WorldWideScience

Sample records for diagnosing atopic eczema

  1. Atopic dermatitis, atopic eczema, or eczema?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kantor, R; Thyssen, J P; Paller, A S

    2016-01-01

    terms for AD. METHODS: A systematic review of the MEDLINE, EMBASE, and LILACS (1945-2016) for the terms AD, atopic eczema (AE), and multiple other eczematous disorders. RESULTS: In MEDLINE, 33 060 were identified, of which 21 299 (64.4%) publications used the term 'AD', 15 510 (46.9%) 'eczema', and only...

  2. Eczema, Atopic Dermatitis, or Atopic Eczema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Shuai; Thyssen, Jacob P; Paller, Amy S

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The lack of standardized nomenclature for atopic dermatitis (AD) creates challenges for scientific communication, patient education, and advocacy. OBJECTIVE: We sought to determine the relative popularity of the terms eczema, AD, and atopic eczema (AE) using global search engine volumes....... METHODS: A retrospective analysis of average monthly search volumes from 2014 to 2016 of Google, Bing/Yahoo, and Baidu was performed for eczema, AD, and AE in English and 37 other languages. Google Trends was used to determine the relative search popularity of each term from 2006 to 2016 in English...... and the top foreign languages, German, Turkish, Russian, and Japanese. RESULTS: Overall, eczema accounted for 1.5 million monthly searches (84%) compared with 247 000 searches for AD (14%) and 44 000 searches for AE (2%). For English language, eczema accounted for 93% of searches compared with 6% for AD and 1...

  3. A comparison between criteria for diagnosing atopic eczema in infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jøhnke, H; Vach, W; Norberg, L A

    2005-01-01

    ; and to describe the association between atopic heredity and postnatal sensitization, respectively, and the development of AE according to the different diagnostic criteria. METHODS: During a 1-year period a consecutive series of 1095 newborns and their parents were approached at the maternity ward at the Odense...

  4. Flexural eczema versus atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Sharon E; Goldenberg, Alina; Nedorost, Susan; Thyssen, Jacob P; Fonacier, Luz; Spiewak, Radoslaw

    2015-01-01

    Flexural eczema and atopic dermatitis are frequently synonymized. As respiratory atopy is rarely tested for and found in these patients, systematically equating a flexural distribution of dermatitis with atopic dermatitis may too frequently result in misclassified diagnoses and potentially missed opportunity for intervention toward improving patients' symptoms and quality of life. We present a critical review of the available evidence for the atopic dermatitis diagnosis and discuss the similarities between atopic dermatitis and allergic contact dermatitis. Because neither flexural predilection nor atopy is specific for atopic dermatitis, we conclude that the term atopic dermatitis is a misnomer and propose an etymologic reclassification of atopic dermatitis to "atopy-related" dermatitis. Allergic contact dermatitis can induce an atopic dermatitis-like phenotype, and thus, flexural dermatitis cannot be assumed as atopic without further testing. Patch testing should at least be considered in cases of chronic or recurrent eczema regardless of the working diagnosis.

  5. Flexural eczema versus atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacob, Sharon E; Goldenberg, Alina; Nedorost, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Flexural eczema and atopic dermatitis are frequently synonymized. As respiratory atopy is rarely tested for and found in these patients, systematically equating a flexural distribution of dermatitis with atopic dermatitis may too frequently result in misclassified diagnoses and potentially missed...... opportunity for intervention toward improving patients' symptoms and quality of life. We present a critical review of the available evidence for the atopic dermatitis diagnosis and discuss the similarities between atopic dermatitis and allergic contact dermatitis. Because neither flexural predilection nor...... atopy is specific for atopic dermatitis, we conclude that the term atopic dermatitis is a misnomer and propose an etymologic reclassification of atopic dermatitis to "atopy-related" dermatitis. Allergic contact dermatitis can induce an atopic dermatitis-like phenotype, and thus, flexural dermatitis...

  6. Tartrazine in atopic eczema.

    OpenAIRE

    Devlin, J; David, T J

    1992-01-01

    Multiple double blind placebo controlled challenges with tartrazine 50 mg (three challenges) and glucose placebo (three challenges) were performed in 12 children with atopic eczema aged 1 to 6 years. The children were selected on the basis of severity (regular clinic attenders) and a parental history that tartrazine provoked worsening of the eczema. In only one patient did the three tartrazine challenge periods correspond with the highest symptom scores or the highest physician observer score...

  7. Tartrazine in atopic eczema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devlin, J; David, T J

    1992-06-01

    Multiple double blind placebo controlled challenges with tartrazine 50 mg (three challenges) and glucose placebo (three challenges) were performed in 12 children with atopic eczema aged 1 to 6 years. The children were selected on the basis of severity (regular clinic attenders) and a parental history that tartrazine provoked worsening of the eczema. In only one patient did the three tartrazine challenge periods correspond with the highest symptom scores or the highest physician observer scores, and the probability of this occurring by chance in one or more patients out of 12 was 0.46. In this sample we were unable to confirm intolerance to tartrazine in 11 out of 12 patients.

  8. Tartrazine in atopic eczema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devlin, J; David, T J

    1992-01-01

    Multiple double blind placebo controlled challenges with tartrazine 50 mg (three challenges) and glucose placebo (three challenges) were performed in 12 children with atopic eczema aged 1 to 6 years. The children were selected on the basis of severity (regular clinic attenders) and a parental history that tartrazine provoked worsening of the eczema. In only one patient did the three tartrazine challenge periods correspond with the highest symptom scores or the highest physician observer scores, and the probability of this occurring by chance in one or more patients out of 12 was 0.46. In this sample we were unable to confirm intolerance to tartrazine in 11 out of 12 patients. PMID:1626990

  9. Eczema and Atopic Dermatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What treatment is best for me? Should I use a steroid cream or ointment? What are the side effects from the steroid cream or ointment? Do I need to take any other medicines? ... type of soap I should use? My child has eczema. What kind of moisturizer ...

  10. Probiotics and infantile atopic eczema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akelma AZ

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Ahmet Zülfikar Akelma,1 Aziz Alper Biten2 1Pediatric Allergy and Immunology Unit, Ankara Kecioren Teaching and Research Hospital, Ankara, Turkey; 2General Directorate of Management Services, Republic of Turkey Ministry of Health, Ankara, Turkey Abstract: Pediatric eczema is a common disease which causes economic and social burden. Its incidence differs among the societies, with an incidence reported to reach up to 20% in developed countries. Eczema is the first allergic disease seen in the childhood, and it is recognized as a precursor for the development of atopic diseases such as asthma, allergic rhinitis, and food allergy in the forthcoming years of children. Increased incidence of eczema in recent years has led to new research in epidemiology, prevention, and intervention of this disease. It is no doubt important to treat itching, rash, and excoriation of the skin; however, treatment of pediatric eczema should not be considered only as a treatment of skin lesions. Considering skin treatment as the tip of the iceberg, proper management of the allergic processes can be accepted as the rest of the iceberg. The role of probiotics in the prevention of atopic eczema is yet to be clarified. Evidence presented by existing studies suggesting that probiotics may prevent pediatric eczema is not strong enough. A positive effect, if any, may be related with onset time, dose, duration, and use of specific probiotics. To date, there is no strong evidence for use of probiotics in the treatment of eczema; however, administration of probiotics in breast-feeding mothers in the prenatal period and in infants in the postnatal period can be accepted as a safe and helpful option in the prevention of eczema. Nevertheless, there are still questions to be answered in the future about probiotic administration for eczema. Clinical use of probiotics will gradually become more widespread when these questions are answered. Based on current information, the administration

  11. Therapy of atopic eczema

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werfel, Thomas; Claes, Christa; Kulp, Werner; Greiner, Wolfgang; von der Schulenburg, Johann-Matthias

    2006-01-01

    Objectives Major objective is the evaluation of the medical effectiveness of different therapeutical approaches and the cost effectiveness with relevance for Germany. Methods This health technology assessment (HTA) evaluates systemically randomized controlled studies (RCT) on the therapy of atopic dermatitis which were published between 1999 and 2004. Further it includes some important clinical studies which have been published after 2004 and other updates the English HTA report by Hoare et al. [1]. Results Topical corticosteroids and topical calcineurin-inhibitors are the principal substances which are currently used for anti-inflammatory therapy in atopic dermatitis. These substances have shown a significant therapeutic efficacy in controlled studies. In newer controlled studies no difference was observable when corticosteroids were applied once or more than once daily onto the skin. Moreover, there is now one controlled study available which points to the fact that an interval therapy with a stronger topical corticosteroid over a limited time (some weeks) may lower the risk of recurrent flares of atopic dermatitis. Both topical calcineurin-inhibitors pimecrolimus and tacrolimus have shown a significant therapeutical efficacy in a number of placebo-controlled prospective studies. The wealth of data is high for these substances. Both substances have been shown to be efficient in infants, children and adult patients with atopic dermatitis. The importance of a so-called basic therapy with emollients which have to be adapted to the current status of skin is generally accepted in clinical practice. Controlled studies show the efficacy of ”basic therapy” - although the level of evidence is quite low for this approach. The skin of patients with atopic dermatitis is colonized in the majority with Staphylococcus aureus, a gram-positive bacterium. Therefore, a therapeutical approach for the treatment of atopic dermatitis is the anti-bacterial or anti-septic treatment

  12. 338 Early Clinical Differential Diagnosis between Infant Atopic Dermatitis and Seborrheic Eczema

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza Leite, Rubens Marcelo; Craveiro Leite, Adriana Aragao

    2012-01-01

    Background Clinical differential diagnosis between atopic dermatitis and seborrheic eczema is sometimes difficult. Early differential diagnosis is important, since atopic dermatitis can be more difficult to treat and may be associated with asthma and allergic rhinitis. Methods In a cohort study, 96 infants with high risk for atopic dermatitis were followed up from the maternal ward until they completed one year of age. The infants were submitted to complete skin examination, monthly, for a 1 year period. A full skin examination was performed and any sign of eczema was registered. Therapy with hydrocortisone 1% cream was prescribed. Eczema onset time, skin distribution, response to therapy and the presence of pruritus were evaluated. Results 87 (96%) infants fulfilled the study criteria (physical examination at least 10 months). Fivty four (62%) infants had signs of eczema during one year follow up. Atopic dermatitis was diagnosed in 14 (16%) patients and seborrheic eczema in 30 (34.5%) infants, with 10 (11.5%) classified as: both eczemas. Atopic eczema onset was mainly between 2 and 4 months and seborrheic eczema between 1 week and 3 months, with an important coincident period. Facial eczema had similar onset and semiological aspect for both diseases in its beginning. Head eczema was present in 40 (74%) eczema infants, 33 (82.5%) with a posterior diagnosis of seborrheic eczema and 7 (17.5%) with atopic dermatitis. After 3 to 5 months, axillar and groin folds eczema were the main signs of seborrheic dermatitis diagnosis, while face, neck and limbs were the main eczema sites in atopic dermatitis. The 10 infants with dubious eczema just after 6 months could have a more accurate eczema diagnosis. Hanifin et Rajka diagnostic criteria for infants showed to be useful just after 6 months, since some of its criteria are evolutive. All patients improved with hydrocortisone cream, but seborrheic eczema infants had a better response and prognosis, with complete eczema

  13. Eczema, Atopic Dermatitis, or Atopic Eczema: Analysis of Global Search Engine Trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shuai; Thyssen, Jacob P; Paller, Amy S; Silverberg, Jonathan I

    The lack of standardized nomenclature for atopic dermatitis (AD) creates challenges for scientific communication, patient education, and advocacy. We sought to determine the relative popularity of the terms eczema, AD, and atopic eczema (AE) using global search engine volumes. A retrospective analysis of average monthly search volumes from 2014 to 2016 of Google, Bing/Yahoo, and Baidu was performed for eczema, AD, and AE in English and 37 other languages. Google Trends was used to determine the relative search popularity of each term from 2006 to 2016 in English and the top foreign languages, German, Turkish, Russian, and Japanese. Overall, eczema accounted for 1.5 million monthly searches (84%) compared with 247 000 searches for AD (14%) and 44 000 searches for AE (2%). For English language, eczema accounted for 93% of searches compared with 6% for AD and 1% for AE. Search popularity for eczema increased from 2006 to 2016 but remained stable for AD and AE. Given the ambiguity of the term eczema, we recommend the universal use of the next most popular term, AD.

  14. Atopic dermatitis, atopic eczema, or eczema? A systematic review, meta-analysis, and recommendation for uniform use of 'atopic dermatitis'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantor, R; Thyssen, J P; Paller, A S; Silverberg, J I

    2016-10-01

    The lack of standardized nomenclature for atopic dermatitis (AD) creates unnecessary confusion for patients, healthcare providers, and researchers. It also negatively impacts accurate communication of research in the scientific literature. We sought to determine the most commonly used terms for AD. A systematic review of the MEDLINE, EMBASE, and LILACS (1945-2016) for the terms AD, atopic eczema (AE), and multiple other eczematous disorders. In MEDLINE, 33 060 were identified, of which 21 299 (64.4%) publications used the term 'AD', 15 510 (46.9%) 'eczema', and only 2471 (7.5%) AE. Most of these publications used the term AD (82.0%) or eczema (70.8%) without additional nomenclature; only 1.2% used AE alone. Few publications used the terminology 'childhood eczema', 'flexural eczema', 'infantile eczema', 'atopic neurodermatitis', or 'Besnier's prurigo'. AD was rarely used until the late 1970s, after which it became the most commonly used of the three terms and continuously increased until 2015. Atopic eczema decreased between 2008 and 2015. Atopic dermatitis was the most commonly used term in studies across almost all publication types, languages, and journals. Atopic dermatitis is the most commonly used term and appears to be increasing in popularity. Given that eczema is a nonspecific term that describes the morphological appearance of several forms of dermatitis, we strongly suggest the use of a more specific term, AD, in publications, healthcare clinician training, and patient education. Support from researchers, reviewers, and editors is key to success. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Allergic characteristics of urban schoolchildren with atopic eczema in Ghana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hogewoning, A. A.; Larbi, I. A.; Addo, H. A.; Amoah, A. S.; Boakye, D.; Hartgers, F.; Yazdanbakhsh, M.; van Ree, R.; Bouwes Bavinck, J. N.; Lavrijsen, A. P. M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Atopic eczema is an increasing clinical problem in Africa. Objective To determine allergic characteristics and to identify possible risk factors for eczema among schoolchildren in an urbanized area in Ghana. Patients and methods Schoolchildren aged 3-16 years with eczema were recruited.

  16. Therapeutic benefits of enhancing permeability barrier for atopic eczema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Man

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The regulatory role of epidermal permeability barrier function in cutaneous inflammation has been well appreciated. While barrier disruption induces cutaneous inflammation, improvement of permeability barrier function alleviates inflammation. Studies have demonstrated that improvement of epidermal permeability barrier function not only prevents the development of atopic eczema, but also delays the relapse of these diseases. Moreover, enhancing the epidermal permeability barrier also alleviates atopic eczema. Furthermore, co-applications of barrier enhancing products with glucocorticoids can increase the therapeutic efficacy and reduce the adverse effects of glucocorticoids in the treatment of atopic eczema. Therefore, utilization of permeability barrier enhancing products alone or in combination with glucocorticoids could be a valuable approach in the treatment of atopic eczema. In this review, we discuss the benefits of improving the epidermal permeability barrier in the management of atopic eczema.

  17. Evidence-based treatment of atopic eczema in general practice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    banzi

    CLINICAL FEATURES. Acute eczema is characterised by red, itchy skin and often by vesicles that ooze serum ... Atopic eczema is a common chronic condition characterised by dry, itchy skin associated with flares and remissions. .... synthetic immune modulator with cyclosporin-like effects) in. AE.The study by Reitamo and.

  18. Psychiatric disorders and symptoms severity in preschool children with atopic eczema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catal, F; Topal, E; Soylu, N; Ozel Ozcan, O; Celiksoy, M H; Babayiğit, A; Karakoç, H T E; Erge, D; Sancak, R

    2016-01-01

    To compare with a control group the frequency of psychiatric disorders and severity of psychiatric symptoms in preschool children with atopic eczema. The study included children between the ages of 3-5 who were diagnosed to have atopic eczema. The parents of the children with atopic eczema were interviewed in person and were asked to fill in "The Early Childhood Inventory-4" form. This form assesses the psychiatric disorders and symptoms severity in children between the ages of 3-5. The atopic eczema group included 80 patients (38 male, 42 female) with a mean age of 48.4 ± 15.7 months and the control group included 74 patients (41 male, 33 female) with a mean age of 49.9 ± 15.19 months. It was established that 68.8% of the group with atopic eczema received at least one psychiatric diagnosis. Between the psychiatric disorders, ADHD (Odds ratio: 2.57, 95% CI: 1.049-6.298, p=0.035), enuresis and encopresis (Odds ratio: 2.39, 95% CI: 1.121-5.097, p=0.022) and attachment disorder (Odds ratio: 2.03, 95% CI: 1.046-3.953, p=0.035) were found to be significantly higher when compared with the healthy control group. When the groups were compared in terms of psychiatric symptom severity scores calculated by using ECI-4, ADHD severity (p=0.043), conduct disorder severity (p=0.001), anxiety disorders severity (p<0.001), eating disorders severity (p=0.011) and tic disorder severity (p=0.01) were found to be higher in the atopic eczema group. Psychiatric illnesses are frequent in preschool children with atopic eczema. Copyright © 2015 SEICAP. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  19. Hand eczema, atopic dermatitis and filaggrin mutations in adult Danes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heede, Nina G.; Thuesen, Betina H.; Thyssen, Jacob P.

    2017-01-01

    in the general population, especially among individuals with a history of atopic dermatitis. Moreover, self-reported hand eczema and atopic dermatitis were associated with particularly high risk of disability pension among FLG mutation carriers [odds ratio (OR) 4.02 and 95% confidence interval (CI): 1...... with a genetically impaired skin barrier, were associated with disability pension, suggesting that FLG mutations carriers with a history of atopic dermatitis and hand eczema could benefit from early attention with respect to choice of occupation....... a questionnaire about skin symptoms and hand eczema. Socioeconomic variables, including disability pension, and information on work in risk occupations were retrieved from national registries. The reasons for granting disability pension were unknown. Results: Disability pension was associated with hand eczema...

  20. Classification of atopic hand eczema and the filaggrin mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giwercman, C.; Lerbaek, A.; Bisgaard, H.

    2008-01-01

    Hand eczema is a common disease with various risk factors of which atopic dermatitis is known to be one of the most important. Recently, two mutations in the gene coding for filaggrin, a protein important for the skin barrier, have repeatedly been shown to be associated with atopic dermatitis...... mutations. We believe this will increase the possibility of subgrouping this otherwise heterogenic disease and thereby enable a better phenotype-genotype characterization of hand eczema. This could improve the preventive initiatives, secure better information of patients about the prognosis...

  1. Psychosocial adjustment in preschool children with atopic eczema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daud, L R; Garralda, M E; David, T J

    1993-12-01

    Atopic eczema is a chronic skin disorder that is most common in early childhood, an important stage in the child's social and emotional development. The psychiatric adjustment and mother-child attachment in 30 preschool children with severe atopic eczema was compared with 20 matched controls. Patients with eczema had a significant increase in behaviour symptoms, 7/30 (23%) v 1/20 (5%); with significant excess of dependency/clinginess, 15/30 (50%) v 2/20 (10%); fearfulness, 12/30 (40%) v 2/20 (10%); and sleep difficulty, 19/30 (63%) v 9/20 (45%), but there was no significant difference between the two groups in the security of attachments, 25/29 (86%) v 14/20 (70%). Significantly fewer mothers of children with atopic eczema were in outside employment, 8/29 (27%) v 13/20 (65%), or felt supported socially, 10/29 (34%) v 13/20 (65%). Significantly more of them, 9/30 (30%) v 1/20 (5%), felt particularly stressed in relation to their parenting and less efficient in their disciplining of the affected child. In spite of this and at variance with earlier reports in the literature, they did not display negative attitudes towards their child. On the contrary mothers had a positive empathic attitude towards the child, 7/14 (50%) v 2/16 (12%). Child behaviour problems, 7/14 (50%) v 2/16 (12%), and maternal distress, 12/14 (85%) v 5/16 (31%), were significantly more common in the more severely affected children. Minor behaviour problems and parenting distress are important features of severe atopic eczema in early childhood but atopic eczema does not lead to insecurity of the mother-child attachment.

  2. The association between atopic dermatitis and hand eczema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruff, S M D; Engebretsen, K A; Zachariae, C

    2018-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) and hand eczema (HE) are common chronic and relapsing inflammatory skin conditions that often co-occur. While several studies have addressed their relationship, the exact association estimate is unknown. We systematically reviewed published literature on the association bet...

  3. An overview of topical treatment for atopic eczema | Motswaledi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... on the elbows and knees in younger children, and the cubital and popliteal fossae in older children and adults. Treatment modalities include emollients, topical corticosteroids, calcineurin inhibitors, phototherapy and immunosuppressive therapy. This article provides a brief overview of topical treatments for atopic eczema.

  4. Patch testing with dermatophagoides and its correlation with chronic eczema and atopic dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapur Chetna

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic eczema is commonly encountered in the Indian set up. So also is atopic dermatitis. House dust mites (Dermatophagoides are implicated in various diseases like atopic dermatitis, asthma, and perennial rhinitis. It has also been proven that patch testing with Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (DP is important for detection of contact sensitization in chronic dermatitis. Aims: To study clinical characteristics of DP mix positive patients with regards to chronic dermatitis and atopic dermatitis. Methods: Dermatology outpatients presenting to the department of Skin and STD of Kasturba Medical College (KMC, with clinically diagnosed atopic dermatitis and chronic eczema were chosen for the study. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were well demarked. Eighty six randomly selected patients of dermatitis were subjected to patch testing with standard series and DP mix. Results: Of the 86, 50 (58% showed positive reaction to DP mix. Among these positive patients, chronic dermatitis was seen in 42 (84% with involvement of exposed parts in 37 (74%. Atopic dermatitis was seen in 19 patients (38% from DP positive group whereas it was observed in 4 patients (17% from the other group. Conclusion: Dermatophagoides mix positivity was statistically significant in chronic eczema as well as atopic dermatitis. Patch testing is an important tool to detect delayed type allergy to house dust mite.

  5. CD30(+) cutaneous lymphoma in association with atopic eczema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Clair L; Orchard, Guy E; Hubbard, Virginia; Whittaker, Sean J; Edelson, Richard L; Russell-Jones, Robin

    2004-04-01

    Chronic atopic eczema is not regarded as a precursor of malignancy, and, to our knowledge, there has been only one previous case report of CD30(+) cutaneous lymphoma in association with atopic dermatitis. We report 4 cases of CD30(+) lymphoproliferative disease in young adult patients with active atopic eczema dating from early childhood. Three patients developed primary cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma, of whom 2 developed systemic disease and 1 died. The other patient developed lymphomatoid papulosis type A, which resolved after withdrawal of cyclosporine therapy. No other patient had received immunosuppressive therapy. Three had been treated with phototherapy, and 2 of these patients exhibited positive immunostaining for p53 within a proportion of the tumor cell population. Although we have not been able to establish a causative link, we believe that the association of these 2 conditions has not occurred by chance. Biopsies of lesional skin from subjects with atopic eczema exhibit a proportion of CD30 cells, and clonal transformation of this subpopulation might account for the CD30(+) lymphomas in our patients.

  6. Economic evidence for the prevention and treatment of atopic eczema: a protocol for a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Sach, Tracey; Mcmanus, Emma; Mcmonagle, Christopher; Levell, Nick

    2016-01-01

    Background Eczema, synonymous with atopic eczema or atopic dermatitis, is a chronic skin disease that has a similar impact on health-related quality of life as other chronic diseases. The proposed research aims to provide a comprehensive systematic assessment of the economic evidence base available to inform economic modelling and decision making on interventions to prevent and treat eczema at any stage of the life course. Whilst the Global Resource of Eczema Trials (GREAT) database collects ...

  7. Research statistics in Atopic Eczema: what disease is this?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hon Kam-Lun

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Atopic eczema is a common and distressing disease. This study aims to review PubMed indexed research statistics on atopic eczema over a-10 year period to investigate the clinical relevance and research interest about this disease. Methods PubMed (a service of the U.S. National Library of Medicine was searched for the terms “atopic dermatitis” and “eczema”, with limits activated (Humans, Clinical Trial, Meta-Analysis, Randomized Controlled Trial, English, published in the last 10 years, and editorials, letters, practice guidelines, reviews, and animal studies excluded. Journal impact factor (IF is in accordance with Journal Citation Report (JCR 2009, a product of Thomson ISI (Institute for Scientific Information. Results A total of 890 articles were retrieved. Taking out publications that were irrelevant and those without an impact factor, 729 articles were obtained. These articles were grouped into dermatology (n = 337, mean IF: 3.01, allergy/immunology (n = 215, mean IF: 4.89, pediatrics (n = 118, mean IF: 2.53 and miscellaneous subject categories (n = 142, mean IF: 5.10. The impact factors were highest in the miscellaneous category (p = 0.0001, which includes such prestigious journals as the New England journal of Medicine (n = 1, IF: 47.05, the Lancet (n = 4, IF: 30.76 and BMJ (n = 6, IF: 13.66. There was no publication in any family medicine or general practice journal. The British Journal of Dermatology (n = 78, Pediatric Allergy and Immunology (n = 49 and Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (n = 46 had the highest number of publications on the subject. Atopic eczema ranked higher in impact factors in allergy/immunology although more publications appeared in the dermatology category. Conclusions Atopic eczema is a multidisciplinary disease. Its clinical relevance and research interests are definitely beyond that of a mere cutaneous disease. Investigators may

  8. THE CASE OF HERPETIC ECZEMA IN A CHILD WITH CONGENITAL ICHTHYOSIS AND ATOPIC DERMATITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Stadnikova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The case of the development of herpetic eczema (Kaposi's eczema is presented against the background of congenital ichthyosis and atopic dermatitis. It has been shown that the presence of atopic diseases such as allergic rhinitis and pollinosis, sensitization to many common allergens, and a positive family history of atopic dermatitis are factors of a more severe course of Kaposi's eczema. The presented clinical observation of the child with Kaposi's eczema showed that early diagnosis and timely initiated complex  therapy are the determining factors of a favorable prognosis of the disease.

  9. Genomic insights into the atopic eczema-associated skin commensal yeast Malassezia sympodialis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gioti, A.; Nystedt, B.; Li, W.; Xu, J.; Andersson, A.; Averette, A.F.; Munch, K.; Wang, X.; Kappauf, C.; Kingsbury, J.M.; Kraak, B.; Walker, L.A.; Johansson, H.J.; Holm, T.; Lehtio, J.; Stajich, J.E.; Mieczkowski, P.; Kahmann, R.; Kennell, J.C.; Cardenas, M.E.; Lundeberg, J.; Saunders, C.W.; Boekhout, T.; Dawson, T.L.; Munro, C.A.; de Groot, P.W.; Butler, G.; Heitman, J.; Scheynius, A.

    2013-01-01

    Malassezia commensal yeasts are associated with a number of skin disorders, such as atopic eczema/dermatitis and dandruff, and they also can cause systemic infections. Here we describe the 7.67-Mbp genome of Malassezia sympodialis, a species associated with atopic eczema, and contrast its genome

  10. Soaps and cleansers for atopic eczema, friends or foes? What every ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Knowledge of the pH level of soaps and cleansers used by patients with atopic eczema and sensitive skin is crucial, as high-alkalinity products are irritants and impair the normal skin barrier, so interfering with the adequate control of atopic eczema. Objectives. The aim of this study was to assess the pH of ...

  11. Is Patch Testing with Food Additives Useful in Children with Atopic Eczema?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catli, Gonul; Bostanci, Ilknur; Ozmen, Serap; Dibek Misirlioglu, Emine; Duman, Handan; Ertan, Ulker

    2015-01-01

    Atopy patch testing is a useful way to determine delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions to foods and aeroallergens. Although food additives have been accused of worsening atopic eczema symptoms, according to recent studies the role of food additives in atopic eczema remains unclear. The purpose of our study was to investigate food additive hypersensitivity in a group of children with atopic eczema by using standardized atopy patch testing and to determine the role of food additive hypersensitivity in atopic eczema. Thirty-four children with atopic eczema and 33 healthy children were enrolled in the study. Children who consumed foods containing additives and did not use either antihistamines or local or systemic corticosteroids for at least 7 days prior to admission were enrolled in the study. All children were subjected to atopy patch testing and after 48 and 72 hours their skin reactions were evaluated by using the guidelines. Positive atopy patch test results were significantly higher in the atopic eczema group. Forty-one percent of the atopic eczema group (n = 14) and 15.2% (n = 5) of the control group had positive atopy patch test results with food additives (p = 0.036) (estimated relative risk 1.68, case odds 0.7, control odds 0.17). Carmine hypersensitivity and the consumption of foods containing carmine, such as gumdrops, salami, and sausage, were significantly higher in the children with atopic eczema. This is the first study investigating hypersensitivity to food additives in children with atopic eczema. Our results indicate that carmine may play a role in atopic eczema. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. What Should General Practice Trainees Learn about Atopic Eczema?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepani Munidasa

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Effective atopic eczema (AE control not only improves quality of life but may also prevent the atopic march. The Royal College of General Practitioners’ (RCGP curriculum does not currently provide specific learning outcomes on AE management. We aimed to gain consensus on learning outcomes to inform curriculum development. A modified Delphi method was used with questionnaires distributed to gather the views of a range of health care professionals (HCPs including general practitioners (GPs, dermatologists, dermatology nurses and parents of children with AE attending a dedicated paediatric dermatology clinic. Ninety-one questionnaires were distributed to 61 HCPs and 30 parents; 81 were returned. All agreed that learning should focus on the common clinical features, complications and management of AE and the need to appreciate its psychosocial impact. Areas of divergence included knowledge of alternative therapies. Parents felt GPs should better understand how to identify, manage and refer severe AD and recognized the value of the specialist eczema nurse. Dermatologists and parents highlighted inconsistencies in advice regarding topical steroids. This study identifies important areas for inclusion as learning outcomes on AE management in the RCGP curriculum and highlights the importance of patients and parents as a valuable resource in the development of medical education.

  13. Association between non-atopic hand eczema and interleukin-13 gene polymorphism in Taiwanese nursing population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yin-Chun; Tu, Hung-Pin; Wu, Ching-Shuang; Ko, Ying-Chin; Yu, Hsin-Su; Lu, Yi-Wei; Li, Wan-Chen; Chen, Gwo-Shing; Lan, Cheng-Che E

    2012-12-01

    Chronic hand eczema is an important occupational skin disease with atopic dermatitis (AD) and wet work being the most important risk factors. This study was launched to analyse the potential association between AD-related inflammation genes and development of non-atopic hand eczema among nurses in University Hospital. Atopic eczema, non-atopic hand dermatitis and control groups were identified. The association between occurrence of non-atopic hand eczema and interleukin (IL)-13, IL-4 and IL-5 gene variants was analysed. IL13 rs20541 A allele [assuming recessive model; odds ratio (OR) = 3.38, 95% CI: (1.63-7.00)] showed association with development of non-atopic hand eczema. Additive score analyses showed combination of this gene variant with previously identified risk factors including certain SPINK5 polymorphism and more than 10 years of work experience conferred highest risk for development of non-atopic hand eczema. As non-atopic hand eczema made up significant portion of occupational skin diseases, further studies should be focused on this commonly encountered skin condition. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  14. Hand dermatitis among university hospital nursing staff with or without atopic eczema: assessment of risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Cheng-Che E; Tu, Hung-Pin; Lee, Chien-Hung; Wu, Ching-Shuang; Ko, Ying-Chin; Yu, Hsin-Su; Lu, Yi-Wei; Li, Wan-Chen; Chen, Gwo-Shing

    2011-02-01

    Nurses are prone to develop hand dermatitis. Although an atopic constitution has been identified as a genetic risk factor, the behavioural risk factors associated with hand dermatitis in wet work conditions have not been fully explored. This study aimed to clarify the impact of atopic eczema (fulfilling the diagnostic criteria during the past 1 year) on the occurrence of hand dermatitis and to identify the behavioural risk factors among non-atopic nurses with hand dermatitis. From August 2007 to July 2009, nurses from Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital were recruited. The associations between different risk factors and hand dermatitis were documented. In addition, the behavioural risk factors among non-atopic nurses were evaluated via observational study. One thousand one hundred and thirty-two nurses participated in the first part of the study, which revealed that individuals with atopic eczema had a 3.76-fold increased risk for hand dermatitis. However, among 248 nurses with hand dermatitis, only 43 had atopic eczema. The observational study performed on 140 non-atopic nurses identified frequency of hand washing as the behavioural risk factor associated with hand dermatitis. Although atopic eczema is the major risk factor for hand dermatitis, those with atopic eczema constitute only 17% of nurses with hand dermatitis. Decreasing hand washing frequency is the most effective strategy to reduce the occurrence of hand dermatitis among non-atopic nurses. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  15. Reporting of symptoms in randomized controlled trials of atopic eczema treatments: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerbens, L. A. A.; Chalmers, J. R.; Rogers, N. K.; Nankervis, H.; Spuls, P. I.

    2016-01-01

    'Symptoms' is a core outcome domain for atopic eczema (AE) trials, agreed by consensus as part of the Harmonising Outcome Measures for Eczema (HOME) initiative. To standardize and validate the core domain symptoms and symptom instruments for AE trials the HOME roadmap is followed. Its first step is

  16. Psoriasis, chronic eczema and atopic dermatitis in males: functioning of sympathoadrenal and vagoinsular systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Yu. Reznichenko

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Psoriasis, chronic eczema and atopic dermatitis are the most common diseases among patients of dermatovenereological profile. The study of the etiology and pathogenesis of chronic dermatoses, and the grounded choice of their treatment are extremely important problems of modern medicine. The objective of this work was to study the peculiarities of functioning of sympathoadrenal and vagal-insular systems in male patients with psoriasis, chronic eczema and atopic dermatitis. Materials and methods. 115 healthy males and males who suffered from psoriasis, chronic eczema and atopic dermatitis were examined. The men were distributed in the study groups depending on their age and the presence of chronic dermatoses. We investigated levels of adrenaline, norepinephrine, dioxyphenylalanine, dopamine in urine, as well as the levels of insulin and cortisol in blood. The calculation of hormones and mediators ratios of the sympathoadrenal and autonomic systems was performed. Results. Sympathoadrenal system was less active and its reserve capacity was lower in males with psoriasis, chronic eczema and atopic dermatitis. We also fixed the acceleration of biosynthesis of catecholamines. The speed of transformation of dioxyphenilalanine and dopamine to their metabolites was higher in patients with psoriasis, chronic eczema and atopic dermatitis. The high tension of glucocorticoid function of adrenal glands and increased activity of autonomic system; the intensive violations of autonomic homeostasis; the reduction of activity of compensatory organism reactions were found in male patients with chronic dermatoses. The discoordinated relationships in neurogenic link of adaptation in patients with chronic dermatoses were fixed. An antagonistic relationship was also revealed between different branches of nervous system in patients with psoriasis, chronic eczema and atopic dermatitis. These data reflected the violations of adaptation in patients with chronic dermatoses

  17. X – linked Hypohidrotic Ectodermal Dysplasia and atopic eczema – case report and discussion on mechanisms of eczema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catarina Moreira

    2017-12-01

    Although XHED has a favorable prognosis, eczema is a major problem and the eczematous characteristics of patient’s skin resemble those of atopic dermatitis. Ceramide profile, reduction of natural moisturizing factors due to hypohidrosis and skin barrier dysfunction elicited by airborne proteins likely contribute to persistent and difficult-to-control AD-like eczema. As a consequence of the rarity of the disease, obtaining a significant number of clinical studies to clarify and validate the pathways involved in skin barrier dysfunction and the consequent eczematous lesions in HED patients will probably remain a challenge.

  18. Clinical Signs, Staphylococcus and Atopic Eczema-Related Seromarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kam Lun Hon

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Childhood eczema or atopic dermatitis (AD is a distressing disease associated with pruritus, sleep disturbance, impaired quality of life and Staphylococcus aureus isolation. The pathophysiology of AD is complex and various seromarkers of immunity are involved. We investigated if anti-staphylococcal enterotoxin IgE (anti-SE, selected seromarkers of T regulatory (Treg, T helper (Th and antigen-presenting cells (APC are associated with clinical signs of disease severity and quality of life. Disease severity was assessed with the Scoring Atopic Dermatitis (SCORAD index, and quality of life with the Children’s Dermatology Life Quality Index (CDLQI in AD patients ≤18 years old. Concentrations of anti-staphylococcus enterotoxin A and B immunoglobulin E (anti-SEA and anti-SEB, selected Treg/Th/APC chemokines, skin hydration and transepidermal water loss (TEWL were measured in these patients. Forty patients with AD [median (interquartile range age of 13.1 (7.9 years were recruited. Backward stepwise linear regression (controlling for age, personal allergic rhinitis and asthma, and other blood markers showed the serum anti-SEB level was positively associated with S. aureus and S. epidermidis isolations, objective SCORAD, clinical signs and CDLQI. TNF-α (a Th1 cytokine was positively associated with objective SCORAD (B = 4.935, p = 0.010, TGF-β (a Treg cytokine negatively with disease extent (B = −0.015, p = 0.001, IL-18 (an APC cytokine positively with disease extent (B = 0.438, p = 0.001 and with TEWL (B = 0.040, p = 0.010, and IL-23 (an APC cytokine negatively with disease extent (B = −2.812, p = 0.006 and positively with pruritus (B = 0.387, p = 0.007. Conclusions: Blood levels of anti-SEB, Th1, Treg and APC cytokines are correlated with various clinical signs of AD. AD is a systemic immunologic disease involving Staphylococcus aureus, cellular, humoral, cytokine and chemokine pathophysiology.

  19. Prevalência de eczema atópico e sintomas relacionados entre estudantes Prevalence of atopic eczema and associated symptoms in school children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inês C Camelo-Nunes

    2004-02-01

    1999 (3,005 in 1996 and 3,033 in 1999 and to 13 to 14-year-old adolescents (3,008 in 1996 and 3,487 in 1999. In the ISAAC, the option eczema ever indicates that a diagnosis of atopic eczema was made by a physician at least once in the subject's life. This was used to define "medical diagnosis" in the present study. The concomitant report of lesions in the last year in characteristic places constitutes the "combined criterion" for the diagnosis of atopic eczema and was also employed in the present study. Data were analyzed using the Epi-Info 6.0 software. RESULTS: In the 6 to 7-year-old group, there was a significant decrease in the number of "medical diagnoses" of atopic eczema in 1999 (11.4% in comparison to 1996 (13.2%. The increase in the prevalence of "medical diagnoses" observed in 1999 among adolescents was not significant (14 vs. 15%. Considering the "combined criterion," there were no significant differences between 1996 and 1999 in either group (6.6% vs. 6.8% for 6 to 7 year-old children; 3.7% vs. 4.4% for adolescents. CONCLUSIONS: Despite the increase in the prevalence of atopic diseases worldwide, we documented a reduction in the prevalence of "medical diagnoses" of atopic eczema in 6 to 7-year-old children. Nevertheless, atopic eczema remains as a relevant disease in the pediatric population.

  20. Infant feeding and the development of food allergies and atopic eczema: An update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamboni, Sarah E; Allen, Katrina J; Nixon, Rosemary L

    2013-05-01

    There is an increasing awareness of food allergies in the community. Dermatologists frequently see patients with atopic eczema, where parents are extremely concerned about the role of food allergy. Advice given to parents regarding the timing of introduction of solid foods has changed markedly over the past decade. Whereas previous advice advocated delaying the introduction of solid foods until the infant's gastrointestinal system had matured, recent studies suggest that the introduction of solids from around 4 to 6 months may actually prevent the development of allergies. Studies on maternal dietary restrictions during pregnancy and lactation have led researchers to believe that antigen avoidance does not play a significant role in the prevention of atopic disease. Breastfeeding exclusively for 4 to 6 months has multiple benefits for mother and child, however, it does not convincingly prevent food allergies or decrease atopic eczema. New evidence suggests that the use of hydrolysed formulas does not delay or prevent atopic eczema or food allergy. This article aims to highlight current evidence and provide an update for dermatologists on the role of food exposure in the development of atopic disease, namely atopic eczema. © 2012 The Authors. Australasian Journal of Dermatology © 2012 The Australasian College of Dermatologists.

  1. Filaggrin null mutations increase the risk and persistence of hand eczema in subjects with atopic dermatitis: results from a general population study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jacob Pontoppidan; Carlsen, B C; Menné, Torkil

    2010-01-01

    Hand eczema is prevalent in the general population. It remains unclear whether or not filaggrin gene (FLG) null mutations increase the overall risk of hand eczema or only increase the risk of hand eczema in subjects with atopic dermatitis.......Hand eczema is prevalent in the general population. It remains unclear whether or not filaggrin gene (FLG) null mutations increase the overall risk of hand eczema or only increase the risk of hand eczema in subjects with atopic dermatitis....

  2. Classification of atopic hand eczema and the filaggrin mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    G. Carson, Charlotte; Jørkov, Anne Lerbæk; Bisgaard, Hans

    2008-01-01

    mutations. We believe this will increase the possibility of subgrouping this otherwise heterogenic disease and thereby enable a better phenotype-genotype characterization of hand eczema. This could improve the preventive initiatives, secure better information of patients about the prognosis...

  3. Risk factors for atopic eczema in school children Fatores de risco para eczema atópico em escolares

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo F. Wandalsen

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: to study risk factors related to atopic eczema (AE in school children of São Paulo. METHODS: 1972 parents or guardians of 6-7 years old children in the Southern Central area of São Paulo answered to a written questionnaire (standardized questionnaire of the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood plus a complementary questionnaire regarding family history of asthma and allergies, and exposure to environmental allergens. AE was defined by the presence of an itchy rash in the last year. Risk factors were analyzed through logical regression. RESULTS: the following factors were significantly associated with AE: history of maternal (OR: 4.1; 95%CI: 2.4 to 7.1 and paternal eczema (OR: 2.6; 95%CI: 1.4 to 5.0, dust in the child's bedroom (OR: 1.6; 95%CI: 1.1 to 2.4, lower maternal education (OR: 1.7; 95%CI: 1.1 to 2.7, rhinitis fever (OR: 1.7; 95%CI: 1.1 to 2.9 and wheezing in the last year (OR: 1.9; 95%CI: 1.2 to 2.8. CONCLUSIONS: our data suggest that AE has a specific pattern of inheritance. The presence of dust in the child's bedroom was the single environmental risk factor found. Diagnose of other allergic diseases, as well as the presence of recent symptoms were strongly associated with AE in children.OBJETIVOS: identificar fatores de risco relacionados ao eczema atópico (EA em escolares do município de São Paulo. MÉTODOS: 1972 pais de escolares de 6-7 anos da região centro-sul de São Paulo responderam a questionários escritos (questionário padrão do International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood e questionário complementar sobre história familiar de doenças alérgicas e exposição ambiental a potenciais fontes de alérgenos e irritantes. A presença de manchas na pele com coceira nos últimos 12 meses, definiu os escolares com EA. Os fatores de risco foram analisados por regressão logística. RESULTADOS: as variáveis significantemente associadas ao EA foram: história materna (OR: 4,1; IC95

  4. Quantitative and qualitative dermatoglyphic patterns in patients with atopic eczema,vitiligo ,and acne vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Ghaderi

    2013-11-01

    Conclusion: The results indicate that frequencies of various dermatoglyphic patterns differ in atopic eczema, acne vulgaris and vitiligo from that of normal population. Perhaps this difference can be used as a diagnostic biological marker to screen for those susceptible to these dermatoses.

  5. Hand eczema, atopic dermatitis and filaggrin mutations in adult Danes: a registry-based study assessing risk of disability pension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heede, Nina G; Thuesen, Betina H; Thyssen, Jacob P; Linneberg, Allan; Szecsi, Pal B; Stender, Steen; Menné, Torkil; Johansen, Jeanne D

    2017-08-01

    Atopic dermatitis and hand eczema often impair the ability of people to work. Only a few studies have investigated whether individuals with loss-of-function filaggrin gene (FLG) mutations, who often have severe and early onset of dermatitis, experience occupational consequences. To investigate the personal consequences of having atopic dermatitis and/or hand eczema and FLG mutations. Adult Danes from the general population (n = 3247) and patients with atopic dermatitis and/or hand eczema (n = 496) were genotyped for common FLG mutations, and completed a questionnaire about skin symptoms and hand eczema. Socioeconomic variables, including disability pension, and information on work in risk occupations were retrieved from national registries. The reasons for granting disability pension were unknown. Disability pension was associated with hand eczema in the general population, especially among individuals with a history of atopic dermatitis. Moreover, self-reported hand eczema and atopic dermatitis were associated with particularly high risk of disability pension among FLG mutation carriers [odds ratio (OR) 4.02 and 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.15-14.11; and OR 6.01 and 95%CI: 2.37-15.34, respectively]. Furthermore, 60% of the FLG mutation carriers with atopic dermatitis who developed hand eczema had experienced symptoms before adulthood. In the general population, self-reported hand eczema and atopic dermatitis, particularly in individuals with a genetically impaired skin barrier, were associated with disability pension, suggesting that FLG mutations carriers with a history of atopic dermatitis and hand eczema could benefit from early attention with respect to choice of occupation. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. An overview of topical treatment for atopic eczema

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    see Figure 1). In younger children, the lesions are usually on extensors surfaces of the .... Lever R. Microbiology of atopic dermatitis. In: Harper J, Orange A, Prose. N, editors. Textbook of Pediatric Dermatology. London: Blackwell Science,. 2002; p ...

  7. Economic evidence for the prevention and treatment of atopic eczema: a protocol for a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sach, Tracey Helen; McManus, Emma; Mcmonagle, Christopher; Levell, Nick

    2016-05-27

    Eczema, synonymous with atopic eczema or atopic dermatitis, is a chronic skin disease that has a similar impact on health-related quality of life as other chronic diseases. The proposed research aims to provide a comprehensive systematic assessment of the economic evidence base available to inform economic modelling and decision making on interventions to prevent and treat eczema at any stage of the life course. Whilst the Global Resource of Eczema Trials (GREAT) database collects together the effectiveness evidence for eczema, there is currently no such systematic resource on the economics of eczema. It is important to gain an overview of the current state of the art of economic methods in the field of eczema in order to strengthen the economic evidence base further. The proposed study is a systematic review of the economic evidence surrounding interventions for the prevention and treatment of eczema. Relevant search terms will be used to search MEDLINE, EMBASE, Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, National Health Service (NHS) Economic Evaluation Database, Health Technology Assessment, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, EconLit, Scopus, Cost-Effectiveness Analysis Registry and Web of Science in order to identify relevant evidence. To be eligible for inclusion studies will be primary empirical studies evaluating the cost, utility or full economic evaluation of interventions for preventing or treating eczema. Two reviewers will independently assess studies for eligibility and perform data abstraction. Evidence tables will be produced presenting details of study characteristics, costing methods, outcome methods and quality assessment. The methodological quality of studies will be assessed using accepted checklists. The systematic review is being undertaken to identify the type of economic evidence available, summarise the results of the available

  8. Affordable moisturisers are effective in atopic eczema: A randomised ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Many patients depend on moisturisers issued by public health services in the management of atopic dermatitis (AD). Methods. In a randomised controlled trial of patients with mild to moderate AD, aged 1 - 12 years, study 1 compared aqueous cream v. liquid paraffin (fragrance-free baby oil) as a soap substitute ...

  9. [Prevalence of atopic eczema and nutritional factors in 6-7 year old children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales Suárez-Varela, María M; García-Marcos Alvarez, Luis; González Díaz, Carlos; Arnedo Pena, Alberto; Domínguez Aurrecoechea, Begoña; Busquets Monge, Rosa M; Blanco Quiros, Alfredo; Batlles Garrido, José; Miner Canflanca, Izaskun; López-Silvarrey Varela, Angel; Martínez Gimeno, Antonio; Aguinagua Ontoso, Inés; Llopis González, Agustín; Jiménez López, María C

    2007-07-01

    To describe the prevalence of atopic eczema (AE) and to find the characteristics of the diet of children with AE. Descriptive, transversal study. Primary schools. The study used the standardized and validated questionnaire of the ISAAC phase III study, which finds the prevalence of AE in children and enables inter-centre comparison to be conducted. A questionnaire about food consumption was included. The prevalence ratio (PR) of AE and food consumption (95% confidence intervals) was calculated. A total of 28 448 children aged 6-7 were included in the study. The prevalence of clinically diagnosed AE was 15.35% in boys and 15.24% in girls. The foods most often consumed were: dairy and cereals, followed by rice, pasta, and eggs. The least consumed were: butter, margarine, and fast food. The PR for children who consumed pasta was (PR=1.35), seafood (PR=1.28), cereals (PR=1.26), eggs (PR=1.13), and meat (PR=1.09). The prevalence of AE in Spain was 15.3%, and was associated with food consumption. The consumption of dairy products, cereals, and olive oil was appropriate. The intake of fruit, vegetables, seafood, and legumes was below the recommended amounts. Future studies on the question are needed.

  10. Association between parental socioeconomic position and prevalence of asthma, atopic eczema and hay fever in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammer-Helmich, Lene; Linneberg, Allan; Thomsen, Simon Francis

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To determine the prevalence of asthma, atopic eczema and hay fever among children in different age groups and examine the associations with parental socioeconomic position. METHODS: A cross-sectional health survey of four complete birth-cohorts in the municipality of Copenhagen was conducted....... Children aged 11 and 15 years and parents of children aged 3 and 6 years completed questionnaires on symptoms and diseases. Data were linked to national registers on demographics and socioeconomic position measured as education, employment and income. In total, 9720 children/parents responded (50...... and ranged between 15.5% and 17.8%. Odds Ratios for children of parents with the lowest vs. the highest educational level were 1.50 (95% CI = 1.17-1.91) for asthma; 1.68 (95% CI = 1.35-2.10) for hay fever; and 0.75 (95% CI = 0.64-0.89) for atopic eczema. Unemployment was significantly associated...

  11. The workload of web-based consultations with atopic eczema patients at home

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solvoll Terje

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Atopic eczema is a chronic inflammatory non-contagious skin disease characterised by intensive itch and inflamed skin. Due to its chronic and relapsing course atopic eczema imposes a great burden on affected families. Review articles about home care telemedicine have indicated advantageous effects of home telehealth. However, few studies have investigated how home care telemedicine applications affect the workload of the clinician. Methods The use of a web-based counselling system was recorded through computerised logging. The doctor who answered the requests sent via the Internet recorded the amount of time needed for reading and answering 93 consecutive requests. Results The time needed by the physician to read and answer a request was less than 5 minutes in 60% of the cases. The doctor spent significantly more time to answer requests that had photographs attached compared to requests without photographs (P = 0.005. The time needed to answer requests received during the winter season (October-March was significantly longer than the rest of the year (P = 0.023. There was no correlation between the answering time and the age of the patient. Conclusions Individual web-based follow-up of atopic eczema patients at home is feasible. The amount of time needed for the doctor to respond to a request from the patient appears to be small. The answering time seems to depend on whether photographs are supplied and also on seasonal variations of disease activity. Since the management of atopic eczema is complex involving many different types of treatments and educational aspects, we expect this type of communication to be useful also to other chronic disease patients requiring close follow-up.

  12. Genomic insights into the atopic eczema-associated skin commensal yeast Malassezia sympodialis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gioti, Anastasia; Nystedt, Björn; Li, Wenjun; Xu, Jun; Andersson, Anna; Averette, Anna F; Münch, Karin; Wang, Xuying; Kappauf, Catharine; Kingsbury, Joanne M; Kraak, Bart; Walker, Louise A; Johansson, Henrik J; Holm, Tina; Lehtiö, Janne; Stajich, Jason E; Mieczkowski, Piotr; Kahmann, Regine; Kennell, John C; Cardenas, Maria E; Lundeberg, Joakim; Saunders, Charles W; Boekhout, Teun; Dawson, Thomas L; Munro, Carol A; de Groot, Piet W J; Butler, Geraldine; Heitman, Joseph; Scheynius, Annika

    2013-01-22

    Malassezia commensal yeasts are associated with a number of skin disorders, such as atopic eczema/dermatitis and dandruff, and they also can cause systemic infections. Here we describe the 7.67-Mbp genome of Malassezia sympodialis, a species associated with atopic eczema, and contrast its genome repertoire with that of Malassezia globosa, associated with dandruff, as well as those of other closely related fungi. Ninety percent of the predicted M. sympodialis protein coding genes were experimentally verified by mass spectrometry at the protein level. We identified a relatively limited number of genes related to lipid biosynthesis, and both species lack the fatty acid synthase gene, in line with the known requirement of these yeasts to assimilate lipids from the host. Malassezia species do not appear to have many cell wall-localized glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) proteins and lack other cell wall proteins previously identified in other fungi. This is surprising given that in other fungi these proteins have been shown to mediate interactions (e.g., adhesion and biofilm formation) with the host. The genome revealed a complex evolutionary history for an allergen of unknown function, Mala s 7, shown to be encoded by a member of an amplified gene family of secreted proteins. Based on genetic and biochemical studies with the basidiomycete human fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans, we characterized the allergen Mala s 6 as the cytoplasmic cyclophilin A. We further present evidence that M. sympodialis may have the capacity to undergo sexual reproduction and present a model for a pseudobipolar mating system that allows limited recombination between two linked MAT loci. Malassezia commensal yeasts are associated with a number of skin disorders. The previously published genome of M. globosa provided some of the first insights into Malassezia biology and its involvement in dandruff. Here, we present the genome of M. sympodialis, frequently isolated from patients with

  13. Parents' experience of childhood atopic eczema in the public health sector of Gauteng.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meintjes, Kaarina F; Nolte, Ann G W

    2015-04-29

    The World Allergy Organization found that 20% - 30%of the world's population suffers from an allergic disease. Most allergic patients are seen by non-allergy-trained healthcare workers. The public primary healthcare (PHC) management of childhood atopic eczema (CAE) in the central Gauteng district was the focus of the overall study. The focus of this article is the parents' experience of CAE and the management thereof. The research question was: What is the experience of parents living with a child with atopic eczema (AE)? The overall purpose was to develop validated PHC management guidelines for CAE. One of the objectives was to explore and describe the experiences of parents regarding the AE of their children and the management thereof. An embedded single case study design using a qualitative, explorative, descriptive and contextual strategy was employed. Data was collected through semi-structured individual interviews from a purposively selected sample and field notes. Ten parents were interviewed, after which data saturation occurred. Data were analysed according to Tesch's steps of descriptive data analysis. Lincoln and Guba's model was used to ensure trustworthiness. Three main themes were identified. This article focuses on theme one: The physical, emotional and social impact of CAE. Theme two identified the management challenges and theme three indicated recommendations regarding the management of CAE. The facilitation of management of CAE focuses on developing PHC guidelines and addressing management challenges in order to achieve better controlled CAE.

  14. Validation of the U.K. Working Party diagnostic criteria for atopic eczema in a Xhosa-speaking African population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalmers, D A; Todd, G; Saxe, N; Milne, J T; Tolosana, S; Ngcelwane, P N; Hlaba, B N; Mngomeni, L N; Nonxuba, T G; Williams, H C

    2007-01-01

    Reliable diagnostic criteria for eczema are important for epidemiological comparisons. Although the U.K. diagnostic criteria for atopic eczema have performed well in an English language setting, limited data are available from other countries where cultural and linguistic factors may affect their validity. We sought to determine the validity of the U.K. criteria for eczema in relation to clinical assessment by a dermatologist in a Xhosa-speaking South African population. A cross-sectional survey of 3067 children aged 3-11 years was conducted in rural, peri-urban and urban settings in South Africa. The prevalence of atopic eczema was determined using the U.K. diagnostic criteria and a clinical assessment by a dermatologist. Questions were translated into the local language (Xhosa). Trained researchers administered the questions to the children's parents or carers. The validity of the U.K. criteria was then determined by calculating the sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and Youden's Index in relation to the dermatologist's examination. The point prevalence of atopic eczema according to a dermatologist was 1.0% [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.6-1.4], while the prevalence of visible flexural eczema according to the U.K. protocol was 1.8% (95% CI 1.3-2.2). The sensitivity and specificity of the U.K. criteria in this setting was 43.7% (95% CI 26.3-62.3) and 97.9% (97.3-98.4), respectively. The positive and negative predictive values of the U.K. criteria were 18.4% (95% CI 10.4-28.9) and 99.4% (95% CI 99.0-99.6), respectively. The presence of visible flexural eczema according to the U.K. photographic protocol was the best predictor of atopic eczema, with a sensitivity and specificity of 81.2% (95% CI 63.5-92.7) and 99.0% (95% CI 98.6-99.3), respectively, and a positive and negative predictive value of 48.1% (95% CI 34.3-62.1) and 99.8% (95% CI 99.5-99.9), respectively. The validity of the full question-based version of the U.K. diagnostic

  15. The Use of Decision-Analytic Models in Atopic Eczema: A Systematic Review and Critical Appraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McManus, Emma; Sach, Tracey; Levell, Nick

    2018-01-01

    The objective of this systematic review was to identify and assess the quality of published economic decision-analytic models within atopic eczema against best practice guidelines, with the intention of informing future decision-analytic models within this condition. A systematic search of the following online databases was performed: MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, NHS Economic Evaluation Database, EconLit, Scopus, Health Technology Assessment, Cost-Effectiveness Analysis Registry and Web of Science. Papers were eligible for inclusion if they described a decision-analytic model evaluating both the costs and benefits associated with an intervention or prevention for atopic eczema. Data were extracted using a standardised form by two independent reviewers, whilst quality was assessed using the model-specific Philips criteria. Twenty-four models were identified, evaluating either preventions (n = 12) or interventions (n = 12): 14 reported using a Markov modelling approach, four utilised decision trees and one a discrete event simulation, whilst five did not specify the approach. The majority, 22 studies, reported that the intervention was dominant or cost effective, given the assumptions and analytical perspective taken. Notably, the models tended to be short-term (16 used a time horizon of ≤1 year), often providing little justification for the limited time horizon chosen. The methodological and reporting quality of the studies was generally weak, with only seven studies fulfilling more than 50% of their applicable Philips criteria. This is the first systematic review of decision models in eczema. Whilst the majority of models reported favourable outcomes in terms of the cost effectiveness of the new intervention, the usefulness of these findings for decision-making is

  16. Atopic eczema

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... such as wool and lanolin Strong soaps or detergents, as well as chemicals and solvents Sudden changes in body temperature and stress, which may cause sweating Triggers that cause allergy symptoms When washing or bathing: Expose your skin ...

  17. Impact of maternal supplementation with probiotics during pregnancy on atopic eczema in childhood : a meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doege, Katja; Grajecki, Donata; Zyriax, Birgit-Christiane; Detinkina, Elena; zu Eulenburg, Christine; Buhling, Kai J.

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, we sought to conduct a literature review of randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials, which assessed the impact of probiotics intake during pregnancy on the development of eczema in children. A meta-analysis was conducted for comparison of the development of atopic

  18. Acid-coated Textiles (pH 5.5-6.5)--a New Therapeutic Strategy for Atopic Eczema?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, Teresa; Rothmaier, Markus; Zander, Holger; Ring, Johannes; Gutermuth, Jan; Anliker, Mark D

    2015-07-01

    Increased transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and decreased skin capacitance are characteristic features of the disturbed epidermal barrier in atopic eczema (AE). The "acid mantle", which is a slightly acidic film on the surface of the skin has led to the development of acidic emollients for skin care. In this context, the effect of citric acid-coated textiles on atopic skin has not been examined to date. A textile carrier composed of cellulose fibres was coated with a citric acid surface layer by esterification, ensuring a constant pH of 5.5-6.5. Twenty patients with AE or atopic diathesis were enrolled in the study. In a double-blind, half-side experiment, patients had to wear these textiles for 12 h a day for 14 days. On day 0 (baseline), 7 and 14, tolerability (erythema, pruritus, eczema, wearing comfort) and efficacy on skin barrier were assessed by TEWL skin hydration (corneometry/capacitance), pH and clinical scoring of eczema (SCORAD). Citric acid-coated textiles were well tolerated and improved eczema and objective parameters of skin physiology, including barrier function and a reduced skin surface pH, with potential lower pathogenic microbial colonisation.

  19. Validation of treatment escalation as a definition of atopic eczema flares.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim S Thomas

    Full Text Available Atopic eczema (AE is a chronic disease with flares and remissions. Long-term control of AE flares has been identified as a core outcome domain for AE trials. However, it is unclear how flares should be defined and measured.To validate two concepts of AE flares based on daily reports of topical medication use: (i escalation of treatment and (ii days of topical anti-inflammatory medication use (topical corticosteroids and/or calcineurin inhibitors.Data from two published AE studies (studies A (n=336 and B (n=60 were analysed separately. Validity and feasibility of flare definitions were assessed using daily global bother (scale 0 to 10 as the reference standard. Intra-class correlations were reported for continuous variables, and odds ratios and area under the receiver operator characteristic (ROC curve for binary outcome measures.Good agreement was found between both AE flare definitions and change in global bother: area under the ROC curve for treatment escalation of 0.70 and 0.73 in studies A and B respectively, and area under the ROC curve of 0.69 for topical anti-inflammatory medication use (Study A only. Significant positive relationships were found between validated severity scales (POEM, SASSAD, TIS and the duration of AE flares occurring in the previous week - POEM and SASSAD rose by half a point for each unit increase in number of days in flare. Smaller increases were observed on the TIS scale. Completeness of daily diaries was 95% for Study A and 60% for Study B over 16 weeks.Both definitions were good proxy indicators of AE flares. We found no evidence that 'escalation of treatment' was a better measure of AE flares than 'use of topical anti-inflammatory medications'. Capturing disease flares in AE trials through daily recording of medication use is feasible and appears to be a good indicator of long-term control.Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN71423189 (Study A.

  20. Topical herbal medicines for atopic eczema: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thandar, Y; Gray, A; Botha, J; Mosam, A

    2017-02-01

    Despite the availability of medicines with proven efficacy, many patients use complementary or alternative medicines (CAMs) to manage atopic eczema (AE). Due to the lack of objective information on topical CAMs, this systematic review evaluates the current evidence for the efficacy and safety of topical herbal preparations in AE. Using Cochrane systematic review methodology, PubMed, the Cochrane Library, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), CINAHL (via EBSCO), MEDLINE (via EBSCO), Proquest Health and Medical Complete, GREAT and CAM-QUEST were searched from inception until June 2014. Bibliographies of retrieved studies were hand searched for further relevant trials. All controlled clinical trials of topical herbal medicines for AE in humans of any age were included regardless of the control intervention or randomization. Only English-language publications were considered. Eight studies met the inclusion criteria. Seven investigated extracts of single plants and one an extract from multiple plants. Only two studies that showed a positive effect were considered to have a low risk of bias across all domains (those of liquorice gel and Hypericum perforatum). In these two, the test product was reported to be superior to placebo. Despite variations in diagnostic criteria and lack of validated tools for outcome assessments in one of these, the promising results may warrant continued research in better-designed studies. No meta-analysis was performed due to heterogeneity in all studies. There is currently insufficient evidence of efficacy for any topical herbal extract in AE. Many studies had methodological flaws and even those showing efficacy were single trials with small patient cohorts. © 2016 British Association of Dermatologists.

  1. Prevalência de sintomas de asma, rinite e eczema atópico entre crianças e adolescentes brasileiros identificados pelo International Study of Asthma and Allergies (ISAAC: fase 3 Prevalence of symptoms of asthma, rhinitis, and atopic eczema among Brazilian children and adolescents identified by the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC: phase 3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirceu Solé

    2006-10-01

    Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics. RESULTS: The mean prevalence rates among schoolchildren and adolescents were respectively 24.3 and 19.0% for active asthma; 12.6 and 14.6% for rhinoconjunctivitis; and 8.2 and 5.0% for atopic eczema. A significant negative association was observed between latitude and physician-diagnosed asthma among schoolchildren, severe asthma, physician-diagnosed asthma, eczema and atopic eczema among adolescents. No association with altitude was found. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of asthma, rhinitis and atopic eczema in Brazil varies considerably. Higher prevalence rates, especially of asthma and eczema, were found at centers located closer to the equator.

  2. Viewing a humorous film decreases IgE production by seminal B cells from patients with atopic eczema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimata, Hajime

    2009-02-01

    Sperms induced IgE production by seminal B cells from patients with atopic eczema via interaction of B cells with galectin-3 on sperms. We studied the effect of viewing a humorous film on IgE production by seminal B cells cultured with sperms. Twenty-four male patients with atopic eczema viewed a humorous film (Modern Times, featuring Charlie Chaplin). Just before and immediately after viewing, semen was collected, and seminal B cells and sperms were purified. Seminal B cells were cultured with sperms and IgE production was measured, while expression of galectin-3 on sperms was assessed. After viewing the humorous film, IgE production by B cells cultured with sperms was significantly decreased. Moreover, expression of galectin-3 on sperms was reduced. Viewing a humorous film reduced galectin-3 expression on sperms, which in turn decreased IgE production by seminal B cells cultured with sperms. These results indicate that viewing a humorous film may be helpful for the study and treatment of local IgE production and allergy in the reproductive tract.

  3. Birch pollen influence the severity of atopic eczema – prospective clinical cohort pilot study and ex vivo penetration study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fölster-Holst R

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Regina Fölster-Holst,1 Jagoda Galecka,1 Sigo Weißmantel,1 Ute Dickschat,2 Frank Rippke,3 Kerstin Bohnsack,3 Thomas Werfel,4 Katja Wichmann,4 Matthias Buchner,1 Thomas Schwarz,1 Annika Vogt,5 Jürgen Lademann,5 Martina C Meinke5 1Department of Dermatology, Venerology and Allergy, University of Kiel, 2Wörth, 3Beiersdorf AG, Hamburg, 4Department of Dermatology, Venerology and Allergy, Division of Immunodermatology and Allergy Research, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, 5Department of Dermatology, Venerology and Allergology, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany Abstract: There is little clinical evidence for a correlation between the severity of atopic eczema (AE and pollen exposition. To obtain more data, we performed a clinical cohort pilot study about the influence of pollen on AE between sensitized and nonsensitized subjects and an experimental study addressing the cutaneous penetration of pollen into the skin. Fifty-five patients were monitored during birch pollen season. To study the cutaneous penetration, grass pollen allergens were applied on excised skin and the uptake in CD1c-expressing dendritic cells was investigated. The correlation between environmental pollen load and severity of the Scoring Atopic Dermatitis (SCORAD score and pruritus was observed, regardless of the status of sensitization. The sensitized group recovered significantly worse after the birch pollen season. Remarkably higher amounts of pollen allergens taken up by CD1c cells were detected in epidermal cells derived from skin explants with a disturbed epidermal barrier. These findings suggest an exacerbating role of pollen in AE utilizing the epidermal route. Keywords: aeroallergens, atopic eczema, seasonality, skin antigen-presenting cells, skin barrier penetration

  4. Elevated levels of IgG and IgG4 to Malassezia allergens in atopic eczema patients with IgE reactivity to Malassezia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Johansson, Catharina; Tengvall Linder, Maria; Aalberse, Rob C.; Scheynius, Annika

    2004-01-01

    The opportunistic yeast Malassezia is considered to be one of the factors that can contribute to atopic eczema (AE). Elevated serum IgE levels, T-cell proliferation and positive skin prick test (SPT) and atopy patch test (APT) reactions to Malassezia are found among AE patients. Sera from 127 AE

  5. A Newly Recognized 13q12.3 Microdeletion Syndrome Characterized by Intellectual Disability, Microcephaly, and Eczema/Atopic Dermatitis Encompassing the HMGB1 and KATNAL1 Genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartholdi, D.; Stray-Pedersen, A.; Azzarello-Burri, S.

