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Sample records for diagnosed vestibular schwannoma

  1. Emotional intelligence in association with quality of life in patients recently diagnosed with vestibular schwannoma.

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    van Leeuwen, Bibian M; Borst, Jacoba M; Putter, Hein; Jansen, Jeroen C; van der Mey, Andel G L; Kaptein, Adrian A

    2014-10-01

    The objective of this study was two-fold. First, to examine the levels of emotional intelligence in patients recently diagnosed with vestibular schwannoma, in comparison to those of healthy individuals and patients with other physical illness. Second, to evaluate the correlation between Emotional Intelligence and quality of life. Cross sectional study in a university tertiary referral center. Consecutive patients (mean age [range], 56.4 [17-85] yr) diagnosed with vestibular schwannoma between April 2011 and October 2012 (N = 254). Sociodemographic characteristics, clinical characteristics, disease-specific quality of life (PANQOL), and Emotional Intelligence (TEIQue-SF) were assessed by questionnaire before the start of medical treatment. Levels of Emotional Intelligence in patients with vestibular schwannoma (N = 178; response rate 70.1%) were significantly lower compared with healthy individuals and patients with cancer. Emotional Intelligence was highly positively correlated to disease-specific quality of life. Balance disorders and cranial nerve dysfunction made a significant negative contribution to the quality of life. For educational level, a significant positive contribution was found as well. The substantial impact of a vestibular schwannoma-diagnosis on a psychological measure (i.e., Emotional Intelligence) in the affected patients as demonstrated in our study has important clinical and research implications when developing guidelines about counselling of these patients. This also has to be taken into account when making clinical decisions about the proposed treatment. Addressing Emotional Intelligence may be helpful in the development of a self-management program for patients with vestibular schwannoma.

  2. Atypical Manifestation of Vestibular Schwannoma

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    Webster, Guilherme

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Vestibular schwannoma (also known as acoustic neuroma is a benign tumor whose cells are derived from Schwann sheaths, which commonly occurs from the vestibular portion of the eighth cranial nerve. Furthermore, vestibular schwannomas account for ∼8% of intracranial tumors in adults and 80 to 90% of tumors of the cerebellopontine angle. Its symptoms are varied, but what stands out most is a unilateral sensorineural hearing loss, with a low index of speech recognition. Objective: Describe an atypical manifestation of vestibular schwannoma. Case Report: The 46-year-old woman had vertigo and binaural hearing loss and fullness, with ear, nose, and throat examination suggestive of cochlear injury. After 6 months, the patient developed worsening of symptoms and onset of right unilateral tinnitus. In further exams the signs of cochlear damage remained, except for the vestibular test (hyporeflexia. Magnetic resonance imaging showed an expansive lesion in the right cerebellopontine angle. Discussion: This report warns about the atypical manifestations of vestibular schwannoma, which must always be remembered in investigating and diagnosing hearing loss.

  3. Deregulated genes in sporadic vestibular schwannomas

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    Cayé-Thomasen, Per; Helweg-Larsen, Rehannah Holga Andrea; Stangerup, Sven-Eric;

    2010-01-01

    In search of genes associated with vestibular schwannoma tumorigenesis, this study examines the gene expression in human vestibular nerve versus vestibular schwannoma tissue samples using microarray technology.......In search of genes associated with vestibular schwannoma tumorigenesis, this study examines the gene expression in human vestibular nerve versus vestibular schwannoma tissue samples using microarray technology....

  4. Deregulated genes in sporadic vestibular schwannomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cayé-Thomasen, Per; Helweg-Larsen, Rehannah Holga Andrea; Stangerup, Sven-Eric

    2010-01-01

    In search of genes associated with vestibular schwannoma tumorigenesis, this study examines the gene expression in human vestibular nerve versus vestibular schwannoma tissue samples using microarray technology.......In search of genes associated with vestibular schwannoma tumorigenesis, this study examines the gene expression in human vestibular nerve versus vestibular schwannoma tissue samples using microarray technology....

  5. Angiogenesis in vestibular schwannomas

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    Møller, Martin Nue; Werther, Kim; Nalla, Amarnadh;

    2010-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are potent mediators of tumor angiogenesis. It has been demonstrated that vestibular schwannoma VEGF expression correlates with tumor growth pattern, whereas knowledge on the expression of MMPs is lacking. This study t...... targets the angiogenic process by investigation of tumor expression of MMP-2, MMP-9, and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1. A possible correlation with gender, patient age, symptom duration, tumor size, and the absolute and relative growth rate is explored....

  6. Audiologic diagnostics of vestibular schwannoma

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    Komazec Zoran

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Vestibular schwannoma (acoustic neuroma is a rare, but important cause of sensorineural hearing loss. Patients with asymmetric hearing loss, or unilateral tinnitus should be evaluated expeditiously, to prevent further neurological damage. Audiologic diagnostics Audiologic diagnostics represents the basic diagnosis for early detection of vestibular schwannoma. Patients with vestibular schwannomas may present with a variety of clinical features, including retrocochlear pattern of sensorineural hearing loss. Supraliminary audiometry, tympano- metry, stapedius reflex and otoacoustic emissions as well as vestibular response to caloric testing are methods for selection of patients with suspicion of this tumor. Conclusion The golden standard for audiologic diagnostics of vestibular schwannoma is BAEP (Brainstem Auditory Evoked Potentials. Patients with pathological findings of BAEP should undergo MRI of the posterior fossa. Gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging is the best and final tool for making a diagnosis of vestibular schwannoma.

  7. Peripheral Vestibular System Disease in Vestibular Schwannomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Martin Nue; Hansen, Søren; Caye-Thomasen, Per

    2015-01-01

    density of the peripheral vestibular nerve branches, and atrophy of the neuroepithelium of the vestibular end organs. In cases with small tumors, peripheral disease occurred only in the tissue structures innervated by the specific nerve from which the tumor originated. CONCLUSION: Vestibular schwannomas...... are associated with distinctive disease of the peripheral vestibular tissue structures, suggesting anterograde degeneration and that dizziness in these patients may be caused by deficient peripheral vestibular nerve fibers, neurons, and end organs. In smaller tumors, a highly localized disease occurs, which...

  8. Radiosurgery for vestibular schwannomas

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    Sumit Sinha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Vestibular schwannomas (VS are benign tumours arising from the 8 th cranial nerve. There are various treatment options for these tumours, which depend upon the tumour size and patient age. However, the surgical treatment has been the conventional method of management of these tumours, since they are frequently detected when quite large in size, especially in our country. Gamma knife radiosurgery (GKRS is frequently reserved for young patients with small and medium-sized VS (<3 cm and few symptoms. The tumour control dose is the most important consideration in GKRS, with higher doses having a risk for cranial nerve palsies, whereas lower doses leading to non-treatment of the tumour. The accepted tumour control dose ranges from 12 to 16 Gy among the various series with the tumour control rates of from 87% to 98% considered generally acceptable. The preservation of hearing is an issue worthwhile to be taken into account in GKRS and various series reporting this to range from 40% to 80%. The comparison between microsurgery and GKRS is still debatable because of different indications for both forms of therapies. Microsurgery is chosen for large tumours and GKRS for relatively smaller tumours.

  9. Epidemiology and natural history of vestibular schwannomas

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    Stangerup, Sven-Eric; Caye-Thomasen, Per

    2012-01-01

    This article describes various epidemiologic trends for vestibular schwannomas over the last 35 years, including a brief note on terminology. Additionally, it provides information on the natural history of tumor growth and hearing level following the diagnosis of a vestibular schwannoma. A treatm......This article describes various epidemiologic trends for vestibular schwannomas over the last 35 years, including a brief note on terminology. Additionally, it provides information on the natural history of tumor growth and hearing level following the diagnosis of a vestibular schwannoma....... A treatment strategy based on the natural history of tumor growth and hearing also is discussed....

  10. Non surgical treatment of vestibular schwannoma.

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    Arribas, Leoncio; Chust, María L; Menéndez, Antonio; Arana, Estanislao; Vendrell, Juan B; Crispín, Vicente; Pesudo, Carmen; Mengual, José L; Mut, Alejandro; Arribas, Mar; Guinot, José L

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the results of local control and complications in the treatment of vestibular schwannoma treated with radiation. A retrospective study of 194 patients diagnosed with vestibular schwannoma, treated consecutively with radiation (either stereotactic radiosurgery or fractionated radiotherapy) from 1997 to 2012. We analyze the local control of tumors, as well as secondary complications to treatment with radiation. A total of 132 (68%) tumors 68% are grade I-II tumors of the Koos classification, 40 (19%) are grade III, and 22 (13%) are grade IV. The tumors associated with neurofibromatosis (NF2), are 3.6% (6 tumors in 4 patients). The tumor control for the overall serie is 97% at 5 years, with a median follow-up of 80.4 months. For large tumors the local control is 91% at 5 years. Free survival of chronic complications is 89% at 5 years. Additionally, 50 tumors were subjected to regular follow-up with MRI without treatment, and 28 (58%) did not experienced tumor growth. Radiation and follow up with MRI, are an alternative to surgery in the treatment of vestibular schwannoma, with a low level of complications inside of multidisciplinary approach. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Patología Cérvico-Facial. All rights reserved.

  11. Electrical vestibular stimulation after vestibular deafferentation and in vestibular schwannoma.

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    Swee Tin Aw

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Vestibular reflexes, evoked by human electrical (galvanic vestibular stimulation (EVS, are utilized to assess vestibular function and investigate its pathways. Our study aimed to investigate the electrically-evoked vestibulo-ocular reflex (eVOR output after bilateral and unilateral vestibular deafferentations to determine the characteristics for interpreting unilateral lesions such as vestibular schwannomas. METHODS: EVOR was recorded with dual-search coils as binocular three-dimensional eye movements evoked by bipolar 100 ms-step at EVS intensities of [0.9, 2.5, 5.0, 7.5, 10.0] mA and unipolar 100 ms-step at 5 mA EVS intensity. Five bilateral vestibular deafferented (BVD, 12 unilateral vestibular deafferented (UVD, four unilateral vestibular schwannoma (UVS patients and 17 healthy subjects were tested with bipolar EVS, and five UVDs with unipolar EVS. RESULTS: After BVD, bipolar EVS elicited no eVOR. After UVD, bipolar EVS of one functioning ear elicited bidirectional, excitatory eVOR to cathodal EVS with 9 ms latency and inhibitory eVOR to anodal EVS, opposite in direction, at half the amplitude with 12 ms latency, exhibiting an excitatory-inhibitory asymmetry. The eVOR patterns from UVS were consistent with responses from UVD confirming the vestibular loss on the lesion side. Unexpectedly, unipolar EVS of the UVD ear, instead of absent response, evoked one-third the bipolar eVOR while unipolar EVS of the functioning ear evoked half the bipolar response. CONCLUSIONS: The bidirectional eVOR evoked by bipolar EVS from UVD with an excitatory-inhibitory asymmetry and the 3 ms latency difference between normal and lesion side may be useful for detecting vestibular lesions such as UVS. We suggest that current spread could account for the small eVOR to 5 mA unipolar EVS of the UVD ear.

  12. Increasing annual incidence of vestibular schwannoma and age at diagnosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stangerup, Sven-Eric; Tos, Mirko; Caye-Thomasen, Per;

    2004-01-01

    During the last 26 years the annual number of diagnosed vestibular schwannomas (VS) has been increasing. The aim of this study is to describe and analyse this increase. Since 1976, 1446 new cases of VS have been diagnosed at the authors' centre. Special focus was on the age at diagnosis, the loca...

  13. Vestibular Schwannoma (Acoustic Neuroma) and Neurofibromatosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the inner ear. The tumor comes from an overproduction of Schwann cells—the cells that normally wrap ... begin to develop new therapies to control the overproduction of Schwann cells in individuals with vestibular schwannoma. ...

  14. Fast-Growing Vestibular Schwannoma

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    Falcioni, Maurizio; Taibah, Abdelkader; De Donato, Giuseppe; Piccirillo, Enrico; Russo, Alessandra; Sanna, Mario

    2000-01-01

    A case of a Jehovah's witness affected by an intracanalicular vestibular schwannoma with an extremely fast growth rate is presented. Nine months after presentation, the tumor reached 23 mm in the cerebellopontine angle. A partial removal through a retrosigmoid approach was planned. Because of the presence of a dominant high jugular bulb masquering the internal auditory canal, the intracanalicular portion of the tumor was left in place. The residual tumor grew 12 mm in 2 months. Even after a gross total removal through a middle cranial fossa approach, the tumor recurred, reaching the size of 30 mm in 17 months. A modified transcochlear approach was then performed, and the patient was free of disease at the last radiologic follow-up, 8 months after the surgery. We illustrate our strategy in treating this aggressive benign lesion with unusual behavior. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8Figure 9Figure 10 PMID:17171109

  15. Vestibular Schwannoma or acoustic neuroma

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    Hekmatara M

    1997-04-01

    Full Text Available Vestibular schwannoma is the most common tumor of the posterior fossa of the skull. Patients referred with the primary otologic symptoms such as hearing loss, tinnitus, vertigo, imbalance, and the cranial nerve palsy. Thirty-three patients were operated and treated by a team of otolaryngologist and neurosurgeon, anudiometrist, and internist. Patients'chiefcomplaint was due to 94% hearing loss and 27% tinnitus. They scarcely complain of vertigo. If a patient refers with the palsy or paralysis of facial nerve preoperation, we must think of the facial nerve schwannoma or hemangioma or congential cholestoma or malignant metastases rather than acoustic neuroma. The best way for preoperative diagnosis is audiometry, ABR (Auditory Brain Response, and SDS (speech discrimination score with 90% success, but computer Tomography (CT scan and MRI (Magnetic Resonance Image are the valuable anatomic diagnostic radiographic devices. The best method of operation is translabirynthine approach (TLA, since it has the advantages such as an easy access to nerve paths and being the nearest path to CPA (Cerebellopontine Angle. Physicians ought to talk to patients about the importance of the microscopic surgery, surgical methods, and their probable diverse effects such as hearing loss, facial nerve palsy, and intracranial problems.

  16. What is the real incidence of vestibular schwannoma?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tos, Mirko; Stangerup, Sven-Eric; Cayé-Thomasen, Per;

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To present the incidence of vestibular schwannoma (VS) in Denmark, compare the incidence with that of previous periods, and discuss the real incidence of VS. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PATIENTS: Prospective registration of all diagnosed VS in Denmark, with a population of 5.1 to 5.2 million...

  17. Complications of Microsurgery of Vestibular Schwannoma

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    Jan Betka

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The aim of this study was to analyze complications of vestibular schwannoma (VS microsurgery. Material and Methods. A retrospective study was performed in 333 patients with unilateral vestibular schwannoma indicated for surgical treatment between January 1997 and December 2012. Postoperative complications were assessed immediately after VS surgery as well as during outpatient followup. Results. In all 333 patients microsurgical vestibular schwannoma (Koos grade 1: 12, grade 2: 34, grade 3: 62, and grade 4: 225 removal was performed. The main neurological complication was facial nerve dysfunction. The intermediate and poor function (HB III–VI was observed in 124 cases (45% immediately after surgery and in 104 cases (33% on the last followup. We encountered disordered vestibular compensation in 13%, permanent trigeminal nerve dysfunction in 1%, and transient lower cranial nerves (IX–XI deficit in 6%. Nonneurological complications included CSF leakage in 63% (lateral/medial variant: 99/1%, headache in 9%, and intracerebral hemorrhage in 5%. We did not encounter any case of meningitis. Conclusions. Our study demonstrates that despite the benefits of advanced high-tech equipment, refined microsurgical instruments, and highly developed neuroimaging technologies, there are still various and significant complications associated with vestibular schwannomas microsurgery.

  18. Long-term socio-economic impact of vestibular schwannoma for patients under observation and after surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tos, Tina; Caye-Thomasen, Per; Stangerup, Sven-Eric

    2003-01-01

    This study describes and compares the long-term socio-economic impact for patients diagnosed with a vestibular schwannoma and either operated on or observed. A consecutive sample of patients diagnosed with vestibular schwannoma in Denmark and either operated on (748 patients) or observed...

  19. Long-term socio-economic impact of vestibular schwannoma for patients under observation and after surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tos, Tina; Caye-Thomasen, Per; Stangerup, Sven-Eric;

    2003-01-01

    This study describes and compares the long-term socio-economic impact for patients diagnosed with a vestibular schwannoma and either operated on or observed. A consecutive sample of patients diagnosed with vestibular schwannoma in Denmark and either operated on (748 patients) or observed by the w...

  20. Preservation of auditory and vestibular function after surgical removal of bilateral vestibular schwannomas in a patient with neurofibromatosis type 2

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    Black, F. O.; Brackmann, D. E.; Hitselberger, W. E.; Purdy, J.

    1995-01-01

    The outcome of acoustic neuroma (vestibular schwannoma) surgery continues to improve rapidly. Advances can be attributed to several fields, but the most important contributions have arisen from the identification of the genes responsible for the dominant inheritance of neurofibromatosis types 1 (NF1) and 2 (NF2) and the development of magnetic resonance imaging with gadolinium enhancement for the early anatomic confirmation of the pathognomonic, bilateral vestibular schwannomas in NF2. These advances enable early diagnosis and treatment when the tumors are small in virtually all subjects at risk for NF2. The authors suggest that advising young NF2 patients to wait until complications develop, especially hearing loss, before diagnosing and operating for bilateral eighth nerve schwannomas may not always be in the best interest of the patient. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first reported case of preservation of both auditory and vestibular function in a patient after bilateral vestibular schwannoma excision.

  1. Vestibular schwannoma: anatomical, medical and surgical perspective

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    Ashfaq Ul Hassan

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The term "acoustic" is a misnomer, as the tumor rarely arises from the acoustic (or cochlear division of the vestibulocochlear nerve. The correct medical term is vestibular schwannoma, because it involves the vestibular portion of the 8th cranial nerve. They are benign, rather rare tumors. They expand in size and grow larger; they can push against the brain. While the tumor does not actually invade the brain, the pressure of the tumor can displace brain tissue. [Int J Res Med Sci 2013; 1(3.000: 178-182

  2. Facial myokymia as a presenting symptom of vestibular schwannoma.

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    Joseph B

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Facial myokymia is a rare presenting feature of a vestibular schwannoma. We present a 48 year old woman with a large right vestibular schwannoma, who presented with facial myokymia. It is postulated that facial myokymia might be due to a defect in the motor axons of the 7th nerve or due to brain stem compression by the tumor.

  3. Signal intensity change of the labyrinth in patients with surgically confirmed or radiologically diagnosed vestibular schwannoma on isotropic 3D fluid-attenuated inversion recovery MR imaging at 3 T

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    Lee, In Ho; Kim, Hyung-Jin; Kim, Eunhee; Moon, Jung Won; Kim, Sung Tae; Kim, Keon Ha; Jeon, Pyoung; Byun, Hong Sik [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea); Chung, Won Ho [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea)

    2010-04-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the signal intensity (SI) change of the labyrinth in patients with vestibular schwannoma on isotropic 3D fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) imaging at 3 T. Thirty-four patients with surgically confirmed or radiologically diagnosed vestibular schwannoma were included in this study. Retrospectively, we visually and quantitatively compared the SIs of the cochlea and vestibule on the affected side with those on the unaffected side. We also investigated whether there was correlation between the SI ratios (SIRs) of the labyrinth and the audiometric findings. On 3D FLAIR images, the SI of the cochlea and vestibule on the affected side was significantly increased in 97% (33/34) and 91% (31/34), respectively. While the SI of the cochlea was diffusely increased, that of the vestibule was only partially increased. Quantitative study also revealed statistically significantly higher SIRs of the cochlea (0.99 {+-} 0.29) and vestibule (0.73 {+-} 0.31) on the affected side, compared with the cochlea (0.47 {+-} 0.20) and vestibule (0.19 {+-} 0.10) on the unaffected side. There was no significant correlation of the SIRs of the labyrinth with the degree of hearing loss. In patients with vestibular schwannoma, isotropic 3D FLAIR imaging is a useful method for the evaluation of the SI changes of the labyrinth. (orig.)

  4. Vestibular schwannoma with contralateral facial pain – case report

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    Ghodsi Mohammad

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vestibular schwannoma (acoustic neuroma most commonly presents with ipsilateral disturbances of acoustic, vestibular, trigeminal and facial nerves. Presentation of vestibular schwannoma with contralateral facial pain is quite uncommon. Case presentation Among 156 cases of operated vestibular schwannoma, we found one case with unusual presentation of contralateral hemifacial pain. Conclusion The presentation of contralateral facial pain in the vestibular schwannoma is rare. It seems that displacement and distortion of the brainstem and compression of the contralateral trigeminal nerve in Meckel's cave by the large mass lesion may lead to this atypical presentation. The best practice in these patients is removal of the tumour, although persistent contralateral pain after operation has been reported.

  5. Repeat Gamma Knife surgery for vestibular schwannomas

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    Lonneville, Sarah; Delbrouck, Carine; Renier, Cécile; Devriendt, Daniel; Massager, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Background: Gamma Knife (GK) surgery is a recognized treatment option for the management of small to medium-sized vestibular schwannoma (VS) associated with high-tumor control and low morbidity. When a radiosurgical treatment fails to stop tumor growth, repeat GK surgery can be proposed in selected cases. Methods: A series of 27 GK retreatments was performed in 25 patients with VS; 2 patients underwent three procedures. The median time interval between GK treatments was 45 months. The median margin dose used for the first, second, and third GK treatments was 12 Gy, 12 Gy, and 14 Gy, respectively. Six patients (4 patients for the second irradiation and 2 patients for the third irradiation) with partial tumor regrowth were treated only on the growing part of the tumor using a median margin dose of 13 Gy. The median tumor volume was 0.9, 2.3, and 0.7 cc for the first, second, and third treatments, respectively. Stereotactic positron emission tomography (PET) guidance was used for dose planning in 6 cases. Results: Mean follow-up duration was 46 months (range 24–110). At the last follow-up, 85% of schwannomas were controlled. The tumor volume decreased, remained unchanged, or increased after retreatment in 15, 8, and 4 cases, respectively. Four patients had PET during follow-up, and all showed a significant metabolic decrease of the tumor. Hearing was not preserved after retreatment in any patients. New facial or trigeminal palsy did not occur after retreatment. Conclusions: Our results support the long-term efficacy and low morbidity of repeat GK treatment for selected patients with tumor growth after initial treatment. PMID:26500799

  6. Normal pressure hydrocephalus after gamma knife radiosurgery for vestibular schwannoma

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    Mohammed T

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Vestibular schwannomas are not uncommon, and gamma knife radiosurgery is one of the treatment options for symptomatic tumors. Hydrocephalus is a complication of gamma knife treatment of vestibular schwannoma, though the mechanism of the development of hydrocephalus remains controversial. We present an unusual case of normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH after gamma knife radiosurgery of a vestibular schwannoma in which the timeline of events strongly suggests that gamma knife played a contributory role in the development of the hydrocephalus. This is probably the first case of NPH post radiosurgery with normal cerebrospinal fluid protein. Communicating hydrocephalus should be treated with placement of shunt while non-communicating hydrocephalus can be treated with third ventriculostomy. Frequent monitoring and early intervention post radiosurgery is highly recommended to prevent irreversible cerebral damage.

  7. Surgical outcome in cystic vestibular schwannomas

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    Nair, Suresh; Baldawa, Sachin S.; Gopalakrishnan, Chittur Viswanathan; Menon, Girish; Vikas, Vazhayil; Sudhir, Jayanand B.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cystic vestibular schwannomas (VS) form a rare subgroup that differs from the solid variant clinically, radiologically, and histopathologically. These tumors also vary in their surgical outcome and carry a different risk of post-operative complications. We analyzed our series of 64 patients with cystic VS and discuss the technical difficulties related to total excision of these tumors and focus on complication avoidance. Materials and Methods: A retrospective review of cystic VS surgically managed over a span of 11 years. The case records were evaluated to record the clinical symptoms and signs, imaging findings, surgical procedure, complications, and follow-up data. Post-operative facial nerve palsy was analyzed with respect to tumor size and tumor type. Results: Progressive hearing impairment was the most common initial symptom (76.6%). Atypical initial symptoms were present in 15 patients (23.4%). Preoperatively, 78% patients had good facial nerve function (HB grade 1, 2) and 22% had intermediate (HB grade 3, 4) to poor (HB grade 5 and 6) function. Mean tumor size was 4.1 cm. Complete tumor removal was achieved in 53 patients (83%). The facial nerve was anatomically intact but thinned out after tumor excision in 38 patients (59.4%). Ninety percent patients had either intermediate or poor facial nerve function at follow-up. Poor facial nerve outcome was associated with giant tumors and peripherally located, thin-walled cystic tumors. Conclusion: Resection of cystic VS is complicated by peritumoral adhesions of the capsule to the nerve. Extensive manipulation of the nerve in order to dissect the tumor–nerve barrier results in worse facial nerve outcome. The outcome is worse in peripherally located, thin-walled cystic VS as compared to centrally located, thick-walled cystic tumors. Subtotal excision may be justified, especially in tumors with dense adhesion of the cyst wall to the facial nerve in order to preserve nerve integrity. PMID:27366248

  8. Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy of vestibular schwannomas accelerates hearing loss

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    Rasmussen, Rune; Claesson, Magnus; Stangerup, Sven-Eric

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate long-term tumor control and hearing preservation rates in patients with vestibular schwannoma treated with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT), comparing hearing preservation rates to an untreated control group. The relationship between radiation dose to the cochlea...... and hearing preservation was also investigated....

  9. 前庭神经鞘瘤%Vestibular schwannoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    焦德让

    2003-01-01

    @@ 前庭神经鞘瘤(vestibular schwannoma,VS)亦称听神经瘤(acoustic neuroma),是颅内较为常见的良性肿瘤之一,约占颅内良性肿瘤的10%,占小脑桥脑角(cerebellopontine angle,CPA)肿瘤的65%~72%.

  10. Sociodemographic factors and vestibular schwannoma: a Danish nationwide cohort study

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    Schüz, Joachim; Steding-Jessen, Marianne; Hansen, Søren;

    2010-01-01

    Vestibular schwannoma (VS) (or acoustic neuroma) accounts for about 5%-6% of all intracranial tumors; little is known about the etiology. We investigated the association between various sociodemographic indicators and VS in a cohort of 3.26 million Danish residents, with 1087 cases identified in 35...

  11. Socio-demographic distribution of vestibular schwannomas in Denmark

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    Stepanidis, Karen; Kessel, Marie; Caye-Thomasen, Per

    2014-01-01

    CONCLUSION: Vestibular schwannomas (VSs) are diagnosed less frequently in the remote parts of Denmark, whereas the diagnostic age and tumor size is the same across the different socio-demographic areas of Denmark. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether VSs are diagnosed equally often in different socio-demographic...... of socio-demographic areas elaborated by Demarks Statistic. RESULTS: The mean national incidence increased almost linearly over the time period from 6.1 per million per year in the first period from 1976 to 1984, to 22.1 per million per year in the last period from 2003 to 2012. There was a lower incidence...... at the end of the period in the remote areas compared with the other socio-demographic areas (1976-1984, p = 0.05 and 2003-2011, p = 0.001). The mean age at diagnosis increased during the period, from 52.6 years in the first period to 58.6 years in the last period. There was no significant difference...

  12. Vestibular function and quality of life in vestibular schwannoma: does size matter?

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    Judith eWagner

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Patients with vestibular schwannoma (VS frequently suffer from disabling vestibular symptoms. This prospective follow-up study evaluates vestibular and auditory function and impairment of quality of life due to vertigo, dizziness and imbalance in patients with unilateral vestibular schwannoma of different sizes before/ after microsurgical or radiosurgical treatment. Methods. 38 patients with unilateral vestibular schwannoma were included. 22 received microsurgery, 16 cyberknife radiosurgery. Two follow-ups took place after a median of 50 and 186.5 days. Patients received a standardized neuro-ophthalmological examination, electronystagmography with bithermal caloric testing, and pure-tone audiometry. Quality of life was evaluated with the Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI. Patient data was grouped and analyzed according to the size of the VS (group 1: < 20mm vs group 2: ≥ 20mm. Results. In group 1, the median loss of vestibular function was +10.5% as calculated by Jongkees Formula (range –43;+52; group 2: median + 36%, range –56; +90. The median change of DHI scores was –9 in group 1 (range –68;30 and +2 in group 2 (–54;+20. Median loss of hearing was 4dB (-42;93 in group 1 and 12dB in group 2 (5;42.Conclusions. Loss of vestibular function in vestibular schwannoma clearly correlates with tumor size. However, loss of vestibular function was not strictly associated with a long-term deterioration of quality of life. This may be due to central compensation of vestibular deficits in long-standing large tumors. Loss of hearing before treatment was significantly influenced by the age of the patient but not by tumor size. At follow-up 1 and 2, hearing was significantly worse in those patients with a large VS and after microsurgical treatment.

  13. The clinical characteristics and treatment for sudden sensorineural hearing loss with vestibular schwannoma.

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    Lin, Chang; Gong, Qilin; Zuo, Wenjing; Zhang, Rong; Zhou, Aidong

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study is to analyze the clinical characteristics and treatment of sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) patients with vestibular schwannoma (VS). The clinical features of the VS patients were explored by retrospectively analyzing the clinical data from 542 cases of SSNHL patients between January 2008 and March 2013. There were 10 cases (10 ears) diagnosed with VS in 542 cases of SSNHL patients (10 ears, 1.85 %), 3 males, 7 females, with a range of 28-57 years. Among all the cases, eight patients with abnormal ABR, ten with ear ipsilateral stapedius reflexes which were completely not elicited and seven patients with healthy ear contralateral stapedius reflexes which were completely not elicited. Neuromas were classified by Koos grades according to size (8 of grade I, 1 of grade II, 1 of grade IV). Eight small VS  patients were taken waiting and MRI therapy strategies. Meanwhile, we used glucocorticoid treatment and timely and short-term medication to improve the microcirculation of the inner ear for these patients. And four cases' hearing was improved. Some vestibular schwannomas have SSNHL as initial symptoms, especially the small ones in internal auditory canal. To prevent misdiagnosis or leak-diagnosis, MRI should be performed as a routine test for SSNHL, and ABR is sometimes necessary for SSNHL patients. It is also necessary to give appropriate treatment to protect hearing of the small vestibular schwannoma patients whose first symptoms are diagnosed as SSNHL in acute phase.

  14. STATE ANXIETY, SUBJECTIVE IMBALANCE AND HANDICAP IN VESTIBULAR SCHWANNOMA

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    Yougan Saman

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTEvidence is emerging of a significant clinical and neuro-anatomical relationship between balance and anxiety. Research has suggested a potentially priming effect with anxiety symptoms predicting a worsening of balance function in patients with underlying balance dysfunction. We propose to show that a vestibular stimulus is responsible for an increase in state anxiety and there is a relationship between increased state anxiety and worsening balance function. Aims1.To quantify state anxiety following a vestibular stimulus in patients with a chronic vestibular deficit.2.To determine if state anxiety during a vestibular stimulus would correlate with the severity of chronic balance symptoms and handicap. MethodsTwo separate cohorts Vestibular Schwannoma (VS patients underwent vestibular tests (electronystagmography, cervical and ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials and caloric responses and questionnaire assessment (Vertigo handicap Questionnaire, Vertigo Symptom Scale, State Trait Anxiety InventoryFifteen post resection Vestibular schwannoma patients, with complete unilateral vestibular deafferentation, were assessed at a minimum of 6 months after surgery in Experiment 1 (Aim 1. Forty-five patients with VS in-situ and with preserved vestibular function formed the cohort for Experiment 2 (Aim 2. Experiment 1: VS subjects (N=15 with a complete post-resection unilateral vestibular deafferentation completed a State anxiety questionnaire before caloric assessment and again afterwards with the point of maximal vertigo as the reference (Aim 1. Experiment 2: State anxiety measured at the point of maximal vertigo following a caloric assessment was compared between two groups of presenting with balance symptoms (Group 1 N=26 and without balance symptoms (Group 2 N=11 (Aim 2. The presence of balance symptoms was defined as having a positive score on the VSS-VER.ResultsIn experiment 1, a significant difference (p<0.01 was found when comparing

  15. Calcification of vestibular schwannoma: a case report and literature review

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    Zhang Yang

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Calcification rarely occurs in vestibular schwannoma (VS, and only seven cases of calcified VS have been reported in the literature. Here, we report a 48-year-old man with VS, who had a history of progressive left-sided hearing loss for 3 years. Neurological examination revealed that he had left-sided hearing loss and left cerebellar ataxia. Magnetic resonance imaging and computerized tomography angiography showed a mass with calcification in the left cerebellopontine angle (CPA. The tumor was successfully removed via suboccipital craniotomy, and postoperative histopathology showed that the tumor was a schwannoma. We reviewed seven cases of calcified VS that were previously reported in the literature, and we analyzed and summarized the characteristics of these tumors, including the calcification, texture, and blood supply. We conclude that calcification in VS is associated with its texture and blood supply, and these characteristics affect the surgical removal of the tumor.

  16. Prediction of Balance Compensation After Vestibular Schwannoma Surgery.

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    Parietti-Winkler, Cécile; Lion, Alexis; Frère, Julien; Perrin, Philippe P; Beurton, Renaud; Gauchard, Gérome C

    2016-06-01

    Background Balance compensation after vestibular schwannoma (VS) surgery is under the influence of specific preoperative patient and tumor characteristics. Objective To prospectively identify potential prognostic factors for balance recovery, we compared the respective influence of these preoperative characteristics on balance compensation after VS surgery. Methods In 50 patients scheduled for VS surgical ablation, we measured postural control before surgery (BS), 8 (AS8) days after, and 90 (AS90) days after surgery. Based on factors found previously in the literature, we evaluated age, body mass index and preoperative physical activity (PA), tumor grade, vestibular status, and preference for visual cues to control balance as potential prognostic factors using stepwise multiple regression models. Results An asymmetric vestibular function was the sole significant explanatory factor for impaired balance performance BS, whereas the preoperative PA alone significantly contributed to higher performance at AS8. An evaluation of patients' balance recovery over time showed that PA and vestibular status were the 2 significant predictive factors for short-term postural compensation (BS to AS8), whereas none of these preoperative factors was significantly predictive for medium-term postoperative postural recovery (AS8 to AS90). Conclusions We identified specific preoperative patient and vestibular function characteristics that may predict postoperative balance recovery after VS surgery. Better preoperative characterization of these factors in each patient could inform more personalized presurgical and postsurgical management, leading to a better, more rapid balance recovery, earlier return to normal daily activities and work, improved quality of life, and reduced medical and societal costs.

  17. Germinoma in the Internal Auditory Canal Mimicking a Vestibular Schwannoma

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    Rubén Martín-Hernández

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The appearance of a primary germinoma in the central nervous system but not on or near the midline or within the brain is exceptional. It may occur at any age; however, it is rare in patients over 50 years old. Only a handful of cases of germinomas located in the cerebellopontine angle were presented, but to our knowledge, there has been no description of an isolated germinoma in the internal auditory canal. We report a case of germinoma in the internal auditory canal in a 51-year-old man simulating the clinical and radiological characteristics of a vestibular schwannoma.

  18. Schwannoma vestibular: involução tumoral espontânea Vestibular Schwannoma: spontaneous tumor involution

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    Norma de Oliveira Penido

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available A história natural dos schwannomas vestibulares ainda não está totalmente elucidada, mas sua maioria tende a apresentar crescimento lento, muitos permanecendo sem sintomas durante toda a vida do paciente. Cerca de 69% deste tipo de tumor diagnosticados não apresentam crescimento e, destes, 16% chegam a apresentar regressão tumoral. Considerando os tumores que apresentam crescimento, cerca de 70% crescem menos de 2 mm ao ano. O avanço nos métodos de diagnóstico por imagem, particularmente à ressonância magnética com contraste de gadolínio, permite o diagnóstico cada vez mais de lesões com sintomas mínimos e tamanhos menores. O tratamento de escolha para estes tumores ainda é a ressecção completa do tumor. As técnicas cirúrgicas apresentaram grande avanço nas últimas décadas, o que possibilitou diminuição da mortalidade. Assim, a cirurgia, que antes tinha como objetivo apenas a ressecção completa do tumor, agora visa também à preservação da audição e da função do nervo facial. Considerações finais: Considerando-se sua história natural, abre-se a possibilidade de uma conduta conservadora já que o ritmo de crescimento no primeiro ano após o diagnóstico prediz o comportamento do tumor nos próximos anos. A conduta conservadora não implica em repúdio à cirurgia, devendo ser utilizada em casos de aumento tumoral, piora dos sintomas ou desejo do paciente. Além disso, em relatos de literatura não há diferença estatisticamente significante entre os pacientes submetidos à cirurgia logo após o diagnóstico ou após conduta conservadora inicial, no que diz respeito às seqüelas pós-operatórias.The natural history of Vestibular Schwannomas (VS is yet not totally known, but most of them have the tendency to slow growth, sometimes without any kind of symptoms during the individual’s entire time. About 69% of diagnosed VS do not grow at all and 16% of these can even regress. Considering tumors that grow

  19. Prevalence of hydrocephalus in 157 patients with vestibular schwannoma

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    Rogg, Jeffrey M.; Ahn, S.H.; Tung, G.A. [Rhode Island Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Providence, Rhode Island (United States); Reinert, S.E. [Rhode Island Hospital, Lifespan Medical Computing, Providence, Rhode Island (United States); Noren, G. [Rhode Island Hospital, Department of Neurosurgery, Providence, Rhode Island (United States)

    2005-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of hydrocephalus in patients with vestibular schwannoma. A second objective was to investigate possible etiologies for hydrocephalus in this population by attempting to correlate the incidence and severity of hydrocephalus with tumor volume and extent of fourth ventricular compression. The MRI examinations of 157 adult patients with vestibular schwannoma were retrospectively reviewed. Tumor size was quantified, and the presence of accompanying hydrocephalus was assessed, categorized as communicating type or non-communicating type and then rated as mild, moderate or severe (grades 1-3). Next, the degree of fourth ventricular distortion caused by tumor mass effect was evaluated and categorized as mild, moderate or severe (grades 1-3). Spearman's rank correlation coefficient was used to test the relationships between tumor volume and (1) the extent of fourth ventricular effacement and (2) severity of hydrocephalus. Hydrocephalus was present in 28/157 (18%) cases and was categorized as mild in 11/28 (39%), moderate in 15/28 (54%) and severe in 2/28 (7%). Communicating-type hydrocephalus was present in 17/28 (61%) and non-communicating type in 11/28 (39%). There was a positive correlation between the grade of non-communicating hydrocephalus and tumor volume (r=0.38; P<0.001) and between the severity of fourth ventricular compression and extent of hydrocephalus in this group(r=0.43; P<0.001). (orig.)

  20. Gamma Knife radiosurgery for vestibular schwannoma: case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthurs, Benjamin J; Lamoreaux, Wayne T; Giddings, Neil A; Fairbanks, Robert K; Mackay, Alexander R; Demakas, John J; Cooke, Barton S; Lee, Christopher M

    2009-12-18

    Vestibular schwannomas, also called acoustic neuromas, are benign tumors of the vestibulocochlear nerve. Patients with these tumours almost always present with signs of hearing loss, and many also experience tinnitus, vertigo, and equilibrium problems. Following diagnosis with contrast enhanced MRI, patients may choose to observe the tumour with subsequent scans or seek active treatment in the form of microsurgery, radiosurgery, or radiotherapy. Unfortunately, definitive guidelines for treating vestibular schwannomas are lacking, because of insufficient evidence comparing the outcomes of therapeutic modalities.We present a contemporary case report, describing the finding of a vestibular schwannoma in a patient who presented with dizziness and a "clicking" sensation in the ear, but no hearing deficit. Audible clicking is a symptom that, to our knowledge, has not been associated with vestibular schwannoma in the literature. We discuss the diagnosis and patient's decision-making process, which led to treatment with Gamma Knife radiosurgery. Treatment resulted in an excellent radiographic response and complete hearing preservation. This case highlights an atypical presentation of vestibular schwannoma, associated with audible "clicks" and normal hearing. We also provide a concise review of the available literature on modern vestibular schwannoma treatment, which may be useful in guiding treatment decisions.

  1. Gamma Knife radiosurgery for vestibular schwannoma: case report and review of the literature

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    Fairbanks Robert K

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Vestibular schwannomas, also called acoustic neuromas, are benign tumors of the vestibulocochlear nerve. Patients with these tumours almost always present with signs of hearing loss, and many also experience tinnitus, vertigo, and equilibrium problems. Following diagnosis with contrast enhanced MRI, patients may choose to observe the tumour with subsequent scans or seek active treatment in the form of microsurgery, radiosurgery, or radiotherapy. Unfortunately, definitive guidelines for treating vestibular schwannomas are lacking, because of insufficient evidence comparing the outcomes of therapeutic modalities. We present a contemporary case report, describing the finding of a vestibular schwannoma in a patient who presented with dizziness and a "clicking" sensation in the ear, but no hearing deficit. Audible clicking is a symptom that, to our knowledge, has not been associated with vestibular schwannoma in the literature. We discuss the diagnosis and patient's decision-making process, which led to treatment with Gamma Knife radiosurgery. Treatment resulted in an excellent radiographic response and complete hearing preservation. This case highlights an atypical presentation of vestibular schwannoma, associated with audible "clicks" and normal hearing. We also provide a concise review of the available literature on modern vestibular schwannoma treatment, which may be useful in guiding treatment decisions.

  2. Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy of Vestibular Schwannomas Accelerates Hearing Loss

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    Rasmussen, Rune, E-mail: rune333@gmail.com [Department of Neurosurgery, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Claesson, Magnus [Department of Neurosurgery, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Stangerup, Sven-Eric [Ear, Nose, and Throat Department, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Roed, Henrik [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Christensen, Ib Jarle [Finsen Laboratory, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Caye-Thomasen, Per [Ear, Nose, and Throat Department, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Juhler, Marianne [Department of Neurosurgery, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2012-08-01

    Objective: To evaluate long-term tumor control and hearing preservation rates in patients with vestibular schwannoma treated with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT), comparing hearing preservation rates to an untreated control group. The relationship between radiation dose to the cochlea and hearing preservation was also investigated. Methods and Materials: Forty-two patients receiving FSRT between 1997 and 2008 with a minimum follow-up of 2 years were included. All patients received 54 Gy in 27-30 fractions during 5.5-6.0 weeks. Clinical and audiometry data were collected prospectively. From a 'wait-and-scan' group, 409 patients were selected as control subjects, matched by initial audiometric parameters. Radiation dose to the cochlea was measured using the original treatment plan and then related to changes in acoustic parameters. Results: Actuarial 2-, 4-, and 10-year tumor control rates were 100%, 91.5%, and 85.0%, respectively. Twenty-one patients had serviceable hearing before FSRT, 8 of whom (38%) retained serviceable hearing at 2 years after FSRT. No patients retained serviceable hearing after 10 years. At 2 years, hearing preservation rates in the control group were 1.8 times higher compared with the group receiving FSRT (P=.007). Radiation dose to the cochlea was significantly correlated to deterioration of the speech reception threshold (P=.03) but not to discrimination loss. Conclusion: FSRT accelerates the naturally occurring hearing loss in patients with vestibular schwannoma. Our findings, using fractionation of radiotherapy, parallel results using single-dose radiation. The radiation dose to the cochlea is correlated to hearing loss measured as the speech reception threshold.

  3. Schwanoma vestibular como causa de surdez súbita Vestibular schwannoma presenting as sudden hearing loss

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    Eduardo M. Kosugi

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available A Surdez Súbita (SS é um sintoma causado por mais de 60 doenças diferentes, dentre elas, o Schwanoma Vestibular (SV. Shaia & Sheehy (1976 apresentaram uma incidência de 1% de SV em 1220 casos de SS. Não há características específicas para o diagnóstico do SV, sendo a ressonância magnética (RM o exame de escolha. OBJETIVO: Verificar a real incidência de SV em casuísticas de SS com a realização de RM. FORMA DE ESTUDO: Coorte transversal. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: Estudo prospectivo com a realização de RM com contraste de gadolínio em todos os pacientes com SS do serviço de urgência em Otorrinolaringologia do Hospital São Paulo no período de abril de 2001 a maio de 2003. RESULTADOS: Foram realizados exames de RM em 49 pacientes que apresentaram SS, sendo diagnosticados 3 (6,1% casos de SV. CONCLUSÃO: A incidência real de SV em casuísticas de SS pode ser maior do que o classicamente descrito na literatura, devido ao subdiagnóstico pela não-utilização da RM de rotina nestes casos.The sudden Hearing Loss (SHL is a symptom caused by more than 60 different diseases, including Vestibular Schwannoma (VS. Shaia & Sheehy (1976 presented a study with 1,220 cases of SHL reporting 1% incidence of VS. There is no specific characteristic for the diagnosis of VS and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI is the gold standard exam to diagnose such disease. AIM: To determine the real incidence of VS presenting as SHL performing MRI in all patients with SHL. STUDY DESIGN: Transversal cohort. MATERIL AND METHOD: Prospective study in which MRI with gadolinium was performed in all patients with SHL in the Emergency Service of Sao Paulo Hospital from April 2001 through May 2003. RESULTS: MRI was performed in 49 patients with symptoms of SHL, with three cases (6.1% of VS found. CONCLUSION: The real incidence of VS presenting as SHL may be greater than that mentioned in conventional reports probably because MRI had not been performed in all patients with

  4. Long-term mobile phone use and the risk of vestibular schwannoma: a Danish nationwide cohort study

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    Schüz, Joachim; Steding-Jessen, Marianne; Hansen, Søren

    2011-01-01

    Vestibular schwannomas grow in the region within the brain where most of the energy by radiofrequency electromagnetic fields from using mobile phones is absorbed. The authors used 2 Danish nationwide cohort studies, one a study of all adult Danes subscribing for a mobile phone in 1995 or earlier...... and one on sociodemographic factors and cancer risk, and followed subjects included in both cohorts for occurrence of vestibular schwannoma up to 2006 inclusively. In this study including 2.9 million subjects, a long-term mobile phone subscription of ≥11 years was not related to an increased vestibular...... reported holding their mobile phone to the right ear. Vestibular schwannomas in long-term male subscribers were not of larger size than expected. Overall, no evidence was found that mobile phone use is related to the risk of vestibular schwannoma. Because of the usually slow growth of vestibular schwannoma...

  5. Long-term mobile phone use and the risk of vestibular schwannoma: a Danish nationwide cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schüz, Joachim; Steding-Jessen, Marianne; Hansen, Søren

    2011-01-01

    Vestibular schwannomas grow in the region within the brain where most of the energy by radiofrequency electromagnetic fields from using mobile phones is absorbed. The authors used 2 Danish nationwide cohort studies, one a study of all adult Danes subscribing for a mobile phone in 1995 or earlier...... and one on sociodemographic factors and cancer risk, and followed subjects included in both cohorts for occurrence of vestibular schwannoma up to 2006 inclusively. In this study including 2.9 million subjects, a long-term mobile phone subscription of =11 years was not related to an increased vestibular...... reported holding their mobile phone to the right ear. Vestibular schwannomas in long-term male subscribers were not of larger size than expected. Overall, no evidence was found that mobile phone use is related to the risk of vestibular schwannoma. Because of the usually slow growth of vestibular schwannoma...

  6. Evaluation of Reported Malignant Transformation of Vestibular Schwannoma: De Novo and After Stereotactic Radiosurgery or Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maducdoc, Marlon M; Ghavami, Yaser; Linskey, Mark E; Djalilian, Hamid R

    2015-09-01

    To critically analyze each reported case of malignant transformation of vestibular schwannoma (VS) after either stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) or microsurgery (MS). We searched the Pubmed/Medline database using the relevant key words vestibular schwannoma, acoustic neuroma, malignant, transformation, radiation, induced, stereotactic, radiosurgery, malignancy, GammaKnife, and CyberKnife and combinations thereof. Inclusion criteria for malignant transformation of VS after SRS included histopathology of initially benign VS, subsequent histopathology confirming malignant VS, reasonable latency period between malignancy and benign diagnoses. A neurotologist and a skull base neurosurgeon independently assessed each case report for quality, entry, exclusion criteria, and comparability of extracted data. We calculated median age, latency times, and survival times for each case report. Malignant transformation has been documented to occur after either SRS or MS. Eight cases were included that showed histopathologic evidence of malignant transformation after SRS and MS. Four cases of malignant transformation were included that demonstrated malignant transformation after MS only. Malignant transformation of VS can also occur de novo, and de novo malignant VSs are also encountered, which can confound a causal inference from either SRS or MS. Eighteen cases of primary malignant VS were included. Studies that were identified but not included in the review are summarized and tabulated. We found 12 studies of malignant transformation associated with NF2. The potential mechanism leading to malignant transformation of VS seems more obvious for SRS and is less understood for MS. Given a low incidence of de novo malignant schwannoma, the possibility that these are spontaneous events in either setting cannot be ruled out. Risk of malignant transformation of VS after either SRS or MS is not zero; however, the magnitude of this risk is probably minimal based on the evidence from eight

  7. Expression of estrogen and progesterone receptors in vestibular schwannomas and their clinical significance

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    Pandey Rakesh

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective The objective was to determine the expression of estrogen and progesterone receptors in vestibular schwannomas as well as to determine predictive factors for estrogen and progesterone receptor positivity. Materials and methods The study included 100 cases of vestibular schwannomas operated from January 2006 to June 2009. The clinical details were noted from the medical case files. Formaldehyde-fixed parafiin-embedded archival vestibular schwannomas specimens were used for the immunohistochemical assessment of estrogen and progesterone receptors. Results Neither estrogen nor progesterone receptors could be detected in any of our cases by means of well known immunohistochemical method using well documented monoclonal antibodies. In the control specimens, a strongly positive reaction could be seen. Conclusion No estrogen and progesterone receptor could be found in any of our 100 cases of vestibular schwannomas. Hence our study does not support a causative role of estrogen and progesterone in the growth of vestibular schwannoma as well as hormonal manipulation in the treatment of this tumor.

  8. The Molecular Biology of Vestibular Schwannomas and Its Association with Hearing Loss: A Review

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    Erika Celis-Aguilar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hearing loss is the most common symptom in patients with vestibular schwannoma (VS. In the past, compressive mechanisms caused by the tumoral mass and its growth have been regarded as the most likely causes of the hearing loss associated with VS. Interestingly, new evidence proposes molecular mechanisms as an explanation for such hearing loss. Among the molecular mechanisms proposed are methylation of TP73, negative expression of cyclin D1, expression of B7-H1, increased expression of the platelet-derived growth factor A, underexpression of PEX5L, RAD54B, and PSMAL, and overexpression of CEA. Many molecular mechanisms are involved in vestibular schwannoma development; we review some of these mechanisms with special emphasis on hearing loss associated with vestibular schwannoma.

  9. Results achieved in the treatment of patients with vestibular schwannoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freigang, Bernd; Rudolf, Jan

    2004-01-01

    Personal experience gathered with the treatment of 264 vestibular schwannoma (VS) at the Magdeburg University ENT Hospital is analysed. ABR Audiometry is useful as a screening, even though it yielded false-negative values in 12.7% (n = 33) for intrameatal VS and 16.9% for all VS, despite accurate evaluation. Latency increases of Waves I, III and V and their intraaural comparison exhibited a statistically significant difference for the VS levels proposed by TOS. The mean of intrameatal VS too was found to have longer latencies compared with the normal-hearing ears of the patients. In the individual case, with threshold hearing normal, anamnestic findings as well as otoneurological evidence provide an early indication for enhanced MRI, CISS imaging, or individual 3D reconstruction of the pontocerebellar cisterna. Adopting intraoperative monitoring of the facial nerve and the cochlea as well as the Pars acustica by means of far-field and near-field electrodes, a good facial 'mobility' was achieved in 95.3%, and a useful audition (AAO-HNS Types A and B) in 60%. Monitoring is beneficial as it enhances the reliability and improves the subtle preparation during surgery. The power of hearing improved postoperatively within six months and remained at a good level over two years. From our perspective, otorhinolaryngologists are the right specialists to attend to VS.

  10. Vestibular schwannoma in patients with sudden sensorineural hearing loss.

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    Lee, Jong Dae; Lee, Byung Don; Hwang, Sun Chul

    2011-03-01

    Sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) has several etiologies. It may be a presenting symptom of vestibular schwannoma (VS). This study aimed to establish the incidence of VS in patients with SSNHL, and we report several unusual cases among these patients. We reviewed retrospectively the charts and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of all adult patients who presented with SSNHL between 2002 and 2008. We utilized three-dimensional fast imaging with steady-state acquisition temporal MRI as a screening method. Of the 295 patients with SSNHL, VS was found in 12 (4%). All patients had intrameatal or small to medium-sized tumors. There were three cases with SSNHL in one ear and an incidental finding of intracanalicular VS in the contralateral ear. There were four cases of VS that showed good recovery from SSNHL with corticosteroid treatment. There were two cases that mimicked labyrinthitis with hearing loss and vertigo. A greater number of cases than expected of VS were detected in patients with SSNHL, as a result of increasing widespread use of MRI. Various unusual findings in these patients were identified. MRI would seem to be mandatory in all cases of SSNHL.

  11. Intraoperative auditory monitoring in vestibular schwannoma surgery: new trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmerber, Sébastien; Lavieille, Jean-Pierre; Dumas, Georges; Herve, Thierry

    2004-01-01

    To investigate the efficiency of a new method of brainstem auditory-evoked potential (BAEP) monitoring during complete vestibular schwannoma (VS) resection with attempted hearing preservation. Dedicated software providing near real-time recording was developed using a rejection strategy of artifacts based on spectral analysis. A small sample number (maximum 200) is required and results are obtained within 10 s. Fourteen consecutive patients with hearing class A operated on for VS, in an attempt to preserve hearing, participated in the investigation. Postoperatively, 7 patients (50%) had useful hearing (hearing class A, 4/14; hearing class B, 3/14) on the operated side. Seven patients (50%) were reduced to hearing class D. Drilling of the internal auditory canal (IAC) and tumor removal at the lateral end of the IAC were identified as the two most critical steps for achieving hearing preservation. Intraoperative BAEP monitoring was sensitive in detecting auditory damage with useful feedback but its effectiveness in preventing irreversible hearing impairment was not demonstrated in this study. Combined BAEP and direct auditory nerve monitoring using the same equipment will be performed in the future in an attempt to enhance the chances of preventing irreversible hearing damage, and possibly to improve the hearing outcome significantly.

  12. [Changes in taste ability in patients with vestibular schwannoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boessert, P; Grüttner, C; van Ewijk, R; Haxel, B

    2014-07-01

    Vestibular schwannomas (VS) are rare tumors that can cause different symptoms due to their anatomical relationship to the cranial nerves in the inner auditory canal. So far little data is known to the effect of VS on the somatosensory function of the intermediate nerve. This study aimed to investigate the taste function of patients suffering from single sided VS. Therefore the well validated psychophysical test "Taste Strips" has been used. 26 patients who consulted our outpatient clinic at a university hospital could be included in the study. All patients were asked carefully for their medical history. A full ENT examination was done. Each side of the anterior two thirds of the tongue was tested separately using the Taste Strips. The average age was 52 years with both gender equally represented. Throughout all age groups the taste score was lower on the tumor vs. the non affected side. Testing for significance just failed the level of 0.05. No correlation between tumor size and location of the tumor with the taste score could be detected. Only 2 patients complained of taste dysfunction. They had a taste score below the 10. percentile of their age group on tumor while normal scores on the non affected side. To sum up a decreased taste score on the tumor side vs. the non affected side could be confirmed. Only 8% of the patients complained of taste disturbance as a symptom. That supports the observation that taste is a whole mouth experience and dysfunction can be compensated.

  13. Reporting success rates in the treatment of vestibular schwannomas: are we accounting for the natural history?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Timothy; Lau, Tsz; Vasan, Rohit; Danner, Christopher; Youssef, A Samy; van Loveren, Harry; Agazzi, Siviero

    2014-06-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery is generally accepted as one of the best treatment options for vestibular schwannomas. We question whether growth control is an accurate measure of success in vestibular schwannoma treatment. We aim to clarify the success rate of stereotactic radiosurgery and adjust the reported results to the benign natural history of untreated tumors. All articles were taken from a PubMed search of the English literature from the years 2000-2011. Inclusion criteria were articles containing the number of patients treated, radiation technique, average tumor size, follow-up time, and percentage of tumors growing during follow-up. Data were extracted from 19 articles. Success rates were adjusted using published data that 17% to 30% of vestibular schwannomas grow. The average reported success rate for stereotactic radiosurgery across all articles was 95.5%. When considering 17% or 30% natural growth without intervention, the adjusted success rates became 78.2% and 86.9% respectively. These rates were obtained by applying the natural history growth percentages to any tumors not reported to be growing before radiosurgical intervention. Success in the treatment of vestibular schwannomas with stereotactic radiosurgery is often defined as lack of further growth. Recent data on the natural growth history of vestibular schwannomas raise the question of whether this is the best definition of success. We have identified a lack of continuity regarding the reporting of success and emphasize the importance of the clarification of the success of radiosurgery to make informed decisions regarding the best treatment options for vestibular schwannoma.

  14. Three cases of retroperitoneal schwannoma diagnosed by EUS-FNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Taiki Kudo; Hiroshi Kawakami; Masaki Kuwatani; Nobuyuki Ehira; Hiroaki Yamato; Kazunori Eto; Kanako Kubota; Masahiro Asaka

    2011-01-01

    Schwannomas are peripheral nerve tumors that are typically solitary and benign. Their diagnosis is largely based on surgically resected specimens. Recently, a number of case reports have indicated that retroperitoneal schwannomas could be diagnosed with endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration(EUS-FNA)We report the diagnosis of three cases of schwannoma using EUS-FNA. Subjects weree two males and one fe-twomale,ages 22, 40, and 46 years, respectively, all of whom were symptom-free. Imaging findings showed well-circumscribed round tumors.However, as the tumors could not be diagnosed using these findings alone, EUS-FNA was performed. Hematoxylin-eosin staining of the resulting tissue fragments revealed bland spindle cells with nuclear palisading. There was no disparity in nuclear sizes.Immunostaining revealed S-100 protein positivity and all cases were diagnosed as schwannomas. Ki-67 indexes were 3%-15%,2%-3%,and 3%, respectively. No case showed any signs of malignancy.As most schwannomas are benign tumors and seldom become malignant, we observed these patients without therapy. All tumors demonstrated no enlargement and no change in characteristics.Schwannomasa are almost always benign and can be observed following diagnosis by EUS-FNA.

  15. Osteoma of the internal auditory canal mimicking vestibular schwannoma: case report and review of 17 recent cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Jun; Takata, Yusuke; Miyazaki, Hiromitsu; Yahata, Izumi; Tachibana, Yasuhiko; Kobayashi, Toshimitsu; Kawase, Tetsuaki; Katori, Yukio

    2014-01-01

    Osteoma of the internal auditory canal (IAC) is an uncommon benign bone tumor. Its imaging features may be similar to other IAC lesions, such as vestibular schwannomas that are benign and usually slow-growing but sometimes life-threatening tumors. Thus, detecting IAC lesions and differentiating osteoma from other IAC lesions are both important clinically. We report a case of misdiagnosis of an IAC osteoma as an IAC schwannoma based on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging using the three-dimensional constructive interference in steady state (CISS) sequence instead of T1-weighted MR imaging with gadolinium. We also review 17 cases of IAC osteomas reported in the past 22 years. A 61-year-old female was admitted to our department with IAC lesion incidentally discovered by the CISS sequence. The lesion was diagnosed as an IAC schwannoma, and was followed up annually under "wait and scan" management. Follow-up T1-weighted MR imaging with gadolinium showed no enhancement of the tumor, and additional computed tomography (CT) of the temporal bone showed a solitary pedunculated bony lesion, resulting in the diagnosis of IAC osteoma. The CISS sequence is useful for detecting small IAC lesions, such as vestibular schwannomas. However, the CISS sequence has limitations for qualitative diagnosis and can misdiagnose osteomas as schwannomas. Use of the CISS sequence without T1-weighted MR imaging with gadolinium for the screening of a lesion of the IAC and cerebellopontine angle should consider the possibility of IAC osteomas, and temporal bone CT or T1-weighted MR imaging with gadolinium should be performed when an IAC lesion is detected.

  16. Incidence of vestibular schwannoma and incidental findings on the magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography scans of patients from a direct referral audiology clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, B Y W; Capper, R

    2012-07-01

    To identify the incidence of vestibular schwannoma amongst patients referred from a direct referral audiology clinic, and also the number of incidental findings, as seen on magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomography scans. Prospective data collection for patients referred from a direct referral audiology clinic due to audiological evidence of asymmetrical hearing loss. The audiograms, magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography scans of patients with diagnosed vestibular schwannoma were subsequently reviewed. A total of 4100 patients were seen during the study period, with 396 scans performed. Six (1.5 per cent) patients had vestibular schwannoma, while 12 (3 per cent) had significant incidental findings. Patients referred from the direct referral audiology clinic had a low incidence of vestibular schwannoma detection. Their detection rate for significant incidental findings was similar to previous reports. If the current protocol had not been in place, over 300 patients would have been needlessly added to the ENT clinic list. Thus, general practitioner referral to direct referral audiology clinics provides a cost-effective way of managing asymmetrical sensorineural hearing loss in older patients. The number of such clinics could be expanded.

  17. Schwannomas no vestibulares de cabeza y cuello: Presentación de 6 casos clínicos

    OpenAIRE

    Celedón L,Carlos; Pardo J,Javiera; Abarca A,Alfredo; Délano R,Paul H

    2011-01-01

    Introducción: Los schwannomas no vestibulares de cabeza y cuello son tumores benignos, de baja frecuencia, que pueden producir gran morbilidad dependiendo de su ubicación. Objetivo: Describir la experiencia del Servicio de Otorrinolaringología del Hospital Clínico de la Universidad de Chile en el manejo de schwannomas no vestibulares de cabeza y cuello. Material y método: Estudio retrospectivo, descriptivo de los casos de schwannomas no vestibulares de cabeza y cuello diagnosticados entre los...

  18. Decreased vestibular signal intensity on 3D-FIESTA in vestibular schwannomas differentiating from meningiomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Kazuhiro; Haneda, Jun; Okamoto, Kouichirou

    2013-02-01

    With reported characteristic MR features, it is difficult to differentiate vestibular schwannomas (VSs) from cerebellopontine angle (CPA) meningiomas (CPAMs) in some cases. This study aimed to evaluate vestibular signal intensity changes in patients with VS and those with CPAM on three-dimensional fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (3D-FIESTA), and to test the effectiveness of the signal intensity change to differentiate these two common CPA tumors. We retrospectively reviewed 21 patients with unilateral VS, six patients with unilateral CPAM, and 25 control subjects. Setting regions of interest in the bilateral vestibules and cerebellar white matter on 3D-FIESTA, we compared the ratio of the signal intensity (SIR) of the vestibule to that of the cerebellar white matter (SIRv) among the VS, CPAM, and control subject groups. We also compared the ratio of SIRv on the affected side (a-SIRv) to that on the unaffected side (AURv) between the VS and CPAM. The a-SIRv in the VS group was significantly lower than the overall SIRv in the control subjects (pre-contrast, P FIESTA was observed in patients with VS, but not in those with CPAM or in normal subjects. The signal intensity change has the potential to be used in differentiating VS from CPAM.

  19. Follow-up after gamma knife radiosurgery for vestibular schwannomas: volumetric and axial control rates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmer, F.C.A.; Hanssens, P.E.; Haren, A.E. van; Overbeeke, J.J. van; Mulder, J.J.S.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.; Graamans, K.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: A prospective long-term follow-up study was conducted to evaluate the results of gamma knife radiosurgery (GKRS) for vestibular schwannoma (VS) patients. Both axial and volumetric measurements are used to determine tumor size during follow-up. STUDY DESIGN: Individual prospect

  20. Late Malignant Transformation of a Vestibular Schwannoma without Association to NFII or Radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bashir, Asma; Poulsgaard, Lars; Broholm, Helle

    Late malignant transformation of vestibular schwannoma (VS) following irradiation has previously been reported 29 times in the literature. Here, the authors report the first late malignant transformation of VS unrelated to neurofibromatosis or radiation exposure. After undergoing a near-total exc...

  1. Late malignant transformation of vestibular schwannoma in the absence of irradiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bashir, Asma; Poulsgaard, Lars; Broholm, Helle

    2016-01-01

    Late malignant transformation of vestibular schwannoma (VS) following irradiation has previously been reported 29 times in the literature. Here, the authors report the first late malignant transformation of VS unrelated to neurofibromatosis or radiation exposure. After undergoing a near-total exc...

