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Sample records for diagnostic radiological protection

  1. Occupational radiological protection in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mota, H.C.

    1983-01-01

    The following topics are discussed: occupational expossure (the ALARA principle, dose-equivalent limit, ICRP justification); radiological protection planning (general aspects, barrier estimation) and determination of the occupational expossures (individual monitoring). (M.A.) [pt

  2. Radiological protection and quality control for diagnostic radiology in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baorong, Yue

    2008-01-01

    Full text: There are 43,000 diagnostic departments, nearly 70,000 X-ray diagnostic facilities, 7,000 CT, 250 million for the annual total numbers of X-ray examinations, 120,000 occupationally exposed workers in diagnostic radiology. 'Basic standards for protection against ionizing radiation and for the safety of radiation sources' is promulgated on October, 2002. This basic standard follows the BSS. 'Rule on the administration of radio-diagnosis and radiotherapy', as a order of the Ministry of Health No. 46, is promulgated by Minister of Health on January 24, 2006. It includes general provisions, requirements and practice, establishment and approval of radio-diagnosis and radiotherapy services, safeguards and quality assurance, and so on. There are a series of radiological protection standards and quality control standards in diagnostic radiology, including 'radiological protection standard for the examination in X-ray diagnosis', 'radiological health protection standards for X-ray examination of child-bearing age women and pregnant women', 'radiological protection standards for the children in X-ray diagnosis', 'standards for radiological protection in medical X-ray diagnosis', 'specification for radiological protection monitoring in medical X-ray diagnosis', 'guide for reasonable application of medical X-ray diagnosis', 'general aspects for quality assurance in medical X-ray image of diagnosis', 'specification of image quality control test for the medical X-ray diagnostic equipment', 'specification of image quality assurance test for X-ray equipment for computed tomography', 'specification for testing of quality control in computed radiography (CR)' and 'specification for testing of quality control in X-ray mammography'. With the X-ray diagnostic equipment, there are acceptant tests, status tests and routing tests in large hospitals. It is poor for routing test in middle and smaller hospitals. CT is used widely in diagnostic radiology, however most workers in CT

  3. Establish radiation protection programme for diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mboya, G.

    2014-01-01

    Mammography is an effective method used for breast diagnostics and screening. The aim of this project is to review the literature on how to establish radiation protection programme for mammography in order to protect the patients, the occupationally exposed workers and the members of the public from harmful effects of ionizing radiation. It reviews some of the trends in mammography doses and dosimetric principles such as average glandular dose in the glandular tissue which is used for description of radiation risk, also the factors affecting patient doses are discussed. However, the average glandular dose should not be used directly to estimate the radiation risk from mammography. Risk is calculated under certain assumptions from determined entrance surface air kerma. Given the increase in population dose, emphasis is placed on the justification and optimization of the mammographic procedures. Protection is optimized by the radiation dose being appropriate with the purpose of the mammographic examination. The need to establish diagnostic reference levels as an optimization is also discussed. In order to obtain high quality mammograms at low dose to the breast, it is necessary to use the correct equipment and perform periodic quality control tests on mammography equipment. It is noted that in order to achieve the goal of this project, the application of radiation protection should begin at the time of requesting for mammography examination, positioning of the patient, irradiation, image processing and interpretation of mammogram. It is recommended that close cooperation between radiology technologists, radiologist, medical physicists, regulatory authority and other support workers be required and established to obtain a consistent and effective level of radiation protection in a mammography facility. (author)

  4. Radiological protection of patients in diagnostic and interventional radiology, nuclear medicine and radiotherapy. Contributed papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    An International Conference on the Radiological Protection of Patients in Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Radiotherapy organized by the International Atomic Energy Agency and co-sponsored by the European Commission, the Pan American Health Organization and the World Health Organization was held in Malaga, Spain, from 26 to 30 March 2001. The Government of Spain hosted this Conference through the Ministerio de Sanidad y Consumo, the Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear, the Junta de Andalucia, the Universidad de Malaga and the Grupo de Investigacion en Proteccion Radiologica de la Universidad de Malaga (PRUMA). The Conference was organized in co-operation with the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR), the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and the following professional societies: International Organization of Medical Physicists (IOMP), International Radiation Protection Association (IRPA), International Society of Radiation Oncology (ISRO), International Society of Radiology (ISR), International Society of Radiographers and Radiological Technologists (ISRRT) and World Federation of Nuclear Medicine and Biology (WFNMB). This publication contains contributed papers submitted to the Conference Programme Committee. The papers are in one of the two working languages of this Conference, English and Spanish. The topics covered by the Conference are as follows: Radiological protection of patients in general diagnostic radiology (radiography), Radiological protection of patients in general diagnostic radiology (fluoroscopy), Radiological protection issues in specific uses of diagnostic radiology, such as mammography and computed tomography (with special consideration of the impact of digital techniques), Radiological protection in interventional radiology, including fluoroscopy not carried out by radiologists, Radiological protection of patients in nuclear medicine, Developing and

  5. Radiological protection of patients in diagnostic and interventional radiology, nuclear medicine and radiotherapy. Contributed papers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    An International Conference on the Radiological Protection of Patients in Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Radiotherapy organized by the International Atomic Energy Agency and co-sponsored by the European Commission, the Pan American Health Organization and the World Health Organization was held in Malaga, Spain, from 26 to 30 March 2001. The Government of Spain hosted this Conference through the Ministerio de Sanidad y Consumo, the Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear, the Junta de Andalucia, the Universidad de Malaga and the Grupo de Investigacion en Proteccion Radiologica de la Universidad de Malaga (PRUMA). The Conference was organized in co-operation with the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR), the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and the following professional societies: International Organization of Medical Physicists (IOMP), International Radiation Protection Association (IRPA), International Society of Radiation Oncology (ISRO), International Society of Radiology (ISR), International Society of Radiographers and Radiological Technologists (ISRRT) and World Federation of Nuclear Medicine and Biology (WFNMB). This publication contains contributed papers submitted to the Conference Programme Committee. The papers are in one of the two working languages of this Conference, English and Spanish. The topics covered by the Conference are as follows: Radiological protection of patients in general diagnostic radiology (radiography), Radiological protection of patients in general diagnostic radiology (fluoroscopy), Radiological protection issues in specific uses of diagnostic radiology, such as mammography and computed tomography (with special consideration of the impact of digital techniques), Radiological protection in interventional radiology, including fluoroscopy not carried out by radiologists, Radiological protection of patients in nuclear medicine, Developing and

  6. Radiation protection of patients in general diagnostic radiology in Lithuania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morkunas, G.; Ziliukas, J.

    2001-01-01

    The situation in control of exposure due to general diagnostic radiological examinations in Lithuania is described. Experience in creation of legal basis for radiation protection, results of measurements of patients' doses and quality control tests of x-ray units are given. The main problems encountered in implementation of international recommendations and requirements of European Medical Exposure Directive are discussed. (author)

  7. Sampling on radiological protection training in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaona, E.

    2001-01-01

    Radiological security aspects were evaluated in radiology departments from Mexico City. The study was carried out in two stages, the first one evaluated 40 departments just before the implementation of the new Official Mexican Standards related to Radiological Security and Quality Control in Radiology; in the second stage 33 departments were evaluated 2 years after those standards were implanted, showing a favorable impact of the training programs for the type of answers obtained [es

  8. Evaluation of the effectiveness of gonad protection in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawaura, Chiyo; Aoyama, Takahiko; Koyama, Shuji

    2004-01-01

    In the present study we describes the evaluation of the effectiveness of gonad protection in diagnostic radiology based on the measurement of organ and the effective doses with and without lead clothing to gonads. We devised in-phantom dosimetry system and measured organ and effective doses in x-ray radiography and CT examinations with the new dosimetry system. From the data of organ and the effective doses we assessed the effectiveness of radiological protection by the use of lead clothing to gonads. Although in chest radiography and chest CT examinations, the effectiveness of radiological protection was not found, in the case of hip joint radiography (AP), gonad doses decreased remarkably by using lead clothing. The effectiveness of radiological protection, i.e. the ratio of the decreased dose to the dose value without protection, in testis and ovary were found to be 91.4% and 68.0%, respectively. It was also found that gonad doses observed with and without gonad protection were extremely lower than those of threshold for sterility recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection 60 (ICRP Publ. 60). (author)

  9. [Evaluation of the effectiveness of gonad protection in diagnostic radiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaura, Chiyo; Aoyama, Takahiko; Koyama, Shuji

    2004-01-01

    In the present study we describe the evaluation of the effectiveness of gonad protection in diagnostic radiology based on the measurement of organ and the effective doses with and without lead clothing to gonads. We devised in-phantom dosimetry system and measured organ and effective doses in x-ray radiography and CT examinations with the new dosimetry system. From the data of organ and the effective doses we assessed the effectiveness of radiological protection by the use of lead clothing to gonads. Although in chest radiography and chest CT examinations, the effectiveness of radiological protection was not found, in the case of hip joint radiography (AP), gonad doses decreased remarkably by using lead clothing. The effectiveness of radiological protection, i.e. the ratio of the decreased dose to the dose value without protection, in testis and ovary were found to be 91.4% and 68.0%, respectively. It was also found that gonad doses observed with and without gonad protection were extremely lower than those of threshold for sterility recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection 60 (ICRP Publ. 60).

  10. Assessment of radiological protection systems among diagnostic radiology facilities in North East India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Thokchom Dewan; Jayaraman, T; Arunkumar Sharma, B

    2017-03-01

    This study aims to assess the adequacy level of radiological protection systems available in the diagnostic radiology facilities located in three capital cities of North East (NE) India. It further attempts to understand, using a multi-disciplinary approach, how the safety codes/standards in diagnostic radiology framed by the Atomic Energy Regulatory Board (AERB) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to achieve adequate radiological protection in facilities, have been perceived, conceptualized, and applied accordingly in these facilities. About 30 diagnostic radiology facilities were randomly selected from three capitals of states in NE India; namely Imphal (Manipur), Shillong (Meghalaya) and Guwahati (Assam). A semi-structured questionnaire developed based on a multi-disciplinary approach was used for this study. It was observed that radiological practices undertaken in these facilities were not exactly in line with safety codes/standards in diagnostic radiology of the AERB and the IAEA. About 50% of the facilities had registered/licensed x-ray equipment with the AERB. More than 80% of the workers did not use radiation protective devices, although these devices were available in the facilities. About 85% of facilities had no institutional risk management system. About 70% of the facilities did not carry out periodic quality assurance testing of their x-ray equipment or surveys of radiation leakage around the x-ray room, and did not display radiation safety indicators in the x-ray rooms. Workers in these facilities exhibited low risk perception about the risks associated with these practices. The majority of diagnostic radiology facilities in NE India did not comply with the radiological safety codes/standards framed by the AERB and IAEA. The study found inadequate levels of radiological protection systems in the majority of facilities. This study suggests a need to establish firm measures that comply with the radiological safety codes/standards of the

  11. Radiological protection of patients in general diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karigi, A.W.

    2001-01-01

    With medical radiation exposures to mankind ranking the highest among man-made radiation, radiation protection safeguards have to be put in place in all countries. Competent authorities should have the legal legislation and adequate infrastructure to ensure implementation, enforcement and compliance with the radiation protection standards. Justification, optimization, quality assurance and control are to be the guiding ideals for those who prescribe and/or carry out radiographic procedures. Radiation dose limitation in medical practices is to be encouraged so far as it does not compromise image quality and the provision of a direct benefit to the exposed individual. (author)

  12. ICRP PUBLICATION 121: Radiological Protection in Paediatric Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khong, P-L.; Ringertz, H.; Donoghue, V.; Frush, D.; Rehani, M.; Appelgate, K.; Sanchez, R.

    2013-01-01

    Paediatric patients have a higher average risk of developing cancer compared with adults receiving the same dose. The longer life expectancy in children allows more time for any harmful effects of radiation to manifest, and developing organs and tissues are more sensitive to the effects of radiation. This publication aims to provide guiding principles of radiological protection for referring clinicians and clinical staff performing diagnostic imaging and interventional procedures for paediatric patients. It begins with a brief description of the basic concepts of radiological protection, followed by the general aspects of radiological protection, including principles of justification and optimisation. Guidelines and suggestions for radiological protection in specific modalities – radiography and fluoroscopy, interventional radiology, and computed tomography – are subsequently covered in depth. The report concludes with a summary and recommendations. The importance of rigorous justification of radiological procedures is emphasised for every procedure involving ionising radiation, and the use of imaging modalities that are non-ionising should always be considered. The basic aim of optimisation of radiological protection is to adjust imaging parameters and institute protective measures such that the required image is obtained with the lowest possible dose of radiation, and that net benefit is maximised to maintain sufficient quality for diagnostic interpretation. Special consideration should be given to the availability of dose reduction measures when purchasing new imaging equipment for paediatric use. One of the unique aspects of paediatric imaging is with regards to the wide range in patient size (and weight), therefore requiring special attention to optimisation and modification of equipment, technique, and imaging parameters. Examples of good radiographic and fluoroscopic technique include attention to patient positioning, field size and adequate collimation

  13. Radiation protection of patients in diagnostic radiology in Estonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filippova, I.

    2001-01-01

    The medical use of ionizing radiation started at the beginning of the century. It has always been considered necessary, as well as for diagnostic applications where exposure to the patient is the price to pay in order to obtain useful images, as for therapy where the patient is exposed on purpose, in order to kill malignant cells. It is nowadays the major man-made contribution to the population dose. Even with the developments of substitutive imaging or treatment techniques, there is still an increasing demand and many organizations are joining their efforts to try to keep the dose to the patient 'as low as reasonably achievable'. This is particularly the case for the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) which recommended in publication 26 to follow three main principles: justification, optimisation and limitation. Limitation, however, does not apply to patients since the individuals exposed are expected to benefit from this exposure, but justification and optimization are relevant. (author)

  14. Radiological protection of the patient in the diagnostic X-ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo, A.M.C. de

    1983-01-01

    Measures and procedures are given in relation to the radiological protection of the patient in diagnostic radiology. Technical and physical factors of the patient protection are discussed, as radiation beam properties, size of the irradiation field, shieldings, control of the scattered radiation that reaches the imaging record system, films, ecrans and radiographic film processing. General recommendations about the radiation protection of the patient in diagnostic radiology are given. (M.A.) [pt

  15. Radiation hazards and protection of patient in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agarwal, Y.C.; Haldar, P.K.

    1980-01-01

    Biological radiation effects such as somatic certainty effects, somatic stochastic effects and genetic effects are described. Diagnostic radiology, therefore, involves risk to the patient in case of undesirable exposures and in particular to the fetus. Gonad doses in diagnostic radiology which may lead to genetic effects have been found to vary within a wide range. To avoid somatic certainty and to keep genetic effects to a minimum, some suggestions are enumerated. They deal with the choice of technique, proper positioning, use of calibrated equipment and use of techniques like xerography, ultrasonography, thermography etc. (M.G.B.)

  16. Radiation Protection Education in Diagnostic Radiology in Uruguay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cotelo, E.; Paolini, G.

    2003-01-01

    In Uruguay the lack of Radiation Protection (RP) laws makes education in medical use of ionizing radiations at University, a decisive factor of changes. The six years experience in teaching technicians, radiologists, interventional cardiologists and anesthetists in curricular lectures, continuing education courses and workshops, show the importance of a close link between educators and occupationally exposed professionals. Regarding training and education in the optimization of the procedures, it is essential that both teacher and student comprehend the exact meaning of ALARA concept. This implies that although the educator is the one who manages the physical basis of RP, the student is who teaches the educator about the procedures. This turns RP education into a dynamic process in which at the same time, both educator and student learn and teach. After the theoretical lectures, it is essential that students show their ability in applying the acquired knowledge in their everyday practice. Last nut not least, in order to fulfill the first RP principle,all medicine students need to be educated in RP and quality image criteria before the get their medical doctor degree. Our experience shows that RP education in diagnostic radiology requires an expert with both medical physics and Image technology knowledge that allow an approach to students work, language and everyday problems. Despite the fact that the main result of the Education Program is the way professionals improve their practice, another consequence was that the Regulatory Authority of the country called the teacher team to coordinate the first RP national course. (Author) 14 refs

  17. Radiological protection program in x-ray diagnostic facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melara F, N.E.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents a basic document to initiate a discussion which will originate a Unified Protocol in Latin America and the Caribbean for radiological protection in the installations of medical radiology. The following principal elements are considered an inherent part of radiology protection: 1. Quality control of equipment. 2. Conditions in the dark room which coincide in the quality of the image. Levels of patient exposure and the processes for the quality control of the processors are not discussed, and it is limited to the installation of radiographic medical x-ray equipment, stationary and mobile. Each point to be put into effect is presented in a diagram, frequency and criteria for acceptance. A detailed explanation of each point along with a clear explanation of the recommended method for each follows in the same order in which they are presented in the diagram. Finally adequate forms for easily acquiring data are presented. (author)

  18. A practical approach to radiation protection information in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cederblad, Aa.; Bjurklint, E.; Maansson, L.G.; Sund, P.; Kheddache, S.

    1999-01-01

    In a benchmarking process, parameters related to patient doses and image quality were compared in x-ray examinations from 10 radiology departments in western Sweden. One main object of the project was to form a pedagogical process focussing on radiation protection and quality matters by engaging radiographers and radiologists from the departments in practical project work and optimisation discussions. Anatomical phantoms with simulated pathology were used for standardised entrance dose measurements and exposure of phantom images. Radiographer performance, such as centering and collimation, was evaluated by radiographers. Radiologists evaluated clinical images using revised CEC quality criteria. The results of the measurements showed significant differences between the departments both for image quality, entrance dose and the performance of examinations. Explanations to these differences were in many cases found in the choice of equipment, working methods etc. (au)

  19. Education and training in radiological protection for diagnostic and interventional procedures ICRP 113 in brief

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salama, S.; Gomaa, M. A.; Alshoufi, J.H.

    2013-01-01

    The international commission on radiological protection (ICRP) is the primary body in protection against ionizing radiation. Among its latest publication is ICRP publication 113 e ducation and training in radiological protection for diagnostic and interventional procedures . This document introduces diagnostic and interventional medical procedures using ionizing radiations in deep details. The document is approved by the commission in October 2010 and translated into Arabic at December 2011. This work is a continuation of the efforts series to translate some of the most important of the radiological protection references into the Arabic; aiming to maximize the benefit. The previous translation include WHO handbook on indoor radon: a public health perspective, issued by world health organization 2009 and Radiation Protection in Medicine, ICRP Publication 105 2007 that translated into Arabic with support of Arab atomic energy authority at 2011.

  20. Procedures in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doyle, T.; Hare, W.S.C.; Thomson, K.; Tess, B.

    1989-01-01

    This book outlines the various procedures necessary for the successful practice of diagnostic radiology. Topics covered are: general principles, imaging of the urinary and gastrointestinal tracts, vascular radiology, arthrography, and miscellaneous diagnostic radiologic procedures

  1. New ethical issues for radiation protection in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malone, J.F.

    2008-01-01

    The ethical basis for many medical practices has been challenged over the last two decades. Radiology has seen enormous growth during the same period. Many practices and equipment types, now commonplace, did not exist a generation ago. Yet the fundamental ethical basis for these practices has not seen a corresponding level of development. This is possibly an oversight, and may be particularly important given that these innovations have taken place over a period of changing social attitudes. Areas of concern include, for example, issues around justification, consent/authorisation, inadvertent irradiation of the foetus/embryo during pregnancy and the place of paternalism/individual autonomy in the structure of practice. This paper provides the background to a workshop on these issues held in late-2006 and presents a summary of its findings. (authors)

  2. Radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azorin N, J.; Azorin V, J. C.

    2010-01-01

    This work is directed to all those people related with the exercise of the radiological protection and has the purpose of providing them a base of knowledge in this discipline so that they can make decisions documented on technical and scientist factors for the protection of the personnel occupationally exposed, the people in general and the environment during the work with ionizing radiations. Before de lack of a text on this matter, this work seeks to cover the specific necessities of our country, providing a solid presentation of the radiological protection, included the bases of the radiations physics, the detection and radiation dosimetry, the radiobiology, the normative and operational procedures associates, the radioactive wastes, the emergencies and the transport of the radioactive material through the medical and industrial applications of the radiations, making emphasis in the relative particular aspects to the radiological protection in Mexico. The book have 16 chapters and with the purpose of supplementing the given information, are included at the end four appendixes: 1) the radioactive waste management in Mexico, 2-3) the Mexican official standards related with the radiological protection, 4) a terms glossary used in radiological protection. We hope this book will be of utility for those people that work in the investigation and the applications of the ionizing radiations. (Author)

  3. Studies on optimization of radiation protection for patients in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Z.; Zhang, Q.; Li, W.; Li, K.; Wei, L.; Zong, X.; Qiang, Z.; Wu, Y.

    1994-01-01

    For the exposure of patients in diagnostic radiology, individual dose limit does not apply, but optimization of radiological protection may play a major role. This project has been carried out with the purpose of improving the protection of patients in medical diagnostic radiology in China utilizing the principles of optimization. Taking Sichuan, Shandong and Beijing as surveyed areas, we investigated the present situation of the protection of patients. In the survey, the patient doses were classified into practical dose, justified dose and optimized dose to evaluate the influences of managerial and equipment factors separately. The results show that there are some urgent protection problems in X-ray protection to be solved in the surveyed regions. This paper, however, points out that the prospects of reducing patient doses are encouraging provided that appropriate measures are adopted. For instance, taking proper managerial measures without radical change of existing equipments may reduce patient doses in chest fluoroscopy and radiography by 40% and 18% respectively; refitting some equipment may reduce the doses by 82.4% in chest fluoroscopy, 66% in chest radiography, and 80% in barium meal examination of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Using chest radiography instead of fluoroscopy supplemented by other protection measures may reduce the doses by 91.7%. Optimization analysis shows that adoption of the above measures conforms to the principle of optimization of radiation protection. (authors). 5 refs., 7 tabs

  4. The quality assurance in diagnostic radiology and their effect in the quality image and radiological protection of the patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaona, Enrique

    2002-01-01

    The quality assurance in diagnostic radiology in Mexico before 1997 was virtually nonexistent except in few academic institutions and hospitals. The purpose of this study was to carry out an exploratory survey of the issue of quality control parameters of general and fluoroscopy x-ray systems in the Mexican Republic and their effects in the quality image and radiological protection of the patient. A general result of the survey is that there is not significant difference in the observed frequencies among public and private radiology departments for α = 0.05, then the results are valid for both departments. 37% of x-ray systems belong to public radiology departments. In the radiology departments that didn't agree with the Mexican regulations in: light field to mach the x-ray field, light field intensity, kV, time and output. In those cases, we found a repeat rate of radiography studies >30% with non necessary dose to patient, low quality image and high operating costs of the radiology service. We found in x-ray fluoroscopy systems that 62% had a low quality image due to electronic noise in the television chain. In general the x-ray systems that didn't agree with Mexican regulations are 35% and they can affect in a way or other the quality image and the dose to patient

  5. Application of the diagnostic radiological index of protection to protective garments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasciak, Alexander S. [Department of Radiology, The University of Tennessee Medical Center at Knoxville, Knoxville, Tennessee 37922 (United States); Jones, A. Kyle, E-mail: kyle.jones@mdanderson.org [Department of Imaging Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Wagner, Louis K. [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Imaging, The University of Texas Medical School at Houston, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Previously, the diagnostic radiological index of protection (DRIP) was proposed as a metric for quantifying the protective value of radioprotective garments. The DRIP is a weighted sum of the percent transmissions of different radiation beams through a garment. Ideally, the beams would represent the anticipated stray radiation encountered during clinical use. However, it is impractical to expect a medical physicist to possess the equipment necessary to accurately measure transmission of scattered radiation. Therefore, as a proof of concept, the authors tested a method that applied the DRIP to clinical practice. Methods: Primary beam qualities used in interventional cardiology and radiology were observed and catalogued. Based on the observed range of beam qualities, five representative clinical primary beam qualities, specified by kV and added filtration, were selected for this evaluation. Monte Carlo simulations were performed using these primary beams as source definitions to generate scattered spectra from the clinical primary beams. Using numerical optimization, ideal scatter mimicking primary beams, specified by kV and added aluminum filtration, were matched to the scattered spectra according to half- and quarter-value layers and spectral shape. To within reasonable approximation, these theoretical scatter-mimicking primary beams were reproduced experimentally in laboratory x ray beams and used to measure transmission through pure lead and protective garments. For this proof of concept, the DRIP for pure lead and the garments was calculated by assigning equal weighting to percent transmission measurements for each of the five beams. Finally, the areal density of lead and garments was measured for consideration alongside the DRIP to assess the protective value of each material for a given weight. Results: The authors identified ideal scatter mimicking primary beams that matched scattered spectra to within 0.01 mm for half- and quarter-value layers in

  6. Application of the diagnostic radiological index of protection to protective garments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasciak, Alexander S; Jones, A Kyle; Wagner, Louis K

    2015-02-01

    Previously, the diagnostic radiological index of protection (DRIP) was proposed as a metric for quantifying the protective value of radioprotective garments. The DRIP is a weighted sum of the percent transmissions of different radiation beams through a garment. Ideally, the beams would represent the anticipated stray radiation encountered during clinical use. However, it is impractical to expect a medical physicist to possess the equipment necessary to accurately measure transmission of scattered radiation. Therefore, as a proof of concept, the authors tested a method that applied the DRIP to clinical practice. Primary beam qualities used in interventional cardiology and radiology were observed and catalogued. Based on the observed range of beam qualities, five representative clinical primary beam qualities, specified by kV and added filtration, were selected for this evaluation. Monte Carlo simulations were performed using these primary beams as source definitions to generate scattered spectra from the clinical primary beams. Using numerical optimization, ideal scatter mimicking primary beams, specified by kV and added aluminum filtration, were matched to the scattered spectra according to half- and quarter-value layers and spectral shape. To within reasonable approximation, these theoretical scatter-mimicking primary beams were reproduced experimentally in laboratory x ray beams and used to measure transmission through pure lead and protective garments. For this proof of concept, the DRIP for pure lead and the garments was calculated by assigning equal weighting to percent transmission measurements for each of the five beams. Finally, the areal density of lead and garments was measured for consideration alongside the DRIP to assess the protective value of each material for a given weight. The authors identified ideal scatter mimicking primary beams that matched scattered spectra to within 0.01 mm for half- and quarter-value layers in copper and within 5% for the

  7. Application of the diagnostic radiological index of protection to protective garments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasciak, Alexander S.; Jones, A. Kyle; Wagner, Louis K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Previously, the diagnostic radiological index of protection (DRIP) was proposed as a metric for quantifying the protective value of radioprotective garments. The DRIP is a weighted sum of the percent transmissions of different radiation beams through a garment. Ideally, the beams would represent the anticipated stray radiation encountered during clinical use. However, it is impractical to expect a medical physicist to possess the equipment necessary to accurately measure transmission of scattered radiation. Therefore, as a proof of concept, the authors tested a method that applied the DRIP to clinical practice. Methods: Primary beam qualities used in interventional cardiology and radiology were observed and catalogued. Based on the observed range of beam qualities, five representative clinical primary beam qualities, specified by kV and added filtration, were selected for this evaluation. Monte Carlo simulations were performed using these primary beams as source definitions to generate scattered spectra from the clinical primary beams. Using numerical optimization, ideal scatter mimicking primary beams, specified by kV and added aluminum filtration, were matched to the scattered spectra according to half- and quarter-value layers and spectral shape. To within reasonable approximation, these theoretical scatter-mimicking primary beams were reproduced experimentally in laboratory x ray beams and used to measure transmission through pure lead and protective garments. For this proof of concept, the DRIP for pure lead and the garments was calculated by assigning equal weighting to percent transmission measurements for each of the five beams. Finally, the areal density of lead and garments was measured for consideration alongside the DRIP to assess the protective value of each material for a given weight. Results: The authors identified ideal scatter mimicking primary beams that matched scattered spectra to within 0.01 mm for half- and quarter-value layers in

  8. Radiation protection in radiological-urological diagnostics in infants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fendel, H.

    1976-01-01

    New measurements of the female and male gonadal doses were made with thermoluminescent dosemeters. The female gonadal dose was measured intrarectally and the male gonadal dose 'in the crotch' outside the lead capsules which in reality protected the testicles. The male point of reference in excretion urography was outside the field in all cases. The median value of the number of radiographs was 1 + 2.43, less than 1 + 2 radiographs in 76% of all cases. The initial voltage was 70 kV, and conventional foils of normal intensification were used. For the male gonadal dose there is a median of 12.5 mrad per investigation, with 75% of the values below 21 mrad and 97% below 62 mrad. The female gonadal dose was: median 40 mrad, 75% below 53 mrad and 97% below 100 mrad. (orig./AK) [de

  9. Course of radiological protection and safety in the medical diagnostic with X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dominguez A, C.E.

    1997-01-01

    The obtention of images of human body to the medical diagnostic is one of the more old and generalized applications for X-ray. Therefore the design and performance of equipment and installations as well as the operation procedures must be oriented toward safety with the purpose to guarantee this radiological practice will bring a net positive benefit to the society. Given that in Mexico only exists the standardization related to source and equipment generators of ionizing radiation in the industrial area and medical therapy, but not so to the medical diagnostic area it is the purpose of this work to present those standards related with this application branch. Also it is presented the preparation of a manual for the course named Formation of teachers in radiological protection and safety in the X-ray medical diagnostic in 1997 which was imparted at ININ. (Author)

  10. Radiation protection in medical diagnostic radiology in the city of Sobral, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menezes, F.L.; Paschoal, C.M.M.; Ferreira, F.C.L.; Alcantara, M.C.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the suitability to radiation protection of four diagnostic radiology medical services in the city of Sobral-CE, Northeast of Brazil, and to analyze results of the literature for the cities of Rio Branco-AC, North of Brazil, and Rio de Janeiro-RJ, South-east of Brazil. In Sobral-CE, it was performed interviews and direct observations with reference to Brazilian law, the National Ordinance No.453/1998 of the Ministry of Health that regulates the operation of medical and odontological diagnostic radiology services. The results show the occurrence of many items in disagreement with the standard. The technical and operational infractions have basically due to unfamiliarity with the legislation, the lack of investment in training and/or professional development courses. (authors)

  11. Litigations in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patil, Ranjit

    2014-01-01

    There are various regulatory bodies at the international and national level, which lay down norms for radiation protection. These are the International Commission for Radiation Protection (ICRP) the National Commission for Radiation Protection (NCRP) in America, and the Atomic Energy Regulatory Board (AERB) in India. These bodies recommend norms on various radiation issues. Radiography and radiology are two key tools for diagnosing and treating diseases. Recently there are concerns about the effect of ionizing radiation on man and the frequent use of diagnostic radiographs. The professionals are expected to conduct their actions according to guidelines which reflect new information and changing technology in diagnostic radiography. Failure to do so may have severe legal consequences. Patient protection is a matter of normal course but knowledge and awareness of the legal issues is important to avoid legal hassles. Implications of the radiation protection guidelines are discussed. (author)

  12. Diagnostic radiology 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margulis, A.R.; Gooding, C.A.

    1987-01-01

    This is the latest version of the continuing education course on diagnostic radiology given yearly by the Department of Radiology at the University of California, San Francisco. The lectures are grouped into sections on gastrointestinal radiology, mammography, uroradiology, magnetic resonance, hepatobiliary radiology, pediatric radiology, ultrasound, interventional radiology, chest radiology, nuclear medicine, cardiovascular radiology, and skeletal radiology. Each section contains four to eight topics. Each of these consists of text that represents highlights in narrative form, selected illustrations, and a short bibliography. The presentation gives a general idea of what points were made in the lecture

  13. A REVIEW OF THE FUNDAMENTAL PRINCIPLES OF RADIATION PROTECTION WHEN APPLIED TO THE PATIENT IN DIAGNOSTIC RADIOLOGY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moores, B Michael

    2017-06-01

    A review of the role and relevance of the principles of radiation protection of the patient in diagnostic radiology as specified by ICRP has been undertaken when diagnostic risks arising from an examination are taken into account. The increase in population doses arising from diagnostic radiology over the past 20 years has been due to the widespread application of higher dose CT examinations that provide significantly more clinical information. Consequently, diagnostic risks as well as radiation risks need to be considered within the patient radiation protection framework. Justification and optimisation are discussed and the limitations imposed on patient protection by employing only a radiation risk framework is highlighted. The example of radiation protection of the patient in breast screening programmes employing mammography is used to highlight the importance of defined diagnostic outcomes in any effective radiation protection strategy. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. A review of the fundamental principles of radiation protection when applied to the patient in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moores, B. Michael

    2017-01-01

    A review of the role and relevance of the principles of radiation protection of the patient in diagnostic radiology as specified by ICRP has been undertaken when diagnostic risks arising from an examination are taken into account. The increase in population doses arising from diagnostic radiology over the past 20 years has been due to the widespread application of higher dose CT examinations that provide significantly more clinical information. Consequently, diagnostic risks as well as radiation risks need to be considered within the patient radiation protection framework. Justification and optimisation are discussed and the limitations imposed on patient protection by employing only a radiation risk framework is highlighted. The example of radiation protection of the patient in breast screening programmes employing mammography is used to highlight the importance of defined diagnostic outcomes in any effective radiation protection strategy. (author)

  15. A study of radiological protection for women of reproductive age in diagnostic radiology. Questionnaire for medical radiation technologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsubone, Chie; Ban, Nobuhiko; Kai, Michiaki

    2005-01-01

    There has been great concern regarding the radiation protection for women of reproductive age when exposed to diagnostic radiation. The 10-day-rule proposed by the ICRP has not been recommended since 1983 because the risk to embryo and fetus within four weeks after menstruation may be small. However, some expects see that incomplete abandon of the 10-day-rule might cause confusion among the medical doctors and patients, and consequently unwarranted abortion happens. This paper surveyed the views of radiation technologies in hospitals and discussed how radiation exposure of women of reproductive age in medicine should be controlled. We found that the views to be 10-day-rule were spilt 50:50 and that radiation technologists do not necessarily think the 10-day-rule should be abandoned. Even the radiation technologists who are supposed to be able to explain to the patients the health risk following diagnostic exposure do not fully understand the risk involved. In conclusion, although a low-dose risk of diagnostic exposure should be sufficiently educated in order to obtain an exact understanding, the 10-day-rule may be useful in order to actually avoid any trouble in diagnostic radiology. (author)

  16. Web-based tools for quality assurance and radiation protection in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moores, B. M.; Charnock, P.; Ward, M.

    2010-01-01

    Practical and philosophical aspects of radiation protection in diagnostic radiology have changed very little over the past 50 y even though patient doses have continued to rise significantly in this period. This rise has been driven by technological developments, such as multi-slice computed tomography, that have been able to improve diagnostic accuracy but not necessarily provide the same level of risk-benefit to all patients or groups of patients given the dose levels involved. Can practical radiation protection strategies hope to keep abreast of these ongoing developments? A project was started in 1992 in Liverpool that aimed to develop IT driven quality assurance (QA)/radiation protection software tools based upon a modular quality assurance dose data system. One of the modules involved the assessment of the patient entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) for an X-ray examination that was based upon the use of calibrated X-ray tube exposure factors to calculate ESAK as well as collecting appropriate patient details (age, sex, weight, thickness etc). The package also contained modules for logging all necessary equipment performance QA data. This paper will outline the experience gained with this system through its transition from a local application on a stand alone PC within the department to the current web-based approach. Advantages of a web-based approach to delivering such an application as well as centrally storing data originating on many hospital sites will be discussed together with the scientific support processes that can be developed with such a system. This will include local, national and international considerations. The advantages of importing radiographic examination details directly from other electronic storage systems such as a hospital's radiology information system will be presented together with practical outcomes already achieved. This will include the application of statistical techniques to the very large data sets generated. The development

  17. Web-based tools for quality assurance and radiation protection in diagnostic radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moores, B M; Charnock, P; Ward, M

    2010-01-01

    Practical and philosophical aspects of radiation protection in diagnostic radiology have changed very little over the past 50 y even though patient doses have continued to rise significantly in this period. This rise has been driven by technological developments, such as multi-slice computed tomography, that have been able to improve diagnostic accuracy but not necessarily provide the same level of risk-benefit to all patients or groups of patients given the dose levels involved. Can practical radiation protection strategies hope to keep abreast of these ongoing developments? A project was started in 1992 in Liverpool that aimed to develop IT driven quality assurance (QA)/radiation protection software tools based upon a modular quality assurance dose data system. One of the modules involved the assessment of the patient entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) for an X-ray examination that was based upon the use of calibrated X-ray tube exposure factors to calculate ESAK as well as collecting appropriate patient details (age, sex, weight, thickness etc). The package also contained modules for logging all necessary equipment performance QA data. This paper will outline the experience gained with this system through its transition from a local application on a stand alone PC within the department to the current web-based approach. Advantages of a web-based approach to delivering such an application as well as centrally storing data originating on many hospital sites will be discussed together with the scientific support processes that can be developed with such a system. This will include local, national and international considerations. The advantages of importing radiographic examination details directly from other electronic storage systems such as a hospital's radiology information system will be presented together with practical outcomes already achieved. This will include the application of statistical techniques to the very large data sets generated. The development

  18. A review of current radiation protection in radiological diagnostics in Montenegro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mijovic, Slavoljub; Kovacevic, Zarko; Vuceljic, Mira; Scepanovic, Mara; Picuric, Ivana; Mardjokic, Aleksandar

    2008-01-01

    After getting independence 2006 year and became 192nd member of UN, Montenegro state is conducting measures for radiation protection autonomously. Because of complexity of such issues, Montenegro faced a lot of problems: lack of a national legal system in this field, expertise, appropriate equipments etc. Some estimates have shown that the major exposures of populations in Montenegro to ionizing radiation are due to the medical care. The purpose of this work is to analyze current protection in radiological diagnostics in Montenegro and compare it with international standards. It could be clearly stated where they are in agreement or disagreement. The method of analyzing is a holistic one, starting from the law, regulations and decisions through the protocols of quality controls and finishing with the reports and database of important parameters and data. The main findings are stated as follows: although the current radiation protection in radiological diagnostics is conducting according the law of former Federal Republic of Yugoslavia (FRY) and its regulations and decisions, the overall legal system is still satisfactory; Identification and location of radiation sources through a system of notification and maintaining a national inventory is not satisfactory; There are a lack of expertise and equipments for the technical services, although the procedures and protocols of the quality control are at a satisfactory level; There is a lack of knowledge of professional staff working in this field. The practice is sometimes operated carelessly; The patients protection is satisfactory but there is not care to decrease a level of exposure according the ALARA principle. (author)

  19. Radiological diagnostics in hyperparathyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moedder, U.; Kuhn, F.P.; Gruetzner, G.

    1991-01-01

    The most important radiologically detectable effects of the primary and secondary hyperparathyroidism of the skeletal system and the periarticular soft tissue structures are presented. In the following sensitivity and specificity of radiological imaging - sonography, scintigraphy, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, arteriography and selective venous sampling - in the preoperative diagnostic of the parathyroid adenomas are discussed. Therefore, radiological imaging can be omitted before primary surgery. It was only in secondary surgery that radiological process proved useful and a guide during surgical intervention. (orig.) [de

  20. Sensitivity of the diagnostic radiological index of protection to procedural factors in fluoroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, A. Kyle, E-mail: kyle.jones@mdanderson.org [Department of Imaging Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Pasciak, Alexander S. [Department of Radiology, The University of Tennessee Medical Center at Knoxville, Knoxville, Tennessee 37922 (United States); Wagner, Louis K. [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Imaging, The John P. and Katharine G. McGovern Medical School, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)

    2016-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the sensitivity of the diagnostic radiological index of protection (DRIP), used to quantify the protective value of radioprotective garments, to procedural factors in fluoroscopy in an effort to determine an appropriate set of scatter-mimicking primary beams to be used in measuring the DRIP. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations were performed to determine the shape of the scattered x-ray spectra incident on the operator in different clinical fluoroscopy scenarios, including interventional radiology and interventional cardiology (IC). Two clinical simulations studied the sensitivity of the scattered spectrum to gantry angle and patient size, while technical factors were varied according to measured automatic dose rate control (ADRC) data. Factorial simulations studied the sensitivity of the scattered spectrum to gantry angle, field of view, patient size, and beam quality for constant technical factors. Average energy (E{sub avg}) was the figure of merit used to condense fluence in each energy bin to a single numerical index. Results: Beam quality had the strongest influence on the scattered spectrum in fluoroscopy. Many procedural factors affect the scattered spectrum indirectly through their effect on primary beam quality through ADRC, e.g., gantry angle and patient size. Lateral C-arm rotation, common in IC, increased the energy of the scattered spectrum, regardless of the direction of rotation. The effect of patient size on scattered radiation depended on ADRC characteristics, patient size, and procedure type. Conclusions: The scattered spectrum striking the operator in fluoroscopy is most strongly influenced by primary beam quality, particularly kV. Use cases for protective garments should be classified by typical procedural primary beam qualities, which are governed by the ADRC according to the impacts of patient size, anatomical location, and gantry angle.

  1. Diagnostic radiology: I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    This chapter describes the historic development of diagnostic equipment for radiology. The problems associated with fluoroscope design are detailed and the current uses of updated technology, particularly digitization, are considered. Numerous historical photographs are included. 13 refs

  2. Radiation protection of patients in diagnostic radiology: implementation of a management system optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corpas Rivera, L.; Devesa Pardo, F. J.; Gamez Jimenez, J. L.; Vallejo Carrascal, C.; Garcia de Diego, A. A.; Amador Vela-Hidalgo, J. J.

    2011-01-01

    The enforcement of quality in diagnostic radiology (Royal Decree 1976/1999 laying down the criteria for quality in diagnostic radiology and Royal Decree 815/2001 to justify the use of ionizing radiations for medical exposure, etc.) and recommendations and European regulations on the matter, is done by carrying out the optimization of the doses received, based on image quality in a continuous process of monitoring of such dose from the dose reference Values ??(VRD ) that the system has allowed to establish for each technique.

  3. Diagnostic and interventional radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogl, Thomas J. [Klinikum der Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universitaet, Frankfurt am Main (Germany). Inst. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie; Reith, Wolfgang [Universitaetsklinikum des Saarlandes, Homburg/Saar (Germany). Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Neuroradiologie; Rummeny, Ernst J. (ed.) [Technische Univ. Muenchen Klinikum rechts der Isar, Muenchen (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologie

    2016-08-01

    This exceptional book covers all aspects of diagnostic and interventional radiology within one volume, at a level appropriate for the specialist. From the basics through diagnosis to intervention: the reader will find a complete overview of all areas of radiology. The clear, uniform structure, with chapters organized according to organ system, facilitates the rapid retrieval of information. Features include: Presentation of the normal radiological anatomy Classification of the different imaging procedures according to their diagnostic relevance Imaging diagnosis with many reference images Precise description of the interventional options The inclusion of many instructive aids will be of particular value to novices in decision making: Important take home messages and summaries of key radiological findings smooth the path through the jungle of facts Numerous tables on differential diagnosis and typical findings in the most common diseases offer a rapid overview and orientation Diagnostic flow charts outline the sequence of diagnostic evaluation All standard procedures within the field of interventional radiology are presented in a clinically relevant and readily understandable way, with an abundance of illustrations. This is a textbook, atlas, and reference in one: with more than 2500 images for comparison with the reader's own findings. This comprehensive and totally up-to-date book provides a superb overview of everything that the radiology specialist of today needs to know.

  4. Gonad shielding in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-06-01

    The use of gonad shielding is an important radiation protection technique, intended to reduce unnecessary x-ray exposure of the gonads of patients from diagnostic x-ray procedures. This pamphlet will provide physicians and radiologic technologists with information which will aid their appropriate use of gonad shielding

  5. Coordinated research programme on radiation protection in diagnostic radiology in Asia and the Far East

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Heron, J.

    1997-01-01

    Ten Asian countries (China, Vietnam, Thailand, Bangladesh, India, Pakistan, Iran, Philipppines, Malaysia, and Indonesia) are currently participating in a three year programme, as part of a Coordinated Research Programme of the International Atomic Energy Agency, aimed at reducing patient doses in diagnostic radiology through the implementation of optimisation of radiation protection. At the first meeting, held in Manila in September 1995, the project protocol was formulated for the first eighteen months of the programme, where the focus was on plain film radiography. The purpose of the second meeting was to briefly review the first half of the project, and to then come up with protocols for the second phase, where the attention was on dose reduction in fluoroscopic procedures and CT procedures. The second Research Coordination Meeting, held in Manila 3-7 March, was attended by participants from all the countries, with the exception of Iran, plus a consultant from each of Italy and New Zealand, and the scientific secretary from IAEA, Vienna. If the obvious enthusiasm of the participants is able to b maintained on return to their respective countries, then the signs are very healthy for a successful second phase of the programme. (author)

  6. Advance of the National Program of Radiological Protection and Safety for medical diagnostic with X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verdejo S, M.

    1999-01-01

    The National Program of Radiological Protection and Safety for medical diagnostic with X-ray (Programa Nacional de Proteccion y Seguridad Radiologica para diagnostico medico con rayos X) was initiated in the General Direction of Environmental Health (Direccion General de Salud Ambiental) in 1995. Task coordinated with different dependences of the Public Sector in collaboration between the Secretary of Health (Secretaria de Salud), the National Commission of Nuclear Safety and Safeguards (Comision Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear y Salvaguardias) and, the National Institute of Nuclear Research (Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares). The surveillance to the fulfilment of the standardization in matter of Radiological Protection and Safety in the medical diagnostic with X-rays has been obtained for an important advance in the Public sector and it has been arousing interest in the Private sector. (Author)

  7. Indonesia's experience with IAEA-CRP on radiation protection in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasukha

    2001-01-01

    IAEA-CRP on Radiation Doses in Diagnostic Radiology and Methods for Dose Reduction has as participants some Asian and East European countries. Indonesia is one of participants that followed the IAEA program. This paper is not a discussion of CRP-results since it will be published as a TECDOC soon. But the work on evaluation of examination frequencies, film reject rate analysis, patient dose measurements, image quality before and after Quality Control (QC) and QC itself, gave some experiences to investigators to be explored and presented. Experiences could be in the form of problems, how to solve problems and some suggestions, starting from no QC up to complicated QC to be faced in conventional radiography to CT-scan and fluoroscopy units. These valuable experiences of Indonesia are proven exercise of IAEA-CRP as a good start for next CRP or national projects in diagnostic radiology. (author)

  8. Pitfalls in diagnostic radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peh, Wilfred C.G. (ed.) [Khoo Teck Puat Hospital (Singapore). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology

    2015-04-01

    Only textbook to focus primarily on the topic of pitfalls in diagnostic radiology. Highlights the pitfalls in a comprehensive and systematic manner. Written by experts in different imaging modalities and subspecialties from reputable centers across the world. The practice of diagnostic radiology has become increasingly complex, with the use of numerous imaging modalities and division into many subspecialty areas. It is becoming ever more difficult for subspecialist radiologists, general radiologists, and residents to keep up with the advances that are occurring year on year, and this is particularly true for less familiar topics. Failure to appreciate imaging pitfalls often leads to diagnostic error and misinterpretation, and potential medicolegal problems. Diagnostic errors may be due to various factors such as inadequate imaging technique, imaging artifacts, failure to recognize normal structures or variants, lack of correlation with clinical and other imaging findings, and poor training or inexperience. Many, if not most, of these factors are potentially recognizable, preventable, or correctable. This textbook, written by experts from reputable centers across the world, systematically and comprehensively highlights the pitfalls that may occur in diagnostic radiology. Both pitfalls specific to different modalities and techniques and those specific to particular organ systems are described with the help of numerous high-quality illustrations. Recognition of these pitfalls is crucial in helping the practicing radiologist to achieve a more accurate diagnosis.

  9. Pitfalls in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peh, Wilfred C.G.

    2015-01-01

    Only textbook to focus primarily on the topic of pitfalls in diagnostic radiology. Highlights the pitfalls in a comprehensive and systematic manner. Written by experts in different imaging modalities and subspecialties from reputable centers across the world. The practice of diagnostic radiology has become increasingly complex, with the use of numerous imaging modalities and division into many subspecialty areas. It is becoming ever more difficult for subspecialist radiologists, general radiologists, and residents to keep up with the advances that are occurring year on year, and this is particularly true for less familiar topics. Failure to appreciate imaging pitfalls often leads to diagnostic error and misinterpretation, and potential medicolegal problems. Diagnostic errors may be due to various factors such as inadequate imaging technique, imaging artifacts, failure to recognize normal structures or variants, lack of correlation with clinical and other imaging findings, and poor training or inexperience. Many, if not most, of these factors are potentially recognizable, preventable, or correctable. This textbook, written by experts from reputable centers across the world, systematically and comprehensively highlights the pitfalls that may occur in diagnostic radiology. Both pitfalls specific to different modalities and techniques and those specific to particular organ systems are described with the help of numerous high-quality illustrations. Recognition of these pitfalls is crucial in helping the practicing radiologist to achieve a more accurate diagnosis.

  10. Radiological protection in interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padovani, R.

    2001-01-01

    Interventional radiology (IR) reduces the need for many traditional interventions, particularly surgery, so reducing the discomfort and risk for patients compared with traditional systems. IR procedures are frequently performed by non-radiologist physicians, often without the proper radiological equipment and sufficient knowledge of radiation protection. Levels of doses to patients and staff in IR vary enormously. A poor correlation exists between patient and staff dose, and large variations of dose are reported for the same procedure. The occurrence of deterministic effects in patients is another peculiar aspect of IR owing to the potentially high skin doses of some procedures. The paper reviews the use of IR and the radiological protection of patients and staff, and examines the need for new standards for IR equipment and the training of personnel. (author)

  11. Training in radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medina G, E.

    2014-08-01

    In the Peru, according to the current regulations, people that work with ionizing radiations should have an authorization (individual license), which is granted by the Technical Office of the National Authority that is the technical body of the Instituto Peruano de Energia Nuclear (IPEN) manager of the control of ionizing radiations in the country. The individual license is obtained after the applicant fulfills the requested requirements, as having safety knowledge and radiological protection. Since its founding in 1972, the Centro Superior de Estudios Nucleares (CSEN) of the IPEN has carried out diverse training courses in order to that people can work in a safe way with ionizing radiations in medicine, industry and research, until the year 2013 have been organized 2231 courses that have allowed the training of 26213 people. The courses are organized according to the specific work that is carried out with radiations (medical radio-diagnostic, dental radiology, nuclear medicine, radiotherapy, industrial radiography, nuclear meters, logging while drilling, etc.). In their majority the courses are directed to people that will make use of radiations for first time, but refresher courses are also granted in the topic. The CSEN also carries out the Master degree programs highlighting the Second Professional Specialization in Radiological Protection carried out from the year 2004 with the support of the National University of Engineering. To the present has been carried out 2 programs and there is other being developed. In this work is shown the historical evolution of the radiological protection courses as well as the important thing that they are to work in a safe way in the country. (Author)

  12. Radiological Protection in Medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valetin, J.

    2011-01-01

    This report was prepared to underpin the Commission's 2007 Recommendations with regard to the medical exposure of patients, including their comforters and carers, and volunteers in biomedical research. It addresses the proper application of the fundamental principles (justification, optimisation of protection, and application of dose limits) of the Commission's 2007 Recommendations to these individuals. With regard to medical exposure of patients, it is not appropriate to apply dose limits or dose constraints, because such limits would often do more harm than good. Often, there are concurrent chronic, severe, or even life-threatening medical conditions that are more critical than the radiation exposure. The emphasis is then on justification of the medical procedures and on the optimisation of radiological protection. In diagnostic and interventional procedures, justification of procedures (for a defined purpose and for an individual patient), and management of the patient dose commensurate with the medical task, are the appropriate mechanisms to avoid unnecessary or unproductive radiation exposure. Equipment features that facilitate patient dose management, and diagnostic reference levels derived at the appropriate national, regional, or local level, are likely to be the most effective approaches. In radiation therapy, the avoidance of accidents is a predominant issue. With regard to comforters and carers, and volunteers in biomedical research, dose constraints are appropriate. Over the last decade, the Commission has published a number of documents that provided detailed advice related to radiological protection and safety in the medical applications of ionising radiation. Each of the publications addressed a specific topic defined by the type of radiation source and the medical discipline in which the source is applied, and was written with the intent of communicating directly with the relevant medical practitioners and supporting medical staff. This report

  13. Radiation protection in the diagnostic radiology. General viewpoint including CT; Strahlenschutz in der diagnostischen Radiologie. Allgemeine Sichtweise einschliesslich CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kroepil, Patric [Universitaetsklinikum Duesseldorf (Germany). Inst. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie

    2017-07-01

    Radiation protection in radiology has received public attention due to reports in the media on radiation hazards due to CT. The contribution covers the issues radiation protection in radiology, including the documentation of dose information, the responsibility of radiologists for their patients, new developments with respect to dose intensive CT and the changes due to the new radiation protection law.

  14. Patient dosimetry in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rweyemamu, M.

    2013-04-01

    The objective of this project was to review patient dosimetry aiming at reducing the patient dose during diagnostic procedures while maintaining the best image quality in order to protect patients from ionizing radiation. CT examination was selected in this study to represent imaging protocols with high patient doses used in diagnostic radiology. Dosimetric parameters in CT which are CTDI, CTDIW, DLP, MSAD, organ dose and effective dose were discussed. Parameters such as tube current, tube voltage, filtration, scan volume and slice thickness were found to affect patient dose, therefore proper management of these factors was recommended. For optimization of protection of the patient, application of the “as low as reasonably achievable” (ALARA) principle was recommended as an important key for avoiding overexposure and minimizing patient doses. Also it was recommended that CT examinations should be performed if and only if is the only suitable option when weighed against other options which do not involve ionizing radiation exposure. (author)

  15. Radiological protection act, 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This Act provides for the establishment of the Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland and dissolves An Bord Fuinnimh Nuicleigh (the Board), transferring its assets and liabilities to the Institute. It sets out a range of radiation protection measures to be taken by various Ministers in the event of a radiological emergency and gives effect at national level to the Assistance Convention, the Early Notification Convention and the Physical Protection Convention. The Institute is the competent Irish authority for the three Conventions. (NEA) [fr

  16. Optimization of radiation protection in diagnostic and interventional radiology: Which is the future?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsapaki, V.

    2012-01-01

    As quoted in the latest UNSCEAR 2008 report: 'it appears that the world is entering another period of major technological changes, where the impact of these changes on the population dose worldwide in the future will be difficult to predict'. It is more than true that in this fast changing world and immense technological advances, especially in the medical sector, scientists run a marathon to be able to follow the new techniques that are continuously introduced for the benefit of the patient. Almost half of the radiation to the population in diagnostic radiology arises due to CT and interventional techniques. More and more medical specialties as well as other professions (nurses, technicians, managers, etc.) are currently being introduced into the term 'radiation safety culture' and 'optimization'. Some of these stakeholders were not aware of these expressions and were never trained or educated on these subjects. Each of these specialties should therefore be approached in a different way, indicating and underlining the specific roles of the experts, in order to persuade them to include radiation safety in their every day clinical routine. Below, some of these issues are identified and possible ways to move forward in the future are suggested. (author)

  17. Cost-risk-benefit analysis in diagnostic radiology: a theoretical and economic basis for radiation protection of the patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moores, B. Michael

    2016-01-01

    In 1973, International Commission on Radiological Protection Publication 22 recommended that the acceptability of radiation exposure levels for a given activity should be determined by a process of cost-benefit analysis. It was felt that this approach could be used to underpin both the principle of ALARA as well for justification purposes. The net benefit, B, of an operation involving irradiation was regarded as equal to the difference between its gross benefit, V, and the sum of three components; the basic production cost associated with the operation, P; the cost of achieving the selected level of protection, X; and the cost Y of the detriment involved in the operation: B=V-(P+X+Y). This article presents a theoretical cost-risk-benefit analysis that is applicable to the diagnostic accuracy (Levels 1 and 2) of the hierarchical efficacy model presented by National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements in 1992. This enables the costs of an examination to be related to the sensitivity and specificity of an X-ray examination within a defined clinical problem setting and introduces both false-positive/false-negative diagnostic outcomes into the patient radiation protection framework. (author)

  18. COST-RISK-BENEFIT ANALYSIS IN DIAGNOSTIC RADIOLOGY: A THEORETICAL AND ECONOMIC BASIS FOR RADIATION PROTECTION OF THE PATIENT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moores, B Michael

    2016-06-01

    In 1973, International Commission on Radiological Protection Publication 22 recommended that the acceptability of radiation exposure levels for a given activity should be determined by a process of cost-benefit analysis. It was felt that this approach could be used to underpin both the principle of ALARA as well for justification purposes. The net benefit, B, of an operation involving irradiation was regarded as equal to the difference between its gross benefit, V, and the sum of three components; the basic production cost associated with the operation, P; the cost of achieving the selected level of protection, X; and the cost Y of the detriment involved in the operation: [Formula: see text] This article presents a theoretical cost-risk-benefit analysis that is applicable to the diagnostic accuracy (Levels 1 and 2) of the hierarchical efficacy model presented by National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements in 1992. This enables the costs of an examination to be related to the sensitivity and specificity of an X-ray examination within a defined clinical problem setting and introduces both false-positive/false-negative diagnostic outcomes into the patient radiation protection framework. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  19. Recent trend of diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S.Y.; Kim, H.K.