    2014-01-01

    microcephaly, and eczema/atopic dermatitis as the predominant symptoms. In addition, they had pronounced feeding difficulties in early infancy. They displayed similar facial features such as malar flattening, a prominent nose with underdeveloped alae nasi, a smooth philtrum, and a thin vermillion of the upper...

  6. GPs' experiences of diagnosing and managing childhood eczema: a qualitative study in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Roux, Emma; Powell, Kingsley; Banks, Jonathan P; Ridd, Mathew J

    2018-02-01

    Eczema is common among children, and in the UK the majority are managed by GPs. The most common cause of poor disease control is incorrect use of topical treatments. There is a lack of research into the challenges faced by GPs in diagnosing and managing this condition. To explore the experiences of GPs in assessing and managing children with eczema. Qualitative study in primary care in England. Semi-structured interviews with 15 GPs were audiorecorded, transcribed verbatim, and analysed thematically using the framework method. GPs described a paucity of dermatology training. Although most GPs were confident diagnosing uncomplicated eczema, they reported using a trial-and-error approach to prescribing emollients, and were uncertain about quantities of topical treatments to issue. Mild and moderate potency topical corticosteroids (TCS) were commonly used, but most GPs lacked confidence in recommending potent TCS, and viewed parents or carers to be fearful of using all strengths of TCS. GPs perceived adherence to treatments to be low, but provision of information to support self-care was variable. Routine review of medication use or disease control was uncommon, which GPs attributed to service constraints. Participants' views on the causes and management of eczema were perceived to be at odds with parents and carers, who were said to be overly focused on an underlying cause, such as allergy. GP uncertainty in managing eczema, lack of routine information and review, and perceived dissonance with parents around causation and management may be contributing to low concordance with treatments. © British Journal of General Practice 2018.

  7. Household environment, lifestyle behaviors, and dietary habits in relation to childhood atopic eczema in Shanghai, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jiao; Liu, Wei; Hu, Yu; Zou, Zhijun; Shen, Li; Huang, Chen

    2017-01-01

    We aim to investigate associations of the child's individual characteristics, building characteristics, home environmental exposures, family lifestyle behaviors, and dietary habits on childhood eczema during lifetime-ever and in the last year before the survey. During April 2011-April 2012, we conducted a cross-sectional study and collected 13,335 parents-reported questionnaires of 4-6-year-old children from 72 kindergartens in Shanghai, China. Logistic regression model was used to investigate associations. After adjusted for sex, age, family history of atopy, and questionnaire reporter, the factors which were strongly associated (increased odds >30% and p value child's first year of life (1.31), using laminate (1.58) and solid (1.42) wood as material of floor covering (compared to using cement), residence located in urban district (1.38), and dampness-related exposures in the early residence (mold spots/stains: 1.41; mold odor: 1.41) and in the current residence (water damage: 1.33; damp stains: 1.34; mold spots: 1.32; and windows pane condensation: 1.31). Parental smoking, pet-keeping, and incense-burning had no significant associations with childhood eczema. Similar associations were found for eczema in the last year before the survey. Families with sick children likely changed lifestyle behaviors and dietary habits. Childhood eczema could be influenced by many household environmental and non-environmental factors. Exposures during early lifetime likely have greater impact on childhood eczema than current exposures. Associations of lifestyle behaviors and dietary habits with childhood eczema could be modified by family avoidance behaviors.

  8. Microarray analysis reveals marked intestinal microbiota aberrancy in infants having eczema compared to healthy children in at-risk for atopic disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nylund Lotta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Deviations in composition and diversity of intestinal microbiota in infancy have been associated with both the development and recurrence of atopic eczema. Thus, we decided to use a deep and global microarray-based method to characterize the diversity and temporal changes of the intestinal microbiota in infancy and to define specific bacterial signatures associated with eczema. Faecal microbiota at 6 and 18 months of age were analysed from 34 infants (15 with eczema and 19 healthy controls selected from a prospective follow-up study based on the availability of faecal samples. The infants were originally randomized to receive either Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG or placebo. Results Children with eczema harboured a more diverse total microbiota than control subjects as assessed by the Simpson’s reciprocal diversity index of the microarray profiles. Composition of the microbiota did not differ between study groups at age of 6 months, but was significantly different at age of 18 months as assessed by MCPP (p=0.01. At this age healthy children harboured 3 -fold greater amount of members of the Bacteroidetes (p=0.01. Microbiota of children suffering from eczema had increased abundance of the Clostridium clusters IV and XIVa, which are typically abundant in adults. Probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG supplementation in early infancy was observed to have minor long-term effects on the microbiota composition. Conclusion A diverse and adult-type microbiota in early childhood is associated with eczema and it may contribute to the perpetuation of eczema.

  9. Atopic Dermatitis Anti-IgE Paediatric Trial (ADAPT): the role of anti-IgE in severe paediatric eczema: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Susan; Cornelius, Victoria; Chen, Tao; Radulovic, Suzana; Wan, Mandy; Jahan, Rahi; Lack, Gideon

    2017-03-22

    The evidence for systemic treatments for severe childhood eczema is limited and largely based on extrapolation of data from adult studies. Current therapies are often immunosuppressant and may be associated with both short- and long-term side effects. There is increasing in vitro and murine-model evidence for the role of IgE in the immunopathogenesis of atopic eczema. The aim of the study is to assess whether anti-IgE treatment (omalizumab) improves eczema, compared to placebo. The Atopic Dermatitis Anti-IgE Paediatric Trial (ADAPT) is a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled study assessing the role of anti-IgE in the management of severe paediatric eczema. Children with severe atopic eczema, with an objective SCORing Atopic Dermatitis (SCORAD) score of over 40 will be recruited. These children are candidates for systemic therapy, have failed systemic therapy or have experienced side effects from systemic therapy. Sixty-two patients aged between 4 and 19 years will receive anti-IgE for 6 months. The primary outcome measure will be the validated eczema score, the objective SCORAD at 24 weeks. This study has 90% power to detect a 33% relative reduction in SCORAD between active and placebo groups, with 5% significance. IgE may have a role to play in eczema, particularly in childhood. This forms the basis for the hypothesis that anti-IgE may be an effective treatment in this patient population. This will be the largest study to evaluate the efficacy of anti-IgE (omalizumab) versus placebo in children with severe eczema. The findings will help to clarify the role of anti-IgE as a potential treatment option in patients with severe childhood eczema. European Clinical Trials Database (EudraCT) Number: 2010-020841-29 . Assigned on 14 May 2010. ISRCTN Registry, Identifier: ISRCTN15090567 . Retrospectively assigned on 3 December 2014. ClinicalTrials.gov, Identifier: NCT02300701 . First received 21 November 2014.

  10. Increase in dermcidin-derived peptides in sweat of patients with atopic eczema caused by a humorous video.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimata, Hajime

    2007-01-01

    Dermcidin (DCD)-derived peptide is an antimicrobial peptide produced by the sweat glands. However, the levels of DCD-derived peptide in sweat were decreased in patients with atopic eczema (AE). The effect of viewing a humorous video on the levels of DCD-derived peptide was studied. Twenty patients with AE viewed an 87-min humorous video (Modern Times, featuring Charlie Chaplin). Just before and immediately after viewing, sweat was collected, and the levels of DCD-derived peptide and total protein in sweat were measured. Viewing a humorous video increased the levels of DCD-derived peptide without affecting the levels of total protein in sweat. Viewing a humorous video increased DCD-derived peptide in sweat of patients with AE, and thus, it may be helpful in the treatment of skin infection of AE.

  11. Association of pollution and climate with atopic eczema in US children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathuria, P; Silverberg, J I

    2016-08-01

    We sought to determine the relationship between childhood eczema, climate, and environmental pollutants. We analyzed data from the 2007-2008 National Survey of Children's Health including a representative sample of 91,642 children age 0-17 years and the 2006-2007 Environmental Protection Agency measurements of carbon monoxide (CO), nitrate (NO3 ), nitrogen dioxide (NO2 ), organic carbon (OC), sulfate (SO3 ), sulfur dioxide (SO2 ), particulate matter ≤2.5 μm (PM-2.5) and Climate Data Center measurements of relative humidity (%), issued UV index, outdoor air temperature, and precipitation levels. In multivariate survey logistic regression models controlling for age, sex, race/ethnicity, household income, US birthplace, and history of moving to a new location, eczema was associated with higher mean annual NO2 (p = 0.008), SO2 (p = 0.006), SO3 (p = 0.0002), arsenic (p = 0.0007), nickel (p = 0.0002), lead (p = 0.03), vanadium (p pollutants and climate factors occurring in the USA, of which 1 was associated with higher prevalence and two were associated with lower prevalences of eczema (p Pollutants in conjunction with climate factors may differentially impact eczema prevalence and severity, some with apparent harmful effects. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Efalizumab for severe refractory atopic eczema: retrospective study on 11 cases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibler, K; Dam, Hans Thorhauge; Gniadecki, R

    2010-01-01

    Efalizumab is a recombinant humanized murine monoclonal antibody against CD11a, approved for the treatment of plaque psoriasis. However, recent reports suggest that it also may be effective in the treatment of severe atopic dermatitis (AD).......Efalizumab is a recombinant humanized murine monoclonal antibody against CD11a, approved for the treatment of plaque psoriasis. However, recent reports suggest that it also may be effective in the treatment of severe atopic dermatitis (AD)....

  13. Comparative effectiveness of homoeopathic vs. conventional therapy in usual care of atopic eczema in children: long-term medical and economic outcomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Roll

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: One in five children visiting a homeopathic physician suffers from atopic eczema. OBJECTIVES: We aimed to examine the long-term effectiveness, safety and costs of homoeopathic vs. conventional treatment in usual medical care of children with atopic eczema. METHODS: In this prospective multi-centre comparative observational non-randomized rater-blinded study, 135 children (48 homoeopathy, 87 conventional with mild to moderate atopic eczema were included by their respective physicians. Depending on the specialisation of the physician, the primary treatment was either standard conventional treatment or individualized homeopathy as delivered in routine medical care. The main outcome was the SCORAD (SCORing Atopic Dermatitis at 36 months by a blinded rater. Further outcomes included quality of life, conventional medicine consumption, safety and disease related costs at six, 12 and 36 months after baseline. A multilevel ANCOVA was used, with physician as random effect and the following fixed effects: age, gender, baseline value, severity score, social class and parents' expectation. RESULTS: The adjusted mean SCORAD showed no significant differences between the groups at 36 months (13.7 95% CI [7.9-19.5] vs. 14.9 [10.4-19.4], p = 0.741. The SCORAD response rates at 36 months were similar in both groups (33% response: homoeopathic 63.9% vs. conventional 64.5%, p = 0.94; 50% response: 52.0% vs. 52.3%, p = 0.974. Total costs were higher in the homoeopathic versus the conventional group (months 31-36 200.54 Euro [132.33-268.76] vs. 68.86 Euro [9.13-128.58], p = 0.005. CONCLUSIONS: Taking patient preferences into account, while being unable to rule out residual confounding, in this long-term observational study, the effects of homoeopathic treatment were not superior to conventional treatment for children with mild to moderate atopic eczema, but involved higher costs.

  14. Climate and prevalence of atopic eczema in 6- to 7-year-old school children in Spain. ISAAC PhASE III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez-Varela, María Morales; García-Marcos Alvarez, Luís; Kogan, Michael D.; González, Agustín Llopis; Gimeno, Antonio Martínez; Ontoso, Inés Aguinaga; Díaz, Carlos González; Pena, Alberto Arnedo; Aurrecoechea, Begoña Domínguez; Monge, Rosa María Busquets; Quiros, Alfredo Blanco; Garrido, José Batlles; Canflanca, Iñaqui Miner; Varela, Ángel López-Silvarrey

    2008-11-01

    Atopic eczema (AE) is a chronic skin disease. Recent reports indicate that the worldwide prevalence of AE is increasing and that various environmental factors are implicated in its aetiology. Climatic conditions have been related with AE prevalence, and Spain has varying climatic conditions. The aim of this study is to document the possible climatic influence on the prevalence of AE in schoolchildren aged 6-7 years in three different climatic regions in Spain. We conducted a cross-sectional population-based survey of 28,394 schoolchildren aged 6-7 years from 10 Spanish centres in three different climatic regions. The mean participation rate was 76.5%. AE prevalence was assessed using the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC) questionnaire and the Spanish Academy of Dermatology criteria used in Spain to diagnose AE. The data, including annual temperature, precipitation, relative humidity and the annual number of sunny hours per climatic region, were obtained from the Spanish National Institute of Meteorology. Different AE prevalences were found in all three climatic regions studied: Atlantic, 32.9; Mediterranean 28.3; and Continental 31.2 per 100 children studied ( p < 0.005). AE was positively associated with precipitation and humidity, and was negatively associated with temperature and the number of sunny hours. The results show that AE is significantly dependent on meteorological conditions.

  15. Enhancement of allergic skin wheal responses in patients with atopic eczema/dermatitis syndrome by playing video games or by a frequently ringing mobile phone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimata, H

    2003-06-01

    Playing video games causes physical and psychological stress, including increased heart rate and blood pressure and aggression-related feelings. Use of mobile phones is very popular in Japan, and frequent ringing is a common and intrusive part of Japanese life. Atopic eczema/dermatitis syndrome is often exacerbated by stress. Stress increases serum IgE levels, skews cytokine pattern towards Th2 type, enhances allergen-induced skin wheal responses, and triggers mast cell degranulation via substance P, vasoactive intestinal peptide and nerve growth factor. (1). In the video game study, normal subjects (n = 25), patients with allergic rhinitis (n = 25) or atopic eczema/dermatitis syndrome (n = 25) played a video game (STREET FIGHTER II) for 2 h. Before and after the study, allergen-induced wheal responses, plasma levels of substance P, vasoactive intestinal peptide and nerve growth factor, and in vitro production of total IgE, antihouse dust mite IgE and cytokines were measured. (2). In the mobile phone study, normal subjects (n = 27), patients with allergic rhinitis (n = 27) or atopic eczema/dermatitis syndrome (n = 27) were exposed to 30 incidences of ringing mobile phones during 30 min. Before and after the study, allergen-induced wheal responses, plasma levels of substance P, vasoactive intestinal peptide and nerve growth factor were measured. Playing video games had no effect on the normal subjects or the patients with allergic rhinitis. In contrast, playing video games significantly enhanced allergen-induced skin wheal responses and increased plasma levels of substance P, vasoactive intestinal peptide and nerve growth factors in the patients with atopic eczema/dermatitis syndrome. Moreover, playing video games enhanced in vitro production of total IgE and anti-house dust mite IgE with concomitant increased production of IL-4, IL-10 and IL-13 and decreased production of IFN-gamma and IL-12 in the patients with atopic eczema/dermatitis syndrome. However, exposure

  16. Treatment of moderate?to?severe atopic eczema in adults within the U.K.: results of a national survey of dermatologists

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, K.; Swan, D.J.; Affleck, A.; Flohr, C.; Reynolds, N.J.

    2017-01-01

    Summary Background Little is known about U.K. dermatologists' treatment approaches towards adult patients with recalcitrant moderate?to?severe atopic eczema. Objectives We wanted to learn about (i) treatment approaches used for this disease in the U.K.; (ii) factors that influence treatment decisions and (iii) perceived gaps in evidence on treatment safety and efficacy, and priorities for future trials. Methods We conducted an online survey of consultant?level dermatologists in the U.K. Resul...

  17. Randomised controlled trial of silk therapeutic garments for the management of atopic eczema in children: the CLOTHES trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Kim S; Bradshaw, Lucy E; Sach, Tracey H; Cowdell, Fiona; Batchelor, Jonathan M; Lawton, Sandra; Harrison, Eleanor F; Haines, Rachel H; Ahmed, Amina; Dean, Taraneh; Burrows, Nigel P; Pollock, Ian; Buckley, Hannah K; Williams, Hywel C; Llewellyn, Joanne; Crang, Clare; Grundy, Jane D; Guiness, Juliet; Gribbin, Andrew; Wake, Eileen V; Mitchell, Eleanor J; Brown, Sara J; Montgomery, Alan A

    2017-04-01

    Atopic eczema (AE) is a chronic, itchy, inflammatory skin condition that affects the quality of life of children and their families. The role of specialist clothing in the management of AE is poorly understood. To assess the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of silk garments for the management of AE in children with moderate to severe disease. Parallel-group, observer-blind, randomised controlled trial of 6 months' duration, followed by a 2-month observational period. A nested qualitative study evaluated the beliefs of trial participants, health-care professionals and health-care commissioners about the use of silk garments for AE. Secondary care and the community in five UK centres. Children aged 1-15 years with moderate or severe AE. Participants were randomised (1 : 1 using online randomisation) to standard care or standard care plus 100% silk garments made from antimicrobially protected knitted sericin-free silk [DermaSilk TM (AlPreTec Srl, San Donà di Piave, Italy) or DreamSkin TM (DreamSkin Health Ltd, Hatfield, UK)]. Three sets of garments were supplied per participant, to be worn for up to 6 months (day and night). At 6 months the standard care group received the garments to use for the remaining 2-month observational period. Primary outcome - AE severity using the Eczema Area and Severity Index (EASI) assessed at 2, 4 and 6 months, by nurses blinded to treatment allocation. EASI scores were log-transformed for analysis. Secondary outcomes - patient-reported eczema symptoms (Patient Oriented Eczema Measure); global assessment of severity (Investigator Global Assessment); quality of life of the child (Atopic Dermatitis Quality of Life, Child Health Utility - 9 Dimensions), family (Dermatitis Family Impact Questionnaire) and main carer (EuroQoL-5 Dimensions-3 Levels); use of standard eczema treatments (e.g. emollients, topical corticosteroids); and cost-effectiveness. The acceptability and durability of the clothing, and adherence to wearing the

  18. Staphylococcus aureus colonization in atopic eczema and its association with filaggrin gene mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, M. L.; Edslev, S. M.; Andersen, P. S.

    2017-01-01

    was to assess differences in S. aureus colonization in patients with AD with and without filaggrin gene mutations. The secondary aim was to assess disease severity in relation to S. aureus colonization. Exploratory analyses were performed to investigate S. aureus genetic lineages in relation to filaggrin gene...... were characterized with respect to disease severity (Scoring Atopic Dermatitis) and FLG mutations (n = 88). Fisher's exact test was used to analyse differences in S. aureus colonization in relation to FLG mutations. Results: Of the 101 patients included, 74 (73%) were colonized with S. aureus....... Of the colonized patients, 70 (95%) carried only one CC type in all three different sampling sites. In lesional skin, S. aureus was found in 24 of 31 patients with FLG mutations vs. 24 of 54 wild-type patients (P = 0·0004). Staphylococcus aureusCC1 clonal lineage was more prevalent in patients with FLG mutations...

  19. Comparative Effectiveness of Homoeopathic vs. Conventional Therapy in Usual Care of Atopic Eczema in Children: Long-Term Medical and Economic Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roll, Stephanie; Reinhold, Thomas; Pach, Daniel; Brinkhaus, Benno; Icke, Katja; Staab, Doris; Jäckel, Tanja; Wegscheider, Karl; Willich, Stefan N.; Witt, Claudia M.

    2013-01-01

    Background One in five children visiting a homeopathic physician suffers from atopic eczema. Objectives We aimed to examine the long-term effectiveness, safety and costs of homoeopathic vs. conventional treatment in usual medical care of children with atopic eczema. Methods In this prospective multi-centre comparative observational non-randomized rater-blinded study, 135 children (48 homoeopathy, 87 conventional) with mild to moderate atopic eczema were included by their respective physicians. Depending on the specialisation of the physician, the primary treatment was either standard conventional treatment or individualized homeopathy as delivered in routine medical care. The main outcome was the SCORAD (SCORing Atopic Dermatitis) at 36 months by a blinded rater. Further outcomes included quality of life, conventional medicine consumption, safety and disease related costs at six, 12 and 36 months after baseline. A multilevel ANCOVA was used, with physician as random effect and the following fixed effects: age, gender, baseline value, severity score, social class and parents’ expectation. Results The adjusted mean SCORAD showed no significant differences between the groups at 36 months (13.7 95% CI [7.9–19.5] vs. 14.9 [10.4–19.4], p = 0.741). The SCORAD response rates at 36 months were similar in both groups (33% response: homoeopathic 63.9% vs. conventional 64.5%, p = 0.94; 50% response: 52.0% vs. 52.3%, p = 0.974). Total costs were higher in the homoeopathic versus the conventional group (months 31–36 200.54 Euro [132.33–268.76] vs. 68.86 Euro [9.13–128.58], p = 0.005). Conclusions Taking patient preferences into account, while being unable to rule out residual confounding, in this long-term observational study, the effects of homoeopathic treatment were not superior to conventional treatment for children with mild to moderate atopic eczema, but involved higher costs. PMID:23383019

  20. Treatment of moderate-to-severe atopic eczema in adults within the U.K.: results of a national survey of dermatologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, K; Swan, D J; Affleck, A; Flohr, C; Reynolds, N J

    2017-06-01

    Little is known about U.K. dermatologists' treatment approaches towards adult patients with recalcitrant moderate-to-severe atopic eczema. We wanted to learn about (i) treatment approaches used for this disease in the U.K.; (ii) factors that influence treatment decisions and (iii) perceived gaps in evidence on treatment safety and efficacy, and priorities for future trials. We conducted an online survey of consultant-level dermatologists in the U.K. Sixty-one respondents from over 30 centres reported on management of moderate-to-severe atopic eczema in adults, outwith the context of an acute flare. Phototherapy or psoralen-ultraviolet A was the most common therapeutic modality chosen first line (46%), and this was usually narrowband ultraviolet B. Systemic therapy was chosen as a first-line approach by 36% of dermatologists. Azathioprine was the commonest drug reported being used as first line followed by oral corticosteroids, ciclosporin and methotrexate. Methotrexate was the most common second-line treatment of respondents. The key factors that influenced decision making on the use of phototherapy and systemic agents were the respondent's clinical experience, results of baseline tests (systemic agents) and knowledge of both efficacy and acute and chronic side-effect profiles. The most important evidence gaps identified were the relative effectiveness of treatments, the alternatives to current approaches and the safety of long-term maintenance treatment. With regard to future trials, respondents suggested that priority should be given to studies involving methotrexate. While survey study designs have limitations, we found that phototherapy, in particular narrowband ultraviolet B, was respondents' preferred first-line treatment for adults with recalcitrant moderate-to-severe atopic eczema, perhaps reflecting access to, and clinical experience of, this approach. Azathioprine is widely used as a longer-term maintenance treatment. © 2016 The Authors. British Journal

  1. Associations of obesity with newly diagnosed and previously known atopic diseases in Chinese adults: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Biao; Wang, Zhiqiang; Wang, Yupeng; Liu, Meina; Wang, Yongchen

    2017-03-02

    To assess the associations of obesity with newly diagnosed and previously known atopic disorders in Chinese adults. 4,629 adults aged 18 years or older were recruited in Harbin, China. Among them, 1,114 were previously diagnosed atopic cases, 1,298 were newly diagnosed cases, and 2,217 non-atopic controls. Obesity and overweight are defined according to the criteria established by the Working Group on Obesity in China. The associations of obesity with known and newly diagnosed atopic disorders were assessed using logistic regressions. Obesity was significantly associated with known atopic disorders (adjusted OR = 2.41 (95% CI: 1.81, 3.22)). The association of obesity with newly diagnosed atopic cases was not as strong as that with known cases, and was not statistically significant (adjusted OR = 1.27 (95% CI: 0.94, 1.72)). The similar pattern was observed in different allergic diseases, gender and age stratifications. The association between overweight and atopic diseases were not significant. Obesity is strongly associated with previously diagnosed atopic cases but not so with newly diagnosed atopic cases in Chinese adults. It is likely that people with atopic disorders have a higher risk of developing obesity. Our findings are important for the management of atopic disorders and chronic disease prevention among atopic disease patients.

  2. Associations of obesity with newly diagnosed and previously known atopic diseases in Chinese adults: a case-control study

    OpenAIRE

    Xie, Biao; Wang, Zhiqiang; Wang, Yupeng; Liu, Meina; Wang, Yongchen

    2017-01-01

    To assess the associations of obesity with newly diagnosed and previously known atopic disorders in Chinese adults. 4,629 adults aged 18 years or older were recruited in Harbin, China. Among them, 1,114 were previously diagnosed atopic cases, 1,298 were newly diagnosed cases, and 2,217 non-atopic controls. Obesity and overweight are defined according to the criteria established by the Working Group on Obesity in China. The associations of obesity with known and newly diagnosed atopic disorder...

  3. Serum interleukin 17, interleukin 23, and interleukin 10 values in children with atopic eczema/dermatitis syndrome (AEDS): association with clinical severity and phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonardi, Salvatore; Cuppari, Caterina; Manti, Sara; Filippelli, Martina; Parisi, Giuseppe Fabio; Borgia, Francesco; Briuglia, Silvana; Cannavò, Patrizia; Salpietro, Annamaria; Arrigo, Teresa; Salpietro, Carmelo

    2015-01-01

    To date cytokines profile in AEDS is poorly described in children. We evaluated the interleukin (IL)-17, IL-23, and IL-10 levels in atopic eczema/dermatitis syndrome (AEDS) children and healthy controls, in atopic AEDS (aAEDS) and nonatopic (naAEDS) subtypes and their relationship with disease severity. A total of 181 children with aAEDS and 93 healthy children were evaluated. According to the skin-prick test (SPT) for allergens and serum total IgE, all patients were subdivided in two groups: 104 aAEDS and 77 naAEDS. In all patients, serum IL-17, IL-23, and IL-10 levels were detected. Serum IL-17 and IL-23 levels were significantly higher, and serum IL-10 levels were significantly lower in AEDS children than healthy group (p children with only allergic sensitization. Our study confirms the role of IL-17, IL-23, and IL-10 and their relationship with the severity of AEDS. We firstly found a correlation between high IL-17/IL-23 axis levels and different phenotypes of AEDS in children, suggesting its role as marker of "atopic march" and disease severity.

  4. Skin provocation tests may help to diagnose atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawro, T; Lehmann, S; Altrichter, S; Fluhr, J W; Zuberbier, T; Church, M K; Maurer, M; Metz, M

    2016-12-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common skin disorder. Its diagnosis relies on clinical judgment. Mild and untypical manifestations may cause diagnostic difficulties. Biomarkers for the differential diagnostic workup of AD are needed. To test whether the results of skin provocation with cowhage, an established model of histamine-independent pruritus, and histamine are different in AD patients and healthy subjects and whether these tests may be used as diagnostic markers of AD. Twenty-two AD patients and 18 healthy controls were subjected to topical cowhage provocation and skin prick testing with histamine and assessed for differences in the quality, intensity, and persistence of itch, for wheal diameter, volume, and flare size and intensity. Patients with AD, compared with healthy controls, exhibited significantly smaller histamine-induced flares (P skin provocation tests should be investigated in further studies. Long persistence of cowhage-induced itch and diminished histamine-induced flare in nonlesional skin may support diagnosis of AD. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Management of Atopic Hand Dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halling-Overgaard, Anne-Sofie; Zachariae, Claus; Thyssen, Jacob P

    2017-01-01

    This article provides an overview of clinical aspects of hand eczema in patients with atopic dermatitis. Hand eczema can be a part of atopic dermatitis itself or a comorbidity, for example, as irritant or allergic contact dermatitis. When managing hand eczema, it is important to first categorize...

  6. When does atopic dermatitis warrant systemic therapy? : Recommendations from an expert panel of the International Eczema Council

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simpson, Eric L.; Bruin-Weller, Marjolein; Flohr, Carsten; Ardern-Jones, Michael R.; Barbarot, Sebastien; Deleuran, Mette; Bieber, Thomas; Vestergaard, Christian; Brown, Sara J.; Cork, Michael J.; Drucker, Aaron M.; Eichenfield, Lawrence F.; Foelster-Holst, Regina; Guttman-Yassky, Emma; Nosbaum, Audrey; Reynolds, Nick J; Silverberg, Jonathan I.; Schmitt, Jochen; Seyger, Marieke M B; Spuls, Phyllis I; Stalder, Jean-Francois; Su, John C.; Takaoka, Roberto; Traidl-Hoffmann, Claudia; Thyssen, Jacob P.; van der Schaft, Jorien; Wollenberg, Andreas; Irvine, Alan D.; Paller, Amy S.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although most patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) are effectively managed with topical medication, a significant minority require systemic therapy. Guidelines for decision making about advancement to systemic therapy are lacking. OBJECTIVE: To guide those considering use of systemic

  7. Eczema Herpeticum in Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grigoriy E. Gurvits

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Eczema Herpeticum (EH, or Kaposi’s varicelliform eruption, is a skin infection with herpes simplex type I virus (HSV-1 that occurs in patients with compromised skin integrity, such as atopic dermatitis (AD. Unrecognized, it may be fatal and viremia in pregnancy may lead to fetal demise and miscarriage. We describe a rare case of EH in pregnancy, eczema herpeticum gravidarum (EHG, which is the third published report in the literature to date.

  8. When does atopic dermatitis warrant systemic therapy? Recommendations from an expert panel of the International Eczema Council

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simpson, Eric L.; Bruin-Weller, Marjolein; Flohr, Carsten; Ardern-Jones, Michael R.; Barbarot, Sebastien; Deleuran, Mette; Bieber, Thomas; Vestergaard, Christian; Brown, Sara J.; Cork, Michael J.; Drucker, Aaron M.; Eichenfield, Lawrence F.; Foelster-Holst, Regina; Guttman-Yassky, Emma; Nosbaum, Audrey; Reynolds, Nick J.; Silverberg, Jonathan I.; Schmitt, Jochen; Seyger, Marieke M. B.; Spuls, Phyllis I.; Stalder, Jean-Francois; Su, John C.; Takaoka, Roberto; Traidl-Hoffmann, Claudia; Thyssen, Jacob P.; van der Schaft, Jorien; Wollenberg, Andreas; Irvine, Alan D.; Paller, Amy S.

    2017-01-01

    Although most patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) are effectively managed with topical medication, a significant minority require systemic therapy. Guidelines for decision making about advancement to systemic therapy are lacking. To guide those considering use of systemic therapy in AD and provide

  9. Steroid hormones and peptide hormones in atopic eczema. Radioimmunological determination of diurnal plasma level variations of testosterone, cortisol, prolactin and human growth factor in healthy volunteers and patients showing atopic eczemae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bock, B.

    1986-01-01

    An analysis of hormone measurements in sera from healthy volunteers and patients that was carried out on the basis of different criteria yielded the following results: 1) The testosterone levels determined in the patients sera were significantly lower than those of the healthy individuals and the daily rhythmic variations seen here did not attain statistical significance. 2) There were no statistically relevant differences in the serum concentrations of cortisol between healthy individuals and patients, nor was the amplitude of the daily variations observed to be changed in a consistent way. 3) In the patients, as compared to the healthy individuals, the prolactin level was considerably increased, as was the amplitude of the daily rhythmic variations. 4) The values determined for the human growth hormone (HCG) varied considerably between the individuals of either group. Since this held true for both the fluctuations with time and the height of the serum concentrations, a statistical analysis of the results appeared pointless. The results confirm that central and autonomous components have an important role in ectopic eczemae. (TRV) [de

  10. IgE-binding components of cultured human keratinocytes in atopic eczema/dermatitis syndrome and their crossreactivity with Malassezia furfur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortekangas-Savolainen, O; Peltonen, S; Pummi, K; Kalimo, K; Savolainen, J

    2004-02-01

    Atopic eczema/dermatitis syndrome (AEDS) patients display immunoglobulin E (IgE) reactivity to several antigens, e.g. saprophytic yeasts as Malassezia furfur. AEDS patients also show IgE autoreactivity towards cells of their own tissue including epidermis. The aim of this study was to investigate the IgE autoreactivity of AEDS patients to cultured keratinocytes and to reveal potential crossreacting epitopes in cultured keratinocytes and M. furfur. Serum samples of 27 AEDS patients were analyzed, of these 13 were M. furfur radioallergosorbent test (RAST) positive and 14 negative. Four urticaria, three psoriasis, and seven nonatopic patients were included as controls. The studies were performed by using IgE immunoblotting and immunoblotting inhibition methods. Ten IgE-binding protein bands were detected in cultured human keratinocytes by IgE immunoblotting using sera from adult AEDS patients. Anti-keratinocyte IgE antibodies were more associated with elevated S-IgE level than M. furfur RAST. Clear crossreactivity with M. furfur could not be shown. The possible pathomechanism of anti-keratinocyte IgE antibodies is not due to IgE epitope mimicry of saprophytic yeast and local tissue in AEDS skin.

  11. Dureza del agua de consumo doméstico y prevalencia de eczema atópico en escolares de Castellón, España Domestic water hardness and prevalence of atopic eczema in Castellon (Spain schoolchildren

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Arnedo-Pena

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Estudiar la asociación entre la prevalencia de eczema atópico (EA y la dureza del agua de uso doméstico. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: El estudio ISAAC (International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood estimó la prevalencia de EA en seis localidades de Castellón, España, en escolares de 6-7 y 13-14 años durante 2002. Se establecieron tres zonas de 300 mg/l según la dureza del agua doméstica de esas localidades. Se empleo regresión logística en el análisis. RESULTADOS: En escolares de 6-7 años, las prevalencias acumuladas de EA en las tres zonas fueron de 28.6, 30.5 y 36.5%. Entre la zona 1 y la zona 3, la razón de momios ajustada (RMa fue 1.58 (IC 95% 1.04-2.39 (prueba de tendencia ajustada p=0.034. La prevalencias de síntomas de EA en el último año fueron de 4.7, 4.5, y 10.4%, respectivamente. Entre la zona 1 y la zona 3, la (RMa fue 2.29 (IC95% 1.19-4.42 (prueba de tendencia ajustada p=0.163. En escolares de 13-14 años no se apreciaron tendencias significativas. CONCLUSIONES: Se sugiere que la dureza del agua podría tener alguna importancia en el desarrollo de la enfermedad en los escolares de 6-7 años.Water hardness has been associated with atopic eczema (AE prevalence in two epidemiologic studies carried out on schoolchildren in England and Japan. OBJECTIVE: To estimate the association between the prevalence of AE and domestic water hardness. METHODS: The prevalence of AE was obtained from The International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood, carried out in six towns in the province of Castellón on schoolchildren 6-7 and 13-14 years of age, using a standard questionnaire in 2002. Three zones were defined according to domestic water hardness of the six study localities: 300 mg/l. A logistic regression analysis was performed. RESULTS: The lifetime prevalence of AE in schoolchildren 6-7 years of age was higher with the increment of water hardness, 28.6, 30.5 and 36.5% respectively for each zone; between

  12. Nanovesicles from Malassezia sympodialis and host exosomes induce cytokine responses--novel mechanisms for host-microbe interactions in atopic eczema.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulf Gehrmann

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Intercellular communication can occur via the release of membrane vesicles. Exosomes are nanovesicles released from the endosomal compartment of cells. Depending on their cell of origin and their cargo they can exert different immunoregulatory functions. Recently, fungi were found to produce extracellular vesicles that can influence host-microbe interactions. The yeast Malassezia sympodialis which belongs to our normal cutaneous microbial flora elicits specific IgE- and T-cell reactivity in approximately 50% of adult patients with atopic eczema (AE. Whether exosomes or other vesicles contribute to the inflammation has not yet been investigated. OBJECTIVE: To investigate if M. sympodialis can release nanovesicles and whether they or endogenous exosomes can activate PBMC from AE patients sensitized to M. sympodialis. METHODS: Extracellular nanovesicles isolated from M. sympodialis, co-cultures of M. sympodialis and dendritic cells, and from plasma of patients with AE and healthy controls (HC were characterised using flow cytometry, sucrose gradient centrifugation, Western blot and electron microscopy. Their ability to stimulate IL-4 and TNF-alpha responses in autologous CD14, CD34 depleted PBMC was determined using ELISPOT and ELISA, respectively. RESULTS: We show for the first time that M. sympodialis releases extracellular vesicles carrying allergen. These vesicles can induce IL-4 and TNF-α responses with a significantly higher IL-4 production in patients compared to HC. Exosomes from dendritic cell and M. sympodialis co-cultures induced IL-4 and TNF-α responses in autologous CD14, CD34 depleted PBMC of AE patients and HC while plasma exosomes induced TNF-α but not IL-4 in undepleted PBMC. CONCLUSIONS: Extracellular vesicles from M. sympodialis, dendritic cells and plasma can contribute to cytokine responses in CD14, CD34 depleted and undepleted PBMC of AE patients and HC. These novel observations have implications for

  13. Atopic dermatitis from adolescence to adulthood in the TOACS cohort: prevalence, persistence and comorbidities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortz, C G; Andersen, K E; Dellgren, C; Barington, T; Bindslev-Jensen, C

    2015-07-01

    While much is known about childhood atopic dermatitis, little is known about persistence of atopic dermatitis into adult life. We report, to our knowledge for the first time, the clinical course of atopic dermatitis in an unselected cohort of adolescents followed into adulthood. The course of atopic dermatitis from adolescence to adulthood was studied prospectively in a cohort of unselected 8th-grade schoolchildren established in 1995 and followed up in 2010 with questionnaire and clinical examination. The lifetime prevalence of atopic dermatitis was high (34.1%), and a considerable number of adults still suffered from atopic dermatitis evaluated both by questionnaire (17.1%) and clinical examination (10.0%). Persistent atopic dermatitis was found in 50% of those diagnosed in school age, and persistent atopic dermatitis was significantly associated with early onset, childhood allergic rhinitis and hand eczema. A close association was also found with allergic contact dermatitis and increased specific IgE to Malassezia furfur, but not with filaggrin gene defect. Persistence of atopic dermatitis in adulthood is common and affects quality of life. Persistent atopic dermatitis is particularly prevalent in those with early onset, allergic rhinitis and hand eczema in childhood. It is important to recognizing atopic dermatitis as a common and disabling disease not only in children but also in adults. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. IL13 genetic polymorphisms, smoking, and eczema in women: a case-control study in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arakawa Masashi

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several genetic association studies have examined the relationships between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the IL13 gene and eczema, and have provided contradictory results. We investigated the relationship between the IL13 SNPs rs1800925 and rs20541 and the risk of eczema in Japanese young adult women. Methods Included were 188 cases who met the criteria of the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC for eczema. Control subjects were 1,082 women without eczema according to the ISAAC criteria, who had not been diagnosed with atopic eczema by a doctor and who had no current asthma as defined by the European Community Respiratory Health Survey criteria. Adjustment was made for age, region of residence, number of children, smoking, and education. Results The minor TT genotype of SNP rs1800925 was significantly associated with an increased risk of eczema in the co-dominant model: the adjusted odds ratio was 2.19 (95% confidence interval: 1.03-4.67. SNP rs20541 was not related to eczema. None of the haplotypes were significantly associated with eczema. Compared with women with the CC or CT genotype of SNP rs1800925 who had never smoked, those with the TT genotype who had ever smoked had a 2.85-fold increased risk of eczema, though the adjusted odds ratio was not statistically significant, and neither multiplicative nor additive interaction was statistically significant. Conclusions Our findings suggest that the IL13 SNP rs1800925 is significantly associated with eczema in Japanese young adult women. We could not find evidence for an interaction between SNP rs1800925 and smoking with regard to eczema.

  15. Classification of hand eczema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agner, T; Aalto-Korte, K; Andersen, K E

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Classification of hand eczema (HE) is mandatory in epidemiological and clinical studies, and also important in clinical work. OBJECTIVES: The aim was to test a recently proposed classification system of HE in clinical practice in a prospective multicentre study. METHODS: Patients were......%) could not be classified. 38% had one additional diagnosis and 26% had two or more additional diagnoses. Eczema on feet was found in 30% of the patients, statistically significantly more frequently associated with hyperkeratotic and vesicular endogenous eczema. CONCLUSION: We find that the classification...

  16. Chinese herbal medicine research in eczema treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leung Ping

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Eczema is a chronic relapsing atopic dermatitis (AD associated with pruritus, sleep disturbance and poor quality of life of the patient. Treatment of eczema includes use of emollient, topical and systemic antimicrobial agents, corticosteroid or immunomodulating agents. Many patients also seek alternative treatments such as dietary avoidance, supplementation or both. This article reviews the basic pathophysiology of eczema and clinical trials involving Chinese medicine in the treatment of eczema. Research reports on Chinese herbal medicine for eczema were retrieved from PubMed and the Cochrane Database for Systematic Reviews for this review. Only a few RCTs demonstrated the efficacy (or lack of efficacy of Chinese medicinal herbs in treating atopic eczema. Further larger scale trials are warranted.

  17. Atopic endotype in childhood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoos, Ann-Marie Malby; Chawes, Bo Lund Krogsgaard; Rasmussen, Morten Arendt

    2016-01-01

    Background: The term atopic disorder is an early attempt to define specific endotypes of children with asthma, eczema, or both and increased IgE levels.Objective: We performed a longitudinal analysis of the relevance of the atopic endotype from birth to age 13 years. Methods: Allergic sensitizati...

  18. Eczema (Atopic Dermatitis)Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Moisturizers should be free of alcohol, scents, dyes, fragrances, and other skin-irritating chemicals. A humidifier in ... LaMontagne, Ph.D. James C. Hill, Ph.D. History Dr. Joseph J. Kinyoun: Father of the NIH ...

  19. Eczema in North West of Libya | Arshah | Libyan Journal of Medicine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The most common type of eczema was contact dermatitis (22.7% of all cases), followed by atopic dermatitis (19.7%) and pityriasis alba (10.5%). In conclusion, eczema is a public health problem in Zliten-Libya, and this necessitates prospective studies to determine its incidence and prevalence. Keywords: Eczema, Atopic ...

  20. Early eczema and the risk of childhood asthma: a prospective, population-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saunes Marit

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Severe eczema in young children is associated with an increased risk of developing asthma and rhino-conjunctivitis. In the general population, however, most cases of eczema are mild to moderate. In an unselected cohort, we studied the risk of current asthma and the co-existence of allergy-related diseases at 6 years of age among children with and without eczema at 2 years of age. Methods Questionnaires assessing various environmental exposures and health variables were administered at 2 years of age. An identical health questionnaire was completed at 6 years of age. The clinical investigation of a random subsample ascertained eczema diagnoses, and missing data were handled by multiple imputation analyses. Results The estimate for the association between eczema at 2 years and current asthma at 6 years was OR=1.80 (95% CI 1.10-2.96. Four of ten children with eczema at 6 years had the onset of eczema after the age of 2 years, but the co-existence of different allergy-related diseases at 6 years was higher among those with the onset of eczema before 2 years of age. Conclusions Although most cases of eczema in the general population were mild to moderate, early eczema was associated with an increased risk of developing childhood asthma. These findings support the hypothesis of an atopic march in the general population. Trial registration The Prevention of Allergy among Children in Trondheim study has been identified as ISRCTN28090297 in the international Current Controlled Trials database

  1. Report from the fourth international consensus meeting to harmonize core outcome measures for atopic eczema/dermatitis clinical trials (HOME initiative)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chalmers, J. R.; Simpson, Elizabeth M; Apfelbacher, C. J.

    2016-01-01

    This article is a report of the fourth meeting of the Harmonising Outcome Measures for Eczema (HOME) initiative held in Malmö, Sweden on 23–24 April 2015 (HOME IV). The aim of the meeting was to achieve consensus over the preferred outcome instruments for measuring patient-reported symptoms and q...

  2. Report from the fourth international consensus meeting to harmonize core outcome measures for atopic eczema/dermatitis clinical trials (HOME initiative)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chalmers, J. R.; Simpson, E.; Apfelbacher, C. J.; Thomas, K. S.; von Kobyletzki, L.; Schmitt, J.; Singh, J. A.; Svensson, A.; Williams, H. C.; Abuabara, K.; Aoki, V.; Ardeleanu, M.; Awici-Rasmussen, M.; Barbarot, S.; Berents, T. L.; Block, J.; Bragg, A.; Burton, T.; Clemmensen, K. K. Bjerring; Creswell-Melville, A.; Dinesen, M.; Drucker, A.; Eckert, L.; Flohr, C.; Garg, M.; Gerbens, L. A. A.; Graff, A. L. B.; Hanifin, J.; Heinl, D.; Humphreys, R.; Ishii, H. A.; Kataoka, Y.; Leshem, Y. A.; Marquort, B.; Massuel, M. -A.; Merhand, S.; Mizutani, H.; Murota, H.; Murrell, D. F.; Nakahara, T.; Nasr, I.; Nograles, K.; Ohya, Y.; Osterloh, I.; Pander, Jan; Prinsen, C.; Purkins, L.; Ridd, M.; Sach, T.; Schuttelaar, M. -L. A.; Shindo, S.; Smirnova, J.; Sulzer, A.; Gjerde, E. Synnove; Takaoka, R.; Talmo, H. Vestby; Tauber, M.; Torchet, F.; Volke, A.; Wahlgren, C. -F.; Weidinger, S.; Weisshaar, E.; Wollenberg, A.; Yamaga, K.; Zhao, C. Y.; Spuls, P. I.

    This article is a report of the fourth meeting of the Harmonising Outcome Measures for Eczema (HOME) initiative held in Malmo, Sweden on 23-24 April 2015 (HOME IV). The aim of the meeting was to achieve consensus over the preferred outcome instruments for measuring patient-reported symptoms and

  3. Gene expression of desaturase (FADS1 and FADS2) and Elongase (ELOVL5) enzymes in peripheral blood: association with polyunsaturated fatty acid levels and atopic eczema in 4-year-old children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chisaguano, Aida Maribel; Montes, Rosa; Pérez-Berezo, Teresa; Castellote, Ana Isabel; Guerendiain, Marcela; Bustamante, Mariona; Morales, Eva; García-Esteban, Raquel; Sunyer, Jordi; Franch, Angels; López-Sabater, M Carmen

    2013-01-01

    It is unknown if changes in the gene expression of the desaturase and elongase enzymes are associated with abnormal n-6 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (LC-PUFA) levels in children with atopic eczema (AE). We analyzed whether mRNA-expression of genes encoding key enzymes of LC-PUFA synthesis (FADS1, FADS2 and ELOVL5) is associated with circulating LC-PUFA levels and risk of AE in 4-year-old children. AE (n=20) and non-AE (n=104) children participating in the Sabadell cohort within the INfancia y Medio Ambiente (INMA) Project were included in the present study. RT-PCR with TaqMan Low-Density Array cards was used to measure the mRNA-expression of FADS1, FADS2 and ELOVL5. LC-PUFA levels were measured by fast gas chromatography in plasma phospholipids. The relationship of gene expression with LC-PUFA levels and enzyme activities was evaluated by Pearson's rank correlation coefficient, and logistic regression models were used to study its association with risk of developing AE. Children with AE had lower levels of several n-6 PUFA members, dihomo-γ-linolenic (DGLA) and arachidonic (AA) acids. mRNA-expression levels of FADS1 and 2 strongly correlated with DGLA levels and with D6D activity. FADS2 and ELOVL5 mRNA-expression levels were significantly lower in AE than in non-AE children (-40.30% and -20.36%; respectively), but no differences were found for FADS1. Changes in the mRNA-expression levels of FADS1 and 2 directly affect blood DGLA levels and D6D activity. This study suggests that lower mRNA-expressions of FADS2 and ELOVL5 are associated with higher risk of atopic eczema in young children.

  4. Eczema, birth order, and infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Ann Maree; Crouch, Simon; Lightfoot, Tracy; Ansell, Pat; Simpson, Jill; Roman, Eve

    2008-05-15

    The association between infections occurring in the first 2 years of life and development of eczema was investigated in 1,782 control children from a national population-based case-control study in the United Kingdom conducted over the period 1991-1996. Dates of eczema and infectious diagnoses were ascertained from contemporaneously collected primary care records. Children diagnosed with eczema before the age of 2 years had more prior clinically diagnosed infections recorded than did children without eczema (rate ratio = 1.26, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.18, 1.36). The difference in infection rates between children with and without eczema was apparent from birth and throughout the first 2 years of life. As expected, compared with children of second or higher birth order, those firstborn were at increased risk of eczema (p = 0.020); however, the relation between eczema and prior infection was evident only among children of second or higher birth order and not among firstborn children (rate ratio = 1.45, 95% CI: 1.32, 1.59, and rate ratio = 1.08, 95% CI: 0.98, 1.20, respectively). The authors' results are consistent with the notion that the association between birth order and eczema is unlikely to be attributable to variations in early infectious exposure.

  5. Which test is best for diagnosing peanut allergy in South African children with atopic dermatitis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Claudia Liesel; Levin, Michael E; Du Toit, George

    2016-01-06

    Diagnosing peanut allergy based on sensitisation alone leads to an unacceptable rate of overdiagnosis. To define parameters that may help differentiate peanut allergy from asymptomatic sensitisation in a cohort of South African (SA) children with atopic dermatitis (AD). It is the first study in SA to utilise oral food challenge tests and analyse peanut component patterns. This was a prospective, observational study at a paediatric university hospital in Cape Town, SA. Children with AD, aged 6 months - 10 years, were recruited randomly. They were assessed for sensitisation and allergy to peanut by questionnaire, skin-prick tests (SPTs), immuno solid-phase allergen chip (ISAC) tests, ImmunoCAP component tests to Ara h 1, 2, 3, 8 and 9, and incremental food challenges. One hundred participants (59 Xhosa (black Africans) and 41 of mixed race, median age 42 months) were enrolled. Overall, 44% of patients were peanut sensitised and 25% had a true peanut allergy. SPTs and ImmunoCAP Ara h 2 produced the highest areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve for predicting peanut allergy in peanut-sensitised patients. The ISAC test was less sensitive, more specific and produced significantly lower median values than ImmunoCAP tests. Ara h 2 was the most useful component in differentiating allergy from tolerance in both ethnic groups, being positive in 92% of allergic and 40% of sensitised but tolerant children (p<0.001). There was little additional contribution from Ara h 1 and 3. Ara h 8 and 9 were associated with tolerance. Commonly used 95% positive predictive values (PPVs) for SPTs, peanut-specific IgE and Ara h 2 levels fared suboptimally in our population. Maximum PPVs for this study population were found at SPT 11 mm, peanut IgE 15 kU/L and ImmunoCAP Ara h 2 of 8 kU/L, but these adjusted levels still had suboptimal PPVs in Xhosa subjects. Severe peanut allergy was associated with increased median peanut IgE and Ara h 2. The component Ara h 2 was useful for

  6. Atopic march in pediatrics: genotype-associated mechanisms Part 1. Genotype-associated mechanisms of the atopic march in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.O. Dytiatkovsky

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The review deals with the data of studies over last 10 years of populations of different countries on association of atopic diseases being the components of the atopic march in children (atopic eczema, allergic rhinitis, allergic rhinoconjunctivitis, bronchial asthma with pathologic mutations of genes (single nucleotid polymorphisms — SNP, which encode the molecules participating in allergic inflammation in the skin and mucosa. PubMed had been used as the search tool. There is a review of studies provided on investigated SNPs — filaggrin, receptors, toll-like receptors; the article describes a perspective bronchial asthma inflammation cascade — interleukin-1 receptor-like-1 and interleukin-33. There has been proposed conducting the studies of SNP on Ukrainian pediatric population for working out the personalized genotype-associated approach for diagnosing and management of atopic diseases in Ukrainian children population.

  7. The atopic march: what's the evidence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ker, Jennifer; Hartert, Tina V

    2009-10-01

    To review and compile data from published studies that provide support for the existence of the atopic march. Relevant articles and references found via a PubMed search using the following keywords: atopic march, allergic march, atopic dermatitis, eczema, atopic eczema, atopy, rhinitis, wheeze, bronchiolitis, and asthma. All articles were reviewed and the most relevant were selected for inclusion in this review and for the compilation and graphical presentation of disease trends. Data on the prevalence of each phenotype of the atopic march confirm the temporal pattern of progression from eczema to allergic rhinitis and asthma. However, the atopic march as it is currently defined, is lacking precision, which affects its usefulness. Early events in the atopic march, such as eczema, may be more useful with more careful refinement of the phenotype into atopic and nonatopic eczema. Evidence supports that the atopic march is a useful paradigm to describe the clinically observed progression of atopy in certain children. There may be more precise phenotypes of the early stages of the atopic march that may improve its utility in predicting the development of later atopic, comorbid chronic disease.

  8. Guidelines for treatment of atopic dermatitis (atopic eczema from American Academy of Dermatology, European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology and Russian Society of Dermatovenereologists and Cosmetologisis. Expert’s opinion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Samtzov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis (AD is a common skin condition treated by dermatologists all over the world. Guidelines for management and treatment of AD have appeared in Europe, USA and Russia recently. the paper contains comparison of European, American and Russian guidelines. Definition of AD, epidemiology, pathophysiology of the disease, clinical features, diagnostic criteria, and risk factors are consistently matched. the analysis demonstrated that guidelines do not contain serious contradictions and principal differences thus stressing their supplementation of each other.

  9. Risk factors for work-related eczema and urticaria among vocational students of agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Śpiewak, Radosław; Góra-Florek, Anna; Horoch, Andrzej; Jarosz, Mirosław J; Doryńska, Agnieszka; Golec, Marcin; Dutkiewicz, Jacek

    2017-12-23

    Farmers are at high risk of occupational skin diseases which may start already during vocational training. This study was aimed at identification of risk factors for work-related skin diseases among vocational students of agriculture. The study involved 440 students (245 males, 195 females aged 17-21 years) in 11 vocational schools which were at least 100 km from each other. The protocol included a physician-managed questionnaire and medical examination, skin prick tests, patch tests, total IgE and Phadiatop. Logistic regression model was used for the identification of relevant risk factors. Work-related dermatoses were diagnosed in 29 study participants (6.6%, 95%CI: 4.3-8.9%): eczema in 22, urticaria in 14, and co-existence of both in 7 students. Significant risk factors for work-related eczema were: history of respiratory allergy (OR=10.10; pagriculture. Atopy, past history of asthma, allergic rhinitis, and eczema (either atopic, allergic or irritant) are relevant risk factors for work-related eczema and urticaria in young farmers, along with family history of any skin disease. Positive skin prick tests seem relevant, especially in the case of urticaria. Asking simple, aimed questions during health checks while enrolling students into agricultural schools would suffice to identify students at risk for work-related eczema and urticaria, giving them the chance for selecting a safer profession, and hopefully avoiding an occupational disease in the future.

  10. Prevalence of foot eczema and associated occupational and non-occupational factors in patients with hand eczema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brans, Richard; Hübner, Anja; Gediga, Günther; John, Swen M

    2015-08-01

    Foot eczema often occurs in combination with hand eczema. However, in contrast to the situation with hand eczema, knowledge about foot eczema is scarce, especially in occupational settings. To evaluate the prevalence of foot eczema and associated factors in patients with hand eczema taking part in a tertiary individual prevention programme for occupational skin diseases. In a retrospective cohort study, the medical records of 843 patients taking part in the tertiary individual prevention programme were evaluated. Seven hundred and twenty-three patients (85.8%) suffered from hand eczema. Among these, 201 patients (27.8%) had concomitant foot eczema, mainly atopic foot eczema (60.4%). An occupational irritant component was possible in 38 patients with foot eczema (18.9%). In the majority of patients, the same morphological features were found on the hands and feet (71.1%). The presence of foot eczema was significantly associated with male sex [odds ratio (OR) 1.78, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.29-2.49], atopic hand eczema (OR 1.60, 95%CI: 1.15-2.22), hyperhidrosis (OR 1.73, 95%CI: 1.33-2.43), and the wearing of safety shoes/boots at work (OR 2.04, 95%CI: 1.46-2.87). Tobacco smoking was associated with foot eczema (OR 1.79, 95%CI: 1.25-2.57), in particular with the vesicular subtype. Foot eczema is common in patients with hand eczema, and is related to both occupational and non-occupational factors. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Atopic march in pediatrics: genotype-associated mechanisms Part 2. Perspective genotype-associated mechanisms and markers of atopic disorders in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.O. Dytiatkovsky

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The review deals with the data of studies covering last 10 years held in populations of different countries concerning the association of atopic diseases, which compose the atopic march in children (atopic eczema, allergic rhinitis, allergic rhinoconjunctivitis, bronchial asthma with genes pathologic mutations (single nucleotid polymorphisms — SNP, which encode the molecules participating in allergic inflammation in the skin and mucosae. The review has been made using the PubMed as a search tool. There is analysis of studies provided on the candidate gens for allergic inflammation — interleukin-1-like-receptor-1, sphyngolipid synthesis regulator, glucorticoid receptor gene, programmed cell death gene 4. There are also provided the candidate markers for the severity of atopic diseases course, particularly, atopic eczema: vitamin D, thymus and activation regulated chemokine, TARC/CCl17 and cutaneous T-cell attracting chemokine, CTAC/CCL27. There has been proposed conducting the studies of provided SNP and allergic inflammation markers on Ukrainian pediatric population for working out the personalized genotype-associated approach for diagnosing and management of atopic diseases in Ukrainian pediatric population.

  12. Current understanding in pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tess McPherson

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available There have been advances in our understanding of the complex pathogenesis of atopic eczema over the past few decades. This article examines the multiple factors which are implicated in this process.

  13. Skin Barrier Dysfunction and the Atopic March

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Maja-Lisa; Agner, Tove; Thomsen, Simon Francis

    2015-01-01

    The atopic diseases: atopic dermatitis, asthma and allergic rhinoconjunctivitis are frequent diseases in the population occurring sequentially in the young (the atopic march).The discovery of filaggrin gene (FLG) mutations and impairments in the skin barrier as predisposing factors for atopic...... dermatitis and subsequent asthma and atopic sensitization in the context of eczema has improved our understanding of the atopic march. The atopic diseases can now be viewed upon as causally related conditions—rather than sequentially occurring manifestations of the same underlying atopic disease state......—with atopic dermatitis and FLG mutations being a prerequisite for the development of the other atopic diseases, particularly asthma. This review discusses the role of the skin barrier function, particularly the role of FLG mutations, in the atopic march....

  14. Allergenic food introduction and risk of childhood atopic diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niels J Elbert

    Full Text Available The role of timing and diversity of allergenic food introduction in the development of childhood allergic sensitization and atopic diseases is controversial.To examine whether timing and diversity of allergenic food introduction are associated with allergic sensitization, allergy and eczema in children until age 10 years.This study among 5,202 children was performed in a population-based prospective cohort. Timing (age ≤6 months vs. >6 months and diversity (0, 1, 2 and ≥3 foods of allergenic food (cow's milk, hen's egg, peanut, tree nuts, soy and gluten introduction were assessed by questionnaires at ages 6 and 12 months. At age 10 years, inhalant and food allergic sensitization were measured by skin prick tests, and physician-diagnosed inhalant and food allergy by questionnaire. Data on parental-reported physician-diagnosed eczema were obtained from birth until age 10 years.Children introduced to gluten at age ≤6 months had a decreased risk of eczema (aOR (95% CI: 0.84 (0.72, 0.99, compared with children introduced to gluten at age >6 months. However, timing of allergenic food introduction was not associated with allergic sensitization or physician-diagnosed allergy. Children introduced to ≥3 allergenic foods at age ≤6 months had a decreased risk of physician-diagnosed inhalant allergy (0.64 (0.42, 0.98, compared with children not introduced to any allergenic food at age ≤6 months. However, diversity of allergenic food introduction was not associated with allergic sensitization, physician-diagnosed food allergy or eczema.Neither timing nor diversity of allergenic food introduction was consistently associated with childhood allergic sensitization, allergy or eczema.

  15. Eek! It's Eczema!

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for eczema. That means that if you have allergies, your eczema may flare up sometimes. Some things that can set off eczema include: soaps, detergents, or perfumes hot and sweaty skin dry winter ...

  16. Relation between diagnoses on severity, sick leave and loss of job among patients with occupational hand eczema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cvetkovski, Rikke Skoet; Rothman, Kenneth J; Olsen, J

    2005-01-01

    the worst prognosis. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate and compare the severity and consequences of recognized OHE in different diagnostic and subdiagnostic groups. METHODS: Between October 2001 and November 2002, all new cases of recognized OHE were identified from the Danish National Board of Industrial Injuries...... occupation and loss of job. RESULTS: The overall response rate to the questionnaire was 82%. We observed substantially greater severity among those with occupational irritant contact dermatitis (ICD) and AD than for any other diagnoses. Age above 50 years was also associated with increased severity of OHE...... that they had lost their job at least once during the past 12 months due to OHE. The only strong association with loss of job was food-related occupations. CONCLUSIONS: Occupational ICD and AD appear to be strongly associated with severity of OHE. AD and severity of OHE were independently associated...

  17. Hand eczema: Correlation of morphologic patterns, atopy, contact sensitization and disease severity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjeev Handa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hand eczema is a common distressing condition aggravated by a number of endogenous and exogenous factors. Various morphological forms of hand eczema have been described, but categorization into one of them is not always possible. Aims: To study the morphological patterns of hand eczema, relationship of atopy with hand eczema, and the implications of contact sensitization with respect to severity and diagnosis of hand eczema. Methods: Hundred consecutive patients of hand eczema attending the contact dermatitis clinic of the institute were recruited over a two year period from 2004-05. Objective assessment was done using hand eczema severity index (HECSI and all the patients were patch tested using Indian standard series. Results: Unspecified type of hand eczema with no definite morphologic picture was seen in 62% followed by pompholyx in 14%. Hand eczema severity was not found to be statistically associated with age, sex, and atopic status of the patient. Positive patch test to one or more allergen was present in 65% of patients. The most common allergens were potassium dichromate (25%, fragrance mix (16%, nickel sulphate (14%, and PPD (13%. There was no significant correlation between patch test positivity and hand eczema severity or atopic status of the patient. Among the morphological patterns pompholyx was strongly associated with an atopic status (P=0.004. Conclusions: Hand eczema was seen twice more commonly in men. Atopic and non-atopic patients of hand eczema had no difference in the severity of disease. Contact sensitivity to different allergens did not correlate with increased eczema severity.

  18. Probiotic bacteria for prevention of atopic diseases: design and application

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niers, L.E.M.

    2009-01-01

    Atopic diseases such as (atopic) eczema, food allergy, asthma, and allergic rhinitis are common diseases. The cumulative incidence during childhood is estimated to be 20 to 30%. In countries with a so called ‘’Western lifestyle’’ an increase in the prevalence of atopic diseases has been observed

  19. Severity of atopic disease inversely correlates with intestinal microbiota diversity and butyrate-producing bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nylund, L.; Nermes, M.; Isolauri, E.; Salminen, S.; Vos, de W.M.; Satokari, R.

    2015-01-01

    The reports on atopic diseases and microbiota in early childhood remain contradictory and both decreased and increased microbiota diversity have been associated with atopic eczema. In this study, the intestinal microbiota signatures associated with the severity of eczema in 6-month-old infants were

  20. Impetiginized Dyshidrotic Eczema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgi Tchernev

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A 16 years old female patient, affected by atopic dermatitis and rhinoconjunctivitis allergica since childhood, requested a dermatologic consultation for lesions which had appeared after 3 months of local treatment with clobethasole propionate. The histological analysis confirmed the diagnosis of dyshidrotic eczema and the microbiological smears demonstrated a significant infection with Staphylococcus aureus. The risk of developing corticosteroids’ side-effects depends on the potency of the product, extended period of use and the volume of product applied. Clobetasol propionate is a group I- highly potent corticosteroid, which should be used for a maximum period of 2 weeks. Several authors have found that this agent has cumulative depot effect, persisting in the epidermis for 4 days after only one application. Taking together these observations, sustained by the clinical case presented above, we can conclude that the infectious risks associated with topical corticosteroid treatment must not be neglected, particularly since treated patients are fragile, and frequently have multiple well-known risk factors.

  1. Filaggrin null alleles are not associated with hand eczema or contact allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørkov, Anne Lerbæk; Bisgaard, H; Agner, T

    2007-01-01

    association with hand eczema or contact allergy are unexplored. OBJECTIVES: To explore associations between the variant alleles, hand eczema, contact allergy and atopic dermatitis. METHODS: In total, 183 adult individuals participated in a clinical examination of the hands, patch testing and filaggrin...... genotyping. Children without any evidence of atopic dermatitis from the Copenhagen Prospective Study on Asthma in Childhood (COPSAC) study were used as controls. The chi(2) test was used for comparison of allele frequencies. RESULTS: The majority (73%) had hand eczema, 25% had contact allergy and 14% had...... a diagnosis of atopic dermatitis. The association between atopic dermatitis and the filaggrin variant alleles was confirmed (odds ratio 3.5, P = 0.015). Allele frequencies in individuals with hand eczema or contact allergy were not statistically significantly increased. CONCLUSION: There is no association...

  2. Patch test results in children and adolescents suffering from allergic contact dermatitis – comparison of patients with and without atopic dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Bacharewicz-Szczerbicka

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction . Allergic contact dermatitis is a more and more frequently diagnosed skin disease in children and adolescents. It may coexist with atopic dermatitis. The frequency of allergy to certain contact haptens is determined by numerous factors. Objective. To assess the frequency of allergy to selected contact allergens among children and adolescents with symptoms of contact eczema. Material and methods . Two hundred seventy-three consecutive patients aged 4–18 years treated because of allergic contact eczema were included in this study. The demographic data and patch test results were assessed in the total group and separately in two age groups of patients without and with atopic dermatitis. Results . The total group examined included 71 (44 female and 27 male children and 202 (145 female and 57 male adolescents. Atopic dermatitis was diagnosed in 64 patients. The patch test results were positive in 36.3% of examined subjects: 26.5% of children and 39.6% of adolescents, with a similar frequency in patients with and without atopic dermatitis. The most common contact sensitizers were nickel sulfate (20.1%, cobalt chloride (12.8%, p-phenylenediamine (3.3%, potassium dichromate and fragrances (2.9% each, balsam of Peru and neomycin sulfate (1.5% each. Cobalt, chromate, fragrances and balsam of Peru more frequently sensitized patients with atopic dermatitis. Among the younger boys with atopic dermatitis there were no cases of contact allergy to nickel and cobalt, while in the atopic adolescent males the results with each of these allergens were positive in 20% of those examined. Conclusions . Contact allergy is detected similarly frequent in children and adolescents with and without atopic dermatitis. The very high prevalence of allergy to nickel and cobalt is a significant problem among teenage girls and boys with atopic dermatitis.

