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Sample records for diabetic chronic kidney

  1. Diabetes and chronic kidney disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2007-08-16

    Aug 16, 2007 ... urinary tract infection and pregnancy. On average urinary ... for microalbuminuria from 5 years after the diagnosis of diabetes has been made, while ... Hypertension. Blood pressure tends to rise once proteinuria becomes evident, and the normal nocturnal dipping of blood pressure on ambulatory monitoring ...

  2. Prevalence of Diabetes Mellitus in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivera Stojceva-Taneva

    2016-01-01

    CONCLUSION: Our study showed that chronic kidney disease is frequent in the Republic of Macedonia and is associated with older age and diabetes. Diabetes had a significantly stronger association with CKD at younger age.

  3. Cadmium, diabetes and chronic kidney disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, Joshua R.; Prozialeck, Walter C.

    2009-01-01

    Recent epidemiological studies suggest a positive association between exposure to the environmental pollutant cadmium (Cd) and the incidence and severity of diabetes. In this review, we examine the literature suggesting a relationship between Cd exposure, elevated blood glucose levels, and the development of diabetes. In addition we review human and animal studies indicating that Cd potentiates or exacerbates diabetic nephropathy. We also review the various possible cellular mechanisms by which Cd may alter blood glucose levels. In addition, we present some novel findings from our own laboratories showing that Cd elevates fasting blood glucose levels in an animal model of subchronic Cd exposure before overt signs of renal dysfunction are evident. These studies also show that Cd reduces insulin levels and has direct cytotoxic effects on the pancreas. Together, these findings indicate that Cd may be a factor in the development of some types of diabetes and they raise the possibility that Cd and diabetes-related hyperglycemia may act synergistically to damage the kidney.

  4. [Chronic kidney failure and carotid atherosclerosis in diabetic patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moumen, Amal; Bouziane, Amal; Meftah, Azzelarab; Errahali, Yassine; Eljadi, Hamza; Elmoussaoui, Souad; Belmejdoub, Ghizlaine

    2016-09-01

    Chronic kidney failure is an independent risk factor of cardiovascular disease. Its association with carotid atherosclerosis remains controversial. The purpose of our study was to assess the factors associated with carotid atherosclerosis specially the components of chronic kidney disease. In a cross-sectional study, we enrolled type 1 or type 2 diabetic patients from the endocrinology an diabetology department of the military hospital of Rabat assigned in two groups according to the presence or absence of carotid atherosclerosis. Kidney function was assessed based on albuminuria and the estimated glomerular filtration rate calculated using the "modification of diet in renal disease" equation. A multiple logistic regression analysis was performed to identify independent factors associated with carotid atherosclerosis. One hundred and six diabetic patients were enrolled including 96 type 2 diabetic patients. Age (Pdiabetes duration (P=0.04), hypertension (P=0.002), peripheral arterial disease (Pfailure (P=0.001) were significantly associated with carotid atherosclerosis. After adjusting for age, hypertension, diabetes duration and peripheral arterial disease, chronic kidney failure was an independent factor associated with carotid atherosclerosis (OR: 5.46; 95%IC: 1.29-23.01; P=0.021). Our data suggest that chronic kidney failure is associated with carotid atherosclerosis in diabetic patients independently of the common cardiovascular risk factors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. [Type 2 diabetes mellitus and chronic kidney disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponťuch, Peter

    The number of type 2 diabetic patients is increasing world-wide and a prediction of prevalence of chronic kidney disease up to 2025 in European diabetic population is alarming. Albuminuria and estimated glomerular filtration rate are cardinal biochemical parameters in diagnostics of diabetic nephropathy. Following diagnostic methods are also used: renal ultrasonography, ophthalmoscopy and in not clarified cases renal biopsy. Long-term optimal glycemic control, efficient antihypertensive treatment by angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor, or angiotensin receptor blocker and recommended protein intake is a cornerstone of therapy. The research is presently focused on new pathophysiological mechanisms, as analysis of genome, microRNA, kidney injury biomarkers and proteomes.Key words: chronic kidney disease - type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  6. Chronic Kidney Disease and Kidney Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Education Visitor Information RePORT NIH Fact Sheets Home > Chronic Kidney Disease and Kidney Failure Small Text Medium Text Large Text Chronic Kidney Disease and Kidney Failure YESTERDAY One third of diabetic ...

  7. An audit of chronic kidney disease risk factors in type 2 diabetic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An audit of chronic kidney disease risk factors in type 2 diabetic patients in a tertiary hospital in Southern Nigeria. ... highly prevalent in type 2 diabetics in this study. Measures aimed at reducing these risks should be instituted to delay the onset and progression of CKD. Keywords: diabetes mellitus, chronic kidney disease, ...

  8. Oxidative Stress in Diabetic Nephropathy with Early Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra Guillermina Miranda-Díaz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The increase in the prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM and the secondary kidney damage produces diabetic nephropathy (DN. Early nephropathy is defined as the presence of microalbuminuria (30–300 mg/day, including normal glomerular filtration rate (GFR or a mildly decreased GFR (60–89 mL/min/1.73 m2, with or without overt nephropathy. The earliest change caused by DN is hyperfiltration with proteinuria. The acceptable excretion rate of albumin in urine is 300 mg/day. Chronic kidney disease (CKD is characterized by abnormalities in renal function that persist for >3 months with health implications. Alterations in the redox state in DN are caused by the persistent state of hyperglycemia and the increase in advanced glycation end products (AGEs with ability to affect the renin-angiotensin system and the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β, producing chronic inflammation and glomerular and tubular hypertrophy and favoring the appearance of oxidative stress. In DN imbalance between prooxidant/antioxidant processes exists with an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS. The overproduction of ROS diminishes expression of the antioxidant enzymes (manganese superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and catalase. The early detection of CKD secondary to DN and the timely identification of patients would permit decreasing its impact on health.

  9. A trial of darbepoetin alfa in type 2 diabetes and chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pfeffer, Marc A; Burdmann, Emmanuel A; Chen, Chao-Yin

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Anemia is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular and renal events among patients with type 2 diabetes and chronic kidney disease. Although darbepoetin alfa can effectively increase hemoglobin levels, its effect on clinical outcomes in these patients has not been adequately...... tested. METHODS: In this study involving 4038 patients with diabetes, chronic kidney disease, and anemia, we randomly assigned 2012 patients to darbepoetin alfa to achieve a hemoglobin level of approximately 13 g per deciliter and 2026 patients to placebo, with rescue darbepoetin alfa when the hemoglobin...... assigned to darbepoetin alfa and 496 patients assigned to placebo (Pchronic kidney disease...

  10. Clinical Guidance on Screening Chronic Kidney Disease in Type 2 Diabetic Patients for Family Physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Esmaeil Managheb

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Incidence of diabetes is increasing in developing countries as well as Iran. Half of the patients are not aware of their disease so screening of diabetes is necessary. Lifestyle changes in society, high-saturated fat diet and decreased physical activity are the factors that influence the growing rate of diabetes in Iran.1 The need for addressing type 2 diabetes has been clarified for family physicians.2 Diabetes is a common disease that is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. It has an asymptomatic stage that may be present for up to several years before diagnosis.3 Diabetes is the leading cause of kidney disease.4 In a study among patients over 45 years with type 2 diabetes, these results were reported: 22% suffered from retinopathy, 7% had impaired vision, 6% had kidney diseases, 9% had clinical symptoms, and 19.1% were at risk for foot ulcers.5 Early treatment of type 2 diabetes can reduce or delay complications.6 Optimal glycemia and BP are important in the prevention of diabetic chronic kidney disease (CKD.4 Therapeutic goals in patients with complications, such as CKD, include maintaining renal function and stopping the trend of renal deterioration.5 Progression of diabetic nephropathy can be slowed through the use of some medications.4 How to screen and manage chronic kidney disease in patients with type 2 diabetes is shown in Figure 1.

  11. Sodium glucose transporter-2 inhibition has no renoprotective effects on non-diabetic chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Qiuyue; Steiger, Stefanie; Anders, Hans-Joachim

    2017-04-01

    Sodium glucose transporter (SGLT)-2 inhibition has renoprotective effects in diabetic kidney disease. Whether similar effects can be achieved also in non-diabetic kidney disease is speculative. Chronic kidney disease was induced in C57BL/6N mice by feeding an oxalate-rich diet for 14 days, known to induce nephrocalcinosis-related tubular atrophy and interstitial fibrosis without directly affecting the glomerular compartment. Empagliflozin treatment started from day 0 of oxalate feeding had no effect on the decline of glomerular filtration rate, crystal deposition, blood urea nitrogen or serum creatinine levels on day 7 and 14. Tissue morphometry of tubular injury and kidney mRNA levels of kidney injury molecule-1 or tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 were comparable between empagliflozin- and vehicle-treated mice with oxalate nephropathy on day 7 and 14. Similarly, empagliflozin did not affect markers of interstitial fibrosis, including silver, alpha smooth muscle actin ( α SMA) and collagen 1 staining, and mRNA levels of fibronectin-1, collagen 1 α 1, fibroblast-specific protein-1, and transforming growth factor (TGF)- β 2 on day 7 and 14. Thus, the specific renoprotective mechanisms-of-action of SGLT2 inhibition in diabetic kidney disease do not apply to chronic oxalosis, a non-diabetic form of chronic kidney disease. © 2017 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Physiological Society and the American Physiological Society.

  12. [Frequency of chronic kidney disease among ambulatory patients with type 2 diabetes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarroel R, Pablo; Parra L, Ximena; Ardiles A, Leopoldo

    2012-03-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is the main cause of chronic kidney disease in developed countries. To study the prevalence of chronic kidney disease among adults with diabetes mellitus attended at a public primary health care clinic in southern Chile. One hundred patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, aged more than 15 years participated in this cross sectional study. Chronic kidney disease was defined as the presence of a urine albumin/creatinine ratio over 30 mg/g or an estimated glomerular filtration rate of less than 60 mL/min/1,73 m², detected in at least two opportunities, separated at least by three months. Thirty four percent of participants had chronic kidney disease (17% stage 1 or 2 and 17% stage 3). Thirty percent of participants had an abnormal urinary albumin/creatinine ratio. Halfof the patients with an estimated glomerular filtration rate below 60 mL/min/1,73 m², had a normal urinary albumin/creatinine ratio. The rates of chronic kidney disease in this group of diabetic patients are very similar to those reported elsewhere.

  13. Nutritional approach of the patient with diabetes mellitus and chronic kidney disease. A case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres Torres, Beatriz; Izaola Jáuregu, Olatz; De Luis Román, Daniel A

    2017-05-08

    The prevention and treatment of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in diabetes through diet and lifestyle have been a topic of much interest over the years. Consideration of the type and amount of carbohydrate, protein and fat is required for optimal blood glucose control, for clinical outcomes related to renal function and for consideration of risk reduction for cardiovascular disease. Depending on the CKD stage different dietary changes should be considered protein-calorie malnutrition is common in chronic kidney disease patients and is a powerful predictor of morbidity and mortality. We review the nutritional management of a diabetic patient throughout the progression of their CKD.

  14. The relation between chronic kidney disease and cerebral microbleeds: difference between patients with and without diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Wi-Sun; Lee, Seung-Hoon; Kim, Chi Kyung; Kim, Beom Joon; Yoon, Byung-Woo

    2012-10-01

    Cerebral microbleeds are an important radiologic marker of bleeding-prone brain and have been reported to be associated with the increased risk of intracerebral haemorrhage. We sought to examine the association of chronic kidney disease with cerebral microbleeds, and determine whether the association differs between patients with and without diabetes. A total of 909 patients with ischemic stroke who were consecutively admitted to our hospital were included in this study. We collected demographic, clinical, and laboratory data (including serum creatinine levels) and documented the presence and numbers of microbleeds. Kidney function was estimated by using the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease formula. We categorized estimated glomerular filtration rates into moderate to severe, mild, and normal (90 ml/min/1·73 m(2), respectively). Cerebral microbleeds is most frequent in the moderate-to-severe chronic kidney disease group (45·6%). In patients without diabetes, mild and moderate-to-severe chronic kidney disease was found to be independently associated with the presence of cerebral microbleeds (adjusted odds ratio, 1·68; 95% confidence interval, 1·04-2·71 and adjusted odds ratio, 3·74; 95% confidence interval, 1·87-7·47) compared with normal kidney function. In patients with diabetes, however, this relationship was not found. Furthermore, ordinal logistic regression analysis revealed that an increased serum creatinine level and a reduced kidney function were associated with the number of cerebral microbleeds. We found that chronic kidney disease is independently associated with cerebral microbleeds in patients without diabetes but not in patients with diabetes. © 2012 The Authors. International Journal of Stroke © 2012 World Stroke Organization.

  15. Chronic kidney disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidney failure - chronic; Renal failure - chronic; Chronic renal insufficiency; Chronic kidney failure; Chronic renal failure ... that you do not have symptoms until your kidneys have almost ... end-stage renal disease (ESRD). At this stage, the kidneys are ...

  16. Prevalence of chronic kidney disease in diabetic adult out-patients in Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janmohamed, Mubarakali N; Kalluvya, Samuel E; Mueller, Andreas; Kabangila, Rodrick; Smart, Luke R; Downs, Jennifer A; Peck, Robert N

    2013-08-31

    The number of adults with diabetes mellitus is increasing worldwide, particularly in Asia and Africa. In sub-Saharan Africa, renal complications of diabetes may go unrecognized due to limited diagnostic resources. The prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) among adult diabetics in sub-Saharan Africa has not been well described. This study was conducted at the diabetes mellitus clinic of Bugando Medical Centre in Mwanza, Tanzania. A total 369 consecutive adult diabetic patients were enrolled and interviewed. Each patient provided a urine sample for microalbuminuria and proteinuria and a blood sample for serum creatinine level. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was calculated using the Cockroft-Gault equation. CKD was staged according to the Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes system. A total of 309 (83.7%) study participants had CKD; 295 (80.0%) had significant albuminuria and 91 (24.7%) had eGFR patients were aware of their renal disease, and only 5 (1.3%) had a diagnosis of diabetic nephropathy recorded in their file. Older age was significantly associated with CKD in this population [OR 1.03, p = 0.03, 95%CI (1.00-1.05)]. Chronic kidney disease is highly prevalent among adult diabetic outpatients attending our clinic in Tanzania, but is usually undiagnosed. Nearly ¼ of patients had an eGFR low enough to require dose adjustment of diabetic medications. More diagnostic resources are needed for CKD screening among adults in Tanzania in order to slow progression and prevent complications.

  17. A Trial of Darbepoetin Alfa in Type 2 Diabetes and Chronic Kidney Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pfeffer, Marc A.; Burdmann, Emmanuel A.; Chen, Chao-Yin; Cooper, Mark E.; de Zeeuw, Dick; Eckardt, Kai-Uwe; Feyzi, Jan M.; Ivanovich, Peter; Kewalramani, Reshma; Levey, Andrew S.; Lewis, Eldrin F.; McGill, Janet B.; McMurray, John J. V.; Parfrey, Patrick; Parving, Hans-Henrik; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Singh, Ajay K.; Solomon, Scott D.; Toto, Robert

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND Anemia is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular and renal events among patients with type 2 diabetes and chronic kidney disease. Although darbepoetin alfa can effectively increase hemoglobin levels, its effect on clinical outcomes in these patients has not been adequately

  18. Diabetes and chronic kidney disease: an increasingly common multi-morbid disease in need of a paradigm shift in care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winocour, P H

    2018-03-01

    Diabetes is considered the commonest cause of end-stage renal disease. The increasing incidence of obesity and an ageing population, together, will lead to a greater number of people with diabetes associated with chronic kidney disease that could either be secondary to diabetic nephropathy or of different aetiology. Ageing and obesity influence approaches to the management of diabetes and accurate assessment of kidney disease. People with diabetes and chronic kidney disease consume a disproportionate component of expenditure on medical care. Guidelines on managing diabetes and kidney disease do not recognize the complex multi-morbid nature of the process. In addition to managing glycaemia and monitoring renal function, the assessment and management of cardiovascular disease risk factors and cardiovascular disease itself need to be factored into care. People with diabetes and diabetic nephropathy are more vulnerable to retinopathy and foot complications requiring coordinated care. People with diabetes and chronic kidney disease are more prone to anaemia and metabolic bone disease than those without diabetes at similar stages of chronic kidney disease, further increasing their vulnerability to acute complications from cardiovascular disease, foot emergencies and fractures. People with diabetes and chronic kidney disease are also more prone to hospitalization with infections and acute kidney injury. Given the 30-40% prevalence of kidney disease amongst people with diabetes, potentially >2% of the adult population would fit into this category, making it vital that new surveillance models of supported care are provided for those living with diabetes and kidney disease and for primary care teams who manage the vast majority of such people. © 2017 Diabetes UK.

  19. Diabetes mellitus and chronic kidney disease in the Eastern Mediterranean Region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mokdad, Ali H

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We used findings from the Global Burden of Disease 2015 study to update our previous publication on the burden of diabetes and chronic kidney disease due to diabetes (CKD-DM) during 1990-2015. METHODS: We extracted GBD 2015 estimates for prevalence, mortality, and disability-adjusted ...... showed a large and increasing burden of diabetes in the region. There is an urgency in dealing with diabetes and its consequences, and these efforts should be at the forefront of health prevention and promotion....

  20. Effect of Pioglitazone on Cardiovascular Outcome in Diabetes and Chronic Kidney Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Schneider, Christian A.; Ferrannini, Ele; DeFronzo, Ralph; Schernthaner, Guntram; Yates, John; Erdmann, Erland

    2008-01-01

    Patients with diabetes and chronic kidney disease (CKD) are at particularly high risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). This post hoc analysis from the PROspective pioglitAzone Clinical Trial In macroVascular Events (PROactive) investigated the relationship between CKD and incident CVD in a population of patients with diabetes and documented macrovascular disease, as well as the effects of pioglitazone treatment on recurrent CVD. CKD, defined as an estimated GFR

  1. Incidence of chronic kidney disease among people with diabetes: a systematic review of observational studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koye, D N; Shaw, J E; Reid, C M; Atkins, R C; Reutens, A T; Magliano, D J

    2017-07-01

    The aim was to systematically review published articles that reported the incidence of chronic kidney disease among people with diabetes. A systematic literature search was performed using MEDLINE, Embase and CINAHL databases. The titles and abstracts of all publications identified by the search were reviewed and 10 047 studies were retrieved. A total of 71 studies from 30 different countries with sample sizes ranging from 505 to 211 132 met the inclusion criteria. The annual incidence of microalbuminuria and albuminuria ranged from 1.3% to 3.8% for Type 1 diabetes. For Type 2 diabetes and studies combining both diabetes types, the range was from 3.8% to 12.7%, with four of six studies reporting annual rates between 7.4% and 8.6%. In studies reporting the incidence of eGFR Disease (MDRD) equation, apart from one study which reported an annual incidence of 8.9%, the annual incidence ranged from 1.9% to 4.3%. The annual incidence of end-stage renal disease ranged from 0.04% to 1.8%. The annual incidence of microalbuminuria and albuminuria is ~ 2-3% in Type 1 diabetes, and ~ 8% in Type 2 diabetes or mixed diabetes type. The incidence of developing eGFR kidney disease, there was only modest variation in incidence rates. These findings may be useful in clinical settings to help understand the risk of developing kidney disease among those with diabetes. © 2017 Diabetes UK.

  2. About Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Advocacy Donate A to Z Health Guide About Chronic Kidney Disease Tweet Share Print Email Chronic kidney disease (CKD) ... Learn about Glomerular Filtration Rate (GFR) What is chronic kidney disease (CKD)? Chronic kidney disease includes conditions that damage ...

  3. Chronic kidney disease stages among diabetes patients in the Cape Coast Metropolis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ephraim, Richard K D; Arthur, Eric; Owiredu, W K B A; Adoba, Prince; Agbodzakey, Hope; Eghan, Ben A

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes patients worldwide are at a high risk of chronic kidney disease (CKD) which affects their quality of life and increases the risk of early death. This study used the new kidney disease improving global outcomes (KDIGO) guidelines to establish the prevalence and also identify the factors associated with CKD among diabetes patients in the Cape Coast Metropolis. Two hundred (200) diabetes patients were randomly recruited from the diabetic clinic of the Cape Coast Teaching Hospital from January to April 2014. Blood and urine samples were collected for the estimation of serum creatinine and urine protein, respectively. The estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was calculated using the chronic kidney disease epidemiology collaboration (CKD-EPI) equation; the 2012 KDIGO guidelines was used to assess CKD. Based on these guidelines, 37% of our participants had CKD. Sixteen percent (16%) of the participants had Stage 1 CKD and 17% had an eGFR <60 mL/min/1.73 m 2 . Albuminuria was higher among female diabetic patients compared to males (69.2% vs. 30.8%, P = 0.017). CKD was present in participants on oral hypoglycemic agents (OHAs) alone or both OHA and insulin. Duration of diabetes, systolic blood pressure, older age, and use of OHA were associated with CKD (P <0.05).

  4. Antihyperglycemic Medication Use Among Medicare Beneficiaries With Heart Failure, Diabetes Mellitus, and Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Priyesh A; Liang, Li; Khazanie, Prateeti; Hammill, Bradley G; Fonarow, Gregg C; Yancy, Clyde W; Bhatt, Deepak L; Curtis, Lesley H; Hernandez, Adrian F

    2016-07-01

    Diabetes mellitus, heart failure (HF), and chronic kidney disease are common comorbidities, but overall use and safety of antihyperglycemic medications (AHMs) among patients with these comorbidities are poorly understood. Using Get With the Guidelines-Heart Failure and linked Medicare Part D data, we assessed AHM use within 90 days of hospital discharge among HF patients with diabetes mellitus discharged from Get With the Guidelines-Heart Failure hospitals between January 1, 2006, and October 1, 2011. We further summarized use by renal function and assessed renal contraindicated AHM use for patients with estimated glomerular filtration rate chronic kidney disease is complex, and these patients are commonly treated with renal contraindicated AHMs, including over 6% receiving a thiazolidinedione, despite known concerns regarding HF. More research regarding safety and efficacy of various AHMs among HF patients is needed. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. Assosition of diabetes and hypertension with the incidence of chronic kidney disease: Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study

    OpenAIRE

    Erfanpoor S; Etemad K; Khalili D; Khodakarim S; Kazempoor Ardebili S; Hadaegh F; Azizi F

    2017-01-01

    Background and aims: Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a common disorder that is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease, kidney failure, and other complications. The ageing of populations along with the growing global prevalence of diabetes and hypertension has led to a corresponding worldwide increase in prevalence of CKD. We studied the risk of diabetes, hypertension and interaction of diabetes with hypertension on the incidence of CKD, stratified by gender. Methods: This...

  6. Chronic Kidney Disease and Associated Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Chinese with Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing-Lin Lou

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundTo determine the frequency of chronic kidney disease (CKD and its associated risk factors in Chinese type 2 diabetic patients, we conducted a cross-sectional study in Nanjing, China, in the period between January 2008 and December 2009.MethodsPatients with type 2 diabetes under the care by Jiangsu Province Official Hospital, Nanjing, China were invited for assessment. CKD was defined as the presence of albuminuria or estimated glomerular filtration rate <60 mL/min/1.73 m2. Albuminuria was defined as urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio ≥30 mg/g.ResultsWe recruited 1,521 urban Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes (mean age, 63.9±12.0 years. The frequency of CKD and albuminuria was 31.0% and 28.9%, respectively. After adjusted by age and sex, hypertension, anemia and duration of diabetes were significantly associated with CKD with odds ratio (95% confidence interval being 1.93 (1.28 to 2.93, 1.70 (1.09 to 2.64, and 1.03 (1.00 to 1.06, respectively.ConclusionIn conclusion, CKD was common in the urban Nanjing Chinese with type 2 diabetes. Strategies to prevent or delay progression of kidney disease in diabetes should be carried out at the early disease course of type 2 diabetes.

  7. Renal failure: implications of chronic kidney disease in the management of the diabetic foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Shari; Raj, Dominic; Guzman, Nicolas J

    2012-06-01

    Foot complications are common in patients with diabetes, however, chronic kidney disease has emerged as an independent risk factor for development of foot lesions in the diabetic population. Apart from peripheral arterial disease, infection, and neuropathy, which are classic factors contributing to development of foot lesions, skin disorders specific to renal failure, impaired wound healing from uremia, and psychosocial issues offer further compounded risk. Consequently, there are high ulceration and amputation rates that are associated with increased morbidity and mortality. In recent studies, foot-care programs with a multidisciplinary approach within dialysis units have demonstrated improved outcomes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Novel combined management approaches to patients with diabetes, chronic kidney disease and cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaak, J

    2017-03-01

    Most patients we care for today suffer from more than one chronic disease, and multimorbidity is a rapidly growing challenge. Concomitant cardiovascular disease, renal dysfunction and diabetes represent a large proportion of all patients in cardiology, nephrology and diabetology. These entities commonly overlap due to their negative effects on vascular function and an accelerated atherosclerosis progression. At the same time, a progressive subspecialisation has caused the cardiologist to treat 'only' the heart, nephrologists 'only' the kidneys and endocrinologists' 'only' diabetes. Studies and guidelines follow the same pattern. This often requires patients to visit specialists for each field, with a risk of both under-diagnosis and under-treatment. From the patient's perspective, there is a great need for coordination and facilitation of the care, not only to reduce disease progression but also to improve quality of life. Person-centred integrated clinics for patients with cardiovascular disease, renal dysfunction and diabetes are a promising approach for complex chronic disease management.

  9. Glycosylation gap in patients with diabetes with chronic kidney disease and healthy participants: A comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Km Neelofar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study it to determine the level of glycosylation gap in patients with type 2 diabetes and its relation with kidney dysfunction. Materials and Methods: In this study, 150 individuals were enrolled (aged 20–75 year and divided into three groups. Group 1 included 50 nondiabetic individuals who served as control. Group 2 included 50 patients with type 2 diabetes without chronic kidney disease (CKD, and in Group 3, there were 50 patients with type 2 diabetes with CKD. Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c and fructosamine (FA were measured in all groups to determine the glycosylation gap (GG, predicted HbA1c, and mean blood glucose (MBG. GG is defined as the difference between measured HbA1c and HbA1c predicted from FA based on the population regression of HbA1c on FA. The variables were compared by correlation analysis. Results: Serum creatinine level was significantly high in patients with CKD (1.93 ± 0.99 as compared to patients with diabetes and control (0.891 ± 0.16; 0.912 ± 0.1, respectively. The study demonstrated a significant elevation in serum FA, measured HbA1c and predicted HbA1c, MBG in patients with diabetes with CKD as compared with those of without CKD, and controls. GG was found in healthy control (0.51 ± 0.78, patients with type 2 diabetes without CKD (0.62 ± 0.45, and patients with diabetes with CKD (1.0 ± 0.91, respectively. Conclusion: It is concluded that GG may be a useful clinical research tool for evaluating pathological source of variation in diabetes complications such as kidney disease.

  10. Diabetes, hypertension, and chronic kidney disease progression: role of DPP4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nistala, Ravi; Savin, Virginia

    2017-04-01

    The protein dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4) is a target in diabetes management and reduction of associated cardiovascular risk. Inhibition of the enzymatic function and genetic deletion of DPP4 is associated with tremendous benefits to the heart, vasculature, adipose tissue, and the kidney in rodent models of obesity, diabetes and hypertension, and associated complications. The recently concluded, "Saxagliptin Assessment of Vascular Outcomes Recorded in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus-Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction 53" trial revealed a reduction in proteinuria in chronic kidney disease patients (stages 1-3). These results have spurred immense interest in the nonenzymatic and enzymatic role of DPP4 in the kidney. DPP4 is expressed predominantly in the glomeruli and S1-S3 segments of the nephron and to a lesser extent in other segments. DPP4 is known to facilitate absorption of cleaved dipeptides and regulate the function of the sodium/hydrogen exchanger-3 in the proximal tubules. DPP4, also known as CD26, has an important role in costimulation of lymphocytes via caveolin-1 on antigen-presenting cells in peripheral blood. Herein, we present our perspectives for the ongoing interest in the role of DPP4 in the kidney.

  11. Chronic kidney disease and diabetes in the national health service: a cross-sectional survey of the U.K. national diabetes audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, C J; Cardwell, C R; Patterson, C C; Maxwell, A P; Magee, G M; Young, R J; Matthews, B; O'Donoghue, D J; Fogarty, D G

    2014-04-01

    We investigated the prevalence of chronic kidney disease and attainment of therapeutic targets for HbA1c and blood pressure in a large U.K.-based diabetes population. The U.K. National Diabetes Audit provided data from 1 January 2007 to 31 March 2008. Inclusion criteria were a documented urinary albumin:creatinine ratio and serum creatinine. Patients were stratified according to chronic kidney disease stage and albuminuria status. Chronic kidney disease was defined as an estimated glomerular filtration rate advanced chronic kidney disease. For example, mean (standard deviation) systolic blood pressure rose from 128.6 (15.4) mmHg among people with Type 1 diabetes and normal renal function to 141.0 (23.6) mmHg in those with chronic kidney disease stage 5 and macroalbuminuria. The high prevalence of chronic kidney disease and poor attainment of treatment targets highlights a large subset of the diabetes population at increased risk of cardiovascular mortality or progressive kidney disease. © 2013 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2013 Diabetes UK.