    1979-01-01

    Present status and recent trend of diagnostic radiology have been reviewed. The interrelationships and Characteristics of various fields of radiology such as computed tomography, X-ray radiology, and nuclear medicine were discussed. The mevit of computed tomography and the promising use of short lived, accelerator produced radionuclides, and radiotherapy in nuclear medicine were emphasized. (author)

  20. Radiologic diagnostics of dementia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Essig, M.; Schoenberg, S.O.

    2003-01-01

    Dementia is one of the most common diseases in the elderly population and is getting more and more important with the ageing of the population. A radiologic structural examination with CT or MRI is meanwhile a standard procedure in the diagnostic work up of patients with dementia syndrome. Radiology enables an early diagnosis and a differential diagnosis between different causes of dementia. Because structural changes occur only late in the disease process, a more detailed structural analysis using volumetric techniques or the use of functional imaging techniques is mandatory. These days, structural imaging uses MRI which enables to detect early atrophic changes at the medial temporal lobe with focus on the amygdala hippocampal complex. These changes are also present in the normal ageing process. In patients with Alzheimer's disease, however, they are more rapid and more pronounced. The use of functional imaging methods such as perfusion MRI, diffusion MRI or fMRI allow new insights into the pathophysiologic changes of dementia. The article gives an overview of the current status of structural imaging and an outlook into the potential of functional imaging methods. Detailed results of structural and functional imaging are presented in other articles of this issue. (orig.) [de

  1. Fetal dosimetry in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faulkner, K.

    2002-01-01

    Diagnostic radiology examinations are frequently performed in all countries because of the benefit that the patient derives from the resultant diagnosis. Given that so many examinations are performed it is inevitable that there will be occasions when the planned exposure of a woman who is known to be pregnant is contemplated. In these circumstances, there must be rigorous justification of the examination and the procedure itself must be optimised as well. Radiation risks from fetal irradiation are well established. These risks fall into three categories: 1) a cancer induction risk (mainly leukaemia); 2) hereditary effects (as the fetus is a potential parent); 3) a risk of serious mental retardation (if the fetus is exposed in the critical 8-15 weeks period when the forebrain is being developed). Risk factors for these effects have been reviewed by the International Commission on Radiological Protection. Special rules apply to the radiology of women who are or who may be pregnant. These rules have been developed to avoid he unintended irradiation of the fetus. These rules have been variously referred to as the 10-day rule and the 28-day rules, in which radiology of potentially pregnant women is restricted to the first 10 or 28 days following menstruation. It is apparent that the advice provided by national bodies varies, as different rules apply internationally, due presumably to a lack of an international consensus on the subject. The advice from the National Radiological Protection Board, the College of Radiographers and the Royal College of Radiologists applies in the United Kingdom. In summary, the advice is that women of child bearing age are asked before a diagnostic radiology examination in which the pelvis is in, or near, the primary beam are asked if they are, or may be, pregnant. If pregnancy can be excluded then the examination can proceed. If it is likely that the patient is pregnant, then the proposed examination must undergo rigorous justification. If

  2. Radiation protection and quality assurance in diagnostic radiology - an IAEA coordinated research project in Asia and Eastern Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oresegun, Modupe; LeHeron, J.; Maccia, C.; Padovani, R.; Vano, E.

    1999-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency currently has two parallel Coordinated Research Projects (CRP) running in Asia and Eastern Europe. The main objective of the CRPs is to raise the level of awareness in participating countries about the need for radiation protection for patients undergoing diagnostic radiology procedures. This is to be achieved by first assessing the status quo in a sample of hospitals and X-ray rooms in each participating country. A program of optimization of radiation protection for patients is then introduced by means of a comprehensive quality assurance program and the implementation of appropriate dose reduction methods, taking into account clinical requirements for diagnostically acceptable images. Patient dose assessment and image quality assessment are to be performed both before and after the introduction of the quality assurance program. The CRP is divided into two phases - the first is concerned with conventional radiography, while the second involves fluoroscopy and computed tomography. The CRP is still running, restricting the scope of this paper to a discussion of the approach being taken with the project. The project will be completed in 1998, with analysis to follow

  3. Radiation protection and quality assurance in diagnostic radiology - an IAEA coordinated research project in Asia and Eastern Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oresegun, Modupe [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); LeHeron, J. [National Radiation Laboratory, Christchurch (New Zealand); Maccia, C. [Centre d' Assurance de qualite des Applications Technologiques dans le Domaine de la Sante, Bourg-la-Reine (France); Padovani, R. [Instituto di Fisica Sanitaria, Udine (Italy); Vano, E. [Medical Physics Group, Radiology Department, Complutense University, Madrid (Spain)

    1999-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency currently has two parallel Coordinated Research Projects (CRP) running in Asia and Eastern Europe. The main objective of the CRPs is to raise the level of awareness in participating countries about the need for radiation protection for patients undergoing diagnostic radiology procedures. This is to be achieved by first assessing the status quo in a sample of hospitals and X-ray rooms in each participating country. A program of optimization of radiation protection for patients is then introduced by means of a comprehensive quality assurance program and the implementation of appropriate dose reduction methods, taking into account clinical requirements for diagnostically acceptable images. Patient dose assessment and image quality assessment are to be performed both before and after the introduction of the quality assurance program. The CRP is divided into two phases - the first is concerned with conventional radiography, while the second involves fluoroscopy and computed tomography. The CRP is still running, restricting the scope of this paper to a discussion of the approach being taken with the project. The project will be completed in 1998, with analysis to follow.

  4. Patient dosimetry in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shrimpton, P.C.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: X-ray examinations remain an essential and widely used diagnostic tool in medicine and hence the most significant source of exposure to man-made radiation for populations. Patterns of practice in diagnostic radiology continue to evolve, with overall growth in the numbers of procedures worldwide and, particularly in developed countries, increasing importance for complex procedures such as computed tomography (CT) and interventional techniques. In order to maximise the benefits from x-rays relative to the associated radiation risks, there is a need to ensure the prior justification of all examinations and the optimisation of patient protection such that doses are as low as reasonably practicable to meet specific clinical requirements. Accordingly, patient dosimetry is a fundamental requirement in diagnostic radiology. Detailed measurements for the assessment of risks or comparison of different types of procedure require the estimation of organ and effective doses. Such comprehensive dosimetry necessarily involves the simulation of clinical practice using anthropomorphic phantoms, with either measurements in a physical phantom or calculations utilising a mathematical phantom. Simpler measurements for the routine monitoring of dose in x-ray departments can be based on practical quantities such as entrance surface dose, dose-area product and, for CT, weighted CT dose index and dose-length product. Widescale surveys reveal significant variations between departments in the typical doses for a given type of procedure and potential scope for dose reductions. In order to promote improvements in practice, the results of periodic dose surveys in departments should be compared with appropriate standards, such as diagnostic reference levels for adult and paediatric patients, that are set nationally or locally for the purposes of promoting critical review of the equipment and techniques in use. Patient dosimetry should form an essential element of routine quality

  5. Rational use of diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Racoveanu, N.T.; Volodin, V.

    1992-01-01

    The escalating number of radiodiagnostic investigations has, as a consequence, an increase in medical irradiation of patients and of cost of radiological services. Radiologists in USA and UK have since early 1970 questioned the efficacy of various radiological investigations and produced substantial evidence that more rational approaches are necessary. WHO initiated, in 1977, a programme in this direction which has issued four technical reports which give practical recommendations on how to rationalize the use of radiological examinations. Three main directions are considered: (1) Abandonment of routine radiological examinations, as procedures with no clinical or epidemiologic significance and which represent a waste of resources and patient dose. (2) Patient selection for various radiological investigations based on clinical criteria (high, intermediate, low yield). Selected patients have an increased prevalence of the given disease and the predictive value of radiological investigation is much higher. (3) Use of diagnostic algorithms with higher cost/efficiency and risk/benefit ratios, improving the outcome of radiological examinations

  6. Radiological diagnostics of skeletal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uhl, M.; Herget, G.W.

    2008-01-01

    The book contains contributions concerning the following topics: 1. introduction and fundamentals: WHO classification of bone tumors, imaging diagnostics and their function; localization, typical clinical and radiological criteria, TNM classification and status classification, invasive tumor diagnostics; 2. specific tumor diagnostics: chondrogenic bone tumors, osseous tumors, connective tissue bony tumors, osteoclastoma, osteomyelogenic bone tumors, vascular bone tumors, neurogenic bone tumors, chordoma; adamantinoma of the long tubular bone; tumor-like lesions, bony metastases, bone granulomas, differential diagnostics: tumor-like lesions

  7. Radiation protection in pediatric radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fendel, H.; Stieve, F.E.

    1983-01-01

    Because of the high growth rate of cell systems in phases of radiation exposure radiological investigations on children should not be considered unless there is a strong indication. The National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements has worked out recommendations on radiation protection which have been published as an NCRP report. This report is most important even outside the USA. The present translation is aimed to contribute to better understanding of the bases and aims of radiation protection during radiological investigations on children. It addresses not only those physicians who carry out radiological investigations on children themselves but also all physicians requiring such investigations. For these physicians, but also for parents who are worried about the radiation risk to their children the report should be a useful source of information and decision aid ensuring, on the one hand, that necessary radiological investigations are not shunned for unjustified fear of radiation and that, on the other hand, all unnecessary exposure of children to radiation is avoided. Thus, it is to be hoped, the quality of pediatric radiological diagnostics will be improved. (orig./MG) [de

  8. The ICRP principles applied to radiation protection of the patient in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlsson, S.; Mattsson, S.

    1994-01-01

    The International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP) has published new recommendations in Publication 60. These take account of the new biological information and trends in the setting of radiation protection standards since 1977. The main principle for radiation protection of the patient is that the exposure should be justified not only at a broad level but also with respect to the individual patient. Protection arrangements should be optimised using reference dose levels as an upper bound of the optimisation process. The reference levels should be applied with flexibility and based on sound clinical judgement. (authors)

  9. The ICRP principles applied to radiation protection of the patient in diagnostic radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlsson, S [Department of Medical Physics, s-451 80 Uddevalla (Sweden); Mattsson, S [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Lund, S-214 01 Malmo (Sweden)

    1994-12-31

    The International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP) has published new recommendations in Publication 60. These take account of the new biological information and trends in the setting of radiation protection standards since 1977. The main principle for radiation protection of the patient is that the exposure should be justified not only at a broad level but also with respect to the individual patient. Protection arrangements should be optimised using reference dose levels as an upper bound of the optimisation process. The reference levels should be applied with flexibility and based on sound clinical judgement. (authors). 7 refs.

  10. Rational use of diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Racoveanu, N.T.; Volodin, V.

    1992-01-01

    Radiologists in USA and UK have since early 1970 questioned the efficacy of various radiological investigations and produced substantial evidence that more rational approaches are necessary. WHO initiated, in 1977, a programme which has issued four technical reports giving practical recommendations on how to rationalise the use of radiological examinations. Three main directions are considered: (1) Abandonment of routine radiological examinations, as procedures with no clinical or epidemiologic significance and which represent a waste of resources and patient dose. (2) Patient selection for various radiological investigations based on clinical criteria (high, intermediate, low yield). Selected patients have an increased prevalence of the given disease and the predictive value of radiological investigation is much higher. (3) Use of diagnostic algorithms with higher cost/efficiency and risk/benefit ratios, improving the outcome of radiological examinations. (author)

  11. Radiological Protection Act 1970

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1970-01-01

    This Act provides for the establishment of a Radiological Protection Board to undertake research and advise on protection from radiation hazards. Its functions include provision of advice to Government departments with responsibilities in relation to protection of sectors of the community or the community as a whole against the hazards of ionizing radiation. The Act, which lays down that the Board shall replace certain departments concerned with radiation protection, repeals several Sections of the Radioactive Substances Act 1948 and the Science and Technology Act 1965. (NEA) [fr

  12. Quality assurance in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    The present guide endeavours to provide an outline of the type of quality assurance programme to be recommended for (1) routine implementation by those performing radiodiagnostic procedures (medical radiology technicians, medical physicists, and radiologists), (2) for application by the responsible national authorities, and (3) for use by international bodies such as the International Society of Radiology (ISR), the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), and the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU)

  13. Radiation protection in medicine (542) comparison of different dosimetry systems for dose measurements in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milkovic, D.; Ranogajec-Komor, M.; Miljanic, S.; Knezevic, Z.; Krpan, K.

    2006-01-01

    The dose measurement on patients in X-ray diagnostic is not simple, because low doses with low and various energies have to be measured. The aim of this preliminary study was to compare high sensitivity thermoluminescent dosimeter (T.L.D.) (LiF:Mg,Cu,P) and radio-photoluminescent (R.P.L.) glass dosimeters for dose measurements in routine X-ray diagnostic of chest of children. The energy dependence of the dosimeters was investigated in Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory (SSDL). The energy range was 33- 65 keV mean energy, the dosimeters were placed free in air and on the water phantom. The results were compared to calculated values of Hp(10). The next step was the irradiation in a routine X-ray diagnostic unit. Irradiations were performed by the Shimadzu X-ray unit. The selected irradiation conditions were the same as that most commonly used for baby examinations. Doses were measured with dosimeters placed free-in-air and also with the dosimeters placed on the water phantom and baby phantom. The results show that the R.P.L. glass dosimeters and LiF:Mg,Cu,P based T.L.D. are suitable for low dose measurements in X-ray diagnostic. The uncertainty of dose determination is mainly caused by the energy dependence of dosimeters. (authors)

  14. Standards for radiation protection and diagnostic radiology at the IAEA Dosimetry Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pernicka, F.; Andreo, P.; Meghzifene, A.; Czap, L.; Girzikowsky, R.

    1999-01-01

    International standardization in dosimetry is essential for the successful exploitation of radiation technology. The IAEA dosimetry programme is focused into services provided to Member States through the IAEA/WHO Network of Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratories (SSDLs), to radiotherapy centres and radiation processing facilities. Radiation protection quantities defined by ICRU and ICRP are used to relate the risk due to exposure to ionizing radiation to a single quantity, irrespective of the type of radiation, which takes into account the human body as a receptor. Two types of quantities, limiting and operational, can be related to basic physical quantities which are defined without need for considering specific aspects of radiation protection, e.g. air kerma for photons and fluence for neutrons. The use of a dosimeter for measurements in radiation protection requires a calibration in terms of a physical quantity together with a conversion from physical into protection quantities by means of a factor or a coefficient

  15. Patient dosimetry in diagnostic radiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciraj-Bjelac Olivera F.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work is to assess patient organ doses, effective doses and entrance surface doses in conventional diagnostic radiology procedures for standard adult patient. The survey consists of measurements of doses delivered to 239 patients in nine types of X-ray examinations. Three types of data were collected: X-ray machine data, patient data, and output measurements. Entrance surface dose was assessed based on the survey data and subsequently, using conversion coefficients, the organ doses and effective doses were calculated. Values of the entrance surface dose and the effective dose were estimated to be 0.4 to 5.8 mGy and 0.03 to 3.00 mSv for different examinations. Derived doses were compared with recommended general diagnostic reference levels. The impact of examination parameters on dose values was discussed. Except for posterior-anterior chest examination, all estimated doses are lower than stated reference levels. Survey data are aimed at helping development of national quality control and radiation protection programmed for medical exposures.

  16. Thematic plan on diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    Due to the vital importance of diagnostic radiology in both the diagnosis and management of disease processes, there is a need for a greater coherent international effort to help the developing nations create strategies for the incorporation of imaging into their healthcare systems. To meet the needs of such countries, a comprehensive programme is required to take into consideration the availability of local expertise (medical and technical), the infrastructure (stable electrical supply, water and air-conditioning) and the disease pattern or burden. In short, the total solution requires coordinating the International Atomic Energy Agency efforts with those of other partners. The Agency already has programmes in nuclear medicine and radiation therapy supported by activities in dosimetry and medical physics. Through the Technical Co-operation fund the Agency already supports projects in some areas of diagnostic imaging, dosimetry and radiation protection, but it lacks a comprehensive programme to provide a systematic approach focusing on the medical aspects of imaging science and including all the imaging technologies. Member States require the Agency's assistance in this area since no single UN organisation has the resources or the expertise to do the entire job without help. This document presents the proposed programme strategy and action plan

  17. Automated Calibration of Dosimeters for Diagnostic Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero Acosta, A.; Gutierrez Lores, S.

    2015-01-01

    Calibration of dosimeters for diagnostic radiology includes current and charge measurements, which are often repetitive. However, these measurements are usually done using modern electrometers, which are equipped with an RS-232 interface that enables instrument control from a computer. This paper presents an automated system aimed to the measurements for the calibration of dosimeters used in diagnostic radiology. A software application was developed, in order to achieve the acquisition of the electric charge readings, measured values of the monitor chamber, calculation of the calibration coefficient and issue of a calibration certificate. A primary data record file is filled and stored in the computer hard disk. The calibration method used was calibration by substitution. With this system, a better control over the calibration process is achieved and the need for human intervention is reduced. the automated system will be used in the calibration of dosimeters for diagnostic radiology at the Cuban Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory of the Center for Radiation Protection and Hygiene. (Author)

  18. Fundamentals of radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wells, J.; Mill, A.J.; Charles, M.W.

    1978-05-01

    The basic processes of living cells which are relevant to an understanding of the interaction of ionizing radiation with man are described. Particular reference is made to cell death, cancer induction and genetic effects. This is the second of a series of reports which present the fundamentals necessary for an understanding of the bases of regulatory criteria such as those recommended by the International Commision on Radiological Protection (ICRP). Others consider basic radiation physics and the biological effects of ionizing radiation. (author)

  19. Fundamentals of radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mill, A.J.; Charles, M.W.; Wells, J.

    1978-04-01

    A review is presented of basic radiation physics with particular relevance to radiological protection. The processes leading to the production and absorption of ionising radiation are outlined, and the important dosimetric quantities and their units of measurements. The review is the first of a series of reports presenting the fundamentals necessary for an understanding of the basis of regulatory criteria such as those recommended by the ICRP. (author)

  20. SU-D-209-05: Sensitivity of the Diagnostic Radiological Index of Protection (DRIP) to Procedural Factors in Fluoroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, A [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Pasciak, A [University of Tennessee Medical Center, Knoxville, TN (United States); Wagner, L [UT Medical School, Houston, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the sensitivity of the Diagnostic Radiological Index of Protection (DRIP) to procedural factors in fluoroscopy in an effort to determine an appropriate set of scatter-mimicking primary beams (SMPB) to be used in measuring the DRIP. Methods: A series of clinical and factorial Monte Carlo simulations were conducted to determine the shape of the scattered X-ray spectra incident on the operator in different clinical fluoroscopy scenarios. Two clinical evaluations studied the sensitivity of the scattered spectrum to gantry angle and patient size while technical factors were varied according to measured automatic dose rate control (ADRC) data. Factorial evaluations studied the sensitivity of the scattered spectrum to gantry angle, field of view, patient size and beam quality for constant technical factors. Average energy was the figure of merit used to condense fluence in each energy bin to a single numerical index. Results: Beam quality had the strongest influence on the scattered spectrum in fluoroscopy. Many procedural factors affected the scattered spectrum indirectly through their effects on primary beam quality through ADRC, e.g., gantry angle and patient size. Lateral C-arm rotation, common in interventional cardiology, increased the energy of the scattered spectrum, regardless of the direction of rotation. The effect of patient size on scattered radiation depended on ADRC characteristics, patient size, and procedure type. Conclusion: The scattered spectrum striking the operator in fluoroscopy, and therefore the DRIP, is most strongly influenced by primary beam quality, particularly kV. Use cases for protective garments should be classified by typical procedural primary beam qualities, which are governed by the ADRC according to the impacts of patient size, anatomical location, and gantry angle. These results will help determine an appropriate set of SMPB to be used for measuring the DRIP.

  1. Course of radiological protection and safety in the medical diagnostic with X-rays; Curso de proteccion y seguridad radiologica en el diagnostico medico con rayos X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dominguez A, C.E. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    1997-07-01

    The obtention of images of human body to the medical diagnostic is one of the more old and generalized applications for X-ray. Therefore the design and performance of equipment and installations as well as the operation procedures must be oriented toward safety with the purpose to guarantee this radiological practice will bring a net positive benefit to the society. Given that in Mexico only exists the standardization related to source and equipment generators of ionizing radiation in the industrial area and medical therapy, but not so to the medical diagnostic area it is the purpose of this work to present those standards related with this application branch. Also it is presented the preparation of a manual for the course named Formation of teachers in radiological protection and safety in the X-ray medical diagnostic in 1997 which was imparted at ININ. (Author)

  2. Radiologic protection in dental radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacheco Jimenez, R.E.; Bermudez Jimenez, L.A.

    2000-01-01

    With this work and employing the radioprotection criterion, the authors pretend to minimize the risks associated to this practice; without losing the quality of the radiologic image. Odontology should perform the following criterions: 1. Justification: all operation of practice that implies exposition to radiations, should be reweighed, through an analysis of risks versus benefits, with the purpose to assure, that the total detriment will be small, compared to resultant benefit of this activity. 2. Optimization: all of the exposures should be maintained as low as reasonable possible, considering the social and economic factors. 3. Dose limit: any dose limit system should be considered as a top condition, nota as an admissible level. (S. Grainger)

  3. Development of a ceramic material to cover walls to be applied in diagnostic radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frimaio, Audrew

    2006-01-01

    This study aims to formulate a ceramic composition for wall coating seeking to contribute to the optimization of diagnosis rooms' shielding. The work was based on experimental measures of X-radiation attenuation (80 and 100 kV) using ceramic coating materials containing different ceramic bases (red, white, gres, stoneware porcelain tiles, etc). Among the appraised ceramic bases, the white gres presented better attenuation properties and it was considered the most suitable material for the targets of this work. Different formulations of white gres were studied and altered in order to obtain better attenuation properties. Simulations of ceramic compositions using gres coating were made maintaining the percentages of 12-20% clay; 6-18% kaolin; 12-25% phyllite; 8-14% quartz; 1018% feldspar; 32-40% pegmatite and 6-8% talc in the composition of the necessary raw-material. The quantitative and qualitative chemical compositions of these materials were also evaluated and the most common representative elements are SiO 2 , Fe 2 O 3 , Al 2 O 3 , CaO and Ti 2 O 3 . Formulations containing Pb and Ba oxides were studied, considering that CaO can be replaced by PbO or BaO. The attenuation properties for X-radiation were investigated by computer simulations considering the incident and transmitted X-ray spectra for the different studied compositions and they were compared to the properties of the reference materials Pb, Ba and BaSO 4 (barite). The results obtained with the simulations indicated the formulated composition of gres ceramic base that presented better attenuation properties considering the X-ray energies used in diagnosis (80, 100 and 150 kV). Ceramic plates based on the formulated compositions that presented lower percentage differences related to Pb were experimentally produced and physically tested as wall coating and protecting barrier. Properties as flexion resistance module, density, load rupture, water absorption and X radiation attenuation were evaluated for

  4. Optimization in radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acosta Perez, Clarice de Freitas

    1996-01-01

    The optimization concept in radiation protection is, in its essence, practical. In each aspect that we deal with the man, it is necessary to take frequent decisions such as: what is the protection level to be pursued, since the protection levels under consideration provide doses lower than the appropriate annual limits. The optimization gives a basic framework of the minding that is appropriate to conduct to a balance kind of the resources available for the protection and protection level obtained against a multitude of factors and constrains in a manner to obtain the best result. In this work, was performed the optimization, from the radiation protection point of view, of a facility project who enclose two shielded hot cells where will be handled UO 2 small plate with 50% of U-235 burn-up, irradiated in the research swimming pool reactor, IEA-R1. To obtain this goal were specified the relevant factors and criteria, were applied the main techniques used in a decision-making in radiological protection, presently adopted and was performed a sensibility study of the factors and criteria used in this work. In order to obtain a greater agility in applying the techniques for decision-making was developed a micro computer program. (author)

  5. Radiological protection in dentistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holliday, B

    1974-01-01

    Information that would allow an assessment of the standard of radiological protection in dentistry in the United Kingdom is sparse. The National Radiological Protection Board (previously the Radiological Protection Service) has provided a monitoring and advisory service to dentists for many years but very limited use has been made of this service. In a recent survey, 114 dentists were visited in representative practices in South East England and it was established that only 6.5% of dentists in general practice do not use radiography as an adjunct to their practice (Smith, 1969). In the 88 x-ray sets which were examined, 24% had less than the recommended thickness of aluminium filtration, while 25% had a fixed field size which was larger than necessary for dental radiography; in addition, 27% of the timers were found to have an error of greater than 20% in repetition of the pre-set exposure time. The exposure rate at the cone tip of a dental x-ray unit is generally in the range 1 to 4 R/s. A fault in the timer unit coupled with a failure on the part of the dentist to notice that x-rays are being generated (normally indicated by a red warning light) would rapidly lead to excessive exposure of the patient. Furthermore, a dentist continually holding films in the mouth of his patient would certainly incur a dose well in excess of the permissible hand dose, assuming anaverage work load for the x-ray equipment. Three case histories are given to illustrate the type of hazard that might arise from faulty equipment or bad operating technique.

  6. Fundamentals of radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charles, M.W.; Wells, J.; Mill, A.J.

    1978-04-01

    A brief review is presented of the early and late effects of ionising radiation on man, with particular emphasis on those aspects of importance in radiological protection. The terminology and dose response curves, are explained. Early effects on cells, tissues and whole organs are discussed. Late somatic effects considered include cancer and life-span shortening. Genetic effects are examined. The review is the third of a series of reports which present the fundamentals necessary for an understanding of the basis of regulatory criteria, such as those of the ICRP. (u.K.)

  7. Radiological protection report 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-06-01

    Two years after the massive release of radiation from the nuclear power plants at Fukushima Dai-ichi, the repercussions continue to preoccupy the radiological and emergency protection community, both in Switzerland and internationally. In Switzerland the Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate (ENSI) has initiated measures as part of the European Union Stress Tests and has its own Fukushima Action Plan. In this Annual Report, ENSI focuses on radiological protection in Swiss nuclear facilities. The average individual dose has changed little compared with previous years. At 0.7 mSv, it is significantly below the limit both for persons exposed to radiation during their work (20 mSv) and the annual average rate of exposure for the population in Switzerland as a whole (5.5 mSv). In terms of collective doses, the extensive maintenance work at the Leibstadt power plant (KKL) resulted in a doubling of rates compared with recent years. However, in the remaining nuclear facilities the rates have not changed significantly. The highest individual dose during the year under review was 13 mSv. Exposure rates in 2012 for all those exposed to radiation during work in facilities subject to ENSI surveillance were below the maximum limit. Greater attention is now being given to work in high and variable radiation fields and in difficult conditions. Swiss nuclear facilities continue to operate a consistent radiological protection approach. Measuring equipment plays an important role in radiological protection. Having conducted a range of inspections and comparative measurements of aerosol-iodine filters and waste water sampling together with measurements in the field of personal dosimetry, ENSI has concluded that the required measuring equipment for radiological protection exists, that this equipment is correctly used and provides reliable data. ENSI maintains a test laboratory that analyses samples from nuclear facilities and their immediate vicinity and also conducts field

  8. Generator for radiological diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seissl, J; Broenner, K; Krause, H

    1978-10-02

    A generator is described for X-ray diagnostics, with a high-voltage transformer with a primary coil connected or with the grid and a secondary coil feeding the X-ray tube and with a rectifier bridge situated in the primary circuit of the high-voltage transformer. The direct current branch of the rectifier bridge contains a filter capacitor and a thyristor which is opened and closed by means of a pulse duty factor determining the capacitor voltage and thus the voltage of the X-ray tube. An LC-tuned circuit is connected to the thyristor whose capacity is discharged to the conductive thyristor so that the thyristor is quenched via a free-wheel diode arranged in parallel to the thyristor. In this way, a high switching frequency of the thyristor and, consequently, a low ripple of the X-ray tube voltage is obtained.

  9. new possibilities in diagnostic radiology

    OpenAIRE

    Scheel, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) allows a non-invasive diffusion-based tissue characterization and thus offers completely new possibilities in the field of diagnostic radiology. On the one hand, this method allows an improved detection of pathological changes at the microstructural level, which are frequently not detectable in conventional MRI methods. On the other hand new strategies for therapy monitoring are feasible by quantification of diffusion parameters (e.g., Parallel, Radial and Mean ...

  10. Diagnostic radiology dosimetry: status and trends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivera M, T., E-mail: trivera@ipn.mx [IPN, Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Av. Legaria 694, 11500 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    Full text: Medical radiation is by far the largest man-made source of public exposure to ionizing radiation. Since 1970 the expression of protection standards shifted from a dose- to a risk-based approach, with dose limits established to yield risks to radiation workers comparable with those for workers in other safe industries. Another hand, worldwide interest in patient dose measurement was stimulated by the publication of Patient Dose Reduction in Diagnostic Radiology by the UK National Radiological Protection Board (NRPB). In response to heightened awareness of the importance of patient dose contributed by radiology procedures, there has been a general trend to effect control of patient doses by applying the principles of optimization coupled with an increase in regulatory enforcement. In this sense, thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) has been actively proposed in the last 3 decades thanks to their successful applications in diagnostic radiology. At the same time, it is emerged as the best radiation dosimetry method. The present work presents advantages of thermoluminescent dosimetry for X-ray beams measurements and its optimization. (Author)

  11. Diagnostic radiology dosimetry: status and trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivera M, T.

    2015-10-01

    Full text: Medical radiation is by far the largest man-made source of public exposure to ionizing radiation. Since 1970 the expression of protection standards shifted from a dose- to a risk-based approach, with dose limits established to yield risks to radiation workers comparable with those for workers in other safe industries. Another hand, worldwide interest in patient dose measurement was stimulated by the publication of Patient Dose Reduction in Diagnostic Radiology by the UK National Radiological Protection Board (NRPB). In response to heightened awareness of the importance of patient dose contributed by radiology procedures, there has been a general trend to effect control of patient doses by applying the principles of optimization coupled with an increase in regulatory enforcement. In this sense, thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) has been actively proposed in the last 3 decades thanks to their successful applications in diagnostic radiology. At the same time, it is emerged as the best radiation dosimetry method. The present work presents advantages of thermoluminescent dosimetry for X-ray beams measurements and its optimization. (Author)

  12. Radiological protection of patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niroomand-Rad, A.

    2003-01-01

    The benefits of ionizing radiation in the diagnosis and treatment of cancer, as well as other conditions such as cardiac ablation, are well established. However determination, monitoring, and evaluation of patient doses is not as easy task. Furthermore, radiation doses for individual patients may vary greatly from one radiological procedure to another. Attention is needed to reduce unnecessary radiation exposure to patients from All types of radiation producing machines and equipment. The patient risk from radiation injury-stochastic and/or deterministic must be weighted against the benefits of a proper medical examination or treatment as well as the risk of depriving the patient from the necessary medical care. Arbitrary reduction of radiological patient doses without regard to final outcome is determined to proper medical care provided to the patient. Sacrificing image quality in order to reduce patient dose is potentially harmful to the patient as well. Furthermore, the role of radiation exposure incurred from screening procedures such as mammography, needs to be properly considered and differentiated from medically indicated procedures. A known radiation induced risk needs to be balanced against diagnostic efficacy of a screening procedure. In these cases, regulations on standards and guidelines for determination, monitoring, and evaluation of patient doses may be appropriate. In this paper, the technical data collected in the United States have been compared with the corresponding data in Canada. However, even here, it has been recognized that we can not assume that one dose limit fits all. It is advisable to consider individual patient specifics if it means the difference between detection and miss

  13. Radiological protection report 2016

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-06-01

    In the radiological protection report 2016, the Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate (ENSI) provides an overview of the radiological protection in its area of supervision. Part A of the report deals with protecting the staff of nuclear power plants from the dangers of ionising radiation. It also includes a list of the personal doses accumulated by the staff, broken down using various parameters. Applying the optimisation imperative, it has been proved possible to significantly reduce the annual collective doses in Switzerland's nuclear power plants since they came on stream thanks to major efforts by the operators. In 2016, a total of 6,153 people measured accumulated 2,877 person-mSv. The collective doses have reached a low level corresponding to the radiological condition of the plants and the scope of the work required to be performed in controlled zones (e.g. non-destructive materials testing). ENSI will continue to follow the trend for collective doses and assess the reasons for local variances as well as for measures initiated. The individual doses for people employed in ENSI's area of supervision in 2016 showed a maximum figure of 10 mSv and a mean value of 0.5 mSv which was significantly below the dose limit of 20 mSv for occupational radiation exposure. The discharge of radioactive substances with the exhaust air and waste water from nuclear power plants are dealt with in Part B of the report. In 2016, nuclear power plant operators again met the admissible release limits set by the authorities, in some cases by a considerable margin. The emissions of Swiss nuclear power plants led to a dose of less than 0.01 mSv per year in the direct neighbourhood. A comparison with the average annual radiation dose for the Swiss population of 5.5 mSv shows that the relevant contribution from nuclear power plants lies in the area of one percent of this figure. Effluents from Swiss nuclear power plants were also below the target of 1 GBq per year set by ENSI

  14. Radiation Protection in Paediatric Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    dealing with the special problems involved. The approach adopted is developed within the IAEA framework of statutory responsibility to establish standards for the protection of people against exposure to ionizing radiation and to provide for the application of these standards. The BSS issued by the IAEA require the radiation protection of patients undergoing medical exposures through justification of the procedures involved and optimization of protection and safety. This challenge is taken up here by adding paediatric radiology to the areas dealt with in recent IAEA publications. These are specifically Safety Reports Series Nos 39 and 40 on diagnostic radiology and nuclear medicine, respectively, and Safety Reports Series Nos 58-61 and 63 on newer medical imaging techniques and other initiatives in justification of procedures and optimization of protection and safety. The advice of the IAEA is intended in particular for professionals, practitioners, and teachers and trainers in the area, as well as physicians referring children for examinations. Resource materials and training materials are available cost free on the IAEA's Radiation Protection of Patients web site (http://rpop.iaea.org).

  15. Radiological protection Program of CDTN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    Radiological protection program of CDTN, its purposes and rules, responsabilities, physical control, monitoring, personnel radiation protection, radiation sources and radioactive wastes control, emergency and accidents and siting are described. (C.M.) [pt

  16. Standards of diagnostic radiological safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yacovenco, A.; Ferreira, R.

    1996-01-01

    Brazil as well as many other countries are characterized for the access differentiated from the society to the products of the development. The lacking in specifications tolerance and mainly requirements of security and they of protection have induced to the inadequate utilization of the procedures technical and products in the area of radiology. We in this context are proposing a new mode of relationships between the diverse levels of intervention and responsibility

  17. Training on Radiological Protection in Peru

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medina Gironzini, E.

    2004-01-01

    Since they were created in 1973 and 1988 respectively, the Superior Center of Nuclear Studies (CSEN) of the Peruvian Institute of Nuclear Energy (IPEN), together with the Peruvian Radioprotection Society (SPR) have carried out different training courses on radiological protection so that people can work safely with ionizing radiations in medicine, industry and investigation. Additionally, radiological protection is taught to pre graduate students of Medical Technology in four Universities. These courses are a must since national regulations demand that people working with ionizing radiations have an authorization, which is granted by the Technical Office of the National Authority - the technical organ of IPEN - after the candidate demonstrates that he or she knows the specific use of the technique using radiations, as well as all aspects related to safety and radiological protection. The analysis of the radiological protection programs is presented in this document. These programs were carried out by CSEN, during the last 30 years, and by the SRP, and they allowed the training of more than 2200 and 1500 people in the country, respectively. The content of both courses is aimed at specific work with radiations (diagnostic radiology, dental radiology, nuclear medicine, radiotherapy, industrial radiography, nuclear gauges, gamma irradiator, etc..) and fulfill the regulatory requirements. The Universities have different programs on radiological protection for the students of Medical Technology. (Author)

  18. Health Risks of Diagnostic Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Oraby, M.N.A.

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiation during diagnostic radiologic procedures carries small but real risks. Children, young adults and pregnant women are especially vulnerable. Exposure of patients to diagnostic energy levels of ionizing radiation should be kept to the minimum necessary to provide useful clinical information and allay patients concerns about radiation-related risks. Computerized Tomography (CT) accounts for two thirds of the cumulative patient dose from diagnostic radiological procedures and the cumulative dose from CT is rising as technological advances increase the number of indications and the capabilities of CT. Carcinogenesis and teratogenesis are the main concerns with ionizing radiation. The risk increases as the radiation dose increases. There is no minimum threshold and the risk is cumulative: a dose of 1 mSv once a year for 10 years is equivalent to a single dose of 10 mSv. Whenever practical, choose an imaging test that uses less radiation or no radiation and lengthen the periods between follow-up imaging tests. Some patients may avoid screening mammography because of fear of radiation-induced cancer, yet this test uses a very small radiation dose (0.6 mSv, much less than the annual dose from background radiation, 3.6 mSv). (author)

  19. Gonad shielding in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1975-01-01

    The use of gonad shielding is an important radiation protection technique, intended to reduce unnecessary x-ray exposure of the gonads of patients from diagnostic x-ray procedures. The types of gonad shields in use are discussed as are the types of diagnostic examinations that should include gonad shielding. It was found that when properly used, most shields provided substantial gonad dose reductions

  20. Radiological protection in equine radiography and radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoxall, A.T.

    1977-10-01

    The principles of radiological protection are summarised and consideration is then given to problems, which may confront the equine practitioner, in the fulfillment of these principles during diagnostic radiography of the limbs, head, and spine of the horse. The place of anaesthesia in such procedures is discussed and the special problems associated with therapeutic radiography of the horse are considered.

  1. Radiation protection in the intervenmtional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, Benjamin V.; Lissek, Friedrich; Waldeck, Stephan

    2017-01-01

    Interventional radiology and neuroradiology covers a variety of diagnostic and therapeutic methods. A minimal invasive percutaneous access under imaging guidance is common for all these methods. The legal regulations for quality assurance are reviewed, technical possibilities for dose reduction and the importance of modern radiation protection procedures are discussed.

  2. Diagnostic errors in pediatric radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, George A.; Voss, Stephan D.; Melvin, Patrice R.; Graham, Dionne A.

    2011-01-01

    Little information is known about the frequency, types and causes of diagnostic errors in imaging children. Our goals were to describe the patterns and potential etiologies of diagnostic error in our subspecialty. We reviewed 265 cases with clinically significant diagnostic errors identified during a 10-year period. Errors were defined as a diagnosis that was delayed, wrong or missed; they were classified as perceptual, cognitive, system-related or unavoidable; and they were evaluated by imaging modality and level of training of the physician involved. We identified 484 specific errors in the 265 cases reviewed (mean:1.8 errors/case). Most discrepancies involved staff (45.5%). Two hundred fifty-eight individual cognitive errors were identified in 151 cases (mean = 1.7 errors/case). Of these, 83 cases (55%) had additional perceptual or system-related errors. One hundred sixty-five perceptual errors were identified in 165 cases. Of these, 68 cases (41%) also had cognitive or system-related errors. Fifty-four system-related errors were identified in 46 cases (mean = 1.2 errors/case) of which all were multi-factorial. Seven cases were unavoidable. Our study defines a taxonomy of diagnostic errors in a large academic pediatric radiology practice and suggests that most are multi-factorial in etiology. Further study is needed to define effective strategies for improvement. (orig.)

  3. Practical radiation protection of the patient in radiological diagnostics; Praktischer Strahlenschutz am Patienten in der radiologischen Diagnostik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiebich, M. [Technische Hochschule Mittelhessen, Institut fuer Medizinische Physik und Strahlenschutz, Giessen (Germany)

    2017-07-15

    The use of radiation protection equipment can reduce the radiation exposure of patients. The aim was to show which patient shields should be used for the different types of examination. The results of multiple studies were compiled and analyzed and recommendations made for the use of patient shields. The absolute dose values and the protective effect were considered. Radiological protection should be used in many investigations; particularly in the case of CT investigations, a reasonable dose reduction potential exists due to the higher radiation dose. Based on these recommendations, workflow changes in some types of investigation are expected due to the use of additional patient shields. (orig.) [German] Durch die Verwendung von Strahlenschutzmitteln kann die Strahlenexposition von Patienten reduziert werden. Es soll dargestellt werden, welche Strahlenschutzmittel bei welchen Untersuchungen eingesetzt werden sollen. Die Ergebnisse von Studien wurden zusammengestellt, analysiert und daraus Empfehlungen fuer die Anwendung von Strahlenschutzmitteln erstellt. Dabei wurden die absoluten Dosiswerte und die Schutzwirkung beruecksichtigt. Bei vielen Untersuchungen sind Strahlenschutzmittel anzuwenden, insbesondere bei CT-Untersuchungen besteht aufgrund der hoeheren Strahlendosis ein gutes Dosisreduktionspotenzial. Aufgrund der Empfehlungen ist bei einigen Untersuchungsarten mit veraenderten Arbeitsablaeufen aufgrund der Anwendung weiterer Strahlenschutzmittel zu rechnen. (orig.)

  4. First Central and Eastern European Workshop on Quality control, patient dosimetry and radiation protection in diagnostic and interventional radiology and nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    National Frederic Joliot-Curie Research Institute for Radiobiology and Radiohygiene

    2007-01-01

    First Central and Eastern European Workshop on Quality Control, Patient Dosimetry and Radiation Protection in Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, scientifically supported and accredited as a CPD event for medical physicists by EFOMP, National 'Frederic Joliot-Curie' Research Institute for Radiobiology and Radiohygiene (NRIRR), Budapest, Hungary, April 25-28, 2007. Topics of the meeting included all areas of medical radiation physics except radiation therapy. A unique possibility was realized by inviting four European manufacturers of quality control instrumentation, not only for exhibiting but they also had 45 minutes individual presentations about each manufacturer's product scale and conception. Further sessions dealt with dosimetry, optimization, quality control and testing, radiation protection and standardization, computed tomography and nuclear medicine, in 29 oral presentations and 1 poster of the participants. (S.I.)

  5. Guidance levels for diagnostic radiology in Romania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iacob, O.; Diaconescu, C.

    2002-01-01

    Over two decades surveys of radiological practice in Romania have demonstrated wide variations in patient dose levels between different hospitals. Local and national investigations revealed poor performances as well as of radiological equipment, darkroom procedure or technology of investigation. Hitherto, the annual collective effective dose to the population of Romania from diagnostic medical exposures attained a value of 13,820 manSv. Since the annual frequencies of radiological examinations remain unchanged over last ten years, this value is mostly attributed to the individual dose levels in different X-ray procedures. Notwithstanding the huge benefits to patients, the reduction of unnecessary exposures and individual doses are our principal concern and the establishment of national reference dose levels should solve this problem. British experience demonstrated that reference doses are a practical tool in this purpose and the adoption of national reference dose values indicated an overall improvement in patient exposure. Even the local of reference dose values proved a useful way to achieve patient dose reduction. In meantime the optimization of patient protection, each X-ray examination should be conducted with lowest necessary dose to achieve the clinical aim. This paper presents the first approach to establish local reference dose levels for some diagnostic examinations based on the measurements made in six (from the eighth of Eastern territory of Romania) districts, invited to cooperate in this end

  6. Clay as Thermoluminescence Dosemeter in diagnostic Radiology ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper reports the investigation of the basic thermoluminescence properties of clay at x-rays in the diagnostic radiology range, including dose monitoring in abdominal radiography. Clay sourced from Calabar, Nigeria, was tested for thermoluminescence response after irradiation at diagnostic radiology doses, including ...

  7. Radiological Protection Science and Application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janssens, Augustin; ); Mossman, Ken; Morgan, Bill

    2016-01-01

    Since the discovery of radiation at the end of the 19. century, the health effects of exposure to radiation have been studied more than almost any other factor with potential effects on human health. The NEA has long been involved in discussions on the effects of radiation exposure, releasing two reports in 1994 and 2007 on radiological protection science. This report is the third in this state-of-the-art series, examining recent advances in the understanding of radiation risks and effects, particularly at low doses. It focuses on radiobiology and epidemiology, and also addresses the social science aspects of stakeholder involvement in radiological protection decision making. The report summarises the status of, and issues arising from, the application of the International System of Radiological Protection to different types of prevailing circumstances. Reports published by the NEA Committee on Radiation Protection and Public Health (CRPPH) in 1998 and 2007 provided an overview of the scientific knowledge available at that time, as well as the expected results from further research. They also discussed the policy implications that these results could have for the radiological protection system. The 2007 report highlighted challenges posed by developments in relation to medical exposure and by intentions to include the environment (i.e. non-human species), within the scope of the radiological protection system. It also addressed the need to be able to respond to a radiological terrorist attack. This report picks up on where the 1998 and 2007 reports left off, and addresses the state of the art in radiological prevention science and application today. It is divided into five chapters. Firstly, following broadly the structural topics from the 1998 and 2007 reports, the more purely scientific aspects of radiological protection are presented. These include cancer risk of low dose and dose rates, non-cancer effects and individual sensitivity. In view of the increasing

  8. Radiological protective screen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flaugnatti, R.B.

    1976-01-01

    A radiological screen for placing on a patient's skin is discussed, comprising a flat jacket containing a fine particulate filler and a settable resin binder, the fine particulate filler being of a material which absorbs medical radiation, and the jacket including a window to transmit such radiation through the flat jacket. 16 claims, 4 drawing figures

  9. Quality Control in Diagnostic Radiology in the Netherlands (invited paper)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoetelief, J.

    1998-01-01

    Application of the general principles of radiation protection to medical diagnostic radiology implies that each procedure using X rays or radionuclides is to be justified and optimised. Optimisation in diagnostic radiology implies that the radiation burden to the patient should be as low as possible, but compatible with the image quality necessary to obtain an adequate diagnosis or to guide treatment. Quality control of equipment is a prerequisite for achieving optimisation in diagnostic radiology. This was especially recognised for mammography as employed for breast cancer screening. Existing legislation in the Netherlands includes only a few criteria for equipment used in diagnostic radiology. In addition, the criteria are not all operational and measurement methods are lacking. Therefore, upon the initiative of the Dutch Ministry of Health, Welfare and Sports, the relevant professional societies, in collaboration with the former TNO Centre for Radiological Protection and Dosimetry, formulated eleven guidelines for quality control of equipment used in diagnostic radiology, including test procedures, test frequencies and limiting values. The implementation of quality control of equipment was included in the 1984 European Directive (84/466/Euratom) laying down basic measures for the radiation protection of persons undergoing medical examination or treatment. In the most recent European Directive on medical exposure (97/43/Euratom) the importance of quality control is stressed. In addition, the latter EC directive proposes the use of diagnostic reference levels for limiting the risks for patients undergoing diagnostic radiology. In the Netherlands preliminary reference levels for various procedures employed in diagnostic radiology are suggested. Finally, methods applied in the Netherlands for assessment of image quality are discussed. (author)

  10. Establishing diagnostic reference levels in digital radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bana, Remy Wilson

    2016-04-01

    Medical application of radiation has gained wider study since diagnostic radiology plays a very important role in modern medicine. The need of the service seems to increase since the invention of digital radiology as a new technology that promises greater accuracy while minimizing patient dose. However, it is not exempted in the harmonization of doses delivered to the patient undergoing same radiologic examination in different institutions either regional or nationwide. The objective of this project was to review the establishment of Diagnostic Reference Levels (DRLs) in digital radiology at National level with the aim to reduce patient dose while maintaining appropriate image quality. A general discussion on digital radiology has been presented focusing on the optimization of patient dose as well as dosimetric quantities used for the establishment of DRLs. Recommendations have been provided for Rwanda to initiate steps to establish National Diagnostic Reference Levels for common procedures in digital radiology. (au)

  11. Radiologic protection in pediatric radiology: ICRP recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, Ramon; Khong, Pek-Lan; Ringertz, Hans

    2013-01-01

    ICRP has provided an updated overview of radiation protection principles in pediatric radiology. The authors recommend that staff, radiologists, medical physicists and vendors involved in pediatric radiology read this document. For conventional radiography, the report gives advice on patient positioning, immobilization, shielding and appropriate exposure conditions. It describes extensively the use of pulsed fluoroscopy, the importance of limiting fluoroscopy time, and how shielding and geometry must be used to avoid unnecessary radiation to the patient and operator. Furthermore, the use of fluoroscopy in interventional procedures with emphasis on dose reduction to patients and staff is discussed in light of the increasing frequency, complexity and length ofthe procedures. CT is the main reason that medical imaging in several developed countries is the highest annual per capita effective radiation dose from man-made sources. The ICRP report gives extensive descriptions of how CT protocols can be optimized to minimize radiation exposure in pediatric patients. The importance of balancing image quality with acceptable noise in pediatric imaging and the controversies regarding the use of protective shielding in CT are also discussed.

  12. Introduction of radiological protection; Pengenalan kepada perlindungan radiologi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1988-12-31

    The chapter briefly discussed the following subjects: basic principles of radiological protection , dose limit which was suggested, stochastic and nonstochastic effects, equivalent dose and alternative of it`s calculation, limit for the publics, ICRP (International Commission for Radiological Protection) recommendations, and the principles of radiological protection. Dangerous radiation sources also briefly summarized i.e. x-ray generators, reactor nucleus.

  13. Digital imaging in diagnostic radiology. Image quality - radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, T.; Stieve, F.E.

    1996-01-01

    The publication contains the 37 lectures of the symposium on digital imaging in diagnostic radiology, held in November 1995 at Kloster Seeon, as well as contributions enhancing the information presented in the lectures. The publication reflects the state of the art in this subject field, discusses future trends and gives recommendations and information relating to current practice in radiology. In-depth information is given about R and D activities for the digitalisation of X-ray pictures and the image quality required to meet the purposes of modern diagnostics. Further aspects encompass radiological protection and dose optimization as well as optimization of examination methods. (vhe) [de

  14. [Radiation protection in interventional radiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamus, R; Loose, R; Wucherer, M; Uder, M; Galster, M

    2016-03-01

    The application of ionizing radiation in medicine seems to be a safe procedure for patients as well as for occupational exposition to personnel. The developments in interventional radiology with fluoroscopy and dose-intensive interventions require intensified radiation protection. It is recommended that all available tools should be used for this purpose. Besides the options for instruments, x‑ray protection at the intervention table must be intensively practiced with lead aprons and mounted lead glass. A special focus on eye protection to prevent cataracts is also recommended. The development of cataracts might no longer be deterministic, as confirmed by new data; therefore, the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has lowered the threshold dose value for eyes from 150 mSv/year to 20 mSv/year. Measurements show that the new values can be achieved by applying all X‑ray protection measures plus lead-containing eyeglasses.

  15. Digital imaging in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newell, J.D. Jr.; Kelsey, C.A.

    1990-01-01

    This monograph on digital imaging provides a basic overview of this field at the present time. This paper covers clinical application, including subtraction angiography; chest radiology; genitourinary, gastrointestinal, and breast radiology; and teleradiology. The chest section also includes an explanation of multiple beam equalization radiography. The remaining chapters discuss some of the technical aspects of digital radiology. It includes the basic technology of digital radiography, image compression, and reconstruction information on the economics of digital radiography

  16. Radiological diagnostics of muscle diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, M.A.; Essig, M.; Kauczor, H.U.

    2007-01-01

    Muscular diseases are a heterogeneous group of diseases with difficult differential diagnosis. This article reviews morphological and functional radiological techniques for assessment of muscular diseases. Morphological techniques can describe edema-like changes, lipomatous and atrophic changes of muscular tissue. However, these imaging signs are often not disease-specific. As a result, clinicians assign radiology a secondary role in the management of muscular diseases. Meanwhile, functional radiological techniques allow the assessment of muscle fiber architecture, skeletal muscle perfusion, myocellular sodium-homoeostasis, lipid- and energy-phosphate metabolism, etc. By detecting and spatially localizing pathophysiological phenomena, these new techniques can increase the role of radiology in muscular diseases. (orig.)

  17. Diagnostic radiology in the nearest future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindenbraten, L.D.

    1984-01-01

    Basic trends of diagnostic radiology (DR) development in the nearest future are formulated. Possibilities of perspective ways and means of DR studies are described. The prohlems of strategy, tactics, organization of diagnostic radiological service are considered. An attempt has been made to outline the professional image of a specialist in the DR of the future. It is shown that prediction of the DR future development is the planning stage of the present, the choice of a right way of development

  18. Basic principles of radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pina, Jorge Luiz Soares de; Fajardo, Patricia Wieland.

    1984-07-01

    The fundamentals of radiological protection are presented. The interaction of radiation with matter and with living systems as well as radioprotection procedures and units are described. 6 refs., 7 figs., 9 tabs of radioactive wastes from nuclear medicine in Brazil are presented. 7 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  19. Dosimetric studies in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamadain, K. E. M.

    2004-04-01

    A dosimetric study in pediatric radiology and adult patients was currently being carried out at the pediatrics units of two large hospitals in Rio de Janeiro city: IPPMG (Instituto de Pediatric e Puericultura Martagao Gesteira, University hospital of federal University of Rio de Janeiro), IFF (Instituto Fernandes Figueira, FIOCRUZ) and Hospital Geral de Bonsucesso, a large public hospital in Rio de Janeiro city (HGB) Brazil. The dosimetric study was also performed at three pediatrics units in Sudan, namely, Ahmed Gasim, Khartoum and Omdurman hospitals. For chest x-ray examination the entrance skin dose(ESD) for AP, PA and LAT projections of pediatric patients, and the scattered dose at the thyroid, ovary and gonads have been obtained with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) and with use of a software package Dosecal in thr Brazilian hospitals, and with the software dosecal in the Sudanese hospitals.The aim of this work was to estimate the entrance skin dose (ESD), the effective dose (ED) and the body organ dose (BOD) for chest x-ray exposure in pediatric patients, and different exams for adults patients, and to compare the results obtained in the tow Countries Sudan and Brazil with the reference dose level. For ESD evaluation of the chest x-ray, three different TL dosimeters have been used, namely LiF: Mg, Ti (TLD 100) CaSo 4 : Dy and LiF:Mg, Cu,P (TLD 100 H). The age intervals considered were: 0-1 years, 1-5 years, 5-10 years and 10-15 years. The results obtained with all dosimeters were in good agreement with, those obtained by the dosecal software, especially for AP and PA projection. However, some discrepancies were found for the LAT projection. The results within Brazil were some what consistent while in Sudan, large difference were observed, it was also noted that the doses in Brazil hospitals were less than the reference dose levels while in Sudanese hospitals the doses were higher than the reference dose levels. For adult patients only the software dosecal

  20. Radiation protection of patients in diagnostic radiology: implementation of a management system optimization; Proteccion radiologica de pacientes en radiodiagnostico: implantacion de un sistema de gestion de la optimizacion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corpas Rivera, L.; Devesa Pardo, F. J.; Gamez Jimenez, J. L.; Vallejo Carrascal, C.; Garcia de Diego, A. A.; Amador Vela-Hidalgo, J. J.

    2011-07-01

    The enforcement of quality in diagnostic radiology (Royal Decree 1976/1999 laying down the criteria for quality in diagnostic radiology and Royal Decree 815/2001 to justify the use of ionizing radiations for medical exposure, etc.) and recommendations and European regulations on the matter, is done by carrying out the optimization of the doses received, based on image quality in a continuous process of monitoring of such dose from the dose reference Values ??(VRD ) that the system has allowed to establish for each technique.

  1. Radiologic science for technologists: physics, biology, and protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bushong, S.C.

    1980-01-01

    The second edition of a textbook primarily for students in radiologic technology is presented. Separate chapters discuss mammography, computed tomography, diagnostic ultrasound, and design of radiologic physics. Radiation protection is specifically presented in two chapters as well as being integrated throughout the text. The fundamentals of radiobiology, molecular and cellular effects of irradiation, and early and late radiation effects comprise four chapters

  2. Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sykora, A.

    2006-01-01

    In this text-book basic knowledge about radiology, biomedical diagnostic methods (radiography, computer tomography), nuclear medicine and safety and radiation protection of personnel on the radiodiagnostic place of work are presented

  3. Spectrum of diagnostic errors in radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Antonio; Brunese, Luca

    2010-10-28

    Diagnostic errors are important in all branches of medicine because they are an indication of poor patient care. Since the early 1970s, physicians have been subjected to an increasing number of medical malpractice claims. Radiology is one of the specialties most liable to claims of medical negligence. Most often, a plaintiff's complaint against a radiologist will focus on a failure to diagnose. The etiology of radiological error is multi-factorial. Errors fall into recurrent patterns. Errors arise from poor technique, failures of perception, lack of knowledge and misjudgments. The work of diagnostic radiology consists of the complete detection of all abnormalities in an imaging examination and their accurate diagnosis. Every radiologist should understand the sources of error in diagnostic radiology as well as the elements of negligence that form the basis of malpractice litigation. Error traps need to be uncovered and highlighted, in order to prevent repetition of the same mistakes. This article focuses on the spectrum of diagnostic errors in radiology, including a classification of the errors, and stresses the malpractice issues in mammography, chest radiology and obstetric sonography. Missed fractures in emergency and communication issues between radiologists and physicians are also discussed.

