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Sample records for diabetic pre-dialysis patients

  1. Nephrotic range proteinuria as a strong risk factor for rapid renal function decline during pre-dialysis phase in type 2 diabetic patients with severely impaired renal function.

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    Kitai, Yuichiro; Doi, Yohei; Osaki, Keisuke; Sugioka, Sayaka; Koshikawa, Masao; Sugawara, Akira

    2015-12-01

    Proteinuria is an established risk factor for progression of renal disease, including diabetic nephropathy. The predictive power of proteinuria, especially nephrotic range proteinuria, for progressive renal deterioration has been well demonstrated in diabetic patients with normal to relatively preserved renal function. However, little is known about the relationship between severity of proteinuria and renal outcome in pre-dialysis diabetic patients with severely impaired renal function. 125 incident dialysis patients with type 2 diabetes were identified. This study was aimed at retrospectively evaluating the impact of nephrotic range proteinuria (urinary protein-creatinine ratio above 3.5 g/gCr) on renal function decline during the 3 months just prior to dialysis initiation. In total, 103 patients (82.4 %) had nephrotic range proteinuria. The median rate of decline in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) in this study population was 0.98 (interquartile range 0.51-1.46) ml/min/1.73 m(2) per month. Compared to patients without nephrotic range proteinuria, patients with nephrotic range proteinuria showed significantly faster renal function decline (0.46 [0.24-1.25] versus 1.07 [0.64-1.54] ml/min/1.73 m(2) per month; p = 0.007). After adjusting for gender, age, systolic blood pressure, serum albumin, calcium-phosphorus product, hemoglobin A1c, and use of an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or an angiotensin II receptor blocker, patients with nephrotic range proteinuria showed a 3.89-fold (95 % CI 1.08-14.5) increased risk for rapid renal function decline defined as a decline in eGFR ≥0.5 ml/min/1.73 m(2) per month. Nephrotic range proteinuria is the predominant renal risk factor in type 2 diabetic patients with severely impaired renal function receiving pre-dialysis care.

  2. Serum osteoprotegerin as a screening tool for coronary artery calcification score in diabetic pre-dialysis patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikami, Satoshi; Hamano, Takayuki; Fujii, Naohiko

    2008-01-01

    Although cardiovascular disease is a principal cause of death in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), it is often asymptomatic in diabetic patients. The coronary artery calcification score (CACS) measured by multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) is useful for screening ischemic heart disease in the general population. We investigated which clinical parameters predict high CACS in predialysis diabetic nephropathy (DN). Participants were 85 patients with DN. Nobody had any history of coronary angioplasty or coronary bypass surgery. We measured blood counts, blood chemistry, bone alkaline phosphatase, intact-parathyroid hormone (PTH), interleukin-6, osteoprotegerin (OPG), hemoglobin A1c, 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) and fetuin-A. CACS and bone mineral density (BMD) were measured by a single 16-slice MDCT and Dual Energy X-ray Absorptiometry (DEXA), respectively. The median value of CACS equaled 256 Agatston units (range 0-4494 units). Stepwise increase in CACS with CKD stage progression was observed (p 200 was 80%, when the cut-off value was 1.2 ng/mL. In conclusion, CACS increased with CKD stage progression in predialysis DN patients. Serum OPG was positively associated with high CACS and can be a useful screening tool for severe coronary calcification, whereas no association between fetuin-A and CACS was found. (author)

  3. Types of vicarious learning experienced by pre-dialysis patients

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    Kate McCarthy

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Haemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis renal replacement treatment options are in clinical equipoise, although the cost of haemodialysis to the National Health Service is £16,411/patient/year greater than peritoneal dialysis. Treatment decision-making takes place during the pre-dialysis year when estimated glomerular filtration rate drops to between 15 and 30 mL/min/1.73 m2. Renal disease can be familial, and the majority of patients have considerable health service experience when they approach these treatment decisions. Factors affecting patient treatment decisions are currently unknown. The objective of this article is to explore data from a wider study in specific relation to the types of vicarious learning experiences reported by pre-dialysis patients. Methods: A qualitative study utilised unstructured interviews and grounded theory analysis during the participant’s pre-dialysis year. The interview cohort comprised 20 pre-dialysis participants between 24 and 80 years of age. Grounded theory design entailed thematic sampling and analysis, scrutinised by secondary coding and checked with participants. Participants were recruited from routine renal clinics at two local hospitals when their estimated glomerular filtration rate was between 15 and 30 mL/min/1.73 m2. Results: Vicarious learning that contributed to treatment decision-making fell into three main categories: planned vicarious leaning, unplanned vicarious learning and historical vicarious experiences. Conclusion: Exploration and acknowledgement of service users’ prior vicarious learning, by healthcare professionals, is important in understanding its potential influences on individuals’ treatment decision-making. This will enable healthcare professionals to challenge heuristic decisions based on limited information and to encourage analytic thought processes.

  4. Types of vicarious learning experienced by pre-dialysis patients.

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    McCarthy, Kate; Sturt, Jackie; Adams, Ann

    2015-01-01

    Haemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis renal replacement treatment options are in clinical equipoise, although the cost of haemodialysis to the National Health Service is £16,411/patient/year greater than peritoneal dialysis. Treatment decision-making takes place during the pre-dialysis year when estimated glomerular filtration rate drops to between 15 and 30 mL/min/1.73 m(2). Renal disease can be familial, and the majority of patients have considerable health service experience when they approach these treatment decisions. Factors affecting patient treatment decisions are currently unknown. The objective of this article is to explore data from a wider study in specific relation to the types of vicarious learning experiences reported by pre-dialysis patients. A qualitative study utilised unstructured interviews and grounded theory analysis during the participant's pre-dialysis year. The interview cohort comprised 20 pre-dialysis participants between 24 and 80 years of age. Grounded theory design entailed thematic sampling and analysis, scrutinised by secondary coding and checked with participants. Participants were recruited from routine renal clinics at two local hospitals when their estimated glomerular filtration rate was between 15 and 30 mL/min/1.73 m(2). Vicarious learning that contributed to treatment decision-making fell into three main categories: planned vicarious leaning, unplanned vicarious learning and historical vicarious experiences. Exploration and acknowledgement of service users' prior vicarious learning, by healthcare professionals, is important in understanding its potential influences on individuals' treatment decision-making. This will enable healthcare professionals to challenge heuristic decisions based on limited information and to encourage analytic thought processes.

  5. Types of vicarious learning experienced by pre-dialysis patients

    OpenAIRE

    McCarthy, Kate; Sturt, Jackie; Adams, Ann

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Haemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis renal replacement treatment options are in clinical equipoise, although the cost of haemodialysis to the National Health Service is £16,411/patient/year greater than peritoneal dialysis. Treatment decision-making takes place during the pre-dialysis year when estimated glomerular filtration rate drops to between 15 and 30 mL/min/1.73 m2. Renal disease can be familial, and the majority of patients have considerable health service experience when ...

  6. Efficacy of a disease management program focused on acquisition of self-management skills in pre-dialysis patients with diabetic nephropathy: 24 months follow-up.

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    Kazawa, Kana; Takeshita, Yae; Yorioka, Noriaki; Moriyama, Michiko

    2015-06-01

    We previously performed a preliminary 6-month controlled trial to examine the effect of a disease management education program on prolongation of the time to renal replacement therapy (RRT) and/or avoidance of RRT for patients with diabetic nephropathy. However, its duration was too short to follow the changes of renal function, so we performed the present study for 24 months. This was a two-group comparative study. The intervention group received self-management education from disease management nurses and was supported by the nurses in cooperation with their primary physicians for 12 months. Then this group was followed for a further 12 months. The control group received standard care and was followed for 24 months. Of the 31 subjects enrolled in each group, 26 subjects in the intervention group and 27 subjects in the control group were analyzed after excluding drop-outs. During the study period, 0 and 2 subjects in the intervention and the control group started RRT, respectively. In the intervention group, renal function was maintained, while significant worsening was observed in the control group. Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) improved in the intervention group, but became significantly worse in the control group. In the intervention group, all process indicators of behavior modification increased significantly after intervention. A well-designed disease management program might be useful for maintaining renal function and improving HbA1c in patients with diabetic nephropathy. It is considered that modification of patient behavior contributed to these results.

  7. Skin autofluorescence is associated with renal function and cardiovascular diseases in pre-dialysis chronic kidney disease patients.

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    Tanaka, Kenichi; Tani, Yoshihiro; Asai, Jun; Nemoto, Fumihiko; Kusano, Yuki; Suzuki, Hodaka; Hayashi, Yoshimitsu; Asahi, Koichi; Katoh, Tetsuo; Miyata, Toshio; Watanabe, Tsuyoshi

    2011-01-01

    Tissue accumulation of advanced glycation end-products (AGE) is thought to be a contributing factor to the progression of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Skin autofluorescence, a non-invasive measure of AGE accumulation using autofluorescence of the skin under ultraviolet light, has shown associations with CVD in haemodialysis patients. The present study aimed to evaluate relationships of skin autofluorescence to renal function as well as CVD in pre-dialysis patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Subjects in this cross-sectional analysis comprised 304 pre-dialysis CKD patients [median age, 62.0 years; median estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), 54.3 mL/min/1.73 m(2); diabetes, n = 81 (26.6%)]. AGE accumulation in skin was assessed by skin autofluorescence using an autofluorescence reader. Relationships between skin autofluorescence, eGFR, CVD history and other parameters were evaluated. Skin autofluorescence correlated negatively with eGFR (r = -0.42, P skin autofluorescence with age, presence of diabetes, eGFR and CVD history in CKD patients (R(2) = 30%). Age, male gender, smoking history, skin autofluorescence and eGFR were significantly correlated with CVD history, and multiple logistic regression analysis identified age [odds ratio (OR), 1.09; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.03-1.15; P skin autofluorescence (OR, 3.74; 95%CI, 1.54-9.24; P skin autofluorescence increased as GFR decreased and was related to CVD history in CKD patients. Non-invasive autofluorescence readers may provide potential markers for clinical risk assessment in pre-dialysis CKD patients.

  8. Severe hyperparathyroidism in a pre-dialysis chronic kidney disease patient treated with a very low protein diet.

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    Ohta, Eriko; Akazawa, Masanobu; Noda, Yumi; Mandai, Shintaro; Naito, Shotaro; Ohta, Akihito; Sohara, Eisei; Okado, Tomokazu; Rai, Tatemitsu; Uchida, Shinichi; Sasaki, Sei

    2012-03-01

    The present report describes a case of a 64-year-old pre-dialysis woman with chronic kidney disease (CKD) stage 5, who developed severe hyperparathyroidism. This patient had been on a very low protein diet (VLPD) to delay the progression of CKD and the need for renal replacement therapy (RRT). Her serum calcium levels were high-normal to slightly high during this time. However, her serum intact parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels increased from 400 to 1160 pg/ml rapidly over a period of 3 months. Serum 1,25-(OH)2D levels were low, and ultrasound of the neck showed three markedly enlarged parathyroid glands exceeding 2 cm. Parathyroidectomy was performed, and all glands showed nodular hyperplasia, which indicated severe secondary hyperparathyroidism leading to tertiary. Severe secondary hyperparathyroidism requiring surgical intervention is usually observed in patients with long-term RRT and is relatively rare in the pre-dialysis patient. In this case, extension of the pre-dialysis period by VLPD may have predisposed this patient to develop severe secondary hyperparathyroidism. Thus, careful monitoring of calcium, phosphorus, and PTH may be necessary in patients treated with VLPD even before renal replacement therapy. Furthermore, initiation of dialysis should not be excessively delayed by strict protein restriction dietary therapy.

  9. How does pre-dialysis education need to change? Findings from a qualitative study with staff and patients.

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    Combes, Gill; Sein, Kim; Allen, Kerry

    2017-11-23

    Pre-dialysis education (PDE) is provided to thousands of patients every year, helping them decide which renal replacement therapy (RRT) to choose. However, its effectiveness is largely unknown, with relatively little previous research into patients' views about PDE, and no research into staff views. This study reports findings relevant to PDE from a larger mixed methods study, providing insights into what staff and patients think needs to improve. Semi-structured interviews in four hospitals with 96 clinical and managerial staff and 93 dialysis patients, exploring experiences of and views about PDE, and analysed using thematic framework analysis. Most patients found PDE helpful and staff valued its role in supporting patient decision-making. However, patients wanted to see teaching methods and materials improve and biases eliminated. Staff were less aware than patients of how informal staff-patient conversations can influence patients' treatment decision-making. Many staff felt ill equipped to talk about all treatment options in a balanced and unbiased way. Patient decision-making was found to be complex and patients' abilities to make treatment decisions were adversely affected in the pre-dialysis period by emotional distress. Suggested improvements to teaching methods and educational materials are in line with previous studies and current clinical guidelines. All staff, irrespective of their role, need to be trained about all treatment options so that informal conversations with patients are not biased. The study argues for a more individualised approach to PDE which is more like counselling than education and would demand a higher level of skill and training for specialist PDE staff. The study concludes that even if these improvements are made to PDE, not all patients will benefit, because some find decision-making in the pre-dialysis period too complex or are unable to engage with education due to illness or emotional distress. It is therefore recommended that

  10. Effects of home-based exercise on pre-dialysis chronic kidney disease patients: a randomized pilot and feasibility trial.

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    Hiraki, Koji; Shibagaki, Yugo; Izawa, Kazuhiro P; Hotta, Chiharu; Wakamiya, Akiko; Sakurada, Tsutomu; Yasuda, Takashi; Kimura, Kenjiro

    2017-06-17

    Only a few research is available on the effects of home-based exercise training on pre-dialysis chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Therefore, we aimed to elucidate the effect of home-based exercise therapy on kidney function and arm and leg muscle strength in pre-dialysis CKD patients. Thirty-six male stage 3-4 pre-dialysis CKD patients (age, 68.7 ± 6.8 years; estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), 39.0 ± 11.6 ml/min/1.73 m 2 ) who were being treated as outpatients were included. The subjects were randomly assigned to an exercise intervention group (Ex group: 18) and a control group (C group: 18). The Ex group wore accelerometer pedometers and were instructed to perform home-based aerobic and resistance exercises, such as brisk walking for 30 min per day, for 12 months. The C group subjects wore accelerometer pedometers but received no exercise therapy guidance; the number of steps covered during normal daily activities was recorded for the C group. The outcome measures were changes in kidney function and handgrip and knee extension muscle strength. Values at the baseline (T1) and 12 months later (T2) were compared. There were no significant differences in baseline characteristics between the two groups; however, the C group was more physically active than the Ex group. Eight subjects dropped out, and 28 subjects (14 in each group) were included in the final analysis. Physical activity increased significantly only in the Ex group. Grip strength (F = 7.0, p = 0.01) and knee extension muscle strength (F = 14.3, p < 0.01) were found to improve only in the Ex group. Further, the changes in eGFR were not significantly different between the two groups (F = 0.01, p = 0.93). Home-based exercise therapy for pre-dialysis CKD patients was feasible and improved arm and leg muscle strength without affecting kidney function. UMIN Clinical Trials Registry ( UMIN000005091 ). Registered 2/15/2011.

  11. Inflammation and nutritional status assessment by malnutrition inflammation score and its outcome in pre-dialysis chronic kidney disease patients.

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    Jagadeswaran, D; Indhumathi, E; Hemamalini, A J; Sivakumar, V; Soundararajan, P; Jayakumar, M

    2018-01-09

    Malnutrition-inflammation complex syndrome (MICS), hyperhomocysteinemia, calcium and phosphate levels derangement have been predicted as important contributing factors for the progression of cardiovascular burden. Among patients with earlier stage of CKD, hypoalbuminaemia and inflammation deliberated as non-traditional cardiovascular risk factors, which add more burden to circulatory disease, mortality and rapid advancement to CKD stage 5. The aim of the study is to evaluate inflammation and nutritional status of CKD patients not on dialysis using Malnutrition inflammation score (MIS) and to verify the association with mortality in the follow-up period. In this prospective cohort study 129 (66 males, 63 females) pre-dialysis CKD patients enrolled between June 2013 to August 2014 and censored until March 2017. Malnutrition and Inflammation assessed using Malnutrition inflammation score. Blood urea nitrogen, serum creatinine, albumin, Interleukin - 6, highly sensitive C reactive protein (hsCRP), total cholesterol and anthropometric data were analyzed. The Malnutrition inflammation score in pre-dialysis CKD patients ranged from 0 to 18 with the median score of two. During 36 or more months of follow-up, there were 30 (23.2%) deaths, 35 (27%) patients initiated on hemodialysis, one (0.7%) patient was initiated on peritoneal dialysis, two (1.4%) patients underwent renal transplantation and two (1.4%) patients were lost for follow-up. In this study, 33% had varying degree of malnutrition and inflammation. Patients who had MIS ≥7 had significant increase in IL-6 (p = 0.003) and HsCRP levels (p < 0.001) when compared with other tertiles of MIS. ROC curve analysis of MIS showed 56.5% sensitivity and 81% specificity in predicting death rate (AUC 0.709; 95% CI 0.604-0.815, p < 0.001). Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed MIS ≥7 had a strong association (log rank test, p < 0.001) with mortality during 36 and more months of follow-up time. In unadjusted analyses

  12. Does the Spiritual Well-Being of Chronic Hemodialysis Patients Differ from that of Pre-dialysis Chronic Kidney Disease Patients?

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    Areewan Cheawchanwattana

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Spiritual well-being is viewed as an essential component of health-related quality of life (HRQOL in the modernized biopsychosocial-spiritual model of health. Understanding spiritual well-being should lead to better treatment plans from the patients’ point of view, and improved patient adherence. There are numerous studies of traditional HRQOL, physical, mental, and social well-being; however, studies of spiritual well-being in chronic kidney disease (CKD patients are limited. Thus, this study compared spiritual well-being of chronic hemodialysis patients and pre-dialysis CKD patients. A total of 31 chronic hemodialysis and 63 pre-dialysis CKD patients were asked for consent and then interviewed for spiritual well-being using the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy–Spiritual Well-Being (FACIT-Sp. Analysis of covariance was applied to compare FACIT-Sp scores between pre-dialysis CKD and chronic hemodialysis groups that were adjusted by patient characteristics. The FACIT-Sp scores of pre-dialysis CKD patients were non-significantly greater than those of chronic hemodialysis patients after adjustment for gender, age, and marital status. However, all FACIT-Sp scores of males were significantly lower than those of females [FACIT Meaning −1.59 (p = 0.024, FACIT Peace −2.37 (p = 0.004, FACIT Faith −2.87 (p = 0.001, FACIT Total Score −6.83 (p = 0.001]. The spiritual well-being did not significantly differ by stages of chronic kidney disease; however, patient gender was associated with spiritual well-being instead. To improve spiritual well-being, researchers should consider patient gender as a significant factor.

  13. Pre-dialysis patients' perceived autonomy, self-esteem and labor participation: associations with illness perceptions and treatment perceptions. A cross-sectional study.

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    Jansen, Daphne L; Grootendorst, Diana C; Rijken, Mieke; Heijmans, Monique; Kaptein, Ad A; Boeschoten, Elisabeth W; Dekker, Friedo W

    2010-12-08

    Compared to healthy people, patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) participate less in paid jobs and social activities. The aim of the study was to examine a) the perceived autonomy, self-esteem and labor participation of patients in the pre-dialysis phase, b) pre-dialysis patients' illness perceptions and treatment perceptions, and c) the association of these perceptions with autonomy, self-esteem and labor participation. Patients (N = 109) completed questionnaires at home. Data were analysed using bivariate and multivariate analyses. The results showed that the average autonomy levels were not very high, but the average level of self-esteem was rather high, and that drop out of the labor market already occurs during the pre-dialysis phase. Positive illness and treatment beliefs were associated with higher autonomy and self-esteem levels, but not with employment. Multiple regression analyses revealed that illness and treatment perceptions explained a substantial amount of variance in autonomy (17%) and self-esteem (26%). The perception of less treatment disruption was an important predictor. Patient education on possibilities to combine CKD and its treatment with activities, including paid work, might stimulate positive (realistic) beliefs and prevent or challenge negative beliefs. Interventions focusing on these aspects may assist patients to adjust to CKD, and ultimately prevent unnecessary drop out of the labor market.

  14. Pre-dialysis patients' perceived autonomy, self-esteem and labor participation: associations with illness perceptions and treatment perceptions. A cross-sectional study

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    Kaptein Ad A

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Compared to healthy people, patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD participate less in paid jobs and social activities. The aim of the study was to examine a the perceived autonomy, self-esteem and labor participation of patients in the pre-dialysis phase, b pre-dialysis patients' illness perceptions and treatment perceptions, and c the association of these perceptions with autonomy, self-esteem and labor participation. Methods Patients (N = 109 completed questionnaires at home. Data were analysed using bivariate and multivariate analyses. Results The results showed that the average autonomy levels were not very high, but the average level of self-esteem was rather high, and that drop out of the labor market already occurs during the pre-dialysis phase. Positive illness and treatment beliefs were associated with higher autonomy and self-esteem levels, but not with employment. Multiple regression analyses revealed that illness and treatment perceptions explained a substantial amount of variance in autonomy (17% and self-esteem (26%. The perception of less treatment disruption was an important predictor. Conclusions Patient education on possibilities to combine CKD and its treatment with activities, including paid work, might stimulate positive (realistic beliefs and prevent or challenge negative beliefs. Interventions focusing on these aspects may assist patients to adjust to CKD, and ultimately prevent unnecessary drop out of the labor market.

  15. Telemedicine: Development of a distance care system for pre-dialysis chronic kidney disease patients.

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    Fernandes, Natália Maria da Silva; Bastos, Marcus Gomes; Oliveira, Nivalda A C de; Costa, Alex do Vale; Bernardino, Heder Soares

    2015-01-01

    The focus in the treatment of CKD is to prevent its progression through optimal medical control. The large number of patients with CKD has pressed nephrologists to assess more patients into ever-smaller periods of consultation. The use of light technologies as a promising form of health care. The internet offers the opportunity to manipulate the doctor in his professional contact with the user. To develop a web system to attend the patients with CKD not on dialysis and clinically stable stages at distance. Developed a system using the Java language, MySQL database and PrimeFaces framework; available on a Glassfish application server. The initial access is performed by the nephrologist, which registers the patients with their personal information and access data. After being registered, the patient (or family doctor) can enter the data of your query and these will be following, passed on to the nephrologist for evaluation. The form with the data of interest is pre-determined, but there is possibility to add free-form information. The system enables, in addition, there is exchange of messages between doctors and patients. In addition, users receive messages via e-mail alerting them of their duties. Confidentiality is guaranteed by individual passwords for doctors and patients. This tool will enable to increase the coverage area of nephrologists, reduce costs and bring the patient to the primary care physician, using the Family Health Program as an interface between the patient and the nephrology secondary care.

  16. Spontaneous variability of pre-dialysis concentrations of uremic toxins over time in stable hemodialysis patients.

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    Sunny Eloot

    Full Text Available Numerous outcome studies and interventional trials in hemodialysis (HD patients are based on uremic toxin concentrations determined at one single or a limited number of time points. The reliability of these studies however entirely depends on how representative these cross-sectional concentrations are. We therefore investigated the variability of predialysis concentrations of uremic toxins over time.Prospectively collected predialysis serum samples of the midweek session of week 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 8, 12, and 16 were analyzed for a panel of uremic toxins in stable chronic HD patients (N = 18 while maintaining dialyzer type and dialysis mode during the study period.Concentrations of the analyzed uremic toxins varied substantially between individuals, but also within stable HD patients (intra-patient variability. For urea, creatinine, beta-2-microglobulin, and some protein-bound uremic toxins, Intra-class Correlation Coefficient (ICC was higher than 0.7. However, for phosphorus, uric acid, symmetric and asymmetric dimethylarginine, and the protein-bound toxins hippuric acid and indoxyl sulfate, ICC values were below 0.7, implying a concentration variability within the individual patient even exceeding 65% of the observed inter-patient variability.Intra-patient variability may affect the interpretation of the association between a single concentration of certain uremic toxins and outcomes. When performing future outcome and interventional studies with uremic toxins other than described here, one should quantify their intra-patient variability and take into account that for solutes with a large intra-patient variability associations could be missed.

  17. Prevalence of CKD-MBD in pre-dialysis patients using biochemical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    dialysis patients were sim- ilarly studied, it was found that blacks had significantly lower levels of 25(OH) D but higher levels of calcium, phosphorus and PTH. This high secondary hyperpar- athyroidism (SHPT) and 25(OH) D deficiency occurs.

  18. Mild cognitive impairment in older adults with pre-dialysis patients with chronic kidney disease: Prevalence and association with physical function.

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    Otobe, Yuhei; Hiraki, Koji; Hotta, Chiharu; Nishizawa, Hajime; Izawa, Kazuhiro P; Taki, Yasuhiro; Imai, Naohiko; Sakurada, Tsutomu; Shibagaki, Yugo

    2017-09-26

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a risk factor for declining cognitive and physical function. However, the prevalence of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and its relationship with physical function is not clear. Therefore, our aim was to evaluate the prevalence of MCI and the relationship between MCI and physical function among older adults with pre-dialysis CKD. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 120 patients, aged ≥ 65 years (mean age, 77.3 years), with pre-dialysis CKD but without probable dementia (Mini Mental State Examination < 24). MCI was evaluated using the Japanese version of the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA-J). For analysis, patients were classified into two cognitive function groups: normal (MoCA-J ≥26) and MCI (MoCA-J <26). Physical, clinical, and biochemical parameters were compared between the groups. Logistic and linear regression analyses were used to evaluate the specific association between cognitive and physical function. Seventy-five patients (62.5%) patients belonged to the MCI group. Significant differences between the two groups were identified for gait speed, balance, age, and haemoglobin concentration. After adjustment for covariates, only gait speed was significantly associated with MCI (odds ratio, 0.06; 95% confidence interval, 0.009-0,411). The prevalence of MCI among older adults with pre-dialysis CKD was as high as 62.5%. The association between MCI and reduced gait speed supports the possible interaction between physical and cognitive functions and the need for early screening. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  19. The Impact of Renin-Angiotensin System Blockade on Renal Outcomes and Mortality in Pre-Dialysis Patients with Advanced Chronic Kidney Disease.

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    Oh, Yun Jung; Kim, Sun Moon; Shin, Byung Chul; Kim, Hyun Lee; Chung, Jong Hoon; Kim, Ae Jin; Ro, Han; Chang, Jae Hyun; Lee, Hyun Hee; Chung, Wookyung; Lee, Chungsik; Jung, Ji Yong

    2017-01-01

    Renin-angiotensin-system (RAS) blockade is thought to slow renal progression in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, it remains uncertain if the habitual use of RAS inhibitors affects renal progression and outcomes in pre-dialysis patients with advanced CKD. In this multicenter retrospective cohort study, we identified 2,076 pre-dialysis patients with advanced CKD (stage 4 or 5) from a total of 33,722 CKD patients. RAS blockade users were paired with non-users for analyses using inverse probability of treatment-weighted (IPTW) and propensity score (PS) matching. The outcomes were renal death, all-cause mortality, hospitalization for hyperkalemia, and interactive factors as composite outcomes. RAS blockade users showed an increased risk of renal death in PS-matched analysis (hazard ratio [HR], 1.381; 95% CI, 1.071-1.781; P = 0.013), which was in agreement with the results of IPTW analysis (HR, 1.298; 95% CI, 1.123-1.500; P renal outcome without improving all-cause mortality. Further studies are warranted to determine whether withholding RAS blockade may lead to better outcomes in these patients.

  20. Association of blood pressure with decline in renal function and time until the start of renal replacement therapy in pre-dialysis patients: a cohort study

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    Sijpkens Yvo WJ

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To investigate whether high blood pressure accelerates renal function decline in patients with advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD, we studied the association of systolic (SBP and diastolic blood pressure (DBP with decline in renal function and time until the start of renal replacement therapy (RRT in patients with CKD stages IV-V on pre-dialysis care. Methods In the PREPARE-1 cohort 547 incident pre-dialysis patients, referred as part of the usual care to outpatient clinics of eight Dutch hospitals, were included between 1999 and 2001 and followed until the start of RRT, mortality, or end of follow-up (January 1st 2008. Main outcomes were rate of decline in renal function, estimated as the slope of available eGFR measurements, and time until the start of RRT. Results A total of 508 patients, 57% men and median (IQR age of 63 (50-73 years, were available for analyses. Mean (SD decline in renal function was 0.35 (0.75 ml/min/1.73 m2/month. Every 10 mmHg increase in SBP or DBP resulted in an accelerated decline in renal function (adjusted additional decline 0.04 (0.02;0.07 and 0.05 (0.00;0.11 ml/min/1.73 m2/month respectively and an earlier start of RRT (adjusted HR 1.09 (1.04;1.14 and 1.16 (1.05;1.28 respectively. Furthermore, patients with SBP and DBP above the BP target goal of 2/month and an earlier start of RRT (adjusted HR 2.08 (1.25;3.44, compared to patients who achieved the target goal (11%. Comparing the decline in renal function and risk of starting RRT between patients with only SBP above the target (≥ 130 mmHg and patients with both SBP and DBP below the target (2/month and adjusted HR 2.24 (1.26;3.97. Therefore, it seems that especially having SBP above the target is harmful. Conclusions In pre-dialysis patients with CKD stages IV-V, having blood pressure (especially SBP above the target goal for CKD patients (

  1. Creatinine index as a surrogate of lean body mass derived from urea Kt/V, pre-dialysis serum levels and anthropometric characteristics of haemodialysis patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard Canaud

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Protein-energy wasting is common in long-term haemodialysis (HD patients with chronic kidney disease and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. The creatinine index (CI is a simple and useful nutritional parameter reflecting the dietary skeletal muscle protein intake and skeletal muscle mass of the patient. Because of the complexity of creatinine kinetic modeling (CKM to derive CI, we developed a more simplified formula to estimate CI in HD patients. DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS & MEASUREMENTS: A large database of 549 HD patients followed over more than 20 years including monthly CKM-derived CI values was used to develop a simple equation based on patient demographics, predialysis serum creatinine values and dialysis dose (spKt/V using mixed regression models. RESULTS: The equation to estimate CI was developed based on age, gender, pre-dialysis serum creatinine concentrations and spKt/V urea. The equation-derived CI correlated strongly with the measured CI using CKM (correlation coefficient  = 0.79, p-value <0.001. The mean error of CI prediction using the equation was 13.47%. Preliminary examples of few typical HD patients have been used to illustrate the clinical relevance and potential usefulness of CI. CONCLUSIONS: The elementary equation used to derive CI using demographic parameters, pre-dialysis serum creatinine concentrations and dialysis dose is a simple and accurate surrogate measure for muscle mass estimation. However, the predictive value of the simplified CI assessment method on mortality deserves further evaluation in large cohorts of HD patients.

  2. Hematological profile of chronic kidney disease (CKD patients in Iran, in pre-dialysis stages and after initiation of hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afshar Reza

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Anemia is a common sequealae of chronic kidney disease (CKD, associated with significant morbidity. A cross-sectional study was conducted on 100 CKD patients (54 hemodia-lyzed, 46 pre-dialyzed. Data including, complete blood count, BUN, creatinine, creatinine clea-rance, underlying diseases and hemodialysis duration were collected by a questionnaire. The most frequent morphologic features were normochromic-normocytic (80%, hypochromic-microcytic (15% and macrocytic (5%. The frequency of anemia in hemodialyzed and pre-dialyzed patients (with mean Hgb level of 10.27 and 11.11 g/dL were 85% and 75%. Hemoglobin concentration was positively correlated to calculated creatinine clearance (P < 0.001. The severity of anemia among hemodialyzed patients was mild (Hgb > 10 g/dL in 5%, moderate in 70% and severe (Hgb < 7 g/dL in 25%, while in pre-dialyzed was mild in 45% and moderate in 55%. There was no correlation between the anemia and CKD causes or hemodialysis duration. In conclusion, data shows that anemia in our patients with CKD is a predominant manifestation, with high frequency but of moderate degree. The most likely cause is inadequate erythropoietin production.

  3. Pre-dialysis patients’ perceived autonomy, self-esteem and labor participation: associations with illness perceptions and treatment perceptions: a cross-sectional study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, D.L.; Grootendorst, D.C.; Rijken, M.; Heijmans, M.; Kaptein, A.A.; Boeschoten, E.W.; Dekker, F.W.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Compared to healthy people, patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) participate less in paid jobs and social activities. The aim of the study was to examine a) the perceived autonomy, self-esteem and labor participation of patients in the pre-dialysis phase, b) pre-dialysis patients'

  4. Influence of Diet Balanced with Essential Amino Acids / Keto Acid Analogs and High-Nutrient Blend on the Progression of Renal Failure in Patients in the Pre-Dialysis Stage of Chronic Kidney Disease Caused by Systemic Autoimmune Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.I. Aleksandrova

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of a low protein diet (LPD balanced with essential amino acids (EAA / keto acid analogs (KAA and protein “SUPRO-XT 219D” in the composition of the high-energy nutrient blend (HENB for slow down of renal failure in patients in the pre-dialysis stage of chronic kidney disease (CKD induced by systemic autoimmune diseases (SAD.Material and Methods: In this study, 46 patients (35 with systemic lupus erythematosus and 15 with various forms of systemic vasculitis with CKD in stages 3-4 were randomized into three groups. Group 1 (18 patients: 10 with CKD stage 3 and 8 with CKD stage 4 was given LPD (0.6 g protein per kg of body weight per day comprising 0.3 g of vegetable protein and 0.3 g of animal protein balanced with EAA/KAA (Diet #1; Group 2 (18 patients: 9 with CKD stage 3 and 9 with CKD stage 4 was given the same LPD, but with an increased vegetable protein content (purified soy protein SUPRO-XT 219D up to 0.4 g/kg/day in the composition of HENB (Diet #2; Group 3, comparison group, (10 patients: 7 with CKD stage 3 and 3 with CKD stage 4 was given a free diet (Diet #3 based on the patient’s personal preferences. Both options of LPD were offered to all the patients of Groups 1 and 2 regardless of their baseline nutritional status (NS. The duration of the observation was 24-48 months. The NS was evaluated based on the bioelectrical impedance analysis. The protein and calorie intake was calculated from the 3-day food diary.Results: Among the 46 patients with CKD stages 3-4, NS impairment was detected in almost half the patients (45.7%. Both forms of LPD were well tolerated. The correction of the nutritive impairment was achieved in patients with baseline impaired NS; the remaining patients of Groups 1 and 2 demonstrated the safety of NS against LPD. At the same time, among Group 3 patients, during the progression of renal disorders, the NS rate was observed to increase by 1.5 times (from 40% to 60

  5. The association between bioimpedance analysis and quality of life in pre-dialysis stage 5 chronic kidney disease, hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yongsiri, Somchai; Thammakumpee, Jiranuch; Prongnamchai, Suriya; Dinchuthai, Pakaphan; Chueansuwan, Rachaneeporn; Tangjaturonrasme, Siriporn; Chaivanit, Pechngam

    2014-03-01

    Protein-energy wasting is a significant problem in End stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. Furthermore, it compromises the patient's Quality of life (QOL). Multifrequency Bioimpedance Spectroscopy (BIS) is a validated method to assess body composition in dialysis patients. There has been no data on the relationship between body composition and QOL in ESRD patients who were treated with different modalities. To explore the association between body composition as assessed by BIS and QOL in ESRD patients who received different treatment modalities. The present study is a cross sectional, descriptive analytic study of the association between QOL and BIS in ESRD patients in Burapha University, Chonburi, Thailand. QOL was assessed by WHOQOL-BREF questionnaire, body composition was measured by BIS technique. The difference between groups was tested by one-way ANOVA test, relationship between groups was tested with Pearson correlation test. Eighteen predialysis-CKD5, 26 peritoneal dialysis (PD), and 34 hemodialysis (HD) patients were included in the present study. All PD patients had weekly Kt/V > or = 1.7 per week and all HD patients had weekly Kt/V > or = 3.6 per week. There were no statistically difference in baseline characteristics including Charlson comorbidity index, dietary intake, BMI, and blood pressure between groups. Mean QOL scores in each group were in the middle range and not significantly difference. PD patients had more over hydration when compare to HD patients (16.18 +/- 11.24 vs. 2.36 +/- 11.07 %OH/ECW p < 0.0001). There were inversed correlation between overhydration and physical health in HD patients (r = -0.372, p = 0.033) but not in PD and CKD5 patients. CKD5 patients had more lean tissue index (LTI) than PD and HD patients (LTI = 14.34 +/- 3.13, 12.26 +/- 3.65, 11.48 +/- 3.48 kg/m2 respectively, p = 0.023). There were correlation between LTI and overall QOL in CKD5 (r = 0.690, p = 0.002) and PD patients (r = 0.498, p = 0.010). In HD patients, LTI

  6. Benefits of regular walking exercise in advanced pre-dialysis chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosmadakis, George C; John, Stephen G; Clapp, Emma L; Viana, Joao L; Smith, Alice C; Bishop, Nicolette C; Bevington, Alan; Owen, Paul J; McIntyre, Christopher W; Feehally, John

    2012-03-01

    There is increasing evidence of the benefit of regular physical exercise in a number of long-term conditions including chronic kidney disease (CKD). In CKD, this evidence has mostly come from studies in end stage patients receiving regular dialysis. There is little evidence in pre-dialysis patients with CKD Stages 4 and 5. A prospective study compared the benefits of 6 months regular walking in 40 pre-dialysis patients with CKD Stages 4 and 5. Twenty of them were the exercising group and were compared to 20 patients who were continuing with usual physical activity. In addition, the 40 patients were randomized to receive additional oral sodium bicarbonate (target venous bicarbonate 29 mmol/L) or continue with previous sodium bicarbonate treatment (target 24 mmol/L). Improvements noted after 1 month were sustained to 6 months in the 18 of 20 who completed the exercise study. These included improvements in exercise tolerance (reduced exertion to achieve the same activity), weight loss, improved cardiovascular reactivity, avoiding an increase in blood pressure medication and improvements in quality of health and life and uraemic symptom scores assessed by questionnaire. Sodium bicarbonate supplementation did not produce any significant alterations. This study provides further support for the broad benefits of aerobic physical exercise in CKD. More studies are needed to understand the mechanisms of these benefits, to study whether resistance exercise will add to the benefit and to evaluate strategies to promote sustained lifestyle changes, that could ensure continued increase in habitual daily physical activity levels.

  7. diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehraban Falahati

    2016-09-01

    candiduria and female gender, high FBS and urine glucose, uncontrolled diabetes (HbA1c ≥8, and acidic urine pH (P<0.05. Conclusion: Considering the high incidence rate of candiduria in diabetic patients, control of diabetes, predisposing factors, and causal relationships between diabetes and candiduria should be highlighted.

  8. Platelet Levels and Implications For Pre-Dialysis Chronic Renal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Platelet count is assumed to be normal in chronic renal insufficiency. However, the possible effect of loss of platelet function in chronic renal failure (CFR) in relation to occult chronic blood loss, haematuria and overall health of the patient has not been given the desired attention. The aim of this study was to determine the ...

  9. Lower Incidence of End-Stage Renal Disease but Suboptimal Pre-Dialysis Renal Care in Schizophrenia: A 14-Year Nationwide Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yueh-Han Hsu

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia is closely associated with cardiovascular risk factors which are consequently attributable to the development of chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease (ESRD. However, no study has been conducted to examine ESRD-related epidemiology and quality of care before starting dialysis for patients with schizophrenia. By using nationwide health insurance databases, we identified 54,361 ESRD-free patients with schizophrenia and their age-/gender-matched subjects without schizophrenia for this retrospective cohort study (the schizophrenia cohort. We also identified a cohort of 1,244 adult dialysis patients with and without schizophrenia (1:3 to compare quality of renal care before dialysis and outcomes (the dialysis cohort. Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate the hazard ratio (HR for dialysis and death. Odds ratio (OR derived from logistic regression models were used to delineate quality of pre-dialysis renal care. Compared to general population, patients with schizophrenia were less likely to develop ESRD (HR = 0.6; 95% CI 0.4-0.8, but had a higher risk for death (HR = 1.2; 95% CI, 1.1-1.3. Patients with schizophrenia at the pre-ESRD stage received suboptimal pre-dialysis renal care; for example, they were less likely to visit nephrologists (OR = 0.6; 95% CI, 0.4-0.8 and received fewer erythropoietin prescriptions (OR = 0.7; 95% CI, 0.6-0.9. But they had a higher risk of hospitalization in the first year after starting dialysis (OR = 1.4; 95% CI, 1.0-1.8, P < .05. Patients with schizophrenia undertaking dialysis had higher risk for mortality than the general ESRD patients. A closer collaboration between psychiatrists and nephrologists or internists to minimize the gaps in quality of general care is recommended.

  10. Profile of chronic kidney disease related-mineral bone disorders in newly diagnosed advanced predialysis diabetic kidney disease patients: A hospital based cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, S; Beatrice, A M; Ghosh, A; Pramanik, S; Bhattacharjee, R; Ghosh, S; Raychaudhury, A; Mukhopadhyay, S; Chowdhury, S

    2017-12-01

    Chronic kidney disease related-mineral bone disorder (CKD-MBD) has been poorly studied in pre-dialysis Indian CKD population. There are limited data on the pattern of these disturbances in diabetic CKD patients. Therefore, a study was conducted to find out the profile of mineral bone disorders in T2DM patients with pre-dialysis CKD. In this cross-sectional design, diabetic patients with newly-diagnosed stage 4 and 5 CKD were evaluated. Serum levels of calcium, phosphorus, intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH), 25 hydroxy vitamin D and total alkaline phosphatase (ALP) were measured in all patients. Bone mineral density (BMD) was measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). A total of 72 eligible patients participated (44 males, 28 females; age 54.2±11.7). Patients with CKD Stage 5 had a lower level of corrected serum calcium and significantly higher level of inorganic phosphorus, total ALP and iPTH as compared to stage 4 patients. Overall, 38.5% were hypocalcemic, 31.43% were hyperphosphatemic. 24.2% of CKD subjects were vitamin D deficient (110pg/ml) was detected in nearly 43% of patients. In stage 5, only 32% patients was found to have hyperparathyroidism (iPTH>300pg/ml). There was a good correlation between iPTH and total ALP (r=0.5, p=0.0001) in this cohort. 25 (OH) vitamin D was inversely correlated with ALP (r=-0.39, P=0.001) and showed negative correlation with urine ACR (r=-0.37, P=0.002). As a group, the osteoporotic CKD subjects exhibited higher iPTH (220.1±153.8 vs. 119±108pg/ml, p<0.05) as compared to those who were osteopenic or had normal bone density. There was significant correlation between BMD and iPTH (adjusted r=-0.436; P=0.001). In the multivariate regression model, we found intact PTH to predict BMD even after adjustment of all the confounders. The current study showed that adynamic bone disease is prevalent even in pre-dialysis CKD population. High bone turnover disease may not be the most prevalent type in diabetic CKD. However, it

  11. Stabilizing effects of cool dialysate temperature on hemodynamic parameters in diabetic patients undergoing hemodialysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghasemi, A.; Shafiee, M.; Rowghani, K.

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the effect of cool dialysis on hemodynamic parameters and serum nitric oxide levels in diabetic patients, we studied 20 old (mean age 63.3+-7.5) chronic hemodialysis diabetics who were dialyzed twice, once using cool and once using standard (37 C) temperature dialysis solution. During the study, all the dialysis conditions were maintained the same except cooling the dailysate from 37C to 35C. Hemodynamic parameters including SBP, DBP and HR were measured hourly. Oral temperature was measured before and after dialysis. Serum urea and nitric oxide metabolites were determined before and after hemodialysis. Systolic, diastolic and mean arterial pressure decreased significantly during standard compared to cool dialysis. Maximum decrease of systolic, diastolic and mean arterial pressure was observed during the third hour of dialysis and magnitude of decrease was 18, 17 and 14 percent for standard temperature and 6, 1, and 4 percent for cool dialysis, respectively. Heart rate did not differ significantly between the two study groups. Compared to the pre dialysis levels of serum nitric oxide metabolites, the post dialysis levels decreased significantly with cool and standard temperature dialysate (59+-5 vs. 37+-4, and 63+-7 vs. 41+-5, umol/L respectively, P<0.01). Cool dialysis could decrease episodes of hypotension and stabilized hemodynamic parameters in diabetic patients. Probably other mechanisms than increased serum nitric oxide levels may be involved in hemodialysis hypotension in this group of patients. (author)

  12. Diabetic patients: Psychological aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adili, Fatemeh; Larijani, Bagher; Haghighatpanah, Mohammadreza

    2006-11-01

    This study was undertaken to consider the psychological aspect of diabetes with regard to improving clinical outcomes. The review was limited to literature reports on the causes, solutions, and treatments of some common psychological problems known to complicate diabetes management. A literature search was undertaken using Pub-Med, CINAHL, Proquest, Elsevier, Blackwell Synergy, Ovid, Ebsco, Rose net, and Google websites, including studies published in English journals between 1995 and 2006. Therefore about 88 articles were selected based on the inclusion criteria. In earlier studies, relatively little empirical research was found to substantiate the effect of psychological counseling in complicated diabetes. The greatest deficits were seen in areas of mental health, self-esteem parent impact, and family cohesion. There were some different factors, which influence the psychological aspect of diabetic patients, such as age, gender, place of living, familial and social support, motivation, energy, life satisfaction, and lifestyle. There are various types of solutions for coping with the psychological problems in diabetic clients. The most essential solution lies in educating the patients and healthcare providers on the subject. Before initiating each educational intervention, a thorough assessment would be crucial. Treatment plans may benefit from cognitive behavior therapy (CBT), behavior family therapy, improving family communication, problem-solving skills, and providing motivation for diabetic patients. Moreover, it seems that the close collaboration between diabetologists and psychologists would be fruitful.

  13. Malnutrition in pre-dialysis chronic kidney disease patients in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    strong relationship between malnutrition, inflammation and atherosclerosis in CKD, ... mia, reduced absorption of nutrients from oedematous gut, metabolic acidosis ..... et al.37 There has been observation that loss of muscle mass and protein ...

  14. Malnutrition in pre-dialysis chronic kidney disease patients in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Malnutrition is a complication in chronic kidney disease (CKD) known to affect quality of life and prognosis although not often diagnosed. It is associated with rapid progression to end stage renal disease (ESRD) and mortality. Early identification and treatment will slow down progression to ESRD and mortality.

  15. ANEMIA IN HEMODIALYSIS PATIENTS: DIABETIC VS NON DIABETIC PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SH SHAHIDI

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. One of the characteristic signs of uremic syndrome is anemia. One of major factors that affects on severity of anemia in ESRD is underlying diseas. The porpuse of this study is to compaire anemia between diabetic and non diabetic ESRD patients. Methods. In a case control study we compared the mean valuse of Hb, Het, MCV, MCH, MCHC, BUN, Cr and duration of dialysis between diabetic and nondiabetic patients on chronic hemodialyis. some variables (such as age, sex, use of erythropoietin, nonderolone decaonats, folic acid, ferrous sulfate, transfusion and blood loss in recent three months and acquired kidney cysts were matched between cases and controls. Results. Means of Hb were 9±1.3 and 8 ± 1.7 in diabetic and non diabetic patients (P<0.05. Mean corposcular volume in diabetic patients (91±3.1 fl was more higher than non diabetic ones (87.1 ± 8.9 (P < 0.05. Other indices had no differences between two groups (P > 0.05. Discussion. Severity of anemia in patients with diabetic nephropathy is milder that other patients with ESRD. So, Anemia as an indicator of chronocity of renal disease in diabetics is missleading.

  16. Predictors of Diabetic Retinopathy in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    type 2 diabetes and diabetic retinopathy (DR) and nephropathy represent one of the ... control, hypertension, dyslipidemia, age of the patient, duration of diabetes .... thus, the presence of one is believed to predict the development of the other.

  17. [Pregnant diabetic patients: institutional experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez Gutiérrez, Héctor Israel; Carrillo Iñiguez, Mayra Judith; Pestaña Mendoza, Silvia; Santamaría Ferreira, Mauricio

    2006-04-01

    Diabetes mellitus complicates 3-5% of all pregnancies and is a major cause of perinatal morbidity and mortality. The diet and insulin have revolutionized the care related with pregnancy complicated by diabetes mellitus. To report the management experience in patients with diabetes and pregnancy at the Instituto Materno Infantil, Estado de Mexico. A descriptive, retrospective, observational and cross-sectional study of pregnant women with diabetes and pregnancy was conducted from 2003 to 2004. We included 55 pregnant women who had: gestational diabetes 30 (54.4%), pregestational diabetes 24 (43.6%), and carbohydrate intolerance 1 (1.8%); every one of them were controlled either with diet, insulin or both. The mean age was 30.6, 80% with family history of type 2 diabetes mellitus, 9% gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes was diagnosed in 33.3% by abnormal 50 g glucose screening and 46.6% with oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). The main complications among the patients were urinary disease (61.3%) and the major fetal malformation were those related with cardiovascular disease (9.09%). The most frequent mode of delivery was cesarean section (58%) and birth weight was of 3,146 g. The main risk factors identified among women in the study group were as follow: More than 25 years of age and family history of diabetes mellitus. We observed a progressive increase in the insulin dosage. The most consistent complications among the patients were urinary infection and the major fetal malformation was cardiovascular disease.

  18. Towards a personalised virtual diabetic patient simulator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, A.H.; Tani, G.; Pul, van C.; Beijerinck, H.C.W.; Cottaar, E.J.E.; Haak, H.R.; Riel, van N.A.W.

    2012-01-01

    The development of a diabetes simulator, an educational software tool which can help diabetic patients to better manage their disease, is described. Education of patients with diabetes mellitus is a fundamental part of diabetes care. One of the goals of diabetes education is to support the patients

  19. Awareness of diabetic retinopathy among patients with diabetes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Diabetic retinopathy is a major cause of blindness worldwide. The associated loss of productivity and quality of life of the patients with diabetic retinopathy will lead to additional socioeconomic burden. This study aims to determine the level of awareness of diabetic retinopathy among diabetic patients. Materials ...

  20. The diabetic patient in Ramadan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamsi-Pasha, Hassan; Aljabri, Khalid S

    2014-04-01

    During the month of Ramadan, all healthy, adult Muslims are required to fast from dawn to sunset. Fasting during Ramadan involves abstaining from food, water, beverages, smoking, oral drugs, and sexual intercourse. Although the Quran exempts chronically ill from fasting, many Muslims with diabetes still fast during Ramadan. Patients with diabetes who fast during the month of Ramadan can have acute complications. The risk of complications in fasting individuals with diabetes increases with longer periods of fasting. All patients with diabetes who wish to fast during Ramadan should be prepared by undergoing a medical assessment and engaging in a structured education program to undertake the fast as safely as possible. Although some guidelines do exist, there is an overwhelming need for better designed clinical trials which could provide us with evidence-based information and guidance in the management of patients with diabetes fasting Ramadan.

  1. Gallbladder function in diabetic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shreiner, D.P.; Sarva, R.P.; Van Thiel, D.; Yingvorapant, N.

    1986-01-01

    Gallbladder emptying and filling was studied in eight diabetic and six normal control patients. None of the patients had gallstones. Cholescintigraphy was performed using [/sup 99m/Tc]disofenin, and gallbladder emptying was studied using a 45-min i.v. infusion of the octapeptide of cholecystokinin (OP-CCK) 20 ng/kg X hr. The peak filling rate was greater in diabetic than in normal subjects; however, emptying of the gallbladder in response to OP-CCK was significantly less in the diabetic subjects (51.6 +/- 10.4% compared with 77.2 +/- 4.9%). When the diabetic group was subdivided into obese and nonobese diabetics, the obese diabetics had a much lower percentage of emptying than the nonobese diabetics (30.0 +/- 10.4% compared with 73.1 +/- 9.3%). These findings suggest that obese diabetics may have impaired emptying of the gallbladder even in the absence of gallstones. The more rapid rate of gallbladder filling in obesity may indicate hypotonicity of the gallbladder. The combination of these abnormalities may predispose the obese diabetic to the development of gallstones

  2. Rosuvastatin in diabetic hemodialysis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holdaas, Hallvard; Holme, Ingar; Schmieder, Roland E

    2011-01-01

    A randomized, placebo-controlled trial in diabetic patients receiving hemodialysis showed no effect of atorvastatin on a composite cardiovascular endpoint, but analysis of the component cardiac endpoints suggested that atorvastatin may significantly reduce risk. Because the AURORA (A Study...

  3. THE RAMADAN FAST AND THE DIABETIC PATIENT

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ill .. :).' A diabetic patient could fall into this category; if he wishes to fast, therefore, several important criteria have to be met. ... Diabetes-Endocrine Unit, University ofNatal, Durban ... the effects such foods could have on diabetics control.

  4. Diabetes in Patients With Acromegaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannon, A M; Thompson, C J; Sherlock, M

    2017-02-01

    Acromegaly is a clinical syndrome which results from growth hormone excess. Uncontrolled acromegaly is associated with cardiovascular mortality, due to an excess of risk factors including diabetes mellitus, hypertension and cardiomegaly. Diabetes mellitus is a frequent complication of acromegaly with a prevalence of 12-37%. This review will provide an overview of a number of aspects of diabetes mellitus and glucose intolerance in acromegaly including the following: 1. Epidemiology and pathophysiology of abnormalities of glucose homeostasis 2. The impact of different management options for acromegaly on glucose homeostasis 3. The management options for diabetes mellitus in patients with acromegaly RECENT FINDINGS: Growth hormone and IGF-1 have complex effects on glucose metabolism. Insulin resistance, hyperinsulinaemia and increased gluconeogenesis combine to produce a metabolic milieu which leads to the development of diabetes in acromegaly. Treatment of acromegaly should ameliorate abnormalities of glucose metabolism, due to reversal of insulin resistance and a reduction in gluconeogenesis. Recent advances in medical therapy of acromegaly have varying impacts on glucose homeostasis. These adverse effects influence management choices in patients with acromegaly who also have diabetes mellitus or glucose intolerance. The underlying mechanisms of disorders of glucose metabolism in patients with acromegaly are complex. The aim of treatment of acromegaly is normalisation of GH/IGF-1 with reduction of co-morbidities. The choice of therapy for acromegaly should consider the impact of therapy on several factors including glucose metabolism.

  5. Serum C-reactive protein levels in pre-dialysis chronic kidney ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-03-01

    Mar 1, 2016 ... SUMMARY. Background: Cardiovascular disease is the major cause of hospitalization and mortality in chronic kidney disease. (CKD). C-reactive protein (CRP) is a marker of cardiovascular disease and predictor of mortality in CKD patients. CKD patients with elevated CRP should be identified early with ...

  6. Serum C-reactive protein levels in pre-dialysis chronic kidney ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Cardiovascular disease is the major cause of hospitalization and mortality in chronic kidney disease (CKD). C- reactive protein (CRP) is a marker of cardiovascular disease and predictor of mortality in CKD patients. CKD patients with elevated CRP should be identified early with institution of measures to treat ...

  7. Serum C-reactive protein levels in pre-dialysis chronic kidney ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-03-01

    Mar 1, 2016 ... 1Department of Internal Medicine, Kidney Care Centre, Ondo, Ondo State, Nigeria. ... C-reactive protein (CRP) is a marker of cardiovascular disease and predictor of mortality in CKD patients. ... Methods: This was a case-control study involving 80 consecutive CKD patients and 40 control subjects without.

  8. Diabetic Foot Risk Factors in Patients with Diabetes at the

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Hosseini

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives Diabetic foot problems are one of the major causes of mortality and disability in diabetic patients. It is considered one of the costliest conditions for health care systems. This study is designed to identify diabetic foot risk factors in patients with diabetes mellitus at Kamkar Hospital diabetes clinic in Qom, Iran during 2006.MethodsThis study was performed on 140 diabetes mellitus patients at the Kamkar Hospital diabetic clinic. International working Group on the Diabetic Foot (IWGDF guidelines were used for physical exam of diabetic foot in these patients. The physical exam consisted of inspection of foot appearance for deformity, skin keratosis and ulcer, and neurological and arterial pulse exam of the lower extremities of these patients. Patients in this study were divided into four risk groups based on the IWGDF guidelines. ANOVA method was used for analysis and comparison of the results with P<0.05 considered as significant. ResultsMean age of the participants in this study was 52.4±11.2 years old from which 67.1% were female, 37.1% of patients were illiterate, and 10% were active smokers. Mean duration of diabetes in these patients was 8.9 years. Mean body mass index (BMI was 29.4± 4.4 and HbA1C was 9.3 ± 1.9. Percentages of the patients with retinopathy and nephropathy were 33.6% and 17.7% respectively. 95% of the patients did not know the correct way of nail clipping, 95.5% were wearing uncomfortable shoes, and 14.3% of patients had history of foot ulcer. None of the them had any education about foot care. Physical examination with monofilament, ankle reflex and vibration perception were defected in 28.6%, 52.5%, and 32.1% of patients respectively. 37.7% of patients had a decreased lower extremity pulse that was not felt by touch. Based on the IWGDF classifications, 70% of the patients were in the higher-risk group for diabetic foot ulcer. In the high risk group, age, duration of diabetes, illiteracy was

  9. Diabetes distress among type 2 diabetic patients

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    McRoy

    Key words: Diabetes mellitus, diabetes distress, HbA1c, glycaemic status ... [3] The management of diabetes mellitus and the ... morbidity and mortality risks associated with ... appropriate policy for prevention, control and ..... Mellitus and its Association Risk Indicators in a ... collaborative Research on Internal Medicine and.

  10. Diabetes knowledge among Greek Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulimeneas, Dimitrios; Grammatikopoulou, Maria G; Bougioukli, Vasiliki; Iosifidou, Parthena; Vasiloglou, Maria F; Gerama, Maria-Assimina; Mitsos, Dimitrios; Chrysanthakopoulou, Ioanna; Tsigga, Maria; Kazakos, Kyriakos

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes knowledge has been shown to improve glycemic control and associate with several demographic parameters. In Greece, a country with high obesity rates, disease knowledge has never been evaluated in diabetic patients. This cross sectional study aimed to assess diabetes knowledge and its associations between social and demographic parameters, among Greek type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients. One hundred fifty nine patients with T2DM were recruited from an urban and a rural clinic in Greece. Diabetes knowledge was assessed with the Brief Diabetes Knowledge Test (DKT). Basic anthropometry was performed. Data regarding glycemic control and sociodemographic characteristics were collected from the patients' medical files. Greek T2DM patients demonstrated poor disease knowledge (mean DKT score 8.3±2.2/14.0 and mean DKT as a percent of correct answers 59.6±15.8%). No differences were observed between sex, place of residence, or glycemic control, among subjects. Patients with higher education demonstrated greater diabetes knowledge. Simple obesity with concurrent central obesity or suboptimal glycemic control decreased diabetes knowledge among participants. Additionally, waist circumference was inversely correlated to diabetes knowledge. Based on the DKT, Greek patients exhibit poor diabetes knowledge. This study provides evidence for the need for better diabetes education in order to ameliorate disease outcome. Copyright © 2016 SEEN. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Medication adherence in type 2 diabetes patients: study of patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Medication adherence in type 2 diabetes patients: study of patients in ... impact of medication adherence on the clinical outcomes of type 2 diabetes patients at ... the review of case notes of one-hundred and fifty two randomly selected patients.

  12. Predictors of Diabetic Retinopathy in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Predictors of Diabetic Retinopathy in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Who Have Normoalbuminuria. R Karoli, J Fatima, V Shukla, P Garg, A Ali. Abstract. Background: Microalbuminuria is an independent predictor of retinopathy, so absence of microalbuminuria may tend clinician not to screen for diabetic retinopathy (DR).

  13. Outcomes of polytrauma patients with diabetes mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background The impact of diabetes mellitus in patients with multiple system injuries remains obscure. This study was designed to increase knowledge of outcomes of polytrauma in patients who have diabetes mellitus. Methods Data from the Trauma Audit and Research Network was used to identify patients who had suffered polytrauma during 2003 to 2011. These patients were filtered to those with known outcomes, then separated into those with diabetes, those known to have other co-morbidities but not diabetes and those known not to have any co-morbidities or diabetes. The data were analyzed to establish if patients with diabetes had differing outcomes associated with their diabetes versus the other groups. Results In total, 222 patients had diabetes, 2,558 had no past medical co-morbidities (PMC), 2,709 had PMC but no diabetes. The diabetic group of patients was found to be older than the other groups (P <0.05). A higher mortality rate was found in the diabetic group compared to the non-PMC group (32.4% versus 12.9%), P <0.05). Rates of many complications including renal failure, myocardial infarction, acute respiratory distress syndrome, pulmonary embolism and deep vein thrombosis were all found to be higher in the diabetic group. Conclusions Close monitoring of diabetic patients may result in improved outcomes. Tighter glycemic control and earlier intervention for complications may reduce mortality and morbidity. PMID:25026864

  14. Knowledge of diabetic complications in patients with diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ullah, F.; Afridi, A.K.; Rahim, F.; Ashfaq, M.; Khan, S.

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of diabetes mellitus has risen exponentially over the last three decades, with resultant increase in morbidity and mortality mainly due to its complications. Limited data is available regarding the awareness and knowledge about these complications in our population. This study was carried out to evaluate the knowledge of diabetic complications in patients with diabetes mellitus. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in the Medical B Unit of Department of Medicine Khyber Teaching Hospital, Peshawar. All admitted diabetic patients above 15 years of age with duration of diabetes mellitus more than one year were included. Results: Out of the 96 patients questioned, 58 were females and 38 were males. Mean age was 53.29 ± 10.821 years while the mean duration of diabetes mellitus was 9.75 ± 7.729 years. Of the total 76 (79.1%) of the patients were illiterate; 36 (37.50%) had good, 24 (25%) had average and 36 (37.50%) had poor knowledge about diabetic complications. Males and university graduate patients had slightly better knowledge. Between 50-60% patients were aware of different cardiac complications of diabetes mellitus. Awareness regarding other complications was foot ulcer/gangrene 70 (72.91%), poor wound healing 68 (70.83%), stroke 54 (56.25%), renal diseases 64 (66.66%), eye diseases 53 (55.20%), gastroparesis and other gastrointestinal problems 45 (46.87%), diabetic ketoacidosis 55 (57.29%), hypoglycaemia 50 (52.08%), lipid abnormalities 26 (27.08%) and symptoms of diabetic neuropathy ranging from 47-65%. Conclusions: Majority of diabetic patients are unaware of diabetic complications. Therefore, hospital and community based awareness programs should be launched to decrease the morbidity and mortality associated with diabetes mellitus. (author)

  15. KNOWLEDGE OF DIABETIC COMPLICATIONS IN PATIENTS WITH DIABETES MELLITUS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Fahim; Afridi, Ayesha Khan; Rahim, Fawad; Ashfaq, Muhammad; Khan, Sheema; Shabbier, Ghulam; Rahman, Sadiq Ur

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of diabetes mellitus has risen exponentially over the last three decades, with resultant increase in morbidity and mortality mainly due to its complications. Limited data is available regarding the awareness and knowledge about these complications in our population. This study was carried out to evaluate the knowledge of diabetic complications in patients with diabetes mellitus. This cross-sectional study was conducted in the Medical B Unit of Department of Medicine Khyber Teaching Hospital, Peshawar. All admitted diabetic patients above 15 years of age with duration of diabetes mellitus more than one year were included. Out of the 96 patients questioned, 58 were females and 38 were males. Mean age was 53.29 +/- 10.821 years while the mean duration of diabetes mellitus was 9.75 +/- 7.729 years. Of the total 76 (79.1%) of the patients were illiterate; 36 (37.50%) had good, 24 (25%) had average and 36 (37.50%) had poor knowledge about diabetic complications. Males and university graduate patients had slightly better knowledge. Between 50-60% patients were aware of different cardiac complications of diabetes mellitus. Awareness regarding other complications was foot ulcer/gangrene 70 (72.91%), poor wound healing 68 (70.83%), stroke 54 (56.25%), renal diseases 64 (66.66%), eye diseases 53 (55.20%), gastroparesis and other gastrointestinal problems 45 (46.87%), diabetic ketoacidosis 55 (57.29%), hypoglycaemia 50 (52.08%), lipid abnormalities 26 (27.08%) and symptoms of diabetic neuropathy ranging from 47-65%. Majority of diabetic patients are unaware of diabetic complications. Therefore, hospital and community based awareness programs should be launched to decrease the morbidity and mortality associated with diabetes mellitus.

