aqueous-phase diffusion of sulfide may thus not be unconditionally correct for this range of sulfide concentrations; however it is hard to distinguish the role of diffusion within pores in the film. In the actual

  9. Heat treatment of NiCrFe alloy to optimize resistance to intergrannular stress corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steeves, Arthur F.; Bibb, Albert E.

    1984-01-01

    A process of producing a NiCrFe alloy having a high resistance to stress corrosion cracking comprising heating a NiCrFe alloy to a temperature sufficient to enable the carbon present in the alloy body in the form of carbide deposits to enter into solution, rapidly cool the alloy body, and heat the cooled body to a temperature between 1100.degree. to 1500.degree. F. for about 1 to 30 hours.

  10. Characterization of acoustic emission signals generated by water flow through intergranular stress corrosion cracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claytor, T.N.; Kupperman, D.S.

    1985-05-01

    A program is under way at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) to develop an independent capability to assess the effectiveness of current and proposed techniques for acoustic leak detection (ALD) in reactor coolant systems. The program will establish whether meaningful quantitative data on flow rates and leak location can be obtained from acoustic signatures of leaks due to intergranular stress corrosion cracks (TGSCCs) and fatigue cracks, and whether these can be distinguished from other types of leaks. 5 refs., 3 figs

  11. Intergranular stress corrosion cracking of ion irradiated 304L stainless steel in PWR environment

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Jyoti

    2016-01-01

    IASCC is irradiation – assisted enhancement of intergranular stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of austenitic stainless steel. It is a complex degrading phenomenon which can have a significant influence on maintenance time and cost of PWRs’ core internals and hence, is an issue of concern. Recent studies have proposed using ion irradiation (to be specific, proton irradiation) as an alternative of neutron irradiation to improve the current understanding of the mechanism. The objective of...

  12. Heat treatment of NiCrFe alloy 600 to optimize resistance to intergranular stress corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steeves, A.F.; Bibb, A.E.

    A process of producing a NiCrFe alloy having a high resistance to stress corrosion cracking comprises heating a NiCrFe alloy to a temperature sufficient to enable the carbon present in the alloy body in the form of carbide deposits to enter into solution, rapidly cooling the alloy body, and heating the cooled body to a temperature between 1100 to 1500/sup 0/F for about 1 to 30 hours.

  13. Study of the Effect of Swelling on Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teysseyre, Sebastien Paul [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-09-01

    This report describes the methodology used to study the effect of swelling on the crack growth rate of an irradiation-assisted stress corrosion crack that is propagating in highly irradiated stainless steel 304 material irradiated to 33 dpa in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II. The material selection, specimens design, experimental apparatus and processes are described. The results of the current test are presented.

  14. Evidence of Deep Water Penetration in Silica during Stress Corrosion Fracture

    OpenAIRE

    Lechenault, F.; Rountree, C. L.; Cousin, F.; Bouchaud, J.-P.; Ponson, L.; Bouchaud, E.

    2011-01-01

    We measure the thickness of the heavy water layer trapped under the stress corrosion fracture surface of silica using neutron reflectivity experiments. We show that the penetration depth is 65-85 \\aa ngstr\\"{o}ms, suggesting the presence of a damaged zone of $\\approx$ 100 \\aa ngstr\\"{o}ms extending ahead of the crack tip during its propagation. This estimate of the size of the damaged zone is compatible with other recent results.

  15. Stress corrosion cracking studies of reactor pressure vessel steels. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Der Sluys, W.A.

    1996-10-01

    The objective of this project was to perform a critical review of the information available in open literature on stress corrosion cracking of reactor pressure vessel materials in simulated light-water-reactor (LWR) conditions, develop a test procedure for conducting stress corrosion crack growth experiments in simulated LWR environments, and conduct a test program in an effort to duplicate some of the data available from the literature. The authors concluded that stress corrosion crack growth has been observed in pressure vessel steels under laboratory test conditions. The composition of the water in most cases where growth was observed is outside of the composition specified for operating conditions. Crack growth was observed in the experiments performed in this program, and it was intermittent. The cracking would start and stop for no apparent reason. In most instances, it would not restart without the change of some external variable. In a few instances, it restarted on its own. Crack growth rates as high as 3.6 x 10 -9 m/sec were observed in pressure vessel steels in high-purity water with 8 ppm oxygen. These high crack growth rates were observed for extremely short bursts in crack extension. They could not be sustained for crack growth extensions greater than a few tenths of a millimeter. From the results of this project it appears highly unlikely that stress corrosion cracking will be observed in operating nuclear plants where the coolant composition is maintained within water chemistry guidelines. However, more work is needed to better define the contaminations that cause crack growth. The crack growth rates are so high and the threshold values for crack nucleation are so low that the conditions causing them need to be well defined and avoided

  16. Constant load and constant displacement stress corrosion in simulated water reactor environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lloyd, G.J.

    1987-02-01

    The stress corrosion behaviour of selected water reactor constructional materials, as determined by constant load or constant displacement test techniques, is reviewed. Experimental results obtained using a very wide range of conditions have been collected in a form for easy reference. A discussion is given of some apparent trends in these data. The possible reasons for these trends are considered together with a discussion of how the observed discrepancies may be resolved. (author)

  17. Stress Corrosion Cracking Sensitivity of High Purity Fe-Cr Alloys in High Temperature Water

    OpenAIRE

    Takaku, H.; Kato, S.; Tani, J.; Abiko, K.

    1995-01-01

    Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) sensitivities of high purity Fe-Cr alloys were investigated in simulated Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) and primary Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) cooling waters, by constant extension rate tests (CERT) at a strain rate of 4x10-7s-1. No high purity Fe-Cr alloy showed any SCC sensitivity in either simulated BWR and PWR primary water environment.

  18. SRNL SHELF LIFE STUDIES - SCC STUDIES AT ROOM TEMPERTURE [stress corrosion cracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mickalonis, J.; Duffey, J.

    2014-11-12

    Phase II, Series 2 corrosion testing performed by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for the Department of Energy 3013 container has been completed. The corrosion tests are part of an integrated plan conducted jointly by Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Savannah River Site. SRNL was responsible for conducting corrosion studies in small-scale vessels to address the influence of salt composition, water loading, and type of oxide/salt contact on the relative humidity inside a 3013 container and on the resulting corrosion of Type 304L and 316L stainless steel (304L and 316L). This testing was conducted in two phases: Phase I evaluated a broad spectrum of salt compositions and initial water loadings on the salt mixtures exposed to 304L and 316L and the resulting corrosion; Phase II evaluated the corrosion of 304L at specific water loadings and a single salt composition. During Phase I testing at high initial moisture levels (0.35 to 1.24 wt%)a, the roomtemperature corrosion of 304L exposed to a series of plutonium oxide/chloride salt mixtures ranged from superficial staining to pitting and stress corrosion cracking (SCC). 304L teardrop coupons that exhibited SCC were directly exposed to a mixture composed of 98 wt % PuO2, 0.9 wt % NaCl, 0.9 wt % KCl, and 0.2 wt % CaCl2. Cracking was not observed in a 316L teardrop coupon. Pitting was also observed in this environment for both 304L and 316L with depths ranging from 20 to 100 μm. Neither pitting nor SCC was observed in mixtures with a greater chloride salt concentration (5 and 28 wt%). These results demonstrated that for a corrosive solution to form a balance existed between the water loading and the salt chloride concentration. This chloride solution results from the interaction of loaded water with the hydrating CaCl2 salt. In Phase II, Series 1 tests, the SCC results were shown to be reproducible with cracking occurring in as little as 85 days. The approximate 0.5 wt% moisture level was found to

  19. Hydrogen-related stress corrosion cracking in line pipe steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lars Vendelbo

    1997-01-01

    A correlation between hydrogen concentration (C0) and the critical stress intensity factor for propagation of hydrogen-related cracks has been established by fracture mechanical testing of CT-specimens for the heat affected zone of an X-70 pipeline steel. This has been compared with field...

  20. Stress-Corrosion Cracking Property of Aluminum-Magnesium Alloy Processed by Equal-Channel Angular Pressing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroaki Nakano

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Stress-corrosion cracking property of an aluminum-magnesium alloy processed by equal-channel angular pressing (ECAP was investigated by a slow strain-rate tensile technique in a 3% NaCl solution of pH 4.2 at 303 K. The maximum stress and elongation of the Al-Mg alloy were lower in the NaCl solution than in air. The stress-corrosion cracking property was evaluated by the decrease ratio of maximum stress and elongation of the Al-Mg alloy with NaCl solution, (max and (, respectively. (max and ( were lower with ECAP than without it, showing that the susceptibility of stress-corrosion cracking decreased with ECAP. The polarization curve and time dependence of the anodic current density at constant potential of the Al-Mg alloy in the NaCl solution revealed that the anodic current density was lower with ECAP than without it, or the corrosion resistance of the Al-Mg alloy was improved by ECAP. The decrease in stress-corrosion crack susceptibility of the Al-Mg alloy with ECAP is attributed to an improvement in corrosion resistance afforded by ECAP.

  1. The role of the chemical environment in frictional deformation: Stress corrosion cracking and comminution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunning, J.; Douglas, B.; Miller, M.; McDonald, S.

    1994-03-01

    The roles of chemically assisted crack and fracture propagation and chemically assisted comminution in frictional deformation are evaluated in this study. Double cantilever beam (DCB) crack propagation data are presented which show that the role of pH in chemically assisted fracture, and to a lesser extent the role of ionic concentration are important in stress corrosion cracking. Data on very slow crack growth and the stress corrosion limit are also presented. These data suggest that stress corrosion cracking may play an important role in compound earthquakes and in asperity breakdown in faults. The comminution literature is also reviewed in order to assess the role of chemically assisted comminution in frictional deformation. It appears that chemically assisted comminution may be important at low and high ionic strength because it may reduce the effective viscosity and the shear strength of fault gouge. At intermediate ionic concentration the role of pH, as an agent which enhances crack and fracture propagation, appears to be more important in reducing the coefficient of sliding friction.

  2. Metallurgical study of stress corrosion in aqueous media of alloy 600 (NC15Fe)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garriga-Majo, Denis

    1993-01-01

    The development of intergranular cracks have been noticed in steam generator tubes made of alloy 600. These cracks result in tube embrittlement, and several actions have been implemented to try to improve tube strength, mainly by reducing the applied mechanical solicitations. For given temperature, chemistry and mechanical solicitations, the alloy sensitivity seems to depend on its micro-structural condition. Thus, after a general description of stress corrosion cracking phenomena, the main existing theories are reviewed as well as means to reproduce these cracking phenomena in laboratory. The author addresses general and microstructure properties of Alloy 600, metallurgical, electrochemical or mechanical parameters which govern its stress corrosion cracking behaviour, and different theories proposed to model and predict this behaviour. In the second part, the author studies the structure of Alloy 600 tubes before their installation in the steam generator: metallurgical study, search for parameters enabling the prediction of tube microstructure and tensile characteristics, study of the origin of microstructure differences with respect to tube fabrication batch. The third part addresses the study of Alloy 600 plasticity and creep with respect to its micro-structural condition, with a particular attention to material deformation mechanisms at grain boundaries. The fourth part reports the analysis of the stress corrosion behaviour of steam generator tubes in pure water and in primary environment [fr

  3. Microstructural evolution and stress-corrosion-cracking behavior of thermally aged Ni-Cr-Fe alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Seung Chang; Choi, Kyoung Joon; Kim, Taeho; Kim, Si Hoon; Kim, Ju Young; Kim, Ji Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Effects of long-term thermal aging on the nickel-based Alloy 600 were investigated. • Heat treatments simulating thermal aging were conducted by considering Cr diffusion. • Nano-indentation test results show hardening of thermally aged materials. • Thermally aged materials are more susceptible to stress corrosion cracking. • The property changes are attributed to the formation and evolution of precipitates. - Abstract: To understand the effect of long-term thermal aging in power plant systems, representative thick-walled Alloy 600 was prepared and thermally aged at 400 °C to fabricate samples with thermal aging effects similar to service operating conditions. Changes of microstructures, mechanical properties, and stress corrosion cracking susceptibility were investigated mainly through electron backscatter diffraction, nanoindentation, and high-temperature slow strain rate test. The formation of abundant semi-continuous precipitates with chromium depletion at grain boundaries was observed after thermally aged for 10 equivalent years. Also, alloys thermally aged for 10 equivalent years of thermal aging exhibited the highest susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking.

  4. Stress corrosion cracking behavior of weldments of ferritic stainless steels in high temperature pure water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, Kazuo; Tomari, Haruo; Shimogori, Kazutoshi

    1985-01-01

    Considering the application of a ferritic stainless steel as heat exchanger tubing for a moisture separator reheater of light water reactors, stress corrosion cracking behavior at the weldment of commercial ferritic stainless steels in high temperature pure water was studied. Double U-bend method was used for the study and the relationship with microstructure was discussed. Welded joint of Type 439SS containing 0.021% C, 0.025% N and 0.27% Ti with In-82 type filler metal was susceptible to intergranular stress corrosion cracking if a tight crevice was provided by inserting a teflon sheet between the inner and outer specimens of double U-bend. This was attributable to the formation of chromium depleted zone due to the precipitation of chromium carbides/nitrides along ferrite grain boundaries. On the other hand welded joint of Type 444SS with 0.007% C, 0.010% N and 0.26% Nb was immune to stress corrosion cracking, and this might be attributed to the higher ratio of Nb/(C+N) content. (author)

  5. Method of evaluation of stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of clad fuel tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takase, Iwao; Yoshida, Toshimi; Ikeda, Shinzo; Masaoka, Isao; Nakajima, Junjiro.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To determine, by an evaluation in out-pile test, the stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of clad fuel tubes in the reactor environment. Method: A plurality of electrodes are mounted in the circumferential direction on the entire surface of cladding tubes. Of the electrodes, electrodes at two adjacent places are used as measuring terminals and electrodes at another two places adjacent thereto are used as constant-current terminals. With a specific current flowing in the constant-current terminals, measurements are made of a potential difference between the terminals to be measured, and from a variation in the potential difference the depth of cracking of the cladding tube surface is presumed to determine the stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of the cladding tube. To check the entire surface of the cladding tube, the cladding tube is moved by each block in the circumferential direction by a contact changeover system, repeating the measurements of the potential difference. Contact type electrodes are secured with an insulator and held in uniform contact with the cladding tube by a spring. It is detachable by use of a locking system and movable as desired. Thus the stress corrosion cracking susceptibility can be determined without mounting the cladding tube through and also a fuel failure can be prevented. (Horiuchi, T.)

  6. Accelerated Stress Corrosion Crack Initiation of Alloys 600 and 690 in Hydrogenated Supercritical Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Tyler; Was, Gary S.

    2017-04-01

    The objective of this study is to determine whether stress corrosion crack initiation of Alloys 600 and 690 occurs by the same mechanism in subcritical and supercritical water. Tensile bars of Alloys 690 and 600 were strained in constant extension rate tensile experiments in hydrogenated subcritical and supercritical water from 593 K to 723 K (320 °C to 450 °C), and the crack initiation behavior was characterized by high-resolution electron microscopy. Intergranular cracking was observed across the entire temperature range, and the morphology, structure, composition, and temperature dependence of initiated cracks in Alloy 690 were consistent between hydrogenated subcritical and supercritical water. Crack initiation of Alloy 600 followed an Arrhenius relationship and did not exhibit a discontinuity or change in slope after crossing the critical temperature. The measured activation energy was 121 ± 13 kJ/mol. Stress corrosion crack initiation in Alloy 690 was fit with a single activation energy of 92 ± 12 kJ/mol across the entire temperature range. Cracks were observed to propagate along grain boundaries adjacent to chromium-depleted metal, with Cr2O3 observed ahead of crack tips. All measures of the SCC behavior indicate that the mechanism for stress corrosion crack initiation of Alloy 600 and Alloy 690 is consistent between hydrogenated subcritical and supercritical water.

  7. Stress corrosion life experience of 182 and 82 welds in French PWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amzallag, C.; Pages, C.; Gimond, C.

    2002-01-01

    Large Components of Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) include many parts fabricated from alloy 600 welded with 182 and 82 alloys. Long-term operating experience shows that the alloy 600 is susceptible to Stress Corrosion Cracking in primary water at high temperature (PWSCC). In the 1980's the first indications were detected in steam generator tubes, and then in pressurizer nozzles. In the 1990's, the vessel head penetrations were in turn affected. In such components, stress corrosion cracks initiated in the base metal and, in some cases propagated in the weld metal. For this reason, much attention has been paid to the behavior of the base metal. In comparison, relatively few studies have been carried out on the weld metal, essentially because of the better service experience and experimental difficulties. Alloy 182 is susceptible to stress corrosion cracking in PWR primary water only if the applied stress exceeds the yield stress. Most of the welds in alloys 182 and 82 of EDF plants are ground and stress relieved with the exception of vessel head penetrations and the weld between the divider plate and the partition stub of the steam generator channel head. The stress-relief at 600 deg. C, primarily used for stress-relieving low alloy components, has a favorable effect in reducing the residual stresses but does not modify the intrinsic PWSCC resistance of the welds. Up to now, the service behavior of 182 welds in EDF plants appears to be better than the components in alloy 600. It can be explained by the following causes -the SCC threshold is generally higher for alloy 182 than for alloy 600, - in alloy 182, the manufacturing processes (final welding, grinding) rarely induce applied stresses higher than yield stress, whereas in alloy 600, various manufacturing processes (expansion, deformations caused by welding, machining) sometimes induce applied stresses higher than yield stress. Due to the recent incidents reported on CRDM nozzles and safe-end welds, significant

  8. Effects of addition of water on strain-electrode characteristic and stress corrosion susceptibility of zirconium in alcohol-iodine solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirao, Keiichi; Yamane, Toshimi; Minamino, Yoritoshi; Makino, Kazuya.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of addition of water on the strain-electrode characteristic and stress corrosion susceptibility of Zr were investigated by the electrochemical method using a bending strain-electrode. Test pieces were heat-treated at 1,073 K for 7.2 ks, quenched into ice-water and tested under bending strain in CH 3 OH-0.33 w% I containing water. Rest potential of Zr had a peak in the solution containing 2∼3 x 10 -2 v% water. In this case, many stress corrosion cracks were observed. An addition of water to the solution progressively increased the rest potential of Zr. The large amount of water, moreover, prevented stress corrosion cracking. Analysis of fracture mechanics for interpreting stress corrosion cracking, shows that crack velocities have the power law on the stress intensity factor K. Time to fracture of stress corrosion was estimated by parameters C and n controlling the growth of stress corrosion cracks. (author)

  9. Corrosion-deformation interactions in Inconel 718: application to stress corrosion in a supercritical aqueous medium and research of a material solution for the hydrothermal oxidation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fournier, L.

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the mechanisms responsible for stress corrosion cracking of nickel base superalloys in supercritical aerated water in order to determine a suitable material for the supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) reactors. For this purpose, alloy 718 is selected as a test material. We first focus on its 'hydrogen assisted cracking' behaviour at 25 deg C and on its 'oxidation assisted cracking behaviour' in the temperature range 400 deg C to 600 deg C. Then, its stress corrosion cracking behaviour in supercritical water is investigated for the first time by means of slow strain rate tensile tests (SSRT) performed on smooth specimens in de-ionised and aerated water at 400 deg C and 250 bars. Oxidation - deformation interactions are shown to control both the initiation and the propagation stages of alloy 718 stress corrosion cracks in supercritical water. We suggest that nickel base alloys without strengthening precipitates and with a high chromium content are suitable materials for the SCWO reactors. Such proposal is confirmed by SSRT performed on alloy 690 (28% Cr) specimens in de-ionised and aerated water at 400 deg C and 250 bars which do not reveal any susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking. (author)

  10. Stress Corrosion Cracking—Crevice Interaction in Austenitic Stainless Steels Characterized By Acoustic Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leinonen, H.; Schildt, T.; Hänninen, H.

    2011-02-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) susceptibility of austenitic EN1.4301 (AISI 304) and EN1.4404 (AISI 316L) stainless steels was studied using the constant load method and polymer (PTFE) crevice former in order to study the effects of crevice on SCC susceptibility. The uniaxial active loading tests were performed in 50 pct CaCl2 at 373 K (100 °C) and in 0.1 M NaCl at 353 K (80 °C) under open-circuit corrosion potential (OCP) and electrochemical polarization. Pitting, crevice, and SCC corrosion were characterized and identified by acoustic emission (AE) analysis using ∆ t filtering and the linear locationing technique. The correlation of AE parameters including amplitude, duration, rise time, counts, and energy were used to identify the different types of corrosion. The stages of crevice corrosion and SCC induced by constant active load/crevice former were monitored by AE. In the early phase of the tests, some low amplitude AE activity was detected. In the steady-state phase, the AE activity was low, and toward the end of the test, it increased with the increasing amplitude of the impulses. AE allowed a good correlation between AE signals and corrosion damage. Although crevice corrosion and SCC induced AE signals overlapped slightly, a good correlation between them and microscopical characterization and stress-strain data was found. Especially, the activity of AE signals increased in the early and final stages of the SCC experiment under constant active load conditions corresponding to the changes in the measured steady-state creep strain rate of the specimen. The results of the constant active load/crevice former test indicate that a crevice can initiate SCC even in the mild chloride solution at low temperatures. Based on the mechanistic model of SCC, the rate determining step in SCC is thought to be the generation of vacancies by selective dissolution, which is supported by the low activity phase of AE during the steady-state creep strain rate region.

  11. Effect of cold working and annealing on stress corrosion cracking of AISI 304 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeon, Y.M.; Kwun, S.I.

    1983-01-01

    A study was made of the effects of cold working and annealing on the stress corrosion cracking of AISI 304 stainless steel in boiling 42% MgCl 2 solution. When the 60% or 76% of yield stress was applied, the resistance to SCC showed maximum at 30% of cold work. However, when the same load was applied to the annealed specimens after cold working, the resistance to SCC decreased abruptly at 675degC annealing. The fracture mode changed mode change mixed → intergranular → transgranular as the amount of cold work increased. (Author)

  12. Stress corrosion of low alloy steels used in external bolting on pressurised water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skeldon, P.; Hurst, P.; Smart, N.R.

    1992-01-01

    The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) susceptibility of AISI 4140 and AISI 4340 steels has been evaluated in five environments, three simulating a leaking aqueous boric acid environment and two simulating ambient external conditions ie moist air and salt spray. Both steels were found to be highly susceptible to SCC in all environments at hardnesses of 400 VPN and above. The susceptibility was greatly reduced at hardnesses below 330 VPN but in one environment, viz refluxing PWR primary water, SCC was observed at hardnesses as low as 260VPN. Threshold stress intensities for SCC were frequently lower than those in the literature

  13. Irradiation-Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking of Austenitic Stainless Steels in BWR Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Y. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Chopra, O. K. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Gruber, Eugene E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Shack, William J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2010-06-01

    The internal components of light water reactors are exposed to high-energy neutron irradiation and high-temperature reactor coolant. The exposure to neutron irradiation increases the susceptibility of austenitic stainless steels (SSs) to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) because of the elevated corrosion potential of the reactor coolant and the introduction of new embrittlement mechanisms through radiation damage. Various nonsensitized SSs and nickel alloys have been found to be prone to intergranular cracking after extended neutron exposure. Such cracks have been seen in a number of internal components in boiling water reactors (BWRs). The elevated susceptibility to SCC in irradiated materials, commonly referred to as irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC), is a complex phenomenon that involves simultaneous actions of irradiation, stress, and corrosion. In recent years, as nuclear power plants have aged and irradiation dose increased, IASCC has become an increasingly important issue. Post-irradiation crack growth rate and fracture toughness tests have been performed to provide data and technical support for the NRC to address various issues related to aging degradation of reactor-core internal structures and components. This report summarizes the results of the last group of tests on compact tension specimens from the Halden-II irradiation. The IASCC susceptibility of austenitic SSs and heat-affected-zone (HAZ) materials sectioned from submerged arc and shielded metal arc welds was evaluated by conducting crack growth rate and fracture toughness tests in a simulated BWR environment. The fracture and cracking behavior of HAZ materials, thermally sensitized SSs and grain-boundary engineered SSs was investigated at several doses (≤3 dpa). These latest results were combined with previous results from Halden-I and II irradiations to analyze the effects of neutron dose, water chemistry, alloy compositions, and welding and processing conditions on IASCC

  14. Effect of Stress Ratio and Loading Frequency on the Corrosion Fatigue Behavior of Smooth Steel Wire in Different Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songquan Wang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the effects of loading condition and corrosion solution on the corrosion fatigue behavior of smooth steel wire were discussed. The results of polarization curves and weight loss curves showed that the corrosion of steel wire in acid solution was more severe than that in neutral and alkaline solutions. With the extension of immersion time in acid solution, the cathodic reaction of steel wire gradually changed from the reduction of hydrogen ion to the reduction of oxygen, but was always the reduction of hydrogen ion in neutral and alkaline solutions. The corrosion kinetic parameters and equivalent circuits of steel wires were also obtained by simulating the Nyquist diagrams. In corrosion fatigue test, the effect of stress ratio and loading frequency on the crack initiation mechanism was emphasized. The strong corrosivity of acid solution could accelerate the nucleation of crack tip. The initiation mechanism of crack under different conditions was summarized according to the side and fracture surface morphologies. For the crack initiation mechanism of anodic dissolution, the stronger the corrosivity of solution was, the more easily the fatigue crack source formed, while, for the crack initiation mechanism of deformation activation, the lower stress ratio and higher frequency would accelerate the generation of corrosion fatigue crack source.

  15. Stress corrosion cracking life estimation of hold-down spring screw for nuclear fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koh, S.K.

    2005-01-01

    Hold-down spring screw fractures due to primary water stress corrosion cracking were observed in nuclear fuel assemblies. The screw fastens hold-down springs that are required to maintain the nuclear fuel assembly in contact with upper core plate and permit thermal and irradiation-induced length changes. In order to investigate the primary causes of the screw fractures, the finite element stress analysis and fracture mechanics analysis were performed on the hold-down spring assembly. The elastic-plastic finite element analysis showed that the local stresses at the critical regions of head-shank fillet and thread root significantly exceeded the yield strength of the screw material, resulting in local plastic deformation. Preloading on the screw applied for tightening had beneficial effects on the screw strength by reducing the stress level at the critical regions, compared to the screw without preload. Calculated deflections and strains at the hold-down springs using the finite element analysis were in very close agreements with the experimentally measured deflections and strains. Primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) life of the Inconel 600 screw was predicted by integrating the Scott's model and resulted in a life of 1.42 years, which was fairly close to the field experience. Cracks were expected to originate at the threaded region of the screw and propagated to the opposite side of the spring, which was confirmed by the fractographic analysis of the fractured screws. (orig.)

  16. Kinetic studies of the stress corrosion cracking of D6AC steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noronha, P. J.

    1975-01-01

    The effect of load interactions on the crack growth velocity of D6AC steel under stress corrosion cracking conditions was determined. The environment was a 3.5 percent salt solution. The modified-wedge opening load specimens were fatigue precracked and subjected to a deadweight loading in creep machines. The effects of load shedding on incubation times and crack growth rates were measured using high-sensitivity compliance measurement techniques. Load shedding results in an incubation time, the length of which depends on the amount of load shed and the baseline stress intensity. The sequence of unloading the specimen also controls the subsequent incubation period. The incubation period is shorter when load shedding passes through zero load than when it does not if the specimen initially had the same baseline stress intensity. The crack growth rates following the incubation period are also different from the steady-state crack growth rate at the operating stress intensity. These data show that the susceptibility of this alloy system to stress corrosion cracking depends on the plane-strain fracture toughness and on the yield strength of the material.

  17. Life time forecasting method upon occurrence of stress corrosion cracking of structure and test device therefor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anzai, Hideya; Kida, Toshitaka; Urayama, Yoshinao; Kikuchi, Eiji; Shimanuki, Sei; Kuniya, Jiro; Nakata, Kiyotomo; Izumitani, Masakiyo; Hattori, Shigeo.

    1993-01-01

    A load stress is applied to a metal piece made of a material identical with the constituent material of a structure and having the sensitivity enhanced to a predetermined level, and plurality of such pieces are immersed in a corrosive circumstance in this state. Then, the time from the immersion till the rupture thereof and the number of ruptured pieces of the metal pieces are detected while observing them. The relation with the probability of rupture is plotted on a paper to determine the life time for the occurrence of minimum stress corrosion creacks (SSC) of the metal pieces. Based on the relationship between the previously determined stress and the life time for the occurrence of minimum SSC, the ratio between the life time for the occurrence of minimum SSC relative to estimated stress applied to the structure and the life time for the occurrence of minimum SSC relative to the stress applied to the metal pieces is determined as a first SSC acceleration rate. The ratio between the time of occurrence for minimum SSC and the sensitivity is determined as a second SSC acceleration rate. The first and the second SSC acceleration rates are multiplied to estimate the time for the occurrence of SSC of the structure. Then, the life time for the occurrence of SSC for the equipments and structures can be recognized quantitatively, to prevent ruptures of actual equipments and extend the life time. (N.H.)

  18. Stress-corrosion cracking of steels in ammonia with consideration given to OTEC design: a survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teel, R.B.

    1980-03-01

    Carbon steel, alloy steel, and high-strength, quenched and tempered steel, when under applied or residual stress and especially when cold formed and/or welded without subsequent thermal stress relief, are subject to failure by stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) in air-contaminated dry ammonia. Water as well as hydrazine when present in small amounts have been shown to be effective inhibitors in an all steel system. Galvanic corrosion between dissimilar metals and/or accelerated failure by SCC of stressed steel as a result of galvanic coupling may be of concern. Where water has proven effective as an inhibitor of SCC in an all steel system, it may not be adequate in a mixed metal system. With aluminum tubes, the tube sheet will either have to be solid aluminum, aluminum clad steel or some nonconductive coating will be necessary to effectively remove the cathodic alloy from the galvanic circuit. Research is required to determine the severity of the coupling effect between dissimilar alloys in ammonia under OTEC conditions; especially the possibility of accelerated SCC failures of stressed steel where the presence of an inhibitor in the ammonia may not be sufficient to override the galvanic coupling effect.

  19. Influence of diameter and intraradicular post in the stress distribution. Finite element analysis

    OpenAIRE

    LEMOS, Cleidiel Aparecido Araujo; ALMEIDA, Daniel Augusto de Faria; BATISTA, Victor Eduardo de Souza; MELLO, Carol Cantieri; VERRI, Fellippo Ramos; PELLIZZER, Eduardo Piza; MAZARO, José Vitor Quinelli

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction The biomechanical behavior of endodontically treated teeth depending on the selected restorative material and tooth situation to be restored. Objective To analyze by the two-dimensional finite element method the biomechanical behavior of different diameters in intraradicular posts and teeth with coronal remaining of 2mm. Material and method Six models were made with three types of posts, as follows: Glass fiber post, carbon fiber post, and cast metal post, both with d...

  20. The hydrogen role on the stress corrosion of the alloy 600 in PWR; Le role de l'hydrogene sur la corrosion sous contrainte de l'alliage 600 en milieu REP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laghoutaris, P.; Chene, J.; Guerre, C.; Raquet, O. [CEA Saclay, 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France); Molins, R. [Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines de Paris, 75 - Paris (France); Vaillant, F. [Electricite de France (EDF), Les Renardieres, 92 - Clamart (France); Scott, P. [Areva La Defense, 92 (France)

    2007-07-01

    In the PWR type reactors, stress corrosion cracks appear in the alloy 600. To explain this phenomenon some corrosion cracking model, based on the hydrogen embrittlement, have been developed. Meanwhile it remains some uncertainties on the following points: the hydrogen source, the hydrogen concentration in the material, the fleetingness which controls the hydrogen solubility and the deformation at the crack end. The aim of this study is to bring new information on the alloy 600 stress corrosion mechanisms. (A.L.B.)

  1. Stress Corrosion Cracking Model for High Level Radioactive-Waste Packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andresen, P.; Gordon, G.; Lu, S.

    2004-01-01

    A stress corrosion cracking (SCC) model has been adapted for performance prediction of high level radioactive-waste packages to be emplaced in the proposed Yucca Mountain repository. For waste packages of the proposed Yucca Mountain repository, the outer barrier material is the highly corrosion-resistant Alloy UNS-N06022 (Alloy 22), the environment is represented by aqueous brine films present on the surface of the waste package from dripping or deliquescence of soluble salts present in any surface deposits, and the tensile stress is principally from weld induced residual stress. SCC has historically been separated into ''initiation'' and ''propagation'' phases. Initiation of SCC will not occur on a smooth surface if the surface stress is below a threshold value defined as the threshold stress. Cracks can also initiate at and propagate from flaws (or defects) resulting from manufacturing processes (such as welding); or that develop from corrosion processes such as pitting or dissolution of inclusions. To account for crack propagation, the slip dissolution/film rupture (SDFR) model is adopted to provide mathematical formulae for prediction of the crack growth rate. Once the crack growth rate at an initiated SCC is determined, it can be used by the performance assessment to determine the time to through-wall penetration for the waste package. This paper presents the development of the SDFR crack growth rate model based on technical information in the literature as well as experimentally determined crack growth rates developed specifically for Alloy UNS-N06022 in environments relevant to high level radioactive-waste packages of the proposed Yucca Mountain radioactive-waste repository. In addition, a seismic damage related SCC crack opening area density model is briefly described

  2. Initiation of Stress Corrosion Cracking of 26Cr-1Mo Ferritic Stainless Steels in Hot Chloride Solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, H. S.; Hehemann, R. F.