  12. Clinical questionnaire study of oral health care and symptoms in diabetic vs. non-diabetic predialysis chronic kidney disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesterinen, Maarit; Ruokonen, Hellevi; Furuholm, Jussi; Honkanen, Eero; Meurman, Jukka H

    2012-04-01

    This paper aims to study oral symptoms (burning mouth sensation, xerostomia, dysphagia, and dysgeusia) and background characteristics among chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. The hypothesis was that patients experience oral discomfort and show interest towards dental care differently depending on the origin of their kidney disease. One hundred thirty-eight CKD patients at predialysis stage (94 men, 44 women, mean age 54 years) at the Helsinki University Central Hospital participated in the study. The patients were divided into a diabetic nephropathy group and a group of patients with other kidney diseases. The patients had a clinical oral examination and filled in a structured questionnaire. The data were analyzed and compared between the groups (SPSS for Windows version 15.0). T test was used for parameters normally distributed while binomial data were analyzed with cross-tabulations and chi-square test. Contrary to our study hypothesis, no statistically significant differences were seen in the questionnaire study between the diabetic vs. non-diabetic CKD patients in any other study parameter except in the use of medication (10 ± 2.3 vs. 8 ± 3.1 drugs daily, p patients investigated (41.7% in diabetic, 48.2% in non-diabetic patients). No difference was seen in the frequency of oral discomfort among the different groups of predialysis patients investigated. Clinicians should be aware of nephropathy patients who frequently suffer from oral discomfort, particularly xerostomia.

  13. Glucose-lowering therapies in patients with diabetes mellitus and chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minara Shamkhalovna Shamkhalova

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Expansion of diabetic population (predominantly due to type 2 diabetes mellitus with chronic kidney disease (CKD comorbidity constitutes one of the major challenges in modern medicine.Throughout the course of diabetes nephropathy development, from its debut to the terminal stage, survival rate and quality of life are lower than those of other categories of patients. This indicates crucial role of hyperglycemia in accelerated metabolic degradation typical of CKD.Renal disease severely narrows the spectrum of available glucose-lowering agents. Concurrent treatment for hypertension and dyslipidemia, as well as anti-platelet therapy and stimulation of erythropoiesis becomes a complex issue. A creative and patient-oriented approach with clear metabolic and cardiovascular goals should be instrumental in its solution.

  14. Optimal medication dosing in patients with diabetes mellitus and chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacCallum, Lori

    2014-10-01

    Diabetes mellitus is the leading cause of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in Canada. As rates of diabetes rise, so does the prevalence of CKD. Diabetes and CKD are chronic diseases that require multiple medications for their management. Many of the anticipated effects of these medications are altered by the physiologic changes that occur in CKD. Failure to individualize drug dosing in this population may lead to toxicity or decreased therapeutic response, leading to treatment failure. At times this can be challenging for a multitude of reasons, including the limitations of available calculations for estimating renal function, inconsistent dosing recommendations and the lack of dosing recommendations for some medications. Clinicians caring for these patients need to consider an approach of individualized drug therapy that will ensure optimal outcomes. The better understanding that clinicians have of these challenges, the more effective they will be at using the available information as a guide together with their own professional judgement to make appropriate dosing changes. This article discusses the following: 1) physiologic changes that occur in CKD and its impact on drug dosing; 2) advantages and disadvantages of various calculations used for estimating renal function; 3) pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic changes of some commonly used medications in diabetes, and finally, 4) an approach to individualized drug dosing for this patient population. Copyright © 2014 Canadian Diabetes Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Characteristics of the Lipid Profile in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus and Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albai Oana

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims Diabetes mellitus (DM is one of the leading causes of end-stage chronic kidney disease (CKD. Patients with DM and CKD have a 10 or even 20 times higher cardiovascular risk (CVR than the general population. Lipid metabolism disorders are more frequent in these patients, dyslipidemia being aggravated by the presence of hyperglycemia and insulin resistance. The main purpose of our study was to identify possible correlations between lipid profile parameters and altered renal function in patients with DM. We have also analyzed the correlations between lipid parameters, CKD, quality of glycemic control and CVR.

  16. Biochemical and Clinical Variables of Normal Parathyroid and Hyperparathyroid Diabetic Chronic Kidney Disease Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Abdul Kader

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: In chronic kidney disease (CKD intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH level is often increased before clinical hyperphosphatemia occurs. Despite its importance very few studies evaluated parathyroid status in CKD. Objective: The study was undertaken to estimate level of parathormone in diabetic CKD patients at a tertiary level hospital and assessing its relationship with different parameters like hemoglobin, calcium etc. and comparing biochemical and clinical variables between normal parathyroid and hyperparathyroid groups. Materials and Methods: It was a hospital based cross-sectional study involving purposively selected chronic kidney disease patients attending nephrology and endocrinology outdoor and indoor services of BIRDEM hospital, Dhaka, Bangladesh. Study was conducted during the period of April to October 2010. All the subjects were divided into two groups based on serum parathormone level and different parameters were compared between groups. Results: The mean duration of chronic kidney disease was significantly higher in hyperparathyroid group than that in the normal group (<0.001. Retinopathy and hypertension were more common in hyperparathyroid group than that in patients with normal serum parathormone (p<0.001 and p=0.012. Neuropathy was solely present in hyperparathyroid group (p<0.001. Mean fasting blood glucose, serum creatinine and serum phosphate were significantly higher in the hyperparathyroid group compared to normal group (p<0.001 in all cases while the mean serum calcium and haemoglobin were lower in hyperparathyroid group than those in the normal group (p<0.001 in both cases. Serum creatinine and serum parathormone bears a significantly linear relationship (r=0.986, p<0.001, while serum parathormone and serum calcium bears a significantly negative relationship (r=−0.892 and p<0.001. Conclusion: Earlier intervention on the basis of iPTH in addition to other biochemical parameters of chronic kidney disease is

  17. Morning hypertension and night non-dipping in patients with diabetes and chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Se Won; Han, Sang Youb; Han, Kum Hyun; Cha, Ran-hui; Kim, Sejoong; Yoon, Sun Ae; Rhu, Dong-Ryeol; Oh, Jieun; Lee, Eun Young; Kim, Dong Ki; Kim, Yon Su

    2015-12-01

    Morning hypertension (HTN) and nocturnal non-dipping (ND) are closely associated with target organ damage and cardiovascular events. However, their importance in diabetics with advanced renal disease is unclear. We evaluated the relationships of morning HTN and ND with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and proteinuria, and determined the risk of morning HTN and ND according to presence of diabetes mellitus (DM) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) stage. A total of 1312 patients, including 439 with diabetes, were prospectively recruited at 21 centers in Korea. All patients had HTN and an eGFR of 15-89 ml min(-1) per 1.73 m(2). Ambulatory 24-h blood pressure was assessed. The rates of morning HTN (25.2% vs. 13.6%, Pmorning HTN only in non-diabetics (P=0.005). Proteinuria was related to ND in all patients (Pmorning HTN only in diabetics (P=0.001). In a regression analysis, the risk of morning HTN was 2.093 (95% confidence interval (95% CI): 1.070-4.094) for the DMCKD2 group, 1.634 (95% CI: 1.044-2.557) for the CKD3-4-only group and 2.236 (95% CI: 1.401-3.570) for the DMCKD3-4 group compared with the CKD2-only group. The risk of ND was high for stage 3-4 CKD: 1.581 (95% CI: 1.180-2.120) for non-diabetics and 1.842 (95% CI: 1.348-2.601) for diabetics. Diabetics showed higher rates of morning HTN, ND and uncontrolled sustained HTN compared with non-diabetics with CKD of the same stages.

  18. The self-management experience of patients with type 2 diabetes and chronic kidney disease: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirazian, Shayan; Crnosija, Natalie; Weinger, Katie; Jacobson, Alan M; Park, Joonho; Tanenbaum, Molly L; Gonzalez, Jeffrey S; Mattana, Joseph; Hammock, Amy C

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore views related to the self-management of type 2 diabetes and chronic kidney disease. We conducted three semi-structured focus groups in participants with type 2 diabetes and chronic kidney disease. Interviews were transcribed, coded, and analyzed using thematic analysis. Credibility was supported through triangulation of data sources and the use of multiple investigators from different disciplines. Twenty-three adults participated. Three major themes were identified: emotional reactions to health state, the impact of family dynamics on self-management, and the burden of self-management regimens. Family dynamics were found to be a barrier and support to self-management, while complicated self-management regimens were found to be a barrier. Additionally, participants expressed several emotional reactions related to their CKD status, including regret related to having developed CKD and distress related both to their treatment regimens and the future possibility of dialysis. This exploratory study of patients with type 2 diabetes and chronic kidney disease describes barriers and supports to self-management and emotional reactions to chronic kidney disease status. Future research should confirm these findings in a larger population and should include family members and/or health care providers to help further define problems with self-management in patients with type 2 diabetes and chronic kidney disease. © The Author(s) 2015.

  19. [GLYCEMIC CONTROL IN DIABETES MELLITUS PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE – HOW TO CHOOSE HYPOGLYCEMIC AGENT]?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baretić, M; Lang, V Bralić

    2016-12-01

    The management of hyperglycemia in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) is complex, and the goals and methods regarding glycemic control are not clearly defined. Although aggressive glycemic control seems to be advantageous in early diabetic nephropathy, outcome data supporting tight glycemic control in patients with advanced CKD are lacking. Challenges in the management of such patients include monitoring difficulties and the complexity of available treatments. In this article, we review the current treatment options for patients with diabetes and CKD discussing all hypoglycemic agents that currently are available, as well as insulin, along with their indications and contraindications. The aim is to provide useful information to family physicians when deciding on individualized glycemic goals and appropriate therapy for patients with early or end stages of CKD.

  20. Hospital-based prevalence of chronic kidney disease among the newly registered patients with diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P A Khanam

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease (CKD is proved to be a major public health issue worldwide and an important contributor to the overall non-communicable disease burden. It increases risk of mortality, end-stage renal disease and accelerated cardiovascular disease (CVD. Diabetes is the biggest contributor to CKD and end stage renal disease (ESRD. In Bangladesh, very few data on CKD is available. This study aimed to estimate the prevalence of CKD among the newly registered diabetic patients at BIRDEM (Bangladesh Institute of Research and Rehabilitation in Diabetes, Endocrine and Metabolic Disorders, a referral center for diabetes in Bangladesh. Methods: The study included all diabetic patients aged 18 - 80 years and were registered in the year 2012. Socio-demographic (age, sex, residence, income, literacy, clinical (obesity, blood pressure and biochemical (blood glucose, lipids, eGFR information were collected from the BIRDEM registry. CKD was defined according to the K/ DOQI guidelines. Results: A total of 1317 type 2 diabetic patients of age 18 to 80 years were studied. Of them, men and women were 54.7% and 45.3%, respectively. The overall prevalence of CKD (eGFR ≤60 (ml/min/m2 was 13.9%. The prevalence was significantly higher in women than men (21.3 v. 7.8%, p50y, higher sBP (≥140mmHg and taking oral hypoglycemic agent (OHA were significant. Conclusions: Thus, the study concludes that the prevalence of CKD among the newly registered diabetic patients is quite high in Bangladesh. The female diabetic patients with older age and with higher SBP bear the brunt of CKD. Considering high prevalence of CKD with severe lifelong complications it is of utmost importance for early detection and intervention at the primary health care (PHC level.

  1. Cardiovascular disease, chronic kidney disease, and diabetes mortality burden of cardiometabolic risk factors from 1980 to 2010: a comparative risk assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Danaei, Goodarz; Lu, Yuan; Singh, Gitanjali M.; Carnahan, Emily; Stevens, Gretchen A.; Cowan, Melanie J.; Farzadfar, Farshad; Lin, John K.; Finucane, Mariel M.; Rao, Mayuree; Khang, Young-Ho; Riley, Leanne M.; Mozaffarian, Dariush; Lim, Stephen S.; Ezzati, Majid; Aamodt, Geir; Abdeen, Ziad; Abdella, Nabila A.; Rahim, Hanan F. Abdul; Addo, Juliet; Aekplakorn, Wichai; Afifi, Mustafa M.; Agabiti-Rosei, Enrico; Salinas, Carlos A. Aguilar; Agyemang, Charles; Ali, Mohammed K.; Ali, Mohamed M.; Al-Nsour, Mohannad; Al-Nuaim, Abdul R.; Ambady, Ramachandran; Di Angelantonio, Emanuele; Aro, Pertti; Azizi, Fereidoun; Babu, Bontha V.; Bahalim, Adil N.; Barbagallo, Carlo M.; Barbieri, Marco A.; Barceló, Alberto; Barreto, Sandhi M.; Barros, Henrique; Bautista, Leonelo E.; Benetos, Athanase; Bjerregaard, Peter; Björkelund, Cecilia; Bo, Simona; Bobak, Martin; Bonora, Enzo; Botana, Manuel A.; Bovet, Pascal; Breckenkamp, Juergen; Breteler, Monique M.; Broda, Grazyna; Brown, Ian J.; Bursztyn, Michael; de León, Antonio Cabrera; Campos, Hannia; Cappuccio, Francesco P.; Capuano, Vincenzo; Casiglia, Edoardo; Castellano, Maurizio; Castetbon, Katia; Cea, Luis; Chang, Chih-Jen; Chaouki, Noureddine; Chatterji, Somnath; Chen, Chien-Jen; Chen, Zhengming; Choi, Jin-Su; Chua, Lily; Cífková, Renata; Cobiac, Linda J.; Cooper, Richard S.; Corsi, Anna Maria; Costanza, Michael C.; Craig, Cora L.; Dankner, Rachel S.; Dastgiri, Saeed; Delgado, Elias; Dinc, Gonul; Doi, Yasufumi; Dong, Guang-Hui; Dorsi, Eleonora; Dragano, Nico; Drewnowski, Adam; Eggertsen, Robert; Elliott, Paul; Engeland, Anders; Erem, Cihangir; Esteghamati, Alireza; Fall, Caroline H. D.; Fan, Jian-Gao; Ferreccio, Catterina; Fezeu, Leopold; Firmo, Josélia O.; Florez, Hermes J.; Fornés, Nélida S.; Fowkes, F. Gerry R.; Franceschini, Guido; Frisk, Fredrik; Fuchs, Flávio D.; Fuller, Eva L.; Getz, Linn; Giampaoli, Simona; Gómez, Luis F.; Gomez-Zumaquero, Juan M.; Graff-Iversen, Sidsel; Grant, Janet F.; Carvajal, Ramiro Guerrero; Gulliford, Martin C.; Gupta, Rajeev; Gupta, Prakash C.; Gureje, Oye; Gutierrez, Hialy R.; Hansen, Tine W.; Hata, Jun; He, Jiang; Heim, Noor; Heinrich, Joachim; Hemmingsson, Tomas; Hennis, Anselm; Herman, William H.; Herrera, Victor M.; Ho, Suzanne; Holdsworth, Michelle; Frisman, Gunilla Hollman; Hopman, Wilma M.; Hussain, Akhtar; Husseini, Abdullatif; Ibrahim, M. Mohsen; Ikeda, Nayu; Jacobsen, Bjarne K.; Jaddou, Hashem Y.; Jafar, Tazeen H.; Janghorbani, Mohsen; Jasienska, Grazyna; Joffres, Michel R.; Jonas, Jost B.; Kadiki, Othman A.; Kalter-Leibovici, Ofra; Kamadjeu, Raoul M.; Kaptoge, Stephen; Karalis, Ioannis; Kastarinen, Mika J.; Katz, Joanne; Keinan-Boker, Lital; Kelly, Paul; Khalilzadeh, Omid; Kiechl, Stefan; Kim, Ki Woong; Kiyohara, Yutaka; Kobayashi, Junji; Krause, Maressa P.; Kubínová, Růžena; Kurjata, Pawel; Kusuma, Yadlapalli S.; Lam, Tai H.; Langhammer, Arnulf; Lawes, Carlene M. M.; Le, Cai; Lee, Jeannette; Lévy-Marchal, Claire; Lewington, Sarah; Li, Yanping; Li, Yuqiu; Lim, T. O.; Lin, Xu; Lin, Cheng-Chieh; Lin, Hsien-Ho; Lind, Lars; Lissner, Lauren; Liu, Xiaoqing; Lopez-Jaramillo, Patricio; Lorbeer, Roberto; Ma, Guansheng; Ma, Stefan; Macià, Francesc; MacLean, David R.; Maggi, Stefania; Magliano, Dianna J.; Makdisse, Marcia; Mancia, Giuseppe; Mannami, Toshifumi; Marques-Vidal, Pedro; Mbanya, Jean Claude N.; McFarlane-Anderson, Norma; Miccoli, Roberto; Miettola, Juhani; Minh, Hoang V.; Miquel, Juan F.; Miranda, J. Jaime; Mohamed, Mostafa K.; Mohan, V.; Mohanna, Salim; Mokdad, Ali; Mollentze, Willem F.; Morales, Dante D.; Morgan, Karen; Muiesan, Lorenza M.; Muntoni, Sergio; Nabipour, Iraj; Nakagami, Tomoko; Nangia, Vinay; Nemesure, Barbara; Neovius, Martin; Nerhus, Kjersti A.; Nervi, Flavio; Neuhauser, Hannelore; Nguyen, Minh; Ninomiya, Toshiharu; Noale, Marianna; Oh, Sang W.; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Olivieri, Oliviero; Önal, Ayse Emel; Onat, Altan; Oróstegui, Myriam; Ouedraogo, Hermann; Pan, Wen-Harn; Panagiotakos, Demosthenes B.; Panza, Francesco; Park, Yongsoo; Passos, Valeria M. A.; Pednekar, Mangesh S.; Pelizzari, Pamela M.; Peres, Marco A.; Pérez, Cynthia; Pérez-Fernández, Román; Pichardo, Rafael; Phua, Hwee Pin; Pistelli, Francesco; Plans, Pedro; Polakowska, Maria; Poulter, Neil; Prabhakaran, Dorairaj; Qiao, Qing; Rafiei, Masoud; Raitakari, Olli T.; Ramos, Luiz R.; Rampal, Sanjay; Rampal, Lekhraj; Rasmussen, Finn; Reddy, Kanala K. R.; Redon, Josep; Revilla, Luis; Reyes-García, Victoria; Roaeid, Ragab B.; Robinson, Carolyn A.; Rodriguez-Artalejo, Fernando; Rojas-Martinez, Rosalba; Ronkainen, Kimmo; Rosero-Bixby, Luis; Roth, Gregory A.; Sachdev, Harshpal S.; Sánchez, José R.; Sanisoglu, Selim Y.; Sans, Susana; Sarraf-Zadegan, Nizal; Scazufca, Marcia; Schaan, Beatriz D.; Schapochnik, Norberto; Schelleman, Hedi; Schneider, Ione J. C.; Schooling, C. Mary; Schwarz, Bernhard; Sekuri, Cevad; Sereday, Martha S.; Serra-Majem, Lluís; Shaw, Jonathan; Shera, Abdul S.; Shi, Zumin; Shiri, Rahman; Shu, Xiao Ou; Silva, Diego Augusto Santos; Silva, Eglé; Simons, Leon A.; Smith, Margaret; Söderberg, Stefan; Soebardi, Suharko; Solfrizzi, Vincenzo; Sonestedt, Emily; Soysal, Ahmet; Stattin, Pär; Stein, Aryeh D.; Stergiou, George S.; Stessman, Jochanan; Sudo, Akihiro; Suka, Machi; Sundh, Valter; Sundquist, Kristina; Sundström, Johan; Swai, Andrew B.; Tai, E. Shyong; Tambs, Kristian; Tesfaye, Fikru; Thomas, George N.; Thorogood, Margaret; Tilvis, Reijo S.; Tobias, Martin; Torheim, Liv E.; Trenkwalder, Peter; Tuomilehto, Jaakko O.; Tur, Josep A.; Tzourio, Christophe; Uhernik, Ana I.; Ukoli, Flora A.; Unwin, Nigel; Hoorn, Stephen Vander; Vanderpump, Mark P.; Varo, Jose Javier; Veierød, Marit B.; Velásquez-Meléndez, Gustavo; Verschuren, Monique; Viet, Lucie; Villalpando, Salvador; Vioque, Jesus; Vollenweider, Peter; Volpato, Stefano; Wang, Ningli; Wang, Ya X.; Ward, Mark; Waspadji, Sarwono; Welin, Lennart X.; Whitlock, Gary; Wilhelmsen, Lars; Willeit, Johann; Woodward, Mark; Wormser, David; Xavier, André J.; Xu, Fei; Xu, Liang; Yamamoto, Akira; Yang, Gonghuan; Yang, Xiaoguang; Yeh, Li-Chia; Yoon, Jin-Sang; You, Qisheng; Yu, Zhijie; Zhang, Jian; Zhang, Lei; Zheng, Wei; Zhou, Maigeng

    2014-01-01

    Background High blood pressure, blood glucose, serum cholesterol, and BMI are risk factors for cardiovascular diseases and some of these factors also increase the risk of chronic kidney disease and diabetes. We estimated mortality from cardiovascular diseases, chronic kidney disease, and diabetes

  2. Oral health in diabetic and nondiabetic patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swapna, Lingam Amara; Koppolu, Pradeep; Prince, Jyothi

    2017-01-01

    The objective of our study is to assess the subjective and objective oral manifestations and salivary pH in diabetic and nondiabetic uremic patients at a nephrology clinic. A total of 194 diabetic and nondiabetic patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), who were divided into four groups, Group A, B, C, D, and who were attending a nephrology clinic were included in the study. Predialytic unstimulated whole salivary pH was recorded using pH- measuring strips. Subjective and objective findings were evaluated and recorded in the specially designed pro forma. Dental health assessment consisted of decayed, missing, and filled teeth index and community periodontal index (CPI). Dysgeusia was found to be significantly more prevalent in nondiabetic patients on dialysis. Uremic odor showed high significance (P diabetic dialysis. There was no significant difference in the incidence of tongue coating between the four groups. A statistically high significance was observed with the objective oral manifestation of mucosal petechiae, with P = 0.01. There was an increased periodontal pocket depth among diabetic CKD patients as compared to that in nondiabetic patients. A moderate significance was found, with a CPI score showing P diabetic CKD patients (Groups A, B). Recorded salivary pH showed no significant difference among diabetic and nondiabetic CKD patients. Findings suggest that these patients are at risk of developing complications, related to systemic health causing morbidity and mortality. Hence, these patients are to be motivated for comprehensive professional oral care and self oral hygiene instructions. Additional research is necessary to elucidate and correlate the combined influence of diabetes, CKD, and dialysis on oral health.

  3. Oral health in diabetic and nondiabetic patients with chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingam Amara Swapna

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of our study is to assess the subjective and objective oral manifestations and salivary pH in diabetic and nondiabetic uremic patients at a nephrology clinic. A total of 194 diabetic and nondiabetic patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD, who were divided into four groups, Group A, B, C, D, and who were attending a nephrology clinic were included in the study. Predialytic unstimulated whole salivary pH was recorded using pH- measuring strips. Subjective and objective findings were evaluated and recorded in the specially designed pro forma. Dental health assessment consisted of decayed, missing, and filled teeth index and community periodontal index (CPI. Dysgeusia was found to be significantly more prevalent in nondiabetic patients on dialysis. Uremic odor showed high significance (P <0.05 with 75% patients being positive in diabetic dialysis. There was no significant difference in the incidence of tongue coating between the four groups. A statistically high significance was observed with the objective oral manifestation of mucosal petechiae, with P = 0.01. There was an increased periodontal pocket depth among diabetic CKD patients as compared to that in nondiabetic patients. A moderate significance was found, with a CPI score showing P <0.05. Increased prevalence of caries was noticed among the diabetic CKD patients (Groups A, B. Recorded salivary pH showed no significant difference among diabetic and nondiabetic CKD patients. Findings suggest that these patients are at risk of developing complications, related to systemic health causing morbidity and mortality. Hence, these patients are to be motivated for comprehensive professional oral care and self oral hygiene instructions. Additional research is necessary to elucidate and correlate the combined influence of diabetes, CKD, and dialysis on oral health.

  4. Bardoxolone Methyl Improves Kidney Function in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease Stage 4 and Type 2 Diabetes: Post-Hoc Analyses from Bardoxolone Methyl Evaluation in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease and Type 2 Diabetes Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Melanie P.; Bakris, George L.; Block, Geoffrey A.; Chertow, Glenn M.; Goldsberry, Angie; Inker, Lesley A.; Heerspink, Hiddo J.L.; O'Grady, Megan; Pergola, Pablo E.; Wanner, Christoph; Warnock, David G.; Meyer, Colin J.

    2018-01-01

    Background Increases in measured inulin clearance, measured creatinine clearance, and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) have been observed with bardoxolone methyl in 7 studies enrolling approximately 2,600 patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) and chronic kidney disease (CKD). The largest of these studies was Bardoxolone Methyl Evaluation in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease and Type 2 Diabetes (BEACON), a multinational, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase 3 trial which enrolled patients with T2D and CKD stage 4. The BEACON trial was terminated after preliminary analyses showed that patients randomized to bardoxolone methyl experienced significantly higher rates of heart failure events. We performed post-hoc analyses to characterize changes in kidney function induced by bardoxolone methyl. Methods Patients in ­BEACON (n = 2,185) were randomized 1: 1 to receive once-daily bardoxolone methyl (20 mg) or placebo. We compared the effects of bardoxolone methyl and placebo on a post-hoc composite renal endpoint consisting of ≥30% decline from baseline in eGFR, eGFR <15 mL/min/1.73 m2, and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) events (provision of dialysis or kidney transplantation). Results Consistent with prior studies, patients randomized to bardoxolone methyl experienced mean increases in eGFR that were sustained through study week 48. Moreover, increases in eGFR from baseline were sustained 4 weeks after cessation of treatment. Patients randomized to bardoxolone methyl were significantly less likely to experience the composite renal endpoint (hazards ratio 0.48 [95% CI 0.36–0.64]; p < 0.0001). Conclusions Bardoxolone methyl preserves kidney function and may delay the onset of ESRD in patients with T2D and stage 4 CKD. PMID:29402767

  5. Knowledge regarding the prevention of chronic kidney disease in hypertensive and diabetic patients: a cross-sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Moura, Elaine Cristina Santa Cruz de; Barbosa, Jefferson Belarmino Nunes; Marinho, Patrícia Érika de Melo

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Hypertension (HT) and diabetes mellitus (DM) lead to functional and structural changes in target organs such as the kidneys, characterizing the need for preventive actions to avoid Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD). Objective: To verify cardiologists’ and endocrinologists’ knowledge, indications and practices regarding prevention of CKD in patients with HT and DM. Methods: A cross-sectional study with 14 cardiologists and 5 endocrinologists applying a questionnaire about ...

  6. Aerobic exercise in obese diabetic patients with chronic kidney disease: a randomized and controlled pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cooper Cheryl

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with obesity, diabetes, and chronic kidney disease (CKD are generally physically inactive, have a high mortality rate, and may benefit from an exercise program. Methods We performed a 24-week randomized controlled feasibility study comparing aerobic exercise plus optimal medical management to medical management alone in patients with type 2 diabetes, obesity (body mass index [BMI] > 30 kg/m2, and stage 2-4 CKD (estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR] 15-90 mL/min/1.73 m2 with persistent proteinuria. Subjects randomized to exercise underwent thrice weekly aerobic training for 6 followed by 18 weeks of supervised home exercise. The primary outcome variable was change in proteinuria. Results Seven subjects randomized to exercise and 4 control subjects completed the study. Exercise training resulted in an increase in exercise duration during treadmill testing, which was accompanied by slight but insignificant decreases in resting systolic blood pressure and 24-hour proteinuria. Exercise did not alter GFR, hemoglobin, glycated hemoglobin, serum lipids, or C-reactive protein (CRP. Caloric intake and body weight and composition also did not change with exercise training. Conclusion Exercise training in obese diabetic patients with CKD is feasible and may have clinical benefits. A large-scale randomized controlled trial to determine the effects of exercise on renal functions, cardiovascular fitness, inflammation, and oxidative stress in diabetic patients with CKD is planned.

  7. Retinopathy and clinical outcomes in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, chronic kidney disease, and anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bello, Natalie A; Pfeffer, Marc A; Skali, Hicham; McGill, Janet B; Rossert, Jerome; Olson, Kurt A; Weinrauch, Larry; Cooper, Mark E; de Zeeuw, Dick; Rossing, Peter; McMurray, John J V; Solomon, Scott D

    2014-01-01

    Objective Retinopathy is an established microvascular complication of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), but its independent relationship with macrovascular and other microvascular complications is less well defined across the spectrum of kidney disease in T2DM. We examined the prognostic value of retinopathy in assessing the risk of developing end-stage renal disease (ESRD), cardiovascular morbidity or death among patients in the Trial to Reduce cardiovascular Events with Aranesp Therapy (TREAT). Design TREAT enrolled 4038 patients with T2DM, chronic kidney disease (CKD) and moderate anemia. Patients were grouped by baseline history of retinopathy. Proportional hazards regression models were utilized to assess the association between retinopathy and subsequent ESRD, cardiovascular morbidity or death over an average of 2.4 years. Results Although younger, the 1895 (47%) patients with retinopathy had longer duration of diabetes, lower estimated glomerular filtration rate, more proteinuria, and more microvascular complications. In univariate analysis, retinopathy was associated with a higher rate of ESRD, but not with cardiovascular events or mortality. After adjustment, retinopathy was no longer statistically significant for the prediction of ESRD or any clinical endpoint. Conclusions In a large cohort of patients with T2DM, CKD, and anemia, retinopathy was common but not independently associated with a higher risk of renal or cardiovascular morbidity or death. Trial registration number NCT00093015 PMID:25452859

  8. Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... control blood pressure, and make hormones. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) means that your kidneys are damaged and ... don't have any symptoms until their kidney disease is very advanced. Blood and urine tests are ...

  9. Predictors of fatal and nonfatal cardiovascular events in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, chronic kidney disease, and anemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McMurray, John J V; Uno, Hajime; Jarolim, Petr

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to examine predictors of cardiovascular mortality and morbidity in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Individuals with the triad of diabetes, CKD, and anemia represent a significant proportion of patients with cardiovascular disease and are at particularly high risk for a...

