WorldWideScience

Sample records for diagnostic radiation procedures

  1. Evaluation of radiation protection in nuclear medicine diagnostic procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammed, Ezzeldien Mohammed Nour

    2013-05-01

    This study conducted to evaluate the radiation protection in nuclear medicine diagnostic procedures in four nuclear medicine departments in Sudan. The evaluated procedures followed in these departments were in accordance with the standards, International Recommendations and code of practice for radiation protection in nuclear medicine. The evolution included the optimum design for diagnostic nuclear medicine departments, dealing with radioactive sources, quality assurance and quality control, training and responsibilities for radiation worker taking into account economic factors in Sudan. Evaluation of radiation protection procedures in diagnostic investigations was carried out by taken direct measurements of dose rate and the contamination level in some areas where radiation sources, radiation workers and public are involved. Designated questionnaires covered thirteen areas of radiation protection based on inspection check list for nuclear medicine prepared by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and American Association of Physicist in Medicine (AAPM) were used in the evaluation. This questionnaire has been Filled by Radiation Protection Officer (RPO), nuclear medicine technologist, nuclear medicine specialist in the nuclear medicine departments. Four hospitals, two governmental hospital and two private hospitals, have been assisted, the assessment shows that although the diagnostic nuclear medicine department in Sudan are not applying a fully safety and radiation protection procedures, but the level of radiation dose and the contamination level were found within acceptable limits. The private hospital D scored the higher level of protection (85.25%) while the governmental hospital C scored the lower level of protection (59.02%). Finally, this study stated some recommendations that if implemented could improve the level of radiation protection in nuclear medicine department. One of the most important recommendations is that a proper radiation protection

  2. Radiation doses from medical diagnostic procedures in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldrich, J.E.; Lentle, B.C.; Vo, C.

    1997-03-01

    This document sets out to record and analyze the doses incurred in Canada from medical procedures involving the use of ionizing radiation in a typical year. Excluded are those doses incurred during therapeutic irradiation, since they differ in scale to such a large degree and because they are used almost exclusively in treating cancer. In this we are following a precedent set by the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Ionizing Radiation. Although the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) notes that dose limits should not be applied to medical exposures, it also observes that doses in different settings for the same procedure may vary by as much as two orders of magnitude, and that there are considerable opportunities for dose reductions in diagnostic radiology. Because these data do not stand in isolation the report also encompasses a review of the relevant literature and some background comment on the evolving technology of the radiological sciences. Because there is a somewhat incomplete perception of the changes taking place in diagnostic methods we have also provided some introductory explanations of the relevant technologies. In addition, there is an analysis of at least some of the limitations on the completeness of the data which are reported here. (author)

  3. New perspective for radiation protection in diagnostic procedure in Paraguay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sosky, R.A.; Gamarra, M.

    2001-01-01

    The Government in Paraguay approved by Decree Law 10754, dated October 6, 2000, its National Regulation on Basic Safety Standards for Radiation Protection and the Safety of Radiation Sources, based on the IAEA Safety Standards 115. The primary goal of Patient Protection is to ensure that both Regulatory Authorities and all Responsible parties in Medical Practices observe procedural process in conducting their responsibilities on regulatory and administrative affairs. On one side the Government, 'Department de Proteccion Radiologica', under the Health Ministry and Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, and on the other side, the medical practitioner who prescribes or conducts diagnostic or therapeutic treatment, both ensure that the exposure of patients be the minimum. This document describes how the Regulatory Authorities intend to implement this recent act and on the other hand take the advantage of this Conference to understand better this subject, especially on the following subjects: essential requirement for licensing, inspection and enforcement programme in the country's capital and in the interior, where there are more difficulties; workers and medical training and lessons learned applying to developing countries. (author)

  4. Overview of radiation protection programme in nuclear medicine facility for diagnostic procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, Ezzeldein Mohammed Nour Mohammed

    2015-02-01

    This project was conducted to review Radiation Protection Program in Nuclear Medicine facility for diagnostic procedures which will provide guide for meeting the standard and regulatory requirements in diagnostic nuclear medicine. The main objective of this project is to keep dose to staff, patient and public as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). The specific objectives were to review the Radiation Protection Program (RPP) in diagnostic nuclear medicine and to make some recommendation for improving the level of radiation protection in diagnostic nuclear medicine that will help to control normal exposure and prevent or mitigate potential exposure. The methodology used is review of various documents. The review showed that if the Radiation Protection Program is inadequate it leads to unjustified exposure to radiation. Finally, this study stated some recommendations that if implemented could improve the level of radiation protection in nuclear medicine department. One of the most important recommendations is that a qualified Radiation Protection Officer (RPO) should be appointed to lay down and oversee a radiation protection in the nuclear medicine department. The RPO must be given the full authority and the adequate time to enable him to perform his duties effectively. (au)

  5. Additional radiation dose to population due to X-ray diagnostic procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chougule, A.

    2006-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Discovery of X rays has revolutionised the medical diagnosis but the fact that the diagnostic radiological procedures contribute about 80 to 90 % of the radiation dose to population as compared to other man made radiation sources cannot be ignored especially when X ray diagnostic facilities are being made available to larger section of the society. The estimated frequency of radiological procedures in India is 12,000 procedures/ year/100,000 population, though it is quite less as compared to developed countries, its increasing day by day. As part of the project, a radiation protection survey of X ray installations and patient radiation dose measurement during various radiological procedures was undertaken. 193 X ray installations were surveyed and the radiation doses received by the patient during various radiological procedure was measured. For measurement of radiation doses, CaSO 4 : Dy thermoluminescence (T.L.) discs of size 13.3 mm diameter and 0.8 mm thickness were used. Pre annealed T.L. discs were fixed by adhesive tape on the patient skin at the center of entrance beam before the exposure. After exposure the T.L. discs were estimated f or entrance skin dose during that particular projection/ examination. 10,000 measurements at different centers during various radiological procedures were done. It was found that chest radiography accounts for 37 % of all radiological procedures and further it was observed that 70 % of the chest X rays were normal with out any pathology indicating scope for curtailing the unwarranted radiological procedures. The special investigations like barium swallow, barium meal and fallow through accounts for about 1.5 % of the total radiological procedures. The entrance skin dose [E.S.D.] during chest radiography was 0.3 + 0.1 mGy where as during K.U.B. and cervical spine radiography it was 6.2 + 1.1 mGy and 5.1 + 0.9 mGy respectively. The details of frequency of various radiological procedures and the

  6. Prenatal radiation exposures at diagnostic procedures: methods to identify exposed pregnant patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pettersson, H.; Sandborg, M.; Nilsson, J.; Olsson, S.

    2002-01-01

    Knowledge about frequency and doses to embryo/foetus from diagnostic radiology is of great importance both in the sense of estimating the radiation risks but also for optimizing the diagnostic procedures and making decisions regarding alternative procedures. In addition, the pregnant patient has the right to know the magnitude and type of radiation risks expected as a result of foetus exposure. From a risk perspective epidemiological data have shown that the embryo/foetus together with children experience higher radiation sensitivity in terms of induced leukemia and cancer compared to an adult population. Recent estimates give cancer excess lifetime mortality risks for whole body exposures of children and foetus (0-15 y age) of 0.06% (ICRP84, 2000) up to 0.14% per 10 mSv (BEIR-V 1990). In addition to the risk of cancer induction effects of cell killing, e.g. CNS abnormalities, cataracts, malformations, growth retardation, may occur. However, these effects are believed to have a threshold, about 100-200 mGy (ICRP84, 2000), and such foetus doses are rarely reached in diagnostic radiology procedures. There are 2 principal situations where foetus exposures may occur in diagnostic radiology; 1. The pregnancy of the patient is known at the time of examination, but due to the medical indications the examination can not be postponed or put forward in time, and there are no suitable alternative non-radiological procedures. 2. The pregnancy of the patient is not known at the time of examination, either due to the fact that the patient is unaware of her pregnancy or the medical personnel failed to obtain this information. The former situation may occur during the first few weeks from conception, whereas the latter situation may cover a greater gestation period

  7. Radiation injury of the skin following diagnostic and interventional fluoroscopic procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koenig, T.R.; Wagner, L.K.; Mettler, F.A.

    2001-01-01

    Many radiation injuries to the skin, resulting from diagnostic and interventional fluoroscopic procedures, have been reported in recent years. In some cases skin damage was severe and debilitating. We analyzed 72 reports of skin injuries for progression and location of injury, type and number of procedures, and contributing patient and operator factors. Most cases (46) were related to coronary angiography and percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA). A smaller number was documented after cardiac radiofrequency catheter ablation (12), transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) placement (7), neuroradiological interventions (3) and other procedures (4). Important factors leading to skin injuries were long exposure times over the same skin area, use of high dose rates, irradiation through thick tissue masses, hypersensitivity to radiation, and positioning of arms or breasts into the radiation entrance beam. Physicians were frequently unaware of the high radiation doses involved and did not recognize the injuries as radiation induced. Based on these findings, recommendations to reduce dose and improve patient care are provided. (author)

  8. Exposure of the French paediatric population to ionising radiation from diagnostic medical procedures in 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Etard, Cecile; Aubert, Bernard [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Medical Expertise Unit, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Mezzarobba, Myriam [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Laboratory of Epidemiology, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Bernier, Marie-Odile [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Laboratory of Epidemiology, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, IRSN/PRP-HOM/SRBE/LEPID, Laboratoire d' Epidemiologie, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France)

    2014-12-15

    Medical examination is the main source of artificial radiation exposure. Because children present an increased sensitivity to ionising radiation, radiology practices at a national level in paediatrics should be monitored. This study describes the ionising radiation exposure from diagnostic medical examinations of the French paediatric population in 2010. Data on frequency of examinations were provided by the French National Health Insurance through a representative sample including 107,627 children ages 0-15 years. Effective doses for each type of procedure were obtained from the published French literature. Median and mean effective doses were calculated for the studied population. About a third of the children were exposed to at least one examination using ionising radiation in 2010. Conventional radiology, dental exams, CT scans and nuclear medicine and interventional radiology represent respectively 55.3%, 42.3%, 2.1% and 0.3% of the procedures. Children 10-15 years old and babies from birth to 1 year are the most exposed populations, with respectively 1,098 and 734 examinations per 1,000 children per year. Before 1 year of age, chest and pelvis radiographs are the most common imaging tests, 54% and 32%, respectively. Only 1% of the studied population is exposed to CT scan, with 62% of these children exposed to a head-and-neck procedure. The annual median and mean effective doses were respectively 0.03 mSv and 0.7 mSv for the exposed children. This study gives updated reference data on French paediatric exposure to medical ionising radiation that can be used for public health or epidemiological purposes. Paediatric diagnostic use appears much lower than that of the whole French population as estimated in a previous study. (orig.)

  9. Exposure of the French paediatric population to ionising radiation from diagnostic medical procedures in 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Etard, Cecile; Aubert, Bernard; Mezzarobba, Myriam; Bernier, Marie-Odile

    2014-01-01

    Medical examination is the main source of artificial radiation exposure. Because children present an increased sensitivity to ionising radiation, radiology practices at a national level in paediatrics should be monitored. This study describes the ionising radiation exposure from diagnostic medical examinations of the French paediatric population in 2010. Data on frequency of examinations were provided by the French National Health Insurance through a representative sample including 107,627 children ages 0-15 years. Effective doses for each type of procedure were obtained from the published French literature. Median and mean effective doses were calculated for the studied population. About a third of the children were exposed to at least one examination using ionising radiation in 2010. Conventional radiology, dental exams, CT scans and nuclear medicine and interventional radiology represent respectively 55.3%, 42.3%, 2.1% and 0.3% of the procedures. Children 10-15 years old and babies from birth to 1 year are the most exposed populations, with respectively 1,098 and 734 examinations per 1,000 children per year. Before 1 year of age, chest and pelvis radiographs are the most common imaging tests, 54% and 32%, respectively. Only 1% of the studied population is exposed to CT scan, with 62% of these children exposed to a head-and-neck procedure. The annual median and mean effective doses were respectively 0.03 mSv and 0.7 mSv for the exposed children. This study gives updated reference data on French paediatric exposure to medical ionising radiation that can be used for public health or epidemiological purposes. Paediatric diagnostic use appears much lower than that of the whole French population as estimated in a previous study. (orig.)

  10. Determining and managing fetal radiation dose from diagnostic radiology procedures in Turkey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozbayrak, Mustafa; Cavdar, Iffet; Seven, Mehmet; Uslu, Lebriz; Yeyin, Nami; Tanyildizi, Handan; Abuqbeitah, Mohammad; Acikgoz, A. Serdar; Tuten, Abdullah; Demir, Mustafa [Istanbul University, Istanbul (Turkmenistan)

    2015-12-15

    We intended to calculate approximate fetal doses in pregnant women who underwent diagnostic radiology procedures and to evaluate the safety of their pregnancies. We contacted hospitals in different cities in Turkey where requests for fetal dose calculation are usually sent. Fetal radiation exposure was calculated for 304 cases in 218 pregnant women with gestational ages ranging from 5 days to 19 weeks, 2 days. FetDose software (ver. 4.0) was used in fetal dose calculations for radiographic and computed tomography (CT) procedures. The body was divided into three zones according to distance from the fetus. The first zone consisted of the head area, the lower extremities below the knee, and the upper extremities; the second consisted of the cervicothoracic region and upper thighs; and the third consisted of the abdominopelvic area. Fetal doses from radiologic procedures between zones were compared using the Kruskal-Wallis test and a Bonferroni-corrected Mann-Whitney U-test. The average fetal doses from radiography and CT in the first zone were 0.05 ± 0.01 mGy and 0.81 ± 0.04 mGy, respectively; 0.21 ± 0.05 mGy and 1.77 ± 0.22 mGy, respectively, in the second zone; and 6.42 ± 0.82 mGy and 22.94 ± 1.28 mGy, respectively, in the third zone (p < 0.001). Our results showed that fetal radiation exposures in our group of pregnant women did not reach the level (50 mGy) that is known to increase risk for congenital anomalies. Fetal radiation exposure in the diagnostic radiology procedures in our study did not reach risk levels that might have indicated abortion.

  11. Exposure to rays and radiation hazards in connection with diagnostic X-ray procedures in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Protzer, K.

    1988-01-01

    In this study, figures and data about radiation exposures for diagnostic purposes are surveyed that were collected in connection with X-ray procedures in children. The data were sorted according to body regions and techniques required for their examination so as to permit separate analyses of procedures in the urogenital tract (intravenous urogramme, micturition cystourethrography), thorax (angiocardiogramme, thoractic aortogramme, examinations using cardiac catheters), gastrointestinal system (fluoroscopy and contrast-enhanced irrigoscopy), pelvis (survey radiography), skull (computed tomography) as well as in miscellaneous group of further origins. The second part of the report discusses the uncertainties surrounding the assessment of radiation hazards and indicated radiation doses. A formula is represented for the calculation of life-time reductions that can be applied to any type of cancer and embraces a number of factors like life expectancy at age X, the patient's age at the time of radiotherapy, the five-year-survival rate for the condition under investigation and the diseased organ. At the end of the study, some methods are pointed out that may be helpful in limiting radiation exposure. (KST) [de

  12. Prenatal Radiation exposures at diagnostic procedures: methods to identify exposed pregnant patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pettersson, H.; Sandborg, M.; Nilsson, J.; Olsson, S.; Hellman, S. [Dept of Radiation Physics, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linkoeping University, Linkoeping(Sweden); Helmrot, E. [Radiology Dept, County Hospital Ryhov, Joenkoeping (Sweden); Persliden, J. [Dept of Medical Physics, Oerebro Univ Hospital, Oerebro (Sweden); Cederlund, T. [Swedish Radiation Protection Authority, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2003-06-01

    Knowledge about frequency and doses to embryo/foetus from diagnostic radiology is of great importance both in the sense of estimating the radiation risks but also for optimizing the diagnostic procedures and making decisions regarding alternative procedures. In addition, the pregnant patient has a right to know the magnitude and type of radiation risks expected as a result of foetus exposure. From a risk perspective epidemiological data has shown that the embryo/foetus together with children experience higher radiation sensitivity in terms of induced leukemia and cancer compared to an adult population. Recent estimates give cancer excess lifetime mortality risks for whole body exposures of children and foetus (0-15 y age) of 0.06% up to 0.14% per 10 mSv. In addition to the risk of cancer induction effects of cell killing, e.g. CNS abnormalities, cataracts, malformations, growth retardation, may occur. However, these effects are believed to have a threshold, about 100-200 mGy, and such foetus doses are rarely reached in diagnostic radiology procedures. There are 2 principal situations where foetus exposures may occur in diagnostic radiology; The pregnancy of the patient is known at the time of examination, but due to the medical indications the examination can not be postponed or put forward in time, and there are no suitable alternative non-radiological procedures. The pregnancy of the patient is not known at the time of examination, either due to the fact that the patient is unaware of her pregnancy or the medical personnel failed to obtain this information. The former situation may occur during the first few weeks from conception, whereas the latter situation may cover a greater gestation period. The frequency of foetus exposure is not well documented. In Sweden, there are well-established routines to track down pregnant patients before examinations are being performed. However, there are no general obligations or routines to document the cases either (i) when

  13. Triggering radiation alarm at security checks. Patients should be informed even after diagnostic nuclear medicine procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palumbo, Barbara; Neumann, Irmgard; Havlik, Ernst; Palumbo, Renato; Sinzinger, Helmut

    2009-01-01

    During the last few years an increasing number of nuclear medicine patients in various countries evoked a radiation alarm after therapeutic or diagnostic procedures, and even after passive exposure. A prospective calculation of activity retention in the patient's body is difficult due to extremely high variation of uptake and kinetics. Furthermore, different sensitivities and distances of the detectors make a prospective calculation even more difficult. In this article a number of cases are being reported, related problems are discussed and the surprisingly very limited literature reviewed. In order to minimize problems after eventually triggering alarms, we strongly recommend that each patient receives a certificate providing personal data, tracer, dose, half-life of the radionuclide, type and date of procedure applied as well as the nuclear medicine unit to contact for further information. Furthermore, a closer cooperation and exchange of information between the authorities and local nuclear medicine societies, would be welcome.

  14. Thyroid Radiation Dose to Patients from Diagnostic Radiology Procedures over Eight Decades: 1930-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Lienard A; Miller, Donald L; Lee, Choonsik; Melo, Dunstana R; Villoing, Daphnée; Drozdovitch, Vladimir; Thierry-Chef, Isabelle; Winters, Sarah J; Labrake, Michael; Myers, Charles F; Lim, Hyeyeun; Kitahara, Cari M; Linet, Martha S; Simon, Steven L

    2017-12-01

    This study summarizes and compares estimates of radiation absorbed dose to the thyroid gland for typical patients who underwent diagnostic radiology examinations in the years from 1930 to 2010. The authors estimated the thyroid dose for common examinations, including radiography, mammography, dental radiography, fluoroscopy, nuclear medicine, and computed tomography (CT). For the most part, a clear downward trend in thyroid dose over time for each procedure was observed. Historically, the highest thyroid doses came from the nuclear medicine thyroid scans in the 1960s (630 mGy), full-mouth series dental radiography (390 mGy) in the early years of the use of x rays in dentistry (1930s), and the barium swallow (esophagram) fluoroscopic exam also in the 1930s (140 mGy). Thyroid uptake nuclear medicine examinations and pancreatic scans also gave relatively high doses to the thyroid (64 mGy and 21 mGy, respectively, in the 1960s). In the 21st century, the highest thyroid doses still result from nuclear medicine thyroid scans (130 mGy), but high thyroid doses are also associated with chest/abdomen/pelvis CT scans (18 and 19 mGy for males and females, respectively). Thyroid doses from CT scans did not exhibit the same downward trend as observed for other examinations. The largest thyroid doses from conventional radiography came from cervical spine and skull examinations. Thyroid doses from mammography (which began in the 1960s) were generally a fraction of 1 mGy. The highest average doses to the thyroid from mammography were about 0.42 mGy, with modestly larger doses associated with imaging of breasts with large compressed thicknesses. Thyroid doses from dental radiographic procedures have decreased markedly throughout the decades, from an average of 390 mGy for a full-mouth series in the 1930s to an average of 0.31 mGy today. Upper GI series fluoroscopy examinations resulted in up to two orders of magnitude lower thyroid doses than the barium swallow. There are

  15. Diagnostic reference level: an important tool for reducing radiation doses in adult and pediatric nuclear medicine procedures in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willegaignon, José; Braga, Luis F E F; Sapienza, Marcelo T; Coura-Filho, George B; Cardona, Marissa A R; Alves, Carlos E R; Gutterres, Ricardo F; Buchpiguel, Carlos A

    2016-05-01

    This study aimed to establish a concise method for determining a diagnostic reference level (DRL) for adult and pediatric nuclear medicine patients on the basis of diagnostic procedures and administered radioisotope as a means of controlling medical exposure. A screening was carried out in all Brazilian Nuclear Medicine Service (NMS) establishments to support this study by collecting the average activities administered during adult diagnostic procedures and the rules applied to adjust these according to the patient's age and body mass. Percentile 75 was used in all the activities administered as a means of establishing DRL for adult patients, with additional correction factors for pediatric patients. Radiation doses from nuclear medicine procedures on the basis of average administered activity were calculated for all diagnostic exams. A total of 107 NMSs in Brazil agreed to participate in the project. From the 64 nuclear medicine procedures studied, bone, kidney, and parathyroid scans were found to be used in more than 85% of all the NMSs analyzed. There was a large disparity among the activities administered, when applying the same procedures, this reaching, in some cases, more than 20 times between the lowest and the highest. Diagnostic exams based on Ga, Tl, and I radioisotopes proved to be the major exams administering radiation doses to patients. On introducing the DRL concept into clinical routine, the minimum reduction in radiation doses received by patients was about 15%, the maximum was 95%, and the average was 50% compared with the previously reported administered activities. Variability in the available diagnostic procedures as well as in the amount of activities administered within the same procedure was appreciable not only in Brazil, but worldwide. Global efforts are needed to establish a concise DRL that can be applied in adult and pediatric nuclear medicine procedures as the application of DRL in clinical routine has been proven to be an important

  16. The estimation of radiation effective dose from diagnostic medical procedures in general population of northern Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shabestani Monfared, A.; Abdi, R.

    2006-01-01

    The risks of low-dose Ionizing radiation from radiology and nuclear medicine are not clearly determined. Effective dose to population is a very important factor in risk estimation. The study aimed to determine the effective dose from diagnostic radiation medicine in a northern province of Iran. Materials and Methods: Data about various radiologic and nuclear medicine procedures were collected from all radiology and nuclear medicine departments In Mazandaran Province (population = 2,898,031); and using the standard dosimetry tables, the total dose, dose per examination, and annual effective dose per capita as well as the annual gonadal dose per capita were estimated. Results: 655,730 radiologic examinations in a year's period, lead to 1.45 mSv, 0.33 mSv and 0.31 mGy as average effective dose per examination, annual average effective dose to member of the public, and annual average gonadal dose per capita, respectively. The frequency of medical radiologic examinations was 2,262 examinations annually per 10,000 members of population. However, the total number of nuclear medicine examinations in the same period was 7074, with 4.37 mSv, 9.6 μSv and 9.8 μGy, as average effective dose per examination, annual average effective dose to member of the public and annual average gonadal dose per caput, respectively. The frequency of nuclear medicine examination was 24 examinations annually per 10,000 members of population. Conclusion: The average effective dose per examination was nearly similar to other studies. However, the average annual effective dose and annual average gonadal dose per capita were less than the similar values in other reports, which could be due to lesser number of radiation medicine examinations in the present study

  17. Unintentional exposure to radiation during pregnancy from nuclear medical diagnostic procedures; Unabsichtliche Strahlenexposition in der Schwangerschaft durch nuklearmedizinische Diagnostik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moka, D. [Gemeinschaftspraxis fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Essen (Germany)

    2005-12-01

    The administration of radiopharmaceuticals during pregnancy is contraindicated due to a lack of vital indications. However, if prenatal exposure to radiation should occur in the framework of a nuclear medical diagnostic procedure then fortunately no longterm side-effects would normally be expected. Radiation damage in the preimplantation phase leads to early abortion. However, if the further course of pregnancy remains uncomplicated then no subsequent side-effects need be expected. On a conservative estimate, it would require doses exceeding 50 mGy to cause radiation damage within the uterus after the preimplantation phase. However, the standard radioactivities applied for diagnostic purposes in nuclear medicine, can be obtained with doses of less than 20 mGy. On the basis of current knowledge, therefore, there is no reason to terminate pregnancy on medical grounds after diagnostic exposure to radiopharmaceuticals. (orig.)

  18. Children's exposure to ionizing radiations linked with diagnostic procedures in 2010 in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize the medical exposure of the French pediatric population to ionizing radiations (IR) in 2010. It only includes diagnostic procedures. Data are mainly provided by the French Health Insurance (CNAM-TS), through a representative sample of about 1% of the French population (the so-called 'EGB' sample). In 2010, more than 100,000 children from 0 to 15 years old were included in this sample. About 600 examinations per 1000 children were performed: 55% are radiological examinations and 42% dental. CT examinations are rather rare (about 2%). Nuclear medicine and interventional radiology represent less than 1% of the examinations. Children from 10 to 15 years old and babies from new born to 1 year old are the most examined. Exposure of girls and boys are rather similar. From 10 to 15 years old, dental and limbs examinations are the most frequent. Chest and pelvic examinations are the most frequent examinations performed on babies. CT pediatric examinations concern mainly the head and the neck. In 2010, a third of the French children has been exposed to at least one examination using IR. The mean and median effective doses were respectively equal to 0.65 mSv and 0.025 mSv. These values were respectively 5.7 mSv and 1.7 mSv for the children exposed to at least one CT examination (about 1% of the studied population). This study brings reference data on pediatric exposure to IR, and makes them available for public health and epidemiological purposes. This analysis should be periodically carried out to assess the evolution of the pediatric exposure. (authors)

  19. Radiation exposure of population due to medical diagnostic procedures in the USSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vorob'ev, E.I.; Stavitskij, R.V.; Knizhnikov, V.A.; Barkhudarov, R.M.; Korsunskij, V.N.; Popov, V.I.; Tarasenko, Yu.I.; Postnikov, V.A.; Frolov, N.V.; Sidorin, V.P.

    1984-01-01

    The evaluation of radiation doses to population in the ussr on the basis of the data on frequency of 12 main forms of X-ray examinations and the results of measuring absorbed doses on tissue-kquivalent main's phantom are given. The evaluation of radiation exposure due to radiopharmaceutical preparations is based on consumption of 26 types of compounds in 320 national laboratories and i is performed by the methods developed in the framework of the mird committee (usa). In thhe active bone marrow, lungs mammary, glands thyroid and other organs (stomach, liver, spleen, etc.) the equivalent doses are determined and on their base the effective equivalent doses (eed). The average eed from x ray diagnostic examinations is 1.4 mSv per year (140 mrem per year) of which 55.4% falls on X-ray examination, 26.9% on radiography, 17.7% on mass miniature radiography (fluorography). Radionuclide diagnostics contribution is 3.2x10 -2 mSv per year (3.8 mrem per year). Medicinal radiation exposure approximately doubles the natural background, it is comparable with exposure in premises and essentially exceeds the radiation doses to population from other sources

  20. Comparison of radiation delivered by current diagnostic procedures for herniated disc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasquet, C.; Drouineau, J.; Goubault, F.; Hurmic, A.; Lavigne, B.; Vandermarcq, P.

    1983-01-01

    Three methods are currently employed for the diagnosis of sciatica due to disc lesions: radiculography, spinal phlebography, and computed tomography. Though their indications vary according to the author, it seemed worthwhile to compare radiation delivered by each of them, because of the often young age of the patients. Dosimetric studies using a Rando Phantom enabled calculation of doses to the skin, spinal cord, and gonads. Results indicated that low doses were delivered by the scanner, relatively high doses by spinal phlebography, and intermediate doses by radiculography. These findings suggest that the initial examination preoperatively in cases of simple sciatica due to herniated disc should be a CT scan whenever possible. Phlebography, on the contrary, and particularly in young women, should be used only exceptionally, as a result of the high doses delivered to the ovaries even during technically simple explorations [fr

  1. Exposure from diagnostic nuclear medicine procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iacob, O.; Diaconescu, C.; Isac, R.

    2002-01-01

    According to our last national study on population exposures from natural and artificial sources of ionizing radiation, 16% of overall annual collective effective dose represent the contribution of diagnostic medical exposures. Of this value, 92% is due to diagnostic X-ray examinations and only 8% arise from diagnostic nuclear medicine procedures. This small contribution to collective dose is mainly the result of their lower frequency compared to that of the X-ray examinations, doses delivered to patients being, on average, ten times higher. The purpose of this review was to reassess the population exposure from in vivo diagnostic nuclear medicine procedures and to evaluate the temporal trends of diagnostic usage of radiopharmaceuticals in Romania. The current survey is the third one conducted in the last decade. As in the previous ones (1990 and 1995), the contribution of the Radiation Hygiene Laboratories Network of the Ministry of Health and Family in collecting data from nuclear medicine departments in hospitals was very important

  2. Radiation exposure to staff involved in diagnostic and therapeutic nuclear medicine procedures in some hospitals in Sudan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salih, Lamia Hamza Bashir

    2015-05-01

    Study was performed to evaluate radiation dose to staff involved in nuclear medicine procedures in some hospitals in Sudan. 15 radiation workers were studied in three hospitals. Radiation dose was measured using personal dose equivalent Hp (10), using calibrated electronic personal dosimeters (EPDs) worn on the chest and read at the end of the day. Staff doses were monitored in each hospital for a period of four weeks, The measured monthly Hp(10) values to staff ranged between 82.96-83.94μSv (to nurses), 38.81-53.97 μSv (to pharmacists), 16.87-70.21μSv (to technologists), 40.22-76.56μSv (to medical physicists). These mean monthly radiation doses were projected to the annual radiation doses received by the staff. The mean monthly radiation doses were projected to the annual radiation doses were found to be between ranges (185.57-923.34μSv/y). Results found showed that there was no dose that exceeded the limits of annual dose recommended for workers by International Commission on Radiology Protection (ICRP) (20 mSv/year). This study is expected to increase the awareness of staff about the radiation hazards and protection.(Author)

  3. Radiation exposure in diagnostic medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haehnel, S.; Michalczak, H.; Reinoehl-Kompa, S.

    1995-01-01

    This volume includes the manuscripts of the papers read at the conference as well as a summary and assessment of its results. The scientific discussions were centred upon the following issues: - International surveys and comparisons of rdiation exposures in diagnostic radiology and nuclear medicine, frequency of the individual diagnostic procedures and age distribution of patients examined; - policies and regulations for the radiation protection of patients, charcteristic dosimetric values and practical usefulness of the effective dose concept during medical examinations; - assessments of the relative benefits and risks and measures to reduce the radiation exposure in the light of quality assurance aspects. The main objective of this conference not only was to evaluate the risks from diagnostic radiology and nuclear medicine but also to encourgage a critical analysis and adjustment of examination routines followed in everyday practice. Among the measures recommended were quality assurance, maintenace of international standards, development of guidelines, introduction of standard doses, improved training and professional education of personnel as well as surveys and analyses of certain examination procedures associated with substantial radiation exposure. (orig./MG) [de

  4. NUCLEAR MEDICINE PRACTICES IN THE 1950s THROUGH THE mid-1970s AND OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION DOSES TO TECHNOLOGISTS FROM DIAGNOSTIC RADIOISOTOPE PROCEDURES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozdovitch, Vladimir; Brill, Aaron B.; Mettler, Fred A.; Beckner, William M.; Goldsmith, Stanley J.; Gross, Milton D.; Hays, Marguerite T.; Kirchner, Peter T.; Langan, James K.; Reba, Richard C.; Smith, Gary T.; Bouville, André; Linet, Martha S.; Melo, Dunstana R.; Lee, Choonsik; Simon, Steven L.

    2014-01-01

    Data on occupational radiation exposure from nuclear medicine procedures for the time period of the 1950s through the 1970s is important for retrospective health risk studies of medical personnel who conducted those activities. However, limited information is available on occupational exposure received by physicians and technologists who performed nuclear medicine procedures during those years. To better understand and characterize historical radiation exposures to technologists, we collected information on nuclear medicine practices in the 1950s, 1960s, and 1970s. To collect historical data needed to reconstruct doses to technologists, a focus group interview was held with experts who began using radioisotopes in medicine in the 1950s and the 1960s. Typical protocols and descriptions of clinical practices of diagnostic radioisotope procedures were defined by the focus group and were used to estimate occupational doses received by personnel, per nuclear medicine procedure, conducted in the 1950s-1960s using radiopharmaceuticals available at that time. The radionuclide activities in the organs of the reference patient were calculated using the biokinetic models described in ICRP Publication 53. Air kerma rates as a function of distance from a reference patient were calculated by Monte Carlo radiation transport calculations using a hybrid computational phantom. Estimates of occupational doses to nuclear medicine technologists per procedure were found to vary from less than 0.01 μSv (thyroid scan with 1.85 MBq of administered 131I-iodide) to 0.4 μSv (brain scan with 26 MBq of 203Hg-chlormerodin). Occupational doses for the same diagnostic procedures starting in the mid-1960s but using 99mTc were also estimated. The doses estimated in this study show that the introduction of 99mTc resulted in an increase in occupational doses per procedure. PMID:25162420

  5. Nuclear medicine practices in the 1950s through the mid-1970s and occupational radiation doses to technologists from diagnostic radioisotope procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozdovitch, Vladimir; Brill, Aaron B; Mettler, Fred A; Beckner, William M; Goldsmith, Stanley J; Gross, Milton D; Hays, Marguerite T; Kirchner, Peter T; Langan, James K; Reba, Richard C; Smith, Gary T; Bouville, André; Linet, Martha S; Melo, Dunstana R; Lee, Choonsik; Simon, Steven L

    2014-10-01

    Data on occupational radiation exposure from nuclear medicine procedures for the time period of the 1950s through the 1970s is important for retrospective health risk studies of medical personnel who conducted those activities. However, limited information is available on occupational exposure received by physicians and technologists who performed nuclear medicine procedures during those years. To better understand and characterize historical radiation exposures to technologists, the authors collected information on nuclear medicine practices in the 1950s, 1960s, and 1970s. To collect historical data needed to reconstruct doses to technologists, a focus group interview was held with experts who began using radioisotopes in medicine in the 1950s and the 1960s. Typical protocols and descriptions of clinical practices of diagnostic radioisotope procedures were defined by the focus group and were used to estimate occupational doses received by personnel, per nuclear medicine procedure, conducted in the 1950s to 1960s using radiopharmaceuticals available at that time. The radionuclide activities in the organs of the reference patient were calculated using the biokinetic models described in ICRP Publication 53. Air kerma rates as a function of distance from a reference patient were calculated by Monte Carlo radiation transport calculations using a hybrid computational phantom. Estimates of occupational doses to nuclear medicine technologists per procedure were found to vary from less than 0.01 μSv (thyroid scan with 1.85 MBq of administered I-iodide) to 0.4 μSv (brain scan with 26 MBq of Hg-chlormerodin). Occupational doses for the same diagnostic procedures starting in the mid-1960s but using Tc were also estimated. The doses estimated in this study show that the introduction of Tc resulted in an increase in occupational doses per procedure.

  6. Radiation hardening of diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siemon, R.E.

    1991-01-01

    The world fusion program has advanced to the stage where it is appropriate to construct a number of devices for the purpose of burning DT fuel. In these next-generation experiments, the expected flux and fluence of 14 MeV neutrons and associated gamma rays will pose a significant challenge to the operation and diagnostics of the fusion device. Radiation effects include structural damage to materials such as vacuum windows and seals, modifications to electrical properties such as electrical conductivity and dielectric strength and impaired optical properties such as reduced transparency and luminescence of windows and fiber optics during irradiation. In preparation for construction and operation of these new facilities, the fusion diagnostics community needs to work with materials scientists to develop a better understanding of radiation effects, and to undertake a testing program aimed at developing workable solutions for this multi-faceted problem. A unique facility to help in this regard is the Los Alamos Spallation Radiation Effects Facility, a neutron source located at the beam stop of the world's most powerful accelerator, the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF). The LAMPF proton beam generates 10 16 neutrons per second because of ''spallation'' reactions when the protons collide with the copper nuclei in the beam stop

  7. Radiation hardening of diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siemon, R. E.

    The world fusion program has advanced to the stage where it is appropriate to construct a number of devices for the purpose of burning DT fuel. In these next-generation experiments, the expected flux and fluence of 14 MeV neutrons and associated gamma rays will pose a significant challenge to the operation and diagnostics of the fusion device. Radiation effects include structural damage to materials such as vacuum windows and seals, modifications to electrical properties such as electrical conductivity and dielectric strength and impaired optical properties such as reduced transparency and luminescence of windows and fiber optics during irradiation. In preparation for construction and operation of these new facilities, the fusion diagnostics community needs to work with materials scientists to develop a better understanding of radiation effects, and to undertake a testing program aimed at developing workable solutions for this multi-faceted problem. A unique facility to help in this regard is the Los Alamos Spallation Radiation Effects Facility, a neutron source located at the beam stop of the world's most powerful accelerator, the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF). The LAMPF proton beam generates 10(exp 16) neutrons per second because of spallation'reactions when the protons collide with the copper nuclei in the beam stop.

  8. MR diagnostics after Ross procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steffens, J.C.; Link, J.; Harringer, W.; Haverich, A.; Heller, M.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the ability of MRI to diagnose morphological and functional changes in patients after Ross procedure. Material and methods: During one year, 5 patients after Ross procedure were studied by MRI. T 1 -weighted spin-echo sequences in different orientations as well as cine sequences and a VENC-sequence were used. Results: In all patients the morphology including the postoperative changes could be visualised by MRI. The cine sequences provided functional information on valvular and ventricular function. VENC-MR yielded an exact quantification of the regurgitant fraction. Conclusion: MRI is capable of providing all important diagnostic information in patients after Ross procedure such as valvular and ventricular function and valvular and outflow tract morphology in a single examination. (orig.) [de

  9. Radiation safety in nuclear medicine procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Sang Geon; Kim, Ja Hae; Song, Ho Chun

    2017-01-01

    Since the nuclear disaster at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant in 2011, radiation safety has become an important issue in nuclear medicine. Many structured guidelines or recommendations of various academic societies or international campaigns demonstrate important issues of radiation safety in nuclear medicine procedures. There are ongoing efforts to fulfill the basic principles of radiation protection in daily nuclear medicine practice. This article reviews important principles of radiation protection in nuclear medicine procedures. Useful references, important issues, future perspectives of the optimization of nuclear medicine procedures, and diagnostic reference level are also discussed

  10. Radiation Safety in Nuclear Medicine Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sang-Geon; Kim, Jahae; Song, Ho-Chun

    2017-03-01

    Since the nuclear disaster at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant in 2011, radiation safety has become an important issue in nuclear medicine. Many structured guidelines or recommendations of various academic societies or international campaigns demonstrate important issues of radiation safety in nuclear medicine procedures. There are ongoing efforts to fulfill the basic principles of radiation protection in daily nuclear medicine practice. This article reviews important principles of radiation protection in nuclear medicine procedures. Useful references, important issues, future perspectives of the optimization of nuclear medicine procedures, and diagnostic reference level are also discussed.

  11. Radiation safety in nuclear medicine procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Sang Geon; Kim, Ja Hae; Song, Ho Chun [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Medical Radiation Safety Research Center, Chonnam National University Hospital, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    Since the nuclear disaster at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant in 2011, radiation safety has become an important issue in nuclear medicine. Many structured guidelines or recommendations of various academic societies or international campaigns demonstrate important issues of radiation safety in nuclear medicine procedures. There are ongoing efforts to fulfill the basic principles of radiation protection in daily nuclear medicine practice. This article reviews important principles of radiation protection in nuclear medicine procedures. Useful references, important issues, future perspectives of the optimization of nuclear medicine procedures, and diagnostic reference level are also discussed.

  12. An update on radiation absorbed dose to patients from diagnostic nuclear medicine procedures in Tehran: A study on four academic centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motazedian, Motahareh; Tabeie, F; Vatankhah, P; Shafiei, B; Amoui, M; Atefi, M; Ansari, M; Asli, I Neshandar

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Use of radiopharmaceuticals for diagnostic nuclear medicine procedures is one of the main sources of radiation exposure. We performed this study with respect to the rapid growth in nuclear medicine in Iran and lack of updated statistics. Materials and Methods: The data were obtained for all active Nuclear Medicine Centers affiliated to Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences during 2009 and 2010. Results: The most frequently performed procedures were bone (30.16%), cardiac (28.96%), renal (17.97%), and thyroid (7.93%) scans. There was a significant decrease in the number of thyroid scintigraphies with 131I and 99mTc-sulfur colloid liver/spleen scans and tremendous increase in the frequencies of cardiac and bone scintigraphies compared to one decade ago. Conclusion: Compared to previous studies, there were striking changes in trends of diagnostic nuclear medicine procedures in Tehran. This field is still evolving in the country, and this trend will further change with the introduction of positron emission tomography scanners in future. PMID:27095860

  13. Compliance to Diagnostic Reference Levels for radiation exposure in common radiological procedures in Dutch hospitals: A nation-wide survey carried out by medical imaging students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijwaard, H; de Vries, G; Scheurleer, J; Roding, T; Erenstein, H; Ravensbergen, W; Haarmans-Jonkman, S; van Welie, F

    2017-08-01

    In the Netherlands, hospitals have difficulty in implementing the formal procedure of comparing radiation dose values to Diagnostic Reference Levels (DRLs). To support the hospitals, train radiography students, and carry out a nationwide dose survey, diagnostic radiography students performed 125 DRL comparisons for nine different procedures in 29 radiology departments. Students were instructed at three Dutch Universities of Applied Sciences with a radiography programme and supervised by medical physicists from the participating hospitals. After a pilot study in the western part of the country in eight hospitals, this study was enlarged to involve 21 hospitals from all over the Netherlands. The 86 obtained dose comparisons fall below the DRLs in 97% of all cases. This very high compliance may have been enhanced by the voluntary participation of hospitals that are confident about their performance. The results indicate that the current DRLs that were not based on a national survey, may need to be updated, sometimes to half their current value. For chest and pelvis examinations the DRLs could be lowered from 12 and 300 μGy·m 2 to the 75-percentile values found in this study of 5,9 and 188 μGy·m 2 , respectively. Copyright © 2017 The College of Radiographers. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Staff radiation exposure in radiation diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khakimova, N.U.; Malisheva, E.Yu.; Shosafarova, Sh.G.

    2010-01-01

    Present article is devoted to staff radiation exposure in radiation diagnostics. Data on staff radiation exposure obtained during 2005-2008 years was analyzed. It was found that average individual doses of staff of various occupations in Dushanbe city for 2008 year are at 0.29-2.16 mSv range. They are higher than the average health indicators but lower than maximum permissible dose. It was defined that paramedical personnel receives the highest doses among the various categories of staff.

  15. Effects of radiation exposure from radiopharmaceuticals used in diagnostic studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witcofski, R.L.

    1981-01-01

    In the United States about 90 percent of man-made radiation exposure to the general population is from the use of radiation in diagnostic medicine. Although the doses of radiation from these procedures to individuals are generally quite small, large numbers of people are exposed. Estimates of the radiation doses associated with such use in the healing arts are approximately 15 million person-rem to the general population from diagnostic x ray and 3.3 million person-rem from the diagnostic use of radiopharmaceuticals. The purpose of this paper is to present what is known about the possible effects of radiation from diagnostic radiopharmaceuticals

  16. The Medical Exposure to Ionizing Radiation and Protection of the Patient in Medical Imaging Procedures for Diagnostic and Therapeutic Purposes (Excluding Radiotherapy) using X-Rays in Israel - Risk - Cost and Benefit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Shlomo, A.

    1998-10-01

    Diagnostic and therapeutic radiology is playing a major role in modern medicine. The utilization of devices emitting ionizing radiation for medical diagnostic and therapeutic purposes is classified into three categories: a. Radiotherapy procedures for the treatment of malignant and benign tumors. b. Nuclear medicine procedures using radiopharmaceuticals that are introduced into the patient's body for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. c. Diagnostic and therapeutic x-ray imaging procedures. This group includes conventional radiography, conventional fluoroscopy, cardiac catheterization, angiography, CT, mammography, dental, and fluoroscopy operation procedures. A survey was carried out on a sample of three major Israeli hospitals in order to: 1. Determine the status of radiation protection of patients in Israel with regard to the use of x-rays in medical imaging and interventional radiology. 2. Assess the extent of exposure of the population to medical x-rays, and assess the collective risk in Israel in this relation (based on Icr-60). 3. Carry out a cost-benefit optimization procedure related to the means that should be used to reduce the exposure of Israeli patients under x-ray procedures. 4. Establish a of practical recommendations to reduce the x-ray radiation exposure of patients and to increase the image quality. 5. Establish a number of basic rules to be utilized by health policy makers in Israel

  17. Review on radiation protection in diagnostic radiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Karami

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Discovery of x-ray and using of it for medical imaging have produced tremendous outcomes for diagnosis and treatment of diseases. More than 10 million diagnostic radiological procedures and 100,000 nuclear medicine exams are being performed daily around the world. According to the national commission on radiological protection and measurements (NCRP-report 160, medical x-ray is contribute to approximately 95% of all radiological examinations that is responsible for 74% of the collective dose to the US population. Despite of unique benefits of ionizing radiations, in the field of radiation protection, they are associated with potential risks such as cancer and genetically abnormalities. The cancer risk attributable to diagnostic radiology is estimated about 0.6% to 3%. It is estimated that the radiation dose from diagnostic x-ray procedures are annually responsible for 7,587 and 5,695 cases of radiation induced cancer in the population of Japan and US, respectively. Although the radiation dose associated with most radiological procedures are very low, but rapid increasing use of radiography procedures during two past decades have been concerned due to the cancer risk associated with ionizing radiations. On the base of linear no-threshold (LNT model of dose-response curve, any level of exposure is dangerous. Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA is the main target of ionizing radiation. For radiological exposure with low dose, the stochastic effects such as genetic damages and leukemia are concerned. According to the recommendations of the radiation protection regulatory organizations, radiological procedure must be done with respect to social and economic factors in which exposure of patient and population kept as low as reasonable and achievable. Hence, prescription of a radiological test is acceptable only when its advantages are higher than its damages. Optimizing the different parameters such as: collimating the primary beam field to the area of

  18. Population radiation dose from diagnostic nuclear medicine procedures in the Tehran population in 1999-2003: striking changes in only one decade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabeie, Faraj; Mohammadi, Hooshang; Asli, Isa Neshandar

    2013-02-01

    Use of unsealed radiopharmaceuticals in Iran's nuclear medicine centers has expanded rapidly in the last decade. As part of a nationwide survey, this study was undertaken to estimate the radiation risk due to the diagnostic nuclear medicine procedures performed in Tehran in 1999-2003. During the five years of the study, the data of 101,540 yearly examinations of diagnostic nuclear medicine were obtained for 34 (out of 40) active nuclear medicine centers in Tehran. The patients studied were aged 1 y, 5 y, 10 y, 15 y, and adults (>15 y). Compared to an earlier investigation in 1989 (which was published in 1995), striking changes were found to be occurring in the trends of nuclear medicine in Tehran in a matter of a decade. The frequency of cardiac examinations increased from less than 1% in 1989 to 43.2% (mean of 5 y) in 2003; thyroid examinations, with the relative frequency of higher than 80% in 1989, decreased to 26.7% in the current investigation (averaged for 2001); and the number of overall examinations per 1,000 population of Tehran increased from 1.9 in 1989 to 8.8 in this study (about fourfold). The decrease in relative frequency of thyroid examinations could be attributed to the lower referral policy (mainly by specialists), decreased incidence of goiter due to implementation of programs for iodine enrichment diets, introduction of fine needle aspiration (FNA), and sonography techniques for diagnosis of thyroid disease. The large increase in relative frequency of cardiac examinations could be due to the increase in the number of single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) systems in recent years as compared to 1989 in Tehran. The collective effective dose increased from 400 (person-Sv) in 1999 to 529 (person-Sv) in 2003, and the effective dose per capita increased from 34.80 μSv in 1999 to 44.06 μSv in 2003 (average, 35.60 μSv).

  19. Radiation control standards and procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1956-12-14

    This manual contains the Radiation Control Standards'' and Radiation Control Procedures'' at Hanford Operations which have been established to provide the necessary control radiation exposures within Irradiation Processing Department. Provision is also made for including, in the form of Bulletins'', other radiological information of general interest to IPD personnel. The purpose of the standards is to establish firm radiological limits within which the Irradiation Processing Department will operate, and to outline our radiation control program in sufficient detail to insure uniform and consistent application throughout all IPD facilities. Radiation Control Procedures are intended to prescribe the best method of accomplishing an objective within the limitations of the Radiation Control Standards. A procedure may be changed at any time provided the suggested changes is generally agreeable to management involved, and is consistent with department policies and the Radiation Control Standards.

  20. Genetic risk from diagnostic X-ray procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephan, G.

    1980-01-01

    This essay introduces epidemiologic studies concerned with the question whether diagnostic X-ray procedures might be the cause of an increased genetic risk. All studies have selected Down's syndrome (mongolism) as genetic indicator. They indiscriminately present the opinion of the respective author. Approximately one half of the studies conclude that radiation exposure will not influence the spontaneous incidence of Down's syndrome in diagnostics, the other half finds a positive relationship between frequent radiation exposure and the incidence of the syndrome. For various reasons, explained in detail, the results of the studies under discussion are suitable for forming hypotheses, but should not be viewed as providing evidence. (orig.) [de

  1. Reducing Radiation Dose in Pediatric Diagnostic Fluoroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghodadra, Anish; Bartoletti, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    To assess radiation dose in common pediatric diagnostic fluoroscopy procedures and determine the efficacy of dose tracking and dose reduction training to reduce radiation use. Fluoroscopy time and radiation dose area product (DAP) were recorded for upper GIs (UGI), voiding cystourethrograms (VCUGs), and barium enemas (BEs) during a six-month period. The results were presented to radiologists followed by a 1-hour training session on radiation dose reduction methods. Data were recorded for an additional six months. DAP was normalized to fluoroscopy time, and Wilcoxon testing was used to assess for differences between groups. Data from 1,479 cases (945 pretraining and 530 post-training) from 9 radiologists were collected. No statistically significant difference was found in patient age, proportion of examination types, or fluoroscopy time between the pre- and post-training groups (P ≥ .1), with the exception of a small decrease in median fluoroscopy time for VCUGs (1.0 vs 0.9 minutes, P = .04). For all examination types, a statistically significant decrease was found in the median normalized DAP (P < .05) between pre- and post-training groups. The median (quartiles) for pretraining and post-training normalized DAPs (μGy·m(2) per minute) were 14.36 (5.00, 38.95) and 6.67 (2.67, 17.09) for UGIs; 13.00 (5.34, 32.71) and 7.16 (2.73, 19.85) for VCUGs; and 33.14 (9.80, 85.26) and 17.55 (7.96, 46.31) for BEs. Radiation dose tracking with feedback, paired with dose reduction training, can reduce radiation dose during diagnostic pediatric fluoroscopic procedures by nearly 50%. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Diagnostic radiation and chromosome aberrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patil, S.R.; Hecht, F.; Lubs, H.A.; Kimberling, W.; Brown, J.; Gerald, P.S.; Summitt, R.L.

    1977-01-01

    Some evidence is presented suggesting that diagnostic X-rays may be important in the origin of a new chromosomal abnormality other than Down syndrome. Chromosome analyses have been carried out on 4342 children, seven or eight years old. Maternal diagnostic irradiation in the year before conception and up to third lunar month of the index pregnancy was recorded, before the chromosome study began, together with a large amount of family and clinical data. Information on X-ray exposure was supplied by the mothers, s o radiation dosage could not be estimated. 21 children (including a pair of twins and a pair of siblings) born to 19 mothers had chromosomal aberrations. The mothers of six children with inherited translocations, rearrangements and XYY karyotypes were excluded, and 3 (23%) of the remaining 13 mothers had received abdominal and pelvic X-ray exposures. In the whole sample, however, only 6% of the mothers had diagnostic irradiation. Two of these mothers, aged sixteen and twenty, gave birth to a child each with de-novo autosomal translocations, and the third mother, aged thirty-two, had a child with a complex mosaicism involving one X chromosome. Although the sample size of the mothers with chromosomally abnormal children is small, the results are significant. (U.K.)

  3. Anemia in pregnancy:laboratory diagnostic procedures

    OpenAIRE

    Panova, Gordana

    2010-01-01

    Anemia is common condition in pregnancy and laboratory diagnostic procedures are essential for its detection and categorization. Complete blood count, serum iron, TIBC and ferritin are basic clinical laboratory parameters that provide information about iron status of mother’s body and possible presence of anemia.

  4. An economic evaluation of the use of rare-earth screens to reduce the radiation dose from diagnostic x-ray procedures in Israel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginzburg, G.M.; Schlesinger, T.; Ben-Shlomo, A.

    1996-01-01

    In contrasts, reducing the patient dose by using improved radiology equipment will often result in a constant reduction without further managerial effort for the lifetime of the equipment. Changing equipment is administratively far easier than altering long-established work practices. There are several methods available to achieve dose reduction in diagnostic radiology via this second category. For example, dose reductions of between 10% and 20% can be achieved independently by reducing attenuation between patient and image receptor to a minimum by means of carbon fiber components in couch tops, cassette fronts and anti-scatter grids [13-15]. Radiation dosage in film radiography can be reduced by approximately 50% by the use of rare- earth screens, which enable a faster film speed to be utilized (thus reducing exposure time) without significant loss in the diagnostic quality of the image. Rare-earth screens have been found in England to be the most cost-effective method of reducing dosage in film radiography, providing large dose reductions at considerably lower costs than carbon fiber components (authors)

  5. Cyclotron radiation as Tokamak diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiedler-Ferrari, N.

    1985-01-01

    A brief introduction to the use of Electron Cyclotron Emission as diagnostics in tokamaks is made. The utilization feasibility of this dignostics in the TBR-1 and TTF2A tokamaks is discussed. (L.C.) [pt

  6. Patient radiation doses from neuroradiology procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Roman, M.J.; Abreu-Luis, J.; Hernandez-Armas, J.; Prada-Martinez, E.

    2001-01-01

    Following the presentation of radiation-induced deterministic effects by some patients undergoing neuroradiological procedures during successive sessions, such as temporary epilation, in the 'Hospital Universitario de Canarias', measurements were made of dose to patients. The maximum dose-area product measured by ionization chamber during these procedures was 39617 cGy.cm 2 in a diagnostic of aneurysm and the maximum dose to the skin measured by thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs) was 462.53 mGy. This can justify certain deterministic effects but it is unlikely that the patients will suffer serious effects from this skin dose. Also, measurements were made of effective dose about two usual procedures, embolisation of tumour und embolisation of aneurysm. These procedures were reproduced with an anthropomorphic phantom Rando and doses were measured with TLDs. Effective doses obtained were 3.79 mSv and 4.11 mSv, respectively. The effective dose valued by the program EFFDOSE was less than values measured with TLDs. (author)

  7. Cancer risks following diagnostic and therapeutic radiation exposure in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleinerman, Ruth A. [National Institutes of Health, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, EPS 7044, Rockville, MD (United States)

    2006-09-15

    The growing use of interventional and fluoroscopic imaging in children represents a tremendous benefit for the diagnosis and treatment of benign conditions. Along with the increasing use and complexity of these procedures comes concern about the cancer risk associated with ionizing radiation exposure to children. Children are considerably more sensitive to the carcinogenic effects of ionizing radiation than adults, and children have a longer life expectancy in which to express risk. Numerous epidemiologic cohort studies of childhood exposure to radiation for treatment of benign diseases have demonstrated radiation-related risks of cancer of the thyroid, breast, brain and skin, as well as leukemia. Many fewer studies have evaluated cancer risk following diagnostic radiation exposure in children. Although radiation dose for a single procedure might be low, pediatric patients often receive repeated examinations over time to evaluate their conditions, which could result in relatively high cumulative doses. Several cohort studies of girls and young women subjected to multiple diagnostic radiation exposures have been informative about increased mortality from breast cancer with increasing radiation dose, and case-control studies of childhood leukemia and postnatal diagnostic radiation exposure have suggested increased risks with an increasing number of examinations. Only two long-term follow-up studies of cancer following cardiac catheterization in childhood have been conducted, and neither reported an overall increased risk of cancer. Most cancers can be induced by radiation, and a linear dose-response has been noted for most solid cancers. Risks of radiation-related cancer are greatest for those exposed early in life, and these risks appear to persist throughout life. (orig.)

  8. Population dose from diagnostic procedures in Sindhudurg district of Maharashtra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhawal, S.J.; Shete, P.B.; Karande, V.A.; Bandgar, A.B.; Khyalappa, R.J.; Pawar, S.H.; Sharma, S.D.

    2011-01-01

    The radiation exposure through medical diagnostic applications has one of the significant impact on human health in addition to other natural radiations. Most of the medical decisions are dependent on X-ray diagnosis. Although the patient is benefited by these X-ray procedures, knowledge of the radiation dose received by the patient during these radiological examinations is necessary. According to the International Commission on Radiological Protection recommendations all medical exposures should be subjected to the radiation safety principles of justification and optimization. Similarly International Atomic Energy Agency also recommended that the guidance levels for medical exposures shall be established for the use by medical practitioners and relevant professional bodies. Therefore, several studies have been carried out all over the world to establish proper guidance levels as well as made efforts in the reduction of unnecessary exposures. In this study, the survey of population exposed to medical X-ray diagnostics in the Sindhudurg district of Maharashtra, India has been carried out. For this study questionnaire was developed and used for the collection of data directly from the people as well as from diagnostic centres. The collected data was sorted according to type of examination, age and gender of the patient and presented here. Using this data collective effective dose and annual per caput effective dose for the Sindhudurg district were calculated. From the study it is concluded that the calculated effective dose per person per year for the region is of the order of 0.061 mSv that is lower than the average value across the global population that is of the order of 0.62 mSv as given in the UNSCEAR 2008 report. (author)

  9. Procedure and methodology of Radiation Protection optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Hengde

    1995-01-01

    Optimization of Radiation Protection is one of the most important principles in the system of radiation protection. The paper introduces the basic principles of radiation protection optimization in general, and the procedure of implementing radiation protection optimization and methods of selecting the optimized radiation protection option in details, in accordance with ICRP 55. Finally, some economic concepts relating to estimation of costs are discussed briefly

  10. Patient dose assessment in different diagnostic procedures in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sena, E. de; Bejar, M.J.; Berenguer, R.; Ruano, R.; Tamayo, P.

    2001-01-01

    Effective doses have been estimated for 314 patients under diagnostic procedures in a Nuclear Medicine Department using data reported in ICRP-80 and RIDIC (Radiation Internal Dose Information Center). Data on administered activity, radiopharmaceutical and administration route, age and sex of the patients have been collected. Doses in the most exposed critical organ for every protocol, doses in uterus, doses in fetus versus the stage of pregnancy (in case the female patient was pregnant) and doses for nursing infants have been also estimated. Ga-67 studies give the highest effective doses per protocol followed by cardiac SPECT procedures using Tl-201 chloride. Ga-67 studies also give the highest absorbed doses in uterus. Due to not administering different activities, depending on height and weight of adults, women receive doses about 20% higher than men. This would be a practice to modify in the future in order to optimise doses. (author)

  11. Measurement of patient radiation doses in certain urography procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulieman, A.; Barakat, H.; Zailae, A.; Abuderman, A.; Theodorou, K.

    2015-01-01

    Patients are exposed to significant radiation doses during diagnostic and interventional urological procedures. This study aimed to measure patient entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) and to estimate the effective dose during intravenous urography (IVU), extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy (ESWL), and ascending urethrogram (ASU) procedures. ESAK was measured in patients using calibrated thermo luminance dosimeters, GR200A). Effective doses (E) were calculated using the National Radiological Protection Board (NRPB) software. A total of 179 procedures were investigated. 27.9 % of the patients underwent IVU procedures, 27.9 % underwent ESWL procedures and 44.2 % underwent ASU procedures. The mean ESAK was 2.1, 4.18 and 4.9 mGy for IVU, ESWL, and ASU procedures, respectively. Differences in patient ESAK for the same procedure were observed. The mean ESAK values were comparable with those in previous studies. (authors)

  12. Diagnostic imaging procedures during pregnancy: what are the fetal risks?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, K.

    2008-01-01

    An important facet of health care is the counsel of patients seeking a better understanding of their medical treatment. One of the most challenging scenarios is the management of female patients exposed to ionizing radiation while pregnant. It requires careful consideration of both maternal benefit and fetal risk. Given the increased frequency of diagnostic examinations involving ionizing radiation, this situation has become commonplace. This paper reviews current literature discussing the risk associated with prenatal exposure to ionizing radiation. The fetal dose received during common radiological procedures is reported in order to emphasize that these doses do not exceed threshold levels for deterministic effects. The definitive cancer risk associated with radiation exposure in utero has yet to be established. This paper will also show that physicians who deal with pregnant women are generally uninformed or misinformed of the doses and risks associated with the exams that they prescribe. This lack of information could be leading to inappropriate advice and actions with respect to patient care. (author)

  13. Diagnostic imaging procedures during pregnancy: what are the fetal risks?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, K. [McMaster Univ., Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)

    2008-07-01

    An important facet of health care is the counsel of patients seeking a better understanding of their medical treatment. One of the most challenging scenarios is the management of female patients exposed to ionizing radiation while pregnant. It requires careful consideration of both maternal benefit and fetal risk. Given the increased frequency of diagnostic examinations involving ionizing radiation, this situation has become commonplace. This paper reviews current literature discussing the risk associated with prenatal exposure to ionizing radiation. The fetal dose received during common radiological procedures is reported in order to emphasize that these doses do not exceed threshold levels for deterministic effects. The definitive cancer risk associated with radiation exposure in utero has yet to be established. This paper will also show that physicians who deal with pregnant women are generally uninformed or misinformed of the doses and risks associated with the exams that they prescribe. This lack of information could be leading to inappropriate advice and actions with respect to patient care. (author)

  14. The IHS diagnostic X-ray equipment radiation protection program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knapp, A.; Byrns, G.; Suleiman, O.

    1994-01-01

    The Indian Health Service (IHS) operates or contracts with Tribal groups to operate 50 hospitals and approximately 165 primary ambulatory care centers. These facilities contain approximately 275 medical and 800 dental diagnostic x-ray machines. IHS environmental health personnel in collaboration with the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH) developed a diagnostic x-ray protection program including standard survey procedures and menu-driven calculations software. Important features of the program include the evaluation of equipment performance collection of average patient entrance skin exposure (ESE) measurements for selected procedures, and quality assurance. The ESE data, collected using the National Evaluation of X-ray Trends (NEXT) protocol, will be presented. The IHS Diagnostic X-ray Radiation Protection Program is dynamic and is adapting to changes in technology and workload

  15. Variation in radiation doses in paediatric cardiac catheterisation procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Haj, A. N.; Lobriguito, A. M.; Rafeh, W.

    2008-01-01

    Paediatric cardiac catheterisation involves diagnostic and therapeutic procedures that range from simple to complex and can subject paediatric patients to varying radiation doses. The study aims to determine the variation in entrance doses in patients in terms of dose-area product (DAP) values and to investigate the methods for optimising radiation protection. A total of 190 paediatric patients belonging to age groups 0, 1, 5 and 10 y who underwent diagnostic and six selected therapeutic procedures at King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia) were included in the study. Therapeutic procedures include coarctation (COA), patent ductus arteriosus (PDA), radiofrequency ablation, pulmonary, embolisation and septostomy. Fluoroscopy and cine radiography were used in all procedures. Patient demography (weight, age, gender and height), radiographic technique factors, fluoroscopy and cine time, frame rate, and DAP values were taken from patients records. Effective doses for each procedure were estimated from the DAP values. The mean DAP per procedure were analysed for correlation with patient equivalent cylindrical diameter, weight, fluoroscopy time and number of frames. Factors influencing the variation in doses were investigated. Initial results show that PDA occlusion has the highest mean DAP value of 23.21 Gy-cm 2 , while the diagnostic and septostomy procedures have the lowest value of 7.77 and 6.95 Gy-cm 2 , respectively. (authors)

  16. Radiation dose to the operator during fluoroscopically guided spine procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roccatagliata, Luca; Pravata, Emanuele; Cianfoni, Alessandro [Department of Neuroradiology, Neurocenter of Southern Switzerland, Ospedale Regionale di Lugano, Lugano (Switzerland); Presilla, Stefano [Unita di Fisica Medica, Ente Ospedaliero Cantonale (EOC), Bellinzona (Switzerland)

    2017-09-15

    Fluoroscopy is widely used to guide diagnostic and therapeutic spine procedures. The purpose of this study was to quantify radiation incident on the operator (operator Air Kerma) during a wide range of fluoroscopy-guided spine procedures and its correlation with the amount of radiation incident on the patient (Kerma Area Product - KAP). We retrospectively included 57 consecutive fluoroscopically guided spine procedures. KAP [Gy cm{sup 2}] and total fluoroscopy time were recorded for each procedure. An electronic dosimeter recorded the operator Air Kerma [μGy] for each procedure. Operator Air Kerma for each procedure, correlation between KAP and operator Air Kerma, and between KAP and fluoroscopy time was obtained. Operator Air Kerma was widely variable across procedures, with median value of 6.4 μGy per procedure. Median fluoroscopy time and median KAP per procedure were 2.6 min and 4.7 Gy cm{sup 2}, respectively. There was correlation between operator Air Kerma and KAP (r{sup 2} = 0.60), with a slope of 1.6 μGy Air Kerma per unit Gy cm{sup 2} KAP incident on the patient and between fluoroscopy time and KAP (r{sup 2} = 0.63). Operator Air Kerma during individual fluoroscopy-guided spine procedures can be approximated from the commonly and readily available information of the total amount of radiation incident on the patient, measured as KAP. (orig.)