  4. Ethical values in radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oughton, D.H.

    1996-01-01

    Issues like consent, equity, control and responsibility are important for an ethical evaluation of radiation risks. This paper discusses the incorporation of ethical values in radiological protection policy and compares how ICRP recommendations promote their use in practice and intervention cases. The paper contends that in cases of intervention, where the overall aim is dose reduction, social and ethical factors are often alluded to when evaluating costs of an action. However, possible ethical or social benefits of intervention measures are seldom raised. On the other hand, when assessing a practice, wherein the net effect is an increase in radiation dose, one is more likely to find an appeal to ethical factors on the benefits side of the equation than with the costs. The paper concludes that all decisions concerning radiological protection should consider both positive and negative ethical aspects. (author)

  5. Fifty years of radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    On 21 March 1957, the Steering Committee for Nuclear Energy of the Organisation for European Economic Co-operation established the Working Party on Public Health and Safety. From this early date onwards, radiological protection formed a central part of the work of what was to become the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency. Now, 50 years later, the Committee on Radiation Protection and Public Health (CRPPH) has commissioned this historical review of half a century of work and accomplishments. Over this period, the key topics in radiological protection have been identified, debated and addressed by the CRPPH. This report brings this history to life, presenting the major questions in the context of their time, and of the personalities who worked to address them. The developments and views of the past condition how we are able to assess and manage radiological risks today, as well as how we may adjust to challenges that will or could emerge in the coming years. This heritage is thus an important element for the CRPPH to consider as it looks forward to its next 50 years of accomplishments. (author)

  6. Radiological protection and environmental management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez Fonseca, A.

    2010-01-01

    From the beginning of its industrial activity twenty five years ago, the Juzbado Factory of Enusa Group has always upheld a strong commitment with Radiological Protection and environmental respect and protection. Consequently, the evolution of dose shows a downward trend over the years. Although production has been increased gradually, the average doses to workers have stayed below 1 mSv. In order to identify and prevent the potential environmental impacts of its industrial activity and minimize its impact on the surroundings, the facility develops and environmental management system according to UNE-EN-ISO 14001 since 1999. (Author)

  7. Spectrum of diagnostic errors in radiology

    OpenAIRE

    Pinto, Antonio; Brunese, Luca

    2010-01-01

    Diagnostic errors are important in all branches of medicine because they are an indication of poor patient care. Since the early 1970s, physicians have been subjected to an increasing number of medical malpractice claims. Radiology is one of the specialties most liable to claims of medical negligence. Most often, a plaintiff’s complaint against a radiologist will focus on a failure to diagnose. The etiology of radiological error is multi-factorial. Errors fall into recurrent patterns. Errors ...

  8. Paediatric doses from diagnostic radiology in Victoria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boal, T.J.; Cardillo, I.; Einsiedel, P.F.

    1998-01-01

    This study examines doses to paediatric patients from diagnostic radiology. Measurements were made at 29 hospitals and private radiology practices in the state of Victoria. Entrance skin doses in air were measured for the exposure factors used by hospital radiology departments and private radiology practices for a standard size 1, 5, 10 and 15 year old child, for the following procedures: chest AP/PA, lat; abdomen AP; pelvis AP; lumbar spine AP, lat; and skull AP, lat. There was a large range of doses for each particular procedure and age group. Factors contributing to the range of doses were identified. Guidance levels for paediatric radiology based on the third quartile value of the skin entrance doses have been recommended and are compared with guidance levels. Copyright (1998) Australasian Physical and Engineering Sciences in Medicine

  9. Evaluation of personal protective devices used in diagnostic radiology; Avaliacao de dispositivos de protecao individual utilizados em radiologia diagnostica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soares, Fernanda Cristina Salvador

    2006-07-01

    In this work protective devices of five manufacturers were evaluated according to the NBR/IEC 61331-1 and NBR/IEC 61331-3 standards. Three different methodologies (linear interpolation, Archer model and sum of exponentials) were applied for the determination of the attenuation equivalent, since the standard does not indicate how it must be determined. Moreover, the uncertainties associated to each method, and the influence of the number of measurements in the combined uncertainty were estimated. The evaluated manufacture characteristics were: accompanying document, design, materials, dimensions and label marking. For this evaluation a check list about the requirements of the NBR/IEC 61331-3 standard was elaborated. The results showed a great difference between nominal and measured attenuation equivalent values. The comparison of the results using the three methodologies showed small variations among the obtained values and among the associated uncertainties in the different methodologies. It was possible to observe that the number of measurements does not contribute significantly for the increase of the uncertainty in all three methodologies. The best methodology for the laboratory routine is the linear interpolation methodology, with five measurements for each air kerma rate value. The discrepancy between the results obtained in this work and the requirements of the applied standards show the need to adopt a compulsory certification process for protective devices, thus contributing for the increase of the radiation protection of the users. (author)

  10. Total quality management (TQM) in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehani, M.M.

    1995-01-01

    The branch of quality assurance is now taking a new direction towards total quality management (TQM). Being of industrial origin, the concepts and terminologies in TQM are alien to medical and paramedical professionals. However, the impetus it has already made in other areas of health sciences makes medical physicists left out when diagnostic radiology does not encompass TQM. The purpose of this paper is to introduce the terms used in TQM and some aspects of its application to diagnostic radiology. (author). 12 refs., 1 tab

  11. The year book of diagnostic radiology 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitehouse, W.M.; Adams, D.F.; Bookstein, J.J.; Gabrielsen, T.O.; Holt, J.F.; Martel, W.; Silver, T.M.; Thornbury, J.R.

    1981-01-01

    The 1981 edition of the Year Book of Diagnostic Radiology fulfills the standards of excellence established by previous volumes in this series. The abstracts were carefully chosen, are concise, and are well illustrated. The book is recommended for all practicing radiologists: for the resident it is a good source from which to select articles to be carefully studied, and as review source before board examinations; for the subspecialist it provides a means to maintain contact with all areas of diagnostic radiology; and for the general radiologist, it is a convenient and reliable guide to new developments in the specialty

  12. Science and Values in Radiological Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lochard, J.; Eggermont, G.; Britt-Marie, Drottz Sjoberg; Tirmarche, M.; Geard, Ch.R.; Atkinson, M.; Murith, Ch.; Grant, K.G.; Luccioni, C.; Mays, C.; Sisko, Salomaa; Kelly, N.G.; Oughton, D.; Shannoun, F.; Grant, K.G.; Cooper, J.; Mays, C.; Weiss, V.; Oughton, D.; Kazuo, Sakai; Carroll, S.

    2010-01-01

    Ohno). Session 2: Societal values and regulatory aspects: views from different perspective. Presentations: Radiation protection: societal impacts (Jill Sutcliffe); The problems of regulation of natural and medical exposures (Karla Petrova); World Nuclear Association (WNA) - WNA's views on bridging science and values in radiological protection (Sylvain Saint-Pierre). Session 3: Summary reports of Break-out sessions. Presentations: Management of radon exposure (Kazuo Sakai); Medical exposures in diagnostic and screening procedures (C. Luccioni, J. Cooper, C. Mays); Radiation-induced vascular effects. Evening session 2: Stakeholder platform opportunity. Presentation: Engaging with differing perspectives (Simon Carroll). Continuing discussions started during the Evening session 1 with focus on different aspects of NGO and society perceptions of the radiological protection regulatory framework, ways of communicating about novel scientific phenomena, and differing perceptions about the need for and effectiveness of regulatory actions, etc. Discussion is intended to be linked to introductory talk in Session 1 on Civil Society Needs. Presentation: Revitalizing radiation protection ethics (Abel Gonzales). Session 4: Plenary panel discussion on topical issues from Break-out sessions - exchange of views. Presentation: 'What if' to 'what now' (Claire Cousins). This session, arranged as a plenary panel discussion, synthesizes the main recommendations of the workshop and also provides an open platform for exchange of views. Audience members have the opportunity here to discuss openly radiation protection principles, regulatory approaches and perspectives in the context of emerging and identified scientific phenomena. (J.S.)

  13. Pediatric radiological diagnostics in suspected child abuse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erfurt, C.; Schmidt, U.; Hahn, G.; Roesner, D.

    2009-01-01

    Advanced and specialized radiological diagnostics are essential in the case of clinical suspicion of pediatric injuries to the head, thorax, abdomen, and extremities when there is no case history or when ''battered child syndrome'' is assumed on the basis of inadequate trauma. In particular, the aim of this sophisticated diagnostic procedure is the detection of lesions of the central nervous system (CNS) in order to initiate prompt medical treatment. If diagnostic imaging shows typical findings of child abuse, accurate documented evidence of the diagnostic results is required to prevent further endangerment of the child's welfare. (orig.) [de

  14. Radiological protection of the worker in medicine and dentistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    The first three sections of this report concern general understanding of radiation protection, basic concepts for all workers, and practical problems common to all users of radiation in medicine and dentistry. The remaining sections cover specialist topics covering practical aspects in diagnostic radiology, dental radiography, the use of unsealed radionuclides (in the laboratory, diagnostic and therapeutic uses) balneotherapy, brachytherapy and external beam radiotherapy. (author)

  15. Radiological protection of the worker in medicine and dentistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-01-01

    The first three sections of this report concern general understanding of radiation protection, basic concepts for all workers, and practical problems common to all users of radiation in medicine and dentistry. The remaining sections cover specialist topics covering practical aspects in diagnostic radiology, dental radiography, the use of unsealed radionuclides (in the laboratory, diagnostic and therapeutic uses) balneotherapy, brachytherapy and external beam radiotherapy. (author).

  16. Radiological protection in veterinary practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konishi, Emiko; Tabara, Takashi; Kusama, Tomoko.

    1990-01-01

    To propose measures for radiological protection of veterinary workers in Japan, X-ray exposure of workers in typical conditions in veterinary clinics was assessed. Dose rates of useful beam and scattered radiation, worker exposure doses at different stations, and effectiveness of protective clothing were determined using TLD and ion chambers. As precausions against radiation, the following practices are important: (1) use of suitable and properly maintained X-ray equipment, (2) proper selection of safe working stations, (3) use of protective clothing. Regulations are necessary to restrict the use of X-rays in the veterinary field. Because the use of X-rays in the veterinary field is not currently controlled by law, the above precautions are essential for minimizing exposure of veterinary staff. (author)

  17. Radiologic protection: technical and legal aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinto, A.V.A.

    1987-01-01

    Radiologic units are described with the aim to decodify the technical dosimetric language. The legal aspect of radiologic protection in Brazil is reported. Information about help in case of radiation accident is presented. (M.A.C.) [pt

  18. Fetal exposure in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, M.L.; Vandergrift, J.F.; Dalrymple, G.V.

    1979-01-01

    The problem of possible radiation damage to the fetus or embryo as a result of diagnostic radiography during pregnancy, particularly in the early stages, is discussed. Recommendations of therapeutic abortion after fetal exposure require an adequate knowledge of the doses involved. In the absence of actual dose measurements or estimates, approximate exposure levels may be determined from the literature. A summary of published values for radiography involving the lower abdomen is given. Data is also presented from a series of fetal exposures resulting mostly from routine diagnostic radiography when pregnancy was not known at the time but was established later. Results of actual dose measurements using a phantom and of dose calculations based on published values are in reasonable agreement indicating that literature values of dose provide a satisfactory alternative to measurement. These data suggest that diagnostic radiography rarely, if ever, results in fetal exposures high enough to justify therapeutic abortion. (author)

  19. Training for Radiation Protection in Interventional Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartal, G.; Sapoval, M.; Ben-Shlomo, A.

    1999-01-01

    Program in radiological equipment has incorporated more powerful x-ray sources into the standard Fluoroscopy and CT systems. Expanding use of interventional procedures carries extensive use of fluoroscopy and CT which are both associated with excessive radiation exposure to the patient and personnel. During cases of Intravenous CT Angiography and direct Intraarterial CT Angiography, one may substitute a substantial number of diagnostic angiography checks. Basic training in interventional radiology hardly includes some of the fundamentals of radiation protection. Radiation Protection in Interventional Radiology must be implemented in daily practice and become an integral part of procedure planning strategy in each and every case. Interventional radiological most master all modern imaging modalities in order to choose the most effective, but least hazardous one. In addition, one must be able to use various imaging techniques (Fluoroscopy, CTA, MM and US) as a stand-alone method, as well as combine two techniques or more. Training programs for fellows: K-based simulation of procedures and radiation protection. Special attention should be taken in the training institutions and a basic training in radiation protection is advised before the trainee is involved in the practical work. Amendment of techniques for balloon and stent deployment with minimal use of fluoroscopy. Attention to the differences between radiation protection in cardiovascular and nonvascular radiology with special measures that must be taken for each one of them (i.e., peripheral angiography vs. stenting, Endo luminal Aortic Stent Graft, or nonvascular procedures such as biliary or endo urological stenting or biliary intervention). A special emphasis should be put on the training techniques of Interventional Radiologists, both beginners and experienced. Patient dose monitoring by maintaining records of fluoroscopic time is better with non-reset timer, but is optional. Lee of automated systems that

  20. The european approach to quality assurance in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benini, A.

    1997-01-01

    The european and increasingly the international organizations are emphasizing the importance of appropriate quality assurance programmes in diagnostic radiology. The European Directive (particularly the directive 84/466/EURATOM). the various publications of the International Commission for radiation protection (ICRP), related to protection of the patients and workers and the Basic Safety Standards of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) might be considered the landmarks of the new approach to the problems of dose reduction and quality in diagnostic radiology. In particular ICRP maintains a watching brief on all aspects related to radiation protection and makes recommendations concerning basic principles. Since ICRP 26 (1977), several ICRP publications have dealt with all the principal fields of diagnostic radiology. The IAEA has recently published the new Basic Safety Standards including guidance levels for the most common diagnostic investigations.Within the European countries the European Union and the European legislation have strong influence of the implementation of radiation protection and Q A at a national level. This has led to a substantial effort in the european countries to establish national standards and basic quality requirements. (author)

  1. Dosimetry in Diagnostic Radiology for Paediatric Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    Concern about the radiation dose to children from diagnostic radiology examinations has recently been popularly expressed, particularly as related to computed tomography (CT) procedures. This involves the observation that children can receive doses far in excess of those delivered to adults, in part due to the digital nature of the image receptors that may give no warning to the operator of the dose to the patient. Concern for CT examinations should be extended to the broad range of paediatric diagnostic radiological procedures responsible for radiation doses in children, especially as factors, such as increased radiosensitivity and the longer life expectancy of children, increase the associated radiation risk. In all cases, owing to the added paediatric radiological examination factor of patient size and its associated impact on equipment selection, clinical examination protocol and dosimetric audit, the determination of paediatric dose requires a distinct approach from adult dosimetry associated with diagnostic radiological examinations. In response to this, there is a need to inform health professionals about standardized methodologies used to determine paediatric dose for all major modalities such as general radiography, fluoroscopy and CT. Methodologies for standardizing the conduct of dose audits and their use for the derivation and application of diagnostic reference levels for patient populations, that vary in size, are also required. In addition, a review is needed of the current knowledge on risks specific to non-adults from radiation, and also an analysis of the management of factors contributing to dose from paediatric radiological examinations. In 2007, the IAEA published a code of practice, Dosimetry in Diagnostic Radiology: An International Code of Practice, as Technical Reports Series No. 457 (TRS 457). TRS 457 recommends procedures for dosimetric measurement and calibration for the attainment of standardized dosimetry, and addresses requirements

  2. Diagnostic radiology in paediatric palliative care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, Preena; Koh, Michelle; Carr, Lucinda; McHugh, Kieran

    2014-01-01

    Palliative care is an expanding specialty within paediatrics, which has attracted little attention in the paediatric radiological literature. Paediatric patients under a palliative care team will have numerous radiological tests which we traditionally categorise under organ systems rather than under the umbrella of palliative medicine. The prevalence of children with life-limiting illness is significant. It has been estimated to be one per thousand, and this may be an underestimate. In this review, we will focus on our experience at one institution, where radiology has proven to be an invaluable partner to palliative care. We will discuss examples of conditions commonly referred to our palliative care team and delineate the crucial role of diagnostic radiology in determining treatment options. (orig.)

  3. Diagnostic radiology in paediatric palliative care

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, Preena; Koh, Michelle; Carr, Lucinda; McHugh, Kieran [Great Ormond Street Hospital, Radiology Department, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-01-15

    Palliative care is an expanding specialty within paediatrics, which has attracted little attention in the paediatric radiological literature. Paediatric patients under a palliative care team will have numerous radiological tests which we traditionally categorise under organ systems rather than under the umbrella of palliative medicine. The prevalence of children with life-limiting illness is significant. It has been estimated to be one per thousand, and this may be an underestimate. In this review, we will focus on our experience at one institution, where radiology has proven to be an invaluable partner to palliative care. We will discuss examples of conditions commonly referred to our palliative care team and delineate the crucial role of diagnostic radiology in determining treatment options. (orig.)

  4. Advance of the National Program of Radiological Protection and Safety for medical diagnostic with X-rays; Avance del Programa Nacional de Proteccion y Seguridad Radiologica para diagnostico medico con rayos X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verdejo S, M. [Direccion de Riesgos Radiologicos, Direccion General de Salud Ambiental (Mexico)

    1999-07-01

    The National Program of Radiological Protection and Safety for medical diagnostic with X-ray (Programa Nacional de Proteccion y Seguridad Radiologica para diagnostico medico con rayos X) was initiated in the General Direction of Environmental Health (Direccion General de Salud Ambiental) in 1995. Task coordinated with different dependences of the Public Sector in collaboration between the Secretary of Health (Secretaria de Salud), the National Commission of Nuclear Safety and Safeguards (Comision Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear y Salvaguardias) and, the National Institute of Nuclear Research (Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares). The surveillance to the fulfilment of the standardization in matter of Radiological Protection and Safety in the medical diagnostic with X-rays has been obtained for an important advance in the Public sector and it has been arousing interest in the Private sector. (Author)

  5. Factors affecting patient dose in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poletti, J.L.

    1994-03-01

    The report, Factors Affecting Patient Dose in Diagnostic Radiology is divided into three main sections. Part one is introductory and covers the basic principles of x-ray production and image formation. It includes discussion of x-ray generators and x-ray tubes, radiation properties and units, specification and measurement of x-ray beams, methods of patient dose measurement, radiation effects, radiation protection philosophy and finally the essentials of imaging systems. Part two examines factors affecting the x-ray output of x-ray machines and the characteristics of x-ray beams. These include the influence of heat ratings, kVp, waveform, exposure timer, filtration, focus-film distance, beam intensity distribution, x-ray tube age and focal spot size. Part three examines x-ray machine, equipment and patient factors which affect the dose received by individual patients. The factors considered include justification of examinations, choice of examination method, film/screen combinations, kVp, mAs, focus-film distance, collimation and field size, exposure time, projection, scatter, generator calibration errors, waveform, filtration, film processing and patient size. The patient dose implications of fluoroscopy systems, CT scanners, special procedures and mammography are also discussed. The report concludes with a brief discussion of patient dose levels in New Zealand and dose optimisation. 104 refs., 32 figs., 27 tabs

  6. Metrology of radiation doses in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leclet, H.

    2016-01-01

    This article recalls how to calculate effective and equivalent doses in radiology from the measured value of the absorbed dose. The 97/43 EURATOM directive defines irradiation standards for diagnostic radiology (NRD) as the value of the radiation dose received by the patient's skin when the diagnostic exam is performed. NRD values are standard values that can be exceeded only with right medical or technical reasons, they are neither limit values nor optimized values. The purpose of NRD values is to avoid the over-irradiation of patients and to homogenize radiologists' practices. French laws impose how and when radiologists have to calculate the radiation dose received by the patient's skin. The calculated values have to be compared with NRD values and any difference has to be justified. A table gives NRD values for all diagnostic exams. (A.C.)

  7. [Radiological diagnostics in CUP syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazmierczak, P M; Nikolaou, K; Rominger, A; Graser, A; Reiser, M F; Cyran, C C

    2014-02-01

    Imaging plays an essential role in the therapeutic management of cancer of unknown primary (CUP) patients for localizing the primary tumor, for the identification of tumor entities for which a dedicated therapy regimen is available and for the characterization of clinicopathological subentities that direct the subsequent diagnostic and therapeutic strategy. Modalities include conventional x-ray, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasound as well as positron emission tomography (PET)-CT and MRI-PET. In whole body imaging CT has a high sensitivity for tumor entities which frequently present as a metastasized cancer illness. According to the current literature CT is diagnostic in 86% of patients with pancreatic carcinoma, in 36% of patients with colon carcinoma and in 74% of patients with lung carcinoma. Additionally a meta-analysis showed that for patients with squamous cell carcinoma and cervical lymph node metastases a positive diagnosis was possible in 22% of the cases using CT, in 36% using MRI and in 28-57% using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose PET-CT ((18)F-FDG PET-CT). In addition, MRI plays an important role in the localization of primary occult tumors (e.g. breast and prostate) because of its high soft tissue contrast and options for functional imaging. At the beginning of the diagnostic algorithm stands the search for a possible primary tumor and CT of the neck, thorax and abdomen is most frequently used for whole body staging. Subsequent organ-specific imaging examinations follow, e.g. mammography in women with axillary lymphadenopathy. For histological and immunohistochemical characterization of tumor tissue, imaging is also applied to identify the most accessible and representative tumor manifestation for biopsy. Tumor biopsy may be guided by CT, MRI or ultrasound and MRI also plays a central role in the localization of primary occult tumors because of superior soft tissue contrast and options for functional imaging (perfusion

  8. Training in radiological protection: Curricula and programming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1964-01-01

    An important activity of the International Atomic Energy Agency is the promotion of training in radiological protection. Through its organized training courses, its fellowship training programme and its field experts, the Agency has assisted many Member States to train an essential group of scientists in radiological protection. Many Member States are now developing their own national training programmes in radiological protection and this report has been prepared to provide the guidance that may be required in this development. In the report the various types of training which are encountered in a radiological protection programme are fully discussed, curricula are suggested and examples of established training courses are annexed

  9. The future policy for radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The international system of radiological protection is currently being revised with the aim of making it more coherent and concise. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has published its draft reflections on the system's evolution, and has opened discussions with the radiological protection community in order to seek a broad range of stakeholder input. This open dialogue will help bring about a common level of understanding of the issues at stake and contribute to the evolution of new ICRP recommendations. These proceedings present a significant block of stakeholder input, comprising the views of policy makers, regulators, radiological protection professionals, industry and representatives of both non-governmental and intergovernmental organisations. (author)

  10. Nordic Guidance Levels for Patient Doses in Diagnostic Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saxebol, G.; Olerud, H.M.; Hjardemaal, O.; Leitz, W.; Servomaa, A.; Walderhaug, T.

    1998-01-01

    Within the framework of Nordic authoritative cooperation in radiation protection and nuclear safety, recommendations have been prepared dealing with dose constraints in diagnostic radiology. A working group with participants from all the Nordic countries has met and discussed possible implementations of the ICRP dose constraint for medical radiology. Dose constraints, expressed as guidance levels, were specified for six different radiological examinations, i.e. chest, pelvis, lumbar spine, urography, barium meal and enema in units of kerma-area product and entrance surface dose. The recommendations are described in report No 5 in the series 'Report on Nordic Radiation Protection Cooperation'. Examples of dose distributions and factors affecting the patient dose are described in the report. (author)

  11. Tasks of physicists and graduated engineers in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angerstein, W.

    1987-01-01

    The tasks of physicists and engineers in diagnostic radiology are compiled and trends of development are discussed. Specific duties can be selected from these tasks for each department and physicist individually. An attempt is made to characterize the specific tasks of medical physics. The most important tasks are concerning subjects of (1) investment planning, (2) quality control and quality assurance, (3) service and maintenance, (4) radiation protection and electrical safety, (5) development, testing and adaption of equipment, (6) assistance in running the radiologic department, (7) research, (8) pre- and postgraduate training, (9) educational training, (10) miscellaneous. (author)

  12. Radiological Protection Miscellaneous Provisions Act 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irish Legislation

    2014-07-01

    This Act provides for the dissolution of the Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland and the transfer of all its functions, assets, liabilities and staff to the Environmental Protection Agency, to give effect to the Amendment to the Convention on the Physical Protection of Nuclear Material done at Vienna on 8 July 2005, to amend the Radiological Protection Act 1991, the Environmental Protection Agency Act 1992 and certain other enactments, and to provide for matters connected therewith

  13. Quality control in diagnostic radiology: experience and challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd Aziz Mhd Ramli; Mohd Ramli Arshad; Mohd Khalid Matori; Muhammad Jamal Md Isa; Husaini Salleh; Abdullah Tahir Aliyasak; Zainal Jamaluddin; Hasrul Hisham Hussain

    2005-01-01

    Malaysian Institute for Nuclear Technology Research through its Medical Physics Group has been providing Quality Control (QC) services for medical x-ray apparatus used in diagnostic radiology to private clinics and hospitals since the year 1997. The quality control (QC) in diagnostic radiology is considered as part of quality assurance program which provide accurate diagnostic information at the lowest cost and the least exposure of the patients to radiation. Many experience and obstacles were faced by Medical Physics Group. This paper will discuss on some of the experiences and challenges that could be shared together with MINT staff especially in the safety aspect related to electrical and mechanical, radiation protection, performance and standard. The challenging in administrative aspect also will discuss. (Author)

  14. Radiological protection in nucleus reactor; Perlindungan radiologi di reaktor nukleus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1988-12-31

    The chapter briefly discussed the following subjects: radiological protection problems of reactor 1. in operation 2. types of reactor i.e. power reactors, research reactors, etc. 3. during maintenance and installation of fuels. 4. nuclear fuels.

  15. Radiological diagnostic in acute chest pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawel, Nadine; Bremerich, Jens

    2010-01-01

    Acute chest pain is one of the main symptoms leading to a consultation of the emergency department. Main task of the initial diagnostic is the confirmation or exclusion of a potentially life threatening cause. Conventional chest X-ray and computed tomography are the most significant techniques. Due to limited availability and long examination times magnetic resonance tomography rather plays a limited role in routine clinical workup. In the following paper we will systematically review the radiological diagnostic of the acute life threatening causes of chest pain. Imaging modalities, technical aspects and image interpretation will be discussed. (orig.)

  16. Quality control in dental diagnostic radiology : anomalous in the use of radiological equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcaraz, M.; Martinez-Beneyto, Y.; Jodar, S.; Velasco, E.; Garcia-Vera, M. C.

    2004-01-01

    7,176 official quality control reports on dental diagnostic radiology were studied, relating to dental clinics located in 37 Spanish provinces covering 16 different autonomous Regions. The reports were issued as a result of the entry into force of Royal Decree 2071/1995 on quality control in General Diagnostic Radiology facilities, this Royal Decree was replaced by R. D. 1976/1999. The reports were writen by the UTPR (Technical Unit of Radiological Protection) Agsigma S. A. L., a company approved by the Nuclear Safety Council, and they correspond with the official reports issued during 1996-2001. This meants that a 5-year period has been monitored in order to observe the impacts of the establlishment of this legislation on quality control in intraoral dental diagnostic radiology facilities. The results show that 72.79% of the reports checked in 2001 would comply with the European Union's official recommendation (70 kVp, 8 mA> 1.5 mm of Al and 20 cm collimator length). Significant alterations have detected in a third (30.59%) of the radiological equipment. (Author) 36 refs

  17. Advantages of digital imaging for radiological diagnostic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trapero, M. A.; Gonzalez, S.; Albillos, J. C.; Martel, J.; Rebollo, M.

    2006-01-01

    The advantages and limitations of radiological digital images in comparison with analogic ones are analyzed. We discuss three main topics: acquisition, post-procedure manipulation, and visualization, archive and communication. Digital acquisition with computed radiology systems present a global sensitivity very close to conventional film for diagnostic purposes. However, flat panel digital systems seems to achieve some advantages in particular clinical situations. A critical issue is the radiation dose-reduction that can be accomplished without reducing image quality nor diagnostic exactitude. The post-procedure manipulation allows, particularly in multiplanar modalities like CT or MR, to extract all implicit diagnostic information in the images: Main procedures are multiplanar and three-dimensional reformations, dynamic acquisitions, functional studies and image fusion. The use of PACS for visualization, archive and communication of images, improves the effectiveness and the efficiency of the workflow, allows a more comfortable diagnosis for the radiologist and gives way to improvements in the communication of images, allowing tele consulting and the tele radiology. (Author) 6 refs

  18. Process management and controlling in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gocke, P.; Debatin, J.F.; Duerselen, L.F.J.

    2002-01-01

    Systematic process management and efficient quality control is rapidly gaining importance in our healthcare system. What does this mean for diagnostic radiology departments?To improve efficiency, quality and productivity the workflow within the department of diagnostic and interventional radiology at the University Hospital of Essen were restructured over the last two years. Furthermore, a controlling system was established. One of the pursued aims was to create a quality management system as a basis for the subsequent certification according to the ISO EN 9001:2000 norm.Central to the success of the workflow reorganisation was the training of selected members of the department's staff in process and quality management theory. Thereafter, a dedicated working group was created to prepare the reorganisation and the subsequent ISO certification with the support of a consulting partner. To assure a smooth implementation of the restructured workflow and create acceptance for the required ISO-9001 documentation, the entire staff was familiarized with the basic ideas of process- and quality-management in several training sessions.This manuscript summarizes the basic concepts of process and quality management as they were taught to our staff. A direct relationship towards diagnostic radiology is maintained throughout the text. (orig.) [de

  19. Radiological protection in medicine. ICRP Publication 105

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    This report was prepared to underpin the Commission's 2007 Recommendations with regard to the medical exposure of patients, including their comforters and carers, and volunteers in biomedical research. It addresses the proper application of the fundamental principles (justification, optimisation of protection, and application of dose limits) of the Commission's 2007 Recommendations to these individuals. With regard to medical exposure of patients, it is not appropriate to apply dose limits or dose constraints, because such limits would often do more harm than good. Often, there are concurrent chronic, severe, or even life-threatening medical conditions that are more critical than the radiation exposure. The emphasis is then on justification of the medical procedures and on the optimisation of radiological protection. In diagnostic and interventional procedures, justification of procedures (for a defined purpose and for an individual patient), and management of the patient dose commensurate with the medical task, are the appropriate mechanisms to avoid unnecessary or unproductive radiation exposure. Equipment features that facilitate patient dose management, and diagnostic reference levels derived at the appropriate national, regional, or local level, are likely to be the most effective approaches. In radiation therapy, the avoidance of accidents is a predominant issue. With regard to comforters and carers, and volunteers in biomedical research, dose constraints are appropriate. Over the last decade, the Commission has published a number of documents that provided detailed advice related to radiological protection and safety in the medical applications of ionising radiation. Each of the publications addressed a specific topic defined by the type of radiation source and the medical discipline in which the source is applied, and was written with the intent of communicating directly with the relevant medical practitioners and supporting medical staff. This report

  20. ICRP Publication 105. Radiological Protection in Medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aubert, Bernard; Biau, Alain; Derreumaux, Sylvie; Etard, Cecile; Rannou, Alain; Rehel, Jean-Luc; Roch, Patrice Elle a ete validee par le Professeur Jean-Marc Cosset

    2011-01-01

    This report was prepared to underpin the Commission's 2007 Recommendations with regard to the medical exposure of patients, including their comforters and carers, and volunteers in biomedical research. It addresses the proper application of the fundamental principles (justification, optimisation of protection, and application of dose limits) of the Commission's 2007 Recommendations to these individuals. With regard to medical exposure of patients, it is not appropriate to apply dose limits or dose constraints, because such limits would often do more harm than good. Often, there are concurrent chronic, severe, or even life-threatening medical conditions that are more critical than the radiation exposure. The emphasis is then on justification of the medical procedures and on the optimisation of radiological protection. In diagnostic and interventional procedures, justification of procedures (for a defined purpose and for an individual patient), and management of the patient dose commensurate with the medical task, are the appropriate mechanisms to avoid unnecessary or unproductive radiation exposure. Equipment features that facilitate patient dose management, and diagnostic reference levels derived at the appropriate national, regional, or local level, are likely to be the most effective approaches. In radiation therapy, the avoidance of accidents is a predominant issue. With regard to comforters and carers, and volunteers in biomedical research, dose constraints are appropriate. Over the last decade, the Commission has published a number of documents that provided detailed advice related to radiological protection and safety in the medical applications of ionising radiation. Each of the publications addressed a specific topic defined by the type of radiation source and the medical discipline in which the source is applied, and was written with the intent of communicating directly with the relevant medical practitioners and supporting medical staff. This

  1. Radiological protection and its organization in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaona, E.; Canizal, C.; Garcia, M.A.

    1996-01-01

    By means of a research carried out in Radiotherapy Centers in Mexico City, divided in 7 public institutions and 5 private, aspects related to the radiological safety and its organization in radiotherapy were evaluated. The population being studied was: medical and technical personnel, that works in the selected radiotherapy centers. The survey was made with 36 dichotomic variables, being obtained 90 surveys. The personnel characteristics are: 76% works for more than 3 years in radiotherapy, 93% has updated information about radiological protection, 67% knows the general radiological safety regulations, 93% knows the radiological emergency project and 95% makes use of personal dosemeter. As result of this research we found that the main problems that the radiological protection have are: lack of personnel training in radiological protection, although the 93% states to have updated information, the few number of persons that takes part in clinical meetings and professional associations. (authors). 7 refs., 3 tabs

  2. Aspects of radiological protection in nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, J.G.; Oliveira Filho, D.S.; Rabello, P.N.P.

    1987-01-01

    Due to the short term, long term and genetic effects of radiation, the work with radioactive materials requires special protection measures. The objective of radiological protection is to assure the occupational health of the workers by maintaining the dose levels as low as reasonably achievable. The radiological protection measures implanted in the NUCLEBRAS fuel element factory are described. The philosophy and practical measures taken are explained, and a comparison between radiation protection and industrial safety norms is made. The result of this work shows that the radiological safety of the element factory is assured. (author) [pt

  3. Audit Programmes in a Diagnostic Radiological Facility (invited paper)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moores, B.M.; Connolly, P.A.; Cole, P.R.

    1998-01-01

    The effective implementation of optimisation strategies for radiation protection in diagnostic radiology including nuclear medicine requires mechanisms for ongoing audit of all relevant factors. The Quality Criteria of the Commission of European Communities highlights clearly the three aspects of a radiological examination which needed to be considered, which are: (i) radiographic technique, (ii) patient dose, and (iii) image quality. Therefore, it is important that the choice of a known and acceptable radiographic technique provides a known outcome in terms of patient dose and image quality. This requirement should be capable of being achieved throughout Europe and capable of being updated as new radiological strategies are developed. Audit programmes aimed at monitoring that this situation exists may be considered at three levels: Level 1 involves routine, periodic, assessment of patient doses on a representative sample of patients undergoing a particular type of examination. Results from this audit are then compared with acceptable and clearly defined diagnostic reference levels or reference dose values which provides a framework for guidance on acceptable practice. A summary of such level 1 programmes which are being pursued in Europe is presented. Level 2 audit programmes, beside patient dose assessment, will also involve an assessment of all those parameters relevant to an X ray examination which may have a bearing on the actual dose delivered to the patient. Such level 2 audit programmes provide the basis for implementation of optimisation strategies for radiation protection in terms of risk reduction, one of the fundamental tenets of radiation protection philosophy. Level 3 audit programmes also include assessment and verification of image quality requirements for particular examinations. This latter aspect is a necessary basis for overall optimisation of radiation protection in diagnostic radiology. (author)

  4. Perception of radiological technicians on radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viana, E.; Borges, L.M.; Camozzato, T.S.C.

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to know the professionals' perception of radiological techniques about radiation protection in the work process in Nuclear Medicine. The research was carried out with nine professionals of the radiological techniques of two private institutions located in the South of Brazil. An interview was applied through recording and transcription. The analysis of the data took place through a thematic analysis. The professionals' perception of radiological techniques regarding the radiological protection in the work process is evidenced when professionals mention the basic rules of radiation protection: time, shielding and distance as attitudes used to minimize the exposure to ionizing radiation. However, it was verified the fragility in the knowledge about the norms and legislation of the radiological protection

  5. Study of the performance of diagnostic radiology instruments during calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freitas, Rodrigo N. de; Vivolo, Vitor; Potiens, Maria da Penha A.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The instruments used in diagnostic radiology measurements represent 8 % of the tested instruments by the calibration laboratory of IPEN annually (approximately 1600 in 2007). Considering that the calibration of this kind of instrument is performed biannually it is possible to conclude that almost 300 instruments are being used to measure the air kerma in diagnostic radiology clinics to determine the in beam values (in front of the patient), attenuated measurements (behind the patient) and scattered radiation. This work presents the results of the calibration of the instruments used in mammography, computed tomography, dental and conventional diagnostic radiology dosimetry, performed during the period of 2005 to 2007. Their performances during the calibrations measurements were evaluated. Although at the calibration laboratory there are three available series of radiation quality to this type of calibration (RQR, N and M, according to standards IEC 61267 and ISO 4037-1.), the applications can be assorted (general radiology, computed tomography, mammography, radiation protection and fluoroscopy). Depending on its design and behaviour , one kind of instrument can be used for one or more type of applications. The instruments normally used for diagnostic radiology measurements are ionization chambers with volumes varying from 3 to 1800 cm 3 , and can be cylindrical, spherical or plane parallel plates kind. They usually are sensitive to photon particles, with energies greater than 15 keV and can be used up to 1200 keV. In this work they were tested in X radiation fields from 25 to 150 kV, in specific qualities depending on the utilization of the instrument. The calibration results of 390 instruments received from 2005 to 2007 were analyzed. About 20 instruments were not able to be calibrated due to bad functioning. The calibration coefficients obtained were between 0.88 and 1.24. The uncertainties were always less than ± 3.6% to instruments used in scattered

  6. Quality control in diagnostic radiology - patient dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prlic, I; Radalj, Z; Brumen, V; Cerovac, H [Institute for Medical Research and Occupational Health, Laboratory for Radiation Protection and Dosimetry, Zagreb (Croatia); Gladic, J [Institute for Physics, Laboratory for Solid State Physics, Zagreb (Croatia); Tercek, V [Clinical Hospital Sisters of Mercy, Health Physics Department, Zagreb (Croatia)

    1997-12-31

    In order to establish the Quality Criteria for diagnostic radiographic images in the radiology departments in Republic of Croatia we have started the several Quality Control projects on the field. The measurements are performed according to some methodology recommendations in our law but the methodology, measurement principles, measurement equipment, phantoms, measurable parameters for the good use by radiographers, statistical and numerical evaluation, dosimetric philosophy etc. where first recognized as a private/or group hazard of each person involved in the procedure of evaluation of diagnostic radiology images/diagnosis. The important quality elements of the imaging process are: the diagnostic quality of the radiographic image, the radiation dose to the patient and the choice of the radiographic technique. This depends on the x-ray unit (tube) radiation quality, image processing quality and final image evaluation quality. In this paper we will show how the Quality Control measurements can be easily connected to the dose delivered to the patient for the known diagnostic procedure and how this can be used by radiographers in their daily work. The reproducibility of the x-ray generator was checked before the service calibration and after the service calibration. The table of kV dependence and output dose per mAs was calculated and the ESD (entrance surface dose) was measured/calculated for the specific diagnostic procedure. After the phantom calculation were made and the dose prediction for the given procedure was done, measurements were done on the patients (digital dosemeters, TLD and film dosemeter combinations). We are claiming that there is no need to measure each patient if the proper Quality Control measurements are done and the proper table of ESD for each particular x-ray tube in diagnostic departments is calculated for the radiographers daily use. (author). 1 example, 1 fig., 13 refs.

  7. Radiological protection in medicine: work of ICRP Committee 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vañó, E.; Cosset, J.M.; Rehani, M.M.

    2012-01-01

    Committee 3 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) is concerned with protection in medicine, and develops recommendations and guidance on the protection of patients, staff, and the public against radiation exposure in medicine. This paper presents an overview of the work of Committee 3 over recent years, and the work in progress agreed at the last annual meeting in Bethesda, MD in October 2011. The reports published by ICRP dealing with radiological protection in medicine in the last 10 years cover topics on: education and training in radiological protection; preventing accidental exposures in radiation therapy; dose to patients from radiopharmaceuticals; radiation safety aspects of brachytherapy; release of patients after therapy with unsealed radionuclides; managing patient dose in digital radiology and computed tomography; avoidance of radiation injuries from medical interventional procedures; pregnancy and medical radiation; and diagnostic reference levels in medical imaging. Three new reports will be published in the coming months dealing with aspects of radiological protection in fluoroscopically guided procedures outside imaging departments; cardiology; and paediatric radiology. The work in progress agreed by Committee 3 is also described.

  8. Protection of the unborn child in diagnostic and interventional radiological procedures; Schutz des ungeborenen Lebens bei diagnostischen und interventionellen radiologischen Verfahren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hojreh, A.; Prosch, H.; Karanikas, G.; Trattnig, S. [Medizinische Universitaet Wien, Universitaetsklinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Wien (Austria); Homolka, P. [Medizinische Universitaet Wien, Zentrum fuer medizinische Physik und biomedizinische Technik, Wien (Austria)

    2015-08-15

    The radiation exposure of an unborn child should be principally avoided, whenever it is medically reasonably possible; therefore, the identification of pregnant patients is the first and the most important step in radiation protection of the unborn child. However, in cases of emergency saving the life of the patient has a higher priority than the radiation protection of the unborn child. In this review article, we present a longitudinal section through the national and international literature and guidelines as a basis for radiological management of a (possibly) pregnant patient. We also list some radiological procedures recommended in the literature for a series of maternal indications considering the contraindications of each method during pregnancy and radiation protection of the unborn child. (orig.) [German] Die Strahlenexposition eines ungeborenen Kindes ist prinzipiell, wann immer dieses medizinisch sinnvoll moeglich ist, zu vermeiden. Daher ist die Identifizierung der schwangeren Patientinnen der erste und wichtigste Schritt zum Strahlenschutz des ungeborenen Kindes. In einer Notfallsituation hat allerdings das Leben der Patientin hoechste Prioritaet. In dieser Uebersichtsarbeit praesentieren wir einen Laengsschnitt durch die nationale und internationale Literatur und Leitlinien, die als Grundlage fuer das radiologische Management einer (moeglicherweise) schwangeren Patientin angewendet werden kann. Wir stellen auch einige in der Literatur empfohlene radiologische Verfahren fuer eine Reihe von Indikationen in der Schwangerschaft vor. Dabei werden sowohl die Kontraindikationen der jeweiligen Methode waehrend der Schwangerschaft als auch der Strahlenschutz des ungeborenen Kindes beruecksichtigt. (orig.)

  9. Research in diagnostic radiology: a holistic perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrams, H.L.

    1981-01-01

    This 24th Annual Crookshank Lecture of the Royal College of Radiologists reviews the continuity and interactive relationships among the various components of radiological research, with particular reference to imaging. The following aspects are considered: 1) Clinical decision-making indications vs. yield and cost vs. utility in relation to diagnostic processes. 2) Generation of the image, including x-ray tubes, cinefluorography, ultrasound, CT, N.M.R.; biological radiation effects. 3) Enhancement of the image, optimised information yield. 4) Image perception 5) Boundaries of the radiological process, e.g. radioimmunoassay, isotopes in tumour therapy, venous sampling for assay 6) Image interpretation, its pathophysiological roots and resultant disease research 7) Impact of the image, and the effect of the decision process of therapeutic alternatives. (U.K.)

  10. Thermoluminescent dosimetry in veterinary diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernández-Ruiz, L.; Jimenez-Flores, Y.; Rivera-Montalvo, T.; Arias-Cisneros, L.; Méndez-Aguilar, R.E.; Uribe-Izquierdo, P.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the results of Environmental and Personnel Dosimetry made in a radiology area of a veterinary hospital. Dosimetry was realized using thermoluminescent (TL) materials. Environmental Dosimetry results show that areas closer to the X-ray equipment are safe. Personnel Dosimetry shows important measurements of daily workday in some persons near to the limit established by ICRP. TL results of radiation measurement suggest TLDs are good candidates as a dosimeter to radiation dosimetry in veterinary radiology. - Highlights: ► Personnel dosimetry in laboratory veterinary diagnostic was determined. ► Student workplaces are safe against radiation. ► Efficiency value of apron lead was determined. ► X-ray beams distribution into veterinarian laboratory was measured.

  11. Quality assurance programme in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yacovenco, A.A.

    1996-01-01

    One hundred years after the discovery of X-rays, they continue being nowadays part of physicians' daily activities, and the diagnosis through the use of X-ray equipment is one of the most important fields in clinical medicine, thus becoming the most important cause of human exposure to artificial sources. For this reason, in the last twenty years, most of the developed countries did the utmost to establish programs which could warrant the quality of the radiographic image. Aiming the protection of human being against the harmful effects of ionizing radiations, in December 1980, World Health Organization decided to form a group of professionals highly experienced in medical radiology, and initiate an inspection and quality control program. In September 1988, the Group of Studies of the Program Related to Radiological Protection of the Commission in the European Communities, prepared a working paper in which guidelines were set up regarding quality of images, dosage to patient, and associated radiographic factors, necessary to obtain acceptable radiologic performance. In Brazil, efforts driven in this direction, guided by some equipment testing, starting in 1990, began to be more known. When the Director and the Head of Radiology in the Military Police Hospital of the State of Rio de Janeiro (HPM) reamed about these efforts, they decided to contact the Institute for Radioprotection and Dosimetry (IRD) of Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear and submit the problem of low radiologic performance and increasing rates of rejection. Thus, with the coincidence of interests and needs, along with a proposal from the Commission of the European Communities (CEC), IRD decided to offer the author laboratory support to elaborate a Quality Assurance Program (QAP) to be implemented in HPM. (author)

  12. Evaluation of conventional x-ray diagnostic equipment and radiological protection systems of hospitals and clinics installed in Recife city, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Passos, Robson Silva

    1999-05-01

    Diagnostic radiology is the main contributor to the man-made exposure of general population. Since Quality Assurance (QA) programs ensure high quality diagnostic images with the lowest possible radiation dose to the patient, it has been recommended that all introduce QA programs for their radiological facilities. Consequently it is important to check the adequacy of equipment operating parameters in diagnostic radiography facilities, to ensure that a high quality of service is delivered. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the operating conditions of diagnostic units installed in Recife, Pernambuco. The study included 31 X-ray units from both public and private diagnostic services. The following parameters were evaluated: coincidence between the luminous and radiation fields; alignment of the radiation beam; agreement between the real and preset values of kVp and exposure time; filtration; half value lower (HVL); luminance of the view box; uniformity of the luminance; illuminance of the environment. The results showed that 20% of the equipment surveyed exhibited discrepancies between the luminous and radiation fields greater than 2% of the source to skin distance. The test of kilovoltage showed that 48% of the units do not fulfill the acceptability criteria, presenting discrepancies higher than ± 10% between the measured and preset values. The results of the accuracy of the timer indicated that 81% of the equipment surveyed present a discrepancy greater than ± 10% between the time selected in the control panel and actual exposure time.The test of the filtration shown that, in 20% of the equipment, this was inferior to 2,5 mm Al. The test of the luminance of view box shown that 96% of the equipment, shown a luminance lower of 2.000 cd/m 2 . Related to the test of the uniformity of the luminance, 81 % of the equipment shown a variation of the uniformity higher then 10%. The test of the iluminancy of the environment shown that 61 % of the equipment presented

  13. Radiologic protection in intensive therapy units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrea, H.; Juliana, C.; Gerusa, R.; Laurete, M.B.; Suelen, S.; Derech, Rodrigo D.A.

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of X-ray was a great achievement for humanity, especially for the medical community. In Intensive Care Units (ICUs), the RX tests, performed with mobile devices, add immense value to the diagnosis of inpatients who do not have the option to carry them out of bed. Following the technology and its improvements, fatalities arose from misuse of ionizing radiation, which mostly gave up for lack of knowledge of the biological effects caused by them, which leads to fear among professionals and often prevents a quick job and effectively by professionals of radiological techniques. The research it is a systematic review of the literature and justified by the scarcity of materials that reflect on the radiological protection in ICUs. For this study we found the Virtual Health Library (VHL) and Pubmed were indexed terms radiological protection and intensive care units, the search in Portuguese and English terms were used radiological protection and intensive care unit. The study aims to inform professionals of ICUs on the main aspects that refer to X-rays in hospital beds, the standards of radiological protection and personal protective equipment, thus avoiding possible damage to the biological health of workers, addressing subjects in rules and laws about the X radiation, emphasizing the protection of professionals in intensive care. It is clear, finally, that little research is conducted in the context of radiological protection of workers ICU's and this is a place that receives daily RX equipment, deserving more attention to protect the worker. (author)

  14. History and Organizations for Radiological Protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Keon Wook

    2016-02-01

    International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), an independent international organization established in 1925, develops, maintains, and elaborates radiological protection standards, legislation, and guidelines. United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) provides scientific evidence. World Health Organization (WHO) and International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) utilise the ICRP recommendations to implement radiation protection in practice. Finally, radiation protection agencies in each country adopt the policies, and adapt them to each situation. In Korea, Nuclear Safety and Security Commission is the governmental body for nuclear safety regulation and Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety is a public organization for technical support and R&D in nuclear safety and radiation protection.

  15. Proceedings of the Session of Radiological Protection in Medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    The Argentine Society for Radiation Protection has organized the Radiological Protection Session in Medicine 2016 in order to continue with the radiological update on specific radiological topics in radiology, nuclear medicine and interventional medicine, as well as to optimize the radiological protection of workers, patients and the public. [es

  16. Research and development in radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butragueno, J. L.; Villota, C.; Gutierrez, C.; Rodriguez, A.

    2004-01-01

    The objective of Radiological Protection is to guarantee that neither people, be they workers or members of the public, or the environment are exposed to radiological risks considered by society to be unacceptable. Among the various resources available to meet this objective is Research and Development (R and D), which is carried out in three areas: I. Radiological protection of persons: (a) knowledge of the biological effects of radiations, in order to determine the relationship that exists between radiation exposure dose and its effects on health; (b) the development of new personal dosimetry techniques in order to adapt to new situations, instrumental techniques and information management technologies allowing for better assessment of exposure dose; and (c) development of the principle of radiological protection optimisation (ALARA), which has been set up internationally as the fundamental principle on which radiological protection interventions are based. II. Assessment of environmental radiological impact, the objective of which is to assess the nature and magnitude of situations of exposure to ionising radiations as a result of the controlled or uncontrolled release of radioactive material to the environment, and III.Reduction of the radiological impact of radioactive wastes, the objective of which is to develop radioactive material and waste management techniques suitable for each situation, in order to reduce the risks associated with their definitive management or their release to the environment. Briefly described below are the strategic lines of R and D of the CSN, the Electricity Industry, Ciemat and Enresa in the aforementioned areas. (Author)

  17. Strengthening the scientific basis of radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazo, Edward

    2016-01-01

    The overarching objective of the radiological protection system is to contribute to an appropriate level of protection against the harmful effects of radiation exposure, without unjustifiably limiting the desired results from the human activity causing exposure. Such a balance is achieved by understanding as best as possible the scientific characteristics of radiation exposure and the related health effects, and by taking this knowledge into consideration when judging which protection decisions will ensure the best balance between social and economic aspects and risks. In general, the existing radiological protection system, on which national regulations are built in virtually every country in the world, works well and does not underestimate protection needs for either individuals or exposed populations as a whole. The latest International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) recommendations, which define this protection system, were formed after a long and open dialogue with the public, where expert views were actively collected and discussed at national, regional and international levels. Although the radiological protection system is very effective, and there is no current need for a prompt revision, it is important nonetheless to keep a watchful eye on the latest scientific results, and to work to ensure that the entire radiological protection community is kept up to date on evolving and emerging scientific issues. In this way, potential or actual scientific changes can be appropriately identified and in turn can stimulate reflection on changes that might be needed in the protection system, in policy, in regulation and in practice. Such reflection should benefit from the input of other scientific disciplines and interested stakeholders. To contribute to this process, the NEA Committee on Radiological Protection and Public Health (CRPPH) has periodically reviewed and released reports on the state of the art in radiological protection science (see NEA

  18. Changes in IEC standards related to diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porubszky, T.; Barsai, J.

    2007-01-01

    Complete test of publication follows. Purposes. Technical Committee TC62 of International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) deals with medical electrical equipment (i.e. medical devices using electricity). Standardization concerning diagnostic radiology equipment is task of its Sub-Committee SC62B. An outlook of its activities and present situation, and especially of radiation protection aspects, is given. Materials and methods. Third edition of basic safety standard for medical electrical equipment IEC 60601-1 was issued in 2005. Elaboration of new collateral and particular standards - applicable together with it - is in progress. These standards are generally at the same time also European - EN - and national standards. There is a great importance of radiation protection in diagnostic X-ray equipment. Collateral standard IEC 6060-1-3 about it was at first issued in 1994. Rapid development of imaging technology demands updating of requirements. SC62B in 2003 founded a maintenance team MT37 for preparation of the second edition of this standard. According to new safety philosophy of IEC all modality specific requirements are to be collected in 'safety and essential performance' particular standards. A new working group WG42 - founded in 2006 - elaborates a new particular standard IEC 60601-2-54 for radiographic and radioscopic equipment. Maintenance team MT32 deals with safety and performance standards for X-ray tube assemblies. The authors actively participate in these activities. Results and discussion. Present and future system of diagnostic radiology IEC standards and some interesting details are presented. Conclusions. International standards - although they are not 'obligatory' - are generally the basis of safety and performance certification of diagnostic radiology equipment and often also of their quality assurance.