  2. Long-term quality of life and tumour control following gamma knife radiosurgery for vestibular schwannoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wangerid, Theresa; Bartek, Jiri; Svensson, Mikael;

    2014-01-01

    Gamma knife radiosurgery (GKRS) has for the last decades been an established treatment option for patients with small- or medium-sized vestibular schwannomas (VS), although little data is reported on long-term outcome regarding quality of life (QOL) and tumour control in this patient category...

  3. Follow-up after gamma knife radiosurgery for vestibular schwannomas: volumetric and axial control rates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmer, F.C.A.; Hanssens, P.E.; Haren, A.E. van; Overbeeke, J.J. van; Mulder, J.J.S.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.; Graamans, K.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: A prospective long-term follow-up study was conducted to evaluate the results of gamma knife radiosurgery (GKRS) for vestibular schwannoma (VS) patients. Both axial and volumetric measurements are used to determine tumor size during follow-up. STUDY DESIGN: Individual

  4. Facial nerve function after vestibular schwannoma surgery following failed conservative management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaltoft, Mikkel; Stangerup, Sven-Eric; Cayé-Thomasen, Per

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND:: As only a limited proportion of vestibular schwannomas display growth following diagnosis, an increasing number of patients are managed conservatively. Tumor growth during "wait and scan" may, however, necessitate surgery. In these cases, increased tumor size is likely to increase th...

  5. Removal of vestibular schwannoma and facial nerve preservation using small suboccipital retrosigmoid craniotomy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Ling; CHEN Li-hua; LING Feng; LIU Yun-sheng; Madjid Samii; Amir Samii

    2010-01-01

    Background Vestibular schwannoma, the commonest form of intracranial schwannoma, arises from the Schwann cells investing the vestibular nerve. At present, the surgery for vestibular schwannoma remains one of the most complicated operations demanding for surgical skills in neurosurgery. And the trend of minimal invasion should also be the major influence on the management of patients with vestibular schwannomas. We summarized the microsurgical removal experience in a recent series of vestibular schwannomas and presented the operative technique and cranial nerve preservation in order to improve the rates of total tumor removal and facial nerve preservation.Methods A retrospective analysis was performed in 145 patients over a 7-year period who suffered from vestibular schwannomas that had been microsurgicaily removed by suboccipital retrosigmoid transmeatus approach with small craniotomy. CT thinner scans revealed the tumor size in the internal auditory meatus and the relationship of the posterior wall of the internal acoustic meatus to the bone labyrinths preoperatively. Brain stem evoked potential was monitored intraoperatively. The posterior wall of the internal acoustic meatus was designedly drilled off. Patient records and operative reports, including data from the electrophysiological monitoring, follow-up audiometric examinations, and neuroradiological findings were analyzed.Results Total tumor resection was achieved in 140 cases (96.6%) and subtotal resection in 5 cases. The anatomical integrity of the facial nerve was preserved in 91.0% (132/145) of the cases. Intracranial end-to-end anastomosis of the facial nerve was performed in 7 cases. Functional preservation of the facial nerve was achieved in 115 patients (Grade Ⅰ and Grade Ⅱ, 79.3%). No patient died in this series. Preservation of nerves and vessels were as important as tumor removal dudng the operation. CT thinner scan could show the relationship between the posterior wall of the internal

  6. Hearing outcomes of vestibular schwannoma patients managed with 'wait and scan': predictive value of hearing level at diagnosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stangerup, S-E; Tos, M; Thomsen, J;

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the predictive value of both hearing level (at various frequencies) and speech discrimination for forecasting hearing outcome after a period of observation, in patients with vestibular schwannoma....

  7. Gamma knife radiosurgery for vestibular schwannomas: results of hearing preservation in relation to the cochlear radiation dose.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmer, F.C.A.; Hanssens, P.E.; Haren, A.E. van; Mulder, J.J.S.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.; Beynon, A.J.; Overbeeke, J.J. van; Graamans, K.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: This study was designed to evaluate hearing preservation after gamma knife radiosurgery (GKRS) and to determine the relation between hearing preservation and cochlear radiation dose in patients with a sporadic vestibular schwannoma (VS). METHODS: Prospective study involving

  8. Surgical management of vestibular schwannomas after failed radiation treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonaka, Yoichi; Fukushima, Takanori; Watanabe, Kentaro; Friedman, Allan H; Cunningham, Calhoun D; Zomorodi, Ali R

    2016-04-01

    Increasing numbers of patients with vestibular schwannoma (VS) have been treated with focused-beam stereotactic radiation treatment (SRT) including Gamma knife, CyberKnife, X-knife, Novalis, or proton beam therapy. The purpose of this study was to document the incidence of tumor regrowth or symptoms that worsened or first developed following SRT and to discuss surgical strategies for patients who have failed SRT for VS. A consecutive series of 39 patients with SRT failed VS were surgically treated. Clinical symptoms, tumor regrowth at follow-up, intraoperative findings, and surgical outcome were evaluated. There were 15 males and 24 females with a mean age of 51.8 years. Thirty-six patients (92.3%) demonstrated steady tumor growth after SRT. Two (5.1%) patients with slight increase of the mass underwent surgical resection because of development of unbearable facial pain. Symptoms that worsened or newly developed following SRT in this series were deafness (41%), dizziness (35.9%), facial numbness (25.6%), tinnitus (20.5%), facial nerve palsy (7.7%), and facial pain (7.7%). Intraoperative findings demonstrated fibrous changes of the tumor mass, cyst formation, and brownish-yellow or purple discoloration of the tumor capsule. Severe adhesions between the tumor capsule and cranial nerves, vessels, and the brainstem were observed in 69.2%. Additionally, the facial nerve was more fragile and irritable in all cases. Gross total resection (GTR) was achieved in 33.3% of patients, near-total resection (NTR) in 35.9%, and subtotal resection (STR) in 30.8% of patients. New facial nerve palsy was seen in seven patients (19.4%) postoperatively. Our findings suggest that patients with VS who fail SRT with either tumor progression or worsening of clinical symptoms will have an increased rate of adhesions to the neurovascular structures and may have radiation-influenced neuromalacia. Salvage surgery of radiation-failed tumors is more difficult and will have a higher risk of

  9. Trigeminal neuralgia and neuropathy in large sporadic vestibular schwannomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neff, Brian A; Carlson, Matthew L; O'Byrne, Megan M; Van Gompel, Jamie J; Driscoll, Colin L W; Link, Michael J

    2017-01-13

    OBJECTIVE The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence, presentation, and treatment outcomes of trigeminal nerve-mediated symptoms secondary to large vestibular schwannomas (VSs) with trigeminal nerve contact. Specifically, the symptomatic results of pain, paresthesias, and numbness after microsurgical resection or stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) were examined. METHODS The authors conducted a retrospective review of a database for concomitant diagnosis of trigeminal neuralgia (TN) or trigeminal neuropathy and VS between 1994 and 2014 at a tertiary academic center. All patients with VS with TN or neuropathy were included, with the exception of those patients with neurofibromatosis Type 2 and patients who elected observation. Patient demographic data, symptom evolution, and treatment outcomes were collected. Population data were summarized, and outcome comparisons between microsurgery and SRS were analyzed at last follow-up. RESULTS Sixty (2.2%) of 2771 total patients who had large VSs and either TN or neuropathy symptoms met inclusion criteria. The average age of trigeminal symptom onset was 53.6 years (range 24-79 years), the average age at VS diagnosis was 54.4 years (range 25-79 years), and the average follow-up for the microsurgery and SRS groups was 30 and 59 months, respectively (range 3-132 months). Of these patients, 50 (83%) had facial numbness, 16 (27%) had TN pain, and 13 (22%) had paresthesias (i.e., burning or tingling). Subsequently, 50 (83%) patients underwent resection and 10 (17%) patients received SRS. Treatment of VS with SRS did not improve trigeminal symptoms in any patient. This included 2 subjects with unimproved facial numbness and 4 patients with worsened numbness. Similarly, SRS worsened TN pain and paresthesias in 5 patients and failed to improve pain in 2 additional patients. The Barrow Neurological Institute neuralgia and hypesthesia scale scores were significantly worse for patients undergoing SRS compared with microsurgery

  10. Predictors of Preoperative Tinnitus in Unilateral Sporadic Vestibular Schwannoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgios Naros

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveNearly two-thirds of patients with vestibular schwannoma (VS are reporting a significantly impaired quality of life due to tinnitus. VS-associated tinnitus is attributed to an anatomical and physiological damage of the hearing nerve by displacing growth of the tumor. In contrast, the current pathophysiological concept of non-VS tinnitus hypothesizes a maladaptive neuroplasticity of the central nervous system to a (hidden hearing impairment resulting in a subjective misperception. However, it is unclear whether this concept fits to VS-associated tinnitus. This study aims to determine the clinical predictors of VS-associated tinnitus to ascertain the compatibility of both pathophysiological concepts.MethodsThis retrospective study includes a group of 478 neurosurgical patients with unilateral sporadic VS evaluated preoperatively regarding the occurrence of ipsilateral tinnitus depending on different clinical factors, i.e., age, gender, tumor side, tumor size (T1–T4 according to the Hannover classification, and hearing impairment (Gardner–Robertson classification, GR1–5, using a binary logistic regression.Results61.8% of patients complain about a preoperative tinnitus. The binary logistic regression analysis identified male gender [OR 1.90 (1.25–2.75; p = 0.002] and hearing impairment GR3 [OR 1.90 (1.08–3.35; p = 0.026] and GR4 [OR 8.21 (2.29–29.50; p = 0.001] as positive predictors. In contrast, patients with large T4 tumors [OR 0.33 (0.13–0.86; p = 0.024] and complete hearing loss GR5 [OR 0.36 (0.15–0.84; p = 0.017] were less likely to develop a tinnitus. Yet, 60% of the patients with good clinical hearing (GR1 and 25% of patients with complete hearing loss (GR5 suffered from tinnitus.ConclusionThese data are good accordance with literature about non-VS tinnitus indicating hearing impairment as main risk factor. In contrast, complete hearing loss appears a negative predictor for tinnitus. For the first

  11. Hearing outcomes of vestibular schwannoma patients managed with 'wait and scan': predictive value of hearing level at diagnosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stangerup, S-E; Tos, M; Thomsen, J

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the predictive value of both hearing level (at various frequencies) and speech discrimination for forecasting hearing outcome after a period of observation, in patients with vestibular schwannoma.......This study aimed to evaluate the predictive value of both hearing level (at various frequencies) and speech discrimination for forecasting hearing outcome after a period of observation, in patients with vestibular schwannoma....

  12. Acute necrosis after Gamma Knife surgery in vestibular schwannoma leading to multiple cranial nerve palsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapitza, Sandra; Pangalu, Athina; Horstmann, Gerhard A; van Eck, Albert T; Regli, Luca; Tarnutzer, Alexander A

    2016-08-01

    We discuss a rare acute complication after Gamma Knife therapy (Elekta AB, Stockholm, Sweden) in a single patient. A 52-year-old woman presented with vertigo, facial weakness and hearing loss emerging 48hours following Gamma Knife radiosurgery for a right-sided vestibular schwannoma. Neurological examination 6days after symptom onset showed right-sided facial palsy, spontaneous left-beating nystagmus and pathologic head-impulse testing to the right. Pure-tone audiogram revealed right-sided sensorineural hearing loss. A diagnosis of acute vestibulocochlear and facial neuropathy was made. Brain MRI demonstrated focal contrast sparing within the schwannoma, likely related to acute radiation necrosis. Acute multiple cranial neuropathies of the cerebellopontine angle after Gamma Knife treatment should raise suspicion of acute tissue damage within the schwannoma and should result in urgent MRI. Treatment with steroids may be considered based on accompanying swelling and edema. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Gene expression, signal transduction pathways and functional networks associated with growth of sporadic vestibular schwannomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sass, Hjalte Christian Reeberg; Borup, Rehannah; Alanin, Mikkel

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine global gene expression in relation to Vestibular schwannomas (VS) growth rate and to identify signal transduction pathways and functional molecular networks associated with growth. Repeated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) prior to surgery determined...... of signal transduction pathways and functional molecular networks associated with tumor growth. In total 109 genes were deregulated in relation to tumor growth rate. Genes associated with apoptosis, growth and cell proliferation were deregulated. Gene ontology included regulation of the cell cycle, cell...... differentiation and proliferation, among other functions. Fourteen pathways were associated with tumor growth. Five functional molecular networks were generated. This first study on global gene expression in relation to vestibular schwannoma growth rate identified several genes, signal transduction pathways...

  14. The role of cervical and ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials in the assessment of patients with vestibular schwannomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elodie Chiarovano

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To investigate the clinical utility of VEMPs in patients suffering from unilateral vestibular schwannoma (VS and to determine the optimal stimulation parameter (air conducted sound, bone conducted vibration for evaluating the function of the vestibular nerve. METHODS: Data were obtained in 63 patients with non-operated VS, and 20 patients operated on VS. Vestibular function was assessed by caloric, cervical and ocular VEMP testing. 37/63 patients with conclusive ACS ocular VEMPs responses were studied separately. RESULTS: In the 63 non-operated VS patients, cVEMPs were abnormal in 65.1% of patients in response to AC STB and in 49.2% of patients to AC clicks. In the 37/63 patients with positive responses from the unaffected side, oVEMPs were abnormal in 75.7% of patients with ACS, in 67.6% with AFz and in 56.8% with mastoid BCV stimulation. In 16% of the patients, VEMPs were the only abnormal test (normal caloric and normal hearing. Among the 26 patients who did not show oVEMP responses on either side with ACS, oVEMPs responses could be obtained with AFz (50% and with mastoid stimulation (89%. CONCLUSIONS: The VEMP test demonstrated significant clinical value as it yielded the only abnormal test results in some patients suffering from a unilateral vestibular schwannoma. For oVEMPs, we suggest that ACS stimulation should be the initial test. In patients who responded to ACS and who had normal responses, BCV was not required. In patients with abnormal responses on the affected side using ACS, BCV at AFz should be used to confirm abnormal function of the superior vestibular nerve. In patients who exhibited no responses on either side to ACS, BCV was the only approach allowing assessment of the function of the superior vestibular nerve. We favor using AFz stimulation first because it is easier to perform in clinical practice than mastoid stimulation.

  15. The role of cervical and ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials in the assessment of patients with vestibular schwannomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiarovano, Elodie; Darlington, Cynthia; Vidal, Pierre-Paul; Lamas, Georges; de Waele, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the clinical utility of VEMPs in patients suffering from unilateral vestibular schwannoma (VS) and to determine the optimal stimulation parameter (air conducted sound, bone conducted vibration) for evaluating the function of the vestibular nerve. Data were obtained in 63 patients with non-operated VS, and 20 patients operated on VS. Vestibular function was assessed by caloric, cervical and ocular VEMP testing. 37/63 patients with conclusive ACS ocular VEMPs responses were studied separately. In the 63 non-operated VS patients, cVEMPs were abnormal in 65.1% of patients in response to AC STB and in 49.2% of patients to AC clicks. In the 37/63 patients with positive responses from the unaffected side, oVEMPs were abnormal in 75.7% of patients with ACS, in 67.6% with AFz and in 56.8% with mastoid BCV stimulation. In 16% of the patients, VEMPs were the only abnormal test (normal caloric and normal hearing). Among the 26 patients who did not show oVEMP responses on either side with ACS, oVEMPs responses could be obtained with AFz (50%) and with mastoid stimulation (89%). The VEMP test demonstrated significant clinical value as it yielded the only abnormal test results in some patients suffering from a unilateral vestibular schwannoma. For oVEMPs, we suggest that ACS stimulation should be the initial test. In patients who responded to ACS and who had normal responses, BCV was not required. In patients with abnormal responses on the affected side using ACS, BCV at AFz should be used to confirm abnormal function of the superior vestibular nerve. In patients who exhibited no responses on either side to ACS, BCV was the only approach allowing assessment of the function of the superior vestibular nerve. We favor using AFz stimulation first because it is easier to perform in clinical practice than mastoid stimulation.

  16. Angiogenesis in vestibular schwannomas: expression of extracellular matrix factors MMP-2, MMP-9, and TIMP-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Martin Nue; Werther, Kim; Nalla, Amarnadh;

    2010-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are potent mediators of tumor angiogenesis. It has been demonstrated that vestibular schwannoma VEGF expression correlates with tumor growth pattern, whereas knowledge on the expression of MMPs is lacking. This study t...... targets the angiogenic process by investigation of tumor expression of MMP-2, MMP-9, and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1. A possible correlation with gender, patient age, symptom duration, tumor size, and the absolute and relative growth rate is explored....

  17. ERbB2 Trafficking and Signaling in Human Vestibular Schwannomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-01

    patients with macular degeneration and respiratory syncytial virus infections (37). A miR-21Yspecific RNA interference knockdown could be achieved...International Conference on Vestibular Schwannomas and Other CPA Lesions, Barcelona, Spain , June 2007 8 Brown, KD, Clark, J, Hansen MR. Differential...Wallerian degeneration . J Neurosci 1997;17: 1642Y59. 11. Frohnert PW, Stonecypher MS, Carroll SL. Constitutive activation of the neuregulin-1/ErbB receptor

  18. Long-term control of vestibular schwannoma after a translabyrinthine complete removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmerber, Sébastien; Palombi, Olivier; Boubagra, Kamel; Charachon, Robert; Chirossel, Jean-Paul; Gay, Emmanuel

    2005-10-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the rate of recurrent vestibular schwannoma after a total removal via the translabyrinthine approach. Between 1973 and 1995, 346 patients were operated on by a translabyrinthine approach. Ninety-one patients were included in a retrospective study for follow-up of 5 years or longer. The mean follow-up period for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination was obtained after mean of 11 years in 91 patients. None of the 91 patients experienced a recurrent vestibular schwannoma on MRI. The translabyrinthine approach is a safe procedure for total definitive removal of a vestibular schwannoma and permitted the absence of tumoral recurrence in our series of 91 patients. A single gadolinium-enhanced MRI scan 5 years after surgery is advised in case of total removal. In case of any doubt about the quality of the tumoral removal, a proposed MRI follow-up schedule within 2 years and 5 years of surgery is an initial baseline pattern, and possibly thereafter repeated MRI examinations on clinical grounds.

  19. Development of an evidence-based decision pathway for vestibular schwannoma treatment options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linkov, Faina; Valappil, Benita; McAfee, Jacob; Goughnour, Sharon L; Hildrew, Douglas M; McCall, Andrew A; Linkov, Igor; Hirsch, Barry; Snyderman, Carl

    To integrate multiple sources of clinical information with patient feedback to build evidence-based decision support model to facilitate treatment selection for patients suffering from vestibular schwannomas (VS). This was a mixed methods study utilizing focus group and survey methodology to solicit feedback on factors important for making treatment decisions among patients. Two 90-minute focus groups were conducted by an experienced facilitator. Previously diagnosed VS patients were recruited by clinical investigators at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC). Classical content analysis was used for focus group data analysis. Providers were recruited from practices within the UPMC system and were surveyed using Delphi methods. This information can provide a basis for multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA) framework to develop a treatment decision support system for patients with VS. Eight themes were derived from these data (focus group + surveys): doctor/health care system, side effects, effectiveness of treatment, anxiety, mortality, family/other people, quality of life, and post-operative symptoms. These data, as well as feedback from physicians were utilized in building a multi-criteria decision model. The study illustrated steps involved in the development of a decision support model that integrates evidence-based data and patient values to select treatment alternatives. Studies focusing on the actual development of the decision support technology for this group of patients are needed, as decisions are highly multifactorial. Such tools have the potential to improve decision making for complex medical problems with alternate treatment pathways. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Vestibular schwannoma (acoustic neuroma mimicking temporomandibular disorders: a case report Schwannoma vestibular (neurinoma do acústico imitando desordens temporomandibulares: um relato de caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurício A. Bisi

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Approximately 6 to 16% of patients with trigeminal neuralgia symptoms present intracranial tumors, the most common being the vestibular schwannoma (acoustic neuroma. Some symptoms reported by patients include hearing loss, tinnitus, headaches, vertigo and trigeminal disturbances. An increased muscle response in the surrounding head and neck musculature may also be observed, which mimics signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders. In these cases, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI has proved to be a useful tool in tumor diagnosis. The differential diagnosis between myofascial and neuralgic pain is important, as both may present similar characteristics, while being of different origin, and demanding special treatment approaches. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the relationship among trigeminal neuralgia symptoms, intracranial tumors and temporomandibular dysfunction by presenting a clinical case.Aproximadamente 6 a 16% dos pacientes com sintomas de neuralgia trigeminal apresentam tumores intracranianos, sendo mais comum o schwannoma vestibular (neurinoma do acústico. Alguns sintomas relatados pelos pacientes são perda da audição, zumbido, dores de cabeça, vertigens e distúrbios trigeminais. Uma resposta muscular aumentada na musculatura associada da cabeça e do pescoço também pode ser observada, o que pode mimetizar sinais e sintomas de desordens temporomandibulares. Nestes casos é de grande valia o uso de imagem de ressonância magnética (IRM para detecção de tumores. É importante, também, a diferenciação de dores miofasciais e neurálgicas, pois ambas podem apresentar características semelhantes, mas com origens e tratamentos diferentes. O objetivo desse trabalho foi demonstrar através de relato de caso clínico a associação entre sintomas de neuralgia trigeminal, tumores intracranianos e disfunção temporomandibular.

  1. Auditory midbrain implant: a combined approach for vestibular schwannoma surgery and device implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samii, Amir; Lenarz, Minoo; Majdani, Omid; Lim, Hubert H; Samii, Madjid; Lenarz, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    The lateral suboccipital approach is a well-established route for safe removal of vestibular schwannomas in neurofibromatosis Type 2 (NF2) patients. The goal of this study was to assess if this approach can be extended to a lateral supracerebellar infratentorial approach to enable insertion of an auditory midbrain implant (AMI) penetrating array along the tonotopic gradient of the inferior colliculus central nucleus (ICC). The AMI is a new auditory prosthesis designed for penetrating stimulation of the ICC in patients with neural deafness. The initial candidates are NF2 patients who, because of the growth and/or surgical removal of bilateral acoustic neuromas, develop neural deafness and are unable to benefit from cochlear implants. The ideal surgical approach in NF2 patients must first enable safe removal of vestibular schwannomas and then provide sufficient exposure of the midbrain for AMI implantation. This study was performed on formalin-fixed and fresh cadaver specimens. Computed tomography scan and magnetic resonance imaging were used to study the heads of the specimens and for surgical navigation. The lateral suboccipital craniotomy enabled sufficient exposure of the cerebellopontine angle and internal auditory canal for tumor removal. It could then be extended to a lateral supracerebellar infratentorial approach that provided good exposure of the dorsolateral aspect of the tentorial hiatus and mesencephalon for implantation of the AMI along the tonotopic gradient of the ICC. This approach did not endanger the trochlear nerve or any major midline venous structures in the quadrigeminal cistern. This modified lateral suboccipital approach ensures safe removal of large vestibular schwannomas and provides sufficient exposure of the inferior colliculus for ideal AMI implantation.

  2. Systematic review of quality of life in the management of vestibular schwannoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauden, Andrew; Weir, Philip; Hawthorne, Graeme; Kaye, Andrew

    2011-12-01

    Vestibular schwannoma (VS) is a benign tumour arising from the vestibular component of the vestibulocochlear nerve. Treatment protocols range from observation to microsurgical resection (MS) or radiation therapy using focused delivery techniques: either stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) or stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT). Most reported outcome measures explore medically orientated results such as extent of resection or facial nerve function and do not give any insight into how the initial disease, the treatment or operative complications impinge upon the patient's quality of life (QoL). The primary aim of this review was to appraise the quality of research concerning the measurement of QoL in patients with VS. A systematic review was performed including trials of patients with newly diagnosed VS undergoing MS, SRT/SRS, or observation with a measure of QoL. Only trials of prospective design were included. Excluded trials included participants with recurrent disease or comorbidities, and studies reporting patients with VS in association with neurofibromatosis type 2. Each trial for inclusion was assessed for bias and underwent formal data extraction. Between 1973 and 2010, 47 unique trials were identified with eight trials of prospective design. All included studies were prospective non-randomised, observational convenience sampled trials. No randomised control trials or systematic reviews were identified. The most common QoL measure used was the Short Form Questionnaire (SF-36), although it has not been validated in VS. The included trials suggest that the treatment protocols of MS and SRS/SRT are of equal efficacy with regard to impact on QoL; however, the trials were hetereogenous and suffered from a variety of methodological deficiencies. Given this heterogeneity, no meta-analysis was able to be performed. The available literature on QoL in the treatment of VS suffers from significant methodological weaknesses making it difficult to make any assessment as to the

  3. Endolympathic hydrops in patients with vestibular schwannoma: visualization by non-contrast-enhanced 3D FLAIR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naganawa, Shinji; Kawai, Hisashi [Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Nagoya (Japan); Sone, Michihiko; Nakashima, Tsutomu [Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Nagoya (Japan); Ikeda, Mitsuru [Nagoya University School of Health Sciences, Department of Radiological Technology, Nagoya (Japan)

    2011-12-15

    Signal intensity of ipsilateral labyrinthine lymph fluid has been reported to increase in most cases with vestibular schwannoma (VS) on 3D fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR). The purpose of this study was twofold, (1) to evaluate if endolymphatic space can be recognized in the patients with VS on non-contrast-enhanced 3D-FLAIR images and (2) to know if the vertigo in the patients with VS correlates to vestibular endolymphatic hydrops. From the introduction of 32-channel head coil at 3 T in May 2008 to June 2010, 15 cases with unilateral VS were identified in the radiology report database. The two cases without a significant signal increase on 3D FLAIR were excluded. Resting 13 cases were retrospectively analyzed in regard to the recognition of endolymphatic hydrops in the cochlea and vestibule and to the correlation between the patients' symptoms and endolymphatic hydrops. In all cases, vestibular endolymphatic space can be recognized on non-contrast-enhanced 3D FLAIR. Cochlear endolymphatic space can be identified only in one case with significant hydrops. Vestibular hydrops was identified in four cases. Among these four cases, three had vertigo, and one had no vertigo. In those nine cases without hydrops, two had vertigo, and seven did not have vertigo. No significant correlation between vertigo and vestibular hydrops was found. Vestibular endolymphatic space can be recognized on non-contrast-enhanced 3D FLAIR. In some patients with VS, vestibular hydrops is seen; however, endolymphatic hydrops in the vestibule might not be the only responsible cause of vertigo in the patients with VS. (orig.)

  4. Predictors of future growth of sporadic vestibular schwannomas obtained by history and radiologic assessment of the tumor.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Artz, J.C.; Timmer, F.C.A.; Mulder, J.J.S.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.; Graamans, K.

    2009-01-01

    Management of a sporadic vestibular schwannoma (VS) is still a subject of controversy, mainly due to distinct and unpredictable growth patterns. To embark on an appropriate therapy it is necessary to dispose of a reliable prediction about tumor progression. This study aims to design a risk profile

  5. Predictors of future growth of sporadic vestibular schwannomas obtained by history and radiologic assessment of the tumor.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Artz, J.C.; Timmer, F.C.A.; Mulder, J.J.S.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.; Graamans, K.

    2009-01-01

    Management of a sporadic vestibular schwannoma (VS) is still a subject of controversy, mainly due to distinct and unpredictable growth patterns. To embark on an appropriate therapy it is necessary to dispose of a reliable prediction about tumor progression. This study aims to design a risk profile w

  6. Gamma knife radiosurgery for vestibular schwannomas: results of hearing preservation in relation to the cochlear radiation dose.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmer, F.C.A.; Hanssens, P.E.; Haren, A.E. van; Mulder, J.J.S.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.; Beynon, A.J.; Overbeeke, J.J. van; Graamans, K.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: This study was designed to evaluate hearing preservation after gamma knife radiosurgery (GKRS) and to determine the relation between hearing preservation and cochlear radiation dose in patients with a sporadic vestibular schwannoma (VS). METHODS: Prospective study involving pa

  7. Quality of life after gamma knife radiosurgery treatment in patients with a vestibular schwannoma: the patient's perspective.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmer, F.C.A.; Haren, A.E. van; Mulder, J.J.S.; Hanssens, P.E.; Overbeeke, J.J. van; Cremers, C.W.R.J.; Graamans, K.

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluates the impact of gamma knife radiosurgery (GKRS) on the quality of life (QOL) of patients with a sporadic vestibular schwannoma (VS). This study pertains to 108 VS patients who had GKRS in the years 2003 through 2007. Two different QOL questionnaires were used: medical outcome stud

  8. Quality of life after gamma knife radiosurgery treatment in patients with a vestibular schwannoma: the patient's perspective.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmer, F.C.A.; Haren, A.E. van; Mulder, J.J.S.; Hanssens, P.E.; Overbeeke, J.J. van; Cremers, C.W.R.J.; Graamans, K.

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluates the impact of gamma knife radiosurgery (GKRS) on the quality of life (QOL) of patients with a sporadic vestibular schwannoma (VS). This study pertains to 108 VS patients who had GKRS in the years 2003 through 2007. Two different QOL questionnaires were used: medical outcome

  9. Thallium chloride 201Tl combined with single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in the evaluation of vestibular schwannoma growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charabi, Samih Ahmed; Lassen, N A; Thomsen, J

    1997-01-01

    Thallium chloride 201Tl combined with SPECT was performed in a series of 29 patients with neuroradiological evidence of vestibular schwannoma (VS). The relative tumor uptake (U) and relative tumor concentration (C) of the radiotracer 201Tl was determined, and the cerebellum served as a reference....

  10. Does Attempt at Hearing Preservation Microsurgery of Vestibular Schwannoma Affect Postoperative Tinnitus?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Chovanec

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of vestibular schwannoma microsurgery via the retrosigmoid-transmeatal approach with special reference to the postoperative tinnitus outcome. Material and Methods. A prospective study was performed in 89 consecutive patients with unilateral vestibular schwannoma indicated for microsurgery. Patient and tumor related parameters, pre- and postoperative hearing level, intraoperative findings, and hearing and tinnitus handicap inventory scores were analyzed. Results. Cochlear nerve integrity was achieved in 44% corresponding to preservation of preoperatively serviceable hearing in 47% and useful hearing in 21%. Main prognostic factors of hearing preservation were grade/size of tumor, preoperative hearing level, intraoperative neuromonitoring, tumor consistency, and adhesion to neurovascular structures. Microsurgery led to elimination of tinnitus in 66% but also new-onset of the symptom in 14% of cases. Preservation of useful hearing and neurectomy of the eighth cranial nerve were main prognostic factors of tinnitus elimination. Preservation of cochlear nerve but loss of preoperative hearing emerged as the main factor for tinnitus persistence and new onset tinnitus. Decrease of THI scores was observed postoperatively. Conclusions. Our results underscore the importance of proper pre- and intraoperative decision making about attempt at hearing preservation versus potential for tinnitus elimination/risk of new onset of tinnitus.

  11. Sensitivity and specificity of vestibular bed-side examination in detecting VIII cranial nerve schwannoma with sensorineural sudden unilateral hearing loss as presenting symptom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Califano, L; Salafia, F; Melillo, M G; Mazzone, S

    2017-08-01

    The objectives of this study were to identify signs of vestibular nerve suffering through a bedside vestibular examination protocol in case of sudden sensorineural unilateral hearing loss without spontaneous signs of vestibular impairment and to propose a bed-side vestibular examination based protocol for the focused execution of gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) only if a vestibular schwannoma is suspected. 96 patients, 52 men, 44 women, mean age 57.73 +/- 12.85 years, suffering from sudden sensorineural unilateral hearing loss, which presented neither vertigo nor spontaneous nystagmus, were enrolled. Pure tone audiometry, tympanometry, measurement of acoustic reflexes and Anderson test to detect adaptation, bedside vestibular examination through head shaking test, vibration test, head impulse test, hyperventilation test and detection of nystagmus in supine and lateral decubitus to search for signs of vestibular impairment were performed. Patients with signs of vestibular impairment and pure tone audiometry threshold at high frequencies better than 70 dB nHL were subjected to auditory brainstem responses. Gadolinium enhanced MRI centred on internal acoustic canals was carried out in all patients with sudden sensorineural unilateral hearing loss. Main outcome measures were signs of vestibular impairment at vestibular bedside examination and presence of vestibular schwannoma on MRI. Signs of vestibular impairment were detected in 22/96 cases (22.9%); a vestibular schwannoma was detected by MRI in 5/96 cases (5.2%), always when vestibular impairment was present. In case of sudden sensorineural unilateral hearing loss, vestibular bedside examination seems to be useful to restrict the suspicion of a vestibular schwannoma to cases with signs of vestibular impairment, reducing the number of MRI exams, with considerable economic savings. © Copyright by Società Italiana di Otorinolaringologia e Chirurgia Cervico-Facciale, Rome, Italy.

  12. Significance of Vestibular Testing on Distinguishing the Nerve of Origin for Vestibular Schwannoma and Predicting the Preservation of Hearing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-Bo He; Chun-Jiang Yu; Hong-Ming Ji; Yan-Ming Qu; Ning Chen

    2016-01-01

    Background:Determining the nerve of origin for vestibular schwannoma (VS),as a method for predicting hearing prognosis,has not been systematically considered.The vestibular test can be used to investigate the function of the superior vestibular nerve (SVN) and the inferior vestibular nerve (IVN).This study aimed to preoperatively distinguish the nerve of origin for VS patients using the vestibular test,and determine if this correlated with hearing preservation.Methods:A total of 106 patients with unilateral VS were enrolled in this study prospectively.Each patient received a caloric test,vestibular-evoked myogenic potential (VEMP) test,and cochlear nerve function test (hearing) before the operation and 1 week,3,and 6 months,postoperatively.All patients underwent surgical removal of the VS using the suboccipital approach.During the operation,the nerve of tumor origin (SVN or IVN) was identified by the surgeon.Tumor size was measured by preoperative magnetic resonance imaging.Results:The nerve of tumor origin could not be unequivocally identified in 38 patients (38/106,35.80%).These patients were not subsequently evaluated.In 26 patients (nine females,seventeen males),tumors arose from the SVN and in 42 patients (18 females,24 males),tumors arose from the IVN.Comparing with the nerve of origins (SVN and IVN) of tumors,the results of the caloric tests and VEMP tests were significantly different in tumors originating from the SVN and the IVN in our study.Hearing was preserved in 16 of 26 patients (61.54%) with SVN-originating tumors,whereas hearing was preserved in only seven of 42 patients (16.67%) with IVN-originating tumors.Conclusions:Our data suggest that caloric and VEMP tests might help to identify whether VS tumors originate from the SVN or IVN.These tests could also be used to evaluate the residual function of the nerves after surgery.Using this information,we might better predict the preservation of hearing for patients.

  13. Stereotactic radiotherapy of vestibular schwannoma. Hearing preservation, vestibular function, and local control following primary and salvage radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Putz, Florian; Mueller, Jan; Wimmer, Caterina; Goerig, Nicole; Knippen, Stefan; Semrau, Sabine; Fietkau, Rainer; Lettmaier, Sebastian [Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Erlangen (Germany); Iro, Heinrich; Grundtner, Philipp [Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Department of Otorhinolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Erlangen (Germany); Eyuepoglu, Ilker; Roessler, Karl [Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Department of Neurosurgery, Erlangen (Germany)

    2017-03-15

    The aim of this publication is to present long-term data on functional outcomes and tumor control in a cohort of 107 patients treated with stereotactic radiotherapy (RT) for vestibular schwannoma. Included were 107 patients with vestibular schwannoma (primary or recurrent following resection) treated with stereotactic RT (either fractioned or single-dose radiosurgery) between October 2002 and December 2013. Local control and functional outcomes were determined. Analysis of hearing preservation was limited to a subgroup of patients with complete audiometric data collected before treatment and during follow-up. Vestibular function test (FVT) results could be analyzed in a subset of patients and were compared to patient-reported dizziness. After a mean follow-up of 46.3 months, actuarial local control for the whole cohort was 100% after 2, 97.6% after 5, and 94.1% after 10 years. In patients with primary RT, serviceable hearing was preserved in 72%. Predictors for preservation of serviceable hearing in multivariate analysis were time of follow-up (odds ratio, OR = 0.93 per month; p = 0.021) and pre-RT tumor size (Koos stage I-IIa vs. IIb-IV; OR = 0.15; p = 0.031). Worsening of FVT results was recorded in 17.6% (N = 3). Profound discrepancy of patient-reported dizziness and FVT results was observed after RT. In patients with primary RT, worsening of facial nerve function occurred in 1.7% (N = 1). Stereotactic RT of vestibular schwannoma provides good functional outcomes and high control rates. Dependence of hearing preservation on time of follow-up and initial tumor stage has to be considered. (orig.) [German] Praesentation von Langzeitdaten zu funktionellen Ergebnissen und Tumorkontrolle nach stereotaktischer Radiotherapie (RT) in einer Kohorte von 107 Patienten mit Akustikusneurinom. Zwischen Oktober 2002 und Dezember 2013 wurden 107 Patienten mit Akustikusneurinom (primaer oder rezidiviert nach vorangegangener Resektion) mittels stereotaktischer RT behandelt

  14. Vertigo Perception and Quality of Life in Patients after Surgical Treatment of Vestibular Schwannoma with Pretreatment Prehabituation by Chemical Vestibular Ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čada, Zdeněk; Balatková, Zuzana; Chovanec, Martin; Čakrt, Ondřej; Hrubá, Silvie; Jeřábek, Jaroslav; Zvěřina, Eduard; Profant, Oliver; Fík, Zdeněk; Komarc, Martin; Betka, Jan; Kluh, Jan; Černý, Rudolf

    2016-01-01

    Surgical removal of vestibular schwannoma causes acute vestibular symptoms, including postoperative vertigo and oscillopsia due to nystagmus. In general, the dominant symptom postoperatively is vertigo. Preoperative chemical vestibular ablation can reduce vestibular symptoms postoperatively. We used 1.0 mL of 40 mg/mL nonbuffered gentamicin in three intratympanic installations over 2 days, 2 months preoperatively in 10 patients. Reduction of vestibular function was measured by the head impulse test and the caloric test. Reduction of vestibular function was found in all gentamicin patient groups. After gentamicin vestibular ablation, patients underwent home vestibular exercising for two months. The control group consisted of 10 patients who underwent only home vestibular training two months preoperatively. Postoperative rates of recovery and vertigo in both groups were evaluated with the Glasgow Benefit Inventory (GBI), the Glasgow Health Status Inventory (GHSI), and the Dizziness Handicap Inventory questionnaires, as well as survey of visual symptoms by specific questionnaire developed by us. There were no statistically significant differences between both groups with regard to the results of questionnaires. Patients who received preoperative gentamicin were more resilient to optokinetic and optic flow stimulation (p < 0.05). This trial is registered with clinical study registration number NCT02963896.

  15. Vertigo Perception and Quality of Life in Patients after Surgical Treatment of Vestibular Schwannoma with Pretreatment Prehabituation by Chemical Vestibular Ablation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdeněk Čada

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Surgical removal of vestibular schwannoma causes acute vestibular symptoms, including postoperative vertigo and oscillopsia due to nystagmus. In general, the dominant symptom postoperatively is vertigo. Preoperative chemical vestibular ablation can reduce vestibular symptoms postoperatively. We used 1.0 mL of 40 mg/mL nonbuffered gentamicin in three intratympanic installations over 2 days, 2 months preoperatively in 10 patients. Reduction of vestibular function was measured by the head impulse test and the caloric test. Reduction of vestibular function was found in all gentamicin patient groups. After gentamicin vestibular ablation, patients underwent home vestibular exercising for two months. The control group consisted of 10 patients who underwent only home vestibular training two months preoperatively. Postoperative rates of recovery and vertigo in both groups were evaluated with the Glasgow Benefit Inventory (GBI, the Glasgow Health Status Inventory (GHSI, and the Dizziness Handicap Inventory questionnaires, as well as survey of visual symptoms by specific questionnaire developed by us. There were no statistically significant differences between both groups with regard to the results of questionnaires. Patients who received preoperative gentamicin were more resilient to optokinetic and optic flow stimulation (p<0.05. This trial is registered with clinical study registration number NCT02963896.

  16. Need for facial reanimation after operations for vestibular schwannoma: patients perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tos, Tina; Caye-Thomasen, Per; Stangerup, Sven-Eric

    2003-01-01

    A total of 779 patients operated on for vestibular schwannoma mostly by the translabyrinthine approach in Denmark during the period 1976-2000 answered a questionnaire about various postoperative consequences. In this paper we describe the patients' facial function evaluated by professionals one...... year postoperatively and self-evaluated by each patient according to the House-Brackmann scale at the time of the questionnaire. The patients' self-evaluation was more pessimistic than that of the professionals with 26% reporting House-Brackmann grade IV-VI, compared with 20%. One hundred and seventeen...... (15%) of 779 patients considered their facial palsy to be a big problem and 125 patients (16%) were interested in surgical treatment for the sequelae of facial palsy. Seventy-eight (10%) had already had some kind of operation, usually the VII-XII coaptation. Thirty-three of 61 patients who had already...

  17. Change in hearing during 'wait and scan' management of patients with vestibular schwannoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stangerup, Sven-Eric; Caye-Thomasen, P.; Tos, M.

    2008-01-01

    per cent still had good hearing at the end of the observation period. However, in patients with even a small initial speech discrimination loss, only 55 per cent maintained good hearing at the end of the observation period. Conclusion: After comparing the hearing results of hearing preservation......: At the time of diagnosis, 334 patients (53 per cent) had good hearing and speech discrimination of better than 70 per cent; at the end of the 10-year observation period, this latter percentage was 31 per cent. In 17 per cent of the patients, speech discrimination at diagnosis was 100 per cent; of these, 88...... surgery and of radiation therapy with those of 'wait and scan' management, it appears that, in vestibular schwannoma patients with a small tumour and normal speech discrimination, the main indication for active treatment should be established tumour growth Udgivelsesdato: 2008/7...

  18. Predicting Nonauditory Adverse Radiation Effects Following Radiosurgery for Vestibular Schwannoma: A Volume and Dosimetric Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayhurst, Caroline; Monsalves, Eric; Bernstein, Mark; Gentili, Fred [Gamma Knife Unit, Division of Neurosurgery, University Health Network, Toronto (Canada); Heydarian, Mostafa; Tsao, May [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto (Canada); Schwartz, Michael [Radiation Oncology Program and Division of Neurosurgery, Sunnybrook Hospital, Toronto (Canada); Prooijen, Monique van [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto (Canada); Millar, Barbara-Ann; Menard, Cynthia [Radiation Oncology Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto (Canada); Kulkarni, Abhaya V. [Division of Neurosurgery, Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto (Canada); Laperriere, Norm [Radiation Oncology Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto (Canada); Zadeh, Gelareh, E-mail: Gelareh.Zadeh@uhn.on.ca [Gamma Knife Unit, Division of Neurosurgery, University Health Network, Toronto (Canada)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To define clinical and dosimetric predictors of nonauditory adverse radiation effects after radiosurgery for vestibular schwannoma treated with a 12 Gy prescription dose. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed our experience of vestibular schwannoma patients treated between September 2005 and December 2009. Two hundred patients were treated at a 12 Gy prescription dose; 80 had complete clinical and radiological follow-up for at least 24 months (median, 28.5 months). All treatment plans were reviewed for target volume and dosimetry characteristics; gradient index; homogeneity index, defined as the maximum dose in the treatment volume divided by the prescription dose; conformity index; brainstem; and trigeminal nerve dose. All adverse radiation effects (ARE) were recorded. Because the intent of our study was to focus on the nonauditory adverse effects, hearing outcome was not evaluated in this study. Results: Twenty-seven (33.8%) patients developed ARE, 5 (6%) developed hydrocephalus, 10 (12.5%) reported new ataxia, 17 (21%) developed trigeminal dysfunction, 3 (3.75%) had facial weakness, and 1 patient developed hemifacial spasm. The development of edema within the pons was significantly associated with ARE (p = 0.001). On multivariate analysis, only target volume is a significant predictor of ARE (p = 0.001). There is a target volume threshold of 5 cm3, above which ARE are more likely. The treatment plan dosimetric characteristics are not associated with ARE, although the maximum dose to the 5th nerve is a significant predictor of trigeminal dysfunction, with a threshold of 9 Gy. The overall 2-year tumor control rate was 96%. Conclusions: Target volume is the most important predictor of adverse radiation effects, and we identified the significant treatment volume threshold to be 5 cm3. We also established through our series that the maximum tolerable dose to the 5th nerve is 9 Gy.

  19. Multivariate Analysis of Factors Influencing Facial Nerve Outcome following Microsurgical Resection of Vestibular Schwannoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Renato; Nguyen, Yann; Vanier, Antoine; Smail, Mustapha; Ferrary, Evelyne; Sterkers, Olivier; Kalamarides, Michel; Bernardeschi, Daniele

    2017-03-01

    Objective To assess through multivariate analysis the clinical pre- and intraoperative factors of facial nerve outcomes at day 8 and 1-year recovery of facial palsy, as compared with day 8 status among patients who underwent total resection of unilateral vestibular schwannoma. Study Design Case series with chart review. Setting Tertiary referral center. Subjects and Methods This study included 229 patients with preoperative normal facial function and anatomic preservation of the facial nerve. Clinical, radiologic, and intraoperative factors were assessed according to facial nerve function at day 8 and 1 year. Results We observed that 74% and 84% of patients had good facial function (House-Brackmann [HB] I-II) at day 8 and 1 year, respectively. Of 60 patients, 26 (43%) who had impaired facial function (HB III-VI) at day 8 recovered good facial function (HB I-II) 1 year after surgery. A structured equation model showed that advanced tumor stage and strong facial nerve adhesion were independently associated with facial nerve conduction block at day 8. No predictive factor of impaired facial function recovery was seen at 1 year. In terms of the extracanalicular diameter of the tumor, the cutoff point to minimize the risk of impaired facial function was 16 mm. Conclusion At day 8 after vestibular schwannoma resection, facial function was impaired in the case of large tumors or strong facial nerve adhesion to the tumor. After 1 year, less than half of the patients recovered good facial function, and no predictive factor was found to be associated with this possible recovery.

  20. Using an end-to-side interposed sural nerve graft for facial nerve reinforcement after vestibular schwannoma resection. Technical note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samii, Madjid; Koerbel, Andrei; Safavi-Abbasi, Sam; Di Rocco, Federico; Samii, Amir; Gharabaghi, Alireza

    2006-12-01

    Increasing rates of facial and cochlear nerve preservation after vestibular schwannoma surgery have been achieved in the last 30 years. However, the management of a partially or completely damaged facial nerve remains an important issue. In such a case, several immediate or delayed repair techniques have been used. On the basis of recent studies of successful end-to-side neurorrhaphy, the authors applied this technique in a patient with an anatomically preserved but partially injured facial nerve during vestibular schwannoma surgery. The authors interposed a sural nerve graft to reinforce the facial nerve whose partial anatomical continuity had been preserved. On follow-up examinations 18 months after surgery, satisfactory cosmetic results for facial nerve function were observed. The end-to-side interposed nerve graft appears to be a reasonable alternative in cases of partial facial nerve injury, and might be a future therapeutic option for other cranial nerve injuries.

  1. Triological Society Thesis Preclinical Validation of AR42, a Novel Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor, as Treatment for Vestibular Schwannomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Abraham; Oblinger, Janet; Bush, Matthew L.; Brendel, Victoria; Santarelli, Griffin; Chaudhury, Abhik R.; Kulp, Samuel; La Perle, Krista M. D.; Chen, Ching-Shih; Chang, Long-Sheng; Welling, D. Bradley

    2012-01-01

    Objective/Hypothesis Recent studies indicate that vestibular schwannomas (VS) rely on PI3-kinase/AKT activation to promote cell proliferation and survival; therefore, targeting AKT may provide new therapeutic options. We have previously shown that AR42, a novel histone deacetylase inhibitor, potently suppresses VS growth in vitro at doses correlating with AKT inactivation. The objectives of the current study were translational: 1) to examine the end biologic effects of AR42 on tumor growth in vivo, 2) to validate AKT as its in vivo molecular target, 3) to determine whether AR42 penetrates the blood brain barrier (BBB), and 4) to study AR42’s pharmacotoxicity profile. Study Design In vivo mouse studies Methods AR42 was dosed orally in murine schwannoma allografts and human vestibular schwannoma xenografts. MRI was used to quantify changes in tumor volume while intracellular molecular targets were analyzed using immunohistochemistry. Blood-brain barrier (BBB) penetration was assayed, and both blood chemistry measurements and histology studies were used to evaluate toxicity. Results Growth of schwannoma implants was dramatically decreased by AR42 at doses correlating with AKT dephosphorylation, cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis. AR42 penetrated the BBB, and wild-type mice fed AR42 for 6-months behaved normally and gained weight appropriately. Blood chemistry studies and organ histology performed after 3- and 6-months of AR42 treatment demonstrated no clinically significant abnormalities. Conclusions AR42 suppresses schwannoma growth at doses correlating with AKT pathway inhibition. This orally bioavailable drug penetrates the BBB, is well tolerated, and represents a novel candidate for translation to human VS clinical trials. PMID:22109824

  2. Hearing outcome after gamma knife radiosurgery for vestibular schwannoma: a prospective Belgian clinical study.

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    Delbrouck, C; Hassid, S; Choufani, G; De Witte, O; Devriendt, D; Massager, N

    2011-01-01

    Leksel Gamma Knife (LGK) radiosurgery is a safe and efficient therapeutic approach for vestibular schwannoma (VS) with low side effects. The goal of radiosurgery is not necessarily to cause significant tumour necrosis or to obtain a complete radiographic response, but to halt the tumour's growth permanently through its biological elimination. The 2 major aims of radiosurgery for VS are long-term tumour control and functional hearing preservation. The purpose of this study is to report our experience with LGK radiosurgery in the management of VS and to evaluate the hearing preservation rate after a minimum one-year follow-up. Between January 2000 and January 2011, 415 patients with unilateral VS underwent LGK radiosurgery at the University Erasmus Hospital of Brussels. There were 349 patients with previously untreated VS (86 grade I, 96 grade II, 141 grade III, 9 grade IVa, 17 unknown grades, according to Koos) and 66 patients with post-operative residual tumour. All patients in our series underwent evaluation with high resolution neurodiagnostic imaging including computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, and clinical evaluation as well as audiological tests that included tonal and speech audiometries. The Gardner Robertson (GR) classification is used to report the results of this study. We identified 276 patients treated for VS with LGK, tested and retested with speech and tonal audiometries by the same team, and followed for a minimum of one year. Before LGK, 144 patients had serviceable (85 GR class I and 59 GR class II) hearing; 95 (65.97%) of these patients had preservation of serviceable hearing (Pure tone average or = 50%) at minimum one-year audiological follow-up. It was observed that 44 of the 85 GR class I patients (51.76%) maintained their level of audition and 66 of these (74.64%) preserved serviceable hearing. In the 34 patients with preradiosurgery non-serviceable hearing (GR class III-IV) 25 of these patients (73.52%) maintained their

  3. Hearing preservation surgery for vestibular schwannoma: experience with the middle fossa approach.

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    DeMonte, Franco; Gidley, Paul W

    2012-09-01

    In the early 1960s William F. House developed the middle fossa approach for the removal of small vestibular schwannomas (VSs) with the preservation of hearing. It is the best approach for tumors that extend laterally to the fundus of the internal auditory canal, although it does have the potential disadvantage of increased facial nerve manipulation, especially for tumors arising from the inferior vestibular nerve. The aim of this study was to monitor the hearing preservation and facial nerve outcomes of this approach. A prospective database was constructed, and data were retrospectively reviewed. Between December 2004 and January 2012, 30 patients with small VSs underwent surgery via a middle fossa approach for hearing preservation. The patients consisted of 13 men and 17 women with a mean age of 46 years. Tumor size ranged from 7 to 19 mm. Gross-total resection was accomplished in 25 of 30 patients. Preoperative hearing was American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery (AAO-HNS) Class A in 21 patients, Class B in 5, Class C in 3, and undocumented in 1. Postoperatively, hearing was graded as AAO-HNS Class A in 15 patients, Class B in 7, Class C in 1, Class D in 2, and undocumented in 5. Facial nerve function was House-Brackmann (HB) Grade I in all patients preoperatively. Postoperatively, facial nerve function was HB Grade I in 28 patients, Grade III in 1, and Grade IV in 1. There were 3 complications: CSF leakage in 1 patient, superficial wound infection in 1, and extradural hematoma (asymptomatic) in 1. The overall hearing preservation rate of at least 73% and HB Grade I facial nerve outcome of 93% in this cohort are in keeping with other contemporary reports. The middle fossa approach for the resection of small VSs with hearing preservation is a viable and relatively safe option. It should be considered among the various options available for the management of small, growing VSs.

  4. Predictive Factors of Unfavorable Events After Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for Vestibular Schwannoma.

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    Kim, Ji Hee; Jung, Hyun Ho; Chang, Jong Hee; Chang, Jin Woo; Park, Yong Gou; Chang, Won Seok

    2017-08-04

    Gamma knife radiosurgery (GKS) for the treatment of vestibular schwannoma (VS) introduces risks to the facial nerve and auditory perception, and may involve post-treatment complications such as pseudoprogression, hydrocephalus, and other cranial neuropathies. This study of patients with VS who underwent GKS investigated radiosurgical results, focusing on post-treatment complications and identifying the factors that predict such complications. We undertook a retrospective review of all VS patients treated with the Perfexion Leksell gamma knife between November 2007 and October 2010 at our institution. Patients who underwent at least 12 months of clinical and radiological assessments before and after GKS were included. All 235 patients were included in the analyses reported here. The 5-year serviceable hearing and facial nerve preservation values were 73.9% and 94.3%, respectively. Following GKS, 43 patients (18.30%) showed pseudoprogression, 15 (6.38%) exhibited hydrocephalus, 22 (9.36%) showed trigeminal neuropathy, 14 (5.96%) showed vertigo, and 25 (10.64%) showed facial myokymia. According to multivariate analysis, solid tumor nature was significantly associated with pseudoprogression and patient age was significantly associated with hydrocephalus. Patients receiving margin dose ≥ 13 Gy had a significantly higher probability of loss of serviceable hearing. Patients with smaller tumors had a trigeminal nerve preservation rate comparable to patients harboring larger tumors. Patients receiving margin dose < 13 Gy or older patients had a significantly higher probability of vestibular nerve dysfunction. Further prospective studies should be designed to provide further insight into the exact relationship between the predictive factors we investigated and post-treatment complications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Large vestibular schwannomas and hydrocephalus: Lessons learnt from a single centre experience

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    Prakash Nair

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of the following study is to analyze the outcome following surgery in 169 patients with large vestibular schwannoma (VS and to evaluate hydrocephalus as a prognostic factor in patients of the VSs. Subjects and Methods: Retrospective analysis of all cases of VSs admitted to our tertiary neurosurgical center from January 2005 to December 2010 was performed. Comparison of patients who underwent pre-operative cerebrospinal fluid (CSF diversion and those who underwent primary surgery was carried out for post-operative complications and delayed hydrocephalus. Results: A total of 169 patients of VS were seen. The mean age at presentation was 39.03 years (12-72 years. The most common symptom was hearing loss seen in 161 (95.2% cases. Giant VS was seen in 130 (75.5% and hydrocephalus was present in 110 (63.9%. Pre-operative CSF diversion was done in 23 (13.1% patients; 8 (4.6% patients developed gradually symptomatic hydrocephalus following surgery and underwent ventriculoperitoneal shunt. Total surgical excision was done in 92.9% patients and subtotal excision was done in 7% patients. Conclusions: Hydrocephalus occurs in longstanding untreated cases of VS. Hydrocephalus causes no statistically significant increase in post-operative complications like CSF leak and post-operative hematoma. Patients with hydrocephalus presenting with acute symptoms of raised intracranial pressure benefit from CSF diversion. In most patients, tumor resection will restore patency of the CSF pathway and CSF diversion can be avoided.

  6. Clinical Evaluation of CyberKnife in the Treatment of Vestibular Schwannomas

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    Jo-Ting Tsai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This study assessed the posttreatment tumor control and auditory function of vestibular schwannoma (VS patients after CyberKnife (CK and analyzed the possible prognostic factors of hearing loss. Methods. We retrospectively studied 117 VS patients, with Gardner-Robertson (GR classification grades I to IV, who underwent CK between 2006 and 2012. Data including radiosurgery treatment parameters, pre- and postoperative tumor size, and auditory function were collected and examined. Results. With CK, 117 patients had excellent tumor control rates (99.1%, with a mean imaging followup of 61.1 months. Excluding 52 patients (GR III-IV pretreatment, 53 (81.5% of the remaining 65 patients (initial GR I-II maintained GR I or II hearing after CK, with a mean audiometric followup of 64.5 months. Twelve patients experienced hearing degradation (91.6% were GR II pretreatment; they appeared to have significantly larger tumor sizes, significantly smaller cochlear sizes, and higher prescribed cochlear doses, compared to the patients with preserved hearing. Conclusion. Our data showed that CK treatment provided an excellent tumor control rate and a comparable hearing preservation rate in VS patients. Patients with pretreatment GR II hearing levels, larger tumor volumes, smaller cochlear sizes, and higher prescribed cochlear doses may have poor hearing prognoses.

  7. Vestibular Schwannoma Growth With Aspirin and Other Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs.

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    Hunter, Jacob B; O'Connell, Brendan P; Wanna, George B; Bennett, Marc L; Rivas, Alejandro; Thompson, Reid C; Haynes, David S

    2017-09-01

    To investigate whether the use of aspirin or other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) impact the growth of vestibular schwannoma (VS). Retrospective case series. Single academic, tertiary care center. Patients with VS who underwent at least two magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies before intervention. Serial MRI studies. VS tumor growth, defined as more than or equal to 2 mm increase in the maximum tumor diameter between consecutive MRI studies, or between the first and last available study. Mean growth rate was also calculated, defined as the change in tumor size divided by length of follow-up. A total of 564 VS patients met inclusion criteria, with 234 (41.2%) taking some type of NSAID. Aspirin use was not associated with VS tumor growth, presenting tumor diameter, or mean VS growth rate. Further, aspirin dosage did not impact growth outcomes or presenting tumor diameter. A total of 96 (17.0%) patients took an NSAID other than aspirin. Neither non-aspirin NSAID use nor degree of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) selectivity, including aspirin, was significantly associated with VS tumor growth, presenting tumor diameter, or mean VS growth rate. While previous studies have suggested a relationship between aspirin usage and VS growth, we found no significant association in our series of 564 observed VS. Furthermore, there was no apparent relationship between aspirin dosage, non-aspirin NSAID use, and COX-2 selectivity with VS growth, presenting tumor diameter at presentation, or mean VS growth rate.

  8. Hearing Outcomes After Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Unilateral Intracanalicular Vestibular Schwannomas: Implication of Transient Volume Expansion

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    Kim, Young-Hoon [Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam-si (Korea, Republic of); Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong Gyu, E-mail: gknife@plaza.snu.ac.kr [Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Han, Jung Ho [Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam-si (Korea, Republic of); Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Hyun-Tai; Kim, In Kyung; Song, Sang Woo [Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jeong-Hoon [Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam-si (Korea, Republic of); Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jin Wook; Kim, Yong Hwy; Park, Chul-Kee [Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chae-Yong [Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam-si (Korea, Republic of); Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Paek, Sun Ha; Jung, Hee-Won [Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: We evaluated the prognostic factors for hearing outcomes after stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for unilateral sporadic intracanalicular vestibular schwannomas (IC-VSs) as a clinical homogeneous group of VSs. Methods and Materials: Sixty consecutive patients with unilateral sporadic IC-VSs, defined as tumors in the internal acoustic canal, and serviceable hearing (Gardner-Roberson grade 1 or 2) were treated with SRS as an initial treatment. The mean tumor volume was 0.34 {+-} 0.03 cm{sup 3} (range, 0.03-1.00 cm{sup 3}), and the mean marginal dose was 12.2 {+-} 0.1 Gy (range, 11.5-13.0 Gy). The median follow-up duration was 62 months (range, 36-141 months). Results: The actuarial rates of serviceable hearing preservation were 70%, 63%, and 55% at 1, 2, and 5 years after SRS, respectively. In multivariate analysis, transient volume expansion of {>=}20% from initial tumor size was a statistically significant risk factor for loss of serviceable hearing and hearing deterioration (increase of pure tone average {>=}20 dB) (odds ratio = 7.638; 95% confidence interval, 2.317-25.181; P=.001 and odds ratio = 3.507; 95% confidence interval, 1.228-10.018; P=.019, respectively). The cochlear radiation dose did not reach statistical significance. Conclusions: Transient volume expansion after SRS for VSs seems to be correlated with hearing deterioration when defined properly in a clinically homogeneous group of patients.

  9. Gamma Knife radiosurgery for large vestibular schwannomas greater than 3 cm in diameter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Cheng-Wei; Tu, Hsien-Tang; Chuang, Chun-Yi; Chang, Cheng-Siu; Chou, Hsi-Hsien; Lee, Ming-Tsung; Huang, Chuan-Fu

    2017-07-14

    OBJECTIVE Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is an important alternative management option for patients with small- and medium-sized vestibular schwannomas (VSs). Its use in the treatment of large tumors, however, is still being debated. The authors reviewed their recent experience to assess the potential role of SRS in larger-sized VSs. METHODS Between 2000 and 2014, 35 patients with large VSs, defined as having both a single dimension > 3 cm and a volume > 10 cm(3), underwent Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS). Nine patients (25.7%) had previously undergone resection. The median total volume covered in this group of patients was 14.8 cm(3) (range 10.3-24.5 cm(3)). The median tumor margin dose was 11 Gy (range 10-12 Gy). RESULTS The median follow-up duration was 48 months (range 6-156 months). All 35 patients had regular MRI follow-up examinations. Twenty tumors (57.1%) had a volume reduction of greater than 50%, 5 (14.3%) had a volume reduction of 15%-50%, 5 (14.3%) were stable in size (volume change 3 cm and a volume > 10 cm(3) and tolerable mass effect can be managed satisfactorily with GKRS. Tumor volume ≥ 15 cm(3) is a significant factor predicting poor tumor control following GKRS.

  10. Spontaneous Intracranial Hypotension after Vestibular Schwannoma Resection Due to an Unexpected Pathology: Tarlov Cysts.

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    Pross, Seth E; Sharon, Jeffrey D; Lim, Michael; Moghekar, Abhay; Rao, Aruna; Carey, John P

    2017-05-19

    While infrequent, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks are known to occur after surgical resection of vestibular schwannomas. Early signs of CSF leak often include headache and altered mental status. If untreated, life-threatening complications can occur, including brainstem herniation and meningitis. The appropriate surgical treatment for a CSF leak requires accurate localization of the source. While the most likely location of a CSF leak after lateral skull base surgery is through the aerated portions of the temporal bone, we present a unique case of a man with a prolonged CSF leak after an acoustic tumor removal who was ultimately found to have an occult spinal perineural (Tarlov) cyst as the source. Accurate localization was ultimately achieved with CT myelogram after empirically obliterating his mastoid failed to restore intracranial CSF volume. Tarlov cysts are the most common cause of idiopathic intracranial hypotension, and this case highlights the importance of considering this entity in the differential diagnosis of postoperative CSF leaks.

  11. Gamma Knife Treatment of Growing Vestibular Schwannoma in Norway: A Prospective Study

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    Varughese, Jobin Kotakkathu, E-mail: jobinv@gmail.com [Institute of Surgical Sciences, University of Bergen, Bergen (Norway); Wentzel-Larsen, Tore [Centre for Clinical Research, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen (Norway); Centre for Child and Adolescent Mental Health, Eastern and Southern Norway, Oslo (Norway); Norwegian Centre for Violence and Traumatic Stress Studies, Oslo (Norway); Pedersen, Paal-Henning [Institute of Surgical Sciences, University of Bergen, Bergen (Norway); Department of Neurosurgery, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen (Norway); Mahesparan, Ruby [Department of Neurosurgery, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen (Norway); Lund-Johansen, Morten [Institute of Surgical Sciences, University of Bergen, Bergen (Norway); Department of Neurosurgery, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen (Norway)

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) has been increasingly used in the treatment of vestibular schwannoma (VS). Very few studies relate tumor control and post-treatment growth rates to pretreatment growth rates. Methods and Materials: We prospectively included 45 consecutive VS patients who were initially treated conservatively and then received GKRS between 2000 and 2007 because of demonstrated tumor growth. Pretreatment and post-treatment tumor volumes were estimated. Patients underwent audiograms, reported their symptoms, and responded to the Short Form General Health Survey (SF-36) questionnaire on each visit. Results: Volume doubling times before and after treatment were 1.36 years (95% confidence intervals, 1.14-1.68) and -13.1 years (95% confidence intervals, -111.0 to -6.94), respectively. Tumor control, defined as a post-GKRS growth rate {<=}0, was achieved in 71.1% of patients, with highest odds for tumor control among older patients and those with larger tumors. The 5-year retreatment-free survival rate was 93.9% (95% confidence intervals, 76.5-98.5). None of the clinical endpoints investigated showed statistically significant changes after GKRS, but improvement was seen in a few SF-36 parameters. Conclusions: GKRS alters the natural course of the tumor by reducing growth. Mathematic models yield poorer tumor control rates than those found by clinical assessment. Symptoms were unaffected by treatment, but quality of life was improved.