  17. Irradiation procedures and radiation dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izard, M.E.

    1985-01-01

    The design and construction of an irradiation facility and the process controls to monitor safety and performance are discussed. Dose rate distribution in an irradiator, dose distribution within the product and the measurement of radiation dose are outlined

  18. SYNTHESIS OF INFORMATION MODEL FOR ALTERNATIVE FUNCTIONAL DIAGNOSTICS PROCEDURE

    OpenAIRE

    P. F. Shchapov; R. P. Miguschenko

    2014-01-01

    Probabilistic approaches in information theory and information theory of measurement, allowing to calculate and analyze the amount expected to models measuring conversions and encoding tasks random measurement signals were considered. A probabilistic model of diagnostic information model transformation and diagnostic procedures was developed. Conditions for obtaining the maximum amount of diagnostic information were found out.

  19. Radiation exposure of nuclear medicine procedures in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hacker, M.

    2005-01-01

    Nuclear Medicine procedures offer the possibility to detect abnormalities on the basis of physiological and metabolic changes and to treat a growing number of diseases in human beings. However, the use of radiopharmaceuticals for nuclear medicine examinations causes a significant component of the total radiation exposure of populations. In Germany it is an essential task of the Federal Office for Radiation Protection to determinate and assess radiation exposure of the population due to nuclear medicine diagnostics and therapy. An important input for this task is the frequency of nuclear-medical examinations with application of ionising radiation and the radiation exposure of patients related to the various procedures. Additional implementation of age- and gender-specific data today allows more exact risk stratification in focusing on different subgroups of patients. Moreover, the collective effective dose as well as the per caput effective dose of the German population may be estimated and compared with earlier collected data or foreign countries. These data reveal where the indication should be questioned particularly critically and if the dose for the various examinations can be reduced and, thus, contribute to the definition of diagnostic reference levels for nuclear medicine procedures in Germany with the aim of both a sufficient image quality and a minimum of radiation exposure. Exceeding the high- as well as the low-values requires documentation and explanation. (orig.)

  20. Calculation of radiation exposure in diagnostic radiology. Method and surveys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duvauferrier, R.; Ramee, A.; Ezzeldin, K.; Guibert, J.L.

    1984-01-01

    A computerized method for evaluating the radiation exposure of the main target organs during various diagnostic radiologic procedures is described. This technique was used for educational purposes: study of exposure variations according to the technical modalities of a given procedure, and study of exposure variations according to various technical protocols (IVU, EGD barium study, etc.). This method was also used for studying exposure of patients during hospitalization in the Rennes Regional Hospital Center (France) in 1982, according to departments (urology, neurology, etc.). This method and results of these three studies are discussed [fr

  1. Radiation Exposure from Medical Exams and Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... replacement, less time- consuming and invasive. Physicians and technologists performing these procedures are trained to use the ... dose from Do magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasound medical exams? use radiation? Ask your doctor to ...

  2. Diagnostic hepatic haemodynamic techniques: safety and radiation exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hari, Andrej; Nair, Hari Kumar; De Gottardi, Andrea; Baumgartner, Iris; Dufour, Jean-François; Berzigotti, Annalisa

    2017-01-01

    Hepatic venous pressure gradient (HVPG) and transjugular liver biopsy (TJLB) are increasingly used in the management of patients with liver disease. We aimed to describe the safety profile of these procedures, providing data on the intra- and periprocedure complications, radiation exposure and amount of iodinated contrast material used. In 106 consecutive patients undergoing HVPG and TJLB data on fluoroscopy time (FT), absorbed radiation dose, equivalent effective dose (mSv) and volume of iodinated contrast material (ICM) were prospectively collected and reviewed, together with clinical and laboratory data. Incidence and severity of procedure-related complications were assessed. In 28 hospitalised patients, creatinine values after 72 hours of the procedure were reviewed to identify contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN). Median effective radiation dose was 5.4 mSv (IQR 10 mSv). A total 28.3% of patients exceeded an effective exposure of 10 mSv and 9.4% exceeded 20 mSv. Only age and BMI correlated with radiation dose (R = .327, P=.001 and R = .410, Pexposure over 20 mSv. Procedure-related complications occurred in eight patients (7.5%), and were minor in six cases. Median ICM volume was 12.5 mL. 6/28 patients met the diagnostic criteria for CIN. Hepatic venous pressure gradient and Transjugular liver biopsy show a good safety profile and radiation exposure associated with these procedures is in most of the cases low. In hepatic haemodynamic procedures, efforts should be made to reduce the radiation dose in patients with overweight/obesity and to use the minimal possible ICM volume in patients with acute-on-chronic liver failure. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Radiation doses to adult patients in interventional procedure: the first data for the Biobio region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ubeda, C.A.; Nocetti, D.A.; Robles, I.L.

    2013-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to estimate the levels of radiation to the patient in interventional cardiology procedures and neurological (diagnostic and therapeutic) in the main public hospital in Chile, in the region of Biobio

  4. Pediatric patients: criteria for radiopharmaceuticals activities in diagnostic procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Felipe Simas dos; Oliveira, Silvia M. Velasques de, E-mail: simas@ird.gov.b, E-mail: silvia@ird.gov.b [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    Recent studies recommend new criteria to determine radiopharmaceuticals activities per diagnostic procedures for children and teenagers. In USA, the criteria are: minimum and maximum activity and activity per body weight. The minimum activity is necessary for assuring the quality image due to the minimum requested statistical counting. The reduction of maximum activities minimizes the probability of detriment of radiation. In the European Union (EU), the Pediatric Dosage Card (PDC) proposes combined parameters: category of radiopharmaceutical, patient body weight and minimum activity per procedure. The PDC classifies the radiopharmaceuticals according to their biodistribution in the most sensitive organs. In Brazil, an investigation evaluated radiopharmaceuticals activities administered to 2,411 pediatric patients in sixteen institutions. The Brazilian mean activities per body weight, minimum and maximum activities used per institutions were compared with similar parameters surveyed in thirteen American hospitals. It was also used the PDC model to calculate the minimum activities per radiopharmaceuticals using recorded Brazilian patients corporal masses. The wider differences between Brazilian and USA installations were noticed for minimum activities by as much as a factor of 2 and 8. For {sup 67}Ga Citrate, the ranges of activities per patient corporal mass were by as much as a factor of 2 and 9 than activities used in USA. The range of maximum activities presented fewer differences, varying between 0.5 and 2 times for the radiopharmaceuticals studied. The present work needs the collaboration of the professional staff for discussion of the results, to promote regional surveys and to optimize pediatric patient protocols (author)

  5. Quality control procedures of dental diagnostic radiology systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, Paula Serra Sasaki

    2007-01-01

    This work presents quality control reference procedures for dental diagnostic radiology systems, following the recommendations of the Publication 453 of the Brazilian Health Ministry (PF453), to be applied in dental clinics, in order to achieve an improvement in the radiological image qualities and the patient dose reduction. All tests were applied in an intraoral X rays system, following the methodology developed and the requirements of the PF 453. In order to verify the best quality of the image in relation to the smaller exposition time an object test was also developed in this work. The use of this object allowed the reduction of the exposition time of 0.5 seconds, the maximum value of the linear region of the characteristic curve, for 0.2 seconds. The tested X rays system showed a very good agreement with the applied procedures, detaching the reduction of the skin entrance dose using the film-holding devices. However, the size of the field increased and exceeded the maximum value of 6 cm recommended in the standard. The importance of the quality control in dental diagnostic radiology systems is essential due to the constant use of X radiation in dental clinics. The PF453 recommends the frequency of at least two years for the constancy tests. However, it is suggested that the professional, surgeon-dentist, should be responsible for the internal control of the image quality obtained from the X rays device. This can be done through monthly exposures of the object test developed in this work. (author)

  6. Radiation-free CMR diagnostic heart catheterization in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratnayaka, Kanishka; Kanter, Joshua P; Faranesh, Anthony Z; Grant, Elena K; Olivieri, Laura J; Cross, Russell R; Cronin, Ileen F; Hamann, Karin S; Campbell-Washburn, Adrienne E; O'Brien, Kendall J; Rogers, Toby; Hansen, Michael S; Lederman, Robert J

    2017-09-06

    Children with heart disease may require repeated X-Ray cardiac catheterization procedures, are more radiosensitive, and more likely to survive to experience oncologic risks of medical radiation. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) is radiation-free and offers information about structure, function, and perfusion but not hemodynamics. We intend to perform complete radiation-free diagnostic right heart catheterization entirely using CMR fluoroscopy guidance in an unselected cohort of pediatric patients; we report the feasibility and safety. We performed 50 CMR fluoroscopy guided comprehensive transfemoral right heart catheterizations in 39 pediatric (12.7 ± 4.7 years) subjects referred for clinically indicated cardiac catheterization. CMR guided catheterizations were assessed by completion (success/failure), procedure time, and safety events (catheterization, anesthesia). Pre and post CMR body temperature was recorded. Concurrent invasive hemodynamic and diagnostic CMR data were collected. During a twenty-two month period (3/2015 - 12/2016), enrolled subjects had the following clinical indications: post-heart transplant 33%, shunt 28%, pulmonary hypertension 18%, cardiomyopathy 15%, valvular heart disease 3%, and other 3%. Radiation-free CMR guided right heart catheterization attempts were all successful using passive catheters. In two subjects with septal defects, right and left heart catheterization were performed. There were no complications. One subject had six such procedures. Most subjects (51%) had undergone multiple (5.5 ± 5) previous X-Ray cardiac catheterizations. Retained thoracic surgical or transcatheter implants (36%) did not preclude successful CMR fluoroscopy heart catheterization. During the procedure, two subjects were receiving vasopressor infusions at baseline because of poor cardiac function, and in ten procedures, multiple hemodynamic conditions were tested. Comprehensive CMR fluoroscopy guided right heart catheterization was feasible and

  7. Radiation diagnostics in extremely harsh environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dona, H.; Lee, P.H.Y.; Williams, A.H.; McGurn, J.L.; Veeser, L.R.

    1986-01-01

    Some recent Trailmaster experiments have required to use of rather delicate radiation diagnostics in hostile environments. We have developed instrumentation for use high-explosive magnetic flux compression generators and near the noisy environment of high energy capacitor banks. These include some rather unique ''fly-away'' designs for x-ray imaging and spectroscopy, and other optical techniques for plasma temperature and field measurements. We will show some representative data and will also discuss an on-going program for the determination of magnetic field via atomic spectral line splitting and/or broadening

  8. Sparsely Ionizing Diagnostic and Natural Background Radiations are Likely Preventing Cancer and Other Genomic-Instability-Associated Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Scott, Bobby R.; Di Palma, Jennifer

    2006-01-01

    Routine diagnostic X-rays (e.g., chest X-rays, mammograms, computed tomography scans) and routine diagnostic nuclear medicine procedures using sparsely ionizing radiation forms (e.g., beta and gamma radiations) stimulate the removal of precancerous neo-plastically transformed and other genomically unstable cells from the body (medical radiation hormesis). The indicated radiation hormesis arises because radiation doses above an individual-specific stochastic threshold activate a system of coop...

  9. Diagnostic radiation of potentially reproductive females

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd El-Bagi, M.E.; Al-Mutairi, M.S.; Al-Thagafi, M.A.; Al-Masri, N.M.; Al-Sasi, O.

    2001-01-01

    Objectives: To find out how consistent or variable is the understanding and practice of radiation protection procedures for women of childbearing age at a multispecialty tertiary hospital. Setting: Riyadh Military Hospital Study. Design: Non-clustered population survey. Methods: A questionnaire was distributed during grand rounds, mid-day clinics and a radiology conference. Questions included which radiation protection rule does the respondent use for females, whether he or she is familiar with those rules and what is his or her source of reference. Further questions were about the radiation dangers to the fetus. Results: Response was 95 (100%). Fifty-seven (60%) were males and 38 (40%) were females. The majority 50 (53%) were Saudis, 16 (17%) Western and 29 (30%) were other nationals. Sixty-two (65%) followed the old rule '10-day rule'; 17 (18%) followed the new '28-day rule' and 16 (17%) didn't know which rule to follow. None of those who followed the '28-day rule' indicated hospital policy as their reference. Conclusions: The understanding and practice of radiation protection guidelines for females is inconsistent. There is significant unfamiliarity with the radiation protection rules among our hospital practitioners. (author)

  10. Diagnostic imaging and radiation therapy equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-05-01

    This is the third edition of CSA Standard C22.2 No. 114 (now CAN/CSA-C22.2 No. 114), which is one of a series of standards issued by the Canadian Standards Association under Part II of the Canadian Electrical Code. This edition marks an important shift towards harmonization of Canadian requirements with those of the European community and the United States. Also important to this edition is the expansion of its scope to include the complete range of diagnostic imaging and radiation therapy equipment, rather than solely radiation-emitting equipment. In so doing, equipment previously addressed by CSA Standard C22.2 No. 125, Electromedical Equipment, specifically lasers for medical applications and diagnostic ultrasound units, is now dealt with in the new edition. By virtue of this expanded scope, many of the technical requirements in the electromedical equipment standard have been introduced to the new edition, thereby bringing CSA Standard C22.2 No. 114 up to date. 14 tabs., 16 figs

  11. Radiation exposures to technologists from nuclear medicine imaging procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sloboda, R.S.; Schmid, M.G.; Willis, C.P.

    1986-05-01

    Radiation exposures incurred by nuclear medicine technologists during diagnostic imaging and gamma camera quality control (QC) were measured on a procedural basis over a three-month period using a portable, low-range, self-reading ion chamber. A total of more than 400 measurements were made for 15 selected procedures. From these, mean procedural exposures and standard deviations were calculated. The results show that daily flood phantom QC, at 0.58 mR, and gated cardiac studies, at 0.45 mR, were the two greatest sources of exposure. Other procedures resulted in exposures varying roughly from 0.10 to 0.20 mR. Difficult patients were responsible for a doubling of technologist exposure for many procedures. Standard deviations were large for all procedures, averaging 65% of the mean values. Comparison of technologist exposure inferred from the procedural measurements with the time coincident collective dose equivalent recorded by the TLD service of the Radiation Protection Bureau indicates that approximately half of the collective technologist exposure arose from patient handling and flood QC

  12. Microbiological procedures in the diagnostics of sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manica Müller Premru

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background:Sepsis is one of the most serious bacterial infections. The diagnosis of sepsis is clinical. Microbiologists can detect bacteremia, which however is not present in all septic patients, by the procedure called blood culture.Methods:Blood culture is a semi-automated procedure of culturing blood in liquid media to detect and identify the causative agents. It is important to take 2 to 3 blood cultures with adequate volume of blood. The new, faster methods for bacterial identification from positive blood cultures and molecular methods for the detection of bacterial DNA directly from a blood sample are also becoming available.Results:In the years 2006 to 2011, the number of blood cultures obtained from patients in the University Medical Centre in Ljubljana, Institute of Oncology and the General hospital of Trbovlje (from 2007 was constantly increasing, from 18,404 in 2006 to 25,214 in 2011. The number of patients with positive blood culture/s increased from 1,033 in 2006 to 1,396 in 2011. The rate of blood culture positivity ranged from 10.9 % to 12.3 %. The ratio between gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria was approximately 50:50 %. In all the years under study, Escherichia coliwas the most frequent pathogenic isolate (19.2 % to 22.9 %, followed by Staphylococcus aureus(15.3 % to 17.4 %. Klebsiellaspp. represented 5.3 % to 8.3 % of isolates, Pseudomonas aeruginosa1.8 % to 3.4 %, Streptococcus pneumoniae2.9 % to 4.7 %, Enterococcusspp. 5.4 % to 8.1 %, anaerobes 2.1 % to 3.2 %. Coagulase-negative staphylococci decreased from 23.3 % to 16.9 %. Today, bacteria are identified by the fast and accurate method of mass spectrometry. Bacteria can alternativelly be detected directly from blood by the molecular tests.Conclusions:Blood culture is a very common procedure, its rate of positivity is stable. Among bacteria, the number and the proportion of pathogenic bacteria such as E. coli, S. aureusand S. pneumoniaeis increasing and the proportion

  13. Education and training in radiological protection for diagnostic and interventional procedures ICRP 113 in brief

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salama, S.; Gomaa, M. A.; Alshoufi, J.H.

    2013-01-01

    The international commission on radiological protection (ICRP) is the primary body in protection against ionizing radiation. Among its latest publication is ICRP publication 113 e ducation and training in radiological protection for diagnostic and interventional procedures . This document introduces diagnostic and interventional medical procedures using ionizing radiations in deep details. The document is approved by the commission in October 2010 and translated into Arabic at December 2011. This work is a continuation of the efforts series to translate some of the most important of the radiological protection references into the Arabic; aiming to maximize the benefit. The previous translation include WHO handbook on indoor radon: a public health perspective, issued by world health organization 2009 and Radiation Protection in Medicine, ICRP Publication 105 2007 that translated into Arabic with support of Arab atomic energy authority at 2011.

  14. Analysis of risk in computerized tomography and other diagnostic radiology procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mossman, K.L.

    1982-01-01

    Medical practice entails continuous risks to the patient taken in good faith by the physician for the benefit of the patient. Risk of radiation induced cancer death approximates 10(-4) per cGy (rad). Assuming an average whole body dose of 0.1 cGy for many diagnostic X-ray procedures, the probability of radiation-induced cancer death is about 10(-5). The purpose of this paper is to compare the risks of common diagnostic X-ray procedures including computerized tomography (CT) with risks of smoking or automobile travel. Such comparisons should be constructive in putting radiation in perspective and facilitating explanation of risk/benefit to patients

  15. Absorbed dose to active red bone marrow from diagnostic and therapeutic uses of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solomon, S.B.

    1980-06-01

    The bone-marrow dose arising from radiological procedures as carried out in Australia have been determined as part of a survey of population doses. This paper describes the method of calculation of the radiation doses to the active bone marrow from diagnostic radiography, fluoroscopy and radiotherapy. The results of the calculations are compared with the results of other models of bone-marrow dose for a number of diagnostic X-ray procedures

  16. Measurement of patient radiation doses in certain urography procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulieman, A; Barakat, H; Zailae, A; Abuderman, A; Theodorou, K

    2015-07-01

    Patients are exposed to significant radiation doses during diagnostic and interventional urologic procedures. This study aimed to measure patient entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) and to estimate the effective dose during intravenous urography (IVU), extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy (ESWL), and ascending urethogram (ASU) procedures. ESAK was measured in patients using calibrated thermo luminance dosimeters, GR200A). Effective doses (E) were calculated using the National Radiological Protection Board (NRPB) software. A total of 179 procedures were investigated. 27.9 % of the patients underwent IVU procedures, 27.9 % underwent ESWL procedures and 44.2 % underwent ASU procedures. The mean ESAK was 2.1, 4.18 and 4.9 mGy for IVU, ESWL, and ASU procedures, respectively. Differences in patient ESAK for the same procedure were observed. The mean ESAK values were comparable with those in previous studies. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Diagnostic x-ray equipment compliance and facility survey. Recommended procedures for equipment and facility testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The Radiation Protection Bureau has set out guidelines for the testing of diagnostic x-ray equipment and facilities. This guide provides information for the x-ray inspector, test engineer, technologist, medical physicist and any other person responsible for verifying the regulatory compliance or safety of diagnostic x-ray equipment and facilities. Diagnostic x-radiation is an essential part of present day medical practice. The largest contributor of irradiation to the general population comes from diagnostic x-radiation. Although individual irradiations are usually small, there is a concern of possible excess cancer risk when large populations are irradiated. Unnecessary irradiations to patients from radiological procedures can be significantly reduced with little or no decrease in the value of medical diagnostic information. This can be achieved by using well designed x-ray equipment which is installed, used and maintained by trained personnel, and by the adoption of standardized procedures. In general, when patient surface dose is reduced, there is a corresponding decrease in dose to x-ray equipment operators and other health care personnel. 2 tabs., 4 figs

  18. Radiation effects in IFMIF Li target diagnostic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molla, J.; Vila, R.; Shikama, T.; Horiike, H.; Simakov, S.; Ciotti, M.; Ibarra, A.

    2009-01-01

    Diagnostics for the lithium target will be crucial for the operation of IFMIF. Several parameters as the lithium temperature, target thickness or wave pattern must be monitored during operation. Radiation effects may produce malfunctioning in any of these diagnostics due to the exposure to high radiation fields. The main diagnostic systems proposed for the operation of IFMIF are reviewed in this paper from the point of view of radiation damage. The main tools for the assessment of the performance of these diagnostics are the neutronics calculations by using specialised codes and the information accumulated during the last decades on the radiation effects in functional materials, components and diagnostics for ITER. This analysis allows to conclude that the design of some of the diagnostic systems must be revised to assure the high availability required for the target system.

  19. Assessment of Seminalysis as a Diagnostic Procedure for Male ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Assessment of Seminalysis as a Diagnostic Procedure for Male infertility in Yola, Adamawa State, Nigeria. A A Abdulazeez, S Ishaq. Abstract. No Abstract. Journal of Medical Laboratory Sciences Vol. 14 (2) 2005: pp. 68-72. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT.

  20. Radiation Doses in Patient Eye Lenses during Interventional Neuroradiology Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, R M; Vañó, E; Fernández, J M; Rosati, S; López-Ibor, L

    2016-03-01

    Eye lenses are among the most sensitive organs to x-ray radiation and may be considered at risk during neurointerventional radiology procedures. The threshold dose to produce eye lens opacities has been recently reduced to 500 mGy by the International Commission on Radiologic Protection. In this article, the authors investigated the radiation doses delivered to patients' eyes during interventional neuroradiology procedures at a university hospital. Small optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters were located over patients' eyes during 5 diagnostic and 31 therapeutic procedures performed in a biplane x-ray system. Phantom measurements were also made to determine the level of radiation to the eye during imaging runs with conebeam CT. The left eye (located toward the lateral C-arm x-ray source) received a 4.5 times greater dose than the right one. The average dose during embolization in the left eye was 300 mGy, with a maximum of 2000 mGy in a single procedure. The patient who received this maximum eye dose needed 6 embolization procedures to treat his high-volume AVM. If one took into account those 6 embolizations, the eye dose could be 2-fold. Sixteen percent of the embolizations resulted in eye doses of >500 mGy. A relevant fraction of patients received eye doses exceeding the threshold of 500 mGy. A careful optimization of the procedures and follow-up of these patients to evaluate potential lens opacities should be considered. © 2016 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  1. Diagnostical Procedure for Logistical Management in Turistical Entities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Libia Arlen Fergusson-Álvarez

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to design a diagnostic procedure of the logistics management for turistical entities, they could be hotels or not. This procedure was validated in Commercial Branch Caracol Santiago de Cuba and finally, different actions for the detected problems were proposed with the objective of improving the logistics management of the organization. To develop this research various tools and techniques served as support, such as: surveys, SPSS software (Statistical Package for Social Sciences 15.0 version and Decision 1.0 version, exponential smoothing, Cronbach's Alpha, the coefficient of Kendall W, financial and logistical indicators, the ABC or Pareto Method, the matrices for the classification of stocks and suppliers, among others. This research made possible the design of a diagnostic procedure for logistical management for turistical entities. And it was validated in the Comercial Branch Caracol Santiago, which allowed the proposition of improvement actions for increasing customer satisfaction.

  2. Diagnostic x-ray procedures and risk of leukemia, lymphoma, and multiple myeloma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boice, J.D. Jr.; Morin, M.M.; Glass, A.G.; Friedman, G.D.; Stovall, M.; Hoover, R.N.; Fraumeni, J.F. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Exposure to diagnostic x-rays and the risk of leukemia, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), and multiple myeloma were studied within two prepaid health plans. Adult patients with leukemia (n = 565), NHL (n = 318), and multiple myeloma (n = 208) were matched to controls (n = 1390), and over 25,000 x-ray procedures were abstracted from medical records. Dose response was evaluated by assigning each x-ray procedure a score based on estimated bone marrow dose. X-ray exposure was not associated with chronic lymphocytic leukemia, one of the few malignant conditions never linked to radiation (relative risk [RR], 0.66). For all other forms of leukemia combined (n = 358), there was a slight elevation in risk (RR, 1.17) but no evidence of a dose-response relationship when x-ray procedures near the time of diagnosis were excluded. Similarly, patients with NHL were exposed to diagnostic x-ray procedures more often than controls (RR, 1.32), but the RR fell to 0.99 when the exposure to diagnostic x-ray procedures within 2 years of diagnosis was ignored. For multiple myeloma, overall risk was not significantly high (RR, 1.14), but there was consistent evidence of increasing risk with increasing numbers of diagnostic x-ray procedures. These data suggest that persons with leukemia and NHL undergo x-ray procedures frequently just prior to diagnosis for conditions related to the development or natural history of their disease. There was little evidence that diagnostic x-ray procedures were causally associated with leukemia or NHL. The risk for multiple myeloma, however, was increased among those patients who were frequently exposed to x-rays

  3. Meeting the Needs for Radiation Protection: Diagnostic Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frush, Donald P

    2017-02-01

    Radiation and potential risk during medical imaging is one of the foremost issues for the imaging community. Because of this, there are growing demands for accountability, including appropriate use of ionizing radiation in diagnostic and image-guided procedures. Factors contributing to this include increasing use of medical imaging; increased scrutiny (from awareness to alarm) by patients/caregivers and the public over radiation risk; and mounting calls for accountability from regulatory, accrediting, healthcare coverage (e.g., Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services), and advisory agencies and organizations as well as industry (e.g., NEMA XR-29, Standard Attributes on CT Equipment Related to Dose Optimization and Management). Current challenges include debates over uncertainty with risks with low-level radiation; lack of fully developed and targeted products for diagnostic imaging and radiation dose monitoring; lack of resources for and clarity surrounding dose monitoring programs; inconsistencies across and between practices for design, implementation and audit of dose monitoring programs; lack of interdisciplinary programs for radiation protection of patients; potential shortages in personnel for these and other consensus efforts; and training concerns as well as inconsistencies for competencies throughout medical providers' careers for radiation protection of patients. Medical care providers are currently in a purgatory between quality- and value-based imaging paradigms, a state that has yet to mature to reward this move to quality-based performance. There are also deficits in radiation expertise personnel in medicine. For example, health physics academic programs and graduates have recently declined, and medical physics residency openings are currently at a third of the number of graduates. However, leveraging solutions to the medical needs will require money and resources, beyond personnel alone. Energy and capital will need to be directed to

  4. Radiation Protection Education in Diagnostic Radiology in Uruguay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cotelo, E.; Paolini, G.

    2003-01-01

    In Uruguay the lack of Radiation Protection (RP) laws makes education in medical use of ionizing radiations at University, a decisive factor of changes. The six years experience in teaching technicians, radiologists, interventional cardiologists and anesthetists in curricular lectures, continuing education courses and workshops, show the importance of a close link between educators and occupationally exposed professionals. Regarding training and education in the optimization of the procedures, it is essential that both teacher and student comprehend the exact meaning of ALARA concept. This implies that although the educator is the one who manages the physical basis of RP, the student is who teaches the educator about the procedures. This turns RP education into a dynamic process in which at the same time, both educator and student learn and teach. After the theoretical lectures, it is essential that students show their ability in applying the acquired knowledge in their everyday practice. Last nut not least, in order to fulfill the first RP principle,all medicine students need to be educated in RP and quality image criteria before the get their medical doctor degree. Our experience shows that RP education in diagnostic radiology requires an expert with both medical physics and Image technology knowledge that allow an approach to students work, language and everyday problems. Despite the fact that the main result of the Education Program is the way professionals improve their practice, another consequence was that the Regulatory Authority of the country called the teacher team to coordinate the first RP national course. (Author) 14 refs

  5. Children's exposure to diagnostic medical radiation and cancer risk: epidemiologic and dosimetric considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linet, Martha S.; Rajaraman, Preetha [National Cancer Institute, Radiation Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Bethesda, MD (United States); Kim, Kwang pyo [National Cancer Institute, Radiation Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Bethesda, MD (United States); Kyung Hee University, Department of Nuclear Engineering, Yongin-si, Gyeonggi (Korea)

    2009-02-15

    While the etiology of most childhood cancers is largely unknown, epidemiologic studies have consistently found an association between exposure to medical radiation during pregnancy and risk of childhood cancer in offspring. The relation between early life diagnostic radiation exposure and occurrence of pediatric cancer risks is less clear. This review summarizes current and historical estimated doses for common diagnostic radiologic procedures as well as the epidemiologic literature on the role of maternal prenatal, children's postnatal and parental preconception diagnostic radiologic procedures on subsequent risk of childhood malignancies. Risk estimates are presented according to factors such as the year of birth of the child, trimester and medical indication for the procedure, and the number of films taken. The paper also discusses limitations of the methods employed in epidemiologic studies to assess pediatric cancer risks, the effects on clinical practice of the results reported from the epidemiologic studies, and clinical and public health policy implications of the findings. Gaps in understanding and additional research needs are identified. Important research priorities include nationwide surveys to estimate fetal and childhood radiation doses from common diagnostic procedures, and epidemiologic studies to quantify pediatric and lifetime cancer risks from prenatal and early childhood exposures to diagnostic radiography, CT, and fluoroscopically guided procedures. (orig.)

  6. Children's exposure to diagnostic medical radiation and cancer risk: epidemiologic and dosimetric considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linet, Martha S.; Rajaraman, Preetha; Kim, Kwang pyo

    2009-01-01

    While the etiology of most childhood cancers is largely unknown, epidemiologic studies have consistently found an association between exposure to medical radiation during pregnancy and risk of childhood cancer in offspring. The relation between early life diagnostic radiation exposure and occurrence of pediatric cancer risks is less clear. This review summarizes current and historical estimated doses for common diagnostic radiologic procedures as well as the epidemiologic literature on the role of maternal prenatal, children's postnatal and parental preconception diagnostic radiologic procedures on subsequent risk of childhood malignancies. Risk estimates are presented according to factors such as the year of birth of the child, trimester and medical indication for the procedure, and the number of films taken. The paper also discusses limitations of the methods employed in epidemiologic studies to assess pediatric cancer risks, the effects on clinical practice of the results reported from the epidemiologic studies, and clinical and public health policy implications of the findings. Gaps in understanding and additional research needs are identified. Important research priorities include nationwide surveys to estimate fetal and childhood radiation doses from common diagnostic procedures, and epidemiologic studies to quantify pediatric and lifetime cancer risks from prenatal and early childhood exposures to diagnostic radiography, CT, and fluoroscopically guided procedures. (orig.)

  7. Characterization of radiation qualities used in diagnostic X-ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bero, M.; Zahili, M.; Al Ahmad, M.

    2013-12-01

    This study aims to adjust the radiation beams emitted from X-ray tubes installed at the National Radiation Metrology Laboratory in the field of diagnostic radiology (radiology and mammography) according to the IAEA protocol code number TRS 457, the second goal of this study is to establish various radiation qualities used fordiagnostic radiology applications: RQR, RQA and RQT and the radiation qualities related to mammography applications: RQA-M and RQR-M (author).

  8. Radiation risk to patients from nuclear medicine procedures in Cuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brigido, O.; Montalván, A.; Barreras, A.; Hernández, J.

    2015-01-01

    Man-made radiation exposure to the Cuban population predominantly results from the medical use of ionizing radiation. It was therefore the aim of the present study, to provide public health information concerning diagnostic nuclear medicine procedures carried out in Camagüey and Ciego de Ávila provinces between 2000 and 2005. Population radiation dose estimation due to administration of radiopharmaceuticals in Camagüey and Ciego de Ávila provinces was carried out using Medical Internal Radiation Dose scheme (MIRD). Data were gathered on the type of radiopharmaceuticals used, the administered activity, the numbers of each kind of examination, and the age and sex of the patients involved during the period 2000 – 2005. The average annual frequency of examinations was estimated to be 3.34 per 1000 population. The results show that imaging nuclear medicine techniques of thyroid and bone explorations with 13.3 and 12.9%, respectively and iodide uptake with 50% are the main techniques implicated in the relative contribution to the total annual effective collective dose which averaged 95 man⋅Sv for the studied period. Radiation risks for the Camagüey-Ciego de Avila population caused by nuclear medicine examinations in the period studied were calculated: the total number of fatal and non-fatal cancers was 34.2 and the number of serious hereditary disturbance was 7.4 as a result of 24139 nuclear medicine procedures, corresponding a total detriment of 1.72 per 1000 examination. (authors)

  9. Collective radiation dose from diagnostic x-ray examination in nine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bernt Lindtjorn

    to estimate the annual incidence of cancer which would be reduced by the use of rare earth intensifying screen. Methods: Data on ... Conclusion: Although the use of ionizing radiation for diagnostic medical procedures is an acceptable part of modern medicine ... coated in a smooth layer on a plastic support or card board.

  10. Developing diagnostic guidelines for the acute radiation syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Densow, D.; Fliedner, T.M.; Kindler, H.

    1996-01-01

    Diagnostic guidelines seem to be promising for improving medical care. One aspect of a diagnostic guideline for the acute radiation syndrome has been tested against an extensive case history database. Subsequently, the guideline has been optimized for a small set of case histories. The improved performance has been proven by a test against the rest of the case history database

  11. Documenting resident procedure and diagnostic experience: simplifying the process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldor, R A; Broadhurst, J

    1997-10-01

    The Residency Review Committee (RRC) requires documentation of family practice residents' procedural and diagnostic experiences. Further, hospital privileging is frequently based on documentation of prior clinical experience. Residency programs need a user-friendly (ie, resident-friendly) mechanism for collecting data and generating reports to document these experiences. This paper outlines a simplified, user-friendly method of documenting resident procedural and diagnostic experiences. We developed a pocket-sized, optically scannable card for data input. This is coupled with a computerized database with report generation capability. The system is based on diagnostic clusters to further simplify the data input process. The system's setup costs are about $10,000. Annual maintenance and operational fees are about $5,000. After instituting the system, the number of residents submitting documentation information increased substantially. This system meets both RRC and potential clinical privileging requirements and provides a useful tool for guiding resident evaluation and developing appropriate training opportunities during the latter half of the residency. Simplified, accurate documentation may allow for comparisons among residents at various levels--program, state, and national.

  12. Patient radiation dose during mammography procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, Swsan Awd Elkriem

    2015-11-01

    The objectives of this study were to estimate the patient dose in term of mean glandular dose and assist in optimization of radiation protection in mammographic procedures in Sudan. A total number of 107 patients were included. Four mammographic units were participated. Only one center was using automatic exposure control (AEC). The mean doses in (mGy) for the CC projection were 3.13, 1.24, 2.45 and 0.98 and for the MLO projection was 2.13, 1.26, 1.99 and 1.02 for centers A, B, C, and D, respectively. The total mean dose per breast from both projections was 5.26, 2.50, 4.44 and 1.99 mGy for centers A, B, C and D, respectively. The minimum mean glandular dose was found between the digital system which was operated under AEC and one of the manual selected exposure factors systems, this highlight possible optimization of radiation protection in the other manual selected systems. The kilo volt and the tube current time products should be selected correctly according to the breast thickness in both centers A and C. (author)

  13. Pediatric radiation exposure from diagnostic nuclear medicine examinations in Tehran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neshandar Asli, I.; Tabeie, F.

    2005-01-01

    As a part of a nationwide survey to estimate population exposure to radiation from diagnostic nuclear medicine in Iran, this paper presents the pediatric population radiation exposure due to nuclear medicine examinations in Tehran. Patients and methods: the effective dose equivalent, H E , was used to calculate the collective effective dose in pediatric patients undergoing nuclear medicine procedures, and the corresponding data were obtained from thirty out of thirty seven active nuclear medicine departments in Tehran. Results: annually about 5.26% of nuclear medicine examinations were performed on patients under 15 years of age in Tehran. The most frequent was renal examinations (38.2%), followed y thyroid (27.4%) and bone (26.7%). The annual collective H E for patients under 15 was 19.03 human-Sv, which contributed 3.96% to the collective H E for all patients. The contribution of renal, bone and thyroid examinations to the pediatric collective H E were 24.6% 48.8% and 13.5% respectively. The mean effective dose equivalent per pediatric patient was 3.75 mSv.Conclusion: Among the three most frequent examinations, the bone with a relative frequency of 27.4% constituted 48.8% of the collective H E , which was the highest absorbed dose per examination. The mean effective dose per examination for patients younger than 15 years was 67.9% of the adults

  14. Radiation safety requirements for training of users of diagnostic X ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Globally, the aim of requirements regarding the use and ownership of diagnostic medical X-ray equipment is to limit radiation by abiding by the 'as low as reasonably achievable' (ALARA) principle. The ignorance of radiographers with regard to radiation safety requirements, however, is currently a cause of ...

  15. Radiation exposure from diagnostic imaging among patients with gastrointestinal disorders.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Desmond, Alan N

    2012-03-01

    There are concerns about levels of radiation exposure among patients who undergo diagnostic imaging for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), compared with other gastrointestinal (GI) disorders. We quantified imaging studies and estimated the cumulative effective dose (CED) of radiation received by patients with organic and functional GI disorders. We also identified factors and diagnoses associated with high CEDs.

  16. Diagnostic criteria and reporting procedures for pre-eclampsia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemmensen, Ase K; Olsen, Sjurdur F.; Wengel, Christina M

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: A precondition for the rational use of obstetric databases in biomedical research is detailed knowledge on how data are being generated. We identified the diagnostic procedures and criteria for pre-eclampsia (PE) and assessed the level of obstetric training of the personnel responsible...... of pregnancy diagnoses to the National Patient Registry differed widely in training. For complicated pregnancies, departments ranged from having only specialists reporting all cases to secretaries reporting up to 50%. Cut off limits of blood pressure (BP) and protein loss used to diagnose pre-eclampsia showed...... large differences across departments. The diagnoses given to three case stories showed little correlation to the criteria the departments reported using. CONCLUSION: Even in a small country like Denmark with 34 obstetrical departments, there was little consensus on the diagnostic criteria for pre-eclampsia...

  17. Current diagnostic procedures for diagnosing vertigo and dizziness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, Leif Erik

    2017-01-01

    Vertigo is a multisensory syndrome that otolaryngologists are confronted with every day. With regard to the complex functions of the sense of orientation, vertigo is considered today as a disorder of the sense of direction, a disturbed spatial perception of the body. Beside the frequent classical syndromes for which vertigo is the leading symptom (e.g. positional vertigo, vestibular neuritis, Menière’s disease), vertigo may occur as main or accompanying symptom of a multitude of ENT-related diseases involving the inner ear. It also concerns for example acute and chronic viral or bacterial infections of the ear with serous or bacterial labyrinthitis, disorders due to injury (e.g. barotrauma, fracture of the oto-base, contusion of the labyrinth), chronic-inflammatory bone processes as well as inner ear affections in the perioperative course. In the last years, diagnostics of vertigo have experienced a paradigm shift due to new diagnostic possibilities. In the diagnostics of emergency cases, peripheral and central disorders of vertigo (acute vestibular syndrome) may be differentiated with simple algorithms. The introduction of modern vestibular test procedures (video head impulse test, vestibular evoked myogenic potentials) in the clinical practice led to new diagnostic options that for the first time allow a complex objective assessment of all components of the vestibular organ with relatively low effort. Combined with established methods, a frequency-specific assessment of the function of vestibular reflexes is possible. New classifications allow a clinically better differentiation of vertigo syndromes. Modern radiological procedures such as for example intratympanic gadolinium application for Menière’s disease with visualization of an endolymphatic hydrops also influence current medical standards. Recent methodical developments significantly contributed to the possibilities that nowadays vertigo can be better and more quickly clarified in particular in

  18. Smith-Purcell Radiation in View of Particle Beam Diagnostics

    CERN Document Server

    Kube, G

    2003-01-01

    The development of the next generation high quality electron beams which are necessary for future high luminosity linear colliders and short wavelengths free electron lasers requires sensitive and non-destructive beam diagnostic techniques. In this context Smith-Purcell radiation which is generated when a charged particle beam passes close to the surface of a periodic structure (diffraction grating) is under discussion as a compact and inexpensive beam profile monitor. In order to study the basic emission process of Smith-Purcell radiation also in view of possible applications for particle beam diagnostics, experimental studies were performed at the Mainz Microtron MAMI in the visible spectral region with a microfocused 855 MeV electron beam. The radiation was separated from background components, as diffracted synchrotron radiation and transition radiation generated by electrons scratching the grating surface, by exploiting their specific emission characteristics. These are the narrow emission cone in the ...

  19. Explanation of diagnostic criteria for radiation thyroid diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Libo; Luo Yunxiao; Wang Jianfeng; Chen Dawei; Cheng Guanghui; Jin Yuke

    2012-01-01

    National occupational health standard-Diagnostic Criteria for Radiation Thyroid Diseases has been approved and issued by the Ministry of Health. Based on the extensive research of literature, this standard was enacted according to the relevant laws and regulations. It is mainly used for diagnosis of thyroid diseases caused by occupational radiation, and it also can serve as a guide to diagnose thyroid disease induced by medical radiation. To implement this standard, and to diagnose and treat the radiation thyroid diseases patient correctly and timely, the contents of this standard were interpreted in this article. (authors)

  20. Prenatal diagnosis--principles of diagnostic procedures and genetic counseling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryszard Slezak

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The frequency of inherited malformations as well as genetic disorders in newborns account for around 3-5%. These frequency is much higher in early stages of pregnancy, because serious malformations and genetic disorders usually lead to spontaneous abortion. Prenatal diagnosis allowed identification of malformations and/or some genetic syndromes in fetuses during the first trimester of pregnancy. Thereafter, taking into account the severity of the disorders the decision should be taken in regard of subsequent course of the pregnancy taking into account a possibilities of treatment, parent's acceptation of a handicapped child but also, in some cases the possibility of termination of the pregnancy. In prenatal testing, both screening and diagnostic procedures are included. Screening procedures such as first and second trimester biochemical and/or ultrasound screening, first trimester combined ultrasound/biochemical screening and integrated screening should be widely offered to pregnant women. However, interpretation of screening results requires awareness of both sensitivity and predictive value of these procedures. In prenatal diagnosis ultrasound/MRI searching as well as genetic procedures are offered to pregnant women. A variety of approaches for genetic prenatal analyses are now available, including preimplantation diagnosis, chorion villi sampling, amniocentesis, fetal blood sampling as well as promising experimental procedures (e.g. fetal cell and DNA isolation from maternal blood. An incredible progress in genetic methods opened new possibilities for valuable genetic diagnosis. Although karyotyping is widely accepted as golden standard, the discussion is ongoing throughout Europe concerning shifting to new genetic techniques which allow obtaining rapid results in prenatal diagnosis of aneuploidy (e.g. RAPID-FISH, MLPA, quantitative PCR.

  1. Coherent Smith-Purcell radiation as a pulse length diagnostic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lampel, M.C.

    1997-01-01

    Recently, Smith-Purcell radiation has been studied as a candidate for laser-type radiation production in the submillimeter regime. With appropriate choices of beam energy, impact parameter, and grating spacing, there is good coupling to strongly polarized, forward directed radiation. Another regime of possible interest is to use Smith-Purcell radiation as a pulse length diagnostic for medium to high energy electron beams of extremely short pulse duration, on the order of tens of femtoseconds to 1000 fs. Strongly in favor of development of such a diagnostic is its relatively non-destructive nature. With the electron beam passing near, but not through, a metal grating, reaction of the beam distribution itself to the production of the radiation is reduced relative to the much stronger scattering induced by passage through a foil. By careful choice of parameters usable diagnostic radiation ought to be produced with acceptably small emittance growth for an on-line beam monitor, even for the extremely bright electron beams proposed for X-ray FELs, Compton backscatter X-ray sources, or laser/plasma accelerator schemes. In this paper coherent and incoherent Smith-Purcell radiation is examined for reasonable operating parameters of the SATURNUS system at UCLA, with comparisons with results reported from the accelerator test facility (ATF) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. (orig.)

  2. Electron Bunch Length Diagnostic With Coherent Smith-Purcell Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, D.C.

    1997-01-01

    The authors have designed a new technique for measuring subpicosecond electron bunch lengths using coherent Smith-Purcell radiation. This new diagnostic technique involves passing the electron beam in close proximity of a grating with a period comparable to the electron bunch length. The emitted Smith-Purcell radiation will have a coherent component whose angular position and distribution are directly related to the electron bunch length and longitudinal profile, respectively. This new diagnostic technique is inherently simple, inexpensive and non-intercepting. The authors show that the new technique is also scaleable to femtosecond regime

  3. Protection of W7-X diagnostics from radiation heat loads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carls, André, E-mail: andre.carls@ipp.mpg.de [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, EURATOM Association, Wendelsteinstr. 1, 17491 Greifswald (Germany); Köppen, Matthias; Fellinger, Joris; Schauer, Felix [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, EURATOM Association, Wendelsteinstr. 1, 17491 Greifswald (Germany)

    2013-10-15

    Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X), a modular advanced stellarator, is presently under construction at the Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics in Greifswald. Part of the inner plasma vessel (PV) surface is covered by graphite tiles which are bolted onto water-cooled CuCrZr heat sink plates. This so-called heat shield is an in-vessel component and shall protect the PV wall and diagnostic components from plasma-edge-radiation and convective heat loads. Numerous diagnostics (e.g. diamagnetic loops, Rogowski coils, etc.) are located in between the heat shield and plasma vessel wall. They are loaded by thermal radiation from the hot heat shield backside, stray radiation from the electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH), and plasma radiation through remaining gaps between the tiles. In order to keep the temperatures of the diagnostics within their specified limits, additional shielding is required. The paper presents the design of such a shielding for the diamagnetic loops. Several options of copper shields and loosely attached Sigraflex{sup ®}-layers, and combinations thereof, are compared with respect to their abilities to reduce the temperatures of the sensitive parts of the diagnostics. To increase the confidence in the results, a sensitivity study with widely varying radiative material properties has been carried out. The advantages and disadvantages of the potential solutions are discussed. As a result two copper shield variants which also reduce the load onto the plasma vessel are presented.

  4. Two dimensional radiated power diagnostics on Alcator C-Moda)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinke, M. L.; Hutchinson, I. H.

    2008-10-01

    The radiated power diagnostics for the Alcator C-Mod tokamak have been upgraded to measure two dimensional structure of the photon emissivity profile in order to investigate poloidal asymmetries in the core radiation. Commonly utilized unbiased absolute extreme ultraviolet (AXUV) diode arrays view the plasma along five different horizontal planes. The layout of the diagnostic set is shown and the results from calibrations and recent experiments are discussed. Data showing a significant, 30%-40%, inboard/outboard emissivity asymmetry during ELM-free H-mode are presented. The ability to use AXUV diode arrays to measure absolute radiated power is explored by comparing diode and resistive bolometer-based emissivity profiles for highly radiative L-mode plasmas seeded with argon. Emissivity profiles match in the core but disagree radially outward resulting in an underprediction of Prad of nearly 50% by the diodes compared to Prad determined using resistive bolometers.

  5. Attitudes of Kuwaiti public towards the radiation risks of nuclear medicine diagnositic procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elgazzar, AH; Al-Ghani, HE; Collier, BD; Al-Saeedi, F; Al-Shammari, J; Mahmoud, AM; Omar, A

    2004-01-01

    Public perception of radiation risks of diagnostic imaging procedures differs from that of professionals working in the field. The perception probably varies among societies and may vary within the same society. The objective of this study is to determine the public perception in Kuwait represented by patients referred for nuclear medicine diagnostic studies. With the assistance of Arabic speaking investigators, 239 patients (139 males and 100 females) with a mean age of 37 years (Range of 15 to 90 years) completed a questionnaire about their opinion of radiation fear from the nuclear medicine procedures as well as their education, income, ability to speak English and foreign travel experience. Radiation phobia was measured by asking the patient to to the statement 'Radiation from nuclear medicine examination is likely to harm my body' by one of 5 choices, 1 strongly agree, 2 somewhat agree, 3 uncertain, 4 somewhat disagree, 5 strongly disagree. Responses 1 and 2 were classified as radiation phobia. Pearson correlation coefficient and logistic regression analysis were used for data analysis. Forty four percent of patients had radiation phobia. Only education significantly correlated with radiation phobia. Income, ability to speak English, age, gender or travel experience did not show significant correlation. Our study indicates that radiation phobia is common and is probably widespread throughout the society. Patient education should emphasize radiation benefits and actual risks and include the entire community. (authors)

  6. Medical radiation exposure and usage for diagnostic radiology in Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, Kwan-Hoong; Rassiah, Premavathy; Abdullah, B.J.J.; Wang, Hwee-Beng; Shariff Hambali, Ahmad; Muthuvelu, Pirunthavany; Sivalingam, S.

    2001-01-01

    A national dose survey of routine X-ray examinations in Malaysia (a Level II country) from 1993 to 1995 had established baseline data for seven common types of x-ray examinations. A total of 12 randomly selected public hospitals and 867 patients were included in this survey. Survey results are generally comparable with those reported in the UK, USA and IAEA. The findings support the importance of the ongoing national quality assurance programme to ensure doses are kept to a level consistent with optimum image quality. The data was useful in the formulation of national guidance levels as recommended by the IAEA. The medical radiation exposure and usage for diagnostic radiology (1990-1994) enabled a comparison to be made for the first time with the UNSCEAR 2000 Report. In 1994, the number of physicians, radiologists, x-ray units and x-ray examinations per 1000 population was 0.45, 0.005, 0.065 and 183, respectively; 3.6 million x-ray examinations were performed; the annual effective dose per capita was 0.05 mSv and collective dose was 1000 person-Sv. Chest examinations contributed 63% of the total. Almost all examinations experienced increasing frequency except for barium studies, cholecystography, and intravenous urography (-23%, -36%, -51%). Notable increases were observed in computed tomography (161%), cardiac procedures (190%), and mammography (240%). (author)

  7. Sphincter-saving procedure for radiation-injuried rectum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moriya, Yoshihiro; Koyama, Yasuo; Hojo, Keiichi

    1982-01-01

    Up to this time the sigmoid colostomy has been widely accepted and conventional treatment for radiation-injured rectum, but patients without residual malignancy strongly desire to live without colostomy. We have tried to remove the involved rectal segments by sphincter-saving procedures. Four patients underwent these procedures, pull-through procedure in three and low anterior resection in one. Among sphincter-saving procedures, pull-through procedure was most adequate. Provided the following five conditions are fulfilled, pull-through procedure should be considered for severe radiation-injured rectum. (1) No recurrence of initial malignancy in the pelvis. (2) More than 2 cm intact rectal segment above dentate line may be preserved. (3) No radiation-injured segment in upper sigmoid. (4) No severe radiation damage in small intestine. (5) Patients under 70 year-old, with normal tonus of anal sphincter. (author)

  8. Synchrotron radiation from magnetic undulators as a prospective diagnostic tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbini, R.; Ciocci, F.; Dattoli, G.; Torre, A.; Ginnessi, L.

    1989-01-01

    The brightness of the radiation emitted by an ultrarelativistic e-beam passing through a magnetic undulator is sensitive to the beam quality (namely, energy spread and emittances) and to the undulator characteristics (i.e., possible random errors both in intensity and direction of magnetization, etc.) The spectrum distortion induced by the above effects and the possibility of using the undulator radiation as a diagnostic tool is discussed. Finally the importance of near-field effects when the radiation is detectedunfocussed off-axis and how they can combine with the effects induced by the beam emittances to produced a larger on-axis inhomogeneous broadening

  9. The design of diagnostic medical facilities using ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-03-01

    This Code, setting out the general principles of radiological protection as applied to diagnostic radiation facilities in hospitals and clinics, is intended as a guide to architects and to works departments concerned with their design and construction, and with the modification of existing units

  10. [Radiation protection in medical research : Licensing requirement for the use of radiation and advice for the application procedure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minkov, V; Klammer, H; Brix, G

    2017-07-01

    In Germany, persons who are to be exposed to radiation for medical research purposes are protected by a licensing requirement. However, there are considerable uncertainties on the part of the applicants as to whether licensing by the competent Federal Office for Radiation Protection is necessary, and regarding the choice of application procedure. The article provides explanatory notes and practical assistance for applicants and an outlook on the forthcoming new regulations concerning the law on radiation protection of persons in the field of medical research. Questions and typical mistakes in the application process were identified and evaluated. The qualified physicians involved in a study are responsible for deciding whether a license is required for the intended application of radiation. The decision can be guided by answering the key question whether the study participants would undergo the same exposures regarding type and extent if they had not taken part in the study. When physicians are still unsure about their decision, they can seek the advisory service provided by the professional medical societies. Certain groups of people are particularly protected through the prohibition or restriction of radiation exposure. A simplified licensing procedure is used for a proportion of diagnostic procedures involving radiation when all related requirements are met; otherwise, the regular licensing procedure should be used. The new radiation protection law, which will enter into force on the 31st of december 2018, provides a notification procedure in addition to deadlines for both the notification and the licensing procedures. In the article, the authors consider how eligible studies involving applications of radiation that are legally not admissible at present may be feasible in the future, while still ensuring a high protection level for study participants.

  11. Revised radiation emergency procedures at Pakistan research reactor PINSTECH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orfi, S.D.; Javed, M.; Ahmad, S.; Akhtar, K.M.; Mubarak, M.A.

    1984-12-01

    Necessary procedures have been laid down in this report to meet the radiation emergency at Pakistan Research Reactor PINSTECH. The Nuclear Safety Committee PINSTECH (NSCP) had also recommended a number of improvements in the existing procedures. Revision of the procedures was also considered necessary to incorporate into it new radiation units/limits and new emergency equipment available. Radiation emergency preparedness programme is of continuous nature. Latest developments else-where and local experience contribute to the improvement of the existing arrangements under this programme. (A.B.)

  12. Audit of radiation dose during balloon mitral valvuloplasty procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Livingstone, Roshan S; Chandy, Sunil; Peace, B S Timothy; George, Paul; John, Bobby; Pati, Purendra

    2006-01-01

    Radiation doses to patients during cardiological procedures are of concern in the present day scenario. This study was intended to audit the radiation dose imparted to patients during the balloon mitral valvuloplasty (BMV) procedure. Thirty seven patients who underwent the BMV procedure performed using two dedicated cardiovascular machines were included in the study. The radiation doses imparted to patients were measured using a dose area product (DAP) meter. The mean DAP value for patients who underwent the BMV procedure from one machine was 19.16 Gy cm 2 and from the other was 21.19 Gy cm 2 . Optimisation of exposure parameters and radiation doses was possible for one machine with the use of appropriate copper filters and optimised exposure parameters, and the mean DAP value after optimisation was 9.36 Gy cm 2

  13. 42 CFR 413.122 - Payment for hospital outpatient radiology services and other diagnostic procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... of this section— (i) Radiology services include diagnostic and therapeutic radiology, nuclear medicine, CAT scan procedures, magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound and other imaging services; and (ii...

  14. Trends in radiation exposure from clinical nuclear medicine procedures in Shanghai, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Yanling; Zheng, Junzheng; Zhuo, Weihai; Gao, Linfeng

    2012-03-01

    This study was designed to assess the trends in the frequencies of nuclear medicine procedures in Shanghai, China, and to determine their contributions to the per capita effective dose to the Shanghai population. The mean activities of radionuclides administered by nuclear medicine departments were compared with the Chinese national guidelines on diagnostic reference levels. On the basis of the three surveys carried out by Shanghai Municipal Center for Disease Control and Prevention in 1996, 1998, and 2008, the typically administered radiopharmaceuticals, levels of activity, the number of procedures, and population were systematically analyzed to assess the frequencies of nuclear medicine procedures and the per capita effective dose. The frequencies were approximately 2.77, 3.46, and 6.63 per 1000 people in 1996, 1998, and 2008, respectively. The annual per capita doses from diagnostic nuclear medicine were estimated to be 0.016, 0.022, and 0.032 mSv in 1996, 1998, and 2008, respectively. The annual frequency of therapeutic nuclear medicine procedures increased from 0.131 to 0.430 per 1000 people in the intervening 12 years. In the 12 years before 2008, diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in nuclear medicine in Shanghai increased continuously, and the annual per capita dose doubled. Increases in PET imaging and bone scans were the major contributors to the increasing frequency and magnitude of radiation exposure to the population. The activities administered for most diagnostic procedures were generally consistent with the designated reference levels.

  15. Medical interventional procedures--reducing the radiation risks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cousins, C. E-mail: claire.cousins@addenbrookes.nhs.uk; Sharp, C

    2004-06-01

    Over the last 40 years, the number of percutaneous interventional procedures using radiation has increased significantly, with many secondary care clinicians using fluoroscopically guided techniques. Many procedures can deliver high radiation doses to patients and staff, with the potential to cause immediate and delayed radiation effects. The challenge for interventionists is to maximize benefit, whilst minimizing radiation risk to patients and staff. Non-radiologist clinicians are often inadequately trained in radiation safety and radiobiology. However, clinical governance and legislation now requires a more rigorous approach to protecting patients and staff. Protection can be ensured, and risks can be controlled, by appropriate design, procurement and commissioning of equipment; quality assurance; and optimal operational technique, backed by audit. Interventionists need knowledge and skills to reduce the risks. Appropriate training should include awareness of the potential for radiation injury, equipment operational parameters, doses measurement and recording methods and dose reduction techniques. Clinical governance requires informed consent, appropriate patient counselling and follow-up.

  16. Diagnostic medical exposures. Advice on exposure to ionising radiation during pregnancy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharp, C.; Shrimpton, J.; Bury, R

    1998-07-01

    The main objective of NRPB advice concerning in utero exposures to ionising radiations is 'to prevent unnecessary exposure of the fetus when medical diagnostic procedures involving ionising radiations are indicated during pregnancy'. In addition, advice is meant to help to avoid unnecessary concern or action if an exposure does occur. NRPB issued ASP8 (Exposure to ionising radiation of pregnant women: advice on the diagnostic exposure of women who are, or who may be, pregnant) in 1985. This advice suggested that there would be no risks to the concepts following irradiation during the first 10 days of the menstrual cycle and that subsequent risks in the remainder of the first 4 week period would be likely to be so small that no special limitation on exposure was required - sometimes known as 'the 28-day rule'. In 1993, NRPB published further advice to replace ASP8 in the Documents of the NRPB series, in Volume 4, No 4 - henceforth referred to as Doc NRPB 4(4){sup 2} - which drew upon data published since 1985. The more recent data suggest that risks in the interval between 10 days and the date at which the next menstrual period is due, although still small for most diagnostic procedures, may be significant for higher dose procedures. Consequently, it is considered there is a need to operate a modified policy for such higher dose procedures. This pocket publication has been produced to present in a concise and user-friendly format the basis of the most recent NRPB advice and to provide a guide for the implementation of that advice in the everyday practice of diagnostic radiology. The opportunity has also been taken to provide the most up to date data on doses in the UK. This publication is split into three parts: an introduction to the terms used in the document, a practical guide to implementation of the advice, and the scientific background to the advice.

  17. Diagnostic medical exposures. Advice on exposure to ionising radiation during pregnancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharp, C.; Shrimpton, J.; Bury, R.

    1998-01-01

    The main objective of NRPB advice concerning in utero exposures to ionising radiations is 'to prevent unnecessary exposure of the fetus when medical diagnostic procedures involving ionising radiations are indicated during pregnancy'. In addition, advice is meant to help to avoid unnecessary concern or action if an exposure does occur. NRPB issued ASP8 (Exposure to ionising radiation of pregnant women: advice on the diagnostic exposure of women who are, or who may be, pregnant) in 1985. This advice suggested that there would be no risks to the concepts following irradiation during the first 10 days of the menstrual cycle and that subsequent risks in the remainder of the first 4 week period would be likely to be so small that no special limitation on exposure was required - sometimes known as 'the 28-day rule'. In 1993, NRPB published further advice to replace ASP8 in the Documents of the NRPB series, in Volume 4, No 4 - henceforth referred to as Doc NRPB 4(4) 2 - which drew upon data published since 1985. The more recent data suggest that risks in the interval between 10 days and the date at which the next menstrual period is due, although still small for most diagnostic procedures, may be significant for higher dose procedures. Consequently, it is considered there is a need to operate a modified policy for such higher dose procedures. This pocket publication has been produced to present in a concise and user-friendly format the basis of the most recent NRPB advice and to provide a guide for the implementation of that advice in the everyday practice of diagnostic radiology. The opportunity has also been taken to provide the most up to date data on doses in the UK. This publication is split into three parts: an introduction to the terms used in the document, a practical guide to implementation of the advice, and the scientific background to the advice

  18. Radiation doses to patients in haemodynamic procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canadillas-Perdomo, B.; Catalan-Acosta, A.; Hernandez-Armas, J.; Perez-Martin, C.; Armas-Trujillo, D. de

    2001-01-01

    Interventional radio-cardiology gives high doses to patients due to high values of fluoroscopy times and large series of radiographic images. The main objective of the present work is the determination of de dose-area product (DAP) in patients of three different types of cardiology procedures with X-rays. The effective doses were estimated trough the organ doses values measured with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs-100), suitable calibrated, placed in a phantom type Rando which was submitted to the same radiological conditions corresponding to the procedures made on patients. The values for the effective doses in the procedures CAD Seldinger was 6.20 mSv on average and 1.85mSv for pacemaker implants. (author)

  19. Bronchoscopic diagnostic procedures and microbiological examinations in proving endobronchial tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şimşek, Abdullah; Yapıcı, İlhami; Babalık, Mesiha; Şimşek, Zekiye; Kolsuz, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    To determine the proportional distribution of endobronchial tuberculosis (EBTB) subtypes and to evaluate the types of bronchoscopic diagnostic procedures that can prove granulomatous inflammation. This was a retrospective study of 18 HIV-negative patients with biopsy-proven EBTB treated between 2010 and 2014. The most common EBTB subtypes, as classified by the bronchoscopic features, were tumorous and granular (in 22.2% for both). Sputum smear microscopy was performed in 11 patients and was positive for AFB in 4 (36.3%). Sputum culture was also performed in 11 patients and was positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis in 10 (90.9%). Smear microscopy of BAL fluid (BALF) was performed in 16 patients and was positive for AFB in 10 (62.5%). Culture of BALF was also performed in 16 patients and was positive for M. tuberculosis in 15 (93.7%). Culture of BALF was positive for M. tuberculosis in 93.7% of the 16 patients tested. Among the 18 patients with EBTB, granulomatous inflammation was proven by the following bronchoscopic diagnostic procedures: bronchial mucosal biopsy, in 8 (44.4%); bronchial brushing, in 7 (38.8%); fine-needle aspiration biopsy, in 2 (11.1%); and BAL, in 2 (11.1%). Bronchial anthracofibrosis was observed in 5 (27.7%) of the 18 cases evaluated. In our sample of EBTB patients, the most common subtypes were the tumorous and granular subtypes. We recommend that sputum samples and BALF samples be evaluated by smear microscopy for AFB and by culture for M. tuberculosis, which could increase the rates of early diagnosis of EBTB. We also recommend that bronchial brushing be employed together with other bronchoscopic diagnostic procedures in patients suspected of having EBTB. Determinar a distribuição proporcional dos subtipos de tuberculose endobrônquica (TBEB) e avaliar os tipos de procedimentos diagnósticos broncoscópicos que podem revelar inflamação granulomatosa. Este foi um estudo retrospectivo com 18 pacientes HIV negativos com TBEB comprovada

  20. Evaluation of medical radiation exposure in pediatric interventional radiology procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navarro, Valeria Coelho Costa; Navarro, Marcus Vinicius Teixeira; Oliveira, Aline da Silva Pacheco, E-mail: vccnavarro@gmail.com [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia da Bahia (IFBA), Salvador, BA (Brazil); Maia, Ana Figueiredo [Universidade Federal de Sergipe (UFS), Aracaju, SE (Brazil); Oliveira, Adriano Dias Dourado [Sociedade Brasileira de Hemodinamica e Cardiologia Intervencionista, Salvador, BA (Brazil)

    2012-07-15

    Objective: To evaluate pediatric radiation exposure in procedures of interventional radiology in two hospitals in the Bahia state, aiming at contributing to delineate the scenario at the state and national levels. The knowledge of exposure levels will allow an evaluation of the necessity of doses optimization, considering that peculiarities of radiology and pediatrics become even more significant in interventional radiology procedures which involve exposure to higher radiation doses. Materials and Methods: A total of 32 procedures were evaluated in four rooms of the two main hospitals performing pediatric interventional radiology procedures in the Bahia state. Air kerma rate and kerma-area product were evaluated in 27 interventional cardiac and 5 interventional brain procedures. Results: Maximum values for air kerma rate and kerma-area product and air kerma obtained in cardiac procedures were, respectively, 129.9 Gy.cm{sup 2} and 947.0 mGy; and, for brain procedures were 83.3 Gy.cm{sup 2} and 961.0 mGy. Conclusion: The present study results showed exposure values up to 14 times higher than those found in other foreign studies, and approximating those found for procedures in adults. Such results demonstrate excessive exposure to radiation, indicating the need for constant procedures optimization and evaluation of exposure rates. (author)

  1. Bunch length diagnostics with coherent relativistic electron radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Ayzatsky, M I; Kushnir, V A; Mitrochenko, V V

    2001-01-01

    One of the most important problems when designing resonance electron linacs with a high beam brightness is creation of an equipment for electron bunch length diagnostics. One of ways to solve this problem is based on analysis of radiation from relativistic electrons (transition,synchrotron etc.). The paper presents results of calculations and experiments on studying the millimeter-band radiation that is a beam exited on the surface of the grating periodic structure and in a linac beam pipe. Experiments were carried out on the linac LIC with 13 MeV particle energy and 0.8 A pulse beam current. The possibility of observed radiation application for estimation of the bunch length value, monitoring its variation and for optimization of the accelerator operating mode was shown experimentally.