  19. Evolution of the system of radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-11-01

    One of the main challenges facing radiological protection experts is how to integrate radiological protection within modern concepts of and approaches to risk governance. It is within this context that the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) decided to develop new general recommendations to replace its Publication 60 recommendations of 1990. In the process of developing these new recommendations, the views of the ICRP have evolved significantly, largely due to stakeholder involvement that has been actively solicited by the ICRP. In this regard, it was upheld during the First Asian Regional Conference organised by the NEA in October 2002 that the implementation of the new system must allow for regional, societal and cultural differences. In order to ensure appropriate consideration of these differences, the NEA organised the Second Asian Regional Conference on the Evolution of the System of Radiological Protection. Held in Tokyo on 28-29 July 2004, the conference included presentations by the ICRP Chair as well as by radiological experts from Australia, China, Japan and Korea. Within their specific cultural and socio-political milieu, Asia-Pacific and western ways of thought on how to improve the current system of radiological protection were presented and discussed. These ways of thinking, along with a summary of the conference results, are described in these proceedings. (author)

  20. The future policy for radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    At the end of the 1990's, the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) launched a process for establishing new recommendations, which are expected to serve as guidelines for national systems of radiological protection. Currently the ICRP's proposed recommendations are being subjected to extensive stakeholder comment and modifications. The NEA Committee on Radiation Protection and Public Health (CRPPH) has been actively involved in this process. Part of the Committee's work has been to undertake collaborative efforts with the ICRP through, for example, the organisation of broad stakeholder fora. The first of these, held in Taormina, Italy in 2002, focused on the development of a policy basis for the radiological protection of the environment. The second forum, held in Lanzarote, Spain in April 2003, addressed the latest concepts and approaches in the ICRP proposed recommendations for a system of radiological protection. During this meeting, the ICRP listened to the views of various stakeholder groups, including radiological protection regulators, environmental protection ministries, the nuclear power industry and NGOs. As a result, the ICRP modified its proposals to better reflect stakeholder needs and wishes. This report presents the outcomes of the discussions, examining what the ICRP proposed and how its proposals have been affected and modified as a result of stakeholder input. (author)

  1. Report of a consultants meeting on dosimetry in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pernicka, F.

    1999-01-01

    During its biennial meeting in 1996, the Standing Advisory Committee 'SSDL Scientific Committee', recommended extending the long experience of the Agency in the field of standardization and monitoring dosimetry calibrations at radiotherapy and radiation protection level for the Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory (SSDL) Network, to the field of diagnostic x-ray dosimetry. It was emphasized that 'Measurements on diagnostic x-ray machines have become increasingly important and some SSDLs are involved in such measurements. The Agency's dosimetry laboratory should, therefore, have proper radiation sources available to provide traceable calibrations to the SSDLs'. The purpose of the consultants' meeting was to advise the Agency on dosimetry in diagnostic radiology. They were specifically requested to overview scientific achievements in the field and to give advice to the Agency on the need for further developments. The purpose of the consultants' meeting was to advise the Agency on dosimetry in diagnostic radiology. They were specifically requested to overview scientific achievements in the field and to give advice to the Agency on the need for further developments

  2. International Society of Radiology and Radiation Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Standertskjoeld-Nordenstam, C.G.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of the International Society of Radiology (ISR), as being the global organization of radiologists, is to promote and help co-ordinate the progress of radiology throughout the world. In this capacity and as a co-operating organization of the IAEA, the ISR has a specific responsibility in the global radiological protection of patients. Globally, there are many users of medical radiation, and radiology may be practised in the most awkward circumstances. The individuals performing X ray studies as well as those interpreting them may be well trained, as in industrialized parts of the world, but also less knowledgeable, as in developing areas. The problems of radiological protection, both of patients and of radiation workers, still exist, and radiation equipment is largely diffused throughout the world. That is why a conference like this is today as important as ever. Radiation protection is achieved through education, on the one hand, and legislation, on the other. Legislation and regulation are the instruments of national authorities. The means of the ISR are education and information. Good radiological practice is something that can be taught. The ISR is doing this mainly through the biannual International Congress of Radiology (ICR), now arranged in an area of radiological need; the three previous ICRs were in China, in India and in South America; the next one is going to be in Mexico in 2002. The goal of the ICR is mainly to be an instructive and educational event, especially designed for the needs of its surrounding region. The ISR is aiming at producing educational material. The International Commission on Radiological Education (ICRE), as part of the ISR, is launching the production of a series of educational booklets, which also include radiation protection. The ICRE is actively involved in shaping and organizing the educational and scientific programme of the ICRs

  3. Guideline concerning specialist knowledge of radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-09-01

    The regulation is to be applied to licenses according to paragraphs 3, 15, 16, 20, 20a of the Radiation Protection Law, paragraphs 6, 7, 9 of the Atomic Law, to notices according to paragraphs 4, 17 of the Radiation Protection Law as well as in the prospecting, mining and processing of radioactive minerals. It regulates the extent and evidence of the special knowledge required for radiation protection of radiological safety officers and personnel responsible for radiation protection. (UK)

  4. Evolution of the system of radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    The development of new radiological protection recommendations by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) continues to be a strategically important undertaking, both nationally and internationally. With the growing recognition of the importance of stakeholder aspects in radiological protection decision making, regional and cultural aspects have also emerged as having potentially significant influence on how protection of the public, workers and the environment are viewed. Differing cultural aspects should therefore be considered by the ICRP in its development of new recommendations. Based on this assumption, the NEA organised the Asian Regional Conference on the Evolution of the System of Radiological Protection to express and explore views from the Far East. Held in Tokyo on 24-25 October 2002, the conference included presentations by the ICRP Chair as well as by radiological protection experts from Japan, the Republic of Korea, China and Australia. The distinct views and needs of these countries were discussed in the context of their regional and cultural heritages. These views, along with a summary of the conference results, are presented in these proceedings. (author)

  5. Worker radiological protection: occupational medical aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardenas Herrera, Juan; Fernandez Gomez, Isis Maria

    2008-01-01

    Radiation exposures experienced by workers are widely explained. The first evidences of biological effects, the implications for human health and the radiological protection have been covered. The conceptual structure that covers the radiological protection and adequate protection without limiting benefits, the scientific basis of radiology, the benefits and risks of the radiological protection are specified. The effective per capita doses are exposed in medical uses both for Latin America and for other regions in the average radiology, dental radiology, nuclear medicine and radiotherapy. The manners of occupational exposures in the medicine are presented. Industrial uses have also its average effective dose in the industrial irradiation, industrial radiography and radioisotopes production. Within the natural radiation the natural sources can significantly contribute to occupational exposure and have their average effective dose. Occupational medical surveillance to be taken into industrial sites is detailed. In addition, the plan of international action for the solution of dilemmas of occupational exposures is mentioned and the different dilemmas of radioactive exposure are showed. The external irradiation, the acute diseases by radiations, the cutaneous syndrome of the chronic radiation, the radioactive contamination, the internal radioactive contamination, the combined lesion and accidental exposures are also treated [es

  6. Radiological protection at particle accelerators: An overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, R.H.

    1991-01-01

    Radiological protection began with particle accelerators. Many of the concerns in the health physics profession today were discovered at accelerator laboratories. Since the mid-1940s, our understanding has progressed through seven stages: observation of high radiation levels; shielding; development of dosimetric techniques; studies of induced activity and environmental impact; legislative and regulatory concerns; and disposal. The technical and scientific aspects of accelerator radiation safety are well in hand. In the US, there is an urgent need to move away from a ''best available technology'' philosophy to risk-based health protection standards. The newer accelerators will present interesting radiological protection issues, including copious muon production and high LET (neutron) environments

  7. Radiological Protection and Environmental Monitoring in Bolivia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MartInez Pacheco, J.

    1979-01-01

    The paper describes the main activities of the Department of Radiological Protection, Nuclear Energy Commission of Bolivia. The following topics are covered: organization, environmental control of air, water, milk and plants, personal dosimetry, instrumentation and calibration, protection in uranium mines. Standard setting and international cooperation aspects are also presented

  8. Protection, interlocks and diagnostics

    CERN Document Server

    Griffiths, S A; White, C; Theed, J E

    2006-01-01

    When designing any power converter it is essential to assess and incorporate adequate protection. The main objective is to offer a solution which is safe, reliable and repairable and that achieves its specification within budget. The level of protection found within each converter varies widely and will depend on the topology employed, its application and rating. This document is a guide to the types of protection engineers should consider mainly when designing power converters, as protection added during construction or after installation will always be expensive.

  9. Radiation Protection Research: Radiological Assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeevaert, T.

    2000-01-01

    The objectives of SCK-CEN's research in the field of radiological impact assessment are (1) to elaborate and to improve methods and guidelines for the evaluation of restoration options for contaminated sites; (2) to develop, test and improve biosphere models for the performance assessment of radioactive waste disposal in near-surface or geological repositories; (3) to asses the impact of releases from nuclear or industrial installations. Main achievements in these areas for 2000 are summarised

  10. Radiological protection for the dental practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mora Rodriguez, Patricia; Loria Meneses, Luis Guillermo

    2007-01-01

    This work offers a didactical material, of easy reading and without mathematical complexity, about the fundamentals of the radiological protection in the dental area. It is dedicated to the personnel of the Ministerio de Salud, responsible to realize radiological inspection in dentistry clinics of the country. It is recommended to consult other bibliographical references if it is wished to extend about a particular subject [es

  11. Clinical dosimetry in diagnostic and interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimcheva, M.; Sergieva, S.; Jovanovska, A.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Introduction: Diagnostic and interventional procedures involving x-rays are the most significant contributor to total population dose form man made sources of ionizing radiation. Purpose and aim: X-ray imaging generally covers a diverse range of examination types, many of which are increasing in frequency and technical complexity. Materials and methods: The European Directives 96/29 and 97/43 EURATOM stress the importance of accurate dosimetry and require calibration of all measuring equipment related to application of ionizing radiation in medicine. Results: The paper gives and overview of current system of dosimetry of ionizing radiations that is relevant for metrology and clinical applications. It also reflects recently achieved international harmonization in the field promoted by International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Discussion: Objectives of clinical dose measurements in diagnostic and interventional radiology are multiple, as assessment of equipment performance, or assessment of risk emerging from use of ionizing radiation Conclusion: Therefore, from the clinical point of view, the requirements for dosimeters and procedures to assess dose to standard dosimetry phantoms and patients in clinical diverse modalities, as computed tomography are presented

  12. Philosophy of radiological protection and radiation hazard protection law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kai, Michiaki; Kawano, Takao

    2013-01-01

    The radiation protection and the human safety in radiation facilities are strictly controlled by law. There are rules on the radiation measurement, too. In the present review, philosophy of the radiological protection and the radiation hazard protection law is outlined with reference to ICRP recommendations. (J.P.N.)

  13. Radiation protection problems with dental radiological equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooney, P.; Rajan, J.; Malone, J.F.; Gavin, G.

    1995-01-01

    With the advent of the EC Patient Directive, the importance of surveying and optimising patient exposure for diagnostic imaging procedures is paramount. In the field of dentistry there has been a heightened interest in areas of equipment performance and patient exposure. This interest, coupled with a number of dental radiation safety incidents investigated by our department, and the issuing of a Code of Practice for Radiological Protection in Dentistry by the Department of Health, led to the establishment in our department, of an evaluation protocol for the performance and operation of dental X ray equipment. The protocol was used to perform a survey on over 100 dental X ray units in use in the Public Sector in Ireland. This presentation will report on the radiation incidents mentioned above. It will detail the protocol and furnish the results and conclusions of the survey. The survey has made it possible to establish clearly the necessary steps required to ensure compliance with requirements. In addition, the corrective steps taken by the dental authorities will be presented and the overall impact of the regulations and the programme consequent on them will be reviewed. (Author)

  14. Evaluations of gonad and fetal doses for diagnostic radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, C J; Tsai, H Y

    1999-07-01

    A national survey of patient doses for diagnostic radiology was planned in the Republic of China. We performed a pilot study for this survey to develop a protocol of the dose assessments. Entrance skin doses and organ (including ovary, testicle and uterus) doses were measured by thermoluminescent dosimeters and calculated by means of Monte Carlo simulations for several diagnostic procedures. We derived a formula and used the RadComp software for the computation of entrance skin doses. This formula involves several factors, such as kVp, mAs, the focus-to-skin-distance and aluminum filtration. RadComp software was applied to obtain free-air entrance exposures which were converted to entrance skin doses by considering the backscattering radiation from the body. Organ doses were measured using a RANDO phantom and calculated using a mathematical phantom for several diagnostic examinations. Genetically significant doses were calculated from ovary and testicle doses for the evaluation of hereditary effects. Embryo/fetal doses were determined from the uterine doses by considering the increase in uterus size with gestational age. We found that the patient doses studied in this work were all below the reference doses recommended by the National Radiological Protection Board of the U.K.

  15. Radiological protection in dental practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1975-01-01

    Intended to be complementary to the more comprehensive document, ''Code of Practice for the protection of persons against ionizing radiations arising from medical and dental use'' (CIS 74-423), the purpose of this booklet is to give dentists some basic information on the safe use of X-rays. Contents: why protection from X-rays; responsibility for radiation protection; protection during a dental examination; ensuring a safe installation; sources of further information. Appendices: maximum permissible doses; useful addresses; summary of relevant recommendations from the Code of Practice; notes on film processing.

  16. Radiological protection in underground uranium mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Napolitano, Celia Marina

    1978-01-01

    The radiosanitary hazards that workers of an uranium ore can suffer were studied. The more used control methods for the the evaluation of doses received by the workers was studied too. It was developed a technique using the scintillation chamber method for the detection of radon. Emanation and diffusion methods were used for extraction of radon from water. A program of radiological protection based on ICRP recommendation was analysed for uranium mines. This program includes: ventilation needs calculation methods, a study of radiological protection optimization based on 'cost-benefit' analysis, a monitoring plan and a study about radioactive waste management. (author)

  17. Operational Radiological Protection and Aspects of Optimisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazo, E.; Lindvall, C.G.

    2005-01-01

    Since 1992, the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), along with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), has sponsored the Information System on Occupational Exposure (ISOE). ISOE collects and analyses occupational exposure data and experience from over 400 nuclear power plants around the world and is a forum for radiological protection experts from both nuclear power plants and regulatory authorities to share lessons learned and best practices in the management of worker radiation exposures. In connection to the ongoing work of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) to develop new recommendations, the ISOE programme has been interested in how the new recommendations would affect operational radiological protection application at nuclear power plants. Bearing in mind that the ICRP is developing, in addition to new general recommendations, a new recommendation specifically on optimisation, the ISOE programme created a working group to study the operational aspects of optimisation, and to identify the key factors in optimisation that could usefully be reflected in ICRP recommendations. In addition, the Group identified areas where further ICRP clarification and guidance would be of assistance to practitioners, both at the plant and the regulatory authority. The specific objective of this ISOE work was to provide operational radiological protection input, based on practical experience, to the development of new ICRP recommendations, particularly in the area of optimisation. This will help assure that new recommendations will best serve the needs of those implementing radiation protection standards, for the public and for workers, at both national and international levels. (author)

  18. Radiological Protection Plan an ethic responsibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huhn, Andrea; Vargas, Mara Ambrosina de Oliveira

    2014-01-01

    The Radiological Protection Plan - PPR, quoted by the Regulatory Standard 32, requires to be maintained at the workplace and at the disposal of the worker's inspection the PPR, for it to be aware of their work environment and the damage that can be caused by misuse of ionizing radiation. Objective: to discuss the interface between PPR and ethical reflection. Method: this is a reflective study. Discussion and results: regulatory norm 32 points out that the worker who conducts activities in areas where there are sources of ionizing radiation should know the risks associated with their work. However, it is considered that the sectors of hospital radiology the multidisciplinary health team is exposed to ionizing radiation and has not always aware of the harm caused by it, so end up unprotected conduct their activities. Concomitantly, recent studies emphasize the radiological protection and concern for the dangers of radiation on humans, but rather refer to the legislation about the radiological protection. In this context an ethical reflection is necessary, seeking to combine work ethics liability to care in protecting themselves and the other with the institutional conditions for this protection becomes effective

  19. 42 CFR 415.180 - Teaching setting requirements for the interpretation of diagnostic radiology and other diagnostic...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... interpretation of diagnostic radiology and other diagnostic tests. 415.180 Section 415.180 Public Health CENTERS... for the interpretation of diagnostic radiology and other diagnostic tests. (a) General rule. Physician fee schedule payment is made for the interpretation of diagnostic radiology and other diagnostic tests...

  20. Slovenian experience from diagnostic angiography to interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavcnik, Dusan

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of writing this article is to document the important events and people in the first 50 years of diagnostic angiography and interventional radiology in Slovenia. During this period not only did the name of the institutions and departments change, but also its governance. This depicted the important roles different people played at various times in the cardiovascular divisions inside and outside of the diagnostic and interventional radiology. Historical data show that Slovenian radiology has relatively immediately introduced the new methods of interventional radiology in clinical practice

  1. A project: 'Radiological protection in radiology', IAEA - Universidad Central de Venezuela

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz, A.R.; Salazar, G.; Fermin, R.; Gonzalez, M.

    2001-01-01

    For several years a reference center of the UCV has been working on the project VEN/9/007 on dose reduction in diagnostic radiology sponsored by the IAEA. The dose and quality image was evaluated for different types of radiological study (conventional radiology, CT, mammography, interventional radiology) in different facilities at Caracas and others regions of the Venezuela. TL dosimeters were used to assess dose and reduction in dose. Based on the recommendations given by CEC documents on diagnostic quality criteria, a quality control program in radiological protection of patients and staff has been developed, for example: Pilot study by using TLD in personnel radiation monitoring. Comparative study between high and low kVp in chest. Evaluation and dose reduction in chest pediatric. Reduction of radiation dose in studies of billiards via Quality Image and reduction of the dose in studies of colon by enema. Radiation dose of staff in fluoroscopy procedures. Evaluation and dose reduction in dental radiography in public Institutions. A mammography accreditation program for Venezuela, applied to public hospitals. (author)

  2. Virtual pilot course in radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez Romero, Angela Maria; Plazas, Maria Cristina

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The radiological protection performs vital importance in the fields medically, industrially and environmental. The X-rays and the radioactive materials used in medicine have allowed to realize important progresses and to develop new technologies skills for the diagnosis, the therapy and the prevention of diseases. Having in it counts tells the risks associated with the ionizing radiations, it is required legally that the personnel that intervenes in the different procedures has the necessary knowledge of radiological protection to assure that the use of radiations in the medical practice should carry out of ideal form, at the right moment and adopting all the necessary measures to guarantee the best protection, so much of the occupationally exposed personnel, since as, like of the patients and the public in general. The virtual environments for the construction of the knowledge like it is the virtual university, allows presenting an effective alternative in the learning of different areas and in this particular case of the radiological protection. With the aim lens to give response to these needs there is implemented this pilot virtual course year based on the current course of radiological protection that is dictated in the Mastery in Medical Physics of the National University of Colombia, sedate Bogota. The purpose of this virtual course is to use as academic and bibliographical support on radiological protection, as well as to answer to the needs of initial formation that the professionals have, to acquire a solid base in the mentioned matter. It has been conceived so that it provides theoretical formation, so much scientific as technology and that contemplates the recommendations and international and national procedure on radiological protection and some applications. Given the incorporation of the technologies of information and communication that in the academic area it has brought with it not only to give support to the curricular activities but

  3. The Society for Radiological Protection - 40 years on from 1963

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunster, H John

    2003-01-01

    The Society for Radiological Protection was created in 1963 at a time when the structure of radiological protection in the United Kingdom was already well established. From its creation 40 years ago to the present, most of the features of British radiological protection stem from the recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection. This review of the development of radiological protection has been produced to celebrate the 40 years of the Society's support of radiological protection, both in the United Kingdom and internationally. (review)

  4. Principles to establish a culture of the radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tovar M, V. M.

    2013-10-01

    The term of Culture of the Radiological Protection means the way in which the radiological protection is founded, regulated, managed, preserved and perceived in the job places, with the use of the ionizing radiations, in the industry, in medicine and in any daily activity that reflects the activities, beliefs, perceptions, goals and values that all the involved parts concern in relation to the radiological protection. The principles to establish a culture of the radiological protection that should be established by the professionals of the radiological protection, following the recommendations of the International Radiological Protection Association (IRPA) are presented. (author)

  5. Environmental and Radiological Protection Department - DEPRA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The activities and purposes of the Environmental and Radiological Protection Dept. of the Institute of Radioprotection and Dosimetry form Brazilian CNEN are presented. It is also presented an historical review of its activities, its personnel and its sections. (J.A.M.M.)

  6. Radiological protection standards in the United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pochin, E.; McLean, A.S.; Richings, L.D.G.

    1976-09-01

    In view of the interest now being expressed in the means by which radiological protection standards are derived and applied, this report briefly outlines the roles of the international organisations involved, summarises the UK arrangements, and indicates the principal sources of relevant biological information. (author)

  7. Notes on basic radiological protection. 2. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDowell, D.J.

    1990-01-01

    A booklet has been compiled giving a basic guide to anyone who has to work with ionising radiations and radioactive and the nature of radiation, radiological units, biological radiation effects, legislation and radiation dose limits, radiation and contamination monitoring and finally methods of protection from both external and internal radiation. (UK)

  8. Radiological protection and nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delpla, M.

    Dosimetric results obtained inside and outside nuclear power plants are examined with a review to proposing revision of the radiological protection standards. Dose limits are considered with regard to leukemia and genetic effects. Other topics discussed are: observed collective damage and mean risk; lethal exposure; healing and sign change of additional risk; and genetic effects of radiation on mice

  9. Radiological protection worker: occupational medical aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mora Ramirez, Erick

    2008-01-01

    International Organizations involved with radiation protection are presented in the first part. Also some documents related to the radiation that have been published by these organizations. Among the analyzed contents are the radiation and their patients, how to avoid the damage of radiation, pregnancy and exposure to medical radiation, effects of radiation, recommendations for the protection and safety standards. Occupational exposure is defined as the exposure received and understood by a worker during a period of work. In addition, it shows the types of occupational exposure, the protection that workers must have with the radiation, regulations, laws and the regulatory authority that protects the medical personnel in the uses of radiology [es

  10. Radiation protection in veterinary radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hone, C.P.

    1989-06-01

    This Code of Practice is designed to give guidance to veterinary surgeons in ensuring that workers and members of the public are adequately protected from the hazards of ionising radiation arising from the use of x-ray equipment in veterinary practice. (author)

  11. Radiologic diagnostics of dementia; Radiologische Demenzdiagnostik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Essig, M. [Radiologie, Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum Heidelberg (Germany); Radiologie, Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120, Heidelberg (Germany); Schoenberg, S.O. [Institut fuer klinische Radiologie, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen (Germany)

    2003-07-01

    Dementia is one of the most common diseases in the elderly population and is getting more and more important with the ageing of the population. A radiologic structural examination with CT or MRI is meanwhile a standard procedure in the diagnostic work up of patients with dementia syndrome. Radiology enables an early diagnosis and a differential diagnosis between different causes of dementia. Because structural changes occur only late in the disease process, a more detailed structural analysis using volumetric techniques or the use of functional imaging techniques is mandatory. These days, structural imaging uses MRI which enables to detect early atrophic changes at the medial temporal lobe with focus on the amygdala hippocampal complex. These changes are also present in the normal ageing process. In patients with Alzheimer's disease, however, they are more rapid and more pronounced. The use of functional imaging methods such as perfusion MRI, diffusion MRI or fMRI allow new insights into the pathophysiologic changes of dementia. The article gives an overview of the current status of structural imaging and an outlook into the potential of functional imaging methods. Detailed results of structural and functional imaging are presented in other articles of this issue. (orig.) [German] Demenzielle Syndrome gehoeren zu den haeufigsten Erkrankungen im hoeheren Lebensalter und werden mit einer Zunahme der Ueberalterung in der Bevoelkerung volkswirtschaftlich immer bedeutender. Die radiologische Untersuchung mittels struktureller CT oder MRT gehoert mittlerweile zur Standardabklaerung jeder demenziellen Symptomatik. Sie dient der Frueherkennung und der Differenzialdiagnostik der verschiedenen Ursachen einer Demenz. Dies gilt insbesondere in Hinblick auf zu erwartende und bereits vorhandene Therapiemoeglichkeiten. Da jedoch strukturelle Veraenderungen erst relativ spaet im Fortschreiten der Erkrankung visualisiert werden koennen, sind detaillierte strukturelle

  12. Assessment of the radiation risk from diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streffer, C.; Mueller, W.U.

    1995-01-01

    In any assessment of radiation risks from diagnostic radiology the main concern is the possible induction of cancer. It now appears to be beyond all doubt that ionizing rays invite the development of cancer in humans. The radiation doses encountered in diagnostic radiology generally vary from 1 to 50 mSv. For this dose range, no measured values are available to ascertain cancer risks from ionizing rays. The effects of such doses must therefore be extrapolated from higher dose levels under consideration of given dose-effect relationships. All relevant figures for diagnostic X-ray measures are therefore mathematically determined approximate values. The stochastic radiation risk following non-homogeneous radiation exposure is assessed on the basis of the effective dose. This dose was originally introduced to ascertain the risk from radioactive substances incorporated at the working place. A secondary intention was to trigger further developmental processes in radiation protection. Due to the difficulties previously outlined and the uncertainties surrounding the determination and assessment of the effective dose from diagnostic X-ray procedures, this dose should merely be used for technological refinements and comaprisons of examination procedures. It appears unreasonable that the effective doses determined for the individual examinations are summed up to obtain a collective effective dose and to multiply this with a risk factor so as to give an approximation of the resulting deaths from cancer. A reasonable alternative is to inform patients subjected to X-ray examinations about the associated radiation dose and to estimate form this the magnitude of the probable radiation risk. (orig./MG) [de

  13. Neutron monitoring for radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibson, J.A.B.

    1985-01-01

    Neutron monitoring is a subject of increasing general interest and considerable attention is being paid to the development of improved techniques and methods for neutron monitoring. The Agency, therefore, considered it important to prepare a guide on the subject of neutron monitoring for radiation protection purposes. The present Manual is intended for those persons or authorities in Member States, particularly developing countries, who are responsible for the organization of neutron monitoring programmes and practical neutron monitoring. This Manual consequently, deals with topics such as neutron dosimetry, sources of neutrons and neutron detection as well as field instruments and operational systems used in this context

  14. Problems of quality assurance and quality control in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angerstein, W.

    1986-01-01

    Topical problems of quality assurance and quality control in diagnostic radiology are discussed and possible solutions are shown. Complex units are differentiated with reference to physicians, technicians, organization of labour, methods of examination and indication. Quality control of radiologic imaging systems should involve three stages: (1) simple tests carried out by radiologic technicians, (2) measurements by service technicians, (3) testing of products by the manufacturer and independent governmental or health service test agencies. (author)

  15. Radiological protection report 2007; Strahlenschutzbericht 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-07-01

    This annual report issued by the Swiss Federal Nuclear Inspectorate (HSK) reports on the work carried out by the Inspectorate in 2007. It provides comprehensive data on radiation protection activities in Switzerland during 2007. This is the fourth annual summary report on the radiological protection issues regulated by the Inspectorate. It provides comprehensive data on doses for the staff and for individual jobs. It also includes year-to-year comparisons and comments on the continuing decline in collective and average doses for persons exposed to radiation in the course of their work. Radiation doses are commented on. Radiation in the four Swiss nuclear power stations and in four further nuclear installations in various Swiss research facilities is commented on. The Swiss radiation measurement network is commented on and the results obtained are discussed. The Inspectorate concludes that radiological protection in Swiss nuclear facilities is carried out consistently and in compliance with existing legislation.

  16. Recent perspectives on optimisation of radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robb, J.D.; Croft, J.R.

    1992-01-01

    The ALARA principle as a requirement in radiological protection has evolved from its theoretical roots. Based on several years work, this paper provides a backdrop to practical approaches to ALARA for the 1990s. The key step, developing ALARA thinking so that it becomes an integral part of radiological protection programmes, is discussed using examples from the UK and France, as is the role of tools to help standardise judgements for decision-making. In its latest recommendations, ICRP have suggested that the optimisation of protection should be constrained by restrictions on the doses to individuals. This paper also considers the function of such restrictions for occupational, public and medical exposure, and in the design process. (author)

  17. Quantities used in radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menossi, Carlos

    2010-01-01

    The application of ICRP recommendations requires knowledge of a variety of concepts and magnitudes. Many of them are employed in other fields of science and precision in its definition reflects this wide application. In this regard, information on quantities and basic units of radiation, which exists in numerous publications, are subjects of great interest. The characteristics and radiation effects are studied by physicists, biologists and chemists mainly. However, there are basics that must be known and to be recognized by general practitioners and specialists from all branches of medicine. The information on quantities and units are used only in radiation protection, have been obtained from the reports listed on the attached bibliography. Such quantities and units contain weighting factors used to provide for different types of radiation and energies that affect the body and thus take into account the relative radio-sensitivity of different tissues. Additionally, they have added a series of data for a better understanding of the units: for example, multiples and sub-multiples, and some examples of converting the units used in radiation protection. (author) [es

  18. Radiology examination as a diagnostic aid in presentations with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Radiology examination as a diagnostic aid in presentations with wide differential diagnoses: Case report of new Hodgkin's lymphoma on a background of poorly controlled HIV. Rachel Hubbard, Jalpa Kotecha, Thomas Nash, Yu Jin Lee, Nasir Khan, Farhat Kazmi ...

  19. Rapporteurs' report: Workshop on ethical issues in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Reilly, G.; Gruppetta, E.; Christofides, S.; Schreiner-Karoussou, A.; Dowling, A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the summary reports of the session rapporteurs at the Workshop on Ethical Issues in Diagnostic Radiology. The summaries reflect the extent to which the topics discussed are well reflected in the papers presented in this proceedings. (authors)

  20. Cost-benefit analysis in decision making for diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabrikant, J.I.; Hilberg, A.W.

    1982-02-01

    This paper reviews certain current concepts and methods relating to benefit-risk analysis, in terms of economic costs and raidation risks to health, in relation to the benefits from diagnostic radiology in clinical medicine

  1. Evaluation of the field size in dental diagnostic radiology system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, P.S.; Potiens, M.P.A.

    2006-01-01

    In this work the field size of a dental X rays machine was evaluated considering the recommendation of the Brazilian Health Ministry Regulation 453 which established basic lines of radiological protection in medical and dental diagnostic radiology. The diameter of the field should not be superior to 6 cm in the localized end point, limiting the radiated area and protecting the head-neck region. The measurements were carried out in a dental X rays machine, Dabi Atlante, model Spectro 70X Seletronic. For the field size or useful beam determination, the intra-oral films were positioned on a plain surface to be exposed in four stages and two focus-film distances (FFD), 20 cm and 27.5 cm: 1) with spacer cone; 2) without spacer cone; 3) with spacer cone and film-holding device; 4) without spacer cone and film-holding device. The results show that the diameter of the field size is satisfactory only for FFD = 20 cm. When the film-holding device is used, which is recommended by the Regulation 453, item 5.8 d(ii), the diameter of the field size exceeds the maximum recommended value of 6 cm. (authors)

  2. National Radiological Protection Board accounts 1986-87

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-05-01

    The 1986-87 accounts of the Radiological Protection Board are presented in accordance with the Radiological Protection Act 1970. The report of the Comptroller and Auditor General is also given. (U.K.)

  3. Radiological respiratory protection in Angra-1 Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amaral, Marcos A. do

    1996-01-01

    The present paper has the purpose to describe the actual situation of the Radiological respiratory Protection in Angra I Nuclear Power Plant, the difficulties found and the goals to achieve, in order of the radiological protection excellence. (author)

  4. National Radiological Protection Board accounts 1986-87

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-01-01

    The 1986-87 accounts of the Radiological Protection Board are presented in accordance with the Radiological Protection Act 1970. The report of the Comptroller and Auditor General is also given. (U.K.).

  5. Radiological protection system in the era of nuclear renaissance expectation for development of radiological protection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyomatsu, Hideki

    2008-01-01

    The current radiological protection system, which was established mainly by the ICRP and UNSCEAR, has contributed to the prevention of potential radiological health hazards, and has been a fundamental concept during the development of nuclear energy. Through a detailed discussion regarding the new ICRP recommendations, the world nuclear industry has reached a consensus that the current radiological protection system keeps its integrity in principle although it involves some remaining issues, such as the disposal of radioactive waste. In order to maximize the advantages of nuclear energy while keeping the integrity of radiological protection system, it is essential to address the characteristics of radiation, which is specific to nuclear energy, so that nuclear energy can coexist with other energy sources. The three basic principles of radiological protection (i.e., justification, optimization and dose limits), which were completed in the 1990 recommendations of ICRP, should be retained as the basic concepts for the future radiological protection system in order to maintain the continuity and consistency of the radiological protection system. The radiological protection system can be furthermore developed only by combining the above three principles with best practices extracted from utilities' field experience. The significant reduction of radiation exposures received by members of the public and radiation workers in the field has resulted from the efforts by the world utilities to achieve the optimization. In order to correctly apply the theory to the work practices, it is essential to see how the theory is practically used in the field. Such a process should be also emphasized in the revision work of the IAEA Basic Safety Standards (BSS), which is currently under progress. Integrating the theory in the work practices is the key to the true development of nuclear renaissance, which could lead to the establishment of the nuclear safety regime. (author)

  6. French diagnostic reference levels in diagnostic radiology, computed tomography and nuclear medicine: 2004-2008 Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roch, P.; Aubert, B.

    2013-01-01

    After 5 y of collecting data on diagnostic reference levels (DRLs), the Nuclear Safety and Radiation Protection French Inst. (IRSN) presents the analyses of this data. The analyses of the collected data for radiology, computed tomography (CT) and nuclear medicine allow IRSN to estimate the level of regulatory application by health professionals and the representativeness of current DRL in terms of relevant examinations, dosimetric quantities, numerical values and patient morphologies. Since 2004, the involvement of professionals has highly increased, especially in nuclear medicine, followed by CT and then by radiology. Analyses show some discordance between regulatory examinations and clinical practice. Some of the dosimetric quantities used for the DRL setting are insufficient or not relevant enough, and some numerical values should also be reviewed. On the basis of these findings, IRSN formulates recommendations to update regulatory DRL with current and relevant examination lists, dosimetric quantities and numerical values. (authors)

  7. Role and responsibilities of medical physicists in radiological protection of patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niroomand-Rad, A.

    2001-01-01

    The paper provides a brief history of the International Organization for Medical Physics (IOMP), followed by some general comments on the radiological protection of patients. The importance of establishing scientific guidelines and professional standards is emphasized, as is the need to ensure the protection of patients undergoing radiation therapy. The responsibility of qualified medical physicists in the protection of patients in nuclear medicine and in diagnostic and interventional radiology is also discussed. (author)

  8. Course on radiology and radiation protection. 3. rev. enl. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    This book shall serve as accompanying study text-book for students of medicine, who are in the clinical semesters in the course on radiology and radiation protection. The book deals in general with the field of radiology, starting from the physical and radiobiological fundamentals, through the large field of X-ray diagnostics and radiotherapy to nuclear medicine, including computerized tomography. Broad space is dedicated to radiation protection. A brief, strongly didactically divided text presents this large scientific field of knowledge in systematic order. It is illustrated by numerous tables and sketches, which shall facilitate understanding in cases of difficult problems. The book is completed by a detailed time table, by references to the essential and most important advancing literature and by a comprehensive subject index. (orig./HP) [de

  9. Radiological protection optimization using derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freitas Acosta Perez, C. de; Sordi, G.M.A.A.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to provide a different approach related to the integral cost-benefit and extended cost-benefit analysis used in the decision-aiding techniques. In the ICRP publication 55 the annual protection cost is envisaged as a set of points, each of them representing an option, linked by a straight line. The detriment cost function is considered a linear function whose angular coefficient is determined by the alpha value. In this paper the uranium mine example considered in the ICRP publication 55 was used. But the potential curve was introduced both in the integral cost benefit analysis and in the extended cost-benefit analysis, which the individual dose distribution attribute is added. The result was obtained using derivatives. The detriment cost, Y, is not necessary because the alpha value is known. The Y derivative dS/dY is the alpha value itself and so, the attention is directed to the derivative -dX/dS on the points that, along with the alpha value, present the optimum option. The results makes clear that the prevailing factor in the optimum option selection is the alpha value imputed, and those a single alpha value, as suggested now, probably as little efficiency on the optimization process. Obtaining a curve for the alpha value and using the derivative technique introduced in this paper, the analytical solution is more convenient and reliable compared to the one used now. (authors)

  10. Protection of staff in interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melkamu, M. A.

    2013-04-01

    This project focuses on the interventional radiology. The main objective of this project work was to provide a guidance and advice for occupational exposure and hospital management to optimize radiation protection safety and endorse safety culture. It provides practical information on how to minimize occupational exposure in interventional radiology. In the literature review all considerable parameters to reduce dose to the occupationally exposed are well discussed. These parameters include dose limit, risk estimation, use of dosimeter, personal dose record keeping, analysis of surveillance of occupational dose, investigation levels, and proper use of radiation protection tools and finally about scatter radiation dose rate. In addition the project discusses the ways to reduce occupational exposure in interventional radiology. The methods for dose reduction are minimizing fluoroscopic time, minimizing the number of fluoroscopic image, use of patient dose reduction technologies, use of collimation, planning interventional procedures, positioning in low scattered areas, use of protective shielding, use of appropriate fluoroscopic imaging equipment, giving training for the staff, wearing the dosimeters and know their own dose regularly, and management commitment to quality assurance and quality control system and optimization of radiation protection of safety. (author)

  11. Orthopaedic positioning in diagnostic radiology. 2. rev. and enlarged ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernau, A.

    1990-01-01

    Effective roentgenology of the skeletal system very much relies on good knowledge of three main factors, namely patient positioning, film cassette positioning, and radiation field. The functional approach developed in orthopaedic diagnostics has been adopted for practical adjustment techniques in all X-ray examinations, so that e.g. examinations of the vertebral column and lower extremities now are carried out in upright position instead of the lying position, which of course corresponds to the real functional demand. In order to guarantee good reproducibility of X-ray images, a high standardization of positioning and adjustment techniques is to be achieved. The aspect of optimum radiological protection is also discussed, referring to shielding of the gonads, foils, measures for reduction of scattered radiation fields, and unambiguous labelling of film material. (orig./GDG) With 490 figs. and 1 separate folded tab [de

  12. Radiological protection criteria for waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, M.D.; Webb, G.A.M.

    1985-01-01

    In this paper the progress being made by international organisations towards the development of a consensus on the radiological protection criteria to be applied to waste management, and in particular waste disposal, is reviewed. Against this background, work on the development of criteria for use in the UK is described. It is concluded that an international consensus is emerging and that the criteria being recommended for use in the UK are consistent with current international views. (author)

  13. Radiological protection criteria for waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, M.D.; Webb, G.A.M.

    1985-01-01

    In this Paper the progress being made by international organizations towards the development of a consensus on the radiological protection criteria to be applied to waste management, and in particular waste disposal, is reviewed. Against this background, work on the development of criteria for use in the UK is described. It is concluded that an international consensus is emerging and that the criteria being recommended for use in the UK are consistent with current international views. (author)

  14. Radiological protection in industrial gamma scintigraphy facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, M.; Suarez, S.

    2002-01-01

    Operational experience has shown that the mobile scintigraphy sector is not only that where individual doses are highest but also where there are the greatest number of high doses, overdoses and incidents. This fact highlights the need for improvement in the optimisation of radiological protection in the sector. In this context the CSN has adopted and implemented an action plan aimed at reducing doses to operation staff. (Author)

  15. Foundations in radiological protection and radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales M, F.

    2002-01-01

    The work is divided in three parts. The part 1 are a brief abstrac of some important concepts related with the cells. The part 2 speak in general of the biological effects of the ionizing radiations according to the recommendations of the international commission of radiological protection. The part 3 refer to radiobiological calculations applying the quadratic lineal pattern to the radiotherapy. These calculations are important in view of the fact that they are applied for the introduction of new outlines of treatments

  16. Diagnostic radiology on multiple injured patients: interdisciplinary management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linsenmaier, U.; Pfeifer, K.J.; Kanz, K.G.; Mutschler, W.

    2001-01-01

    The presence of a radiologist within the admitting area of an emergency department and his capability as a member of the trauma team have a major impact on the role of diagnostic radiology in trauma care. The knowledge of clinical decision criteria, algorithms, and standards of patient care are essential for the acceptance within a trauma team. We present an interdisciplinary management concept of diagnostic radiology for trauma patients, which comprises basic diagnosis, organ diagnosis, radiological ABC, and algorithms of early clinical care. It is the result of a prospective study comprising over 2000 documented multiple injured patients. The radiologist on a trauma team should support trauma surgery and anesthesia in diagnostic and clinical work-up. The radiological ABC provides a structured approach for diagnostic imaging in all steps of the early clinical care of the multiple injured patient. Radiological ABC requires a reevaluation in cases of equivocal findings or difficulties in the clinical course. Direct communication of radiological findings with the trauma team enables quick clinical decisions. In addition, the radiologist can priority-oriented influence the therapy by using interventional procedures. The clinical radiologist is an active member of the interdisciplinary trauma team, not only providing diagnostic imaging but also participating in clinical decisions. (orig.) [de

  17. Training in Radiation Protection for Interventional Radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vano, E.; Guibelalde, E.

    2002-07-01

    Several potential problems have been detected in the safety aspects for the practice of interventional radiology procedures: a) An important increase in the number cases and their complexity and the corresponding increase of installations and specialists involved; b) New X ray systems more sophisticated, with advanced operational possibilities, requiring special skills in the operators to obtain the expected benefits;c) New medical specialists arriving to the interventional arena to profit the benefits of the interventional techniques without previous experience in radiation protection. For that reason, education and training is one of the basic areas in any optimisation programme in radiation protection (RP). the medical field and especially interventional radiology requires actions to promote and to profit the benefit of the new emerging technologies for training (Internet, electronic books, etc). The EC has recently sponsored the MARTIR programme (Multimedia and Audio-visual Radiation Protection Training in Interventional Radiology) with the production of two videos on basic aspects of RP and quality control and one interactive CD-ROM to allow tailored individual training programmes. those educational tools are being distributed cost free in the main European languages. To go ahead with these actions, the EC has decided to promote during 2002, a forum with the main Medical European Societies involved in these interventional procedures. (Author)

  18. Principles of radiological protection: new paradigms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ximenes, Edmir; Guimaraes, Maria Ines Calil Cury

    2009-01-01

    Full text: The relationships of workers, patients and physicians to the basic principles of radiological protection were given in this work an historical introduction that emphasizes their development from their beginnings to the current period. The evolution of scientific knowledge as regards the benefits and injuries resulting from the use of the ionizing radiation in human activities is the main focus of the work. These principles (justification, optimization and limitation) are presented in order to offer a broader view of their application fields. The principle of the optimization receives the contribution of techniques aimed to help the decision used in radiological protection. The principle of the limitation of doses is helped by the concept of limit specifically linked to a given segment of the population or a given human activity. Regarding the current relationship between physicians and patients a change of philosophy is discussed in what concerns the radiation dose supplied that should be the minimum one in relation to the diagnosis or cure objectives. The administration of radiation must follow the recommendations of ICRP - International Commission on Radiological Protection. The radiation can bring benefits if used with rationality, efficacy and care. The radiation should not be feared, but respected. (author)

  19. Evolution of the radiological protection paradigms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sordi, Gian Maria A.A.

    2009-01-01

    We consider as initial radiological protection paradigms those in vigour after the release of the atomic energy for pacific usages in 1955. In that occasion, only one paradigm was introduced, presently named dose limitation system. After arguing about the basis that raised the paradigm, we introduced the guidance, that is, the measurements to be implemented to comply with the paradigm. In that occasion, they were two, i.e., the radiation dose monitoring and the workplace classification. Afterwards, the reasons that caused the radiological protection paradigms changes in force until 1995 are discussed. The initial paradigm was modified introducing the justification and the optimization principles, adding that the radiological protection should be economical and effective. The guidance also increased to four: personal monitoring, workplace classification, reference level and workers classification. Afterwards, we give the main justifications for the present paradigms that besides the formers were added the dose constraints, the potential exposure and the annual risk limits. Due to these modifications, the workers classifications were eliminated from the guidance, but the potential exposure and the search for the dose constraints were added. Eventually, we discuss the tendencies for the next future and the main changes introduced by the ICRP in the Publication 103, 2007. (author)

  20. Training in Radiation Protection for Interventional Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vano, E.; Guibelalde, E.

    2002-01-01

    Several potential problems have been detected in the safety aspects for the practice of interventional radiology procedures: a) An important increase in the number cases and their complexity and the corresponding increase of installations and specialists involved; b) New X ray systems more sophisticated, with advanced operational possibilities, requiring special skills in the operators to obtain the expected benefits;c) New medical specialists arriving to the interventional arena to profit the benefits of the interventional techniques without previous experience in radiation protection. For that reason, education and training is one of the basic areas in any optimisation programme in radiation protection (RP). the medical field and especially interventional radiology requires actions to promote and to profit the benefit of the new emerging technologies for training (Internet, electronic books, etc). The EC has recently sponsored the MARTIR programme (Multimedia and Audio-visual Radiation Protection Training in Interventional Radiology) with the production of two videos on basic aspects of RP and quality control and one interactive CD-ROM to allow tailored individual training programmes. those educational tools are being distributed cost free in the main European languages. To go ahead with these actions, the EC has decided to promote during 2002, a forum with the main Medical European Societies involved in these interventional procedures. (Author)

  1. Quality assurance program on diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yacovenco, Alejandro; Borges, Jose Carlos; Mota, Helvecio Correa

    1995-01-01

    Aiming to elaborate a methodology to optimize the performance of the Radiology Service of the Military Police Hospital, in Rio de Janeiro, some goals were established: improvement of the attendance to patients; improvement of the qualification of technicians; achievement and maintenance of high degrees of quality in each step of the radiological process; improvement of the image quality; optimization of dose per examination and cost reduction. (author). 8 refs., 3 figs

  2. The mandate and work of ICRP Committee 3 on radiological protection in medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, D L; Martin, C J; Rehani, M M

    2018-01-01

    The mandate of Committee 3 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) is concerned with the protection of persons and unborn children when ionising radiation is used in medical diagnosis, therapy, and biomedical research. Protection in veterinary medicine has been newly added to the mandate. Committee 3 develops recommendations and guidance in these areas. The most recent documents published by ICRP that relate to radiological protection in medicine are 'Radiological protection in cone beam computed tomography' (ICRP Publication 129) and 'Radiological protection in ion beam radiotherapy' (ICRP Publication 127). A report in cooperation with ICRP Committee 2 entitled 'Radiation dose to patients from radiopharmaceuticals: a compendium of current information related to frequently used substances' (ICRP Publication 128) has also been published. 'Diagnostic reference levels in medical imaging' (ICRP Publication 135), published in 2017, provides specific advice on the setting and use of diagnostic reference levels for diagnostic and interventional radiology, digital imaging, computed tomography, nuclear medicine, paediatrics, and multi-modality procedures. 'Occupational radiological protection in interventional procedures' was published in March 2018 as ICRP Publication 139. A document on radiological protection in therapy with radiopharmaceuticals is likely to be published in 2018. Work is in progress on several other topics, including appropriate use of effective dose in collaboration with the other ICRP committees, guidance for occupational radiological protection in brachytherapy, justification in medical imaging, and radiation doses to patients from radiopharmaceuticals (an update to ICRP Publication 128). Committee 3 is also considering the development of guidance on radiological protection in medicine related to individual radiosusceptibility, in collaboration with ICRP Committee 1.

  3. Radiological protection and safety in medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1998-01-01

    Here is presented a book published by ICRP ( International Commission Radiological Protection) that exposes the base principles of radiation protection, especially in medical sector. The exposure to ionizing radiations in medicine concerns the persons that profit by a diagnosis or a treatment but also the medical personnel, the patients family and the public. This publication 'CIPR 73' is more particularly adapted to the physicists and physicians implied in radiotherapy, medical imaging, in nuclear medicine and dentistry. It is also useful for the hospital establishments managers and to concerned national authorities. (N.C.)

  4. ICRP-26, the recommendations on radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jun, J.S.

    1983-01-01

    Since the last ICRP recommendations on radiological protection was pubished in 1966 as it's publication 9, the revised edition of the recommendations had first been published in 1977, accommodating up-to-date knowledge of radiobiology and operational experiences of radiation protection built up for over a decade. In this article, the new version of the recommendations is reviewed in comparison with those of the publication 9, while the corrections and modifications made afterward are introduced together with the recent trends and responses of the experts in various countries for the pracical adoption or legislation of the recommendations. (Author)

  5. Radiological protection of paediatric patients: An overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ringertz, H.G.; Bremmer, S.

    2001-01-01

    Paediatric patients require special attention with respect to radiation protection, for various reasons. The difference between a 1 kg premature baby and a 100 kg teenager puts special demands on the radiographic techniques used, and the increased radiosensitivity of growing tissue and the patients' longer life expectancy put greater demands on the justification of the procedures to be carried out. The optimization procedure involves practical aspects such as immobilization, body build specific exposure parameters and body build specific anatomical knowledge. These and other aspects of paediatric radiological protection are discussed in this overview. (author)

  6. Solitary pulmonary nodule: radiologic features and diagnostic approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez Cambronero, Luis Enrique

    2012-01-01

    A literature review is conducted on the solitary pulmonary nodule, to determine the diagnostic methods and specific characteristics. The diagnostic methods used have been: chest radiography, computed tomography, positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. The radiological features are defined: location, size, definition of contours or edges (margins), densitometric and attenuation characteristics, cavitation, air bronchogram, growth, doubling time, satellite nodules, nutrient vessels [es

  7. Advanced radiological protection course 1993: 15 November - 3 December

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This pamphlet describes an advanced radiological protection course organised by the NRPB and aimed at experienced health physicists and others who have worked in radiological protection for some years. A knowledge of basic radiological protection is assumed. The course concentrates on developing awareness of the policies and philosophy upon which radiological protection is based. Emphasis is given to managerial and professional responsibilities in radiological protection and to involvement with problems of industrial and public relations. The 1994 course is 3 - 21st October. (Author)

  8. Implications of tissue reactions for radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyazaki, S.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer effects and risks at low doses from ionising radiation have been main issues within the field of radiological protection. In contrast, non-cancer effects and risks at low doses from ionising radiation are controversial topics within the field of radiation protection. These issues are discussed in ICRP Publication 118, 'ICRP Statement on Tissue Reactions.' Both non-cancer effects and risks are expected to become increasingly important to the system of radiation protection. Before this can happen, several factors must be considered: thorough characterization of the relationship between dose and risk; verification of the biological mechanisms for any noted excess risk; and adjustment of noted excess risks through the use of a detriment factor. It is difficult to differentiate the relatively small risks associated with radiation from other risk factors in the low-dose region of the dose response curve. Several recent papers also indicate the possibility of a non-linear dose response relationship for non-cancer effects. In addition, there are still many uncertainties associated with the biological mechanisms for non-cancer effects. Finally, it is essential to consider the incorporation of detriment into a well-defined system of radiological protection. Given the recent interest in non-cancer effects, it is essential to facilitate discussions in order to more clearly define dose limits within the existing system of radiation protection for both cancer and non-cancer effects. (author)

  9. Radiology standards for primary dental care: report by the Royal College of Radiologists and the National Radiological Protection Board

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hudson, Tony

    1994-01-01

    In 1992 a joint venture between the Royal College of Radiologists (RCR) and the National Radiological Protection Board (NRPB) resulted in the formation of a Working Party (WP) to consider dental radiology. Although individual doses to patients are low, WP identified considerable scope for reducing the collective dose to patients and for improving the diagnostic quality of radiographs. The report published in the Documents of the NRPB series presents the WP conclusions in the form of guidelines that deal with all aspects of dental radiology in primary dental care. (Author)

  10. Practical X-ray diagnostics orthopedics and trauma surgery. Indication, adjustment technique and radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flechtenmacher, Johannes; Sabo, Desiderius

    2014-01-01

    The book on X-ray diagnostics in orthopedics and trauma surgery includes the following chapters: 1. Introduction: radiation protection, equipment technology radiological diagnostics of skeleton carcinomas, specific aspects of trauma surgery, special aspects of skeleton radiology for children. 2. X-ray diagnostics of different anatomical regions: ankle joint, knee, hips and pelvis, hand and wrist joint, elbow, shoulder, spinal cord. 3. Appendix: radiation protection according to the X-ray regulations.

  11. Performance study of the primary standard ionization chamber for deployment of the diagnostic radiology qualities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardoso, Ricardo de Souza; Bossio, Francisco; Quaresma, Daniel da Silva; Peixoto, Jose Guilherme Pereira

    2013-01-01

    Activities radiotherapy, diagnostic radiology and radiation protection, require knowledge of physical and dosimetric parameters, to be applied safely. Aiming to meet demand in Brazil, the National Laboratory of Metrology of Ionising Radiation - LNMRI - is deploying the primary standard for the calibration of secondary standard chambers, used in quality control in hospitals, clinics and industries. (author)

  12. Radiological protection report 2014; Strahlenschutzbericht 2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2015-06-15

    In its 11{sup th} Annual Report on Radiological Protection, the Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate (ENSI) provides the public with information on dose rates for individuals professionally exposed to radiation, releases of radioactive material and the monitoring of environmental radiation. ENSI, as the regulatory body for nuclear facilities in Switzerland, is continuing to expand its information provision over and above that contained in the Radiological Protection Report. At 0.6 mSv per year, the average individual dose for professionally exposed persons remains significantly below the annual limit of 20 mSv specified by the Swiss Federal Council. It is also less than the average annual rate of natural environmental exposure of 5.5 mSv for the population in Switzerland as a whole. The highest individual dose during the year was 12 mSv. The collective doses lie within the range of past years. There is a trend towards higher collective doses at KKL. As a general rule, planning by the licensees of nuclear facilities in the field of radiological protection is of a high standard. Actual collective doses in 2014 at Beznau 1, Goesgen and Leibstadt were within 10% of projected exposure rates and at Beznau 2 and Muehleberg the doses were about 30% lower. Demands in terms of radiological protection were particularly high at Leibstadt and Beznau 1; at Leibstadt mainly as a result of a fuel cladding defect and at Beznau 1 because of the continuing elevated ambient rate for components in the primary circuit. ENSI concluded that the Swiss nuclear facilities continue to operate a consistent approach to radiological protection. In 2014, licensees of nuclear facilities remained within official release limits, in some cases by a significant margin. Liquid releases from Muehleberg were below the target value of 1 GBq per year set by ENSI on the basis of international recommendations. At the Central Interim Storage Facility (ZWILAG) and at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI

  13. Importance of establishing radiation protection culture in Radiology Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploussi, Agapi; Efstathopoulos, Efstathios P

    2016-02-28

    The increased use of ionization radiation for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes, the rapid advances in computed tomography as well as the high radiation doses delivered by interventional procedures have raised serious safety and health concerns for both patients and medical staff and have necessitated the establishment of a radiation protection culture (RPC) in every Radiology Department. RPC is a newly introduced concept. The term culture describes the combination of attitudes, beliefs, practices and rules among the professionals, staff and patients regarding to radiation protection. Most of the time, the challenge is to improve rather than to build a RPC. The establishment of a RPC requires continuing education of the staff and professional, effective communication among stakeholders of all levels and implementation of quality assurance programs. The RPC creation is being driven from the highest level. Leadership, professionals and associate societies are recognized to play a vital role in the embedding and promotion of RPC in a Medical Unit. The establishment of a RPC enables the reduction of the radiation dose, enhances radiation risk awareness, minimizes unsafe practices, and improves the quality of a radiation protection program. The purpose of this review paper is to describe the role and highlight the importance of establishing a strong RPC in Radiology Departments with an emphasis on promoting RPC in the Interventional Radiology environment.

  14. 1987 year book of diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bragg, D.G.; Keats, T.E.; Kieffer, S.A.; Kirkpatrick, J.A. Jr.; Koehler, P.R.

    1987-01-01

    The book is divided into seven sections, which cover neuroradiology, the thorax, the abdomen, the musculoskeletal system, pediatric radiology, radiation physics, and cardiovascular and interventional radiology. Each of the seven editors was responsible for one section. These editors gleaned what they thought were the most important articles from 78 medical journals worldwide, wrote abstracts, and then commented on their relevance. For each journal article, the heading lists the title of the paper, the authors, the authors' affiliations, and the journal name. If an article contained an important table or figure, it was reproduced for the review

  15. Cognitive and system factors contributing to diagnostic errors in radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Cindy S; Nagy, Paul G; Weaver, Sallie J; Newman-Toker, David E

    2013-09-01

    In this article, we describe some of the cognitive and system-based sources of detection and interpretation errors in diagnostic radiology and discuss potential approaches to help reduce misdiagnoses. Every radiologist worries about missing a diagnosis or giving a false-positive reading. The retrospective error rate among radiologic examinations is approximately 30%, with real-time errors in daily radiology practice averaging 3-5%. Nearly 75% of all medical malpractice claims against radiologists are related to diagnostic errors. As medical reimbursement trends downward, radiologists attempt to compensate by undertaking additional responsibilities to increase productivity. The increased workload, rising quality expectations, cognitive biases, and poor system factors all contribute to diagnostic errors in radiology. Diagnostic errors are underrecognized and underappreciated in radiology practice. This is due to the inability to obtain reliable national estimates of the impact, the difficulty in evaluating effectiveness of potential interventions, and the poor response to systemwide solutions. Most of our clinical work is executed through type 1 processes to minimize cost, anxiety, and delay; however, type 1 processes are also vulnerable to errors. Instead of trying to completely eliminate cognitive shortcuts that serve us well most of the time, becoming aware of common biases and using metacognitive strategies to mitigate the effects have the potential to create sustainable improvement in diagnostic errors.

  16. Quality assurance program in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yacovenco, Alejandro; Borges, J.C.

    1994-01-01

    Aiming to elaborate a methodology to optimize the performance of the Radiology Service of the Military Police Hospital, in Rio dee Janeiro, some goals were established: improvement of the attendance to patients; improvement of the qualification of technicians; achievement and maintenance of high degrees of quality in each step of the radiological process; improvement of the image quality; optimization of dose per examination and cost reduction. The procedure used to detect faults in the radiological process was the analysis of causes of film losses. Results show a 70% reduction in the film rejection rate. 74% of total identified faults were due to equipment, 11% to films, 10% to patients and 5% to developing. The reduction in the cost of developed film reached 75%. A training course given to the staff of the radiological service fully reached its goals, contributing, with the staff motivation, mostly to the success of the program. This success indicates that, with a serious persistent work, it is possible to offer to patients services within their expectations, even at a public hospital. Such programs should be supported by health authorities, not only due to their technical and economic needs but, mostly, due to their social implications. (author). 10 refs., 11 figs

  17. Diagnostic radiology in the rheumatic diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, A.; Martin, W.

    1986-01-01

    In the radiological investigation of joint disease there are several signs which are helpful in making a diagnosis, Individually these signs will often suggest the presence of joint disease but may not be specific. However when present in combination or when considering the anatomic distribution, a definitive diagnosis is possible. Several of the signs of rheumatic disease can occur in other nonrheumatic conditions

  18. Outpatient invasive radiologic procedures - Diagnostic and therapeutic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dublin, A.

    1987-01-01

    This book is a ''how-to'' book for radiologists who are planning to, or considering whether to establish outpatient practice in response to DRGs. It provides practical, expert advice on both the administrative and clinical sides of outpatient radiology. It focuses on the essentials of clinical practice in the outpatient setting - and how it differs from inpatient practice

  19. Factors affecting patient dose in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poletti, J.L.

    1985-01-01

    There are two stages in the X-ray image forming process; first the irradiation of the patient to produce the X-ray pattern in space, known as the primary radiological image, and second, the conversion of this pattern into a visible form. This report discusses the first stage and its interrelation with image quality and patient dose

  20. Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edholm, P.R.

    1990-01-01

    This is a report describing diagnostic techniques used in radiology. It describes the equipment necessary for, and the operation of a radiological department. Also is described the standard methods used in radiodiagnosis. (K.A.E.)