  10. Increased risk of stroke with darbepoetin alfa in anaemic heart failure patients with diabetes and chronic kidney disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bello, Natalie A.; Lewis, Eldrin F.; Desai, Akshay S.; Anand, Inder S.; Krum, Henry; McMurray, John J. V.; Olson, Kurt; Solomon, Scott D.; Swedberg, Karl; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Young, James B.; Pfeffer, Marc A.

    2015-01-01

    Aims The use of an erythropoesis-stimulating agent, darbepoetin alfa (DA), to treat anaemia in patients with diabetes mellitus and chronic kidney disease was associated with a heightened risk of stroke and neutral efficacy in the Trial to Reduce Cardiovascular Events with Aranesp Therapy (TREAT),

  11. Diet - chronic kidney disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002442.htm Diet - chronic kidney disease To use the sharing features on this page, ... make changes to your diet when you have chronic kidney disease (CKD). These changes may include limiting fluids, eating ...

  12. Aliskiren and losartan trial in non-diabetic chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Keng-Thye; Choong, Hui-Lin; Wong, Kok-Seng; Tan, Han-Kim; Foo, Marjorie; Fook-Chong, Stephanie; Lee, Evan J C; Anantharaman, Vathsala; Lee, Grace S L; Chan, Choong-Meng

    2014-12-01

    This is a report of a clinical trial on the therapeutic efficacy and safety of combined aliskiren and losartan (an angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB)) versus aliskiren alone and ARB alone in non-diabetic chronic kidney disease (CKD) over a 3-year period. This was a randomised trial in 155 patients with non-diabetic CKD comparing aliskiren (150 mg/day) (n=52) versus losartan (100 mg/day) (n=52) and the third group aliskiren (150 mg/day) combined with losartan (100 mg/day) (n=51). The trial utilised primary renal end points of eGFR proteinuria (p<0.001 for all). The changes in eGFR, total urinary protein from baseline to each year were not significantly different between the three therapeutic groups. This study in non-diabetic CKD patients showed that combination therapy with aliskiren and ARB was as efficacious as aliskiren alone and ARB alone. There was one patient who developed a non-fatal stroke in the combined aliskiren and ARB group while the other two groups had none. © The Author(s) 2014.

  13. Effect of probucol on insulin resistance in patients with non-diabetic chronic kidney disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui; Wei, Ri-Bao; Yang, Yue; Wang, Na; Huang, Meng-Jie; Cao, Cui-Ming; Wang, Zi-Cheng; Cai, Guang-Yan; Chen, Xiang-Mei

    2015-01-01

    Background Insulin resistance (IR) is present at all stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and is associated with CKD progression. Probucol can improve the prognosis of IR in diabetes mellitus (DM) patients. This study aimed to observe the effect of probucol on IR and kidney protection in non-diabetic CKD patients. Methods This was an open-label, non-placebo-controlled, randomized study. A total of 59 patients were randomized to the probucol group (0.5 g, twice daily) or the control group using a 1: 1 treatment ratio. IR was determined using a homeostatic model assessment-IR (HOMA-IR) index. An Excel database was established to analyze follow-up data at weeks 0, 12, and 24. The primary outcome of interest was changes in the HOMA-IR, and the secondary outcomes of interest were changes in the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), body mass index (BMI), cholesterol, triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein (HDL), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), and 24-h urinary protein. Results The HOMA-IR index of the probucol group after 24 weeks was significantly decreased (P HOMA-IR index in the control group increased (average increase: 0.54; range: −0.38 to 1.87). For the secondary outcomes of interest, the changes between these two groups also exhibited significant differences in eGFR (P = 0.041), cholesterol (P = 0.001), fasting insulin (P < 0.001), and fasting C-peptide (P = 0.001). Conclusions Compared to angiotensin receptor blockers alone, the combination with probucol ameliorates IR in non-diabetic CKD patients and delays disease progression. PMID:26512244

  14. Cystatin C, chronic kidney disease and retinopathy in adults without diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Wei Yan; Teo, Boon Wee; Tai, E Shyong; Sethi, Sunil; Lamoureux, Ecosse; Tien Yin, Wong; Sabanayagam, Charumathi

    2016-09-01

    Serum cystatin C, a novel marker of renal function has been shown to be superior to serum creatinine in predicting renal function decline and adverse outcomes of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Our aim was to investigate the association between cystatin C and retinopathy in adults without diabetes. We examined 1725 Indian adults, aged 40-80 years who participated in the Singapore Indian Eye Study (2007-2009) and were free of diabetes mellitus. CKD was defined as an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) Retinopathy was assessed from digital fundus photographs of both eyes by trained graders using the modified Airlie House classification. The associations of CKD defined by the two markers alone and in combination (confirmed CKD, eGFRcr retinopathy were examined using logistic regression models adjusted for potential confounding factors including preexisting cardiovascular disease and albuminuria. The prevalence of retinopathy among those with CKD-eGFRcr and CKD-eGFRcys was 9.9% and 8.5%, respectively. In separate models, the associations of retinopathy with both CKD-eGFRcys (odds ratio (OR) (95% confidence interval (CI)) = 2.18 (1.14-4.16)) and CKD-eGFRcr were significant (OR (95% CI) = 2.63 (1.10-6.28)). In models including both markers, compared to optimal kidney function (eGFRcr ≥60 and eGFRcys ≥60), confirmed CKD was associated with a fourfold higher odds of retinopathy (OR (95% CI) = 4.01 (1.52-10.60)). In a population-based sample of Indian adults without diabetes, CKD defined by both cystatin C and creatinine was strongly associated with retinopathy. © The European Society of Cardiology 2016.

  15. Bardoxolone methyl in type 2 diabetes and stage 4 chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Zeeuw, Dick; Akizawa, Tadao; Audhya, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Although inhibitors of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system can slow the progression of diabetic kidney disease, the residual risk is high. Whether nuclear 1 factor (erythroid-derived 2)-related factor 2 activators further reduce this risk is unknown....

  16. Effect of aliskiren on proteinuria in non-diabetic chronic kidney disease: a double-blind, crossover, randomised, controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Lizakowski, Sławomir; Tylicki, Leszek; Renke, Marcin; Rutkowski, Przemysław; Heleniak, Zbigniew; Sławińska-Morawska, Maja; Aleksandrowicz, Ewa; Łysiak-Szydłowska, Wieslawa; Rutkowski, Bolesław

    2012-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the proteinuria-lowering effect of a renin inhibitor (aliskiren), compared to placebo and to an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (perindopril), in patients with non-diabetic chronic kidney disease. Methods A randomised, double-blind, crossover trial was performed in 14 patients with nondiabetic chronic kidney disease with 24-h mean proteinuria of 2.01 g (95% CI, 1.36–2.66) and estimated creatinine clearance of 93 ± 6.8 ml/min. The study consisted of five treatment perio...

  17. Dietary restriction and exercise for diabetic patients with chronic kidney disease: a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liesbeth Van Huffel

    Full Text Available Obesity and sedentary lifestyle are major health problems and key features to develop cardiovascular disease. Data on the effects of lifestyle interventions in diabetics with chronic kidney disease (CKD have been conflicting.Systematic review.Diabetes patients with CKD stage 3 to 5. SEARCH STRATEGY AND SOURCES: Medline, Embase and Central were searched to identify papers.Effect of a negative energy balance on hard outcomes in diabetics with CKD.Death, cardiovascular events, glycaemic control, kidney function, metabolic parameters and body composition.We retained 11 studies. There are insufficient data to evaluate the effect on mortality to promote negative energy balance. None of the studies reported a difference in incidence of Major Adverse Cardiovascular Events. Reduction of energy intake does not alter creatinine clearance but significantly reduces proteinuria (mean difference from -0.66 to -1.77 g/24 h. Interventions with combined exercise and diet resulted in a slower decline of eGFR (-9.2 vs. -20.7 mL/min over two year observation; p<0.001. Aerobic and resistance exercise reduced HbA1c (-0.51 (-0.87 to -0.14; p = 0.007 and -0.38 (-0.72 to -0.22; p = 0.038, respectively. Exercise interventions improve the overall functional status and quality of life in this subgroup. Aerobic exercise reduces BMI (-0.74% (-1.29 to -0.18; p = 0.009 and body weight (-2.2 kg (-3.9 to -0.6; p = 0.008. Resistance exercise reduces trunk fat mass (-0,7±0,1 vs. +0,8 kg ±0,1 kg; p = 0,001-0,005. In none of the studies did the intervention cause an increase in adverse events.All studies used a different intervention type and mixed patient groups.There is insufficient evidence to evaluate the effect of negative energy balance interventions on mortality in diabetic patients with advanced CKD. Overall, these interventions have beneficial effects on glycaemic control, BMI and body composition, functional status and quality of life, and no harmful

  18. Serum uric acid to creatinine ratio: A predictor of incident chronic kidney disease in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients with preserved kidney function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Liubao; Huang, Liji; Wu, Haidi; Lou, Qinglin; Bian, Rongwen

    2017-05-01

    Serum uric acid has shown to be a predictor of renal disease progression in most but not all studies. This study aims to test whether renal function-normalized serum uric acid is superior to serum uric acid as the predictor of incident chronic kidney disease in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients. In this study, 1339 type 2 diabetes mellitus patients with estimated glomerular filtration rate ⩾60 mL/min/1.73 m 2 and normouricemia were included. Renal function-normalized serum uric acid was calculated using serum uric acid/creatinine. Cox regression analysis was used to estimate the association between serum uric acid, renal function-normalized serum uric acid and incident chronic kidney disease. In total, 74 (5.53%) patients developed to chronic kidney disease 3 or greater during a median follow-up of 4 years, with older ages, longer diabetes duration and lower estimated glomerular filtration rate at baseline. The decline rate of estimated glomerular filtration rate was positively correlated with serum uric acid/creatinine ( r = 0.219, p type 2 diabetes mellitus patients.

  19. Impact of dietary fiber intake on glycemic control, cardiovascular risk factors and chronic kidney disease in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: the Fukuoka Diabetes Registry

    OpenAIRE

    Fujii, Hiroki; Iwase, Masanori; Ohkuma, Toshiaki; Ogata-Kaizu, Shinako; Ide, Hitoshi; Kikuchi, Yohei; Idewaki, Yasuhiro; Joudai, Tamaki; Hirakawa, Yoichiro; Uchida, Kazuhiro; Sasaki, Satoshi; Nakamura, Udai; Kitazono, Takanari

    2013-01-01

    Background Dietary fiber is beneficial for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus, although it is consumed differently in ethnic foods around the world. We investigated the association between dietary fiber intake and obesity, glycemic control, cardiovascular risk factors and chronic kidney disease in Japanese type 2 diabetic patients. Methods A total of 4,399 patients were assessed for dietary fiber intake using a brief self-administered diet history questionnaire. The associations betwee...

  20. From “Kidneys Govern Bones” to Chronic Kidney Disease, Diabetes Mellitus, and Metabolic Bone Disorder: A Crosstalk between Traditional Chinese Medicine and Modern Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Qin Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Although traditional Chinese medicine (TCM and Western medicine have evolved on distinct philosophical foundations and reasoning methods, an increasing body of scientific data has begun to reveal commonalities. Emerging scientific evidence has confirmed the validity and identified the molecular mechanisms of many ancient TCM theories. One example is the concept of “Kidneys Govern Bones.” Here we discuss the molecular mechanisms supporting this theory and its potential significance in treating complications of chronic kidney disease (CKD and diabetes mellitus. Two signaling pathways essential for calcium-phosphate metabolism can mediate the effect of kidneys in bone homeostasis, one requiring renal production of bioactive vitamin D and the other involving an endocrine axis based on kidney-expressed Klotho and bone-secreted fibroblast growth factor 23. Disruption of either pathway can lead to calcium-phosphate imbalance and vascular calcification, accelerating metabolic bone disorder. Chinese herbal medicine is an adjunct therapy widely used for treating CKD and diabetes. Our results demonstrate the therapeutic effects and underlying mechanisms of a Chinese herbal formulation, Shen-An extracts, in diabetic nephropathy and renal osteodystrophy. We believe that the smart combination of Eastern and Western concepts holds great promise for inspiring new ideas and therapies for preventing and treating complications of CKD and diabetes.

  1. Pulse pressure is not an independent predictor of outcome in type 2 diabetes patients with chronic kidney disease and anemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theilade, S; Claggett, B; Hansen, T W

    2015-01-01

    Pulse pressure (PP) remains an elusive cardiovascular risk factor with inconsistent findings. We clarified the prognostic value in patients with type 2 diabetes, chronic kidney disease (CKD) and anemia in the Trial to Reduce cardiovascular Events with Aranesp (darbepoetin alfa) Therapy. In 4038......, CKD and anemia, PP did not independently predict cardiovascular events or ESRD. This may reflect confounding by aggressive antihypertensive treatment, or PP may be too rough a risk marker in these high-risk patients....

  2. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF-alpha) and C-reactive protein (CRP) are positively associated with the risk of chronic kidney disease in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Eun-Sil; Hwang, Ji-Yun; Park, Ji Eun; Choi, Young Ju; Huh, Kap Bum; Kim, Wha Young

    2010-07-01

    Chronic low-grade inflammation may induce chronic kidney disease in patients with type 2 diabetes. This study investigated the relation between inflammatory biomarkers and chronic kidney disease in patients with type 2 diabetes, which has not yet been reported in Asian populations. A cross-sectional study was performed in 543 patients recruited from diabetic clinics for an ongoing, prospective study. Multivariate logistic regression was used to evaluate the association between inflammatory biomarkers and the presence of chronic kidney disease (estimated glomerular filtration rate Disease equation using plasma creatinine). The risk of chronic kidney disease increased in the highest quartiles of C-reactive protein (CRP) [multivariate odds ratio (OR) = 3.73; 95% CI = 1.19-1.70] and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (multivariate OR = 4.45; 95% CI = 1.63-12.11) compared to the lowest quartiles after adjustments for age, sex, zinc intake, and other putative risk factors for chronic kidney disease. Our results suggest that CRP and tumor necrosis factor-alpha may be independent risk factors for chronic kidney disease in patients with type 2 diabetes. A causal mechanism of this association should be evaluated in a followup study of Korean patients with type 2 diabetes.

  3. Chronic kidney disease and diabetes mellitus predict resistance to vitamin D replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshayeb, Hala M; Wall, Barry M; Showkat, Arif; Mangold, Therese; Quarles, L Darryl

    2013-04-01

    25-Hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] is a marker of nutritional status; however, chronic kidney disease (CKD) results in alterations in vitamin D metabolism, including the loss of vitamin D-binding proteins and alterations in CYP27B1 and CYP24 enzymes that metabolize 25(OH)D. This study was designed to determine the predictors of responsiveness to correction of vitamin D deficiency with oral vitamin D2 (ergocalciferol) in adults. A retrospective study of 183 veterans with 25(OH)D level vitamin D2, was performed. Logistic regression models were developed to determine the factors predicting the response to treatment, defined as either the change in serum 25(OH)D level/1000 IU of vitamin D2 or the number of vitamin D2 doses (50,000 IU per dose) administered. The mean age of the patients was 63 ± 12 years. About 87% were men and 51% diabetic, and 29% had an estimated glomerular filtration rate of vitamin D2 doses was 10.91 ± 5.95; the average increase in 25(OH)D level was 18 ± 10.80 ng/mL. 25(OH)D levels remained vitamin D2 treatment in logistic regression models. Patients with CKD required greater amounts of vitamin D2 to achieve similar increases in 25(OH)D levels, versus non-CKD patients. The presence of CKD and diabetes mellitus is associated with resistance to correction of 25(OH)D deficiency with vitamin D2 therapy. The underlying mechanism needs to be evaluated in prospective studies.

  4. Retinopathy and clinical outcomes in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, chronic kidney disease, and anemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bello, Natalie A; Pfeffer, Marc A; Skali, Hicham; McGill, Janet B; Rossert, Jerome; Olson, Kurt A; Weinrauch, Larry; Cooper, Mark E; de Zeeuw, Dick; Rossing, Peter; McMurray, John J V; Solomon, Scott D

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Retinopathy is an established microvascular complication of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), but its independent relationship with macrovascular and other microvascular complications is less well defined across the spectrum of kidney disease in T2DM. We examined the prognostic value of

  5. Effect of alogliptin on hypertensive chronic kidney disease patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amira Said

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background Diabetes mellitus (DM is a leading cause of chronic kidney disease (CKD. The antihyperglycemic treatment options for patients with Type 2 DM are limited because of safety and tolerability concerns. Aims To retrospectively assess the effect of using Alogliptin; a dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor (DPP-4i along with conventional gliclazide: a sulphonylurea (SU on renal outcomes and glycaemic control in T2DM patients with mild CKD and hypertension. Methods A total of 76 patient records (38 males and 38 females of patient ages 40–60 were analysed from the kidney unit at Punjab Care hospital, Lahore, Pakistan. All patients had a confirmed history of T2DM with mild CKD and established hypertension. Eligible patients were divided into two groups of 38 individuals each. Group SU received gliclazide monotherapy (SU or Alogliptin (DPP-4i+gliclazide (SU add on therapy. All patients were followed up for 12 months. Results The alogliptin (DPP-4i plus gliclazide (SU add on therapy group, in comparison to the group only receiving gliclazide (SU, showed a significant difference in eGFR values. The mean±SD GFR values post 12 months were 74.8±0.31 (95%CI:74.8±0.09;74.7–74.9 and 76.1±0.25 (95%CI: 76.1±0.08;76.0-76.2 for SU vs. SU+DPP-4i, respectively, with mean calculated effect size of 1.6,. HbA1c, 1,5 AG and ipid profile values have significantly changed (p<0.05 while blood pressure values showed no change. The mean±SD systolic blood pressure readings post 12 months for for SU vs. SU+DPP-4i were 131.4±10.4 (95% CI 131.4±3.3;128.1– 134.7, and 131.8±9.9 (95%CI 131.8±3; 128.8–134.8, respectively. Conclusion In the present study, patients using alogliptin in addition to sulfonyl urea showed improved glycaemic control and lipid profile without increased occurrence of hypoglycaemia. We concluded that, DPP-4i inhibitors are safe treatment options for patients with type 2 diabetes and mild degree of renal impairment.

  6. Non-albuminuric renal disease among subjects with advanced stages of chronic kidney failure related to type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boronat, Mauro; García-Cantón, César; Quevedo, Virginia; Lorenzo, Dionisio L; López-Ríos, Laura; Batista, Fátima; Riaño, Marta; Saavedra, Pedro; Checa, María D

    2014-03-01

    Urinary albumin excretion has been consistently found to be normal in a significant number of subjects with early stages of diabetic kidney disease. This study was aimed to estimate the prevalence and characteristics of non-albuminuric chronic kidney disease associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus among subjects who reach advanced stages of renal failure. Study population was composed of incident patients with advanced chronic kidney disease (glomerular filtration rate <30 mL/min) related to type 2 diabetes in a tertiary hospital from Gran Canaria (Spain) during a period of 2 years. Subjects were classified as normoalbuminuric (urinary albumin-to-creatine ratio [UACR] <30 mg/g), microalbuminuric (UACR ≥30 and <300 mg/g), or proteinuric (UACR ≥300 mg/g). Of 78 eligible patients, 21.8% had normoalbuminuria, 20.5% had microalbuminuria, and 57.7% had proteinuria. Individuals with normoalbuminuria were mostly women and had a lower prevalence of smoking and polyneuropathy than subjects with microalbuminuria or proteinuria. They also presented greater measures of body mass index and waist circumference, higher values of total and LDL cholesterol, and lower values of HbA1c and serum creatinine than subjects with microalbuminuria or proteinuria. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that female sex (positively) and HbA1c and polyneuropathy (negatively) were independently associated with absence of albuminuria. In conclusion, around 20% of subjects with diabetes-related advanced chronic kidney disease, characteristically women, have normal urinary albumin excretion. HbA1c and polyneuropathy are inversely related to this non-albuminuric form of nephropathy.

  7. Effect of aliskiren on proteinuria in non-diabetic chronic kidney disease: a double-blind, crossover, randomised, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizakowski, Sławomir; Tylicki, Leszek; Renke, Marcin; Rutkowski, Przemysław; Heleniak, Zbigniew; Sławińska-Morawska, Maja; Aleksandrowicz, Ewa; Łysiak-Szydłowska, Wieslawa; Rutkowski, Bolesław

    2012-12-01

    To evaluate the proteinuria-lowering effect of a renin inhibitor (aliskiren), compared to placebo and to an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (perindopril), in patients with non-diabetic chronic kidney disease. A randomised, double-blind, crossover trial was performed in 14 patients with nondiabetic chronic kidney disease with 24-h mean proteinuria of 2.01 g (95% CI, 1.36–2.66) and estimated creatinine clearance of 93±6.8 ml/min. The study consisted of five treatment periods. The patients were randomly assigned to receive aliskiren (150 mg), aliskiren (300 mg), perindopril (5 mg), perindopril (10 mg) or placebo. Aliskiren and perindopril reduced proteinuria. These effects were dose-dependent. Furthermore, 24-h proteinuria was reduced by 23% (mean 95% CI; 2–44) by treatment with aliskiren (150 mg), by 36% (95% CI, 17–55; Pproteinuria. The antiproteinuric effect is probably similar to that of perindopril, for equivalent hypotensive dosages. The renin inhibitor provides a promising alternative approach for the treatment of patients with chronic proteinuric non-diabetic kidney disease.

  8. Can glycated hemoglobin act as a reliable glycemic indicator in patients with diabetic chronic kidney disease? evidence from the Northeast of Thailand

    OpenAIRE

    Sojib Bin Zaman; Naznin Hossain; Ahmed E. Rahman; Sheikh M.S. Islam

    2017-01-01

    Background: Chronic kidney diseases (CKD) is a common microvascular complication in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) which requires adequate glycemic control. Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) is a conventional biomarker to estimate glycemic status, but its role in diabetic CKD patients is unclear. Therefore, this study aimed to determine whether patients with high HbA1c are associated to develop diabetic CKD.Methods: Data were obtained from a clinical registry of diabetic patients who were tre...

  9. Association of insulin resistance with chronic kidney disease in non-diabetic subjects with normal weight.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanying Chen

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To the best of our knowledge, the association of insulin resistance (IR with chronic kidney disease (CKD has not been well studied in normal-weight individuals. The aim of this study is to examine whether IR is associated with CKD in non-diabetic subjects with normal weight. We also examine whether the presence of obesity modifies the association of IR with CKD. METHODS: Data were drawn from a cross-sectional survey in China. Both estimated glomerular filtration rate and urinary albumin to creatinine ratio were used as markers of CKD. Logistic regression models and the quartiles of homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance were used to explore the associations of IR with CKD in entire cohort, normal-weight and overweight/obese subpopulations. RESULTS: In normal-weight subpopulation, the prevalence of IR and metabolic syndrome were 11.11% and 8.99%, respectively. In the entire cohort, the highest quartile HOMA-insulin resistance had a 70% increased risk for CKD (RR 1.70, 95% CI 1.07, 2.71, P=0.03, comparing the highest to the lowest quartile. However, when adding obesity to the model, the association was abolished. IR was associated with CKD in overweight/obese subpopulation but not in normal-weight subpopulation. CONCLUSION: IR and MetS in normal-weight individuals is common in the Chinese population. IR is associated with CKD in overweight/obese subpopulation but not in normal-weight subpopulation and the presence of obesity modifies the association of IR with CKD.

  10. Empagliflozin and Clinical Outcomes in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus, Established Cardiovascular Disease, and Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanner, Christoph; Lachin, John M; Inzucchi, Silvio E; Fitchett, David; Mattheus, Michaela; George, Jyothis; Woerle, Hans J; Broedl, Uli C; von Eynatten, Maximilian; Zinman, Bernard

    2018-01-09

    Empagliflozin, a sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitor, reduced cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and established cardiovascular disease in the EMPA-REG OUTCOME trial (Empagliflozin Cardiovascular Outcome Event Trial in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients). Urinary glucose excretion with empagliflozin decreases with declining renal function, resulting in less potency for glucose lowering in patients with kidney disease. We investigated the effects of empagliflozin on clinical outcomes in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, established cardiovascular disease, and chronic kidney disease. Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, established cardiovascular disease, and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) ≥30 mL·min -1 ·1.73 m -2 at screening were randomized to receive empagliflozin 10 mg, empagliflozin 25 mg, or placebo once daily in addition to standard of care. We analyzed cardiovascular death, hospitalization for heart failure, all-cause hospitalization, and all-cause mortality in patients with prevalent kidney disease (defined as eGFR 300 mg/g) at baseline. Additional analyses were performed in subgroups by baseline eGFR (300, 30-≤300, 10 years, 58% were receiving insulin, and 84% were taking angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers. In patients with prevalent kidney disease at baseline, empagliflozin reduced the risk of cardiovascular death by 29% compared with placebo (hazard ratio [HR], 0.71; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.52-0.98), the risk of all-cause mortality by 24% (HR, 0.76; 95% CI, 0.59-0.99), the risk of hospitalization for heart failure by 39% (HR, 0.61; 95% CI, 0.42-0.87), and the risk of all-cause hospitalization by 19% (HR, 0.81; 95% CI, 0.72-0.92). Effects of empagliflozin on these outcomes were consistent across categories of eGFR and urine albumin-creatinine ratio at baseline and across the 2 doses studied. The adverse event profile of empagliflozin

  11. Correlation of chronic kidney disease, diabetes and peripheral artery disease with cardiovascular events in patients using stress myocardial perfusion imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuhashi, Tatsuhiko; Masai, Hirofumi; Kunimasa, Taeko; Nakazato, Ryo; Fukuda, Hiroshi; Sugi, Kaoru; Moroi, Masao

    2011-01-01

    Normal stress myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) studies generally suggest an excellent prognosis for cardiovascular events. Chronic kidney disease (CKD), diabetes and peripheral artery disease (PAD) have been established as the risk factors for cardiovascular events. However, whether these risk factors significantly predict cardiovascular events in patients with normal stress MPI is unclear. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prognostic value of these risk factors in patients with normal stress MPI. Patients with normal stress MPI (n=372, male=215 and female=157, age=69 years, CKD without hemodialysis=95, diabetes=99, PAD=19, previous coronary artery disease=116) were followed up for 14 months. Normal stress MPI was defined as a summed stress score of 2 and/or persistent proteinuria. Cardiovascular events included cardiac death, non-fatal myocardial infarction and congestive heart failure requiring hospitalization. Cardiovascular events occurred in 20 of 372 patients (5.4%). In univariate Cox regression analysis, PAD, diabetes, diabetic retinopathy, insulin use, anemia, hypoalbuminemia, CKD, left ventricular ejection fraction and pharmacological stress tests were significant predictors of cardiovascular events. In multivariate Cox regression analysis, PAD, diabetes and CKD were independent and significant predictors for cardiovascular events, and their number was the strongest predictor for cardiovascular events (hazard ratio=21.7, P<0.001). PAD, diabetes and CKD are coexisting, independent and significant risk factors for cardiovascular events, CKD being the strongest predictor. The number of coexisting risk factors is important in predicting cardiovascular events in patients with normal stress MPI. (author)

  12. Impact of dietary fiber intake on glycemic control, cardiovascular risk factors and chronic kidney disease in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: the Fukuoka Diabetes Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Hiroki; Iwase, Masanori; Ohkuma, Toshiaki; Ogata-Kaizu, Shinako; Ide, Hitoshi; Kikuchi, Yohei; Idewaki, Yasuhiro; Joudai, Tamaki; Hirakawa, Yoichiro; Uchida, Kazuhiro; Sasaki, Satoshi; Nakamura, Udai; Kitazono, Takanari

    2013-12-11

    Dietary fiber is beneficial for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus, although it is consumed differently in ethnic foods around the world. We investigated the association between dietary fiber intake and obesity, glycemic control, cardiovascular risk factors and chronic kidney disease in Japanese type 2 diabetic patients. A total of 4,399 patients were assessed for dietary fiber intake using a brief self-administered diet history questionnaire. The associations between dietary fiber intake and various cardiovascular risk factors were investigated cross-sectionally. Body mass index, fasting plasma glucose, HbA1c, triglyceride and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein negatively associated with dietary fiber intake after adjusting for age, sex, duration of diabetes, current smoking, current drinking, total energy intake, fat intake, saturated fatty acid intake, leisure-time physical activity and use of oral hypoglycemic agents or insulin. The homeostasis model assessment insulin sensitivity and HDL cholesterol positively associated with dietary fiber intake. Dietary fiber intake was associated with reduced prevalence of abdominal obesity, hypertension and metabolic syndrome after multivariate adjustments including obesity. Furthermore, dietary fiber intake was associated with lower prevalence of albuminuria, low estimated glomerular filtration rate and chronic kidney disease after multivariate adjustments including protein intake. Additional adjustments for obesity, hypertension or metabolic syndrome did not change these associations. We demonstrated that increased dietary fiber intake was associated with better glycemic control and more favorable cardiovascular disease risk factors including chronic kidney disease in Japanese type 2 diabetic patients. Diabetic patients should be encouraged to consume more dietary fiber in daily life.