  3. Atopic Dermatitis in Adults: A Diagnostic Challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestre Salvador, J F; Romero-Pérez, D; Encabo-Durán, B

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) has a prevalence of 1%-3% in adults. Adult-onset AD has only been defined recently, and lack of familiarity with this condition and confusion regarding the appropriate terminology persist. AD may first appear in childhood or de novo in adults and is characterized by pronounced clinical heterogeneity. The disease often deviates from the classic pattern of flexural dermatitis, and there are forms of presentation that are specific to adults, such as head-and-neck dermatitis, chronic eczema of the hands, multiple areas of lichenification, or prurigo lesions. Although diagnosis is clinical, adult-onset AD frequently does not fit the traditional diagnostic criteria for the disease, which were developed for children. Thus, AD is often a diagnosis of exclusion, especially in de novo cases. Additional diagnostic tests, such as the patch test, prick test, skin biopsy, or blood test, are usually necessary to rule out other diseases or other types of eczema appearing concomitantly with AD. This article presents an update of the different forms of clinical presentation for AD in adults along with a proposed diagnostic approach, as new treatments will appear in the near future and many patients will not be able to benefit from them unless they are properly diagnosed.

  4. Incidence of hand eczema in a population-based twin cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lerbaek, A; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm; Ravn, H

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Population-based studies on the incidence of hand eczema are sparse. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this prospective follow-up study was to determine the incidence rate of hand eczema in a population-based twin cohort. Secondly, the role of genetic factors and other potential risk factors...... 1.4-4.1). Also, significantly increased IRRs were found for positive patch test, atopic dermatitis, and wet work. CONCLUSIONS: Hand eczema is still a frequent disease and genetic factors are confirmed important risk factors. Positive patch test, atopic dermatitis and wet work were associated...... with an increased risk, whereas no association with age, sex, smoking or alcohol was found...

  5. The epidemiologic characteristics of healthcare provider-diagnosed eczema, asthma, allergic rhinitis, and food allergy in children: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, David A; Grundmeier, Robert W; Ram, Gita; Spergel, Jonathan M

    2016-08-20

    The rates of childhood allergic conditions are changing, prompting the need for continued surveillance. Examination of healthcare provider-based diagnosis data is an important and lacking methodology needed to complement existing studies that rely on participant reporting. Utilizing our care network of 1,050,061 urban and sub-urban children, we defined two retrospective cohorts: (1) a closed birth cohort of 29,662 children and (2) a cross-sectional cohort of 333,200 children. These cohorts were utilized to determine the epidemiologic characteristics of the conditions studied. Logistic regression was utilized to determine the extent to which food allergy was associated with respiratory allergy. In our birth cohort, the peak age at diagnosis of eczema, asthma, rhinitis, and food allergy was between 0 and 5 months (7.3 %), 12 and 17 months (8.7 %), 24 and 29 months (2.5 %), and 12 and 17 months (1.9 %), respectively. In our cross-sectional cohort, eczema and rhinitis prevalence rates were 6.7 % and 19.9 %, respectively. Asthma prevalence was 21.8 %, a rate higher than previously reported. Food allergy prevalence was 6.7 %, with the most common allergenic foods being peanut (2.6 %), milk (2.2 %), egg (1.8 %), shellfish (1.5 %), and soy (0.7 %). Food allergy was associated with development of asthma (OR 2.16, 95 % CI 1.94-2.40), and rhinitis (OR 2.72, 95 % CI 2.45-3.03). Compared with previous reports, we measure lower rates of eczema and higher rates of asthma. The distribution of the major allergenic foods diverged from prior figures, and food allergy was associated with the development of respiratory allergy. The utilization of provider-based diagnosis data contributes an important and lacking methodology that complements existing studies.

  6. Prevalence of atopic diseases in Nigerian children with vernal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Specifically inquired about were asthma, eczema, allergic rhinitis or hay fever, allergic skin rash e.g. scabies, reaction to drugs and others. The children were also examined to confirm or detect the presence of these atopic diseases. The overall prevalence of atopic conditions was 19.8% amongst cases of VKC.

  7. House dust mite reduction and avoidance measures for treating eczema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nankervis, Helen; Pynn, Emma V; Boyle, Robert J; Rushton, Lesley; Williams, Hywel C; Hewson, Deanne M; Platts-Mills, Thomas

    2015-01-19

    Eczema is an inflammatory skin disease that tends to involve skin creases, such as the folds of the elbows or knees; it is an intensely itchy skin condition, which can relapse and remit over time. As many as a third of people with eczema who have a positive test for allergy to house dust mite have reported worsening of eczema or respiratory symptoms when exposed to dust. To assess the effects of all house dust mite reduction and avoidance measures for the treatment of eczema. We searched the following databases up to 14 August 2014: the Cochrane Skin Group Specialised Register, CENTRAL in The Cochrane Library (2014, Issue 8), MEDLINE (from 1946), Embase (from 1974), LILACS (from 1982), and the GREAT database. We also searched five trials registers and checked the reference lists of included and excluded studies for further references to relevant studies. We handsearched abstracts from international eczema and allergy meetings. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of any of the house dust mite reduction and avoidance measures for the treatment of eczema, which included participants of any age diagnosed by a clinician with eczema as defined by the World Allergy Organization. We included all non-pharmacological and pharmacological interventions that sought to reduce or avoid exposure to house dust mite and their allergenic faeces. The comparators were any active treatment, no treatment, placebo, or standard care only. Two authors independently checked the titles and abstracts identified, and there were no disagreements. We contacted authors of included studies for additional information. We assessed the risk of bias using Cochrane methodology. We included seven studies of 324 adults and children with eczema. Overall, the included studies had a high risk of bias. Four of the seven trials tested interventions with multiple components, and three tested a single intervention. Two of the seven trials included only children, four included children and adults, and one

  8. Hand Eczema: Treatment options

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Tamara Theresia; Agner, Tove

    2017-01-01

    Hand eczema is a common disease, it affects young people, is often work-related, and the burden of the disease is significant for the individual as well as for society. Factors to be considered when choosing a treatment strategy are, among others, whether the eczema is acute or chronic, the sever...

  9. Atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Simon Francis

    2014-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis is an inflammatory skin disease with early onset and with a lifetime prevalence of approximately 20%. The aetiology of atopic dermatitis is unknown, but the recent discovery of filaggrin mutations holds promise that the progression of atopic dermatitis to asthma in later childhood...... may be halted. Atopic dermatitis is not always easily manageable and every physician should be familiar with the fundamental aspects of treatment. This paper gives an overview of the natural history, clinical features, and treatment of atopic dermatitis....

  10. Domestic dog exposure at birth reduces the incidence of atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorsteinsdottir, S; Thyssen, J P; Stokholm, J; Vissing, N H; Waage, J; Bisgaard, H

    2016-12-01

    While the etiopathogenesis of atopic dermatitis is complex and poorly understood, neonatal exposures are important for disease occurrence. However, the effect of dog exposure on the risk of atopic dermatitis is unresolved. We investigated whether domestic dog exposure affected the risk of atopic dermatitis in children during the first 3 years of life. Copenhagen Prospective Studies on Asthma in Childhood (COPSAC) are ongoing prospective clinical birth cohort studies. Data from 411 children born to mothers with asthma (COPSAC 2000 ) and 700 unselected children (COPSAC 2010 ) were analyzed following the same protocols at the same research site. Atopic dermatitis was diagnosed prospectively according to the Hanifin-Rajka criteria. Parental history of asthma, eczema, or rhinitis was defined by self-reported physician diagnosis. In the COPSAC 2000 , maternal specific serum IgE against eight inhalant allergens was sampled after the children's birth and at pregnancy week 24 in the COPSAC 2010 cohort. Associations between dog exposure and atopic dermatitis were analyzed by Cox proportional hazard regression models and adjusted for lifestyle confounders. In the COPSAC 2000 and COPSAC 2010 cohorts, the risk of atopic dermatitis was significantly lower in children with domestic dog exposure ( adjusted HR = 0.46 [0.25-0.87], P = 0.02; and adjusted HR = 0.58 [0.36-0.93], P = 0.03, respectively). The risk of atopic dermatitis decreased in a dose-dependent manner with increasing number of dogs ( adjusted HR = 0.58 [0.38-0.89], P = 0.01) in the COPSAC 2010 . The protective effect was restricted to children born to mothers with atopic disease in the unselected COPSAC 2010 cohort ( adjusted HR = 0.39 [0.19-0.82], P = 0.01), as no effect was observed in children born to mothers without atopic disease ( adjusted HR = 0.92 [0.49-1.73], P = 0.79). Paternal atopic status did not affect the risk of atopic dermatitis. We found no significant interaction between the CD14 T/T genotype and

  11. Risk analysis of early childhood eczema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, Hans; Halkjaer, Liselotte B; Hinge, Rikke

    2009-01-01

    : The Copenhagen Study on Asthma in Childhood is a prospective clinical study of a birth cohort of 411 children born of mothers with asthma. Eczema was diagnosed, treated, and monitored at the clinical research unit, and complete follow-up for the first 3 years of life was available for 356 children. Risk...

  12. Prevention of hand eczema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fisker, Maja H; Ebbehøj, Niels E; Vejlstrup, Søren Grove

    2018-01-01

    Objective Occupational hand eczema has adverse health and socioeconomic impacts for the afflicted individuals and society. Prevention and treatment strategies are needed. This study aimed to assess the effectiveness of an educational intervention on sickness absence, quality of life and severity...... of hand eczema. Methods PREVEX (PreVention of EXema) is an individually randomized, parallel-group superiority trial investigating the pros and cons of one-time, 2-hour, group-based education in skin-protective behavior versus treatment as usual among patients with newly notified occupational hand eczema...

  13. Typical and atypical clinical appearance of atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverberg, Nanette B

    Atopic dermatitis is a complex, systemic inflammatory disorder associated with a variety of clinical features. The original criteria of Hanifin and Rajka include major criteria and a list of about two dozen minor criteria however, even the minor criteria do not include some features of atopic dermatitis noted less commonly but still seen with some frequency. This contribution first reviews the common clinical appearance of atopic dermatitis in infancy, childhood, and adulthood, as well as the less typical appearances, including lichenoid atopic dermatitis; juvenile plantar dermatosis; nummular-type atopic dermatitis; follicular atopic dermatitis; alopecia of atopic dermatitis; eczema coxsackium; and psoriasiform, perineal, and lip licker's dermatitis. The clinician will be able to recognize and treat rarer forms of atopic dermatitis and incorporate this into their daily practice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Hand eczema in hairdressers: a Danish register-based study of the prevalence of hand eczema and its career consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysdal, Susan Hovmand; Søsted, Heidi; Andersen, Klaus Ejner; Johansen, Jeanne Duus

    2011-09-01

    Occupational hand eczema is common in hairdressers, owing to wet work and hairdressing chemicals. To estimate the prevalence of hand eczema and its career consequences among hairdressers in Denmark. A register-based study was conducted, comprising all graduates from hairdressing vocational schools from 1985 to 2007 (n = 7840). The participants received a self-administered postal questionnaire including questions on hand eczema, atopic dermatitis, and career change. A response rate of 67.9% (n = 5324) was obtained. Of the respondents, 44.3% no longer worked as hairdressers and had worked for an average of 8.4 years in the profession before leaving it. Hand eczema was more common among ex-hairdressers (48.4%) than among current hairdressers (37.6%) (p reason for career change. In this group, logistic regression analysis showed that chronic hand eczema contributed the most to the decision to change career (odds ratio 50.12; 95% confidence interval 18.3-137). Hairdressers work an average of 8.4 years in the profession before leaving it, and hand eczema contributes significantly to this career change. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  15. Health service use among children with and without eczema, asthma, and hay fever

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammer-Helmich, Lene; Linneberg, Allan; Thomsen, Simon Francis

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Atopic diseases, for example, eczema, asthma, and hay fever, are among the most common chronic diseases of childhood. Knowledge on health service use among children with atopic disease is limited. This study aimed to investigate the total use and costs of health services for children...... with and without eczema, asthma, and hay fever in a Danish general population. METHODS: We conducted a health survey with four complete birth cohorts from the City of Copenhagen. Individual questionnaire data on eczema, asthma, and hay fever for children aged 3, 6, 11, and 15 years were linked to register.......77 [1.29-2.26]), current asthma symptoms (2.53 [2.08-2.98]), and current hay fever symptoms (1.21 [0.74-1.67]), compared with children without these symptoms. We also found increased use of prescribed medication and most subtypes of health services. Current asthma symptoms and current eczema symptoms...

  16. Meta-analysis identifies seven susceptibility loci involved in the atopic march

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marenholz, Ingo; Esparza-Gordillo, Jorge; Rueschendorf, Franz; Bauerfeind, Anja; Strachan, David P.; Spycher, Ben D.; Baurecht, Hansjoerg; Margaritte-Jeannin, Patricia; Saaf, Annika; Kerkhof, Marjan; Ege, Markus; Baltic, Svetlana; Matheson, Melanie C.; Li, Jin; Michel, Sven; Ang, Wei Q.; McArdle, Wendy; Arnold, Andreas; Homuth, Georg; Demenais, Florence; Bouzigon, Emmanuelle; Soderhall, Cilla; Pershagen, Goran; de Jongste, Johan C.; Postma, Dirkje S.; Braun-Fahrlaender, Charlotte; Horak, Elisabeth; Ogorodova, Ludmila M.; Puzyrev, Valery P.; Bragina, Elena Yu; Hudson, Thomas J.; Morin, Charles; Duffy, David L.; Marks, Guy B.; Robertson, Colin F.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Musk, Bill; Thompson, Philip J.; Martin, Nicholas G.; James, Alan; Sleiman, Patrick; Toskala, Elina; Rodriguez, Elke; Foelster-Holst, Regina; Franke, Andre; Lieb, Wolfgang; Gieger, Christian; Heinzmann, Andrea; Rietschel, Ernst; Keil, Thomas; Cichon, Sven; Noethen, Markus M.; Pennell, Craig E.; Sly, Peter D.; Schmidt, Carsten O.; Matanovic, Anja; Schneider, Valentin; Heinig, Matthias; Huebner, Norbert; Holt, Patrick G.; Lau, Susanne; Kabesch, Michael; Weidinger, Stefan; Hakonarson, Hakon; Ferreira, Manuel A. R.; Laprise, Catherine; Freidin, Maxim B.; Genuneit, Jon; Koppelman, Gerard H.; Melen, Erik; Dizier, Marie-Helene; Henderson, A. John; Lee, Young Ae

    2015-01-01

    Eczema often precedes the development of asthma in a disease course called the 'atopic march'. To unravel the genes underlying this characteristic pattern of allergic disease, we conduct a multi-stage genome-wide association study on infantile eczema followed by childhood asthma in 12 populations

  17. Prevention of hand eczema among Danish hairdressing apprentices: an intervention study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregnhøj, Anne; Menné, Torkil; Johansen, Jeanne Duus

    2012-01-01

    for this study and delivered by teachers specially trained in the prevention of hand eczema; the other half received normal training and served as a control group. All apprentices completed self-administered questionnaires including questions regarding hand eczema, use of gloves and degree of wet work, and were...... used gloves during wet work procedures and significantly fewer developed hand eczema compared with apprentices from the control group (p=0.04). A logistic regression model showed that atopic dermatitis had a significant influence on the development of hand eczema in the cohort irrespective...... of the intervention.ConclusionsWe were able to increase the use of gloves and reduce the incidence of hand eczema in hairdressing apprentices by implementing a training program in hairdressing schools....

  18. Difficult to control atopic dermatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Difficult to control atopic dermatitis (AD) presents a therapeutic challenge and often requires combinations of topical and systemic treatment. Anti-inflammatory treatment of severe AD most commonly includes topical glucocorticosteroids and topical calcineurin antagonists used for exacerbation management and more recently for proactive therapy in selected cases. Topical corticosteroids remain the mainstay of therapy, the topical calcineurin inhibitors tacrolimus and pimecrolimus are preferred in certain locations. Systemic anti-inflammatory treatment is an option for severe refractory cases. Microbial colonization and superinfection contribute to disease exacerbation and thus justify additional antimicrobial / antiseptic treatment. Systemic antihistamines (H1) may relieve pruritus but do not have sufficient effect on eczema. Adjuvant therapy includes UV irradiation preferably of UVA1 wavelength. “Eczema school” educational programs have been proven to be helpful. PMID:23663504

  19. Inpatient Financial Burden of Atopic Dermatitis in the United States

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Narla, Shanthi; Hsu, Derek Y; Thyssen, Jacob P

    2017-01-01

    Little is known about the inpatient burden of atopic dermatitis (AD). We sought to determine the risk factors and financial burden of hospitalizations for AD in the United States. Data were analyzed from the 2002-2012 National Inpatient Sample, including a 20% representative sample of all...... hospitalizations in the United States. Hospitalization rates for AD or eczema were highest in the northeast during the winter and south during the summer. Geometric mean cost of care (95% confidence interval) was lower for a primary diagnosis of AD or eczema versus no AD or eczema in adults ($3,502 [$3......, there is a substantial inpatient financial burden of AD in the United States....

  20. Clinical epidemiology of hand eczema in patients accessing dermatological reference centres: results from Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalone, L; Cortesi, P A; Mantovani, L G; Belisari, A; Ayala, F; Fortina, A B; Bonamonte, D; Borroni, G; Cannavò, S P; Guarneri, F; Cristaudo, A; De Pità, O; Gallo, R; Girolomoni, G; Gola, M; Lisi, P; Pigatto, P D; Satta, R; Giannetti, A

    2015-01-01

    Data on the epidemiological impact and clinical characteristics of chronic hand eczema in Southern Europe are lacking. To estimate the prevalence of chronic hand eczema in its different stages of severity and refractoriness to standard therapy in patients accessing Italian dermatological reference centres, and to evaluate sociodemographic and clinical factors associated with each stage. A cross-sectional multicentre study was conducted. Adult patients with hand eczema, consecutively accessing 14 centres over a 6-month period, were enrolled. Patients were classified according to disease duration, severity and response to standard therapy with potent topical corticosteroids. Logistical regression was performed to investigate the relationship between sociodemographic and clinical data with different stages of eczema. The total number of participants was 981. Hand eczema was chronic in 83·5% of patients; 21·3% had severe eczema, with 62·0% of these patients refractory to standard therapy. Food processing and related work, the health professions, craft and related trade works (building, plumbing, electrical), hairdressing/beauty and handicraft work were most frequently associated with chronic hand eczema. Severe chronic hand eczema was more likely to be seen in men, older patients and those with less education. Severe and refractory hand eczema was also more likely among the unemployed and patients with allergic rhinitis and/or atopic dermatitis. Chronic hand eczema is frequent among patients with hand eczema accessing dermatology centres. Many patients were severe and refractory to standard therapy. The appropriate identification of hand eczema is the first step in implementing effective and efficient treatments. © 2014 British Association of Dermatologists.

  1. Maternal intake of sugar during pregnancy and childhood respiratory and atopic outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bédard, Annabelle; Northstone, Kate; Henderson, A John; Shaheen, Seif O

    2017-07-01

    The possible role of maternal consumption of free sugar during pregnancy in the inception of respiratory and atopic diseases has not been studied. We aimed to study the relationship between maternal intake of free sugar during pregnancy and respiratory and atopic outcomes in the offspring in a population-based birth cohort, the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children.We analysed associations between maternal intake of free sugar in pregnancy (estimated by a food frequency questionnaire), and current doctor-diagnosed asthma, wheezing, hay fever, eczema, atopy, serum total IgE and lung function in children aged 7-9 years (n=8956 with information on maternal diet in pregnancy and at least one outcome of interest).After controlling for potential confounders, maternal intake of free sugar was positively associated with atopy (OR for highest versus lowest quintile of sugar intake 1.38, 95% CI 1.06-1.78; per quintile p-trend=0.006) and atopic asthma (OR 2.01, 95% CI 1.23-3.29; per quintile p-trend=0.004). These associations were not confounded by intake of sugar in early childhood, which was unrelated to these outcomes.Our results suggest that a higher maternal intake of free sugar during pregnancy is associated with an increased risk of atopy and atopic asthma in the offspring, independently of sugar intake in early childhood. Copyright ©ERS 2017.

  2. Atopic dermatitis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bieber, Thomas; Leung, Donald Y. M

    2002-01-01

    ... strategies. The book is divided into several parts to make a clear presentation of the various aspects of this disease. Part I examines the impact of atopic dermatitis, addressing the epidemiological, psychological, and socioeconomic effects of this disease. A distinction is also made between allergic vs. non-allergic atopic dermatitis. ...

  3. Hand eczema classification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diepgen, T L; Andersen, Klaus Ejner; Brandao, F M

    2008-01-01

    Summary Background Hand eczema is a long-lasting disease with a high prevalence in the background population. The disease has severe, negative effects on quality of life and sometimes on social status. Epidemiological studies have identified risk factors for onset and prognosis, but treatment of ...

  4. Chromosome 11q13.5 variant associated with childhood eczema: an effect supplementary to filaggrin mutations.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Regan, Grainne M

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Atopic eczema is a common inflammatory skin disease with multifactorial etiology. The genetic basis is incompletely understood; however, loss of function mutations in the filaggrin gene (FLG) are the most significant and widely replicated genetic risk factor reported to date. The first genome-wide association study in atopic eczema recently identified 2 novel genetic variants in association with eczema susceptibility: a single nucleotide polymorphism on chromosome 11q13.5 (rs7927894) and a single nucleotide polymorphism (rs877776) within the gene encoding hornerin on chromosome 1q21. OBJECTIVE: To test the association of these 2 novel variants with pediatric eczema and to investigate their interaction with FLG null mutations. METHODS: Case-control study to investigate the association of rs7927894, rs877776 and the 4 most prevalent FLG null mutations with moderate-severe eczema in 511 Irish pediatric cases and 1000 Irish controls. Comprehensive testing for interaction between each of the loci was also performed. RESULTS: The association between rs7927894 and atopic eczema was replicated in this population (P = .0025, chi(2) test; odds ratio, 1.27; 95% CI, 1.09-1.49). The 4 most common FLG null variants were strongly associated with atopic eczema (P = 1.26 x 10(-50); combined odds ratio, 5.81; 95% CI, 4.51-7.49). Interestingly, the rs7927894 association was independent of the well-established FLG risk alleles and may be multiplicative in its effect. There was no significant association between rs877776 and pediatric eczema in this study. CONCLUSION: Single nucleotide polymorphism rs7927894 appears to mark a genuine eczema susceptibility locus that will require further elucidation through fine mapping and functional analysis.

  5. [Severe childhood atopic dermatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahfoudh, Anis; Zaraa, Inès; Amara, Thouraya; Zribi, Hela; El Euch, Dalenda; Mokni, Mourad; Ben Osman, Amel

    2014-04-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic relapsing eczematous skin disease. It represents one of the symptoms of atopic diathesis. DA affects usually infants and children. aim : The aim of our study is to draw up the epidemiological, clinical features, treatment and outcome of severe childhood AD through a hospital series. methods: A retrospective study of 24 cases of severe childhood AD hospitalized in the Dermatology Department of La Rabta hospital of Tunis was conducted during a 28 year-period (1981 - 2009). results: The hospital incidence of severe childhood AD was 0,085‰. Patient's mean age at the beginning was 14 months. The sex ratio H/F was 1.66. Cutaneous manifestations occurred preferentially in face (75%). Generalized eczema was observed in 37.5% of cases. Pruritus and xerosis were constant. The mean duration of hospitalization was 11 days. Topical corticosteroids was the most effective method of treating severe DA, associated with antiseptic solutions emollient and antihistaminic drugs. Infectious complications were noted in 50% of cases. Ocular complications were observed in 16.7% of cases. Recurrences were reported in 9 cases. Conclusion :AD is an inflammatory, chronically relapsing, and pruritic skin disorder developing in a xerotic skin. Severe AD in childhood is rare in Tunisia. It requires a good understanding of therapeutic modalities by the patient and his family. It is a cause of important morbidity and it may have a bad impact on quality of life.

  6. Neonatal colonization with Staphylococcus aureus is not associated with development of atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, L; Halkjaer, L B; Agner, T

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Staphylococcus aureus in atopic skin has been associated with exacerbation of eczema. Objectives To investigate a possible association between neonatal colonization with S. aureus and the risk of atopic dermatitis (AD) during the first 3 years of life. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study...

  7. Maternal obesity, gestational weight gain, and risk of asthma and atopic disease in offspring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harpsøe, Maria C; Basit, Saima; Bager, Peter

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: High pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI) and excessive gestational weight gain (GWG) are suggested to influence risk of asthma and atopic disease in offspring. OBJECTIVE: We examined the effect of BMI and GWG on risk of asthma, wheezing, atopic eczema (AE), and hay fever in children d...

  8. Atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haagerup, Annette; Bjerke, Torbjørn; Schiøtz, Peter Oluf

    2004-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis is one of the most common chronic diseases of childhood and closely related to other clinical manifestations of allergy. The incidence is high and still increasing. The genetic contribution to disease development is substantial and complex. Only recently genetic research has begun...... to focus on this phenotype, and specific susceptibility genes remain to be found. To identify candidate regions holding genes for atopic dermatitis we performed a genome-scan in Danish affected sib-pair families containing sib-pairs matching a phenotype definition of both clinical atopic dermatitis...

  9. Hyper IgE in Childhood Eczema and Risk of Asthma in Chinese Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Chantel; Hon, Kam Lun; Kung, Jeng Sum Charmaine; Pong, Nga Hin; Leung, Ting-Fan; Wong, Chun Kwok

    2016-06-10

    Atopic eczema is a common childhood disease associated with high IgE and eosinophilia. We characterized the clinical features associated with hyper-IgE (defined as IgE > 2000 IU/L) in eczema. Nottingham Eczema Severity Score (NESS), family and personal history of atopy, skin prick test (SPT) for common food and aeroallergens, highest serum IgE ever and eosinophil counts were evaluated in 330 children eczema patients. Childhood-NESS (NESS performed at 10 years of age) were further analyzed. IgE correlated with NESS (spearman coefficient 0.35, p hyper-IgE (n = 163) were associated with male gender (p = 0.002); paternal atopy (p = 0.026); personal history of atopic rhinitis (p = 0.016); asthma (p hyper-IgE was associated with personal history of asthma (exp(B) = 5.12, p = 0.002) and eczema severity during childhood and adolescence (p hyper-IgE. For patients >10years of age, food allergen sensitization was associated with hyper-IgE (p = 0.008). Hyper-IgE is independently associated with asthma, more severe atopy and more severe eczema during childhood and adolescence. IgE > 2000 IU/L may be a tool to aid prognostication of this chronic relapsing dermatologic disease and its progression to asthma.

  10. Shared genetic origin of asthma, hay fever and eczema elucidates allergic disease biology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferreira, Manuel A; Vonk, Judith M; Baurecht, Hansjörg; Marenholz, Ingo; Tian, Chao; Hoffman, Joshua D; Helmer, Quinta; Tillander, Annika; Ullemar, Vilhelmina; van Dongen, Jenny; Lu, Yi; Rüschendorf, Franz; Esparza-Gordillo, Jorge; Medway, Chris W; Mountjoy, Edward; Burrows, Kimberley; Hummel, Oliver; Grosche, Sarah; Brumpton, Ben M; Witte, John S; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Willemsen, Gonneke; Zheng, Jie; Rodríguez, Elke; Hotze, Melanie; Franke, Andre; Revez, Joana A; Beesley, Jonathan; Matheson, Melanie C; Dharmage, Shyamali C; Bain, Lisa M; Fritsche, Lars G; Gabrielsen, Maiken E; Balliu, Brunilda; Nielsen, Jonas B; Zhou, Wei; Hveem, Kristian; Langhammer, Arnulf; Holmen, Oddgeir L; Løset, Mari; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Willer, Cristen J; Arnold, Andreas; Homuth, Georg; Schmidt, Carsten O; Thompson, Philip J; Martin, Nicholas G; Duffy, David L; Novak, Natalija; Schulz, Holger; Karrasch, Stefan; Gieger, Christian; Strauch, Konstantin; Melles, Ronald B; Hinds, David A; Hübner, Norbert; Weidinger, Stephan; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Jansen, Rick; Jorgenson, Eric; Lee, Young-Ae; Boomsma, Dorret I; Almqvist, Catarina; Karlsson, Robert; Koppelman, Gerard H; Paternoster, Lavinia

    2017-01-01

    Asthma, hay fever (or allergic rhinitis) and eczema (or atopic dermatitis) often coexist in the same individuals, partly because of a shared genetic origin. To identify shared risk variants, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS; n = 360,838) of a broad allergic disease phenotype that

  11. Shared genetic origin of asthma, hay fever and eczema elucidates allergic disease biology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferreira, Manuel A.; Vonk, Judith M.; Baurecht, Hansjorg; Marenholz, Ingo; Tian, Chao; Hoffman, Joshua D.; Helmer, Quinta; Tillander, Annika; Ullemar, Vilhelmina; van Dongen, Jenny; Lu, Yi; Rueschendorf, Franz; Esparza-Gordillo, Jorge; Medway, Chris W.; Mountjoy, Edward; Burrows, Kimberley; Hummel, Oliver; Grosche, Sarah; Brumpton, Ben M.; Witte, John S.; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Willemsen, Gonneke; Zheng, Jie; Rodriguez, Elke; Hotze, Melanie; Franke, Andre; Revez, Joana A.; Beesley, Jonathan; Matheson, Melanie C.; Dharmage, Shyamali C.; Bain, Lisa M.; Fritsche, Lars G.; Gabrielsen, Maiken E.; Balliu, Brunilda; Nielsen, Jonas B.; Zhou, Wei; Hveem, Kristian; Langhammer, Arnulf; Holmen, Oddgeir L.; Loset, Mari; Abecasis, Goncalo R.; Willer, Cristen J.; Arnold, Andreas; Homuth, Georg; Schmidt, Carsten O.; Thompson, Philip J.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Duffy, David L.; Novak, Natalija; Schulz, Holger; Karrasch, Stefan; Gieger, Christian; Strauch, Konstantin; Melles, Ronald B.; Hinds, David A.; Huebner, Norbert; Weidinger, Stephan; Magnusson, Patrik K. E.; Jansen, Rick; Jorgenson, Eric; Lee, Young-Ae; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Almqvist, Catarina; Karlsson, Robert; Koppelman, Gerard H.; Paternoster, Lavinia

    2017-01-01

    Asthma, hay fever (or allergic rhinitis) and eczema (or atopic dermatitis) often coexist in the same individuals(1), partly because of a shared genetic origin(2-4). To identify shared risk variants, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS; n = 360,838) of a broad allergic disease

  12. Maternal psychiatric symptoms during pregnancy and risk of childhood atopic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbert, N J; Duijts, L; den Dekker, H T; de Jong, N W; Nijsten, T E C; Jaddoe, V W V; de Jongste, J C; van Wijk, R Gerth; Tiemeier, H; Pasmans, S G M A

    2017-04-01

    Maternal psychiatric symptoms during pregnancy might affect the developing immune system and subsequent risk of childhood atopic diseases. Our aim was to examine the associations of maternal psychiatric symptoms during pregnancy with allergic sensitization, allergy and eczema in children until age 10 years. This study among 5205 children was performed in a population-based prospective cohort from foetal life onwards. We assessed maternal and paternal psychiatric symptoms (overall, depressive, anxiety) during pregnancy and at 36 months after delivery, and maternal psychiatric symptoms at 2 and 6 months after delivery using the Brief Symptom Inventory. Inhalant and food allergic sensitization were measured by skin prick tests, and physician-diagnosed inhalant and food allergy or eczema by questionnaires from birth until age 10 years. We used multivariate logistic regression, multinomial logistic regression or generalized estimating equation models where appropriate. We observed no association of maternal psychiatric symptoms during pregnancy with allergic sensitization. Maternal overall psychiatric, depressive and anxiety symptoms during pregnancy were associated with an increased risk of inhalant allergy only (adjusted odds ratio (95% confidence interval) 1.96 (1.44, 2.65), 1.58 (1.25, 1.98) and 1.61 (1.27, 2.03), respectively, per 1-unit increase). Maternal overall psychiatric and anxiety symptoms during pregnancy were associated with an increased risk of eczema (1.21 (1.05, 1.39) and 1.15 (1.02, 1.29), respectively, per 1-unit increase). Effect estimates did not materially change when maternal psychiatric symptoms after delivery, or paternal psychiatric symptoms during pregnancy and after delivery were taken into account. Maternal psychiatric symptoms during pregnancy were associated with increased risks of childhood inhalant allergy and eczema, independent of maternal psychiatric symptoms after delivery and of paternal psychiatric symptoms. © 2017 John Wiley

  13. Treating atopic dermatitis: safety, efficacy, and patient acceptability of a ceramide hyaluronic acid emollient foam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pacha O

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Omar Pacha, Adelaide A HebertDepartment of Dermatology, University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston, TX, USAAbstract: Advances in current understanding of the pathophysiology of atopic dermatitis have led to improved targeting of the structural deficiencies in atopic skin. Ceramide deficiency appears to be one of the major alterations in atopic dermatitis and the replenishment of this epidermal component through topically applied ceramide based emollients appears to be safe, well tolerated, and effective. Recently a ceramide hyaluronic acid foam has become commercially available and increasing evidence supports its safety and efficacy in patients who suffer from atopic dermatitis.Keywords: atopic dermatitis, ceramide, Hylatopic, eczema, non-steroidal, dermatology

  14. The epidemiology of hand eczema in the general population--prevalence and main findings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jacob P; Johansen, Jeanne D; Linneberg, Allan

    2010-01-01

    Numerous studies have investigated the prevalence and risk factors of hand eczema in the general population. These studies are of high value as they tend to be less biased than studies using clinical populations and as they are important for healthcare decision makers when they allocate resources....... This study aimed to review the epidemiology of hand eczema in the general population. Literature was examined using Pubmed-Medline, Biosis, Science Citation Index, and dermatology text books. On the basis of studies performed between 1964 and 2007, the point prevalence of hand eczema was around 4%, the 1......-year prevalence nearly 10%, whereas the lifetime prevalence reached 15%. Based on seven studies, the median incidence rate of hand eczema was 5.5 cases/1000 person-years (women = 9.6 and men = 4.0). A high incidence rate was associated with female sex, contact allergy, atopic dermatitis, and wet work...

  15. Contact hypersensitivity to nickel in patients with atopic dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michał Rożalski

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis is a chronic, recurrent inflammatory dermatosis with a complex and not fully explained pathogenesis. Recent years’ research points to a significant percentage of patients with atopic eczema in whom hapten patch test results are positive, especially with respect to nickel. These observations undermine suggestions that contact allergy (type IV hypersensitivity is rare in this group due to the dominance of the Th2-type cellular response characteristic for type I allergic reactions. In this review we aimed to systematize current knowledge regarding the pathomechanisms of contact hypersensitivity to nickel in patients with atopic dermatitis and the potential influence of this hapten on the clinical course of the disease.

  16. A multicentre randomised controlled trial and economic evaluation of ion-exchange water softeners for the treatment of eczema in children:the Softened Water Eczema Trial (SWET)

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, K. S.; Koller, K.; Dean, Tara; O'Leary, C. J.; Sach, T. H.; Frost, A.; Pallett, I.; Crook, A. M.; Meredith, S.; Nunn, A. J.; Burrows, N.; Pollock, I.; Graham-Brown, R.; O'Toole, E.; Potter, D.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To determine whether installation of an ion-exchange water softener in the home could improve atopic eczema in children and, if so, to establish its likely cost and cost-effectiveness. Design: An observer-blind, parallel-group randomised controlled trial of 12 weeks duration followed by a 4-week observational period. Eczema was assessed by research nurses blinded to intervention at baseline, 4 weeks, 12 weeks and 16 weeks. The primary outcome was analysed as intent-to-treat, using...

  17. A Pragmatic Approach to Patch Testing Atopic Dermatitis Patients: Clinical Recommendations Based on Expert Consensus Opinion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jennifer K; Jacob, Sharon E; Nedorost, Susan T; Hanifin, Jon M; Simpson, Eric L; Boguniewicz, Mark; Watsky, Kalman L; Lugo-Somolinos, Aida; Hamann, Carsten R; Eberting, Cheryl Lee; Silverberg, Jonathan I; Thyssen, Jacob P

    2016-01-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) may complicate the clinical course of atopic dermatitis (AD), and patch testing remains the criterion standard for diagnosing ACD. To date, there have been no guidelines or consensus recommendations on when and how to patch test individuals with AD. Failure to patch test when appropriate may result in overlooking an important and potentially curable complicating comorbidity. In this article, we present consensus recommendations regarding when to perform patch testing in the AD patient, best practices, and common pitfalls. Patch testing should be considered in AD patients with dermatitis that fails to improve with topical therapy; with atypical/changing distribution of dermatitis, or pattern suggestive of ACD; with therapy-resistant hand eczema in the working population; with adult- or adolescent-onset AD; and/or before initiating systemic immunosuppressants for the treatment of dermatitis. A suggested patch testing algorithm for AD patients is provided.

  18. Food compounds inhibit Staphylococcus aureus bacteria and the toxicity of Staphylococcus Enterotoxin A (SEA) associated with atopic dermatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atopic dermatitis or eczema is characterized by skin rashes and itching is an inflammatory disease that affects 10-20% of children and 1-3% of adults. Staphylococcus aureus bacteria are present on the skin of nearly all patients with atopic dermatitis. Antibiotics that suppress colonization of S. au...

  19. Treatment and secondary prevention effects of the probiotics Lactobacillus paracasei or Bifidobacterium lactis on early infant eczema: randomized controlled trial with follow-up until age 3 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gore, C; Custovic, A; Tannock, G W; Munro, K; Kerry, G; Johnson, K; Peterson, C; Morris, J; Chaloner, C; Murray, C S; Woodcock, A

    2012-01-01

    Allergic disease has been associated with altered intestinal microbiota. Therefore, probiotics have been suggested as a potential treatment for eczema. We investigated whether dietary supplementation of infants with eczema at age 3-6 months with Lactobacillus paracasei CNCM I-2116 or Bifidobacterium lactis CNCM I-3446 had a treatment effect or altered allergic disease progression. Primary outcome included eczema severity (SCORing Atopic Dermatitis, SCORAD) 3 months post-randomization. Secondary: SCORAD (other visits); infant dermatitis quality of life (IDQoL); gastrointestinal permeability; urinary eosinophilic protein X; allergen-sensitization; allergic symptoms (age 12, 18, 36 months). A total of 208 infants aged 3-6 months with physician-diagnosed eczema were recruited; 137/208 (SCORAD ≥ 10, consuming ≥ 200 mL standard formula/day) were randomized to daily supplements containing L. paracasei or B. lactis or placebo for a 3-month period, while receiving extensively hydrolysed whey-formula (dairy-free diet). There were two open observational groups, one group exclusively breastfed (n = 22) and the other, standard formula-fed (n = 49). ISRCTN41490500. Eczema severity decreased significantly over time in all groups. No significant difference was observed between randomized groups after 12-week treatment-period (SCORAD-score pre-/post-intervention: B. lactis 25.9 [95% CI: 22.8-29.2] to 12.8 [9.4-16.6]; L. paracasei 25.4 [22.1-29] to 12.5 [9.2-16.4]; placebo 26.9 [23.4-30.6] to 11.8 [9.6-14.3]; P = 0.7). Results were similar when analysis was controlled for allergen-sensitization, or when only sensitized infants were analysed. No differences were found for secondary outcomes. No difference was observed in SCORAD-score between randomized and observational groups. We found no benefit from supplementation with B. lactis or L. paracasei in the treatment of eczema, when given as an adjunct to basic topical treatment, and no effect on the progression of allergic disease

  20. Cupping Therapy May be Harmful for Eczema: A PubMed Search

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kam Lun E. Hon

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Eczema is a common childhood atopic condition and treatment is with emollients, topical corticosteroids, and avoidance of possible triggers. S. aureus colonization is a common complication. As there is no immediate cure, many parents seek alternative therapies that claim unproven therapeutic efficacy. We report a girl with long history of treatment noncompliance. After practicing a long period of dietary avoidance and supplementation, the grandparents took her to an alternative medicine practitioner. Following cupping therapy and acupuncture, the child developed blistering and oozing over her back the next day, which rapidly evolved to two large irregular-edge deep ulcers. She was treated with intravenous antibiotics and received multidisciplinary supportive intervention. Using search words of  “cupping,” “eczema,” and “atopic dermatitis,” only two reports were found on PubMed. Therapeutic efficacy was claimed but not scientifically documented in these reports. Childhood eczema is an eminently treatable atopic disease. Extreme alternative therapy seems not to be efficacious and may even be associated with serious undesirable sequelae. Physicians should be aware of various alternative treatment modalities and be prepared to offer evidence-based advice to the patients with eczema and their families.

  1. Cupping Therapy May be Harmful for Eczema: A PubMed Search

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hon, Kam Lun E.; Luk, David Chi Kong; Leong, Kin Fon; Leung, Alexander K. C.

    2013-01-01

    Eczema is a common childhood atopic condition and treatment is with emollients, topical corticosteroids, and avoidance of possible triggers. S. aureus colonization is a common complication. As there is no immediate cure, many parents seek alternative therapies that claim unproven therapeutic efficacy. We report a girl with long history of treatment noncompliance. After practicing a long period of dietary avoidance and supplementation, the grandparents took her to an alternative medicine practitioner. Following cupping therapy and acupuncture, the child developed blistering and oozing over her back the next day, which rapidly evolved to two large irregular-edge deep ulcers. She was treated with intravenous antibiotics and received multidisciplinary supportive intervention. Using search words of  “cupping,” “eczema,” and “atopic dermatitis,” only two reports were found on PubMed. Therapeutic efficacy was claimed but not scientifically documented in these reports. Childhood eczema is an eminently treatable atopic disease. Extreme alternative therapy seems not to be efficacious and may even be associated with serious undesirable sequelae. Physicians should be aware of various alternative treatment modalities and be prepared to offer evidence-based advice to the patients with eczema and their families. PMID:24282650

  2. Atopic eczema in school children | Melaku | Ethiopian Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... was reported by 2.6% of children. By using a simple standardized questionnaire, an internationally comparable local data was generated by this study. However, further studies with a more objective diagnostic criteria which includes skin prick test is recommended. (Ethiopian Journal of Health Development: 2000, 14(1): ...

  3. Use of ustekinumab for severe refractory atopic dermatitis in a young teenager.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wlodek, C; Hewitt, H; Kennedy, C T

    2016-08-01

    When conventional systemic immunosuppressive treatments fail in the setting of severe eczema, unlike in psoriasis, there are limited treatment options and only anecdotal evidence to help guide clinicians. There is a growing body of evidence for the use of certain biologic agents for moderate to severe eczema. We report the youngest case to date successfully and safely treated with ustekinumab for severe refractory atopic dermatitis. © 2016 British Association of Dermatologists.

  4. Hand eczema - prognosis and consequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, A. H.; Johansen, J D; Hald, M

    2014-01-01

    and eczema in other body locations during the follow-up period were risk factors of a poor prognosis. The same factors, as well as being a woman, were associated with occupational consequences and low health-related quality of life. Of those with persistent hand eczema only 40% had visited a dermatologist...... during the follow-up period and 7% had oral treatment. CONCLUSIONS: The disease had improved 7 years later; nevertheless, many patients continued to have considerable symptoms. Patients with a greater risk of a poor outcome are characterized by frequent eruptions, severe hand eczema and more widespread......BACKGROUND: Hand eczema is recognized as a long-lasting disease with personal and societal repercussions. Long-term studies are required to generate information on factors contributing to a poor outcome. OBJECTIVES: The aims of this 7-year follow-up study were to evaluate the clinical course...

  5. Maternal obesity, gestational weight gain, and risk of asthma and atopic disease in offspring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harpsøe, Maria C; Basit, Saima; Bager, Peter

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: High pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI) and excessive gestational weight gain (GWG) are suggested to influence risk of asthma and atopic disease in offspring. OBJECTIVE: We examined the effect of BMI and GWG on risk of asthma, wheezing, atopic eczema (AE), and hay fever in children...... during the first 7 years of life. METHODS: This was a cohort study of 38,874 mother-child pairs from the Danish National Birth Cohort (enrollment 1996-2002) with information from the 16th week of pregnancy and at age 6 months, 18 months, and 7 years of the child. Odds ratios (ORs) with 95% CIs were...... calculated by logistic regression with adjustment for potential confounders. RESULTS: During the first 7 years of life, 10.4% of children developed doctor-diagnosed asthma, 25.8% AE, and 4.6% hay fever. Maternal BMI and to a lesser extent GWG were associated with doctor-diagnosed asthma ever. In particular...

  6. Maternal obesity, gestational weight gain, and risk of asthma and atopic disease in offspring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harpsøe, Maria C; Basit, Saima; Bager, Peter

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: High pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI) and excessive gestational weight gain (GWG) are suggested to influence risk of asthma and atopic disease in offspring. OBJECTIVE: We examined the effect of BMI and GWG on risk of asthma, wheezing, atopic eczema (AE), and hay fever in children...... during the first 7 years of life. METHODS: This was a cohort study of 38,874 mother-child pairs from the Danish National Birth Cohort (enrollment 1996-2002) with information from the 16th week of pregnancy and at age 6 months, 18 months, and 7 years of the child. Odds ratios (ORs) with 95% CIs were...... calculated by logistic regression with adjustment for potential confounders. RESULTS: During the first 7 years of life, 10.4% of children developed doctor-diagnosed asthma, 25.8% AE, and 4.6% hay fever. Maternal BMI and to a lesser extent GWG were associated with doctor-diagnosed asthma ever. In particular...

  7. Immune-modulatory genomic properties differentiate gut microbiota of infants with and without eczema

    KAUST Repository

    Oh, Seungdae

    2017-10-19

    Gut microbiota play an important role in human immunological processes, potentially affecting allergic diseases such as eczema. The diversity and structure of gut microbiota in infants with eczema have been previously documented. This study aims to evaluate by comparative metagenomics differences in genetic content in gut microbiota of infants with eczema and their matched controls. Stools were collected at the age of one month old from twelve infants from an at risk birth cohort in a case control manner. Clinical follow up for atopic outcomes were carried out at the age of 12 and 24 months. Microbial genomic DNA were extracted from stool samples and used for shotgun sequencing. Comparative metagenomic analysis showed that immune-regulatory TCAAGCTTGA motifs were significantly enriched in the six healthy controls (C) communities compared to the six eczema subjects (E), with many encoded by Bifidobacterium (38% of the total motifs in the C communities). Draft genomes of five Bifidobacterium species populations (B. longum, B. bifidum, B. breve, B. dentium, and B. pseudocatenulatum) were recovered from metagenomic datasets. The B. longum BFN-121-2 genome encoded more TCAAGCTTGA motifs (4.2 copies per one million genome sequence) than other Bifidobacterium genomes. Additionally, the communities in the stool of controls (C) were also significantly enriched in functions associated with tetrapyrrole biosynthesis compared to those of eczema (E). Our results show distinct immune-modulatory genomic properties of gut microbiota in infants associated with eczema and provide new insights into potential role of gut microbiota in affecting human immune homeostasis.

  8. Filaggrin gene variants and atopic diseases in early childhood assessed longitudinally from birth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bønnelykke, Klaus; Pipper, Christian Bressen; Tavendale, Roger

    2010-01-01

    Copenhagen Prospective Study on Asthma in Childhood (COPSAC) was one of the discovery cohorts of the association between eczema and variants in the filaggrin coding gene (FLG). Here, we study the FLG-associated risk of asthma symptoms in early life and describe the temporal relationship in the de......Copenhagen Prospective Study on Asthma in Childhood (COPSAC) was one of the discovery cohorts of the association between eczema and variants in the filaggrin coding gene (FLG). Here, we study the FLG-associated risk of asthma symptoms in early life and describe the temporal relationship...... diagnosed prospectively by the investigators. FLG variants R501X and Del4 were determined in 382 Caucasians. Filaggrin variants increased risk of developing recurrent wheeze, asthma and asthma exacerbations (hazard ratio 1.82 [1.06-3.12], p = 0.03), which was expressed within the first 1.5 yr of life...... fully in the first year of life (point prevalence ratio for age 0-5 was 1.75 [1.29-2.37]; p-value = 0.0003) contrasting the increased risk of specific sensitization by age 4 (odds ratio 3.52 [1.72-7.25], p = 0.0007) but not age 1.5. This study describes a FLG-associated pattern of atopic diseases...

  9. An educational programme for patients with psoriasis and atopic dermatitis: a prospective randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostoen, J; Bracke, S; De Keyser, S; Lambert, J

    2012-11-01

    Patient education in addition to standard treatment, with the aim of affecting care through courses, is a relatively new concept in dermatology. Here we introduce a randomized controlled trial (RCT) regarding a previously described 12-week educational programme for chronic skin diseases. The primary objective of the RCT was to measure the effect of an educational programme on disease severity and quality of life in patients with psoriasis or atopic dermatitis. We recruited 50 patients from Ghent University Hospital. Patients with diagnosed psoriasis or atopic dermatitis were randomized (1 : 1) to the intervention or control group. The clinical outcome was measured by two blinded observers using the Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI), Scoring Atopic Dermatitis or the Eczema Area and Severity Index. Quality of life was measured by dermatology-specific quality-of-life questionnaires. There was a follow-up period of 9 months. We found that disease severity and quality of life improved significantly for patients with psoriasis (n = 29) but not for patients with atopic dermatitis (n = 21) at 3 months. Patients in the intervention group showed a significant reduction in mean PASI (P = 0·036), mean Dermatology Life Quality Index (P = 0·019) and mean Psoriasis Disability Index (P = 0·015), compared with the control group at 3 months. This improvement continued for at least 6 months, i.e. 3 months after the intervention, but was lost at follow-up after 9 months. Evaluating this form of educational programme, by means of a single-centre RCT, indicates its added value in the longer term management of psoriasis. © 2012 The Authors. BJD © 2012 British Association of Dermatologists.

  10. Circulating LL-37 is a biomarker for eczema severity in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, T F; Ching, K W; Kong, A P S; Wong, G W K; Chan, J C N; Hon, K L

    2012-04-01

    Eczema lesions are characterized by impaired expression of antimicrobial peptides such as cathelicidin, which play crucial roles in the innate immune defence against cutaneous infections. LL-37 corresponds to amino acids 134-170 of human cathelicidin and is a multifunctional host defence molecule essential for normal immune responses to infection and tissue injury. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between childhood eczema and circulating LL-37 levels. One hundred and forty-four eczema children and 36 controls were recruited. Eczema severity was assessed by SCORing Atopic Dermatitis (SCORAD) and serum LL-37 concentration measured using enzyme immunoassay. Patients' skin hydration and transepidermal water loss at forearms were measured using Corneometer and Tewameter. Patients' mean SCORAD was 49.2 and their disease was classified as mild (n=28; 12.8%), moderate (n=95; 43.6%) and severe (n=95; 43.6%). Serum LL-37 concentrations did not differ between eczema patients and controls (mean: 832 pg/mL vs. 952 pg/mL, P=0.471). However, serum LL-37 concentrations increased with increasing eczema severity among the patients (P=0.005 for trend). This biomarker shows weakly positive correlation with patients' objective SCORAD (r=0.207, P=0.013) and age (r=0.170, P=0.041), but not skin hydration or transepidermal water loss (P>0.09). Linear regression confirmed significant association between objective SCORAD and serum LL-37 when adjusted for age and gender as covariates (β=0.171, P=0.038). On the other hand, serum LL-37 did not differ between patients with and without heavy growth of staphylococci (P=0.151). Circulating LL-37 may be a biomarker for severity of childhood eczema, which supports the importance of innate immunity in eczema pathogenesis. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology © 2011 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  11. A multicentre randomized controlled trial of ion-exchange water softeners for the treatment of eczema in children: protocol for the Softened Water Eczema Trial (SWET) (ISRCTN: 71423189).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, K S; Sach, T H

    2008-09-01

    There is epidemiological evidence linking increased water hardness with increased eczema prevalence. A number of plausible mechanisms can be forwarded to suggest why hard water could exacerbate eczema. The most likely explanation is increased soap usage in hard water areas, the deposits of which can cause skin irritation in individuals with eczema. To assess the cost and cost-effectiveness of ion-exchange water softeners for the treatment of eczema in children. Three hundred and ten children aged 6 months to 16 years, with moderate to severe eczema. The children must live in hard water areas (>or= 200 mg L(-1) of calcium carbonate) and have a home that is suitable for the installation of a water softener. This is a single-blind, parallel-group, randomized controlled trial of 12 weeks duration followed by a 4-week cross-over period. RESULTS/ANALYSIS PLAN: difference in the mean change in disease severity (Six Area, Six Sign Atopic Dermatitis score) at 12 weeks compared with baseline. (i) proportion of time spent moving during the night; (ii) self-reported global changes in eczema severity; (iii) amount of topical treatment used; (iv) Patient Oriented Eczema Measure; (v) number of totally controlled and well controlled weeks; (vi) impact on health-related quality of life for the child (EQ-5D) and the family (Dermatitis Family Impact questionnaire); and (vii) cost-effectiveness. It is planned that recruitment will be completed by the end of 2008 and results will be available towards the end of 2009.

  12. A randomised controlled trial of ion-exchange water softeners for the treatment of eczema in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Kim S; Dean, Tara; O'Leary, Caroline; Sach, Tracey H; Koller, Karin; Frost, Anthony; Williams, Hywel C

    2011-02-15

    Epidemiological studies and anecdotal reports suggest a possible link between household use of hard water and atopic eczema. We sought to test whether installation of an ion-exchange water softener in the home can improve eczema in children. This was an observer-blind randomised trial involving 336 children (aged 6 months to 16 years) with moderate/severe atopic eczema. All lived in hard water areas (≥200 mg/l calcium carbonate). Participants were randomised to either installation of an ion-exchange water softener plus usual eczema care, or usual eczema care alone. The primary outcome was change in eczema severity (Six Area Six Sign Atopic Dermatitis Score, SASSAD) at 12 weeks, measured by research nurses who were blinded to treatment allocation. Analysis was based on the intent-to-treat population. Eczema severity improved for both groups during the trial. The mean change in SASSAD at 12 weeks was -5.0 (20% improvement) for the water softener group and -5.7 (22% improvement) for the usual care group (mean difference 0.66, 95% confidence interval -1.37 to 2.69, p = 0.53). No between-group differences were noted in the use of topical corticosteroids or calcineurin inhibitors. Water softeners provided no additional benefit to usual care in this study population. Small but statistically significant differences were found in some secondary outcomes as reported by parents, but it is likely that such improvements were the result of response bias, since participants were aware of their treatment allocation. A detailed report for this trial is also available at http://www.hta.ac.uk. Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN71423189 Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary.

  13. A randomised controlled trial of ion-exchange water softeners for the treatment of eczema in children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim S Thomas

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies and anecdotal reports suggest a possible link between household use of hard water and atopic eczema. We sought to test whether installation of an ion-exchange water softener in the home can improve eczema in children.This was an observer-blind randomised trial involving 336 children (aged 6 months to 16 years with moderate/severe atopic eczema. All lived in hard water areas (≥200 mg/l calcium carbonate. Participants were randomised to either installation of an ion-exchange water softener plus usual eczema care, or usual eczema care alone. The primary outcome was change in eczema severity (Six Area Six Sign Atopic Dermatitis Score, SASSAD at 12 weeks, measured by research nurses who were blinded to treatment allocation. Analysis was based on the intent-to-treat population. Eczema severity improved for both groups during the trial. The mean change in SASSAD at 12 weeks was -5.0 (20% improvement for the water softener group and -5.7 (22% improvement for the usual care group (mean difference 0.66, 95% confidence interval -1.37 to 2.69, p = 0.53. No between-group differences were noted in the use of topical corticosteroids or calcineurin inhibitors.Water softeners provided no additional benefit to usual care in this study population. Small but statistically significant differences were found in some secondary outcomes as reported by parents, but it is likely that such improvements were the result of response bias, since participants were aware of their treatment allocation. A detailed report for this trial is also available at http://www.hta.ac.uk.Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN71423189 Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary.

  14. Atopic dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watson Wade

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Atopic dermatitis (AD is a common, chronic skin disorder that can significantly impact the quality of life of affected individuals as well as their families. Although the pathogenesis of the disorder is not completely understood, it appears to result from the complex interplay between defects in skin barrier function, environmental and infectious agents, and immune abnormalities. There are no specific diagnostic tests for AD; therefore, the diagnosis is based on specific clinical criteria that take into account the patient’s history and clinical manifestations. Successful management of the disorder requires a multifaceted approach that involves education, optimal skin care practices, anti-inflammatory treatment with topical corticosteroids and/or topical calcineurin inhibitors (TCIs, the use of first-generation antihistamines to help manage sleep disturbances, and the treatment of skin infections. Systemic corticosteroids may also be used, but are generally reserved for the acute treatment of severe flare-ups. Topical corticosteroids are the first-line pharmacologic treatments for AD, and evidence suggests that these agents may also be beneficial for the prophylaxis of disease flare-ups. Although the prognosis for patients with AD is generally favourable, those patients with severe, widespread disease and concomitant atopic conditions, such as asthma and allergic rhinitis, are likely to experience poorer outcomes.

  15. Nickel sensitization in adolescents and association with ear piercing, use of dental braces and hand eczema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørtz, Charlotte G; Lauritsen, Jens Martin; Bindslev-Jensen, Carsten

    2002-01-01

    The prevalence of nickel allergy (sensitization) and the associations with ear piercing, use of dental braces and hand eczema were assessed in a cohort of 1,501 8th grade schoolchildren (aged 12-16 years) in Odense, Denmark. Nickel allergy was found in 8.6% and was clinically relevant in 69......% of cases. Nickel allergy was found most frequently in girls and the association with ear piercing was confirmed. Application of dental braces (oral nickel exposure) prior to ear piercing (cutaneous nickel exposure) was associated with a significantly reduced prevalence of nickel allergy. In adolescents...... a significant association was found between hand eczema and nickel allergy. A follow-up study of this population is planned in order to assess the course and development of contact dermatitis, hand eczema and atopic diseases in adulthood and after choice of occupation....

  16. Japanese guidelines for atopic dermatitis 2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katayama, Ichiro; Aihara, Michiko; Ohya, Yukihiro; Saeki, Hidehisa; Shimojo, Naoki; Shoji, Shunsuke; Taniguchi, Masami; Yamada, Hidekazu

    2017-04-01

    Given the importance of appropriate diagnosis and appropriate assessment of cutaneous symptoms in treatment of atopic dermatitis, the basics of treatment in this guideline are composed of (1) investigation and countermeasures of causes and exacerbating factors, (2) correction of skin dysfunctions (skin care), and (3) pharmacotherapy, as three mainstays. These are based on the disease concept that atopic dermatitis is an inflammatory cutaneous disease with eczema by atopic diathesis, multi-factorial in onset and aggravation, and accompanied by skin dysfunctions. These three points are equally important and should be appropriately combined in accordance with the symptoms of each patient. In treatment, it is important to transmit the etiological, pathological, physiological, or therapeutic information to the patient to build a favorable partnership with the patient or his/her family so that they may fully understand the treatment. This guideline discusses chiefly the basic therapy in relation to the treatment of this disease. The goal of treatment is to enable patients to lead an uninterrupted social life and to control their cutaneous symptoms so that their quality of life (QOL) may meet a satisfactory level. The basics of treatment discussed in this guideline are based on the "Guidelines for the Treatment of Atopic Dermatitis 2008" prepared by the Health and Labour Sciences Research and the "Guidelines for the Management of Atopic Dermatitis 2015 (ADGL2015)" prepared by the Atopic Dermatitis Guidelines Advisory Committee, Japanese Society of Allergology in principle. The guidelines for the treatment of atopic dermatitis are summarized in the "Japanese Guideline for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Allergic Disease 2016" together with those for other allergic diseases. Copyright © 2017 Japanese Society of Allergology. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Clinical characteristics and consequences of hand eczema - an 8-year follow-up study of a population-based twin cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lerbaek, Anne; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm; Ravn, Henrik

    2008-01-01

    /METHODS: A total of 274 individuals with and without hand eczema were examined, patch tested, and interviewed in 1997-1998 and 2005-2006. Data on 188 individuals with hand eczema in 2005-2006 were analysed. RESULTS: Erythema and scaling were the most frequent symptoms, and fingers and palms were most often...... affected. Mean hand eczema severity index score in individuals with clinical symptoms was 12.0. Sick leave was reported by 12.4%; job change by 8.5%. Being in the lowest socio-economic group and atopic dermatitis were risk factors for sick leave [odds ratio (OR) = 5.6; 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1...

  18. Relevance of inhalant and food allergens to the etiology and management of patients with atopic dermatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platts-Mills, T.A.; Mitchell, E.B.; Rowntree, S.; Heymann, P.W.; Chapman, M.D.

    Patients with atopic dermatitis have IgE antibodies to common environmental antigens, both foods and inhalants. Such antibodies are probably relevant and exposure to the corresponding antigens can give rise to eczema. Nevertheless, the mechanisms involved and the role of other etiologies, e.g. contact reactions, remain to be elucidated. Patients with atopic dermatitis should have comprehensive evaluations to determine the role of environmental antigens.

  19. Hand eczema severity and quality of life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agner, Tove; Andersen, Klaus E; Brandao, Francisco M

    2008-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Hand eczema is a chronic disease with negative impact on quality of life (QoL). In this study, QoL in hand eczema patients is assessed and related to age, sex, severity, and diagnostic subgroups. Methods: A total of 416 patients with hand eczema from 10 European patch...... test clinics participated in the study. Data on QoL were obtained from a self-administered questionnaire using the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI). Severity was assessed by a scoring system (Hand Eczema Severity Index, HECSI) as well as frequency of eruptions and sick leave due to hand eczema...

  20. T-cell inhibitors for atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tidwell, W James; Fowler, Joseph F

    2018-03-01

    The management of atopic dermatitis is changing with the development of novel biologic agents to target specific molecules in the inflammatory cascade. Following the ability of dupilumab has proved its ability to act on the interleukin 4 receptor in treating atopic dermatitis. Thymic stromal lymphopoietin monoclonal antibody (AMG157/MEDI9929) and OX40 blocking antibody (GBR 830) were developed by targeting the same pathway as dupilumab further upstream. The clinical data on the efficacy for these drugs are not yet known. There is some early evidence that AMG157/MEDI9929 attenuates most measures of allergen-induced asthmatic responses. However, there are no public data on its ability to treat atopic dermatitis. In a phase 2a study, GBR 830 showed at least a 50% reduction in the Eczema Area and Severity Index scores of 17 of 23 patients, but it was not sufficiently powered for identification of statistical differences between GBR 830 versus placebo. Although there is potential for these 2 drugs to greatly improve the management of severe atopic dermatitis, significant clinical trials have not yet been completed to prove efficacy, and there are not yet any available phase 3 clinical trials, which are needed to truly evaluate their efficacy in affecting T-cells. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Exposures related to hand eczema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibler, K.S.; Jemec, G.B.E.; Agner, T.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Hand eczema is common in healthcare workers, owing to intensive exposure to wet work and skin irritants. Targeted interventions and vocational guidance based on documented exposures and risk factors are needed. Objectives. The aims of the study were to investigate the relationship bet...

  2. Emollients and moisturisers for eczema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Zuuren, Esther J; Fedorowicz, Zbys; Christensen, Robin

    2017-01-01

    of moisturisers for eczema. SEARCH METHODS: We searched the following databases to December 2015: Cochrane Skin Specialised Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, LILACS, the GREAT database. We searched five trials registers and checked references of included and excluded studies for further relevant trials...

  3. Prevalence of atopic dermatitis, asthma, allergic rhinitis, and hand and contact dermatitis in adolescents. The Odense Adolescence Cohort Study on Atopic Diseases and Dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørtz, Charlotte G; Lauritsen, J M; Bindslev-Jensen, C

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Atopic diseases are common in children and adolescents. However, epidemiological knowledge is sparse for hand eczema and allergic contact dermatitis in this age group. Furthermore, no population-based studies have evaluated the prevalence of atopic diseases and hand and contact...... associated. A considerable number of adolescents still suffers from AD, and a considerable sex difference was noted for hand eczema and allergic contact dermatitis. Nickel allergy and perfume allergy were the major contact allergies. In the future this cohort of eighth grade school children will be followed...... dermatitis in the same group of adolescents. OBJECTIVES: To assess prevalence measures of atopic dermatitis (AD), asthma, allergic rhinitis and hand and contact dermatitis in adolescents in Odense municipality, Denmark. METHODS: The study was carried out as a cross-sectional study among 1501 eighth grade...

  4. Serum OX40 ligand: a potential marker of atopic dermatitis disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ehab

    Pediatrics,. Dermatology*, and. Clinical Pathology**,. Faculty of Medicine,. Ain Shams University,. Cairo, Egypt. Correspondence: Mohamed Hesham M. Ezzat. 25, El-Sebak Street, .... symptoms (extent and intensity of eczema) and 2 subjective symptoms ... asthma, allergic rhinitis or allergic conjunctivitis. 3. Atopic dermatitis ...

  5. Association of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and atopic diseases : a case-control study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Der Schans, Jurjen; Pleiter, Janine C; De Vries, Tjalling W.; Schuiling-Veninga, Catharina C.M.; Bos, Jens H.J.; Hoekstra, Pieter J.; Hak, Eelko

    2015-01-01

    Background: Data on the association between attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and atopic diseases have been inconclusive. We assessed whether children using ADHD medication are more likely to receive drug treatment for asthma, allergic rhinitis, and/or eczema than children not using

  6. Association between medication prescription for atopic diseases and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Schans, Jurjen; Pleiter, Janine C.; de Vries, Tjalling W.; Schuiling-Veninga, Catharina C. M.; Bos, Jens H. J.; Hoekstra, Pieter J.; Hak, Eelko

    BACKGROUND: Data on the association between atopic diseases and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have been inconclusive. OBJECTIVES: To assess whether children with drug-treated ADHD are more likely to receive treatment for asthma, allergic rhinitis, or eczema before the start of ADHD

  7. Mold Occurring on the Air Cleaner High-Efficiency Particulate Air Filters Used in the Houses of Child Patients with Atopic Dermatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Seong Hwan; Ahn, Geum Ran; Son, Seung Yeol; Bae, Gwi-Nam; Yun, Yeo Hong

    2014-01-01

    Fungi are the known sources of irritation associated with atopic diseases (e.g., asthma, allergic rhinoconjunctivitis, and atopic eczema). To quantitatively estimate their presence in the indoor environment of atopic dermatitis-inflicted child patient's houses (ADCPHs), the high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters installed inside the air cleaners of three different ADCPHs were investigated for the presence of mold. The air cleaner HEPA filters obtained from the three different ADCPHs w...