    1987-01-01

    Elongation measurements of 26Cr-1Mo ferritic stainless steels undergoing stress corrosion in boiling LiCl solution allow the induction period to be distinguished from the propagation period of cracks by the deviation of elongation from the logarithmic creep law. Localised corrosion cells are activated exclusively at slip steps by loading and developed into corrosion trenches. No cracks have developed from the corrosion trenches until the induction period is exceeded. The induction period is regarded as a time for localised corrosion cells to achieve a critical degree of occlusion for crack initiation. The repassivation rate of exposed metal by creep or emergence of slip steps decreases as the load increases and is very sensitive to the microstructural changes that affect slip tep height. The greater susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking of either prestrained or grain coarsened 26Cr-1Mo alloy compared with that of mill annealed material results from a significant reduction of repassivation rate associated with the increased slip step height. The angular titanium carbonitrides particles dispersed in Ti-stabilized 26Cr-1Mo alloy have a detrimental effect on the resistance to stress corrosion cracking

  3. Stress corrosion crack initiation of alloy 182 weld metal in primary coolant - Influence of chemical composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calonne, O.; Foucault, M.; Steltzlen, F. [AREVA (France); Amzallag, C. [EDF SEPTEN (France)

    2011-07-01

    Nickel-base alloys 182 and 82 have been used extensively for dissimilar metal welds. Typical applications are the J-groove welds of alloy 600 vessel head penetrations, pressurizer penetrations, heater sleeves and bottom mounted instrumented nozzles as well as some safe end butt welds. While the overall performance of these weld metals has been good, during the last decade, an increasing number of cases of stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 182 weld metal have been reported in PWRs. In this context, the role of weld defects has to be examined. Their contribution in the crack initiation mechanism requires laboratory investigations with small scale characterizations. In this study, the influence of both alloy composition and weld defects on PWSCC (Stress Corrosion Cracking in Primary Water) initiation was investigated using U-bend specimens in simulated primary water at 320 C. The main results are the following: -) the chemical compositions of the weld deposits leading to a large propensity to hot cracking are not the most susceptible to PWSCC initiation, -) macroscopically, superficial defects did not evolve during successive exposures. They can be included in large corrosion cracks but their role as 'precursors' is not yet established. (authors)

  4. Simulation of Mechanical Stress on Stainless Steel for Pb-Bi Corrosion Test by Using ABAQUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwanto, D.; Mustari, A. P. A.; Budiman, B. A.

    2017-03-01

    Pb-Bi eutectic with its advantageous is proposed to be utilized as a coolant in the GEN IV type of rSeactor. However, high temperature corrosion when contact with stainless steels is one of the issues of Pb-Bi eutectic utilization. It is known that in the environment of high temperature Pb-Bi, mechanical strength of stainless steel may decrease. Thus, simulation of mechanical stress working on stainless steel during in-situ bending test by using ABAQUS was conducted. Several bending degrees were simulated at high temperature to obtain the mechanical stress information. Temperature condition was strongly affect the stress vs. displacement profile. The reported mechanical strength reduction percentage was used to draw predicted mechanical stress under high temperature Pb-Bi environment.

  5. Stress corrosion of Zircaloy-4. Fracture mechanics study of the intergranular - transgranular transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farina, Silvia B.; Duffo, Gustavo S.

    2003-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of Zircaloy-4 wires was studied in 1M NaCl, 1M KBr and 1M KI aqueous solutions, and in iodine alcoholic solutions. In all cases, intergranular attack preceded transgranular propagation. It is generally accepted that the intergranular-transgranular transition occurs when a critical value of the stress intensity factor is reached. In the present work it was confirmed that the transition from intergranular to transgranular propagation cracking in Zircaloy-4 wires also occurs when a critical value of the stress intensity factor is reached. This critical stress intensity factor in wire samples is independent of the solution tested and close to 10 MPa.m-1/2. This value is in good agreement with those reported in the literature measured by different techniques. (author)

  6. Literature Survey on the Stress Corrosion Cracking of Low-Alloy Steels in High Temperature Water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seifert, H.P.

    2002-02-01

    The present report is a summary of a literature survey on the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behaviour/ mechanisms in low-alloy steels (LAS) in high-temperature water with special emphasis to primary-pressure-boundary components of boiling water reactors (BWR). A brief overview on the current state of knowledge concerning SCC of low-alloy reactor pressure vessel and piping steels under BWR conditions is given. After a short introduction on general aspects of SCC, the main influence parameter and available quantitative literature data concerning SCC of LAS in high-temperature water are discussed on a phenomenological basis followed by a summary of the most popular SCC models for this corrosion system. The BWR operating experience and service cracking incidents are discussed with respect to the existing laboratory data and background knowledge. Finally, the most important open questions and topics for further experimental investigations are outlined. (author)

  7. Inhibition of intergranular stress corrosion cracking of sensitized type 304 stainless steel. Annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, B.F.

    1977-01-01

    The effectiveness of various inhibitors in mitigating stress corrosion cracking of stainless steel in hot aqueous environment was evaluated. The inhibitors studied were of three types: poly-oxy-anions, organic competitive absorbers, and simple cations; the corrosive medium was 4M NaCl acidified with H 2 SO 4 to ph of about 2.3. The following conclusions were reached: pH does not affect cracking kinetics in a sensitive way; cracking time is highly dependent on chloride concentrations; poly-oxy-anions do not perform well; organics offer some possibilities as inhibitors; cationic additives can have effects varying from trivial to total suppression of cracking--behavior is both cation and concentration dependent. 2 figures, 5 tables

  8. Stress corrosion cracking tests for low carbon stainless steels with work hardened layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, Junichi; Kikuchi, Masahiko; Tsukada, Takashi

    2005-01-01

    To avoid introduction of Cr depletion at grain boundaries by welding process, low carbon stainless steels (SSs) were used in corrosive environment as one of countermeasures for Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC). Recently, it is reported that SCCs were introduced at portion with work hardened layer although low carbon SSs had been used at core shrouds and primary loop recirculation piping in Boiling Water Reactors. To simulate and examine the phenomenon, mechanical working, metallographic observation, hardness test and SCC tests in chloride solutions were conducted for low carbon SSs. From the results of metallographic observation and hardness test, it was confirmed that slip bands were observed around the surface and hardened layer was introduced by mechanical working. From the results of SCC tests, it was noticed that cracks which introduced from the surface, had grown into the matrix. It is thought that low carbon SSs with work hardened layer have susceptibility to SCC from the above. (author)

  9. Investigation of Stress Corrosion Cracking in Magnesium Alloys by Quantitative Fractography Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sozańska M.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The article shows that the use of quantitative fracture description may lead to significant progress in research on the phenomenon of stress corrosion cracking of the WE43 magnesium alloy. Tests were carried out on samples in air, and after hydrogenation in 0.1 M Na2SO4 with cathodic polarization. Fracture surfaces were analyzed after different variants of the Slow Strain Rate Test. It was demonstrated that the parameters for quantitative evaluation of fracture surface microcracks can be closely linked with the susceptibility of the WE43 magnesium alloy operating under complex state of the mechanical load in corrosive environments. The final result of the study was the determination of the quantitative relationship between Slow Strain Rate Test parameters, the mechanical properties, and the parameters of the quantitative evaluation of fracture surface (microcracks.

  10. Some important considerations in the development of stress corrosion cracking test methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, R. P.; Novak, S. R.; Williams, D. P.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of some of the precaution needs the development of fracture-mechanics based test methods for studying stress corrosion cracking involves. Following a review of pertinent analytical fracture mechanics considerations and of basic test methods, the implications for test corrosion cracking studies of the time-to-failure determining kinetics of crack growth and life are examined. It is shown that the basic assumption of the linear-elastic fracture mechanics analyses must be clearly recognized and satisfied in experimentation and that the effects of incubation and nonsteady-state crack growth must also be properly taken into account in determining the crack growth kinetics, if valid data are to be obtained from fracture-mechanics based test methods.

  11. Intergranular stress corrosion cracking: A rationalization of apparent differences among stress corrosion cracking tendencies for sensitized regions in the process water piping and in the tanks of SRS reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louthan, M.R.

    1990-01-01

    The frequency of stress corrosion cracking in the near weld regions of the SRS reactor tank walls is apparently lower than the cracking frequency near the pipe-to-pipe welds in the primary cooling water system. The difference in cracking tendency can be attributed to differences in the welding processes, fabrication schedules, near weld residual stresses, exposure conditions and other system variables. This memorandum discusses the technical issues that may account the differences in cracking tendencies based on a review of the fabrication and operating histories of the reactor systems and the accepted understanding of factors that control stress corrosion cracking in austenitic stainless steels

  12. Electrochemical studies on stress corrosion cracking of incoloy-800 in caustic solution. Part II: Precracking samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinu Alice

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Stress corrosion cracking (SCC in a caustic medium may affect the secondary circuit tubing of a CANDU NPP cooled with river water, due to an accidental formation of a concentrated alkaline environment in the areas with restricted circulation, as a result of a leakage of cooling water from the condenser. To evaluate the susceptibility of Incoloy-800 (used to manufacture steam generator tubes for CANDU NPP to SCC, some accelerated corrosion tests were conducted in an alkaline solution (10% NaOH, pH = 13. These experiments were performed at ambient temperature and 85 °C. We used the potentiodynamic method and the potentiostatic method, simultaneously monitoring the variation of the open circuit potential during a time period (E corr/time curve. The C-ring method was used to stress the samples. In order to create stress concentrations, mechanical precracks with a depth of 100 or 250 μm were made on the outer side of the C-rings. Experimental results showed that the stressed samples were more susceptible to SCC than the unstressed samples whereas the increase in temperature and crack depth lead to an increase in SCC susceptibility. Incipient micro cracks of a depth of 30 μm were detected in the area of the highest peak of the mechanical precrack.

  13. Applied methods for mitigation of damage by stress corrosion in BWR type reactors; Metodos aplicados para la mitigacion del dano por corrosion bajo esfuerzo en reactores BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez C, R.; Diaz S, A.; Gachuz M, M.; Arganis J, C. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Gerencia de Ciencia de Materiales, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    1998-07-01

    The Boiling Water nuclear Reactors (BWR) have presented stress corrosion problems, mainly in components and pipes of the primary system, provoking negative impacts in the performance of energy generator plants, as well as the increasing in the radiation exposure to personnel involucred. This problem has caused development of research programs, which are guided to find solution alternatives for the phenomena control. Among results of greater relevance the control for the reactor water chemistry stands out particularly in the impurities concentration and oxidation of radiolysis products; as well as the supervision in the materials selection and the stresses levels reduction. The present work presents the methods which can be applied to diminish the problems of stress corrosion in BWR reactors. (Author)

  14. Investigation of thermally sensitised stainless steels as analogues for spent AGR fuel cladding to test a corrosion inhibitor for intergranular stress corrosion cracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whillock, Guy O. H.; Hands, Brian J.; Majchrowski, Tom P.; Hambley, David I.

    2018-01-01

    A small proportion of irradiated Advanced Gas-cooled Reactor (AGR) fuel cladding can be susceptible to intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) when stored in pond water containing low chloride concentrations, but corrosion is known to be prevented by an inhibitor at the storage temperatures that have applied so far. It may be necessary in the future to increase the storage temperature by up to ∼20 °C and to demonstrate the impact of higher temperatures for safety case purposes. Accordingly, corrosion testing is needed to establish the effect of temperature increases on the efficacy of the inhibitor. This paper presents the results of studies carried out on thermally sensitised 304 and 20Cr-25Ni-Nb stainless steels, investigating their grain boundary compositions and their IGSCC behaviour over a range of test temperatures (30-60 °C) and chloride concentrations (0.3-10 mg/L). Monitoring of crack initiation and propagation is presented along with preliminary results as to the effect of the corrosion inhibitor. 304 stainless steel aged for 72 h at 600 °C provided a close match to the known pond storage corrosion behaviour of spent AGR fuel cladding.

  15. Effect of Local Strain Distribution of Cold-Rolled Alloy 690 on Primary Water Stress Corrosion Crack Growth Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim S.-W.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This work aims to study the stress corrosion crack growth behavior of cold-rolled Alloy 690 in the primary water of a pressurized water reactor. Compared with Alloy 600, which shows typical intergranular cracking along high angle grain boundaries, the cold-rolled Alloy 690, with its heterogeneous microstructure, revealed an abnormal crack growth behavior in mixed mode, that is, in transgranular cracking near a banded region, and in intergranular cracking in a matrix region. From local strain distribution analysis based on local mis-orientation, measured along the crack path using the electron back scattered diffraction method, it was suggested that the abnormal behavior was attributable to a heterogeneity of local strain distribution. In the cold-rolled Alloy 690, the stress corrosion crack grew through a highly strained area formed by a prior cold-rolling process in a direction perpendicular to the maximum principal stress applied during a subsequent stress corrosion cracking test.

  16. The effect of heat treatment and test parameters on the aqueous stress corrosion cracking of D6AC steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbreath, W. P.; Adamson, M. J.

    1974-01-01

    The crack growth behavior of D6AC steel as a function of stress intensity, stress and corrosion history and test technique, under sustained load in natural seawater, 3.3 percent NaCl solution, distilled water, and high humidity air was investigated. Reported investigations of D6AC were considered with emphasis on thermal treatment, specimen configuration, fracture toughness, crack-growth rates, initiation period, threshold, and the extension of corrosion fatigue data to sustained load conditions. Stress history effects were found to be most important in that they controlled incubation period, initial crack growth rates, and apparent threshold.

  17. The probability distribution of intergranular stress corrosion cracking life for sensitized 304 stainless steels in high temperature, high purity water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akashi, Masatsune; Kenjyo, Takao; Matsukura, Shinji; Kawamoto, Teruaki

    1984-01-01

    In order to discuss the probability distribution of intergranular stress corrsion carcking life for sensitized 304 stainless steels, a series of the creviced bent beem (CBB) and the uni-axial constant load tests were carried out in oxygenated high temperature, high purity water. The following concludions were resulted; (1) The initiation process of intergranular stress corrosion cracking has been assumed to be approximated by the Poisson stochastic process, based on the CBB test results. (2) The probability distribution of intergranular stress corrosion cracking life may consequently be approximated by the exponential probability distribution. (3) The experimental data could be fitted to the exponential probability distribution. (author)

  18. Differential effects of two indigenous broilers exposed to cold stress and characters of follicle density and diameter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing Y. Chen

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available digenous chickens from various part of China, due to different feather characters, always performed differently when countered with cold stress. In this study, the effects of long term hypothermia on serum hormones (triiodothyronine, thyroxine and insulin and activity of plasma enzymes (Alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, gamma-glutamyltransferase, creatine kinase and lactic dehydrogenase were studied in two indigenous broiler breeds, Huainan partridge (H and Wenchang (W chickens. Chickens in 20°C±2°C were compared with those subjected to moderate (15°C±2°C and severe low temperature (10°C±2°C for one week. Long-term hypothermia elevated plasma insulin and reduced T4 in W, decelerated insulin and increased T4 in H, while T3 did not change in the two breeds. Plasma enzymes AST, LDH and CK decreased in the two breeds and ALT only decreased in W exposed to cold stress. A significantly decreased body weight gain of H and no variations in W at low temperature were observed. However, a trend of decreased weight gain in W was observed when bred under low temperature condition. Follicle density and diameter were compared in the two breeds with back density in H significantly higher than W and diameter from back of H significantly smaller than W, while much larger than the latter at latero-abdominal part. We investigated the pattern of serum biological change, follicle diameter and density under cold stress condition in two indigenous broiler breeds from different areas of China to provide informative guidance for broiler production and indications in breeding of cold resistant breed.

  19. Stress corrosion cracking of iron-nickel-chromium alloys in primary circuit environment of PWR-type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boursier, Jean-Marie

    1993-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 steam generator tubing is a great concern for pressurized water reactors. The mechanism that controls intergranular stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 in primary water (lithiated-borated water) has yet to be clearly identified. A study of stress corrosion cracking behaviour, which can identify the main parameters that control the cracking phenomenon, was so necessary to understand the stress corrosion cracking process. Constant extension rate tests, and constant load tests have evidenced that Alloy 600 stress corrosion cracking involves firstly an initiation period, then a slow propagation stage with crack less than 50 to 80 micrometers, and finally a rapid propagation stage leading to failure. The influence of mechanical parameters have shown the next points: - superficial strain hardening and cold work have a strong effect of stress corrosion cracking resistance (decrease of initiation time and increase of crack growth rate), - strain rate was the most suitable parameter for describing the different stage of propagation. The creep behaviour of alloy 600 has shown an increase of creep rate in primary water compared to air, which implies a local interaction plasticity/corrosion. An assessment of the durations of the initiation and the propagation stages was attempted for the whole uniaxial tensile tests, using the macroscopic strain rate: - the initiation time is less than 100 hours and seems to be an electrochemical process, - the durations of the propagation stage are strongly dependent on the strain rate. The behaviour in high primary water temperature of Alloys 690 and 800, which replace Alloy 600, was studied to appraise their margin, and validate their choice. Then the last chapter has to objective to evaluate the crack tip strain rate, in order to better describe the evolution of the different stages of cracking. (author) [fr

  20. The effect of implant and abutment diameter on peri-implant bone stress: A three-dimensional finite element analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Mary Abraham

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Load transfer mechanisms from the implant to surrounding bone and failure of osseointegrated implants are affected by implant geometry and mechanical properties of the site of placement as well as crestal bone resorption. Estimation of such effects allows for a correct design of implant geometry to minimize crestal bone loss and implant failure. Objectives: To evaluate the effect of implant and abutment diameter on stress distribution in the peri-implant area. Materials and Methods: Three-dimensional finite element models created to replicate completely osseointegrated endosseous titanium implants and were used for the purpose of stress analysis. Two study groups that consisting of a regular platform (RP group and narrow platform (NP group were used with a standard bone density and loaded using the ANSYS Workbench software to calculate the von Mises and Principal (maximum tensile and minimum compressive stress. Results: The von Mises, compressive, and tensile stresses in the peri-implant bone were lower in the RP model compared to the NP model. Conclusion: RP model yielded a positive result with regard to lowering of peri-implant bone stress levels, in healthy as well as compromised bone qualities when compared to NP designs.

  1. EPRI-NASA Cooperative Project on Stress Corrosion Cracking of Zircaloys. [nuclear fuel failures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubicciotti, D.; Jones, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    Examinations of the inside surface of irradiated fuel cladding from two reactors show the Zircaloy cladding is exposed to a number of aggressive substances, among them iodine, cadmium, and iron-contaminated cesium. Iodine-induced stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of well characterized samples of Zircaloy sheet and tubing was studied. Results indicate that a threshold stress must be exceeded for iodine SCC to occur. The existence of a threshold stress indicates that crack formation probably is the key step in iodine SCC. Investigation of the crack formation process showed that the cracks responsible for SCC failure nucleated at locations in the metal surface that contained higher than average concentrations of alloying elements and impurities. A four-stage model of iodine SCC is proposed based on the experimental results and the relevance of the observations to pellet cladding interaction failures is discussed.

  2. Evaluating stress corrosion cracking behaviour of high strength AA7075-T651 aluminium alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhuraj, P.; Rajakumar, S.; Lakshminarayanan, A. K.; Balasubramanian, V.

    2017-12-01

    The objective of the present study is to determine the threshold stress level of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in AA7075-T651 aluminium alloy by suitable experimentation. The test was carried out using a circumferential notch specimen in a horizontal-type constant load SCC setup in a 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution. The time to failure by SCC was determined at various loading conditions. The threshold stress of AA7075-T651 alloy was found to be 242 MPa in a 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution. The various regions of the fractured surface specimen such as machined notch, SCC region and final overload fracture area were examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in order to identify the SCC mechanism.

  3. A mechanical property and stress corrosion evaluation of VIM-ESR-VAR work strengthened and direct double aged Inconel 718 bar material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montano, J. W.

    1986-01-01

    Presented are the mechanical properties and the stress corrosion resistance of triple melted vacuum induction melted (VIM), electro-slag remelted (ESR), and vacuum arc remelted (VAR), solution treated, work strengthened and direct double aged Inconel 718 alloy bars 4.00 in. (10.16) and 5.75 in. (14.60 cm) diameter. Tensile, charpy v-notched impact, and compact tension specimens were tested at ambient temperature in both the longitudinal and transverse directions. Longitudinal tensile and yield strengths in excess of 220 ksi (1516.85 MPa) and 200 ksi (1378.00 MPa) respectively, were realized at ambient temperature. Additional charpy impact and compact tension tests were performed at -100 F (-73 C). Longitudinal charpy impact strength equalled or exceeded 12.0 ft-lbs (16.3 Joules) at ambient and at -100 F(-73 C) while longitudinal compact (LC) tension fracture toughness strength remained above 79 ksi (86.80 MPa) at ambient and at -100 F(-73 C) temperatures. No failures occurred in the longitudinal or transverse tensile specimens stressed to 75 and 100 percent of their respective yield strengths and exposed to a salt fog environment for 180 days. Tensile tests performed after the stress corrosion test indicated no mechanical property degradation.

  4. Evaluation of the cracking by stress corrosion in nuclear reactor environments type BWR; Evaluacion del agrietamiento por corrosion bajo esfuerzo en ambientes de reactores nucleares tipo BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arganis J, C. R.

    2010-07-01

    The stress corrosion cracking susceptibility was studied in sensitized, solution annealed 304 steel, and in 304-L welded with a heat treatment that simulated the radiation induced segregation, by the slow strain rate test technique, in a similar environment of a boiling water reactor (BWR), 288 C, 8 MPa, low conductivity and a electrochemical corrosion potential near 200 mV. vs. standard hydrogen electrode (She). The electrochemical noise technique was used for the detection of the initiation and propagation of the cracking. The steels were characterized by metallographic studies with optical and scanning electronic microscopy and by the electrochemical potentiodynamic reactivation of single loop and double loop. In all the cases, the steels present delta ferrite. The slow strain rate tests showed that the 304 steel in the solution annealed condition is susceptible to transgranular stress corrosion cracking (TGSCC), such as in a normalized condition showed granulated. In the sensitized condition the steel showed intergranular stress corrosion cracking, followed by a transition to TGSCC. The electrochemical noise time series showed that is possible associated different time sequences to different modes of cracking and that is possible detect sequentially cracking events, it is means, one after other, supported by the fractographic studies by scanning electron microscopy. The parameter that can distinguish between the different modes of cracking is the re passivation rate, obtained by the current decay rate -n- in the current transients. This is due that the re passivation rate is a function of the microstructure and the sensitization. Other statistic parameters like the localized index, Kurtosis, Skew, produce results that are related with mixed corrosion. (Author)

  5. Dissolution of copper in chloride/ammonia mixtures and the implications for the stress corrosion cracking of copper containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, F.; Greidanus, G.; Jobe, D.J.

    1999-05-01

    Stress-corrosion cracking is a possible failure mechanism for copper nuclear fuel waste disposal containers. One species known to cause the stress corrosion of copper alloys is ammonia. It is conceivable that ammonia could be produced in a disposal vault under certain, very specific conditions. There are a number of conditions, however, that mitigate against container failure by stress corrosion, one of which is the presence of chloride ions in deep Canadian Shield groundwaters. There are a number of reports in the literature that suggest that Cl - has an inhibitive effect on the stress corrosion of Cu alloys in ammonia solutions. The electrochemical behaviour of Cu in Cl - /ammonia solutions has been studied as a function of ammonia concentration, pH, the rate of mass transport and electrochemical potential. In particular, the effects of these parameters on the formation Of Cu 2 O films and the steady-state dissolution behaviour have been determined. All experiments were carried out in 0.1 mol·dm -3 NaC1 as a base solution. A series of aqueous speciation and equilibrium potential/pH diagrams are also presented for the quaternary system Cu-C1 - NH 3 /NH 4 + H 2 O. These diagrams are used to interpret the results of the electrochemical experiments reported here. In addition, it is demonstrated how these diagrams could be used to predict the time-dependence of the susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking of Cu containers in a disposal vault. (author)

  6. Effect of stress corrosion cracking at various strain rates on the electrochemical corrosion behavior of Mg-Zn-In-Sn alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhan; Ju, Dongying; Zhao, Hongyang

    2013-12-01

    This study is aimed to determine the effect of stress corrosion with low strain rates on the electrochemical properties of alloy electrode. Stress corrosion cracking tests of Mg-Zn-In-Sn alloy in 3.5 wt.% sodium chloride solutions at 25°C were performed. The effects of the electrochemical properties under the stress corrosion with low strain rates were investigated. The microstructures of cross section were observed by optical microscope. The results showed that the ultimate tensile strengths of Mg-Zn-In-Sn alloy increased and the strain decreased as the strain rates increased. Open circuit potentials (OCP) of Mg-Zn-In-Sn alloy electrode possess stability and the loop currents (LC) were improved with the increasing of stress in the elastic zone. The variation of OCP and LC did not change with the increasing of strain-rate. The microstructure of cross section observing revealed the mechanism of OCP and LC changing. Copyright © 2013 The Research Centre for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Theoretical and experimental study of stress corrosion cracking of pipeline steel in near neutral pH environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, B.; Fan, J.; Chudnovsky, A. [Illinois Univ., Chicago, IL (United States); Gogotsi, Y. [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Teitsma, A. [Gas Technology Inst., Chicago, IL (United States)

    2000-07-01

    Field observations indicate that stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in a near neutral pH environment starts with microcracks growing from corrosion pits on the external surface of the buried pipe. A complex phenomenon, SCC combines stochasticity and determinism resulting in the evolution of a SCC colony. The authors proposed a statistical model which generates a random field of corrosion pits and crack initiation at randomly selected pits. Using the framework of the Crack Layer theory, a thermodynamic model of individual stress corrosion growth was also developed recently. Relations between the crack growth, hydrogen diffusion and corrosion rates on one hand and corresponding thermodynamic forces on the other were used to develop the mathematical realization of the stress corrosion crack growth model. Additionally, there is a quick overview of the experimental program for determination of the kinetic coefficients employed in the crack growth equations. A simulation of SCC colony evolution, including a stage of the large-scale crack interaction is provided by applying the individual crack growth law to random configuration of multiple cracks. Finally, the FRANC2D Finite Element Methods resulted in a computer simulation of multi-crack cluster formation within the colony. 14 refs., 15 figs.

  8. PIE technologies for the study of stress corrosion cracking of reactor structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ugachi, Hirokazu; Nakano, Jun-ichi; Nemoto, Yoshiyuki; Kondo, Keietsu; Miwa, Yukio; Kaji, Yoshiyuki; Tsukada, Takashi; Kizaki, Minoru; Ohmi, Masao; Shimizu, Michio

    2006-01-01

    Irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) is one of the critical concerns when stainless steel components have been in service in the light water reactors (LWRs) for a long period. In general, IASCC can be reproduced on the materials irradiated over a certain threshold fluence level of fast neutron by the post-irradiation examinations (PIEs) at hot laboratories. On the other hand, recently in the Japanese boiling water reactor (BWR) power plants, many incidents of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of structural material such as the reactor core shrouds and primary loop recirculation (PLR) system piping were reported. In order to investigate the cause of SCC, PIEs at hot laboratories were carried out on the sample material extracted from BWR power plants. SCC studies require various kind of PIE techniques, because the SCC is caused by a complicated synergistic effects of stress and chemical environment on material that suffered degradations by irradiation and/or thermal aging. In this paper, we describe the PIE techniques adopted recently for our SCC studies, especially the crack growth measurement, uniaxial constant load (UCL) tensile test method, in-situ observation during slow strain rate test (SSRT) and several metallurgical test technique using the field-emission type transmission electron microscopy (FE-TEM), focused ion beam (FIB) processing technique, three Dimensional Atom Probe (3DAP) analysis and atomic force microscopy (AFM). (author)

  9. Development of an underwater shot peening system to prevent stress corrosion cracking of reactor internals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obata, M.; Kimura, M.; Shima, S.; Kanno, M.

    1998-01-01

    The water projection type shot peening system and remotely driven robots were developed to be operated under water, in order to apply shot peening to reactor internals (shroud) in boiling water reactors (BWRs). The effects of processing parameters on the residual stress depth profiles were examined to obtain the optimum processing conditions to suppress stress corrosion cracking (SCC). Creviced bent beam (CBB) type stress corrosion tests showed that the SCC resistance in Type 304 stainless steel was remarkable increased by the shot peening. It was ascertained by several fundamental experiments that the shot peening had no detrimental effects on the other material characteristics and had sufficient applicability to the practical shroud. The reliable processing system which the accelerated shots by the pressurized water could be supplied, completely sucked and repeatedly used in order to reduce radioactive waste was developed. Two types of remote handling robots were also developed to positioning to follow the complicated shape of the core shroud welds, and for processing efficiency by reducing radiation exposure , one for processing the inner surface of the cylindrical core shroud, and the other for processing the outer surface in the narrow annulus region. The system and robots were successfully applied to the core shrouds of Hamaoka Unit- 1 and Unit-2 of Chubu Electric Power Co., Ltd. (author)

  10. Pitting and stress corrosion cracking behavior in welded austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, B.T.; Chen, Z.K.; Luo, J.L.; Patchett, B.M.; Xu, Z.H.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of microstructural changes in 304 austenitic stainless steel induced by the processes of gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) and laser-beam welding (LBW) on the pitting and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behaviors was investigated. According to the in situ observations with scanning reference electrode technique (SRET) and the breakdown potentials of the test material with various microstructures, the GTAW process made the weld metal (WM) and heat-affected zone (HAZ) more sensitive to pitting corrosion than base metal (BM), but the LBW process improved the pitting resistance of the WM. In the initiation stage of SCC, the cracks in the BM and HAZ propagated in a transgranular mode. Then, the crack growth mechanism changed gradually into a mixed transgranular + intergranular mode. The cracks in the WM were likely to propagate along the dendritic boundaries. The crack initiation rate, crack initiation lifetime and crack propagation rate indicated that the high-to-low order of SCC resistance is almost the same as that for pitting resistance. High heat-input (and low cooling rate) was likely to induce the segregation of alloying elements and formation of Cr-depleted zones, resulting in the degradation in the corrosion resistance

  11. Characterization of the roles of electrochemistry, convection and crack chemistry in stress corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andresen, P.L.; Young, L.M.

    1995-01-01

    Understanding the role of ionic current flow within a crack and near the crack tip is fundamental to modeling of environmentally assisted crack advance. Critical conceptual issues and models related to ionic current flow within cracks, and the associated ''crevice'' chemistry and metal oxidation that results, are presented and examined in the light of experimental evidence. Various advanced techniques have been developed to evaluate the roles of electrochemistry, transport, and crack chemistry in stress corrosion cracking, with emphasis on high temperature ''pure'' water. These include high resolution crack length measurement by dc potential drop performed simultaneously with microsampling, electrochemical microprobe mapping, microinjection of species, and micropolarization of the crack. Conceptual issues addressed include the importance of the corrosion potential vs. oxidant concentration, the absence of oxidants and associated low corrosion potential within cracks, the location and role of macrocell currents associated with potential gradients from differential aeration cells, the localized nature of the microcell currents associated with dissolution at the crack tip, the importance of pH and adsorbed species on repassivation and crack advance, and the role of convection in crack chemistry and crack advance. Correct concepts are shown to be an essential pre-cursor to quantitative modeling

  12. Stress corrosion crack depth investigation using the time reversed elastic nonlinearity diagnostic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Brian E; Pieczonka, Lukasz; Remillieux, Marcel C; Ulrich, Timothy J; Le Bas, Pierre-Yves

    2017-01-01

    Evidence of the ability to probe depth information of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) are presented using the time reversed elastic nonlinearity diagnostic (TREND). Depth estimation of SCC is important to determine when a stainless steel canister has been breached. TREND is a method to focus elastic energy to a point in space in order to probe that point for damage and its' depth penetration is used here to study depth information about SCC. High frequencies are used to probe near the surface, while low frequencies are used to probe deeper into a stainless steel section of a cylinder.

  13. Stress corrosion cracking of Ti-8Al-1 Mo-1V in molten salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyrl, W. H.; Blackburn, M. J.