  13. Tryptophan Metabolism in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease Secondary to Type 2 Diabetes: Relationship to Inflammatory Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subrata Debnath

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Type 2 diabetes (T2D is the primary case of chronic kidney disease (CKD. Inflammation is associated with metabolic dysregulation in patients with T2D and CKD. Tryptophan (TRP metabolism may have relevance to the CKD outcomes and associated symptoms. We investigated the relationships of TRP metabolism with inflammatory markers in patients with T2D and CKD. Methods: Data were collected from a well-characterized cohort of type 2 diabetic individuals with all stages of CKD, including patients on hemodialysis. Key TRP metabolites (kynurenine [KYN], kynurenic acid [KYNA], and quinolinic acid [QA], proinflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-α [TNF-α] and interleukin-6 [IL-6], and C-reactive protein were measured in plasma. The KYN/TRP ratio was utilized as a surrogate marker for indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO1 enzyme activity. Results: There was a significant inverse association between circulating TRP level and stages of CKD ( P  < 0.0001. Downstream bioactive TRP metabolites KYN, KYNA, and QA were positively and robustly correlated with the severity of kidney disease ( P  < 0.0001. In multiple linear regression, neither TNF-α nor IL-6 was independently related to KYN/TRP ratio after adjusting for estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR. Only TNF-α was independently related to KYN after taking into account the effect of eGFR. Conclusions: Chronic kidney disease secondary to T2D may be associated with accumulation of toxic TRP metabolites due to both inflammation and impaired kidney function. Future longitudinal studies to determine whether the accumulation of KYN directly contributes to CKD progression and associated symptoms in patients with T2D are warranted.

  14. Glycaemic, blood pressure and lipid goal attainment and chronic kidney disease stage of type 2 diabetic patients treated in primary care practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcillo, Antonella; Pivin, Edward; Lalubin, Fabrice; Pitteloud, Nelly; Burnier, Michel; Zanchi, Anne

    2017-07-11

    The prevalence of chronic kidney disease and diabetes is rising in Europe. These patients are at high cardiovascular and renal risk and need a challenging multifactorial therapeutic approach. The goal of this cross-sectional study was to examine the treatment and attainments of goals related to cardiovascular risk factors within chronic kidney disease stages in type 2 diabetic patients followed up by primary care physicians in Switzerland. Each participating physician entered into a web database the anonymised data of up to 15 consecutive diabetic patients attending her/his office between December 2013 and June 2014. Diabetes, hypertension and lipid lowering therapies were analysed, as well as glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c), blood pressure and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-c) levels and goal attainments by KDIGO chronic kidney disease stage 1 to 4. A total of 1359 patients (mean age 66.5±12.4 years) were included by 109 primary care physicians. Chronic kidney disease stages 0-2, 3a, 3 b and 4 were present in 77.6%, 13.9%, 6.1%, and 2.4%, respectively. Average HbA1c was independent of chronic kidney disease stage and close to 7%; more than half of the patients reached the HbA1c goal. Eighty-four percent of patients were hypertensive and only 18.2% reached the then current Swiss or American Diabetes Association 2013 blood pressure goals. Despite loosening of blood pressure goals in 2015, only half of the patients reached them and most needed multiple therapies. Increased body mass index and advanced chronic kidney disease stage decreased the chance of reaching blood pressure goals. Lipid lowering therapy was prescribed in 62.1% of cases, with average LDL-c levels similar across chronic kidney disease stages. Only 42% of patients reached the LDL-c goal of primary prevention and 32% reached primary care physicians in Switzerland. Goal attainments for HbA1c and LDL-c were not influenced by chronic kidney disease stages, in contrast to blood pressure. Reaching

  15. Subclinical hypothyroidism and the associations with macrovascular complications and chronic kidney disease in patients with Type 2 diabetes.

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    Jia, F; Tian, J; Deng, F; Yang, G; Long, M; Cheng, W; Wang, B; Wu, J; Liu, D

    2015-08-01

    The prevalence of subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH) is high among patients with diabetes, although the relationship between SCH and diabetic vascular complications is unknown. This study aimed to determine the relationship between SCH and vascular complications in patients with Type 2 diabetes. In this cross sectional study, 991 patients with Type 2 diabetes were screened for thyroid function at their admission to the Second Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University. We compared the prevalence of coronary heart disease (CHD), ischaemic stroke and chronic kidney disease (CKD) with the prevalence of euthyroidism and SCH. Among the 991 patients, 126 (12.7%) patients had SCH. The prevalence of CHD was significantly higher in the SCH group than in the euthyroid group (22.2% and 15.0%, respectively; P = 0.039). In the logistic regression analyses, SCH was associated with CHD [odds ratio (OR): 1.993; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.135-3.497; P = 0.016]. This association was stronger in patients aged ≥ 65 years than in younger patients [2.474 (1.173-5.220); P = 0.017]. No significant association was found between SCH and ischaemic stroke. Patients with severe SCH had a high risk of CKD [1.842 (1.120-3.029); P = 0.016]. This study provides evidence that SCH in patients with Type 2 diabetes is associated with a high prevalence of CHD (and CKD in severe SCH), although not with ischaemic stroke. © 2015 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2015 Diabetes UK.

  16. Association Between High and Very High Albuminuria and Nighttime Blood Pressure: Influence of Diabetes and Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Hurtado, Gema; Ruilope, Luis M; de la Sierra, Alex; Sarafidis, Pantelis; de la Cruz, Juan J; Gorostidi, Manuel; Segura, Julián; Vinyoles, Ernest; Banegas, José R

    2016-10-01

    Nighttime blood pressure (BP) and albuminuria are two important and independent predictors of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Here, we examined the quantitative differences in nighttime systolic BP (SBP) across albuminuria levels in patients with and without diabetes and chronic kidney disease. A total of 16,546 patients from the Spanish Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring Registry cohort (mean age 59.6 years, 54.9% men) were analyzed. Patients were classified according to estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), as ≥60 or albuminuria (30-300 mg/g), or very high albuminuria (>300 mg/g). Office and 24-h BP were determined with standardized methods and conditions. High albuminuria was associated with a statistically significant and clinically substantial higher nighttime SBP (6.8 mmHg higher than with normoalbuminuria, P albuminuria among patients with diabetes and low eGFR (16.5 mmHg, P albuminuria than in those with normoalbuminuria (P albuminuria had a 6.1 mmHg greater nighttime SBP than those with high albuminuria (P Albuminuria in hypertensive patients is accompanied by quantitatively striking higher nighttime SBP, particularly in those with diabetes with very high albuminuria and low eGFR. © 2016 by the American Diabetes Association.

  17. Association of Chronic Kidney Disease and Cerebral Small Vessel Disease with Cognitive Impairment in Elderly Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

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    Toshitaka Umemura

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: In recent years, the relationship between chronic kidney disease (CKD and cognitive impairment has been attracting attention. Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD is also associated with an increased risk of cognitive impairment. However, it is still unknown whether CKD markers are associated with cognitive impairment independently of SVD in elderly diabetic patients. Methods: Seventy-nine type 2 diabetic patients (mean age, 76.0 years were enrolled in the present study. CKD was defined as the presence of albuminuria and/or a low estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR 2. SVD was evaluated by the presence and severity of silent brain infarcts (SBIs and white matter lesions (WMLs on brain magnetic resonance imaging. Neuropsychological tests were assessed using four validated cognitive instruments. Results: In multiple linear regression analyses, albuminuria was associated with worse modified Stroop Color Word scores (β = 0.284, p = 0.017 and low eGFR was associated with reduced Digit Symbol Substitution scores (β = -0.224, p = 0.026 after adjustment for age, sex, education years, diabetes duration, hypertension, multiple SBIs, and advanced WMLs. In contrast, there were no significant associations between CKD markers and Mini-Mental State Examination or Word Recall scores. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that albuminuria and low eGFR are associated with frontal lobe dysfunction independently of SVD in elderly type 2 diabetic patients.

  18. Magnesium modifies the association between serum phosphate and the risk of progression to end-stage kidney disease in patients with non-diabetic chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaguchi, Yusuke; Iwatani, Hirotsugu; Hamano, Takayuki; Tomida, Kodo; Kawabata, Hiroaki; Kusunoki, Yasuo; Shimomura, Akihiro; Matsui, Isao; Hayashi, Terumasa; Tsubakihara, Yoshiharu; Isaka, Yoshitaka; Rakugi, Hiromi

    2015-10-01

    It is known that magnesium antagonizes phosphate-induced apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells and prevents vascular calcification. Here we tested whether magnesium can also counteract other pathological conditions where phosphate toxicity is involved, such as progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD). We explored how the link between the risk of CKD progression and hyperphosphatemia is modified by magnesium status. A post hoc analysis was run in 311 non-diabetic CKD patients who were divided into four groups according to the median values of serum magnesium and phosphate. During a median follow-up of 44 months, 135 patients developed end-stage kidney disease (ESKD). After adjustment for relevant clinical factors, patients in the lower magnesium-higher phosphate group were at a 2.07-fold (95% CI: 1.23-3.48) risk for incident ESKD and had a significantly faster decline in estimated glomerular filtration rate compared with those in the higher magnesium-higher phosphate group. There were no significant differences in the risk of these renal outcomes among the higher magnesium-higher phosphate group and both lower phosphate groups. Incubation of tubular epithelial cells in high phosphate and low magnesium medium in vitro increased apoptosis and the expression levels of profibrotic and proinflammatory cytokine; these changes were significantly suppressed by increasing magnesium concentration. Thus, magnesium may act protectively against phosphate-induced kidney injury.

  19. Screening for Chronic Kidney Disease

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    Understanding Task Force Recommendations Screening for Chronic Kidney Disease The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force) has issued a final recommendation on Screening for Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) . This recommendation ...

  20. Chronic kidney disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Romagnani, Paola; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Glassock, Richard; Levin, Adeera; Jager, Kitty J.; Tonelli, Marcello; Massy, Ziad; Wanner, Christoph; Anders, Hans-Joachim

    2017-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is defined by persistent urine abnormalities, structural abnormalities or impaired excretory renal function suggestive of a loss of functional nephrons. The majority of patients with CKD are at risk of accelerated cardiovascular disease and death. For those who progress

  1. Urine RAS components in mice and people with type 1 diabetes and chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wysocki, Jan; Goodling, Anne; Burgaya, Mar; Whitlock, Kathryn; Ruzinski, John; Batlle, Daniel; Afkarian, Maryam

    2017-08-01

    The pathways implicated in diabetic kidney disease (DKD) are largely derived from animal models. To examine if alterations in renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in humans are concordant with those in rodent models, we measured concentration of angiotensinogen (AOG), cathepsin D (CTSD), angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), and ACE2 and enzymatic activities of ACE, ACE2, and aminopeptidase-A in FVB mice 13-20 wk after treatment with streptozotocin ( n = 9) or vehicle ( n = 15) and people with long-standing type 1 diabetes, with ( n = 37) or without ( n = 81) DKD. In streptozotocin-treated mice, urine AOG and CTSD were 10.4- and 3.0-fold higher than in controls, respectively ( P animals ( P animals ( P = 0.017). Compared with people without DKD, those with DKD had higher urine AOG (170 vs. 15 μg/g) and CTSD (147 vs. 31 μg/g). In people with DKD, urine ACE concentration was 1.8-fold higher (1.4 vs. 0.8 μg/g in those without DKD), while its enzymatic activity was 0.6-fold lower (1.0 vs. 1.6 × 10 9 RFU/g in those without DKD). Lower ACE activity, but not ACE protein concentration, was associated with ACE inhibitor (ACEI) treatment. After adjustment for clinical covariates, AOG, CTSD, ACE concentration, and ACE activity remained associated with DKD. In conclusion, in mice with streptozotocin-induced diabetes and in humans with DKD, urine concentrations and enzymatic activities of several RAS components are concordantly increased, consistent with enhanced RAS activity and greater angiotensin II formation. ACEI use was associated with a specific reduction in urine ACE activity, not ACE protein concentration, suggesting that it may be a marker of exposure to this widely-used therapy. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  2. Relationship between chronic kidney disease and silent cerebral infarction in patients with Type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchi, R; Babazono, T; Yoshida, N; Nyumura, I; Toya, K; Hayashi, T; Hanai, K; Tanaka, N; Ishii, A; Iwamoto, Y

    2010-05-01

    Silent cerebral infarction (SCI) is an independent risk factor for future symptomatic stroke. Although the prevalence of SCI is closely related to kidney function in non-diabetic individuals, evidence is lacking whether albuminuria and/or reduced estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) independently increase the risk of SCI in diabetic patients. We therefore examined the relationships between albuminuria, eGFR and SCI in patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). We studied 786 T2DM patients with an eGFR > or = 15 ml/min 1.73/m(2), including 337 women and 449 men [mean (+/- sd), age 65 +/- 11 years]. All patients underwent cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to detect SCI. GFR was estimated using the modified three-variable equation for Japanese subjects. Albuminuria was defined as a first morning urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (ACR) > or = 30 mg/g. SCI was detected in 415 (52.8%) of the subjects. The prevalence of SCI was significantly associated with both elevated ACR and decreased eGFR in univariate analysis. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, urinary ACR remained independently associated with SCI after adjusting for conventional cardiovascular risk factors [odds ratio (OR) of urinary ACR per logarithmical value: 1.89, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.41-2.51, P < 0.001]; however, eGFR was no longer significantly associated with SCI (OR per ml/min 1.73/m(2) = 0.99, 95% CI = 0.98-1.00, P = 0.095). In conclusion, albuminuria but not decreased eGFR may be an independent predictor of prevalent SCI in patients with T2DM.

  3. Biomarkers of chronic kidney disease in the urine of diabetic/hypertensive patients by means of Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Elzo Everton de Sousa; Bispo, Jeyse Aliana Martis; Fernandes, Adriana Barrinha; Silveira, Landulfo

    2016-03-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) and arterial hypertension (AH) are common diseases that, if untreated, predispose the patient to renal failure. This study aimed to evaluate possible biomarkers in the urine of patients with DM and AH capable to predict the chronic renal disease, by means of Raman spectroscopy. Urines were obtained from patients with DM and AH, and separated into four groups: no symptoms of diseases related to DM and AH (G1), with low clinical complications (G2), with severe clinical complications (G3), and with chronic kidney disease (G4) arised from DM and AH. It has been used a dispersive Raman spectrometer (830nm, 250mW, 20s accumulation). In the spectra of urine it was identified Raman peaks at 680cm-1 (creatinine), 1004cm-1 (urea) and 1128cm-1 (glucose). The results revealed that G2, G3 and G4 presented the creatinine peak with lower intensity than G1 (p kidney disease associated to DM and AH, particularly the renal failure.

  4. Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... artérielle Heart Disease Mineral & Bone Disorder Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease What is anemia? Anemia is a condition in ... as they should. How is anemia related to chronic kidney disease? Anemia commonly occurs in people with chronic kidney ...

  5. Correlations of dietary energy and protein intakes with renal function impairment in chronic kidney disease patients with or without diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mei-En; Hwang, Shang-Jyh; Chen, Hung-Chun; Hung, Chi-Chih; Hung, Hsin-Chia; Liu, Shao-Chun; Wu, Tsai-Jiin; Huang, Meng-Chuan

    2017-05-01

    Dietary energy and protein intake can affect progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD). CKD complicated with diabetes is often associated with a decline in renal function. We investigated the relative importance of dietary energy intake (DEI) and dietary protein intake (DPI) to renal function indicators in nondiabetic and diabetic CKD patients. A total of 539 Stage 3-5 CKD patients [estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR)Disease equation] with or without diabetes were recruited from outpatient clinics of Nephrology and Nutrition in a medical center in Taiwan. Appropriateness of DEI and DPI was used to subcategorize CKD patients into four groups:(1) kidney diet (KD) A (KD-A), the most appropriate diet, was characterized by low DPI and adequate DEI; (2) KD-B, low DPI and inadequate DEI; (3) KD-C, excess DPI and adequate DEI; and (4) KD-D, the least appropriate diet, excess DPI and inadequate DEI. Inadequate DEI was defined as a ratio of actual intake/recommended intake less than 90% and adequate DEI as over 90%. Low DPI was defined as less than 110% of recommended intake and excessive when over 110%. Outcome measured was eGFR. In both groups of CKD patients, DEI was significantly lower (ppatients were KD-C and KD-D significantly correlated with reduced eGFR compared with KD-A at increments of -5.63 mL/min/1.73 m 2 (p = 0.029) and -7.72 mL/min/1.73 m 2 (p=0.015). In conclusion, inadequate energy and excessive protein intakes appear to correlate with poorer renal function in nondiabetic CKD patients. Patients with advanced CKD are in need of counseling by dietitians to improve adherence to diets. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  6. Hepcidin-25 in diabetic chronic kidney disease is predictive for mortality and progression to end stage renal disease.

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    Martin Wagner

    Full Text Available Anemia is common and is associated with impaired clinical outcomes in diabetic chronic kidney disease (CKD. It may be explained by reduced erythropoietin (EPO synthesis, but recent data suggest that EPO-resistance and diminished iron availability due to inflammation contribute significantly. In this cohort study, we evaluated the impact of hepcidin-25--the key hormone of iron-metabolism--on clinical outcomes in diabetic patients with CKD along with endogenous EPO levels.249 diabetic patients with CKD of any stage, excluding end-stage renal disease (ESRD, were enrolled (2003-2005, if they were not on EPO-stimulating agent and iron therapy. Hepcidin-25 levels were measured by radioimmunoassay. The association of hepcidin-25 at baseline with clinical variables was investigated using linear regression models. All-cause mortality and a composite endpoint of CKD progression (ESRD or doubling of serum creatinine were analyzed by Cox proportional hazards models.Patients (age 67 yrs, 53% male, GFR 51 ml/min, hemoglobin 131 g/L, EPO 13.5 U/L, hepcidin-25 62.0 ng/ml were followed for a median time of 4.2 yrs. Forty-nine patients died (19.7% and forty (16.1% patients reached the composite endpoint. Elevated hepcidin levels were independently associated with higher ferritin-levels, lower EPO-levels and impaired kidney function (all p<0.05. Hepcidin was related to mortality, along with its interaction with EPO, older age, greater proteinuria and elevated CRP (all p<0.05. Hepcidin was also predictive for progression of CKD, aside from baseline GFR, proteinuria, low albumin- and hemoglobin-levels and a history of CVD (all p<0.05.We found hepcidin-25 to be associated with EPO and impaired kidney function in diabetic CKD. Elevated hepcidin-25 and EPO-levels were independent predictors of mortality, while hepcidin-25 was also predictive for progression of CKD. Both hepcidin-25 and EPO may represent important prognostic factors of clinical outcome and have the

  7. 76 FR 14676 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-17

    ... Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Cognitive Function in Chronic Diseases... Diseases and Nutrition Research; 93.849, Kidney Diseases, Urology and Hematology Research, National...

  8. [Treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus in patients with chronic kidney disease. Grupo de Trabajo para el Documento de Consenso sobre el tratamiento de la diabetes tipo 2 en el paciente con enfermedad renal crónica].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Huelgas, Ricardo; Martínez-Castelao, Alberto; Artola, Sara; Górriz, José Luis; Menéndez, Edelmiro

    2014-01-21

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are highly prevalent chronic diseases, which represent an important public health problem and require a multidisciplinary management. T2DM is the main cause of CKD and it also causes a significant comorbidity with regard to non-diabetic nephropathy. Patients with diabetes and kidney disease represent a special risk group as they have higher morbi-mortality as well as higher risk of hypoglycemia than diabetic individuals with a normal kidney function. Treatment of T2DM in patients with CKD is controversial because of the scarcity of available evidence. The current consensus report aims to ease the appropriate selection and dosage of antidiabetic treatments as well as the establishment of safety objectives of glycemic control in patients with CKD. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  9. Serum uric acid and its association with hypertension, early nephropathy and chronic kidney disease in type 2 diabetic patients

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    Mohamed Fouad

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Early detection diabetic nephropathy (DN is important. Whether serum uric acid (SUA has a role in the development of DN is not known. Objective: To study the relationship between SUA and hypertension, early nephropathy and progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. Methods: The total number of the study was 986 participants, according to presence and duration of diabetes were classified into three groups. Group I; including 250 healthy participants. Group II; including 352 with onset of diabetes 5 years. All participants were submitted to complete clinical examination, anthropometric measurements, laboratory investigations, including glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1C, as well triglycerides to high-density lipoprotein ratios (TG/HDL-C, SUA, urinary albumin/creatinine ratio (ACR and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR. Results: SUA, BP, HbA1c, TG/HDL-C ratio, and ACR levels were significantly higher in group III than group I, II and in II than I. eGFR significantly lower in group III than group I, II and in II than I (p 6.1 mg/dl, > 6.2 mg/dl and > 6.5 mg/dl had a greater sensitivity and specificity for identifying hypertension, early nephropathy and decline eGFR respectively. Conclusion: Even high normal SUA level, was associated with the risk of hypertension, early nephropathy and decline of eGFR. Moreover SUA level may identify the onset of hypertension, early nephropathy and progression of CKD in T2DM.

  10. An estimation of the prevalence and progression of chronic kidney disease in a rural diabetic cambodian population.

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    Bernadette Thomas

    Full Text Available To date, there are no known estimates of the prevalence of chronic kidney disease within Cambodia, the vast majority of whose citizens live in rural areas with limited access to renal replacement therapy.Observational analysis of patients from the Takeo province in Cambodia who presented to MoPoTsyo, a non-governmental organization, for screening and management of diabetes mellitus between 2010 and 2012 (n = 402; 75% females. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR was calculated using the CKD-Epi equation.On average, women were younger, with a higher percentage of hypercholesterolemia but also high-density lipoprotein level. Men had a higher serum creatinine level (1.31 mg/dl than that of women (1.13 mg/dl at 95% CI. More than half of all screened patients had a reduced eGFR; 60% (95% CI 55%, 65% had an eGFR<60 ml/min/1.73 m(2; 54% (49%, 59% had an eGFR 30-60 ml/min/1.73 m(2, and 5.7% (3.4%, 8.0% with eGFR 15-30 ml/min/1.73 m(2. Women had a greater prevalence of stage 3 CKD (57% women vs. 47% men and stage 4 CKD (7.0% vs. 2.0%. The adjusted odds ratio for females compared to males having an eGFR <60 ml/min/1.73 m(2 was 3.19 (95% CI 1.78, 5.43; p value<0.001. Thirty-two percent of patients lost ≥ 5 ml/min/1.73 m2 eGFR during median follow-up time of 433 days (IQR 462 days days.Over one-half of Cambodians with diabetes mellitus had reduced eGFR, implying a point-prevalence of chronic kidney disease of 1.2% in among adult Cambodians within the country. This high burden of kidney disease in a society that lacks universal access to renal replacement therapy underscores the importance of early diagnosis - a largely unmet need in Cambodia.

  11. Predictors of chronic kidney disease in type 2 diabetes: A longitudinal study from the AMD Annals initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Cosmo, Salvatore; Viazzi, Francesca; Pacilli, Antonio; Giorda, Carlo; Ceriello, Antonio; Gentile, Sandro; Russo, Giuseppina; Rossi, Maria C; Nicolucci, Antonio; Guida, Pietro; Pontremoli, Roberto

    2016-07-01

    The identification of clinical predictors for the development of chronic kidney disease is a critical issue in the management of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.We evaluated 27,029 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) ≥60 mL/min/1.73 m and normoalbuminuria from the database of the Italian Association of Clinical Diabetologists network. Primary outcomes were eGFR <60 mL/min/1.73 m and normoalbuminuria; albuminuria and eGFR ≥60 mL/min/1.73 m; and eGFR <60 mL/min/1.73 m and albuminuria. Secondary outcomes were eGFR <60 mL/min/1.73 m and albuminuria. eGFR from serum creatinine by chronic kidney disease epidemiology collaboration equation (CKD-EPI), urinary albumin excretion, HbA1c, triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c), blood pressure, and body mass index.Over a 4-year period, 33.2% of patients (n = 8973) developed chronic kidney disease, 10.3% (n = 2788) showed a decline in eGFR <60 mL/min/1.73 m, 18.4% (n = 4978) developed albuminuria, and 4.5% (n = 1207) developed both features. Relative risk ratios (RRRs) for age (1.37, P < 0.001 by 5 years), sex (0.77, P < 0.001 for being male), body mass index (1.03, P < 0.001 by 1 kg/m), triglycerides (1.02, P < 0.001 by 10 mg/dL), and LDL-c (0.97, P = 0.004 by 10 mg/dL) were independently related to the onset of eGFR reduction. Age (1.08, P < 0.001 by 5 years), sex (1.36, P < 0.001 for being male), body mass index (1.02, P < 0.001 by 1 kg/m), triglycerides (1.01, P = 0.02 by 10 mg/dL), HDL-c, and LDL-c (0.97, P = 0.008 and 0.99, P = 0.003 by 5 and 10 mg/dL, respectively) were related to the onset of albuminuria. HbA1c and the intensity of antihypertensive treatment showed a weaker association with renal outcome.Reduction in eGFR and albuminuria showed distinct sets of risk factors, suggesting that different mechanisms are involved in

  12. Diabetes Mellitus in the Transplanted Kidney

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    Vasil ePeev

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus (DM is the most common cause of chronic kidney disease (CKD and end stage renal disease (ESRD. New onset diabetes mellitus after transplant (NODAT has been described in approximately 30 percent of non-diabetic kidney transplant recipients many years post transplantation. DM in patients with kidney transplantation constitutes a major comorbidity, and has significant impact on the patients and allografts’ outcome. In addition to the major comorbidity and mortality that result from cardiovascular and other DM complications, long standing DM after kidney transplant has significant pathological injury to the allograft, which results in lowering the allografts and the patients’ survivals. In spite of the cumulative body of data on diabetic nephropathy (DN in the native kidney, there has been very limited data on the DN in the transplanted kidney. In this review, we will shed the light on the risk factors that lead to the development of NODAT. We will also describe the impact of DM on the transplanted kidney, and the outcome of kidney transplant recipients with NODAT. Additionally, we will present the most acceptable data on management of NODAT.

  13. The role of chronic kidney disease as a predictor of outcome after revascularisation of the ulcerated diabetic foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venermo, M; Biancari, F; Arvela, E; Korhonen, M; Söderström, M; Halmesmäki, K; Albäck, A; Lepäntalo, M

    2011-12-01

    The aim of the study was to stratify the risk of diabetic patients with leg ulcer or gangrene undergoing infrainguinal revascularisation for critical limb ischaemia. The study cohort included 732 revascularisation procedures performed in 597 diabetic patients with ulcer or gangrene. Logistic regression and CART analysis were used for identification of predictors of 1-year outcome. Logistic regression showed that chronic kidney disease (CKD) class (OR 1.38, 95% CI 1.16, 1.65) was an independent predictor of 1-year leg salvage (area under the receiver operating characteristic [ROC] curve 0.60, 95% CI 0.54, 0.65). The terminal nodes of the CART for 1-year leg salvage were CKD classes 4-5, the level (infrapopliteal vs femoropopliteal revascularisation), type of revascularisation (bypass surgery vs percutaneous transluminal angioplasty) and gangrene (area under the ROC curve 0.62, 95% CI 0.57, 0.68). Logistic regression showed that pulmonary disease (OR 1.76, 95% CI 1.11, 2.78), CKD class (OR 1.43, 95% CI 1.24, 1.65), foot gangrene (OR 1.76, 95% CI 1.21, 2.60) and patient age (OR 1.02, 95% CI 1.01, 1.04) were independent predictors of 1-year amputation-free survival (area under the ROC curve 0.65, 95% CI 0.60, 0.69). The terminal nodes of the CART for 1-year amputation-free survival were CKD classes 3-5, patient's age of ≥ 75 years and foot gangrene (area under the ROC curve 0.64, 95% CI 0.60, 0.68). CKD is a formidable risk factor for poor intermediate outcome after infrainguinal revascularisation in diabetic patients with foot ulcer or gangrene. CART analysis indicates that foot gangrene is also a significant risk factor for adverse outcome.

  14. Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibition in chronic kidney disease and potential for protection against diabetes-related renal injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penno, G; Garofolo, M; Del Prato, S

    2016-05-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is associated with a high risk of chronic kidney disease (CKD). About 20% of patients with T2DM have CKD of stage ≥ 3; up to 40% have some degree of CKD. Beyond targeting all renal risk factors together, renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system blockers are to date the only effective mainstay for the treatment of diabetic kidney disease (DKD). Indeed, several potentially nephroprotective agents have been in use, which have been unsuccessful. Some glucose-lowering agents, including dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors (DPP-4i), have shown promising results. Here, we discuss the evidence that glucose lowering with DPP-4i may be an option for protecting against diabetes-related renal injury. A comprehensive search was performed of the literature using the terms "alogliptin," "linagliptin," "saxagliptin," "sitagliptin," and "vildagliptin" for original articles and reviews addressing this topic. DPP-4i are an effective, well-tolerated treatment option for T2DM with any degree of renal impairment. Preclinical observations and clinical studies suggest that DPP-4i might also be a promising strategy for the treatment of DKD. The available data are in favor of saxagliptin and linagliptin, but the consistency of results points to the possible nephroprotective effect of DPP-4i. This property appears to be independent of glucose lowering and can potentially complement other therapies that preserve renal function. Larger prospective clinical trials are ongoing, which might strengthen these hypothesis-generating findings. The improvement in albuminuria associated with DPP-4i suggests that these agents may provide renal benefits beyond their glucose-lowering effects, thus offering direct protection from DKD. These promising results must be interpreted with caution and need to be confirmed in forthcoming studies. Copyright © 2016 The Italian Society of Diabetology, the Italian Society for the Study of Atherosclerosis, the Italian Society of Human

  15. Correlations of dietary energy and protein intakes with renal function impairment in chronic kidney disease patients with or without diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-En Chen

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Dietary energy and protein intake can affect progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD. CKD complicated with diabetes is often associated with a decline in renal function. We investigated the relative importance of dietary energy intake (DEI and dietary protein intake (DPI to renal function indicators in nondiabetic and diabetic CKD patients. A total of 539 Stage 3–5 CKD patients [estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR<60 mL/min/1.73 m2 using the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease equation] with or without diabetes were recruited from outpatient clinics of Nephrology and Nutrition in a medical center in Taiwan. Appropriateness of DEI and DPI was used to subcategorize CKD patients into four groups:(1 kidney diet (KD A (KD-A, the most appropriate diet, was characterized by low DPI and adequate DEI; (2 KD-B, low DPI and inadequate DEI; (3 KD-C, excess DPI and adequate DEI; and (4 KD-D, the least appropriate diet, excess DPI and inadequate DEI. Inadequate DEI was defined as a ratio of actual intake/recommended intake less than 90% and adequate DEI as over 90%. Low DPI was defined as less than 110% of recommended intake and excessive when over 110%. Outcome measured was eGFR. In both groups of CKD patients, DEI was significantly lower (p<0.001 and DPI higher (p=0.002 than recommended levels. However, only in the nondiabetic CKD patients were KD-C and KD-D significantly correlated with reduced eGFR compared with KD-A at increments of −5.63 mL/min/1.73 m2 (p = 0.029 and −7.72 mL/min/1.73 m2 (p=0.015. In conclusion, inadequate energy and excessive protein intakes appear to correlate with poorer renal function in nondiabetic CKD patients. Patients with advanced CKD are in need of counseling by dietitians to improve adherence to diets.