  8. Association between breastfeeding and eczema during childhood and adolescence: A cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingying Wang

    Full Text Available Breastfeeding is said to protect children from eczema (atopic dermatitis, but the available evidence is conflicting and subject to the influences of parental atopy and reverse causation (when mothers extended duration of breastfeeding because their children had eczema.In the prospective, population-based Leicester Respiratory Cohort study, we assessed duration of breastfeeding in children aged 1-4 years. Prevalence of eczema was determined by questionnaire surveys that were repeated until the children were 17 years old. We investigated the association between having been breastfed and current eczema using generalized estimating equations, adjusting for potential confounders, and tested for effect modification by parental atopy. We also assessed the association between having been breastfed and incident eczema at ages 2, 4, and 6 years using multivariable logistic regression.Among the 5,676 children in the study, 2,284 (40% had never been breastfed, while 1,610 (28%, 705 (12%, and 1,077 (19% had been breastfed for 0-3, 4-6, and >6 months, respectively. Prevalence of current eczema decreased from 36% in 1-year-olds to 18% in children aged 10-17 years. Breastfeeding was not associated with current eczema. Compared with children who had never been breastfed, the adjusted odds ratios for current eczema at any age were 1.02 (95% confidence interval 0.90-1.15 for children who had been breastfed for 0-3 months, 0.97 (0.82-1.13 for children breastfed for 4-6 months, and 0.98 (0.85-1.14 for children breastfed for >6 months. There was no strong evidence for an effect modification by parental atopy (p-value for interaction term was 0.061 and no association between having been breastfed and incident eczema later in childhood.This population-based cohort study found no evidence for protection of breastfeeding against childhood eczema at any age, from infancy through adolescence.

  9. The diagnostic accuracy of the atopy patch test in diagnosing hypersensitivity to cow's milk and hen's egg in unselected children with and without atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osterballe, Morten; Andersen, Klaus E; Bindslev-Jensen, Carsten

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous studies have suggested that the atopy patch test (APT) may make oral challenge superfluous in diagnosing children with food hypersensitivity. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the clinical relevance of APT in predicting hypersensitivity to cow's milk and hen's egg in 486 unselected...... children 3 years of age. METHOD: The children were examined by APT, skin prick (SPT), histamine release (HR), and specific IgE followed by oral challenge when hypersensitivity to cow's milk or hen's egg was suspected. RESULTS: Food hypersensitivity confirmed by oral challenge was 1.6% to hen's egg and 0.......6% to cow's milk. No hypersensitivity to cow's milk or hen's egg was predicted by APT alone. CONCLUSION: APT could not predict food hypersensitivity not predicted by SPT, HR, or specific IgE. Thus, APT cannot be recommended in daily practice for the diagnosis of hypersensitivity to cow's milk and hen's egg...

  10. Hand eczema in the TOACS cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortz, C G; Bindslev-Jensen, C; Andersen, Klaus Ejner

    2014-01-01

    unselected young adults, was associated with sick leave/pension/rehabilitation indicating possible severe social consequences. LIMITATIONS: Only 39% participated in the clinical examination while 75% answered the questionnaire. CONCLUSIONS: A high incidence and prevalence of hand eczema was found in 28......BACKGROUND: Several studies have evaluated the incidence and prevalence of hand eczema in unselected adults. However, no studies have followed unselected adolescents from primary school into adult life to evaluate the course and risk factors for hand eczema. OBJECTIVES: To estimate the incidence...... of hand eczema from adolescence to adulthood and prevalence of hand eczema in young adults together with risk factors for hand eczema. METHODS: A cohort of 1501 unselected 8(th) grade schoolchildren was established in 1995. In 2010, 1206 young adults from the cohort were asked to complete a questionnaire...

  11. Early life exposure to antibiotics and the subsequent development of eczema, wheeze, and allergic sensitization in the first 2 years of life: the KOALA Birth Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kummeling, Ischa; Stelma, Foekje F.; Dagnelie, Pieter C.; Snijders, Bianca E. P.; Penders, John; Huber, Machteld; van Ree, Ronald; van den Brandt, Piet A.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Antibiotic exposure in early life may be associated with atopic disease development either by interfering with bacterial commensal flora or by modifying the course of bacterial infections. We evaluated early life exposure to antibiotics and the subsequent development of eczema, wheeze,

  12. Health service use among children with and without eczema, asthma, and hay fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hammer-Helmich L

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Lene Hammer-Helmich,1,2 Allan Linneberg,1,3,4 Simon Francis Thomsen,5,6 Line Tang,1 Charlotte Glümer1,7 1Research Center for Prevention and Health, The Capital Region of Denmark, Copenhagen, 2Department of Real World Evidence and Epidemiology, H. Lundbeck A/S, Valby, 3Department of Clinical Experimental Research, Rigshospitalet, 4Department of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, 5Department of Dermatology, Bispebjerg Hospital, 6Department of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, 7Department of Health Science and Technology, Faculty of Medicine, Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark Background: Atopic diseases, for example, eczema, asthma, and hay fever, are among the most common chronic diseases of childhood. Knowledge on health service use among children with atopic disease is limited. This study aimed to investigate the total use and costs of health services for children with and without eczema, asthma, and hay fever in a Danish general population. Methods: We conducted a health survey with four complete birth cohorts from the City of Copenhagen. Individual questionnaire data on eczema, asthma, and hay fever for children aged 3, 6, 11, and 15 years were linked to register information on use and costs of health services and prescribed medication and parental education. In total 9,720 children participated (50.5%. Results: We found increased health service use (number of additional consultations per year [95% confidence interval] among children with current eczema symptoms (1.77 [1.29–2.26], current asthma symptoms (2.53 [2.08–2.98], and current hay fever symptoms (1.21 [0.74–1.67], compared with children without these symptoms. We also found increased use of prescribed medication and most subtypes of health services. Current asthma symptoms and current eczema symptoms, but not current hay fever symptoms, increased the health

  13. Immune-modulatory genomic properties differentiate gut microbiota of infants with and without eczema.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seungdae Oh

    Full Text Available Gut microbiota play an important role in human immunological processes, potentially affecting allergic diseases such as eczema. The diversity and structure of gut microbiota in infants with eczema have been previously documented. This study aims to evaluate by comparative metagenomics differences in genetic content in gut microbiota of infants with eczema and their matched controls. Stools were collected at the age of one month old from twelve infants from an at risk birth cohort in a case control manner. Clinical follow up for atopic outcomes were carried out at the age of 12 and 24 months. Microbial genomic DNA were extracted from stool samples and used for shotgun sequencing. Comparative metagenomic analysis showed that immune-regulatory TCAAGCTTGA motifs were significantly enriched in the six healthy controls (C communities compared to the six eczema subjects (E, with many encoded by Bifidobacterium (38% of the total motifs in the C communities. Draft genomes of five Bifidobacterium species populations (B. longum, B. bifidum, B. breve, B. dentium, and B. pseudocatenulatum were recovered from metagenomic datasets. The B. longum BFN-121-2 genome encoded more TCAAGCTTGA motifs (4.2 copies per one million genome sequence than other Bifidobacterium genomes. Additionally, the communities in the stool of controls (C were also significantly enriched in functions associated with tetrapyrrole biosynthesis compared to those of eczema (E. Our results show distinct immune-modulatory genomic properties of gut microbiota in infants associated with eczema and provide new insights into potential role of gut microbiota in affecting human immune homeostasis.

  14. Itch in Atopic Dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kido-Nakahara, Makiko; Furue, Masutaka; Ulzii, Dugarmaa; Nakahara, Takeshi

    2017-02-01

    Chronic itch in inflammatory skin diseases, such as atopic dermatitis, markedly diminishes the quality of life of affected individuals. Comprehensive progress has been made in understanding itch signaling and associated mediators in the skin, dorsal root ganglia, spinal cord, and central nervous system, which may amplify or suppress atopic itch. Conventional therapies for atopic dermatitis are capable of reducing atopic itch; however, most patients are not satisfied with the antipruritic capacity of conventional treatments. Exploring itch pathways and mechanisms may lead to novel therapeutic approaches for atopic itch. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Importance of genetic factors in the etiology of atopic dermatitis: a twin study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Simon F; Ulrik, Charlotte S; Kyvik, Kirsten O

    2007-01-01

    ?" Latent factor models of genetic and environmental influences were fitted to the observed data using maximum likelihood methods. The overall lifetime prevalence of atopic dermatitis was 7.3%. A cotwin of an affected identical twin had a sevenfold increased risk of atopic dermatitis compared......The susceptibility to develop atopic dermatitis can be attributed both to genetic and environmental causes. We estimated the relative impact of genetic and environmental factors in the etiology of atopic dermatitis in a population-based sample of twins. From the birth cohorts of 1953-1982 who were...... enrolled in The Danish Twin Registry, a total of 11,515 twin pairs were identified in a nationwide questionnaire survey. Subjects were classified as atopic dermatitis cases when responding affirmatively to the question, "Do you have, or have you ever had, eczema in the folds of your elbows or knees...

  16. The effect of tobacco smoking and alcohol consumption on the prevalence of self-reported hand eczema: a cross-sectional population-based study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, J P; Linneberg, A; Menné, T

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hand eczema is a prevalent disorder that leads to high health care costs as well as a decreased quality of life. Important risk factors include atopic dermatitis, contact allergy and wet work whereas the role of null mutations in the filaggrin gene complex remains to be clarified....... It has been debated whether life-style factors such as tobacco smoking and alcohol consumption are associated with hand eczema. OBJECTIVES: The current study aimed to investigate whether self-reported hand eczema was associated with smoking and alcohol consumption in the general population. METHODS...... heavy smokers (OR = 1.38; CI = 0.99-1.92) compared with never-smokers. CONCLUSIONS: Tobacco smoking was positively associated with hand eczema among adults from the general population in Denmark. Apparently, current light smokers (

  17. The Association between Maternal Stress and Childhood Eczema: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen W. H. Chan

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Eczema is a chronic atopic disease that is highly prevalent among children worldwide. Identification of factors that may contribute to childhood eczema is needed in order to develop strategies in its prevention. Over the past decade, accumulating evidence has suggested a potential correlation between the experience of stress by mothers and the risk of eczema development in their child. The present review attempts to provide an overview of the studies that contribute data on this correlation. The literature search was conducted using five databases, resulting in the inclusion of eleven studies in the review. The findings of these studies were summarized narratively. Further, an appraisal of the reporting quality of the included studies was conducted using a twelve-item checklist adapted from the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE checklist. Overall, the included studies showed that a positive correlation exists between the experience of stress among mothers and eczema risk of their child. The findings highlight the importance of the implementation of stress reduction programs for pregnant women and those in their postpartum period within communities in order to enable these individuals to relieve stress effectively.

  18. Factors associated with combined hand and foot eczema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agner, T; Aalto-Korte, K; Andersen, K E

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: As for hand eczema, the aetiology of foot eczema is multifactorial and not very well understood. The aim of the present study was to identify factors associated with foot eczema in a cohort of hand eczema patients being classified into different subgroups. METHODS: Associations between...... foot and hand eczema were studied in a cross-sectional design in a cohort of hand eczema patients. Consecutive patients were recruited from nine different European Centres during the period October 2011-September 2012. Data on demographic factors, presence of foot eczema, hand eczema duration...... and severity, and whether the hand eczema was work-related or not were available, as well as patch-test results. RESULTS: Of a total of 427 hand eczema patients identified, information on foot eczema was available in 419 patients who were included in the present study. A total of 125 patients (29.8%) had...

  19. Child behaviour problems and childhood illness: development of the Eczema Behaviour Checklist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, A E; Morawska, A; Fraser, J A; Sillar, K

    2017-01-01

    Children with atopic dermatitis are at increased risk of both general behaviour problems, and those specific to the condition and its treatment. This can hamper the ability of parents to carry out treatment and manage the condition effectively. To date, there is no published instrument available to assess child behaviour difficulties in the context of atopic dermatitis management. Our aim was to develop a reliable and valid instrument to assess atopic dermatitis-specific child behaviour problems, and parents' self-efficacy (confidence) for managing these behaviours. The Eczema Behaviour Checklist (EBC) was developed as a 25-item questionnaire to measure (i) extent of behaviour problems (EBC Extent scale), and (ii) parents' self-efficacy for managing behaviour problems (EBC Confidence scale), in the context of child atopic dermatitis management. A community-based sample of 292 parents completed the EBC, measures of general behaviour difficulties, self-efficacy with atopic dermatitis management and use of dysfunctional parenting strategies. There was satisfactory internal consistency and construct validity for EBC Extent and Confidence scales. There was a negative correlation between atopic dermatitis-specific behaviour problems and parents' self-efficacy for dealing with behaviours (r = -.53, p behaviours; (ii) symptom-related behaviours; and (iii) behaviours related to impact of the illness. Variation in parents' self-efficacy for managing their child's atopic dermatitis was explained by intensity of illness-specific child behaviour problems and parents' self-efficacy for dealing with the behaviours. The new measure of atopic dermatitis-specific child behaviour problems was a stronger predictor of parents' self-efficacy for managing their child's condition than was the measure of general child behaviour difficulties. Results provide preliminary evidence of reliability and validity of the EBC, which has potential for use in clinical and research settings, and

  20. Consumption of organic foods and risk of atopic disease during the first 2 years of life in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kummeling, Ischa; Thijs, Carel; Huber, Machteld; van de Vijver, Lucy P. L.; Snijders, Bianca E. P.; Penders, John; Stelma, Foekje; van Ree, Ronald; van den Brandt, Piet A.; Dagnelie, Pieter C.

    2008-01-01

    We prospectively investigated whether organic food consumption by infants was associated with developing atopic manifestations in the first 2 years of life. The KOALA Birth Cohort Study in the Netherlands (n 2764) measured organic food consumption, eczema and wheeze in infants until age 2 years

  1. Melatonin and Atopy: Role in Atopic Dermatitis and Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Marseglia

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin may have important immunostimulatory actions in allergic diseases, in addition to its well-known antioxidant and cytoprotective effects in several inflammatory conditions. The activation of the immune system leads to free radical production associated with decreased melatonin levels and depressed antioxidant enzyme activities in several inflammatory diseases. Many skin disorders, including atopic dermatitis, are accompanied by infiltration and activation of mast cells, which release vasoactive and proinflammatory mediators. Experimental data suggest that melatonin inhibits development of atopic eczema and reduces serum total IgE and IL-4. Allergic asthma is a condition characterized by bronchial hyperresponsiveness and the presence of IgE antibodies in response to inhaled allergens; often there is also enhanced total serum IgE levels. Melatonin regulates smooth muscle tone and influences the immune response. Melatonin may, however, act as a pro-inflammatory agent in asthma leading to bronchial constriction. The safety of melatonin as a sleep-inducing agent has been confirmed in asthmatic subjects, but its routine use is not recommended in bronchial asthma. This review summarizes what is known about the role of melatonin as an immunomodulatory agent in asthma and atopic eczema.

  2. Atopic dermatitis: skin care and topical therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischer, David M; Udkoff, Jeremy; Borok, Jenna; Friedman, Adam; Nicol, Noreen; Bienstock, Jeffrey; Lio, Peter; Tollefson, Megha M; Eichenfield, Lawrence F

    2017-09-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) pathogenesis is strongly influenced by Type 2 innate lymphoid cell and T-helper cell type 2 lymphocyte-driven inflammation and skin barrier dysfunction. AD therapies attempt to correct this pathology, and guidelines suggest suggest basics of AD therapy, which include repair of the skin barrier through bathing practices and moisturizers, infection control, and further lifestyle modifications to avoid and reduce AD triggers.While some patients' AD may be controlled using these measures, inflammatory eczema including acute flares and maintenance therapy in more severe patients are treated with topical pharmacologic agents such as topical corticosteroids, topical calcineurin inhibitors, and, more recently, topical PDE-4 inhibitors. This model of basic skin therapy and, as needed, topical pharmacologic agents may be used to treat the vast majority of patients with AD and remains the staple of AD therapy. ©2017 Frontline Medical Communications.

  3. [Nickel allergy in contact and atopic dermatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoszczyk, Grazyna; Obtułowicz, Krystyna; Wojas-Pelc, Anna; Szmigiel-Michalak, Katarzyna; Bogdaszewska-Czabanowska, Jadwiga; Obtułowicz, Aleksander

    2003-01-01

    The study is aimed to determine the importance of type I and type IV allergy in eczema caused by allergy to nickel. The study was performed at 55 patients (42 women, 13 men, aged 16-58 yrs) suffering from hand dermatitis (19 cases), disseminated eczema (22 cases) and atopic dermatitis (14 cases) with positive skin patch test to 2.5% nickel sulphate. In each patients history of illness was analyzed, total serum IgE level (tIgE) was estimated and specific IgE (sIgE) for nickel and also absolute blood eosinophils and basophils counts were estimated for the evaluation of the atopy features. In each patient patch skin test with different nickel sulphate dilutions were performed as well as skin prick tests with different dilutions of nickel sulphate. The following oral provocation tests were carried out with the nickel sulphate in doses 0.56 mg, 1.12 mg, 2.24 mg, 5.6 mg and 11.2 mg. The test was stopped at the dose provoking the symptoms of illness. Positive family history, the increased tIgE serum level as well as absolute counts of eosinophils and basophils were present in some patients with atopic and contact dermatitis and they were not useful in differential diagnosis of this forms of skin allergy. Skin patch test with different concentrations of nickel sulphate was helpful to establish the degree of contact sensitivity in all patients. The oral provocation test with different dose of nickel sulphate also provoked symptoms in some patients in each observed groups, but the reaction to the lowest dose was observed only in patients with atopic dermatitis. Specific IgE to nickel as well as skin prick testing also with different dilutions of nickel sulphate are not useful in the diagnosis of nickel allergy. In the all examined patients they were negative. It seems that both types of allergy (type I and IV) may take part in the patho-mechanism of atopic and contact skin allergy with alternate prevalence of one of its depending on patient condition.

  4. Preeclampsia Associates with Asthma, Allergy, and Eczema in Childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokholm, Jakob; Sevelsted, Astrid; Anderson, Ulrik D; Bisgaard, Hans

    2017-03-01

    Preeclampsia reflects an unusual increase in systemic inflammation during pregnancy. We studied associations between preeclampsia and asthma, allergy, and eczema in Copenhagen Prospective Studies on Asthma in Childhood 2000 (COPSAC 2000 ) and in national registries. COPSAC 2000 is a high-risk birth cohort of 411 Danish children. Asthma, allergy, and eczema were diagnosed prospectively, and lung function measured at age 1 month and 7 years. Sensitization was evaluated at age 6 months, 18 months, 4 years, and 6 years by skin prick tests and IgE measurements. The register-based cohort included 1.7 million children from Danish national registries in the 35-year period 1977-2012. Children born to mothers with preeclampsia were analyzed regarding risk of asthma, allergy, and eczema. In the COPSAC 2000 cohort, 5.6% (n = 23) were diagnosed with preeclampsia. Preeclampsia was associated with increased risk of treatment with inhaled corticosteroids at age 7 years (adjusted odds ratio, 4.01 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.11-14.43]; P = 0.0337), increased bronchial responsiveness to methacholine (adjusted β-coefficient log-μmol, -0.80 [95% CI, -1.55 to -0.06]; P = 0.0348), and allergic rhinitis (adjusted odds ratio, 4.83 [95% CI, 1.58-14.78]; P = 0.0057) in the 7-year-old children. Furthermore, the children had an increased risk of sensitization to both aeroallergens and food allergens, and increased amount of total IgE during childhood. In the registry-based cohort, 3.7% (n = 62,728) were born to mothers with preeclampsia. Preeclampsia was associated with increased risk of asthma, eczema, and aeroallergen and food allergy, especially pronounced after a duration of preeclampsia of 14 days or more. Maternal asthma increased the risk of preeclampsia. Preeclampsia is a shared prenatal risk factor for asthma, eczema, and allergy in childhood pointing toward in utero immune programming of the child.

  5. Patterns of lower leg and foot eczema in south India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chougule Abhijit

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The pattern of eczema is altered by geography, habits of people and environmental factors and regional variation in skin structure and function. Aims: Our study was done to estimate frequency and patterns of lower leg and foot eczemas. Methods: A total of 200 patients with various types of lower leg and foot eczemas were recruited over a period of 2 years. Demographic and clinical characteristics were noted. Suspected cases of allergic contact dermatitis were patch tested. Results: The frequency of these eczemas was 2.5 per 1000 out patients. Mean age of patients was 40.49 years. Female to male ratio was 1.6:1. Sixty (30% patients were farmers, sixty (30% were housewives, forty (20% were students, nineteen (9.5% were daily laborers, nine had sedentary jobs and three were teachers. Most eczemas were bilateral (72%. Mean duration of eczema was 36.6 months. Most common type of eczema was lichen simplex chronicus (36% followed by discoid eczema (18.5%, allergic contact dermatitis (14.5% and stasis eczema (7.5%. Other eczemas noted were juvenile plantar dermatosis, cumulative irritant contact dermatitis, infected eczema, hyperkeratotic eczema, asteatotic eczema, pompholyx, infective eczema and unclassified endogenous eczema. Common sites of involvement were dorsa of feet (49.5%, followed by lateral aspect of lower leg (31%, medial aspect of lower leg (17.5% and ankle (12%. Conclusion : Our study highlights lichen simplex chronicus as the most common eczema affecting the lower legs and feet.

  6. Eczema

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Healthy Living Healthy Living Healthy Living Nutrition Fitness Sports Oral Health Emotional Wellness Growing Healthy Sleep Safety & Prevention Safety & Prevention Safety and Prevention Immunizations At Home ...

  7. Eczema

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Exercise is a great way to blow off stress — just try walking, bike riding, swimming, or another sport that keeps your skin cool and dry while you work out. Reviewed by: Patrice Hyde, MD Date reviewed: June 2015 More on this topic ... for Taking Care of Your Skin Stress Hives (Urticaria) Body Image and Self-Esteem Food ...

  8. Fragrance allergy and hand eczema - a review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heydorn, S; Menné, T; Johansen, J D

    2003-01-01

    Because hand eczema and fragrance allergy are common both among patients and in the general population, simultaneous occurrence by chance must be expected. Fragrances are ubiquitous and a part of many domestic and occupational products intended for hand exposure. The present review is based...... fragrance allergy and hand eczema. In future studies, a more detailed exposure assessment is needed, combined with patch test studies among patients with hand eczema tested with relevant fragrance allergens, as well as experimental control exposure studies to specific fragrance allergens on the hands....... As exposures to fragrances on the hands are often simultaneous exposures to irritants, this combined exposure approach needs to be considered....

  9. Use of textiles in atopic dermatitis: care of atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, G; Patrizi, A; Bellini, F; Medri, M

    2006-01-01

    has been demonstrated in patients with AD. Such colonization has been included in the group of trigger factors for eczema in AD. Silver products have recently been demonstrated to offer two advantages in the control of bacterial infections. Textiles may be used not only for clothes, but also to prevent dust mite sensitization in atopic patients. A marked clinical improvement of AD was observed in a group of adults and children with positive skin tests (not necessarily towards mites), after an intensive eradication programme for mite allergens. Skin treatment with acaricide and house dust mite control measures can decrease AD symptoms. Different textiles have various potential worsening links with allergies: e.g. clothing has been proposed as an additional source of exposure to mite and cat allergens. On the other hand, special textiles can be used to prevent dust mite sensitization.

  10. Effects of prenatal and perinatal exposure to fine air pollutants and maternal fish consumption on the occurrence of infantile eczema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jedrychowski, Wieslaw; Perera, Frederica; Maugeri, Umberto; Mrozek-Budzyn, Dorota; Miller, Rachel L; Flak, Elzbieta; Mroz, Elzbieta; Jacek, Ryszard; Spengler, John D

    2011-01-01

    As there is a scarcity of evidence on potential hazards and preventive factors for infantile eczema operating in the prenatal period, the main goal of this study was to assess the role of prenatal exposure to fine particulate matter and environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) in the occurrence of infant eczema jointly with the possible modulating effect of maternal fish consumption. The study sample consisted of 469 women enrolled during pregnancy, who gave birth to term babies (>36 weeks of gestation). Among all pregnant women recruited, personal measurements of fine particulate matter (PM₂.₅) were performed over 48 h in the second trimester of pregnancy. After delivery, every 3 months in the first year of the newborn's life, a detailed, standardized, face-to-face interview was administered to each mother, in the process of which a trained interviewer recorded any history of infantile eczema and data on potential environmental hazards. The estimated risk of eczema related to higher prenatal exposure to fine particulate matter (PM₂.₅ > 53.0 μg/m³) and postnatal ETS as well as the protective effect of maternal fish intake were adjusted for potential confounders in a multivariable logistic regression model. While the separate effects of higher prenatal PM₂.₅ and postnatal ETS exposure were not statistically significant, their joint effect appeared to have a significant influence on the occurrence of infantile eczema [odds ratio 2.39, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.10-5.18]. With maternal fish intake of more than 205 g/week, the risk of eczema decreased by 43% (odds ratio 0.57, 95% CI 0.35-0.93). The incidence rate ratio (IRR) for eczema symptoms, estimated from the Poisson regression model, was increased with both higher exposure to prenatal PM₂.₅ and postnatal ETS (IRR 1.55, 95% CI 0.99-2.44) and in children of atopic mothers (IRR 1.35, 95% CI 1.04-1.75) but was lower in girls (IRR 0.78, 95% CI 0.61-1.00). The observed preventive effect of fish

  11. European birth cohort studies on asthma and atopic diseases I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keil, T; Kulig, M; Simpson, A

    2006-01-01

    initiated over the last two decades. AIM: One of the work packages within the Global Allergy and Asthma European Network (GA(2)LEN) project was designed to identify and compare European birth cohorts on asthma and atopic diseases. The present review (part I) describes their objectives, study settings......, outcome and exposure parameters at each time point. RESULTS: We identified and assessed 18 European birth cohorts on asthma, allergic rhinitis and eczema. Six of these studies also focused on food allergies. The birth cohorts were mostly initiated in the 1990s with predominantly urban...

  12. Atopic dermatitis 2017

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    No, Daniel J; Amin, Mina; Egeberg, Alexander

    2018-01-01

    Novel and innovative treatment options for atopic dermatitis (AD) are underway. The recent advancements in understanding AD are reminiscent of the progress made in psoriasis research over a decade ago.......Novel and innovative treatment options for atopic dermatitis (AD) are underway. The recent advancements in understanding AD are reminiscent of the progress made in psoriasis research over a decade ago....

  13. Sublingual immunotherapy in the treatment of atopic dermatitis: a systematic review using the GRADE system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gendelman, Samantha R; Lang, David M

    2015-02-01

    Controversy exists regarding the role of allergen immunotherapy as a therapeutic intervention for patients with atopic dermatitis and aeroallergen sensitivity. Our aim was to critically appraise the evidence supporting the use of sublingual immunotherapy for patients with atopic dermatitis and aeroallergen sensitivity. We performed a literature search using the terms "sublingual immunotherapy" and "atopic dermatitis" and "sublingual immunotherapy" and "eczema." We used the same terms to search PubMed, Ovid, and Scopus. Our limits were "Humans" and "English." We excluded articles that were not in English. These articles were analyzed using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) approach. Many studies reported improvement in clinical symptoms of atopic dermatitis. Serious methodological shortcomings were noted including but not limited to lack of control group, lack of randomization, incomplete descriptions of randomization and/or allocation concealment, many enrolled subjects not completing participation, and/or data analysis not by intention to treat.

  14. Topical steroid addiction in atopic dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fukaya M

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Mototsugu Fukaya,1 Kenji Sato,2 Mitsuko Sato,3 Hajime Kimata,4 Shigeki Fujisawa,5 Haruhiko Dozono,6 Jun Yoshizawa,7 Satoko Minaguchi8 1Tsurumai Kouen Clinic, Nagoya, 2Department of Dermatology, Hannan Chuo Hospital, Osaka, 3Sato Pediatric Clinic, Osaka, 4Kimata Hajime Clinic, Osaka, 5Fujisawa Dermatology Clinic, Tokyo, 6Dozono Medical House, Kagoshima, 7Yoshizawa Dermatology Clinic, Yokohama, 8Department of Dermatology, Kounosu Kyousei Hospital, Saitama, Japan Abstract: The American Academy of Dermatology published a new guideline regarding topical therapy in atopic dermatitis in May 2014. Although topical steroid addiction or red burning skin syndrome had been mentioned as possible side effects of topical steroids in a 2006 review article in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, no statement was made regarding this illness in the new guidelines. This suggests that there are still controversies regarding this illness. Here, we describe the clinical features of topical steroid addiction or red burning skin syndrome, based on the treatment of many cases of the illness. Because there have been few articles in the medical literature regarding this illness, the description in this article will be of some benefit to better understand the illness and to spur discussion regarding topical steroid addiction or red burning skin syndrome. Keywords: topical steroid addiction, atopic dermatitis, red burning skin syndrome, rebound, corticosteroid, eczema

  15. Translation and validation of Portuguese of a questionnaire for evaluation of psychosomatic symptoms in adults with atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boleira, Manuela; Lupi, Omar; Pires, Gisele Vianna; Dias, Gabriela; Seba, Amanda Jaccobson; Guimarães, Daniel Boleira Sieiro

    2014-01-01

    atopic dermatitis is directly related to psychological stress, reduced quality of life and psychosomatic symptoms. The Psychosomatic Scale for Atopic Dermatitis is the only questionnaire developed specifically for assessment of psychosomatization in atopic dermatitis. the objective of this study was to cross-culturally adapt and validate a Brazilian-Portuguese version of the Psychosomatic Scale for Atopic Dermatitis. adaptation consisted of independent translation and backtranslation by three bilingual translators, followed by a pre-test. The Psychosomatic Scale for Atopic Dermatitis and the Dermatology Life Quality Index were self-administered to 47 patients with atopic dermatitis. Disease severity was evaluated using the Eczema Area and Severity Index. Factor analysis was used to identify the dimensions of the Brazilian Portuguese version of the Psychosomatic Scale for Atopic Dermatitis. Internal consistency and convergence validity were also analyzed. Reproducibility was assessed using the Kappa coefficient. factor analysis revealed a two-dimensional structure: stress/laziness/insecurity (I) and maladjustment/social relationships (II), explaining 54.4% of total variance. All dimensions revealed excellent internal consistency. External construct validity was confirmed by positive correlations between the Psychosomatic Scale for Atopic Dermatitis and the Dermatology Life Quality Index. Test-retest reliability was excellent, with k>0.7 for all questions. the Brazilian Portuguese version of the Psychosomatic Scale for Atopic Dermatitis demonstrated acceptable psychometric properties and can be used for the evaluation of psychosomatic symptoms in patients with atopic dermatitis and as a tool in clinical and epidemiological research.

  16. Topical tacrolimus for atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cury Martins, Jade; Martins, Ciro; Aoki, Valeria; Gois, Aecio F T; Ishii, Henrique A; da Silva, Edina M K

    2015-07-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) (or atopic eczema) is a chronic inflammatory skin condition that affects children and adults and has an important impact on quality of life. Topical corticosteroids (TCS) are the first-line therapy for this condition; however, they can be associated with significant adverse effects when used chronically. Tacrolimus ointment (in its 2 manufactured strengths of 0.1% and 0.03%) might be an alternative treatment. Tacrolimus, together with pimecrolimus, are drugs called topical calcineurin inhibitors (TCIs). To assess the efficacy and safety of topical tacrolimus for moderate and severe atopic dermatitis compared with other active treatments. We searched the following databases up to 3 June 2015: the Cochrane Skin Group Specialised Register, CENTRAL in the Cochrane Library (Issue 5, 2015), MEDLINE (from 1946), EMBASE (from 1974), LILACS (from 1982), and the Global Resource of Eczema Trials (GREAT database). We searched six trials registers and checked the bibliographies of included studies for further references to relevant trials. We contacted specialists in the field for unpublished data.A separate search for adverse effects of topical tacrolimus was undertaken in MEDLINE and EMBASE on 30 July 2013. We also scrutinised the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) websites for adverse effects information. All randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of participants with moderate to severe atopic dermatitis (both children and adults) using topical tacrolimus at any dose, course duration, and follow-up time compared with other active treatments. Two authors independently screened and examined the full text of selected studies for compliance with eligibility criteria, risk of bias, and data extraction. Our three prespecified primary outcomes were physician's assessment, participant's self-assessment of improvement, and adverse effects. Our secondary outcomes included assessment of improvement of the disease by validated or objective measures, such as

  17. A multicentre randomised controlled trial and economic evaluation of ion-exchange water softeners for the treatment of eczema in children: the Softened Water Eczema Trial (SWET).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, K S; Koller, K; Dean, T; O'Leary, C J; Sach, T H; Frost, A; Pallett, I; Crook, A M; Meredith, S; Nunn, A J; Burrows, N; Pollock, I; Graham-Brown, R; O'Toole, E; Potter, D; Williams, H C

    2011-02-01

    To determine whether installation of an ion-exchange water softener in the home could improve atopic eczema in children and, if so, to establish its likely cost and cost-effectiveness. An observer-blind, parallel-group randomised controlled trial of 12 weeks duration followed by a 4-week observational period. Eczema was assessed by research nurses blinded to intervention at baseline, 4 weeks, 12 weeks and 16 weeks. The primary outcome was analysed as intent-to-treat, using the randomised allocation rather than actual treatment received. A secondary per-protocol analysis excluded participants who failed to receive their allocated treatment and who were deemed to be protocol violators. Secondary and primary care referral centres in England (UK) serving a variety of ethnic and social groups and including children living in both urban and periurban homes. Three hundred and thirty-six children (aged 6 months to 16 years) with moderate/severe atopic eczema, living in homes in England supplied by hard water (≥ 200 mg/l calcium carbonate). Participants were randomised to either installation of an ion-exchange water softener plus usual eczema care (group A) for 12 weeks or usual eczema care alone (group B) for 12 weeks. This was followed by a 4-week observational period, during which water softeners were switched off/removed from group A homes and installed in group B homes. Standard procedure was to soften all water in the home, but to provide mains (hard) water at a faucet-style tap in the kitchen for drinking and cooking. Participants were therefore exposed to softened water for bathing and washing of clothes, but continued to drink mains (hard) water. Usual care was defined as any treatment that the child was currently using in order to control his or her eczema. New treatment regimens used during the trial period were documented. Primary outcome was the difference between group A and group B in mean change in disease severity at 12 weeks compared with baseline, as

  18. Systemic antihistamines--a common outside the guidelines therapeutic strategy in hand eczema management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowska-Konsur, A; Reich, A; Szepietowski, J C

    2016-01-01

    Hand eczema (HE) is the most common skin disease affecting hands. Although the current treatment guidelines do not recommend use of systemic antihistamines as routine therapy, they seem to be widely used by physicians handling with this problem. The aim of the study was to investigate the attitude to prescribe systemic antihistamines in HE. A 10-item questionnaire was distributed among physicians participating in regional dermatological conferences. 127 valid questionnaires were analysed. A total of 127 physicians participated in the survey. 124 (97.6%) responders prescribe antihistamines in HE and 16 (12.6%) subjects declared routine use of oral antihistamines in the HE management. Significantly more dermatologists than other specialists used antihistamines in the treatment of HE accompanying atopic dermatitis (77.8% vs. 54.5%, P antihistamines in HE due to their anti-inflammatory properties (40.3% vs. 20.0%, P = 0.02). Regarding the type of eczema, antihistamines were prescribed most frequently in acute allergic HE (n = 92, 72.4%) and in HE accompanying atopic dermatitis (n = 86, 67.7%). Despite the lack of the large, randomized, controlled studies on the effectiveness of the systemic antihistamines in the treatment of HE, this type of therapy seems to be prevalently used among the physicians. © 2015 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  19. Comorbidities of Atopic Dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Yuki M F; Egeberg, Alexander; Skov, Lone

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: In this review article, we summarize the current evidence about atopic dermatitis (AD)-associated comorbidities, beyond the traditional atopic and allergic conditions. RECENT FINDINGS: Patients with AD may have an increased risk of cardiovascular diseases, certain malignancies...... therapy, in combination with reduction of risk factors, may help prevention of certain comorbidities. The reported observations may generate hypotheses for future investigations in underlying risk factors for AD-associated comorbidities....

  20. Ocular Surface Squamous Neoplasia Associated with Atopic Keratoconjunctivitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Ankit; Espana, Edgar M; Singh, Arun D

    2017-01-01

    To describe 2 cases of invasive squamous cell carcinoma that originated in the setting of severe atopic keratoconjunctivitis (AKC). Case one involved a 73-year-old male with atopic eczema and severe AKC who developed a limbal lesion suspicious for ocular surface squamous neoplasia (OSSN). Slit-lamp examination was significant for a new sessile lesion in the temporal limbal region of the left eye. The lesion was treated with excisional biopsy and cryotherapy. Topical therapy with mitomycin C, topical interferon alpha 2b, and topical 5-fluorouracil provided only partial control. Exenteration was eventually needed. Case two involved a 53-year-old male with history of severe AKC and eczema. Computed tomography imaging showed an infiltrative mass of the right orbit. Incisional biopsies confirmed conjunctival squamous cell carcinoma of both sides (invasive in the right eye, in situ in the left eye). Exenteration was needed for control of invasive carcinoma in the right eye. Squamous cell carcinoma was treated without success in spite of surgical excision and aggressive treatment with multiple topical agents and multiple applications of cryotherapy. Orbital exenteration was needed in both cases. Chronic inflammation associated with AKC may be a risk factor for the development of bilateral, diffuse, invasive, and recurrent OSSN that may require exenteration.

  1. The effect of encasings on quality of life in adult house dust mite allergic patients with rhinitis, asthma and/or atopic dermatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terreehorst, I.; Duivenvoorden, H. J.; Tempels-Pavlica, Z.; Oosting, A. J.; de Monchy, J. G. R.; Bruijnzeel-Koomen, C. A. F. M.; van Wijk, R. Gerth

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Environmental control has been put forward as an integral part of the management of house dust mite (HDM) allergy in sensitized patients. To validate this statement allergic disorders involved in HDM allergy--allergic asthma, rhinitis and atopic eczema/dermatitis syndrome (AEDS)--should

  2. The effect of encasings on quality of life in adult house dust mite allergic patients with rhinitis, asthma and/or atopic dermatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terreehorst, [No Value; Duivenvoorden, HJ; Tempels-Pavlica, Z; Oosting, AJ; de Monchy, JGR; Bruijnzeel-Koomen, CAFM; van Wijk, R.

    Background: Environmental control has been put forward as an integral part of the management of house dust mite (HDM) allergy in sensitized patients. To validate this statement allergic disorders involved in HDM allergy - allergic asthma, rhinitis and atopic eczema/dermatitis syndrome (AEDS) -

  3. Inhibition of allergic dermal inflammation by the novel imidazopyridazine derivative TAK-427 in a guinea pig experimental model of eczema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Shigeru; Midoro, Katsuo; Kamei, Takayuki; Gyoten, Michiyo; Kawano, Yasuhiko; Ashida, Yasuko; Nagaya, Hideaki

    2002-12-01

    Antigen challenge by patch ovalbumin emulsion induced an eczema-like skin lesion in epicutaneously sensitized guinea pigs. Diseased skin sites were macroscopically characterized by manifestations of dermatitis, such as erythema, edema, and papules, and microscopically characterized by acanthosis, spongiosis, and dermal infiltration by eosinophils. Using such lesions as a model of eczema, we evaluated the potential value of TAK-427 [2-[6-[[3-[4-(diphenylmethoxy)piperidino]propyl]amino] imidazo[1,2-b]pyridazin-2-yl]-2-methylpropionic acid dihydrate] as a therapeutic agent for atopic dermatitis by comparing it with dexamethasone and antihistamines. TAK-427 (0.3-30 mg/kg, p.o.) and dexamethasone (3 and 10 mg/kg, p.o.) inhibited eosinophil infiltration into the skin and ameliorated the dermatitis manifestations and epidermal damage. By contrast, none of the antihistamines tested (azelastine, ketotifen, terfenadine, and cetirizine) suppressed the eosinophil infiltration or dermatitis manifestations. To elucidate the mechanism by which TAK-427 inhibited the development of eczema, we investigated cytokine expression in the affected skin. Both TAK-427 and dexamethasone suppressed the increased mRNA expression of interleukin (IL)-13, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, IL-1alpha, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interferon-gamma, and IL-8, but not IL-10, suggesting that TAK-427 inhibits allergic inflammation of the skin leading to the development of eczema by inhibiting the expression of proinflammatory cytokines after antigen challenge.

  4. Burden of atopic dermatitis in Japanese adults: Analysis of data from the 2013 National Health and Wellness Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arima, Kazuhiko; Gupta, Shaloo; Gadkari, Abhijit; Hiragun, Takaaki; Kono, Takeshi; Katayama, Ichiro; Demiya, Sven; Eckert, Laurent

    2018-01-31

    Atopic dermatitis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease. The objective of this study was to characterize the burden of atopic dermatitis in Japanese adult patients relative to the general population. Japanese adults (≥18 years) with a self-reported diagnosis of atopic dermatitis and adult controls without atopic dermatitis/eczema/dermatitis were identified from the 2013 Japan National Health and Wellness Survey. Atopic dermatitis patients were propensity-score matched with non-atopic dermatitis controls (1:2 ratio) on demographic variables. Patient-reported outcome data on comorbidities, mood and sleep disorders, health-related quality of life, work productivity and activity impairment, and health-care resource utilization were analyzed in atopic dermatitis patients and matched controls. A total of 638 Japanese adult patients with atopic dermatitis were identified, of whom 290 (45.5%) rated their disease as "moderate/severe" and 348 (54.5%) as "mild". The analysis cohort comprised 634 atopic dermatitis patients and 1268 matched controls. Atopic dermatitis patients reported a significantly higher prevalence of arthritis, asthma, nasal allergies/hay fever, anxiety, depression and sleep disorders compared with controls (all P Atopic dermatitis patients also reported a significantly poorer health-related quality of life, higher overall work and activity impairment, and higher health-care resource utilization (all P atopic dermatitis reported a substantial disease burden relative to adults without atopic dermatitis, suggesting an unmet need for effective strategies targeting disease management. © 2018 The Authors. The Journal of Dermatology published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Dermatological Association.

  5. IgE sensitization in relation to preschool eczema and filaggrin mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Emma Kristin; Bergström, Anna; Kull, Inger; Lind, Tomas; Söderhäll, Cilla; van Hage, Marianne; Wickman, Magnus; Ballardini, Natalia; Wahlgren, Carl-Fredrik

    2017-12-01

    Eczema (atopic dermatitis) is associated with an increased risk of having IgE antibodies. IgE sensitization can occur through an impaired skin barrier. Filaggrin gene (FLG) mutation is associated with eczema and possibly also with IgE sensitization. We sought to explore the longitudinal relation between preschool eczema (PSE), FLG mutation, or both and IgE sensitization in childhood. A total of 3201 children from the BAMSE (Children Allergy Milieu Stockholm Epidemiology) birth cohort recruited from the general population were included. Regular parental questionnaires identified children with eczema. Blood samples were collected at 4, 8, and 16 years of age for analysis of specific IgE. FLG mutation analysis was performed on 1890 of the children. PSE was associated with IgE sensitization to both food allergens and aeroallergens up to age 16 years (overall adjusted odds ratio, 2.30; 95% CI, 2.00-2.66). This association was even stronger among children with persistent PSE. FLG mutation was associated with IgE sensitization to peanut at age 4 years (adjusted odds ratio, 1.88; 95% CI, 1.03-3.44) but not to other allergens up to age 16 years. FLG mutation and PSE were not effect modifiers for the association between IgE sensitization and PSE or FLG mutation, respectively. Sensitized children with PSE were characterized by means of polysensitization, but no other specific IgE sensitization patterns were found. PSE is associated with IgE sensitization to both food allergens and aeroallergens up to 16 years of age. FLG mutation is associated with IgE sensitization to peanut but not to other allergens. Sensitized children with preceding PSE are more often polysensitized. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Staphylococcus aureus and hand eczema severity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haslund, P; Bangsgaard, N; Jarløv, J O

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The role of bacterial infections in hand eczema (HE) remains to be assessed. OBJECTIVES: To determine the prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus in patients with HE compared with controls, and to relate presence of S. aureus, subtypes and toxin production to severity of HE. METHODS......: Bacterial swabs were taken at three different visits from the hand and nose in 50 patients with HE and 50 controls. Staphylococcus aureus was subtyped by spa typing and assigned to clonal complexes (CCs), and isolates were tested for exotoxin-producing S. aureus strains. The Hand Eczema Severity Index...... was used for severity assessment. RESULTS: Staphylococcus aureus was found on the hands in 24 patients with HE and four controls (P aureus was found to be related to increased severity of the eczema (P aureus types on the hands...

  7. [Atopic dermatitis of the adult].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hello, M; Aubert, H; Bernier, C; Néel, A; Barbarot, S

    2016-02-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) of the adult is a common skin disease. Its prevalence has greatly increased during the past decades. AD is commonly associated with other atopic disorders. Its impact on quality of life is often underestimated. Various immunopathologic mechanisms are involved in AD: innate epidermal barrier dysfunction due to filaggrin gene mutations, innate and adaptative abnormalities of the immune system (an initial Th2 phase precedes a chronic Th1 phase), intestinal and cutaneous microbiomes dysbiosis, and environmental factors. Diagnosis of AD is clinical and there is no predictive biomarker of future severity. The main differential diagnoses are: scabies, psoriasis, cutaneous adverse reaction, cutaneous T cell lymphoma, primary immunodeficiency, and Netherton's syndrome. Therapeutic management is challenging and should integrate a therapeutic education program. Topical corticosteroids are the first line treatment, including a preliminary assessment of possible topical corticosteroids phobia. Systemic treatments are recommended in severe, chronic and resistant AD, after careful evaluation in a reference centre. Dupilumab, an IL4/IL13 inhibitor, might be the first effective targeted therapy in AD, whereas therapies that specifically target the mechanisms of pruritus represent an exciting perspective. Copyright © 2015 Société nationale française de médecine interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Natural advances in eczema care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichenfield, Lawrence F; Fowler, Joseph F; Rigel, Darrell S; Taylor, Susan C

    2007-12-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic relapsing dermatitis characterized by increased transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and subjective symptoms of pruritus, inflammation, skin sensitivity, and dryness. AD is a frequent issue for individuals of color, though it may be underrecognized. Therapy for AD is based on reducing pruritus and inflammation, and normalizing skin surface lipids, particularly ceramides. Topical corticosteroids are the gold-standard treatment for controlling disease flares, but a variety of active natural ingredients can be used adjunctively to help control itch, inflammation, and dryness. Oatmeal, particularly avenanthramides, a newly discovered oat fraction, may be of particular value in restoring the cutaneous barrier and reducing symptoms of AD. Feverfew, licorice, and dexpanthenol also have been shown to be effective in the management of inflammation. Licorice, which has some skin-lightening activity, may be helpful in patients with postinflammatory hyperpigmentation (PIH). The compromised skin barrier in AD is especially vulnerable to UV radiation exposure. Several new long-lasting photostable sunscreen ingredients provide longer durations of protection with improved cosmetic attributes.

  9. Protein Linked to Atopic Dermatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Matters NIH Research Matters January 14, 2013 Protein Linked to Atopic Dermatitis Normal skin from a ... in mice suggests that lack of a certain protein may trigger atopic dermatitis, the most common type ...

  10. Fragrance allergy and hand eczema - a review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heydorn, S; Menné, T; Johansen, J D

    2003-01-01

    Because hand eczema and fragrance allergy are common both among patients and in the general population, simultaneous occurrence by chance must be expected. Fragrances are ubiquitous and a part of many domestic and occupational products intended for hand exposure. The present review is based on a ...

  11. Hand eczema and stratum corneum ceramides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jungersted, J. M.; Høgh, Julie Kaae; Hellgren, Lars

    2015-01-01

    : Using cyanoacrylate, SC samples were taken from 23 patients with allergic/irritant HE and 15 with hyperkeratotic HE for lipid analysis by high-performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC). Samples were also taken from adjacent, unaffected skin. Severity of HE was assessed by the Hand Eczema Severity...

  12. Testing with fine fragrances in eczema patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, J D; Frosch, Peter J; Rastogi, Suresh Chandra

    2001-01-01

    The frequencies of contact allergic reactions to 2 fine fragrances were studied by patch testing. Further, a comparison was made of test results before and after evaporation of the solvent. A total of 480 consecutive eczema patients were included, 100 in the Dortmund clinic and 380 in the Gentoft...

  13. Eczema Coxsackium Caused by Coxsackievirus A6

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horsten, Hans-Henrik; Fisker, Niels; Bygum, Anette

    2016-01-01

    We present the first case of atypical hand, food, and mouth disease in our department with the distinct cutaneous morphology of eczema coxsackium. Clinicians should be aware of the possibility for more extensive cutaneous eruption related to coxsackievirus A6 infection and the diagnostic methods...

  14. Automatic detection and severity measurement of eczema using image processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Md Nafiul; Munia, Tamanna Tabassum Khan; Tavakolian, Kouhyar; Vasefi, Fartash; MacKinnon, Nick; Fazel-Rezai, Reza

    2016-08-01

    Chronic skin diseases like eczema may lead to severe health and financial consequences for patients if not detected and controlled early. Early measurement of disease severity, combined with a recommendation for skin protection and use of appropriate medication can prevent the disease from worsening. Current diagnosis can be costly and time-consuming. In this paper, an automatic eczema detection and severity measurement model are presented using modern image processing and computer algorithm. The system can successfully detect regions of eczema and classify the identified region as mild or severe based on image color and texture feature. Then the model automatically measures skin parameters used in the most common assessment tool called "Eczema Area and Severity Index (EASI)," by computing eczema affected area score, eczema intensity score, and body region score of eczema allowing both patients and physicians to accurately assess the affected skin.

  15. Comparison of patient (POEM), observer (EASI, SASSAD, TIS) and corneometry measures of emollient effectiveness in children with eczema: findings from the COMET feasibility Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridd, M J; Gaunt, D M; Guy, R H; Redmond, N M; Garfield, K; Hollinghurst, S; Ball, N; Shaw, L; Purdy, S; Metcalfe, C

    2018-02-24

    Eczema affects ~20% of children but multiple different outcome measures have hampered research into the effectiveness of different treatments. To compare the change in scores and correlations within and between five measures of eczema severity: Patient Orientated Eczema Measure (POEM), Eczema Area Severity Index (EASI), Six Area Six Sign Atopic Dermatitis (SASSAD), Three Item Severity (TIS), and skin hydration (corneometry). Data from a feasibility trial that randomised young children with eczema to one of four emollients were used. Participants were followed for three months (84 days). Descriptive statistics (by emollient over time) and Spearman's correlation coefficients comparing scores at each time-point and absolute change (between adjacent time-points) for each outcome measure were calculated. 197 children, mean age (SD) of 21.7 (12.8) months, were randomised. POEM and TIS appeared to capture a range of eczema severity at baseline but only POEM had close approximation to normal distribution. Mean POEM, EASI, SASSAD and TIS scores improved month-by-month, with POEM showing the greatest sensitivity (effect size 0.42). Correlations within POEM, EASI, SASSAD and TIS were moderate-to-good, decreasing over time. Correlations between measures were strongest for EASI, SASSAD and TIS. By contrast, corneometry scores were more variable, correlated less well over time, and were poorly correlated with the other measures. Except for corneometry, all measures appear to change in relation to emollient use over time and correlate well with themselves. POEM demonstrated the greatest range of scores at baseline and change in eczema severity over the first 28 days. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  16. 20 Years of standard patch testing in an eczema population with focus on patients with multiple contact allergies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Berit Christina; Menné, Torkil; Johansen, Jeanne Duus

    2007-01-01

    (Me)isothiazolinone, and primin and poor for paraben mix. 5.1% were multiple allergic, primarily women, and 90% got diagnosed by the first test. Frequency of multiple allergies increased with age. More multiple- than mono/double-allergic patients were tested multiple times. Persistency and sensitivity rates in a Danish eczema...

  17. Variations in risk of asthma and seasonal allergies between early- and late-onset pediatric atopic dermatitis: A cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Joy; Mitra, Nandita; Hoffstad, Ole J; Gelfand, Joel M; Yan, Albert C; Margolis, David J

    2017-10-01

    Atopic dermatitis is associated with other allergic conditions, but variations in this "atopic march" are poorly understood. To determine the impact of the age of atopic dermatitis onset on the risk for asthma and seasonal allergies. A cohort study was performed using the Pediatric Eczema Elective Registry, which is an observational cohort of subjects with pediatric onset atopic dermatitis. In total, 3966 children were included, and 73% reported atopic dermatitis onset before age 2 years. At baseline, subjects with atopic dermatitis onset at ages 3 to 7 or 8 to 17 years had significantly lower rates of seasonal allergies and asthma than those with onset before age 2. During follow-up, the adjusted relative risks for incident seasonal allergies were 0.82 (95% confidence interval, 0.72-0.91) and 0.64 (95% CI confidence interval, 0.47-0.83) in the 3- to 7- and 8- to 17-years-old at onset groups compared with the age 2 years or younger at onset group. The adjusted risk for incident asthma was not significantly different between the older onset groups and the earliest onset group. Misclassification bias may arise from using self-reported onset age data. The timing of atopic dermatitis onset may explain part of the variation in the atopic march. These findings may improve future risk stratification of patients for treatment. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Hand eczema classification: a cross-sectional, multicentre study of the aetiology and morphology of hand eczema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diepgen, T L; Andersen, K E; Brandao, F M; Bruze, M; Bruynzeel, D P; Frosch, P; Gonçalo, M; Goossens, A; Le Coz, C J; Rustemeyer, T; White, I R; Agner, T

    2009-02-01

    Hand eczema is a long-lasting disease with a high prevalence in the background population. The disease has severe, negative effects on quality of life and sometimes on social status. Epidemiological studies have identified risk factors for onset and prognosis, but treatment of the disease is rarely evidence based, and a classification system for different subdiagnoses of hand eczema is not agreed upon. Randomized controlled trials investigating the treatment of hand eczema are called for. For this, as well as for clinical purposes, a generally accepted classification system for hand eczema is needed. The present study attempts to characterize subdiagnoses of hand eczema with respect to basic demographics, medical history and morphology. Clinical data from 416 patients with hand eczema from 10 European patch test clinics were assessed. A classification system for hand eczema is proposed. It is suggested that this classification be used in clinical work and in clinical trials.

  19. DIAGNOSTIC VALUE OF PATCH TEST IN HAND AND FOOT ECZEMAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sravani Sandhya Bellam

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The present study is undertaken to evaluate the results of patch test in 50 patients having hand and foot eczema attending skin OPD from October 2010 to September 2012 at KIMS, Narketpally. RESULTS Maximum number of cases in this study belong to 16-30 yrs. (46%.  In majority of cases, eczema was seen in both hands and feet (40%. Hand and foot eczema was commonly seen in construction workers (42.3%.  Mean duration of illness is 19.48 months.  42% of patients presented with acute eczema followed by subacute eczema (38% and then chronic eczema (20%.  Personal and family history of atopy was seen in only 4% and 6%, respectively.  Hand and foot eczema (42.3% was the commonest eczema followed by hand (30.74% and then foot eczema (11.53% and others (15.37%.  57.69% of patients are positive to more than one allergen and 42.3% were positive to single allergen.  Multiple allergens positivity is seen in construction workers (30.76%.  Potassium di chromate (28.5% is the common allergen found in patch test followed by Parthenium (16.6% followed by Paraphenylenediamine (14% and then Cobalt sulphate and Thiuram mix (9.5% and lastly Parabens mix, Nickel sulphate, Black rubber mix and Neomycin (4.7%.  Positive patch test is more commonly observed in patients having hands and or foot eczemas (42.30%. CONCLUSION Hand and foot eczema (42% was the commonest eczema followed by hand (30% and then foot eczema (11.5% and others (15.3%. Potassium dichromate is the commonest sensitiser (28.8%. We encountered a high degree of patch test positivity in our study group and the Indian standard series proved to be very useful.

  20. Microbiome in atopic dermatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Wollina,Uwe

    2017-01-01

    Uwe Wollina Department of Dermatology and Allergology, Academic Teaching Hospital Dresden-Friedrichstadt, Dresden, Germany Abstract: Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common chronic inflammatory skin disease affecting ~10–20% of the general population. AD is characterized by disturbances in epidermal barrier function and hyperactive immune response. Recently, changes in the skin and intestinal microbiome have been analyzed in more detail. The available data suggest a link between disturbe...

  1. Associations between lifestyle factors and hand eczema severity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jennifer A; Fisker, Maja H; Agner, Tove

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It has been suggested that lifestyle factors such as smoking, being overweight and stress may influence the prevalence and severity of hand eczema. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the association between lifestyle factors and hand eczema severity in a cohort of patients with work...... no significant association was found for body weight and stress. Other factors linked to severe eczema were male sex and older age (p = 0.04 and p = 0.01, respectively), and wet work (p = 0.08). CONCLUSION: The data from the present study strongly support an association between smoking and hand eczema severity......-related hand eczema. METHODS: Individuals with work-related hand eczema notified in the period between June 2012 and November 2013 were included in this questionnaire-based cross-sectional study. Participants responded to a questionnaire including questions on lifestyle factors, as well as a photographic guide...

  2. Topical therapy in patients with microbial eczema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakulev A.L.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available

    The study aimed to display that clinical and microbiologic research of patients with microbial eczema. The study revealed that the usage of co — formulated medication Supirocin — B was rather effcient, it promotes statistically authentic reduction of eczematous foci with pathogenic St.aureus and Str.spp. Besides, it has strong anti — infammatory effect and reduces eczematous process.

  3. A Multicenter, Open-Label, Controlled Phase II Study to Evaluate Safety and Immunogenicity of MVA Smallpox Vaccine (IMVAMUNE in 18-40 Year Old Subjects with Diagnosed Atopic Dermatitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard N Greenberg

    Full Text Available Replicating smallpox vaccines can cause severe complications in individuals with atopic dermatitis (AD. Prior studies evaluating Modified Vaccinia Ankara virus (MVA, a non-replicating vaccine in humans, showed a favorable safety and immunogenicity profile in healthy volunteers.This Phase II study compared the safety and immunogenicity of MVA enrolling groups of 350 subjects with AD (SCORAD ≤ 30 and 282 healthy subjects.Subjects were vaccinated twice with MVA, each dose given subcutaneously 4 weeks apart. Adverse events, cardiac parameters, and the development of vaccinia virus humoral immune responses were monitored.The overall safety of the vaccine was similar in both groups. Adverse events affecting skin were experienced significantly more often in subjects with AD, but the majority of these events were mild to moderate in intensity. Seroconversion rates and geometric mean titers for total and neutralizing vaccinia-specific antibodies in the AD group were non-inferior compared to the healthy subjects.The size of the study population limited the detection of serious adverse events occurring at a frequency less than 1%.MVA has a favorable safety profile and the ability to elicit vaccinia-specific immune responses in subjects with AD.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00316602.

  4. Validation and refinement of the Millennium Criteria for atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schram, Mandy E; Leeflang, Mariska M G; DEN Ottolander, Jan Paul S; Spuls, Phyllis I; Bos, Jan D

    2011-09-01

    There is no gold standard for a definite diagnosis of atopic dermatitis. For the time being, several lists of diagnostic criteria have been proposed, some of them in actual use. The Millennium Criteria have been proposed to diagnose atopic dermatitis and to differentiate it from atopiform dermatitis. Our aim was to further refine the Millennium Criteria into a manageable set that can differentiate between atopic and atopiform dermatitis and other entities. The hereby refined Millennium Criteria will be compared with the UK Working Party Criteria and the Hanifin & Rajka Criteria. Data of 210 included patients were used. After multiple logistic regression, a minimum set of five criteria was identified as best discriminators: (i) typical morphology; (ii) early age of onset; (iii) Dennie-Morgan fold; (iv) historical and (v) actual flexural involvement. The refined Millennium Criteria were constituted from these criteria. When comparing the different list for validity in diagnosing atopic dermatitis, the refined Millennium Criteria showed a sensitivity of 81.8% and a specificity of 98.8% compared to a sensitivity of 97.7% and specificity of 72.9% of the UK Criteria and a sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 48.8% of the Hanifin & Rajka Criteria. This refinement and validity study shows that the refined Millennium Criteria are a valid tool to diagnose atopic and atopiform dermatitis in a hospital-based setting and therefore could be incorporated in clinical practice and trials. © 2011 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  5. Foetal Exposure to Maternal Passive Smoking Is Associated with Childhood Asthma, Allergic Rhinitis, and Eczema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. L. Lee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. We examined the hypothesis that foetal exposure to maternal passive smoking is associated with childhood asthma, allergic rhinitis, and eczema. Methods. The study was a population-based cross-sectional survey of Hong Kong Chinese children aged ≤14 years carried out in 2005 to 2006. Results. Foetal exposure to maternal passive smoking was significantly associated with wheeze ever (OR 2.05; 95% CI 1.58–2.67, current wheeze (OR 2.06; 95% CI 1.48–2.86, allergic rhinitis ever (OR 1.22; 95% CI 1.09–1.37, and eczema ever (OR 1.61; 95% CI 1.38–1.87. Foetal exposure to maternal active smoking was significantly associated with asthma ever (OR 2.10; 95% CI 1.14–3.84, wheeze ever (OR 2.46; 95% CI 1.27–4.78, and current wheeze (OR 2.74; 95% CI 1.24–6.01 but not with allergic rhinitis ever (OR 1.01; 95% CI 0.70–1.46 or eczema ever (OR 1.38; 95% CI 0.87–2.18. The dose response relationship between wheeze ever and current wheeze with increasing exposure, from no exposure to maternal passive smoking and then to maternal active smoking, further supports causality. Conclusion. There is significant association between foetal exposure to maternal passive smoking and maternal active smoking with childhood asthma and related atopic illnesses. Further studies are warranted to explore the potential causal relationship.

  6. Prognosis of Preschool Eczema and Factors of Importance for Remission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Emma Kristin; Bergström, Anna; Kull, Inger; Lind, Tomas; Söderhäll, Cilla; Melén, Erik; Asad, Samina; Bradley, Maria; Liedén, Agne; Ballardini, Natalia; Wahlgren, Carl-Fredrik

    2018-03-02

    Information on factors of importance for remission of eczema is scarce. This study explored factors related to the remission and course of preschool eczema (eczema at 1, 2 and/or 4 years of age) to 16 years of age (n = 889) in a Swedish cohort. Half of the children were in complete remission by school age. In multivariate prognostic models, persistent preschool eczema (eczema at 1, 2 and 4 years of age) (odds ratio 0.27 (95% confidence interval 0.18-0.41)), preschool eczema with sleep disturbance (due to itch at least once a week at 1, 2 and/or 4 years of age) (0.59 (0.43-0.81)), parental allergy (0.73 (0.55-0.96)), parental smoking at child's birth (0.70 (0.50-0.99)) and filaggrin mutation (R501X, R2447X, 2282del4) (0.47 (0.26-0.85)) were inversely associated with complete remission by school age. Male sex (1.37 (1.03-1.82)) and exclusive breastfeeding ≥4 months (1.44 (1.01-2.05)) were positively associated with complete remission by school age. In conclusion, half of the children with preschool eczema were in complete remission by school age. The most important prognostic factors were persistent preschool eczema and preschool eczema with sleep disturbance due to itch.

  7. Microbiome and pediatric atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Claire E; McShane, Diana B; Gilligan, Peter H; Burkhart, Craig N; Morrell, Dean S

    2015-12-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a chronic inflammatory skin condition with drastic impacts on pediatric health. The pathogenesis of this common disease is not well understood, and the complex role of the skin microbiome in the pathogenesis and progression of atopic dermatitis is being elucidated. Skin commensal organisms promote normal immune system functions and prevent the colonization of pathogens. Alterations in the skin microbiome may lead to increased Staphylococcus aureus colonization and atopic dermatitis progression. Despite the evidence for their important role, probiotics have not been deemed efficacious for the treatment of atopic dermatitis, although studies suggest that probiotics may be effective at preventing the development of atopic dermatitis when given to young infants. This review will cover the most recent published work on the microbiome and pediatric atopic dermatitis. © 2015 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  8. Can atopic dermatitis be prevented?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-de la Fuente, E

    2015-05-01

    Atopic dermatitis has become a health problem in our setting due to its rising prevalence, impact on quality of life, associated costs, and role in the progression to other atopic diseases. Furthermore, atopic dermatitis has no definitive cure and therefore preventive measures are important. In this article, we review the latest advances in both primary prevention (reduction of the incidence of atopic dermatitis) and secondary prevention (reduction of associated morbidity and reduction of the atopic march). We analyze the different preventive strategies available, including modification of the immune system through microbial exposure, induction of immune tolerance through antigen exposure, and restoration of skin barrier function to halt the atopic march. Dermatologists need to be familiar with these strategies in order to apply them where necessary and to accurately inform patients and their relatives to prevent misguided or inappropriate actions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  9. Is the atopic march related to confounding by genetics and early-life environment? A systematic review of sibship and twin data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, S J; Dharmage, S C; Matheson, M C; Gurrin, L C

    2018-01-01

    A popular hypothesis known as the atopic march proposes a set of sequential allergy and respiratory disorders in early childhood contributes enormously to the burden of disease in developed countries. Although the concept of the atopic march has been refined and strengthened by many cross-sectional and longitudinal studies linking eczema as the initial manifestation with progression to hay fever and then asthma, there is yet no definitive proof that the atopic march is the primary causal factor in childhood allergic disease. This debate is mainly related to the controversy around potential confounding of these associations by genetic and environmental factors. Family studies are ideally suited to unravelling the role of these factors. While multiple reviews have synthesized evidence from studies investigating this question, no review to date has explored specific evidence generated by twin and sibling studies to understand the aetiology of atopic march diseases. Our aim was to conduct a systematic review of twin and sibling studies that examine the allergic phenotypes that form the atopic march, to determine whether such analyses of data from these studies attempt to control for the effect confounding by shared factors, and to report estimates of the magnitude of associations between multiple phenotypes. Our review suggests that (1) genetics play a bigger role predisposing eczema to hay fever and eczema to asthma than environmental factors, and (2) the link between eczema and asthma and hay fever is independent of shared early-life environmental factors. © 2017 EAACI and John Wiley and Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley and Sons Ltd.

  10. Dual Factors May Be Necessary for Development of Atopic March in Early Infancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniuchi, Shoichiro; Soejima, Kazuhiko; Hatano, Yasuko; Takahashi, Masaya; Minami, Hirotaka

    2018-01-01

    The incidence of atopic diseases, including atopic dermatitis (AD), food allergies, allergic rhinitis, and asthma, has increased in recent decades, and currently affects approximately 20% of the population. Atopic march is the development of AD in infancy and subsequent food allergies, allergic rhinitis, and asthma in later childhood. Patients with infantile eczema may develop typical symptoms of AD, allergic rhinitis, and asthma at certain ages. Some patients' symptoms persist for several years, whereas others may have resolution with aging. Development of these diseases is strongly influenced by the following two factors: skin dysfunction caused by filaggrin mutations and development of colonization of microflora in early infancy. Filaggrin mutations predisposing to asthma, allergic rhinitis, and allergic sensitization, only in the presence of AD, strongly support the role of filaggrin in the pathogenesis of AD and in subsequent progression of the atopic march. Several studies have shown that development of colonization of microflora in early infancy might affect development of allergic disease or food desensitization. Therefore, massive allergen exposure to genetic skin dysfunction in early infancy and an imbalance of microflora might be necessary for development of atopic march.