    1975-01-01

    The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of Ti-8Al-1 Mo-1V has been studied in several molten salt environments. Extensive data are reported for the alloy in highly pure LiCl-KCl. The influence of the metallurgical heat treatment and texture, and the mechanical microstructure show similarities with aqueous solutions at lower temperature. The fracture path and cracking modes are also similar to that found in other environments. The influence of H2O and H(-) in molten LiCl-KCl lead to the conclusion that hydrogen does not play a major role in crack extension in this environment.

  14. Internal oxidation and probabilistic fracture model of irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking in stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantinović, M. J.

    2017-11-01

    A probabilistic fracture model is applied to irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking effect, assuming that the oxidized part of stainless steel sample plays an essential role in the crack initiation, propagation and the sample failure. The Weibull statistical distribution of time-to-failures, estimated through the correlation with the statistical distribution of oxide strengths, including both the surface oxide layer and oxidized grain boundaries, fully describe the experimental scatter obtained in the constant load time-to-failure tests. Large failure uncertainties in these type of tests originate from an intrinsic stochastic behavior of the oxide cracking due to subcritical crack propagation process.

  15. Understanding susceptibility of in-core components to irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, H.M.; Ruther, W.E.; Sanecki, J.E.; Kassner, T.F.

    1991-03-01

    As nuclear plants age and accumulated fluences of core structural components increase, susceptibility of the components to irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) is also expected to increase. Irradiation-induced sensitization, commonly associated with an IASCC failure, was investigated in this study to provide a better understanding of long-term structural integrity of safety-significant in-core components. Irradiation-induced sensitization of high- and commercial-purity Type 304 stainless steels irradiated in BWRs was analyzed. 7 refs., 8 figs

  16. Stress corrosion test of Al- Zn- Mg alloys with and without Nb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, E.C.; Garlipp, W.

    1982-01-01

    Two aluminium alloys 1 and 2 with the respectives compositions 6,10 wt% Zn; 1,58 wt% Mg; 0,24 wt% Cu and 6,25 wt% Zn; 2,03 wt% Mg; 0,24 wt% Cu; 0,078 wt% Nb, was cast, annealed, extruded and cold rolled to 10% of the initial area. Samples was made for tensile testing and stress corrosion cracking in accord with the recommended standard test. After quench from 460 0 C they was preaged at 100 0 C, 6 hours and aged again at 160 0 C in different times. The tests revealed better properties for the alloys 2. (Author) [pt

  17. Stress analysis of a large diameter, heated pipeline in mountainous terrain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arevalo, Dario R.; Riccillo, Domingo; Curle, Ronald K. [TECHINT S.A. (Brazil)

    2003-07-01

    The primary goals of modern pipeline design and construction projects, are safety and low cost. High strength steels such as API-5L Gr. X70 reduce installed weights but translate into high D/t ratios. Modern manufacturing methods, used produce API grade pipes, increase yield strength with minimal changes to the ultimate tensile strength (UTS). The trend toward the use of high strength pipe reduces costs, but correspondingly increases D/t ratios. There are significant challenges in stress and rupture analysis to ensure stability under loading conditions that include static and transient pressures, high temperatures, dead weights, and seismic forces. (author)

  18. Stress corrosion cracking of nickel alloys in bicarbonate and chloride solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ares, A. E.; Carranza, R. M.; Giordano, C. M.; Zadorozne, N. S.; Rebak, R.B.

    2013-01-01

    Alloy 22 is one of the candidates for the manufacture of high level radioactive waste containers. These containers provide services in natural environments characterized by multi-ionics solutions, it is estimated they could suffer three types of deterioration: general corrosion, localized corrosion (crevice corrosion) and stress corrosion cracking (SCC). It has been confirmed that the presence of bicarbonate at temperatures above 60°C and applied potentials around +400 mVSCE are necessary in order to produce cracking, . This susceptibility may be associated to the instability of the passive film formed and to the formation of an anodic current peak in the polarization curves in these media. Until now, it is unclear the role played by each alloying element (Ni, Cr or Mo) in the SCC susceptibility of Alloy 22 in these media The aim of this work is to evaluate the SCC susceptibility of nickel-based alloys in media containing bicarbonate and chloride ions, at high temperature. Slow Strain Rate Testing (SSRT) was conducted to samples of different alloys: 22 (Ni-Cr-Mo), 600 (Ni-Cr-Fe), 800H (Ni-Fe-Cr) y 201 (99.5% Ni).This tests were conducted in 1.1 mol/L NaHCO 3 +1.5 mol/L NaCl a 90°C and different applied potentials (+200mVSCE,+300 mVSCE, +400 mVSCE). These results were complemented with those obtained in a previous work, where we studied the anodic electrochemical behavior of nickel base alloys under the same conditions. It was found that alloy 22 showed a current peak in a potential range between +200 mVSCE and +300 mVSCE when immersed in bicarbonate ions containing solutions. This peak was attributed to the presence of chromium in the alloys. The SSRT showed that only alloy 22 has a clear indication of stress corrosion cracking. The current results suggested that the presence of an anodic peak in the polarization curves was not a sufficient condition for cracking. (author)

  19. Effect of heat treatment and composition on stress corrosion cracking of steam generation tubing materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, H. P.; Hwang, S. S.; Kuk, I. H.; Kim, J. S.; Oh, C. Y.

    1998-01-01

    Effects of heat treatment and alloy composition on stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of steam generator tubing materials have been studied in 40% NaOH at 315.deg.C at potential of +200mV above corrosion potential using C-ring specimen and reverse U bend specimen. The tubing materials used were commercial Alloy 600, Alloy 690 and laboratory alloys, Ni-χCr-10Fe. Commercial Alloy 600, Alloy 690 were mill annealed or thermally treated.Laboratory alloy Ni-χCr-10Fe, and some of Alloy 600 and Alloy 690 were solution annealed. Polarization curves were measured to find out any relationship between SCC susceptibility and electrochemical behaviour. The variation in thermal treatment of Alloy 600 and Alloy 690 had no effect on polarization behaviour probably due to small area fraction of carbide and Cr depletion zone near grain boundary. In anodic polarization curves, the first and second anodic peaks at about 170mV and about at 260mV, respectively, above corrosion potential were independent of Cr content, whereas the third peak at 750mV above corrosion potential and passive current density in-creased with Cr content. SCC susceptibility decreased with Cr content and thermal treatment producing semicontinuous grain boundary decoration. Examination of cross sectional area of C-ring specimen showed deep SCC cracks for the alloys with less than 17%Cr and many shallow attacks for alloy 690. The role of Cr content in steam generator tubing materials and grain boundary carbide on SCC were discussed

  20. Stress Corrosion Cracking of the Drip Shield, the Waste Package Outer Barrier, and the Stainless Steel Structural Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, G.

    2004-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking is one of the most common corrosion-related causes for premature breach of metal structural components. Stress corrosion cracking is the initiation and propagation of cracks in structural components due to three factors that must be present simultaneously: metallurgical susceptibility, critical environment, and static (or sustained) tensile stresses. This report was prepared according to ''Technical Work Plan for: Regulatory Integration Modeling and Analysis of the Waste Form and Waste Package'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171583]). The purpose of this report is to provide an evaluation of the potential for stress corrosion cracking of the engineered barrier system components (i.e., the drip shield, waste package outer barrier, and waste package stainless steel inner structural cylinder) under exposure conditions consistent with the repository during the regulatory period of 10,000 years after permanent closure. For the drip shield and waste package outer barrier, the critical environment is conservatively taken as any aqueous environment contacting the metal surfaces. Appendix B of this report describes the development of the SCC-relevant seismic crack density model (SCDM). The consequence of a stress corrosion cracking breach of the drip shield, the waste package outer barrier, or the stainless steel inner structural cylinder material is the initiation and propagation of tight, sometimes branching, cracks that might be induced by the combination of an aggressive environment and various tensile stresses that can develop in the drip shields or the waste packages. The Stainless Steel Type 316 inner structural cylinder of the waste package is excluded from the stress corrosion cracking evaluation because the Total System Performance Assessment for License Application (TSPA-LA) does not take credit for the inner cylinder. This document provides a detailed description of the process-level models that can be applied to assess the performance of Alloy 22

  1. Stress Corrosion Cracking of the Drip Shield, the Waste Package Outer Barrier, and the Stainless Steel Structural Material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Gordon

    2004-10-13

    Stress corrosion cracking is one of the most common corrosion-related causes for premature breach of metal structural components. Stress corrosion cracking is the initiation and propagation of cracks in structural components due to three factors that must be present simultaneously: metallurgical susceptibility, critical environment, and static (or sustained) tensile stresses. This report was prepared according to ''Technical Work Plan for: Regulatory Integration Modeling and Analysis of the Waste Form and Waste Package'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171583]). The purpose of this report is to provide an evaluation of the potential for stress corrosion cracking of the engineered barrier system components (i.e., the drip shield, waste package outer barrier, and waste package stainless steel inner structural cylinder) under exposure conditions consistent with the repository during the regulatory period of 10,000 years after permanent closure. For the drip shield and waste package outer barrier, the critical environment is conservatively taken as any aqueous environment contacting the metal surfaces. Appendix B of this report describes the development of the SCC-relevant seismic crack density model (SCDM). The consequence of a stress corrosion cracking breach of the drip shield, the waste package outer barrier, or the stainless steel inner structural cylinder material is the initiation and propagation of tight, sometimes branching, cracks that might be induced by the combination of an aggressive environment and various tensile stresses that can develop in the drip shields or the waste packages. The Stainless Steel Type 316 inner structural cylinder of the waste package is excluded from the stress corrosion cracking evaluation because the Total System Performance Assessment for License Application (TSPA-LA) does not take credit for the inner cylinder. This document provides a detailed description of the process-level models that can be applied to assess the

  2. Electro chemical studies on stress corrosion cracking of Incoloy-800 in caustic solution, part I: As received samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinu Alice

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Many non-volatile impurities accidentally introduced into the steam generator tend to Concentrate on its surface in restricted flow areas. In this way these impurities can lead to stress corrosion cracking (SCC on stressed tubes of the steam generator. Such impurities can be strong alkaline or acid solutions. To evaluate the effect of alkaline concentrated environments on SCC of steam generator tubes, the tests were con ducted on stressed samples of Incoloy-800 in 10% NaOH solution. To accelerate the SCC process, stressed specimens were anodically polarised in a caustic solution in an electro chemical cell. The method of stressing of Incoloy-800 tubes used in our experiments was the C-ring. Using the cathodic zone of the potentiodynamic curves it was possible to calculate the most important electrochemical parameters: the corrosion current, the corrosion rate, and the polarization resistance. We found that the value of the corrosion potential to initiate the SCC microcracks was -100 mV. The tested samples were examined using the metallographic method. The main experimental results showed that the in crease of the stress state promoted the in crease of the SCC susceptibility of Incoloy-800 samples tested under the same conditions, and that the length of the SCC-type microcracks in creased with the growth of the stress value.

  3. Key parameters having an influence on stress corrosion cracking resistance of alloy 182

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steltzlen, F.; Benhamou, C.; Calonne, O.; Brugier, B.; Massoud, J.P.

    2015-01-01

    Nickel-base Alloy 182 has been widely used in nuclear power plants for welds of Alloy 600 components (RPV Bottom Mount Instrumentation and Head Nozzles, Steam Generator Divider Plates...). In service, Alloy 182 shows a better resistance to SCC (Stress Corrosion Cracking) than Alloy 600, but, taking into account operational feedback outside of France, its behavior remains questionable for Long Term Operations. International Field experience and laboratory studies showed that stress relief heat-treated alloy 182 welds result in a better PWSCC resistance than the untreated ones. Trends concerning the following parameters: chemical composition, temperature, stress, surface condition and sampling orientation emerged as influential parameters from preliminary studies. In order to confirm and quantify the effect of the identified key parameters on PWSCC crack initiation, two alloy 182 welds with chemical compositions inducing high and low hot cracking susceptibility and respectively low and high PWSCC susceptibility were investigated. The experimental program included eleven primary water exposures from 5000 up to 15000 hours, in terms of cumulative exposure time, in 3 autoclaves at 3 different operating temperatures (320, 345 and 360 C. degrees). More than 20 various sets of U-bend specimens (6 specimens per set) were tested to investigate 4 stress levels, 2 sampling orientations and 2 surface conditions (grinding on an automatic grinding bench or mechanical polishing). After each successive corrosion test period, optical, dye penetrant tests, XRD measurements and SEM surface examinations were carried out on the specimens. Destructive examinations are performed on the cracked specimens progressively removed from the autoclave and on the un-cracked specimens at the end of the tests. We can draw the following conclusions. The initial weld defects (hot cracking, slag inclusion, mechanical defect...) existing on surface of the specimens did not propagate. Existing weld

  4. A Study on the Residual Stress Improvement of PWSCC(Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking) in DMW(Dissimilar Metal Weld)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Sung Sik; Kim, Seok Hun; Lee, Seung Gun [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Heung Bae [KEPCO Engineering and Construction Company, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    Since 2000s, most of the cracks are found in welds, especially in (DMW) dissimilar metal welds such as pressurizer safety relief nozzle, reactor head penetration, reactor bottom mounted instrumentation (BMI), and reactor nozzles. Even the cracks are revealed as a primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC), it is difficult to find the cracks by current non destructive examination. The PWSCC is occurred by three incident factors, such as susceptible material, environmental corrosive condition, and welding residual stress. If one of the three factors can be erased or decreased, the PWSCC could be prevented. In this study, we performed residual stress analysis for DMW and several residual stress improvement methods. As the preventive methods of PWSCC, we used laser peening(IP) method, inlay weld(IW) method, and induction heating stress improvement(IHSI) method. The effect of residual stress improvement for preventive methods was compared and discussed by finite element modeling and residual stress of repaired DMW

  5. A Study on the Residual Stress Improvement of PWSCC(Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking) in DMW(Dissimilar Metal Weld)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Sung Sik; Kim, Seok Hun; Lee, Seung Gun; Park, Heung Bae

    2010-01-01

    Since 2000s, most of the cracks are found in welds, especially in (DMW) dissimilar metal welds such as pressurizer safety relief nozzle, reactor head penetration, reactor bottom mounted instrumentation (BMI), and reactor nozzles. Even the cracks are revealed as a primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC), it is difficult to find the cracks by current non destructive examination. The PWSCC is occurred by three incident factors, such as susceptible material, environmental corrosive condition, and welding residual stress. If one of the three factors can be erased or decreased, the PWSCC could be prevented. In this study, we performed residual stress analysis for DMW and several residual stress improvement methods. As the preventive methods of PWSCC, we used laser peening(IP) method, inlay weld(IW) method, and induction heating stress improvement(IHSI) method. The effect of residual stress improvement for preventive methods was compared and discussed by finite element modeling and residual stress of repaired DMW

  6. Imaging and size analysis of stress corrosion cracks in austenitic components using the synthetic aperture focus technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spies, Martin; Rieder, Hans; Dillhoefer, Alexander; Dugan, Sandra

    2011-01-01

    Riss formation and growth by intercrystalline stress corrosion cracking occurs especially in nickel alloys in case of mixed steels and also in the heat-affected zone in some austenitic Cr-Ni steels. In view of the strong branching of these cracks, amplitude-based ultrasonic methods of measurement may fail. The contribution describes the detection and size analysis of stress corrosion cracks. The synthetic aperture focus technique (SAFT) was used to improve the signal-noise ratio of the ultrasonic inspection data, especially for crack tip identification. several test bodies with intercrystalline stress corrosion cracks with depths ranging from 2.5 mm to 16 mm were analyzed successfully by a combination of conventional techniques for acquisition of B-scan data, followed by SAFT processing.

  7. Fabrication of imitative stress corrosion cracking using diffusion bonding for the development of nondestructive testing and evaluations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yusa, Noritaka; Hashizume, Hidetoshi

    2011-01-01

    This study reports a method to fabricate imitative stress corrosion cracking suitable for the development of nondestructive testing and evaluation methods. The method is to embed a partially-bonded region, which simulates the characteristics of stress corrosion cracking, inside a material by bonding together surfaces having artificial grooves. Since the sizes of the grooves are smaller than the spatial resolution of nondestructive testing method applied, the material property realized can be regarded as uniform as the actual stress corrosion cracking. The grooves are introduced using mechanical machining, which enables one to control the characteristics of the simulated flaw. Four specimens made of type 316L austenitic stainless steel are fabricated. The method is demonstrated by visual and eddy current examinations. (author)

  8. POTENTIAL FOR STRESS CORROSION CRACKING OF A537 CARBON STEEL NUCLEAR WASTE TANKS CONTAINING HIGHLY CAUSTIC SOLUTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lam, P.; Stripling, C.; Fisher, D.; Elder, J.

    2010-04-26

    The evaporator recycle streams of nuclear waste tanks may contain waste in a chemistry and temperature regime that exceeds the current corrosion control program, which imposes temperature limits to mitigate caustic stress corrosion cracking (CSCC). A review of the recent service history found that two of these A537 carbon steel tanks were operated in highly concentrated hydroxide solution at high temperature. Visual inspections, experimental testing, and a review of the tank service history have shown that CSCC has occurred in uncooled/un-stress relieved tanks of similar construction. Therefore, it appears that the efficacy of stress relief of welding residual stress is the primary corrosion-limiting mechanism. The objective of this experimental program is to test A537 carbon steel small scale welded U-bend specimens and large welded plates (30.48 x 30.38 x 2.54 cm) in a caustic solution with upper bound chemistry (12 M hydroxide and 1 M each of nitrate, nitrite, and aluminate) and temperature (125 C). These conditions simulate worst-case situations in these nuclear waste tanks. Both as-welded and stress-relieved specimens have been tested. No evidence of stress corrosion cracking was found in the U-bend specimens after 21 days of testing. The large plate test was completed after 12 weeks of immersion in a similar solution at 125 C except that the aluminate concentration was reduced to 0.3 M. Visual inspection of the plate revealed that stress corrosion cracking had not initiated from the machined crack tips in the weld or in the heat affected zone. NDE ultrasonic testing also confirmed subsurface cracking did not occur. Based on these results, it can be concluded that the environmental condition of these tests was unable to develop stress corrosion cracking within the test periods for the small welded U-bends and for the large plates, which were welded with an identical procedure as used in the construction of the actual nuclear waste tanks in the 1960s. The

  9. Uncertainty quantification methodologies development for stress corrosion cracking of canister welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dingreville, Remi Philippe Michel [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bryan, Charles R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-09-30

    This letter report presents a probabilistic performance assessment model to evaluate the probability of canister failure (through-wall penetration) by SCC. The model first assesses whether environmental conditions for SCC – the presence of an aqueous film – are present at canister weld locations (where tensile stresses are likely to occur) on the canister surface. Geometry-specific storage system thermal models and weather data sets representative of U.S. spent nuclear fuel (SNF) storage sites are implemented to evaluate location-specific canister surface temperature and relative humidity (RH). As the canister cools and aqueous conditions become possible, the occurrence of corrosion is evaluated. Corrosion is modeled as a two-step process: first, pitting is initiated, and the extent and depth of pitting is a function of the chloride surface load and the environmental conditions (temperature and RH). Second, as corrosion penetration increases, the pit eventually transitions to a SCC crack, with crack initiation becoming more likely with increasing pit depth. Once pits convert to cracks, a crack growth model is implemented. The SCC growth model includes rate dependencies on both temperature and crack tip stress intensity factor, and crack growth only occurs in time steps when aqueous conditions are predicted. The model suggests that SCC is likely to occur over potential SNF interim storage intervals; however, this result is based on many modeling assumptions. Sensitivity analyses provide information on the model assumptions and parameter values that have the greatest impact on predicted storage canister performance, and provide guidance for further research to reduce uncertainties.

  10. Modeling of Stress Corrosion Cracking for High Level Radioactive-Waste Packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, S C; Gordon, G M; Andresen, P L; Herrera, M L

    2003-01-01

    A stress corrosion cracking (SCC) model has been adapted for performance prediction of high level radioactive-waste packages to be emplaced in the proposed Yucca Mountain radioactive-waste repository. SCC is one form of environmentally assisted cracking due to three factors, which must be present simultaneously: metallurgical susceptibility, critical environment, and static (or sustained) tensile stresses. For waste packages of the proposed Yucca Mountain repository, the outer barrier material is Alloy 22, a highly corrosion resistant alloy, the environment is represented by the water film present on the surface of the waste package from dripping or deliquescence of soluble salts present in any surface deposits, and the stress is principally the weld induced residual stress. SCC has historically been separated into ''initiation'' and ''propagation'' phases. Initiation of SCC will not occur on a smooth surface if the surface stress is below a threshold value defined as the threshold stress. Cracks can also initiate at and propagate from flaws (or defects) resulting from manufacturing processes (such as welding). To account for crack propagation, the slip dissolution/film rupture (SDFR) model is adopted to provide mathematical formulas for prediction of the crack growth rate. Once the crack growth rate at an initiated SCC is determined, the time to through-wall penetration for the waste package can be calculated. The SDFR model relates the advance (or propagation) of cracks, subsequent to the crack initiation from bare metal surface, to the metal oxidation transients that occur when the protective film at the crack tip is continually ruptured and repassivated. A crack, however, may reach the ''arrest'' state before it enters the ''propagation'' phase. There exists a threshold stress intensity factor, which provides a criterion for determining if an initiated crack or pre-existing manufacturing flaw will reach the ''arrest'' state. This paper presents the research

  11. Test report on experimental stress analysis of a 24 inch diameter tee (ORNL T-13)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henley, D.R.

    1975-03-01

    The experimental stress analysis and low cycle fatigue test of one 24 in. x 24 in. x 10 in. schedule 160 carbon steel, ANSI B16.9 tee performed by Combustion Engineering, Inc. are described. The tee was instrumented with 230 rectangular strain gage rosettes. Elastic data was obtained for 12 loading conditions consisting of internal pressure and orthogonal pure moments and orthogonal direct forces applied individually to the free branch and run ends of the tee. One of the run ends of the tee was ''built in'' throughout the test. All loads were applied through pipe extensions welded to the tee. The tee was tested to failure in a low cycle pressure fatigue test with a cyclic internal pressure between 100 psi and 7000 psi. A through-the-wall fatigue crack occurred at 15,084 cycles. Significant test results are summarized and compared with design values tabulated in the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section III, 1971. (U.S.)

  12. Inspection indications, stress corrosion cracks and repair of process piping in nuclear materials production reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louthan, M.R. Jr.; West, S.L.; Nelson, D.Z.

    1991-01-01

    Ultrasonic inspection of Schedule 40 Type 304 stainless steel piping in the process water system of the Savannah River Site reactors has provided indications of discontinuities in less than 10% of the weld heat affected zones. Pipe sections containing significant indications are replaced with Type 304L components. Post removal metallurgical evaluation showed that the indications resulted from stress corrosion cracking in weld heat-affected zones and that the overall weld quality was excellent. The evaluation also revealed weld fusion zone discontinuities such as incomplete penetration, incomplete fusion, inclusions, underfill at weld roots and hot cracks. Service induced extension of these discontinuities was generally not significant although stress corrosion cracking in one weld fusion zone was noted. One set of UT indications was caused by metallurgical discontinuities at the fusion boundary of an extra weld. This extra weld, not apparent on the outer pipe surface, was slightly overlapping and approximately parallel to the weld being inspected. This extra weld was made during a pipe repair, probably associated with initial construction processes. The two nearly parallel welds made accurate assessment of the UT signal difficult. The implications of these observations to the inspection and repair of process water systems of nuclear reactors is discussed

  13. Stress corrosion cracking of U-0.1% Cr in humid helium atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zalkind, S.; Eshkenazy, R.; Harush, S.; Halperin, D.; Moreno, D.; Abramov, E.; Venkert, A.

    1994-01-01

    Rivets were matched into adapted drilled holes in plates, both made of U-0.1% Cr alloy and were placed in different environments containing dry air and helium and humid air and helium for a variety of exposure times. After opening, the most significant amounts of corrosion products were detected in the specimens that stayed for three years in humid helium (5% RH) environment. Radial cracks, developed in the bore edge, were detected in the specimens. X-ray diffraction patterns of the corrosion products gave the composition of UH 3 and UO 2 . The microstructure was examined using light and electron microscopy techniques. The hydride phase that was observed, formed mainly beneath the oxide layer and penetrated into the metal matrix as needle-like forms. The formation of a lower density hydride phase, yielded in a large volume change causing the development of high stresses at the rivet-bore interface. The combination of the high stress and the weakening of the bore edge due to the presence of the brittle hydride phase led to radial crack formation around the bore edge. (orig.)

  14. Using transmission Kikuchi diffraction to study intergranular stress corrosion cracking in type 316 stainless steels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisnar, Martina; Vilalta-Clemente, Arantxa; Gholinia, Ali; Moody, Michael; Wilkinson, Angus J; Huin, Nicolas; Lozano-Perez, Sergio

    2015-08-01

    Transmission Kikuchi diffraction (TKD), also known as transmission-electron backscatter diffraction (t-EBSD) is a novel method for orientation mapping of electron transparent transmission electron microscopy specimen in the scanning electron microscope and has been utilized for stress corrosion cracking characterization of type 316 stainless steels. The main advantage of TKD is a significantly higher spatial resolution compared to the conventional EBSD due to the smaller interaction volume of the incident beam with the specimen. Two 316 stainless steel specimen, tested for stress corrosion cracking in hydrogenated and oxygenated pressurized water reactor chemistry, were characterized via TKD. The results include inverse pole figure (IPFZ) maps, image quality maps and misorientation maps, all acquired in very short time (crack with respect to the grain boundary, deformation bands, twinning and slip. Furthermore, TKD has been used to measure the grain boundary misorientation and establish a gauge for quantifying plastic deformation at the crack tip and other regions in the surrounding matrix. Both grain boundary migration and slip transfer have been detected as well. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Mitigation of Intergranular Stress Corrosion Cracking in Al-Mg by Electrochemical Potential Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, M. E.; Scully, J. R.; Burns, J. T.

    2017-08-01

    Intergranular stress corrosion cracking in the Al-Mg alloy AA5456-H116 is suppressed via cathodic polarization in 0.6 M NaCl, saturated (5.45 M) NaCl, 2 M MgCl2, and saturated (5 M) MgCl2. Three zones of intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IG-SCC) susceptibility correlate with pitting potentials of unsensitized AA5456-H116 and pure β phase (Al3Mg2) in each solution. These critical potentials reasonably describe the influence of α Al matrix and β phase dissolution rates on IG-SCC severity. Complete inhibition occurred at applied potentials of -1.0 V and -1.1 V versus saturated calomel electrode ( V SCE) in 0.6 M NaCl. Whereas only partial mitigation of IG-SCC was achieved at -0.9 V SCE in 0.6 M NaCl and at -0.9, -1.0, and -1.1 V SCE in the more aggressive environments. Correlation of pitting potentials in bulk environments with IG-SCC behavior suggests an effect of bulk environment [Cl-] and pH on the stabilized crack tip chemistry.

  16. Aqueous chloride stress corrosion cracking of titanium: A comparison with environmental hydrogen embrittlement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, H. G.

    1973-01-01

    The physical characteristics of stress corrosion cracking of titanium in an aqueous chloride environment are compared with those of embrittlement of titanium by a gaseous hydrogen environment in an effort to help contribute to the understanding of the possible role of hydrogen in the complex stress corrosion cracking process. Based on previous studies, the two forms of embrittlement are shown to be similar at low hydrogen pressures (100 N/sqm) but dissimilar at higher hydrogen pressures. In an effort to quantify this comparison, tests were conducted in an aqueous chloride solution using the same material and test techniques as had previously been employed in a gaseous hydrogen environment. The results of these tests strongly support models based on hydrogen as the embrittling species in an aqueous chloride environment. Further, it is shown that if hydrogen is the causal species, the effective hydrogen fugacity at the surface of titanium exposed to an aqueous chloride environment is equivalent to a molecular hydrogen pressure of approximately 10 N/sqm.

  17. Evaluation of the Stress Corrosion Cracking Behavior of Inconel 600 Alloy by Acoustic Emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sung, Key Yong; Kim, In Sup; Yoon, Young Ku

    1996-01-01

    Acoustic emission(AE) response during stress corrosion cracking(SCC) of Inconel 600 alloy has been monitored to study the AE detectability of crack generation and growth by comparing the crack behavior with AE parameters processed, and to evaluate the applicability as a nondestructive evaluation(AE) by measuring the minimum crack size detectable with AE. Variously heat-treated specimens were tensioned by constant extension rate test(CERT) in various extension rate to give rise to the different SCC behavior of specimens. The AE amplitude level generated from intergranular stress-corrosion cracking(IGSCC) is higher than those from ductile fracture and mechanical deformation, which means the AE amplitude can be a significant parameter for distinguishing the An source. AE can also provide the effective means to identify the transition from the small crack initiation and formation of dominant cracks to the dominant crack growth. Minimum crack size detectable with AE is supposed to be approximately 200 to 400μm in length and below 100μm in depth. The test results show that AE technique has a capability for detecting the early stage of IGSCC growth and the potential for practical application as a NDE

  18. Experimental study on the stress corrosion cracking behavior of AISI347 in acid chloride ion solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanpeng Qu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The stress corrosion cracking (SCC behavior of AISI347 austenitic stainless steel exposed to acid solution containing chloride ion at different temperature and pressure is studied through slow strain rate testing (SSRT at different test condition. The result of SSRT shows, with the pressure increasing, the SCC resistance is getting worse and the trend of brittle fracture presented by the fracture surface is more obvious. With the temperature rising, the mechanical properties of AISI347 getting worse first and then getting better, it gets to be the worst when the temperature is 260 °C. The result of significance effect analysis of temperature and pressure on SCC shows that the temperature has a greater effect on the resistance to SCC of AISI347 austenitic stainless steel than the pressure. The main component of passive film is analyzed and the mechanism of SCC is discussed. Chromium oxides soluble in the acidic chloride solution results in the forming of corrosion pits and the cracking of the passive film under stress.

  19. Stress corrosion cracking test with slow strain rate and constant current

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ondrejcin, R.S.

    1976-01-01

    A rapid electrochemical tensile test was developed for evaluating stress corrosion crack initiation in carbon steel. Constant anodic current was imposed on smooth-bar tensile specimens as the specimens were slowly strained to fracture at cross-head speeds of 1.3 x 10 -6 /sec. Equivalent response results were obtained for all ductility properties measured; uniform elongation, total elongation and reduction of area. Total elongation was chosen as the index for stress corrosion crack initiation. An equation was developed that allowed calculation of total elongation of specimens in electrolytes (test solutions) with composition ranges of 1.5 to 5.5 M nitrate, 0 to 3.5 M nitrite, and 0 to 5.0 M hydroxide, and a temperature range of 50 0 C to 100 0 C. A minimum of 13 percent total elongation was selected to indicate the possible initiation of cracking in A 285-B steel alloy. The test was used to evaluate relative aggressiveness of synthetic nuclear wastes on A 285-B carbon steel and the relative resistances of several steels to given solution compositions. Test results formed one of the bases for setting temperature limits and concentration limits for several ions in nuclear wastes that are stored in carbon steel tanks at the Savannah River Plant

  20. Prediction of stress corrosion of carbon steel by nuclear process liquid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ondrejcin, R.S.

    1978-08-01

    Radioactive liquid wastes are produced as a consequence of processing fuel from Savannah River Plant (SRP) production reactors. These wastes are stored in mild steel waste tanks, some of which have developed cracks from stress corrosion. A laboratory test was developed to determine the relative agressiveness of the wastes for stress corrosion cracking of mild steel. Tensile samples were strained to fracture in synthetic waste solutions in an electrochemical cell with the sample as the anode. Crack initiation is expected if total elongation of the steel in the test is less than its uniform elongation in air. Cracking would be anticipated in a plant waste tank if solution conditions were equivalent to test conditions that cause a total elongation that is less than uniform elongation. The electrochemical tensile tests showed that the supernates in salt receiver tanks at SRP have the least aggressive compositions, and wastes newly generated during fuel repocessing have the most aggressive ones. Test data also verified that ASTM A 516-70 steel used in the fabrication of the later design waste tanks is less susceptible to cracking than the ASTM A 285-B steel used in earlier designs

  1. Stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of the earthquake resistant NOM B457 Mexican steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arganis J, C.R.

    1994-01-01

    The Mexican construction code was modified after the Mexico city 1985 earthquake, substituted the medium carbon reinforced steel NOM B6 by the new micro alloyed steel NOM B457 in 42 Kg/mm 2 grade. The present study reports the evaluation of the NOM B457 steel behavior in mortar with and without 2% wt. in chlorides and in Ca(OH) 2 saturated solutions. The results are compared with the NOM B6 steel behavior in the same conditions. The Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) is not present in all the conditions used in this study and there are not susceptibility potential range to SCC when the material is evaluated by electrochemical Tests, Constant Extension Rate Tests (CERT) and Constant Load Test at 80 % of yield stress. A susceptibility potential range to Hydrogen Induced Cracking (HIC) is detected, below -900 mV. vs Standard Calomel Electrode (SCE) by CERT at constant potential

  2. New insight into the pit-to-crack transition from finite element analysis of the stress and strain distribution around a corrosion pit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turnbull, A.; Wright, L.; Crocker, L.