  1. Optimization in radiological protection; Otimizacao em radioprotecao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acosta Perez, Clarice de Freitas

    1996-07-01

    The optimization concept in radiation protection is, in its essence, practical. In each aspect that we deal with the man, it is necessary to take frequent decisions such as: what is the protection level to be pursued, since the protection levels under consideration provide doses lower than the appropriate annual limits. The optimization gives a basic framework of the minding that is appropriate to conduct to a balance kind of the resources available for the protection and protection level obtained against a multitude of factors and constrains in a manner to obtain the best result. In this work, was performed the optimization, from the radiation protection point of view, of a facility project who enclose two shielded hot cells where will be handled UO{sub 2} small plate with 50% of U-235 burn-up, irradiated in the research swimming pool reactor, IEA-R1. To obtain this goal were specified the relevant factors and criteria, were applied the main techniques used in a decision-making in radiological protection, presently adopted and was performed a sensibility study of the factors and criteria used in this work. In order to obtain a greater agility in applying the techniques for decision-making was developed a micro computer program. (author)

  2. Evaluation of radiation protection conditions in intraoral radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miguel, Cristiano; Barros, Frieda Saicla; Rocha, Anna Silvia Penteado Setti da, E-mail: miguel_cristianoch@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (PPGEB/UTFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Programa de Pos-graduacao em Engenharia Biomedica; Tilly Junior, Joao Gilberto [Universidade Federal do Parana (UNIR/UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Hospital de Clinicas. Unidade de Imagem e Radioterapia; Almeida, Claudio Domingues de [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica Medica

    2016-04-15

    Introduction: The dental radiology represents about 20% of human exposure to radiation in radio diagnostic. Although the doses practiced in intraoral dentistry are considered low, they should not be ignored due to the volume of the performed procedures. This study presents the radiation protection conditions for intraoral radiology in Curitiba - PR. Methods: Data was collected through a quantitative field research of a descriptive nature during the period between September of 2013 and December of 2014. The survey sample consisted of 97 dentists and 130 intraoral equipment. The data related to the equipment was collected using structured questions and quality control evaluations. The evaluations of the entrance skin dose, the size of the radiation field and the total filtration were performed with dosimetry kits provided and evaluated by IRD/CNEN. The exposure time and voltage were measured using noninvasive detectors. The occupational dose was verified by thermoluminescent dosimeters. The existence of personal protection equipment, the type of image processing and knowledge of dentists about radiation protection were verified through the application of a questionnaire. Results: Among the survey's results, it is important to emphasize that 90% of the evaluated equipment do not meet all the requirements of the Brazilian radiation protection standards. Conclusion: The lack of knowledge about radiation protection, the poor operating conditions of the equipment, and the image processing through visual method are mainly responsible for the unnecessary exposure of patients to ionizing radiation. (author)

  3. Work management to optimise occupational radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahier, B.

    2009-01-01

    Occupational exposures at nuclear power plants worldwide have steadily decreased since the early 1990's. Regulatory pressures, technological advances, improved plant designs and operational procedures, as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) culture and information exchange have contributed to this downward trend. However, with the continued ageing and possible life extensions of nuclear power plants, ongoing economic pressures, regulatory, social and political evolutions, and the potential of new nuclear build, the task of ensuring that occupational exposures are kept as low as reasonably achievable continues to present challenges to radiological protection professionals

  4. Work management to optimise occupational radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahier, B.

    2009-01-01

    Although work management is no longer a new concept, continued efforts are still needed to ensure that good performance, outcomes and trends are maintained in the face of current and future challenges. The ISOE programme thus created an Expert Group on Work Management in 2007 to develop an updated report reflecting the current state of knowledge, technology and experience in the occupational radiological protection of workers at nuclear power plants. Published in 2009, the new ISOE report on Work Management to Optimise Occupational Radiological Protection in the Nuclear Power Industry provides up-to-date practical guidance on the application of work management principles. Work management measures aim at optimising occupational radiological protection in the context of the economic viability of the installation. Important factors in this respect are measures and techniques influencing i) dose and dose rate, including source- term reduction; ii) exposure, including amount of time spent in controlled areas for operations; and iii) efficiency in short- and long-term planning, worker involvement, coordination and training. Equally important due to their broad, cross-cutting nature are the motivational and organisational arrangements adopted. The responsibility for these aspects may reside in various parts of an installation's organisational structure, and thus, a multi-disciplinary approach must be recognised, accounted for and well-integrated in any work. Based on the operational experience within the ISOE programme, the following key areas of work management have been identified: - regulatory aspects; - ALARA management policy; - worker involvement and performance; - work planning and scheduling; - work preparation; - work implementation; - work assessment and feedback; - ensuring continuous improvement. The details of each of these areas are elaborated and illustrated in the report through examples and case studies arising from ISOE experience. They are intended to

  5. Design principles for radiological protection instrumentation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wells, F.H.; Powell, R.G.

    1981-02-01

    This Code of Practice takes the form of recommendations intended for designers and installers of Radiological Protection Instrumentation, and should also be of value to the newcomer to the R.P.I. field. Topics are discussed under the following headings: outline of R.P.I. requirements, specifying the requirement, satisfying the requirements, (overall design, availability and reliability, information display, human factors, power supplies, manufacture, quality assurance, testing, and cost analysis), supply, location and operation of the equipment, importance of documentation. (U.K.)

  6. Radiological protection report 2012; Strahlenschutzbericht 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-06-15

    Two years after the massive release of radiation from the nuclear power plants at Fukushima Dai-ichi, the repercussions continue to preoccupy the radiological and emergency protection community, both in Switzerland and internationally. In Switzerland the Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate (ENSI) has initiated measures as part of the European Union Stress Tests and has its own Fukushima Action Plan. In this Annual Report, ENSI focuses on radiological protection in Swiss nuclear facilities. The average individual dose has changed little compared with previous years. At 0.7 mSv, it is significantly below the limit both for persons exposed to radiation during their work (20 mSv) and the annual average rate of exposure for the population in Switzerland as a whole (5.5 mSv). In terms of collective doses, the extensive maintenance work at the Leibstadt power plant (KKL) resulted in a doubling of rates compared with recent years. However, in the remaining nuclear facilities the rates have not changed significantly. The highest individual dose during the year under review was 13 mSv. Exposure rates in 2012 for all those exposed to radiation during work in facilities subject to ENSI surveillance were below the maximum limit. Greater attention is now being given to work in high and variable radiation fields and in difficult conditions. Swiss nuclear facilities continue to operate a consistent radiological protection approach. Measuring equipment plays an important role in radiological protection. Having conducted a range of inspections and comparative measurements of aerosol-iodine filters and waste water sampling together with measurements in the field of personal dosimetry, ENSI has concluded that the required measuring equipment for radiological protection exists, that this equipment is correctly used and provides reliable data. ENSI maintains a test laboratory that analyses samples from nuclear facilities and their immediate vicinity and also conducts field

  7. Radiological protection report 2013; Strahlenschutzbericht 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2014-06-15

    The public often regard radiation from nuclear facilities as more dangerous than that from natural sources or medicinal applications, but there is no scientific justification for this view. Operators of nuclear facilities endeavour to keep radiation releases at a level much below the limits specified in law. The latter are defined in such a way that the limit for public exposure to radiation is not exceeded even if very unfavourable assumptions were to apply. In its 10{sup th} Annual Report on Radiological Protection, the Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate (ENSI) analyses the release of radioactive materials from Swiss nuclear facilities. All nuclear facilities complied with the limits and in some cases by a very large margin. Fuel rod damage at the Leibstadt nuclear power station (KKL) did trigger higher releases of airborne iodine than in previous years. The Muehleberg power station must further reduce its waterborne releases of radiation. The Swiss Federal Office of Public Health (FOPH) has confirmed that these releases would not have affected public safety even if river or seawater had been used for drinking water. With the exception of the increase in the release of gaseous iodine at KKL, emissions from Swiss nuclear facilities were comparable with previous years and the annual dose to which young children in the immediate vicinity of nuclear facilities were exposed was less than 0.01 mSv. The main element contributing to these releases is the radioactive carbon isotope {sup 14}C produced by neutron reactions with nitrogen, carbon and oxygen. The low level of releases is due to the responsible actions of nuclear facilities in the fulfillment of their obligations with regard to radiological protection. The mean individual dose for those exposed to radiation during their work has not changed significantly in recent years and is at 0.6 mSv significantly below the limit for persons professionally exposed to radiation (20 mSv) and even the mean annual dose

  8. Radiological protection and public health: crossbreeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smeesters, Patrick; Pinak, Miroslav

    2008-01-01

    Full text: This paper summarizes the scope of activities, ongoing experience and current results of the Expert Group on the Public Health Perspective in Radiological Protection (EGPH) of the Committee of Radiological Protection and Public Health, OECD Nuclear Energy Agency. While the prime and general task of the EGPH group is looking at how the public health and radiation protection can better take an advantage of their respective perspectives, the following four areas have been explored in detail: a) Exposure to radon; b) Justification of medical exposures; c) Public health judgement and decision making based on new scientific evidence; and d) Management of individual differences. In most of these areas, a targeted telephone survey on public policies in selected countries was used for collecting information from stake holders (public, consumers groups, public health and radiation protection regulators, governmental bodies, medical practitioners, patients, scientific communities, NGOs, etc.). The presented paper also highlights key issues of collected information and summarises existing approaches and policies. The case study on exposure to radon collects national information on approaches to the management of domestic radon risks, focusing on the integration of radiation protection and public health aspects (quality of dwellings, overall quality of indoor air, perception of radon levels, position of radon risk in the pool of other risks). In the case of justification of medical exposures, the Group studies the applications of the justification principle in opportunistic screenings (responsibilities, management of the situation, risk assessment). The precautionary principle and its impact on policy judgement in the light of significant scientific uncertainties can have a large influence on radiological-protection decision making. The case study on public health judgement and decision making based on new scientific evidence is exploring how these uncertainties and

  9. Radiological diagnostics of birth trauma in newborns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Юрій Анатолійович Коломійченко

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the work. To analyze indices of the different radiological methods and to compare it.Materials and methods. The newborns with spinal trauma (n=33 were analyzed, the children who have been excluded this diagnosis (n=27 formed the control group. All children underwent the radiography of cervical spine, the part of them – MRT and USG. There was carried out the visual assessment and analysis of metrical indices.Results. Patients were separated into groups of heaviness, 16 patients with slight degree, 10 with middle one and 7 with heavy degree of injury. At all methods the width of the Cruveilhier joint fissure in children with an injury of upper cervical spine reliably (р<0,001 differs from the one in the control group, and was detected the moderate correlation (r>0,4.When using radiology and MRT in children with traumatic injures the width of prevertebral soft tissues was reliably more and the degree of reliability was higher at radiology (р<0,001, than at MRT (р<0,01. The correlations between the width of soft tissues and the degree of heaviness were detected at all levels at radiography and only at the level C1 at MRT.Conclusions. An analysis demonstrated the different degree of importance of some indices for detecting injuries of the upper cervical spine in newborns. There was also proved that the metrical data of the different methods not reliably differ

  10. Global view on the radiological protection of patients: PAHO position paper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borras, C.

    2001-01-01

    The Pan American Health Organization/World Health Organization (PAHO/WHO), founded in 1902, initiated a radiological health programme in the 1950s. Within this programme, there are currently three lines of work: (a) radiology services; (b) radiation safety; and (c) radiological emergencies. Radiology services deals with health services for diagnostic and interventional imaging, and for radiation therapy. Radiation safety studies the three types of exposures to both ionizing and non-ionizing radiation: occupational; medical; and public. Radiological emergencies involve radioactive waste management programmes and emergency plans. The radiological protection of patients is addressed in each of these areas: (a) when analysing the infrastructure of radiology services; and (b) when determining medical exposures; and (c) when investigating overexposures in interventional or therapeutic procedures or under-doses in radiation therapy. (author)

  11. Radiological protection of the unborn child. Recommendation of the Commission on Radiological Protection and scientific grounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarenio, O.

    2006-01-01

    The Commission on Radiological Protection was asked to give advice on the practical implications of the absorption of the maximum possible activity values that, under the Radiological Protection Ordinance, may be incorporated in women of child-bearing age occupationally exposed to radiation with regard to incorporation monitoring and compliance with the dose limit for the protection of the unborn child. An unborn child's conceivable level of exposure to radiation in the least favourable case due to continuous and single incorporations of radionuclides in the mother was determined on a nuclide-specific basis by the Federal Office for Radiation Protection with the aid of the mathematical metabolic models provided in ICRP 88. At the proposal of the Commission on Radiological Protection, the Federal Office for Radiation Protection considered the following very conservative scenarios: - the mother's maximum possible exposure due to a continuous intake of activity over 10 years prior to the pregnancy and in the first 10 weeks postconception based on the limits set out in the Radiological Protection Ordinance; - the mother's maximum possible exposure due to a single intake at the most unfavourable time in the first 10 weeks postconception based on the limits set out in the Radiological Protection Ordinance. Examination of these scenarios found that, with a few exceptions, the dose to the unborn child attributable to the incorporation of radiation in the mother summed up over 70 years is less than that to the mother. The committed effective dose to the unborn child from certain radionuclides may exceed the value of 1 mSv when the dose to the mother reaches the maximum limit. The Commission on Radiological Protection was therefore asked 1. to examine whether compliance with the limit of 1 mSv effective dose is sufficient for the protection of the unborn child or whether any additional limitation is required for individual organs, 2. to discuss the implications for

  12. History of the radiological protection in Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortiz M, J. R.

    2008-12-01

    The beginning in the use of the ionizing radiations goes back towards end of 19 century, when Wilhelm Roentgen discovers x-rays in 1985, finding that quickly founds also the new technology, which spreads to tabs of multiple applications anywhere in the world, some of very beneficial them of use like the radio diagnosis, but others of frivolous and commercial kind. As much in the beneficial uses as in the banal ones, the world also is begun to be aware that the ionizing radiations are a physical element that must be handled with precaution then also can induce injuries in the involved people, which is documented already in 1912. This characteristic is confirmed with the use of Radio-226 as source of ionizing radiation, in whose applications were observed some deleterious effects, which forces to take some measures of protection an intuitive and rather incipient way. The first attempt of limit was denominated erythema dose, that it was a concept of qualitative-subjective character when it is observed a reddening of the skin of the radiated zone. Just a short time later, with the invention of the detector Geiger and the possibility of measuring the radiation quantity received by the people, the limits are transformed into quantitative. lt is as well as it is born the radiological protection like scientific and technological discipline, and essential ally of the nuclear energy pacific applications , event in which the international organizations related to the subject play a very important role, in the middle of the 1920 decade. Since then radiological protection (RP) is in permanent evolution, keeping a balance between the people protection, the sources security and the benefits of the ionizing radiations applications. In Mexico, the nuclear energy taking height from the second half of 1950, when the National Commission of Nuclear Energy was created, it spent in his first years to functions that mainly were of investigation, but in which already appeared the RP like

  13. Radiological protection report 2015; Strahlenschutzbericht 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2016-06-15

    In the 2015 annual report on radiological protection, the Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate (ENSI) reports on occupational radiation doses, releases of radioactive material and the monitoring of environmental radiation in the areas subject to its surveillance. It concludes that Swiss nuclear facilities continue to maintain a consistent approach to radiological protection. ENSI has identified an increasing public interest in data concerning radiation and has therefore introduced a number of new concepts, such as the online availability of monthly nuclear power plant releases. There is also a new development concerning the data from the network for automatic measurement of dose rates in the vicinity of nuclear power plants (MADUK) which has been in operation since 1994. It is now possible to view dose rates since 1994 averaged over periods of ten minutes, one hour and one day. A special chapter of this report deals with {sup 14}C releases, which are the subject of enquiries from interested parties. The mean annual individual occupational radiation dose remains at 0.6 mSv, being significantly less than the mean annual radiation dose of the population in Switzerland of 5.5 mSv. The highest annual individual dose was almost 11 mSv so that once again in 2015 the annual limit of 20 mSv was not exceeded. The collective doses lie within the range of past years. However, the trend towards a higher collective dose noted at the Leibstadt Nuclear Power Plant has continued. Planning by the operators of nuclear facilities in the field of radiological protection is of a high standard so that the resulting collective doses generally closely match the projected values. In 2015, nuclear power plant operators have again complied with the release limits specified by the authorities, to some extent by a considerable margin. Emissions from Swiss nuclear power plants resulted in a dose of less than 0.01 mSv per year in their immediate surroundings. Liquid releases from Swiss

  14. Training in radiological protection; Capacitacion en proteccion radiologica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medina G, E., E-mail: medina@ipen.gob.pe [Instituto Peruano de Energia Nuclear, Av. Canada 1470, San Borja, Lima 41 (Peru)

    2014-08-15

    In the Peru, according to the current regulations, people that work with ionizing radiations should have an authorization (individual license), which is granted by the Technical Office of the National Authority that is the technical body of the Instituto Peruano de Energia Nuclear (IPEN) manager of the control of ionizing radiations in the country. The individual license is obtained after the applicant fulfills the requested requirements, as having safety knowledge and radiological protection. Since its founding in 1972, the Centro Superior de Estudios Nucleares (CSEN) of the IPEN has carried out diverse training courses in order to that people can work in a safe way with ionizing radiations in medicine, industry and research, until the year 2013 have been organized 2231 courses that have allowed the training of 26213 people. The courses are organized according to the specific work that is carried out with radiations (medical radio-diagnostic, dental radiology, nuclear medicine, radiotherapy, industrial radiography, nuclear meters, logging while drilling, etc.). In their majority the courses are directed to people that will make use of radiations for first time, but refresher courses are also granted in the topic. The CSEN also carries out the Master degree programs highlighting the Second Professional Specialization in Radiological Protection carried out from the year 2004 with the support of the National University of Engineering. To the present has been carried out 2 programs and there is other being developed. In this work is shown the historical evolution of the radiological protection courses as well as the important thing that they are to work in a safe way in the country. (Author)

  15. Radiological protection national system. Basic security rules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    This work has been prepared as the first one of a set of standards and regulations that will be enforced to provide the protection of men and the environment against the undesirable effects of ionizing radiations. It establishes, in the first place, the system of dose limits for the country and the principles of its utilization. It takes into account the CIPR's recommendations in this area and the mentioned frame of reference, it establishes further the necessary restrictions for the application of the limits to the professionally exposed workers, as well as to the isolated members of the public and the population in general. In addition it establishes the general conditions to be met for the implementation of radiological protection, among them, the classification of working areas and working conditions as well as the compulsory periodical medical surveillance. (H.D.N.)

  16. Radiological protection and nuclear safety postgraduate course

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segado, R.C.; Menossi, C.A.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: The first Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Postgraduate Course was held in 1977, when the former Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety Branch of the National Atomic Energy Commission decided implement that course for the qualification of its professionals. After then, in 1980, by agreement between the CNEA, the National University of Buenos Aires and the Ministry of Health and Social Welfare got its present academic qualification as a Post-Graduate Course. Since then, it was sponsored by the IAEA. This Organization annually grants fellowships to fifteen students from different countries. Up to now, twenty consecutive courses have been delivered and more than five hundredth graduated, more than half of them coming from abroad. The aim of the course is the qualification and training in Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety of those professionals involved in the design, construction, operation and decommissioning of Nuclear and Radioactive Installation and their related regulatory issues. (author) [es

  17. The provision of radiological protection services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1965-01-01

    This publication is a code of practice for the provision or radiological protection services for establishments in which, or in part of which, work is primarily with radiation sources. It was prepared with the help of an international panel of experts and representatives of international organizations which have an interest in this field and was promulgated by the Director General of the Agency under the authority of the Board of Governors of the Agency as a code of practice in the framework of the Agency's Safety Standards. The Board of Governors also authorized the Director General to recommend to Member States that the code of practice be taken into account in the formulation of national regulations or recommendations. The Appendix to the code contains a number of examples of the organization of radiological protection services that have been provided by the members of the panel of experts. These examples do not form a part of the code of practice, but are intended to illustrate the methods of organization which have been adopted in different countries.

  18. Evolution of the system of radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) has actively participated in discussions with the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) regarding the development of new recommendations that will replace those in ICRP Publication 60, which has long served as the international standard in this field. Part of this development process has involved the organisation of seven international workshops, including the First and Second Asian Regional Conferences on the Evolution of the System of Radiological Protection which took place in Tokyo, Japan in October 2002 and July 2004. The Third Asian Regional Conference was held on 5-6 July 2006, also in Tokyo. The main objective of these conferences was to ensure that the views and concerns of relevant Asian stakeholders, such as regulatory authorities, industry, professional societies and NGO, could be expressed and discussed with the ICRP. The three conferences provided the ICRP with specific views on how new recommendations could best be developed to address regulatory and implementation needs in the Asian context. These proceedings summarize the results and key discussions of the Third Asian Regional Conference. (author)

  19. ICRP and radiological protection in medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cousins, Claire

    2017-01-01

    Standards in relation to radiological protection in medicine are well-documented, particularly with the recent update of the Basic Safety Standards. The principles of justification and optimisation remain key, as dose limitation is not applicable in medical practice. Appropriate justification relies on the knowledge, experience and discretion of the relevant medical practitioners and this may be overlooked in the race for diagnosis and treatment. One argument would be further regulation of medical exposures, although it is difficult to see how this could be imposed without denying patients essential investigations and treatments. Another contentious issue is individual patient dose management with the possible creation of a 'radiation passport'. Individual radiation susceptibility is a topic that has attracted much attention, but how to manage such persons, if identified, raises further questions. Communicating radiation risks and benefits to patients appropriately needs to be addressed, including who should be responsible for this, given accurate knowledge is a prerequisite. Ethics in radiological protection is also being widely discussed and this in relation to medical practice, which already involves numerous ethical issues, is likely to be open to debate in the near future. (authors)

  20. Radiological protection of patients: conceptual framework and new international recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gisone, Pablo A.; Perez, Maria del R.

    2005-01-01

    Medical exposures represent the largest man-made source of radiation exposure. Within the concept medical exposures includes different kind of exposure: of patients as part of their own medical diagnosis or treatment; of individuals as part of occupational health surveillance; of individuals as part of health screening programs; of volunteers participating in biomedical research programs; of individuals as part of medico-legal procedures and of voluntary patient caregivers (relatives or friends). Radiological protection of patients (RPP) is founded on two basic principles: justification and optimization. The justification of a medical exposure is founded in the consideration that it will give a sufficient net benefit, including the direct health benefits to the patients and the potential benefits to society, against the individual detriment that the exposure might cause, taking into account the efficacy, benefits and risks of available alternative techniques having the same objective but involving no or less exposure to ionizing radiation. Concerning optimization in diagnosis, the radiological protection objective is to keep doses as low as reasonably achievable while obtaining the necessary diagnostic information. In therapy, the objective is to ensure that the target tissue is given the prescribed dose while minimizing the dose to surrounding healthy tissue. In this presentation we analyze new international recommendations concerning RPP, with emphasis in the Directive 97/43/EURATOM. The importance of referral guidelines to help physicians during the process of justification and use of diagnostic reference levels (to help in optimization) is discussed. (author)

  1. Radiological protection in interventional cardiology in Chile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez, A.; Leyton, F.A.; Farias, E.; Silva, A.M.; Vano, E.; Oyarzun, C.; Gamarra, J.; Ortiz, P.

    2001-01-01

    In September 2000, an expert mission was assigned to Chile, under the regional project named 'International BBS in Medical Practices Radiation Protection and Quality Assurance In Interventional Radiology' (ARCAL XLIX). The objective of the mission was to evaluate the level of radiation protection (RP) and safety in interventional cardiology ( IC ) installations. A team of local cardiologists, medical physicists and technologists was created for this purpose and during one week, several cardiology laboratories were evaluated and some basic quality controls (QC) were carried out. A basic pilot training course in radiation protection was imparted at the Hospital of the University of Chile in Santiago de Chile and some of the key objectives for a future national quality assurance programme were presented during the national congress of IC. In addition, a national survey on radiation protection aspects was circulated and its results evaluated. These activities enabled the local team to become familiar with the methodology of assessment of the level of protection and the organization of a programme, which was illustrated with the examples of similar European programmes. As result of these actions, several proposals were made to both the local authorities and the IAEA. The most important were: a) to initiate a basic QC programme, b) to organize a training in RP for cardiologists in order to formalize their accreditation, c) to improve personal occupational dosimetry, d) to initiate a programme of patient dosimetry, e) to optimize the technical and clinical protocols, f) to create a national registry of incidents with skin injuries. (author)

  2. Proceedings of the National Conference on Radiological Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The Radioprotection Argentine Society (SAR) was organized the National Conference on Radiation Protection in 2014, in order to inform to the technical and scientific community about the scopes on radiation protection. The principal treated topics were the following: radiological protection in medical applications, radiology, nuclear medicine, radiotherapy, nuclear fuel cycle, industrial gammagraphy, oil well logging.

  3. Board's system of publications. [National Radiological Protection Board

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaines, M J [National Radiological Protection Board, Harwell (UK)

    1978-07-01

    The purpose of each of the several classes of publication issued by the National Radiological Protection Board is stated. The classes are: advice on standards for protection, emergency reference levels, technical reports, instrument evaluation reports, annual research and development reports, three-yearly reports on the work of the NRPB, miscellaneous specialist booklets, publications for the layman, radiological protection bulletin, information sheets, and brochures.

  4. Human engineering of a radiological diagnostic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andou, Eiji; Yuba, Fumimaro; Kotoh, Yukitoshi; Oohara, Kazuo; Uto, Fumiaki.

    1992-01-01

    Current practices for patient safety control in radiological diagnosis may involve problems. For solving of these problems, we have to bear in mind that the mental and physical capacity of patients tend to be limited during radiological testing. When radiography is performed using a general X-ray device at a source table distance (STD) of 100 cm, the patient's head can touch the X-ray tube housing during position adjustment on the stand (up and down adjustment) or the patient is made to take an unnatural posture during body positioning. With this in mind, we carried out a questionnaire survey about source image receptor distance (SID). This survey disclosed that more than 92% of the institutions have adapted 100 cm STD. We then conducted a three-dimensional analysis of a patient's posture and motion by video taping patients during positioning on a roentgenographic table. This analysis revealed that the adoption of the 120 cm STD resulted in less contact between the patient's head and X-ray tube housing, less of unnatural body position and less time required for positioning adjustment when compared to those at 100 cm STD. These results indicate that the current STD (100 cm) is not suitable for safe and smooth adjustment of the positioning of a patient's body of a roentgenographic table. We examined the optimun STD, taking into consideration the dimensions of patient's movement and posture during an X-ray examination. (author)

  5. Exposure to Indian population from diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Supe, S.J.; Venkataraman, G.; Sasane, J.B.; Sawant, S.G.; Shirva, V.K.; Iyer, P.S.

    1993-01-01

    Many national and international agencies are actively engaged in taking stock of radiation safety status of radiation procedures which add to the population dose significantly. National survey is being conducted to collect data from various diagnostic X-ray institutions to assess radiation safety status and population dose arising from such practices in India. For this purpose 11 centres are collecting information on annual number of patients examined site wise and on their age and sex distribution. Patient doses are also measured for various diagnostic X-ray examinations in a few hospitals using CaSO 4 :Dy TLD dosimeters. Preliminary results of earlier study indicate that the country has about 50000 diagnostic X-ray units. The annual number of X-ray examinations is estimated to be 9x10 7 . Mean entrance skin dose for diagnostic X-rays are between 0.2 to 50 mGy depending on the type of examination. On the basis of experience gained in the earlier survey an exhaustive survey is undertaken for 1992-93 for improving the assessment of population dose. (author). 3 refs

  6. Classical diagnostic radiological features of Von Recklinghausen's ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... and appropriately guiding management decisions. The patient presented is a 29- year old female who had presented with right orbital and periorbital masses, lisch nodules, multiple scalp and body nodules, cranial bony defect and complex kyphoscoliosis. She had three of the seven classical diagnostic features of NF-1 ...

  7. Diagnostic radiology - the impact of new technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, R.M.

    1989-01-01

    Recent technological advances that have led to the introduction of new or improved methods of diagnostic imaging are examined. In particular, the application of computer techniques for image acquisition and processing has facilitated new methods of image synthesis and analysis. (author)

  8. Requirements to obtain the recognition of radiological protection experts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arguelles, R.; Villarroel, R.; Senderos, V.; Campos, R.; Pinos, M.; Ponjuan, G.; Franco, P.; Rueda, D.

    2003-01-01

    The scope of this paper is to summarize the general requirements related to education, training and skill of the individual to obtain the recognition of radiological protection experts on ionizing radiation (experts on radiological protection- RP). There has been established two levels according to the grade of responsibility: Qualified expert provided with a diploma given by de Nuclear Safety Council. Technician expert on radiological protection whose certification is made by the Qualified expert that supervise their work. To obtain the diploma of qualified expert is required an official degree, a title of Architecture, Engineering or equivalent in case of no national degrees; specific training on radiological protection (300 hours) and the knowledge on safety and radiological protection of the facilities to be supervised. Three years of experience on radiological protection must be proved. To get the recognition of technician expert on radiological protection is required Formacion Profesional de Grado Superior or equivalent and specific training on safety and radiological protection. Knowledge on basis and principles of radiological protection are required. According to the type of the facilities to be supervised there are two models: A model: to deal with facilities included in RD 1836/1999 (nuclear and radioactive facilities). B model: to deal with medical X rays facilities approved under RD 1891/1991 three months of experience on the selected model must be proved. (Author)

  9. Training in radiological protection for nuclear programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    Many Member States are developing or already have developed their own national training programmes. The IAEA is actively involved in promoting training in radiological protection for nuclear programmes. The various types of training are fully discussed, with suggested curricula. An earlier report was published as Technical Reports Series No.31 in 1964. In 1973, new and additional information was received from Member States which is reflected in the present report. Training programmes are classified, according to those requiring training: specialists; persons whose work is closely related to radiological protection (administrators, public health officers and industrial health personnel, safety inspectors and engineers in nuclear installations, public service personnel); persons working with radiation; and the general public. Forms, scope and duration of training are discussed. Different types of training programmes are currently required for training of medical doctors (those providing medical surveillance for radiation workers and others dealing with public health aspects of radiation hazards), for technical supervisors, radiologists, and qualified workers in nuclear medicine, technological staff, administrators, persons working with radiation, and public service personnel. Standard curricula and desirable experiments and exercises are discussed. The organization of training together with the facilities, equipment and teaching staff required are considered, as is follow-up training. Annexes 1 to 4 give examples of training curricula and training courses available in various countries, a suggested syllabus for training of technical supervisors, and a bibliography consisting of 210 references dealing with general topics, nuclear radiation physics, radiochemistry and radiation chemistry, radiation biology and biophysics, dosimetry and health physics and radiation protection, medical aspects and toxicology, and environmental aspects

  10. Challenges in setting up quality control in diagnostic radiology ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal Home > Vol 24, No 4 (2015) >. Log in or ... Quality control (QC) on diagnostic radiology equipment form part of the fundamental requirements for the ... Inadequate cooperation by facilities management, lack of QC equipment and insufficient staff form the major challenges in setting up QC in the facilities under study.

  11. Survey of diagnostic radiology in the Republic of Ireland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunningham, J.D.; Howett, D.; Hone, C.; Mulholland, C.

    1988-03-01

    This survey examined a number of aspects of the practice of diagnostic radiology in Ireland. These included the frequency of examinations, the gonadal and active bone marrow doses to patients, the genetically significant dose, the standard of design of x-ray rooms and of performance of equipment, and an inventory of equipment currently in use (author)

  12. Diagnostic efficacy of handheld devices for emergency radiologic consultation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Toomey, Rachel J

    2010-02-01

    Orthopedic injury and intracranial hemorrhage are commonly encountered in emergency radiology, and accurate and timely diagnosis is important. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the diagnostic accuracy of handheld computing devices is comparable to that of monitors that might be used in emergency teleconsultation.

  13. Genetically significant dose from diagnostic radiology in Great Britain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darby, S C; Wall, B F [National Radiological Protection Board, Harwell (UK)

    1981-01-01

    A brief discussion is presented of the use of population and child expectancy data to estimate the annual genetically significant dose for diagnostic radiology (GSD). The current estimate of GSD is compared with that reported in a survey 20 years previously. Comparisons are made with estimates of GSD from other countries.

  14. Coincidence of needs in radiological and toxicological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osborne, R.V.

    1988-01-01

    Research needs for radiological protection and research programs that have evolved to meet these needs parallel closely those in the chemical toxicology field. The similarity of these needs is described as perceived from the radiological side. Further, the frame work for radiologically-related research, out lines of the research programs, and the development of the facilities at Chalk River Nuclear Labs were presented

  15. [Regulating radiological protection and the role of health authorities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, César F

    2006-01-01

    This article summarizes the development of protection against ionizing radiation and explains current thinking in the field. It also looks at the decisive role that regulatory agencies for radiological protection must play and the important contributions that can be made by health authorities. The latter should take an active part in at least three aspects: the formal education of health personnel regarding radiological protection; the medical care of individuals who are accidentally overexposed, and the radiological protection of patients undergoing radiological procedures. To this end, health professionals must possess sufficient knowledge about radiological protection, promote the use of proper equipment, and apply the necessary quality assurance procedures. Through their effective intervention, national health authorities can greatly contribute to reducing unnecessary doses of radiation during medical procedures involving radiation sources and decrease the chances that radiological accidents will take place.

  16. An Evolved System of Radiological Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, M.

    2004-01-01

    The current system of radiological protection based on the Linear No-Threshold (LNT) hypothesis has greatly contributed to the minimization of doses received by workers and members of the public. However, it has brought about r adiophobia a mong people and waste of resources due to over-regulation, because the LNT implies that radiation is harmful no matter how small the dose is. The author reviewed the results of research on health effects of radiation including major epidemiological studies on radiation workers and found no clear evidence of deleterious health effects from radiation exposures below the current maximum dose limits (50 mSv/y for workers and 5 mSv/y for members of the public), which have been adopted worldwide in the second half of the 20th century. Now that the existence of bio-defensive mechanisms such as DNA repair, apoptosis and adaptive response are well recognized, the linearity assumption cannot be said to be s cientific . Evidences increasingly imply that there are threshold effects in risk of radiation. A concept of practical thresholds or virtually safe doses will have to be introduced into the new system of radiological protection in order to resolve the low dose issues. Practical thresholds may be defined as dose levels below which induction of detectable radiogenic cancers or hereditary effects are not expected. If any workers and members of the public do not gain benefits from being exposed, excepting intentional irradiation for medical purposes, their radiation exposures should be kept below practical thresholds. On the assumption that the current dose limits are below practical thresholds and with no radiation detriments, there is no need of justification and optimization (ALARA) principles for occupational and public exposures. Then the ethical issue of justification to allow benefit to society to offset radiation detriments to individuals can be resolved. And also the ethical issue of optimization to exchange health or safety for

  17. Basic quality control in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wikstrom, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Along the route toward regular performance of Quality Control in the Diagnostic Imaging sector there are a number of balances to negotiate: Patient/Staff safety considerations vs Regulatory compliance vs Performance of modern equipment vs Clinic's Productivity. At first glance these ambitions may seem in conflict. The tests performed to meet regulatory requirements may or may not bear any semblance to real clinical measurement scenarios. And the process of collecting the data from the quality assurance tests may induce a system down- time that adversely affects the clinic's overall productivity. Furthermore, the time it takes to complete the analysis of the test data and provide the report required to take the facility back into operation is time wasted for patients waiting for a diagnostic imaging exam

  18. Radiation exposure and image quality in x-Ray diagnostic radiology physical principles and clinical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Aichinger, Horst; Joite-Barfuß, Sigrid; Säbel, Manfred

    2012-01-01

    The largest contribution to radiation exposure to the population as a whole arises from diagnostic X-rays. Protecting the patient from radiation is a major aim of modern health policy, and an understanding of the relationship between radiation dose and image quality is of pivotal importance in optimising medical diagnostic radiology. In this volume the data provided for exploring these concerns are partly based on X-ray spectra, measured on diagnostic X-ray tube assemblies, and are supplemented by the results of measurements on phantoms and simulation calculations.

  19. Mamma diagnostics for MTRA (medical-radiological personnel)/RT (radiologists); Mammadiagnostik fuer MTRA/RT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Uwe; Baum, Friedemann

    2014-07-01

    The text book on mamma diagnostics for MTRA (medical-radiological personnel)/RT (radiologists) covers the following issues: Anatomy, development and physiology of mammary glands; tumor development an breast cancer risk; pathology, non-imaging diagnostics; mammography: physical-technical fundamentals; mammography: analogue technique; mammography: digital technique; mammography: quality assurance; mammography: legal questions and radiation protection; mammography: new developments; mammography: setting technique; mammography: use and appraisal; mamma-sonography: technique and methodology; mamma-sonography: assignment and appraisal, mamma-NMR: technique and methodology; mamma-NMR: assignment and appraisal lymph node diagnostics; mamma interventions; biopsy; mamma interventions: marking examination concepts; therapeutic concepts; hygienic concepts; communication and interaction.

  20. Science and values in radiological protection: impact on radiological protection decision making

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salomaa, Sisko; Pinak, Miroslav

    2008-01-01

    Full text: This work summarises the main ideas and achievements of the Science and Values in Radiological Protection Workshop that was held on 15-17 January 2008 in Helsinki, Finland. In the view of developing of new radiological applications and emerging scientific phenomena it has been recognized a need to develop a shared understanding of emerging challenges for radiological protection among scientific and regulatory communities, public and other concerned stake holders. In response to this the Committee of Radiation Protection and Public Health of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority of Finland tried to initiate a process of longer-term reflection on scientific and societal issues that might challenge radiological protection in the coming years. Among general issues like radiological policy issues, improvement of understanding between research and policy communities, sharing views on emerging scientific issues, there were addressed several scientific issues, like non-targeted effects, individual sensitivity; and circulatory diseases. The main focus of these discussions was to elaborate potential 'what if' scenarios and propose feasible solutions at various levels. These discussions addressed effects that are not direct and evident consequence of the initial lesions produced at the cellular and DNA level like bystander responses, genomic instability, gene induction, adaptive responses and low dose. Particular interest was paid to an extrapolation of risk estimates to low doses and role of Linear Non-Threshold theory in setting regulatory principles. Individual radio-sensitivity and identification of genes that are suspected of having an influence on it were also discussed in one of the Breakout Sessions. Another Breakout Session addressed circulatory diseases. There is emerging evidence in the A-bomb survivors and in other exposed groups that ionising radiation also causes other diseases than cancer, such as circulatory

  1. Development of a ceramic material to cover walls to be applied in diagnostic radiological protection; Desenvolvimento de um material ceramico para utilizacao em protecao radiologica diagnostica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frimaio, Audrew

    2006-07-01

    This study aims to formulate a ceramic composition for wall coating seeking to contribute to the optimization of diagnosis rooms' shielding. The work was based on experimental measures of X-radiation attenuation (80 and 100 kV) using ceramic coating materials containing different ceramic bases (red, white, gres, stoneware porcelain tiles, etc). Among the appraised ceramic bases, the white gres presented better attenuation properties and it was considered the most suitable material for the targets of this work. Different formulations of white gres were studied and altered in order to obtain better attenuation properties. Simulations of ceramic compositions using gres coating were made maintaining the percentages of 12-20% clay; 6-18% kaolin; 12-25% phyllite; 8-14% quartz; 1018% feldspar; 32-40% pegmatite and 6-8% talc in the composition of the necessary raw-material. The quantitative and qualitative chemical compositions of these materials were also evaluated and the most common representative elements are SiO{sub 2}, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, CaO and Ti{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Formulations containing Pb and Ba oxides were studied, considering that CaO can be replaced by PbO or BaO. The attenuation properties for X-radiation were investigated by computer simulations considering the incident and transmitted X-ray spectra for the different studied compositions and they were compared to the properties of the reference materials Pb, Ba and BaSO{sub 4} (barite). The results obtained with the simulations indicated the formulated composition of gres ceramic base that presented better attenuation properties considering the X-ray energies used in diagnosis (80, 100 and 150 kV). Ceramic plates based on the formulated compositions that presented lower percentage differences related to Pb were experimentally produced and physically tested as wall coating and protecting barrier. Properties as flexion resistance module, density, load rupture, water absorption and X

  2. ENETRAP: training and education in radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coeck, M.

    2006-01-01

    The development of a common European radiation protection and safety culture and, based on that, the mutual recognition of radiation protection courses and the acquired competencies of radiation protection experts (RPE) and officers (RPO) is becoming a real need. The ENETRAP project ('European Network for Education and Training in RAdiological Protection') aims at bringing together different ideas and approaches of education and training (E and T) in radiological protection (RP) in order to better integrate and harmonise national E and T activities on a European level. The project started in April 2005. 10 partners are involved in ENETRAP: SCK-CEN (coordinator), CEA-INSTN, FZK-FTU, BfS, ENEA, NRG, CIEMAT, HPA-RPD, UJF and UHI-NHC. These partners have years of experience with established E and T programmes and play an important role in the development of specific techniques such as e-learning or On-the-Job Training (OJT) related to RP. As a result of their fundamental scientific research, collaboration with industry and practical experience, the partners have a solid scientific knowledge of all aspects of RP and are ideally placed to transfer the know-how and estimate the needs in this field. The ENETRAP project aims at establishing a sustainable E and T infrastructure for RP as an essential component to combat the perceived decline in expertise and to ensure the continuation of the high level of RP knowledge. The main objectives of the ENETRAP project are (1) to better integrate existing E and T activities in the RP infrastructure of the European countries in order to combat the decline in both student numbers and teaching institutions, (2) to develop more harmonised approaches for E and T in RP in Europe, (3) to better integrate the national resources and capacities for E and T and (4) to provide the necessary competence and expertise for the continued safe use of radiation in industry, medicine and research. Any such infrastructure must ensure that provision is

  3. Patients exposure assessment for radiographic procedures in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arandjic, D.; Ciraj-Bjelac, O.; Stankovic, K.; Lazarevic, Dj.; Ciraj-Bjelac, O.)

    2007-01-01

    In this work the results of dose assessment for the most frequent radiographic procedures in diagnostic radiology are shown. Entrance surface doses were assessed for 7 radiographic procedures. Three hospitals, six x-ray units in total, were enrolled in investigation. Patient doses were estimated based on results of x-ray tube output measurements. Finally, doses were compared with Diagnostic reference level. Higher dose values were observed for chest examinations. In comparison with results from other countries, doses from this procedure in Serbia are significantly higher. Estimated doses for other procedures were well below Diagnostic reference levels [sr

  4. Radiological protection in the dental profession

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holyoak, B.

    1979-01-01

    A summary is given of legislation concerning health and safety of people as affected by work activities. In connection with legislation in the special field of radiological protection, it was agreed between the (United Kingdom) Health and Safety Executive and the British Dental Association that a survey should be carried out into the use of radiography in dental practices. The terms of the survey, and relevant safety standards, are summarized. The results are discussed under the following headings: personal radiation dose to dental staff, beam filtration, beam diameter, timing units, warning signals, dose per exposure, scattered doserate, film processing, location of the x-ray set, maintenance of the x-ray equipment, holding of dental films, instruction training and supervision. Conclusions are reached, and basic rules proposed. (U.K.)

  5. Magnitudes and units in the X-ray dosimetry in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tovar M, V. M.; Cejudo A, J.; Vergara M, F.

    2009-10-01

    The dosimetry objective in the radiological image is the quantification from the exposition to the radiation with a commitment of optimizing the image quality to the reason of the absorbed dose. The dosimetry has the meaning of avoiding excessive dose that could imply a significant risk of deterministic effects induction. The dosimetric magnitudes and dosimetry protocols in the radiological image, are those that are related to the risks for the patient. Exist in diagnostic radiology two fundamentals reason to measure or to estimate the patient radiation dose. First, the mensurations are a means to verify the good practices and an aid to the optimization of the patient protection. Second, the absorbed dose estimation to tissues and organs in the patient are necessary to determine the risks, and this way to indicate that the radiological techniques employees can be justified and in investigated cases of over exposition. (Author)

  6. Quality criteria in diagnostic radiology of the skeleton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freyschmidt, J.

    1985-01-01

    Conventional diagnostic radiology continues to represent the basic technique in skeleton diagnostics and results in decisive diagnoses in more than 80% of all cases. Compared with other examination methods, it is cheap and relatively easy to perform; however, it makes high demands on the physician's clinical and technical expertise. Compared with computerized tomography, conventional radiography has the advantage of decades of experience and of being cheaper by far. The author thinks the following quality criteria to be important in diagnostic radiology of the skeleton: roentgenological examination of one or several skeleton regions in keeping with the clinical issue concerned, accurate visualization of the object in a typical and reproducible projection, radiation quality matched to the dimension of the object, matched mean optical density, visualization of soft tissue near to bones and joints, and radiation dose in keeping with the clinical issue concerned. (orig./MG) [de

  7. Radiological protection report 2008; Strahlenschutzbericht 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-05-15

    This annual report issued by the Swiss Federal Nuclear Inspectorate (ENSI) reports on the work carried out by ENSI in 2008. It provides comprehensive data on radiation protection activities in Switzerland during the year 2008. The first section of the report provides comprehensive data on radiation protection and deals with exposure rates for personnel and individual jobs. The authors note that, in recent years, both collective doses and average individual doses have declined by a factor of two. Radiation doses are commented on as being significantly lower than the maximum annual limit for persons exposed to radiation in the course of their work. Radiation in the four Swiss nuclear power stations and in four further nuclear installations in various Swiss research facilities is commented on. The Swiss radiation measurement network is commented on and the results obtained are discussed. ENSI concludes that the new recommendations published by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP 103) did not necessitate any significant changes in its surveillance activities.

  8. Benefit/risk comparisons in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oosterkamp, W.J.

    1976-01-01

    Benefit and risks in radiodiagnostic examination, either with X-rays or with radioactive isotopes, can be expressed in restored health and health impaired by radiation or: lives saved and estimated lives lost as a result of genetic or somatic radiation damage. Published data on benefit-risk comparisons for mass stomach and chest surveys show a considerable benefit surplus. It is demonstrated that this is also true in the case of clinical examinations of the sick. Efforts should be concentrated on better ways and means to reduce the number of diagnostic errors. Risk estimates should be made as realistic as possible

  9. Diagnostic and interventional radiology in gynecologic neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorvinger, B.

    1990-05-01

    The role and clinical value of the modern radiologic methods for evaluation of gynecologic tumors is not finally settled. The aims of our investigation were therefore to compare clinical examination with CT in patients with possible recurrence of cervical carcinoma; to evaluate the usefulness of CT in patients with fistulas following gynecologic tumors or their treatment; to evaluate the ability of transabdominal US and MR imaging in intrauterine staging including myometrial invasion on patients with endometrial carcinoma; to evaluate CT in the capacity of monitoring therapy response, probable recurrence or clinical remission in patients with ovarian carcinoma; and to evaluate the effect of intraarterial occlusion in facilitating surgery and in evaluating the role of the intraarterial infusion in gynecologic tumors otherwise refractory to all therapy given. CT was more accurate (91%) than clinical pelvic examination (78%) in revealing extensive disease after radiation and/ or surgical treatment. CT was also a most valuable tool in demonstrating genital fistulas following gynecologic malignancy or its treatment. Transabdominal US did not improve staging in early endometrila carcinoma while MR had potential for delineating intrauterine tumor growth (accuracy for myometrial invasion 95%). CT was most valuable in the evaluation of therapeutic response of ovarian malignancy. For possible recurrence or in clinical remission, only positive CT was of clinical significance. The potentials of transcatheter intraarterial management in order to facilitate operability are also discussed. (92 refs.)

  10. Radiological protection report 2016; Strahlenschutzbericht 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2017-06-15

    In the radiological protection report 2016, the Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate (ENSI) provides an overview of the radiological protection in its area of supervision. Part A of the report deals with protecting the staff of nuclear power plants from the dangers of ionising radiation. It also includes a list of the personal doses accumulated by the staff, broken down using various parameters. Applying the optimisation imperative, it has been proved possible to significantly reduce the annual collective doses in Switzerland's nuclear power plants since they came on stream thanks to major efforts by the operators. In 2016, a total of 6,153 people measured accumulated 2,877 person-mSv. The collective doses have reached a low level corresponding to the radiological condition of the plants and the scope of the work required to be performed in controlled zones (e.g. non-destructive materials testing). ENSI will continue to follow the trend for collective doses and assess the reasons for local variances as well as for measures initiated. The individual doses for people employed in ENSI's area of supervision in 2016 showed a maximum figure of 10 mSv and a mean value of 0.5 mSv which was significantly below the dose limit of 20 mSv for occupational radiation exposure. The discharge of radioactive substances with the exhaust air and waste water from nuclear power plants are dealt with in Part B of the report. In 2016, nuclear power plant operators again met the admissible release limits set by the authorities, in some cases by a considerable margin. The emissions of Swiss nuclear power plants led to a dose of less than 0.01 mSv per year in the direct neighbourhood. A comparison with the average annual radiation dose for the Swiss population of 5.5 mSv shows that the relevant contribution from nuclear power plants lies in the area of one percent of this figure. Effluents from Swiss nuclear power plants were also below the target of 1 GBq per year set by ENSI

  11. Radiological Protection of Patients in Nuclear Medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojo, A.M.

    2011-01-01

    Full text: This lecture aims at presenting the state of the art of radiological protection of patients in nuclear medicine focusing on three aspects of interest where to achieve improvement. The hierarchy of the justification principle of the radiation protection is one of them. There seems for a change to be presented in the paradigm of the radiological protection of patients. The role of the physician who prescribes the medical practice becomes more relevant, together with the nuclear medicine specialist who should be co-responsible for the application of this justification principle. Regarding the doses optimization and the implementation of Dose Reference Level the involvement extends far beyond the physician and radioprotection officer. It is clear that the Medical Physicist is to play a very relevant role in the coordination of actions, as the nuclear medicine technician is to execute them. Another aspect to consider is patient specific dosimetry. It should become a routine practice through calculation of the absorbed dose based on biodistribution data. It should be assessed for each individual patient, as it depends on a number of patient-specific parameters, such as gender, size and the amount of fatty tissue in the body, as well as the extent and nature of the disease. In most cases, dosimetry calculations are not carried out and patients are administered standard levels of activity. There may be situations with a lack of knowledge on internal dosimetry as in many centers either none or only one or two medical physics experts are available. It shows that a formal training for experts in internal dosimetry at national level is required. However up to now, there has been no satisfactory correlation between absorbed dose estimates and patient response. Moreover, the radiation protection for the patient is not assured, as the dose values given are often numbers without connection to radiobiological and/or hematological findings. Pending tasks related to

  12. Excercises in diagnostic radiology. Vol. 8. 2. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langston, C.S.; Squire, L.F.

    1982-01-01

    Diagnostic radiology in emergency patients as a supplement to anamnesis and examination has gained increasing importance in the last few years. Usually, the physician in charge has only few sigus to go by when a patient is gent to radiology. The most frequent sigus are pectoral pain, headache, dysponea, etc. The cases in this book have been selected accordingly. Although the names have been invented the case histories presented have not been greatly changed. The original 'negatives' of the anamnesis presented in most cases unless they would have taken up too much space. No important information has been omitted. Untypical and unusual cases are characterized as such. (orig./MG) [de

  13. Cost/benefit of high technology in diagnostic radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goethlin, J.H.

    1987-08-01

    High technology is frequently blamed as a main cause for the last decade's disproportionate rise in health expenditure. Total costs for all large diagnostic and therapeutic appliances are typically less than 1% of annual expenditure on health care. CT, DSA, MRI, interventional radiology, ESWL, US, mammography, computers in radiology and PACS may save 10-80% of total cost for diagnosis and treatment of disease. Expenditure on high technology is in general vastly overestimated. Because of its medical utility, a slower deployment cannot be desirable. (orig.)

  14. Cost/benefit of high technology in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goethlin, J.H.

    1987-01-01

    High technology is frequently blamed as a main cause for the last decade's disproportionate rise in health expenditure. Total costs for all large diagnostic and therapeutic appliances are typically less than 1% of annual expenditure on health care. CT, DSA, MRI, interventional radiology, ESWL, US, mammography, computers in radiology and PACS may save 10-80% of total cost for diagnosis and treatment of disease. Expenditure on high technology is in general vastly overestimated. Because of its medical utility, a slower deployment cannot be desirable. (orig.)

  15. Common patterns in 558 diagnostic radiology errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donald, Jennifer J; Barnard, Stuart A

    2012-04-01

    As a Quality Improvement initiative our department has held regular discrepancy meetings since 2003. We performed a retrospective analysis of the cases presented and identified the most common pattern of error. A total of 558 cases were referred for discussion over 92 months, and errors were classified as perceptual or interpretative. The most common patterns of error for each imaging modality were analysed, and the misses were scored by consensus as subtle or non-subtle. Of 558 diagnostic errors, 447 (80%) were perceptual and 111 (20%) were interpretative errors. Plain radiography and computed tomography (CT) scans were the most frequent imaging modalities accounting for 246 (44%) and 241 (43%) of the total number of errors, respectively. In the plain radiography group 120 (49%) of the errors occurred in chest X-ray reports with perceptual miss of a lung nodule occurring in 40% of this subgroup. In the axial and appendicular skeleton missed fractures occurred most frequently, and metastatic bone disease was overlooked in 12 of 50 plain X-rays of the pelvis or spine. The majority of errors within the CT group were in reports of body scans with the commonest perceptual errors identified including 16 missed significant bone lesions, 14 cases of thromboembolic disease and 14 gastrointestinal tumours. Of the 558 errors, 312 (56%) were considered subtle and 246 (44%) non-subtle. Diagnostic errors are not uncommon and are most frequently perceptual in nature. Identification of the most common patterns of error has the potential to improve the quality of reporting by improving the search behaviour of radiologists. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Medical Imaging and Radiation Oncology © 2012 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  16. Education and Training in the Field of Radiological Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meskens, G.

    2002-01-01

    The International School for Radiological Protection (isRP) was founded within SCK-CEN in 1996 and organises training programmes on radiological protection for nuclear workers and staff. In 2001, isRP organised twelve courses for Belgian and foreign organisations active in the nuclear and non-nuclear field. The report gives an overview of the main activities in 2001

  17. Environmental aspects at radiological protection in ArcelorMittal Monlevade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva Filho, Cleber Marques; Soares Filho, Mauricio; Franco, Jose Otavio Andrade; Leite, Roberto Paulo; Goncalves, Breno Cunha; Costa, Jose Gustavo de Souza

    2010-01-01

    ArcelorMittal Monlevade Environmental Management of Radiological Protection is based on radiological protection team training, start up of radioactivity materials detection equipment in several steps of industrial processes and internal procedures according to CNEN - Nuclear Energy National Commission guidelines. At this way ArcelorMittal Monlevade seeks to guarantee the safety of employees, community, customers, equipment and the environment and their business. (author)

  18. Account 1983-1984. [National Radiological Protection Board

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-01-01

    Account prepared pursuant to section 3 (4) of the Radiological Protection Act 1970 of the receipts and payments of the National Radiological Protection Board for the year ended 31st March 1984; together with the Report of the Comptroller and Auditor General thereon. (In continuation of House of Commons Paper No. 149 of 1983-84).

  19. Some aspects of radiological protection in uranium mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palacios, E.; Napolitano, C.M.

    1978-01-01

    The basic principles of radiation protection recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection - ICRP are presented and the main radiological risks for the uranium mining workers are discussed. Finally some criteria for planning the radioactive waste management in uranium mines are given [pt

  20. Radiological Protection (Amendment) Act, 2002. Number 3 of 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    This Act amends the Radiological Protection Acts, 1991 and 1995, and provides for the making of grants out of funds provided by the legislature for remediation works for houses having certain levels of radon gas and for the administration by the Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland of such grants and to provide for related matters

  1. Radiological Protection Studies for NGLS XTOD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Shanjie [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Santana-Leitner, Mario [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Rokni, Sayed [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Donahue, Rick [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Emma, Paul [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Floyd, James [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Warwick, Tony [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2017-11-21

    The X-ray transport, optics and diagnostic system (XTOD) starts from the end of bending magnets sending electrons to the main dump and ends at the end wall separating the accelerator tunnel from the user experimental hall (hereafter referred as EH wall), as shown in Figure 1. Figure 1.a shows the general schematic and Figure 1.b shows the initial layout with possible shielding components. This document summarizes the extensive studies on the shielding and collimator system design necessary to meet the radiation protection requirements.