  16. Constipation prevalence in diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoel Álvaro de Freitas Lins Neto

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: the aim of this study was to identify the prevalence of constipation in diabetic patients treated at the endocrinology outpatient clinic at Hospital Universitário Professor Alberto Antunes and PAM Salgadinho, from April to August 2013. Methods: a descriptive and cross-sectional study, carried out through a questionnaire using the Rome III criteria in 372 patients treated at the outpatient endocrinology clinic. Results: of 372 patients evaluated, the frequency of constipation found was 31.2% among diabetic patients. Females predominated in the sample (72.8% as well as for the frequency of constipation (80.2%. The incidence of type II diabetes was 97.3% and it was observed that 80.2% of the sample was older than 50 years. One hundred and twelve patients with inadequate glycemic control (HgA1c ≥ 7 had an association with constipation. Conclusion: there was an increased frequency of constipation in patients with diabetes mellitus according to the Rome III criteria, in relation to the general population. The inadequate glycemic control in patients with diabetes mellitus increases the frequency of constipation and it is necessary to perform studies that allow the confirmation of this association to demonstrate this hypothesis. Resumo: Objetivo: analisar a prevalência da constipação intestinal em pacientes diabéticos atendidos no ambulatório de endocrinologia do Hospital Universitário Professor Alberto Antunes e no PAM Salgadinho (HUPAA, de abril de 2013 a agosto 2013. Método: estudo descritivo e transversal, realizado através da aplicação de um questionário com os critérios de Roma III no ambulatório de endocrinologia do HUPAA. Resultado: em 372 pacientes, 271 feminino, 101 masculino, 162 de etnia branca, 55 negros e 155 pardos, 297 pacientes estavam acima de 50 anos, houve uma frequência de constipação de 31,2% nos pacientes diabéticos. O gênero feminino prevaleceu na amostra (73% assim como no índice de frequ

  17. Diabetic vitrectomy in a large type 1 diabetes patient population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostri, Christoffer; la Cour, Morten; Lund-Andersen, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    1996 and 2010. Surgical history was obtained from The Danish National Patient Register. RESULTS: The population consisted of 3980 patients with type 1 diabetes. Median follow-up was 10.0 years. In total, 106 patients underwent diabetic vitrectomy in the observation period. Surgery indications were...... nonclearing vitreous haemorrhage (43%) or tractional retinal detachment (57%). The cumulative incidence rates of diabetic vitrectomy were 1.6% after 5 years and 2.9% after 10 years. When excluding patients with no or mild diabetic retinopathy, the corresponding rates were higher; 3.7% and 6.4%, respectively...... (p diabetic vitrectomy increased in patients experiencing glycosylated haemoglobin A1c > 75 mmol/mol in the observation period (p

  18. Markers of Diabetic Nephropathy in Diabetic Patients in Gusau ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    by abnormal renal function as present by an abnormality in ... for a large proportion of patients beginning dialysis therapy (USSRDS 2001) ... and their presence predict development of clinical diabetics ... MATERIALS AND METHODS. Patients ...

  19. Evaluation of Smoking Status among Diabetes Patients in the State ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HP

    Purpose: To determine the prevalence of smoking among diabetes patients attending Diabetes. Outpatient Clinic at Penang .... (2,547) medical records of type 1 and 2 diabetes patients were .... American Diabetes Association. Standards of ...

  20. Conjunctival bacterial flora in diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najmun Nahar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Conjunctival flora refers to population of microorganisms that dwell within the eyes of healthy individuals and is important in maintaining a healthy ocular surface and normal conjunctival function. Conjunctival flora may be altered by a variety of factors that include age, immunosuppression and geography. Immune function is compromised in diabetes mellitus. The aim of the present study was to see the pattern of conjunctival bacterial flora in diabetic and non-diabetic patients. This cross sectional study was carried out in BSMMU during the period of January 2011 to December 2011. Total 500 conjunctival swabs were collected from both eyes of 50 diabetic patients attending OPD of Endocrinology Department of BSMMU and 200 non-diabetic individuals. Significant number of culture was positive in diabetic patients (64.0% compared to that of non-diabetic individuals (38.0%. Staphylococcus epidermidis was predominant in both study groups (diabetic vs non-diabetic: 41.3% vs 65.26%. Staphylococcus aureus (15.22%, Escherichia coli (6.52% and Enterobacter (8.33% were isolated in diabetic patients. Rate of positive culture in both and single eyes were higher in diabetic (28%, 36.0% than that of non-diabetic individuals (9.5%, 28.5%. Ibrahim Med. Coll. J. 2013; 7(1: 5-8

  1. Retinal changes in diabetic patients without diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumitrescu, Alina Gabriela; Istrate, Sinziana Luminita; Iancu, Raluca Claudia; Guta, Oana Maria; Ciuluvica, Radu; Voinea, Liliana

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure retinal vessel caliber and to examine early changes in macular thickness using optical coherence tomography (OCT). We evaluated to what extend vascular caliber and macular thickness differed between patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus without diabetic retinopathy compared with healthy individuals. 26 diabetic patients without diabetic retinopathy and 26 normal participants without any retinal and optic nerve diseases underwent ophthalmic examination, fundus photography, and OCT imaging. Temporal inferior retinal vessel diameters were measured using OCT. Also, we measured macular thickness in nine ETDRS subfields using Cirrus OCT. The mean age in the diabetic group was 61.5 years and in the control group, 55.5 years. Wider retinal arterioles and venules were found in patients with diabetes compared with healthy subjects (120 µm versus 96 µm, pdiabetes mellitus, central macular thickness was significantly thinner than that of control eyes (243.5 µm versus 269.9 µm, p value diabetes without diabetic retinopathy.

  2. Erectile dysfunction in haemodialysis patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mumtaz, A.; Hussain, S.; Nazir, M.

    2009-01-01

    There is a very high prevalence of Erectile Dysfunction (ED) in dialysis patients. There is no as such available data on ED and factors affecting it in our patients. Analytical, cross-sectional, hospital based study conducted from January to March 2008, Haemodialysis unit of Shalimar and Mayo Hospital, Lahore. All male patients of end stage renal disease (ESRD) on maintenance haemodialysis therapy, whose spouses are alive and able to perform intercourse, were included in the study. Patient with cognitive and communication deficits were excluded from study. International index of erectile function-5 (IIEF-5), adopted in Urdu was used for the determination of prevalence of erectile function. Categorization of erectile dysfunction was done as mild, moderate and severe. Demographic data were collected and certain laboratory parameters (haemoglobin, haematocrit, urea, HBsAg and Anti HCV) were sent. Total numbers of patient were fifty. Major cause of ESRD was diabetes mellitus 28 (56%). Most of the patients 33 (66%) have passed 10th grade or they were under 10th grade. Prevalence of ED was 86% with mean IIEF-5 score of 10.36+-7.13. Majority of patients 33 (64.7%) were suffering from severe degree of ED. Factors responsible for ED are diabetes mellitus, age more than 50 year, high pre dialysis urea and Anti HCV positive patients. In this study, smoking, duration of dialysis and monthly spending is not related with ED. Majority of the patients suffering from ESRD, on maintenance haemodialysis are having ED. None of the patients suffering from ED were taking any treatment for it. Haemodialysis does not improve sexual dysfunction. Major factors responsible for ED are diabetes mellitus, age more than 50 years, high pre dialysis urea and Anti HCV positive patients. (author)

  3. MANAGEMENT OF DIABETES MELLITUS IN DIABETIC PATIENTS: ISFAHAN. 1999

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P ABAZARI

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Diabetic control and its acute and chronic complications needed to investigate the characteristics medical and self care in diabetics. This evaluation can detect conflicts in this field and provide the possibility of better planning to arrive the ideal control of diabetes. Methods. This study was a cross sectional survey. Samples were 344 diabetic patients who were living in Isfahan. Data was collected by a questionnaire described diabetics contextual characteristics, position of medical services use, position of diabetic education, self blood glucose monitoring (SMBG, attendance to diet regimen and so on. Questionnaires were cmpeleted through interview. Results. Mean age of patients was 56.5±13.6 years. More than fifty percent (57.7 percent were female. More than one third (57.6 percent were illiterate. Patients had 1 to 40 years history of diabetes. More than one forth (27.4 percent did not seek medical advice and 61.2 percent had referred to physician only when they were encountering with a problem for example lack of insulin or oral hypoglycemic agents. Over eighty percent never had foot examination by their physicians. Only 7.4 percent, had heared about glycosylated hemoglubine. This test had not been accomplished for 95.9 percent of patients. 46.2 percent had not performed self foot examination till study time. More than eighty percent of interviewers had reported their lost blood glucose value above 130 mg/dl. Only ten percent of the study population had performed 5MBG. About fifty percent (45.3 percent, did not educated about diabetes. Only 26.8 percent reported that they always follow their dietary regimen. Discussion. Results of this survey showed irregular calls to physicians, poor blood glucose control, high rate of hospitalization due to acute and chronic diabetes complications, irregular blood glucose monitoring. Diabetes management needs more attention in our city.

  4. Calcium antagonists and the diabetic hypertensive patient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parving, H H; Rossing, P

    1993-01-01

    Roughly 40% of all diabetic patients, whether insulin dependent or not, develop persistent albuminuria (over 300 mg/24 hr), a decrease in the glomerular filtration rate, and elevated blood pressure, ie, diabetic nephropathy. Diabetic nephropathy is the single most important cause of end stage renal...... disease in the Western world, and accounts for over a quarter of all end stage renal disease. It also is a major cause of the increased morbidity and mortality seen in diabetic patients; for example, the cost of end stage renal care in the United States currently exceeds +1.8 billion per year for diabetic...... nephropathy alone and is rapidly rising. Increased arterial blood pressure is an early and common finding in incipient and overt diabetic nephropathy. Fluid and sodium retention with normal concentrations of active renin, angiotensin I and II, and aldosterone has been demonstrated in diabetic renal disease...

  5. Risikostratificering af patienter med diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvist, Peter; Glintborg, Dorte; Andries, Alin

    2008-01-01

    with diabetes mellitus. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We included patients with diabetes from the catchment areas of four diabetes out-patient clinics in southern Denmark. Patients were risk-stratified to 3 follow-up levels (level 1 - follow-up only by their GP, level 2 - intensified follow-up by GP and/or shared care...... schemes, level 3 - follow-up only in out-patient clinics). The results were subsequently compared with the patients' actual follow-up status. RESULTS: A total of 647 patients (563 type 2 diabetes and 84 type 1 diabetes) were included from 15 GPs. Among these, 139 were stratified to level 1, 409 to level 2...

  6. The Prevalance of Diabetes in Psoriatic Patients Versus the Prevalance of Psoriasis in Diabetic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahide Onsun

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: Previous studies reported that there are some relations between psoriasis and the diabetes mellitus. However, incidence rates of diabetes mellitus in psoriasis and also incidence rates of psoriasis in diabetes mellitus are lacking.Our aim was to assess and compare incidence rates of diabetes mellitus in patients with psoriasis and incidence rates of psorasis in diabetes mellitus and also evaluate the role of psoriasis as a risk factor for diabetes mellitus. Material and Method: Four hundred eighteen patients with psoriasis and one hundred fifty four patients with diabetes were included. Blood glucose, oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT, glycolised hemoglobine (HbA1C were performed in psoriatic patients and these results were consulted with diabetes clinic. Psoriasis screening by clinical history, dermatologic examination, skin biopsy; if it is necessary were held for patients with diabetes. Results: Prevalance of diabetes was 9.3% in psoriatic patients; prevalance of psoriasis was 1.3% in diabetic patients. The proportion of diabetes was significantly higher in psoriatic patients compared to the proportion of psoriasis in diabetic patients (odds ratio (OR: 7.82, confidence interval (CI: 1.86-32.79, p=0.001. The age and sex-adjusted proportion of diabetes was significantly higher in psoriatic patients as compared the proportion of psoriasis in diabetic patients (OR: 18.35, p<0.001. Differences of mean duration of disease and mean PASİ (psorasis area severity index were not significant between the psoriatic patients without diabetes mellitus and with diabetes mellitus.Conclusion: Risk rate of diabetes is increased in psoriatic patients. Chronic inflammation may lead insulin resistance and diabetes. We think that development of diabetes in patients with psoriasis depends on chronic inflammation. Unfortunately we could not assess the role of therapeutical agents especially effect of potent corticosteroids in development of

  7. Patient education for preventing diabetic foot ulceration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorresteijn, J.A.; Kriegsman, D.M.; Assendelft, W.J.; Valk, G.D.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ulceration of the feet, which can result in loss of limbs and even death, is one of the major health problems for people with diabetes mellitus. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of patient education on the prevention of foot ulcers in patients with diabetes mellitus. SEARCH METHODS: We

  8. Patient education for preventing diabetic foot ulceration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorresteijn, J.A.; Kriegsman, D.M.; Assendelft, W.J.J.; Valk, G.D.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ulceration of the feet, which can result in loss of limbs and even death, is one of the major health problems for people with diabetes mellitus. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of patient education on the prevention of foot ulcers in patients with diabetes mellitus. SEARCH METHODS:

  9. Lipid Profile in Sudanese Diabetic Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naway, L. M. Y.

    2011-04-01

    This study composes of two parts, the first one is an experiment to evaluate the level of blood glucose and lipid profile (TC, TG, LDL, HDL and VLDL) among diabetic patients and comparison of the result with non diabetic subjects and the second one is a survey to assess the standards of health care and patients knowledge. The subject were divided into two groups according to insulin requirement. Type 1 is insulin dependent diabetes mellitus and type 2 is non insulin dependent diabetes mellitus and then divided according to gender (males and female) subgroups. The study subjects selected for this study consist of one hundred Sudanese diabetic patients from Ribat University Hospital during January 2009 they had mean age (52±11.063) years,a mean height (165.82±8.573) cm and a mean weight of (70.20±11.203) kg. fifty healthy non diabetic subject were chosen as controls, their mean age (45.72±11.169) years, mean height (167.28±9.450) cm and mean weight (71.02±13.429) kg. Blood glucose and lipid profile total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), low density lipoprotein (LDL) and high density lipoprotein (HDL) were measured by enzymatic colorimetric methods in both groups, and very low density lipoprotein cholesterol were calculated for each sample. All patients were interviewed and filled out the questionnaire consisted of five parts. The result of the study found highly significant elevated level of blood glucose level among diabetic patients compared to non diabetic subjects. In addition to significant elevated level of serum lipids TC p=0.001, TG p=0.001, LDL p=0.001, and VLDL p=0.001. And decrease in HDL P=0.001 level in diabetic patient compared to non diabetic subjects. Among subgroups (type 1, type 2) diabetic patients glucose level and serum total cholesterol, triglycerides, LDL cholesterol and VLDL cholestrol were significantly higher (p<0.5) while HDL cholestrol was significantly lower when compared to non diabetic subjects. Non statistically variation

  10. Lipid Profile in Sudanese Diabetic Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naway, L M. Y. [Sudan Academy of Sciences, Atomic Energy Council, Khartoum (Sudan)

    2011-04-15

    This study composes of two parts, the first one is an experiment to evaluate the level of blood glucose and lipid profile (TC, TG, LDL, HDL and VLDL) among diabetic patients and comparison of the result with non diabetic subjects and the second one is a survey to assess the standards of health care and patients knowledge. The subject were divided into two groups according to insulin requirement. Type 1 is insulin dependent diabetes mellitus and type 2 is non insulin dependent diabetes mellitus and then divided according to gender (males and female) subgroups. The study subjects selected for this study consist of one hundred Sudanese diabetic patients from Ribat University Hospital during January 2009 they had mean age (52{+-}11.063) years,a mean height (165.82{+-}8.573) cm and a mean weight of (70.20{+-}11.203) kg. fifty healthy non diabetic subject were chosen as controls, their mean age (45.72{+-}11.169) years, mean height (167.28{+-}9.450) cm and mean weight (71.02{+-}13.429) kg. Blood glucose and lipid profile total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), low density lipoprotein (LDL) and high density lipoprotein (HDL) were measured by enzymatic colorimetric methods in both groups, and very low density lipoprotein cholesterol were calculated for each sample. All patients were interviewed and filled out the questionnaire consisted of five parts. The result of the study found highly significant elevated level of blood glucose level among diabetic patients compared to non diabetic subjects. In addition to significant elevated level of serum lipids TC p=0.001, TG p=0.001, LDL p=0.001, and VLDL p=0.001. And decrease in HDL P=0.001 level in diabetic patient compared to non diabetic subjects. Among subgroups (type 1, type 2) diabetic patients glucose level and serum total cholesterol, triglycerides, LDL cholesterol and VLDL cholestrol were significantly higher (p<0.5) while HDL cholestrol was significantly lower when compared to non diabetic subjects. Non statistically

  11. Diabetic Retinopathy Awareness among Diabetic Patients Attending COMS-TH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahal, P; Adhikari, H

    Background Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is one of the leading causes of blindness in Nepal. Objective The main objective of the study is to know the awareness of diabetic retinopathy among new cases of diabetes mellitus (DM) attending the college of medical science- teaching hospital, Bharatpur, Nepal. Method All the diabetic cases referred for ophthalmic consultation and also referred outpatient department cases from other departments to ophthalmic outpatient department was carried out. Detailed demographics of the subjects and their awareness of potential ocular problems from diabetes mellitus were noted. Result Total one hundred and thirty-one patients were enrolled during the study period from 15 November 2016 to 15 May 2017. Brahmin 39.69% and 19.08% Mongolian were the most predominant ethnical group. The predominant group of patients were housewives (41.22%) then followed by service (19.85%), business (13.74%), agriculture (12.21%), others (12.98%). Among 36.64% of the literate patients, 19.85% had passed school level, 9.92% had passed intermediate level, 88.55% were aware of Diabetic retinopathy. Among them majority 88.55% were referred by physician. Family history were present in 35.68% and fundus evaluation was done for the first time in almost half of diabetic cases (64.12%) and diabetic retinopathy was found in 32.06% of total cases in right eye and 30.53% of total cases in left eye. Conclusion Along with the awareness, routine dilated fundoscopy is mandatory for slight threating stage of retinopathy and to reduce the burden of blindness from diabetic retinopathy in Nepal.

  12. Are we meeting the American Diabetes Association goals for HIV-infected patients with diabetes mellitus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeyemi, Oluwatoyin; Vibhakar, Sonia; Max, Blake

    2009-09-01

    We determined rates of achieving the American Diabetes Association goals among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected diabetic patients. American Diabetes Association goals (for hemoglobin A1c, blood pressure, and lipid levels) were defined by 2008 American Diabetes Association guidelines. HIV-infected diabetic patients achieved American Diabetes Association goals at rates similar to those in general medicine clinic patients. A multidisciplinary approach is needed to improve diabetes management in HIV clinics.

  13. [Lifestyle of elderly patients with diabetes mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuoka, Yuki; Yamada, Yuichiro

    2013-11-01

    In elderly people, glucose tolerance is deteriorated and the incidence of diabetes mellitus is increased, due to decreased muscle mass and physical activity, declining pancreatic beta cell function, and other factors. Diabetes mellitus is an important risk factor for arteriosclerosis development in the elderly. Precise diagnosis and adequate treatment are necessary to prevent cerebrovascular and ischemic heart diseases. Elderly patients with diabetes mellitus are characteristically afflicted with more complications, impaired activities of daily living, cognitive function decline, and family environment problems, as compared with young and middle-aged diabetics. Therefore, tailor-made rather than uniform therapy becomes important. Lifestyle modification is the basis of diabetes treatment. Herein, we describe "prevention and management" of diabetes mellitus, focusing on the lifestyles of elderly diabetics.

  14. Perioperative management of the diabetic patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Hyon K; Serafin, Bethany L

    2006-05-01

    Diabetes is a chronic disease characterized by the body's inability to process blood glucose properly. It is generally classified as insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM), or type 1, and non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM), or type 2. Type 1 is characterized by a defect in insulin secretion by the beta cells of the pancreas, usually secondary to autoimmune destruction of those cells. Type 2 is characterized by peripheral insulin resistance with an insulin-secretory defect that varies in severity. Diabetes is a common medical condition that affects 6% of Americans younger than 50 years and approximately 10% to 15% of those older than 50 years. Increasing numbers of patients who have diabetes are presenting to the oral surgeon's office for care. Patients who have diabetes have a 50% chance of undergoing a surgical procedure in their lifetime.

  15. Regional cerebral blood flow in diabetic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagamachi, Shigeki; Ono, Shinnichi; Nishikawa, Takushi

    1993-01-01

    N-isopropyl-p- 123 I-iodoamphetamine (IMP) was used to quantify the regional cerebral blood flow (r-CBF) in 11 diabetic patients (average age; 67.9 years) and 12 non-diabetic subjects (average age; 67.4 years), none of whom had (cerebrovascular disease (CVD) on CT studies. A reference sampling method by continuous arterial blood sampling was used to quantify r-CBF. There were no significant differences in physiological or laboratory data between diabetic and non-diabetic groups except for fasting plasma glucose and HbA 1c levels. The average of r-CBF in each region of cerebrum and cerebellum was significantly lower in diabetic group than that in the control group (p<0.01). These observations show that r-CBF of diabetic patients is reduced, even in the absence of findings of CVD on a CT study. (author)

  16. Diabetes-Related Distress Assessment among Type 2 Diabetes Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljuaid, Majed O; Almutairi, Abdulmajeed M; Assiri, Mohammed A; Almalki, Dhifallah M; Alswat, Khaled

    2018-01-01

    Diabetes is one of the most common chronic diseases; it is a debilitating and hard to live with. Diabetes-related distress (DRD) refers to the emotional and behavioral changes caused by diabetes. Our study aims to assess the prevalence of DRD among type 2 diabetes (T2D) patients using Diabetes Distress Scale-17 items (DDS-17) and its relation to complications and treatment modalities. A cross-sectional study of adult T2D patients with follow-up visits at the Diabetes and Endocrinology Center in Taif, Saudi Arabia, between January and July 2017. We excluded patients with other forms of diabetes, untreated hypothyroidism, and psychiatric illness. The total score of DDS-17 was calculated by summing the 17 items' results and then dividing the total by 17. If the total score was >2, then it was considered as clinically significant results (moderate distress), but if it is ≥3, then it is classified as a high distress. A total of 509 T2D patients with a mean age of 58 ± 14 years were included. The majority of participants were male, married, not college educated, and reported a sedentary lifestyle. We found 25% of the screened T2D patients have moderate to high DRD. Regarding the DRD components, emotional distress was the most prevalent followed by physician-related distress. HabA1c was significantly higher in those with high combined distress and high emotional distress compared to those with mild/moderate distress ( p = 0.015 and 0.030, resp.). Our study shows that DRD is a medically relevant issue that clinicians need to address. Despite observing a low prevalence of DRD compared to other studies, we found significant correlations between DRD scores and HabA1c, triglyceride levels, BMI, T2D duration, and interval between visits.

  17. Diabetic ketoacidosis in a patient with acromegaly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kopff, B; Mucha, S; Wolffenbuttel, B H; Drzewoski, J

    2001-01-01

    Abnormalities of glucose metabolism are a common feature of acromegaly. Overt diabetes mellitus develops in about 10-15% of patients. We present an unusual complication of acromegaly: a 37-year old man with a 2-year history of acromegaly developed diabetic ketoacidosis 3 weeks after transsphenoidal

  18. Oxidative Stress and Anesthesia in Diabetic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peivandi Yazdi A

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Free radical and peroxide production lead to intracellular damage. On the other hand, free radicals are used by the human immune system to defend against pathogens. The aging process could be limited by oxidative stress in the short term. Chronic diseases like diabetes mellitus (DM are full-stress conditions in which remarkable metabolic functional destructions might happen. There is strong evidence regarding antioxidant impairment in diabetes. Performing a particular method for anesthesia in diabetic patients might prevent or modify excessive free radical formation and oxidative stress. It seems that prescribing antioxidant drugs could promote wound healing in diabetics.  

  19. Preclinical carotid atherosclerosis in patients with latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA), type 2 diabetes and classical type 1 diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Hern?ndez, Marta; L?pez, Carolina; Real, Jordi; Valls, Joan; Ortega-Martinez de Victoria, Emilio; V?zquez, Federico; Rubinat, Esther; Granado-Casas, Minerva; Alonso, Nuria; Mol?, Teresa; Betriu, Angels; Lecube, Albert; Fern?ndez, Elvira; Leslie, Richard David; Mauricio, D?dac

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND LADA is probably the most prevalent form of autoimmune diabetes. Nevertheless, there are few data about cardiovascular disease in this group of patients. The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency of carotid atherosclerotic plaques in patients with LADA as compared with patients with classic type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. METHODS Patients with LADA were matched for age and gender in different proportions to patients with type 2 diabetes, and classic type 1 diabete...

  20. The ocular biometric differences of diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocatürk, Tolga; Zengin, Mehmet Özgür; Cakmak, Harun; Evliçoglu, Gökhan Evren; Dündar, Sema Oruç; Omürlü, Imran Kurt; Unübol, Mustafa; Güney, Engin

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the differences in ocular biometric and keratometric characteristics in comparison with biometric measurements using the noncontact optical low coherence reflectometer (OLCR) (Lenstar LS 900, Haag-Streit) on diabetic patients. The eyes of 170 patients were included in this study, including 81 diabetic and 89 nondiabetic subjects. Optical biometric measurements of diabetic and nondiabetic patients (between the ages of 25 and 85 years) who applied to the ophthalmology clinic were noted from March to June 2013. Detailed ophthalmologic examinations were done for every subject. Biometric measurements were done using the noncontact OLCR device. Patient age ranged from 29 to 83 years. Subgroup analyses were done in diabetic patients according to their Hba1C levels. The minimum Hba1C value was 5.3, maximum was 12.4, and mean was 7.56 ± 1.48. The median duration of diabetes was 5 years (25th-75th percentile 3.00-11.75). Diabetic patients were found to have thicker lens and shallower anterior chamber in both eyes compared to nondiabetic control subjects. There were no statistical differences between the groups according to central corneal thickness, axial length, or keratometric values in both eyes. However, lens thicknesses were found to be thicker and anterior chamber depth values were found to be shallower in the diabetic group in both eyes. It may useful to determine eyeglasses prescription, refractive surgery calculation, lens selection, and previous cataract surgery according to biometric measurements after the regulation of blood glucose.

  1. Glaucoma evolution in patients with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apreutesei, Nicoleta Anton; Chiselita, D; Motas, O I

    2014-01-01

    Glaucoma and diabetes are two chronic diseases with a long suspected pathogenic relationship. Screening for glaucoma in patients with diabetes. A retrospective study on 92 eyes from 46 patients with primitive open angle glaucoma (POAG) (normal and hypertensive) and intraocular hypertension (OHT) receiving medication and/or surgery associated with diabetes mellitus (DM) (type I, type II, mixed) is presented. Participants were divided into two groups as following: 16 eyes with glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy changes (group 1) and 76 eyes with glaucoma and without diabetic retinopathy changes (group 2). The following parameters were analysed: ocular pressure (Goldmann aplanotonometry), perimeter development (computerized perimetry) and fundus condition (absence, presence or progression of diabetic retinopathy). In patients with glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy (8 patients) we found a mean difference between treated intraocular pressure (IOP) and IOP last untreated control of 4.95 mmHg; a depreciation of the MD by 4.18 dB and an average number of glaucoma medications used of 0.889 +/- 1.054. Predominant changes in proliferative diabetic retinopathy were mild. In patients with glaucoma in the absence of diabetic retinopathy, the average difference between untreated IOP and IOP under treatment at the last check-up was 1.63 mmHg, the MD depreciation was by 0.65 dB and the average number of glaucoma medications used was 0.795 +/- 0.978. No statistically significant differences in terms of initial and final pressure were found. No statistically significant differences in the evolution of changes in perimeter between the two groups were observed. The presence of non-proliferating diabetic retinopathy influenced (only marginally statistically) the glaucomatous disease progression. Large comparative prospective studies are needed for the long-term follow up.

  2. Insulin inhalation for diabetic patients: Nursing considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanan Mohammed Mohammed

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Scientific knowledge has advanced to enable the development of inhaled insulin. It is a form of diabetes medication administered via the pulmonary system that studies have shown to be efficacious in the treatment of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Inhaled insulin is a new, safe means to deliver insulin that may increase patient compliance with insulin therapy, helping them to achieve optimal glycemic control and possibly reducing their risk of developing cardiovascular complications. However, diabetes is a chronic illness requiring lifetime intervention. Empowering patients with the knowledge of the diabetes disease process may give them the confidence to be more autonomous in managing their diabetes. HIIP gives nurse practitioners a new option that may improve their patients’ acceptance of insulin therapy, and improve glycemic control.

  3. New injection recommendations for patients with diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frid, A.; Hirsch, L.; Gaspar, R.; Hicks, D.; Kreugel, G.; Liersch, J.; Letondeur, C.; Sauvanet, J. P.; Tubiana-Rufi, N.; Strauss, K.

    Aim: Injections administered by patients are one of the mainstays of diabetes management. Proper injection technique is vital to avoiding intramuscular injections, ensuring appropriate delivery to the subcutaneous tissues and avoiding common complications such as lipohypertrophy. Yet few formal

  4. In situ saphenous vein bypass surgery in diabetic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, L P; Schroeder, T V; Lorentzen, J E

    1992-01-01

    .005). Indication for surgery was gangrene or ulceration in 57% of diabetics, as opposed to 36% in non-diabetic patients (p = 0.0002). A femoro-popliteal bypass was performed in 18% of patients, whereas 82% received an infrapopliteal procedure, of which 42% were to the distal third of the calf or foot. Diabetic......From 1986 through to 1990 a total of 483 consecutive in situ infra-inguinal vein bypass procedures were performed in 444 patients, of whom 112 (25%) were diabetics (57 insulin dependent diabetes mellitus and 55 non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus). Based on a prospective vascular data registry...... this material was analysed to determine the influence of diabetes on the outcome. Preoperative risk factors were equally distributed among diabetic and non-diabetic patients, except for smoking habits (diabetics: 48%; non-diabetics: 64%, p = 0.002) and cardiac disease (diabetics: 45%; non-diabetics: 29%, p = 0...

  5. Accommodative Ability in Prepresbyopic Diabetic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Etezad Razavi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: To compare various accommodative parameters in prepresbyopic diabetic patients with age-matched healthy individuals. Materials and Methods: Study populationconsisted of 32 younger-onset diabetic patients (30-40 years of age and 28 age-matched healthy normal individuals. Using the best correction for distance visual acuity (20.20 by Snellen chart, multiple accommodative ability tests such as near point of accommodation, accommodative amplitude, negative or positive accommodative facility and near point of convergence were measured in both groups. Results: Mean near point of accommodation in diabetic patients was significantly greater than the control group (18.5±4.4 centimeters [cm] versus 9.5±2 centimeters, p= 0.000. Mean accommodative amplitude was (5.93±1.75 Diopter (D and (10.95±2.16 Diopter in diabetics and normal individuals, respectively (p=0.000. Mean accommodation facility was (3.19±3.04 cycle/minute [cyl/min] in patients and 10.01±5.09 cycle/minute in the control group (p= 0.000. Mean positive relative accommodation was (–3.37±1.19 D in diabetic and (-2.11±0.99 D in healthy participants (p=0.000. Mean negative relative accommodation was lower in diabetic patients compared with the control group, however, this difference did not reach statistical significance (2.61±0.65 D versus (2.61±0.60 D, p= 0.23. Mean near point of convergence was (8.23±1.43 cm and (7.13±0.67 cm in normal and diabetic groups, respectively which had insignificant difference (p= 0.45. Conclusion: Majority of accommodative ability functions decreased in prepresbyopic diabetic patients. Early detection and rehabilitation of such patients with corrective near spectacles are strongly recommended.

  6. Risk factors of diabetic retinopathy in type 2 diabetic patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI Xiao-ling; WANG Fang; JI Li-nong

    2006-01-01

    Background Advances in treatment have greatly reduced the risk of blindness from this disease, but because diabetes is so common, diabetic retinopathy remains an important problem. The purpose of this study is to investigate the risk factors of diabetic retinopathy (DR) in Chinese type 2 diabetic patients.Methods Totally 746 type 2 diabetic patients were selected for biochemical and clinical characteristics test and examined by the retina-camera for diabetic retinopathy and the average age was 55.9 years old.Results A total of 526 patients was classified as non-DR, 159 patients as non-proliferative-DR and 61 patients as proliferative-DR. Duration of diabetes [(66.09±72.51) months vs (143.71 ±93.27) months vs (174.30±81.91)months, P=0.00], systolic blood pressure [(131.95±47.20) mmHg vs (138.71 ±21.36) mmHg vs (147.58±24.10)mmHg, P=0.01], urine albumin [(32.79± 122.29) mg/L vs (190.96±455.65) mg/L vs (362.00±552.51) mg/L,P=0.00], glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) [(8.68 ± 2.26)% vs (9.42±1.84)% vs (9.42±1.96)%, P=0.04],C-reactive protein (CRP) [(3.19±7.37) mg/L vs (6.36± 23.59) mg/L vs (3.02±4.34) mg/L, P=0.03],high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) [(1.23±0.37) mmol/L vs (1.33±0.35) mmol/L vs (1.24±0.33)mmol/L, P=0.01], uric acid (UA) [(288.51 ±90.85) mmol/L vs (300.29±101.98) mmol/L vs (337.57±115.09)mmol/L, P=0.00], creatinine (CREA) [(84.22±16.31) μmol/L vs (89.35±27.45) μmol/L vs (103.28±48.64)μmol/L, P=0.00], blood urine nitrogen (BUN) [(5.62± 1.62) mmol/L vs (6.55±2.74) mmol/L vs (8.11±3.60)mmol/L, P=0.00] were statistically different among the three groups. Logistic regression analysis showed that diabetic duration and urine albumin were two independent risk factors of DR (the OR values were 1.010 and 1.003 respectively).Conclusions Diabetic duration and urine albumin are two independent risk factors of diabetic retinopathy in elderly type 2 diabetic patients.

  7. Health-Related Quality of Life Impacts Mortality but Not Progression to End-Stage Renal Disease in Pre-Dialysis Chronic Kidney Disease: A Prospective Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesky, Mark D; Dutton, Mary; Dasgupta, Indranil; Yadav, Punit; Ng, Khai Ping; Fenton, Anthony; Kyte, Derek; Ferro, Charles J; Calvert, Melanie; Cockwell, Paul; Stringer, Stephanie J

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with reduced health-related quality of life (HRQL). However, the relationship between pre-dialysis CKD, HRQL and clinical outcomes, including mortality and progression to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is unclear. All 745 participants recruited into the Renal Impairment In Secondary Care study to end March 2014 were included. Demographic, clinical and laboratory data were collected at baseline including an assessment of HRQL using the Euroqol EQ-5D-3L. Health states were converted into an EQ-5Dindex score using a set of weighted preferences specific to the UK population. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression and competing risk analyses were undertaken to evaluate the association of HRQL with progression to ESRD or all-cause mortality. Regression analyses were then performed to identify variables associated with the significant HRQL components. Median eGFR was 25.8 ml/min/1.73 m2 (IQR 19.6-33.7ml/min) and median ACR was 33 mg/mmol (IQR 6.6-130.3 mg/mmol). Five hundred and fifty five participants (75.7%) reported problems with one or more EQ-5D domains. When adjusted for age, gender, comorbidity, eGFR and ACR, both reported problems with self-care [hazard ratio 2.542, 95% confidence interval 1.222-5.286, p = 0.013] and reduced EQ-5Dindex score [hazard ratio 0.283, 95% confidence interval 0.099-0.810, p = 0.019] were significantly associated with an increase in all-cause mortality. Similar findings were observed for competing risk analyses. Reduced HRQL was not a risk factor for progression to ESRD in multivariable analyses. Impaired HRQL is common in the pre-dialysis CKD population. Reduced HRQL, as demonstrated by problems with self-care or a lower EQ-5Dindex score, is associated with a higher risk for death but not ESRD. Multiple factors influence these aspects of HRQL but renal function, as measured by eGFR and ACR, are not among them.

  8. Orthodontic Treatment Consideration in Diabetic Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almadih, Ahmed; Al-Zayer, Maryam; Dabel, Sukainh; Alkhalaf, Ahmed; Al Mayyad, Ali; Bardisi, Wajdi; Alshammari, Shouq; Alsihati, Zainab

    2018-02-01

    Although orthodontic treatment is commonly indicated for young healthy individuals, recent trends showed an increase in number of older individuals undergoing orthodontic interventions. The increased age resulted in a proportionate increase in the prevalence of systemic diseases facing dentists during orthodontic procedures, especially diabetes mellitus. This necessitates that dentists should be aware of the diagnosis of diabetes mellitus and its early signs particularly in teeth and oral cavity. It is also essential for them to understand the implications of diabetes on orthodontic treatment and the measures to be considered during managing those patients. In this review, we focused on the impact of diabetes mellitus on orthodontic treatment. We also summarized the data from previous studies that had explained the measures required to be taken into consideration during managing those patients. We included both human and animal studies to review in depth the pathophysiological mechanisms by which diabetes affects orthodontic treatment outcome. In conclusion, this review emphasizes the need to carefully identify early signs and symptoms of diabetes mellitus in patients demanding orthodontic treatment and to understand the considerations to be adopted before and during treating these patients.

  9. Comparison platelet indices in diabetic patients with and without diabetic foot ulcer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardia, A. I.; Gatot, D.; Lindarto, D.

    2018-03-01

    Diabetes Mellitus is a group of metabolic disease which incidence increases every year. Some diabetic patients have diabetic foot ulcer as acomplication. The occurrence of ulcers in diabetic patients can be caused by the presence of thrombosis due to increased platelet function. Therefore, a cross-sectional study on 40 diabetic patients was performed at RSUP Adam Malik Medan to see whether there were differences in platelet indices between diabetic patients with and without diabetic foot ulcers. Platelets indices were examined and looked for differences in diabetic patients with and without diabetic foot ulcers. Data were analyzed using Chi-Square and Mann-Whitney U test with 95% CI. P-valuediabetic patients with diabetic foot ulcers indicating more reactive and aggregatable platelet function.

  10. Diabetes patient management by pharmacists during Ramadan

    OpenAIRE

    Wilbur, Kerry; Al Tawengi, Kawthar; Remoden, Eman

    2014-01-01

    Many Muslim diabetes patients choose to participate in Ramadan despite medical advice to the contrary. This study aims to describe Qatar pharmacists' practice, knowledge, and attitudes towards guiding diabetes medication management during Ramadan. Methods. A cross-sectional descriptive study was performed among a convenience sample of 580 Qatar pharmacists. A web-based questionnaire was systematically developed following comprehensive literature review and structured according to 4 main domai...

  11. Dyslipidemias in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients in Nnewi South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ramakantb

    Conclusion: Dyslipidemia is highly prevalent among type 2 diabetic patients in Nigeria with the majority of the patients having ... in type 2 diabetic patients seen in the medical unit of the ... informed consent obtained in each case and then.

  12. Diabetes Health Literacy Among Somali Patients with Diabetes Mellitus in a US Primary Care Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Njeru, Jane W; Hagi-Salaad, Misbil F; Haji, Habibo; Cha, Stephen S; Wieland, Mark L

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe diabetes literacy among Somali immigrants with diabetes and its association with diabetes outcomes. Among Somali immigrants in North America, the prevalence of diabetes exceeds that of the general population, and their measures of diabetes control are suboptimal when compared with non-Somali patients. Diabetes literacy is an important mediator of diabetes outcomes in general populations that has not been previously described among Somali immigrants and refugees. Diabetes literacy was measured using a translated version of the spoken knowledge in low literacy in diabetes (SKILLD) scale among Somali immigrants and refugees with type 2 diabetes. Diabetes outcome measures, including hemoglobin A1C, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, and blood pressure, were obtained for each patient. Multivariate logistic regression was used to assess associations between diabetes literacy and diabetes outcomes. Among 50 Somali patients with diabetes who completed the survey, the mean SKILLD score was low (42.2 %). The diabetes outcome measures showed a mean hemoglobin A1C of 8 %, LDL cholesterol of 99.17 mg/dL (2.57 mmol/L), systolic blood pressure of 130.9 mmHg, and diastolic blood pressure of 70.2 mmHg. There was no association between diabetes literacy scores and diabetes outcome measures. Somali patients with diabetes mellitus had low diabetes literacy and suboptimal measures of diabetes disease control. However, we found no association between diabetes literacy and diabetes outcomes. Future work aimed at reduction of diabetes-related health disparities among Somali immigrants and refugees to high-income countries should go beyond traditional means of patient education for low-literacy populations.

  13. Diabetes education improves depressive state in newly diagnosed patients with type 2 diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Bin; Zhang, Xiyao; Xu, Xiuping; Lv, Xiaofeng; Yao, Lu; Huang, Xu; Guo, Xueying; Liu, Baozhu; Li, Qiang; Cui, Can

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The prevalence of depression is relatively high in individuals with diabetes. However, screening and monitoring of depressive state in patients with diabetes is still neglected in developing countries and the treatment of diabetes-related depression is rarely performed in these countries. In this study, our aim was to study the role of diabetes education in the improvement of depressive state in newly diagnosed patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods: The Dutch version of the cente...

  14. Frequency of diabetic retinopathy in hypertensive diabetic patients in a tertiary care hospital of Peshawar, Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, S.; Khan, G.J.; Aamir, A.H.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Diabetic retinopathy is a common microvascular complication of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. If left untreated, it can progress to serious visual disability. Coexistence of hypertension with diabetes has been described as another risk factor adding to the problem. We designed this study to assess the occurrence of diabetic retinopathy in hypertensive diabetic patients of this region and to compare it with normotensive diabetic patients. Methods: This cross-sectional study was carried out on 200 previously diagnosed diabetic patients. Apart from routine examination and investigations, retinopathy and blood pressure assessment of each patient was done using standard techniques. Hypertensive diabetic subjects (Group-I, n=107) were compared with non-hypertensive diabetics (Group-II, n=93) for the presence of retinopathy. Results: Retinopathy and hypertension were observed in 51% and 53.5% of the total diabetic patients respectively. Hypertensive diabetic patients had significantly higher percentage of retinopathy compared to non-hypertensive diabetic patients (58 vs 43%; p<0.05). Conclusion: Retinopathy and hypertension are highly prevalent in our diabetic patients. The proportion of retinopathy is significantly more in hypertensive as compared to normotensive diabetics. (author)

  15. Gait parameters in patients with diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Elena Prado Teles Fregonesi

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease that results in sensorimotor alterations. These changes affect balance and walking and predispose affected patients to falls. The aim of this review was to identify studies in the recent literature that assess gait parameters and aspects involved in walking. The MEDLINE, SciELO, LILACS and PEDro databases were searched using the following combination of keywords: diabetic neuropathies x gait; diabetes mellitus x gait, and diabetic foot x gait. After the application of selection criteria, 15 articles were retrieved, summarized, discussed, and are included in this review. Diabetic neuropathy was found to lead to deficits in step amplitude, gait velocity and gait cadence on flat surfaces, without sudden changes in direction or stops, and to balance and coordination deficits on inclined and uneven terrain. Diabetic neuropathies also increase plantar pressure rates and lead to difficulties in the terminal stance phase and pre-swing phase due to changes in triceps surae activation. Thus, the next initial contact occurs in an inadequate manner, with the forefoot and without absorption of shocks.

  16. [Nasal mucosa in patients with diabetes mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Maciej; Betlejewski, Stanisław

    2003-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is the most common endocrinologic disease all over the world. 150 million people suffer from this disease, in Poland about 2 million. The disease on the basis of the onset and pathophysiology may be divided into type I and type II. Pathophysiologic changes include diabetic microangiopathy, macroangiopathy and neuropathy. The most common presentations in head and neck are otitis externa, hypoacusis, vertigo, disequilibrium, xerostomia, dysphagia, fungal and recurrent infections. The changes in nasal mucosa are not very well known. Only few papers concerned the problem. The main complaints of patients regarding the nose are xeromycteria, hyposmia and various degree of decreased patency of the nose. Chronic atrophic rhinitis, septal perforation, ulceration of nasal mucosa, alar necrosis, symptoms of staphylococcal or fungal infection can be found during otolaryngologic examination. The treatment in this group of patients should consist of systemic therapy of diabetes mellitus and on the other hand focal therapy with the use of a solution to moisten the nasal mucosa.

  17. Insulin sensitivity to trace metals (Chromium, manganese) in type 2 diabetic patients and diabetic individuals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hajra, B.; Orakzai, S.A.; Faryal, U.; Hassan, M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Diabetes mellitus constitutes one of the most important problems in developing and non-developing countries. The purpose of the study to estimate the concentrations of Chromium and Manganese in diabetic and non-diabetic population of Hazara division. The cross sectional comparative study was carried out on one hundred blood samples of Type 2 Diabetic patients collected non-randomly from Ayub Teaching Hospital and one hundred normal healthy controls from Women Medical College Abbottabad from September 2014 to April 2015. Methods: The study included two hundred subjects. Among them 100 were diabetic and 100 non diabetic respectively. The blood samples were collected from Ayub Medical College, Abbottabad. The serum Chromium and Manganese levels were determined by Atomic Absorption spectrophotometer. Results: Serum Chromium and Manganese levels were decreased in diabetic and increased in non-diabetic patients. Conclusion: Low serum level of Chromium and manganese were found in diabetic patients as compare to non-diabetic individuals. (author)

  18. Carpal Tunnel Release in Diabetic and Non-Diabetic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad H Ebrahimzadeh

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS is a compression neuropathy that causes paresthesia, pain or numbness in the territory of median nerve. The aim of this study is to compare the open surgery outcome and patients` satisfaction in carpal tunnel syndrome among diabetic and non-diabetic patients. Methods: In a retrospective cohort study from April 2011 to June 2012, patients suffered from carpal tunnel syndrome at least 6 months, without response to conservative treatment, who had the inclusion and exclusion criteria, were evaluated by the usage of MHQ and WHOQOL-BREEF tests, one month before surgery and three months after that. Carpal tunnel decompression surgery was performed by two surgeons, experienced in hand surgery, which used the same surgical method. Statistical analysis was performed by SPSS 19.0. Results: 24 of patient (34.2% were male and 46 (65.8% were female and there was no significant difference between two groups (P>0.05. MHQ total score before and after surgery was respectively 50.22±7.13 and 63.49±11.28 and this difference was significant (P

  19. Evaluation of Smoking Status among Diabetes Patients in the State ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To determine the prevalence of smoking among diabetes patients ... of type 1 and 2 diabetes patients were reviewed to assess the prevalence of smoking. ... were the most prevalent race among smokers, compared with Malay and ...

  20. Anaemia in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus attending regular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anaemia in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus attending regular Diabetic ... Nigerian Journal of Health and Biomedical Sciences ... some patients may omit important food items in their daily diet for fear of increasing their blood sugar level.

  1. Rhinocerebral zygomycosis in a diabetic patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirella Alves da Cunha

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Rhinocerebral zygomycosis is the most frequent form of fungal infection caused by members of the Zygomycetes class. A fatal case of rhinocerebral zygomycosis caused by Rhizopus (oryzae arrhizus with histopathological and mycological diagnosis is reported in a diabetic patient.

  2. Coronary artery bypass surgery in the diabetic patient.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Maher, M

    2012-02-03

    Coronary artery and peripheral occlusive arterial disease frequently complicate diabetes mellitus, with death due to atherosclerotic coronary artery disease being three times more likely in diabetic compared to non-diabetic patients. The profile of 32 diabetic patients and 32 matched controls who underwent coronary artery bypass (CABG) is studied and their early and late postoperative outcomes are described. The mean age was 61 +\\/- 1 year in both groups. The diabetic group comprised 26 non-insulin dependent and 6 insulin dependent diabetics, who had a mean duration of diabetes of 8.5 years (range 2 months--35 years). The median number of grafts per patient performed in the diabetic group and the control group was 3.5 and 3 respectively. There was no mortality in the series, however considerably greater wound morbidity rates were encountered in the diabetic group when compared to matched controls. One renal transplant patient in the diabetic group suffered irreversible acute tubular necrosis and became dialysis dependent post-operatively. Longterm follow-up showed no longterm mortality in either group, with full relief of angina achieved in 75% of diabetic patients compared with 87.5% of matched controls. In addition diabetic patients suffered greater longterm cardiac morbidity than the control group (21.8% versus 12.5%). The results of this study suggest that CABG is a safe operation for the diabetic patient. Diabetic patients receive satisfactory symptomatic relief of angina, but suffer increased perioperative wound complications and greater incidence of longterm cardiac morbidity.

  3. Awareness of diabetic retinopathy among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakkar, May M; Haddad, Mera F; Gammoh, Yazan S

    2017-01-01

    Increasing the level of awareness of diabetic retinopathy among individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus is considered an important factor for early diagnosis and management of diabetic retinopathy. The aim of this study was to evaluate awareness of diabetic retinopathy among a sample of type 2 diabetes mellitus patients in Jordan. The study period was from August to December 2015. The sample was selected randomly from patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus from the general population in three main cities of Jordan (Amman, Irbid, and Zarqa). A questionnaire was distributed to 237 participants with diabetes to assess their awareness and knowledge of diabetes and diabetic retinopathy. The questionnaire included questions to assess awareness about diabetic retinopathy, sources of knowledge about the disease, and patients' knowledge and compliance with available treatments and routine eye examinations. Patients were also questioned about the barriers that may interfere with early eye examination. A total of 237 participants (107 [45.1%] females and 130 [54.9%] males) with type 2 diabetes were interviewed. Mean age±SD for the study population was 54.51±10.28 years. Of the study population, 88.2% were aware that diabetes can affect the eyes and 81% reported that diabetic retinopathy can lead to blindness. Higher level of patients' awareness of diabetic retinopathy was related to higher level of formal education ( p diabetic retinopathy as reported by 47.3% patients was general practitioners. Patients' compliance with diabetes management was relatively high; however, their compliance with routine retinal assessment was poor, with only a total of 29.5% of participants having had an eye examination in the previous year. Awareness of the nature and consequences of diabetic retinopathy among patients with diabetes in Jordan is relatively high. However, patients' motivation to undergo retinal assessment was poor in the sample, thus hindering early diagnosis and management.

  4. Relation of retinopathy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus to other diabetic complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Hui Chen

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To investigate the correlation between systemic complications and diabetic retinopathy in the patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.METHODS: Seven hundred and two hospitalized patients with type 2 diabetes were included. All patients were divided into two groups according to with or without retinopathy: NDR group and DR group. DR group was divided into group non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy(NPDRand group proliferative diabetic retinopathy(PDR. The relation between DR and other complications of diabetes, including diabetic macrovascular complications, diabetic nephropathy(DN, diabetic peripheral neuropathy(DPN, peripheral vascular disease of diabetes mellitus(PVD, diabetic foot(DF, diabetic ketoacidosis(DKA, was analyzed.RESULTS: The development of DR was related to hypertension, hyperlipemia, carotid atherosclerosis and plaque, lower extremity arteriosclerosis and plaque, DN, DPN, DF and PVD. PDR was closely associated with hypertension and DPN. CONCLUSION: The prevalence of DR increased in the diabetic patients with systemic complications, especially, the increase of prevalence of PDR in the patients with hypertension and DPN. Vascular endothelial injury and microcirculatory disturbance are the common pathologic base for DR and other complications. Therefore, it is important to carry out the regular fundus examination in the diabetic patients, especially in those with systemic complication, in order to decrease the rate of blindness.

  5. Association of statin use and hypertriglyceridemia with diabetic macular edema in patients with type 2 diabetes and diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Yoo-Ri; Park, Sung Wook; Choi, Shin-Young; Kim, Seung Woo; Moon, Ka Young; Kim, Jeong Hun; Lee, Kihwang

    2017-01-07

    To investigate the effects of dyslipidemia and statin therapy on progression of diabetic retinopathy and diabetic macular edema in patients with type 2 diabetes. The medical records of 110 patients with type 2 diabetes (70 statin users and 40 non-users) were retrospectively reviewed. The two outcome measures were progression of diabetic retinopathy by two or more steps on the early treatment diabetic retinopathy study scale and diabetic macular edema based on optical coherence tomography. Serum lipid profiles were analyzed from 6 months prior to diagnosis of diabetic macular edema. Diabetic retinopathy progressed in 23% of statin users and 18% of non-users (p = 0.506), but diabetic macular edema was present in 23% of statin users and 48% of non-users (p = 0.008). Statins reduced low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in patients with and without diabetic macular edema (p = 0.043 and p = 0.031, respectively). Among statin users, patients with diabetic macular edema had higher levels of triglycerides (p = 0.004) and lower levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (p = 0.033) than those without diabetic macular edema. Logistic regression analysis showed that statin use significantly lowered the risk of diabetic macular edema [odds ratio (OR): 0.33, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.12-0.91, p = 0.032]. Hypertriglyceridemia at 6 months prior to development of macular edema was significantly associated with central retinal thickness (OR: 1.52; 95% CI 1.14-2.02, p = 0.005). Lipid lowering therapy with statins protected against the development of diabetic macular edema and progression of diabetic retinopathy in patients with type 2 diabetes. Hypertriglyceridemia could be used as a surrogate marker for diabetic macular edema.

  6. Long-term graft and patient survival following renal transplantation in diabetic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rømming Sørensen, Vibeke; Schwartz Sørensen, Søren; Feldt-Rasmussen, Bo

    2006-01-01

    . The groups were similar with respect to age and sex. RESULTS: The patient survival rates (diabetic versus non-diabetic patients) were 88% vs 91% (p=NS) at 1 year, 68% vs 73% (p=NS) at 5 years and 31% vs 52% (pnon-diabetic patients) were 72% vs 72...... patients, 55% were smokers. Among the diabetic patients, graft and patient survival were independent of smoking habits, blood pressure, HbA1c and total cholesterol. CONCLUSIONS: Graft survival was similar in diabetic and non-diabetic patients. For the first 5 years following renal transplantation......OBJECTIVE: To study long-term graft and patient survival following renal transplantation in diabetic and non-diabetic patients. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Over the time period 1985-99, 498 transplantations in 399 non-diabetic patients and 68 transplantations in 62 diabetic patients were performed...

  7. Choroidal thickness alterations in diabetic nephropathy patients with early or no diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocasarac, Can; Yigit, Yavuz; Sengul, Erkan; Sakalar, Yildirim Beyazit

    2018-04-01

    To assess changes in choroidal thickness (CT) in diabetes patients with and without diabetic nephropathy using enhanced depth imaging spectral domain optical coherence tomography (EDI-OCT). Thirty-five type 2 diabetes patients with a diagnosis of diabetic nephropathy (DNP) in nephrology department and 35 type 2 diabetes patients without nephropathy (non-DNP) were included in our prospective study consecutively. The control group comprised 34 healthy individuals. CT measurements were recorded under the fovea and at 1500 µm from the foveal center in the nasal and temporal sides. The study parameters also included age, refractive error, axial length, intraocular pressure, HbA1c, glomerular filtration rate and proteinuria amount. The subfoveal, temporal and nasal choroidal thickness was noted to be thinner in patients with DNP compared with non-DNP and normal subjects (p diabetic patients when diabetic nephropathy accompanies diabetes mellitus.

  8. Potential Effect of Opium Consumption on Controlling Diabetes and Some Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Diabetic Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Rahimi, Najmeh; Gozashti, Mohamad Hossain; Najafipour, Hamid; Shokoohi, Mostafa; Marefati, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    Background Due to this belief that opium may have beneficial effects on diabetes or cardiovascular risk factors, the present study aimed to assess the potential and possible effects of opium consumption on diabetes control and some cardiovascular risk factors in diabetic patients. Methods This study enrolled 374 diabetic subjects from diabetes care centers in Kerman, Iran, including opium user group (n = 179) and a non-opium user group (n = 195). The data were collected through a questionnair...

  9. Survival in dialysis patients is not different between patients with diabetes as primary renal disease and patients with diabetes as a co-morbid condition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schroijen, Marielle A.; Dekkers, Olaf M.; Grootendorst, Diana C.; Noordzij, Marlies; Romijn, Johannes A.; Krediet, Raymond T.; Boeschoten, Elisabeth W.; Dekker, Friedo W.; Apperloo, A. J.; Bijlsma, J. A.; Boekhout, M.; Boer, W. H.; van der Boog, P. J. M.; Büller, H. R.; van Buren, M.; de Charro, F. Th; Doorenbos, C. J.; van den Dorpel, M. A.; van Es, A.; Fagel, W. J.; Feith, G. W.; de Fijter, C. W. H.; Frenken, L. A. M.; van Geelen, J. A. C. A.; Gerlag, P. G. G.; Gorgels, J. P. M. C.; Grave, W.; Huisman, R. M.; Jager, K. J.; Jie, K.; Koning-Mulder, W. A. H.; Koolen, M. I.; Kremer Hovinga, T. K.; Lavrijssen, A. T. J.; Luik, A. J.; van der Meulen, J.; Parlevliet, K. J.; Raasveld, M. H. M.; van der Sande, F. M.; Schonck, M. J. M.; Schuurmans, M. M. J.; Siegert, C. E. H.; Stegeman, C. A.; Stevens, P.; Thijssen, J. G. P.; Valentijn, R. M.; Vastenburg, G. H.; Verburgh, C. A.; Vincent, H. H.; Vos, P. F.

    2011-01-01

    On dialysis, survival among patients with diabetes mellitus is inferior to survival of non-diabetic patients. We hypothesized that patients with diabetes as primary renal disease have worse survival compared to patients with diabetes as a co-morbid condition and aimed to compare all-cause mortality

  10. Impact of hyperglycemia on ischemic stroke mortality in diabetic and non-diabetic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kes, V.B.; Solter, V.V.; Supanc, V.; Demarin, V.

    2007-01-01

    Previous studies suggest that infarct expansion may be responsible for increased mortality after stroke onset in patients with prolonged stress hyperglycemia on stroke mortality in patients with and without diabetes. For 630 stroke patients admitted to the neurological intensive care department within 24 hours of stroke onset, we correlated mean blood glucose levels (MBGL) at admission and 72 hours after admission in diabetic and non-diabetic patients with final outcome. Blood glucose levels higher then 6.1 mmol/L (121mg/dL) was treated as hyperglycemia. Of 630 patients (mean age 71+-6), 410 were non-diabetic (mortality, 25%) and 220 patients were diabetic (mortality, 20%). All patients who died within 28 days of hospitalization had prolonged hyperglycemia at admission and after 72 hours, despite insulin therapy). The unadjusted relative risk of in-hospital mortality within 28 days of all stroke patients was 0.68 (95% CI, 0.14-1.9) for non-diabetic patients and 0.39 (95% CI, 0.27-1.56) for diabetic patients. The unadjusted relative risk of in-hospital mortality within 28 days in ischemic stroke in patients with MBGL> 6.1-8.0 mmol/L (121-144 mg/dL) at admission after 72 hours was 1.83 (95% CI, 0.41-5.5) for non-diabetic patients and 1.13 (95% CI, 0.78-4.5) for diabetic patients and 1.13 (95%, 0.78-4.5) for diabetic patients. Non-diabetic patients with hyperglycemia had a 1.7 times higher relative risk of in-hospital 28-day mortality than patients with diabetes. Prolonged stress hyperglycemia in ischemic stroke patients increases the risk of in-hospital 28-day mortality, especially in non-diabetic patients. (author)

  11. EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDY OF DIABETIC RETINOPATHY IN DIABETES MELLITUS PATIENTS IN TERTIARY CARE CENTRE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhaskar

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE The study objective was to examine the effect of glycaemic control and variations on the incidence and progression of diabetic retinopathy (DR among the diabetes mellitus patients visiting Medicine and Ophthalmology OPD Sapthagiri Medical college, Bangalore. MATERIALS AND METHODS 10 patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus, and 70 persons with type 2 diabetes mellitus, visiting the Medicine OPD of Sapthagiri Medical College and referred to Ophthalmology department of the above to detect the Diabetic Retinopathy changes in a diabetes mellitus management programme conducted for 3 months in Bangalore, participated in the study. Patients who were followed up for 6 months the same above were also included in the study. Analyses were conducted to assess the relationship between the risk factors, incidence and progression of Diabetic Retinopathy among Diabetes Mellitus patients and management. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES To determine the risk factors associated with it, stage of retinopathy diagnosed at presentation, management of it, and final visual outcome. The prevention is by strict glycaemic control, prompt use of anti-diabetic drugs and regular exercises. These included age and gender-adjusted prevalence of diabetes and diabetic retinopathy, 1 and correlation of prevalence with history-based risk factors. RESULTS The three months cumulative incidence of DR was 58 %in type I diabetes mellitus and 42 % among type II Diabetes mellitus. After controlling for known risk factors for DR,1 a high baseline haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c, ethnicity, age, type of diabetes mellitus, duration were associated with the incidence of referable DR in patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. The age- and gender-adjusted prevalence rate of diabetes in urban Bangalore 28.2% (95% confidence interval [CI], and the prevalence of diabetic retinopathy in general population was 3.5% (95% CI. The prevalence of diabetic retinopathy in the population with diabetes

  12. Illness representations of type 2 diabetes patients are associated with perceptions of diabetes threat in relatives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Esch, S.C.M.; Nijkamp, M.D.; Cornel, M.C.; Snoek, F.J.

    2014-01-01

    In the fight against the type 2 diabetes epidemic, patients might be asked to discuss familial susceptibility to type 2 diabetes in their family. Illness representations of patients (N = 546) were assessed to explore their impact on perceived type 2 diabetes threat in relatives. Reporting high type

  13. Diabetic patients treated with dialysis: complications and quality of life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, V R; Mathiesen, E R; Watt, T

    2007-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: The aim of this study was to describe the prevalence of complications, health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and the influence of beliefs about control over health in diabetic dialysis patients. METHODS: Of 53 eligible diabetic patients on chronic dialysis during January 2004...... in our clinic, 38 (76%) completed a kidney-specific (Kidney Disease Quality of Life) and a generic (SF-36) questionnaire and were characterised in terms of cardiovascular diseases and diabetic complications. Matched groups of non-diabetic dialysis patients (n = 40) and diabetic patients with a long...... population (47 +/- 19). The diabetic dialysis patients had similar levels of kidney-specific quality of life and mental health compared with the control groups. Reduced physical health was predicted by the presence of end-stage renal disease, diabetes and short time spent in education. Among the diabetic...