  12. Intracochlear schwannoma

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    Manoj Manikoth Puthiyaparambil

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Intracochlear schwannoma is rarely diagnosed. We report the case of a 27-year-old woman with intracochlear schwannoma who presented with 7 years history of hearing impairment. Audiological tests and imaging studies revealed a possibility of intracochlear schwannoma. Excision of the tumor was done by transcochlear approach. The histologic diagnosis was schwannoma. Her postoperative course was uneventful. We present this rare case and discuss the presentation, diagnosis, and management options in such cases.

  13. Cochlear Implantation in Patients with Neurofibromatosis Type 2 and Patients with Vestibular Schwannoma in the Only Hearing Ear

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    Erika Celis-Aguilar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cochlear implants are a new surgical option in the hearing rehabilitation of patients with neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2 and patients with vestibular schwannoma (VS in the only hearing ear. Auditory brainstem implant (ABI has been the standard surgical treatment for these patients. We performed a literature review of patients with NF2 and patients with VS in the only hearing ear. Cochlear implantation (CI provided some auditory benefit in all patients. Preservation of cochlear nerve integrity is crucial after VS resection. Results ranged from environmental sound awareness to excellent benefit with telephone use. Promontory stimulation is recommended although not crucial. MRI can be performed safely in cochlear implanted patients.

  14. Gamma Knife radiosurgery for treatment of growing vestibular schwannomas in patients with neurofibromatosis Type 2: a matched cohort study with sporadic vestibular schwannomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruyt, Ivo J; Verheul, Jeroen B; Hanssens, Patrick E J; Kunst, Henricus P M

    2017-01-27

    OBJECTIVE Neurofibromatosis Type 2 (NF2) is a tumor syndrome characterized by an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance. The hallmark of NF2 is the development of bilateral vestibular schwannomas (VSs), generally by 30 years of age. One of the first-line treatment options for small to medium-large VSs is radiosurgery. Although radiosurgery shows excellent results in sporadic VS, its use in NF2-related VS is still a topic of dispute. The aim of this study was to evaluate long-term tumor control, hearing preservation rates, and factors influencing outcome of optimally dosed, contemporary Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) for growing VSs in patients with NF2 and compare the findings to data obtained in patients with sporadic VS also treated by means of GKRS. METHODS The authors performed a retrospective analysis of 47 growing VSs in 34 NF2 patients who underwent GKRS treatment performed with either the Model C or Perfexion Leksell Gamma Knife, with a median margin dose of 11 Gy. Actuarial tumor control rates were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. For patient- and treatment-related factors, a Cox proportional hazards model was used to identify predictors of outcome. Trigeminal, facial, and vestibulocochlear nerve function were assessed before and after treatment. NF2-related VS patients were matched 1:1 with sporadic VS patients who were treated in the same institute, and the same indications for treatment, definitions, and dosimetry were used in order to compare outcomes. RESULTS Actuarial tumor control rates in NF2 patients after 1, 3, 5, and 8 years were 98%, 89%, 87%, and 87%, respectively. Phenotype and tumor volume had significant hazard rates of 0.086 and 22.99, respectively, showing that Feiling-Gardner phenotype and a tumor volume not exceeding 6 cm(3) both were associated with significantly better outcome. Actuarial rates of serviceable hearing preservation after 1, 3, 5, and 7 years were 95%, 82%, 59%, and 33%, respectively. None of the patients

  15. Acute clinical adverse radiation effects after Gamma Knife surgery for vestibular schwannomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuleasca, Constantin; George, Mercy; Faouzi, Mohamed; Schiappacasse, Luis; Leroy, Henri-Arthur; Zeverino, Michele; Daniel, Roy Thomas; Maire, Raphael; Levivier, Marc

    2016-12-01

    OBJECTIVE Vestibular schwannomas (VSs) represent a common indication of Gamma Knife surgery (GKS). While most studies focus on the long-term morbidity and adverse radiation effects (AREs), none describe the acute clinical AREs that might appear on a short-term basis. These types of events are investigated, and their incidence, type, and outcomes are reported in the present paper. METHODS The included patients were treated between July 2010 and March 2016, underwent at least 6 months of follow-up, and presented with a disabling symptom during the first 6 months after GKS that affected their quality of life. The timing of appearance, as well as the type of main symptom and outcome, were noted. The prescribed dose was 12 Gy at the margin. RESULTS Thirty-five (22%) of 159 patients who fulfilled the inclusion criteria had acute clinical AREs. The mean followup period was 30 months (range 6-49.2 months). The mean time of appearance was 37.9 days (median 31 days; range 3-110 days). In patients with de novo symptoms, the more frequent symptoms were vertigo (n = 4; 11.4%) and gait disturbance (n = 3; 8.6%). The exacerbation of a preexisting symptom was more frequently related to hearing loss (n = 10; 28.6%), followed by gait disturbance (n = 7; 20%) and vertigo (n = 3, 8.6%). In the univariate logistic regression analysis, the following factors were statistically significant: age (p = 0.002; odds ratio [OR] 0.96), hearing at baseline by Gardner-Robertson (GR) class (p = 0.006; OR 0.21), pure tone average at baseline (p = 0.006; OR 0.97), and Koos grade at baseline (with Koos Grade I used as a reference) (for Koos Grade II, OR 0.17 and p = 0.002; for Koos Grade III, OR 0.42 and p = 0.05). The following were not statistically significant but showed a tendency toward significance: the number of isocenters (p = 0.06; OR 0.94) and the maximal dose received by the cochlea (p = 0.07; OR 0.74). Fractional polynomial regression analysis showed a nonlinear relationship between the

  16. Identifying predictors of early growth response and adverse radiation effects of vestibular schwannomas to radiosurgery.

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    Soroush Larjani

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To determine whether pre-treatment growth rate of vestibular schwannomas (VS predict response to radiosurgery. METHODS: A retrospective review of a prospectively maintained database of all VS patients treated with 12Gy prescription dose between September 2005 and June 2011 at our institution using the Leksell Model 4C Gamma Knife Unit was conducted. Patients who had a minimum of 12-months clinical and radiological assessment before and after radiosurgery were included in this study. Tumor growth rates were calculated using specific growth rate (SGR. Tumor volumes were measured on FIESTA-MRI scans using ITK-SNAP v2.2. RESULTS: Following radiosurgery, twenty-seven (42.9% patients showed a significant decrease in volume after one year, twenty-nine (46.0% stabilized, and seven (11.1% continued to grow. There was no correlation between VS pre-treatment SGRs with post-treatment SGRs (p = 0.34, and incidence of adverse radiation effects (ARE. The reduction in tumors' SGRs after radiosurgery was proportional to pre-treatment SGRs, although this correlation was not statistically significant (p = 0.19. Analysis of risk factors revealed a positive correlation between post-treatment SGRs and incidence of non-auditory complications, most of which were attributed to ARE (p = 0.047. CONCLUSION: Pre-treatment growth rate of VS does not predict tumor response to radiosurgery or incidence of ARE. VS with higher SGRs post-radiosurgery are more likely to experience ARE.

  17. Pretreatment Growth Rate Predicts Radiation Response in Vestibular Schwannomas

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    Niu, Nina N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Harvard Medical School, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Niemierko, Andrzej [Department of Radiation Oncology, Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Larvie, Mykol [Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Curtin, Hugh [Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Loeffler, Jay S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); McKenna, Michael J. [Harvard Medical School, Department of Otolaryngology, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Shih, Helen A., E-mail: hshih@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2014-05-01

    Purpose: Vestibular schwannomas (VS) are often followed without initial therapeutic intervention because many tumors do not grow and radiation therapy is associated with potential adverse effects. In an effort to determine whether maximizing initial surveillance predicts for later treatment response, the predictive value of preirradiation growth rate of VS on response to radiation therapy was assessed. Methods and Materials: Sixty-four patients with 65 VS were treated with single-fraction stereotactic radiation surgery or fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy. Pre- and postirradiation linear expansion rates were estimated using volumetric measurements on sequential magnetic resonance images (MRIs). In addition, postirradiation tumor volume change was classified as demonstrating shrinkage (ratio of volume on last follow-up MRI to MRI immediately preceding irradiation <80%), stability (ratio 80%-120%), or expansion (ratio >120%). The median pre- and postirradiation follow-up was 20.0 and 27.5 months, respectively. Seven tumors from neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) patients were excluded from statistical analyses. Results: In the 58 non-NF2 patients, there was a trend of correlation between pre- and postirradiation volume change rates (slope on linear regression, 0.29; P=.06). Tumors demonstrating postirradiation expansion had a median preirradiation growth rate of 89%/year, and those without postirradiation expansion had a median preirradiation growth rate of 41%/year (P=.02). As the preirradiation growth rate increased, the probability of postirradiation expansion also increased. Overall, 24.1% of tumors were stable, 53.4% experienced shrinkage, and 22.5% experienced expansion. Predictors of no postirradiation tumor expansion included no prior surgery (P=.01) and slower tumor growth rate (P=.02). The control of tumors in NF2 patients was only 43%. Conclusions: Radiation therapy is an effective treatment for VS, but tumors that grow quickly preirradiation may be

  18. Gamma knife radiosurgery for vestibular schwannomas: identification of predictors for continued tumor growth and the influence of documented tumor growth preceding radiation treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmer, F.C.A.; Mulder, J.J.S.; Hanssens, P.E.; Overbeeke, J.J. van; Donders, R.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.; Graamans, K.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: Gamma knife radiosurgery (GKRS) has become an important treatment modality for vestibular schwannomas. The primary aim of this study was to investigate whether tumor growth at the moment of GKRS has any correlation with the outcome. The secondary aim was to identify clinical p

  19. Gamma Knife radiosurgery for vestibular schwannomas: evaluation of tumor control and its predictors in a large patient cohort in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klijn, S.; Verheul, J.B.; Beute, G.N.; Leenstra, S.; Mulder, J.J.S.; Kunst, H.P.M.; Hanssens, P.E.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECT The authors of this study sought to assess tumor control and complication rates in a large cohort of patients who underwent Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) for vestibular schwannoma (VS) and to identify predictors of tumor control. METHODS The records of 420 patients treated with GKRS for VS

  20. Gamma knife radiosurgery for vestibular schwannomas: identification of predictors for continued tumor growth and the influence of documented tumor growth preceding radiation treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmer, F.C.A.; Mulder, J.J.S.; Hanssens, P.E.; Overbeeke, J.J. van; Donders, R.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.; Graamans, K.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: Gamma knife radiosurgery (GKRS) has become an important treatment modality for vestibular schwannomas. The primary aim of this study was to investigate whether tumor growth at the moment of GKRS has any correlation with the outcome. The secondary aim was to identify clinical

  1. Risk factors associated with vestibulocochlear nerve schwannoma: systematic review Fatores de risco associados ao Schwannoma do nervo vestibular: revisão sistemática

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    Ana Paula Corona

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The vestibulocochlear nerve schwannoma (VS is a benign tumor that stems from the edge of the Schwann´s sheath. It is considered the most frequent intracranial benign tumor, of low lethality rate and unknown etiology. AIM: to identify risk factors associated with VS. STUDY DESIGN: systematic review. METHODS: electronic search of studies using the following key words: "risk", "schwannoma", "vestibular", "neuroma" and "acoustic". All original articles on epidemiological studies published in Portuguese, English or Spanish describing measures of association were included. RESULTS: twenty case-control studies were found, most of them published in the United States. The analysis of those studies shows educational level, household income, occupation, exposure to ionizing radiation and noise, allergic diseases as well as the use of both cellular and cordless phones as risk factors for the VS. CONCLUSION: methodological limitations and lack of precision in the findings impose limits to definitive conclusions concerning those risk factors. The current study contributes with information which can subsidize decisions related to the methodology to be used, having in mind new investigations on risk factors for VS. Therefore, it is of great help for knowledge improvement in this field.O Schwannoma do nervo vestibular (SV é um tumor benigno que se origina da bainha de Schwann do VIII par craniano. É o tumor benigno intracraniano mais frequente, de baixa letalidade e etiologia obscura. OBJETIVO: Identificar fatores de risco associados ao SV. DESENHO DO ESTUDO: Revisão sistemática. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: Identificação de estudos em bases de dados eletrônicos utilizando as palavras-chaves "risk", "risco", "schwannoma", "vestibular", "neuroma" e "acoustic". Incluíram-se artigos originais de pesquisa epidemiológica publicados em português, espanhol ou inglês, que referiam alguma medida de associação. Foram comparados e analisados aspectos metodológicos e

  2. Dosimetric comparison of helical tomotherapy and dynamic conformal arc therapy in stereotactic radiosurgery for vestibular schwannomas.

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    Lee, Tsair-Fwu; Chao, Pei-Ju; Wang, Chang-Yu; Lan, Jen-Hong; Huang, Yu-Je; Hsu, Hsuan-Chih; Sung, Chieh-Cheng; Su, Te-Jen; Lian, Shi-Long; Fang, Fu-Min

    2011-01-01

    The dosimetric results of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for vestibular schwannoma (VS) performed using dynamic conformal arc therapy (DCAT) with the Novalis system and helical TomoTherapy (HT) were compared using plan quality indices. The HT plans were created for 10 consecutive patients with VS previously treated with SRS using the Novalis system. The dosimetric indices used to compare the techniques included the conformity index (CI) and homogeneity index (HI) for the planned target volume (PTV), the comprehensive quality index (CQI) for nine organs at risk (OARs), gradient score index (GSI) for the dose drop-off outside the PTV, and plan quality index (PQI), which was verified using the plan quality discerning power (PQDP) to incorporate 3 plan indices, to evaluate the rival plans. The PTV ranged from 0.27-19.99 cm(3) (median 3.39 cm(3)), with minimum required PTV prescribed doses of 10-16 Gy (median 12 Gy). Both systems satisfied the minimum required PTV prescription doses. HT conformed better to the PTV (CI: 1.51 ± 0.23 vs. 1.94 ± 0.34; p < 0.01), but had a worse drop-off outside the PTV (GSI: 40.3 ± 10.9 vs. 64.9 ± 13.6; p < 0.01) compared with DCAT. No significant difference in PTV homogeneity was observed (HI: 1.08 ± 0.03 vs. 1.09 ± 0.02; p = 0.20). HT had a significantly lower maximum dose in 4 OARs and significant lower mean dose in 1 OAR; by contrast, DCAT had a significantly lower maximum dose in 1 OAR and significant lower mean dose in 2 OARs, with the CQI of the 9 OARs = 0.92 ± 0.45. Plan analysis using PQI (HT 0.37 ± 0.12 vs. DCAT 0.65 ± 0.08; p < 0.01), and verified using the PQDP, confirmed the dosimetric advantage of HT. However, the HT system had a longer beam-on time (33.2 ± 7.4 vs. 4.6 ± 0.9 min; p < 0.01) and consumed more monitor units (16772 ± 3803 vs. 1776 ± 356.3; p < 0.01). HT had a better dose conformity and similar dose homogeneity but worse dose gradient than DCAT. Plan analysis confirmed the dosimetric advantage of HT

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging characteristics and the prediction of outcome of vestibular schwannomas following Gamma Knife radiosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chih-Chun; Guo, Wan-Yuo; Chung, Wen-Yuh; Wu, Hisu-Mei; Lin, Chung-Jung; Lee, Cheng-Chia; Liu, Kang-Du; Yang, Huai-Che

    2017-02-10

    OBJECTIVE Gamma Knife surgery (GKS) is a promising treatment modality for patients with vestibular schwannomas (VSs), but a small percentage of patients have persistent postradiosurgical tumor growth. The aim of this study was to determine the clinical and quantitative MRI features of VS as predictors of long-term tumor control after GKS. METHODS The authors performed a retrospective study of all patients with VS treated with GKS using the Leksell Gamma Knife Unit between 2005 and 2013 at their institution. A total of 187 patients who had a minimum of 24 months of clinical and radiological assessment after radiosurgery were included in this study. Those who underwent a craniotomy with tumor removal before and after GKS were excluded. Study patients comprised 85 (45.5%) males and 102 (54.5%) females, with a median age of 52.2 years (range 20.4-82.3 years). Tumor volumes, enhancing patterns, and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values were measured by region of interest (ROI) analysis of the whole tumor by serial MRI before and after GKS. RESULTS The median follow-up period was 60.8 months (range 24-128.9 months), and the median treated tumor volume was 3.54 cm(3) (0.1-16.2 cm(3)). At last follow-up, imaging studies indicated that 150 tumors (80.2%) showed decreased tumor volume, 20 (10.7%) had stabilized, and 17 (9.1%) continued to grow following radiosurgery. The postradiosurgical outcome was not significantly correlated with pretreatment volumes or postradiosurgical enhancing patterns. Tumors that showed regression within the initial 12 months following radiosurgery were more likely to have a larger volume reduction ratio at last follow-up than those that did not (volume reduction ratio 55% vs 23.6%, respectively; p < 0.001). Compared with solid VSs, cystic VSs were more likely to regress or stabilize in the initial postradiosurgical 6-12-month period and during extended follow-up. Cystic VSs exhibited a greater volume reduction ratio at last follow-up (cystic

  4. Dosimetric and Clinical Analysis of Spatial Distribution of the Radiation Dose in Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for Vestibular Schwannoma

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    Massager, Nicolas, E-mail: nmassage@ulb.ac.be [Gamma Knife Center, Hospital Erasme, Brussels (Belgium); Neurosurgery-Department, Hospital Erasme, Brussels (Belgium); Lonneville, Sarah [Gamma Knife Center, Hospital Erasme, Brussels (Belgium); Neurosurgery-Department, Hospital Erasme, Brussels (Belgium); Delbrouck, Carine [Gamma Knife Center, Hospital Erasme, Brussels (Belgium); ENT-Department, Hospital Erasme, Brussels (Belgium); Benmebarek, Nadir [Gamma Knife Center, Hospital Erasme, Brussels (Belgium); Neurosurgery-Department, Hospital Erasme, Brussels (Belgium); Desmedt, Francoise [Gamma Knife Center, Hospital Erasme, Brussels (Belgium); Radiophysics, Bordet Institute, Brussels (Belgium); Devriendt, Daniel [Gamma Knife Center, Hospital Erasme, Brussels (Belgium); Radiotherapy, Bordet Institute, Brussels (Belgium)

    2011-11-15

    Objectives: We investigated variations in the distribution of radiation dose inside (dose inhomogeneity) and outside (dose falloff) the target volume during Gamma Knife (GK) irradiation of vestibular schwannoma (VS). We analyzed the relationship between some parameters of dose distribution and the clinical and radiological outcome of patients. Methods and Materials: Data from dose plans of 203 patients treated for a vestibular schwannoma by GK C using same prescription dose (12 Gy at the 50% isodose) were collected. Four different dosimetric indexes were defined and calculated retrospectively in all plannings on the basis of dose-volume histograms: Paddick conformity index (PI), gradient index (GI), homogeneity index (HI), and unit isocenter (UI). The different measures related to distribution of the radiation dose were compared with hearing and tumor outcome of 203 patients with clinical and radiological follow-up of minimum 2 years. Results: Mean, median, SD, and ranges of the four indexes of dose distribution analyzed were calculated; large variations were found between dose plans. We found a high correlation between the target volume and PI, GI, and UI. No significant association was found between the indexes of dose distribution calculated in this study and tumor control, tumor volume shrinkage, hearing worsening, loss of functional hearing, or complete hearing loss at last follow-up. Conclusions: Parameters of distribution of the radiation dose during GK radiosurgery for VS can be highly variable between dose plans. The tumor and hearing outcome of patients treated is not significantly related to these global indexes of dose distribution inside and around target volume. In GK radiosurgery for VS, the outcome seems more to be influenced by local radiation dose delivered to specific structures or volumes than by global dose gradients.

  5. Image-guided stereotactic radiotherapy for patients with vestibular schwannoma. A clinical study

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    Badakhshi, H.; Muellner, S.; Budach, V. [Charite School of Medicine and University Hospital of Berlin, Departments for Radiation Oncology, Berlin (Germany); Wiener, E. [School of Medicine and University Hospital of Berlin, Institute for Neuroradiology, Berlin (Germany)

    2014-06-15

    Local tumor control and functional outcome after linac-based stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) for vestibular schwannoma (VS) were assessed. In all, 250 patients with VS were treated: 190 patients with tumors < 2 cm diameter underwent SRS and 60 patients with tumors >2 to 3.5 cm underwent FSRT. Dose prescription for all cases with SRS (n = 190, 76 %) was 13.5 Gy. For FSRT, mainly two hypofractionated schedules (n = 60, 24 %) with either 7 fractions of 5 Gy (total dose: 35 Gy; n = 35) or 11 fractions of 3.8 Gy (total dose: 41.8 Gy; n = 16) were used. The primary endpoint was local tumor control. Secondary endpoints were symptomatic control and morbidity. The median follow-up was 33.8 months. The 3-year local tumor control was 88.9 %. Local control for SRS and FSRT was 88 and 92 %, respectively. For FSRT with 35 and 41.8 Gy, local control was 90 and 100 %, respectively. There were no acute reactions exceeding grade I. In 61 cases (24.4 % of the entire cohort), trigeminal neuralgia was reported prior to treatment. At last follow-up, 16.3 % (10/61) of those patients reported relief of pain. Regarding facial nerve dysfunction, 45 patients (18 %) presented with symptoms prior to RT. At the last follow-up, 13.3% (6/45) of those patients reported a relief of dysesthesia. Using SRS to treat small VS results in good local control rates. FSRT for larger lesions also seems effective. Severe treatment-related complications are not frequent. Therefore, image-guided stereotactic radiotherapy is an appropriate alternative to microsurgery for patients with VS. (orig.) [German] Wir analysierten die lokale Kontrolle und die funktionellen Verlaeufe bei Patienten mit einem Vestibularisschwannom (VS), die sich einer linacbasierten stereotaktischen Radiochirurgie (SRS) oder einer fraktionierten stereotaktischen Radiotherapie (FSRT) unterzogen. Zwischen 1998 und 2008 wurden 250 Patienten mit einem VS behandelt. In dieser Kohorte wurden 190

  6. Outcome on hearing and facial nerve function in microsurgical treatment of small vestibular schwannoma via the middle cranial fossa approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginzkey, Christian; Scheich, Matthias; Harnisch, Wilma; Bonn, Verena; Ehrmann-Müller, Desiree; Shehata-Dieler, Wafaa; Mlynski, Robert; Hagen, Rudolf

    2013-03-01

    Encouraging results regarding hearing preservation and facial nerve function as well as increasing understanding of the natural behaviour of vestibular schwannomas have led to the recommendation of an early treatment in small VS. The aim of the present study was to evaluate current data on functional outcome of patients with small VS treated by middle cranial fossa (MCF) approach. A retrospective chart study of all cases treated by MCF approach between October 2007 and September 2011 was performed. Records were analyzed regarding demographical data, tumor size, hearing status, vestibular function and facial nerve function. Facial nerve function was classified according to the House-Brackmann scale (HB). Hearing status was classified according to the American Association of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery (AAO-HNS) and a modified classification of Gardner and Robertson (GR). Eighty-nine patients were included in the study; 41 % of VS was classified as intracanalicular (stage 1) and 59 % as stage 2. From 65 patients with a preoperative hearing status according to AAO-HNS A or B, 74 % still presented with A or B after surgery. Using a modified GR classification, from 70 patients categorized as class I or II prior to surgery, 70 % were still class I or II. Looking to the facial nerve function 1 week after surgery, 82 % of patients presented with HB 1 or 2. Three to twelve months later, 96 % demonstrated HB 1 or 2. A persisting facial palsy was recorded in four patients. Preoperative hearing status was evaluated as a prognostic factor for postoperative hearing, whereas no influence was detected in ABR, vestibular function and tumor length. Early diagnosis of small VS due to high-sensitive MRI requires the management of this tumor entity. Natural behaviour of VS in many cases demonstrates an increase of tumor size over time with deterioration of hearing status. The presented data underline the recommendation of an early surgical treatment in small VS as a valuable

  7. Investigation of the in vitro therapeutic efficacy of nilotinib in immortalized human NF2-null vestibular schwannoma cells.

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    Nesrin Sabha

    Full Text Available Vestibular schwannomas (VS are a common posterior fossa brain tumor, and though benign can cause significant morbidity, particularly loss of hearing, tinnitus, vertigo and facial paralysis. The current treatment options for VS include microsurgical resection, stereotactic radiosurgery or close surveillance monitoring, with each treatment option carrying associated complications and morbidities. Most importantly, none of these options can definitively reverse hearing loss or tinnitus. Identification of a novel medical therapy, through the use of targeted molecular inhibition, is therefore a highly desirable treatment strategy that may minimize complications arising from both tumor and treatment and more importantly be suitable for patients whose options are limited with respect to surgical or radiosurgical interventions. In this study we chose to examine the effect of Nilotinib on VS. Nilotinib (Tasigna® is a second-generation receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK inhibitor with a target profile similar to that of imatinib (Gleevec®, but increased potency, decreased toxicity and greater cellular and tissue penetration. Nilotinib targets not only the BCR-ABL oncoprotein, but also platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF receptor signalling. In this preclinical study, the human NF2-null schwannoma cell line HEI-193 subjected to nilotinib inhibition demonstrated decreased viability, proliferation and anchorage-independent growth, and increased apoptosis. A daily dose of nilotinib for 5 days inhibited HEI-I93 proliferation at a clinically-relevant concentration in a dose-dependent manner (IC(50 3-5 µmol/L in PDGF-stimulated cells. These anti-tumorigenic effects of nilotinib were correlated to inhibited activation of PDGFR-α and PDGFR-β and major downstream signalling pathways. These experiments support a therapeutic potential for Nilotinib in VS.

  8. Increased signal intensity of the cochlea on pre- and post-contrast enhanced 3D-FLAIR in patients with vestibular schwannoma

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    Yamazaki, Masahiro; Naganawa, Shinji; Kawai, Hisashi; Nihashi, Takashi [Nagoya University, Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan); Fukatsu, Hiroshi [Aichi Medical University Hospital, Department of Medical Informatics, Nagakute (Japan); Nakashima, Tsutomu [Nagoya University, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan)

    2009-12-15

    In the vestibular schwannoma patients, the pathophysiologic mechanism of inner ear involvement is still unclear. We investigated the status of the cochleae in patients with vestibular schwannoma by evaluating the signal intensity of cochlear fluid on pre- and post-contrast enhanced thin section three-dimensional fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (3D-FLAIR). Twenty-eight patients were retrospectively analyzed. Post-contrast images were obtained in 18 patients, and 20 patients had the records of their pure-tone audiometry. Regions of interest of both cochleae (C) and of the medulla oblongata (M) were determined on 3D-FLAIR images by referring to 3D heavily T2-weighted images on a workstation. The signal intensity ratio between C and M on the 3D-FLAIR images (CM ratio) was then evaluated. In addition, correlation between the CM ratio and the hearing level was also evaluated. The CM ratio of the affected side was significantly higher than that of the unaffected side (p < 0.001). In the affected side, post-contrast signal elevation was observed (p < 0.005). In 13 patients (26 cochleae) who underwent both gadolinium injection and the pure-tone audiometry, the post-contrast CM ratio correlated with hearing level (p < 0.05). The results of the present study suggest that alteration of cochlear fluid composition and increased permeability of the blood-labyrinthine barrier exist in the affected side in patients with vestibular schwannoma. Furthermore, although weak, positive correlation between post-contrast cochlear signal intensity on 3D-FLAIR and hearing level warrants further study to clarify the relationship between 3D-FLAIR findings and prognosis of hearing preservation surgery. (orig.)

  9. Surdez súbita unilateral como manifestação de schwannoma vestibular: relato de caso Sudden deafness as a presenting symptom of acoustic neuroma: case report

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    Sérgio Marquez Nascentes

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available O schwannoma vestibular, também conhecido como neuroma ou neurinoma do acústico, é o tumor mais freqüente do ângulo pontocerebelar correspondendo a aproximadamente a 9% de todos os tumores intracranianos. APRESENTAÇÃO DO CASO: Os autores apresentam um relato de caso de surdez súbita e zumbido unilateral com melhora dos sintomas através de tratamento clínico com Prednisona e Pentoxifilina e posterior diagnóstico por exame de imagem de schwannoma vestibular. DISCUSSÃO: A surdez súbita pode ser descrita como uma perda neurossensorial abrupta e intensa. Costuma ser acima de 30 dB, em três ou mais freqüências contíguas e se desenvolve em menos de três dias. CONCLUSÃO: É de grande importância a pesquisa da etiologia nos casos de surdez súbita para a boa condução do caso e orientação terapêutica.Vestibular schwannoma, also known as acoustic neurinoma, is the most frequent tumor of the cerebellopontine angle, and represents 9% of all intracranial tumors. CASE REPORT: The authors report a case of sudden deafness with unilateral tinnitus. The patients responded to therapy with Prednisone and Pentoxifylline after the diagnosis of acoustic neurinoma by imaging exams. DISCUSSION: Sudden deafness can be described as an intense and abrupt sensorineural loss. Usually it is higher than 30 dB at three or more frequencies and develops in less than three days. CONCLUSION: Investigation of the etiology of sudden deafness is extremely important to establish the adequate strategy for the case.

  10. Development of anterior inferior cerebellar artery pseudoaneurysm after gamma knife surgery for vestibular schwannoma. A case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunderland, Geraint; Hassan, Faizul; Bhatnagar, Priya; Mitchell, Patrick; Jayakrishnan, Vijayam; Forster, David; Mendelow, Alexander David

    2014-08-01

    Gamma knife surgery (GKS) is a well-established modality for controlling the progression of vestibular schwannomas. Adverse effects of this treatment are extremely rare but include cyst formation and malignant transformation. We report a case of anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) pseudoaneurysm development rupture presenting as a poor WFNS grade subarachnoid haemorrhage. This is only the fourth case of aneurysm development (AICA aneurysm) following GKS reported but due to its serious nature we believe this potential complication warrants awareness in those offering this treatment.

  11. Surgical treatment of sporadic vestibular schwannoma in a series of 1006 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z; Nguyen, Y; De Seta, D; Russo, F Y; Rey, A; Kalamarides, M; Sterkers, O; Bernardeschi, D

    2016-09-06

    La gestione dello schwannoma vestibolare (SV) sporadico si è gradualmente evoluta negli ultimi decenni. Lo scopo di questo studio è di analizzare l’evoluzione negli esiti chirurgici dell’exeresi di queste lesioni, realizzata da un team neurotologico tra il 1990 e il 2006, attraverso differenti approcci. È stata eseguita una revisione retrospettica monocentrica dei dati clinici di 1006 pazienti. Al fine di valutare eventuali modifiche e progressi, il periodo di 17 anni è stato diviso in tre periodi, ciascuno comprendente rispettivamente 268 SV (1990- 1996), 299 SV (1997-2001), e 439 SV (2002-2006). Il follow-up medio è stato di 5,9 ± 2,4 anni. Complessivamente l’asportazione totale è stata ottenuta nel 99,4% dei casi. Il tasso di mortalità è stato dello 0,3%, la meningite e la perdita di liquido cefalo rachidiano (LCR) sono stati osservati nel 1,2% e il 9% dei casi, rispettivamente. La frequenza della perdita di LCR è diminuita dal 11,6% al 7,1% tra il primo e dell’ultimo periodo (p stata osservata nel 85,1% dei pazienti (I e II grado House- Brackmann), con una variazione tra il primo e l’ultimo periodo che andava dal 78,4% al 87,6% (p stata ottenuta nel 61,6% dei pazienti, passando dal 50,9% del primo periodo, al 69,0% del periodo piú recente (p < 0,05) (classe A + B + C dalla classificazione AAO-HNS). L’udito utile (classe A + B) è stato conservato nel 33,5% dei casi complessivamente, con percentuali comprese tra il 21,8% e 42% nel primo e nell’ultimo periodo rispettivamente (p < 0,01). Gli esiti chirurgici dell’asportazion dello schwannoma vestibolare sporadico sono migliorati negli anni per quanto riguarda i risultati funzionali del nervo facciale, la conservazione dell’udito, le perdite di liquido cefalorachidiano, principalmente grazie all’esperienza del team neurotologico. I risultati funzionali dopo la rimozione microchirurgica completa SV di grandi dimensioni dipendono dall’ esperienza maturata sulle lesioni di piccole

  12. 3D quantitative assessment of response to fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy and single-session stereotactic radiosurgery of vestibular schwannoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, T. [The Johns Hopkins Hospital School of Medicine, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Division of Neuroradiology, Baltimore, MD (United States); University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Hamburg (Germany); Chapiro, J. [The Johns Hopkins Hospital School of Medicine, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Division of Interventional Radiology, Baltimore, MD (United States); Lin, M. [Philips Research North America, Ultrasound Imaging and Interventions (UII), Briarcliff Manor, NY (United States); Geschwind, J.F. [The Johns Hopkins Hospital School of Medicine, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Division of Interventional Radiology, Baltimore, MD (United States); Yale University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Imaging Science, New Haven, CT (United States); Kleinberg, L. [The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Baltimore, MD (United States); Rigamonti, D.; Jusue-Torres, I.; Marciscano, A.E. [The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Department of Neurological Surgery, Baltimore, MD (United States); Yousem, D.M. [The Johns Hopkins Hospital School of Medicine, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Division of Neuroradiology, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2016-03-15

    To determine clinical outcome of patients with vestibular schwannoma (VS) after treatment with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) and single-session stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) by using 3D quantitative response assessment on MRI. This retrospective analysis included 162 patients who underwent radiation therapy for sporadic VS. Measurements on T1-weighted contrast-enhanced MRI (in 2-year post-therapy intervals: 0-2, 2-4, 4-6, 6-8, 8-10, 10-12 years) were taken for total tumour volume (TTV) and enhancing tumour volume (ETV) based on a semi-automated technique. Patients were considered non-responders (NRs) if they required subsequent microsurgical resection or developed radiological progression and tumour-related symptoms. Median follow-up was 4.1 years (range: 0.4-12.0). TTV and ETV decreased for both the FSRT and SRS groups. However, only the FSRT group achieved significant tumour shrinkage (p < 0.015 for TTV, p < 0.005 for ETV over time). The 11 NRs showed proportionally greater TTV (median TTV pre-treatment: 0.61 cm{sup 3}, 8-10 years after: 1.77 cm{sup 3}) and ETV despite radiation therapy compared to responders (median TTV pre-treatment: 1.06 cm{sup 3}; 10-12 years after: 0.81 cm{sup 3}; p = 0.001). 3D quantification of VS showed a significant decrease in TTV and ETV on FSRT-treated patients only. NR had significantly greater TTV and ETV over time. (orig.)

  13. Relationship Between Muscle Dissection Method and Postoperative Muscle Atrophy in the Lateral Suboccipital Approach to Vestibular Schwannoma Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogiwara, Toshihiro; Goto, Tetsuya; Aoyama, Tatsuro; Hara, Yosuke; Nagm, Alhusain; Tanaka, Yuichiro; Hongo, Kazuhiro

    2016-10-01

    Various techniques are available for occipital skull exposure with muscle dissection, as well as different types of skin incisions in the lateral suboccipital approach to vestibular schwannoma (VS) surgery. The skin incisions are generally classified as S-shaped, J-shaped, or C-shaped. In each method, the technique used for muscle dissection differs in terms of cut, single layer, and multiple layers. This study was performed to identify the relationships among muscle dissection method, skin incision type, and muscle atrophy in the lateral suboccipital approach to surgery for VS. Between 2002 and 2011, we performed surgical resection in 53 patients with VS at Shinshu University Hospital. Of these 53 patients, 35 with radiographic annual follow-up for >3 years after surgery were evaluated retrospectively. These patients included 14 who underwent an S-shaped incision, 6 with a J-shaped incision, and 15 with a C-shaped incision. Bilateral areas of the skin and occipital muscles were measured, and rates of atrophy were calculated and compared among the 3 methods. Postoperative muscle atrophy was significantly advanced in the second postoperative year, but did not tend to develop further after the third year. The postoperative muscle atrophy ratio was significantly lower in the C-shaped incision group (mean ± SD, 4.0% ± 6.9%) compared with the S-shaped (17.1% ± 9.8%) and J-shaped (17.6% ± 10.0%) incision groups within 2 years after surgery (P muscle dissection was associated with significantly reduced postoperative muscle atrophy compared with the other methods. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Quality of life after gamma knife radiosurgery treatment in patients with a vestibular schwannoma: the patient’s perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Haren, Anniek E. P.; Mulder, Jef J. S.; Hanssens, Patrick E. J.; van Overbeeke, Jacobus J.; Cremers, Cor W. R. J.; Graamans, Kees

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluates the impact of gamma knife radiosurgery (GKRS) on the quality of life (QOL) of patients with a sporadic vestibular schwannoma (VS). This study pertains to 108 VS patients who had GKRS in the years 2003 through 2007. Two different QOL questionnaires were used: medical outcome study short form 36 (SF36) and Glasgow benefit inventory (GBI). Radiosurgery was performed using a Leksell 4C gamma knife. The results of the QOL questionnaires in relation to prospectively and retrospectively gathered data of the VS patients treated by GKRS. Eventually, 97 patients could be included in the study. Their mean tumor size was 17 mm (range 6–39 mm); the mean maximum dose on the tumor was 19.9 Gy (range 16–25.5 Gy) and the mean marginal dose on the tumor was 11.1 (range 9.3–12.5 Gy). SF36 scores showed results comparable to those for a normal Dutch population. GBI showed a marginal decline in QOL. No correlation was found between QOL and gender, age, tumor size, or radiation dose. Increased audiovestibular symptoms after GKRS were correlated with a decreased GBI score, and decreased symptoms were correlated with a higher QOL post-GKRS. In this study shows that GKRS for VS has little impact on the general QOL of the VS patient. However, there is a wide range in individual QOL results. Individual QOL was influenced by the audiovestibular symptoms. No predictive patient, tumor, or treatment factors for QOL outcome after GKRS could be determined. Comparison with microsurgery is difficult because of intra group variability. PMID:19894058

  15. Rare synchronous association of vestibular schwannoma and indolent insular oligodendroglioma in a patient without neurofibromatosis: controversial issue of timing for surgical treatment of asymptomatic low-grade gliomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zizzi A

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Maurizio Iacoangeli,1 Alessandro Di Rienzo,1 Roberto Colasanti,1 Lorenzo Alvaro,1 Niccolò Nocchi,1 Gabriele Polonara,2 Lucia Giovanna Maria Di Somma,1 Antonio Zizzi,3 Marina Scarpelli,3 Massimo Scerrati11Department of Neurosurgery, 2Department of Radiology, Section of Neuroradiology, 3Department of Pathology, Università Politecnica delle Marche, Umberto I General Hospital, Ancona, ItalyAbstract: The co-occurrence of a vestibular schwannoma and a low-grade glioma is rare, and even rarer is the association with an oligodendroglioma. Although various authors have addressed the problem of treating patients with incidentally discovered indolent low-grade gliomas, an established protocol does not exist to date. The common approach is to reserve surgery until there is radiological evidence of tumor growth or high-grade transformation. However, because incidental low-grade glioma may represent the first stage of unavoidable pathological progression towards high-grade glioma, early and radical surgical resection should be advocated in order to increase the chance of a "cure" and prolonged survival. This case report supports this view, and suggests reflection on a possible change from a conservative philosophy to preventative surgical treatment.Keywords: multiple primary intracranial tumors, vestibular schwannoma, oligodendroglioma, indolent low grade gliomas, incidentaloma, surgery

  16. Radiation-Induced Peripheral Malignant Nerve Sheath Tumor Arising from Vestibular Schwannoma after Linac-Based Stereotactic Radiation Therapy: A Case Report and Review of Literatures

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    Putipun Puataweepong

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years the use of stereotactic radiation for vestibular schwannomas has increased worldwide. However, malignant transformation associated with radiation, although uncommon, has been reported in recent publications. We present a case of the 34 year-old female who had left vestibular schwannoma and who underwent surgery and postoperative stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT, hypofraction in 2005. At 6 years after SRT, the patient came with left facial palsy and severe headache. CT brain revealed progression in size with cystic and hemorrhagic changes of the preexisting tumor at left CPA with new obstructive hydrocephalus. Partial tumor removal was done, and the pathological report was malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST. Regarding the uncertainty of carcinogenesis risk, we should still practice radiation therapy with caution, especially in the young patient with tumor predisposition syndrome. Because of low incidence of MPNST after radiation, it should not be a major decision about giving radiotherapy. However, with the poor prognosis of MPNST, this possibility should be explained to the patient before radiation treatment option.

  17. WE-F-304-04: Radiosurgery for Vestibular Schwannomas: Tumor Control Probability Analyses and Recommended Reporting Standards

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    Soltys, S. [Stanford Univ. (United States)

    2015-06-15

    in explaining the results of hypofractionated RT Describe the dose/volume metrics that are considered safe in SBRT treatment of tumors near the optic structures. Discuss the efficacy of hypofractionation and dosing schedules used in treating vestibular schwannomas Identify some difficulties in modeling TCP and NTCP for cranial tumors treated with hypofractionation. One moderator, Dr. Grimm, designed and holds intellectual property rights to the DVH Evaluator software tool which is an FDA-cleared product in commercial use, and can analyze some of this data. No others have relevant conflicts of interest.

  18. The Risk Factors of Symptomatic Communicating Hydrocephalus After Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Unilateral Vestibular Schwannoma: The Implication of Brain Atrophy

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    Han, Jung Ho [Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong Gyu, E-mail: gknife@plaza.snu.ac.kr [Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Hyun-Tai; Paek, Sun Ha; Park, Chul-Kee [Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chae-Yong [Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Seung-Sik [Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Inha University School of Medicine, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jeong-Hoon [Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young-Hoon [Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jin Wook; Kim, Yong Hwy; Song, Sang Woo; Kim, In Kyung; Jung, Hee-Won [Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To identify the effect of brain atrophy on the development of symptomatic communicating hydrocephalus (SCHCP) after stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for sporadic unilateral vestibular schwannomas (VS). Methods and Materials: A total of 444 patients with VS were treated with SRS as a primary treatment. One hundred eighty-one patients (40.8%) were male, and the mean age of the patients was 53 {+-} 13 years (range, 11-81 years). The mean follow-up duration was 56.8 {+-} 35.8 months (range, 12-160 months). The mean tumor volume was 2.78 {+-} 3.33 cm{sup 3} (range, 0.03-23.30 cm{sup 3}). The cross-sectional area of the lateral ventricles (CALV), defined as the combined area of the lateral ventricles at the level of the mammillary body, was measured on coronal T1-weighted magnetic resonance images as an indicator of brain atrophy. Results: At distant follow-up, a total of 25 (5.6%) patients had SCHCP. The median time to symptom development was 7 months (range, 1-48 months). The mean CALV was 334.0 {+-} 194.0 mm{sup 2} (range, 44.70-1170 mm{sup 2}). The intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.988 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.976-0.994; p < 0.001). In multivariate analysis, the CALV had a significant relationship with the development of SCHCP (p < 0.001; odds ration [OR] = 1.005; 95% CI, 1.002-1.007). Tumor volume and female sex also had a significant association (p < 0.001; OR = 1.246; 95% CI, 1.103-1.409; p < 0.009; OR = 7.256; 95% CI, 1.656-31.797, respectively). However, age failed to show any relationship with the development of SCHCP (p = 0.364). Conclusion: Brain atrophy may be related to de novo SCHCP after SRS, especially in female patients with a large VS. Follow-up surveillance should be individualized, considering the risk factors involved for each patient, for prompt diagnosis of SCHCP.

  19. Intraosseous schwannoma in schwannomatosis

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    Kashima, T.G.; Gibbons, M.R.J.P.; Whitwell, D.; Gibbons, C.L.M.H.; Bradley, K.M.; Ostlere, S.J.; Athanasou, N.A. [University of Oxford, Nuffield Orthopaedic Centre, Department of Pathology, Nuffield Department of Orthopaedics, Rheumatology and Musculoskeletal Sciences, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2013-12-15

    This study investigates the clinical, radiological, and pathological features of two cases of intraosseous schwannoma that arose in patients with multiple soft tissue schwannomas. In both cases, the patients were adult females and the tibial bone was affected. Vestibular schwannomas were not identified, indicating that these were not cases of neurofibromatosis 2 (NF2). Radiographs showed a well-defined lytic lesion in the proximal tibia; in one case, this was associated with a pathological fracture. Histologically, both cases showed typical features of benign schwannoma. Molecular analysis of one of the excised tumors showed different alterations in the NF2 gene in keeping with a diagnosis of schwannomatosis. Our findings show for the first time that intraosseous schwannomas can occur in schwannomatosis. (orig.)

  20. Rare synchronous association of vestibular schwannoma and indolent insular oligodendroglioma in a patient without neurofibromatosis: controversial issue of timing for surgical treatment of asymptomatic low-grade gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacoangeli, Maurizio; Di Rienzo, Alessandro; Colasanti, Roberto; Alvaro, Lorenzo; Nocchi, Niccolò; Polonara, Gabriele; Di Somma, Lucia Giovanna Maria; Zizzi, Antonio; Scarpelli, Marina; Scerrati, Massimo

    2012-01-01

    The co-occurrence of a vestibular schwannoma and a low-grade glioma is rare, and even rarer is the association with an oligodendroglioma. Although various authors have addressed the problem of treating patients with incidentally discovered indolent low-grade gliomas, an established protocol does not exist to date. The common approach is to reserve surgery until there is radiological evidence of tumor growth or high-grade transformation. However, because incidental low-grade glioma may represent the first stage of unavoidable pathological progression towards high-grade glioma, early and radical surgical resection should be advocated in order to increase the chance of a "cure" and prolonged survival. This case report supports this view, and suggests reflection on a possible change from a conservative philosophy to preventative surgical treatment.

  1. Rare synchronous association of vestibular schwannoma and indolent insular oligodendroglioma in a patient without neurofibromatosis: controversial issue of timing for surgical treatment of asymptomatic low-grade gliomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacoangeli, Maurizio; Di Rienzo, Alessandro; Colasanti, Roberto; Alvaro, Lorenzo; Nocchi, Niccolò; Polonara, Gabriele; Di Somma, Lucia Giovanna Maria; Zizzi, Antonio; Scarpelli, Marina; Scerrati, Massimo

    2012-01-01

    The co-occurrence of a vestibular schwannoma and a low-grade glioma is rare, and even rarer is the association with an oligodendroglioma. Although various authors have addressed the problem of treating patients with incidentally discovered indolent low-grade gliomas, an established protocol does not exist to date. The common approach is to reserve surgery until there is radiological evidence of tumor growth or high-grade transformation. However, because incidental low-grade glioma may represent the first stage of unavoidable pathological progression towards high-grade glioma, early and radical surgical resection should be advocated in order to increase the chance of a “cure” and prolonged survival. This case report supports this view, and suggests reflection on a possible change from a conservative philosophy to preventative surgical treatment. PMID:23180968

  2. Stereotactic radiosurgery for vestibular schwannomas: average 10-year follow-up results focusing on long-term hearing preservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Shinya; Yamamoto, Masaaki; Kawabe, Takuya; Koiso, Takao; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Matsumura, Akira; Kasuya, Hidetoshi

    2016-12-01

    OBJECTIVE The aim of this study was to reappraise long-term treatment outcomes of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for vestibular schwannomas (VSs). The authors used a database that included patients who underwent SRS with a unique dose-planning technique, i.e., partial tumor coverage designed to avoid excess irradiation of the facial and cochlear nerves, focusing on tumor control and hearing preservation. Clinical factors associated with post-SRS tumor control and long-term hearing preservation were also analyzed. METHODS This institutional review board-approved, retrospective cohort study used the authors' prospectively accumulated database. Among 207 patients who underwent Gamma Knife SRS for VSs between 1990 and 2005, 183 (who were followed up for at least 36 post-SRS months) were studied. The median tumor volume was 2.0 cm(3) (range 0.05-26.2 cm(3)). The median prescribed dose at the tumor periphery was 12.0 Gy (range 8.8-15.0 Gy; 12.0 Gy was used in 171 patients [93%]), whereas tumor portions facing the facial and cochlear nerves were irradiated with 10.0 Gy. As a result, 72%-99% of each tumor was irradiated with the prescribed dose. The mean cochlear doses ranged from 2.3 to 5.7 Gy (median 4.1 Gy). RESULTS The median durations of imaging and audiometric follow-up were 114 months (interquartile range 73-144 months) and 59 months (interquartile range 33-109 months), respectively. Tumor shrinkage was documented in 110 (61%), no change in 48 (27%), and enlargement in the other 22 (12%) patients. A further procedure (FP) was required in 15 (8%) patients. Thus, the tumor growth control rate was 88% and the clinical control rate (i.e., no need for an FP) was 92%. The cumulative FP-free rates were 96%, 93%, and 87% at the 60th, 120th, and 180th post-SRS month, respectively. Six (3%) patients experienced facial pain, and 2 developed transient facial palsy. Serviceable hearing was defined as a pure tone audiogram result better than 50 dB. Among the 66 patients with

  3. Combined use of diffusion tensor tractography and multifused contrast-enhanced FIESTA for predicting facial and cochlear nerve positions in relation to vestibular schwannoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshino, Masanori; Kin, Taichi; Ito, Akihiro; Saito, Toki; Nakagawa, Daichi; Ino, Kenji; Kamada, Kyousuke; Mori, Harushi; Kunimatsu, Akira; Nakatomi, Hirofumi; Oyama, Hiroshi; Saito, Nobuhito

    2015-12-01

    The authors assessed whether the combined use of diffusion tensor tractography (DTT) and contrast-enhanced (CE) fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (FIESTA) could improve the accuracy of predicting the courses of the facial and cochlear nerves before surgery. The population was composed of 22 patients with vestibular schwannoma in whom both the facial and cochlear nerves could be identified during surgery. According to DTT, depicted fibers running from the internal auditory canal to the brainstem were judged to represent the facial or vestibulocochlear nerve. With regard to imaging, the authors investigated multifused CE-FIESTA scans, in which all 3D vessel models were shown simultaneously, from various angles. The low-intensity areas running along the tumor from brainstem to the internal auditory canal were judged to represent the facial or vestibulocochlear nerve. For all 22 patients, the rate of fibers depicted by DTT coinciding with the facial nerve was 13.6% (3/22), and that of fibers depicted by DTT coinciding with the cochlear nerve was 63.6% (14/22). The rate of candidates for nerves predicted by multifused CE-FIESTA coinciding with the facial nerve was 59.1% (13/22), and that of candidates for nerves predicted by multifused CE-FIESTA coinciding with the cochlear nerve was 4.5% (1/22). The rate of candidates for nerves predicted by combined DTT and multifused CE-FIESTA coinciding with the facial nerve was 63.6% (14/22), and that of candidates for nerves predicted by combined DTT and multifused CE-FIESTA coinciding with the cochlear nerve was 63.6% (14/22). The rate of candidates predicted by DTT coinciding with both facial and cochlear nerves was 0.0% (0/22), that of candidates predicted by multifused CE-FIESTA coinciding with both facial and cochlear nerves was 4.5% (1/22), and that of candidates predicted by combined DTT and multifused CE-FIESTA coinciding with both the facial and cochlear nerves was 45.5% (10/22). By using a combination of

  4. BAY 61-3606, CDKi, and Sodium Butyrate Treatments Modulate p53 Protein Level and Its Site-Specific Phosphorylation in Human Vestibular Schwannomas In Vitro

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    Rohan Mitra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study is done to evaluate the effect of spleen tyrosine kinase inhibitor (BAY 61-3606, cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor (CDKi, and sodium butyrate (Na-Bu on the level and phosphorylation of p53 protein and its binding to murine double minute 2 (MDM2 homologue in human vestibular schwannomas (VS. Primary cultures of the tumor tissues were treated individually with optimum concentrations of these small molecules in vitro. The results indicate modulation of p53 protein status and its binding ability to MDM2 in treated samples as compared to the untreated control. The three individual treatments reduced the level of total p53 protein. These treatments also decreased Ser392 and Ser15 phosphorylated p53 in tumor samples of young patients and Ser315 phosphorylated p53 in old patients. Basal level of Thr55 phosphorylated p53 protein was present in all VS samples and it remained unchanged after treatments. The p53 protein from untreated VS samples showed reduced affinity to MDM2 binding in vitro and it increased significantly after treatments. The MDM2/p53 ratio increased approximately 3-fold in the treated VS tumor samples as compared to the control. The differential p53 protein phosphorylation status perhaps could play an important role in VS tumor cell death due to these treatments that we reported previously.

  5. Results of hemihypoglossal-facial nerve anastomosis in the treatment of facial nerve paralysis after failed stereotactic radiosurgery for vestibular schwannoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziedzic, Tomasz A; Kunert, Przemysław; Marchel, Andrzej

    2017-04-01

    Vestibular schwannoma treatment with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) carries a risk of facial nerve (CNVII) palsy that is lower than that with microneurosurgery. The results of hemihypoglossal-facial nerve anastomosis (HHFA) have not been described yet in CNVII palsy after failed stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Here we report a case series of the first four consecutive patients (three women; average age 58.5, age range: 46-74), who underwent HHFA due to failed SRS. All patients were admitted because of progressive peripheral facial nerve palsy. Three patients received retrosigmoid craniotomy due to tumor enlargement that resulted in facial nerve paralysis. All patients achieved satisfactory (House-Brackmann grade III) CNVII regeneration. No or minimal tongue atrophy occurred on the side of the anastomosis. Patients reported no problems with phonation or swallowing, except for the patients with preexisting lower cranial nerve deficits. HHFA effectively treats facial palsy after failed SRS with minimal risk of tongue atrophy and minimal morbidity. The results of the treatment are comparable to those achieved with patients without previous SRS.

  6. Intracochlear Schwannoma: Diagnosis and Management

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    Bittencourt, Aline Gomes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Schwannomas of the eighth cranial nerve are benign tumors that usually occur in the internal auditory canal or the cerebellopontine angle cistern. Rarely, these tumors may originate from the neural elements within the vestibule, cochlea, or semicircular canals and are called intralabyrinthine schwannomas. Intracochlear schwannomas (ICSs represent a small percentage of these tumors, and their diagnosis is based on high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Objectives To report the clinical and radiologic features and audiometric testing results of an ICS in a 48-year-old man after a 22-month follow-up period. Resumed Report A patient with an 8-year history of persistent tinnitus in his right ear, combined with ipsilateral progressive hearing loss and aural fullness. Audiometry revealed normal hearing in the left ear and a moderate to severe sensorineural hearing loss in the right ear, with decreased speech reception threshold and word recognition score, compared with the exam performed 5 years previously. MRI showed a small intracochlear nodular lesion in the modiolus, isointense on T1 with a high contrast enhancement on T1 postgadolinium images. During the follow-up period, there were no radiologic changes on imaging studies. Thus, a wait-and-scan policy was chosen as the lesion remained stable with no considerable growth and the patient still presents with residual hearing. Conclusions Once diagnosed, not all ICS patients require surgery. Treatment options for ICS include stereotactic radiotherapy and rescanning policy, depending on the tumor's size, evidence of the tumor's growth, degree of hearing loss, intractable vestibular symptoms, concern about the pathologic diagnosis, and the patient's other medical conditions.

  7. Intracochlear schwannoma: diagnosis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittencourt, Aline Gomes; Alves, Ricardo Dourado; Ikari, Liliane Satomi; Burke, Patrick Rademaker; Gebrim, Eloisa Maria Santiago; Bento, Ricardo Ferreira

    2014-07-01

    Introduction Schwannomas of the eighth cranial nerve are benign tumors that usually occur in the internal auditory canal or the cerebellopontine angle cistern. Rarely, these tumors may originate from the neural elements within the vestibule, cochlea, or semicircular canals and are called intralabyrinthine schwannomas. Intracochlear schwannomas (ICSs) represent a small percentage of these tumors, and their diagnosis is based on high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Objectives To report the clinical and radiologic features and audiometric testing results of an ICS in a 48-year-old man after a 22-month follow-up period. Resumed Report A patient with an 8-year history of persistent tinnitus in his right ear, combined with ipsilateral progressive hearing loss and aural fullness. Audiometry revealed normal hearing in the left ear and a moderate to severe sensorineural hearing loss in the right ear, with decreased speech reception threshold and word recognition score, compared with the exam performed 5 years previously. MRI showed a small intracochlear nodular lesion in the modiolus, isointense on T1 with a high contrast enhancement on T1 postgadolinium images. During the follow-up period, there were no radiologic changes on imaging studies. Thus, a wait-and-scan policy was chosen as the lesion remained stable with no considerable growth and the patient still presents with residual hearing. Conclusions Once diagnosed, not all ICS patients require surgery. Treatment options for ICS include stereotactic radiotherapy and rescanning policy, depending on the tumor's size, evidence of the tumor's growth, degree of hearing loss, intractable vestibular symptoms, concern about the pathologic diagnosis, and the patient's other medical conditions.

  8. Symptomatic Outcomes in Relation to Tumor Expansion After Fractionated Stereotactic Radiation Therapy for Vestibular Schwannomas: Single-Institutional Long-Term Experience

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    Aoyama, Hidefumi, E-mail: h-aoyama@med.niigata-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Medicine, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Department of Radiology, Division of Radiation Oncology, Niigata University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Niigata (Japan); Onodera, Shunsuke [Department of Radiation Medicine, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Takeichi, Norihito [Department of Otolaryngology, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Onimaru, Rikiya [Department of Radiation Medicine, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Terasaka, Shunsuke; Sawamura, Yutaka [Department of Neurosurgery, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Shirato, Hiroki [Department of Radiation Medicine, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan)

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: The effect of transient tumor expansion after conventionally fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (SRT) on the symptomatic outcomes is not well-known. Methods and Materials: This study enrolled 201 consecutive patients who received SRT for vestibular schwannoma. A conventional fractionation schedule was applied in 194 patients (97%), and 142 (71%) received a total dose of 50 Gy. The median follow-up time was 72 months. Results: The maximum diameter was 9 mm or less in 13 patients, 10-19 mm in 79 patients, 20-29 mm in 87 patients, and 30 mm or greater in 22 patients. At presentation, tumor size of 20 mm or greater was significantly associated with loss of serviceable hearing and trigeminal neuropathy. After SRT, tumor expansion was observed in 42 patients (21%). By tumor size, tumor expansion was observed in 0%, 11.4%, 25.6%, and 50% of patients with tumors of 9 mm or less, 10-19 mm, 20-29 mm, and 30 mm or greater, respectively, in diameter. The tumor expansion was significantly associated with an increased risk of hydrocephalus requiring shunt placement (P=.004), loss of serviceable hearing (P=.0064), and worsening of facial (P<.0001) and trigeminal nerve (P<.0001) functions. Spontaneous tumor shrinkage was observed in 29 of those 42 patients, mostly within 2 years after the expansion, and the majority of the worsened symptoms except for hearing resolved once the tumor had shrunk. As a result, salvage surgical resection for symptomatic relief was required in only 5% of patients. Conclusions: Fractionated SRT could be safely applied even for medium- to large-sized ({>=}20 mm) tumors. However, greater knowledge of the risks and consequences, including transient symptomatic worsening, and the time span of expansion will be required for the follow-up of patients after SRT to avoid unnecessary surgical intervention.

  9. Long-term safety and efficacy of stereotactic radiosurgery for vestibular schwannomas: evaluation of 440 patients more than 10 years after treatment with Gamma Knife surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Toshinori; Kida, Yoshihisa; Kato, Takenori; Iizuka, Hiroshi; Kuramitsu, Shunichiro; Yamamoto, Takashi

    2013-03-01

    Object Little is known about long-term outcomes, including tumor control and adverse radiation effects, in patients harboring vestibular schwannomas (VSs) treated with stereotactic radiosurgery > 10 years previously. The aim of this study was to confirm whether Gamma Knife surgery (GKS) for VSs continues to be safe and effective > 10 years after treatment. Methods A total of 440 patients with VS (including neurofibromatosis Type 2) treated with GKS between May 1991 and December 2000 were evaluable. Of these, 347 patients (79%) underwent GKS as an initial treatment and 93 (21%) had undergone prior resection. Three hundred fifty-eight patients (81%) had a solid tumor and 82 (19%) had a cystic tumor. The median tumor volume was 2.8 cm(3) and the median marginal dose was 12.8 Gy. Results The median follow-up period was 12.5 years. The actuarial 5- and ≥ 10-year progression-free survival was 93% and 92%, respectively. No patient developed treatment failure > 10 years after treatment. According to multivariate analysis, significant factors related to worse progression-free survival included brainstem compression with a deviation of the fourth ventricle (p 13 Gy) and 100% in the low marginal dose group (≤ 13 Gy). Ten patients (2.3%) developed delayed cyst formation. One patient alone developed malignant transformation, indicating an incidence of 0.3%. Conclusions In this study GKS was a safe and effective treatment for the majority of patients followed > 10 years after treatment. Special attention should be paid to cyst formation and malignant transformation as late adverse radiation effects, although they appeared to be rare. However, it is necessary to collect further long-term follow-up data before making conclusions about the long-term safety and efficacy of GKS, especially for young patients with VSs.

  10. Diffusion tensor imaging-based fiber tracking for prediction of the position of the facial nerve in relation to large vestibular schwannomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerganov, Venelin M; Giordano, Mario; Samii, Madjid; Samii, Amir

    2011-12-01

    The reliable preoperative visualization of facial nerve location in relation to vestibular schwannoma (VS) would allow surgeons to plan tumor removal accordingly and may increase the safety of surgery. In this prospective study, the authors attempted to validate the reliability of facial nerve diffusion tensor (DT) imaging-based fiber tracking in a series of patients with large VSs. Furthermore, the authors evaluated the potential of this visualization technique to predict the morphological shape of the facial nerve (tumor compression-related flattening of the nerve). Diffusion tensor imaging and anatomical images (constructive interference in steady state) were acquired in a series of 22 consecutive patients with large VSs and postprocessed with navigational software to obtain facial nerve fiber tracking. The location of the cerebellopontine angle (CPA) part of the nerve in relation to the tumor was recorded during surgery by the surgeon, who was blinded to the results of the fiber tracking. A correlative analysis was performed of the imaging-based location of the nerve compared with its in situ position in relation to the VS. Fibers corresponding to the anatomical location and course of the facial nerve from the brainstem to the internal auditory meatus were identified with the DT imaging-based fiber tracking technique in all 22 cases. The location of the CPA segment of the facial nerve in relation to the VS determined during surgery corresponded to the location of the fibers, predicted by the DT imaging-based fiber tracking, in 20 (90.9%) of the 22 patients. No DT imaging-based fiber tracking correlates were found with the 2 morphological types of the nerve (compact or flat). The current study of patients with large VSs has shown that the position of the facial nerve in relation to the tumor can be predicted reliably (in 91%) using DT imaging-based fiber tracking. These are preliminary results that need further verification in a larger series.

  11. Acoustic neuroma (vestibular schwannoma: surgical results on 240 patients operated on dorsal decubitus position Neurinoma do acústico (schwannoma do vestibular: resultados do tratamento cirúrgico de 240 pacientes operados na posição de decúbito dorsal

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    Arquimedes Cavalcante Cardoso

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the result of the surgical treatment of vestibular schwannoma (VS operated in dorsal decubitus (mastoid position. METHOD: 240 patients with a VS underwent a retrosigmoid craniotomy for tumor resection in dorsal decubitus (mastoid position. The function of 7th and 8th cranial nerves was monitored during surgery and the opened internal auditory canal (IAC was reconstructed using a vascularized dura flap, muscle and fibrin glue. RESULTS: Complete tumor removal was achieved in 99% of the cases, with a mortality of 1.6%. The facial nerve function was preserved in 85% of cases and hearing in 40% of the patients (with preoperative hearing with tumors of up 1.5 cm in diameter. The incidence of cerebrospinal fluid leak was 5.8% and meningitis 2.9%. Venous air embolism was registered in 3% of cases; it was not associated to mortality. CONCLUSION: Surgical removal of VS in dorsal position has several advantages; the morbidity and mortality are very low.OBJETIVO: Avaliar o resultado do tratamento cirúrgico de pacientes portadores de schwannoma do vestibular (SV operados em decúbito dorsal (posição de mastóide. MÉTODO: 240 pacientes foram submetidos a craniotomia retrosigmóide na posição de mastóide. A função do VII e VIII nervos cranianos foi monitorizada durante a cirurgia e a reconstrução da abertura do conduto auditivo interno foi realizada com retalho vascularizado de dura-mater, músculo e cola de fibrina. RESULTADOS: A exérese foi completa em 99% dos casos, com mortalidade de 1,6%. Houve preservação da função do nervo facial em 85% dos casos e da audição em 40% dos pacientes com audição prévia e tumores menores de 1,5 cm. A incidência de fístula liquórica foi 5,8% e meningite 2,9%. Embolia gasosa foi registrada em 3% dos casos, não associada à mortalidade. CONCLUSÃO: O tratamento cirúrgico dos SV utilizando-se a posição de mastóide tem várias vantagens, com baixa morbidade e mortalidade.