  11. Interrelationships between Atopic Disorders in Children: A Meta-Analysis Based on ISAAC Questionnaires.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David H J Pols

    Full Text Available To study the prevalence and interrelationship between asthma, allergic rhinitis and eczema using data obtained from ISAAC questionnaires.The Medline, Pubmed Publisher, EMBASE, Google Scholar and the Cochrane Controlled Clinical Trials Register databases were systematically reviewed to evaluate epidemiological data of children with atopic disorders. To study these interrelationships, a new approach was used. Risk ratios were calculated, describing the risk of having two different atopic disorders when the child is known with one disorder.Included were 31 studies, covering a large number of surveyed children (n=1,430,329 in 102 countries. The calculated worldwide prevalence for asthma, eczema and allergic rhinitis is 12.00% (95% CI: 11.99-12.00, 7.88% (95% CI: 7.88-7.89 and 12.66% (95% CI: 12.65-12.67, respectively. The observed prevalence [1.17% (95% CI: 1.17-1.17] of having all three diseases is 9.8 times higher than could be expected by chance. For children with asthma the calculated risk ratio of having the other two disorders is 5.41 (95% CI: 4.76-6.16, for children with eczema 4.24 (95% CI: 3.75-4.79, and for children with allergic rhinitis 6.20 (95% CI: 5.30-7.27. No studied confounders had a significant influence on these risk ratios.Only a minority of children suffers from all three atopic disorders, however this co-occurrence is significantly higher than could be expected by chance and supports a close relationship of these disorders in children. The data of this meta-analysis supports the hypothesis that there could be a fourth distinct group of children with all three disorders. Researchers and clinicians might need to consider these children as a separate group with distinct characteristics regarding severity, causes, treatment or prognosis.

  12. Sesame seed sensitization in a group of atopic Egyptian children ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... seed sensitization in a group of atopic Egyptian infants and children. Methods: We consecutively enrolled 90 patients with physician diagnosed allergic disease. The study measurements included clinical evaluation for the site and duration of allergy, history suggestive of sesame seed allergy, and family history of allergy, ...

  13. A Pragmatic Approach to Patch Testing Atopic Dermatitis Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Jennifer K; Jacob, Sharon E; Nedorost, Susan T

    2016-01-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) may complicate the clinical course of atopic dermatitis (AD), and patch testing remains the criterion standard for diagnosing ACD. To date, there have been no guidelines or consensus recommendations on when and how to patch test individuals with AD. Failure to pa...

  14. Parents' reported preference scores for childhood atopic dermatitis disease states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Emmanuel B

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We sought to elicit preference weights from parents for health states corresponding to children with various levels of severity of atopic dermatitis. We also evaluated the hypothesis that parents with children who had been diagnosed with atopic dermatitis would assign different preferences to the health state scenarios compared with parents who did not have a child with atopic dermatitis. Methods Subjects were parents of children aged 3 months to 18 years. The sample was derived from the General Panel, Mommies Sub-Panel, and Chronic Illness Sub-Panel of Harris Interactive. Participants rated health scenarios for atopic dermatitis, asthma, and eyeglasses on a visual analog scale, imagining a child was experiencing the described state. Results A total of 3539 parents completed the survey. Twenty-nine percent had a child with a history of atopic dermatitis. Mean preference scores for atopic dermatitis were as follows: mild, 91 (95% confidence interval [CI], 90.7 to 91.5; mild/moderate, 84 (95%CI, 83.5 to 84.4; moderate, 73 (95%CI, 72.5 to 73.6; moderate/severe, 61 (95%CI, 60.6 to 61.8; severe, 49 (95% CI, 48.7 to 50.1; asthma, 58 (95%CI, 57.4 to 58.8; and eyeglasses, 87(95%CI, 86.3 to 87.4. Conclusions Parents perceive that atopic dermatitis has a negative effect on quality of life that increases with disease severity. Estimates of parents' preferences can provide physicians with insight into the value that parents place on their children's treatment and can be used to evaluate new medical therapies for atopic dermatitis.

  15. Hand eczema guidelines based on the Danish guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of hand eczema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Menné, Torkil; Johansen, Jeanne D; Sommerlund, Mette

    2011-01-01

    Background. Classification of hand eczema has traditionally been based both on aetiology and clinical appearance. For 20% of cases, the aetiology is unknown. Objectives. To suggest a classification based on well-defined aetiology as well as on predefined clinical patterns and on the dynamics of h...

  16. Overview of studies of treatments for hand eczema - the EDEN hand eczema survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Coevorden, AM; Coenraads, PJ; Svensson, A; Bavinck, JNB; Diepgen, TL; Naldi, L; Elsner, P; Williams, HC

    Background Hand eczema is a major cause of morbidity and lost earnings. Many interventions ranging from topical steroids to oral ciclosporin are used, but their evidence base and the best methods to assess their efficacy are uncertain. Objectives As part of a long-term project to improve standards

  17. Stratum corneum lipids, skin barrier function and filaggrin mutations in patients with atopic eczema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgh, Julie Kaae; Hellgren, Lars; Jungersted, JM

    2010-01-01

    , no studies have analysed stratum corneum (SC) lipids combined with skin barrier parameters in subjects of known FLG genotype. Methods: A cohort of 49 German individuals genotyped for the most common FLG mutations (R501X, 2282del4) had SC samples taken for lipid analysis by high-performance thin layer...... chromatography. In addition, TEWL, erythema, skin hydration and pH were measured. In 27 of the 49 individuals, a 24-h irritation patch test with sodium lauryl sulphate was performed. For the analysis, both the AD group and the control group were stratified by FLG mutation status (FLGmut/FLGwt). Results...

  18. Xerosis is Associated with Atopic Dermatitis, Hand Eczema and Contact Sensitization Independent of Filaggrin Gene Mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jacob P; Johansen, Jeanne D; Zachariae, Claus

    2013-01-01

    sensitization, taking filaggrin gene mutations into account. Questionnaire data were collected from a cross-sectional study performed in a general population in Copenhagen. A total of 3,460 18-69-year-olds were patch-tested and 3,335 were genotyped for the 2282del4 and R501X mutations in the filaggrin gene...

  19. Atopic eczema : the role of stratum corneum lipids in the skin barrier

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssens, Michelle

    2013-01-01

    The skin barrier function strongly relies on the outermost layer of the skin, the stratum corneum (SC), which consists of dead corneocytes embedded in a highly organized extracellular lipid matrix. The lipids are thought to play a crucial role in the skin barrier function. This lipid matrix consists

  20. Parents' self-efficacy, outcome expectations, and self-reported task performance when managing atopic dermatitis in children: instrument reliability and validity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Amy E; Fraser, Jennifer A

    2011-02-01

    Support and education for parents faced with managing a child with atopic dermatitis is crucial to the success of current treatments. Interventions aiming to improve parent management of this condition are promising. Unfortunately, evaluation is hampered by lack of precise research tools to measure change. To develop a suite of valid and reliable research instruments to appraise parents' self-efficacy for performing atopic dermatitis management tasks; outcome expectations of performing management tasks; and self-reported task performance in a community sample of parents of children with atopic dermatitis. The Parents' Eczema Management Scale (PEMS) and the Parents' Outcome Expectations of Eczema Management Scale (POEEMS) were developed from an existing self-efficacy scale, the Parental Self-Efficacy with Eczema Care Index (PASECI). Each scale was presented in a single self-administered questionnaire, to measure self-efficacy, outcome expectations, and self-reported task performance related to managing child atopic dermatitis. Each was tested with a community sample of parents of children with atopic dermatitis, and psychometric evaluation of the scales' reliability and validity was conducted. A community-based convenience sample of 120 parents of children with atopic dermatitis completed the self-administered questionnaire. Participants were recruited through schools across Australia. Satisfactory internal consistency and test-retest reliability was demonstrated for all three scales. Construct validity was satisfactory, with positive relationships between self-efficacy for managing atopic dermatitis and general perceived self-efficacy; self-efficacy for managing atopic dermatitis and self-reported task performance; and self-efficacy for managing atopic dermatitis and outcome expectations. Factor analyses revealed two-factor structures for PEMS and PASECI alike, with both scales containing factors related to performing routine management tasks, and managing the

  1. Staphylococcus aureus clonal dynamics and virulence factors in children with atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lomholt, Hans; Andersen, Klaus Ejner; Kilian, Mogens

    2005-01-01

    A prospective cohort study was undertaken to determine the clonal dynamics of Staphylococcus aureus colonization and infection during 1 y in children with atopic dermatitis, and to correlate specific clones, accessory gene regulator (agr) groups, and production of virulence factors with eczema......, toxins, and were assigned to agr groups. S. aureus colonization patterns ranged from rare colonization over transient colonization to persistent colonization by a single clone or a dynamic exchange of up to five clones. Production of no single virulence factor including superantigens and toxins...

  2. Case for diagnosis. Infective dermatitis associated with HTLV-1: differential diagnosis of atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Lorena Maria Lima de; Souza, Marcos Vilela de; Guedes, Antonio Carlos Martins; Araújo, Marcelo Grossi

    2017-01-01

    Infective dermatitis associated with HTLV-1 (IDH) is the main cutaneous marker of HTLV-1 infection. This disease occurs primarily in children and should be differentiated from other eczemas, especially from atopic dermatitis. The largest series of IDH are from Jamaica and Brazil. There are an estimated 15 to 20 million infected people in the world, and Brazil is one of the endemic regions. Studies suggest that IDH in children may be a marker for the development of T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) or myelopathy associated with HTLV-1/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM / TSP) in adulthood.

  3. Tobacco smoking and hand eczema - is there an association?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jennifer A; Clemmensen, Kim K; Nixon, Rosemary L

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Numerous risk factors have been suggested for hand eczema. This systematic review evaluates the association between tobacco smoking and hand eczema. OBJECTIVE: To review the literature systematically on the association between smoking and hand eczema. METHODS: The PubMed and EMBASE...... databases were searched up to 27 January 2015 for articles on the association between tobacco smoking and hand eczema, including human studies in English and German only. Experimental studies, studies on tobacco allergy, case reports, reviews and studies on second-hand smoking were excluded. RESULTS: Twenty...... articles were included. Among studies in occupational settings, three of seven found a statistically significant positive association between tobacco smoking and hand eczema prevalence rate, as did four of eight population-based studies. The association was stronger for studies in occupational settings...

  4. The familial aggregation of atopic diseases and depression or anxiety in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brew, Bronwyn K; Lundholm, Cecilia; Gong, Tong; Larsson, Henrik; Almqvist, Catarina

    2018-03-07

    Children with asthma and atopic diseases have an increased risk of depression or anxiety. Each of these diseases have strong genetic and environmental components, therefore it seems likely that there is a shared liability rather than causative risk. To investigate the existence and nature of familial aggregation for the comorbidity of atopic diseases and depression or anxiety. Participants came from the Childhood and Adolescent Twin Study in Sweden (CATSS), n= 14197. Current and ever asthma, eczema, hayfever and food-allergy were reported by parents. Internalizing disorders were identified using validated questionnaires. Familial co-aggregation analysis compared monozygotic MZ twins and same-sex dizygotic DZ twins for atopic disease in one twin with internalizing disorder in the other to test for genetic liability. Several familial liability candidates were also tested including parental education, recent maternal psychological stress, childhood family trauma and parental country of birth. Familial co-aggregation analysis found that if one twin had at least one current atopic disease the partner twin was at risk of having an internalizing disorder regardless of their own atopic status (Adjusted OR 1.22 (95% CI 1.08, 1.37). Similar results were found for each atopic disease ever and current. MZ associations were not higher than DZ associations suggesting that the liability is not genetic in nature. Including other familial candidates to the models made little difference to effect estimates. Atopic diseases and depression or anxiety tend to occur together in families, therefore when treating for one disease the physician should consider comorbidity in both the individual and the individual's siblings. We did not find evidence to support a genetic explanation for comorbidity and further exploration is needed to disentangle the environmental and epigenetic reasons for familial aggregation. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is

  5. Differential Diagnosis of Genetic Disorders Associated with Moderate to Severe Refractory Eczema and Elevated Immunoglobulin E.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjona Aguilera, C; Albarrán Planelles, C; Tercedor Sánchez, J

    2016-03-01

    The association of moderate to severe eczema and elevated plasma levels of immunoglobulin E is a characteristic not only of atopic dermatitis but also of various genodermatoses: hyperimmunoglobulin E syndromes, Omenn syndrome, Netherton syndrome, peeling skin syndrome type B, severe dermatitis, multiple allergies, and metabolic wasting syndrome, Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, prolidase deficiency, Loeys-Dietz syndrome, IPEX syndrome, STAT5B deficiency, and pentasomy X. The clinical presentation of these genodermatoses -typically in children- is consistent with severe atopic dermatitis. Immunoglobulin E is elevated from birth and response to conventional treatments is poor. Diagnosis is further complicated by the fact that these genodermatoses often share other clinical manifestations and laboratory findings. We present practical guidelines for differentiating among these various entities, with the aim of helping physicians decide what type of genetic test should be carried out -and when- in order to establish a definitive diagnosis. Copyright © 2015 AEDV. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Relevance of Cat and Dog Sensitization by Skin Prick Testing in Childhood Eczema and Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hon, Kam Lun; Tsang, Kathy Yin Ching; Pong, Nga Hin Henry; Leung, Ting Fan

    2017-01-01

    Household animal dander has been implicated as aeroallergen in childhood atopic diseases. Many parents seek healthcare advice if household pet keeping may be detrimental in atopic eczema (AE), allergic rhinitis and asthma. We investigated if skin sensitization by cat/dog dander was associated with disease severity and quality of life in children with AE. Demographics, skin prick test (SPT) results, disease severity (Nottingham eczema severity score NESS), Children Dermatology Life Quality Index (CDLQI), blood IgE and eosinophil counts of a cohort of AE patients were reviewed. 325 AE patients followed at a pediatric dermatology clinic were evaluated. Personal history of asthma was lowest (20%) in the dog-dander-positive-group but highest (61%) in bothcat- and-dog-dander-positive group (p=0.007). Binomial logistic regression ascertained that catdander sensitization was associated with increasing age (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 1.056; 95% Confidence Interval [CI], 1.006 to 1.109; p=0.029), dust-mite sensitization (aOR, 4.625; 95% CI, 1.444 to 14.815; p=0.010), food-allergen sensitization (aOR, 2.330; 95% CI, 1.259 to 4.310; p=0.007) and keeping-cat-ever (aOR, 7.325; 95% CI, 1.193 to 44.971; p=0.032); whereas dogdander sensitization was associated with dust-mite sensitization (aOR, 9.091; 95% CI, 1.148 to 71.980; p=0.037), food-allergen sensitization (aOR, 3.568; 95% CI, 1.341 to 9.492; p=0.011) and keeping-dog-ever (aOR, 6.809; 95% CI, 2.179 to 21.281; p=0.001). However, neither cat nor dog sensitization were associated with asthma, allergic rhinitis, parental or sibling atopic status, disease severity or quality of life. Physicians should advise parents that there is no direct correlation between AE severity, quality of life, asthma or allergic rhinitis with cutaneous sensitization to cats or dogs. Sensitized patients especially those with concomitant asthma and severe symptoms may consider non-furry alternatives if they plan to have a pet. Highly sensitized

  7. Staphylococcus aureus clonal dynamics and virulence factors in children with atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lomholt, Hans Bredsted; Andersen, KE; Kilian, Mogens

    2005-01-01

    SCORAD value. In 11 of 12 cases with two different clones co-colonizing a child the clones belonged to the same agr group. In conclusion, this limited group of children with atopic dermatitis showed highly variable colonization patterns of S. aureus, and communication between strains by use of agr......A prospective cohort study was undertaken to determine the clonal dynamics of Staphylococcus aureus colonization and infection during 1 y in children with atopic dermatitis, and to correlate specific clones, accessory gene regulator (agr) groups, and production of virulence factors with eczema......, toxins, and were assigned to agr groups. S. aureus colonization patterns ranged from rare colonization over transient colonization to persistent colonization by a single clone or a dynamic exchange of up to five clones. Production of no single virulence factor including superantigens and toxins...

  8. Development of atopic dermatitis during the first 3 years of life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halkjær, Liselotte Brydensholt; Loland, Lotte; Buchvald, Frederik F

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To describe the development of atopic dermatitis (AD) during the first 3 years of life and identify the localization of the early skin lesions that predicts the development of AD. DESIGN: Prospective, longitudinal, birth cohort study of children born to mothers with a history of asthma....... Predictive odds ratios of early skin lesions for those who developed AD vs those who did not were calculated. RESULTS: The cumulative incidence of AD by age 3 years was 44% (155/356). The prevalence rate peaked at age 2 years for boys and at age 2.5 years for girls, but there were no other sex differences...... predicted AD at age 3 years. CONCLUSIONS: Atopic dermatitis begins at the scalp, forehead, ear, and neck in a balaclava-like pattern. Eczema at the arms and joints provides the highest predictive value for the development of AD at age 3 years. This may be used for early prediction and intervention of AD....

  9. Topical therapy of atopic dermatitis: controversies from Hippocrates to topical immunomodulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilles, Gérard; Wallach, Daniel; Taïeb, Alain

    2007-02-01

    Although atopic dermatitis can be treated efficiently, there is still much controversy about the risk/benefit ratio of both topical corticosteroids and topical immunomodulators. Conflicting data may be found about the usefulness of bathing, diet regulation, and other therapeutic interventions. These controversies result in part from the persistence of Hippocratic doctrines in modern medical thinking. Humoralist and diathetic doctrines, as they pertain to eczema, are reviewed. The paradoxical worsening of oozing and the deadly hazards of hospitalization before the era of antibiotics are brought to mind. We hope that this historical review will improve the understanding of current controversies and help dermatologists to manage patients with atopic dermatitis and other chronic skin diseases.

  10. Omalizumab for atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Jesper Grønlund; Agner, Tove; Sand, Carsten

    2017-01-01

    Omalizumab is a recombinant humanized monoclonal antibody targeting the high-affinity Fc receptor of IgE, registered for the treatment of chronic spontaneous urticaria and severe allergic asthma. We present a case series of nine patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) treated off-label with omalizumab...... and a systematic review of the existing literature. Patients were selected consecutively from a tertiary dermatological referral center during a 5-year period. All patients were treated with omalizumab at a starting dose of 300 mg subcutaneously every 4 weeks. Systematic literature searches were performed in Pub......Med, Web of Science, EMBASE, and ClinicalTrials.gov to identify any study (case reports, case series, and controlled trials) evaluating the effect of treatment with omalizumab in AD. Based on physicians' assessment, 50% of our patients had a good or excellent response to treatment with omalizumab...

  11. Associations of Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior with Atopic Disease in United States Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strom, Mark A; Silverberg, Jonathan I

    2016-07-01

    To determine if eczema, asthma, and hay fever are associated with vigorous physical activity, television/video game usage, and sports participation and if sleep disturbance modifies such associations. Data were analyzed from 2 cross-sectional studies including 133 107 children age 6-17 years enrolled in the 2003-2004 and 2007-2008 National Survey of Children's Health. Bivariate and multivariate survey logistic regression models were created to calculate the odds of atopic disease and atopic disease severity on vigorous physical activity, television/video game use, and sports participation. In multivariate logistic regression models controlling for sociodemographic factors, lifetime history of asthma was associated with decreased odds of ≥1 days of vigorous physical activity (aOR, 0.87; 95% CI, 0.77-0.99) and decreased odds of sports participation (0.91; 95% CI, 0.84-0.99). Atopic disease accompanied by sleep disturbance had significantly higher odds of screen time and lower odds of sports participation compared with children with either atopic disease or sleep disturbance alone. Severe eczema (aOR, 0.39; 95% CI, 0.19-0.78), asthma (aOR, 0.29; 95% CI, 0.14-0.61), and hay fever (aOR, 0.48; 95% CI, 0.24-0.97) were all associated with decreased odds of ≥1 days of vigorous physical activity. Moderate (aOR, 0.76; 95% CI, 0.57-0.99) and severe eczema (aOR, 0.45; 95% CI, 0.28-0.73), severe asthma (aOR, 0.47; 95% CI, 0.25-0.89), and hay fever (aOR, 0.53; 95% CI, 0.36-0.61) were associated with decreased odds of sports participation in the past year. Children with severe atopic disease, accompanied by sleep disturbance, have higher risk of sedentary behaviors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Research progress of atopic myelitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min WANG

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Atopic myelitis (AM, also described as idiopathic eosinophil myelitis, is a kind of myelitis associated with atopic diathesis, and is considered to be one kind of primary acute transverse myelitis (ATM. It mainly develops in Japan. Since the first case was reported by Kira, et al, Japan has reported more than 100 cases. In South Korea and Europe there were cases reported in recent years. In this paper, the research progress on atopic myelitis is reviewed. doi: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2014.06.016

  13. Prevalence and features of canine atopic dermatitis in Hungary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarpataki, Noémi; Pápa, Kinga; Reiczigel, J; Vajdovich, P; Vörösi, K

    2006-09-01

    Medical records of 600 dogs diagnosed with atopic dermatitis were reviewed and evaluated with reference to history, geographical distribution, breed predilection, clinical signs and positive reactions to allergens as determined by intradermal skin testing (IDT) manufactured by Artuvetrin Laboratories. In 66.6% of dogs, the age of onset of atopic dermatitis was between 4 months and 3 years. Dogs living in the garden suburb of Budapest were more sensitive to house dust mites, fleas and moulds, and dogs from the western part of Hungary were more sensitive to weeds than to other allergens (p city in Hungary. Breeds with verified adverse reaction to food were Cocker spaniels, French bulldogs, Bullmastiffs, Bull terriers, St. Bernards, Tervurens, West Highland White terriers and American Staffordshire terriers (p < 0.05). The clinical signs of atopic dermatitis and their occurrence are in accordance with the data described in the literature.

  14. Anti-Interleukin-31 Receptor A Antibody for Atopic Dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzicka, Thomas; Hanifin, Jon M; Furue, Masutaka; Pulka, Grazyna; Mlynarczyk, Izabela; Wollenberg, Andreas; Galus, Ryszard; Etoh, Takafumi; Mihara, Ryosuke; Yoshida, Hiroki; Stewart, Jonathan; Kabashima, Kenji

    2017-03-02

    Interleukin-31 may play a role in the pathobiologic mechanism of atopic dermatitis and pruritus. We wanted to assess the efficacy and safety of nemolizumab (CIM331), a humanized antibody against interleukin-31 receptor A, in the treatment of atopic dermatitis. In this phase 2, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, 12-week trial, we assigned adults with moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis that was inadequately controlled by topical treatments to receive subcutaneous nemolizumab (at a dose of 0.1 mg, 0.5 mg, or 2.0 mg per kilogram of body weight) or placebo every 4 weeks or an exploratory dose of 2.0 mg of nemolizumab per kilogram every 8 weeks. The primary end point was the percentage improvement from baseline in the score on the pruritus visual-analogue scale (on which a negative change indicates improvement) at week 12. Secondary end points included changes in the score on the Eczema Area and Severity Index (EASI, on which a negative change indicates improvement), and body-surface area of atopic dermatitis. Of 264 patients who underwent randomization, 216 (82%) completed the study. At week 12, among the patients who received nemolizumab every 4 weeks, changes on the pruritus visual-analogue scale were -43.7% in the 0.1-mg group, -59.8% in the 0.5-mg group, and -63.1% in the 2.0-mg group, versus -20.9% in the placebo group (Patopic dermatitis were -7.5%, -20.0%, and -19.4% with nemolizumab, versus -15.7% with placebo. Among the patients receiving nemolizumab every 4 weeks, treatment discontinuations occurred in 9 of 53 patients (17%) in the 0.1-mg group, in 9 of 54 (17%) in the 0.5-mg group, and in 7 of 52 (13%) in the 2.0-mg group, versus in 9 of 53 (17%) in the placebo group. In this phase 2 trial, nemolizumab at all monthly doses significantly improved pruritus in patients with moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis, which showed the efficacy of targeting interleukin-31 receptor A. The limited size and length of the trial preclude conclusions regarding

  15. Antibiotic sales and the prevalence of symptoms of asthma, rhinitis, and eczema: The International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foliaki, Sunia; Nielsen, Sandy Kildegaard; Björkstén, Bengt; Von Mutius, Erika; Cheng, Soo; Pearce, Neil

    2004-06-01

    It has been hypothesized that antibiotic use early in life may increase the subsequent risk of asthma. We have conducted an ecologic analysis of the relationship between antibiotics sales and the prevalence of symptoms of asthma, allergic rhinoconjunctivitis, and atopic eczema in 99 centres from 28 countries. Data for antibiotics sales for 28 countries were obtained from the Institute for Medical Statistics (IMS), Health Global Services, UK and converted to defined daily doses (DDD). Data on the prevalence of symptoms of asthma, rhinitis, and eczema in 13-14 year olds were based on the responses to the written and video questionnaires from the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC). The analysis was adjusted for gross national product (GNP) as an estimate of the level of affluence. In general, there was a positive association between per capita antibiotics sales and the prevalence of symptoms for asthma, rhinitis, and eczema, but the associations generally became negative once the analyses had been adjusted for GNP. In particular, there were non-significant negative associations between total antibiotics sales and the prevalence of wheeze ever, wheeze in the last 12 months, nose problems with itchy-watery eyes, itchy rash in the last 12 months, and eczema ever. On the other hand there were weak non-significant positive associations for asthma ever, nose problems ever, nose problems in the last 12 months, and itchy rash ever. There was a statistically significant positive association with wheeze at rest as measured by the asthma video questionnaire; however, even this association was weak and would not account for more than a 1% difference in asthma prevalence between countries. These findings are generally not consistent with the hypothesis that antibiotic use increases the risk of asthma, rhinitis, or eczema. If there is a causal association of antibiotic use with asthma risk, it does not appear to explain the international differences in

  16. Difficult to control atopic dermatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    U. Darsow (U.); A. Wollenberg (A.); D. Simon; A. Taieb; T. Werfel; A.P. Oranje (Arnold); C. Gelmetti (C.); Ã. Svensson (Ãke); M. Deleuran (M.); A.M. Calza; F. Giusti; J. Lübbe (Jann); S. Seidenari (Stefania); J. Ring (J.)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractDifficult to control atopic dermatitis (AD) presents a therapeutic challenge and often requires combinations of topical and systemic treatment. Anti-inflammatory treatment of severe AD most commonly includes topical glucocorticosteroids and topical calcineurin antagonists used for

  17. Hexa-herbal Chinese formula for eczema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chang, J.; Jäger, Anna; Heinrich, M.

    2014-01-01

    Diverse pharmacological activities and reliable clinical performances of Chinese herbal medicines have attracted worldwide attention in terms of its modernization. Here, a hexa-herbal Chinese formula (HHCF) for treating eczema topically has been studied from both chemical and biological perspective....... It consists of roots of Scutellaria baicalensis Gerogi, Rheum officinale Baill., Sophora flavescens Aiton; root's bark of Dictamnus dasycarpus Turcz.; bark of Phellodendron chinense C.K. Schnied and fruit of Kochia scoparia (L.) Schard.. To evaluate the anti-inflammatory effects of the hexa-herbal decoction...... colonizes the skin of most patients with AD and produces superantigens that could further increase severity of AD via subverting T-regulatory cell activity and inducing corticosteroid resistance. [3] Therefore, activity of the decoctions prepared from mixture and individual medicinal plants of the formula...

  18. The impact Atopic dermatitis on the life quality of childrens 1-6 year

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansoureh Shariati

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Eczema or atopic dermatitis (AD is one of the most prevalent skin diseases in the world. Although, the disorder is not fatal, it can cause life quality reduction. The aim of the current study was to investigate the impact of atopic dermatitis on life quality of 1-6-year-old children. Materials and Methods: The current study is a descriptive and analytical one designed to assess quality of life (QOL in 1-6-year-old children with atopic dermatitis in Kurdistan province (West of Iran. All the children who attended skin clinic of Besat Hospital, Sanandaj- Iran, during 2014 and 2016, participated in the study. Quality of life questionnaires were used to obtain data. Parents of the participating children were asked to complete the questionnaire. Index of Scoring Atopic Dermatitis (SCORAD was used to determine the severity of the disease. The study data were analysis using Stata-12 software. Results: During the study, 53 children with atopic dermatitis were identified and 66.04% were male. According to the classification of SCORAD index, 54.36% of the children (19 subjects were included in the moderate group (SCORAD 14-40 and 63.46% (33 persons in the severe group (SCORAD> 40. Mean of life quality score was 9.24 ± 10.48 (range 0-30 and there was no statistically significant difference between the genders (P >0.05. Conclusion: There was a positive correlation between the quality of life and pain severity in AD children; and children with atopic dermatitis had low quality of life and itching, wound, discomfort and sleep disorder, were the factors that mainly impact on their life quality.

  19. Atopic dermatitis in adolescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giampaolo Ricci

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis (AD is a chronic inflammatory skin disorder that typically occurs during childhood especially in the first year of life, with a variable frequency from 10% to 30%. Recent studies have shown that in Europe among 10-20% of children with AD suffer from this disorder also in adolescence. AD is a chronic inflammatory skin disease with a typical onset in the first years of life and with a 10- 30% prevalence among young children. AD prevalence in adolescence has been estimated around 5-15% in European countries. AD persists from childhood through adolescence in around 40% of cases and some risk factors have been identified: female sex, sensitization to inhalant and food allergens, allergic asthma and/or rhinoconjunctivitis, the practice of certain jobs. During adolescence, AD mainly appears on the face and neck, often associated with overinfection by Malassezia, and on the palms and soles. AD persistence during adolescence is correlated with psychological diseases such as anxiety; moreover, adolescents affected by AD might have problems in the relationship with their peers. Stress and the psychological problems represent a serious burden for adolescents with AD and cause a significant worsening of the patients’ quality of life (QoL. The pharmacological treatment is similar to other age groups. Educational and psychological approaches should be considered in the most severe cases.

  20. Optimal Diet Planning for Eczema Patient Using Integer Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen Sheng, Low; Sufahani, Suliadi

    2018-04-01

    Human diet planning is conducted by choosing appropriate food items that fulfill the nutritional requirements into the diet formulation. This paper discusses the application of integer programming to build the mathematical model of diet planning for eczema patients. The model developed is used to solve the diet problem of eczema patients from young age group. The integer programming is a scientific approach to select suitable food items, which seeks to minimize the costs, under conditions of meeting desired nutrient quantities, avoiding food allergens and getting certain foods into the diet that brings relief to the eczema conditions. This paper illustrates that the integer programming approach able to produce the optimal and feasible solution to deal with the diet problem of eczema patient.

  1. Occupational hand eczema and/or contact urticaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carøe, Tanja K; Ebbehøj, Niels E; Bonde, Jens P

    2018-01-01

    /contact urticaria METHODS: A registry-based study including 2703 employees with recognised occupational hand eczema/contact urticaria in Denmark in 2010/2011. Four to five years later the participants received a follow-up questionnaire, comprising questions on current job situation (response rate 58.0%). RESULTS......BACKGROUND: Occupational hand eczema and/or contact urticaria may have social consequences such as change of profession or not remaining in the workforce. OBJECTIVES: To identify factors associated with job change in a cohort of participants with recognised occupational hand eczema......: At follow-up, 51.3% of the participants were no longer in the same profession. 32.5% had changed profession and 18.8% were no longer in employment. Change of profession was associated with young age, positive patch test, low educational level and severity of hand eczema/contact urticaria. With regard...

  2. Preeclampsia Associates with Asthma, Allergy, and Eczema in Childhood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stokholm, Jakob; Sevelsted, Astrid; Anderson, Ulrik D

    2017-01-01

    RATIONALE: Preeclampsia reflects an unusual increase in systemic inflammation during pregnancy. OBJECTIVES: We studied associations between preeclampsia and asthma, allergy, and eczema in Copenhagen Prospective Studies on Asthma in Childhood2000 (COPSAC2000) and in national registries. METHODS: C...... of preeclampsia. CONCLUSIONS: Preeclampsia is a shared prenatal risk factor for asthma, eczema, and allergy in childhood pointing toward in utero immune programming of the child....

  3. Thermoregulation, scratch, itch and sleep deficits in children with eczema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camfferman, D; Short, M A; Kennedy, J D; Gold, M; Kohler, M; Lushington, K

    2016-09-01

    Successful sleep onset and maintenance is associated with a reduction in core temperature, facilitated by heat loss at the distal periphery. Problems with initiating and maintaining sleep in children with eczema may relate to impaired thermoregulatory mechanisms, which also contribute to itching and scratching. Our hypothesis was that nocturnal distal skin temperature in eczematous children would be lower than controls, and would also be related to poor sleep quality. We compared overnight polysomnography and distal (finger) and proximal (clavicle) skin temperature in 18 children with eczema and 15 controls (6-16 years). Children with eczema had longer periods of nocturnal wakefulness (mean [SD] = 88.8 [25.8] vs. 44.3 [35.6] min) and lower distal temperatures (34.1 [0.6] °C vs. 34.7 [0.4] °C) than controls, whereas proximal temperature and the distal-proximal gradient were not significantly different. In children with eczema, a higher distal temperature was associated with indicators of poor sleep quality, whereas lower distal temperature was related to more scratching events during sleep. In conclusion, our findings indicate complex interrelationships among eczema, thermoregulation and sleep, and further, that deficits in thermoregulatory mechanisms may contribute to sleep disturbances in children with eczema. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Atopic dermatitis, cutaneous steroids and cataracts in children: two case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatham Andrew

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Atopic dermatitis is a chronic, pruritic, eczematous skin disease mediated through an immediate (type I hypersensitivity reaction. Posterior sub-capsular cataracts are a recognised complication of atopic dermatitis in adults; however they are rare in children. The management of atopic dermatitis is based on the exclusion of allergens, the use of emollients, and on topical corticosteroids for disease exacerbations. Cataracts may be due to atopic dermatitis but may also occur secondary to the use of corticosteroids. Case presentation We describe two children with atopic dermatitis, treated with cutaneous corticosteroids, both of whom were diagnosed with bilateral posterior sub-capsular cataracts. Conclusion These cases demonstrate that atopic dermatitis and topical corticosteroids may be associated with cataracts in children as well as adults. The cause of cataracts in atopic dermatitis is not known, however, it has been suggested that habitual tapping and rubbing of the face may play a role. Care needs to be taken when prescribing corticosteroids. Inadequate treatment of atopic dermatitis may lead to other ocular complications such as keratitis and permanent visual loss.

  5. Measurement of the B$0\\atop{d}$ lifetime using B$0\\atop{d}$ → J/ΨK$0\\atop{S}$ decays at D0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balm, Paul Wijnand [Univ. of Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2004-12-08

    This thesis describes a measurement of the B$0\\atop{d}$ lifetime in the decay to (J/ΨK$0\\atop{S}$), using 114 pb-1 of data collected by the D0 experiment at the Tevatron from October 15, 2002, to June 10, 2003. The measurement is motivated by the tests of the Standard Model that it makes possible. These include tests of Heavy Quark Effective Theory predicting B-meson lifetimes, and of the complex phase in the CKM-matrix as the source of CP-violation in B$0\\atop{d}$ decays to (J/ΨK$0\\atop{S}$).

  6. Experience of vitamin D3 combined therapy in atopic dermatitis in children

    OpenAIRE

    Selska Z.V.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the efficacy of vitamin D3 in the treatment of atopic dermatitis in children. Materials and methods. We examined 42 children with atopic dermatitis. In 7 (16.7±5.8%) children had mild atopic dermatitis, 22 (52.4±7.7%) children had moderate severity of the disease, and 13 (31.0±7.1%) children diagnosed with severe degree of illness. Patients were aged 3 to 16 years. Definition 25(OH)D was performed using elektrochemiluminestsencysi method. Results. Average indicat...

  7. Reduced neonatal regulatory T cell response to microbial stimuli associates with subsequent eczema in high-risk infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Intan H; Boyle, Robert J; Mah, Li-Jeen; Licciardi, Paul V; Tang, Mimi L K

    2014-11-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg) play an essential role in early immune programming and shaping the immune response towards a pro-allergic or tolerant state. We evaluated cord blood Treg and cytokine responses to microbial and non-microbial stimuli in infants at high risk of allergic disease and their associations with development of allergic disease in the first year. Cord blood mononuclear cells from 72 neonates were cultured with toll-like receptors (TLR2) ligands: lipoteichoic acid (LTA) and heat-killed Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (HKL); TLR4 ligand: lipopolysaccharide (LPS); ovalbumin (OVA); anti-CD3; or media for 48 h. Treg numbers and Treg cytokines were assessed in relation to allergic disease outcomes during the first year of life (eczema and atopic sensitization). Infants with eczema (n = 24) had reduced percentages of FoxP3(hi)CD25(hi) Treg in LTA (p = 0.01, adj p = 0.005) and HKL (p = 0.04, adj p = 0.02) stimulated cultures as well as reduced IL-10 (p = 0.01) production following HKL stimulation compared to those without eczema (n = 48). No differences in Treg or cytokine responses to LPS, OVA or anti-CD3 were seen. Infants who developed sensitization had lower percentages of Treg following TLR2 stimulation (but not other stimuli) compared to non-sensitized infants. High-risk children who develop allergic disease in the first year of life have deficient Treg responses to microbial stimuli but not allergen from the time of birth, which may contribute to failure of immune tolerance development in infancy. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. When does atopic dermatitis warrant systemic therapy?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simpson, Eric L; Bruin-Weller, Marjolein; Flohr, Carsten

    2017-01-01

    -specific literature review, referred to guidelines when available, and provided interpretation and expert opinion. RESULTS: We recommend a systematic and holistic approach to assess patients with severe signs and symptoms of AD and impact on quality of life before systemic therapy. Steps taken before commencing...... systemic therapy include considering alternate or concomitant diagnoses, avoiding trigger factors, optimizing topical therapy, ensuring adequate patient/caregiver education, treating coexistent infection, assessing the impact on quality of life, and considering phototherapy. LIMITATIONS: Our work......BACKGROUND: Although most patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) are effectively managed with topical medication, a significant minority require systemic therapy. Guidelines for decision making about advancement to systemic therapy are lacking. OBJECTIVE: To guide those considering use of systemic...

  9. Mycosis Fungoides mimic chronic eczema? Observation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Andruszkiewicz

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Mycosis fungoides (MF is the most common type of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma [1]. Because of its great variety of clinical features and nonspecific histological findings (especially in early stages has been named the "great imitator "and can induce many wrong diagnosis [2,3]. Mycosis fungoides (MF, is an epidermotropic lymphoma included as an indolent form in the recent WHO/EORTC classification. From a clinical point of view, the classic disease progression usually is slow and takes over years or even decades, and characterized by the evolution from patches to more infiltrated plaques and eventually to tumours or erythroderma. However, the analysis of the MF disease course has been greatly impaired by the rarity of the disease, thus data about the time course of disease progression and pattern of relapse during time are not well known [4,5]. Therefore very often Mycosis fungoides is misdiagnosed as chronic eczema [6]. MF can also mimic: vitiligo [6], alopecia-Areata [7], ecchymosis [8].

  10. Dermatitis, atopic on the legs (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are caused by an inherited allergic condition called atopic dermatitis. Many of these areas have been scratched until ... infection triggering and perpetuating the problem. In adults, atopic dermatitis frequently involves the body creases, such as inside ...

  11. Dermatitis, atopic on the arms (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This person has inherited allergic skin inflammation (atopic dermatitis) on the arms. Red (erythematous), scaly plaques can be seen on the inside of the elbows (antecubital fossa). In adults, atopic dermatitis usually ...

  12. Twin Studies of Atopic Dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elmose, Camilla; Thomsen, Simon Francis

    2015-01-01

    about filaggrin and its role in the atopic march and provide suggestions for future research in this area. Methods. We identified all twin studies (published after 1970) that have calculated the concordance rate and/or the heritability of AD, or the genetic and environmental correlations between AD...... was around 85% explained by genetic pleiotropy. Conclusions. Genetic factors account for most of the variability in AD susceptibility and for the association between AD and asthma. Controversy remains as to whether the atopic diseases are causally related or whether they are diverse clinical manifestations...

  13. Dust mite avoidance for the primary prevention of atopic dermatitis: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bremmer, Samuel F; Simpson, Eric L

    2015-11-01

    Dust mite sensitization plays a controversial role in the development of atopic dermatitis. Despite a lack of evidence for its efficacy, dust mite avoidance is commonly recommended for the prevention and treatment of atopic dermatitis. We aimed to evaluate whether dust mite avoidance strategies reduce the risk of developing atopic dermatitis in high-risk infants compared to randomized controls. Studies were obtained by searching MEDLINE, PubMed, Scopus, The Cochrane Library, and The Global Resource of Eczema Trials databases. We included randomized, controlled trials of high-risk infants treated with a dust mite avoidance intervention and assessed for atopic dermatitis. Data were extracted independently by two reviewers using predefined criteria. Seven randomized controlled trials met our inclusion criteria (total n = 3040). Studies were largely unblinded but otherwise of reasonable quality. Three trials utilizing a dust mite avoidance approach but not additional interventions were combined in a meta-analysis. Dust mite avoidance provided no benefit in the prevention of atopic dermatitis (relative risk (RR) = 1.08, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.78-1.49, I(2) = 73%). Dust mite avoidance strategies alone or in combination with additional allergen avoidance modalities do not decrease the risk of developing atopic dermatitis and, given the current state of the evidence, should not be recommended for this purpose. The utility of dust mite avoidance for the treatment of atopic dermatitis or for the prevention and treatment of asthma or seasonal rhinoconjunctivitis are outside the scope of this review. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. How should an incident case of atopic dermatitis be defined? A systematic review of primary prevention studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Eric L; Keck, Laura E; Chalmers, Joanne R; Williams, Hywel C

    2012-07-01

    Eczema prevention is now an active area of dermatologic and allergy research. Defining an incident case is therefore a prerequisite for such a study. We sought to examine how an incident case of atopic dermatitis was defined in previous atopic dermatitis prevention studies in order to make recommendations on a standard definition of new atopic dermatitis cases for use in future prevention trials. We conducted a systematic review of controlled interventional atopic dermatitis prevention studies by using searches of MEDLINE and Cochrane databases for studies published from 1980 to the end of January 2011. Studies that included atopic dermatitis as a secondary outcome, such as asthma prevention trials, were included. One hundred two studies were included in the final analysis, of which 27 (26.5%) did not describe any criteria for defining an incident case of atopic dermatitis. Of the remaining 75 studies with reported disease criteria, the Hanifin-Rajka criteria were the most commonly used (28 studies). A disease definition unique to that particular study (21 studies) was the second most commonly used disease definition, although the sources for such novel definitions were not cited. The results from this systematic review highlight the need for improved reporting and standardization of the definition used for an incident case in atopic dermatitis prevention studies. Most prevention studies have used disease definitions such as the Hanifin-Rajka criteria that include disease chronicity. While acceptable for cumulative incidence outcomes, inclusion of disease chronicity precludes the precise measurement of disease onset. We propose a definition based on existing scientific studies that could be used in future prospective studies. Copyright © 2012 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Biopsychosocial Factors Associated with Prurigo Nodularis in Endogenous Eczema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Choon Chiat; Li, Huihua; Lee, Wellington; Tey, Hong Liang

    2015-01-01

    Prurigo nodularis is a dermatological manifestation secondary to chronic scratching or picking on focal areas of the skin. Its pathogenesis remains poorly understood, and limited data has indicated its association with psychological factors. To determine the biological, psychological and social factors associated with the occurrence of prurigo nodularis in patients with underlying endogenous eczema. A prospective case-control questionnaire -based study on patients with endogenous eczema, with and without prurigo nodules, was performed. The Impact of Skin Disease on Daily Life questionnaire was used to assess dimensions of physical functioning, including extent and severity of skin disease, itch, pain, fatigue and scratching, as well as dimensions of psychological and social functioning, including mood, illness cognition, disease-related impact, stigmatization and social support. Thirty-six cases and 47 controls were recruited. Patients with endogenous eczema and prurigo nodules indicated a higher itch score on the visual analog scale over the previous 4 weeks compared to those without prurigo nodules (p=0.0292). There were no significant differences between the 2 groups in the scores reflecting the other parameters of physical, psychological and social functioning. In patients with endogenous eczema, those with prurigo nodules experience a greater itch intensity compared to those without prurigo nodules. There were no other physical, psychological and social factors that were found to be associated with the occurrence of prurigo nodules in endogenous eczema.

  16. Evolving Concepts in Atopic Dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidbury, Robert; Khorsand, Kate

    2017-07-01

    Tremendous advances have been made in the field of atopic dermatitis in the past 5 years. We will explore developments in burden of disease, co-morbidities, pathogenesis, prevention, and management. The tremendous burden moderate to severe atopic dermatitis (AD) places on families from a medical, psychosocial, and financial perspective has been characterized. Epidemiologic studies have identified intriguing new associations beyond the well-characterized "atopic march" of food allergies, asthma, and hay fever. Studies of primary prevention have gained traction including the remarkable impacts of early emollient therapy. Basic advances have simultaneously elucidated the nature of atopic inflammation, setting the stage for an explosion of new potential therapeutic targets. After a fallow period of nearly 15 years without a substantial therapeutic advance, this year has already seen two new FDA-approved treatments for AD. AD has a tremendous impact on quality of life with an underappreciated burden of disease; there are important newly described co-morbidities including ADHD and anemia; new insights into etio-pathogenesis have paved the way for novel topical therapies like crisaborole, and new systemic interventions like dupilumab.

  17. Atopy patch test with house dust mite in Chinese patients with atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, X; Kim, J; Ni, C Y; Shao, Y; Zhang, J

    2016-09-01

    The atopy patch test (APT) has been defined as an important tool in the diagnosis of cutaneous hypersensitivity caused by house dust mites in atopic dermatitis (AD). The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of the APT to mite allergens by comparing its positive results with those of the skin prick test (SPT) and serum specific IgE test in Chinese AD patients. The APT, SPT and serum specific IgE test with Dermatophagoiodes pteronyssinus and Dermatophagoides farina were performed on a total of 120 patients with atopic dermatitis. Overall, 37.5% of the patients showed a positive APT reaction to mite allergens. A statistically significant association was observed between positive APT results and air-exposed eczema pattern. The positive APT results were not significantly associated with SCORAD scores and accompanied atopic respiratory disorders in AD patients. A higher frequency of APT positive reactions to mite allergens was observed in adolescent and adult patients. There was no significant difference in APT positivity between extrinsic patients (40.7%) and intrinsic patients (27.6%). This study identified house dust mite induced cutaneous hypersensitivity in Chinese patients with AD by APT, especially in air-exposed distribution patterns or adolescent and adult patients. Both intrinsic and extrinsic AD patients showed positive APT reactions to house dust mite. © 2016 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  18. Spotlight on dupilumab in the treatment of atopic dermatitis: design, development, and potential place in therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D’Erme AM

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Angelo Massimiliano D’Erme,1,2 Marco Romanelli,2 Andrea Chiricozzi2 1Dermatology Unit, Livorno Hospital, Livorno, 2Dermatology Unit, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy Abstract: Atopic dermatitis (AD is among the most common inflammatory skin diseases in children and adults in industrialized countries. Up to one-third of adults (probably a smaller proportion in childhood suffer from moderate-to-severe AD, whose recommended treatment is usually based on systemic therapies. The currently available therapeutics are limited, and AD management becomes challenging in most cases. Over the last few years, new advances in the understanding of AD pathogenic mechanisms and inflammatory pathways have led to the identification of specific therapeutic targets and new molecules have been tested. Dupilumab is a fully human monoclonal antibody directed against the IL-4 receptor α subunit that is able to block the signaling of both IL-4 and IL-13 and achieve rapid and significant improvements in adults with moderate-to-severe AD. Dupilumab is ready to inaugurate a long and promising biological target treatment option for Th2 cell-mediated atopic immune response that characterizes AD. Keywords: dupilumab, atopic dermatitis, eczema, IL-4, IL-13, biologics

  19. Synergistic effect of multiple indoor allergen sources on atopic symptoms in primary school children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, W-Y.; Tseng, H-I.; Wu, M-T.; Hung, H-C.; Wu, H-T.; Chen, H-L.; Lu, C.-C.

    2003-01-01

    Accumulating data show that the complex modern indoor environment contributes to increasing prevalence of atopic diseases. However, the dose-response relationship between allergic symptoms and complexity of indoor environmental allergen sources (IEAS) has not been clearly evaluated before. Therefore, we designed this study to investigate the overall effect of multiple IEAS on appearance of asthma (AS), allergic rhinitis (AR), and eczema (EC) symptoms in 1472 primary school children. Among various IEAS analyzed, only stuffed toys, cockroaches, and mold patches fit the model of 'more IEAS, higher odds ratio (OR) of association'. The association of IEAS and AR increased stepwise as more IEAS appeared in the environment (1.71, 2.47, to 2.86). In AS and EC, the association was significant only when all three IEAS were present (1.42, 1.98, to 4.11 in AS; 1.40, 1.76, to 2.95 in EC). These results showed that different IEAS had a synergistic effect on their association with atopic symptoms and also suggest that there is a dose-response relationship between kinds of IEAS and risk of appearance of atopic diseases

  20. Review of Medicinal Remedies on Hand Eczema Based on Iranian Traditional Medicine: A Narrative Review Article

    Science.gov (United States)

    MANSOURI, Parvin; KHADEMI, Aleme; PAHLEVAN, Daryoush; MEMARIANI, Zahra; ALIASL, Jale; SHIRBEIGII, Laila

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hand Eczema (HE) is a dermatological disorder with frequent relapses and multiple causes such as atopic, allergic and irritant contact dermatitis. The management is complex because of the wide range of different pathogenesis. Efficacy of some of available treatments is not well established and it can affect patients’ quality of life significantly. Methods: Reports on HE such as diagnosis, pathophysiology, pharmacological and nonpharmacological therapy that described in medieval Iranian medicine, were gathered and analyzed from selected medical and pharmaceutical textbooks of Iranian Traditional Medicine (ITM). The search of databases such as PubMed, EMBASE/Excerpta Medica, Science direct, Scopus, Google scholar, Web of science, Sid, Iran medex, Irandoc, was performed to reconfirm the efficacy of ITM remedies in conventional medicine from 1980-Jan-1 to 2015-Dec-30. Results: According to their opinion, HE is highly associated with liver function. This disorder was categorized into two main types as wet and dry ones. Most Iranian textbook explained signs of HE, as excessive skin itching, redness, burning and dryness. Treatments recommended by Iranian scientists were lifestyle modification, dietary intervention and performing the rules of prevention as well as herbal therapy and special manipulations. Conclusion: Iranian practitioners believed that, six essential principles, diet therapy and medicinal plants have high impact on treatment of HE. These remedies based on Iranian scholar’s experiences might be useful for further studies to the management of HE. PMID:27928524

  1. Patch test results of hand eczema patients : relation to clinical types

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boonstra, M B; Christoffers, W A; Coenraads, P J; Schuttelaar, M L A

    BACKGROUND: Allergic contact dermatitis is a well-known cause of hand eczema, although the influence of contact allergens on different clinical types of hand eczema remains still unclear. OBJECTIVE: To identify most common positive tested allergens among hand eczema patients and to define the

  2. Vitamin D levels and susceptibility to asthma, elevated immunoglobulin E levels, and atopic dermatitis: A Mendelian randomization study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manousaki, Despoina; Paternoster, Lavinia; Standl, Marie; Moffatt, Miriam F; Farrall, Martin; Bouzigon, Emmanuelle; Strachan, David P; Demenais, Florence; Lathrop, Mark; Cookson, William O C M; Richards, J Brent

    2017-05-01

    Low circulating vitamin D levels have been associated with risk of asthma, atopic dermatitis, and elevated total immunoglobulin E (IgE). These epidemiological associations, if true, would have public health importance, since vitamin D insufficiency is common and correctable. We aimed to test whether genetically lowered vitamin D levels were associated with risk of asthma, atopic dermatitis, or elevated serum IgE levels, using Mendelian randomization (MR) methodology to control bias owing to confounding and reverse causation. The study employed data from the UK Biobank resource and from the SUNLIGHT, GABRIEL and EAGLE eczema consortia. Using four single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) strongly associated with 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) levels in 33,996 individuals, we conducted MR studies to estimate the effect of lowered 25OHD on the risk of asthma (n = 146,761), childhood onset asthma (n = 15,008), atopic dermatitis (n = 40,835), and elevated IgE level (n = 12,853) and tested MR assumptions in sensitivity analyses. None of the four 25OHD-lowering alleles were associated with asthma, atopic dermatitis, or elevated IgE levels (p ≥ 0.2). The MR odds ratio per standard deviation decrease in log-transformed 25OHD was 1.03 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.90-1.19, p = 0.63) for asthma, 0.95 (95% CI 0.69-1.31, p = 0.76) for childhood-onset asthma, and 1.12 (95% CI 0.92-1.37, p = 0.27) for atopic dermatitis, and the effect size on log-transformed IgE levels was -0.40 (95% CI -1.65 to 0.85, p = 0.54). These results persisted in sensitivity analyses assessing population stratification and pleiotropy and vitamin D synthesis and metabolism pathways. The main limitations of this study are that the findings do not exclude an association between the studied outcomes and 1,25-dihydoxyvitamin D, the active form of vitamin D, the study was underpowered to detect effects smaller than an OR of 1.33 for childhood asthma, and the analyses were restricted to white populations of

  3. Prevalence of delayed-type and immediate-type hypersensitivity in healthcare workers with hand eczema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibler, Kristina S; Jemec, Gregor B E; Garvey, Lene H; Agner, Tove

    2016-10-01

    Occupational contact dermatitis is common in healthcare workers. Although irritant contact dermatitis resulting from wet work is the most frequently reported cause, healthcare workers also constitute high-risk group for the development of allergic contact dermatitis and contact urticaria. To evaluate the prevalence of delayed-type and immediate-type hypersensitivity in 120 healthcare workers with hand eczema. One hundred and twenty healthcare workers from three major hospitals in Denmark with self-reported hand eczema within the last year participated in the study. Patch tests included baseline series plus selected allergens, and prick tests included standard inhalational allergens plus natural rubber latex and chlorhexidine. Levels of IgE specific for latex, chlorhexidine and ethylene oxide were measured. Of the participants, 53% had positive patch test reactions. The most frequent positive patch test reactions were to nickel, thiomersal, fragrances, rubber chemicals, and colophonium. The prevalence of natural rubber latex allergy as diagnosed by prick testing was 2.5%, and chlorhexidine allergy (both contact allergy and IgE-mediated allergy) was found in allergy was not identified in any of the participants. Our results confirm previous reports on contact allergy patterns in healthcare workers. Testing for natural rubber latex allergy is still important, but increased risks of chlorhexidine and ethylene oxide allergy could not be confirmed. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. A Randomized Controlled Trial of an Eczema Care Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rea, Corinna J; Tran, Katherine D; Jorina, Maria; Wenren, Larissa M; Hawryluk, Elena B; Toomey, Sara L

    2018-03-02

    To test whether an eczema care plan (ECP) would improve provider documentation and management, decrease eczema severity, and increase patient quality of life (QOL) in the pediatric primary care setting. We conducted a randomized controlled trial from June 2015 to September 2016 at a large hospital-based pediatric primary care clinic. Participants included children from 1 month to 16 years of age with a diagnosis of eczema. The intervention group received the ECP and the control group received usual care. Both groups completed a validated eczema severity scale (Patient-Oriented Eczema Measure [POEM]) and a QOL scale (Infant's Dermatitis Quality of Life Index [IDQOL]) or Children's Dermatology Life Quality Index [CDLQI]) before the visit and again ~1 month later. A total of 211 caregivers completed both the pre- and postintervention surveys (100 control group and 111 intervention group [94% completion]). Intervention group providers were more likely to recommend a comprehensive "step-up" plan (88%) vs 28%; P plan to families (80%) vs 2%; P improved between the pre- and postintervention periods. However, there was not a significant difference between the groups on either measure: POEM difference -0.8, 95% confidence interval (CI) -3.2 to 1.7; IDQOL difference -0.1, 95% CI -1.8 to 1.6; CDLQI difference 0.8, 95% CI -0.9 to 2.6. Intervention group providers documented more comprehensive eczema care than control group providers. Although patients improved on all measures in the postintervention period, the ECP did not augment that improvement. Copyright © 2018 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Histamine Modulates Sweating and Affects Clinical Manifestations of Atopic Dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Aya; Tani, Saki; Murota, Hiroyuki; Katayama, Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    Many factors such as food or environmental allergens, bacteria, fungi, and mental stress aggravate the condition of atopic dermatitis (AD) eczema. Sweating can also exacerbate AD, and patients are aware of that. In the past, it has been reported that contamination of skin surface antigens by sweat induces acute allergic reactions and that sweating functions of AD patients via axonal reflexes are decreased. Histamine demonstrably inhibits acetylcholine-induced sweating in both mice and humans via histamine H1 receptor-mediated signaling. In sweat glands, acetylcholine inactivates glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β), a kinase involved in endocytosis and secretion, whereas simultaneous stimulation with histamine activates GSK3β and inhibits sweat secretion. Thus, histamine might be involved in the mechanism of abnormal skin dryness in patients with AD via decreasing sweat secretion. On another front, some patients secrete sweat normally. Patients with regular sweating are prone to develop skin disorders such as papules or erythema by residual sweat left on the skin surface. Patients with decreased sweating are prone to develop disorders characterized by xerosis, lichenoid changes, prurigo by elevated skin temperature, skin dryness, and compromised skin conditions. Careful inspection of skin manifestations provides a good indication of a patient's ability to sweat. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. The natural history of atopic dermatitis and its association with Atopic March.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somanunt, Sinjira; Chinratanapisit, Sasawan; Pacharn, Punchama; Visitsunthorn, Nualanong; Jirapongsananuruk, Orathai

    2017-09-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is the first manifestation of Atopic March. The natural history of AD and predictive factors for Atopic March have not been widely studied in Asia. To study the natural history and associated factors of disease remission and risk of respiratory allergy in Thai children with AD. Medical records of AD patients attending Allergy clinic at Siriraj hospital from 2004-2014 were reviewed. Patients were further followed-up to obtain current symptoms and treatment. One hundred and two AD patients (60.8% female) were followed for 10.2±4.7 years. The median age at diagnosis was 1.5 (0.1-12.0) years. The most common allergen sensitization was Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus and Dermatophagoides farinae. Forty-four percent of patients had complete remission at the median age of 6.3 (2.0-15.0) years. Forty-seven percent of early AD patients (onset < 2 years) had concomitant food allergy which egg and cow's milk were leading causes. The remission rate of AD was higher in early AD than later onset AD (p=0.02). Allergic rhinitis (AR) and asthma were diagnosed in 61.8% and 29.4% of the patients at the median age of 4.6 and 3.8 years, respectively. Early AD and food allergies were significantly associated with early asthma (onset < 3years) (OR=10.80, p< 0.01 and OR=8.70, p=0.01). Almost half of AD children had complete remission at school age with a better prognosis in early AD. At preschool age, two-thirds and one-third developed AR and asthma, respectively. Early AD and food allergy were risk factors of early asthma.

  7. Asthma, allergy and eczema among adults in multifamily houses in Stockholm (3-HE study)--associations with building characteristics, home environment and energy use for heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norbäck, Dan; Lampa, Erik; Engvall, Karin

    2014-01-01

    Risk factors for asthma, allergy and eczema were studied in a stratified random sample of adults in Stockholm. In 2005, 472 multifamily buildings (10,506 dwellings) were invited (one subject/dwelling) and 7,554 participated (73%). Associations were analyzed by multiple logistic regression, adjusting for gender, age, smoking, country of birth, income and years in the dwelling. In total, 11% had doctor's diagnosed asthma, 22% doctor's diagnosed allergy, 23% pollen allergy and 23% eczema. Doctor's diagnosed asthma was more common in dwellings with humid air (OR = 1.74) and mould odour (OR = 1.79). Doctor's diagnosed allergy was more common in buildings with supply exhaust air ventilation as compared to exhaust air only (OR = 1.45) and was associated with redecoration (OR = 1.48) and mould odour (OR = 2.35). Pollen allergy was less common in buildings using more energy for heating (OR = 0.75) and was associated with humid air (OR = 1.76) and mould odour (OR = 2.36). Eczema was more common in larger buildings (OR 1.07) and less common in buildings using more energy for heating (OR = 0.85) and was associated with water damage (OR = 1.47), humid air (OR = 1.73) and mould odour (OR = 2.01). Doctor's diagnosed allergy was less common in buildings with management accessibility both in the neighbourhood and in larger administrative divisions, as compared to management in the neighbourhood only (OR = 0.49; 95% CI 0.29-0.82). Pollen allergy was less common if the building maintenance was outsourced (OR = 0.67; 95% CI 0.51-0.88). Eczema was more common when management accessibility was only at the division level (OR = 1.49; 95% CI 1.06-2.11). In conclusions, asthma, allergy or eczema were more common in buildings using less energy for heating, in larger buildings and in dwellings with redecorations, mould odour, dampness and humid air. There is a need to reduce indoor chemical emissions and to control dampness. Energy saving may have consequences for allergy and eczema. More

  8. Asthma, Allergy and Eczema among Adults in Multifamily Houses in Stockholm (3-HE Study) - Associations with Building Characteristics, Home Environment and Energy Use for Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norbäck, Dan; Lampa, Erik; Engvall, Karin

    2014-01-01

    Risk factors for asthma, allergy and eczema were studied in a stratified random sample of adults in Stockholm. In 2005, 472 multifamily buildings (10,506 dwellings) were invited (one subject/dwelling) and 7,554 participated (73%). Associations were analyzed by multiple logistic regression, adjusting for gender, age, smoking, country of birth, income and years in the dwelling. In total, 11% had doctor's diagnosed asthma, 22% doctor's diagnosed allergy, 23% pollen allergy and 23% eczema. Doctor's diagnosed asthma was more common in dwellings with humid air (OR = 1.74) and mould odour (OR = 1.79). Doctor's diagnosed allergy was more common in buildings with supply exhaust air ventilation as compared to exhaust air only (OR = 1.45) and was associated with redecoration (OR = 1.48) and mould odour (OR = 2.35). Pollen allergy was less common in buildings using more energy for heating (OR = 0.75) and was associated with humid air (OR = 1.76) and mould odour (OR = 2.36). Eczema was more common in larger buildings (OR 1.07) and less common in buildings using more energy for heating (OR = 0.85) and was associated with water damage (OR = 1.47), humid air (OR = 1.73) and mould odour (OR = 2.01). Doctor's diagnosed allergy was less common in buildings with management accessibility both in the neighbourhood and in larger administrative divisions, as compared to management in the neighbourhood only (OR = 0.49; 95% CI 0.29–0.82). Pollen allergy was less common if the building maintenance was outsourced (OR = 0.67; 95% CI 0.51–0.88). Eczema was more common when management accessibility was only at the division level (OR = 1.49; 95% CI 1.06–2.11). In conclusions, asthma, allergy or eczema were more common in buildings using less energy for heating, in larger buildings and in dwellings with redecorations, mould odour, dampness and humid air. There is a need to reduce indoor chemical emissions and to control dampness

  9. Asthma, allergy and eczema among adults in multifamily houses in Stockholm (3-HE study--associations with building characteristics, home environment and energy use for heating.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Norbäck

    Full Text Available Risk factors for asthma, allergy and eczema were studied in a stratified random sample of adults in Stockholm. In 2005, 472 multifamily buildings (10,506 dwellings were invited (one subject/dwelling and 7,554 participated (73%. Associations were analyzed by multiple logistic regression, adjusting for gender, age, smoking, country of birth, income and years in the dwelling. In total, 11% had doctor's diagnosed asthma, 22% doctor's diagnosed allergy, 23% pollen allergy and 23% eczema. Doctor's diagnosed asthma was more common in dwellings with humid air (OR = 1.74 and mould odour (OR = 1.79. Doctor's diagnosed allergy was more common in buildings with supply exhaust air ventilation as compared to exhaust air only (OR = 1.45 and was associated with redecoration (OR = 1.48 and mould odour (OR = 2.35. Pollen allergy was less common in buildings using more energy for heating (OR = 0.75 and was associated with humid air (OR = 1.76 and mould odour (OR = 2.36. Eczema was more common in larger buildings (OR 1.07 and less common in buildings using more energy for heating (OR = 0.85 and was associated with water damage (OR = 1.47, humid air (OR = 1.73 and mould odour (OR = 2.01. Doctor's diagnosed allergy was less common in buildings with management accessibility both in the neighbourhood and in larger administrative divisions, as compared to management in the neighbourhood only (OR = 0.49; 95% CI 0.29-0.82. Pollen allergy was less common if the building maintenance was outsourced (OR = 0.67; 95% CI 0.51-0.88. Eczema was more common when management accessibility was only at the division level (OR = 1.49; 95% CI 1.06-2.11. In conclusions, asthma, allergy or eczema were more common in buildings using less energy for heating, in larger buildings and in dwellings with redecorations, mould odour, dampness and humid air. There is a need to reduce indoor chemical emissions and to control dampness. Energy saving may have consequences for allergy and eczema. More

  10. The validity of register data to identify children with atopic dermatitis, asthma or allergic rhinoconjunctivitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stensballe, Lone Graff; Klansø, Lotte; Jensen, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    the algorithms vs gold standard deep telephone interviews with the caretaker about physician-diagnosed atopic dermatitis, wheezing, asthma or allergic rhinoconjunctivitis in the child. Methods: The algorithms defined each of the three atopic diseases using register-based information on disease-specific hospital......Background: The incidence of atopic dermatitis, wheezing, asthma and allergic rhinoconjunctivitis has been increasing. Register-based studies are essential for research in subpopulations with specific diseases and facilitate epidemiological studies to identify causes and evaluate interventions....... Algorithms have been developed to identify children with atopic dermatitis, asthma or allergic rhinoconjunctivitis using register information on disease-specific dispensed prescribed medication and hospital contacts, but the validity of the algorithms has not been evaluated. This study validated...