  14. Distribution of Esophageal Motor Disorders in Diabetic Patients With Dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Nina S; Rangan, Vikram; Geng, Zhuo; Khan, Freeha; Kichler, Adam; Gabbard, Scott; Ganocy, Stephen; Fass, Ronnie

    Diabetes mellitus can cause various gastrointestinal symptoms. Assessment of esophageal dysmotility in diabetic patients has been scarcely studied. The aim of this study was to determine the esophageal motor characteristics of diabetic versus nondiabetic patients who present with dysphagia. High-resolution esophageal manometries (HREMs) of 83 diabetic patients and 83 age and gender-matched nondiabetic patients with dysphagia from 2 medical centers were included in this study. Demographic information, medical comorbidities, and medication usage were recorded for each patient in a single registry. HREM of each patient was evaluated and the different functional parameters were recorded. Overall, 46% of diabetic patients were found to have an esophageal motor disorder. Diabetic patients with dysphagia were more likely to have failed swallows on HREM (50.6% vs. 33.7%; P=0.03) as compared with nondiabetic patients. Among diabetic patients, those being treated with insulin were more likely to have failed (69.0% vs. 40.7%; P=0.01) and weak (65.5% vs. 33.3%; P=0.005) swallows as compared with diabetic patients not on insulin. Among diabetic patients, those with abnormal manometry were more likely to demonstrate diabetic retinopathy (27.0% vs. 8.7%; P=0.04). There was a trend toward increased incidence of esophagogastric junction outflow obstruction in diabetic patients (10.8% vs. 2.4%; P=0.057) as compared with nondiabetic patients. Nearly half of diabetic patients with dysphagia have some type of an esophageal motility disorder. Diabetic retinopathy and the use of insulin are predictive of esophageal motor abnormalities among diabetic patients.

  15. Apolipoprotein(a) in insulin-dependent diabetic patients with and without diabetic nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gall, M A; Rossing, P; Hommel, E

    1992-01-01

    Insulin-dependent diabetic patients with diabetic nephropathy have a highly increased morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular diseases. To determine whether altered levels of apolipoprotein(a) (apo(a)), the glycoprotein of the potentially atherogenic lipoprotein(a) (Lp(a)), contribute...... to the increased risk of ischaemic heart disease, apo(a) was determined in 50 insulin-dependent diabetic patients with diabetic nephropathy (group 1), in 50 insulin-dependent diabetic patients with microalbuminuria (group 2), in 50 insulin-dependent diabetic patients with normoalbuminuria (group 3), and in 50...... healthy subjects (group 4). The groups were matched with regard to sex, age and body mass index. The diabetic groups were also matched with regard to diabetes duration. The level of apo(a) was approximately the same in the four groups, being: 122 (x/ divided by 4.2) U l-1, 63 (x/ divided by 4.4) U l-1...

  16. Prevalence of diabetic retinopathy in type II diabetic patients in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    patients in a health facility in Karachi, Pakistan. Humera Ishaq1* ... regular medication, diet and exercise to avoid development and progress of DR. Keywords: Diabetes .... levels for likelihood on participants that they will develop diabetic ...

  17. CT findings of TB in diabetic and non-diabetic patients: A comparison before and after anti-tuberculous therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Wu

    2016-03-01

    Conclusion: CT findings of tuberculosis in diabetic patients are different from those in non-diabetic patients, with a higher occurrence of non-segmental distribution and multiple cavities within a tuberculous lesion. By follow-up re-examination, diabetic patients show a slower and unobvious therapeutic response on CT scans compared to non-diabetic patients. CT can provide important information for the diagnosis and management of TB in diabetic and non-diabetic patients.

  18. CARDIAC REHABILITATION IN PATIENTS WITH DIABETES MELLITUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzieh Saeidi

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available AbstractINTRODUCTION: Prevalence of cardiovascular diseases (CVD is 19.4% in Iran anddiabetes mellitus is an important CVD risk factor in this country. Non-insulin-dependentdiabetes mellitus (type II DM is associated with increased morbidity and mortality due toatherosclerosis. With cardiac rehabilitation (CR we can modify CVD risk factors such astype II DM and play an important role in decreasing its mortality and morbidity. Weinvestigated the effects of CR on cardiac patients with and without type II DM.METHODS: In this retrospective before-and-after study we analyzed data from 496 cardiacpatients (419 with type II DM and 77 without type II DM. All of the subjects completeddemographic data questionnaires and underwent weight and height measurement, exercisetest to assess exercise capacity (EC, echocardiography, and blood test to assess lipidprofile and fasting blood glucose. The subjects then participated in a 24-session CRprogram. Each session consisted of 10 minutes warm-up, 40 minutes aerobic exercise, 10minutes cool-down and 20 minutes relaxation. They also took part in 8 educational sessionson life style modification, diet therapy and stress management supervised by CR team (acardiologist, a physician, a physiotherapist, a nurse, a nutritionist and a psychiatrist. At theend of the program, all measurements, exams and tests were repeated. Data were analyzedwith SPSS11.5 using independent t-test at level of P<0.05.RESULTS: We studied 419 non-diabetics (mean age: 55.61±9.41 years and 77 diabetics(mean age: 58.59±7.76 years. Mean EC increased significantly after CR in both groups. Inthe diabetic group, EC increased significantly compared to the non-diabetic group(62.21±133.40 vs. 33.68±31/42, P=0.02. Mean levels of triglyceride, cholesterol, LDLcholesterol,as well as body mass index and heart rate decreased significantly after CR inboth groups. However, no significant difference was seen between the two groups in respectof these variables

  19. Fod- og ankeltraume hos patient med diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falborg, Bettina; Ebskov, Lars

    2009-01-01

    If confronted with a neuropathic patient with an acute foot-ankle trauma, including fracture, this patient is by definition Eichenholtz stage 0. This is of major importance for the treatment. Whereas the surgical handling of fractures does not differ from ordinary fracture treatment, the subsequent...... treatment of sprains and fractures with immobilisation and a non-weight bearing period is significantly prolonged, frequently doubled, in diabetic patients. Follow-up includes frequent ambulatory controls including X-rays. If the neuroarthropathy progresses, the period of treatment is adjusted accordingly...

  20. Fod- og ankeltraume hos patient med diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falborg, Bettina; Ebskov, Lars

    2009-01-01

    If confronted with a neuropathic patient with an acute foot-ankle trauma, including fracture, this patient is by definition Eichenholtz stage 0. This is of major importance for the treatment. Whereas the surgical handling of fractures does not differ from ordinary fracture treatment, the subsequent...... treatment of sprains and fractures with immobilisation and a non-weight bearing period is significantly prolonged, frequently doubled, in diabetic patients. Follow-up includes frequent ambulatory controls including X-rays. If the neuroarthropathy progresses, the period of treatment is adjusted accordingly....

  1. Fod- og ankeltraume hos patient med diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falborg, Bettina; Ebskov, Lars

    2009-01-01

    treatment of sprains and fractures with immobilisation and a non-weight bearing period is significantly prolonged, frequently doubled, in diabetic patients. Follow-up includes frequent ambulatory controls including X-rays. If the neuroarthropathy progresses, the period of treatment is adjusted accordingly.......If confronted with a neuropathic patient with an acute foot-ankle trauma, including fracture, this patient is by definition Eichenholtz stage 0. This is of major importance for the treatment. Whereas the surgical handling of fractures does not differ from ordinary fracture treatment, the subsequent...

  2. Prevalence of Gall Bladder Stones among Type 2 Diabetic Patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: The prevalence of gallstones in Libyan diabetic patients is higher than the rates reported in other parts of the world. Libyan diabetic patients with gallstones tend to be older and more obese than those without gallstones. Duration of diabetes mellitus and type of treatment does not seem to influence the ...

  3. Patients with type 2 diabetes and difficulties associated with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: Many patients with type 2 diabetes are uncontrolled on maximum oral treatment. The early introduction of insulin can lower diabetes-related complications. The purpose of this study was to explore the reasons behind a perceived reluctance of patients with type 2 diabetes to commence insulin therapy despite ...

  4. Clinical and functional correlates of foot pain in diabetic patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijken, P.M.; Dekker, J.; Rauwerda, J.A.; Dekker, E.; Lankhorst, G.J.; Bakker, K.; Dooren, J.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: patients with diabetes mellitus frequently suffer from foot pain. This pain seems to be a neglected area in studies on the diabetic foot. The purpose of this study was to identify clinical variables associated with foot pain in diabetic patients. In addition, the relationships between foot

  5. Antioxidant status in diabetic and non-diabetic senile patients, with cataract or cardiovascular complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gul, A.; Rahman, Muhammad A.

    2008-01-01

    Objective was to assess the total antioxidant status in diabetic and non-diabetic senile patients, with cataract or cardiovascular complications, and without complications. A comparative study on 186 senile patients and control subjects was carried from March 2004 to November 2006 on patients from Ziauddin University Hospital, Karachi, Pakistan. Among them 33 were diabetic patients without any clinical evidence of chronic diabetic complications, 32 with cardiovascular complications, 30 non-diabetic patients with cardiovascular complications, 30 diabetic patients with cataract and 31 apparently normal, age, gender and weight matched control subjects were investigated. All patients were selected on clinical grounds. Total antioxidant status was significantly decreased (p<0.001) in all diabetic patients with and without complications and non-diabetic patients with same complications (155 patients) as compared with control subjects (31 subjects). Fasting plasma glucose was increased (p<0.001) in all diabetic patients with and without complications (95 patients), and correlated significantly with glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and serum fructosamine concentrations. Fasting plasma glucose, HbA1c, and serum fructosamine were not different in diabetic patients with and without complications. Fasting plasma glucose, HbA1c, serum fructosamine and total serum protein were not different in non-diabetic patients with the same complications as compared with control subjects. Total antioxidant status is decreased in diabetic and non-diabetic senile patients with the same complication as compared with same complication as compared with control subjects. Some other factors may be responsible for decease antioxidant status. (author)

  6. Frequency of diabetic retinopathy in patients after ten years of diagnosis of type 2 diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaikh, M.A.; Yakta, D.E.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Diabetic retinopathy is one of the most common and serious complications of type 2 diabetes mellitus and a leading cause of blindness not only in Pakistan but also worldwide. So we conducted this study to record the frequency of diabetic retinopathy in known diabetic patients ten years after diagnosis of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods: The study was conducted at Liaquat University of Medical and Health Sciences, Jamshoro, Pakistan for a period of 1 year from January 2008 to January 2010. The study group comprised of 200 patients of type 2 diabetes mellitus attending the medical clinic. All patients who were diagnosed as type 2 diabetes mellitus since ten years duration were included in the study. Retinopathy was graded into background, pre proliferative and proliferative retinopathy. Type 2 diabetes was diagnosed using the WHO criteria. Statistical analysis was carried out using the SPSS-11. Results: Diabetic retinopathy was found in 25.5% of the total Type 2 patients after ten years of diagnosis, and of these 4% of patients had proliferative retinopathy. Conclusion: Type 2 diabetic patients should be screened as early as possible to prevent permanent visual loss by timely management of diabetic retinopathy because diabetes is one of most common preventable cause of blindness in the world. (author)

  7. Cognitive impairment in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cognitive impairment in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: Perspectives and ... may have a deteriorating effect on mental health including a decline in cognitive ... of Diabetes; Functional Foods and Human Diet; Quality of Life and Wellness ...

  8. Care of Patients with Diabetic Foot Disease in Oman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Busaidi, Ibrahim S.; Abdulhadi, Nadia N.; Coppell, Kirsten J.

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a major public health challenge and causes substantial morbidity and mortality worldwide. Diabetic foot disease is one of the most debilitating and costly complications of diabetes. While simple preventative foot care measures can reduce the risk of lower limb ulcerations and subsequent amputations by up to 85%, they are not always implemented. In Oman, foot care for patients with diabetes is mainly provided in primary and secondary care settings. Among all lower limb amputations performed in public hospitals in Oman between 2002–2013, 47.3% were performed on patients with diabetes. The quality of foot care among patients with diabetes in Oman has not been evaluated and unidentified gaps in care may exist. This article highlights challenges in the provision of adequate foot care to Omani patients with diabetes. It concludes with suggested strategies for an integrated national diabetic foot care programme in Oman. PMID:27606104

  9. microbiological profile of oral infections in diabetic patients and non

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    boaz

    aerobic bacteria were significantly isolated from cases of dental caries. Conclusion: The oral .... study, it was reported that periodontal pathogens were different in diabetic patients and non-diabetic controls as well as in aggressive and chronic.

  10. Proliferative diabetic retinopathy is associated with microalbuminuria in patients with type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.C. Boelter

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic retinopathy is one of the leading causes of blindness in working-age individuals. Diabetic patients with proteinuria or those on dialysis usually present severe forms of diabetic retinopathy, but the association of diabetic retinopathy with early stages of diabetic nephropathy has not been entirely established. A cross-sectional study was conducted on 1214 type 2 diabetic patients to determine whether microalbuminuria is associated with proliferative diabetic retinopathy in these patients. Patients were evaluated by direct and indirect ophthalmoscopy and grouped according to the presence or absence of proliferative diabetic retinopathy. The agreement of diabetic retinopathy classification performed by ophthalmoscopy and by stereoscopic color fundus photographs was 95.1% (kappa = 0.735; P < 0.001. Demographic information, smoking history, anthropometric and blood pressure measurements, glycemic and lipid profile, and urinary albumin were evaluated. On multiple regression analysis, diabetic nephropathy (OR = 5.18, 95% CI = 2.91-9.22, P < 0.001, insulin use (OR = 2.52, 95% CI = 1.47-4.31, P = 0.001 and diabetes duration (OR = 1.04, 95% CI = 1.01-1.07, P = 0.011 were positively associated with proliferative diabetic retinopathy, and body mass index (OR = 0.90, 95% CI = 0.86-0.96, P < 0.001 was negatively associated with it. When patients with macroalbuminuria and on dialysis were excluded, microalbuminuria (OR = 3.3, 95% CI = 1.56-6.98, P = 0.002 remained associated with proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Therefore, type 2 diabetic patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy more often presented renal involvement, including urinary albumin excretion within the microalbuminuria range. Therefore, all patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy should undergo an evaluation of renal function including urinary albumin measurements.

  11. Hypervascularisation in diabetic patients shown by angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinhardt, K.

    1981-11-01

    Two diabetic patients are described who showed widened and tortuous arteries, increased blood flow and increased filling of small arteries, which simultaneous filling of arteries and veins (increased flow through arterio-venous anastomoses). In one patient, during an observation period of four years, occlusion of both common iliacs developed, as well as a block of one femoral artery and mural changes in the other. In the second patient, areas of occlusion and hypervascularisation co-existed. The first patient showed osteolytic changes, also involving the joints, whereas the second patient developed diffuse rarefaction of the bones in the leg and foot. Ischaemic necroses developed in the soft tissues in both patients and leg amputation was therefore carried out. The angiographic and skeletal findings, however, suggest that the soft tissues suffered trophic changes which should be regarded as a secondary complication of the ischaemia.

  12. Psychosocial interventions for the diabetic patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harvey JN

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available John N Harvey Diabetes Research Group, Wrexham Academic Unit, Bangor University, Wrexham, UK Abstract: Diabetes usually requires substantial life-long self-management by the patient. Psychological factors and the patient's health beliefs are important determinants of self-care behavior. Education has a modest influence on generating better self-care, but psychologically based interventions are clearly more effective. This review gives an overview of these interventions with some discussion of their basis in psychological theory. Some labels such as cognitive behavioral therapy and family therapy include a wide range of approaches. Randomized trials have generally produced improvement in measures of psychological well-being, but improved glycemic control has been more elusive. The influence on behavior can be very dependent on the individual therapist. Only a few trials have managed to sustain improvement in glycosylated hemoglobin beyond a year. Not all patients are prepared to engage and accept these forms of therapeutic intervention. We are still some way from moving psychological management from the trial situation into the diabetic clinic. Keywords: health beliefs, motivational interviewing, cognitive behavioral therapy, family therapy, adolescence

  13. Patients' Evaluation of the Quality of Diabetes Care (PEQD)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pouwer, F; Snoek, Frank J

    2002-01-01

    aspects of the quality of diabetes care as delivered by the specialist in internal medicine (internist) and the diabetes nurse specialist (DNS). Two principal components analyses (internist/DNS) both yielded one 14 item factor with a high internal consistency. Satisfaction with diabetes care, fewer......OBJECTIVES: To develop a brief measure of patients' evaluation of the quality of diabetes care and to study predictors of consumers' rating of the quality of diabetes care. DESIGN: A prospective design. SUBJECTS: 176 adults with type 1 (39%) or type 2 (61%) diabetes. MAIN MEASURES: Demographic...... variables, HbA1c, number of diabetes complications, satisfaction with diabetes care, diabetes related distress, and fear of hypoglycaemia were assessed by self-report. In addition, satisfaction with diabetes care and evaluations about quality of the care were measured at 16 month follow up. Statistical...

  14. The Influence of Smoking on Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Diabetic and Non-Diabetic Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Kuan-Jen; Lee, Jen-Jyh; Chien, Shun-Tien; Suk, Chi-Won; Chiang, Chen-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Background Both smoking and diabetes can increase the risk and influence the manifestations and outcomes of tuberculosis (TB). It is not clear whether the influence of smoking on pulmonary TB differs between non-diabetic and diabetic patients. Herein, we assessed the manifestations and outcomes of TB in relation to smoking in both diabetic and non-diabetic TB patients. Methodology/Principal Findings All diabetic culture-positive pulmonary TB patients notified from 2005–2010 at three teaching hospitals in Taiwan were enrolled. A culture-positive pulmonary TB patient without DM who was notified to the health authority immediately prior to each diabetic TB patient was selected for comparison. The 972 patients in this study cohort included 365 (37.6%) non-diabetic non-smokers, 149 (15.3%) non-diabetic smokers, 284 (29.2%) diabetic non-smokers, and 174 (17.9%) diabetic smokers. The adjusted relative risk of a pretreatment positive smear for a smoker compared with a non-smoker was 2.19 (95% CI 1.38–3.47) in non-diabetic patients and 2.23 (95% CI 1.29–3.87) in diabetic culture-positive pulmonary TB patients. The adjusted relative risk for a positive smear among diabetic smokers was 5.61 (95% CI 3.35–9.41) compared with non-diabetic non-smokers. Smoking was significantly associated with an increased frequency of bilateral lung parenchyma involvement (AdjOR 1.84, 95% CI 1.16–2.93), far-advanced pulmonary TB (AdjOR 1.91, 95% CI 1.04–3.50), cavitary lesions (AdjOR 2.03, 95% CI 1.29–3.20), and unfavorable outcomes of TB (AdjOR 2.35, 95% CI 1.02–5.41) in non-diabetic patients. However, smoking was not associated with cavitary lung parenchyma lesions regarding the location, number or size of the cavity in diabetic TB patients. Conclusions/Significance Smoking and diabetes have joint effects on a pretreatment positive smear. Diabetic smokers had more than a 5-fold increased risk of a pretreatment positive smear than did non-diabetic non-smokers, indicating

  15. Diabetes Stories: Use of Patient Narratives of Diabetes to Teach Patient-Centered Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, Arno K.; Murphy, Elizabeth A.; Ross, Paula T.

    2009-01-01

    A critical component to instituting compassionate, patient-centered diabetes care is the training of health care providers. Our institution developed the Family Centered Experience (FCE), a comprehensive 2-year preclinical program based on longitudinal conversations with patients about living with chronic illness. The goal of the FCE is to explore…

  16. PREVALENCE OF DIABETIC RETINOPATHY IN PATIENTS WITH NEWLY DIAGNOSED TYPE II DIABETES MELLITUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bostak

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic retinopathy is a common complication of type II diabetes mellitus and carries with it the threat of blindness. Accurate information regarding the incidence of diabetic retinopathy and associated risk factors is important in the prevention of its development and of the visual impairment caused by this complication. This study was designed to determine the prevalence of diabetic retinopathy in newly diagnosed patients with type II diabetes mellitus. We have also evaluated the association of diabetic retinopathy with clinical and biochemical variables. In a cross-sectional study, 152 consecutive patients with newly diagnosed type II diabetes mellitus were referred from two outpatient clinics in Tehran for ophthalmologic exam to detect retinopathy. Indirect ophthalmoscopy was performed and data regarding risk factors were extracted from routine medical records. Chi square and Mann Whitney U tests were used to analyze the data. The overall prevalence of diabetic retinopathy was 13.8 %( 21 cases: three cases with microaneurysm only, 10 with mild, 5 with moderate and 2 with severe non proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Only one patient had advanced proliferative retinopathy. The prevalence of diabetic retinopathy was positively associated with age, duration of disease, fasting plasma glucose, HbA1c, and systolic blood pressure. Diabetic retinopathy is common in newly diagnosed type II diabetes mellitus patients. Ophthalmologic consultation is essential at the time of diagnosis for all patients.

  17. Thickness of the retinal photoreceptor outer segment layer in healthy volunteers and in patients with diabetes mellitus without retinopathy, diabetic retinopathy, or diabetic macular edema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Ozkaya

    2017-04-01

    Conclusion: The PROS layer at the foveal center was thinner in patients who had diabetic retinopathy or diabetic macular edema than both the healthy volunteers and diabetic patients without retinopathy.

  18. Carotid disease in diabetic patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahid, M.; Abid, A.R.; Dar, M.A.; Noeman, A.; Amin, S.; Azhar, M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To compare the severity of carotid artery disease in diabetic and non-diabetic patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting. Methods: From January to June 2008, 379 patients undergoing elective coronary artery bypass surgery were preoperatively evaluated for the presence of carotid stenoses by duplex scanning. Patients were divided into two groups, Group I, 156 (41.2%) diabetic patients and Group II, 223 (58.8%) non-diabetic patients. Results: There were 314 (82.8%) males and 65 (17.2%) females with a mean age of 57.2+-9.1 years. In diabetic group there were 125 (80.1%) males and 31 (19.9%) females with a mean age of 56.3+-8.9 years. Left main stem stenosis was present in 59 (37.8%) diabetics and 45 (20.2%) non-diabetics (p 70% stenosis was present in 20 (5.3%) with 13 (8.3%) diabetics and 7 (3.1%) non-diabetics (p<0.025). Stenosis of 50-70% was observed in 30 (7.9%) of which 17 (10.9%) were diabetics and 13 (5.8%) were non-diabetics. Conclusion: Presence of diabetes mellitus is associated with diffuse coronary artery disease and significant carotid artery disease in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting. (author)

  19. Patients' Perspectives on Factors that Influence Diabetes Self-Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakibazadeh, E; Larijani, B; Shojaeezadeh, D; Rashidian, A; Forouzanfar, Mh; Bartholomew, Lk

    2011-12-01

    Although diabetes mellitus is of high concern in Iran, and the level of control is unacceptable, few qualitative studies have been carried out to reflect the experiences of patients on the barriers and motivators to self-care. This study aimed to explore a culturally based experience of Iranian diabetic patients regarding the personal and environmental barriers to and facilitating factors for diabetes self-care. Six focus groups were conducted among type 2 diabetic patients in the Charity Foundation for Special Diseases' diabetes clinic. Purposeful sampling was used. Newly diagnosed patients (less than six months) and all type 1 diabetic patients were excluded. Three focus groups were held on for each sex. A total of 43 patients participated in the study. Frame-work analysis was used to extract the themes from the data. DATA ANALYSIS SHOWED FIVE MAIN BARRIERS: physical barriers (such as physical effects of diabetes); psychological barriers (such as health beliefs); educational barriers (such as lack of knowledge about diabetes); social barriers (such as group pressure); and care system barriers (such as service availability). Along with the barriers, there were some motivators that the participants mentioned as a stimuli to control their diabetes. They include beliefs about diabetes, perceived responsibility for family, religious beliefs, and the views of significant others. Culturally based interventions are needed to improve diabetes care management in Iran. In addition to personal factors, diabetes health educators should pay attention to the environmental factors when they develop programs.

  20. Pulmonary zygomycosis in a diabetic patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anuradha K

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of pulmonary zygomycosis in an adult male diabetic patient who presented with fever and altered sensorium initially and later developed streaky haemoptysis. Bronchoscopy showed picture of necrotizing pneumonia. Sputum was negative for fungal elements on admission but later bronchial wash and repeat sputum samples were positive by microscopy and culture showed growth of Rhizopus species. Immediately the patient was put on amphotericin B but had a bout of massive haemoptysis and succumbed. A high index of suspicion is needed for an early diagnosis and aggressive treatment of this infection in view of the high mortality rate.

  1. Transperitoneal transport in diabetic and non-diabetic patients on peritoneal dialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graff, J; Fugleberg, Steen; Nielsen, S L

    1999-01-01

    To investigate differences in the transport characteristics of the peritoneal membrane between diabetic and non-diabetic patients on chronic peritoneal dialysis, a study was conducted in 21 non-diabetic and 18 diabetic patients. Transperitoneal transport of small solutes was evaluated in terms...... of the mass transfer area coefficients (urea, creatinine and glucose), ultra-filtration sieving coefficients (urea and creatinine) and by peritoneal equilibration test results. The capacity of the peritoneal membrane to transport macromolecules was evaluated by albumin mass transfer rates and clearances......-labelled human albumin. Despite a significantly increased transcapillary escape rate of albumin in the diabetic patients, no differences in peritoneal membrane characteristics could be demonstrated between diabetic and non-diabetic patients on peritoneal dialysis....

  2. Associations between diabetes self-management and microvascular complications in patients with type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Mehravar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Diabetes is a major public health problem that is approaching epidemic proportions globally. Diabetes self-management can reduce complications and mortality in type 2 diabetic patients. The purpose of this study was to examine associations between diabetes self-management and microvascular complications in patients with type 2 diabetes. METHODS: In this cross-sectional study, 562 Iranian patients older than 30 years of age with type 2 diabetes who received treatment at the Diabetes Research Center of the Endocrinology and Metabolism Research Institute of the Tehran University of Medical Sciences were identified. The participants were enrolled and completed questionnaires between January and April 2014. Patients’ diabetes self-management was assessed as an independent variable by using the Diabetes Self-Management Questionnaire translated into Persian. The outcomes were the microvascular complications of diabetes (retinopathy, nephropathy, and neuropathy, identified from the clinical records of each patient. A multiple logistic regression model was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs between diabetes self-management and the microvascular complications of type 2 diabetes, adjusting for potential confounders. RESULTS: After adjusting for potential confounders, a significant association was found between the diabetes self-management sum scale and neuropathy (adjusted OR, 0.64; 95% CI, 0.45 to 0.92, p=0.01. Additionally, weak evidence was found of an association between the sum scale score of diabetes self-management and nephropathy (adjusted OR, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.47 to 1.05, p=0.09. CONCLUSIONS: Among patients with type 2 diabetes, a lower diabetes self-management score was associated with higher rates of nephropathy and neuropathy.

  3. An investigation into diabetic patients knowledge of diabetes and its ocular complications in the Western Cape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. C. Clarke-Farr

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the findings of a study which evaluated the knowledge of a sample of diabetic patients about their disease and its ocular complications. A comprehensive questionnaire was provided to diabetic patients in the Cape Town metropolitan district and its surrounds. Specifically, the questionnaire aimed to determine the patient’s knowledge of diabetes, their knowledge of the ocular complications of diabetes, the options for its management and treatment as well as a section considering other general information relating to diabetes and its ocular complications. Their subject knowledge about diabetes and its ocular complications was relatively limited as only 42% of respondents knew about the existence of two types of diabetes. Twenty nine percent of respondents believed that diabetes would not affect their eyes. Although 76% of the patients felt it very important to measure their blood sugar and 80% rated blood sugar control as very important, only 37% of the respondents measured their blood sugar on a daily basis. A particular concern was that although 96% of the respondents felt that it was important to have their eyes checked regularly, only 30% of the respondents stated that they had actually had their eyes checked every year. The results of this investigation support the need for diabetic patients to receive better patient education about diabetes and its ocular complications. Furthermore, attention needs to be paid to expanding patient access to diabetic screenings and ocular examinations in order to manage this condition effectively.

  4. Are we telling the diabetic patients adequately about foot care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, R.; Din, M.J.U.; Jadoon, R.J.; Farooq, U.; Alam, M.A.; Qureshi, A.; Shah, S.U.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Diabetes mellitus affects more than 285 million people worldwide. The prevalence is expected to rise to 439 million by the year 2030. Diabetic foot ulcers precede 84 percentage of non-traumatic amputations in diabetics. One lower limb is lost every 30 seconds around the world because of diabetic foot ulceration. Apart from being lengthy, the treatment of diabetic foot is also very expensive. There is very limited emphasis on foot care in diabetic patients. Even in developed countries patients feel that they do not have adequate knowledge about foot care. This study was conducted to find out how much information is imparted by doctors to diabetic patients about foot care. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in admitted patients of the Department of Medicine, DHQ Hospital, Abbottabad from May 2014 to June 2015. 139 diabetic patients more than 25 years of age were included by non-probability consecutive sampling. Results: The mean age was 57.17 ( percentage 11.1) years. 35.3 percentage of patients were male and 64.7 percentage were female. The mean duration of diabetes in patients was 8.3 (±6) years. Only 36.7 percentage of patients said that their doctor told them about foot care. Less than 40 percentage of patients knew that they should daily inspect their feet, wash them with gentle warm water, and dry them afterwards. Only 25.2 percentage of the participants knew how to manage corns or calluses on feet. 66.5 percentage of patients knew that they should not walk bare foot. Overall, 63 percentage of our patients had less than 50 percentage knowledge of the 11 points regarding foot care that the investigators asked them. Conclusion: Diabetic foot problems are the one of the costliest, most disabling and disheartening complication of diabetes mellitus. Doctors are not properly telling diabetic patients about foot care. There is a deficiency of knowledge among the diabetic patients regarding foot care. (author)

  5. The Impact of Patient Education on Diabetes Empowerment Scale (DES) and Diabetes Attitude Scale (DAS-3) in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    ATAK, Nazlı; KÖSE, Kenan; GÜRKAN, Tanju

    2008-01-01

    Aim: This study was conducted to assess the impact of a brief, patient-centered education program on perceived self-efficacy and attitudes towards diabetes of patients with type 2 diabetes. Materials and Methods: A randomized controlled study was designed and conducted to assess the impact of education using the DES (Diabetes Empowerment Scale) and DAS-3 (Diabetes Attitude Questionnaire-3), which were administered using a pre- and post-test design. A patient-centered education program was d...

  6. Study of diabetes mellitus among patients with hepatitis C virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona Abdel Raouf

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion We can concluded that diabetic HCV patients had intermediate clinical phenotype lower BMI and LDL than control and development of type 2 diabetes mellitus in HCV patients was significantly higher in nontreated patients than treated patients. Antiviral therapy and clearance of HCV improves IR, β-cell function, the blood glucose abnormalities.

  7. The Kynurenine Pathway: a Proposed Mechanism Linking Diabetes and Periodontal Disease in Diabetic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rishabh Kapila

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disease characte-rized by dysregulation of carbohydrate, protein and lipid metabolism. Diabetes could result, in part, in activation of tryptophan metabolism. Diabetic patients are more susceptible to gingivitis and periodontitis than healthy subjects. The salivary kynurenine derivatives are also implicated in the onset and development of periodontal dis-ease in humans.The hypothesis: We propose that the tryptophan metabolites via kynurenine pathway may lead to diabetes and an increased severity of periodontal disease in diabetic patients, thus linking both diabetes and periodontal disease.Evaluation of the hypothesis: Tryptophan has been found in significant amount in saliva in diabetic individuals in some studies, particularly tryptophan metabolites like kynurenine and anthranilic acid. Moreover, altered tryptophan metabolism has also been reported in the onset of periodontal disease. Thus, this correlation between diabetes mellitus, periodontal disease and salivary tryptophan metabolite levels could be related to the impaired kynurenine pathway metabolism of tryptophan.

  8. Assessment of lipid profile in Saudi type 2 diabetic and non-diabetic periodontal patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Otaibi, Dalal H.; Babay, Nadir A.; Habib, Syed S.; Almas, K.

    2008-01-01

    Objective was to study the extent of periodontal disease in diabetic and non-diabetic periodontitis patients and to investigate the relationship of dyslipidemia and periodontal disease, in diabetic and non-diabetic periodontitis patients. This is a cross-sectional study at the Department of Preventive Dental Sciences College of Dentistry and Department of Physiology, College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, from February 2003 to June 2004. A total of 90 patients was recruited and divided into 3 equal groups of 30 subjects, with age and gender matched, and divided as follows: group 1 healthy group: periodontally and systemically healthy subjects, group 2 periodontitis group: chronic periodontitis patients with no systemic disease, group 3 diabetic group: chronic periodontitis patients with chronic type 2 diabetes mellitus. Plaque index, bleeding on probing, probing pocket depth PPD, and clinical attachment level CAL were measured at the time of initial examination. The glycated hemoglobin, total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein LDL, triglyceride, high density lipoprotein were also measured. Periodontal parameters PPD and CAL were of significantly higher value in the diabetic patients, when compared to the periodontitis patients p<0.05. The total cholesterol, LDL, and triglyceride were also found to be significantly higher among the periodontitis patients than the healthy subjects p<0.05. This study indicated that type 2 diabetic patients had a higher risk to developed advanced periodontal disease hat the non-diabetic subjects. It also highlighted the association of dyslipidemia in periodontitis patients. (author)

  9. Assessment of lipid profile in Saudi type 2 diabetic and non-diabetic periodontal patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Otaibi, Dalal H; Babay, Nadir A [Dept. of Preventive Dental Services, Coll. of Dentistry, King Saud Univ., Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Habib, Syed S [Dept. of Physiology, Habib Coll. of Medicine, King Khalid Univ. Hospital, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Almas, K [Dept. of Periodontology, Univ. of Connecticut (United States)

    2008-07-01

    Objective was to study the extent of periodontal disease in diabetic and non-diabetic periodontitis patients and to investigate the relationship of dyslipidemia and periodontal disease, in diabetic and non-diabetic periodontitis patients. This is a cross-sectional study at the Department of Preventive Dental Sciences College of Dentistry and Department of Physiology, College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, from February 2003 to June 2004. A total of 90 patients was recruited and divided into 3 equal groups of 30 subjects, with age and gender matched, and divided as follows: group 1 healthy group: periodontally and systemically healthy subjects, group 2 periodontitis group: chronic periodontitis patients with no systemic disease, group 3 diabetic group: chronic periodontitis patients with chronic type 2 diabetes mellitus. Plaque index, bleeding on probing, probing pocket depth PPD, and clinical attachment level CAL were measured at the time of initial examination. The glycated hemoglobin, total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein LDL, triglyceride, high density lipoprotein were also measured. Periodontal parameters PPD and CAL were of significantly higher value in the diabetic patients, when compared to the periodontitis patients p<0.05. The total cholesterol, LDL, and triglyceride were also found to be significantly higher among the periodontitis patients than the healthy subjects p<0.05. This study indicated that type 2 diabetic patients had a higher risk to developed advanced periodontal disease hat the non-diabetic subjects. It also highlighted the association of dyslipidemia in periodontitis patients. (author)

  10. Pregnancy outcomes in type 2 diabetic patients as compared with type 1 diabetic patients and nondiabetic controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Kristin M; Thornburg, Loralei L; Pressman, Eva K

    2012-01-01

    To characterize the neonatal and maternal outcomes of type 2 diabetic patients as compared with type 1 diabetic patients and nondiabetic controls. We performed a retrospective cohort study reviewing perinatal outcomes of type 1 and type 2 diabetic patients and nondiabetic controls from July 2000 to August 2006. Analysis of variance, t testing and chi2 analysis were used to compare groups. Post hoc power analysis indicated 80% power was necessary to detect a 15% difference in composite poor neonatal outcomes. A total of 64 type 2 and 64 type 1 diabetic patients were compared with 256 controls. Type 1 diabetic patients had higher incidences of composite poor neonatal outcome and congenital anomalies than did type 2 diabetic and control patients. Both diabetic groups had similarly higher incidences of cesarean delivery, preeclampsia, preterm delivery, polyhydramnios and macrosomia than did controls. Type 2 diabetic patients have a decreased incidence of adverse neonatal outcomes when compared with that of type 1 diabetic patients. No difference was observed between the diabetic groups in the incidence of a majority of the adverse maternal outcomes examined, however both diabetic groups had overall worse outcomes that did nondiabetic controls.

  11. Patient understanding of diabetes self-management: participatory decision-making in diabetes care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Charlene C; Royak-Schaler, Renee; Lender, Dan; Steinle, Nanette; Gadalla, Shahinaz; Zhan, Min

    2011-05-01

    Our aim was to determine whether patient participation in decision-making about diabetes care is associated with understanding of diabetes self-management and subsequent self-care practices. We also identified issues that would impact messaging for use in mobile diabetes communication. A cross-sectional observational study was conducted with type 2 diabetes patients (n = 81) receiving their care at the University of Maryland Joslin Diabetes Center. A convenience sample of patients were eligible to participate if they were aged 25-85 years, had type 2 diabetes, spoke English, and visited their physician diabetes manager within the past 6 months. In-person patient interviews were conducted at the time of clinic visits to assess patient understanding of diabetes management, self-care practices, and perceptions of participation in decision-making about diabetes care. African Americans reported fewer opportunities to participate in decision-making than Caucasians, after controlling for education [mean difference (MD) = -2.4, p = .02]. This association became insignificant after controlling for patient-physician race concordance (MD = -1.5, p = .21). Patient understanding of self-care was predicted by having greater than high school education (MD = 3.6, p = .001) and having physicians who involved them in decision-making about their care. For each unit increase in understanding of diabetes self-care, the mean patient self-care practice score increased by 0.16 (p = .003), after adjustment for patient race and education. Patient participation in decision-making is associated with better understanding of care. Participation in decision-making plays a key role in patient understanding of diabetes self-management and subsequent self-care practices. Patients with limited education need specific instruction in foot care, food choices, and monitoring hemoglobin A1c. © 2011 Diabetes Technology Society.

  12. Diabetes-related emotional distress in Dutch and U.S. diabetic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Snoek, Frank J; Pouwer, F; Welch, G W

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the cross-cultural validity of the Problem Areas in Diabetes Scale (PAID) in Dutch and U.S. diabetic patients. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: A total of 1,472 Dutch people with diabetes completed the PAID along with other self-report measures of affect. Statistics covered...... diabetes. CONCLUSIONS: The Dutch and U.S. 20-item PAID appeared to be psychometrically equivalent, which allowed for cross-cultural comparisons....

  13. Alteration of melatonin secretion in patients with type 2 diabetes and proliferative diabetic retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hikichi T

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Taiichi Hikichi1, Naohiro Tateda2, Toshiaki Miura31Department of Ophthalmology, Ohtsuka Eye Hospital, Sapporo; 2Asahikawa National College of Technology, Asahikawa; 3Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, JapanBackground: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the dynamics of plasma melatonin secretion in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and diabetic retinopathy.Methods: Plasma melatonin levels were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography in 56 patients. Patients were divided into a diabetic group (30 patients and a nondiabetic group (26 patients. The diabetic group was divided further into a proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR group (n = 14 and a nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR group (n = 16. Plasma melatonin levels obtained at midnight and 3 am were compared between the groups.Results: Nighttime melatonin levels were significantly lower in the diabetic group than in the nondiabetic group (P < 0.03 and lower in the PDR group than in the nondiabetic and NPDR groups (P < 0.01 and P < 0.03, respectively, but no significant difference was found between the nondiabetic and NPDR groups. The daytime melatonin level did not significantly differ between the nondiabetic and diabetic groups or between the nondiabetic, NPDR, and PDR groups.Conclusion: The nighttime melatonin level is altered in patients with diabetes and PDR but not in diabetic patients without PDR. Although patients with PDR may have various dysfunctions that affect melatonin secretion more severely, advanced dysfunction of retinal light perception may cause altered melatonin secretion. Alteration of melatonin secretion may accelerate further occurrence of complications in diabetic patients.Keywords: circadian rhythm, diabetes, proliferative diabetic retinopathy, melatonin

  14. Elevated vascular endothelial growth factor in type 1 diabetic patients with diabetic nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hovind, P; Tarnow, L; Oestergaard, P B

    2000-01-01

    patients with and without proliferative retinopathy were detected. CONCLUSIONS: Our data suggest that VEGF is elevated early in the course of diabetic nephropathy in men with type 1 diabetes mellitus. Baseline albuminuria, arterial blood pressure and male gender was predictors of diabetic nephropathy......BACKGROUND: Growth factors have been suggested to play a role in the development and progression of diabetic nephropathy. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a potent cytokine family that induces angiogenesis and markedly increases endothelial permeability. The aim of the present study...... was to investigate plasma levels of VEGF in a large cohort of type 1 diabetic patients with diabetic nephropathy and in long-standing type 1 diabetic patients with persistent normoalbuminuria, and to evaluate VEGF as a predictor of nephropathy progression. METHODS: We measured VEGF with an enzyme...

  15. Adipsic diabetes insipidus in adult patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuesta, Martín; Hannon, Mark J; Thompson, Christopher J

    2017-06-01

    Adipsic diabetes insipidus (ADI) is a very rare disorder, characterized by hypotonic polyuria due to arginine vasopressin (AVP) deficiency and failure to generate the sensation of thirst in response to hypernatraemia. As the sensation of thirst is the key homeostatic mechanism that prevents hypernatraemic dehydration in patients with untreated diabetes insipidus (DI), adipsia leads to failure to respond to aquaresis with appropriate fluid intake. This predisposes to the development of significant hypernatraemia, which is the typical biochemical manifestation of adipsic DI. A literature search was performed to review the background, etiology, management and associated complications of this rare condition. ADI has been reported to occur in association with clipping of an anterior communicating artery aneurysm following subarachnoid haemorrhage, major hypothalamic surgery, traumatic brain injury and toluene exposure among other conditions. Management is very difficult and patients are prone to marked changes in plasma sodium concentration, in particular to the development of severe hypernatraemia. Associated hypothalamic disorders, such as severe obesity, sleep apnoea and thermoregulatory disorders are often observed in patients with ADI. The management of ADI is challenging and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Prognosis is variable; hypothalamic complications lead to early death in some patients, but recent reports highlight the possibility of recovery of thirst.

  16. Intraocular surgery in a large diabetes patient population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostri, Christoffer

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of diabetes is on the increase in developed countries. Accordingly, the prevention and treatment of vision-threatening diabetic eye complications is assuming greater importance. The overall aim of this thesis is to analyse risk factors for intraocular surgery in a large diabetes po...... surgery, which can be used for preventive purposes, surgical decision-making and patient counselling....

  17. Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Diseases among Diabetic Patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Studies on cardiovascular risk factors among diabetic persons in Ethiopia are lacking. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of the cardiovascular risk factors (hypertension, obesity, physical inactivity, dyslipidemia and smoking) among diabetic patients at the diabetic clinic of Jimma ...

  18. Adipsic diabetes insipidus in pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janus, Dominika Malgorzata; Wojcik, Malgorzata; Zygmunt-Górska, Agata; Wyrobek, Lukasz; Urbanik, Andrzej; Starzyk, Jerzy Bogdan

    2014-12-01

    To present symptoms, complications and proposition of management protocol in children diagnosed with adipsic diabetes insipidus (aDI). Clinical and biochemical analysis of six pediatric patients diagnosed with aDI, four boys aged 5, 13, 16, and 17 y and two girls aged 2.5 and 10 y. The etiology of aDI was germinoma (n = 2), extensive surgery due to optic glioma (n = 1) and astrocytoma (n = 1), congenital brain malformations (n = 1) and complications secondary to bacterial meningitis (n = 1). Two patients had severely impaired vision and two had hemiparesis. In all the patients, loss of thirst reflex was observed. The serum electrolytes in all patients showed sodium concentration from 159 to 176.6 mmol/L with plasma osmolality from above 297 mOsmol/kg. Polyuria was absent in three most severely dehydrated patients on admission. In two patients in whom DDAVP (1-desamino-8-D-arginine vasopressin; Desmopressin) therapy was withdrawn based on lack of polyuria deep venous thrombosis developed. Lack of polydipsia and polyuria, the key symptoms of diabetes insipidus (DI), may delay the diagnosis of aDI and may lead to severe complications of chronic hyperosmolar status. The fluid intake in patients diagnosed with aDI need to be supervised daily based on calculated constant volume of oral fluids, daily measurements of fluid balance, body weight and sodium levels, especially in patients whose vision is compromised or who are physically unable to take care of themselves.

  19. Relationship between serum adiponectin concentration and diabetic nephropathy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Wei; Yang Yuzhi; Li Xianhou; Feng Kun; Wang Dan

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the relationship between serum adiponectin concentration and diabetic nephropathy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods: The serum adiponectin concentrations were measured with RIA in 163 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and 50 controls. Results: In the diabetic patients, serum adiponectin concentrations were significantly higher in patients with macro albuminuria (n = 54) than those inpatients with microalbuminuria (n = 57) (P 0.05). Adiponectin concentrations were higher in women than in men, but there was no significant difference (P > 0.05). Conclusion: Serum adiponectin concentrations are increased in type 2 diabetic patients with advanced nephropathy. The kidney seems to be involved in the metabolism and excretion of adiponectin. Adiponectin may play important roles in the onset and development of diabetic nephropathy. (authors)

  20. Diabetisk nefropati. Uaendret forekomst hos patienter med insulinkraevende diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossing, P; Rossing, K; Jacobsen, P

    1996-01-01

    Recently, a dramatic decline in the cumulative incidence of diabetic nephropathy (less than 10% after 25 years of diabetes) has been reported in IDDM patients diagnosed between 1961 and 1980. In a clinic based study we assessed recent trends in the incidence of diabetic nephropathy. All 356...... patients in whom IDDM was diagnosed before the age of 41 years between 1965 and 1979, identified in 1984 were followed to 1991 or to death. The cumulative incidence of diabetic nephropathy (urinary albumin excretion 300 mg/24 hours in two out of three consecutive samples) after 15 years of diabetes...... and in 1991 were (cumulative incidence (SE)): 18 (4)% and 35 (5)% (onset of diabetes 1965-69, n = 113), 20 (4)% and 35 (5)% (onset of diabetes 1970-74, n = 130), and 16 (5)% (onset of diabetes 1975-79, n = 113), respectively (ns). The mean (SE) haemoglobin A1c measured yearly beginning in 1984 was higher...

  1. Predictors of Diabetic Retinopathy in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and end‑stage renal disease respectively in adults of both ... Departments of Medicine, and 1Ophthalmology, Era's Lucknow Medical ... The collected data included age, gender, duration of diabetes and ..... also shown to be effective in preventing DR in individuals .... retinopathy and diabetic macular edema disease severity.

  2. Assessment of Ramadan Education and Knowledge Among Diabetic Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almalki, Mussa Hussain; Hussen, Ibtihal; Khan, Shawana A; Almaghamsi, Abdulrahman; Alshahrani, Fahad

    2018-01-01

    During Ramadan, Muslims fast from dawn until dusk for one lunar month every year. Most of the Muslim patients with diabetes are unaware of the potential complications that can occur while fasting, such as hypoglycemia. The aim of this study is to assess the the patient education level and patients' overall awareness of any possible complications that could occur while fasting during Ramadan and to determine how these patients deal with these complications. We conducted a cross-sectional study and surveyed diabetic patients about their diabetes-related knowledge over a period of 4 months from the outpatient clinic at the Obesity, Endocrine, and Metabolism Center at King Fahad Medical City. Patients were included if they were ≥16 years and if they had been receiving treatment for at least 1 year before the study, irrespective of the medications used; patients were also asked about the presence or absence of complications. This study included 477 patients (325 women and 152 men). Most patients (297; 62.3%) had type 2 diabetes. The patients' mean age was 39.72 ± 15.29 years, and the mean duration of diabetes was 10.80 ± 5.88 years. During the preceding Ramadan, 76% of patients reported fasting, whereas 58% said that they monitored their blood glucose levels once per day. Hypoglycemic episodes were reported in 60.3% of cases with type 2 diabetes and in 8.3% of cases with type 1 diabetes. Among those who had hypoglycemia, 2.8% of patients with type 1 diabetes and 17.8% with type 2 diabetes broke their fast. Finally, 54% of patients reported that their health care providers offered them instructions on diabetes management during Ramadan. Ramadan health education in diabetes can encourage, improve, and guide patients to change their lifestyles during Ramadan while minimizing the risk of acute complications.

  3. Optimizing postpartum care for the patient with gestational diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Noelle G; Niznik, Charlotte M; Yee, Lynn M

    2017-09-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus poses well-established risks to both the mother and infant. As >50% of women with gestational diabetes mellitus will develop type 2 diabetes mellitus in their lifetime, performing postpartum oral glucose tolerance testing is paramount to initiation of appropriate lifestyle interventions and pharmacologic therapy. Nonetheless, test completion among women with gestational diabetes mellitus is estimated to be diabetes mellitus. Based on existing evidence, we propose best practices for the postpartum care of women with gestational diabetes mellitus: (1) enhanced patient support for identifying long-term health care providers, (2) patient-centered medical home utilization when possible, (3) patient and provider test reminders, and (4) formalized obstetrician-primary care provider hand offs using the Situation Background Assessment Recommendation (SBAR) mnemonic. These strategies deserve future investigation to solidify a multilevel approach for identifying and preventing the continuum of diabetes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Hypoglycemia in Patients with Diabetes and Renal Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Alsahli, Mazen; Gerich, John E.

    2015-01-01

    This article summarizes our current knowledge of the epidemiology, pathogenesis, and morbidity of hypoglycemia in patients with diabetic kidney disease and reviews therapeutic limitations in this situation.

  5. Hypoglycemia in Patients with Diabetes and Renal Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsahli, Mazen; Gerich, John E

    2015-05-13

    This article summarizes our current knowledge of the epidemiology, pathogenesis, and morbidity of hypoglycemia in patients with diabetic kidney disease and reviews therapeutic limitations in this situation.

  6. Trigeminal small-fibre dysfunction in patients with diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agostino, R.; Cruccu, G.; Iannetti, G. D.

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To investigate trigeminal small-fibre function in patients with diabetes mellitus. Methods: In 52 diabetic patients we studied the trigeminal laser evoked potentials after stimulation of the skin bordering the lower lip. In the 21 patients with the severest peripheral nerve damage we a...

  7. Lipid profile among diabetes patients in Gaborone, Botswana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lipid profile among diabetes patients in Gaborone, Botswana. ... in males, but there was no difference in LDL levels between type 1 and 2 DM patients. ... associated with exercise, smoking or alcohol consumption in the DM patients studied.

  8. Which increases depressive symptoms in obese patients, hypertension or diabetes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakir Özgür Keskek

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Depression and obesity are common disorders. Obesity is also predictive of several chronic diseases like hypertension and diabetes. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare depression frequency of obese patients with hypertension or diabetes. Methods: Weight, height and body mass index (BMI were measured. The definition of obesity was a body mass index (weight (kg/height (m2 ≥30 kg/m2. Obese patients with hypertension or diabetes were documented. All participants had a Beck Depression Inventory (BDI evaluation. Results: A total of 389 subjects were included, of whom 100, 101, 92, 96 participants were healthy, obese, obese with hypertension, obese with diabetes, respectively. Beck Depression Inventory scores of obese patients, obese patients with hypertension or diabetes were higher compared to the control group. BDI scores of obese patients with diabetes were higher compared to obese and obese with hypertension subjects.

  9. Increased left ventricular mass in normotensive type 1 diabetic patients with diabetic nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sato, A; Tarnow, L; Parving, H H

    1998-01-01

    in normotensive type 1 diabetic patients with and without nephropathy. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: M-mode and Doppler echocardiography was performed in 17 type 1 diabetic patients with nephropathy (albuminuria [median (range)], 345 (135-2,846) mg/24 h) and compared with 34 normotensive, normoalbuminuric (10 [3......-30] mg/24 h) type 1 diabetic patients matched for arterial blood pressure (mean +/- SD) ([134/77] +/- [13/7] vs. [129/78] +/- [12/7] mmHg), age (40 +/- 11 vs. 42 +/- 10 years), duration of diabetes (28 +/- 7 vs. 28 +/- 6 years), and BMI (24.2 +/- 4.2 vs. 24.6 +/- 2.4 kg/m2). RESULTS: Left ventricular......OBJECTIVE: Diabetic nephropathy increases the risk of premature cardiovascular disease and sudden death, particularly in type 1 diabetic patients. One possible mechanism for this risk may be left ventricular hypertrophy. In our study, we aimed to evaluate left ventricular structure and function...

  10. Type 2 diabetes and pre-diabetic abnormalities in patients with bipolar disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leopold, Karolina; Reif, Andreas; Haack, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Abnormalities in the glucose metabolism cause nervous and organic damage and are a cardiovascular risk factor. They could be a main cause for the increased morbidity and mortality rates found in patients with bipolar disorders. The exact prevalence of diabetes and pre-diabetic...... quality were assessed. RESULTS: Diabetes mellitus was found in 7% of the patients, pre-diabetic abnormalities in 27%. The group of patients with abnormalities in the glucose metabolism had significantly lower quality of life and global functioning. Higher BMI, leptin, triglycerides and CRP levels...

  11. Decrease in toe pinch force in male type 2 diabetic patients with diabetic nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataoka, Hiroaki; Miyatake, Nobuyuki; Kitayama, Naomi; Murao, Satoshi; Tanaka, Satoshi

    2018-06-01

    The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to investigate the toe pinch force (TPF) of type 2 diabetic patients with diabetic nephropathy by disease stage, and to clarify the factors affecting the TPF. Seventy-four men with diabetic nephropathy (age: 62.7 ± 8.9 years, duration of diabetes: 14.2 ± 8.6 years) were enrolled. According to the staging of diabetic nephropathy, TPF and knee extension force (KEF) were compared among three groups: normoalbuminuria, microalbuminuria, and overt nephropathy. In addition, we investigated factors influencing TPF and KEF by performing multiple regression analysis. Normoalbuminuria group, microalbuminuria group, and overt nephropathy group included 26, 25, and 23 patients, respectively. The TPF of the overt nephropathy group (3.15 ± 0.75 kg) was significantly lower than that of the normoalbuminuria (4.2 ± 0.7 kg, p diabetic polyneuropathy (DPN) and diabetic nephropathy were determinant factors of the TPF; and age, body mass index, and diabetic nephropathy were determinant factors of the KEF. We found in male patients with diabetic nephropathy, the TPF and KEF decreased with progression of diabetic nephropathy. Furthermore, our findings suggest diabetic nephropathy and DPN are critically involved in the reduction of TPF and KEF.

  12. Progress of the patients with diabetes mellitus who were managed with the staged diabetes management framework

    OpenAIRE

    Zanetti, Maria Lúcia; Otero, Liudmila Miyar; Peres, Denise Siqueira; Santos, Manoel Antônio dos; Guimarães, Fernanda Pontin de Mattos; Freitas, Maria Cristina Foss

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the progress of patients with diabetes mellitus seen by health care team members who followed the Staged Diabetes Management framework. METHODS: This descriptive, prospective, and longitudinal study was conducted in a period of 12 months. The sample consisted of 54 patients with diabetes mellitus. Data were collected in three occasions through interviews: P0 - at beginning of the study; P6 - in six months; and, P12 - at the end of the study. RESULTS: There was an increa...

  13. Candida colonization on the denture of diabetic and non-diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hossein Lotfi-Kamran

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oral candidiasis is a common opportunistic infection in diabetic patients. Presence of denture in the oral cavity of diabetic patients can promote Candida colonization and results in the higher incidence of oral and systemic candidiasis. The general purpose of the present study was to evaluate and compare Candida colonization in denture of diabetic patients and non-diabetic control group. Methods: In current case-control study, samples for mycological examinations were collected from the palatal impression surface of maxillary dentures from 92 edentulous patients including 46 dia-betic and 46 non-diabetic denture wearers. All samples were cultured directly on sabouraud agar me-dium and isolated colonies were counted and identified based on specific tests. Data were statistically analyzed using Mann-Whitney and Spearman correlation tests. Results: The higher density of isolated colonies was seen in diabetic group in compare with control group (P = 0.0001. There was a statistically significant correlation between the blood glucose level (P = 0.0001 and the duration of denture usage (P = 0.022 with the colonization of Candida on den-ture of diabetic patients. C. albicans was the most common isolated Candida species in both groups, though diabetic patients with dentures had more non-albicans Candida isolated from their dentures compared to non-diabetic patients. Conclusions: Mycological findings from the present study revealed that diabetes mellitus can in-crease colonization of Candida in denture and mouth. By elimination of local and systemic factors in diabetic patients and improving their oral health care, Candida colonization and the risk of oral and systemic candidiasis will be decreased.

  14. The management of ankle fractures in patients with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wukich, Dane K; Kline, Alex J

    2008-07-01

    Patients with diabetes mellitus have higher complication rates following both open and closed management of ankle fractures. Diabetic patients with neuropathy or vasculopathy have higher complication rates than both diabetic patients without these comorbidities and nondiabetic patients. Unstable ankle fractures in diabetic patients without neuropathy or vasculopathy are best treated with open reduction and internal fixation with use of standard techniques. Patients with neuropathy or vasculopathy are at increased risk for both soft-tissue and osseous complications, including delayed union and nonunion. Careful soft-tissue management as well as stable, rigid internal fixation are crucial to obtaining a good outcome. Prolonged non-weight-bearing and subsequently protected weight-bearing are recommended following both operative and nonoperative management of ankle fractures in patients with diabetes.

  15. [Superficial mycoses: comparative study between type 2 diabetic patients and a non-diabetic control group].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Humbría, Leila; Richard-Yegres, Nicole; Pérez-Blanco, Maigualida; Yegres, Francisco; Mendoza, Mireya; Acosta, Arnaldo; Hernández, Rosaura; Zárraga, Eluz

    2005-03-01

    Superficial mycoses are considered to affect more frequently patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM-2), specially onychomycosis and Tinea pedis. The purpose of this study was to compare the dermatophytoses, candidiasis and Pitiriasis versicolor frequency between 40 patients with DM-2 and 40 healthy persons of either sex, 40 years old or more. Clinical, metabolic, mycologic and inmunologic studies against Candida albicans, were carried out. Both diabetics 75% (30/40) and controls 65% (26/40) presented a high frequency of superficial mycoses (no significant difference p = 0.329). Pitiriasis versicolor was not detected in diabetic patients. They presented Tinea unguium, concomitant with Tinea pedis, with a higher frequency. The predominant dermatophyte was Trichophyton rubrum 18/23 (78%) in diabetics and 8/16 (50%) in non diabetics. Candida was isolated as commensal from oral mucous: 23/40 (58%) in diabetics and 21/40 (52%) in non diabetics (serotipo A was the more frequent), and from onychomycosis: 11/40 (28%) in diabetics and 12/40 (30%) in non diabetics. The immunological response was the same in both groups: celular 100%, humoral 20%. No statistical correlation among superficial mycoses, blood glucose level, glycosylated hemoglobin values or the time suffering the disease was observed. The high susceptibility to dermatophytes and Candida sp. infection showed to be associated with age and no with the diabetic type 2 condition in those patients.

  16. Diabetic Ketoacidosis in a Patient with Acromegaly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen-Ling Chen

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus develops in about 10% of acromegalic patients, usually secondary to insulin resistance caused by growth hormone excess. Diabetic ketoacidosis is a result of relative insulin deficiency and is a rare feature of acromegaly. Here, we present one case of this disorder. A 57-year-old man came to the emergency room due to 2 weeks of dizziness. He also had polyuria, polydipsia, nausea, diplopia, blurred vision and dysarthria. His plasma glucose level was 32.06 mmol/L, plasma osmolarity was 322 mOsm/L, arterial pH was 7.30, level of bicarbonates was 18 mmol/L, urine ketones was 4+, and HbA1c was 14.1%. No specific cause for the development of this metabolic derangement could be found. He displayed clinical features of acromegaly during admission, which was confirmed by an elevated growth hormone level and pituitary macroadenoma shown on magnetic resonance imaging. The patient underwent total transsphe-noid tumor removal 2 weeks later; plasma glucose levels became normal thereafter.

  17. Non-diabetic renal disease in patients with type-2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Yaqub

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic nephropathy (DN is the leading cause of end-stage renal disease in diabetics worldwide, yet most patients with type-2 diabetes mellitus are not formally evaluated with a renal biopsy. The diagnosis is almost always based on clinical grounds. A wide spectrum of non-diabetic renal disease (NDRD is reported to occur in patients with type-2 diabetes. It has been estimated that up to one-third of all diabetic patients who present with proteinuria are suffering from NDRD. The aim of this analysis was to evaluate the prevalence and etiology of NDRD in patients with type-2 diabetes. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of patients with type-2 diabetes who underwent kidney biopsy on clinical suspicion of NDRD (absence of diabetic retinopathy and/or neuropathy; short duration of diabetes, i.e. less than five years from January 2003 through December 2007 at the Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi. Based on the biopsy findings, patients were grouped as Group-I, isolated NDRD; Group-II, NDRD with underlying DN; and Group-III, isolated DN. Of 68 patients studied, 75% were males and the mean age was 56 years. The mean duration of diabetes was nine years. Group-I included 34 patients (52%, Group-II included 11 patients (17% and Group-III included 23 patients (31%. Among the Group-I patients, the mean age was 56 years (41-77 years. The most common NDRDs were acute interstitial nephritis (32%, diffuse proliferative glomerulonephritis (17%; membranous nephropathy (12% and crescentic glomerulonephritis (12%. Among Group-II, the mean age was 60 years (46-71 years, and the most common lesion was interstitial nephritis superimposed on underlying DN (63% cases. Among Group-III, the mean age was 53 years (42- 80 years. The mean proteinuria was 5, 6.3 and 7.3 g/24 h of urine collection in Groups I, II and III, respectively (P = NS. The mean duration of diabetes was 7.3, 11.7 and 10.7 years in Groups I, II and III, respectively. The duration of

  18. Depression and quality of life in patients with diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schram, Miranda T; Baan, Caroline A; Pouwer, Francois

    2009-01-01

    Diabetes patients are known to have a worse quality of life than individuals without diabetes. They also have an increased risk for depressive symptoms, which may have an additional negative effect on their quality of life. This systematic review summarizes the current knowledge on the associatio...... symptoms. Therefore, increased awareness and monitoring for depression is needed within different diabetes care settings.......Diabetes patients are known to have a worse quality of life than individuals without diabetes. They also have an increased risk for depressive symptoms, which may have an additional negative effect on their quality of life. This systematic review summarizes the current knowledge on the association...... between depressive symptoms and quality of life in individuals with diabetes. A systematic literature search using MEDLINE, Psychinfo, Social SciSearch, SciSearch and EMBASE was conducted from January 1990 until September 2007. We identified studies that compared quality of life between diabetic...

  19. Lavkulhydratdiæt til patienter med type 2-diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gram-Kampmann, Eva-Marie; Olsen, Michael Hecht; Beck-Nielsen, Henning

    2016-01-01

    knowledge of low-carbohydrate diets and how they affect glycaemic control, diabetic dyslipidaemia, weight and markers of cardiovascular risk, and our aim is to aid medical practitioners in guiding patients with Type 2 diabetes who wish to try a low-carbohydrate diet in order to take control of their disease.......Recently, low-carbohydrate diets have increased in popularity as a method to achieve glycaemic control and weight loss in Type 2 diabetes patients. However, there is a lack of consistency and long-term results in existing studies on patients with Type 2 diabetes. In this review, we address current...