  2. Effective doses and standardised risk factors from paediatric diagnostic medical radiation exposures: Information for radiation risk communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bibbo, Giovanni

    2018-01-01

    In the paediatric medical radiation setting, there is no consistency on the radiation risk information conveyed to the consumer (patient/carer). Each communicator may convey different information about the level of risk for the same radiation procedure, leaving the consumer confused and frustrated. There is a need to standardise risks resulting from medical radiation exposures. In this study, paediatric radiographic, fluoroscopic, CT and nuclear medicine examination data have been analysed to provide (i) effective doses and radiation induced cancer risk factors from common radiological and nuclear medicine diagnostic procedures in standardised formats, (II) awareness of the difficulties that may be encountered in communicating risks to the layperson, and (iii) an overview of the deleterious effects of ionising radiation so that the risk communicator can convey with confidence the risks resulting from medical radiation exposures. Paediatric patient dose data from general radiographic, computed tomography, fluoroscopic and nuclear medicine databases have been analysed in age groups 0 to <5 years, 5 to <10 years, 10 to <15 years and 15 to <18 years to determine standardised risk factors. Mean, minimum and maximum effective doses and the corresponding mean lifetime risks for general radiographic, fluoroscopic, CT and nuclear medicine examinations for different age groups have been calculated. For all examinations, the mean lifetime cancer induction risk is provided in three formats: statistical, fraction and category. Standardised risk factors for different radiological and nuclear medicine examinations and an overview of the deleterious effects of ionising radiation and the difficulties encountered in communicating the risks should facilitate risk communication to the patient/carer.

  3. Proposal of a survey of radiation protection procedures during breast feeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Liliane dos; Oliveira, Silvia M. Velasques de

    2009-01-01

    Contamination can occur by breast milk ingestion involving mothers subjected to diagnostic procedures or treatment with radiopharmaceuticals, which can reach high concentrations in milk causing significant absorbed doses to the children organs. Besides internal dose, close contact between the baby and his mother give rise to external exposures. In Brazil, 7% of diagnostic procedures use 131 I or 123 I for thyroid imaging and 84% of these were hold by women. For 131 I, 67 Ga and 201 Tl, is recommended breast feeding cessation. The present work proposes a survey of the state of the art of radiation protection to breast feeding infants. It was planned interviews with nuclear medicine staff applying a questionnaire in order to assess specific procedures to women in reproductive age. This is 'on progress work'. (author)

  4. Radiographer Delivered Fluoroscopy Reduces Radiation Exposure During Endoscopic Urological Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, J; Hennessey, D B; Young, M; Pahuja, A

    2016-01-01

    The 1999 Ionising Radiation Regulations recommend that medical professionals using ionising radiation should aim to keep exposure as 'low as reasonably practicable'. Urologists regularly use fluoroscopy during endoscopic surgical procedures. In some institutions, this is delivered by a radiographer whereas in others, it is delivered by the urological surgeon. To determine if radiographer-delivered fluoroscopy can reduce the exposure to ionising radiation during urological procedures. An analysis of 395 consecutive patients, who underwent endoscopic urological procedures requiring fluoroscopy, was performed simultaneously across two institutions, over a 4 month period. 321 patients were matched and included in the analysis. Radiographer delivered fluoroscopy was associated with reduced ionising radiation exposure for retrograde pyelography procedures ED 0.09626 vs. 1.323 mSev, p= 0.0003, and endoscopic stone surgeries ED 0.3066 Vs. 0.5416 mSev, p=0.0039, but not for ureterorenoscopic stone surgeries 0.4880 vs. 0.2213 mSev, p=0.8292. Radiographer delivered fluoroscopy could reduce the patient's exposure to ionising radiation for some urological procedures.

  5. Assessment of patient radiation doses during routine diagnostic radiography examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, Asim Karam Aldden Adam

    2015-11-01

    Medical applications of radiation represent the largest source of exposure to general population. Accounting for 3.0 mSv against an estimated 2.4 mSv from a natural back ground in United States. The association of ionizing radiation an cancer risk is assumed to be continuos and graded over the entire range of exposure, The objective of this study is to evaluate the patient radiation doses in radiology departments in Khartoum state. A total of 840 patients ? during two in the following hospitals Khartoum Teaching Hospital (260 patients), Fedail specialized hospital ( 261 patients). National Ribat University hospital ( 189 patients) and Engaz hospital (130 patients). Patient doses were measured for 9 procedures. The Entrance surface Air Kerma (ESAK) was quantified using x-ray unit output by Unifiers xi dose rate meter( Un fore inc. Billdal. Sweden) and patient exposure parameters. The mean patient age. Weight and Body Mass index (BMI) were 42.6 year 58/4 kg and 212 kg/m respectively. The mean patient doses, kv and MAS and E.q was 0.35 mGy per procedures 59.9 volt 19.8 Ampere per second 0.32 Sv . Patient doses were comparable with previous studies. Patient radiation doses showed considerable difference between hospitals due to x- ray systems exposure settings and patient weight. Patient are exposed to unnecessary radiation.(Author)

  6. Critical issues in radiation hardening of fusion diagnostic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baur, J.F.; Barker, R.A.; Engholm, B.A.; Miller, P.H.

    1983-01-01

    In the most recent phase of the DOE funded program in Radiation Hardening of Fusion Reactor Diagnostics, a study and listing have been completed of the critical issues. With this information a long range program plan-including system studies, data surveys and a sponsored experimental program-is being developed for integration into the DOE Fusion Engineering Development Plan. More than twenty critical issues were identified, ranked in terms of three parameters (priority, urgency and impact) and described in terms of the remaining research needed. In addition to the critical issues list, three studies that were completed to assess the impact of some of the critical issues are described here briefly. A Survey was conducted of detectors and transducers expected to be impaired by doserate effects in the fusion environment. A set of Monte Carlo computer calculations of the streaming of neutrons through small, diagnostic-sized penetrations in a blanket-shield structure showed that simple analytic expressions for such streaming are inadequate for even preliminary designs of radiationsensitive diagnostic systems. Tests on radiation-darkened window blanks of quartz and sapphire showed that transmission in the ultraviolet region was improved by annealing at 300 0 C, indicating that it may be feasible to include windows in a well-designed viewing system in a reactor

  7. Towards the definition of Institutional diagnostic reference levels in paediatric interventional cardiology procedures in Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kottou, S; Kollaros, N; Plemmenos, C; Mastorakou, I; Apostolopoulou, S C; Tsapaki, V

    2018-02-01

    This study aimed to evaluate paediatric radiation doses in a dedicated cardiology hospital, with the objective of characterising patterns in dose variation. The ultimate purpose was to define Local (Institutional) Diagnostic Reference Levels (LDRLs) for different types of paediatric cardiac interventional procedures (IC), according to patient age. From a total of 710 cases performed during three consecutive years, by operators with more than 15 years of experience, the age was noted in only 477 IC procedures. The median values obtained for Fluoroscopy Time (FT), Number of Frames (N) and Kerma Area Product (P KA ) by age range were 5.8 min, 1322 and 2.0 Gy.cm 2 for definition of LDRLs presents challenges mainly due to the multiple clinical and technical factors affecting the outcome. On the other hand the lack of paediatric IC DRLs makes the identification of good practices more difficult. A consensus is needed on IC procedures nomenclature and grouping in order to allow a common assessment and comparison of doses. Copyright © 2018 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Radiation safety and quality control assurance in X-ray diagnostics 1998; Saeteilyturvallisuus ja laadunvarmistus roentgendiagnostiikassa 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Servomaa, A. [ed.

    1998-03-01

    The report is based on a seminar course of lectures `Radiation safety and quality assurance in X-ray diagnostics 1998` organized by the Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK) in Finland. The lectures included actual information on X-ray examinations: methods of quality assurance, methods of measuring and calculating patient doses, examination frequencies, patient doses, occupational doses, and radiation risks. Paediatric X-ray examinations and interventional procedures were the most specific topics. The new Council Directive 97/43/Euratom on medical exposure, and the European Guidelines on quality criteria for diagnostic radiographic images, were discussed in several lectures. Lectures on general radiation threats and preparedness, examples of radiation accidents, and emergency preparedness in hospitals were also included. (editor)

  9. Review on patients radiation dose and frequency of procedures during medical exposure in Sudan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abu Baker, Samah Mohamed Nasr

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate patient dose, the annual frequency and the number of staff and devices in the medical applications of ionizing radiation in Sudan. Survey was conducted on diagnostic radiology, nuclear medicine and radiotherapy. With respect to diagnostic radiology, only patient radiation dose was estimated. The data for diagnostic radiology was obtained from 24 peer reviewed scientific published literatures during the years ( 2006 - 2015). The collected publications included about 64 Sudanese hospitals covering different types of diagnostic exams. A values of the effective dose for pediatrics and adult patients were within the ranges of similar worldwide values published by UNSCEAR report in 2008 with exceptional to fluoroscopy hysterosalpingography for adult patients. For nuclear medicine procedures, questionnaires were distributed to five hospitals representing the whole existing NM department in Sudan at the time of of study. The estimated total annual frequency of diagnostic procedures was 0.2 per 1000 population. The estimated total annual collective and annual per caput effective dose from all NM procedures were 16.268 man Sv and 0.5 μSv, respectively. Comparing the annual per caput effective dose with UNSCEAR value our results was less than the worldwide value and greater than the value for heath care level 111-1 v countries. Questionnaires were also distributed to collect data on radiotherapy procedures performed in the two existing radioisotopes Sudanese hospitals. The prescribed dose and the number of fractions were comparable between the two hospitals. The minimum prescribed dose was 20 Gy with 5 fractions for nasopharynx (NPH) palliative and the maximum prescribed dose was 64 Gy with 32 fractions for prostate.(Author)

  10. Recommendations to improve radiation safety during invasive cardiovascular procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miranda, Patricia; Ubeda, Carlos; Vano, Eliseo; Nocetti, Diego

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we present guidelines aimed to improve radiation safety during invasive cardiovascular procedures. Unwanted effects upon patients and medical personnel are conventionally classified. A program of Quality Assurance is proposed, an aspect of which is a program for radiologic protection, including operator protection, radiation monitoring, shielding and personnel training. Permanent and specific actions should be taken at every cardiovascular lab, before, during and after interventions. In order to implement these guidelines and actions, a fundamental step is a review of current legislation. Specific programs for quality control and radiologic protection along with a definition of acceptable radiation exposure doses are required

  11. Radiation damage in diagnostic window materials for the TFTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Primak, W.

    1981-07-01

    The general problem of evaluating diagnostic window materials for the TFTR at the tank wall location is described. Specific evaluations are presented for several materials: vitreous silica, crystal quartz, sapphire, zinc selenide, and several fluorides: lithium fluoride, magnesium fluoride, and calcium fluoride; and seal glasses are discussed. The effects of the neutrons will be minimal. The major problems arise from the high flux of ionizing radiation, mainly the soft x rays which are absorbed near the surface of the materials. Additionally, this large energy deposition causes a significant thermal pulse with attendant thermal stresses. It is thus desirable to protect the windows with cover slips where this is feasible or to reduce the incident radiation by mounting the windows on long pipes. A more detailed summary is given at the end of this report.

  12. Patient radiation exposure in right versus left trans-radial approach for coronary procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rigattieri, Stefano; Di Russo, Cristian; Cera, Maria; Fedele, Silvio; Sciahbasi, Alessandro [Interventional Cardiology Unit, Sandro Pertini Hospital, Rome (Italy); Pugliese, Francesco Rocco [Emergency Department Sandro Pertini Hospital, Rome (Italy)

    2015-01-15

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare radiation exposure, assessed by dose-area product (DAP), in right trans-radial approach (RR) versus left trans-radial approach (LR) for coronary procedures. Background: In LR the catheter course is more similar to trans-femoral approach, thus allowing an easier negotiation of coronary ostia which, in turn, might translate into reduced fluoroscopy time (FT) and radiation exposure as compared to RR. Methods: We retrospectively selected diagnostic and interventional procedures (PCI) performed by RR or LR at our center from May 2009 to May 2014. We only included in the analysis the procedures in which DAP values were available. Results: We analyzed 1464 procedures, 1175 of which performed by RR (80.3%) and 289 by LR (19.7%). Median DAP values were significantly higher in RR as compared to LR for diagnostic and interventional procedures (4482 vs. 3540 cGy.cm{sup 2} and 11523 vs. 10086 cGy.cm{sup 2}, respectively; p < 0.05). No significant differences were observed in FT and in contrast volume (CV). In the propensity-matched cohort, consisting of 269 procedures for each group, no significant differences between LR and RR were observed in median DAP values for both diagnostic and interventional procedures (3990 vs. 3542 cGy.cm{sup 2} and 9964 vs. 10216 cGy.cm{sup 2}, respectively; p = ns); FT and CV were also similar. At multiple linear regression analysis laterality of trans-radial approach was not associated with DAP. Conclusions: In an experienced trans-radial center LR is not associated with a reduction in radiation exposure, FT or CV as compared to RR. - Highlights: • Right trans-radial approach is by far more commonly used than left trans-radial approach. • Left trans-radial approach has the advantage of an easier catheter manipulation, more similar to trans-femoral approach. • This could reduce fluoroscopy time and radiation exposure. • We conducted a retrospective study to investigate patient radiation

  13. Injection diagnostic procedures for the Chalk River Superconducting Cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, W.G.

    1984-01-01

    The beam diagnostics system for the injection beam line for the Chalk River Tandem Accelerator - Superconducting Cyclotron is described. The system has been designed such that simple and easily interpreted measurements can be made for operational beam monitoring as well as for the complete 6-dimensional beam phase-space determinations required for beam development

  14. Quality guarantee of images as a way for obtained lower levels of radiation doses in diagnostic x-ray rooms: criteria for licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castellanos, C.A.

    1996-01-01

    This work constitutes a criticism to the present system for licensing in diagnostic x-ray installations in Guatemala. A series of recommendations are made with the aim of obtaining the best diagnostic imaging. This procedure leads to obtain lower doses of radiation for patients and workers

  15. Radiation exposure of an anaesthesiologist in catheterisation and electrophysiological cardiac procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreoli, Stefano; Moretti, Renzo; Lorini, Ferdinando Luca; Lagrotta, Mariavittoria

    2016-01-01

    Sometimes, cardiac catheterisation and electrophysiological procedures, diagnostic and interventional, require an anaesthesiological support. The anaesthesiologist receives radiation doses depending on various factors, such as type of procedure and exposure modality, anaesthesiological technique, individual protective devices and operator experience. The aim of this study was to investigate the dose per procedure, the exposure inhomogeneity and the effective dose, E, of a senior anaesthesiologist in the haemodynamic laboratory of Ospedali Riuniti, Bergamo. The dose monitoring was routinely performed with sets of several thermoluminescent dosemeters and an electronic personal dosemeter. The study covered 300 consecutive procedures over 1 y. The anaesthesiologist wore a protective apron, a thyroid collar and glasses (0.5 mm lead-equivalent). (authors)

  16. Case-control study of leukemia and diagnostic radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuasa, Hidemichi; Hamajima, Nobuyuki; Ueda, Ryuzo

    1997-01-01

    A case-control study of leukemia and diagnostic X-ray exposure was conducted by a multi-institution co-operative study group. The subjects were 134 patients with acute myelogenous leukemia, 57 with chronic myelogenous leukemia, 56 with acute lymphocytic leukemia and 50 with myelodysplasia syndrome, who were between 15 and 79 years old, and diagnosed at one of 27 hospitals between September 1993 and August 1995. The controls were 479 first-visit patients seen at eight of these 27 hospitals. History of diagnostic X-ray tests between 1982 and 1991 was determined by an anonymous self-administered questionnaire. The total relative dose of radiation exposure was calculated by summing the products of given weights and frequencies of each test. The relative risk was 0.83 (95% confidence interval (C.I.), 0.58-1.19) for relative dose of 10-30 (equivalent to 4-11 times of UGI series), 0.76 (0.48-1.20) for relative dose of 30 or more (more than 12 times of UGI series), when compared with relative dose of 0-10 (0-3 times of UGI series). Analysis according to type of leukemia revealed that only acute myelogenous leukemia had an estimated relative risk above unity (1.08, 95%, C.I. 0.69-1.69, for relative dose 10-30). This study did not support the hypothesis that diagnostic X-ray tests increases leukemia risk. (author)

  17. NaI(Tl) scintillator detectors stripping procedure for air kerma measurements of diagnostic X-ray beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, L.S.R. [Centro Tecnológico do Exército, CTEx (Brazilian Army Technological Center), Av. das Américas n° 28705, 23085-470 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Instituto de Radioprotecão e Dosimetria, CNEN/IRD (Institute for Radioprotection and Dosimetry, CNEN/IRD), Av. Salvador Allende s/no, P.O. Box 37750, 22783-127 Barra da Tijuca, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Conti, C.C., E-mail: ccconti@ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioprotecão e Dosimetria, CNEN/IRD (Institute for Radioprotection and Dosimetry, CNEN/IRD), Av. Salvador Allende s/no, P.O. Box 37750, 22783-127 Barra da Tijuca, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Amorim, A.S.; Balthar, M.C.V. [Centro Tecnológico do Exército, CTEx (Brazilian Army Technological Center), Av. das Américas n° 28705, 23085-470 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2013-03-21

    Air kerma is an essential quantity for the calibration of national standards used in diagnostic radiology and the measurement of operating parameters used in radiation protection. Its measurement within the appropriate limits of accuracy, uncertainty and reproducibility is important for the characterization and control of the radiation field for the dosimetry of the patients submitted to diagnostic radiology and, also, for the assessment of the system which produces radiological images. Only the incident beam must be considered for the calculation of the air kerma. Therefore, for energy spectrum, counts apart the total energy deposition in the detector must be subtracted. It is necessary to establish a procedure to sort out the different contributions to the original spectrum and remove the counts representing scattered photons in the detector’s materials, partial energy deposition due to the interactions in the detector active volume and, also, the escape peaks contributions. The main goal of this work is to present spectrum stripping procedure, using the MCNP Monte Carlo computer code, for NaI(Tl) scintillation detectors to calculate the air kerma due to an X-ray beam usually used in medical radiology. The comparison between the spectrum before stripping procedure against the reference value showed a discrepancy of more than 63%, while the comparison with the same spectrum after the stripping procedure showed a discrepancy of less than 0.2%.

  18. Diagnostics of machine parts by means of reverse engineering procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Rysinski

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In this article, an application of a three-dimensional scanner for building a special diagnostic stand is described. An experimental method of detection of material defects is discussed. The considered defects are connected with cooperation of particular surfaces of machine parts. In the discussed experiments, particularly the dimensions of pitting holes can be evaluated. Availability of laboratory facilities required that the investigations were performed using geared wheels. The three-dimensional model which represents a degenerated surface, obtained based upon the diagnostic measurements, was compared with the pattern of an undamaged surface. The latter was generated by means of our pre-processor. The pre-processor enables generation of files which are compatible with the majority of the computer-aided design system formats. Therefore, the analyses were performed by means of commercial system inventor and computer-aided three-dimensional interactive application.

  19. Sensitivity of the diagnostic radiological index of protection to procedural factors in fluoroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, A Kyle; Pasciak, Alexander S; Wagner, Louis K

    2016-07-01

    To evaluate the sensitivity of the diagnostic radiological index of protection (DRIP), used to quantify the protective value of radioprotective garments, to procedural factors in fluoroscopy in an effort to determine an appropriate set of scatter-mimicking primary beams to be used in measuring the DRIP. Monte Carlo simulations were performed to determine the shape of the scattered x-ray spectra incident on the operator in different clinical fluoroscopy scenarios, including interventional radiology and interventional cardiology (IC). Two clinical simulations studied the sensitivity of the scattered spectrum to gantry angle and patient size, while technical factors were varied according to measured automatic dose rate control (ADRC) data. Factorial simulations studied the sensitivity of the scattered spectrum to gantry angle, field of view, patient size, and beam quality for constant technical factors. Average energy (Eavg) was the figure of merit used to condense fluence in each energy bin to a single numerical index. Beam quality had the strongest influence on the scattered spectrum in fluoroscopy. Many procedural factors affect the scattered spectrum indirectly through their effect on primary beam quality through ADRC, e.g., gantry angle and patient size. Lateral C-arm rotation, common in IC, increased the energy of the scattered spectrum, regardless of the direction of rotation. The effect of patient size on scattered radiation depended on ADRC characteristics, patient size, and procedure type. The scattered spectrum striking the operator in fluoroscopy is most strongly influenced by primary beam quality, particularly kV. Use cases for protective garments should be classified by typical procedural primary beam qualities, which are governed by the ADRC according to the impacts of patient size, anatomical location, and gantry angle.

  20. Radiation Dose to Patients and Medical Staff in Different Procedures of Nuclear Medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimcheva, M.; Sergieva, S.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to provide information on developing technologies and clinical techniques for Hybrid SPECT/CT imaging using ionizing radiation and their associated radiation dose to patients and medical staff. A thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) was used in this study to analyze the historic records of the external radiation doses to staff members working in our nuclear medicine department in 7 procedures, including elution of 99mTc from 99m Mo/ 99m Tc generators, syringe preparation, radiopharmacy kit preparation, injection, accompanying patients, SPECT/CT scan, oral 131 I preparation. These dosimeters was worn by the staff members at the level of the chest on the front part of the body. A retrospective review of 110 clinical studies of various nuclear medicine procedures ( 99m Tc–MIBI–Tetrofosmin, 99m Tc–MDP bone scan, 99m Tc–Tektrotyd, 99m Tc–Thyroid imaging, 99m Tc–Nanocoll, 131 I–Nal (diagnostic application 185 MBq) obtained on hybrid SPECT/CT systems was performed to calculate the effective radiation dose to patients. The results from this study showed that annual effective radiation doses to nuclear medicine department staff members were within permissible levels. The contribution of total effective radiation dose from SPECT component were calculated using the activity of the injected radiopharmaceutical and dose tables published by the conversion factors listed in ICRP 53 and ICRP 80. The radiation dose for CT was calculated by Dose Length Product method. According to the results of this study the dose in each procedure depends on different factors such as the education and experience of the staff members, usage of shielding and taking the radiation protection requirements into consideration. When SPECT–CT is being performed, all measures should be taken to reduce both the radiopharmaceutical dose and the CT effective dose following the ALARA principle. (author)

  1. Efficacy of clinical diagnostic procedures utilized in nuclear medicine. Nine month progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-01-01

    This study is designed to determine the efficacy of nuclear medicine procedures in clinical practice. Several methods of determining efficacy will be evaluated to determine those most suitable. Nuclear medicine methods will be confined to the study of lung diseases by pulmonary perfusion and ventilation. In addition to evaluating the above methods data will be obtained to determine the sensitivity, specificity, predictive value and efficiency of the test under consideration. These values, corrected for prevalence of the disease processes under consideration will then be compared to the values obtained by the MACRO and MICRO methods and will help to bound the clinical reliability of the diagnostic method depending on the degree to which the several methods trend together. Depending on the practicality of these two methods, in addition to the determination of efficacy, cost effectiveness factors and benefit-risk estimates which are used to apply to radiation effects will be determined for nuclear medicine studies of the brain, bone, heart, liver and thyroid subsequently. The measurement techniques will then be utilized to establish guidelines for the most useful applications of the given procedure so that clinicians will be able to obtain a pretest estimate of the utility of the nuclear medicine test.

  2. Assessment of radiation protection of patients and staff in interventional procedures in four Algerian hospitals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khelassi-Toutaoui, N.; Toutaoui, A.; Merad, A.; Sakhri-Brahimi, Z.; Baggoura, B.; Mansouri, B.

    2016-01-01

    This study was aimed to assess patient dosimetry in interventional cardiology (IC) and radiology (IR) and radiation safety of the medical operating staff. For this purpose, four major Algerian hospitals were investigated. The data collected cover radiation protection tools assigned to the operating staff and measured radiation doses to some selected patient populations. The analysis revealed that lead aprons are systematically worn by the staff but not lead eye glasses, and only a single personal monitoring badge is assigned to the operating staff. Measured doses to patients exhibited large variations in the maximum skin dose (MSD) and in the dose area product (DAP). The mean MSD registered values are as follows: 0.20, 0.14 and 1.28 Gy in endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography (ERCP), coronary angiography (CA) and percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) procedures, respectively. In PTCA, doses to 3 out of 22 patients (13.6 %) had even reached the threshold value of 2 Gy. The mean DAP recorded values are as follows: 21.6, 60.1 and 126 Gy cm 2 in ERCP, CA and PTCA procedures, respectively. Mean fluoroscopic times are 2.5, 5 and 15 min in ERCP, CA and PTCA procedures, respectively. The correlation between DAP and MSD is fair in CA (r = 0.62) and poor in PTCA (r = 0.28). Fluoroscopic time was moderately correlated with DAP in CA (r = 0.55) and PTCA (r = 0.61) procedures. Local diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) in CA and PTCA procedures have been proposed. In conclusion, this study stresses the need for a continuous patient dose monitoring in interventional procedures with a special emphasis in IC procedures. Common strategies must be undertaken to substantially reduce radiation doses to both patients and medical staff. (authors)

  3. Diagnostic procedures and treatment of childhood obesity by pediatricians: 'The Dutch Approach'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schwiebbe, L.; Talma, H.; van Mil, E.G.; Fetter, W.P.F.; Hirasing, R.A.; Renders, C.M.

    2013-01-01

    Child Public Health professionals in the Netherlands refer obese children to a pediatrician to check for underlying causes and comorbidity. What happens to these children in terms of diagnostics and treatment when they visit a pediatrician? To get an overview of the diagnostic procedures and

  4. Galactography: the diagnostic procedure of choice for nipple discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabar, L.; Dean, P.B.; Pentek, Z.

    1983-01-01

    Galactogrpahy was performed in 204 women with a nipple discharge and the secretion confirmed histopathologically. All 116 intraductal tumors (papilloma, papillomatosis, carcinoma), which were associated with a serous or bloody discharge, were detected preoperatively. A palpable mass had little diagnostic significance, and exfoliative cytology was positive in only 11% (2/18) of the patients with carcinoma. The authors recommend that all patients with a spontaneous bloody or serous discharge from a single lactiferous orifice undergo galactography in addition to physical, cytological, and mammographic examination. Intraductal injection of methylene blue dye will demonstrate the affected duct system to the surgeon and can often make surgery less radical or even unnecessary

  5. Use of an Online Education Platform to Enhance Patients' Knowledge About Radiation in Diagnostic Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Joseph R; Jones, A Kyle; Clarke, Ryan K; Shiao, Sue J; Wei, Wei; Shoemaker, Stowe; Parmar, Simrit

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the impact of a digital interactive education platform and standard paper-based education on patients' knowledge regarding ionizing radiation. Beginning in January 2015, patients at a tertiary cancer center scheduled for diagnostic imaging procedures were randomized to receive information about ionizing radiation delivered through a web-based interactive education platform (interactive education group), the same information in document format (document education group), or no specialized education (control group). Patients who completed at least some education and control group patients were invited to complete a knowledge assessment; interactive education patients were invited to provide feedback about satisfaction with their experience. A total of 2,226 patients participated. Surveys were completed by 302 of 745 patients (40.5%) participating in interactive education, 488 of 993 (49.1%) participating in document education, and 363 of 488 (74.4%) in the control group. Patients in the interactive education group were significantly more likely to say that they knew the definition of ionizing radiation, outperformed the other groups in identifying which imaging examinations used ionizing radiation, were significantly more likely to identify from a list which imaging modality had the highest radiation dose, and tended to perform better when asked about the tissue effects of radiation in diagnostic imaging, although this difference was not significant. In the interactive education group, 84% of patients were satisfied with the experience, and 79% said that they would recommend the program. Complex information on a highly technical subject with personal implications for patients may be conveyed more effectively using electronic platforms, and this approach is well accepted. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Activities of radiopharmaceuticals administered for diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in nuclear medicine in Argentina: results of a national survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bomben, Ana M.; Chiliutti, Claudia A.

    2004-01-01

    Nuclear medicine in Argentine is carried out at 292 centres, distributed all over the country, mainly concentrated in the capital cities of the provinces. With the purpose of knowing the activity levels of radiopharmaceuticals that were administered to patients for diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in nuclear medicine, a national survey was conducted, during 2001 and 2002. This survey was answered voluntarily by 107 centres. Sixty-four percent of the participants centres are equipped with SPECT system while the other centres have a gamma camera or scintiscanner. There were 37 nuclear medicine procedures, chosen among those most frequently performed, were included in the survey. In those diagnostic procedures were included tests for: bone, brain, thyroid, kidney, liver, lung and cardiovascular system; and also activities administered for some therapeutic procedures. The nuclear medicine physicians reported the different radiopharmaceutical activities administered to typical adult patients. In this paper are presented the average radiopharmaceutical activity administered for each of the diagnostic and therapeutic procedures included in the survey and the range and distribution of values. In order to place these data in a frame of reference, these average values were compared to the guidance levels for diagnostic procedures in nuclear medicine mentioned at the Safety Series no. 115. From this comparison it was noticed that the activities administered in the 40% of the diagnostic procedures included in the survey were between ±30% of the reference values. For those nuclear medicine procedures that could not be compared with the above mentioned guidance levels, the comparison was made with values published by UNSCEAR or standards recommended by international bodies. As a result of this study, it is important to point out the need to continue the gathering of data in a wider scale survey to increase the knowledge about national trends. It is also essential to widely

  7. Diagnostic CT and percutaneous procedures after pancreatic transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Letourneau, J.G.; Hunter, D.W.; Thompson, W.M.; Sutherland, D.E.R.

    1987-01-01

    CT evaluation of the abdomen and pelvis is of great value after pancreatic transplantation. The expected CT appearance after pancreas transportation with both enteric and bladder drainage of exocrine function are presented, as is the appearance of infected and ischemic grafts. The CT detection and CT- and US-guided percutaneous aspiration and drainage of abdominal fluid collections are described. At the authors' institution, such aspiration and drainage procedures have obviated transplant pancreatectomy or surgical abscess drainage in 29% of patients

  8. High repetition rate laser systems: targets, diagnostics and radiation protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gizzi, Leonida A.; Clark, Eugene; Neely, David; Roso, Luis; Tolley, Martin

    2010-02-01

    Accessing the high repetition regime of ultra intense laser-target interactions at small or moderate laser energies is now possible at a large number of facilities worldwide. New projects such as HiPER and ELI promise to extend this regime to the high energy realm at the multi-kJ level. This opportunity raises several issues on how best to approach this new regime of operation in a safe and efficient way. At the same time, a new class of experiments or a new generation of secondary sources of particles and radiation may become accessible, provided that target fabrication and diagnostics are capable of handling this rep-rated regime. In this paper, we explore this scenario and analyse existing and perspective techniques that promise to address some of the above issues.

  9. Radiation protection of patients in diagnostic radiology in Estonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filippova, I.

    2001-01-01

    The medical use of ionizing radiation started at the beginning of the century. It has always been considered necessary, as well as for diagnostic applications where exposure to the patient is the price to pay in order to obtain useful images, as for therapy where the patient is exposed on purpose, in order to kill malignant cells. It is nowadays the major man-made contribution to the population dose. Even with the developments of substitutive imaging or treatment techniques, there is still an increasing demand and many organizations are joining their efforts to try to keep the dose to the patient 'as low as reasonably achievable'. This is particularly the case for the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) which recommended in publication 26 to follow three main principles: justification, optimisation and limitation. Limitation, however, does not apply to patients since the individuals exposed are expected to benefit from this exposure, but justification and optimization are relevant. (author)

  10. A retrospective study of relevant diagnostic procedures in vulvodynia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Christina Damsted; Kristensen, Ellids; Lundvall, Lene

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify objective clinical signs of vulvodynia and determine specific diagnostic tests for vulvodynia in women referred to a vulvar outpatient clinic for vulval complaints. STUDY DESIGN: A retrospective study was performed of the medical records of 201 consecutive Danish patients...... with vulvodynia in the vulvar clinic, 88.9% were correctly diagnosed before referral. The women with vulvodynia were more likely to report dyspareunia (chi2 = 7.89, p = 0.005) and stinging pain (chi2 = 3.74, p = 0.05). The nonvulvodynia group was more likely to report a tendency toward fissures (chi2 = 5.94, p...... pain are strongly associated with vulvodynia. Self-reported pruritus and a tendency toward fissures are not likely to be associated with vulvodynia. Whether vulvar biopsies should be performed regularly when redness and pain is present must...

  11. High level of patient satisfaction and comfort during diagnostic urological procedures performed by urologists and residents.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, A.H. de; Lesterhuis, E.; Verweij, L.M.; Schout, B.M.A.; Horst, H.J.R. van der; Leppink, J.; Koldewijn, E.L.; Wagner, C.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to investigate how patients experience diagnostic urological procedures performed by urologists, junior residents and senior residents, and to assess the influence of procedure-related factors on patient experiences. Methods. Data were collected during 222

  12. Radiation safety procedures in radioiodine therapy for thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajashekharrao, B.; Samuel, A.M.

    1999-01-01

    During any administration of radioactive materials, it is imperative to always be conversant with any forbidden radiation health safety practices. This need is amplified when dealing with therapeutic amount of radionuclides. Among all the procedures dealing with the use of radiopharmaceuticals, it is easiest to think of 131 I, since this is the most widely used unsealed source of a radiopharmaceutical for treatment of thyroid cancer and hyperthyroidism and carries with it most of the problems associated with therapy applications

  13. EFSUMB Guidelines on Interventional Ultrasound (INVUS), Part II Diagnostic Ultrasound-Guided Interventional Procedures (Long Version)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sidhu, P. S.; Brabrand, K.; Cantisani, V.

    2015-01-01

    This is the second part of the series on interventional ultrasound guidelines of the Federation of Societies for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology (EFSUMB). It deals with the diagnostic interventional procedure. General points are discussed which are pertinent to all patients, followed by organ......-specific imaging that will allow the correct pathway and planning for the interventional procedure. This will allow for the appropriate imaging workup for each individual interventional procedure (Long version)....

  14. Pharmacological aspects of the antibiotics used for urological diagnostic procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzei, Teresita; Diacciati, Sara

    2014-10-01

    Surgical antimicrobial prophylaxis is the use of an antibiotic before, during, or shortly after a urological procedure to prevent postoperative infections such as urinary tract or wound infection. The optimal antimicrobial drug must be microbiologically active against the most frequent potential pathogens and have good pharmacological properties. Correct timing of antimicrobial prophylaxis is the first critical issue in determining treatment efficacy. The antibiotic must be administered before the start of the surgical procedure in order to ensure a high tissue level at the time of microbial contamination. If using an oral antibiotic, this must be administered 1-3 hours before the operation and a parenteral antibiotic should be administered at the induction of anaesthesia. The antibiotics potentially useful for antimicrobial prophylaxis are the beta-lactams, cotrimoxazole, fluoroquinolones, and fosfomycin trometamol. The criteria for choosing the optimal antibiotic include an appropriate antimicrobial spectrum, favourable pharmacokinetic parameters (especially good tissue penetration), and elevated safety or tolerability. The use of cotrimoxazole must be restricted due to increasing chemoresistance. Unfortunately fluoroquinolone-based regimens, once the mainstay of prophylaxis guidelines, are increasingly ineffective due to a constant increase in multidrug-resistant (MDR) Gram-negative bacteria. The same concerns apply with regard to the second and third generation cephalosporins that have problems of resistance and, if administered orally, do not sufficiently penetrate prostatic tissue. An appropriate beta-lactam could be an aminopenicillin combined with a beta-lactamase inhibitor. Fosfomycin trometamol can also be a good potential choice due to its elevated activity against MDR Gram-negative bacteria and its favourable pharmacokinetic parameters, including an elevated penetration into prostatic tissue.

  15. Low dose diagnostic radiation does not increase cancer risk in cancer prone mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boreham, D., E-mail: dboreham@nosm.ca [Northern Ontario School of Medicine, ON (Canada); Phan, N., E-mail: nghiphan13@yahoo.com [Univ. of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Lemon, J., E-mail: lemonja@mcmaster.ca [McMaster Univ., Hamilton, ON (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    The increased exposure of patients to low dose diagnostic ionizing radiation has created concern that these procedures will result in greater risk of carcinogenesis. However, there is substantial evidence that shows in many cases that low dose exposure has the opposite effect. We have investigated whether CT scans can modify mechanisms associated with carcinogenesis in cancer-prone mice. Cancer was induced in Trp53+/- mice with an acute high dose whole-body 4 Gy γ-radiation exposure. Four weeks following the cancer-inducing dose, weekly whole-body CT scans (10 mGy/scan, 75 kVp X-rays) were given for ten consecutive weeks adding an additional radiation burden of 0.1 Gy. Short-term biological responses and subsequent lifetime cancer risk were investigated. Five days following the last CT scan, there were no detectable differences in the spontaneous levels of DNA damage in blood cells (reticulocytes). In fact, CT scanned mice had significantly lower constitutive levels of oxidative DNA damage and cell death (apoptosis), compared to non-CT scanned mice. This shows that multiple low dose radiation exposures modified the radio response and indicates protective processes were induced in mice. In mice treated with the multiple CT scans following the high cancer-inducing 4 Gy dose, tumour latency was increased, significantly prolonging lifespan. We conclude that repeated CT scans can reduce the cancer risk of a prior high-dose radiation exposure, and delay the progression of specific types of radiation-induced cancers in Trp53+/-mice. This research shows for the first time that low dose exposure long after cancer initiation events alter risk and reduce cancer morbidity. Cancer induction following low doses does not follow a linear non-threshold model of risk and this model should not be used to extrapolate risk to humans following low dose exposure to ionizing radiation. (author)

  16. Monitoring radiation use in cardiac fluoroscopy imaging procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, Nathaniel T.; Steiner, Stefan H.; Smith, Ian R.; MacKay, R. Jock

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Timely identification of systematic changes in radiation delivery of an imaging system can lead to a reduction in risk for the patients involved. However, existing quality assurance programs involving the routine testing of equipment performance using phantoms are limited in their ability to effectively carry out this task. To address this issue, the authors propose the implementation of an ongoing monitoring process that utilizes procedural data to identify unexpected large or small radiation exposures for individual patients, as well as to detect persistent changes in the radiation output of imaging platforms. Methods: Data used in this study were obtained from records routinely collected during procedures performed in the cardiac catheterization imaging facility at St. Andrew's War Memorial Hospital, Brisbane, Australia, over the period January 2008-March 2010. A two stage monitoring process employing individual and exponentially weighted moving average (EWMA) control charts was developed and used to identify unexpectedly high or low radiation exposure levels for individual patients, as well as detect persistent changes in the radiation output delivered by the imaging systems. To increase sensitivity of the charts, we account for variation in dose area product (DAP) values due to other measured factors (patient weight, fluoroscopy time, and digital acquisition frame count) using multiple linear regression. Control charts are then constructed using the residual values from this linear regression. The proposed monitoring process was evaluated using simulation to model the performance of the process under known conditions. Results: Retrospective application of this technique to actual clinical data identified a number of cases in which the DAP result could be considered unexpected. Most of these, upon review, were attributed to data entry errors. The charts monitoring the overall system radiation output trends demonstrated changes in equipment performance

  17. Monitoring radiation use in cardiac fluoroscopy imaging procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, Nathaniel T.; Steiner, Stefan H.; Smith, Ian R.; MacKay, R. Jock [Department of Statistics and Actuarial Sciences, Business and Industrial Statistics Research Group, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada); St. Andrew' s Medical Institute, St. Andrew' s War Memorial Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland 4000 (Australia); Department of Statistics and Actuarial Sciences, Business and Industrial Statistics Research Group, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada)

    2011-01-15

    Purpose: Timely identification of systematic changes in radiation delivery of an imaging system can lead to a reduction in risk for the patients involved. However, existing quality assurance programs involving the routine testing of equipment performance using phantoms are limited in their ability to effectively carry out this task. To address this issue, the authors propose the implementation of an ongoing monitoring process that utilizes procedural data to identify unexpected large or small radiation exposures for individual patients, as well as to detect persistent changes in the radiation output of imaging platforms. Methods: Data used in this study were obtained from records routinely collected during procedures performed in the cardiac catheterization imaging facility at St. Andrew's War Memorial Hospital, Brisbane, Australia, over the period January 2008-March 2010. A two stage monitoring process employing individual and exponentially weighted moving average (EWMA) control charts was developed and used to identify unexpectedly high or low radiation exposure levels for individual patients, as well as detect persistent changes in the radiation output delivered by the imaging systems. To increase sensitivity of the charts, we account for variation in dose area product (DAP) values due to other measured factors (patient weight, fluoroscopy time, and digital acquisition frame count) using multiple linear regression. Control charts are then constructed using the residual values from this linear regression. The proposed monitoring process was evaluated using simulation to model the performance of the process under known conditions. Results: Retrospective application of this technique to actual clinical data identified a number of cases in which the DAP result could be considered unexpected. Most of these, upon review, were attributed to data entry errors. The charts monitoring the overall system radiation output trends demonstrated changes in equipment

  18. Design And Measurement Of Radiation Exposure Rates At An X-Ray Diagnostic Radiological Unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tito-Sutjipto

    2003-01-01

    Every radiation employees suffers radiation exposure risk while doing his job. It is important therefore to investigate the occupational health and safety of radiation employees on its relationship with the design and measurement of radiation exposure rates at an X-ray diagnostic radiological unit in this work, a case study was held on the radiological unit at BP-4 Yogyakarta for patient diagnostics, This research armed to investigate the relationship between the design of radiological unit for X-ray diagnostics and the location of the X-ray machine, based on the distance variable and radiation exposure rate during patient diagnostics. This was performed using radiological unit design data for X-ray diagnostics and the measurement of radiation exposure rates throughout patient diagnostics. The design data can then be used for determining the requirement of primary and secondary shielding materials for radiological unit as well as a calculation basis of radiation exposure rates during patient diagnostics. From the result of the research, it can be concluded that from the occupational health and safety point of view, radiation exposure around the X-ray machines are fairly good, both for the shielding materials in each X-ray room and the radiation exposures received by the workers, because they are far beyond the maximum permittable average limit (16.67 m R/days). (author)

  19. Changes in the 'medical research' licensing procedure under the German Radiation Protection Ordinance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habeck, M.; Minkov, V.; Griebel, J.; Brix, G.; Epsch, R.; Langer, M.

    2012-01-01

    This publication outlines the 'medical research' licensing procedure as specified in the amendment of the German Radiation Protection Ordinance of November 1, 2011. The general licensing requirements for the use of radiation have not been changed by the amendment. Three so-called use restrictions (i.e., dose limits of 10 mSv and 20 mSv, age limit of 50 years) have been modified. They will only apply to healthy volunteers in the future. In addition, there are considerable simplifications with respect to applications and licensing procedures of the Federal Office for Radiation Protection (Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz, BfS) regarding the use of radiation in the newly introduced 'accompanying diagnostics' ('Begleitdiagnostik') case group. The newly established, independent panel of experts at the German Radiological Society (Deutsche Roentgengesellschaft, DRG) may provide essential support to principal investigators, qualified physicians and sponsors for differentiating between 'medical research' and 'health care', the latter not being subject to licensing. An expert statement will be issued by the DRG within four weeks of an inquiry. This consulting service is subject to confidentiality, and is free of charge for inquirers and without any commitment. (orig.)

  20. [Changes in the "medical research" licensing procedure under the German Radiation Protection Ordinance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habeck, M; Epsch, R; Minkov, V; Langer, M; Griebel, J; Brix, G

    2012-06-01

    This publication outlines the "medical research" licensing procedure as specified in the amendment of the German Radiation Protection Ordinance of November 1, 2011. The general licensing requirements for the use of radiation have not been changed by the amendment. Three so-called use restrictions (i. e., dose limits of 10 mSv and 20 mSv, age limit of 50 years) have been modified. They will only apply to healthy volunteers in the future. In addition, there are considerable simplifications with respect to applications and licensing procedures of the Federal Office for Radiation Protection (Bundesamt für Strahlenschutz, BfS) regarding the use of radiation in the newly introduced "accompanying diagnostics" ("Begleitdiagnostik") case group. The newly established, independent panel of experts at the German Radiological Society (Deutsche Röntgengesellschaft, DRG) may provide essential support to principal investigators, qualified physicians and sponsors for differentiating between "medical research" and "health care", the latter not being subject to licensing. An expert statement will be issued by the DRG within four weeks of an inquiry. This consulting service is subject to confidentiality, and is free of charge for inquirers and without any commitment. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  1. Calibration methodology for instruments utilized in X radiation beams, diagnostic level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penha, M. da; Potiens, A.; Caldas, L.V.E. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, Sao Paulo (Brazil)]. E-mail: mppalbu@ipen.br

    2004-07-01

    Methodologies for the calibration of diagnostic radiology instruments were established at the Calibration Laboratory of IPEN. The methods may be used in the calibration procedures of survey meters used in radiation protection measurements (scattered radiation), instruments used in direct beams (attenuated and non attenuated beams) and quality control instruments. The established qualities are recommended by the international standards IEC 1267 and ISO 4037-3. Two ionization chambers were used as reference systems, one with a volume of 30 cm{sup 3} for radiation protection measurements, and the other with a volume of 1 cm{sup 3} for direct beam measurements. Both are traceable to the German Primary Laboratory of Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB). In the case of calibration of quality control instruments, a non-invasive method using the measurement of the spectrum endpoint was established with a portable gamma and X-ray Intertechnique spectrometer system. The methods were applied to survey meters (radiation protection measurements), ionization chambers (direct beam measurements) and k Vp meters (invasive and non-invasive instruments). (Author)

  2. Patient and staff doses in fluoroscopically guided invasive diagnostic and interventional urology procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanova, D.; Hristova-Popova, J.; Avramova-Cholakova, S.; Deyanova, Ts.; Dobrikov, R.

    2015-01-01

    Full text: The aim of this study is to evaluate patient and staff doses in fluoroscopically guided invasive diagnostic and interventional urology procedures. All the data were collected in the Emergency Hospital 'N. I. Pirogov'. While recording data for the patients, a real time dosimetry measurement of the medical staff was made. Air kerma-area product (KAP) was recorded for intravenous pyelogram (IVP), percutaneous nephrostomy (PN) and ureteral 'double-J' stenting. Patient data sex, age and weight were also taken. Staff doses were estimated with the system RaySafe i2. It contains four dosimeters, with a wireless connection to a real time display. The dosimeters were worn on the unprotected upper part of the body and measured the personal dose equivalent Hp(10). The mean KAP values for the procedures are: 3.21 Gy.cm 2 for IVP, 10.37 Gy.cm 2 for PN and 4.15 Gy.cm 2 for 'double-J' respectively. The highest staff dose for PN and 'double-J' is received by the urologist (160 μSv and 47.3 μSv, respectively), while for the IVP the radiographer has the highest exposure (20 μSv). Each member of the medical staff was on a different position in respect to the X-ray tube and the patient, which is the main reason for the differences in the staff doses. The variations in the mean patient and staff doses are mostly due to the interventions themselves, their complexity and the individual treatment of every patient. RaySafe i2 is very useful as guideline for making a choice of a better position and in the decreasing of radiation exposure to the staff

  3. Practical X-ray diagnostics orthopedics and trauma surgery. Indication, adjustment technique and radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flechtenmacher, Johannes; Sabo, Desiderius

    2014-01-01

    The book on X-ray diagnostics in orthopedics and trauma surgery includes the following chapters: 1. Introduction: radiation protection, equipment technology radiological diagnostics of skeleton carcinomas, specific aspects of trauma surgery, special aspects of skeleton radiology for children. 2. X-ray diagnostics of different anatomical regions: ankle joint, knee, hips and pelvis, hand and wrist joint, elbow, shoulder, spinal cord. 3. Appendix: radiation protection according to the X-ray regulations.

  4. SHOULD DIAGNOSTIC HYSTEROSCOPY BE A ROUTINE PROCEDURE DURING DIAGNOSTIC LAPAROSCOPY IN INFERTILE WOMEN?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godinjak, Zulfo; Idrizbegović, Edin

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify the role of simultaneous combined diagnostic approach using laparoscopy and hysteroscopy in the evaluation of female infertility. In a retrospective study, 360 infertile women underwent complete fertility evaluation. All the patients were examined by simultaneous combined laparoscopy and hysteroscopy as a part of the routine infertility evaluation. Laparoscopy and hysteroscopy were successful in 360 patients. Bilateral tubes were blocked in 18 (5%) and unilateral tubal occlusion were in 30 (8,33%) of patients. Pelvic adhesions were revealed in 40 (11,11%), and myomas in 42 (11,65%) out of that 31 (8,6%) were revealed by laparoscopy and 11 (3,05%) by hysteroscopy. Endometrial polyps were revealed in 26 (7,22%) and Syndrome Asherman in 3(0,83%) of patients. Uterine anomaly was found in 19 (5,27%) of cases and out of that septate uterus in 7 (37,15%), bicornuate uterus in 5 (26,31%), arcuate uterus in 4 (21,26%) and uterus unicornu cum cornu rudimentario in 3 (15,27%) of uterine anomalies. Endometriosis was found in 51 (14,16%), dermoid cysts in 8 (2,22%) and in 16 (4,44%) functional cysts of patients. Also, Fitz-Hugh- Curtis syndrome was revealed in 23 (6,11%) of our patients. Laparoscopy and hysteroscopy play very important role as diagnostic tools in the infertility women. Combined diagnostic simultaneous laparoscopy and hysteroscopy should be performed in all infertile patients before the treatment. PMID:18318671

  5. A review of current radiation protection in radiological diagnostics in Montenegro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mijovic, Slavoljub; Kovacevic, Zarko; Vuceljic, Mira; Scepanovic, Mara; Picuric, Ivana; Mardjokic, Aleksandar

    2008-01-01

    After getting independence 2006 year and became 192nd member of UN, Montenegro state is conducting measures for radiation protection autonomously. Because of complexity of such issues, Montenegro faced a lot of problems: lack of a national legal system in this field, expertise, appropriate equipments etc. Some estimates have shown that the major exposures of populations in Montenegro to ionizing radiation are due to the medical care. The purpose of this work is to analyze current protection in radiological diagnostics in Montenegro and compare it with international standards. It could be clearly stated where they are in agreement or disagreement. The method of analyzing is a holistic one, starting from the law, regulations and decisions through the protocols of quality controls and finishing with the reports and database of important parameters and data. The main findings are stated as follows: although the current radiation protection in radiological diagnostics is conducting according the law of former Federal Republic of Yugoslavia (FRY) and its regulations and decisions, the overall legal system is still satisfactory; Identification and location of radiation sources through a system of notification and maintaining a national inventory is not satisfactory; There are a lack of expertise and equipments for the technical services, although the procedures and protocols of the quality control are at a satisfactory level; There is a lack of knowledge of professional staff working in this field. The practice is sometimes operated carelessly; The patients protection is satisfactory but there is not care to decrease a level of exposure according the ALARA principle. (author)

  6. DIII-D radiation shielding procedures and experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, P.L.

    1991-11-01

    The D3-D tokamak operates with a neutron radiation shield to allow enhanced plasma operations with increased neutron production while minimizing the site boundary dose level. Neutron rates as high as 4 x 10 15 neutrons/s and total neutron production as high as 4 x 10 15 neutrons per shot are obtained while maintaining the site dose below the DOE administrative level of 20 mrem per year; a much more restrictive level than the State of California radiation limits. The radiation shielding has increased by a factor of 300 over the preshield value and is in agreement with the design calculation. The maximum site neutron dose since installation of the shield has been less than 0.03 mrem for a shot and less than 0.4 mrem for a day. The site neutron and gamma dose are monitored continuously during operations by a PC-based computer system that provides the means of measuring the low dose levels that occur during a shot by including postshot background subtraction. The neutron and gamma dose are measured and archived by shot, hour, and day in a database. Activation of the machine after a run day and during vessel entries is monitored and the activated nuclides have been determined. A radiation monitoring program and procedures are used to control the exposures to facility personnel and the exposure at the site boundary

  7. Current global and Korean issues in radiation safety of nuclear medicine procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, H C

    2016-06-01

    In recent years, the management of patient doses in medical imaging has evolved as concern about radiation exposure has increased. Efforts and techniques to reduce radiation doses are focussed not only on the basis of patient safety, but also on the fundamentals of justification and optimisation in cooperation with international organisations such as the International Commission on Radiological Protection, the International Atomic Energy Agency, and the World Health Organization. The Image Gently campaign in children and Image Wisely campaign in adults to lower radiation doses have been initiated in the USA. The European Association of Nuclear Medicine paediatric dosage card, North American consensus guidelines, and Nuclear Medicine Global Initiative have recommended the activities of radiopharmaceuticals that should be administered in children. Diagnostic reference levels (DRLs), developed predominantly in Europe, may be an important tool to manage patient doses. In Korea, overexposure to radiation, even from the use of medical imaging, has become a public issue, particularly since the accident at the Fukushima nuclear power plant. As a result, the Korean Nuclear Safety and Security Commission revised the technical standards for radiation safety management in medical fields. In parallel, DRLs for nuclear medicine procedures have been collected on a nationwide scale. Notice of total effective dose from positron emission tomography-computed tomography for cancer screening has been mandatory since mid-November 2014. © The International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics.

  8. The Swedish radiation protection institute's regulations on x-ray diagnostics; issued on April 28, 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-04-01

    These regulations are applicable to practices with ionising radiation with respect to medical and dental diagnostics by means of external radiation sources like x-rays or radioactive substances. The regulations are also applicable to medical or dental use of such radiation sources for planning and guidance, for research and for legal and insurance related examinations

  9. Establishment of diagnostic reference levels in computed tomography for select procedures in Pudhuchery, India

    OpenAIRE

    Saravanakumar, A.; Vaideki, K.; Govindarajan, K. N.; Jayakumar, S.

    2014-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) scanner under operating conditions has become a major source of human exposure to diagnostic X-rays. In this context, weighed CT dose index (CTDI w ), volumetric CT dose index (CTDI v ), and dose length product (DLP) are important parameter to assess procedures in CT imaging as surrogate dose quantities for patient dose optimization. The current work aims to estimate the existing dose level of CT scanner for head, chest, and abdomen procedures in Pudhuchery in south I...

  10. New perineal injection technique for pudendal nerve infiltration in diagnostic and therapeutic procedures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weinschenk, Stefan; Hollmann, Markus W.; Strowitzki, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Pudendal nerve injection is used as a diagnostic procedure in the vulvar region and for therapeutic purposes, such as in vulvodynia. Here, we provide a new, easy-to-perform perineal injection technique. We analyzed 105 perineal injections into the pudendal nerve with a local anesthetic (LA),

  11. Anaesthesiological aspects of thorax-diagnostic procedures in intensive-care units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulte am Esch, J.

    1989-01-01

    Diagnostic procedures of the thorax in intensive-care units are conventional X-ray chest images, chest images by digital luminescence radiography, sonography and transoesophageal Doppler echocardiography. In addition to these bedside methods the stationary usable techniques, such as computed tomography, digital subtraction angiography and the seldom in intensive care patients used computed nuclear spin resonance tomography (NMR) are applicable. The selection of the above mentioned techniques depends on the availability and the quality of the methods as well as the qualifications of the involved staff. The diagnostic procedures of the chest must be arranged depending on the decision if patients have to be transported or not. In conclusion it can be stated that in spite of growing technical preconditions the availability of the methods in immobile patients and the diagnostic potency of the techniques have to be examined. (orig.) [de

  12. Radiation exposure and image quality in x-Ray diagnostic radiology physical principles and clinical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Aichinger, Horst; Joite-Barfuß, Sigrid; Säbel, Manfred

    2012-01-01

    The largest contribution to radiation exposure to the population as a whole arises from diagnostic X-rays. Protecting the patient from radiation is a major aim of modern health policy, and an understanding of the relationship between radiation dose and image quality is of pivotal importance in optimising medical diagnostic radiology. In this volume the data provided for exploring these concerns are partly based on X-ray spectra, measured on diagnostic X-ray tube assemblies, and are supplemented by the results of measurements on phantoms and simulation calculations.

  13. Radiation exposure during the lateral lumbar interbody fusion procedure and techniques to reduce radiation dosage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatsumi, Robert L

    2012-01-01

    Fluoroscopy is widely used in spine surgery to assist with graft and hardware placement. Previous studies have not measured radiation exposure to a surgeon during minimally invasive lateral lumbar spine surgery for single-level discectomy and interbody cage insertion. This study was performed to model and measure radiation exposure to a surgeon during spine surgery using the direct lateral lumbar procedure. The study was performed using a mannequin substituting for the surgeon and a cadaver substituting for the patient. Radiation was measured with dosimeters attached to 6 locations on the mannequin using a OEC Medical Systems 9800 C-arm fluoroscope (OEC Medical Systems, Salt Lake City, Utah). Three different fluoroscopy setups were tested: a standard imaging setup, a standard setup using pulsed-mode fluoroscopy, and a reversed setup. The experiment was tested 5 times per setup, and the dosimeters' values were recorded. The highest amount of radiation exposure occurred when obtaining an anteroposterior view of the spine in the standard setup. Compared with the standard setup, the pulsed-mode setting decreased the radiation exposure to the mannequin by a factor of 6 times (P exposure to the mannequin by a factor of 6 times (P exposure to the eye level (P exposure. Radiation exposure to the surgeon can be greatly minimized by using either a pulsed imaging mode or the reversed setup. The reversed setup has the lowest amount of radiation exposure to the eye level.

  14. Radiation doses by radiation diagnostics at the border of a hospital. Calculation model for Nuclear Energy Law regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapiro, B.; Thijssen, T.; De Jong, R.

    2000-01-01

    According to the Nuclear Energy Law in the Netherlands radiation doses at the border of a specific institute (e.g. hospitals) must be determined which can not simply be done by measurements. In this article a model calculation for radiation diagnostics is described

  15. Nuclear energy - Radioprotection - Procedure for radiation protection monitoring in nuclear installations for external exposure to weakly penetrating radiation, especially to beta radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    This International Standard specifies a procedure for radiation protection monitoring in nuclear installations for external exposure to weakly penetrating radiation, especially to beta radiation and describes the procedure in radiation protection monitoring for external exposure to weakly penetrating radiation in nuclear installations. This radiation comprises β - radiation, β + radiation and conversion electron radiation as well as photon radiation with energies below 15 keV. This International Standard describes the procedure in radiation protection planning and monitoring as well as the measurement and analysis to be applied. It applies to regular nuclear power plant operation including maintenance, waste handling and decommissioning. The recommendations of this International Standard may also be transferred to other nuclear fields including reprocessing, if the area-specific issues are considered. This International Standard may also be applied to radiation protection at accelerator facilities and in nuclear medicine, biology and research facilities

  16. Practical techniques for reducing radiation exposure during cerebral angiography procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearl, Monica S; Torok, Collin; Wang, Jiangxia; Wyse, Emily; Mahesh, Mahadevappa; Gailloud, Philippe

    2015-02-01

    DSA remains the gold standard imaging method for the evaluation of many cerebrovascular disorders, in particular cerebral aneurysms and vascular malformations. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the effect of modifying DSA frame rate, fluoroscopic and roadmap pulse rates, and flat panel detector (FPD) position on the radiation dose delivered during routine views for a cerebral angiogram in a phantom model. Adult skull and abdomen/pelvis anthropomorphic phantoms were used to compare the radiation dose metrics Ka,r (in mGy), PKA (in μGym(2)), and fluoroscopy time (in minutes) after modification of fluoroscopic pulses per second (p/s), DSA frames per second (f/s), and FPD position and collimation in three components of a cerebral angiogram: (1) femoral artery access, (2) roadmap guidance, and (3) biplane cerebral DSA. For femoral artery access, DSA protocols resulted in significantly higher doses than those utilizing fluoroscopy alone (p=0.007). Roadmaps using 3 p/s or 4 p/s delivered significantly less dose than higher pulse rates (p=0.008). The ranges of delivered doses for biplane cerebral DSA were 347.3-1188.5 mGy and 3914.54-9518.78 μGym(2). The lowest radiation doses were generated by the variable frame rate DSA protocols. Replacing femoral arterial access evaluations by DSA with fluoroscopy, utilizing lower pulse rates during fluoroscopy and roadmap guidance, and choosing variable frame rates for DSA are simple techniques that may be considered by operators in their clinical practices to lower radiation dose during cerebral angiography procedures. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  17. MRI-guided stereotactic neurosurgical procedures in a diagnostic MRI suite: Background and safe practice recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Paul S; Willie, Jon T; Vadivelu, Sudhakar; Azmi-Ghadimi, Hooman; Nichols, Amy; Fauerbach, Loretta Litz; Johnson, Helen Boehm; Graham, Denise

    2017-07-01

    The development of navigation technology facilitating MRI-guided stereotactic neurosurgery has enabled neurosurgeons to perform a variety of procedures ranging from deep brain stimulation to laser ablation entirely within an intraoperative or diagnostic MRI suite while having real-time visualization of brain anatomy. Prior to this technology, some of these procedures required multisite workflow patterns that presented significant risk to the patient during transport. For those facilities with access to this technology, safe practice guidelines exist only for procedures performed within an intraoperative MRI. There are currently no safe practice guidelines or parameters available for facilities looking to integrate this technology into practice in conventional MRI suites. Performing neurosurgical procedures in a diagnostic MRI suite does require precautionary measures. The relative novelty of technology and workflows for direct MRI-guided procedures requires consideration of safe practice recommendations, including those pertaining to infection control and magnet safety issues. This article proposes a framework of safe practice recommendations designed for assessing readiness and optimization of MRI-guided neurosurgical interventions in the diagnostic MRI suite in an effort to mitigate patient risk. The framework is based on existing clinical evidence, recommendations, and guidelines related to infection control and prevention, health care-associated infections, and magnet safety, as well as the clinical and practical experience of neurosurgeons utilizing this technology. © 2017 American Society for Healthcare Risk Management of the American Hospital Association.

  18. Establishment of national diagnostic reference levels for breast cancer CT protocols in radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, Sean O'; Mc Ardle, Orla; Mullaney, Laura

    2016-10-01

    To establish whether CT dose variation occurs in breast cancer localization procedures between radiation therapy (RT) centres in Ireland and to propose diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) for this procedure. All RT centres in Ireland were invited to participate in a dose audit survey, providing data on the CT dose index volume (CTDIvol), dose-length product (DLP), current-time product (mAs), tube potential, scan length, slice thickness, scanning margins, use of automated exposure control (AEC) and scanner technology for 10 patients with breast cancer who were average sized. DRLs were derived for each dose descriptor by calculation of the rounded 75th percentile of the distribution of mean doses. Data were returned for 60 patients from 6 RT centres (50% response rate). Significant variation in mean CTDIvol and mean DLP was observed between centres (p CT dose variation occurs between centres, establishing a need for optimization. DRLs for breast cancer localization have been proposed with the potential for reduction in CT dose. This article provides the first reported DRL for breast cancer CT localization procedure in RT and can be used as a benchmark for comparison for other RT centres.

  19. The impact of education on occupational radiation exposure reduction in a diagnostic radiology department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vetter, R.J.; Gray, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    Patient load, number of radiographic exams, complexity of some exams, and associated potential occupational radiation exposure of medical personnel have increased significantly in the past decade. Efforts to reduce exposure through employee education and awareness have resulted in significant reduction in occupational exposure for most diagnostic radiographic areas at Mayo Clinic. This paper reviews trends in occupational radiation exposure from diagnostic x- rays at Mayo Clinic over the past ten years. Changes in employee radiation dose equivalents are correlated with patient workload, complexity of exams, increased interventional radiology and cardiology, and efforts to reduce employee radiation exposure

  20. [X-ray endoscopic semiotics and diagnostic algorithm of radiation studies of preneoplastic gastric mucosa changes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akberov, R F; Gorshkov, A N

    1997-01-01

    The X-ray endoscopic semiotics of precancerous gastric mucosal changes (epithelial dysplasia, intestinal epithelial rearrangement) was examined by the results of 1574 gastric examination. A diagnostic algorithm was developed for radiation studies in the diagnosis of the above pathology.

  1. Evaluation of occupational radiation exposure in cardiology interventional procedures in some Khartoum hospitals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahim, Doaa Mohammed Ali

    2015-12-01

    The number of cardiology interventional procedures has significantly increased recently. This is due to the reliability of the diagnostic equipment to diagnose many heart diseases. In the procedures the x-ray used results in increasing radiation doses to the staff. The cardiologists and other staff member in interventional cardiology are usually working close to the area under examination and receive the dose primarily as well as from scattered radiation from the patients. In this study three electronic personal dosimeters (EPDs) were used to measured personal equivalent dose Hp (10) for assessment staff doses were monitoring during interventional cardiology procedure, totally in (100) procedures were performed in two clinical. The procedures was collect in two main hospitals in Khartoum State, the staff workers include cardiologists, technologists and nurses. The EPDs were used by each worker at the two cardiology centers, was one worn under a protective apron attach to chest. The annual doses received by 6 cardiologists, 6 nurses and 2 technologists at the sudan heart center were tn the range: (27.25-33.5) μSv, (3.25-3.66) μSv, (3.25-3.66) μSv, (3.23 and 3.70) μSv respectively. In the royal care hospital the annual doses received by 2 doctors, 4 nurses and 2 technologists were in the range ( 38.375 and 39.375) μSv (12.06-14.125) μSv, (8.5 and 9.25) μSv respectively, estimated for four weeks. The highest doses were received by the cardiologist followed by nurses and the x-ray technicians. The results showed that the annual doses received by the workers do not exceed 20 mSv. Recommendation on how to reduce staff doses in interventional cardiology are presented.(Author)

  2. General Principles of Radiation Protection in Fields of Diagnostic Medical Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Kyung-Hyun

    2016-02-01

    After the rapid development of medical equipment including CT or PET-CT, radiation doses from medical exposure are now the largest source of man-made radiation exposure. General principles of radiation protection from the hazard of ionizing radiation are summarized as three key words; justification, optimization, and dose limit. Because medical exposure of radiation has unique considerations, diagnostic reference level is generally used as a reference value, instead of dose limits. In Korea, medical radiation exposure has increased rapidly. For medical radiation exposure control, Korea has two separate control systems. Regulation is essential to control medical radiation exposure. Physicians and radiologists must be aware of the radiation risks and benefits associated with medical exposure, and understand and implement the principles of radiation protection for patients. The education of the referring physicians and radiologists is also important.