  2. Radiological protection of patients in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harding, L.K.

    2001-01-01

    The key factor in medical exposure is justification, that is ensuring that the benefit exceeds the risk. Nuclear medicine studies are comparable in cost to more sophisticated radiological tests such as ultrasound, computed tomography or magnetic resonance. Radiation doses are similar from X ray and nuclear medicine procedures. Having justified exposures the next step is optimization, namely using a radiation dose as low as is reasonably practicable. Diagnostic reference levels may be set nationally or locally such that the balance of diagnostic quality and radiation burden is optimized. In therapy the aim is to achieve a therapeutic dose while keeping the dose to non-target tissues as low as reasonably practicable. Variations in activities may be required for overweight patients, those in severe pain, those with certain conditions and in the case of tomography. Any woman who has missed a period should be assumed to be pregnant; there should be notices to patients emphasizing this. Following the administration of longer lived pharmaceuticals it is important to avoid pregnancy for a time such that the dose to a foetus will not exceed 1 mGy. A similar situation applies to a child who is being breastfed when a mother receives a radiopharmaceutical. In the case of children undergoing investigations the activity needs to be reduced to maintain the same count density as in adults. With the administration of an incorrect pharmaceutical an attempt should be made to enhance excretion, and the referring doctor and the patient should be informed. Extravasation usually requires no action. Positron emission tomography results in higher doses both to staff and patients. Research should use subjects over the age of 50, and avoid anyone who is pregnant or is a child. Nuclear medicine procedures result in a very small loss in life expectancy compared with other common risks. (author)

  3. Radiological protection of service and civilian personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    Since the United Kingdom's defence nuclear industry was founded in the late 1940s, Service and civilian personnel have been exposed to ionising radiation. During the last forty years, as knowledge about the effects of radiation exposure has grown, concern to ensure adequate protection against exposure has also increased,. As part of our continuing scrutiny of the Ministry of Defence (MoD), we have undertaken a short inquiry to examine MoD's current and future policy and practice on radiological protection. The principal work involving exposure of Service and civilian personnel to significant levels of radiation falls into two discrete areas: the nuclear weapons programme and the nuclear propulsion programme. The nuclear weapons programme involves research, the production of nuclear warheads and their deployment with Her Majesty's Forces. The nuclear propulsion programme involves research, production, operation, refitting and decommissioning of pressurised water reactors as a source of propulsion power in Royal Navy submarines. These two nuclear programmes are not the only sources of ionising radiation within MoD's responsibility: it also arises from research, non-destructive testing and medical applications, most notably conventional radiography. In this Report we have concentrated upon ionising radiation arising from the two defence nuclear programmes. (author)

  4. Accounting for biological effectiveness in radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dennis, J.A.

    1989-01-01

    Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) presents a practical problem to radiological protection when attempts are made to ensure that the assessed risks from different types of radiation and different modes of exposure to radiation are commensurate with one another. Unfortunately, the theoretical understanding of RBE is still in the stage of competing explanations and hypotheses. Furthermore, the division of the concept of dose equivalent into a set of concepts for risk assessment and another set for measurement and control has introduced conflicting requirements of a practical nature that are difficult to resolve. Many of those working in radiobiology and radiation protection have perceived the need to increase the quality factors for photon and neutron radiations. It may be more reasonable to change the quality factors for neutrons than for other radiations. The advantages and disadvantages of different methods for accommodating such changes within the dose-equivalent concepts are to be examined. The method of accommodating such a change that has the least practical disadvantages is to increase the quality factors for all secondary particles produced in tissue by neutron radiations by a constant factor. The only disadvantage would be the perception that the quality factors for these secondary particles were not treated in a consistent fashion for all types of ionising radiation. (author)

  5. Nuclear medicine and its radiological protection in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, J.

    2001-01-01

    The China Society of Nuclear Medicine was established on 27 May 1980. Since then, nuclear medicine in clinical diagnosis and therapy has been developed rapidly in China. So far there are more than 4000 members of the Society, and more than 350 sets of SPECT and 12 sets of PET have been installed and are busily running in clinic nowadays and about 1 million patients with different types of diseases have obtained nuclear medicine imaging examinations per year. Concerning the nuclear medicine therapy, a lot of patients with many types of diseases obtained benefit from radioisotope therapy. Accordingly, several Policies and Regulations have been enacted by the Government for the radiological protection. Furthermore, a special book titled 'Standardization in Diagnostic and Therapeutic Nuclear Medicine' has been promulgated in June, 1997 by the Health Administration of People's Republic of China, and this book is distributed to almost every nuclear medicine physician and technician in China for their reference in routine nuclear medicine work or research. In this book three parts of the contents are covered: Policies and Regulations for the radiological protection, basic knowledge and clinical nuclear medicine applications. (author)

  6. Mission and activities of the International Commission on Radiological Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clements, C.H.

    2018-01-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), formed in 1928, develops the System of Radiological Protection for the public benefit. The objective of the recommendations is to contribute to an appropriate level of protection for people and the environment against the harmful effects of radiation exposure without unduly limiting the individual or societal benefits of activities involving radiation. In developing its recommendations, ICRP considers advances in scientific knowledge, evolving social values, and practical experience. These recommendations are the basis of radiological protection standards and practice worldwide

  7. Quantitative evaluation of risks for individuals in diagnostic radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iinuma, T A; Tateno, Y; Hashizume, T [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

    1980-05-01

    A method to estimate quantitatively risks of individual patients due to exposure to diagnostic radiation (carcinogenetic and genetic effects of radiation) was proposed on the basis of ICRP-26. Carcinogenetic effect of radiation was calculated by multiplying mean dose equivalent for each organ per each radiological examination by shortening of average life-expectancy which was calculated from incidence of fetal carcinoma of each organ, latent period of carcinoma, and incidence period of carcinoma. Genetic effect of radiation was calculated by multiplying mean dose equivalent for gonad per each radiological examination by incidence of genetically severe radiation damages due to parent's exposure and child expectancy rate. Three examples were shown on calculations of risks in the photofluorographic examinations of the stomach and chest, and mammography. The same method of calculation could be applied to the in-vivo nuclear medicine examinations. Further investigation was required to calculate the risks quantitatively for various types of diagnostic procedures using radiation.

  8. Quantitative evaluation of risks for individuals in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iinuma, T.A.; Tateno, Yukio; Hashizume, Tadashi

    1980-01-01

    A method to estimate quantitatively risks of individual patients due to exposure to diagnostic radiation (carcinogenetic and genetic effects of radiation) was proposed on the basis of ICRP-26. Carcinogenetic effect of radiation was calculated by multiplying mean dose equivalent for each organ per each radiological examination by shortening of average life-expectancy which was calculated from incidence of fetal carcinoma of each organ, latent period of carcinoma, and incidence period of carcinoma. Genetic effect of radiation was calculated by multiplying mean dose equivalent for gonad per each radiological examination by incidence of genetically severe radiation damages due to parent's exposure and child expectancy rate. Three examples were shown on calculations of risks in the photofluorographic examinations of the stomach and chest, and mammography. The same method of calculation could be applied to the in-vivo nuclear medicine examinations. Further investigation was required to calculate the risks quantitatively for various types of diagnostic procedures using radiation. (Tsunoda, M.)

  9. Early resident-to-resident physics education in diagnostic radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kansagra, Akash P

    2014-01-01

    The revised ABR board certification process has updated the method by which diagnostic radiology residents are evaluated for competency in clinical radiologic physics. In this work, the author reports the successful design and implementation of a resident-taught physics course consisting of 5 weekly, hour-long lectures intended for incoming first-year radiology residents in their first month of training. To the author's knowledge, this is the first description of a course designed to provide a very early framework for ongoing physics education throughout residency without increasing the didactic burden on faculty members. Twenty-six first-year residents spanning 2 academic years took the course and reported subjective improvement in their knowledge (90%) and interest (75%) in imaging physics and a high level of satisfaction with the use of senior residents as physics educators. Based on the success of this course and the minimal resources required for implementation, this work may serve as a blueprint for other radiology residency programs seeking to develop revised physics curricula. Copyright © 2014 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. UWGSP6: a diagnostic radiology workstation of the future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milton, Stuart W.; Han, Sang; Choi, Hyung-Sik; Kim, Yongmin

    1993-06-01

    The Univ. of Washington's Image Computing Systems Lab. (ICSL) has been involved in research into the development of a series of PACS workstations since the middle 1980's. The most recent research, a joint UW-IBM project, attempted to create a diagnostic radiology workstation using an IBM RISC System 6000 (RS6000) computer workstation and the X-Window system. While the results are encouraging, there are inherent limitations in the workstation hardware which prevent it from providing an acceptable level of functionality for diagnostic radiology. Realizing the RS6000 workstation's limitations, a parallel effort was initiated to design a workstation, UWGSP6 (Univ. of Washington Graphics System Processor #6), that provides the required functionality. This paper documents the design of UWGSP6, which not only addresses the requirements for a diagnostic radiology workstation in terms of display resolution, response time, etc., but also includes the processing performance necessary to support key functions needed in the implementation of algorithms for computer-aided diagnosis. The paper includes a description of the workstation architecture, and specifically its image processing subsystem. Verification of the design through hardware simulation is then discussed, and finally, performance of selected algorithms based on detailed simulation is provided.

  11. Radiation protection in the intervenmtional radiology; Strahlenschutz in der interventionellen Radiologie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, Benjamin V. [Institut fuer Radiobiologie der Bundeswehr, Muenchen (Germany); Ulm Univ. (Germany); Lissek, Friedrich; Waldeck, Stephan [Bundeswehrzentralkrankenhaus Koblenz (Germany). Klinik fuer Radiologie und Neuroradiologie

    2017-07-01

    Interventional radiology and neuroradiology covers a variety of diagnostic and therapeutic methods. A minimal invasive percutaneous access under imaging guidance is common for all these methods. The legal regulations for quality assurance are reviewed, technical possibilities for dose reduction and the importance of modern radiation protection procedures are discussed.

  12. Radiological protection in the mining industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Riordan, M.C.

    1976-01-01

    The information contained in the National Radiological Protection Board's report (Strong, J.C., Laidlaw, A.J. and O'Riordan, M.C., Radon and its daughters in various British mines, NRPB-R39 (1975), HMSO) is updated with data collected between October 1975 and January 1976, and certain aspects of the work highlighted. The latest results in the continuing survey, which now covers more than 60 non-coal mines employing nearly 2000 men underground, reflect the corrective actions taken in a number of mines by improvements in ventilation management. The survey is now carried out by means of radon flasks supplied by post and returned to the NRPB for measurement. An empirical relationship is used to relate the radon gas and daughter concentrations at different ventilation rates. The results show that there has been a marked decrease (from 42% to 24%) in the number of men exposed above 4 working level months (WLM) in a year, the category requiring supervision (1 to 4 WLM in a year) has increased from 15% to 28%, and the lowest exposure category has increased from 43% to 48%. Although excessive exposures are still a problem, particularly in some tin mines in Cornwall, general compliance with the exposure limit seems possible in the near future. (U.K.)

  13. Radiation protection during radiological examinations of children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claus, D.; Gillet, R.; Wambersie, A.

    The dose delivered to children during radiological examinations were assessed and their variations compared with an experimental model. It is shown how to make good radiological examinations limiting the dose delivered to children and reducing the hazard to the medical staff [fr

  14. The IHS diagnostic X-ray equipment radiation protection program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knapp, A.; Byrns, G.; Suleiman, O.

    1994-01-01

    The Indian Health Service (IHS) operates or contracts with Tribal groups to operate 50 hospitals and approximately 165 primary ambulatory care centers. These facilities contain approximately 275 medical and 800 dental diagnostic x-ray machines. IHS environmental health personnel in collaboration with the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH) developed a diagnostic x-ray protection program including standard survey procedures and menu-driven calculations software. Important features of the program include the evaluation of equipment performance collection of average patient entrance skin exposure (ESE) measurements for selected procedures, and quality assurance. The ESE data, collected using the National Evaluation of X-ray Trends (NEXT) protocol, will be presented. The IHS Diagnostic X-ray Radiation Protection Program is dynamic and is adapting to changes in technology and workload

  15. Dosimetry in diagnostic and interventional radiology - ICRU and IAEA activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoetelief, J.; Pernicka, F.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Main aims of patient dosimetry in diagnostic and interventional radiology are to determine dosimetric quantities for establishment and use of guidance levels or diagnostic reference levels and for comparative risk assessment. In the latter case, the average doses to the organs and tissues at risk should be assessed. Only limited number of measurements serve to potential risk assessment of the examination and intervention. An additional objective of dosimetry in diagnostic and interventional radiology is the assessment of equipment performance. Ionization chambers are the main devices used for dosimetric measurements in diagnostic and interventional radiology but other devices with special properties are also used. Important examples are thermoluminescent detectors (TLDs) and semiconductor detectors. For most dosemeters used in x-ray medical imaging the desired quantity for calibration of dosemeters is the air kerma free-in-air. Calibrations should be made at appropriate radiation qualities, for which recommendations are available for conventional radiology. It is important that the calibrations are traceable to the international measurement system. The uncertainty of dose measurements in medical x-ray imaging, for comparative risk assessments as well as for quality assurance, should not exceed about 7 per cent in terms of the expanded uncertainty using a coverage factor of 2. The dosimetric approaches in general diagnostic radiology, mammography and computed tomography are slightly different, resulting in application specific dosimetric quantities. Consequently, different protocols for patient dosimetry are available for these different purposes. In general diagnostic radiology, various quantities and terminologies have been used for the specification of dose on the central beam axis at the point where the x-ray beam enters the patient (or a phantom representing the patient). These include the exposure at skin entrance (ESE), the input radiation exposure

  16. Independent auto evaluation of an operative radiological protection program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medrano L, M.A.; Rodriguez C, C.C.; Linares R, D.; Zarate M, N.; Zempoalteca B, R.

    2006-01-01

    The program of operative radiological protection of a nuclear power plant consists of multiple procedures and associate tasks that have as purpose the radiological protection of the workers of the power station. It is for this reason that the constant evaluation of the one it programs it is an important tool in the identification of their weaknesses (and strengths), so they can be assisted appropriately. In this work the main elements of the program of independent auto evaluation of the program of operative radiological protection of the Laguna Verde Central that has been developed and implemented by the National Institute of Nuclear Research are described. (Author)

  17. New nuclear build and evolving radiological protection challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazo, T.

    2010-01-01

    Many trends and indicators suggest that the use of nuclear power for generating electricity will increase, perhaps significantly, in the coming 10 to 20 years and beyond. Any such expansion will not take place in a static scientific or social context, but rather in the midst of ongoing changes in many relevant fields, radiological protection, radioactive waste management and nuclear safety to name a few. Regarding radiological protection, this evolution can be characterised in many different ways, but can conveniently be described as having scientific and socially driven aspects. These may well pose challenges to radiological protection (RP) policy, regulation and application in the future

  18. Radiation dose reduction: comparative assessment of publication volume between interventional and diagnostic radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansmann, Jan; Henzler, Thomas; Gaba, Ron C; Morelli, John N

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to quantify and compare awareness regarding radiation dose reduction within the interventional radiology and diagnostic radiology communities. Abstracts accepted to the annual meetings of the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR), the Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe (CIRSE), the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA), and the European Congress of Radiology (ECR) between 2005 and 2015 were analyzed using the search terms "interventional/computed tomography" and "radiation dose/radiation dose reduction." A PubMed query using the above-mentioned search terms for the years of 2005-2015 was performed. Between 2005 and 2015, a total of 14 520 abstracts (mean, 660±297 abstracts) and 80 614 abstracts (mean, 3664±1025 abstracts) were presented at interventional and diagnostic radiology meetings, respectively. Significantly fewer abstracts related to radiation dose were presented at the interventional radiology meetings compared with the diagnostic radiology meetings (162 abstracts [1% of total] vs. 2706 [3% of total]; P radiology abstracts (range, 6-27) and 246±105 diagnostic radiology abstracts (range, 112-389) pertaining to radiation dose were presented at each meeting. The PubMed query revealed an average of 124±39 publications (range, 79-187) and 1205±307 publications (range, 829-1672) related to interventional and diagnostic radiology dose reduction per year, respectively (P radiology community over the past 10 years has not mirrored the increased volume seen within diagnostic radiology, suggesting that increased education and discussion about this topic may be warranted.

  19. Quality assurance, quality control and quality audit in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vassileva, J.

    2009-01-01

    Full text:The lecture aims to present contemporary view of quality assurance in X-Ray diagnosis and its practical realization in Bulgaria. In the lecture the concepts of quality assurance, quality control and clinical audit will be defined and their scope will be considered. An answer of the following questions will be given: why is it necessary to determine the dose of patient in X-ray studies, what is the reference dose level and how it is used for dosimetric quantity which characterized the patient's exposure in X-ray, mammography and CT scans and how they are measured, who conducted the measurement and how to keep the records, what are the variations of doses in identical tests and what defines them? The findings from a national survey of doses in diagnostic radiology, conducted in 2008-2009 and the developed new national reference levels will be presented. The main findings of the first tests of radiological equipment and the future role of quality control as well as the concept of conducting clinical audit and its role in quality assurance are also presented. Quality assurance of the diagnostic process with minimal exposure of patients is a strategic goal whose realization requires understanding, organization and practical action, both nationally and in every hospital. To achieve this the important role of education and training of physicians, radiological technicians and medical physicists is enhanced

  20. Surgical requirements for radiological diagnostics of liver pathologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruenberger, T.

    2004-01-01

    Radiology is an essential preoperative tool for a liver surgeon to plan extent of resection and potential difficulties during liver surgery. Primary goal in defining liver pathologies is a careful patients' history, a clinical evaluation and reviewing at least one radiological film one could acquire. Don't rely on written reports that may direct you in a useless track. This overview tries to address the essential radiological requests of a surgeon in defining liver tumors ethiology and best optional treatment. Major advances in radiologic diagnostics led to an improvement in the adequate staging of a given liver pathology. Therefore we are nowadays able to inform our patients about possible treatment options without leaving a big gap to possible intra-operative findings which may alter the therapy. Surgical exploration to define therapeutic strategies becomes fundamental only in a minority of patients with unclear preoperative imaging studies. Interdisciplinary groups should define future strategies in a patient with a given liver pathology. Specialisation has defined the hepatobiliary surgeon which should be consulted in case of a liver or biliary tumor to guide possible therapeutic treatment options. (orig.) [de

  1. Radiological protection in the industrial area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraga, H.

    2008-12-01

    Radiation protection (RP) in industrial applications is composed of four major themes that are recruiting and training personnel, equipment and instrumentation, materials used and also the acquisition of new technologies to improve their own RP. To carry out the recruitment of staff and train them to serve as occupationally exposed personnel in the industry continues with the Mexican Official Standard NOM-031-NUCL-1999, R equirements for qualification and training of personnel occupationally exposed to radiation ionizing , what will be done regarding the physical fitness of personnel by NOM-026-NUCL-1999, M edical surveillance of personnel occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation . The principle of optimization of the RP, or ALARA principle (keeping the risk as low as reasonably achievable), is assumed to be the safety philosophy in the field of industrial applications of ionizing radiation. Practically all the elements that make up the equipment, instrumentation and materials used in industrial radiography and other industrial applications, has an orientation towards the protection, along with procedures that operate. For example, in industrial radiography the technician always has several instruments for radiation detection and measurement, some with visible and audible alarms. The equipment characteristics and transport (containers) are regulated by the standards NOM-025/1- 2000 and NOM-025/2-2996, which contains requirements for radiological safety in design and operation, respectively, for both as containers for some of its parts and accessories. As part of the technological innovation with benefits to the RP itself and eventually target practice today are venturing into the radiography digital, which involves the exposure of a plate image phosphorus-based with the later download to a computer. In combination with the use of sources of X-rays, there is a real contribution to reducing the dose, since the later are nowadays equipped with programmable

  2. Protective equipment of radiological protection and the worker wear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassia, Flor Rita de; Huhn, Andrea; Lima, Gelbcke Francine

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative research with workers of seven hemodynamic service of Santa Catarina, Brazil aimed to analyze the use of radiological protection equipment (RPE), as well as wear to the health of workers who use these causes. The study was conducted between March 2010 and November 2010, totaling approximately 30 hours of observations. Results showed resistance to the use of RPE and also showed wear to workers' health, mainly due to the weight and discomfort they cause, as may weigh 7-9 pounds, depending on the model used. Evidenced also the absence of workers due herniated disc, back pain, and other musculo skeletal problems. These complaints, in addition to being related to the use of these protective gear also related with the time that workers remain standing for long periods on certain procedures, such as angioplasty. Given these results, the research recommended the use of these devices with materials, that are already being produced, making lighter aprons, thus avoiding fatigue and back pain and also provide greater comfort by reducing workers' resistance to its use and its adverse consequences

  3. Quality assurance programs from laboratories offering radiological protection services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marrero Garcia, M.; Prendes Alonso, M.; Jova Sed, L.; Morales Monzon, J.A.

    1998-01-01

    The implementation of an adequate program for quality assurance in institutions servicing radiological protection programs will become an additional tool to achieve security targets included in that program. All scientific and technical services offered by CPHR employ quality assurance systems

  4. Endoscopic and radiological diagnostics of esophagus diseases in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krstić Vanja

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to expand the range of diagnostic methods for determining diseases of the esophagus and to make them more present in everyday practise, it is desirable to work out in more detail the procedure of endoscopic and radiological examinations, determine their limitations and possibilities, describe the topographic-anatomical and morphological status of the esophagus in an endoscopic and radiological picture, as well as to define which diseases of this organ are most represented. The paper presents the results of six-month investigations of esophagus diseases in dogs of different breeds and ages. A total of 15 animals were examined: 2 golden retrievers, 2 rottweilers, 5 German shepherds, 3 giant schnauzers, 2 cross-breeds, and 1 dalmatian. Cases of chronic esophagitis were described, as well as the presence of a foreign body and megaesophagus, and the prescribed therapy for all these diseases.

  5. SCK CEN'S International School for Radiological Protection (ISRP): communicating the aspects of radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coeck, M.; Majakowski, I.; Verachtert, C.; Meskens, G.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Thanks to its thorough experience in the field of peaceful applications of nuclear science and technology, radiological protection and radiobiology, the Belgian nuclear research centre S.C.K. E.N. has garnered a reputation as an outstanding centre of research, training and education. Functioning as a task force within S.C.K. E.N., the international school for Radiological Protection (i.s.R.P.) initiates and manages training and research projects and contributes to related activities on national and international level. I.s.R.P. activities are situated on three axes: Coordination and organisation of training and education programmes on radiological protection The i.s.R.P. training activities deal with all aspects of radiological protection and are directed to the private, medical and industrial nuclear sector, national and international policy organisations, the political and academic world and the general public. Courses are also organised in cooperation with technical high schools, universities and public and private health services. In addition, i.s.R.P. is involved in international research networks and training programmes, such as those of the European Commission and the IAEA. The i.s.R.P. team of lecturers includes technicians, physicists, biologists, medical doctors, engineers and social scientists, who all bring insights and ideas from their specific background into the course programmes. As S.C.K. E.N. staff members, they have a solid knowledge and experience in their field, and can thus directly transfer their theoretical knowledge and practical experience to the various courses. Course programmes are composed together with the customer, drawing from the set of basic and expertise course modules and completed with technical visits. The basic modules textbooks exist in Dutch, French and English. In addition, all course modules and visits can be lectured and guided in Dutch, French or English. Research on trans-disciplinary aspects of education

  6. ICRP Publication 139: Occupational Radiological Protection in Interventional Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, P Ortiz; Dauer, L T; Loose, R; Martin, C J; Miller, D L; Vañó, E; Doruff, M; Padovani, R; Massera, G; Yoder, C

    2018-03-01

    In recent publications, such as Publications 117 and 120, the Commission provided practical advice for physicians and other healthcare personnel on measures to protect their patients and themselves during interventional procedures. These measures can only be effective if they are encompassed by a framework of radiological protection elements, and by the availability of professionals with responsibilities in radiological protection. This framework includes a radiological protection programme with a strategy for exposure monitoring, protective garments, education and training, and quality assurance of the programme implementation. Professionals with responsibilities in occupational radiological protection for interventional procedures include: medical physicists; radiological protection specialists; personnel working in dosimetry services; clinical applications support personnel from the suppliers and maintenance companies; staff engaged in training, standardisation of equipment, and procedures; staff responsible for occupational health; hospital administrators responsible for providing financial support; and professional bodies and regulators. This publication addresses these elements and these audiences, and provides advice on specific issues, such as assessment of effective dose from dosimeter readings when an apron is worn, estimation of exposure of the lens of the eye (with and without protective eyewear), extremity monitoring, selection and testing of protective garments, and auditing the interventional procedures when occupational doses are unusually high or low (the latter meaning that the dosimeter may not have been worn).

  7. Education and Training in the Field of Radiological Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meskens, G.

    2001-01-01

    The International School for Radiological Protection (isRP) was founded within SCK-CEN in 1996 and organises training programmes on radiological protection for nuclear workers and staff. In 2000, isRP organised eleven courses for Belgian and foreign organisations active in the nuclear and non-nuclear field. The report summarises major achievements in 2000 and outlines a number of recent initiates, in particular the development of a distance learning programme

  8. Conditions of radiological protection in the health unities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sa, L.R.B.S.; Neto, A.T.; Pires, A.; Azevedo, H.F.; Boasquevisque, E.M.

    1987-01-01

    The objective of this study was explained which conditions is practiced for occupational and environmental radiological protection. Fifteen hospitables and ambulatories services, pertaining to the public system are studies, verifying that the professional group that are preoccupied with the radioprotection conditions are the assistants services and technician. The common knowledge about Basic Standards of Radiological Protection was also observed, of which is rather precarious. (C.G.C.) [pt

  9. Good practices in radiological protection at Narora Atomic Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, V.P.; Kumar, Sanjeev; Agrawal, Mitesh; Tiwari, S.K.; Kulhari, Praveen; Gupta, Ashok

    2016-01-01

    Radiological protection performance of nuclear power plant is assessed by collective exposure, individual average exposure, external/external exposure, personnel/surface contamination and reduction of radioactive wastes. Collective exposure is reduced by integrated comprehensive ALARA program in all aspects of nuclear plant operation and maintenance has reduced collective dose many folds. In the present paper, implementation of new good practices in Radiological Protection is presented

  10. Quality Control in Diagnostic Radiology: Experiences and Achievements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Khalid Matori; Husaini Salleh; Muhammad Jamal Md Isa

    2015-01-01

    Malaysian Nuclear Agency through its Medical Physics Group has been providing Quality Control (QC) services for medical X-ray apparatus used in diagnostic radiology to private clinics and hospitals since the year 1997. The Medical Physics Groups services is endorsed by the Malaysian Ministry Of Health (MOH) and is in accordance with the Malaysian Standard MS 838 and the Atomic Energy Licensing Act, 1984. Until today, the scopes of testing services also include all types of medical x-ray apparatus. The quality control (QC) in diagnostic radiology is considered as part of quality assurance program which provide accurate diagnostic information at the lowest cost and the least exposure of the patients to radiation. Many experience and obstacles were faced by Medical Physics Group. This paper will discuss the experiences and achievements of providing QC service from early stage until now so that it can be shared by the citizens of the Malaysian Nuclear Agency. The results of quality assurance inspection of all types of X-ray apparatus for medical conducted by Agency Nuclear Malaysia will be presented in brief. (author)

  11. Radiological protection survey results about radiodiagnosis protection practices in Cuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jova S, L.; Morales M, J.A.; Quevedo, J.R.; Medina, J.R.; Naranjo, A.M.; Fornet, O.M.

    1996-01-01

    In order to identify radiation protection current situation in national X-ray diagnostic practice , the State (cuban) Supervision System for Radiation and Nuclear Safety carried out in 1992 a survey which was planned for projection of future regulatory activities in this field. Survey covers the most important aspects related to radiation protection of occupationally exposed workers, patients and general population. Surveyed sample included a total of 52 X-ray units, sited in 7 dental clinics, 2 polyclinics and 13 hospitals, from 7 provinces of the country. Results showed that the organization of radiation protection in terms of personnel specially designated to carry out surveillance and control activities and level of documentation is deficient. Survey evidenced the general lack of safety and quality culture among technologists and radiologists which is mainly reflected in non regular application of basic patient protection measures (shielding, collimation, use of proper filtration among others) and non regular execution of basic quality inspection of employed radiographic systems. (authors). 4 refs., 1 fig

  12. Radiological protection objectives for the disposal of solid radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-10-01

    Guidance is given on the standards to be used in the UK in decisions on the radiological acceptability of disposal methods for solid radioactive wastes. The radiological protection objectives given in the report are intended to be applied to all types of solid radioactive waste, and to all the disposal methods which are in use or under consideration. This guidance complements and extends previous Board advice on radiological protection objectives which apply to the control of routine discharges of gaseous and liquid effluents. (author)

  13. Calculation of radiation exposure in diagnostic radiology. Method and surveys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duvauferrier, R.; Ramee, A.; Ezzeldin, K.; Guibert, J.L.

    1984-01-01

    A computerized method for evaluating the radiation exposure of the main target organs during various diagnostic radiologic procedures is described. This technique was used for educational purposes: study of exposure variations according to the technical modalities of a given procedure, and study of exposure variations according to various technical protocols (IVU, EGD barium study, etc.). This method was also used for studying exposure of patients during hospitalization in the Rennes Regional Hospital Center (France) in 1982, according to departments (urology, neurology, etc.). This method and results of these three studies are discussed [fr

  14. Quality criteria in diagnostic radiology of the skull

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedmann, G.

    1985-01-01

    Diagnostic survey radiology of the skull relies on pictures to be taken if indicated and to meet all conceivable requirements. Those radiograph directions and projections were selected out of the profusion of known and described ones which allow both as small a number of pictures and as comprehensive a demonstration of all skull sections and1structures as possible. With this in mind, quality criteria for plain radiographs of the skull taken laterally and sagittably, for partial radiographs of the visceral cranium including orbit and of the base of the skull including petrons bone are described. (orig./MG) [de

  15. Radiological protection in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zorrilla R, S.

    2008-12-01

    This presentation sharing experiences which correspond to the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde. This nuclear power plant is located at level 2 of four possible, in the classification performance of the World Association of Nuclear Operators (WANO), which means the mexican nuclear power plant is classified in terms of its performance indicators and above the average achieved by their counterparts americans and canadians. In the national context, the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde has also been honored with several awards such as the National Quality Award, the Clean Industry Certificate, the distinction of Environmental Excellence and others of similar importance. For the standards of WANO, the basic idea is that there are shortcomings in one of nuclear power plant concern to all partners. The indicators used for the classification will always go beyond more compliance with regulations, which are assumed, and rather assume come or a path to excellence. Among the most important indicators are: the collective dose, the percentage of areas declared as contaminated, the number, type and tendency of contamination personal cases, the number of dosimetry alarms, the number of unplanned exposures, loss control of high radiation areas and the release of contaminated material outside the restricted areas. Furthermore, as already indicated, nuclear power plants are of special care situations, such as, carrying out work in areas with radiation fields of more than 15 mSv h -1 , the movement of spent fuel in the reload floor. The consideration of the minimum total effective dose equivalent as a criterion for prescribing tools that reduce exposures, but may increase the external cases of contaminated casualties, the experience in portals such as workers subject to radiology, where exposure in industrial radiography, and so on. Special mention deserve the conditions generated during fuel reload stops, which causes a massive personnel movement, working simultaneously on

  16. Training in radiological protection at the Institute of Naval Medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, P.E.; Robb, D.J.

    1991-01-01

    The Training Division at the Institute of Naval Medicine, Alverstoke, UK, provides courses in radiological protection for government and military personnel who are radiation protection supervisors, radiation safety officers, members of naval emergency monitoring teams and senior medical officers. The course programmes provide formal lectures, practical exercises and tabletop exercises. The compliance of the Ministry of Defence with the Ionising Radiations Regulations 1985 and the implementation of Ministry of Defence instructions for radiological protection rely to a large extent on its radiation protection supervisors understanding of the training he receives. Quality assurance techniques are therefore applied to the training. (author)

  17. Guidelines for selection of radiological protective head covering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galloway, G.R. Jr.

    1995-08-01

    The hood is recognized throughout the nuclear industry as the standard radiological protective head covering for use in radioactively contaminated work environments. As of June 15, 1995, hoods were required for all activities performed in contaminated areas at the Y-12 Plant. The use of hoods had historically been limited to those radiological activities with a high potential for personnel contamination. Due to the large size of many posted contaminated areas at the Y-12 Plant, and compounding safety factors, requirements for the use of hoods are being reevaluated. The purpose of the evaluation is to develop technically sound guidelines for the selection of hoods when prescribing radiological protective head covering. This report presents the guidelines for selection of radiological protective hoods

  18. Pre-surgical radiologic diagnostics of pancreas diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seifried, C.

    1979-01-01

    At the example of a comparative study with 112 patients it should be demonstrated that the different radiologic techniques are complementary in pancreas diagnostics with respect to their indication and proposition. The study yields the following procedure for the pancreas diagnostics: cysts and pancreatites are diagnosed by means of sonography and computed tomography. Stomach-colon-barium passage and intravenous cholangio cholecystography can be applied for clarification of functional reactions on the stomach-colon regions, respectively the biliary region. Only in a complicated process, e.g. in a sustaining tumor suspicion or before surgery should angiography be used. In pancreatitis also the endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatiography is used. Tumors are generally submitted to angiography for clarification of diagnosis, resiscivity, and vessel conditions. (orig./MG) [de

  19. Use of digital speech recognition in diagnostics radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arndt, H.; Stockheim, D.; Mutze, S.; Petersein, J.; Gregor, P.; Hamm, B.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: Applicability and benefits of digital speech recognition in diagnostic radiology were tested using the speech recognition system SP 6000. Methods: The speech recognition system SP 6000 was integrated into the network of the institute and connected to the existing Radiological Information System (RIS). Three subjects used this system for writing 2305 findings from dictation. After the recognition process the date, length of dictation, time required for checking/correction, kind of examination and error rate were recorded for every dictation. With the same subjects, a correlation was performed with 625 conventionally written finding. Results: After an 1-hour initial training the average error rates were 8.4 to 13.3%. The first adaptation of the speech recognition system (after nine days) decreased the average error rates to 2.4 to 10.7% due to the ability of the program to learn. The 2 nd and 3 rd adaptations resulted only in small changes of the error rate. An individual comparison of the error rate developments in the same kind of investigation showed the relative independence of the error rate on the individual user. Conclusion: The results show that the speech recognition system SP 6000 can be evaluated as an advantageous alternative for quickly recording radiological findings. A comparison between manually writing and dictating the findings verifies the individual differences of the writing speeds and shows the advantage of the application of voice recognition when faced with normal keyboard performance. (orig.) [de

  20. The current contribution of diagnostic radiology to the population dose in Great Britain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wall, B.F.; Rae, S.; Kendall, G.M.; Darby, S.C.; Fischer, E.S.; Harries, S.V.

    1980-01-01

    The National Radiological Protection Board of the UK has just completed a national survey to determine the genetically significant dose (GSD) to the population of Great Britain from diagnostic radiology. A statistically selected sample of about 80 hospitals spread throughout England, Scotland and Wales has supplied information on the numbers of patients examined in their X-ray departments during a week in June 1977, together with details of age, sex and examination technique. This sample is sufficient to make a reliable estimate of the total diagnostic work-load in all National Health Service Hospitals throughout Great Britain for a year. Gonadal doses from 16 examination types that are likely to be the main contributors to the GSD have been measured on nearly 5000 patients at 20 hospitals throug'out the country using specially developed thermoluminescent dosemeters. These gonadal doses are combined with the examination frequency figures and current values for child expectancy derived from data supplied by tthe registrar general, to estimate the GSD. Those changes in practice which have occurred since the late 1950's which may have influenced the new value for the GSD are discussed, as well as the progress that has been made in estimating population somatic doses from diagnostic radiology using clinical measurements that are currently underway. (H.K.)

  1. Occupational and Radiological Protection Department - DEPRO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    This report presents the activities and purposes of the Occupational and Radiological Dept. of the Institute of Radioprotection and Dosimetry of Brazilian CNEN. A critical analysis of its situation and expectations are also presented, besides personnel list. (J.A.M.M.)

  2. The Role of Radiology in the Diagnostic Process: Information, Communication, and Teamwork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, David B; Langlotz, Curtis P

    2017-11-01

    The diagnostic radiology process represents a partnership between clinical and radiology teams. As such, breakdowns in interpersonal interactions and communication can result in patient harm. We explore the role of radiology in the diagnostic process, focusing on key concepts of information and communication, as well as key interpersonal interactions of teamwork, collaboration, and collegiality, all based on trust. We propose 10 principles to facilitate effective information flow in the diagnostic process.

  3. Radiological safety status and quality assurance audit of medical X-ray diagnostic installations in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonawane, A U; Singh, Meghraj; Sunil Kumar, J V K; Kulkarni, Arti; Shirva, V K; Pradhan, A S

    2010-10-01

    We conducted a radiological safety and quality assurance (QA) audit of 118 medical X-ray diagnostic machines installed in 45 major hospitals in India. The main objective of the audit was to verify compliance with the regulatory requirements stipulated by the national regulatory body. The audit mainly covered accuracy check of accelerating potential (kVp), linearity of tube current (mA station) and timer, congruence of radiation and optical field, and total filtration; in addition, we also reviewed medical X-ray diagnostic installations with reference to room layout of X-ray machines and conduct of radiological protection survey. A QA kit consisting of a kVp Test-O-Meter (ToM) (Model RAD/FLU-9001), dose Test-O-Meter (ToM) (Model 6001), ionization chamber-based radiation survey meter model Gun Monitor and other standard accessories were used for the required measurements. The important areas where there was noncompliance with the national safety code were: inaccuracy of kVp calibration (23%), lack of congruence of radiation and optical field (23%), nonlinearity of mA station (16%) and timer (9%), improper collimator/diaphragm (19.6%), faulty adjustor knob for alignment of field size (4%), nonavailability of warning light (red light) at the entrance of the X-ray room (29%), and use of mobile protective barriers without lead glass viewing window (14%). The present study on the radiological safety status of diagnostic X-ray installations may be a reasonably good representation of the situation in the country as a whole. The study contributes significantly to the improvement of radiological safety by the way of the steps already taken and by providing a vital feed back to the national regulatory body.

  4. Radiological safety status and quality assurance audit of medical X-ray diagnostic installations in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonawane A

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We conducted a radiological safety and quality assurance (QA audit of 118 medical X-ray diagnostic machines installed in 45 major hospitals in India. The main objective of the audit was to verify compliance with the regulatory requirements stipulated by the national regulatory body. The audit mainly covered accuracy check of accelerating potential (kVp, linearity of tube current (mA station and timer, congruence of radiation and optical field, and total filtration; in addition, we also reviewed medical X-ray diagnostic installations with reference to room layout of X-ray machines and conduct of radiological protection survey. A QA kit consisting of a kVp Test-O-Meter (ToM (Model RAD/FLU-9001, dose Test-O-Meter (ToM (Model 6001, ionization chamber-based radiation survey meter model Gun Monitor and other standard accessories were used for the required measurements. The important areas where there was noncompliance with the national safety code were: inaccuracy of kVp calibration (23%, lack of congruence of radiation and optical field (23%, nonlinearity of mA station (16% and timer (9%, improper collimator/diaphragm (19.6%, faulty adjustor knob for alignment of field size (4%, nonavailability of warning light (red light at the entrance of the X-ray room (29%, and use of mobile protective barriers without lead glass viewing window (14%. The present study on the radiological safety status of diagnostic X-ray installations may be a reasonably good representation of the situation in the country as a whole. The study contributes significantly to the improvement of radiological safety by the way of the steps already taken and by providing a vital feed back to the national regulatory body.

  5. Radiological safety status and quality assurance audit of medical X-ray diagnostic installations in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonawane, A.U.; Singh, Meghraj; Sunil Kumar, J.V.K.; Kulkarni, Arti; Shirva, V.K.; Pradhan, A.S.

    2010-01-01

    We conducted a radiological safety and quality assurance (QA) audit of 118 medical X-ray diagnostic machines installed in 45 major hospitals in India. The main objective of the audit was to verify compliance with the regulatory requirements stipulated by the national regulatory body. The audit mainly covered accuracy check of accelerating potential (kVp), linearity of tube current (mA station) and timer, congruence of radiation and optical field, and total filtration; in addition, we also reviewed medical X-ray diagnostic installations with reference to room layout of X-ray machines and conduct of radiological protection survey. A QA kit consisting of a kVp Test-O-Meter (ToM) (Model RAD/FLU-9001), dose Test-O-Meter (ToM) (Model 6001), ionization chamber-based radiation survey meter model Gun Monitor and other standard accessories were used for the required measurements. The important areas where there was noncompliance with the national safety code were: inaccuracy of kVp calibration (23%), lack of congruence of radiation and optical field (23%), nonlinearity of mA station (16%) and timer (9%), improper collimator/diaphragm (19.6%), faulty adjustor knob for alignment of field size (4%), nonavailability of warning light (red light) at the entrance of the X-ray room (29%), and use of mobile protective barriers without lead glass viewing window (14%). The present study on the radiological safety status of diagnostic X-ray installations may be a reasonably good representation of the situation in the country as a whole. The study contributes significantly to the improvement of radiological safety by the way of the steps already taken and by providing a vital feed back to the national regulatory body. (author)

  6. Central nervous system tumors: Radiologic pathologic correlation and diagnostic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishita Pant

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study was conducted to formulate location-wise radiologic diagnostic algorithms and assess their concordance with the final histopathological diagnosis so as to evaluate their utility in a rural setting where only basic facilities are available. Materials and Methods: A retrospective analysis to assess the concordance of radiology (primarily MRI with final histopathology report was done. Based on the most common incidence of tumor location and basic radiology findings, diagnostic algorithms were prepared. Results: For supratentorial intraaxial parenchymal location concordance was seen in all high-grade astrocytomas, low- and high-grade oligodendrogliomas, metastatic tumors, primitive neuroectodermal tumors, high-grade ependymomas, neuronal and mixed neuro-glial tumors and tumors of hematopoietic system. Lowest concordance was seen in low-grade astrocytomas. In the supratentorial intraaxial ventricular location, agreement was observed in choroid plexus tumors, ependymomas, low-grade astrocytomas and meningiomas; in the supratentorial extraaxial location, except for the lack of concordance in the only case of metastatic tumor, concordance was observed in meningeal tumors, tumors of the sellar region, tumors of cranial and paraspinal nerves; the infratentorial intraaxial parenchymal location showed agreement in low- as well as high-grade astrocytomas, metastatic tumors, high-grade ependymoma, embryonal tumors and hematopoietic tumors; in the infratentorial intraaxial ventricular location, except for the lack of concordance in one case of low-grade astrocytoma and two cases of medulloblastomas, agreement was observed in low- and high-grade ependymoma; infratentorial extraaxial tumors showed complete agreement in all tumors of cranial and paraspinal nerves, meningiomas, and hematopoietic tumors. Conclusion: A location-based approach to central nervous system (CNS tumors is helpful in establishing an appropriate differential diagnosis.

  7. Quality control procedures of dental diagnostic radiology systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, Paula Serra Sasaki

    2007-01-01

    This work presents quality control reference procedures for dental diagnostic radiology systems, following the recommendations of the Publication 453 of the Brazilian Health Ministry (PF453), to be applied in dental clinics, in order to achieve an improvement in the radiological image qualities and the patient dose reduction. All tests were applied in an intraoral X rays system, following the methodology developed and the requirements of the PF 453. In order to verify the best quality of the image in relation to the smaller exposition time an object test was also developed in this work. The use of this object allowed the reduction of the exposition time of 0.5 seconds, the maximum value of the linear region of the characteristic curve, for 0.2 seconds. The tested X rays system showed a very good agreement with the applied procedures, detaching the reduction of the skin entrance dose using the film-holding devices. However, the size of the field increased and exceeded the maximum value of 6 cm recommended in the standard. The importance of the quality control in dental diagnostic radiology systems is essential due to the constant use of X radiation in dental clinics. The PF453 recommends the frequency of at least two years for the constancy tests. However, it is suggested that the professional, surgeon-dentist, should be responsible for the internal control of the image quality obtained from the X rays device. This can be done through monthly exposures of the object test developed in this work. (author)

  8. Biological effects and radiation protection in veterinary radiology: a literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosa, P.C.; Siqueira, D.; Barros, F.S.

    2017-01-01

    Veterinary radiology is a tool of excellent diagnostic support. Besides X--ray, it counts on technological advances such as computed tomography, nuclear medicine and interventional radiology . It is common during X-ray practice to use exposure parameters with short times to avoid blurring by the movement of the animal, but the fact that the animals need to be immobilized during the exposures contribute significantly with the increase of the dose received by the professionals, whose biological risks are not yet well established as a result of exposure to other factors harmful to health, such as anesthetic gases, insecticides, zoonoses and others. For this reason, we sought to verify the main radiological risks to which veterinarians are exposed and the best means to guarantee radiological protection

  9. Second Professional Specialization in Radiological Protection in Peru

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medina-Gironzini, E.

    2004-01-01

    Considering that professionals with studies, training and experience in Radiological Protection as a Second Professional Specialization must be recognized, the Peruvian Institute of Nuclear Energy (IPEN), which is the institution responsible for the promotion and control of ionizing radiations in the country, has sign a specific agreement with the Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, in order to develop these courses. They are based on the content of the Post Graduate Course on Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety of the Universidad de Buenos Aires, in Argentina, where more than 360 people from 27 different countries have been trained in the last 20 years. People who have a professional degree in Sciences or Engineering, and who fulfill the requirements demanded by the University, study this Second Professional Specialization in Radiological Protection. The studies last 2 years and the courses cover the following subjects: Nuclear Physics, Basic Mathematics, Basic Biology, Radiation Sources, Interaction between Radiation and Matter, Radiation Detection and Measurement, Biological effects of ionizing radiations, Radiological protection in the use of radiations in industry and medicine, Regulatory aspects, and nuclear safety - radiological protection interface. IPEN has taken the responsibility to carry out these studies due to its experience in the organization, together with different Universities, of six Masters in Nuclear Energy, four Masters in Medical Physics, one Master in Nuclear Physics, one Master in Nuclear Chemistry, and two Specialization in Nuclear Medicine. For this purpose, IPEN has the Superior Center of Nuclear Studies (CSEN), which has trained more than 2200 people in radiological protection in more than 30 years. CSEN is the first center in the country to train people in the area of nuclear energy and radiological protection. It has the best staff of professors with a both a great education and professional experience, as well as

  10. Second Professional Specialization in Radiological Protection in Peru

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medina-Gironzini, E.

    2004-07-01

    Considering that professionals with studies, training and experience in Radiological Protection as a Second Professional Specialization must be recognized, the Peruvian Institute of Nuclear Energy (IPEN), which is the institution responsible for the promotion and control of ionizing radiations in the country, has sign a specific agreement with the Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, in order to develop these courses. They are based on the content of the Post Graduate Course on Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety of the Universidad de Buenos Aires, in Argentina, where more than 360 people from 27 different countries have been trained in the last 20 years. People who have a professional degree in Sciences or Engineering, and who fulfill the requirements demanded by the University, study this Second Professional Specialization in Radiological Protection. The studies last 2 years and the courses cover the following subjects: Nuclear Physics, Basic Mathematics, Basic Biology, Radiation Sources, Interaction between Radiation and Matter, Radiation Detection and Measurement, Biological effects of ionizing radiations, Radiological protection in the use of radiations in industry and medicine, Regulatory aspects, and nuclear safety - radiological protection interface. IPEN has taken the responsibility to carry out these studies due to its experience in the organization, together with different Universities, of six Masters in Nuclear Energy, four Masters in Medical Physics, one Master in Nuclear Physics, one Master in Nuclear Chemistry, and two Specialization in Nuclear Medicine. For this purpose, IPEN has the Superior Center of Nuclear Studies (CSEN), which has trained more than 2200 people in radiological protection in more than 30 years. CSEN is the first center in the country to train people in the area of nuclear energy and radiological protection. It has the best staff of professors with a both a great education and professional experience, as well as

  11. Current evaluation of the information about Radiological Protection in Internet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruiz-Cruces, R.; Marco, M.; Villanueva, I.

    2003-01-01

    To analyze the current situation about the pedagogic information on radiological protection training which could be found in Internet. More than 756 web-pages have been visited in Internet about Radiological Protection in the nuclear and medical fields, providing information mainly focusing on information to the members of the public. In this search were used internet Searching Appliance (as Copernicus, Google and Scirus), using key words related with this subject (as Radiological Protection and Health Safety), getting the internet address of organizations, societies and investigation groups. Only a low percentage (less than 5 per cent) of these addresses content information on Radiological Protection for the members of the public, including information about the regulator Organizations, and which are the objectives for protection of the members of the public against ionization radiation (from the point of view of the use of the ionization radiation in the medical and nuclear field). This work attempts to propose the use of internet as a tool for informing the members of the public in matter of radiological protection, as first link in the chain of the training and education. (Author)

  12. Continuing training in radiological protection as an effective means of avoiding radiological accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, C.M.A.; Pelegrineli, S.Q.; Martins, G.; Lima, A.R.; Silva, F.C.A. da

    2017-01-01

    it is notorious that one of the main causes of radiological accidents is the lack of knowledge of radiological protection of workers. In order to meet the needs of professionals in acquiring a solid base in radiological protection and safety, was created in 2013, by the Casa Branca School / SP and technically supported by the company MAXIM Cursos, the 'Post-Graduation Course Lato Sensu de Radiological Protection in Medical, Industrial and Nuclear Applications', which offers a broad improvement in radiation protection. The course of 380 hours and duration of 18 months is divided into 13 modules, including theoretical classes, in person and online using the virtual classroom and practical training in radiation protection in general. In the end students should present a monograph, guided by a course teacher and reviewed by an Examining Bank. Five classes have been formed in these four years, totaling 92 students. In all, 51 monographs have been defended on topics of technical and scientific interest. For this, the Faculty consists of 25 professors, being 9 Doctors, 13 Masters and 3 Specialists in Radiological Protection

  13. How conservative is routine personal dosimetry monitoring in diagnostic radiology?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boetticher, H. von; Lachmund, J.; Hoffmann, W.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Dose values obtained by official personal radiation exposure monitoring are often considered equivalent to the effective dose of a person. This paper provides estimates of the extent of deviation between the two dose concepts under various conditions. Materials and Methods: Doses for patients and personnel were measured using thermoluminescence dosimeters for five different geometries at three work settings in a radiology department. Patients and personnel were simulated with anthropomorphic phantoms. Different types of protective clothing as well as permanent protection shields were considered in the calculations. Results: Dose values obtained by official personal dose monitoring are conservative only for specific radiation protection situations. With state-of-the-art personal protective equipment (wrap-around style lead apron with thyroid shield), the ratio between effective dose and personal dose varies between 0.6 and 1.25. Without thyroid protection the official personal dose systematically underestimates the effective dose: for protective clothing with 0.5 mm lead equivalent without thyroid shielding, the effective dose exceeds the personal dose by factors between 1.7 and 3.1. If protective clothing with lead equivalent 0.35 mm is used, this factor varies between 1.1 and 1.82. (orig.)

  14. Radiological protection of the environment from an NGO perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carroll, S.

    2008-01-01

    Non-governmental environmental organisations (environmental NGOs) may consider the issue of radiological protection of the environment differently to other interested parties such as regulators or industry. While environmental NGOs are broadly positive towards the current emphasis and engagement on radiological protection of the environment per se, there remain concerns about the precise meaning of the term and the ultimate objectives of the current initiatives. Various strategies are studied and discussed. The disposal of radioactive waste at sea is discussed and a case study presented. What the environmental NGOs are looking for is focused upon and various environmental protection systems are discussed (tk)

  15. Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland activities and responsibilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This brochure describes the Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland's functions and responsibilities which relate principally to the monitoring of radioactivity in the environment and of radiation doses received by people occupationally or otherwise; regulation of the uses of ionising radiation in medicine, industry and elsewhere; assistance in developing national preparedness for response to a radiological emergency; and providing information and advice to government, other organisations and the general public on matters relating to ionising radiation. ills

  16. Radiological protection in computed tomography and cone beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehani, M M

    2015-06-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has sustained interest in radiological protection in computed tomography (CT), and ICRP Publications 87 and 102 focused on the management of patient doses in CT and multi-detector CT (MDCT) respectively. ICRP forecasted and 'sounded the alarm' on increasing patient doses in CT, and recommended actions for manufacturers and users. One of the approaches was that safety is best achieved when it is built into the machine, rather than left as a matter of choice for users. In view of upcoming challenges posed by newer systems that use cone beam geometry for CT (CBCT), and their widened usage, often by untrained users, a new ICRP task group has been working on radiological protection issues in CBCT. Some of the issues identified by the task group are: lack of standardisation of dosimetry in CBCT; the false belief within the medical and dental community that CBCT is a 'light', low-dose CT whereas mobile CBCT units and newer applications, particularly C-arm CT in interventional procedures, involve higher doses; lack of training in radiological protection among clinical users; and lack of dose information and tracking in many applications. This paper provides a summary of approaches used in CT and MDCT, and preliminary information regarding work just published for radiological protection in CBCT. © The International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  17. Radiological protection for medical exposure to ionizing radiation. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    When ionizing radiation was discovered more than 100 years ago its beneficial uses were quickly discovered by the medical profession. Over the years new diagnostic and therapeutic techniques have been developed and the general level of health care has improved. This has resulted in medical radiation exposures becoming a significant component of the total radiation exposure of populations. Current estimates put the worldwide annual number of diagnostic exposures at 2500 million and therapeutic exposures at 5.5 million. Some 78% of diagnostic exposures are due to medical X rays, 21% due to dental X rays and the remaining 1% due to nuclear medicine techniques. The annual collective dose from all diagnostic exposures is about 2500 million man Sv, corresponding to a worldwide average of 0.4 mSv per person per year. There are, however, wide differences in radiological practices throughout the world, the average annual per caput values for States of the upper and lower health care levels being 1.3 mSv and 0.02 mSv, respectively. It should, however, be noted that doses from therapeutic uses of radiation are not included in these averages, as they involve very high doses (in the region of 20-60 Gy) precisely delivered to target volumes in order to eradicate disease or to alleviate symptoms. Over 90% of total radiation treatments are conducted by teletherapy or brachytherapy, with radiopharmaceuticals being used in only 7% of treatments. Increases in the uses of medical radiation and the resultant doses can be expected following changes in patterns of health care resulting from advances in technology and economic development. For example, increases are likely in the utilization of computed tomography (CT), digital imaging and, with the attendant potential for deterministic effects, interventional procedures; practice in nuclear medicine will be driven by the use of new and more specific radiopharmaceuticals for diagnosis and therapy, and there will be an increased demand for

  18. Radiological protection for medical exposure to ionizing radiation. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    When ionizing radiation was discovered more than 100 years ago its beneficial uses were quickly discovered by the medical profession. Over the years new diagnostic and therapeutic techniques have been developed and the general level of health care has improved. This has resulted in medical radiation exposures becoming a significant component of the total radiation exposure of populations. Current estimates put the worldwide annual number of diagnostic exposures at 2500 million and therapeutic exposures at 5.5 million. Some 78% of diagnostic exposures are due to medical X rays, 21% due to dental X rays and the remaining 1% due to nuclear medicine techniques. The annual collective dose from all diagnostic exposures is about 2500 million man Sv, corresponding to a worldwide average of 0.4 mSv per person per year. There are, however, wide differences in radiological practices throughout the world, the average annual per caput values for States of the upper and lower health care levels being 1.3 mSv and 0.02 mSv, respectively. It should, however, be noted that doses from therapeutic uses of radiation are not included in these averages, as they involve very high doses (in the region of 20-60 Gy) precisely delivered to target volumes in order to eradicate disease or to alleviate symptoms. Over 90% of total radiation treatments are conducted by teletherapy or brachytherapy, with radiopharmaceuticals being used in only 7% of treatments. Increases in the uses of medical radiation and the resultant doses can be expected following changes in patterns of health care resulting from advances in technology and economic development. For example, increases are likely in the utilization of computed tomography (CT), digital imaging and, with the attendant potential for deterministic effects, interventional procedures. Practice in nuclear medicine will be driven by the use of new and more specific radiopharmaceuticals for diagnosis and therapy, and there will be an increased demand for

  19. Skeletal diseases. Diagnostic clinical radiology and differential diagnostics. 2. rev. and enl. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freyschmidt, J.

    1997-01-01

    The book focuses on the diagnostic evaluation of idiopathic diseases of the skeleton and bone joints, also including the fundamental healing processes of bone fractures, particularly of stress-induced and pathologic fractures. Ample space has been given to the description and imaging of the course of diseases under treatment by up-to-date therapies, as e.g. for ostitis deformans Paget's disease, or skeletal metastases. This second edition of the book incorporates the progress achieved over the last five years in skeletal diagnostics. The advances in this field have been resulting from basic research work, for instance in molecular biology, or from a variety of completed studies relating to clinical medicine, laboratory chemistry, histopathology and radiology of skeletal diseases, and from experience obtained with the diagnostic radiology methods and techniques, with the potentials and constraints of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) today being more critically assessed than five years ago. MRI is a modality currently meeting with interest in the context of search for additional diagnostic information, new definition of complete pictures of diseases, or false or overinterpretation of diagnostic findings. (orig./MG). 431 figs [de

  20. Quality control in diagnostic radiology. Historical development and present status in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michael Moores, B.

    2007-01-01

    Complete test of publication follows. Quality control is now an accepted activity within the overall radiation protection framework for diagnostic radiology. Indeed it is now a legal requirement within Member States specified in EC Directives that establish the basic requirements for radiation protection in medicine. This was not always the case and its historical development can be considered in three parts: 1) The development of test procedures and standardisation of practices; 2) Harmonisation of initiatives and the creation of a European dimension in such practices; 3) Its role and function in a changing and evolving technological environment - current status and future needs. The development of tests methods for diagnostic X-ray equipment was initially intimately related to the development of a scientific basis for the X-ray imaging process. Knowledge of the physical basis for image production in film-screen and fluoroscopic processes required the definition and specification and measurement of particular parameters within the image forming chain. The development of test methods and the necessary measuring equipment involved ongoing research and development by physical scientists throughout Europe and North America. However, the many different approaches employed meant that results of measurements could not always be compared. However, once acceptable test methods and equipment had been developed it was possible to standardise practices through the development of test protocols. In 1980 a foundation for collective European actions was established through the EC radiation protection research and development programme. This helped to establish a European wide forum for actions in the field of medical radiation protection including quality control. These initiatives were driven by EC Directives, which were concerned with protection of the worker, general public and patients from medical practices that utilised ionising radiation. Multi national research

  1. Comprehensive Clinical Audits of Diagnostic Radiology Practices: A Tool for Quality Improvement. Quality Assurance Audit for Diagnostic Radiology Improvement and Learning (QUAADRIL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    Interest in quality assurance processes and quality improvement in diagnostic radiology is being driven by a number of factors. These include the high cost and complexity of radiological equipment, acknowledgement of the possibility of increasing doses to patients, and the importance of radiological diagnosis to patient management within the health care environment. To acknowledge these interests, clinical audits have been introduced and, in Europe, mandated under a European Directive (Council Directive 97/47/EURATOM). Comprehensive clinical audits focus on clinical management and infrastructure, patient related and technical procedures, and education and research. This publication includes a structured set of standards appropriate for diagnostic radiology, an audit guide to their clinical review, and data collection sheets for the rapid production of reports in audit situations. It will be a useful guide for diagnostic radiology facilities wishing to improve their service to patients through timely diagnosis with minimal radiation dose.