  20. Risk factors for diabetic retinopathy in Kuwaiti type 2 diabetic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Adsani, Afaf M.S.

    2007-01-01

    To determine the risk factors associated with diabetic retinopathy in Kuwaiti subjects with type 2 diabetes. Kuwaiti subjects with type 2 diabetes (n=165) attending the Diabetic Clinic at Al-sabah Hospital, Kuwait between October 2000 and March 2005 were screened for diabetic retinopathy. Any diabetic retinopathy was found in 40% while 20.6% had sight threatening retinopathy. Mild NPDR was present in 21.2%, moderate to severe non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR) in 7.9%, and proliferative diabetic retinopathy in 3.0%. Maculopathy was present in 10.3% and 7.9 % pf patients were photocoagulated. Compared to those without retinopathy, diabetic patients with any retinopathy were significantly older (51.7+-10.3 versus 47.2+-9.5 years; p<0.005), had longer duration of diabetes (13.1+-6.3 versus 4.7 +-5.4 years; p<0.0001), higher systolic blood pressure (142.9+-23.0 versus 130.3+-20.2; p<0.0001) and poor glycemic control (Hemoglobin A1c=10.1+-2.4 versus 8.9+-2.3; p<0.005). The prevalence of hypertension and nephropathy was significantly higher in patients with any retinopathy than those without retinopathy (70.8% versus 49.5%; p<0.01 and 64.4% versus 30.8%; p<0.0001) respectively. Longer duration of diabetes and presence of nephropathy was the most significant independent factors associated with any retinopathy and sight-threatening retinopathy. Treatment with sulphonylurea or insulin, and poor glycemic control were other significant independent factors associated with any retinopathy. Longer duration of diabetes, presence of nephropathy, glycemic control and mode of treatment were the most significant independent factors of diabetic retinopathy. However, population-based study is warranted to identify the risk factors, as well as the prevalence of diabetic retinopathy. (author)

  1. Non-diabetic renal disease in patients with type 2 diabetes: a single centre study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jian-Zhen; Wang, Rong

    2018-04-01

    Non-diabetic renal disease (NDRD) has been widely known in diabetic patients. The clinical differentiation between diabetic nephropathy (DN) and NDRD is still not so clear and effective. To analyse the pathological characteristics and distribution of renal injury in selected type 2 diabetic patients. Comparison between DN and NDRD in clinical characteristics, to find important predictors for NDRD. To conduct retrospective analysis of clinical, laboratory and pathohistological data of type 2 diabetic patients in whom renal biopsies were performed from March 2010 to September 2014 in Shandong Provincial Hospital affiliated to Shandong University (n = 88). According to the findings of renal biopsy, the incidences of DN, NDRD and DN complicated with NDRD were 20.46, 72.73 and 6.82% respectively. The most common NDRD found were: membranous nephropathy, followed by IgA nephropathy and focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. In multivariate logistic-analysis, fasting blood glucose (odds ratio (OR) 0.714; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.543-0.939; P = 0.016) and absence of diabetic retinopathy (OR 18.602; 95% CI = 2.176-159.018; P = 0.003) were independent predictors of NDRD. This study confirmed a considerably high prevalence of NDRD in type 2 diabetic patients with renal injury. As some cases of NDRD are readily treatable or remittable, we should consider renal biopsy in selected diabetic patients with renal involvement, especially in those with effective blood glucose control and the absence of diabetic retinopathy. © 2017 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  2. Diabetic Foot Syndrome as a Possible Cardiovascular Marker in Diabetic Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuttolomondo, Antonino; Maida, Carlo; Pinto, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic foot ulcerations have been extensively reported as vascular complications of diabetes mellitus associated with a high degree of morbidity and mortality; in fact, some authors showed a higher prevalence of major, previous and new-onset, cardiovascular, and cerebrovascular events in diabetic patients with foot ulcers than in those without these complications. This is consistent with the fact that in diabetes there is a complex interplay of several variables with inflammatory metabolic disorders and their effect on the cardiovascular system that could explain previous reports of high morbidity and mortality rates in diabetic patients with amputations. Involvement of inflammatory markers such as IL-6 plasma levels and resistin in diabetic subjects confirmed the pathogenetic issue of the “adipovascular” axis that may contribute to cardiovascular risk in patients with type 2 diabetes. In patients with diabetic foot, this “adipovascular axis” expression in lower plasma levels of adiponectin and higher plasma levels of IL-6 could be linked to foot ulcers pathogenesis by microvascular and inflammatory mechanisms. The purpose of this review is to focus on the immune inflammatory features of DFS and its possible role as a marker of cardiovascular risk in diabetes patients. PMID:25883983

  3. Higher mortality of patients on haemodialysis with pancreatic diabetes compared to type 2-diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bodlaj Gert

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In rare cases (1-8% diabetic patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD suffer from diabetic nephropathy (dNP due to pancreatic diabetes mellitus (PDM. Aim of this study was to investigate differences in the outcome of patients with PDM and those with type 2 diabetes. In a retrospective study we evaluated 96 diabetic patients, who started hemodialysis (HD in our dialysis centre (1997-2005. In 12 patients PMD was diagnosed, and 84 patients had type 2 diabetes. In both groups we compared vascular risk factors and prevalence of vascular diseases at the start of dialysis. We also evaluated incidence of malnutrition, and 5-year survival in both patient groups. The vascular risk factors were similar in both patient groups, also the prevalence of vascular diseases at the initiation of HD was similar in both groups. In the patients with PDM the mean BMI (kg/m2 was lower (22 + 3 versus 25 + 3, and also their serum albumin was lower (2.7 + 0.3 versus 3.4 + 0.3 g/dl, p Conclusions in HD-treated patients with type 2 diabetes or PDM the prevalence of vascular diseases was not significantly different. The lower survival of PDM patients can be related to poor nutrition status.

  4. Emotional disturbances among adult diabetic patients attending a diabetic clinic in a Malaysian general hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali SabriRadeef1, Ramli Musa, NikNurFatnoonBintiNik Ahmad, Ghasak Ghazi Faisal

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Emotional disturbances such as depression, anxiety and stress play an important role in the management of diabetes mellitus since their presence can adversely affect glycemic control, quality of life and compliance with medications. Despite this, emotional disturbances are consistently under-diagnosed and under-treated by physicians in general practice. Objectives: This study aims to determine the prevalence and severity of emotional disturbances among diabetic patients Methodology: This is a cross sectional study conducted on a sample of 200 patients with diabetes mellitus attending the diabetic clinic at the Hospital Tengku Ampuan Afzan, Pahang state, Malaysia. The prevalence and severity of depressive, anxiety and stress symptoms were assessed in those diabetic patients by using the self-rating Bahasa Malaysia version of the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scales (DASS-42. Results: The prevalence of depression, anxiety, and stress among diabetic patients was 13.5%, 28%, 11% respectively. Most of the patients with emotional disturbances had moderate depression and anxiety symptoms. However, stress symptoms were mild. Although females showed higher prevalence of emotional disturbances, only anxiety was significantly higher than males. Conclusion: Diabetic patients are at risk to develop psychiatric illnesses in the form of depression, anxiety and stress. Anxiety symptoms were more prominent than depression and stress in diabetic patients

  5. Detrusor overactivity in diabetic and non-diabetic patients: is there a difference?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Golabek, Tomasz

    2013-07-22

    To compare urodynamic characteristics in patients with idiopathic detrusor overactivity (IDO) with those of an age matched cohort with diabetes mellitus (DM) and detrusor overactivity (DO). Secondly, to determine whether urodynamic features could help distinguish these two groups of patients.

  6. Prevalence of dry eye syndrome and diabetic retinopathy in type 2 diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afkhami-Ardekani Mohammad

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study was performed to assess the prevalence of dry eye syndrome and diabetic retinopathy (DR in type 2 diabetic patients and their contributing factors. Methods 199 type 2 diabetic patients referred to Yazd Diabetes Research Center were consecutively selected. All Subjects were assessed by questionnaire about other diseases and drugs. Dry eye syndrome was assessed with Tear break up time tests and Schirmer. All the subjects underwent indirect ophthalmoscopy and retinal color photography. DR was graded according to early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy (ETDRS criteria. Results Of 199 subjects, 108 patients (54.3% suffer from dry eye syndrome. Although dry eye syndrome was more common in older and female patients, this association was not significant. But there was significantly association between dry eye syndrome and duration of diabetes (P = 0.01. Dry eye syndrome was more frequent in diabetic patients with DR (P = 0.02. DR was found in 140 patients (70.35%, which included 34 patients (17.1% with mild non proliferative DR (NPDR, 34 patients (17.1% with moderate NPDR, 22 patients (11.1% with severe NPDR and 25 patients (25.1% with proliferative DR (PDR. There were significant relation between age, sex and duration of diabetes and DR. Conclusion In this study the prevalence of dry eye syndrome was 54.3%. Diabetes and dry eyes appear to have a common association. Further studies need to be undertaken to establish an etiologic relationship. However, examination for dry eye should be an integral part of the assessment of diabetic eye disease.

  7. Vaegtanamnesen for patienter med nyopdaget type 2-diabetes--sekundaerpublikation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Fine Olivarius, Niels; Richelsen, Bjørn; Siersma, Volkert

    2008-01-01

    The aim was to estimate and illustrate the weight history of 1,320 newly diagnosed diabetic patients according to patient characteristics at diagnosis. The median recalled weight gain from age 20 to diabetes diagnosis at a median age of 65.3 years was 14.7 kg. The average weight gain from 10 year....... Udgivelsesdato: 2008-Nov-3...

  8. Nephropathy in patients with recently diagonised type 2 diabetes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Subjects: Patients who were newly diagnosed or had had type 2 diabetes for 2 years or less. Main outcome measures: Microalbuminuria, lipids, glycated haemoglobin, fasting blood glucose and blood pressure. Results: One hundred and thirty nine patients who had type 2 diabetes mellitus for ≤2 yrs were seen, but only ...

  9. Musculoskeletal pain in patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molsted, S; Tribler, J; Snorgaard, O

    2012-01-01

    The aims were to investigate the prevalence of musculoskeletal pain in patients with type 2 diabetes and demonstrate possible associated factors.......The aims were to investigate the prevalence of musculoskeletal pain in patients with type 2 diabetes and demonstrate possible associated factors....

  10. Vaegtanamnesen for patienter med nyopdaget type 2-diabetes--sekundaerpublikation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olivarius, Niels de Fine; Richelsen, Bjørn; Siersma, Volkert

    2008-01-01

    The aim was to estimate and illustrate the weight history of 1,320 newly diagnosed diabetic patients according to patient characteristics at diagnosis. The median recalled weight gain from age 20 to diabetes diagnosis at a median age of 65.3 years was 14.7 kg. The average weight gain from 10 years...

  11. Problems faced by newly diagnosed diabetes mellitus patients at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Diabetes mellitus can be a frightening experience for newly diagnosed patients. The aim of this study was to determine and describe the problems faced by newly diagnosed diabetes mellitus patients at primary healthcare facilities at Mopani district, Limpopo Province. A qualitative, descriptive and contextual research ...

  12. Insulin Storage by Patients with Diabetes Mellitus in Jos, Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To determine how insulin is stored at home among insulin-treated patients with Diabetes mellitus in Jos, Nigeria, 150 such patients attending the Diabetes clinic of Jos University Teaching Hospital were interviewed. It was found that 87 (58%) kept their insulin in a refrigerator. Most of the remainder, 43 (28.7%) stored insulin ...

  13. Different Pathophysiological Phenotypes among Newly Diagnosed Type 2 Diabetes Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stidsen, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) can be considered a syndrome with several different pathophysiological mechanisms leading to hyperglycemia. Nonetheless, T2D is treated according to algorithms as if it was one disease entity. Methods: We investigated the prevalence of different pathophysiological phenotypes...... or secondary diabetes), classic obesity-associated insulin resistant diabetes ( f-P-C-peptide >= 568 pmol/l) and a normoinsulinopenic group (333 age of our new T2D patients was 61 years (range 21-95 years), 57% were men. We found that 3.0% newly diagnosed T2D patients...... suffered from LADA, 3.9% from secondary diabetes, 6.0% from steroid induced diabetes 5.9% had insulinopenic diabetes, whereas 56.7% presented the classic obesity-associated insulin-resistant phenotype. 24.6% was classified as normoinsulinopenic patients. Conclusion: We conclude that newly diagnosed T2D...

  14. Diabetic ketoacidosis characteristics and differences in type 1 versus type 2 diabetes patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rashid, M.O.; Sheikh, A.; Salam, A.; Farooq, S.; Kiran, Z.; Islam, N.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Diabetes is undoubtedly one of the most challenging health problems of the 21st century. It is well known that diabetes once develop can lead to several complications. Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is one of the life-threatening complications of diabetes. This study was designed to determine the frequency of DKA in diabetes patients and find out the clinical and biochemical determinants of DKA. Methods: This descriptive study was conducted at Aga Khan University Hospital (AKUH) Karachi, Pakistan from January 2010 to February 2016. All known or newly diagnosed diabetic patients of >16 years of age irrespective of gender and type of diabetes were included. Information regarding patient’s demographics, presenting symptoms, precipitating causes of DKA, biochemical profiles and outcome at the time of discharge was collected. Results: Majority (54.7%) had moderate and 12.4% had severe DKA at presentation. Previous history of DKA was found higher in type 1 diabetes patients (T1DM) (14%) as compare to (4%) type 2 diabetes patients (T2DM) (p<0.05). DKA severity was observed more (12%) in newly diagnosed (T1DM) (p<0.05). Comorbidities were found more (81%) in (T2DM) (p<0.05) Mortality was also observed higher in Type 2 diabetes patients (p<0.05). Conclusion: Majority of the diabetics had moderate to severe DKA at presentation. Mortality and morbidity related with DKA was found considerably higher among patients with T2DM while infection, myocardial infarction and stroke found as triggering factors in these patients. (author)

  15. Comparison of the clinical parameters of benign prostate hyperplasia in diabetic and non diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levent Ozcan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We evaluated the correlation between benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH measures and diabetes mellitus in men with benign prostate hyperplasia in a prospective study. Materials and methods: Between 2008-2012, 100 diabetic and 200 non diabetic patients undergoing surgery due to benign prostate hyperplasia were enrolled in the study. The parameters evaluated for each patients included prostate volume, fasting blood glucose, HbA1c, total testosterone, total prostatic specific antigen (T-PSA, triglicerides, total cholesterol and body mass index (BMI. A questionnaire including international prostate symptom score (IPSS was sdministered and uroflow test measuring the peak urinary flow rate was performed to appreciate the complaints of the patients objectively. Results: Diabetic patients are more likely to have larger prostate volume. The symptom score evaluated by IPSS and post micturition residual volume were also significantly higher in diabetic groups. The other statistically significant different parameter between two groups was total testosterone that diabetic patients tend to have lower levels. Diabetic counterparts were established to have higher BMI. No statistically significant differentiation was observed about trigliceryde and total cholesterol levels and uroflow rates. Conclusions: Our study suggests a positive correlation between high prostate volume and diagnosis of diabetes mellitus in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia. We also observed a positive correlation between symptom scores and post micturion residual volumes and diagnosis of diabetes mellitus suggesting that the presence of diabetes is related to both static and dynamic components of benign prostate hyperplasia. Additionally testosterone levels were lower in diabetic patients. Further studies need to confirm these relationship in a larger population.

  16. Glomerular size- and charge selectivity in type 2 (non-insulin-dependent) diabetic patients with diabetic nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gall, M A; Rossing, P; Kofoed-Enevoldsen, A

    1994-01-01

    In an attempt to evaluate the mechanisms of proteinuria in diabetic kidney disease, we measured the renal clearances of albumin, total IgG, and IgG4 in 20 male Type 2 (non-insulin-dependent) diabetic patients with diabetic glomerulosclerosis (biopsy proven), in 10 male Type 2 diabetic patients...

  17. Sociodemographic factors responsible for blindness in diabetic Egyptian patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abueleinen KGI

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Khaled Gamal Ibraheem Abueleinen1, Hany El-Mekawey1, Yasser Sayed Saif2, Amr Khafagy1, Hoda Ibrahim Rizk3, Eman M Eltahlawy41Department of Ophthalmology, Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt; 2Department of Ophthalmology, Beni-Suef University, Beni-Suef, Egypt; 3Department of Public Health, Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt; 4Public Health and Community Medicine National Research Center, Cairo, EgyptPurpose: To evaluate factors behind the delay in diagnosis and treatment among Egyptian patients who present with complicated diabetic retinopathy.Methods: Observational cross-sectional study of diabetic patients with advanced diabetic retinopathy. Patients were asked to answer a questionnaire to assess the impact of several sociodemographic factors.Results: A total of 397 patients agreed to take the questionnaire. Diabetic vitreous hemorrhage was the most common ocular complication and was found in 359 patients (90.4%. A total of 158 (39.8% patients knew that diabetes mellitus can be sight threatening, while 240 (60.2% were not aware until they developed sight threatening complication. A total of 179 patients (45.1% had early retirement because of visual loss related to diabetes mellitus. Multivariate logistic regression has shown that education, internist, contact with other patients, and media were respectively significant in predicting the awareness of patients about the sight-threatening effect of diabetic retinopathy.Conclusion: Patient education regarding diabetes and diabetic eye disease is essential for early detection and compliance with treatment. Illiteracy has a significant impact on development of sight-threatening diabetic complications. The internist is the first line of prophylaxis. Media has to participate more in patient education.Keywords: blindness, education, laser photocoagulation, macular edema, vitreous hemorrhage

  18. Impact of endocrine and diabetes team consultation on hospital length of stay for patients with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levetan, C S; Salas, J R; Wilets, I F; Zumoff, B

    1995-07-01

    To determine whether consultation by an individual endocrinologist or by a multidisciplinary diabetes team (endocrinologist, diabetes nurse educator, and registered dietitian) can impact length of hospital stay of patients with diabetes. Hospital stays of consecutive patients with a principal diagnosis of diabetes were compared. Forty-three patients were seen by an individual endocrine consultant and 27 were managed by the internist alone. Thirty-four patients were seen in consultation by the diabetes team. All consultations were performed at the request of the primary physician. There were no statistically significant differences among groups with respect to age, duration of diabetes, admitting diagnosis, glucose levels, or concomitant acute or chronic illness. Average length of stay of diabetes-team patients was 3.6 +/- 1.7 days, 56% shorter than the value, 8.2 +/- 6.2 days, of patients in the no-consultation group (P team consultation. Three million Americans are hospitalized annually with diabetes at a cost of $65 billion. A team approach to their inpatient care may reduce their hospital stays, resulting in considerable health and economic benefits.

  19. Diabetes Causation Beliefs Among Spanish-Speaking Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concha, Jeannie Belinda; Mayer, Sallie D; Mezuk, Briana R; Avula, Danielle

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore how the inquiry of cultural diabetes causation beliefs can improve Hispanic/Latino patient self-management. Two semistructured focus groups were conducted with 13 Hispanic/Latinos adults diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Prior to taking part in the group discussion, participants completed a demographic survey and the Illness Perception Questionnaire-Revised. The top 5 diabetes causation items endorsed by participants per the questionnaire included stress or worry, behavior, hereditary, diet/eating habits, and family problems/worries. The qualitative analysis revealed stress as a recurring theme for a cause of diabetes. Work stress was specifically identified as a contributor to unhealthy eating and diabetes. Most participants were aware of and believed in susto and referred to it as coraje (anger). Participants believed that asking patients about their diabetes causation beliefs and emotional status can help health professionals (1) better understand the patient and (2) identify and prioritize diabetes treatments. Participants also indicated that the role of doctors is important and the encouragement that they give to patients is clinically and spiritually valued. Stress was identified as a cause of diabetes in addition to unhealthy diets and heredity. Asking patients about diabetes causation beliefs and emotional status may help prioritize treatment and management goals. © 2015 The Author(s).

  20. The particular prediction of normal MPI in diabetic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Z.-F.; Li, S.-J.; Liu, H.-Y.; Liu, J.Z.; Li, X.F.; Cheng, Y.; Zhang, Y.W.; Wang, J.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Objectives: To explore the prognostic value of normal SPECT MPI in diabetic pts. Methods: 1371 consecutively registered pts suspected with CAD were studied using rest SPECT MPI, and 1047 cases (76.37%) were followed up successfully. The mean interval of following up was 33.25±14.95(1∼56) months, and even longer than 18 months for pts with no cardiac events (CE). Results: Of 1047 pts, 172 were diabetic. During the follow up period, there are 42 cardiac events in 172 diabetic patients, and 86 in 857 non-diabetics. Diabetic pts had significantly higher rates of cardiac events (24.4% versus 9.8%; chi-square 28.5, P<0.0001). In the 567 pts with normal MPI, there are 4 cardiac events in 54 diabetic pts and 6 cases in 513 nondiabetic pts. The diabetic pts had significantly higher rates of cardiac events compared with the non-diabetic pts (7.41% versus 1.17%, Fisher's Exact Test, P=0.01). Conclusions: A normal SPECT has a high negative predictive value, but diabetic patients had significantly higher cardiac events rate compared with non-diabetic patients, what ever the MPI is normal or abnormal. (author)

  1. Hyperglycemia and diabetes in patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cohen, D; Stolk, RP; Grobbee, DE; Gispen-De Wied, CC

    OBJECTIVE - Pharmacoepidemiological studies have shown an increased prevalence of diabetes in patients with schizophrenia. To address this issue, we decided to assess glucose metabolism in a population of patients With schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - Oral

  2. [Lower extremity amputation rates in diabetic patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cisneros-González, Nelly; Ascencio-Montiel, Iván Jesús; Libreros-Bango, Vita Norma; Rodríguez-Vázquez, Héctor; Campos-Hernández, Ángel; Dávila-Torres, Javier; Kumate-Rodríguez, Jesús; Borja-Aburto, Víctor Hugo

    2016-01-01

    The lower extremity amputations diminish the quality of life of patients with Diabetes Mellitus (DM). The aim of this study was to describe the lower extremity amputation rates in subjects with DM in the Mexican Social Security Institute (IMSS), comparing 2004 and 2013. A comparative cross-sectional study was done. Amputations were identified from the hospital records of System of Medical Statistics (DataMart). The DM patient census was obtained from the System of Integral Attention to Health. Major and minor amputations rates were expressed per 100,000 DM patients. We observed 2 334 340 and 3 416 643 DM patients during 2004 and 2013, respectively. The average age at the time of the amputation was similar in 2004 and 2013 (61.7 and 65.6 years old for minor and major amputations respectively). The major amputations rates were 100.9 and 111.1 per 100 000 subjects with DM in during 2004 and 2013 (p = 0.001); while minor amputations rates were 168.8 and 162.5 per 100 000 subjects with DM in during 2004 and 2013 respectively (p = 0.069). The lower extremity amputations rates at IMSS are very high compared with that reported in developed countries. The major amputations rate increased in 2013 compared with 2004.

  3. Diabetic retinopathy is associated with insulin resistance and cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction in type 2 diabetic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anan, Futoshi; Takayuki, Masaki; Takahashi, Naohiko; Nakagawa, Mikiko; Eshima, Nobuoki; Saikawa, Tetsunori; Yoshimatsu, Hironobu

    2009-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) and cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction are associated with high mortality in type 2 diabetic patients. This preliminary study was therefore designed to test the hypothesis that DR is associated with insulin resistance and cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction in type 2 diabetic patients without insulin treatment. Seventy persons were diagnosed to have type 2 diabetes in the examination from June 2004 to May 2006. The study group consisted of 29 type 2 diabetic patients with DR (age: 58±6 years, mean±standard deviation (s.d.)) and 41 type 2 diabetic patients with no DR (NDR) (n=41, 58±5 years). Cardiovascular autonomic function was assessed by baroreflex sensitivity (BRS), heart rate variability, plasma norepinephrine concentration and cardiac 123 I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) scintigraphic findings. DR patients had lower BRS, early and delayed 123 I-MIBG myocardial uptake values and higher percent washout rate (WR) of 123 I-MIBG than the NDR patients. With respect to metabolic findings, DR patients had higher fasting plasma insulin concentration (P 123 I-MIBG (P 123 I-MIBG are independently associated with DR in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. (author)

  4. [Abdominal ultrasonography in patients with diabetes mellitus. Part 1: Liver].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenssen, C; Pietsch, C; Gottschalk, U; Barreiros, A P; Teufel, A; Cui, X W; Dietrich, C F

    2015-04-01

    In patients with diabetes mellitus, abdominal ultrasonography is the appropriate diagnostic technique to detect and to follow-up secondary and accompanying diseases of the liver, the kidneys, the pancreas, the gastrointestinal tract and of abdominal vessels. Moreover, pancreatic and hepatic diseases may be realized which are of etiological importance for diabetes mellitus. Based on a systematic survey of the published literature, this review in 3 parts will describe the value of abdominal ultrasonography in patients with diabetes mellitus. Part 1 deals with the diagnostic relevance and particular findings of ultrasonographic methods in hepatic manifestations and complications of diabetes mellitus. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  5. Peripheral nervous system involvement in patients with diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. R. Kamchatnov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is a widespread disease often affecting peripheral nervous system. This include diabetic autonomous neuropathy that can endanger the patient's life. Timely detection of complications of diabetes mellitus as well as its adequate therapy can improve prognosis of the disease. The possibilities of Milgamma and Tiogamma for pathogenic therapy in patients with diabetic polyneuropathy are considered in this paper. Gabagamma can be effectively relieve neuropathic pain and used together with other drugs that normalize nerve tissue metabolism.

  6. The Kynurenine Pathway: a Proposed Mechanism Linking Diabetes and Periodontal Disease in Diabetic Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Rishabh Kapila; KS Nagesh; Asha R. Iyengar; Subash BV. Adiga

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disease characte-rized by dysregulation of carbohydrate, protein and lipid metabolism. Diabetes could result, in part, in activation of tryptophan metabolism. Diabetic patients are more susceptible to gingivitis and periodontitis than healthy subjects. The salivary kynurenine derivatives are also implicated in the onset and development of periodontal dis-ease in humans.The hypothesis: We propose that the tryptophan metabolites via kynurenine path...

  7. Presentation of frozen shoulder among diabetic and non-diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddin, Mohammad Moin; Khan, Aminuddin A; Haig, Andrew J; Uddin, Mohammad Kafil

    2014-12-01

    The literature is inconsistent regarding the level of pain and disability in frozen shoulder patients with or without diabetes mellitus. The aim of this study is to evaluate some demographic features of frozen shoulder patients and to look into the disparity of information by comparing the level of pain and disability due to frozen shoulder between diabetic and non-diabetic people. This is a prospective comparative study. People with frozen shoulder attending an outpatient department were selected by consecutive sampling. Disability levels were assessed by the Shoulder Pain & Disability Index (SPADI). Means of pain and disability scores were compared using unpaired t-test. Among 140 persons with shoulder pain 99 (71.4%) had frozen shoulder. From the participating 40 frozen shoulder patients, 26 (65%) were males and 14 (35%) were females. Seventeen participants (42.5%) were diabetic, two (5%) had impaired glucose tolerance and 21 (52.5%) patients were non-diabetic. Mean disability scores (SPADI) were 51 ± 15.5 in diabetic and 57 ± 16 in non-diabetic persons. The differences in pain and disability level were not statistically significance (respectively, p = 0.24 and p = 0.13 at 95% confidence interval). No difference was found in level of pain and disability level between frozen shoulder patients with and without diabetes.

  8. Outcomes in Diabetic Patients Undergoing Orbital Atherectomy System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Michael S; Shlofmitz, Evan; Nguyen, Heajung; Shlofmitz, Richard A

    2016-10-01

    We evaluated the angiographic and clinical outcomes of orbital atherectomy to treat severely calcified coronary lesions in diabetic and non-diabetic patients. Diabetics have increased risk for death, myocardial infarction, and target vessel revascularization after percutaneous coronary intervention. Severely calcified coronary lesions are associated with increased cardiac events. Orbital atherectomy facilitates stent delivery and optimizes stent expansion by modifying severely calcified plaque. Outcomes in diabetic patients who undergo orbital atherectomy have not been reported. Our retrospective multicenter registry included 458 consecutive real-world patients with severely calcified coronary arteries who underwent orbital atherectomy. The primary safety endpoint was the rate of major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular events at 30 days. Diabetics represented 42.1% (193/458) of the entire cohort. The primary endpoint was similar in diabetics and non-diabetics (1.0% vs. 3.0%%, P = 0.20), as were 30-day rates of death (0.5% vs. 1.9%, P = 0.41), myocardial infarction (0.5% vs. 1.5%, P = 0.40), target vessel revascularization (0% vs. 0%, P = 1), and stroke (0% vs. 0.4%, P > 0.9). Angiographic complications and stent thrombosis rate were low and did not differ between the 2 groups. Diabetics represented a sizeable portion of patients who underwent orbital atherectomy. Diabetics who had severely calcified coronary arteries and underwent orbital atherectomy had low event rates that were similar to non-diabetics. Orbital atherectomy appears to be a viable treatment strategy for diabetic patients. Randomized trials with longer-term follow-up are needed to determine the ideal treatment strategy for diabetics. © 2016, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Coronary Stents in Diabetic Patients: State of the Knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codner, Pablo; Gurm, Hitinder Singh; Motivala, Apurva

    2017-04-01

    This review article aims to summarize the findings of the most relevant research that compared the use of paclitaxel vs. "limus" based drug eluting stent (DES) in diabetic patients and to define the current state of knowledge with new stent technologies in this patient population. Since drug eluting stents (DES) were introduced, it has been of great interest to establish whether paclitaxel or sirolimus eluting stents have the same safety and efficacy features for patients with coronary artery disease. The answer to this question is particularly relevant for diabetic patients. Several randomized trials, registry-based studies, and meta-analyses have assessed the performance of these different DES in diabetic patients. The most recently published data favors limus over paclitaxel DES in diabetic patients, but most of these studies compared first vs. second generation DES with the inherent caveats of comparing different platforms, alloys, and drug delivery vehicles. In this literature review, we found that there is robust evidence favoring the use of DES over bare metal stents in diabetic patients with coronary artery disease. We also found that the current state of knowledge is that the everolimus eluting stents have better safety and efficacy than paclitaxel eluting stents in diabetic patients and hence should be the preferred choice. New revascularization strategies including bio-absorbable scaffolds, polymer free stents, and bio-degradable polymers are being studied in diabetic patients with encouraging results.

  10. Sildenafil dilates ophthalmic artery in type 2 diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akeel AMH Zwain

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Conflicting reports exist on the effect of sildenafil on ophthalmic artery blood flow; many visual disturbances due to vascular insult were reported with the use of sildenafil in diabetic patients like nonarteritic ischemic optic neuropathy. Objectives: The present work aimed to investigate whether sildenafil modulates ophthalmic artery vasoreactivity in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Literature reports on this aspect are lacking. Methods: A total of 35 male subjects were enrolled in this study, 18 with type 2 diabetes mellitus matched with 17 normal individuals. Ophthalmic artery was insonated through a transorbital window using colored Doppler equipment with transcranial Doppler facility. Ophthalmic artery reactivity was assessed using breath holding/hyperventilation test, before and after giving 50 mg oral sildenafil. Results: It was found that in both normal subjects and diabetic patients, sildenafil increased baseline control of mean flow velocity of ophthalmic artery significantly (p 0.05 after sildenafil, in normal and diabetic groups. There was a significant increase of resistive index of ophthalmic artery flow in diabetic patients compared with that of normal subject (p < 0.05. Sildenafil decreased resistive index of ophthalmic artery flow significantly only in diabetic patients (p < 0.05. Conclusion: Sildenafil increased MFVopa, but had no significant effect on vasoreactivity of ophthalmic artery; sildenafil decreased resistive index only in type 2 diabetic patients.

  11. Medication adherence in type 2 diabetes patients: study of patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    diabetes mellitus over the years, diabetes places an immense burden on the individuals living ... Key words: Diabetes type 2, adherence, glycemic level, health education and counselling. ... modifying dietary choices, implementing exercise re-.

  12. Semaglutide and Cardiovascular Outcomes in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marso, Steven P; Bain, Stephen C; Consoli, Agostino

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Regulatory guidance specifies the need to establish cardiovascular safety of new diabetes therapies in patients with type 2 diabetes in order to rule out excess cardiovascular risk. The cardiovascular effects of semaglutide, a glucagon-like peptide 1 analogue with an extended half......-life of approximately 1 week, in type 2 diabetes are unknown. METHODS: We randomly assigned 3297 patients with type 2 diabetes who were on a standard-care regimen to receive once-weekly semaglutide (0.5 mg or 1.0 mg) or placebo for 104 weeks. The primary composite outcome was the first occurrence of cardiovascular...... significantly higher (hazard ratio, 1.76; 95% CI, 1.11 to 2.78; P=0.02). Fewer serious adverse events occurred in the semaglutide group, although more patients discontinued treatment because of adverse events, mainly gastrointestinal. CONCLUSIONS: In patients with type 2 diabetes who were at high cardiovascular...

  13. Nrf2 and Redox Status in Prediabetic and Diabetic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angélica S. Jiménez-Osorio

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The redox status associated with nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor-2 (Nrf2 was evaluated in prediabetic and diabetic subjects. Total antioxidant status (TAS in plasma and erythrocytes, glutathione (GSH and malondialdehyde (MDA content and activity of antioxidant enzymes were measured as redox status markers in 259 controls, 111 prediabetics and 186 diabetic type 2 subjects. Nrf2 was measured in nuclear extract fractions from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC. Nrf2 levels were lower in prediabetic and diabetic patients. TAS, GSH and activity of glutamate cysteine ligase were lower in diabetic subjects. An increase of MDA and superoxide dismutase activity was found in diabetic subjects. These results suggest that low levels of Nrf2 are involved in the development of oxidative stress and redox status disbalance in diabetic patients.

  14. Methodology and early findings of the Diabetes Management Project: a cohort study investigating the barriers to optimal diabetes care in diabetic patients with and without diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamoureux, Ecosse Luc; Fenwick, Eva; Xie, Jing; Mcauley, Annie; Nicolaou, Theona; Larizza, Melanie; Rees, Gwyn; Qureshi, Salmaan; Wong, Tien Yin; Benarous, Rehab; Dirani, Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    The Diabetes Management Project is investigating the clinical, behavioural and psychosocial barriers to optimal diabetes care in individuals with and without diabetic retinopathy. Prospective cohort. Two hundred and twenty-three and 374 patients without and with diabetic retinopathy, respectively. All individuals underwent a comprehensive dilated eye test, anthropometric measurements, blood and urine samples, and psychosocial questionnaires. Good glycaemic control was defined as glycosylated haemoglobin Management Project, developed to assess factors associated with suboptimal diabetes care. © 2011 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Ophthalmology © 2011 Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists.

  15. Increased sympathetic activity during sleep and nocturnal hypertension in Type 2 diabetic patients with diabetic nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, F S; Hansen, H P; Jacobsen, P

    1999-01-01

    AIMS: To elucidate the putative factors involved in the blunted nocturnal blood pressure reduction in hypertensive Type 2 diabetic patients with diabetic nephropathy. METHODS: Extracellular fluid volume and fluid shift from interstitial to plasma volume (haematocrit), sympathetic nervous activity...... (plasma noradrenaline and adrenaline) and the internal 'body clock' (serum melatonin) were investigated in 31 hypertensive Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) patients with diabetic nephropathy (24 males, age 60 (45-73) years). All variables, except extracellular volume, were measured repeatedly...... constant in both groups. Extracellular fluid volume and plasma melatonin levels were comparable in the two groups. CONCLUSION: Sustained adrenergic activity during sleep is associated with blunted nocturnal blood pressure reduction in hypertensive Type 2DM patients with diabetic nephropathy, probably...

  16. Depression in diabetic patients attending University of Gondar Hospital Diabetic Clinic, Northwest Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birhanu AM

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Anteneh Messele Birhanu,1 Fekadu Mazengia Alemu,2 Tesfaye Demeke Ashenafie,3 Shitaye Alemu Balcha,4 Berihun Assefa Dachew5 1School of Medicine, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Wollo University, Dessie, 2Department of Midwifery, 3Department of Nursing, 4Department of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, 5Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Institute of Public Health, University of Gondar, Gondar, Ethiopia Background: Diabetes mellitus, frequently associated with comorbid depression, contributes to the double burden of individual patients and community. Depression remains undiagnosed in as many as 50%–75% of diabetes cases. This study aimed to determine the prevalence and associated factors of depression among diabetic patients attending the University of Gondar Hospital Diabetic Clinic, Northwest Ethiopia. Methods: An institution-based cross-sectional study was conducted from March to May 2014 among 422 sampled diabetic patients attending the University of Gondar Hospital Diabetic Clinic. The participants were selected using systematic random sampling. Data were collected by face-to-face interview using a standardized and pretested questionnaire linked with patient record review. Depression was assessed using the Patient Health Questionnaire-9. Data were entered to EPI INFO version 7 and analyzed by SPSS version 20 software. Binary logistic regression analysis was performed to identify factors associated with depression. Results: A total of 415 diabetic patients participated in the study with a response rate of 98.3%. The prevalence of depression among diabetic patients was found to be 15.4% (95% confidence interval (CI: 11.7–19.2. Only religion (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] =2.65 and 95% CI: 1.1–6.0 and duration of diabetes (AOR =0.27 and 95% CI: 0.07–0.92 were the factors associated with depression among diabetic patients. Conclusion: The prevalence of depression was low as compared to other

  17. Kidney transplant in diabetic patients: modalities, indications and results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rangel Érika B

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diabetes is a disease of increasing worldwide prevalence and is the main cause of chronic renal failure. Type 1 diabetic patients with chronic renal failure have the following therapy options: kidney transplant from a living donor, pancreas after kidney transplant, simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplant, or awaiting a deceased donor kidney transplant. For type 2 diabetic patients, only kidney transplant from deceased or living donors are recommended. Patient survival after kidney transplant has been improving for all age ranges in comparison to the dialysis therapy. The main causes of mortality after transplant are cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events, infections and neoplasias. Five-year patient survival for type 2 diabetic patients is lower than the non-diabetics' because they are older and have higher body mass index on the occasion of the transplant and both pre- and posttransplant cardiovascular diseases prevalences. The increased postransplant cardiovascular mortality in these patients is attributed to the presence of well-known risk factors, such as insulin resistance, higher triglycerides values, lower HDL-cholesterol values, abnormalities in fibrinolysis and coagulation and endothelial dysfunction. In type 1 diabetic patients, simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplant is associated with lower prevalence of vascular diseases, including acute myocardial infarction, stroke and amputation in comparison to isolated kidney transplant and dialysis therapy. Conclusion Type 1 and 2 diabetic patients present higher survival rates after transplant in comparison to the dialysis therapy, although the prevalence of cardiovascular events and infectious complications remain higher than in the general population.

  18. The study of Insulin Resistance in the Off Springs of Diabetics and Non Diabetic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganesh Manoorkar

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Insulin resistance is one of the main cause in the pathogenesis of the development of type- 2 diabetes mellitus. Elevated insulin levels and insulin resistance may be present several years prior to the development of hyperglycaemia. Hence the diagnosis of insulin resistance at the initial stages in risk group people could be used as an effective measure to prevent type 2 diabetes mellitus and its outcome, including reduction in morbidity and mortality. Though type 2 diabetes mellitus has multifactorial aetiology, genetic factor plays an important role in the development of diabetes mellitus. So we have tried to establish relation between genetic factor and insulin resistance by studying the insulin resistance in off springs of diabetics and non diabetics patients. Aims and objectives: Estimation of insulin levels in the off springs (non diabetics of diabetics and non diabetics patients. Comparision of insulin resistance in the off springs (non diabetics of diabetics and non diabetics. To find the relation between insulin resistance and genetic factor. Material and method: This study was carried out in the department of Biochemistry Grant Government Medical College Mumbai. Total 100 non diabetic people were included in the study of age above 30 years. These are divided into two groups as- Group-I includes 50 off springs (Ist degree relatives of non diabetic people. Group-II includes 50 off springs (Ist degree relatives of diabetic people. The fasting plasma glucose and serum insulin levels are estimated in the above two groups. The insulin resistance was calculated by using HOMA-IR model. Result: Fasting plasma glucose, serum insulin level and insulin resistance is significantly increased in group-II people as compared to group-I people. Conclusion: There is a strong relation between genetic factor and insulin resistance which exist prior to the development of diabetes mellitus. The people of group-II are susceptible for the

  19. Patients' Experiences with and Attitudes towards a Diabetes Patient Web Portal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ronda, Maaike C. M.; Dijkhorst-Oei, Lioe-Ting; Rutten, Guy E. H. M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective A diabetes patient web portal allows patients to access their personal health record and may improve diabetes outcomes; however, patients' adoption is slow. We aimed to get insight into patients' experiences with a web portal to understand how the portal is being used, how patients

  20. Prevalence of diabetic retinopathy in type II diabetic patients in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prevalence of diabetic retinopathy in type II diabetic patients in a health facility in Karachi, Pakistan. ... Conclusion: DR is prevalent in the target population and, therefore, emphasis should be on the education of the local population of New Karachi Township on how to attain euglycemic state with regular medication, diet and ...

  1. Cardiovascular morbidity and early mortality cluster in parents of type 1 diabetic patients with diabetic nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarnow, L; Rossing, P; Nielsen, F S

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: A familial predisposition was proposed to be a determinant of the increased morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular disease in type 1 diabetic patients with diabetic nephropathy. The insertion allele of an insertion/deletion polymorphism in the ACE (ACE/ID) gene seems to protect ag...

  2. Association between Diabetic Polyneuropathy and Cardiovascular Complications in Type 2 Diabetic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Ook Chung

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundDiabetes mellitus is a major independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD, but high cardiovascular risk in diabetes mellitus patients is not completely explained by clustering traditional risk factors. Recently, associations between diabetic polyneuropathy (DPN and macrovasculopathy have been suggested. We aimed to assess associations between DPN and cardiovascular complications in type 2 diabetic patients.MethodsMicrovascular and cardiovascular complications were evaluated in 1,041 type 2 diabetic patients.ResultsIn patients with DPN, the age, prevalence of hypertension, diabetes duration, systolic blood pressure, pulse pressure, and hemoglobin glycation (HbA1c levels were significantly higher, while the high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C levels were lower than in those without DPN. The prevalence of CVD was higher in patients with DPN. In multivariate analysis, DPN was independently associated with CVD (odds ratio, 1.801; 95% confidence interval, 1.009 to 3.214.ConclusionOur results showed that DPN was associated with a high prevalence of cardiovascular disease in type 2 diabetic patients, but further studies are needed to investigate the causative nature of associations between DPN and CVD.

  3. Helicobacter pylori in Diabetic and Non-Diabetic Patients with Dyspepsia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hossein Hashemi

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori is one of the most common chronic infections in patients with gastrointestinal disorders. Recent reports suggested that H. pylori might have high prevalence among patients with diabetes. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to assess the prevalence of H. pylori infection in diabetes mellitus and to study the relationship between histological findings and H. pylori infection in diabetic patients. Eighty patients with dyspepsia that were referred to our gastrointestinal department between May 2007 and May 2008 were included in our study. We checked fasting blood sugar for all of the study samples. All of patients underwent upper endoscopy and biopsy specimens were obtained from the antrum and the corpus. The specimens for the presence of H. pylori were colored by Giemsa stains. A single pathologist evaluated the histology slides. We found that prevalence of H. pylori infection was significantly higher in diabetics than in non-diabetics (P=0.001. Indeed, the prevalence of gastritis did differ significantly between the two groups (P=0.001. According to our results diabetes mellitus is one of the risk factor that must be considered in evaluation of H. pylori infection in diabetic patients with dyspepsia.

  4. Relationship of glycemic and triglycerides with BMI in diabetic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parvez, A.; Ihsanullah; Rafiq, A.; Ahmad, N.; Khan, E.H.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a metabolic disorder characterised by chronic hyperglycaemia with disturbances in carbohydrate, fat and protein metabolism arising from defect in insulin secretion or action or both. The clinical guidelines recommend measurement of BMI as vital signs for evaluating the obese and diabetic patients. Methods: This study was carried out on 160 diabetics, which were divided on the basis of BMI into obese (120) and non-obese (40) diabetics from Peshawar district. All patients had their triglycerides and glucose checked after over night fast. Results: The serum triglyceride in diabetics having BMI >30 (obese) was increased as compared to patients having BMI <30 (non-obese). The comparison of serum glucose level in obese diabetics was found to be significantly raised as compared to non-obese diabetics. Conclusions and Recommendations: It was concluded that dyslipidemia is common in all diabetics. The abnormal triglyceride level can improve with good glycemic control, but do not reach the normal state. Good glycaemic control, Reducing BMI, periodic checkups of lipids and blood glucose are recommended for all diabetics in order to avoid complications. (author)

  5. Relationship of glycemic and triglycerides with BMI in diabetic patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parvez, A; Ihsanullah,; Rafiq, A; Ahmad, N; Khan, E H [Khyber Teaching Hospital, Peshawar (Pakistan). Department of Pathology

    2010-04-15

    Background: Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a metabolic disorder characterised by chronic hyperglycaemia with disturbances in carbohydrate, fat and protein metabolism arising from defect in insulin secretion or action or both. The clinical guidelines recommend measurement of BMI as vital signs for evaluating the obese and diabetic patients. Methods: This study was carried out on 160 diabetics, which were divided on the basis of BMI into obese (120) and non-obese (40) diabetics from Peshawar district. All patients had their triglycerides and glucose checked after over night fast. Results: The serum triglyceride in diabetics having BMI >30 (obese) was increased as compared to patients having BMI <30 (non-obese). The comparison of serum glucose level in obese diabetics was found to be significantly raised as compared to non-obese diabetics. Conclusions and Recommendations: It was concluded that dyslipidemia is common in all diabetics. The abnormal triglyceride level can improve with good glycemic control, but do not reach the normal state. Good glycaemic control, Reducing BMI, periodic checkups of lipids and blood glucose are recommended for all diabetics in order to avoid complications. (author)

  6. Comparison of Oral Manifestations of Diabetic and Non-Diabetic Uremic Patients Undergoing Hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Javad Kia

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives: Chronic renal failure (CRF, also known as chronic kidney disease, caused by devastated nephron mass of the kidney results in uremia. Hypertension, diabetes mellitus and glomerulonephritis are common etiologic factors of CRF. This condition causes miscellaneous oral manifestations especially in diabetic patients. The aim of this study was to comparison oral manifestations of diabetic and non-diabetic uremic patients undergoing hemodialysis.   Methods: A total of 95 patients who undergoing hemodialysis in Razi hospital in Rasht city participated in this descriptive analytical study. Patients were divided into two diabetic and non- diabetic groups. Oral cavity examinations were done by latex gloves and single use mirror. Objective and subjective oral manifestations such as xerostomia, bad taste, mucosal pain, uremic odor, coating tongue, petechial, purpura, pale oral mucosa, ulcer, dental erosion and candida infection were recorded in questionnaire. After gathering of information, the data were analyzed by SPSS 15 software using t-test and chi square statistical test.   Results: About 60% of patients (57 person were men and 40 % (38 person were women. The mean age of patients was 48 years (range of 20 -76 years. Common subjective oral manifestation in both groups was xerostomia and most common objective oral manifestations were pale oral mucosa, uremic odor and coating tongue respectively. The DMFT index in diabetic group was significantly higher (17.3±7.63 than non-diabetic patients (12.4±8.26. There was no significant statistical correlation between the time of dialysis, number of dialysis appointment during the week and objective and subjective oral manifestations in two groups.   Conclusion: Although, the present study has shown an increase in oral manifestations in diabetic patients undergoing hemodialysis relative to non-diabetic group, but this increase was not statistically significant. On the other hand

  7. Transient Tear Film Dysfunction after Cataract Surgery in Diabetic Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donghong Jiang

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is an increasingly common systemic disease. Many diabetic patients seek cataract surgery for a better visual acuity. Unlike in the general population, the influence of cataract surgery on tear film function in diabetic patients remains elusive. The aim of this study was to evaluate the tear function in diabetic and nondiabetic patients following cataract surgery.In this prospective, interventional case series, 174 diabetic patients without dry eye syndrome (DES and 474 age-matched nondiabetic patients as control who underwent phacoemulsification were enrolled at two different eye centers between January 2011 and January 2013. Patients were followed up at baseline and at 7 days, 1 month, and 3 months postoperatively. Ocular symptom scores (Ocular Surface Disease Index, OSDI and tear film function including tear film stability (tear film break-up time, TBUT, corneal epithelium integrity (corneal fluorescein staining, CFS, and tear secretion (Schirmer's I test, SIT were evaluated.In total, 83.9% of the diabetic patients (146 cases with 185 eyes and 89.0% of the nondiabetic patients (422 cases with 463 eyes completed all check-ups after the interventions (P = 0.095. The incidence of DES was 17.1% in the diabetic patients and 8.1% in the nondiabetic patients at 7 days after cataract surgery. In the diabetic patients, the incidence of DES remained 4.8% at 1 month postoperatively and decreased to zero at 3 months after surgery. No DES was diagnosed in nondiabetic patients at either the 1-month or 3-month follow-up. Compared with the baseline, the diabetic patients had worse symptom scores and lower TBUT values at 7 days and 1 month but not at 3 months postoperatively. In the nondiabetic patients, symptom scores and TBUT values had returned to preoperative levels at 1-month check-up. CFS scores and SIT values did not change significantly postoperatively in either group (P = 0.916 and P = 0.964, respectively.Diabetic patients undergoing

  8. Surgical Site Infection in Diabetic and Non-Diabetic Patients Undergoing Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butt, U. I.; Khan, A.; Nawaz, A.; Mansoor, R.; Malik, A. A.; Sher, F.; Ayyaz, M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To compare the frequency of surgical site infections in patients with type II diabetes undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy as compared with non-diabetic patients. Study Design: Cohort study. Place and Duration of Study: Surgical Unit 2, Services Hospital, Lahore, from May to October 2012. Methodology: Patients were divided into two groups of 60 each, undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Group A comprised non-diabetic patients and group B comprised type II diabetic patients. Patients were followed postoperatively upto one month for the development of SSIs. Proportion of patients with surgical site infections or otherwise was compared between the groups using chi-square test with significance of p < 0.05. Results: In group A, 35 patients were above the age of 40 years. In group B, 38 patients were above the age of 40 years. Four patients in group A developed a surgical site infection. Seven patients in group B developed SSIs (p = 0.07). Conclusion: Presence of diabetes mellitus did not significantly affect the onset of surgical site infection in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy. (author)

  9. [Microalbuminuria in diabetic and hypertensive patients: a study of 979 patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberto Robles, Nicolás; Velasco, Joaquín; Mena, Cándido; Angulo, Enrique; Garrote, Timotea

    2006-11-25

    Microalbuminuria is a known complication of diabetes mellitus but it is also a cardiovascular risk factor commonly present among hypertensive (non diabetic) population. The prevalence of microalbuminuria is variable and it has been never estimated in our region. The aim of this study has been to determine the prevalence of microalbuminuria in hypertensive (non diabetic) and diabetic population in Extremadura (Spain). The study included diabetic patients and non-diabetic hypertensive ones randomly selected. Microalbuminuria was measured in every patient using albumin/creatinin reactive stick in fasting first morning urine. Whenever possible microalbuminuria was confirmed in laboratory by microalbuminuria/creatinina coefficient in first morning urine samples. A total of 979 patients (mean age [SD], 67.9 [10.8] years; 409 men and 570 women, 505 diabetics) were studied. The presence of microalbuminuria was found in 12.4% of hypertensive patients and in 21.4% of diabetic patients (p < 0.001). Hypertensives and normotensive diabetics showed a similar prevalence of microalbuminuria (13.3%, not significant), but it tripled in hypertensive diabetics (33.8; p < 0.01). Glicemic control was not different for microalbuminuric diabetic patients and non microalbuminuric ones. The patients receiving rennin-angiotensin axis blocking drugs do not showed less prevalence of microalbuminuria (hypertensives 10.5%, diabetics 23.5%). Microalbuminuria was confirmed in 65.4% of patients. The prevalence of microalbuminuria in Extremadura seems to be high either in diabetics or non diabetic hypertensive patients. The finding of microalbuminuria in diabetics patients correlates with hypertension but do not with glicemic control. The prevalence of microalbuminuria is high in spite of using rennin-angiotensin axis blocking drugs.

  10. Application of semiquantitative parameters of bone scintigraphy in diabetic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bokhchelyan, Kh.; Klisarova, A.; Koeva, L.; Pranchev, L.; Tranulov, G.

    1997-01-01

    The aim of the study is to introduce semiquantitative indicators, contributing to early detection and dynamic measurement of the degree of bone metabolism in the foot of diabetic patients. Ten diabetics (3 women and 7 men) and 20 controls (10 women and 10 men) are included in the study. All patients are subjected to bone scintigraphy, clinical and biochemical investigation. Data are obtained pointing to enhanced and disproportional fixation of the radionuclide in symmetrical zones of the foot. The results are interpreted with a special reference to the extent of metabolic control and complications of the diabetic condition. Enhanced bone metabolism in the foot of the diabetic patients examined was established. Semiquantitative parameters enabling early detection and dynamic measurement of bone metabolism in the diabetic foot are practically implemented

  11. Inhaled insulin for controlling blood glucose in patients with diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard L Silverman

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Bernard L Silverman1, Christopher J Barnes2, Barbara N Campaigne3, Douglas B Muchmore31Alkermes, Inc, Cambridge, MA, USA; 2i3 Statprobe, Ann Arbor, MI; 3Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN, USAAbstract: Diabetes mellitus is a significant worldwide health problem, with the incidence of type 2 diabetes increasing at alarming rates. Insulin resistance and dysregulated blood glucose control are established risk factors for microvascular complications and cardiovascular disease. Despite the recognition of diabetes as a major health issue and the availability of a growing number of medications designed to counteract its detrimental effects, real and perceived barriers remain that prevent patients from achieving optimal blood glucose control. The development and utilization of inhaled insulin as a novel insulin delivery system may positively influence patient treatment adherence and optimal glycemic control, potentially leading to a reduction in cardiovascular complications in patients with diabetes.Keywords: diabetes, inhaled insulin, cardiovascular disease, blood glucose

  12. [Aspects of perioperative care in patients with diabetes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pestel, G; Closhen, D; Zimmermann, A; Werner, C; Weber, M M

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes is a common disease in Germany. Due to diabetes-associated end-organ disease, such as large and small vessel disease and neuropathy, diabetic patients require more intense anesthesia care during the perioperative phase. An in-depth and comprehensive medical history focusing on hemodynamic alterations, gastroparesis, neuropathy and stiff joint syndrome is a cornerstone of perioperative care and may affect outcome of diabetes patients more than specific anesthetic medications or the anesthetic procedure. Intraoperative anesthetic care needs to focus on preservation of hemodynamic stability, perioperative infection control and maintenance of glucose homeostasis. Whereas some years ago strict glucose control by aggressive insulin therapy was adamantly advocated, the results of recent studies have put the risk of such therapeutic algorithms into perspective. Therefore, optimized perioperative care of diabetic patients consists of setting a predefined targeted blood glucose level, evidence-based therapeutic approaches to reach that goal and finally adequate and continuous monitoring and amendment of the therapeutic approach if required.

  13. Presentations and complications of diabetes patients presenting to diabetic clinic of Eastern Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabin Kumar Singh

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective Diabetes mellitus leads to damage, dysfunction and failure of various organs especially eyes, kidneys, nerves and heart. The latency of occurence of hyperglycemia and diagnosis may be of long duration. This study was aimed to find out the mode of presetation of diabetes mellitus in diabetic patients attending out patients clinic of B P Koirala Institute of Health Sciences. Associated complications and comorbid condition present at the time of presenation were also studied. Methods The diabetic patients attending the Diabetic Out Patient Clinic of B P Koirala Institute of Health Sciences during June 2006 to June 2007 were included in this study.The patients details were collected from the predefined Proforma for diabetes patient from the database. This included demographic data, biochemical parameters and diabetic complications. For the purpose of study a total of 775 patients were randomly selected.The Data collected were entered and analysed using excel and SPSS(version 11.5 Results Out of 775 cases 436 (56.3% were male and 339(43.7% were female. Majority of patients 81.55% (n=632 had osmotic sympmtoms or symptoms related to complication of diabetes at the time of presentation to the clinic. Asymptomatic patient constituted 18.45% (n=143. The most common presenting complaints were polyuria (44.58%, followed by polydypsia (39.62% and polyphagia (24.88%. About 54.97% (n=426 had symptoms of complications related to diabetes. Among them most common complication was neurological (39.67%, followed by renal (10.8% metabolic (4.93%, cardiac(4.46%, autonomic neuropathy (4.93% and peripheral vascular disease (3.99%. Conclusion Majority of the patients presenting in our OPD had osmotic symptoms or symptoms related to complication of diabetes. Access to diabetes care and lack of awareness of the disease and its complication might had contributed to this. Community awareness, program for early detection and managemnet may help proper diabetes care

  14. [Diabetic foot risk in patients with type II diabetes mellitus in a family medicine unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez-Godínez, S A; Zonana-Nacach, A; Anzaldo-Campos, M C; Muñoz-Martínez, J A

    2014-01-01

    To determine the risk of diabetic foot in patients with type II diabetes mellitus (DM) seen in a Family Medicine Unit. The study included type II DM patients with a disease duration ≥ 5 years seen in a Family Medicine Unit, Tijuana, Mexico, during September-December 2011. Neuropathy was assessed with the Diabetic Neuropathy Symptom questionnaire, and pressure sensation using a 10-g Semmes-Weinstein monofilament. A patient had a high risk of diabetic foot if there was sensitivity loss, foot deformities, and non-palpable pedal pulses. We studied 205 patients with an average (± SD) age and DM duration of 59 ± 10 years and 10.7 ± 6.7 years, respectively. Ninety one patients (44%) had a high risk of developing diabetic foot, and it was associated with; an education of less than 6 years (OR 2.3; 95%CI: 1-1-4.1), DM disease duration ≥ 10 years (OR 5.1; 95%CI: 2.8-9.4), female gender (OR 2.0; 95%CI: 1.1-3.6), monthly familiar income diabetic neuropathy, since they have a high risk of diabetic foot. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  15. Inpatient Blood Glucose Management of Diabetic Patients in a Large ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Diabetes has become a major health problem worldwide, as well as in South Africa. This, coupled with the chronicity of the disease, relate to an increasing burden on health care facilities and an increasing number of hospital admissions of patients suffering from diabetes. Admissions are mostly related to ...

  16. Diabetic patients: their knowledge and perception of oral health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: The objectives of the study were to: (1) assess the knowledge and awareness of diabetic patients of their risk for systemic and oral diseases as complications associated with diabetes, (2) to assess their attitudes toward sustaining good oral health through proper oral hygiene and regular dental check-ups, and ...

  17. risk factors for cardiovascular diseases among diabetic patients

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    uncommon among diabetic patients in Jimma University Specialized Hospital. Type 2 DM was a ... have been to Israel for less than 4 years (5). .... 102 (39.8%) had primary education. Sixty eight ..... Ethiopian immigrants to Israel. Diabetes care ...

  18. Patients' Knowledge of Diabetes Mellitus in a Nigerian City

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    2011-04-13

    Apr 13, 2011 ... Benin Teaching Hospital, 3Department of Medicine, University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City, Nigeria. Abstract ... The study employed the use of a 14-item Diabetes. Knowledge Test ... glucose control patients need to adhere to ... use of pamphlets, films, lectures, behavioural .... diabetes self care.

  19. Nephropathy and Neuropathy in Diabetic Patients with Chronic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Several reports described an association between type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) and chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Chronic HCV infection is prevalent in Egypt. The present work aimed to evaluate the prevalence of proteinuria and neuropathy among diabetic patients with and without chronic HCV ...

  20. Asymptomatic Bacteriuria among Patients with Type 2 Diabetes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: The global increase in the prevalence of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes has brought asymptomatic bacteriuria, one of its complications to the fore. This study was designed to determine the prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria in patients with type 2 diabetes, identify the bacterial pathogens and their ...

  1. Pre-diabetes and arterial stiffness in uraemic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hornum, Mads; Clausen, Peter; Kjaergaard, Jesper

    2010-01-01

    In order to address factors of relevance for new onset diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease after kidney transplantation, we investigated the presence of pre-diabetes, arterial stiffness and endothelial dysfunction in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) accepted for kidney...

  2. Preventative foot care in people with diabetes: Quality patient ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Foot ulceration and amputation cause extensive burden on individuals and health care systems. One of the reasons for the poor outcome of foot complications in developing countries is the lack of patient education. Due to the multi-factorial pathology of diabetic foot ulceration, the person with diabetes should receive health ...

  3. Shigella sonnei bacteremia in an elderly diabetic patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dronda, F; Parras, F; Martínez, J L; Baquero, F

    1988-06-01

    A case of Shigella sonnei bacteremia in a 65-year-old patient suffering from diabetes mellitus is discussed. The isolated strain had plasmid-mediated serum resistance and excreted aerobactin. The presence of diabetes mellitus as an underlying disease and the production by the Shigella sonnei isolate of factors related to bacterial invasion may have contributed to the bacteremic episode.

  4. Characteristics of patients with diabetic retinopathy in Gaborone ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    (GLLAMMs) to account for the non-independence of the eye diabetic retinopathy outcome at the patient level (Rabe-Hesketh et al., 2000). This model allowed for analysis of a polytomous ordinal response on a set of predictors and computed the odds ratios (OR) of having a more severe diabetic retinopathy grade compared ...

  5. High prevalence of diabetes mellitus in patients with liver cirrhosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wlazlo, N.; Beijers, H. J. B. H.; Schoon, E. J.; Sauerwein, H. P.; Stehouwer, C. D. A.; Bravenboer, B.

    2010-01-01

    The reported prevalence of Type 2 diabetes mellitus in patients with liver cirrhosis is five times higher than in the general population. However, these data were never adjusted for classical risk factors for Type 2 diabetes. We therefore investigated the association between cirrhosis and Type 2

  6. The bacteria profiles of wounds in diabetic patients hospitalized in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Diabetic wound infections still remain a health concern such that correct identification of bacteria is essential in monitoring the spread of the infections as well as in the administration of the correct treatment. This study therefore focuses on isolating and identifying bacteria present in diabetic wounds of hospitalized patients in ...

  7. Assessment of sexual dysfunction in patients with diabetes mellitus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Sexual dysfunction is a known complication of diabetes mellitus that negatively affects the life of the patient. Most times physicians do not consider it during consultation with diabetics. Its prevalence, types and pattern as well as risk factors have been reported elsewhere including some parts of Nigeria but these ...

  8. Hormonal status of diabetes mellitus patients with microcirculation disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golubyatnikova, G.A.; Zhumatova, M.G.; Goryajnova, I.I.