  3. Assessment of medical radiation exposure to patients and ambient doses in several diagnostic radiology departments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulieman, A.; Elhadi, T.; Babikir, E.; Alkhorayef, M.; Alnaaimi, M.; Alduaij, M.; Bradley, D. A.

    2017-11-01

    In many countries diagnostic medical exposures typically account for a very large fraction of the collective effective dose that can be assigned to anthropological sources and activities. This in part flags up the question of whether sufficient steps are being taken in regard to potential dose saving from such medical services. As a first step, one needs to survey doses to compare against those of best practice. The present study has sought evaluation of the radiation protection status and patient doses for certain key radiological procedures in four film-based radiology departments within Sudan. The radiation exposure survey, carried out using a survey meter and quality control test tools, involved a total of 299 patients their examinations being carried out at one or other of these four departments. The entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) was determined from exposure settings using DosCal software and an Unfors -Xi-meter. The mean ESAK for x-ray examination of the chest was 0.30±0.1 mGy, for the skull it was 0.96±0.7 mGy, for the abdomen 0.85±0.01 mGy, for spinal procedures 1.30±0.6 mGy and for procedures involving the limbs it was 0.43±0.3 mGy. Ambient dose-rates in the reception area, at the closed door of the x-ray room, recorded instantaneous values of up to 100 μSv/h. In regard to protection, the associated levels were found to be acceptable in three of the four departments, corrective action being required for one department, regular quality control also being recommended.

  4. A new non intercepting beam size diagnostics using diffraction radiation from a Slit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castellano, M.

    1996-09-01

    A new non interpreting beam size diagnostic for high charge electron beams is presented. This diagnostics is based on the analysis of the angular distribution of the 'diffracted' transition radiation emitted by the beam when crossing a slit cut in metallic foil. It allows a resolution better then the radiation transverse formation zone. Numerical results based on the parameters of the TTF FEL beam are given as example

  5. A new non intercepting beam size diagnostics using diffraction radiation from a Slit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castellano, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Frascati (Italy). Lab. Nazionale di Frascati

    1996-09-01

    A new non interpreting beam size diagnostic for high charge electron beams is presented. This diagnostics is based on the analysis of the angular distribution of the `diffracted` transition radiation emitted by the beam when crossing a slit cut in metallic foil. It allows a resolution better then the radiation transverse formation zone. Numerical results based on the parameters of the TTF FEL beam are given as example.

  6. Updating Allergy and/or Hypersensitivity Diagnostic Procedures in the WHO ICD-11 Revision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanno, Luciana Kase; Calderon, Moises A; Li, James; Casale, Thomas; Demoly, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    The classification of allergy and/or hypersensitivity conditions for the World Health Organization (WHO) International Classification of Diseases (ICD)-11 provides the appropriate corresponding codes for allergic diseases, assuming that the final diagnosis is correct. This classification should be linked to in vitro and in vivo diagnostic procedures. Considering the impact for our specialty, we decided to review the codification of these procedures into the ICD aiming to have a baseline and to suggest changes and/or submit new proposals. For that, we prepared a list of the relevant allergy and/or hypersensitivity diagnostic procedures that health care professionals are dealing with on a daily basis. This was based on the main current guidelines and selected all possible and relevant corresponding terms from the ICD-10 (2015 version) and the ICD-11 β phase foundation (June 2015 version). More than 90% of very specific and important diagnostic procedures currently used by the allergists' community on a daily basis are missing. We observed that some concepts usually used by the allergist community on a daily basis are not fully recognized by other specialties. The whole scheme and the correspondence in the ICD-10 (2015 version) and ICD-11 foundation (June 2015 version) provided us a big picture of the missing or imprecise terms and how they are scattered in the current ICD-11 framework, allowing us to submit new proposals to increase the visibility of the allergy and/or hypersensitivity conditions and diagnostic procedures. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. All rights reserved.

  7. 42 CFR 414.506 - Procedures for public consultation for payment for a new clinical diagnostic laboratory test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... a new clinical diagnostic laboratory test. 414.506 Section 414.506 Public Health CENTERS FOR... FOR PART B MEDICAL AND OTHER HEALTH SERVICES Payment for New Clinical Diagnostic Laboratory Tests § 414.506 Procedures for public consultation for payment for a new clinical diagnostic laboratory test...

  8. Value of noninvasive diagnostic procedures in cardiology: typical findings in hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riebeling, V.; Bubenheimer, P.

    1984-06-01

    Routine chest X-ray often yields poor information for diagnosis of heart disease. The diagnostic value of invasive procedures in cardiology is generally accepted. The patient's as well as the physician's risk of the examination, however, has to be considered. A high number of heart diseases, e.g. hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM) is mainly detected by noninvasive procedures such as auscultation, electrocardiography, phonomechanocardiography, echocardiography, physical manoeuvres, and pharmacological provocation tests. Typical findings in hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy are demonstrated.

  9. Activity based costing of diagnostic procedures at a nuclear medicine center of a tertiary care hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hada, Mahesh Singh; Chakravarty, Abhijit; Mukherjee, Partha

    2014-01-01

    Escalating health care expenses pose a new challenge to the health care environment of becoming more cost-effective. There is an urgent need for more accurate data on the costs of health care procedures. Demographic changes, changing morbidity profile, and the rising impact of noncommunicable diseases are emphasizing the role of nuclear medicine (NM) in the future health care environment. However, the impact of emerging disease load and stagnant resource availability needs to be balanced by a strategic drive towards optimal utilization of available healthcare resources. The aim was to ascertain the cost of diagnostic procedures conducted at the NM Department of a tertiary health care facility by employing activity based costing (ABC) method. A descriptive cross-sectional study was carried out over a period of 1 year. ABC methodology was utilized for ascertaining unit cost of different diagnostic procedures and such costs were compared with prevalent market rates for estimating cost effectiveness of the department being studied. The cost per unit procedure for various procedures varied from Rs. 869 (USD 14.48) for a thyroid scan to Rs. 11230 (USD 187.16) for a meta-iodo-benzyl-guanidine (MIBG) scan, the most cost-effective investigations being the stress thallium, technetium-99 m myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) and MIBG scan. The costs obtained from this study were observed to be competitive when compared to prevalent market rates. ABC methodology provides precise costing inputs and should be used for all future costing studies in NM Departments

  10. Activity based costing of diagnostic procedures at a nuclear medicine center of a tertiary care hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hada, Mahesh Singh; Chakravarty, Abhijit; Mukherjee, Partha

    2014-10-01

    Escalating health care expenses pose a new challenge to the health care environment of becoming more cost-effective. There is an urgent need for more accurate data on the costs of health care procedures. Demographic changes, changing morbidity profile, and the rising impact of noncommunicable diseases are emphasizing the role of nuclear medicine (NM) in the future health care environment. However, the impact of emerging disease load and stagnant resource availability needs to be balanced by a strategic drive towards optimal utilization of available healthcare resources. The aim was to ascertain the cost of diagnostic procedures conducted at the NM Department of a tertiary health care facility by employing activity based costing (ABC) method. A descriptive cross-sectional study was carried out over a period of 1 year. ABC methodology was utilized for ascertaining unit cost of different diagnostic procedures and such costs were compared with prevalent market rates for estimating cost effectiveness of the department being studied. The cost per unit procedure for various procedures varied from Rs. 869 (USD 14.48) for a thyroid scan to Rs. 11230 (USD 187.16) for a meta-iodo-benzyl-guanidine (MIBG) scan, the most cost-effective investigations being the stress thallium, technetium-99 m myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) and MIBG scan. The costs obtained from this study were observed to be competitive when compared to prevalent market rates. ABC methodology provides precise costing inputs and should be used for all future costing studies in NM Departments.

  11. Diagnostic criterions of the postradiation encephalopathy in remote period of the acute radiation syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyagu, A.I.; Loganovskij, K.N.; Vashchenko, E.A.

    1998-01-01

    Development of post-radiation encephalopathy diagnostic criteria on the base of neuro psychic, neuro- and psychofisiological research in patients who suffered with acute radiation disease after Chernobyl catastrophe was the aim of this work. 110 persons of 20-75 years age were investigated. 55 refs., 6 tab., 6 figs

  12. Estimated cumulative radiation dose received by diagnostic imaging during staging and treatment of operable Ewing sarcoma 2005-2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnsen, Boel [Haukeland University Hospital, Centre for Nuclear Medicine and PET, Department of Radiology, P.O. Box 1400, Bergen (Norway); Fasmer, Kristine Eldevik [Haukeland University Hospital, Department of Oncology, Medical Physics Section, Bergen (Norway); Boye, Kjetil [Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo University Hospital, Department of Oncology, Oslo (Norway); Rosendahl, Karen; Aukland, Stein Magnus [Haukeland University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Paediatric Section, Bergen (Norway); University of Bergen, Department of Clinical Medicine, Bergen (Norway); Trovik, Clement [University of Bergen, Department of Clinical Medicine, Bergen (Norway); Haukeland University Hospital, Department of Surgery, Orthopaedic Section, Bergen (Norway); Biermann, Martin [Haukeland University Hospital, Centre for Nuclear Medicine and PET, Department of Radiology, P.O. Box 1400, Bergen (Norway); University of Bergen, Department of Clinical Medicine, Bergen (Norway)

    2017-01-15

    Patients with Ewing sarcoma are subject to various diagnostic procedures that incur exposure to ionising radiation. To estimate the radiation doses received from all radiologic and nuclear imaging episodes during diagnosis and treatment, and to determine whether {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography - computed tomography ({sup 18}F-FDG PET-CT) is a major contributor of radiation. Twenty Ewing sarcoma patients diagnosed in Norway in 2005-2012 met the inclusion criteria (age <30 years, operable disease, uncomplicated chemotherapy and surgery, no metastasis or residual disease within a year of diagnosis). Radiation doses from all imaging during the first year were calculated for each patient. The mean estimated cumulative radiation dose for all patients was 34 mSv (range: 6-70), radiography accounting for 3 mSv (range: 0.2-12), CT for 13 mSv (range: 2-28) and nuclear medicine for 18 mSv (range: 2-47). For the patients examined with PET-CT, the mean estimated cumulative effective dose was 38 mSv, of which PET-CT accounted for 14 mSv (37%). There was large variation in number and type of examinations performed and also in estimated cumulative radiation dose. The mean radiation dose for patients examined with PET-CT was 23% higher than for patients not examined with PET-CT. (orig.)

  13. Estimated cumulative radiation dose received by diagnostic imaging during staging and treatment of operable Ewing sarcoma 2005-2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnsen, Boel; Fasmer, Kristine Eldevik; Boye, Kjetil; Rosendahl, Karen; Aukland, Stein Magnus; Trovik, Clement; Biermann, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Patients with Ewing sarcoma are subject to various diagnostic procedures that incur exposure to ionising radiation. To estimate the radiation doses received from all radiologic and nuclear imaging episodes during diagnosis and treatment, and to determine whether 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography - computed tomography ( 18 F-FDG PET-CT) is a major contributor of radiation. Twenty Ewing sarcoma patients diagnosed in Norway in 2005-2012 met the inclusion criteria (age <30 years, operable disease, uncomplicated chemotherapy and surgery, no metastasis or residual disease within a year of diagnosis). Radiation doses from all imaging during the first year were calculated for each patient. The mean estimated cumulative radiation dose for all patients was 34 mSv (range: 6-70), radiography accounting for 3 mSv (range: 0.2-12), CT for 13 mSv (range: 2-28) and nuclear medicine for 18 mSv (range: 2-47). For the patients examined with PET-CT, the mean estimated cumulative effective dose was 38 mSv, of which PET-CT accounted for 14 mSv (37%). There was large variation in number and type of examinations performed and also in estimated cumulative radiation dose. The mean radiation dose for patients examined with PET-CT was 23% higher than for patients not examined with PET-CT. (orig.)

  14. Radiation syndrome - pathogenesis, course, diagnostic and therapeutic measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trott, K.R.

    1981-01-01

    Owing to lack of practical experience, schemes for medical aid in cases of reactor accidents are based on theoretical models and the results of radiation biology and tumor research. The chances for medical assistance are deduced from the course of the radiation syndrome in affected persons. (DG) [de

  15. Oncology Patient Perceptions of the Use of Ionizing Radiation in Diagnostic Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Joseph R; Jones, Aaron K; Clarke, Ryan K; Giordano, Sharon H; Shoemaker, Stowe

    2016-07-01

    To measure the knowledge of oncology patients regarding use and potential risks of ionizing radiation in diagnostic imaging. A 30-question survey was developed and e-mailed to 48,736 randomly selected patients who had undergone a diagnostic imaging study at a comprehensive cancer center between November 1, 2013 and January 31, 2014. The survey was designed to measure patients' knowledge about use of ionizing radiation in diagnostic imaging and attitudes about radiation. Nonresponse bias was quantified by sending an abbreviated survey to patients who did not respond to the original survey. Of the 48,736 individuals who were sent the initial survey, 9,098 (18.7%) opened it, and 5,462 (11.2%) completed it. A total of 21.7% of respondents reported knowing the definition of ionizing radiation; 35.1% stated correctly that CT used ionizing radiation; and 29.4% stated incorrectly that MRI used ionizing radiation. Many respondents did not understand risks from exposure to diagnostic doses of ionizing radiation: Of 3,139 respondents who believed that an abdominopelvic CT scan carried risk, 1,283 (40.9%) believed sterility was a risk; 669 (21.3%) believed heritable mutations were a risk; 657 (20.9%) believed acute radiation sickness was a risk; and 135 (4.3%) believed cataracts were a risk. Most patients and caregivers do not possess basic knowledge regarding the use of ionizing radiation in oncologic diagnostic imaging. To ensure health literacy and high-quality patient decision making, efforts to educate patients and caregivers should be increased. Such education might begin with information about effects that are not risks of diagnostic imaging. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Childhood leukaemia following medical diagnostic exposure to ionizing radiation in utero or after birth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakeford, R.

    2008-01-01

    A statistical association between childhood leukaemia and an abdominal X-ray examination of the pregnant mother was first reported in 1956 from a case-control study of childhood cancer mortality conducted in Great Britain. This study, later called the Oxford Survey of Childhood Cancers (OSCC), was continued and eventually showed a highly statistically significant ∼50% proportional increase in the risk of childhood leukaemia associated with antenatal diagnostic radiography. The association has been confirmed by many case-control studies carried out around the world, the appropriately combined results of which show a highly statistically significant increase in risk that is compatible with the OSCC finding. There is no doubt about the reality of the statistical association, but a causal interpretation has been questioned. On balance, however, the evidence points to low-level irradiation of the fetus increasing the risk of leukaemia in childhood, with an excess relative risk coefficient of around 50 Gy -1 (equivalent to an excess absolute risk coefficient of about 3% Gy -1 ), although the uncertainty associated with these coefficients is considerable and they are likely to be overestimates. In contrast to exposure in utero, the evidence from case-control studies for an association between childhood leukaemia and postnatal exposure to medical diagnostic irradiation is equivocal and sometimes conflicting. Since standard radiation risk models predict that low-level exposure in the early years of life should produce an increased risk of childhood leukaemia that is roughly similar to that arising from fetal exposure, this absence of persuasive evidence is likely to be due to various problems with the studies. This is unfortunate given the rise in relatively high dose diagnostic procedures (e.g. paediatric CT scans) that would be predicted to materially increase the relative risk of childhood leukaemia. (authors)

  17. Pain related to cancer treatments and diagnostic procedures: a no man's land?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripamonti, C I; Bossi, P; Santini, D; Fallon, M

    2014-06-01

    While guidelines are available for the management of cancer-related pain, little attention is given to the assessment and treatment of pain caused by treatments and diagnostic procedures in cancer patients. We evaluated the literature on pain related to cancer treatment and diagnostic procedures within a critical analysis. The data available are sparse, suggesting that little attention has been directed at this important aspect of oncology. This points to potentially suboptimal patient management. Appropriate studies are necessary in order to understand the incidence and appropriate management of pain, both during and/or after oncological treatments and diagnostic procedures. At the same time, Health Care Professionals should have heightened awareness of the causes and treatment of pain with the aim of anticipating and managing pain most appropriately for each individual patient. This is clearly an important component of holistic patient care before, during, and after oncological treatment. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Research on radiation exposure from CT part of hybrid camera and diagnostic CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solný, Pavel; Zimák, Jaroslav

    2014-11-01

    Research on radiation exposure from CT part of hybrid camera in seven different Departments of Nuclear Medicine (DNM) was conducted. Processed data and effective dose (E) estimations led to the idea of phantom verification and comparison of absorbed doses and software estimation. Anonymous data from about 100 examinations from each DNM was gathered. Acquired data was processed and utilized by dose estimation programs (ExPACT, ImPACT, ImpactDose) with respect to the type of examination and examination procedures. Individual effective doses were calculated using enlisted programs. Preserving the same procedure in dose estimation process allows us to compare the resulting E. Some differences and disproportions during dose estimation led to the idea of estimated E verification. Consequently, two different sets of about 100 of TLD 100H detectors were calibrated for measurement inside the Aldersnon RANDO Anthropomorphic Phantom. Standard examination protocols were examined using a 2 Slice CT- part of hybrid SPECT/CT. Moreover, phantom exposure from body examining protocol for 32 Slice and 64 Slice diagnostic CT scanner was also verified. Absorbed dose (DT,R) measured using TLD detectors was compared with software estimation of equivalent dose HT values, computed by E estimation software. Though, only limited number of cavities for detectors enabled measurement within the regions of lung, liver, thyroid and spleen-pancreas region, some basic comparison is possible.

  19. Coordinated research programme on radiation protection in diagnostic radiology in Asia and the Far East

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Heron, J.

    1997-01-01

    Ten Asian countries (China, Vietnam, Thailand, Bangladesh, India, Pakistan, Iran, Philipppines, Malaysia, and Indonesia) are currently participating in a three year programme, as part of a Coordinated Research Programme of the International Atomic Energy Agency, aimed at reducing patient doses in diagnostic radiology through the implementation of optimisation of radiation protection. At the first meeting, held in Manila in September 1995, the project protocol was formulated for the first eighteen months of the programme, where the focus was on plain film radiography. The purpose of the second meeting was to briefly review the first half of the project, and to then come up with protocols for the second phase, where the attention was on dose reduction in fluoroscopic procedures and CT procedures. The second Research Coordination Meeting, held in Manila 3-7 March, was attended by participants from all the countries, with the exception of Iran, plus a consultant from each of Italy and New Zealand, and the scientific secretary from IAEA, Vienna. If the obvious enthusiasm of the participants is able to b maintained on return to their respective countries, then the signs are very healthy for a successful second phase of the programme. (author)

  20. Radiation dose reduction: comparative assessment of publication volume between interventional and diagnostic radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansmann, Jan; Henzler, Thomas; Gaba, Ron C; Morelli, John N

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to quantify and compare awareness regarding radiation dose reduction within the interventional radiology and diagnostic radiology communities. Abstracts accepted to the annual meetings of the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR), the Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe (CIRSE), the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA), and the European Congress of Radiology (ECR) between 2005 and 2015 were analyzed using the search terms "interventional/computed tomography" and "radiation dose/radiation dose reduction." A PubMed query using the above-mentioned search terms for the years of 2005-2015 was performed. Between 2005 and 2015, a total of 14 520 abstracts (mean, 660±297 abstracts) and 80 614 abstracts (mean, 3664±1025 abstracts) were presented at interventional and diagnostic radiology meetings, respectively. Significantly fewer abstracts related to radiation dose were presented at the interventional radiology meetings compared with the diagnostic radiology meetings (162 abstracts [1% of total] vs. 2706 [3% of total]; P radiology abstracts (range, 6-27) and 246±105 diagnostic radiology abstracts (range, 112-389) pertaining to radiation dose were presented at each meeting. The PubMed query revealed an average of 124±39 publications (range, 79-187) and 1205±307 publications (range, 829-1672) related to interventional and diagnostic radiology dose reduction per year, respectively (P radiology community over the past 10 years has not mirrored the increased volume seen within diagnostic radiology, suggesting that increased education and discussion about this topic may be warranted.

  1. Dose evaluation in medical staff during diagnostics procedures in interventional radiology; Avaliacao da dose na equipe medica durante procedimentos diagnoticos de radiologia intervencionista

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacchim Neto, Fernando A.; Alves, Allan F.F.; Rosa, Maria E.D.; Miranda, Jose R.A. [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Biociencias. Departamento de Fisica e Biofisica; Moura, Regina [Faculdade de Medicina de Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Departamento de Cirurgia e Ortopedia; Pina, Diana R., E-mail: bacchim@ibb.unesp.br [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Departamento de Doencas Tropicais e Diagnostico por Imagem

    2014-08-15

    Studies show that personal dosimeters may underestimate the dose values in interventional physicians, especially in extremities and crystalline. The objective of this work was to study the radiation exposure levels of medical staff in diagnostic interventional radiology procedures. For this purpose LiF:Mg,Ti (TLD-100) dosimeters were placed in different regions of the physician body. When comparing with reference dose levels, the maximum numbers of annual procedures were found. This information is essential to ensure the radiological protection of those professionals. (author)

  2. Method of middle-intensive electron beams diagnostics by means of transient radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vorobyov G. S.

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The general method of diagnostics of transient radiation of ribbon-shaped and axially-symmetric electron beams of small section and high power density is described. A comparative analysis of different types of receivers of a transient radiation is carried out for the first time. Advantages and disadvantages of each of receivers of radiation, which must be taken into account at the analysis of concrete object of researches, are indicated.

  3. Risk and safety requirements for diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in allergology: World Allergy Organization Statement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek L. Kowalski

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract One of the major concerns in the practice of allergy is related to the safety of procedures for the diagnosis and treatment of allergic disease. Management (diagnosis and treatment of hypersensitivity disorders involves often intentional exposure to potentially allergenic substances (during skin testing, deliberate induction in the office of allergic symptoms to offending compounds (provocation tests or intentional application of potentially dangerous substances (allergy vaccine to sensitized patients. These situations may be associated with a significant risk of unwanted, excessive or even dangerous reactions, which in many instances cannot be completely avoided. However, adverse reactions can be minimized or even avoided if a physician is fully aware of potential risk and is prepared to appropriately handle the situation. Information on the risk of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in allergic diseases has been accumulated in the medical literature for decades; however, except for allergen specific immunotherapy, it has never been presented in a systematic fashion. Up to now no single document addressed the risk of the most commonly used medical procedures in the allergy office nor attempted to present general requirements necessary to assure the safety of these procedures. Following review of available literature a group of allergy experts within the World Allergy Organization (WAO, representing various continents and areas of allergy expertise, presents this report on risk associated with diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in allergology and proposes a consensus on safety requirements for performing procedures in allergy offices. Optimal safety measures including appropriate location, type and required time of supervision, availability of safety equipment, access to specialized emergency services, etc. for various procedures have been recommended. This document should be useful for allergists with already established

  4. Analysis of utilization patterns and associated costs of the breast imaging and diagnostic procedures after screening mammography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlahiotis A

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Anna Vlahiotis,1 Brian Griffin,2 A Thomas Stavros,3 Jay Margolis1 1Value Based Care, Outcomes Research, Truven Health Analytics, an IBM Company, Bethesda, MD USA; 2Value Based Care, Outcomes Research, Truven Health Analytics, an IBM Company, Newark, NJ, USA; 3Seno Medical Instruments, Inc., San Antonio, TX, USA Background: Little data exist on real-world patterns and associated costs of downstream breast diagnostic procedures following an abnormal screening mammography or clinical exam.Objectives: To analyze the utilization patterns in real-world clinical settings for breast imaging and diagnostic procedures, including the frequency and volume of patients and procedures, procedure sequencing, and associated health care expenditures.Materials and methods: Using medical claims from 2011 to 2015 MarketScan Commercial and Medicare Databases, adult females with breast imaging/diagnostic procedures (diagnostic mammography, ultrasound, molecular breast imaging, tomosynthesis, magnetic resonance imaging, or biopsy other than screening mammography were selected. Continuous health plan coverage without breast diagnostic procedures was required for ≥13 months before the first found breast diagnostic procedure (index event, with a 13-month post-index follow-up period. Key outcomes included diagnostic procedure volumes, sequences, and payments. Results reported descriptively were projected to provide US national patient and procedure volumes.Results: The final sample of 875,526 patients was nationally projected to 12,394,432 patients annually receiving 8,732,909 diagnostic mammograms (53.3% of patients, 6,987,399 breast ultrasounds (42.4% of patients, and 1,585,856 biopsies (10.3% of patients. Following initial diagnostic procedures, 49.4% had second procedures, 20.1% followed with third procedures, and 10.0% had a fourth procedure. Mean (SD costs for diagnostic mammograms of US$349 ($493, ultrasounds US$132 ($134, and biopsies US$1,938 ($2,343 contributed

  5. Inactivation of rabies diagnostic reagents by gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gamble, W.C.; Chappell, W.A.; George, E.H.

    1980-11-01

    Treatment of CVS-11 rabies adsorbing suspensions and street rabies infected mouse brains with gamma radiation resulted in inactivated reagents that are safer to distribute and use. These irradiated reagents were as sensitive and reactive as the nonirradiated control reagents.

  6. Inactivation of rabies diagnostic reagents by gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamble, W.C.; Chappell, W.A.; George, E.H.

    1980-01-01

    Treatment of CVS-11 rabies adsorbing suspensions and street rabies infected mouse brains with gamma radiation resulted in inactivated reagents that are safer to distribute and use. These irradiated reagents were as sensitive and reactive as the nonirradiated control reagents

  7. Pragmatic ethical basis for radiation protection in diagnostic radiology

    OpenAIRE

    Malone, Jim; Z?lzer, Friedo

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Medical ethics has a tried and tested literature and a global active research community. Even among health professionals, literate and fluent in medical ethics, there is low recognition of radiation protection principles such as justification and optimization. On the other hand, many in healthcare environments misunderstand dose limitation obligations and incorrectly believe patients are protected by norms including a dose limit. Implementation problems for radiation protection in ...

  8. Indications for invasive prenatal diagnostic procedures at a dedicated fetal medicine centre: an 8 year audit 2003-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valayatham, Vijayan; Subramaniam, Raman; Juan, Yap Moy; Chia, Patrick

    2013-08-01

    Analyze indications and type of prenatal diagnostic procedures performed. This retrospective audit was conducted at a dedicated fetal medicine center in Petaling Jaya. All invasive prenatal diagnosis procedures performed from 2003 up until 2010 (amniocentesis, chorionic villous sampling and fetal blood sampling) were analyzed. A total of 1560 invasive prenatal diagnostic procedures were performed during the 8 year period. Advanced maternal age is the leading indication for invasive prenatal diagnostic procedures followed by fetal abnormalities. The fetal loss rate was 0.2% for amniocentesis and 1.2% for CVS. Advanced maternal age is the leading indication for invasive prenatal diagnostic procedures at this centre but is on a declining trend. The fetal loss rates are comparable to auditable standards set by professional bodies, in this case, the Royal College of Obstetricians & Gynecologists of London.

  9. A Diagnostic Procedure for Transformative Change Based on Transitions, Resilience, and Institutional Thinking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Briony C. Ferguson

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Urban water governance regimes around the world have traditionally planned large-scale, centralized infrastructure systems that aim to control variables and reduce uncertainties. There is growing sectoral awareness that a transition toward sustainable alternatives is necessary if systems are to meet society's future water needs in the context of drivers such as climate change and variability, demographic changes, environmental degradation, and resource scarcity. However, there is minimal understanding of how the urban water sector should operationalize its strategic planning for such change to facilitate the transition to a sustainable water future. We have integrated concepts from transitions, resilience, and institutional theory to develop a diagnostic procedure for revealing insights into which types of strategic action are most likely to influence the direction and pace of change in the overall system toward a desired trajectory. The procedure used the multipattern approach, from transition theory, to identify the system conditions and type of changes necessary for enabling system transformation. It incorporated the adaptive cycle, from resilience theory, to identify the current phase of change for different parts of the system. Finally, it drew on the concepts of institutional pillars and institutional work to identify mechanisms that are likely to be most effective in influencing the transformative dynamics of the system toward a desired trajectory. We have demonstrated application of the proposed diagnostic procedure on a case study of recent transformative change in the urban water system of Melbourne, Australia. We have proposed that an operational diagnostic procedure provides a useful platform from which planners, policy analysts, and decision makers could follow a process of deduction that identifies which types of strategic action best fit the current system conditions.

  10. Calibration of diagnostic x-ray machines using radiation exposure and radiographic parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agba, E.H.; Uloko, P. I.; Tyovenda, A. A.

    2011-01-01

    Calibration of diagnostic x-ray machines using radiation exposure and radiographic parameters of the x-ray machines has been carried out. Three phase diagnostic x-ray machines situated at Federal Medical Centre, Makurdi, General Hospital, Otukpo and Christian Hospital, Mkar were used for the calibration work. The radiation meter was used to measure x-ray radiation exposure. The result of this work demonstrates mR/mAs=C(KV p ) that there exist a power law relation of the form between the radiation exposure and the radiographic parameters of diagnostic x-ray machines, which can be used to estimate patient exposure during routine x-ray diagnostic examinations for wide range of operating parameters. The values of the power exponent n, constant c and total filtrations of the diagnostic x-ray machines have been estimated. These values for the diagnostic x-ray machines at the Federal Medical Centre, Makurdi are: 2.14, 0.88 and 2.77 respectively, for the one at the General Hospital, Otukpo are: 2.07, 0.76 and 2.68 respectively and that of the Christian Hospital, Mkar are: 2.01,0.69 and 2.61 respectively.

  11. Theoretical modelling of experimental diagnostic procedures employed during pre-dose dosimetry of quartz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pagonis, V.; Chen, R.; Kitis, G.

    2006-01-01

    The pre-dose technique in thermoluminescence (TL) is used for dating archaeological ceramics and for accident dosimetry. During routine applications of this technique, the sensitisation of the quartz samples is measured as a function of the annealing temperature, yielding the so-called thermal activation characteristic (TAC). The measurement of multiple TACs and the study of the effect of UV-radiation on the TL sensitivity of quartz are important analytical and diagnostic tools. In this paper, it is shown that a modified Zimmerman model for quartz can successfully model the experimental steps undertaken during a measurement of multiple TACs. (authors)

  12. Prophylactic radiation protection in X-ray diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogel, H.; Loehr, H.

    1982-01-01

    X-ray diagnosis can lead to stochastic ratidation damage such as uncreased incidence of malignant growths resp. leucemia and malformations in the child and grandchild generations as a consequence of radiation-induced mutations. Non-stocharadiation damage such as burns and lense opacification, which are in each instance clearly attributable to radiation, occur today only on account of incorrect handling of the examination method and technical defects. Normally, the risk to both patient and diagnostician is low and acceptable. Yed if adequate awareness of radiation hazards is missing - which includes full control over the X-ray appliance and knowledge of possible technical defects, the legal maximum doses may be surpassed and avoidable damage caused. (orig.) [de

  13. Longitudinal Electron Bunch Diagnostics Using Coherent Transition Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Mihalcea, Daniel; Happek, Uwe; Regis-Guy Piot, Philippe

    2005-01-01

    The longitudinal charge distribution of electron bunches in the Fermilab A0 photo-injector was determined by using the coherent transition radiation produced by electrons passing through a thin metallic foil. The auto-correlation of the transition radiation signal was measured with a Michelson type interferometer. The response function of the interferometer was determined from measured and simulated power spectra for low electron bunch charge and maximum longitudinal compression. Kramers-Kroning technique was used to determine longitudinal charge distribution. Measurements were performed for electron bunch lengths in the range from 0.3 to 2 ps (rms).

  14. Qualification of a multi-diagnostic detonator-output characterization procedure utilizing PMMA witness blocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biss, Matthew; Murphy, Michael; Lieber, Mark

    2017-06-01

    Experiments were conducted in an effort to qualify a multi-diagnostic characterization procedure for the performance output of a detonator when fired into a poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) witness block. A suite of optical diagnostics were utilized in combination to both bound the shock wave interaction state at the detonator/PMMA interface and characterize the nature of the shock wave decay in PMMA. The diagnostics included the Shock Wave Image Framing Technique (SWIFT), a photocathode tube streak camera, and photonic Doppler velocimetry (PDV). High-precision, optically clear witness blocks permitted dynamic flow visualization of the shock wave in PMMA via focused shadowgraphy. SWIFT- and streak-imaging diagnostics captured the spatiotemporally evolving shock wave, providing a two-dimensional temporally discrete image set and a one-dimensional temporally continuous image, respectively. PDV provided the temporal velocity history of the detonator output along the detonator axis. Through combination of the results obtained, a bound was able to be placed on the interface condition and a more-physical profile representing the shock wave decay in PMMA for an exploding-bridgewire detonator was achieved.

  15. Radiation safety in X-ray diagnostic installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, K.R.; Ambiger, T.Y.; Viswanathan, P.S.

    1977-01-01

    Safety measures to be strictly adhered to in handling X-ray equipment and exposing patients to X-radiation are described in detail. Hazards resulting from ignorance and careless handling are mentioned. Methods of shielding are indicated. (A.K.)

  16. Compact endocavity diagnostic probes for nuclear radiation detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yonggang; James, Ralph; Bolotnikov, Aleksey

    2014-08-26

    This invention relates to the field of radiation imaging. In particular, the invention relates to an apparatus and a method for imaging tissue or an inanimate object using a novel probe that has an integrated solid-state semiconductor detector and complete readout electronics circuitry.

  17. Principles of longitudinal beam diagnostics with coherent radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimm, O.; Schmueser, P.

    2006-04-24

    The FLASH facility requires novel techniques to characterize the longitudinal charge distribution of the electron bunches that drive the free-electron laser. Bunch features well below 30 {mu}m need to be resolved. One technique is based on the measurement of the far-infrared radiation spectrum and reconstruction of the bunch shape through Fourier analysis. Currently, experiments using synchrotron, transition and diffraction radiation are operating at FLASH, studying the emission spectra with various instruments. This report describes the basic physics, the measurement principles, and gives explicit mathematical derivations. References to more comprehensive discussions of practical problems and experiments are listed. After a brief introduction in Sect. 1, the radiation spectrum emitted by an electron bunch is calculated in Sect. 2 in far-field approximation. The technique to reconstruct the bunch shape from the spectrum and its basic limitations are then explained in Sect. 3. Practical examples are given. The typical radiation pulse duration ranges from less than 100 femtoseconds to several picoseconds. (orig.)

  18. Explanation of diagnostic criteria for radiation-induced nervous system disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing Zhiwei; Jiang Enhai

    2012-01-01

    National occupational health standard-Diagnostic Criteria for Radiation-Induced Nervous System Disease has been issued and implemented by the Ministry of health. This standard contained three independent criteria of the brain, spinal cord and peripheral nerve injury. These three kinds of disease often go together in clinic,therefore,the three diagnostic criteria were merged into radioactive nervous system disease diagnostic criteria for entirety and maneuverability of the standard. This standard was formulated based on collection of the clinical practice experience, extensive research of relevant literature and foreign relevant publications. It is mainly applied to diagnosis and treatment of occupational radiation-induced nervous system diseases, and to nervous system diseases caused by medical radiation exposure as well. In order to properly implement this standard, also to correctly deal with radioactive nervous system injury, the main contents of this standard including dose threshold, clinical manifestation, indexing standard and treatment principle were interpreted in this article. (authors)

  19. Major femoral vascular access complications after coronary diagnostic and interventional procedures: A Danish register study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dencker, Ditte; Pedersen, Frants; Engstrøm, Thomas; Køber, Lars; Højberg, Søren; Nielsen, Michael B; Schroeder, Torben V; Lönn, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Vascular access complications after coronary angiography (CAG) and percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) are known to increase morbidity, prolong hospitalization and raise hospital costs. Therefore, risk factor identification and improvement of safety strategies for vascular management are important. We aimed to assess the incidence of major vascular complications related to femoral access, and to identify potential risk factors. Over a period of six years, 23,870 index procedures (CAG) were performed in two centres, prospectively entered in the database and retrospectively analysed. Data was obtained from the Eastern Danish Heart Registry and cross-matched with data from the Danish Vascular Registry. Index procedures were defined as the first trans-femoral procedure. Demographic, procedural and mortality data, as well as information on access complications requiring surgery within 30 days were collected. Mortality data were collected for minimum 12 months. We identified 130 (0.54%) access complications requiring surgery; 65 pseudoaneurysms (0.28%), 46 arterial occlusions (0.19%), 15 hematomas (nine groin and six retroperitoneal hematomas) (0.06%), and 4 arterial dissections (0.02%). Risk factors for complications were left sided femoral access (OR 4.11 [2.29-7.37] pVascular complications related to femoral access in coronary diagnostic and interventional procedures are low (0.54%). Risk factors were left sided access, PAD, and female sex. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Swiss nation-wide survey on radiation doses in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aroua, A.; Valley, J.F.; Vader, J.-P.; Burnand, B.

    2001-01-01

    A nation-wide survey on radiation doses in diagnostic radiology was conducted in Switzerland in 1998-1999. More than 250 types of examinations were considered, covering conventional and interventional radiology, angiography, CT, mammography, osteodensitometry, conventional tomography and dental radiology. This survey aimed at establishing the collective radiological impact of radiodiagnostics on the Swiss population. The methodology of the survey is described. The examination frequencies and integral dosimetric results associated with diagnostic radiology in Switzerland are presented. (author)

  1. SU-D-209-05: Sensitivity of the Diagnostic Radiological Index of Protection (DRIP) to Procedural Factors in Fluoroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, A [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Pasciak, A [University of Tennessee Medical Center, Knoxville, TN (United States); Wagner, L [UT Medical School, Houston, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the sensitivity of the Diagnostic Radiological Index of Protection (DRIP) to procedural factors in fluoroscopy in an effort to determine an appropriate set of scatter-mimicking primary beams (SMPB) to be used in measuring the DRIP. Methods: A series of clinical and factorial Monte Carlo simulations were conducted to determine the shape of the scattered X-ray spectra incident on the operator in different clinical fluoroscopy scenarios. Two clinical evaluations studied the sensitivity of the scattered spectrum to gantry angle and patient size while technical factors were varied according to measured automatic dose rate control (ADRC) data. Factorial evaluations studied the sensitivity of the scattered spectrum to gantry angle, field of view, patient size and beam quality for constant technical factors. Average energy was the figure of merit used to condense fluence in each energy bin to a single numerical index. Results: Beam quality had the strongest influence on the scattered spectrum in fluoroscopy. Many procedural factors affected the scattered spectrum indirectly through their effects on primary beam quality through ADRC, e.g., gantry angle and patient size. Lateral C-arm rotation, common in interventional cardiology, increased the energy of the scattered spectrum, regardless of the direction of rotation. The effect of patient size on scattered radiation depended on ADRC characteristics, patient size, and procedure type. Conclusion: The scattered spectrum striking the operator in fluoroscopy, and therefore the DRIP, is most strongly influenced by primary beam quality, particularly kV. Use cases for protective garments should be classified by typical procedural primary beam qualities, which are governed by the ADRC according to the impacts of patient size, anatomical location, and gantry angle. These results will help determine an appropriate set of SMPB to be used for measuring the DRIP.

  2. Intraarticular Sacroiliac Joint Injection Under Computed Tomography Fluoroscopic Guidance: A Technical Note to Reduce Procedural Time and Radiation Dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paik, Nam Chull, E-mail: pncspine@gmail.com [Arumdaun Wooldul Spine Hospital, Department of Radiology (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-07-15

    PurposeA technique for computed tomography fluoroscopy (CTF)-guided intraarticular (IA) sacroiliac joint (SIJ) injection was devised to limit procedural time and radiation dose.MethodsOur Institutional Review Board approved this retrospective analysis and waived the requirement for informed consent. Overall, 36 consecutive diagnostic or therapeutic IA SIJ injections (unilateral, 20; bilateral, 16) performed in 34 patients (female, 18; male, 16) with a mean age of 45.5 years (range 20–76 years) under CTF guidance were analyzed, assessing technical success (i.e., IA contrast spread), procedural time, and radiation dose.ResultsAll injections were successful from a technical perspective and were free of serious complications. Respective median procedural times and effective doses of SIJ injection were as follows: unilateral, 5.28 min (range 3.58–8.00 min) and 0.11 millisievert (mSv; range 0.07–0.24 mSv); and bilateral, 6.72 min (range 4.17–21.17 min) and 0.11 mSv (range 0.09–0.51 mSv).ConclusionsGiven the high rate of technical success achieved in limited time duration and with little radiation exposure, CTF-guided IA SIJ injection is a practical and low-risk procedure.

  3. Intraarticular Sacroiliac Joint Injection Under Computed Tomography Fluoroscopic Guidance: A Technical Note to Reduce Procedural Time and Radiation Dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paik, Nam Chull

    2016-01-01

    PurposeA technique for computed tomography fluoroscopy (CTF)-guided intraarticular (IA) sacroiliac joint (SIJ) injection was devised to limit procedural time and radiation dose.MethodsOur Institutional Review Board approved this retrospective analysis and waived the requirement for informed consent. Overall, 36 consecutive diagnostic or therapeutic IA SIJ injections (unilateral, 20; bilateral, 16) performed in 34 patients (female, 18; male, 16) with a mean age of 45.5 years (range 20–76 years) under CTF guidance were analyzed, assessing technical success (i.e., IA contrast spread), procedural time, and radiation dose.ResultsAll injections were successful from a technical perspective and were free of serious complications. Respective median procedural times and effective doses of SIJ injection were as follows: unilateral, 5.28 min (range 3.58–8.00 min) and 0.11 millisievert (mSv; range 0.07–0.24 mSv); and bilateral, 6.72 min (range 4.17–21.17 min) and 0.11 mSv (range 0.09–0.51 mSv).ConclusionsGiven the high rate of technical success achieved in limited time duration and with little radiation exposure, CTF-guided IA SIJ injection is a practical and low-risk procedure.

  4. Development of quality assurance procedures for production of sealed radiation source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nam, J. H.; Han, H. S.; Cho, W. K.; Kim, S. D.; Hong, S. B.; Chang, K. D.; Lim, N. J.; Lee, Y. G.; Kim, K. H.

    2001-11-01

    The quality assurance procedures for sealed radiation sources production using HANARO and RIPF have been developed. The detailed quality assurance procedures are essential to manage the whole work process effectively and ensure the quality of the produced sealed sources. Through applying this quality assurance procedures to the entire production works of the sealed radiation sources, it is expected that the quality of the products, the safety of the works and the satisfaction of the customers will be increased

  5. Development of quality assurance procedures for production of sealed radiation source

    CERN Document Server

    Nam, J H; Cho, W K; Han, H S; Hong, S B; Kim, K H; Kim, S D; Lee, Y G; Lim, N J

    2001-01-01

    The quality assurance procedures for sealed radiation sources production using HANARO and RIPF have been developed. The detailed quality assurance procedures are essential to manage the whole work process effectively and ensure the quality of the produced sealed sources. Through applying this quality assurance procedures to the entire production works of the sealed radiation sources, it is expected that the quality of the products, the safety of the works and the satisfaction of the customers will be increased.

  6. Diagnosing alcoholism in high-risk drinking drivers: comparing different diagnostic procedures with estimated prevalence of hazardous alcohol use

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korzec, A.; Bär, M.; Koeter, M. W.; de Kieviet, W.

    2001-01-01

    In several European countries, drivers under influence (DUI), suspected of an alcohol use disorder (AUD, 'alcoholism') are referred for diagnostic examination. The accuracy of diagnostic procedures used in diagnosing AUD in the DUI population is unknown. The aim of this study was to compare three

  7. A national survey of occupational radiation exposure among diagnostic radiologic technologists in South Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeeyoung; Cha, Eun Shil; Jeong, Meeseon; Lee, Won Jin

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate representative occupational characteristics and radiation exposure for South Korean radiologic technologists. The authors conducted a national survey by stratified sampling of South Korean administrative districts and types of medical facilities. A total of 585 technologists were surveyed, and survey data were linked with dosimetry data from the National Dose Registry. A total of 73 % of radiologic technologists sampled were male, 62 % were younger than age 40 and 86.5 % began employment after 1990. The most frequent practices among radiologic technologists were diagnostic routine X-ray followed by computed tomography (CT) and portable X-ray. Male workers were more frequently involved in CT, portable X-ray and interventional radiology whereas female workers carried out most mammography procedures. The average annual effective dose was 2.3 mSv for male and 1.3 mSv for female workers. The dose was significantly higher for workers in the provinces and those who had recently started work. (authors)

  8. Radiation safety concerns and diagnostic reference levels for computed tomography scanners in Tamil Nadu

    OpenAIRE

    Livingstone Roshan; Dinakaran Paul

    2011-01-01

    Radiation safety in computed tomography (CT) scanners is of concern due its widespread use in the field of radiological imaging. This study intends to evaluate radiation doses imparted to patients undergoing thorax, abdomen and pelvic CT examinations and formulate regional diagnostic reference levels (DRL) in Tamil Nadu, South India. In-site CT dose measurement was performed in 127 CT scanners in Tamil Nadu for a period of 2 years as a part of the Atomic Energy Regulatory Board (AERB)-funded ...

  9. Evaluation of Patient Radiation Dose during Cardiac Interventional Procedures: What Is the Most Effective Method?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chida, K.; Saito, H.; Ishibashi, T.; Zuguchi, M.; Kagaya, Y.; Takahashi, S.

    2009-01-01

    Cardiac interventional radiology has lower risks than surgical procedures. This is despite the fact that radiation doses from cardiac intervention procedures are the highest of any commonly performed general X-ray examination. Maximum radiation skin doses (MSDs) should be determined to avoid radiation-associated skin injuries in patients undergoing cardiac intervention procedures. However, real-time evaluation of MSD is unavailable for many cardiac intervention procedures. This review describes methods of determining MSD during cardiac intervention procedures. Currently, in most cardiac intervention procedures, real-time measuring of MSD is not feasible. Thus, we recommend that physicians record the patient's total entrance skin dose, such as the dose at the interventional reference point when it can be monitored, in order to estimate MSD in intervention procedures

  10. Survey of prenatal counselling practices regarding aneuploidy risk modification, invasive diagnostic procedure risks, and procedure eligibility criteria in Canadian centres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, Danna; Davies, Gregory; Armour, Christine M

    2012-07-01

    To explore prenatal practices related to aneuploidy screening, risk modification, and invasive diagnostic procedures across Canadian centres. We conducted a survey of members of the Canadian Association of Genetic Counsellors, the Canadian College of Medical Genetics, and the Canadian Society of Maternal Fetal Medicine, who provide direct counselling or management of prenatal patients in Canada. Eighty-two of 157 respondents indicated that their centre's definition of advanced maternal age was ≥ 35 years, with 33/157 respondents reporting an advanced maternal age definition of ≥ 40 years. The majority of respondents reported that prenatal serum screening for aneuploidy is provincially funded in their province or territory (121/147). The majority of respondents who reported that prenatal screening is not provincially funded (17/147) were from Quebec (14/17). Thirty-nine of 123 respondents reported that their centre defines increased nuchal translucency as ≥ 3.0 mm, whereas 49/123 reported a definition of ≥ 3.5 mm. Sixty-four of 150 respondents reported that the aneuploidy risk provided by serum screening is modified by a soft marker likelihood ratio, whereas 46/150 respondents reported that both age-related and serum screening risks are modified. Fifty-nine of 124 respondents reported that their centre will modify aneuploidy risk after a normal ultrasound; the most commonly cited negative likelihood ratio was 0.5. The most commonly reported procedure-related risk for chorionic villus sampling was 1/100 (123/147) and for amniocentesis was 1/200 (73/142). This study demonstrates inconsistencies in prenatal practices and access to screening programs across Canada. The information gained from this study will inform policy advisors developing prenatal practice guidelines at both the provincial and national levels.

  11. Personalized estimates of radiation dose from dedicated breast CT in a diagnostic population and comparison with diagnostic mammography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedantham, Srinivasan; Shi, Linxi; Karellas, Andrew; O’Connell, Avice M.; Conover, David L.

    2013-01-01

    lower than diagnostic mammography, the median MGD from dedicated breast CT was approximately 13.5% higher than that from diagnostic mammography. The MGD for breast CT is based on a 1.45 mm skin layer and that for diagnostic mammography is based on a 4 mm skin layer; thus, favoring a lower estimate for MGD from diagnostic mammography. The median MGD from dedicated breast CT corresponds to the median MGD from 4 to 5 diagnostic mammography views. In comparison, for the same 133 breasts, the mean and the median number of views per breast during diagnostic mammography were 4.53 and 4, respectively. Paired analysis showed that there was approximately equal likelihood of receiving lower MGD from either breast CT or diagnostic mammography. Future work will investigate methods to reduce and optimize radiation dose from dedicated breast CT. PMID:24165162

  12. Personalized estimates of radiation dose from dedicated breast CT in a diagnostic population and comparison with diagnostic mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vedantham, Srinivasan; Shi, Linxi; Karellas, Andrew; O'Connell, Avice M; Conover, David L

    2013-01-01

    diagnostic mammography, the median MGD from dedicated breast CT was approximately 13.5% higher than that from diagnostic mammography. The MGD for breast CT is based on a 1.45 mm skin layer and that for diagnostic mammography is based on a 4 mm skin layer; thus, favoring a lower estimate for MGD from diagnostic mammography. The median MGD from dedicated breast CT corresponds to the median MGD from four to five diagnostic mammography views. In comparison, for the same 133 breasts, the mean and the median number of views per breast during diagnostic mammography were 4.53 and 4, respectively. Paired analysis showed that there was approximately equal likelihood of receiving lower MGD from either breast CT or diagnostic mammography. Future work will investigate methods to reduce and optimize radiation dose from dedicated breast CT. (paper)

  13. Activities identification for activity-based cost/management applications of the diagnostics outpatient procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alrashdan, Abdalla; Momani, Amer; Ababneh, Tamador

    2012-01-01

    One of the most challenging problems facing healthcare providers is to determine the actual cost for their procedures, which is important for internal accounting and price justification to insurers. The objective of this paper is to find suitable categories to identify the diagnostic outpatient medical procedures and translate them from functional orientation to process orientation. A hierarchal task tree is developed based on a classification schema of procedural activities. Each procedure is seen as a process consisting of a number of activities. This makes a powerful foundation for activity-based cost/management implementation and provides enough information to discover the value-added and non-value-added activities that assist in process improvement and eventually may lead to cost reduction. Work measurement techniques are used to identify the standard time of each activity at the lowest level of the task tree. A real case study at a private hospital is presented to demonstrate the proposed methodology. © 2011 National Association for Healthcare Quality.

  14. Optical remote diagnostics of atmospheric propagating beams of ionizing radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karl JR., Robert R.

    1990-03-06

    Data is obtained for use in diagnosing the characteristics of a beam of ionizing radiation, such as charged particle beams, neutral particle beams, and gamma ray beams. In one embodiment the beam is emitted through the atmosphere and produces nitrogen fluorescence during passage through air. The nitrogen fluorescence is detected along the beam path to provide an intensity from which various beam characteristics can be calculated from known tabulations. Optical detecting equipment is preferably located orthogonal to the beam path at a distance effective to include the entire beam path in the equipment field of view.

  15. An auto-calibration procedure for empirical solar radiation models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bojanowski, J.S.; Donatelli, Marcello; Skidmore, A.K.; Vrieling, A.

    2013-01-01

    Solar radiation data are an important input for estimating evapotranspiration and modelling crop growth. Direct measurement of solar radiation is now carried out in most European countries, but the network of measuring stations is too sparse for reliable interpolation of measured values. Instead of

  16. Senior medical students' awareness of radiation risks from common diagnostic imaging examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scali, Elena; Mayo, John; Nicolaou, Savvas; Kozoriz, Michael; Chang, Silvia

    2017-12-01

    Senior medical students represent future physicians who commonly refer patients for diagnostic imaging studies that may involve ionizing radiation. The radiology curriculum at the University of British Columbia provides students with broad-based knowledge about common imaging examinations. The purpose of this study was to investigate students' awareness of radiation exposures and risks. An anonymous multiple-choice cross-sectional questionnaire was distributed to final year medical students to assess knowledge of radiation from common diagnostic examinations and radiation-related risks following completion of the longitudinal radiology curriculum, carried out over the four years of medical training. Sixty-three of 192 eligible students participated (33% response rate). The majority felt that knowledge of radiation doses of common imaging examinations is somewhat or very important; however, only 12% (N = 8) routinely discuss radiation-related risks with patients. While all respondents recognized children as most sensitive to the effects of radiation, only 24% (N = 15) correctly identified gonads as the most radiation-sensitive tissue. Almost all respondents recognized ultrasound and MRI as radiation free modalities. Respondents who correctly identified the relative dose of common imaging examinations in chest x-ray equivalents varied from 3-77% (N = 2 - 49); the remaining responses were largely underestimates. Finally, 44% (N = 28) correctly identified the excess risk of a fatal cancer from an abdominal CT in an adult, while the remainder underestimated this risk. Medical students acknowledge the importance of radiation-related issues to patient care. While almost all students are familiar with radiation-free modalities, many are not familiar with, and commonly underestimate, the relative doses and risks of common imaging studies. This may expose patients to increasing imaging investigations and exposure to radiation hazards.

  17. Constancy of radiation output during diagnostic X-ray exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ardran, G.M.; Crooks, H.E.; Birch, R.

    1978-01-01

    Variation in X-ray output and quality during a diagnostic exposure can be undesirable and may result in unnecessary dose to the patient. When significant build-up or decay periods are present errors will arise if factors obtained under steady-state conditions are employed to estimate the exposure. These parameters must be taken into account when calibrating X-ray generators. A variable speed spinning film device and a spectrometry system have been used to measure the variations under fluoroscopic and radiographic conditions for a number of generators. Variations in output due to filament heating, voltage supply and rectification, cable capacity and target pitting have been demonstrated. At low fluoroscopic currents, large surges and long decays have been observed; the significance of these effects is considered. (author)

  18. Evaluation of TLD dose response compared to MCNP-5 simulation of diagnostic X ray equipment - radiation diagnostic image

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez G, R.; Cavalieri, T. A.; De Paiva, F.; Dalledone S, P. de T.; Yoriyaz, H. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, Centro de Engenharia Nuclear / CNEN, Av. Lineu Prestes 2242, Cidade Universitaria, 05508-000 Sao Paulo (Brazil); Rodrigues F, M. A. [Universidade Estadual Paulista, Faculdade de Medicina de Botucatu, Departamento de Dermatologia e Radioterapia, Av. Prof. Montenegro s/n, Rubiao Junior, 18601-970 Botucatu (Brazil); Vivolo, V., E-mail: chancez@hotmail.com [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, Gerencia de Metrologia das Radiacoes / CNEN, Av. Lineu Prestes 2242, Cidade Universitaria, 05508-000 Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    The thermo luminescent dosimeter (TLD) is used as a radiation dosimeter and can be used as environmental and staff personnel monitoring. The TLD measures ionizing radiation exposure by a process in which the amount of radiation collected by the dosimeter is converted in visible light when the crystal is heated. The amount of emitted light is proportional to the radiation exposure, and then the response of the TLD must be the related to the real dose. In this work it was used twenty four TLD 700 in order to obtain eight values of doses from a diagnostic X-ray equipment. The TLD-700 is a LiF TLD enriched with {sup 7}Li isotope. One way to compare and study the response of TLD is by Monte Carlo method, which has been used as a computational tool to solve problems stochastically. This method can be applied to any geometry, even those where the boundary conditions are unknown, making the method particularly useful to solve problems a priori. In this work it was modeled the X-ray tube exactly as the one used to irradiate the TLD, after the simulation and the TLD irradiation the results of dose value from both were compared. (Author)

  19. Evaluation of TLD dose response compared to MCNP-5 simulation of diagnostic X ray equipment - radiation diagnostic image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez G, R.; Cavalieri, T. A.; De Paiva, F.; Dalledone S, P. de T.; Yoriyaz, H.; Rodrigues F, M. A.; Vivolo, V.

    2014-08-01

    The thermo luminescent dosimeter (TLD) is used as a radiation dosimeter and can be used as environmental and staff personnel monitoring. The TLD measures ionizing radiation exposure by a process in which the amount of radiation collected by the dosimeter is converted in visible light when the crystal is heated. The amount of emitted light is proportional to the radiation exposure, and then the response of the TLD must be the related to the real dose. In this work it was used twenty four TLD 700 in order to obtain eight values of doses from a diagnostic X-ray equipment. The TLD-700 is a LiF TLD enriched with 7 Li isotope. One way to compare and study the response of TLD is by Monte Carlo method, which has been used as a computational tool to solve problems stochastically. This method can be applied to any geometry, even those where the boundary conditions are unknown, making the method particularly useful to solve problems a priori. In this work it was modeled the X-ray tube exactly as the one used to irradiate the TLD, after the simulation and the TLD irradiation the results of dose value from both were compared. (Author)

  20. Trends of radiation dose to the Slovak population from diagnostic nuclear medicine examinations during the period from 1985 to 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ftacnikova, S.; Ragan, P.

    1998-01-01

    A mathematical formalism was used to evaluate the radiation dose to population from radiodiagnostic procedures. Data for the calculation were obtained from questionnaires sent to the 12 Slovak hospitals which involve nuclear medicine departments. The mean effective dose for a procedure was determined by multiplying the administered radioactivity by the effective dose per unit of applied radiopharmaceutical activity; the latter value was taken from the literature. The values of the collective effective dose, total number of examinations, mean effective dose per examination and per capita and the number of examinations in 1000 inhabitants are tabulated for the 1985-1995 period. A favorable decreasing trend in the mean effective dose per examination after 1991 was observed. This was mainly due to the replacement of 131 I labelled compounds by 99m Tc radiopharmaceuticals. An overview of nuclear medicine diagnostic practice for pediatric and adult patients is also presented. The number of diagnostic procedures per 1000 inhabitants is significantly lower than in the most developed countries, and this unfavorable trend is continuing so far. (P.A.)

  1. A practical approach to radiation protection information in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cederblad, Aa.; Bjurklint, E.; Maansson, L.G.; Sund, P.; Kheddache, S.

    1999-01-01

    In a benchmarking process, parameters related to patient doses and image quality were compared in x-ray examinations from 10 radiology departments in western Sweden. One main object of the project was to form a pedagogical process focussing on radiation protection and quality matters by engaging radiographers and radiologists from the departments in practical project work and optimisation discussions. Anatomical phantoms with simulated pathology were used for standardised entrance dose measurements and exposure of phantom images. Radiographer performance, such as centering and collimation, was evaluated by radiographers. Radiologists evaluated clinical images using revised CEC quality criteria. The results of the measurements showed significant differences between the departments both for image quality, entrance dose and the performance of examinations. Explanations to these differences were in many cases found in the choice of equipment, working methods etc. (au)

  2. Diagnostic Accuracy and Radiation Dose of CT Coronary Angiography in Atrial Fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vorre, Mette Medom; Abdulla, Jawdat

    2013-01-01

    Purpose:To determine by means of a systematic review and meta-analysis the diagnostic accuracy, associated radiation dose, and technical challenges of computed tomographic (CT) coronary angiography in patients with atrial fibrillation.Materials and Methods:A systematic literature search...

  3. A Complex of Imaging Diagnostic Devices of Vacuum UV Radiation for the GOL-3 Multimirror Trap

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Burdakov, A. V.; Weinzettl, Vladimír; Piffl, Vojtěch; Polosatkin, S. V.; Postupaev, V. V.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 47, č. 2 (2004), s. 234-239 ISSN 0020-4412 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2043910 Keywords : plasma diagnostics, spectroscopy, UV radiation Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 0.312, year: 2004

  4. Technical note: Reduction of radiation dose using ultrasound guidance during transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roshan S Livingstone

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS procedure for decompression of the portal venous system generally performed under fluoroscopic guidance has undergone continuous technical modifications recently. Due to the length of the procedure, the fluoroscopy times are reasonably high, thus increasing the risk from ionizing radiation. Radiation doses were measured for 19 patients using dose area product (DAP meter. The average DAP value for the TIPS procedure was 63.86 Gy cm 2 (21.12-117.07. Radiation doses to patients can be reduced with the use of USG guidance and intermittent fluoroscopy screening.

  5. Evaluation of radiation protection in interventional orthopedic procedures in Khartoum state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahim, M. Y. A.

    2013-06-01

    In this study an evaluation of radiation safety and protection in interventional orthopedic procedures for the staff in three theatres in Khartoum state was conducted. To evaluate radiation protection program and staff knowledge with regard to radiation protection a questionnaire was designed and distributed among the staff there. Integrity check was conducted on the available radiation tools ( lead aprons) to ensure that they provide optimal protection when positioned appropriately. Also dose rate was measured around the theatre to evaluate the level of leakage radiation. Finally the absorbed dose to orthopedic specialists was measured during several procedures. The study showed the absence of most of the radiation protection and safety procedures that ensure the protection of of workers and lack of radiation protection program. The integrity check conducted on lead aprons showed uncapable crack in about 24% of the checked aprons. And in spite of this, there was no action taken to withdraw those faulty aprons or to replace them due to the acute shortage of the aprons available in the three centers and this will cause unjustified radiation exposure to the staff. The level of radiation around the theatres was found to fall within the acceptable limit according to the international commission of radiation protection (ICRP) recommendations that -if implemented -could improve the status of radiation protection in interventional orthopedic procedures. The improve. The important recommendations are to establish a single regulatory authority in Sudan independent from any user or promotion of radiation as well as to conduct periodically training courses for orthopedic staff on radiation protection in orthopedic interventional procedures.(Author)

  6. Radiation doses and correlated late effects in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gustafsson, M.

    1980-04-01

    Patient irradiation in diagnostic radiology was estimated from measurements of absorbed doses in different organs, assessment of the energy imparted and retrospective calculations based on literature data. Possible late biological effects, with special aspects on children, were surveyed. The dose to the lens of the eye and the possibility of shielding in carotid angiography was studied as was the absorbed dose to the thyroid gland at cardiac catheterization and angiocardiography in children. Calculations of the mean bone marrow dose and gonad doses were performed in children with chronic skeletal disease revealing large contributions from examinations of organs other than the skeleton. The dose distribution in the breast in mammography was investigated. Comparison of the energy imparted in common roentgen examinations in 1960 and 1975 showed an unexpected low decrease in spite of technical improvements. Reasons for the failing decrease are discussed. The energy imparted to children in urological examinations was reduced significantly due to introduction of high sensitivity screens and omission of dose demanding projections. Contributions to the possible late effects were estimated on the basis of the organ doses assessed. (author)

  7. Establishment of diagnostic reference levels in computed tomography for select procedures in Pudhuchery, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saravanakumar, A; Vaideki, K; Govindarajan, K N; Jayakumar, S

    2014-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) scanner under operating conditions has become a major source of human exposure to diagnostic X-rays. In this context, weighed CT dose index (CTDIw), volumetric CT dose index (CTDIv), and dose length product (DLP) are important parameter to assess procedures in CT imaging as surrogate dose quantities for patient dose optimization. The current work aims to estimate the existing dose level of CT scanner for head, chest, and abdomen procedures in Pudhuchery in south India and establish dose reference level (DRL) for the region. The study was carried out for six CT scanners in six different radiology departments using 100 mm long pencil ionization chamber and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) phantom. From each CT scanner, data pertaining to patient and machine details were collected for 50 head, 50 chest, and 50 abdomen procedures performed over a period of 1 year. The experimental work was carried out using the machine operating parameters used during the procedures. Initially, dose received in the phantom at the center and periphery was measured by five point method. Using these values CTDIw, CTDIv, and DLP were calculated. The DRL is established based on the third quartile value of CTDIv and DLP which is 32 mGy and 925 mGy.cm for head, 12 mGy and 456 mGy.cm for chest, and 16 mGy and 482 mGy.cm for abdomen procedures. These values are well below European Commission Dose Reference Level (EC DRL) and comparable with the third quartile value reported for Tamil Nadu region in India. The present study is the first of its kind to determine the DRL for scanners operating in the Pudhuchery region. Similar studies in other regions of India are necessary in order to establish a National Dose Reference Level.