  11. The history of atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Owen N; Strom, Mark A; Ladizinski, Barry; Lio, Peter A

    Fred Wise (1881-1950) and Marion Sulzberger (1895-1983) are often credited with introducing the term atopic dermatitis to dermatology in 1933. This definition was based on atopy, a term first created by Arthur Coca (1875-1959) and Robert Cooke (1880-1960) in 1923, when they recognized an association between allergic rhinitis and asthma. Despite its recent introduction into our medical lexicon, historical precursors of atopic dermatitis date back to at least as early as 69-140 ce. In this contribution, we highlight both the prominent individuals credited with shaping the disorder into our current interpretation and the suspected historical precursors of this disease and reported treatments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. First observation of the decay $\\bar{B}$$0\\atop{s}$ →; D$+\\atop{s}$ K and measurement of B($\\bar{B}$$0\\atop{s}$ →; D$±\\atop{s}$K)/Br($\\bar{B}$$0\\atop{s}$→; D$+\\atop{s}$ π-)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muelmenstaedt, Johannes [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2007-01-01

    We present the first observation of the decay $\\bar{B}$$0\\atop{s}$ → D$+\\atop{s}$ K and measure the relative branching fraction of $\\bar{B}$$0\\atop{s}$ → D$+\\atop{s}$ K to $\\bar{B}$$0\\atop{s}$ → D$+\\atop{s}$ π-. The measurement of the relative branching fraction is performed by applying a fit in invariant mass and specific ionization to 1.2 fb-1 of Ds(φπ)X data collected with the CDF II detector in pp collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. We measure B($\\bar{B}$$0\\atop{s}$ → D± s K∓¢/B($\\bar{B}$$0\\atop{s}$ → D$+\\atop{s}$ π-) = 0.107±0.019(stat)±0.008(sys). The statistical significance of the $\\bar{B}$$0\\atop{s}$ → D$+\\atop{s}$ K signal is 7.9σ. To cross-check our analysis method, we also measure B($\\bar{B0}$ → D+K-)/B($\\bar{B0}$ → D+π-) and B($\\bar{B0}$ → D*+K-)/B($\\bar{B0}$ → D*+π-) and verify that our results are in agreement with the world average.

  13. Low-energy electromagnetic irradiation for eczema treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karakaeva A.V.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to study the efficacy of treatment and diagnostic complex "Elec-troMAG" as a new method of physical therapy in complex treatment of truths-term eczema. Matherial and Methods. The article presents the results of application in complex treatment of 42 patients with a diagnosis of true eczema low-intensity electromagnetic radiation. The course of treatment consisted of 12 sessions. Acomparison group (30 patients received conventional therapy with standard doses and regimens of drugs without the use of physiotherapy therapies. The clinical efficiency was estimated on the basis of the definition of the functional state of the aquatic components of the internal environment of an organism at eczematous process and on the basis of defined-dividing the index of prevalence and severity of eczema EASI. Results. Identified a high effectiveness of low-intensity electromagnetic effect on the disease process, as evidenced by the earlier reduction of the clinical symptoms than in the comparison group, confirming the reduction of the absolute values of the index EASI. Conclusion. The obtained results suggest the safety and effectiveness of high-efficiency of this method of physical therapy treatment of eczema

  14. Treatment of hand eczema, any help from classification?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuttelaar, Marie-Louise; Christoffers, Wietske; Boonstra, Marrit; Coenraads, Pieter Jan

    Background: Intervention studies often use unclear definitions of either morphological or aetiological types of hand eczema, or there is no classification at all. These studies are not reproducible or difficult to compare. A generally accepted classification system is essential for clinical trials.

  15. Fragrance allergy in patients with hand eczema - a clinical study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heydorn, Siri; Johansen, Jeanne Duus; Andersen, Klaus E

    2003-01-01

    Fragrance allergy and hand eczema are both common among dermatological patients. Fragrance mix (FM) and its constituents have a recognized relevance to exposure to fine fragrances and cosmetic products. Based on extensive chemical analysis and database search, a new selection of fragrances was es...

  16. Medical consultations in relation to severity of hand eczema in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, M; Berg, Nikolaj Drimer; Elberling, J

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hand eczema is a common disease with a wide severity spectrum. Little information exists concerning the association between the severity of hand eczema and medical consultations. OBJECTIVES: To describe the self-rated severity of hand eczema in a general population and the relationship....... Multivariate analysis showed a positive association (P consultations. Of those individuals (n = 102) who had not consulted a dermatologist 26% had experienced moderate to very severe hand eczema within the previous 12 months. CONCLUSIONS: A considerable...... the second questionnaire. The 1-year period prevalence of hand eczema was estimated to be 14% in the population. Twenty-three per cent rated their hand eczema as moderate to very severe. In total, 67% had consulted their general practitioner and 44% had consulted a dermatologist because of hand eczema...

  17. Medical consultations in relation to severity of hand eczema in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, M.; Berg, N.D.; Elberling, J.

    2008-01-01

    Background Hand eczema is a common disease with a wide severity spectrum. Little information exists concerning the association between the severity of hand eczema and medical consultations. Objectives To describe the self-rated severity of hand eczema in a general population and the relationship....... Multivariate analysis showed a positive association (P consultations. Of those individuals (n = 102) who had not consulted a dermatologist 26% had experienced moderate to very severe hand eczema within the previous 12 months. Conclusions A considerable...... the second questionnaire. The 1-year period prevalence of hand eczema was estimated to be 14% in the population. Twenty-three per cent rated their hand eczema as moderate to very severe. In total, 67% had consulted their general practitioner and 44% had consulted a dermatologist because of hand eczema...

  18. Silk garments plus standard care compared with standard care for treating eczema in children: A randomised, controlled, observer-blind, pragmatic trial (CLOTHES Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim S Thomas

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The role of clothing in the management of eczema (also called atopic dermatitis or atopic eczema is poorly understood. This trial evaluated the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of silk garments (in addition to standard care for the management of eczema in children with moderate to severe disease.This was a parallel-group, randomised, controlled, observer-blind trial. Children aged 1 to 15 y with moderate to severe eczema were recruited from secondary care and the community at five UK medical centres. Participants were allocated using online randomisation (1:1 to standard care or to standard care plus silk garments, stratified by age and recruiting centre. Silk garments were worn for 6 mo. Primary outcome (eczema severity was assessed at baseline, 2, 4, and 6 mo, by nurses blinded to treatment allocation, using the Eczema Area and Severity Index (EASI, which was log-transformed for analysis (intention-to-treat analysis. A safety outcome was number of skin infections. Three hundred children were randomised (26 November 2013 to 5 May 2015: 42% girls, 79% white, mean age 5 y. Primary analysis included 282/300 (94% children (n = 141 in each group. The garments were worn more often at night than in the day (median of 81% of nights [25th to 75th centile 57% to 96%] and 34% of days [25th to 75th centile 10% to 76%]. Geometric mean EASI scores at baseline, 2, 4, and 6 mo were, respectively, 9.2, 6.4, 5.8, and 5.4 for silk clothing and 8.4, 6.6, 6.0, and 5.4 for standard care. There was no evidence of any difference between the groups in EASI score averaged over all follow-up visits adjusted for baseline EASI score, age, and centre: adjusted ratio of geometric means 0.95, 95% CI 0.85 to 1.07, (p = 0.43. This confidence interval is equivalent to a difference of -1.5 to 0.5 in the original EASI units, which is not clinically important. Skin infections occurred in 36/142 (25% and 39/141 (28% of children in the silk clothing and standard care groups

  19. Silk garments plus standard care compared with standard care for treating eczema in children: A randomised, controlled, observer-blind, pragmatic trial (CLOTHES Trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Kim S; Bradshaw, Lucy E; Sach, Tracey H; Batchelor, Jonathan M; Lawton, Sandra; Harrison, Eleanor F; Haines, Rachel H; Ahmed, Amina; Williams, Hywel C; Dean, Taraneh; Burrows, Nigel P; Pollock, Ian; Llewellyn, Joanne; Crang, Clare; Grundy, Jane D; Guiness, Juliet; Gribbin, Andrew; Mitchell, Eleanor J; Cowdell, Fiona; Brown, Sara J; Montgomery, Alan A

    2017-04-01

    The role of clothing in the management of eczema (also called atopic dermatitis or atopic eczema) is poorly understood. This trial evaluated the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of silk garments (in addition to standard care) for the management of eczema in children with moderate to severe disease. This was a parallel-group, randomised, controlled, observer-blind trial. Children aged 1 to 15 y with moderate to severe eczema were recruited from secondary care and the community at five UK medical centres. Participants were allocated using online randomisation (1:1) to standard care or to standard care plus silk garments, stratified by age and recruiting centre. Silk garments were worn for 6 mo. Primary outcome (eczema severity) was assessed at baseline, 2, 4, and 6 mo, by nurses blinded to treatment allocation, using the Eczema Area and Severity Index (EASI), which was log-transformed for analysis (intention-to-treat analysis). A safety outcome was number of skin infections. Three hundred children were randomised (26 November 2013 to 5 May 2015): 42% girls, 79% white, mean age 5 y. Primary analysis included 282/300 (94%) children (n = 141 in each group). The garments were worn more often at night than in the day (median of 81% of nights [25th to 75th centile 57% to 96%] and 34% of days [25th to 75th centile 10% to 76%]). Geometric mean EASI scores at baseline, 2, 4, and 6 mo were, respectively, 9.2, 6.4, 5.8, and 5.4 for silk clothing and 8.4, 6.6, 6.0, and 5.4 for standard care. There was no evidence of any difference between the groups in EASI score averaged over all follow-up visits adjusted for baseline EASI score, age, and centre: adjusted ratio of geometric means 0.95, 95% CI 0.85 to 1.07, (p = 0.43). This confidence interval is equivalent to a difference of -1.5 to 0.5 in the original EASI units, which is not clinically important. Skin infections occurred in 36/142 (25%) and 39/141 (28%) of children in the silk clothing and standard care groups

  20. Childhood immunization and atopic disease into middle-age--a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matheson, Melanie C; Haydn Walters, E; Burgess, John A; Jenkins, Mark A; Giles, Graham G; Hopper, John L; Abramson, Michael J; Dharmage, Shyamali C

    2010-03-01

    The association between childhood immunizations and risk of atopic diseases is unclear. No study has examined possible associations between childhood immunizations and such diseases in middle age. The Tasmanian Longitudinal Health Study (TAHS) is a population based cohort study of respiratory disease. The TAHS participants were followed from 7 to 44 yrs of age. Immunizations during childhood were examined for any association with asthma and atopic disease at age 44 yrs. Multivariable regression models were used to estimate relative risks while adjusting for confounders. Cox regression was used to estimate the association between childhood immunizations and asthma developing after the age of 7 yrs. We found no association between any childhood immunization (Diphtheria, Tetanus, Pertussis, Polio, Smallpox) and asthma (ORs ranged from 0.87 to 1.17 p > 0.05), eczema (ORs ranged from 0.99 to 1.07 p > 0.05), food allergy (ORs ranged from 0.97 to 1.11 p > 0.05), or hay fever (ORs ranged from 1.02 to 1.05 p > 0.05) at age 44. Nor did we find any association between childhood immunizations and an increased risk of incident asthma after the age of 7 yrs (Diphtheria HR = 1.06, 95% CI 0.82, 1.36; Tetanus HR = 1.13, 95% CI 0.88, 1.44; Pertussis HR = 1.03, 95% CI 0.81, 1.30; Polio HR = 1.15, 95% CI 0.86, 1.54; Smallpox HR = 1.21, 95% CI 0.99, 1.48; DTP HR = 1.05, 95% CI 0.85, 1.30). Our analysis does not support any association between common childhood immunizations and risk of asthma and atopic disease in middle-age. Our findings should provide reassurance that in terms of life time risk of asthma and atopic disease, childhood immunization is safe.

  1. Retinal Detachment Associated With Atopic Dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kothari, Nikisha; Young, Ryan C; Read, Sarah P; Tutiven, Jacqueline; Perez, Victor L; Flynn, Harry W; Berrocal, Audina M

    2017-06-01

    Ocular manifestations related to atopic dermatitis include keratoconus, keratoconjunctivitis, cataract, and retinal detachment. The authors report three cases of retinal detachment associated with atopic dermatitis. Although the pathogenesis is poorly understood, chronic blunt trauma may play a role in the development of retinal detachment. In addition, retinal detachments associated with atopic dermatitis may have lower rates of successful retinal detachment repair. [Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging Retina. 2017;48:513-517.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  2. Clinico-Epidemiological Profile And Factors Affecting Severity Of Atopic Dermatitis In North Indian Chilldren

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarkar Rashmi

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis (AD is a chronic, relapsing dermatitis commonly affecting children. Various epidemiologic factors and clinical patterns of the same were evaluated in 125 patients out of 418 attending the pediatric dermatology clinic over a period of 11/2 years. Of these, 26 were infants (upto 1 year of age and 99 were children. Mean duration of the disease in the infantile group was 3 months while in the childhood group it was 6 years. In the infantile group, family history of atopy was found in 11 patients (42.3%, while in the childhood group 35 (35.35% had family history of atopy, 7 (7.07% had personal history of atopy and 2 (2.02% had both personal and family history of atopy. The infantile group had more frequent facial involvement and acute type of eczema, while in the childhood type, site involvement was less specific and chronic type of eczema was more frequent. Most of the patients had mild to moderate degree of severity of the disease.

  3. Monoclonal antibodies against interleukin 13 and interleukin 31RA in development for atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamann, Carsten R; Thyssen, Jacob P

    2018-03-01

    The interleukin 13 (IL-13) and IL-31 cytokines and inflammatory pathways have been identified as important for the pathophysiology of atopic dermatitis (AD). Monoclonal antibodies against IL-13 have been studied for the treatment of asthma since 2011. More recently, 2 phase 2 trials have been completed with these antibodies in AD treatment. In both trials, significant reductions of Eczema Area and Severity Index scores were seen. IL-31 is thought to play a role transmitting itch sensation to the central nervous system, and blocking IL-31 activity reduces itch in patients with AD. One phase 2 trial has been completed for a humanized antibody against IL-31 receptor alpha, which is 1 subunit of the IL-31 receptor complex. This study showed significant dose-dependent reductions in pruritus, Eczema Area and Severity Index scores, and markers of sleep quality. Initial clinical trials for monoclonal antibodies against IL-13 and IL-31 receptor A all show promise, although long-term safety and efficacy data are lacking. Nevertheless, these medications will likely play a role in the treatment of moderate-to-severe AD. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Japanese Guideline for Atopic Dermatitis 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ichiro Katayama

    2014-01-01

    The basics of treatment discussed in this guideline are based on the "Guidelines for the Treatment of Atopic Dermatitis 2008" prepared by the Health and Labour Sciences Research and the "Guidelines for the Management of Atopic Dermatitis 2012 (ADGL2012" prepared by the Atopic Dermatitis Guidelines Advisory Committee, Japanese Society of Allergology in principle. The guidelines for the treatment of atopic dermatitis are summarized in the "Japanese Guideline for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Allergic Disease 2013" together with those for other allergic diseases.

  5. Japanese guidelines for atopic dermatitis 2017

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ichiro Katayama

    2017-04-01

    The basics of treatment discussed in this guideline are based on the “Guidelines for the Treatment of Atopic Dermatitis 2008” prepared by the Health and Labour Sciences Research and the “Guidelines for the Management of Atopic Dermatitis 2015 (ADGL2015” prepared by the Atopic Dermatitis Guidelines Advisory Committee, Japanese Society of Allergology in principle. The guidelines for the treatment of atopic dermatitis are summarized in the “Japanese Guideline for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Allergic Disease 2016” together with those for other allergic diseases.

  6. Contact allergy in children with atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, A. B.; Johansen, J. D.; Deleuran, M.

    2017-01-01

    The importance of contact allergy in children with atopic dermatitis is frequently debated. Previously, patients with atopic dermatitis were believed to have a reduced ability to produce a type IV immunological response. However, this belief has been challenged and authors have highlighted the risk...... frequencies of positive patch test reactions in children with atopic dermatitis. We identified 436 manuscripts of which 31 met the inclusion criteria. Although the literature is conflicting, it is evident that contact allergy is a common problem in children with atopic dermatitis....

  7. Does Stress Increase the Risk of Atopic Dermatitis in Adolescents? Results of the Korea Youth Risk Behavior Web-Based Survey (KYRBWS-VI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Jeoung A.; Park, Eun-Cheol; Lee, Minjee; Yoo, Ki-Bong; Park, Sohee

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between level of stress in middle and high school students aged 12–18 and risk of atopic dermatitis. Data from the Sixth Korea Youth Risk Behavior Web-based Survey (KYRBWS-VI), a cross-sectional study among 74,980 students in 800 middle schools and high schools with a response rate of 97.7%, were analyzed. Ordinal logistic regression analyses were conducted to determine the relationship between stress and atopic dermatitis with severity. A total of 5,550 boys and 6,964 girls reported having been diagnosed with atopic dermatitis. Younger students were more likely to have atopic dermatitis. Interestingly, the educational level of parents was found to be associated with having atopic dermatitis and having more severe condition. In particular, girls with mothers with at least college education had a 41% higher risk of having atopic dermatitis and severe atopic condition (odds ratio (OR)) = 1.41, 95% CI, 1.22–1.63; Patopic dermatitis. Compared to boys with who reported “no stress”, boys with “very high” stress had 46% higher the risk of having more severe atopic dermatitis (OR = 1.46, 95% CI, 1.20–1.78; Patopic dermatitis in girls. This study suggests that stress and parents' education level were associated with atopic dermatitis. Specifically, degree of stress is positively correlated with likelihood of being diagnosed with this condition and increasing the severity. PMID:23940513

  8. Getting Diagnosed

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... also for those with related disorders. How is Marfan syndrome diagnosed? getting_diagnosed.jpg A Marfan diagnosis can ... spinal column). Is there a genetic test for Marfan syndrome? Genetic testing can provide helpful information in some ...

  9. The ideal moisturizer: a survey of parental expectations and practice in childhood-onset eczema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hon, Kam-Lun Ellis; Wang, Shuxin Susan; Pong, Nga Hin; Leung, Ting Fan

    2013-02-01

    We evaluated the moisturizing and bathing practices and preferences of patients with childhood-onset eczema. The attitudes and practice of patients with eczema managed at a pediatric dermatology clinic were evaluated, using children with non-eczematous skin diseases as controls. Disease severity of eczema in the preceding 12 months was evaluated by the Nottingham Eczema Severity Score (NESS). Skin hydration (SH) and transepidermal water loss (TEWL) were assessed. Majority of patients took shower instead of bath and spent 12-13 min in shower. Most eczema patients applied emollients after shower/bath. Air-conditioning use was frequent, and patients with eczema maintained a lower ambient temperature than non-eczema patients (p = 0.001). Most eczema patients reported regular emollient usage (1.8 times/day for mild vs 2.8 times/day for moderate-to-severe eczema, p = 0.001), and acceptability of the current product was good to fair. Parents reported that the current emollients were most often recommended by doctors. Majority of parents/patients with mild eczema thought an ideal emollient needs only to be used twice a day whereas moderate-to-severe patients preferred more frequent usage (p = 0.001), and most of them preferred a non-fragrant, non-herbal white cream. Agreements concerning ideal emollient usage were only "moderate-to-fair" (kappa values times per day. Compliance may be enhanced if the recommended moisturizer conforms to the parents/patients preference.

  10. Atopic dermatitis is associated with active and passive cigarette smoking in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, So Young; Sim, Songyong; Choi, Hyo Geun

    2017-01-01

    The relationship between passive smoking and atopic dermatitis has previously been reported, but few studies have simultaneously evaluated the association of atopic dermatitis with active and passive smoking. The relationships between atopic dermatitis and active and passive smoking were evaluated in Korean adolescents. We used a large, representative, population-based survey (The Korea Youth Risk Behavior Web-based Survey) conducted in 2011 and 2012. Active smoking was classified into 3 groups (0 days, 1-19 days, and ≥ 20 days/month). Passive smoking was categorized into 3 groups (0 days, 1-4 days, and ≥ 5 days/week). Atopic dermatitis diagnosed by a medical doctor either during the past 1 month or during the participant's lifetime was surveyed. Age, sex, obesity status, region of residence, economic level, and parental educational level of the participants were adjusted as confounders. Adjusted odds ratios (AORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using multiple logistic regression analysis with complex sampling. A total of 6.8% (10,020/135,682) of the participants reported atopic dermatitis during the last 12 months. Active smoking was significantly associated with atopic dermatitis (previous 12 months) (AOR [95% CI] of smoking ≥ 20 days/month = 1.18 [1.07-1.29]; 1-19 days/month = 1.11 [0.99-1.23], P = 0.002). Passive smoking was also related to atopic dermatitis (previous 12 months) (AOR [95% CI] of smoking ≥ 5 days/week = 1.12 [1.05-1.20]; 1-4 days/week = 1.08 [1.03-1.13], P Atopic dermatitis was significantly associated with active and passive smoking in Korean adolescents.

  11. Atopic dermatitis is associated with active and passive cigarette smoking in adolescents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So Young Kim

    Full Text Available The relationship between passive smoking and atopic dermatitis has previously been reported, but few studies have simultaneously evaluated the association of atopic dermatitis with active and passive smoking.The relationships between atopic dermatitis and active and passive smoking were evaluated in Korean adolescents. We used a large, representative, population-based survey (The Korea Youth Risk Behavior Web-based Survey conducted in 2011 and 2012. Active smoking was classified into 3 groups (0 days, 1-19 days, and ≥ 20 days/month. Passive smoking was categorized into 3 groups (0 days, 1-4 days, and ≥ 5 days/week. Atopic dermatitis diagnosed by a medical doctor either during the past 1 month or during the participant's lifetime was surveyed. Age, sex, obesity status, region of residence, economic level, and parental educational level of the participants were adjusted as confounders. Adjusted odds ratios (AORs and 95% confidence intervals (CI were calculated using multiple logistic regression analysis with complex sampling.A total of 6.8% (10,020/135,682 of the participants reported atopic dermatitis during the last 12 months. Active smoking was significantly associated with atopic dermatitis (previous 12 months (AOR [95% CI] of smoking ≥ 20 days/month = 1.18 [1.07-1.29]; 1-19 days/month = 1.11 [0.99-1.23], P = 0.002. Passive smoking was also related to atopic dermatitis (previous 12 months (AOR [95% CI] of smoking ≥ 5 days/week = 1.12 [1.05-1.20]; 1-4 days/week = 1.08 [1.03-1.13], P < 0.001.Atopic dermatitis was significantly associated with active and passive smoking in Korean adolescents.

  12. Epidemiology and natural history of atopic diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Simon F

    2015-01-01

    of the atopic diseases now seems to have reached a plateau in many Western countries, they are still on the increase in the developing world. This emphasizes continuing research aimed at identifying the causes, risk factors, and natural history of these diseases. Herein, the fundamental aspects of the natural...... history and epidemiology of the atopic diseases are reviewed....

  13. Feeding filaggrin: effects of L-histidine supplementation in atopic dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan SP

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Siao Pei Tan,1,2 Simon B Brown,1,2 Christopher EM Griffiths,3 Richard B Weller,1,2 Neil K Gibbs3,4 1MRC Centre for Inflammation Research, 2Department of Dermatology, The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, 3Dermatology Centre, Division of Musculoskeletal and Dermatological Sciences, Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust, University of Manchester, Manchester, 4Curapel, Life Sciences Hub Wales, Cardiff, UK Abstract: Atopic dermatitis (AD, also known as eczema, is one of the most common chronic skin conditions worldwide, affecting up to 16% of children and 10% of adults. It is incurable and has significant psychosocial and economic impacts on the affected individuals. AD etiology has been linked to deficiencies in the skin barrier protein, filaggrin. In mammalian skin, l-histidine is rapidly incorporated into filaggrin. Subsequent filaggrin proteolysis releases l-histidine as an important natural moisturizing factor (NMF. In vitro studies were conducted to investigate the influence of l-histidine on filaggrin processing and barrier function in human skin-equivalent models. Our further aim was to examine the effects of daily oral l-histidine supplementation on disease severity in adult AD patients. We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover, nutritional supplementation pilot study to explore the effects of oral l-histidine in adult AD patients (n=24. In vitro studies demonstrated that l-histidine significantly increased both filaggrin formation and skin barrier function (P<0.01, respectively. Data from the clinical study indicated that once daily oral l-histidine significantly reduced (P<0.003 AD disease severity by 34% (physician assessment using the SCORingAD tool and 39% (patient self-assessment using the Patient Oriented Eczema Measure tool after 4 weeks of treatment. No improvement was noted with the placebo (P>0.32. The clinical effect of oral l-histidine in AD was similar to that of mid-potency topical corticosteroids

  14. Atopic dermatitis in Tunisian schoolchildren

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amouri, Meriem; Masmoudi, Abderahmen; Borgi, Nozha; Rebai, Ahmed; Turki, Hamida

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The prevalence of atopic dermatitis (AD) is low in North Africa. We describe the epidemiology of this atopic condition among school children in Tunisia. Methods We conducted a Cross-sectional survey study of 5 to 6-year-old schoolchildren from 21 primary schools of Sfax. The diagnosis of AD was based on the U.K. Working Party diagnostic criteria. A questionnaire including these criteria and some risk factors of AD was issued to the children. All children were examined by one dermatologist. Results Among the 1617 examined children, ten had AD giving a one-year prevalence of 0.65%. The overall sex ratio was 2.33. The disease occurred before the age of 2 years in 3 children. Pure AD without concomitant respiratory allergies was noted in 3 cases. One first-degree family member with atopy was at least noted in seven children. The strongest associated factor was the presence of AD in at least one parent and maternal age at the time of the child birth. Nor breast-feeding neither environmental characteristics of the house did correlate with AD. Conclusion The prevalence of AD in Tunisian schoolchildren is low but comparable to those of other developing countries. Family history of atopy and maternal age at the birth time was the most important associated factors. PMID:22145066

  15. Fragrance allergy in patients with hand eczema - a clinical study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heydorn, Siri; Johansen, Jeanne Duus; Andersen, Klaus E

    2003-01-01

    Fragrance allergy and hand eczema are both common among dermatological patients. Fragrance mix (FM) and its constituents have a recognized relevance to exposure to fine fragrances and cosmetic products. Based on extensive chemical analysis and database search, a new selection of fragrances...... was established, including 14 known fragrance allergens present in products to which hand exposure would occur. A non-irritating patch-test concentration for some fragrances was established in 212 consecutive patients. 658 consecutive patients presenting with hand eczema were patch tested with the European...... standard series and the developed selection of fragrances. 67 (10.2%) of the 658 patients had a positive reaction to 1 or more of our selection of fragrance chemicals present in the new selection. The most common reactions to fragrances not included in the FM were to citral, Lyral (hydroxyisohexyl-3...

  16. Contact Eczema Caused by True Teak (Tectona grandis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krogh, H. K.

    1964-01-01

    A follow-up study of a previous epidemiological investigation in a furniture factory concerning allergic contact eczema caused by true teak (Tectona grandis) clearly shows that a good educational campaign associated with specific and general prophylactic measures are able to control occupational dermatoses. At the first investigation 20·5% of the workers had allergic contact eczema and/or severe itching whereas only 8·3% suffered from the same complaints on re-examination. The different prophylactic measures previously recommended had been taken. Patch tests with various teak extracts were made on 13 workers sensitized to teak; these showed that lapachol (a derivative of naphthoquinone) is one of the sensitizing agents in teak wood. Furthermore, allergic reactions were obtained in seven of these workers when Jacaranda wood dust containing lapachol was used as the test substance. PMID:14106137

  17. Gene-environment interaction in atopic diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kahr, Niklas; Naeser, Vibeke; Stensballe, Lone Graff

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The development of atopic diseases early in life suggests an important role of perinatal risk factors. OBJECTIVES: To study whether early-life exposures modify the genetic influence on atopic diseases in a twin population. METHODS: Questionnaire data on atopic diseases from 850....... Significant predictors of atopic diseases were identified with logistic regression and subsequently tested for genetic effect modification using variance components analysis. RESULTS: After multivariable adjustment, prematurity (gestational age below 32 weeks) [odds ratio (OR) = 1.93, confidence interval (CI...... stratified by exposure status showed no significant change in the heritability of asthma according to the identified risk factors. CONCLUSION: In this population-based study of children, there was no evidence of genetic effect modification of atopic diseases by several identified early-life risk factors...

  18. The Atopic March. A Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan F. Salazar-Espinosa

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The atopic march is defined as the progression of atopic diseases, generally during childhood, such as atopic dermatitis, asthma, allergic rhinitis and food allergies. The main risk factors for developing these atopic diseases include genetics, aeroallergens, food allergens, late food introduction to the infant, and living in developing countries. The immunologic contributors to this problem include the Th2 response, epigenetics, and lack of certain factors like thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP and filaggrin. As a whole, the therapeutic approach has been changing during recent years because of the discovery of new factors involved in this problem. This article explains the definition of atopic march, the immunological pathway, clinical features, epidemiology and therapeutic approaches to create a context for the broader understanding of this important condition.

  19. Predominant genera of fecal microbiota in children with atopic dermatitis are not altered by intake of probiotic bacteria Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM and Bifidobacterium animalis subsp.lactis Bi-07

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Nadejda Nikolajevna; Vogensen, Finn Kvist; Gøbel, Rikke Juul

    2011-01-01

    randomized to intake of one of the probiotic strain or placebo. Microbial composition was characterized by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, quantitative PCR and, in a subset of subjects, by pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. The core population of the Lactobacillus group was identified...... significantly after intervention, indicating survival of the ingested bacteria. The levels of Bifidobacterium correlated positively (P = 0.03), while the levels of the Lactobacillus group negatively (P = 0.01) with improvement of atopic eczema evaluated by the Severity Scoring of Atopic Dermatitis index......The effect of probiotic bacteria Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM and Bifidobacterium lactis Bi-07 on the composition of the Lactobacillus group, Bifidobacterium and the total bacterial population in feces from young children with atopic dermatitis was investigated. The study included 50 children...

  20. A survey of occupational hand eczema in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skoet, Rikke; Olsen, Jorn; Mathiesen, Bent

    2004-01-01

    Occupational hand eczema (OHE) is the most frequently recognized work-related disease in Denmark and the annual cost to society is high. Understanding of the epidemiology of OHE is essential to be able to give appropriate recommendations for its prevention. The study comprised 758 persons, 490 fe...... to chromium (leather exposure), rubber additives (gloves) and nickel due to exposure from work tools and metalworking industry....

  1. Eczema in early childhood, sociodemographic factors and lifestyle habits are associated with food allergy: a nested case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Shoshan, Moshe; Soller, Lianne; Harrington, Daniel W; Knoll, Megan; La Vieille, Sebastian; Fragapane, Joseph; Joseph, Lawrence; St Pierre, Yvan; Wilson, Kathie; Elliott, Susan J; Clarke, Ann E

    2015-01-01

    Studies suggest an increase in food allergy prevalence over the last decade, but the contributing factors remain unknown. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between the most common food allergies and atopic history, sociodemographic characteristics and lifestyle habits. We conducted a case-control study nested within the SPAACE study (Surveying Prevalence of Food Allergy in All Canadian Environments) – a cross-Canada, random telephone survey. Cases consisted of individuals with probable food allergy (self-report of convincing symptoms and/or physician diagnosis) to milk, egg, peanut, tree nut, shellfish, fish, wheat, soy, or sesame. Controls consisted of nonallergic individuals, matched for age. Cases and controls were queried on personal and family history of atopy, sociodemographic characteristics and lifestyle habits. Multivariate logistic regression was used to evaluate the association between atopy, sociodemographic characteristics and lifestyle habits with probable food allergy. Between September 2010 and September 2011, 480 cases and 4,950 controls completed the questionnaire. For all 9 allergens, factors associated with a higher risk of probable allergy were as follows: (1) personal history of eczema (in the first 2 years of life), asthma or hay fever (odds ratio, OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.6-3.5; OR 2.8, 95% CI 2.2-3.6, and OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.8-3.0, respectively), (2) maternal, paternal or sibling's food allergy (OR 3.7, 95% CI 2.5-5.6; OR 3.0, 95% CI 1.8-5.1, and OR 3.1, 95% CI 2.2-4.2), (3) high household income (top 20%; OR 1.5, 95% CI 1.2-2.0). Males and older individuals were less likely to have food allergy (OR 0.7, 95% CI 0.6-0.9, and OR 0.99, 95% CI 0.99-1.00). Eczema in the first 2 years of life was the strongest risk factor for egg, peanut, tree nut and fish allergy. This is the largest population-based nested case-control study exploring factors associated with food allergies. Our results reveal that, in addition to previously reported

  2. Cesarean section delivery and development of food allergy and atopic dermatitis in early childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papathoma, Evangelia; Triga, Maria; Fouzas, Sotirios; Dimitriou, Gabriel

    2016-06-01

    Delivery by Cesarean section (CS) may predispose to allergic disorders, presumably due to alterations in the establishment of normal gut microbiota in early infancy. In this study, we sought to investigate the association between CS and physician-diagnosed food allergy and atopic dermatitis during the first 3 years of life, using data from a homogeneous, population-based, birth cohort. A total of 459 children born and cared for in the same tertiary maternity unit were examined at birth and followed up at 1, 6, 12, 18, 24, 30 and 36 months of age. Participants with symptoms suggestive of food allergy or atopic dermatitis were evaluated by a pediatric allergy specialist to confirm the diagnosis based on well-defined criteria. The rate of CS was 50.8% (n = 233). Food allergy was diagnosed in 24 participants (5.2%) while atopic dermatitis was diagnosed in 62 children (13.5%). Cesarean section (OR 3.15; 95% CI 1.14-8.70), atopic dermatitis of the child (OR 3.01; 95% CI 1.18-7.80), parental atopy (OR 4.33; 95% CI 1.73-12.1), and gestational age (OR 1.57; 95% CI 1.07-2.37) were significant and independent predictors of food allergy. Children with at least one allergic parent delivered by CS had higher probability of developing food allergy compared with vaginally delivered children of non-allergic parents (OR 10.0; 95% CI 3.06-32.7). Conversely, the effect of CS on atopic dermatitis was not significant (OR 1.35; 95% CI 0.74-2.47). Delivery by CS predisposes to the development of food allergy but not atopic dermatitis in early childhood. Cesarean section delivery seems to upregulate the immune response to food allergens, especially in children with allergic predisposition. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. The Roles of Malassezia Yeast and House Dust Mites in Atopic Dermatitis with Head and Neck Involvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gökhan Okan

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of the present study was to evaluate to the effects of Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, Dermatophagoides farinea and Pityrosporum ovale allergens on atopic dermatitis and to compare the patients with and without head and neck involvement. Moreover, the effect of P. ovale on atopic dermatitis according to different geographic conditions was also determined. Methods: Thirty-one patients with atopic dermatitis, who were admitted to İstanbul Medical Faculty Dermatology Clinic, were enrolled. Skin prick tests were performed for P. ovale and house dust mites (D. pteronyssinus ve D. farinea Results: Ten patients (32.3% showed positive reaction to D. pteronyssinus, nine patients (29% to D. farinea, and nine patients (29% to P. ovale. Head and neck involvement was observed in 22 patients. Head and neck involvement was mostly seen in the patients in the first two decades of life (48%. Eczema was significantly more severe in the patients with head and neck involvement compared to that in those without (p500 IU/mL were significantly higher in the head and neck involvement group (p<0.05. Conclusion: Although the effect of P. ovale on atopic dermatitis in head and neck involvement could not be demonstrated in the present study, it should not be ignored. The results of skin prick test for P. ovale might change according to age and disease severity. Geographical variations of Malassezia species distribution should be kept in mind while evaluating test results. Moreover, it should be remembered that inhalan allergens are also triggering factor in some patients with atopic dermatitis with head and neck involvement.

  4. Fragrance allergy in patients with hand eczema - a clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heydorn, Siri; Johansen, Jeanne Duus; Andersen, Klaus E; Bruze, Magnus; Svedman, Cecilia; White, Ian R; Basketter, David A; Menné, Torkil

    2003-06-01

    Fragrance allergy and hand eczema are both common among dermatological patients. Fragrance mix (FM) and its constituents have a recognized relevance to exposure to fine fragrances and cosmetic products. Based on extensive chemical analysis and database search, a new selection of fragrances was established, including 14 known fragrance allergens present in products to which hand exposure would occur. A non-irritating patch-test concentration for some fragrances was established in 212 consecutive patients. 658 consecutive patients presenting with hand eczema were patch tested with the European standard series and the developed selection of fragrances. 67 (10.2%) of the 658 patients had a positive reaction to 1 or more of our selection of fragrance chemicals present in the new selection. The most common reactions to fragrances not included in the FM were to citral, Lyral (hydroxyisohexyl-3-cyclohexene carboxaldehyde) and oxidized l-limonene. A concomitant reaction to the FM identified potential fragrance allergy in less than (1/2) of these patients. Exposure assessment and a statistically significant association between a positive patch test to our selected fragrances and patients' history support the relevance of this selection of fragrances. Those with a positive reaction to our selected fragrances were significantly more likely to have 1 or more positive patch tests in the standard series. This observation is the basis for the hypothesis concerning cross-reactivity and the effect of simultaneous exposure. The study found that fragrance allergy could be a common problem in patients with eczema on the hands.

  5. Iron therapy in hand eczema: A new approach for management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashimav Deb Sharma

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available It is observed that adequate iron intake and status can limit nickel absorption from the diet in the human body. Chronic vesicular hand eczema (CVHE due to nickel sensitivity is a common dermatological condition where the dietary nickel acts as a provocating factor. Such patients are usually treated with low nickel diet (LND. The present study was conducted to observe the result of addition of oral iron with LND in the treatment of CVHE in patients due to nickel sensitivity. 23 patients with CVHE due to nickel sensitivity were taken for this study. Study group (12 patients were advised LND with oral iron for a period of 12 weeks. Control group (11 patients were advised LND alone for a period of 12 weeks. Fast improvement noted in the skin lesions of the study group patients; 10 (83.33% patients had complete clearance of their hand eczemas at the end of 12 weeks. There were significant reductions in the blood level of nickel in those patients. Moderate improvement noted in the skin lesions of the control group patients; 5 (45.45% patients showed complete clearance of hand eczema at the end of 12 weeks. This study showed that oral iron helped to reduce nickel absorption from the diet. The study also showed that combination of LND and oral iron can bring a faster reduction in the severity of clinical symptoms of CVHE in a nickel sensitive individual.

  6. Remarkable improvement of relapsing dyshidrotic eczema after treatment of coexistant hyperhidrosis with oxybutynin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markantoni, Vasiliki; Kouris, Anargyros; Armyra, Kalliopi; Vavouli, Charitomeni; Kontochristopoulos, George

    2014-01-01

    Dyshidrotic hand eczema is a common condition, which can be resistant to various treatments. Although a number of etiologic factors are involved in the pathogenesis of dyshidrotic eczema, hyperhidrosis is assumed to play a significant role. Oxybutynin is an alternative treatment for hyperhidrosis. We present the cases of two patients suffering from hyperhidrosis and dyshidrotic eczema, who were treated with oxybutynin with impressive results. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. [Streptococcal impetigo at topical tacrolimus application sites in a woman with atopic dermatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynaert, G; Rey, A-C; Graveriau, C; Hesse, S; Denoeux, J-P

    2007-03-01

    We report a case of staphylococcal impetigo in a girl treated with tacrolimus ointment (Protopic) for atopic dermatitis. A 15 year-old girl was receiving treatment with tacrolimus 0.03% (Protopic) for an episode of atopic dermatitis. On reduction of applications of tacrolimus, a vesicular-pustular rash appeared and was treated with pristinamycin and valaciclovir. At the end of antibiotic and antiviral therapy, the vesicular-pustular rash recurred while the goal was receiving treatment once more with tacrolimus ointment 0.1%. The bacteriological and virological skin samples revealed B-haemolytic streptococcus group A. The negative results for cutaneous virological samples ruled out Kaposi-Juliusberg syndrome and a diagnosis of staphylococcal impetigo was made. The intrinsic imputability of tacrolimus was I3 (C3 S2). The most obvious specific feature of this impetigo was its limitation to areas of eczema treated by application of tacrolimus. In prospective studies in large patient cohorts, tacrolimus ointment has been associated with two types of adverse effect: local irritations and skin infections chiefly caused by Staphylococcus aureus. To date, there have been no reports in the literature of impetigo due to haemolytic B streptococcus following application of tacrolimus. Because of its immunodepressant effect, tacrolimus ointment may result in increased incidence of skin infections even though a number of studies have shown a reduction in such infections.

  8. First measurement of the B$0\\atop{2}$ semileptonic branching ratio to an orbitally excited d$**\\atop{s}$ state, Br(B$0\\atop{2}$ → D$-\\atop{s1}$(2536)μ+vX)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rieger, Jason [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States)

    2007-12-08

    In a data sample of approximately 1.3 fb-1 collected with the D0 detector between 2002 and 2006, the orbitally excited charm state D$±\\atop{s1}$(2536)has been observed with a measured mass of 2535.7 ± 0.6(stat) ± 0.5(syst) MeV/c2 via the decay mode B$0\\atop{s}$ → D$-\\atop{s1}$(2536)μ+vX followed by D$±\\atop{s1}$(2536) → DK$0\\atop{S}$. By normalizing to the known branching ratio Br($\\bar{b}$ → D*- μ+vX) and to the number of reconstructed D* mesons with an associated identified muon, a first-ever measurement is made of the product branching ratio ($\\bar{b}$ →} D$-\\atop{s1}$(2536)μ+vX) • Br(D$-\\atop{s1}$ → D*-K$0\\atop{S}$). Assuming that D$-\\atop{s1}$(2536) production in semileptonic decay is entirely from B$0\\atop{s}$, an extraction of the semileptonic branching ratio Br(B$0\\atop{s}$ → D$-\\atop{s1}$(2536)μ+vX) is made. Comparisons are made with theoretical expectations.

  9. Search for rare decays of the B$0\\atop{s}$ meson with the DØ experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernhard, Ralf Patrick [Univ. of Zurich, Irchel (Switzerland)

    2005-10-01

    This document presents the searches for the flavour-changing neutral current decays B$0\\atop{s}$ → μ+μ- and B$0\\atop{s}$s → φμ+μ- . A data set with integrated luminosity of 300 pb-1 of proton-antiproton collisions at √ s = 1 . 96 TeV collected with the DØ detector in Run II of the FERMILAB Tevatron collider is used. The former decay mode is particularly sensitive to supersymmetric extensions of the Standard Model. For the latter mode, a measurement of the branching ratio could validate the prediction of the Standard Model. In the absence of an apparent signal, a limit on the branching fraction B(B$0\\atop{s}$ → μ+μ-) can be computed by normalising the upper limit on the number of events in the B$0\\atop{s}$ signal region to the number of reconstructed B ± → J/ψ K ± events. An upper limit on the branching fraction of B(B$0\\atop{s}$ → μ+ μ- ) ≤ 3.7 × 10-7 at a 95% CL is obtained. This limit can be used to constrain models beyond the Standard Model. In models where the lightest supersymmetric particle is considered to be a dark matter candidate the limit aids in restricting the dark matter scattering cross section on nucleons. For the decay B$0\\atop{s}$ → φμ+μ- also no signal has been observed and an upper limit on the branching ratio normalised to B$0\\atop{s}$ → J/ψ φ events of B$0\\atop{s}$ B(B$0\\atop{s}$ → φ μ+ μ-)/B(B$0\\atop{s}$→J/ψφ) < 4 . 4 × 10-3 at a 95% CL is obtained. In addition, the rare decay B$0\\atop{s}$ → ψ (2 S ) φ has been observed. To measure a branching ratio, the B$0\\atop{s}$ → J/ψ φ mode was used for normalisation, while B± → ψ (2S) K± and B± → J/ψ K± modes were used as control samples. The relative branching ratio has been measured to be B(B$0

  10. Traffic-related air pollution, climate, and prevalence of eczema in Taiwanese school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yung-Ling; Su, Huey-Jen; Sheu, Hamm-Ming; Yu, Hsin-Su; Guo, Yueliang L

    2008-10-01

    The prevalence of childhood eczema is increasing in many countries. Epidemiological studies, however, say little of its association to outdoor air pollution and climate factors. We conducted a nationwide survey of middle-school students in Taiwan from 1995 to 1996. The 12-month prevalence of eczema was compared with air monitoring station data of temperature, relative humidity, and criteria air pollutants. A total of 317,926 children attended schools located within 2 km of 55 stations. Prevalence rates of recurrent eczema were 2.4 and 2.3% in boys and girls, respectively, with prevalence rates of flexural eczema 1.7% in both sexes. After adjustment for possible confounders, flexural eczema was found to be associated with traffic-related air pollutants, including nitrogen oxides and carbon monoxide. Recurrent eczema was associated with traffic-related air pollution only in girls. There were no associations for the highest monthly means of temperature, whereas the annual means and the lowest monthly means of temperature were negatively related to flexural eczema, but only in girls. The lowest monthly mean relative humidity was positively related to eczema. The results suggest that air pollution and climatic factors, which showed stronger associations in girls than boys, may affect the prevalence of childhood eczema.

  11. Outbreak of eczema and rhinitis in a group of office workers in Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebbehøj, Niels E; Agner, Tove; Zimerson, Erik

    2015-01-01

    : In total, 32 out of 80 workers (40%) developed symptoms; 27 reported eczema, 20 rhinitis and 4 urticaria. Eczema was located on the hands and/or lower arms in 18 workers, on the face in 10 workers and on legs/trunk in 12 workers. After intervention in the office, 22 workers with eczema reported significant...... improvement, all cases of hand eczema cleared and 16 workers with rhinitis also improved. Positive patch tests to carpet extracts were found significantly more frequent in the worker cohort than in a control group comprising 47 dermatitis patients (p

  12. Nuclear microprobe investigation of the penetration of ultrafine zinc oxide into human skin affected by atopic dermatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szikszai, Z., E-mail: szikszai@atomki.hu [Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Debrecen (Hungary); Kertesz, Zs. [Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Debrecen (Hungary); Bodnar, E. [Department of Dermatology, University of Debrecen, Medical and Health Science Center, Debrecen (Hungary); Borbiro, I. [Abiol Ltd., Debrecen (Hungary); Angyal, A.; Csedreki, L.; Furu, E.; Szoboszlai, Z.; Kiss, A.Z. [Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Debrecen (Hungary); Hunyadi, J. [Department of Dermatology, University of Debrecen, Medical and Health Science Center, Debrecen (Hungary)

    2011-10-15

    Skin penetration is one of the potential routes for nanoparticles to gain access into the human body. Ultrafine metal oxides, such as titanium dioxide and zinc oxide are widely used in cosmetic and health products like sunscreens. These oxides are potent UV filters and the particle size smaller than 200 nm makes the product more transparent compared to formulations containing coarser particles. The present study continues the work carried out in the frame of the NANODERM: 'Quality of skin as a barrier to ultrafine particles' European project and complements our previous investigations on human skin with compromised barrier function. Atopic dermatitis (a type of eczema) is an inflammatory, chronically relapsing, non-contagious skin disease. It is very common in children but may occur at any age. The exact cause of atopic dermatitis is unknown, but is likely due to a combination of impaired barrier function together with a malfunction in the body's immune system. In this study, skin samples were obtained from two patients suffering from atopic dermatitis. Our results indicate that the ultrafine zinc oxide particles, in a hydrophobic basis gel with an application time of 2 days or 2 weeks, have penetrated deeply into the stratum corneum in these patients. On the other hand, penetration into the stratum spinosum was not observed even in the case of the longer application time.

  13. Nuclear microprobe investigation of the penetration of ultrafine zinc oxide into human skin affected by atopic dermatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szikszai, Z.; Kertész, Zs.; Bodnár, E.; Borbíró, I.; Angyal, A.; Csedreki, L.; Furu, E.; Szoboszlai, Z.; Kiss, Á. Z.; Hunyadi, J.

    2011-10-01

    Skin penetration is one of the potential routes for nanoparticles to gain access into the human body. Ultrafine metal oxides, such as titanium dioxide and zinc oxide are widely used in cosmetic and health products like sunscreens. These oxides are potent UV filters and the particle size smaller than 200 nm makes the product more transparent compared to formulations containing coarser particles. The present study continues the work carried out in the frame of the NANODERM: “Quality of skin as a barrier to ultrafine particles” European project and complements our previous investigations on human skin with compromised barrier function. Atopic dermatitis (a type of eczema) is an inflammatory, chronically relapsing, non-contagious skin disease. It is very common in children but may occur at any age. The exact cause of atopic dermatitis is unknown, but is likely due to a combination of impaired barrier function together with a malfunction in the body's immune system. In this study, skin samples were obtained from two patients suffering from atopic dermatitis. Our results indicate that the ultrafine zinc oxide particles, in a hydrophobic basis gel with an application time of 2 days or 2 weeks, have penetrated deeply into the stratum corneum in these patients. On the other hand, penetration into the stratum spinosum was not observed even in the case of the longer application time.

  14. Family management of childhood atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Hae Kyoung; Kim, Dong Hee; Lee, Hyejung; Kim, Heejung; Chung, Kyoungmee; Kim, Hee-Soon

    2018-02-22

    To identify the variables that affect family management of childhood atopic dermatitis and establish a prediction model based on Bandura's self-efficacy theory. Atopic dermatitis is a chronic recurrent skin disease and common health problem in childhood. It is necessary to use an approach that includes parental factors when considering the effective management of childhood atopic dermatitis. A cross-sectional study design. A convenience sample, comprising 168 Korean mothers caring for a child with atopic dermatitis under the age of 13, was recruited from the pediatric outpatient departments of two general hospitals in Seoul, South Korea. Data were collected using structured self-reported questionnaires including severity, antecedents, effort, self-efficacy and family management of childhood atopic dermatitis from 1 November 1 2015 - 28 February 28 2016. Descriptive statistics regarding the participants and variables were examined and data were analyzed using structural equation modeling. The hypothetical model had an adequate fit to the data, indicating that severity, antecedents, effort and self-efficacy influenced family management of childhood atopic dermatitis. These results suggest that strategies to support children with atopic dermatitis and their family should consider the influence of such variables. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  15. Eczema in Psoriatico: An Important Differential Diagnosis Between Chronic Allergic Contact Dermatitis and Psoriasis in Palmoplantar Localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolesnik, Malgorzata; Franke, Ingolf; Lux, Anke; Quist, Sven R; Gollnick, Harald P

    2018-01-12

    Differential diagnosis of palmoplantar non-pustular psoriasis and chronic allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) and the combination of these conditions, termed "eczema in psoriatico" (EIP), is difficult, especially in cases of isolated involvement. A blind re-evaluation of 63 archived formalin-fixed palmoplantar samples, previously diagnosed clinically as either psoriasis or chronic ACD, was performed. Samples were allocated to histopathological diagnoses of psoriasis, contact dermatitis or EIP. Immunohistological stainings were performed for better characterization. Immunochemistry of EIP revealed features that overlapped contemporarily with psoriasis (cytokeratin 17 (CK17), Ki67, interleukin (IL)-8, IL-17, IL-23) and with ACD (CD1a, major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I, MHC class II, epidermal T-cell subsets). Surprisingly, a significantly much higher number of dermal CD8+ T cells was found in EIP than in ACD and psoriasis. In conclusion, this study provides insight into the immunohistological differentiation of palmoplantar psoriasis, chronic ACD and EIP.

  16. Comparison of atopic cough with cough variant asthma: is atopic cough a precursor of asthma?

    OpenAIRE

    Fujimura, M; Ogawa, H; Nishizawa, Y; Nishi, K

    2003-01-01

    Background: We have described a group of patients who present with isolated chronic bronchodilator resistant non-productive cough with an atopic constitution, eosinophilic tracheobronchitis, and airway cough receptor hypersensitivity without bronchial hyperresponsiveness, which we have termed "atopic cough". Although cough variant asthma (in which the cough responds to bronchodilators) is recognised as a precursor of typical asthma, it is not known whether atopic cough is also a precursor of ...

  17. Management of Children with Atopic Dermatitis: A Narrative Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Golpour

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Context Atopic dermatitis is a chronic, relapsing skin disorder that affects all ages including infancy and childhood. There are many proved and unproved treatments for atopic dermatitis. Evidence Acquisition Data sources of this narrative review included studies about pediatric atopic dermatitis with the following keywords, pediatric, atopic dermatitis, immunity, acute, chronic, pruritic inflammatory skin disorder, infancy, childhood, diagnosis, management and treatment. All of the articles were written in English language with full text on management or treatment. Results Innate and adaptive immune system involved atopic dermatitis. Major characteristics of atopic dermatitis include pruritus, chronic or relapsing lesions and personal or family history of atopic disease. There is no specific treatment for atopic dermatitis. The treatment included rehydration, emollients, topical steroid, calcineurin inhibitors and immunosuppressant. Crisaborole topical ointment, a PDE4 anti-inflammatory topical agent (phase three of the research could be effective in atopic dermatitis. Conclusions Avoidance from trigger factors and emollients are basic treatments of atopic dermatitis.

  18. Search for B$0\\atop{s}$ oscillations at D0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bose, Tulika [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Measurement of the B$0\\atop{s}$ oscillation frequency via B$0\\atop{s}$ mixing analyses provides a powerful constraint on the CKM matrix elements. A search for B$0\\atop{s}$ oscillations was performed using data collected by the DØ detector during the period 2002-2005 at the Fermilab Tevatron. Approximately 610 pb-1 of data was analyzed to reconstruct a large set of B0 s mesons in different semileptonic decay modes. Opposite-side flavor tagging algorithms that were tested on semileptonic B0 d decays with the measurement of the B$0\\atop{d}$ mixing frequency were used to determine the initial state flavor of the reconstructed B0 s meson. No significant signal for any particular value of the oscillation frequency was found. A 95% confidence level limit on the B$0\\atop{s}$ oscillation frequency Δms > 7.3 ps-1 and a sensitivity of 9.5 ps-1 were obtained.

  19. May - August 2014 correct2

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Four patients (2.5%) presented with multiple dermatological diagnoses. Atopic eczema (11.1%) was the commonest skin disease diagnosed in the clinic. Acne vulgaris was the commonest skin disease among adults (18 years and above). Eczema (26.5%) was the commonest group of skin diseases diagnosed in the clinic.

  20. Atopic dermatitis in the domestic dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pucheu-Haston, Cherie M

    2016-01-01

    Dogs may develop a syndrome of spontaneous, inflammatory, pruritic dermatitis that shares many features with human atopic dermatitis, including a young age of onset, characteristic lesion distribution, immunoglobulin E sensitization to common environmental allergen sources, and evidence of epidermal barrier dysfunction. There are also several important differences between canine and human atopic dermatitis. Although dogs may suffer from multiple-organ hypersensitivity syndromes, there is no evidence that this species experiences the progressive evolution from cutaneous to respiratory allergy characteristic of the human atopic march. Despite the presence of epidermal barrier derangement, there is no significant association between canine atopic dermatitis and mutations in filaggrin. Finally, treatment of canine disease relies much less heavily on topical therapy than does its human counterpart, while allergy testing and allergen-specific immunotherapy provide an often essential component of effective clinical management of affected dogs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Emerging therapies for atopic dermatitis: JAK inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotter, David G; Schairer, David; Eichenfield, Lawrence

    2018-03-01

    The Janus kinase-signal transducer and activator of transcription pathway is a conserved master regulator of immunity and myeloproliferation. Advanced understanding of this pathway has led to development of targeted inhibitors of Janus kinases (Jakinibs). As a class, JAK inhibitors effectively treat a multitude of hematologic and inflammatory diseases. Given such success, use of JAK inhibitors for mitigation of atopic dermatitis is under active investigation. Herein, we review the evolving data on the safety and efficacy of JAK inhibitors in treatment of atopic dermatitis. Although it is still early in the study of JAK inhibitors for atopic dermatitis, evidence identifies JAK inhibitors as effective alternatives to conventional therapies. Nonetheless, multiple large safety and efficacy trials are needed before widespread use of JAK inhibitors can be advocated for atopic dermatitis. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Skin absorption through atopic dermatitis skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halling-Overgaard, A-S; Kezic, S; Jakasa, I

    2017-01-01

    Patients with atopic dermatitis have skin barrier impairment in both lesional and non-lesional skin. They are typically exposed to emollients daily and topical anti-inflammatory medicaments intermittently, hereby increasing the risk of developing contact allergy and systemic exposed to chemicals...... ingredients found in these topical preparations. We systematically searched for studies that investigated skin absorption of various penetrants, including medicaments, in atopic dermatitis patients, but also animals with experimentally induced dermatitis. We identified 40 articles, i.e. 11 human studies...... examining model penetrants, 26 human studies examining atopic dermatitis drugs and 3 animal studies. We conclude that atopic dermatitis patients have nearly two-fold increased skin absorption when compared to healthy controls. There is a need for well-designed epidemiological and dermato...

  3. Timing of solid food introduction in relation to eczema, asthma, allergic rhinitis, and food and inhalant sensitization at the age of 6 years: results from the prospective birth cohort study LISA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zutavern, Anne; Brockow, Inken; Schaaf, Beate; von Berg, Andrea; Diez, Ulrike; Borte, Michael; Kraemer, Ursula; Herbarth, Olf; Behrendt, Heidrun; Wichmann, H-Erich; Heinrich, Joachim

    2008-01-01

    Current prophylactic feeding guidelines recommend a delayed introduction of solids for the prevention of atopic diseases. This study investigates whether a delayed introduction of solids (past 4 or 6 months) is protective against the development of eczema, asthma, allergic rhinitis, and food or inhalant sensitization at the age of 6 years. Data from 2073 children in the ongoing LISA birth cohort study were analyzed at 6 years of age. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed for all children and for children without skin or allergic symptoms within the first 6 months of life to take into account reverse causality. A delayed introduction of solids (past 4 or 6 months) was not associated with decreased odds for asthma, allergic rhinitis, or sensitization against food or inhalant allergens at 6 years of age. On the contrary, food sensitization was more frequent in children who were introduced to solids later. The relationship between the timing of solid food introduction and eczema was not clear. There was no protective effect of a late introduction of solids or a less diverse diet within the first 4 months of life. However, in children without early skin or allergic symptoms were considered, eczema was significantly more frequent in children who received a more diverse diet within the first 4 months. This study found no evidence supporting a delayed introduction of solids beyond 4 or 6 months for the prevention of asthma, allergic rhinitis, and food or inhalant sensitization at the age of 6 years. For eczema, the results were conflicting, and a protective effect of a delayed introduction of solids cannot be excluded. Positive associations between late introduction of solids and food sensitization have to be interpreted with caution. A true protective effect of a delayed introduction of solids on food sensitization seems unlikely.

  4. What do patients with occupational hand eczema know about skin care?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fisker, Maja H; Ebbehøj, Niels E; Jungersted, Jakob M

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the knowledge of skin care and treatment of hand eczema (HE) in a sample of patients with newly reported occupational HE.......The aim of the present study was to examine the knowledge of skin care and treatment of hand eczema (HE) in a sample of patients with newly reported occupational HE....

  5. Guideline for translation and national validation of the Quality of Life in Hand Eczema Questionnaire (QOLHEQ)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterhaven, Jart A F; Schuttelaar, Marie L A; Apfelbacher, Christian; Diepgen, Thomas L; Ofenloch, Robert F

    There is a need for well-developed and validated questionnaires to measure patient reported outcomes. The Quality of Life in Hand Eczema Questionnaire (QOLHEQ) is such a validated instrument measuring disease-specific health-related quality of life in hand eczema patients. A re-validation of

  6. Phenotyping asthma, rhinitis and eczema in MeDALL population-based birth cohorts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia-Aymerich, J; Benet, M; Saeys, Y

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Asthma, rhinitis and eczema often co-occur in children, but their interrelationships at the population level have been poorly addressed. We assessed co-occurrence of childhood asthma, rhinitis and eczema using unsupervised statistical techniques. METHODS: We included 17 209 children a...

  7. Knowledge, attitudes and behaviour in everyday life with chronic hand eczema - a qualitative study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mollerup, A; Johansen, J D; Thing, Lone Friis

    2013-01-01

    Chronic hand eczema is a common disease which may impact quality of life and have occupational and social consequences. Self-management is pivotal, both in handling acute eruptions and avoiding relapses. However, little is known about how people with hand eczema self-manage and integrate their di...

  8. Predictive factors of self-reported hand eczema in adult Danes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heede, N G; Thyssen, J P; Thuesen, B H

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Information about predictive factors of hand eczema is crucial for primary prevention. OBJECTIVES: To investigate predictive factors of hand eczema in adult Danes from the general population. METHODS: Participants from a cross-sectional 5-year follow-up study in the general population...

  9. Breast milk IL-1β level associates with development of eczema during early childhood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, A. A.; Chawes, B. L. K.; Carson, C. G.

    2015-01-01

    We recently demonstrated adual effect of breastfeeding with increasedrisk of eczema and decreased risk ofwheezing in early childhood. We hypothesizethat maternal immune constitutioncharacterized by breast milk mediatorsmay explain such association.......We recently demonstrated adual effect of breastfeeding with increasedrisk of eczema and decreased risk ofwheezing in early childhood. We hypothesizethat maternal immune constitutioncharacterized by breast milk mediatorsmay explain such association....

  10. ATOPIC DERMATITIS: NEW ASPECTS OF TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Sh. Macharadze

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis is a chronic inflammatory cutaneous disease, which demands a prolonged treatment. A modern views on the main approaches to treatment of atopic dermatitis in children and adults are analyzed in this article. The treatment is based on the permanent use of emollients in order to achieve an anti-inflammatory effect — topical calcineurin inhibitors (tacrolimus and pimecrolimus, and short courses (5 days of topical corticosteroids during relapses. For the 10-year period of topical calcineurin inhibitors usage in treatment of atopic dermatitis a great amount of experimental and clinical data have been accumulated. Two the most important changes and additions in the treatment of atopic dermatitis in recent times were related to a new hypothesis of proactive therapy with the use of topical tacrolimus and closing of «black box» warnings, associated to malignization risk due to the long-term usage of topical calcineurin inhibitors. Since atopic dermatitis is characterized by relapsing course, nowadays topical tacrolimus should be considered the most appropriate treatment approach, both in adults and children. The results of investigations confirmed more than 6-times decrease in relapse rate, as well as the significant improvement of quality of life, when the above-mentioned treatment scheme is used, both in children and adults.Key words: children, atopic dermatitis, emollients, treatment, tacrolimus.

  11. Classification of hand eczema: clinical and aetiological types. Based on the guideline of the Danish Contact Dermatitis Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Jeanne Duus; Hald, Marianne; Andersen, Bo Lasthein

    2011-01-01

    aetiological diagnosis. Results. Irritant contact dermatitis was most frequent in chronic, dry fissured hand eczema (44.3%), pulpitis (41.7%), and nummular hand eczema (40.9%), whereas allergic contact dermatitis dominated in vesicular types of hand eczema, with recurrent (35%) and few (24.2%) eruptions...

  12. The validity of register data to identify children with atopic dermatitis, asthma or allergic rhinoconjunctivitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stensballe, Lone Graff; Klansø, Lotte; Jensen, Andreas; Haerskjold, Ann; Thomsen, Simon Francis; Simonsen, Jacob

    2017-09-01

    The incidence of atopic dermatitis, wheezing, asthma and allergic rhinoconjunctivitis has been increasing. Register-based studies are essential for research in subpopulations with specific diseases and facilitate epidemiological studies to identify causes and evaluate interventions. Algorithms have been developed to identify children with atopic dermatitis, asthma or allergic rhinoconjunctivitis using register information on disease-specific dispensed prescribed medication and hospital contacts, but the validity of the algorithms has not been evaluated. This study validated the algorithms vs gold standard deep telephone interviews with the caretaker about physician-diagnosed atopic dermatitis, wheezing, asthma or allergic rhinoconjunctivitis in the child. The algorithms defined each of the three atopic diseases using register-based information on disease-specific hospital contacts and/or filled prescriptions of disease-specific medication. Confirmative answers to questions about physician-diagnosed atopic disease were used as the gold standard for the comparison with the algorithms, resulting in sensitivities and specificities and 95% confidence intervals. The interviews with the caretaker of the included 454 Danish children born 1997-2003 were carried out May-September 2015; the mean age of the children at the time of the interview being 15.2 years (standard deviation 1.3 years). For the algorithm capturing children with atopic dermatitis, the sensitivity was 74.1% (95% confidence interval: 66.9%-80.2%) and the specificity 73.0% (67.3%-78.0%). For the algorithm capturing children with asthma, both the sensitivity of 84.1% (78.0%-88.8%) and the specificity of 81.6% (76.5%-85.8%) were high compared with physician-diagnosed asthmatic bronchitis (recurrent wheezing). The sensitivity remained high when capturing physician-diagnosed asthma: 83.3% (74.3%-89.6%); however, the specificity declined to 66.0% (60.9%-70.8%). For allergic rhinoconjunctivitis, the sensitivity

  13. Skin care education and individual counselling versus treatment as usual in healthcare workers with hand eczema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibler, K.S.; Jemec, G.B.E.; Thomsen, S.F.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of a secondary prevention programme with education on skin care and individual counselling versus treatment as usual in healthcare workers with hand eczema. Design: Randomised, observer blinded parallel group superiority clinical trial. Setting: Three hospitals....... The secondary outcomes were scores on the dermatology life quality index, self evaluated severity of hand eczema, skin protective behaviours, and knowledge of hand eczema from onset to follow-up. Results: Follow-up data were available for 247 of 255 participants (97%). At follow-up, the mean score on the hand...... in Denmark. Participants: 255 healthcare workers with self reported hand eczema within the past year randomised centrally and stratified by profession, severity of eczema, and hospital. 123 were allocated to the intervention group and 132 to the control group. Interventions: Education in skin care...

  14. Lifetime difference in the B$0\\atop{s}$ system from untagged B$0\\atop{s}$ → J/ΨΦ decay at √s= 1.96 TeV at D0 detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandra, Avdhesh [Tata Inst. of Fundamental Research (TIFR), Mumbai (India)

    2006-01-01

    In this dissertation, they present a study of the untagged decay of B$0\\atop{s}$ → J/ΨΦ, the final state of which is a superposition of the CP-even and CP-odd states. Within the framework of the standard model (SM), to a good approximation, the two CP eigenstates of the (B$0\\atop{s}$, $\\bar{B}$$0\\atop{s}$) system are equivalent to mass eigenstates. The data collected by the D0 detector between June 2002 to August 2004 (an integrated luminosity of approximately 450 pb-1) has been used for the analysis presented in this thesis. From a simultaneous fit to the B$0\\atop{s}$ candidate mass, lifetime, and the angular distribution of the decay products, they obtain the CP-odd fraction in the final state at production time to be 0.16 ±} 0.10(stat) ± 0.02(syst). The average lifetime of the (B$0\\atop{s}$, $\\bar{B}$$0\\atop{s}$) system is measured to be 1.39$+0.13\\atop{-0.16}$(stat)$+0.01\\atop{-0.02}$(syst) ps, with the relative width difference between the heavy and light mass eigenstates, Δγ/$\\bar{γ}$ = (γLH)/$\\bar{γ}$ = 0.24$+0.16\\atop{-0.38}$(stat)$+0.03\\atop{-0.04}$(syst). With the additional constraint from the world average of the B$0\\atop{s}$ lifetime measurements using semileptonic decays, they find average lifetime of the (B$0\\atop{s}$, $\\bar{B}$$0\\atop{s}$) system 1.39 ± 0.06 ps with Δγ/$\\bar{γ}$ = 0.25$+0.14\\atop{-0.15}$. They have also done B0 lifetime measurement for its analogous decay mode to J/Ψ}K*. With this measurement they get B0 lifetime 1.530 ± 0.043(stat) ± 0.023(syst) ps. Using above results, they get 0.91 ± 0.09(stat) ± 0.003(syst), for the ratio of the B$0\\atop{s}$ and B0 lifetimes ($\\bar{γ}$(B$0\\atop{s}$)/γ(B0)). These measurements are consistent with the predictions of SM within the measurement uncertainty.