    1984-01-01

    The results of the study of immunoreactive insulin (IRI) and anti-insular hormones show their correlation with homorheological disorders in patients with diabetic angiopathies. The results obtained indicate a possble involvement of the anti-insular hormones in the development of vascular changes in diabetes mellitus

  9. Changes in serum leptin level in patients with diabetic retinopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Jing; Cao Huiling

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To explore the regulation of changes in serum leptin level in patients with diabetic retinopathy. Methods: The 120 participating subjects were of four groups: healthy controls, diabetic patients without retinopathy, patients with NPDR and patients with PDR, each group consisted of 18 males and 12 females with comparable BMI. The levels of serum leptin, IVC, insulin and blood glucose of these patients were measured and the correlation between serum leptin level and other parameters was analysed. Results: The level of serum leptin in controls, diabetic patients without retinopathy, patients with NPDR and patients with PDR were 6.91 ± 1.87 μg/L, 7,83 ±2.11 μg/L, 9.56 ± 2.43 μg/L and 11.69 ± 2.57 μg/L respectively. The patients with PDR had higher serum leptin levels than patients with NPDR (t=2.15, p < 0.05), diabetic patients without retinopathy (t = 2.71, p < 0.01), and controls (t = 3.50, p < 0.001), the patients with NPDR had higher serum leptin levels than diabetic patients without retinopathy (t = 2.23, p < 0.05) and controls (t = 2.75, p < 0.01), while the difference in serum leptin was not significant between diabetic patients without retinopathy and controls. The serum level was positively correlated to BMI (r = 0.22, p < 0.05) and FINS (r = 0.28, p < 0.01). Conclusion: Serum leptin level is elevated in patients with diabetic retinopathy and is positively correlated to the severity of the disease

  10. A study of dynamic foot pressure measurement in diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milka D Madhale

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Diabetic foot ulcer is a major source of morbidity and a leading cause of hospitalization. It is estimated that approximately 20% of hospital admissions among patients with diabetes mellitus are due to diabetic foot ulcer. It can lead to infection, gangrene, amputation, and even death if appropriate care is not provided. Overall, the lower limb amputation in diabetic patients is 15 times higher than in non-diabetics. In the majority of cases, the cause for the foot ulcer is the altered architecture of the foot due to neuropathy resulting in abnormal pressure points on the soles. Purpose: The aim of this study is to develop low cost, lightweight foot pressure scanner and check its reliability and validity which can help to prevent foot ulceration. Design/Methodology/Approach: In the present study, a low cost, lightweight foot pressure scanner is developed, and dynamic plantar pressures in a group of 110 Indian patients with diabetes with or without neuropathy and foot ulcers are measured. Practical Implications: If these pressure points can be detected, ulcers can be prevented by providing offloading footwear. Originality/Value: Differences are found in dynamic foot pressures in different study groups, namely, diabetic patients, patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy, patients with foot ulcers, and nondiabetics. The differences are significant (P < 0.01, which showed the validity of the tool. Reliability and consistency of the tool was checked by test–retest method. Paper Type: Original Research work. Conclusion: Based on the results of the present study, it is concluded that the scanner is successfully developed and it can measure foot pressures. It is a novel device to proactively monitor foot health in diabetics in an effort to prevent and reduce diabetic foot complications.

  11. Investigation of depression in Greek patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rekleiti, Maria; Sarafis, Pavlos; Saridi, Maria; Toska, Aikaterini; Melos, Chrysovaladis; Souliotis, Kyriakos; Tsironi, Maria

    2013-06-16

    Considerable studies directly connect the complications in diabetic patients, and especially peripheral neuropathy, with the emergence of depression. Neuropathetic pain may deteriorate the general health status of the diabetic patient and glycaemic regulation. The purpose of this study was to investigate the appearance and degree of diabetic peripheral neuropathy and its correlation with depression, with other parameters of the disease and also duration. 57 diabetic patients participated with diagnosed diabetic peripheral neuropathy (male n=27, female n= 30, mean of age 72.7±6.35 years). The first part of Michigan Neuropathy Screening Instrument and the Zung Depression Rating Scale were used as tools for our study. Data was analysed with the SPSS 18.0 statistic program. 57.9% of the patients were overweight, 35.1% were obese and only 7% were within normal weight range. The BMI findings between the two genders indicate that male participants are more often obese than females. Women surpassed men in the category of overweight patients (p depression, it derives that a high degree of diabetic neuropathy is related with high score of depression [F(3.160)=9.821, p=0.001]. Moderate and severe neuropathy was found with almost the same levels of depression. The correlation between diabetic neuropathy and depression is confirmed, while a very high depression rate was found in patients with severe neuropathy. The issue needs further study by using common instruments to obtain comparative results from the scientific community.

  12. Characteristics of diabetic patients visiting a podiatry practice in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauterbach, S; Kostev, K; Becker, R

    2010-04-01

    To describe the foot characteristics of diabetic patients attending a podiatry practice for their first consultation. The objective was to determine how effectively diabetic foot ulcers are being prevented in primary care. All diabetic patients who presented at a podiatry practice between 2006 and 2008 for their first consultation were analysed. Anonymous data were obtained from the standard patient anamnesis sheet completed by the podiatrist. These included results of patient interviews and examinations. A total of 230 diabetic patients (93.9% had type 2 diabetes mellitus and 6.1% had type 1) were analysed. The mean age was 67.7 years (+/- 10.8). Just under half (47.4%) were female. The mean duration of diabetes was 12.6 years (+/- 10.5) years. 70.4% of the patients had diabetic neuropathy (confidence intervals: 64.5-76.3), of whom 73.2% already had resting foot pain or strain foot pain while walking. 58.3% of the patients had toenail mycosis, and of these 38.1% had the infection in all 10 toenails. Most of the patients had at least one foot deformities (89.6% splayfoot and 37.0% flatfoot). 40.2% had no sensation to microfilament testing on either their right or left foot toes. The overall mean vibration sensation test threshold was 3.7 (+/- 2.3). While there is a structure and strategy for the primary and secondary prevention of the diabetic foot ulcers, its delivery is often ineffective. This audit shows that, in Germany, the detection and prevention of diabetic foot problems in podiatric practices happens far too late.

  13. The knowledge of dietary rules among patients with diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Świrska

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The incidence of diabetes increases in Poland and all over the world. Diet is an integral element of diabetes therapy. The knowledge of dietary rules and compliance with them facilitates body mass reduction and improves metabolic parameters of the body thus preventing diabetes’ complications development. Aim: The aim of the study was to evaluate the knowledge of dietary rules among diabetic patients. Material and methods: The study included 50 patients with recognized diabetes  who were hospitalized in SPSK-4 hospital in Lublin from January to May, 2016. In the study the diagnostic survey was applied. Results: The knowledge of basic dietary rules in diabetes among the majority of surveyed diabetic patients (64% was unsatisfactory. The most significant deficit included lack of acquaintance with glycemic index and carbohydrate exchanges thus making it impossible to make use of them in preparing everyday meals. The knowledge of the surveyed patients depended on their educational status, place of residence and age. Unsatisfactory knowledge was found among 82% of patients  with primary education vs. 40% with higher education, in 80% with countryside residence vs. 53% residing in town and in 80% of patients aged 31-40  and 41-55 years vs. 50% aged 18-30. Conclusion: Dietary education is a necessary element of diabetes therapy. Educating patients about diabetic diet should be repeated regularly as even patients with long-standing diabetes history have unsatisfactory knowledge about the dietary rules. Preferably, educating should be individual and adjusted to patient’s age and education.

  14. Study methodology and diabetes control in patients from the non-English diabetes management project (NEDMP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirani, Mohamed; Dang, Trung M; Xie, Jing; Gnanasekaran, Sivashanth; Nicolaou, Theona; Rees, Gwyneth; Fenwick, Eva; Lamoureux, Ecosse L

    2017-03-01

    To describe the clinical characteristics of non-English speaking patients from the Diabetes Management Project (NEDMP), and compare their diabetes management and severity of diabetic retinopathy (DR) with the English-speaking DMP sample (EDMP). A prospective study was conducted on non-English speaking adults with diabetes who attended the Royal Victorian Eye and Ear Hospital. 136 (90.1%) non-English speaking adults were assessed, with a mean age of 72.2 years (range: 50-88 years); 74 (54.4%) were male. Participants completed interviewer-administered questionnaires and underwent visual acuity, fundus photography, optical coherence tomography, biochemistry and anthropometric measurements. The EDMP assessed 609 patients in 2009 using a similar protocol. Type and duration of diabetes, diabetes control and diabetic retinopathy. A total of 127 (93.4%) and 8 (5.9%) participants reported having type 2 and type 1 diabetes, respectively, with a median (IQR) duration of 17 (14) years. The proportion of patients with poor diabetes control (HbA1c ≥ 7%) in the NEDMP was similar to the EDMP (64.0% and 68.2%, respectively; P = 0.411). A significantly higher proportion of patients with DR in the NEDMP were found to have poor diabetes control (HbA1c ≥ 7%) compared to those without DR (80.9% vs. 50.0%, P = 0.003). Almost two-thirds of NEDMP patients (74/118) had DR and 23% (27/115) had diabetic macular edema. The prevalence of DR was similar between the NEDMP and EDMP studies, ranging from 25-30% and 28-29%. The clinical characteristics, diabetes control, and DR severity of English and non-English-speaking patients were similar. The high proportion of poor diabetes management in non-English speaking patients with DR suggests educational and behavioural interventions to improve glycaemic control are warranted. © 2016 Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists.

  15. Optical coherence tomography angiography discerns preclinical diabetic retinopathy in eyes of patients with type 2 diabetes without clinical diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Dan; Yang, Dawei; Huang, Zhongning; Zeng, Yunkao; Wang, Jun; Hu, Yunyan; Zhang, Liang

    2018-05-01

    To investigate changes in retinal vascular plexuses and choriocapillaris in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) without diabetic retinopathy (DR) and healthy controls using optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA). A total of 71 DM2 and 67 healthy control subjects were included. All subjects underwent OCTA examination (RTVue-XR Avanti; Optovue, Fremont, CA, USA). Average vessel density in superficial capillary plexus (SCP), deep capillary plexus (DCP) and choriocapillaris, parafoveal vessel density in SCP and DCP, FAZ area (mm 2 ) in SCP, microaneurysms and capillary nonperfusion were taken into analysis. Parafoveal vessel density in both SCP and DCP decreased in the eyes without clinical DR compared to normal controls (p Diabetic patients with no signs of DR also had a significant reduction in average vessel density of SCP, DCP and choriocapillaris (p diabetic eyes, and capillary nonperfusion was noted in 18 of 71 diabetic eyes. We demonstrated that OCTA can identify preclinical DR before the manifestation of clinically apparent retinopathy in diabetic eyes. DM2 patients without DR have SCP, DCP and choriocapillaris impairment. Our results suggested that OCTA might be a promising tool for regular screening of diabetic eyes for DR.

  16. [Patient education: an indispensable element of care of patients with diabetes mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidvégi, Tibor

    2011-11-27

    Diabetes is a chronic and progressive disorder that impacts upon almost every aspect of life. The number of people with diabetes is continuously growing and diabetes is associated with a high mortality rate. Diabetes education is a critical element of care of people with diabetes in order to improve clinical outcomes. The therapeutic patient education is a planned and structured program that is comprehensive in scope, flexible in content, responsive to an individual's clinical and psychological needs, and adaptable to patients' educational and cultural background. The diabetes educator should control the implementation of education and should evaluate the patient's knowledge. The educator should be trained for care of patients with chronic diseases and for education of patients with diabetes mellitus.

  17. CT findings of pulmonary tuberculosis in diabetic and immunocompromised patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, Noriyuki; Ikezoe, Junpei; Johkoh, Tsuyoshi

    1992-01-01

    To evaluate the CT features of pulmonary tuberculosis in diabetic or immunocompromised patients, we reviewed CT of the chest in 42 adult patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis. Forty-two had some underlying diseases or immunocompromised conditions (31 diabetes mellitus, 6 malignancies, 2 long-term steroid therapy, 2 pneumoconiosis, and one anorexia nervosa). In diabetic or immunocompromised patients, a high incidence of non-segmental distribution (27%) and multiple small cavities in a cavitary lesion (45%) was observed. Unusual localization of the lesions such as lower lung field disease was observed in 18% of cases (the incidence of unusual localization in patients with no underlying disease was equal to diabetic or immunocompromised patients). (author)

  18. CT findings of pulmonary tuberculosis in diabetic and immunocompromised patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeuchi, Noriyuki; Ikezoe, Junpei; Johkoh, Tsuyoshi (Osaka Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine) (and others)

    1992-01-01

    To evaluate the CT features of pulmonary tuberculosis in diabetic or immunocompromised patients, we reviewed CT of the chest in 42 adult patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis. Forty-two had some underlying diseases or immunocompromised conditions (31 diabetes mellitus, 6 malignancies, 2 long-term steroid therapy, 2 pneumoconiosis, and one anorexia nervosa). In diabetic or immunocompromised patients, a high incidence of non-segmental distribution (27%) and multiple small cavities in a cavitary lesion (45%) was observed. Unusual localization of the lesions such as lower lung field disease was observed in 18% of cases (the incidence of unusual localization in patients with no underlying disease was equal to diabetic or immunocompromised patients). (author).

  19. Alteration in serum osteocalcin levels in patients with diabetic nephropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salem, E.S.; Abdel-Messeih, Ph.L.; Mansour, H.H.

    2013-01-01

    The fact that bone mass density (BMD) is not useful for assessing fracture risk in diabetic patients (DM) seems problematic, because those populations are increasing in every country. Osteocalcin (OC) is synthesized by osteoblasts and is considered to be a marker of bone formation. The present study was carried out to evaluate the usefulness of OC as noninvasive biomarker of bone formation in diabetes mellitus type 2 (uncomplicated) and diabetic nephropathy. Immunoradiometric assay(IRMA) was used for the quantitative measurement of human intact OC both N-terminal and C-terminal fragments in the serum of the control and the studied groups. OC levels in the uncomplicated diabetic group were significantly lower while in the diabetic nephropathy group was significantly higher compared to control values . There was a weak negative correlation between OC and both fasting blood glucose and glycated Hb% in the diabetic group. In diabetic nephropathy patients, a weak positive correlation was observed between OC and protein creatinine ratio. The results concluded that changes in bone remodelling marker OC are present in both DM type 2 and diabetic nephropathy explaining osteopenia and osteoporosis observed in both cases.Therefore, an effective glycaemic control should be the hallmark of prevention and treatment of diabetes mellitus induced osteoporosis

  20. Left ventricular hypertrophy in non-insulin-dependent diabetic patients with and without diabetic nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, F S; Ali, S; Rossing, P

    1997-01-01

    patients with normoalbuminuria (42 males, 61 +/- 7 years, group 2), and 22 non-diabetic control subjects (15 males, 58 +/- 8 years, group 3) were investigated. Previous antihypertensive treatment was withdrawn 2 weeks before the study. Left ventricular mass index (LVMI) and systolic function were......(-2), respectively (p prevalence of LVH was 42% (95% CI, 23-63) and 14% (95% CI, 2-43) (p = 0.07) in these two groups, respectively. In conclusion, normotensive and hypertensive NIDDM patients with and without diabetic nephropathy frequently suffer from LVH and relatively reduced......The aim of our cross-sectional case-control study was to evaluate putative mechanisms of the increased cardiac morbidity and mortality in NIDDM patients with or without diabetic nephropathy. Fifty-one NIDDM patients with diabetic nephropathy (38 males, age 61 +/- 8 years, group 1), 53 NIDDM...

  1. Role of myocardial perfusion SPECT in asymptomatic diabetic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, I.; Chun, K.; Won, K.; Lee, H.; Park, J.; Shin, D.; Kim, Y.; Shim, B.; Lee, J.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: It is important that early diagnosis and treatment of coronary artery disease in diabetic patients, but there are few reports on the prevalence of stress-induced myocardial perfusion abnormalities and the rates of cardiac event in patients with type 2 diabetes. We evaluated the scan findings on gated myocardial perfusion SPECT in asymptomatic diabetic patients. Methods: We performed pharmacological stress test and gated perfusion SPECT in 69 diabetic patients without cardiovascular symptom (mean age: 65 year, male 31 and female 38). Patients underwent two-day imaging protocol and stress study was performed injection of Tc-99m MIBI during adenosine infusion. We followed up these patients by reviewing medical records. Results: Fifty-two of 69 patients (74.5%) showed normal scan findings and 17 patients (24.6%) showed reversible or fixed perfusion defects. Three of 52 patients with normal scan findings showed decreased LV ejection fraction and decreased wall motion. Twenty-three patients with normal scan findings were possible to follow up for more than 1yr (mean time: 18.3±3.3 mo.) and they all had no cardiac event. Three patients with reversible perfusion defects were performed coronary angioplasty. Conclusion: Myocardial perfusion SPECT is a noninvasive method and maybe useful in early diagnosis and predicting prognosis in diabetic patients

  2. Ocular surface changes in type II diabetic patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Gao

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To detect and analyze the changes on ocular surface and tear function in type II diabetic patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR, an advanced stage of diabetic retinopathy (DR, using conventional ophthalmic tests and the high-resolution laser scanning confocal microscopy. METHODS: Fifty-eight patients with type II diabetes were selected. Based on the diagnostic criteria and stage classification of DR, the patients were divided into the non-DR (NDR group and the PDR group. Thirty-six patients with cataract but no other ocular and systemic disease were included as non-diabetic controls. All the patients were subjected to the conventional clinical tests of corneal sensitivity, Schirmer I Test, and corneal fluorescein staining. The non-invasive tear film break-up time (NIBUT and tear interferometry were conducted by a Tearscope Plus. The morphology of corneal epithelia and nerve fibers was examined using the high-resolution confocal microscopy. RESULTS: The NDR group exhibited significantly declined corneal sensitivity and Schirmer I test value, as compared to the non-diabetic controls (P< 0.001. The PDR group showed significantly reduced corneal sensitivity, Schirmer I test value, and NIBUT in comparison to the non-diabetic controls (P < 0.001. Corneal fluorescein staining revealed the progressively injured corneal epithelia in the PDR patients. Moreover, significant decrease in the corneal epithelial density and morphological abnormalities in the corneal epithelia and nerve fibers were also observed in the PDR patients. CONCLUSION: Ocular surface changes, including blunted corneal sensitivity, reduced tear secretion, tear film dysfunction, progressive loss of corneal epithelia and degeneration of nerve fibers, are common in type II diabetic patients, particularly in the diabetic patients with PDR. The corneal sensitivity, fluorescein staining scores, and the density of corneal epithelial cells and nerve fibers in the diabetic

  3. Ocular surface changes in type II diabetic patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan; Gao; Yan; Zhang; Yu-Sha; Ru; Xiao-Wu; Wang; Ji-Zhong; Yang; Chun-Hui; Li; Hong-Xing; Wang; Xiao-Rong; Li; Bing; Li

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To detect and analyze the changes on ocular surface and tear function in type II diabetic patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy(PDR), an advanced stage of diabetic retinopathy(DR), using conventional ophthalmic tests and the high-resolution laser scanning confocal microscopy.METHODS: Fifty-eight patients with type II diabetes were selected. Based on the diagnostic criteria and stage classification of DR, the patients were divided into the non-DR(NDR) group and the PDR group. Thirty-six patients with cataract but no other ocular and systemic disease were included as non-diabetic controls. All the patients were subjected to the conventional clinical tests of corneal sensitivity, Schirmer I test, and corneal fluorescein staining. The non-invasive tear film break-up time(NIBUT) and tear interferometry were conducted by a Tearscope Plus. The morphology of corneal epithelia and nerve fibers was examined using the high-resolution confocal microscopy.RESULTS: The NDR group exhibited significantly declined corneal sensitivity and Schirmer I test value, as compared to the non-diabetic controls(P <0.001). The PDR group showed significantly reduced corneal sensitivity, Schirmer I test value, and NIBUT in comparison to the non-diabetic controls(P <0.001).Corneal fluorescein staining revealed the progressively injured corneal epithelia in the PDR patients. Moreover,significant decrease in the corneal epithelial density andmorphological abnormalities in the corneal epithelia and nerve fibers were also observed in the PDR patients.CONCLUSION: Ocular surface changes, including blunted corneal sensitivity, reduced tear secretion, tear film dysfunction, progressive loss of corneal epithelia and degeneration of nerve fibers, are common in type II diabetic patients, particularly in the diabetic patients with PDR. The corneal sensitivity, fluorescein staining scores,and the density of corneal epithelial cells and nerve fibers in the diabetic patients correlate with the

  4. Chromium level in prediction of diabetes in pre-diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahmatollah Rafiei

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chromium supplementations (Cr have been shown to exert beneficial effects in the management of type-2 diabetes. Prevalence of Cr deficiency in pre-diabetic patients is not well-understood, therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the extent of this prevalence. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional descriptive study, 132 pre-diabetic patients were recruited. The participants were randomly selected from those who referred to the Shariati Hospital in Isfahan, Iran. Blood samples are collected for measurement of Cr, insulin, fasting blood sugar (FBS, and two-hour post-load plasma glucose. The body mass index (BMI was calculated. Determination of Cr was carried out by atomic absorption spectrometry. Results: Thirty-four (31.5% patients had Cr deficiency and 74 (68.5% patients had normal Cr. There was no significant difference between sex, age groups (<50 years and ≥50 years and between patients with and without a family history of diabetes in both the groups. No significant differences in age, BMI, FBS or insulin were observed between two groups. In the group with a normal level of Cr, there was a significant reversed correlation between the Cr level and age, but no significant correlation existed between the Cr level and other factors in both groups. Conclusion: The levels of Cr deficiency are relatively common in patients with pre-diabetes, and it is necessary to screen patients with diabetes and pre-diabetes according to the American Diabetes Association guidelines, with regard to the Cr level and action should be taken to eliminate the Cr deficiency in these patients.

  5. Treatment Modality-Dependent Risk of Diabetic Ketoacidosis in Patients with Type 1 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoshina, Sari; Andersen, Gregers S; Jørgensen, Marit E

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence rates of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) according to treatment modality in patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D) in Denmark, either multiple daily injections (MDI) or continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII). MATERIALS AND...... events were lower among CSII users, while the opposite was true for the smaller clinics (P = 0.016). CONCLUSIONS: Delivery of CSII in large diabetes clinics with sufficient support and patient education may ensure that CSII treatment does not lead to an increased risk of DKA....

  6. Oxidative stress in diabetic patients with retinopathy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    one of the late complications of diabetes mellitus is diabetic retinopathy, which is a leading cause of acquired blindness. ... cataract. Chronic hyperglycemia and its associated ... microvascular disease. This may be ... as ulcers, neuropathy, and nephropathy which are ... 10 ml of venous blood was collected from the median.

  7. Management of Diabetes Mellitus in Patients with Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miulescu Rucsandra Dănciulescu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS is a human immune system disease characterized by increased susceptibility to opportunistic infections, certain cancers and neurological disorders. The syndrome is caused by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV that is transmitted through blood or blood products, sexual contact or contaminated hypodermic needles. Antiretroviral treatment reduces the mortality and the morbidity of HIV infection but is increasingly reported to be associated with increasing reports of metabolic abnormalities. The prevalence and incidence of diabetes mellitus in patients on antiretroviral therapy is high. Recently, a joint panel of American Diabetes Association (ADA and European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD experts updated the treatment recommendations for type 2 diabetes (T2DM in a consensus statement which provides guidance to health care providers. The ADA and EASD consensus statement concur that intervention in T2DM should be early, intensive, and uncompromisingly focused on maintaining glycemic levels as close as possible to the nondiabetic range. Intensive glucose management has been shown to reduce microvascular complications of diabetes but no significant benefits on cardiovascular diseases. Patients with diabetes have a high risk for cardiovascular disease and the treatment of diabetes should emphasize reduction of the cardiovascular factors risk. The treatment of diabetes mellitus in AIDS patients often involves polypharmacy, which increases the risk of suboptimal adherence

  8. Risk factors associated with diabetic retinopathy among type 2 diabetes patients at teaching hospital in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abougalambou, Salwa Selim Ibrahim; Abougalambou, Ayman S

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is the leading cause of blindness in the United States and it is the leading cause of new cases of blindness in adults aged 20-74. It is estimated that about 20% of patients with type 2 DM have evidence of diabetic retinopathy at diagnosis with diabetes. To evaluate the prevalence of DR and to determine risk factors related to diabetic retinopathy among type 2 diabetes patients attending endocrinology clinics at Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia (HUSM). The study design was observational prospective longitudinal follow-up study, the study was conducted with sample of 1077 type 2 diabetes mellitus outpatient recruited via attended the diabetes clinics at HUSM. Diagnosis of retinopathy is based on finding the diagnostic signs of retinopathy on eye exams by fundoscopy. Logistic regression analysis was used to assess the independent variables that affect the development of retinopathy. The prevalence of retinopathy was 39.3%. It has been noticed from this study findings, that the progression of retinopathy is been influenced by five independent risk factors such as duration of diabetes, presence neuropathy, total cholesterol at second and third visit and createnine clearance. DR is highly prevalent among type 2 DM. The progression of retinopathy is been influenced by five independent risk factors such as duration of diabetes, presence neuropathy, total cholesterol at second and third visit and createnine clearance. DR is a serious diabetic complication and public health strategies are required in order to reduce its risk factors and decrease its prevalence. Copyright © 2014 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Prevalence of Psychiatric Disorders in Patients with Diabetes Type 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Alireza Sajjadi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Psychiatric disorders are important complications of chronic diseases such as diabetes mellitus.Materials and method: In this descriptive study, 80 patients with diabetes type 2 referred to diabetes clinic of Zahedan in 2009. They were selected by simple randomized method, screened by General Health Questionnaire and assessed by psychiatric interview, if it was necessary.Results: Totally, 67.5% required an interview and 43.75% were diagnosed with a psychiatric disorder. Major depression were more prevalent (13.5% than adjustment disorders (15%.Conclusion: High prevalence of depression and adjustment disorder in diabetic patients needs psychiatric assessment and treatment as the main part, in the diabetes clinics

  10. Attenuated purinergic receptor function in patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thaning, Pia; Bune, Laurids T.; Hellsten, Ylva

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Extra cellular nucleotides and nucleosides are involved in regulation of skeletal muscle blood flow. Diabetes induces cardiovascular dysregulation but the extent to which the vasodilatatory capacity of nucleotides and nucleosides are affected in type 2 diabetes is unknown. The present...... study investigated: 1) the vasodilatatory effect of ATP, UTP, and adenosine (ADO) and 2) the expression and distribution of P2Y(2) and P2X(1) receptors in skeletal muscles of diabetic subjects. Research Design and Methods: In 10 diabetic patients and 10 age-matched controls, leg blood flow (LBF......-DM (1.5). The distribution and mRNA-expression of receptors were similar in the two groups. Conclusions: The vasodilatatory effect of the purinergic system is severely reduced in type 2 diabetic patients. The potency of nucleotides varies with the following rank order: UTP>ATP>>>ADO. This is not due...

  11. Evaluation of New-Onset Diabetes in Patients Presenting Emergency Service with a Diabetic Ketoacidosis Attack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yavuz Yiğit

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate the rate of new-onset diabetes mellitus (DM in patients presenting to our emergency department with diabetic ketoacidosis. Methods: We retrospectively evaluated hospital records of patients who presented to the Emergency Department at Istanbul Goztepe Research and Training Hospital between 01 April 2009 and 01 April 2011 and were diagnosed with diabetic ketoacidosis. 57 patients having complete clinical data were included in the study. Results: 45.6%of patients had type 1 DM, 33.3%- type 2 DM, and 21%of them were with new-onset DM. No statistically significant difference was found between type 1 DM, type 2 DM and new-onset DM patients with respect to arterial blood pH and HCO3 levels and serum sodium, potassium and plasma glucose levels at presentation as well as time of presentation (p>0.05, while HbA1c levels showed statistically significant difference in new-onset DM patients. Conclusion: No statistically significant difference was found between types of DM in patients diagnosed with diabetic ketoacidosis except for precipitating factors, age and HbA1c. Detecting high blood glucose levels in patients presenting to emergency room for reasons other than DM is not a rare condition. Cautious evaluation and recognition of these patients in emergency room for the possibility of undiagnosed DM is important for prevention of future diabetic ketoacidosis episodes. (The Medical Bulletin of Haseki 2013; 51: 168-72

  12. Red cell distribution width in type 2 diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nada AM

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Aml Mohamed Nada Department of Internal Medicine, Unit of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, Faculty of Medicine, Mansoura University, Mansoura, Egypt Objective: To study the indices of some elements of the complete blood count, in type 2 diabetic patients, in comparison with nondiabetic healthy controls; and to find out the effects of glycemic control and different medications on these indices. To the best of our knowledge, this study is novel in our environment and will serve as a foundation for other researchers in this field. Methods: This retrospective study included 260 type 2 diabetic patients on treatment and 44 healthy control subjects. Sex, age, weight, height, blood pressure, complete blood count, fasting plasma glucose, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c, and lipid profile data, were available for all of the study population. For diabetic patients, data on duration of diabetes and all medications were also available. Results: Red cell distribution width (RDW was significantly higher in diabetic patients than in control subjects (P=0.008. It was also higher in patients with uncontrolled glycemia (HbA1c >7% than those with good control (HbA1c ≤7%; P=0.035. Mean platelet volume (MPV was comparable in both diabetic patients and healthy controls (P=0.238. RDW and MPV did not significantly correlate with fasting plasma glucose, HbA1c, or duration of diabetes. Both aspirin and clopidogrel did not show a significant effect on MPV. Both insulin and oral hypoglycemic agents did not show a significant effect on RDW, mean corpuscular volume, MPV, platelet count, or white blood cell count. Diabetic patients treated with indapamide or the combined thiazides and angiotensin receptor blockers showed no significant difference in RDW when compared with the control subjects. Conclusion: RDW, which is recently considered as an inflammatory marker with a significant predictive value of mortality in diseased and healthy populations, is significantly higher in

  13. Barriers to exercise in obese patients with type 2 diabetes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Egan, A M

    2013-07-01

    Although regular exercise is a critical component of the management of type 2 diabetes, many patients do not meet their exercise targets. Lack of exercise is associated with obesity and adverse cardiovascular outcomes.

  14. [Sacubitril / Valsartan in patients with diabetes and heart failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandenburg, Vincent Matthias; Rocca, Hans-Peter Brunner-La; Marx, Nikolaus

    2016-10-01

    Sacubitril / Valsartan proofed to be an effective treatment compared to enalapril in reducing heart failure hospitalisations and mortality in patients with severe "Heart failure with reduced ejection fraction" (HFREF). Recent European cardiology guidelines attributed a class IB recommendation for Sacubitril / Valsartan in HFREF patients who remain symptomatic despite optimal treatment with ACE-I, a beta-blocker, and a mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist. There is a significant overlap between diabetic and HFREF patients and thus, efficacy assessment of Sacubitril / Valsartan is a clinically meaningful issue in the large subgroup of HFREF patients with diabetes. We discuss the present evidence why local authorities speculated about a potential interaction between the two diseases decreasing the efficacy of sacubitril/valsartan in terms of reducing relevant end-points in this cohort. Overall, Sacubitril / Valsartan is obviously a treatment option in diabetics with HFREF. However, diabetic cardiomyopathy needs to be recognised as a specific disease condition. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. Relationship between patient satisfactions with diabetes care and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-08-05

    Aug 5, 2013 ... Bener, et al.: Patients satisfaction evaluation and management of diabetes care. 219 ... socioeconomic status (SES), females and the elderly.[5‑8] .... the subject was standing bare feet and with normal straight posture. Weight ...

  16. Hypoglycemia in Patients with Diabetes and Renal Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazen Alsahli

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This article summarizes our current knowledge of the epidemiology, pathogenesis, and morbidity of hypoglycemia in patients with diabetic kidney disease and reviews therapeutic limitations in this situation.

  17. relapse in adiposity of type 2 diabetes patients following withdrawa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    In order to achieve optimum health status, Type 2 Diabetes (T2D) patients are usually encouraged to undergo ... This study investigated whether the gains of exercises on adiposity ..... the likelihood of morbidity, and prevention of weight gain.

  18. Patients with type 2 diabetes and difficulties associated with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-10-28

    ended questions. Setting and .... a perceived reluctance by patients with type 2 diabetes, .... regarding fear of injections was similar to that of other ... A holistic treatment ... generalise the findings to other race groups in the country.

  19. Haemorheological factors in diabetes mellitus patients in Obafemi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    . Fifty blood samples were analyzed, comprising of thirty (30) diagnosed diabetes mellitus patients attending chemical pathology Clinic in OAUTH Ile-Ife and twenty (20) from apparently health individuals. The haemorheological parameters ...

  20. Use of hypoglycemic plants by Tunisian diabetic patients

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rym Ben Othman

    2013-03-30

    Mar 30, 2013 ... hypoglycemic effect among 200 diabetic patients followed up at the National Institute .... logical activities of the many herbal remedies now being used to treat many diseases ... The persuasive appeal of alternative medicine.

  1. Illness perception, diabetes knowledge and self-care practices among type-2 diabetes patients: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kugbey, Nuworza; Oppong Asante, Kwaku; Adulai, Korkor

    2017-08-10

    Self-care practices among persons living with type-2 diabetes are very crucial in diabetes manages as poor self-care results in complications. However, little research exists within the Ghanaian context. This study examined whether type-2 diabetes patients' illness perception and diabetes knowledge significantly predict diabetes self-care practices. A cross-sectional survey design was employed and a total of 160 participants (45 males and 115 females) were sampled from a general hospital in Accra. A self-administered questionnaire measuring illness perception, diabetes knowledge and diabetes self-care practices as well as demographic checklist were used collect data. Results showed that illness perception and diabetes knowledge significantly predicted overall diabetes self-care practices. Analysis of domain specific self-care practices showed that patients' diet was significantly predicted by illness perception and diabetes knowledge. Exercise was significantly predicted by only illness perception while blood sugar testing and diabetes foot-care were significantly predicted by diabetes knowledge. Cognitive and emotional representation of diabetes and diabetes knowledge are key determinants of patients' diabetes self-care practices. It is therefore important that appropriate psychosocial interventions are developed to help patients' adherence to recommended self-care practices.

  2. Defects in α-Cell Function in Patients With Diabetes Due to Chronic Pancreatitis Compared With Patients With Type 2 Diabetes and Healthy Individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumme, Lena; Breuer, Thomas G K; Rohrer, Stephan; Schenker, Nina; Menge, Björn A; Holst, Jens J; Nauck, Michael A; Meier, Juris J

    2017-10-01

    Diabetes frequently develops in patients with chronic pancreatitis. We examined the alterations in the glucagon response to hypoglycemia and to oral glucose administration in patients with diabetes due to chronic pancreatitis. Ten patients with diabetes secondary to chronic pancreatitis were compared with 13 patients with type 2 diabetes and 10 healthy control subjects. A stepwise hypoglycemic clamp and an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) were performed. Glucose levels during the OGTT were higher in patients with diabetes and chronic pancreatitis and lower in control subjects ( P chronic pancreatitis and with type 2 diabetes ( P chronic pancreatitis. α-Cell responses to oral glucose ingestion and to hypoglycemia are disturbed in patients with diabetes and chronic pancreatitis and in patients with type 2 diabetes. The similarities between these defects suggest a common etiology. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  3. Emphysematous liver abscess in diabetic patient: two cases report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhim, Hyun Chul; Koo, Ja Hong; Kim, Sung Tae; Kim, Yong Soo; Koh, Byung Hee; Cho, On Koo

    1995-01-01

    There has not been any report on massive air-containing liver abscess in diabetic patients, although emphysematous cholecystitis or pyelonephritis is a well-known complication in them. Authors report two cases of emphysematous liver abscess in diabetic patient, which showed typical findings of massive air-containing hepatic abscess on ultrasonography and computed tomography, but very poor prognosis in spite of immediate and successful percutaneous drainage procedure

  4. Sulphonylurea monotherapy for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hemmingsen, Bianca; Schroll, Jeppe B; Lund, Søren

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a growing health problem worldwide. Whether sulphonylureas show better, equal or worse therapeutic effects in comparison with other antidiabetic interventions for patients with T2DM remains controversial.......Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a growing health problem worldwide. Whether sulphonylureas show better, equal or worse therapeutic effects in comparison with other antidiabetic interventions for patients with T2DM remains controversial....

  5. Periodontal status among patients with diabetes in Nuuk, Greenland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Lamer Schjetlein

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetes is becoming more common in the Greenlandic population. Patients with diabetes are more prone to periodontal disease. Periodontal status may have an effect on metabolic control. Objective: The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of periodontitis amongst patients with diabetes in Nuuk, Greenland, and secondly, to observe if dental care was associated with improved periodontal status and metabolic control. Study design: Observational cross-sectional study and a pilot study of a dental care intervention. Methods: Sixty-two Greenlandic patients with diabetes were included in the study. Data were collected from the Electronic Medical Records (EMR, in addition to a telephone interview. Patients were offered 3 dental examinations with a 3-month interval. The dental examinations consisted of a full-mouth assessment of number of remaining teeth and assessment of periodontal status. Patients received scaling and root planing, together with information and instructions on oral hygiene. Information on glycated haemoglobin (HbA1C values was collected from the EMR at each dental examination. Results: In this study, 21.0% (13/62 of patients with diabetes had periodontitis. About 42% had less than 20 teeth. The association between diabetes and periodontitis was known by 20 out of the 62 patients. Over half of the patients had been to a dental examination within the last year. The prevalence of periodontitis decreased significantly from 21.0 to 0% (p<0.001 after 3 dental examinations. No change in HbA1C levels was observed (p=0.440. Conclusion: Periodontitis was common among patients with diabetes in Nuuk. Dental health status based on Periodontal Screening Index (PSI and bleeding on probing (BOP seemed to improve after dental health care, indicating a need for increased awareness among patients and health care professionals. HbA1C levels were not improved among the patients.

  6. Burnout and diabetes: reflections from working with educators and patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charman, D

    2000-05-01

    Patients with Type-2 diabetes present with a range of psychosocial symptoms that, in combination with social and organizational pressures, often serve to exacerbate the stress of diabetes educators and contribute to burnout. Some of the more salient sources of both patient and educator stress are elaborated upon, and the nature of parallel processes between these two groups is noted. A case illustration with a burned-out diabetes educator demonstrates how enhancing self-understanding and achieving a greater sense of balance can reduce symptoms of burnout, depression, and anxiety. This article highlights the need for educators, and more broadly all health professionals, to develop self-management skills.

  7. Hearing loss in patients with diabetes mellitus Perdas auditivas em pacientes portadores de diabetes melito

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Hernandes Diniz

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between diabetes mellitus and hearing loss is described as 'controversial' in the literature, given that in the clinical realm many patients present dysacusis while others do not. AIM: this study aims to investigate the relationship between hearing loss and diabetes mellitus and add to the knowledge being developed in this area. STUDY DESIGN: cross-sectional clinical trial. MATERIALS AND METHOD: in our study we analyzed the medical charts of 50 adult patients of both genders, aged above 45 years, and diagnosed with diabetes mellitus, seen in our institution in 2006 and 2007, and compared them to the charts of 50 metabolic disease-free individuals. RESULTS: this study found statistically significant worse audiometric thresholds among patients with diabetes mellitus when compared to patients in the control group. CONCLUSION: the results identified in this study point to a correlation between hearing loss and diabetes mellitus. This possibility should therefore be further investigated by health care workers providing care to patients with diabetes mellitus, in the form of closer follow-up on the auditory health of this patient group.A literatura especializada descreve que a relação causa e efeito entre diabetes melito e perda auditiva é bastante controversa, visto que, na prática clínica, muitos pacientes apresentam disacusia e outros não. OBJETIVO: Investigar a relação entre perda auditiva e diabetes melito, a fim de contribuir para resultados mais precisos sobre o assunto em pauta. FORMA DE ESTUDO: Estudo clínico com coorte transversal. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: No presente estudo foram analisados os prontuários de 50 indivíduos adultos atendidos nos anos de 2006 e 2007, de ambos os sexos, com idade superior a 45 anos, portadores do diabetes melito, e 50 prontuários de indivíduos que não apresentaram doenças metabólicas. RESULTADOS: A presente pesquisa identificou uma piora dos limiares audiométricos dos pacientes com

  8. Use of Diabetes Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire in Diabetes Care: Importance of Patient-Reported Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshifumi Saisho

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The efficacy of diabetes treatment should not be evaluated solely by HbA1c levels as they should also focus on patient-reported outcomes (PROs, such as patient satisfaction, wellbeing and quality of life. The Diabetes Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire (DTSQ has been developed to assess patient satisfaction with diabetes treatment. DTSQ has been translated into more than 100 languages and is widely used in many countries, since it is relatively easy to answer and is used for both patients with and without medical therapy. Novel therapeutic options, such as insulin analogs, incretin-based therapy and sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2 inhibitors, have been shown to improve patient satisfaction using DTSQ for assessments. DTSQ is not only used for comparisons between different medications or treatment strategies, but also can be used to assess the quality of diabetes care in clinical settings. This is important as an improvement in treatment satisfaction may enhance patients’ self-efficacy and adherence to therapy, leading to the achievement of long-term stable glycemic control and reduced risk of diabetic complications. In this review, we summarize the current topics in DTSQ, introducing our own experience, and discuss the role of PROs in diabetes treatment.

  9. Diabetes complications in 1952 type 2 diabetes mellitus patients managed in a single institution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alwakeel, Jamal S.; Suliman, R.; Tarif, N.; Al-Suwaida, A.; Hammad, D.; Al-Asaad, H.; Al-Harbi, A.; Al-Mohaya, S.; Alam, A.

    2008-01-01

    Because there is no recent update on the state of diabetes and its concomitant applications in Saudi Arabia, we undertook a study of the prevalence of health complications in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus admitted to our institution. We conducted a retrospective review of medical results of adult Saudi patients with type 2 diabetes who were seen in clinics or admitted to the Security Forces Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, between January 1989 and January 2004. Of 1952, 943 (48.3%) were males. For the whole study population the mean age at enrollment was 58.4+-14.2 years, the mean age at the onset of diabetes was 48.1+-12.8 years, the mean duration of diabetes was 10.4+-7.5 years, and the mean duration of follow-up was 7.9+-4.6 years. Nephropathy was the most prevalent complication, occurring in 626 patients (32.1%). Acute coronary syndrome occurred in 451 (23.1%), cataracts in 447 (22.9$), retinopathy in 326 (16.7%), and myocardial infarction in 279 (14.3%), Doubling of serum ceartinine was seen in 250 (12.8%) and 79 (4.0%) went into dialysis. Hypertension was present in 1524 (78.1%) dyslipidemia in 764 (39.1%). Overall mortality was 8.2%. Multiple complications were frequent. Males had higher prevalence of complications than females (P<.05). Mortality was significantly higher in males 92 (9.8%) than females 69 (6.8%) (P=.024). The prevalence of complications significantly increased with duration of diabetes and age (P<.05). Among Saudis, the prevalence of concomitant diabetic complications is high, with cardiovascular and renal complications the most frequent. Many patients had multiple complications. Early and frequent screening in patients with type 2 diabetes is desirable to identify patients at high risk for concomitant complications and to prevent disabilities. (author)

  10. Diabetes complications in 1952 type 2 diabetes mellitus patients managed in a single institution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alwakeel, Jamal S; Suliman, R; Tarif, N; Al-Suwaida, A; Hammad, D [Dept. of Medicine, Security Forces, Hospital, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Al-Asaad, H; Al-Harbi, A; Al-Mohaya, S [Coll. of Medicine and Research Center, King Khalid Univ. Hospital, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Alam, A [Dept. of Family and Community Medicine, King Khalid Univ. Hospital, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia)

    2008-07-01

    Because there is no recent update on the state of diabetes and its concomitant applications in Saudi Arabia, we undertook a study of the prevalence of health complications in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus admitted to our institution. We conducted a retrospective review of medical results of adult Saudi patients with type 2 diabetes who were seen in clinics or admitted to the Security Forces Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, between January 1989 and January 2004. Of 1952, 943 (48.3%) were males. For the whole study population the mean age at enrollment was 58.4+-14.2 years, the mean age at the onset of diabetes was 48.1+-12.8 years, the mean duration of diabetes was 10.4+-7.5 years, and the mean duration of follow-up was 7.9+-4.6 years. Nephropathy was the most prevalent complication, occurring in 626 patients (32.1%). Acute coronary syndrome occurred in 451 (23.1%), cataracts in 447 (22.9$), retinopathy in 326 (16.7%), and myocardial infarction in 279 (14.3%), Doubling of serum ceartinine was seen in 250 (12.8%) and 79 (4.0%) went into dialysis. Hypertension was present in 1524 (78.1%) dyslipidemia in 764 (39.1%). Overall mortality was 8.2%. Multiple complications were frequent. Males had higher prevalence of complications than females (P<.05). Mortality was significantly higher in males 92 (9.8%) than females 69 (6.8%) (P=.024). The prevalence of complications significantly increased with duration of diabetes and age (P<.05). Among Saudis, the prevalence of concomitant diabetic complications is high, with cardiovascular and renal complications the most frequent. Many patients had multiple complications. Early and frequent screening in patients with type 2 diabetes is desirable to identify patients at high risk for concomitant complications and to prevent disabilities. (author)

  11. The Relationship between Demographic Variables and Diabetes Self-Management in Diabetic Patients in Amman City/Jordan

    OpenAIRE

    Adwan, Mezyed A.; Najjar, Yahya W.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Diabetes is a chronic disease that requires routine and complicated self care. Although self care can be managed by most diabetes patients, there are many variables that may make diabetes self-management difficult. Aim: The study examined the relationship between clients? demographic variables and diabetes self-management in diabetic clients in Amman city/Jordan. Method: The data were collected through a self-completed questionnaire developed by the researchers and combined with t...

  12. Lipoprotein(a Serum Levels in Diabetic Patients with Retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Malaguarnera

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Atherogenic lipoproteins, such as total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, oxidized low density lipoprotein, and triglycerides, are associated with progression of retinopathy. Aim. To evaluate the relationship between lipoprotein(a and retinopathy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Materials and Methods. We enrolled 145 diabetic consecutive patients (82 females, 63 males; mean age 66.8±12 years, mean duration of diabetes 9.4±6.8 years. Presence and severity of retinopathy were evaluated. Serum lipid profile, including Lp(a level, was assessed. Results. High Lp(a levels have been observed in 54 (78.3% subjects and normal levels in 13 (18.85% subjects as regards diabetic patients with retinopathy. Lp(a levels were high in 15 subjects (21.75% and normal in 63 subjects (91.35% as regards patients without retinopathy. Conclusions. Lp(a levels are increased in a significant percentage of patients with retinopathy compared to diabetic patients without retinopathy. The impact of Lp(a levels on diabetic retinopathy needs to be further investigated.

  13. [Educational program to type 1 diabetes mellitus patients: basic topics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, Silmara A Oliveira; Zanim, Ligia Maria; Granzotto, Paula Carolina D; Heupa, Sabrina; Lamounier, Rodrigo N

    2008-03-01

    Type 1 diabetes incidence has been increasing worldwide, however the vast majority of patients do not have a good glycaemic control. This review focuses on diabetes educational programs designed for children, young adults and their families, as well as regular pump users educational tips, collected from papers published between 2000 and 2007. A comprehensive review of the literature has identified 40 articles describing the methods and the evaluation of diabetes self-management education interventions. Three research questions are posed. First: what are the recommendations and standards for diabetes self-management education from the different diabetes institutions/associations? Second: is there sufficient evidence to recommend any adaptation of any particular program? And third: Are the educational programs effective in lowering glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c)? The patient and his family should be instructed and trained to take appropriate decisions for diabetes management regarding their daily care. Diabetes self-management education improves glicaemic control (both in an individual basis as well as in groups) in such a way that the longer the education training in diabetes the better is the effect on glycaemic control is.

  14. Bilateral Ramsay Hunt syndrome in a diabetic patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goyal Amit

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Herpes zoster oticus accounts for about 10% cases of facial palsy, which is usually unilateral and complete and full recovery occurs in only about 20% of untreated patients. Bilateral herpes zoster oticus can sometime occur in immunocompromised patients, though incidence is very rare. Case presentation Diabetic male, 57 year old presented to us with bilateral facial palsy due to herpes zoster oticus. Patient was having bilateral mild to moderate sensorineural hearing loss. Patient was treated with appropriate metabolic control, anti-inflammatory drugs and intravenous acyclovir. Due to uncontrolled diabetes, glucocorticoids were not used in this patient. Significant improvement in hearing status and facial nerve functions were seen in this patient. Conclusions Herpes zoster causes severe infections in diabetic patients and can be a cause of bilateral facial palsy and bilateral Ramsay Hunt syndrome. Herpes zoster in diabetic patients should be treated with appropriate metabolic control, NSAIDS and intravenous acyclovir, which we feel should be started at the earliest. Glucocorticoids should be avoided in diabetic patients.

  15. Study of Knowledge and Practice of Patient Self directed Care among Diabetics Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Abedini

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and ObjectivesDiabetic patients play the main role in the management of their disease. Adequate knowledge of this disease state and self directed patient care will improve the health of these patients. Some studies have indicated a high prevalence of diabetes complication are due to the lack of knowledge of self directed patient care and practice in diabetic patient group. The objective of this study is to measure the knowledge level of self directed patient care and practice in order to evaluate their effects on improvement of diabetic patients' health in the city of Qom, Iran.MethodsIn this cross sectional study 1004 patients with diabetes participated (During year 2006. Data were collected from patients of General Hospital metabolism and endocrine research center.An interviewing method was used to asses the demographics data, history of disease, and knowledge of self directed patient care in these patients. Data were analyzed using a descriptive statistic, chi-square, and Pearson correlation coefficient, and SPSS software.ResultsOut of 1004 observed case, 154 patients were with Diabetes type I and 850 patients with Diabetes type II. The knowledge of self directed patient care and practice level of with both types of diabetes were determined to be mostly at an intermediate level. In type I diabetic patients there was a significant relation between knowledge level of self directed patient care and gender of the patients (P=0.01. Also, there was a significant correlation between practice and age (P=0.03(, and economical status (P=0.06 of the patients. In type II diabetic patients there was a significant relation between knowledge level of self directed patient care and educational level (P=0.00(, and economical status (P=0.01 of the patients. The practice level of self directed patient care was significantly related to economical status (p=0.03 in this group of patients. ConclusionThese results indicate that an increase in knowledge

  16. Action on diabetic macular oedema: achieving optimal patient management in treating visual impairment due to diabetic eye disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gale, R; Scanlon, P H; Evans, M; Ghanchi, F; Yang, Y; Silvestri, G; Freeman, M; Maisey, A; Napier, J

    2017-05-01

    This paper identifies best practice recommendations for managing diabetes and sight-threatening diabetic eye disease. The authors provide an update for ophthalmologists and allied healthcare professionals on key aspects of diabetes management, supported by a review of the pertinent literature, and recommend practice principles for optimal patient management in treating visual impairment due to diabetic eye disease. In people with diabetes, early optimal glycaemic control reduces the long-term risk of both microvascular and macrovascular complications. The authors propose more can and should be done to maximise metabolic control, promote appropriate behavioural modifications and encourage timely treatment intensification when indicated to ameliorate diabetes-related complications. All people with diabetes should be screened for sight-threatening diabetic retinopathy promptly and regularly. It is shown that attitudes towards treatment adherence in diabetic macular oedema appear to mirror patients' views and health behaviours towards the management of their own diabetes. Awareness of diabetic macular oedema remains low among people with diabetes, who need access to education early in their disease about how to manage their diabetes to delay progression and possibly avoid eye-related complications. Ophthalmologists and allied healthcare professionals play a vital role in multidisciplinary diabetes management and establishment of dedicated diabetic macular oedema clinics is proposed. A broader understanding of the role of the diabetes specialist nurse may strengthen the case for comprehensive integrated care in ophthalmic practice. The recommendations are based on round table presentations and discussions held in London, UK, September 2016.

  17. Subclinical hypothyroidism and diabetic nephropathy in Iranian patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansournia, N; Riyahi, S; Tofangchiha, S; Mansournia, M A; Riahi, M; Heidari, Z; Hazrati, E

    2017-03-01

    Association of subclinical hypothyroidism with type 2 diabetes and its complications has been previously documented. These reports were, however, inconclusive and mainly gathered from Chinese and East Asian populations. In this study, we aimed to determine the prevalence of subclinical hypothyroidism and its relationship with diabetic nephropathy in Iranian individuals with type 2 diabetes, drawn from a white Middle Eastern population with an increasing prevalence of diabetes. In this cross-sectional study, 255 Iranian participants with type 2 diabetes and without history of thyroid disorders were included. Patients with TSH > 4.2 mIU/L and normal T4 were classified as having subclinical hypothyroidism. Diabetic nephropathy was diagnosed based on abnormal 24-h urinary albumin or protein measurements (24-h urinary albumin ≥30 mg/day or 24-h urinary protein ≥150 mg/day). Multivariate logistic regression was employed to obtain the OR for the relationship between subclinical hypothyroidism and diabetic nephropathy. We found that subclinical hypothyroidism and diabetic nephropathy were as prevalent as 18.1 and 41.2 %, respectively, among the participants. We also found that subclinical hypothyroidism was independently associated with higher rates of diabetic nephropathy, after multivariable adjustment (OR [95 % CI] 3.23 [1.42-7.37], p = 0.005). We found that the prevalence of subclinical hypothyroidism in Iranian diabetic population was among the highest rates reported to date. Our data supported the independent association of subclinical hypothyroidism with diabetic nephropathy, calling for further investigations to evaluate their longitudinal associations.

  18. Comparison of diabetic ketoacidosis in patients with type-1 and type-2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barski, Leonid; Nevzorov, Roman; Harman-Boehm, Ilana; Jotkowitz, Alan; Rabaev, Elena; Zektser, Miri; Zeller, Lior; Shleyfer, Elena; Almog, Yaniv

    2013-04-01

    Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) occurs most often in patients with type 1 diabetes, however patients with type 2 diabetes are also susceptible to DKA under stressful conditions. The aims of our study were to evaluate and compare the clinical and biochemical characteristics and outcomes of type 1 versus type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) patients with DKA. A retrospective cohort study of adult patients hospitalized with DKA between January 1, 2003, and January 1, 2010. The clinical and biochemical characteristics of DKA patients with type-1 DM were compared with those of patients with type-2 DM. The primary outcome was in-hospital all-cause mortality. The study cohort included 201 consecutive patients for whom the admission diagnosis was DKA: 166 patients (82.6%) with type-1 DM and 35 patients (17.4%) with type-2 DM. The patients with DKA and type-2 DM were significantly older than patients with type-1 DM (64.3 versus 37.3, P ventilation and bed-ridden state were independent predictors of 30-day mortality.

  19. DIABETES MELLITUS IN PATIENTS WITH LIVER CIRRHOSIS: NEW TREATMENT OPTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Yu. Morgunov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In economically developed countries, cirrhosis is one of the six leading causes of death at the age of 35–60 years and ranges from 14 to 30 cases per 100000 population. In the world 40 million people die of cirrhosis each year. At 6% of the population of the Russian Federation there is a diabetes mellitus. The combination of diabetes mellitus in patients with cirrhosis of the liver is a common comorbid pathology. Diabetes mellitusis a risk factor for the development of liver cirrhosis, and the incidence of combination of both diseases is quite high, although the frequency of occurrence varies. About 80% of patients with LC may have impaired glucose metabolism, and 30% have diabetes mellitus. Prospective studies have shown that diabetes is associated with an increased risk of developing hepatic complications and death in patients with cirrhosis of the liver. Diabetes mellitus increases the risk of complications of liver cirrhosis of any etiology (varicose veins of the esophagus, hepatic encephalopathy, hepatic-cell insufficiency and subsequent survival. The incidence, frequency of hospitalizations and mortality from this combined pathology are very high. There are common mechanisms that provoke metabolic and autoimmune disorders in the development of chronic hepatitis and cirrhosis, leading to steatosis, insulin resistance, impaired glucose tolerance and the development of diabetes mellitus. There are certain features of the evaluation of the compensation of carbohydrate metabolism in patients with cirrhosis of the liver, anemia and impaired protein metabolism. Effective control of glycemia can have a beneficial effect on the treatment of these patients. However, few studies have evaluated the efficacy and safety of antidiabetic drugs and the effect of diabetes treatment on morbidity and mortality in patients with cirrhosis. Previously it was believed that in the presence of cirrhosis the only treatment remains insulin. At present, in

  20. An Analysis, Using Concept Mapping, of Diabetic Patients' Knowledge, before and after Patient Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchand, C.; d'Ivernois, J. F.; Assal, J. P.; Slama, G.; Hivon, R.

    2002-01-01

    Assesses whether concept maps used with diabetic patients could describe their cognitive structure, before and after having followed an educational program. Involves 10 diabetic patients and shows that concept maps can be a suitable technique to explore the type and organization of the patients' prior knowledge and to visualize what they have…

  1. Transciptional profiling of myotubes from patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, CM; Højlund, K; Hansen, L

    2008-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Microarray-based studies of skeletal muscle from patients with type 2 diabetes and high-risk individuals have demonstrated that insulin resistance and reduced mitochondrial biogenesis co-exist early in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes independently of hyperglycaemia and obesity....... It is unknown whether reduced mitochondrial biogenesis or other transcriptional alterations co-exist with impaired insulin responsiveness in primary human muscle cells from patients with type 2 diabetes. METHODS: Using cDNA microarray technology and global pathway analysis with the Gene Map Annotator...... and Pathway Profiler (GenMapp 2.1) and Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA 2.0.1), we examined transcript levels in myotubes established from obese patients with type 2 diabetes and matched obese healthy participants, who had been extensively metabolically characterised both in vivo and in vitro. We have...

  2. Health coaching in diabetes: empowering patients to self-manage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong-Rieger, Durhane; Rieger, Francis P

    2013-02-01

    To effectively manage diabetes mellitus, patients must adhere to treatment recommendations and healthy lifestyle behaviors, but research shows many patients do not do this. Education is effective when combined with self-management support but peer-support programs do not lead to lasting changes. Health coaching, or professional support, can be highly effective if it focuses on developing self-efficacy and skills such as goal-setting, problem-solving and managing cognitive and emotional barriers. This overview discusses the benefits of patient self-management for chronic conditions such as diabetes, core competencies for health coaching, theoretical bases and principles of health coaching interventions, delivery methods and the evidence that health coaching works for diabetes self-management. Copyright © 2013 Canadian Diabetes Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Patient and professional delay in the referral trajectory of patients with diabetic foot ulcers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanders, A.P.; Stoeldraaijers, L.G.M.C.; Pero, M.W.M.; Hermkes, P.J.; Carolina, R.C.A.; Elders, P.J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Aims: A cohort study investigated referral and treatment trajectories of patients with diabetic foot ulceration consulting podiatrists. The study aims were to quantify patient, professional and treatment (=total) delay and to identify relationships between patient- or professional-related

  4. Association of Metformin Treatment with Reduced Severity of Diabetic Retinopathy in Type 2 Diabetic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Li

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To evaluate effects of long-term metformin on the severity of diabetic retinopathy (DR in high-risk type 2 diabetic (T2D patients. Methods. A retrospective chart review study was conducted involving 335 DR patients with T2D ≥ 15 years from 1990 to 2013. The severity of DR was determined by Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study scale. The associations between metformin and DR severity were evaluated. Comparison with stratification for the use of sulfonylurea and insulin was performed to identify possible confounding effects. Results. Severe nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy or proliferative diabetic retinopathy (SNPDR/PDR was more often diagnosed in nonmetformin users (67/142, 47% versus metformin users (48/193, 25% (p<0.001, regardless of gender and race of the patients. The odds ratio of metformin associated with SNPDR/PDR was 0.37 in all cases (p<0.001, 0.35 in sulfonylurea use cohort (p<0.05, 0.45 in nonsulfonylurea use cohorts (p<0.01, and 0.42 in insulin use cohort (p<0.01. Insulin users had a higher rate of SNPDR/PDR. Metformin had no influence on the occurrence of clinical significant diabetic macular edema. Conclusions. Long-term use of metformin is independently associated with a significant lower rate of SNPDR/PDR in patients with type 2 diabetes ≥ 15 years.

  5. Short term outcome of Percutanous Coronary Intervention in diabetic and non-diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nouzari Y

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite recent improvement in coronary intervention, there are many controversies about it’s results in diabetic patients. The goal of this study is comparison of in hospital outcome of diabetics after coronary intervention with nondiabetics. Methods: In this study 115 diabetic and 115non diabetic patients who admitted for coronary intervention in our center during 1383&84 were entered in an analytic study of Cohort type. Datas about clinical, aniographic, procedural and post procedural (24hours characteristics were entered in each patient’s form. Independent T test,chi-square and Fisher’s exact test were used for analyzing datas. Results: The Diabetic Patients were most often older men, and they had higher angina class, more co-risk factors and lower ejection fractions. Diabetic’s lesions were longer and more located in proximal portion of vessels. But success rate, major complication (death, revascularization, Q Wave MI and CVA, and minor complications (coronary/peripheral arteries complication, pulmonary edema, ischemic ECG had no significant differences between two groups. Conclusion: Diabetes mellitus does not affect short outcomes of coronary intervention as an independent factor. So intervention could be done in these patients with considering favorable outcomes.

  6. From the diabetic foot ulcer and beyond: how do foot infections spread in patients with diabetes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragón-Sánchez, Javier; Lázaro-Martínez, Jose Luis; Pulido-Duque, Juan; Maynar, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    A diabetic foot infection is usually the result of a pre-existing foot ulceration and is the leading cause of lower extremity amputation in patients with diabetes. It is widely accepted that diabetic foot infections may be challenging to treat for several reasons. The devastating effects of hyperglycemia on host defense, ischemia, multi-drug resistant bacteria and spreading of infection through the foot may complicate the course of diabetic foot infections. Understanding the ways in which infections spread through the diabetic foot is a pivotal factor in order to decide the best approach for the patient's treatment. The ways in which infections spread can be explained by the anatomical division of the foot into compartments, the tendons included in the compartments, the initial location of the point of entry of the infection and the type of infection that the patient has. The aim of this paper is to further comment on the existed and proposed anatomical principles of the spread of infection through the foot in patients with diabetes. PMID:23050067

  7. Diabetes mellitus: a risk factor in patients with Graves' orbitopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalmann, R.; Mourits, M. P.

    1999-01-01

    AIMS: To assess the prevalence of dysthyroid optic neuropathy (DON) in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) and Graves' orbitopathy (GO) and to investigate the complications of surgery for GO in these patients. METHODS: The records of 482 consecutive patients with GO referred in a 5 year period were

  8. Effective Nurse Communication With Type 2 Diabetes Patients : A Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, Bob C.; Lokhorst, Anne Marike; Rutten, Guy E H M; van Woerkum, Cees M J

    Many type 2 diabetes mellitus patients have difficulties reaching optimal blood glucose control. With patients treated in primary care by nurses, nurse communication plays a pivotal role in supporting patient health. The twofold aim of the present review is to categorize common barriers to

  9. Effective Nurse Communication With Type 2 Diabetes Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, B.C.; Lokhorst, A.M.; Rutten, G.E.H.M.; Woerkum, van C.M.J.