  8. Establishment of diagnostic reference levels in computed tomography for select procedures in Pudhuchery, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Saravanakumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Computed tomography (CT scanner under operating conditions has become a major source of human exposure to diagnostic X-rays. In this context, weighed CT dose index (CTDI w , volumetric CT dose index (CTDI v , and dose length product (DLP are important parameter to assess procedures in CT imaging as surrogate dose quantities for patient dose optimization. The current work aims to estimate the existing dose level of CT scanner for head, chest, and abdomen procedures in Pudhuchery in south India and establish dose reference level (DRL for the region. The study was carried out for six CT scanners in six different radiology departments using 100 mm long pencil ionization chamber and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA phantom. From each CT scanner, data pertaining to patient and machine details were collected for 50 head, 50 chest, and 50 abdomen procedures performed over a period of 1 year. The experimental work was carried out using the machine operating parameters used during the procedures. Initially, dose received in the phantom at the center and periphery was measured by five point method. Using these values CTDI w , CTDI v , and DLP were calculated. The DRL is established based on the third quartile value of CTDI v and DLP which is 32 mGy and 925 mGy.cm for head, 12 mGy and 456 mGy.cm for chest, and 16 mGy and 482 mGy.cm for abdomen procedures. These values are well below European Commission Dose Reference Level (EC DRL and comparable with the third quartile value reported for Tamil Nadu region in India. The present study is the first of its kind to determine the DRL for scanners operating in the Pudhuchery region. Similar studies in other regions of India are necessary in order to establish a National Dose Reference Level.

  9. Lung cancer: Diagnostic procedures and therapeutic management, with special reference to radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scarantino, C.W.

    1985-01-01

    This book on lung cancer provides a good overview of this very common cause of death in both men and women. The eight chapters in this book review a number of aspects of the disease including epidemiology, pathology, diagnostic workup, and treatment by radiation and chemotherapy. The two introductory chapters provide a summary of the epidemiology of this disease and an approach to each individual patient. Included are chapters on the many methods of treating lung cancer and the results of clinical trials as well as a brief discussion given to surgical treatment. A chapter on clinical research is directed primarily at ideas relating to chemotherapy. This brief book provides an overview of the many aspects involved in diagnosing and treating lung cancer

  10. The effectiveness of drama therapy on preparation for diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in children suffering from cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ľubica Ilievová

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The integral part of the treatment of pediatric oncological patients is a range of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. These procedures are often associated with the fear and anxiety of the suffering child. We investigated whether a psychological preparation through drama therapy and the therapeutic puppet may reduce the anxiety related to diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in the preschool or early school children suffering from cancer.Methods: Twenty consecutive pediatric patients of preschool and early school age, with the diagnosis of lymphoblastic leukemia, were included in the study. The patients were alternatingly assigned to experimental or control group, and subjected or not subjected to drama therapy, respectively. We measured the changes in heart rate, blood pressure and respiratory rate as indicators of anxiety and fear, before and after the diagnostic or therapeutic procedures.Results: Heart rate, blood pressure, and respiratory rate in pediatric oncological patients before and after the diagnostic or therapeutic procedure were significantly lower in the experimental group of patients.Conclusion: Our results show that psychological preparation using drama therapy and therapeutic puppet reduced the fear and anxiety related to diagnostic or therapeutic procedures in pediatric oncological patients.Key words: drama therapy; therapeutic puppet; children; oncology; psychology 

  11. Radiation Exposure and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and are told you need a diagnostic or therapeutic professional advises you to procedure involving radia- undergo ... or whether another medical procedure, such as an ultrasound about radiation and pregnancy can be found on ...

  12. Radiation doses in diagnostic radiology and methods for dose reduction. Report of a co-ordinated research programme (1991-1993)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-04-01

    It is well recognized that diagnostic radiology is the largest contributor to the collective dose from all man-made sources of radiation. Large differences in radiation doses from the same procedures among different X ray rooms have led to the conclusion that there is a potential for dose reduction. A Co-ordinated Research Programme on Radiation Doses in Diagnostic Radiology and Methods for Dose Reduction, involving Member States with different degrees of development, was launched by the IAEA in co-operation with the CEC. This report summarizes the results of the second and final Research Co-ordination Meeting held in Vienna from 4 to 8 October 1993. 22 refs, 6 figs and tabs

  13. New diagnostic techniques in the service of radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goitein, M.

    1979-01-01

    A new technique is a solution to a problem. In this review, the treatment of malignant diseases is discussed according to the following schema; tumor evaluation, with pathology, staging and treatment techniques; the technical assistance in therapy planning, with planning radiation technique, dosimetry, monitoring therapy execution and charged particle therapy; the monitoring of tumor response during therapy; follow-up after therapy; and the impact of technology on outcome. The most significant advance in the last decade is the introduction of X-ray transmission computed tomography (CT). Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is applied to the medical field as another physical means. Ultrasound, radioactively labeled compounds, alpha particle microradiography, etc. are promissing techniques for the purpose. Positron emission can be imaged from a variety of isotopes, particularly short-lived positron emitters such as 11 C. Special purpose cameras are used to monitor the positron activity induced within patients by high energy (45 MeV) therapy beam itself. By carefully measuring washout curves, the blood perfusion rate in tumors can be deduced. To the extent that this is an indication of the oxygen tension of the tumors, it may have a value in assessing the likely responsiveness of the tumors to therapy and in guiding the choice of dose and fractionation. (Yamashita, S.)

  14. Off-Axis Undulator Radiation for CLIC Drive Beam Diagnostics

    CERN Document Server

    Jeff, A; Welsch, CP

    2013-01-01

    The Compact LInear Collider (CLIC) will use a novel acceleration scheme in which energy extracted from a very intense beam of relatively low-energy electrons (the Drive Beam) is used to accelerate a lower intensity Main Beam to very high energy. The high intensity of the Drive Beam, with pulses of more than 1015 electrons, poses a challenge for conventional profile measurements such as wire scanners. Thus, new non-invasive profile measurements are being investigated. In this paper we propose the use of relatively inexpensive permanent-magnet undulators to generate off-axis visible Synchrotron Radiation from the CLIC Drive Beam. The field strength and period length of the undulator should be designed such that the on-axis undulator wavelength is in the ultra-violet. A smaller but still useable amount of visible light is then generated in a hollow cone. This light can be reflected out of the beam pipe by a ring-shaped mirror placed downstream and imaged on a camera. In this contribution, results of SRW and ZEMA...

  15. Radiation Protection Procedures to Individuals According to Situations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomaa, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    The new recommendations of the International Commission for Radiological Protection (ICRP) had been adopted in March 2007. Historically, the first main ICRP recommendations were adopted in 1976. Hence, IAEA issued its publication (safety series no 9) entitled Basic safety standards for radiation protection, EU issued its legislative directive. Furthermore, U K issued its 1985 Ionizing Radiation Regulations . These recommendations were based upon system of dose limitation (justification, optimization and annual dose limits and Four types of exposures (occupational, medical, public and planned special exposure) The second main ICRP recommendations were adopted in 1990. Hence, IAEA together with other international organizations issued its publication (safety series no 115) entitled International Basic Safety Standards for protection against ionizing radiation and safety of radiation sources in 1996. Furthermore, EU issued its new legislative directive and UK issued its updated Ionizing radiation regulations in 1999. These recommendations based upon two systems of protection, these are system of protection in practice and system of protection in intervention. The new ICRP or 2007 recommendations is based upon situations 1- Planned situations, 2- Emergency situations, and 3- Existing situations. The 2007 recommendations rely also on Individuals 1- Occupational, 2- Public and 3- Patient and Furthermore, elements of Radiation Protection system are 1- Justification, 2- Optimization and 3- Dose limits. Updated numerical values for radiation weighting factors for proton is 2 instead of 5 and for neutron , its continuous function instead of discrete values . New numerical values for tissue weighting factors include value of 8% for Gonads instead of 20%. The recommended nominal probability is around 5 per cSv. IAEA as well other international organization are updating its Basic Safety Standards . National regulations shall also be updated accordingly

  16. Measuring scatter radiation in diagnostic x rays for radiation protection purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panayiotakis, George; Vlachos, Ioannis; Delis, Harry; Tsantilas, Xenophon; Kalyvas, Nektarios; Kandarakis, Ioannis

    2015-01-01

    During the last decades, radiation protection and dosimetry in medical X-ray imaging practice has been extensively studied. The purpose of this study was to measure secondary radiation in a conventional radiographic room, in terms of ambient dose rate equivalent H*(10) and its dependence on the radiographic exposure parameters such as X-ray tube voltage, tube current and distance. With some exceptions, the results indicated that the scattered radiation was uniform in the space around the water cylindrical phantom. The results also showed that the tube voltage and filtration affect the dose rate due to the scatter radiation. Finally, the scattered X-ray energy distribution was experimentally calculated. (authors)

  17. Manual of radiation protection procedures and quality control of Cobalt-60 teletherapy unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chavez, Miguel

    1997-09-01

    This document compiles basic concepts, radiation protection procedures, safety standards, equipment quality control, operation instructions for the theratron 780/2, general description of the cobalt 60 teletherapy unit of the Oncology Service, Carlos Andrade Marin Hospital

  18. Diagnostic value of acoustic radiation force impulse imaging for assessing superficial lymph nodes: A diagnostic accuracy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fengjuan; Zhao, Xinming; Ji, Xiaohui; Han, Ruoling; Li, Ping; Du, Min

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the diagnostic value of acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging for differentiating superficial lymph nodes.Virtual touch tissue imaging (VTI) grade and shear wave velocity (SWV) were analyzed and compared in 97 patients (65 women, 32 men; mean age, 49 y; range, 23-72 y) with 97 lymph nodes [23 chronic nonspecific reactive lymph nodes (CLNs), 38 metastatic lymph nodes (MLNs), and 36 blood and lymphatic system diseases lymph nodes (BLLNs)]. The elastography characteristics in patients with CLNs, MLNs, and BLLNs were compared using the nonparametric Kruskal-Wallis test and Mann-Whitney U test for continuous variables and categorical variables. The diagnostic performance of VTI grade and SWV were evaluated using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC).The median of SWV of MLNs was significantly higher (2.90 m/s) than those of CLNs (2.15 m/s) and BLLNs (2.52 m/s). The VTI grade of MLNs was significantly higher than those of CLNs (P accuracy, and AUC were 81.58%, 95.65%, 86.89%, and 0.904, respectively, at a cutoff level of grade IV for VTI grade in differentiating MLNs from CLNs, whereas those of SWV were 57.89%, 86.96%, 68.85%, and 0.752, respectively, at a cutoff level of 2.76 m/s.The diagnostic performance of VTI grade was significantly higher than that of SWV in differentiating MLNs from CLNs. The diagnostic performance of VTI grade and SWV were lower intermediate in differentiating MLNs from BLLNs and in differentiating BLLNs from CLNs, and there was no significant difference between VTI grade and SWV. ARFI imaging may be a feasible method for differentiating MLNs from CLNs.

  19. ICNIRP Statement on Diagnostic Devices Using Non-ionizing Radiation: Existing Regulations and Potential Health Risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    Use of non-ionizing radiation (NIR) for diagnostic purposes allows non-invasive assessment of the structure and function of the human body and is widely employed in medical care. ICNIRP has published previous statements about the protection of patients during medical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), but diagnostic methods using other forms of NIR have not been considered. This statement reviews the range of diagnostic NIR devices currently used in clinical settings; documents the relevant regulations and policies covering patients and health care workers; reviews the evidence around potential health risks to patients and health care workers exposed to diagnostic NIR; and identifies situations of high NIR exposure from diagnostic devices in which patients or health care workers might not be adequately protected by current regulations. Diagnostic technologies were classified by the types of NIR that they employ. The aim was to describe the techniques in terms of general device categories which may encompass more specific devices or techniques with similar scientific principles. Relevant legally-binding regulations for protection of patients and workers and organizations responsible for those regulations were summarized. Review of the epidemiological evidence concerning health risks associated with exposure to diagnostic NIR highlighted a lack of data on potential risks to the fetus exposed to MRI during the first trimester, and on long-term health risks in workers exposed to MRI. Most of the relevant epidemiological evidence that is currently available relates to MRI or ultrasound. Exposure limits are needed for exposures from diagnostic technologies using optical radiation within the body. There is a lack of data regarding risk of congenital malformations following exposure to ultrasound in utero in the first trimester and also about the possible health effects of interactions between ultrasound and contrast media.

  20. Patient radiation doses in various fluoroscopically guided orthopaedic procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsapaki, V.; Fagkrezos, D.; Tsalafoutas, I. A.; Lazaretos, I.; Nikolaou, V.S.; Efstathopoulos, N.

    2016-01-01

    All orthopaedic fluoroscopic procedures performed using C-arm guidance were monitored for 1 y. The type of procedure, fluoroscopy time (T), kerma-area product (KAP) values and number of radiographs (F) were recorded. The two most often performed techniques were as follows: intramedullary nailing (IMN) of intertrochanteric/peritrochanteric (IP) fractures (101 cases, 49.3 %) and antergrade IMN of femur or tibia shaft (TS) fractures (28 cases, 13.7 %). For the remaining procedures, none accounted for >5 %, categorised as 'various' (76 cases, 37 %). Large variations in T, KAP and F were observed. For IMN of IP fractures, antergrade IMN of femur and TS fractures and for various procedures, respectively, median values were T-2.1, 2.2 and 0.6 min, KAP-6.3, 6.3 and 0.6 Gy cm-2 and F-21, 2.2 and 6.7. The patient doses during fluoroscopically guided procedures are relatively low compared with other interventional procedures. (authors)

  1. Radiation exposure of the population due to medical procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frischauf, H.

    1976-01-01

    The question of individual benefit-risk ratio in X-ray exposures is considered. The growth rate of the number of radiological examinations in New Zealand, Sweden, UK and USA is stated to be between 2 and 6 per cent per annum. The risks of internal radioisotope tests are emphasised and reductions of exposure are reported when 99Tc isotopes are used, counterbalanced by the increasing number of exposures made; the question of radiation-induced leukemia is raised in this respect. The problems of analysing delayed radiation effects are discussed, and the possibility of animal tests is suggested. (G.M.E.)

  2. Diagnostic Dental Radiation Risk during Pregnancy: Awareness among General Dentists in Tabriz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahmineh Razi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. Pregnant women often do not receive proper dental care in emergency visits due to a lack of awareness of the effect of radiation doses and the involved risks for the fetus. The aim of the present study was to assess the awareness of general dentists practicing in Tabriz, Iran, of the risks involved during exposure to diagnostic dental radiation in pregnant women. Materials and methods. In this descriptive/cross-sectional study, 250 general dentists, who had attended continuing education courses under the supervision of the Faculty of Dentistry, filled out questionnaires on their awareness of radiation risks. Data was analyzed by Spearman's correlation coefficient test. Results. The mean of correct answers was 6.47±1.66, with the least and highest correct answers of 2 and 10, respectively. The highest and the lowest levels of awareness were related to the use of a lead apron (92% and a long rectangular collimator (3.2%, respectively. There was a statistically significant correlation between the age of practitioners and awareness of radiation risks (P=0.02. However, no statistically significant correlation was observed between job experience (P=0.25 and the number of continuing education courses attended (P=0.16 and awareness of radiation risks. Conclusion. The studied population of dentists does not seem to have the sufficient knowledge regarding the diagnostic dental radiation risk during pregnancy. Further educational courses and pamphlets are recommended for increasing their awareness of this subject.

  3. Re-Establishment of Standard Radiation Qualities for Calibration of Dosemeter in Diagnostic Radiology - RQR Series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asmaliza Hashim; Norhayati Abdullah; Mohd Firdaus Abd Rahman

    2016-01-01

    After repairing the high voltage (HV) generator for Philips MG165 X-Ray Machine, the reestablishment of the standard radiation qualities has been done at Medical Physics Calibration Laboratory to meet the IEC and IAEA standard. Standard radiation qualities are the important criteria for calibration of dosemeter in diagnostic radiology. Standard radiation qualities are defined as the added filtration needed to produce and the half value layer (HVL) of the beam for specifies x-ray tube kilo voltage (kV). For calibration of dosemeter in diagnostic radiology, standard radiation qualities RQR represent the beam incident on the patient in general radiography, fluoroscopy and dental application. The HVL were measured using PTW ion chamber of volume 1 cm 3 with PTW electrometer and aluminium filter with 99.9 % purity was used as additional filter for RQR and filter for HVL. The first establishment of standard radiation qualities was made in 2009 for the radiation qualities of RQR. The results of additional filter and 1st HVL from 2009 to 2016 will be discussed further in paper. The ratios of the measured HVL to the standard IEC HVL value for the RQR series also described in this paper. The details of the measurement and the results are described in this paper. (author)

  4. A diagnostic procedure for applying the social-ecological systems framework in diverse cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jochen Hinkel

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The framework for analyzing sustainability of social-ecological systems (SES framework of Elinor Ostrom is a multitier collection of concepts and variables that have proven to be relevant for understanding outcomes in diverse SES. The first tier of this framework includes the concepts resource system (RS and resource units (RU, which are then further characterized through lower tier variables such as clarity of system boundaries and mobility. The long-term goal of framework development is to derive conclusions about which combinations of variables explain outcomes across diverse types of SES. This will only be possible if the concepts and variables of the framework can be made operational unambiguously for the different types of SES, which, however, remains a challenge. Reasons for this are that case studies examine other types of RS than those for which the framework has been developed or consider RS for which different actors obtain different kinds of RU. We explore these difficulties and relate them to antecedent work on common-pool resources and public goods. We propose a diagnostic procedure which resolves some of these difficulties by establishing a sequence of questions that facilitate the step-wise and unambiguous application of the SES framework to a given case. The questions relate to the actors benefiting from the SES, the collective goods involved in the generation of those benefits, and the action situations in which the collective goods are provided and appropriated. We illustrate the diagnostic procedure for four case studies in the context of irrigated agriculture in New Mexico, common property meadows in the Swiss Alps, recreational fishery in Germany, and energy regions in Austria. We conclude that the current SES framework has limitations when applied to complex, multiuse SES, because it does not sufficiently capture the actor interdependencies introduced through RS and RU characteristics and dynamics.

  5. Radiation protection and quality assurance in diagnostic radiology - an IAEA coordinated research project in Asia and Eastern Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oresegun, Modupe; LeHeron, J.; Maccia, C.; Padovani, R.; Vano, E.

    1999-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency currently has two parallel Coordinated Research Projects (CRP) running in Asia and Eastern Europe. The main objective of the CRPs is to raise the level of awareness in participating countries about the need for radiation protection for patients undergoing diagnostic radiology procedures. This is to be achieved by first assessing the status quo in a sample of hospitals and X-ray rooms in each participating country. A program of optimization of radiation protection for patients is then introduced by means of a comprehensive quality assurance program and the implementation of appropriate dose reduction methods, taking into account clinical requirements for diagnostically acceptable images. Patient dose assessment and image quality assessment are to be performed both before and after the introduction of the quality assurance program. The CRP is divided into two phases - the first is concerned with conventional radiography, while the second involves fluoroscopy and computed tomography. The CRP is still running, restricting the scope of this paper to a discussion of the approach being taken with the project. The project will be completed in 1998, with analysis to follow

  6. Occupational radiation exposure to anesthetists from fluoroscopic projections during orthopedic operative procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abas, A A; Rahman, R A; Yahya, N; Kamaruzaman, E; Zainuddin, K; Manap, N A

    2014-01-01

    The role of anesthetists during orthopedic fluoroscopic procedures exposes them to radiation. We conducted a prospective, descriptive study to estimate the radiation exposure to anesthetists during procedures over a six-month period in the orthopedic trauma operating theatres which had the most fluoroscopic usage. Thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) chips were placed two metres away from the radiation source, in three positions to simulate the anesthetist's position in the operating theatre during the fluoroscopic procedures as well as their radiation safety practices. The three positions were above the lead gown, behind the lead gown and behind the protective lead screen. The fourth TLD chip was assigned as a control measure to account for background radiation. The radiation exposure was measured at every end of each month during the period of six consecutive months. The TLD chips were sent to the Malaysian Institute for Nuclear Technology (MINT) for the analysis. From the study, the annual exposure without a protective shield at a 2 metre distance from the projection source was estimated to be 0.70 milliSievert (mSv)/year. With the use of lead gowns and protective lead screens, the annual exposure was estimated to be 0.08 mSv / year. All the radiation levels measured were within the maximum permissible dose of 50 mSv / year. During fluoroscopic assisted orthopedic procedures, the anesthetists in UKMMC are exposed to a small amount of radiation which is well below the annual maximum permissible limit as determined by local and international regulatory bodies.

  7. A study on enforcement effects of radiation safety control regulations for diagnostic X-ray equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sung, Mo IL; Park, Myeong Hwan; Kwon, Duk Moon; Lee, Joon IL

    1999-01-01

    The purposes of this study are to analyze the realities after enforcements of safety control regulations for diagnostic X-ray equipment and to suggest means for an improvement of low radiation safety control. A questionnaire survey for medical radiologic technologists was carried out to determine enforcement effects of the safety control regulations. The results of analysis from the survey are as follows. That is, most of he respondents realized the importance of the radiation safety control system, but about a half of them revealed that regulations were not well observed in accordance with their purposes. Only 43.9 percent of the respondents took an active part in quality control of radiation. And responsibility, sex, age, and knowledge for safety control were important indicators for observations of the regulations. Training for the safety control regulations are needed to ensure safety control and proper usage of diagnostic X-ray equipment. And management of organizations using diagnostic X-ray equipment have to understand and stress the importance of radiation safety control system. (author)

  8. Avoidance of radiation injuries from medical interventional procedures, ICRP Publication 85

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valentin, J.

    2000-01-01

    Interventional radiology (fluoroscopically-guided) techniques are being used by an increasing number of clinicians not adequately trained in radiation safety or radiobiology. Many of these interventionists are not aware of the potential for injury from these procedures or the simple methods for decreasing their incidence. Many patients are not being counselled on the radiation risks, nor followed up when radiation doses from difficult procedures may lead to injury. Some patients are suffering radiation-induced skin injuries and younger patients may face an increased risk of future cancer. Interventionists are having their practice limited or suffering injury, and are exposing their staff to high doses. In some interventional procedures, skin doses to patients approach those experienced in some cancer radiotherapy fractions. Radiation-induced skin injuries are occurring in patients due to the use of inappropriate equipment and, more often, poor operational technique. Injuries to physicians and staff performing interventional procedures have also been observed. Acute radiation doses (to patients) may cause erythema at 2 Gy, cataract at 2 Gy, permanent epilation at 7 Gy, and delayed skin necrosis at 12 Gy. Protracted (occupational) exposures to the eye may cause cataract at 4 Gy if the dose is received in less than 3 months, at 5.5 Gy if received over a period exceeding 3 months. Practical actions to control dose to the patient and to the staff are listed. The absorbed dose to the patient in the area of skin that receives the maximum dose is of priority concern. Each local clinical protocol should include, for each type of interventional procedure, a statement on the cumulative skin doses and skin sites associated with the various parts of the procedure. Interventionists should be trained to use information on skin dose and on practical techniques to control dose. Maximum cumulative absorbed doses that appear to approach or exceed 1 Gy (for procedures that may be

  9. A procedure for routine radiation protection checking of mammography equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bengtsson, L.G.; Lundehn, I.

    1980-01-01

    A procedure was developed for checking of mammography equipment used in screening for mammary cancer. The procedure will be handled by hospital physicists or x-ray inspectors and is intended to permit checking of x-ray equipment performance as well as evaluation of mean dose or eneray imparted to groups of patients. Measurement methods studied involve TLD, ionization chambers and a new plastic scintillator designed to measure energy imparted. After careful study of sizes and attenuation properties of breasts, a 50 mm polymethylmetacrylate phantom seemed the most appropriate. The choice of measuring equipment is reported as well as some preliminary results from field measurements. (author)

  10. Coherent Synchrotron Radiation as a Diagnostic Tool for the LCLS Longitudinal Feedback System

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Juhao; Huang, Zhirong

    2005-01-01

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) will be the world's first x-ray free-electron laser (FEL). To ensure the vitality of FEL lasing, a longitudinal feedback system is required together with other diagnostics. In this paper, we study the possibility of using Coherent Synchrotron Radiation (CSR) from the chicane as the diagnostic tool for bunch length feedback. Calculations show that CSR is a good candidate, even for the non-Gaussian, double-horn longitudinal charge distribution. We further check the feasibility for low and high charge options, and also the possibility for detecting the microbunching.

  11. Progress on the Flash X-Ray Optical Transition Radiation Diagnostic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, V; Houck, T; Brown, C

    2008-03-30

    This document summarizes the Flash X-Ray accelerator (FXR) optical transition radiation (OTR) spot-size diagnostics efforts in FY07. During this year, new analysis, simulation, and experimental approaches were utilized to interpret OTR spot data from both dielectric foils such as Kapton (VN type) and metal coated foils. Significant new findings of the intricacies involved in the diagnostic and of FXR operational issues were achieved. Geometry and temperature based effects were found to affect the beam image profiles from the OTR foils. These effects must be taken into account in order to deduce accurately the beam current density profile.

  12. A Case of Radiation-Induced Multifocal Laryngeal Angiosarcoma Presenting as a Diagnostic Dilemma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayme R. Dowdall

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Head and neck sarcomas are relatively rare tumors, with angiosarcomas representing a small subset. Angiosarcoma is a malignant endothelial neoplasm characterized by atypical, multilayered, or solid endothelial proliferation with vasoformative architecture. The global incidence of irradiation-associated sarcoma is estimated as between 0.03% and 0.08%. Here we reported the case of an elderly woman previously treated with radiation more than 20 years ago for an unknown primary of head and neck. This interesting case presented as a diagnostic challenge, and multiple biopsies were required to eventually establish the diagnosis of laryngeal angiosarcoma. We additionally have confirmation from our prior radiation records that the patient did, in fact, receive a substantial dose of radiation to the site previously. To our knowledge, this case represents the first report of a documented radiation-induced multifocal laryngeal angiosarcoma.

  13. Review of advanced catheter technologies in radiation oncology brachytherapy procedures

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou J; Zamdborg L; Sebastian E

    2015-01-01

    Jun Zhou,1,2 Leonid Zamdborg,1 Evelyn Sebastian1 1Department of Radiation Oncology, Beaumont Health System, 2Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine, Royal Oak, MI, USA Abstract: The development of new catheter and applicator technologies in recent years has significantly improved treatment accuracy, efficiency, and outcomes in brachytherapy. In this paper, we review these advances, focusing on the performance of catheter imaging and reconstruction techniques in brachytherapy ...

  14. The Swedish radiation protection institute's regulations on x-ray diagnostics; issued on April 28, 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-04-01

    These regulations are applicable to practices with ionising radiation with respect to medical and dental diagnostics by means of external radiation sources like x-rays or radioactive substances. The regulations are also applicable to medical or dental use of such radiation sources for planning and guidance, for research and for legal and insurance related examinations.

  15. Image-producing procedures for non-medical applications. Benefits, risks, radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czarwinski, Renate; Estier, Sybille; Lorenz, Bernd; Vahlbruch, Jan; Henning, Ulrich; Michel, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    A survey is given of image-producing procedures for non-medical applications, and this under technical, juridical and radiation protection aspects. The historical development of these procedures is also described. An example is given for today's practical application.

  16. A conceptual framework for managing radiation dose to patients in diagnostic radiology using reference dose levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almen, Anja; Baath, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    The overall aim of the present work was to develop a conceptual framework for managing radiation dose in diagnostic radiology with the intention to support optimisation. An optimisation process was first derived. The framework for managing radiation dose, based on the derived optimisation process, was then outlined. The outset of the optimisation process is four stages: providing equipment, establishing methodology, performing examinations and ensuring quality. The optimisation process comprises a series of activities and actions at these stages. The current system of diagnostic reference levels is an activity in the last stage, ensuring quality. The system becomes a reactive activity only to a certain extent engaging the core activity in the radiology department, performing examinations. Three reference dose levels-possible, expected and established-were assigned to the three stages in the optimisation process, excluding ensuring quality. A reasonably achievable dose range is also derived, indicating an acceptable deviation from the established dose level. A reasonable radiation dose for a single patient is within this range. The suggested framework for managing radiation dose should be regarded as one part of the optimisation process. The optimisation process constitutes a variety of complementary activities, where managing radiation dose is only one part. This emphasises the need to take a holistic approach integrating the optimisation process in different clinical activities. (authors)

  17. A CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK FOR MANAGING RADIATION DOSE TO PATIENTS IN DIAGNOSTIC RADIOLOGY USING REFERENCE DOSE LEVELS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almén, Anja; Båth, Magnus

    2016-06-01

    The overall aim of the present work was to develop a conceptual framework for managing radiation dose in diagnostic radiology with the intention to support optimisation. An optimisation process was first derived. The framework for managing radiation dose, based on the derived optimisation process, was then outlined. The outset of the optimisation process is four stages: providing equipment, establishing methodology, performing examinations and ensuring quality. The optimisation process comprises a series of activities and actions at these stages. The current system of diagnostic reference levels is an activity in the last stage, ensuring quality. The system becomes a reactive activity only to a certain extent engaging the core activity in the radiology department, performing examinations. Three reference dose levels-possible, expected and established-were assigned to the three stages in the optimisation process, excluding ensuring quality. A reasonably achievable dose range is also derived, indicating an acceptable deviation from the established dose level. A reasonable radiation dose for a single patient is within this range. The suggested framework for managing radiation dose should be regarded as one part of the optimisation process. The optimisation process constitutes a variety of complementary activities, where managing radiation dose is only one part. This emphasises the need to take a holistic approach integrating the optimisation process in different clinical activities. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Gamma radiation grafted polymers for immobilization of Brucella antigen in diagnostic test studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Docters, E. H.; Smolko, E. E.; Suarez, C. E.

    The radiation grafting process has a wide field of industrial applications, and in the recent years the immobilization of biocomponents in grafted polymeric materials obtained by means of ionizing radiations is a new and important contribution to biotechnology. In the present work, gamma preirradiation grafting method was employed to produce acrylics hydrogels onto polyethylene (PE), polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and polystyrene (PS). Two monomers were used to graft the previously mentioned polymers: methacrylic acid (MAAc) and acrylamide (AAm), and several working conditions were considered as influencing the degree of grafting. All this grafted polymers were used to study the possibility of a subsequent immobilization of Brucella antigen (BAg) in diagnostic test studies (ELISA).

  19. Developing an automated database for monitoring ultrasound- and computed tomography-guided procedure complications and diagnostic yield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itri, Jason N; Jones, Lisa P; Kim, Woojin; Boonn, William W; Kolansky, Ana S; Hilton, Susan; Zafar, Hanna M

    2014-04-01

    Monitoring complications and diagnostic yield for image-guided procedures is an important component of maintaining high quality patient care promoted by professional societies in radiology and accreditation organizations such as the American College of Radiology (ACR) and Joint Commission. These outcome metrics can be used as part of a comprehensive quality assurance/quality improvement program to reduce variation in clinical practice, provide opportunities to engage in practice quality improvement, and contribute to developing national benchmarks and standards. The purpose of this article is to describe the development and successful implementation of an automated web-based software application to monitor procedural outcomes for US- and CT-guided procedures in an academic radiology department. The open source tools PHP: Hypertext Preprocessor (PHP) and MySQL were used to extract relevant procedural information from the Radiology Information System (RIS), auto-populate the procedure log database, and develop a user interface that generates real-time reports of complication rates and diagnostic yield by site and by operator. Utilizing structured radiology report templates resulted in significantly improved accuracy of information auto-populated from radiology reports, as well as greater compliance with manual data entry. An automated web-based procedure log database is an effective tool to reliably track complication rates and diagnostic yield for US- and CT-guided procedures performed in a radiology department.

  20. Dosimetric methodology and reference system for diagnostic level X radiation; Metodologia dosimetrica e sistema de referencia para radiacao X nivel diagnostico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potiens, Maria da Penha Albuquerque

    1999-07-01

    Several methodologies for the calibration of diagnostic radiology instruments were developed and established at the Calibration Laboratory of IPEN. These established radiation qualities are recommended by international standards. The methods may be used in the calibration procedures of survey meters used in radiation protection measurements (scattered radiation), instruments used in direct beams (attenuated and non attenuated beams) and quality control instruments. A reference system was proposed using two identical ionization chambers developed at IPEN. They differ only by the collecting electrode material, one of aluminium and the other of graphite. The different energetic dependence of the chamber's response provided a ratio related to the tube potential. The variation of only 0.28%, from 14.3 to 111 keV, on the energetic dependence of the graphite electrode chamber, provided the possibility of air kerma rate determination in the studied radiation beams. (author)

  1. A pilot study of radiation exposures arising from interventional radiology procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellet, S.; Giczi, F.; Gaspardy, G.; Temesi, A.; Ballay, L.

    2006-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: In the past 25 years, considerable number of new therapeutic procedures have been worked out and adopted in radiology. These interventional procedures are mainly based on angiographic methods. During these procedures the exposure of patients and staff are usually greater than of conventional radiography and fluoroscopy as a consequence of longer fluoroscopy times and great number of cine-radiography. In the latest years radiation-induced skin injuries occurred in some patients. Injuries to physicians and staff performing interventional procedures have also been observed. In our days interventional procedures are widely used and more sophisticated procedures are worked out and adopted. Consequently, there is a need for the protection of the patient and the staff on a higher level. Radiation protection of intervention radiology deserves a distinguish attention. In Hungary interventional radiology were performed in 36 laboratories in 2003. According to statistical data the gross number of interventional radiological procedures were 19442. The most frequently performed procedures were the P.T.C.A., the coronary and ilio-femoral stent implantation and chemo-embolization. In 2004, the National Research Institute for Radiobiology and Radio-hygiene and the National Patient Dose Evaluation Program started a pilot study of radiation exposures arising from interventional radiology procedures. During the study the patient exposure were measured by D.A.P.-meters. The patient skin dose and the staff dose were performed by thermoluminescent chips. In their presentation the authors present the most important results of the study. (authors)

  2. An observation study of radiation exposure to nurses during interventional radiology procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komemushi, Atsushi; Tanigawa, Noboru; Aoki, Atsuko

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to prospectively measure the level of radiation exposure among nursing staff during interventional radiology procedures. All interventional radiology procedures performed at our institution between April 20 and June 19, 2009 were included in this study. Radiation exposure was measured as the equivalent dose penetrating tissue to a depth of 10 mm using electronic personal dosimeters attached outside (Ha) and inside (Hb) lead aprons. Effective dose (HE) was estimated by calculating from Ha and Hb. In total, data from 68 procedures were included in this study. Four nurses performed 71 nursing cares. The mean Ha was 0.70±1.0 μSv, while the mean Hb was 0.06±0.2 μSv. The mean HE was 0.14±0.3 μSv. The present findings indicate that during interventional radiology procedures, nurses were exposed to very low levels of radiation. (author)

  3. Diagnostic accuracy of computed tomography using lower doses of radiation for patients with Crohn's disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Craig, Orla

    2012-08-01

    Magnetic resonance and ultrasonography have increasing roles in the initial diagnosis of Crohn\\'s disease, but computed tomography (CT) with positive oral contrast agents is most frequently used to identify those with acute extramural complications. However, CT involves exposure of patients to radiation. We prospectively compared the diagnostic accuracy of low-dose CT (at a dose comparable to that used to obtain an abdominal radiograph) with conventional-dose CT in patients with active Crohn\\'s disease.

  4. CT-discography; diagnostic accuracy in lumbar disc herniation and significance of induced pain during procedure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, En Hao [Yan Bian Medical College, Beijing (China); Chung, Tae Sub; Jeong, Mi Gyoung; Kim, Young Soo; Roh, Sung Woo [Yonsei Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-01-01

    To evaluate the usefulness and the accuracy of CT-discography in lumbar disc disease by analyzing the findings of CT-discogram and types of evoked pain during the procedure. CT-discograms were retrospectively evaluated in 47 intervertebral discs of 20 patients with multilevel involvement of lumbar disc diseases. In 28 herniated discs confirmed at surgery, the findings of CT-discogram (28 disc levels/20 patients), MRI(23/16) and CT(21/15) were comparatively analysed. The type of pain after infusion of contrast media during CT-discography was compared with that prior to the procedure. The accuracy for determining types of the herniated lumbar disc when compared with post-operative results was 96.4%(27 discs/28 discs) in the CT-discogram, 82.6%(19 discs/23 discs) in MRI and 71.4%(15 discs/21 discs) in the CT scan. Pains encountered during discography were radiating pain in 12 discs and back pain in 24 discs. CT-discography was especially helpful in 10 patients with multilevel involvement of the lumbar disc diseases to evaluate the exact location of diseased disc(s) that provoked the pain. CT-discography is a highly accurate method in diagnosis of the herniated lumbar intervertebral discs and is very useful in determining the precise location related to the development of pain in such cases.

  5. CT-discography; diagnostic accuracy in lumbar disc herniation and significance of induced pain during procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, En Hao; Chung, Tae Sub; Jeong, Mi Gyoung; Kim, Young Soo; Roh, Sung Woo

    1996-01-01

    To evaluate the usefulness and the accuracy of CT-discography in lumbar disc disease by analyzing the findings of CT-discogram and types of evoked pain during the procedure. CT-discograms were retrospectively evaluated in 47 intervertebral discs of 20 patients with multilevel involvement of lumbar disc diseases. In 28 herniated discs confirmed at surgery, the findings of CT-discogram (28 disc levels/20 patients), MRI(23/16) and CT(21/15) were comparatively analysed. The type of pain after infusion of contrast media during CT-discography was compared with that prior to the procedure. The accuracy for determining types of the herniated lumbar disc when compared with post-operative results was 96.4%(27 discs/28 discs) in the CT-discogram, 82.6%(19 discs/23 discs) in MRI and 71.4%(15 discs/21 discs) in the CT scan. Pains encountered during discography were radiating pain in 12 discs and back pain in 24 discs. CT-discography was especially helpful in 10 patients with multilevel involvement of the lumbar disc diseases to evaluate the exact location of diseased disc(s) that provoked the pain. CT-discography is a highly accurate method in diagnosis of the herniated lumbar intervertebral discs and is very useful in determining the precise location related to the development of pain in such cases

  6. The Design of Diagnostic Medical Facilities where Ionising Radiation is used

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malone, J.; O'Reilly, G.; O'Connor, U.; Gallagher, A.; Sheahan, N.; Fennell, S.

    2009-06-01

    The original Code of Practice on The Design of Diagnostic Medical Facilities Using Ionising Radiation was first published by the Nuclear Energy Board in 1988. In the intervening years the 'Blue Book' as it became known has served the medical community well as the sector has expanded and modernised and the late Dr Noel Nowlan, then Chief Executive of the Nuclear Energy Board, deserves much credit for initiating this pioneering contribution to radiation safety in Ireland. There have been significant developments since its publication in terms of the underlying radiation protection legislation, regulatory practice as well as developments in new technologies that have given rise to the need for a revision of the Code. This revised Code is based on a comprehensive draft document produced by the Haughton Institute under contract to the RPII and was finalised following extensive consultations with the relevant stakeholders. The revised Code includes a brief review of the current legislative framework and its specific impact on the management of building projects (Chapters 1 and 2), a presentation of the main types of radiological (Chapter 3) and nuclear medicine (Chapter 4) facilities, a treatment of the technical aspects of shielding calculations (Chapter 5) and a discussion of the practical aspects of implementing shielding solutions in a building context (Chapter 6). The primary purpose of the Code is to assist in the design of diagnostic facilities to the highest radiation protection standards in order to ensure the safety of workers and members of the public and the delivery of a safe service to patients. Diagnostic radiology is a dynamic environment and the Code is intended to be used in consultation with the current literature, an experienced Radiation Protection Advisor and a multidisciplinary project team

  7. Diagnostic options for radiative divertor feedback control on NSTX-U

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soukhanovskii, V. A.; Gerhardt, S. P.; Kaita, R.; McLean, A. G.; Raman, R.

    2012-10-01

    A radiative divertor technique is used in present tokamak experiments and planned for ITER to mitigate high heat loads on divertor plasma-facing components (PFCs) to prevent excessive material erosion and thermal damage. In NSTX, a large spherical tokamak with lithium-coated graphite PFCs and high divertor heat flux (qpeak ≤ 15 MW/m2), radiative divertor experiments have demonstrated a significant reduction of divertor peak heat flux simultaneously with good core H-mode confinement using pre-programmed D2 or CD4 gas injections. In this work diagnostic options for a new real-time feedback control system for active radiative divertor detachment control in NSTX-U, where steady-state peak divertor heat fluxes are projected to reach 20–30 MW/m2, are discussed. Based on the NSTX divertor detachment measurements and analysis, the control diagnostic signals available for NSTX-U include divertor radiated power, neutral pressure, spectroscopic deuterium recombination signatures, infrared thermography of PFC surfaces, and thermoelectric scrape-off layer current. In addition, spectroscopic “security” monitoring of possible confinement or pedestal degradation is recommended. These signals would be implemented in a digital plasma control system to manage the divertor detachment process via an actuator (impurity gas seeding rate).

  8. Radiation doses to the unborn child at diagnostic examinations in Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helmrot, E. [County Hospital Ryhov, Radiology Department, Joenkoeping (Sweden); Pettersson, H.; Sandborg, M.; Olsson, S.; Nilsson, J. [Linkoeping University, Faculty of Health Sciences, Department of Radiation Physics (Sweden); Cederlund, T. [Swedish Radiation Protection Authority, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2003-06-01

    The use of ionising radiation in a medical examination of a woman caring a child is not always possible to avoid. The following situations can occur: (1) The pregnancy of the patient is known and the examination has to be performed due to medical reason, (2) The pregnancy of the patient is unknown at the time of examination. Methods to identify pregnant women at radiological departments in Sweden are already in use, but national rules and methods to calculate the individual dose to the unborn child for different examinations are less evaluated. There is a need of standards for the calculations, estimations and documentation of the radiation dose to the unborn child. According to directives from the European Commission, every X-ray examination has to be justified and optimised. The aim of this study is to determine the absorbed dose to the unborn child for common radiation diagnostic examinations used in Sweden and to find a standardised method for dose calculations. (orig.)

  9. Radiation doses to the unborn child at diagnostic examinations in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helmrot, E.; Pettersson, H.; Sandborg, M.; Olsson, S.; Nilsson, J.; Cederlund, T.

    2003-01-01

    The use of ionising radiation in a medical examination of a woman caring a child is not always possible to avoid. The following situations can occur: (1) The pregnancy of the patient is known and the examination has to be performed due to medical reason, (2) The pregnancy of the patient is unknown at the time of examination. Methods to identify pregnant women at radiological departments in Sweden are already in use, but national rules and methods to calculate the individual dose to the unborn child for different examinations are less evaluated. There is a need of standards for the calculations, estimations and documentation of the radiation dose to the unborn child. According to directives from the European Commission, every X-ray examination has to be justified and optimised. The aim of this study is to determine the absorbed dose to the unborn child for common radiation diagnostic examinations used in Sweden and to find a standardised method for dose calculations. (orig.)

  10. Evaluation of radiation protection in x rays room design in diagnostic radiography department in Omdurman locality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, Ahmed yusif Abdelrahman

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this study is conducted in order to evaluate the application of radiation protection in x-ray rooms design in diagnosis radiology department, evaluate personal monitoring devices, to assess primary scatter and leakage radiation dose, to assess monitoring devices if available, in period from March 2013 to August 2013. The design data included room size, control room size, manufacture of equipment, room surrounding areas, workload of all equipment rooms, type of x-ray equipment, radiation worker's in all hospital, number of patient in each shift, structural material and shielding, K vp and m As used in x-ray room department during examination testing. The results of this study show that there is x-ray room design, the design of x-ray equipment is accepted according to the radiation safety institute team of quality control. Also the study shows that the radiation protection devices are available and in a good condition and enough in number. The study shows that there are not personal monitoring devices and services. the radiological technologist are well trained. Also the study investigation the radiation protection in x-ray room in diagnostic department in Omdurman locality. Finally the study shows that there is compact able to ICRP recommended and National quality control in Sudan Atomic Energy Council exception, Alwedad, Abusied and Blue Nile there are have not control room concludes that there is only in relationship hospital have a window without shield.(Author)

  11. Review of advanced catheter technologies in radiation oncology brachytherapy procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Jun; Zamdborg, Leonid; Sebastian, Evelyn

    2015-01-01

    The development of new catheter and applicator technologies in recent years has significantly improved treatment accuracy, efficiency, and outcomes in brachytherapy. In this paper, we review these advances, focusing on the performance of catheter imaging and reconstruction techniques in brachytherapy procedures using magnetic resonance images and electromagnetic tracking. The accuracy of catheter reconstruction, imaging artifacts, and other notable properties of plastic and titanium applicators in gynecologic treatments are reviewed. The accuracy, noise performance, and limitations of electromagnetic tracking for catheter reconstruction are discussed. Several newly developed applicators for accelerated partial breast irradiation and gynecologic treatments are also reviewed. New hypofractionated high dose rate treatment schemes in prostate cancer and accelerated partial breast irradiation are presented

  12. Evaluating the Performance Diagnostic Checklist-Human Services to Assess Incorrect Error-Correction Procedures by Preschool Paraprofessionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowe, Melissa; Sellers, Tyra P.

    2018-01-01

    The Performance Diagnostic Checklist-Human Services (PDC-HS) has been used to assess variables contributing to undesirable staff performance. In this study, three preschool teachers completed the PDC-HS to identify the factors contributing to four paraprofessionals' inaccurate implementation of error-correction procedures during discrete trial…

  13. Assessment of microbiological diagnostic procedures for respiratory specimens from cystic fibrosis patients in German laboratories by use of a questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häfner, Laura; Peters, Georg; Kahl, Barbara C

    2014-03-01

    Respiratory specimens from cystic fibrosis (CF) patients challenge microbiological laboratories with their complexity of pathogens and atypical variants. We evaluated the diagnostic procedures in German laboratories by use of a questionnaire. Although most laboratories followed guidelines, some of them served only a small number of patients, while others did not use the recommended selective agars to culture the particular CF-relevant species.

  14. Analysis of radiation doses to patients from diagnostic department of nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lepej, L.; Messingerova, M.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper the values of mean effective dose equivalents per unit activity (H E/1Bq ) were used for the calculation of mean effective dose equivalents for one examination (H E ). The collective effective dose equivalents for each radiopharmaceutical and type of examination (S ER ) and global collective effective dose equivalent for department for all radiopharmaceuticals (S E ) during evaluated period were defined. The data for years from 1992 to 1994 were evaluated and compared with results in literature. The evaluation of radiation doses in nuclear medicine department is useful parameter for internal quality control. Using this method, the radiation dose in this laboratory was changed to minimum (under mean value of Slovak Republic). Unfortunately, the real data of patients radiation doses are different from the calculated one. Due to different kinetic of radiopharmaceuticals in individual patients (influenced by pathology, age, etc.) the evaluation of radiation burden to nuclear medicine patients is problematic. But this approach enable the relative comparison of the changes in values of H E and S E during the observed period. The evaluation of individual (minimal) effective dose equivalent - (H min ) which represents dose calculated under physiologic conditions can be useful for indication of diagnostic examination by physicians. Therefore the systematic registration of H min from all examinations - patient's radiation history. This is specially important in the case of children and young people. The importance of the proposed method, is in regulation of radiation dose from nuclear medicine diagnostic examinations, not only be the control of number and type of examinations, but also by selection of used radiopharmaceuticals and by the way how to use them. (J.K.) 1 fig., 2 refs

  15. Using of new minimally invasive procedures in diagnostic, treatment and prevention of acute pericarditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Григорий Николаевич Урсол

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This study proves satisfactorily the effectiveness of using two new methods of minimally invasive procedures for possibility of accurate diagnosis, appropriative and intense medical treatment of acute pericarditis in long term period.Aim – presentation of two new methods of minimally invasive procedures, which are performed with pericardioscopy and are assigned for effective diagnostic and treatment of pericarditis: introducing of micro drainage into pericardium; Performing pericardioscopy with following drainage using pericardioscope without using large discission.Materials and methods. This study includes results of 571 patients with acute pericarditis diagnosed since 1990 till 2014. Due to the etiology of pericarditis all the patients were divided into six groups: Viral, Bacterial, Tuberculous, Autologous-Reactive, Uremic, Tumoral. Main group included patient with viral acute pericarditis. Study includes 339 males and 232 females. Male’s main group was with viral pericarditis, female’s – patients with autologous-reactive acute pericarditis.In this study were used: assessment of clinical signs, ECG, chest X-Ray, echocardiogram, pericardium puncture, pericardiocentesis.Results. Results of using both methods are presented in clinical case, which illustrates opportunities of accurate diagnosis, appropriative and intense medical treatment of acute pericarditis. In 11-years follow-up patient has no clinically significant changes in chest organs, no exacerbations were diagnosed, thus, the effectiveness of proposed method for long-term period was proved.Conclusion. 1. Using of the method «Introducing of micro drainage into pericardium», allows to determine diagnosis during 24 hours in 90% of all cases, to prevent complications related to acute pericarditis and in some ways to neutralize the acute condition of the disease.2. In case when diagnosis is not verified in 48 hour another method is used: «Performing pericardioscopy with following

  16. Hospital discharge diagnostic and procedure codes for upper gastro-intestinal cancer: how accurate are they?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stavrou Efty

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Population-level health administrative datasets such as hospital discharge data are used increasingly to evaluate health services and outcomes of care. However information about the accuracy of Australian discharge data in identifying cancer, associated procedures and comorbidity is limited. The Admitted Patients Data Collection (APDC is a census of inpatient hospital discharges in the state of New South Wales (NSW. Our aim was to assess the accuracy of the APDC in identifying upper gastro-intestinal (upper GI cancer cases, procedures for associated curative resection and comorbidities at the time of admission compared to data abstracted from medical records (the ‘gold standard’. Methods We reviewed the medical records of 240 patients with an incident upper GI cancer diagnosis derived from a clinical database in one NSW area health service from July 2006 to June 2007. Extracted case record data was matched to APDC discharge data to determine sensitivity, positive predictive value (PPV and agreement between the two data sources (κ-coefficient. Results The accuracy of the APDC diagnostic codes in identifying site-specific incident cancer ranged from 80-95% sensitivity. This was comparable to the accuracy of APDC procedure codes in identifying curative resection for upper GI cancer. PPV ranged from 42-80% for cancer diagnosis and 56-93% for curative surgery. Agreement between the data sources was >0.72 for most cancer diagnoses and curative resections. However, APDC discharge data was less accurate in reporting common comorbidities - for each condition, sensitivity ranged from 9-70%, whilst agreement ranged from κ = 0.64 for diabetes down to κ  Conclusions Identifying incident cases of upper GI cancer and curative resection from hospital administrative data is satisfactory but under-ascertained. Linkage of multiple population-health datasets is advisable to maximise case ascertainment and minimise false

  17. Diagnostics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donné, A.J.H.; Costley, A.E.; Barnsley, R.

    2007-01-01

    In order to support the operation of ITER and the planned experimental programme an extensive set of plasma and first wall measurements will be required. The number and type of required measurements will be similar to those made on the present-day large tokamaks while the specification...... of the measurements—time and spatial resolutions, etc—will in some cases be more stringent. Many of the measurements will be used in the real time control of the plasma driving a requirement for very high reliability in the systems (diagnostics) that provide the measurements. The implementation of diagnostic systems......&D is needed to prepare the systems. In some cases the environmental difficulties are so severe that new diagnostic techniques are required. The starting point in the development of diagnostics for ITER is to define the measurement requirements and develop their justification. It is necessary to include all...

  18. Diagnostic Accuracy of Ultrasonic Histogram Features to Evaluate Radiation Toxicity of the Parotid Glands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaofeng; Tridandapani, Srini; Beitler, Jonathan J.; Yu, David S.; Chen, Zhengjia; Kim, Sungjin; Bruner, Deborah W.; Curran, Walter J.; Liu, Tian

    2015-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives To investigate the diagnostic accuracy of ultrasound histogram features in the quantitative assessment of radiation-induced parotid gland injury and to identify potential imaging biomarkers for radiation-induced xerostomia (dry mouth)—the most common and debilitating side effect after head-and-neck radiotherapy (RT). Materials and Methods Thirty-four patients, who have developed xerostomia after RT for head-and-neck cancer, were enrolled. Radiation-induced xerostomia was defined by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer morbidity scale. Ultrasound scans were performed on each patient’s parotids bilaterally. The 34 patients were stratified into the acute-toxicity groups (16 patients, ≤3 months after treatment) and the late-toxicity group (18 patients, >3 months after treatment). A separate control group of 13 healthy volunteers underwent similar ultrasound scans of their parotid glands. Six sonographic features were derived from the echo-intensity histograms to assess acute and late toxicity of the parotid glands. The quantitative assessments were compared to a radiologist’s clinical evaluations. The diagnostic accuracy of these ultrasonic histogram features was evaluated with the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. Results With an area under the ROC curve greater than 0.90, several histogram features demonstrated excellent diagnostic accuracy for evaluation of acute and late toxicity of parotid glands. Significant differences (P parotid glands. Conclusions We demonstrated that ultrasound histogram features could be used to measure acute and late toxicity of the parotid glands after head-and-neck cancer RT, which may be developed into a low-cost imaging method for xerostomia monitoring and assessment. PMID:25088832

  19. Comparison of radiation exposure during transradial diagnostic coronary angiography with single- or multi-catheters approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plourde, Guillaume; Abdelaal, Eltigani; MacHaalany, Jimmy; Rimac, Goran; Poirier, Yann; Arsenault, Jean; Costerousse, Olivier; Bertrand, Olivier F

    2017-08-01

    To compare radiation exposure during transradial diagnostic coronary angiography (DCA) using standard single- or multi-catheters with different shapes. Transradial DCA can be performed using single- or multi-catheters to canulate left and right coronary ostia. To date, it remains unknown whether there are differences in radiation exposure between the two strategies. From November 2012 to June 2014, 3,410 consecutive patients who underwent transradial DCA were recruited. Groups were based on the initial diagnostic catheter used and were dichotomized between single- and multi-catheters approach. All crossovers were excluded. The multi-catheters approach (Multi) group consisted of Judkins left and right catheters, whereas the single-catheter (Single) group included Amplatz, Barbeau, or Multipurpose catheters. Fluoroscopy time (FT) as a surrogate end-point for total radiation exposure and kerma-area product (KAP; patient radiation exposure) were collected as radiation exposure parameters. A single-catheter strategy was used in 439 patients, while 2,971 patients had a multi-catheters approach. There was no significant difference in FT between groups (2.86 ± 1.48 min for Multi vs. 2.87 ± 1.72 min for Single, P = 0.13). The multi-catheters approach was associated with a significant 15% reduction in KAP (3,599 ± 2,214 cGy · cm 2 vs. 3,073 ± 1,785 cGy · cm 2 , P approach. When pooling all patients, mean FT was 2.86 ± 1.51 min. Mean KAP was 3,141 ± 1,854 cGy · cm 2 . Reference levels in our institution in both groups were below international diagnostic reference levels. Overall both FT and KAP decreased by 15% and 19%, respectively, over the 2-year study period. Compared to a single-catheter approach, a multi-catheters approach with standard Judkins catheters for DCA significantly reduced patient radiation exposure. Whether single catheter designed for DCA by radial approach can further reduce radiation exposure compared to

  20. Reliability of self-reported diagnostic radiation history in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pijpe, Anouk; Manders, Peggy; Mulder, Renee L.; Leeuwen, Flora E. van; Rookus, Matti A.

    2010-01-01

    We assessed reliability of self-reported diagnostic radiation history in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers with and without breast cancer. Within the frame-work of the HEBON study, 401 BRCA1/2 mutation carriers completed a baseline (1999-2004) and a follow-up questionnaire (2006-2007). Test-retest reliability of self-reported exposure to chest X-rays, fluoroscopies and mammograms was assessed for the entire study population and by case status. Overall proportion agreement on reporting ever/never exposure was good (> 75%), while the corresponding kappa coefficients were between 0.40 and 0.75, indicating at least moderate reliability beyond chance. Reliability of number of exposures was also good (> 75%). Proportion agreement on reporting age at first mammogram was low (40%) for exact consistency and moderate (60%) for consistency ± 1 year. Reliability of age at first mammogram was higher for cases than for unaffected carriers (P < 0.001) but this difference disappeared when excluding diagnostic mammograms (P = 0.60). In unaffected carriers proportion agreement on age at last mammogram was 50%. In general, the direction of disagreement on all items was equally distributed. More consistent reporting was mainly determined by a younger age at questionnaire completion. In conclusion, inconsistent self-report of diagnostic radiation by BRCA1/2 mutation carriers was mainly non-differential by disease status.

  1. Radiation field distribution within the room for three commonly-used interventional procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Changcai; Zhang Lin; Min Nan; Lu Feng; Li Quantai; Deng Daping; Chen Yue; Zhu Jianguo

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To detect the radiation field distribution within the room for three commonly-used interventional procedures, in order to provide basic data for the radiation protection and safe operation of staff involved in interventional radiology. Methods: The thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs) were placed in different points on the horizontal plane around the interventional table and the vertical plane where the staff often stayed. Based on the selected experimental conditions, the TLDs were grouped to be irradiated. After the experiment, the TLDs were measured in the laboratory to calculate the doses of radiation field. Results: Data obtained at the same position followed basically as cardiovascular intervention > cerebrovascular intervention > liver intervention. Intervention of same type at the same position followed as high-dose group > mid-dose group > low-dose group. These results were consistent with the useful beam doses, and proportional to the fluoroscopy time. A few data with exception were due to measurement error or experimental error. Conclusions: Cerebrovascular and liver interventional procedures resulted in the relatively low radiation doses. The radiation doses at the distance of more than 3 m can be negligible. For cardiovascular interventional procedure, with the decrease of the distance from the X-ray tube, the dose decreased. In the radiation field,the operator, the first assistant and second assistant would exposed to higher dose on the standing points while patients receive lower doses in the head and feet direction. (authors)

  2. Experimental procedure for the characterization of radiation damage in macromolecular crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leal, Ricardo M. F.; Bourenkov, Gleb P.; Svensson, Olof; Spruce, Darren; Guijarro, Matias; Popov, Alexander N.

    2011-01-01

    A novel automatic procedure to determine the sensitivity of macromolecular crystals to radiation damage is presented. The information extracted from this procedure can be directly used for optimal planning of data collection or/and beamline calibration. A reliable and reproducible method to automatically characterize the radiation sensitivity of macromolecular crystals at the ESRF beamlines has been developed. This new approach uses the slope of the linear dependence of the overall isotropic B-factor with absorbed dose as the damage metric. The method has been implemented through an automated procedure using the EDNA on-line data analysis framework and the MxCuBE data collection control interface. The outcome of the procedure can be directly used to design an optimal data collection strategy. The results of tests carried out on a number of model and real-life crystal systems are presented

  3. Radiation-Induced Noncancer Risks in Interventional Cardiology: Optimisation of Procedures and Staff and Patient Dose Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khairuddin Md Yusof, Ahmad

    2013-01-01

    Concerns about ionizing radiation during interventional cardiology have been increased in recent years as a result of rapid growth in interventional procedure volumes and the high radiation doses associated with some procedures. Noncancer radiation risks to cardiologists and medical staff in terms of radiation-induced cataracts and skin injuries for patients appear clear potential consequences of interventional cardiology procedures, while radiation-induced potential risk of developing cardiovascular effects remains less clear. This paper provides an overview of the evidence-based reviews of concerns about noncancer risks of radiation exposure in interventional cardiology. Strategies commonly undertaken to reduce radiation doses to both medical staff and patients during interventional cardiology procedures are discussed; optimisation of interventional cardiology procedures is highlighted. PMID:24027768

  4. Identifying Institutional Diagnostic Reference Levels for CT with Radiation Dose Index Monitoring Software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacGregor, Kate; Li, Iris; Dowdell, Timothy; Gray, Bruce G

    2015-08-01

    To retrospectively evaluate radiation optimization efforts over 4 years for three computed tomography (CT) protocols and to determine institutional (local) diagnostic reference levels for prospective tracking by using automated radiation dose index monitoring software. Approval for this retrospective observational study was obtained from the hospital research ethics board, and the need to obtain informed consent was waived. The study followed a 48-month radiation dose optimization effort in a large academic inner-city trauma and quaternary referral center. Exposure according to equipment, protocol, and year (2010-2013) for adult patients was determined for routine unenhanced head CT examinations, CT pulmonary angiography examinations, and CT examinations for renal colic. Mean exposure (as volume CT dose index [CTDIvol] and dose-length product [DLP]) was averaged to establish local diagnostic reference levels. Means and 75th percentiles for 2013 were compared with findings from surveys in Canada and diagnostic reference levels for similar protocol types internationally. Student t tests were performed to assess significance between annual means, and χ(2) tests were performed for changes in categoric variables. There were 36 996 examinations in 25 234 patients. There was an average exposure reduction of 22% for CTDIvol and 13% for DLP from 2010 to 2013. In 2013, mean CTDIvol for routine head examinations was 50.8 mGy ± 3.7 (standard deviation), 11.8 mGy ± 5.6 for CT pulmonary angiography examinations, and 10.2 mGy ± 4.2 for renal colic CT examinations, while mean DLP was 805.7 mGy · cm ± 124.3, 432.8 mGy-cm ± 219.9, and 469.4 mGy · cm ± 209.2, respectively. The mean CTDIvol and DLP in 2013 were at or close to identified reference values; however, additional optimization is required to reach "as low as reasonably achievable" values for all examinations. Automated methods of radiation dose data collection permit a detailed analysis of radiation dose according

  5. Retrospective study of cumulative diagnostic radiation exposure during childhood in patients with spina bifida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smookler, Gregory; Deavenport-Saman, Alexis

    2015-10-01

    The Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation Committee of the National Academy of Sciences in 2005 and other expert panels have warned that risk of cancer increases with higher doses of radiation. Children with spina bifida and hydrocephalus have far greater exposure to radiation than the average person, starting almost directly after birth and continuing throughout their lifetimes. The purpose of this study was to estimate the amount of ionizing radiation that patients with spina bifida and hydrocephalus are exposed to during childhood from diagnostic imaging. Thirty patients, ages 18 years or older, with spina bifida and hydrocephalus were randomly selected from a spina bifida clinic and their radiology records were reviewed. Descriptive analyses were conducted. The total radiation exposure was then calculated for the study group, and the mean effective dose per patient was determined. In the study group, during their first 18 years, each patient had a mean of 55.1 studies and a median of 45 radiologic studies, a mean of 9.6 brain CT scans, and a mean cumulative effective dose of 81.9 mSv (2.6 mSv/patient/year over 18 years) and a median cumulative effective dose of 77.2 mSV of accumulated radiation exposure (4.5 mSv/patient/year over 18 years). Clinicians should recognize that increased radiation exposure puts patients with spina bifida and hydrocephalus at higher risk for cancer. The population of children and adults with spina bifida and hydrocephalus should be surveyed for incidence of cancer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Internal qualification and credentialing of radiation oncology physicists to perform patient special procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D Mills

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the arena of radiation oncology special procedures, medical physicists are often the focus professionals for implementation and administration of advanced and complex technologies. One of the most vexing and challenging aspects of managing complexity concerns the ongoing internal qualification and credentialing of radiation oncology physicists to perform patient special procedures. To demonstrate ongoing qualification, a physicist must a document initial training and successful completion of competencies to implement and perform this procedure, b demonstrate familiarity with all aspects of the commissioning and quality assurance process, c demonstrate continuing education respecting this procedure, d demonstrate the peer-reviewed completion of a minimum number of patient special procedures during a specified time span, and e demonstrate satisfactory overall progress toward maintenance of specialty board certification. In many respects, this information complement is similar to that required by an accredited residency program in therapy physics. In this investigation, we report on the design of a management tool to qualify staff radiation oncology physicists to deliver patient procedures.

  7. A systematic review on the accuracy of diagnostic procedures for infravesical obstruction in boys.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauline M L Hennus

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Infravesical obstruction leads to kidney and bladder dysfunction in a significant proportion of boys. The aim of this review is to determine the value of diagnostic tests for ascertainment of infravesical obstruction in boys. METHODOLOGY: We searched PubMed and EMBASE databases until January 1, 2013, to identify papers that described original diagnostic accuracy research for infravesical obstruction in boys. We extracted information on (1 patient characteristics and clinical presentation of PUV and (2 diagnostic pathway, (3 diagnostic accuracy measures and (4 assessed risk of bias. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We retrieved 15 studies describing various diagnostic pathways in 1,189 boys suspected for infravesical obstruction. The included studies reflect a broad clinical spectrum of patients, but all failed to present a standardised approach to confirm the presence and severity of obstruction. The risk of bias of included studies is rather high due to work-up bias and missing data. CONCLUSIONS: As a consequence of low quality of methods of the available studies we put little confidence in the reported estimates for the diagnostic accuracy of US, VCUG and new additional tests for ruling in or ruling out infravesical obstruction. To date, firm evidence to support common diagnostic pathways is lacking. Hence, we are unable to draw conclusions on diagnostic accuracy of tests for infravesical obstruction. In order to be able to standardise the diagnostic pathway for infravesical obstruction, adequate design and transparent reporting is mandatory.

  8. Indonesia's experience with IAEA-CRP on radiation protection in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasukha

    2001-01-01

    IAEA-CRP on Radiation Doses in Diagnostic Radiology and Methods for Dose Reduction has as participants some Asian and East European countries. Indonesia is one of participants that followed the IAEA program. This paper is not a discussion of CRP-results since it will be published as a TECDOC soon. But the work on evaluation of examination frequencies, film reject rate analysis, patient dose measurements, image quality before and after Quality Control (QC) and QC itself, gave some experiences to investigators to be explored and presented. Experiences could be in the form of problems, how to solve problems and some suggestions, starting from no QC up to complicated QC to be faced in conventional radiography to CT-scan and fluoroscopy units. These valuable experiences of Indonesia are proven exercise of IAEA-CRP as a good start for next CRP or national projects in diagnostic radiology. (author)

  9. Development and Optimisation of the SPS and LHC beam diagnostics based on Synchrotron Radiation monitors

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2081364; Roncarolo, Federico

    Measuring the beam transverse emittance is fundamental in every accelerator, in particular for colliders, where its precise determination is essential to maximize the luminosity and thus the performance of the colliding beams.
 Synchrotron Radiation (SR) is a versatile tool for non-destructive beam diagnostics, since its characteristics are closely related to those of the source beam. At CERN, being the only available diagnostics at high beam intensity and energy, SR monitors are exploited as the proton beam size monitor of the two higher energy machines, the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The thesis work documented in this report focused on the design, development, characterization and optimization of these beam size monitors. Such studies were based on a comprehensive set of theoretical calculations, numerical simulations and experiments. A powerful simulation tool has been developed combining conventional softwares for SR simulation and optics design, thus allowing t...