  16. Usefulness of Estimation of Glycated Albumin and Glycosylated Haemoglobin in Indian Diabetic Chronic Kidney Disease Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumaresan Ramanathan

    2014-09-01

    CONCLUSION: GA estimation is a useful marker in assessment of short term glycemic control in stage III & IV (< 30 ml/min/1.73m2 diabetic CKD patients. GA: HbA1c ratio if routinely done may also become a useful marker in Diabetic CKD population in future.

  17. Profile of chronic kidney disease related-mineral bone disorders in newly diagnosed advanced predialysis diabetic kidney disease patients: A hospital based cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, S; Beatrice, A M; Ghosh, A; Pramanik, S; Bhattacharjee, R; Ghosh, S; Raychaudhury, A; Mukhopadhyay, S; Chowdhury, S

    2017-12-01

    Chronic kidney disease related-mineral bone disorder (CKD-MBD) has been poorly studied in pre-dialysis Indian CKD population. There are limited data on the pattern of these disturbances in diabetic CKD patients. Therefore, a study was conducted to find out the profile of mineral bone disorders in T2DM patients with pre-dialysis CKD. In this cross-sectional design, diabetic patients with newly-diagnosed stage 4 and 5 CKD were evaluated. Serum levels of calcium, phosphorus, intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH), 25 hydroxy vitamin D and total alkaline phosphatase (ALP) were measured in all patients. Bone mineral density (BMD) was measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). A total of 72 eligible patients participated (44 males, 28 females; age 54.2±11.7). Patients with CKD Stage 5 had a lower level of corrected serum calcium and significantly higher level of inorganic phosphorus, total ALP and iPTH as compared to stage 4 patients. Overall, 38.5% were hypocalcemic, 31.43% were hyperphosphatemic. 24.2% of CKD subjects were vitamin D deficient (110pg/ml) was detected in nearly 43% of patients. In stage 5, only 32% patients was found to have hyperparathyroidism (iPTH>300pg/ml). There was a good correlation between iPTH and total ALP (r=0.5, p=0.0001) in this cohort. 25 (OH) vitamin D was inversely correlated with ALP (r=-0.39, P=0.001) and showed negative correlation with urine ACR (r=-0.37, P=0.002). As a group, the osteoporotic CKD subjects exhibited higher iPTH (220.1±153.8 vs. 119±108pg/ml, p<0.05) as compared to those who were osteopenic or had normal bone density. There was significant correlation between BMD and iPTH (adjusted r=-0.436; P=0.001). In the multivariate regression model, we found intact PTH to predict BMD even after adjustment of all the confounders. The current study showed that adynamic bone disease is prevalent even in pre-dialysis CKD population. High bone turnover disease may not be the most prevalent type in diabetic CKD. However, it

  18. Effect of add-on direct renin inhibitor aliskiren in patients with non-diabetes related chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Szu-yuan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS plays an important role in the progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD. Although dual RAAS inhibition results in worse renal outcomes than monotherapy in high risk type 2 diabetes patients, the effect of dual RAAS inhibition in patients with non-DM CKD is unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential renoprotective effect of add-on direct renin inhibitor in non-DM CKD patients. Methods We retrospectively enrolled 189 non-DM CKD patients who had been taking angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs for more than six months. Patients were divided into an add-on aliskiren group and an ARB monotherapy group. The primary outcomes were a decline in glomerular filtration rate (GFR and a reduction in urinary protein-to-creatinine ratio at six months. Results The baseline characteristics of the two groups were similar. Aliskiren 150 mg daily reduced the urinary protein-to-creatinine ratio by 26% (95% confidence interval, 15 to 37%; p  Conclusion Add-on direct renin inhibitor aliskiren (150 mg daily safely reduced proteinuria and attenuated the decline in GFR in the non-DM CKD patients who were receiving ARBs.

  19. Serum uric acid, the metabolic syndrome, and the risk of chronic kidney disease in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikhbahaei, Sara; Fotouhi, Akbar; Hafezi-Nejad, Nima; Nakhjavani, Manouchehr; Esteghamati, Alireza

    2014-03-01

    Serum uric acid (SUA) has been suggested as a potentially modifiable mediator associated with the metabolic syndrome. Hyperuricemia and metabolic syndrome were both associated with adverse renal outcome. However, epidemiologic data are limited regarding this relationship in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). This study aims to determine whether elevated SUA is associated with an increased prevalence of metabolic risk factors, albuminuria, and chronic kidney disease (CKD) in a large sample of patients with T2DM. It also examines the combined effect of SUA and metabolic syndrome components on the odds of CKD. A total of 1463 patients with T2DM were recruited. Blood samples were obtained to measure metabolic parameters. Patients with macroalbuminuria or an estimated glomerular filtration rate of metabolic syndrome, central obesity, hypertension, high triglycerides (TGs), CKD, and macroalbuminuria was significantly higher in patients with hyperuricemia than those in the lowest tertile of SUA (T1). One standard deviation (SD) increment of SUA was significantly associated with metabolic syndrome, central obesity, and high TGs after adjustment for age, sex, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), and albuminuria. The odds of CKD went up to 1.37-fold with every 1 SD increment of SUA, independent of age, sex, and components of metabolic syndrome. There was a significant, graded increase in odds of CKD by increasing SUA levels and the number of metabolic syndrome risk factors (Pmetabolic syndrome components on the odds of CKD.

  20. Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Immunosuppressant medicines Anxiety, depression and mental health Kidney rejection Lifestyle changes Donate a kidney Being a living ... Healthy kidneys take the waste out of your blood. One type of waste is called creatinine. If you have ...

  1. Risk of development of chronic kidney disease in patients with type 2 diabetes having metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moin, Shaheen; Gondal, Ghulam Murtaza; Bano, Uzma

    2008-08-01

    To measure the relation of creatinine clearance in type-2 diabetic patients with different components of metabolic syndrome and to quantify the relationship of frequency of incident CKD with increasing number of metabolic syndrome components while controlling for age, gender and duration of diabetes. Cross-sectional descriptive study. Diabetes Clinic, Fauji Foundation Hospital, Rawalpindi, from January to August 2006. Patients having type-2 Diabetes for more than 5 years were enrolled. Information regarding age, gender, duration of diabetes , type of diabetes, treatment taking, complete fasting lipid profile, fasting blood glucose, Body Mass Index (BMI), 24 hours urinary proteins and creatinine clearance, co-existent risk factors like hypertension and ischemic heart disease was taken. Patients were divided into groups having one to all five metabolic syndrome traits. Progressive increase in the metabolic syndrome traits was compared with decline in creatinine clearance. Pearson correlation test and multiple logistic regression were applied to determine correlation with significance at 'r' and 'p' creatinine clearance, 37% had a creatinine clearance between 60-90 ml/min, 19% had a creatinine clearance of 30-59 ml/min, 18% had a creatinine clearance of less than 30 ml/min and 10% were already in stage 5 CKD. The decline in renal function was more severe in subjects evaluated who had a higher number of features of the metabolic syndrome. Age was the only significant determinant of development of CKD (p=0.05). The renal function progressively declined with 3 or more features of the metabolic syndrome.

  2. Detection of Chronic Kidney Disease by Using Different Equations of Glomerular Filtration Rate in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Cross-Sectional Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Zaman, Sojib Bin

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a global threat due to its high mortality. It is essential to know the actual magnitude of diabetic CKD to design a specific management program. However, there is limited knowledge regarding the most suitable equation to measure CKD in patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). This paper aimed to analyze estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) based on different equations to detect the CKD among T2DM.? Methods A hospital-based cross-sectio...

  3. Direct renin inhibition in chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, Frederik; Rossing, Peter; Parving, Hans-Henrik

    2013-01-01

    that renin inhibition could hold potential for improved treatment in patients with chronic kidney disease, with diabetic nephropathy as an obvious group of patients to investigate, as the activity of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system is enhanced in these patients and as there is an unmet need...... early as a beneficial effect was unlikely and there was an increased frequency of side effects. Also in non-diabetic kidney disease a few intervention studies have been carried out, but there is no ongoing hard outcome study. In this review we provide the current evidence for renin inhibition in chronic...... kidney disease by reporting of the studies published so far as well as perspective on the future possibilites....

  4. Circulating CXCL16 in Diabetic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usama Elewa

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Chronic kidney disease and, specifically, diabetic kidney disease, is among the fastest increasing causes of death worldwide. A better understanding of the factors contributing to the high mortality may help design novel monitoring and therapeutic approaches. CXCL16 is both a cholesterol receptor and a chemokine with a potential role in vascular injury and inflammation. We aimed at identifying predictors of circulating CXCL16 levels in diabetic patients with chronic kidney disease. Methods: We have now studied plasma CXCL16 in 134 European patients with diabetic kidney disease with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR categories G1-G4 and albuminuria categories A1-A3, in order to identify factors influencing plasma CXCL16 in this population. Results: Plasma CXCL16 levels were 4.0±0.9 ng/ml. Plasma CXCL16 increased with increasing eGFR category from G1 to G4 (that is, with decreasing eGFR values and with increasing albuminuria category. Plasma CXCL16 was higher in patients with prior cardiovascular disease (4.33±1.03 vs 3.88±0.86 ng/ml; p=0.013. In multivariate analysis, eGFR and serum albumin had an independent and significant negative correlation with plasma CXCL16. Conclusion: In diabetic kidney disease patients, GFR and serum albumin independently predicted plasma CXCL16 levels.

  5. Risk of development of chronic kidney disease in patients with type 2 diabetes having metabolic syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moin, S.; Gondal, G.M.G.

    2008-01-01

    To measure the relation of creatinine clearance in type-2 diabetic patients with different components of metabolic syndrome and to quantify the relationship of frequency of incident CKD with increasing number of metabolic syndrome components while controlling for age, gender and duration of diabetes. Cross-sectional descriptive study. Patients having type-2 Diabetes for more than 5 years were enrolled. Information regarding age, gender, duration of diabetes, type of diabetes, treatment taking, complete fasting lipid profile, fasting blood glucose, Body Mass Index (BMI), 24 hours urinary proteins and creatinine clearance, co-existent risk factors like hypertension and ischemic heart disease was taken. Patients were divided into groups having one to all five metabolic syndrome traits. Progressive increase in the metabolic syndrome traits was compared with decline in creatinine clearance. Pearson correlation test and multiple logistic regression were applied to determine correlation with significance at r and p <0.05. Out of 104 evaluated female and male patients, 70% had hypertension, ischemic heart disease and a family history of diabetes. While 20% had normal creatinine clearance, 37% had a creatinine clearance between 60-90 ml/min, 19% had a creatinine clearance of 30-59 ml/min, 18% had a creatinine clearance of less than 30 ml/min and 10% were already in stage 5 CKD. The decline in renal function was more severe in subjects evaluated who had a higher number of features of the metabolic syndrome. Age was the only significant determinant of development of CKD (p=0.05). The renal function progressively declined with 3 or more features of the metabolic syndrome. (author)

  6. Serum Cystatin C, Markers of Chronic Kidney Disease, and Retinopathy in Persons with Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chee Wai Wong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. We examined the association of CKD defined by serum creatinine, serum cystatin C, and albuminuria with moderate diabetic retinopathy (DR. Methods. We examined 1,119 Indian adults with diabetes, aged 40–80 years, who participated in the Singapore Indian Eye Study (2007–2009, a population-based cross-sectional study. The associations of CKD defined by each of the three markers alone and in combination with moderate DR were examined using logistic regression models adjusted for potential confounding factors including duration of diabetes, smoking, body mass index, systolic blood pressure, and HbA1c. Results. The prevalence of moderate DR was significantly higher among those with CKD defined by triple markers (41.1% compared to CKD defined separately by creatinine (26.6%, cystatin C (20.9%, and albuminuria (23.4%. People with CKD defined by triple markers had a fourteenfold higher odds of moderate DR (OR (95% CI = 13.63 (6.08–30.54 compared to those without CKD by any marker. Nearly half (48.7% of participants with cystatin C ≥ 1.12 mg/L have moderate DR. Conclusions. CKD defined by a triple marker panel was strongly associated with moderate DR in this Asian population with diabetes.

  7. Prevalence of chronic kidney disease after preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes van Balen, Veronica Agatha; Spaan, Julia Jeltje; Cornelis, Tom; Spaanderman, Marc Erich August

    2017-06-01

    Preeclampsia (PE), an endothelial disease that affects kidney function during pregnancy, is correlated to an increased future risk of cardiovascular and chronic kidney disease. The Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) 2012 guideline emphasizes the combined role of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and albuminuria in determining the frequency of monitoring of kidney function. In this study we evaluated the prevalence of CKD in women with a history of PE. We investigated how many seemingly healthy women required monitoring of kidney function according to the KDIGO guideline. We included 775 primiparous women with a history of PE. They were at least 4 months postpartum, and had no pre-existing hypertension, diabetes or kidney disease. We estimated GFR by the CKD-Epidemiology equation and urinary albumin loss by albumin creatinine ratio in a 24-h urine collection. Most women, 669 (86.3 %), had a normal GFR and absent albuminuria. Based on the KDIGO guideline, 13.7 % would require at least yearly monitoring of kidney function. Only 1.4 % were classified to be at high risk for kidney function deterioration. Monitoring of kidney function seems relevant for about one in seven women with a history of PE, mainly due to albuminuria. Albuminuria should be evaluated postpartum to identify those women that need further monitoring of kidney function.

  8. Diagnosis of diabetic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, Frederik; Rossing, Peter

    2018-01-01

    Approximately 20% to 40% of patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes mellitus develop diabetic kidney disease. This is a clinical syndrome characterized by persistent albuminuria (> 300 mg/24 h, or > 300 mg/g creatinine), a relentless decline in glomerular filtration rate (GFR), raised arterial......). Untreated microalbuminuria will gradually worsen, reaching clinical proteinuria or severely increased albuminuria (albuminuria grade A3) over 5 to 15 years. The GFR then begins to decline, and without treatment, end-stage renal failure is likely to result in 5 to 7 years. Although albuminuria is the first...... sign of diabetic nephropathy, the first symptom is usually peripheral edema, which occurs at a very late stage. Regular, systematic screening for diabetic kidney disease is needed in order to identify patients at risk of or with presymptomatic diabetic kidney disease. Annual monitoring of urinary...

  9. Achievement of therapeutic targets in patients with diabetes and chronic kidney disease: insights from the Associazione Medici Diabetologi Annals initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Cosmo, Salvatore; Viazzi, Francesca; Pacilli, Antonio; Giorda, Carlo; Ceriello, Antonio; Gentile, Sandro; Russo, Giuseppina; Rossi, Maria Chiara; Nicolucci, Antonio; Guida, Pietro; Di Bartolo, Paolo; Pontremoli, Roberto

    2015-09-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) entails a worse cardiovascular outcome. The aim of our work was to study the relationship between CKD and the achievement of recommended targets for glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c) and blood pressure (BP) in a real-life sample of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). We analysed a sample of 116 777 outpatients from the Network of the Italian Association of Clinical Diabetologists; all patients had T2DM and at least one measurement of HbA1c, LDL-c, BP, serum creatinine and albuminuria in the year 2010. The outcome was the achievement of HbA1c, LDL-c and BP values as recommended by International Guidelines. In the entire sample, the mean value of HbA1c was 7.2 ± 1.2%, of LDL-c was 102 ± 33 mg/dL and of BP was 138/78 ± 19/9 mmHg. CKD and its components were associated with poor glycaemic and BP control, notwithstanding greater use of glucose and BP-lowering drugs, while no association was found with LDL-c values. Factors independently related to unsatisfactory glycaemic control included female gender, body mass index, duration of disease and high albuminuria. Men, older people and those taking statins were more likely to reach LDL-c target levels. Male gender, age and high albuminuria strongly affected the achievement of BP targets. CKD or its components, mainly high albuminuria, are associated with failure to reach therapeutic targets, especially for HbA1c and BP, despite a greater use of drugs in patients with T2DM. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. All rights reserved.

  10. Chronic kidney disease and anticoagulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sciascia, Savino; Radin, Massimo; Schreiber, Karen

    2017-01-01

    Anticoagulation in patients with impaired kidney function can be challenging since drugs' pharmacokinetics and bioavailability are altered in this setting. Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) treated with conventional anticoagulant agents [vitamin K antagonist (VKA), low-molecular weight...... are eliminated via the kidneys pose additional challenges. More recently, two classes of direct oral anticoagulant agents (DOACs) have been investigated for the prevention and management of venous thromboembolic events: the direct factor Xa inhibitors rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban, and the direct thrombin...

  11. Relationship between chronic kidney disease with diabetes or hypertension and frailty in community-dwelling Japanese older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sungchul; Lee, Sangyoon; Harada, Kazuhiro; Bae, Seongryu; Makizako, Hyuma; Doi, Takehiko; Tsutsumimoto, Kota; Hotta, Ryo; Nakakubo, Sho; Park, Hyuntae; Suzuki, Takao; Shimada, Hiroyuki

    2017-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the relationship between kidney function with concomitant diabetes or hypertension and frailty in community-dwelling Japanese older adults. The participants were 9606 residents (community-dwelling Japanese older adults) who completed baseline assessments. The estimated glomerular filtration rate (mL/min/1.73 m 2 ) was determined according to the serum creatinine level, and participants were classified into four mutually exclusive categories: ≥60.0 (normal range), 45.0-59.9, 30.0-44.9 and who met three, four or five criteria satisfied the definition of having frailty. Multivariate logistic regression was used to examine the relationships between estimated glomerular filtration rate and frailty. After multivariate adjustment, participants with lower kidney function (estimated glomerular filtration rate hypertension (OR 2.53, 95% CI 1.45-5.12) showed a significantly increased risk of frailty in the lower kidney function group, regardless of multivariate controls. Furthermore, the analyses showed an even greater increase in the risk of frailty in patients with a history of both diabetes and hypertension (OR 3.67, 95% CI 1.13-14.1) CONCLUSIONS: A lower level of kidney function was associated with a higher risk of frailty in community-dwelling Japanese older adults. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2017; 17: 1527-1533. © 2016 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  12. Prevalence of Hypertension and Diabetes and Coexistence of Chronic Kidney Disease and Cardiovascular Risk in the Population of the Republic of Moldova

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codreanu, Igor; Sali, Vera; Gaibu, Sergiu; Suveica, Luminita; Popa, Sergiu; Perico, Norberto; Ene-Iordache, Bogdan; Carminati, Sergio; Feehally, John; Remuzzi, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    In 2005, the International Society of Nephrology (ISN) established the Global Outreach Program (GO) aimed at building a capacity for detecting and managing chronic kidney disease and its complications in low- and middle-income countries. Here we report data from the 2006-2007 screening program (1025 subjects from the general population) in the Republic of Moldova aimed to determine the prevalence of hypertension, diabetes, and their coexistence with microalbuminuria. The likelihood of a serious cardiovascular (CV) event was also estimated. Hypertension and diabetes were very common among screened subjects. The prevalence of microalbuminuria was 16.9% and that of estimated GFR Moldova patients with hypertension and diabetes should be screened for the coexistence of renal abnormalities, with the intention of developing disease-specific health-care interventions with the primary goal to reduce CV morbidity and mortality and prevent renal disease progression to end stage renal disease. PMID:23251790

  13. Para- and perirenal fat thickness is an independent predictor of chronic kidney disease, increased renal resistance index and hyperuricaemia in type-2 diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamacchia, Olga; Nicastro, Vincenzo; Camarchio, Donatella; Valente, Umberto; Grisorio, Rosaria; Gesualdo, Loreto; Cignarelli, Mauro

    2011-03-01

    Many interfering factors may reduce the reliability of waist circumference (WC) measurement in estimating the risk for chronic kidney disease (CKD) associated with obesity. Therefore, we determined the independent associations of para- and perirenal ultrasonographic fat thickness with the main markers of kidney function. A cross-sectional study was performed in 151 type-2 diabetic subjects. Para- and perirenal fat thickness was measured from the inner side of the abdominal musculature to the surface of the kidneys. CKD was defined as eGFR perirenal fat thickness even when BMI and waist circumference were further added in the statistical model (r(2): 0.366, P = 0.001; r(2): 0.529, P = 0.005; r(2): 0.310, P = 0.026, respectively), whereas waist circumference and BMI did not contribute independently of para- and perirenal fat thickness. Albuminuria was predicted by waist circumference but not by para- and perirenal fat thickness. In subjects with waist circumference above the diagnostic values of metabolic syndrome (48M/59F), eGFR significantly and progressively declined across tertiles of para- and perirenal fat thickness (87.0 ± 27.9 vs 83.5 ± 26.0 vs 62.3 ± 30.6 mL min(-1) 1.73 m(-2), adjusted P perirenal fat thickness is an independent predictor of kidney dysfunction in type-2 diabetes explaining an important proportion of the variance of eGFR, renal resistance index and uricaemia.

  14. Prevalence of anemia in patients with type II diabetes and mild to moderate chronic kidney disease and the impact of anti-RAS medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dousdampanis, Periklis; Trigka, Konstantina; Fourtounas, Costas

    2014-05-01

    Anemia is a common feature of diabetes and chronic kidney disease (CKD) mainly due to erythropoietin (EPO) deficiency and uremic toxicity. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) have been established as first-choice medications for the treatment of diabetic nephropathy. However, there are conflicting data regarding their impact on hemoglobin levels in patients with diabetic nephropathy. We evaluated the prevalence of anemia in 101 patients with diabetes mellitus type II and CKD at stage III-IV (group A) compared with 101 non-diabetic patients with similar renal function (group B). Moreover, we evaluated the impact of ACE inhibitors and ARBs on patients' anemia. Anemia was observed in 60 patients in group A and in 47 patients in group B (P patients in group A and 19 patients in group B were receiving exogenous EPO for correction of renal anemia (P patients in group A and 52 patients in group B were receiving ACE inhibitors and/or ARBs (P medications. Anemia is more common in diabetic patients with CKD stage III-IV than in non-diabetic patients with similar renal function. Our results indicate that ACE inhibitors and ARBs are not a significant cause of anemia for both populations.

  15. Chronic Kidney Disease: What Does It Mean for Me?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cysts Solitary Kidney Your Kidneys & How They Work Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) View or Print All Sections ​​What Is Chronic Kidney Disease? Chronic kidney disease (CKD) means your kidneys are ...

  16. Src family kinases in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Zhuang, Shougang

    2017-09-01

    Src family kinases (SFKs) belong to nonreceptor protein tyrosine kinases and have been implicated in the regulation of numerous cellular processes, including cell proliferation, differentiation, migration and invasion, and angiogenesis. The role and mechanisms of SFKs in tumorgenesis have been extensively investigated, and some SFK inhibitors are currently under clinical trials for tumor treatment. Recent studies have also demonstrated the importance of SFKs in regulating the development of various fibrosis-related chronic diseases (e.g., idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, liver fibrosis, renal fibrosis, and systemic sclerosis). In this article, we summarize the roles of SFKs in various chronic kidney diseases, including glomerulonephritis, diabetic nephropathy, human immunodeficiency virus-associated nephropathy, autosomal dominant form of polycystic kidney disease, and obesity-associated kidney disease, and discuss the mechanisms involved. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  17. Paediatric chronic kidney disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    presence of markers of kidney damage. • Markers of kidney disease include any of the following: • proteinuria (urine dipstick ≥2+ or urine protein:creatinine ratio 5 × the upper limit of normal). • urine sediment abnormalities. • electrolyte and other abnormalities caused by tubular disorders. • histological abnormalities.

  18. Paediatric chronic kidney disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    (oliguria) (<1.0 mL/kg/hour). • Serum calcium, phosphate, alkaline phosphatase and plasma parathyroid hormone should be determined to assess bone mineral disease and secondary hyperparathyroidism. • Renal ultrasound is necessary to demonstrate kidney size (small shrunken kidneys are characteristic of CKD) and.

  19. Primary and tertiary health professionals' views on the health-care of patients with co-morbid diabetes and chronic kidney disease - a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Clement; Ilic, Dragan; Teede, Helena; Fulcher, Greg; Gallagher, Martin; Kerr, Peter G; Murphy, Kerry; Polkinghorne, Kevan; Russell, Grant; Usherwood, Timothy; Walker, Rowan; Zoungas, Sophia

    2016-05-18

    Health-care for co-morbid diabetes and chronic kidney disease (CKD) is often sub-optimal. To improve health-care, we explored the perspectives of general practitioners (GPs) and tertiary health-care professionals concerning key factors influencing health-care of diabetes and CKD. A total of 65 health professionals were purposively sampled from Australia's 2 largest cities to participate in focus groups and semi-structured interviews. Four focus groups were conducted with GPs who referred to 4 tertiary health services in Australia's 2 largest cities, with 6 focus groups conducted with tertiary health-care professionals from the 4 tertiary health services. An additional 8 semi-structured interviews were performed with specialist physicians who were heads of diabetes and renal units. All discussions were facilitated by the same researcher, with discussions digitally recorded and transcribed verbatim. All qualitative data was thematically analysed independently by 2 researchers. Both GPs and tertiary health-care professionals emphasised the importance of primary care and that optimal health-care was an inter-play between patient self-management and primary health-care, with specialist tertiary health-care support. Patient self-management, access to specialty care, coordination of care and a preventive approach were identified as key factors that influence healthcare and require improvement. Both groups suggested that an integrated specialist diabetes-kidney service could improve care. Unit heads emphasised the importance of quality improvement activities. GPs and tertiary health-care professionals emphasised the importance of patient self-management and primary care involvement in the health-care of diabetes and CKD. Supporting GPs with an accessible, multidisciplinary diabetes-renal health service underpinned by strong communication pathways, a preventive approach and quality improvement activities, may improve health-care and patient outcomes in co-morbid diabetes

  20. Can glycated hemoglobin act as a reliable glycemic indicator in patients with diabetic chronic kidney disease? evidence from the Northeast of Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sojib Bin Zaman

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic kidney diseases (CKD is a common microvascular complication in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM which requires adequate glycemic control. Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c is a conventional biomarker to estimate glycemic status, but its role in diabetic CKD patients is unclear. Therefore, this study aimed to determine whether patients with high HbA1c are associated to develop diabetic CKD.Methods: Data were obtained from a clinical registry of diabetic patients who were treated in a district hospital in the Northeast of Thailand. CKD was defined according to the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR<60mL/min/1.73m2. Anthropometric and biochemical measurements of the patient were taken by review of medical records. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to determine the likelihood of the association between HbA1c and CKD.Results: Among 4,050 participants, 1,027 (25.3% developed diabetic CKD. Older age (adjusted odds ratio (AOR: 4.88, 95% confidence interval (CI: 3.71–6.42, p<0.05, female (AOR: 1.38, 95% CI: 1.05–1.73, p<0.05, and hypertension (AOR: 1.52, 95% CI: 1.21–1.91, p<0.05 were found as the risk factors of diabetic CKD. However, patients with high HbA1c (>6.5% were negatively associated with diabetic CKD (AOR: 0.66, 95% CI: 0.51–0.86, p<0.05.Conclusion: This study found patients with higher HbA1c level were not associated with diabetic CKD. Therefore, using the conventional cut-off values of HbA1c in diabetic CKD patients may be problematic in the clinical settings. Enhanced detection of glycemic status in patients with diabetic CKD is warranted to improve the outcome.

  1. Effects of short-term rosuvastatin therapy on heart and kidney function in patients with acute coronary syndrome combining diabetes mellitus and concomitant chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heng WU

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective To observe the effects and safety of rosuvastatin therapy on protecting the renal and heart function in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS combining diabetes mellitus (DM and concomitant chronic kidney disease (CKD undergoing contrast media injection. Methods Concurrent parallel control and before-after self-control method were employed in present study. From Dec. 2008 to Oct. 2011, 2998 patients from 53 central hospitals in China were enrolled in a TRACK-D project. Out of 2998, 2309 patients with ACS combining DM and concomitant CKD were randomly assigned to rosuvastatin group (n=1183 or control group (n=1126. Patients in rosuvastatin group were given rosuvastatin 10mg/d for five days (two days before and three days post-procedure, while those in control group received no treatment. Isotonic non-ionic contrast medium (iodixanol was used in both groups when angiography, left ventriculography and percutaneous vascular intervention were started. Serum creatinine (Scr, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR and urinary albumin/creatinine ratio (ACR were measured before and 48h, 72h after exposure to contrast medium. A 30-day clinical follow-up was conducted including the evaluation of aggravated heart failure, acute renal failure, dialysis/hemofiltration and all-cause mortality. Results No significant difference existed between the two groups at the preoperative levels of Scr (95.11±23.79μmol/L vs 94.88±20.31μmol/L, P=0.80 and eGFR [73.98±14.52ml/(min.1.73m2 vs 74.10±13.80ml/(min.1.73m2, P=0.85]. The postoperative Scr level showed no significant difference between the two groups (94.87±25.15μmol/L vs 95.74±30.50μmol/L, P=0.45, however, the postoperative Scr value presented a decline tendency in rosuvastatin group, while an upward trend in control group. The 30-day clinical follow-up found that the incidence of aggravated heart failure was significantly lower in rosuvastatin group than in control group (2.4% vs

  2. 78 FR 13360 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-27

    ... Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Chronic Kidney Disease in Children. Date... Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the..., Kidney Diseases, Urology and Hematology Research, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: February 21...