    2010-01-01

    A finite element (FE) analysis has been undertaken to evaluate the stress and strain distribution associated with a single corrosion pit in a cylindrical steel specimen stressed remotely in tension. A key observation was the localisation of plastic strain to the pit walls (just below the surface of the specimen). Simulation of a growing pit in a static stress field indicated corresponding plastic strain rates that were commensurate with values associated with stress corrosion cracking. This observation introduces a wholly new concept in understanding of the evolution of stress corrosion cracks from pits and correlates with recent X-ray tomography measurements.

  3. Stress corrosion cracking initiation of oxidized Incoloy 800 in caustic environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinu, A.; Chicinas, I.; Abrudeanu, M.; Velciu, L.; Ionescu, D.; Stanciulescu, M.; Chicinas, I.; Abrudeanu, M.; Dinu, A.

    2013-01-01

    With the purpose to study the influence of the oxide layer in the first step of the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) mechanism, some oxidized and non-oxidized C-rings cuts from Incoloy 800 tubes were tested in 10% sodium hydroxide solutions (ph=13) at 260 O C and 50 atm, for 57 days. We used in our experiments C-rings because this type of samples have small dimensions and may be stressed using simple methods and in this way they can be exposed in nearly any type of medium. To create some stress concentrations, a mechanical pre-crack of 100.m depth was executed on the external side of the C-rings. The value of the appeared stresses at mechanical crack tip was evaluated using ANSYS code. The oxidized C-rings were obtained by autoclaving for 20 days in demineralised water adjusted with hydrazine (ph=9.7), at 260 O C and 50 atm. By X-rays diffraction there are emphasized iron dichromium oxide, nickel dichromium oxide, magnetite and hematite. Using the scanning electron microscopy we distinguished the presence of a double layer: the inner layer compact and adherent, containing fine grains associated with iron dichromium oxide, nickel dichromium oxide and the outer layer composed of other greater and less uniform particles associated with magnetite and hematite. After the SCC test, it was observed that the presence of the oxide layer led to a transgranulary SCC initiation, direct from a fissure in the oxide layer; the length of the SCC cracks is about 80-100 microns. In the absence of the oxide layer, the SCC cracks start intergranulary, from a local corrosive attack zone and their depth is approximately 200 microns. In both cases the SCC cracks have transgranular propagation. (authors)

  4. Stress corrosion cracking tests on electron beam welded carbon steel specimens in carbonate-bicarbonate solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parkins, R.N.

    1985-04-01

    Stress corrosion cracking tests have been performed on tapered carbon steel test pieces containing electron beam welds with a view to defining susceptibility to such cracking in a carbonate-bicarbonate solution at 90 C and an appropriate electrode potential. The tests involved applying cyclic loads to the specimens and it is shown that the threshold stress for cracking reduces linearly with increase in the magnitude of the cyclic load component. Extrapolation of these trends to zero fluctuating stress indicates static load threshold stresses in the vicinity of the yield stress (i.e. about 300 N/mm 2 for parent plate without a weld, 400 N/mm 2 for specimens with welds on one side only and 600 N/mm 2 for specimens having welds penetrating through the thickness of the specimen). The averages of the maximum crack velocities observed were least for parent plate material and greatest for weld metal, the former being essentially intergranular in morphology and the latter mostly transgranular, with heat affected zone material being intermediate between these extremes. (author)

  5. Modeling of stresses at grain boundaries with respect to occurrence of stress corrosion cracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozaczek, K.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Sinharoy, A.; Ruud, C.O. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); McIlree, A.R. [Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The distributions of elastic stresses/strains in the grain boundary regions were studied by the analytical and the finite element models. The grain boundaries represent the sites where stress concentration occurs as a result of discontinuity of elastic properties across the grain boundary and the presence of second phase particles elastically different from the surrounding matrix grains. A quantitative analysis of those stresses for steels and nickel based alloys showed that the stress concentrations in the grain boundary regions are high enough to cause a local microplastic deformation even when the material is in the macroscopic elastic regime. The stress redistribution as a result of such a plastic deformation was discussed.

  6. Flat growth of 7075, 7475, 7050 and 7049 aluminum alloy plate in stress corrosion environments: 2-year marine atmosphere results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorward, R. C.; Hasse, K. R.

    1978-01-01

    Marine atmospheric exposure of smooth and precracked specimens from 7075, 7475, 7050 and 7049 plates support the conclusion that for a given strength level, the short transverse stress corrosion resistance of 7050-T7X and 7049-T7X is superior to that of 7075-T7X. The threshold stress intensity (K sub Iscc) for these alloys is about 25 MPa square root m at a yield strength of about 460 MPa; the corresponding yield strength level for 7075-T7X at this SCR level is about 425 MPa. Additional tests on two lots of high-toughness 7475 plate indicate that this alloy is capable of achieving K sub Iscc values of about 35 MPa square root m at yield strengths of 400-450 MPa. Precracked specimens from all these 7XXX-series alloys are subject to self loading from corrosion product wedging. This effect causes stress corrosion cracks to continue growing at very low apparent stress intensities, and should therefore be considered a potential driving force for stress corrosion in design and materials selection.

  7. Stress corrosion of austenitic steels mono and polycrystals in Mg Cl2 medium: micro fractography and study of behaviour improvements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chambreuil-Paret, A.

    1997-01-01

    The austenitic steels in a hot chlorinated medium present a rupture which is macroscopically fragile, discontinuous and formed with crystallographic facets. The interpretation of these facies crystallographic character is a key for the understanding of the stress corrosion damages. The first aim of this work is then to study into details the micro fractography of 316 L steels mono and polycrystals. Two types of rupture are observed: a very fragile rupture which stresses on the possibility of the interatomic bonds weakening by the corrosive medium Mg Cl 2 and a discontinuous rupture (at the micron scale) on the sliding planes which is in good agreement with the corrosion enhanced plasticity model. The second aim of this work is to search for controlling the stress corrosion by the mean of a pre-strain hardening. Two types of pre-strain hardening have been tested. A pre-strain hardening with a monotonic strain is negative. Indeed, the first cracks starts very early and the cracks propagation velocity is increased. This is explained by the corrosion enhanced plasticity model through the intensifying of the local corrosion-deformation interactions. On the other hand, a cyclic pre-strain hardening is particularly favourable. The first micro strains starts later and the strain on breaking point levels are increased. The delay of the starting of the first strains is explained by a surface distortion structure which is very homogeneous. At last, the dislocations structure created in fatigue at saturation is a planar structure of low energy which reduces the corrosion-deformation interactions, source of micro strains. (O.M.)

  8. INVESTIGATION OF THE POTENTIAL FOR CAUSTIC STRESS CORROSION CRACKING OF A537 CARBON STEEL NUCLEAR WASTE TANKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lam, P.

    2009-10-15

    The evaporator recycle streams contain waste in a chemistry and temperature regime that may be outside of the current waste tank corrosion control program, which imposes temperature limits to mitigate caustic stress corrosion cracking (CSCC). A review of the recent service history (1998-2008) of Tanks 30 and 32 showed that these tanks were operated in highly concentrated hydroxide solution at high temperature. Visual inspections, experimental testing, and a review of the tank service history have shown that CSCC has occurred in uncooled/un-stress relieved F-Area tanks. Therefore, for the Type III/IIIA waste tanks the efficacy of the stress relief of welding residual stress is the only corrosion-limiting mechanism. The objective of this experimental program is to test carbon steel small scale welded U-bend specimens and large welded plates (12 x 12 x 1 in.) in a caustic solution with upper bound chemistry (12 M hydroxide and 1 M each of nitrate, nitrite, and aluminate) and temperature (125 C). These conditions simulate worst-case situations in Tanks 30 and 32. Both as-welded and stress-relieved specimens have been tested. No evidence of stress corrosion cracking was found in the U-bend specimens after 21 days of testing. The large plate test is currently in progress, but no cracking has been observed after 9 weeks of immersion. Based on the preliminary results, it appears that the environmental conditions of the tests are unable to develop stress corrosion cracking within the duration of these tests.

  9. Tensile stress corrosion cracking of type 304 stainless steel irradiated to very high dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, H. M.; Ruther, W. E.; Strain, R. V.; Shack, W. J.

    2001-09-01

    Certain safety-related core internal structural components of light water reactors, usually fabricated from Type 304 or 316 austenitic stainless steels (SSs), accumulate very high levels of irradiation damage (20--100 displacement per atom or dpa) by the end of life. The data bases and mechanistic understanding of, the degradation of such highly irradiated components, however, are not well established. A key question is the nature of irradiation-assisted intergranular cracking at very high dose, i.e., is it purely mechanical failure or is it stress-commotion cracking? In this work, hot-cell tests and microstructural characterization were performed on Type 304 SS from the hexagonal fuel can of the decommissioned EBR-11 reactor after irradiation to {approximately}50 dpa at {approximately}370 C. Slow-strain-rate tensile tests were conducted at 289 C in air and in water at several levels of electrochemical potential (ECP), and microstructural characteristics were analyzed by scanning and transmission electron microcopies. The material deformed significantly by twinning and exhibited surprisingly high ductility in air, but was susceptible to severe intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) at high ECP. Low levels of dissolved O and ECP were effective in suppressing the susceptibility of the heavily irradiated material to IGSCC, indicating that the stress corrosion process associated with irradiation-induced grain-boundary Cr depletion, rather than purely mechanical separation of grain boundaries, plays the dominant role. However, although IGSCC was suppressed, the material was susceptible to dislocation channeling at low ECP, and this susceptibility led to poor work-hardening capability and low ductility.

  10. The Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking Mechanism of Alloy 600 Steam Generator Tubes: Materials Perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Youngsuk; Kim, Sungsoo; Kim, Daewhan

    2013-01-01

    The problem is that intergranular (IG) cracking of austenitic Fe-Cr-Ni alloys occurs even in Ar with no corrosion or oxidation of grain boundaries being accompanied. This fact suggests that IG cracking has nothing to do with grain boundary (GB) corrosion or oxidation. This fact cast a doubt about the current notion that applied stresses are required to initiate IG cracking or PWSCC. These facts indicate that PWSCC is closely related to internal factors of materials, not to external factors such as grain boundary oxidation or corrosion or applied stresses. Given that austenitic alloys including Alloy 600 are a kind of solid solution alloys with alloying elements dissolved in the matrix as solutes, ordering of alloying elements of Fe, Cr and Ni occur in Alloy 600 during exposure to reactor operating condition. We suggest that atomic ordering is the main internal factor to govern PWSCC or IG cracking of austenitic Fe-Cr-Ni alloys because lattice contraction due to atomic ordering induces internal stresses which are large enough to cause GB cracking. The aim of this work is to provide experimental evidence for our suggestion. To this end, water quenching (WQ) or air cooling (AC) or furnace cooling (FC) was applied respectively to Alloy 600 after solution treatment at 1095 .deg. C for 0.5h to make Alloy 600 with either disorder (DO) or different degrees of short range order, respectively. Alloy 600 showed lattice contraction upon aging at 400 .deg. C whose extent increased with increasing cooling rate: the water-quenched (WQ) Alloy 600 exhibited the largest amount of lattice contraction than the furnace-cooled (FC) or air-cooled (AC) one. Yonezawa's experiments have indeed shown that the WQ-Alloy 600 with the largest amount of lattice contraction upon aging at 400 .deg. C is the most susceptible to PWSCC when compared to the AC- or FC-Alloy 600 with the lesser amount of lattice contraction. These observations demonstrate, for the first time, that PWSCC of Alloy 600 is

  11. Stress Corrosion Cracking in Light Water Reactors: Good Practices and Lessons Learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    One of the IAEAs statutory objectives is to 'seek to accelerate and enlarge the contribution of atomic energy to peace, health and prosperity throughout the world'. One way this objective is achieved is through the publication of a range of technical series. Two of these are the IAEA Nuclear Energy Series and the IAEA Safety Standards Series. According to Statute Article III, A.6, the IAEA Safety Standards establish 'standards of safety for protection of health and minimization of danger to life and property.' The safety standards include the Safety Fundamentals, Safety Requirements, and Safety Guides. These standards are written primarily in a regulatory style, and are binding on the IAEA for its own programmes. The principal users are the Member States, regulatory bodies and other national authorities. The IAEA Nuclear Energy Series comprises reports designed to encourage and assist R and D on and practical application of, nuclear energy for peaceful uses. This includes practical examples to be used by Member States, owners and operators of utilities, implementing organizations, academia, and government officials; among others. This information is presented in guides, reports on technology status and advances, and best practices for peaceful uses of nuclear energy based on inputs from international experts. The IAEA Nuclear Energy Series complements the IAEA Safety Standards. Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is a significant ageing degradation mechanism for major components of both pressurized water reactors (PWRs) and boiling water reactors (BWRs). In PWRs, the main problem with SCC has been with Alloy 600 components such as steam generator tubes, pressurizer instrument penetrations and heater sleeves, control rod drive mechanism (CRDM) nozzles, and hot leg penetrations. In BWRs, piping and other components made from austenitic stainless steel or (to a much lesser extent) nickel based alloys have experienced intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) and

  12. Stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue characterisation of MgZn1Ca0.3 (ZX10) in a simulated physiological environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Sajjad; Raman, R K Singh; Davies, Chris H J; Hofstetter, Joelle; Uggowitzer, Peter J; Löffler, Jörg F

    2017-01-01

    Magnesium (Mg) alloys have attracted great attention as potential materials for biodegradable implants. It is essential that an implant material possesses adequate resistance to cracking/fracture under the simultaneous actions of corrosion and mechanical stresses, i.e., stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and/or corrosion fatigue (CF). This study investigates the deformation behaviour of a newly developed high-strength low-alloy Mg alloy, MgZn1Ca0.3 (ZX10), processed at two different extrusion temperatures of 325 and 400°C (named E325 and E400, respectively), under slow strain tensile and cyclic tension-compression loadings in air and modified simulated body fluid (m-SBF). Extrusion resulted in a bimodal grain size distribution with recrystallised grain sizes of 1.2 μm ± 0.8 μm and 7 ± 5 μm for E325 and E400, respectively. E325 possessed superior tensile and fatigue properties to E400 when tested in air. This is mainly attributed to a grain-boundary strengthening mechanism. However, both E325 and E400 were found to be susceptible to SCC at a strain rate of 3.1×10 -7 s -1 in m-SBF. Moreover, both E325 and E400 showed similar fatigue strength when tested in m-SBF. This is explained on the basis of crack initiation from localised corrosion following tests in m-SBF. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Intercrystalline Stress Corrosion of Inconel 600 Inspection Tubes in the Aagesta Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groenwall, B.; Ljungberg, L.; Huebner, W.; Stuart, W.

    1966-08-15

    Intercrystalline stress corrosion cracking has occurred in the Aagesta reactor in three so-called inspection tubes made of Inconel 600. The tubes had been exposed to 217 deg C light water, containing 1-4 ppm LiOH (later KOH) but only small amounts of oxygen, chloride and other impurities. Some of the circumferential cracks developed in or at crevices on the outside surface. At these positions constituents dissolved in the water may have concentrated. The crevices are likely to have contained a gas phase, mainly nitrogen. Local boiling in the crevices may also have occurred. Some few cracks were also found outside the crevice region. Irradiation effects can be neglected. No surface contamination could be detected except for a very minor fluoride content (1 {mu}g/cm{sup 2}). The failed tubes had been subjected to high stresses, partly remaining from milling, partly induced by welding operations. The possibility that stresses slightly above the 0.2 per cent offset yield strength have occurred at the operating temperature cannot be excluded. The cracked tube material contained a large amount of carbide particles and other precipitates, both at grain boundaries and in the interior of grains. The particles appeared as stringers in circumferential zones. Zones depleted in precipitates were found along grain boundaries. The failed tube turned out to have an unusually high mechanical strength, likely due to a combination of some kind of ageing process and cold work (1.0 - 1.3 per cent plastic strain). Laboratory exposures of stressed surplus material in high purity water and in 1 M LiOH at 220 deg C showed some pitting but no cracking after 6800 h and 5900 h respectively. Though the encountered failures may have developed because of influence of some few or several of the above-mentioned detrimental factors, the actual cause cannot be stated with certainty. In the literature information is given concerning intercrystalline stress corrosion cracking of Inconel 600 both in

  14. Intercrystalline Stress Corrosion of Inconel 600 Inspection Tubes in the Aagesta Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groenwall, B.; Ljungberg, L.; Huebner, W.; Stuart, W.

    1966-08-01

    Intercrystalline stress corrosion cracking has occurred in the Aagesta reactor in three so-called inspection tubes made of Inconel 600. The tubes had been exposed to 217 deg C light water, containing 1-4 ppm LiOH (later KOH) but only small amounts of oxygen, chloride and other impurities. Some of the circumferential cracks developed in or at crevices on the outside surface. At these positions constituents dissolved in the water may have concentrated. The crevices are likely to have contained a gas phase, mainly nitrogen. Local boiling in the crevices may also have occurred. Some few cracks were also found outside the crevice region. Irradiation effects can be neglected. No surface contamination could be detected except for a very minor fluoride content (1 μg/cm 2 ). The failed tubes had been subjected to high stresses, partly remaining from milling, partly induced by welding operations. The possibility that stresses slightly above the 0.2 per cent offset yield strength have occurred at the operating temperature cannot be excluded. The cracked tube material contained a large amount of carbide particles and other precipitates, both at grain boundaries and in the interior of grains. The particles appeared as stringers in circumferential zones. Zones depleted in precipitates were found along grain boundaries. The failed tube turned out to have an unusually high mechanical strength, likely due to a combination of some kind of ageing process and cold work (1.0 - 1.3 per cent plastic strain). Laboratory exposures of stressed surplus material in high purity water and in 1 M LiOH at 220 deg C showed some pitting but no cracking after 6800 h and 5900 h respectively. Though the encountered failures may have developed because of influence of some few or several of the above-mentioned detrimental factors, the actual cause cannot be stated with certainty. In the literature information is given concerning intercrystalline stress corrosion cracking of Inconel 600 both in caustic

  15. Acoustic emission characteristics of stress corrosion cracks in a type 304 stainless steel tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Woong Gi; Bae, Seung Gi; Lee, Bo Young [School of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering, Korea Aerospace University, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jae Seong [Center for Robot Technology and Manufacturing, Institute for Advanced Engineering, Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Sung Sik [Dept. of Nuclear Safety Research, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kwag, Nog Won [Ultrasonic Division, RM910, Byucksan Digital Valley II, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Acoustic emission (AE) is one of the promising methods for detecting the formation of stress corrosion cracks (SCCs) in laboratory tests. This method has the advantage of online inspection. Some studies have been conducted to investigate the characteristics of AE parameters during SCC propagation. However, it is difficult to classify the distinct features of SCC behavior. Because the previous studies were performed on slow strain rate test or compact tension specimens, it is difficult to make certain correlations between AE signals and actual SCC behavior in real tube-type specimens. In this study, the specimen was a AISI 304 stainless steel tube widely applied in the nuclear industry, and an accelerated test was conducted at high temperature and pressure with a corrosive environmental condition. The study result indicated that intense AE signals were mainly detected in the elastic deformation region, and a good correlation was observed between AE activity and crack growth. By contrast, the behavior of accumulated counts was divided into four regions. According to the waveform analysis, a specific waveform pattern was observed during SCC development. It is suggested that AE can be used to detect and monitor SCC initiation and propagation in actual tubes.

  16. Acoustic emission characteristics of stress corrosion cracks in a type 304 stainless steel tube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woonggi Hwang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Acoustic emission (AE is one of the promising methods for detecting the formation of stress corrosion cracks (SCCs in laboratory tests. This method has the advantage of online inspection. Some studies have been conducted to investigate the characteristics of AE parameters during SCC propagation. However, it is difficult to classify the distinct features of SCC behavior. Because the previous studies were performed on slow strain rate test or compact tension specimens, it is difficult to make certain correlations between AE signals and actual SCC behavior in real tube-type specimens. In this study, the specimen was a AISI 304 stainless steel tube widely applied in the nuclear industry, and an accelerated test was conducted at high temperature and pressure with a corrosive environmental condition. The study result indicated that intense AE signals were mainly detected in the elastic deformation region, and a good correlation was observed between AE activity and crack growth. By contrast, the behavior of accumulated counts was divided into four regions. According to the waveform analysis, a specific waveform pattern was observed during SCC development. It is suggested that AE can be used to detect and monitor SCC initiation and propagation in actual tubes.

  17. Low temperature tensile properties and stress corrosion cracking resistance in the super duplex stainless steels weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeung Woo; Sung, Jang Hyun; Lee, Sung Keun

    1998-01-01

    Low temperature tensile properties and SCC resistances of super duplex stainless steels and their weldments are investigated. Tensile strengths increase remarkably with decreasing test temperature, while elongations decrease steeply at -196 .deg. C after showing peak or constant value down to -100 .deg. C. Owing to the low tensile deformation of weld region, elongations of welded specimen decrease in comparison to those of unwelded specimen. The welded tensile specimen is fractured through weld region at -196 .deg. C due to the fact that the finely dispersed ferrite phase in the austenite matrix increases an opportunity to supply the crack propagation path through the brittle ferrite phase at low temperature. The stress corrosion cracking initiates preferentially at the surface ferrite phase of base metal region and propagates through ferrite phase. When the corrosion crack meets with the fibrously aligned austenite phase to the tensile direction, the ferrite phase around austenite continues to corrode. Eventually, fracture of the austenite phase begins without enduring the tensile load. The addition of Cu+W to the super duplex stainless steel deteriorates the SCC resistance in boiling MgCl 2 solution, possibly due to the increment of pits in the ferrite phase and reduction of N content in the austenite phase

  18. Effect of Microstructure on Stress Corrosion Cracking Behaviour of High Nitrogen Stainless Steel Gas Tungsten Arc Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Raffi; Srinivasa Rao, K.; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.

    2018-03-01

    Present work is aimed to improve stress corrosion cracking resistance of high nitrogen steel and its welds. An attempt to weld high nitrogen steel of 5 mm thick plate using gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) with three high strength age hardenable fillers i.e., 11-10 PH filler, PH 13- 8Mo and maraging grade of MDN 250 filler is made. Welds were characterized by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Vickers hardness testing of the welds was carried out to study the mechanical behaviour of welds. Potentio-dynamic polarization studies were done to determine pitting corrosion resistance in aerated 3.5% NaCl solution. Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) testing was carried out using constant load type machine with applied stress of 50% yield strength and in 45% MgCl2 solution boiling at 155°C. The results of the present investigation established that improvement in resistance to stress corrosion cracking was observed for PH 13- 8Mo GTA welds when compared to 11-10 PH and MDN 250 GTA welds. However, All GTA welds failed in the weld interface region. This may be attributed to relatively lower pitting potential in weld interface which acts as active site and the initiation source of pitting.

  19. Stress corrosion of ASTM Grade-2 and Grade-12 titanium in simulated rock salt brines at 830C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, H.; Ahn, T.M.; Soo, P.

    1983-01-01

    Slow-strain-rate tests have been conducted on Grade-2 and Grade-12 titanium in simulated rock salt brines at 83 0 C. Although neither metal shows stress corrosion cracking, total elongation and reduction in area show some decrease. Optical and SEM results are discussed to elucidate the fracture mechanism

  20. Effects of hardness and test temperature on the stress-corrosion cracking susceptibility of carbon steel in simulated BWR environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakayama, Guen; Akashi, Masatsune

    1998-01-01

    Carbon steels which are used for such as water supply line, core spray line, and clean up heat exchanger in Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) Plant, are main structural materials as well as an austenitic stainless steels, and Ni based alloys. It has been well known that carbon steels can become susceptible to stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) in BWR primary coolant water environments, i.e., the high-temperature, high-purity water containing dissolved oxygen. Nevertheless, their sensitivity of SCC appears to be markedly smaller compared to that of weld-sensitized Type 304 stainless steels, whole failure has often been observed. This paper examines the critical condition, especially effects of hardness, and temperature for the initiation of SCC by means of Slow Strain Rate Tensile (SSRT) test, and Creviced Bent Beam (CBB) test as laboratory accelerated tests. It has been shown that, (1) Intergranular stress-corrosion cracking (IGSCC) initiates over hardness of Hv 400 for single bead weld material, simulated corner weld; (2) in middle temperature domain around 160 to 190degC range, so many stress-corrosion cracks initiate, but each crack is not so deep, on the other hand, in high temperature domain, stress-corrosion cracks initiate few in number, but each cracks is developed so deep. (author)

  1. Hydrogen Cracking and Stress Corrosion of Pressure Vessel Steel ASTM A543

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlShawaf, Ali Hamad

    with the previously used plain carbon steel and other currently used pressure vessel steels was successfully completed. The experimental and computational results of the Q&T HSLA steel agreed well with each other. The susceptibility of the Q&T A543 steel to stress corrosion cracking was investigated using the slow strain rate testing under different environments and conditions. Also, advanced corrosion study using the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy was done at different conditions. The corrosion study revealed that this A543 steel is prone to form pits in most of the conditions. The model results in the corrosion study were validated with the Gamry Echem Analyst software that A543 steel tends to form pits in the tested environment.

  2. Enhanced osteoblast proliferation and corrosion resistance of commercially pure titanium through surface nanostructuring by ultrasonic shot peening and stress relieving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jindal, Shitu; Bansal, Rajesh; Singh, Bijay P; Pandey, Rajiv; Narayanan, Shankar; Wani, Mohan R; Singh, Vakil

    2014-07-01

    This investigation was carried out to study the effect of a novel process of surface modification, surface nanostructuring by ultrasonic shot peening, on osteoblast proliferation and corrosion behavior of commercially pure titanium (c p-Ti) in simulated body fluid. A mechanically polished disc of c p-Ti was subjected to ultrasonic shot peening with stainless steel balls to create nanostructure at the surface. A nanostructure (corrosion resistance. Corrosion rate was increased by 327% in the shot peened condition. In order to examine the role of residual stresses associated with the shot peened surface on these aspects, a part of the shot peened specimen was annealed at 400°C for 1 hour. A marked influence of annealing treatment was observed on surface structure, cell proliferation, and corrosion resistance. Surface nanostructure was much more prominent, with increased number density and sharper grain boundaries; cell proliferation was enhanced to approximately 50% and corrosion rate was reduced by 86.2% and 41% as compared with that of the shot peened and the as received conditions, respectively. The highly significant improvement in cell proliferation, resulting from annealing of the shot peened specimen, was attributed to increased volume fraction of stabilized nanostructure, stress recovery, and crystallization of the oxide film. Increase in corrosion resistance from annealing of shot peened material was related to more effective passivation. Thus, the surface of c p-Ti, modified by this novel process, possessed a unique quality of enhancing cell proliferation as well as the corrosion resistance and could be highly effective in reducing treatment time of patients adopting dental and orthopedic implants of titanium and its alloys.

  3. Experimental study on stress corrosion crack propagation rate of FV520B in carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Ming; Li, Jianfeng; Chen, Songying; Qu, Yanpeng

    FV520B steel is a kind of precipitation hardening Martensitic stainless steel, it has high-strength, good plasticity and good corrosion resistance. Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is one of the main corrosion failure mode for FV520B in industrial transportation of natural gas operation. For a better understanding the effect on SCC of FV520B, the improved wedge opening loading (WOL) specimens and constant displacement loading methods were employed in experimental research in carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide solution. The test results showed that the crack propagation rate is 1.941 × 10-7-5.748 × 10-7 mm/s, the stress intensity factor KISCC is not more than 36.83 MPa √{ m } . The rate increases with the increasing of the crack opening displacement. Under the condition of different initial loading, KISCC generally shows a decreasing tendency with the increase in H2S concentration, and the crack propagation rate showed an increasing trend substantially. For the enrichment of sulfur ion in the crack tip induced the generation of pitting corrosion, promoting the surrounding metal formed the corrosion micro batteries, the pit defects gradually extended and connected with the adjacent pit to form a small crack, leading to further propagation till cracking happened. Fracture microscopic morphology displayed typical brittle fracture phenomena, accompanying with trans-granular cracking, river shape and sector, many second cracks on the fracture surface.

  4. Susceptibility of 17-4PH stainless steel to stress corrosion cracking in aqueous environments by electrochemical techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz S, A.C.

    1997-01-01

    The susceptibility of a 17-4PH type steel to Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) in low pressure steam turbine environments was assessed using slow strain rate test at 90 Centigrade and at 1.35x10 -6 seg -1 . Environments tested included different concentrated solutions of NaCl, NaOH and Na 2 SO 4 . It was concluded that this steel is susceptible to SCC in 20 % NaCl and pH=3 and in 20 % NaCl pH=neutral but under cathodic polarisation. The electrochemical potential noise of the specimen was monitored during the test. The naturally fluctuations in potential were arise due to spontaneous brake protective film and were characteristics of the kind of corrosion like pit or stress corrosion cracking. After that using Fast Fourier Transformer (FFT) the noise data set were analyzed to obtain power spectral density plots which showed differences between general corrosion and localized corrosion. Polarization curves were carry out at two different rates and them showed the general behavior of the systems. (Author)

  5. Improved stress corrosion cracking resistance of a novel biodegradable EW62 magnesium alloy by rapid solidification, in simulated electrolytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakimi, O; Aghion, E; Goldman, J

    2015-06-01

    The high corrosion rate of magnesium (Mg) and Mg-alloys precludes their widespread acceptance as implantable biomaterials. Here, we investigated the potential for rapid solidification (RS) to increase the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) resistance of a novel Mg alloy, Mg-6%Nd-2%Y-0.5%Zr (EW62), in comparison to its conventionally cast (CC) counterpart. RS ribbons were extrusion consolidated in order to generate bioimplant-relevant geometries for testing and practical use. Microstructural characteristics were examined by SEM. Corrosion rates were calculated based upon hydrogen evolution during immersion testing. The surface layer of the tested alloys was analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Stress corrosion resistance was assessed by slow strain rate testing and fractography. The results indicate that the corrosion resistance of the RS alloy is significantly improved relative to the CC alloy due to a supersaturated Nd enrichment that increases the Nd2O3 content in the external oxide layer, as well as a more homogeneous structure and reduced grain size. These improvements contributed to the reduced formation of hydrogen gas and hydrogen embrittlement, which reduced the SCC sensitivity relative to the CC alloy. Therefore, EW62 in the form of a rapidly solidified extruded structure may serve as a biodegradable implant for biomedical applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Critical study of test methods in stress corrosion cracking. Application to stainless steels in chloride environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ajana, Lotfi

    1985-01-01

    The transposition of results obtained in laboratory to the prediction of in-service material resistance is a crucial problem in the case of stress corrosion cracking (SCC). The search for a SCC test which allows a reliable and realistic classification of stainless steels in chloride environments requires a choice of adequate electrolytes and of mechanical solicitation mode. In this research, the author first justifies the choice of an environment which could be representative of actual service conditions in the case of 5 grades of austenitic steels and 1 grade of austeno-ferric steel. Using a computerized data acquisition and processing system, the author compares the information obtained with two types of test: under constant load and under slow strain rate [fr

  7. Analitical electron mycroscopy (AEM) investigations of primary water stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in nickel alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fish, J.S.; Perry, D.J.; Lewis, N.; Thompson, C.D.; Yang, W.J.S.

    1997-08-01

    The microstructure of nickel alloys, particularly the grain boundary composition and intergranular precipitates, plays an important role in high temperature primary water stress corrosion cracking (SCC) performance. Analytical electron microscopy (AEM) was used to examine SCC cracks in Alloys 600 and X-750 to investigate the role of grain boundary precipitates, dislocations and oxides in primary water SCC (PWSCC). Analysis of oxides by AEM and ESCA/Auger indicates that the crack tip oxides are different than the oxides formed on the outer surfaces. Comparison of heats with good and poor SCC resistance has identified metallurgical features that affect cracking. These AEM results show that the mechanism of PWSCC in nickel-base alloys does not involve void formation or blunting of the crack tip near intergranular carbides. The role of grain boundary composition, the interaction of cracks with carbides and other intergranular precipitates, and observations from AEM examinations ahead of the crack tip are discussed in relation to the mechanism of SCC

  8. Stress corrosion cracking of steam generator tube and primary pipe in PWR type nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Weiguo; Gao Fengqin; Zhou Hongyi

    1993-01-01

    The behavior of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is studied by slow strain rate test (SSRT), constant load test (CLT) and low frequency cyclic loading test (LFCLT). The purpose of these tests is to get the test data for evaluating the integrity of pressurized boundary of pipes in Qinshan and Guangdong nuclear power plants. Tested materials are 316 nuclear grade stainless steel (SS) for primary pipes in welded heat affected zone (WHAZ) and steam generator tubes, such as Incoloy-800, Inconel-600, Inconel-690 and 321 SS which are used for steam generator in PWR. The effects of material metallurgy, shot-peening treatment, tensile load, strain rate, cyclic load and water chemistry on the behavior of SCC are investigated

  9. Standard Test Method for Stress-Corrosion of Titanium Alloys by Aircraft Engine Cleaning Materials

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2006-01-01

    1.1 This test method establishes a test procedure for determining the propensity of aircraft turbine engine cleaning and maintenance materials for causing stress corrosion cracking of titanium alloy parts. 1.2 The evaluation is conducted on representative titanium alloys by determining the effect of contact with cleaning and maintenance materials on tendency of prestressed titanium alloys to crack when subsequently heated to elevated temperatures. 1.3 Test conditions are based upon manufacturer's maximum recommended operating solution concentration. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use. For specific precautionary statements, see and .