  12. [Lingual schwannoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulkü, Cağatay Han; Demir, Hilal; Yeşildemir, Huri Sultan; Esen, Hasan

    2014-01-01

    Schwannomas are benign, slow growing, solitary and encapsulated neuroectodermal tumors arising from Schwann cells of the nerve sheath. Twenty-five percent of all extracranial schwannomas are seen in the head and neck region. Intra-oral schwannomas are rare and commonly seen at the tongue base. In this article, a 20-year-old female case with lingual schwannoma as a rare clinical condition and characteristics of the disease were summarized in the lights of the literature.

  13. Solitary eyelid schwannoma

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    Renu M Magdum

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Schwannomas are rare benign tumors arising from Schwann cells of peripheral nerves that form the neural sheath. While there have been reports of such tumors in the orbit, solitary schwannomas arising from the eyelids are very rare. There are reports of schwannomas being erroneously diagnosed as chalazion, inclusion cysts or even eyelid malignancy. We are reporting a case of a 20-year-old female who presented with a painless, non-tender, slow-growing mass in the upper eyelid of the right eye. The external appearance of the mass was suggestive of an implantation cyst of the eyelid and it could be completely excised as it had a well-defined capsule. Histopathological examination showed characteristic hypercellular and hypocellular areas with fusiform nuclei that tended to form palisades. The purpose of reporting this case of schwannoma in a young female is to recommend the inclusion of this entity as a differential diagnosis of well-defined lid tumors.

  14. Ten-Year Follow-up on Tumor Growth and Hearing in Patients Observed With an Intracanalicular Vestibular Schwannoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirchmann, Malene; Karnov, Kirstine; Hansen, Søren

    2017-01-01

    growth and hearing loss in 156 patients diagnosed with an intracanalicular VS and managed conservatively.  METHODS: In this longitudinal cohort study, diagnostic and follow-up magnetic resonance imaging and audiometry were compared.  RESULTS: After a follow-up of 9.5 years, tumor growth had occurred...... in 37% and growth into the cerebellopontine angle had occurred in 23% of patients. Conservative treatment failed in 15%. The pure tone average had increased from 51- to 72-dB hearing level, and the speech discrimination score (SDS) had decreased from 60% to 34%. The number of patients with good hearing...

  15. Lingual schwannoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enoz, Murat; Suoglu, Yusufhan; Ilhan, Ridvan

    2006-01-01

    Schwannomas or neurilemmomas are benign, slow growing, usually solitary and encapsulated tumor, originating from Schwann cells of the nerve sheath. Intraoral schwannoma accounts for 1% of head and neck region and are commonly seen at the base region of tongue. Most of the few such reports in the literature, have described schwannomas that occurred in the tongue. In this article, we report a rare case of lingual schwannoma involving the anterior of tongue, in a young individual, in whom the lesion was completely excised via an intra oral approach.

  16. Primary Psammomatous Melanotic Schwannoma of the Spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakan, Selim; Kayadibi, Yasemin; Ersen, Ezel; Vatankulu, Betul; Ustundag, Nil; Hasıloglu, Zehra Isık

    2015-06-01

    Schwannoma is an easily identifiable and frequently diagnosed lesion of the spinal column. However, if the schwannoma contains a melanin component, the diagnosis is challenging. Our purpose in this case report is to discuss the imaging and histopathologic findings of a rarely seen psammomatous type of melanotic schwannoma diagnosed in a 31-year-old woman. Copyright © 2015 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Schwannoma of the tongue in a child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukšić, Ivica; Müller, Danko; Virag, Mišo; Manojlović, Spomenka; Ostović, Karmen Trutin

    2011-09-01

    A schwannoma or neurilemmoma is a benign, slow growing, usually solitary and encapsulated tumour originating from Schwann cells of the nerve sheath. Approximately 25-40% of all schwannomas are seen in the soft tissues of the head and neck, often originate from the acoustic nerve. Intraoral schwannomas are rare and account for 1% of schwannomas of the head and neck region. We report the case of a 10-year-old boy diagnosed with a schwannoma of the tongue. The purpose of this report is to emphasize the possibility of diagnosing schwannoma among all other lingual lesions in children. The disease itself was diagnosed histologically after complete surgical excision. Five years after surgical treatment, the patient is without signs of recurrence. This paper highlights the importance of a multidisciplinary approach in the diagnosis and surgical treatment of this very rare entity.

  18. Fractionated vs. single-fraction stereotactic radiotherapy in patients with vestibular schwannoma. Hearing preservation and patients' self-reported outcome based on an established questionnaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kessel, Kerstin A.; Fischer, Hanna; Vogel, Marco M.E.; Combs, Stephanie E. [Technical University of Munich (TUM), Department of Radiation Oncology, Munich (Germany); Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, Institute of Innovative Radiotherapy (iRT), Neuherberg (Germany); Oechsner, Markus [Technical University of Munich (TUM), Department of Radiation Oncology, Munich (Germany); Bier, Henning [Technical University of Munich (TUM), Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Munich (Germany); Meyer, Bernhard [Technical University of Munich (TUM), Department of Neurosurgery, Munich (Germany)

    2017-03-15

    Stereotactic radiotherapy (RT) has been established as a valid treatment alternative in patients with vestibular schwannoma (VS). There is ongoing controversy regarding the optimal fractionation. Hearing preservation may be the primary goal for patients with VS, followed by maintenance of quality of life (QoL). From 2002 to 2015, 184 patients with VS were treated with radiosurgery (RS) or fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT). A survey on current symptoms and QoL was conducted between February and June 2016. Median follow-up after RT was 7.5 years (range 0-14.4 years). Mean overall survival (OS) after RT was 31.1 years, with 94 and 87% survival at 5 and 10 years, respectively. Mean progression-free survival (PFS) was 13.3 years, with 5- and 10-year PFS of 92%. Hearing could be preserved in RS patients for a median of 36.3 months (range 2.3-13.7 years). Hearing worsened in 17 (30%) cases. Median hearing preservation for FSRT was 48.7 months (range 0.0-13.8 years); 29 (23%) showed hearing deterioration. The difference in hearing preservation was not significant between RS and FSRT (p = 0.3). A total of 123/162 patients participated in the patient survey (return rate 76%). The results correlate well with the information documented in the patient files for tinnitus and facial and trigeminal nerve toxicity. Significant differences appeared regarding hearing impairment, gait uncertainty, and imbalance. These data confirm that RS and FSRT are comparable in terms of local control for VS. RS should be reserved for smaller lesions, while FSRT can be offered independently of tumor size. Patient self-reported outcome during follow-up is of high value. The established questionnaire could be validated in the independent cohort. (orig.) [German] Die stereotaktische Radiotherapie (RT) wurde als gueltige Behandlungsalternative bei Patienten mit Vestibularisschwannom (VS) etabliert. Diskussionen ueber die optimale Fraktionierung laufen jedoch. Der Erhalt von Hoervermoegen

  19. Intraosseous schwannoma of the ilium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Hiroki; Kanematsu, Masayuki; Ohno, Takatoshi; Oshima, Koji; Nagano, Akihito; Hatano, Yuichiro; Nishibori, Hironori

    2015-01-01

    We presented a 27-year-old male diagnosed with intraosseous schwannoma of the ilium. Computed tomographic images revealed a well-demarcated, lobulated, expansile, osteolytic lesion in the right supraacetabular region of the ilium. In addition, an intratumoral punctate calcification and a sclerotic rim were observed. T2-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) images demonstrated a heterogeneously hyperintense lesion with a hypointense rim. Major parts of the lesion, excluding some central areas, were enhanced on gadolinium-enhanced MR images. Pathological examination revealed an intraosseous schwannoma. Our findings indicate that intraosseous schwannoma should be considered when images demonstrate a well-demarcated, lobulated, expansile, osteolytic lesion with a sclerotic rim.

  20. Schwannoma of the palatine tonsil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anil, H T; Gowda, B V Chandre; Lakshmi, S; Niveditha, S R

    2005-07-01

    Schwannoma is a solitary, benign tumour arising from the neural sheath Schwann cells of the peripheral, cranial or autonomic nerves. In the head and neck region, it occurs most commonly in association with the acoustic nerve within the skull and is rarely found in oral structures. When it is found in oral structures, the tongue is reported to be the favoured site. Schwannoma of the tonsil is extremely rare, with only two cases reported in the literature. We report what is, to our knowledge, the third case of schwannoma of the tonsil, diagnosed by histopathology.

  1. Stereotactic radiotherapy for vestibular schwannoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muzevic, Dario; Legcevic, Jelena; Splavski, Bruno;

    2014-01-01

    ; Web of Science; CAB Abstracts; ISRCTN and additional sources for published and unpublished trials. The date of the search was 24 July 2014. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) exploring the efficacy of stereotactic radiotherapy compared with observation alone, microsurgical...

  2. Spontaneous shrinkage of vestibular schwannoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossana Romani

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Early WWR management can be associated with spontaneous shrinkage of VS over time. Prospective clinical study of larger numbers of such cases using the UK VS database may help to identify predictive factors for the spontaneous regression of VS.

  3. MR findings in intralabyrinthine schwannomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montague, Mary-Louise; Kishore, Ameet; Hadley, Donald M.; O' Reilly, Brian

    2002-05-01

    AIM: Intralabyrinthine schwannomas (ILS) are rare benign tumours. They are not always recognized on routine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We aimed to study the clinical presentation and MRI findings in our patients with ILS. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Retrospective analysis of patients with vestibular schwannomas treated at this center. RESULTS: Of 144 vestibular schwannomas studied at this centre, three patients had an ILS. The most common presenting symptoms were unilateral hearing loss, tinnitus and vertigo. Two patients demonstrated a progressive sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL). The third patient had a severe SNHL at presentation. MRI enhanced with contrast medium was positive in the two patients with progressive SNHL and negative in the patient with the severe SNHL. CONCLUSION: This series demonstrates the ability of MRI to identify schwannomas filling the labyrinth, and also its inability to identify extremely small ILS. It underlines the importance of sending the cristae of patients undergoing labyrinthectomy for presumed Meniere's disease for histological examination. Montague, M.-L. et al. (2002)

  4. SCHWANNOMA PRESENTING AS PAPILLOMA – A DIAGNOSTIC DILEMMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sourabh Mandwariya

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Schwannomas are slow growing benign nerve sheath tumors. They are notcommonly seen in the oral cavity and the tongue is the most common site of schwannomas found there. Here, we report a case of a tongue swelling presenting asa Papilloma clinically, which was histopathologically diagnosed as Schwannoma(Neurilemmoma and discuss its clinical presentation, histological features andmanagement.

  5. [Anterior skull-base schwannoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquivel-Miranda, Miguel; De la O Ríos, Elier; Vargas-Valenciano, Emmanuelle; Moreno-Medina, Eva

    2017-06-24

    Schwannomas are nerve sheath tumours that originate in Schwann cells. They are usually solitary and sporadic and manifest on peripheral, spinal or cranial nerves. Intracranial schwannomas tend to manifest on the eighth cranial nerve, particularly in patients with neurofibromatosis type2. Anterior skull-base schwannomas represent less than 1% of all intracranial schwannomas. They are more frequent in young people and are typically benign. These tumours represent a diagnostic challenge due to their rarity and difficult differential diagnosis, and numerous theories have been postulated concerning their origin and development. In this article, we present the case of a 13-year-old male with a single anterior cranial-base tumour not associated with neurofibromatosis who presented with headache, papilloedema, eye pain and loss of visual acuity. Complete resection of the tumour was performed, which was histopathologically diagnosed as a schwannoma. The patient made a complete clinical recovery with abatement of all symptoms. We conducted a review of the literature and found 66 cases worldwide with this diagnosis. We describe the most relevant epidemiological and clinical characteristics of this kind of tumour and its relation with the recently discovered and similar olfactory schwannoma. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Intraosseous Schwannoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhavna Nayal

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Intraosseous schwannomas are rare and benign neoplasms originating from the nerve sheath cells. We present two such cases, one located in the ninth thoracic vertebrae and the other involving the sacrum. Clinicoradiological diagnosis in both the cases was a primary bone tumour. Histopathological examination revealed characteristic morphology of schwannoma which was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. These two cases highlight the importance of clinical, radiological and histopathological correlation in the diagnosis of these uncommon bone tumors. [J Interdiscipl Histopathol 2015; 3(2.000: 74-77

  7. Solid cystic trigeminal schwannoma with intraorbital extension causing proptosis and vision loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Pankaj; Sharma, Arvind; Singh, Jitendra

    2016-01-01

    Schwannomas are slowly growing, well capsulated, benign tumors. Involvement of vestibular nerve is most commonly followed by trigeminal nerve. Trigeminal schwannoma is rare entity, and cystic degeneration with intraorbital extension of trigeminal schwannoma is even rarer. These tumors occur in fourth and fifth decades of life and patients have variable presentation depending on which cranial compartment is involved. Orbital schwannoma usually presents with proptosis with or without vision loss. We are reporting such a rare case of solid cystic trigeminal schwannoma with intraorbital extension through superior orbital fissure that was removed surgically. PMID:27695572

  8. THREE YEARS STUDY OF SCHWANNOMAS OF PERIPHERAL NERVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subha Dhua

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND In this paper authors present three cases of schwannomas including a case of multiple schwannomas without the features of neurofibromatosis (NF. There was no family history of neurofibromatosis. All the patients underwent surgical excision and improved from the symptomatic lesions. Histopathology confirmed these lesions as schwannomas. The authors recommend surgery for symptomatic lesions. Asymptomatic tumours can be monitored. Regular follow up is essential as they may develop fresh lesions at any time. The relevant literature is discussed. • Malignant transformation of the schwannomas is rare and has poor prognosis. It should be considered in the differential diagnosis of schwannomas. • We should distinguish between “ancient schwannoma” and malignant transformation of schwannoma since treatment and prognosis vary. • Imaging is not entirely reliable in differentiating benign from malignant peripheral nerve tumours. MATERIALS AND METHODS All the patients underwent surgical excision and improved from the symptomatic lesions. Histopathology confirmed these lesions as schwannomas. The authors recommend surgery for symptomatic lesions. RESULTS The histopathological studies confirmed the lesion as Flexi Schwannoma and surgery was considered to be the best option. CONCLUSION Schwannomas and meningiomas are usually benign tumours curable by complete removal. They occur either as single sporadic tumors in otherwise healthy individuals in the fourth to sixth decades of life or as multiple tumours at an early age as part of the autosomal dominant genetic disorder neurofibromatosis 2 (NF2. The hallmark feature of NF2 is bilateral vestibular schwannomas. Multiplicity, a lobular growth pattern, and invasiveness are typical features of NF2 schwannomas. The diagnosis of NF2 is difficult in a group of heterogeneous and poorly defined patients who do not have BVSs but present with other features suggestive of NF2, namely (1 multiple

  9. Isolated colonic schwannoma in the ascending colon: A case report and literature review of Schwannomas in the large intestine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, In Chul; Lee, Ye Daum; Kim, Seung Ho; Yoon, Jung Hee; Baek, Hye Jin; Lee, Kwang Hwi; Nam, Kyung Han [Haeundae Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Schwannomas are benign mesenchymal spindle cell tumors arising from the Schwann cells that form the peripheral neural sheath. Several recent studies indicate that although reports of gastrointestinal schwannomas have increased with advanced technological developments in immunohistochemical staining, isolated colonic schwannomas are extremely rare. Moreover, it is known to be somewhat difficult to diagnose colonic schwannoma before surgical operation. In this paper, we report a case of isolated schwannoma that was incidentally discovered in the ascending colon, along with a review of few recent literatures.

  10. Retroperitoneal Schwannoma: A Rare Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Kalaycı

    2011-01-01

    Case Presentation. A 38-year-old woman was admitted to the emergency service with the complaints of progressive abdominal pain and nausea for the last 24 hours. Abdominal examination was compatible with acute abdomen. Acute appendicitis was diagnosed by CT. During CT evaluation, a round shaped soft-tissue mass at the retroperitoneal area inferior to the right kidney was detected, The mass was resected and histology revealed schwannoma. Conclusion. Rare tumoral lesions with benign course such as schwannoma can be detected incidentally.

  11. Ileal schwannoma developing into ileocolic intussusception

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shoji Hirasaki; Hiromitsu Kanzaki; Kohei Fujita; Seiyuu Suzuki; Kazuyasu Kobayashi; Hiromitsu Suzuki; Hideyuki Saeki

    2008-01-01

    Intussusception is rare in adults. We describe a 47-year-old man with ileal schwannoma that led to ileocolic intussusception. Abdominal ultrasonography, abdominal CT scan and barium enema confirmed an ileal tumor. Colonoscopy revealed a peduncular submucosal tumor (SMT) 75 mm long with an ulcerated apex at the ascending colon. The provisional diagnosis was a gastrointestinal stromal tumor of the terminal ileum. Ileocecal resection was carried out and the tumor was historically diagnosed as schwannoma. Abdominal pain resolved postoperatively. This case reminds us that ileal schwannoma should be included in the differential diagnosis of intussusception caused by an SMT in the intestine.

  12. Surgical approaches for tongue base schwannoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Binbin; Zhu, Songsong; Qiao, Yang; Ye, Weimin; Maimaiti, Abdikerimjian; Hu, Jingzhou; Zhang, Yong

    2013-01-01

    Schwannomas (neurilemmomas) are benign nerve sheath tumor originating from Schwann cells. They are well circumscribed and rarely infiltrate and metastasize. Schwannomas of the head and neck commonly occur in the tongue followed by the palate, floor of mouth, buccal mucosa, and mandible. Tongue base schwannomas could extend to the pharyngeal cavity or the floor of the mouse, and it is difficult to differentiate between tumors of the lingual, hypoglossal, and glossopharyngeal nerves.Surgical treatment of tongue base schwannomas is difficult because of limited operative exposure. Although mandibulotomy with lip splitting could obtain good exposure, surgeons might strike a balance between exposure obtaining and morbidity following because there are intricate neurovascular anatomical relationships in this region, and mandibulotomy with lip splitting would cause significant morbidity. Surgical approach options are important for tongue base schwannoma removal. From March 2008 to March 2010, 8 patients were clinically and pathologically diagnosed with tongue base schwannomas in our department, and all underwent surgical treatment. In our experience, transoral approach was used for tongue base schwannomas extending to the floor of the mouse and suprahyroid pharyngotomy approach for those extending to the pharyngeal cavity. Follow-up was made until now. One patient who experienced transoral excision still experienced numbness in the region of the lateral tongue tip, and the other 7 patients had no postoperative long-term complications.

  13. [Multifrequency vestibular study after vestibular neurotomy and chemical labyrinthectomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morel, N; Dumas, G; Righini, C; Karkas, A; Hitter, A; Schmerber, S

    2008-06-01

    Vestibular neurotomy (VN) and chemical labyrinthectomy (CL) are the two most common techniques of vestibular deafferention to treat patients with intractable vertigo. A long-term evaluation of vestibular function has been performed with a variety of vestibular tests to find out whether there persisted any residual vestibular function after each technique. We called in all patients who have been treated for the last 10 years and have no known vestibular disease in the non treated ear. Low frequencies were analyzed with caloric tests, medium frequencies with the head-shaking test and head-impulse test, and high frequencies with the skull vibration test. The otolithic function was explored with the subjective vertical visual analysis and otolithic myogenic evoked potentials. Nine patients treated with VN and 12 with CL presented to our department. We were thus able to compare VN and CL patients with a group of 10 normal patients and another group of nine patients that had had a translabyrinthine approach for an acoustic neuroma. We found out that vestibular responses did persist in seven out of nine (78 %) patients after VN and 11 out of 12 (92 %) patients after CL. On the other hand, no vestibular response was detected following resection of vestibular schwannoma through a translabyrinthine approach. We came to the conclusion that the two latter techniques, unlike vestibulocochlear nerve section via the translabyrinthine approach, are only incomplete methods of vestibular deafferention.

  14. Tongue schwannoma: clinicopathological findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalfamo, Luciano; Lombardo, Giuseppe; Nava, Carla; Familiari, Elena; Petrocelli, Marzia; Iudicello, Valeria; Ieni, Antonio; Barresi, Valeria; De Ponte, Francesco Saverio

    2011-05-01

    Schwannomas are peripheral nerve sheath tumors. Approximately 25% of extracranial schwannomas are located in the head and neck district, but only 1% shows an intraoral origin. We report a case of a 28-year-old patient with a tongue schwannoma. Morphologic analysis and immunohistochemical findings strongly support the diagnosis. Surgical treatment is discussed.

  15. Schwannoma of tongue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-García, Carlos; Pons-García, María Asunción; González-García, Raúl; Monje-Gil, Florencio

    2014-06-01

    The schwannomas are nervous tissue tumors. We report a case of schwannoma of oral tongue. Because schwannomas are quite rare in the oral cavity, they are often not immediately included in the differential diagnosis of oropharyngeal masses, causing delay in identification and treatment. The definitive diagnosis requires histopathologic examination.

  16. Intraosseous Schwannoma of the Petrous Apex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Ryota; Takahashi, Satoshi; Kohno, Maya; Kameyama, Kaori; Fujiwara, Hirokazu; Yoshida, Kazunari

    2015-07-01

    Background and Importance Intraosseous schwannoma is a relatively rare clinical entity that typically arises in vertebral and mandibular bone. Intraosseous schwannoma located entirely within the petrous bone is exceedingly rare, and only two cases have been reported to date. Clinical Presentation A 47-year-old Asian man was referred to our hospital with a chief complaint of double vision. Neurologic examination revealed left abducens nerve palsy. Radiologic imaging showed a 35-mm osteolytic expansive lesion located in the left petrous apex. We made a preoperative diagnosis of chondrosarcoma and performed surgical resection. Surgery was performed via a left subtemporal epidural approach with anterior petrosectomy. The histopathologic diagnosis of the tumor was schwannoma. Schwannoma arising from cranial nerves was excluded from intraoperative findings in conjunction with the results for cranial nerves, and intraosseous schwannoma was diagnosed. Postoperative course was uneventful, and abducens nerve palsy resolved immediately after surgery. Conclusion The differential diagnosis of intraosseous schwannoma should be considered for an osteolytic mass lesion within the petrous apex. Subcapsular tumor removal was considered ideal in terms of preservation of the cranial nerves and vessels around the tumor.

  17. Dilde Schwannoma

    OpenAIRE

    2001-01-01

    Schwannoma, sinir kılıflarının Schwan hücrelerinden kaynaklanan, nöroektodermden ori jin alan, sert, düzgün sınırlı, kapsüllü, yavaş büyüyen ve genellikle sarımtırak renkte iyi huylu bir tümördür. Etiyolojisi bilinmemektedir. En sık baş ve boyun bölgesinde görülür. İntrakranial olguların büyük bir bölümü 8. kran ial sinirden kaynaklanmaktadır. Oral kavitede ve özellikle dilde oldukça nadir görülür. Tedavisi kitlenin cerrahi olarak çıkarılmasıdır. İngilizce literatürde dilde yerleşimli sadece ...

  18. Vertigo with sudden hearing loss: audio-vestibular characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogson, Jacob M; Taylor, Rachael L; Young, Allison S; McGarvie, Leigh A; Flanagan, Sean; Halmagyi, G Michael; Welgampola, Miriam S

    2016-10-01

    Acute vertigo with sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) is a rare clinical emergency. Here, we report the audio-vestibular test profiles of 27 subjects who presented with these symptoms. The vestibular test battery consisted of a three-dimensional video head impulse test (vHIT) of semicircular canal function and recording ocular and cervical vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (oVEMP, cVEMP) to test otolith dysfunction. Unlike vestibular neuritis, where the horizontal and anterior canals with utricular function are more frequently impaired, 74 % of subjects with vertigo and SSNHL demonstrated impairment of the posterior canal gain (0.45 ± 0.20). Only 41 % showed impairment of the horizontal canal gains (0.78 ± 0.27) and 30 % of the anterior canal gains (0.79 ± 0.26), while 38 % of oVEMPs [asymmetry ratio (AR) = 41.0 ± 41.3 %] and 33 % of cVEMPs (AR = 47.3 ± 41.2 %) were significantly asymmetrical. Twenty-three subjects were diagnosed with labyrinthitis/labyrinthine infarction in the absence of evidence for an underlying pathology. Four subjects had a definitive diagnosis [Ramsay Hunt Syndrome, vestibular schwannoma, anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) infarction, and traction injury]. Ischemia involving the common-cochlear or vestibulo-cochlear branches of the labyrinthine artery could be the simplest explanation for vertigo with SSNHL. Audio-vestibular tests did not provide easy separation between ischaemic and non-ischaemic causes of vertigo with SSNHL.

  19. [Submucosal lingual schwannoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulusoy, Bülent; Bozdemir, Kazım; Ersoy Çallıoğlu, Elif; Kutluhan, Ahmet; Korkmaz, Mehmet Hakan

    2015-01-01

    Schwannoma or neurilemmoma is a slow growing, solitary, and encapsulated benign tumor originating from Schwann cells of the peripheral nerves. Lingual schwannomas are rare. A 46-year-old male patient admitted with a complaint of swelling on the right half of the tongue for one year. An approximately 1x1 cm submucosal mass was detected on the right side of the tongue. The submucosal mass was totally excised under local anesthesia. Pathological examination was consistent with schwannoma. Lingual schwannomas should be considered in the differential diagnosis of tongue masses.

  20. Microsurgical management of non-neurofibromatosis spinal schwannoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altaş, Murat; Cerçi, Ajlan; Silav, Gokalp; Sari, Ramazan; Coşkun, Kenan; Balak, Naci; Işik, Nejat; Elmaci, Ilhan

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the clinical properties and surgical results of patients diagnosed with spinal schwannomas without neurofibromatosis (NF) properties. The data obtained from 35 patients who underwent resection of spinal schwannomas were analyzed. All cases with neurofibromas and those with a known diagnosis of NF Type 1 or 2 were excluded. 35 patients underwent surgery for spinal schwannoma at our institution between January 1997 and 2010. The data were gathered retrospectively from medical records and included clinical presentation, tumor location and post-operative complications. All cases were surgically excised, and they were confirmed to be schwannomas by pathologists with histopathological sections in paraffin stained with hematoxylin-eosin. We treated 35 (20 males and 15 females) patients with spinal schwannomas. The mean age of the patients was 47.2 (between 13 and 76) years. Of the cases, six schwannomas were located in the cervical spine, four in the thoracic spine, two in cervico-thoracic area, 10 in the thoraco-lumbar area and 13 in the lumbar spine. Two patients had malignant schwannomas that were recurrent. Of the 35 cases, the schwannomas were intradural-extramedullary in 30 cases (86%), intradural-intramedullar in 2 cases (6%), and extradural in 3 cases (9%). Spinal schwannomas may occur at any level of the spinal axis and are most frequently intradural-extramedullary. The most common clinical presentation is pain. Most of the spinal schwannomas in non-NF patients can be resected completely without or with minor post-operative deficits. This knowledge may help us to create a strategy for total resection of a spinal schwannomas. Copyright © 2011 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  1. Contribution of p75NTR to Schwannoma Growth and Therapeutic Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    NOTES 14. ABSTRACT 15. SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: a. REPORT b. ABSTRACT c. THIS PAGE 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES...Hanemann CO, Karajannis MA. 2010. ErbB/HER receptor activation and pre- clinical efficacy of lapatinib in vestibular schwannoma. Neuro -oncology 12: 834–843...the site of origin of cochleovestibular schwannomas? Audiol Neuro -otol 17:121–125. Rouleau GA, Merel P, Lutchman M, Sanson M, Zucman J, Marineau C

  2. Outcome after translabyrinthine surgery for vestibular schwannomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Springborg, Jacob Bertram; Fugleholm, Kåre; Poulsgaard, Lars;

    2012-01-01

    outcome (House-Brackmann grade 1 or 2). The chance of a good outcome was related to tumor size with a higher the chance the smaller the tumor, but not to the degree of tumor removal. In ~78% of the patients with facial paresis at discharge the paresis improved over time, in ~42% from a poor to a good...... and in ~85% the nerve was intact during surgery. During 33 years, 12 patients died from complications to surgery and ~14% had cerebrospinal fluid leakage. Before surgery, 74 patients had facial paresis and 46% of these improved after surgery. In patients with normal facial function, overall ~70% had a good...... function. The translabyrinthine approach is generally efficient in tumor control and with satisfactory facial nerve outcome. With larger tumors the risk of a poor outcome is evident and more data on patients managed with alternative strategies are warranted....

  3. Isolated trochlear nerve schwannoma presenting with diplopia: A case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Samadian

    2015-06-01

    Conclusion: Trochlear nerve schwannoma is a rare type of schwannoma and in almost all of the cases is diagnosed intraoperatively. There are three types of trochlear nerve schwannoma according to the classification proposed for trigeminal schwannoma: cisternal type—confined to the precavernous segment of the trochlear nerve; cistocavernous type—invading the cavernous sinus and the retroclival and retropetrosal cistern; cavernous type—located in the middle cranial fossa on the cavernous or paracavernous segment of the fourth cranial nerves, with or without cavernous sinus invasion. The cisternal type was the most common type encountered in previous studies. The clinical signs and symptoms of trochlear nerve schwannoma are similar to the trigeminal schwannoma and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of trigeminal schwannoma.

  4. Schwannoma in the midline of hard palate: a case report and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradzadeh Khiavi, Monir; Taghavi Zenouz, Ali; Mesgarzadeh, Ali Hossein; Sabetmehr, Omid; Mahmoudi, Seyyed Mostafa; Kouhsoltani, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    Schwannoma is a benign encapsulated slow-growing tumor that originates from Schwann cells of the peripheral nerve sheath. It usually occurs in the head and neck; however, it is rare in the oral cavity. The tongue is the most common site of intraoral schwannomas, followed by the floor of the mouth, palate, gingiva, vestibular mucosa, lips and mental nerve area. We report a rare case of schwannoma in the midline of hard palate with ulcerated surface in a 21-year-old male with a two-month history of a painless swelling on his palate. Clinical, radiographic and histopathological features along with differential diagnosis and treatment are also discussed.

  5. Schwannoma of the conus medullaris: a rare case

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Suat Canbay; Askin Esen Hasturk; Fatma Markoc; Sukru Caglar

    2011-01-01

    Intradural schwannoma of the conus medullaris is a rare form of spinal neoplasm,which commonly occurs in the lumbar region.Conus medullaris level is unusual for schwannomas.A 49-year-old woman presented with chronic sciatica,mild bladder dysfunction,and paresthesia in the buttocks.Magnetic resonance imaging of the spine showed a mass lesion in the conus medullaris region with nerve compression.The tumor was completely resected and diagnosed histologically as schwannoma.The patient recovered after surgery.Clinical and radiologic features of this rare tumor are reviewed and are accompanied by literature findings.

  6. SCHWANNOMA TONGUE - CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available A schwannoma (also known as an "neurilemmomma (1, is a benign nerve sheath tumor composed of Schwann cells , which normally produce the insulating myelin sheath covering peripheral nerves .

  7. VESTIBULAR REHABILITATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maksim Valer'evich Zamergrad

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Vestibular disorders are a frequent abnormality that physicians of various specialties have to encounter. Vestibular and equilibrium disorders are particularly common in elderly patients. In this case they are frequently a cause of falls and various injuries. Vestibular rehabilitation is the most important component of treatment for vestibular and equilibrium disorders. The paper considers the basic mechanisms of vestibular compensation, discusses vestibular rehabilitation procedures by doing routine exercises and by using various biofeedback crunches. In particular, it describes the principle of operation of a posturography platform, a SwayStar system for the diagnosis and therapy of vestibular disorders, and a Brainport device for vestibular rehabilitation. The current methods for drug stimulation of vestibular compensation are discussed. Vestibular rehabilitation used in the complex therapy of equilibrium disorders is stressed to considerably enhance therapeutic effectiveness, to cause a reduction in the risk of falls, and to increase quality of life in patients with vestibular disorders

  8. LINGUAL SCHWANNOMA: OUR EXPERIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aneesa A Mirza

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Schwannomas are benign tumors of nerve sheath and quite uncommon in oral cavity. The case of a 15 yr old male is presented who had a 4 months history of swelling on right lateral border of tongue associated with disturbance in mastication. Examination revealed a 2x2 cm globular and smooth swelling on right lateral border of tongue. Complete excision with primary closure was carried out. Histopathological examination of the surgical specimen was consistent with schwannoma.

  9. Breast schwannoma in a patient with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salihoglu Ayse

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Schwannomas are mostly benign tumors arising from Schwann cells of the nerve sheaths. Breast schwannomas are very rare and account for only 2.6% of cases. As far as we know this is the first reported case of breast schwannoma discovered in a patient with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. The breast schwannoma was evaluated with positron emission tomography and it exhibited moderate 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose uptake. Case presentation We present the case of a breast schwannoma in a 63-year-old Caucasian woman who was diagnosed with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Conclusion Imaging modalities including positron emission tomography-computed tomography failed to distinguish breast schwannoma from diffuse large B-cell lymphoma involvement of the breast.

  10. Rare presentation of pancreatic schwannoma: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tofigh Arash

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Schwannoma is a rare tumor among pancreatic neoplasms. Schwannomas vary in size, and most of them are cystic, mimicking pancreatic cystic lesions. Generally, a definitive diagnosis is made at the time of histological analysis. The mainstay treatment is surgical resection. Case presentation We report an unusual presentation of pancreatic schwannoma with abdominal pain and several episodes of cholangitis in a 54-year-old Caucasian (Iranian man. The condition was not diagnosed pre-operatively and Whipple's procedure was performed. Conclusion Pancreatic schwannoma is an important clinical entity to include in the differential diagnosis of pancreatic lesions. Pre-operative diagnosis is difficult but computed tomographic findings may be helpful. The tumor may also have atypical and rare presentations, such as cholangitis and weight loss. For benign tumors, simple enucleation is usually adequate, whereas malignant tumors require standard oncological resection.

  11. Schwannoma located in the palate: clinical case and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Carriches, Carmen; Baca-Pérez-Bryan, Rafael; Montalvo-Montero, Santiago

    2009-09-01

    Schwannoma is a benign tumor that originates from the presence of Schwann cells of the peripheral nerves. They are usually asymptomatic, do not recur, and malignant transformation is rare. The preoperative diagnosis is often difficult, and although computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are very helpful, in the majority of cases, the diagnosis can only be made during surgery and by histological study. The immunohistochemistry reveals that the Schwannoma cells test positive for S-100 protein. We describe a clinical case of Schwannoma located in the palate of a 15-year-old patient. It is important to highlight that the Schwannoma is usually found in the head and neck, and rarely in the oral cavity. When it does occur in this area, it is more likely to be found in the tongue. Other locations in the oral cavity include: the floor of the mouth, palate, gingiva, vestibular mucosa, lips and mental nerve area, listed from most common to least common. There has been no sign of recurrence two years after surgery.

  12. Ancient Schwannoma of the Thumb Pulp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajime Matsumine, MD, PhD

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary: A 21-year-old woman had become aware of a mass on the palmar aspect of the distal phalanx of her left thumb 11 years earlier. Her medical history was unremarkable, with no traumatic injury of the left thumb. Initial examination revealed a hard but elastic, immovable tumor of 30 × 25 mm on the palmar aspect of the distal phalanx of the left thumb, with an ulcer formed at the center. No pain, sensory disturbance, or motor dysfunction was noted. The patient underwent punch biopsy at the outpatient clinic, and the tumor was histopathologically diagnosed as benign schwannoma. Total excision of the tumor was performed with digital nerve block under surgical microscope. Histopathological findings revealed a fibrous capsule covering the tumor, directional growth of tightly organized spindle-shaped cells, and mixed Antoni A and B patterns. The tumor also contained many various sized cysts and showed histological degenerative changes not observed in ordinary schwannoma, such as hemorrhage and prominent blood vessels with hyalinized walls. The S-100 stain was positive. Based on these findings, the patient was diagnosed as having ancient schwannoma. There was no evidence of infection, pain, complications such as ulcer formation, or recurrent tumor at 6 months postoperative.

  13. Parapharyngeal space schwannoma of hypoglossal nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surya Kanta Pradhan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Parapharyngeal schwannomas are rare benign neoplasms located in a difficult anatomical region. Most of them are asymptomatic and some presents late. Neurological deficit is a late finding, and it occurs only when the lesion is very large and compresses contiguous structures. Computed tomography (CT guided fine needle aspiration cytology along with preoperative CT and magnetic resonance imaging can detect and diagnose it correctly and helps in proper planning and management. Total surgical excision is the treatment of choice. The approach is different as per the site, but trans-cervical approach is preferred. Recurrence is rare after complete excision. We are presenting a very rare parapharyngeal schwannoma arising from the hypoglossal nerve that was excised by trans-cervical approach without any complications and less morbidity as compared to other described approaches.

  14. Sinais e sintomas associados a alterações otoneurológicas diagnoticadas ao exame vestibular computadorizado em pacientes com esclerose múltipla Signs and symptoms associated to otoneurologic alterations diagnosed on computerized vestibular exam of patients with multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreza Tomaz

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Descrever os principais sintomas e sinais ao exame vestibular computadorizado em pacientes com diagnóstico de esclerose múltipla. MÉTODO:Foram examinados 30 pacientes com diagnóstico de esclerose múltipla. Analisaram-se os dados relativos à sintomatologia e achados ao exame vestibular computadorizado realizado no ambulatório de otoneurologia da Irmandade Santa Casa de Misericórdia de São Paulo, em 2003. RESULTADOS: Em relação aos sintomas relatados, observamos desequilíbrio (60%, formigamento de extremidades (43,3%, vertigem (40%, cefaléia e ansiedade (36,7%, zumbido (30%, depressão (26,7%. Ao exame vestibular encontramos alterações do nistagmo de posicionamento (6,7%, nistagmo espontâneo de olhos fechados (30%, nistagmo semi-espontâneo (13,3%, rastreio pendular (3,3% e prova calórica (63,3%. Na conclusão do exame tivemos prevalência de síndrome vestibular periférica irritativa (60% e síndrome central (13,4%. CONCLUÇÃO: Concluimos que a realização do exame otoneurológico torna-se imprescindível nos pacientes com esclerose múltipla devido a elevada prevalência de alterações à vectonistagmografia computadorizada e elevada prevalência de sintomas otoneurológicos.OBJETIVE: To identify main symptoms and signs on computerized vestibular testing in patients diagnosed with multiple sclerosis. METHOD: Thirty patients with the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis were studied. We analyzed data related to presented symptoms and the findings from a computerized vestibular testing realized in the otoneurological ambulatory in Santa Casa de Misericórdia de São Paulo in 2003. RESULTS: Reported symptoms consisted mainly of disequilibrium (60%, tingling of limbs (43.3%, vertigo (40%, headache and anxiety (36.7%, tinnitus (30%, depression (26.7%. In vestibular testing we found alterations in positional nystagmus (6.7%, spontaneous nystagmus with the eyes shut (30%, directional nystagmus (13.3% and caloric testing (63

  15. Plexiform schwannoma of the clitoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Wen-Yu; Yeh, Chi-Ju; Jung, Shih-Ming; Hsueh, Swei

    2007-07-01

    Only three cases of clitoral schwannoma have been reported in the English language literature, with none of them being a plexiform schwannoma. Here we report the first plexiform schwannoma of the clitoris. A 41-year-old woman without neurofibromatosis presented with a 2 x 2 cm, slowly growing, painless tumor of the clitoris. Simple excision of the tumor was performed, and pathological examination revealed a plexiform schwannoma. No evidence of recurrence was noted after 2 years of follow-up. Despite its rarity, a schwannoma should be included in the differential diagnosis of a clitoral enlargement or mass. Our case, despite its unique plexiform growth pattern, has clinical features similar to those of other reported cases of clitoral schwannoma.

  16. Schwannoma of the nasal septum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Karatas

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Schwannomas are benign and slow growing tumors originating from the Schwann cells of peripheral nerve sheath. Schwannomas of sinonasal origin are rare (4% however septal schwannomas are much more rarer. We presented a 31 year old female patient. At physical examination a pale gray, smooth polypoid lesion obstructing the right nasal cavity was detected. Midfacial degloving and endoscopic approach were combined for surgical treatment. The tumor was originating from posteromedial area of the septal nasal cartilage, close to the bony cartilaginous junction. Postoperative histological examination of the specimen showed a benign tumoral growth consisting of spindle shaped cells and immunohistochemical staining of the tumor proved septal schwannoma.

  17. Varied Presentation of Schwannoma – A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruquaya Mir

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Schwannomas can occur anywhere in the body with unusual presentation. They are difficult to diagnose preoperatively. Fine needle aspiration biopsy does not appear to provide an accurate preoperative diagnosis. Complete excision of the mass should be the goal of surgical excision.

  18. [Infraorbital schwannoma. Case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora-Ríos, Laura Evelyn; Ríos Y Valles-Valles, Dolores; Flores-Estrada, José Javier; Rodríguez-Reyes, Abelardo Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Antecedentes: el schwannoma infraorbitario es un tumor benigno de la vaina nerviosa periférica compuesto por células de Schwann. Suele aparecer entre los 20 y 70 años de edad, asintomático y producir proptosis progresiva e indolora durante su crecimiento. Caso clínico: paciente masculino de 32 años de edad que ingresó al hospital debido a un tumor no doloroso de crecimiento lentamente progresivo sobre el saco lagrimal izquierdo. A la exploración oftalmológica el tumor era de consistencia ahulada y estaba firmemente adherido a las estructuras vecinas. La transiluminación resultó negativa. El ultrasonido modo B mostró un ojo fáquico y un tumor infraorbitario homogéneo, bien circunstrito, con diámetro mayor de 19.7 mm, sin afectación de la vía lagrimal. El ultrasonido modo A mostró una reflectividad media-alta, con escasa vascularidad interna. La tomografía computada mostró un tumor de densidad homogénea, bien circunscrito a la región anterior y por debajo del globo ocular, sin erosión ósea. El tumor se extirpó mediante una incisión subdérmica. El diagnóstico histopatológico fue: schwannoma infraorbitario. Conclusiones: el schwannoma es un tumor benigno, poco frecuente en la órbita. Su diagnóstico definitivo se establece con base en los hallazgos histopatológicos, como: cápsula verdadera, áreas hiper e hipocelulares, engrosamiento y hialinización de las paredes vasculares. Sin esos hallazgos puede confundirse con tumores fusocelulares benignos. Se informa un nuevo caso de schwannoma infraorbitario y se compara con los casos previamente reportados.

  19. VESTIBULAR VERTIGO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M V Zamergrad

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors consider the cardinal causes of vestibular vertigo, a benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, Meniere's disease, vestibular neuroni-tis, vestibular migraine, cerebrovascular diseases. It gives brief data on the etiology, pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, and treatment of these diseases. The diagnosis of the latter is largely based on a patientKhs complaints and medical history data and frequently requires no additional instrumental study. The currently available treatments for various diseases manifesting as vestibular vertigo are analyzed. Vestibular exercises and rehabilitation maneuvers that are effective in benign positional vertigo are noted to play an important role. In addition, methods for drug stimulation of vestibular compensation in central and peripheral vestibulopathies are described.

  20. A Usual Schwannoma at an Unusual Site-The Mesorectum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaya Manchanda

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article is to present a rare case of mesorectal schwannoma diagnosed by fine needle aspiration cytology in a 36 year old man. Schwannomas are benign encapsulated tumors arising from Schwann cells of motor and peripheral nerves. They commonly present on the head, neck and trunk and on rare occasion arise in the retroperitoneum and in the lumbosacral region. It is however quite uncommon for a schwanomma to originate in the mesorectum. In evaluating such cases, FNAC provides a safe and effective method to resolve the great diagnostic dilemma.

  1. VESTIBULAR VERTIGO

    OpenAIRE

    M V Zamergrad

    2009-01-01

    The authors consider the cardinal causes of vestibular vertigo, a benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, Meniere's disease, vestibular neuroni-tis, vestibular migraine, cerebrovascular diseases. It gives brief data on the etiology, pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, and treatment of these diseases. The diagnosis of the latter is largely based on a patientKhs complaints and medical history data and frequently requires no additional instrumental study. The currently available treatments for ...

  2. Intraosseous schwannoma of the humerus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mutema, George K. [Department of Pathology, University of Cincinnati, OH (United States); Sorger, Joel [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, University of Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2002-07-01

    Intraosseous schwannomas are rare benign neoplasms of the bone, of which fewer than 200 cases have been described in the world literature. These tumors are well-defined, lytic lesions, rarely associated with pathologic fracture. The mandible is the most frequently involved bone. We present only the third case of an intraosseous schwannoma involving the humerus. (orig.)

  3. Parietal intraparenchymal Schwannoma: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seong Hwan; Chung, Tae Woong; Yoon, Woong; Jeong, Gwang Woo; Kang, Heoung Keun [Chonnam National University Hospital, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-10-15

    We report a case of an intraparenchymal schwannoma of the left parietal lobe. A 51-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital with complaints of intermittent headaches. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance images revealed a 1.3 cm sized intra-axial homogeneous enhancing mass in the left parietal lobe. The lesion was pathologically confirmed to be a schwannoma.

  4. Vestibular migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lempert, Thomas; Olesen, Jes; Furman, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents diagnostic criteria for vestibular migraine, jointly formulated by the Committee for Classification of Vestibular Disorders of the Bárány Society and the Migraine Classification Subcommittee of the International Headache Society (IHS). The classification includes vestibular mi....... Symptoms that qualify for a diagnosis of vestibular migraine include various types of vertigo as well as head motion-induced dizziness with nausea. Symptoms must be of moderate or severe intensity. Duration of acute episodes is limited to a window of between 5 minutes and 72 hours....

  5. Clinical presentation of intralabyrinthine schwannomas: a multicenter study of 110 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubernard, Xavier; Somers, Thomas; Veros, Konstantinos; Vincent, Christophe; Franco-Vidal, Valérie; Deguine, Olivier; Bordure, Philippe; Linder, Thomas; Lescanne, Emmanuel; Ayache, Denis; Mondain, Michel; Schmerber, Sébastien; Dahmani-Causse, Myriam; Truy, Eric; Darrouzet, Vincent

    2014-10-01

    To describe the presentation of intralabyrinthine schwannomas (ILSs). Retrospective multicenter study involving 12 European skull base surgery tertiary referral centers. One hundred ten patients with the diagnosis of ILS, either labyrinth confined or extending into the internal auditory meatus for less than 50% of their volume. Data collected were age, sex, nature and timing of presenting symptoms, hearing (according to the AAO-HNS grading system), results of vestibular tests (caloric tests and cervical vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials [c-VEMPs]), and tumor localization. Presenting symptoms and laboratory test results were studied according to the extension of the lesion into the cochlea (C) and vestibule (V), on one hand, and according to unifocal (L1) or plurifocal (L2) extension into the labyrinth, on the other. Intracochlear type was more common (50%) than vestibular (19.1%) and more diffuse forms (30.9%). The mean delay for diagnosis was long (72.5 mo; SD, 76.6). Mean age was 53.9 years (SD, 13.2). Deafness was the most common symptom (77.8 dB HL [SD, 33.6], with only 24.6% of patients keeping viable hearing. Caloric tests (65.5% of patients) were abnormal in 77.8% of cases. c-VEMPs were abnormal in 65.7% of the 36 cases analyzed. In V forms, hearing was significantly better (class A + B in 21.1% in C and 45.8% in V forms) (p = 0.03), and vestibular function was more altered (C: 57%, V: 100%, p = 0.0009*). L2 forms were diagnosed later (L1: 59.1 mo, L2: 104.5 mo; p = 0.004*) and were associated more frequently with a dead ear (L1: 13.1%, L2: 41.2%, p = 0.002*) than L1 forms. This series, which is the largest in the literature, demonstrates that even very small and localized ILSs heavily compromise labyrinthine functions.

  6. Sigmoid schwannoma: A rare case

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Constantine I. Fotiadis; Ilias A. Kouerinis; Ioannis Papandreou; George C. Zografos; George Agapitos

    2005-01-01

    Schwannomas are rare tumors derived from the cells of Schwann that form the neural sheath. When located in the gastrointestinal tract, they constitute together with leiomyoma, leiomyoblastoma, and leiomyosarcoma, the gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST). Peripheral nerve sheath tumors represent 2-6% GIST with most common location, the stomach and the small intestine. Schwannomas of the colon and rectum are extremely rare and radical excision with wide margins is mandatory, due to their tendency to recur locally and become malignant, if left untreated. In the present study, we report a rare case of a sigmoid schwannoma, which was successfully treated in our department and reviewed the literature.

  7. Coexistence of meningioma and schwannoma in the same cerebellopontine angle in a patients with NF2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matyja, Ewa; Kunert, Przemysław; Grajkowska, Wiesława; Marchel, Andrzej

    2012-01-01

    The coexistence of schwannoma and meningioma in the same cerebellopontine angle (CPA) is uncommon. Especially, the presence of a single mixed tumour composed of demarcated or intermingled components of schwannoma and meningioma tissue is extremely rare. Such a phenomenon is mainly reported in a patient with NF2 or with history of previous irradiation. We present two cases of simultaneous occurrence of schwannoma and meningioma in the same cerebellopontine angle in young adult patients with clinical manifestation of NF2. The first patient was a 18-year-old young man who presented with bilateral CPA tumours, spinal mass lesion and multiple, small, schwannoma-like lesions of the cauda equina. Both CPA tumours was initially diagnosed as schwannomas based on preoperative MR imagings, however right CPA tumour appeared to be composed of a well-circumscribed transitional meningioma located inside schwannoma of Antoni A and B type. The second patient, a young 16-year-old boy, presented bilaterall CPA tumours as well as many meningeal tumours supratentorially and infratentorially. Two adjacent tumours in the left CPA proved to be schwannoma and meningioma. In both cases, the different neoplastic components were confirmed by histopathological and immunohistochemical studies. The possible mechanism underlying the occurrence of such coexisting tumors of different histogenesis remains unclear.

  8. Three dimensional vestibular ocular reflex testing using a six degrees of freedom motion platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dits, Joyce; Houben, Mark M J; van der Steen, Johannes

    2013-05-23

    ; subjects N1-N3) after being diagnosed with vestibular schwannoma. Their tumors had been stabile for over 8-10 years on magnetic resonance imaging.

  9. Intraosseous schwannoma of the metacarpal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vora, R.A.; Athanasian, E.A. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Mintz, D.N. [Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY (United States)

    2000-04-01

    Intraosseous schwannoma (neurilemmoma) is an extremely rare, benign neoplasm, constituting less than 0.2% of primary bone tumors. It infrequently involves the bones of the hand. We present a case of intraosseous neurilemmoma of the metacarpal. (orig.)

  10. Multiple isolated cutaneous plexiform schwannomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enas A. S. Attia

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Plexiform schwannoma is a rare neurogenic tumor, arising from skin and subcutaneous tissue. The presence of multiple schwannomas suggests a possible association with neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2. A 50-year old male patient presented with multiple papulo-nodular cutaneous lesions on both arms and forearms. Histopathological examination revealed a dermal multinodular pattern of well-circumscribed masses of closely packed cells, with peripheral myxoid tissue, well-encapsulated in a thin collagenous capsule. S-100 immunohistochemical staining was diffusely and strongly positive. Neuron-specific enolase was positive, confirming a neural tissue tumor. An audiogram and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI of cerebro-pontine angle showed no detected abnormality, excluding acoustic neuroma. Thus, we present a case of multiple bilateral isolated cutaneous plexiform schwannomas, not associated with NF2. Multiple plexiform schwannomas is a very rare entity, distinct from neurofibromatosis (NF, and being confined to the dermis is even more rarely reported.

  11. Schwannoma of the hard palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isildak, Huseyin; Yilmaz, Mehmet; Ibrahimov, Metin; Aslan, Mehmet; Karaman, Emin; Enver, Ozgun

    2010-01-01

    About half of all neurogenic tumors are seen in the head and neck region. The types of neurogenic tumors must be distinguished. Schwannomas originate from Schwann cells of the neural sheath and are solitary, well-encapsulated, slow-growing adjacent to the parental nerve but extrinsic to the nerve fascicles.Approximately 25% to 45% of all schwannomas are seen in the head and neck region and are found rarely in the oral cavity. Most of the intraoral schwannomas are located in the tongue. Other less common locations are the buccal mucosa, palate, base of the mouth, gingiva, and lips.In this study, we report a rare case of schwannoma of the hard palate, which was excised intraorally.

  12. Plexiform schwannoma of the forearm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katsumi, Keiichi; Ogose, Akira; Hotta, Tetsuo; Hatano, Hiroshi; Kawashima, Hiroyuki; Endo, Naoto [Division of Orthopedic Surgery, Department of Regenerative and Transplant Medicine, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Niigata University, Asahimachi 1-751, 951-8510, Niigata (Japan); Umezu, Hajime [Division of Pathology, Niigata University Hospital, Niigata (Japan)

    2003-12-01

    We report a case of plexiform schwannoma located in the flexor muscles of the forearm in the absence of other signs of neurofibromatosis or schwannomatosis. Magnetic resonance examination revealed a multinodular irregular inhomogeneous mass. Some nodules displayed a peripheral, high intensity rim and a central low intensity (target sign) on T2-weighted images. Pre-operative diagnosis of the rare plexiform schwannoma may be possible with careful imaging examination for the target sign. (orig.)

  13. Schwannoma of the hard palate

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Schwannomas are benign encapsulated perineural tumors. The head and neck region is the most common site. Intraoral origin is seen in only 1% of cases, tongue being the most common site; its location in the palate is rare. We report a case of hard-palate schwannoma with bony erosion which was immunohistochemically confirmed. The tumor was excised completely intraorally. After two months of follow-up, the defect was found to be completely covered with palatal mucosa.

  14. Schwannoma of the sigmoid colon

    OpenAIRE

    Çakır, Tuğrul; Aslaner, Arif; Yaz, Müjgan; Gündüz, Umut Rıza

    2015-01-01

    Colonic schwannomas are very rare gastrointestinal tumours originating from Schwann cells, which form the neural sheath. Primary schwannomas of the lower gastrointestinal tract are very rare and usually benign in nature. However, if they are not surgically removed, malign degeneration can occur. We report a case of a 79-year-old woman who presented to our clinic with rectal bleeding and constipation. She underwent a lower gastrointestinal tract endoscopy. A mass subtotally obstructing the lum...

  15. Benign giant mediastinal schwannoma presenting as cardiac tamponade in a woman: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sekiya Mitsuaki

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Mediastinal schwannomas are typically benign and asymptomatic, and generally present no immediate risks. We encountered a rare case of a giant benign posterior mediastinal schwannoma, complicated by life-threatening cardiac tamponade. Case presentation We report the case of a 72-year-old Japanese woman, who presented with cardiogenic shock. Computed tomography of the chest revealed a posterior mediastinal mass 150 cm in diameter, with pericardial effusion. The cardiac tamponade was treated with prompt pericardial fluid drainage. A biopsy was taken from the mass, and after histological examination, it was diagnosed as a benign schwannoma, a well-encapsulated non-infiltrating tumor, originating from the intrathoracic vagus nerve. It was successfully excised, restoring normal cardiac function. Conclusion Our case suggests that giant mediastinal schwannomas, although generally benign and asymptomatic, should be excised upon discovery to prevent the development of life-threatening cardiopulmonary complications.

  16. A Huge Ancient Schwannoma of the Epiglottis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong Hoon; Kim, Jo Heon; Yoon, Tae Mi; Lee, Joon Kyoo; Lim, Sang Chul

    2016-03-01

    Ancient schwannoma of the epiglottis is extremely rare. The authors report the first case of a patient with a huge ancient schwannoma of the epiglottis. Clinicians should consider the possibility that ancient schwannoma may originate in the epiglottis mimicking the other more frequently observed lesions.

  17. Intraosseous schwannoma originating in inferior alveolar nerve: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suga, Kenichiro; Ogane, Satoru; Muramatsu, Kyotaro; Ohata, Hitoshi; Uchiyama, Takeshi; Takano, Nobuo; Shibahara, Takahiko; Eguchi, Jun; Murakami, Satoshi; Matsuzaka, Kenichi

    2013-01-01

    Schwannomas (neurilemmomas) are benign neoplasms derived from Schwann cells of the neurilemma and appear most frequently on the auditory nerve or peripheral nerves of the skin. They arise in the oral and maxillofacial region infrequently, and very rarely in the center of the jaw. We herein present a case of a rare mandibular intraosseous schwannoma derived from the main trunk of the inferior alveolar nerve in a 33-year-old man. Fusiform expansion in the mandibular canal was observed and a mass showing the target sign in the mandibular canal was confirmed on T2-weighted and Gd contrastenhanced T1-weighted MRI. Based on these findings, an inferior alveolar nerve-derived schwannoma or other benign nervous system neoplasm was diagnosed. A buccal side cortical bone flap in the mandibular molar region was removed to expose the mass, which was then peeled away from the nerve fibers and completely removed. Some inferior alveolar nerve fibers that were connected to the mass were removed at the same time, but the remaining nerve fiber bundle was preserved. Histopathology confirmed the diagnosis of a schwannoma with Antoni type A and Antoni type B regions. Although the patient experienced extremely mild paresthesia in the skin over the mental region and mental foramen at immediately after surgery, this had almost entirely disappeared at 7 years and 4 months later, and there has been no tumor recurrence.

  18. Malignant renal schwannoma in a cat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monier Sharif

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A nine-year-old male European shorthair cat with rapidly enlarging mass at the left kidney doubted to be malignant was presented. The purpose of this study is to present the clinical, radiological and pathological findings of a primary renal tumor in the cat. Grossly, the mass mostly encapsulated the kidney. Histologically, excisional biopsy showed worrying histological features. A sarcoma-like tumor composed mainly of neoplastic spindle-shaped cells. Neoplastic nodules of aggregations of fusiform cells arranged in multidirectional bundles. Immunohistochemically, several immunohistochemical satins (melan-A, S-100, vimentin, actin, desmin, cytokeratin, neurofilament, melan-A, NSE, synaptophysin, chromogranin, Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein GFAP, Collagen IV and CD99 were used to differentially diagnose the mass. The stained neoplastic sections positively tested to S-100, but negative to the other aforementioned immunohistochemical stains. Immunohistochemistry with S-100 antibody staining showed an unusually strong positive reaction throughout the tumor cells. Based on our comparative diagnosis relative to other tumors, in addition to the progressive clinical signs, histopathological and immunohistochemical results, this case was presumptively diagnosis as a malignant schwannoma. According to our investigation of the relevant literature, this study of malignant renal Schwannoma (malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor is a highly rare case not previously characterized in a cat.

  19. Current Treatment Options in Vestibular Migraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obermann, Mark; Strupp, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 1% of the general population in western industrialized countries suffers from vestibular migraine. However, it remains widely unknown and often under diagnosed despite the recently published diagnostic criteria for vestibular migraine. Treatment trials that specialize on vestibular migraine are scarce and systematic randomized controlled clinical trials are now only emerging. This review summarizes the knowledge on the currently available treatment options that were tested specifically for vestibular migraine and gives an evidence-based, informed treatment recommendation with all its limitations. To date only two randomized controlled treatment trials provide limited evidence for the use of rizatriptan and zolmitriptan for the treatment of vestibular migraine attacks because of methodological shortcomings. There is an ongoing multicenter randomized placebo-controlled trial testing metoprolol 95 mg vs. placebo (PROVEMIG-trial). Therefore, the therapeutic recommendations for the prophylactic treatment of vestibular migraine are currently widely based on the guidelines of migraine with and without aura as well as expert opinion. PMID:25538676

  20. Giant Plexiform Schwannoma of the Tongue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lluís Nisa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the case of a 38-year-old woman that presented with a very slowly enlarging mass of the tongue. MRI revealed a large mass originating in the tongue base and extending to the supraglottic space. Biopsy of this tumor confirmed the diagnosis of schwannoma. An endaural approach allowed complete resection of the tumor. Definitive histopathological examination showed a plexiform schwannoma. Schwannoma or neurilemoma represents a benign tumor potentially affecting any nerve. The head and neck region is a relatively common location for schwannomas, but tongue schwannomas are considered to be rare and pose the problem of both clinical and histological differential diagnosis of tongue masses.

  1. Giant plexiform schwannoma of the tongue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisa, Lluís; von Büren, Toni; Tiab, Amine; Giger, Roland

    2011-01-01

    We present the case of a 38-year-old woman that presented with a very slowly enlarging mass of the tongue. MRI revealed a large mass originating in the tongue base and extending to the supraglottic space. Biopsy of this tumor confirmed the diagnosis of schwannoma. An endaural approach allowed complete resection of the tumor. Definitive histopathological examination showed a plexiform schwannoma. Schwannoma or neurilemoma represents a benign tumor potentially affecting any nerve. The head and neck region is a relatively common location for schwannomas, but tongue schwannomas are considered to be rare and pose the problem of both clinical and histological differential diagnosis of tongue masses.

  2. Vestibular schowanoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massoume Rouzbahani

    2000-05-01

    Full Text Available Vestibular Schowanoma is one of the most common Intracranial Tumors which has elicited from the Schwann cells in the upper part of vestibular branch of 8th nerve and can affect the cochlear branch too. This benign capsulated tumor  is mostly unilateral. Schowanoma is relatively slow growing. In the current article we have presented the case of a 51 year-old woman complaining Right ear Tinnitus accompanying with numbness of the right side of the face without any sign of vertigo or imbalance. MRI and Auditory Brain stem Responses (ABR studies demonstrated right side vestibular Schowanoma next to cerebellopontine Angle (CPA. The audiological and imaging findings have been brought here in details.

  3. Schwannoma in the Upper Limbs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Yuk Kwan Tang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Schwannomas are the commonest tumours of peripheral nerves. Despite the classical description that schwannomas are well encapsulated and can be completely enucleated during excision, a portion of them have fascicular involvement and could not be completely shelled out. A retrospective review for 8 patients was carried out over 10 years. 75% of schwannoma occurred over the distal region of upper limb (at elbow or distal to it. It occurs more in the mixed nerve instead of pure sensory or motor nerve. 50% of patients had mixed nerve involvement. Fascicular involvement was very common in schwannoma (75% of patients. Removal of the tumour with fascicles can cause functional deficit. At present, there is no method (including preoperative MRI which can predict the occurrence of fascicular involvement; the authors therefore proposed a new system to stratify patients who may benefit from interfascicular nerve grafts. In this group of patients, the authors strongly recommend that the possibility and option of nerve graft should be discussed with patients prior to schwannoma excision, so that nerve grafting could be directly proceeded with patient consent in case there is fascicular involvement of tumour found intraoperatively.

  4. Intrathoracic Schwannoma Presented with Hemothorax

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alkin Yazicioglu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Intrathoracic schwannomas are typically benign and asymptomatic tumors that originate from the Schwann cells of a neural sheath. Hemorrhage from intrathoracic schwannomas is an uncommon finding. We present the case of a 17 year-old girl who had dyspnea and numbness of the right arm. Chest x%u2013ray showed a right-sided massive pleural effusion and exploratory puncture showed hemothorax. After tube thoracostomy and drainage of the bloody effusion, a mass was observed in the right upper hemithorax. Chest tomography revealed a 76x104 mm mass arising from the fourth intercostal nerve. The tumor was successfully resected and, on histopathologic examination it was reported as a schwannoma. After resection, the patient has remained problem-free for fourteen months.

  5. An Individual with Gastric Schwannoma with Pathologically Malignant Potential Surviving Two Years after Laparoscopy-Assisted Partial Gastrectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Watanabe

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Schwannomas are a kind of neurogenic tumor. They are generally benign and originate primarily from the central and peripheral nerve. They rarely develop in the gastrointestinal tract: gastric schwannomas make up 0.2% of gastric neoplasms. A malignant gastric schwannoma is a comparatively rare tumor, a few cases have been reported until now. We present the case of a 34-year-old male patient diagnosed during medical examination. The patient was treated with surgical resection, and 2 years passed without recurrence.

  6. Intercostal schwannoma simulating pulmonary Neoplasia

    OpenAIRE

    1998-01-01

    RESUMO – Schwannoma é uma neoplasia mesenquimal, usualmente solitária, encontrada no mediastino, retroperitônio ou pelve, sendo rara sua apresentação na parede torácica. OBJETIVO. Relatar o caso de um paciente masculino, tabagista, com um nódulo pulmonar direito com características de malignidade, detectado em radiografia de tórax de rotina, cujo diagnóstico anatomopatológico foi de schwannoma benigno de nervo intercostal. MÉTODOS. Revisaram-se os dados referentes ao quadro clínico, exames la...