  3. Association between plasma soluble RAGE and renal function is unaffected by medication usage and enzymatic antioxidants in chronic kidney disease with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Foo Nian; Tan, Jin Ai Mary Anne; Keng, Tee Chau; Ng, Kok Peng; Chua, Kek Heng; Kuppusamy, Umah Rani

    2016-01-30

    This study aimed to investigate the relationship between soluble RAGE and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) after controlling for the potential confounding factors such as medication usage and enzymatic antioxidants. A total of 222 CKD patients whose eGFR is less than 60ml/min/1.73m(2) and 111 non-CKD individuals were recruited. The study subjects were classified based on their diabetes status. The plasma glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities as well as plasma soluble RAGE level were measured. The plasma GPx and SOD activities were significantly lower and the plasma soluble RAGE level was significantly higher in the CKD patients than in the non-CKD individuals, regardless of the diabetes status. Soluble RAGE was significantly correlated with eGFR in both diabetic CKD (D-CKD) and non-diabetic CKD (ND-CKD) patients. The association between soluble RAGE and eGFR remained largely unaffected by the confounding factors in D-CKD patients. However, the confounding effect of enzymatic antioxidants in the relationship between eGFR and soluble RAGE was observed in ND-CKD patients. The increased plasma level of soluble RAGE is a better indicator of renal function decline in diabetic CKD patients instead of non-diabetic CKD patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Calcium isotope signature: new proxy for net change in bone volume for chronic kidney disease and diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Yu-Ki; Yajima, Nobuyuki; Higuchi, Yusuke; Yamato, Hideyuki; Hirata, Takafumi

    2017-12-01

    Herein, we measure the Ca isotope ratios ( 44 Ca/ 42 Ca and 43 Ca/ 42 Ca) in serum and bone samples collected from rats with chronic kidney disease (CKD) or diabetes mellitus (DM). For the serum samples, the isotope ratios are lower for the CKD (δ 44 Ca/ 42 Ca serum = 0.16 ± 0.11‰; 2SD, n = 6) and the DM (δ 44 Ca/ 42 Ca serum = -0.11 ± 0.25‰; 2SD, n = 7) rats than that for the control rats (δ 44 Ca/ 42 Ca serum = 0.25 ± 0.04‰; 2SD, n = 7). Bone samples from two distinct positions of 20 rats in total, namely, the center and proximal parts of the tibial diaphysis, are subject to Ca isotope analysis. The resulting δ 44 Ca/ 42 Ca values for the bone of the proximal part are about 0.3‰ lower than that for the serum samples from the same rats. The larger isotope fractionations between the serum and bone are consistent with previously reported data for vertebrate animals (e.g., Skulan and DePaolo, 1999), which suggests the preferential incorporation of lighter Ca isotopes through bone formation. For the bones from the control and CKD rats, there were no differences in the δ 44 Ca/ 42 Ca values between the positions of the bone. In contrast, the δ 44 Ca/ 42 Ca values of the bone for the DM rats were different between the positions of the bone. Due to the lower bone turnover rate for the DM rats, the δ 44 Ca/ 42 Ca for the middle of the diaphysis can reflect the Ca isotopes in the bone formed prior to the progression of DM states. Thus, the resulting δ 44 Ca/ 42 Ca values show a clear correlation with bone mineral density (BMD). This can be due to the release of isotopically lighter Ca from the bone to the serum. In the present study, our data demonstrate that the δ 44 Ca/ 42 Ca value for serum can be used as a new biomarker for evaluating changes in bone turnover rate, followed by changes in bone volume.

  5. Diabetic Kidney Disease: A Syndrome Rather Than a Single Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccoli, Giorgina B; Grassi, Giorgio; Cabiddu, Gianfranca; Nazha, Marta; Roggero, Simona; Capizzi, Irene; De Pascale, Agostino; Priola, Adriano M; Di Vico, Cristina; Maxia, Stefania; Loi, Valentina; Asunis, Anna M; Pani, Antonello; Veltri, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    The term "diabetic kidney" has recently been proposed to encompass the various lesions, involving all kidney structures that characterize protean kidney damage in patients with diabetes. While glomerular diseases may follow the stepwise progression that was described several decades ago, the tenet that proteinuria identifies diabetic nephropathy is disputed today and should be limited to glomerular lesions. Improvements in glycemic control may have contributed to a decrease in the prevalence of glomerular lesions, initially described as hallmarks of diabetic nephropathy, and revealed other types of renal damage, mainly related to vasculature and interstitium, and these types usually present with little or no proteinuria. Whilst glomerular damage is the hallmark of microvascular lesions, ischemic nephropathies, renal infarction, and cholesterol emboli syndrome are the result of macrovascular involvement, and the presence of underlying renal damage sets the stage for acute infections and drug-induced kidney injuries. Impairment of the phagocytic response can cause severe and unusual forms of acute and chronic pyelonephritis. It is thus concluded that screening for albuminuria, which is useful for detecting "glomerular diabetic nephropathy", does not identify all potential nephropathies in diabetes patients. As diabetes is a risk factor for all forms of kidney disease, diagnosis in diabetic patients should include the same combination of biochemical, clinical, and imaging tests as employed in non-diabetic subjects, but with the specific consideration that chronic kidney disease (CKD) may develop more rapidly and severely in diabetic patients.

  6. 75 FR 77649 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-13

    ... Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Adherence Studies in Adolescents with Chronic Diseases: Kidney, Urologic or Diabetes (R01). Date: January 10, 2011. Time: 8 a.m. to... Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the...

  7. Chronic Kidney Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... changes, vitamins, minerals, and medications to help with growth and to prevent bone disease. Sometimes unhealthy kidneys have problems producing a hormone that helps make red blood cells, the cells ...

  8. Doubling of serum creatinine and the risk of cardiovascular outcomes in patients with chronic kidney disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus: a cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schneider C

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Cornelia Schneider,1,2 Blai Coll,3 Susan S Jick,4 Christoph R Meier1,2,4 1Basel Pharmacoepidemiology Unit, Division of Clinical Pharmacy and Epidemiology, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland; 2Hospital Pharmacy, University Hospital Basel, Basel, Switzerland; 3Renal Development, AbbVie, North Chicago, IL, USA; 4Boston Collaborative Drug Surveillance Program, Boston University School of Public Health, MA, USA Background: Doubling of serum creatinine is often used as a marker for worsening kidney function in nephrology trials. Most people with chronic kidney disease die of other causes before reaching end-stage renal disease. We were interested in the association between doubling of serum creatinine and the risk of a first-time diagnosis of angina pectoris, congestive heart failure (CHF, myocardial infarction (MI, stroke, or transient ischemic attack in patients with chronic kidney disease and with diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods: We identified all adult patients registered in the “Clinical Practice Research Datalink” between 2002 and 2011 with incident chronic kidney disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus and did a cohort study with a Cox proportional hazard analysis. Results: We identified in total 27,811 patients, 693 developed angina pectoris, 1,069 CHF, 508 MI, 970 stroke, and 578 transient ischemic attacks. Patients whose serum creatinine doubled during follow-up had increased risks of CHF (hazard ratio [HR] 2.98, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.27–3.89, MI (HR 2.53, 95% CI 1.62–3.96, and stroke (HR 1.93, 95% CI 1.38–2.69, as compared with patients whose serum creatinine did not double. The relative risks of angina pectoris (HR 1.18, 95% CI 0.66–2.10 or a transient ischemic attack (HR 1.32, 95% CI 0.78–2.22 were similar in both groups. Conclusion: Diabetic patients with a doubling of serum creatinine were at an increased risk of CHF, MI, or stroke, compared with diabetic

  9. Chronic kidney disease in Nigeria: primary care physicians must ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chronic Kidney disease (CKD) is one of the world's major public health problems and the prevalence of Kidney failure is rising steadily. ... Only thirty percent (30%) of the doctors tested for proteinuria in thirty nine percent (39%) of those they were treating for Diabetes Mellitus and only thirty five percent (35%) of the doctors ...

  10. Protein Diet Restriction Slows Chronic Kidney Disease Progression in Non-Diabetic and in Type 1 Diabetic Patients, but Not in Type 2 Diabetic Patients: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Using Glomerular Filtration Rate as a Surrogate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rughooputh, Mahesh Shumsher; Zeng, Rui; Yao, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Studies, including various meta-analyses, on the effect of Protein Diet Restriction on Glomerular Filtration Rate (GFR) in Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) have reported conflicting results. In this paper, we have provided an update on the evidence available on this topic. We have investigated the reasons why the effect has been inconsistent across studies. We have also compared the effect on GFR in various subgroups including type 1 diabetics, type 2 diabetics and non-diabetics. We searched for Randomized Controlled Trials on this intervention from MEDLINE, EMBASE, and other information sources. The PRISMA guidelines, as well as recommended meta-analysis practices were followed in the selection process, analysis and reporting of our findings. The effect estimate used was the change in mean GFR. Heterogeneity across the considered studies was explored using both subgroup analyses and meta-regression. Quality assessment was done using the Cochrane risk of bias tool and sensitivity analyses. 15 randomized controlled trials, including 1965 subjects, were analyzed. The pooled effect size, as assessed using random-effects model, for all the 15 studies was -0.95 ml/min/1.73m2/year (95% CI: -1.79, -0.11), with a significant p value of 0.03. The combined effect estimate for the non-diabetic and type 1 diabetic studies was -1.50 ml/min/1.73m2/year (95% CI: -2.73, -0.26) with p value of 0.02. The effect estimate for the type 2 diabetic group was -0.17 ml/min/1.73m2/year (95% CI: -1.88, 1.55) with p value of 0.85. There was significant heterogeneity across the included studies (I2 = 74%, p value for Q diabetic subjects, the number of subjects and overall compliance level to diet prescribed. Our findings suggest that protein diet restriction slows chronic renal disease progression in non-diabetic and in type 1 diabetic patients, but not in type 2 diabetic patients.

  11. Prognostic value of proteinuria and glomerular filtration rate on Taiwanese patients with diabetes mellitus and advanced chronic kidney disease: a single center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ping-Min; Wada, Takashi; Chiang, Chih-Kang

    2017-04-01

    Several risk factors were associated with poor outcomes in diabetic patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, few studies addressed the prognostic implications of these factors in advanced CKD. Our study aimed to provide more evidence for risk factor stratification of diabetic patients with advanced CKD. A total of 447 diabetic patients with advanced CKD, age of 18-80, who visited the nephrology out-patient clinic were enrolled. All patients were in stage 3B-5 CKD. The primary outcomes included long-term renal replacement therapy and mortality. The occurrence of cardiovascular events was also analyzed as secondary outcome. Multivariate Cox regression models were used to address each risk factor in this cohort. We also used this cohort to evaluate the validity of the modified diabetic nephropathy score. Patients with lower estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) were associated with higher degree of proteinuria. In the multivariate Cox regression model, eGFR and the degree of proteinuria were both strong outcome predictors. The effects of glycosylated hemoglobin and blood pressure in this advanced CKD cohort were minimal. Elder patients with advanced CKD had a higher mortality rate, but commenced less renal replacement therapy. Applying these indicator analyses, we proposed a modified diabetic nephropathy score for outcome prediction. Our analysis demonstrated the impact of eGFR and proteinuria in the advanced CKD group. Indicators in early CKD possessed a different prognostic profile in this advanced CKD cohort, therefore, necessitating a modified scoring system.

  12. Gum Acacia Improves Renal Function and Ameliorates Systemic Inflammation, Oxidative and Nitrosative Stress in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetes in Rats with Adenine-Induced Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Al Za’abi

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The effect of treatment with gum acacia (GA, a prebiotic shown previously to ameliorate chronic kidney disease (CKD, in diabetic and non – diabetic rats with adenine – induced CKD has been investigated using several conventional and novel physiological, biochemical, and histopathological parameters. Methods: Diabetes mellitus was induced in rats by a single injection of streptozotocin (STZ. Diabetic and non – diabetic rats were randomly divided into several groups, and given either normal food or food mixed with adenine (0.25% w/w, for five weeks to induce CKD. Some of these groups were also concomitantly treated orally with GA in the drinking water (15% w/w. Results: Rats fed adenine alone exhibited physiological (decreased body weight, increased food and water intake and urine output, biochemical (increase in urinary albumin/creatinine ratio, plasma urea and, creatinine, indoxyl sulfate and phosphorus, inflammatory biomarkers (increased in neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, transforming growth factor beta -1, tumor necrosis factor alpha, adiponectin, cystatin C and interleukin-1β, oxidative biomarkers (8-isoprostane, 8 -hydroxy -2-deoxy guanosine, nitrosative stress biomarkers (nitrite and nitrate and histopathological (increase in tubular necrosis and fibrosis signs of CKD. STZ - induced diabetes alone worsened most of the renal function tests measured. Administration of adenine in STZ – diabetic rats further worsened the renal damage induced by adenine alone. GA significantly ameliorated the renal actions of adenine and STZ, given either singly or in combination, especially with regards to the histopathological damage. Conclusion: GA is a useful dietary agent in attenuating the progression of CKD in rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes.

  13. Diabetes and Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... women who are pregnant. Develop or maintain healthy lifestyle habits Healthy lifestyle habits can help you reach ... Grants & Grant History Research Resources Research at NIDDK Technology Advancement & Transfer Meetings & Workshops Health Information Diabetes Digestive ...

  14. Chronic kidney disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CKD in terms of the ever-increasing number of dialysis patients, often because of diabetes and, in our black ... The approximate annual cost of dialysis is R200 000 per patient and that of transplantation R300 000 in ... and its threat to the national health system, the objectives were to set up projects to prevent CKD, educate.

  15. Diabetes mellitus as a risk factor for incident chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease in women compared with men: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yanjue; Cai, Rongrong; Sun, Jie; Dong, Xue; Huang, Rong; Tian, Sai; Wang, Shaohua

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a strong risk factor for chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease. Whether sex differences in chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease incidence exist among diabetic patients remains unclear. This systematic review and meta-analysis was conducted to evaluate the relative effect of diabetes on chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease risk in women compared with men. We systematically searched Embase, PubMed, and the Cochrane Library for both cohort and case-control studies until October 2015. Studies were selected if they reported a sex-specific relationship between diabetes mellitus and chronic kidney disease or end-stage renal disease. We generated pooled estimates across studies using random-effects meta-analysis after log transformation with inverse variance weighting. Ten studies with data from more than 5 million participants were included. The pooled adjusted risk ratio of chronic kidney disease associated with diabetes mellitus was 3.34 (95 % CI 2.27, 4.93) in women and 2.84 (95 % CI 1.73, 4.68) in men. The data showed no difference in diabetes-related chronic kidney disease risk between the sexes (pooled adjusted women-to-men relative risk ratio was 1.14 [95 % CI 0.97, 1.34]) except for end-stage renal disease-the pooled adjusted women-to men relative risk ratio was 1.38 (95 % CI 1.22, 1.55; p = 0.114, I² = 38.1 %). The study found no evidence of a sex difference in the association between diabetes mellitus and chronic kidney disease. However, the excess risk for end-stage renal disease was higher in women with diabetes than in men with the same condition, from which we assume that the female gender could accelerate the disease progression. Further studies are needed to support this notion and elucidate the underlying mechanisms.

  16. Lower blood glucose and variability are associated with earlier recovery from renal injury caused by episodic urinary tract infection in advanced type 2 diabetic chronic kidney disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping-Fang Chiu

    Full Text Available In our previous study, type 2 diabetic chronic kidney disease (CKD patients with glomerular filtration rates of 9 days, Group B groups. The differences in the continuous and categorical variables of the two groups were assessed separately. The mean glucose levels and their variability (using the standard deviation and the coefficient of standard deviation were compared at the fasting, midday pre-meal, evening pre-meal, and evening post-meal time points during hospitalization. We have organized the manuscript in a manner compliant with the STROBE (Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology statement.Acute kidney injury occurred within the two groups (p = 0.007 and p = 0.001, respectively. The early-morning blood glucose levels (149.7±44.0 mg/dL and average blood glucose levels (185.6±52.0 mg/dL were better in Group A (p = 0.01, p = 0.02. Group A patients also had lower glucose variability than Group B at the different time points (p<0.05. Group A also had earlier renal recovery. More relevant pathogens were identified from blood in Group B (p = 0.038.Early-morning fasting and mean blood glucose levels and their variability can be good indicators of severe infection and predictors of renal outcome in type 2 diabetic patients with CKD and UTI.

  17. [Simultaneous kidney and pancreas transplantation (SKPT) in patients with type 1 diabetes and chronic renal failure: experience in 12 patients in Chile].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alba, Andrea; Morales, Jorge; Ferrario, Mario; Zehnder, Carlos; Aguiló, Jorge; Zavala, Carlos; Herzog, Cristina; Calabran, Lorena; Contreras, Luis; Espinoza, Ricardo; Buckel, Erwin; Fierro, Juan Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Simultaneous kidney and pancreas transplantation (SKPT) is the best alternative for end stage renal disease among patients with insulin dependent diabetes mellitus. To report our experience with SKPT. Retrospective analysis of 12 recipients of SKPT transplanted in one center starting in 1994, with a mean follow-up period of 6.8 years (2-15). Eleven of 12 recipients were in chronic hemodialysis before SKPT. Mean A, B, DR and HLA mismatch was 4.3. Mean preformed anti HLA antibodies was 3.3 %. Mean cold ischemia times for pancreas and kidney were 6 and 10 hours, respectively. In the first eight cases, the pancreas was drained to the bladder, and in the last four, an enteric drainage was performed. Eleven recipients were induced with antibodies, and maintenance immunosuppression consisted of cyclosporin or tacrolimus plus an antiproliferative agent. Ten year patient survival was 70%. Pancreas and kidney survival, defined by insulin and dialysis independence, were 72 and 73% respectively. Fifty percent of recipients experienced acute graft rejection (cellular or humoral), with good response to treatment except in one case. This experience shows that SKPT is associated with an excellent patient survival associated to insulin and dialysis independence in 70% of patients at 10 years.

  18. Identifying health service barriers in the management of co-morbid diabetes and chronic kidney disease in primary care: a mixed-methods exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Clement; Teede, Helena; Ilic, Dragan; Russell, Grant; Murphy, Kerry; Usherwood, Timothy; Ranasinha, Sanjeeva; Zoungas, Sophia

    2016-10-01

    Co-morbid diabetes and chronic kidney disease (CKD) are common in primary care but health care can be suboptimal. In this multi-centre mixed-methods study, we investigated GPs' perspectives on health service barriers in managing diabetes and CKD as an initial step towards health care improvement. Four focus groups were conducted among GPs in Australia's two largest cities. Transcripts underwent content analysis to inform development of a survey exploring health service barriers. This survey was then emailed/mailed to 840 GPs. Statistical analyses were performed using STATA v2.1. Responses were received from 13.7% of GPs (n = 115), mean (±SD) age 55.3 (10.1) years and mean duration of practice 26.6 (10.6). The majority (88.4%) reported wanting to manage diabetes and CKD in primary care with specialist assistance. However, 34.8% were unclear about the definition of CKD with 73.2% wanting more education. Access to specialist services was problematic with 39.3% and 28.2% reporting the process of referring patients to diabetes or CKD services, respectively, as hard. Coordination of care was also a problem with 35.6% unclear about each health care provider's role, 50.5% believing patients faced difficulties due to poor coordination across providers and 51.6% reporting duplication of tests. GPs expressed a clear interest in being the principal health care providers for patients with co-morbid diabetes and CKD. Supporting GPs and health care improvement focusing on overcoming reported barriers such as inadequate knowledge about CKD, access to specialist services and coordination of care may improve outcomes for people with co-morbid diabetes and CKD. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Predictors of fatal and nonfatal cardiovascular events in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, chronic kidney disease, and anemia : An analysis of the Trial to Reduce cardiovascular Events with Aranesp (darbepoetin-alfa) Therapy (TREAT)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McMurray, John J. V.; Uno, Hajime; Jarolim, Petr; Desai, Akshay S.; de Zeeuw, Dick; Eckardt, Kai-Uwe; Ivanovich, Peter; Levey, Andrew S.; Lewis, Eldrin F.; McGill, Janet B.; Parfrey, Patrick; Parving, Hans-Henrik; Toto, Robert M.; Solomon, Scott D.; Pfeffer, Marc A.

    2011-01-01

    Aims This study aims to examine predictors of cardiovascular mortality and morbidity in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Individuals with the triad of diabetes, CKD, and anemia represent a significant proportion of patients with cardiovascular disease and are at particularly high risk for

  20. Sexual Dysfunction in Women with Diabetic Kidney

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ersilia Satta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Few studies address alteration of sexual function in women with diabetes and chronic kidney disease (CKD. Quality of life surveys suggest that discussion of sexual function and other reproductive issues are of psychosocial assessment and that education on sexual function in the setting of chronic diseases such as diabetes and CKD is widely needed. Pharmacologic therapy with estrogen/progesterone and androgens along with glycemic control, correction of anemia, ensuring adequate dialysis delivery, and treatment of underlying depression are important. Changes in lifestyle such as smoking cessation, strength training, and aerobic exercises may decrease depression, enhance body image, and have positive impacts on sexuality. Many hormonal abnormalities which occur in women with diabetes and CKD who suffer from chronic anovulation and lack of progesterone secretion may be treated with oral progesterone at the end of each menstrual cycle to restore menstrual cycles. Hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD is the most common sexual problem reported by women with diabetes and CKD. Sexual function can be assessed in women, using the 9-item Female Sexual Function Index, questionnaire, or 19 items. It is important for nephrologists and physicians to incorporate assessment of sexual function into the routine evaluation protocols.

  1. Adherence and Outcomes of the Low and Very Low Protein Diets in Chronic Diabetic Kidney Disease – A Debate that Needs Consensus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teodoru Ileana

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Since the Brenner`s theory of the „workload” in the remnant nephrons, due to the largely available access to the dialysis facilities, many patients with advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD were given low-protein diets (LPDs apparently with great success. Four main diets are today accepted for achieving a balanced intake of 0.6 g protein/kg/day diet and together with a very low-protein diet of 0.3 g protein/kg/day with keto-analogues and amino-acids supplementation, known as keto-diet, are recommended in specific situations. Still, some questions have debatable answers and are waiting for more conclusive studies: are low and very low-protein diets (VLPDs really effective in diabetic CKD?; which LPD should be given? and what strategy should be used in order to get maximum compliance and best outcomes?

  2. Secondary hyperparathyroidism prevalence and profile, between diabetic and non-diabetic patients with stage 3 to 4 chronic kidney disease attended in internal medicine wards. MiPTH study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arévalo-Lorido, José Carlos; Carretero-Gómez, Juana; García-Sánchez, Francisco; Maciá-Botejara, Enrique; Ramiro-Lozano, José Manuel; Masero-Carretero, Antonio; Robles, Nicolás Roberto; Bureo-Dacal, Juan Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPTH) is a leading cause of renal osteodystrophy, and an independent risk factor for all-cause and cardiovascular mortality. Our aim is to establish differences in prevalence and profile of SHPTH, regarding diabetics or non-diabetics with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Cross-sectional multicenter study which included patients with stages 3 to 4 CKD. SHPTH was considered when the intact PTH levels (iPTH) were equal or higher than 70pg/ml. We divided the sample into two groups (diabetics and non-diabetics). We used robust statistical methods. 409 patients (214 diabetics) were studied. HPTH was found in 60.4% of diabetics vs 65% of non-diabetics (P=0.42). Diabetics with HPTH were younger (79.5 vs 82.3 years-old, P=0.005), and had more hypertension (P=0.0014), dyslipidemia (P=0.0001) and comorbidities. In multivariate analysis, we found a significant relationship in case of diabetics, with age (OR: 1.04, 95%CI 1.005-1.09 P=0.02 ), and with statins treatment (OR 2.3, 95%CI 1.17-4.54, P=0.01). The prevalence of SHPTH between the groups was similar, however, diabetics had more presence of hypertension and dyslipidemia, and SHPTH in this case was also related with moderate microalbuminuria and lower levels of vitamin D. An association with statins was also found in this group. Copyright © 2016 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Prognostic significance of stress myocardial ECG-gated perfusion imaging in asymptomatic patients with diabetic chronic kidney disease on initiation of haemodialysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Momose, Mitsuru; Kondo, Chisato; Kobayashi, Hideki; Kusakabe, Kiyoko [Tokyo Women' s Medical University, School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Babazono, Tetsuya [Tokyo Women' s Medical University, School of Medicine, Diabetes Centre, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Nakajima, Takatomo [Tokyo Women' s Medical University, School of Medicine, Department of Cardiology, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo (Japan)

    2009-08-15

    Diabetic patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) frequently develop cardiac events within several years of the initiation of haemodialysis. The present study assesses the prognostic significance of stress myocardial ECG-gated perfusion imaging (MPI) in patients with diabetic CKD requiring haemodialysis. Fifty-five asymptomatic patients with diabetic stage V CKD and no history of heart disease scheduled to start haemodialysis were enrolled in this study (56{+-}11 years old; 49 with type 2 diabetes mellitus). All patients underwent {sup 201}Tl stress ECG-gated MPI 1 month before or after the initiation of haemodialysis to assess myocardial involvement. We evaluated SPECT images using 17-segment defect scores graded on a 5-point scale, summed stress score (SSS) and summed difference scores (SDS). The patients were followed up for at least 2 years (42{+-}15 months) to determine coronary intervention (CI) and heart failure (HF) as soft events and acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and all causes of deaths as hard events. The frequencies of myocardial ischaemia, resting perfusion defects, low ejection fraction and left ventricular (LV) dilatation were 24,20,29 and 49%, respectively. Ten events (18%) developed during the follow-up period including four CI, one HF, one AMI and four sudden deaths. Multivariate Cox analysis selected SDS (p=0.0011) and haemoglobin A{sub 1c} (HbA{sub 1c}) (p=0.0076) as independent prognostic indicators for all events. Myocardial ischaemia, in addition to glycaemic control, is a strong prognostic marker for asymptomatic patients with diabetic CKD who are scheduled to start haemodialysis. Stress MPI is highly recommended for the management and therapeutic stratification of such patients. (orig.)

  4. NAFLD and Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcuccilli, Morgan; Chonchol, Michel

    2016-04-14

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of chronic liver disease in developed countries and it is now considered a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Evidence linking NAFLD to the development and progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is emerging as a popular area of scientific interest. The rise in simultaneous liver-kidney transplantation as well as the significant cost associated with the presence of chronic kidney disease in the NAFLD population make this entity a worthwhile target for screening and therapeutic intervention. While several cross-sectional and case control studies have been published to substantiate these theories, very little data exists on the underlying cause of NAFLD and CKD. In this review, we will discuss the most recent publications on the diagnosis of NAFLD as well new evidence regarding the pathophysiology of NAFLD and CKD as an inflammatory disorder. These mechanisms include the role of obesity, the renin-angiotensin system, and dysregulation of fructose metabolism and lipogenesis in the development of both disorders. Further investigation of these pathways may lead to novel therapies that aim to target the NAFLD and CKD. However, more prospective studies that include information on both renal and liver histology will be necessary in order to understand the relationship between these diseases.

  5. NAFLD and Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgan Marcuccilli

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is the most common cause of chronic liver disease in developed countries and it is now considered a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Evidence linking NAFLD to the development and progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD is emerging as a popular area of scientific interest. The rise in simultaneous liver-kidney transplantation as well as the significant cost associated with the presence of chronic kidney disease in the NAFLD population make this entity a worthwhile target for screening and therapeutic intervention. While several cross-sectional and case control studies have been published to substantiate these theories, very little data exists on the underlying cause of NAFLD and CKD. In this review, we will discuss the most recent publications on the diagnosis of NAFLD as well new evidence regarding the pathophysiology of NAFLD and CKD as an inflammatory disorder. These mechanisms include the role of obesity, the renin-angiotensin system, and dysregulation of fructose metabolism and lipogenesis in the development of both disorders. Further investigation of these pathways may lead to novel therapies that aim to target the NAFLD and CKD. However, more prospective studies that include information on both renal and liver histology will be necessary in order to understand the relationship between these diseases.

  6. Plasma concentrations of extracellular matrix protein fibulin-1 are related to cardiovascular risk markers in chronic kidney disease and diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scholze, Alexandra; Bladbjerg, Else-Marie; Sidelmann, Johannes J

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Fibulin-1 is one of a few extracellular matrix proteins present in blood in high concentrations. We aimed to define the relationship between plasma fibulin-1 levels and risk markers of cardiovascular disease. METHODS: Plasma fibulin-1 was determined in subjects with chronic...... to determine central hemodynamic and arterial stiffness indices. RESULTS: We observed a positive correlation of fibulin-1 levels with age (r = 0.38; p = 0.033), glycated hemoglobin (r = 0.80; p = 0.003), creatinine (r = 0.35; p = 0.045), and fibrinogen (r = 0.39; p = 0.027). Glomerular filtration rate...... and fibulin-1 were inversely correlated (r = -0.57; p = 0.022). There was a positive correlation between fibulin-1 and central pulse pressure (r = 0.44; p = 0.011) and central augmentation pressure (r = 0.55; p = 0.001). In a multivariable regression model, diabetes, creatinine, fibrinogen and central...