  10. Mitigating Intergranular Stress Corrosion Cracking in Age-Hardenable Al-Zn-Mg-Cu Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajay Krishnan, M.; Raja, V. S.; Shukla, Shweta; Vaidya, S. M.

    2018-04-01

    This article reports an attempt to develop high-strength aluminum alloys of 7xxx series resistant to intergranular stress corrosion cracking (SCC). A novel aging technique reported in this work exhibited improved strength levels (as high as 100 MPa to that of conventional overaged temper for AA 7050) with significant resistance to SCC measured even at a low strain rate (10-7 s-1) in 3.5 wt pct NaCl. The novel aging heat treatment produced a microstructure that is finer and dense enough in the matrix to impart strength, whereas it is enriched with Cu on the grain boundaries to impart SCC resistance. A detailed explanation for the enhanced strength and SCC resistance is discussed.

  11. Effect of thermal stabilization on the low-temperature stress-corrosion cracking of Inconel 600

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bandy, R.; van Rooyen, D.

    1983-01-01

    The propensity to low-temperature stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) of thermally stabilized Inconel 600 in sulfur-bearing environments has been investigated using U-bends and slow-strain-rate testing. The results have been compared with those of sensitized Inconel 600. The potential dependence of crack-propagation rate has been established in a single test by using several U-bends held at different potentials, by choosing an appropriate electrical circuitry. The difference in SCC susceptibility of the sensitized and stabilized materials is discussed in terms of the grain-boundary chromium depletion and resulting intergranular attack in boiling ferric sulfate-sulfuric acid tests, and electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation (EPR) tests. 10 figures

  12. Stress corrosion cracking of steam generator tube and primary pipe in PWR type nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Weiguo; Gao Fengqin; Zhou Hongyi

    1992-03-01

    The behavior of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) was studied by slow strain rate test (SSRT), constant load test (CLT) and low frequency cyclic loading test (LFCLT). The purpose of these tests is to get the test data for evaluating the integrity of pressurized boundary of pipes in Qinshan and Guangdong nuclear power plants (NPPs). Tested materials are 316 nuclear grade stainless steel (SS) for primary pipes in welded heat affected zone (WHAZ) and tubes of heat transfer, such as Incoloy-800, Inconel-600 and 321 SS which are used for steam generator in PWR NPPs. The effects of material metallurgy, shot peening treatment, tensile load, strain rate, cyclic load and water chemistry on the behavior of SCC were considered

  13. Fractures in high-strength bolts due to hydrogen induced stress corrosion. Causes and corrective actions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoche, Holger; Oechsner, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    Delayed brittle fractures of high-strength bolts of the strength class 10.9 are presented, taking the example of three damage cases. The respective damage mechanisms could be attributed to hydrogen induced stress corrosion which was caused, in turn, by hydrogen absorption during operation. The examples were chosen with a particular focus on the material condition's susceptibility which explains the cause for the occurrence of the damage mechanism. However, in only one of the three cases the susceptibility was evident and could be explained by violations of normative specifications and an unfavorable material choice. Whereas in the two other examples, only slight or no deviations from the standards and/or regulations could be found. The influencing parameters that caused the damage, those that further promoted the damage, as well as possible corrective actions are discussed taking into account the three exemplary damage cases.

  14. Finite element modeling of stress corrosion cracking for electromagnetic nondestructive evaluations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, J.; Yusa, N.; Hashizume, H.

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses appropriate numerical model for a stress corrosion crack (SCC) from the viewpoint of anisotropy of their conductivity. Two SCCs, which are introduced into a plate of type 316 stainless steel, are considered. Finite element simulations are carried out to evaluate the conductivity. In the simulations, the cracks are modeled as a region with a constant width on the basis of the destructive tests. The results show the conductivity on direction of width has large effect to the accuracy of numerical modeling of SCC, whereas the conductivities on direction of length and depth almost do not have remarkable effects. The results obtained by this study indicate that distribution of conductivity along the surface of a crack would be more important than the anisotropy in modeling SCCs in finite element simulations

  15. Stress Corrosion Cracking of Zircaloy-4 in Halide Solutions: Effect of Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farina S.B.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Zircaloy-4 was found to be susceptible to stress corrosion cracking in 1 M NaCl, 1 M KBr and 1 M KI aqueous solutions at potentials above the pitting potential. In all the solutions tested crack propagation was initially intergranular and then changed to transgranular. The effect of strain rate and temperature on the SCC propagation was investigated. An increase in the strain rate was found to lead to an increase in the crack propagation rate. The crack propagation rate increases in the three solutions tested as the temperatures increases between 20 and 90 °C. The Surface-Mobility SCC mechanism accounts for the observation made in the present work, and the activation energy predicted in iodide solutions is similar to that found in the literature.

  16. Stress Corrosion Cracking and Fatigue Crack Growth Studies Pertinent to Spacecraft and Booster Pressure Vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, L. R.; Finger, R. W.

    1972-01-01

    This experimental program was divided into two parts. The first part evaluated stress corrosion cracking in 2219-T87 aluminum and 5Al-2.5Sn (ELI) titanium alloy plate and weld metal. Both uniform height double cantilever beam and surface flawed specimens were tested in environments normally encountered during the fabrication and operation of pressure vessels in spacecraft and booster systems. The second part studied compatibility of material-environment combinations suitable for high energy upper stage propulsion systems. Surface flawed specimens having thicknesses representative of minimum gage fuel and oxidizer tanks were tested. Titanium alloys 5Al-2.5Sn (ELI), 6Al-4V annealed, and 6Al-4V STA were tested in both liquid and gaseous methane. Aluminum alloy 2219 in the T87 and T6E46 condition was tested in fluorine, a fluorine-oxygen mixture, and methane. Results were evaluated using modified linear elastic fracture mechanics parameters.

  17. Dissociative chemisorption of O2 inducing stress corrosion cracking in silicon crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleizer, Anna; Peralta, Giovanni; Kermode, James R; De Vita, Alessandro; Sherman, Dov

    2014-03-21

    Fracture experiments to evaluate the cleavage energy of the (110)[1 1 0] and (111)[1 1 2] cleavage systems in silicon at room temperature and humidity give 2.7 ± 0.3 and 2.2 ± 0.2 J/m(2), respectively, lower than any previous measurement and inconsistent with density functional theory (DFT) surface energy calculations of 3.46 and 2.88 J/m(2). However, in an inert gas environment, we measure values of 3.5 ± 0.2 and 2.9 ± 0.2 J/m(2), consistent with DFT, that suggest a previously undetected stress corrosion cracking scenario for Si crack initiation in room conditions. This is fully confirmed by hybrid quantum-mechanics-molecular-mechanics calculations.

  18. Fundamental understanding and life prediction of stress corrosion cracking in BWRs and energy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andresen, P.L.; Ford, F.P.

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to present an approach for design and lifetime evaluation of environmental cracking based on experimental and fundamental modeling of the underlying processes operative in crack advance. In detailed this approach and its development and quantification for energy (hot water) systems, the requirements for a life prediction methodology will be highlighted and the shortcomings of the existing design and lifetime evaluation codes reviewed. Examples are identified of its use in a variety of cracking systems, such as stainless steels, low alloy steels, nickel base alloys, and irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking in boiling water reactor (BWR) water, as well as preliminary use for low alloy steel and Alloy 600 in pressurized water reactors (PWRs) and turbine steels in steam turbines. Identification of the common aspects with environmental cracking in other hot water systems provides a secure basis for its extension to related energy systems. 166 refs., 49 figs

  19. Elucidating the iodine stress corrosion cracking (SCC) process for zircaloy tubing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagai, M.; Shimada, S.; Nishimura, S.; Amano, K.

    1984-01-01

    Several experimental investigations were made to enhance understanding of the iodine stress corrosion cracking (SCC) process for Zircaloy: (1) oxide penetration process, (2) crack initiation process, and (3) crack propagation process. Concerning the effect of the oxide layer produced by conventional steam-autoclaving, no significant difference was found between results for autoclaved and as-pickled samples. Tests with 15 species of metal iodides revealed that only those metal iodides which react thermodynamically with zirconium to produce zirconium tetraiodide (ZrI 4 ) caused SCC of Zircaloy. Detailed SEM examinations were made on the SCC fracture surface of irradiated specimens. The crack propagation rate was expressed with a da/dt=C Ksup(n) type equation by combining results of tests and calculations with a finite element method. (author)

  20. Stress corrosion crack initiation of alloy 600 in PWR primary water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhai, Ziqing; Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.

    2017-07-01

    Stress corrosion crack (SCC) initiation of three mill-annealed (MA) alloy 600 heats in simulated pressurized water reactor primary water has been investigated using constant load tests equipped with in-situ direct current potential drop (DCPD) measurement capabilities. SCC initiation times were greatly reduced by a small amount of cold work. Shallow intergranular (IG) attack and/or cracks were found on most high-energy grain boundaries intersecting the surface with only a small fraction evolving into larger cracks and IGSCC growth. Crack depth profiles were measured and related to DCPD-detected initiation response. Processes controlling the SCC initiation in MA alloy 600 are discussed. IN PRESS, CORRECTED PROOF, 05/02/2017 - mfl

  1. In vivo oxide-induced stress corrosion cracking of Ti-6Al-4V in a neck-stem modular taper: Emergent behavior in a new mechanism of in vivo corrosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Jeremy L; Mali, Sachin; Urban, Robert M; Silverton, Craig D; Jacobs, Joshua J

    2012-02-01

    In vivo modular taper corrosion in orthopedic total joint replacements has been documented to occur for head-neck tapers, modular-body tapers, and neck-stem tapers. While the fretting corrosion mechanism by which this corrosion occurs has been described in the literature, this report shows new and as yet unreported mechanisms at play. A retrieved Ti-6Al-4V/Ti-6Al-4V neck-stem taper interface, implanted for 6 years is subjected to failure analysis to document taper corrosion processes that lead to oxide driven crack formation on the medial side of the taper. Metallurgical sectioning techniques and scanning electron microscopy analysis are used to document the taper corrosion processes. The results show large penetrating pitting attack of both sides of the taper interface where corrosion selectively attacks the beta phase of the microstructure and eventually consumes the alpha phase. The pitting attack evolves into plunging pits that ultimately develop into cracks where the crack propagation process is one of corrosion resulting in oxide formation and subsequent reorganization. This process drives open the crack and advances the front by a combination of oxide-driven crack opening stresses and corrosion attack at the tip. The oxide that forms has a complex evolving structure including a network of transport channels that provide access of fluid to the crack tip. This emergent behavior does not appear to require continued fretting corrosion to propagate the pitting and cracking. This new mechanism is similar to stress corrosion cracking where the crack tip stresses arise from the oxide formation in the crack and not externally applied tensile stresses. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Dissolution of copper in chloride/ammonia mixtures and the implications for the stress corrosion cracking of copper containers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, F.; Greidanus, G.; Jobe, D.J

    1999-05-01

    Stress-corrosion cracking is a possible failure mechanism for copper nuclear fuel waste disposal containers. One species known to cause the stress corrosion of copper alloys is ammonia. It is conceivable that ammonia could be produced in a disposal vault under certain, very specific conditions. There are a number of conditions, however, that mitigate against container failure by stress corrosion, one of which is the presence of chloride ions in deep Canadian Shield groundwaters. There are a number of reports in the literature that suggest that Cl{sup -} has an inhibitive effect on the stress corrosion of Cu alloys in ammonia solutions. The electrochemical behaviour of Cu in Cl{sup -}/ammonia solutions has been studied as a function of ammonia concentration, pH, the rate of mass transport and electrochemical potential. In particular, the effects of these parameters on the formation Of Cu{sub 2}O films and the steady-state dissolution behaviour have been determined. All experiments were carried out in 0.1 mol{center_dot}dm{sup -3} NaC1 as a base solution. A series of aqueous speciation and equilibrium potential/pH diagrams are also presented for the quaternary system Cu-C1{sup -}NH{sub 3}/NH{sub 4{sup +}}H{sub 2}O. These diagrams are used to interpret the results of the electrochemical experiments reported here. In addition, it is demonstrated how these diagrams could be used to predict the time-dependence of the susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking of Cu containers in a disposal vault. (author)

  3. Experimental study on stress corrosion crack propagation rate of FV520B in carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Qin

    Full Text Available FV520B steel is a kind of precipitation hardening Martensitic stainless steel, it has high-strength, good plasticity and good corrosion resistance. Stress corrosion cracking (SCC is one of the main corrosion failure mode for FV520B in industrial transportation of natural gas operation. For a better understanding the effect on SCC of FV520B, the improved wedge opening loading (WOL specimens and constant displacement loading methods were employed in experimental research in carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide solution. The test results showed that the crack propagation rate is 1.941 × 10−7–5.748 × 10−7 mm/s, the stress intensity factor KISCC is not more than 36.83 MPa m. The rate increases with the increasing of the crack opening displacement. Under the condition of different initial loading, KISCC generally shows a decreasing tendency with the increase in H2S concentration, and the crack propagation rate showed an increasing trend substantially. For the enrichment of sulfur ion in the crack tip induced the generation of pitting corrosion, promoting the surrounding metal formed the corrosion micro batteries, the pit defects gradually extended and connected with the adjacent pit to form a small crack, leading to further propagation till cracking happened. Fracture microscopic morphology displayed typical brittle fracture phenomena, accompanying with trans-granular cracking, river shape and sector, many second cracks on the fracture surface. Keywords: FV520B, Wedge opening loading specimen, Stress corrosion cracking, Hydrogen sulfide

  4. Correlation between flow accelerated corrosion and wall shear stress downstream from an orifice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utanohara, Yoichi; Nakamura, Akira; Murase, Michio; Kamahori, Koichi; Nagaya, Yukinori

    2013-01-01

    Flow accelerated corrosion (FAC) thinning rate downstream from an orifice was measured under different velocity conditions in a high-temperature water test loop to understand the effects of flow velocity on FAC thinning rate. The FAC tendency differed downstream and upstream from the orifice. The metal loss increased linearly with time downstream from the orifice, though metal loss rate gradually decreased with time upstream. FAC rate increased as flow velocity increased, particularly from 1D to 3D. The maximum FAC thinning rate increased in proportional to the 0.51th power of the mean cross-sectional velocity in this experiment. The root mean square (RMS) of wall shear stress predicted by large eddy simulation (LES) had a clear relationship with FAC thinning rate. This result indicated that FAC thinning rate can be described as a function of the wall shear stress. Additionally, the mass transfer coefficient estimated from the RMS of wall shear stress had an almost linear correlation with FAC thinning rate. (author)

  5. Stress corrosion cracking in the vessel closure head penetrations of French PWR's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buisine, D.; Cattant, F.; Champredonde, J.; Pichon, C.; Benhamou, C.; Gelpi, A.; Vaindirlis, M.

    1994-01-01

    During a hydrotest in September 1991, part of the statutory decennial in-service inspection, a leak was detected on the vessel head of Bugey 3, which is one of the first 900 MW 3-loop PWR's in France. This leak was due to a cracked penetration used for a control rod drive mechanism. The investigations performed identified Primary Stress Corrosion Cracking of Alloy 600 as being the origin of this degradation. So a lot of the same design PWR's are a concern due to this generic problem. In this case, PWSCC was linked to: - hot temperature of the vessel head; - high residual stresses due to the welding process between peripherical penetrations and the vessel head; - sensitivity of forged Alloy 600 used for penetration manufacturing. This following paper will present the cracked analysis based, in particular, on the main results obtained in France on each of these items. These results come from the operating experience, the destructive examinations and the programs which are running on stress analysis and metallurgical characterizations. (authors). 9 figs., 2 tabs

  6. Stress corrosion of unalloyed steels in geological storage conditions; Corrosion sous contrainte des aciers non allies dans les conditions du stockage geologique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Didot, A.; Herms, E.; Bataillon, C.; Chene, J. [CEA Saclay, Dept. de Physico-Chimie (DEN/DANS/DPC/SCCME/LECA), 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France); Crusset, D. [Agence Nationale pour la Gestion des Dechets Radioactifs (ANDRA), 92 - Chatenay Malabry (France)

    2007-07-01

    The concept retained for high level and years living radioactive waste disposal is the underground storage. It is then necessary to know the behaviour in time (about 10000 years) of the different constituent elements of the containment. The storage site chosen is the Bures' ones, presenting a clay formation at 600 m of depth. Each compartment is separated of a sufficient distance in order to profit of the thermal dispersion effect in the rock for optimizing the cooling of the package. In this work, has been used an unalloyed steel sur-container. The aim is to understand the resistance of the material under corrosion and loading, and particularly the stress corrosion which is a particular case of cracking assisted by environment. The material studied is a weld of two unalloyed steels obtained by electron beam. Slow traction tests have been carried out in an autoclave in the following experimental conditions: interstitial water in equilibrium with a helium-CO{sub 2} mixture 5.4 per thousand under 50 bar and at a temperature of 90 C. The results show an influence of the hydrogen corrosion on the mechanical behaviour of the material and particularly a decrease of the size of the reduction in area, which is practically unexisting in the case of the melted zone. These results are explained into details. (O.M.)

  7. Influence of microstructure on stress corrosion cracking of mild steel in synthetic caustic-nitrate nuclear waste solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarafian, P.G.

    1975-12-01

    The influence of alloy microstructure on stress corrosion cracking of mild steel in caustic-nitrate synthetic nuclear waste solutions was studied. An evaluation was made of the effect of heat treatment on a representative material (ASTM A 516 Grade 70) used in the construction of high activity radioactive waste storage tanks at Savannah River Plant. Several different microstructures were tested for susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking. Precracked fracture specimens loaded in either constant load or constant crack opening displacement were exposed to a variety of caustic-nitrate and nitrate solutions. Results were correlated with the mechanical and corrosion properties of the microstructures. Crack velocity and crack arrest stress intensity were found to be related to the yield strength of the steel microstructures. Fractographic evidence indicated pH depletion and corrosive crack tip chemistry conditions even in highly caustic solutions. Experimental results were compatible with crack growth by a strain-assisted anodic dissolution mechanism; however, hydrogen embrittlement also was considered possible

  8. Development of Laser Peening to Prevent Stress Corrosion Cracking of Pressure Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Chang Hwan; Lee, Ki Tae; Baik, Sung Hoon; Park, Seung Kyu; Lim, Kwon; Ko, Kwan Hoon; Chung, Jin Man; Kwon, Sung Ok

    2005-01-01

    Preventive maintenance has been received vast attention to enhance the reliability of components and to eliminate the outages in nuclear power plant. Mechanical shot peening technique, which employs the impulsive effect of high-speed metal ball, has been used to retain compressive stress on the surface of nuclear power plant components for many years. Residual compressive stress on the metal surface has been used to extend the fatigue life and to prevent stress corrosion cracking. Similarly, an intense laser irradiation under water can introduce compressive stress on an immersed metal surface by high-pressure confined plasma. Laser based technology is considered to be the best tool for remote processing in nuclear power plants, and especially so for the maintenance of nuclear reactor. Since there is no reactive force against laser irradiation, accessibility can be greatly improved by simple handing system. Further more, minimized heat effect on material extends the applicability to neutron-irradiated materials. The first laser peening experiments took place more than 30 years ago at the Battelle Institute in Ohio. However, it was only recently (1996). with the advent of high-power solid-state lasers at higher repetition rates and better beam quality.that this method began to compete with traditional shot-peening methods, which employ small metal or ceramic particles to deliver the impact. While shot peening and other mechanical surface treatment techniques are only capable of producing compressive stress down to depths of a few tenths of a millimeter, depths of compressive residual stress induced by laser peening are typically on the order of a millimeter or more. In the present work, we describe the shock wave generation and propagation in metal and compare our results with the Fabbro's model. We use commercially available code named Hyades, which is one dimensional Lagrangian MHD code and supports material properties. The shock wave pressure was calculated to

  9. Influence of Tensile Stresses on α+β – Titanium Alloy VT22 Corrosion Resistance in Marine Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. A. Puchkov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tensile stresses and hydrogen render strong influence on the titanic alloys propensity for delayed fracture. The protective film serves аs a barrier for penetration in hydrogen alloy. Therefore to study the stress effect on its structure and protective properties is of significant interest.The aim of this work is to research the tensile stress influence on the passivation, indexes of corrosion, protective film structure and reveal reasons for promoting hydrogenation and emerging propensity for delayed fracture of titanium alloy VТ22 in the marine air atmosphere.The fulfillеd research has shown that:- there is а tendency to reduce the passivation abilities of the alloy VТ22 in synthetic marine water (3 % solution of NaCl with increasing tensile stresses up to 1170 МPа, namely to reduce the potential of free corrosion and the rate of its сhange, thus the alloy remains absolutely (rather resistant;- the protective film consists of a titanium hydroxide layer under which there is the titanium oxide layer adjoining to the alloy, basically providing the corrosion protection.- the factors providing hydrogenation of titanium alloys and formation in their surface zone fragile hydrides, causing the appearing propensity for delayed fracture, alongside with tensile stresses are:- substances promoting chemisorbtion of hydrogen available in the alloy and on its surface;- the cathodic polarization caused by the coupling;- the presence of the structural defects promoting the formation of pitting and local аcidifying of the environment surrounding the alloy.

  10. Two peculiarities of evaluating stress-corrosion cracking in structural alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romaniv, O.N.; Nikiforchin, G.N.; Student, A.Z.; Tsirul'nik, A.T.

    1982-01-01

    Two aspects of evaluating subcritical crack growth are considered for alloys under long-term loading in corrosive environments: corrosion cracks morphology and electrochemical conditions at corrosion crack tips. Specimens of the 20Kh13, 45KhN2MFA and 50Kh steels were tested in NaCl aqueous solution, distilled water and isobutanol. The necessity is shown to take into account the branching of corrosion cracks for constructing fracture kinetic diagrams as well as real corrosion processes at a crack tip. A new technique is suggested for measurements of solution pH and potential of the metal-environment system at a crack tip [ru

  11. Development of stress corrosion cracking resistant welds of 321 stainless steel by simple surface engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mankari, Kamal; Acharyya, Swati Ghosh

    2017-12-01

    We hereby report a simple surface engineering technique to make AISI grade 321 stainless steel (SS) welds resistant to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in chloride environment. Heat exchanger tubes of AISI 321 SS, welded either by (a) laser beam welding (LBW) or by (b) metal inert gas welding (MIG) were used for the study. The welds had high magnitude of tensile residual stresses and had undergone SCC in chloride environment while in service. The welds were characterized using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Subsequently, the welded surfaces were subjected to buffing operation followed by determination of residual stress distribution and surface roughness by XRD and surface profilometer measurements respectively. The susceptibility of the welds to SCC was tested in buffed and un-buffed condition as per ASTM G-36 in boiling MgCl2 for 5 h and 10 h, followed by microstructural characterization by using optical microscope and FESEM. The results showed that the buffed surfaces (both welds and base material) were resistant to SCC even after 10 h of exposure to boiling MgCl2 whereas the un-buffed surfaces underwent severe SCC for the same exposure time. Buffing imparted high magnitude of compressive stresses on the surface of stainless steel together with reduction in its surface roughness and reduction in plastic strain on the surface which made the welded surface, resistant to chloride assisted SCC. Buffing being a very simple, portable and economic technique can be easily adapted by the designers as the last step of component fabrication to make 321 stainless steel welds resistant to chloride assisted SCC.

  12. Stress Corrosion Cracking of alloy 600 in high temperature water: a study of mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boursier, J.M.; Bouvier, O. de; Gras, J.M.; Noel, D.; Vaillant, F.; Rios, R.

    1992-12-01

    Investigations of the stress corrosion cracking behaviour of Alloy 600 tubing in high temperature water were performed in order to get a precise knowledge of the different stages of the cracking and their dependence on various parameters. The compatibility of the results with the main mechanisms to be considered was examined. Results showed three stages in the cracking: a true incubation time, a slow-rate propagation period followed by a rapid-propagation stage. Tests separating stress and strain rate contributions show that the strain rate is the main parameter which controls the crack propagation. The hydrogen overpressure was found to increase the crack growth rate up to 1-4 bar, but a strong decrease is observed from 4 to 20 bar. Analysis of the hydrogen ingress in the metal showed that it is neither correlated to the hydrogen overpressure nor to the severity of cracking; so cracking resulting from an hydrogen-model is unlikely. No detrimental effect of oxygen (4 bar) was noticed both in the mill-annealed and the sensitized conditions. Finally, none of the classical mechanisms, neither hydrogen-assisted cracking nor slip-step dissolution, can correctly describe the observed behaviour. Some fractographic examinations, and an influence of primary water on the creep rate of Alloy 600, lead to consider that other recent mechanisms, involving an interaction between dissolution and plasticity, have to be considered

  13. Numerical investigation on stress corrosion cracking behavior of dissimilar weld joints in pressurized water reactor plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingyan Zhao

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available There have been incidents recently where stress corrosion cracking (SCC observed in the dissimilar metal weld (DMW joints connecting the reactor pressure vessel (RPV nozzle with the hot leg pipe. Due to the complex microstructure and mechanical heterogeneity in the weld region, dissimilar metal weld joints are more susceptible to SCC than the bulk steels in the simulated high temperature water environment of pressurized water reactor (PWR. Tensile residual stress (RS, in addition to operating loads, has a great contribution to SCC crack growth. Limited experimental conditions, varied influence factors and diverging experimental data make it difficult to accurately predict the SCC behavior of DMW joints with complex geometry, material configuration, operating loads and crack shape. Based on the film slip/dissolution oxidation model and elastic-plastic finite element method (EPFEM, an approach is developed to quantitatively predict the SCC growth rate of a RPV outlet nozzle DMW joint. Moreover, this approach is expected to be a pre-analytical tool for SCC experiment of DMW joints in PWR primary water environment.

  14. Life prediction of steam generator tubing due to stress corrosion crack using Monte Carlo Simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Jun; Liu Fei; Cheng Guangxu; Zhang Zaoxiao

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → A life prediction model for SG tubing was proposed. → The initial crack length for SCC was determined. → Two failure modes called rupture mode and leak mode were considered. → A probabilistic life prediction code based on Monte Carlo method was developed. - Abstract: The failure of steam generator tubing is one of the main accidents that seriously affects the availability and safety of a nuclear power plant. In order to estimate the probability of the failure, a probabilistic model was established to predict the whole life-span and residual life of steam generator (SG) tubing. The failure investigated was stress corrosion cracking (SCC) after the generation of one through-wall axial crack. Two failure modes called rupture mode and leak mode based on probabilistic fracture mechanics were considered in this proposed model. It took into account the variance in tube geometry and material properties, and the variance in residual stresses and operating conditions, all of which govern the propagations of cracks. The proposed model was numerically calculated by using Monte Carlo Simulation (MCS). The plugging criteria were first verified and then the whole life-span and residual life of the SG tubing were obtained. Finally, important sensitivity analysis was also carried out to identify the most important parameters affecting the life of SG tubing. The results will be useful in developing optimum strategies for life-cycle management of the feedwater system in nuclear power plants.

  15. Stress corrosion mechanisms of alloy-600 polycrystals and monocrystals in primary water: effect of hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foct, F.

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study is to identify the mechanisms involved in Alloy 600 primary water stress corrosion cracking. Therefore, this work is mainly focussed on the two following points. The first one is to understand the influence of hydrogen on SCC of industrial Alloy 600 and the second one is to study the crack initiation and propagation on polycrystals and single crystals. A cathodic potential applied during slow strain rate tests does not affect crack initiation but increases the slow crack growth rate by a factor 2 to 5. Cathodic polarisation, cold work and 25 cm 3 STP/kg hydrogen content increase the slow CGR so that the K ISCC (and therefore fast CGR) is reached. The influence of hydrogenated primary water has been studied for the first time on Alloy 600 single crystals. Cracks cannot initiate on tensile specimens but they can propagate on pre-cracked specimens. Transgranular cracks present a precise crystallographic aspect which is similar to that of 316 alloy in MgCl 2 solutions. Moreover, the following results improve the description of the cracking conditions. Firstly, the higher the hydrogen partial pressure, the lower the Alloy 600 passivation current transients. Since this result is not correlated with the effect of hydrogen on SCC, cracking is not caused by a direct effect of dissolved hydrogen on dissolution. Secondly, hydrogen embrittlement of Alloy 600 disappears at temperatures above 200 deg.C. Thirdly, grain boundary sliding (GBS) does not directly act on SCC but shows the mechanical weakness of grain boundaries. Regarding the proposed models for Alloy 600 SCC, it is possible to draw the following conclusions. Internal oxidation or absorbed hydrogen effects are the most probable mechanisms for initiation. Dissolution, internal oxidation and global hydrogen embrittlement models cannot explain crack propagation. On the other hand, the Corrosion Enhanced Plasticity Model gives a good description of the SCC propagation. (author)

  16. The stress corrosion resistance and the cryogenic temperature mechanical properties of hot rolled Nitronic 32 bar material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montano, J. W. L.

    1977-01-01

    The ambient and cryogenic temperature mechanical properties and the ambient temperature stress corrosion properties of hot rolled and centerless ground Nitronic 32 stainless steel bar material are presented. The mechanical properties of longitudinal specimens were evaluated at test temperatures from ambient to liquid hydrogen. The tensile test data indicated increasing smooth tensile strength with decreasing temperature to liquid hydrogen temperature. However, below -200 F (-129.0 C) the notched tensile strength decreased slightly and below -320 F (-196.0 C) the decrease was significant. The elongation and reduction of area decreased drastically at temperatures below -200 F (-129.0 C). The Charpy V-notched impact energy decreased steadily with decreasing test temperature. Stress corrosion tests were performed on longitudinal tensile specimens stressed to 0, 75, and 90 percent of the 0.2 percent yield strength and on transverse 'C'-ring specimens stressed to 75 and 90 percent of the yield strength and exposed to: alternate immersion in a 3.5 percent NaCl bath, humidity cabinet environment, and a 5 percent salt spray atmosphere. The longitudinal tensile specimens experienced no corrosive attack; however, the 'C'-rings exposed to the alternate immersion and to the salt spray experienced some shallow etching and pitting, respectively. Small cracks appeared in two of the 'C'-rings after one month exposure to the salt spray.

  17. Standard test method for determining susceptibility to stress-corrosion cracking of 2XXX and 7XXX Aluminum alloy products

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1998-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers a uniform procedure for characterizing the resistance to stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) of high-strength aluminum alloy wrought products for the guidance of those who perform stress-corrosion tests, for those who prepare stress-corrosion specifications, and for materials engineers. 1.2 This test method covers method of sampling, type of specimen, specimen preparation, test environment, and method of exposure for determining the susceptibility to SCC of 2XXX (with 1.8 to 7.0 % copper) and 7XXX (with 0.4 to 2.8 % copper) aluminum alloy products, particularly when stressed in the short-transverse direction relative to the grain structure. 1.3 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. The inch-pound units in parentheses are provided for information. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and de...

  18. Recent progress to understand stress corrosion cracking in sodium borosilicate glasses: linking the chemical composition to structural, physical and fracture properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rountree, Cindy L.

    2017-08-01

    This topical review is dedicated to understanding stress corrosion cracking in oxide glasses and specifically the SiO_2{\\text-B_2O_3{\\text-}Na_2O} (SBN) ternary glass systems. Many review papers already exist on the topic of stress corrosion cracking in complex oxide glasses or overly simplified glasses (pure silica). These papers look at how systematically controlling environmental factors (pH, temperature...) alter stress corrosion cracking, while maintaining the same type of glass sample. Many questions still exist, including: What sets the environmental limit? What sets the velocity versus stress intensity factor in the slow stress corrosion regime (Region I)? Can researchers optimize these two effects to enhance a glass’ resistance to failure? To help answer these questions, this review takes a different approach. It looks at how systemically controlling the glass’ chemical composition alters the structure and physical properties. These changes are then compared and contrasted to the fracture toughness and the stress corrosion cracking properties. By taking this holistic approach, researchers can begin to understand the controlling factors in stress corrosion cracking and how to optimize glasses via the initial chemical composition.