  10. Radiation protection in medical diagnostic radiology in the city of Sobral, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menezes, F.L.; Paschoal, C.M.M.; Ferreira, F.C.L.; Alcantara, M.C.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the suitability to radiation protection of four diagnostic radiology medical services in the city of Sobral-CE, Northeast of Brazil, and to analyze results of the literature for the cities of Rio Branco-AC, North of Brazil, and Rio de Janeiro-RJ, South-east of Brazil. In Sobral-CE, it was performed interviews and direct observations with reference to Brazilian law, the National Ordinance No.453/1998 of the Ministry of Health that regulates the operation of medical and odontological diagnostic radiology services. The results show the occurrence of many items in disagreement with the standard. The technical and operational infractions have basically due to unfamiliarity with the legislation, the lack of investment in training and/or professional development courses. (authors)

  11. Diagnostic accuracy at several reduced radiation dose levels for CT imaging in the diagnosis of appendicitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Di; Khatonabadi, Maryam; Kim, Hyun; Jude, Matilda; Zaragoza, Edward; Lee, Margaret; Patel, Maitraya; Poon, Cheryce; Douek, Michael; Andrews-Tang, Denise; Doepke, Laura; McNitt-Gray, Shawn; Cagnon, Chris; DeMarco, John; McNitt-Gray, Michael

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: While several studies have investigated the tradeoffs between radiation dose and image quality (noise) in CT imaging, the purpose of this study was to take this analysis a step further by investigating the tradeoffs between patient radiation dose (including organ dose) and diagnostic accuracy in diagnosis of appendicitis using CT. Methods: This study was IRB approved and utilized data from 20 patients who underwent clinical CT exams for indications of appendicitis. Medical record review established true diagnosis of appendicitis, with 10 positives and 10 negatives. A validated software tool used raw projection data from each scan to create simulated images at lower dose levels (70%, 50%, 30%, 20% of original). An observer study was performed with 6 radiologists reviewing each case at each dose level in random order over several sessions. Readers assessed image quality and provided confidence in their diagnosis of appendicitis, each on a 5 point scale. Liver doses at each case and each dose level were estimated using Monte Carlo simulation based methods. Results: Overall diagnostic accuracy varies across dose levels: 92%, 93%, 91%, 90% and 90% across the 100%, 70%, 50%, 30% and 20% dose levels respectively. And it is 93%, 95%, 88%, 90% and 90% across the 13.5-22mGy, 9.6-13.5mGy, 6.4-9.6mGy, 4-6.4mGy, and 2-4mGy liver dose ranges respectively. Only 4 out of 600 observations were rated "unacceptable" for image quality. Conclusion: The results from this pilot study indicate that the diagnostic accuracy does not change dramatically even at significantly reduced radiation dose.

  12. Academic training of radiation protection human resources in the X-ray medical diagnostic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaona, E.

    2008-12-01

    The current regulation, established by NOM-229-SSA1-2002 standard, T echnical requirements for facilities, health responsibilities, technical specifications for equipment and facilities for radiation protection in medical diagnosis with X-rays, t hat should be credited refresher courses, and training in radiation safety in accordance with current regulations, however, has been observed that the assistance and accreditation of courses is basically to cover administrative and regulatory requirements and therefore does not necessarily cover needs of the patient to radiation protection in the use of old and new technologies. David Brenner and Eric Hall claim that between 1.5 and 2% of all cancers in the USA may be attributable to exposure to X-ray computerized tomography techniques, given the intensive use of these techniques and the patient dose ranges in which incurred. While this is not debatable, if it is, the alternative does not seem to be abandoning the use of computerized tomography, because it gives them undoubted benefits with respect to invasive procedures. Deserves mention concerns the use of computerized tomography in children using scanning protocols designed for adults, in which case it incurs in 5 times higher dose. An additional warning about unwarranted use of computerized tomography is a procedure of this technique in abdomen resulting in an equivalent dose to 298 times that of a mammogram. Additional aspects such as biological effects (including deterministic) of both medical staff and patients of interventional procedures further reinforces the idea that there are education programs in radiation protection. Attention must put in the new generations, including in the curricula of medical residencies in radiology, endoscopy, cardiology and orthopedic, the education (no emerging courses) in radiation protection, radiobiology, radiology physics, and other topics, but previously must have medical physicists in radiology available to train new

  13. AUTOMATIC ACQUISITION OF CT RADIATION DOSE DATA: USING THE DIAGNOSTIC REFERENCE LEVEL FOR RADIATION DOSE OPTIMIZATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakada, Yoshihiro; Okuda, Yasuo; Tsuge, Tatsuya; Suzuki, Jyunichi; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Konishi, Yasuhiko; Tsujimoto, Takeshi; Nishiki, Shigeo; Satoh, Toshimitsu; Aoyama, Nobukazu; Morimoto, Kyohei; Aita, Masamichi; Yamashita, Yusuke; Yoshitake, Takayasu; Mukai, Masami; Yokooka, Yuki; Yokohama, Noriya; Akahane, Keiichi

    2018-02-07

    The present work describes that we try to construct a system that collects dose information that performed CT examination from multiple facilities and unified management. The results of analysis are compared with other National diagnostic reference level (DRL), and the results are fed back to each facility and the cause of the abnormal value is investigated for dose optimization. Medical information collected 139 144 tests from 33 CT devices in 13 facilities. Although the DRL of this study is lower than that of Japan DRL, it was higher than the DRL of each country. When collecting all the examination, it is thought that the variation of the dose due to the error other than the intended imaging site is large. In future, we should continue to collect information in order to DRL renewal and we also think that it is desirable to collect information on physique and detailed scan region as well. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. 16 CFR 1209.8 - Procedure for calibration of radiation instrumentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... instruments used in the test procedures for measuring critical radiant flux. (a) Radition pyrometer. Calibrate the radiation pyrometer by means of a conventional black body enclosure placed within a furnace and maintained at uniform temperatures of 490, 500, and 510 °C (914, 932, and 950 °F). The black body enclosure...

  15. 78 FR 19268 - Subcommittee on Procedures Review, Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health (ABRWH...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-29

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Subcommittee on Procedures Review, Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health (ABRWH), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub...

  16. 75 FR 58408 - Subcommittee on Procedures Review, Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health (ABRWH...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-24

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Subcommittee on Procedures Review, Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health (ABRWH), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub...

  17. 76 FR 54775 - Subcommittee on Procedures Review, Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health (ABRWH...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-02

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Subcommittee on Procedures Review, Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health (ABRWH), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub...

  18. 78 FR 78963 - Subcommittee on Procedures Review, Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health (ABRWH...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-27

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Subcommittee on Procedures Review, Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health (ABRWH), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub...

  19. 78 FR 732 - Subcommittee on Procedures Review, Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health (ABRWH...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-04

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Subcommittee on Procedures Review, Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health (ABRWH), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub...

  20. 75 FR 39029 - Subcommittee on Procedures Review, Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health (ABRWH...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-07

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Subcommittee on Procedures Review, Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health (ABRWH), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub...

  1. 75 FR 28626 - Subcommittee on Procedures Review, Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health (ABRWH...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-21

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Subcommittee on Procedures Review, Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health (ABRWH), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub...

  2. 75 FR 10807 - Subcommittee on Procedures Reviews (SPR), Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health (ABRWH...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-09

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Subcommittee on Procedures Reviews (SPR), Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health (ABRWH), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee...

  3. 77 FR 15761 - Subcommittee on Procedures Review, Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health (ABRWH...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-16

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Subcommittee on Procedures Review, Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health (ABRWH), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub...

  4. 78 FR 38346 - Subcommittee on Procedures Review, Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health (ABRWH...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-26

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Subcommittee on Procedures Review, Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health (ABRWH), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act...

  5. 75 FR 78998 - Subcommittee on Procedures Review, Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health (ABRWH...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-17

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Subcommittee on Procedures Review, Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health (ABRWH), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub...

  6. 78 FR 62635 - Subcommittee on Procedures Review, Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health (ABRWH...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-22

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Subcommittee on Procedures Review, Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health (ABRWH), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub...

  7. 76 FR 38183 - Subcommittee on Procedures Review, Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health (ABRWH...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-29

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Subcommittee on Procedures Review, Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health (ABRWH), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub...

  8. 76 FR 11483 - Subcommittee on Procedures Review, Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health (ABRWH...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-02

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Subcommittee on Procedures Review, Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health (ABRWH), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub...

  9. 76 FR 77235 - Subcommittee on Procedures Review, Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health (ABRWH...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-12

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Subcommittee on Procedures Review, Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health (ABRWH), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub...

  10. 77 FR 40890 - Subcommittee on Procedures Review, Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health (ABRWH...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-11

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Subcommittee on Procedures Review, Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health (ABRWH), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub...

  11. 78 FR 78965 - Subcommittee on Procedures Review, Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health (ABRWH...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-27

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Subcommittee on Procedures Review, Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health (ABRWH), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub...

  12. 77 FR 61756 - Subcommittee on Procedures Review, Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health (ABRWH...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-11

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Subcommittee on Procedures Review, Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health (ABRWH), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub...

  13. Method of neutralising the effects of electromagnetic radiation in a radiation detector and a radiation detector applying the procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gripentog, W.G.

    1972-01-01

    Circuitry is described by means of which radiation detectors of the Neher-White type, employing ionisation chambers can be unaffected by electromagnetic radiation which would otherwise cause inductive effects leading to erroneous signals. It is therefore unnecessary to use shielded cables for these instruments. (JIW)

  14. Evaluation of radiation dose to pediatric patients during certain special procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulieman, A.; Alzimami, K.; Elhag, B.; Babikir, E.; Alsafi, K.

    2014-11-01

    This study was intended to measure pediatric entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) and effective dose during micturating cystourethrography (MCU), intravenous urography (IVU) and barium studies (barium meal, enema, and swallow) and to propose a local diagnostic reference level (DRL). ESAK was measured for patients using calibrated thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs, GR200A). Effective doses (E) were calculated using the National Radiological Protection Board (NRPB) software. A total of 236 special pediatric procedures were investigated. 21.7% of the sample comprised barium procedures, 18.6% were MCU procedures while 59.5% of the sample were IVU procedures. The mean ESAK measurements (mGy) were 2.1±0.8, 3.0±23 and 1.2±0.2 for barium meal, enema and swallow in the same order. The mean patient dose for IVU procedures was 12.4±8.7 mGy per procedure and the mean patient dose per MCU procedure was 5.8±7 mGy. Local DRLs were proposed for all procedures. The patient doses in this study are within the reported values, suggesting that pediatric patients are adequately protected.

  15. MO-C-BRB-01: Introduction [Diagnostic radiology and radiation oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boone, J. [University of California Davis School of Medicine (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Diagnostic radiology and radiation oncology are arguably two of the most technologically advanced specialties in medicine. The imaging and radiation medicine technologies in clinical use today have been continuously improved through new advances made in the commercial and academic research arenas. This symposium explores the translational path from research through clinical implementation. Dr. Pettigrew will start this discussion by sharing his perspectives as director of the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB). The NIBIB has focused on promoting research that is technological in nature and has high clinical impact. We are in the age of precision medicine, and the technological innovations and quantitative tools developed by engineers and physicists working with physicians are providing innovative tools that increase precision and improve outcomes in health care. NIBIB funded grants lead to a very high patenting rate (per grant dollar), and these patents have higher citation rates by other patents, suggesting greater clinical impact, as well. Two examples of clinical translation resulting from NIH-funded research will be presented, in radiation therapy and diagnostic imaging. Dr. Yu will describe a stereotactic radiotherapy device developed in his laboratory that is designed for treating breast cancer with the patient in the prone position. It uses 36 rotating Cobalt-60 sources positioned in an annular geometry to focus the radiation beam at the system’s isocenter. The radiation dose is delivered throughout the target volume in the breast by constantly moving the patient in a planned trajectory relative to the fixed isocenter. With this technique, the focal spot dynamically paints the dose distribution throughout the target volume in three dimensions. Dr. Jackson will conclude this symposium by describing the RSNA Quantitative Imaging Biomarkers Alliance (QIBA), which is funded in part by NIBIB and is a synergistic collaboration

  16. MO-C-BRB-02: ASTRO President [Diagnostic radiology and radiation oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minsky, B. [ASTRO (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Diagnostic radiology and radiation oncology are arguably two of the most technologically advanced specialties in medicine. The imaging and radiation medicine technologies in clinical use today have been continuously improved through new advances made in the commercial and academic research arenas. This symposium explores the translational path from research through clinical implementation. Dr. Pettigrew will start this discussion by sharing his perspectives as director of the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB). The NIBIB has focused on promoting research that is technological in nature and has high clinical impact. We are in the age of precision medicine, and the technological innovations and quantitative tools developed by engineers and physicists working with physicians are providing innovative tools that increase precision and improve outcomes in health care. NIBIB funded grants lead to a very high patenting rate (per grant dollar), and these patents have higher citation rates by other patents, suggesting greater clinical impact, as well. Two examples of clinical translation resulting from NIH-funded research will be presented, in radiation therapy and diagnostic imaging. Dr. Yu will describe a stereotactic radiotherapy device developed in his laboratory that is designed for treating breast cancer with the patient in the prone position. It uses 36 rotating Cobalt-60 sources positioned in an annular geometry to focus the radiation beam at the system’s isocenter. The radiation dose is delivered throughout the target volume in the breast by constantly moving the patient in a planned trajectory relative to the fixed isocenter. With this technique, the focal spot dynamically paints the dose distribution throughout the target volume in three dimensions. Dr. Jackson will conclude this symposium by describing the RSNA Quantitative Imaging Biomarkers Alliance (QIBA), which is funded in part by NIBIB and is a synergistic collaboration

  17. MO-C-BRB-03: RSNA President [Diagnostic radiology and radiation oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arenson, R. [RSNA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Diagnostic radiology and radiation oncology are arguably two of the most technologically advanced specialties in medicine. The imaging and radiation medicine technologies in clinical use today have been continuously improved through new advances made in the commercial and academic research arenas. This symposium explores the translational path from research through clinical implementation. Dr. Pettigrew will start this discussion by sharing his perspectives as director of the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB). The NIBIB has focused on promoting research that is technological in nature and has high clinical impact. We are in the age of precision medicine, and the technological innovations and quantitative tools developed by engineers and physicists working with physicians are providing innovative tools that increase precision and improve outcomes in health care. NIBIB funded grants lead to a very high patenting rate (per grant dollar), and these patents have higher citation rates by other patents, suggesting greater clinical impact, as well. Two examples of clinical translation resulting from NIH-funded research will be presented, in radiation therapy and diagnostic imaging. Dr. Yu will describe a stereotactic radiotherapy device developed in his laboratory that is designed for treating breast cancer with the patient in the prone position. It uses 36 rotating Cobalt-60 sources positioned in an annular geometry to focus the radiation beam at the system’s isocenter. The radiation dose is delivered throughout the target volume in the breast by constantly moving the patient in a planned trajectory relative to the fixed isocenter. With this technique, the focal spot dynamically paints the dose distribution throughout the target volume in three dimensions. Dr. Jackson will conclude this symposium by describing the RSNA Quantitative Imaging Biomarkers Alliance (QIBA), which is funded in part by NIBIB and is a synergistic collaboration

  18. Radiation dose differences between thoracic radiotherapy planning CT and thoracic diagnostic CT scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanderud, A.; England, A.; Hogg, P.; Fosså, K.; Svensson, S.F.; Johansen, S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the absorbed dose from computed tomography (CT) in radiotherapy planning (RP-CT) against those from diagnostic CT (DG-CT) examinations and to explore the possible reasons for any dose differences. Method: Two groups of patients underwent CT-scans of the thorax with either DG-CT (n = 55) or RP-CT (n = 55). Patients from each group had similar weight and body mass index (BMI) and were divided into low (<25) and high BMI (>25). Parameters including CTDIvol, DLP and scan-length were compared. Results: The mean CTDIvol and DLP values from RP-CT (38.1 mGy, 1472 mGy cm) are approximately four times higher than for DG-CT (9.63 mGy, 376.5 mGy cm). For low BMI group, the CTDIvol in the RP-CT scans (36.4 mGy) is 6.3 times higher than the one in the DG-CT scans (5.8 mGy). For the high BMI group, the CTDIvol in the RP-CT (39.6 mGy) is 2.5 times higher than the one in the DG-CT scans (15.8 mGy). In the DG-CT scans a strong negative linear correlation between noise index (NI) and mean CTDIvol was observed (r = −0.954, p = 0.004); the higher NI, the lower CTDIvol. This was not the case in the RP-CT scans. Conclusion: The absorbed radiation dose is significantly higher and less BMI dependent for RP-CT scans compared to DG-CT. Image quality requirements of the examinations should be researched to ensure that radiation doses are not unnecessarily high. - Highlights: • The radiation dose differences in diagnostic vs. radiotherapy planning thorax CT. • The average effective dose given to radiotherapy planning patients are 30.0 mSv. • The average effective dose given to diagnostic patients are 7.7 mSv. • The CTDIvol is less BMI dependent for radiotherapy planning thorax CT scans compared to diagnostic scans.

  19. 105KE Basin Area Radiation Monitor System (ARMS) Acceptance Test Procedure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KINKEL, C.C.

    1999-12-14

    This procedure is intended for the Area Radiation Monitoring System, ARMS, that is replacing the existing Programmable Input-Output Processing System, PIOPS, radiation monitoring system in the 105KE basin. The new system will be referred to as the 105KE ARMS, 105KE Area Radiation Monitoring System. This ATP will ensure calibration integrity of the 105KE radiation detector loops. Also, this ATP will test and document the display, printing, alarm output, alarm acknowledgement, upscale check, and security functions. This ATP test is to be performed after completion of the 105KE ARMS installation. The alarm outputs of the 105KE ARMS will be connected to the basin detector alarms, basin annunciator system, and security Alarm Monitoring System, AMS, located in the 200 area Central Alarm Station (CAS).

  20. 105KE Basin Area Radiation Monitor System (ARMS) Acceptance Test Procedure

    CERN Document Server

    Kinkel, C C

    1999-01-01

    This procedure is intended for the Area Radiation Monitoring System, ARMS, that is replacing the existing Programmable Input-Output Processing System, PIOPS, radiation monitoring system in the 105KE basin. The new system will be referred to as the 105KE ARMS, 105KE Area Radiation Monitoring System. This ATP will ensure calibration integrity of the 105KE radiation detector loops. Also, this ATP will test and document the display, printing, alarm output, alarm acknowledgement, upscale check, and security functions. This ATP test is to be performed after completion of the 105KE ARMS installation. The alarm outputs of the 105KE ARMS will be connected to the basin detector alarms, basin annunciator system, and security Alarm Monitoring System, AMS, located in the 200 area Central Alarm Station (CAS).

  1. Web-based tools for quality assurance and radiation protection in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moores, B. M.; Charnock, P.; Ward, M.

    2010-01-01

    Practical and philosophical aspects of radiation protection in diagnostic radiology have changed very little over the past 50 y even though patient doses have continued to rise significantly in this period. This rise has been driven by technological developments, such as multi-slice computed tomography, that have been able to improve diagnostic accuracy but not necessarily provide the same level of risk-benefit to all patients or groups of patients given the dose levels involved. Can practical radiation protection strategies hope to keep abreast of these ongoing developments? A project was started in 1992 in Liverpool that aimed to develop IT driven quality assurance (QA)/radiation protection software tools based upon a modular quality assurance dose data system. One of the modules involved the assessment of the patient entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) for an X-ray examination that was based upon the use of calibrated X-ray tube exposure factors to calculate ESAK as well as collecting appropriate patient details (age, sex, weight, thickness etc). The package also contained modules for logging all necessary equipment performance QA data. This paper will outline the experience gained with this system through its transition from a local application on a stand alone PC within the department to the current web-based approach. Advantages of a web-based approach to delivering such an application as well as centrally storing data originating on many hospital sites will be discussed together with the scientific support processes that can be developed with such a system. This will include local, national and international considerations. The advantages of importing radiographic examination details directly from other electronic storage systems such as a hospital's radiology information system will be presented together with practical outcomes already achieved. This will include the application of statistical techniques to the very large data sets generated. The development

  2. Radiation dose and cancer risk among pediatric patients undergoing interventional neuroradiology procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thierry-Chef, Isabelle; Simon, Steven L.; Miller, Donald L.

    2006-01-01

    During interventional neuroradiology procedures, patients can be exposed to moderate to high levels of radiation. Special considerations are required to protect children, who are generally more sensitive to the short- and long-term detrimental effects of radiation exposure. Estimates of dose to the skin of children from certain interventional procedures have been published elsewhere, but we are not aware of data on dose to the brain or on the long-term risk of cancer from brain radiation. Our goals were to estimate radiation doses to the brain in 50 pediatric patients who had undergone cerebral embolization and to assess their lifetime risks of developing radiation-related brain cancer. Entrance-peak skin dose and various assumptions on conditions of exposure were used as input for dosimetric calculations to estimate the spatial pattern of dose within the brain and the average dose to the whole brain for each child. The average dose and the age of the child at time of exposure were used to estimate the lifetime risk of developing radiation-related brain cancer. Among the 50 patients, average radiation doses to the brain were estimated to vary from 100 mGy to 1,300 mGy if exposed to non-collimated fields and from 20 mGy to 160 mGy for collimated, moving fields. The lifetime risk of developing brain cancer was estimated to be increased by 2% to 80% as a result of the exposure. Given the very small lifetime background risk of brain tumor, the excess number of cases will be small even though the relative increase might be as high as 80%. ALARA principles of collimation and dose optimization are the most effective means to minimize the risk of future radiation-related cancer. (orig.)

  3. Fluoroscopy procedure and equipment changes to reduce staff radiation exposure in the interventional spine suite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plastaras, Chris; Appasamy, Malathy; Sayeed, Yusef; McLaughlin, Coleen; Charles, Jeremy; Joshi, Anand; Macron, Donald; Pukenas, Bryan

    2013-01-01

    Fluoroscopic guided percutaneous interventional spine procedures are increasingly performed in recent years as they have been shown to be target specific and enhance patient safety. However, ionizing radiation has been associated with stochastic effects such as cancer and genetic defects as well as deterministic effects such as cataracts, erythema, epilation, and even death. These are dose related, and hence, measures should be taken to minimize radiation exposure to patients and health care personnel to reduce these adverse effects. A risk reduction project was completed with the goal of reducing effective doses to the staff and patients in a university-based spinal interventional practice. Effective dose reduction to the staff and patients was hypothesized to occur with technique and equipment changes in the procedure suite. The goal of this study was to quantify effective dose rates to staff before and after interventions. Retrospective study comparing descriptive data of effective dose to the health care staff before and after implementation of a combination of technique and equipment changes. Technique changes from pre to post intervention period included continuous needle advancement under continuous fluoroscopic controlled by the interventional physician to intermittent needle advancement under pulsed fluoroscopic controlled by the radiology technician. Equipment changes included circumferential lead drape skirt around the procedure table and use of mobile transparent lead barriers on both sides of the procedure table.Effective dose exposure measured in Millirem (mrem) from the radiation dosimetry badges for pre-intervention (February 2009 through June 2009) and post-intervention (November 2009 through March 2010) periods were examined through monthly radiation dosimetry reports for the fluoroscopy suite staff. A total of 685 interventional procedures were performed in the pre-intervention period and 385 in the post-intervention period. The median cumulative

  4. Exposure of the surgical team to ionizing radiation during orthopedic surgical procedures,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evandro Pereira Palácio

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: the aim of this study was to assess the degree of exposure of the orthopedic surgical team to fluoroscopic ionizing radiation.METHODS: the ionizing radiation to which the orthopedic surgical team (R1, R2 and R3 was exposed was assayed using thermoluminescent dosimeters that were distributed in target anatomical regions (regions with and without protection using a lead apron. This was done during 45 hip osteosynthesis procedures to treat transtrochanteric fractures that were classified as 31-A2.1 (AO.RESULTS: the radioactive dose received by R3 was 6.33 mSv, R2 4.51 mSv and R3 1.99 mSv (p = 0.33. The thyroid region received 0.86 mSv of radiation, the thoracic region 1.24 mSv and the gonadal region 2.15 mSv (p = 0.25. There was no record of radiation at the dosimeters located below the biosafety protectors or on the team members' backs.CONCLUSIONS: the members of the surgical team who were located closest to the fluoroscope received greater radiation doses than those located further away. The anatomical regions located below the waistline were the ones that received most ionizing radiation. These results emphasize the importance of using biosafety devices, since these are effective in preventing radiation from reaching the vital organs of the medical team.

  5. Procedure to evaluate the ionizing radiation influence over LED and magnetic induction lamps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Otavio Luis de; Menzel, Silvio Carlos, E-mail: otavioluis@ipen.br, E-mail: scmenzel@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (CEN/IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Engenharia Nuclear; Ribas, Jacinto Oliveira, E-mail: jacinto@eletronuclear.gov.br [Eletrobras Termonuclear S.A. (ELETRONUCLEAR), Angra dos Reis, RJ (Brazil). Gerencia de Eletrica e Instrumentacao

    2015-07-01

    The goal of this paper is to present a methodology to evaluate the ionizing radiation influence over Lighting Emitting Diode (LED) and Magnetic Induction (MI) lamps as they use a lot of electronic in their power supply. Considering they have a huge lifetime it is interesting to apply this technology into environments under ionizing radiation, such as a nuclear facility. Thus, it is possible to increase the period between two consecutive maintenance, reduce the repair and global maintenance costs and reduce the operational personnel exposure to ionizing radiation. In this context it is going to be presented a scheme to select different LED and MI lamps available in the Brazilian market, a methodology to irradiate several lamp samples according various radiation levels that can be found in the facilities and the electrical and photometric evaluation to be performed. Considering this methodology it will be possible to analyze the lamps capacity to withstand ionizing radiation, under regular operating conditions of the facilities and its effects in the performance and lifetime of the selected lamps. Thus, the procedures suggested in this work can be used as a guide to perform experiments and analysis to find specific lamps that can reduce the global maintenance costs and the personnel exposure. Hereafter, several lamps are going to be acquired and the tests performed, according the procedures here described. (author)

  6. Procedure to evaluate the ionizing radiation influence over LED and magnetic induction lamps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Otavio Luis de; Menzel, Silvio Carlos; Ribas, Jacinto Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to present a methodology to evaluate the ionizing radiation influence over Lighting Emitting Diode (LED) and Magnetic Induction (MI) lamps as they use a lot of electronic in their power supply. Considering they have a huge lifetime it is interesting to apply this technology into environments under ionizing radiation, such as a nuclear facility. Thus, it is possible to increase the period between two consecutive maintenance, reduce the repair and global maintenance costs and reduce the operational personnel exposure to ionizing radiation. In this context it is going to be presented a scheme to select different LED and MI lamps available in the Brazilian market, a methodology to irradiate several lamp samples according various radiation levels that can be found in the facilities and the electrical and photometric evaluation to be performed. Considering this methodology it will be possible to analyze the lamps capacity to withstand ionizing radiation, under regular operating conditions of the facilities and its effects in the performance and lifetime of the selected lamps. Thus, the procedures suggested in this work can be used as a guide to perform experiments and analysis to find specific lamps that can reduce the global maintenance costs and the personnel exposure. Hereafter, several lamps are going to be acquired and the tests performed, according the procedures here described. (author)

  7. Ionizing radiation used in medical diagnostics as a source of radiation exposure of the patient with occupational diseases. Analysis and problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apostolova, D.B.; Paskalev, Z.D.

    2001-01-01

    X-rays in medical diagnostic are the major source of Bulgarian population exposure to ionizing radiations. Diagnostic X-ray is the most diagnostic application and is used in a wide variety of examinations. The modern concept for radiation protection of patients in diagnostic radiology is based on two main principles: justification of the examinations and radiation protection optimization. It is pointed out that the collective effective dose of radiation may be considerably reduced by decreasing the number of clinically unwarranted X-ray examination of storage and delivery of diagnostic information and adopting a system for physical and technical quality control of the X-ray equipment. The aim of this investigation is assessment of the collective effective doses for the patients with occupational diseases exposed to ionizing radiation by radiological diagnostics. The study covers the period of 1990 through 1999. A total of 3293 patients, treated in the Department of Occupational Toxicology, Clinic of Occupational Diseases, Medical University - Sofia, were examined with X-ray and KT (cervical and lumbar spine, chest, skull, stomach, extremities, pelvis, brain). Most of the observed patients were with predominantlyheavy metals poisonings and a few with other chemical agents poisonings. Number of patients with radiological examinations was 1938, number of examination per capita was 0,59 and the total number of radiological examinations was 2536. The average number of radiological examination for one patient was 1,36, the most number of radiological examinations for one patient was 4. The collective effective dose for an examined patient was 1803 man.mSv. Our results shown the essential of the raising ensure that the medical exposure of patients be the minimum necessary to achieve the required diagnostic objective. (author)

  8. A study of radiological protection for women of reproductive age in diagnostic radiology. Questionnaire for medical radiation technologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsubone, Chie; Ban, Nobuhiko; Kai, Michiaki

    2005-01-01

    There has been great concern regarding the radiation protection for women of reproductive age when exposed to diagnostic radiation. The 10-day-rule proposed by the ICRP has not been recommended since 1983 because the risk to embryo and fetus within four weeks after menstruation may be small. However, some expects see that incomplete abandon of the 10-day-rule might cause confusion among the medical doctors and patients, and consequently unwarranted abortion happens. This paper surveyed the views of radiation technologies in hospitals and discussed how radiation exposure of women of reproductive age in medicine should be controlled. We found that the views to be 10-day-rule were spilt 50:50 and that radiation technologists do not necessarily think the 10-day-rule should be abandoned. Even the radiation technologists who are supposed to be able to explain to the patients the health risk following diagnostic exposure do not fully understand the risk involved. In conclusion, although a low-dose risk of diagnostic exposure should be sufficiently educated in order to obtain an exact understanding, the 10-day-rule may be useful in order to actually avoid any trouble in diagnostic radiology. (author)

  9. Optimization of radiation protection in diagnostic and interventional radiology: Which is the future?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsapaki, V.

    2012-01-01

    As quoted in the latest UNSCEAR 2008 report: 'it appears that the world is entering another period of major technological changes, where the impact of these changes on the population dose worldwide in the future will be difficult to predict'. It is more than true that in this fast changing world and immense technological advances, especially in the medical sector, scientists run a marathon to be able to follow the new techniques that are continuously introduced for the benefit of the patient. Almost half of the radiation to the population in diagnostic radiology arises due to CT and interventional techniques. More and more medical specialties as well as other professions (nurses, technicians, managers, etc.) are currently being introduced into the term 'radiation safety culture' and 'optimization'. Some of these stakeholders were not aware of these expressions and were never trained or educated on these subjects. Each of these specialties should therefore be approached in a different way, indicating and underlining the specific roles of the experts, in order to persuade them to include radiation safety in their every day clinical routine. Below, some of these issues are identified and possible ways to move forward in the future are suggested. (author)

  10. Radiation Exposure from Diagnostic Imaging in a Cohort of Pediatric Transplant Recipients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Seal

    Full Text Available Recipients of solid organ transplants (SOT have extensive diagnostic imaging (DI. The purpose of this study was to quantify this exposure. Children from northern Alberta with SOTs at Stollery Children's Hospital, Edmonton, Alberta January 1, 2006, to July 31, 2012, were included. Effective doses of radiation were estimated using published norms for DI performed post-transplant up to October 16, 2014. The 54 eligible children had 6215 DI studies (5628 plain films, 293 computerized tomography (CT scans, 149 positron emission topography (PET -CT scans, 47 nuclear medicine scans and 98 cardiac catheterizations. Children less than 5 years of age underwent more DI studies than did older children (median (IQR 140 (66-210 vs 49 (19-105, p = 0.010. Children with post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (N = 8 had more CT scans (median (IQR 13 (5.5-36 vs 1 (0-5, p100 mSv. In conclusion, a significant proportion of pediatric transplant recipients have sufficient radiation exposure post-transplant for DI to be at potential risk for radiation-induced malignancies.

  11. Irradiation tests of radiation resistance optical fibers for fusion diagnostic application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakuta, Tsunemi; Shikama, Tatsuo; Nishitani, Takeo; Yamamoto, Shin; Nagata, Shinji; Tsuchiya, Bun; Toh, Kentaro; Hori, Junichi

    2002-11-01

    To promote development of radiation-resistant core optical fibers, the ITER-EDA (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor-Engineering Design Activity) recommended carrying out international round-robin irradiation tests of optical fibers to establish a reliable database for their applications in the ITER plasma diagnostics. Ten developed optical fibers were irradiation-tested in a Co-60 gamma cell, a Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR). Also, some of them were irradiation tested in a fast neutron irradiation facility of FNS (Fast Neutron Source), especially to study temperature dependence of neutron-associated irradiation effects. Included were several Japanese fluorine doped fibers and one Japanese standard fiber (purified and undoped silica core), as well as seven Russian fibers. Some of Russian fibers were drawn by Japanese manufactures from Russian made pre-form rods to study effects of manufacturing processes to radiation resistant properties. The present paper will describe behaviors of growth of radiation-induced optical transmission loss in the wavelength range of 350-1750nm. Results indicate that role of displacement damages by fast neutrons are very important in introducing permanent optical transmission loss. Spectra of optical transmission loss in visible range will depend on irradiation temperatures and material parameters of optical fibers.

  12. Radiation doses to the unborn child at diagnostic examination in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helmrot, E.

    2002-01-01

    This report describes methods to estimate fetal radiation doses from radiation diagnostic examinations, based on survey data from 3 hospitals in southern Sweden. The fetal dose has been calculated with available computer programs and verified by dose measurements inside a female human phantom for conventional X-ray and computed tomography (CT) examinations. Measured fetal doses have been correlated to the DAP (Dose Area Product) value or the CTDI (Computer Tomography Dose Index) and DLP (Dose Length Product) values and conversion factors have been evaluated. For nuclear medicine examinations tables for the calculations of fetal doses by administered activity are presented together with information of administered activity for normal and pregnant women in Sweden. For X-ray examinations where the uterus is outside the primary radiation fields the fetal dose is generally below 1-2 mSv. In order to calculate fetal doses documentation of fluoroscopy time and number of X-ray images, scanning parameters for the CT and administered activity for nuclear medicine examinations are necessary

  13. Radiation exposure and image quality in X-ray diagnostic radiology. Physical principles and clinical applications. 2. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saebel, Manfred; Aichinger, Horst; Dierker, Joachim; Joite-Barfuss, Sigrid

    2012-01-01

    Diagnostic X-rays are the largest contributor to radiation exposure to the general population, and protecting the patient from radiation damage is a major aim of modern health policy. Once the decision has been taken to use ionising radiation for imaging in a particular patient, it is necessary to optimize the image acquisition process taking into account the diagnostic quality of the images and the radiation dose to the patient. Both image quality and radiation dose are affected by a number of parameters, knowledge of which permits scientifically based decision making. The authors of this second edition of Radiation Exposure and Image Quality in X-ray Diagnostic Radiology have spent many years studying the optimization of radiological imaging. In this book they present in detail the basic physical principles of diagnostic radiology and their application to clinical problems. Particular attention is devoted to evaluation of the dose to the patient, the influence of scattered radiation on image quality, the use of antiscatter grids, and optimization of image quality and dose. The final section is a supplement containing tables of data and graphical depictions of X-ray spectra, interaction coefficients, characteristics of X-ray beams, and other aspects relevant to patient dose calculations. In addition, a complementary CD-ROM contains a user-friendly Excel file database covering these aspects that can be used in the reader's own programs. Since the first edition, the text, figures, tables, and references have all been thoroughly updated, and more detailed attention is now paid to image quality and radiation exposure when using digital imaging and computed tomography. This book will be an invaluable aid to medical physicists when performing calculations relating to patient dose and image quality, and will also prove useful for diagnostic radiologists and engineers. (orig.)

  14. Evaluation of patient skin dose equivalent due to diagnostic procedures with X-rays in Lagos State Nigeria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aweda, M.A.

    2001-01-01

    This paper reports the study of Patient Skin Dose Equivalents in Lagos State, Nigeria, as one of the strategies of patient protection and x-ray procedure quality assessment. 13 most frequent x-ray diagnostic procedures were studied, these were: chest, skull, cervical spine, lumbosacral spine, sinusis, pelvis, plain abdomen, shoulder, foot, hysterosalpingography, intravenous urography, barium meal and barium enema. 1977 procedures were monitored for a period of 12 months in both private and public hospitals carefully selected from all over the state. The results obtained compared favorably well with those from similar studies reported in the literature. The slight differences observed have been ascribed to variations in the patient anatomy, exposure conditions and choice of radiographic parameters. (author)

  15. Evaluation of doses from radiodiagnostic procedures performed in veterinary medicine and assessing of the doses of secondary radiation in the medical staff and animal owners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veneziani, Glauco Rogerio

    2012-01-01

    The primary goal in veterinary radiography is to produce radiographs of diagnostic quality on the first attempt. This goal serves three purposes: (1) to decrease radiation exposure to the patient and veterinary personnel; (2) to decrease the cost of the study for the client; and (3) to produce diagnostic data for rapid interpretation and treatment of the patient. This work aimed to determine the doses in dogs submitted to chest and abdomen X rays using the technique of thermoluminescence (TL) dosimetry. The radiation doses were assessed using thermoluminescent dosimeters of calcium sulphate doped with dysprosium (CaSO 4 :Dy) and lithium fluoride doped with magnesium and titanium (LiF:Mg,Ti). The obtained results indicate that is extremely important the assessment of radiation doses involved in veterinary diagnostic radiology procedures, to evaluate the delivered doses to the animals, to be used as a parameter in the individual monitoring of pet's owners, who assist the animal positioning, and to protect occupationally exposed workers at the Veterinary Radiology Clinics. (author)

  16. Diagnostics of ionization in air produced by infrared radiation from A pulse CO2 laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huston, E. S.

    This thesis begins with a brief account of the historical development of the modern concept of the atom and, building on this foundation, the physical principles responsible for the operation of a LASER are presented. A more detailed description is then given of the pulsed CO2 LASER used in this research, including principles of operation and safety procedures. Next, the research itself is described: an analysis of the ionization in air produced by focusing the LASER's infrared radiation. The data are summarized in graphs which map the region of ionization. Following conclusions on the research performed, specific suggestions are made for future work with the LASER.

  17. Investigation of reference levels and radiation dose associated with abdominal EVAR (endovascular aneurysm repair) procedures across several European Centres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuthill, E.; Rainford, L. [University College Dublin, Diagnostic Imaging, School of Medicine, Dublin (Ireland); O' Hora, L.; O' Donohoe, M. [Mater Misericordiae University Hospital, Dublin (Ireland); Panci, S. [San Giovanni di Dio Hospital, Florence (Italy); Gilligan, P.; Fox, E. [Mater Private Hospital, Dublin (Ireland); Campion, D. [Mauriziano-Umberto Hospital, Turin (Italy); Trenti, R. [Policlinico S. Orsola-Malpighi, Bologna (Italy); Catania, D. [AITRI, Association of Italian Interventional Radiographers, Milan (Italy)

    2017-11-15

    Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) is considered the treatment of choice for abdominal aortic aneurysms with suitable anatomy. In order to improve radiation safety, European Directive (2013/59) requires member states to implement diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) in radio-diagnostic and interventional procedures. This study aimed to determine local DRLs for EVAR across five European centres and identify an interim European DRL, which currently remains unestablished. Retrospective data was collected for 180 standard EVARs performed between January 2014 and July 2015 from five specialist centres in Ireland (n=2) and Italy (n=3). Data capture included: air kerma-area product (P{sub KA}), total air kerma at the reference point (K{sub a,r}), fluoroscopic time (FT), number of acquisitions, frame rate of acquisition, type of acquisition, patient height, weight, and gender. The mean values for each site A, B, C, D, and E were: P{sub KA}s of 4343 ± 994 μGym{sup 2}, 18,200 ± 2141 μGym{sup 2}, 11,423 ± 1390 μGym{sup 2}, 7796 ± 704 μGym{sup 2}, 31,897 ± 5798 μGym{sup 2}; FTs of 816 ± 92 s, 950 ± 150 s, 708 ± 70 s, 972 ± 61 s, 827 ± 118 s; and number of acquisitions of 6.72 ± 0.56, 10.38 ± 1.54, 4.74 ± 0.19, 5.64 ± 0.36, 7.28 ± 0.65, respectively. The overall pooled 75th percentile P{sub KA} was 15,849 μGym{sup 2}. Local reference levels were identified. The pooled data has been used to establish an interim European DRL for EVAR procedures. (orig.)

  18. Radiation and environmental data analysis computer (REDAC) hardware, software band analysis procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendricks, T.J.

    1985-01-01

    The REDAC was conceived originally as a tape verifier for the Radiation and Environmental Data Acquisition Recorder (REDAR). From that simple beginning in 1971, the REDAC has evolved into a family of systems used for complete analysis of data obtained by the REDAR and other acquisition systems. Portable or mobile REDACs are deployed to support checkout and analysis tasks in the field. Laboratory systems are additionally used for software development, physics investigations, data base management and graphics. System configurations range from man-portable systems to a large laboratory-based system which supports time-shared analysis and development tasks. Custom operating software allows the analyst to process data either interactively or by batch procedures. Analysis packages are provided for numerous necessary functions. All these analysis procedures can be performed even on the smallest man-portable REDAC. Examples of the multi-isotope stripping and radiation isopleth mapping are presented. Techniques utilized for these operations are also presented

  19. Radiation load of the extremities and eye lenses of the staff during selected interventional radiology procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikodemova, Denisa; Trosanova, Dominika

    2010-01-01

    The Slovak Medical University in Bratislava is involved in the ORAMED (Optimization of Radiation Protection for Medical Staff) research project, aimed at developing a unified methodology for a more accurate assessment of professional exposure of interventional radiology staff, with focus on extremity and eye lens dosimetry in selected procedures. Three cardiac procedures and 5 angiography examinations were selected: all technical parameters were monitored and the dose equivalent levels were measured by TL dosimetry at 9 anatomic sites of the body. Preliminary results were obtained for the radiation burden of the eyes and extremities during digital subtraction angiography of the lower limbs, collected from 7 hospital departments in partner EU states. Correlations between the evaluated data and the influence of some parameters are shown

  20. The Effect of a New Angiographic Imaging Technology on Radiation Dose in Visceral Embolization Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Frederic; Peña, Constantino; Kloeckner, Roman; Katzen, Barry T; Gandhi, Ripal; Benenati, James B

    2017-05-01

    To evaluate the impact of a new angiographic imaging technology on radiation dose during visceral embolization procedures involving both fluoroscopy and digital subtraction angiography. A retrospective analysis from a single-center consecutive series of patients was performed comparing 2 angiographic imaging systems. The AlluraClarity (CIQ; Philips Healthcare, Best, the Netherlands) was used in 100 patients (n = 59 male, mean age: 70.6 years) from July 2013 to April 2014 and compared to the former AlluraXper (AX) technology used in 139 patients (n = 71 male, mean age: 70.1 years) from May 2011 to June 2013. Patients were categorized according to body mass index (BMI [kg/m 2 ])-group 1: BMI technology significantly reduced mean radiation dose by 39.4% for visceral embolization procedures when compared to fluoroscopy time and contrast media dose. This dose relationship was consistent across all BMI groups.

  1. Low-dose radiation employed in diagnostic imaging causes genetic effects in cultured cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ponzinibbio, Maria V.; Peral-Garcia, Pilar; Seoane, Analia (Inst. de Genetica Veterinaria, Univ. Nacional de La Plata CONICET, La Plata (Argentina)), e-mail: aseoane@fcv.unlp.edu.ar; Crudeli, Cintia (Agencia Nacional de Promocion Cientifica y Tecnologica, La Plata (Argentina))

    2010-11-15

    Background: Exposure to environmental, diagnostic, and occupational sources of radiation frequently involves low doses. Although these doses have no immediately noticeable impact on human health there is great interest in their long-term biological effects. Purpose: To assess immediate and time-delayed DNA damage in two cell lines exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation by using the comet assay and micronucleus test, and to compare these two techniques in the analysis of low-dose induced genotoxicity. Material and Methods: CHO and MRC-5 cells were exposed to 50 milliSievert (mSv) of ionizing radiation and assayed immediately after irradiation and at 16 or 12 passages post-irradiation, respectively. Comet assay and micronucleus test were employed. Results: The comet assay values observed in 50 mSv-treated cells were significantly higher than in the control group for both sample times and cell lines (P < 0.001). Micronuclei frequencies were higher in treated cells than in the control group (P < 0.01, CHO cells passage 16; P < 0.05, MRC-5 cells immediately after exposure; P < 0.01 MRC-5 cells passage 12). Correlation analysis between the two techniques was statistically significant (correlation coefficient 0.82, P < 0.05 and correlation coefficient 0.86, P < 0.05 for CHO and MRC-5 cells, respectively). Cells scored at passages 12 or 16 showed more damage than those scored immediately after exposure in both cell lines (no statistically significant differences). Conclusion: Cytomolecular and cytogenetic damage was observed in cells exposed to very low doses of X-rays and their progeny. A single low dose of ionizing radiation was sufficient to induce such response, indicating that mammalian cells are exquisitely sensitive to it. Comet and micronucleus assays are sensitive enough to assess this damage, although the former seems to be more efficient

  2. Monte Carlo radiation shielding and activation analyses for the Diagnostic Equatorial Port Plug in ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serikov, A.; Fischer, U.; Leichtle, D.; Pitcher, C.S.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Systematic neutronics analyses were conducted to assess the ITER Equatorial Port Plug radiation shielding performance. ► Shielding optimization was achieved by parametric analyses of several design variants using the MCNP5, FISPACT-2007, and R2Smesh codes. ► Dominant effect of radiation streaming along the port plug gaps was recognized. ► Combination of the gap labyrinths and streaming stoppers or rails reduces shutdown doses by 2 orders of magnitude. ► Using the proposed shielding, the shutdown dose in the ITER port interspace is less than the personnel access limit of 100 μSv/h. - Abstract: This paper addresses neutronics aspects of the design development of the Diagnostic Generic Equatorial Port Plug (EPP) in ITER. To secure the personnel access at the EPP back-end interspace, parametric neutronics analyses of the EPP radiation environment have been performed and practical shielding solutions have been found. Radiation transport was performed with the Monte Carlo MCNP5 code. Activation calculations were conducted with the FISPACT-2007 inventory code. The R2Smesh approach was applied to couple transport and activation calculations. Newly created EPP local MCNP5 model was devised by extracting the EPP and adjacent blanket modules from the ITER Alite-4.1 model with proper modification of the EPP geometry in accordance with recent 3D CAD CATIA model. The EPP local model reproduces the EPP neutronically important features and allows investigation of the EPP neutronics effects in isolation from all other ITER components. Thorough EPP parametric analyses revealed dominant effect of gaps around EPP and several EPP design improvements were implemented as the outcomes of the analyses. Gap labyrinths and streaming stoppers inserted into the gaps were shown are capable to reduce the shutdown dose rate which is below the 100 μSv/h limit of personnel access and by 2 orders of magnitude less than the value in the model with straight gaps.

  3. Low-dose radiation employed in diagnostic imaging causes genetic effects in cultured cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponzinibbio, Maria V.; Peral-Garcia, Pilar; Seoane, Analia; Crudeli, Cintia

    2010-01-01

    Background: Exposure to environmental, diagnostic, and occupational sources of radiation frequently involves low doses. Although these doses have no immediately noticeable impact on human health there is great interest in their long-term biological effects. Purpose: To assess immediate and time-delayed DNA damage in two cell lines exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation by using the comet assay and micronucleus test, and to compare these two techniques in the analysis of low-dose induced genotoxicity. Material and Methods: CHO and MRC-5 cells were exposed to 50 milliSievert (mSv) of ionizing radiation and assayed immediately after irradiation and at 16 or 12 passages post-irradiation, respectively. Comet assay and micronucleus test were employed. Results: The comet assay values observed in 50 mSv-treated cells were significantly higher than in the control group for both sample times and cell lines (P < 0.001). Micronuclei frequencies were higher in treated cells than in the control group (P < 0.01, CHO cells passage 16; P < 0.05, MRC-5 cells immediately after exposure; P < 0.01 MRC-5 cells passage 12). Correlation analysis between the two techniques was statistically significant (correlation coefficient 0.82, P < 0.05 and correlation coefficient 0.86, P < 0.05 for CHO and MRC-5 cells, respectively). Cells scored at passages 12 or 16 showed more damage than those scored immediately after exposure in both cell lines (no statistically significant differences). Conclusion: Cytomolecular and cytogenetic damage was observed in cells exposed to very low doses of X-rays and their progeny. A single low dose of ionizing radiation was sufficient to induce such response, indicating that mammalian cells are exquisitely sensitive to it. Comet and micronucleus assays are sensitive enough to assess this damage, although the former seems to be more efficient

  4. The primary exposure standard for Co-60 gamma radiation: characteristics and measurements procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laitano, R.F.; Toni, M.P.

    1983-01-01

    A description is given of a cavity ionization chamber used, as a primary exposure standard, at the Laboratorio di Metrologia delle Radiazioni Ionizzanti of the ENEA in Italy. The primary standard is designed to make absolute measurements of exposure due to the Co-60 gamma radiation. The procedures for the realizationof the exposure unit are also described. Finally results of some international comparisons are reported

  5. [Biomagnetism from the neuropsychiatric viewpoint--principles of recent developments in diagnostic procedure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühne, G E; Lemke, S

    1985-04-01

    The following survey is intended to demonstrate and discuss some principle problems of biomagnetism and the application in clinical fields. The development of special technical parameters especially by the SQUID method is initiating new possibilities of research and completing the neurobiologically determinated basis and conditions of neuropsychiatric disorders. The Magnetoencephalography (MEG) will be represent an important role of a new functional diagnostic method.

  6. 40 CFR 85.2222 - On-board diagnostic test procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... on-board diagnostic systems on 1996 and newer light-duty vehicles and light-duty trucks shall consist... the unset readiness code(s) in question may be issued a passing certificate without being required to... lit malfunction indicator light (MIL) must be failed, though setting the unset readiness flags in...

  7. High-throughput Procedure for the Peat Soil Reference Sample Stabilization Using Microwave Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiti Oliveira Alessio

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Reference materials used in quality control laboratories need to maintain homogeneity and stability that can be affected by temperature, humidity and microbial activity. This research aimed to investigate a rapid, cheap and high-throughput procedure, using microwave radiation for the inhibition of microbial growth in peat reference sample, in order to increase its stability. Different exposure times (60, 120 and 180 seconds of the material to radiation were evaluated, and the microbiological tests were conducted to assess the percentage reduction in CFUs for fungi and bacteria. The results showed 100% and >90% of reduction in growth for bacterial and fungi, respectively, over 90 days of monitoring the material, using 120 to 180 seconds of microwave radiation exposure times. The results demonstrate that this method is economical and efficient at stabilizing peat reference materials. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.17807/orbital.v9i5.942

  8. Theoretical Study of Radiation from a Broad Range of Impurity Ions for Magnetic Fusion Diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safronova, Alla [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States)

    2014-03-14

    describing the ionization balance of plasmas, which in turn determines the lines contributing to the spectral emission and the radiative power loss. In particular, we have calculated relativistic atomic data and corresponding dielectronic satellite spectra of highly ionized W ions, such as, for example, Li-like W (with the shortest wavelength of x-ray radiation of about 0.2 Å) that might exist in ITER core plasmas at very high temperatures of 30-40 keV. In addition, we have completed relativistic calculations of low ionized W ions from Lu-like (W3+) to Er-like (W6+) and for Sm-like(W12+) and Pm-like (W13+) that cover a spectral range from few hundred to thousand Å and are more relevant to the edge plasma diagnostics in tokamak.

  9. Radiation exposure to the eye lens of orthopaedic surgeons during various orthopaedic procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romanova, K.; Alyakov, M.; Vassileva, J.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the radiation dose to the eye lens of orthopaedic surgeons during various orthopaedic procedures and to make efforts to ensure that radiation protection is optimised. The study was performed for Fractura femoris and Fractura cruris procedures performed in orthopaedic operating theatres, as well as for fractures of wrist, ankle and hand/ shoulder performed in the emergency trauma room. The highest mean value of the eye lens dose of 47.2 μSv and higher mean fluoroscopy time of 3 min, as well as the corresponding highest maximum values of 77.1 μSv and 5.0 min were observed for the Fractura femoris procedure performed with the Biplanar 500e fluoroscopy systems. At a normal workload, the estimated mean annual dose values do not exceed the annual occupational dose limit for the lens of eye, but at a heavy workload in the department, this dose limit could be achieved or exceeded. The use of protective lead glasses is recommended as they could reduce the radiation exposure of the lens of the eye. The phantom measurements demonstrated that the use of half-dose mode could additionally reduce dose to the operator's eye lens. (authors)

  10. Multiple procedures and cumulative individual radiation exposure in interventional cardiology: A long-term retrospective study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weltermann, Birgitta M.; Rock, Thomas; Berndt, Peter; Viehmann, Anja; Reinders, Sabrina; Gesenhues, Stefan [University of Duisburg-Essen, Institute for General Medicine, University Hospital, Essen (Germany); Brix, Gunnar; Schegerer, Alexander [Federal Office for Radiation Protection, Department of Radiation Protection and Health, Neuherberg (Germany)

    2015-09-15

    Various studies address discrepancies between guideline recommendations for coronary angiographies and clinical practice. While the issue of the appropriateness of recurrent angiographies was studied focusing on the role of the cardiologist, little is known about individual patients' histories and the associated radiation exposures. We analyzed all patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) in an academic teaching practice who underwent at least one angiography with or without intervention between 2004 and 2009. All performed angiographies in these patients were analyzed and rated by three physicians for appropriateness levels according to cardiology guidelines. Typical exposure data from the medical literature were used to estimate individual radiation exposure. In the cohort of 147 patients, a total of 441 procedures were analyzed: between 1981 and 2009, three procedures were performed per patient (range 1-19) on average. Appropriateness ratings were 'high/intermediate' in 71 %, 'low/no' in 27.6 % and data were insufficient for ratings in 1.4 %. Procedures with 'low/no' ratings were associated with potentially avoidable exposures of up to 186 mSv for single patients. Using retrospective data, we exemplify the potential benefit of guideline adherence to decrease patients' radiation exposures. (orig.)

  11. Evaluation of patients radiation dose from computed tomography during lower peripheral angiography procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khlafallah, Leena Ahmed Ali

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate patient radiation doses in lower peripheral angiography CT examinations in Sudan. Survey was conducted in four major hospitals which almost carry out lower peripheral angiography procedures in Sudan at the time of study. All hospitals were equipped with 64 slices multi detectors CT from Toshiba (Japan). The total number of patients was 74. Information on patient's genders and ages, exposure technique factors and radiation dose were collected. The procedures performed in multi phases, up to five phases covering part of the abdomen region, which can make patients exposure reasonably high. CTDI values in the different phases ranged between (13-30) mGy. The total DLP in the four hospitals were 6888.75, 5065.05, 6608.88 and 5754.9 mGy.cm. This study provided first survey for patient dose during lower peripheral angiography procedures in Sudan. Taking into account that the CT machines were similar: the variation between patient's DLP and CTDI values in the different hospitals indicated the need of optimization of radiation protection. Staff training and awareness on factors affecting patient dose are essential.(Author)

  12. Accuracy and calibration of integrated radiation output indicators in diagnostic radiology: A report of the AAPM Imaging Physics Committee Task Group 190

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Pei-Jan P.; Schueler, Beth A.; Balter, Stephen; Strauss, Keith J.; Wunderle, Kevin A.; LaFrance, M. Terry; Kim, Don-Soo; Behrman, Richard H.; Shepard, S. Jeff; Bercha, Ishtiaq H.

    2015-01-01

    Due to the proliferation of disciplines employing fluoroscopy as their primary imaging tool and the prolonged extensive use of fluoroscopy in interventional and cardiovascular angiography procedures, “dose-area-product” (DAP) meters were installed to monitor and record the radiation dose delivered to patients. In some cases, the radiation dose or the output value is calculated, rather than measured, using the pertinent radiological parameters and geometrical information. The AAPM Task Group 190 (TG-190) was established to evaluate the accuracy of the DAP meter in 2008. Since then, the term “DAP-meter” has been revised to air kerma-area product (KAP) meter. The charge of TG 190 (Accuracy and Calibration of Integrated Radiation Output Indicators in Diagnostic Radiology) has also been realigned to investigate the “Accuracy and Calibration of Integrated Radiation Output Indicators” which is reflected in the title of the task group, to include situations where the KAP may be acquired with or without the presence of a physical “meter.” To accomplish this goal, validation test protocols were developed to compare the displayed radiation output value to an external measurement. These test protocols were applied to a number of clinical systems to collect information on the accuracy of dose display values in the field

  13. Accuracy and calibration of integrated radiation output indicators in diagnostic radiology: A report of the AAPM Imaging Physics Committee Task Group 190

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Pei-Jan P., E-mail: Pei-Jan.Lin@vcuhealth.org [Virginia Commonwealth University Medical Center, Richmond, Virginia 23298 (United States); Schueler, Beth A. [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States); Balter, Stephen [Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York 10032 (United States); Strauss, Keith J. [Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio 45229 (United States); Wunderle, Kevin A. [Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio 44195 (United States); LaFrance, M. Terry [Baystate Health Systems, Inc., Springfield, Massachusetts 01199 (United States); Kim, Don-Soo [Children’s Hospital Boston, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Behrman, Richard H. [Boston University Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts 02118 (United States); Shepard, S. Jeff [University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77096 (United States); Bercha, Ishtiaq H. [Children’s Hospital Colorado, Aurora, Colorado 80045 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Due to the proliferation of disciplines employing fluoroscopy as their primary imaging tool and the prolonged extensive use of fluoroscopy in interventional and cardiovascular angiography procedures, “dose-area-product” (DAP) meters were installed to monitor and record the radiation dose delivered to patients. In some cases, the radiation dose or the output value is calculated, rather than measured, using the pertinent radiological parameters and geometrical information. The AAPM Task Group 190 (TG-190) was established to evaluate the accuracy of the DAP meter in 2008. Since then, the term “DAP-meter” has been revised to air kerma-area product (KAP) meter. The charge of TG 190 (Accuracy and Calibration of Integrated Radiation Output Indicators in Diagnostic Radiology) has also been realigned to investigate the “Accuracy and Calibration of Integrated Radiation Output Indicators” which is reflected in the title of the task group, to include situations where the KAP may be acquired with or without the presence of a physical “meter.” To accomplish this goal, validation test protocols were developed to compare the displayed radiation output value to an external measurement. These test protocols were applied to a number of clinical systems to collect information on the accuracy of dose display values in the field.

  14. Accuracy and calibration of integrated radiation output indicators in diagnostic radiology: A report of the AAPM Imaging Physics Committee Task Group 190.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Pei-Jan P; Schueler, Beth A; Balter, Stephen; Strauss, Keith J; Wunderle, Kevin A; LaFrance, M Terry; Kim, Don-Soo; Behrman, Richard H; Shepard, S Jeff; Bercha, Ishtiaq H

    2015-12-01

    Due to the proliferation of disciplines employing fluoroscopy as their primary imaging tool and the prolonged extensive use of fluoroscopy in interventional and cardiovascular angiography procedures, "dose-area-product" (DAP) meters were installed to monitor and record the radiation dose delivered to patients. In some cases, the radiation dose or the output value is calculated, rather than measured, using the pertinent radiological parameters and geometrical information. The AAPM Task Group 190 (TG-190) was established to evaluate the accuracy of the DAP meter in 2008. Since then, the term "DAP-meter" has been revised to air kerma-area product (KAP) meter. The charge of TG 190 (Accuracy and Calibration of Integrated Radiation Output Indicators in Diagnostic Radiology) has also been realigned to investigate the "Accuracy and Calibration of Integrated Radiation Output Indicators" which is reflected in the title of the task group, to include situations where the KAP may be acquired with or without the presence of a physical "meter." To accomplish this goal, validation test protocols were developed to compare the displayed radiation output value to an external measurement. These test protocols were applied to a number of clinical systems to collect information on the accuracy of dose display values in the field.

  15. Radiation exposure from diagnostic imaging in young patients with testicular cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, C.J.; Twomey, M.; O' Regan, K.N. [Cork and Mercy University Hospitals, Department of Radiology, Cork (Ireland); Murphy, K.P.; Maher, M.M.; O' Connor, O.J. [Cork and Mercy University Hospitals, Department of Radiology, Cork (Ireland); University College Cork, Department of Radiology, Cork (Ireland); McLaughlin, P.D. [Cork and Mercy University Hospitals, Department of Radiology, Cork (Ireland); Vancouver General Hospital, Department of Emergency and Trauma Radiology, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Power, D.G. [Cork and Mercy University Hospitals, Department of Medical Oncology, Cork (Ireland)

    2015-04-01

    Risks associated with high cumulative effective dose (CED) from radiation are greater when imaging is performed on younger patients. Testicular cancer affects young patients and has a good prognosis. Regular imaging is standard for follow-up. This study quantifies CED from diagnostic imaging in these patients. Radiological imaging of patients aged 18-39 years, diagnosed with testicular cancer between 2001 and 2011 in two tertiary care centres was examined. Age at diagnosis, cancer type, dose-length product (DLP), imaging type, and frequency were recorded. CED was calculated from DLP using conversion factors. Statistical analysis was performed with SPSS. In total, 120 patients with a mean age of 30.7 ± 5.2 years at diagnosis had 1,410 radiological investigations. Median (IQR) surveillance was 4.37 years (2.0-5.5). Median (IQR) CED was 125.1 mSv (81.3-177.5). Computed tomography accounted for 65.3 % of imaging studies and 98.3 % of CED. We found that 77.5 % (93/120) of patients received high CED (>75 mSv). Surveillance time was associated with high CED (OR 2.1, CI 1.5-2.8). Survivors of testicular cancer frequently receive high CED from diagnostic imaging, mainly CT. Dose management software for accurate real-time monitoring of CED and low-dose CT protocols with maintained image quality should be used by specialist centres for surveillance imaging. (orig.)

  16. Major femoral vascular access complications after coronary diagnostic and interventional procedures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dencker, Ditte; Pedersen, Frants; Engstrøm, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Vascular access complications after coronary angiography (CAG) and percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) are known to increase morbidity, prolong hospitalization and raise hospital costs. Therefore, risk factor identification and improvement of safety strategies for vascular...... management are important. We aimed to assess the incidence of major vascular complications related to femoral access, and to identify potential risk factors. METHODS: Over a period of six years, 23,870 index procedures (CAG) were performed in two centres, prospectively entered in the database...... and retrospectively analysed. Data was obtained from the Eastern Danish Heart Registry and cross-matched with data from the Danish Vascular Registry. Index procedures were defined as the first trans-femoral procedure. Demographic, procedural and mortality data, as well as information on access complications requiring...

  17. Free Thyroid Transfer: A Novel Procedure to Prevent Radiation-induced Hypothyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, Jeffrey; Almarzouki, Hani; Barber, Brittany; Scrimger, Rufus; Romney, Jacques; O'Connell, Daniel; Urken, Mark; Seikaly, Hadi

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The incidence of hypothyroidism after radiation therapy for head and neck cancer (HNC) has been found to be ≤53%. Medical treatment of hypothyroidism can be costly and difficult to titrate. The aim of the present study was to assess the feasibility of free thyroid transfer as a strategy for the prevention of radiation-induced damage to the thyroid gland during radiation therapy for HNC. Methods and Materials: A prospective feasibility study was performed involving 10 patients with a new diagnosis of advanced HNC undergoing ablative surgery, radial forearm free-tissue transfer reconstruction, and postoperative adjuvant radiation therapy. During the neck dissection, hemithyroid dissection was completed with preservation of the thyroid arterial and venous supply for implantation into the donor forearm site. All patients underwent a diagnostic thyroid technetium scan 6 weeks and 12 months postoperatively to examine the functional integrity of the transferred thyroid tissue. Results: Free thyroid transfer was executed in 9 of the 10 recruited patients with advanced HNC. The postoperative technetium scans demonstrated strong uptake of technetium at the forearm donor site at 6 weeks and 12 months for all 9 of the transplanted patients. Conclusions: The thyroid gland can be transferred as a microvascular free transfer with maintenance of function. This technique could represent a novel strategy for maintenance of thyroid function after head and neck irradiation.