    2015-01-01

    Many type 2 diabetes mellitus patients have difficulties reaching optimal blood glucose control. With patients treated in primary care by nurses, nurse communication plays a pivotal role in supporting patient health. The twofold aim of the present review is to categorize common barriers to

  10. Review of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in the diabetic patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punjabi, Paawan; Hira, Angela; Prasad, Shanti; Wang, Xiangbing; Chokhavatia, Sita

    2015-09-01

    This article reviews the known pathophysiological mechanisms of comorbid gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in the diabetic patient, discusses therapeutic options in care, and provides an approach to its evaluation and management. We searched for review articles published in the past 10 years through a PubMed search using the filters diabetes mellitus, GERD, pathophysiology, and management. The search only yielded a handful of articles, so we independently included relevant studies from these review articles along with related citations as suggested by PubMed. We found diabetic patients are more prone to developing GERD and may present with atypical manifestations. A number of mechanisms have been proposed to elucidate the connection between these two diseases. Studies involving treatment options for comorbid disease suggest conflicting drug-drug interactions. Currently, there are no published guidelines specifically for the evaluation and management of GERD in the diabetic patient. Although there are several proposed mechanisms for the higher prevalence of GERD in the diabetic patient, this complex interrelationship requires further research. Understanding the pathophysiology will help direct diagnostic evaluation. In our review, we propose a management algorithm for GERD in the diabetic patient. © 2015 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  11. Patients' expectations and solutions for improving primary diabetes care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vachon, Brigitte; Huynh, Ai-Thuy; Breton, Mylaine; Quesnel, Louise; Camirand, Michel; Leblanc, Jeannette; Tardif, Sylvie

    2017-07-10

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to document health care needs expressed by people living with diabetes, describe the solutions they envisaged for improving the quality of primary care (PC) services and empower them to make better use of PC services. Design/methodology/approach A participatory research approach was used. Six workshops were organised to provide diabetes patients with knowledge on available services and to engage them in sharing their experience. Group discussions were recorded. Data were analysed using the thematic analysis method. Findings In total, 79 persons living with diabetes for a mean of 13 years participated. Needs expressed were grouped under seven themes: assurance of satisfactory follow-up by a family physician, continuous access to services adapted to evolving needs, motivation to adopt and maintain healthy behaviours, maintenance of knowledge about diabetes, psychological support, financial constraints, and collaboration with secondary-level services. Patients proposed solutions for improving services that were grouped under five themes: facilitating access to services, disseminating information about available services, centralising diabetes information on the internet, offering personalised services and improving interprofessional collaboration. Practical implications Needs expressed by diabetic patients concern different aspects of care such as accessibility, organisation, coordination, and better dissemination and visibility of services. The solutions proposed by patients focussed on better access to information and interprofessional services. Originality/value The workshop format used in this study offers an original and interesting approach and tool for actively engaging patients in quality improvement of services.

  12. Increased Circulating Betatrophin Concentrations in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Espes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Betatrophin has recently been described as a key hormone to stimulate beta-cell mass expansion in response to insulin resistance and obesity in mice. The finding has generated an interest in the development of antidiabetic drugs with betatrophin as the active component. However, the circulating levels of betatrophin in patients with type 2 diabetes are not well known. Betatrophin concentrations in plasma of 27 type 2 diabetes patients and 18 gender-, age-, and BMI-matched controls were measured. Study participants were characterized with regard to BMI, waist and hip circumference, blood pressure, and fasting plasma blood lipids, creatinine, glucose, HbA1c, and C-peptide. HOMA2 indices were calculated. Betatrophin was 40% higher in patients with type 2 diabetes (893±80 versus 639±66 pg/mL. Betatrophin positively correlated with age in the controls and with HbA1c in the type 2 diabetes patients. All study participants were insulin resistant with mean HOMA2B IR in both groups exceeding 2 and HOMA2%S<50%. Control individuals had impaired fasting glucose concentrations. In this report on betatrophin concentrations in type 2 diabetes and insulin resistance, elevated betatrophin levels were measured in the patients with type 2 diabetes. Future studies are clearly needed to delineate the exact role, if any, of betatrophin in regulating human beta-cell mass.

  13. Achievement of therapeutic targets in Mexican patients with diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavalle-González, Fernando J; Chiquete, Erwin; de la Luz, Julieta; Ochoa-Guzmán, Ana; Sánchez-Orozco, Laura V; Godínez-Gutiérrez, Sergio A

    2012-12-01

    Complications of diabetes comprise the leading cause of death in Mexico. We aimed to describe the characteristics of management and achievement of therapeutic targets in Mexican patients with diabetes mellitus. We analyzed data from 2642 Mexican patients with type 1 (T1D, n=203, 7.7%) and type 2 diabetes (T2D, n=2439, 92.3%) included in the third wave of the International Diabetes Management Practices Study. Of T2D patients, 63% were on oral glucose-lowering drugs (OGLD) exclusively (mostly metformin), 11% on insulin, 22% on OGLD plus insulin, and 4% on diet and exercise exclusively. T2D patients on insulin were more likely to be trained on diabetes, but they were older, had worse control, longer disease duration and more chronic complications than patients on OGLD only. Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) diabetes did not reach therapeutic targets. Insulin was used mostly in complicated cases with advanced disease. Copyright © 2011 SEEN. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  14. Treatment of dyslipidemia in patients with type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijayaraghavan Krishnaswami

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Type 2 diabetes is associated with significant cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Although low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels may be normal in patients with type 2 diabetes, insulin resistance drives a number of changes in lipid metabolism and lipoprotein composition that render low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and other lipoproteins more pathogenic than species found in patients without type 2 diabetes. Dyslipidemia, which affects almost 50% of patients with type 2 diabetes, is a cardiovascular risk factor characterized by elevated triglyceride levels, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, and a preponderance of small, dense, low-density lipoprotein particles. Early, aggressive pharmacological management is advocated to reduce low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, regardless of baseline levels. A number of lipid-lowering agents, including statins, fibrates, niacin, and bile acid sequestrants, are available to target normalization of the entire lipid profile. Despite use of combination and high-dose lipid-lowering agents, many patients with type 2 diabetes do not achieve lipid targets. This review outlines the characteristics and prevalence of dyslipidemia in patients with type 2 diabetes and discusses strategies that may reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease in this population.

  15. The Spoken Knowledge in Low Literacy in Diabetes scale: a diabetes knowledge scale for vulnerable patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothman, Russell L; Malone, Robb; Bryant, Betsy; Wolfe, Catherine; Padgett, Penelope; DeWalt, Darren A; Weinberger, Morris; Pignone, Michael

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and validate a new knowledge scale for patients with type 2 diabetes and poor literacy: the Spoken Knowledge in Low Literacy patients with Diabetes (SKILLD). The authors evaluated the 10-item SKILLD among 217 patients with type 2 diabetes and poor glycemic control at an academic general medicine clinic. Internal reliability was measured using the Kuder-Richardson coefficient. Performance on the SKILLD was compared to patient socioeconomic status, literacy level, duration of diabetes, and glycated hemoglobin (A1C). Respondents' mean age was 55 years, and they had diabetes for an average of 8.4 years; 38% had less than a sixth-grade literacy level. The average score on the SKILLD was 49%. Less than one third of patients knew the signs of hypoglycemia or the normal fasting blood glucose range. The internal reliability of the SKILLD was good (0.72). Higher performance on the SKILLD was significantly correlated with higher income (r = 0.22), education level (r = 0.36), literacy status (r = 0.33), duration of diabetes (r = 0.30), and lower A1C (r = -0.16). When dichotomized, patients with low SKILLD scores (< or = 50%) had significantly higher A1C (11.2% vs 10.3%, P < .01). This difference remained significant when adjusted for covariates. The SKILLD demonstrated good internal consistency and validity. It revealed significant knowledge deficits and was associated with glycemic control. The SKILLD represents a practical scale for patients with diabetes and low literacy.

  16. Thyroid cancer risk is not increased in diabetic patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin-Hsiao Tseng

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study evaluated thyroid cancer risk with regards to diabetes status and diabetes duration, and with the use of anti-diabetic drugs including sulfonylurea, metformin, insulin, acarbose, pioglitazone and rosiglitazone, by using a population-based reimbursement database in Taiwan. METHODS: A random sample of 1,000,000 subjects covered by the National Health Insurance was recruited. After excluding patients with type 1 diabetes, 999730 subjects (495673 men and 504057 women were recruited into the analyses. Logistic regression estimated the odds ratios (OR and their 95% confidence intervals (CI for independent variables including age, sex, diabetes status/duration, anti-diabetic drugs, other medications, comorbidities, living regions, occupation and examinations that might potentially lead to the diagnosis of thyroid cancer in various models. RESULTS: The diabetic patients had a significantly higher probability of receiving potential detection examinations (6.38% vs. 5.83%, P<0.0001. After multivariable-adjustment, the OR (95% CI for diabetes status was 0.816 (0.652-1.021; and for diabetes duration <1 year, 1-3 years, 3-5 years and ≥ 5 years vs. non-diabetes was 0.071 (0.010-0.507, 0.450 (0.250-0.813, 0.374 (0.203-0.689 and 1.159 (0.914-1.470, respectively. Among the anti-diabetic agents, only sulfonylurea was significantly associated with thyroid cancer, OR (95% CI: 1.882 (1.202-2.947. The OR (95% CI for insulin, metformin, acarbose, pioglitazone and rosiglitazone was 1.701 (0.860-3.364, 0.696 (0.419-1.155, 0.581 (0.202-1.674, 0.522 (0.069-3.926 and 0.669 (0.230-1.948, respectively. Furthermore, patients with benign thyroid disease or other cancer, living in Kao-Ping/Eastern regions, or receiving potential detection examinations might have a significantly higher risk; and male sex, hypertension, dyslipidemia, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, vascular complications or use of statin, aspirin or non-steroidal anti

  17. A study of pulmonary function in end-stage renal disease patients on hemodialysis: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashima Sharma

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT BACKGROUND: The aim here was to study acute effects of hemodialysis among end-stage renal disease (ESRD patients. DESIGN AND SETTING: Prospective study in tertiary-level care center. METHODS: Fifty ESRD patients undergoing hemodialysis were studied. Spirometric pulmonary function tests were performed before and after four-hour hemodialysis sessions. RESULTS: The patients’ average age was 45.8 ± 10.0 years; 64% were males and 64% had normal body mass index. Anemia (94% and hypoalbuminemia (72% were common. Diabetes mellitus (68%, hypertension (34% and coronary artery disease (18% were major comorbidities. Forty-five patients (90% had been on hemodialysis for six months to three years. The patients’ pre-dialysis mean forced vital capacity (FVC and forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1 were below normal: 45.8 ± 24.9% and 43.5 ± 25.9% of predicted, respectively. After hemodialysis, these increased significantly, to 51.1 ± 23.4% and 49.3 ± 25.5% of predicted, respectively (P 0.05. The pre-dialysis mean forced expiratory flow 25-75% was 50.1 ± 31% and increased significantly, to 56.3 ± 31.6% of predicted (P < 0.05. The mean peak expiratory flow was below normal (43.8 ± 30.7% and increased significantly, to 49.1 ± 29.9% of predicted (P < 0.05. Males and females showed similar directions of change after hemodialysis. CONCLUSIONS: Pulmonary function abnormalities are common among ESRD patients. Comparison of pre and post-hemodialysis parameters showed significant improvements, but normal predicted values were still not achieved.

  18. Increase in overall mortality risk in patients with type 2 diabetes receiving different oral diabetes drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E A Pigarova

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Реферат по статье: Pantalone KM, Kattan MW, Yu C, Wells BJ, Arrigain S, Jain A, Atreja A, Zimmerman RS. Increase in overall mortality risk in patients with type 2 diabetes receiving glipizide, glyburide or glimepiride monotherapy versus metformin: a retrospective analysis. Diabetes Obes Metab. 2012 Sep;14(9:803-809.

  19. Role of autogenic relaxation in management of diabetic cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy in type II diabetes mellitus patients

    OpenAIRE

    Manish K. Verma; D. A. Biswas; Shambhavi Tripathi; N. S. Verma

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cardiac autonomic neuropathy (CAN) is a very common complication of Type II diabetes mellitus patients. Early detection and treatment of CAN is necessary for reduction of mortality and morbidity in type II diabetes patients. Methods: The study included 120 diagnosed cases of type 2 diabetes mellitus with autonomic neuropathy both male and female, with more than 5 years duration of disease. Age group of the study subjects was between 30 and ndash; 70 years. All the 120 diabet...

  20. Epidemiology and outcome in patients of diabetic foot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashraf, M.N.; Rehman, K.U.; Malik, K.I.; Iqbal, G.S.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The aim of study was detailed analysis of the presentation of diabetic foot ulcers, characteristics and predictors of outcome (incidence of amputation in neuropathic, ischemic, neuro ischemic) in patients presenting with diabetic foot at our hospital. Methods: This prospective analytic study was conducted from January 2009-August 2010 at POF Hospital Wah Cantt. Diabetic patients who presented with foot ulcers were enrolled in this study. Demographics of patients along with ulcer size, type, site and Grade according to Wagner Classification were recorded. Wounds were managed with daily dressings, nursing care and de-sloughing of necrotic tissue along with appropriate antibiotic cover. Patients were followed over period until wound healed completely or a lower limb amputation performed, the outcome noted and patient was deemed to have completed study. Results: One hundred and fifteen patients with mean age 55.46 +- 8.23 years, both male and female were included in this study. Out of 115 patients 111 patients had Type-II diabetes while only 4 presented with Type-I. Mean Duration of diabetes was 14.61 +- 2.17 years. With respect to underlying causes 18.3% foot ulcers were ischemic, 22.6% were neuropathic and 59% were neuro-ischemic. Median ulcer size was 74% of ulcer classified as Wagner grade-II and III while 24% were of Grade-V. Lower limb amputation were performed in 25% of patients whereas limb salvage achieved in 75% of patients with wounds healed (median healing time 5 (3-10 weeks). Conclusion: Preservation of the limb function without endangering the patient must be a goal of treating diabetic foot. Once foot amputation is successful, rehabilitation with orthotic or prosthetic devices may allow years of a functional extremity along with preventive measures like cessation of smoking, daily foot hygiene and foot inspection. (author)

  1. Association between information sources and level of knowledge about diabetes in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cántaro, Katherine; Jara, Jimena A; Taboada, Marco; Mayta-Tristán, Percy

    2016-05-01

    To evaluate the association between the type of information source and the level of knowledge about diabetes mellitus in patients with type 2 diabetes. A cross-sectional study was conducted at a reference diabetes and hypertension center in Lima, Peru, during 2014. Level of knowledge was measured using the Diabetes Knowledge Questionnaire-24 and 12 information sources. Patients with 75% correct answers were considered to have a good knowledge. Adjusted odds ratios were calculated. Of the total 464 patients enrolled, 52.2% were females, and 20.3% used the Internet as information source. Mean knowledge was 12.9±4.8, and only 17.0% had a good knowledge, which was associated with information on diabetes obtained from the Internet (OR=2.03, 95% CI 1.32 to 3.14), and also from other patients (OR=1.99, 95% CI 1.20 to 3.31). Good knowledge was also associated with postgraduate education (OR=3.66, 95% CI 1.21 to 11.09), disease duration longer than 12 years (OR=1.91, 95% CI 1,22 to 3.01), and age older than 70 years (OR=0.39, 95% CI 0.21-0.72). Search for information in the Internet was positively associated to a good level of knowledge. It is suggested to teach patients with diabetes to seek information on the Internet and, on the other hand, to develop virtual spaces for interaction of patients with diabetes. Copyright © 2016 SEEN. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Diagnosing diabetes mellitus in patients with porphyria cutanea tarda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Anne L.; Bygum, Anette; Hother-Nielsen, Ole

    2018-01-01

    The prevalence of diabetes mellitus is increased in patients with porphyria cutanea tarda. Different tests are available for diagnosing and screening for type II diabetes mellitus, however choosing the most suitable test is challenging. The pitfalls in the different tests along with the interfering...... comorbidities and treatments concerning patients with porphyria cutanea tarda complicate diagnosing these patients with diabetes mellitus. HbA1c, fasting glucose, or oral glucose tolerance are the current available tests, with HbA1c as first choice. Measuring HbA1c requires no fasting, however HbA1c can...... be false low if the patient is treated with phlebotomy or has liver cirrhosis or chronic hepatitis. Instead fasting glucose and oral glucose tolerance tests can be used if the patient is not acutely ill. If either of the tests give a result in the diagnostic range, the test should be repeated...

  3. Comparison of blood electrolytes and glucose during cardiopulmonary bypass in diabetic and non-diabetic patients

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    Golamreza Maasoumi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB during coronary artery bypass grafting is thought to contribute significantly to increased blood glucose level and altered blood electrolytes balance during the operation. In this (CABG study, blood electrolytes and glucose during CPB in insulin-dependent diabetic and non-diabetic patients were assessed with special emphasis on the trend of the changes. Materials and Methods: Blood glucose and electrolytes were assessed in 30 insulin-dependent diabetic and 30 non-diabetic patients, classified as class II and III American Society of Anesthesiologist, before, during, and after CPB. Repeated-measures analysis of variance (ANOVA was used to compare the trend of the changes during CPB for the two groups. Results: The trend in blood glucose level did not show any significant difference between two groups ( P = 0.59. For other blood factors, no significant between-group difference was detected except for PaCO 2 ( P = 0.002. Conclusion: The study suggested that the changes in blood electrolytes and the increase in blood glucose level do not differ between insulin dependent diabetic and non-diabetic patients.

  4. [Assessment and follow up of diabetic patients in hemodialysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanhueza, María Eugenia; Cotera, Alejandro; Elgueta, Leticia; López S, Gloria; Loncon, Patricia; Macan, Fernando; Pérez, Francisco; Cavada, Gabriel; Alvo, Miriam

    2008-03-01

    Despite a better management of the variables that influence the development of diabetic nephropathy there is a progressive increase in the prevalence of terminal renal failure among diabetics, whose cause is not clear. To study in a group of patients in hemodialysis, the quality of diabetes control previous to the entry to dialysis, their physical condition and their evolution. Diabetic patients with at least three months of hemodialysis answered a questionnaire about diabetes control quality previous to dialysis and had physical and laboratory assessment. They were followed for at least four years thereafter. Fifty seven patients aged 62+/-11 years were studied. Eighty four percent had some degree of disability. Eighty seven percent had high blood pressure and 73% had to enter dialysis as an emergency. Mean glycosilated hemoglobin was 7.7% and 58% had a dialysis dose with a Kt/Vofless than 1.2. Fifty eight percent died during follow up. No relationship between mortality and age, blood pressure, glycosilated hemoglobin of Kt/V, was observed. There is an inadequate management of blood glucose and blood pressure of diabetic patients before entry to dialysis. They are referred inverted exclamation markate to the nephrologist, the dialysis dose is insufficient and they have a high mortality.

  5. Periodontal disease in diabetic patients - clinical and histopathological aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corlan Puşcu, Dorina; Ciuluvică, Radu Constantin; Anghel, Andreea; Mălăescu, Gheorghe Dan; Ciursaş, Adina Nicoleta; Popa, Gabriel Valeriu; Agop Forna, Doriana; Busuioc, Cristina Jana; Siloşi, Izabela

    2016-01-01

    Periodontal disease is one of the most frequent diseases affecting people all over the world. The relation between periodontal disease and diabetes mellitus raised the interest both of dentists and doctors treating metabolic diseases, as the two conditions influence one another. In our study, we analyzed a number of 75 patients with diabetes mellitus and periodontal disease that presented to the medical consultory for conditions of the dental maxillary system. The clinical study showed that periodontal disease and diabetes may affect young adults as well, still this pathological association more frequently appears after the age of 50. The disease was identified especially in the women living in urban area. The clinical examination of the dental maxillary system identified the presence of gingival ulcerations, dental calculus, gingival bleeding, radicular leftovers with anfractuous margins, fixed prostheses with an inappropriate cervical adjustment. Of the systemic diseases associated to periodontal disease and diabetes mellitus, there was observed that 66.66% of the patients also suffered from cardiovascular diseases (high blood pressure, ischemic cardiopathy, heart failure), and 37.33% suffered from obesity. The histopathological and immunohistochemical tests highlighted the presence of an inflammatory chronic, intense reaction, mainly formed of lymphocytes, plasmocytes, macrophages and granulocytes, heterogeneously disseminated and alteration of the structure of marginal and superficial periodontium. The inflammatory reaction in the patients with periodontal disease and diabetes was more intense than in the patients with periodontal disease without diabetes.

  6. Tendinopathy in diabetes mellitus patients-Epidemiology, pathogenesis, and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, P P Y

    2017-08-01

    Chronic tendinopathy is a frequent and disabling musculo-skeletal problem affecting the athletic and general populations. The affected tendon is presented with local tenderness, swelling, and pain which restrict the activity of the individual. Tendon degeneration reduces the mechanical strength and predisposes it to rupture. The pathogenic mechanisms of chronic tendinopathy are not fully understood and several major non-mutually exclusive hypotheses including activation of the hypoxia-apoptosis-pro-inflammatory cytokines cascade, neurovascular ingrowth, increased production of neuromediators, and erroneous stem cell differentiation have been proposed. Many intrinsic and extrinsic risk/causative factors can predispose to the development of tendinopathy. Among them, diabetes mellitus is an important risk/causative factor. This review aims to appraise the current literature on the epidemiology and pathology of tendinopathy in diabetic patients. Systematic reviews were done to summarize the literature on (a) the association between diabetes mellitus and tendinopathy/tendon tears, (b) the pathological changes in tendon under diabetic or hyperglycemic conditions, and (c) the effects of diabetes mellitus or hyperglycemia on the outcomes of tendon healing. The potential mechanisms of diabetes mellitus in causing and exacerbating tendinopathy with reference to the major non-mutually exclusive hypotheses of the pathogenic mechanisms of chronic tendinopathy as reported in the literature are also discussed. Potential strategies for the management of tendinopathy in diabetic patients are presented. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Patient decision making: strategies for diabetes diet adherence intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavookjian, Jan; Berger, Bruce A; Grimley, Diane M; Villaume, William A; Anderson, Heidi M; Barker, Kenneth N

    2005-09-01

    Patient self-care is critical in controlling diabetes and its complications. Lack of diet adherence is a particular challenge to effective diabetes intervention. The Transtheoretical Model (TTM) of Change, decision-making theory, and self-efficacy have contributed to successful tailoring of interventions in many target behaviors. The purpose of this study was to develop a diagnostic tool, including TTM measures for the stages of change, decisional balance, and self-efficacy, that pharmacists involved in diabetes intervention can use for patients resistant to a diet regimen. A questionnaire was developed through a literature review, interviews with diabetic patients, an expert panel input, and pretesting. Cross-sectional implementation of the questionnaire among a convenience sample of 193 type 1 and type 2 diabetic patients took place at 4 patient care sites throughout the southeastern United States. Validated measures were used to collect respondent self-report for the TTM variables and for demographic and diabetes history variables. Social desirability was also assessed. Relationships among TTM measures for diet adherence generally replicated those established for other target behaviors. Salient items were identified as potential facilitators (decisional balance pros) or barriers (decisional balance cons and self-efficacy tempting situations) to change. Social desirability exhibited a statistically significant relationship with patient report of diet adherence, with statistically significant differences in mean social desirability across race categories. The TTM measures for the stages of change, decisional balance, and self-efficacy are useful for making decisions on individually tailored interventions for diet adherence, with caution asserted about the potential of diabetes patients to self-report the target behavior in a socially desirable manner. Future research directions, implications, and limitations of the findings are also presented.

  8. Analysis of cognitive status in patients with type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina V. Gatckikh

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cognitive impairment is a common complication of type 2 diabetes, greatly reduce the quality of life and daily functioning of patients, as well as have an impact on their compliance to therapy. Aim: Explore the nature and frequency of cognitive impairment in patients with type 2 diabetes, their relation to carbohydrate metabolism. Materials and methods: The study involved 113 patients with type 2 diabetes aged 40–70 years, with disease duration of more than 12 months; Control group consisted of 33 persons, stateless persons with type 2 diabetes, matched by age, sex, level of education, the presence of cardiovascular diseases such as hypertension and coronary heart disease. The complex included a survey of clinical and laboratory tests, instrumental, neuropsychological testing. To screen for cognitive impairment used by the Montreal Cognitive Assessment Scale (MоСа test, for the study of the frontal functions FAB (frontal dysfunction battery. Results: The study of cognitive impairment were diagnosed in 53,1 ± 9,2% of patients with type 2 diabetes, which is statistically significantly higher than in those in the control group 15,2 ± 12,2%. In patients with type 2 diabetes prevailed violations fronto-subcortical type with a reduction in short-term memory function, attention and constructive praxis. Cognitive impairment correlated with indices of carbohydrate metabolism (HbA1c, fasting glucose, disease duration 7 [5, 12] years and the patient's. Conclusions: These data confirm the impact of hyperglycemia as a major pathogenic factor and duration of the disease on the formation and progression of cognitive impairment in patients with type 2 diabetes.

  9. Study of 123I-IMP SPECT on diabetic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinoshita, Ikuo; Takeo, Goh; Iwanaga, Keisuke; Uotani, Shigeo; Nakamura, Minoru; Sohda, Masanori; Ohe, Haruto; Toshimitsu, Takashi; Ohe, Nobuharu

    1991-01-01

    The involvement of peripheral nerves and nerve roots often leads to neurological manifestations which have frequently been described in association with diabetes mellitus. Whether there is any specific involvement of the central nervous system in this process has yet to be determined. Recently, many reports have suggested that significant neurophysiologic abnormalities in the central nervous system can sometimes be found in diabetic patients. In order to accurately examine the existence of central nervous system involvement in patients with diabetes mellitus, comparisons of 123 I-IMP (IMP) washout rates were made between normal adults (n=19, average age 43.3 years) and diabetic patients (n=23, average age 43.3 years), and these results were graphically demonstrated by color images. Early images were obtained 30 minutes after intravenous injection, while delayed images were made 4 hours after injection. The IMP washout rate was obtained by subtracting the values of the delayed image with the early image. The standard deviation (SD) of the IMP washout rate for each patient was compared to the averaged SD obtained from healthy adults. After calculating the deviation from SD levels of healthy adults, we made an image of the patient's IMP washout rates. These images were divided into seven degrees (I, II: normal, III, IV: borderline, V∼VII: abnormal) and the ratio of each degree was expressed by a histogram in each cerebral hemisphere as the washout rate index. In 23 diabetic subjects, seven patients were found to be borderline while sixteen patients were abnormal. These impairments were not related either to the presence of diabetic triopathy or the duration of disease. By utilising such a noninvasive method, we were able to accurately evaluate the extent of diabetic central neuropathy. Therefore this subtraction method, which uses the specificity of IMP SPECT, is thus considered to be highly useful for broad clinical application. (author)

  10. Hypertension among 1000 patients with type 2 diabetes attending a national diabetes center in Jordan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mubarak, Fayzeh M.; Ajlouni, Kamel M.; Froelicher, Erika S.; Jaddou, Hashem Y.

    2008-01-01

    In Jordan there is a paucity of research on hypertension and its risk factors among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The study was designed to assess the prevalence of hypertension, risk factors and the level of awareness and control of hypertension among outpatients with type 2 diabetes. A cross-sectional study was carried out on a sample of 1000 patients with type 2 diabetes who were attending the National Center for Diabetes, Endocrine and Genetic Diseases for follow-up during the period of June to December 2006. Data were collected from medical records and through a structured interview questionnaire. Logistic regression analysis was used to assess the independent effect of variables on hypertension. The prevalence of hypertension (PB>130/80 or on medication for high blood pressure) was 72.4% (70.9% of males and 73.9% of females). The logistic regression indicated that hypertension was positively associated with age (P=0.001), body mass index (P=0.001). About one-half of patients who were aware of having hypertension failed to keep their blood pressure under control. Hypertension is a common co-morbidity among diabetic patients. Despite a high rate of awareness of hypertension among study subjects (93%), hypertension was not controlled to the recommended levels of blood pressure in one but a one-half (50.4%) of patients. (author)

  11. Improvements in Care and Reduced Self-Management Barriers Among Rural Patients With Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettori, Nancy; Flook, Benjamin N.; Pessl, Erich; Quesenberry, Kim; Loh, Johnson; Harris, Colleen; McDowall, Janet M.; Butcher, Marcene K.; Helgerson, Steven D.; Gohdes, Dorothy; Harwell, Todd S.

    2005-01-01

    Improved preventive care and clinical outcomes among patients with diabetes can reduce complications and costs; however, diabetes care continues to be suboptimal. Few studies have described effective strategies for improving care among rural populations with diabetes. In 2000, the Park County Diabetes Project and the Montana Diabetes Control…

  12. Unexpected cutaneous reactions in diabetic and pre diabetic patients treated with salsalate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adibi, N.; Faghihimani, E.; Mirbagher, L.; Sohrabi, H.; Toghiani, A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The most commonly reported side effects of salsalate are gastrointestinal events, and few reports are available on its cutaneous side effects. We therefore assessed cutaneous side effects among diabetic/pre-diabetic patients treated with salsalate. Methodology: In a randomized placebo-controlled trial, we evaluated cutaneous side effects in 52 diabetic and 124 pre-diabetic patients, 90 of whom received 3 g/day salsalate and 86 of whom receive a placebo for four weeks. The evaluation was carried out every week using a checklist completed by a single general practitioner. Results: The difference between the salsalate- and placebo-treated groups in overall prevalence of cutaneous reactions was not significant (26.7% versus 17.4%; P < 0.05). Side effects included urticaria (nine (10.1%) salsalate-treated versus six (6.9%) placebo-treated), rashes (five (5.5%) salsalate-treated versus three (3.4%) placebo-treated), pruritus (six (6.7%) salsalate-treated versus three (3.4%) placebo-treated), and edema (two (2.2%) salsalate-treated versus one (1.2%) placebo-treated); in addition, one (1.1%) case of erythema nodosum and one (1.1%) of vasculitis were observed in the salsalate-treated group. In the salsalate group, therapy was discontinued by the physician for three (3.3%) patients because of acute and severe vasculitis, erythema nodosum and urticaria and two (2.2%) patients stopped the treatment themselves because of mild urticaria compared with two patients who stopped using the placebo. Conclusions: Salsalate can cause several and, in some cases, severe cutaneous side effects in patients with diabetes/pre-diabetes. Because these cutaneous eruptions can raise various concerns, including patient non-compliance, greater attention should be paid to dermatological problems in patients under salsalate treatment. (author)

  13. Cardiac, renal and vascular complications in the diabetic patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Zanchetti

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes has long been known to be associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Patients with type 2 diabetes have also been shown to benefit more from antihypertensive therapy than do non-diabetics with hypertension. The benefits of aggressive antihypertensive therapy are reflected in the recent reduction of blood pressure (BP targets in international guidelines. Drugs acting on the reninangiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS have well-documented efficacy, and results from large-scale trials with highly selective angiotensin II (Ang II receptor blockers (ARBs, such as valsartan, are awaited. The VALUE trial will provide the largest body of information yet on the comparative benefits of using an ARB or calcium channel blocker in hypertensive patients with diabetes.

  14. Weight history of patients with newly diagnosed Type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olivarius, N de Fine; Richelsen, B; Siersma, V

    2008-01-01

    AIMS: To estimate and illustrate how the 10 years of weight change immediately preceding diabetes diagnosis vary with weight at the age of 20 years and with socio-demographic variables, risk factors and comorbidities at diagnosis. METHODS: Data were from a population-based cohort of 1320 persons...... newly diagnosed with diabetes aged > or = 40 years. Patients' weight at diagnosis was measured by the doctor, while patients recalled their weight approximately 1, 5 and 10 years prior to diagnosis and at age 20 years. RESULTS: Median weight gain from age 20 years to diabetes diagnosis at median age 65.......3 years was 14.7 kg (interquartile range 6.0-23.0). Women gained weight more than men, and the lower the weight at age 20 years, the greater the weight gain. The average weight gain from 10 years prior to diabetes diagnosis until diagnosis, however, was only 1 kg and decreased markedly with age. These 10...

  15. Brain changes in diabetes mellitus patients with gastrointestinal symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drewes, Anne M; Søfteland, Eirik; Dimcevski, Georg

    2016-01-01

    to stimulation of GI organs. Imaging studies on patients with diabetes and GI symptoms mainly showed microstructural changes, especially in brain areas involved in visceral sensory processing. As the electrophysiological and imaging changes were associated with GI and autonomic symptoms they may represent...... neuropathy of the central nervous system (CNS) may play a major role. This systematic review provides an overview of the neurodegenerative changes that occur as a consequence of diabetes with a focus on the CNS changes and gastrointestinal (GI) dysfunction. Animal models where diabetes was induced...... experimentally support that the disease induces changes in CNS. Recent investigations with electroencephalography and functional brain imaging in patients with diabetes confirm these structural and functional brain changes. Encephalographic studies demonstrated that altered insular processing of sensory stimuli...

  16. A low-fat diet improves peripheral insulin sensitivity in patients with Type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenfalck, A M; Almdal, T; Viggers, L

    2006-01-01

    To compare the effects on insulin sensitivity, body composition and glycaemic control of the recommended standard weight-maintaining diabetes diet and an isocaloric low-fat diabetes diet during two, 3-month periods in patients with Type 1 diabetes.......To compare the effects on insulin sensitivity, body composition and glycaemic control of the recommended standard weight-maintaining diabetes diet and an isocaloric low-fat diabetes diet during two, 3-month periods in patients with Type 1 diabetes....

  17. Assessment of diabetes among tuberculosis patients presenting at a tertiary care facility in Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Irfan

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: This study identified 11.4% diabetics among TB patients presenting to a tertiary care facility. Despite the high diabetes incidence in Pakistan, 71% of the diabetics in the group studied did not know their status. Given the negative impact of diabetes on treatment outcomes of TB, it is important that screening for diabetes be included as initial workup for TB patients. Identification and management of diabetes would result in improved outcomes for TB treatment.

  18. Incidence of diabetic macular edema and associated risk factors in a cohort of patients with type 1 diabetes in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Malin Lundberg

    Incidence of diabetic macular edema and associated risk factors in a cohort of patients with type 1 diabetes in Denmark. Rasmussen M.L.1, Pedersen R.B. 1, Sjølie A.K. 1, Grauslund J1 1University of Southern Denmark, Department of ophthalmology, Odense University Hospital, Denmark Purpose: To eval......Incidence of diabetic macular edema and associated risk factors in a cohort of patients with type 1 diabetes in Denmark. Rasmussen M.L.1, Pedersen R.B. 1, Sjølie A.K. 1, Grauslund J1 1University of Southern Denmark, Department of ophthalmology, Odense University Hospital, Denmark Purpose......: To evaluate the 16-year incidence of diabetic macular edema (DME) in a cohort of type 1 diabetic patients and to investigate possible risk factors of developing DME. Methods: This was a prospective cohort study of Danish type 1 diabetic patients. A total of 131 patients were examined at baseline in 1995...

  19. Prevalence of left ventricular hypertrophy in Type I diabetic patients with diabetic nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sato, A; Tarnow, L; Parving, H H

    1999-01-01

    , serum creatinine 109 (53-558) micromol/l], and 140 Type I diabetic patients with persistent normoalbuminuria [79 men, 47+/-10 years, urinary albumin excretion rate 8 (0-30) mg/24 h, and serum creatinine 81 (55-121) micromol/l]. Patients with and without nephropathy were comparable with respect to sex...

  20. Risk of bladder cancer in patients with diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goossens, Maria E; Zeegers, Maurice P; Bazelier, Marloes T

    2015-01-01

    Statistics (ONS). Patients diagnosed with diabetes mellitus type 1 or 2, or using antidiabetic drugs (ADDs), were compared to matched non-diabetic controls. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate the risk and mortality of UBC. We adjusted for age, sex, smoking status and body mass index....... RESULTS: The cohort included 329,168 patients using ADD, and 307,315 controls with 1295 and 1071 patients, respectively, diagnosed as having UBC during follow-up. The adjusted HRs of UBC were 0.77 (95% CI 0.57 to 1.05) and 1.04 (95% CI 0.96 to 1.14) for type 1 and 2 diabetes, respectively. These results...... haemoglobin. Mortality of UBC was not increased for patients with either type 1 (HR=0.95 (95% CI 0.39 to 2.34)) or type 2 diabetes (HR=1.16 (95% CI 0.91 to 1.46)). CONCLUSIONS: Neither the risk of UBC nor the mortality from UBC was increased in patients with type 1 and patients with type 2 diabetes...

  1. Anaplerosis in Complex Treatment of Patients with Diabetic Foot Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.G. Bezrodny

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the improvement of anaplerosis in patients with diabetic foot syndrome using skin flaps on vascular pedicle of the perforating vessels. The study involved patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus complicated with diabetic foot syndrome of neuroischemic form and chronic wounds of the lower extremities that do not heal for more than 21 days from the date of occurrence. The wounds were cleaned with ultrasonic cavitation. There was applied bandage with sorption antibacterial remedy base on nanodispersed silicon dioxide. There was applied a drainage vacuum bandage on a wound on the third day (VAC therapy. The flap is forming fitting to the size and configuration of a wound on a foot. Fourteen patients (93 % in the basic group were found to have survived flaps. Long-term follow up in 6 months demonstrated full maintenance of supporting function and good survived skin graft, absence of foot ulcers. In a control group 7 patients had recurrent foot ulcer. Improved techniques of autodermoplasty in patients with diabetic foot syndrome include glycemia control, preparation of a wound using vacuum apparatus bandage. Usage of split-skin graft combined with vacuum apparatus bandage allows close acute and chronic wounds effectively, maintain supporting function of an extremity, decrease in-hospital staying, and improve quality of patient’s life. Adequate foot wound closure prevents high-level amputation of low extremities in diabetic patients.

  2. Alcohol consumption among patients with diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Mathilde L; Larsen, Julie R; Glümer, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    AIMS: To estimate alcohol consumption among Danish adults with diabetes and to investigate whether certain comorbidities are related to a high alcohol intake. METHODS: A total of 162,283 participants responded to the Danish National Health Survey 2013 (questionnaire study, response rate 54.......0%). Variables on the participants were extracted from the survey and 6.5% of respondents reported having diabetes. High alcohol consumption was defined as >21 (men) or >14 (women) standard drinks per week. RESULTS: High alcohol consumption was reported by 11.2 % of men and 4.3% of women with diabetes...... a problematic alcohol intake (men OR 0.80, 95% CI 0.75-0.86, palcohol within the last year (men 13.5%; women 28.2%) compared with participants...

  3. Visual functions and disability in diabetic retinopathy patients

    OpenAIRE

    Shrestha, Gauri Shankar; Kaiti, Raju

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This study was undertaken to find correlations between visual functions and visual disabilities in patients with diabetic retinopathy. Method: A cross-sectional study was carried out among 38 visually impaired diabetic retinopathy subjects at the Low Vision Clinic of B.P. Koirala Lions Centre for Ophthalmic Studies, Kathmandu. The subjects underwent assessment of distance and near visual acuity, objective and subjective refraction, contrast sensitivity, color vision, and central a...

  4. Quality of primary health care and autonomous motivation for effective diabetes self-management among patients with type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne M Koponen

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This study showed, in line with self-determination theory, that of the six central quality dimensions of primary health care (access to care, continuity of care, diabetes counseling, autonomy support from one’s physician, trust, patient-centered care, autonomy support from one’s physician was most strongly associated with autonomous motivation (self-regulation for effective diabetes self-management among patients with type 2 diabetes ( n  = 2866. However, overall support for diabetes care received from friends, family members, other patients with diabetes, and health care professionals may even play a greater role.

  5. Potential effect of opium consumption on controlling diabetes and some cardiovascular risk factors in diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, Najmeh; Gozashti, Mohamad Hossain; Najafipour, Hamid; Shokoohi, Mostafa; Marefati, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    Due to this belief that opium may have beneficial effects on diabetes or cardiovascular risk factors, the present study aimed to assess the potential and possible effects of opium consumption on diabetes control and some cardiovascular risk factors in diabetic patients. This study enrolled 374 diabetic subjects from diabetes care centers in Kerman, Iran, including opium user group (n = 179) and a non-opium user group (n = 195). The data were collected through a questionnaire completed by interviewing, physical examination and laboratory assessment. Opium did not show any statistically significant effect on blood glucose, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1C), fasting blood sugar (FBS), low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and diastolic blood pressure. However, systolic blood pressure (SBP) and prevalence of high SBP were significantly higher in opium user group (P opium user group (P opium does not seem to have beneficial effects on diabetes control or cardiovascular risk factors. Therefore, it would not be advisable to consume opium as an anti-diabetes or cardioprotective agent.

  6. Navigating care for Bedouin patients with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunton, Shauna; Higgins, Alison; Amkraut, Jonathan; Abu-Rabia, Yones

    2016-03-04

    The Bedouin Arab population in the southern Negev region of Israel has faced health problems as a result of transitioning rapidly from a nomadic agricultural lifestyle to a more modern urban lifestyle. Like many populations around the world, the Bedouins have changed their diets and become more sedentary and this has led to a high rate of diabetes. In this case report, we examine how diabetes has affected the life of an influential man in the Bedouin community and the significance this case has in the greater context of a global rise in chronic disease. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  7. Adipsia in a Diabetes Insipidus Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Conceição Pereira

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Central diabetes insipidus is a very common disorder after brain surgery or/trauma or even in the presence of brain inflammatory diseases. Polyuria and polydipsia are the clinical markers, but sometimes clinical situations are presenting with no thirst. These are not frequent but are life-treating conditions. Diagnosis is not easy, and for this reason some cases are treated late. We describe here a very infrequent oncological case of dangerous adipsic diabetes insipidus in a young girl who survived.

  8. Diabetes Self-Management: A Key for Better Health-related Quality of Life in Patients with Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badr, Hanan E; Al-Khaledi, Maha; Al-Dousari, Hussah; Al-Dhufairi, Shaikhah; Al-Mousawi, Taiba; Al-Azemi, Rehab; Al-Azimi, Farah

    2018-04-17

    This study was aimed at assessing health-related quality of life (HRQOL) among adult patients with diabetes attending primary health care diabetes clinics in Kuwait and to examine the factors associated with patients with the HRQOL of patients with diabetes. This cross-sectional study was conducted among 503 patients with diabetes attending 26 primary healthcare diabetes clinics in Kuwait. A self-administered questionnaire on participants' socio-demographic and clinical characteristics, in addition to the Diabetes Self-Management Questionnaire (DSMQ) to assess patients' DSM was used. SF12 was employed to assess the HRQOL, producing two outcomes: Physical health composite and Mental health composite. The mean age of participants was 52. ± 0.8 years, 53.1% were males, and 49.0% were Kuwaitis. The median DSM sum score was 6.5. Male patients with diabetes showed significantly better median DSM sum score than female patients with diabetes. The overall median score of HRQOL was 61.7/100 with a better median score of PHC than MHC of quality of life (66.7/100 and 56.7/100, respectively). Multivariate analysis revealed a significant direct association between DSM and better primary health composite and mental health composite. It also showed that female gender, and reporting two or more diabetic complications were significantly associated with poor PHC. Kuwaiti patients with diabetes showed a modest level of HRQOL. Patients' DSM, gender, and diabetes complications were significant independent correlates to HRQOL. Appraisal of patients with diabetes' HRQOL as an essential component of diabetes management in clinical settings is suggested. Further studies to examine the impact of good diabetes self-management on HRQOL improvement are needed. . ©2018The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Saroglitazar for the treatment of dyslipidemia in diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Shashank R

    2015-03-01

    Diabetes and dyslipidemia are commonly associated modifiable risk factors for cardiovascular diseases. Majority of patients with diabetes also suffer from dyslipidemia (diabetic dyslipidemia). Diabetic dyslipidemia is more atherogenic as it is commonly associated with high triglyceride (TG) levels, high proportion of small dense low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) level (atherogenic dyslipidemia). Currently used pharmacotherapies for the management of diabetes and dyslipidemia like thiazolidinediones (PPAR-γ agonist; for insulin resistance) and fibrates (PPAR-α agonist; for hypertriglyceridemia) have many limitations and side effects. Saroglitazar , a dual PPAR-α/γ agonists, is an emerging therapeutic option with its dual benefit on glycemic and lipid parameters. This paper reviews the clinical development of saroglitazar for the management of diabetic dyslipidemia. The efficacy and safety profile of saroglitazar is reviewed in context to currently available therapy like pioglitazone for diabetes and fibrates for hypertriglyceridemia. In addition, this paper also reviews the association between diabetes and dyslipidemia and the role of TG in reducing cardiovascular events. Saroglitazar, a dual PPAR-α/γ agonist, is a potential therapeutic option for the management of diabetic dyslipidemia. It has dual benefit of significant improvement in glycemic parameters (glycated hemoglobin and fasting blood glucose) and significant improvement in dyslipidemia (TGs, apolipoprotein B, non-HDL-C). The results of Phase III clinical trials indicate that saroglitazar is devoid of conventional side effects of fibrates and pioglitazone. Future clinical trials of saroglitazar will further establish its place in the management of diabetes, dyslipidemia and associated cardiovascular risk.

  10. Osteoprotegerin as a Marker of Atherosclerosis in Diabetic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Areti Augoulea

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is the principal cause of cardiovascular disease (CVD and has many risk factors, among which is diabetes. Osteoprotegerin (OPG is a soluble glycoprotein, involved in bone metabolism. OPG is also found in other tissues, and studies have shown that it is expressed in vascular smooth muscle cells. OPG has been implicated in various inflammations and also has been linked to diabetes mellitus. Increased serum OPG levels were found in patients with diabetes and poor glycemic control. Furthermore, prepubertal children with type 1 diabetes have significantly increased OPG levels. Receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL is not found in the vasculature in normal conditions, but may appear in calcifying areas. OPG and RANKL are important regulators of mineral metabolism in both bone and vascular tissues. Few data are available on the relationship between plasma OPG/RANKL levels and endothelial dysfunction as assessed using noninvasive methods like ultrasound indexes, neither in the general population nor, more specifically, in diabetic patients. The aim of our review study was to investigate, based on the existing data, these interrelationships in order to identify a means of predicting, via noninvasive methods, later development of endothelial dysfunction and vascular complications in diabetic patients.

  11. Osteoprotegerin and mortality in type 2 diabetic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinhard, Henrik; Lajer, Maria Stenkil; Gall, Mari-Anne

    2010-01-01

    aimed to investigate the prognostic value of OPG in relation to all-cause and cardiovascular mortality in a cohort of type 2 diabetic patients. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS In a prospective observational follow-up study, 283 type 2 diabetic patients (172 men; aged 53.9 ± 8.8 years) were followed...... predictor of all-cause mortality in type 2 diabetic patients. The effect of OPG on all-cause mortality was independent of conventional cardiovascular risk factors, UAER, and NT-proBNP levels....... for a median of 16.8 years (range 0.2-23.0). Baseline plasma OPG concentrations were determined by immunoassay. RESULTS During follow-up, 193 (68%) patients died. High versus low levels of OPG predicted all-cause mortality (covariate-adjusted for urinary albumin excretion rate [UAER], estimated glomerular...

  12. Comparison of Oral Health Indicators in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients and Controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohit Sharma

    2011-01-01

    Conclusion: The results of present study demonstrate that gingival index, periodontal index and bone loss measurements in diabetic patients are significantly higher than nondiabetic patients. Smoking is also a promoting factor of periodontal disease in diabetic patients.

  13. Diabetic foot complications among patients attending a specialist diabetes clinic in Jamaica: prevalence and associated factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, T S; Tulloch-Reid, M K; Younger, N O M; Wright-Pascoe, R A; Boyne, M S; McFarlane, S R; Francis, D K; Wilks, R J

    2013-03-01

    To estimate the prevalence of diabetic foot complications among patients at a specialist diabetes clinic in Jamaica and identify factors associated with foot complications. A stratified random sample of 188 patients were interviewed and examined between 2009 and 2010. Trained nurses obtained demographic and clinical data, measured anthropometrics and performedfoot examinations including inspection for amputations, ulcers or infection and assessment of pain, vibration and pressure perception. Participants included 143 women and 45 men (mean age 56years; mean diabetes duration 16 years). The prevalence of amputations was 8.5% (95% CI 4.5, 12.5%) and was higher among men (22.2%) compared to women (4.2%, p foot infections was 4.3% and 3.7%, respectively. Overall, 12% ofpatients had at least one of these foot complications. Foot complications were more prevalent among men, patients with high blood pressure (BP > or = 130/80 mmHg) or peripheral neuropathy In multivariable logistic regression models, factors associated with foot complications were: neuropathy (OR 9.3 [95% CI 2.8, 30.3]), high BP (OR 7.9 [1.3, 49.7]) and diabetes duration (OR 1.32 [1.02, 1.72]). Approximately one of every eight patients in this specialist clinic had a major foot complication. Associated factors were neuropathy, high blood pressure and longer duration of diabetes.

  14. Fluorescence lifetime imaging ophthalmoscopy in type 2 diabetic patients who have no signs of diabetic retinopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweitzer, Dietrich; Deutsch, Lydia; Klemm, Matthias; Jentsch, Susanne; Hammer, Martin; Peters, Sven; Haueisen, Jens; Müller, Ulrich A.; Dawczynski, Jens

    2015-06-01

    The time-resolved autofluorescence of the eye is used for the detection of metabolic alteration in diabetic patients who have no signs of diabetic retinopathy. One eye from 37 phakic and 11 pseudophakic patients with type 2 diabetes, and one eye from 25 phakic and 23 pseudophakic healthy subjects were included in the study. After a three-exponential fit of the decay of autofluorescence, histograms of lifetimes τi, amplitudes αi, and relative contributions Qi were statistically compared between corresponding groups in two spectral channels (490diabetic patients and age-matched controls (p450 ps, and the shift of τ3 from ˜3000 to 3700 ps in ch1 of diabetic patients when compared with healthy subjects indicate an increased production of free flavin adenine dinucleotide, accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGE), and, probably, a change from free to protein-bound reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide at the fundus. AGE also accumulated in the crystalline lens.

  15. Diabetes self-management support for patients with low health literacy: Perceptions of patients and providers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fransen, Mirjam P.; Beune, Erik J. A. J.; Baim-Lance, Abigail M.; Bruessing, Raynold C.; Essink-Bot, Marie-Louise

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to explore perceptions and strategies of health care providers regarding diabetes self-management support for patients with low health literacy (LHL), and to compare their self-management support with the needs of patients with LHL and type 2 diabetes. This study

  16. Complications of ankle fracture in patients with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Saad B; Liporace, Frank A; Gandhi, Ankur; Donley, Brian G; Pinzur, Michael S; Lin, Sheldon S

    2008-03-01

    Ankle fractures in patients with diabetes mellitus have long been recognized as a challenge to practicing clinicians. Complications of impaired wound healing, infection, malunion, delayed union, nonunion, and Charcot arthropathy are prevalent in this patient population. Controversy exists as to whether diabetic ankle fractures are best treated noninvasively or by open reduction and internal fixation. Patients with diabetes are at significant risk for soft-tissue complications. In addition, diabetic ankle fractures heal, but significant delays in bone healing exist. Also, Charcot ankle arthropathy occurs more commonly in patients who were initially undiagnosed and had a delay in immobilization and in patients treated nonsurgically for displaced ankle fractures. Several techniques have been described to minimize complications associated with diabetic ankle fractures (eg, rigid external fixation, use of Kirschner wires or Steinmann pins to increase rigidity). Regardless of the specifics of treatment, adherence to the basic principles of preoperative planning, meticulous soft-tissue management, and attention to stable, rigid fixation with prolonged, protected immobilization are paramount in minimizing problems and yielding good functional outcomes.

  17. Is tetrahydrobiopterin a therapeutic option in diabetic hypertensive patients?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Francisco Rubio-Guerra

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Alberto Francisco Rubio-Guerra1, Hilda Vargas-Robles2, Luz Maria Ramos-Brizuela1, Bruno Alfonso Escalante-Acosta21Metabolic Clinic, Hospital General de Ticomán SS DF, Mexico; 2Department of Molecular Biomedicine, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, MexicoAbstract: Nitric oxide (NO is an important regulator of vascular tone, and is also an antithrombotic, anti-inflammatory, antiproliferative, and antiatherogenic factor. Endothelial function is altered in patients with coronary artery disease, stroke, and peripheral artery disease, and endothelial dysfunction correlates with the risk factor profile for a patient. Hypertension and type 2 diabetes are risk factors for vascular disease, and are both pathologies characterized by loss of NO activity. Indeed, endothelial dysfunction is usually present in diabetic and/or hypertensive patients. Tetrahydrobiopterin is an essential cofactor for the NO synthase enzyme, and insufficiency of this cofactor leads to uncoupling of the enzyme, release of superoxide, endothelial dysfunction, progression of hypertension, and finally, proatherogenic effects. Tetrahydrobiopterin is also an important mediator of NO synthase regulation in type 2 diabetes and hypertension, and may be a rational therapeutic target to restore endothelial function and prevent vascular disease in these patients. The aim of this paper is to review the rationale for therapeutic strategies directed to biopterins as a target for vascular disease in type 2 diabetic hypertensive patients.Keywords: tetrahydrobiopterin, endothelial dysfunction, diabetes, hypertension, oxidative stress, nitric oxide, eNOS synthase uncoupling

  18. Defects in α-Cell Function in Patients With Diabetes Due to Chronic Pancreatitis Compared With Patients With Type 2 Diabetes and Healthy Individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mumme, Lena; Breuer, Thomas G K; Rohrer, Stephan

    2017-01-01

    .0002) but not in patients with chronic pancreatitis. CONCLUSIONS: α-Cell responses to oral glucose ingestion and to hypoglycemia are disturbed in patients with diabetes and chronic pancreatitis and in patients with type 2 diabetes. The similarities between these defects suggest a common etiology.......OBJECTIVE: Diabetes frequently develops in patients with chronic pancreatitis. We examined the alterations in the glucagon response to hypoglycemia and to oral glucose administration in patients with diabetes due to chronic pancreatitis. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Ten patients with diabetes...... secondary to chronic pancreatitis were compared with 13 patients with type 2 diabetes and 10 healthy control subjects. A stepwise hypoglycemic clamp and an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) were performed. RESULTS: Glucose levels during the OGTT were higher in patients with diabetes and chronic...

  19. Dermatoses em pacientes com diabetes mellitus Skin lesions in diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N T Foss

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Ainda é desconhecida a relação do diabetes com fatores determinantes ou precipitantes de lesões dermatológicas em pacientes diabéticos. Assim, o objetivo do estudo foi investigar a presença de lesões cutâneas, não referidas pelo paciente diabético e sua relação com o controle metabólico da doença. MÉTODOS: Foram examinados 403 pacientes, dos quais 31% eram diabéticos do tipo 1 e 69% do tipo 2. Em ambulatório de um hospital universitário, os pacientes foram atendidos por endocrinologista para a avaliação endócrino-metabólica e por dermatologista para a avaliação dermatológica. O grau de controle metabólico foi documentado em 136 pacientes por meio da dosagem de hemoglobina glicada. RESULTADOS: Houve predomínio de dermatofitoses (82,6%, seguido de grupo de dermatoses como acne e degeneração actínica (66,7%, piodermites (5%, tumores cutâneos (3% e necrobiose lipoídica (1%. Entre as dermatoses mais comuns em diabéticos, foram confirmados com exame histológico: dois diagnósticos de necrobiose (0,4%, cinco de dermopatia diabética (1,2% e três casos de mal perfurante plantar (0,7%. Os valores da hemoglobina glicada foram: 7,2% em pacientes com controle metabólico adequado nos dois tipos de diabetes e de 11,9% e 12,7% nos tipos 1 e 2, respectivamente, com controle inadequado. Nos pacientes com controle metabólico inadequado foi observada freqüência maior de dermatofitoses, em ambos os tipos de diabetes. CONCLUSÕES: Os dados revelaram freqüência elevada de lesão dermatológica nos pacientes diabéticos, especialmente dermatofitoses. Dessa forma, o descontrole metabólico do diabético propicia maior suscetibilidade a infecções cutâneas.OBJECTIVE: It is yet unknown the relationship between diabetes and determinants or triggering factors of skin lesions in diabetic patients. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the presence of unreported skin lesions in diabetic patients and their

  20. Clinical outcomes in hypertensive or diabetes patients who ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The use of complementary medicines in addition to medical prescription by patients with hypertension, diabetes and other chronic diseases presents a challenge for healthcare providers in Nigeria and globally. There is very little data on the clinical outcomes in these patients. Objectives: To evaluate clinical ...

  1. Appraisal Of Quality Of Life Of Diabetic Patients, Including Life ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The review showed that patients with diabetes mellitus had signi cantly low ... of life (physical health, psychological health, social relations, and environment). ... of quality of life regarding gender, age, or the level of education of the patients. ... neuropathy, impaired vision, elevated blood lipids and amputation of toes or feet.

  2. Perioperative hyperglycaemia and its treatment in patients with diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polderman, J.A.W.

    2018-01-01

    This dissertation is divided into two parts. In part 1, we have investigated whether we should monitor glucose in patients without diabetes, in order to diagnose ‘stress hyperglycaemia’. Two studies in this dissertation showed that it is not necessary to monitor glucose in patients undergoing

  3. Plasma follistatin is elevated in patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J; Rinnov, Anders Rasmussen; Krogh-Madsen, Rikke

    2013-01-01

    Plasma follistatin is elevated in patients with low-grade inflammation and insulin resistance as observed with polycystic ovary syndrome. In the present study, we evaluated plasma follistatin in patients with type 2 diabetes characterised by low-grade inflammation and assessed the acute effects o...... of hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia and LPS on plasma follistatin....

  4. Identification of Drug Therapy Problems in Patients with Diabetes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DTPs) as well as the treatment pattern of patients with diabetes admitted to the medical wards of the Central hospital Benin City. A prospective descriptive survey of 40 patients was undertaken during a 3 month period in the male and female ...

  5. Diabetes mellitus among tuberculosis patients: a cross sectional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We monitored the fasting blood sugar of each patient by using a semi automated clinical chemistry analyzer followed by an HbA1c level check of all ... other hand, diabetic patients have weak cellular immunity, kidney problems and alveolar .... dividuals that may be due to weak immune system along with multiple ailments.

  6. Dyslipidemias in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients in Nnewi South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Dyslipidemia has been noted to play an integral role in the pathogenesis and progression of micro and macrovascular complications in diabetes mellitus patients. The complications exemplified by renal vascular and cardiovascular disease cause the most morbidity and mortality in this group of patients.

  7. Continuous intraperitoneal insulin infusion in patients with 'brittle' diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    DeVries, J H; Eskes, S A; Snoek, Frank J

    2002-01-01

    AIMS: To evaluate the effects of continuous intraperitoneal insulin infusion (CIPII) using implantable pumps on glycaemic control and duration of hospital stay in poorly controlled 'brittle' Dutch diabetes patients, and to assess their current quality of life. METHODS: Thirty-three patients were...

  8. Anti Diabetic Drug Utilization by Elderly Patients in a Tertiary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study is intended to determine the pattern and rational use of drugs in the elderly diabetic patients in a tertiary health care facility in Western Nigeria. ... Metformin was the most commonly prescribed antidiabetic medication for the patients followed by glimepiride (52.8%) (highest within age 50-59 years) and then ...

  9. Cost-effectiveness of telemonitoring of diabetic foot ulcer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fasterholdt, Iben; Gerstrøm, Marie; Rasmussen, Benjamin Schnack Brandt

    2016-01-01

    This study compared the cost-effectiveness of telemonitoring with standard monitoring for patients with diabetic foot ulcers. The economic evaluation was nested within a pragmatic randomised controlled trial. A total of 374 patients were randomised to either telemonitoring or standard monitoring...

  10. Dietary Treatment Options for Depression among Diabetic Patient, Focusing on Macronutrients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azadbakht, Leila

    2013-01-01

    There is a bidirectional adverse association between diabetes and depression. The odds for experiencing depressive symptoms in diabetic patients are two times more than nondiabetic persons, and depression is an independent predictor for the onset of diabetes. However, depression has been approximately unrecognized and untreated in two-thirds of diabetic patients, which may lead to worsened diabetes complications. A cornerstone strategy for managing depression among diabetic patients is the use of diet to improve both health problems. Because of similar pathophysiology for chronic diseases and depression, it seems that similar dietary recommendations could be useful. However, few studies have been conducted among diabetic patients. Regarding the complications of diabetes such as renal diseases and coronary heart diseases, the proper range of various macronutrients should be clarified in depressed diabetic patients as well as the proper type of each macronutrient. In this paper, we reviewed the available data on the treatment of depression in diabetic patients. PMID:24199205

  11. Ultrasonic Measurement of Common Carotid Intima-Media Thickness in Type 2 Diabetic and Non-Diabetic Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alizadeh, Ahmad; Roudbari, Ali; Heidarzadeh, Abtin; Babaei Jandaghi, Ali; Bani Jamali, Maryam

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a widespread disease. Its vascular complications can be characterized by arteriosclerosis formation in carotid arteries. Due to its delayed diagnosis resulting in more complications in Iran, it seems that screening diabetic patients is mandatory. The aim of this study was to compare the intima-media thickness (IMT) of carotid artery in diabetic and non-diabetic patients. This is a cross-sectional study, which included 80 participants (40 diabetics and 40 non-diabetics). By using ultrasound, bilateral IMTs of the distal carotid were measured and the data were analyzed using ANOVA and multivariate regression tests in SPSS 14. The mean IMT was 0.97 in diabetic patients and 0.63 in non-diabetics (P < 0.001). Age and gender had significant positive effects on the increase of IMT (P < 0.05 and P < 0.005, respectively for age and gender). Past medical history of coronary heart disease (CHD) and cerebrovascular accident (CVA) in diabetes is associated significantly with an increase in IMT (P =0.019 and 0.027 respectively). Other confounding variables such as smoking, history of hypertension (HTN) and hyperlipoproteinemia (HLP) in diabetic patients showed no significant relationship with the increase of IMT. Although measuring the IMT of the carotid artery by sonography is a useful tool for screening diabetic patients, more studies are needed for determining how to use these measurements in promoting the patients outcomes

  12. Physical activity level and exercise in patients with diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Camila Kümmel; Almeida, Jussara Carnevale de; Merker, Aline Juliana Schneider; Brauer, Fabiane de Oliveira; Rodrigues, Ticiana da Costa

    2012-01-01

    To compare physical activity level (PAL) and care related to exercise in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). DM outpatients (adult, insulin-user patients) were assessed for PAL (international questionnaire; moderate- and high-level activities, as well as walking, over a typical week) and questioned about formal exercise practice, self-care, and hypoglycemic episodes related to exercise or reasons for not exercising. Two hundred twenty five patients were assessed: 107 (47.6%) had type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) and 118 (52.4%) had type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM1), with a larger percentage of patients with DM2 being classified as poorly active [33 (30.7%) versus 12 (10.3%)] and a lower percentage being classified as highly active [9 (8.7%) versus 29 (25%)], compared with patients having DM1. Patients who do not exercise (n = 140) gave different reasons for not doing so: patients with DM2 claimed that they "felt uncomfortable", "presented medical restrictions", and "did not like it"; DM1 patients claimed that they "had no time to exercise", "were lazy", and "had hypoglycemic episodes". Only 85 patients exercised regularly, regardless of the PAL, and 38.8% performed self-care, such as eating, stretching, and capillary glucose monitoring. Patients with DM2 [5 (14.3%)] reported a lower number of hypoglycemic episodes related to exercise than those with DM1 [17 (34%)]. Patients with DM2 have different PAL and behavior related to exercise than those seen in DM1 patients.