  7. mTORC1 inhibition delays growth of neurofibromatosis type 2 schwannoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovannini, Marco; Bonne, Nicolas-Xavier; Vitte, Jeremie; Chareyre, Fabrice; Tanaka, Karo; Adams, Rocky; Fisher, Laurel M.; Valeyrie-Allanore, Laurence; Wolkenstein, Pierre; Goutagny, Stephane; Kalamarides, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Background Neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) is a rare autosomal dominant genetic disorder, resulting in a variety of neural tumors, with bilateral vestibular schwannomas as the most frequent manifestation. Recently, merlin, the NF2 tumor suppressor, has been identified as a novel negative regulator of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1); functional loss of merlin was shown to result in elevated mTORC1 signaling in NF2-related tumors. Thus, mTORC1 pathway inhibition may be a useful targeted therapeutic approach. Methods We studied in vitro cell models, cohorts of mice allografted with Nf2−/− Schwann cells, and a genetically modified mouse model of NF2 schwannoma in order to evaluate the efficacy of the proposed targeted therapy for NF2. Results We found that treatment with the mTORC1 inhibitor rapamycin reduced the severity of NF2-related Schwann cell tumorigenesis without significant toxicity. Consistent with these results, in an NF2 patient with growing vestibular schwannomas, the rapalog sirolimus induced tumor growth arrest. Conclusions Taken together, these results constitute definitive evidence that justifies proceeding with clinical trials using mTORC1-targeted agents in selected patients with NF2 and in patients with NF2-related sporadic tumors. PMID:24414536

  8. Auditory function in vestibular migraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Mathew

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Vestibular migraine (VM is a vestibular syndrome seen in patients with migraine and is characterized by short spells of spontaneous or positional vertigo which lasts between a few seconds to weeks. Migraine and VM are considered to be a result of chemical abnormalities in the serotonin pathway. Neuhauser′s diagnostic criteria for vestibular migraine is widely accepted. Research on VM is still limited and there are few studies which have been published on this topic. Materials and Methods: This study has two parts. In the first part, we did a retrospective chart review of eighty consecutive patients who were diagnosed with vestibular migraine and determined the frequency of auditory dysfunction in these patients. The second part was a prospective case control study in which we compared the audiological parameters of thirty patients diagnosed with VM with thirty normal controls to look for any significant differences. Results: The frequency of vestibular migraine in our population is 22%. The frequency of hearing loss in VM is 33%. Conclusion: There is a significant difference between cases and controls with regards to the presence of distortion product otoacoustic emissions in both ears. This finding suggests that the hearing loss in VM is cochlear in origin.

  9. Sociodemographic factors and vestibular schwannoma: a Danish nationwide cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schüz, Joachim; Steding-Jessen, Marianne; Hansen, Søren

    2010-01-01

    .23-0.50) compared with married men with a higher education. Lower incidence rates were also observed among unemployed or early-retirement pensioners, whereas there were no differences in incidence rates across the broad groups of occupations and across the types of districts. Sociodemographic indicators were...

  10. Balance (or Vestibular) Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the Public / Hearing and Balance Balance (or Vestibular) Rehabilitation Audiologic (hearing), balance, and medical diagnostic tests help ... whether you are a candidate for vestibular (balance) rehabilitation. Vestibular rehabilitation is an individualized balance retraining exercise ...

  11. Misdiagnosis of Brachial Plexus Schwannoma as Cervical Radiculopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahnaz Khajepour

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Schwannomas are relatively rare but benign nerve sheath tumors deriving from Schwann cells with low tendency of transformation to malignancy. Extracranial shwannomas usually present insidiously and thus are often diagnosed incorrectly or after lengthy delays. We present the case of a 51 years old female patient with chronic cervical pain radiating in left upper limb who was treated as cervical radiculopathy for 5 years. By aggrevation of pain and paresthesia, imaging and electrodiagnostic study revealed schwannoma of brachial plexus. In case of radiating pain and paresthesia in upper limb (such as this case symptoms can be misleading for cervical radiculopathy but careful examination especialy in persistence of symptoms with negative imaging results for radiculopathies are important and electrodiagnostic study can be helpful.

  12. Malignant epithelioid schwannoma of the oral cavity in a cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonsriroj, Hassadin; Kimitsuki, Kazunori; Akagi, Tetsuya; Park, Chun-Ho

    2014-06-01

    A malignant epithelioid schwannoma of the oral cavity was diagnosed in an 8-year-old domestic short-hair cat. The mass was located in the gingiva of the upper left premolar to molar region and showed multinodular growth patterns. The mass comprised epithelioid cells arranged in densely packed sheets. Tumor cells had large, round to oval nuclei with prominent nucleoli and an abundant eosinophilic cytoplasm. Immunohistochemically, most of the tumor cells were positive for S-100 protein, glial fibrillary acidic protein and vimentin, but all lacked melanoma-associated antigen and muscle and neuroendocrine markers. Stains for type IV collagen showed linear immunoreactivity around single cells and groups of cells. Ultrastructurally, tumor cells were separated by a well-defined basement membrane, and interdigitating cell processes were observed. To our knowledge, this is the first report of feline malignant epithelioid schwannoma.

  13. Nasal Schwannoma: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siu-Navarro YJ, Pérez-Carbajal AJ

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Schwannomas are benign tumors that arise from Schwann cells peripheral nerves sheath. About 25-45% occur in the head and neck and only 4% of these tumors involve the sinunasal tract.Objective: To provide, through a clinic case and lecture review, the clinical and radiopatology findings of a bening and unusual tumors, as are the Nasal schwannomas. Case Report: We report a case of a young woman with nasal schwannoma, who complain of left nasal obstruction and rhinorrhea, which after subsequent imaging studies, surgical and pathology analisis, diagnosis was found. Sustained a favorable clinical evolution.Results and Discussion: The clinic and radiologic findings are nonspecific, depend upon the location or size of the tumor and subsequent involvement of surrounding structures, but generally present as a mass with less agressive behavior. The elective treatment is surgery, confirming this disease by microscopic and immunohistochemistry studies.Conclusion: Given these aspects must be considered nasal schwannomas within the differential diagnosis of a tumor with less aggressive behavior, clinical-radiological, because implies good results for the patient and unusual recurrence after surgery.

  14. AN INTERESTING CASE OF ANCIENT SCHWANNOMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION : Schwannoma is a common benign tumour of nerve sheath. Degenerating type of schwannoma is called ancient schwannoma. Ancient schwannomas of scalp are rare and are often misdiagnosed as sebaceous cyst or dermoid cyst. CASE REPORT : We present a thirty two year old male presented with scalp swel ling of eight years duration. X - ray showed no intracranial extension. He underwent excision of the tumour and histopathology was reported as ancient schwannoma. DISCUSSION : Histopathologically , ancient schwannomas charecterised by cellular Antoni type A ar eas and less cellular Antoni type - B areas. 9 th , 7 th , 11 th , 5 th and 4 th cranial nerves are often affected and may be associated with multiple neuro fibramatosis (Von - Recklinghausen’s disease. Impact : Case is presented for its rarity and possible pre - operative misdiagnosis

  15. Predictors of development of chronic vestibular insufficiency after vestibular neuritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamec, Ivan; Krbot Skorić, Magdalena; Ozretić, David; Habek, Mario

    2014-12-15

    To evaluate the role of clinical parameters, MRI and ocular VEMP (oVEMP) and cervical VEMP (cVEMP) as predictors of development of chronic vestibular insufficiency after vestibular neuritis. Twenty-six patients with vestibular neuritis were included: 15 patients (58%) showed complete clinical recovery, and 11 patients (41%) were diagnosed with the syndrome of chronic vestibular insufficiency. Clinical parameters (vomiting, nystagmus, postural stability, and nausea) were assessed at diagnosis. MRI was performed within 3 months and VEMP within 6 days and at 1 year after the initial presentation. The amplitude asymmetry ratio (AR) was calculated using the following formula: AR=((healthy side-affected side)/(healthy side+affected side) × 100). Of all studied parameters, only chronic white matter supratentorial lesions present on brain MRI negatively correlated with clinical recovery (Phi coefficient=-0.637, p=0.001). The logistic regression analysis showed that positive brain MRI and older age reduced odds for clinical recovery. There was no correlation between clinical recovery and oVEMP AR recovery between groups (p=0.781). Seven patients showed improvement, and 19 showed worsening on oVEMP AR after a 1-year follow-up. Statistical regression model for predicting the outcome of clinical recovery using asymmetry score recovery, as an independent variable, was not statistically significant. Older age and chronic white matter lesions on brain MRI are positive predictors of development of chronic vestibular insufficiency after vestibular neuritis. VEMPs are not useful in predicting the development of chronic vestibular insufficiency. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Orbital Schwannoma. A Case Report Schwannoma orbitario. Presentación de un caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando Rafael Milanés Armengol

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Schwannoma is a benign tumor of the myelin sheath composed of Schwann cells. It represents from 8 to 10% of all intracranial tumors. The case of a female, 37 years old patient, who attended the Ophthalmology Service because of non-specific pain mostly when performing ocular movements of the eye, proptosis and loss of vision in the left eye, is presented. Physical examination confirmed ocular visual acuity, left eye proptosis of 23 mm, pupillary hypokinesia with a relative afferent pupillary defect and fundus signs of papillary stasis. In imaging studies it was found: exophthalmos of the left eye and retro-ocular hyperdense lesion of 25 x 20 mm. Surgical procedure was performed with biopsy of the lesion. Schwannoma was diagnosed as partially encapsulated. Three months after surgery symptoms and proptosis disappeared. The patient achieved visual and fundoscopic recovery.El schwannoma es un tumor benigno de la vaina de mielina compuesto por células de Schwann. Constituyen del 8 al 10 % de los tumores intracraneales. Se presenta el caso de una paciente de 37 años de edad, que acudió al Servicio de Oftalmología por presentar dolor ocular inespecífico sobre todo a los movimientos del globo ocular, proptosis y pérdida de visión del ojo izquierdo. Al examen físico ocular se comprobó disminución de la agudeza visual, una proptosis de 23 mm del ojo izquierdo, hipoquinesia pupilar con un defecto pupilar aferente relativo y al fondo de ojo signos de estasis papilar. En los estudios imagenológicos aparecieron: exoftalmos del ojo izquierdo, lesión hiperdensa retro-ocular de 25 x 20 mm. Se realizó proceder quirúrgico con toma de biopsia de la lesión. Se diagnosticó como schwannoma parcialmente encapsulado. A los tres meses se constató desaparición de los síntomas y de la proptosis así como recuperación visual y fondoscópica.

  17. Gastric schwannoma coexists with peptic ulcer perforation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volkan İnce

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Gastric schwannoma is a benign neoplasm that originates from sheet of nerve cell in stomach. Differential diagnosis of gastrointestinal stromal tumors, (GISTs which have malign potential, than these tumors, which definite diagnosis is determined by histopathological and immunohistochemical methods have clinical significance due to gastric schwannomas have excellent progress after surgical resection. We presented a case of gastric schwannoma coexists with peptic ulcer perforation with guide of literature in this study.

  18. Schwannomas of the head and neck

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasios Kanatas

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Schwannomas are benign encapsulated nerve sheath tumors composed of Schwann cells. Malignant change in head and neck schwannomas is rare, with the incidence varying between 8 and 13.9%. In this review, we discuss the presentation and the management of head and neck schwannomas. The issues and difficulties based on our own experience as well as the experience of published reports from the literature are presented.

  19. Facial nerve schwannoma in revision stapedotomy surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmerber, Sébastien; Lavieille, Jean-Pierre

    2004-05-01

    We describe a male patient who presented a progressive conductive unilateral hearing loss 20 years after otosclerosis surgery. Computed tomography (CT) scan and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings suggested a facial schwannoma in its tympanic segment. At the time of revision surgery, a facial schwannoma was found to originate at the tympanic segment, pushing the prosthesis out of the oval window fenestration. The Teflon-piston was repositioned with difficulties in the central platinotomy, and the facial schwannoma was left intact.

  20. Giant Plexiform Schwannoma of the Tongue

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    We present the case of a 38-year-old woman that presented with a very slowly enlarging mass of the tongue. MRI revealed a large mass originating in the tongue base and extending to the supraglottic space. Biopsy of this tumor confirmed the diagnosis of schwannoma. An endaural approach allowed complete resection of the tumor. Definitive histopathological examination showed a plexiform schwannoma. Schwannoma or neurilemoma represents a benign tumor potentially affecting any nerve. The head and ...

  1. Congenital plexiform schwannoma of the clitoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yegane, Rooh A; Alaee, Mohammadreza S; Khanicheh, Elham

    2008-04-01

    Schwannomas are slow-growing nerve sheet neoplasms which are rarely found in the female genital system. In this article, we present a patient with Antony A congenital plexiform schwannoma of the clitoris. A 6-year-old girl was brought to our hospital with the history of a firm non-cystic clitoral mass from birth, which had been growing more rapidly during the previous year. The patient was scheduled for surgery. Histological studies revealed plexiform schwannoma of the clitoris post-operatively. Therefore, schwannoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of clitoral masses.

  2. Palatal schwannoma in an elderly woman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Shishir Ram; Mishra, Chandni; Shetty, Pushparaj; Kaur, Arshdeep; Babu, Subhas

    2012-06-01

    Schwannoma also known as neurilemmoma is a benign tumour derived from schwann cells and is relatively rare in occurrence. Only 1% of the schwannomas in the head and neck region occur at intra-oral sites. Schwannomas usually occur during the third or fourth decades of life and the tongue is the most common intra-oral site. A case of intra-oral schwannoma in a 70-year-old female in the region of hard palate is described which is extremely rare.

  3. [Vestibular migraine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Lars Juul; Kirchmann, Malene; Friis, Morten

    2015-12-14

    Dizziness caused by migraine, vestibular migraine (VM), has been highly debated over the last three decades. The co-morbidity of migraine and dizziness is higher than a random concurrence. One third of the patients with migraine and dizziness have VM. Recently, The International Headache Society approved VM as a diagnostic entity and the diagnostic criteria for VM appear in the appendix for The International Classification of Headache Disorders. VM is common but often underdiagnosed. Treatment follows migraine management guidelines although evidence is sparse.

  4. Implantes vestibulares

    OpenAIRE

    Aedo Sánchez,Cristian; Délano Reyes,Paul H

    2013-01-01

    La lesión o hipofunción vestibular bilateral (HVB) es un cuadro clínico que provoca oscilopsias y desequilibrio incapacitante que se agrava en oscuridad. Algunas de las causas de HVB son el uso de drogas ototóxicas, enfermedad de Ménière bilateral, enfermedades autoinmunes y degeneración espinocerebelar. El manejo de esta discapacidad es complejo y muchas veces la rehabilitación no logra los objetivos deseados. Una de las alternativas terapéuticas futuras para la HVB y aún en plena fase exper...

  5. Plexiform hypoglossal schwannoma of the tongue and the submandibular region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mahdi, Akmam H; Al-Khurrhi, Luay E; Atto, Ghada Z; Dhaher, Ameer

    2012-09-01

    Hypoglossal schwannomas usually develop in the intracranial portion of the brain. Incidence of hypoglossal schwannomas of the submandibular region is extremely rare. A 27-year-old patient presented to us with hypoglossal schwannoma of the tongue and the submandibular region. The tumor was excised intraorally combined with submandibular approach. Histopathologic examination revealed a plexiform schwannoma (a rare variant).

  6. Cecal Schwannoma: A Rare Cause of Gastrointestinal Bleeding in a Young Woman with Review of Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalyan Kanneganti

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Schwannomas are rare mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract. Occurrence of these tumors is more common in the stomach than in the large intestine. These tumors usually present as polypoidal intraluminal lesions and based on their location can present with rectal bleeding, colonic obstruction, and abdominal pain or defecation disorders. We present a case of a thirty-five-year-old woman who presented with abdominal pain and melena. Patient was diagnosed with a nonobstructing superficially ulcerated mass in the cecum on colonoscopy and required right hemicolectomy. A very rare pathological diagnosis of cecal schwannoma was made postoperatively.

  7. Spontaneous regression of a cystic hypoglossal schwannoma causing unilateral tongue atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durnford, Andrew J; Harrisson, Stuart E; Ditchfield, Adam; Shenouda, Emad

    2014-01-01

    A 60-year-old lady presented with intermittent headaches. Examination revealed striking marked unilateral tongue atrophy. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a cystic lesion in the hypoglossal canal and a provisional diagnosis of cystic hypoglossal schwannoma made. Annual surveillance scans showed stable appearances but surprisingly at 3 years they showed a significant reduction in the size of the lesion. Most patients with hypoglossal schwannomas present with ipsilateral hypoglossal nerve palsy; careful cranial nerve examination is vital in diagnosing such rare lesions. Little is known of their natural history, with most lesions undergoing surgery. This case highlights spontaneous regression following non-operative management.

  8. Schwannoma intralaberíntico. Descripción de un caso

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Introducción y objetivos: El schwannoma intralaberíntico es un tumor benigno muy infrecuente, de lento crecimiento extradural, localizado primariamente en el laberinto membranoso. A través de un caso clínico presentamos las características de su evolución, intentamos ofrecer una explicación fisiopatológica de la sintomatología y de los hallazgos audio-vestibulares y describimos finalmente, las diferentes opciones terapéuticas. Descripción: Se trata de una mujer de 59 años, que comienza con sí...

  9. Multimodality Management of Trigeminal Schwannomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niranjan, Ajay; Barnett, Samuel; Anand, Vijay; Agazzi, Siviero

    2016-08-01

    Patients presenting with trigeminal schwannomas require multimodality management by a skull base surgical team that can offer expertise in both transcranial and transnasal approaches as well as radiosurgical and microsurgical strategies. Improvement in neurologic symptoms, preservation of cranial nerve function, and control of mass effect are the primary goals of management for trigeminal schwannomas. Complete surgical resection is the treatment of choice but may not be possible in all cases. Radiosurgery is an option as primary management for small- to moderate-sized tumors and can be used for postoperative residuals or recurrences. Planned surgical resection followed by SRS for residual tumor is an effective option for larger trigeminal schwannomas. The endoscopic resection is an excellent approach for patients with an extradural tumor or tumors isolated to the Meckel cave. A detailed analysis of a tumor and its surroundings based on high-quality imaging can help better estimate the expected outcome from each treatment. An expert skull base team should be able to provide precise counseling for each patient's situation for selecting the best option.

  10. Gastric schwannoma: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayfa Romdhane

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Schwannomas are generally benign, slow growing tumors. They are rarely observed in the gastrointestinal tract with the most common site being the stomach. These tumors are usually asymptomatic. The preoperative diagnosis via endoscopy is a challenging issue due to the difficulty of differentiation from other submucosal tumors. A 54-year-old woman presented with epigastric pain persisting for the last 10 months. Upper endoscopy revealed an elevated submucosal mass of the gastric antrum. The overlying mucosa was normal. Biopsy specimens yielded only unspecific signs of mild inactive chronic inflammation. Endoscopic ultrasound examination noted a hypoechoic homogeneous mass lesion located in the gastric antrum. The mass appeared to arise from the muscularis propria, and there was no perigastric lymphadenopathy. A contrast-enhanced computed tomography scan identified a homogeneous round mass and arising from the antrum of the stomach. Submucosal tumor was suspected and surgical intervention was recommended. The patient underwent an elective laparoscopic partial gastrectomy. The histopathologic features and immunohistochemical-staining pattern were consistent with a benign gastric schwannoma. Our patient shows no recurrence with a follow-up of one year. The definitive diagnosis of gastric schwannomas requires immunohistochemical studies. Complete margin negative surgical resection, as in this case, is the curative treatment of choice. The clinical course is generally benign.

  11. Lingual schwannoma in pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manna, Francesco; Barbi, Egidio; Murru, Flora; Bussani, Rossana

    2012-09-01

    We present the case of a 15-year-old boy who presented to our emergency department because of a soft lesion growing on the back of his tongue. On examination, a vegetant mass on the posteromidline lingual part of the body of the tongue was noticed: it was not painful, even if the boy reported discomfort because of its size; there was no bleeding or signs of infection. The magnetic resonance imaging showed the lesion as trilobated and capsulated, but was not diriment to define a diagnosis; excisional biopsy was performed under general anesthesia, and the mass was identified as a schwannoma. Schwannoma, or neurilemmoma, is a benign tumor originating from Schwann cells of the nerve sheath surrounding peripheral nerves. It is slow-growing, usually solitary, and encapsulated. Intraoral schwannomas are rare and account for 1% of lesions of the head and neck region. There is no sex predilection. The symptoms depend on size and location of the tumor. Recurrence is rare after complete surgical resection. The present study aimed to retrospectively describe our experience with a case of neurilemmoma of the tongue presenting in childhood, the diagnostic methods used, the surgical decision, and the treatment outcome and to analyze the data and review the literature available on this type of tumor. The etiology, clinical presentation, differential diagnosis, and management are discussed.

  12. Schwannoma of the adrenal gland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anunayi Jeshtadi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Visceral schwannomas are extremely rare and are usually discov-ered incidentally on USG/CT-Scan. Primary schwannomas of the adrenal gland are extremely uncommon. It has been theorized that they originate from Schwann cells that insulate the nerve fi-bers innervating the adrenal medulla. Histopathological examina-tion coupled with immunohistochemistry provides the definitive diagnosis. A 55 year old normotensive female presented with pain in the right loin since 5 months. Her renal parameters were normal. Contrast enhanced computed tomography of abdomen showed a well delineated 6.5 x 5cms mass at upper pole of her right kidney. 24-hour urinary metanephrine was slightly elevated (3.07mg/24hrs. A decline in Serum cortisol levels was observed following a dexamethasone suppression test (18.89nmol/l. Histopathological examination revealed a spindle cell tumor. Immunohistochemistry showed strong and diffuse positive staining for S-100 with negative expression for CD-117, desmin, CD-34, HMB-45, synaptophysin, chromogranin, cytokeratin, and SMA. Ki-67 index was 2%.A diagnosis of cellular schwannoma of adrenal gland was confirmed.

  13. Temporal fossa intra-extracranial dumbbell schwannoma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wong, Limy

    2011-02-01

    Intra-extracranial schwannomas arising unrelated to major cranial nerves are exceedingly rare neoplasms. We report the case of a 23-year-old male who presented with a 9 month history of progressive temporal swelling which was excised and found histologically to be a schwannoma. A succinct review of the relevant literature is presented.

  14. Temporal fossa intra-extracranial dumbbell schwannoma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wong, Limy

    2012-02-01

    Intra-extracranial schwannomas arising unrelated to major cranial nerves are exceedingly rare neoplasms. We report the case of a 23-year-old male who presented with a 9 month history of progressive temporal swelling which was excised and found histologically to be a schwannoma. A succinct review of the relevant literature is presented.

  15. CONTRIBUTION OF THE AUDIOLOGICAL AND VESTIBULAR ASSESSMENT TO THE DIFFERENTIAL AND ETIOLOGICAL DIAGNOSIS OF PERIPHERIC VESTIBULAR SYNDROMES

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    Loreta Ungureanu

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Scope of the study: Vestibular pathology is a complex one, requiring a minute clinical evaluation, as well as numerous paraclinical investigations. The present study analyzes the contribution of the modern methods of vestibular and auditive investigation to the diagnosis of dizziness. Materials and method: The results of the investigations performed on 84 patients with peripheric vestibular syndrome, on whom a complete audiological and vestibular assessment had been also made, have been retrospectively analyzed. Results: Anamnestic data and the results of evaluation permitted classification of peripheric vestibular pathology according to topo-lesional and etiological criteria. The most frequently diagnosed diseases were: benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, Ménière syndrome and vestibular neuronitis. Conclusions: Testing of the vestibulo-ocular and vestibulo-spinal reflexes through videonystagmoscopy and, respectively, computerized dynamic posturography, besides tonal vocal audiometry and precocious auditive potentials, is especially important for a positive diagnosis and etiological differentiation of vestibular syndromes.

  16. Common bile duct schwannoma: A case report and review of literature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luigi Fenoglio; Rodolfo Brizio; Felice Borghi; Sara Severini; Paola Cena; Elena Migliore; Christian Bracco; Fulvio Pomero; Sergio Panzone; Giovan Battista Cavallero; Alberto Silvestri

    2007-01-01

    Schwannoma is a myelin sheath tumor complicated with neurofibroma, neurofibromatosis and neurogenic sarcoma. Peripheral nerve sheath tumors represent 2%-6% of gastrointestinal tract stromal tumors (GIST),but there are deficient data about location of neurogenic tumors in the biliary system and only nine cases of schwannoma of the extrahepatic biliary tract have been reported. These tumors are clinically non-specific. They are usually symptomatic by compressing the close or adjacent structures when being retroperitoneal, and their preoperative diagnosis is extremely difficult. This paper reviews the literature data and describes a case of schwannoma of the common bile duct associated with cholestasis in a healthy young woman, diagnosed and treated in our department. This case is of interest on account of the complexity of its diagnosis and the atypical macroscopic growth pattern of the tumor.

  17. Biliary tract schwannoma: A rare cause of obstructive jaundice in a young patient

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gilton Marques Fonseca; André Luis Montagnini; Manoel de Souza Rocha; Rosely Antunes Patzina; Mário Vinícius Angelete Alvarez Bernardes; Ivan Cecconello; José Jukemura

    2012-01-01

    Schwannoma is a tumor derived from Schwann cells which usually arises in the upper extremities,trunk,head and neck,retroperitoneum,mediastinum,pelvis,and peritoneum.However,it can arise in the gastrointestinal tract,including biliary tract.We present a 24-year-old male patient with obstructive jaundice,whose investigation with computed tomography abdomen showed focal wall thickening in the common hepatic duct,difficult to differentiate with hilar adenocarcinoma.He was diagnosed intraoperatively schwannoma of common bile duct and treated with local resection.The patient recovered well without signs of recurrence of the lesion after 12 mo.We also reviewed the common bile duct schwannoma related in the literature and evaluated the difficulty in pre and intraoperative differential diagnosis with adenocarcinoma hilar.Resection is the treatment of choice for such cases and the tumor did not recur in any of the resected cases.

  18. Schwannoma intercostal simulando neoplasia pulmonar

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    Henn L.A.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Schwannoma é uma neoplasia mesenquimal, usualmente solitária, encontrada no mediastino, retroperitônio ou pelve, sendo rara sua apresentação na parede torácica. OBJETIVO: Relatar o caso de um paciente masculino, tabagista, com um nódulo pulmonar direito com características de malignidade, detectado em radiografia de tórax de rotina, cujo diagnóstico anatomopatológico foi de schwannoma benigno de nervo intercostal. MÉTODOS: Revisaram-se os dados referentes ao quadro clínico, exames laboratoriais e de imagem (radiografia e tomografia computadorizada de tórax do caso em estudo, assim como os exames anatomopatológico e imuno-histoquímico do espécime cirúrgico. RESULTADOS: O paciente foi submetido à toracotomia direita diagnóstica com ressecção da tumoração. O exame anatomopatológico convencional mostrou células tumorais de aspecto fusiforme, dispostas em paliçada, formando os corpos de Verocay, compatível com schwannoma intercostal. A imuno-histoquímica foi positiva para proteína S-100, vimentina e enolase, e negativa para neurofilamentos. CONCLUSÃO: O diagnóstico definitivo de schwannoma só é possível por meio da análise histopatológica e imuno-histoquímica da lesão. Seu aspecto celular, associado à atividade mitótica e a áreas de pleomorfismo, pode levar ao diagnóstico incorreto de malignidade. A imuno-histoquímica, por meio da proteína S-100, é útil na caracterização da benignidade da lesão, já que não é detectada nas lesões malignas. Os schwannomas de parede torácica podem simular neoplasias pulmonares na radiografia e tomografia computadorizada de tórax.

  19. Cellular schwannoma: a benign neoplasm sometimes overdiagnosed as sarcoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alberghini, M. [Dept. of Surgical Pathology, Rizzoli Institute, Bologna (Italy); Anatomia Patologica, Istituto Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy); Zanella, L.; Bacchini, P.; Bertoni, F. [Dept. of Surgical Pathology, Rizzoli Institute, Bologna (Italy)

    2001-06-01

    A case of cellular schwannoma originating in the left lumbar paraspinal region is described. The diagnosis was originally made on needle biopsy material. The histological examination is usually not sufficient to correctly diagnose this benign neoplasm. Bone erosion, neurological symptoms, caused by compression of the spinal roots, together with hypercellularity, pleomorphism and an occasional increase in mitotic activity, may lead to an erroneous diagnosis of malignancy. Immunohistochemistry and ultrastructural analysis are helpful in confirming the diagnosis. The recognition of this entity avoids unnecessary overtreatment of these patients. (orig.)

  20. Rehabilitation in vestibular system diseases

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    Maksim Valeryevich Zamergrad

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Vestibular rehabilitation is an important component of combination treatment in a patient with vertigo. Vestibular rehabilitation is indicated for different diseases of the central or peripheral vestibular system. The goal of vestibular rehabilitation is to ensure gaze stabilization, to train postural stability, and to reduce subjective vertigo. Vestibular rehabilitation is based on the stimulation of vestibular adaptation, sensory substitution, and habituation. Vestibular suppressants, inadequate mobility, anxiety, and depression decelerate vestibular compensation whereas early activation, mobility, and betaserc use accelerate it.

  1. Tratamento cirúrgico do schwannoma traqueal

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    Orlando Jorge Martins Torres

    Full Text Available Schwannoma is a rare benign tumor of the proximal tracheobronchial tree. The aim of the present study is to report a case of tracheal schwannoma causing airway obstruction. A 16-year-old woman complained of cough, wheezing and dyspneia. Bronchoscopy and computerized tomography showed a polypoide intratracheal mass obstructing approximately 80% of the lumen. The treatment consisted of tracheal resection and primary anastomosis. Histological analysis revealed a tracheal schwannoma. The postoperative course was uneventful and the patient remains well twelve months after surgery.

  2. Schwannoma of the tongue: one case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mevio, E; Gorini, E; Lenzi, A; Migliorini, L

    2002-01-01

    The schwannomas are nervous tissue tumours that arise from Schwann cells; they are uncommon in peripheral nerves and rare in the tongue. After, a review of the literature, we present a case of schwannoma which arose in the ventral part of the body of the tongue. The tumour presented as a slowly growing mass producing few symptoms. The diagnosis of schwannoma is usually made post-operatively by histological identification although modern imaging techniques can provide useful indications. The treatment is exclusively surgical and usually enucleation of the mass is uncomplicated. There are no reports of malignant transformation.

  3. Vestibular Function Tests for Vestibular Migraine: Clinical Implication of Video Head Impulse and Caloric Tests

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Woo Seok; Lee, Sang Hun; Yang, Chan Joo; Ahn, Joong Ho; Chung, Jong Woo; Park, Hong Ju

    2016-01-01

    Vestibular migraine (VM) is one of the most common causes of episodic vertigo. We reviewed the results of multiple vestibular function tests in a cohort of VM patients who were diagnosed with VM according to the diagnostic criteria of the Barany Society and the International Headache Society and assessed the efficacy of each for predicting the prognosis in VM patients. A retrospective chart analysis was performed on 81 VM patients at a tertiary care center from June 2014 to July 2015. Patient...

  4. Vestibular function tests for vestibular migraine: clinical implication of video head impulse and caloric tests

    OpenAIRE

    Woo Seok Kang; Sang Hun Lee; Chan Joo Yang; Joong Ho Ahn; Jong Woo Chung; Hong Ju Park

    2016-01-01

    Vestibular migraine (VM) is one of the most common causes of episodic vertigo. We reviewed the results of multiple vestibular function tests in a cohort of VM patients who were diagnosed with VM according to the diagnostic criteria of the Barany Society and the International Headache Society and assessed the efficacy of each for predicting the prognosis in VM patients. A retrospective chart analysis was performed on 81 VM patients at a tertiary care center from June 2014 to July 2015. Patient...

  5. Tentorium schwannoma mimicking meningioma: an unusual location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calişaneller, Tarkan; Ozen, Ozlem; Altinörs, Nur; Caner, Hakan

    2008-07-01

    A 60-year-old female was admitted to our clinic complaining of a long-lasting headache. Cranial magnetic resonance imagining examination of the patient revealed a 22x24 mm extra-axial, well-demarcated, mass lesion based on the left tentorium. The patient underwent a craniotomy and the tumor was totally excised with the adjacent tentorium. The histopathological examination of the tumor complied with the diagnosis of schwannoma. The rest of the clinical course was uneventful and the patient was released from the hospital without any neurological deficit. Intracranial schwannomas can rarely originate from atypical dural locations and radiological techniques are not always helpful in distinguishing tentorial schwannoma from tentorial meningioma. We presented a patient with a tentorium schwannoma mimicking meningioma and discussed the current literature.

  6. Laparoscopic Resection of an Adrenal Schwannoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantinos, Toutouzas G.; Panagiotis, Kekis B.; Nikolaos, Michalopoulos V.; Ioannis, Flessas; Andreas, Manouras; Geogrios, Zografos

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Schwannomas are tumors originating from Schwann cells of the peripheral nerve sheath (neurilemma) of the neuroectoderm. Rarely, schwannomas can arise from the retroperitoneum and adrenal medulla. We describe a case of a 71-y-old woman who presented with an incidentally discovered adrenal tumor. Methods: Ultrasound and computed tomography scans revealed a lesion with solid and cystic areas originating from the left adrenal gland. The patient underwent complete laparoscopic resection of the tumor and the left adrenal gland. Results: Histopathological examination and immunohistochemical staining of the excised specimen revealed a benign schwannoma measuring 5.5×5×3.7 cm. To our knowledge, few other cases of laparoscopic resection of adrenal schwannomas have been reported. Conclusion: Because preoperative diagnosis of adrenal tumors is inconclusive, complete laparoscopic excision allows for definitive diagnosis with histological evaluation and represents the treatment of choice. PMID:23484583

  7. Cystic cervical intramedullary schwannoma with syringomyelia

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    Shenoy S

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of cervical intramedullary cystic schwannoma associated with segmental syrinx in a young adult without evidence of neurofibromatosis. The relevant literature is reviewed.

  8. Case report 872. "Ancient" schwannoma (degenerated neurilemoma).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, E; Sapan, M R; McHeffey-Atkinson, B; Naidich, J B; Arlen, M

    1994-10-01

    A case of an ancient schwannoma was presented. The rare occurrence of this tumor has resulted in only a few reported cases with descriptions of its features on imaging. Our patient's tumor, like one previously reported case, demonstrated calcification on the plain film - a finding not associated with other histologic types of schwannomas. Angiography revealed the tumor to be hypervascular. Evaluation by MRI demonstrated a lobulated, encapsulated soft tissue mass containing several cystic areas that corresponded histologically to areas of necrosis. Hypertrophied blood vessels were seen in the periphery of the tumoral mass. Too few ancient schwannomas have been reported to conclude whether or not radiographic evidence of soft tissue calcification is characteristic of this histologically distinctive subtype of schwannoma. However, since calcification is seen histologically as part of the degenerating process, its presence on plain films could be a feature of this tumor. Furthermore, the presence of cystic areas on MRI is not surprising given the pathological changes that occur in this tumor. We suggest that a diagnosis of ancient schwannoma be considered when a patient presents with a hypervascular soft tissue mass containing amorphous calcification on plain films and cystic areas on MRI. Despite the nonspecificity of these imaging findings, this point is relevant because each of these features suggests the presence of a malignant mass. Awareness of the possibility of a benign ancient schwannoma could obviate unnecessary radical surgery.

  9. TONGUE BASE SCHWANNOMA : A RARE ENTITY

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    Vivek

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Schwannomas are the benign tumours arising from the Schwann cells. Intraoral and pharyngeal schwannomas are rare and constitute less than 1%. CASE REPORT: We report a case of a 39 year old lady who presented with progressive dysphagia and dysphonia since three months. Intraoral examination showed a well - defined reddish lesion arising from the base of the tongue. She was referred to the department of radiodiagnosis for CT and MRI of the neck to know the extent of the lesion. Differential diagnosis of schwannoma and minor salivary gland tumor was given. Excision biopsy of the lesion was done and the histologic examination showed it as schwannoma. DISCUSSION: Schwannomas of the base of the tongue are rare and should be included in the differential diagnosis based on the imaging features and enhancem ent pattern. CONCLUSION: Imaging features, particularly MRI with contrast helps in differentiating benign from malignant lesions of the base of the tongue. Schwannomas are benign and have good prognosis as they can be excised when compared to the other intraoral malignant lesions.

  10. Fourth Ventricular Schwannoma: Identical Clinicopathologic Features as Schwann Cell-Derived Schwannoma with Unique Etiopathologic Origins

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    Tiffany R. Hodges

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. To our knowledge, this is the sixth reported case in the literature of fourth ventricular schwannoma. The etiology and natural history of intraventricular schwannomas is not well understood. A thorough review of potential etiopathogenic mechanisms is provided in this case report. Case Description. A 69-year-old man presented with an incidentally found fourth ventricular tumor during an evaluation for generalized weakness, gait instability, and memory disturbance. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI revealed a heterogeneously enhancing lesion in the fourth ventricle. A suboccipital craniotomy was performed to resect the lesion. Histopathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of schwannoma (WHO grade I. Conclusions. Schwannomas should be considered in the differential diagnosis of intraventricular tumors. Although the embryologic origins may be different from nerve sheath-derived schwannomas, the histologic, clinical, and natural history appear identical and thus should be managed similarly.

  11. Pancreatic schwannoma: Report of a case and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinhal, Vidyadhar A; Ravishankar, T H S; Melapure, Ashok I; Jayaprakasha, G; Range Gowda, B C; Manjunath

    2010-07-01

    Connective tissue tumors of pancreas are uncommon, among them pancreatic schwannoma is very rare tumor, very few cases were reported in literature. Aggressive resections like whipple's procedure, or distal pancreatectomy are not necessary for pancreatic schwannoma as it rarely goes to malignant change and simple enuclation is sufficient.In our patient pancreatic schwannoma is associated with simple cyst in liver and absence of one kidney. Here, we are presenting a case of pancreatic schwannoma treated by simple enucleation.

  12. Current treatment options in vestibular migraine

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    Mark eObermann

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Approximately 1% of the general population in western industrialized countries suffers from vestibular migraine. However, it remains widely unknown and often under diagnosed even despite the recently published diagnostic criteria for vestibular migraine. Treatment trials that specialize on vestibular migraine are scarce and systematic randomized controlled clinical trials are only now emerging.This review summarizes the knowledge on the currently available treatment options that were tested specifically for vestibular migraine and gives an evidence-based, informed treatment recommendation with all its limitations.To date only two randomized controlled treatment trials provide limited evidence for the use of rizatriptan and zolmitriptan for the treatment of vestibular migraine attacks because of methodological shortcommings. There is an on-going a multicenter randomized placebo-controlled trial testing metoprolol 95 mg vs. placebo (PROVEMIG-trial. Therefore, the therapeutic recommendations for the prophylactic treatment of vestibular migraine are currently widely based on the guidelines of migraine with and without aura as well as expert opinion.

  13. A CASE OF GASTRIC SCHWANNOMA

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    Ch. Deepak

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: A 65 years old lady from Nagamapal, Imphal, India pre sented with pain in upper abdomen off and on for about 1 year duration and hi story of upper gastrointestinal bleeding and melena occasionally for which blood transfusion was required. Routine haematological investigations were normal, liver function test and kidney function test were within normal limits. EGD shows fundal polypoid growth of about 5cm diameter with areas of ulceration at places. Biopsy o f EGD specimen shows inflammatory cells with marked fibroblastic proliferation and no eviden ce of malignancy. CT of whole abdomen shows features suggestive of large gastric polyp in f undus of stomach. Laparotomy was done and surgical resection of the polypoid mass from fun dus of stomach was performed. HPE revealed schwannoma with degenerative changes.

  14. Glossopharyngeal schwannoma : a case report and review of literature.

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    Gupta V

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available We report a rare case of glossopharyngeal schwannoma whose clinical presentation and the radiological work up suggested an acoustic schwannoma. The diagnosis was made at surgery, once attachment to ninth cranial nerve was seen. The clinical presentation, radiological features and surgical findings of the glossopharyngeal schwannoma are presented along with the review of literature.

  15. Association between intraosseous schwannoma occurrence and the position of the intraosseous nutrient vessel: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Kayo; Yasuda, Taketoshi; Watanabe, Kenta; Kanamori, Masahiko; Kimura, Tomoatsu

    2016-05-01

    Intraosseous schwannoma is a rare benign bone tumor that originates from Schwann cells of the nerve sheath. The majority of intraosseous schwannomas arise in the mandible and sacrum, but an intraosseous schwannoma involving the ulna is described in the present case report. Radiologically, the current case presented as a well-defined lytic lesion, with a pathological fracture and no intralesional calcification, in the proximal metaphysis of the left ulna. Using magnetic resonance imaging, an intraosseous mass spreading out from the cortical defect was observed. The lesion appeared isointense to skeletal muscle on T1-weighted images, and hyperintense or heterogeneous on T2-weighted images. The differential diagnosis comprised benign bone tumors, including bone cyst, aneurysmal bone cyst, giant cell tumor and fibrous dysplasia. Based on the results of a needle biopsy, a schwannoma involving the ulnar bone was diagnosed, and tumor marginal resection followed by artificial bone grafting and fixation was performed. A total of one year subsequent to surgery, the patient exhibits no symptoms, and there is no evidence of disease recurrence.

  16. Schwannoma de colon: reporte de un caso

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    Marlen Vega-Vega

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Los schwannomas del tracto gastrointestinal son muy raros, los más comúnmente encontrados son los de estómago. Se presenta un caso de un schwannoma de colon, el cual es aún menos común. Los schwannomas se han asociado con neurofibromatosis. La incidencia es igual en ambos sexos y el rango de edad es amplio, desde los 18 hasta los 87 años. Los síntomas más hallados son el sangrado, el dolor abdominal y la obstrucción intestinal. El método diagnóstico más certero es la tomografía axial computarizada. El tratamiento es quirúrgico y consiste en la resección completa del tumor; la quimioterapia y radioterapia no han mostrado resultados favorables. El pronóstico depende principalmente del tamaño del tumor, edad mayor de siete años, la necrosis del 25% del tumor o más y la presencia de neurofibromatosis.Schwannomas of the gastrointestinal tract are uncommon, gastric schwannomas are the most common. We report a case of a colonic schwannoma, wich are even less frecuent. They occur in association with neurofibromatosis. Schwannomas occur equally in men and women, in a wide age range. Haemorrhage, abdominal pain and bowel obstruction the most common presenting features. Computerized tomography confirms the diagnosis. Primary treatment is the complete surgical excision. Radiation therapy and chemotherapy do any have additional benefit over surgery. Size, age greater than 7 years, more than 25% of tumor necrosis and neurofibromatosis are the most important factors regarding in prognosis.

  17. Inferior vestibular neuritis in a fighter pilot: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Su Jiang; Jia, Hong Bo; Xu, Po; Zheng, Ying Juan

    2013-06-01

    Spatial disorientation in airplane pilots is a leading factor in many fatal flying accidents. Spatial orientation is the product of integrative inputs from the proprioceptive, vestibular, and visual systems. One condition that can lead to sudden pilot incapacitation in flight is vestibular neuritis. Vestibular neuritis is commonly diagnosed by a finding of unilateral vestibular failure, such as a loss of caloric response. However, because caloric response testing reflects the function of only the superior part of the vestibular nerve, it cannot detect cases of neuritis in only the inferior part of the nerve. We describe the case of a Chinese naval command fighter pilot who exhibited symptoms suggestive of vestibular neuritis but whose caloric response test results were normal. Further testing showed a unilateral loss of vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs). We believe that this pilot had pure inferior nerve vestibular neuritis. VEMP testing plays a major role in the diagnosis of inferior nerve vestibular neuritis in pilots. We also discuss this issue in terms of aeromedical concerns.

  18. Olfactory schwannoma: A report of two cases and literature review

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    Zheng Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Intracranial schwannoma is a kind of benign intracranial tumors, derived from neuron myelin sheath, growing slowly and curable. Olfactory schwannoma is an exceedingly rare kind of schwannoma, whose origin is still uncovered. Although several theories have been put up for pathogenesis of olfactory schwannoma, till now, none of these hypotheses has been widely accepted and acknowledged officially. Up to date, only 46 cases of olfactory schwannoma were reported across numerous institutes worldwide. Here we gathered two cases from Department of Neurosurgery in Beijing Tiantan Hospital across two years collection.

  19. Central pancreatectomy for pancreatic schwannoma: A case report and literature review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shao-Yan; Sun, Ke; Owusu-Ansah, Kwabena Gyabaah; Xie, Hai-Yang; Zhou, Lin; Zheng, Shu-Sen; Wang, Wei-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Schwannomas are mesenchymal tumors originating from Schwann cells in peripheral nerve sheaths. Although the tumor can be located in any part of the human body, the most common locations are the head, neck, trunk and extremities. Pancreatic schwannomas are rare. To our knowledge, only 64 cases of pancreatic schwannoma have been reported in the English literature over the past 40 years. In this paper, we present a pancreatic schwannoma in a 59-year-old female. Ultrasound, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed the tumor located in the pancreatic body; however, accurate diagnosis was hard to obtain preoperatively and a pancreatic cystadenoma was preliminarily considered. During laparotomy, the mass was found in the body of the pancreas. An enlarged gallbladder with multiple stones was also observed. We performed central pancreatectomy, end-to-side pancreaticojejunostomy and cholecystectomy. Notably, central pancreatectomy has been reported in only one case prior to this report. The gross specimen showed a mass with a thin capsule, 1.6 cm × 1.1 cm × 1.1 cm in size. Microscopic examination showed that the tumor was mainly composed of spindle-shaped cells with palisading arrangement and no atypia, which is consistent with a benign tumor. Both hypercellular and hypocellular areas were visible. Immunohistochemical staining revealed strongly positive results for protein S-100. Finally, the tumor was diagnosed as a schwannoma of the pancreatic body. Postoperatively, the patient recovered well and left the hospital 6 d later. During the 53-mo follow-up period, the patient remained well and free of complications. PMID:27729750

  20. Gamma Knife radiosurgery in the treatment of abducens nerve schwannomas: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Govindaraju Lakshmi; Sharma, Manish Singh; Kale, Shashank S; Agrawal, Deepak; Singh, Manmohan; Sharma, Bhawani Shankar

    2016-10-01

    OBJECTIVE Of the intracranial schwannomas, those arising from the vestibular nerves are the most common. Abducens nerve (AN) schwannomas are very rare, and there is limited literature on their optimal management. Therapeutic options include surgery and/or stereotactic radiosurgery. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) in these sixth cranial nerve (CN) schwannomas. METHODS The authors performed a retrospective analysis of patients who had undergone GKRS for intracranial tumors at their institute in the period from 2003 to 2010. Inclusion criteria were as follows: isolated AN paresis on presentation, a lesion along the course of the sixth CN, and imaging features characteristic of a schwannoma. Patients with other CN deficits and neurofibromatosis Type 2 were excluded. Symptomatic improvement was defined as the resolution of or an improvement in diplopia noted on a subjective basis or as an improvement in lateral eyeball excursion noted objectively on follow-up. A reduction in tumor volume by at least 20%, as noted by comparing the pre- and post-GKRS images, was deemed significant. RESULTS Six patients with a mean age of 37.1 years (range 17-55 years) underwent primary GKRS. There were 2 prepontine cistern, 3 cavernous sinus, and 1 cisterno-cavernous tumor. The mean duration of symptoms was 6.1 months (range 3-12 months). The mean tumor volume was 3.3 cm(3) (range 1.5-4.8 cm(3)). The mean tumor margin radiation dose was 12.5 Gy (range 12-14 Gy), while the median margin dose was 12 Gy (50% isodose line). The median number of isocenters used was 5 (range 4-8). The brainstem received an average 8.35-Gy radiation dosage (range 5.5-11 Gy). The mean follow-up duration was 44.3 months (range 24-78 months). Symptoms remained stable in 1 patient, improved in 3, and resolved in 2 (total improvement 83%). Magnetic resonance imaging at the last follow-up showed a stable tumor size in 3 patients (50%) and a reduction in the other 3

  1. Vestibular perception following acute unilateral vestibular lesions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sian Cousins

    Full Text Available Little is known about the vestibulo-perceptual (VP system, particularly after a unilateral vestibular lesion. We investigated vestibulo-ocular (VO and VP function in 25 patients with vestibular neuritis (VN acutely (2 days after onset and after compensation (recovery phase, 10 weeks. Since the effect of VN on reflex and perceptual function may differ at threshold and supra-threshold acceleration levels, we used two stimulus intensities, acceleration steps of 0.5°/s(2 and velocity steps of 90°/s (acceleration 180°/s(2. We hypothesised that the vestibular lesion or the compensatory processes could dissociate VO and VP function, particularly if the acute vertiginous sensation interferes with the perceptual tasks. Both in acute and recovery phases, VO and VP thresholds increased, particularly during ipsilesional rotations. In signal detection theory this indicates that signals from the healthy and affected side are still fused, but result in asymmetric thresholds due to a lesion-induced bias. The normal pattern whereby VP thresholds are higher than VO thresholds was preserved, indicating that any 'perceptual noise' added by the vertigo does not disrupt the cognitive decision-making processes inherent to the perceptual task. Overall, the parallel findings in VO and VP thresholds imply little or no additional cortical processing and suggest that vestibular thresholds essentially reflect the sensitivity of the fused peripheral receptors. In contrast, a significant VO-VP dissociation for supra-threshold stimuli was found. Acutely, time constants and duration of the VO and VP responses were reduced - asymmetrically for VO, as expected, but surprisingly symmetrical for perception. At recovery, VP responses normalised but VO responses remained shortened and asymmetric. Thus, unlike threshold data, supra-threshold responses show considerable VO-VP dissociation indicative of additional, higher-order processing of vestibular signals. We provide evidence of

  2. Clinical Analysis of 81 Cases of Benign Retroperitoneal Schwannoma%81例良性腹膜后神经鞘瘤临床分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李强; 高春涛

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the clinical manifestations of retroperitoneal schwannoma in order to improve the diagnosis and treatment of this rare disease. Methods: Between January 1951 and September 2004, 81 patients with retroperitoneal schwannoma were retrospectively analyzed. Results: All cases received operative therapy. Sixty cases (74.1%) received a total resection; 12 cases (14.9%) subtotal resection, and 9 cases (11.1%) exploration. During the surgical operation, a single tumor was found in 77 cases (95.1%), and multiple tumors in 4 cases (4.9%). Most of the retroperitoneal schwannomas located beside the spine. The tumor was a fusiform, round or oval mass that was sharply circumscribed and encapsulated. Pathologic results showed all 81 cases were benign schwannoma. In the 4 cases of multiple tumors,2 (2.5%) were diagnosed as double-primary tumors associated with ascending colon adenocarcinoma and lung squamous-cell cancer. One case recurred postoperatively. Conclusion: Retroperitoneal schwannoma was rare and preoperative diagnosis was difficult. Most of retroperitoneal schwannoma were benign and the surgical treatment was the first choice.

  3. Base of tongue schwannoma: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Yu-Lan Mary; Zimmer, Lee A; Myers, Eugene N

    2006-07-01

    Both malignant and benign lesions may be found on the base of the tongue, including metastasis from other sites. Various surgical approaches to the base of tongue have been described. Here, we report a case of a 26-year-old woman with a schwannoma in the base of tongue removed through a suprahyoid pharyngotomy approach. The biology and pathology of schwannoma in the oral cavity are discussed. The advantage of the suprahyoid pharyngotomy approach for complete excision of a mass in the base of tongue is demonstrated.

  4. Central vestibular dysfunction in an otorhinolaryngological vestibular unit: incidence and diagnostic strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafa, Badr E; Kahky, Ayman O El; Kader, Hisham M Abdel; Rizk, Michael

    2014-07-01

    Introduction Vertigo can be due to a variety of central and peripheral causes. The relative incidence of central causes is underestimated. This may have an important impact of the patients' management and prognosis. Objective The objective of this work is to determine the incidence of central vestibular disorders in patients presenting to a vestibular unit in a tertiary referral academic center. It also aims at determining the best strategy to increase the diagnostic yield of the patients' visit. Methods This is a prospective observational study on 100 consecutive patients with symptoms suggestive of vestibular dysfunction. All patients completed a structured questionnaire and received bedside and vestibular examination and neuroimaging as required. Results There were 69 women and 31 men. Their ages ranged between 28 and 73 (mean 42.48 years). Provisional videonystagmography (VNG) results were: 40% benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), 23% suspicious of central causes, 18% undiagnosed, 15% Meniere disease, and 4% vestibular neuronitis. Patients with an unclear diagnosis or central features (41) had magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and Doppler studies. Combining data from history, VNG, and imaging studies, 23 patients (23%) were diagnosed as having a central vestibular lesion (10 with generalized ischemia/vertebra basilar insufficiency, 4 with multiple sclerosis, 4 with migraine vestibulopathy, 4 with phobic postural vertigo, and 1 with hyperventilation-induced nystagmus). Conclusions Combining a careful history with clinical examination, VNG, MRI, and Doppler studies decreases the number of undiagnosed cases and increases the detection of possible central lesions.

  5. Central Vestibular Dysfunction in an Otorhinolaryngological Vestibular Unit: Incidence and Diagnostic Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa, Badr E.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Vertigo can be due to a variety of central and peripheral causes. The relative incidence of central causes is underestimated. This may have an important impact of the patients' management and prognosis. Objective The objective of this work is to determine the incidence of central vestibular disorders in patients presenting to a vestibular unit in a tertiary referral academic center. It also aims at determining the best strategy to increase the diagnostic yield of the patients' visit. Methods This is a prospective observational study on 100 consecutive patients with symptoms suggestive of vestibular dysfunction. All patients completed a structured questionnaire and received bedside and vestibular examination and neuroimaging as required. Results There were 69 women and 31 men. Their ages ranged between 28 and 73 (mean 42.48 years. Provisional videonystagmography (VNG results were: 40% benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV, 23% suspicious of central causes, 18% undiagnosed, 15% Meniere disease, and 4% vestibular neuronitis. Patients with an unclear diagnosis or central features (41 had magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and Doppler studies. Combining data from history, VNG, and imaging studies, 23 patients (23% were diagnosed as having a central vestibular lesion (10 with generalized ischemia/vertebra basilar insufficiency, 4 with multiple sclerosis, 4 with migraine vestibulopathy, 4 with phobic postural vertigo, and 1 with hyperventilation-induced nystagmus. Conclusions Combining a careful history with clinical examination, VNG, MRI, and Doppler studies decreases the number of undiagnosed cases and increases the detection of possible central lesions.

  6. [Malignant schwannoma metastasizing to the heart].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes Júnior, A da S; Greco, O T; Fiorini, M; Pavarino, P; Corbucci, H; Caixeta, A M

    1992-01-01

    We introduce the case of a 34-year-old male with a malignant metastasizing tumor in the heart associated with skin manifestations. The patient was submitted to heart surgery to resect the tumor. The correct diagnosis was done by pathological findings and immunohistochemical methods and showed, malignant schwannoma.

  7. Atypical sinonasal Schwannomas: a difficult diagnostic challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacopo, Galli; Micaela, Imperiali; Italo, Cantore; Luigi, Corina; Larocca, Luigi M; Gaetano, Paludetti

    2009-08-01

    Schwannomas are benign tumours arising from Schwann cells of the peripheral nerve sheath. They are relatively frequent in the head and neck region (25-45%) but rarely involve in the sinonasal tract (4%). The authors outline the diagnostic difficulties and the problems in choosing the best surgical approach in two atypical cases of sinonasal Schwannomas. In the first case reported clinical data, sex and age of the patient, nasal endoscopy and angio-MRI led us to suspect an angiofibroma; therefore, we approached the case without a biopsy performing a preoperative selective embolization followed by an endoscopic resection. In the second case, due to initial visual symptoms and to the ethmoid-orbital compartment involvement, we performed a sinonasal endoscopy and collected a biopsy which resulted to be fundamental in the diagnostic assessment. Tumour excision was then obtained throughout an intracranial/endonasal approach. The two presented cases revealed the presence of cystic Schwannomas. In the first case, diagnosis was made only post-operatively after histological examination. Patients underwent complete surgical excision by means of an endoscopic sinonasal approach, in the second case associated to a left frontal craniotomy. The patients showed no signs of recurrence at a 9 months follow-up. Nasal endoscopy was extremely important in making the diagnosis, allowing an accurate assessment of the tumour extension and a biopsy. The diagnosis of sinonasal Schwannomas remains challenging; sometimes, clinical behaviour and modern imaging may be misleading. The diagnostic and therapeutic importance of sinonasal endoscopy is emphasised in the two presented cases.

  8. Giant Trigeminal Schwannoma Presenting with Obstructive Hydrocephalus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Gutierrez, Juan Carlos; Elder, Benjamin D; Olivi, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Trigeminal schwannomas represent between 0.07% and 0.36% of all intracranial tumors and 0.8% to 8% of intracranial schwannomas. Selection of the appropriate management strategy requires an understanding of the tumor’s natural history and treatment outcomes. This report describes the case of a 36-year-old male who presented with a three-month history of progressive headaches, dizziness, loss of balance, decreased sleep, and cognitive decline. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a large enhancing lesion centered around the left Meckel’s cave and extending into both the middle and the posterior fossa with obstructive hydrocephalus secondary to compression of the fourth ventricle. Resection of the posterior fossa component of the tumor was performed in order to relieve the mass effect upon the brainstem without attempting a radical removal of the middle fossa component and a potential risk of further cognitive impairment. The pathological exam confirmed the diagnosis of a trigeminal schwannoma. The residual tumor showed progressive spontaneous volumetric shrinkage after a subtotal surgical resection. This case shows the value of a planned conservative surgery in complex schwannomas and highlights the challenges in interpreting the treatment responses in these benign tumors, whether approached surgically or with stereotactic radiation techniques. PMID:26719829

  9. Spontaneous expulsion of schwannoma of epiglottis

    OpenAIRE

    1997-01-01

    A rare case of spontaneous expulsion of schwannoma of epiglottis is being reported. These are neurogenic tumours arising from the schwan sheath of peripheral, cranial and sympathetic nerves. The great majority of these neurogenic tumours originate from aryepiglottic fold or false vocal cords. However the neurofibroma of the epiglottis are quite uncommon.

  10. THE ANALYSIS OF NF2 GENE MUTATION IN SPORADIC SCHWANNOMAS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卞留贯; 孙青芳; 沈建康; 赵卫国; 罗其中

    2002-01-01

    Objective To analyze the mutation of NF2 gene (exon 2,4,6 and 13) in schwannomas. Methods The NF2 gene mutation in 36 schwannomas were observed by PCR-SSCP and DNA sequence. The proliferative index of schwannoma was detected by immunohistochemistry. Results We found 13 mutations in 36 schwannomas, including 6 deletion or insertion resulting in a frameshift, 2 nonsense mutations, 2 missense mutations, and 3 alterations affecting acceptor or donor of splicing sites in E4,E6,E13. The proliferative index of schwannomas with mutation were significantly higher than those without mutation (P< 0.05). Conclusion NF2 gene mutation is the frequent event in the tumorigenesis of schwannomas, and there is some correlation between the mutation and clinical behavior(tumor proliferation).

  11. Laryngeal schwannoma: a case report with emphasis on sonographic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Luis Ronan Marquez Ferreira de, E-mail: luisronan@gmail.com [Universidade Federal do Triangulo Mineiro (UFTM), Uberaba, MG (Brazil); De Nicola, Harley; Yamasaki, Rosiane; Pedroso, Jose Eduardo; Brasil, Osiris de Oliveira Campones do; Yamashita, Helio [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (EPM/UNIFESP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Escola Paulista de Medicina

    2014-05-15

    Schwannomas are benign nerve sheath tumors composed of Schwann cells, which normally produce the insulating myelin sheath covering peripheral, cranial and autonomic nerves. Twenty-five to forty-five percent of all schwannomas occur in the head and neck region, but location of such tumors in the larynx is rarely observed. The present report is aimed at describing a clinical case of laryngeal schwannoma, with emphasis on sonographic findings. (author)

  12. [A rare case of schwannoma of the tongue].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowski, Leszek

    2008-01-01

    Author described a rare case of lingual Schwannoma in 20 years old female. After complete surgical excision she has not shown recurrence during 2 years of follow-up. Schwannomas are peripheral nerve tumors of nerve sheath origin. Extracranial schwannoma in the head and neck region comprise 25-45% of all shwannomas, but only 1% are located intraoral and usually present as slow growing mass of long duration, producing few symptoms. The treatment is surgical excision.

  13. CT findings of esophageal schwannoma: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Man Ho; Ryu, Dae Shick; Eom, Dae Woon; Shin, Dong Rock; Choi, Soo Jung; Ahn, Jae Hong; Park, Man Soo; Yoo, Dong Kon [Gangneung Asan Hospital, College of Medicine, University of Ulsan, Gangneung (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-15

    Esophageal schwannomas are a relative rare benign neoplasm that usually occurs in the upper esophagus, in the middle aged women. We report a case of a 67-year-old man with a lower esophageal schwannoma. This lesion was composed of homogenous density, iso-attenuating with the chest wall muscle on pre- and post-contrast chest computed tomography (CT). The CT findings of the esophageal schwannoma are similar to those of esophageal leiomyoma. Hense, esophageal schwannoma may be a differential diagnosis with esophageal leiomyoma.

  14. Solitary Schwannoma in the breast: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Yun Jung; Kim, Ji Young; Park, Kyeong Mee; Han, Se Hwan; Kim, Soung Hee; Jeong, Myeong Ja; Kim, Soo Hyun [Sanggye Paik Hospital, Inje University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-08-15

    Schwannoma (neurilemoma) is a benign nerve tumor derived from the nerve sheath. The most common locations are the flexor surfaces of the extremities, and the head and the neck. Schwannoma of the breast is unusual. To our knowledge, few studies have reported the radiologic appearance of Schwannoma in the breast and there has been only one report from Korea (1-3). This tumor can be clinically and radiologically considered to be fibroadenoma, which is a common benign tumor of the breast. We describe the mammographic and sonographic findings of a case of Schwannoma in the breast.

  15. An Unusual Cause of Cardiac Arrhythmias; Mediastinal Schwannoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serdar Ozkan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Schwannomas are rare tumours, which originated from neural crest cells. Thoracic schwannomas are very rare and most commonly seen in posterior mediastinum. In a 39 year old female patient whose tumor story dated back to 4 years, a 14 cm extra parenchymal intrathoracic tumor was observed to put minimal pressure on the heart. The patient%u2019s arrhythmia, who had preoperative complaints of palpitations, was improved after tumor excision. Although schwannomas generally are asympthomatic masses, they can lead mass effect according to their localization. In this study, patient with thoracic schwannoma presented with cardiac arrhythmia which never reported in literature so far.

  16. Vestibular function testing.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lang, E E

    2010-06-01

    Vestibular symptoms of vertigo, dizziness and dysequilibrium are common complaints which can be disabling both physically and psychologically. Routine examination of the ear nose and throat and neurological system are often normal in these patients. An accurate history and thorough clinical examination can provide a diagnosis in the majority of patients. However, in a subgroup of patients, vestibular function testing may be invaluable in arriving at a correct diagnosis and ultimately in the optimal treatment of these patients.

  17. Schwannoma intralaberíntico. Descripción de un caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Antonio CÁMARA-ARNAZ

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introducción y objetivos: El schwannoma intralaberíntico es un tumor benigno muy infrecuente, de lento crecimiento extradural, localizado primariamente en el laberinto membranoso. A través de un caso clínico presentamos las características de su evolución, intentamos ofrecer una explicación fisiopatológica de la sintomatología y de los hallazgos audio-vestibulares y describimos finalmente, las diferentes opciones terapéuticas. Descripción: Se trata de una mujer de 59 años, que comienza con síntomas inespecíficos del oído izquierdo a los que posteriormente se añade una pérdida auditiva. Al confirmar que se trata de una hipoacusia unilateral no justificada, solicitamos una RM que pone de manifiesto la presencia de un pequeño tumor de 2-3 mm intravestibular, al que revisaremos periódicamente. Discusión: El origen y la prevalencia del schwannoma intralaberíntico son desconocidos. Aunque la clínica se confunde con la de otros procesos otológicos más frecuentes, la realización de RM incrementaría el número de casos diagnosticados. En función del paciente, de su sintomatología, de la evolución y de las características tumorales, se decide el tipo de tratamiento Conclusión: El schwannoma intralaberíntico debe formar parte del diagnóstico diferencial en pacientes con síntomas audio-vestibulares unilaterales y solicitar una RM de alta resolución para obtener el diagnóstico definitivo. Presentando un pronóstico excelente, la observación es considerada como la mejor opción terapéutica.