  19. Accelerated test for evaluation of intergranular stress corrosion cracking initiation characteristics of non-sensitized 316 austenitic stainless steel in simulated pressure water reactor environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong, Xiangyu; Bali, Shirish Chandrakant; Shoji, Tetsuo

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Accelerated technique was developed for evaluation of stress corrosion cracking. • The effect of strain rate on stress corrosion cracking was investigated. • Typical intergranular crack feature was observed on the fracture surface. • The crack depth distribution shows two peaks feature. • The work hardened layer has a strong effect on stress corrosion cracking. - Abstract: Accelerated technique has been developed for evaluation of intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) initiation behavior of non-sensitized materials in pressure water reactor environment by means of the implementation of hollowed cylindrical specimens under slow strain rate tensile. Typical IGSCC feature was observed on the fracture surface. The crack depth distribution showed two peaks feature which relates to the worked hardened layer on the inner surface. The specimens tested at lower strain rate showed higher fraction of IGSCC, larger number of cracks initiation, shorter elongation and smaller crack opening displacement, suggesting the transition behavior of IGSCC initiation and short crack growth.

  20. Stress Corrosion Cracking of Pipeline Steels in Fuel Grade Ethanol and Blends - Study to Evaluate Alternate Standard Tests and Phenomenological Understanding of SCC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-30

    Main aim of this project was to evaluate alternate standard test methods for stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and compare them with the results from slow strain rate test (SSRT) results under equivalent environmental conditions. Other important aim of...

  1. Effects of Cr and Nb contents on the susceptibility of Alloy 600 type Ni-base alloys to stress-corrosion cracking in a simulated BWR environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akashi, Masatsune

    1995-01-01

    In order to discuss the effects of chromium and niobium contents on the susceptibility of Alloy 600 type nickel-base alloys to stress-corrosion cracking in the BWR primary coolant environment, a series of creviced bent-beam (CBB) tests were conducted in a high-temperature, high-purity water environment. Chromium, niobium, and titanium as alloying elements improved the resistivity to stress-corrosion cracking, whereas carbon enhanced the susceptibility to it. Alloy-chemistry-based correlations have been defined to predict the relative resistances of alloys to stress-corrosion cracking. A strong correlation was found, for several heats of alloys, between grain-boundary chromium depletion and the susceptibility to stress-corrosion cracking

  2. Cracks propagation by stress corrosion cracking in conditions of Boiling Water Reactor (BWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuentes C, P.

    2003-01-01

    This work presents the results of the assays carried out in the Laboratory of Hot Cells of the National Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ) to a type test tube Compact Tension (CT), built in steel austenitic stainless type 304L, simulating those conditions those that it operates a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR), at temperature 288 C and pressure of 8 MPa, to determine the speed to which the cracks spread in this material that is of the one that different components of a reactor are made, among those that it highlights the reactor core vessel. The application of the Hydrogen Chemistry of the Water is presented (HWC) that is one alternative to diminish the corrosion effect low stress in the component, this is gets controlling the quantity of oxygen and of hydrogen as well as the conductivity of the water. The rehearsal is made following the principles of the Mechanics of Elastic Lineal Fracture (LEFM) that considers a crack of defined size with little plastic deformation in the tip of this; the measurement of crack advance is continued with the technique of potential drop of direct current of alternating signal, this is contained inside the standard Astm E-647 (Method of Test Standard for the Measurement of Speed of Growth of Crack by fatigue) that is the one that indicates us as carrying out this test. The specifications that should complete the test tubes that are rehearsed as for their dimensions, it forms, finish and determination of mechanical properties (tenacity to the fracture mainly) they are contained inside the norm Astm E-399, the one which it is also based on the principles of the fracture mechanics. The obtained results were part of a database to be compared with those of other rehearsals under different conditions, Normal Chemistry of the Water (NWC) and it dilutes with high content of O 2 ; to determine the conditions that slow more the phenomena of stress corrosion cracking, as well as the effectiveness of the used chemistry and of the method of

  3. Stand density, tree social status and water stress influence allocation in height and diameter growth of Quercus petraea (Liebl.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trouvé, Raphaël; Bontemps, Jean-Daniel; Seynave, Ingrid; Collet, Catherine; Lebourgeois, François

    2015-10-01

    Even-aged forest stands are competitive communities where competition for light gives advantages to tall individuals, thereby inducing a race for height. These same individuals must however balance this competitive advantage with height-related mechanical and hydraulic risks. These phenomena may induce variations in height-diameter growth relationships, with primary dependences on stand density and tree social status as proxies for competition pressure and access to light, and on availability of local environmental resources, including water. We aimed to investigate the effects of stand density, tree social status and water stress on the individual height-circumference growth allocation (Δh-Δc), in even-aged stands of Quercus petraea Liebl. (sessile oak). Within-stand Δc was used as surrogate for tree social status. We used an original long-term experimental plot network, set up in the species production area in France, and designed to explore stand dynamics on a maximum density gradient. Growth allocation was modelled statistically by relating the shape of the Δh-Δc relationship to stand density, stand age and water deficit. The shape of the Δh-Δc relationship shifted from linear with a moderate slope in open-grown stands to concave saturating with an initial steep slope in closed stands. Maximum height growth was found to follow a typical mono-modal response to stand age. In open-grown stands, increasing summer soil water deficit was found to decrease height growth relative to radial growth, suggesting hydraulic constraints on height growth. A similar pattern was found in closed stands, the magnitude of the effect however lowering from suppressed to dominant trees. We highlight the high phenotypic plasticity of growth in sessile oak trees that further adapt their allocation scheme to their environment. Stand density and tree social status were major drivers of growth allocation variations, while water stress had a detrimental effect on height in the

  4. Structural integrity assessment of steam generator tubes deteriorated through primary water stress corrosion cracking in transition region of tube expansion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silveira, Helvecio Carlos Klinke da

    2002-01-01

    In PWR plants, steam generator tube degradation has been one of the most important economical concerns, besides causing operational safety problems. In this work, a survey of steam generator tube degradation modes is done. Degradation mechanisms and influence factors are introduced and discussed. The importance of stress corrosion cracking, especially in transition region of tube expansion zone, is underlined. The actual steam generator tube plugging criteria are conservative. Proposed alternative criteria are introduced and discussed. Distinction is done to structural integrity assessment of defective tubes. Real data of tube defect indications of axial cracks in expansion transition zone due to primary water stress corrosion cracking are used in analysis. Results allow discussing application aspects of deterministic and probabilistic criteria on structural integrity assessment of tubes with defect indications. Applied models are specifics, but the application of concept may be extended to other steam generator tube degradation modes. (author)

  5. Monte Carlo simulation taking account of surface crack effect for stress corrosion cracking in a stainless steel SUS 304

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tohgo, Keiichiro; Suzuki, Hiromitsu; Shimamura, Yoshinobu; Nakayama, Guen; Hirano, Takashi

    2008-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in structural metal materials occurs by initiation and coalescence of micro cracks, subcritical crack propagation and multiple large crack formation or final failure under the combination of materials, stress and corrosive environment. In this paper, a Monte Carlo simulation for the process of SCC has been proposed based on the stochastic properties of micro crack initiation and fracture mechanics concept for crack coalescence and propagation. The emphasis in the model is put on the influence of semi-elliptical surface cracks. Numerical simulations are carried out based on CBB (creviced bent beam) test results of a sensitized stainless steel SUS 304 and the influence of micro crack initiation rate and coalescence condition on the simulation results is discussed. The numerical examples indicate the applicability of the present model to a prediction of the SCC behavior in real structures. (author)

  6. Inhibition of stress corrosion cracking of alloy AA8090 T-8171 by addition of rare earth salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davo, B.; Conde, A.; Damborenea, J.J. de

    2005-01-01

    Aluminium-lithium alloys are suitable for aeronautical purposes because of their good mechanical properties and high damage tolerance. Although these alloys are less susceptible to stress corrosion cracking than conventional alloys, Al-Li-Cu-Mg alloy (8090-T8171) still experiences this problem in a NaCl + H 2 O 2 solution. In this work it has been demonstrated that the addition of 10,000 ppm of CeCl 3 to the medium inhibits the stress corrosion cracking of 8090 alloy by precipitation of cerium oxides/hydroxides. The deposition of these compounds on the alloy surface decreases the pit density and slows the crack growth through the grain boundaries by hindering the anodic dissolution of T phases

  7. Flaw growth of 7075, 7475, 7050 and 7049 aluminum alloy plate in stress corrosion environments: 4-year marine atmosphere results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasse, K. R.; Dorward, R. C.

    1981-01-01

    After nearly 53 months of exposure to marine atmosphere, crack growth in SL DCB specimens from 7075, 7475, 7050, and 7049-T7X plate has slowed to the arbitrary 10 to the -10 power m/sec used to define threshold stress intensity. Because some specimens appear to be approaching crack arrest, the importance of self-loading from corrosion product wedging as a significant driving force for crack propagation in overaged materials is questioned. Crack length-time data were analyzed using a computer curve fitting program which minimized the effects of normal data scatter, and provided a clearer picture of material performance. Precracked specimen data are supported by the results of smooth specimen tests. Transgranular stress corrosion cracking was observed in TL DCB specimens from all four alloys. This process is extremely slow and is characterized by a striated surface morphology.

  8. Stress corrosion cracking behaviour of low alloy steels in high temperature water: Description and results from modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tirbonod, B.

    2001-01-01

    The initiation and growth of a crack by stress and corrosion in the low alloy steels used for the pressure vessels of Boiling Water Reactors may affect the availability and safety of the plant. This paper presents a new model for stress corrosion cracking of the low alloy steels in high temperature water. The model, based on observations, assumes the crack growth mechanism to be based on an anodic dissolution and cleavage. The main results deal with the position of the dissolution cell found at the crack tip, and with the identification of the parameters sensitive to crack growth, among which are the electrolyte composition and the cleavage length. The model is conservative, in qualitative agreement with measurements conducted at PSI, and may be extended to other metal-environment systems. (author)

  9. Thermally activated dislocation creep model for primary water stress corrosion cracking of NiCrFe Alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, M.M. Jr.

    1995-01-01

    There is a growing awareness that environmentally assisted creep plays an important role in intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of NiCrFe alloys in the primary coolant water environment of a pressurized water reactor (PWR). The expected creep mechanism is the thermally activated glide of dislocations. This mode of deformation is favored by the relatively low temperature of PWR operation combined with the large residual stresses that are most often identified as responsible for the SCC failure of plant components. Stress corrosion crack growth rate (CGR) equations that properly reflect the influence of this mechanism of crack tip deformation are required for accurate component life predictions. A phenomenological IGSCC-CGR model, which is based on an apriori assumption that the IGSCC-CGR is controlled by allow temperature dislocation creep mechanism, is developed in this report. Obstacles to dislocation creep include solute atoms such as carbon, which increase the lattice friction force, and forest dislocations, which can be introduced by cold prestrain. Dislocation creep also may be environmentally assisted due to hydrogen absorption at the crack tip. The IGSCC-CGR model developed here is based on an assumption that crack growth occurs by repeated fracture events occurring within an advancing crack-tip creep-fracture zone. Thermal activation parameters for stress corrosion cracking are obtained by fitting the CGR model to IGSCC-CGR data obtained on NiCrFe alloys, Alloy X-750 and Alloy 600. These IGSCC-CGR activation parameters are compared to activation parameters obtained from creep and stress relaxation tests. Recently reported CGR data, which exhibit an activation energy that depends on yield stress and the applied stress intensity factor, are used to benchmark the model. Finally, the effects of matrix carbon concentration, grain boundary carbides and absorbed hydrogen concentration are discussed within context of the model. (author). 19 refs, 7 figs

  10. Methodology to evaluate the crack growth rate by stress corrosion cracking in dissimilar metals weld in simulated environment of PWR nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paula, Raphael G.; Figueiredo, Celia A.; Rabelo, Emerson G.

    2013-01-01

    Inconel alloys weld metal is widely used to join dissimilar metals in nuclear reactors applications. It was recently observed failures of weld components in plants, which have triggered an international effort to determine reliable data on the stress corrosion cracking behavior of this material in reactor environment. The objective of this work is to develop a methodology to determine the crack growth rate caused by stress corrosion in Inconel alloy 182, using the specimen (Compact Tensile) in simulated PWR environment. (author)

  11. Effects of microstructure and local mechanical fields on intergranular stress corrosion cracking of a friction stir welded aluminum–copper–lithium 2050 nugget

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhondt, Matthieu; Aubert, Isabelle; Saintier, Nicolas; Olive, Jean Marc

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Applied stress changes the corrosion mode from pitting to intergranular cracking. • Residual stresses are sufficient to induce intergranular stress corrosion cracking. • Effect of crystallographic texture on the development of IGSCC evidenced by EBSD. • Cubic elasticity drives the local orientation of the intergranular cracking. • Tomography observations show the 3D nature of the corrosion development. - Abstract: The effects of the microstructure and mechanical fields on intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of the nugget zone of heat treated welds obtained by friction stir welding in the AA2050 aluminum alloy have been investigated at different scales. At low strain rate, in 1.0 NaCl aqueous solution, IGSCC develops in the microstructure, whereas only pitting corrosion is observed without any mechanical stress. Based on surface observations, EBSD analysis and X-ray tomography, the key role of sub-millimetric textured bands (induced by the welding process) on the IGSCC is demonstrated. Analyses at a more local scale show the grain boundary (low angle boundary, special coincident site lattice boundary or high angle boundary) do not have a significant effect on crack initiation. Crystal plasticity finite element calculations show that the threshold normal stress at grain boundaries for IGSCC development is about 80% of the macroscopic stress. It is also highlighted by crystal plasticity calculations that there is a drastic effect of the local stress field on the shape of cracks. Finally, it is shown that plasticity induced residual stresses are sufficient for the formation of IGSCC

  12. Oxide inclusions in laser additive manufactured stainless steel and their effects on impact toughness and stress corrosion cracking behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Xiaoyuan; Andresen, Peter L.; Rebak, Raul B.

    2018-02-01

    Intergranular and intragranular Si and Mn rich oxide inclusions are present in laser additive manufactured austenitic stainless steel. The uniform oxide dispersions in additive manufactured material promoted early initiation of microvoids and reduced its impact toughness relative to powder metallurgy (hot isostatic pressing) and wrought materials. For stress corrosion cracking in high temperature water, the silica inclusions along the grain boundaries preferentially dissolved and appeared to accelerate oxidation and caused extensive crack branching.

  13. Mechanism of intergranular stress corrosion cracking in HAZ for super-martensitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyata, Yukio; Kimura, Mitsuo [Tubular Products and Casting Research Dept., JFE Steel Corporation, 1-1, Kawasaki-cho, Handa (Japan); Nakamichi, Haruo; Sato, Kaoru [Analysis and Characterization Research Dept., JFE Steel Corporation, 1-1, Minamiwatarida-cho, Kawasaki-ku, Kawasaki (Japan); Itakura, Noritsugu [Products Service and Development Dept., Chita Works, JFE Steel Corporation. 1-1, Kawasaki-cho, Handa (Japan); Masamura, Katsumi [Tubular Products Business Planning Dept., JFE Steel Corporation, 2-2-3, Uchisaiwai-sho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo (Japan)

    2004-07-01

    Mechanism of intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) for heat affected zone (HAZ) of super-martensitic stainless steel was studied using two types of the steel. One was a lean grade, which was Mo free and low Ni, and the other was a high grade, which was Mo added and high Ni. Specimens received heat treatments simulating welding thermal cycles were applied to SCC tests. Cracks were observed in some specimens after U-bend SCC test under low pH environments. Thermal cycle conditions with sensitization were verified from the results. No crack was observed in the specimen with the thermal cycle simulating post welding heat treatment (PWHT) after sensitizing conditions. Therefore, PWHT was clarified to be effective to prevent the cracking. Cr carbides were observed along prior austenite grain boundary intermittently, and Cr depleted zone was confirmed on the grain boundary adjacent to carbides that precipitated on the grain boundary. It is, therefore, concluded that the cracking results from Cr depletion on prior austenite grain boundary accompanied by precipitation of Cr carbides under specific welding conditions. (authors)

  14. Stress-corrosion-cracking studies on candidate container alloys for the Tuff Repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beavers, J.A.; Durr, C.L.

    1992-05-01

    Cortest Columbus Technologies, Inc. (CC Technologies) investigated the long-term performance of container materials used for high-level waste package as part of the information needed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to assess the Department of Energy's application to construct to geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste. At the direction of the NRC, the program focused on the Tuff Repository. This report summarizes the results of Stress-Corrosion-Cracking (SCC) studies performed in Tasks 3, 5, and 7 of the program. Two test techniques were used; U-bend exposures and Slow-Strain-Rate (SSR) tests. The testing was performed on two copper-base alloys (Alloy CDA 102 and Alloy CDA 175) and two Fe-Cr-Ni alloys (Alloy 304L and Alloy 825) in simulated J-13 groundwater and other simulated solutions for the Tuff Repository. These solutions were designed to simulate the effects of concentration and irradiation on the groundwater composition. All SCC testing on the Fe-Cr-Ni Alloys was performed on solution-annealed specimens and thus issues such as the effect of sensitization on SCC were not addressed

  15. Assessment of NDE Technologies for Detection and Characterization of Stress Corrosion Cracking in LWRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, Ryan M.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Bond, Leonard J.; Montgomery, Robert O.

    2012-12-31

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in light water reactors (LWRs) has been a persistent form of degradation in the nuclear industry. Examples of SCC can be found for a range of materials in boiling and pressurized water reactor environments, including carbon steels, stainless steels, and nickel-base stainless alloys. The evolution of SCC is often characterized by a long initiation stage followed by a phase of more rapid crack growth to failure. This provides a relatively short window of opportunity to detect the start of observable SCC, and it is conceivable that SCC could progress from initiation to failure between subsequent examinations when managed by applying periodic in-service inspection techniques. Implementation of advanced aging management paradigms in the current fleet of LWRs will require adaptation of existing measurement technologies and development of new technologies to perform on-line measurements during reactor operation to ensure timely detection of material degradation and to support the implementation of advanced diagnostics and prognostics. This paper considers several non-destructive examination (NDE) technologies with known sensitivity to detection of indicators for SCC initiation and/or propagation, and assesses these technologies with respect to their ability to detect and accurately characterize the significance of an SCC flaw. Potential strategies to improve SCC inspection or monitoring performance are offered to benefit management of SCC degradation in LWRs.

  16. Improving regulatory practices through the OECD-NEA Stress Corrosion Cracking and Cable Ageing Project (SCAP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, A.; Huerta, A.; Sekimura, N.; Gott, K.; Koshy, T.

    2012-01-01

    For regulatory authorities, it is important to verify the adequacy of ageing management methods applied by the licensees, based on reliable technical evidence. In order to achieve that goal, 14 NEA member countries joined the SCAP (Project) in 2006 to share knowledge and three more countries joined during the course of the project. The project focused on two important safety issues, the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and the degradation of cable insulation, due to their relevance for plant ageing assessments and their implication on inspection practices. The commendable practices identified in the project are intended to strengthen technical approaches to optimize ageing management in the areas of SCC and cable ageing. The SCAP SCC and Cable data- and knowledge bases provided extensive information to benefit all stakeholders in designing, constructing, operating and regulating Nuclear Power Plants and also provide commendable practices applicable to new reactors. The paper presents the product of SCAP work resulting from 4 years of technical interactions and shared knowledge from all participants from June 2006 to June 2010. (author)

  17. Stress corrosion cracking of low-alloy reactor pressure vessel steels under boiling water reactor conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seifert, H.P.; Ritter, S.

    2008-01-01

    The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behaviour of different reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels and weld filler/heat-affected zone materials was characterized under simulated boiling water reactor (BWR) normal water (NWC) and hydrogen water chemistry (HWC) conditions by periodical partial unloading, constant and ripple load tests with pre-cracked fracture mechanics specimens. The experiments were performed in oxygenated or hydrogenated high-purity or sulphate/chloride containing water at temperatures from 150 to 288 deg. C. In good agreement with field experience, these investigations revealed a very low susceptibility to SCC crack growth and small crack growth rates (<0.6 mm/year) under most BWR/NWC and material conditions. Critical water chemistry, loading and material conditions, which can result in sustained and fast SCC well above the 'BWRVIP-60 SCC disposition lines' were identified, but many of them generally appeared atypical for current optimized BWR power operation practice or modern RPVs. Application of HWC always resulted in a significant reduction of SCC crack growth rates by more than one order of magnitude under these critical system conditions and growth rates dropped well below the 'BWRVIP-60 SCC disposition lines'

  18. Diagnosis of 3-dimensional geometry and stress corrosion cracking in steam generator tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, D.H.; Choi, M.S.; Hur, D.H.; Kim, K.M.; Han, J.H.; Song, M.H.

    2015-01-01

    Most of the corrosive degradations in steam generator tubes of nuclear power plants are closely related to the residual stress existing in the local region of a geometric change, that is, an expansion transition, u-bend, dent, bulge, etc. Therefore, accurate information on a geometric anomaly (precursor of degradation) in a tube is a prerequisite to the activity of pre- and in-service non destructive inspection for a precise and earlier detection of a defect in order to prevent a failure during an operation, and also for a root cause analysis of a failure. In this paper, a new diagnostic eddy current probe technology which has simultaneous dual function of a 3-dimensional geometry measurement and defect detection in steam generator tube is introduced. The D-Probe is a rotary type eddy current coil probe equipped with 3 different eddy current coil units (surface riding type plus-point and pancake coils for defect detection, and non-surface riding type shielded high frequency pancake coil for tube profile measurement). A specific data analysis software has been developed. By comparing the eddy current data from the defect with those from the geometric changes, the relationship between the degradation and geometric changes can be revealed. Also, it supplies information on tube location at which defect is most probable and thus, a more efficient detection of earlier degradation. The use of D-probe and analysis software has been demonstrated for steam generator tubes with various geometric anomalies in manufacturing and operating nuclear power plants

  19. A state of the art on primary side stress corrosion cracking in nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, H. P.; Kim, J. S.; Han, J. H.; Lee, D. H.; Lim, Y. S.; Suh, J. H.; Hwang, S. S.; Hur, D. H.

    1999-09-01

    A state of art on primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) of alloy 600 used as steam generator tubing of nuclear power plant and remedial action on the PWSCC were reviewed and analyzed. One of the major metallurgical factors which have effect on PWSCC is Cr carbide distribution. A semicontinuous intergranular Cr carbide distribution enhance PWSCC of alloy 600. PWSCC rate is reported to be reported to be proportional to exp(-50 cal/RT) σ 4 . PWSCC rate also increase with increase in hydrogen partial pressure from 0 to 150 ppm and then decreased with further increase in hydrogen partial pressure to 757 ppm. Development of PWSCC prediction technology which takes into account tubing material, fabrication process and operating history of steam generator is needed to manage PWSCC of domestic nuclear power plant. PWSCC has mainly occurred at expansion irregularities within tubesheet, expansion transitions, dented tube support plate intersections and transition and apex of U bend. Remedial actions to PWSCC are sleeving, plugging, temperature reduction, Ni plating, Ni sleeving, shot peening and steam generator replacement in worst case. Option to remedial actions depend on plant specific such as plant age, leak rate from primary to secondary, density and progression of PWSCC. Ni sleeving developed in Framatome seems to be a powerful method because it never subject to PWSCC. Remedial action should be developed and evaluated for possible PWSCC of domestic nuclear power plant. (author)

  20. SCAP: the Nea project on stress corrosion cracking and cable ageing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, A.; Huerta, A.; Gott, K.; Koshy, T.

    2007-01-01

    Two subjects - stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and degradation of cable insulation - were selected as the focus of the SCC and Cable Ageing Project (SCAP) due to their relevance for plant ageing assessments and their implication on inspection practices. Fourteen NEA member countries agreed to contribute to the project. The main SCAP objectives are to: establish a complete database with regard to major ageing phenomena for SCC and degradation of cable insulation through collective efforts by OECD/NEA members; establish a knowledge base in these areas by compiling and evaluating the collected data and information systematically; perform an assessment of the data and identify the basis for commendable practices which would help regulators and operators to enhance ageing management. The aim of the knowledge base is to provide a state-of-the-art description of the degradation mechanisms, the main influencing factors, the most susceptible materials and locations, and common strategies available for mitigation and repair. The SCAP project is currently in the development phase, defining and refining the database performance requirements, data format and coding guidelines. The project is scheduled to last four years. It is anticipated that the database definition and the collection of data from member countries will take approximately two years. The subsequent assessment and the commendable practices report are expected to take one year each

  1. Stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 in primary water of PWR: study of chromium diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chetroiu, Bogdan-Adrian

    2015-01-01

    Alloy 600 (Ni-15%Cr-10%Fe) is known to be susceptible to Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) in primary water of Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR). Recent studies have shown that chromium diffusion is a controlling rate step in the comprehension of SCC mechanism. In order to improve the understanding and the modelling of SCC of Alloy 600 in PWR primary medium the aim of this study was to collect data on kinetics diffusion of chromium. Volume and grain boundary diffusion of chromium in pure nickel and Alloy 600 (mono and poly-crystals) has been measured in the temperature range 678 K to 1060 K by using Secondary Ions Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS) and Glow Discharge-Optical Spectrometry (GD-OES) techniques. A particular emphasis has been dedicated to the influence of plastic deformation on chromium diffusion in nickel single crystals (orientated <101>) for different metallurgical states. The experimental tests were carried out in order to compare the chromium diffusion coefficients in free lattice (not deformed), in pre-hardening specimens (4% and 20%) and in dynamic deformed tensile specimens at 773 K. It has been found that chromium diffusivity measured in dynamic plastic deformed creep specimens were six orders of magnitude greater than those obtained in not deformed or pre-hardening specimens. The enhancement of chromium diffusivity can be attributed to the presence of moving dislocations generated during plastic deformation. (author)

  2. Stress state reassessment of Romanian offshore structures taking into account corrosion influence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joavină, R.; Zăgan, S.; Zăgan, R.; Popa, M.

    2017-08-01

    Progressive degradation analysis for extraction or exploration offshore structure, with appraisal of failure potential and the causes that can be correlated with the service age, depends on the various sources of uncertainty that require particular attention in design, construction and exploitation phases. Romanian self erecting platforms are spatial lattice structures consist of tubular steel joints, forming a continuous system with an infinite number of dynamic degrees of freedom. Reassessment of a structure at fixed intervals of time, recorrelation of initial design elements with the actual situation encountered in location and with structural behaviour represents a major asset in lowering vulnerabilities of offshore structure. This paper proposes a comparative reassessment of the stress state for an offshore structure Gloria type, when leaving the shipyard and at the end of that interval corresponding to capital revision, taking into account sectional changes due to marine environment corrosion. The calculation was done using Newmark integration method on a 3D model, asses of the dynamic loads was made through probabilistic spectral method.

  3. Modelling of the Stress Corrosion Cracking Behaviour for Low Alloy Steels in High Temperature Water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tirbonod, B.

    2000-11-01

    The goal of the model is to calculate the crack growth and to determine the parameters of relevance for the stress corrosion cracking of the low alloy steels in high temperature water for reactor safety purposes. The model assumes for the crack growth mechanism an anodic dissolution initiated by the rupture of the oxide film by creep at the crack tip, a repassivation, and, for representing other possible crack growth mechanisms, a cleavage. The model for the dissolution considers all the parameters of relevance for the dissolution and well accepted laws of physics. The creep is calculated by a constitutive law of Chaboche with the finite element method. The dissolution cell is found to be situated in the region of the crack tip with a length up to a few hundred micrometers. Sensitive parameters for the crack growth are the strain to film rupture, the composition of the electrolyte, the exchange current densities, and the cleavage length. The model is in qualitative agreement with measurements. It is discussed with particular attention to the geometry and dimensions of the dissolution cell and to the species transport in the dissolution cell and along the crack. Further work should be devoted to the comparison of the model to experiments. (author)

  4. Utilizing various test methods to study the stress corrosion behavior of Al-Li-Cu alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzo, P. P.; Galvin, R. P.; Nelson, H. G.

    1984-01-01

    Recently, much attention has been given to aluminum-lithium alloys because of rather substantial specific-strength and specific-stiffness advantages offered over commercial 2000and 7000-series aluminum alloys. An obstacle to Al-Li alloy development has been inherent limited ductility. In order to obtain a more refined microstructure, powder metallurgy (P/M) has been employed in alloy development programs. As stress corrosion (SC) of high-strength aluminum alloys has been a major problem in the aircraft industry, the possibility of an employment of Al-Li alloys has been considered, taking into account a use of Al-Li-Cu alloys. Attention is given to a research program concerned with the evaluation of the relative SC resistance of two P/M processed Al-Li-Cu alloys. The behavior of the alloys, with and without an addition of magnesium, was studied with the aid of three test methods. The susceptibility to SC was found to depend on the microstructure of the alloys.

  5. Assessment of NDE technologies for detection and characterization of stress corrosion cracking in LWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, R.M.; Ramuhalli, P.; Toloczko, M.B.; Bond, L.J.; Montgomery, R.O.

    2012-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in light water reactors (LWRs) has been a persistent form of degradation in the nuclear industry. Examples of SCC can be found for a range of materials in boiling and pressurized water reactor environments, including carbon steels, stainless steels, and nickel-base alloys. The evolution of SCC is often characterized by a long initiation stage followed by a phase of more rapid crack growth to failure. This provides a relatively short window of opportunity to detect the start of observable SCC, and it is conceivable that SCC could progress from initiation to failure between subsequent examinations when managed by applying periodic in-service inspection techniques. Implementation of advanced aging management paradigms in the current fleet of LWRs will require adaptation of existing measurement technologies and development of new technologies to perform on-line measurements during reactor operation to ensure timely detection of material degradation and to support the implementation of advanced diagnostics and prognostics. This paper considers several non-destructive examination (NDE) technologies with known sensitivity to detection of indicators for SCC initiation and/or propagation, and assesses these technologies with respect to their ability to detect and accurately characterize the significance of an SCC flaw. Potential strategies to improve SCC inspection or monitoring performance are offered to benefit management of SCC degradation in LWRs. (author)

  6. Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking considerations at temperatures below 288 degree C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonen, E.P.; Jones, R.H.; Bruemmer, S.M.

    1995-03-01

    Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) occurs above a critical neutron fluence in light-water reactor (LWR) water environments at 288 C, but very little information exists to indicate susceptibility as temperatures are reduced. Potential low-temperature behavior is assessed based on the temperature dependencies of intergranular (IG) SCC in the absence of irradiation, radiation-induced segregation (RIS) at grain boundaries and micromechanical deformation mechanisms. IGSCC of sensitized SS in the absence of irradiation exhibits high growth rates at temperatures down to 200 C under conditions of anodic dissolution control, while analysis of hydrogen-induced cracking suggests a peak crack growth rate near 100 C. Hence from environmental considerations, IASCC susceptibility appears to remain likely as water temperatures are decreased. Irradiation experiments and model predictions indicate that RIS also persists to low temperatures. Chromium depletion may be significant at temperatures below 100C for irradiation doses greater than 10 displacements per atom (dpa). Macromechanical effects of irradiation on strength and ductility are not strongly dependent on temperature below 288 C. However, temperature does significantly affect radiation effects on SS microstructure and micromechanical deformation mechanisms. The critical conditions for material susceptibility to IASCC at low temperatures may be controlled by radiation-induced grain boundary microchemistry, strain localization due to irradiation microstructure and irradiation creep processes. 39 refs

  7. The stress-corrosion behavior of Al-Li-Cu alloys: A comparison of test methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, P. P.; Galvin, R. P.; Nelson, H. G.

    1982-01-01

    Two powder metallurgy processed (Al-Li-Cu) alloys with and without Mg addition were studied in aqueous 3.5% NaCl solution during the alternate immersion testing of tuning fork specimens, slow crack growth tests using fracture mechanics specimens, and the slow strain rate testing of straining electrode specimens. Scanning electron microscopy and optical metallography were used to demonstrate the character of the interaction between the Al-Li-Cu alloys and the selected environment. Both alloys are susceptible to SC in an aqueous 3.5% NaCl solution under the right electrochemical and microstructural conditions. Each test method yields important information on the character of the SC behavior. Under all conditions investigated, second phase particles strung out in rows along the extrusion direction in the alloys were rapidly attacked, and played principal role in the SC process. With time, larger pits developed from these rows of smaller pits and under certain electrochemical conditions surface cracks initiated from the larger pits and contributed directly to the fracture process. Evidence to support slow crack growth was observed in both the slow strain rate tests and the sustained immersion tests of precracked fracture mechanics specimens. The possible role of H2 in the stress corrosion cracking process is suggested.