  18. Free Thyroid Transfer: A Novel Procedure to Prevent Radiation-induced Hypothyroidism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, Jeffrey [Division of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Department of Surgery, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Almarzouki, Hani [Division of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Department of Surgery, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia); Barber, Brittany, E-mail: brittanybarber0@gmail.com [Division of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Department of Surgery, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Scrimger, Rufus [Division of Radiation Oncology, Department of Oncology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Romney, Jacques [Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); O' Connell, Daniel [Division of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Department of Surgery, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Urken, Mark [Institute for Head and Neck and Thyroid Cancers, Icahn School of Medicine, Mount Sinai Hospital, New York, New York (United States); Seikaly, Hadi [Division of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Department of Surgery, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada)

    2016-09-01

    Purpose: The incidence of hypothyroidism after radiation therapy for head and neck cancer (HNC) has been found to be ≤53%. Medical treatment of hypothyroidism can be costly and difficult to titrate. The aim of the present study was to assess the feasibility of free thyroid transfer as a strategy for the prevention of radiation-induced damage to the thyroid gland during radiation therapy for HNC. Methods and Materials: A prospective feasibility study was performed involving 10 patients with a new diagnosis of advanced HNC undergoing ablative surgery, radial forearm free-tissue transfer reconstruction, and postoperative adjuvant radiation therapy. During the neck dissection, hemithyroid dissection was completed with preservation of the thyroid arterial and venous supply for implantation into the donor forearm site. All patients underwent a diagnostic thyroid technetium scan 6 weeks and 12 months postoperatively to examine the functional integrity of the transferred thyroid tissue. Results: Free thyroid transfer was executed in 9 of the 10 recruited patients with advanced HNC. The postoperative technetium scans demonstrated strong uptake of technetium at the forearm donor site at 6 weeks and 12 months for all 9 of the transplanted patients. Conclusions: The thyroid gland can be transferred as a microvascular free transfer with maintenance of function. This technique could represent a novel strategy for maintenance of thyroid function after head and neck irradiation.

  19. Evaluation of radiation doses in patient and medical staff during endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Deoknam; Kim, Kie Hwan; Park, Kyung; Kim, Jung-Su; Han, Seonggyu; Kim, Jungmin

    2016-01-01

    The radiation exposure dose must be optimised because the hazard resulting from an interventional radiology procedure is long term depending on the patient. The aim of this study was to measure the radiation doses received by the patients and medical staff during endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography (ERCP) procedures. Data were collected during 126 ERCP procedures, including the dose-area product (DAP), entrance dose (ED), effective dose (E), fluoroscopy time (T) and number of digital radiographs (F). The medical staff members each wore a personal thermoluminescence dosemeter to monitor exposure during ERCP procedures. The mean DAP, ED, E and T were 47.06 Gy cm 2 , 196.06 mGy, 8.93 mSv, 7.65 min and 9.21 images, respectively. The mean dose to the staff was 0.175 mSv and that to the assistant was 0.069 mSv. The dose to the medical staff was minimal when appropriate protective measures were used. The large variation in the patient doses must be further investigated. (authors)

  20. Radiation-resistance assessment of IR fibres for ITER thermography diagnostic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brichard, B.; Ierschot, S. van; Ooms, H.; Berghmans, F.; Reichle, R.; Pocheau, C.; Decreton, M.

    2006-01-01

    The actively cooled target plates in the divertor of ITER will be subjected to high thermal fluxes (∼ 10 MW/m 2 ). These target plates are compound structures of an armour material at the surface - either carbon fibre reinforced carbon (CFC) or tungsten - and a water cooled CuCrZr structure inside or below. The thermal limit of the interface between the two materials must not exceed 550 o C. Therefore, the temperature must be carefully monitored to prevent structural damages of the divertor plates. Non contact measurements of the temperature offer the advantage to avoid weakening of the cooling plate structure which is already quite complex to manufacture. Infrared thermography of the target surface is therefore considered as a possible solution. Recently a diagnostic concept for spectrally resolved ITER divertor thermography using optical fibres has been proposed by CEA-Cadarache. However, the divertor region will have to face high-radiation flux and the radiation-resistance of InfraRed (IR)-fibres must be evaluated. In collaboration with CEA-Cadarache, an irradiation program has been started at SCK-CEN (Mol, Belgium) with the aim to measure the radiation-induced absorption of different IR fibre candidates operating in the 1-5 μm range. We selected various commercially available IR technologies: ZrF 4 , Hollow-Waveguide, Sapphire and Chalcogenide. For wavelengths below 2 μm we also tested low-OH silica fibres. We carried out a gamma irradiation at a maximum dose-rate of 0.42 Gy/s up to a total dose of about 5000 Gy. We showed that the optical transmission of ZrF 4 fibres strongly decreased under gamma radiation, primarily for wavelengths below 2 μm. In this type of fibre typical optical losses can reach 50 % at 5000 Gy around 3 μm. Nevertheless, the optical transmission can be significantly recovered by performing a thermal annealing treatment at a temperature of 100 o C. We also irradiated a Silver-coated hollow waveguide fibre at the same dose-rate but up

  1. The use of roentgen diagnostics in chiropractor activities. Project based survey according to new regulations regarding radiation protection and use of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raaum, Aud; Widmark, Anders

    2005-12-01

    An audit has been performed in 17 chiropractic enterprises according to new radiation protection legislation. Before the audits a survey of the use of diagnostic imaging in Norwegian chiropractic enterprises was carried out. This report summarizes the results of the survey and the findings at the audits. (Author)

  2. Efficient Noninferiority Testing Procedures for Simultaneously Assessing Sensitivity and Specificity of Two Diagnostic Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guogen Shan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sensitivity and specificity are often used to assess the performance of a diagnostic test with binary outcomes. Wald-type test statistics have been proposed for testing sensitivity and specificity individually. In the presence of a gold standard, simultaneous comparison between two diagnostic tests for noninferiority of sensitivity and specificity based on an asymptotic approach has been studied by Chen et al. (2003. However, the asymptotic approach may suffer from unsatisfactory type I error control as observed from many studies, especially in small to medium sample settings. In this paper, we compare three unconditional approaches for simultaneously testing sensitivity and specificity. They are approaches based on estimation, maximization, and a combination of estimation and maximization. Although the estimation approach does not guarantee type I error, it has satisfactory performance with regard to type I error control. The other two unconditional approaches are exact. The approach based on estimation and maximization is generally more powerful than the approach based on maximization.

  3. Work-related stress and bullying: gender differences and forensic medicine issues in the diagnostic procedure

    OpenAIRE

    Tonini, Stefano; Lanfranco, Andrea; Dellabianca, Antonio; Lumelli, Diego; Giorgi, Ines; Mazzacane, Fulvio; Fusi, Camilla; Scafa, Fabrizio; Candura, Stefano M

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The attention of international agencies and scientific community on bullying and work-related stress is increasing. This study describes the gender differences found in victims of bullying and work-related stress in an Italian case series and analyzes the critical issues in the diagnostic workup. Methods Between 2001 and 2009 we examined 345 outpatients (148 males, 197 females; mean age: 41 ± 10.49) for suspected psychopathological work-related problems. Diagnosis of bully...

  4. Evaluation method of reference levels of radiation diagnostic in computerized tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flores, Walter; Borges, Jose C.; Mota, Helvecio C.

    2000-01-01

    The computerized tomography (CT) is a complex technique, with many parameters to be selected and protocols of quality control not standardized, connected with high doses in the patients. In this work a simple methodology is developed, to evaluate levels of reference of diagnosis in computerized tomography using the concept of Multiple Scan Average Dose (MSAD), recently adopted by the Ministry of Health of Brazil. This methodology, can be used in the routine of inspection of evaluation of radiological safety in medical radiation diagnostics, executed by the Department of Medical Physics of the Institute of Radiation Protection and Dosimetry and by the sanitary authorities in Brazil. In order to evaluate this dosimeter magnitude the distribution of dose it was studied the dose distribution obtained trough a profile of dose measured in the axial axis of a simulator(phantom) of water with thermoluminescent dosimeters, TLD-100, for three techniques of examination by CT. The magnitude MSAD was evaluated by means of two different methods. In first, it was evaluated for an only cut, and in the second for multiple cuts. This last method presents/displays to be more practical and adapted to be applied in the routine of evaluation of reference levels, with TLDs

  5. Survey of Compliance with Radiation Protection Standards in Diagnostic Imaging Centers of Khuzestan Province in 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    farshid mahmoudi

    2017-03-01

    rooms in 32 diagnostic imaging centers in Khuzestan Province, Iran, 2015. The centers were chosen through random cluster sampling method. The data were obtained using open-ended interview and a checklist designed based on the recommendations of the International Commission for Radiation Protection and Atomic Energy Organization of Iran. Results: The compliance rates with regard to radiology room, radiology equipment, darkroom, and radiographer’s protection were 80.76%, 80.47%, 69.28%, and 93.12%, respectively. Maximum and minimum rates of compliance with the standards were related to performance of the cassette tray (100% and hopper status (25%, respectively. Comparison of public and private imaging centers in terms of safety standards showed no significant differences (P>0.05.Conclusion: The observance of the radiation protection standards in Khuzestan Province was in a relativly desirable condition. However, there are some shortcomings in compliance with the principles of protection in the darkroom. In this regard, with recommend adopting protection measures such as timelyreplacement of processing solution, appropriate ventilation of darkroom, provisionof protection equipment and appliances, and protection training required for entering the darkroom.

  6. Radiation safety concerns and diagnostic reference levels for computed tomography scanners in Tamil Nadu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingstone, Roshan S; Dinakaran, Paul M

    2011-01-01

    Radiation safety in computed tomography (CT) scanners is of concern due its widespread use in the field of radiological imaging. This study intends to evaluate radiation doses imparted to patients undergoing thorax, abdomen and pelvic CT examinations and formulate regional diagnostic reference levels (DRL) in Tamil Nadu, South India. In-site CT dose measurement was performed in 127 CT scanners in Tamil Nadu for a period of 2 years as a part of the Atomic Energy Regulatory Board (AERB)-funded project. Out of the 127 CT scanners,13 were conventional; 53 single-slice helical scanners (SSHS); 44 multislice CT (MSCT) scanners; and 17 refurbished scanners. CT dose index (CTDI) was measured using a 32-cm polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA)-body phantom in each CT scanner. Dose length product (DLP) for different anatomical regions was generated using CTDI values. The regional DRLs for thorax, abdomen and pelvis examinations were 557, 521 and 294 mGy cm, respectively. The mean effective dose was estimated using the DLP values and was found to be 8.04, 6.69 and 4.79 mSv for thorax, abdomen and pelvic CT examinations, respectively. The establishment of DRLs in this study is the first step towards optimization of CT doses in the Indian context.

  7. Radiation safety concerns and diagnostic reference levels for computed tomography scanners in Tamil Nadu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livingstone Roshan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiation safety in computed tomography (CT scanners is of concern due its widespread use in the field of radiological imaging. This study intends to evaluate radiation doses imparted to patients undergoing thorax, abdomen and pelvic CT examinations and formulate regional diagnostic reference levels (DRL in Tamil Nadu, South India. In-site CT dose measurement was performed in 127 CT scanners in Tamil Nadu for a period of 2 years as a part of the Atomic Energy Regulatory Board (AERB-funded project. Out of the 127 CT scanners,13 were conventional; 53 single-slice helical scanners (SSHS; 44 multislice CT (MSCT scanners; and 17 refurbished scanners. CT dose index (CTDI was measured using a 32-cm polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA-body phantom in each CT scanner. Dose length product (DLP for different anatomical regions was generated using CTDI values. The regional DRLs for thorax, abdomen and pelvis examinations were 557, 521 and 294 mGy cm, respectively. The mean effective dose was estimated using the DLP values and was found to be 8.04, 6.69 and 4.79 mSv for thorax, abdomen and pelvic CT examinations, respectively. The establishment of DRLs in this study is the first step towards optimization of CT doses in the Indian context.

  8. Radiopharmaceutical activities administered for diagnostic procedures in nuclear medicine in the first six months of the gamma camera use in the Clinical Center of Montenegro - Podgorica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antovic, Nevenka; Aligrudic, Irena

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear medicine procedures have carried out in the Clinical Center of Montenegro - Podgorica since 2006 by the dual-headed SPECT and Digital gamma camera NUCLINE Spirit DH-V. In the first six months of the gamma camera use (from September 2006 to March 2007) examinations of skeleton, kidneys, thyroid and lung were performed. For diagnostic skeletal imaging (102 patients) the radiopharmaceutical 99m Tc-MDP is used, and administered activities were in the range from 555 to 740 MBq. For thyroid imaging (203 patients) 99m Tc-pertechnetate is used, and administered activities were in the range (37-111) MBq. Lung imaging is performed for 3 patients, using 99m Tc-MAA and administered activities in the range (111-185) MBq. Renal imaging is carried out for 72 patients: 42 dynamic studies of kidneys were performed with 99m Tc-DTPA and administered activities from 207 to 282 MBq, and 30 static kidneys scintigraphies were performed using the radiopharmaceutical 99m Tc-DMSA. 6 patients in the last mentioned group were children with year of birth between 2000 and 2006, and administered activities were from 16.6 to 55.5 MBq. In the same group, activities 28.5 MBq, 74.4 MBq and 120 MBq were administered to three patients with age between 6 and 18 years, and in the other cases, administered activities to the patients (adults) were in the range (59.2 to 196) MBq. The administered activities presented here are basis for further estimations of cumulated activity and absorbed dose to the various organs, which is useful for comparison of the average dose to patient organs in various nuclear medicine procedures and calculation of effective dose equivalent and total effective dose, significant for an estimation of potential risk due to the radioactivity administered to a patient during nuclear medicine procedures. It is very important for procedures optimization and improvement of the radiation protection. (author)

  9. Quality control procedures of dental diagnostic radiology systems; Elaboracao de um procedimento para controle de qualidade em sistemas de radiodiagnostico odontologico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, Paula Serra Sasaki

    2007-07-01

    This work presents quality control reference procedures for dental diagnostic radiology systems, following the recommendations of the Publication 453 of the Brazilian Health Ministry (PF453), to be applied in dental clinics, in order to achieve an improvement in the radiological image qualities and the patient dose reduction. All tests were applied in an intraoral X rays system, following the methodology developed and the requirements of the PF 453. In order to verify the best quality of the image in relation to the smaller exposition time an object test was also developed in this work. The use of this object allowed the reduction of the exposition time of 0.5 seconds, the maximum value of the linear region of the characteristic curve, for 0.2 seconds. The tested X rays system showed a very good agreement with the applied procedures, detaching the reduction of the skin entrance dose using the film-holding devices. However, the size of the field increased and exceeded the maximum value of 6 cm recommended in the standard. The importance of the quality control in dental diagnostic radiology systems is essential due to the constant use of X radiation in dental clinics. The PF453 recommends the frequency of at least two years for the constancy tests. However, it is suggested that the professional, surgeon-dentist, should be responsible for the internal control of the image quality obtained from the X rays device. This can be done through monthly exposures of the object test developed in this work. (author)

  10. Heuristic determination of relevant diagnostic procedures in a medical expert system for gynecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, S L; Muechler, E K

    1989-07-01

    Many professions including medicine have standard operating procedures for the performance of their tasks. In the construction of expert systems, knowledge engineers have exploited this fact in devising heuristic rules that mimic the standard practice among such personnel (i.e., experts). This article suggests that the expert system designer should not stop at the level of the standard operating procedure heuristic but should instead investigate the reasons that the standard procedures have become standard. Because the experts in a field often do not understand the reasons for the standard operating procedures of their profession, this effort not only rewards the system designer but the expert as well. Because medical training does not always emphasize the logical reasoning underlying certain standard operating procedures, the ability to perform this reasoning is especially important in medicine. Further, a medical expert system for consultation or education would make a valuable impact by incorporating such knowledge and inference rules. This article investigates the development of a computerized medical expert system that applies the principles of artificial intelligence by limiting the number of questions and tests to find the solution for an ill-defined complex problem. Finally, we describe a logic program that tests the basic ideas.

  11. CT imaging of congenital lung lesions: effect of iterative reconstruction on diagnostic performance and radiation dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haggerty, Jay E.; Smith, Ethan A.; Dillman, Jonathan R. [University of Michigan Health System, Section of Pediatric Radiology, Department of Radiology, C.S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Kunisaki, Shaun M. [University of Michigan Health System, Section of Pediatric Surgery, Department of Surgery, C.S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Different iterative reconstruction techniques are available for use in pediatric computed tomography (CT), but these techniques have not been systematically evaluated in infants. To determine the effect of iterative reconstruction on diagnostic performance, image quality and radiation dose in infants undergoing CT evaluation for congenital lung lesions. A retrospective review of contrast-enhanced chest CT in infants (<1 year) with congenital lung lesions was performed. CT examinations were reviewed to document the type of lung lesion, vascular anatomy, image noise measurements and image reconstruction method. CTDI{sub vol} was used to calculate size-specific dose estimates (SSDE). CT findings were correlated with intraoperative and histopathological findings. Analysis of variance and the Student's t-test were used to compare image noise measurements and radiation dose estimates between groups. Fifteen CT examinations used filtered back projection (FBP; mean age: 84 days), 15 used adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR; mean age: 93 days), and 11 used model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR; mean age: 98 days). Compared to operative findings, 13/15 (87%), 14/15 (93%) and 11/11 (100%) lesions were correctly characterized using FBP, ASiR and MBIR, respectively. Arterial anatomy was correctly identified in 12/15 (80%) using FBP, 13/15 (87%) using ASiR and 11/11 (100%) using MBIR. Image noise was less for MBIR vs. ASiR (P < 0.0001). Mean SSDE was different among groups (P = 0.003; FBP = 7.35 mGy, ASiR = 1.89 mGy, MBIR = 1.49 mGy). Congenital lung lesions can be adequately characterized in infants using iterative CT reconstruction techniques while maintaining image quality and lowering radiation dose. (orig.)

  12. CT imaging of congenital lung lesions: effect of iterative reconstruction on diagnostic performance and radiation dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haggerty, Jay E.; Smith, Ethan A.; Dillman, Jonathan R.; Kunisaki, Shaun M.

    2015-01-01

    Different iterative reconstruction techniques are available for use in pediatric computed tomography (CT), but these techniques have not been systematically evaluated in infants. To determine the effect of iterative reconstruction on diagnostic performance, image quality and radiation dose in infants undergoing CT evaluation for congenital lung lesions. A retrospective review of contrast-enhanced chest CT in infants (<1 year) with congenital lung lesions was performed. CT examinations were reviewed to document the type of lung lesion, vascular anatomy, image noise measurements and image reconstruction method. CTDI vol was used to calculate size-specific dose estimates (SSDE). CT findings were correlated with intraoperative and histopathological findings. Analysis of variance and the Student's t-test were used to compare image noise measurements and radiation dose estimates between groups. Fifteen CT examinations used filtered back projection (FBP; mean age: 84 days), 15 used adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR; mean age: 93 days), and 11 used model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR; mean age: 98 days). Compared to operative findings, 13/15 (87%), 14/15 (93%) and 11/11 (100%) lesions were correctly characterized using FBP, ASiR and MBIR, respectively. Arterial anatomy was correctly identified in 12/15 (80%) using FBP, 13/15 (87%) using ASiR and 11/11 (100%) using MBIR. Image noise was less for MBIR vs. ASiR (P < 0.0001). Mean SSDE was different among groups (P = 0.003; FBP = 7.35 mGy, ASiR = 1.89 mGy, MBIR = 1.49 mGy). Congenital lung lesions can be adequately characterized in infants using iterative CT reconstruction techniques while maintaining image quality and lowering radiation dose. (orig.)

  13. Radiation safety education and compliance with safety procedures: The Korea Nurses' Health Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Oksoo; Kim, Mi Sun; Jang, Hee Jung; Lee, Hyangkyu; Kang, Younhee; Pang, Yanghee; Jung, Heeja

    2018-03-15

    To examine the current state of radiation safety education and its influence on nurses' compliance with safety procedures. Use of radiation in therapy and diagnosis has prolonged and improved millions of lives, but it presents potential hazards for healthcare professionals. A cross-sectional design. Participants included 1,672 female nurses of childbearing age who had recently been exposed to radiation emitting generators or radiation. Quantitative data were taken from the Korea Nurses' Health Study, the Korean version of the Nurses' Health Study conducted in the USA. Confounding variables included sociodemographic factors, duration of employment in a department where work involved radiation, hospital's geographical location, bed size, and hospital safety climate. Statistical analyses included descriptive statistics, Spearman's correlation coefficients, and multivariable ordinal logistic regression. Half (50.3%) of nurses received no safety training, whereas the other half received some safety training as follows: only once (14.4%), irregularly (10.2%), and regularly (25.1%). Out of the 6 radioactive safety compliance questionnaires, 29.4%, 20.2%, 30.7%, and 19.7% complied to none, one, two, and more than three, respectively. After controlling for confounding variables, relative to that observed with no safety education, irregular education that occurred more than twice (OR=1.597, CI=1.177-2.164) and regular education (OR=2.223, CI=1.770-2.792) increased the likelihood that nurses would comply with safety procedures. Low levels of safety education and adherence raise critical concerns regarding nurses' well-being. As routine safety education increases safety adherence, healthcare managers and policymakers should emphasize regular safety education. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  14. Chromatographic quality control procedures for /sup 99m/Tc-diagnostic agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marinelli, M.; Pozzato, R.; Garuti, P.; Zucchini, G.L.

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to experiment simple and rapid chromatographic systems, based on paper and thin-layer techniques, to test the radiochemical purity of some common /sup 99m/Tc diagnostic agents, and select those systems able to prevent the anomalies due to oxidation and artifact production. The agents were examined under conditions which usually bring about the above mentioned anomalies, then the results were compared with those obtained under controlled conditions. Quali- and quantitative detection of the activity present on the chromatograms was carried out using the equipment available in nuclear medicine departments

  15. The role of gastrointestinal endosonography in diagnostic and therapeutic interventional procedures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, M B

    1999-01-01

    and therapeutic purposes. This paper describes the technique and experience with some of the interventional EUS procedures based on the present literature. Many of the techniques must still be considered experimental and will need substantial clinical testing in larger series before any final conclusions can...

  16. Risk and safety requirements for diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in allergology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kowalski, Marek L; Ansotegui, Ignacio; Aberer, Werner

    2016-01-01

    One of the major concerns in the practice of allergy is related to the safety of procedures for the diagnosis and treatment of allergic disease. Management (diagnosis and treatment) of hypersensitivity disorders involves often intentional exposure to potentially allergenic substances (during skin...

  17. A non-destructive electron beam diagnostic for a SASE FEL using coherent off-axis undulator radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuman, C.P.; Ponds, M.L.; Barnett, G.A.; Madey, J.M.J.; O'Shea, P.G.

    1999-01-01

    We show that by observing coherent off-axis undulator radiation (COUR) from a short diagnostic wiggler, it may be possible to determine the length and structure of a short electron bunch. Typically the on-axis undulator radiation is incoherent, but at angles of a few degrees, the wavelength of the emitted radiation may be comparable to the length of a short electron bunch, and thus coherence effects emerge. Due to such coherence effects, the intensity of the emitted radiation may change by up to a factor of 10 9 as the angle of observation is increased. The radiation becomes coherent in a way which depends on the length and structure of the electron bunch. Observing COUR disturbs the electron bunch negligibly. Thus, COUR can be used as a non-destructive diagnostic which would allow for optimization of FEL performance while an FEL is operating. Such a diagnostic could be used for proposed SASE FELs, which use short electron bunches. We present two methods to describe the theory for COUR, and we use these methods to calculate the expected outcome of a COUR experiment. We propose an experiment to demonstrate COUR effects and their applications to SASE FELs

  18. Work-related stress and bullying: gender differences and forensic medicine issues in the diagnostic procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonini, Stefano; Lanfranco, Andrea; Dellabianca, Antonio; Lumelli, Diego; Giorgi, Ines; Mazzacane, Fulvio; Fusi, Camilla; Scafa, Fabrizio; Candura, Stefano M

    2011-11-16

    The attention of international agencies and scientific community on bullying and work-related stress is increasing. This study describes the gender differences found in victims of bullying and work-related stress in an Italian case series and analyzes the critical issues in the diagnostic workup. Between 2001 and 2009 we examined 345 outpatients (148 males, 197 females; mean age: 41 ± 10.49) for suspected psychopathological work-related problems. Diagnosis of bullying was established using international criteria (ICD-10 and DSM-IV). After interdisciplinary diagnostic evaluation (Occupational Medicine Unit, Psychology and Psychiatry Service), the diagnosis of bullying was formulated in 35 subjects, 12 males and 23 females (2 cases of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder and 33 of Adjustment Disorder). Fifty-four (20 males, 34 females) suffered from work-related anxiety, while work-unrelated Adjustment Disorder and other psychiatric disorders were diagnosed in 7 and 112 subjects, respectively. Women between 34 and 45 years showed a high prevalence (65%) of "mobbing syndrome" or other work-related stress disorders. At work, women are more subject to harassment (for personal aspects related to emotional and relational factors) than men. The knowledge of the phenomenon is an essential requisite to contrast bullying; prevention can be carried out only through effective information and training of workers and employers, who have the legal obligation to preserve the integrity of the mental and physical status of their employees during work.

  19. Diagnostic value of performing endocervical curettage at the time of colposcopy procedure; a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shabnam Imannezhad

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The importance of high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN as a precursor to invasive cervical cancer suggests a considerable need for accurate screening of the patients for the risk of these lesions. This systematic review aimed to study the diagnostic significance of endocervical curettage (ECC at the time of colposcopy in the detection of CIN 2, 3, and preinvasive lesions.Methods: PubMed was searched to obtain the relevant articles based on the following search term: (endocervical curettage OR ECC AND colposcopy. The most relevant articles were included after studying the title, abstract, and full text of the obtained articles at initial search. Only English language articles published after 1992 with at least 500 patients were included in this study.Result: Among 300 articles identified by the first search, only seven articles were in line with the purpose of this systematic review. Majority of the included studies were retrospective observational studies.Conclusion: Performing ECC has higher sensitivity in women older than 40 years and those with unsatisfactory colposcopy results. However exact diagnostic usefulness of ECC at the time of colposcopy needs to be investigated in further studies.

  20. Work-related stress and bullying: gender differences and forensic medicine issues in the diagnostic procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tonini Stefano

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The attention of international agencies and scientific community on bullying and work-related stress is increasing. This study describes the gender differences found in victims of bullying and work-related stress in an Italian case series and analyzes the critical issues in the diagnostic workup. Methods Between 2001 and 2009 we examined 345 outpatients (148 males, 197 females; mean age: 41 ± 10.49 for suspected psychopathological work-related problems. Diagnosis of bullying was established using international criteria (ICD-10 and DSM-IV. Results After interdisciplinary diagnostic evaluation (Occupational Medicine Unit, Psychology and Psychiatry Service, the diagnosis of bullying was formulated in 35 subjects, 12 males and 23 females (2 cases of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder and 33 of Adjustment Disorder. Fifty-four (20 males, 34 females suffered from work-related anxiety, while work-unrelated Adjustment Disorder and other psychiatric disorders were diagnosed in 7 and 112 subjects, respectively. Women between 34 and 45 years showed a high prevalence (65% of "mobbing syndrome" or other work-related stress disorders. Conclusions At work, women are more subject to harassment (for personal aspects related to emotional and relational factors than men. The knowledge of the phenomenon is an essential requisite to contrast bullying; prevention can be carried out only through effective information and training of workers and employers, who have the legal obligation to preserve the integrity of the mental and physical status of their employees during work.

  1. Diagnostic procedures for the detection of bone metastases in patients with neuroendocrine gastrointestinal and pancreatic tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steger, W.; Amthauer, H.; Vogl, T.J.; Steger, S.; Eichstaedt, H.; Wiedenmann, B.

    1999-01-01

    Introduction: In patients with neuroendocrine gastrointestinal tumors and liver metastases, but without known extrahepatic manifestations, liver transplantation may be indicated as curativ or 'long-term-palliativ' therapy. For these patients the absence of bone lesions is mandatory. Methods: 4 patients with a histologically proven neuroendocrine tumor were examined in order to exclude further metastases. We compared the diagnostic value of somatostatin-receptor-scintigraphy (SRS), X-ray, 99 m Tc-DPD-scintigraphy, CT and MRI. Results: In all 4 patients bone metastases could be detected using SRC, CT and MRT. In one case MRI proved multiple infiltrations, while SRS showed only a solitary, focal lesion. 99 m Tc-DPD-scintigraphy was positive in 3 cases, X-ray in 1 case. Conclusion: As a diagnostic strategy we initially recommend somatostatin-receptor-scintigraphy. When locating suspect areas in SRS, MRI should be the method of choice for the exact evaluation of malignant bone infiltrations. A CT-guided biopsy is necessary to gain histological information. (orig.) [de

  2. Radiation exposure of paediatric patients during micturating cysto-urethrography procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sulieman, A. [Prince Sattam Abdulaziz University, College of Applied Medical Sciences, Radiology and Medical Imaging Department, P. O. Box 422, Alkharj 11942 (Saudi Arabia); Babikir, E.; Alkhorayef, M. [King Saud University, College of Applied Sciences, Radiological Sciences Department, P. O. Box 10219, Riyadh 11433 (Saudi Arabia); Alrihaima, N. [Sudan Atomic Energy Commission, P. O. Box 55, Khartoum (Sudan); Bradley, D. [University of Surrey, Centre for Nuclear and Radiation Physics, Department of Physics, Surrey GU2 7XH Guildford (United Kingdom); Theodorou, K., E-mail: Abdelmoneim_a@yahoo.com [University Hospital of Larissa, Medical Physics Department, P. O. Box 1425, Larissa 41110 (Greece)

    2015-10-15

    The objectives of this work are to measure the entrance surface air kerma (ESA K) and the effective doses for pediatric patients undergoing MCU. The study was carried out in five hospitals in Khartoum. The ESA K was determined by using calibrated thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD- Gr 200 A) for 167 pediatric patients. Patients' populations were categorized into three groups in accordance with their ages (0-5 year (group 1), 6-10 years (group 2) and 11-15 years (group 3)). The mean ESA K± sd and range (mGy) resulting from MCU procedure has been estimated to be 2.2±0.5 (0.8-9.2), 2.48±0.6 (0.9-8.1) and 3.90±0.6 (1.1-10.3) for first, second and third age groups, respectively. The mean effective dose was between 0.03 to 0.4 mSv per procedure for all pediatric population. The number of films ranged between 2.0 to 11.0 per procedure. The radiation dose to the patients is comparable with previous studies in all hospitals. Pediatric patients were exposed to avoidable radiation dose because no gonad shields were used. (Author)

  3. Betatron radiation based diagnostics for plasma wakefield accelerated electron beams at the SPARC-LAB test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shpakov, V.; Anania, M.P.; Biagioni, A.; Chiadroni, E. [INFN - LNF, via Enrico Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Cianchi, A. [INFN - LNF, via Enrico Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); “Tor Vergata” University, via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Rome (Italy); Curcio, A. [INFN - LNF, via Enrico Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Dabagov, S. [INFN - LNF, via Enrico Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute RAS, Leninskiy Prospekt 53, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); NRNU “MEPhI”, Kashirskoe highway 31, 115409 Moscow (Russian Federation); Ferrario, M.; Filippi, F. [INFN - LNF, via Enrico Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Marocchino, A. [Dipartimento SBAI Universitá di Roma ‘La Sapienza’, via Antonio Scarpa 14/16, 00161 Rome (Italy); Paroli, B. [INFN - MI, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milan (Italy); Pompili, R. [INFN - LNF, via Enrico Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Rossi, A.R. [INFN - MI, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milan (Italy); Zigler, A. [Racah Institute of Physics Hebrew University of Jerusalem (Israel)

    2016-09-01

    Recent progress with wake-field acceleration has shown a great potential in providing high gradient acceleration fields, while the quality of the beams remains relatively poor. Precise knowledge of the beam size at the exit from the plasma and matching conditions for the externally injected beams are the key for improvement of beam quality. Betatron radiation emitted by the beam during acceleration in the plasma is a powerful tool for the transverse beam size measurement, being also non-intercepting. In this work we report on the technical solutions chosen at SPARC-LAB for such diagnostics tool, along with expected parameters of betatron radiation. - Highlights: • The betatron radiation parameters in SPARC-LAB wakefiled experiments were studied. • The differences with betatron radiation in other wake-field experiments were highlighted. • The solution for betatron radiation detection was investigated.

  4. Evaluation of patient radiation doses using DAP meter in interventional radiology procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Byung Sam [Dept. of Radiological Technology. Shingu University, Sungnam (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Yong Su [Dept. of Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu Univeristy, Kyushu (Japan)

    2017-03-15

    The author investigated interventional radiology patient doses in several other countries, assessed accuracy of DAP meters embedded in intervention equipment in domestic country, conducted measurement of patient doses for 13 major interventional procedures with use of Dose Area Product(DAP) meters from 23 hospitals in Korea, and referred to 8,415 cases of domestic data related to interventional procedures by radiation exposure after evaluation the actual effective of dose reduction variables through phantom test. Finally, dose reference level for major interventional procedures was suggested. In this study, guidelines for patient doses were 237.7 Gy·cm{sup 2} in TACE, 17.3 Gy·cm{sup 2} in AVF, 114.1 Gy·cm{sup 2} in LE PTA and STENT, 188.5 Gy·cm{sup 2} in TFCA, 383.5 Gy·cm{sup 2} in Aneurysm Coil, 64.6 Gy·cm{sup 2} in PTBD, 64.6 Gy·cm{sup 2} in Biliary Stent, 22.4 Gy·cm{sup 2} in PCN, 4.3 Gy·cm{sup 2} in Hickman, 2.8 Gy·cm{sup 2} in Chemo-port, 4.4 Gy·cm{sup 2} in Perm-Cather, 17.1 Gy·cm{sup 2} in PCD, and 357.9 Gy·cm{sup 2} in Vis, EMB. Dose reference level acquired in this study is considered to be able to use as minimal guidelines for reducing patient dose in the interventional radiology procedures. For the changes and advances of materials and development of equipment and procedures in the interventional radiology procedures, further studies and monitoring are needed on dose reference level Korean DAP dose conversion factor for the domestic procedures.

  5. Finite volume method in 3-D curvilinear coordinates with multiblocking procedure for radiative transport problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talukdar, P.; Steven, M.; Issendorff, F.V.; Trimis, D. [Institute of Fluid Mechanics (LSTM), University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Cauerstrasse 4, D 91058 Erlangen (Germany)

    2005-10-01

    The finite volume method of radiation is implemented for complex 3-D problems in order to use it for combined heat transfer problems in connection with CFD codes. The method is applied for a 3-D block structured grid in a radiatively participating medium. The method is implemented in non-orthogonal curvilinear coordinates so that it can handle irregular structure with a body-fitted structured grid. The multiblocking is performed with overlapping blocks to exchange the information between the blocks. Five test problems are considered in this work. In the first problem, present work is validated with the results of the literature. To check the accuracy of multiblocking, a single block is divided into four blocks and results are validated against the results of the single block simulated alone in the second problem. Complicated geometries are considered to show the applicability of the present procedure in the last three problems. Both radiative and non-radiative equilibrium situations are considered along with an absorbing, emitting and scattering medium. (author)

  6. Radiation protection to the eye and thyroid during diagnostic cerebral angiography : a phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shortt, C. P.; Malone, L.; Thornton, J.; Brennan, P.; Lee, M. J.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: We measured radiation doses to the eye and thyroid during diagnostic cerebral angiography to assess the effectiveness of bismuth and lead shields at dose reduction. Phantom head angiographic studies were performed with bismuth (study 1) and lead shields (study 2). In study 1 (12 phantoms), thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) were placed over the eyes and thyroid in three groups: (i) no shields (four phantoms); (ii) anterior bismuth shields (four phantoms) and (iii) anterior and posterior bismuth shields (four phantoms). In a second study (eight phantoms), lead shields were placed over the thyroid only and TLD dose measurements obtained in two groups: (i) no shielding (four phantoms) and (ii) thyroid lead shielding (four phantoms). A standard 4-vessel cerebral angiogram was performed on each phantom. Study 1 (bismuth shields) showed higher doses to the eyes compared with thyroid (mean 13.03 vs 5.98 mSv, P < 0.001) and a higher eye dose on the X-ray tube side. Overall, the use of bismuth shielding did not significantly reduce dose to either eyes or thyroid in the measured TLD positions. In study 2, a significant thyroid dose reduction was found with the use of lead shields (47%, mean 2.46 vs 4.62 mSv, P < 0.001). Considerable doses to the eyes and thyroid highlight the need for increased awareness of patient protection. Eye shielding is impractical and interferes with diagnostic capability. Thyroid lead shielding yields significant protection to the thyroid, is not in the field of view and should be used routinely.

  7. Radiation protection to the eye and thyroid during diagnostic cerebral angiography: a phantom study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shortt, C P

    2008-08-01

    We measured radiation doses to the eye and thyroid during diagnostic cerebral angiography to assess the effectiveness of bismuth and lead shields at dose reduction. Phantom head angiographic studies were performed with bismuth (study 1) and lead shields (study 2). In study 1 (12 phantoms), thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) were placed over the eyes and thyroid in three groups: (i) no shields (four phantoms); (ii) anterior bismuth shields (four phantoms) and (iii) anterior and posterior bismuth shields (four phantoms). In a second study (eight phantoms), lead shields were placed over the thyroid only and TLD dose measurements obtained in two groups: (i) no shielding (four phantoms) and (ii) thyroid lead shielding (four phantoms). A standard 4-vessel cerebral angiogram was performed on each phantom. Study 1 (bismuth shields) showed higher doses to the eyes compared with thyroid (mean 13.03 vs 5.98 mSv, P < 0.001) and a higher eye dose on the X-ray tube side. Overall, the use of bismuth shielding did not significantly reduce dose to either eyes or thyroid in the measured TLD positions. In study 2, a significant thyroid dose reduction was found with the use of lead shields (47%, mean 2.46 vs 4.62 mSv, P < 0.001). Considerable doses to the eyes and thyroid highlight the need for increased awareness of patient protection. Eye shielding is impractical and interferes with diagnostic capability. Thyroid lead shielding yields significant protection to the thyroid, is not in the field of view and should be used routinely.

  8. A design procedure for a slotted waveguide with probe-fed slots radiating into plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colborn, J.A.

    1989-11-01

    A design procedure is developed for slotted-waveguide antennas with probe-fed slots. Radiation into a gyrotropic, plane-stratified medium is considered, nonzero waveguide wall thickness is assumed, and noncosinusoidal slot fields and arbitrary slot length up to about one free-space wavelength are allowed. External mutual coupling is taken into account by matching the tangential fields at the antenna surface. The particular case of longitudinal slots in the broad face of rectangular guide is analyzed. The motivation for this work is the design of such radiators for plasma heating and current-drive on thermonuclear fusion experiments, but some of the analysis is applicable to the probeless slotted waveguide used for avionics and communications. 20 refs., 5 figs

  9. Practical X-ray diagnostics orthopedics and trauma surgery. Indication, adjustment technique and radiation protection; Praktische Roentgendiagnostik Orthopaedie und Unfallchirurgie. Indikation, Einstelltechnik, Strahlenschutz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flechtenmacher, Johannes [Ortho-Zentrum am Ludwigsplatz, Karlsruhe (Germany); Sabo, Desiderius [Klinik St. Elisabeth, Heidelberg (Germany). Sportopaedic Heidelberg

    2014-07-01

    The book on X-ray diagnostics in orthopedics and trauma surgery includes the following chapters: 1. Introduction: radiation protection, equipment technology radiological diagnostics of skeleton carcinomas, specific aspects of trauma surgery, special aspects of skeleton radiology for children. 2. X-ray diagnostics of different anatomical regions: ankle joint, knee, hips and pelvis, hand and wrist joint, elbow, shoulder, spinal cord. 3. Appendix: radiation protection according to the X-ray regulations.

  10. [Significant changes in diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in smoldering multiple myeloma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurczyszyn, Artur; Olszewska-Szopa, Magdalena; Skotnicki, Aleksander B

    2015-01-01

    Smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM) is a precursor disease of multiple myeloma (MM) with an average annual risk of progression to MM of 10%. Several prognostic factors have been identified and combined in models to discriminate patient groups with different outcomes. These factors include size of the M-protein, plasma cell (PC) infiltration in the bone marrow (BM), serum free light-chain ratio, immunoparesis and percentage of aberrant BMPCs on flow cytometry or the presence of focal lesions on magnetic resonance imaging. The current standard of care has been to initiate treatment with progression to symptomatic MM. Current approaches aim at identifying patients with an ultra-high risk of progression (≥ 80% within the first 2 years) who are considered as 'early myeloma' patients requiring therapy. A recent trial on high-risk SMM patients, comparing early treatment with lenalidomide plus dexamethasone (Rd) versus observation, reported a benefit with respect to time to progression and survival for Rd-treated patients. Therefore, in 2014, the International Myeloma Working Group (IMWG) revised the diagnostic criteria and proposed to treat patients with ultra-high risk SMM as symptomatic MM. Promising markers for further studies may be high levels of circulating and high proliferative rate of PCs, abnormal PC phenotype with > 95% plus immunoparesis, evolving SMM, specific cytogenetic subtypes, genomic and additional biomarkers; all being acknowledged by the IMWG be added to the diagnostic criteria in the future, if any proves to be associated with a risk of progression of SMM to MM of at least 80% within 2 years.

  11. SU-F-I-77: Radiation Dose in Cardiac Catheterization Procedures: Impact of a Systematic Reduction in Pulsed Fluoroscopy Frame Rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schultz, C; Dixon, S [Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate whether one small systematic reduction in fluoroscopy frame rate has a significant effect on the total air kerma and/or dose area product for diagnostic and interventional cardiac catheterization procedures. Methods: The default fluoroscopy frame rate (FFR) was lowered from 15 to 10 fps in 5 Siemens™ Axiom Artis cardiac catheterization labs (CCL) on July 1, 2013. A total of 7212 consecutive diagnostic and interventional CCL procedures were divided into two study groups: 3602 procedures from 10/1/12 –6/30/13 with FFR of 15 fps; and 3610 procedures 7/1/13 – 3/31/14 at 10 fps. For each procedure, total air kerma (TAK), fluoroscopy skin dose (FSD), total/fluoroscopy dose area products (TAD, FAD), and total fluoroscopy time (FT) were recorded. Patient specific data collected for each procedure included: BSA, sex, height, weight, interventional versus diagnostic; and elective versus emergent. Results: For pre to post change in FFR, each categorical variable was compared using Pearson’s Chi-square test, Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals. No statistically significant difference in BSA, height, weight, number of interventional versus diagnostic, elective versus emergent procedures was found between the two study groups. Decreasing the default FFR from 15 fps to 10 fps in the two study groups significantly reduced TAK from 1305 to 1061 mGy (p<0.0001), FSD from 627 to 454 mGy (p<0.0001), TAD from 8681 to 6991 uGy × m{sup 2}(p<0.0001), and FAD from 4493 to 3297 uGy × m{sup 2}(p<0.0001). No statistically significant difference in FT was noted. Clinical image quality was not analyzed, and reports of noticeable effects were minimal. From July 1, 2013 to date, the default FFR has remained 10 fps. Conclusion: Reducing the FFR from 15 to 10 fps significantly reduced total air kerma and dose area product which may decrease risk for potential radiation-induced skin injuries and improve patient outcomes.

  12. Significantly reduced radiation exposure to operators during kyphoplasty and vertebroplasty procedures: methods and techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, A O; Natarajan, V; Gregorius, D R; Pollack, S

    2006-05-01

    Vertebroplasty and kyphoplasty can be associated with significant radiation exposure to the operator. We compared the exposure levels to an operator performing vertebral fracture augmentation with vertebroplasty and kyphoplasty, to assess a cement injection and a monitoring technique designed to reduce this exposure. A neuroradiologist performed 189 consecutive vertebral augmentation procedures in 135 patients with osteoporotic compression fractures by using a bilateral approach with biplane pulse fluoroscopy at 7.5 pulses/second. Cement delivery was performed with intermittent fluoroscopy with kyphoplasty and vertebroplasty by using syringes or continuous fluoroscopic monitoring with a cement delivery system (CDS). Data collection included time and operator exposure parameters. A total of 87 kyphoplasty procedures, 82 vertebroplasty procedures with a CDS (VP-CDS), and 20 vertebroplasty procedures with syringes (VP-S) were safely performed. Mean fluoroscopy time for device positioning was 4.3 minutes for each procedure type. Mean fluoroscopy time (minutes) for cement delivery was significantly different for the 3 procedure types; 2.1 for kyphoplasty, 3.7 for VP-CDS, and 1.5 for VP-S (P exposure rates (microsieverts/minute) were 0.8 for kyphoplasty, 1.1 for VP-CDS, and 0.3 for VP-S during device-positioning and 1.7 for kyphoplasty, 2.9 for VP-CDS, and 0.2 for VP-S during cement injection (P technique and intermittent fluoroscopy with kyphoplasty and vertebroplasty with syringes results in a significantly lower operator exposure rate compared with vertebroplasty with a CDS.

  13. Exposure of the French population to ionizing radiations related to medical diagnosis procedures in 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    This report updates (for 2012) data concerning the exposure of the French population related to diagnosis imagery tests using ionizing radiations. It notably outlines the characteristics of this medical exposure with respect to imagery modality (conventional radiology, scans, diagnosis interventional radiology, and nuclear medicine), to anatomic examined region, to age and to patient gender, and the share of the French population (quantity, age, gender) actually submitted to diagnosis procedures in 2012. The authors report the selection of procedure types, the determination of their frequency, the assessment of associated doses (choice of the efficient dose as indicator, assessment of efficient doses associated with each procedure type), the exposure of the French population in 2012 (general assessment, distribution of procedures and of the collective efficient dose, distribution in terms of age and gender), the characteristics of the actually exposed population. The representativeness of data is discussed, as well as the evolution of diagnosis medical exposure from 2007 to 2012. Data are compared with European and international data

  14. Digital imaging using storage phosphor screens a film-less procedure to detect radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narayana Rao, A.V.S.S.; Mahajan, S.K.

    1998-01-01

    The imaging plate is a film-like radiation sensor comprising of specifically designed phosphors (photostimulable storage phosphors) that trap and store energy resulting from the decay of radioactive atoms in the sample. In a typical setup, samples containing radioactivity are placed next to the imaging plate for a duration of about 5-10 times less than that is needed for normal x-ray films. The stored energy is stable until scanned with a laser beam, which releases the energy as luminescence. Digital signal processing of the emitted light results in an image which represents a quantitative measure of the activity of the radiolabeled sample. This phosphor technology, launched in its first application to the medical x-ray diagnostic field, portends great promise in a wide range of newer scientific and technological applications. (author)

  15. Linac-beam characterizations at 600 MeV using optical transition radiation diagnostics.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumpkin, A. H.

    1998-05-27

    Selected optical diagnostics stations were upgraded in anticipation of low-emittance, bright electron beams from a thermionic rf gun or a photoelectric rf gun on the Advanced Photon Source (APS) injector linac. These upgrades include installation of optical transition radiation (OTR) screens, transport lines, and cameras for use in transverse beam size measurements and longitudinal profile measurements. Using beam from the standard thermionic gun, tests were done at 50 MeV and 400 to 650 MeV. Data were obtained on the limiting spatial ({sigma} {approximately} 200 {micro}m) and temporal resolution (300 ms) of the Chromox (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} : Cr) screen (250-{micro}n thick) in comparison to the OTR screens. Both charge-coupled device (CCD) and charge-injection device (CID) video cameras were used as well as the Hamamatsu C5680 synchroscan streak camera operating at a vertical deflection rate of 119.0 MHz (the 24th subharmonic of the S-band 2856-MHz frequency). Beam transverse sizes as small as {sigma}{sub x} = 60 {micro}m for a 600-MeV beam and micropulse bunch lengths of {sigma}{sub {tau}}<3 ps have been recorded for macropulse-averaged behavior with charges of about 2 to 3 nC per macropulse. These techniques are applicable to linac-driven, fourth-generation light source R and D experiments including the APS's SASE FEL experiment.

  16. Nonintercepting Electron Beam Diagnostics Based on Optical Diffraction Radiation for X-Ray FELs

    CERN Document Server

    Lumpkin, Alex H; Sereno, N S; Yang, B X; Yao, C

    2005-01-01

    The challenge of providing nonintercepting beam diagnostics that address transverse parameters such as beam size and divergence in a linear transport line has been met. We have successfully used near-field imaging of optical diffraction radiation (ODR) from a 7-GeV electron beam passing near a single edge of a conducting screen to obtain beam size for the first time [1]. In this case appreciable visible wavelength ODR is emitted for impact parameters of 1 to 2 mm, values that are close to gamma times the reduced observation wavelength. We have now upgraded our imaging system to include an intensified camera; selectable bandpass filters, neutral density filters, and polarizers; a steering mirror; and an optical lens setup that provides either near-field or far-field imaging. The ODR has been obtained in both the single-edge mode and aperture mode with a single pulse of 3.3 nC. Beam-size resolution in the 20-50 micron regime is projected while beam position resolution to 10 microns with a smaller beam and highe...

  17. Evaluation of diagnostic procedures for subclinical mastitis in meat-producing sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clements, Archie C A; Taylor, David J; Fitzpatrick, Julie L

    2003-05-01

    Samples of foremilk were collected from 261 clinically normal glands of 150 ewes, and tested using the California mastitis test (CMT). Further samples were collected from 195 of these glands for determination of automated somatic cell counts (SCC), and from 60 of these glands for bacteriological assessment. The sensitivity and specificity of CMT for detecting samples with SCC above different threshold levels and for CMT and SCC in determining bacteriological status were evaluated using two-graph receiver operating characteristics (TG-ROC). Milk samples were obtained subsequently from ten CMT positive, and five CMT negative first- and second-lactation ewes. Samples were cultured using a variety of media, incubation temperatures and atmospheric conditions, immediately after collection, and 1 week after storage at 4 degrees C and -21 degrees C. Results suggested that CMT is best used as a diagnostic test for ovine subclinical mastitis (SCM) with a cut-off of 3 (distinct gel formation), and that automated SCC thresholds of > 1200 x 10(3) cells/ml are appropriate, especially where low prevalences are expected (e.g. culture, either at 4 degrees C or -21 degrees C, was detrimental to the isolation of several of these organisms.

  18. Effects of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction on radiation dose reduction and diagnostic accuracy of pediatric abdominal CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Sohi; Kim, Myung-Joon; Lee, Mi-Jung [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiological Science, Severance Children' s Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Choon-Sik [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong Wook; Hong, Jung Hwa [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Biostatistics Collaboration Unit, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    Since children are more radio-sensitive than adults, there is a need to minimize radiation exposure during CT exams. To evaluate the effects of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) on radiation dose reduction, image quality and diagnostic accuracy in pediatric abdominal CT. We retrospectively reviewed the abdominal CT examinations of 41 children (24 boys and 17 girls; mean age: 10 years) with a low-dose radiation protocol and reconstructed with ASIR (the ASIR group). We also reviewed routine-dose abdominal CT examinations of 41 age- and sex-matched controls reconstructed with filtered-back projection (control group). Image quality was assessed objectively as noise measured in the liver, spleen and aorta, as well as subjectively by three pediatric radiologists for diagnostic acceptability using a four-point scale. Radiation dose and objective image qualities of each group were compared with the paired t-test. Diagnostic accuracy was evaluated by reviewing follow-up imaging studies and medical records in 2012 and 2013. There was 46.3% dose reduction of size-specific dose estimates in ASIR group (from 13.4 to 7.2 mGy) compared with the control group. Objective noise was higher in the liver, spleen and aorta of the ASIR group (P < 0.001). However, the subjective image quality was average or superior in 84-100% of studies. Only one image was subjectively rated as unacceptable by one reviewer. There was only one case with interpretational error in the control group and none in the ASIR group. Use of the ASIR technique resulted in greater than a 45% reduction in radiation dose without impairing subjective image quality or diagnostic accuracy in pediatric abdominal CT, despite increased objective image noise. (orig.)

  19. Guideline Implementation: Radiation Safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fencl, Jennifer L

    2015-12-01

    Because radiologic technology is used in a variety of perioperative procedures and settings, it is essential for perioperative RNs to be knowledgeable of the risks related to radiation and the ways to adequately protect patients and health care providers from unintended radiation exposure. The updated AORN "Guideline for radiation safety" provides guidance on preventing injury from ionizing radiation exposure during therapeutic, diagnostic, and interventional procedures. This article focuses on key points of the guideline to help perioperative personnel practice radiation safety. The key points address the requirements for an organization's radiation safety program, measures used to keep radiation exposure as low as reasonably achievable, proper handling and testing of radiation protection devices, and considerations for protecting employees and patients who are pregnant and who will be exposed to radiation. Perioperative RNs should review the complete guideline for additional information and for guidance when writing and updating policies and procedures. Copyright © 2015 AORN, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Guidelines on the implementation of radiation protection measures during diagnostic medical exposures of female patients of reproductive capacity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-08-01

    These guidelines were produced in response to a perceived need for clear guidance concerning the implementation of the 10-day and 28-day rules regarding radiological radiation protection practices. At the outset it is important to emphasise that, in all cases, the seriousness of the clinical situation must be taken into account as being of paramount importance and an overriding consideration to the guidelines. Radiographs of the chest, skull and extremities may be done at any time, provided that best practices are adhered to. All requests for radiological examinations of female patients, which place the uterus in or near the primary X-ray beam, i.e. irradiation between the diaphragm and pubis, or nuclear medicine examinations which are likely to result in a dose to the unborn child up to 10 mGy, should include the date of the last menstrual period. The prescriber and practitioner or radiographer should ask a patient beyond day 10 of the menstrual cycle whether she might be pregnant. This enquiry and the patient's answer should be recorded in writing. If the answer is no, the examination may proceed. If the answer is yes or uncertain, the examination should not proceed. In cases of medical emergency, the practitioner or the prescriber, if necessary following discussion with the practitioner or radiographer and taking justification into account, may decide to proceed with the examination. The practitioner or prescriber must record this decision in writing and sign it. The 10-day rule is recommended for certain high dose examinations where the dose to the uterus is likely to exceed 10 mGy. These include a small number of diagnostic X-ray and nuclear medicine procedures. (author)

  1. Guidelines on the implementation of radiation protection measures during diagnostic medical exposures of female patients of reproductive capacity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-08-01

    These guidelines were produced in response to a perceived need for clear guidance concerning the implementation of the 10-day and 28-day rules regarding radiological radiation protection practices. At the outset it is important to emphasise that, in all cases, the seriousness of the clinical situation must be taken into account as being of paramount importance and an overriding consideration to the guidelines. Radiographs of the chest, skull and extremities may be done at any time, provided that best practices are adhered to. All requests for radiological examinations of female patients, which place the uterus in or near the primary X-ray beam, i.e. irradiation between the diaphragm and pubis, or nuclear medicine examinations which are likely to result in a dose to the unborn child up to 10 mGy, should include the date of the last menstrual period. The prescriber and practitioner or radiographer should ask a patient beyond day 10 of the menstrual cycle whether she might be pregnant. This enquiry and the patient's answer should be recorded in writing. If the answer is no, the examination may proceed. If the answer is yes or uncertain, the examination should not proceed. In cases of medical emergency, the practitioner or the prescriber, if necessary following discussion with the practitioner or radiographer and taking justification into account, may decide to proceed with the examination. The practitioner or prescriber must record this decision in writing and sign it. The 10-day rule is recommended for certain high dose examinations where the dose to the uterus is likely to exceed 10 mGy. These include a small number of diagnostic X-ray and nuclear medicine procedures. (author)

  2. Diagnostic and corrective procedures for TL analysis using the pre-dose technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haskell, E.H.

    1985-01-01

    The high sensitivity of the pre-dose TL technique using fired quartz grains with relatively low doses makes it the only TL technique that is generally suitable for retrospective environmental dosimetry. The use of this technique for dose measurements of less than 0.2 Gy has been the focus of research at the Utah laboratory, while the extension of the useful range of the pre-dose technique to doses in excess of 5 Gy has been the aim of the Durham laboratory. Certain characteristics of the pre-dose phenomenon, if not properly diagnosed, can lead to erroneous dose estimates at both extremes. This paper describes the procedures used at both laboratories to diagnose such problems and recently developed methods for their circumvention. (author)

  3. Laboratory methods used for testing the effect of radiation sterilization and preservation procedures on bone allografts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dziedzic-Goclawska, A.

    1999-01-01

    Sterilization of tissue allografts with ionizing radiation introduced in the mid of 1950s is more and more frequently used in tissue banking practice. The dose of 25 kGy is currently recommended and commonly used by many tissue banks in the world with the exception of the Central Tissue Bank in Warsaw where the dose of 33 kGy + 10 % has been routinely used since 1963, and from 1997 the dose of 35 kGy + 10 % has been introduced. To study the effect of radiation-sterilization on bone allografts the interdisciplinary investigations have been undertaken and several techniques have been implemented in our tissue bank. The electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy has been applied to investigate the amount, origin and stability of free radicals and other paramagnetic entities induced in radiation-sterilized bone allografts. This technique has been also utilized for quantitative evaluation of remodeling process of radiation-sterilized bone allografts and for estimation of the absorbed dose of ionizing radiation using bone tissue as a dosimeter. A model of heterotopically induced osteogenesis after transplantation of devitalized bone matrix into the muscle (described by Urist in 1965) is very useful in tissue banking practice. It allows one to determine the contribution the graft itself makes to osteogenesis. This model is routinely used in our tissue bank to evaluate the effect of various sterilization and preservation procedures on osteoinductive properties of bone allografts. The solubility in vitro of collagen - a carrier for bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPS) and a major constituent of bone and the other connective tissue grafts, has been studied by measuring the amount of extracted neutral, acid and total soluble collagen from bone grafts preserved by different methods at irradiated at vanous experimental conditions. A positive correlation between collagen solubility in vitro and the rate of graft resorption in vivo has been observed. The high doses of

  4. Efficacy of clinical diagnostic procedures utilized in nuclear medicine. Technical progress report, 1 December 1981-30 November 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saenger, E.L.

    1982-07-01

    The efficacy of nuclear medicine diagnostic procedures was measured. Three levels of efficacy were defined. However, two different methods of evaluating efficacy itself were first compared. Using two methods, logistic regression and entropy-minimax pattern detection, substantial agreement was found between them in several clinical observations. (1) There are no attributes that indicate that any grouping of symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings is capable of suggesting that a patient does or does not have a pulmonary embolus. (2) The lung scan test is the only reliable method which indicates that a patient may have a pulmonary embolus or does not have a pulmonary embolus. (3) The validity of these conclusions and the ability to apply them widely to ongoing clinical practice is based on the prospective design of the Study which included an appropriate distribution of institutions by type, size, and geographic location. Also, the only judgement samples was that of the referring physician

  5. Sagittal reconstruction computed tomography in metrizamide cisternography. Useful diagnostic procedure for malformations in craniovertebral junction and posterior fossa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mochizuki, H.; Okita, N.; Fujii, T.; Yoshioka, M.; Saito, H. (Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1982-08-01

    We studied the sagittal reconstruction technique in computed tomography with metrizamide. Ten ml of metrizamide, 170 mg iodine/ml in concentration, were injected by lumbar puncture. After diffusion of the injected metrizamide, axial computed tomograms were taken by thin slice width (5 mm) with overlapped technique. Then electrical sagittal reconstruction was carried out by optioned software. Injection of metrizamide, non-ionic water soluble contrast media, made clear contrasts among bone, brain parenchyma and cerebrospinal fluid with computed tomography. Sagittal reconstruction technique could reveal more precise details and accurate anatomical relations than ordinary axial computed tomography. This technique was applied on 3 cases (Arnold-Chiari malformation, large cisterna magna and partial agenesis cerebellar vermis), which demonstrated a useful diagnostic procedure for abnormalities of craniovertebral junction and posterior fossa. The adverse reactions of metrizamide were negligible in our series.

  6. Effect of respiratory motion on internal radiation dosimetry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xie, Tianwu; Zaidi, Habib

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Estimation of the radiation dose to internal organs is essential for the assessment of radiation risks and benefits to patients undergoing diagnostic and therapeutic nuclear medicine procedures including PET. Respiratory motion induces notable internal organ displacement, which influences

  7. SU-F-207-14: Low Contrast Detectability (LCD) at Different Diagnostic Reference Levels for Adult Abdominal CT Procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahmood, U; Erdi, Y [Mem Sloan-Kettering Cancer Ctr, New York, NY (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose Using diagnostic reference levels (DRL) to optimize CT protocols has potential to reduce radiation dose and meet regulatory requirements. However, DRL’s tend to be misconstrued as dose limits, are typically designed for specific patient populations, and are assumed to have acceptable image quality (AIQ) associated with them. To determine the image quality that is associated with established DRL’s for adult abdominal CT studies, a LCD phantom study was employed. Methods: A CT phantom (CIRS) containing three columns of 7 spherical targets, ranging from 10mm to 2.4 mm, that are 5, 10, and 20 HU below the background (HUBB) matrix was scanned with a GE HD750 64 slice scanner. The phantom was scanned at the NEXT 2006 25th CTDIvol of 12 mGy, the NCRP 172 achievable dose (AD) CTDIvol of 17 mGy and 75th CTDIvol of 25 mGy and at the ACR recommended CTDIvol of 25 mGy. It was also scanned at a CTDIvol 20% greater than the AD at 20 mGy and the ACR maximum threshold of 30 mGy. Results: At the NEXT 2006 25th percentile CTDIvol of 12 mGy, a 6.3 mm low contrast lesion was detectable in the 20 HUBB; 6.3 mm in the 10 HUBB and 10 mm in the 5 HUBB column. Increasing the CTDIvol to the NCRP 172 AD of 17 mGy, an additional 4.8 mm lesion was visualized in the 20 HUBB column. At 20 mGy, an additional 4.8 mm lesion was detectable in the 10 HUBB column. No further lesions were visible between 20 and 30 mGy. However, conspicuity of all lesions increased with each additional step up in CTDI. Conclusion: Optimizing radiation dose to achieve AIQ is a critical aspect of any dose optimization committee. Hence, judicious monitoring of radiation exposure to patients has to be balanced with diagnostic image quality.

  8. C-arm flat-panel CT arthrography of the shoulder: Radiation dose considerations and preliminary data on diagnostic performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guggenberger, Roman; Ulbrich, Erika J.; Kaelin, Pascal; Pfammatter, Thomas; Alkadhi, Hatem; Andreisek, Gustav [University Hospital Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zuerich (Switzerland); Dietrich, Tobias J. [Balgrist University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Scholz, Rosemarie; Koehler, Christoph; Elsaesser, Thilo [Siemens Healthcare GmbH, Business Area Advanced Therapies, Forchheim (Germany); Le Corroller, Thomas [Aix-Marseille Universite, CNRS, ISM UMR 7287, Marseille (France); Radiology Department, APHM, Marseille (France)

    2017-02-15

    To investigate radiation dose and diagnostic performance of C-arm flat-panel CT (FPCT) versus standard multi-detector CT (MDCT) shoulder arthrography using MRI-arthrography as reference standard. Radiation dose of two different FPCT acquisitions (5 and 20 s) and standard MDCT of the shoulder were assessed using phantoms and thermoluminescence dosimetry. FPCT arthrographies were performed in 34 patients (mean age 44 ± 15 years). Different joint structures were quantitatively and qualitatively assessed by two independent radiologists. Inter-reader agreement and diagnostic performance were calculated. Effective radiation dose was markedly lower in FPCT 5 s (0.6 mSv) compared to MDCT (1.7 mSv) and FPCT 20 s (3.4 mSv). Contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs) were significantly (p < 0.05) higher in FPCT 20-s versus 5-s protocols. Inter-reader agreements of qualitative ratings ranged between κ = 0.47-1.0. Sensitivities for cartilage and rotator cuff pathologies were low for FPCT 5-s (40 % and 20 %) and moderate for FPCT 20-s protocols (75 % and 73 %). FPCT showed high sensitivity (81-86 % and 89-99 %) for bone and acromioclavicular-joint pathologies. Using a 5-s protocol FPCT shoulder arthrography provides lower radiation dose compared to MDCT but poor sensitivity for cartilage and rotator cuff pathologies. FPCT 20-s protocol is moderately sensitive for cartilage and rotator cuff tendon pathology with markedly higher radiation dose compared to MDCT. (orig.)

  9. [Quality of diagnostic procedures and frequency of endoscopically defined diseases of the upper gastrointestinal tract].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartels, F; Hahn, H-J; Stolte, M; Schmidt-Wilcke, H A

    2003-04-01

    (diagnosis histologically confirmed) were found with the same ratio of the diffuse type and the intestinal type. In 18 patients a carcinoma could be detected in the neighbouring area of gastric ulcers. The endoscopic findings in this investigation do not differ significantly from the results found in literature. It is important that there are more gastric ulcers than duodenal ulcers. This can be explained by the frequent use of PPIs which are prescribed additionally to NSARs and ASS. The deficits of histological diagnostics on Barett's oesophagus and gastritis were remarkable. An improvement of the endoscopic and histologic assessment quality by valid standards systematically applied should be aimed at in future. Furthermore it could be helpful to use the same nomenclature for pathologic findings to intensify the co-operation between the physicians in hospitals and the practitioners.

  10. 3D-radiative transfer in terrestrial atmosphere: An efficient parallel numerical procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bass, L. P.; Germogenova, T. A.; Nikolaeva, O. V.; Kokhanovsky, A. A.; Kuznetsov, V. S.