  18. Vestibular migraine: clinical and epidemiological aspects

    OpenAIRE

    Ligia Oliveira Gonçalves Morganti; Márcio Cavalcante Salmito; Juliana Antoniolli Duarte; Karina Cavalcanti Sumi; Juliana Caminha Simões; Fernando Freitas Ganança

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION: Vestibular migraine (VM) is one of the most often common diagnoses in neurotology, but only recently has been recognized as a disease. OBJECTIVE: To analyze the clinical and epidemiological profile of patients with VM. METHODS: This was a retrospective, observational, and descriptive study, with analysis of patients' records from an outpatient VM clinic. RESULTS: 94.1% of patients were females and 5.9% were males. The mean age was 46.1 years; 65.6% of patients h...

  19. Incidental diagnosis of a retroperitoneal schwannoma in a patient with chronic leukemia undergoing prostatic biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autieri, Domenico; Pastore, Antonio Luigi; Silvestri, Luigi; Leto, Antonino; Ripoli, Andrea; Palleschi, Giovanni; Porta, Natale; Petrozza, Vincenzo; Carbone, Antonio

    2012-12-30

    We present a case of retroperitoneal schwannoma incidentally diagnosed in a patient undergoing surgical drainage of a pelvic abscess as a complication of a prostatic biopsy. A 50-year-old male, suffering from lymphatic leukemia, came to our observation due to lichen ruber planus and ejaculatory pain. The patient underwent a trans-perineal ultrasound-guided biopsy of the right seminal vesicle and of a hypoechoic area documented by ultrasonography. 48 hours after the procedure, the patient had developed: cold sores, shortness of breath with dyspnea, and high fever (40°C). The patient was hospitalized, underwent an emergency CT which documented a right presacral and pararectal liquid mass (abscess). The patient underwent emergency laparotomy and drainage of the abscess. The lesion histological examination revealed a retroperitoneal schwannoma with inflammatory phenomena and hyperplasic lymphadenitis. The retroperitoneal schwannoma is a silent disease whose only clinical manifestation coincides with the compression of adjacent anatomical structures. In many cases, the symptoms, even if present, as in this case (ejaculatory pain with compression of the seminal vesicle), are non-specific, thus delaying diagnosis and the therapeutic approach.

  20. Angiosarcoma arising in schwannoma of cerebellopontine angle and later associating with meningioma in a patient with neurofibromatosis type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Yasuhiro; Hirose, Takanori; Tomono, Ayako; Kawakami, Fumi; Nakai, Tokiko; Ohbayashi, Chiho; Mizowaki, Takashi; Tanaka, Kazuhiro; Kohmura, Eiji; Itoh, Tomoo

    2014-10-01

    Here, we describe an extremely rare case of angiosarcoma arising in schwannoma of the cerebellopontine angle and later associating with meningioma in a patient with neurofibromatosis type 2. A 33-year-old disabled Japanese man with right drop foot after surgery for an unspecified tumor demonstrated multiple tumors, suspected to be schwannoma, in the bilateral cerebellopontine angles, the cervical and lumbar spinal cord, and on the right nuchal skin. Also present were several tumors in the medulla and thoracic spinal cord suspected to be ependymoma or astrocytoma. The patient was diagnosed with neurofibromatosis type 2 according to the diagnostic criteria by the U.S. National Institutes of Health. The bilateral tumors in the cerebellopontine angle were resected to reduce symptoms and brain stem compression. Histopathological analysis revealed angiosarcoma arising in schwannoma of the bilateral tumors, and angiosarcoma was proportionally larger in the right tumor than in the left. At age 36, the patient underwent a second resection of the regrown tumor in the left cerebellopontine angle, and histopathology demonstrated mixed angiosarcoma and meningioma. That angiosarcoma arises in schwannoma is a pathogenesis within the realm of conjecture, especially that the phenomenon of mixed meningioma and angiosarcoma has not been reported to date.

  1. Is Vestibular Neuritis an Immune Related Vestibular Neuropathy Inducing Vertigo?

    OpenAIRE

    Greco, A.; Macri, G. F.; Gallo, A.; M. Fusconi; DE VIRGILIO, A.; G. Pagliuca; Marinelli, C.; M. De Vincentiis

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. To review the current knowledge of the aetiology of vestibular neuritis including viral infections, vascular occlusion, and immunomediated mechanisms and to discuss the pathogenesis with relevance to pharmacotherapy. Systematic Review Methodology. Relevant publications on the aetiology and treatment of vestibular neuritis from 1909 to 2013 were analysed. Results and Conclusions. Vestibular neuritis is the second most common cause of peripheral vestibular vertigo and is due to a su...

  2. [A case of tongue base schwannoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Huishan; Yang, Feng; Zhuo, Mingying

    2013-09-01

    Published reports of benign nerve sheath tumors of the oropharynx especially at tongue base are extremely rare. They may slowly growing but represent a potential threat to the airway, prompt diagnosis and treatment are vital. To our knowledge, this case presents the rare clinical condition and the first giant one. Due to the rarity, awareness of the possibility of a schwannoma in various otolaryngological conditions is an important step in making a correct clinical diagnosis. Here we represent a rare case of a giant schwannoma that arose from valleculae projecting to supraglottis to cause swallowing difficult but no breathing problem. The mass was completely removed, and no recurrence during next 2 years follow-up.

  3. Vestibular migraine: clinical and epidemiological aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ligia Oliveira Gonçalves Morganti

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION: Vestibular migraine (VM is one of the most often common diagnoses in neurotology, but only recently has been recognized as a disease. OBJECTIVE: To analyze the clinical and epidemiological profile of patients with VM. METHODS: This was a retrospective, observational, and descriptive study, with analysis of patients' records from an outpatient VM clinic. RESULTS: 94.1% of patients were females and 5.9% were males. The mean age was 46.1 years; 65.6% of patients had had headache for a longer period than dizziness. A correlation was detected between VM symptoms and the menstrual period. 61.53% of patients had auditory symptoms, with tinnitus the most common, although tonal audiometry was normal in 68.51%. Vectoelectronystagmography was normal in 67.34%, 10.20% had hyporeflexia, and 22.44% had vestibular hyperreflexia. Electrophysiological assessment showed no abnormalities in most patients. Fasting plasma glucose and glycemic curve were normal in most patients, while the insulin curve was abnormal in 75%. 82% of individuals with MV showed abnormalities on the metabolism of carbohydrates. CONCLUSION: VM affects predominantly middle-aged women, with migraine headache representing the first symptom, several years before vertigo. Physical, auditory, and vestibular evaluations are usually normal. The most frequent vestibular abnormality was hyperreflexia. Most individuals showed abnormality related to carbohydrate metabolism.

  4. Interaural difference values of vestibular evoked myogenic.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marziyeh Moallemi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Migraine is a neurologic disease, which often is associated with a unilateral headache. Vestibular abnormalities are common in migraine. Vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs assess otolith function in particular functional integrity of the saccule and the inferior vestibular nerve. We used VEMP to evaluate if the migraine headache can affect VEMP asymmetry parameters. A total of 25 patients with migraine (22 females and 3 males who were diagnosed according to the criteria of IHS-1988 were enrolled in this cross-sectional study. Control group consisted of 26 healthy participants (18 female and 8 male, without neurotological symptoms and history of migraine. The short tone burst (95 dB nHL, 500 Hz was presented to ears. VEMP was recorded with surface electromyography over the contracted ipsilateral sternocleidomastoid (SCM muscle. Although current results showed that the amplitude ratio is greater in migraine patients than normal group, there was no statistical difference between two groups in mean asymmetry parameters of VEMP. Asymmetry measurements in vestibular evoked myogenic potentials probably are not indicators of unilateral deficient in saccular pathways of migraine patients.

  5. Pelvic schwannoma in the right parametrium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Machairiotis N

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Nikolaos Machairiotis,4 Paul Zarogoulidis,3 Aikaterini Stylianaki,1 Eleni Karatrasoglou,4 Georgia Sotiropoulou,4 Alvin Floreskou,4 Eleana Chatzi,4 Athanasia Karamani,4 Georgia Liapi,5 Eleni Papakonstantinou,5 Nikolaos Katsikogiannis,1 Nikolaos Courcoutsakis,2 Christodoulos Machairiotis4 1Surgery Department, 2Radiology Department, University General Hospital of Alexandroupolis, Democritus University of Thrace, Alexandroupolis, Greece; 3Pulmonary Department, G Papanikolaou General Hospital, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece; 4Obstetric Gynecology Department, 5Pathology Department, Thriasio General Hospital, Athens, Greece Abstract: Neurilemomas are benign usually encapsulated nerve sheath tumors derived from the Schwann cells. These tumors commonly arise from the cranial nerves as acoustic neurinomas but they are extremely rare in the pelvis and the retroperitoneal area (less than 0.5% of reported cases, unless they are combined with von Recklinghausen disease (type 1 neurofibromatosis. We report the case of a 58-year-old female with pelvic schwannoma, 6.5 × 5.5 cm in size, in the right parametrium. This is the first case reported in the literature. Based on the rarity of this tumor and in order to ensure optimum treatment and survival for our patient, we performed laparotomy with total abdominal hysterectomy and en-block tumor excision. A frozen section was taken during the surgery before complete resection of the mass, which was ambiguous. Because of the possibility of malignancy, complete excision of the mass was performed, with pelvic blunt dissection. Histological examination showed a benign neoplasm, originating from the cells of peripheral nerve sheaths; diagnosis was a schwannoma. There were degenerative areas, including cystic degeneration, hemorrhagic infiltrations, ischemic foci with pycnotic cells, and collagen replacement. Pelvic schwannomas are rare neoplasms that can be misdiagnosed. Laparoscopy is a safe

  6. Schwannoma da goteira olfatória: relato de caso Olfactory groove schwannoma: case report

    OpenAIRE

    Heider Lopes de Souza; Ana Maria de Oliveira Ramos; Carlos Cesar Formiga Ramos; Syomara Pereira da Costa Melo; Hougelle Simplício Gomes Pereira; João Flávio Gurjão Madureira; Janaína Martins de Lana

    2003-01-01

    Schwannomas intracranianos não associados a nervos cranianos são incomuns e raramente encontrados na região subfrontal. Apresentamos raro caso de schwannoma da goteira olfatória, acometendo paciente de 27 anos, masculino, com quadro iniciado há 1 ano com perda da olfação e cefaléia. Ao exame de admissão, apresentava papiledema bilateral e anosmia. Tomografia computadorizada de Cranio (TC) revelou processo expansivo bifrontal hipodenso ao parênquima, com aspecto multicístico, sem captação do c...

  7. A Case Report of Schwannoma Presenting as Sciatica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Afshar Fard

    2012-08-01

    The patient underwent operation and sciatic nerve explored via posterior tight and unique neural branch of mass dissociated of sciatic and mass resected. Pathology report confirmed Schwannoma in the patient. Conclusion: In patients with sciatic pain, schwannoma nerve is one of the differential diagnosis and it needs to be considered in assessing of patients.

  8. Pancreatic schwannoma: Report of a case and review of literature

    OpenAIRE

    Vidyadhar A Kinhal; Ravishankar, T. H. S.; Melapure, Ashok I.; Jayaprakasha, G.; Range Gowda, B. C.; Manjunath

    2010-01-01

    Connective tissue tumors of pancreas are uncommon, among them pancreatic schwannoma is very rare tumor, very few cases were reported in literature. Aggressive resections like whipple’s procedure, or distal pancreatectomy are not necessary for pancreatic schwannoma as it rarely goes to malignant change and simple enuclation is sufficient.

  9. [Case report and review of the literature: a perineal schwannoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravier, E; Lopez, J-G; Augros, M; Romy, P; Pugeat, G

    2011-05-01

    Schwannoma is a rare and benign peripheral nerve sheath tumor arising from Schwann cells. Perineal localisation is exceptional. It is most frequently isolated but can be associated with neurofibromatosis 2 or schwannomatosis. This article describes a case of perineal schwannoma, its management and update diagnosis modality and treatment of this tumor. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Schwannoma of the tongue: An unusual presentation in a child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naidu Giridhar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Schwannomas are benign tumors of nerve sheath and quite uncommon in the oral cavity. In contrast to the earlier reports in the literature, a confounding case of a lingual schwannoma presenting as a symptomatic and exophytic growth on the ventral surface of the tongue in a 12-year-old boy is discussed here.

  11. Schwannoma of the tongue: an unusual presentation in a child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidu, Giridhar S; Sinha, Samindra Mohan

    2010-01-01

    Schwannomas are benign tumors of nerve sheath and quite uncommon in the oral cavity. In contrast to the earlier reports in the literature, a confounding case of a lingual schwannoma presenting as a symptomatic and exophytic growth on the ventral surface of the tongue in a 12-year-old boy is discussed here.

  12. SCHWANNOMA IN A YOUNG MALE BREAST: A DIFFICULT DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSIS

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    Minakshi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A benign tumour of Schwann cells of the peripheral nerve sheath is called Schwannoma, also called as neurilemoma or neurinoma. Most breast cancers and other breast tumors have an epithelial cell origin, with stromal and myoepithelial cell tumors being less common. A nerve sheath tumor arising from neural crest-derived Schwann cells within the breast is rarer still. For unknown reasons, these cells can sometimes grow in a neoplastic fashion which results in a benign tumor termed as schwannoma. Neurilemoma, neurinoma, peripheral nerve sheath tumor and schwannoma are considered to be synonymous though the term schwannoma appears to be more precise than the others as this tumour is believed to arise from schwan cells. Schwannoma are commonly slow growing solitary lesions which rarely show malignant transformation. The clinical significance of this benign tumor is that it may clinically and radiographically simulate malignant neoplasm.

  13. Tongue base schwannoma: report, review, and unique surgical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawhney, Raja; Carron, Michael A; Mathog, Robert H

    2008-01-01

    Base of tongue schwannomas are exceedingly rare and therefore often are not immediately included in the differential diagnosis and treatment of oropharyngeal tumors. After a thorough review of the English literature, we found only 6 previously reported cases of tongue base schwannomas. We are contributing a report of a 37-year-old woman with progressive dysphagia, dysarthria, and large tongue base schwannoma. Diagnosis was confirmed by imaging studies and biopsy followed by surgical excision designed to preserve nerve function. A number of surgical approaches have been described for tongue base schwannomas. Each has its own degree of postoperative morbidity. The use of a unilateral transcervical incision with blunt dissection was simple and quickly accomplished with protection of nearby nerves. Histologic identification of Antoni A and B areas along with strong and diffuse staining with S-100 stain pathologically completed the diagnosis of schwannoma.

  14. Recovery from vestibular ototoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, F. O.; Gianna-Poulin, C.; Pesznecker, S. C.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Determine whether subjects with documented vestibular ototoxicity recover vestibular function and, if so, investigate the recovery dynamics. STUDY DESIGN: Prospective and retrospective reviews and repeated measures. SETTING: Clinical research and technology center. SUBJECTS: Twenty-eight subjects who received vestibulotoxic medications were followed for at least 12 months after initial treatment. CONTROLS: Our subject sample was compared with a published database of normal individuals. INTERVENTIONS: All 28 subjects received systemically administered medications known to be ototoxic. The subjects' treating physicians controlled medication, dosage, and administration schedules. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Tests of horizontal canal vestibulo-ocular function were performed. Subjects' auditory and vestibular symptoms were recorded. RESULTS: Eleven subjects (39%) showed changes in horizontal canal vestibulo-ocular gain constant (GC) and/or time constant (TC) consistent with vestibular ototoxicity. When tested 1 year after ototoxic drug administration, eight of the nine subjects who experienced ototoxic decrease in GC showed a recovery of GC to normal limits. Only one of the eight subjects who experienced ototoxic decrease in TC showed recovery of TC to within normal limits. Ototoxicity onset and recovery were independent of baseline vestibular function, and ototoxicity onset did not correlate with cumulative dose of ototoxic medication. There was no relationship between subjective symptoms and ototoxicity onset. CONCLUSIONS: Recovery of GC after vestibular ototoxicity is more commonly observed than recovery of TC. Because ototoxic changes developed and continued in an unpredictable time and manner in relation to ototoxic drug administration, we propose that once ototoxic changes in vestibulo-ocular reflex are detected, ototoxic medications should be discontinued as soon as possible.

  15. Vestibular Impairment in Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harun, Aisha; Oh, Esther S; Bigelow, Robin T; Studenski, Stephanie; Agrawal, Yuri

    2016-09-01

    Recent studies suggest an association between vestibular and cognitive function. The goal of the study was to investigate whether vestibular function was impaired in individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) compared with cognitively normal individuals. Cross-sectional study. Outpatient memory clinic and longitudinal observational study unit. Older individuals ≥55 years with MCI or AD. Age, sex, and education-matched normal controls were drawn from the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging (BLSA). Saccular and utricular function was assessed with cervical and ocular vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (c- and oVEMPs) respectively, and horizontal semicircular canal function was assessed with video head impulse testing. Presence or absence of VEMP responses, VEMP amplitude, and vestibular ocular reflex (VOR) gain were measured. Forty-seven individuals with cognitive impairment (MCI N = 15 and AD N = 32) underwent testing and were matched with 94 controls. In adjusted analyses, bilaterally absent cVEMPs were associated with an over three-fold odds of AD (OR 3.42, 95% CI 1.33-8.91, p = 0.011). One microvolt increases in both cVEMP and oVEMP amplitudes were associated with decreased odds of AD (OR 0.28, 95% CI 0.09-0.93, p = 0.038 and OR 0.92, 95% CI 0.85-0.99, p = 0.036, respectively). There was no significant difference in VOR gain between the groups. These findings confirm and extend emerging evidence of an association between vestibular dysfunction and cognitive impairment. Further investigation is needed to determine the causal direction for the link between peripheral vestibular loss and cognitive impairment.

  16. Concurrent spinal nerve root schwannoma and meningioma mimicking single-component schwannoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamizo, Akira; Suzuki, Satoshi O; Shimogawa, Takafumi; Amano, Toshiyuki; Mizoguchi, Masahiro; Yoshimoto, Koji; Sasaki, Tomio

    2012-04-01

    We present a first case of concurrent tumors consisting of schwannoma and meningioma arising at the same spinal level in a patient without neurofibromatosis. A 49-year-old man without clinical evidence of neurofibromatosis presented with a 5-month history of right neck pain. MRI demonstrated an extradural tumor involving the right-sided C2 nerve root with a small intradural component. T1- and T2-weighted and contrast-enhanced MRI could not differentiate the intradural tumor as different from the extradural tumor. Total removal of the tumors was performed. No contiguity of the extradural tumor with the intradural tumor was seen. The intradural tumor attached strongly to the dura mater around the C2 nerve root exits. Intraoperative pathological diagnosis confirmed the extradural tumor as schwannoma and the intradural tumor as meningioma. We therefore thoroughly coagulated the dura mater adjacent to the intradural tumor and resected the dura mater around the nerve root exits together with the tumor. Pathological examination revealed that the resection edge of the extradural component consisted of a spinal nerve with thickened epineurium and was free of neoplastic cells. No schwannoma component was evident in the intradural tumor. No obvious transition thus existed between the extra- and intradural tumors. Distinguishing these tumors prior to surgery is critical for determining an optimal surgical plan, as schwannoma and meningioma require different surgical procedures. We therefore recommend a careful review of preoperative imaging with the possibility of concurrent tumors in mind. © 2011 Japanese Society of Neuropathology.

  17. Vestibular Deficits Following Concussion

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    J Gordon Millichap

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Investigators from the Division of Emergency Medicine, Sports Medicine, and Department of Pediatrics, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, PA, and Sports Medicine, Somerset, NJ, performed a retrospective cohort study of 247 patients ages 5-18 years with concussion referred from July 2010 to Dec 2011; 81% of patients showed a vestibular abnormality on initial clinical examination.

  18. Cervical sympathetic chain schwannoma: A case report

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    Inès Nacef

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Nerve tumors arising from the sympathetic chain are uncommon slow-growing tumors and represent a diagnosis challenge. Their malignant degeneration is rare. Definitive pre-operative diagnosis may be difficult as investigations are not usually helpful. We report the case of a 23-year old woman who presented with an asymptomatic solitary left cervical swelling. She was evaluated with sonography and computed tomography. Complete surgical excision of the lesion was carried out and histologic examination revealed a schwannoma. Post-operatively, the patient showed clinical findings of Horner’s syndrome. Pathologic and radiological evaluation, differential diagnosis of this neoplasm and its management are discussed.

  19. Intraoperative monitoring during surgery for hypoglossal schwannoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Mami; Kusaka, Gen; Takashima, Kouichi; Kamochi, Haruna; Shinoda, Soji

    2010-08-01

    A 54-year-old man presented with an intracranial schwannoma of the hypoglossal nerve between the medulla and the left hypoglossal canal. The condylar fossa approach was used with intra-operative electromyography (EMG) monitoring of the lower cranial nerves. The tumor was then removed carefully without decreasing the tongue EMG responses. EMG monitoring enabled us to remove the tumor while maintaining the function of the hypoglossal nerve. Tongue EMG was easily recorded by stimulating the hypoglossal nerve fibers, which was useful in identifying the hypoglossal nerve and evaluating its function. This suggests that tongue EMG is a useful monitoring tool to enhance neurological outcome following removal of tumors in this region.

  20. SCHWANNOMA OF THE TONGUE - A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satyananda Rao

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: A case report of an 18 - year - old young girl presented with a slow - growing, painless swelling on the right side of the tongue since 4 years. This was associated with disturbances in mastication. Examination revealed a 3 cm x 4 cm, globular smooth, mobile mass on right side of the tongue. There was no neurological deficit and no neck nodes palpable. She underwent excision of the mass under general anaesthesia. Complete enucleation with primary closure was carried out. The patient had an uneventful postoperative recovery and histo patho logical evaluation was consistent with schwannoma. The patient is recurrence free till date

  1. Retroperitoneal ancient schwannoma: Review of clinico-radiological features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loke, T.K.L.; Lo, K.K.L.; Lo, J.; Chan, J.C.S. [United Christian Hospital, Kwun Tong, (Hong Kong). Department of Diagnostics Radiology; Yuen, N.W.F. [United Christian Hospital, Kwun Tong, (Hong Kong). Department of Histopathology

    1998-05-01

    A case is reported here of an ancient schwannoma in the retroperitoneum. The findings of abdominal ultrasound and CT in a patient with a retroperitoneal ancient schwannoma are presented, and the clinical and radiological features of this unusual tumour are reviewed. The presence of a large, well-delineated complex cystic mass in the deep soft tissues should raise the possibility of an ancient schwannoma. It is important to recognize these tumours as benign with excellent prognosis so as to avoid unnecessary radical surgery. Copyright (1998) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd 12 refs., 2 figs.

  2. Loss of lingual sensitivity and slightly increased size signaling schwannoma in a patient with mixed conjunctive tissue disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, D C; Nogueira, G; Cancio, V A; Cavalcante, F S; Godefroy, P; Sousa, D S C; Hespanhol, W; dos Santos, K R N; Cavalcante, M A B

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe an unusual case of a lingual schwannoma associated with a mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD). A case report. A lingual schwannoma with loss of lingual sensitivity and slightly increased size in an 18-year-old patient with MCTD was correctly diagnosed through a biopsy and no reoccurrence was observed one year after the surgical removal of the tumor and sensitivity returned 3 months after surgery. This case was considered uncommon, making the clinical diagnosis challenging in view of the diversity of possibilities for its differential diagnosis, thus showing the importance of a biopsy to confirm the diagnosis and long term follow up in such cases.

  3. Is Vestibular Neuritis an Immune Related Vestibular Neuropathy Inducing Vertigo?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Greco

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To review the current knowledge of the aetiology of vestibular neuritis including viral infections, vascular occlusion, and immunomediated mechanisms and to discuss the pathogenesis with relevance to pharmacotherapy. Systematic Review Methodology. Relevant publications on the aetiology and treatment of vestibular neuritis from 1909 to 2013 were analysed. Results and Conclusions. Vestibular neuritis is the second most common cause of peripheral vestibular vertigo and is due to a sudden unilateral loss of vestibular function. Vestibular neuronitis is a disorder thought to represent the vestibular-nerve equivalent of sudden sensorineural hearing loss. Histopathological studies of patients who died from unrelated clinical problems have demonstrated degeneration of the superior vestibular nerve. The characteristic signs and symptoms include sudden and prolonged vertigo, the absence of auditory symptoms, and the absence of other neurological symptoms. The aetiology and pathogenesis of the condition remain unknown. Proposed theories of causation include viral infections, vascular occlusion, and immunomediated mechanisms. The management of vestibular neuritis involves symptomatic treatment with antivertiginous drugs, causal treatment with corticosteroids, and physical therapy. Antiviral agents did not improve the outcomes.

  4. Benign schwannoma in supraclavicular region: a false-positive lymph node recurrence of breast cancer suspected by PET scan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perniola, Giorgia; Tomao, Federica; Fischetti, Margherita; Lio, Stephanie; Pecorella, Irene; Benedetti Panici, Pierluigi

    2014-09-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is the most accurate imaging modalities to detect malignancies. And it helps to take decisions regarding diagnosis, staging, recurrence, and therapeutical management. We report a case of a suspected supraclavicular lymph node relapse, diagnosed by PET-CT in a breast cancer patient. The lymph node was surgically removed in outpatient with local anesthesia. Histological findings diagnosed a benign Schwannoma. In this patient PET-CT failed to distinguish benign tumors from metastatic supraclavicular lymph nodes. This case confirms the need to investigate histologically suspected supraclavicular lesions, during breast cancer follow up.

  5. Caffeine effect in vestibular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledesma, Alleluia Lima Losno; Barreto, Monique Antunes de Souza Chelminski; Bahmad, Fayez

    2014-01-01

    Caffeine benefits and harms in health is a very controversial subject for a scientific research. This is a systematic literature using PubMed database linking caffeine with the following keywords: 'vestibular', 'vertigo', 'vestibular function', 'caloric tests' e 'electronystagmography". Thirty articles were found and ten were analyzed for fulfill the inclusion criteria. These ten articles were grouped and then a separated in four groups, according to the approach. There is a need of further randomized and controlled studies to understand the vestibular system.

  6. Spinal accessory nerve schwannomas masquerading as a fourth ventricular lesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shyam Sundar Krishnan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Schwannomas are benign lesions that arise from the nerve sheath of cranial nerves. The most common schwannomas arise from the 8 th cranial nerve (the vestibulo-cochlear nerve followed by trigeminal and facial nerves and then from glossopharyngeal, vagus, and spinal accessory nerves. Schwannomas involving the oculomotor, trochlear, abducens and hypoglossal nerves are very rare. We report a very unusual spinal accessory nerve schwannoma which occupied the fourth ventricle and extended inferiorly to the upper cervical canal. The radiological features have been detailed. The diagnostic dilemma was due to its midline posterior location mimicking a fourth ventricular lesion like medulloblastoma and ependymoma. Total excision is the ideal treatment for these tumors. A brief review of literature with tabulations of the variants has been listed.

  7. An enigmatic clinical entity: A new case of olfactory schwannoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manto, Andrea; Manzo, Gaetana; De Gennaro, Angela; Martino, Vincenzo; Buono, Vincenzo; Serino, Antonietta

    2016-06-01

    Olfactory schwannomas, also described as subfrontal or olfactory groove schwannomas, are very rare tumors, whose pathogenesis is still largely debated. We report a case of olfactory schwannoma in a 39-year-old woman who presented with anosmia and headache. The clinical examination did not show lesions in the nose-frontal region and there was no history of neurofibromatosis. Head MRI and CT scan revealed a lobulated extra-axial mass localized in the right anterior cranial fossa that elevated the ipsilateral frontal pole. Bilateral frontal craniotomy demonstrated a tumor strictly attached to the right portion of the cribriform plate that surrounded the right olfactory tract, not clearly identifiable. The immunohistochemical analysis suggested the diagnosis of typical schwannoma. The patient was discharged without any neurological deficit and a four-month postoperative MRI scan of the brain showed no residual or recurrent tumor. © The Author(s) 2016.

  8. A rare Cervical Nerve Root, C2-C3 Schwannoma

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    Nilesh Chordia

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Schwannomas, neurilemmomas or neurinomas are benign nerve sheath tumors deriving from Schwann cells that occur in the head and neck region in 25-45% of cases 1 .About 10% of schwannoma that occur in the head and neck region generally originate from the vagus or sympathetic nervous system, those arising from C2 nerve root are extremely rare. 2 Preoperative imaging studies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and computed tomography (CT are used to distinguish its location and origin. The treatment of schwannoma is surgical resection, with several surgical modalities have been introduced to preserve the neurological function. We present a rare case of Cervical nerve (C2-C3 root schwannoma of 70 years old male who presented with lateral neck swelling with no neurological deficit ,swelling which also had intervertebral part was removed successfully through neck incision with no post-operative neurological symptoms

  9. Schwannoma of the base of tongue – A rare presentation

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    M. Panduranga Kamath

    2014-03-01

    Conclusion: Schwannomas arising in the base of tongue are rare and are not often included in the differential diagnosis. They are usually benign and have excellent prognosis as compared to the usual malignant lesions which occur in the tongue base.

  10. Isolated tongue tremor after gamma knife radiosurgery for acoustic schwannoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Sun J; Im, Joo-Hyuk; Lee, Jae-Hong; Cho, A-Hyun; Kwon, Miseon; Lee, Myoung C

    2005-01-01

    We describe a patient who had an isolated tongue tremor with an audible click after gamma knife radiosurgery for acoustic schwannoma. The nature of the tongue tremor was clearly demonstrated by videofluoroscopy. The possible pathogenic mechanisms are discussed.

  11. Drug therapy for peripheral vestibular vertigo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. M. Antonenko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The choice of effective treatments for vestibular vertigo is one of the important problems, by taking into account the high prevalence of peripheral vestibular diseases. Different drugs, such as vestibular suppressants for the relief of acute vertigo attacks and vestibular compensation stimulants for rehabilitation treatment, are used to treat vestibular vertigo. Drug therapy in combination with vestibular exercises is effective in patients with vestibular neuronitis, Meniere's disease, so is that with therapeutic maneuvers in patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. The high therapeutic efficacy and safety of betahistines permit their extensive use for the treatment of various vestibular disorders.

  12. Sciatica due to Schwannoma at the Sciatic Notch

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    Yavuz Haspolat

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Schwannomas are rarely seen on the sciatic nerve and can cause sciatica. In this case report we aimed to present an unusual location of schwannoma along sciatic nerve that causes sciatica. A 60-years-old-man was admitted to us with complaints of pain on his thigh and paresthesia on his foot. Radiography of the patient revealed a solitary lesion on the sciatic nerve. The lesion was excised and the symptoms resolved after surgery.

  13. SCHWANNOMA OF TONGUE, A RARE INTRAORAL NEOPLASM: CASE REPORT

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Schwannomas are truly encapsulated neoplasms of the human body and are always solitary. Only 1-2% occur intraorally with tongue being the most common site. A 20yr old male presented with a painless, slow growing swelling on the left side of the tongue for the past 1 year. Fine needle aspiration cytology was done and a benign mesenchymal lesion, possibility of Schwannoma was given. Biopsy of the tumour was performed and sent for histopathological examination which confirmed the diagnosis of Sc...

  14. Ancient schwannoma of the tongue: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilici, Suat; Akpınar, Meltem; Yiğit, Ozgür; Günver, Feray

    2011-01-01

    A 45-year-old male patient had left sided submucosal swelling extending backwards from the tip of the tongue disturbing articulation and swallowing. Submucosally located lesion was 3 x 2 x 1.5 cm in size and totally excised under local anesthesia. In this article, we present a case of ancient schwannoma of tongue. Although a very rare entity, ancient schwannoma should be considered in differential diagnosis of tongue lesions.

  15. A columellar deformity caused by a congenital schwannoma

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    Mohamed El Bouihi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Schwannoma is a benign neoplasm arising from Schwann cells of the peripheral nerve. It very rarely located in the nasal tip. We report two cases of congenital schwannoma of the nasal columella and discuss the surgical approach of such tumor.Case report: Case 1: An 18 year-old female was referred to us for a very slow growing tumor of the columella. The deformity had been present since the birth. The patient underwent an excision of its tumor using an open rhinoplasty approach. The histological examination revealed a schwannoma. No recurrence was found within 2 years of follow up.Case 2: A 4 month male baby presenting a congenital tumor of his columella. He underwent an excision using open rhinoplasty approach. The histological examination showed a plexiform schwannoma.Discussion: Schwannoma of the nasal tip is a benign tumor that gradually causes aesthetic and functional disorders. Congenital schwannoma of columella is an extremely rare clinical situation. Its diagnosis and treatment can pose certain challenges. The treatment is surgical excision and histological analysis of the specimen. Open rhinoplasty approach provided a good surgical exploration and a good cosmetic result on this nasal tip tumor.

  16. Plexiform (multinodular) schwannoma of soft palate. Report of a case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapetanakis, Stylianos; Vasileiadis, Ioannis; Petousis, Aristotelis; Fiska, Aliki; Stavrianaki, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Plexiform schwannoma is a rare benign neoplasm of the neural sheath characterized by a multinodular plexiform growth pattern. Only 5% of schwannomas have a plexiform or multinodular growth pattern. Schwannoma apparently derives from the Schwann cells. Extracranially, 25% of all schwannomas are located in the head and neck region, but only 1% show an intraoral origin. The intraoral lesions show a predilection for the tongue, followed by the palate, buccal mucosa, lip and gingival. Microscopic examination is necessary to confirm the diagnosis. Characteristic histological signs are the palisading of the spindle-shaped Schwann cells around the central acellular area, so called Verocay bodies. We report a case of a 21-year-old woman with a smooth mass of the soft palate that was gradually increasing. Surgical excision of the mass was done and the histopathology and immunohistochemistry study of the excised lesion revealed a multinodular plexiform schwannoma of the soft palate. The patient is under regular clinical control, with no signs of recurrence after 17 months. Plexiform schwannomas of the soft palate are mentioned very rarely in the English literature. This rare benign tumor is worthy of recognition because it can be misdiagnosed as plexiform neurofibroma.

  17. Vestibular compensation and vestibular rehabilitation. Current concepts and new trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deveze, A; Bernard-Demanze, L; Xavier, F; Lavieille, J-P; Elziere, M

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this review is to present the current knowledge of the mechanisms underlying the vestibular compensation and demonstrating how the vestibular rehabilitation is conducted to help the recovery of balance function. Vestibular rehabilitation is based on improving the natural phenomenon called vestibular compensation that occurs after acute vestibular disturbance or chronic and gradual misbalance. Central compensation implies three main mechanisms namely adaptation, substitution and habituation. The compensation, aided by the rehabilitation aimed to compensate and/or to correct the underused or misused of the visual, proprioceptive and vestibular inputs involved in the postural control. As the strategy of equilibration is not corrected, the patient is incompletely cured and remains with inappropriate balance control with its significance on the risk of fall and impact on quality of life. The vestibular rehabilitation helps to correct inappropriate strategy of equilibrium or to accelerate a good but slow compensation phenomenon. Nowadays, new tools are more and more employed for the diagnosis of vestibular deficit (that may include various sources of impairment), the assessment of postural deficit, the control of the appropriate strategy as well to facilitate the efficiency of the rehabilitation especially in elderly people.

  18. Vestibular tributaries to the vein of the vestibular aqueduct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Jesper Marsner; Qvortrup, Klaus; Friis, Morten

    2011-01-01

    The vein of the vestibular aqueduct drains blood from areas extensively lined by vestibular dark cells (VDCs). A possible involvement in the pathogenesis of an impaired endolymphatic homeostasis can be envisioned at the level of the dark cells area. The aim of this study was to investigate the vascular relationship between the vein of the vestibular aqueduct and the vestibular apparatus, with focus on the VDCs. Sixteen male Wistar rats were divided into groups of 6 and 10. In the first group, 2 μm thick sections including the vein of the vestibular aqueduct, utricle, and crista ampullaris of the lateral ampulla were examined by light microscopy and computer-generated three-dimensional imaging. In the second group, ultrathin sections including venules and VDCs were examined by transmission electron microscopy. A microvascular network was observed in close relation to the VDCs in the utricle and the crista ampullaris of the lateral semicircular canal in the vestibular apparatus. One major vein emanated from these networks, which emptied into the vein of the vestibular aqueduct. Veins draining the saccule and the common crus of the superior and posterior semicircular canals were likewise observed to merge with the vein of the vestibular aqueduct.

  19. Advances in the diagnosis and treatment of vestibular disorders: psychophysics and prosthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Richard F

    2015-04-01

    Although vestibular disorders are common and often disabling, they remain difficult to diagnose and treat. For these reasons, considerable interest has been focused on developing new ways to identify peripheral and central vestibular abnormalities and on new therapeutic options that could benefit the numerous patients who remain symptomatic despite optimal therapy. In this review, I focus on the potential utility of psychophysical vestibular testing and vestibular prosthetics. The former offers a new diagnostic approach that may prove to be superior to the current tests in some circumstances; the latter may be a way to provide the brain with information about head motion that restores some elements of the information normally provided by the vestibular labyrinth. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/355089-08$15.00/0.

  20. Vestibular tributaries to the vein of the vestibular aqueduct

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jesper Marsner; Qvortrup, Klaus; Friis, Morten

    2010-01-01

    CONCLUSION: The vein of the vestibular aqueduct drains blood from areas extensively lined by vestibular dark cells (VDCs). A possible involvement in the pathogenesis of an impaired endolymphatic homeostasis can be envisioned at the level of the dark cells area. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study...... was to investigate the vascular relationship between the vein of the vestibular aqueduct and the vestibular apparatus, with focus on the VDCs. METHODS: Sixteen male Wistar rats were divided into groups of 6 and 10. In the first group, 2 µm thick sections including the vein of the vestibular aqueduct, utricle......, and crista ampullaris of the lateral ampulla were examined by light microscopy and computer-generated three-dimensional imaging. In the second group, ultrathin sections including venules and VDCs were examined by transmission electron microscopy. RESULTS: A microvascular network was observed in close...

  1. The vestibular implant: Quo vadis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond eVan De Berg

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available AbstractObjective: to assess the progress of the development of the vestibular implant and its feasibility short-term. Data sources: a search was performed in Pubmed, Medline and Embase. Key words used were vestibular prosth* and vestibular implant. The only search limit was language: English or Dutch. Additional sources were medical books, conference lectures and our personal experience with per-operative vestibular stimulation in patients selected for cochlear implantation.Study selection: all studies about the vestibular implant and related topics were included and evaluated by two reviewers. No study was excluded since every study investigated different aspects of the vestibular implant. Data extraction and synthesis: data was extracted by the first author from selected reports, supplemented by additional information, medical books conference lectures. Since each study had its own point of interest with its own outcomes, it was not possible to compare data of different studies. Conclusion: to use a basic vestibular implant in humans seems feasible in the very near future. Investigations show that electric stimulation of the canal nerves induces a nystagmus which corresponds to the plane of the canal which is innervated by the stimulated nerve branch. The brain is able to adapt to a higher baseline stimulation, while still reacting on a dynamic component. The best response will be achieved by a combination of the optimal stimulus (stimulus profile, stimulus location, precompensation, complemented by central vestibular adaptation. The degree of response will probably vary between individuals, depending on pathology and their ability to adapt.

  2. Bilateral hypoglossal schwannoma: a radiologic diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bektaş, Devrim; Caylan, Refik

    2004-01-01

    A 53-year-old woman presented with a complaint of a sore throat. Examination showed a left-sided atrophy of the tongue. Upon protrusion, the tongue deviated to the left, suggestive of a unilateral hypoglossal nerve palsy. Computed tomography revealed enlarged hypoglossal canals. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated bilateral hypoglossal canal masses, with enhancement following gadolinium administration. Magnetic resonance angiography and MRI with fat suppression revealed nonvascular masses in both hypoglossal canals. Radiological diagnosis of bilateral hypoglossal nerve schwannoma was made and the patient was scheduled for MRI monitoring with six-month intervals. The size of the masses and the clinical manifestations remained unchanged during a two-year follow-up period.

  3. Intradural microsurgery and extradural gamma knife surgery for hypoglossal schwannoma: case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, A; Miyake, H; Tsuji, M; Ukita, T; Nishihara, K; Ohmura, T

    2007-12-01

    There have been only 26 cases of hypoglossal schwannomas reported to originate intradurally and extend extradurally into the hypoglossal canal. This 31-year-old mother of two children presented with a 5-day history of progressive headache, nausea, vomiting and vertigo. Her neurological exam was significant for nystagmus and left tongue deviation with marked atrophy. An initial head CT revealed extensive left hypoglossal canal erosion with 4th ventricle compression. T1-weighted MR images with contrast revealed a 4x3 cm left cerebellopontine angle non-homogeneously enhancing mass with an intracranial cystic component and prominent extension into the eroded hypoglossal canal. A left lateral suboccipital craniotomy was performed for subtotal microsurgical resection of the intradural posterior fossa mass. A schwannoma was diagnosed after resection and gamma knife surgery (GKS) was performed three months later for the extradural residual tumor without further deficits. This is a rare report of a hypoglossal schwannoma in a young patient who was treated with a multimodality approach in order to minimize risks. A review of the literature and discussion of the respective benefits of microsurgery versus GKS and long-term follow-up issues are presented.

  4. Role of cervical vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials testing in vestibular migraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enass Sayed Mohamed

    2015-07-01

    Conclusion: cVEMP is a useful complementary tool for testing vestibular function in vestibular migraine. Reduced cVEMP amplitude or absent response were the most frequent features in vestibular migraine. The saccule and or the sacculo-collic pathway are affected in vestibular migraine, with more tendencies for peripheral vestibular dysfunction in our patient group.

  5. Posterior fossa vermian cystic schwannoma mimicking as pilocytic astrocytoma: A case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alok Umredkar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Intraparenchymal schwannomas are rare and most of the reported cases are in supratentorial region with frontal lobe being most common. Infratentorial location is very rare. We report a posterior fossa midline large cystic schwannoma with mural nodule mimicking as pilocytic astrocytoma. The pathogenesis and neuroradiological findings of intraparenchymal schwannomas are discussed with review of the related literature.

  6. Spontaneous acute hemorrhage of intraspinal canal cellular schwannoma with paraplegia: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Heng-Zhu; Li, Yuping; Han, Yang; Wang, Xiaodong; She, Lei; Yan, Zhengcun; Dong, Lun

    2015-06-01

    Cellular schwannoma, an unusual histological subtype of schwannoma, is a benign hypercellular variant of a peripheral nerve sheath tumor. We report a 48-year-old woman with sudden onset of paraplegia. The complete surgical resection was achieved. This is the first report about intraspinal canal cellular schwannoma following spontaneous acute hemorrhage and paraplegia.

  7. Tumor Occupation in the Spinal Canal and Clinical Symptoms of Cauda Equina Schwannoma: An Analysis of 22 Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakane, Masataka; Abe, Tetsuya; Nakagawa, Tsukasa; Sakai, Shinsuke; Tatsumura, Masaki; Funayama, Toru; Yamazaki, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective, radiological study. Purpose To determine the relationship between clinical symptoms and the extent of tumor occupation of the spinal canal by cauda equina schwannoma. Overview of Literature Little is known about the relationship between the size of tumors of the cauda equina and the manifestation of clinical symptoms. We analyzed this relationship by estimating the percentage of tumor occupation (PTO) in the spinal canal in cauda equina schwannomas and by correlating this parameter with the presence and severity of clinical symptoms. Methods Twenty-two patients (9 men and 13 women; age, 19–79 years; mean age, 55.3 years) who were radiologically diagnosed with schwannomas of the cauda equina between April 2004 and July 2014 were retrospectively analyzed. PTO was measured in axial and sagittal magnetic resonance imaging slices in which the cross-sectional area of the tumor was the largest. Data regarding clinical symptoms and results of physical examinations were collected from patient medical records. PTO differences between symptom-positive and -negative groups were analyzed for each variable. Results In the 4 cases in which tumor presence was not related to clinical symptoms, PTO was 5%–10% (mean, 9%) in axial slices and 23%–31% (mean, 30%) in sagittal slices. In the 18 cases in which symptoms were associated with the tumor, PTO was 11%–86% (mean, 50%) in axial slices and 43%–88% (mean, 71%) in sagittal slices. PTO in axial slices was significantly higher in the presence of Déjèrine symptoms and/or muscle weakness, a positive straight leg raise test, and a positive Kemp sign. Conclusions PTO >20% in axial slices and >40% in sagittal slices can be an indication of symptomatic cauda equina schwannoma. PMID:27994784

  8. [Some characteristics of vertigo in vestibular neuronitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skliut, I A; Likhachev, S A; Rybina, O V

    2004-01-01

    The authors present a detailed clinical analysis of objective neurological symptoms and vertigo in patients with vestibular neuronitis. Diagnostic criteria are specified allowing differentiation between vertigo and dizziness, pathognomonic signs of vestibular neuronitis are outlined. Peripheral location of the pathological process in vestibular neuronitis is suggested. How rotating vertigo is forming in patients with vestibular neuronitis is hypothesized.

  9. Need for facial reanimation after operations for vestibular schwannoma: patients perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tos, Tina; Caye-Thomasen, Per; Stangerup, Sven-Eric

    2003-01-01

    year postoperatively and self-evaluated by each patient according to the House-Brackmann scale at the time of the questionnaire. The patients' self-evaluation was more pessimistic than that of the professionals with 26% reporting House-Brackmann grade IV-VI, compared with 20%. One hundred and seventeen...

  10. Low Frequency Fluctuated Hearing Loss in a Case with Vestibular Schwannomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahin Sedaei

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available A 34-year-old female with a history of a sudden mild left-sided hearing loss and high-pitched tinnitus along with fullness in the same ear was referred to the audiology clinic. Hearing fluctuation and variability in other symptoms were also reported. Although no complain of any vertigo or balance disorder was mentioned, light headedness was implied. Differential diagnosis of endolymphatic Fistula and retro cochlear lesion was demanded. Audiologic and radiologic findings of this patient are presented in the article to discuss findings regarding the diagnosis of the suspected disorder.

  11. ErbB2 Trafficking and Signaling in Human Vestibular Schwannomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-01

    human VSs resected from 2 patients with NF2. These cell lines were generated by transfection with HPV E6 / E7 , similar to the HEI193 cells, in...S 51 8A m er lin -S 51 8D merlin RhoGDI Figure 4. IAVS2 NF2 cell line generated by HPV E6 / E7 transformation of cultured VS cells from an NF2...minutes. Mouse anti-erbB2 (Ab-2, 1:400; Oncogene Research Products, San Diego, CA, USA), diluted in blocking buffer, was then incubated overnight at

  12. Need for facial reanimation after operations for vestibular schwannoma: patients perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tos, Tina; Caye-Thomasen, Per; Stangerup, Sven-Eric

    2003-01-01

    (15%) of 779 patients considered their facial palsy to be a big problem and 125 patients (16%) were interested in surgical treatment for the sequelae of facial palsy. Seventy-eight (10%) had already had some kind of operation, usually the VII-XII coaptation. Thirty-three of 61 patients who had already...... been operated on for facial palsy were interested in further surgical treatment. One hundred and ninety-five patients (25%) had some kind of operation on the eye, mostly (88%) a tarsorrhaphy. Reanimation procedures such as a palpebral gold weight or a spring, apparently still have a small place...

  13. Pituitary adenoma and vestibular schwannoma: Case report and review of the literature

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    Niu Y

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The concurrence of the intracranial multiple primary tumors (MPTs consisting of acoustic neuroma (AN and pituitary adenoma is very rare. Here, we report a 42-year-old female who presented with left AN associated with pituitary adenoma. A total of three such cases have been reported before and which also presented with left AN with pituitary adenoma. Recently, a new "field cancerization" model has been proposed, which could explain MPTs and is consistent with the pathogenesis of such cases. The model also indicates that when a pituitary tumor or AN is detected separately, we might consider the development of "expanding field" after oncological treatment especially after radiotherapy in order to prevent the second field tumor occurring.

  14. Need for facial reanimation after operations for vestibular schwannoma: patients perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tos, Tina; Caye-Thomasen, Per; Stangerup, Sven-Eric;

    2003-01-01

    been operated on for facial palsy were interested in further surgical treatment. One hundred and ninety-five patients (25%) had some kind of operation on the eye, mostly (88%) a tarsorrhaphy. Reanimation procedures such as a palpebral gold weight or a spring, apparently still have a small place...

  15. Partial Recovery of Audiological, Vestibular, and Radiological Findings following Spontaneous Intralabyrinthine Haemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Pézier

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The diagnosis, work-up, and treatment of sudden sensorineural hearing loss and sudden vestibular loss vary widely between units. With the increasing access to both magnetic resonance imaging and objective vestibular testing, our understanding of the various aetiologies at hand is increasing. Despite this, the therapeutic options are limited and without a particularly strong evidence base. We present a rare, yet increasingly diagnosed, case of intralabyrinthine haemorrhage (ILH together with radiological, audiological, and vestibular test results. Of note, this occurred spontaneously and has shown partial recovery in all the mentioned modalities.

  16. Severe progressive sensorineural hearing loss improved after removal of large jugular foramen schwannoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oishi, Naoki; Kohno, Naoyuki; Shiokawa, Yoshiaki

    2011-06-01

    We report a very rare case of hearing improvement after removal of the intracranial part of a jugular foramen schwannoma (JFS) presenting with chronic and severe progressive sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL). The patient presented with progressive hearing impairment in his right ear, lasting 2 years. The patient's pure tone audiogram revealed severe SNHL. His speech discrimination score (SDS) was 0%. Auditory-evoked brain responses (ABRs) comprised only I waves following 30-100dB stimulation, although distortion-product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) had good responses. These test results indicated that his hearing impairment was retrocochlear SNHL. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed within the right jugular foramen a large intracranial-extracranial tumor that compressed the brainstem. The intracranial part of the tumor was resected through retrosigmoidal craniotomy, and the tumor was pathologically diagnosed as a schwannoma. Several months after the operation, the patient's auditory thresholds improved to a level consistent with mild SNHL, ABR V waves emerged following 60-90dB stimulation, and SDS improved significantly to 95%. This case demonstrates that hearing improvement can be achieved after surgery for JFS presenting with severe and chronic progressive SNHL, and that good DPOAE responses and the presence of ABR I waves may be predictors of postoperative hearing recovery in JFS.

  17. Concurrent spinal schwannoma and meningioma mimicking a single cervical dumbbell-shaped tumor: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oichi, Takeshi; Chikuda, Hirotaka; Morikawa, Teppei; Mori, Harushi; Kitamura, Daisuke; Higuchi, Junya; Taniguchi, Yuki; Matsubayashi, Yoshitaka; Oshima, Yasushi; Tanaka, Sakae

    2015-12-01

    Dumbbell-shaped tumors consisting of 2 different tumors are extremely rare. Herein, the authors present a case of concurrent spinal schwannoma and meningioma mimicking a single cervical dumbbell-shaped tumor. A 64-year-old man presented with a 5-year history of gradually exacerbating left occipital pain without clinical evidence of neurofibromatosis. Magnetic resonance imaging showed an extradural tumor along the left C-2 nerve root with a small intradural component. The tumor was approached via a C-1 hemilaminectomy. The intradural tumor was resected together with the extradural tumor after opening the dura mater. The intradural tumor was attached to the dura mater around the exit point of the C-2 nerve root. Intraoperative biopsy revealed that the extradural tumor was a schwannoma and that the intradural tumor was a meningioma. The dura mater adjacent to the tumor was then coagulated and resected. Postoperative pathological examination confirmed the same diagnoses with no evidence of continuity between the intra- and extradural components. The patient's postoperative clinical course was uneventful. Clinicians should be aware that cervical dumbbell-shaped tumors can consist of 2 different tumors.

  18. Gastric schwannomas: radiological features with endoscopic and pathological correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, H.S. [Department of Radiology, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seodaemoon-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ha, H.K. [Department of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Songpa-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: hkha@amc.seoul.kr; Won, H.J.; Byun, J.H.; Shin, Y.M.; Kim, A.Y.; Kim, P.N.; Lee, M.-G. [Department of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Songpa-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, G.H. [Internal Medicine, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Songpa-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, M.J. [Pathology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Songpa-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-05-15

    Aim: To describe the radiological, endoscopic, and pathological findings of gastric schwannomas in 16 patients. Materials and methods: The radiological, endoscopic, and pathological findings of 16 surgically proven cases of gastric schwannoma were retrospectively reviewed. All patients underwent computed tomography (CT) and four patients were evaluated with upper gastrointestinal series. Two radiologists reviewed the CT and upper gastrointestinal series images by consensus with regard to tumour size, contour, margin, and growth pattern, the presence or absence of ulcer, cystic change, and the CT enhancement pattern. Endoscopy was performed in eight of these 16 patients. Six patients underwent endoscopic ultrasonography. Pathological specimens were obtained from and reviewed in all 16 patients. Immunohistochemistry was performed for c-kit, CD34, smooth muscle actin, and S-100 protein. Results: On radiographic examination, gastric schwannomas appeared as submucosal tumours with the CT features of well-demarcated, homogeneous, and uncommonly ulcerated masses. Endoscopy with endoscopic ultrasonography demonstrated homogeneous, submucosal masses contiguous with the muscularis propria in all six examined cases. On pathological examination, gastric schwannomas appeared as well-circumscribed and homogeneous tumours in the muscularis propria and consisted microscopically of interlacing bundles of spindle cells. Strong positivity for S-100 protein was demonstrated in all 16 cases on immunohistochemistry. Conclusion: Gastric schwannomas appear as submucosal tumours of the stomach and have well-demarcated and homogeneous features on CT, endoscopic ultrasonography, and gross pathology. Immunohistochemistry consistently reveals positivity for S-100 protein in the tumours.

  19. Raman spectroscopy and immunohistochemistry for schwannoma characterization: a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neto, Lazaro P. M.; das Chagas, Maurilio J.; Carvalho, Luis Felipe C. S.; Ferreira, Isabelle; dos Santos, Laurita; Haddad, Marcelo; Loddi, Vinicius; Martin, Airton A.

    2016-03-01

    The schwannomas is a tumour of the tissue that covers nerves, called the nerve sheath. Schwannomas are often benign tumors of the Schwan cells, which are the principal glia of the peripheral nervous system (PNS). Preoperative diagnosis of this lesion usually is difficult, therefore, new techniques are being studied as pre surgical evaluation. Among these, Raman spectroscopy, that enables the biochemical identification of the tissue analyzed by their optical properties, may be used as a tool for schwannomas diagnosis. The aim of this study was to discriminate between normal nervous tissue and schwannoma through the confocal Raman spectroscopy and Raman optical fiber-based techniques combined with immunohistochemical analysis. Twenty spectra were analyzed from a normal nerve tissue sample (10) and schwannoma (10) by Holospec f / 1.8 (Kayser Optical Systems) coupled to an optical fiber with a 785nm laser line source. The data were pre-processed and vector normalized. The average analysis and standard deviation was performed associated with cluster analysis. AML, 1A4, CD34, Desmin and S-100 protein markers were used for immunohistochemical analysis. Immunohistochemical analysis was positive only for protein S-100 marker which confirmed the neural schwanomma originality. The immunohistochemistry analysis were important to determine the source of the injury, whereas Raman spectroscopy were able to differentiated tissues types indicating important biochemical changes between normal and benign neoplasia.

  20. Presbivértigo: ejercicios vestibulares Presbivertigo: vestibular exercises

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    Esther Bernal Valls

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available El uso de ejercicios en el tratamiento de pacientes con déficit vestibular crónico está incrementándose de forma notable, lo que evidencia que se trata de un procedimiento que resulta beneficioso para este tipo de pacientes. Los buenos resultados que se obtienen sugieren que los ejercicios vestibulares dan lugar a una estabilidad postural y a una disminución de la sensación de desequilibrio.The use of exercises in the treatment of patients with vestibular deficits is increasing in a representative way, what evidences this is a profitable process for this kind of patients. The good results suggest that vestibular exercises permit a postural stability and a decrease in the perception of disequilibrium.

  1. Outcomes after vestibular rehabilitation and Wii® therapy in patients with chronic unilateral vestibular hypofunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdecchia, Daniel H; Mendoza, Marcela; Sanguineti, Florencia; Binetti, Ana C

    2014-01-01

    Vestibular rehabilitation therapy is an exercise-based programme designed to promote central nervous system compensation for inner ear deficit. The objective of the present study was to analyse the differences in the perception of handicap, the risk of falls, and gaze stability in patients diagnosed with chronic unilateral vestibular hypofunction before and after vestibular rehabilitation treatment with complementary Wii® therapy. A review was performed on the clinical histories of patients in the vestibular rehabilitation area of a university hospital between April 2009 and May 2011. The variables studied were the Dizziness Handicap Inventory, the Dynamic Gait Index and dynamic visual acuity. All subjects received complementary Wii® therapy. There were 69 cases (41 woman and 28 men), with a median age of 64 years. The initial median Dizziness Handicap Inventory score was 40 points (range 0-84, percentile 25-75=20-59) and the final, 24 points (range 0-76, percentile 25-75=10.40), P<.0001. The initial median for the Dynamic Gait Index score was 21 points (range 8-24, percentile 25-75=17.5-2.3) and the final, 23 (range 12-24, percentile 25-75=21-23), P<.0001. The initial median for dynamic visual acuity was 2 (range 0-6, percentile 25-75=1-4) and the final, 1 (range 0-3, percentile 25-75=0-2), P<.0001. A reduction was observed in the Dizziness Handicap Inventory Values. Values for the Dynamic Gait Index increased and dynamic visual acuity improved. All these variations were statistically significant. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Patología Cérvico-Facial. All rights reserved.

  2. Vestibular Function Tests for Vestibular Migraine: Clinical Implication of Video Head Impulse and Caloric Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Woo Seok; Lee, Sang Hun; Yang, Chan Joo; Ahn, Joong Ho; Chung, Jong Woo; Park, Hong Ju

    2016-01-01

    Vestibular migraine (VM) is one of the most common causes of episodic vertigo. We reviewed the results of multiple vestibular function tests in a cohort of VM patients who were diagnosed with VM according to the diagnostic criteria of the Barany Society and the International Headache Society and assessed the efficacy of each for predicting the prognosis in VM patients. A retrospective chart analysis was performed on 81 VM patients at a tertiary care center from June 2014 to July 2015. Patients were assessed by the video head impulse test (vHIT), caloric test, vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs), and sensory organization test (SOT) at the initial visit and then evaluated for symptomatic improvement after 6 months. Complete response (CR) was defined as no need for continued medication, partial response (PR) as improved symptoms but need for continued medication, and no response (NR) as no symptomatic improvement and requiring increased dosage or change in medications. At the initial evaluation, 9 of 81 patients (11%) exhibited abnormal vHIT results, 14 of 73 (19%) exhibited abnormal caloric test results, 25 of 65 (38%) exhibited abnormal SOT results, 8 of 75 (11%) exhibited abnormal cervical VEMP results, and 20 of 75 (27%) exhibited abnormal ocular VEMP results. Six months later, 63 of 81 patients (78%) no longer required medication (CR), while 18 (22%) still required medication, including 7 PR and 11 NR patients. Abnormal vHIT gain and abnormal caloric results were significantly related to the necessity for continued medication at 6-month follow-up (OR = 5.67 and 4.36, respectively). Abnormal vHIT and caloric test results revealed semicircular canal dysfunction in VM patients and predicted prolonged preventive medication requirement. These results suggest that peripheral vestibular abnormalities are closely related to the development of vertigo in VM patients.

  3. Vestibular Function Tests for Vestibular Migraine: Clinical Implication of Video Head Impulse and Caloric Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Woo Seok; Lee, Sang Hun; Yang, Chan Joo; Ahn, Joong Ho; Chung, Jong Woo; Park, Hong Ju

    2016-01-01

    Vestibular migraine (VM) is one of the most common causes of episodic vertigo. We reviewed the results of multiple vestibular function tests in a cohort of VM patients who were diagnosed with VM according to the diagnostic criteria of the Barany Society and the International Headache Society and assessed the efficacy of each for predicting the prognosis in VM patients. A retrospective chart analysis was performed on 81 VM patients at a tertiary care center from June 2014 to July 2015. Patients were assessed by the video head impulse test (vHIT), caloric test, vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs), and sensory organization test (SOT) at the initial visit and then evaluated for symptomatic improvement after 6 months. Complete response (CR) was defined as no need for continued medication, partial response (PR) as improved symptoms but need for continued medication, and no response (NR) as no symptomatic improvement and requiring increased dosage or change in medications. At the initial evaluation, 9 of 81 patients (11%) exhibited abnormal vHIT results, 14 of 73 (19%) exhibited abnormal caloric test results, 25 of 65 (38%) exhibited abnormal SOT results, 8 of 75 (11%) exhibited abnormal cervical VEMP results, and 20 of 75 (27%) exhibited abnormal ocular VEMP results. Six months later, 63 of 81 patients (78%) no longer required medication (CR), while 18 (22%) still required medication, including 7 PR and 11 NR patients. Abnormal vHIT gain and abnormal caloric results were significantly related to the necessity for continued medication at 6-month follow-up (OR = 5.67 and 4.36, respectively). Abnormal vHIT and caloric test results revealed semicircular canal dysfunction in VM patients and predicted prolonged preventive medication requirement. These results suggest that peripheral vestibular abnormalities are closely related to the development of vertigo in VM patients.

  4. Vestibular function tests for vestibular migraine: clinical implication of video head impulse and caloric tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woo Seok Kang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Vestibular migraine (VM is one of the most common causes of episodic vertigo. We reviewed the results of multiple vestibular function tests in a cohort of VM patients who were diagnosed with VM according to the diagnostic criteria of the Barany Society and the International Headache Society and assessed the efficacy of each for predicting the prognosis in VM patients. A retrospective chart analysis was performed on 81 VM patients at a tertiary care center from June 2014 to July 2015. Patients were assessed by the video head impulse test (vHIT, caloric test, vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (VEMP, and sensory organization test (SOT at the initial visit and then evaluated for symptomatic improvement after 6 months. Complete response (CR was defined as no need for continued medication, partial response (PR as improved symptoms but need for continued medication, and no response (NR as no symptomatic improvement and requiring increased dosage or change in medications. At the initial evaluation, 9 of 81 patients (11% exhibited abnormal vHIT results, 14 of 73 (19% exhibited abnormal caloric test results, 25 of 65 (38% exhibited abnormal SOT results, 8 of 75 (11% exhibited abnormal cervical VEMP results, and 20 of 75 (27% exhibited abnormal ocular VEMP results. Six months later, 63 of 81 patients (78% no longer required medication (CR, while 18 (22% still required medication, including 7 PR and 11 NR patients. Abnormal vHIT gain and abnormal caloric results were significantly related to the necessity for continued medication at 6-month follow-up (OR = 5.67 and 4.36, respectively. Abnormal vHIT and caloric test results revealed semicircular canal dysfunction in VM patients and predicted prolonged preventive medication requirement. These results suggest that peripheral vestibular abnormalities are closely related to the development of vertigo in VM patients.

  5. Vestibular Evoked Myogenic Potential Produced by Bone-Conducted Stimuli: A Study on its Basics and Clinical Applications in Patients With Conductive and Sensorineural Hearing Loss and a Group With Vestibular Schawannoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvane Mahdi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Vestibular evoked myogenic potential (VEMP has recently been broadly studied in vestibular disorders. As it is evoked by loud sound stimulation, even mild conductive hearing loss may affect VEMP results. Bone-conducted (BC stimulus is an alternative stimulation for evoking this response. This study aims to assess the characteristics of BC-VEMP in different groups of patients.   Materials and Methods: We performed a cross sectional analysis on 20 healthy volunteers with normal pure-tone audiometry as a control group; and on a group of patients consisted of 20 participants with conductive hearing loss, five with bilateral sensorineural hearing loss and four with vestibular schawannoma. AC and BC-VEMP were performed in all participants.   Results: In control group the VEMP responses to both kinds of stimuli had an acceptable morphology and consisted of p13 and n23 waves. Latency value of these main components in each type of stimulus was not significantly different (P>0.05. However, the mean amplitude was larger in BC modality than AC stimulation (P=0.025. In the group with conductive hearing loss, the VEMP response was absent in fifteen (46.87% of the 32 ears using the AC method, whereas all (100% displayed positive elicitability of VEMP by BC method. Normal VEMP responses in both stimuli were evoked in all patients with sensorineural hearing loss. In patients with unilateral vestibular schwannomas (VS, 2 (50.00% had neither AC-VEMP nor BC-VEMP. Conclusion:  Auditory stimuli delivered by bone conduction can evoke VEMP response. These responses are of vestibular origin and can be used in vestibular evaluation of patients with conductive hearing loss.