  8. Influence of Thermal Aging on Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking of Cast Duplex Stainless Steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, T.; Totsuka, N.; Nakajima, N.; Arioka, K.; Negishi, K.

    2002-01-01

    In order to evaluate the SCC (stress corrosion cracking) susceptibility of cast duplex stainless steels which are used for the main coolant piping material of pressurized water reactors (PWRs), the slow strain rate test (SSRT) and the constant load test (CLT) were performed in simulated PWR primary water at 360 C. The main coolant piping materials contain ferrite phase with ranging from 8 to 23 % and its mechanical properties are affected by long time thermal aging. The 23% ferrite material was prepared for test as the maximum ferrite content of main coolant pipes in Japanese PWRs. The brittle fracture in the non-aged materials after SSRT is mainly caused by quasi-cleavage fracture in austenitic phase. On the other hand, a mixture of quasi-cleavage fracture in austenite and ferrite phases was observed on long time aged material. Also on CLT, (2 times σ y ), after 3,000 hours exposure, microcracks were observed on the surface of non-aged and aged for 10,000 hours at 400 C materials. The crack initiation site of CLT is similar to that of SSRT. The SCC susceptibility of the materials increases with aging time. It is suggested that the ferrite hardening with aging affect SCC susceptibility of cast duplex stainless steels. (authors)

  9. Stress corrosion cracking and hydrogen embrittlement of an Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, R.G.; Dietzel, W.; Zhang, B.J.; Liu, W.J.; Tseng, M.K.; Atrens, A.

    2004-01-01

    The age hardening, stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and hydrogen embrittlement (HE) of an Al-Zn-Mg-Cu 7175 alloy were investigated experimentally. There were two peak-aged states during ageing. For ageing at 413 K, the strength of the second peak-aged state was slightly higher than that of the first one, whereas the SCC susceptibility was lower, indicating that it is possible to heat treat 7175 to high strength and simultaneously to have high SCC resistance. The SCC susceptibility increased with increasing Mg segregation at the grain boundaries. Hydrogen embrittlement (HE) increased with increased hydrogen charging and decreased with increasing ageing time for the same hydrogen charging conditions. Computer simulations were carried out of (a) the Mg grain boundary segregation using the embedded atom method and (b) the effect of Mg and H segregation on the grain boundary strength using a quasi-chemical approach. The simulations showed that (a) Mg grain boundary segregation in Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloys is spontaneous, (b) Mg segregation decreases the grain boundary strength, and (c) H embrittles the grain boundary more seriously than does Mg. Therefore, the SCC mechanism of Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloys is attributed to the combination of HE and Mg segregation induced grain boundary embrittlement

  10. Implications of Y-fluting microstructures in zircaloy stress-corrosion fracture and analogous systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banks, T.M.; Garlick, A.

    1982-01-01

    Transgranular cleavage is an important mode of crack propagation during stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) of Zircaloy in iodine vapour; and another characteristic feature is the presence of parallel closely spaced ridges. These are often referred to as Y-flutings because each ridge takes the form of an inverted Y when viewed along the direction of crack growth. The flutings are shown here to be formed by localised ductile parting of the Zircaloy near the tips of cleavage cracks; high mechanical constraints in those regions and the limited number of available slip systems result in the formation of a planar array of parallel tunnels. Upon final separation these appear as a pattern of parallel ridges on each fracture face. Striking similarities in morphology have been noted here between Y-flutings in Zircaloy and those produced during tests on unstable fluid interfaces: the direction of motion of the fluid interface can be determined from the Y-morphology and is in agreement with observations from Zircaloy SCC tests. It is further demonstrated that equations governing thermodynamic and kinetic instability of fluid interfaces can be adapted to relate the fluting spacing in Zircaloy to standard fracture mechanics parameters. (author)

  11. Three-dimensional finite element analysis of stress distribution in a tooth restored with metal and fiber posts of varying diameters: An in-vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pradeep; Rao, R Nageswar

    2015-01-01

    To compare stress distribution in a tooth restored with metal and fiber posts of varying diameters (1.2 and 1.4 mm) by means of three-dimensional finite element analysis (3D-FEA). Four 3D-FEA models were constructed: (1) fiber post (1.2 and 1.4 mm) and (2) metal post (1.2 and 1.4 mm). The material properties were assigned and a force of 100 N was applied at 45° angle to the longitudinal axis of the tooth onto the palatal surface incisal to the cingulum. Analysis was run and stress distribution pattern was studied. Maximum stresses in the radicular tooth structure for fiber post were higher than that for metal post. In the former models, stresses in the tooth structure were slightly reduced with increase in fiber post diameter. To reduce stress in the remaining radicular tooth structure, it is better to use a fiber post of a large diameter.

  12. Enhancement of the Stress Corrosion Sensitivity of AA5083 by Heat Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jie; Quesnel, David J.

    2011-02-01

    In this study, the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) resistance of AA5083 is intentionally degraded by a series of progressively longer annealing treatments at 448 K (175 °C) that create a two-phase microstructure. Precipitation of strongly anodic Mg2Al3, known as β-phase, occurs heterogeneously with substantial precipitation along the grain boundaries, as observed by differential interference microscopy. Ultimate tensile strength, yield strength, and strain to failure of AA5083 alloy were found to be independent of the amount of β-phase precipitates, making AA5083 an ideal system to study the relative contributions of anodic dissolution and hydrogen embrittlement. Open circuit dropwise exposure SCC tests with precracked double cantilever beam (DCB) specimens made from the AA5083 alloy with different heat treatment conditions were conducted using 3.5 pct NaCl solution at an initial stress intensity factor ( K I ) of 1 5 {{ksi}}sqrt {{in}} .( { 1 6. 5 {{MPa}}sqrt {{m}} } ). Two SCC characteristics, initial crack growth rate and incubation time, were found to be strongly dependent on the amount of β-phase precipitates. Initial crack growth rate increased sigmoidally as a function of heat treatment time with an inflection point between 120 and 240 hours of sensitization time, while the incubation time decreases monotonically with sensitization time. Additionally, fracture surfaces investigated by scanning electron microscopy demonstrated characteristics of intergranular cracking with multiple crack tips. Discussion centers on the evidence supporting anodic dissolution of β-phase grain boundary precipitates as a primary mechanism of SCC in severely sensitized AA5083 alloy and the potential contribution of hydrogen embrittlement in the failure of grain boundary ligaments between β-phase grain boundary precipitates in less severely sensitized conditions.

  13. Stress corrosion cracking of ferritic reactor pressure vessel steels under boiling water reactor conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritter, S.; Seifert, H.P.

    2001-01-01

    The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behaviour of low-alloy reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels in oxygenated high-temperature water and its relevance to boiling water reactor (BWR) power operation, in particular its possible effect on both, RPV structural integrity and safety, has been a subject of controversial discussions for many years. The SCC crack growth behaviour of different RPV steels under simulated BWR/NWC conditions was therefore characterized by constant load and ripple load tests with pre-cracked fracture mechanics specimens in oxygenated high-temperature water at temperatures of either 288, 250, 200 or 150 C. Modern high-temperature water loops, online crack growth monitoring (DCPD) and fractographical analysis by scanning electron microscopy were used to quantify the cracking response. It is concluded that there is no susceptibility to sustained SCC crack growth at temperatures around 288 C under purely static loading, as long as small-scale-yielding conditions prevail at the crack tip and the water chemistry is maintained within current BWR/NWC operational practice (EPRI water chemistry guidelines). However, sustained, fast SCC (with respect to operational time scales) cannot be excluded for faulted water chemistry conditions (EPRI Action Level 3) and/or for highly stressed specimens, either loaded near to K IJ or with a high degree of plasticity in the remaining ligament. The conservative character of the 'BWR VIP 60 Disposition Lines 1 and 2' for SCC crack growth in low-alloy steels has been confirmed by this study for 288 C and RPV base material. Preliminary results indicate, that these disposition lines may be significantly or slightly exceeded (even in steels with low sulphur content) in the case of small load fluctuations at high load ratios (ripple loading) or at intermediate temperatures (200 - 250 C) in RPV materials, which show a distinct susceptibility to Dynamic Strain Ageing (DSA). (orig.)

  14. Impact of surface condition on sulphide stress corrosion cracking of 316L stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinds, G.; Wickström, L.; Mingard, K.; Turnbull, A.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Heat tinting renders 316L stainless steel more susceptible to sulphide stress corrosion cracking. ► Pitting more likely at physical defects generated from specimen preparation than at inclusions. ► Cracks developed after 90 days that were not evident after the standard test duration of 30 days. ► Only shallow pitting observed due to constrained access of H 2 S to the pit recesses. ► Determination of near surface residual stress in austenitic stainless steels by XRD is unreliable. -- Abstract: The effect of surface condition on crack initiation in 316L stainless steel during laboratory testing in sour (H 2 S) environments for oil and gas applications has been investigated using the four-point bend test method. The main focus was on the effect of the degree of surface damage introduced during specimen machining and the influence of heat tinting to simulate the welding process. Detailed mapping of the surface of the four-point bend specimens before and after the tests revealed a greater tendency for pits to form at pre-existing mechanical defects than at inclusions. Perhaps surprisingly, pitting was initiated more readily on the finer ground surface. The effect of heat tinting was (i) to increase the pit density and (ii) to facilitate cracking, shifting the material from the pass to the failure domain. In all cases cracks initiated at pitting sites. A clear time dependence was observed in both the evolution of pitting and the transition from pit to crack during the four-point bend test, implying that the standard 30 day test duration may not always be sufficiently conservative. Characterisation of pitting and cracking in the specimens using electron back-scatter diffraction (EBSD) and focused ion beam (FIB) milling revealed evidence of de-alloying local to the crack. The origin of the cracks could not be identified precisely but initiation in the thinned region of the metal caused by undercutting or intense localised dissolution along slip

  15. Study of Hot Salt Stress Corrosion Crack Initiation of Alloy IMI 834 by using DC Potential Drop Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pustode, Mangesh D. [Bharat Forge Ltd., Pune (India); Dewangan, Bhupendra [Tata Steel, Jamshedpur (India); Raja, V. S. [Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai (India); Paulose, Neeta; Babu, Narendra [Gas Turbine Research Establishment (GTRE), Bangalore (India)

    2016-10-15

    DC potential drop technique was employed during the slow strain rate tests to study the hot salt stress corrosion crack (HSSCC) initiation at 300 and 400 ℃. Threshold stresses for HSSCC initiation were found to about 88 % of the yield strength at both temperatures, but the time from crack initiation to final failure (Δtscc) decreased significantly with temperature, which reflects larger tendency for brittle fracture and secondary cracking. The brittle fracture features consisted of transgranular cracking through the primary α grain and discontinuous faceted cracking through the transformed β grains.

  16. Fabrication and loading of long-term stress corrosion cracking surveillance specimens for the Dresden 1 decontamination program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, W.L.

    1979-10-01

    Stress-corrosion cracking test specimens were prepared for Dow Nuclear Services for insertion in the Dresden 1 reactor during the chemical decontamination of the primary system, and for subsequent exposure under operating conditions when the station returns to service. The specimens consist of pressurized tubes fabricated from Type-304 and -304L stainless steel, Inconel 600, Incoloy 800, and Zircaloy 2. In addition, constant radius bent-beam specimens of 3/4 hard Type-410 stainless steel were also included. All specimens were stressed to, or slightly above, their respective 0.2% offset yield strengths at the temperatures of interest

  17. Iodine stress corrosion cracking of Zircaloy: Laboratory data, a phenomenological model, and predictions of in-reactor behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, A.K.; Tasooji, A.

    1981-01-01

    Data from laboratory tests performed on unirradiated and irradiated Zircaloy have been used as the basis for developing a phenomenological model of iodine-induced stress corrosion crack initiation and growth. The model is capable of predicting the response of cladding subjected to complex loading conditions. Major features of the data incorporated into the model include the existence of a threshold stress, the effect of iodine concentration, temperature effects, the role of chemical inhomogeneities and mechanical flaws, crack initiation in smooth specimens, crack propagation rates as a function of stress intensity in flawed specimens, and the detrimental effect of irradiation. The major physical processes addressed by the model include intergranular stress corrosion cracking (SCC), transgranular SCC, ductile rupture, iodine penetration by surface diffusion along existing on incipient cracks, and stress and strain intensification and triaxiality caused by cracks or flaws. A probabilistic description of the size distribution of the flaws found in as-fabricated cladding is used at the basis for quantitatively extrapolating the laboratory test results to predict in-reactor cladding behavior. The in-reactor SCC resistance of a large fuel assembly is predicted to be substantially lower and more variable than that of small laboratory specimens. (orig.)

  18. In vivo and in vitro studies of the stress-corrosion cracking behavior of surgical implant alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bundy, K J; Marek, M; Hochman, R F

    1983-05-01

    Behavior of implant alloys exposed simultaneously to tensile stresses and corrosion environments has been examined. In the in vivo studies, a stainless steel and a titanium alloy exhibited cracklike features when loaded to the yield stress sigma y and implanted for 16 weeks. A cobalt-chromium alloy stressed beyond sigma y exhibited them in plastically deformed areas. A cobalt-chromium-nickel-molybdenum alloy appeared to be immune. In vitro samples loaded to various stress levels were immersed in Ringer's solution at 37 degrees C. Half of them were subjected to applied anodic potentials; the remaining control group was not. The applied potentials were dc potentials of magnitude similar to those generated by bioelectric effects. No attempt was made to duplicate time dependence or wave forms. Cracklike features were observed in the stainless steel and in the titanium alloy loaded to or beyond sigma y and polarized for 38 weeks. None were observed below sigma y. For the controls, no cracklike features were observed at any stress level after 53 1/2 weeks. Polarization measurements and potential versus time measurements were performed to study possible mechanisms for crack propagation. These investigations suggest that the in vivo corrosion environment is more severe than a 37 degrees C Ringer's solution because of the influence of both bioelectric effects and organic constituents. The implications of these studies for the performance of prosthetic devices is discussed.

  19. The influence of implant diameter and length on stress distribution of osseointegrated implants related to crestal bone geometry: a three-dimensional finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baggi, Luigi; Cappelloni, Ilaria; Di Girolamo, Michele; Maceri, Franco; Vairo, Giuseppe

    2008-12-01

    Load transfer mechanisms and possible failure of osseointegrated implants are affected by implant shape, geometrical and mechanical properties of the site of placement, as well as crestal bone resorption. Suitable estimation of such effects allows for correct design of implant features. The purpose of this study was to analyze the influence of implant diameter and length on stress distribution and to analyze overload risk of clinically evidenced crestal bone loss at the implant neck in mandibular and maxillary molar periimplant regions. Stress-based performances of 5 commercially available implants (2 ITI, 2 Nobel Biocare, and 1 Ankylos implant; diameters of 3.3 mm to 4.5 mm, bone-implant interface lengths of 7.5 mm to 12 mm) were analyzed by linearly elastic 3-dimensional finite element simulations, under a static load (lateral component: 100 N; vertical intrusive component: 250 N). Numerical models of maxillary and mandibular molar bone segments were generated from computed tomography images, and local stress measures were introduced to allow for the assessment of bone overload risk. Different crestal bone geometries were also modelled. Type II bone quality was approximated, and complete osseous integration was assumed. Maximum stress areas were numerically located at the implant neck, and possible overloading could occur in compression in compact bone (due to lateral components of the occlusal load) and in tension at the interface between cortical and trabecular bone (due to vertical intrusive loading components). Stress values and concentration areas decreased for cortical bone when implant diameter increased, whereas more effective stress distributions for cancellous bone were experienced with increasing implant length. For implants with comparable diameter and length, compressive stress values at cortical bone were reduced when low crestal bone loss was considered. Finally, dissimilar stress-based performances were exhibited for mandibular and maxillary

  20. Irradiation Programs and Test Plans to Assess High-Fluence Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking Susceptibility.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teysseyre, Sebastien [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-03-01

    . Irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) is a known issue in current reactors. In a 60 year lifetime, reactor core internals may experience fluence levels up to 15 dpa for boiling water reactors (BWR) and 100+ dpa for pressurized water reactors (PWR). To support a safe operation of our fleet of reactors and maintain their economic viability it is important to be able to predict any evolution of material behaviors as reactors age and therefore fluence accumulated by reactor core component increases. For PWR reactors, the difficulty to predict high fluence behavior comes from the fact that there is not a consensus of the mechanism of IASCC and that little data is available. It is however possible to use the current state of knowledge on the evolution of irradiated microstructure and on the processes that influences IASCC to emit hypotheses. This report identifies several potential changes in microstructure and proposes to identify their potential impact of IASCC. The susceptibility of a component to high fluence IASCC is considered to not only depends on the intrinsic IASCC susceptibility of the component due to radiation effects on the material but to also be related to the evolution of the loading history of the material and interaction with the environment as total fluence increases. Single variation type experiments are proposed to be performed with materials that are representative of PWR condition and with materials irradiated in other conditions. To address the lack of IASCC propagation and initiation data generated with material irradiated in PWR condition, it is proposed to investigate the effect of spectrum and flux rate on the evolution of microstructure. A long term irradiation, aimed to generate a well-controlled irradiation history on a set on selected materials is also proposed for consideration. For BWR, the study of available data permitted to identify an area of concern for long term performance of component. The efficiency of

  1. Lead-induced stress-corrosion cracking of alloy 600 in plausible steam generator crevice environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, M.D. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Manolescu, A. [Ontario Hydro Technologies, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Mirzai, M. [Ontario Hydro, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    1999-03-01

    Laboratory stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) test environments were developed to simulate crevice chemistries representative of Bruce Nuclear Generating Station A (BNPD A) steam generators (SGs); these test environments were used to determine the susceptibility of Alloy 600 to lead-induced SCC under plausible SG conditions. Test environments were based on plant SG hideout return data and analysis of removed tubes and deposits. Deviations from the normal near-neutral crevice pH environment were considered to simulate possible faulted excursion crevice chemistry and to bound the postulated crevice pH range of 3 to 9 (at temperature). The effect of lead contamination up to 1000 ppm, but with an emphasis on the 100- to 500-ppm range, was determined. SCC susceptibility was investigated using constant extension rate tensile (CERT) tests and encapsulated C-ring tests. CERT tests were performed at 305 degrees C on tubing representative of BNPD A SG U-bends. The C-ring test method allowed a wider test matrix, covering 3 temperatures (280 degrees C, 304 degrees C and 315 degrees C), 3 strain levels (0.2%, 2% and 4%), and tubing representative of U-bends plus tubing given a simulated stress relief to represent material at the tube sheet. The results of this test program confirmed that in the absence of lead contamination, cracking does not occur in these concentrated, 3.3 to 8.9 pH range, crevice environments. Also, it appears that the concentrated crevice environments suppress lead-induced cracking relative to that seen in all-volatile-treatment (AVT) water. For the (static) C-ring tests, lead-induced SCC was only produced in the near-neutral crevice environment and was more severe at 500 ppm than at 100 ppm PbO. This trend was also observed in CERT tests, but some cracking-grain boundary attack occurred in acidic (pH 3.3) and alkaline (pH 8.9) environments. The C-ring tests indicated that a certain amount of resistance to cracking was imparted by simulated stress relief of

  2. Initiation of stress corrosion cracking in pre-stained austenitic stainless steels exposed to primary water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huguenin, P.

    2012-01-01

    Austenitic stainless steels are widely used in primary circuits of Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) plants. However, a limited number of cases of Intergranular Stress Corrosion Cracking (IGSCC) has been detected in cold-worked (CW) areas of non-sensitized austenitic stainless steel components in French PWRs. A previous program launched in the early 2000's identified the required conditions for SCC of cold-worked stainless steels. It was found that a high strain hardening coupled with a cyclic loading favoured SCC. The present study aims at better understanding the role of pre-straining on crack initiation and at developing an engineering model for IGSCC initiation of 304L and 316L stainless steels in primary water. Such model will be based on SCC initiation tests on notched (not pre-cracked) specimens under 'trapezoidal' cyclic loading. The effects of pre-straining (tensile versus cold rolling), cold-work level and strain path on the SCC mechanisms are investigated. Experimental results demonstrate the dominating effect of strain path on SCC susceptibility for all pre-straining levels. Initiation can be understood as crack density and crack depth. A global criterion has been proposed to integrate both aspects of initiation. Maps of SCC initiation susceptibility have been proposed. A critical crack depth between 10 and 20 μm has been demonstrated to define transition between slow propagation and fast propagation for rolled materials. For tensile pre-straining, the critical crack depth is in the range 20 - 50 μm. Experimental evidences support the notion of a KISCC threshold, whose value depends on materials, pre-straining ant load applied. The initiation time has been found to depend on the applied loading as a function of (σ max max/YV) 11,5 . The effect of both strain path and surface hardening is indirectly taken into account via the yield stress. In this study, material differences rely on strain path effect on mechanical properties. As a result, a stress

  3. Micrographic and microfractographic characteristics of the T-A6V titanium alloy under fatigue and stress corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laziou, J.C.

    1976-01-01

    In a previous article the author studied the influence of the structure on the mechanical properties, tenacity and fatigue behaviour of the T-A6V titanium alloy. The four stages of a crack propagation have been observed: (i) The initial stage or initiation, characterized by the forming of slipband, on the one hand, and of extrusions-intrusions, on the other hand, which are generative of micro-cracks. The α-β interfaces are also initiation sites. (ii) Stage 1, characterized by its fracture of fragile aspect. (iii) Stage II, characterized by the presence of fatigue striations. (iv) The ultimate stage or rapid propagation of the crack. The behaviour of the different structure of the T-A6V and the effect of the forging field (β or α+β) has also been studied from the standpoint of resistance to crack propagation in a corrosive environment. These tests have confirmed that satisfactory behaviour of an acicular structure with regard to the stress-corrosion. It is confirmed that a stress-corrosion crack propagates by cleavage in the α-phase according to a plane approximately oriented by 13 to 14 0 in relation to the base plane (0001)sub(α). (Auth.)

  4. Effect of solution treatment on stress corrosion cracking behavior of an as-forged Mg-Zn-Y-Zr alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S D; Xu, D K; Wang, B J; Sheng, L Y; Han, E H; Dong, C

    2016-07-08

    Effect of solid solution treatment (T4) on stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of an as-forged Mg-6.7%Zn-1.3%Y-0.6%Zr (in wt.%) alloy has been investigated using slow strain rate tensile (SSRT) testing in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution. The results demonstrated that the SCC susceptibility index (ISCC) of as-forged samples was 0.95 and its elongation-to-failure (εf) was only 1.1%. After T4 treatment, the SCC resistance was remarkably improved. The ISCC and εf values of T4 samples were 0.86 and 3.4%, respectively. Fractography and surface observation indicated that the stress corrosion cracking mode for as-forged samples was dominated by transgranular and partially intergranular morphology, whereas the cracking mode for T4 samples was transgranular. In both cases, the main cracking mechanism was associated with hydrogen embrittlement (HE). Through alleviating the corrosion attack of Mg matrix, the influence of HE on the SCC resistance of T4 samples can be greatly suppressed.

  5. Influence of hydrogen embrittlement on caustic stress corrosion cracking of 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steels: comparative tests performed on specimens loaded in modes I and III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berge, P.; Vaillant, F.

    1982-01-01

    The comparison of stress corrosion susceptibilities in mode I (tensile stress) and mode III (shear stress) can reveal the possible involvement of an hydrogen embrittlement mechanism, particularly for 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steels in caustic solution [fr

  6. TEM characterisation of stress corrosion cracks in nickel based alloys: effect of chromium content and chemistry of environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delabrouille, F.

    2004-11-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is a damaging mode of alloys used in pressurized water reactors, particularly of nickel based alloys constituting the vapour generator tubes. Cracks appear on both primary and secondary sides of the tubes, and more frequently in locations where the environment is not well defined. SCC sensitivity of nickel based alloys depends of their chromium content, which lead to the replacement of alloy 600 (15 % Cr) by alloy 690 (30 % Cr) but this phenomenon is not yet very well understood. The goal of this thesis is two fold: i) observe the effect of chromium content on corrosion and ii) characterize the effect of environment on the damaging process of GV tubes. For this purpose, one industrial tube and several synthetic alloys - with controlled chromium content - have been studied. Various characterisation techniques were used to study the corrosion products on the surface and within the SCC cracks: SIMS; TEM - FEG: thin foil preparation, HAADF, EELS, EDX. The effect of chromium content and surface preparation on the generalised corrosion was evidenced for synthetic alloys. Moreover, we observed the penetration of oxygen along triple junctions of grain boundaries few micrometers under the free surface. SCC tests show the positive effect of chromium for contents varying from 5 to 30 % wt. Plastic deformation induces a modification of the structure, and thus of the protective character, of the internal chromium rich oxide layer. SCC cracks which developed in different chemical environments were characterised by TEM. The oxides which are formed within the cracks are different from what is observed on the free surface, which reveals a modification of medium and electrochemical conditions in the crack. Finally we were able to evidence some structural characteristics of the corrosion products (in the cracks and on the surface) which turn to be a signature of the chemical environment. (author)

  7. Study and characterization by acoustic emission and electrochemical measurements of the stress corrosion cracking of the 304L steel in chloride environment; Etude et caracterisation par emission acoustique et mesures electrochimiques de la corrosion sous contrainte de l'acier 304L en milieu chlorure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tshimombo, A.; Delaunois, F. [UMONS, Faculte Polytechnique, Mons (Belgium); Tshimombo, A.; Idrissi, H. [INSA-Lyon, Laboratoire MATEIS, 69 - Villeurbanne (France)

    2010-03-15

    As the prediction of stress corrosion cracking risks is a matter of interest, the authors report the development and the application of the acoustic emission technique to characterize and control this corrosion mode. They describe the choice of an accelerated test as experiment conditions, comment and discuss the correlation between acoustic emission and corrosion current density measurements

  8. Investigation with slow traction conditions of the stress corrosion of carbon steels in alkaline media. Role of passivating inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miroud, Lakhdar

    1991-01-01

    The stress corrosion cracking (S.C.C.) sensitivity of carbon steels in basic media, such as carbonates, is well known. A constant strain-rate test have allowed to observe two steels (A42 [E26] and XC38) behaviour in such conditions at pH 9. The S.C.C. potentials susceptibility range has been found. Inter and Trans-granular cracking have been revealed and measured with micrographic methods. A crack growth rate has been studied as a function of strain rate: an experimental rate has been compared to calculated values from methods which have proposed previously, and methods which have been elaborated in this work. These last permit a best approach of cracking in our case. The chromates use, as inhibitor ions, has permit to decrease the corrosive attack and to cancel the crack growth rate. (author) [fr

  9. Characterizing the effect of creep on stress corrosion cracking of cold worked Alloy 690 in supercritical water environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lefu; Chen, Kai; Du, Donghai; Gao, Wenhua; Andresen, Peter L.; Guo, Xianglong

    2017-08-01

    The effect of creep on stress corrosion cracking (SCC) was studied by measuring crack growth rates (CGRs) of 30% cold worked (CW) Alloy 690 in supercritical water (SCW) and inert gas environments at temperatures ranging from 450 °C to 550 °C. The SCC crack growth rate under SCW environments can be regarded as the cracking induced by the combined effect of corrosion and creep, while the CGR in inert gas environment can be taken as the portion of creep induced cracking. Results showed that the CW Alloy 690 sustained high susceptibility to intergranular (IG) cracking, and creep played a dominant role in the SCC crack growth behavior, contributing more than 80% of the total crack growth rate at each testing temperature. The temperature dependence of creep induced CGRs follows an Arrhenius dependency, with an apparent activation energy (QE) of about 225 kJ/mol.

  10. An overview of stress corrosion in nuclear reactors from the late 1950s to the 1990s

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bush, S.H.; Chockie, A.D.

    1996-02-01

    This report examines the problems that US and certain foreign reactors have experienced with intergranular and transgranular stress corrosion cracking. Included is a review of the failure modes and mechanisms, various corrective measures, and the techniques available to detect and size the cracks. The information has been organized into four time periods: late 1950s to mid 1960s; mid 1960s to 1975; 1975 to 1985; and 1985 to 1991. The key findings concerning BWRs are: Corrective actions have led to a substantial reduction of IGSCC; Control of carbon levels - through use of ELC or NG grades of austenitic stainless steels - should minimize IGSCC; Control of residual stresses, particularly with IHSI, greatly reduces the incidence of IGSCC; Hydrogen water treatment controls the oxygen and should limit IGSCC; The problem with furnace-sensitized safe ends is well recognized and should not recur; In most cases, severe circumferential SCC should lead to detectable leakage so that leak-before-break can be identified; IGSCC of austenitic stainless steels can occur in all pipe sizes from smallest to largest, especially when stress, sensitization, and oxygen are all present. In the case of PWRs, it is clear that the incidents of primary water stress corrosion cracking appear to be increasing. Cases containing steam generators, austenitic stainless steels, and Inconels have been known for years. Now it is occurring in safe ends and piping at very low oxygen levels. Secondary side water chemistry must be controlled to prevent SCC in PWRs. 18 refs

  11. An overview of stress corrosion in nuclear reactors from the late 1950s to the 1990s

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bush, S.H. [Review and Synthesis Associates, Richland, WA (United States); Chockie, A.D. [Chockie Group International Inc., Seattle, WA (United States)

    1996-02-01

    This report examines the problems that US and certain foreign reactors have experienced with intergranular and transgranular stress corrosion cracking. Included is a review of the failure modes and mechanisms, various corrective measures, and the techniques available to detect and size the cracks. The information has been organized into four time periods: late 1950s to mid 1960s; mid 1960s to 1975; 1975 to 1985; and 1985 to 1991. The key findings concerning BWRs are: Corrective actions have led to a substantial reduction of IGSCC; Control of carbon levels - through use of ELC or NG grades of austenitic stainless steels - should minimize IGSCC; Control of residual stresses, particularly with IHSI, greatly reduces the incidence of IGSCC; Hydrogen water treatment controls the oxygen and should limit IGSCC; The problem with furnace-sensitized safe ends is well recognized and should not recur; In most cases, severe circumferential SCC should lead to detectable leakage so that leak-before-break can be identified; IGSCC of austenitic stainless steels can occur in all pipe sizes from smallest to largest, especially when stress, sensitization, and oxygen are all present. In the case of PWRs, it is clear that the incidents of primary water stress corrosion cracking appear to be increasing. Cases containing steam generators, austenitic stainless steels, and Inconels have been known for years. Now it is occurring in safe ends and piping at very low oxygen levels. Secondary side water chemistry must be controlled to prevent SCC in PWRs. 18 refs.

  12. Study of initiation and growth of stress corrosion cracks. Quantitative characterization and modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peyrat, Christine

    1997-01-01

    A phenomenological study of Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) cracks initiation and growth was carried out on a Z 2 CN 18.10 stainless steel in a boiling aqueous magnesium chloride solution at 153 deg. C. The characterization method exploits the morphological information (cracks shape and size distribution) available on a specimen after SCC test. This method, independent of any mechanistic hypothesis, led to the analytical representation of the growth rate of a given crack as a function of its depth and of the density of deeper cracks. The presence of this last parameter could be the expression of a 'shielding effect' of mechanical origin, exerted by the cracks of large size. A 'true initiation' rate was calculated by an extrapolation based on the analytical expression of the growth rate. This analytical representation of cracks initiation and growth accounts for the saturation observed in the experimental determination of the 'apparent initiation'. As time goes, the number of cracks deeper than a given threshold depth tends towards a limit which depends very strongly on the chosen threshold. This saturation effect can be interpreted as exclusively due to the way the small cracks propagate, as the 'true initiation' rate can be expressed versus time by a simple power law. In the case of slow strain rate tests, it is shown that the kinetic parameters characteristic of initiation and growth depend on the applied elongation rate. In particular, the initial crack growth rate increases with elongation rate. The validity domains of the proposed expressions have been specified by means of SCC tests carried out under different types of mechanical loading. (author) [fr

  13. Stress corrosion cracking of austenitic weld deposits in a salt spray environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, J.B.; Yu, C.; Shiue, R.K.; Tsay, L.W.

    2015-01-01

    ER 308L and 309LMo were utilized as the filler metals for the groove and overlay welds of a 304L stainless steel substrate, which was prepared via a gas tungsten arc-welding process in multiple passes. U-bend and weight-loss tests were conducted by testing the welds in a salt spray containing 10 wt% NaCl at 120 °C. The dissolution of the skeletal structure in the fusion zone (FZ) caused the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of the weld. The FZ in the cold-rolled condition showed the longest single crack length in the U-bend tests. Moreover, sensitization treatment at 650 °C for 10 h promoted the formation of numerous fine cracks, which resulted in a high SCC susceptibility. The weight loss of the deposits was consistent with the SCC susceptibility of the welds in a salt spray. The 309LMo deposit was superior to the 308L deposit in the salt spray. - Highlights: • ER 308L and 309LMo were utilized as fillers for the groove and overlay welds of a 304L SS. • U-bend and weight-loss tests in a salt spray containing 10 wt% NaCl at 120 °C were performed. • The dissolution of solidified structure caused the SCC of the welds in a salt spray. • Sensitization treatment increased the weight loss and SCC susceptibility of the deposits. • The weight loss of the weld deposits was related to their SCC susceptibility in a salt spray.