  7. Chronic kidney disease and 10-year risk of cardiovascular death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzmann, Martin J; Carlsson, Axel C; Hammar, Niklas; Ivert, Torbjörn; Walldius, Göran; Jungner, Ingmar; Wändell, Per; Ärnlöv, Johan

    2016-07-01

    In recent clinical guidelines, individuals with chronic kidney disease are considered to have a similar 10-year absolute risk of cardiovascular death as individuals with diabetes or established cardiovascular disease. There is limited evidence to support this claim. We investigated the 10-year risk for cardiovascular death in individuals with moderate or severe chronic kidney disease (glomerular filtration rate of 30-60 or disease. The inclusion criteria, exposure, study outcome and follow-up period adhered strictly to the definitions of the European Society of Cardiology guidelines. The absolute 10-year risk of cardiovascular death was 3.9% and 14.0% in individuals with moderate and severe chronic kidney disease, respectively, but was substantially lower in women and in younger individuals. The risk in individuals with prevalent diabetes and cardiovascular disease was approximately two and three times higher compared to the risk estimate for moderate chronic kidney disease (hazard ratio (HR) 4.1, 95% confidence interval (CI) 3.8-4.5 and HR 6.2, 95% CI 5.7-6.7 vs. HR 2.3 95% CI 2.0-2.6, respectively) while the risk for individuals with severe chronic kidney disease appeared more congruent to that of diabetes and cardiovascular disease (HR 5.5, 95% CI 3.3-8.9). Although moderate chronic kidney disease is an independent predictor for an increased 10-year risk of cardiovascular death, only those with severe chronic kidney disease had similar risk to those with diabetes or cardiovascular disease. © The European Society of Cardiology 2015.

  8. Kidney Stones and the Risk for Chronic Kidney Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Rule, Andrew D.; Bergstralh, Eric J.; Melton, L. Joseph; Li, Xujian; Weaver, Amy L.; Lieske, John C.

    2009-01-01

    Background and objectives: Kidney stones lead to chronic kidney disease (CKD) in people with rare hereditary disorders (e.g., primary hyperoxaluria, cystinuria), but it is unknown whether kidney stones are an important risk factor for CKD in the general population.

  9. Lower blood glucose and variability are associated with earlier recovery from renal injury caused by episodic urinary tract infection in advanced type 2 diabetic chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Ping-Fang; Wu, Chia-Lin; Huang, Ching-Hui; Liou, Hung-Hsiang; Chang, Chirn-Bin; Chang, Horng-Rong; Chang, Chia-Chu

    2014-01-01

    In our previous study, type 2 diabetic chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients with glomerular filtration rates of 9 days, Group B) groups. The differences in the continuous and categorical variables of the two groups were assessed separately. The mean glucose levels and their variability (using the standard deviation and the coefficient of standard deviation) were compared at the fasting, midday pre-meal, evening pre-meal, and evening post-meal time points during hospitalization. We have organized the manuscript in a manner compliant with the STROBE (Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology) statement. Acute kidney injury occurred within the two groups (p = 0.007 and p = 0.001, respectively). The early-morning blood glucose levels (149.7±44.0 mg/dL) and average blood glucose levels (185.6±52.0 mg/dL) were better in Group A (p = 0.01, p = 0.02). Group A patients also had lower glucose variability than Group B at the different time points (pdiabetic patients with CKD and UTI.

  10. Chronic Kidney Disease in Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koratala, Abhilash; Bhattacharya, Deepti; Kazory, Amir

    2017-09-01

    With the increasing prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) worldwide, the number of pregnant women with various degrees of renal dysfunction is expected to increase. There is a bidirectional relation between CKD and pregnancy in which renal dysfunction negatively affects pregnancy outcomes, and the pregnancy can have a deleterious impact on various aspects of kidney disease. It has been shown that even mild renal dysfunction can increase considerably the risk of adverse maternal and fetal outcomes. Moreover, data suggest that a history of recovery from acute kidney injury is associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. In addition to kidney dysfunction, maternal hypertension and proteinuria predispose women to negative outcomes and are important factors to consider in preconception counseling and the process of risk stratification. In this review, we provide an overview of the physiologic renal changes during pregnancy as well as available data regarding CKD and pregnancy outcomes. We also highlight the important management strategies in women with certain selected renal conditions that are seen commonly during the childbearing years. We call for future research on underexplored areas such as the concept of renal functional reserve to develop a potential clinical tool for prognostication and risk stratification of women at higher risk for complications during pregnancy.

  11. Ways of promoting health to patients with diabetes and chronic kidney disease from a nursing perspective in Vietnam: A phenomenographic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lotta Pham

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Health promotion plays an important role in the management of diabetes and chronic kidney disease, especially when the prevalence of the disease is rising in Vietnam. Nurses have been identified to be the front figure in health promotion; however, little is written about how nurses in Vietnam work with these issues. Therefore, the aim of this study was to describe nurses’ conceptions about how health is promoted, with special focus on physically activity, for patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM and/or end-stage renal disease (ESRD. Individual interviews were done with 25 nurses working at two major hospitals in Hanoi, Vietnam. A phenomenographic approach was used to analyse the interviews. Nurses described how creating positive relationships and supporting patients to take part in their social context promoted health. Health was also promoted by educating patients and relatives about health and disease and by supporting patients to be physically active. The findings indicate that the Vietnamese nursing knowledge about health promotion needs to be gathered, and health promotion needs to be further integrated in the education. Further research is necessary to examine patients’ knowledge and attitudes about health and the efficiency of various health-promoting strategies in the Vietnamese context.

  12. Potential implications of the choice among three alternative treatment targets for apolipoprotein B100 in the management of patients with type 2 diabetes and chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boronat, Mauro; García-Cantón, César; López-Ríos, Laura; Quevedo, Virginia; Lorenzo, Dionisio L; Batista, Fátima; Riaño, Marta; Nóvoa, Francisco J

    2014-01-01

    This study analyses discordance rates between attainment of therapeutic goals for apolipoprotein B100 (apoB) and both low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) and non-high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (non-HDL-C) in a sample of 152 patients with type 2 diabetes and chronic kidney disease from Gran Canaria (Spain), using treatment targets recommended by the American Diabetes Association/American College of Cardiology (ADA/ACC), the European Society of Cardiology/European Atherosclerosis Society (ESC/EAS) and by a Spanish population-based study. Among subjects with LDL-C levels at therapeutic goal, apoB was above target in 16.3% (ADA/ACC), 6.5% (ESC/EAS) and 39.1% (population-based criteria), and among subjects with non-HDL-C levels at therapeutic goal, apoB was above target in 10.5% (ADA/ACC), 1.2% (ESC/EAS) and 29.6% (population-based criteria). These findings show that clinical management would be very differently altered depending on the criteria used to set treatment targets for apoB. Cut-off points derived from population data identify a greater number of subjects suitable for a more intensive lipid-lowering therapy.

  13. Metformin in chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heaf, James

    2014-01-01

    Metformin has traditionally been regarded as contraindicated in chronic kidney disease (CKD), though guidelines in recent years have been relaxed to permit therapy if the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is > 30 mL/min. The main problem is the perceived risk of lactic acidosis (LA). Epidemiological...... reduction, including weight loss, which are beneficial to patients. The risk of death and cardiovascular disease is reduced by about a third in non-CKD patients. Since metformin intoxication undoubtedly causes LA, and metformin is renally excreted, inappropriate dosage of metformin will increase the risk...

  14. Does treating obesity stabilize chronic kidney disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atray Naveen K

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obesity is a growing health issue in the Western world. Obesity, as part of the metabolic syndrome adds to the morbidity and mortality. The incidence of diabetes and hypertension, two primary etiological factors for chronic renal failure, is significantly higher with obesity. We report a case with morbid obesity whose renal function was stabilized with aggressive management of his obesity. Case report A 43-year old morbidly obese Caucasian male was referred for evaluation of his chronic renal failure. He had been hypertensive with well controlled blood pressure with a body mass index of 46 and a baseline serum creatinine of 4.3 mg/dl (estimated glomerular filtration rate of 16 ml/min. He had failed all conservative attempts at weight reduction and hence was referred for a gastric by-pass surgery. Following the bariatric surgery he had approximately 90 lbs. weight loss over 8-months and his serum creatinine stabilized to 4.0 mg/dl. Conclusion Obesity appears to be an independent risk factor for renal failure. Targeting obesity is beneficial not only for better control of hypertension and diabetes, but also possibly helps stabilization of chronic kidney failure.

  15. Chronic Kidney Disease in Police Forces Households in Khartoum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: In the Police Forces Hypertension, Diabetes, Renal Insufficiency and Thyroid Derangement (HyDRIT) pilot study we explored the prevalence, risk factors, awareness, treatment adequacy and complications of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and other non-communicable diseases among adult Police Forces ...

  16. Prevalence and correlates of chronic kidney disease among civil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-01-31

    Jan 31, 2014 ... Introduction: Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has become a public health problem with rising incidence and prevalence ... Conclusion: The prevalence of CKD among Nigerian civil servants was fairly high and was associated with advancing ... including Nigeria, hypertension (HTN) and diabetes mellitus.

  17. Adherence of adult Chronic Kidney Disease patients with regard to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) has become a major health problem as a result of complicated interrelationships with diabetes mellitus, hypertension and other associated diseases. Effective management of CKD depends on patient's adherence to their dialysis plan, medications, dietary and fluid restrictions.

  18. Prevention of chronic kidney disease : The next step forward!

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, PE; Gansevoort, RT

    The incidence of end stage renal disease in patients who have not experienced a classic primary renal disease is dramatically increasing. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) in these patients is due to diabetes, mostly type 2, hypertension and generalised atherosclerosis. As these patients are frequently

  19. Reducing major risk factors for chronic kidney disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luyckx, Valerie A.; Tuttle, Katherine R.; Garcia-Garcia, Guillermo; Gharbi, Mohammed Benghanem; Heerspink, Hiddo J. L.; Johnson, David W.; Liu, Zhi-Hong; Massy, Ziad A.; Moe, Orson; Nelson, Robert G.; Sola, Laura; Wheeler, David C.; White, Sarah L.

    2017-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a global public health concern and a key determinant of poor health outcomes. While the burden of CKD is reasonably well defined in developed countries, increasing evidence indicates that the CKD burden may be even greater in developing countries. Diabetes,

  20. Low-Protein Diets in Diabetic Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) Patients: Are They Feasible and Worth the Effort?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccoli, Giorgina B; Ventrella, Federica; Capizzi, Irene; Vigotti, Federica N; Mongilardi, Elena; Grassi, Giorgio; Loi, Valentina; Cabiddu, Gianfranca; Avagnina, Paolo; Versino, Elisabetta

    2016-10-21

    Low-protein diets (LPDs) are often considered as contraindicated in diabetic patients, and are seldom studied. The aim of this observational study was to provide new data on this issue. It involved 149 diabetic and 300 non-diabetic patients who followed a LPD, with a personalized approach aimed at moderate protein restriction (0.6 g/day). Survival analysis was performed according to Kaplan-Meier, and multivariate analysis with Cox model. Diabetic versus non-diabetic patients were of similar age (median 70 years) and creatinine levels at the start of the diet (2.78 mg/dL vs. 2.80 mg/dL). There was higher prevalence of nephrotic proteinuria in diabetic patients (27.52% vs. 13.67%, p = 0.002) as well as comorbidity (median Charlson index 8 vs. 6 p = 0.002). Patient survival was lower in diabetic patients, but differences levelled off considering only cases with Charlson index > 7, the only relevant covariate in Cox analysis. Dialysis-free survival was superimposable in the setting of good compliance (Mitch formula: 0.47 g/kg/day in both groups): about 50% of the cases remained dialysis-free 2 years after the first finding of e-GFR (estimated glomerular filtration rate) patients with type 2 diabetes, higher proteinuria was associated with mortality and initiation of dialysis. In conclusion, moderately restricted LPDs allow similar results in diabetic and non non-diabetic patients with similar comorbidity.

  1. Chronic kidney disease in neurogenic bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Bong Mo; Oh, Dong-Jin; Choi, Moon Hee; Choi, Hye Min

    2018-03-01

    It was believed that neurogenic bladder (NB) might be a risk factor of chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, data are limited regarding the real incidence or risk of CKD in NB. In addition, serum creatinine (sCr), a classical marker of renal function, is not reliable in NB patients because they present muscle wasting due to disuse or denervation. The aim of the study was to estimate the prevalence of CKD in NB patients using serum Cystatin-C. Secondly, we aimed to identify the risk factors for CKD development in NB. This was a cross-sectional study in a public hospital, a specialized center for patients who were victims of industrial accidents. Serum Cystatin-C was checked at the regular laboratory test in the structured NB programme of the hospital, and 313 patients were included in the study. The overall prevalence of CKD, defined as estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) bladder volume, recurrent urinary tract infection, and proteinuria were significantly associated with CKD in the multivariable analysis. Chronic kidney disease prevalence was more than three times higher in NB patients than in the general population despite recent progress in the medical care of NB. Co-morbid diabetes, small bladder volume, recurrent urinary tract infection, and proteinuria seem to be the risk factors for CKD development in NB. © 2016 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  2. Nutrition for Advanced Chronic Kidney Disease in Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Chronic Kidney Disease in Adults Nutrition for Advanced Chronic Kidney Disease in Adults Why is nutrition important for someone with advanced chronic kidney disease? A person may prevent or delay some health ...

  3. Treatment of Chronic Kidney Diseases with Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shougang eZhuang

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Histone deacetylases (HDACs induce deacetylation of both histone and non-histone proteins and play a critical role in the modulation of physiological and pathological gene expression. Pharmacological inhibition of HDAC has been reported to attenuate progression of renal fibrogenesis in obstructed kidney and reduce cyst formation in polycystic kidney disease. HDAC inhibitors (HDACis are also able to ameliorate renal lesions in diabetes nephropathy, lupus nephritis, aristolochic acid nephropathy and transplant nephropathy. The beneficial effects of HDACis are associated with their anti-fibrosis, anti-inflammation, and immmunosuppressant effects. In this review, we summarize recent advances on the treatment of various chronic kidney diseases with HDACis in preclinical models.

  4. Skin manifestations of chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles-Mendez, J C; Vazquez-Martinez, O; Ocampo-Candiani, J

    2015-10-01

    Skin manifestations associated with chronic kidney disease are very common. Most of these conditions present in the end stages and may affect the patient's quality of life. Knowledge of these entities can contribute to establishing an accurate diagnosis and prognosis. Severe renal pruritus is associated with increased mortality and a poor prognosis. Nail exploration can provide clues about albumin and urea levels. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis is a preventable disease associated with gadolinium contrast. Comorbidities, such as diabetes mellitus and secondary hyperparathyroidism, can lead to acquired perforating dermatosis and calciphylaxis, respectively. Effective and innovative treatments are available for all of these conditions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  5. The relationship between chronic kidney function and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance and beta cell function in Korean adults with or without type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Gwang Seok; Kim, Sung Gil; Kim, Han Soo; Hwang, Eun Young; Lee, Jun Ho; Yoon, Hyun

    2017-12-28

    The present study was conducted to assess the relationship between chronic kidney disease (CKD) and the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and beta cell function (HOMA-B) in Korean adults with or without type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). This study included 5,188 adults aged 20 or older using the 2015 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES) data, which represents national data in Korea. A covariance test adjusted for covariates was performed for HOMA-IR and HOMA-B in relation to CKD. The present study has several key findings. First, in T2DM, HOMA-IR (p = 0.035) was higher in the CKD group than in the non-CKD group after adjusting for the related variables but HOMA-B (p = 0.141) was not significant. Second, in non-T2DM, HOMA-IR (p = 0.163) and HOMA-B (p = 0.658) were not associated with CKD after adjusting for the related variables (except age). However, when further adjusted for age, HOMA-IR (p = 0.020) and HOMA-B (p = 0.006) were higher in the CKD group than in the non-CKD group. In conclusion, insulin resistance was positively associated CKD with in Korean adults with or without T2DM. Beta cell function was positively associated CKD with in Korean adults without T2DM but not in Korean adults with T2DM.

  6. The Age-Specific Association of Waist Circumference and Risk of Chronic Kidney Disease in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Shandong, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingling Xu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To examine the association of three most common obesity measures including body mass index (BMI, waist circumference (WC, and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR with chronic kidney disease (CKD risk in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D. Design. Cross-sectional evaluation of the effect of anthropometric measures on CKD risk. Setting. Outpatient Department. Subjects. T2D patients who were treated between October 2012 and May 2013. Intervention. None. Main Outcome Measure. CKD risk. Results. On average, the patients had a mean age of 60.2 years, and 40% were males. CKD was present in 46% of all the patients. In multivariate logistic regression using the imputed data, higher WC was associated with greater odds of CKD (OR = 1.019, 95% CI = 1.002–1.006, P=0.030, but not BMI and WHR. Interestingly, we found that patients with very small WC seemed to have greater odds of CKD. We observed age-specific effect of WC such that the effect of WC on CKD risk is significant only in middle-aged T2D patients. Conclusion. Our study provides evidence for the association of WC with CKD in Chinese patients with T2D. T2D patients, especially middle-aged T2D patients, should reduce their WC to decrease CKD risk.

  7. Metabolic Syndrome without Diabetes or Hypertension Still Necessitates Early Screening for Chronic Kidney Disease: Information from a Chinese National Cross-Sectional Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daqing Hong

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome (MS is prevalent, with an increasing contribution to the incidence of chronic kidney disease (CKD. The study of the relationship between them is important. The CKD survey, a national cross-sectional study, provided a large database to accomplish this study. The study population were 41 131 adults from this survey between 2008 and 2009. CKD was defined as estimate glomerular filtration rate (eGFR less than 60 mL/min per 1.73 m2 or the presence of albuminuria. MS was diagnosed by National Cholesterol Education Program-Adult Treatment Panel III (ATPIII, ATPIII-modified or International Diabetes Federation (IDF criteria. Logistic regression model was applied to study the impact of MS or its components on CKD or its components. The age and sex standardized prevalence of MS by ATPIII, ATPIII-modified and IDF criteria was 11.77% (11.13%-12.40%, 21.51% (20.69%-22.34% and 16.67% (15.92-17.42% respectively. Multivariate logistic regression models showed that MS and its components were associated with higher CKD prevalence. The risk for CKD and its components increased with the number of MS components. After adjusting for hypertension and diabetes, the odds ratios of MS for CKD decreased, but remained significantly more than 1 between 1.16(95%CI 1.07-1.26 and 1.37 (95% CI 1.25-1.50 across the different models. Similar results were found with albuminuria, while for decreased eGFR, after adjusting for hypertension and diabetes, the odds ratios of MS and MS components (except elevated TG became insignificant. In conclusion, MS is prevalent and associated with a higher prevalence of CKD. Different MS components are associated with different risks for CKD, even after adjusting for hypertension and diabetes, which may mainly be contributed more by the increased risk for albuminuria than that for decreased eGFR. More attention must be paid to the population with MS, including those with elevated blood pressure and serum glucose.

  8. The impact of the quality of care and other factors on progression of chronic kidney disease in Thai patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A nationwide cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paithoon Sonthon

    Full Text Available The present study investigates the impact of quality of care (QoC and other factors on chronic kidney disease (CKD stage progression among Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM patients.This study employed a retrospective cohort from a nationwide Diabetes and Hypertension study involving 595 Thai hospitals. T2DM patients who were observed at least 2 times in the 3 years follow-up (between 2011-2013 were included in our study. Ordinal logistic mixed effect regression modeling was used to investigate the association between the QoC and other factors with CKD stage progression.After adjusting for covariates, we found that the achievement of the HbA1c clinical targets (≤7% was the only QoC indicator protective against the CKD stage progression (adjusted OR = 0.76; 95%CI = 0.59-0.98; p<0.05. In terms of other covariates, age, occupation, type of health insurance, region of residence, HDL-C, triglyceride, hypertension and insulin sensitizer were also strongly associated with CKD stage progression.This cohort study demonstrates the achievement of the HbA1c clinical target (≤7% is the only QoC indicator protective against progression of CKD stage. Neither of the other clinical targets (BP and LDL-C nor any process of care targets could be shown to be associated with CKD stage progression. Therefore, close monitoring of blood sugar control is important to slow CKD progression, but long-term prospective cohorts are needed to gain better insights into the impact of QoC indicators on CKD progression.

  9. Is TCF7L2 variant associated with non-diabetic chronic kidney disease progression? Results of a family-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Kiliś-Pstrusińska

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: It is assumed that genetic factors may play a significant role in CKD development. The aim of the study was to investigate the role of rs7903146 polymorphism in the TCF7L2 gene in development and progression of non-diabetic chronic kidney disease (CKD. Material/Methods: 109 children and young adults with CKD caused by primary glomerulopathy and tubulointerstitial nephropathy, stages 3-5, and their 218 biological parents with no renal dysfunction were included in the study. We tested the transmission of alleles of rs7903146 polymorphism in the TCF7L2 gene from heterozygous parents to offspring affected with CKD using the transmission/disequilibrium test. We also analysed whether rs7903146 polymorphism had any impact on the loss of glomerular filtration rate. Results: The rs7903146 polymorphism in TCF7L2 allele transmission from heterozygous parents to their affected children was not different from a random proportion expected for no association, in the whole group of subjects, and in the subgroups, depending on CKD aetiology. Lack of association between the analysed polymorphism and the loss of glomerular filtration rate was found in the total group of patients as well as in the subgroups, regarding the cause of CKD. Conclusions: This study found no association between rs7903146 polymorphism in the TCF7L2 gene and the increased risk for development of CKD caused by primary glomerulopathy and analysed tubulointerstitial nephropathy. The progression rate of CKD of non-diabetic aetiology does not depend on this polymorphism.

  10. Is TCF7L2 variant associated with non-diabetic chronic kidney disease progression? Results of a family-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Kiliś-Pstrusińska

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: It is assumed that genetic factors may play a significant role in CKD development. The aim of the study was to investigate the role of rs7903146 polymorphism in the TCF7L2 gene in development and progression of non-diabetic chronic kidney disease (CKD.Material/Methods: 109 children and young adults with CKD caused by primary glomerulopathy and tubulointerstitial nephropathy, stages 3-5, and their 218 biological parents with no renal dysfunction were included in the study. We tested the transmission of alleles of rs7903146 polymorphism in the TCF7L2 gene from heterozygous parents to offspring affected with CKD using the transmission/disequilibrium test. We also analysed whether rs7903146 polymorphism had any impact on the loss of glomerular filtration rate.Results: The rs7903146 polymorphism in TCF7L2 allele transmission from heterozygous parents to their affected children was not different from a random proportion expected for no association, in the whole group of subjects, and in the subgroups, depending on CKD aetiology. Lack of association between the analysed polymorphism and the loss of glomerular filtration rate was found in the total group of patients as well as in the subgroups, regarding the cause of CKD.Conclusions: This study found no association between rs7903146 polymorphism in the TCF7L2 gene and the increased risk for development of CKD caused by primary glomerulopathy and analysed tubulointerstitial nephropathy. The progression rate of CKD of non-diabetic aetiology does not depend on this polymorphism.

  11. Diabetic kidney disease: a report from an ADA Consensus Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuttle, Katherine R; Bakris, George L; Bilous, Rudolf W; Chiang, Jane L; de Boer, Ian H; Goldstein-Fuchs, Jordi; Hirsch, Irl B; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Narva, Andrew S; Navaneethan, Sankar D; Neumiller, Joshua J; Patel, Uptal D; Ratner, Robert E; Whaley-Connell, Adam T; Molitch, Mark E

    2014-10-01

    The incidence and prevalence of diabetes mellitus have grown significantly throughout the world, due primarily to the increase in type 2 diabetes. This overall increase in the number of people with diabetes has had a major impact on development of diabetic kidney disease (DKD), one of the most frequent complications of both types of diabetes. DKD is the leading cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD), accounting for approximately 50% of cases in the developed world. Although incidence rates for ESRD attributable to DKD have recently stabilized, these rates continue to rise in high-risk groups such as middle-aged African Americans, Native Americans, and Hispanics. The costs of care for people with DKD are extraordinarily high. In the Medicare population alone, DKD-related expenditures among this mostly older group were nearly $25 billion in 2011. Due to the high human and societal costs, the Consensus Conference on Chronic Kidney Disease and Diabetes was convened by the American Diabetes Association in collaboration with the American Society of Nephrology and the National Kidney Foundation to appraise issues regarding patient management, highlighting current practices and new directions. Major topic areas in DKD included (1) identification and monitoring, (2) cardiovascular disease and management of dyslipidemia, (3) hypertension and use of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system blockade and mineralocorticoid receptor blockade, (4) glycemia measurement, hypoglycemia, and drug therapies, (5) nutrition and general care in advanced-stage chronic kidney disease, (6) children and adolescents, and (7) multidisciplinary approaches and medical home models for health care delivery. This current state summary and research recommendations are designed to guide advances in care and the generation of new knowledge that will meaningfully improve life for people with DKD. Copyright © 2014 American Diabetes Association and the National Kidney Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc

  12. Genetic loci influencing kidney function and chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, John C; Zhang, Weihua; Lord, Graham M; van der Harst, Pim; Lawlor, Debbie A; Sehmi, Joban S; Gale, Daniel P; Wass, Mark N; Ahmadi, Kourosh R; Bakker, Stephan J L; Beckmann, Jacqui; Bilo, Henk J G; Bochud, Murielle; Brown, Morris J; Caulfield, Mark J; Connell, John M C; Cook, H Terence; Cotlarciuc, Ioana; Davey Smith, George; de Silva, Ranil; Deng, Guohong; Devuyst, Olivier; Dikkeschei, Lambert D; Dimkovic, Nada; Dockrell, Mark; Dominiczak, Anna; Ebrahim, Shah; Eggermann, Thomas; Farrall, Martin; Ferrucci, Luigi; Floege, Jurgen; Forouhi, Nita G; Gansevoort, Ron T; Han, Xijin; Hedblad, Bo; Homan van der Heide, Jaap J; Hepkema, Bouke G; Hernandez-Fuentes, Maria; Hypponen, Elina; Johnson, Toby; de Jong, Paul E; Kleefstra, Nanne; Lagou, Vasiliki; Lapsley, Marta; Li, Yun; Loos, Ruth J F; Luan, Jian'an; Luttropp, Karin; Maréchal, Céline; Melander, Olle; Munroe, Patricia B; Nordfors, Louise; Parsa, Afshin; Peltonen, Leena; Penninx, Brenda W; Perucha, Esperanza; Pouta, Anneli; Prokopenko, Inga; Roderick, Paul J; Ruokonen, Aimo; Samani, Nilesh J; Sanna, Serena; Schalling, Martin; Schlessinger, David; Schlieper, Georg; Seelen, Marc A J; Shuldiner, Alan R; Sjögren, Marketa; Smit, Johannes H; Snieder, Harold; Soranzo, Nicole; Spector, Timothy D; Stenvinkel, Peter; Sternberg, Michael J E; Swaminathan, Ramasamyiyer; Tanaka, Toshiko; Ubink-Veltmaat, Lielith J; Uda, Manuela; Vollenweider, Peter; Wallace, Chris; Waterworth, Dawn; Zerres, Klaus; Waeber, Gerard; Wareham, Nicholas J; Maxwell, Patrick H; McCarthy, Mark I; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Mooser, Vincent; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Lightstone, Liz; Scott, James; Navis, Gerjan; Elliott, Paul; Kooner, Jaspal S

    2010-05-01

    Using genome-wide association, we identify common variants at 2p12-p13, 6q26, 17q23 and 19q13 associated with serum creatinine, a marker of kidney function (P = 10(-10) to 10(-15)). Of these, rs10206899 (near NAT8, 2p12-p13) and rs4805834 (near SLC7A9, 19q13) were also associated with chronic kidney disease (P = 5.0 x 10(-5) and P = 3.6 x 10(-4), respectively). Our findings provide insight into metabolic, solute and drug-transport pathways underlying susceptibility to chronic kidney disease.

  13. [ANEMIA IN CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukmir, L; Fišić, M; Diminić-Lisica, I; Ljubotina, A

    2016-12-01

    Renal anemia develops secondary to chronic kidney disease (CKD) and its incidence increases with the progression of CKD. The aim is to inform family physicians about the latest developments and ways of approaching the issue, in accordance with national guidelines. The PubMed and Cochrane systematic reviews databases were searched for the 1996-2015 period using the following key words: anemia, chronic renal failure, erythropoietin, and primary health care. In addition, all relevant articles and textbooks available were manually searched to suggest the following conclusions. The use of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESA) slows down the progression of CKD, reduces the need for blood transfusions and improves the patient quality of life. Target hemoglobin (Hb) concentration to be permanently maintained is 110-120 g/L. Higher Hb levels are associated with higher mortality and major cardiovascular events in dialysis patients. Target hemoglobin level should be strictly individualized depending on CKD stage (both non-dialyzed and dialyzed population), age, other risks, initial and maintenance treatment. Early recognition and appropriate correction of anemia using ESA is of utmost importance in CKD patients. Systematic primary and secondary prevention measures along with education and professional implementation of national guidelines in daily work of family practitioners can improve medical care of patients with CKD.