  6. Osteoplastic maxillotomy approach for infraorbital nerve schwannoma, a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karkas, Alexandre A; Schmerber, Sébastien A; Bettega, Georges V; Reyt, Emile P; Righini, Christian A

    2008-03-01

    Extracranial schwannomas can readily occur in the head and neck region and rarely involve the trigeminal nerve. As a rule, their treatment is surgical and dictated by the location of the tumor and nerve of origin. We describe a case of a 14-year-old boy with a mass invading right nasal fossa, maxillary sinus, orbital floor, pterygopalatine fossa, and infratemporal fossa. The diagnosis of a nerve sheath tumor was evoked after angiography showed no vascular blush. The tumor was removed through a Weber-Fergusson incision with subciliary extension followed by maxillozygomatic osteotomy. This approach showed the tumor to be coming from the infraorbital nerve and allowed complete tumor exposure and removal. Pathology confirmed the diagnosis of a schwannoma. We describe the osteoplastic maxillotomy approach which we felt most appropriate for removal of the infraorbital schwannoma and discuss other possible surgical options for this type of tumor. (c) 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 2008.

  7. Giant cystic sacral schwannoma mimicking tarlov cyst: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attiah, Mark A; Syre, Peter P; Pierce, John; Belyaeva, Elizaveta; Welch, William C

    2016-05-01

    To present a rare case of a giant schwannoma of the sacrum mimicking a Tarlov cyst. A 58-year-old woman had a 1-year history of low back pain. MRI revealed a large cystic mass in the sacral canal with bony erosion. Radiological diagnosis of Tarlov cyst was made. The patient underwent surgical treatment for the lesion, which revealed a solid mass. Histopathological examination of the tumor confirmed the diagnosis of schwannoma. The postoperative course was uneventful and the patient has had significant improvement in her pain 1 month postoperatively. Giant cystic schwannoma of the sacrum is a very rare diagnosis overlooked by practitioners for more common cystic etiologies, but its treatment is significantly different. Care should be taken to include this diagnosis in a differential for a cystic sacral mass.

  8. Schwannoma of tongue base treated with transoral carbon dioxide laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrzad, H; Persaud, R; Papadimitriou, N; Kaniyur, S; Mochloulis, G

    2006-12-01

    Schwannomas are benign slow growing solitary tumours of nerve sheath origin and can arise from any myelinated nerve. They have been reported to occur in most parts of the body with the highest incidence (25%) in the head and neck region, although tongue base lesions are rare. The tumour is resistant to radiotherapy, and therefore, the treatment of choice is surgery. We present a case of a tongue base schwannoma which was completely extirpated with a carbon dioxide laser via the transoral approach. The patient experienced virtually no morbidity from the use of the laser. Whilst tongue base schwannoma has been documented, we could not find an earlier report in the English literature describing our method of treatment. We conclude that transoral carbon dioxide laser can be added to the surgical armamentarium for the management of other similar cases in the future.

  9. Intraoral schwannoma--a report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurup, Seema; Thankappan, Krishnakumar; Krishnan, Nitin; Nair, Preeti P

    2012-07-09

    Schwannomas, also known as neurilemmomas, are uncommon neoplasms, derived from schwann cells. These neoplasms, although rare, should be considered in the differential diagnosis of slow growing tumour masses of the oral cavity. The growth of these tumours sometimes causes displacement and compression of the nerve of origin, giving rise to clinical signs and symptoms. It can develop at any age and there is no sex predilection. Intraorally, the tongue is the most common site followed by the palate, floor of the mouth, buccal mucosa, lips and jaws. Surgical excision is the treatment of choice for schwannomas, with few reports of recurrence or malignant transformation. In this paper, the authors report two cases of patients with intraoral schwannoma, where the preoperative clinical diagnosis was inconclusive and final diagnosis was established based on radiographic and histopathological examination.

  10. Intra-oral schwannoma: case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Manoela Domingues; Anunciato de Jesus, Luciane; Fernandes, Kristianne Porta Santos; Bussadori, Sandra Kalil; Taghloubi, Saad Ahmad; Martins, Marco Antonio Trevizani

    2009-01-01

    Schwannoma is a relatively uncommon, slow-growing benign tumor that is derived apparently from the Schwann cells. The tongue is the most common site, followed by the palate, floor of mouth, buccal mucosa, lips, and jaws. It can present itself at any age. Usually, this lesion is not taken into account during clinical practice and the differential diagnosis includes numerous benign neoformations based on epithelial and connective tissues. Immunohistochemical features can be useful in determining the neural differentiation. Anti-S100 protein is probably the most used antibody to identify this lesion. The schwannoma is usually a solitary lesion, and can be multiple when associated with neurofibromatosis. In the current study, authors report a case of an intraoral schwannoma situated at the vestibule with 20 years of evolution treated by complete surgical excision. The diagnosis was established based on clinical, histopathological, and immunohistochemical aspects. The patient is under clinical control, with no signs of recurrence even after four years.

  11. Vestibular rehabilitation with visual stimuli in peripheral vestibular disorders

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    Andréa Manso

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION: Visual stimuli can induce vestibular adaptation and recovery of body balance. OBJECTIVE: To verify the effect of visual stimuli by digital images on vestibular and body balance rehabilitation of peripheral vestibular disorders. METHODS: Clinical, randomized, prospective study. Forty patients aged between 23 and 63 years with chronic peripheral vestibular disorders underwent 12 sessions of rehabilitation with visual stimuli using digital video disk (DVD (experimental group or Cawthorne-Cooksey exercises (control group. The Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI, dizziness analog scale, and the sensitized Romberg static balance and one-leg stance tests were applied before and after the intervention. RESULTS: Before and after the intervention, there was no difference between the experimental and control groups (p > 0.005 regarding the findings of DHI, dizziness analog scale, and static balance tests. After the intervention, the experimental and control groups showed lower values (p < 0.05 in the DHI and the dizziness analog scale, and higher values (p < 0.05 in the static balance tests in some of the assessed conditions. CONCLUSION: The inclusion of visual stimuli by digital images on vestibular and body balance rehabilitation is effective in reducing dizziness and improving quality of life and postural control in individuals with peripheral vestibular disorders.

  12. Task, muscle and frequency dependent vestibular control of posture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Forbes, P.A.; Siegmund, G.P.; Schouten, A.C.; Blouin, J.S.

    2015-01-01

    The vestibular system is crucial for postural control; however there are considerable differences in the task dependence and frequency response of vestibular reflexes in appendicular and axial muscles. For example, vestibular reflexes are only evoked in appendicular muscles when vestibular

  13. Vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colebatch, J G; Rosengren, S M; Welgampola, M S

    2016-01-01

    The vestibular-evoked myogenic potential (VEMP) is a short-latency potential evoked through activation of vestibular receptors using sound or vibration. It is generated by modulated electromyographic signals either from the sternocleidomastoid muscle for the cervical VEMP (cVEMP) or the inferior oblique muscle for the ocular VEMP (oVEMP). These reflexes appear to originate from the otolith organs and thus complement existing methods of vestibular assessment, which are mainly based upon canal function. This review considers the basis, methodology, and current applications of the cVEMP and oVEMP in the assessment and diagnosis of vestibular disorders, both peripheral and central. © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Retroperitoneal Gastrointestinal Type Schwannoma Presenting as a Renal Mass

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    Susan J. Hall

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Retroperitoneal schwannomas are extremely rare, and unreported in Urology. Often thought to be malignant from imaging the diagnosis is often delayed until Histology. We report a case of retroperitoneal schwanoma thought to be a malignant renal mass. Seventy three year old lady presented with abdominal pain. Imaging showed a mass attached to the renal pelvis thus she underwent a radical nephrectomy. Histology reported retroperitoneal schwannoma. Malignant forms are rare however treatment for these is surgical excision. Awareness of the existence of these tumors may help in avoiding unnecessary radical surgeries by opting for biopsy preoperatively.

  15. Schwannoma da goteira olfatória: relato de caso

    OpenAIRE

    Souza Heider Lopes de; Ramos Ana Maria de Oliveira; Ramos Carlos Cesar Formiga; Melo Syomara Pereira da Costa; Pereira Hougelle Simplício Gomes; Madureira João Flávio Gurjão; Lana Janaína Martins de

    2003-01-01

    Schwannomas intracranianos não associados a nervos cranianos são incomuns e raramente encontrados na região subfrontal. Apresentamos raro caso de schwannoma da goteira olfatória, acometendo paciente de 27 anos, masculino, com quadro iniciado há 1 ano com perda da olfação e cefaléia. Ao exame de admissão, apresentava papiledema bilateral e anosmia. Tomografia computadorizada de Cranio (TC) revelou processo expansivo bifrontal hipodenso ao parênquima, com aspecto multicístico, sem captação do c...

  16. Procedures for restoring vestibular disorders

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    This paper will discuss therapeutic possibilities for disorders of the vestibular organs and the neurons involved, which confront ENT clinicians in everyday practice. Treatment of such disorders can be tackled either symptomatically or causally. The possible strategies for restoring the body's vestibular sense, visual function and co-ordination include medication, as well as physical and surgical procedures. Prophylactic or preventive measures are possible in some disorders which involve vert...

  17. Vestibular Barre Syndrome and Lieou

    OpenAIRE

    Aniya, Julio; Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Perú

    2014-01-01

    Barré syndrome and Lieou of vestibular origin, is characterized by a vertiginous symptomatology box , accompanied by disorders of neuro- vegetative type ; which is often confused with Meniere's Syndrome and other neurolóciccs entities. The cause of this condition lies in a cervical disc disease at C5- C6 level of understanding that phenomena on the sympathetic peri -arterial -cervical vertebral artery disorders will produce reflections at the maze , preferably ; or of the vestibular nuclei . ...

  18. Vestibular interactions in the thalamus

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    Aaron eCamp

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available It has long been known that the vast majority of all information en route to the cerebral cortex must first pass through the thalamus. The long held view that the thalamus serves as a simple hi fidelity relay station for sensory information to the cortex, however, has over recent years been dispelled. Indeed, multiple projections from the vestibular nuclei to thalamic nuclei (including the ventrobasal nuclei, and the geniculate bodies- regions typically associated with other modalities- have been described. Further, some thalamic neurons have been shown to respond to stimuli presented from across sensory modalities. For example, neurons in the rat anterodorsal and laterodorsal nuclei of the thalamus respond to visual, vestibular, proprioceptive and somatosensory stimuli and integrate this information to compute heading within the environment. Together, these findings imply that the thalamus serves crucial integrative functions, at least in regard to vestibular processing, beyond that imparted by a simple relay. In this mini review we outline the vestibular inputs to the thalamus and provide some clinical context for vestibular interactions in the thalamus. We then focus on how vestibular inputs interact with other sensory systems and discuss the multisensory integration properties of the thalamus.

  19. Vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials in central vestibular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Sun-Young; Kim, Hyo-Jeong; Kim, Ji-Soo

    2016-02-01

    Vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs) are short latency manifestations of vestibulo-ocular and vestibulocollic reflexes that originate from the utricle and saccule. Although cervical and ocular VEMPs have mostly been applied to peripheral vestibular disorders, the characteristics and the diagnostic values of VEMPs have been expanded to assess the function of the central otolithic pathways. In the central nervous system, the cervical VEMPs (cVEMPs) are mediated by the vestibular nuclei and uncrossed medial vestibulospinal tract descending in the lower brainstem and spinal cord. In contrast, the ocular VEMPs (oVEMPs) reflect the function of the vestibular nuclei and the crossed vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) pathways, mostly contained in the medial longitudinal fasciculus (MLF). Therefore, lesions involving the vestibular nuclei can present abnormalities of both cVEMPs and oVEMPs. The medullary lesions involving the descending MLF or the spinal accessory nucleus impair cVEMPs. In contrast, the lesions involving the MLF, the crossed ventral tegmental tract, oculomotor nuclei and the interstitial nucleus of Cajal can impair oVEMPs. Patients with unilateral cerebellar infarctions may show abnormal VEMPs especially when they have the ocular tilt reaction. Delayed responses of VEMPs are characteristic of multiple sclerosis (MS). Reduced VEMP responses can be observed in patients with vestibular migraine. VEMPs are useful in evaluating central as well as peripheral otolithic function that are not readily defined by conventional vestibular function tests, and can aid in detecting and localizing central lesions, especially silent brainstem lesions such as tiny infarctions or MS plaques.

  20. [Recent surgical options for vestibular vertigo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkenstein, Stefan; Dazert, Stefan

    2017-04-01

    Vertigo is not a well defined symptom but a heterogenous entity diagnosed and treated mainly by otolaryngologists, neurologists, internal medicine and primary care physicians. Most vertigo syndroms have a good prognosis and management is predominantly conservative, whereas the need for surgical therapy is rare, but for a subset of patients often the only remaining option. In this paper, we describe the development of surgical therapy for hydropic inner ear diseases, Menière disease, dehiscence syndroms, perilymphatic fistulas, and benign paroxysmal vertigo. At the end, we shortly introduce the most recent development of vestibular implants. Surgical vestibular therapy is still indicated for selected patients nowadays when conservative options did not reduce symptoms and patients are still suffering. Success depends on the correct diagnosis and indication for the different procedures going along with an adequate patient selection. In regard to the invasiveness and the possible risks due to the surgery, in depth individual counselling is necessary. Ablative and destructive surgical procedures usually achieve a successful vertigo control, but go along with a high risk for hearing loss. Therefore, residual hearing has to be included in the decission making process for a surgical therapy. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  1. [Skull vibratory test in partial vestibular lesions--influence of the stimulus frequency on the nystagmus direction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, G; Perrin, P; Morel, N; N'Guyen, D Q; Schmerber, S

    2005-01-01

    Results of the skull vibratory test (SVT) in partial unilateral vestibular peripheral lesions (PUVL) are different from the results in total vestibular lesions (TUVL). To reveal a correlation between the results of the analysis of the skull vibratory nystagmus (SVN) horizontal component and the side of the lesion; to correlate these results with the stimulus frequency. To find out a predictive correlation between the SVN horizontal and vertical components and the topography of a vestibular lesion. To appreciate the degree of vestibular deafferentation (extended to high frequencies) provoked by gentamicin labyrinthectomy and its efficiency in Meniere's disease. 53 patients with a SVN and a PUVL were included and compared with 10 TUVL and 10 normal subjects. Protocol included a HST (2 Hz), a SVT at 30, 60 and 100 Hz and a caloric test. Recordings were performed with a 2D and 3D VNG device. In PUVL, SVN at 30, 60 and 100 Hz was obtained in 80, 90 and 90% of cases respectively. SVN is correlated with the side of the lesion at 30, 60 and 100 Hz respectively in 65%, 63%, 80% of cases. SVN is not correlated with the side of the lesion in 20% of Meniere's disease, in 8% of vestibular neuritis and in 6% of vestibular schwannoma. In PUVL HSN is correlated with the side of the lesion in 69% of cases. The direction of the HSN and of the SVN was different in 23% when the nystagmus attended at the same time for both tests. In PUVL the direction of the SVN is different at 100 Hz and 30 Hz in 16% of cases when they are concomittant on the same patient. After Gentamicine labyrinthectomy, the coherence of the results in caloric test, HSN and SVN (areflexy and lesional nystagmus beating toward the safe side) was correlated with the efficiency of the therapy. A SVN vertical component was met in 10% of PUVL (essentially in anterior canal dehiscence and few cases of partial labyrinthitis). The horizontal SVN SPV is significantly slower in PUVL than in TUVL patients (p=0.0004). The SVT

  2. Unilateral Enlarged Vestibular Aqueduct Syndrome and Bilateral Endolymphatic Hydrops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Ralli

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Enlarged vestibular aqueduct (EVA syndrome is a common congenital inner ear malformation characterized by a vestibular aqueduct with a diameter larger than 1.5 mm, mixed or sensorineural hearing loss that ranges from mild to profound, and vestibular disorders that may be present with a range from mild imbalance to episodic objective vertigo. In our study, we present the case of a patient with unilateral enlarged vestibular aqueduct and bilateral endolymphatic hydrops (EH. EH was confirmed through anamnestic history and audiological exams; EVA was diagnosed using high-resolution CT scans and MRI images. Therapy included intratympanic infusion of corticosteroids with a significant hearing improvement, more evident in the ear contralateral to EVA. Although most probably unrelated, EVA and EH may present with similar symptoms and therefore the diagnostic workup should always include the proper steps to perform a correct diagnosis. Association between progression of hearing loss and head trauma in patients with a diagnosis of EVA syndrome is still uncertain; however, these individuals should be advised to avoid activities that increase intracranial pressure to prevent further hearing deterioration. Intratympanic treatment with steroids is a safe and well-tolerated procedure that has demonstrated its efficacy in hearing, tinnitus, and vertigo control in EH.

  3. Vestibular evoked myogenic potential findings in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escorihuela García, Vicente; Llópez Carratalá, Ignacio; Orts Alborch, Miguel; Marco Algarra, Jaime

    2013-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is an inflammatory disease involving the occurrence of demyelinating, chronic neurodegenerative lesions in the central nervous system. We studied vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs) in this pathology, to allow us to evaluate the saccule, inferior vestibular nerve and vestibular-spinal pathway non-invasively. There were 23 patients diagnosed with multiple sclerosis who underwent VEMP recordings, comparing our results with a control group consisting of 35 healthy subjects. We registered p13 and n23 wave latencies, interaural amplitude difference and asymmetry ratio between both ears. Subjects also underwent an otoscopy and audiometric examination. The prolongation of p13 and n23 wave latencies was the most notable characteristic, with a mean p13 wave latency of 19.53 milliseconds and a mean latency of 30.06 milliseconds for n23. In contrast, the asymmetry index showed no significant differences with our control group. In case of multiple sclerosis, the prolongation of the p13 and n23 VEMP wave latencies is a feature that has been attributed to slowing of conduction by demyelination of the vestibular-spinal pathway. In this regard, alteration of the response or lack thereof in these potentials has a locator value of injury to the lower brainstem. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  4. Diagnosing MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a Local Support Group Ask an MS Navigator Edward M. Dowd Personal Advocate Program Connect with Peers ... Symptoms & Diagnosis Diagnosing MS Possible MS Clinically Isolated Syndrome (CIS) Newly Diagnosed Diagnosing Tools Other Conditions to ...

  5. A schwannoma of the S1 dural sleeve was resected while the intact nerve fibers were preserved using a microscope. Report of a case with early MRI findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, S; Uchida, K; Kokubo, Y; Yayama, T; Nakajima, H; Inukai, T; Nomura, E; Baba, H

    2007-04-01

    In this report, we describe a small schwannoma of the dural sleeve and mention that it is often difficult to differentiate this tumor from lumbar disc herniation, especially a sequestered hernia, or a discal cyst. Gadolinium-enhanced MR images were a useful preoperative examination modality for differentiating this lesion from other diseases. Microscopically, the intradural tumor was successfully removed. The dura mater of the S1 nerve root was opened microsurgically, allowing the nerve fibers involved in the tumor to be identified. The involved fibers were cut around the tumor, and the lesion was resected while the intact nerve fibers were preserved. Based on histological examination of the resected specimen, the tumor was diagnosed as a schwannoma with multilocular cystic degeneration. Microsurgery allowed the tumor to be removed with minimal impairment from cutting of nerve fibers in the nerve root.

  6. Reabilitação vestibular: utilidade clínica em pacientes com esclerose múltipla Vestibular rehabilitation: clinical benefits to patients with multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Simone Zeigelboim

    2010-01-01

    , diagnosed for six years, who referred frequent dizziness of moderate intensity for three years, headaches, falls, deviation of gait to the right and fainting sensations (sic. In the vestibular exam, she presented bilateral peripheral vestibular deficiency syndrome. The second case was a 49-year-old female, diagnosed for two years, who referred deviation of gait to the right, difficulty and/or pain with neck movement, paraesthesia of the extremities and vocal alteration. In the vestibular exam, she presented peripheral vestibular deficiency syndrome to the right. Both cases had significant improvements regarding physical, functional and emotional aspects of the Dizziness Handicap Inventory after vestibular rehabilitation. The protocol used benefitted the subjects' quality of life and favored the process of vestibular compensation.

  7. Malignant schwannoma of the infratemporal fossa: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touati, Mohamed Mliha; Darouassi, Youssef; Chihani, Mehdi; Al Jalil, Abdelfettah; Tourabi, Khalid; Lakouichmi, Mohamed; Essadi, Ismail; Bouaity, Brahim; Ammar, Haddou

    2015-07-04

    Malignant schwannomas or neurofibrosarcomas are rare nerve tumors of unknown etiology. These neoplasms are highly aggressive with a marked propensity for local recurrence and metastatic spread. Their management continues to be a challenge for pathologists and surgeons. Maxillofacial locations are very exceptional. We report the case of a patient with unusual malignant schwannoma of the infratemporal fossa discovered at a late evolving stage. A 56-year-old woman, of Moroccan nationality, presented to our hospital in 2013 with a large right-sided hemifacial swelling that had evolved over the previous 4 months, with a limitation of mouth opening, nasal obstruction and episodes of epistaxis. A CT scan and MRI showed a large and invasive tumor occupying her right infratemporal fossa and maxillary sinus, with sphenoidal, ethmoidonasal, nasopharyngeal and intraorbital extension. A nasal endoscopic biopsy was performed. Immunohistochemical examination concluded a diagnosis of malignant schwannoma, and a palliative radiotherapy was decided; however, our patient died 10 days later. Malignant schwannoma of paranasal sinuses and the anterior skull base is a rare tumor that involves a high rate of local invasion. The prognosis is poorer compared to that occurring in the trunk and extremities.

  8. Differential diagnosis and treatment of vestibular vertigo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Anatolyevich Parfenov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Vertigo is a common complaint that leads patients to visit physicians of various specialties. Diseases resulting in vestibular vertigo are very diverse and may be caused by lesion of both the central parts of the vestibular system and the peripheral vestibular apparatus. In many cases, its diagnosis can be made from complaints and a history of disease and special bedside tests requiring no sophisticated equipment. Management of vestibular vertigo should aim at treating the underlying disease; vestibular dilators as symptomatic therapy can be effective for several days. Vestibular exercises the efficiency of which can be enhanced by betahistine and other drugs accelerating vestibular compensation should be further needed. Data on the efficacy of betaver (betahistine in patients with vestibular vertigo are given.

  9. Caloric vestibular stimulation in aphasic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David eWilkinson

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Caloric vestibular stimulation (CVS is commonly used to diagnose brainstem disorder but its therapeutic application is much less established. Based on the finding that CVS increases blood flow to brain structures associated with language and communication, we assessed whether the procedure has potential to relieve symptoms of post-stroke aphasia. Three participants, each presenting with chronic, unilateral lesions to the left hemisphere, were administered daily CVS for 4 consecutive weeks. Relative to their pre-treatment baseline scores, two of the three participants showed significant improvement on both picture and responsive naming at immediate and one-week follow-up. One of these participants also showed improved sentence repetition, and another showed improved auditory word discrimination. No adverse reactions were reported. These data provide the first, albeit tentative, evidence that CVS may relieve expressive and receptive symptoms of aphasia. A larger, sham-controlled study is now needed to further assess efficacy.

  10. [Inferior vestibular neuritis: diagnosis using VEMP].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, L E; Repik, I

    2012-02-01

    Vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMP) are a new method to establish the functional status of the otolith organs. The sacculocollic reflex of the cervical VEMP to air conduction (AC) reflects predominantly saccular function due to saccular afferents to the inferior vestibular nerve. We describe a case of inferior vestibular neuritis as a rare differential diagnosis of vestibular neuritis. Clinical signs were a normal caloric response, unilaterally absent AC cVEMPs and bilaterally preserved ocular VEMPs (AC oVEMPs).

  11. Vestibular vertigo and comorbid cognitive and psychiatric impairment: the 2008 National Health Interview Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigelow, Robin T; Semenov, Yevgeniy R; du Lac, Sascha; Hoffman, Howard J; Agrawal, Yuri

    2016-04-01

    Patients with vestibular disease have been observed to have concomitant cognitive and psychiatric dysfunction. We evaluated the association between vestibular vertigo, cognitive impairment and psychiatric conditions in a nationally representative sample of US adults. We performed a cross-sectional analysis using the 2008 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), which included a Balance and Dizziness Supplement, and questions about cognitive function and psychiatric comorbidity. We evaluated the association between vestibular vertigo, cognitive impairment (memory loss, difficulty concentrating, confusion) and psychiatric diagnoses (depression, anxiety and panic disorder). We observed an 8.4% 1-year prevalence of vestibular vertigo among US adults. In adjusted analyses, individuals with vestibular vertigo had an eightfold increased odds of 'serious difficulty concentrating or remembering' (OR 8.3, 95% CI 4.8 to 14.6) and a fourfold increased odds of activity limitation due to difficulty remembering or confusion (OR 3.9, 95% CI 3.1 to 5.0) relative to the rest of the US adults. Individuals with vestibular vertigo also had a threefold increased odds of depression (OR 3.4, 95% CI 2.9 to 3.9), anxiety (OR 3.2, 95% CI 2.8 to 3.6) and panic disorder (OR 3.4, 95% CI 2.9 to 4.0). Our findings indicate that vestibular impairment is associated with increased risk of cognitive and psychiatric comorbidity. The vestibular system is anatomically connected with widespread regions of the cerebral cortex, hippocampus and amygdala. Loss of vestibular inputs may lead to impairment of these cognitive and affective circuits. Further longitudinal research is required to determine if these associations are causal. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  12. Ocular Vestibular Evoked Myogenic Potentials

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    Felipe, Lilian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Diagnostic testing of the vestibular system is an essential component of treating patients with balance dysfunction. Until recently, testing methods primarily evaluated the integrity of the horizontal semicircular canal, which is only a portion of the vestibular system. Recent advances in technology have afforded clinicians the ability to assess otolith function through vestibular evoked myogenic potential (VEMP testing. VEMP testing from the inferior extraocular muscles of the eye has been the subject of interest of recent research. Objective To summarize recent developments in ocular VEMP testing. Results Recent studies suggest that the ocular VEMP is produced by otolith afferents in the superior division of the vestibular nerve. The ocular VEMP is a short latency potential, composed of extraocular myogenic responses activated by sound stimulation and registered by surface electromyography via ipsilateral otolithic and contralateral extraocular muscle activation. The inferior oblique muscle is the most superficial of the six extraocular muscles responsible for eye movement. Therefore, measurement of ocular VEMPs can be performed easily by using surface electrodes on the skin below the eyes contralateral to the stimulated side. Conclusion This new variation of the VEMP procedure may supplement conventional testing in difficult to test populations. It may also be possible to use this technique to evaluate previously inaccessible information on the vestibular system.

  13. Compensation following bilateral vestibular damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bill J Yates

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Bilateral loss of vestibular inputs affects far fewer patients than unilateral inner ear damage, and thus has been understudied. In both animal subjects and human patients, bilateral vestibular hypofunction (BVH produces a variety of clinical problems, including impaired balance control, inability to maintain stable blood pressure during postural changes, difficulty in visual targeting of images, and disturbances in spatial memory and navigational performance. Experiments in animals have shown that nonlabyrinthine inputs to the vestibular nuclei are rapidly amplified following the onset of BVH, which may explain the recovery of postural stability and orthostatic tolerance that occurs within 10 days. However, the loss of the vestibulo-ocular reflex and degraded spatial cognition appear to be permanent in animals with BVH. Current concepts of the compensatory mechanisms in humans with BVH are largely inferential, as there is a lack of data from patients early in the disease process. Translation of animal studies of compensation for BVH into therapeutic strategies and subsequent application in the clinic is the most likely route to improve treatment. In addition to physical therapy, two types of prosthetic devices have been proposed to treat individuals with bilateral loss of vestibular inputs: those that provide tactile stimulation to indicate body position in space, and those that deliver electrical stimuli to branches of the vestibular nerve in accordance with head movements. The relative efficacy of these two treatment paradigms, and whether they can be combined to facilitate recovery, is yet to be ascertained.

  14. Aging of vestibular function evaluated using correlational vestibular autorotation test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsieh LC

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Li-Chun Hsieh,1,2 Hung-Ching Lin,2,3 Guo-She Lee4,5 1Institute of Brain Science, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan; 2Department of Otolaryngology, Mackay Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; 3Department of Audiology and Speech Language Pathology, Mackay Memorial Medical College, Taipei, Taiwan; 4Faculty of Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan; 5Department of Otolaryngology, Taipei City Hospital, Ren-Ai Branch, Taipei, Taiwan Background: Imbalance from degeneration of vestibular end organs is a common problem in the elderly. However, the decline of vestibular function with aging was revealed in few vestibular function tests such as vestibular autorotation test (VAT. In the current VAT, there are drawbacks of poor test–retest reliability, slippage of the sensor at high-speed rotations, and limited data about the effect of aging. We developed a correlational-VAT (cVAT system that included a small, light sensor (less than 20 g with wireless data transmission technique to evaluate the aging of vestibular function. Material and methods: We enrolled 53 healthy participants aged between 25 and 75 years and divided them into five age groups. The test conditions were vertical and horizontal head autorotations of frequencies from 0 to 3 Hz with closed eyes or open eyes. The cross-correlation coefficient (CCC between eye velocity and head velocity was obtained for the head autorotations between 1 Hz and 3 Hz. The mean of the CCCs was used to represent the vestibular function. Results: Age was significantly and negatively correlated with the mean CCC for all test conditions, including horizontal or vertical autorotations with open eyes or closed eyes (P<0.05. The mean CCC with open eyes declined significantly at 55–65 years old and the mean CCC with closed eyes declined significantly at 65–75 years old.Conclusion: Vestibular function evaluated using mean CCC revealed a decline with

  15. Plexiform Schwannoma of the Stomach in Neurofibromatosis Type 2: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun Jung [Dept. of Pathology, Sanggye Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yeom, Dong Heon; Cho, Hyun Sun; Cho, Woo Ho [Dept. of Radiology, Sanggye Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-02-15

    Plexiform schwannoma is a relatively rare benign subepithelial tumor arising from the peripheral nerve sheath, and associated with Neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2). There are a few reports of plexiform schwannomas arising from the gastrointestinal tract, and to our knowledge, there is no report of it arising from the stomach in a patient with NF2. Here we present the first case of a plexiform schwannoma of the stomach in an NF2 patient a submucosal tumor on radiologic finding.

  16. Symptomatic pericardial schwannoma treated with video-assisted thoracic surgery: a case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Po-Jen; Huang, Tsai-Wang; Li, Yao-Feng; Chang, Hung; Lee, Shih-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Intrathoracic schwannomas are neurogenic tumors derived from the Schwann cells of the nerve sheath, most often seen in the posterior mediastinum with anatomical correlations to nerves. Although they are typically benign, a malignant transformation can occur, and thoracotomy instead of video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) is required to achieve a complete resection. Only a few cases of pericardial schwannoma have been reported so far. We present a rare case of pericardial schwannoma confirmed by video-assisted thoracoscopic resection. PMID:27162698

  17. Intrinsic brainstem schwannoma – A rare clinical entity and a histological enigma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil Kumar Sharma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Intraparenchymal schwannomas arising in the brainstem are very rare, and only eight cases have been reported in literature till now. We report an intraparenchymal brainstem schwannoma presenting with the classical clinical presentation of an intrinsic brainstem lesion, and discuss its clinicoradiological characteristics and histological origins. We highlight the importance of an intraoperative frozen section diagnosis in such cases. Intraoperative tissue diagnosis significantly may alter the surgical strategy, which should be aimed at near total intracapsular decompression of the schwannoma.

  18. Schwannoma (Neurilemmoma) on the Base of the Tongue: A Rare Clinical Case

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Female, 20 Final Diagnosis: Schwannoma of the tongue Symptoms: Dysarthria • dysphagia Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Excision of the mass via trans-oral approach Specialty: Surgery Objective: Rare disease Background: Schwannomas are slow-growing benign tumors. They can arise from any peripheral nerve, including the cranial nerves (except the olfactory and optic nerves), spinal nerves, and autonomic nerves. Schwannomas of the head and neck account for 25–40% of all cases. However, ...

  19. Schwannoma of the tongue: two case reports and review of the literature

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe clinicopathologic and radiographic features of two cases of schwannoma involving the oral tongue and to review the literature of this unusual clinical entity. Case reports with review of the pathologic, radiologic and clinical data for two patients with schwannoma of the tongue are reported. Review of the literature of case reports of schwannomas (neurilemmomas) of the tongue from 1955 to 2006 with analysis of the patient’s age, gender, presenting symptom...

  20. Hemiatrophy of the tongue due to hypoglossal schwannoma shown by MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okura, A; Shigemori, M; Abe, T; Yamashita, M; Kojima, K; Noguchi, S

    1994-04-01

    Schwannomas account for 8.5% of all intracranial tumours; more than 90% arise from the 8th cranial nerve. Only 42 cases of schwannoma of the hypoglossal nerve have been reported. A 59 year-old woman developed right hemiatrophy of the tongue, clearly demonstrated on MRI, as was a small hypoglossal schwannoma. High signal was seen in the atrophic side of the tongue on both T1- and T2-weighted images, as described in the literature.

  1. Schwannoma of the Tongue in a Paediatric Patient: A Case Report and 20-Year Review

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Schwannomas (Neurilemmomas) are benign, encapsulated, slow-growing, and usually solitary tumours originating from Schwann cells of the peripheral nerve sheath with uncertain etiology. Approximately 25–48% of cases are seen in the head and neck region, of which 1% appears in the oral cavity. Lingual schwannoma can affect all age groups with peak incidence between the third and sixth decade. We report a rare case of lingual schwannoma in a 14-year-old girl complaining of asymptomatic swelling o...

  2. Procedures for restoring vestibular disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walther, Leif Erik

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper will discuss therapeutic possibilities for disorders of the vestibular organs and the neurons involved, which confront ENT clinicians in everyday practice. Treatment of such disorders can be tackled either symptomatically or causally. The possible strategies for restoring the body's vestibular sense, visual function and co-ordination include medication, as well as physical and surgical procedures. Prophylactic or preventive measures are possible in some disorders which involve vertigo (bilateral vestibulopathy, kinetosis, height vertigo, vestibular disorders when diving (Tables 1 and 2. Glucocorticoid and training therapy encourage the compensation of unilateral vestibular loss. In the case of a bilateral vestibular loss, it is important to treat the underlying disease (e.g. Cogan's disease. Although balance training does improve the patient's sense of balance, it will not restore it completely.In the case of Meniere's disease, there are a number of medications available to either treat bouts or to act as a prophylactic (e.g. dimenhydrinate or betahistine. In addition, there are non-ablative (sacculotomy as well as ablative surgical procedures (e.g. labyrinthectomy, neurectomy of the vestibular nerve. In everyday practice, it has become common to proceed with low risk therapies initially. The physical treatment of mild postural vertigo can be carried out quickly and easily in outpatients (repositioning or liberatory maneuvers. In very rare cases it may be necessary to carry out a semicircular canal occlusion. Isolated disturbances of the otolith function or an involvement of the otolith can be found in roughly 50% of labyrinth disturbances. A specific surgical procedure to selectively block the otolith organs is currently being studied. When an external perilymph fistula involving loss of perilymph is suspected, an exploratory tympanotomy involving also the round and oval window niches must be carried out. A traumatic rupture of the

  3. Vestibular stimulation by magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Bryan K.; Roberts, Dale C.; Della Santina, Charles C.; Carey, John P.; Zee, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Individuals working next to strong static magnetic fields occasionally report disorientation and vertigo. With the increasing strength of magnetic fields used for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies, these reports have become more common. It was recently learned that humans, mice and zebrafish all demonstrate behaviors consistent with constant peripheral vestibular stimulation while inside a strong, static magnetic field. The proposed mechanism for this effect involves a Lorentz force resulting from the interaction of a strong static magnetic field with naturally occurring ionic currents flowing through the inner ear endolymph into vestibular hair cells. The resulting force within the endolymph is strong enough to displace the lateral semicircular canal cupula, inducing vertigo and the horizontal nystagmus seen in normal mice and in humans. This review explores the evidence for interactions of magnetic fields with the vestibular system. PMID:25735662

  4. Negative emotional stimuli enhance vestibular processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preuss, Nora; Ellis, Andrew W; Mast, Fred W

    2015-08-01

    Recent studies have shown that vestibular stimulation can influence affective processes. In the present study, we examined whether emotional information can also modulate vestibular perception. Participants performed a vestibular discrimination task on a motion platform while viewing emotional pictures. Six different picture categories were taken from the International Affective Picture System: mutilation, threat, snakes, neutral objects, sports, and erotic pictures. Using a Bayesian hierarchical approach, we were able to show that vestibular discrimination improved when participants viewed emotionally negative pictures (mutilation, threat, snake) when compared to neutral/positive objects. We conclude that some of the mechanisms involved in the processing of vestibular information are also sensitive to emotional content. Emotional information signals importance and mobilizes the body for action. In case of danger, a successful motor response requires precise vestibular processing. Therefore, negative emotional information improves processing of vestibular information. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  5. Ressecção de schwannoma mediastinal por cirurgia torácica videoassistida Resection of a mediastinal schwannoma using video-assisted thoracoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Ortigara

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Os schwannomas são tumores em sua maioria benignos, derivados das células de Schwann (células da glia pertencentes ao sistema nervoso periférico que ajudam a separar e isolar neurônios de estruturas adjacentes, normalmente localizados em nervos intracranianos, principalmente no VIII par (neuroma acústico. Quando extradurais, sua apresentação mais comum é através de massas tumorais que podem comprimir estruturas adjacentes, tornando-se sintomático, como é o caso dos schwannomas intratorácicos (presentes mais comumente no mediastino posterior. Este trabalho apresenta o relato de caso de um schwannoma tratado por videotoracoscopia e uma revisão literária sobre o assunto.Schwannomas are tumors that are typically benign. They are derived from Schwann cells (glial cells of the peripheral nervous system that serve to separate and isolate nerve cells from adjacent structures. The most common type of schwannoma is a benign tumor of cranial nerve VIII and is referred to as an acoustic neuroma. When extradural, such tumors usually present as masses that can invade adjacent structures, thereby becoming symptomatic, as in the case of intrathoracic schwannomas (typically found in the posterior mediastinum. Herein, we present a case of a schwannoma treated through video-assisted thoracoscopy, and we review the literature on the subject.

  6. Perspectival Structure and Vestibular Processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alsmith, Adrian John Tetteh

    2015-01-01

    I begin by contrasting a taxonomic approach to the vestibular system with the structural approach I take in the bulk of this commentary. I provide an analysis of perspectival structure. Employing that analysis and following the structural approach, I propose three lines of empirical investigation...

  7. Perspectival Structure and Vestibular Processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alsmith, Adrian John Tetteh

    2016-01-01

    I begin by contrasting a taxonomic approach to the vestibular system with the structural approach I take in the bulk of this commentary. I provide an analysis of perspectival structure. Employing that analysis and following the structural approach, I propose three lines of empirical investigation...

  8. Vision and vestibular adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demer, J L; Crane, B T

    1998-07-01

    This article summarizes six recent degree-of-freedom studies of visual-vestibular interaction during natural activities and relates the findings to canal-otolith interactions evaluated during eccentric axis rotations. Magnetic search coils were used to measure angular eye and head movements of young and elderly subjects. A flux gate magnetometer was used to measure three-dimensional head translation. Three activities were studied: standing quietly, walking in place, and running in place. Each activity was evaluated with three viewing conditions: a visible target viewed normally, a remembered target in darkness, and a visible target viewed with x2 binocular telescopic spectacles. Canal-otolith interaction was assessed with passive, whole-body, transient, and steady-state rotations in pitch and yaw at multiple frequencies about axes that were either oculocentric or eccentric to the eyes. For each rotational axis, subjects regarded visible and remembered targets located at various distances. Horizontal and vertical angular vestibulo-ocular reflexes were demonstrable in all subjects during standing, walking, and running. When only angular gains were considered, gains in both darkness and during normal vision were less than 1.0 and were generally lower in elderly than in young subjects. Magnified vision with x2 telescopic spectacles produced only small gain increases as compared with normal vision. During walking and running all subjects exhibited significant mediolateral and dorsoventral head translations that were antiphase locked to yaw and pitch head movements, respectively. These head translations and rotations have mutually compensating effects on gaze in a target plane for typical viewing distances and allow angular vestibulo-ocular reflex gains of less than 1.0 to be optimal for gaze stabilization during natural activities. During passive, whole-body eccentric pitch and yaw head rotations, vestibulo-ocular reflex gain was modulated as appropriate to stabilize

  9. Intratemporal and extratemporal facial nerve schwannoma: CT and MRI findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Keum Won [Pohang Medical Center, Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ho Kyu; Shin, Ji Hoon; Choi, Choong Gon; Suh, Dae Chul [Asan Medical Center, Ulsan Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cheong, Hae Kwan [Dongguk Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-05-01

    To analyze the characteristics of CT and MRI findings of facial nerve schwannoma in ten patients. Ten patients with pathologically confirmed facial nerve schwannoma, underwent physical and radilolgic examination. The latter involved MRI in all ten and CT scanning in six. We analyzed the location (epicenter), extent and number of involved segments of tumors, tuumor morphology, and changes in adjacent bony structures. The major symptoms of facial nerve schwannoma were facial nerve paralysis in seven cases and hearing loss in six. Epicenters were detected at the intraparotid portion in five cases, the intracanalicular portion in two, the cisternal portion in one, and the intratemporal portion in two. The segment most frequently involved was the mastoid (n=6), followed by the parotid (n=5), intracanalicular (n=4), cisternal (n=2), the labyrinthine/geniculate ganglion (n=2) and the tympanic segment (n=1). Tumors affected two segments of the facial nerve in eight cases, only one segment in one, and four continuous segments in one. Morphologically, tumors were ice-cream cone shaped in the cisternal segment tumor (1/1), cone shaped in intracanalicular tumors (2/2), oval shaped in geniculate ganglion tumors (1/1), club shaped in intraparotid tumors (5/5) and bead shaped in the diffuse-type tumor (1/1). Changes in adjacent bony structures involved widening of the stylomastoid foramen in intraparotid tumors (5/5), widening of the internal auditary canal in intracanalicular and cisternal tumors (3/3), bony erosion of the geniculate fossa in geniculate ganglion tumors (2/2), and widening of the facial nerve canal in intratemporal and intraparotid tumors (6/6). The characteristic location, shape and change in adjacent bony structures revealed by facial schwannomas on CT and MR examination lead to correct diagnosis.

  10. Olfactory region schwannoma: Excision with preservation of olfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pravin Salunke

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Olfactory region schwannomas are rare, but when they occur, they commonly arise from the meningeal branches of the trigeminal nerve and may present without involvement of the olfaction. A 24 year old lady presented with hemifacial paraesthesias. Radiology revealed a large olfactory region enhancing lesion. She was operated through a transbasal with olfactory preserving approach. This manuscript highlights the importance of olfactory preservation in such lesions.

  11. Management of Large Tongue Schwannoma – A Short Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayanta Medhi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Schwannoma is a benign nerve sheath tumor composed of schwann cells. Oral cavity is a rare site for schwannomas, tongue being the most common location. Here we are presenting a case of a young adult who presented with a huge swelling in the tongue which was removed by mandibulotomy approach and pre-operative tracheostomy. A 22-year-old male patient presented to the outpatient department with a history of swelling in the tongue for the last 4 years with progressive difficulty in swallowing food and change of voice over the last few months. Upon examination a large swelling was observed on the posterior part of the tongue compromising the oropharyngeal inlet. The approximate size of the swelling was 5cmx4cm. After proper clinical evaluation the patient was advised to obtain a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI study of the oral cavity, which showed it to be a nerve sheath tumor (Schwannoma originating from the hypoglossal nerve branch. The patient was admitted for surgery. As difficult intubation was anticipated, pre-operative tracheostomy was performed. The tongue mass was approached by right paramedian mandibulotomy using a transcervical lip split incision. Post operative histopathological examination of the removed specimen showed hypercellular ‘Antony A’ area with plump spindle cells and hypocellular ‘Antony B’ area in a Hematoxylin & eosin stain (200x. This confirmed the diagnosis for a schwannoma. As each and every case is unique in its presentation, so is the management. The idea of presenting the above case is to emphasise the role of selection for the proper approach and foresee the preventable complications while working around the airway.

  12. Vestibular Findings in Military Band Musicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeigelboim, Bianca Simone

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Exposure to music is the subject of many studies because it is related to an individual's professional and social activities. Objectives Evaluate the vestibular behavior in military band musicians. Methods A retrospective cross-sectional study was performed. Nineteen musicians with ages ranging from 21 to 46 years were evaluated (average = 33.7 years and standard deviation = 7.2 years. They underwent anamnesis and vestibular and otolaryngologic evaluation through vectoelectronystagmography. Results The most evident otoneurologic symptoms in the anamnesis were tinnitus (84.2%, hearing difficulties (47.3%, dizziness (36.8%, headache (26.3%, intolerance to intense sounds (21.0%, and earache (15.7%. Seven musicians (37.0% showed vestibular abnormality, which occurred in the caloric test. The abnormality was more prevalent in the peripheral vestibular system, and there was a predominance of irritative peripheral vestibular disorders. Conclusion The alteration in vestibular exam occurred in the caloric test (37.0%. There were changes in the prevalence of peripheral vestibular system with a predominance of irritative vestibular dysfunction. Dizziness was the most significant symptom for the vestibular test in correlation with neurotologic symptoms. The present study made it possible to verify the importance of the labyrinthine test, which demonstrates that this population should be better studied because the systematic exposure to high sound pressure levels may cause major vestibular alterations.

  13. Benign retroperitoneal schwannoma presenting as colitis: A case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    We report a case of a patient presenting with clinical, radiological and endoscopic features of colitis due to a compressive left para-aortic mass. Total open surgical excision was performed, which resulted in complete resolution of colitis. Histopathology and immunohistochemistry revealed benign retroperitoneal schwannoma. These neural sheath tumors rarely occur in the retroperitoneum. They are usually asymptomatic but as they enlarge they may compress adjacent structures, which leads to a wide spectrum of nonspecific symptoms, including lumbar pain, headache, secondary hypertension, abdominal pain and renal colicky pain. CT and MR findings show characteristic features, but none are specific. Schwannoma can be isolated sporadic lesions, or associated with schwannomatosis or neurofibromatosis type Ⅱ (NF2). Although they vary in biological and clinical behavior, their presence is, in nearly every case, due to alterations or absence of the NF2 gene, which is involved in the growth regulation of Schwann cells. Both conditions were excluded by thorough mutation analysis. Diagnosis is based on histopathological examination and immunohistochemistry. Total excision is therapeutic and has a good prognosis. Schwannomatosis and NF2 should be excluded through clinical diagnostic criteria. Genetic testing of NF2 is probably not justified in the presence of a solitary retroperitoneal schwannoma.

  14. Schwannoma base tongue: Case report and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, N A; Wagh, M; Balagopal, P G; Gupta, S; Sukumaran, R; Sebastian, P

    2014-07-01

    Schwannomas are benign peripheral nerve sheath tumors. These are rare in the oral cavity (1%). The most common site of involvement in oral cavity is the tongue. Posterior third of tongue is not frequently involved. The aim of this paper is to present a case report of base tongue schwannoma and review literature of this rare tumor. Data from literature were analyzed for age, gender, presenting symptom, size at presentation, and surgical approach. We report a case of 26 year-old male who presented with swelling posterior 1/3rd tongue and change in quality of voice. He was evaluated for the same with MR and incision biopsy and was planned for surgery. Surgery was abandoned at a district hospital due to difficulty in intubation. At our center he underwent fibro optic bronchoscopy guided intubation followed by general anesthesia. He underwent excision of mass using left paramedian lip spitting approach with mandibulotomy and mandibular swing. Tumor was excised in toto. His postoperative recovery was uneventful. Literature review between 2001 and 2012 was done. 15 cases of base tongue schwannoma were identified. The most common age group involved was between 30-40 years. There was a slightly higher incidence in females. All patients were symptomatic at presentation. Most common complaints were related to swallowing and throat pain. Most patients underwent transoral excision of the tumor.

  15. Intra-oral schwannoma: Case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martins Manoela

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Schwannoma is a relatively uncommon, slow-growing benign tumor that is derived apparently from the Schwann cells. The tongue is the most common site, followed by the palate, floor of mouth, buccal mucosa, lips, and jaws. It can present itself at any age. Usually, this lesion is not taken into account during clinical practice and the differential diagnosis includes numerous benign neoformations based on epithelial and connective tissues. Immunohistochemical features can be useful in determining the neural differentiation. Anti-S100 protein is probably the most used antibody to identify this lesion. The schwannoma is usually a solitary lesion, and can be multiple when associated with neurofibromatosis. In the current study, authors report a case of an intraoral schwannoma situated at the vestibule with 20 years of evolution treated by complete surgical excision. The diagnosis was established based on clinical, histopathological, and immunohistochemical aspects. The patient is under clinical control, with no signs of recurrence even after four years.

  16. Schwannoma of the sino-nasal tract: a rare clinico-pathological entity revisited

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nadia Shirazi; Saurabh Varshney; Meena Harsh; S. S Bisht

    2012-01-01

    Schwannomas are benign neoplasms arising from Schwann cells of the peripheral, cranial and autonomic nerves. We report a case of schwannoma in the sino-nasal tract, a very rare site of tumour origin with unusual pseudoangiomatous histopathological changes, which we came across in a 22 years male with progressive nasal obstruction.

  17. [Studies on the largest Lyapunov exponents of the standing posture in patients with unilateral vestibular dysfunction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuta, Keisuke; Tokita, Takashi; Ito, Yatsuji; Aoki, Mitsuhiro; Kuze, Bunya

    2009-12-01

    In the present study, we investigated the body sway in patients with unilateral vestibular dysfunction by the largest Lyapunov exponents using a chaotic time series analysis. The largest Lyapunov exponent is regarded as a parameter indexing an orbital instability. Subjects consisted of 55 normal healthy subjects, 11 patients diagnosed as having vestibular neuritis (VN), 6 patients diagnosed as having sudden deafness (SD) with vertigo, 23 patients diagnosed as having Meniere disease (MD), 11 patients diagnosed as having benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) and 14 patients diagnosed as having other vestibular disorders. Using a stabilometer, the sway of the body center of gravity in an upright standing position was recorded with eyes open and closed for 60 seconds under each condition. From the time series data obtained, the largest Lyapunov exponents were calculated using a chaos analysis program. In normal healthy subjects and patients with unilateral vestibular dysfunction, the largest Lyapunov exponents on right-left sway were larger than those on forward-backward sway with eyes open and closed. The largest Lyapunov exponents in patients with unilateral vestibular dysfunction on forward-backward sway with eyes closed were significantly larger than those in normal healthy subjects. A few patients with the instability of standing posture judged from conventional analysis (area of sway, locus length per time) showed higher values of the LLE. We investigated the variation of the values of the largest Lyapunov exponents in patients with unilateral vestibular dysfunction at each stage during recovery from their vestibular damage. The largest Lyapunov exponents at the early stage with stable standing posture were significantly higher than those at the late stable stage with stable standing posture. Some patients at the very early stage had lower values of the largest Lyapunov exponents. We speculate that the orbital instability indicated by the values of the

  18. Evaluation of cochleo-vestibular functions in patients with auditory neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Namea M. Ismail

    2014-07-01

    Conclusion: Patients with auditory neuropathy could also have vestibular neuropathy. Vestibular neuropathy could be classified into three groups: superior vestibular neuropathy, inferior vestibular neuropathy and superior/inferior vestibular neuropathy.

  19. LOSS OF HETEROZYGOSITY FOR MARKERS ON 22CHROMOSOME IN SPORADIC SCHWANNOMA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective To analyze the loss of heterozygosity ( LOH) for markers on chromosome 22 ( CHR 22 ) and its significance with their clinical behaviors. Methods The frequency of CHR22 LOH in 36 schwannomas was observed by dena tured polyacrylamide gels and silver staining, and the proliferative index of schwannoma was calculated by Ki-67 and PCNA im munohistochemistry. Results 15 schwannomas (41.6%) showed allele loss. The proliferative index of schwannomas with LOH were significantly higher than those without LOH (P<0.05). In acoustic neuromas, patients with LOH were younger at the age of diagnosis, larger size of tumor, shorter history and higher growth rate than those without LOH, but with no signifi cance. Conclusion CHR22 LOH was the frequent event in the tumorigenesis of sporadic schwannoma. There were some links between CHR22 LOH and clinical behavior.

  20. Ancient schwannoma at the olfactory groove mimicking meningioma: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heo, Young Jin; Jeong, Hae Woong [Dept. of Radiology, Busan Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    Schwannomas are benign slow-growing nerve sheath tumors, which can develop in any peripheral or central nerve that contains Schwann cells. Schwannomas located near the olfactory groove are extremely rare and radiological diagnosis can be difficult. Moreover, ancient schwannoma is an uncommon variant, and radiologic findings are rarely reported. Herein, we reported a surgically confirmed case of ancient schwannoma at the olfactory groove in a 44-year-old woman presenting with headache and visual disturbance. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a solid and cystic extra-axial mass located in the subfrontal area mimicking an olfactory groove meningioma. Histopathologic diagnosis of ancient schwannoma was confirmed by immunohistochemical staining for S100, CD56, vimentin, and other markers. Furthermore, we described the clinical manifestations, MRI characteristics, and histopathologic findings of the case, and presented a review of related literature.

  1. Pediatric cervical sympathetic chain schwannoma with Horner syndrome: a rare case presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhagat, Sanjeev; Varshney, Saurabh; Bist, Sampan S; Gupta, Nitin

    2014-03-01

    Schwannomas are rare, benign, slowly growing neurogenic tumors that originate in peripheral, spinal, or cranial nerves other than the optic and olfactory nerves. In the head and neck, these tumors usually arise from the vagus nerve and the cervical sympathetic chain in the parapharyngeal space. Cervical sympathetic chain schwannomas represent a rare subgroup of schwannomas; fewer than 60 cases have been reported in the literature. These tumors are rarely seen in children and adolescents. Because patients typically present with an asymptomatic neck mass and vague complaints, clinical suspicion is important in making the diagnosis. Neural deficits at presentation are uncommon. The presence of features of Horner syndrome before excision is very rare, having been previously reported in only 10 cases of cervical sympathetic chain schwannoma. We report an extremely rare case of a cervical sympathetic chain schwannoma in a child who presented with Horner syndrome. The lesion was successfully excised.

  2. Ancient schwannoma of thoracic spine in a schizophrenic patient with somatic delusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-Ting Wen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Ancient schwannoma is a rare variant of schwannoma characterized by histopathologic degenerative changes, which are thought to be the result of long-term tumor growth and aging. However, ancient schwannoma in the spinal canal is particularly rare. We report a case of thoracic spine intradural extramedullary ancient schwannoma in a schizophrenic patient, who kept saying that “something in his back was giving him electric shock” for a long time. Unfortunately, this complaint was misinterpreted as somatic delusion symptoms. A spinal cord tumor was taken into consideration only after paraparesis developed. We have highlighted this case to remind every clinician to remain alert about the possibility of organic disease while treating patients with psychotic disorder history. Thorough neurological examination is required to avoid misdiagnosis. Spinal canal schwannoma can be totally removed successfully with good functional outcome and prognosis.

  3. Tandem intercostal thoracic schwannomas resected using a thoracoscopic nerve-sparing technique: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantwerker, Brian R; Dickman, Curtis A

    2011-07-01

    To describe a novel nerve-sparing technique for the resection of intercostal nerve schwannomas. This case demonstrates that intercostal neuralgia can be caused by intercostal schwannomas and that it can be relieved by their removal. A young woman with schwannomatosis had progressively worsening intercostal neuralgia caused by compression of the intercostal nerve against the rib by tandem intercostal schwannomas. After the tumors were removed, her symptoms were completely relieved. A thoracoscopic technique was used to define the involved fascicles and to facilitate removal of the tumors while sparing the uninvolved nerve. The patient's radicular pain was relieved completely by the tumor resection. Thoracoscopic surgery offers a safe and minimally invasive technique for removal of intercostal schwannomas and is a valid alternative to open thoracotomy. Removal of thoracic schwannomas can relieve intercostal neuralgia.

  4. DARA vestibular equipment onboard MIR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, P; Kellig, A; Hoffmann, H U; Ruyters, G

    1998-01-01

    In space, the weightless environment provides a different stimulus to the otolith organs of the vestibular system, and the resulting signals no longer correspond with the visual and other sensory signals sent to the brain. This signal conflict causes disorientation. To study this and also to understand the vestibular adaptation to weightlessness, DARA has developed scientific equipment for vestibular and visuo-oculomotoric investigations. Especially, two video-oculography systems (monocular--VOG--and binocular--BIVOG, respectively) as well as stimuli such as an optokinetic stimulation device have successfully been employed onboard MIR in the frame of national and European missions since 1992. The monocular VOG was used by Klaus Flade during the MIR '92 mission, by Victor Polyakov during his record 15 months stay onboard MIR in 1993/94 as well as by Ulf Merbold during EUROMIR '94. The binocular version was used by Thomas Reiter and Sergej Avdeyev during the 6 months EUROMIR '95 mission. PIs of the various experiments include H. Scherer and A. Clarke (FU Berlin), M. Dieterichs and S. Krafczyk (LMU Munchen) from Germany as well as C.H. Markham and S.G. Diamond from the United States. Video-Oculography (VOG) is a technique for examining the function of the human balance system located in the inner ear (vestibular system) and the visio-oculomotor interactions of the vestibular organ. The human eye movements are measured, recorded and evaluated by state-of-the-art video techniques. The method was first conceived and designed at the Vestibular Research Laboratory of the ENT Clinic in Steglitz, FU Berlin (A. Clarke, H. Scherer). Kayser-Threde developed, manufactured and tested the facilities for space application under contract to DARA. Evaluation software was first provided by the ENT Clinic, Berlin, later by our subcontractor Sensomotoric Instruments (SMI), Teltow. Optokinetic hardware to support visuo-oculomotoric investigations, has been shipped to MIR for EUROMIR '95

  5. [Schwannoma located in the tongue. A clinical case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallesio, C; Berrone, S

    1992-12-01

    Schwannoma or neurilemmoma and neurofibroma are two tumors of the peripheral nerves originating in the nerve sheaths. Schwannoma account for just over 1% of benign tumors reported in the oral cavity. The tongue is unanimously considered the most frequent site at this level; however, the tip is the least affected part of the organ. The case of schwannoma reported here is the third observed with a lingual localization in 18 years by the Division of Maxillo-Facial Surgery of The Odontostomatological Clinic of the University of Turin. The case is of interest due the rarity of this pathology and the presence of non-significant symptoms for a presumed initial diagnosis. CASE REPORT. A 21-year-old woman was referred to our attention following the appearance two years earlier of a slowly growing swelling on the tip of the tongue. The patient complained of the fastidious presence, disturbance to mastication and phonation and occasional paresthesia of the tip of the tongue. The small mass, which was clearly evident on examination, was covered with normal mucosa. On palpation it had a hard-elastic consistency; it was slightly painful, smooth and partial mobile on surrounding levels. The patient underwent the surgical removal of the neoplasia under anesthesia. The mass was well capsulated and a good cleavage plane was easily found. The neoformation was yellowy grey, oval bean-shaped, measuring 1.9 x 1.3 x 1.1 cm. The histological diagnosis, confirmed by immunohistochemical tests, was benign Antoni's, type A schwannoma. The postoperative period was good an there was no recidivation during the course of a one-year follow-up. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSIONS. Benign schwannoma, which are relatively rare in the oral cavity, represent a pathology which are often not taken into account during clinical practice. Symptoms which take the form of slight hypoesthesia and vague paresthesia may lead to the suspected diagnosis of this type of neoplasia. The final diagnosis is always made after a

  6. Vestibular rehabilitation therapy for the dizzy patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tee, L H; Chee, N W C

    2005-05-01

    A customised vestibular rehabilitation therapy (VRT) programme is an important treatment modality in patients with vestibular dysfunction resulting in motion-provoked vertigo, oscillopsia (gaze instability), disequilibrium and gait disturbances. We discuss in this paper the patient selection criteria for VRT, rehabilitation strategies for unilateral and bilateral vestibular deficits, and some of the compelling evidence to support the use of VRT in treating such patients.

  7. Movement Symmetries and the Mammalian Vestibular System

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCollum, Gin; Boyle, Richard

    2000-03-01

    Unity of movement requires vertebrates to have an ability to symmetrize along the midline. For example, human erect stance involves symmetry with respect to gravity. The mammalian vestibular system provides a mechanism for maintaining symmetries, which is also open to influence and adaptation by the rest of the organism. The vestibular system includes the inner ear endorgans and central nuclei, along with projections to oculomotor, cerebellar, thalamic, and spinal motor centers. The vestibular endorgans - the semicircular canals and the otoliths - use sensory hairs to register inertia. The vestibular endorgans are right-left symmetric and the semicircular canals form an approximately orthogonal coordinate system for angular motion. Primary afferent axons project from the endorgans to the vestibular nuclei (and a few other places). The vestibular nuclei integrate vestibular, visual, and somatosensory signals, along with a proposed copy of the voluntary motor command and signals from other central structures. The relationship between the canals and the otoliths gives rise to symmetries among neurons, in the organization among the several vestibular nuclei, and in the projections from the vestibular nuclei. These symmetries organize the space of body movements so that functional relationships are maintained in spite of the many free variables of body movement. They also provide a foundation for adaptive reinterpretation of the relationship between canal and otolith signals, for example in freefall.

  8. Vestibular loss disrupts daily rhythm in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, T; Mauvieux, B; Bulla, J; Quarck, G; Davenne, D; Denise, P; Philoxène, B; Besnard, S

    2015-02-01

    Hypergravity disrupts the circadian regulation of temperature (Temp) and locomotor activity (Act) mediated through the vestibular otolithic system in mice. In contrast, we do not know whether the anatomical structures associated with vestibular input are crucial for circadian rhythm regulation at 1 G on Earth. In the present study we observed the effects of bilateral vestibular loss (BVL) on the daily rhythms of Temp and Act in semipigmented rats. Our model of vestibular lesion allowed for selective peripheral hair cell degeneration without any other damage. Rats with BVL exhibited a disruption in their daily rhythms (Temp and Act), which were replaced by a main ultradian period (τ <20 h) for 115.8 ± 68.6 h after vestibular lesion compared with rats in the control group. Daily rhythms of Temp and Act in rats with BVL recovered within 1 wk, probably counterbalanced by photic and other nonphotic time cues. No correlation was found between Temp and Act daily rhythms after vestibular lesion in rats with BVL, suggesting a direct influence of vestibular input on the suprachiasmatic nucleus. Our findings support the hypothesis that the vestibular system has an influence on daily rhythm homeostasis in semipigmented rats on Earth, and raise the question of whether daily rhythms might be altered due to vestibular pathology in humans. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  9. Hearing loss in enlarged vestibular aqueduct and incomplete partition type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahadizadeh, Emily; Ascha, Mustafa; Manzoor, Nauman; Gupta, Amit; Semaan, Maroun; Megerian, Cliff; Otteson, Todd

    2017-06-23

    The purpose of this work is to identify the role of incomplete partition type II on hearing loss among patients with enlarged vestibular aqueduct (EVA). EVA is a common congenital inner ear malformation among children with hearing loss, where vestibular aqueduct morphology in this population has been shown to correlate to hearing loss. However, the impact of incomplete partition between cochlear turns on hearing loss has not been, despite meaningful implications for EVA pathophysiology. A retrospective review of radiology reports for patients who had computed tomography (CT) scans with diagnoses of hearing loss at a tertiary medical center between January 2000 and June 2016 were screened for EVA. CT scans of the internal auditory canal (IAC) for those patients with EVA were examined for evidence of incomplete partition type II (IP-II), measurements of midpoint width and operculum width a second time, and patients meeting Cincinnati criteria for EVA selected for analysis. Statistical analysis including chi-square, Wilcoxon rank-sum, and t-tests were used to identify differences in outcomes and clinical predictors, as appropriate for the distribution of the data. Linear mixed models of hearing test results for all available tests were constructed, both univariable and adjusting for vestibular aqueduct morphometric features, with ear-specific intercepts and slopes over time. There were no statistically significant differences in any hearing test results or vestibular aqueduct midpoint and operculum widths. Linear mixed models, both univariable and those adjusting for midpoint and operculum widths, did not indicate a statistically significant effect of incomplete partition type II on hearing test results. Hearing loss due to enlarged vestibular aqueduct does not appear to be affected by the presence of incomplete partition type II. Our results suggest that the pathophysiological processes underlying hearing loss in enlarged vestibular aqueduct may not be a result of

  10. Giant thoracic schwannoma presenting with abrupt onset of abdominal pain: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Isaac

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Giant intradural extramedullary schwannomas of the thoracic spine are not common. Schwannomas, that is, tumors derived from neoplastic Schwann cells, and neurofibromas represent the most common intradural extramedullary spinal lesions. We report the case of a patient with a giant thoracic schwannoma presenting unusually with acute abdominal pain and with delayed neurological impairment. Case presentation A 26-year-old Hispanic man with no previous medical problems presented with acute periumbilical pain. After extensive work-up including an exploratory laparotomy for appendectomy, magnetic resonance imaging scans of the lumbar and thoracic spine revealed a giant intradural extramedullary thoracic schwannoma within the spinal canal posterior to the T9, T10, and T11 vertebral bodies. Magnetic resonance imaging signal prolongation was noted in the spinal cord both rostral and caudal to the schwannoma. The patient underwent an urgent laminectomy from T8 to L1. After sacrificing the T10 root, the tumor was removed en bloc. Postoperatively, the patient improved significantly gaining antigravity strength in both lower extremities. Conclusion The T10 dermatome is represented by the umbilical region. This referred pain may represent a mechanism by which a giant thoracic schwannoma may present as acute abdominal pain. Acute, intense abdominal pain with delayed neurologic deficit is a rare presentation of a thoracic schwannoma but should be considered as a possible cause of abdominal pain presenting without clear etiology. Although these lesions may be delayed in their diagnosis, early diagnosis and treatment may lead to an improved clinical outcome.