  13. [Primary care for diabetic patients: a quality improvement cycle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Martínez, A; Suárez-Beke, M P; Sánchez-Nicolás, J A; Lázaro-Aragues, P; de Jesús Jiménez-Vázquez, E; Huertas-de Mora, O

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate and improve the quality of medical care provided to diabetic patients following the standards proposed by the American Diabetes Association. The study was conducted in three phases by analyzing data from the computerized clinical history of a sample of 340 patients. First phase (2010): cross-sectional, descriptive study which assessed the proportion of patients who met the standards related to the screening of diabetes, and goals of control and treatment. Subsequently, health professionals reviewed the results in order to promote the implementation of corrective action. Finally (2012), a new assessment with the same standards was performed. An increase in the number of patients treated with insulin (12.7% in 2010 and 20.2% in 2012) was observed (P < .01). There were also percentage increases in the number of patients who met the screening standards as regards analytical determinations: glycosylated hemoglobin (from 44.4% to 68.2%), lipid profile (47.6%-73.8%), creatinine (32.5% - 73.5%), and albumin-creatinine ratio (9.2%-24.4%) (P < .001). Only 6.4% (CI: 3.2- 9.8) of diabetic patients attained the composite target of glycosylated hemoglobin < 7%, blood pressure < 130/80 mmHg and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol < 100 mg/dl in 2012. This study shows that medical care has improved the goals related to analytical determinations and the number of insulin-treated diabetic type 2 patients. An optimal level was also maintained in metabolic control of diabetes, but there was still poor control of risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Copyright © 2014 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  14. Long-term renoprotective effect of nisoldipine and lisinopril in type 1 diabetic patients with diabetic nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarnow, L; Rossing, P; Jensen, C

    2000-01-01

    ). Two patients in the lisinopril group and three patients in the nisoldipine group entered therapy for end-stage renal failure. CONCLUSIONS: Long-term treatment with lisinopril or nisoldipine has similar beneficial effects on progression of diabetic nephropathy in hypertensive type 1 diabetic patients.......OBJECTIVE: To compare the long-term effect on kidney function of a long-acting calcium antagonist (nisoldipine) versus a long-acting ACE inhibitor (lisinopril) in hypertensive type 1 diabetic patients with diabetic nephropathy. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: We performed a 4-year prospective......, randomized, double-dummy controlled study comparing nisoldipine (20-40 mg once a day) with lisinopril (10-20 mg once a day). The study was double-blinded for the first year and single-blinded thereafter. The study included 51 hypertensive type 1 diabetic patients with diabetic nephropathy. Three patients...

  15. The Value of Urine Specific Gravity in Detecting Diabetes Insipidus in a Patient with Uncontrolled Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akarsu, Ersin; Buyukhatipoglu, Hakan; Aktaran, Sebnem; Geyik, Ramazan

    2006-01-01

    When a patient with diabetes mellitus presents with worsening polyuria and polydipsia, what is a sensible, cost-effective approach? We report the unique coincidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus and diabetes insipidus. A 46-year-old woman with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes complained of polyuria with a daily output of 5 L. Although urinalysis demonstrated significant glucosuria, diabetes insipidus was suspected owing to a low urine specific gravity (1.008). The low specific gravity persisted during a water deprivation test. Ultimately, diabetes insipidus was confirmed when urine specific gravity and urine osmolality normalized following desmopressin administration. This case emphasizes the importance of accurately interpreting the urine specific gravity in patients with polyuria and diabetes mellitus to detect diabetes insipidus. PMID:17026722

  16. Drug treatment of hypertension in older patients with diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yandrapalli, Srikanth; Pal, Suman; Nabors, Christopher; Aronow, Wilbert S

    2018-05-01

    Hypertension is more prevalent in the elderly (age>65 years) diabetic population than in the general population and shows an increasing prevalence with advancing age. Both diabetes mellitus (DM) and hypertension are independent risk factors for cardiovascular (CV) related morbidity and mortality. Optimal BP targets were not identified in elderly patients with DM and hypertension. Areas covered: In this review article, the authors briefly discuss the pathophysiology of hypertension in elderly diabetics, present evidence with various antihypertensive drug classes supporting the treatment of hypertension to reduce CV events in older diabetics, and then discuss the optimal target BP goals in these patients. Expert opinion: Clinicians should have a BP goal of less than 130/80 mm in all elderly patients with hypertension and DM, especially in those with high CV-risk. When medications are required for optimal BP control in addition to lifestyle measures, either thiazide diuretics, angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers, or calcium channel blockers should be considered as initial therapy. Combinations of medications are usually required in these patients because BP control is more difficult to achieve in diabetics than those without DM.

  17. Vitamin D deficiency in type 2 diabetic patients with hypogonadism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellastella, Giuseppe; Maiorino, Maria Ida; Olita, Laura; Capuano, Annalisa; Rafaniello, Concetta; Giugliano, Dario; Esposito, Katherine

    2014-02-01

    Both type 2 diabetes and secondary hypogonadism may be associated with low vitamin D levels. The aim of this study was to evaluate 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentrations in type 2 diabetic males with and without hypogonadism. We performed a case-control study among 122 male adults with type 2 diabetes, 51 with associated hypogonadism (Group 1) and 71 with normal gonadal function (Group 2). One hundred age-matched nondiabetic males with normal gonadal function served as a control group. Levels of 25(OH)D were assessed by a chemiluminescent immunoassay in all patients. Morning testosterone, pituitary, thyroid, parathyroid hormones, fasting glucose, and hemoglobin A1c were also evaluated. The overall diabetic population showed a mean 25(OH)D concentration (22.3 ± 6.09 ng/mL) significantly lower than the control group (34.3 ± 7.2, P hypogonadism as compared with the 9 patients with hypergonadotropic hypogonadism (19.4 ± 7.06 vs. 23.8 ± 6.11 ng/mL, P hypogonadism present lower 25(OH)D concentration and higher prevalence of vitamin D deficiency, compared with patients without hypogonadism. The finding that 25(OH)D concentrations were similar between type 2 diabetic patients with hypergonadotropic hypogonadism and those with normal gonadal function deserves further study. © 2013 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  18. Probiotic yogurt improves antioxidant status in type 2 diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejtahed, Hanie S; Mohtadi-Nia, Javad; Homayouni-Rad, Aziz; Niafar, Mitra; Asghari-Jafarabadi, Mohammad; Mofid, Vahid

    2012-05-01

    Oxidative stress plays a major role in the pathogenesis and progression of diabetes. Among various functional foods with an antioxidant effect, probiotic foods have been reported to repress oxidative stress. The objective of this clinical trial was to assess the effects of probiotic and conventional yogurt on blood glucose and antioxidant status in type 2 diabetic patients. Sixty-four patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, 30 to 60 y old, were assigned to two groups in this randomized, double-blind, controlled clinical trial. The patients in the intervention group consumed 300 g/d of probiotic yogurt containing Lactobacillus acidophilus La5 and Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12 and those in the control group consumed 300 g/d of conventional yogurt for 6 wk. Fasting blood samples, 24-h dietary recalls, and anthropometric measurements were collected at the baseline and at the end of the trial. Probiotic yogurt significantly decreased fasting blood glucose (P activities and total antioxidant status (P activity within either group (P > 0.05). The consumption of probiotic yogurt improved fasting blood glucose and antioxidant status in type 2 diabetic patients. These results suggest that probiotic yogurt is a promising agent for diabetes management. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Long-term outcomes of ophthalmosurgery in diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitriy Valentinovich Lipatov

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes morbidity grows steadily despite recent progress in its diagnostics and treatment. Its most frequent complication is retinopathy although thereare increasingly more cases of diabetic cataract, secondary rubeous (neovascular glaucoma, eyelid diseases, and transient impairment of vision.Aim To analyse late results of ophthalmosurgery in diabetic patients with vision problems.Materials and methods Over 24,000 patients were examined from January 2006 to November 2010 at the Department of Diabetic Retinopathyand Ophthalmosurgery, Endocrinological Research Centre. Results of more than 2660 seances of retinal laser coagulation and about 350 surgicalinterventions for diabetic cataract and secondary neovascular glaucoma were available for analysis.Conclusion Timely and correct application of retinal laser coagulation, modern facoemulsification of complicated cataract and drainage surgeryof uncompensated secondary rubeous glaucoma produces good functional results and permits to preserve or even improve visual acuity. The efficacyof surgical intervention is directly related to the quality of diabetes compensation and depends on the joint efforts of ophthalmologists, endocrinologists,and anesthesiologists.

  20. Selected antibacterial factors in the saliva of diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malicka, Barbara; Kaczmarek, Urszula; Skośkiewicz-Malinowska, Katarzyna

    2015-03-01

    Diabetes mellitus leads to many systemic complications, including changes in the morphology, function of the salivary glands, and the composition of saliva. The study comprised a randomly selected 156 adults, of both genders, aged from 21 to 79, out of which patients with diabetes type 1 and 2, and healthy subjects forming two control age- and gender matched to the ill subjects. In unstimulated mixed saliva, total protein, peroxidase, myeloperoxidase and immunoglobulin A were measured as well as salivary flow rate. The periodontal condition was assessed with the use of GI, mSBI and PSR index. The obtained data were analysed with the use of U Mann-Whitney's test, Spearman's rang correlation and Chi-square test at a significant level of p diabetics in comparison to healthy age and gender matched control group had a lower salivary flow rate (p diabetics in comparison to control subjects had a higher level of total protein concentration (p diabetes type 1 and 2 can cause abnormalities in salivary glands function resulting in the diminishing of salivary flow rate and the increase in total protein content. Higher levels of myeloperoxidase and IgA in the saliva can be linked to worse periodontal condition in the diabetic patients. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Intraerythrocyte and serum electrolytes in diabetic patients hypertension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasmin, F.; Haleem, D.J.; Haleem, M. A.

    2006-01-01

    To determine the serum and intraerythrocyte concentrations of vasoactive ions in patients of diabetes mellitus of either gender with hypertension. The study was conducted on 48 volunteers. Out of 48, 24(12 men and 12 women) were hypertensive patients with diabetes mellitus. Remaining (12 men and 12 women) were normal healthy subjects. Biochemical estimations were done by flame photometry and spectrophotometry. Data were analyzed by Two-way ANOVA followed by Newman-Keuls test. A decrease in serum concentrations of sodium, calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, chloride and intraerythrocyte potassium and an increase in the levels of glucose, haematocrit and intraerythrocyte sodium was observed in both male and female patients with diabetes mellitus and hypertension. No significant changes were observed in serum potassium levels. The results suggest that dysregulations of electrolyte balance caused by hyperinsulinemia or altered glucose metabolism may lead to hypertension. (author)

  2. Menu variations for diabetes mellitus patients using Goal Programming model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhoruri, Atmini; Lestari, Dwi; Ratnasari, Eminugroho

    2017-08-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) was a chronic metabolic disease characterized by higher than normal blood glucose level (normal blood glucose level = = 80 -120 mg/dl). In this study, type 2 DM which mostly caused by unhealthy eating habits would be investigated. Related to eating habit, DM patients needed dietary menu planning with an extracare regarding their nutrients intake (energy, protein, fat and carbohydrate). Therefore, the measures taken were by organizing nutritious dietary menu for diabetes mellitus patients. Dietary menu with appropriate amount of nutrients was organized by considering the amount of calories, proteins, fats and carbohydrates. In this study, Goal Programming model was employed to determine optimal dietary menu variations for diabetes mellitus patients by paying attention to optimal expenses. According to the data obtained from hospitals in Yogyakarta, optimal menu variations would be analyzed by using Goal Programming model and would be completed by using LINGO computer program.

  3. Severe hypoglycaemia in 1076 adult patients with type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen-Bjergaard, Ulrik; Pramming, Stig; Heller, Simon R

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Differences between studies in rates of severe hypoglycaemia in type 1 diabetic cohorts are common and poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to assess the frequency of severe hypoglycaemia in unselected patients treated in different secondary care centres and to evaluate...... the influence of risk markers, clinical setting and selection. METHODS: Cross-sectional Danish-British multicentre survey of 1076 consecutive adult patients with clinical type 1 diabetes who completed a detailed questionnaire on hypoglycaemia and related issues. Key variable was the self-reported rate of severe......, the rate of severe hypoglycaemia was 0.35 episodes/patient-year and only retinopathy was a significant risk marker together with state of awareness. CONCLUSION: Severe hypoglycaemia remains a significant clinical problem in type 1 diabetes. The rate of severe hypoglycaemia and the influence of risk markers...

  4. A Systematic Review: Family Support Integrated with Diabetes Self-Management among Uncontrolled Type II Diabetes Mellitus Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Pamungkas, Rian Adi; Chamroonsawasdi, Kanittha; Vatanasomboon, Paranee

    2017-01-01

    The rate of type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) is dramatically increasing worldwide. Continuing diabetes mellitus (DM) care needs effective self-management education and support for both patients and family members. This study aimed to review and describe the impacts of diabetes mellitus self-management education (DSME) that involve family members on patient outcomes related to patient health behaviors and perceived self-efficacy on self-management such as medication adherence, blood glucose moni...

  5. Diabetes-related emotional distress in Dutch and U.S. diabetic patients: cross-cultural validity of the problem areas in diabetes scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snoek, F. J.; Pouwer, F.; Welch, G. W.; Polonsky, W. H.

    2000-01-01

    To examine the cross-cultural validity of the Problem Areas in Diabetes Scale (PAID) in Dutch and U.S. diabetic patients. A total of 1,472 Dutch people with diabetes completed the PAID along with other self-report measures of affect. Statistics covered Cronbach's alpha, exploratory factor analysis

  6. Oral Soft Tissue Pathologies among Diabetic Patients in Rasht- 2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Hassannia

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Diabetes can affect organs including the oral mucosa. There is a disagreement about the prevalence of oral mucosal disease in diabetic patients. We therefore decided to investigate more about that. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of soft tissue pathologies by assessing burning mouth and xerostomia in diabetic patients on the basis of type of diabetes and control status of diabetes. Methods: This descriptive, analytic study was done by visiting 486 known diabetic patients who were referred to the Endocrine Clinic in summer of 2005. Their demographic information with history of systemic diseases accompanied by the amount of HbAIC and duration of disease was recorded in their questionnaire. Diagnosis of oral lesions was done by clinical examination. Burning mouth was assessed by visual analog scale in persons who suffered and subjective xerostomia was evaluated by standard questionnaire. Data collection was done by software SPSS 10, and statistical analysis was done by X2 and logistic regression test. Results: In this study, 34 patients were type I and 434 were type II patients with mean age of 47.84±9.77 years. Frequency of all candidasis lesions was 15.4% which included denture stomatitis 5.3%, angular cheilitis 4.1%, median rhomboid glossitis 1.5%and papillary atrophy of tongue 4.5%. Frequency of non-candidal lesions was 20.1%, which included fissured tongue 10.5%, geographic tongue 7.9% and lichen planus 1.7%. 6.2% of patients suffered from glossodyna. 15.6% of patients had xerestomia. By logistical regression test, we found that type of diabetes affects denture stomatitis, angular cheilitis, tongue atrophy and amount of HbA1c. Conclusion: All of the pathologies were greater in type I than type II diabetes patients. Level of HbA1c had an important role in appearance of oral lesions and level changes can cause problems in the mouth. Thus, patients should maintain their oral hygiene and control their glucose

  7. Angina and exertional myocardial ischemia in diabetic and nondiabetic patients: assessment by exercise thallium scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nesto, R.W.; Phillips, R.T.; Kett, K.G.; Hill, T.; Perper, E.; Young, E.; Leland, O.S. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Patients with diabetes mellitus and coronary artery disease are thought to have painless myocardial ischemia more often than patients without diabetes. We studied 50 consecutive patients with diabetes and 50 consecutive patients without diabetes, all with ischemia, on exercise thallium scintigraphy to show the reliability of angina as a marker for exertional ischemia. The two groups had similar clinical characteristics, treadmill test results, and extent of infarction and ischemia, but only 7 patients with diabetes compared with 17 patients without diabetes had angina during exertional ischemia. In diabetic patients the extent of retinopathy, nephropathy, or peripheral neuropathy was similar in patients with and without angina. Angina is an unreliable index of myocardial ischemia in diabetic patients with coronary artery disease. Given the increased cardiac morbidity and mortality in such patients, periodic objective assessments of the extent of ischemia are warranted

  8. Foot ulcers in the diabetic patient, prevention and treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Stephanie C; Driver, Vickie R; Wrobel, James S; Armstrong, David G

    2007-01-01

    Lower extremity complications in persons with diabetes have become an increasingly significant public health concern in both the developed and developing world. These complications, beginning with neuropathy and subsequent diabetic foot wounds frequently lead to infection and lower extremity amputation even in the absence of critical limb ischemia. In order to diminish the detrimental consequences associated with diabetic foot ulcers, a com-mon-sense-based treatment approach must be implemented. Many of the etiological factors contributing to the formation of diabetic foot ulceration may be identified using simple, inexpensive equipment in a clinical setting. Prevention of diabetic foot ulcers can be accomplished in a primary care setting with a brief history and screening for loss of protective sensation via the Semmes-Weinstein monofilament. Specialist clinics may quantify neuropathy, plantar foot pressure, and assess vascular status with Doppler ultrasound and ankle-brachial blood pressure indices. These measurements, in conjunction with other findings from the history and physical examination, may enable clinicians to stratify patients based on risk and help determine the type of intervention. Other effective clinical interventions may include patient education, optimizing glycemic control, smoking cessation, and diligent foot care. Recent technological advanced combined with better understanding of the wound healing process have resulted in a myriad of advanced wound healing modalities in the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers. However, it is imperative to remember the fundamental basics in the healing of diabetic foot ulcers: adequate perfusion, debridement, infection control, and pressure mitigation. Early recognition of the etiological factors along with prompt management of diabetic foot ulcers is essential for successful outcome. PMID:17583176

  9. Management of Hypertriglyceridemia in the Diabetic Patient

    OpenAIRE

    Jialal, Ishwarlal; Amess, William; Kaur, Manpreet

    2010-01-01

    The hypertriglyceridemia of diabetes can be classified into mild to moderate (triglycerides between 150–499 mg/dL) and severe hypertriglyceridemia (triglycerides ≥500 mg/dL). As in any other individuals with hypertriglyceridemia, secondary causes need to be excluded. The management of severe hypertriglyceridemia (chylomicronemia syndrome) includes aggressive reduction of triglycerides with intravenous insulin, fibrates, omega-3 fatty acids, and/or niacin therapy to avert the risk of pancreati...

  10. [Erectile dysfunction and diabetes in Conakry (Guinea): frequency and clinical characteristics from 187 diabetic patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldé, N M; Diallo, A B; Baldé, M C; Kaké, A; Diallo, M M; Diallo, M B; Maugendre, D

    2006-09-01

    Sexual dysfunction is frequent in the diabetic population. In Africa, medical care for erectile dysfunction is underprovided, profoundly altering the quality of life of the patients. We report the prevalence of erectile dysfunction in 187 diabetic patients followed in the department of Endocrinology of the Conakry teaching hospital. Prevalence was estimated from the French version of the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF). Erectile dysfunction concerned 90 patients (48%) of whom a severe form was observed in 54%, a moderate form in 35% and a mild form in 12%. The patients who presented erectile dysfunction were significantly older, displayed longer duration of diabetes with more complications (sensorial neuropathy and macroangiopathy) and often took drugs for associated cardiovascular diseases. In 28% of the cases, erectile dysfunction was associated with a decline in libido and in 26% with ejaculation disorders. In conclusion, erectile dysfunction is frequent and severe among diabetic patients in Guinea. The medical staff plays an essential role to initiate early diagnosis, promote psychological support and provide medication, if possible.

  11. The predictors of exercise capacity impairment in diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florina Frîngu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background. The exercise capacity is a key issue in a diabetic patient’s management, due to its well-known beneficial effects in terms of glycemic control, cardiovascular risk reduction and quality of life improvement. However the exercise capacity of diabetic patients is decreased many times and its determinants are sometimes less known. Our study aimed to assess the effort capacity in a cohort of diabetic patients and to find the main causative factors of its impairment. Method: 61 patients with type-2 diabetes mellitus were enrolled and underwent and transthoracic echocardiography and a cycloergometer exercise testing. Exercise performance was calculated and the influence of clinical data and ultrasound parameters was assessed. Sedentary status of each patient was established from total time/week of at least moderate physical activity. Results: the study group consisted of 48.4 % women, mean age 61.4 (±8.4 years. Disease median duration was 5 years and 21.3 % of the patients presented neuropathy, 4.5 % retinopathy and 6.5 % nephropathy. Exercise capacity was moderately and severe decreased (<5 METs in 37.7 % of patients and in this subgroup the diastolic dysfunction, sedentary behavior and old age has a significantly higher prevalence. Interestingly, by multivariate regression, the sedentary lifestyle was the main determinant of decreased effort capacity (beta-coefficient 1.37, p<0.001, suggesting the potential benefits of physical training in these patients. Conclusion. Our study found a decreased effort capacity in at least one third of the patients and this is mainly due to sedentary lifestyle and deconditioning, the diastolic dysfunction also contributes to decreased effort capacity in diabetic patients.

  12. Renoprotective effects of angiotensin II receptor blockade in type 1 diabetic patients with diabetic nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, S; Tarnow, L; Rossing, P

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors reduce angiotensin II formation and induce bradykinin accumulation. Animal studies suggest that bradykinin may play a role for the effects of ACE inhibition on blood pressure and kidney function. Therefore, we compared the renal and hem...... inhibition is primarily caused by interference in the renin-angiotensin system. Our study suggest that losartan represents a valuable new drug in the treatment of hypertension and proteinuria in type 1 diabetic patients with diabetic nephropathy....... and hemodynamic effects of specific intervention in the renin-angiotensin system by blockade of the angiotensin II subtype-1 receptor to the effect of ACE inhibition. METHODS: A randomized, double-blind, cross-over trial was performed in 16 type 1 diabetic patients (10 men), age 42 +/- 2 years (mean +/- SEM...

  13. Significance of determination of bone mineral density and osteocalcin in diabetic patients with diabetic microvascular complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kong Xianghui; Mu Junqing; Lu Kuan

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To study the influence of diabetic microvascular complications on bone mineral density (BMI) and osteocalcin (BGP). Methods: 60 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus were studied, including 33 with microvascular complications (retinopathy, nephropathy, neuropathy) (group 1) and 27 without complications (group 2). Fasting blood glucose, serum fructosamine (GSP), total alkaline phosphatase (TALP), calcium (Ca 2+ ) levels were measured by biochemical method; osteocalcin (BGP) level was detected by RIA. BMD of the lumbar spine and femur was measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry in all patients. Body mass index (BMI) was calculated from the height and body weight. Results: The BMI, GSP, FBG, TALP and Ca 2+ values in the two groups were not much different, but BGP and BMD in group 1 were significantly lower than those in group 2. Conclusion: Bone mineral density (BMD) and BGP values were closely related to the microvascular complications in diabetes, which could decrease bone formation and increase the frequency of osteoporosis

  14. Assessment of urinary tract infection and their resistance to antibiotics in diabetic and non-diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nureen Zahra

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic patients are more susceptible to urinary tract infections (UTIs than non-diabetic patients and due to the development of multidrug resistant uropathogenic strains, the choice of antibacterial agents is being limited. The study was undertaken to determine the influence of diabetes mellitus on the uropathogens and antibiotic sensitivity pattern among patients with UTIs. A cross-sectional study was conducted in which total of 400 patients were studied out of which 150 were diabetics and 250 were non-diabetics. Patients with negative urine culture (n = 240 were excluded from the study and 160 patients with positive culture of UTIs of which 80 were diabetics and 80 were non-diabetics, included in this study. Clinical data were obtained from individual study participant with informed written consent using pre-tested questionnaire. According to the clean-catch procedure, midstream urine samples were collected and cultured for the diagnosis and susceptibility of bacteriuria. Out of 160 uropathogenic isolates, E. coli was found as a leading pathogen i.e. 46.25% followed by Candida spp. 30.62%, S. Faecalis 15.62%, P. aeruginosa 3.13%, Pneumococcus. 1.25%, MSSA 1.25%, MRSA 0.63%, Proteus spp. 0.63% and Vancomycin resistant enterococcus spp. 0.63%. The results indicated that prevalence of UTIs was significantly higher in diabetic patients than in non-diabetic subjects. E. coli was found to be the most common isolate. It was observed that UTIs in diabetic patients was more in female diabetic patients than in male patients. Investigation of bacteriuria in diabetic patients for UTIs is an important tool for the treatment and prevention of renal complications.

  15. Endothelial progenitor cells in long-standing asymptomatic type 1 diabetic patients with or without diabetic nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinhard, Henrik; Jacobsen, Peter Karl; Lajer, Maria

    2011-01-01

    with or without DN and to study the effect of CVD and medication on EPC numbers. Methods: We examined EPC numbers in 37 type 1 diabetic patients with DN and 35 type 1 diabetic patients with long-standing normoalbuminuria. Patients were without symptoms of CVD and the prevalence of CVD was previously shown......A decrease in the number and dysfunction of endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) may increase the risk for progression of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in type 1 diabetic patients with diabetic nephropathy (DN). Our aim was to evaluate EPC numbers in asymptomatic CVD type 1 diabetic patients...... with CVD (p > 0.05). Conventional risk factors were significantly higher in patients with DN and they received more CVD-preventive treatment. All patients receiving simvastatin or calcium-channel blockers had higher numbers of EPC compared to patients not treated with these drugs. Conclusions: Asymptomatic...

  16. Plasma concentration of asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) predicts cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in type 1 diabetic patients with diabetic nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lajer, Maria Stenkil; Tarnow, Lise; Jorsal, Anders

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether circulating asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) levels are predictive of cardiovascular events, decline in glomerular filtration rate (GFR), end-stage renal disease (ESRD), and all-cause mortality in type 1 diabetic patients. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: We...... performed a prospective observational follow-up study including 397 type 1 diabetic patients with overt diabetic nephropathy (243 men aged 42.1 +/- 10.5 years, GFR 76 +/- 34 ml/min per 1.73 m(2)) and a control group of 175 patients with longstanding type 1 diabetes and persistent normoalbuminuria (104 men...... aged 42.7 +/- 9.7 years, duration of diabetes 27.7 +/- 8.3 years). Patients were followed for a median 11.3 years (range 0.0-12.9) with yearly measurements of GFR ((51)Cr-EDTA plasma clearance) in patients with diabetic nephropathy. Endpoints were fatal and nonfatal cardiovascular disease (CVD...

  17. Patient- and Provider-Centered Design of an Outpatient Diabetes Technology Clinic

    OpenAIRE

    Cramer, Angela M.; Scalzo, Patricia; Bach, Sarah M.; Kudva, Yogish C.

    2016-01-01

    The number of US patients using diabetes technology is increasing, and sophisticated technologies continue to emerge. Patients using diabetes technology require access to providers prepared to offer care in this rapidly changing field. The authors sought to identify factors important to both patients using diabetes technology and providers caring for such patients. They redesigned the Diabetes Technology Clinic at an academic group practice in response to the needs of patients and providers. ...

  18. Association of glycated albumin to HbA1c ratio with diabetic retinopathy but not diabetic nephropathy in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umayahara, Yutaka; Fujita, Yohei; Watanabe, Hirotaka; Kasai, Noriko; Fujiki, Noritaka; Hatazaki, Masahiro; Koga, Masafumi

    2017-04-01

    The ratio of glycated albumin to HbA1c (GA/HbA1c ratio) is a known indicator that reflects fluctuations in plasma glucose. In this study, the association of the GA/HbA1c ratio to diabetic nephropathy and diabetic retinopathy in patients with type 2 diabetes was investigated. Among patients with type 2 diabetes, 613 patients (364 males and 249 females, aged 63.2±12.5, body mass index (BMI) 25.4±4.8kg/m 2 ) were enrolled. Patients with overt proteinuria, reduced renal function, or anemia were excluded. In a comparison between patients with and without diabetic nephropathy, significance was observed in insulin therapy, HbA1c, and GA. In addition, in a comparison between patients with and without diabetic retinopathy, the GA/HbA1c ratio along with insulin therapy, HbA1c, and GA showed significant differences. When the GA/HbA1c ratios were divided into three groups and compared, the rates of diabetic nephropathy did not show any significance, while the rate of diabetic retinopathy increased significantly as the GA/HbA1c ratio increased. In multivariable analyses, while insulin therapy and BMI were the significant independent variables for diabetic nephropathy, insulin therapy and the GA/HbA1c ratios were the significant independent variable for diabetic retinopathy. The GA/HbA1c ratio was associated with diabetic retinopathy, but not with diabetic nephropathy in patients with type 2 diabetes. These results suggest that the development and progression of diabetic retinopathy is associated with plasma glucose fluctuations. Copyright © 2016 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Scleredema Diabeticorum in a Patient with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Martín

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Scleredema adultorum, a connective tissue disorder of unknown aetiology, is characterized by a thickening of the reticular dermis in the upper back of the body that may decrease the mobility of the affected tissues. It has been reported in diabetic patients with poor metabolic control. Therapeutic options are limited with generally poor results. Case Report. 53-year-old white male with type 2 diabetes mellitus was referred to our department for evaluation of incipient nephropathy and retinopathy. On examination, he presented erythematous, indurated, painless and ill-defined plaque on the skin of the upper back with limited movement of shoulders. A biopsy was done revealing scleredema. PUVA treatment and physiotherapy were started with the amelioration of mobility and acquiring some elasticity of the upper back. Discussion. The development of scleredema in diabetic patients has been related to prolonged exposure to chronic hyperglycaemia. Our patient has had diabetes for 20 years with an acceptable glucose control, however he developed the scleredema 10 years ago. Conclusions. Scleredema is a rare connective disorder that seems to appear most frequently in diabetic subjects. Good metabolic control seems not to preclude its development. PUVA treatment and physiotherapy are therapeutic options that seem to be of some help.

  20. Do Psychosocial Factors Predict Readmission among Diabetic Elderly Patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alavi, Mousa; Baharlooei, Omeleila; AdelMehraban, Marzieh

    2017-01-01

    Despite advances in diabetes treatment, the rate of readmission is still relatively high among these patients, especially in older population. Various factors may predict readmission in these patients; hence, the aim of this study was to assess the role of psychosocial factors in predicting readmission among diabetic elderly hospitalized in selected hospitals of Isfahan. In this cross-sectional study conducted from January to September 2016, 150 diabetic elderly hospitalized in selected hospitals affiliated with Isfahan University of medical sciences were chosen using a convenient sampling method. The initial information was collected by a three-part questionnaire consisting of (a) demographic characteristics, (b) 21-item depression, anxiety, and stress scale (DASS-21), and (c) multidimensional scale of perceived social support (MSPSS). Further information about readmission was gathered 3 months after completing the questionnaires through a phone call follow-up. Descriptive and inferential statistics (discriminant function analysis test) were used to analyze the data. During 3 months after discharge, 44% of hospitalized diabetic elderly were readmitted. Analytical model predicted the readmission status of 109 individuals (of total 150 persons) in the studied units (success rate of 72.2%). Among predicting factors, depression and social support had the most and the least important roles in predicting readmission rate, respectively. Interventions to improve mental status (i.e., decreasing levels of depression, anxiety, and stress) and develop social support are suggested to reduce the risk of readmission among diabetic elderly patients. Nevertheless, future studies are needed to verify the value of such interventions.

  1. Hospitalized cardiovascular events in patients with diabetic macular edema

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    Nguyen-Khoa Bao-Anh

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microvascular and macrovascular complications in diabetes stem from chronic hyperglycemia and are thought to have overlapping pathophysiology. The aim of this study was to investigate the incidence rate of hospitalized myocardial infarctions (MI and cerebrovascular accidents (CVA in patients with diabetic macular edema (DME compared with diabetic patients without retinal diseases. Methods This was a retrospective cohort study of a commercially insured population in an administrative claims database. DME subjects (n = 3519 and diabetes controls without retinal disease (n = 10557 were matched by age and gender. Healthcare claims were analyzed for the study period from 1 January 2002 to 31 December 2005. Incidence and adjusted rate ratios of hospitalized MI and CVA events were then calculated. Results The adjusted rate ratio for MI was 2.50 (95% CI: 1.83-3.41, p  Conclusion Event rates of MI or CVA were higher in patients with DME than in diabetes controls. This study is one of few with sufficient sample size to accurately estimate the relationship between DME and cardiovascular outcomes.

  2. Computed tomography of the pancreas in diabetic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsumata, Kazuo; Katsumata, Yoshinao; Nakagawa, Takeo; Sakuma, Sadayuki.

    1984-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) of the pancreas usually shows either a smooth or granular image in the margin and contents. We have divided these images into three types in both the margin and contents (smooth type, fine-granule type and rough-granule type). These types were analyzed in relation to the clinical features of diabetes mellitus. Four hundred and six controls without diabete, mellitus, gallstones, pancreatitis, liver cirrhosis or malignant tumors were analyzed as a control group, and 121 diabetic patients without these four complications were analyzed as a diabetic group. The following results were obtained. 1. In the control group, the younger obese persons showeds high incidence of the rough-granule type of the pancreatic margin and contents. This decreased with an increase in age. 2. In the diabetic group, the incidence of the rough-granule type of both the pancreatic margin and contents was high among the elderly and older patients. Lean patients did not show the rough-granule type of pancreatic contents. The incidence of the rough-granule type tended to decrease as the clinical features became worse. 3. Pancreata having the rough-granule type of pancreatic contents were considered to be rich in fat tissue. (author)

  3. Analysis of risk factors of pulmonary embolism in diabetic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Changhui; Ma Zhihai; Zhu Lin; Chi Lianxiang

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To study the related risk factors in diabetic patients with pulmonary embolism (PE). Methods: 58 diabetic cases underwent lower limbs 99m Tc-MAA veins imaging (and/or ultrasonography) and pulmonary perfusion imaging. The related laboratory data [fasting blood glucose (FBG), blood cholesterol, blood long chain triglycerides (LCT)] and clinic information [age, disease courses, chest symptoms (chest pain and short of breathe), lower limbs symptoms (swelling, varicose veins and diabetic foot) and acute complication (diabetic ketoacidosis and hyperosmolar non ketotic diabetic coma)] were collected simultaneously. SPSS was used for χ 2 -test and Logistic regression analysis. Results: (1) 28 patients (48.3%) were showed to be with lower limbs deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and by 99m Tc-MAA imaging, 10 cases (17.2%) with PE. The PE ratios (32.1%) of the patients with DVT was more higher than no DVT (3.3%) (χ 2 =6.53, P 2 ≥4.23, P 2 ≤2.76, P>0.05), respectively. (3) Multiplicity analysis indicated: the related risk factors for PE included chest symptoms (Score=13.316, P=0.000) and lower limbs symptoms (Score=7.780, P=0.005). No significant difference to other factors (Score≤2.494, P>0.114), respectively. Conclusion: The serious DM with chest symptoms, lower limbs symptoms and/or DVT must be controlled as early as possible by all kinds of treatment. It will decrease the PE complication. (authors)

  4. Computed tomography of the pancreas in diabetic patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katsumata, Kazuo [Katsumata Hospital, Nagoya (Japan); Katsumata, Yoshinao; Nakagawa, Takeo; Sakuma, Sadayuki

    1984-08-01

    Computed tomography (CT) of the pancreas usually shows either a smooth or granular image in the margin and contents. We have divided these images into three types in both the margin and contents (smooth type, fine-granule type and rough-granule type). These types were analyzed in relation to the clinical features of diabetes mellitus. Four hundred and six controls without diabete, mellitus, gallstones, pancreatitis, liver cirrhosis or malignant tumors were analyzed as a control group, and 121 diabetic patients without these four complications were analyzed as a diabetic group. The following results were obtained. 1. In the control group, the younger obese persons showed high incidence of the rough-granule type of the pancreatic margin and contents. This decreased with an increase in age. 2. In the diabetic group, the incidence of the rough-granule type of both the pancreatic margin and contents was high among the elderly and older patients. Lean patients did not show the rough-granule type of pancreatic contents. The incidence of the rough-granule type tended to decrease as the clinical features became worse. 3. Pancreata having the rough-granule type of pancreatic contents were considered to be rich in fat tissue.

  5. Ghrelin attenuates vascular calcification in diabetic patients with amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Suining; Ye, Fei; Li, Lihua; Yan, Jinchuan; Bao, Zhengyang; Sun, Zhen; Xu, Liangjie; Zhu, Jie; Wang, Zhongqun

    2017-07-01

    Vascular calcification is established to be a critical factor in diabetes mellitus, which causes cardiovascular and amputation complication of diabetic patients. OPG/RANKL/RANK axis serves as a regulatory role in vascular calcification. Ghrelin, an endogenous ligand of growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR), has been reported to exhibit potent cardiovascular protective effects. However, the role of ghrelin in the regulation of diabetic vascular calcification is still elusive. Here, we reported the role of ghrelin and its relationship with OPG/RANKL/RANK system in patients with diabetic foot amputation. In vivo and in vitro investigations were performed. Sixty type 2 diabetic patients with foot amputation were enrolled in vivo investigation, and they were divided into three groups through Doppler ultrasound: mild stenosis group (n=20), moderate stenosis group (n=20), and severe stenosis/occlusion group (n=20). Morphological analysis results showed diffused calcium depositions in the anterior tibial artery of diabetic amputees. Compared with the mild and moderate stenosis group, the severe stenosis/occlusion group had more spotty calcium depositions in atherosclerotic plaques. Western blot analysis indicated the expressions of osteoprotegerin (OPG) and ghrelin were downregulated, while the expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL) was upregulated with the vascular stenosis aggravation. Pearson correlation analysis revealed a negative correlation between calcium content and ghrelin levels (r=-0.58, Pghrelin levels and sRANKL levels (r=-0.57, Pghrelin levels (r=0.63, PGhrelin blunted calcification in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, ghrelin upregulated OPG expression and downregulated RANKL expression in VSMC calcification when anti-OPG antibody and RANKL were performed. Collectively, we therefore conclude serum ghrelin level may be a predictor of diabetic vascular calcification. The possible mechanism may be related with OPG

  6. Patients with diabetes mellitus and their management - a local scenario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Younis, B.B.; Ahmad, R.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The prevalence of diabetes is dangerously increasing esp. in this part of the world. The study is done to analyze the disease in both genders, the average age of onset of disease, the treatment which the patients are getting esp. by their family physicians and their control based upon their average random blood sugars. Material and Methods: Case series observational study was done selecting 200 patients with Type 2 Diabetes of at least one year duration, from ages 20 yrs and above. 2 centers were included in the study one at the heart of Lahore and other at peripheral district Sheikhupura. The patients which were selected were being treated by family physicians and were not consulting any specialist for the control of their disease. First 200 patients were selected 100 at each centre irrespective of their ages gender and duration of disease. Results: The gender ratio was 38 and 62 % for Males and Females respectively. The average age of onset was 40 years. On the average 26% patients were on insulin and 74% were on oral anti Diabetic medicine. The glucose control was better in patients on insulin as compared to those on oral medication. Overall 14% were controlled in our study, even when controlled BSR was taken as 200 mg %. Conclusion: There are significantly more females diabetic as compared to males in our study, the overall control was dis-appointing, however 26% of patients were on insulin and their average blood sugar random was better than others. More large observational studies are required to get to more reliable picture, Customized local guide lines needs to be developed for our family physicians, they should be included in the team for developing the guidelines, as they see majority of the patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus. (author)

  7. [A blood glucose slide chart for improving diabetes patient education].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potteau, Marie-Hélène

    2015-03-01

    A blood glucose slide chart has been developed in order to help patients with type 2 diabetes who do not speak French or who have comprehension difficulties. Combined with pictograms to help patients visualise the action they need to take depending on the recorded glucose level, it constitutes a therapeutic education tool which can be useful on a day-to-day basis both for patients as well as caregivers.

  8. Gastroesophageal reflux disease in patients with diabetes: preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Mariko; Miwa, Takashi; Kawai, Takashi; Odawara, Masato

    2015-03-01

    Some studies report that complications of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) occur more frequently in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) than in non-diabetic patients. This study used transnasal endoscopy to elucidate the current status of concurrent GERD in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, and to examine the associations between intraesophageal pressure and GERD, as well as other neuropathic conditions. The study included 57 outpatients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The mean age was 67 years and the duration of DM was 13 years. The mean hemoglobin A1c was 6.8%. Transnasal endoscopic evaluation items were (i) the presence or absence of esophagitis and its severity; (ii) intraesophageal pressure; and (iii) Helicobacter pylori status, which was evaluated by endoscopic findings, such as the presence or absence of gastritis and peptic ulcer, and by urea breath test. Of 57 patients, 24 (42.1%) were given a diagnosis of GERD based on endoscopy. Patients with concurrent GERD were younger, had shorter duration of DM, and were taller and heavier. Interestingly, no difference in body mass index was observed. There was no significant association between the presence of concurrent GERD and diabetic complications, including peripheral neuropathy, and infection or non-infection with H. pylori. Although there was no significant association between the presence of concurrent GERD and intraesophageal pressure values, we found aging, reduced estimated glomerular filtration rate, and the presence of autonomic nerve symptoms to correlate with reduced intraesophageal pressure. The results of this study could be used to answer the question of whether or not endoscopic GERD is a diabetic complication; however, further study is required. © 2015 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  9. Predictors of Diabetes Self-Management among Type 2 Diabetes Patients

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    Azylina Gunggu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is a public health concern in Malaysia. Treatment of diabetes is costly and can lead to complications if disease is poorly controlled. Diabetes self-management (DSM is found to be essential for optimal glycemic control. This cross-sectional study was conducted among samples from four randomly selected diabetes clinics in Sarawak, Malaysia. The aim was to determine the predictors for DSM. Face-to-face interview using questionnaire was used to collect data. Four hundred respondents with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM were recruited. Majority of the respondents were Sarawak Bumiputra (Iban and Bidayuh, 48.6% and female (68.6%. The mean age was 58.77 years (SD = 11.46 and approximately half of the respondents (50.6% had T2DM for six years (SD = 4.46. The mean fasting blood glucose (FBG was 8.06 mmol/L (SD = 2.94, with majority (76.1% having the level higher than 6.1 mmol/L. Multiple logistic regression tests showed significant linear relationship between DSM and belief in treatment effectiveness (p=0.001, family support (p=0.007, and self-efficacy (p=0.027. Health care personnel must convince patients with T2DM of the effectiveness of the treatment, empower and enhance their self-efficacy, and enlist the family support so as to ensure patients sustain their DSM efforts.

  10. Association of clopidogrel treatment with risk of mortality and cardiovascular events following myocardial infarction in patients with and without diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Charlotte; Lyngbæk, Stig; Nguyen, Cu Dinh

    2012-01-01

    Pharmacodynamic studies have shown that persistently high platelet reactivity is common in patients with diabetes in spite of clopidogrel treatment. Clinical trials have not convincingly demonstrated that clopidogrel benefits patients with diabetes as much patients without diabetes....

  11. Plasma proteome analysis of patients with type 1 diabetes with diabetic nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Anne Julie; Hansen, Henning Gram; Lajer, Maria

    2010-01-01

    patients was investigated with the goal of finding improved candidate biomarkers to predict diabetic nephropathy. In order to reach lower concentration proteins in plasma a pre-fractionation step, either hexapeptide bead-based libraries or anion exchange chromatography, was performed prior to surface...... enhanced laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis....

  12. CHROMOGRANIN A DETECTION IN SALIVA OF TYPE 2 DIABETES PATIENTS

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    Martine Soell

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Chromogranin A is present in secretion granules of nerve, endocrine and immune cells and is a precursor of several peptides with antibacterial and antifungal properties at micromolar concentrations.Our aim in this prospective, double blind study, was to determine the expression of chromogranin A and its peptides at protein level in saliva of type 2 diabetic patients and thereby to obtain a new non-invasive diagnostic means for the future.Saliva was taken from 30 type 2 diabetic patients and 30 healthy individuals at the same time interval in the morning without any oral stimuli. Circadianic periodics in protein productions have been avoided. The presence of chromogranin A and its derived peptides was determined in whole saliva, after centrifugation at 40C for 12 min at 14 000 rpm, by SDS-PAGE electrophoresis and Immunoblotting (Western Blot. To ensure same protein concentrations Bradford protein quantification assay has been performed before.For the first time, we have determined an overexpression of chromogranin A in saliva of diabetic patients in 100% of the individuals.Chromogranin A, a circulating biomarker for epithelial tumours, is also overexpressed in saliva of type 2 diabetic patients. To confirm our results, more studies with a large amount of patients is necessary.

  13. Chromogranin A Detection in Saliva of Type 2 Diabetes Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martine Soell

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Chromogranin A is present in secretion granules of nerve, endocrine and immune cells and is a precursor of several peptides with antibacterial and antifungal properties at micromolar concentrations.Our aim in this prospective, double blind study, was to determine the expression of chromogranin A and its peptides at protein level in saliva of type 2 diabetic patients and thereby to obtain a new non-invasive diagnostic means for the future.Saliva was taken from 30 type 2 diabetic patients and 30 healthy individuals at the same time interval in the morning without any oral stimuli. Circadianic periodics in protein productions have been avoided. The presence of chromogranin A and its derived peptides was determined in whole saliva, after centrifugation at 4°C for 12 min at 14 000 rpm, by SDS-PAGE electrophoresis and Immunoblotting (Western Blot. To ensure same protein concentrations Bradford protein quantification assay has been performed before.For the first time, we have determined an overexpression of chromogranin A in saliva of diabetic patients in 100% of the individuals.Chromogranin A, a circulating biomarker for epithelial tumours, is also overexpressed in saliva of type 2 diabetic patients. To confirm our results, more studies with a large amount of patients is necessary.

  14. Reliability of diabetic patients' gait parameters in a challenging environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allet, L; Armand, S; de Bie, R A; Golay, A; Monnin, D; Aminian, K; de Bruin, E D

    2008-11-01

    Activities of daily life require us to move about in challenging environments and to walk on varied surfaces. Irregular terrain has been shown to influence gait parameters, especially in a population at risk for falling. A precise portable measurement system would permit objective gait analysis under such conditions. The aims of this study are to (a) investigate the reliability of gait parameters measured with the Physilog in diabetic patients walking on different surfaces (tar, grass, and stones); (b) identify the measurement error (precision); (c) identify the minimal clinical detectable change. 16 patients with Type 2 diabetes were measured twice within 8 days. After clinical examination patients walked, equipped with a Physilog, on the three aforementioned surfaces. ICC for each surface was excellent for within-visit analyses (>0.938). Inter-visit ICC's (0.753) were excellent except for the knee range parameter (>0.503). The coefficient of variation (CV) was lower than 5% for most of the parameters. Bland and Altman Plots, SEM and SDC showed precise values, distributed around zero for all surfaces. Good reliability of Physilog measurements on different surfaces suggests that Physilog could facilitate the study of diabetic patients' gait in conditions close to real-life situations. Gait parameters during complex locomotor activities (e.g. stair-climbing, curbs, slopes) have not yet been extensively investigated. Good reliability, small measurement error and values of minimal clinical detectable change recommend the utilization of Physilog for the evaluation of gait parameters in diabetic patients.

  15. Assesment of propolis supplementation on insulin resistance in diabetic patients

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    nazli samadi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Diabetes mellitus is a common endocrine disease . The number of people with diabetes over the last twenty years has doubled . Asia as a result of rapid economic growth , as the center of the epidemic in the world . Iran is among the countries with a high prevalence of diabetes mellitus . Use of medicinal plants as adjunctive therapy along with medication always been original . In recent years the tendency of patients to alternative therapies and traditional medicine has increased. Methods : Among patients referred to clinics of University of Medical Sciences, Yazd, Iran , 67 people were selected and randomly divided into two groups,intervention or placebo. Patients in the intervention group received 3 tablets of 300 mg bee propolis and in the control group received placebo . The study lasted 12 weeks . Serum insulin and insulin resistance index were evaluated at the beginning and end of the study. Results: 57 patients completed the study . The average demographic characteristics , anthropometric indices , serum insulin and insulin resistance index at the beginning and end of the study between the two groups showed no significant difference. Conclusion : In this study , supplementation with bee propolis for 12 weeks , on the serum insulin and indices of insulin resistance in patients with type II diabetes is not effective . Further studies are needed to make a final decision.

  16. Biomarkers of Renal Disease and Progression in Patients with Diabetes

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    Radovan Hojs

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes prevalence is increasing worldwide, mainly due to the increase in type 2 diabetes. Diabetic nephropathy occurs in up to 40% of people with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. It is important to identify patients at risk of diabetic nephropathy and those who will progress to end stage renal disease. In clinical practice, most commonly used markers of renal disease and progression are serum creatinine, estimated glomerular filtration rate and proteinuria or albuminuria. Unfortunately, they are all insensitive. This review summarizes the evidence regarding the prognostic value and benefits of targeting some novel risk markers for development of diabetic nephropathy and its progression. It is focused mainly on tubular biomarkers (neutrophil-gelatinase associated lipocalin, kidney injury molecule 1, liver-fatty acid-binding protein, N-acetyl-beta-d-glucosaminidase, markers of inflammation (pro-inflammatory cytokines, tumour necrosis factor-α and tumour necrosis factor-α receptors, adhesion molecules, chemokines and markers of oxidative stress. Despite the promise of some of these new biomarkers, further large, multicenter prospective studies are still needed before they can be used in everyday clinical practice.

  17. Predicting diabetic nephropathy in insulin-dependent patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, C E; Christensen, Cramer

    1984-01-01

    We studied whether microalbuminuria (urinary albumin excretion rates of 15 to 150 micrograms per minute) would predict the development of increased proteinuria in Type I diabetes. We also studied the influence of glomerular filtration rate, renal blood flow, and blood pressure on the later...... development of proteinuria. Forty-four patients who had had Type I diabetes for at least seven years and who had albumin excretion rates below 150 micrograms per minute were studied from 1969 to 1976, and 43 were restudied in 1983. Of the 14 who initially had albumin excretion rates at or above 15 micrograms...... was not elevated in these patients. We conclude that microalbuminuria predicts the development of diabetic nephropathy and that elevated glomerular filtration rates and increased blood pressure may also contribute to this progression....

  18. Safety of diabetes drugs in patients with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco-Sánchez, F J; Ostos-Ruiz, A I; Soto-Martín, M

    2018-03-01

    Heart failure (HF) and diabetes mellitus are 2 clinical conditions that often coexist, particularly in patients older than 65 years. Diabetes mellitus promotes the development of HF and confers a poorer prognosis. Hypoglycaemic agents (either by their mechanism of action, hypoglycaemic action or adverse effects) can be potentially dangerous for patients with HF. In this study, we performed a review of the available evidence on the safety of diabetes drugs in HF, focused on the main observational and experimental studies. Recent studies on cardiovascular safety have evaluated, although as a secondary objective, the impact of new hypoglycaemic agents on HF, helping us understand the neutrality, risks and potential benefits of these agents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  19. Which diabetic patients should receive podiatry care? An objective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGill, M; Molyneaux, L; Yue, D K

    2005-08-01

    Diabetes is the leading cause of lower limb amputation in Australia. However, due to limited resources, it is not feasible for everyone with diabetes to access podiatry care, and some objective guidelines of who should receive podiatry is required. A total of 250 patients with neuropathy (Biothesiometer; Biomedical Instruments, Newbury, Ohio, USA) ( > 30, age podiatry care (mean of estimates from 10 reports), the NNT to prevent one foot ulcer per year was: no neuropathy (vibration perception threshold (VPT) 30) alone, NNT = 45; +cannot feel monofilament, NNT = 18; +previous ulcer/amputation, NNT = 7. Provision of podiatry care to diabetic patients should not be only economically based, but should also be directed to those with reduced sensation, especially where there is a previous history of ulceration or amputation.

  20. Dietary carbohydrates and glucose metabolism in diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parillo, M; Riccardi, G

    1995-12-01

    Dietary carbohydrates represent one of the major sources of energy for the human body. However, the main (if not the only) therapy for diabetes since ancient times has been based on reducing dietary carbohydrates drastically because of their effects on blood glucose levels. The introduction of insulin in the 1920s and then of oral hypoglycaemic drugs led to various studies evaluating the biochemical characteristics of carbohydrates and their effects on glucose metabolism in diabetic patients. This review considers the role of dietary carbohydrates in the diet of diabetic patients in the light of the most recent studies and provides a short summary of the biochemistry of carbohydrates and the physiology of carbohydrate digestion.

  1. Intensified multifactorial treatment of patients with Type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Oluf

    2009-01-01

    By influencing the standards of diabetes care and treatment guidelines throughout the world, the results of recent long-term risk factor interventions in Type 2 diabetes (T2D) have likely contributed to the improved health outcomes and induced a decline in mortality in people with T2D. Although we...... have a need for even more evidence to support early, individualized, and intensive management of all known modifiable risk factors, we have now reached an era in T2D care where the critical challenges appear to be to translate the insights, knowledge and benefits to patients in the community setting....... Current surveys show slow progress in achieving treatment goals and in the use of recommended drugs and adjustments of lifestyle for the prevention of vascular complications in diabetes. The resistance and barriers among medical professionals and patients likely have multiple causes. The present review...

  2. Mitochondrial Haplogroups Modify the Effect of Diabetes Duration and HbA1c on Proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy Risk in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Sabrina L; Neininger, Abigail C; Bruce, Carleigh N; Chocron, Isaac M; Bregman, Jana A; Estopinal, Christopher B; Muhammad, Ayesha; Umfress, Allison C; Jarrell, Kelli L; Warden, Cassandra; Harlow, Paula A; Wellons, Melissa; Samuels, David C; Brantley, Milam A

    2017-12-01

    We previously demonstrated an association between European mitochondrial haplogroups and proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR). The purpose of this study was to determine how the relationship between these haplogroups and both diabetes duration and hyperglycemia, two major risk factors for diabetic retinopathy (DR), affect PDR prevalence. Our population consisted of patients with type 2 diabetes with (n = 377) and without (n = 480) DR. A Kruskal-Wallis test was used to compare diabetes duration and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) among mitochondrial haplogroups. Logistic regressions were performed to investigate diabetes duration and HbA1c as risk factors for PDR in the context of European mitochondrial haplogroups. Neither diabetes duration nor HbA1c differed among mitochondrial haplogroups. Among DR patients from haplogroup H, longer diabetes duration and increasing HbA1c were significant risk factors for PDR (P = 0.0001 and P = 0.011, respectively). Neither diabetes duration nor HbA1c was a significant risk factor for PDR in DR patients from haplogroup UK. European mitochondrial haplogroups modify the effects of diabetes duration and HbA1c on PDR risk in patients with type 2 diabetes. In our patient population, longer diabetes duration and higher HbA1c increased PDR risk in patients from haplogroup H, but did not affect PDR risk in patients from haplogroup UK. This relationship has not been previously demonstrated and may explain, in part, why some patients with nonproliferative DR develop PDR and others do not, despite similar diabetes duration and glycemic control.

  3. Outcome of Diabetic and Non-Diabetic Patients Undergoing Successful Percutaneous Coronary Intervention of Chronic Total Occlusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahram Sohrabi

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Diabetes mellitus is associated with an increased risk of adverse clinical outcomes after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI. The prognosis of patients with diabetes mellitus and chronic total occlusion (CTO treated with PCI is poorly investigated. Current study evaluates outcome of successful PCI on CTO in patients with and without diabetes. Methods: One hundred and sixty three patients treated with successful PCI on CTO between January 2009 and March 2011 were prospectively identified from the PCI registry at the Madani Heart Center, Tabriz, Iran. Patients were followed for 15±3 months, were evaluated for the occurrence of major adverse cardiac events (MACE comprising death, acute myocardial infarction, and need for repeat revascularization.Results: No differences were found in baseline clinical and procedural variables between patients with (n=34 and without diabetes (n=129, unless for hypertension (p=0.03. Hospitalization period after PCI in diabetics (3.26±0.61 days and non-diabetics (2.86±0.52 days was similar. In-hospital MACE occurred in 8 (23.5% individuals of diabetics and 10 (7.8% individuals of non-diabetics (p=0.02, among them revascularization was significantly higher in diabetics (20.6% vs. 7%, p=0.04. Follow-up events in diabetic and non-diabetic groups were 12 (35.3% and 37 (28.5%, respectively (p was not significant. Conclusion: In patients undergoing successful PCI on CTO, diabetes is associated with higher in-hospital adverse events; however diabetes does not affect long term outcomes in these patients.

  4. Prognostic value of exercise echocardiography in diabetic patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Joselina LM; Barreto-Filho, José AS; Oliveira, Carla RP; Santana, Thaiana A; Anjos-Andrade, Fernando D; Alves, Érica O; Nascimento-Junior, Adão C; Góes, Thiago JS; Santana, Nathalie O; Vasconcelos, Francis L; Barreto, Martha A; D'Oliveira Junior, Argemiro; Salvatori, Roberto; Aguiar-Oliveira, Manuel H; Sousa, Antônio CS

    2009-01-01

    Background Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the leading cause of death in diabetic patients. Although exercise echocardiography (EE) is established as a useful method for diagnosis and stratification of risk for CAD in the general population, there are few studies on its value as a prognostic tool in diabetic patients. The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the value of EE in predicting cardiac events in diabetics. Methods 193 diabetic patients, 97 males, 59.8 ± 9.3 yrs (mean ± SD) were submitted to EE between 2001 and 2006 and followed from 7 to 65 months with median of 29 months by phone calls and personal interviews with patients and their primary physician, and reviewing medical records and death certificates. The end points were cardiac events, defined as non-fatal myocardial infarction, late myocardial revascularization and cardiac death. Sudden death without another explanation was considered cardiac death. Survival free of end points was estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Results Twenty-six cardiac events were registered in 24 individuals during the follow-up. The rates of cardiac events were 20.6 and 7% in patients with positive and negative EE, respectively (p < 0.001). Predictors of cardiac events included sedentary lifestyle, with RR of 2.57 95%CI [1.09 to 6.02] (P = 0.03) and positive EE, with RR 3.63, 95%CI [1.44 to 9.16] (P = 0.01). Patients with positive EE presented higher rates of cardiac events at 12 months (6.8% vs. 2.2%), p = 0.004. Conclusion EE is a useful method to predict cardiac events in diabetic patients with suspected or known CAD. PMID:19480653

  5. Clinical study of the oral manifestations and related factors in type 2 diabetics patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Maria Goretti de Menezes; Costa, Antonio de Lisboa Lopes; Roncalli, Angelo Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    Diabetes Mellitus (DM) is reported with and associated to oral alterations, with conflicting results. The aim of this study was to identify the prevalence of oral soft tissue alterations in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients. Socioeconomic variables, gender, heredity, capillary glucose control and local factors (prosthesis, dry mouth sensation) were analyzed in 196 diabetic and non-diabetic patients enrolled in HIPERDIA, at 41 Health units of Natal, Brazil. A case study. The last blood glucose mean was 177.0 mg/dl for diabetics and 89.46 mg/dl for non-diabetics. Mean capillary blood glucose was elevated in diabetics (215.95 mg/dl); it was 102.31 mg/dl in non-diabetics. The family history confirmed the heredity nature of the disease in 68.8% of diabetic patients (n = 66) (p salivary flow was 49% (n = 47) in diabetics, and 34% (n = 34) in non-diabetics. Candidiasis was present in 30.5% of diabetic patients (n=29) and 36% of non-diabetics (n=36). Both groups had lesions in the palate - 81.4% (n = 35) in diabetics, and 71.1% in non-diabetics (n = 27) (p = 0.68). The alterations are not related to diabetes and are present independently of having or not type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

  6. Effect of a polyherbal formulation cream on diabetic neuropathic pain among patients with type 2 diabetes – A pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Vijay; Rajsekar, Seena; Selvaraj, Bamila; Kumpatla, Satyavani

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: Painful diabetic neuropathy is a common complication of diabetes and can severely limit patients’ daily functions. The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the safety and effect of using a polyherbal formulation in reducing the symptoms of diabetic neuropathic pain in comparison with placebo among patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods: A total of 50 (M:F = 33:17) consecutive type 2 diabetes patients with painful diabetic neuropathy were enrolled in this study. All these patients had either two or more symptoms of diabetic neuropathy such as pain, burning and pricking sensations and numbness in their feet. They were randomly assigned to two groups: group 1 (n = 26) patients were treated with polyherbal formulation cream and group 2 (n = 24) patients were administered placebo. The patients were followed up for six months. Changes in the symptoms of painful diabetic neuropathy of each patient were recorded at baseline, third and sixth month using the Diabetic Neuropathic Score. Results: The mean age of the patients, duration of diabetes and glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) were similar in both groups at baseline. During follow up visits, there was a decrease in the HbA1c levels in the study and control groups. The symptoms of painful diabetic neuropathy were also similar in both groups at baseline. A significant decrease in symptoms of neuropathic pain was observed among the group of patients treated with polyherbal formulation cream (76.9 per cent) compared to the placebo-treated group (12.5 per cent) (P<0.001), at the end of the final follow up. Interpretation & conclusions: In this pilot study polyherbal formulation cream was found to be effective as well as safe to treat painful diabetic neuropathy. However, its long term use needs to be evaluated for any further effectiveness and side effects. PMID:27934800

  7. Esophageal radionuclide in transit in patient with Diabetes Mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pruzzo, R.; Sirandoni, G.; Olea, E.

    1985-01-01

    Nineteen unselected patients with Diabetes Mellitus (D.M.), were studied by Esophageal Radionuclide Transit (ERT), with positive or negative gastrointestinal symptoms, and/or peripheral neuropathy. Esophageal Manometry (EM) was performed to 10 of them. 6/10 symptomatic patients had abnormal ERT, 5 of which had dysphagia, 6/9 asymptomatic patients also had an altered ERT. 83% of those patients with peripheral neuropathy, had altered ERT. We found a 90% diagnostic correlation between ERT and EM. Our findings confirm that abnormal esophageal motor function, often subclinical, is present in most of the long term diabetic patients. This can be highly correlated with the presence of peripheral neuropathy and can be easily evaluated through a non-invasive method like TER. (Author)

  8. Acute Abdomen in Diabetic Patients – Analysis of Complications and Mortality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dejeu Dănuț

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims. We aimed to analyze the complications and mortality of acute abdomen cases in diabetic patients compared to non-diabetic patients. Materials and Method. This observational, retrospective, cohort study was conducted between 2008 - 2011, on a total of 4021 cases with acute abdomen admitted to the Surgical Ward I of the Clinical County Emergency Hospital Oradea. Of these, 488 were diabetic patients and 3533 non-diabetics. Results. Women represented the majority in both groups (62.24% respectively 58.40%. Entero-mesenteric infarction and acute pancreatitis were more common in diabetic patients compared to non-diabetics. Peritonitis was more frequent in non-diabetics, with statistically significant difference (p = 0.0003. In diabetic patients the postoperative morbidity was 36.27%, significantly higher than in non-diabetic patients (14.43%. The mortality was significantly higher in diabetic patients than in nondiabetics (9.84% vs. 5.38%. Average length of stay in Surgical Ward I is 3.8 days. For non-diabetic patients, mean hospitalization for acute abdomen was 5.1 days, and for diabetics 7.8 days. Conclusions. This study showed important differences between diabetics and non-diabetic patients in the clinical evolution, complications, mortality and length of hospitalization.