  15. Atopic status and latex sensitization in a cohort of 1,628 students of health care faculties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wudy, Anna Elena; Negro, Corrado; Adami, Alessandro; Larese Filon, Francesca

    2017-05-01

    Atopic diseases have increased since the second half of the previous century. Atopic workers are at higher risk to be sensitized to latex, and the first years of exposure are supposed to be especially risky. To assess atopic status and rate of latex sensitization in health care students starting their exposure to latex gloves. We analyzed medical surveillance data from 1,628 health care students from 2010 to 2016. Students completed a questionnaire focused on their previous and current latex exposure and personal and family histories of allergic diseases; underwent skin prick testing with common allergens and latex extract (and/or total and latex-specific immunoglobulin E in serum); and underwent a medical examination. Skin prick test results for common inhalant allergens showed that 807 of 1,628 students (49.6%) had atopy. Atopy by skin prick testing was associated with male sex (odds ratio 1.49, 95% confidence interval 1.18-1.86), a personal history of oculorhinitis or asthma (odds ratio 10.22, 95% confidence interval 7.4-14.13), and atopic eczema (odds ratio 1.87, 95% confidence interval 1.05-3.36) at multivariate regression analysis. Eleven students (0.7% of total population) were found to be sensitized to latex and all had atopy. Despite the high prevalence of atopy in health care students of Trieste, the latex sensitization rate is very low and comparable to general population. This is reasonably due to the low exposure to latex gloves at the time of the evaluation and to low latex release from the gloves currently used in our hospital. Copyright © 2017 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Wheeze in children : the impact of parental education on atopic and non-atopic symptoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Meer, Gea; Reijneveld, Sijmen A.; Brunekreef, Bert

    There is conflicting evidence for the relationship between parental socioeconomic position and their children's asthma. The aim of this study was to investigate relationships between parental education and respiratory symptoms in their children, distinguishing atopic and non-atopic symptoms. A

  17. Atopic dermatitis phenotypes and the need for personalized medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabanillas, Beatriz; Brehler, Ann-Christin; Novak, Natalija

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review To describe recent developments in therapies which target the molecular mechanisms in atopic dermatitis. Recent findings Current advances in the understanding of the molecular basis of atopic dermatitis are leading to the stratification of different atopic dermatitis phenotypes. New therapies offer the option to target-specific molecules involved in the pathophysiology of atopic dermatitis. Current new therapies under investigation aim to modulate specific inflammatory pathways associated with distinctive atopic dermatitis phenotypes, which would potentially translate into the development of personalized, targeted-specific treatments of atopic dermatitis. Summary Despite the unmet need for well tolerated, effective, and personalized treatment of atopic dermatitis, the current standard treatments of atopic dermatitis do not focus on the individual pathogenesis of the disease. The development of targeted, phenotype-specific therapies has the potential to open a new promising era of individualized treatment of atopic dermatitis. PMID:28582322

  18. Study of B$0\\atop{s}$ Mixing at the D-Zero Detector at Fermilab Using the Semi-leptonic Decay B$0\\atop{s}$ → D$-\\atop{s}$ μ+v X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anzelc, Meghan [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)

    2008-06-01

    B$0\\atop{s}$ mixing studies provide a precision test of Charge-Parity violation in the Standard Model. A measurement of Δms constrains elements of the CKM quark rotation matrix [1], providing a probe of Standard Model Charge-Parity violation. This thesis describes a study of B$0\\atop{s}$ mixing in the semileptonic decay B$0\\atop{s}$ → Ds- μ+vX, where Ds- → Φπ-, using data collected at the D-Zero detector at Fermi National Accelerator in Batavia, Illinois. Approximately 2.8 fb-1 of data collected between April 2002 and August 2007 was used, covering the entirety of the Tevatron's RunIIa (April 2002 to March 2006) and part of RunIIb (March 2006-August 2007). Taggers using both opposite-side and same-side information were used to obtain the flavor information of the Bs0 meson at production. The charge of the muon in the decay B$0\\atop{s}$ → Ds-μ+vX was used to determine the flavor of the B$0\\atop{s}$ at decay. The B$d\\atop{0}$ mixing frequency, Δmd, was measured to verify the analysis procedure. A log-likelihood calculation was performed, and a measurement of Δms was obtained. The final result was Δms = 18.86 ± 0.80(stat.) ± 0.37(sys.) with a significance of 2.6σ.

  19. Mixing and CP violation in the B$0\\atop{s}$ meson system at CDF; Mélange et violation de CP dans le système des mésons B$0\\atop{s}$ à CDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Giovanni, Gian Piero [Univ. of Paris VI-VII (France)

    2008-01-01

    The two analyses presented in the thesis, the B$0\\atop{s}$ mixing analysis and the B$0\\atop{s}$ → J/ψφ angular analysis, share most of the technical implementations and features. Thus, my choice was to pursue in parallel the common aspects of the analyses, avoiding, whenever possible, repetitions. Each Chapter is split in two parts, the first one dedicated to the B$0\\atop{s}$ mixing analysis and the second one describing the angular analysis on the B$0\\atop{s}$ → J/ψφ decay mode. They are organized as follows. In Chapter 1 we present the theoretical framework of the B$0\\atop{s}$ neutral mesons system. After a general introduction on the Standard Model, we focus on the quantities which are relevant to the Δms measurement and the CP violation phenomena, underlying the details concerning the study of pseudo-scalar to vector vector decays, P → VV, which allow to carry out an angular analysis. A discussion on the implication of the measurements performed in the search of physics beyond the Standard Model is presented. The accelerator facilities and the CDF-II detector are reported in Chapter 2. While describing the detector, more emphasis is given to the components fundamental to perform B physics analyses at CDF. The Chapter 3 is focused on the reconstruction and selection of the data samples. The Chapter starts with a description of the on-line trigger requirements, according to the B$0\\atop{s}$ sample considered, followed by the offline selection criteria implemented to reconstruct B$0\\atop{s}$ semileptonic and hadronic decays, fully and partially reconstructed, for the B$0\\atop{s}$ mixing analysis, as well as the B$0\\atop{s}$ → J/ψφ decay mode for the angular analysis. The subsequent Chapter 4 is dedicated to the revision of the technical ingredients needed in the final analyses. The B$0\\atop{s}$ mixing elements are firstly described. The methodology historically used in the oscillation searches, the 'amplitude scan', is here

  20. Wet work and hand eczema in apprentice nurses; part I of a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, Maaike J; Verberk, Maarten M; van Dijk, Frank J H; Bakker, Jan G; Bos, Jan D; Kezic, Sanja

    2014-01-01

    Environmental exposure and personal susceptibility both contribute to the development of hand eczema. Here, we report an investigation on wet work exposure and its influence on the risk of developing hand eczema in apprentice nurses. A prospective cohort study was performed among 721 Dutch apprentice nurses. Participants recorded wet work exposure and symptoms of hand eczema using specially designed diary cards. For 533 apprentice nurses, a follow-up time of 1-3 years was completed. Diary cards were supplied by 383 students. The 1-year period prevalence of hand eczema was 23% in the first year, 25% in the second year and 31% in the third year of follow-up. Eighty-one new cases of hand eczema developed, most of which occurred during the first year of follow-up. In approximately one-third of the participants, wet work exposure exceeded the national guidelines. Frequent hand washing during traineeships [odds ratio (OR) 1.5; 90% confidence interval (CI) 1.0-2.3], frequent hand washing at home (OR 2.3; 90% CI 1.5-3.7) and having a side job involving wet work (OR 1.6; 90% CI 1.0-2.4) were independent risk factors for hand eczema. As a considerable number of apprentice nurses had already developed hand eczema during traineeships, more attention should be paid to skin protection in vocational education. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Complementary and alternative medicines and childhood eczema: a US population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverberg, Jonathan I; Lee-Wong, Mary; Silverberg, Nanette B

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use in US children with eczema is unknown. Furthermore, it is unknown whether CAM use in the United States is associated with higher eczema prevalence. We sought to determine the eczema prevalence in association with CAM usage. We analyzed data from the 2007 National Health Interview Survey that included a nationally representative sample of 9417 children ages 0 to 17 years. Overall, 46.9% (95% confidence interval, 45.6%-48.2%) of children in the United States used 1 or more CAM, of which 0.99% (0.28%-1.71%) used CAM specifically to treat their eczema, including herbal therapy (0.46%), vitamins (0.33%), Ayurveda (0.28%), naturopathy (0.24%), homeopathy (0.20%), and traditional healing (0.12%). Several CAMs used for other purposes were associated with increased eczema prevalence, including herbal therapy (survey logistic regression; adjusted odds ratio [95% confidence interval], 2.07 [1.40-3.06]), vitamins (1.45 [1.21-1.74]), homeopathic therapy (2.94 [1.43-6.00]), movement techniques (3.66 [1.62-8.30]), and diet (2.24 [1.10-4.58]), particularly vegan diet (2.53 [1.17-5.51]). In conclusion, multiple CAMs are commonly used for the treatment of eczema in US children. However, some CAMs may actually be harmful to the skin and be associated with higher eczema prevalence in the United States.

  2. 20 Years of standard patch testing in an eczema population with focus on patients with multiple contact allergies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Berit Christina; Menné, Torkil; Johansen, Jeanne Duus

    2007-01-01

    Results of standard patch tests performed with the same methodology in one centre are rarely available over a large time span. This gives the unique opportunity to study not only prevalence but also persistency of contact allergy and characterize subpopulations. The objectives were to investigate...... sensitivity rates and persistencies of patch test results and characterize patients with multiple contact allergies. A 20-year retrospective database-based study of 14 998 patients patch tested with the European Standard Series was performed. 34.5% were sensitized, primarily women. Sensitivity to nickel......(Me)isothiazolinone, and primin and poor for paraben mix. 5.1% were multiple allergic, primarily women, and 90% got diagnosed by the first test. Frequency of multiple allergies increased with age. More multiple- than mono/double-allergic patients were tested multiple times. Persistency and sensitivity rates in a Danish eczema...

  3. Treatment policy for psoriasis and eczema: a survey among dermatologists in the Netherlands and Belgian Flanders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roelofzen, Judith H J; Aben, Katja K H; Khawar, Ali J M; Van de Kerkhof, Peter C M; Kiemeney, Lambertus A L M; Van Der Valk, Pieter G M

    2007-01-01

    Today, many therapies are available for the treatment of psoriasis and eczema. One of the oldest topical therapies is coal tar. Coal tar has been used for decades, but over the past years, the use of coal tar has decreased for several reasons, including the supposed carcinogenicity of coal tar. We investigated the current and past treatment policies for psoriasis and eczema with special emphasis on the use of tar products; a postal survey was conducted among all dermatologists in two European countries: the Netherlands (n = 360) and the Flemish speaking part of Belgium (Flanders) (n = 328). This study was conducted as part of the ongoing LATER-study ("Late effects of coal tar treatment in eczema and psoriasis; the Radboud study"). All practising dermatologists received a questionnaire. Dermatologists were asked to describe their treatment policies in mild/moderate psoriasis, severe psoriasis, mild/moderate eczema and severe eczema. The response rate to the questionnaire was 62.5% for the Dutch dermatologists and 45.7% for the Flemish dermatologists. Almost all dermatologists prescribe topical corticosteroids. In eczema, most of the dermatologists prescribe the recently introduced calcineurin inhibitors (95%). Coal tar is a second choice topical therapy. Dutch dermatologists mainly use tar in the treatment of eczema (72% vs. 48% in Flanders), whereas in Flanders, tar is mainly prescribed in psoriasis (60% vs. 41% in Holland). Flemish dermatologists very frequently prescribe PUVA in psoriasis (93% vs. 63%). Topical treatment, especially topical corticosteroids, is the mainstay in psoriasis and eczema. Coal tar still is an important (second choice) therapy for the topical treatment of psoriasis and eczema, but its use varies from country to country. Despite the carcinogenicity of PUVA, this photochemotherapy is frequently prescribed by dermatologists, mainly in Flanders.

  4. Discordance Between Physician- and Patient-Reported Disease Severity in Adults with Atopic Dermatitis: A US Cross-Sectional Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wenhui; Anderson, Peter; Gadkari, Abhijit; Blackburn, Stuart; Moon, Rachel; Piercy, James; Shinde, Shashank; Gomez, Jorge; Ghorayeb, Eric

    2017-12-01

    There is limited understanding of severity rating of atopic dermatitis in clinical practice. To evaluate the agreement between physician- and patient-rated severity of atopic dermatitis. Data were collected from the 2014 Adelphi US Atopic Dermatitis Disease Specific Programme, a cross-sectional survey of physicians and their patients with a history of moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis; patients voluntarily completed a questionnaire. Current disease severity (mild/moderate/severe), based on personal judgment, was rated independently by patients and their physicians. The weighted kappa statistic identified level of agreement between physicians and patients. Bivariate analyses characterized agreement; multi-nomial logistic regression identified factors associated with discordance. Overall, 678 patients were included (369 [54.4%] were women, 525 [77.4%] were White, mean age was 39.3 years). Agreement was moderate (weighted kappa = 0.52): compared with physician ratings, patient-rated severity was higher in 76 patients (11.2%), lower in 137 patients (20.2%), and matched in 465 patients (68.6%). There were no differences in the rates of agreement between physician and patient ratings based on physician specialty (p = 0.6781), objective severity measures [Eczema Area and Severity Index score (p = 0.5308), percent body surface area affected (p = 0.9872), and current systemic immunosuppressant use (p = 0.9197)]. Multivariate analysis showed patients with a worse quality of life (Dermatology Life Quality Index) were more likely to rate a higher severity (relative risk ratio 1.04, 95% confidence interval 1.00-1.08; p = 0.0460). Physicians were more likely to rate a higher severity with a greater physician-reported sleep disturbance (relative risk ratio 1.71, 95% confidence interval 1.01-2.89; p = 0.0440). Almost one-third of patients rated atopic dermatitis severity differently from their physicians, supporting the importance of the patient perspective in

  5. The Atopic March: Progression from Atopic Dermatitis to Allergic Rhinitis and Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bantz, Selene K; Zhu, Zhou; Zheng, Tao

    2014-04-01

    The development of atopic dermatitis (AD) in infancy and subsequent allergic rhinitis and asthma in later childhood is known as the atopic march. This progressive atopy is dependent on various underlying factors such as the presence of filaggrin mutations as well as the time of onset and severity of AD. Clinical manifestations vary among individuals. Previously it was thought that atopic disorders may be unrelated with sequential development. Recent studies support the idea of a causal link between AD and later onset atopic disorders. These studies suggest that a dysfunctional skin barrier serves as a site for allergic sensitization to antigens and colonization of bacterial super antigens. This induces systemic Th2 immunity that predisposes patients to allergic nasal responses and promotes airway hyper reactivity. While AD often starts early in life and is a chronic condition, new research signifies that there may be an optimal window of time in which targeting the skin barrier with therapeutic interventions may prevent subsequent atopic disorders. In this review we highlight recent studies describing factors important in the development of atopic disorders and new insights in our understanding of the pathogenesis of the atopic march.

  6. Vaccinations in the first year of life and risk of atopic disease - Results from the KiGGS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlaud, Martin; Schmitz, Roma; Poethko-Müller, Christina; Kuhnert, Ronny

    2017-09-12

    The study focused on the question of whether and - if so - to what direction and extent immunisations in the 1st year may be associated with the risk of being diagnosed with atopic diseases after the 1st year of life. Data from the German Health Interview and Examination Survey for Children and Adolescents (KiGGS, 2003-2006) were analysed. For analyses of potential associations between vaccination status and risk of hay fever, atopic dermatitis or asthma, sample sizes of 15254, 14297, and 15262, respectively, were available. Children with a sufficient TDPHiHeP vaccination at the end of the 1st year of life had a lower risk of being diagnosed with hay fever after the 1st year of life (adjusted prevalence ratio 0.85, 95% confidence interval 0.76-0.96). Analyses for associations between TDPHiHeP vaccination and risk of atopic dermatitis or asthma, or between age at onset of vaccination or of the number of antigens vaccinated in the 1st year of life and risk of atopic disease failed to yield statistical significance. Our results provide no evidence that immunisations in the 1st year of life may increase the risk of atopic disease. If any association exists at all, our results may be interpreted as weakly supportive of the hypothesis that immunisations may slightly decrease the risk of atopy in later life. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Gene-environment interaction in the onset of eczema in infancy: filaggrin loss-of-function mutations enhanced by neonatal cat exposure.

    OpenAIRE

    Bisgaard, H; Simpson, A; Palmer, CN; B?nnelykke, K; McLean, I; Mukhopadhyay, S; Pipper, CB; Halkjaer, LB; Lipworth, B; Hankinson, J; Woodcock, A; Custovic, A

    2008-01-01

    Editors' Summary Background. Eczema is a skin condition characterized by dry, red, and itchy patches on the skin. Eczema is associated with asthma and allergy, though allergy rarely plays a role in development or severity of eczema. Eczema usually begins during infancy, typically on the face, scalp, neck, extensor sides of the forearms, and legs. Up to one in five infants develops eczema, but in more than half of them, the condition improves or disappears completely before they are 15 years o...

  8. Hyperlinearity in atopic dermatitis, on the palm (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This picture shows a manifestation of atopic dermatitis on the palm. Individuals with atopic dermatitis characteristically have increased numbers and depth of skin lines (hyperlinearity) on the palms with little ...

  9. Dry skin conditions, eczema and emollients in their management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddappa K

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Dry skin, which refers to roughened, flaky, or scaly skin that is less flexible than normal and dry to feel, is relatively common problem in all age groups, but is more common in elderly individuals. The water content of the stratum corneum is of paramount importance in maintaining the normal appearance and texture of human skin. The relative hydration of the stratum corneum is a composite of 3 factors viz. the rate of water transport from dermis to stratum corneum, the rate of surface loss of water and the rate of water binding ability of stratum corneum. Loss of integrity of the barrier function is a central factor in the development of dry skin conditions and eczema. The various factors involved in producing dry skin, various causes of dry skin and the role of emollients in the management of these conditions are discussed.

  10. Fragrance allergy in patients with hand eczema - a clinical study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heydorn, Siri; Johansen, Jeanne Duus; Andersen, Klaus E

    2003-01-01

    Fragrance allergy and hand eczema are both common among dermatological patients. Fragrance mix (FM) and its constituents have a recognized relevance to exposure to fine fragrances and cosmetic products. Based on extensive chemical analysis and database search, a new selection of fragrances...... standard series and the developed selection of fragrances. 67 (10.2%) of the 658 patients had a positive reaction to 1 or more of our selection of fragrance chemicals present in the new selection. The most common reactions to fragrances not included in the FM were to citral, Lyral (hydroxyisohexyl-3......-cyclohexene carboxaldehyde) and oxidized l-limonene. A concomitant reaction to the FM identified potential fragrance allergy in less than (1/2) of these patients. Exposure assessment and a statistically significant association between a positive patch test to our selected fragrances and patients' history...

  11. Immunological mechanisms in atopic dermatitis : clinical and experimental studies

    OpenAIRE

    Tengvall Linder, Maria

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate immunological mechanisms in atopic dermatitis. Serum IgE levels are elevated in 80% of atopic dermatitis patients and CD4+ T cells and environmental allergens are known to be of importance in the pathogenesis of the disease. It was therefore of interest to further elucidate the role of these factors in atopic dermatitis. Cyclosporin A (CSA) was used as a tool for exploring the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis, with emphasis on the...

  12. Atopic Dermatitis and Allergic Urticaria: Cutaneous Manifestations of Immunodeficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudinski, Martin Robert; Milner, Joshua D

    2017-02-01

    Atopic dermatitis and allergic urticaria are common conditions of the skin that can also be the presenting symptoms of uncommon diseases. Defects leading to immunodeficiency may be associated with atopic dermatitis or allergic urticaria. Unusually severe or otherwise atypical presentations of atopic dermatitis or allergic urticaria may lead to clinical suspicion of an underlying immunodeficiency. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Filaggrin genotype and skin diseases independent of atopic dermatitis in childhood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bager, Peter; Wohlfahrt, Jan; Thyssen, Jacob Pontoppidan

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Filaggrin gene (FLG) mutations compromise skin barrier functions and increase risk of atopic dermatitis. We aimed to study effects on other skin diseases using unique data from the Danish registers. METHODS: FLG genotyping of a population-based sample of 1547 children with extracted D...... mutations may predispose to skin disease in young children including urticaria, and rash not recognized as atopic dermatitis although equally frequent. In clinical practice, FLG genotyping may help indicate the use of moisturizers to reduce skin problems.......BACKGROUND: Filaggrin gene (FLG) mutations compromise skin barrier functions and increase risk of atopic dermatitis. We aimed to study effects on other skin diseases using unique data from the Danish registers. METHODS: FLG genotyping of a population-based sample of 1547 children with extracted DNA...... and information on skin diseases from the Danish National Birth Cohort and Health Register, with 18 years follow-up during years 1996-2013. Odds ratios (OR) and hazard ratios (HR) were estimated using logistic regression and Cox regression, respectively, and adjusted for physician-diagnosed atopic dermatitis...

  14. Lithosphere erosion atop mantle plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrusta, R.; Arcay, D.; Tommasi, A.

    2012-12-01

    rejuvenation of the lithosphere. The onset time and the vigor of SSC and, hence, the new equilibrium thermal state of the lithosphere atop the plume wake depends on the Rayleigh number (Ra) in the unstable layer at the base of the lithosphere, which is controlled by the temperature anomaly and rheology in the plume-fed layer. For vigorous, hot plumes, SSC onset times do not depend on plate velocity. For more sluggish plumes, SSC onset times decrease with increasing plate velocity. This behavior is explained by differences in the thermal structure of the lithosphere, due to variations in the spreading behavior of the plume material at the lithosphere base. Reduction of the viscosity in partial molten areas and decrease in density of the depleted residuum enhance the vigor of small-scale convection in the plume-fed low-viscosity layer at the lithosphere base, leading to more effective erosion of the base of the lithosphere.

  15. Effect of Alnus japonica extract on a model of atopic dermatitis in NC/Nga mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sun Eun; Park, Kwan Hee; Jeong, Mi Sook; Kim, Han Hyuk; Lee, Do Ik; Joo, Seong Soo; Lee, Chung Soo; Bang, Hyoweon; Choi, Young Wook; Lee, Mi-Kyung; Seo, Seong Jun; Lee, Min Won

    2011-07-14

    The bark of Alnus species has long been used in traditional oriental medicine in the treatment of many pathological conditions, including fever, hemorrhage, diarrhea, alcoholism, various skin diseases (e.g. chronic herpes, eczema and prurigo), and inflammation. In order to assess the immunomodulatory efficacy of a novel herbal medicine in treating atopic dermatitis, we measured serum levels of several allergic and inflammatory biomarkers in NC/Nga mice before and after treatment with this experimental agent. Gene and protein expression analyses of iNOS and COX-2 were quantified by real time PCR and Western blot analysis and serum levels of IL-4, -5 and -13 were also measured by ELISA, all of which were reduced after treatment with the experimental agent. Additionally, serum concentrations of IgE and blood eosinophil counts were reduced in treated mice. The topical application of leaf and bark extract from Alnus japonica suppressed the development of AD-like skin lesions. The percent of blood eosinophils was decreased after treatment with leaf and bark extract from Alnus japonica. The serum IgE and Th2-related cytokine levels were decreased after treatment with leaf and bark extract from Alnus japonica compared with those treated with base cream (vehicle treated AD group). The IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13 were lower than those of vehicle treated AD group. We contend that leaf and bark extract from Alnus japonica may prove useful in the treatment of atopic dermatitis and other allergic skin diseases, although more in-depth clinical studies are necessary before clinical implementation. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Dupilumab: A review of its use in the treatment of atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooderham, Melinda J; Hong, H Chih-Ho; Eshtiaghi, Panteha; Papp, Kim A

    2018-03-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic, pruritic immune-mediated inflammatory dermatosis characterized by a T helper 2 (Th2) immune response phenotype and may be associated with systemic inflammation. Dupilumab is an interleukin 4 (IL-4) receptor α-antagonist that inhibits IL-4 and IL-13 signaling through blockade of the shared IL-4α subunit. Blockade of IL-4/13 is effective in reducing Th2 response. Dupilumab has recently been approved in the United States and Europe for the treatment of adult patients with moderate-to-severe AD. Clinical trials have shown that adults with moderate-to-severe AD who receive weekly or biweekly dupilumab injections have significantly improved clinical and patient-reported outcomes, including Eczema Area Severity Index, SCORing Atopic Dermatitis, Dermatology Life Quality Index, and itch Numeric Rating Scale scores. Concomitant use of topical corticosteroids along with dupilumab results in a greater improvement in signs and symptoms of AD than with use of dupilumab alone. Biomarker analyses show that dupilumab modulates the AD molecular signature and other Th2-associated biomarkers. Common adverse events reported in the clinical trials were nasopharyngitis, upper respiratory tract infection, injection site reactions, skin infections, and conjunctivitis. These were mild-to-moderate in nature, and overall rates of adverse events occurred with similar frequency between the treatment and placebo groups. There were no significant serious safety concerns identified in phase III clinical trials. Dupilumab, as monotherapy or with concomitant use of topical corticosteroids, can significantly improve clinical outcomes and quality of life in patients suffering from moderate-to-severe AD. Ongoing studies of dupilumab will help determine the clinical efficacy and safety profile of its long-term use. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Frequency and Management of Sleep Disturbance in Adults with Atopic Dermatitis: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Caleb; Yan, Di; Nakamura, Mio; Sekhon, Sahil; Bhutani, Tina; Berger, Timothy; Liao, Wilson

    2017-09-01

    Intense nocturnal pruritus as well as the complex pathophysiology of atopic dermatitis (AD) can severely affect sleep and become a major factor in negatively impacting quality of life in adults. However, much of the literature on sleep disturbance in AD patients is on the pediatric population, and it is not well studied in adults. Furthermore, limited studies are available to guide effective management of sleep disturbance in AD in general. We review the literature to present the studies that have investigated the relationship between AD and its effect on sleep in adults and provide an approach for clinicians caring for this population. A systematic literature search was conducted through the PubMed and EMBASE databases using the search terms "atopic dermatitis" OR "eczema" AND "sleep." The articles generated by the search and their references were reviewed. A high prevalence of sleep disturbance is experienced by adults with AD. The likelihood of sleep disturbance is much higher in patients with AD compared to those without AD. Sleep disturbance appears to worsen with AD severity. Pruritus and scratching appear to be large contributors to sleep disturbance in adult patients with AD. It is important that clinicians evaluate the severity of AD and ask general questions about itching, sleep, impact on daily activities, and persistence of disease during each patient visit and follow-up with the complaint of sleep disturbance. Management of sleep disturbance in AD should focus on adequate disease control of AD as well as possible medical interventions to help improve sleep. The pathophysiology of sleep disturbance in AD is extremely complex, and further research is needed to better understand the interplay of the immune system, circadian rhythm, and environmental factors implicated in both AD and sleep.

  18. A clinical trial for evaluation of leech application in the management of Vicarcikā (Eczema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K M Pratap Shankar

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion : Leech application gives significant relief for the symptoms of eczema. The life quality of the patient also improved significantly after leech therapy. No adverse reactions were reported during the entire course of study.

  19. Environmental factors associated with childhood eczema: Findings from a national web-based survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari Sasaki

    2016-10-01

    Conclusions: Duration of breastfeeding, season of birth, pet ownership, household income, and the number of siblings were associated with the prevalence of childhood eczema in a nationwide web survey.

  20. Update on the use of alitretinoin in treating chronic hand eczema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedram Ghasri

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Pedram Ghasri1, Noah Scheinfeld21University of California, Irvine School of Medicine, Irvine, CA, USA; 2Department of Dermatology, Columbia University, School of Medicine, New York, USAAbstract: Chronic hand eczema is a debilitating dermatological condition with significant economic, social, and functional impacts. To date, conventional treatments such as topical corticosteroids, phototherapy, and systemic immunosuppressants have yielded disappointing results, owing to either a lack of efficacy or significant adverse events. Oral alitretinoin (9-cis-retinoic acid is a unique panagonist retinoid with immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory activity that has emerged as a novel treatment for chronic hand eczema. Several large-scale clinical studies have demonstrated oral alitretinoin’s high efficacy rate of 28% to 89%, its safe tolerability profile, and its positive impact on quality of life, validating it as a therapeutic option for patients with severe chronic hand eczema refractory to standard treatment.Keywords: hand eczema, alitretinoin, 9-cisretinoic acid

  1. Analysis of Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP rs22114085 Associated with Canine Atopic Dermatitis by PCR-RFLP Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Miluchová

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Canine atopic dermatitis (cAD is a common inflammatory skin disease that is considered to be a naturally occurring, spontaneous model of human atopic dermatitis (eczema. The aim of the paper was to identify of the SNP rs22114085 in different dog breeds. The material involved 52 dogs from 5 different breeds. Canine genomic DNA was isolated from saliva by modified method with using DNAzol® and linear polyacrylamide (LPA carrier and from blood by using commercial kit NucleospinBlood and used in order to estimate rs22114085 SNP genotypes by PCR-RFLP method. The PCR products were digested with DdeI restriction enzyme. The C allele was distributed in Czech Pointer, Chihuahua, German Wirehaired Pointer with an allele frequency ranging from 0.4545 to 1.00. In the population of Czech Pointer we detected all genotypes CC, CT and TT with frequency in male 0.25, 0.5833 and 0.1667, and in female 0.2728, 0.3636 and 0.3636, subsequently. In German Wirehaired Pointer was detected homozygote genotype CC in male and heterozygote genotype CT in female with frequency 1 and 1. In Chihuahua was observed homozygote genotype CC and heterozygote genotype CT with frequency 0.3333 and 0.6667, subsequently. In Golden retriever and Pincher we detected genotype TT with frequency 1.

  2. Analysis of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP RS23472497 associated with canine atopic dermatitis by ACRS-PCR method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Miluchová

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper was to identify of the SNP rs23472497 associated with canine atopic dermatitis (cAD. cAD is a common inflammatory skin disease that is considered to be a naturally occurring, spontaneous model of human atopic dermatitis (eczema. The material involved 60 dogs from 6 different breeds. Canine genomic DNA was isolated from saliva by modified method with using DNAzol® and linear polyacrylamide (LPA carrier and from blood by using commercial kit NucleospinBlood and used in order to estimate rs23472497 SNP genotypes by ACRS-PCR method. The PCR products were digested with NlaIII restriction enzyme. In the population of Czech Pointer and Slovak Wirehaired Pointer we detected all genotypes AA, AG and GG with frequency 0.0732, 0.5122 and 0.4146 for Czech Pointer and 0.1818, 0.5455 and 0.2727 for Slovak Wirehaired Pointer. In Border Collie was observed heterozygote genotype AG and homozygote genotype GG with frequency 0.6667 and 0.3333, subsequently. In German Wirehaired Pointer, Australian Shepherd dog and American Staffordshire terrier we detected only genotype AG with frequency 1. The A allele was distributed with an allele frequency ranging from 0.3293 to 0.5. The G allele was distributed with an allele frequency ranging from 0.5 to 0.6707.

  3. Topical application of rapamycin ointment ameliorates Dermatophagoides farina body extract-induced atopic dermatitis in NC/Nga mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fei; Tanaka, Mari; Wataya-Kaneda, Mari; Yang, Lingli; Nakamura, Ayumi; Matsumoto, Shoji; Attia, Mostafa; Murota, Hiroyuki; Katayama, Ichiro

    2014-08-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD), a chronic inflammatory skin disease characterized by relapsing eczema and intense prurigo, requires effective and safe pharmacological therapy. Recently, rapamycin, an mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) inhibitor, has been reported to play a critical role in immune responses and has emerged as an effective immunosuppressive drug. In this study, we assessed whether inhibition of mTOR signalling could suppress dermatitis in mice. Rapamycin was topically applied to inflamed skin in a murine AD model that was developed by repeated topical application of Dermatophagoides farina body (Dfb) extract antigen twice weekly for 7 weeks in NC/Nga mice. The efficacy of topical rapamycin treatment was evaluated immunologically and serologically. Topical application of rapamycin reduced inflammatory cell infiltration in the dermis, alleviated the increase of serum IgE levels and resulted in a significant reduction in clinical skin condition score and marked improvement of histological findings. In addition, increased mTOR phosphorylation in the lesional skin was observed in our murine AD model. Topical application of rapamycin ointment inhibited Dfb antigen-induced dermatitis in NC/Nga mice, promising a new therapy for atopic dermatitis. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Inhibition of serum naphthylamidases by atopic allergens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berrens, L.

    1968-01-01

    Human serum hydrolyses the 2-naphthylamides of -lysine and -arginine. The enzymatic activity of the serum naphthylamidases is inhibited by atopic allergens and by protein-sugar conjugates carrying 1-deoxy-2-ketose residues attached to the -amino groups of lysine residues in their peptide moieties.

  5. A study of atopic diseases in Basrah

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-11-19

    Nov 19, 2008 ... The patients were divided into three age stages as shown in. Table 1. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION. From 174 patients 68 (39.08%) patients suffer with atopic dermatitis followed by bronchial asthma with 59 cases. (33.90%) and allergic rhinitis with 47 cases (27.01%). (Table 2). Table 3 shows that more ...

  6. Use of systemic corticosteroids for atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drucker, A M; Eyerich, K; de Bruin-Weller, M S

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Guidelines discourage the use of systemic corticosteroids for atopic dermatitis (AD), but their use remains widespread. OBJECTIVES: To reach consensus among an international group of AD experts on the use of systemic corticosteroids for AD. METHODS: A survey consisting of statements a...

  7. Significant improvement of eczema with skin care and food elimination in small children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norrman, Gunilla; Tomicić, Sara; Böttcher, Malin Fagerås; Oldaeus, Göran; Strömberg, Leif; Fälth-magnusson, Karin

    2005-10-01

    To evaluate common methods of investigation and treatment in children younger than 2 y of age with eczema, with or without sensitization to food allergens. One hundred and twenty-three children younger than 2 y of age with eczema and suspected food allergy were included in this prospective study. The children underwent skin-prick test with cow's milk, fresh hen's egg white and wheat. Specific IgE to milk and egg white was analysed. The eczema extent and severity was estimated with SCORAD before and after treatment. Children with a positive skin-prick test were instructed to exclude that food item from their diet. All children were treated with emollients and topical steroids when needed. Sixty-two of the children were skin-prick positive to at least one of the allergens; 62% had mild, 30% moderate and 8% severe eczema at their first visit. After treatment, 90% had mild, 10% moderate and 0% severe eczema. Forty-six per cent of the children had circulating IgE antibodies to milk or egg white. Ten per cent had specific IgE but negative skin-prick test to the same allergen. This subgroup improved their eczema significantly without elimination diet. The conventional treatments for children with eczema, i.e. skin care and food elimination, are effective. The beneficial effect of skin care as the first step should not be neglected, and it may not be necessary to eliminate food allergens to relieve skin symptoms in all food-sensitized children with eczema.

  8. The Hand Eczema Trial (HET): Design of a randomised clinical trial of the effect of classification and individual counselling versus no intervention among health-care workers with hand eczema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibler, Kristina Sophie; Agner, Tove; Hansen, Jane L.

    2010-01-01

    from a self-administered questionnaire delivered to 3181 health-care workers in three Danish hospitals. The questionnaire identifies the prevalence of hand eczema, knowledge of skin-protection, and exposures that can lead to hand eczema. At entry, all participants are assessed regarding: disease....... The experimental group undergoes patch and prick testing; classification of the hand eczema; demonstration of hand washing and appliance of emollients; individual counselling, and a skin-care programme. The control group receives no intervention. All participants are reassessed after six months. The primary...... strategies are needed to reduce occupational hand eczema. METHODS/DESIGN: We describe the design of a randomised clinical trial to investigate the effects of classification of hand eczema plus individual counselling versus no intervention. The trial includes health-care workers with hand eczema identified...

  9. Serum concentrations of metalloproteinase 2, metalloproteinase 9 and granzyme B in contact eczema patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Żbikowska-Gotz, Magdalena; Czajkowski, Rafał; Bartuzi, Zbigniew

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Contact eczema is a common skin condition with complex etiology, variable clinical presentation and lengthy therapy duration. The mechanism of contact eczema is complex, since it is affected by multiple inflammatory mediators. Aim To assess concentrations of metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2), metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) and granzyme B (GzmB) in patients with contact eczema. Material and methods Seventy patients with contact eczema and 30 healthy persons as controls were included in the study. In all subjects, MMP-2, MMP-9 and GzmB were determined using ELISA immunoassay. In study group patients, concentrations were assayed in periods of disease exacerbation and remission. Obtained results were analyzed statistically. Results Mean MMP-2 and GzmB concentrations were found to be significantly higher in the study group than in the control group. Mean MMP-2, MMP-9 and GzmB levels were also statistically significantly higher during skin lesion relapse compared to contact eczema remission periods. Conclusions The presented paper demonstrates that MMP-2, MMP-9 and GzmB are good markers of contact eczema exacerbations. PMID:24278051

  10. Prevalence of xerosis, eczema, and hair and nail abnormalities in PLWHA in Cotonou, Benin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atadokpede, F; Adegbidi, H; Sehonou, J J; Koudoukpo, C; Houenassi, D M; Yedomon, H G; Do Ango-Padonou, F

    2012-11-01

    The objective of this investigation was to study the prevalence of xerosis, eczema, and hair and nail abnormalities in PLWHA in Cotonou. A retrospective study was performed on the records of PLWHA in Cotonou. All PLWHA with xerosis, eczema, or abnormal appendages were included. Forty-seven patients had xerosis or eczema. Their mean age was 38 years; the sex ratio 0.51 and the mean CD4 count 89 cells/mm(3). Twenty-three patients had xerosis, which affected the whole body (n = 20), lower limb (n = 2), limbs and trunk (n = 1), without gender difference. Twenty-four patients had eczema of which eight had both eczema and xerosis. Forty-two patients had abnormalities of the hair or nails. Their sex ratio was 0.80 and the mean CD4 count 110 cells/mm(3) . Nineteen patients had abnormalities of the hair and scalp: straight hair (n = 16), squamous lesions (n = 2), and folliculitis abscess (n = 1) with a male predominance. Twenty-three patients had nail dermatophytosis (n = 15), candidiasis (n = 7), and ingrowing nails (n = 1). These conditions affected more often women (74%) than men (26%). The prevalence of eczema and xerosis is low in our patients. Onychomycosis was the most frequent nail abnormality. © 2012 The International Society of Dermatology.

  11. Emollients, education and quality of life: the RCPCH care pathway for children with eczema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Helen; Lloyd, Kate; Williams, Hywel; Arkwright, Peter D; Brown, Trevor; Clark, Christine; Campbell, Margaret; Gore, Claudia; Hardman, Catherine; Langford, Andrew; Lewis-Jones, Sue; Lawton, Sandra; Ridd, Matthew; Russell, Lucia; Sohi, Dalbir; Turnbull, Rosemary; Venter, Carina; Warner, John O

    2011-11-01

    The Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health (RCPCH) Science and Research Department was commissioned by the Department of Health to develop national care pathways for children with allergies. The eczema pathway focuses on defining the competences to improve the equity of care received by children with eczema. The eczema pathway was developed by a multidisciplinary working group and was based on a comprehensive review of evidence. The pathway was reviewed by a broad group of stakeholders including paediatricians, allergists, dermatologists, specialist nurses, dietician, patients' representatives and approved by the Allergy Care Pathways Project Board and the RCPCH Clinical Standards Committee. It was also reviewed by a wide range of stakeholders. The results are presented in three sections: the evidence review, mapping and the core knowledge document. The various entry points to the ideal pathway of care are defined from self-care through to follow-up. There is considerable emphasis on good skin care and when allergy problems should be dealt with. The pathway algorithm and associated competences can be downloaded from http://www.rcpch.ac.uk/allergy/eczema. Effective eczema management is holistic and encompasses an assessment of severity and impact on quality of life, treatment of the inflamed epidermal skin barrier, recognition and treatment of infection and assessment and management of environmental and allergy triggers. Patient and family education which seeks to maximise understanding and concordance with treatment is also important in all children with eczema.

  12. Inhibition of 2,4-dinitrofluorobenzene-induced atopic dermatitis by topical application of the butanol extract of Cordyceps bassiana in NC/Nga mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Guang; Li, Lan; Sung, Gi Ho; Kim, Tae Woong; Byeon, Se Eun; Cho, Jae Youl; Park, Chun Wook; Park, Hyoung Jin

    2011-03-24

    The Cordyceps species are insect-borne mushrooms that have been ethnopharmacologically used for skin diseases such as eczema and dermatitis. In this study, we investigated the curative effects of the butanol fraction (CBBF) of Cordyceps bassiana on atopic dermatitis. Dermatitis was induced by repeated application of 2,4-dinitrofluorobenzene (DNFB) in NC/Nga mice. After a topical application of CBBF on the skin lesions, the dermatitis score, epidermal thickness, mast cell number, and interleukin (IL)-4 and interferon (IFN)-γ, as well as the levels of histamine and immunoglobulin E (IgE) in the serum, were measured. Moreover, effect of CBBF on histamine release was examined using RBL-2H3 under stimulation with 2,4-dinitrophenylated bovine serum albumin (DNP-BSA). CBBF inhibited atopic dermatitis symptoms and signs in the DNFB-treated NC/Nga mice. The suppressive activity of topically applied CBBF may be due to the dose-dependent blockade of a series of immunopathological events, including the release of histamine, the production of IgE, and the secretion of IL-4 and IFN-γ. However, this extract did not directly suppress the degranulation process, assessed by measuring β-hexosaminidase release. Our results suggest that CBBF can be applied as an effective herbal remedy to treat atopic dermatitis. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Atopic dermatitis from adolescence to adulthood in the TOACS cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørtz, Charlotte G; Andersen, K E; Dellgren, C

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: While much is known about childhood atopic dermatitis, little is known about persistence of atopic dermatitis into adult life. We report, to our knowledge for the first time, the clinical course of atopic dermatitis in an unselected cohort of adolescents followed into adulthood. METHODS......: The course of atopic dermatitis from adolescence to adulthood was studied prospectively in a cohort of unselected 8th-grade schoolchildren established in 1995 and followed up in 2010 with questionnaire and clinical examination. RESULTS: The lifetime prevalence of atopic dermatitis was high (34...

  14. Prevalence of asthma, rhinitis and eczema in children from the Bangkok area using the ISAAC (International Study for Asthma and Allergy in Children) questionnaires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vichyanond, P; Jirapongsananuruk, O; Visitsuntorn, N; Tuchinda, M

    1998-03-01

    Within the past three decades, there has been a rising trend for prevalences of asthma and allergic diseases worldwide, particularly from developed and industrializing countries. In Thailand, limited studies on epidemiology of atopic diseases have indicated relatively low prevalences of these conditions among the Thais. Recently, a standardized phase I questionnaire of the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC) has been developed to study and to compare geographical and temporal trend for prevalences of asthma, allergic rhinitis and eczema in children. The objectives of phase I ISAAC study in Thailand are to study prevalence of the three most common allergic diseases i.e. asthma, allergic rhinitis and eczema among Thai children of the two age groups (i.e., 6-7 and 13-14 years) living in the Bangkok metropolitan area and to collect basic epidemiologic data of these diseases among these children. The Thai translated version of phase I ISAAC questionnaires was administered to Thai children of the two age groups as above. Questionnaires were answered by parents of younger children, whereas, they were self-administered by 13-14 years old children. In addition, the validated international video questionnaires were used with older children. Fourteen primary schools and 13 secondary schools were randomly selected to cover the entire Bangkok metropolitan area. A total of 7341 questionnaires were eligible for the analysis (3628 from the younger age group and 3713 from the older age group). Data were entered and analysed by the Epi-Info program. The cumulative and 12 month period prevalences of the three conditions for all children were as follows; wheezing, 18.3 per cent, 12.7 per cent; rhinitis, 44.2 per cent, 38.7 per cent; and eczema, 15.4 per cent, 14.0 per cent, respectively. The period prevalence of wheezing for older children (13.6%) was higher than for younger children (11.7%). Prevalences of severe wheeze and exercise wheeze were more

  15. Complementary and Alternative Medicine for Atopic Dermatitis: An Evidence-Based Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Brittany L; Lim, Neil R; Lohman, Mary E; Lio, Peter A

    2016-12-01

    Complementary and alternative interventions are becoming increasingly utilized as adjuncts to conventional treatment of atopic dermatitis (AD). While the number of studies continues to grow, the vastness of the subject coupled with the relatively poor quality and small size of the studies limit their usefulness to clinicians. Our aim was to comprehensively review randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of complementary and alternative therapies for AD. Searches were performed on PubMed, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, EMBASE, and the Global Resource for EczemA Trial (GREAT) databases, focusing on RCTs of alternative or complementary AD therapies, with a sample size of ≥10, through March 2015 and limited to the English language. A total of 70 manuscripts met the inclusion criteria and were included in the final analysis. There is at least some level I evidence to support the use of acupuncture and acupressure, stress-reducing techniques such as hypnosis, massage, and biofeedback, balneotherapy, herbal preparations (with many important caveats), certain botanical oils, oral evening primrose oil, vitamin D supplementation, and topical vitamin B 12 . Many other therapies either have sufficient data to suggest that they are ineffective, or simply do not have enough evidence to formulate a verdict. Careful review of the literature reveals several promising therapies in this domain; such findings may help direct further research that is necessary to bolster clinical recommendations for alternative or complementary treatments of AD.

  16. Four Cases of Atopic Dermatitis Complicated by Sjogren's Syndrome: Link between Dry Skin and Autoimmune Anhidrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shun Kitaba

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We report four adult cases of atopic dermatitis (AD complicated by Sjogren's syndrome (SS. The patients fulfilled diagnostic criteria for AD and SS. All cases showed persistent itchy dry skin and eczematous lesions complicated by sicca symptoms including dry eyes and dry mouth with moderate joint pain. One case manifested annular erythema and another manifested widespread discoid erythema. To investigate the underlying cause of dry skin in these cases, sweating function was evaluated using a quantitative sudomotor axon reflex test (QSART in which the axon reflex is stimulated by acetylcholine iontophoresis. The sweating latency time was significantly prolonged in eczematous skin of AD and AD/SS compared to normal controls. Axon reflex (AXR sweat volume was also significantly reduced in AD (normal and eczematous skin and AD/SS (normal and eczema compared to normal control. In contrast, the direct sweat volume of lesional or non-lesional AD skin induced by direct stimulation with acetylcholine was only slightly reduced compared to that in normal controls, but not in SS and lesional skin of AD/SS patients. These results suggest that the impaired sweat response in AD is attributable to an abnormal sudomotor axon reflex, which is accelerated and modulated when complicated by SS resulting in dry skin in the present cases.

  17. Cedar Pollen Aggravates Atopic Dermatitis in Childhood Monozygotic Twin Patients with Allergic Rhino Conjunctivitis

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    Yukako Murakami

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of 7-year-old monozygotic twin patients with atopic dermatitis. The HLA haplotypes were HLA A2, A11, B27, B61, DR1, and DR4. Both serum IgE levels and cedar pollen radioallergosorbent test (RAST scores were high in the twins (elder/younger sister: IgE: 5170/3980 IU/ml and Japansese cedar pollen: >100/64.0 in contrast to low mite and food RAST scores (Dermatophagoides Pterygonium; 0.59/0.4 and egg white 9.24/4.6. The patients showed positive immediate (20 min in both sisters and delayed (24 hours in elder sister, 24, 48, 72 hours in younger sister reactions to a scratch test with Japanese cedar pollen. Skin lesions on the face were aggravated and extended to the trunk and extremities during the Japanese cedar pollen season and gradually subsided in summer. Oral provocation with egg white or cow milk showed no exacerbations, and topical corticosteroid did not improve the eczema. In contrast, successful protection from severe scratching behaviors was achieved by use of topical anti-allergic eye drops and wearing nightgowns made by the mother.

  18. THE ROLE OF Th1 AND Th2 CELLS IN ATOPIC AND AUTOIMMUNE DISEASES

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    Snežana Cekić

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available –helper cells can be divided into two distinct subtypes of effector cells based on the profile of cytokines they produce. Th1 cells produce interferon– γ (IFN– γ and tumor necrosis factor β (TNF– β, and are associated with cell– mediated responses, particularly with resistance to intracellular pathogens (bacteria, parasites, yeasts and viruses. In contrast, Th2 . cells produce IL– 4, IL– 5, IL– 9 and IL– 13. Th2 cells are involved in antibody responses and IgE production, as well as tissue fibrosis, and eosinophilia. Th2 responses are important in the resistance to infection with helminth parasites. Although both Th responses are protective against certain infectious pathogens, they can themselves be pathogenic: Th1 cell responses can mediate autoimmune diseases, whereas dysregulation of Th2 responses is implicated inatopic diseases (allergic rhinitis, asthma, atopic eczema, food allergy and anaphylaxis. The recent progress in our understanding of the mechanism of initiation and control of Th1 and Th2 cell responses will eventually lead to new therapeutic strategies.

  19. The mediating effect of sleep satisfaction on the relationship between stress and perceived health of adolescents suffering atopic disease: Secondary analysis of data from the 2013 9th Korea Youth Risk Behavior Web-based Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Won Oak; Im, YeoJin; Suk, Min Hyun

    2016-11-01

    Difficulty in sleep is one disturbing symptom in adolescents with atopic diseases including asthma, allergic rhinitis, and atopic dermatitis. Assuming psychological stress can affect adolescents' health status, impaired sleep quality can be one mediator that negatively impacts the health status of adolescents with atopic disease. This study aimed to identify the mediating effect of sleep satisfaction on the relationship between stress and perceived health status in Korean adolescents with atopic disease and to examine the differences among three types of atopic disease. A cross-sectional descriptive study was completed based on secondary analysis of raw data from the 2013 9th Korea Youth Risk Behavior Web-based Survey. The 21,154 adolescents (29.2%) ever diagnosed and treated for at least one atopic disease regardless of the symptom presence in a recent year were extracted out of 72,435 survey participants. Then, the 13,216 individuals with exclusively single atopic diseases were included in analyzing the mediation model. Variables including demographics, stress, perceived health status, and sleep satisfaction were included. Pearson correlation, one-way ANOVA, path analysis to define direct/indirect effects with bootstrapping analysis, and multi-group variance analysis were conducted. High levels of stress in adolescents with atopic diseases had a significant and direct effect on their negative health status perception for all atopic disease groups. A significant negative mediating effect of sleep satisfaction was identified on the relationship between stress and perceived health status, irrespective of the type of atopic disease. Total effect and remaining direct effect on the path from stress and perceived health status via sleep satisfaction was high in adolescents with atopic dermatitis and allergic rhinitis compared to those with asthma. To improve sleep satisfaction for adolescents with atopic diseases, interventions are needed to enhance the adolescents

  20. The association between contact allergy and hand eczema in 2 cross-sectional surveys 8 years apart

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Niels Henrik; Linneberg, Allan; Menné, Torkil

    2002-01-01

    contact allergy and hand eczema among adult Danes before and after nickel exposure regulation in Denmark. In 1990 and 1998, random samples of 15-41-year-old persons were examined in 2 cross-sectional studies of the general population in Copenhagen, Denmark. The studies included questionnaires, patch...... the hand eczema related to nickel allergy by exposure regulation, public education or both....... and prick testing. From 1990 to 1998 the prevalence of a history of hand eczema increased significantly. This increase did not appear to be fully explained by changes in the prevalence of flexural eczema, prick test reactivity, patch test reactivity, and nickel allergy. In 1990, nickel allergy and allergic...

  1. Immunoproteomic characterization of a Dermatophagoides farinae extract used in the treatment of canine atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moya, Raquel; Carnés, Jerónimo; Sinovas, Nuria; Ramió, Laura; Brazis, Pilar; Puigdemont, Anna

    2016-11-01

    Canine atopic dermatitis is a pruritic allergic skin disease. House dust mites have been identified as the main non-seasonal responsible agent. Unlike in human allergic patients, groups 1 and 2 antigens have been described as minor allergens in dogs, while groups 15 and 18 are considered the major allergens. Despite these differences, allergic dogs have traditionally been treated using extracts intended for human immunotherapy. To investigate the immunological characteristics and the allergen reactivity of dogs with atopic dermatitis using a Dermatophagoides farinae commercial extract. Eighteen dogs diagnosed with atopic dermatitis and 3 healthy control dogs from the Iberian Peninsula were included in the study. All the animals were older than 12 months, from both sexes and different breeds and showed positive specific IgE against D. farinae (>2500 ELISA Absorbance Units). The D. farinae allergenic extract used in this study was manufactured and characterized. The allergenic profile of the dogs was investigated by immunoblot and specific IgE, IgG, IgG1 and IgG2 measured by direct ELISA. Allergen identity was confirmed by immunoblot inhibition and mass spectrometry analyses. The results confirmed the relevance of groups 15 and 18 antigens, but also groups 1, 2 and other medium molecular weight allergens in the sensitization of dogs with atopic dermatitis. Immunoblot inhibition and mass spectrometry assays confirmed these results. Relevant allergens were quantified by scanning densitometry (Der f 1: 17μg/mg, Der f 2: 20.3μg/mg, Der f 15: 18.1μg/mg and Der f 18: 9.4μg/mg). Concerning immunoglobulins profile, differences in IgE and IgG1 levels were observed between non-atopic and atopic dogs. The commercial D. farinae extract characterized in this study contains the major allergens involved in the sensitization of dogs with atopic dermatitis, representing a suitable candidate for its use in the diagnosis and immunotherapy of mite allergic dogs. Copyright © 2016

  2. Clinical Holistic Medicine: Developing from Asthma, Allergy, and Eczema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Ventegodt

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows how consciousness-based holistic medicine can be used in the case of asthma, allergy, and eczema. We have many fine drugs to relieve patients from the worst of these symptoms, where many children and adults suffer health problems related to hyper-reactivity of the immune system. Many symptoms remain throughout life because the drugs do not cure the allergy and allergy today is the sixth leading cause of chronic illness. The etiology of the immune disturbances is mostly unknown from a biomedical perspective. Consciousness-based holistic medicine could therefore be used to treat these diseases if the patient is willing to confront hidden existential pain, is motivated to work hard, and is dedicated to improve quality of life, quality of working life, and personal relationships. Improving quality of life is not always an easy job for the patient, but it can be done with coaching from the physician. An increased physical health is often observed after only a few sessions with a physician skilled in using holistic medical tools and able to coach the patient successfully through a few weeks of dedicated homework. Children with allergy and asthma can also be helped if their parents are able to do work on personal development, to improve the general quality of life in the family and their relationship with the child.

  3. Nitrosative events in atopic asthma pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parilova O. O.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The correlation between high exhaled nitric oxide levels and eosinophilic-mediated airway inflammation in patients with atopic asthma has been well documented. This generates prerequisites that a regulatory feedback mechanism exists between them. Therefore, the paper briefly describes evidence implementing biosynthesis, enzyme structural features, expression regulation of its isoforms and effects of nitric oxide, which have helped elucidate molecular mechanisms by which nitric oxide selectively promotes asthma exacerbation. In previous study we have demonstrated that airway infiltrate of immune cells contributes to NO synthesis in the respiratory tract during allergic inflammation under guinea pig model of acute asthma with multiple challenges. On the basis of these findings the authors posits that nitric oxide represents an additional signal of the induction of Th2 subset response and be considerably involved in the complex network of immune regulation distinctive for atopic asthma phenotype.

  4. AAPE proliposomes for topical atopic dermatitis treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahn, Alexander; Song, Chung Kil; Balakrishnan, Prabagar; Hong, Soon-Sun; Lee, Ju-Hee; Chung, Suk-Jae; Kim, Dae-Duk

    2014-01-01

    Anti-inflammatory effect of advanced adipose stem cell derived protein extract (AAPE) could be improved by minimising protein degradation. To develop a proliposomal formulation of AAPE for the treatment of topical atopic dermatitis. Proliposomal powder was manufactured by evaporating a solution of soy phosphatidyl choline, AAPE and Poloxamer 407 in ethanol under vacuum on sorbitol powder. Characterisation of proliposomes (zeta potential, diameter, stability and flowability) as well as in vivo efficacy in a dermatitis mouse model was investigated. Reconstitution of the proliposomal powder formed liposomes of 589 ± 3.6 nm diameter with zeta potential of -51.33 ± 0.36 mV. Protein stability was maintained up to 90 days at 25 °C as proliposomes. In vivo studies on atopic dermatitis mouse model showed a significant reduction in IgE levels after topical AAPE proliposome treatment. AAPE proliposomes maintained protein stability and showed promising results for atopic dermatitis treatment.

  5. A starch, glycyrretinic, zinc oxide and bisabolol based cream in the treatment of chronic mild-to-moderate atopic dermatitis in children: a three-center, assessor blinded trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licari, Amelia; Ruffinazzi, Giulia; DE Filippo, Maria; Castagnoli, Riccardo; Marseglia, Alessia; Agostinis, Fabio; Puviani, Mario; Milani, Massimo; Marseglia, Gian L

    2017-12-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a very common chronic inflammatory and eczematous skin condition characterized by flares and remissions. Skin barrier alteration or dysfunction is the most relevant patogenetic factor. Topical corticosteroids are the mainstay treatment of AD, especially during flare periods. The daily use of emollients and moisturizers is also considered a relevant adjunctive strategy to improve skin barrier function and skin appearance in AD patients. Long-term use of topical corticosteroids is associated with important drawbacks and side effects. A corticosteroid-free cream containing starch, glycyrretinic acid, zinc oxide and bisabolol (Dermamid™; Difa Cooper, Caronno Pertusella, Varese, Italy) has been designed for the treatment of acute eczematous conditions like diaper dermatitis. However, this formulation could be particularly suitable also for AD. We evaluated in a three-center, assessor-blinded prospective 6-week treatment trial the efficacy and tolerability of this cream in children with chronic mild-to-moderate atopic dermatitis. A total of 30 children (mean age 5 years, 18 males and 12 females) with chronic mild to moderate AD, affecting face, lower and upper limbs or trunk, were enrolled after parents' written informed consent. Exclusion criteria were a condition of immunosuppression, acute flares or a positive history of allergy to one of the components of the cream. The primary outcome was the evolution total eczema severity score (TESS) calculated as the sum of the single eczema severity score for each body area involved. Single area Eczema Severity Score (ESS) was calculated assessing eczema, infiltration, lichenification and scraching lesions using a 4-point scale grade (with 0=no sign, and 4=severe sign). A secondary endpoint was the percentage of subjects reaching at least 50% of TESS reduction at week 6 in comparison with baseline. The TESS was evaluated at baseline and after 3 and 6 weeks of treatment (twice daily application) in an

  6. Particular features of the immune status in microbial eczema and erysipelas patients: a therapeutic method

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    G. M. Zinatulina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Goal of the study. To study particular features of the immune status in microbial eczema and erysipelas patients in the process of a complex immune modulating therapy with Xymedone®. Materials and methods. the study involved 45 microbial eczema patients and 31 patients with a combined form of microbial eczema and erysipelas (the study group and healthy subjects (60 and 50 subjects. All of the subjects underwent immunology examinations of their cell and humoral immunity prior to and after the pathogenetic treatment with Xymedone®. The traditional therapy of a combined course of microbial eczema and erysipelas comprised the following basic treatment: third-generation cephalosporins (ceftriaxone: 1.0 g a day for 10 days; second-generation antihistamine drugs (peroral loratadine 10 mg once a day for 10 days and ascorbic acid 0.5 g a day for 14 days. topical treatment comprised antiseptic agents (furacilin solution 1:1000 at the acute stage, emulsions and creams (depending on the disease stage: topical mometasone furoate 0.1% twice a day for 14 days. The patients receiving Xymedone were treated in the dose of 0.25 g, one pill tree times a day for 14 days. The patients underwent an immunology study using the Sysmex Corporation XT2000 automated analyzer at the CityLab laboratory centers in the city of Kazan. Key findings. Prior to the pathogenic therapy, a high level of CD4 (T helpers and reduced level of the immunoregulatory index (T helpers to T suppressors ratio (IRI was revealed in the microbial eczema patients. Ig А and Ig G concentrations were reliably increased. According to a study of immunology indices, the pathogenic therapy using Xymedone® normalized the number of peripheral blood leucocytes and reliably increased the IRI (p < 0.001 in 45 microbial eczema patients. Prior to the pathogenic therapy, a reduced level of CD3 and CD4 cells was revealed in patients with a combined form of microbial eczema and erysipelas; the levels of CD8 and

  7. First observation of the decay $\\bar{B}$$0\\atop{s}$ → D$±\\atop{s}$ K and measurement of the relative branching fraction B($\\bar{B}$$0\\atop{s}$→ D$±\\atop{s}$ K)/B($\\bar{B}$$0\\atop{s}$→ D$+\\atop{s}$ π-).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muelmenstaedt, Johannes [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2007-01-01

    We present the first observation of the decay $\\bar{B}$$0\\atop{s}$→ D$±\\atop{s}$ K∓ and measure the relative branching fraction of $\\bar{B}$$0\\atop{s}$ → D$±\\atop{s}$ K∓ to $\\bar{B}$$0\\atop{s}$ → D$+\\atop{s}$ π-. The measurement of the relative branching fraction is performed by applying a fit in invariant mass and specific ionization to 1.2 fb-1 of Ds(φπ)X data collected with the CDF II detector in pp collisions at √ s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. We measure B $\\bar{B}$$0\\atop{s}$ → D$±\\atop{s}$ K∓ /B $\\bar{B}$$0\\atop{s}$ → D$+\\atop{s}$ π- = 0.107±0.019(stat)±0.008(sys). The statistical significance of the $\\bar{B}$$0\\atop{s}$ → D$±\\atop{s}$ K signal is 7.9σ. To cross-check our analysis method, we also measure B $\\bar{B0}$→ D+K- /B $\\bar{B0}$ → D+π- and B $\\bar{B0}$ → D+*K- /B $\\bar{B0}$ → D*+π- and verify that our results are in agreement with the world average.

  8. Managing childhood eczema: qualitative study exploring carers' experiences of barriers and facilitators to treatment adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santer, Miriam; Burgess, Hana; Yardley, Lucy; Ersser, Steven J; Lewis-Jones, Sue; Muller, Ingrid; Hugh, Catherine; Little, Paul

    2013-11-01

    To explore parents and carers' experiences of barriers and facilitators to treatment adherence in childhood eczema Childhood eczema is common and causes significant impact on quality of life for children and their families, particularly due to sleep disturbance and itch. Non-adherence to application of topical treatments is the main cause of treatment failure. Qualitative interview study. Qualitative interviews were carried out with 31 carers from 28 families of children with eczema. Participants were recruited through primary care and included if they had a child aged 5 or less with a diagnosis of eczema. Interviews were carried out between December 2010-May 2011. Data were analysed using a constant comparative approach. Barriers to treatment adherence included carer beliefs around eczema treatment, the time consuming nature of applying topical treatments, and child resistance to treatment. Families employed a range of strategies in an attempt to work around children's resistance to treatment with varying success. Strategies included involving the child in treatment, distracting the child during treatment, or making a game of it, using rewards, applying treatment to a sleeping child or, in a few cases, physically restraining the child. Some carers reduced frequency of applications in an attempt to reduce child resistance. Regular application of topical treatments to children is an onerous task, particularly in families where child resistance develops. Early recognition and discussion of resistance and better awareness of the strategies to overcome this may help carers to respond positively and avoid establishing habitual confrontation. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. Atopic diseases in twins born after assisted reproduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jäderberg, Ida; Thomsen, Simon F; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm

    2012-01-01

    Jäderberg I, Thomsen SF, Kyvik KO, Skytthe A, Backer V. Atopic diseases in twins born after assisted reproduction. Paediatric and Perinatal Epidemiology 2012; 26: 140-145. We examined the risk of atopic diseases in twins born after assisted reproduction. Data on atopic diseases and assisted...... reproduction in 9694 twin pairs, 3-20 years of age, from the Danish Twin Registry were collected via multidisciplinary questionnaires. The risk of atopic diseases in twins born after assisted reproduction was compared with the risk in twins born after spontaneous conception using logistic regression...... and variance components analysis. Children born after assisted reproduction did not have a different risk of atopic outcomes (adjusted odds ratios [95% confidence intervals] for asthma: 0.95 [0.85, 1.07], P = 0.403; hay fever: 1.01 [0.86, 1.18], P = 0.918; and atopic dermatitis: 1.02 [0.81, 1.11], P = 0...

  10. Nickel allergy and relationship with Staphylococcus aureus in atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anna, Bogdali M.; Grazyna, Antoszczyk; Wojciech, Dyga

    2016-01-01

    Background: The increase of nickel air pollution is supposed to frequent side effects of nickel action related to virulence potential of Staphylococcus aureus in patients with nickel allergy in atopic dermatitis. The goal was to investigate the relationship between nickel allergy and infection by S....... aureus in atopic dermatitis. Methods: Nickel allergy was confirmed in atopic patients and excluded in healthy volunteers using patch testing. Infection by S. aureus was tested in atopic patients and healthy volunteers by use of API Staph system. The specific IgE for staphylococcal enterotoxin A and B...... were measured. Secretion of IFN-g, IL-2, IL-13 by PBMC under nickel sulfate and the enterotoxins A and B stimulations were studied with ELISpot. Results: We found the increased number of infections by S. aureus in atopic patients with nickel allergy in comparison to atopic patients and healthy...

  11. Current understanding of allergic march and the role of eczema in its development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolina Gwoździewicz

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available An increasing morbidity of atopic diseases (atopic dermatitis, food allergy, asthma and allergic rhinitis documented in large cohort epidemiological studies is at least partially determined by high hygienic standards of living. Over the last 40 years, the accepted concept of pathogenesis of atopic diseases, the so-called atopic march, was proposed by Fouchard in 1973. It referred to the natural history of atopy manifestation, with a typical sequence of symptoms presented as atopic dermatitis in early childhood for subsequent development of allergic respiratory symptoms in late childhood and adolescence. New data suggests that the leading role of atopic dermatitis in atopic march might be less pronounced than previously expected, indicating coexistence rather than succession of atopic symptoms. The objective of this paper is to present the currently discussed concepts of atopic dermatitis – its pathogenesis, etiology, course and role in the development of other allergic diseases. More widely, we will present: 1. The genetic factors involved in skin barrier disruption with the leading role of loss-of-function gene for filaggrin mutation, 2. Genetic defects and epigenetic regulation of the immune system 3. Epidermal changes with physical barrier dysfunction as well as 4. Skin microbiome disturbances with Staphylococcus aureus colonization leading to abnormalities of the epidermal protective barrier.