  2. Comprehensive Clinical Audits of Diagnostic Radiology Practices: A Tool for Quality Improvement. Quality Assurance Audit for Diagnostic Radiology Improvement and Learning (QUAADRIL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    Interest in quality assurance processes and quality improvement in diagnostic radiology is being driven by a number of factors. These include the high cost and complexity of radiological equipment, acknowledgement of the possibility of increasing doses to patients, and the importance of radiological diagnosis to patient management within the health care environment. To acknowledge these interests, clinical audits have been introduced and, in Europe, mandated under a European Directive (Council Directive 97/47/EURATOM). Comprehensive clinical audits focus on clinical management and infrastructure, patient related and technical procedures, and education and research. This publication includes a structured set of standards appropriate for diagnostic radiology, an audit guide to their clinical review, and data collection sheets for the rapid production of reports in audit situations. It will be a useful guide for diagnostic radiology facilities wishing to improve their service to patients through timely diagnosis with minimal radiation dose.

  3. Radiation protection in dental radiology - Recent advances and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsapaki, V

    2017-12-01

    Dental radiology uses X-ray technology to diagnose and design treatment of various clinical problems related to the oral cavity and surrounding tissues. As technology quickly evolves, there are numerous X-ray modalities using different tools in the attempt to best image and treat efficiently these diseases, disorders or other related clinical conditions. The reported numbers of dental X-rays, the fact that these may be under-reported in many countries and because dental X-rays are performed more on younger individuals, whose teeth and dentition are still developing, calls for increased need on radiation protection. The objectives of this paper are to report on the latest technology updates and related radiation protection issues, to present future directions and define gaps. Most of existing radiation protection national and international guidelines are more than a decade old. Update is needed to account for newer technologies such as cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and digital imaging. Diagnostic Reference Levels (DRLs), a well established method for dose optimization, are not yet defined for CBCT and have to be set for various clinical indications. As far as shielding is concerned, recent data confirm that use of lead apron, even in pregnant patients, or gonadal shielding are not recommended, due to negligible radiation dose reduction. Thyroid lead shielding should be used in case the organ is in or close to the primary beam. Specifically for CBCT, leaded glasses, thyroid collars and collimation (smaller field of view (FOV) especially for paediatric patients) minimize the dose to organs outside the FOV. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. 2000 RSNA annual oration in diagnostic radiology: The future of interventional radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, G J

    2001-08-01

    Origins in imaging, procedural emphasis, and dependence on innovation characterize interventional radiology, which will continue as the field of image-guided minimally invasive therapies. A steady supply of innovators will be needed. Current workforce shortages demand that this problem be addressed and in an ongoing fashion. Interventional radiology's major identity problem will require multiple corrective measures, including a name change. Diagnostic radiologists must fully embrace the concept of the dedicated interventionalist. Interspecialty turf battles will continue, especially with cardiologists and vascular surgeons. To advance the discipline, interventional radiologists must remain involved in cutting-edge therapies such as endograft repair of aortic aneurysms and carotid stent placement. As the population ages, interventionalists will experience a shift toward a greater emphasis on cancer treatment. Political agendas and public pressure will improve access to care and result in managed health care reforms. Academic centers will continue to witness a decline in time and resources available to pursue academic missions. The public outcry for accountability will result in systems changes aimed at reducing errors and process changes in the way physicians are trained, certified, and monitored. Evidence-based medicine will be the watchword of this century. Interventional radiology will maintain its role through development of methods for delivery of genes, gene products, and drugs to specific target sites; control of angiogenesis and other biologic processes; and noninvasive image-guided delivery of various forms of energy for ablation.

  5. Dose classification scheme for digital imaging techniques in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hojreh, A.

    2002-04-01

    Purpose: image quality in diagnostic radiology is determined in crucial extent by the signal-noise-ratio, which is proportional to the applied x-ray dose. Onward technological developments in the diagnostic radiology are therefore frequently connected with a dose increase, which subjectively is hardly or even not perceptible. The aim of this work was to define reproducible standards for image quality as a function of dose and expected therapeutical consequence in case of computed tomography of the paranasal sinuses and the upper and lower jaw (dental CT), whereby practical-clinical purposes are considered. Materials and methods: the image quality of computed tomography of the paranasal sinuses and dental CT was determined by standard deviation of the CT-numbers (pixel noise) in a region of interest of the phantom of American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM phantom) and additionally in the patients CT images. The diagnostic quality of the examination was classified on the basis of patients CT images in three dose levels (low dose, standard dose and high dose). Results: the pixel noise of CT of the paranasal sinuses with soft tissue reconstruction amounts to 19.3 Hounsfield units (HU) for low dose, 8.8 HU for standard dose, and below 8 HU for high dose. The pixel noise of the dental CT with bone (high resolution) reconstruction amounts to 344 HU for low dose, 221 HU for standard dose, and below 200 HU for high dose. Suitable indications for low dose CT are the scanning of body regions with high contrast differences, like the bony delimitations of air-filled spaces of the facial bones, and radiological follow-up examinations with dedicated questions such as axis determination in dental implantology, as well as the images of objects with small diameter such as in case of children. The standard dose CT can be recommended for all cases, in which precise staging of the illness plays an indispensable role for the diagnosis and therapy planning. With high dose

  6. The teaching of Radiological Protection in actual society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenzo, Nestor Pedro de

    1996-01-01

    The use more and more frequent of radiations in different areas of the daily life generate a growing necessity of competent professionals and technicians qualified in Health Physics. The teaching of the Radiological Protection does not limit only to the instruction in scientists topics that quality to the professionals in the resolution of problems or the application of techniques, must qualified also the students in the diffusion of the own problems of the radiological protection. The content of different courses of radiological protection given in the Instituto Bailer's ( a join between the National University of Cuyo and the National Commission of Atomic Energy) guided to different groups of students or professionals are also introduced. Finally, some of the examples used in order to clarify practical situations are shown. (author)

  7. 42 CFR 413.122 - Payment for hospital outpatient radiology services and other diagnostic procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Payment for hospital outpatient radiology services... radiology services and other diagnostic procedures. (a) Basis and purpose. (1) This section implements section 1833(n) of the Act and establishes the method for determining Medicare payments for radiology...

  8. Radiation protection study of radiology medical workers in radiodiagnosis area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaona, E.; Canizal, C.; Garcia, M.A.; Orozco, M.; Rincon, A.; Padilla, Y.; Martinez, A.

    1996-01-01

    Aspects related to radiological safety and its organization in radiodiagnosis were evaluated by means of scanning carried out in 18 hospitals of Mexico City, divided in 11 public institutions and 7 private ones. The population being studied was: hospital personnel that works in radiodiagnosis. The survey was made with 31 dichotomic variables, being obtained 132 surveys. The personnel characteristics are 83% works in public institutions, 49% works in radiodiagnosis, 3% has an academic degree, 13% is member of a hospital professional association, 13% has updated information on radiological protection, 36% was trained, 45% works for more than 2 years, 52% uses personal dosemeter, less than the 20% knows about the fundamentals of the radiological protection and 24% states to suffer from biological radiation effects, due to the exposure to x-rays. As result of the study, it was found that the main problems that the radiological protection has, are: lack of training programs in radiological protection and supervision, medical surveillance and the few number of persons that takes part in clinical meetings and professional associations. (authors). 7 refs., 3 tabs

  9. Evaluation of the conditions and practices of radiological protection technicians in radiology, according to Ordinance 453

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Rogerio Ferreira da

    2013-01-01

    Professionals in radiology suffer whole body exposure to low doses for long periods . The system of radiological protection should keep exposures below recommended thresholds, thus avoiding the stochastic effects that can be triggered with any dose level value, and there is not a threshold for induction of the same. Therefore it is important to use personal dosimeter for monitoring doses and protective equipment. The increase in procedures using ionizing radiation in recent years has been noted with concern, since many companies are not complying with the standards of protection. This is because some procedures may be performed without the need of surgery, which presents a greater risk to the patient. Furthermore, Brazilians are being exposed to radiation without necessity. The reasons range from radiological equipment miscalibrated to poorly trained staff. Thus we evaluate the conditions and practices of radiation protection technicians in radiology according to Ordinance 453 in Goiania, GO, Brazil. Through a descriptive survey with a quantitative approach, we used the technique of gathering information based on a questionnaire. From this survey, we identified the procedures used by radiation protection professionals and concluded that there are failures in the procedures for protecting patients and accompanying and in the training of the professionals. (author)

  10. Evaluation of PC-based diagnostic radiology workstations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollack, T.; Brueggenwerth, G.; Kaulfuss, K.; Niederlag, W.

    2000-01-01

    Material and Methods: During February 1999 and September 1999 medical users at the hospital Dresden-Friedrichstadt Germany had tested 7 types of radiology diagnostic workstations. Two types of test methods were used: In test type 1 ergonomic and handling functions were evaluated impartial according to 78 selected user requirements. In test type 2 radiologists and radiographers (3+4) performed 23 work flow steps with a subjectively evaluation. Results: By using a progressive rating no product could fully meet the user requirements. As a result of the summary evaluation for test 1 and test 2 the following compliance rating was calculated for the different products: Rad Works (66%), Magic View (63%), ID-Report (58%), Impax 3000 (53%), Medical Workstation (52%), Pathspeed (46%) and Autorad (39%). (orig.) [de

  11. Splenic infarct as a diagnostic pitfall in radiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshi Sanjeev

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Follow-up of colorectal carcinoma after therapy is based on symptoms, tumor markers, and imaging studies. Clinicians sometimes face diagnostic dilemmas because of unusual presentations on the imaging modalities coupled with rising serum markers. We report a case of colorectal carcinoma that presented with gastrointestinal symptoms 14 months after completion of treatment. Investigations showed rise in carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA. Suspecting disease recurrence, complete radioimaging workup was performed; the only abnormality detected was a smooth, hypodense area in the posterior third of the spleen on contrast-enhanced computed tomography abdomen. In view of the previous diagnosis of carcinoma colon, the symptoms reported by the patient, the elevated CEA, and the atypical CECT appearance, a diagnosis of splenic metastasis was made. The patient was subjected to splenectomy as a curative treatment. However, the histopathological report revealed it to be a splenic infarct. The present case reemphasizes the limitations of radiological studies in the follow-up of carcinoma colon.

  12. Fiber-coupled Luminescence Dosimetry in Therapeutic and Diagnostic Radiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Claus Erik

    2011-01-01

    . Some crystalline phosphors, such as carbon-doped aluminium oxide (Al2O3:C) have the ability to store charge produced in the crystal during irradiation. The stored charge may later be released by fiber-guided laser light under emission of so-called optically stimulated luminescence (OSL). The OSL signal......Fiber-coupled luminescence dosimetry is an emerging technology with several potentially attractive features of relevance for uses in therapeutic and diagnostic radiology: direct water equivalence (i.e. no significant perturbation of the radiation field in a water phantom or a patient), sub......-mm detector size, high dynamic range (below a mGy to several Gy), microsecond time resolution, and absence of electrical wires or other electronics in the dosimeter probe head. Fiber-coupled luminescence dosimetry systems typically consist of one or more small samples of phosphor, e.g. a mg of plastic...

  13. X-ray scatter data for diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dick, C.E.; Soares, C.G.; Motz, J.W.

    1978-01-01

    The ratio of the scattered to the total X-ray fluence (scatter fraction) at the centre of the image plane for X-rays transmitted through polystyrene phantoms has been measured for X-ray energies of 32 and 69 keV, X-ray beam diameters from 4 to 40 cm, phantom thicknesses from 5 to 30 cm and phantom-to-image-plane separations from 0.3 to 40 cm. The experimental values for this ratio have less than a 10% variation for these two X-ray energies and the experimental data show good agreement with Monte Carlo calculations and available experimental results for low atomic number materials. Based on these results, simple curves are generated which give estimates (+ - 10%) of the scatter fraction for all combinations of the geometric parameters encountered in diagnostic radiology. (author)

  14. Quality of life evaluation of workers for diagnostic radiology services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, Ivani Martins

    2011-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to evaluate the quality of life (QOL) of diagnostic radiology services workers at a hospital of Sao Paulo city. It aimed also to draw the profile of these workers identifying the variables, as its influence on their quality of life. A descriptive exploratory study with qualitative and quantitative approaches was carried out. The data were collected using the questionnaires: the abbreviated instrument for the assessment of the QOL, World Health Organization Quality of Life Instrument bref (WHOQOL-bref) and a questionnaire including the social demographic variables, work conditions and the variables that express the lifestyle of individuals, both questionnaires self-applied. The sample was formed by 118 workers, among them: physicians, technologists/technicians in radiology, nurses, technicians and assistants in nursing, and others health professionals. The data analysis included descriptive statistics, nonparametric tests and the use of a linear regression model. The reliability of the instrument for the studied sample was verified by Cronbach's Alpha Coefficient (α). The WHOQOL-bref proved to be an adequate instrument, with a good level of internal consistency (α=0.884), being easily and quickly administrated for the evaluation of the QOL. The study provided an overview of the perception of quality of life of the studied group. (author)

  15. Clinical Training of Medical Physicists Specializing in Diagnostic Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    The application of radiation in human health, for both diagnosis and treatment of disease, is an important component of the work of the IAEA. The responsibility for the increasing technical aspects of this work is undertaken by the medical physicist. To ensure good practice in this vital area, structured clinical training programmes are required to complement academic learning. This publication is intended to be a guide to the practical implementation of such a programme for diagnostic radiology. There is a general and growing awareness that radiation medicine is increasingly dependent on well trained medical physicists based in the clinical setting. However, an analysis of the availability of medical physicists indicates a large shortfall of qualified and capable professionals. This is particularly evident in developing countries. While strategies to increase academic educational opportunities are critical to such countries, the need for guidance on structured clinical training was recognized by the members of the Regional Cooperative Agreement (RCA) for Research, Development and Training related to Nuclear Sciences for Asia and the Pacific. Consequently, a technical cooperation regional project (RAS6038) under the RCA programme was formulated to address this need in the Asia-Pacific region by developing suitable material and establishing its viability. Development of a clinical training guide for medical physicists specializing in diagnostic radiology started in 2007 with the appointment of a core drafting committee of regional and international experts. The publication drew on the experiences of clinical training programmes in Australia and New Zealand, the UK and the USA, and was moderated by physicists working in the Asian region. This publication follows the approach of the IAEA publication Training Course Series No. 37, Clinical Training of Medical Physicists specializing in Radiation Oncology. This approach to clinical training has been successfully tested

  16. Strategic planning for radiology: opening an outpatient diagnostic imaging center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leepson, Evan

    2003-01-01

    Launching a new diagnostic imaging center involves very specific requirements and roadmaps, including five major areas of change that have a direct impact on planning: Imaging and communication technology Finances and reimbursement Ownership structure of imaging entities Critical workforce shortages Imaging is moving outside radiology First, planning must focus on the strategic level of any organization, whether it is a multi-national corporation or a six-person radiology group. Think of all organizations as a triangle with three horizontal levels: strategic, managerial and operational. The strategic level of decision-making is at the top of the triangle, and here is where planning must take place. For strategic planning to work, there must be focused time and energy spent on this activity, usually away from the reading room and imaging center. There are five planning strategies, which must have the explicit goal of developing and growing the imaging center. The five strategies are: Clinical and quality issues, Governance and administration, Technology, Relationships, Marketing and business development. The best way to plan and implement these strategies is to create work groups of radiologists, technologists, and administrative and support staff. Once the group agrees on the strategy and tactic, it takes responsibility for implementation. Embarking on the launch of a new outpatient diagnostic imaging center is no small undertaking, and anyone who has struggled with such an endeavor can readily attest to the associated challenges and benefits. Success depends on many things, and one of the most important factors relates to the amount of time and the quality of effort spent on strategic planning at the outset. Neglecting or skimping on this phase may lead to unforeseen obstacles that could potentially derail the project.

  17. Quality control of conventional diagnostic radiology equipment in Serbia and Montenegro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciraj, O.; Kosutic, D.; Markovic, S.

    2003-01-01

    hospitals. These results are link between patient dosimetry, as a first step in optimization of radiation protection, and quality assurance program in diagnostic radiology. The use of dose assessment from X-ray tube output for standard patient enables comparison of dosimetric data when it is not possible to perform extensive measurements using hundreds of patients. It is of great importance to extend the survey to large number of hospitals and to include complex examinations, with goal to establish diagnostic reference levels on national scale. (authors)

  18. Radiological protection, from regulation to culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehler, M.C.

    1996-01-01

    In order to encourage a high degree of radiation protection of workers and members of public, the relevant authorities and operators in the nuclear industry should urge those responsible for radiation protection to do more than is required bu the pure and simple application of the regulations related to dose limitation compliance with the technical standards and specifications a necessary but not sufficient condition for quality in radiation protection. Reaching this quality objective is not a matter of forcing improvements bu a regulatory policy of reducing dose limits, but of promoting a real radiation protection culture based on an approach of optimizing the radiation protection formalized at the lightest level of the company structure, as well as on the professionalism individual responsibility, motivation and the freely consented to and understood participation of those involved in implementing this policy. The spread of a radiation protection culture encourages the deliberate adoption in everyday practice of behaviour likely to reduce exposure to ionizing radiation, as law as reasonably achievable, and to give life to the 'spirit' of the regulations in the best conditions. This article intends to show that the need to diffuse a radiation protection culture, particularly based on the principle of optimization, is inspired both by the philosophy behind the system recommended by the behavioural and incentive approach implied by the optimization principle. Special attention will be given to the fundamentals likely to contribute in a definition of radiation protection culture. (author)

  19. Radiological protection of the radiotherapy patient?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waligorski, M.P.R.; Lesiak, J.

    2001-01-01

    We propose that the system and concepts of radiation protection should not be used with reference to radiotherapy patients. We justify this on conceptual grounds. The patient undergoing radiotherapy procedures, as prescribed by the medical practitioner, is protected by the quality assurance system legally required for medical exposures. (author)

  20. Proceedings of the 3. Regional Meeting on Radiological and Nuclear Safety, Regional Meeting on International Radiation Protection Association (IRPA)and 3. Peruvian Meeting on Radiological Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-10-01

    There we show works of the Third Regional Meeting on Radiological and Nuclear Safety held on 23-27 October, 1995 in Cusco-Peru. Latin americans specialists talk about nuclear safety and radiological protection, radiation natural exposure, biological effect of radiation, radiotherapy and medical radiological safety, radiological safety in industry and research. Also we deal with subjects related to radiological safety of nuclear and radioactive facilities, radioactive waste management, radioactive material transport, environmental radiological monitoring program, radiological emergency and accidents, instruments and dosimetry, basic safety standards of protection against radiation. More than 225 works were presented on the meeting

  1. Protecting National Critical Infrastructure against Radiological Threat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaar, I.; Halevy, I.; Berenstein, Z.; Sharon, A.

    2014-01-01

    National Critical Infrastructure (NCI) such as transportation, water, energy etc., are essential elements in a developed country's economy. As learned after the 9/11 attackxx, a terror attack on these complex system may cause thousands of casualties and significant economic damage. The attack can be a conventional one; like the train bombing in Spainxxi or the bus bombing in Londonxxii, or a non-conventional one; like the Sarin attack on the underground train in Tokyo, Japanxxiii. A radiological attack on a NCI is also feasiblexxiv. This type of attack must be taken into consideration due to the vulnerability of ani infrastructure to such an attack, and the severe economic outcome of itxxv. The radioactive materials that might be used by terrorists were recently identified and categorized in one of the IAEA Nuclear Security Series publicationxxvi,xxvii. The most common and therefore reachable radio nuclides are the gamma emitters 60Co, 137Cs and 192Ir, the beta emitter 90Sr and the alpha emitters 241Pu, 238Pu and 241Am. A radiological event can be any of two principle scenarios. In the first scenario, a radiological dispersion device (RDD) or ôdirtyö bomb is used. This device consists of a radiation source which is detonated using conventional or improvised explosivesxxviii. Most of the casualties in this event will be from the explosion blast wave. However, some people might become contaminated with different levels of radiationxxix, some might need to go through some type of medical screening process and the costs of the total actions might be significantxxx. The second scenario involves a silent dispersion of radioactive material in a public site. In this event, there are no immediate known casualties, and the fact that people were exposed to radioactive material will be discovered only in the uncommon event when symptoms of radiation sickness will be identified due to exposure to high radiation dosexxxi, or if the radioactive material is discovered by a first

  2. Imaging and radiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Interventional radiology; Diagnostic radiology; X-ray imaging ... DIAGNOSTIC RADIOLOGY Diagnostic radiology helps health care professionals see structures inside your body. Doctors that specialize in the interpretation ...

  3. Quality Control in diagnostic radiology according to national regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domienik, J.; Chruscielewski, W.; Jankowski, J.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to review the main aspects of quality control of radiological devices according to the current national regulations. Explanation of the physical principles of image formation by different test phantoms used to measure focal spot sizes is presented in appendix. The obligation for quality assurance (QA) for all X-ray systems which follows European standards was enforced in updated '' Atomic Law Act '' of 29 November 2000 . This document is the main regulatory act which establishes the basic safety standards for radiation protection in Poland. The main modifications introduced by this new Act concerned the issue of radiation protection of individuals undergoing medical examinations with the use of ionizing radiation which is regulated by EC Directive 97/43 Euratom. According to this Directive quality assurance programmes, including quality control measures need to be implemented by the holder of the radiological installation. Therefore, in the above Act the Minister of Health has been obligated to impose specific regulations describing the way of implementation of general principles laid down in the Directive. Some of these regulations, like those concerning QC tests and tolerances, have already been mentioned in the document titled '' On the conditions for safe application of ionizing radiation in medicine ''. For example, the QC program in radiography is being considered; the obligatory tests- acceptance, routine and annual- are discussed and specific procedures are being indicated. The main idea of the document '' On the conditions for safe application of ionizing radiation in medicine '' which concerns radiation protection of patients and staff against ionizing radiation used in medicine is to implement the surveillance of all X-ray systems in form of acceptance tests followed by internal tests (routine and annual) performed in accordance with European standards. (author)

  4. Protection and radiological safety in medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nenot, J.C.; Lochard, J.; Aubert, B.; Aurengo, A.; Cosset, J.M.; Kalifa, G.

    1996-01-01

    The present publication put the base principles of radiation protection by dwelling on these ones that take the lead of medicine. It is a reference text. The exposure to ionizing radiations in medicine, concerns essentially the persons that need a diagnosis or a treatment but also the medical personnel, the family of the patients and the public: the protection have to take into account all these situations. (N.C.)

  5. Determination of organ doses in radiographic imaging and diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rathjen, M.

    1981-01-01

    Earlier publications on diagnostic radiation exposure commonly presented data on the gonadal dose. This emphasis on the genetic radiation risk is no longer valid in view of recent radiobiological findings; equal attention should be paid to the somatic radiation risk which is manifested by the induction of malignant neoplasms, e.g. in the lungs, red bone marrow, thyroid and female breast (ICRP 26). The permissible radiation doses for these organs and the gonals for routine diagnostic radiology are determined. A formula is established on the basis of terms from relevant publications (e.g. open-air dose, backscattering factor) and from the author's own measurements in an Alderson-Rando phantom (depth dose curves, dose decrements). The measurements were carried out using CaP 2 thermoluminescence dosemeters, and the organ doses for the various techniques of X-ray examination were calculated by computer. Calculations of this type will enable the radiologist to determine the patient exposure quickly and easily from the records kept according to Sect. 29 of the X-ray Ordinance. Experimental value from relevant publications are compared with the author's own results. (orig./HP) [de

  6. Evolution of diagnostic reference levels in Spanish intraoral radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcaraz, M.; Velasco, F.; Martinez-Beneyto, Y.; Alcaraz-Saura, M.; Velasco, E.; Achel, G. D.; Canteras, M.

    2008-01-01

    A total of 16 175 official reports of quality assurance on dental radiodiagnostic surgeries from 16 Spanish autonomous regions compiled during 2002-09 were studied to determine the evolution of diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) for obtaining a diagnostic image in the normal conditions of clinical practice in Spanish dental clinics. A DRL of 3.1 mGy was set in 2009, which represents a 35.4 % decrease compared with the dose determined in 2002 (4.8 mGy). During the same period, the mean dose fell by only 17.2 %. The DRL recommended by the European Union in 2004 for intraoral radiology is 4 mGy, and this study shows that 83.4 % of the installations used a dose below this. Of the installations using indirect or direct digital systems 1.1 and 1.2 %, respectively, used doses higher than those recommended, while 14.2 % of those using radiographic film exceeded this limit. (authors)

  7. National radiology standards in X-ray diagnostic incl. interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valek, V.; Kratochvil, P.

    2005-01-01

    In 2004 the Ministry of Health care started within the frame of the program for support of quality in health care a project consisting of 4 separate tasks: creating of standards for medical irradiation in radiodiagnostics, in radiotherapy , in nuclear medicine and creating of standards for patients dose assessment in radiophysics. This document continues with description of a part of the project aimed on X-ray radiodiagnostics. The authors of the project were chosen based on their bids to the public grant issued by the Ministry of Health care. The authors used recommendations, guidelines and instructions of international professional societies and IAEA, as well as the already existing procedures and practices while considering possibilities and state of the praxis in the Czech Republic. The outcome of authors work is now an interim version of a document that will be published in the bulletin of the Ministry of Health care. The document contains a set of standards that cover the whole range o fall complimentarily performed ways of patients irradiation in X-ray diagnostics and interventional radiology . The standards are divided to several categories according to the requirement of the Ministry of Health care based on the diagnostic appliances used for diagnostic irradiation i.e. radiography , fluoroscopy, mammography, stomatology, computer tomography, angiography, interventional radiography and cardiography. (authors)

  8. Radiological protection criteria risk assessments for waste disposal options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, M.D.

    1982-01-01

    Radiological protection criteria for waste disposal options are currently being developed at the National Radiological Protection Board (NRPB), and, in parallel, methodologies to be used in assessing the radiological impact of these options are being evolved. The criteria and methodologies under development are intended to apply to all solid radioactive wastes, including the high-level waste arising from reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel (because this waste will be solidified prior to disposal) and gaseous or liquid wastes which have been converted to solid form. It is envisaged that the same criteria will be applied to all solid waste disposal options, including shallow land burial, emplacement on the ocean bed (sea dumping), geological disposal on land and sub-seabed disposal

  9. Quality assurance in diagnostic radiology in Hungary - first experiences in acceptance testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porubszky, T.; Pellet, S.; Ballay, L.; Talian, L.; Giczi, F.

    2003-01-01

    It is a general experience that optimum imaging with minimum patient doses, moreover, the safe operation and long life of X-ray equipment can be assured by regular measurement of technical parameters and checking of their constancy (routine performance testing) only. These tests are generally known as quality control, while together with the so-called corrective actions and its management it is called (physical-technical) quality assurance (QA). In the European Union, Directive 97/43/EURATOM about radiation protection of patients requires - among others - the good practice of (physical-technical) quality assurance. In Hungary, Decree No. 31/2001. (X.3.) of the Minister of Health harmonizes all of its requirements. Acceptance testing of new diagnostic X-ray equipment is assigned to NPHC-NRIRR. QA has been a daily practice in radiation therapy and nuclear medicine for a long time. A National Patient Dose Assessment Programme has also successfully run since 1989. We had, however, only few preliminaries in QA in diagnostic radiology in the second half of the eighties. Nowadays there are running QA programmes in some hospitals and mammography centres. he testing activity of our institute is independent from manufacturers, it is run within the frame of an accredited testing laboratory, using calibrated measuring instruments and based on valid international standards. So the started way of implementing QA in diagnostic radiology needs a lot of further efforts, adapting experiences of other countries, and also some financial help to reach an acceptable level in the EU. (authors)

  10. Intervention levels for protective action in the radiological emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, G.Y.; Khang, B.O.; Lee, M.; Lee, J.T.

    1998-09-01

    In the event of nuclear accident or radiological emergency, the protective action based on intervention levels prepared in advance should be implemented in order to minimize the public hazard. There are several protective measures such as sheltering, evacuation, iodine prophylaxis, foodstuff restrictions, temporary relocation, permanent resettlement, etc. for protecting the public. The protective measures should be implemented on the basis of operational intervention level of action level. This report describes the basic principles of intervention and the methodology for deriving intervention levels, and also recommendations for the intervention levels suggested from IAEA, ICRP, WHO and EU are summarized to apply to the domestic radiological emergency. This report also contains a revision procedure of operational intervention levels to meet a difference accident condition. Therefore, it can be usefully applied to establish revised operational intervention levels considering or the regional characteristics of our country. (author). 20 refs

  11. Optimization of radiological protection in Spanish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Donnell, P.; Amor, I.; Butragueno, J.L.

    1997-01-01

    Optimizing the radiological protection of occupationally exposed nuclear power plant workers has become one further item in what is called the safety culture. Spanish facilities are implementing programme with this in mind, grounded on a personal motivation policy with the backing of a suitable organizational structure. (Author)

  12. Radiological protection. Responsibility of the Safety Engineering Company

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Netto, A.L.

    1987-01-01

    This subject takes care of the Safety Engineering at the Radiologic Protection area on the X and Gama Rays Services. It mainly emphasis the case of that companies that, due do not have proper X and Gama Rays Services utilize partime task force on this area, but answer themselves for the safety of their employees in case of any accident occurence. (author) [pt

  13. Action research regarding the optimisation of radiological protection for nurses during vascular interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Hiroshige

    2015-01-01

    The optimisation and decision-making processes for radiological protection have been broadened by the introduction of re-examination or feedback after introducing protective measures. In this study, action research was used to reduce the occupational exposure of vascular interventional radiology (IR) nurses. Four radiological protection improvement measures were continuously performed in cooperation with the researchers, nurses and stakeholders, and the nurses’ annual effective doses were compared before and after the improvements. First, the dosimetry equipment was changed from one electronic personal dosimeter (EPD) to two silver-activated phosphate glass dosimeters (PGDs). Second, the nurses were educated regarding maintaining a safe distance from the sources of scattered and leakage radiation. Third, portable radiation shielding screens were placed in the IR rooms. Fourth, the x-ray units’ pulse rates were reduced by half. On changing the dosimetry method, the two PGDs recorded a 4.4 fold greater dose than the single EPD. Educating nurses regarding radiological protection and reducing the pulse rates by half decreased their effective doses to one-third and two-fifths of the baseline dose, respectively. No significant difference in their doses was detected after the placement of the shielding screens. Therefore, the action research effectively decreased the occupational doses of the vascular IR nurses. (practical matter)

  14. Action research regarding the optimisation of radiological protection for nurses during vascular interventional radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Hiroshige

    2015-06-01

    The optimisation and decision-making processes for radiological protection have been broadened by the introduction of re-examination or feedback after introducing protective measures. In this study, action research was used to reduce the occupational exposure of vascular interventional radiology (IR) nurses. Four radiological protection improvement measures were continuously performed in cooperation with the researchers, nurses and stakeholders, and the nurses' annual effective doses were compared before and after the improvements. First, the dosimetry equipment was changed from one electronic personal dosimeter (EPD) to two silver-activated phosphate glass dosimeters (PGDs). Second, the nurses were educated regarding maintaining a safe distance from the sources of scattered and leakage radiation. Third, portable radiation shielding screens were placed in the IR rooms. Fourth, the x-ray units' pulse rates were reduced by half. On changing the dosimetry method, the two PGDs recorded a 4.4 fold greater dose than the single EPD. Educating nurses regarding radiological protection and reducing the pulse rates by half decreased their effective doses to one-third and two-fifths of the baseline dose, respectively. No significant difference in their doses was detected after the placement of the shielding screens. Therefore, the action research effectively decreased the occupational doses of the vascular IR nurses.

  15. Environmental radiological protection of Bariloche Atomic Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andres, Pablo A.; Levanon, Izhar S.

    2013-01-01

    This plan of monitoring radiological environmental routine fits on environmental policy of CNEA, satisfying national and international recommendations for licensed facilities. Sampling matrices are related to direct routes of exposure: air and water (river, lake, sediments, drinking water). Soil samples are also analyzed for having integrated matrices. They are considered as minimum three points of measurement: a white point (water or winds up), a point of maximum (water or winds down) and a point corresponding to the location of the individual representative or a point of public interest. Measurements in air estimate KERMA rate with thermoluminescent dosimeters, bi-monthly, and concentrations of particulate material and aerosols. For water samples (monthly), soil and sediments (quarterly), radionuclides that have download limits are analyzed, according to its importance in the dosages produced in the representative individual. In these cases artificial radionuclides using gamma spectrometry, beta total and Sr-90 by radiochemical techniques if the value of total screening (1 Bq/L) is exceeded. Foods are not included because no possible matrices were detected, either by their distance. by located not predominant wind direction. They are however still looking for milk producers that fulfills the minimum requirements.The data collected are compared with environmental baselines to set trends that might point to future significant changes in the environment during the life of the facilities. So far it was not observed significant differences with respect to baseline values

  16. Computer modeling and design of diagnostic workstations and radiology reading rooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratib, Osman M.; Amato, Carlos L.; Balbona, Joseph A.; Boots, Kevin; Valentino, Daniel J.

    2000-05-01

    We used 3D modeling techniques to design and evaluate the ergonomics of diagnostic workstation and radiology reading room in the planning phase of building a new hospital at UCLA. Given serious space limitations, the challenge was to provide more optimal working environment for radiologists in a crowded and busy environment. A particular attention was given to flexibility, lighting condition and noise reduction in rooms shared by multiple users performing diagnostic tasks as well as regular clinical conferences. Re-engineering workspace ergonomics rely on the integration of new technologies, custom designed cabinets, indirect lighting, sound-absorbent partitioning and geometric arrangement of workstations to allow better privacy while optimizing space occupation. Innovations included adjustable flat monitors, integration of videoconferencing and voice recognition, control monitor and retractable keyboard for optimal space utilization. An overhead compartment protecting the monitors from ambient light is also used as accessory lightbox and rear-view projection screen for conferences.

  17. Ethical foundations of environmental radiological protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oughton, D H

    2016-06-01

    Assessing the potential ecological impact of ionising radiation raises a number of ethical questions. These include fundamental questions such as what exactly constitutes harming the environment, and how the environment should be valued, as well as links to political protection principles such as sustainability and biodiversity. Starting from developments within ecological risk assessment, this paper summarises some of the ethical issues concerning the protection of the environment from radiation. Chapter 2 gives a brief overview of different philosophical and cultural world views on valuing the environment in a context of radiation risk. Chapter 3 addresses some recent challenges to proposed environmental protection frameworks, including practical applications following the Chernobyl and Fukushima accidents, and some scientific developments such as the ecosystem approach. Finally, Chapter 4 offers some recommendations on how ethical evaluation can help produce a more robust and transparent approach to the protection of the environment. In conclusion, there is a need for a holistic evaluation of the environmental impacts of ionising radiation that not only considers the direct consequences on the health of humans and non-human species, but also the more complex social, ethical, and economic consequences of both human and non-human exposures. © The International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics.

  18. Protection of persons undergoing radiological examinations ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Protection was in the form of gonad shields, lead apron to shield the unwanted parts during examinations and coning the X-ray field before exposure. The staff had Thermoluminscent Dosimeters (TLD) to monitor dose levels received by such staff every three months. They wore hand gloves, lead aprons and stayed behind ...

  19. International Commission on Radiological Protection. History, policies, procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindell, Bo; Dunster, H.J.; Valentin, Jack; )

    2000-01-01

    This report briefly reviews the history, mode of operation, concepts, and current policies of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). It touches upon the objectives of the Commission's recommendations, the quantities used, the biological basis of the Commission's policy, the quantitative basis for its risk estimates, the structure of the system of protection, some problems of interpretation and application in that system, and the need for stability, consistency, and clarity in the Commission's recommendations. (author)

  20. Objectives of radiological environment protection in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oberhausen, E.

    1976-01-01

    The aim of the radiological environment protection is to avoid risks to the health of the population. But the risks from radiation can only be considered in connection with spontaneously occuring malignancies. The comparison shows that according to the maximum permissible doses in the German Ordinance of Radiation Protection the risks of radiation injury are so low that they cannot be detected relative to the spontaneous malignancies. (orig.) [de

  1. Influence of physical parameters on radiation protection and image quality in intra-oral radiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belinato, W.; Souza, D. N.

    2011-10-01

    In the world of diagnostic imaging, radiography is an important supplementary method for dental diagnosis. In radiology, special attention must be paid to the radiological protection of patients and health professionals, and also to image quality for correct diagnosis. In Brazil, the national rules governing the operation of medical and dental radiology were specified in 1998 by the National Sanitary Surveillance Agency, complemented in 2005 by the guide "Medical radiology: security and performance of equipment." In this study, quality control tests were performed in public clinics with dental X-ray equipment in the State of Sergipe, Brazil, with consideration of the physical parameters that influence radiological protection and also the quality of images taken in intra-oral radiography. The accuracy of the exposure time was considered acceptable for equipment with digital timers. Exposure times and focal-spot size variations can lead to increased entrance dose. Increased dose has also been associated with visual processing of radiographic film, which often requires repeating the radiographic examination.

  2. Influence of physical parameters on radiation protection and image quality in intra-oral radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belinato, W.; Souza, D.N.

    2011-01-01

    In the world of diagnostic imaging, radiography is an important supplementary method for dental diagnosis. In radiology, special attention must be paid to the radiological protection of patients and health professionals, and also to image quality for correct diagnosis. In Brazil, the national rules governing the operation of medical and dental radiology were specified in 1998 by the National Sanitary Surveillance Agency, complemented in 2005 by the guide 'Medical radiology: security and performance of equipment.' In this study, quality control tests were performed in public clinics with dental X-ray equipment in the State of Sergipe, Brazil, with consideration of the physical parameters that influence radiological protection and also the quality of images taken in intra-oral radiography. The accuracy of the exposure time was considered acceptable for equipment with digital timers. Exposure times and focal-spot size variations can lead to increased entrance dose. Increased dose has also been associated with visual processing of radiographic film, which often requires repeating the radiographic examination.

  3. Influence of physical parameters on radiation protection and image quality in intra-oral radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belinato, W. [Instituto Federal de Ensino Basico, Tecnico e Tecnologico da Bahia, Av. Amazonas, 1350-45030-220, Zabele, Vitoria da Conquista, BA (Brazil); Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Sergipe, Av. Marechal Rondon s/n, 49100-000 Rosa Elze, Sao Cristovao, SE (Brazil); Souza, D.N., E-mail: divanizi@ufs.br [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Sergipe, Av. Marechal Rondon s/n, 49100-000 Rosa Elze, Sao Cristovao, SE (Brazil)

    2011-10-01

    In the world of diagnostic imaging, radiography is an important supplementary method for dental diagnosis. In radiology, special attention must be paid to the radiological protection of patients and health professionals, and also to image quality for correct diagnosis. In Brazil, the national rules governing the operation of medical and dental radiology were specified in 1998 by the National Sanitary Surveillance Agency, complemented in 2005 by the guide 'Medical radiology: security and performance of equipment.' In this study, quality control tests were performed in public clinics with dental X-ray equipment in the State of Sergipe, Brazil, with consideration of the physical parameters that influence radiological protection and also the quality of images taken in intra-oral radiography. The accuracy of the exposure time was considered acceptable for equipment with digital timers. Exposure times and focal-spot size variations can lead to increased entrance dose. Increased dose has also been associated with visual processing of radiographic film, which often requires repeating the radiographic examination.

  4. Diagnostic imaging, a 'parallel' discipline. Can current technology provide a reliable digital diagnostic radiology department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, C.J.; Eddleston, B.

    1985-01-01

    Only recently has any detailed criticism been voiced about the practicalities of the introduction of generalised, digital, imaging complexes in diagnostic radiology. Although attendant technological problems are highlighted the authors argue that the fundamental causes of current difficulties are not in the generation but in the processing, filing and subsequent retrieval for display of digital image records. In the real world, looking at images is a parallel process of some complexity and so it is perhaps untimely to expect versatile handling of vast image data bases by existing computer hardware and software which, by their current nature, perform tasks serially. (author)

  5. Medical exposure and optimization of radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drexler, Gunter

    1997-01-01

    Full text. In the context of occupational and populational exposure the concepts of optimization are implemented widely, at least conceptually, by the relevant authorities and the responsible for radiation protection. In the case of medical exposures this is not so common since the patient is exposed deliberately and cannot be isolated from his environment. The concepts and the instruments of optimization in these cases are discussed with emphasis to the ICRP recommendations in Publication 73. (author)

  6. Health and nuclear: For which radiological protection?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proust, Claude

    2016-01-01

    The author aims at providing citizen with knowledge in the field of health in relationship with nuclear energy. A first part proposes a historical overview of knowledge of nuclear effects on health, with references to the discovery and first works on radioactivity, to the Manhattan project, to the creation of national and international bodies in charge of nuclear issues, to various nuclear accidents and their consequences. In the second part, the author describes mechanisms of radiation protection and its organisation at the world level (ICRP, UNSCEAR, IAEA, and so on), and discusses in a very critical way the basic aspects which are now governing radiation protection standards. Indeed, he outlines denials, lies, and the inappropriate character of the risk model created in 1951. He also discusses the optimisation principle, criticises the application of deterministic effect criteria to stochastic effects. In the fourth part, the author analyses consequences of the present official radiation protection which he considers as a pseudo-science as shown by misleading assessments of Chernobyl victims, and by publications which also criticise this science. The last part addresses the specific case of France

  7. Exposure of the bulgarian population from diagnostic radiology during 2001/2006 y

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostova-Lefterova, D.; Ingilizova, K.

    2008-01-01

    Each Member State of the European Union is currently committed to produce national legislation, demonstrating conformity with the European Directive on medical exposures. According to the Directive, each country shall estimate the medical exposure of its population. For this purpose it is necessary to calculate the individual effective dose from each type of diagnostic radiology examination and the frequency of the examinations. The collective effective dose (CED) is disputable indicator for the medical exposures but it is a criterion for the level of the country on the radiation protection of persons undergoing medical exposure. The individual effective doses from each type of diagnostic radiology examination will depend on the patient's age, sex, weight, the number and type of images, the screening time and also the equipment used. Some mean values can be obtained through surveys of patient dose and compared with the national or European reference doses for 'standard sized' patients. The aim of this investigation is to assess the exposure of Bulgarian population undergoing diagnostic radiology examinations. The diagnostic radiology procedures are in 30 positions, distributed in 3 age groups: 0 - 17 y., 17 - 45 y. and over 45 y. For the assessment of the CED the generally accepted formula has been applied. The individual effective doses have been established on the basis of standard tablegrams for the radiographic diagnostic examinations and the results from the national research project 'Phare' in 2002. Presented data are: average number of examinations 3848.92x10 3 , frequency in thousands 500, annual effective individual dose 0.89 mSv/y and average annual collective effective dose - 3314.59 man.Sv/y. The mean effective dose per caput of population for medical exposures can then be compared with that of other countries having similar levels of health care. Comparisons can also be made with exposure of the population from other sources of radiation. The dynamics

  8. Hanford Radiological Protection Support Services Annual Report for 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynch, Timothy P.; Bihl, Donald E.; Johnson, Michelle L.; Maclellan, Jay A.; Piper, Roman K.

    2001-05-07

    During calendar year 2000, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory performed its customary radiological protection support services in support of the U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office and the Hanford contractors. These services included: 1) external dosimetry, 2) internal dosimetry, 3) in vivo monitoring, 4) radiological records, 5) instrument calibration and evaluation, and 6) calibration of radiation sources traceable to the National Institute of Standards and Technology. Each program summary describes the routine operations, program changes and improvements, program assessments, supporting technical studies, and professional activities.

  9. Hanford Radiological Protection Support Services Annual Report for 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DE Bihl; JA MacLellan; ML Johnson; RK Piper; TP Lynch

    1999-05-14

    During calendar year (CY) 1998, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) performed its customary radiological protection support services in support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Richland Operations OffIce (RL) and the Hanford contractors. These services included: 1) external dosimetry, 2) internal dosimetry, 3) in vivo measurements, 4) radiological records, 5) instrument calibra- tion and evaluation, and 6) calibration of radiation sources traceable to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (MST). The services were provided under a number of projects as summarized here.

  10. Design an online course of radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia S, R.; Del Sol F, S.; Rivera M, T.; Sanchez G, D.

    2015-10-01

    Currently there is a vast research about the harmful effects of the use of ionizing radiation in medical procedures and in recent years struck by the rapid innovation in imaging equipment, considerably increasing the radiation dose received both patients and professionals in the radiodiagnosis area, service having the greatest demand in our country. The main strategy that has so far is education, that is, to inform all those involved in managing ionizing radiation about the applications and risks associated with them. Generally it requires that all personnel occupationally exposed attesting a course of radiation protection. However, the high demand for this type of medical services and poorly trained staff, makes taking a classroom course for personnel occupationally exposed is complicated. So that in the Instituto Politecnico Nacional (IPN) we are designing a course in radiation protection to be implemented online, through the virtual platform Moodle in a first stage, and a massive open online course as the second stage so that can be carried by anyone interested in the subject, without having to appear in person. This will allows to reach the largest possible number of personnel occupationally exposed to just have a computer with internet access. (Author)

  11. International conference to explore ways to improve radiological protection of patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The first international conference specifically focused on the radiological protection of patients will be held in Torremolinos (Malaga), Spain, next week, from 26 to 30 March 2001. The conference, formally titled, 'International Conference on the Radiological Protection of Patients in Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Radiotherapy', is being organized by the IAEA, hosted by the Government of Spain and co-sponsored by the European Commission, the Pan American Health Organization and the World Health Organization. Medical applications of ionizing radiation are accepted world-wide as essential tools for keeping or restoring human health. However, they also represent by far the largest man-made source of radiation exposure. The United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) estimates that diagnostic medical applications of radiation account for about 95% of the exposure to radiation from man-made sources of radiation and about 12% of total exposure, which includes the exposures received from natural sources. More than 900 participants from 80 countries are expected to attend the conference. They cover a broad spectrum of expertise, including radiologists, nuclear medicine specialists, radiation oncologists, medical physicists, technologists/radiographers, radiological protection officers, equipment manufacturers, experts who develop standards for radiological equipment, hospital administrators and public health officials and representatives of professional societies. In addition, a number of patients who have undergone radiation treatment will represent patients' interests and a patient will chair one of the round table debates. The conclusions of the Conference will be incorporated into the IAEA's programme of work in the field of radiation safety and will be reported to the IAEA General Conference at its next meeting in September 2001

  12. Services of radiological protection: as sizing the human and material resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rueda Guerrero, M. D.; Sierra Perler, I.; Lorenzo Perez, P.

    2014-01-01

    Discussion of radiological protection in the Middle Health has formed a task force to develop a technical document recommendatory to help plan and evaluate resources radiological protection services. (Author)

  13. Statutory Instrument No 48 of 1992. Radiological Protection Act, 1991 (Establishment day) Order, 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-03-01

    This order appoints 1st April 1992 as the day on which the Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland is established. From that day the Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland will take over the functions of An Bord Fuinnimh Nuicleigh

  14. Capacitation in radiological protection by internet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pena, Juan J.; Vega, Jose Maria; Rossell, Maria Angeles; Calvo, Jose L.; Galvez, Manuel

    2001-01-01

    This paper makes a proposal to use the Web for training Radiation Protection in Spanish/Portuguese languages. The Iberoamerican Group of Scientific Societies of Radioprotection (GRIAPRA) should take the lead of this educational project, to get in two years the following objectives: to prepare educational resources about Radioprotection in Spanish/Portuguese languages with the support of two Internet servers, one of them will be in Latin-American and the other in Spain; to talk over the methods for exchanging information between the teachers, tutors and students interested in participating in this project, to have a thorough knowledge of the activities and courses supported by the two internet servers; to set up agreements with Universities and professional Institutions related with Radioprotection in order that students, who get pass all the evaluations, exams and practical presential training organized in reference Centers previously selected, could obtain an academic accreditation. (author)

  15. Accreditation of professionals for radiological protection in medical and dental radiology at Minas Gerais, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Teogenes A. da; Pereira, Elton G.; Alonso, Thessa C.; Guedes, Elton C.; Goncalves, Elaine C.; Nogueira, Maria Angela A.

    2000-01-01

    The role of the CDTN/CNEN as far as the radiological protection services in the medical and dental radiology has changed a lot due to the new Regulatory Directives. The CDTN/CNEN was recognized as the regional reference center for providing not only radiological survey services, but to coordinate an accreditation procedure for professional persons to be accepted by the State Regulatory Authorities to work at Minas Gerais. All the new activities were formalized in a Cooperation Agreement between the CDTN/CNEN and the Regulatory Authority. This paper describes the accreditation procedure for candidates, the adopted requirements, the intercomparison results among measuring instruments and the main achievements during the first year of the Agreement. (author)

  16. Medical radiation exposure and usage for diagnostic radiology in Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, Kwan-Hoong; Rassiah, Premavathy; Abdullah, B.J.J.; Wang, Hwee-Beng; Shariff Hambali, Ahmad; Muthuvelu, Pirunthavany; Sivalingam, S.

    2001-01-01

    A national dose survey of routine X-ray examinations in Malaysia (a Level II country) from 1993 to 1995 had established baseline data for seven common types of x-ray examinations. A total of 12 randomly selected public hospitals and 867 patients were included in this survey. Survey results are generally comparable with those reported in the UK, USA and IAEA. The findings support the importance of the ongoing national quality assurance programme to ensure doses are kept to a level consistent with optimum image quality. The data was useful in the formulation of national guidance levels as recommended by the IAEA. The medical radiation exposure and usage for diagnostic radiology (1990-1994) enabled a comparison to be made for the first time with the UNSCEAR 2000 Report. In 1994, the number of physicians, radiologists, x-ray units and x-ray examinations per 1000 population was 0.45, 0.005, 0.065 and 183, respectively; 3.6 million x-ray examinations were performed; the annual effective dose per capita was 0.05 mSv and collective dose was 1000 person-Sv. Chest examinations contributed 63% of the total. Almost all examinations experienced increasing frequency except for barium studies, cholecystography, and intravenous urography (-23%, -36%, -51%). Notable increases were observed in computed tomography (161%), cardiac procedures (190%), and mammography (240%). (author)

  17. A comparative study of quality control in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kharita, M. H.; Khedr, M.S.; Wannus, K.M.

    2008-01-01

    The main objective of this comparative study was to evaluate the national quality assurance program for X-ray diagnostic radiology in Syrian governmental hospitals. Two periods were covered in this study, the first period was from 1986 to 1998 (52 hospitals and 149 X-ray machines were considered) and the second period from 1999 to 2005 (41 hospitals and 95 X-ray machines were considered). Most of the X-ray machines studied were within the acceptable performance, but few machines needed recalibration for some parameters. Considerable improvement of about 50% was reported in the second period. This improvement could be attributed to the establishment of an effective National Regulatory Authority in Syria in 1998 that introduced and gradually enforced the quality assurance requirement for X-ray equipment as part of the licensing process and to the relatively newer X-ray machines covered in the second period. The Author 2008. Published by Oxford Univ. Press. All rights reserved. (authors)

  18. Radiation doses and correlated late effects in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gustafsson, M.

    1980-04-01

    Patient irradiation in diagnostic radiology was estimated from measurements of absorbed doses in different organs, assessment of the energy imparted and retrospective calculations based on literature data. Possible late biological effects, with special aspects on children, were surveyed. The dose to the lens of the eye and the possibility of shielding in carotid angiography was studied as was the absorbed dose to the thyroid gland at cardiac catheterization and angiocardiography in children. Calculations of the mean bone marrow dose and gonad doses were performed in children with chronic skeletal disease revealing large contributions from examinations of organs other than the skeleton. The dose distribution in the breast in mammography was investigated. Comparison of the energy imparted in common roentgen examinations in 1960 and 1975 showed an unexpected low decrease in spite of technical improvements. Reasons for the failing decrease are discussed. The energy imparted to children in urological examinations was reduced significantly due to introduction of high sensitivity screens and omission of dose demanding projections. Contributions to the possible late effects were estimated on the basis of the organ doses assessed. (author)

  19. Quality assurance of computed tomography scanner beams in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindskoug, B.A.

    1989-01-01

    The number of computed tomography (CT) scanners in diagnostic radiology is increasing, to the extent that they are now found in relatively small hospitals. These hospitals do not have local physicists available and so methods must be developed to allow quality assurance to be carried out at distant laboratories. Several different types of solid water phantoms are available with various built-in test objects that may supply sufficient information about the many parameters that must be checked. The dose distributions, however, are usually not so well considered, although the connection between image quality and absorbed dose must be known for optimal use of a CT scanner. By introducing thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs) into a commercial phantom (RMI), it was possible to measure the absorbed dose profile and the line integral of the absorbed dose across the slit. The computer-guided readout of the TLDs gives the absorbed dose, the average dose and half maximum width, absorbed dose curve, and also the line integral of the peak. The only modification of the phantom was five holes, drilled at strategic positions, that did not influence the built-in test objects. This single measurement provides an appropriate monthly quality assurance check of the CT scanner with little extra effort. (author)

  20. Division of Radiological Protection : progress report, 1989-1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, B.L.; Nagarajan, P.S.; Bhatt, B.C.; Seethapathy, A.; Pradhan, A.S.; Vishwakarma, R.R.

    1992-01-01

    This report describes the work of the Division of Radiological Protection during 1989-91, for implementation of radiation safety in all institutions in the country using radiation sources for medical, industrial and research applications. It gives information about personnel monitoring using photographic film and TLD badges, neutron monitoring badges, dosimetric techniques developed, calibration techniques for high-dose irradiators, design and fabrication of special radiation protection instruments, advisory and licensing services, regulation and transport of radioactive materials, periodic protection survey, education and training related to radiation safety programmes. About 164 publications by the staff of this Division are listed. (author). 1 index., 1 tab

  1. Practical X-ray diagnostics orthopedics and trauma surgery. Indication, adjustment technique and radiation protection; Praktische Roentgendiagnostik Orthopaedie und Unfallchirurgie. Indikation, Einstelltechnik, Strahlenschutz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flechtenmacher, Johannes [Ortho-Zentrum am Ludwigsplatz, Karlsruhe (Germany); Sabo, Desiderius [Klinik St. Elisabeth, Heidelberg (Germany). Sportopaedic Heidelberg

    2014-07-01

    The book on X-ray diagnostics in orthopedics and trauma surgery includes the following chapters: 1. Introduction: radiation protection, equipment technology radiological diagnostics of skeleton carcinomas, specific aspects of trauma surgery, special aspects of skeleton radiology for children. 2. X-ray diagnostics of different anatomical regions: ankle joint, knee, hips and pelvis, hand and wrist joint, elbow, shoulder, spinal cord. 3. Appendix: radiation protection according to the X-ray regulations.

  2. Training in radiological protection of residents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vicent, M. D.; Fernandez, M. J.; Olmos, C.; Isidoro, B.; Espana, M. L.; Arranz, L.