    2003-04-01

    Light propagation and scattering in terrestrial atmosphere is usually studied in the framework of the 1D radiative transfer theory [1]. However, in reality particles (e.g., ice crystals, solid and liquid aerosols, cloud droplets) are randomly distributed in 3D space. In particular, their concentrations vary both in vertical and horizontal directions. Therefore, 3D effects influence modern cloud and aerosol retrieval procedures, which are currently based on the 1D radiative transfer theory. It should be pointed out that the standard radiative transfer equation allows to study these more complex situations as well [2]. In recent year the parallel version of the 2D and 3D RADUGA code has been developed. This version is successfully used in gammas and neutrons transport problems [3]. Applications of this code to radiative transfer in atmosphere problems are contained in [4]. Possibilities of code RADUGA are presented in [5]. The RADUGA code system is an universal solver of radiative transfer problems for complicated models, including 2D and 3D aerosol and cloud fields with arbitrary scattering anisotropy, light absorption, inhomogeneous underlying surface and topography. Both delta type and distributed light sources can be accounted for in the framework of the algorithm developed. The accurate numerical procedure is based on the new discrete ordinate SWDD scheme [6]. The algorithm is specifically designed for parallel supercomputers. The version RADUGA 5.1(P) can run on MBC1000M [7] (768 processors with 10 Gb of hard disc memory for each processor). The peak productivity is equal 1 Tfl. Corresponding scalar version RADUGA 5.1 is working on PC. As a first example of application of the algorithm developed, we have studied the shadowing effects of clouds on neighboring cloudless atmosphere, depending on the cloud optical thickness, surface albedo, and illumination conditions. This is of importance for modern satellite aerosol retrieval algorithms development. [1] Sobolev

  11. A comparative study of some aspects of radiation protection and dosimetry procedures. Pt. 1 and 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drexler, G.; Goeksu, H.Y.; Johns, T.F.

    1987-10-01

    A study has been made of the procedures used in the Member States of the European Communities for dealing with certain practical and administrative aspects of radiation protection of occupationally exposed persons, and especially of the methods and procedures used in personnel dosimetry. It was found that the different states have adopted quite different methods for dealing with some of these problems, the method chosen seeming to depend on the size of the country and the extent and timing of its involvement with nuclear power developments; but although the different countries have adopted different methods of control, as far as we can judge they have all been reasonably effective in achieving adequate control of occupational exposures. Nevertheless, there are still issues that each country could probably learn and perhaps improve its own procedure by making a more careful study of the way in which other countries deal with these problems. Therefore the study was extended to cover the USA and Japan in order to facilitate such comparisons and improvements. (orig.)

  12. Radiation protection procedures for the dismantling and decontamination of nuclear facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, C.C.; Garcia, R.H.L.; Cambises, P.B.S.; Silva, T.M. da; Paiva, J.E.; Carneiro, J.C.G.G.; Rodrigues, D.L.

    2013-01-01

    This work presents the operational procedures and conditions to ensure the required level of protection and safety during the dismantling and decontamination of a natural uranium purification facility at IPEN-CNEN/SP, Brazil. The facility was designed for chemical processing of natural uranium, aiming to obtain the uranyl nitrate, nuclear-grade. Afterwards, the installation operated in treatment and washing of thorium sulfate and thorium oxycarbonate dissolution, to get thorium nitrate as final product. A global evaluation of the potential exposure situation was carried out by radioprotection team in order to carry out the operations planned. For the facility dismantling, was established both measures to control the radiation exposure at workplace and individual monitoring of workers. A combination of physical, chemical and mechanical methods was used in the decontamination procedure applied in this unit. Concerning the internal operation procedures of IPEN-CNEN/SP, the radioactive waste control, the transport of the radioactive materials and authorization of use of decontaminated equipment were also subject of study. (author)

  13. Biological effects of radiation and dosimetry in X-ray diagnostics of children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milkovic, Durdica; Beck, Natko; Kovac, Kornelija; Garaj-Vrhovac, Vera; Gajski, Goran

    2008-01-01

    The chest radiograms represent the basic radiological examinations of thorax. The basis for radiation protection especially in pediatrics is the exact determination of doses. The risk estimation of genome damages can be received in human peripheral blood lymphocytes using alkaline version of Comet Assay. The aim of this work was assessment and quantification of the level of DNA damage in peripheral blood lymphocytes of children during airways X-ray examinations of chest and to compare data to the dose of exposure. Doses were determined using thermoluminescence (TL) dosimetry and radiophotoluminescent (RPL) glass dosimetry system. Twenty children with pulmonary diseases, ages between 5 and 14 years were assessed. Dose measurements were conducted for poster-anterior (PA) projection on the forehead, thyroid gland, gonads, chest and back. We used a 150 kV Shimadzu CH-200 M X-ray unit. Peripheral blood samples were taken from children after and prior to X-ray exposure and were examined with the alkaline Comet Assay. Comet Assay is one of the standard techniques for assessing genome damage with variety applications in genotoxicity testing as well as fundamental research in DNA damage and repair. As a measure of DNA damage tail length was used, calculated from the centre of the head and presented in micrometers (μm). Mean value of group after irradiation was 14.04 ± 1.74 as opposed to mean value of group before irradiation that was 13.15 ± 1.33. Differences between mean tail lengths were statistically significant (P<0.05, ANOVA). In addition, correlation was found between doses in primary beam (measured on the back) and the ratio of tail length (DNA damage) before and after irradiation. Doses measured with TL and RPL dosimeters showed satisfactory agreement and both dosimetry methods are suitable for dosimetric measurements in X-ray diagnostics. (author)

  14. Proposal of a survey of radiation protection procedures during breast feeding;Proposta de um levantamento do estado da arte da radioprotecao para lactantes submetidas a procedimento com radiofarmacos e respectivos bebes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Liliane dos; Oliveira, Silvia M. Velasques de [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Servico de Monitoracao Individual Interna

    2009-07-01

    Contamination can occur by breast milk ingestion involving mothers subjected to diagnostic procedures or treatment with radiopharmaceuticals, which can reach high concentrations in milk causing significant absorbed doses to the children organs. Besides internal dose, close contact between the baby and his mother give rise to external exposures. In Brazil, 7% of diagnostic procedures use {sup 131}I or {sup 123}I for thyroid imaging and 84% of these were hold by women. For {sup 131}I, {sup 67}Ga and {sup 201}Tl, is recommended breast feeding cessation. The present work proposes a survey of the state of the art of radiation protection to breast feeding infants. It was planned interviews with nuclear medicine staff applying a questionnaire in order to assess specific procedures to women in reproductive age. This is 'on progress work'. (author)

  15. The benefits of using a bismuth-containing, radiation-absorbing drape in cardiac resynchronization implant procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Michael A; Cocker, Mary; Khiani, Raj; Foley, Paul; Qureshi, Norman; Wong, Kelvin C K; Rajappan, Kim; Betts, Timothy R

    2014-07-01

    Radiation exposure is a major concern in cardiac device implantation, especially cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) procedures. The RadPad™ (Worldwide Innovations & Technologies, Inc., Kansas City, MO, USA), a radiation-attenuating adhesive drape, has been shown to be beneficial in several clinical settings involving fluoroscopy, but less is known about the actual benefits in CRT procedures. Consecutive CRT implants performed with and without a RadPad™ drape over a 10-month period were analyzed. Two thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were attached to each implanting physician at several locations (adjacent to eyes, center abdomen [outside lead apron], left and right index fingers, and dorsum of the right foot). Results were corrected for background using control TLDs, and normalized to dose-area product (DAP). Thirty-six patients (31 male), 16 with and 20 without the RadPad™, were included in the study. No technical problems were caused by the presence of the radiation-absorbing drape. Time required to position the drape never exceeded 30 seconds, no acute skin reactions were noted, and no radiation-absorbing drape became displaced. Despite a trend toward longer fluoroscopy times and higher DAPs in the radiation-absorbing drape group, radiation exposure was significantly reduced: 65% in the case of the hands and body (P radiation-absorbing drape results in a significant reduction in radiation dose to the implanting physician during CRT procedures. Not only is the dose to the hands reduced, but also the eye and body doses are significantly reduced. The routine use of radiation-absorbing drapes should be considered for all CRT implant procedures in the light of these findings. ©2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Radiation dose electrophysiology procedures; Dosis de radiacion debidas a procedimientos de electrofisiologia cardiaca

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez-Armas, J.; Rodriguez, A.; Catalan, A.; Hernandez Armas, O.; Luque Japon, L.; Moral, S.; Barroso, L.; Rfuez-Hdez, R.

    2006-07-01

    The aim of this paper has been to measure and analyse some of the parameters which are directly related with the doses given to patients in two electrophysiology procedures: diagnosis and ablation with radiofrequency. 16 patients were considered in this study. 13 them had an ablation with radiofrequency at the Unit of Electrophysiology at the University Hospital of the Canaries, La Laguna., Tenerife. The results of skin doses, in the ablation cases, were higher than 2 Gy (threshold of some deterministic effects). The average value was 1.1 Gy. The personal doses, measured under the lead apron, for physician and nurses were 4 and 3 micro Sievert. These results emphasised the necessity of radiation protection measures in order to reduce, ad much as possible, the doses to patients. (Author)

  17. Defining the Key Competencies in Radiation Protection for Endovascular Procedures: A Multispecialty Delphi Consensus Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyen, Bart; Maurel, Blandine; Cole, Jonathan; Maertens, Heidi; Mastracci, Tara; Van Herzeele, Isabelle

    2018-02-01

    Radiation protection training courses currently focus on broad knowledge topics which may not always be relevant in daily practice. The goal of this study was to determine the key competencies in radiation protection that every endovascular team member should possess and apply routinely, through multispecialty clinical content expert consensus. Consensus was obtained through a two round modified Delphi methodology. The expert panel consisted of European vascular surgeons, interventional radiologists, and interventional cardiologists/angiologists experienced in endovascular procedures. An initial list of statements, covering knowledge skills, technical skills and attitudes was created, based on a literature search. Additional statements could be suggested by the experts in the first Delphi round. Each of the statements had to be rated on a 5- point Likert scale. A statement was considered to be a key competency when the internal consistency was greater than alpha = 0.80 and at least 80% of the experts agreed (rating 4/5) or strongly agreed (rating 5/5) with the statement. Questionnaires were emailed to panel members using the Surveymonkey service. Forty-one of 65 (63.1%) invited experts agreed to participate in the study. The response rates were 36 out of 41 (87.8%): overall 38 out of 41(92.6%) in the first round and 36 out of 38 (94.7%) in the second round. The 71 primary statements were supplemented with nine items suggested by the panel. The results showed excellent consensus among responders (Cronbach's alpha = 0.937 first round; 0.958 s round). Experts achieved a consensus that 30 of 33 knowledge skills (90.9%), 23 of 27 technical skills (82.1%), and 15 of 20 attitudes (75.0%) should be considered as key competencies. A multispecialty European endovascular expert panel reached consensus about the key competencies in radiation protection. These results may serve to create practical and relevant radiation protection training courses in the future, enhancing

  18. From 'Image Gently' to image intelligently: a personalized perspective on diagnostic radiation risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guillerman, R.P. [Department of Pediatric Radiology, Texas Children' s Hospital, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)

    2014-10-15

    The risk of ionizing radiation from diagnostic imaging has been a popular topic in the radiology literature and lay press. Communicating the magnitude of risk to patients and caregivers is problematic because of the uncertainty in estimates derived principally from epidemiological studies of large populations, and alternative approaches are needed to provide a scientific basis for personalized risk estimates. The underlying patient disease and life expectancy greatly influence risk projections. Research into the biological mechanisms of radiation-induced DNA damage and repair challenges the linear no-threshold dose-response assumption and reveals that individuals vary in sensitivity to radiation. Studies of decision-making psychology show that individuals are highly susceptible to irrational biases when judging risks. Truly informed medical decision-making that respects patient autonomy requires appropriate framing of radiation risks in perspective with other risks and with the benefits of imaging. To follow the principles of personalized medicine and treat patients according to their specific phenotypic and personality profiles, diagnostic imaging should optimally be tailored not only to patient size, body region and clinical indication, but also to underlying disease conditions, radio-sensitivity and risk perception and preferences that vary among individuals. (orig.)

  19. Backscatter radiation at tissue-titanium interfaces; Biological effects from diagnostic 65 kVp X-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosengren, B. (Department of Radiation Sciences, Uppsala University (Sweden) Dept. of Oncology, University Hospital, Bergen (Norway)); Wulff, L. (Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Central Hospital, Boden (Sweden)); Carlsson, E. (Department of Radiation Sciences, Uppsala University (Sweden)); Carlsson, J. (Department of Radiation Sciences, Uppsala University (Sweden)); Strid, K.G. (Dept. of Handicap Research, Goeteborg Univ. (Sweden)); Montelius, A. (Dept. of Hospital Physics, University Hospital, Uppsala (Sweden))

    1993-01-01

    The induced secondary electrons from a metal surface by diagnostic X-rays are thought to contribute to cell damage near the tissue-metal boundaries of metal implants. Titanium implants are becoming increasingly more popular for tissue reconstructions and it is rather often desirable to take radiographs of the operated area. In this study we compared the biological effects of radiation on cultured mammalian test cells grown on titanium plates with the radiation effects on cells that were grown on plastic control plates. In order to study the acute radiation effects on cell growth it was necessary to work with rather high radiation doses (0.7-5 Gy). Photon energies, suitable for diagnostic radiography in odontology, 65 kV, were applied. We found that the cells grown on titanium plates were, in terms of the applied dose in the surrounding culture medium, more sensitive to the irradiations than the cells growing on plastic plates. The survival curve for the cells on titanium had a steeper slope, showed no shoulder in the low-dose region and looked like curves normally obtained for high LET radiation. It was not possible to resolve to what degree the titanium-dependent changes were due to an increased dose near the titanium surface or to a change in the radiobiological effectiveness. Although there was a significant decrease in cellular survival near the metal, postoperative intraoral radiography after titanium implantations need not be excluded. The maximal doses given in odontological X-ray examinations are less than 1 mGy and, if the results in this study are applied, the biological effects near the titanium implant will correspond to biological effects in soft tissue of doses less than 20 mGy which is lower than the doses that give acute effects. The risk of acute healing disturbances are significant only at much higher radiation doses. (orig.).

  20. MERRA 3D IAU Diagnostic, Radiation, Time average 3-hourly (1.25x1.25L42) V5.2.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The MAT3CPRAD or tavg3_3d_rad_Cp data product is the MERRA Data Assimilation System 3-Dimensional radiation diagnostic that is time averaged on pressure levels at a...

  1. MERRA 3D IAU Diagnostic, Radiation, Diurnal (1.25x1.25L42) V5.2.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The MATUCPRAD or tavgU_3d_rad_Cp data product is the MERRA Data Assimilation System 3-Dimensional radiation diagnostic that is time averaged on pressure levels at a...

  2. MERRA 3D IAU Diagnostic, Radiation, Monthly Mean (1.25x1.25L42) V5.2.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The MATMCPRAD or tavgM_3d_rad_Cp data product is the MERRA Data Assimilation System 3-Dimensional radiation diagnostic that is time averaged on pressure levels at a...

  3. Development and optimization of the LHC and the SPS beam diagnostics based on synchrotron radiation monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trad, Georges

    2015-01-01

    Measuring the beam transverse emittance is fundamental in every accelerator, in particular for colliders, where its precise determination is essential to maximize the luminosity and thus the performance of the colliding beams. Synchrotron Radiation (SR) is a versatile tool for non-destructive beam diagnostics, since its characteristics are closely related to those of the source beam. At CERN, being the only available diagnostics at high beam intensity and energy, SR monitors are exploited as the proton beam size monitor of the two higher energy machines, the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The thesis work documented in this report focused on the design, development, characterization and optimization of these beam size monitors. Such studies were based on a comprehensive set of theoretical calculations, numerical simulations and experiments. A powerful simulation tool has been developed combining conventional softwares for SR simulation and optics design, thus allowing the description of an SR monitor from its source up to the detector. The simulations were confirmed by direct observations, and a detailed performance studies of the operational SR imaging monitor in the LHC, where different techniques for experimentally validating the system were applied, such as cross-calibrations with the wire scanners at low intensity (that are considered as a reference) and direct comparison with beam sizes de-convoluted from the LHC luminosity measurements. In 2015, the beam sizes to be measured with the further increase of the LHC beam energy to 7 TeV will decrease down to ∼190 μm. In these conditions, the SR imaging technique was found at its limits of applicability since the error on the beam size determination is proportional to the ratio of the system resolution and the measured beam size. Therefore, various solutions were probed to improve the system's performance such as the choice of one light polarization, the reduction of

  4. Radiation safety and quality assurance in diagnostic x-ray imaging 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Servonmaa, A.

    1999-04-01

    In the European Union, the Directive 97/43/Euratom concerning the medical use of radiation brings many new tasks to radiation users. Quality assurance, patient dose measurement, staff training and clinical audit are among the most essential of these tasks. The Finnish radiation legislation has been modified to comply with the Directive. Much work is still required for practical implementation of these rules. This report deals with applications of the medical radiation Directive. Most applications are still at the planning stage, and clear guidance is lacking. However, the users have to know in time about these plans and future duties concerning them. Experience on quality assurance and clinical audit in hospitals are especially valuable in providing practical information on benefits and problems of these practices. Other radiation related topics, such as radiation risks, radioactivity in foods, and use of radiation in other European countries, are also included in the report. (orig.)

  5. Radiation dose to children in diagnostic radiology. Measurements and methods for clinical optimisation studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almen, A.J.

    1995-09-01

    A method for estimating mean absorbed dose to different organs and tissues was developed for paediatric patients undergoing X-ray investigations. The absorbed dose distribution in water was measured for the specific X-ray beam used. Clinical images were studied to determine X-ray beam positions and field sizes. Size and position of organs in the patient were estimated using ORNL phantoms and complementary clinical information. Conversion factors between the mean absorbed dose to various organs and entrance surface dose for five different body sizes were calculated. Direct measurements on patients estimating entrance surface dose and energy imparted for common X-ray investigations were performed. The examination technique for a number of paediatric X-ray investigations used in 19 Swedish hospitals was studied. For a simulated pelvis investigation of a 1-year old child the entrance surface dose was measured and image quality was estimated using a contrast-detail phantom. Mean absorbed doses to organs and tissues in urography, lung, pelvis, thoracic spine, lumbar spine and scoliosis investigations was calculated. Calculations of effective dose were supplemented with risk calculations for special organs e g the female breast. The work shows that the examination technique in paediatric radiology is not yet optimised, and that the non-optimised procedures contribute to a considerable variation in radiation dose. In order to optimise paediatric radiology there is a need for more standardised methods in patient dosimetry. It is especially important to relate measured quantities to the size of the patient, using e g the patient weight and length. 91 refs, 17 figs, 8 tabs.

  6. Radiation dose to children in diagnostic radiology. Measurements and methods for clinical optimisation studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almen, A.J.

    1995-09-01

    A method for estimating mean absorbed dose to different organs and tissues was developed for paediatric patients undergoing X-ray investigations. The absorbed dose distribution in water was measured for the specific X-ray beam used. Clinical images were studied to determine X-ray beam positions and field sizes. Size and position of organs in the patient were estimated using ORNL phantoms and complementary clinical information. Conversion factors between the mean absorbed dose to various organs and entrance surface dose for five different body sizes were calculated. Direct measurements on patients estimating entrance surface dose and energy imparted for common X-ray investigations were performed. The examination technique for a number of paediatric X-ray investigations used in 19 Swedish hospitals was studied. For a simulated pelvis investigation of a 1-year old child the entrance surface dose was measured and image quality was estimated using a contrast-detail phantom. Mean absorbed doses to organs and tissues in urography, lung, pelvis, thoracic spine, lumbar spine and scoliosis investigations was calculated. Calculations of effective dose were supplemented with risk calculations for special organs e g the female breast. The work shows that the examination technique in paediatric radiology is not yet optimised, and that the non-optimised procedures contribute to a considerable variation in radiation dose. In order to optimise paediatric radiology there is a need for more standardised methods in patient dosimetry. It is especially important to relate measured quantities to the size of the patient, using e g the patient weight and length. 91 refs, 17 figs, 8 tabs

  7. WE-A-BRF-01: Dual-Energy CT Imaging in Diagnostic Imaging and Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molloi, S [University of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Li, B [Boston University Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States); Yin, F [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Chen, H [New York Presbyterian Hospital, New York, NY (United States)

    2014-06-15

    classification based on calcium scores shows excellent agreement with classification on the basis of conventional coronary artery calcium scoring. These studies demonstrate dual-energy cardiovascular CT can potentially be a noninvasive and sensitive modality in high risk patients. On-board KV/MV Imaging. To enhance soft tissue contrast and reduce metal artifacts, we have developed a dual-energy CBCT technique and a novel on-board kV/MV imaging technique based on hardware available on modern linear accelerators. We have also evaluated the feasibility of these two techniques in various phantom studies. Optimal techniques (energy, beam filtration, # of overlapping projections, etc) have been investigated with unique calibration procedures, which leads to successful decomposition of imaged material into acrylic-aluminum basis material pair. This enables the synthesis of virtual monochromatic (VM) CBCT images that demonstrate much less beam hardening, significantly reduced metal artifacts, and/or higher soft tissue CNR compared to single-energy CBCT. Adaptive Radiation Therapy. DECT could actually contribute to the area of Dose-Guided Radiation Therapy (or Adaptive Therapy). The application of DECT imaging using 80kV and 140 kV combinations could potentially increase the image quality by reducing the bone or high density material artifacts and also increase the soft tissue contrast by a light contrast agent. The result of this higher contrast / quality images is beneficial for deformable image registration / segmentation algorithm to improve its accuracy hence to make adaptive therapy less time consuming in its recontouring process. The real time re-planning prior to per treatment fraction could become more realistic with this improvement especially in hypofractional SBRT cases. Learning Objectives: Learn recent developments of dual-energy imaging in diagnosis and radiation therapy; Understand the unique clinical problem and required quantification accuracy in each application

  8. Patients with IBD are exposed to high levels of ionizing radiation through CT scan diagnostic imaging: a five-year study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroeker, Karen I; Lam, Simon; Birchall, Iain; Fedorak, Richard N

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the total effective dose of ionizing radiation from abdominal diagnostic imaging in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) over a 5-year period. Radiation exposure from diagnostic imaging is becoming increasingly common in IBD patients, in part due the availability of computed tomography (CT). Increased risk of malignancy has been associated with radiation exposure. This is a retrospective chart review. A university-based gastroenterology database was searched for patients with a diagnosis of Crohn's disease (CD) or ulcerative colitis (UC) seen between 2003 and 2008. The cumulative ionizing radiation exposure, expressed in milli-Sieverts (mSv), was then calculated from standard tables and by counting the number of abdominal imaging studies. Patients with CD had higher cumulative radiation exposure from diagnostic imaging than patients with UC (14.3 ± 1.45 mSv/5-y period vs. 5.9 ± 0.81 mSv/5-y period, P=0.00003). Three-quarters of the radiation exposure in both CD and UC was from CT scans. Thirty-four percent (127 of 373) of CD patients had CT scans, compared with just 20% (37 of 182) of UC patients. Importantly, 7% of CD patients were exposed to high levels of radiation (>50 mSv/5 y), in contrast to none of the UC patients. Patients with IBD, and especially CD patients, undergo frequent diagnostic imaging and thus significant exposure to ionizing radiation. This radiation exposure reaches high levels in 7% of CD patients, mainly from CT scanning. Efforts should be made to minimize the radiation exposure from diagnostic imaging by reducing either the number of studies or radiation dose in modalities with ionizing radiation.

  9. Should excretory urography be used as a routine diagnostic procedure in patients with acute ureteric colic: A single center study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osama A Samara

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to find an accurate, easily available and safe imaging modality as an alternative to intravenous urography for the diagnosis of acute urinary obstruction. This retrospective study included 332 patients, who underwent both excretory urography (EU preceeded by plain radiograph as well as ultrasonography for evaluation of acute flank pain. There were 198 male and 134 female patients. The presence or absence of urinary stones, level of obstruction, excretion delay on EU and dilated excretory system on either or both techniques were recorded. The sensitivity, specificity, predictive values, and accuracy for plain radiograph, ultrasonography, and for both modalities together were measured considering EU as a standard reference. The sensitivity and specificity of combined plain radiograph and ultrasound were 97% and 67%, respectively, with positive and negative predictive values and accuracy rates of 92%, 99%, and 97%, respectively. Our study suggests that the combination of plain radiograph and ultrasonography yields a high sensitivity, negative predictive value, and accuracy in depiction of urinary stones. Thus, EU need not be used as a routine diagnostic procedure in patients with acute obstructive uropathy.

  10. Should excretory urography be used as a routine diagnostic procedure in patients with acute ureteric colic: a single center study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samara, Osama A; Haroun, Dina A; Ashour, Do'a Z; Tarawneh, Emad S; Haroun, Azmi A

    2011-05-01

    The aim of this study was to find an accurate, easily available and safe imaging modality as an alternative to intravenous urography for the diagnosis of acute urinary obstruction. This retrospective study included 332 patients, who underwent both excretory urography (EU) preceeded by plain radiograph as well as ultrasonography for evaluation of acute flank pain. There were 198 male and 134 female patients. The presence or absence of urinary stones, level of obstruction, excretion delay on EU and dilated excretory system on either or both techniques were recorded. The sensitivity, specificity, predictive values, and accuracy for plain radiograph, ultrasonography, and for both modalities together were measured considering EU as a standard reference. The sensitivity and specificity of combined plain radiograph and ultrasound were 97% and 67%, respectively, with positive and negative predictive values and accuracy rates of 92%, 99%, and 97%, respectively. Our study suggests that the combination of plain radiograph and ultrasonography yields a high sensitivity, negative predictive value, and accuracy in depiction of urinary stones. Thus, EU need not be used as a routine diagnostic procedure in patients with acute obstructive uropathy.

  11. Radiation protection in dentistry. Recommended safety procedures for the use of dental x-ray equipment. Safety code 30

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The Radiation Protection Bureau has prepared a series of documents on safety codes to set out requirements for the safe use of radiation-emitting equipment. This Safety Code has been prepared to provide specific guidance to the dentist, dental hygienist, dental assistant and other support personnel concerned with safety procedures and equipment performance. Dental radiography is one of the most valuable tools used in modern dental health care. It makes possible the diagnosis of physical conditions that would otherwise be difficult to identify. The use of dental radiological procedures must be carefully managed, because x-radiation has the potential for damaging healthy cells and tissues. Although no known occurrence of cancer or genetic damage has been observed from radiation doses delivered in modern dentistry, and until more evidence is available, one should practice radiation hygiene with the same care as would be dictated if a hazard were known to exist. The aim of radiation protection in dentistry is to obtain the desired clinical information with minimal radiation exposure to patients, dental personnel and the public. 15 tabs

  12. On Application of Inverse Radon Transform for Diagnostics of Asymetric Plasmatic Radiation Sources

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hlína, Jan; Chvála, František

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 4 (2006), s. 317-325 ISSN 0001-7043 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA202/04/1341; GA ČR(CZ) GA202/05/0728 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20570509 Keywords : radiating plasma * radiation intensity * side-on radiation profiles Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics

  13. Radiation protection in medical research. Licensing requirement for the use of radiation and advice for the application procedure; Strahlenschutz in der medizinischen Forschung. Genehmigungsbeduerftigkeit von Strahlenanwendungen und Hinweise zum Antragsverfahren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minkov, V.; Klammer, H.; Brix, G. [Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz, Abteilung fuer medizinischen und beruflichen Strahlenschutz, Neuherberg (Germany)

    2017-07-15

    In Germany, persons who are to be exposed to radiation for medical research purposes are protected by a licensing requirement. However, there are considerable uncertainties on the part of the applicants as to whether licensing by the competent Federal Office for Radiation Protection is necessary, and regarding the choice of application procedure. The article provides explanatory notes and practical assistance for applicants and an outlook on the forthcoming new regulations concerning the law on radiation protection of persons in the field of medical research. Questions and typical mistakes in the application process were identified and evaluated. The qualified physicians involved in a study are responsible for deciding whether a license is required for the intended application of radiation. The decision can be guided by answering the key question whether the study participants would undergo the same exposures regarding type and extent if they had not taken part in the study. When physicians are still unsure about their decision, they can seek the advisory service provided by the professional medical societies. Certain groups of people are particularly protected through the prohibition or restriction of radiation exposure. A simplified licensing procedure is used for a proportion of diagnostic procedures involving radiation when all related requirements are met; otherwise, the regular licensing procedure should be used. The new radiation protection law, which will enter into force on the 31st of december 2018, provides a notification procedure in addition to deadlines for both the notification and the licensing procedures. In the article, the authors consider how eligible studies involving applications of radiation that are legally not admissible at present may be feasible in the future, while still ensuring a high protection level for study participants. (orig.) [German] Personen, bei denen Strahlenanwendungen zum Zweck der medizinischen Forschung durchgefuehrt

  14. Radiation doses in pediatric computed tomography procedures: challenges facing new technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cotelo, E.; Padilla, M.; Dibarboure, L.

    2008-01-01

    Despite the fact that in recent years an increasing number of radiologists and radiological technologists have been applying radiation dose optimization techniques in paediatric Computed Tomography (CT) examinations, dual and multi -slice CT (MSCT) scanners present a new challenge in Radiation Protection (RP). While on one hand these scanners are provided with Automatic Exposure Control (AEC) devices, dose reduction modes and dose estimation software, on the other hand Quality Control (QC) tests and CT Kerma Index (C) measurements and patient dose estimation present specific difficulties and require changes or adaptations of traditional QC protocols. This implies a major challenge in most developing countries where Quality Assurance Programmes (QAP) have not been implemented yet and there is a shortage in the number of medical physicists This paper analyses clinical and technical protocols as well as patient doses in 204 CT body procedures performed in 154 children. The investigation was carried out in a paediatric reference hospital of Uruguay, where are performed an average of 450 paediatric CT examinations per month in a sole CT dual scanner. Besides, C VOL reported from the scanner display was registered in order to be related with the same dosimetric quantity derived from technical parameters and C values published on tables. Results showed that not all the radiologists applied the same protocol in similar clinical situations delivering unnecessary patient dose with no significant differences in image quality. Moreover, it was found that dose reduction modes represent a drawback in order to estimate patient dose when mA changes according to tissue attenuation, in most cases in each rotation. The study concluded on the importance of QAP that must include education on RP of radiologists and technologists, as well as in the need of medical physicists to perform QC tests and patient dose estimations and measurements. (author)

  15. Evaluation of radiation protection and technical procedures in Wad Madani Heart Diseases and Surgery Center (WHDSC) (cardiac catheterization laboratory)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gesmallah, A. H. A.

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this study is conducted in order to evaluate the application of radiation protection program, evaluate the design of cardiac catheterization laboratory, evaluate the effectiveness of radiation protection devices, evaluate personal monitoring, usage of G-Arm x-ray machine, to evaluate the responsibilities of radiation protection officer (RPO), to assess monitoring devices if available, and to assess patient patient dose in Wad Madani hear disease and surgery center in a period from march 2013 to june 2013. The most data in this study was obtained from the results of the team of quality assurance and control of radiation safety institute when they visited hospital on 14/2/2011 for inspection and calibration for issue of registration and licenses, except the data of patients dose which obtained from exposure parameters and dosimetric information's in the archive of G-arm x-ray fluoroscopic machine (which were 110 of cardiac catheterization diagnostic and therapeutic cases, 60 of adult patients and 50 of children. The patient data included age, weight, kv, mAs, DAP, air kerma, and fluoro time. The results of this study show that there is radiation protection program need correction and partially applied, the design of cardiac catheterization laboratory is accepted according to radiation safety institute team of quality control. Also the study shows that the radiation protection program devices are available and good condition and enough in number. The study shows that there are no personal monitoring devices and services and the radiological technologist are well trained to dial with the G-arm x-ray machine and to apply the radiation protection program effectively. Also the study states that the radiation protection officer could apply his responsibilities partially. Finally the study shows that there is a direct linear relationship between the patient's weight and (DAP, air kerma, kv, and mAs) concludes that there is excessive radiation dose in cardiac

  16. Dose and diagnostic performance comparison between phase-contrast mammography with synchrotron radiation and digital mammography: a clinical study report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedon, Christian; Rigon, Luigi; Arfelli, Fulvia; Dreossi, Diego; Quai, Elisa; Tonutti, Maura; Tromba, Giuliana; Cova, Maria Assunta; Longo, Renata

    2018-01-01

    Two dosimetric quantities [mean glandular dose (MGD) and entrance surface air kerma (ESAK)] and the diagnostic performance of phase-contrast mammography with synchrotron radiation (MSR) are compared to conventional digital mammography (DM). Seventy-one patients (age range, 41 to 82 years) underwent MSR after a DM examination if questionable or suspicious breast abnormalities were not clarified by ultrasonography. The MGD and the ESAK delivered in both examinations were evaluated and compared. Two on-site radiologists rated the images in consensus according to the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System assessment categories, which were then correlated with the final diagnoses by means of statistical generalized linear models (GLMs). Receiver operating characteristic curves were also used to assess the diagnostic performance by comparing the area under the curve (AUC). An important MGD and ESAK reduction was observed in MSR due to the monoenergetic beam. In particular, an average 43% reduction was observed for the MGD and a reduction of more than 50% for the ESAK. GLM showed higher diagnostic accuracy, especially in terms of specificity, for MSR, confirmed by AUC analysis ([Formula: see text]). The study design implied that the population was characterized by a high prevalence of disease and that the radiologists, who read the DM images before referring the patient to MSR, could have been influenced in their assessments. Within these limitations, the use of synchrotron radiation with the phase-contrast technique applied to mammography showed an important dose reduction and a higher diagnostic accuracy compared with DM. These results could further encourage research on the translation of x-ray phase-contrast imaging into the clinics.

  17. Radiation safety and quality in diagnostic x-ray imaging 2001; Saeteilyturvallisuus ja laatu roentgendiagnostiikassa 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Servomaa, A.; Parviainen, T. (eds.)

    2001-05-01

    The obligations of the medical exposure directive (97/43/Euratom) for hospitals dominate the current activities in radiation protection in medical radiology. The directive gives special emphasis to radiation exposure of children, to examinations with high radiation doses and to radiation exposure in health screening programmes. The most important examinations with high doses are radiological interventions, where even acute skin effects are possible, and the computed tomography where the number of CT examinations makes only about 5% from the total number of x-ray examinations but the collective effective dose about 40% from the combined collective effective dose of all x-ray examinations. In the research projects financed by the European Commission, radiation exposures to paediatric patients have been measured in radiography, fluoroscopy and CT, and various dose assessment methods have been compared to develop a method for national follow-up of patients' radiation dose. The newest research project is focused on dosimetry and quality assurance in interventional radiology and digital imaging. Other actual topics are the development of radiation protection regulations and quality systems, education and training programmes, and clinical audits. This report deals with new radiation protection guides and recommendations and the education and training of radiological staff in radiation protection. One important topic is the development of national follow-up method of radiation exposure to patients and comparison of various dose assessment methods. Quality assurance in health care and in paediatric radiology, and the acceptance test and quality assurance measurements of radiological equipment are also described. (orig.)

  18. The radiation protection principles model as a tool in the e-waste procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsitomeneas, S. Th., E-mail: stsit@teipir.gr [Piraeus University of Applied Sciences, Aigaleo (Greece); Vourlias, K., E-mail: kvourlias@yahoo.gr [Aristotle University of Thessaloniki (Greece); Geronikolou, St. A., E-mail: sgeronik@bioacademy.gr [Biomedical Research Foundation Academy of Athens, Athens (Greece)

    2016-03-25

    The electrical and electronic waste (e-waste) management is a global environmental problem dominated by the precautionary principle application, resulted to preliminary and ambiguous potential adverse effects, of extensive scientific uncertainty. In order to overcome the detected stochastic effects confusions in this field, we propose the inclusion of the principles of justification-optimization-limitation and of prudent avoidance. This model is already, established in radiation protection, so that toxicity as a result of the e-waste management would decrease, whilst the precious metals would be saved. We, further, resolve the classification of rejected items as reusable or as waste, so that the procedure of dismantling and recycling becomes easier, and the collecting-transporting-placement at an e-waste landfill would be safer. In conclusion, our proposing pattern in the e-waste management enforces the sustainable reducing-reusing-recycling, saves time/money and advances safety by including more sources of e-waste (military, medical etc) that were excluded previously.

  19. The radiation protection principles model as a tool in the e-waste procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsitomeneas, S. Th.; Vourlias, K.; Geronikolou, St. A.

    2016-01-01

    The electrical and electronic waste (e-waste) management is a global environmental problem dominated by the precautionary principle application, resulted to preliminary and ambiguous potential adverse effects, of extensive scientific uncertainty. In order to overcome the detected stochastic effects confusions in this field, we propose the inclusion of the principles of justification-optimization-limitation and of prudent avoidance. This model is already, established in radiation protection, so that toxicity as a result of the e-waste management would decrease, whilst the precious metals would be saved. We, further, resolve the classification of rejected items as reusable or as waste, so that the procedure of dismantling and recycling becomes easier, and the collecting-transporting-placement at an e-waste landfill would be safer. In conclusion, our proposing pattern in the e-waste management enforces the sustainable reducing-reusing-recycling, saves time/money and advances safety by including more sources of e-waste (military, medical etc) that were excluded previously.

  20. A strategy to optimize radiation exposure for non-contrast head CT: comparison with the Japanese diagnostic reference levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumamaru, Kanako K; Kogure, Yosuke; Suzuki, Michimasa; Hori, Masaaki; Nakanishi, Atsushi; Kamagata, Koji; Hagiwara, Akifumi; Andica, Christina; Ri, Keiken; Houshido, Naoyoshi; Aoki, Shigeki

    2016-06-01

    To describe how we performed a protocol review, analyzed data, identified opportunities to reduce radiation exposure, and then implemented a new imaging protocol for non-contrast adult head CT at our institution with reduced radiation exposure, using the Japanese diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) as the reference. After analyzing the CT dose index (CTDIvol) and dose length product (DLP) in all non-contrast adult head CT examinations performed during a 3-month period (September to November 2015) in order to identify a specific protocol that contributed to the above-DRL-level radiation exposure observed for non-contrast adult head CT at our institution, phantom studies with objective and subjective image quality analyses were performed to develop a new imaging protocol. After implementing the new protocol, its feasibility was evaluated in terms of radiation exposure, prevalence of significant disease detection, and subjective image quality. The review of 2040 examinations revealed that a helical protocol (CTDIvol = 93.4 mGy) with one of four CT scanners mainly contributed to the above-DRL-level radiation exposure (mean DLP at this scanner = 1401.2 mGy cm) in non-contrast adult head CT at our institution. To replace this protocol, the phantom study identified a wide-volume scan using 120 kVp, 350 mAs, a 4-cm detector, a slice thickness of 5 mm, and a CTDIvol of 69.8 mGy as a new protocol that yielded comparable image quality to the existing protocol. After the implementation of the new protocol, the overall mean DLP reduced to 1365 mGy cm without any apparent degradation of image quality. No significant decrease in the prevalence of significant findings after protocol revision was noted. We report the successful implementation of a new protocol with reduced radiation exposure for non-contrast head CT examinations.

  1. The ICRP principles applied to radiation protection of the patient in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlsson, S.; Mattsson, S.

    1994-01-01

    The International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP) has published new recommendations in Publication 60. These take account of the new biological information and trends in the setting of radiation protection standards since 1977. The main principle for radiation protection of the patient is that the exposure should be justified not only at a broad level but also with respect to the individual patient. Protection arrangements should be optimised using reference dose levels as an upper bound of the optimisation process. The reference levels should be applied with flexibility and based on sound clinical judgement. (authors)

  2. Interview - a method for diagnostic and attitude formation to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsarova, N.; Katsarov, V.; Belcheva, Yu.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the experimental methodological model used for analyses of attitude changes. The analysis has been performed using two inquiries about ionizing radiation applications between 48 high level school students in Plovdiv, Bulgaria

  3. Fluoroscopically Guided Interventional Procedures: A Review of Radiation Effects on Patients’ Skin and Hair

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-01

    Upton AC . Medical effects of ionizing radiation . Philadelphia, Pa : Saunders/ Elsevier , 2008 . 50 . Trott K , Kummermehr J...Radiation effects in skin . In: Scherer E , Streffer C , Trott K , eds. Radiopathology of organs and tissues . Berlin, Germany : Springer

  4. Transition in occupational radiation exposure monitoring methods in diagnostic and interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loennroth, N.; Hirvonen-Kari, M.; Timonen, M.; Savolainen, S.; Kortesniemi, M.

    2008-01-01

    Radiation exposure monitoring is a traditional keystone of occupational radiation safety measures in medical imaging. The aim of this study was to review the data on occupational exposures in a large central university hospital radiology organisation and propose changes in the radiation worker categories and methods of exposure monitoring. An additional objective was to evaluate the development of electronic personal dosimeters and their potential in the digitised radiology environment. The personal equivalent dose of 267 radiation workers (116 radiologists and 151 radiographers) was monitored using personal dosimeters during the years 2006-2010. Accumulated exposure monitoring results exceeding the registration threshold were observed in the personal dosimeters of 73 workers (59 radiologists' doses ranged from 0.1 to 45.1 mSv; 14 radiographers' doses ranged from 0.1 to 1.3 mSv). The accumulated personal equivalent doses are generally very small, only a few angiography radiologists have doses >10 mSv per 5 y. The typical effective doses are -1 and the highest value was 0.3 mSv (single interventional radiologist). A revised categorisation of radiation workers based on the working profile of the radiologist and observed accumulated doses is justified. Occupational monitoring can be implemented mostly with group dosimeters. An active real-time dosimetry system is warranted to support radiation protection strategy where optimisation aspects, including improving working methods, are essential. (authors)

  5. Quality initiatives: CT radiation dose reduction: how to implement change without sacrificing diagnostic quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamm, Eric P; Rong, X John; Cody, Dianna D; Ernst, Randy D; Fitzgerald, Nancy E; Kundra, Vikas

    2011-01-01

    The risks and benefits of using computed tomography (CT) as opposed to another imaging modality to accomplish a particular clinical goal should be weighed carefully. To accurately assess radiation risks and keep radiation doses as low as reasonably achievable, radiologists must be knowledgeable about the doses delivered during various types of CT studies performed at their institutions. The authors of this article propose a process improvement approach that includes the estimation of effective radiation dose levels, formulation of dose reduction goals, modification of acquisition protocols, assessment of effects on image quality, and implementation of changes necessary to ensure quality. A first step toward developing informed radiation dose reduction goals is to become familiar with the radiation dose values and radiation-associated health risks reported in the literature. Next, to determine the baseline dose values for a CT study at a particular institution, dose data can be collected from the CT scanners, interpreted, tabulated, and graphed. CT protocols can be modified to reduce overall effective dose by using techniques such as automated exposure control and iterative reconstruction, as well as by decreasing the number of scanning phases, increasing the section thickness, and adjusting the peak voltage (kVp setting), tube current-time product (milliampere-seconds), and pitch. Last, PDSA (plan, do, study, act) cycles can be established to detect and minimize negative effects of dose reduction methods on image quality.

  6. Radiation exposure during follow-up of adults with congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoffmann, Andreas; Engelfriet, Peter; Mulder, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    Adult patients with congenital heart disease under follow-up often need to undergo diagnostic procedures which expose them to radiation. To evaluate radiation doses in adult patients with congenital heart disease during follow-up. Data on diagnostic procedures were used from the European Heart

  7. Radiation exposure of the Italian population due to medical diagnostic examinations in 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benassai, S.; Curatolo, M.; Dobici, F.; Indovina, P.L.; Pugliani, L.; Salvadori, P.

    1977-01-01

    The genetically significant dose received by the Italian population in 1975 due to the diagnostic X-ray examinations and radiopharmaceuticals was investigated and the results are presented. Concerning the diagnostic X-ray examinations the data were obtained by a representative sample and extrapolated over the whole population with reference to the over-all X-ray film consumption. From the reported data it can be concluded that about 50% of population was subjected to X-ray examinations and the genetically significant dose amounts to about 30 mrem. With reference to diagnostic use of radiopharmaceuticals the number of collected data was so large to be considered as representative of the situation. From the collected data it can be concluded that about 10% of population was subjected to these examinations and that the genetically significant dose is less than 2 mrem. Both for diagnostic X-ray examinations and use of radiopharmaceuticals results are here presented for the distribution of different uses and examinations. The genetically significant dose to which the Italian population was exposed in 1975 can be said to be of the order of 30 mrem. In view of lowering this dose some indications are presented with reference both to the legislative and technical measures

  8. Radiation protection in medicine (542) comparison of different dosimetry systems for dose measurements in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milkovic, D.; Ranogajec-Komor, M.; Miljanic, S.; Knezevic, Z.; Krpan, K.

    2006-01-01

    The dose measurement on patients in X-ray diagnostic is not simple, because low doses with low and various energies have to be measured. The aim of this preliminary study was to compare high sensitivity thermoluminescent dosimeter (T.L.D.) (LiF:Mg,Cu,P) and radio-photoluminescent (R.P.L.) glass dosimeters for dose measurements in routine X-ray diagnostic of chest of children. The energy dependence of the dosimeters was investigated in Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory (SSDL). The energy range was 33- 65 keV mean energy, the dosimeters were placed free in air and on the water phantom. The results were compared to calculated values of Hp(10). The next step was the irradiation in a routine X-ray diagnostic unit. Irradiations were performed by the Shimadzu X-ray unit. The selected irradiation conditions were the same as that most commonly used for baby examinations. Doses were measured with dosimeters placed free-in-air and also with the dosimeters placed on the water phantom and baby phantom. The results show that the R.P.L. glass dosimeters and LiF:Mg,Cu,P based T.L.D. are suitable for low dose measurements in X-ray diagnostic. The uncertainty of dose determination is mainly caused by the energy dependence of dosimeters. (authors)

  9. Radiation protection in medicine (542) comparison of different dosimetry systems for dose measurements in diagnostic radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milkovic, D. [Srebrnjak, Specialized Hospital for Respiratory System Diseases in Children and Youth, Zagreb (Croatia); Ranogajec-Komor, M.; Miljanic, S.; Knezevic, Z.; Krpan, K. [Ruder Boskovic Institute, Zagreb (Croatia)

    2006-07-01

    The dose measurement on patients in X-ray diagnostic is not simple, because low doses with low and various energies have to be measured. The aim of this preliminary study was to compare high sensitivity thermoluminescent dosimeter (T.L.D.) (LiF:Mg,Cu,P) and radio-photoluminescent (R.P.L.) glass dosimeters for dose measurements in routine X-ray diagnostic of chest of children. The energy dependence of the dosimeters was investigated in Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory (SSDL). The energy range was 33- 65 keV mean energy, the dosimeters were placed free in air and on the water phantom. The results were compared to calculated values of Hp(10). The next step was the irradiation in a routine X-ray diagnostic unit. Irradiations were performed by the Shimadzu X-ray unit. The selected irradiation conditions were the same as that most commonly used for baby examinations. Doses were measured with dosimeters placed free-in-air and also with the dosimeters placed on the water phantom and baby phantom. The results show that the R.P.L. glass dosimeters and LiF:Mg,Cu,P based T.L.D. are suitable for low dose measurements in X-ray diagnostic. The uncertainty of dose determination is mainly caused by the energy dependence of dosimeters. (authors)

  10. ESTIMATION OF CARDIAC CT ANGIOGRAPHY RADIATION DOSE TOWARD THE ESTABLISHMENT OF NATIONAL DIAGNOSTIC REFERENCE LEVEL FOR CCTA IN IRAN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini Nasab, Seyed Mohammad Bagher; Shabestani-Monfared, Ali; Deevband, Mohammad Reza; Paydar, Reza; Nabahati, Mehrdad

    2017-05-01

    In recent years, with the introduction of 64-slice CT and dual-source CT technology, coronary CT angiography (CCTA) has emerged as a useful diagnostic imaging modality as a non-invasive assessment of coronary heart disease. CT produces a larger radiation dose than other imaging tests and cardiac CT involves higher radiation dose with the advances in the spatial and temporal resolution. The aims of this study are patient dose assessment and establishment of national diagnostic reference level for CCTA in Iran. A questionnaire was sent to CCTA centers. Data for patient and CT protocols were obtained. The volumetric CT dose index (CTDIvol), dose length product (DLP) and total DLP were considered in the 32 cm standard body phantom. Calculation of estimated effective dose (ED) was obtained by multiplying the DLP by a conversion factor [k = 0.014 mSv (mGy·cm)-1]. Mean value of CTDIvol and DLP for CCTA was 50 mGy and 825 mGy·cm. The third quartile (75th) of the distribution of mean CTDIvol (66.54 mGy) and DLP (1073 mGy·cm) values was expressed as the diagnostic reference level (DRL) for CCTA in Iran. The median of ED was 10.26 mSv and interquartile range of ED was 7.08-15.03 mSv. A large variety in CTDIvol and DLP among CT scanner and different sites due to variability in CT parameter is noted. It seems that training could help to reduce patient's dose. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Coherent transition radiation from a laser wakefield accelerator as an electron bunch diagnostic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tilborg, J. van; Geddes, C.G.R.; Toth, C.; Esarey, E.; Schroeder, C.B.; Martin, M.C.; Hao, Z.; Leemans, W.P.

    2004-01-01

    The observation and modeling of coherent transition radiation from femtosecond laser accelerated electron bunches is discussed. The coherent transition radiation, scaling quadratically with bunch charge, is generated as the electrons transit the plasma-vacuum boundary. Due to the limited transverse radius of the plasma boundary, diffraction effects will strongly modify the angular distribution and the total energy radiated is reduced compared to an infinite transverse boundary. The multi-nC electron bunches, concentrated in a length of a few plasma periods (several tens of microns), experience partial charge neutralization while propagating inside the plasma towards the boundary. This reduces the space-charge blowout of the beam, allowing for coherent radiation at relatively high frequencies (several THz). The charge distribution of the electron bunch at the plasma-vacuum boundary can be derived from Fourier analysis of the coherent part of the transition radiation spectrum. A Michelson interferometer was used to measure the coherent spectrum, and electron bunches with duration on the order of 50 fs (rms) were observed

  12. Feasibility of optical diffraction radiation for a non-invasive low-emittance beam diagnostics

    CERN Document Server

    Urakawa, J; Kubo, K; Kuroda, S; Terunuma, N; Kuriki, M; Okugi, T; Naito, T; Araki, S; Potylitsin, A P; Naumenko, G A; Karataev, P; Potylitsyna, N A; Vnukov, I; Hirose, T; Hamatsu, R; Muto, T; Ikezawa, M; Shibata, Y

    2001-01-01

    A 'proof-of-principle' experiment on the optical diffraction radiation (ODR) as a single-pulse beam profile monitor is planned using an electron beam extracted from the KEK-ATF damping ring. The main goals of this experiment are the following: (i) To measure the yield and the angular distributions of the optical diffraction radiation from a large-size target at different wavelengths, impact parameters and beam characteristics for a comparison with analogous characteristics of optical transition radiation from a foil with identical optical parameters and for a verification of the model assumption (perfectly conducting semi-infinite target). (ii) To investigate the ODR angular distributions from a tilted target with a slit for observing the interference effects. (iii) To compare the results obtained by simulations based on classical approaches, taking into account the optical characteristics of the equipment and the beam parameters. (iv) To estimate the prospects of using ODR as a new non-invasive tool for ultr...

  13. Diagnostic value of 18F-FDG uptake by spleen in acute radiation disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao-jie WU

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate whether 18F-FDG uptake can be applied in dosimetry to facilitate a rapid and accurate evaluation of individual radiation dosage after a nuclear accident. Methods Forty-eight Tibetan minipigs were randomly assigned into 6 groups, i.e., 0, 1, 2, 5, 8 and 11Gy groups. Animals in all except 0Gy group received total body irradiation (TBI with a 8MV X centrifugal linear accelerator, and 18F-FDG combined positron-emission tomography and computed tomography (PET/CT were carried out before TBI, and also at 6, 24 and 72h after receiving TBI in different doses ranging from 1 to 11Gy. Spleen tissues and blood samples were collected for histological examination, apoptosis, and routine blood analysis. Results Mean standardized uptake values (SUVs of the spleen showed significant differences between experimental groups and control group. The spleen SUVs at 6h post-irradiation showed significant correlation with radiation dose; Spearman's correlation coefficient was 0.95(P<0.01. Histopathological observations showed that the degree of splenic damage was proportional to the radiation dose. Moreover, flow cytometry revealed that apoptosis was one of the major forms of splenic lymphocyte death. Conclusion In the Tibetan minipig model, it was shown that radiation doses bear a close relationship with the 18F-FDG uptake of spleen. This finding suggests that 18F-FDG PET/CT may be useful for the rapid detection of individual radiation dosage after acute radiation disease (ARD. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2015.07.08

  14. Dose assessment and radioprotective medical evaluation of prenatal radiation exposures to diagnostic X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruening, L.; Haehnel, S.; Arndt, D.

    1989-01-01

    The 2nd to 15th weeks after conception are assessed to be the critical time period for the induction of teratogenic radiation damage. In the GDR, women having incurred fetal doses in excess of 100 mGy are recommended to interrupt pregnancy. Of 275 patients advised in the National Board for Atomic Safety and Radiation Protection between 1978 and 1988, approximately 90% were found to have received fetal doses below 20 mGy. Only 4 women had been exposed to doses above 100 mGy. Exposure data were given in the form of tables, and discussed. (author)

  15. The impact of altering filling pressures in diagnostic outpatient hysteroscopy on the procedure completion rates and associated pain: a randomised double-blind controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haggag, Hisham M; Hassan, AbdelGany M A

    2016-02-01

    Several studies have compared different distension media and analgesics to optimise the efficiency of outpatient hysteroscopy. However, studies comparing different uterine filling pressures are scarce. The objective of this study was to evaluate and compare different uterine filling pressures during diagnostic outpatient hysteroscopy in an attempt to find the optimal pressure allowing adequate visualisation while minimising pain and increasing patient satisfaction. This was a double-blind randomised controlled trial. A total of 240 women who had diagnostic outpatient hysteroscopy were randomly divided into three equal groups: the uterine filling pressure was 30 mm Hg in group 1, 50 mm Hg in group 2 and 80 mm Hg in group 3. The primary outcome was adequate visualisation, and secondary outcomes were the proportion of completed procedures, pain perceived during the procedure, immediately after the procedure and 30 min later. Adequate visualisation was lower in group 1 (88.7% vs 97.5% and 98.7%; P = 0.009), but was not different between groups 2 and 3 (P > 0.999). The proportion of completed procedures was not different among the groups. There was a progressive increase in pain scores from the lower to the higher pressure groups during the procedure, immediately after the procedure and 30 min after completing the procedure. Uterine filling pressure of 50 mm Hg was associated with better visualisation than 30 mm Hg and lower pain scores than that of 80 mmHg with no difference in the proportion of completed procedures. © 2015 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  16. Radiation doses to patients in medical diagnostic x-ray examinations in New Zealand: a 1983-84 survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williamson, B.D.P.; Poletti, J.L.; Cartwright, P.H.; Le Heron, J.C.

    1993-06-01

    A survey of doses to patients undergoing diagnostic x-ray examinations was performed in 1983-84. Developments since 1983-84 were reviewed and estimates made of the frequency of x-ray examinations, and doses to patients, as at 1992. The collective effective dose from general medical diagnostic radiology in 1983-84 was estimated to have been about 443 μSv per capita per annum. The figure excluded computed tomography which was estimated to have contributed about 5.6 μSv per capita per annum and mammography gave 0.3 μSv per annum. The total per capital effective dose from all medical diag over the whole period from 1983-84 to 1992. The highest dose examinations in 1983-84 were the fluoroscopic procedures barium enema and meal. Over the whole period 1983-84 to 1992 the genetically significant dose (GSD) to the population of New Zealand from medical diagnostic radiology was estimated to have been in the range 200-250 μSv per capita per annum. The two opposing tendencies noted for effective dose, viz, the fall in frequency of some examination types and the rise of Computed tomography, acted also upon this dose index. 43 refs., tabs., figs., ills

  17. Barytes board: a cost effective radiation barrier material for use in diagnostic x-ray suites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of barium based products in protective barrier materials proved successful for many years until their cost of manufacture and increases in labour costs for fixing and stopping saw the introduction of lead ply as the material of choice in diagnostic X-ray suites. Whilst the advantage of sheet lead as a barrier for diagnostic X-rays, where the photoelectric effect predominates is recognised, this precedence is somewhat negated by the high cost of manufacture and delays in supply. Lead lined ply also requires external cladding after erection for an acceptable finish to be obtained. Such cost increases have prompted us to re-evaluate the use of precast barium plaster sheets (Barytes Board) as an alternative barrier material

  18. Diagnostic radiation: a possible factor in malignancy in patients with chronic inflammatory bowel diseases and other essays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, A.G.

    1980-01-01

    This short book is a compilation of five papers that attempt to explore the potential radiation risk of bowel cancer in patients with inflammatory bowel disease who receive excessive diagnostic radiological examinations. The editor is a co-author for each paper and he wrote the preface. Each paper represents a short series of case histories: in three patients with inflammatory bowel disease, one ultimately developed colon cancer, one esophageal cancer, and one renal cancer; one patients with Crohn disease developed acute myelocytic leukemia; of four patients with renal calculi there were no cancers; one patient is discussed twice. In general, the authors use the same approach: in a small number of patients, the number of radiologic examinations and the number of x-ray films are recorded; the dosage for each patient is calculated with considerable precision from this information; the cancer risk in the absence of additional radiation is cited from the literature; and the probability of the radiation causation of the cancer is discussed, but not proven. (JMT)

  19. Exposure of the U.S. population from diagnostic medical radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    This publication includes a short introduction and overview, followed by a brief section on concepts, units, and quantities. Data sources, equipment availability and film usage, number and trends of examinations, demographics, differential trends, exposure and absorbed dose, quality assurance and dose reduction, gonadal and genetically significant doses, mean active bone marrow dose, somatic doses and effective dose equivalents, and future trends in diagnostic radiology are discussed. A summary is then presented

  20. A new diagnostic prospects: the application of synchroton radiation in the cardiac angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, A.R. de.

    1984-01-01

    The application of synchroton radiation by digital subtraction in cardiac angiography is studied. Preliminary researches with phantons, excised hearts of animals and in vivo tests with dogs are reported. The arteriography by synchroton X-ray beam is compared with arteriography by conventional way. (M.A.C.) [pt

  1. Array diagnostics, spatial resolution, and filtering of undesired radiation with the 3D reconstruction algorithm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cappellin, C.; Pivnenko, Sergey; Jørgensen, E.

    2013-01-01

    This paper focuses on three important features of the 3D reconstruction algorithm of DIATOOL: the identification of array elements improper functioning and failure, the obtainable spatial resolution of the reconstructed fields and currents, and the filtering of undesired radiation and scattering...

  2. Collective radiation dose from diagnostic x-ray examination in nine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Medical x-ray exposures have the largest man made source of population exposure to ionizing radiation in different countries. Recent developments in medical imaging have led to rapid increases in a number of high dose xray examinations performed with significant consequences for individual patient doses ...

  3. Procedures for estimating the radiation dose in the vicinity of uranium mines and mills by direct calculation methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coelho, C.P.

    1983-01-01

    A methodology for estimating the radiation doses to the members of the general public, in the vicinity of uranium mines and mills is presented. The data collected in the surveys performed to characterize the neighborhood of the site, and used in this work to estimate the radiation dose, are required by the Regulatory Body, for the purpose of Licensing. Initially, a description is shown of the main processing steps to obtain the uranium concentrate and the critical instalation radionuclides are identified. Following, some studies required to characterize the facility neighborhood are presented, specially those related to geography, demography, metheorology, hydrology and environmental protection. Also, the basic programs for monitoring the facility neighborhood in the pre-operational and operational phases are included. It is then proposed a procedure to estimate inhalation, ingestion and external doses. As an example, the proposed procedure is applied to a hypotetical site. Finally, some aspects related to the applicability of this work are discussed. (Author) [pt

  4. Benefits of inferential statistical methods in radiation exposure studies: another look at percutaneous spinal cord stimulation mapping [trialing] procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wininger, Kevin L

    2012-01-01

    Two studies, each consisting of large sample sets, were recently published on radiation exposure in percutaneous spinal cord stimulation (SCS) trialing procedures. A more rigorous use of statistical methods in the second study more accurately defined benchmark reference levels. Principally, one physician implanter-considered an advanced interventional pain physician-performed all such procedures to nullify inter-physician variability. However, the literature is sparse in articles comparing exposure levels of radiation in pain procedures conducted by novice and advanced interventionally trained physicians, and inferential statistical analysis is seldom included in radiation exposure studies. The aim of this study was to compare fluoroscopy times between novice and expert physician implanters performing SCS trialing procedures, and to the benchmarked reference level, using inferential statistical methods. As a secondary objective, the importance of statistical concepts in interpretive-imaging and image guidance studies for interventional pain procedures will be outlined. An observational study. A non-university outpatient Interventional Pain Management practice in the United States. Fluoroscopy time (in seconds) was retrospectively studied in 18 SCS trialing procedures (with dual lead placement in the low thoracic spine) performed over a 3-month period. The procedures were categorized by physician experience: one novice physician implanter with n = 5 cases and one expert physician implanter with n = 13 cases. All procedures were conducted with the same fluoroscope operator and the same mobile C-arm fluoroscopy system. A two-tailed t-test was used to compare mean fluoroscopy times between physician categories. Left-tailed t-tests were used to compare mean fluoroscopy times for each physician category separately to the benchmark level (μ = 71.7 seconds). Incident air kerma (KERMA) was assessed by nonsimplistic modeling. No statistical difference was found in mean

  5. Radiation dose reduction through combining positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) and diagnostic CT in children and young adults with lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Zhihua; Gates, Erica L; O'Brien, Maureen M; Trout, Andrew T

    2018-02-01

    Both [F-18]2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography ( 18 F-FDG PET/CT) and diagnostic CT are at times required for lymphoma staging. This means some body segments are exposed twice to X-rays for generation of CT data (diagnostic CT + localization CT). To describe a combined PET/diagnostic CT approach that modulates CT tube current along the z-axis, providing diagnostic CT of some body segments and localization CT of the remaining body segments, thereby reducing patient radiation dose. We retrospectively compared total patient radiation dose between combined PET/diagnostic CT and separately acquired PET/CT and diagnostic CT exams. When available, we calculated effective doses for both approaches in the same patient; otherwise, we used data from patients of similar size. To confirm image quality, we compared image noise (Hounsfield unit [HU] standard deviation) as measured in the liver on both combined and separately acquired diagnostic CT images. We used t-tests for dose comparisons and two one-sided tests for image-quality equivalence testing. Mean total effective dose for the CT component of the combined and separately acquired diagnostic CT exams were 6.20±2.69 and 8.17±2.61 mSv, respectively (Pdose savings with the combined approach was 24.8±17.8% (2.60±2.51 mSv [range: 0.32-4.72 mSv]) of total CT effective dose. Image noise was not statistically significantly different between approaches (12.2±1.8 HU vs. 11.7±1.5 HU for the combined and separately acquired diagnostic CT images, respectively). A combined PET/diagnostic CT approach as described offers dose savings at similar image quality for children and young adults with lymphoma who have indications for both PET and diagnostic CT examinations.

  6. Feasibility of diffraction radiation for noninvasive beam diagnostics as characterized in a storage ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobb, L.; Kieffer, R.; Lefevre, T.; Mazzoni, S.; Aumeyr, T.; Karataev, P.; Billing, M.; Conway, J.; Shanks, J.

    2018-03-01

    In recent years, there has been an increasing demand for noninvasive beam size monitoring on particle accelerators. Ideally, these monitors should be cost effective and require little or no maintenance. These monitors should also be suitable for both linear and circular machines. Here, the experimental setup is described in detail, and the results from a diffraction radiation beam size monitor are presented. This monitor has been tested on the Cornell Electron Storage Ring using a 1 mA (1.6 ×1010 particles per bunch) single bunch electron beam at 2.1 GeV energy. Images of the target surface and the angular distribution of the emitted diffraction radiation were acquired at wavelengths of 400 and 600 nm. These measurements are compared to two analytical models.

  7. The use of diagnostic computerized tomography and radiation therapy in canine and feline hyperadenocorticism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mauldin, G.N.; Burk, R.L.

    1990-01-01

    Therapy for canine pituitary-dependent Cushing's syndrome (PDC) has primarily been medical management with o,p'-DDD. This drug therapy does not directly affect the underlying pituitary pathology, and may have undesirable side effects. Pituitary-dependent Cushing's syndrome may be caused by pituitary microadenomas or macroadenomas. Advances in diagnostic imagery have allowed the antemortem diagnosis of pituitary macrotumors. Treatment of pituitary tumors may be attempted with radiotherapy, especially if a diagnosis of macrotumor can be made before the onset of profound neurologic signs

  8. Study of TJ-1 Tokamak plasmas with Thomson scattering and radiation diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pardo, C.; Zurro, B.

    1987-06-01

    The Thomson scattering system of TJ-1 is described in detail. The radial profiles of T e and n e obtained in TJ-1 discharges are presented. This data makes possible to deduce characteristic parameters of the plasma confinement in this machine, as energy confinement times, Z eff B. Using also radiation measurements (global and in the visible range) we obtained the particle confinement time and Z eff without non experimental assumptions. (author) 56 figs., 52 refs

  9. Diagnostic medical exposures: advice on exposure to ionising radiation during pregnancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    The NRPB offers advice on exposure to ionizing radiation during pregnancy, based on data published since 1985. In providing this advice the Board has considered risks to the developing embryo and fetus of death, malformation, mental impairment, cancer (solid tumours and leukaemias) and genetic damage from irradiation after the first missed menstrual period. The possible risks from irradiation of the early (up to 3-4 weeks) conceptus and from gonodal irradiation of patients is also covered in the present advice. (Author)

  10. Steps towards an individual treatment planning with the internal dosimetry of 18F-FDG as example for nuclear diagnostics and perspectives for internal radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaickner, M.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Moving towards a more individual treatment planning, the studies below describe the perspectives and methods both in nuclear diagnostics and in internal radiation therapy. With 18 F-FDG as example in nuclear diagnostics, a more pr