  12. The relationship of rhinitis and asthma, sinusitis, food allergy, and eczema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Ricardo A; Corren, Jonathan

    2011-08-01

    Epidemiologic, genetic, immunologic, and clinical studies show a close relationship between allergic rhinitis and asthma, food allergy, and atopic dermatitis. Rhinitis and sinusitis often coexist and are commonly referred to with the term rhinosinusitis. These conditions are also linked in the so-called atopic march, which is the sequential appearance of atopic manifestations starting with atopic dermatitis and later followed by food allergy, allergic rhinitis, and asthma. Allergic rhinitis and asthma are now increasingly being approached diagnostically and therapeutically as the one-airway concept. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. IgE-mediated sensitization to malassezia in atopic dermatitis: more common in male patients and in head and neck type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodská, Petra; Panzner, Petr; Pizinger, Karel; Schmid-Grendelmeier, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common chronic inflammatory skin disease. Malassezia, the predominant skin microbiota fungus, is considered to exacerbate AD, especially in a subset of patients with head and neck type AD (HNAD). In the present study, the relationship between AD and sensitization to Malassezia antigens was investigated. We assessed 173 patients with AD. The severity of eczema was determined with Eczema Area and Severity Index (EASI); the type of AD, namely, head and neck type, was reported as well. The total serum IgE and specific IgE to Malassezia were determined and correlated with clinical picture of AD, sex, age, and the EASI. Total IgE was elevated in 77.7% of patients. Specific IgE to Malassezia was positive (≥0.35 kU/L) in 49.1% of patients. Men were significantly more often sensitized to Malassezia antigen (58% of men vs 42% of women; P value, 0.04). Concurrently, 58% of patients with HNAD versus 42% non-HNAD patients had higher levels of specific IgE to Malassezia, this difference being nearly significant (P value, 0.06). Patients with atopy were also more frequently sensitized to Malassezia. No significant relationship between EASI and the level of total IgE or specific IgE to Malassezia was observed. In our population, IgE-mediated sensitization was found in up to 49% of all patients with AD, most common in men and in head and neck type.

  14. Economic Impact of Atopic Dermatitis in Korean Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chulmin; Park, Kui Young; Ahn, Seohee; Kim, Dong Ha; Li, Kapsok; Kim, Do Won; Kim, Moon-Beom; Jo, Sun-Jin; Yim, Hyeon Woo

    2015-01-01

    Background Atopic dermatitis is a global public health concern owing to its increasing prevalence and socioeconomic burden. However, few studies have assessed the economic impact of atopic dermatitis in Korea. Objective We conducted a cost analysis of atopic dermatitis and evaluated its economic impacts on individual annual disease burden, quality of life, and changes in medical expenses with respect to changes in health related-quality of life. Methods The cost analysis of atopic dermatitis was performed by reviewing the home accounting records of 32 patients. The economic impact of the disease was evaluated by analyzing questionnaires. To handle uncertainties, we compared the results with the data released by the Health Insurance Review & Assessment Board on medical costs claimed by healthcare facilities. Results The direct cost of atopic dermatitis per patient during the 3-month study period was 541,280 Korean won (KRW), and expenditures on other atopic dermatitis-related products were 120,313 KRW. The extrapolated annual direct cost (including expenditures on other atopic dermatitis-related products) per patient was 2,646,372 KRW. The estimated annual indirect cost was 1,507,068 KRW. Thus, the annual cost of illness of atopic dermatitis (i.e., direct+indirect costs) was estimated to be 4,153,440 KRW. Conclusion The annual total social cost of atopic dermatitis on a national level is estimated to be 5.8 trillion KRW. PMID:26082587

  15. Atopic dermatitis: Kids are not just little people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awasthi, Smita; Rothe, Marti Jill; Eichenfield, Lawrence F

    2015-01-01

    The approach to children and adults with atopic dermatitis is similar. In both age groups, failure to respond to conventional therapy should prompt evaluation for complicating factors such as secondary infection and secondary ACD. Immunologic, metabolic, genetic, and nutritional disorders should be considered in the differential diagnosis of refractory pediatric atopic dermatitis. Cutaneous T cell lymphoma (CTCL), cutaneous drug reactions, other spongiotic dermatoses, psoriasis, dermatomycosis, and infestations should be considered in the differential of refractory atopic dermatitis in adults. Systemic therapies prescribed to both children and adults with severe atopic dermatitis include oral corticosteroids, cyclosporine, methotrexate, azathioprine, and mycophenolate mofetil. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Ambient Air Pollution, Meteorological Factors and Outpatient Visits for Eczema in Shanghai, China: A Time-Series Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiao; Yang, Yingying; Chen, Renjie; Kan, Haidong; Song, Weimin; Tan, Jianguo; Xu, Feng; Xu, Jinhua

    2016-11-08

    Environmental irritants are important risk factors for skin diseases, but little is known about the influence of environmental factors on eczema incidence. In this time-series study, our objective was to examine the associations of environmental factors with outpatient visits for eczema. Daily outpatient visits between 2007 and 2011 (1826 days) were collected from Huashan Hospital in Shanghai, China. We used an overdispersed generalized additive model to investigate the short-term association between environmental factors and outpatient visits for eczema. Daily outpatient visits for eczema were significantly associated with air pollution and meteorological factors. For example, a 10 μg/m³ increase of 7-day (lag 06) average concentrations of PM 10 (particulate matter no greater than 10 microns), SO₂, NO₂ was associated with 0.81% (95% confidence intervals (CI) 0.39%, 1.22%), 2.22% (95% CI: 1.27%, 3.16%) and 2.31% (95% CI: 1.17%, 3.45%) increase in outpatient visits for eczema, respectively. A 10 °C elevation of temperature on lag 0 day were associated with 8.44% (95% CI: 4.66%, 12.22%) increase in eczema visits, whereas 10 unit decrease of 7-day average relative humidity were associated with 10.86% (95% CI: 8.83%, 12.89%) increase in eczema visits. This study provided clear evidence of ambient air pollution, high temperature and low relative humidity on increasing the incidence of eczema in Shanghai, China.

  17. Contact sensitisation in hand eczema patients-relation to subdiagnosis, severity and quality of life: a multi-centre study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agner, T.; Andersen, K.E.; Brandao, F.M.

    2009-01-01

    Background Contact sensitisation has been identified as a factor associated with poor prognosis for patients with hand eczema. Objectives To study implications of contact sensitisation with respect to severity, quality of life (QoL) and subdiagnosis of hand eczema. Methods The study was performed...

  18. Outbreak of eczema and rhinitis in a group of office workers in Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebbehøj, Niels E; Agner, Tove; Zimerson, Erik

    2015-01-01

    the office of the Bank of Greenland had a total renovation of the building, including new furniture and carpets. Symptoms developed within the first year after moving back into the renewed buildings. After removal of carpets in the building, symptoms significantly improved. Workers were examined in 2009......INTRODUCTION: Disturbed indoor climate may in some cases be associated with illness. In the present paper, we report the results from a thorough investigation of office workers in Greenland, who developed skin and/or airway problems after moving into renewed offices. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In 2009......: In total, 32 out of 80 workers (40%) developed symptoms; 27 reported eczema, 20 rhinitis and 4 urticaria. Eczema was located on the hands and/or lower arms in 18 workers, on the face in 10 workers and on legs/trunk in 12 workers. After intervention in the office, 22 workers with eczema reported significant...

  19. Successful treatment of dyshidrotic hand eczema using tap water iontophoresis with pulsed direct current.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odia, S; Vocks, E; Rakoski, J; Ring, J

    1996-11-01

    The efficacy of tap water iontophoresis in treating palmoplantar hyperhidrosis has been sufficiently documented and has led to its extensive use in clinical practice. In order to test the efficacy of this treatment modality in cases of dyshidrotic hand eczema, 20 patients were treated with tap water iontophoresis in addition to two-sided steroid-free topical therapy in a randomized half-side-study. A special score for dyshidrotic eczema including objective and subjective criteria was developed to document the success of the therapy. Only those sides treated with tap water iontophoresis showed significant improvement. This significant effect of iontophoresis indicates the efficacy of this treatment in cases of dyshidrotic hand eczema.

  20. Alitretinoin in treatment of chronic hand eczema – mechanism of action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Matejko

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Hand eczema is a common skin disorder with significant functional and economic impacts. Conventional therapy options, such as topical corticosteroids, calcineurin inhibitors, phototherapy and systemic immunosuppressants, often give unsatisfactory results, due to lack of efficacy or predominant adverse effects. Alitretinoin (9-cis-retinoic acid is an active substance from the group of retinoids and is licensed as a systemic drug for chronic and severe hand eczema refractory to topical treatment. It binds with high affinity to both retinoic acid receptor (RAR and retinoid X receptor (RXR receptors and presents anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory activity. Due to its good tolerance and high efficacy, demonstrated in several large clinical studies, alitretinoin may be an option for patients with severe chronic hand eczema refractory to other treatment.

  1. Consumption of vegetables, fruit, and antioxidants during pregnancy and wheeze and eczema in infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Y; Sasaki, S; Tanaka, K; Hirota, Y

    2010-06-01

    Two previous cohort studies showed inverse relationships between maternal vitamin E and zinc intake during pregnancy and the risk of wheeze and/or asthma in the offspring. We investigated the association between maternal intake of vegetables, fruit, and selected antioxidants during pregnancy and the risk of wheeze and eczema in the offspring aged 16-24 months. Subjects were 763 Japanese mother-child pairs. Data on maternal intake during pregnancy were assessed with a diet history questionnaire. Data on symptoms of wheeze and eczema were based on criteria of the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood. Higher maternal intake of green and yellow vegetables, citrus fruit, and beta-carotene during pregnancy was significantly associated with a reduced risk of eczema, but not wheeze, in the offspring {adjusted odds ratios (ORs) between extreme quartiles [95% confidence intervals (CIs)] = 0.41 (0.24-0.71), 0.53 (0.30-0.93), and 0.52 (0.30-0.89), respectively}. Maternal vitamin E consumption during pregnancy was significantly inversely related to the risk of infantile wheeze, but not eczema [adjusted OR (95% CI) = 0.54 (0.32-0.90)]. No statistically significant exposure-response associations were observed between maternal intake of total vegetables, vegetables other than green and yellow vegetables, total fruit, apples, alpha-carotene, vitamin C, or zinc and the risk of wheeze or eczema in the children. Higher maternal consumption of green and yellow vegetables, citrus fruit, and beta-carotene during pregnancy may be protective against the development of eczema in the offspring. Higher maternal vitamin E intake during pregnancy may reduce the risk of infantile wheeze.

  2. Comparison of therapeutic effect of topical Nigella with Betamethasone and Eucerin in hand eczema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefi, M; Barikbin, B; Kamalinejad, M; Abolhasani, E; Ebadi, A; Younespour, S; Manouchehrian, M; Hejazi, S

    2013-12-01

    Nigella sativa has been used in traditional medicine. Although it was investigated in different studies, its effect on hand eczema has not been studied yet. To compare the effects of Nigella, Betamethasone and Eucerin on severity of hand eczema and patients' life quality. In this randomized, controlled, double-blinded clinical trial, we allocated new cases of hand eczema with 18-60 years of age in three therapeutic groups (Nigella, Betamethasone and Eucerin) by using permuted blocks for randomization. Patients applied medications twice a day and followed in a 4-week period. The primary outcome of the study was changes in severity and life quality, which were assessed at the beginning, 14th and 28th days of the study by Hand Eczema Severity index (HECSI) and Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) respectively. Sixty patients recruited in the study with 20 patients allocated in each study arm. Eighteen, 19 and 15 patients in Eucerin, Nigella and Betamethasone groups, respectively, attended at least one of the therapy sessions. Nigella and Betamethasone showed significantly more rapid improvement in hand eczema compared with Eucerin (P = 0.003 and P = 0.012 respectively); Nigella and Betamethasone ointments caused significant decreases in DLQI scores compared with Eucerin (P Nigella and Betamethasone groups over time (P = 0.38 and P = 0.99 respectively). It seems that Nigella might have the same efficacy as Betamethasone in improvement of life quality and decreasing severity of hand eczema. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology © 2012 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  3. Comparative analysis of fecal microbiota in infants with and without eczema.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Ying Hong

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Eczema is a chronic form of childhood disorder that is gaining in prevalence in affluent societies. Previous studies hypothesized that the development of eczema is correlated with changes in microbial profile and composition of early life endemic microbiota, but contradictory conclusions were obtained, possibly due to the lack of minimization of apparent non-health related confounders (e.g., age, antibiotic consumption, diet and mode of delivery. In this study, we recruited seven caesarean-delivered and total formula-fed infants, and comparatively examined the early-life endemic microbiota in these infants with and without eczema. Using 16S pyrosequencing, infants' fecal microbiota were observed to comprise Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes as the four main phyla, and the presence and absence of specific populations within these four phyla are primarily mediated by ageing. Quantitative analysis of bacterial targets on a larger sample size (n = 36 at 1, 3, and 12 months of age revealed that the abundances of Bifidobacterium and Enterobacteriaceae were different among caesarean-delivered infants with and without eczema, and the bacterial targets may be potential biomarkers that can correlate to the health status of these infants. Our overall findings suggest that the minimization of possible confounders is essential prior to comparative evaluation and correlation of fecal microbiota to health status, and that stool samples collected from caesarean-delivered infants at less than 1 year of age may represent a good cohort to study for potential biomarkers that can distinguish infants with eczema from those without. These findings would greatly facilitate future efforts in understanding the possible pathogenesis behind certain bacterial targets, and may lead to a timely intervention that reduces the occurrence of early life eczema and possibly allergic disorders in later life.

  4. A rare variant in CYP27A1 and its association with atopic dermatitis with high serum total IgE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, H; Makino, Y; Nagata, M; Furuta, J; Enomoto, H; Hirota, T; Tamari, M; Noguchi, E

    2016-10-01

    This study investigated rare variants associated with atopic dermatitis. We performed exome analyses on 37 patients who were diagnosed with atopic dermatitis by board-certified dermatologists and had total serum IgE levels greater than 1000 IU/ml. The exome analysis identified seven variants with 5% allele frequency in the atopic dermatitis exome samples. We then conducted a replication study using 469 atopic dermatitis patients with total serum IgE ≥1000 IU/ml and 935 Japanese controls to assess the presence of these 7 candidate variants. The replication study confirmed that CYP27A1 rs199691576 (A/G) was associated with atopic dermatitis with high serum IgE levels (P = 0.012, odds ratio = 2.1). CYP27A1 is involved in the metabolism of vitamin D3, which plays important roles in modulating immune function. Previous studies have reported polymorphisms in vitamin D pathway genes that are associated with allergy-related phenotypes. Our data confirm the importance of genes regulating the vitamin D pathway in the development of atopic dermatitis. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Homeopathy in paediatric atopic diseases: long-term results in children with atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Elio; Bartoli, Paola; Bianchi, Alba; Da Frè, Monica

    2012-01-01

    To study the socio-demographic features, the prescribed remedies and the outcome of atopic diseases in children treated with homeopathy at the Homeopathic Clinic of Lucca (Italy), and the long-term outcome of children suffering from atopic dermatitis (AD) after an approximate 8-year period (range 5-10 years). Our data derive from an observational longitudinal study carried out on 213 children (38.6%) with atopic diseases out of 551 children consecutively examined from September 1998 to December 2008. We used the Glasgow Homeopathic Hospital Outcome Score to evaluate the results that were classified on the basis of a Likert scale. Eighty-three (39%) children were affected by asthma, 51 (24%) by allergic rhinoconjunctivitis, 76 (36%) by AD and 3 (1%) by food intolerance. Follow-up patients were 104 (48.8%), and 65 (62.5%) of them reported a major improvement or resolution. The parents of paediatric patients suffering from AD, who had started homeopathic treatment at homeopathy in atopic children. Furthermore, according to the data from the literature paediatric patients treated with homeopathy seem to show a reduced tendency to maintain AD and develop asthma (and allergic rhinitis) in adult age. Copyright © 2011 The Faculty of Homeopathy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. HSP: bystander antigen in atopic diseases?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joost A Aalberse

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Over the last years insight in the complex interactions between innate and adaptive immunity in the regulation of an inflammatory response has increased enormously. This has revived the interest in stress proteins; proteins that are expressed during cell stress. As these proteins can attract and trigger an immunological response they can act as important mediators in this interaction. In this respect, of special interest are proteins that may act as modulators of both innate and adaptive immunity. Heat shock proteins (HSPs are stress proteins that have these, and more, characteristics. More than two decades of studies on HSPs has revealed that they are part of intrinsic, natural mechanisms that steer inflammation. This has provoked comprehensive explorations of the role of HSPs in various human inflammatory diseases.Most studies have focused on classical autoimmune diseases. This has led to the development of clinical studies with HSPs that have shown promise in Phase II/III clinical trials. Remarkably, only very little is yet known of the role of HSPs in atopic diseases. In allergic disease a number of studies have investigated the possibility that allergen-specific regulatory T cell (Treg function is defective in individuals with allergic diseases. This raises the question whether methods can be identified to improve the Treg repertoire. Studies from other inflammatory diseases have suggested HSPs may have such a beneficial effect on the T cell repertoire. Based on the immune mechanisms of atopic diseases, in this review we will argue that, as in other human inflammatory conditions, understanding immunity to HSPs is likely also relevant for atopic diseases. Specifically, we will discuss why certain HSPs such as HSP60 connect the immune response to environmental antigens with regulation of the inflammatory response.Thus they provide a molecular link that may eventually even help to better understand the immune pathological basis of the hygiene

  7. Atopic dermatitis, melatonin, and sleep disturbance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yung-Sen; Chou, Yen-Ting; Lee, Jyh-Hong; Lee, Pei-Lin; Dai, Yang-Shia; Sun, Chi; Lin, Yu-Tsan; Wang, Li-Chieh; Yu, Hsin-Hui; Yang, Yao-Hsu; Chen, Chun-An; Wan, Kong-Sang; Chiang, Bor-Luen

    2014-08-01

    Sleep disturbance is common in patients with atopic dermatitis (AD). However, studies have largely been questionnaire-based, and the pathophysiology remains unclear. The aims of this study were to determine objective characteristics of sleep disturbance in children with AD and explore contributing factors and clinical predictors. Sleep parameters were measured by actigraphy and polysomnography in 72 patients with AD and 32 controls ages 1 to 18 years. Urinary 6-sulfatoxymelatonin levels, serum cytokines, and total and allergen-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) levels were also measured. The patients with AD had significantly reduced sleep efficiency, longer sleep onset latency, more sleep fragmentation, and less nonrapid eye movement sleep. Results from actigraphy correlated well with those from polysomnography. The AD disease severity was associated with sleep disturbance (r = 0.55-0.7), and a Scoring Atopic Dermatitis index of ≥48.7 predicted poor sleep efficiency with a sensitivity of 83.3% and a specificity of 75% (area under the curve = 0.81, P = .001). Lower nocturnal melatonin secretion was significantly associated with sleep disturbance in the patients with AD. Other correlates of sleep disturbance included pruritus, scratching movements, higher total serum IgE levels, and allergic sensitization to dust mite and staphylococcal enterotoxins. Poor sleep efficiency is common in children with AD and can be predicted by the Scoring Atopic Dermatitis index. Melatonin and IgE might play a role in the sleep disturbance. Further studies are required to explore the mechanisms and clinical implications, and actigraphy could serve as a useful evaluating tool. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  8. Job change facilitates healing in a cohort of patients with occupational hand eczema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carøe, T. K.; Ebbehøj, N. E.; Bonde, J. P. E.

    2017-01-01

    who were not. METHODS: The study is a register-based cohort study including patients with recognised occupational hand eczema in Denmark in 2010 and 2011. Outcomes were eczema related parameters and Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) obtained from a follow-up questionnaire after 5 years. RESULTS...... on HR-QoL, indicated by increased DLQI. Change of work procedures while staying in the same profession positively influenced improvement, with no marked influence on HR-QoL, and should be considered as an alternative to job change. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved....

  9. Approach to suspected food allergy in atopic dermatitis. Guideline of the Task Force on Food Allergy of the German Society of Allergology and Clinical Immunology (DGAKI) and the Medical Association of German Allergologists (ADA) and the German Society of Pediatric Allergology (GPA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werfel, Thomas; Erdmann, Stephan; Fuchs, Thomas; Henzgen, Margot; Kleine-Tebbe, Jörg; Lepp, Ute; Niggemann, Bodo; Raithel, Martin; Reese, Imke; Saloga, Joachim; Vieths, Stefan; Zuberbier, Torsten

    2009-03-01

    The following guideline of the "Arbeitsgruppe Nahrungsmittelallergie der DGAKI" (Task Force on Food Allergy of the German Society of Allergology and Clinical Immunology) and the ADA ("Arzteverband Deutscher Allergologen", Medical Association of German Allergologists) and the GPA (German Society of Pediatric Allergology) summarizes the approach to be taken when food allergy is suspected in patients with atopic dermatitis (neurodermatitis, atopic eczema). The problem is clinically relevant because many patients assume that allergic reactions against foods are responsible for triggering or worsening their eczema. It is important to identify those patients who will benefit from an elimination diet but also to avoid unnecessary diets. Elimination diets (especially in early childhood) are associated with the risk of malnutrition and additional emotional stress for the patients. The gold standard for the diagnosis of food-dependent reactions is to perform placebo-controlled, double-blind oral food challenges because specific IgE, prick tests and history often do not correlate with clinical reactivity. This is particularly true in the case of delayed eczematous skin reactions. Diagnostic elimination diets should be used before an oral provocation test. If multiple sensitizations against foods are discovered in a patient, an oligoallergenic diet and a subsequent stepwise supplementation of the nutrition should be performed. If a specific food is suspected of triggering food allergy, oral provocation should be performed after a diagnostic elimination diet. As eczema-tous skin reactions may develop slowly (i. e. within one or two day), the skin be inspected the day after the provocation test and that a repetitive test be performed if the patient has not reacted to a given food on the first day of oral provocation. The guideline discusses various clinical situations for patients with atopic dermatitis to facilitate differentiated diagnostic procedures.

  10. ROLE OF ENVIRONMENTAL ALLERGENS ON ATOPIC DERMATITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Wardhana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Atopic dermatitis (AD is a chronic eczematous skin disease that develops in a patient with atopic diathesis, which is characterized by an increased liability to produce IgE antibodies for allergens mostly derived from environmental or inhalant allergens and food allergens. They are produced by cell-mediated allergic contact reactions, and recently contact sensitivity to various environmental allergens has been demonstrated in patients with AD. Atopic patients are recognized by their ability to produce large amounts of specific IgE antibodies to common substances as environmental allergens, i.e. house dust mites, grass pollens, animal danders, molds, food, etc. These antibodies can be detected by skin prick test. The aim of this study was to identify the sensitization against environmental or inhalants allergens through skin prick tests in the patients with atopic dermatitis. Material and Methods: This is a retrospective, descriptive study. We revised all medical records of patients with AD since January 2002 to December 2004 in the Out Patients Unit of Sanglah General Hospital, Bali-Indonesia. The variables studied were: gender, age, work related, diagnosis associates to AD, and prick test of environmental allergens. Results: In 3 years periods we had revised 46 of patients with AD that was done skin prick tests. The median age was 38 years (range 29-54 years, 34/46 (73.9 % of these were male and 12 (26.1 % female. Twenty nine patients presented pure AD, and 17 patients had AD with asthma and allergic rhinitis. Only 16 (34.7% of patients had no history of allergic disease. Thirsty six of 46 (78.20% of all tested AD patients had a positive skin prick tests against inhalant (aeroallergens 16 patients and food allergens 21 patients. Sixteen patients with positive of skin test include; dust mite in 12 patients, animal dander in 10 patients, grass pollen in 9 patients and cockroach in 6 patients. Conclusion: We concluded that

  11. Assessment of major comorbidities in adults with atopic dermatitis using the Charlson comorbidity index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jacob P.; Skov, Lone; Hamann, Carsten R.

    2017-01-01

    Background There is a growing interest in comorbidities of adults with atopic dermatitis (AD). Objectives To examine the burden of comorbidities in adult patients with AD using the Charlson comorbidity index (CCI) in nationwide registries. Methods All Danish patients ≥18 years on January 1, 2012...... with AD diagnosed by a hospital dermatologist were included. Patients were age-and sex-matched in a 1:4 ratio with general population controls. Severity was determined by systemic AD treatment and analyzed by conditional logistic regression. Results In total, 10,738 adult patients with AD and 42...

  12. Atopic dermatitis: a restropective study of associated factors in a dermopathic canine population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Fernandes do Amarante

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT. Amarante C.F., Ramadinha R.R. & Pereira M.J.S. Atopic dermatitis: a restropective study of associated factors in a dermopathic canine population. [Dermatite atópica: um estudo retrospectivo dos fatores associados em uma população canina dermopata.] Revista Brasileira de Medicina Veteriná- ria, 37(Supl.1:13-17, 2015. Curso de Pós-Graduação em Ciências Veterinárias, Instituto de Veterinária, Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro, BR 465, Km 7, Seropédica, RJ 23897-970, Brasil. E-mail: cristinaf.amarante@gmail.com Canine atopic dermatitis (AD is a pruriginous inflammatory disease related to the production of IgE antibodies and frequently, diagnosed in the clinical veterinary practice. However, there are many controversies about the predisposing factors. The objective of this study was to analyze the contribution of the sex, age, breed, castration, time of year, the use of perfume and cleaning products as predisposing factors for the occurrence of AD using binomial generalized linear regression model estimating the prevalence ratio as a measure of effect. The clinical records of 2,280 dogs attended by the Section of Dermatology Small Animal Hospital of the Rural Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, between 2005 and 2010, were reviewed and 1,462 dogs were included in the study. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were performed using a generalized binomial linear regression model. Significance was set at a p-value of ≤ 0.05. Atopic dermatitis was diagnosed in 36.1% (528/1462 of the canine population studied and was associated with females [PR= 1.204 (1.048 to 1.384], adults [PR= 2.045 (1.542 to 2.711], the dry season [PR= 0.840 (0.734 to 0.962], the use of perfumes [PR= 1.271 (1.089 to 1.483]. Thus, atopic dermatitis prevalence in the study population was higher in females, adults, in which applied perfumes and in the rainy season. . This study constitutes a new approach to the epidemiological aspects of canine atopic

  13. Endotoxin exposure and atopic sensitization in adult pig farmers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Portengen, L.; Preller, L.; Tielen, M.; Doekes, G.; Heederik, D.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Recent studies have reported a low prevalence of atopic sensitization and respiratory allergy in children growing up on farms. Objectives: We sought to evaluate the dose-response relationship between endotoxin and atopic sensitization in adult farmers and to assess the effect on

  14. Atopic diseases by filaggrin mutations and birth year

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, J P; Linneberg, A; Johansen, J D

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of atopic disorders has increased in recent years. The pathogenesis is complex with genetic and environmental risk factors. Filaggrin loss-of-function mutations are common and associated with atopic disorders. We investigated whether the prevalence of filaggrin mutations increased ...... in different birth cohorts in adults from the general population in Denmark....

  15. Atopic Dermatitis and Comorbidities: Added Value of Comprehensive Dermatoepidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijsten, Tamar

    2017-05-01

    Atopic dermatitis is common and in its severe form is devastating. This chronic inflammatory dermatosis is part of the atopic syndrome, which includes asthma, food allergies, and hay fever and is known to be associated with mental health disorders. In line with psoriasis, several recent observational studies using national survey and linkage data have suggested a link between atopic dermatitis and cardiovascular disease. The atopic dermatitis field can benefit from the past experiences in psoriasis research and should not follow the same path, but, rather, aim for a more comprehensive approach from the beginning. A recent German consortium studying links between atopic dermatitis and cardiovascular disease first screened a large claims database, followed by analyses of more deeply phenotyped (birth) cohorts with longitudinal data. In addition, genetic and metabolic analyses assessing the predisposition of patients with atopic dermatitis for cardiovascular disease were performed. Overall, the association between atopic dermatitis and cardiovascular disease was at most modest, but in more refined cohorts the cardiovascular risk profile and genetic architecture was comparable. A more integrated approach could create clarity about the clinical relevance of cardiovascular disease in individuals with atopic dermatitis sooner, avoid speculation that affects patient care, and save scientific resources. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The course of life of patients with childhood atopic dermatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elian, E.; Brenninkmeijer, A.; Legierse, C.M.; Sillevis Smitt, J.H.; Last, B.F.; Grootenhuis, M.A.; Bos, J.D.

    2009-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis mainly covers the period of infancy to adulthood, an important period in the development of an individual. The impairment of quality of life and the psychological wellbeing of children with atopic dermatitis have been well documented but so far no data exist about the impact of

  17. The Course of Life of Patients with Childhood Atopic Dermatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brenninkmeijer, Elian E. A.; Legierse, Catharina M.; Sillevis Smitt, J. Henk; Last, Bob F.; Grootenhuis, Martha A.; Bos, Jan D.

    2009-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis mainly covers the period of infancy to adulthood, an important period in the development of an individual. The impairment of quality of life and the psychological wellbeing of children with atopic dermatitis have been well documented but so far no data exist about the impact of

  18. Clinical Profile Of Atopic Dermatitis In Benin City, Nigeria | Onunu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To study the clinical presentation and management problems of atopic dermatitis in Benin City, Nigeria. Design: A 15-year retrospective study from May 1985 to April 2000. Setting: Dermatology clinics of the University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City, Nigeria. Subjects: All new cases of atopic dermatitis ...

  19. Atopic dermatitis: tacrolimus vs. topical corticosteroid use | Langa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Atopic dermatitis (AD), the dermatological manifestation of the atopic diathesis, has a variety of clinical presentations. It is a chronic and relapsing inflammatory disorder, requiring a multifaceted treatment approach. Topical corticosteroids are the backbone of therapy. However, concerns over adverse drug reactions ...

  20. Investigations on the immunopathogenesis of atopic dermatitis in cats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roosje, Pieternella Janna

    2002-01-01

    The term atopic dermatitis (AD) is commonly used in cats. At present, however, there is little known about the pathogenesis of feline AD. The aim was to investigate various aspects of the immunopathogenesis in a defined group of cats with signs and symptoms of atopic dermatitis and compare our

  1. Nickel allergy and relationship with Staphylococcus aureus in atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdali, Anna M; Anna, Bogdali M; Grazyna, Antoszczyk; Wojciech, Dyga; Aleksander, Obtulowicz; Anna, Bialecka; Andrzej, Kasprowicz; Zofia, Magnowska; Krystyna, Obtulowicz

    2016-01-01

    The increase of nickel air pollution is supposed to frequent side effects of nickel action related to virulence potential of Staphylococcus aureus in patients with nickel allergy in atopic dermatitis. The goal was to investigate the relationship between nickel allergy and infection by S. aureus in atopic dermatitis. Nickel allergy was confirmed in atopic patients and excluded in healthy volunteers using patch testing. Infection by S. aureus was tested in atopic patients and healthy volunteers by use of API Staph system. The specific IgE for staphylococcal enterotoxin A and B were measured. Secretion of IFN-g, IL-2, IL-13 by PBMC under nickel sulfate and the enterotoxins A and B stimulations were studied with ELISpot. We found the increased number of infections by S. aureus in atopic patients with nickel allergy in comparison to atopic patients and healthy volunteers without nickel allergy. The elevated secretion of IL-2 under nickel sulfate stimulation in vitro was exclusively found in atopic patients with nickel allergy infected by S. aureus. Our data suggest that nickel allergy and infection by S. aureus are linked in atopic dermatitis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  2. Apgar score is related to development of atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naeser, Vibeke; Kahr, Niklas; Stensballe, Lone Graff

    2013-01-01

    Aim. To study the impact of birth characteristics on the risk of atopic dermatitis in a twin population. Methods. In a population-based questionnaire study of 10,809 twins, 3-9 years of age, from the Danish Twin Registry, we identified 907 twin pairs discordant for parent-reported atopic dermatitis...

  3. Is atopic dermatitis associated with obesity?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ali, Zarqa; Suppli Ulrik, Charlotte; Agner, Tove

    2018-01-01

    Obesity has been associated with atopic dermatitis (AD), however the results have been conflicting. Our aim was to provide an update on current knowledge from observational studies addressing the possible association between obesity and AD. Systematic literature review was performed by identifyin...... to confirm the association between AD and obesity and the possibility that weight control in childhood may help to mitigate or reverse AD symptoms. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.......Obesity has been associated with atopic dermatitis (AD), however the results have been conflicting. Our aim was to provide an update on current knowledge from observational studies addressing the possible association between obesity and AD. Systematic literature review was performed by identifying...... studies addressing a possible link between AD and overweight/obesity from PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA)-guidelines. The quality of the included studies was assessed using the Newcastle...

  4. The Role of Malassezia spp. in Atopic Dermatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glatz, Martin; Bosshard, Philipp P.; Hoetzenecker, Wolfram; Schmid-Grendelmeier, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Malassezia spp. is a genus of lipophilic yeasts and comprises the most common fungi on healthy human skin. Despite its role as a commensal on healthy human skin, Malassezia spp. is attributed a pathogenic role in atopic dermatitis. The mechanisms by which Malassezia spp. may contribute to the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis are not fully understood. Here, we review the latest findings on the pathogenetic role of Malassezia spp. in atopic dermatitis (AD). For example, Malassezia spp. produces a variety of immunogenic proteins that elicit the production of specific IgE antibodies and may induce the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. In addition, Malassezia spp. induces auto-reactive T cells that cross-react between fungal proteins and their human counterparts. These mechanisms contribute to skin inflammation in atopic dermatitis and therefore influence the course of this disorder. Finally, we discuss the possible benefit of an anti-Malassezia spp. treatment in patients with atopic dermatitis. PMID:26239555

  5. Contact sensitivity in patients with recalcitrant atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamagawa-Mineoka, Risa; Masuda, Koji; Ueda, Sachiko; Nakamura, Naomi; Hotta, Eri; Hattori, Junko; Minamiyama, Rina; Yamazaki, Akiko; Katoh, Norito

    2015-07-01

    Patients with atopic dermatitis are usually responsive to conventional treatment such as topical steroids; however, they are sometimes refractory to the treatment. The influence of contact sensitivities on the course of patients with recalcitrant atopic dermatitis is not known. The aim of this study was to investigate whether contact sensitivities affect the course of patients with recalcitrant atopic dermatitis. We evaluated 45 patients with atopic dermatitis who had failed conventional therapy. Patch testing was performed with the Japanese standard series, metal series and/or suspected items. A total of 15 patients had a positive patch test reaction to at least one allergen. The most common allergens were nickel, topical drugs and rubber accelerators. Avoidance of products or food containing allergic substances greatly or partially improved skin symptoms in nine patients. These results suggest that contact allergens and metals may be critical factors causing eczematous lesions in patients with recalcitrant atopic dermatitis. © 2015 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  6. Harlequin ichthyosis in an infant born to a father with eczema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatima, Saba; Rafiq, Ali; Majid, Zain

    2015-04-01

    Harlequin ichthyosis is characterized by thickening of the layer of the skin which contains keratin. Eczema is a chronic relapsing skin disorder which is also associated with disrupted epidermal barrier. We report the case of a 6-hour-old male patient who was brought to the neonatal intensive care unit of our hospital with crusting skin lesions all over the body, presence of a severe ectropion and deranged electrolytes. A diagnosis of harlequin ichthyosis was made, and the neonate was managed accordingly. However, the infant eventually expired on the seventh day of life. The infant's father was a patient of eczema with a chronic relapsing course and was on oral steroid therapy. As per our knowledge, this is the first reported case of an infant with harlequin ichthyosis born to a father suffering from eczema. The similarities in the pathogenesis of the two diseases and the genetic mutation of filaggrin might suggest an association between the two conditions. Harlequin ichthyosis can hence be looked out for in infants born of parents with eczema. © The Author [2014]. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. A randomized controlled trial in children with eczema : nurse practitioner vs. dermatologist

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuttelaar, M L A; Vermeulen, K M; Drukker, N; Coenraads, P J

    P>Background We hypothesized that a nurse practitioner would improve the quality of life of a child with eczema more than a dermatologist because of a structured intervention and more consultation time. Objectives To compare the level of care by nurse practitioners with that by dermatologists in

  8. Hand eczema among hairdressing apprentices in Denmark following a nationwide prospective intervention programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steengaard, Sanne Skovvang; Bregnhøj, Anne; Johansen, Jeanne Duus

    2016-01-01

    of hand eczema of 22.4%. Reactions to hair dye were reported for 24.5%, and 35.5% had left the trade; 36.4% used gloves when shampooing, and 21.3% stated that they cut hair before colouring it. CONCLUSIONS: The effect of the intervention was not visible after 6 years, but an overall improvement in work...

  9. Treatment policy for psoriasis and eczema: a survey among dermatologists in the Netherlands and Belgian Flanders.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelofzen, J.H.J.; Aben, K.K.H.; Khawar, A.J.M.; Kerkhof, P.C.M. van de; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Valk, P.G.M. van der

    2007-01-01

    Today, many therapies are available for the treatment of psoriasis and eczema. One of the oldest topical therapies is coal tar. Coal tar has been used for decades, but over the past years, the use of coal tar has decreased for several reasons, including the supposed carcinogenicity of coal tar.We

  10. The effect of ceramide-containing skin care products on eczema resolution duration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draelos, Zoe Diana

    2008-01-01

    Eczema is a common dermatologic condition that affects children as well as adults and is related to a defective skin barrier, which is most commonly caused by damage to the intercellular lipids from improper selection of skin cleansers and moisturizers. A new concept in skin care is the incorporation of ceramides into therapeutic cleansers and moisturizers. Ceramides are important components of the intercellular lipids that are necessary to link the protein-rich corneocytes into a waterproof barrier that is capable of protecting the underlying skin tissues and regulating body homeostasis. This study evaluated the effect of both a multilamellar vesicular emulsion (MVE) ceramide-containing liquid cleanser and moisturizing cream plus fluocinonide cream 0.05% compared with a bar cleanser plus fluocinonide cream 0.05% in the treatment of mild to moderate eczema. The addition of an MVE ceramide-containing liquid cleanser and moisturizing cream to a high-potency corticosteroid enhanced the treatment outcome of mild to moderate eczema compared with the use of a bar cleanser and high-potency corticosteroid in reducing disease duration, time to disease clearance, and symptoms. Thus, skin care product selection can have an important clinical effect on the clearance of mild to moderate eczema.

  11. Application of Medical Moisture Retention Cream (ALHYDRAN®), : A New Option in the Treatment of Venous Eczema

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rondas, A.A.L.M.; Schols, Jos

    Aim: Patients with venous eczema may suffer considerably from redness, crusts, pain, flaking and itching. Ingeneral, as treatment, compression therapy and indifferent ointments/crèmes are used, often together with topicalsteroids, though the latter may exhibit considerable side effects. This study

  12. Response shift in severity assessment of hand eczema with visual analogue scales

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mollerup, Annette; Johansen, Jeanne D

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hand eczema is a common and fluctuating disease. Visual analogue scales (VASs) are used to assess disease severity, both currently and when at its worst. However, such patient-reported outcomes may be at risk of being flawed owing to recall bias or response shifts. OBJECTIVE: To explore...

  13. Doctor, can we prevent food allergy and eczema in our baby?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waserman, Susan

    2016-06-01

    The purpose is to review evidence from recent clinical trials that focus on early life interventions to prevent the onset of eczema and food allergy. There is evidence that skin barrier defects may be a risk factor for the development of eczema and may increase the risk of early onset food sensitization and allergy. The measurement of transepidermal water loss as a marker of skin barrier defect may be a simple, noninvasive measurement that may predict who is at risk of eczema, however, the protective effects of daily moisturizer application in high-risk infants remains unclear.Although there is increased attention on the role of intestinal microbiota and its influence on sensitization, there is limited evidence to support the preventive effects of probiotics on allergic diseases.Recent clinical trials have provided much needed evidence supporting the early introduction of peanut in the primary and secondary prevention of peanut allergy in high-risk children. There still remain unanswered questions and challenges regarding protocols and implementation of current recommendations. Although progress has been considerable, the fact is that there are no simple strategies to prevent the development of eczema and food allergy in infants. Physicians must remain informed of the dynamic evidence in allergy prevention to make responsible, informed recommendations to families.

  14. Cr(III) and Cr(VI) in leather and elicitation of eczema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Malene Barré; Menne, Torkil; Johansen, Jeanne Duus

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the relation between the content of Cr(VI) and soluble Cr(III) in leather and the ability of the leather to elicit eczema in chromium allergic patients. An array of chromium-tanned leather samples was analysed for the content of total Cr(VI) and sol...

  15. Exposure to selected fragrance materials. A case study of fragrance-mix-positive eczema patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, J D; Rastogi, Suresh Chandra; Menné, T

    1996-01-01

    . In all cases, the use of these cosmetics completely or partly explained present or past episodes of eczema. Between 1 to 6 constituents of the fragrance mix were found in 22 out of 23 products. The cosmetics of all the patients sensitive to hydroxycitronellal, eugenol, cinnamic alcohol and alpha...

  16. High breast milk IL-1β level is associated with reduced risk of childhood eczema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, A. A.; Chawes, B. L.; Carson, C. G.

    2016-01-01

    We recently demonstrated a dual effect of breastfeeding with increased risk of eczema and decreased risk of wheezing in early childhood by increasing breastfeeding length. We hypothesize that immune mediators in breast milk could explain such association either through a direct effect...... or as a surrogate marker of maternal immune constitution....

  17. Maternal intake of Natto, a Japan's traditional fermented soybean food, during pregnancy and the risk of eczema in Japanese babies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozawa, Naoko; Shimojo, Naoki; Suzuki, Yoichi; Ochiai, Shingo; Nakano, Taiji; Morita, Yoshinori; Inoue, Yuzaburo; Arima, Takayasu; Suzuki, Shuichi; Kohno, Yoichi

    2014-06-01

    There are reports that the maternal diet during pregnancy may affect development of babies' eczema. We sought to investigate the association between the maternal diet during pregnancy and the risk of eczema in infancy in Japan. A birth cohort was set up at 2 hospitals in Chiba city. Dietary habits concerning fish, butter, margarine, yogurt and natto during pregnancy was obtained from mothers just after delivery. The intake frequencies of these foods were classified into four groups: 1) daily, 2) 2-3 times a week, 3) once a week and 4) once a month or less. Diagnosis of eczema at 6 months of age was made by the presence of an itchy rash that persisted more than two months. Valid data on 650 mother-baby pairs were obtained. No relationship between frequencies of the maternal intake of fish, margarine and yogurt during pregnancy and the onset rate of the babies' eczema were observed. For butter consumption, the incidence of babies' eczema was significantly higher in the group with daily intake than in those with an intake 2-3 times a week or less (p = 0.044). For natto, incidence of babies' eczema was significantly lower in the group with everyday intake than those eating it 2-3 times a week or less (p = 0.020). High frequency intake of natto during pregnancy possibly reduces the incidence of eczema in children at 6 months of age.

  18. The Hand Eczema Trial (HET): Design of a randomised clinical trial of the effect of classification and individual counselling versus no intervention among health-care workers with hand eczema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibler, Kristina Sophie; Agner, Tove; Hansen, Jane L.

    2010-01-01

    strategies are needed to reduce occupational hand eczema. METHODS/DESIGN: We describe the design of a randomised clinical trial to investigate the effects of classification of hand eczema plus individual counselling versus no intervention. The trial includes health-care workers with hand eczema identified...... outcome is observer-blinded assessment of disease severity and the secondary outcomes are unblinded assessments of disease severity; number of eruptions; knowledge of skin protection; skin-protective behaviour, and quality of life. TRIAL REGISTRATION: The trial is registered in ClinicalTrials.Gov, NCT...

  19. IgE Sensitization Profiles Differ between Adult Patients with Severe and Moderate Atopic Dermatitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Mittermann

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis (AD is a complex chronic inflammatory disease where allergens can act as specific triggering factors.To characterize the specificities of IgE-reactivity in patients with AD to a broad panel of exogenous allergens including microbial and human antigens.Adult patients with AD were grouped according to the SCORAD index, into severe (n = 53 and moderate AD (n = 126. As controls 43 patients were included with seborrhoeic eczema and 97 individuals without history of allergy or skin diseases. Specific IgE reactivity was assessed in plasma using Phadiatop®, ImmunoCap™, micro-arrayed allergens, dot-blotted recombinant Malassezia sympodialis allergens, and immune-blotted microbial and human proteins.IgE reactivity was detected in 92% of patients with severe and 83% of patients with moderate AD. Sensitization to cat allergens occurred most frequently, followed by sensitization to birch pollen, grass pollen, and to the skin commensal yeast M. sympodialis. Patients with severe AD showed a significantly higher frequency of IgE reactivity to allergens like cat (rFel d 1 and house dust mite (rDer p 4 and 10, to Staphylococcus aureus, M. sympodialis, and to human antigens. In contrast, there were no significant differences in the frequencies of IgE reactivity to the grass pollen allergens rPhl p 1, 2, 5b, and 6 between the two AD groups. Furthermore the IgE reactivity profile of patients with severe AD was more spread towards several different allergen molecules as compared to patients with moderate AD.We have revealed a hitherto unknown difference regarding the molecular sensitization profile in patients with severe and moderate AD. Molecular profiling towards allergen components may provide a basis for future investigations aiming to explore the environmental, genetic and epigenetic factors which could be responsible for the different appearance and severity of disease phenotypes in AD.

  20. Oleanolic acid acetate inhibits atopic dermatitis and allergic contact dermatitis in a murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jin Kyeong; Oh, Hyun-Mee; Lee, Soyoung; Park, Jin-Woo; Khang, Dongwoo; Lee, Seung Woong; Lee, Woo Song; Rho, Mun-Chual; Kim, Sang-Hyun

    2013-05-15

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) and allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) are common allergic and inflammatory skin diseases caused by a combination of eczema, scratching, pruritus, and cutaneous sensitization with allergens. This paper examines whether oleanolic acid acetate (OAA) modulates AD and ACD symptoms by using an existing AD model based on the repeated local exposure of mite extract (Dermatophagoides farinae extract, DFE) and 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene to the ears of BALB/c mice. In addition, the paper uses a 2,4-dinitrofluorobenzene-sensitized local lymph node assay (LLNA) for the ACD model. The oral administration of OAA over a four-week period attenuated AD symptoms in terms of decreased skin lesions, epidermal thickness, the infiltration of immune cells (CD4⁺ cells, eosinophils, and mast cells), and serum IgE, IgG2a, and histamine levels. The gene expression of Th1, Th2, Th17, and Th22 cytokines was reduced by OAA in the lymph node and ear tissue, and the LLNA verified that OAA suppressed ACD. The oral administration of OAA over a three-day period attenuated ACD symptoms in terms of ear thickness, lymphocyte proliferation, and serum IgG2a levels. The gene expression of Th1, Th2, and Th17 cytokines was reduced by OAA in the thymus and ear tissue. Finally, to define the underlying mechanism, this paper uses a TNF-α/IFN-γ-activated human keratinocyte (HaCaT) model. OAA inhibited the expression of cytokines and chemokines through the downregulation of NF-κB and MAPKs in HaCaT cells. Taken together, the results indicate that OAA inhibited AD and ACD symptoms, suggesting that OAA may be effective in treating allergic skin disorders. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Functional textiles for atopic dermatitis: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Cristina; Silva, Diana; Delgado, Luís; Correia, Osvaldo; Moreira, André

    2013-09-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a relapsing inflammatory skin disease with a considerable social and economic burden. Functional textiles may have antimicrobial and antipruritic properties and have been used as complementary treatment in AD. We aimed to assess their effectiveness and safety in this setting. We carried out a systematic review of three large biomedical databases. GRADE approach was used to rate the levels of evidence and grade of recommendation. Meta-analyses of comparable studies were carried out. Thirteen studies (eight randomized controlled trials and five observational studies) met the eligibility criteria. Interventions were limited to silk (six studies), silver-coated cotton (five studies), borage oil, and ethylene vinyl alcohol (EVOH) fiber (one study each). Silver textiles were associated with improvement in SCORAD (2 of 4), fewer symptoms, a lower need for rescue medication (1 of 2), no difference in quality of life, decreased Staphyloccosus aureus colonization (2 of 3), and improvement of trans-epidermal water loss (1 of 2), with no safety concerns. Silk textile use was associated with improvement in SCORAD and symptoms (2 of 4), with no differences in quality of life or need for rescue medication. With borage oil use only skin erythema showed improvement, and with EVOH fiber, an improvement in eczema severity was reported. Recommendation for the use of functional textiles in AD treatment is weak, supported by low quality of evidence regarding effectiveness in AD symptoms and severity, with no evidence of hazardous consequences with their use. More studies with better methodology and longer follow-up are needed. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Global Associations between UVR Exposure and Current Eczema Prevalence in Children from ISAAC Phase Three.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuertes, Elaine; Flohr, Carsten; Silverberg, Jonathan I; Standl, Marie; Strachan, David P

    2017-06-01

    We sought to examine the relationship globally between UVR dose exposure and current eczema prevalences. ISAAC Phase Three provided data on eczema prevalence for 13- to 14-year-olds in 214 centers in 87 countries and for 6- to 7-year-olds in 132 centers in 57 countries. Linear and nonlinear associations between (natural log transformed) eczema prevalence and the mean, maximum, minimum, standard deviation, and range of monthly UV dose exposures were assessed using linear mixed-effects regression models. For the 13- to 14-year-olds, the country-level eczema prevalence was positively and linearly associated with country-level monthly mean (prevalence ratio = 1.31 [95% confidence interval = 1.05-1.63] per kJ/m 2 ) and minimum (1.25 [1.06-1.47] per kJ/m 2 ) UVR dose exposure. Linear and nonlinear associations were also observed for other metrics of UV. Results were similar in trend, but nonsignificant, for the fewer centers with 6- to 7-year-olds (e.g., 1.24 [0.96-1.59] per kJ/m 2 for country-level monthly mean UVR). No consistent within-country associations were observed (e.g., 1.05 [0.89-1.23] and 0.92 [0.71-1.18] per kJ/m 2 for center-level monthly mean UVR for the 13- to 14- and 6- to 7-year-olds, respectively). These ecological results support a role for UVR exposure in explaining some of the variation in global childhood eczema prevalence. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. A Traditional Diet Is Associated with a Reduced Risk of Eczema and Wheeze in Colombian Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso M. Cepeda

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diet might influence the risk of allergic diseases. Evidence from developing countries with high prevalence of childhood asthma is scant. Methods: Information on wheeze, rhinitis, and eczema was collected from 3209 children aged 6–7 years in 2005, who were taking part in the International Study on Asthma and Allergy in Children (ISAAC in Colombia. Intake frequency of twelve food groups was assessed. Associations between each food group and current wheeze, rhino-conjunctivitis, and eczema were investigated with multiple logistic regressions, adjusting for potential confounders. Simes’ procedure was used to test for multiple comparisons. Results: 14.9% of children reported wheeze in the last 12 months, 16% rhino-conjunctivitis, and 22% eczema. Eczema was negatively associated with consumption of fresh fruits and pulses three or more times per week (adjusted Odds ratio (aOR: 0.64; 95% Confidence Interval (CI: 0.49 to 0.83; p value = 0.004; and aOR: 0.62, 95% CI: 0.47 to 0.80; p value < 0.001, respectively. Current wheeze was negatively associated with intake of potatoes (aOR: 0.44, 95% CI: 0.31 to 0.62, p value = 0.005, whilst this outcome was positively associated with consumption of fast food (aOR: 1.76, 95% CI: 1.32 to 2.35, p value = 0.001. These associations remained statistically significant after controlling for multiple comparisons. Conclusions: A traditional diet might have a protective effect against eczema and wheeze in Colombian children, whilst intake of fast foods increases this risk.

  4. Evidence-based training as primary prevention of hand eczema in a population of hospital cleaning workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, Kim K B; Randbøll, Ingelise; Ryborg, Malene F.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Skin disorders accounted for one third of all recognised occupational diseases in Denmark in 2010. Wet work is a risk factor for the development of occupational hand eczema. The consequences of occupational hand eczema include sick leave, loss of job and impaired quality of life....... OBJECTIVES: The aim of the present study was to investigate exposures related to cleaning and the effect of an evidence-based educational intervention on the prevention of hand eczema among hospital cleaners. PATIENTS/MATERIALS/METHODS: The intervention consisted of a 1 hr course in hand protective behaviour...

  5. An unusual case of eruptive syringomas presenting as itchy symmetrical lesions on both forearms in a patient of hyperkeratotic eczema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shyam B Verma

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This report describes an unusual case of bilaterally symmetrically occurring hyperpigmented itchy popular lesions on both forearms of a 50-year-old woman. The woman had antecedent hyperkeratotic eczema of the feet and she had a similar eruption in the past which had cleared with topical steroid application. Biopsy of the lesion showed syringomas. We present this case to highlight an unusual case of bilaterally symmetrical papular pruritic eruption against a background of hyperkeratotic eczema. Some syringomas are supposed to be a response to an inflammatory trigger and we wonder if in this case the eczema acted as an inflammatory trigger.

  6. An unusual case of eruptive syringomas presenting as itchy symmetrical lesions on both forearms in a patient of hyperkeratotic eczema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Shyam B

    2011-07-01

    This report describes an unusual case of bilaterally symmetrically occurring hyperpigmented itchy popular lesions on both forearms of a 50-year-old woman. The woman had antecedent hyperkeratotic eczema of the feet and she had a similar eruption in the past which had cleared with topical steroid application. Biopsy of the lesion showed syringomas. We present this case to highlight an unusual case of bilaterally symmetrical papular pruritic eruption against a background of hyperkeratotic eczema. Some syringomas are supposed to be a response to an inflammatory trigger and we wonder if in this case the eczema acted as an inflammatory trigger.

  7. Multifactorial skin barrier deficiency and atopic dermatitis: Essential topics to prevent the atopic march.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egawa, Gyohei; Kabashima, Kenji

    2016-08-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is the most common inflammatory skin disease in the industrialized world and has multiple causes. Over the past decade, data from both experimental models and patients have highlighted the primary pathogenic role of skin barrier deficiency in patients with AD. Increased access of environmental agents into the skin results in chronic inflammation and contributes to the systemic "atopic (allergic) march." In addition, persistent skin inflammation further attenuates skin barrier function, resulting in a positive feedback loop between the skin epithelium and the immune system that drives pathology. Understanding the mechanisms of skin barrier maintenance is essential for improving management of AD and limiting downstream atopic manifestations. In this article we review the latest developments in our understanding of the pathomechanisms of skin barrier deficiency, with a particular focus on the formation of the stratum corneum, the outermost layer of the skin, which contributes significantly to skin barrier function. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Risk Factors for Developing Atopic Dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    G. Carson, Charlotte

    2013-01-01

    for developing AD at 3 years of age. Our data suggested a strong heredity of AD and confirmed the risk associated with the non-functional FLG allele mutations after adjustments for confounders. Besides this mother's dermatitis and father's allergic rhinitis were found to increase the risk of AD. Perinatal...... exposure to dog was the only environmental exposure that significantly reduced the disease manifestation, suggesting other, yet unknown environmental factors affecting the increasing prevalence of AD in children. Length at birth was shown to be inversely associated with the risk of later developing AD......-up period (HR 1.44, 95% CI 1.05-1.99, p=0.024). The increased risk was still significant after confounder adjustment for mother's education, AD and smoking habits during the 3rd trimester. There was no association between alcohol intake during pregnancy and other atopic endpoints (wheeze episodes, asthma...

  9. Autoimmune diseases in adults with atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Yuki M F; Egeberg, Alexander; Gislason, Gunnar H.

    2017-01-01

    Background: An increased susceptibility to autoimmune disease has been shown in patients with atopic dermatitis (AD), but data remain scarce and inconsistent. Objective: We examined the co-occurrence of selected autoimmune diseases in adult patients with AD. Methods: Nationwide health registers...... were used. Adult patients with a hospital diagnosis of AD in Denmark between 1997 and 2012 were included as cases (n = 8112) and matched with controls (n = 40,560). The occurrence of autoimmune diseases was compared in the 2 groups. Logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios. Results: AD...... was significantly associated with 11 of 22 examined autoimmune diseases. In addition, AD was associated with having multiple autoimmune comorbidities. Patients with a history of smoking had a significantly higher occurrence of autoimmune comorbidities compared to nonsmokers. Limitations: This study was limited...

  10. Risk Factors for Developing Atopic Dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    G. Carson, Charlotte

    2013-01-01

    -up period (HR 1.44, 95% CI 1.05-1.99, p=0.024). The increased risk was still significant after confounder adjustment for mother's education, AD and smoking habits during the 3rd trimester. There was no association between alcohol intake during pregnancy and other atopic endpoints (wheeze episodes, asthma......The aim of this thesis was to investigate possible risk factors affecting the development of AD. AD is a frequent disease among children and has a substantial impact on the lives of both the child and its family. A better understanding of the disease would enable better treatment, prevention...... for developing AD at 3 years of age. Our data suggested a strong heredity of AD and confirmed the risk associated with the non-functional FLG allele mutations after adjustments for confounders. Besides this mother's dermatitis and father's allergic rhinitis were found to increase the risk of AD. Perinatal...

  11. Association of atopic dermatitis with smoking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kantor, Robert; Kim, Ashley; Thyssen, Jacob P

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tobacco exposure might be a modifiable risk factor for atopic dermatitis (AD). OBJECTIVE: We examine the association between AD and exposure to tobacco smoke. METHODS: We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies (n = 86) in MEDLINE, EMBASE, Scopus......-sectional, longitudinal), study sizes (smoking (mild, extensive). RESULTS: A diagnosis of AD was associated with higher odds of active smoking (OR 1.87, 95% confidence interval 1.32-2.63) and exposure to passive smoke (OR 1.18, 95% confidence interval 1.......01-1.38), but not maternal smoking during pregnancy (OR 1.06, 95% confidence interval 0.80-1.40). The association between active smoking and AD remained significant in children and adults, all continents studied, and study sizes, but all were cross-sectional designs and had NOS score 6 or greater. Passive smoke...

  12. Atopic diseases in twins born after assisted reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäderberg, Ida; Thomsen, Simon F; Kyvik, Kirsten O; Skytthe, Axel; Backer, Vibeke

    2012-03-01

    We examined the risk of atopic diseases in twins born after assisted reproduction. Data on atopic diseases and assisted reproduction in 9694 twin pairs, 3-20 years of age, from the Danish Twin Registry were collected via multidisciplinary questionnaires. The risk of atopic diseases in twins born after assisted reproduction was compared with the risk in twins born after spontaneous conception using logistic regression and variance components analysis. Children born after assisted reproduction did not have a different risk of atopic outcomes (adjusted odds ratios [95% confidence intervals] for asthma: 0.95 [0.85, 1.07], P = 0.403; hay fever: 1.01 [0.86, 1.18], P = 0.918; and atopic dermatitis: 1.02 [0.81, 1.11], P = 0.773 respectively) compared with children born after spontaneous conception. Assisted reproduction did not modify the heritability of atopic diseases. This study does not support an association between assisted reproduction and development of atopic diseases. This result must be confirmed in subsequent studies, preferably of singleton populations. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Complementary and alternative interventions in atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joohee; Bielory, Leonard

    2010-08-01

    The burden of atopic diseases, including atopic dermatitis (AD), is significant and far-reaching. In addition to cost of care and therapies, it affects the quality of life for those affected as well as their caretakers. Complementary and alternative therapies are commonly used because of concerns about potential adverse effects of conventional therapies and frustration with the lack of response to prescribed medications, be it due to the severity of the AD or the lack of appropriate regular use. Despite the promising results reported with various herbal medicines and biologic products, the clinical efficacy of such alternative therapies remains to be determined. Physicians need to be educated about alternative therapies and discuss benefits and potential adverse effects or limitations with patients. A systematic approach and awareness of reputable and easily accessible resources are helpful in dealing with complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). The use of CAM interventions is common among individuals with AD. Epidemiologic data have been a motivating drive for better elucidation of the efficacy of CAM interventions for allergic disease. Herbal medicines and biologics for AD treatment and, more recently, prevention comprise a major area of clinical investigation. Potential mechanisms of therapeutic effect elucidated by animal models and human clinical studies implicate modulation of TH2-type allergic inflammation and induction of immune tolerance. Population-based research regarding the use of CAM for allergic diseases underscores the increasing challenge for care providers with respect to identifying CAM use and ensuring safe use of allopathic and complementary medicines in disease management. Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Atopic dermatitis: new evidence on the role of allergic inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heratizadeh, Annice

    2016-10-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a chronic relapsing inflammatory skin disease. In the presence of a complex genetic background, there is increasing evidence for the role of specific allergenic trigger factors in perpetuating skin inflammation in sensitized atopic dermatitis patients. In this review, clinical and in-vitro data so far published on allergen-induced adaptive immune responses in atopic dermatitis are summarized. Emerging new data have been published particularly on adaptive immune responses to inhalant allergens in atopic dermatitis. In a randomized controlled study, the induction of a flare-up by grass pollen exposure in sensitized atopic dermatitis patients could be demonstrated for the first time. T cells directed to the two major allergens of house dust mite have been characterized to display a Th2, and moreover, a Th17 and Th2/Th17 phenotype in sensitized atopic dermatitis patients. With regard to microbial antigens, T cell-mediated immune responses directed to proteins of the species themselves can be observed - as has been published for Staphylococcus aureus and Malassezia spp. Beyond this, specific T-cell activation to cross-reacting human proteins might further trigger the disease in distinct patients. The role of 'autoallergic' phenomena in atopic dermatitis, because of human antigens without known cross-reactivity to environmental allergens, is currently under investigation as well. Recent findings on immunological and clinical characteristics of adaptive immune responses to allergens in atopic dermatitis, but also on the identification of new, potentially relevant allergen sources might contribute to the development of effective treatment strategies 'customized' for allergic inflammation in atopic dermatitis in future.

  15. RESULTS OF APPLYING POLYVITAMIN COMPLEX FOR CHILDREN WITH ATOPIC DERMATITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.A. Ivanova

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents findings of applying vitamin-and-mineral complex (VMC for children frequently suffering from diseases and children with atopic dermatitis. It shows that usage of VMC within a complex therapy promotes regression of subnormal vitamin provision symptoms, as well as symptoms of the core disease. This happens against heightened vitamin content in child's organism — which was proven with the test of A and E vitamins content in blood. The research has demonstrated a quite good tolerance of VMC by children suffering from atopic dermatitis.Key words: children frequently suffering from diseases, atopic dermatitis, vitamins, treatment.

  16. "Inflammatory skin march" in atopic dermatitis and psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furue, Masutaka; Kadono, Takafumi

    2017-10-01

    Comorbidities of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs), metabolic syndrome and autoimmune diseases with systemic inflammation are recent topics in medicine. Inflammatory skin diseases such as atopic dermatitis and psoriasis are an active source of diverse proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, which are readily detectable in the circulation and are likely to be involved in developing comorbidities. Both atopic dermatitis and psoriasis are frequently comorbid with CVD, metabolic syndrome and autoimmune diseases, the consequence of which is called "inflammatory skin march", "psoriatic march" or "march of psoriasis". In this review, we summarize the epidemiological evidence and pathogenetic concepts regarding inflammatory skin march in atopic dermatitis and psoriasis.

  17. Review of Critical Issues in the Pathogenesis of Atopic Dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irvine, Alan D; Eichenfield, Lawrence F; Friedlander, Sheila F; Simpson, Eric L

    2016-06-01

    About a decade age, loss-of-function mutations in the filaggrin molecule were first implicated in the pathogenesis of ichthyosis vulgaris and, subsequently, of atopic dermatitis and other atopic diseases. Since then, intensive study of the role of filaggrin null mutations have led to other milestones in understanding the pathologic pathways in these diseases, including the initiation, maintenance, and promotion of the disease processes. The result has been new and emerging clinical and pharmacologic strategies for early identification of and intervention in atopic diseases. Semin Cutan Med Surg 35(supp5):S89-S91. 2016 published by Frontline Medical Communications.

  18. Fatty acid composition of human milk in atopic Danish mothers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, Lotte; Halkjaer, Liselotte Brydensholt; Mikkelsen, Tina Buur

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Atopic dermatitis has been related to a disturbed metabolism of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). OBJECTIVE: We tested whether the PUFA composition of breast milk differs significantly between mothers with atopic dermatitis, mothers with other types of atopy, and nonatopic mothers...... taken into account. CONCLUSION: Our data do not support the possibility that the fatty acid composition of breast milk is affected by atopic dermatitis or atopy in general, because most differences in breast-milk PUFA composition appear to be explained by the diet....

  19. Development of atopic dermatitis in the DARC birth cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eller, Esben; Kjaer, Henrik Fomsgaard; Høst, Arne

    2009-01-01

    Eller E, Kjaer HF, Høst A, Andersen KE, Bindslev-Jensen C. Development of Atopic Dermatitis in the DARC birth cohort. Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2009. (c) 2009 John Wiley & Sons A/SThe aim was to describe the relapsing pattern, sensitization and prognosis of atopic dermatitis (AD) in the first 6 yr...... was measured by objective SCORing Atopic Dermatitis (SCORAD). Point-prevalence of AD peaked at 18 months of age (10%) and decreased at 36 and 72 months to slightly below 7%. The 6-yr cumulative incidence was 22.8% and sensitization was found in 43% of children with AD. It was predominately sensitization...

  20. Four cases of atopic dermatitis complicated by Sjögren's syndrome: link between dry skin and autoimmune anhidrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitaba, Shun; Matsui, Saki; Iimuro, Eriko; Nishioka, Megumi; Kijima, Akiko; Umegaki, Noriko; Murota, Hiroyuki; Katayama, Ichiro

    2011-09-01

    We report four adult cases of atopic dermatitis (AD) complicated by Sjögren's syndrome (SS). The patients fulfilled diagnostic criteria for AD and SS. All cases showed persistent itchy dry skin and eczematous lesions complicated by sicca symptoms including dry eyes and dry mouth with moderate joint pain. One case manifested annular erythema and another manifested widespread discoid erythema. To investigate the underlying cause of dry skin in these cases, sweating function was evaluated using a quantitative sudomotor axon reflex test (QSART) in which the axon reflex is stimulated by acetylcholine iontophoresis. The sweating latency time was significantly prolonged in eczematous skin of AD and AD/SS compared to normal controls. Axon reflex (AXR) sweat volume was also significantly reduced in AD (normal and eczematous skin) and AD/SS (normal and eczema) compared to normal control. In contrast, the direct sweat volume of lesional or non-lesional AD skin induced by direct stimulation with acetylcholine was only slightly reduced compared to that in normal controls, but not in SS and lesional skin of AD/SS patients. These results suggest that the impaired sweat response in AD is attributable to an abnormal sudomotor axon reflex, which is accelerated and modulated when complicated by SS resulting in dry skin in the present cases.