  14. Stress corrosion cracking behaviour of Alloy 600 in high temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, G.L.; Burke, M.G.

    1995-01-01

    The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) susceptibility of Alloy 600 in deaerated water at 360 deg. C, as measured with statistically-loaded U-bend specimens, is dependent upon microstructure and whether the material was cold-worked and annealed (CWA) or hot-worked and annealed (HWA). All cracking was intergranular, and materials lacking grain boundary carbides were most susceptible to SCC initiation. CWA tubing materials are more susceptible to SCC initiation than HWA ring-rolled forging materials with similar microstructures, as determined by light optical metallography (LOM). In CWA tubing materials one crack dominated and grew to a large size that was observable by visual inspection. HWA materials with a low hot-working finishing temperature (below 925 deg. C) and final anneals at temperatures ranging from 1010 deg. C to 1065 deg. C developed both large cracks, similar to those found in CWA materials, and also small intergranular microcracks, which are detectable only by destructive metallographic examination. HWA materials with a high hot-working finishing temperature (above 980 deg. C) and high-temperature final anneal (above 1040 deg. C), with grain boundaries that are fully decorated, developed only microcracks, which were observed in all specimens examined. These materials developed no large, visually detectable cracks, even after more than 300 weeks exposure. A low-temperature thermal treatment (610 deg. C for 7h), which reduced or eliminates SCC in Alloy 600, did not eliminate microcrack formation in the high temperature processed HWA materials. Detailed microstructural characterization using conventional metallographic and analytical electron microscopy (AEM) techniques was performed on selected materials to identify the factors responsible for the observed differences in cracking behaviour. 11 refs, 12 figs, 3 tabs

  15. Effects of potential and concentration of bicarbonate solution on stress corrosion cracking of annealed carbon steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haruna, Takumi; Zhu, Liehong; Murakami, Makoto; Shibata, Toshio

    2000-01-01

    Effects of potential and concentration of bicarbonate on stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of annealed SM 400 B carbon steel has been investigated in bicarbonate solutions at 343 K. The surface of annealed specimen had decarburized layer of about 0. 5 mm thickness. A potentiostatic slow strain rate testing apparatus equipped with a charge coupled device camera system was employed to evaluate SCC susceptibility from the viewpoint of the crack behavior. In a constant bicarbonate concentration of 1 M, cracks were observed in the potential range from -800 to 600 mV Ag/ A gCl . and especially, the initiation and the propagation of the cracks were accelerated at -600 mV. At a constant potential of -600 mV, cracks were observed in the concentration range from 0.001 to 1 M, and the initiation and the propagation of the cracks were suppressed as the concentration decreased. Polarization curves for the decarburized surface were measured with two different scan rates. High SCC susceptibility may be expected in the potential range where the difference between the two current densities is large. It was found in this system that the potential with the maximum difference in the current density was -600 mV for 1 M bicarbonate solution, and the potential increased with a decrease in the concentration of bicarbonate. This means that an applied potential of -600 mV provides the highest SCC susceptibility for 1 M bicarbonate solution, and that the SCC susceptibility decreases as the concentration decreases. These findings support the dependence of the actual SCC behavior on the potential and the concentration of bicarbonate. (author)

  16. Intergranular stress corrosion cracking of ion irradiated 304L stainless steel in PWR environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Jyoti

    2016-01-01

    IASCC is irradiation - assisted enhancement of intergranular stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of austenitic stainless steel. It is a complex degrading phenomenon which can have a significant influence on maintenance time and cost of PWRs' core internals and hence, is an issue of concern. Recent studies have proposed using ion irradiation (to be specific, proton irradiation) as an alternative of neutron irradiation to improve the current understanding of the mechanism. The objective of this study was to investigate the cracking susceptibility of irradiated SA 304L and factors contributing to cracking, using two different ion irradiations; iron and proton irradiations. Both resulted in generation of point defects in the microstructure and thereby causing hardening of the SA 304L. Material (unirradiated and iron irradiated) showed no susceptibility to intergranular cracking on subjection to SSRT with a strain rate of 5 * 10 -8 s -1 up to 4 % plastic strain in inert environment. But, irradiation (iron and proton) was found to increase intergranular cracking severity of material on subjection to SSRT in simulated PWR primary water environment at 340 C. Correlation between the cracking susceptibility and degree of localization was studied. Impact of iron irradiation on bulk oxidation of SA 304L was studied as well by conducting an oxidation test for 360 h in simulated PWR environment at 340 C. The findings of this study indicate that the intergranular cracking of 304L stainless steel in PWR environment can be studied using Fe irradiation despite its small penetration depth in material. Furthermore, it has been shown that the cracking was similar in both iron and proton irradiated samples despite different degrees of localization. Lastly, on establishing iron irradiation as a successful tool, it was used to study the impact of surface finish and strain paths on intergranular cracking susceptibility of the material. (author) [fr

  17. The Role of Stress in the Corrosion Cracking of Aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    aluminium alloy in sodium chloride solution," Journal of Corrosion Science, vol. 65, pp. 387-396, 2012. [26] X. F. Liu et al. "The influence of tensile...circular pits around cathodic intermetallic particles, as listed in Table 1, a process generally referred to as “pitting.” When the chloride ions...grain boundaries acts as a catalyst prompting crack growth and subsequent intergranular corrosion cracking through anodic dissolution [4]. As chloride

  18. Relative Humidity and the Susceptibility of Austenitic Stainless Steel to Stress Corrosion Cracking in an impure Plutonium Oxide Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zapp, P.; Duffey, J.; Lam, P.; Dunn, K.

    2010-05-05

    Laboratory tests to investigate the corrosivity of moist plutonium oxide/chloride salt mixtures on 304L and 316L stainless steel coupons showed that corrosion occurred in selected samples. The tests exposed flat coupons for pitting evaluation and 'teardrop' stressed coupons for stress corrosion cracking (SCC) evaluation at room temperature to various mixtures of PuO{sub 2} and chloride-bearing salts for periods up to 500 days. The exposures were conducted in sealed containers in which the oxide-salt mixtures were loaded with about 0.6 wt % water from a humidified helium atmosphere. Observations of corrosion ranged from superficial staining to pitting and SCC. The extent of corrosion depended on the total salt concentration, the composition of the salt and the moisture present in the test environment. The most significant corrosion was found in coupons that were exposed to 98 wt % PuO{sub 2}, 2 wt % chloride salt mixtures that contained calcium chloride and 0.6 wt% water. SCC was observed in two 304L stainless steel teardrop coupons exposed in solid contact to a mixture of 98 wt % PuO{sub 2}, 0.9 wt % NaCl, 0.9 wt % KCl, and 0.2 wt % CaCl{sub 2}. The cracking was associated with the heat-affected zone of an autogenous weld that ran across the center of the coupon. Cracking was not observed in coupons exposed to the headspace gas above the solid mixture, or in coupons exposed to other mixtures with either no CaCl{sub 2} or 0.92 wt% CaCl{sub 2}. SCC was present where the 0.6 wt % water content exceeded the value needed to fully hydrate the available CaCl{sub 2}, but was absent where the water content was insufficient. These results reveal the significance of the relative humidity in the austenitic stainless steels environment to their susceptibility to corrosion. The relative humidity in the test environment was controlled by the water loading and the concentration of the hydrating salts such as CaCl{sub 2}. For each salt or salt mixture there is a threshold

  19. Corrosion Failures in Marine Environment

    OpenAIRE

    R. Krishnan

    1985-01-01

    This paper gives a brief description of typical marine environments and the most common form of corrosion of materials used in this environment. Some typical case histories of failures pertaining to pitting, bimetallic corrosion, dealloying, cavitation and stress corrosion cracking are illustrated as typical examples of corrosion failures.

  20. Stress Corrosion Cracking of the Drip Shield, The Waste Package Outer Barrier and the Stainless Steel Structural Material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. Stephen

    2000-04-17

    One of the potential failure modes of the drip shield (DS), the waste package (WP) outer barrier, and the stainless structural material is the initiation and propagation of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) induced by the WP environment and various types of stresses that can develop in the DSs or the WPs. For the current design of the DS and WP, however, the DS will be excluded from the SCC evaluation because stresses that are relevant to SCC are insignificant in the DS. The major sources of stresses in the DS are loadings due to backfill and earthquakes. These stresses will not induce SCC because the stress caused by backfill is generally compressive stress and the stress caused by earthquakes is temporary in nature. The 316NG stainless steel inner barrier of the WP will also be excluded from the SCC evaluation because the SCC performance assessment will not take credit from the inner barrier. Therefore, the purpose of this document is to provide a detailed description of the process-level models that can be applied to assess the performance of the material (i.e., Alloy 22) used for the WP outer barrier subjected to the effects of SCC. As already mentioned in the development plan for the WP PMR (CRWMS M and O 1999e), this Analyses and Models Report (AMR) is to serve as a feed to the Waste Package Degradation (WPD) Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) and Process Model Report (PMR).

  1. Quantitative characterization of initiation and propagation in stress corrosion cracking. An approach of a phenomenological model; Caracterisation quantitative de l`amorcage et de la propagation en corrosion sous contrainte. Approche d`une modelisation phenomenologique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raquet, O.

    1994-11-25

    A purely phenomenological study of stress corrosion cracking was performed using the couple Z2CN 18.10 (304L) austenitic stainless steel/boiling MgCl{sub 2} aqueous solution. The exploitation of the morphological information (shape of the cracks and size distribution) available after constant elongation rate tests led to the proposal of an analytical expression of the crack initiation and growth rates. This representation allowed to quantitatively characterize the influence of the applied strain rate as well as the effect of corrosion inhibitors on the crack initiation and propagation phases. It can be used in the search for the stress corrosion cracking mechanisms as a `riddle` for the determination of the rate controlling steps. As a matter of fact, no mechanistic hypothesis has been used for its development. (author).

  2. Modeling of primary water stress corrosion cracking at control rod drive mechanism nozzles of pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aly, Omar Fernandes

    2006-01-01

    One of the main failure mechanisms that cause risks to pressurized water reactors is the primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) occurring in alloys. It can occurs, besides another places, at the control reactor displacement mechanism nozzles. It is caused by the joint effect of tensile stress, temperature, susceptible metallurgical microstructure and environmental conditions of the primary water. These cracks can cause accidents that reduce nuclear safety by blocking the rod's displacement and may cause leakage of primary water, reducing the reactor's life. In this work it is proposed a study of the existing models and a modeling proposal to primary water stress corrosion cracking in these nozzles in a nickel based Alloy 600. It is been superposed electrochemical and fracture mechanics models, and validated using experimental and literature data. The experimental data were obtained at CDTN-Brazilian Nuclear Technology Development Center, in a recent installed slow strain rate testing equipment. In the literature it is found a diagram that indicates a thermodynamic condition for the occurrence of some PWSCC sub modes in Alloy 600: it was used potential x pH diagrams (Pourbaix diagrams), for Alloy 600 in high temperature primary water (300 deg C till 350 deg C). Over it, were located the PWSCC sub modes, using experimental data. It was added a third parameter called 'stress corrosion strength fraction'. However, it is possible to superpose to this diagram, other parameters expressing PWSCC initiation or growth kinetics from other models. Here is the proposition of the original contribution of this work: from an original experimental condition of potential versus pH, it was superposed, an empiric-comparative, a semi-empiric-probabilistic, an initiation time, and a strain rate damage models, to quantify respectively the PWSCC susceptibility, the failure time, and in the two lasts, the initiation time of stress corrosion cracking. It was modeling from our

  3. Allowing for surface preparation in stress corrosion cracking modelling; Prise en compte de l`etat de surface dans la modelisation de la fissuration par corrosion sous contrainte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berge, P.; Buisine, D. [Electricite de France (EDF), 92 - Clamart (France); Gelpi, A. [FRAMATOME, 92 - Paris-La-Defence (France)

    1997-12-31

    When a 600 alloy component is significantly deformed during installation, by welding, rolling, bending, its stress corrosion cracking in Pressurized Water Nuclear Reactor`s primary coolant, is significantly changed by the initial surface treatment. Therefore, the crack initiated time may be reduced by several orders of magnitude for certain surfaces preparations. Allowing for cold working of the surface, for which modelling is proposed, depends less on the degree of cold work then on the depths of the hardened layers. Honing hardens the metal over depths of about one micron for vessel head penetrations, for example, and has little influence on subsequent behaviour after the part deforms. On the other hand, coarser turning treatment produces cold worked layers which can reach several tens of microns and can very significantly reduce the initiation time compared to fine honing. So evaluation after depths of hardening is vital on test pieces for interpreting laboratory results as well as on service components for estimating their service life. Suppression by mechanical or chemical treatment of these layers, after deformation, seems to be the most appropriate solution for reducing over-stressing connected with surface treatment carried out before deformation. (author). 14 refs.

  4. Stress corrosion cracking of stainless steel under deaerated high-temperature water. Influence of cold work and processing orientation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terachi, Takumi; Yamada, Takuyo; Chiba, Goro; Arioka, Koji

    2006-01-01

    The influence of cold work and processing orientation on the propagation of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of stainless steel under hydrogenated high-temperature water was examined. It was shown that (1) the crack growth rates increased with heaviness of cold work, and (2) processing orientation affected crack growth rate with cracking direction. Crack growth rates showed anisotropy of T-L>>T-S>L-S, with T-S and L-S branches representing high shear stress direction. Geometric deformation of crystal grains due to cold work caused the anisotropy and shear stress also assisted the SCC propagation. (3) The step intervals of slip like patterns observed on intergranular facets increased cold work. (4) Nano-indentation hardness of the crack tip together with EBSD measurement indicated that the change of hardness due to crack propagation was less than 5% cold-work, even though the distance from the crack tip was 10μm. (author)

  5. Tensile and stress corrosion cracking properties of type 304 stainless steel irradiated to a very high dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, H.M.; Strain, R.V.; Shack, W.J.

    2001-01-01

    Certain safety-related core internal structural components of light water reactors, usually fabricated from Type 304 or 316 austenitic stainless steels (SSs), accumulate very high levels of irradiation damage (20-100 displacement per atom or dpa) by the end of life. Our databases and mechanistic understanding of the degradation of such highly irradiated components, however, are not well established. A key question is the nature of irradiation-assisted intergranular cracking at very high doses, i.e. is it purely mechanical failure or is it stress-corrosion cracking? In this work, hot-cell tests and microstructural characterization were performed on Type 304 SS from the hexagonal fuel can of the decommissioned EBR-II reactor after irradiation to ∼50 dpa at ∼370 deg. C. Slow-strain-rate tensile tests were conducted at 289 degree sign C in air and in water at several levels of electrochemical potential (ECP), and microstructural characteristics were analyzed by scanning and transmission electron microscopies. The material deformed significantly by twinning and exhibited surprisingly high ductility in air, but was susceptible to severe intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) at high ECP. Low levels of dissolved O and ECP were effective in suppressing the susceptibility of the heavily irradiated material to IGSCC, indicating that the stress corrosion process associated with irradiation-induced grain-boundary Cr depletion, rather than purely mechanical separation of grain boundaries, plays the dominant role. However, although IGSCC was suppressed, the material was susceptible to dislocation channeling at a low ECP, and this susceptibility led to a poor work-hardening capability and low ductility

  6. Influence of localized deformation on A-286 austenitic stainless steel stress corrosion cracking in PWR primary water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, L.; Savoie, M.; Delafosse, D.

    2007-06-01

    The low cycle fatigue (LCF) behaviour of precipitation-strengthened A-286 austenitic stainless steel was first investigated at room temperature under 0.2% plastic strain control. LCF led to hardening for the first 20 cycles and then to significant softening. LCF-induced dislocation microstructure was characterized using both bright and dark-field imaging techniques in transmission electron microscopy. Cycling softening was correlated with the formation of precipitate-free localized deformation bands. The effect of these precipitate-free localized deformation bands on A-286 stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behaviour in PWR primary water was then examined by means of constant extension rate tensile (CERT) tests at 320 °C and 360 °C. Comparative CERT tests were performed on companion specimens with similar yield stress but pre-fatigued to a few cycles (4-8) or between 125 and 200 cycles. Specimens pre-fatigued to a few cycles with no precipitate-free localized deformation bands exhibited little susceptibility to intergranular SCC (IGSCC). In contrast, the presence of precipitate-free localized deformation bands formed by pre-fatigue to between 125 and 200 cycles strongly promoted IGSCC. The interest of the approach used in this study is to provide insight into the role of localized deformation in irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking.

  7. Influence of localized deformation on A-286 austenitic stainless steel stress corrosion cracking in PWR primary water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fournier, L.; Savoie, M.; Delafosse, D.

    2007-01-01

    The low cycle fatigue (LCF) behaviour of precipitation-strengthened A-286 austenitic stainless steel was first investigated at room temperature under 0.2% plastic strain control. LCF led to hardening for the first 20 cycles and then to significant softening. LCF-induced dislocation microstructure was characterized using both bright and dark-field imaging techniques in transmission electron microscopy. Cycling softening was correlated with the formation of precipitate-free localized deformation bands. The effect of these precipitate-free localized deformation bands on A-286 stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behaviour in PWR primary water was then examined by means of constant extension rate tensile (CERT) tests at 320 o C and 360 o C. Comparative CERT tests were performed on companion specimens with similar yield stress but pre-fatigued to a few cycles (4-8) or between 125 and 200 cycles. Specimens pre-fatigued to a few cycles with no precipitate-free localized deformation bands exhibited little susceptibility to intergranular SCC (IGSCC). In contrast, the presence of precipitate-free localized deformation bands formed by pre-fatigue to between 125 and 200 cycles strongly promoted IGSCC. The interest of the approach used in this study is to provide insight into the role of localized deformation in irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking

  8. Effect of Dynamic Change in Strain Rate on Mechanical and Stress Corrosion Cracking Behavior of a Mild Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Govinda; Varshney, A.; Parameswaran, Venkitanarayanan; Mondal, K.

    2017-05-01

    The current work analyzes the effect of the dynamic change in strain rate during tensile loading of a mild steel on its mechanical and stress corrosion behavior in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution. The sample experiences high strain rate (10-2 s-1) up to 10, 15 and 20% of total deformation and then very low strain rate of 10-6 s-1 till fracture without any unloading in between. The behavioral characteristics of the steel under these circumstances are found to be different from that exhibited during complete loading till fracture both at high and slow strain rates separately. Total strain increases with the increase in the strain at which change in strain rate happens, and this is attributed to the generation of large number of dislocations at higher strain rate and subsequently release of dislocation at low strain rate during change over due to more time available for dynamic recovery. This observation is common for both in air and corrosive environment. One unique observation in this study is the higher total strain and lower strength observed during dynamic change in strain rate in the corrosive environment compared to that in air, which is attributed to the hydrogen-induced plasticity mechanism.

  9. Sulfide Stress Corrosion Cracking Resistance of Modified ASTM A694 F60 Low Alloy Steel for Subsea Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Stridsklev, Camilla A

    2013-01-01

    The resistance to sulfide stress corrosion cracking (SSC) of modified ASTM A694 F60 low alloy steel, produced by two different manufacturers, was studied by four-point bend-testing. The two materials are named material A and material B in this report. Both materials were tested in two different environments with different severity, one ?sweet-transition region? test and one ?sour service? test. The test conditions were controlled by the H2S partial pressure (pH2S) and pH. These parameters wer...

  10. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Investigation of the Stress Corrosion Cracking in Nickel-Base Alloys, Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruemmer, Stephen M.; Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Olszta, Matthew J.

    2012-03-01

    The objective of this program is to evaluate the primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) susceptibility of high chromium alloy 690 and its weld metals, establish quantitative measurements of crack-growth rates and determine relationships among cracking susceptibility, environmental conditions and metallurgical characteristics. Stress-corrosion, crack-growth rates have been determined for 12 alloy 690 specimens, 11 alloy 152/52/52M weld metal specimens, 4 alloy 52M/182 overlay specimens and 2 alloy 52M/82 inlay specimens in simulated PWR primary water environments. The alloy 690 test materials included three different heats of extruded control-rod-drive mechanism (CRDM) tubing with variations in the initial material condition and degree of cold work for one heat. Two cold-rolled (CR) alloy 690 plate heats were also obtained and evaluated enabling comparisons to the CR CRDM materials. Weld metal, overlay and inlay specimens were machined from industry mock ups to provide plant-representative materials for testing. Specimens have been tested for one alloy 152 weld, two alloy 52 welds and three alloy 52M welds. The overlay and inlay specimens were prepared to propagate stress-corrosion cracks from the alloy 182 or 82 material into the more resistant alloy 52M. In all cases, crack extension was monitored in situ by direct current potential drop (DCPD) with length resolution of about +1 µm making it possible to measure extremely low growth rates approaching 5x10-10 mm/s. Most SCC tests were performed at 325-360°C with hydrogen concentrations from 11-29 cc/kg; however, environmental conditions were modified during a few experiments to evaluate the influence of temperature, water chemistry or electrochemical potential on propagation rates. In addition, low-temperature (~50°C) cracking behavior was examined for selected alloy 690 and weld metal specimens. Extensive characterizations have been performed on material microstructures and stress-corrosion cracks by

  11. Cracks propagation by stress corrosion cracking in conditions of Boiling Water Reactor (BWR); Propagacion de grietas por corrosion bajo esfuerzo en condiciones de reactor de agua hirviente (BWR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuentes C, P

    2003-07-01

    This work presents the results of the assays carried out in the Laboratory of Hot Cells of the National Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ) to a type test tube Compact Tension (CT), built in steel austenitic stainless type 304L, simulating those conditions those that it operates a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR), at temperature 288 C and pressure of 8 MPa, to determine the speed to which the cracks spread in this material that is of the one that different components of a reactor are made, among those that it highlights the reactor core vessel. The application of the Hydrogen Chemistry of the Water is presented (HWC) that is one alternative to diminish the corrosion effect low stress in the component, this is gets controlling the quantity of oxygen and of hydrogen as well as the conductivity of the water. The rehearsal is made following the principles of the Mechanics of Elastic Lineal Fracture (LEFM) that considers a crack of defined size with little plastic deformation in the tip of this; the measurement of crack advance is continued with the technique of potential drop of direct current of alternating signal, this is contained inside the standard Astm E-647 (Method of Test Standard for the Measurement of Speed of Growth of Crack by fatigue) that is the one that indicates us as carrying out this test. The specifications that should complete the test tubes that are rehearsed as for their dimensions, it forms, finish and determination of mechanical properties (tenacity to the fracture mainly) they are contained inside the norm Astm E-399, the one which it is also based on the principles of the fracture mechanics. The obtained results were part of a database to be compared with those of other rehearsals under different conditions, Normal Chemistry of the Water (NWC) and it dilutes with high content of O{sub 2}; to determine the conditions that slow more the phenomena of stress corrosion cracking, as well as the effectiveness of the used chemistry and of the method of

  12. Potential mechanisms for corrosion and stress corrosion cracking failure of 3013 storage containers composed of 316 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolman, D.G.; Butt, D.P.

    1998-01-01

    The degradation of 316 stainless steel (SS) storage container materials is a potential problem for radioactive waste disposition. Container materials will be exposed to significant ionizing radiation, elevated temperatures, embrittling and/or alloying agents (e.g., gallium), chloride-containing compounds (as much as 20 wt% Cl or Cl - ), oxidizing compounds, and a limited quantity of moisture. Additionally, containers will contain welds that have heterogeneous composition due to solute segregation and that may retain significant residual stress. All of the above-listed environmental and material conditions have been shown to be deleterious to material integrity under certain conditions. Unfortunately, the precise conditions within each container and environment is unknown and may vary widely from container to container. Thus, no single test or set of tests will be able mimic the broad range of storage container conditions. Additionally, material behavior cannot be predicted because the synergistic effects of temperature, time, chloride, moisture, sensitization, weldments, salt formation, etc., have not been fully studied. The complexity and uncertainty of storage conditions precludes any detailed recommendations. This document attempts to detail selected previous studies and to suggest some general guidelines for storage of radioactive waste. Because of the voluminous research in this area, this review cannot be considered to be comprehensive. Readers are directed to references that contain detailed reviews of particular processes for more information. Note that the effect of gallium on the degradation of SS storage containers has been discussed elsewhere and will not be discussed here

  13. STRESS CORROSION CRACKING OF A 52M WELD OVERLAY IN A PWR ENVIRONMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexandreanu, Bogdan; Chen, Yiren; Natesan, Ken; Shack, William J.

    2015-01-01

    Weld overlays (WOL) of alloys believed to possess superior stress corrosion cracking (SCC) resistance due to their higher Cr content are typically applied over welds made with SCC-susceptible alloys with the expectation that they will act as a barrier to SCC. The objective of this work was to investigate the SCC behavior near or at the WOL interface. For this purpose, a 52M WOL was deposited on a double-J Alloy 182 weld using prototypical welding parameters. In the first set stage of this work, cracks were initiated in Alloy 182 and allowed to propagate in a direction perpendicular to the Alloy 52M WOL interface. Two identical tests conducted in this manner revealed that the average SCC propagation rates in Alloy 182 decreased by an order of magnitude to approx. 10-11 m/s by the time they reached the Alloy 52M interface, and that they continued to propagate past the interface into Alloy 52M at a similar rate. The post-test examination found that significant crack branching occurred at the interface between the two alloys, with SCC propagation along both the original direction into Alloy 52M and the interface between the two welds. Growth along the interface between the two welds was severe, with a rates estimated at approx. 10-10 m/s. While the average rate of propagation in Alloy 52M was measured to be in the 10-11 m/s range, the maximum SCC penetration into Alloy 52M was 2.5 mm which translates into an estimated maximum SCC rate an order of magnitude higher. Hence, in the second stage of this work – and this is the focus of this paper, confirmatory tests were conducted with the specimens aligned along the WOL interface. These tests substantiated the earlier findings: the SCC rate under constant load conditions at the interface between the two welds (20% Cr) was slightly faster than that in Alloy 52M near the interface (25% Cr), and both were in the 10-10 m/s range.

  14. Finite element analysis of the influence of elastic anisotropy on stress intensification at stress corrosion cracking initiation sites in fcc alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meric de Bellefon, G.; van Duysen, J. C.

    2018-05-01

    A recent finite-element method (FEM)-based study from the present authors quantified the effect of elastic anisotropy of grains on stress intensification at potential intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) initiation sites in austenitic stainless steels. In particular, it showed that the auxetic behavior of grains (negative Poisson's ratio) in some directions plays a very important role in IGSCC initiation, since it can induce local stress intensification factors of about 1.6. A similar effect is expected for other fcc alloys such as Ni-based alloys. The present article confirms those results and paves the way to the definition of an IGSCC susceptibility index by identifying grain configurations that are the most favorable for crack initiation. The index will rely on the probability to get those configurations on surface of specimens.

  15. Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracks in Nickel Alloy Dissimilar Metal Welds: Detection and Sizing Using Established and Emerging Nondestructive Examination Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braatz, Brett G.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Doctor, Steven R.; Prokofiev, Iouri

    2012-12-31

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has established the Program to Assess the Reliability of Emerging Nondestructive Techniques (PARENT) as a follow-on to the international cooperative Program for the Inspection of Nickel Alloy Components (PINC). The goal of PINC was to evaluate the capabilities of various nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques to detect and characterize surface-breaking primary water stress corrosion cracks in dissimilar-metal welds (DMW) in bottom-mounted instrumentation (BMI) penetrations and small-bore (≈400-mm diameter) piping components. A series of international blind round-robin tests were conducted by commercial and university inspection teams. Results from these tests showed that a combination of conventional and phased-array ultrasound techniques provided the highest performance for flaw detection and depth sizing in dissimilar metal piping welds. The effective detection of flaws in BMIs by eddy current and ultrasound shows that it may be possible to reliably inspect these components in the field. The goal of PARENT is to continue the work begun in PINC and apply the lessons learned to a series of open and blind international round-robin tests that will be conducted on a new set of piping components including large-bore (≈900-mm diameter) DMWs, small-bore DMWs, and BMIs. Open round-robin testing will engage universities and industry worldwide to investigate the reliability of emerging NDE techniques to detect and accurately size flaws having a wide range of lengths, depths, orientations, and locations. Blind round-robin testing will invite testing organizations worldwide, whose inspectors and procedures are certified by the standards for the nuclear industry in their respective countries, to investigate the ability of established NDE techniques to detect and size flaws whose characteristics range from easy to very difficult to detect and size. This paper presents highlights of PINC and reports on the plans and progress for

  16. Primary water stress corrosion cracks in nickel alloy dissimilar metal welds: Detection and sizing using established and emerging nondestructive examination techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braatz, B.G.; Doctor, S.R.; Cumblidge, S.E.; Prokofiev, I.G.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has established the Program to Assess the Reliability of Emerging Nondestructive Techniques (PARENT) as a follow-on to the international cooperative Program for the Inspection of Nickel Alloy Components (PINC). The goal of PINC was to evaluate the capabilities of various nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques to detect and characterize surface-breaking primary water stress corrosion cracks in dissimilar-metal welds (DMW) in bottom-mounted instrumentation (BMI) penetrations and small-bore (∼400-mm diameter) piping components. A series of international blind round-robin tests were conducted by commercial and university inspection teams. Results from these tests showed that a combination of conventional and phased-array ultrasound techniques provided the highest performance for flaw detection and depth sizing in dissimilar metal piping welds. The effective detection of flaws in BMIs by eddy current and ultrasound shows that it may be possible to reliably inspect these components in the field. The goal of PARENT is to continue the work begun in PINC and apply the lessons learned to a series of open and blind international round-robin tests that will be conducted on a new set of piping components including large-bore (∼900-mm diameter) DMWs, small-bore DMWs, and BMIs. Open round-robin testing will engage universities and industry worldwide to investigate the reliability of emerging NDE techniques to detect and accurately size flaws having a wide range of lengths, depths, orientations, and locations. Blind round-robin testing will invite testing organizations worldwide, whose inspectors and procedures are certified by the standards for the nuclear industry in their respective countries, to investigate the ability of established NDE techniques to detect and size flaws whose characteristics range from easy to very difficult to detect and size. This paper presents highlights of PINC and reports on the plans and progress for

  17. About a mechanism of the influence of shear stress for viscosity of the blood in vessels of small diameter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Лев Николаевич Катюхин

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available It is proposed a physiological and experimentally confirmed explanation of Fåhraeus-Lindqvist-effect in capillaries using the profile analyses of osmotic deformability of red blood cells. It was shown the dose-dependent change of the erythrocytes deformability in the stage of isotropic spheres after forming artificial water pores (nystatin and occlusion (PbCl2 of available pores. The Sigma-effect reducing of hematocrit and viscosity in a shear flow of blood through the vessels of a small diameter was conditioned by the interchange of liquid phase between the erythrocyte and the plasma.

  18. The influence of environmental variables and irradiation on iodine stress corrosion crack initiation and growth in Zircaloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lunde, L.; Videm, K.

    1980-01-01

    Variables in the SCC testing technique and the effect of the fast neutron dose appear to explain most of the controversy about the effect of irradiation damage on the SCC behaviour of Zircaloy. On the basis of extensive laboratory testing functions expressing the time for stress corrosion crack (SCC) initiation and the rate of crack propagation at different stresses and temperatures have been worked out. The environmental variables in the SCC test can have a much larger influence on the life-time for autoclaved material than for pickled and sandblasted metal. For irradiated (oxidized) material a ten times increase in the iodine concentration reduced the failure stress from 500 to 250 MPa. By comparing our results with published data it is concluded that the failure stress (after 1-3 hours) is very dependent upon the neutron dose. Neutron damage will raise the stress threshold for doses up to 10 20 n/cm 2 and thereafter the failure stress is gradually decreased to low values with increasing neutron doses up to 5.10 21 n/cm 2 . (author)

  19. Scanning reference electrode techniques in localized corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isaacs, H.S.; Vyas, B.

    1979-04-01

    The principles, advantages, and implementations of scanning reference electrode techniques are reviewed. Data related to pitting, intergranular corrosion, welds and stress corrosion cracking are presented. The technique locates the position of localized corrosion and can be used to monitor the development of corrosion and changes in the corrosion rate under a wide range of conditions

  20. Corrosion of PWR steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garnsey, R.

    1979-01-01

    Some designs of pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generators have experienced a variety of corrosion problems which include stress corrosion cracking, tube thinning, pitting, fatigue, erosion-corrosion and support plate corrosion resulting in 'denting'. Large international research programmes have been mounted to investigate the phenomena. The operational experience is reviewed and mechanisms which have been proposed to explain the corrosion damage are presented. The implications for design development and for boiler and feedwater control are discussed. (author)