    2013-01-01

    In compliance with the current laws, radiation protection (RP) training is required during the formative programs of certain Health Sciences specialties. Laws entrust to official bodies in specialized training the adoption of necessary measures to coordinate and ensure a correct implementation. The aim of this study is to describe Community of Madrid experience in RP training to specialists during their formative programs, and to determine the number of residents trained and analyze their satisfaction level with the training. A descriptive cross-sectional study was performed, including all training specialists from the Community of Madrid during the 2007-2011 period. We determined the number of residents trained per year and we evaluated their satisfaction level with the training through a survey. A total of 55 training courses were carried out and 5820 residents have been trained during the 2007-2011 period. the student satisfaction level with the training has increased gradually from 6.1 points in 2007 to 7.0 points in 2011. The development of the RP formative program for residents in the Community of Madrid has meant the start up o the necessary official mechanisms to ensure the quality and adequacy of training in this area, covering the formative needs of the collective. (Author)

  3. Scientific issues and emerging challenges for radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    Scientific knowledge is constantly evolving as more advanced technologies become available and more in-depth research is carried out. Given the potential implications that new findings could have on policy decisions, in 1998 the NEA Committee on Radiation Protection and Public Health (CRPPH) performed a survey of state-of-the-art research in radiological protection science. This study suggested that, while the current system of radiological protection was well under-pinned by scientific understanding, growing knowledge in several areas could seriously impact policy and regulation. Ten years later, the CRPPH has again performed a survey of state-of-the-art research which reiterates and clarifies its earlier conclusions. This report summarises the results of this latest CRPPH assessment of radiological protection science. Specifically, it explains that knowledge of non-targeted and delayed effects, as well as of individual sensitivity, have been significantly refined over the past ten years. Although at this point there is still no scientific certainty in these areas, based on the most recent studies and results, the report strongly suggests that policy makers and regulatory authorities should consider possible impacts that could arise from research in the next few years. Further, the report identifies research areas that should be supported to more definitively answer scientific questions having the most direct impacts on policy choices. (author)

  4. Concepts of collective dose in radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindell, B.

    1985-01-01

    The collective dose (S) is the product of the number of individuals exposed and their average radiation dose. ''Radiation dose'' is usually taken to be the effective dose equivalent (Hsub(E)) as defined by the ICRP. The unit of the collective dose is then the man.sievert (man.Sv). The following four applications of the collective dose are the most common: (a) in the assessment of the highest per caput dose rate in the future from a continued practice which exposes some critical group or the population as a whole to radiation; (b) in the limitation of present radiation sources, if it is believed that additional sources in the future may add to the per caput dose in a population so that it might reach unacceptable levels unless all sources are controlled at an early stage; (c) as an input to justification assessments, indicating the total detriment from a certain practice; and (d) as an input to optimization assessments as the basis for costing detriment in differential cost-benefit analyses of protection arrangements. It is sometimes said that the collective dose is a useful quantity only if the assumption of a non-threshold, linear dose-response relation is valid. This assumption is not always necessary. Applications (a) and (b) are possible without any assumption on the dose-response relationship at very low doses. Only applications (c) and (d) require the assumption of a non-threshold, linear dose-response relation. Some hesitation in using the collective dose originates in distrust in the biological assumptions implied by uses (c) and (d), but also in lack of confidence in the meaningfulness of collective doses that have been derived by adding dose contributions over very long time periods. However, none of the four applications (a) - (d) is by necessity related to extreme time scales. That problem mainly arises in the assessment of radioactive waste repositories

  5. Administrative organization in diagnostic radiology residency program leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, Grant R; Mullins, Mark E; Chen, Zhengjia; Meltzer, Carolyn C

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to document the current state of administrative structure in US diagnostic radiology (DR) residency program leadership. A secondary objective was to assess for correlation(s), if any, with DR residency programs that equipped positions such as assistant, associate, and emeritus program director (PD) with respect to residency size and region of the country. The Fellowship and Residency Electronic Interactive Database, as well as direct communication and programmatic Web site searches, were used to gather data regarding current US DR residency leadership. Data collected included the presence of additional leadership titles, including assistant PD, associate PD, and PD emeritus, and how many faculty members currently held each position. Programs were excluded if results could not be identified. Analysis of variance and t tests were used to estimate the correlations of the size of a residency with having additional or shared PD positions and the types of positions, respectively. Chi-square tests were used to assess for any regional differences. As of the time of this project, the Fellowship and Residency Electronic Interactive Database defined 186 US DR residency programs. A total of 173 programs (93%) were included in the analysis; the remainder were excluded because of unavailability of relevant data. Seventy-two percent (124 of 173) of programs had additional DR leadership positions. Of these, 30 programs (17%) had more than one such position. There were no significant differences in the sizes of the programs that used these additional positions (mean, 25 ± 12; range, 6-72) compared with those that did not (mean, 24 ± 12; range, 7-51). There were no significant differences between programs that had additional positions with respect to region of the country. The majority of US DR residency programs used some form of additional DR leadership position. In the majority of cases, this was in the form of an assistant or associate PD. Nearly one

  6. Midazolam administration at a department of pediatric radiology: Conscious sedation for diagnostic imaging studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madzik, J.; Marcinski, A.; Brzewski, M.; Jakubowska, A.; Roik, D.; Majkowska, Z.; Biejat, A.; Krzemien, G.

    2006-01-01

    The aims of the study were to evaluate the usefulness of midazolam administration for sedation prior to some diagnostic examinations in children and to present the requirements and rules for sedation in departments of pediatric radiology. From Oct. 2001 to Aug. 2005, two hundred children were investigated after conscious sedation with midazolam. The examinations were: voiding cystourethrography (129), voiding sonocystography (64), barium enema (3), ultrasonography (1), urography (1), X-ray of facial bone (1), and brain CT (1). The children's age-range was 4 months to 13 years 9 months. The decision for sedation was based on conversation with the child and/or parents, their experience with previous examinations, emotional status of the child, and exclusion of contraindications (renal insufficiency, hepatic failure, respiratory/circulatory insufficiency, allergy to benzodiazepines in anamnesis). Midazolam was given orally in a dose of 0.5 mg/kg body weight, 15-20 minutes before examination (already at the department of pediatric radiology). The parents were informed of the possible side effects and what to do after the procedure. All diagnostic procedures with conscious sedation were well tolerated by the children and accepted by the parents. The parents with experience from previous diagnostic procedures indicated that they would want their child to have midazolam again if the examination needed to be repeated. No significant complications were observed in the children receiving midazolam and few adverse effect on voiding during cystourethrography. In three children (2.5, 3, and 5 years old), paradoxical reactions occurred (psychomotor agitation) which disappeared spontaneously after some minutes and had no influence on the procedure. Application of midazolam for conscious sedation diminished anxiety and discomfort from diagnostic procedures and short anterograde amnesia protected the child's mind from painful experience. Conscious sedation should be widely used in

  7. The regulation of the radiological protection in Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eibenschutz H, J.

    2008-12-01

    The regulation antecedents in nuclear question in Mexico are placed in 1950, with the promulgation of L aw that declares national mining reserves the uranium deposits, thorium and the other substances of which obtains fissionable isotopes that can produce nuclear energy , instrument that stipulated the control of uranium, thorium, as to its it indicated it name, and other fissionable substances, on the part of the state, although they were without a doubt the respective institutions, the National Commission of Nuclear Energy in 1955, and the one of the National Commission of Nuclear Safety and Safeguards (CNSNS) in 1979, those that allowed the development of a prescribed frame in the nuclear and radiological areas. One characteristic of the regulation in radiological protection is the variety in the authorities type that have incidence in the regulation, as a result of the different approaches with which it can be approached. For example, in Mexico normative instruments with content in radiological protection exist and are watched over the Health Secretary, who is oriented to the protection of the patient, their relatives and the medical body; Work and Social Welfare Secretary, with a labor approach; Communications and Transport Secretary, which regulates the transport of nuclear and radioactive materials; Finance and Public Credit Secretary, who regulates the import and export of radioactive materials; Environment and Natural Resources Secretary, which regulates the environment protection; Energy Secretary who has responsibilities inside of the p rescribed law of article 27 constitutional in nuclear matter ; and within the energy sector, the CNSNS that expedite and watch the fulfillment of normative in radiological protection and nuclear safety. In order to resist effects of on regulation; frequently inter institutional agreements are carried out in which the areas of monitoring are agreed by each authority. The regulation in radiological protection demands the

  8. Radiological protection procedures for industrial applications of computed radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aquino, Josilto Oliveira de

    2009-03-01

    Due to its very particular characteristics, industrial radiography is responsible for roughly half of the relevant accidents in nuclear industry, in developed as well as in developing countries, according to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Thus, safety and radiological protection in industrial gamma radiography have been receiving especial treatment by regulatory authorities of most Member States. The main objective of the present work was to evaluate, from the radioprotection point of view, the main advantages of computed radiography (CR) for filmless industrial radiography. In order to accomplish this, both techniques, i.e. conventional and filmless computed radiography were evaluated and compared through practical studies. After the studies performed at the present work it was concluded that computed radiography significantly reduces the inherent doses, reflecting in smaller restricted areas and costs, with consequent improvement in radiological protection and safety. (author)

  9. e-Learning applications for radiological protection training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, F.; Gomez-Arguello, B.; Callejo, J. L.

    2003-01-01

    The unattended training, through e-learning platforms, offers advantages in comparison with the traditional attended training, such as, freedom to study when, where and how the trance desires, the student is learning customization, a continuous self evaluation of the learning process and the rhythm of study, etc. To explore the possibilities of the radiological protection training in a WEB site, a first application for External Workers has been developed. The high number of students, their geographical dispersion and their different level of knowledge and experience arise attended training limitations in this area. In this article, the WEB course Basic Radiological Protection is presented and the results, preliminarily conclusions and lesson learnt are analysed. (Author) 7 refs

  10. Surveillance and radiological protection in the Hot Cell laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez, J.M.; Torre, J. De la; Garcia C, M.A.

    2004-01-01

    The Hot Cells Laboratory (LCC) located in the National Institute of Nuclear Research are an installation that was designed for the management at distance of 10,000 Curies of Co-60 or other radioactive materials with different values in activity. The management of such materials in the installation, implies to analyze and to determine the doses that the POE will receive as well as the implementation of protection measures and appropriate radiological safety so that is completed the specified by the ALARA concept. In this work it is carried out an evaluation of the doses to receive for the POE when managing radionuclides with maximum activities that can be allowed in function of the current conditions of the cells and an evaluation of results is made with the program of surveillance and radiological protection implemented for the development of the works that carried out in the installation. (Author)

  11. Radiological Engineering: A graduate engineering - based curriculum for radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kearfott, K.J.; Wepfer, W.J.

    1994-01-01

    Several U.S. universities maintain formal graduate health physics curricula within their Colleges of Engineering. The term radiological engineering was coined to describe the discipline of applying engineering principles to the radiation protection aspects of nuclear technology. Radiological engineering programmes may require a specific core group of courses such as radiation biology, radiation protection practice, nuclear physics, radiation detectors, and radiation dosimetry. Students then might specialist in environmental, nuclear facilities or medical applications areas by selecting advanced courses and graduate design or research projects. In some instances the master's degree may be completed through remotely-delivered lectures. Such programmes promise to assist in educating a new group of engineering professionals dedicated to the safe utilisation of nuclear technology. The Georgis Institute of Technology's programme will serve as the specific example for this report. 8 refs., 1 fig

  12. Protective effect of lead aprons in medical radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huyskens, C.J.

    1995-01-01

    This article summarizes the results of an ongoing study regarding the protective effect that lead aprons, as used in medical radiology, have on the resulting effective dose for medical personnel. By means of model calculations we have analyzed the protection efficacy of lead aprons for various lead thicknesses, in function of tube potential and of variations in exposure geometry as they occur in practice. The degree of efficacy appears to be highly dependent on the fit of aprons because of the dominating influence of the equivalent dose of partially unshielded organs on the resulting effective dose. Also by model calculations we investigated the ratio between the effective dose and the operational quantify for personal dose monitoring. Our study enables the choice of appropriate correction factors for convering personal dosimetry measurements into effective dose, for typical exposure situations in medical radiology. (orig.) [de

  13. Radiation and man. From radiology to radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-04-01

    Man first became aware of the invisible radiation surrounding him in 1895, when Wilhelm Roentgen showed that a photographic plate could be affected by an invisible radiation capable of passing through matter. He called this radiation 'X-rays' from X, the unknown. Doctors immediately saw the usefulness of this type of radiation and began to use it in medical research. This was the birth of radiology. 'Mankind has been exposed to radiation since his first appearance on Earth. We first became aware of this at the end of the 19. century'. However, it was not long before some of the doctors and radiologists treating their patients with X-rays began to fall ill. It began to be understood that exposure to high doses of radiation was dangerous and protective measures were necessary. From the 1920's onwards, international commissions were established to specify regulations for the use of radiation and for the radiological protection of personnel. (authors)

  14. Communication in diagnostic radiology: meeting the challenges of complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, David B; Froehle, Craig M; Johnson, Neil D; Towbin, Alexander J

    2014-11-01

    As patients and information flow through the imaging process, value is added step-by-step when information is acquired, interpreted, and communicated back to the referring clinician. However, radiology information systems are often plagued with communication errors and delays. This article presents theories and recommends strategies to continuously improve communication in the complex environment of modern radiology. Communication theories, methods, and systems that have proven their effectiveness in other environments can serve as models for radiology.

  15. Proposed radiological protection rules for patients in radiodiagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yacovenco, A.; Souza, A.C.A.; Ferreira, R.S.

    1998-01-01

    Faced with the increasing exposure of the population to ionizing radiations and the need to respect users' rights, political and scientific efforts have been undertaken in order to improve image quality in radiodiagnostics and reduce risks to patients. In Brazil, in the past 20 years, a low rate of investment in this area and inadequate health policies have lead to diagnostic radiology services of poor quality. For their part, scientific societies, professional associations and the Ministry of Health have issued federal and state norms which require the control of physical parameters of the radiological equipment. Consequently, there is a need to create a National Reference Laboratory to oversee, inspect and evaluate the implementation of such norms. Another topic addressed in this article is the professional profile of the Medical Physics Specialist. (author)

  16. Regional views on the new system of radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoda, N.; Fujimoto, K.; Miyamaru, K.; Lee, J.; Loy, J.; Pan, Z.Q.

    2005-01-01

    This document takes stock on the second session of the second Asian regional conference. In this session, japanese regulators, researchers and operators presented their regional views on the new ICRP recommendations. It was commonly expressed that an understanding of the background to the introduced concepts in the new recommendations is required. Other regional views from Korea, Australia and China were also expressed, based on their own regulatory system and referring to radiological protection topics in their countries. (A.L.B.)

  17. Skin dosimetry - radiological protection aspects of skin dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dennis, J.A.

    1991-01-01

    Following a Workshop in Skin Dosimetry, a summary of the radiological protection aspects is given. Aspects discussed include routine skin monitoring and dose limits, the need for careful skin dosimetry in high accidental exposures, techniques for assessing skin dose at all relevant depths and the specification of dose quantities to be measured by personal dosemeters and the appropriate methods to be used in their calibration. (UK)

  18. ICRU activity in the field of phantoms in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wambersie, A.

    1992-01-01

    The ICRU Report on 'Phantoms and Computational Models in Radiation Therapy, Diagnosis and Protection' is presented. Different types of phantoms may be defined. They may be broadly categorized according to their primary function: dosimetry, calibration and imaging. Within each functional category, there are 3 types or designs of phantoms: body phantoms (anthropomorphic), standard phantoms and reference phantoms (used in the definition and specification of certain radiation quantities). In radiological imaging, anthropomorphic body phantoms are used for measuring the absorbed dose distribution resulting from imaging procedures. Standard phantoms have simple reproducible geometry and are used for comparing measurements under standard conditions of exposure. Imaging phantoms are useful for evaluating a given imaging system; they contain different types of test pieces. The report contains a major section on human anatomy, from fetus to adult with the variations due to ethnic origin. Tolerance levels for the phantoms (composition, dimensions) are proposed and quality assurance programs are outlined. The report contains extensive appendices; human anatomical data and full specification of over 80 phantoms and computational models. ICRU Report 46 on 'Photon, electron, proton and neutron interaction data for body tissues' is closely related to the field of phantoms. It is a logical continuation on ICRU Report 44 (1989) on 'Tissue substitutes in radiation dosimetry and measurements' and contains the interaction data for more than 100 tissues, from fetal to adult, including some diseased tissues

  19. Enhancement of radiological protection through an internal quality assessment cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Figueiredo, Filipe Morais de; Gama, Zenewton Andre da Silva

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To determine the level of quality in radiation protection of patients during radiological examination, evaluating the effectiveness of an intervention aimed at enhancing the quality of such a protection. Materials and Methods: A quality improvement cycle was implemented in a radiology service of the Regional Health Administration, in Algarve, Portugal. Based on six quality criteria, an initial evaluation was performed and followed by an intervention focused on the most problematic points (over an eight-month period) and a subsequent quality reassessment. A random sampling (n = 60) has allowed the authors to infer the point estimates and confidence intervals for each criterion, as well as calculating the statistical significance of the results by means of the Z-test. Results: Initially, deficiencies were observed in relation to all the quality criteria. After the intervention, a minimum relative improvement of 33% was observed in five of the six criteria, with statistical significance (p < 0.05) in two of them. The absolute frequency of noncompliance decreased from 38 (first evaluation) to 21 (second evaluation), corresponding to a 44.7% improvement. Conclusion: The first institutional evaluation cycle showed a seemingly incipient improvement margin. However, the implemented intervention was effective in stimulating good practices and improving the level of radiological protection of patients. (author)

  20. Training in radiological protection - a pool of practical exercises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Croft, J.R.; Hudson, A.P.

    1981-01-01

    Courses in Radiological Protection have been organised at Leeds by the NRPB since its formation, and prior to that by the Leeds Centre of the Radiological Protection Service. From the outset it seemed essential that such courses should contain a practical element, and accordingly a number of exercises were drawn up. Since that time further exercises have been added, often in response to a specific requirement from a customer or group of customers. Most of the exercises have involved the design and construction of 'one-off' items of equipment, a number of which can be considered to represent interesting approaches towards radiological protection teaching. The construction of a 'second generation' of hardware has focused attention on the objectives and design features of the exercises, which in turn has prompted a desire to publish a series of short papers describing the pool of exercises that is currently available for inclusion in the various courses run by the NRPB Centres. The first of these papers puts the series into context and provides a background to the descriptions of specific exercises. (author)

  1. Guidelines for training and qualification of radiological protection technicians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-08-01

    These guidelines, used in combination with plant-specific job analysis, provide the framework for a training and qualification program for radiological protection technicians at nuclear power plants. Radiological protection technicians are defined as those individuals, both plant and contractor, who will be engaged in the evaluation of radiological conditions in the nuclear plant and the implementation of the necessary radiological safety measures as they apply to nuclear plant workers and members of the general public. An important aspect of this work is recognizing and handling unusual situations involving radioactivity, including incidents related to degraded core conditions. These guidelines incorporate the results of an industry-wide job analysis and task analysis (JTA) combined with industry operating experience review. However, the industry-wide analyses did not identify all important academic and fundamental knowledge and skills. Further in-depth analysis by subject matter experts produced additional knowledge and skills that were added to these guidelines. All utilities should use these guidelines in conjunction with plant-specific and industry-wide JTA results to develop or validate their radiological protection technician training program. Plant-specific information should be used to establish appropriate training program content. This plant-specific information should reflect unique job duties, equipment, operating experience, and trainee entry-level qualifications. Revisions to these guidelines should be reviewed for applicability and incorporated into the training program using each utility's training system development (TSD) procedures. Plant-specific job analysis and task analysis data is essential to the development of performance-based training programs. These analyses are particularly useful in selecting tasks for training and in developing on-the-job training (OJT), laboratory training, and mock-up training. Qualification programs based on these

  2. Anti-scatter grids, applied in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porubszky, T.

    2012-01-01

    During imaging in diagnostic radiology, X-ray beam is scattered on all media between X-ray source and X-ray image receptor. The most important one from these is the patient itself. Scattered radiation, reaching X-ray image receptor - which may be even 5-6 times more intensive than X-ray pattern, in case of pelvis of a corpulent patient - reduces image contrast, impairs detail visibility and, moreover - in case of examinations during which staff stays in the controlled area, it causes radiation exposure of the staff. For diminishing scattered radiation, in principle, there are two possibilities. One of them is the so-called air gap, i.e. increasing the distance between the patient and the X-ray image receptor; however, because of the geometric magnification it is not always applicable or appropriate. The other way is application of anti-scatter grids directly in front of the X-ray image receptor. Interest of the patient is firstly the image, appropriate for diagnosis, and only after it the possible lowest radiation exposure. In most cases radiation exposure is optimized if image quality impairing effect of scattered radiation is decreased, although entrance skin dose and so radiation exposure of the patient may increase then by a factor of 2 to 5. Examinations of babies and small children as well as extremities, however, are exceptions: in these cases antiscatter grids are to be removed from the beam as amount of scattered radiation is very small, therefore optimizing radiation exposure in these cases reached by examination without grid. The presentation deals with the most important characteristics of anti-scatter grids as new edition of their international standard will be published next year. (author)

  3. Computational evaluation of a pencil ionization chamber in a standard diagnostic radiology beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendonca, Dalila Souza Costa; Neves, Lucio Pereira; Perini, Ana Paula; Belinato, Walmir

    2016-01-01

    In this work a pencil ionization chamber was evaluated. This evaluation consisted in the determination of the influence of the ionization chamber components in its response. For this purpose, the Monte Carlo simulations and the spectrum of the standard diagnostic radiology beam (RQR5) were utilized. The results obtained, showed that the influence of the ionization chamber components presented no significant influence on the chamber response. Therefore, this ionization chamber is a good alternative for dosimetry in diagnostic radiology. (author)

  4. The work of the international commission on radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarke, R.H.

    1996-01-01

    ICRP was established in 1928 as the International X-ray and Radium Protection Committee. In 1950 the name was changed to reflect the wider scope of radiological protection. The present membership of the Main Commission and its four committees was established in July 1993 for the period 1993-1997. Their programmes of work are now nearing completion with the Committees having met four times and their progress is summarised. The Main Commission meets in November 1996, when one of the main topics will be the election of the new Commission and members of the four Committees for the period 1997-2001

  5. Shielded chamber control stations: an answer to radiological protection requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delaboudiniere, Catherine.

    1979-06-01

    This study, carried out at the radiometallurgy laboratory of the Fontenay-aux-Roses Nuclear Research Centre, is based on an ergonomic approach. It shows that the shielded chamber control station, designed for human protection against ionizing radiations, demands an effort of adaptation on the part of the operator. This station does in fact meet radiological protection obligations but would benefit from certain improvements aimed at reducing the secondary fatigue of manipulators already under the strain of adapting to the machine. Fields in which improvements and/or changes are desirable have been investigated with special reference to telemanipulators. New and better designed instruments will soon appear on the telemanipulator market [fr

  6. Radiation Protection Knowledge, Attitude, and Practice (KAP) in Interventional Radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabani, Fatemeh; Hasanzadeh, Hadi; Emadi, Alireza; Mirmohammadkhani, Majid; Bitarafan-Rajabi, Ahmad; Abedelahi, Ali; Bokharaeian, Mitra; Masoumi, Hamed; Seifi, Danial; Khani, Tahereh; Sanchooli, Mohamad; Moshfegh, Shima; Ziari, Abbas

    2018-03-01

    Due to increasing cardiac disease and its mortality rate, the frequency of cardiac imaging has grown and, as a result, interventional cardiologists potentially receive high radiation doses in cardiac examinations. This study aimed to assess the knowledge, attitude, and practice (KAP) level of radiation protection (RP) among interventional radiology staff in Iranian health care centers across the country. We used a validated questionnaire survey consisting of 30 multiple-choice questions to perform a cross-sectional study. Participants were healthcare personnel working professionally with radiation at different levels (i.e., secretary, radiology technologists, nurse, and physician). The questionnaire was divided into three sections to assess KAP regarding RP. Significant differences exist in RP KAP mean scores based on educational age (p 0.050). We found a significant difference between RP KAP mean scores and different regions (p < 0.050). Educational and practice age, sex, type of hospital, and geographical region affect he KAP of interventional radiology staff regarding RP. Since many of the subjective radiation harms for both medical team and patients, this can be easily controlled and prevented; a checkup for personnel of interventional radiology departments, considering samples from different parts of the country with different levels of education, continuous training, and practical courses may help map the status of KAP. The results of this study may also help authorized health physics officers design strategic plans to enhance the quality of such services in radiation departments.

  7. Radiation Protection Knowledge, Attitude, and Practice (KAP in Interventional Radiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Shabani

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Due to increasing cardiac disease and its mortality rate, the frequency of cardiac imaging has grown and, as a result, interventional cardiologists potentially receive high radiation doses in cardiac examinations. This study aimed to assess the knowledge, attitude, and practice (KAP level of radiation protection (RP among interventional radiology staff in Iranian health care centers across the country. Methods: We used a validated questionnaire survey consisting of 30 multiple-choice questions to perform a cross-sectional study. Participants were healthcare personnel working professionally with radiation at different levels (i.e., secretary, radiology technologists, nurse, and physician. The questionnaire was divided into three sections to assess KAP regarding RP. Results: Significant differences exist in RP KAP mean scores based on educational age (p 0.050. We found a significant difference between RP KAP mean scores and different regions (p < 0.050. Conclusions: Educational and practice age, sex, type of hospital, and geographical region affect he KAP of interventional radiology staff regarding RP. Since many of the subjective radiation harms for both medical team and patients, this can be easily controlled and prevented; a checkup for personnel of interventional radiology departments, considering samples from different parts of the country with different levels of education, continuous training, and practical courses may help map the status of KAP. The results of this study may also help authorized health physics officers design strategic plans to enhance the quality of such services in radiation departments.

  8. Implications of science and technology on the radiological protection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metivier, H.; LAZO, T.

    2006-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: The mission of the Nuclear Energy Agency (Nea) Committee on Radiation Protection and Public Health (C.R.P.P.H.) includes providing member -country governments with insight into evolving or emerging issues that could affect radiation protection policy, regulation or application. Although it can not be currently said that the scientific understanding of radiological risks has significantly changed recently, ongoing radio-biological and epidemiological research could challenge the conventional paradigm in the mid -term future. The C.R.P.P.H. finalized in March 2006 finalize a study of possible challenges and their implications. This study includes two principle areas: challenges arising from scientific developments; and, challenges to the implementation of radiation protection. This report updates the earlier C.R.P.P.H. report, 'Developments in Radiation Health Sciences and their Impact on Radiation Protection' (Nea 1998). Broadly speaking, ongoing radiation biology studies present the possibility that our current practice of summing various type s of exposures into a single value of effective dose is not scientifically supported because of significantly differing dose/response relationships (chronic vs. acute, internal vs. external, high Let versus low Let, etc.). In addition, non-targeted effects, and the possibility of individual hyper-sensitivity to radiation further challenge our current notion of the relationship between detriment and dose. Although there is no conclusive evidence for this at this time, the possible implications of such changes will be investigated to better prepare governments and the radiation protection community should sound scientific evidence emerge. In addition to these possible scientific challenges, the applications and events that would require radiological protection input are also evolving. In particular, the use of radiation in medicine, with new techniques and the spread of existing technologies

  9. Current aspects in the development of the quality control in the conventional X-ray diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoeva, M.; Velkova, K.

    2004-01-01

    The role of the X-ray diagnostic radiology as one of the main factors forming the general public dose is indisputable. Following the requirement for justification of the application of X-rays for medical purposes, certain criteria for assessment of the parameters of the X-ray diagnostic equipment are formed and maximum permissible values defined. The latter are developed by the international and national radiation protection organizations and introduced both in the international and national legislation. The importance of the quality assurance concept for the radiation protection of the patient and staff in diagnostic radiology turned the quality control into main toll for obtaining high quality images with minimum dose to the patient and staff. X-ray diagnostics is one of the most common methods used in the medical practice. This is the main reason for the increase of the quality control protocols, winch makes their handling difficult. The latest developments in this area bring forward the idea for the development of specialized quality control software, which is capable of: 1) full or semi-automated calculation and assessment of the parameters of the X-ray diagnostic units; 2) tools for data handling and access; 3) tools for data analysis based on predefined procedures

  10. Assessment of radiological safety of some new diagnostic agents used in nuclear medicine investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, M.M.; Nagaratnam, A.

    1993-01-01

    Effective dose estimations have been carried out for some newer technetium-99m labelled diagnostic agents employed for myocardial and regional cerebral perfusion studies. Mean absorbed doses due to these preparations were taken from published literature. Effective dose was calculated by multiplying mean absorbed dose to an organ or tissue by the value of tissue weighting factor assigned to that organ or tissue in the recommendations of the international Commission on Radiological Protection and integrating over all organs or tissues of interest. The process was repeated considering revised values of tissue weighting factors as recommended recently. A method for approximate effective dose calculation is described in cases where complete data on mean absorbed dose or tissue weighting factor for an organ or tissue are not available. Revised values of tissue weighting factor normally result in a lowering of estimated effective doses due to these radiopharmaceuticals. It was also demonstrated that additional total stochastic risk will only be marginal. (author)

  11. Air kerma standardization for diagnostic radiology in a secondary standard laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramos, Manoel M.O.; Peixoto, J. Guilherme P.; Lopes, Ricardo T.

    2009-01-01

    The demand for calibration services and quality control in diagnostic radiology has grown in the country since the publication of the governmental regulation 453, issued by the Brazilian Ministry of Health in 1998. At that time, to produce results facing the new legislation, many laboratories used different standards and radiation qualities, some of which could be inadequate. The international standards neither supplied consistent radiation qualities and standardization for the different types of equipment available. This situation changed with the publication of the new edition of the IEC 61267 standard, published in 2005. The objective of this work was to implement the standardization of the air kerma for the unatenuated qualities (RQR) of IEC 61267 in the National Laboratory of Metrology of the Ionizing Radiations (LNMRI) of the Institute of Radiation Protection and Dosimetry (IRD). Technical procedures were developed together with uncertainty budget. Results of interlaboratory comparisons demonstrate that the quantity is standardized and internationally traceable. (author)

  12. Design And Measurement Of Radiation Exposure Rates At An X-Ray Diagnostic Radiological Unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tito-Sutjipto

    2003-01-01

    Every radiation employees suffers radiation exposure risk while doing his job. It is important therefore to investigate the occupational health and safety of radiation employees on its relationship with the design and measurement of radiation exposure rates at an X-ray diagnostic radiological unit in this work, a case study was held on the radiological unit at BP-4 Yogyakarta for patient diagnostics, This research armed to investigate the relationship between the design of radiological unit for X-ray diagnostics and the location of the X-ray machine, based on the distance variable and radiation exposure rate during patient diagnostics. This was performed using radiological unit design data for X-ray diagnostics and the measurement of radiation exposure rates throughout patient diagnostics. The design data can then be used for determining the requirement of primary and secondary shielding materials for radiological unit as well as a calculation basis of radiation exposure rates during patient diagnostics. From the result of the research, it can be concluded that from the occupational health and safety point of view, radiation exposure around the X-ray machines are fairly good, both for the shielding materials in each X-ray room and the radiation exposures received by the workers, because they are far beyond the maximum permittable average limit (16.67 m R/days). (author)

  13. Patient dosimetry and quality control in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suliman, I. I.

    2007-08-01

    In the first part of the study, entrance surface doses (ESDs) to patients in radiography were estimated from x-ray tube output parameters for a sample of 346 radiographs. The mean ESDs estimated in the hospitals ranged from 0.17 to 0.27 mGy for chest PA, 1.04-2.26 mGy for skull AP/PA, 0.83-1.32 mGy for skull LAT, 1.31-1.89 mGy for pelvis AP, 1.46-3.33 mGy for Lumbar Spine AP and 2.9-9.9 mGy for Lumbar Spine LAT. With the exception of chest PA examination at two hospitals, mean ESDs were found to be within the established international reference doses. In addition, study was performed to compare two methods used for effective dose calculation in diagnostic radiology. Initially, ED values were calculated from ESD values using NRPB-SR262 Monte Carlo data and XDOSE software. Next, the energy imparted to patients was computed using values for entrance skin exposure-area product and half-value layer. Effective doses were then determined from energy imparted using ED/ε conversion factors proposed in the literature. Mean ED values calculated using the two methods were: 21.3-23.4, 14.1-12.8, 7.9-8.5, 232-226, 215-223 and 91-85.6 μSv for chest PA, Skull AP/PA, Skull LAT, Pelvis AP, Lumbar Spine AP and Lumbar Spine LAT examinations, respectively. The values obtained were in agreement between themselves and with data reported in the literature. In the second part, a protocol for quality control (QC) tests has been drafted based on various national and international recommendations. Tests were included for various parts of the imaging chain, i.e. x-ray tube and generator; x-ray tube control system; laser printer and display station; image quality and patient dose. Preliminary tolerance levels have been set for the various tests, after initial measurements. To check the suitability of the QC tests and the stated tolerance levels, measurements were made at the University Hospital Gasthuisberg in Leuven, the Netherland, for equipment used for paediatric radiology and a unit used

  14. Program of training and technical expertise in radiation protection for personnel of medical radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Sergio R. de

    2013-01-01

    This work aims to verify the actual conditions for the training of technicians in Radiology, in relation to the knowledge of radiation protection in the field of Medical Diagnostic Radiology. To evaluate the knowledge of professionals was prepared a questionnaire on the topic, having been answered by workers with varied experience. The questionnaire was divided into three parts, being the initial self-evaluation, followed by closed and open issues, all specific knowledge. With a total of 55 questionnaires answered, it was found that 85% of respondents consider themselves able to work in the area performing the function, but when questioned about the technical details regarding the exposure to ionizing radiation, it was found that only 15% of respondents had some knowledge about the subject. In relation to Radiological Protection, was found that little more than 10% of the respondents know about the subject. The results found in this survey outlined the creation of a technical specialization course in radiation protection, which is part of the permanent staff of course of the Polytechnical School of Health of FIOCRUZ, solving, partially, one of the problems pointed out today by health bodies, that is the lack of trained personnel

  15. Hanford radiological protection support services annual report for 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyon, M.; Fix, J.J.; Kenoyer, J.L.; Leonowich, J.A.; Palmer, H.E.; Sula, M.J.

    1988-08-01

    This report documents the performance of certain radiological protection sitewide services during calendar year (CY) 1987 by Pacific Northwest Laboratory in support of the US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) and contractor activities on the Hanford Site. The routine program for each service is discussed along with any significant program changes and tasks, investigations, and studies performed in support of each program. Other related activities such as publications, presentations, and memberships on standards or industry committees are also discussed. The programs covered provide services in the areas of: external dosimetry, internal dosimetry, in vivo measurements, instrument calibration and evaluation, calibration of radiation sources traceable to the National Bureau of Standards, and radiological records. 21 refs., 10 figs., 12 tabs

  16. Hanford radiological protection support services annual report for 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyon, M.; Fix, J.J.; Kenoyer, J.L.; Leonowich, J.A.; Palmer, H.E.; Sula, M.J.

    1989-06-01

    The report documents the performance of certain radiological protection sitewide services during calendar year (CY) 1988 by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in support of the US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) and contractor activities on the Hanford Site. The routine program for each service is discussed along with any significant program changes and tasks, investigations, and studies performed in support of each program. Other related activities such as publications, presentations, and memberships on standard or industry committees are also listed. The programs covered provide services in the areas of (1) internal dosimetry, (2) in vivo measurements, (3) external dosimetry, (4) instrument calibration and evaluation, (5) calibration of radiation sources traceable to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) (formerly the National Bureau of Standards), and (6) radiological records. 23 refs., 15 figs., 15 tabs

  17. Evaluation of radiological protection aspects in radiodiagnostic rooms in Mexico City

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escobar A, L.; Vizuet G, J.; Ruiz, M.A.

    1996-01-01

    The preliminary results of an evaluation of radiological protection carried out in radiology services of different hospitals of Mexico are shown. The evaluated points were: relative aspects of the room, operation parameters of operation of the equipment, work procedures and training about radiological protection for the equipment operators. (authors). 2 refs., 1 fig

  18. Radiological protection issues in endovascular use of radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-02-01

    The use of radiation from radioactive materials for cancer treatment is well established. However, examples of uses of radiation therapy for benign conditions have been limited. Placing a radioactive source in the blood vessel so as to irradiate the surrounding inner periphery of the vessel has been attempted in recent years to prevent restenosis after percutaneous coronary and peripheral interventions. This kind of endovascular application provides treatment options that are less invasive for various vascular conditions compared with open surgery. As a part of the International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA) function for providing for application of the International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources (BSS) that were jointly sponsored by the IAEA, FAO, ILO, OECD/NEA, PAHO and WHO, the IAEA planned a coordinated research project (CRP) that was to start in 2002 on radiological protection problems in endovascular use of radiation sources. However, as experts soon realized that the interest in this modality was waning, the CRP was not initiated. Nevertheless, it was felt that it would be appropriate to compile the information available on radiological protection problems observed so far and their possible solutions. This work was seen as part of a broader IAEA programme that covered accident prevention in radiotherapy. Publications on this topic have included, inter alia, Lessons Learned from Accidental Exposures in Radiotherapy (Safety Reports Series No. 17); Accidental Overexposure of Radiotherapy Patients in Bialystok; Investigation of an Accidental Exposure of Radiotherapy Patients in Panama; Accidental Overexposure of Radiotherapy Patients in San Jose, Costa Rica; and Investigation of an Accidental Exposure of Radiotherapy Patients in Poland. Keeping in mind that endovascular applications involve specialists such as cardiologists, angiologists and surgeons, all of whom might not have a

  19. TH-E-201-02: Hands-On Physics Teaching of Residents in Diagnostic Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, J.

    2016-01-01

    The ABR Core Examination stresses integrating physics into real-world clinical practice and, accordingly, has shifted its focus from passive recall of facts to active application of physics principles. Physics education of radiology residents poses a challenge. The traditional method of didactic lectures alone is insufficient, yet it is difficult to incorporate physics teaching consistently into clinical rotations due to time constraints. Faced with this challenge, diagnostic medical physicists who teach radiology residents, have been thinking about how to adapt their teaching to the new paradigm, what to teach and meet expectation of the radiology resident and the radiology residency program. The proposed lecture attempts to discuss above questions. Newly developed diagnostic radiology residents physics curriculum by the AAPM Imaging Physics Curricula Subcommittee will be reviewed. Initial experience on hands-on physics teaching will be discussed. Radiology resident who will have taken the BAR Core Examination will share the expectation of physics teaching from a resident perspective. The lecture will help develop robust educational approaches to prepare radiology residents for safer and more effective lifelong practice. Learning Objectives: Learn updated physics requirements for radiology residents Pursue effective approaches to teach physics to radiology residents Learn expectation of physics teaching from resident perspective J. Zhang, This topic is partially supported by RSNA Education Scholar Grant

  20. TH-E-201-01: Diagnostic Radiology Residents Physics Curriculum and Updates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sensakovic, W.

    2016-01-01

    The ABR Core Examination stresses integrating physics into real-world clinical practice and, accordingly, has shifted its focus from passive recall of facts to active application of physics principles. Physics education of radiology residents poses a challenge. The traditional method of didactic lectures alone is insufficient, yet it is difficult to incorporate physics teaching consistently into clinical rotations due to time constraints. Faced with this challenge, diagnostic medical physicists who teach radiology residents, have been thinking about how to adapt their teaching to the new paradigm, what to teach and meet expectation of the radiology resident and the radiology residency program. The proposed lecture attempts to discuss above questions. Newly developed diagnostic radiology residents physics curriculum by the AAPM Imaging Physics Curricula Subcommittee will be reviewed. Initial experience on hands-on physics teaching will be discussed. Radiology resident who will have taken the BAR Core Examination will share the expectation of physics teaching from a resident perspective. The lecture will help develop robust educational approaches to prepare radiology residents for safer and more effective lifelong practice. Learning Objectives: Learn updated physics requirements for radiology residents Pursue effective approaches to teach physics to radiology residents Learn expectation of physics teaching from resident perspective J. Zhang, This topic is partially supported by RSNA Education Scholar Grant

  1. TH-E-201-01: Diagnostic Radiology Residents Physics Curriculum and Updates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sensakovic, W. [Florida Hospital (United States)

    2016-06-15

    The ABR Core Examination stresses integrating physics into real-world clinical practice and, accordingly, has shifted its focus from passive recall of facts to active application of physics principles. Physics education of radiology residents poses a challenge. The traditional method of didactic lectures alone is insufficient, yet it is difficult to incorporate physics teaching consistently into clinical rotations due to time constraints. Faced with this challenge, diagnostic medical physicists who teach radiology residents, have been thinking about how to adapt their teaching to the new paradigm, what to teach and meet expectation of the radiology resident and the radiology residency program. The proposed lecture attempts to discuss above questions. Newly developed diagnostic radiology residents physics curriculum by the AAPM Imaging Physics Curricula Subcommittee will be reviewed. Initial experience on hands-on physics teaching will be discussed. Radiology resident who will have taken the BAR Core Examination will share the expectation of physics teaching from a resident perspective. The lecture will help develop robust educational approaches to prepare radiology residents for safer and more effective lifelong practice. Learning Objectives: Learn updated physics requirements for radiology residents Pursue effective approaches to teach physics to radiology residents Learn expectation of physics teaching from resident perspective J. Zhang, This topic is partially supported by RSNA Education Scholar Grant.

  2. TH-E-201-02: Hands-On Physics Teaching of Residents in Diagnostic Radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, J. [University of Kentucky (United States)

    2016-06-15

    The ABR Core Examination stresses integrating physics into real-world clinical practice and, accordingly, has shifted its focus from passive recall of facts to active application of physics principles. Physics education of radiology residents poses a challenge. The traditional method of didactic lectures alone is insufficient, yet it is difficult to incorporate physics teaching consistently into clinical rotations due to time constraints. Faced with this challenge, diagnostic medical physicists who teach radiology residents, have been thinking about how to adapt their teaching to the new paradigm, what to teach and meet expectation of the radiology resident and the radiology residency program. The proposed lecture attempts to discuss above questions. Newly developed diagnostic radiology residents physics curriculum by the AAPM Imaging Physics Curricula Subcommittee will be reviewed. Initial experience on hands-on physics teaching will be discussed. Radiology resident who will have taken the BAR Core Examination will share the expectation of physics teaching from a resident perspective. The lecture will help develop robust educational approaches to prepare radiology residents for safer and more effective lifelong practice. Learning Objectives: Learn updated physics requirements for radiology residents Pursue effective approaches to teach physics to radiology residents Learn expectation of physics teaching from resident perspective J. Zhang, This topic is partially supported by RSNA Education Scholar Grant.

  3. Exercises in diagnostic radiology. Vol. 1. 4. rev. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Squire, L.F.; Colaiace, W.M.; Strutynsky, N.

    1983-01-01

    Intention of this book is to impart - by means of numerous exercises to be done - knowledge about radiology. It shall be used around the termination of the study of medicine, more or less in the sense of a self-test and supplement of the previous lectures and previously revised text books. The exercises of this first volume proceed from a certain knowledge about thorax radiology to be present. (orig./MG) [de

  4. Improving Communication of Diagnostic Radiology Findings through Structured Reporting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panicek, David M.; Berk, Alexandra R.; Li, Yuelin; Hricak, Hedvig

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the content, clarity, and clinical usefulness of conventional (ie, free-form) and structured radiology reports of body computed tomographic (CT) scans, as evaluated by referring physicians, attending radiologists, and radiology fellows at a tertiary care cancer center. Materials and Methods: The institutional review board approved the study as a quality improvement initiative; no written consent was required. Three radiologists, three radiology fellows, three surgeons, and two medical oncologists evaluated 330 randomly selected conventional and structured radiology reports of body CT scans. For nonradiologists, reports were randomly selected from patients with diagnoses relevant to the physician’s area of specialization. Each physician read 15 reports in each format and rated both the content and clarity of each report from 1 (very dissatisfied or very confusing) to 10 (very satisfied or very clear). By using a previously published radiology report grading scale, physicians graded each report’s effectiveness in advancing the patient’s position on the clinical spectrum. Mixed-effects models were used to test differences between report types. Results: Mean content satisfaction ratings were 7.61 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 7.12, 8.16) for conventional reports and 8.33 (95% CI: 7.82, 8.86) for structured reports, and the difference was significant (P radiology.rsna.org/lookup/suppl/doi:10.1148/radiol.11101913/-/DC1 PMID:21518775

  5. The radiological protection in the nuclear medicine practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maldonado M, H.

    2010-09-01

    The nuclear medicine practice dates of the 1950 years, in this work the achievements reached as regards radiological protection are shown, although even lack a lot to make, the doses for the occupationally exposed personnel have decreased with lapsing of the years, thanks to the perception of the nuclear physicians to improve the administration techniques of the radioactive material, the decrease of administered activity and the unit doses use among the most remarkable advances. The changes in the equipment s technology to quantify the activity to administer, detection systems and image formation have demanded the development of the new professionals of the nuclear medicine that allows give protection to the patient. This improvement needs to consolidate with the appropriate normative development, the involved personnel qualification and the methods and procedures actualization to improve the protection of the occupationally exposed personnel, the public, the environment and the patient. (Author)

  6. Division of Radiological Protection progress report 1982-1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, B.L.; Bhat, R.M.; Narayan, G.R.

    1989-01-01

    This report describes the work of the Division of Radiological Protection during 2-88, for implementation of radiation safety in all institutions in the country using radiation sources for medical, industrial and research applications. It gives information about personnel monitoring using photographic film and TLD badges, neutron monitoring badges, dosimetric techniques developed, calibration facilities and maintenance of national standards for radiation and radioactivity, design and fabrication of special radiation protection instruments, development of coloured indicators for indentification of radiation sterilized medical products, advisory and licencing services, regulation and transport of radioactive materials, periodic protection survey, education and training related to radiation safety programmes. About 500 publications by the staff of this Division are listed. (author). 46 figs

  7. The R+D radiological protection program in the European Communities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mingot Buades, F.

    1993-01-01

    The R+D program a radiological protection for the year 1992 has lied basically on three areas: I .- Radiological exposure of man II .- Radiation effects on man (evaluation, prevention and treatment) III.- Risks and management of radiation exposure

  8. X ray spectra and qualities for use in diagnostic radiology and equipment calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Karla Cristina de

    1996-12-01

    The goal of this work was the standardization of radiation qualities of diagnostic X ray equipment of the Assay Laboratory of the Institute for Radiation Protection and Dosimetry (IRD) of the National Commission of Nuclear Energy, Brazil. X ray spectra were determined from pulse height distribution measured directly on the primary beam using a high pure planar Ge detector. A program was developed to convert pulse height distribution into radiation spectra in the range from 20 to 150 keV. X ray qualities based on those used by the 'Physikalish-Technish Bundesantalt' (PTB) primary laboratory were implanted in three radiological equipment of the Assay Laboratory. These qualities simulate radiation beams on patients submitted to typical radiological examinations. Besides the spectrometric system, a reference measurement system based on an ionization chamber calibrated in air kerma was used to establish parameters such as kilovoltage, first and second half-value layer, mean energy, effective energy and inherent filtration. Our data have shown that the implantation of these radiation qualities in the Assay Laboratory results on a metrological basis for calibration of dose measurement assemblies and kV-meters, like those used by IRD to evaluate the parameters of X ray equipment around the country. A catalogue of spectral data resulting from this work is a data bank that allows various applications like dose calculation using Monte Carlo simulation techniques. (author)

  9. SHIELD 1.0: development of a shielding calculator program in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Romulo R.; Real, Jessica V.; Luz, Renata M. da; Friedrich, Barbara Q.; Silva, Ana Maria Marques da

    2013-01-01

    In shielding calculation of radiological facilities, several parameters are required, such as occupancy, use factor, number of patients, source-barrier distance, area type (controlled and uncontrolled), radiation (primary or secondary) and material used in the barrier. The shielding design optimization requires a review of several options about the physical facility design and, mainly, the achievement of the best cost-benefit relationship for the shielding material. To facilitate the development of this kind of design, a program to calculate the shielding in diagnostic radiology was implemented, based on data and limits established by National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) 147 and SVS-MS 453/98. The program was developed in C⌗ language, and presents a graphical interface for user data input and reporting capabilities. The module initially implemented, called SHIELD 1.0, refers to calculating barriers for conventional X-ray rooms. The program validation was performed by the comparison with the results of examples of shielding calculations presented in NCRP 147.

  10. Radiation protection in radiology services in the municipality of Sao Paulo, SP, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senise, Paulo H.; Silva, Ezequiel; Ruzene, Anderson A.; Braga, Adriano C.; Spirgatis, Armim; Medeiros, Regina B.

    2013-01-01

    The FIDI company providing service to local health care system is responsible for managing part of the services diagnostic imaging of Sao Paulo in the South and Southeast ( 60 % ), Eastern ( 20 % ) and Midwest (20 %), Brazil. The generation of images in the municipal net is performed in conventional manner. Since 2009 works a maintenance associated with the verification of the performance of radiological equipment (annual) and processing (monthly) one. In 2008, on the occasion of the agreement between the city hall and FIDI, conditions were evaluated for radiological protection in 52 care units of the municipality. Were carried out verification tests of performance in conventional equipment, mammographic and tomographic equipment, in 138 and 71 analog processors, according to current legislation. In 2008 , 33 % of the devices had technical problems that prevented its operation. Currently only 3.4 % of the 91 are in radiological equipment maintenance. In 2008 the majority of radiological equipment had more than 10 years of manufacturing, while today fixed equipment have been replaced by new ones and therefore the use of mammography and generally have 2 to 3 years of manufacture . Currently the 31 processors are operative in 2008, 28 % were out of order. The replacement of most of the equipment associated with program quality and preventive/corrective maintenance has kept the service in accordance with the law. (author)

  11. Radiological, sonographic and radionuclide diagnostics in headache syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheibler, C.; Pink, V.; Luettschwager, L.; Zur, C.

    1987-01-01

    The complex diagnostics of the headache syndrome is taken as an example for the necessity to apply imaging procedures in a purposeful way in diagnostic strategy. Cooperation of the clinical partners involved is of particular importance in control of the diagnostic process

  12. Environmental protection: Researches in National Inst. of Radiological Sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuma, S.; Ban-nai, T.; Doi, M.; Fujimori, A.; Ishii, N.; Ishikawa, Y.; Kawaguchi, I.; Kubota, Y.; Maruyama, K.; Miyamoto, K.; Nakamori, T.; Takeda, H.; Watanabe, Y.; Yanagisawa, K.; Yasuda, T.; Yoshida, S.

    2011-01-01

    Some studies for radiological protection of the environment have been made at the National Inst. of Radiological Sciences (NIRS). Transfer of radionuclides and related elements has been investigated for dose estimation of non-human biota. A parameter database and radionuclide transfer models have been also developed for the Japanese environments. Dose (rate)-effect relationships for survival, growth and reproduction have been investigated in conifers, Arabidopsis, fungi, earthworms, springtails, algae, duckweeds, daphnia and medaka. Also genome-wide gene expression analysis has been carried out by high coverage expression profiling (HiCEP). Effects on aquatic microbial communities have been studied in experimental ecosystem models, i.e., microcosms. Some effects were detected at a dose rate of 1 Gy day -1 and were likely to arise from inter-species interactions. The results obtained at NIRS have been used in development of frameworks for environmental protection by some international bodies, and will contribute to environmental protection in Japan and other Asian countries. (authors)

  13. Radiological protection in the use of radiotracers in industrial process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, M.L L.; Gomes, R.S.; Gomes, J.D.R.L.; Costa, E.L.C.; Thomé, Z.D.

    2017-01-01

    The use of radiotracers plays an important role to provide methods to optimize industrial process and improve product quality. An increase in the use of radiotracers investigations has been observed in Brazil, however, as there is no specific standard for the licensing of these facilities, generic radiation protection regulations have been used, but these are not comprehensive or technically suitable for this purpose. Regulatory inspections in radiotracer facilities have reported failures in disagreement with best practices for radiological safety, mainly in radioactive waste management and in the control of workplaces during radiotracer injections. In this work, an assessment of radiological protection aspects of radioactive tracers is performed, based on the licensing process of radiotracers facilities, as well as the experience of regulatory inspections and a review of international standards, pointing out relevant radiation safety aspects for working practices, procedures and protective measures before, during and after injections of radioactive tracers, in order to contribute to the future development of specific safety regulations on radiotracers in Brazil. (author)

  14. Radiological protection in the use of radiotracers in industrial process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, M.L L.; Gomes, R.S.; Gomes, J.D.R.L.; Costa, E.L.C., E-mail: mara@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: rogeriog@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: jlopes@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: evaldo@cnen.gov.br [Comissão Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Diretoria de Radioproteção e Segurança Nuclear; Thomé, Z.D., E-mail: zielithome@gmail.com [Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Seção de Engenharia Nuclear

    2017-07-01

    The use of radiotracers plays an important role to provide methods to optimize industrial process and improve product quality. An increase in the use of radiotracers investigations has been observed in Brazil, however, as there is no specific standard for the licensing of these facilities, generic radiation protection regulations have been used, but these are not comprehensive or technically suitable for this purpose. Regulatory inspections in radiotracer facilities have reported failures in disagreement with best practices for radiological safety, mainly in radioactive waste management and in the control of workplaces during radiotracer injections. In this work, an assessment of radiological protection aspects of radioactive tracers is performed, based on the licensing process of radiotracers facilities, as well as the experience of regulatory inspections and a review of international standards, pointing out relevant radiation safety aspects for working practices, procedures and protective measures before, during and after injections of radioactive tracers, in order to contribute to the future development of specific safety regulations on radiotracers in Brazil. (author)

  15. Radiological protection: a summary handbook of ICRP publications and recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagaratnam, A.

    1995-01-01

    The biological effects of radiation and potential risks therefrom far exceeds the knowledge of any other hazardous agent, whether in the industrial field, or in the general environment affecting members of the public. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has been playing a pioneering role for decades in this direction. The extensive database that has been established over the decades by the ICRP, the methodologies, techniques and the organizational structures that have been developed to control radiation hazards, and, above all, the philosophy of risk evaluation and management that has been evolved by ICRP, would serve as valuable guides not only to those concerned with radiological protection but to scientist, technologist and administrators involved in all facets of occupational and industrial safety, as well as those concerned with environmental protection. From 1959 to the end of 1993 ICRP has brought out 64 publications running to around 9000 pages. It is important that everyone connected with the uses of ionizing radiations should be familiar with at least the basic features of the thinking of ICRP as embodied in these publications. The present handbook attempts to give in a concise, consolidated and codified form the salient features of all the relevant information contained in the voluminous ICRP publications. The material has been presented in 7 parts, each dealing with one major aspect of the recommendations, and summarizing the various publications connected with it. A separate note following the preface gives a brief summary of the way the contents of the handbook have been arranged. refs., tabs., figs

  16. The regulatory application of authorization in radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazo, T.; Frullani, S.

    2004-01-01

    Authorization is the process used by governments and regulatory authorities to decide what regulatory controls or conditions, if any, should be applied to radioactive sources or radiation exposure situations in order to protect the public, workers and the environment appropriately. Over the years, governments and regulatory authorities have used various approaches to the authorization process under differing circumstances. Now, with the new draft recommendations from the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), there is the prospect of being able to use a single, simple and self-coherent approach for the process of regulatory authorization under all circumstances. Previously, the ICRP recommended the use of various approaches to manage radiological protection situations. For what were called practices, exposures were subject to limits, and optimisation was required below these limits. What were called interventions were subject to intervention levels, above which some action could be considered justified, and which should be optimised based on consideration of how much dose could be averted by the countermeasure considered. Radon in homes was subject to action levels, above which some sort of countermeasure could be recommended. These approaches are all philosophically distinct and logically constructed, but their differences, particularly in the types of numerical criteria used (limits, intervention levels, action levels, etc.) contributed to confusion and misunderstanding. (author)

  17. Hanford Radiological Protection Support Services annual report for 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyon, M.; Bihl, D.E.; Fix, J.J.; Piper, R.K.; Froelich, T.J.; Lynch, T.P.

    1993-07-01

    Various Hanford Site radiation protection services provided by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory for the US Department of Energy Richland Field Office and Hanford contractors are described in this annual report of calendar year 1992. These activities include internal dosimetry measurements and evaluations, in vivo measurements, external dosimetry measurements and evaluations, instrument calibration and evaluation, radiation source calibration, and radiological record keeping. For each of these activities, the routine program and any program changes or enhancements are described, as well as associated tasks, investigations, and studies. Program-related publications, presentations, and other staff professional activities are also described

  18. General comments on radiological patient protection in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tellez de Cepeda, M.; Plaza, R.; Corredoira, E.; Martin Curto, L.M.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper an observation series about different aspects of the radiological protection of the patient in nuclear medicine is provided. It includes: The specific legislation contribution, the justification and, especially, optimization, as a fundamental base of the quality guarantee program, the importance of the fulfillment of the program and the importance of getting done the corresponding internal audits of the pursuit, the communication between the different groups of professionals implicated and between these and the patient, the volunteers who collaborate in the patient's care and the people in the patient's environment, knowing that the patient is a source of external radiation and contamination. (author) [es

  19. Hanford radiological protection support services annual report for 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyon, M.; Bihl, D.E.; Fix, J.J.; Piper, R.K.; Freolich, T.J.; Leonowich, J.A.; Lynch, T.P.

    1991-07-01

    Various Hanford site-wide radiation protection services provided by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory for the US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office and Hanford contractors are described in this annual report for calendar year 1990. These activities include internal dosimetry measurements and evaluations, in vivo measurements, external dosimetry measurements and evaluations, instrument calibration and evaluation, radiation source calibration, and radiological records keeping. For each of these activities, the routine program, program changes and enhancements, associated tasks, investigations and studies, and related publications, presentations, and other staff professional activities are discussed as applicable. 22 refs., 10 figs., 19 tabs

  20. Hanford Radiological Protection Support Services annual report for 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyon, M.; Bihl, D.E.; Fix, J.J.; Froelich, T.J.; Piper, R.K.; Olsen, P.C.

    1994-07-01

    Various Hanford Site radiation protection services provided by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory for the US Department of Energy Richland Operations Office and Hanford contractors are described in this annual report for calendar year 1993. These activities include internal dosimetry measurements and evaluations, in vivo measurements, external dosimetry measurements and evaluations, instrument calibration and evaluation, radiation source calibration, and radiological record keeping. For each of these activities, the routine program and any program changes or enhancements are described, as well as associated tasks, investigations, and studies. Program-related publications, presentations, and other staff professional activities are also described