  11. Endoscopic ultrasound features of gastric schwannomas with radiological correlation: A case series report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dan-Dan Zhong; Cai-Hua Wang; Jing-Hong Xu; Miao-Yan Chen; Jian-Ting Cai

    2012-01-01

    Gastric schwannomas are rare mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract.They are usually misdiagnosed as other submucosal tumors preoperatively.Experience of the imaging features of gastric schwannomas is extremely limited.In this report,we summarize the features of a series of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) images of gastric schwannomas in an effort to improve the diagnosis and differential diagnosis rate.We retrospectively reviewed the endosonographic features of four patients with gastric schwannomas and their computed tomography imaging results.Gastric schwannomas had heterogeneous hypoechogenicity or isoechogenicity,and a well-demarcated margin.The tumors originated from the fourth layer.Cystic changes and calcification were uncommon.Marginal hypoechoic haloes were observed in two patients.The results described here were different from those of previous studies.In the EUS evaluation,the internal echogenicity of gastric schwannomas was heterogeneous and low,but slightly higher than that of muscularis propria.These features might help us differentiate gastric schwannomas from other submucosal tumors.Further investigation is needed to differentiate these mesenchymal tumors.

  12. Correlation of magnetic resonance imaging findings of spinal intradural extramedullary schwannomas with pathologic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yeo Ju; Park, In Suh; Yoon, Seung Hwan; Choi, Suk Jin; Kim, Youn Jeong; Kang, Young Hye; Lee, Ha Young; Kim, Woo Chul; Han, Jun Gu; Cho, Soon Gu [Inha University Hospital, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    To evaluate the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of spinal intradural extramedullary schwannomas with pathologic correlation and to determine whether these schwannomas share the imaging features of schwannomas in the peripheral nerves. The MRIs of 17 cases of pathologically proven spinal intradural extramedullary schwannomas were reviewed retrospectively, and cystic changes, enhancement, and intratumoral hemorrhage of the tumors were evaluated. Imaging features known to be common findings of schwannoma in the peripheral nerves, such as encapsulation, the target sign, the fascicular sign, and visualization of entering or exiting nerve rootlets, were also evaluated. The histopathology of the tumors was correlated with the MRI findings. Cystic changes were detected in 14 cases by MRI and in 16 cases by pathology. The most common pattern of enhancement was a thick peripheral septal pattern (70.59%). Intratumoral hemorrhage was detected in four cases on MRI, but in all cases on pathology. Encapsulation was observed in all cases. The fascicular sign was seen in only four cases, and thickening of an exiting rootlet was visualized in one case. None of the cases showed the target sign. Spinal intradural extramedullary schwannomas were typical encapsulated cystic tumors and had few imaging features of schwannomas in the peripheral nerves.

  13. Ancient Schwannoma of the hard palate. An uncommon case report and review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gainza-Cirauqui, Maria L; Eguía-Del Valle, Asier; Martínez-Conde, Rafael; Coca-Meneses, Juan C; Aguirre-Urizar, José M

    2013-02-01

    Schwannoma or neurilemmoma is an infrequent benign tumor in the oral cavity that originates from the Schwann cells on the neural sheath of the peripheral nerves. Schwannomas are frequently located in the soft tissues of head and neck region, but only a 1 to 12% of them are located in the oral cavity. Some histological variants of schwannoma have been described including the cellular, plexiform, epithelioid, ancient, and melanocytic types. The "ancient schwannoma" is an uncommon variant of this tumor that shows specific histological characteristics, and is rare in the oral cavity with less than 15 cases described on the literature. Most of them were located in the tongue or in the floor of the mouth, being the hard palate an extremely rare localization. We present a new clinical case of an ancient schwannoma with a long time of evolution, arising from the nasopalatine nerve, and located in the hard palate of a 35 year old female. We also review the main clinical and histological characteristics of this pathology. Key words:Ancient schwannoma, neurilemmoma, palate, schwannoma.

  14. Facial Nerve Paralysis due to a Pleomorphic Adenoma with the Imaging Characteristics of a Facial Nerve Schwannoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nader, Marc-Elie; Bell, Diana; Sturgis, Erich M; Ginsberg, Lawrence E; Gidley, Paul W

    2014-08-01

    Background Facial nerve paralysis in a patient with a salivary gland mass usually denotes malignancy. However, facial paralysis can also be caused by benign salivary gland tumors. Methods We present a case of facial nerve paralysis due to a benign salivary gland tumor that had the imaging characteristics of an intraparotid facial nerve schwannoma. Results The patient presented to our clinic 4 years after the onset of facial nerve paralysis initially diagnosed as Bell palsy. Computed tomography demonstrated filling and erosion of the stylomastoid foramen with a mass on the facial nerve. Postoperative histopathology showed the presence of a pleomorphic adenoma. Facial paralysis was thought to be caused by extrinsic nerve compression. Conclusions This case illustrates the difficulty of accurate preoperative diagnosis of a parotid gland mass and reinforces the concept that facial nerve paralysis in the context of salivary gland tumors may not always indicate malignancy.

  15. Motor development after vestibular deprivation in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geisler, HC; Gramsbergen, A

    1998-01-01

    This review summarizes the postural development in the rat and the influences of vestibular deprivation from the 5th postnatal day on this development. Vestibular deprivation leads to a delay in motor development. Most probably this delay is caused by a delay in the development of postural control,

  16. Newly Diagnosed

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sites Podcasts QR Codes RSS Feeds Social Bookmarking Social Network Sites Text Messaging Twitter Video Games Video Sharing ... in care is similar to that of HIV-negative individuals. Additional Resources AIDSinfo – Just Diagnosed: Next ...

  17. Anesthetic management of schwannoma of the base of the tongue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Upma B Batra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Schwannoma arising from the base of the tongue are very rare and only a few cases have been reported so far. Definitive diagnosis is always made after a histological examination. Apart from an anticipated difficult airway with a risk of airway obstruction upon induction of general anesthesia, anesthetic concerns also include possibility of trauma to the growth and bleeding with attendant risks. We discuss the awake fiberoptic technique used for endotracheal intubation in such a case. This case report highlights the importance of detailed history taking and clinical examination, with emphasis on airway assessment and preoperative planning.

  18. Critical Airway Compromise due to a Massive Vagal Schwannoma

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McDermott, AM

    2016-05-01

    We describe the case of a 37-year-old man with a slowly enlarging neck lump and compressive symptoms. He presented to a separate institution 10 years prior where an observational approach was advocated. Following preoperative investigations and embolization, an 11cm vagal schwannoma was excised and vagus nerve was sacrificed. Although conservative management is appropriate for a select patient population, surgical excision is treatment of choice for cervical neurogenic tumours and paraganglionomas and must be considered in young patients or rapidly expanding tumours to avoid compressive symptoms, as in this case.

  19. Intraperitoneal schwannoma. Three cases. Schwanoma intraperitoneal. Tres casos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez Lafuente, J.; Rodriguez Sanpedro, F.; Varela, R.; Lopez Ojeda, J.; Martinez, J. (Hospital regional. Servicio de Radiodignostico. Malaga (Spain))

    1993-01-01

    Schwanomas are nerve sheath tumors which can spread throughout the entire organism, although their intraperitoneal localization is exceptional. Three cases are presented of schwannoma originating in jejunal mesentery, 2 of which were predominantly cystic, with histological features of malignancy, while the third was seen to be solid, non homogenous and histologically benign. The literature is reviewed and the difficulties involved in establishing radiological criteria for benignity or malignity in these tumors are discussed, as is the differential diagnosis with regard to other abdominal cystic or solid masses. (Author) 14 refs.

  20. Anesthetic management of schwannoma of the base of the tongue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batra, Upma B; Usha, G; Gogia, Anoop R

    2011-04-01

    Schwannoma arising from the base of the tongue are very rare and only a few cases have been reported so far. Definitive diagnosis is always made after a histological examination. Apart from an anticipated difficult airway with a risk of airway obstruction upon induction of general anesthesia, anesthetic concerns also include possibility of trauma to the growth and bleeding with attendant risks. We discuss the awake fiberoptic technique used for endotracheal intubation in such a case. This case report highlights the importance of detailed history taking and clinical examination, with emphasis on airway assessment and preoperative planning.

  1. Quality of life questionnaire application in patients before and after vestibular rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishino, Lucia Kazuko

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Conventional vestibular tests are not efficient instruments to evaluate the level of commitment in the life quality of a patient with dizziness. The quality of life questionnaire specific for dizziness, the Dizziness Handicap Inventory, was translated and validated into Portuguese intending to get over this difficulty in quantifying the vertiginous patient symptoms. Objective: This study aims at comparing the Brazilian Dizziness Handicap Inventory results before and after personalized vestibular rehabilitation in patients diagnosed with chronic vertigo from benign paroxist positional vertigo and chronic vertigo from other causes. Method: Retrospective study of 30 medical records; all of which were submitted to the Brazilian Dizziness Handicap Inventory before and after the personalized vestibular rehabilitation treatment. Results: In the total scores average of vestibular pre-rehabilitation, the benign paroxist positional vertigo had a score of 47.93±24.46 and the chronic vertigo for other causes of 54.40±20.97. At discharge, the benign paroxist positional vertigo scores average was of 6.13±7.22 and in the chronic vertigo from other causes, the scores average was of 26.13±20.51. Conclusion: The commitment of the life quality of individuals with dizziness, both for chronic vertigo from other causes and benign paroxist positional vertigo, was very similar, confirming an important commitment. The vestibular rehabilitation effect for both cases was also efficient and the Dizziness Handicap Inventory was an efficient instrument to evaluate the vertiginous case evolution.

  2. [Vestibular disorders and nausea during head and neck intensity-modulated radiation therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berta, É; Righini, C A; Chamorey, E; Villa, J; Atallah, I; Reyt, É; Coffre, A; Schmerber, S

    2016-06-01

    We studied whether there is a relationship between nausea and vestibular disorders in patients treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for head and neck cancer. We performed a prospective single-centre study that enrolled 31 patients. A videonystagmography was carried out before and within 15 days after radiation therapy for each patient. Nausea was assessed at baseline, every week, and at the post-radiotherapy videonystagmography visit. Twenty-six patients had benefited from a complete interpretable videonystagmography. For 14 of these patients vestibular damage was diagnosed post-radiotherapy. During irradiation, six patients felt nauseous, but without dizziness. In univariate analysis, we found a relationship statistically significant between the average dose received by the vestibules and vestibular disorder videonystagmography (P=0.001, odds ratio [OR]: 1.08 [1.025-.138]), but there was no relationship between vestibular disorder videonystagmography and nausea (P=0.701). Irradiation of the vestibular system during IMRT does not seem to explain the nausea. Copyright © 2016 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Facial Nerve Schwannoma of Parotid Gland: Difficulties in Diagnosis and Management

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    Murat Damar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Facial nerve schwannomas (FNS are encapsulated benign tumors arising from Schwann cells of seventh cranial nerve. Most of the facial nerve schwannomas are localized in intratemporal region; only 9% of cases involve a portion of the extratemporal segment. Preoperative diagnosis is often unclear; diagnosis is often made intraoperatively. Management of intraparotid FNS is troublesome because of the facial nerve paralysis. In this report we presented a case of intraparotid schwannoma in a 55-year-old male patient complaining of a painless mass without peripheral facial nerve palsy in left parotid gland. Clinical features, preoperative and intraoperative diagnosis, and difficulties during management are discussed with the review of the literature.

  4. Gastric schwannoma: a benign tumor often misdiagnosed as gastrointestinal stromal tumor

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    Apurva S. Shah

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Gastric schwannomas are rare mesenchymal tumors that arise from the nerve plexus of gut wall. They present with nonspecific symptoms and are often detected incidentally. Preoperative investigation is not pathognomic and many are therefore misdiagnosed as gastrointestinal stromal tumors. We report a rare case of a 37-year old woman who underwent laparotomy for complex bilateral ovarian cyst with resection of gastric-gastrointestinal stromal tumor preoperatively, but confirmed to have a gastric schwannomas postoperatively. This case underscores the differential diagnosis of submucosal, exophytic gastric mass as schwannoma.

  5. Rare occurrence of intraosseous schwannoma in a young child, its review and its pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Kumar Bansal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Schwannoma is a benign, encapsulated, perineural tumor that arises from the Schwann cells. Approximately 25% of the reported cases originate from the head and neck region. Of these, approximately 1-12% occurs intraorally. The intrabony lesion accounts for less than 1% of the central neoplasms. We report a rare case of intraosseous schwannoma in an 8-year-old male patient characteristically originating from the mental nerve. Radiographic examination followed by histopathological evaluation was further confirmed by immunohistochemical markers, S-100 protein, and GFAP that stained intensely positive for the tumor. Thus, confirming the diagnosis of intraosseous schwannoma.

  6. Schwannoma of the epiglottis: case report focusing on clinico-pathological aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saita, V; Azzolina, A; Galia, A; Fraggetta, F

    2005-12-01

    Laryngeal schwannomas are uncommon lesions with only few cases reported. Herein we present a further case of a schwannoma of the epiglottis, occurring in a 62-year-old with a clinical history of a cutaneous malignant melanoma and laryngeal glottic keratosis. The schwannoma was incidentally discovered as a small polypoid lesion located on the laryngeal surface of the epiglottis and was removed endoscopically. The procedure was uneventful and the patient is well six months later. Authors focus on the diagnostic and therapeutic options for this unusual lesion and discuss the differential diagnosis of the spindle cell proliferation of the larynx.

  7. Soft Tissue Schwannomas of the Hard Palate and the Mandibular Mentum

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    Cennet Neslihan Eroglu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Schwannomas are benign, slow growing, encapsulated tumours that originate from the Schwann cells. Intraoral schwannomas are rare, and most of these tumours involve the tongue. They are rarely located in the hard palate or in the facial soft tissue. Herein, we present the clinical and histological features as well as the prognoses of two male patients with schwannoma, one of which was localized to the hard palate and the other to the facial soft tissue around the mandibular mentum and caused swelling.

  8. Task, muscle and frequency dependent vestibular control of posture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Forbes, P.A.; Siegmund, G.P.; Schouten, A.C.; Blouin, J.S.

    2015-01-01

    The vestibular system is crucial for postural control; however there are considerable differences in the task dependence and frequency response of vestibular reflexes in appendicular and axial muscles. For example, vestibular reflexes are only evoked in appendicular muscles when vestibular informati

  9. Effects of vibrotactile vestibular substitution on vestibular rehabilitation - preliminary study,

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    Cibele Brugnera

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION: Some patients with severe impairment of body balance do not obtain adequate improvement from vestibular rehabilitation (VR. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effectiveness of Vertiguard(tm biofeedback equipment as a sensory substitution (SS of the vestibular system in patients who did not obtain sufficient improvement from VR. METHODS: This was a randomized prospective clinical study. Thirteen patients without satisfactory response to conventional VR were randomized into a study group (SG, which received the vibrotactile stimulus from Vertiguard(tm for ten days, and a control group (CG, which used equipment without the stimulus. For pre- and post-treatment assessment, the Sensory Organization Test (SOT protocol of the Computerized Dynamic Posturography (CDP and two scales of balance self-perception, Activities-specific Balance Confidence (ABC and Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI, were used. RESULTS: After treatment, only the SG showed statistically significant improvement in C5 (p = 0.007 and C6 (p = 0.01. On the ABC scale, there was a significant difference in the SG (p= 0.04. The DHI showed a significant difference in CG and SG with regard to the physical aspect, and only in the SG for the functional aspect (p = 0.04. CONCLUSION: The present findings show that sensory substitution using the vibrotactile stimulus of the Vertiguard(tm system helped with the integration of neural networks involved in maintaining posture, improving the strategies used in the recovery of body balance.

  10. Special (vestibular training of servicemen

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    Afonin V.M.

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available It has been shown that conditions of professional activity of airmobile servicemen require from them, in addition to excellent proficiency in military armament and materiel, high level of physical qualities and movement coordination development. It is essential to have high practice of vestibular apparatus, which helps to resist such negative feature as air sickness. The essences of term air sickness, its negative consequences for professional activity are highlighted. Possible tendencies of work in terms of enhancing organism resistance to air sickness (according to the analysis of publications and practical experience are investigated.

  11. Cerebellopontine angle facial schwannoma relapsing towards middle cranial fossa

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    Takafumi Nishizaki

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Facial nerve schwannomas involving posterior and middle fossas are quite rare. Here, we report an unusual case of cerebellopontine angle facial schwannoma that involved the middle cranial fossa, two years after the first operation. A 53-year-old woman presented with a 3-year history of a progressive left side hearing loss and 6-month history of a left facial spasm and palsy. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI revealed 4.5 cm diameter of left cerebellopontine angle and small middle fossa tumor. The tumor was subtotally removed via a suboccipital retrosigmoid approach. The tumor relapsed towards middle cranial fossa within a two-year period. By subtemporal approach with zygomatic arch osteotomy, the tumor was subtotally removed except that in the petrous bone involving the facial nerve. In both surgical procedures, intraoperative monitoring identified the facial nerve, resulting in preserved facial function. The tumor in the present case arose from broad segment of facial nerve encompassing cerebellopontine angle, meatus, geniculate/labyrinthine and possibly great petrosal nerve, in view of variable symptoms. Preservation of anatomic continuity of the facial nerve should be attempted, and the staged operation via retrosigmoid and middle fossa approaches using intraoperative facial monitoring, may result in preservation of the facial nerve.

  12. Schwannoma of the breast: an unexpected diagnosis by magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solano Díaz, P; Hidalgo Martín, M T; Sánchez Cordero, M F; Soto Aguilar, M C

    2017-04-28

    Schwannomas consist of benign tumors that arise from the nerves, however, they are not frequent in the breast. Our search criteria only found 28 cases described in Literature. We show the case about a 63 years old woman who underwent a breast magnetic resonance (MR) because of high risk for breast cancer, in which a lession on her left breast was found. Not only MR features seemed to be benign, but ultrasound and mamography features, too. The diagnosis of schwannoma was confirmed by ultrasound-guided biopsy. Findings in conventional radiology were correlated with those described in the reviewed literature. In our opinion, this case results valuable due to the inicial diagnosis by MR, which is not an imaging proof for bening tumors, innitially. According to the revised bibliography these features are pretty funny, as mamography and ultrasound, with histological findings, are the clues for the usual diagnosis. Copyright © 2017 SERAM. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Transoral Robotic Surgery in Retrostyloid Parapharyngeal Space Schwannomas

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    Mohssen Ansarin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Parapharyngeal space (PPS tumors are very rare, representing about 0.5% of head and neck neoplasms. An external surgical approach is mainly used. Several recent papers show how transoral robotic surgery (TORS excision could be a prospective tool to remove mainly benign lesions in PPS; no cases of neurogenic tumors from the retrostyloid space treated with TORS have been reported. We present two cases which underwent TORS for schwannomas from the retrostyloid compartment of the parapharyngeal space. Clinical diagnosis of schwannoma was performed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. In the first case a 6 cm neurogenic tumor arose from the vagus nerve and in the second case a 5 cm mass from the sympathetic chain was observed. Both cases were treated successfully by the TORS approach using a new “J”-shaped incision through the mucosa and superior pharyngeal constrictor muscle. Left vocal cord palsy and the Claude Bernard Horner syndrome, respectively, were observed as expected postsurgical sequelae. In case 1 the first bite syndrome developed after three months, while no complications were observed in case 2. Both patients regained a normal swallowing function. TORS seems to be a feasible mini-invasive procedure for benign PPS masses including masses in the poststyloid space.

  14. Transoral robotic surgery in retrostyloid parapharyngeal space schwannomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansarin, Mohssen; Tagliabue, Marta; Chu, Francesco; Zorzi, Stefano; Proh, Michele; Preda, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    Parapharyngeal space (PPS) tumors are very rare, representing about 0.5% of head and neck neoplasms. An external surgical approach is mainly used. Several recent papers show how transoral robotic surgery (TORS) excision could be a prospective tool to remove mainly benign lesions in PPS; no cases of neurogenic tumors from the retrostyloid space treated with TORS have been reported. We present two cases which underwent TORS for schwannomas from the retrostyloid compartment of the parapharyngeal space. Clinical diagnosis of schwannoma was performed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In the first case a 6 cm neurogenic tumor arose from the vagus nerve and in the second case a 5 cm mass from the sympathetic chain was observed. Both cases were treated successfully by the TORS approach using a new "J"-shaped incision through the mucosa and superior pharyngeal constrictor muscle. Left vocal cord palsy and the Claude Bernard Horner syndrome, respectively, were observed as expected postsurgical sequelae. In case 1 the first bite syndrome developed after three months, while no complications were observed in case 2. Both patients regained a normal swallowing function. TORS seems to be a feasible mini-invasive procedure for benign PPS masses including masses in the poststyloid space.

  15. Clinical experience with Leksell gamma knife in the treatment of trigeminal schwannomas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG En-min; PAN Li; ZHANG Nan; ZHOU Liang-fu; WANG Bing-jiang; DONG Ya-fei; DAI Jia-zhong; CAI Pei-wu

    2005-01-01

    @@ Trigeminal nerve schwannomas, which are rare, slowly growing, benign tumors, account for 0.2% to 1.0% of all intracranial tumors and 0.8% to 8.0% of intracranial schwannomas.1-5 These tumors are treated surgically.1-4 The development of microsurgery and skull base surgery has made complete resection possible in most patients. Nevertheless, cranial nerve sequelae appear after complete resection of these tumors because they are located close to the cavernous sinus and usually adhere to the vital vascular and neural structures. As an alternative to microsurgical resection, Leksell gamma knife (LGK) radiosurgery has been performed for patients with intracranial schwannomas to minimize the treatment-related morbidity and achieve a long-term control of tumor growth.6,7 In this report, we describe our 6-year experience in the treatment of 38 patients with trigeminal schwannomas by LGK.

  16. Epibulbar schwannoma in a 12-year-old boy: A case report and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akshay Gopinathan Nair

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Schwannomas are benign, encapsulated, primary neurilemmal tumors composed of proliferating Schwann cells. Schwannomas are commonly seen in the orbit, but are rare on the epibulbar surface. Herein, we report a case of a 12-year-old boy who presented to us with a slow-growing painless subconjunctival mass in the left eye. There was no intraocular extension of the mass and intra-operatively, the mass could be clearly delineated and was excised off the underlying sclera. Histopathological examination of the mass showed typical features of schwannoma and immunohistochemistry helped to confirm the diagnosis. There was no recurrence of the lesion observed at follow-up 26 months after surgery. Here, we describe this uncommon tumor and review the available literature. Although rare, an epibulbar schwannoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of an amelanotic, painless subconjunctival nodular mass. Excision of the lesion is the recommended treatment.

  17. An infrequent plexiform variant of schwannoma of the glans penis: a rare finding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tzu-Chun Lin; Po-Yuan Wu; Tze-Yi Lin; Tsong-Liang Lee

    2010-01-01

    @@ Dear Editor, I am Dr Tzu-Chun Lin, from the Department of Dermatology, China Medical University Hospital,Taichung, Taiwan, China. We write to you to present a rare case of plexiform variant of schwannoma on the glans penis.

  18. A giant vagal schwannoma with unusual extension from skull base to the mediastinum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shenoy S Vijendra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cervical vagal schwannoma is an extremely rare neoplasm. Middle aged people are usually affected. These tumors usually present as asymptomatic masses. These tumors are almost always benign. Preoperative diagnosis of these lesions is important due to the morbidity associated with its excision. Preoperative tissue diagnosis is not accurate. The imaging modality can be done to assess the extent and for planning the treatment. Surgical excision with preservation of neural origin is the treatment option. Giant vagal schwannomas are extremely rare. Only one case has been reported in the literature till date. There has no reported case of extensive vagal schwannoma from skull base to the mediastinum. Here, we describe the asymptomatic presentation of an unusual appearing giant cervical vagal schwannoma with an extension from skull base to the mediastinum.

  19. Aging of the Human Vestibular System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalewski, Christopher K.

    2015-01-01

    Aging affects every sensory system in the body, including the vestibular system. Although its impact is often difficult to quantify, the deleterious impact of aging on the vestibular system is serious both medically and economically. The deterioration of the vestibular sensory end organs has been known since the 1970s; however, the measurable impact from these anatomical changes remains elusive. Tests of vestibular function either fall short in their ability to quantify such anatomical deterioration, or they are insensitive to the associated physiologic decline and/or central compensatory mechanisms that accompany the vestibular aging process. When compared with healthy younger individuals, a paucity of subtle differences in test results has been reported in the healthy older population, and those differences are often observed only in response to nontraditional and/or more robust stimuli. In addition, the reported differences are often clinically insignificant insomuch that the recorded physiologic responses from the elderly often fall within the wide normative response ranges identified for normal healthy adults. The damaging economic impact of such vestibular sensory decline manifests itself in an exponential increase in geriatric dizziness and a subsequent higher prevalence of injurious falls. An estimated $10 to $20 billion dollar annual cost has been reported to be associated with falls-related injuries and is the sixth leading cause of death in the elderly population, with a 20% mortality rate. With an estimated 115% increase in the geriatric population over 65 years of age by the year 2050, the number of balanced-disordered patients with a declining vestibular system is certain to reach near epidemic proportions. An understanding of the effects of age on the vestibular system is imperative if clinicians are to better manage elderly patients with balance disorders, dizziness, and vestibular disease. PMID:27516717

  20. Subclinical vestibular dysfunction in migraine patients: a preliminary study of ocular and rectified cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potentials

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Chul-Ho; Jang, Min-Uk; Choi, Hui-Chul; Sohn, Jong-Hee

    2015-01-01

    Background Many studies have identified various vestibular symptoms and laboratory abnormalities in migraineurs. Although the vestibular tests may be abnormal, the changes may exist without vestibular symptoms. To date, vestibular-evoked myogenic potential (VEMP) has been the easiest and simplest test for measuring vestibular function in clinical practice. Cervical VEMP (cVEMP) represents a vestibulo-collic reflex, whereas ocular VEMP (oVEMP) reflects a vestibulo-ocular pathway. Therefore, we...

  1. Triad of Intraspinal Meningioma, Schwannoma, and Ependymoma: Report of an Extremely Rare Case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasheed, Faiza; Fatima, Saira; Ahmad, Zubair

    2016-02-01

    Mixed tumors composed of schwannoma and meningioma are extremely rare and are usually associated with neurofibromatosis type 2. So far, all the cases reported have involved the cerebellopontine angle. Only 3 reported cases did not have a clear association with neurofibromatosis type 2. We report a mixed tumor comprising schwannoma admixed with meningioma and ependymoma in the cervical spinal cord of a 22-year-old male. © The Author(s) 2015.

  2. Tongue base schwannoma: differential diagnosis and imaging features with a case presentation

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Schwannomas are slow growing, encapsulated neoplasms that arise from the nerve sheath. A vast majority of these benign neoplasms occur in the head and neck region, most commonly involving the 8th cranial nerve. Schwannomas arising from the base of tongue are very rare and, thus, can easily escape the list of differential diagnosis for a posterior tongue mass. A systematic approach is recommended for diagnosis of a posterior tongue mass, with neoplastic, infectious, and congenital categories. ...

  3. Schwannoma of the tongue: two case reports and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Marc; Wang, Marilene B

    2009-11-01

    The aim of this study was to describe clinicopathologic and radiographic features of two cases of schwannoma involving the oral tongue and to review the literature of this unusual clinical entity. Case reports with review of the pathologic, radiologic and clinical data for two patients with schwannoma of the tongue are reported. Review of the literature of case reports of schwannomas (neurilemmomas) of the tongue from 1955 to 2006 with analysis of the patient's age, gender, presenting symptom(s), tumor size, and surgical approach was undertaken. The two patients in our series presented with painless swelling of the tongue. Transoral excision was performed and pathologic examination confirmed the diagnosis of schwannoma in both the cases. A total of 126 cases of schwannoma of the tongue have been reported in the English literature over the past 51 years. Schwannomas of the tongue typically present in the third decade of life (33%), display no gender predilection (52.8% female; 47.2% male) and often present as a painless mass (69.6%). Schwannomas are likely to elicit distressing symptoms when they occur in the posterior one-third of the tongue (63.2 vs. 13.5%) or approach 3 cm in greatest dimension (33.0 vs. 18.2 mm). The vast majority of cases have been treated with transoral excision (94.8%). Recurrence after surgical excision has not been reported. Schwannoma of the tongue is a relatively rare tumor of the head and neck. Transoral resection allows for removal of this tumor in a manner that precludes recurrence, avoids causing morbidity of tongue function, and remains the standard approach for the treatment of the vast majority of these tumors.

  4. Recovery of vestibular ocular reflex function and balance control after a unilateral peripheral vestibular deficit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allum, J H J

    2012-01-01

    This review describes the effect of unilateral peripheral vestibular deficit (UPVD) on balance control for stance and gait tests. Because a UPVD is normally defined based on vestibular ocular reflex (VOR) tests, we compared recovery observed in balance control with patterns of recovery in VOR function. Two general types of UPVD are considered; acute vestibular neuritis (AVN) and vestibular neurectomy. The latter was subdivided into vestibular loss after cerebellar pontine angle tumor surgery during which a vestibular neurectomy was performed, and vestibular loss following neurectomy to eliminate disabling Ménière's disease. To measure balance control, body-worn gyroscopes, mounted near the body's center of mass (CoM), were used. Measurement variables were the pitch (anterior-posterior) and roll (lateral) sway angles and angular velocities of the lower trunk/pelvis. Both patient groups showed balance deficits during stance tasks on foam, especially with eyes closed when stable balance control is normally highly dependent on vestibular inputs. Deficits during gait were also present and were more profound for complex gait tasks such as tandem gait than simple gait tasks. Major differences emerged between the groups concerning the severity of the deficit and its recovery. Generally, the effects of acute neuritis on balance control were more severe but recovered rapidly. Deficits due to vestibular neurectomy were less severe, but longer lasting. These results mostly paralleled recovery of deficits in VOR function. However, questions need to be raised about the effect on balance control of the two modes of neural plasticity occurring in the vestibular system following vestibular loss due to neuritis: one mode being the limited central compensation for the loss, and the second mode being some restoration of peripheral vestibular function. Future work will need to correlate deficits in balance control during stance and gait more exactly with VOR deficits and carefully

  5. Unusual cause of non-discogenic sciatica: Foraminal lumbar root schwannoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Karekezi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Schwannomas are tumors of peripheral nerves that develop from the nerve sheath. Foraminal schwannomas are rare and account for 1-5% of all spinal schwannomas. The lumbosacral root schwannoma is a rare cause of sciatica and may raise confusion in diagnosis with late discovery of the tumor. Case Description: We report the case of a patient 30 years of age with chronic left sciatica in whom lumbosacral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI revealed a  tumor involving the S1 nerve root. The excision of the tumor was simple. Histological examination revealed a benign schwannoma. The evolution was favorable postoperative with no neurological deficit, which confirms the good prognosis of this tumor. Conclusion: Nerve root schwannomas should be considered in the differential diagnosis of sciatica, especially when signs and symptoms of sciatica cannot be simply explained by prolapsed disc syndrome, which can often delay the diagnosis. Through this case presentation, the authors try to discuss the clinical and radiological features of this condition.

  6. Pancreatic Tail Schwannoma in a 44-Year-Old Male: A Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Abu-Zaid

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic schwannomas are exceedingly uncommon neoplasms. According to a recent study in 2012, less than 50 cases of pancreatic schwannoma have been described in the English literature over the past thirty years. The vast majority of pancreatic schwannomas take place in the head and body of pancreas, respectively. Herein, we report the case of pancreatic tail ancient schwannoma in a 44-year-old man who presented with a 4-month history of epigastric pain. On physical examination, epigastric region was moderately tender to palpation without evidence of a palpable mass. All laboratory tests were normal. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT scan showed a 9.2 × 9.5 × 11.5 cm, huge, and well-defined left suprarenal mass arising either from adrenal gland, pancreas, or retroperitoneum. The mass demonstrated mild heterogeneous enhancement with central cystic/necrotic area. No evidence of distant metastasis was identified. At laparoscopy, the mass was noticed to originate from pancreatic tail. Patient underwent surgical resection of pancreatic tail. Microscopic and immunohistochemical examination of the pancreatic tail specimen showed ancient schwannoma. Patient received no adjuvant therapy. At a postoperative 6-month followup, patient was completely asymptomatic and CT scan imaging showed no evidence of tumor recurrence. Moreover, a literature review on pancreatic schwannomas is presented.

  7. The Association Between Vestibular Physical Examination, Vertigo Questionnaires, and the Electronystagmography in Patients With Vestibular Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gofrit, Shany G; Mayler, Yulia; Eliashar, Ron; Bdolah-Abram, Tali; Ilan, Ophir; Gross, Menachem

    2017-04-01

    Dizziness makes up a diagnostic and treatment challenge. The diagnostic accuracy of the medical history and vestibular physical examination in cases of vestibular symptoms is not clear. The aim of this study is to determine the association between vestibular physical examination, vestibular questionnaires, and electronystagmography (ENG) test in patients with vestibular symptoms. This is a prospective study of 135 adults with vestibular symptoms. The subjects underwent targeted physical examination and filled vestibular questionnaires, including the Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI), before ENG testing. The results of the physical examination and questionnaires were compared with the final ENG findings. Of patients who had normal ENG results, 32.1% (17/52) showed abnormal physical examination, and 48.8% (40/82) of the patient who had normal physical examination showed abnormal ENG results ( P = .46). Among patients with severe disability by DHI, 46.4% (13/28) had an abnormal ENG, and 42.9% (12/28) had a normal ENG ( P = .39). This study did not demonstrate association between vestibular physical examination, vestibular questionnaires, and ENG results. Although history (augmented by questionnaires) and physical examination are the initial steps in the evaluation of vertigo, the current study suggests that they should be complemented by objective testing for evaluation of inner ear origin of vertigo.

  8. Preclinical Validation of Anti-Nuclear Factor Kappa B Therapy against Vestibular Schwannoma and Neurofibromatosis Type II

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Eagle’s medium with Ham’s F12 mixture (DMEM/F12), 10% fetal bovine serum, 1% Penicillin/Strepto- mycin (Pen/Strep) and 1% GlutaMAX, dissociated in...cells were placed in antibiotic - and serum-free media over- night as instructed by manufacturer. The next day, the cells were incubated with siRNAs...media fortified with antibiotics and serum. BAY11 or curcumin, diluted in 100% DMSO, were mixed to the accu- rate concentrations in media and applied to

  9. The effect of bevacizumab on vestibular schwannoma tumour size and hearing in patients with neurofibromatosis type 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alanin, Mikkel Christian; Klausen, Camilla; Caye-Thomasen, Per;

    2015-01-01

    /kg was administered every third week. Patients were evaluated with repeated audiometries, MR scans and clinical evaluations. Radiological response was defined as a 20 % or greater reduction in VS volume. A total of 398 treatments (median 36) were administered and the median duration on therapy was 22 months (range 7...

  10. Sodium butyrate modulates pRb phosphorylation and induces cell death in human vestibular schwannomas in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Rohan; Devi, B Indira; Gope, Mohan L; Subbakrishna, D K; Gope, Rajalakshmi

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, effect of Na-Bu on the pRb phosphorylation was analysed in the primary cultures of 12 VS tumors. Primary cultures of VS tumors were established from the fresh tumor tissues removed surgically and were treated with Na-Bu. Na-Bu treatment for 48 h led to morphological changes and apoptotic cell death in VS tumor cells. Na-Bu treatment decreased level of total pRb and phosphorylated form of pRb and caused specific dephosphorylation at Ser 249/Thr 252 and Ser 567. In the untreated and Na-Bu treated cells (when present), pRb was localised in the nucleus. Moreover, in Na-Bu treated cells the nucleus appeared highly condensed as compared to untreated cells. Results of the present study indicated that Na-Bu treatment modulated pRb phosphorylation status and caused apoptotic cell death in VS tumors.

  11. Preclinical Validation of Anti-Nuclear Factor Kappa B Therapy Against Vestibular Schwannoma and Neurofibromatosis Type II

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Wallis tests were applied as nonparametric tests. Dunn’s multiple comparison test and Benjamini–Hochberg correction for multi- ple hypotheses were...users and VS growth: odds ratio 0.32, 95% confidence interval 0.11 to 0.91. VS-induced audio - metric thresholds shifts were larger above than below

  12. Prediction of facial nerve position in large vestibular schwannomas using diffusion tensor imaging tractography and its intraoperative correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachin Anil Borkar

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: This study validates the reliability of facial nerve DTI-based fiber tracking for prediction of the facial nerve position in patients with large VSs. The reliable preoperative visualization of facial nerve location in relation to the VS will allow surgeons to plan tumor removal accordingly and may increase the safety of surgery.

  13. Internal auditory canal metastasis mimicking a vestibular schwannoma at presentation - a case report and review of the literature

    OpenAIRE

    Loo, Suat W; Dean, Andrew; Murray,Philip

    2009-01-01

    RIGHTS : This article is licensed under the BioMed Central licence at http://www.biomedcentral.com/about/license which is similar to the 'Creative Commons Attribution Licence'. In brief you may : copy, distribute, and display the work; make derivative works; or make commercial use of the work - under the following conditions: the original author must be given credit; for any reuse or distribution, it must be made clear to others what the license terms of this work are. Abstract Metastas...

  14. Current drug treatments for vestibular disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maksim Valeryevich Zamergrad

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available There has recently been significant progress in the treatment of different diseases accompanied by dizziness. First and foremost, this is due to the development of highly effective medical positioning maneuvers for benign paroxysmal positional vertigo and to their introduction into practice. At the same time, drug treatments for vertigo are being continued under development. The paper considers the current methods of symptomatic and pathogenetic treatment for different diseases of the vestibular system. It gives data on current medicinal approaches to the treatment of vestibular neuronitis, Mеniеre's disease, migraine-associated vertigo, and central vestibulopathies. Furthermore, prospects for the use of drugs together with vestibular exercises to stimulate central vestibular compensation are discussed.

  15. Sensory Dissociation in Vestibular Function Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tolmachev Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The project aims to create а solution to the problem of early diagnostics of neurodegenerative disorders, accompanied by imbalance, and to develop rehabilitation methods for patients with vestibular disorders. The balanced upright position is a result of interaction between vestibular system, skeleton and muscles, visual, and proprioceptive systems. Postural abnormalities are caused by morphological or functional alteration of the components of the equilibrioception system. These disorders weaken the ability of the central nervous system to process vestibular, visual and proprioceptive signals, which are responsible for the sense of balance. Moreover, it also decreases the plasticity of the nervous system, resulting in adaptation disfunctionality. Unfortunately, premorbid detection of vestibular dysfunctions is quite a complicated test because available methods to evaluate postural reflexes have low sensitivity and specifity. Consequently, the development of methods to assess functional state of the equilibrioception system becoming viable in order to detect neurodegenerative disorders as early as possible, to control treatment and rehabilitation procedures.

  16. [Experimental study of vestibular neurectomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pech, A; Cannoni, M; Appaix, M; Cahier, S; Lacour, M; Roll, J P

    1976-06-01

    The authors describe an experimental study carried out on baboons. After unilateral vestibular neurectomy, the behaviour disorders on the one hand, and on the other, modifications and temporal development of reflex muotatic excitability of the spine using Hoffmann's reflex method are analyzed. As far as behaviour is concerned, a four-day period of motor restriction following the operation causes more marked residual disorders in comparison with controls. From the neurophysiological point of view, neurectomy results in seriously disordered spinal reflexes characterized by ipsilateral hypo-excitability developing in there stages: a tw-day initial critical phase during which the disorders are at their worst, a four-day recuperative stage with partial regression of the disorders, finally a chronic compensation stage in which spinal excitability returns to normal after several months.

  17. BASIC CONCEPTS IN UNDERSTANDING RECOVERY OF FUNCTION IN VESTIBULAR REFLEX NETWORKS DURING VESTIBULAR COMPENSATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenna ePeusner

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Unilateral peripheral vestibular lesions produce a syndrome of oculomotor and postural deficits with the symptoms at rest, the static symptoms, partially or completely normalizing shortly after the lesion due to a process known as vestibular compensation. The symptoms are thought to result from changes in the activity of vestibular sensorimotor reflexes. Since the vestibular nuclei must be intact for recovery to occur, many investigations have focused on studying these neurons after lesions. At present, the neuronal plasticity underlying early recovery from the static symptoms is not fully understood. Here we propose that knowledge of the reflex identity and input-output connections of the recorded neurons is essential to link the responses to animal behavior. We further propose that the cellular mechanisms underlying vestibular compensation can be sorted out by characterizing the synaptic responses and time course for change in morphologically-defined subsets of vestibular reflex projection neurons. Accordingly, this review focuses on the perspective gained by performing electrophysiological and immunolabeling studies on a specific subset of morphologically-defined, glutamatergic vestibular reflex projection neurons, the principal cells of the chick tangential nucleus. Reference is made to pertinent findings from other studies on vestibular nuclei neurons, but no comprehensive review of the literature is intended since broad reviews already exist. From recording excitatory and inhibitory spontaneous synaptic activity in principal cells, we find that the rebalancing of excitatory synaptic drive bilaterally is essential for vestibular compensation to proceed. This work is important for it defines for the first time the excitatory and inhibitory nature of the changing synaptic inputs and the time course for changes in a morphologically-defined subset of vestibular reflex projection neurons during early stages of vestibular compensation.

  18. Computational Approaches to Vestibular Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Muriel D.; Wade, Charles E. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The Biocomputation Center at NASA Ames Research Center is dedicated to a union between computational, experimental and theoretical approaches to the study of neuroscience and of life sciences in general. The current emphasis is on computer reconstruction and visualization of vestibular macular architecture in three-dimensions (3-D), and on mathematical modeling and computer simulation of neural activity in the functioning system. Our methods are being used to interpret the influence of spaceflight on mammalian vestibular maculas in a model system, that of the adult Sprague-Dawley rat. More than twenty 3-D reconstructions of type I and type II hair cells and their afferents have been completed by digitization of contours traced from serial sections photographed in a transmission electron microscope. This labor-intensive method has now been replace d by a semiautomated method developed in the Biocomputation Center in which conventional photography is eliminated. All viewing, storage and manipulation of original data is done using Silicon Graphics workstations. Recent improvements to the software include a new mesh generation method for connecting contours. This method will permit the investigator to describe any surface, regardless of complexity, including highly branched structures such as are routinely found in neurons. This same mesh can be used for 3-D, finite volume simulation of synapse activation and voltage spread on neuronal surfaces visualized via the reconstruction process. These simulations help the investigator interpret the relationship between neuroarchitecture and physiology, and are of assistance in determining which experiments will best test theoretical interpretations. Data are also used to develop abstract, 3-D models that dynamically display neuronal activity ongoing in the system. Finally, the same data can be used to visualize the neural tissue in a virtual environment. Our exhibit will depict capabilities of our computational approaches and

  19. [Cavernous haemangiomas: hearing and vestibular inaugural symptoms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, G; Schmerber, S

    2004-11-01

    Cavernous haemangiomas (cavernomas)(CH) are relatively rare (2% of cranial tumoral pathology) vascular malformations mostly observed in the central nervous system. Their most common topographical site in brain stem is midline in the pons, for which clinical course may mimic symptoms of peripheral origin (sudden deafness, fluctuating hearing loss, Meniere-like vertigo). To establish the correlation between the clinical manifestations of hearing and balance disturbance and the anatomical site within the pons of cavernous haemangiomas, and to describe their clinical features, and the findings on auditory brainstem response (ABR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). To propose a literature review about CH and its implications. We made a retrospective review of the histories of three patients aged 24, 44 and 45 years, diagnosed as having cavernomas of the brainstem in which audiometric evaluation, videonystagmography (VNG), ABR and imaging techniques lead to the diagnosis of intracranial cavernoma. The clinical and radiological files were reviewed and a direct relationship between symptoms and localization was found in all 3 patients, especially in relation to our understanding of the auditory and vestibular pathways within the brainstem. The literature regarding cavernomas of the pons is reviewed and the clinical, neuroimage, pathological, natural course and management aspects of the disease are discussed. We recommend the use of cerebral MRI for initial diagnosis which shows a typical rosette-like appearance with a heterogeneous signal on T2-weighted images, along with follow-up and investigation into similar profiles among family members. At present there is no consensus about the treatment to follow when cavernomas are located in the brain stem. There is no specific medical treatment for this condition, and surgery is indicated only exceptionally. Anticoagulant therapy, platelet-dispersing medication and violent sports activities are contraindicated.

  20. [Vestibular neuronitis: pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaper, Dinka; Adamec, Ivan; Gabelić, Tereza; Krbot, Magdalena; Isgum, Velimir; Hajnsek, Sanja; Habek, Mario

    2012-01-01

    Vestibular neuritis (VN) is one of the most common causes of peripheral vertigo. Caloric testing has been the traditional gold standard for detecting a peripheral vestibular deficit, but some recently developed bedside tests (head thrust, head heave, head shake and vibration test) were evaluated as a good alternative with similar sensitivity and specificity. These tests have shown both diagnostic value in the short term and prognostic value in the long term, and have availability and ease of use as an advantage. As an addition to clinical examination, vestibular evoked myogenic potentials can differentiate between involvement of superior and inferior branch of the vestibular nerve, but also between peripheral and central lesions. Although glucocorticoids are currently widely used in the treatment of VN, there is a lack of evidence for the validity of their administration. There are a number of high quality clinical trials that suggest vestibular rehabilitation exercises, which are based on the mechanisms of vestibular compensation, in the managment of VN. This review will focus on the latest developments in the pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of patients with VN.

  1. Dynamic transformation of vestibular signals for orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osler, Callum J; Reynolds, Raymond F

    2012-11-01

    The same pattern of vestibular afferent feedback may signify a loss of balance or a change in body orientation, depending upon the initial head posture. To resolve this ambiguity and generate an appropriate motor response, the CNS must transform vestibular information from a head-centred reference frame into relevant motor coordinates. But what if the reference frame is continuously moving? Here, we ask if this neural transformation process is continuously updated during a voluntary change in head posture. Galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) was used to induce a sensation of head roll motion in blindfolded subjects marching on the spot. When head orientation was fixed, this caused unconscious turning behaviour that was maximal during neck flexion, minimal with the head level and reversed direction with neck extension. Subjects were then asked to produce a continuous voluntary change in head pitch, while GVS was applied. As the neck moved from full flexion into extension, turn velocity was continuously modulated and even reversed direction, reflecting the pattern observed during the head-fixed condition. Hence, an identical vestibular input resulted in motor output which was dynamically modulated by changes in head pitch. However, response magnitude was significantly reduced, suggesting possible suppression of vestibular input during voluntary head movement. Nevertheless, these results show that the CNS continuously reinterprets vestibular exafference to account for ongoing voluntary changes in head posture. This may explain why the head can be moved freely without losing the sense of balance and orientation.

  2. Mandibular nerve schwannoma resection using sagittal split ramus osteotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmood, Laith; Demian, Nagi; Weinstock, Yitzchak E; Weissferdt, Annikka

    2013-11-01

    A case is presented of a unique presentation and treatment of a mandibular nerve schwannoma. Its uniqueness stems from the fact that it consisted of 2 distinct tumors along the same nerve: one within the body of the mandible and the other within the ipsilateral pterygomandibular space. Rather than the standard approach of lip split and hemimandibulectomy, a unique approach of a sagittal split ramus osteotomy was used that allowed access to the 2 lesions and avoided the added morbidity of the former approach. The 2 portions of the lesion were successfully removed and the patient was satisfied with the result. Recurrence has not been detected after 6 months. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss in the Only Hearing Ear: Large Vestibular Aqueduct Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kemal Koray Bal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sudden hearing loss in the only hearing ear cases are rarely published in the English literature; most of the cases are idiopathic. It is an otologic emergency needing urgent treatment. Delayed diagnosis can interfere with patient’s social life with interrupting the verbal communication. In this case report we presented a 33-year-old female patient having sudden sensorineural hearing loss in the only hearing ear diagnosed as bilateral large vestibular aqueduct syndrome.

  4. Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss in the Only Hearing Ear: Large Vestibular Aqueduct Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bal, Kemal Koray; Bucioglu, Helen; Vayısoğlu, Yusuf; Gorur, Kemal

    2016-01-01

    Sudden hearing loss in the only hearing ear cases are rarely published in the English literature; most of the cases are idiopathic. It is an otologic emergency needing urgent treatment. Delayed diagnosis can interfere with patient's social life with interrupting the verbal communication. In this case report we presented a 33-year-old female patient having sudden sensorineural hearing loss in the only hearing ear diagnosed as bilateral large vestibular aqueduct syndrome. PMID:28018692

  5. Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss in the Only Hearing Ear: Large Vestibular Aqueduct Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Bal, Kemal Koray; Ismi, Onur; Bucioglu, Helen; Vayısoğlu, Yusuf; Gorur, Kemal

    2016-01-01

    Sudden hearing loss in the only hearing ear cases are rarely published in the English literature; most of the cases are idiopathic. It is an otologic emergency needing urgent treatment. Delayed diagnosis can interfere with patient's social life with interrupting the verbal communication. In this case report we presented a 33-year-old female patient having sudden sensorineural hearing loss in the only hearing ear diagnosed as bilateral large vestibular aqueduct syndrome.

  6. Clinical, radiological, surgical, and pathological determinants of olfactory groove schwannoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andi Sadayandi Ramesh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Olfactory groove schwannomas (OGS are rare anterior cranial fossa base tumors with only 41 cases reported in literature. Olfactory ensheathing cell schwannoma (OECS has similar clinico-radiological features as OGS, but a different cell of origin. In recent years, there is growing interest in OECS as more cases are being reported. Aims: The objective was to study the clinico-radiological features of OGS and define the histological differentiation from OECS. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively analyzed clinical, radiological, surgical and histopathological picture of all cases of OGS managed in our institute. Immuno histochemical studies were performed in these tumors for differentiating from OECS. A comprehensive review of articles published until date describing the operative treatment was done. Results: All three cases had presented with seizures, two had anosmia and papilledema. Gross-total resection was achieved in all our patients. One patient expired in the postoperative period due to septicemia. Positive expression to newer immuno histochemical biomarker CD57 (Leu7, with negative staining to smooth muscle α-actin (SMA was helpful in confirming the diagnosis of OGS and differentiating it from OECS in all our cases. Conclusions: OECS, though rare has to be differentiated from OGS using immuno histochemistry. Gross-total resection of OGS with preservation of olfactory function is often possible and curative. Although these tumors are commonly treated with microsurgical skull base approaches, an endoscopic endonasal approach can be considered in some cases, with repair using mucoperiosteal pedicled flap to prevent cerebrospinal fluid leak.

  7. Early diagnosis of acoustic neuroma by the vestibular test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haid, T.; Rettinger, G.; Berg, M.; Wigand, M.E.

    1981-11-01

    In a series of 390 cases with suspicion of acoustic neurinomas 78 such tumors could be diagnosed, including 12 early stage neurinomas. This relatively high detection quote of small neurinomas is due to a special diagnostical programme: Every patient with unilateral and sensoneural hearingloss, independent of vertigo anamnesis or of the result of X-rays must be further examined by a vestibular test. All 78 patients with acoustic neuroma had pathological vestibular findings. The positional test turned out to be the most sensitive examination in the early diagnosis of acoustic neuromas and yields a still higher incidence than the thermic test: 95% of the patients with a neuroma showed pathological findings in the positional test. Every patient suffering from an unidentified unilateral and sensoneural hearingloss combined with a pathological result in the positional test must be further checked by a cisternomeatography or computerized tomography using airinsufflation. Every fifth of these patients showed typical signs of an acoustic neuroma in the neuroradiological tests. 68 neuromas are operated today and verfied histologically, 10 patients are still waiting for surgical treatment.

  8. Misdiagnosis Analysis of Gastric Schwannoma by CT Scanning%胃神经鞘瘤CT检查误诊原因分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王文娜; 周倩静; 蔡鹏杰; 曾利泉; 李泽龄; 文戈

    2012-01-01

    Objective To explore the CT manifestations of gastric schwannoma and to analyze the misdiagnosis causes.Methods Clinical data of 5 cases with gastrie schwannoma, which were misdiagnosed by CT and finally diagnosed by pathological examinations for operation, went retrospectively analyzrd. Results All the patients complained of epipgastrie discomfort, upper ab-dominal mass and dark stools and underwent CT examination. Iimiging features showed as roundish humogenous masses with dislinct margin which was hypodense in eonparison with muscle and had an endoluminal or exophytie growth puttern. The average long di-ameter of foeus were (6. 2 ±2. 3)cm, and among them was above 5. 0 em in 4 of 5 cases. All the imagings of the 5 casex were misdi-agnosed as malignant gastric interstitialoma (n =2), leiomyoma of stomach (n =1 ) , gastrie extrrior neoplasms (n =1) and benign gastric interstitialoma (n = 1). The final diagnosis of gastric schwannoma was proven by pathology and chernie hromoscopy. Conclusion The diagnosis of gastric schwannoma should be taken into cunsideration when a homogenous and well-defined mass of gas-tral wall without hemorrhage, necrosis and eystie change are found by CT imagen.%目的 探讨胃神经鞘瘤CT影像特征并分析误诊原因.方法 回顾性分析5例经手术病理检查证实但CT检查误诊的胃神经鞘瘤临床资料.结果 5例均以上腹部不适、上腹部肿块、黑便等就诊,均行上腹部CT扫描.CT影像表现为边界锐利的类圆形均质肿块,与肌肉组织比较呈低密度,向腔内或腔外生长,病灶长径平均(6.2 ±2.3)cm,其中 4例病变长径>5.0 cm.5例CT检查误诊为恶性胃间质瘤2例,胃平滑肌瘤、胃外肿瘤及偏良性胃间质瘤各1例,均经手术病理及免疫组织化学染色检查确诊胃神经鞘瘤.结论 对CT表现为胃肠道壁内均质性、边界清晰的肿块,且无出血、坏死和囊变时,应警惕胃神经鞘瘤.

  9. Naso-ethmoid schwannoma with intracranial extension: case report Schwannoma naso-etmoidal com extensão intracraniana: relato de caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario G. Siqueira

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Intranasal schwannomas are rare lesions, specially when they present with an intracranial extension. The fifth case in the medical literature of a naso-ethmoid schwannoma with extension into the anterior cranial fossa is presented. The magnetic resonance findings and the details of the combined intracranial / transfacial operative approach used are described. The possible origin and the clinical characteristics of this rare lesion are reviewed.Schwannomas intranasais são lesões raras, principalmente quando apresentam um extensão intracraniana. Estamos apresentando o quinto caso da literatura médica de um schwannoma naso-etmoidal com extensão para o interior da fossa craniana anterior. São descritos os achados da ressonância magnética e os detalhes da via de acesso cirúrgico combinada intracraniana/transfacial. A possível origem e as características clínicas dessa lesaõ rara são revistas.

  10. Interactive Healthcare Systems in the Home: Vestibular Rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarhus, Rikke; Grönvall, Erik; Larsen, Simon Bo

    2010-01-01

    Vestibular dysfunction is a balance disorder, causing dizziness that provokes discomfort and fall situations. This paper discusses early results from a project that aims to develop assistive technologies to support home-based rehabilitation for elderly affected by Vestibular dysfunction....

  11. Interactive Healthcare Systems in the Home: Vestibular Rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarhus, Rikke; Grönvall, Erik; Larsen, Simon Bo

    2010-01-01

    Vestibular dysfunction is a balance disorder, causing dizziness that provokes discomfort and fall situations. This paper discusses early results from a project that aims to develop assistive technologies to support home-based rehabilitation for elderly affected by Vestibular dysfunction....

  12. Computational Approaches to Vestibular Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Muriel D.; Wade, Charles E. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The Biocomputation Center at NASA Ames Research Center is dedicated to a union between computational, experimental and theoretical approaches to the study of neuroscience and of life sciences in general. The current emphasis is on computer reconstruction and visualization of vestibular macular architecture in three-dimensions (3-D), and on mathematical modeling and computer simulation of neural activity in the functioning system. Our methods are being used to interpret the influence of spaceflight on mammalian vestibular maculas in a model system, that of the adult Sprague-Dawley rat. More than twenty 3-D reconstructions of type I and type II hair cells and their afferents have been completed by digitization of contours traced from serial sections photographed in a transmission electron microscope. This labor-intensive method has now been replace d by a semiautomated method developed in the Biocomputation Center in which conventional photography is eliminated. All viewing, storage and manipulation of original data is done using Silicon Graphics workstations. Recent improvements to the software include a new mesh generation method for connecting contours. This method will permit the investigator to describe any surface, regardless of complexity, including highly branched structures such as are routinely found in neurons. This same mesh can be used for 3-D, finite volume simulation of synapse activation and voltage spread on neuronal surfaces visualized via the reconstruction process. These simulations help the investigator interpret the relationship between neuroarchitecture and physiology, and are of assistance in determining which experiments will best test theoretical interpretations. Data are also used to develop abstract, 3-D models that dynamically display neuronal activity ongoing in the system. Finally, the same data can be used to visualize the neural tissue in a virtual environment. Our exhibit will depict capabilities of our computational approaches and

  13. Diagnosis and Management of Extracranial Head and Neck Schwannomas: A Review of 27 Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryuji Yasumatsu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Clinical records of 27 patients with extracranial head and neck schwannoma were retrospectively reviewed. Methods. Ultrasonography (US was performed in all cases. Seven patients underwent CT. Twenty-five patients underwent MRI. Fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC was performed for 12 of the 27 patients. Clinical history, surgical data, and postoperative morbidity were analyzed. Results. The images of US showed a well-defined, hypoechoic, primarily homogeneous solid mass. At CT, only one of 7 cases (14% was able to suggest the diagnosis of schwannoma. At MRI, twenty of 25 cases (80% suggested the diagnosis of schwannoma. Only three of 12 cases (25% displayed a specific diagnosis of schwannoma rendered on FNAC. The distribution of 27 nerves of origin was 10 (37% vagus nerves, 6 (22% sympathetic trunks, 5 (19% cervical plexuses, 3 (11% brachial plexuses, 2 (7% hypoglossal nerves, and 1 (4% accessory nerve. Complete tumor resection was performed in 11 patients, and intracapsular enucleation of the tumor was performed in 16 patients. The rate of nerve palsy was 100 (11/11 and 31% (5/16. Conclusions. MRI is sensitive and specific in the diagnosis of schwannoma. Intracapsular enucleation was an effective and feasible method for preserving the neurological functions.

  14. Major diseases manifesting by vestibular vertigo: Treatment and rehabilitation

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Betahistine hydrochloride is the drug of choice for the treatment of vestibular vertigo in the presence of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, Meniere's disease, and vestibular neuronitis. Effective combination therapy regimens that contain, along with drugs from other pharmacological groups, betahistine hydrochloride that improves blood circulation in the vestibular structures, accelerates vestibular compensation, and prevents recurrent dizzy spells, have been elaborated to treat central v...

  15. Vestibular Rehabilitation Therapy: Review of Indications, Mechanisms, and Key Exercises

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Byung In; Song, Hyun Seok; Kim, Ji Soo

    2011-01-01

    Vestibular rehabilitation therapy (VRT) is an exercise-based treatment program designed to promote vestibular adaptation and substitution. The goals of VRT are 1) to enhance gaze stability, 2) to enhance postural stability, 3) to improve vertigo, and 4) to improve activities of daily living. VRT facilitates vestibular recovery mechanisms: vestibular adaptation, substitution by the other eye-movement systems, substitution by vision, somatosensory cues, other postural strategies, and habituatio...

  16. Task, muscle and frequency dependent vestibular control of posture

    OpenAIRE

    Patrick A Forbes; Gunter P Siegmund; Schouten, Alfred C.; Jean-Sébastien eBlouin

    2015-01-01

    The vestibular system is crucial for postural control; however there are considerable differences in the task dependence and frequency response of vestibular reflexes in appendicular and axial muscles. For example, vestibular reflexes are only evoked in appendicular muscles when vestibular information is relevant to postural control, while in neck muscles they are maintained regardless of the requirement to maintain head on trunk balance. Recent investigations have also shown that the bandwid...

  17. Vestibular stimulation for management of premenstrual syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johny, Minu; Kumar, Sai Sailesh; Rajagopalan, Archana; Mukkadan, Joseph Kurien

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: The present study was undertaken to observe the effectiveness of vestibular stimulation in the management of premenstrual syndrome (PMS). Materials and Methods: The present study was an experimental study; twenty female participants of age group 18–30 years were recruited in the present study. Conventional swing was used to administer vestibular stimulation. Variables were recorded before and after vestibular stimulation and compared. Results: Depression and stress scores are significantly decreased after 2 months of intervention. Anxiety scores decreased followed by vestibular stimulation. However, it is no statistically significant. Serum cortisol levels significantly decreased after 2 months of intervention. WHOQOL-BREF-transformed scores were not significantly changed followed by the intervention. However, psychological domain score (T2) and social relationships domain score (T3) were increased followed by intervention. Systolic blood pressure was significantly decreased after 2 months of intervention. No significant change was observed in diastolic pressure and pulse rate. Pain score was significantly decreased after 2 months of intervention. Mini mental status examination scores and spatial and verbal memory score were significantly improved followed by intervention. Conclusion: The present study provides preliminary evidence for implementing vestibular stimulation for management of PMS as a nonpharmacological therapy. Hence, we recommend further well-controlled, detailed studies in this area with higher sample size. PMID:28250680

  18. Visual dependency and dizziness after vestibular neuritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sian Cousins

    Full Text Available Symptomatic recovery after acute vestibular neuritis (VN is variable, with around 50% of patients reporting long term vestibular symptoms; hence, it is essential to identify factors related to poor clinical outcome. Here we investigated whether excessive reliance on visual input for spatial orientation (visual dependence was associated with long term vestibular symptoms following acute VN. Twenty-eight patients with VN and 25 normal control subjects were included. Patients were enrolled at least 6 months after acute illness. Recovery status was not a criterion for study entry, allowing recruitment of patients with a full range of persistent symptoms. We measured visual dependence with a laptop-based Rod-and-Disk Test and severity of symptoms with the Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI. The third of patients showing the worst clinical outcomes (mean DHI score 36-80 had significantly greater visual dependence than normal subjects (6.35° error vs. 3.39° respectively, p = 0.03. Asymptomatic patients and those with minor residual symptoms did not differ from controls. Visual dependence was associated with high levels of persistent vestibular symptoms after acute VN. Over-reliance on visual information for spatial orientation is one characteristic of poorly recovered vestibular neuritis patients. The finding may be clinically useful given that visual dependence may be modified through rehabilitation desensitization techniques.

  19. Origin of vestibular dysfunction in Usher syndrome type 1B.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sun, J.; Alphen, A.M. van; Wagenaar, M.; Huygen, P.L.M.; Hoogenraad, C.C.; Hasson, T.; Koekkoek, S.K.; Bohne, B.A.; Zeeuw, C.I. de

    2001-01-01

    It is still debated to what extent the vestibular deficits in Usher patients are due to either central vestibulocerebellar or peripheral vestibular problems. Here, we determined the origin of the vestibular symptoms in Usher 1B patients by subjecting them to compensatory eye movement tests and by

  20. Origin of vestibular dysfunction in Usher syndrome type 1B.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sun, J.; Alphen, A.M. van; Wagenaar, M.; Huygen, P.L.M.; Hoogenraad, C.C.; Hasson, T.; Koekkoek, S.K.; Bohne, B.A.; Zeeuw, C.I. de

    2001-01-01

    It is still debated to what extent the vestibular deficits in Usher patients are due to either central vestibulocerebellar or peripheral vestibular problems. Here, we determined the origin of the vestibular symptoms in Usher 1B patients by subjecting them to compensatory eye movement tests and by in