  9. [Clinical profile of patients diagnosed with type 2 Diabetes Mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Represas Carrera, Francisco Jesús; Carrera García, Álvaro; Clavería Fontán, Ana

    2018-03-09

    Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus is a chronic disease that represent an important problem of public health. The objective of this study was to describe the sociodemographic, anthropometric, metabolic control, comorbidity and cardiovascular risk characteristics of patients diagnosed with Diabetes Mellitus type 2 in the health area of Vigo. Retrospective observational descriptive study. Between March and September 2016, it did telephone interview and an audit of electronic medical records to 195 patients ≥ 18 years old from the health area of Vigo diagnosed with type 2 Diabetes Mellitus. It selected by random sampling with replacement. It evaluated the cardiovascular risk using the method "United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study", the metabolic control with the recommendations of the "American Diabetes Association" 2016, and the comorbidity using the Charlson index. It performed a descriptive and bivariate analysis with R statistical package. The glycemic control was adequate (HbA1c less than 7.0%) in the 61.03% of the patients. The 58.46% had a blood pressure under 140/90mmHg, 52.82% had a total cholesterol under 185mg/dl and 66.15% had a triglyceride level under 150mg/dl. The 49.74% presented a high comorbidity (Charlson larger or the same as 3 points). The risk of suffering and/or dying of heart disease was 37.81%, and 23.50% of suffering and/or dying of a stroke in the next 10 years. Most diabetic patients of the health area of Vigo have a good control of their disease but they present a high index of comorbidity and high cardiovascular risk.

  10. Managing hyperglycaemia in patients with diabetes on enteral nutrition: the role of a specialized diabetes team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, V W; Manoharan, M; Mak, M

    2014-12-01

    Hyperglycaemia is commonly observed in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) while receiving enteral nutrition (EN) in hospital, and hyperglycaemia has been shown to be associated with poor clinical outcomes. The aim of this study was to assess the glycaemic status of patients with DM who received EN during hospital admission and evaluate the impact of intervention by a specialist diabetes team (SDT) on glycaemic control and clinical outcomes of these patients. A retrospective review of patients with DM who required EN during hospital admission was conducted. We compared patient characteristics, glycaemic profile and clinical outcomes between patients who were managed by SDT and those who were managed by the admitting team. Seventy-four patients with DM on EN were included in this study, of whom 27 were managed by SDT while on EN. Compared with patients managed by the admitting team, those who were reviewed by SDT had better glycaemic control during the period of EN as well as during the 24 h after EN was ceased. These patients also had shorter length-of-stay in hospital and lower in-patient mortality. Our findings confirmed that there was a role for SDT in managing patients with DM who received EN during their hospital admission. These patients had improved glycaemic control while receiving EN and had better clinical outcomes. Further prospective studies will be required to validate the findings of this study.

  11. Severe diabetic ketoacidosis and acute pericarditis precipitated by concomitant Graves′ thyrotoxicosis in type 1 diabetic patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muneera A Alshareef

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available 20-year-old male known case of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM presented to emergency department with vomiting and abdominal pain, and was diagnosed to have diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA. There was no obvious precipitating cause for DKA. Patient was started on DKA protocol and initially responded well to treatment. Later on, patient developed severe metabolic acidosis and chest pain. The cardiac evaluation established the diagnosis of acute pericarditis and ruled out acute coronary syndrome. The cause for his stormy coarse of DKA, and persistent tachycardia were further evaluated, and he was diagnosed to have concomitant thyrotoxicosis (graves′ disease complicating the DKA. He was successfully treated with aggressive management of DKA and started on thyrotoxicosis treatment. Autoimmune diseases are known to manifest in cluster but concomitant thyrotoxicosis precipitating DKA and causing acute pericarditis is rare. Prompt recognition of thyrotoxicosis in patients with persistent tachycardia, and treatment of thyrotoxicosis will improve outcome in DKA patients.

  12. The effects of probiotic yoghurt on C-Reactive Protein in type 2 diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    hanoyesadat Ejtahed

    2013-09-01

    Conclusion: Consumption of probiotic yoghurt improved C-Reactive Protein concentration in type 2 diabetic patients. Probiotic yoghurt consumption is recommended as auxiliary therapy in type 2 diabetic patients.

  13. Perioperative glycemic control in diabetic patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehab A. Wahby

    2016-08-01

    Conclusion: Tight glycemic control improved perioperative outcome in diabetic CABG patients. Maintaining perioperative blood glucose level between 110 and 149 mg/dl is safe and should be recommended as a routine practice in diabetic patients undergoing CABG surgery.

  14. The association of vitamin D deficiency and glucose control among diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansour S Almetwazi

    2017-12-01

    Conclusion: Vitamin D deficiency is very common in patients with diabetes. We found no significant association between vitamin D level and glycemic control in patients with diabetes after adjustment for control variables.

  15. Diabetic patients served at a regional level hospital: what is their ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-10-20

    Oct 20, 2014 ... Obesity remains a major modifiable risk factor in both type 1 and 2 diabetes patients. Blood glucose .... JEMDSA. Co-morbid conditions found in our patients included: ..... were probably type 2 diabetes mellitus in childhood,.

  16. A patient treated with olanzapine developing diabetes de novo : proposal for hyperglycaemia screening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duiverman, M. L.; Cohen, D.; van Oven, W.; Nieboer, P.

    2007-01-01

    We report a patient with schizophrenia who developed diabetes mellitus during treatment with olanzapine. The case confirms the pattern of atypical antipsychotic-related diabetic emergencies: rapid onset in relatively young patients, often with severe glucose derangements and serious complications.

  17. Bone mineral density in diabetes mellitus patients with and without a Charcot foot

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Tomas M; Bülow, Jens; Simonsen, Lene

    2010-01-01

    To measure bone mineral density in patients with diabetes mellitus and the complication Charcot osteoarthropathy (CA).......To measure bone mineral density in patients with diabetes mellitus and the complication Charcot osteoarthropathy (CA)....

  18. Comparison of carotid and cerebrovascular disease between diabetic and non-diabetic patients using dual-source CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Ci; Yang Zhigang; Chu Zhigang; Dong Zhihui; Li Yunming; Shao Heng; Deng Wen

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To clarify the differences of the carotid and cerebrovascular disease between patients with and without type 2 diabetes using dual-source CT angiography. Materials and methods: Dual-source CT angiography of the carotid and cerebrovascular arteries was performed in 79 type 2 diabetic patients and 207 non-diabetic patients. The type, extent and distribution of plaques, and luminal stenosis were compared. Results: Compared with non-diabetic patients, diabetic patients had a higher overall incidence of plaque (p 0.05), as well as for the number of diseased segments and the distribution of plaques; both mainly involved the bilateral cavernous segment of the internal carotid artery. As for the stenosis, non-obstructive lesions were more common in diabetic patients (p 0.05). Conclusion: Diabetes is associated with a higher incidence of plaque and non-obstructive stenosis. However, no significant differences were observed in the type, extent and distribution of involved plaques between diabetic and non-diabetic patients.

  19. DIABETIC FOOT DISEASE IN KING GEORGE HOSPITAL, VISHAKAPATNAM: A DESCRIPTIVE STUDY ON 100 PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kishore Babu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic foot as the leading cause of lower limb amputation is one of the most important complications of diabetes mellitus. Effective treatment and formulation of prevention guidelines for diabetic foot require a thorough understanding of characteristics of diabetic foot patients and their ulcers, so we conducted this study to investigate these characteristics . INTRODUCTION : Necessary data was collected from case sheets of 100 diabetic foot patients admitted in King Goerge Hospital, Vishakapatnam in the year 2014

  20. Improvement of diabetic patients nursing care by the development of educational programs

    OpenAIRE

    Bakalis Vissarion; Maria Malliarou; Paraskevi Theofilou; Sofia Zyga

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes is a major health problem with many social and economic consequences in general population. The importance of education in the diabetic patient and his family, led to the development of diabetes clinical nurse specialist. The role of diabetes clinical nurse specialist is essential and crucial to the hospitals and the community, in order to form a relationship with the diabetic patient and his/her family. In this way health is promoted to the maximum extent possible. In conclusion edu...

  1. Ambulatory anesthesia: optimal perioperative management of the diabetic patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polderman JAW

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Jorinde AW Polderman, Robert van Wilpe, Jan H Eshuis, Benedikt Preckel, Jeroen Hermanides Department of Anaesthesiology, Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands Abstract: Given the growing number of patients with diabetes mellitus (DM and the growing number of surgical procedures performed in an ambulatory setting, DM is one of the most encountered comorbidities in patients undergoing ambulatory surgery. Perioperative management of ambulatory patients with DM requires a different approach than patients undergoing major surgery, as procedures are shorter and the stress response caused by surgery is minimal. However, DM is a risk factor for postoperative complications in ambulatory surgery, so should be managed carefully. Given the limited time ambulatory patients spend in the hospital, improvement in management has to be gained from the preanesthetic assessment. The purpose of this review is to summarize current literature regarding the anesthesiologic management of patients with DM in the ambulatory setting. We will discuss the risks of perioperative hyperglycemia together with the pre-, intra-, and postoperative considerations for these patients when encountered in an ambulatory setting. Furthermore, we provide recommendations for the optimal perioperative management of the diabetic patient undergoing ambulatory surgery. Keywords: diabetes mellitus, perioperative period, ambulatory surgery, insulin, complications, GLP-1 agonist, DPP-4 inhibitor

  2. A CRITICAL ANALYSIS OF PATIENT SATISFACTION WITH DIABETES CARE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cotiu Madalina-Alexandra

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Consumer satisfaction represents one of the core principles of marketing as it is acknowledged that organizations survive and prosper only by properly meeting the needs and wants of their customers. The same logic can be applied to the healthcare sector, especially in the current context of increased public scrutiny and funding pressure. Furthermore, research shows that patient satisfaction is linked to positive effects from both a marketing and a medical point of view. From a marketing point of view, patient satisfaction is closely linked to positive word of mouth and likelihood to recommend, while from a medical poinbt of view, research suggests that satisfied patients are more inclined toward treatment adherence, are less likely to seek another opinion elsewhere thus delaying treatment, while medical staff tend to have a higher morale. Yet, research regarding patient satisfaction with a particular illness is scarce with studies rarely building on previous results. The article takes on this challenge and aims to critically analyse several empirical studies conducted on patient satisfaction with diabetes care in order to synthesize results on particular determinants and suggest areas for further research. Diabetes is currently one of the most spread chronic disease around the world, while also affecting both old and younger patients. At the same time, it is a chronic disease characterised by the need for disease management efforts on behalf of the patients as well as high treatment adherence in order to avoid complications. It is also a costly chronic disease especially because of the numerous complications which patients may arrive to face during their struggle with this disease. In order to achieve the aim of this article we have chosen to adopt a marketing approach meaning that we see diabetes patients as clients of the medical institutions. Results show that diabetes particularities call for a broader view on patient satisfaction

  3. Caries in patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collin, H L; Uusitupa, M; Niskanen, L; Koivisto, A M; Markkanen, H; Meurman, J H

    1998-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence and risk factors of dental caries in patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and to determine whether these factors are associated with metabolic control and vascular complications of the disease. Both the occurrence of caries, acidogenic oral bacteria, and yeasts and salivary flow were studied in 25 patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus whose diagnosis had been set 13 to 14 years earlier and in whom the metabolic evolution of the disease was well established. The patients' glycemic control was determined by means of analysis of the blood hemoglobin A1C concentration at the time of dental examination. The control group consisted of 40 nondiabetic subjects in the same age group. Decayed, missing, and filled teeth indices and numbers of surfaces with caries, filled surfaces, and root caries were determined by means of clinical dental caries examination. Stimulated salivary flow was measured, and levels of Streptococcus mutans, lactobacilli, and yeasts were analyzed. The median hemoglobin A1C concentration of the patients was 8.6%, which indicates poor metabolic control of diabetes. No association was found between the metabolic control of disease and dental caries. The occurrence of dental caries was not increased in the patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus in comparison with the control subjects. The counts of acidogenic microbes and yeasts did not differ statistically significantly between the groups. There was no association of caries with the prevalence of coronary artery disease or hypertension in either the patients or the control subjects. In a stepwise logistic regression model, a salivary flow of at least 0.8 ml/min was related to the occurrence of dental caries in patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, whereas negligence with respect to dental care was the most important risk predictor in the control group. Our results showed no effect

  4. Gastroparesis in a young diabetic patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovacic, P.; Jamar, B.

    2002-01-01

    Background. Gastroparesis is defined as a delay in emptying of contents from the stomach and occurs in a variety of conditions, e.g. after vagotomy or in systemic diseases such as diabetes mellitus, scleroderma and amyloidosis. The purpose of this paper is to present the radiologic examination, a simple, reliable and noninvasive method as an alternative to other methods for the assessment of gastric emptying. Case report. A twenty-one years old female was admitted because of suspected autonomic neuropathy. She had insulin dependent diabetes mellitus type I for the last ten years. At the time of admission she was complaining of nausea, vomiting, weakness and occasional dizziness. A barium study of oesophagus and stomach was performed: oesophagus was dilated and aperistaltic, remnants of food were seen in aperistaltic stomach but no obstruction, causing delayed emptying, was found. Conclusions. Scintigraphy is at the present the standard technique for the assessment of gastric emptying. Ultrasonography, magnetic resonance imaging, electrogastrography, gastroduodenal manometry and emptying of radiopaque pellets are also used for the evaluation of gastric motility in cases of delayed gastric emptying. The role of barium studies remains to be established. (author)

  5. Effective management of patients with diabetes foot ulcers: outcomes of an Interprofessional Diabetes Foot Ulcer Team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogrin, Rajna; Houghton, Pamela E; Thompson, G William

    2015-08-01

    A longitudinal observational study on a convenience sample was conducted between 4 January and 31 December of 2010 to evaluate clinical outcomes that occur when a new Interprofessional Diabetes Foot Ulcer Team (IPDFUT) helps in the management of diabetes-related foot ulcers (DFUs) in patients living in a small urban community in Ontario, Canada. Eighty-three patients presented to the IPDFUT with 114 DFUs of average duration of 19·5 ± 2·7 weeks. Patients were 58·4 ± 1·4 years of age and 90% had type 2 diabetes, HbA1c of 8·3 ± 2·0%, with an average diabetes duration of 22·3 ± 3·4 years; in 69% of patients, 78 DFUs healed in an average duration of 7·4 ± 0·7 weeks, requiring an average of 3·8 clinic visits. Amputation of a toe led to healing in three patients (4%) and one patient required a below-knee amputation. Six patients died and three withdrew. Adding a skilled IPDFUT that is trained to work together resulted in improved healing outcomes. The rate of healing, proportion of wounds closed and complication rate were similar if not better than the results published previously in Canada and around the world. The IPDFUT appears to be a successful model of care and could be used as a template to provide effective community care to the patients with DFU in Ontario, Canada. © 2013 The Authors. International Wound Journal © 2013 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Association of aldose reductase gene Z+2 polymorphism with reduced susceptibility to diabetic nephropathy in Caucasian Type 1 diabetic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lajer, Mathilde; Tarnow, L; Fleckner, Jan

    2004-01-01

    AIMS: The Z-2 allele of the (AC)n polymorphism in the aldose reductase gene (ALR2) confers increased risk of microvascular diabetic complications, whereas the Z+2 allele has been proposed to be a marker of protection. However data are conflicting. Therefore, we investigated whether this polymorph......AIMS: The Z-2 allele of the (AC)n polymorphism in the aldose reductase gene (ALR2) confers increased risk of microvascular diabetic complications, whereas the Z+2 allele has been proposed to be a marker of protection. However data are conflicting. Therefore, we investigated whether...... this polymorphism is associated with diabetic nephropathy and retinopathy in Type 1 diabetes mellitus in a large case-control study and a family-based analysis. METHODS: A total of 431 Type 1 diabetic patients with diabetic nephropathy and 468 patients with longstanding Type 1 diabetes and persistent...... of the ALR2 promoter polymorphism is associated with a reduced susceptibility to diabetic nephropathy in Danish Type 1 diabetic patients, suggesting a minor role for the polyol pathway in the pathogenesis of diabetic kidney disease. No association of the ALR2 polymorphism with diabetic retinopathy was found....

  7. Diabetes technology: improving care, improving patient-reported outcomes and preventing complications in young people with Type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prahalad, P; Tanenbaum, M; Hood, K; Maahs, D M

    2018-04-01

    With the evolution of diabetes technology, those living with Type 1 diabetes are given a wider arsenal of tools with which to achieve glycaemic control and improve patient-reported outcomes. Furthermore, the use of these technologies may help reduce the risk of acute complications, such as severe hypoglycaemia and diabetic ketoacidosis, as well as long-term macro- and microvascular complications. In addition, diabetes technology can have a beneficial impact on psychosocial health by reducing the burden of diabetes. Unfortunately, diabetes goals are often unmet and people with Type 1 diabetes too frequently experience acute and long-term complications of this condition, in addition to often having less than ideal psychosocial outcomes. Increasing realization of the importance of patient-reported outcomes is leading to diabetes care delivery becoming more patient-centred. Diabetes technology in the form of medical devices, digital health and big data analytics have the potential to improve clinical care and psychosocial support, resulting in lower rates of acute and chronic complications, decreased burden of diabetes care, and improved quality of life. © 2018 Diabetes UK.

  8. Study of serum soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 levels in type 2 diabetic patients with diabetic retinopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Fangdu; Chu Qiaomei

    2002-01-01

    To study the change and the correlation of serum soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (sV-CAM-1) levels with diabetic retinopathy in type 2 diabetic patients, serum sVCAM-1 levels were measured in duplicate by ELISA in 85 type 2 diabetic patients; fundus examination was performed by an ophthalmologist using ophthalmoscope or fundus fluorescein angiography, and the findings were graded as: no signs of diabetic retinopathy (NDR), background diabetic retinopathy (BDR) and proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR). Serum sVCAM-1 levels were significantly higher in the PDR and BDR groups than those in the control and NDR groups respectively (P<0.01). NDR group showed significantly increased serum sVCAM-levels compared with control group (P<0.01). In contrast, serum sVCAM-1 levels were not related to the presence of blood glucose, serum insulin levels or known diabetic duration. Authors' results suggest that serum sVCAM-1 might be implicated in the development of the diabetic retinopathy, and could assess the severity of diabetic retinopathy. The measurement of serum sVCAM-1 levels in 2 type diabetic patients may be clinically useful for early diagnosis or treatment of diabetic retinopathy

  9. Exocrine pancreatic insufficiency in diabetic patients: prevalence, mechanisms, and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piciucchi, Matteo; Capurso, Gabriele; Archibugi, Livia; Delle Fave, Martina Maria; Capasso, Marina; Delle Fave, Gianfranco

    2015-01-01

    Pancreas is a doubled-entity organ, with both an exocrine and an endocrine component, reciprocally interacting in a composed system whose function is relevant for digestion, absorption, and homeostasis of nutrients. Thus, it is not surprising that disorders of the exocrine pancreas also affect the endocrine system and vice versa. It is well-known that patients with chronic pancreatitis develop a peculiar form of diabetes (type III), caused by destruction and fibrotic injury of islet cells. However, less is known on the influence of diabetes on pancreatic exocrine function. Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (PEI) has been reported to be common in diabetics, with a prevalence widely ranging, in different studies, in both type I (25-74%) and type II (28-54%) diabetes. A long disease duration, high insulin requirement, and poor glycemic control seem to be risk factors for PEI occurrence. The impact of pancreatic exocrine replacement therapy on glycemic, insulin, and incretins profiles has not been fully elucidated. The present paper is aimed at reviewing published studies investigating the prevalence of PEI in diabetic patients and factors associated with its occurrence.

  10. Decreased incidence of gout in diabetic patients using pioglitazone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Sheng-Wen; Chang, Kai-Ting; Lin, Hugo You-Hsien; Kuo, I-Ching; Chang, Yu-Han; Chen, Yu-Han; Hung, Chi-Chih; Chiu, Yi-Wen; Hwang, Shang-Jyh

    2018-01-01

    The incidence and prevalence of gout are increasing, but the management is poor. Considering the increased prevalence of gout in the diabetic population, this study evaluated the effects of pioglitazone, an insulin resistance inhibitor, on the incidence of gout in the diabetic population. We used data from the National Health Insurance program in Taiwan. The pioglitazone cohort contained 30 100 patients and each patient was age and sex matched with three non-pioglitazone users who were randomly selected from the diabetic population. Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was conducted to estimate the effects of pioglitazone on the incidence of gout in the diabetic population. The incidence of gout was significantly lower in pioglitazone users than in non-pioglitazone users [adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) 0.81 (95% CI 0.78, 0.85)]. The HR for the incidence of gout was lower in both male [aHR 0.80 (95% CI 0.75, 0.85)] and female [aHR 0.83 (95% CI 0.78, 0.88)] pioglitazone users than in non-pioglitazone users. An analysis of three age groups (gout in the diabetic population using pioglitazone was less. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  11. Angiotensinogen gene polymorphisms in IDDM patients with diabetic nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarnow, L; Cambien, Francois; Rossing, P

    1996-01-01

    Genotypic abnormalities of the renin-ANG system have been suggested as a risk factor for the development of diabetic nephropathy. Cleavage of angiotensinogen is the rate-limiting step in the activation of the renin-ANG system. The TT genotype of a polymorphism encoding threonine instead of methio......Genotypic abnormalities of the renin-ANG system have been suggested as a risk factor for the development of diabetic nephropathy. Cleavage of angiotensinogen is the rate-limiting step in the activation of the renin-ANG system. The TT genotype of a polymorphism encoding threonine instead...... of methionine (M235T) has been associated not only with increased plasma angiotensinogen concentration but also with essential hypertension. In addition, a polymorphism in the angiotensinogen gene substituting methionine for threonine (T174M) has been associated with hypertension in nondiabetic populations. We...... studied the relationship between these polymorphisms in the angiotensinogen gene in IDDM patients with diabetic nephropathy (121 men, 74 women, age 40.9 +/- 10 years, diabetes duration 27 +/- 8 years). There was no difference in M235T genotype distribution between IDDM patients with diabetic nephropathy...

  12. Exocrine Pancreatic Insufficiency in Diabetic Patients: Prevalence, Mechanisms, and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Piciucchi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreas is a doubled-entity organ, with both an exocrine and an endocrine component, reciprocally interacting in a composed system whose function is relevant for digestion, absorption, and homeostasis of nutrients. Thus, it is not surprising that disorders of the exocrine pancreas also affect the endocrine system and vice versa. It is well-known that patients with chronic pancreatitis develop a peculiar form of diabetes (type III, caused by destruction and fibrotic injury of islet cells. However, less is known on the influence of diabetes on pancreatic exocrine function. Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (PEI has been reported to be common in diabetics, with a prevalence widely ranging, in different studies, in both type I (25–74% and type II (28–54% diabetes. A long disease duration, high insulin requirement, and poor glycemic control seem to be risk factors for PEI occurrence. The impact of pancreatic exocrine replacement therapy on glycemic, insulin, and incretins profiles has not been fully elucidated. The present paper is aimed at reviewing published studies investigating the prevalence of PEI in diabetic patients and factors associated with its occurrence.

  13. Psychosocial stress in South African patients with type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha Ramkisson

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Diabetes mellitus is considered an emotionally and behaviourally demanding condition which adds to the stress of a patient’s daily living. There is a paucity of literature in South Africa regarding stress and diabetes. This study therefore aims to identify the areas and contributory factors of psychosocial stress in South African patients with diabetes. Method: A cross-sectional study was conducted at two public facilities and five private medical practices on the north coast of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. The Questionnaire on Stress in Diabetes – Revised was administered to 401 participants. Results: Eighteen percent of the sample reported having extreme psychosocial stress. Depression, physical complaints and self-medication/diet were the main areas which contributed to high psychosocial stress. Factors that also contributed to high levels of psychosocial stress were low educational level, unemployment, female gender, attending the public sector and high HbA1c levels. Conclusion: Psychosocial stress affects metabolic control in patients with diabetes, thereby increasing the risks of long-term complications.

  14. A review of Ramadan fasting and diabetes mellitus: Controversies regarding the effects of Ramadan fasting on diabetic patients

    OpenAIRE

    Zhaleh Shadman; Mahdieh Akhoundan; Mohsen Khoshniat Nikoo

    2014-01-01

    Although several studies have investigated the effects of Ramadan fasting on diabetic patients, the exact impacts on diabetes control have not been well elucidated yet. There are neither precise quantitative criteria nor clear guidelines regarding Ramadan fasting for diabetic patients. This review aimed to discuss the results of previous studies. The neglected points in performed studies should be considered in the design and interpretation of future research related to Ramadan fasting in dia...

  15. Social orientation and diabetes-related distress in Japanese and American patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaori Ikeda

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Recent evidence in cultural and social psychology suggests Eastern cultures' emphasis on harmony and connection with others and Western cultures' emphasis on self-direction and autonomy. In Eastern society, relational harmony is closely linked to people's well-being. The impact of this cultural and social orientation on diabetes-related distress was investigated. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Japanese and American patients with type 2 diabetes were surveyed by well-established questionnaire in Japan and in the United States, respectively. The association of personal values for interdependence, perceived emotional support, and the Problem Areas in Diabetes scale (PAID were analyzed. RESULTS: A positive correlation between interdependence and PAID (r = 0.18; P = 0.025 and a negative correlation between perceived emotional support and PAID (r = - 0.24; P = 0.004 were observed after adjustments for other factors in Japanese data (n = 149, but not in American data (r = 0.00; P = 0.990, r = 0.02; P = 0.917, respectively, n = 50. In Japanese data, the three-factor structure of PAID (negative feelings about total life with diabetes, about living conditions with diabetes, and about treatment of diabetes was identified, and interdependence showed significant positive correlations with the first and second factors and perceived emotional support showed significant negative correlations with all three factors of PAID. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that personal values for interdependence may be linked to the level of diabetes-related distress and that the distress may be relieved by perception of emotional support, especially in an interdependent cultural context.

  16. Effects of fenofibrate in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus complicated by diabetic neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Nikolaevna Tkacheva

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic neuropathy is a severe complication of diabetes mellitus (DM that considerably worsens the patients quality of life and reduces life expectancy.The FIELD study for the first time demonstrated the ability of fenofibrate to prevent macro- and microvacular complications in patientswith DM2 regardless of glycated hemoglobin level and dyslipidemia at the early stage of the disease. Neuropathy being a manifestation of microangiopathy,it suggests the possibility to treat this disorder with fenofibrate.Aim. To study effects of fenofibrate in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus complicated by diabetic neuropathy. Materials and methods. The present study included 73 patients with DM2 randomized into 2 groups to receive standard therapy (antihypertensiveand glucose control, statins or fenofibrate (Tricor 145 mg, Solvay Pharma in addition to the standard treatment. Results. Positive effect of fenofibrate on autonomous and peripheral neuropathy was apparent within 6 months after the onset of therapy when thesought parameters of AP, glycemia, and lipid spectrum were achieved. Fenofibrate improved cardiovascular function, reduced cardiac rhythm variability;QT length and dispersion, pain and paresthesia thereby enhancing quality of life and preventing cardiovascular catastrophes including death. Conclusion. It is concluded that supplementation of standard therapy of DM with fenofibrate is both safe and pathogenetically sound.

  17. Self‑Care Activities Among Patients with Diabetes Attending a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    quality-of-life among patients with diabetes and can lead to better prevention ... Results: A healthy eating plan on a daily basis was followed by 45.9% (133/290) of the participants .... differences between the two groups for the median number.

  18. Early insulin therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a progressive disease characterised by beta cell dysfunction and insulin resistance. Beta cell dysfunction progresses to beta cell failure. Many patients with T2DM are managed with oral agents until complications develop. 'Clinical inertia' in T2DM, defined as lack of initiation or ...

  19. Prognostic factors in patients hospitalised with diabetic ketoacidosis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the clinico-laboratory predictors of outcomes of patients hospitalised with diabetic ketoacidosis who were undergoing treatment. Design: Cross-sectional descriptive study. Setting: The accident and emergency department and medical wards of the Kenyatta National Hospital. Subjects: Fifty one ...

  20. Steroid induced diabetes mellitus in patients receiving prednisolone ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Steroids are a useful component of combination chemotherapy or as a single agent in the treatment of haematological disorders even though there are adverse effects associated with its use. Methods: We report four patients who developed diabetes mellitus (DM) during treatment with steroids for ...

  1. Quality of life of patients with type I diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hart, HE; Bilo, HJG; Redekop, WK; Stolk, RP; Meyboom-de Jong, B

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess health related quality of life (QOL) in patients with type I diabetes mellitus (DMT1) and to compare their QOL with the QOL of persons of comparable age in the general population. Furthermore we wanted to investigate which factors mostly influence QOL. In a

  2. standards of diabetic care - successes and failures of a patient

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    medical care provided for adult diabetic patients in primary ... An analysis of the prevalences of obesity, ... managed elsewhere were selected for the study. ..... Levitt NS, Bradshaw D, Zwarenstein MF, Bawa AA, Maphumolo S. Audit of public sector ... sis, Meta. - embryo. Neuroen cycle; Sp implanta. Prostagla. Part 11: C.

  3. Self care activities among patients with diabetes attending a tertiary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Self care activities among patients with diabetes attending a tertiary care hospital in Mangalore Karnataka, India. ... Conclusions: Self‑care practices were found to be unsatisfactory in almost all aspects except for blood sugar monitoring and treatment adherence. As these practices are essential for prevention of ...

  4. Evaluation of Smoking Status among Diabetes Patients in the State ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HP

    specific groups in Malaysia [7-9]. The current study was aimed at determining the prevalence of smoking among type 2 diabetes patients in. Penang Island, Malaysia. METHODS. Study design. Penang General Hospital is the largest tertiary public hospital in the state of Penang. It provides health care, emergency treatment ...

  5. Secretion of salivary statherin is compromised in uncontrolled diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Izumi

    2015-06-01

    Conclusions and general significance: The results show that synthesis and secretion of statherin is reduced in diabetics and this reduction is salivary gland specific. As compromised salivary statherin secretion leads to increased oral health risk, this study indicates that routine oral health assessment of these patients is warranted.

  6. Structural and functional salivary disorders in type 2 diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carda, Carmen; Mosquera-Lloreda, Nezly; Salom, Lucas; Gomez de Ferraris, Maria Elsa; Peydró, Amando

    2006-07-01

    Diabetes mellitus type 2 is the most common metabolic disorder and it causes an important morbimortality. The structural modifications in the parotid gland (sialosis) had already been described in these patients and could result in variations in the salivary composition, as well as an increase in periodontal and dental pathology. To compare the biochemical findings in the saliva and to correlate these biochemical disturbances with the morphologic findings previously described. Clinical information were gathered about 33 patients, 17 had type 2 diabetes. Samples of whole saliva were obtained for biochemical analysis and serum samples to determine metabolic control. In the diabetics saliva we found urea and total proteins increased and reduced levels of microalbumina. Salivary glucose was only augmented in patients with poor metabolic control. Clinical symptoms of xerostomia were present in 76,4% and dental and periodontal disease in 100%. The parotid gland was characterised by the presence of small acini, lipid intracytoplasmic droplets, as well as adipose stroma infiltration. The acinar cytoqueratins expression was heterogeneous and very positive in the hyperplasic ducts. These biochemical disorders in the saliva of the type 2 diabetic patients would be related with the structural changes previously observed in parotid glands.

  7. Metabolic Syndrome among Type-2 Diabetic Patients in Benghazi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of three out of five conditions that are due to hyperinsulinemia: abdominal obesity, atherogenic dyslipidemia (high triglycerides and/or low HDL), elevated blood pressure, and elevated plasma glucose. The syndrome is highly prevalent in patients with type-2 diabetes mellitus ...

  8. Neuromusculoskeletal disorders in patients with Type 2 diabetes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Usual line of management of diabetes patients is drug and diet with their physical needs usually receiving minimal attention. Among the physical needs, requiring attention is their neuromusculoskeletal disorders. This study was designed to investigate the effect of a twelve-week therapeutic exercise on ...

  9. Dysgonic fermenter 3-associated abscess in a diabetic patient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bangsborg, Jette Marie; Frederiksen, W; Bruun, B

    1990-01-01

    We report a case in which a strain of the U.S.A. Centers for Disease Control (CDC) dysgonic fermenter (DF) 3, together with Citrobacter freundii, was isolated from an abscess in a diabetic patient. DF 3 may be easily overlooked due to its fastidious nature, a characteristic shared with two former...

  10. Prevalence of diabetes mellitus in patients with acromegaly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dreval, A V; Trigolosova, I V; Misnikova, I V; Kovalyova, Y A; Tishenina, R S; Barsukov, I A; Vinogradova, A V; Wolffenbuttel, B H R

    2014-01-01

    Early carbohydrate metabolism disorders (ECMDs) and diabetes mellitus (DM) are frequently associated with acromegaly. We aimed to assess the prevalence of ECMDs in patients with acromegaly and to compare the results with those in adults without acromegaly using two population-based epidemiologic

  11. Diabetes mellitus among tuberculosis patients: a cross sectional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The co-occurrence of diabetes mellitus (DM) and tuberculosis (TB) is largely associated with high frequency of morbidity. Objective: To determine the prevalence of DM among TB patients and describe the socio-demographic and behavioral factors associated with TB-DM co-occurrence . Methods: We enrolled ...

  12. Loss of inverse relationship between pulsatile insulin and glucagon secretion in patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Menge, Björn A; Grüber, Lena; Jørgensen, Signe M

    2011-01-01

    In patients with type 2 diabetes, glucagon levels are often increased. Furthermore, pulsatile secretion of insulin is disturbed in such patients. Whether pulsatile glucagon secretion is altered in type 2 diabetes is not known.......In patients with type 2 diabetes, glucagon levels are often increased. Furthermore, pulsatile secretion of insulin is disturbed in such patients. Whether pulsatile glucagon secretion is altered in type 2 diabetes is not known....

  13. Free Triiodothyronine Levels Are Associated with Diabetic Nephropathy in Euthyroid Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingcheng Wu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To investigate the association of thyroid function and diabetic nephropathy (DN in euthyroid patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods. A total of 421 patients were included in this cross-sectional study. The following parameters were assessed: anthropometric measurements, fast plasma glucose, serum creatinine, lipid profile, HbA1c, free triiodothyronine (FT3, free thyroxine, thyroid-stimulating hormone levels, and urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (UACR. Patients with UACR of ≥30 mg/g were defined as those suffering from DN. Results. Of the 421 patients, 203 (48.2% suffered from DN, and no difference was found between males and females. The patients with DN yielded significantly lower FT3 levels than those without DN (P<0.01. The prevalence of DN showed a significantly decreasing trend across the three tertiles based on FT3 levels (59.6%, 46.4%, and 38.6%, P<0.01. After adjustment for gender and age, FT3 levels were found to correlate positively with estimated glomerular filtration rate (P=0.03 and negatively with UACR (P<0.01. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that FT3 level was independently associated with UACR (β=-0.18, t=-3.70, and P<0.01. Conclusion. Serum FT3 levels are inversely associated with DN in euthyroid patients with type 2 diabetes, independent of traditional risk factors.

  14. A comparative study of risk factors for corneal infection in diabetic and non-diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Wang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To compare the clinical characteristics of infectious keratopathy in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM and non-diabetes mellitus (NDM and to investigate risk factors for infectious keratopathy in T2DM patients. METHODS: Totally 230 patients with T2DM and 168 with NDM diagnosed as infectious keratopathy were hospitalized at Qingdao Eye Hospital from 2001 to 2015. Data including sex, age, occupation, season, smoking and alcohol consumption habits, duration between onset and treatments, duration of hospitalization were collected. Initially identified indicators were analyzed with a multivariate logistic regression. Glycosylated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c in patients with T2DM was analyzed. The infectious keratopathies in the two groups were categorized and compared. RESULTS: The diabetic group consisted of 146 (63.5% males and 84 (36.5% females. The NDM group consisted of 111 (66.1% males and 57 (33.9% females. There was no signigicantly difference in sex distribution between the two groups (P>0.05. There were significant differences in age, occupation of patients, season of the onset of diseases, duration between onset and treatment, and durations of hospitalization between the two groups (P0.05. CONCLUSION: Advanced age and the summer and winter seasons are identified as risk factors for infectious keratopathy in T2DM patients, and T2DM patients are more prone to bacterial keratitis.

  15. Diabetic patients have abnormal cerebral autoregulation during cardiopulmonary bypass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Croughwell, N.; Lyth, M.; Quill, T.J.; Newman, M.; Greeley, W.J.; Smith, L.R.; Reves, J.G.

    1990-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that insulin-dependent diabetic patients with coronary artery bypass graft surgery experience altered coupling of cerebral blood flow and oxygen consumption. In a study of 23 patients (11 diabetics and 12 age-matched controls), cerebral blood flow was measured using 133Xe clearance during nonpulsatile, alpha-stat blood gas managed cardiopulmonary bypass at the conditions of hypothermia and normothermia. In diabetic patients, the cerebral blood flow at 26.6 +/- 2.42 degrees C was 25.3 +/- 14.34 ml/100 g/min and at 36.9 +/- 0.58 degrees C it was 27.3 +/- 7.40 ml/100 g/min (p = NS). The control patients increased cerebral blood flow from 20.7 +/- 6.78 ml/100 g/min at 28.4 +/- 2.81 degrees C to 37.6 +/- 8.81 ml/100 g/min at 36.5 +/- 0.45 degrees C (p less than or equal to 0.005). The oxygen consumption was calculated from jugular bulb effluent and increased from hypothermic values of 0.52 +/- 0.20 ml/100 g/min in diabetics to 1.26 +/- 0.28 ml/100 g/min (p = 0.001) at normothermia and rose from 0.60 +/- 0.27 to 1.49 +/- 0.35 ml/100 g/min (p = 0.0005) in the controls. Thus, despite temperature-mediated changes in oxygen consumption, diabetic patients did not increase cerebral blood flow as metabolism increased. Arteriovenous oxygen saturation gradients and oxygen extraction across the brain were calculated from arterial and jugular bulb blood samples. The increase in arteriovenous oxygen difference between temperature conditions in diabetic patients and controls was significantly different (p = 0.01). These data reveal that diabetic patients lose cerebral autoregulation during cardiopulmonary bypass and compensate for an imbalance in adequate oxygen delivery by increasing oxygen extraction

  16. The Burden of Diagnosed and Undiagnosed Diabetes in Native Hawaiian and Asian American Hospitalized Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sentell, T L; Cheng, Y; Saito, E; Seto, T B; Miyamura, J; Mau, M; Juarez, D T

    2015-12-01

    Little is known about diabetes in hospitalized Native Hawaiians and Asian Americans. We determined the burden of diabetes (both diagnosed and undiagnosed) among hospitalized Native Hawaiian, Asian (Filipino, Chinese, Japanese), and White patients. Diagnosed diabetes was determined from discharge data from a major medical center in Hawai'i during 2007-2008. Potentially undiagnosed diabetes was determined by Hemoglobin A1c ≥6.5% or glucose ≥200 mg/dl values for those without diagnosed diabetes. Multivariable log-binomial models predicted diabetes (potentially undiagnosed and diagnosed, separately) controlling for socio-demographic factors. Of 17,828 hospitalized patients, 3.4% had potentially undiagnosed diabetes and 30.5% had diagnosed diabetes. In multivariable models compared to Whites, Native Hawaiian and all Asian subgroups had significantly higher percentages of diagnosed diabetes, but not of potentially undiagnosed diabetes. Potentially undiagnosed diabetes was associated with significantly more hospitalizations during the study period compared to both those without diabetes and those with diagnosed diabetes. In all racial/ethnic groups, those with potentially undiagnosed diabetes also had the longest length of stay and were more likely to die during the hospitalization. Hospitalized Native Hawaiians (41%) and Asian subgroups had significantly higher overall diabetes burdens compared to Whites (23%). Potentially undiagnosed diabetes was associated with poor outcomes. Hospitalized patients, irrespective of race/ethnicity, may require more effective inpatient identification and management of previously undiagnosed diabetes to improve clinical outcomes.

  17. Prevalence of antiplatelet therapy in patients with diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Littenberg Benjamin

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To determine the prevalence of, and patient characteristics associated with, antiplatelet therapy in a cohort of primary care patients with Type 1 or Type2 diabetes. Methods Subjects participating in a randomized trial of a decision support system were interviewed at home and medication usage verified by a research assistant. Eligibility for antiplatelet therapy was determined by American Diabetes Association criteria and clinical contraindications. The association between antiplatelet use and patient characteristics was examined using bivariate and multivariate logistic regression. Results The mean age of subjects was 64 years (range 31–93. The prevalence of antiplatelet use was 54% overall; 45% for subjects without known CVD vs. 78% for those with CVD; 46% for women vs. 63% for men; and 45% for younger subjects (age = 65 (OR 1.9 [1.3, 2.7]. The prevalence of antiplatelet therapy for younger women without CVD was 32.8% compared to a prevalence of 90.3% for older men with CVD. Conclusion Despite clinical practice guidelines recommending antiplatelet therapy for patients with diabetes, there are still many eligible patients not receiving this beneficial therapy, particularly patients under 65, women, and patients without known CVD. Effective methods to increase antiplatelet use should be considered at the national, community, practice and provider level.

  18. Balneotherapy and platelet glutathione metabolism in type II diabetic patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtsuka, Yoshinori; Yabunaka, Noriyuki; Watanabe, Ichiro; Noro, Hiroshi; Agishi, Yuko

    1996-09-01

    Effects of balneotherapy on platelet glutathione metabolism were investigated in 12 type II (non-insulin-dependent) diabetic patients. Levels of the reduced form of glutathione (GSH) on admission were well correlated with those of fasting plasma glucose (FPG; r=0.692, Pbalneotherapy, the mean level of GSH showed no changes; however, in well-controlled patients (FPG 150 mg/dl), the value decreased ( Pbalneotherapy, the activity increased in 5 patients, decreased in 3 patients and showed no changes (alteration within ±3%) in all the other patients. From these findings in diabetic patients we concluded: (1) platelet GSH synthesis appeared to be induced in response to oxidative stress; (2) lowered GPX activities indicated that the antioxidative defense system was impaired; and (3) platelet glutathione metabolism was partially improved by 4 weeks balneotherapy, an effect thought to be dependent on the control status of plasma glucose levels. It is suggested that balneotherapy is beneficial for patients whose platelet antioxidative defense system is damaged, such as those with diabetes mellitus and coronary heart disease.

  19. Diabetes mellitus in β-thalassemia major patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riadi Wirawan

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available β-thalassemia major is a disease caused by β polypeptide chain synthesis disorder which is inherited as an autosomal recessive from both parents which is marked by little or no β globin chain synthesis. Medication for β thalassemia major patients is by repeated blood transfusions, which causes hemochromatosis. Hemochromatosis can occur in various organs including the pancreas. The aim of the study was to assess the alteration of plasma glucose concentration and the hemochromatosis prevalence. Fasting plasma glucose concentration and serum ferritin examination were measured in 115 β thalassemia major patients with ages between 10-23 years who were out-patients in the Thalassemia Centre, Department of Child Health, Medical School, University of Indonesia / Dr. Cipto Mangunkusumo General Hospital, Jakarta. The plasma glucose concentration examination was conducted by the GDH enzymatic method, with American Diabetes Association (ADA criteria in the evaluation, while the serum ferritin examination was conducted with the microparticle enzyme immuno assay (MEIA method. All patients had hemochromatosis, 14.8% of the patients had impaired fasting glucose level and 2.6% of the patients showed indications of diabetes mellitus. β thalassemia major patients who receive frequent transfusions will develop hemochromatosis that will in turn impair the pancreatic function. (Med J Indones 2003; 12: 87-93 Keywords : β thalassemia major, hemochromatosis, diabetes mellitus

  20. Patient web portals to improve diabetes outcomes: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborn, Chandra Y; Mayberry, Lindsay Satterwhite; Mulvaney, Shelagh A; Hess, Rachel

    2010-12-01

    Patient web portals (PWPs), defined as the integration of electronic medical records and patient health records, have been related to enhanced patient outcomes. A literature review was conducted to characterize the design and evaluation of PWPs to improve health care processes and outcomes in diabetes. A summary of 26 articles revealed the positive impact PWPs have on patient outcomes, patient-provider communication, disease management, and access to and patient satisfaction with health care. Innovative and useful approaches included the evaluation of specific components of the PWPs, assessing the impact of PWPs on mediators of health behaviors, such as patient distress, identification of barriers to use, and patient willingness to pay for access. Future research should focus on relevant processes that mediate patient and provider use, impact on health care utilization, and a patient-centered approach to the design and integration of educational opportunities afforded through PWPs.

  1. Hypothyroidism in diabetes mellitus patients in Eastern Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin Maskey

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: The coexistence of diabetes mellitus (DM with hypothyroidism is a known clinical observation. Aims: To estimate prevalence and co-relate that of hypothyroidism in patients with DM in relation to the age and sex, the lipid profile, body mass index visiting diabetes clinic and inpatients in B. P. Koirala Institute of Health Sciences. Settings and Design: The hospital-based descriptive study. Materials and Methods: Two hundred and seventy-one known or newly detected cases of DM aged more than 15 years were selected randomly from September 2012 to September 2013 and subjected to evaluation for thyroid function - clinically and biochemically and other relevant investigations were done. Statistical Analysis Used: For descriptive statistics mean, standard deviation, percentage, proportion were calculated. For inferential statistics following test were carried out at the level of significant 0.05 where confidence interval is 95%. The statistical operations were done through Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 10. Results: Of 271 subjects, the prevalence of hypothyroidism (clinical and subclinical in diabetics was, 4.05% (11/271 with females preponderance, of which 7 (30.4% were clinically hypothyroid and 4 (17.4% were subclinical hypothyroid. One (4.3% patient had subclinical hyperthyroidism. The mean age at diagnosis of type 2 DM was 51-60 years. 8.69% of diabetics with primary hypothyroids were having morbid obesity. High-density lipoprotein among different thyroid status were statistically significant (P = 0.042. Conclusions: Hypothyroidism is not uncommon in diabetes, and we found body mass index, mean triglyceride and cholesterol levels were more in those diabetic patients having coexisting hypothyroidism.

  2. Reducing patient drug acquisition costs can lower diabetes health claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, John J

    2005-08-01

    Concerned about rising prevalence and costs of diabetes among its employees, Pitney Bowes Inc recently revamped its drug benefit design to synergize with ongoing efforts in its disease management and patient education programs. Specifically, based on a predictive model showing that low medication adherence was linked to subsequent increases in healthcare costs in patients with diabetes, the company shifted all diabetes drugs and devices from tier 2 or 3 formulary status to tier 1. The rationale was that reducing patient out-of-pocket costs would eliminate financial barriers to preventive care, and thereby increase adherence, reduce costly complications, and slow the overall rate of rising healthcare costs. This single change in pharmaceutical benefit design immediately made critical brand-name drugs available to most Pitney Bowes employees and their covered dependents for 10% coinsurance, the same coinsurance level as for generic drugs, versus the previous cost share of 25% to 50%. After 2 to 3 years, preliminary results in plan participants with diabetes indicate that medication possession rates have increased significantly, use of fixed-combination drugs has increased (possibly related to easier adherence), average total pharmacy costs have decreased by 7%, and emergency department visits have decreased by 26%. Hospital admission rates, although increasing slightly, remain below the demographically adjusted Medstat benchmark. Overall direct healthcare costs per plan participant with diabetes decreased by 6%. In addition, the rate of increase in overall per-plan-participant health costs at Pitney Bowes has slowed markedly, with net per-plan-participant costs in 2003 at about 4000 dollars per year versus 6500 dollars for the industry benchmark. This recent moderation in overall corporate health costs may be related to these strategic changes in drug benefit design for diabetes, asthma, and hypertension and also to ongoing enhancements in the company's disease

  3. Renal outcomes with aliskiren in patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heerspink, Hiddo J Lambers; Persson, Frederik; Brenner, Barry M

    2016-01-01

    ALTITUDE trial, 8561 patients with type 2 diabetes and chronic kidney disease or cardiovascular disease were randomly assigned (1:1) to receive aliskiren 300 mg per day or placebo as an adjunct to ACE inhibitors or ARBs. Randomisation was stratified on the basis of baseline urinary albumin......Background: The primary results of the ALTITUDE trial showed no benefit of aliskiren on renal outcomes (doubling of serum creatinine and end-stage renal disease) when used as an adjunct to angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) in patients with type 2...... diabetes and chronic kidney disease or cardiovascular disease. We did a prespecified analysis of the ALTITUDE trial to analyse the effects of aliskiren on surrogate renal outcomes in all patients and on primary renal outcomes in subgroups of patients. Methods: In the double-blind, randomised, controlled...

  4. Partial central diabetes insipidus in patient with common variable immunodeficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megías, Marta Cano; Matei, Ana Maria; Gonzalez Albarran, Olga; Perez Lopez, Gilberto

    2012-07-03

    Approximately 20% of patients with common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) have any autoimmune disease, as concurrent as prior to diagnosis, even during follow-up. In recent years, cases of CVID associated to endocrine autoimmune diseases have been reported. To our knowledge, no cases of CVID with diabetes insipidus has been reported previously. The authors present the case of a 37-year-old male, diagnosed of CVID, who had thirst, polyuria and nocturia for several years. After a water deprivation test and a complete resolution of patient's symptoms with vasopressin (DDAVP) treatment, diagnosis of partial central diabetes insipidus was finally made. Patients diagnosed of CVID could develop water misbalance due to posterior hypophysis autoimmune disorder. A high index of clinical suspicion, an early diagnosis and treatment of these disease could avoid future complications and improve the quality of life of these patients.

  5. Underuse of an invasive strategy for patients with diabetes with acute coronary syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustafsson, Ida; Hvelplund, Anders; Hansen, Kim Wadt

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Guidelines recommend an early invasive strategy for patients with diabetes with acute coronary syndromes (ACS). We investigated if patients with diabetes with ACS are offered coronary angiography (CAG) and revascularisation to the same extent as patients without diabetes. METHODS AND ...

  6. Impaired vascular function during short-term poor glycaemic control in Type 1 diabetic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, V.R.; Mathiassen, E.R.; Clausen, P.

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To study the effects of short-term poor glycaemic control on vascular function in Type 1 diabetic patients. METHODS: Ten Type 1 diabetic patients, with diabetes duration of less than 10 years and normal urinary albumin excretion and ophthalmoscopy, were studied. All patients were examined af...

  7. Serum AGEs in black South African patients with type 2 diabetes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    T2D and 81 non-diabetic patients at Dr George Mukhari Academic Hospital in Pretoria, South Africa. Outcome ... Subjects. In total, 138 subjects with type 2 diabetes (T2D) and 81 control subjects were ..... loss of glucose tolerance associated with the diabetic state, treatment ..... fracture risk in older adults with type 2 diabetes.

  8. Plasma osteoprotegerin concentrations in peripheral sensory neuropathy in Type 1 and Type 2 diabetic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nybo, M; Poulsen, M K; Grauslund, J

    2010-01-01

    Osteoprotegerin (OPG) has been linked to different diabetes complications, including cardiovascular disease, and new findings have indicated a specific role in diabetic peripheral neuropathy, but the exact mechanism is unknown. To investigate a possible association between OPG and diabetic...... peripheral sensory neuropathy, we therefore analysed plasma OPG in Type 1 and Type 2 diabetic patients with and without peripheral neuropathy....

  9. Arterial Stiffness in Nonhypertensive Type 2 Diabetes Patients in Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwame Yeboah

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Increased arterial stiffness is an independent cardiovascular risk factor in diabetes patients and general population. However, the contribution of diabetes to arterial stiffness is often masked by coexistent obesity and hypertension. In this study, we assessed arterial stiffness in nonhypertensive, nonobese type 2 diabetes (T2DM patients in Ghana. Methods. In case-control design, 166 nonhypertensive, nonobese participants, comprising 96 T2DM patients and 70 nondiabetes controls, were recruited. Peripheral and central blood pressure (BP indices were measured, and arterial stiffness was assessed as aortic pulse wave velocity (PWVao, augmentation index (AIx, cardioankle vascular index (CAVI, and heart-ankle pulse wave velocity (haPWV. Results. With similar peripheral and central BP indices, T2DM patients had higher PWVao (8.3 ± 1 versus 7.8 ± 1.3, p=0.044 and CAVI (7.9 ± 1.2 versus 6.9 ± 0.7, p=0.021 than nondiabetic control. AIx and haPWV were similar between T2DM and nondiabetic controls. Multiple regression models showed that, in the entire study participants, the major determinants of PWVao were diabetes status, age, gender, systolic BP, and previous smoking status (β = 0.22, 0.36, 0.48, 0.21, and 0.25, resp.; all p<0.05; the determinants of CAVI were diabetes status, age, BMI, heart rate, HbA1c, total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, and previous smoking status (β = 0.21, 0.38, 0.2, 0.18, 0.24. 0.2, −0.19, and 0.2, resp.; all p<0.05. Conclusion. Our findings suggest that nonhypertensive, nonobese T2DM patients have increased arterial stiffness without appreciable increase in peripheral and central pressure indices.

  10. Panel: Big Data & Social Media for Empowering Patients with Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Luque, Luis; Mejova, Yelena; Mayer, Miguel-Angel; Hasvold, Per Erlend; Joshi, Surabhi

    2016-01-01

    Millions of people living with diabetes are using mobile phones, Internet and social media to socialize with other patients, share experience or search information relevant for their self-management. This phenomena is leading towards a new paradigm of hyper-connected diabetes digital self-management. This is also leading towards an explosion on data, a large amount of data is collected on populations around the world. This panel will address the opportunities this data presents, discuss the latest research that uses it, and the limitations and other concerns.

  11. Aqueous humor pentraxin-3 levels in patients with diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutlu, M; Yuksel, N; Takmaz, T; Dincel, A S; Bilgihan, A; Altınkaynak, H

    2017-10-01

    PurposeTo evaluate aqueous humor (AH) pentraxin-3 (PTX3) levels in diabetic patients with and without diabetic retinopathy (DR).MethodsIn this prospective study, patients undergoing cataract surgery were enrolled. The study group was composed of 26 type-2 diabetic patients without DR (group 1), 32 diabetic patients with DR (group 2) and 29 age-matched subjects without any systemic disease (group 3). Fifteen proliferative DR (PDR) and 17 non-proliferative DR (NPDR) patients were enrolled in Group 2. HbA1c levels and duration of diabetes were noted. AH samples were obtained from anterior chamber at the beginning of cataract surgery and PTX3 levels were analyzed with Elisa kit.ResultsBaseline demographic characteristics were similar between groups. The mean duration of diabetes was 11.9±7.9 years in group 1 and 15.8±7.8 years in group 2 (P=0.11). The mean plasma HbA1c levels in group 1 was 9.1±2.6 and 8.2±2.4 in group 2 (P=0.36). PTX3 levels were 5.75±0.41 in group 1, 6.11±1.47 in group 2 and 4.93±0.84 ng/ml in group 3 (P=0.01). PTX3 levels in group 2 were higher than in group 1 and 3 (P=0.06 and P=0.01, respectively). There was no correlation between HbA1c and PTX3 levels (P=0.06 r=0.57, P=0.19 r=0.3, respectively). The mean PTX3 was 6.6±0.3 in PDR group and 5.6±0.5 ng/ml in NPDR group (P=0.04).ConclusionsPTX3 is an important marker especially for vascular endothelial damage. Since diabetic vascular changes are dependent on endothelial cell damage, high levels of AH PTX3 of DR patients may indicate the importance of PTX3 protein in the pathogenesis of DR.

  12. Prevalence of dyslipidemia in patients with type-2 diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siddiqui, S.A.; Shabbir, I.; Sherwani, M.U.I.K.; Hussain, R.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The dyslipidaemia associated with type-2 diabetes is associated with raised plasma triglycerides, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and very low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels and is a risk factor of cardiovascular disease. Objectives: To assess the lipid abnormalities in patients with type-2 diabetes. Study design and settings: A cohort study carried out at Diabetic Clinic of PMRC Research Centre, FJMC, Lahore, Pakistan. Patients and Methods Eight years case records of type-2 diabetic patients seen at the research centre from 1999-2006 were reviewed. The research centre is a specialized centre for diagnosing and treating diabetes mellitus. All the patients were recruited for their follow up check up and laboratory investigations for dislipidemia. Adult treatment panel III guidelines for dyslipidaemia were followed. A 12 hours fasting blood sample was collected from each patient for serum total cholesterol, triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and glucose as well as glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) by using standard methods at Biochemistry laboratory of the research centre. LDL-C/ HDL-C ratios, Very low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (VLDL-C) and body mass index was calculated after anthropometery body mass index (BMI) less than or equal to 25 was considered as overweight while less than or equal 30 obese. HbA1c 40 mg/dl were seen in 67%. Raised VLDL-C (above 40 mg/dl) was seen in 32.9% cases. The group with high LDL and VLDL is at risk of developing cardiovascular disease. Hypertriglyceridaemia was found in 55% and hypercholesterolaemia in 45.4% cases. Obesity as indicated by body mass index was found in 53.7% patients. Statistically significant association of hypercholesterolemia, hypertriglyceridemia, hypo HDL cholesterolemia and VLDL-C was found with advancing age while only hypertriglyceridemia and VLDL-C showed a positive

  13. Xerostomia, Hyposalivation, and Salivary Flow in Diabetes Patients

    OpenAIRE

    L?pez-Pintor, Rosa Mar?a; Casa?as, Elisabeth; Gonz?lez-Serrano, Jos?; Serrano, Julia; Ram?rez, Luc?a; de Arriba, Lorenzo; Hern?ndez, Gonzalo

    2016-01-01

    The presence of xerostomia and hyposalivation is frequent among diabetes mellitus (DM) patients. It is not clear if the presence of xerostomia and hyposalivation is greater in DM than non-DM patients. The aims of this systematic review are (1) to compare the prevalence rates of xerostomia, (2) to evaluate the salivary flow rate, and (3) to compare the prevalence rates of hyposalivation in DM versus non-DM population. This systematic review was conducted according to the PRISMA group guideline...

  14. Diabetes knowledge and utilization of healthcare services among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in Dhaka, Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddique, Md Kaoser Bin; Islam, Sheikh Mohammed Shariful; Banik, Palash Chandra; Rawal, Lal B

    2017-08-22

    Diabetes is a significant global public health concern. Poor knowledge of disease and healthcare utilization is associated with worse health outcomes, leading to increasing burden of diabetes in many developing countries. This study aimed to determine diabetes related knowledge and factors affecting utilization of healthcare services among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in Bangladesh. This analytical study was conducted among 318 patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) attending two large tertiary hospitals in Dhaka, Bangladesh between August 2014 and January 2015. Interviewer assisted semi-structured survey questionnaire was used to collect data on diabetes knowledge (measured by a validated Likert scale) and self-reported utilization of service for diabetes. Univariate and bivariate analyses were conducted to determine the factors associated with diabetes knowledge and healthcare utilization. The mean (±SD) age of participants was 52 (±10) years. Majority of the participants were females (58%) and urban residents (74%). Almost two-third (66%) of the participants had an average level of knowledge of T2DM. One-fifth (21%) of the participants had poor knowledge which was significantly associated with gender (P knowledge of diabetes which might affect the utilization of healthcare services for diabetes management. Innovations in increasing diabetes knowledge and health behavior change are recommended specially for females, those with lower education and less income.

  15. Foot ulcers in the diabetic patient, prevention and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie C Wu

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Stephanie C Wu1, Vickie R Driver1, James S Wrobel2, David G Armstrong21Center for Lower Extremity Ambulatory Research,William M. Scholl College of Podiatric Medicine at Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science, and National Center of Limb Salvage, Advocate Lutheran General Hospital, Chicago, IL, USA; 2Center for Lower Extremity Ambulatory Research, Dr. William M. Scholl College of Podiatric Medicine at Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine, Chicago, IL, USAAbstract: Lower extremity complications in persons with diabetes have become an increasingly significant public health concern in both the developed and developing world. These complications, beginning with neuropathy and subsequent diabetic foot wounds frequently lead to infection and lower extremity amputation even in the absence of critical limb ischemia. In order to diminish the detrimental consequences associated with diabetic foot ulcers, a common-sense-based treatment approach must be implemented. Many of the etiological factors contributing to the formation of diabetic foot ulceration may be identified using simple, inexpensive equipment in a clinical setting. Prevention of diabetic foot ulcers can be accomplished in a primary care setting with a brief history and screening for loss of protective sensation via the Semmes-Weinstein monofilament. Specialist clinics may quantify neuropathy, plantar foot pressure, and assess vascular status with Doppler ultrasound and ankle-brachial blood pressure indices. These measurements, in conjunction with other findings from the history and physical examination, may enable clinicians to stratify patients based on risk and help determine the type of intervention. Other effective clinical interventions may include patient education, optimizing glycemic control, smoking cessation, and diligent foot care. Recent technological advanced combined with better understanding of the wound healing process have resulted in a myriad of advanced

  16. The dilemma of diabetic patients living with hypoglycaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fei-Ling; Juang, Jyuhn-Huarng; Yeh, Mei Chang

    2011-08-01

    To examine the impact of the threat of hypoglycaemic episodes on people with diabetes in Taiwan. Intensive diabetes treatment in people with diabetes helps them to achieve better glycaemic control. However, it also causes more frequent hypoglycaemic episodes and has an impact on their overall quality of life. Hypoglycaemia is accompanied by various distressing symptoms which may cause excessive fear, affecting decision making in hypoglycaemic management. Purposive sampling and in-depth, face-to-face interviews were used to collect data. Semi-structured interviews were conducted from July 2008-January 2009 with 17 individuals treated with insulin who had previous hypoglycaemic episodes. Data were analysed using qualitative content analysis. Four themes were generated from the analysis, 'inability to control fluctuations in health', 'challenges to interpersonal relationships', 'facing the disease alone' and 'finding a balance between competing symptoms'. Hypoglycaemia is a major health issue for many people with diabetes. Understanding individuals' experiences with hypoglycaemic episodes should help practitioners become more fully involved in promoting self-management. We identified key areas that health care providers should address, including concerns about patient education and professional support for people with diabetes experiencing hypoglycaemia, to enhance problem solving skills for them and their families. We recommend that health care providers make proper use of support groups for family caregivers or other important individuals in the lives of people with diabetes to provide education, clarification, support and guidance. In addition, health care providers also need to provide clients with hypoglycaemia-related emotional support, while enhancing diabetes self-management and problem-solving skills. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. Chronic ulcers: MATRIDERM® system in smoker, cardiopathic, and diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara De Angelis

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic ulcers and pressure ulcers represent a more frequent cause of chronic wounds in aging populations. It is estimated that approximately 15% of the diabetic population will develop diabetic ulcers during their life and over half of these patients develop an infection, often osteomyelitis, with 20% requiring amputation. The authors report a case of a 65-year-old woman affected by a post-traumatic loss of substance due to road accidents with soft tissue exposure (comprising muscle tendon of the left knee combined with the fracture of the right fibula previously subjected to surgery and reconstruction of muscle tendon. The patient was affected by diabetes type II, hypertension, and ischemic heart disease. In 2008, she underwent a double bypass surgery and coronary angioplasty. Initially, the patient was treated with cycles of advanced dressings, with fibrinolytic ointments, hydrocolloid, and subsequently, when the bottom began granulated with fibrinolytic and idrocellulosa, Hydrofibra-Ag, and Ag-alginate, three times a week for 30 days. In the second step, the authors decided to treat the ulcer with the MATRIDERM system and auto skin graft. Following the first treatment, 7 days after the procedure, the authors found the reduction of the loss of substance until its complete closure. The wound’s infection was evaluated by a buffer negative confirmation performed every 2 weeks four times. We obtained decrease of limb edema and full functional rehabilitation. The skin appeared renovated, with volume restoration and an improvement of the texture.

  18. Prevalence of Diabetes and Pre-Diabetes and Associated Risk Factors among Tuberculosis Patients in India