  14. Coronary Artery Disease Is a Predictor of Progression to Dialysis in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease, Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus, and Anemia: An Analysis of the Trial to Reduce Cardiovascular Events With Aranesp Therapy (TREAT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabe, Marwa A; Claggett, Brian; Burdmann, Emmanuel A; Desai, Akshay S; Ivanovich, Peter; Kewalramani, Reshma; Lewis, Eldrin F; McMurray, John J V; Olson, Kurt A; Parfrey, Patrick; Solomon, Scott D; Pfeffer, Marc A

    2016-04-23

    Although clear evidence shows that chronic kidney disease is a predictor of cardiovascular events, death, and accelerated coronary artery disease (CAD) progression, it remains unknown whether CAD is a predictor of progression of chronic kidney disease to end-stage renal disease. We sought to assess whether CAD adds prognostic information to established predictors of progression to dialysis in patients with chronic kidney disease, diabetes, and anemia. Using the previously described Trial to Reduce Cardiovascular Events With Aranesp Therapy (TREAT) population, we compared baseline characteristics of patients with and without CAD. Cox proportional hazards models were used to assess the association between CAD and the outcomes of end-stage renal disease and the composite of death or end-stage renal disease. Of the 4038 patients, 1791 had a history of known CAD. These patients were older (mean age 70 versus 65 years, Pdisease. CAD patients were less likely to have marked proteinuria (29% versus 39%, Pdisease (adjusted hazard ratio 1.20 [95% CI 1.01-1.42], P=0.04) and to have the composite of death or end-stage renal disease (adjusted hazard ratio 1.15 [95% CI 1.01-1.30], P=0.03). In patients with chronic kidney disease, diabetes, and anemia, a history of CAD is an independent predictor of progression to dialysis. In patients with diabetic nephropathy, a history of CAD contributes important prognostic information to traditional risk factors for worsening renal disease. © 2016 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  15. Central Blood Pressure and Chronic Kidney Disease Progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debbie L. Cohen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension, diabetes, and proteinuria are well-recognized risk factors for progressive kidney function loss. However, despite excellent antihypertensive and antidiabetic drug therapies, which also often lower urinary protein excretion, there remains a significant reservoir of patients with chronic kidney disease who are at high risk for progression to end-stage kidney disease. This has led to the search for less traditional cardiovascular risk factors that will help stratify patients at risk for more rapid kidney disease progression. Among these are noninvasive estimates of vascular structure and function. Arterial stiffness, manifested by the pulse wave velocity in the aorta, has been established in a number of studies as a significant risk factor for kidney disease progression and cardiovascular endpoints. Much less well studied in chronic kidney disease are measures of central arterial pressures. In this paper we cover the physiology behind the generation of the central pulse wave contour and the studies available using these approaches and conclude with some speculations on the rationale for why measurements of central pressure may be informative for the study of chronic kidney disease progression.

  16. Hypertension in Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamrahian, Seyed Mehrdad; Falkner, Bonita

    2017-01-01

    Hypertension, a global public health problem, is currently the leading factor in the global burden of disease. It is the major modifiable risk factor for heart disease, stroke and kidney failure. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is both a common cause of hypertension and CKD is also a complication of uncontrolled hypertension. The interaction between hypertension and CKD is complex and increases the risk of adverse cardiovascular and cerebrovascular outcomes. This is particularly significant in the setting of resistant hypertension commonly seen in patient with CKD. The pathophysiology of CKD associated hypertension is multi-factorial with different mechanisms contributing to hypertension. These pathogenic mechanisms include sodium dysregulation, increased sympathetic nervous system and alterations in renin angiotensin aldosterone system activity. Standardized blood pressure (BP) measurement is essential in establishing the diagnosis and management of hypertension in CKD. Use of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring provides an additional assessment of diurnal variation in BP commonly seen in CKD patients. The optimal BP target in the treatment of hypertension in general and CKD population remains a matter of debate and controversial despite recent guidelines and clinical trial data. Medical therapy of patients with CKD associated hypertension can be difficult and challenging. Additional evaluation by a hypertension specialist may be required in the setting of treatment resistant hypertension by excluding pseudo-resistance and treatable secondary causes. Treatment with a combination of antihypertensive drugs, including appropriate diuretic choice, based on estimated glomerular filtration rate, is a key component of hypertension management in CKD patients. In addition to drug treatment non-pharmacological approaches including life style modification, most important of which is dietary salt restriction, should be included in the management of hypertension in CKD patients.

  17. Olmesartan/amlodipine/hydrochlorothiazide in participants with hypertension and diabetes, chronic kidney disease, or chronic cardiovascular disease: a subanalysis of the multicenter, randomized, double-blind, parallel-group TRINITY study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kereiakes Dean J

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with hypertension and cardiovascular disease (CVD, diabetes, or chronic kidney disease (CKD usually require two or more antihypertensive agents to achieve blood pressure (BP goals. Methods The efficacy/safety of olmesartan (OM 40 mg, amlodipine besylate (AML 10 mg, and hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ 25 mg versus the component dual-combinations (OM 40/AML 10 mg, OM 40/HCTZ 25 mg, and AML 10/HCTZ 25 mg was evaluated in participants with diabetes, CKD, or chronic CVD in the Triple Therapy with Olmesartan Medoxomil, Amlodipine, and Hydrochlorothiazide in Hypertensive Patients Study (TRINITY. The primary efficacy end point was least squares (LS mean reduction from baseline in seated diastolic BP (SeDBP at week 12. Secondary end points included LS mean reduction in SeSBP and proportion of participants achieving BP goal ( Results At week 12, OM 40/AML 10/HCTZ 25 mg resulted in significantly greater SeBP reductions in participants with diabetes (−37.9/22.0 mm Hg vs −28.0/17.6 mm Hg for OM 40/AML 10 mg, −26.4/14.7 mm Hg for OM 40/HCTZ 25 mg, and −27.6/14.8 mm Hg for AML 10/HCTZ 25 mg, CKD (−44.3/25.5 mm Hg vs −39.5/23.8 mm Hg for OM 40/AML 10 mg, −25.3/17.0 mm Hg for OM 40/HCTZ 25 mg, and −33.4/20.6 mm Hg for AML 10/HCTZ 25 mg, and chronic CVD (−37.8/20.6 mm Hg vs −31.7/18.2 mm Hg for OM 40/AML 10 mg, −30.9/17.1 mm Hg for OM 40/HCTZ 25 mg, and −27.5/16.1 mm Hg for AML 10/HCTZ 25 mg (P Conclusions In patients with diabetes, CKD, or chronic CVD, short-term (12 weeks and long-term treatment with OM 40/AML 10/HCTZ 25 mg was well tolerated, lowered BP more effectively, and enabled more participants to reach BP goal than the corresponding 2-component regimens. Trial Identification Number NCT00649389

  18. Subclinical cerebral abnormalities in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Hiroshi; Takashima, Yuki; Hashimoto, Manabu; Uchino, Akira; Yuzuriha, Takefumi

    2013-01-01

    Impaired kidney function or chronic kidney disease (CKD), as measured by estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), is associated with incident stroke risk. However, few studies have examined the relationship between CKD and subclinical cerebral abnormalities. We examined 675 elderly subjects (mean age 69.9 years), who were living independently at home without apparent dementia, using magnetic resonance imaging. Serum creatinine values, measured by the enzymatic method, were used for the Japanese equation of eGFR. Subclinical lacunar infarction, deep white matter lesions, and periventricular hyperintensities were detected in 88 (13.0%), 240 (35.6%) and 158 (23.4%) of the 675 participants, respectively. In the forward stepwise method of logistic analysis, age (OR 2.081/10, 95% CI 1.541-2.810), hypertension (OR 3.656, 95% CI 2.184-6.119), diabetes mellitus (OR 1.961, 95% CI 1.007-3.820), alcohol intake (OR 2.130, 95% CI 1.283-3.535), and eGFR <45 ml/min/1.73 m(2) were significant factors concerning subclinical lacunar infarction. CKD defined as eGFR <60 ml/min/1.73 m(2) was not significantly associated with subclinical lacunar infarction. Decreased eGFR was not a significant factor associated with white matter lesions (WMLs). Age (OR 2.781/10, 95% CI 2.252-3.435), hypertension (OR 1.746, 95% CI 1.231-2.477), diabetes mellitus (OR 1.854, 95% CI 1.070-3.213), but not eGFR were significant factors concerning WMLs. The present study showed that community-dwelling elderly subjects with late stage 3 CKD were at high risk for prevalent subclinical lacunar infarction. The identification of CKD-specific modifiable risk factors for SBI and WMLs is of increased importance for prevention of subclinical brain ischemic lesions. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. When Your Child Has a Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search English Español When Your Child Has a Chronic Kidney Disease KidsHealth / For Parents / When Your Child Has a Chronic Kidney Disease What's in this article? Treating Kidney Diseases Dialysis ...

  20. Clinical aspects of chronic kidney disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Clinical course of chronic kidney disease. Although patients with kidney disease may present with symptoms such as oedema (nephritic or nephrotic syndrome) and changes in urine composition, histological and functional renal decompensation can often not be diagnosed owing to a lack of symptoms. Undetected loss.

  1. A study assessing the association of glycated hemoglobin A1C (HbA1C associated variants with HbA1C, chronic kidney disease and diabetic retinopathy in populations of Asian ancestry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Chen

    Full Text Available Glycated hemoglobin A1C (HbA1C level is used as a diagnostic marker for diabetes mellitus and a predictor of diabetes associated complications. Genome-wide association studies have identified genetic variants associated with HbA1C level. Most of these studies have been conducted in populations of European ancestry. Here we report the findings from a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies of HbA1C levels in 6,682 non-diabetic subjects of Chinese, Malay and South Asian ancestries. We also sought to examine the associations between HbA1C associated SNPs and microvascular complications associated with diabetes mellitus, namely chronic kidney disease and retinopathy. A cluster of 6 SNPs on chromosome 17 showed an association with HbA1C which achieved genome-wide significance in the Malays but not in Chinese and Asian Indians. No other variants achieved genome-wide significance in the individual studies or in the meta-analysis. When we investigated the reproducibility of the findings that emerged from the European studies, six loci out of fifteen were found to be associated with HbA1C with effect sizes similar to those reported in the populations of European ancestry and P-value ≤ 0.05. No convincing associations with chronic kidney disease and retinopathy were identified in this study.

  2. A study assessing the association of glycated hemoglobin A1C (HbA1C) associated variants with HbA1C, chronic kidney disease and diabetic retinopathy in populations of Asian ancestry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Peng; Ong, Rick Twee-Hee; Tay, Wan-Ting; Sim, Xueling; Ali, Mohammad; Xu, Haiyan; Suo, Chen; Liu, Jianjun; Chia, Kee-Seng; Vithana, Eranga; Young, Terri L; Aung, Tin; Lim, Wei-Yen; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Wong, Tien-Yin; Teo, Yik-Ying; Tai, E-Shyong

    2013-01-01

    Glycated hemoglobin A1C (HbA1C) level is used as a diagnostic marker for diabetes mellitus and a predictor of diabetes associated complications. Genome-wide association studies have identified genetic variants associated with HbA1C level. Most of these studies have been conducted in populations of European ancestry. Here we report the findings from a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies of HbA1C levels in 6,682 non-diabetic subjects of Chinese, Malay and South Asian ancestries. We also sought to examine the associations between HbA1C associated SNPs and microvascular complications associated with diabetes mellitus, namely chronic kidney disease and retinopathy. A cluster of 6 SNPs on chromosome 17 showed an association with HbA1C which achieved genome-wide significance in the Malays but not in Chinese and Asian Indians. No other variants achieved genome-wide significance in the individual studies or in the meta-analysis. When we investigated the reproducibility of the findings that emerged from the European studies, six loci out of fifteen were found to be associated with HbA1C with effect sizes similar to those reported in the populations of European ancestry and P-value ≤ 0.05. No convincing associations with chronic kidney disease and retinopathy were identified in this study.

  3. Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy and Chronic Kidney Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sairam, Krish; Scoffone, Cesare M; Alken, Peter

    2012-01-01

    by glomerular filtration rate, including chronic kidney disease stages 0/I/II-greater than 60, stage III-30 to 59 and stages IV/V-less than 30 ml/minute/1.73 m(2). Patient characteristics, operative characteristics, outcomes and morbidity were assessed. RESULTS: Estimated glomerular filtration rate data were...... available on 5,644 patients, including 4,436 with chronic kidney disease stages 0/I/II, 994 with stage III and 214 with stages IV/V. A clinically significant minority of patients with nephrolithiasis presented with severe chronic kidney disease. A greater number of patients with stages IV/V previously...... underwent percutaneous nephrolithotomy, ureteroscopy or nephrostomy and had positive urine cultures than less severely affected patients, consistent with the higher incidence of staghorn stones in these patients. Patients with chronic kidney disease stages IV/V had statistically significantly worse...

  4. Childhood BMI and Adult Type 2 Diabetes, Coronary Artery Diseases, Chronic Kidney Disease, and Cardiometabolic Traits: A Mendelian Randomization Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Tingting; Smith, Caren E; Li, Changwei; Huang, Tao

    2018-05-01

    To test the causal effect of childhood BMI on adult cardiometabolic diseases using a Mendelian randomization analysis. We used 15 single nucleotide polymorphisms as instrumental variables for childhood BMI to test the causal effect of childhood BMI on cardiometabolic diseases using summary-level data from consortia. We found that a 1-SD increase in childhood BMI (kg/m 2 ) was associated with an 83% increase in risk of type 2 diabetes (odds ratio [OR] 1.83 [95% CI 1.46, 2.30]; P = 2.5 × 10 -7 ) and a 28% increase in risk of coronary artery disease (CAD) (OR 1.28 [95% CI 1.17, 1.39]; P = 2.1 × 10 -8 ) at the Bonferroni-adjusted level of significance ( P BMI was associated with a 0.587-SD increase in adulthood BMI (kg/m 2 ), a 0.062-SD increase in hip circumference (cm), a 0.602-SD increase in waist circumference (cm), a 0.111 pmol/L increase in log fasting insulin, a 0.068 increase in log-transformed HOMA of ß-cell function (%), a 0.126 increase in log-transformed HOMA of insulin resistance (%), and a 0.109-SD increase in triglyceride (mg/dL) but a 0.138-SD decrease in HDL (mg/dL) in adults at the Bonferroni-adjusted level of significance ( P BMI was associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes and CAD in adult life. These results provide evidence supportive of a causal association between childhood BMI and these outcomes. © 2018 by the American Diabetes Association.

  5. 76 FR 60057 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-28

    ... Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel, Cognitive Function in Chronic Disease Ancillary Studies. Date..., Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolic Research; 93.848, Digestive Diseases and Nutrition Research; 93.849...

  6. Genetic loci influencing kidney function and chronic kidney disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chambers, John C.; Zhang, Weihua; Lord, Graham M.; van der Harst, Pim; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Sehmi, Joban S.; Gale, Daniel P.; Wass, Mark N.; Ahmadi, Kourosh R.; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Beckmann, Jacqui; Bilo, Henk J. G.; Bochud, Murielle; Brown, Morris J.; Caulfield, Mark J.; Connell, John M. C.; Cook, H. Terence; Cotlarciuc, Ioana; Smith, George Davey; de Silva, Ranil; Deng, Guohong; Devuyst, Olivier; Dikkeschei, Lambert D.; Dimkovic, Nada; Dockrell, Mark; Dominiczak, Anna; Ebrahim, Shah; Eggermann, Thomas; Farrall, Martin; Ferrucci, Luigi; Floege, Jurgen; Forouhi, Nita G.; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Han, Xijin; Hedblad, Bo; van der Heide, Jaap J. Homan; Hepkema, Bouke G.; Hernandez-Fuentes, Maria; Hypponen, Elina; Johnson, Toby; de Jong, Paul E.; Kleefstra, Nanne; Lagou, Vasiliki; Lapsley, Marta; Li, Yun; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Luan, Jian'an; Luttropp, Karin; Marechal, Celine; Melander, Olle; Munroe, Patricia B.; Nordfors, Louise; Parsa, Afshin; Peltonen, Leena; Penninx, Brenda W.; Perucha, Esperanza; Pouta, Anneli; Prokopenko, Inga; Roderick, Paul J.; Ruokonen, Aimo; Samani, Nilesh J.; Sanna, Serena; Schalling, Martin; Schlessinger, David; Schlieper, Georg; Seelen, Marc A. J.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Sjogren, Marketa; Smit, Johannes H.; Snieder, Harold; Soranzo, Nicole; Spector, Timothy D.; Stenvinkel, Peter; Sternberg, Michael J. E.; Swaminathan, Ramasamyiyer; Tanaka, Toshiko; Ubink-Veltmaat, Lielith J.; Uda, Manuela; Vollenweider, Peter; Wallace, Chris; Waterworth, Dawn; Zerres, Klaus; Waeber, Gerard; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Maxwell, Patrick H.; McCarthy, Mark I.; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Mooser, Vincent; Abecasis, Goncalo R.; Lightstone, Liz; Scott, James; Navis, Gerjan; Elliott, Paul; Kooner, Jaspal S.

    Using genome-wide association, we identify common variants at 2p12-p13, 6q26, 17q23 and 19q13 associated with serum creatinine, a marker of kidney function (P = 10(-10) to 10(-15)). Of these, rs10206899 (near NAT8, 2p12-p13) and rs4805834 (near SLC7A9, 19q13) were also associated with chronic kidney

  7. Genetic loci influencing kidney function and chronic kidney disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chambers, John C.; Zhang, Weihua; Lord, Graham M.; van der Harst, Pim; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Sehmi, Joban S.; Gale, Daniel P.; Wass, Mark N.; Ahmadi, Kourosh R.; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Beckmann, Jacqui; Bilo, Henk J. G.; Bochud, Murielle; Brown, Morris J.; Caulfield, Mark J.; Connell, John M. C.; Cook, H. Terence; Cotlarciuc, Ioana; Davey Smith, George; de Silva, Ranil; Deng, Guohong; Devuyst, Olivier; Dikkeschei, Lambert D.; Dimkovic, Nada; Dockrell, Mark; Dominiczak, Anna; Ebrahim, Shah; Eggermann, Thomas; Farrall, Martin; Ferrucci, Luigi; Floege, Jurgen; Forouhi, Nita G.; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Han, Xijin; Hedblad, Bo; Homan van der Heide, Jaap J.; Hepkema, Bouke G.; Hernandez-Fuentes, Maria; Hypponen, Elina; Johnson, Toby; de Jong, Paul E.; Kleefstra, Nanne; Lagou, Vasiliki; Lapsley, Marta; Li, Yun; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Luan, Jian'an; Luttropp, Karin; Maréchal, Céline; Melander, Olle; Munroe, Patricia B.; Nordfors, Louise; Parsa, Afshin; Peltonen, Leena; Penninx, Brenda W.; Perucha, Esperanza; Pouta, Anneli; Prokopenko, Inga; Roderick, Paul J.; Ruokonen, Aimo; Samani, Nilesh J.; Sanna, Serena; Schalling, Martin; Schlessinger, David; Schlieper, Georg; Seelen, Marc A. J.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Sjögren, Marketa; Smit, Johannes H.; Snieder, Harold; Soranzo, Nicole; Spector, Timothy D.; Stenvinkel, Peter; Sternberg, Michael J. E.; Swaminathan, Ramasamyiyer; Tanaka, Toshiko; Ubink-Veltmaat, Lielith J.; Uda, Manuela; Vollenweider, Peter; Wallace, Chris; Waterworth, Dawn; Zerres, Klaus; Waeber, Gerard; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Maxwell, Patrick H.; McCarthy, Mark I.; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Mooser, Vincent; Abecasis, Goncalo R.; Lightstone, Liz; Scott, James; Navis, Gerjan; Elliott, Paul; Kooner, Jaspal S.

    2010-01-01

    Using genome-wide association, we identify common variants at 2p12-p13, 6q26, 17q23 and 19q13 associated with serum creatinine, a marker of kidney function (P = 10(-10) to 10(-15)). Of these, rs10206899 (near NAT8, 2p12-p13) and rs4805834 (near SLC7A9, 19q13) were also associated with chronic kidney

  8. High dietary phosphorus density is a risk factor for incident chronic kidney disease development in diabetic subjects: a community-based prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Chang-Yun; Park, Jung Tak; Jhee, Jong Hyun; Noh, Juhwan; Kee, Youn Kyung; Seo, Changhwan; Lee, Misol; Cha, Min-Uk; Kim, Hyoungnae; Park, Seohyun; Yun, Hae-Ryong; Jung, Su-Young; Han, Seung Hyeok; Yoo, Tae-Hyun; Kang, Shin-Wook

    2017-07-01

    Background: High serum phosphorus concentrations are associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, the relation between dietary phosphorus intake and CKD development has not been well evaluated. Objective: In this study, we investigated the impact of dietary phosphorus density on the development of incident CKD in a cohort of subjects with normal renal function. Design: Data were retrieved from the Korean Genome and Epidemiology Study, a prospective community-based cohort study. The study cohort consisted of subjects aged 40-69 y, who were followed up biennially from 2001 to 2014. A total of 873 subjects with diabetes mellitus (DM) and 5846 subjects without DM (non-DM) were included in the final analysis. The primary endpoint was incident CKD, defined as a composite of estimated glomerular filtration rate phosphorus density, defined as the ratio of a single-day dietary phosphorus amount to the total daily calorie intake, were 0.51 ± 0.08 mg/kcal in the DM group and 0.51 ± 0.07 mg/kcal in the non-DM group. During the follow-up, CKD newly developed in 283 (32.4%) and 792 subjects (13.5%) in the DM and non-DM groups, respectively. When the subjects were divided into quartiles according to the dietary phosphorus density in each group, the highest quartile was significantly associated with the development of incident CKD by multiple Cox proportional hazard analysis in the DM group ( P = 0.02) but not in the non-DM group ( P = 0.72). Conclusions: High dietary phosphorus density is associated with an increased risk of CKD development in DM patients with normal renal function. The causality in this association needs to be tested in a randomized controlled trial. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  9. Hospitalization and 1-year all-cause mortality in type 2 diabetic patients with chronic kidney disease at Stages 1 and 2: Effect of mild anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nseir, William; Artul, Suheil; Nasrallah, Najib; Mograbi, Julnar; Mahamid, Mahmud

    2016-07-01

    The effect of anemia in advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD) on morbidity and mortality is known. The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of mild anemia on hospitalization and 1-year all-cause mortality in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients with Stage 1 and 2 CKD. Hospitalized T2DM patients (n = 307) with a glomerular filtration rate ≥ 60 mL/min per 1.73 m(2) and urinary albumin excretion > 30 mg/24 h (Stage 1 and 2 CKD) were enrolled in the study and divided into two groups based on hemoglobin (Hb) concentrations: those with (mean [ ± SD] Hb 10.7 ± 0.7 g/dL) and without (mean Hb 13.3 ± 1.28 g/dL) anemia. There was no significant difference between patients with and without anemia in terms of age, gender, body mass index, HbA1c, and cardiovascular diseases. The mean length of hospitalization of the 130 anemic and 177 non-anemic patients was 4.3 ± 3.5 and 3.5 ± 1.9 days, respectively (P anemia (9.2% vs 1.7%, respectively; P = 0.002). After adjusting for confounding variables, multivariate Cox regression analysis revealed that mild anemia was significantly associated with 1-year all-cause mortality (hazard ratio 2.15, 95% confidence interval 1.92-2.54; P = 0.033). Mild anemia may increase the length of hospitalization and was associated with 1-year all-cause mortality among hospitalized T2DM patients with Stage 1 and 2 CKD. © 2015 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  10. The devil is in the detail - a multifactorial intervention to reduce blood pressure in co-existing diabetes and chronic kidney disease: a single blind, randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manias Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background About 30-60% of individuals are non-adherent to their prescribed medications and this risk increases as the number of prescribed medications increases. This paper outlines the development of a consumer-centred Medicine Self-Management Intervention (MESMI, designed to improve blood pressure control and medication adherence in consumers with diabetes and chronic kidney disease recruited from specialist outpatients' clinics. Methods We developed a multifactorial intervention consisting of Self Blood Pressure Monitoring (SBPM, medication review, a twenty-minute interactive Digital Versatile Disc (DVD, and follow-up support telephone calls to help consumers improve their blood pressure control and take their medications as prescribed. The intervention is novel in that it has been developed from analysis of consumer and health professional views, and includes consumer video exemplars in the DVD. The primary outcome measure was a drop of 3-6 mmHg systolic blood pressure at three months after completion of the intervention. Secondary outcome measures included: assessment of medication adherence, medication self-efficacy and general wellbeing. Consumers' adherence to their prescribed medications was measured by manual pill count, self-report of medication adherence, and surrogate biochemical markers of disease control. Discussion The management of complex health problems is an increasing component of health care practice, and requires interventions that improve patient outcomes. We describe the preparatory work and baseline data of a single blind, randomized controlled trial involving consumers requiring cross-specialty care with a follow-up period extending to 12 months post-baseline. Trial Registration The trial was registered with the Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Register (ACTRN12607000044426.

  11. Vascular ossification – calcification in metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes mellitus, chronic kidney disease, and calciphylaxis – calcific uremic arteriolopathy: the emerging role of sodium thiosulfate

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    Sowers James R

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vascular calcification is associated with metabolic syndrome, diabetes, hypertension, atherosclerosis, chronic kidney disease, and end stage renal disease. Each of the above contributes to an accelerated and premature demise primarily due to cardiovascular disease. The above conditions are associated with multiple metabolic toxicities resulting in an increase in reactive oxygen species to the arterial vessel wall, which results in a response to injury wound healing (remodeling. The endothelium seems to be at the very center of these disease processes, acting as the first line of defense against these multiple metabolic toxicities and the first to encounter their damaging effects to the arterial vessel wall. Results The pathobiomolecular mechanisms of vascular calcification are presented in order to provide the clinician – researcher a database of knowledge to assist in the clinical management of these high-risk patients and examine newer therapies. Calciphylaxis is associated with medial arteriolar vascular calcification and results in ischemic subcutaneous necrosis with vulnerable skin ulcerations and high mortality. Recently, this clinical syndrome (once thought to be rare is presenting with increasing frequency. Consequently, newer therapeutic modalities need to be explored. Intravenous sodium thiosulfate is currently used as an antidote for the treatment of cyanide poisioning and prevention of toxicities of cisplatin cancer therapies. It is used as a food and medicinal preservative and topically used as an antifungal medication. Conclusion A discussion of sodium thiosulfate's dual role as a potent antioxidant and chelator of calcium is presented in order to better understand its role as an emerging novel therapy for the clinical syndrome of calciphylaxis and its complications.

  12. Effect of diacerein on renal function and inflammatory cytokines in participants with type 2 diabetes mellitus and chronic kidney disease: A randomized controlled trial.

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    Fabiana Piovesan

    Full Text Available Diacerein seems to improve metabolic control and reduce inflammatory marker levels in individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus (Type 2 DM, but for participants with chronic kidney disease (CKD its effect is unknown. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of diacerein vs. placebo on urinary albumin/creatinine ratio (ACR, glomerular filtration rate (GFR, and inflammatory cytokines in type 2 DM participants with CKD. Blood pressure (BP and metabolic control were secondary outcomes. This randomized, placebo-controlled, parallel trial of adjuvant treatment of type 2 DM with diacerein enrolled seventy-two participants with CKD, aged 30-80 years, with glycated hemoglobin levels from 53-97 mmol/mol (7.0-11.0%, receiving angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers and antidiabetic agents. Participants randomized to diacerein or placebo were followed-up up to 90 days. Both groups had a marked reduction in ACR, but there was no effect on glomerular filtration rate. While the diacerein group had reduced TNF-α levels at the 75th percentile with a borderline significance (P = 0.05, there were no changes in the IL levels at the 75th percentile. Diacerein prevented the increase in blood glucose to the level observed in the placebo group (P = 0.04, improving metabolic control by 74%, reducing 24-hour diastolic BP, nighttime systolic and diastolic BP compared to the placebo group. In conclusion, among patients with type 2 DM and CKD, diacerein does not have an effect on ACR or GFR, but slows metabolic control deterioration and is associated with lower nighttime systolic and diastolic blood pressure.Brazilian Clinical Trials Registry (Registro Brasileiro de Ensaios Clinicos; ReBeC U1111-1156-0255.

  13. Primary care detection of chronic kidney disease in adults with type-2 diabetes: the ADD-CKD Study (awareness, detection and drug therapy in type 2 diabetes and chronic kidney disease).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczech, Lynda A; Stewart, Rebecca C; Su, Hsu-Lin; DeLoskey, Richard J; Astor, Brad C; Fox, Chester H; McCullough, Peter A; Vassalotti, Joseph A

    2014-01-01

    This US, multicenter, observational study assessed the CKD prevalence in adult patients with type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and characterized the proportion of detected and undiagnosed CKD in the primary care setting using the following: a clinician survey; a patient physical exam and medical history; a single blood draw for estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and glycosolated hemoglobin (HbA1c); urine dipstick for protein; urine albumin-creatinine ratio (ACR); two patient quality of life questionnaires; and a 15-month medical record review. The study consisted of 9339 adults with T2DM and 466 investigator sites. Of the 9339 enrolled, 9307 had complete data collection for analysis. The 15-month retrospective review showed urine protein, urine ACR, and eGFR testing were not performed in 51.4%, 52.9% and 15.2% of individuals, respectively. Of the 9307 patients, 5036 (54.1%) had Stage 1-5 CKD based on eGFR and albuminuria; however, only 607 (12.1%) of those patients were identified as having CKD by their clinicians. Clinicians were more successful in diagnosing patients with Stage 3-5 CKD than Stages 1 and 2. There were no differences in clinicians' likelihood of identification of CKD based on practice setting, number of years in practice, or self-reported patients seen per week. Awareness or patient self-reported CKD was 81.1% with practitioner detection versus 2.6% in the absence of diagnosis. Primary care of T2DM demonstrates recommended urine CKD testing is underutilized, and CKD is significantly under-diagnosed. This is the first study to show CKD detection is associated with awareness.

  14. Chronic kidney disease in children (literature review

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    I.A. Karimdzhanov

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The article presents modern concepts of chronic kidney disease in children as a condition that develops due to the irreversible decrease in renal homeostatic functions in any severe progressive kidney disease, data on epidemiological prevalence, etiological factors, diagnostic methods, stages and clinical course of chronic kidney disease in children. Moreover, it was indicated that early detection and timely treatment of chronic kidney disease in children is an important background for preventing or postponing its adverse outcome. In addition, a high degree of disability and a significant decrease in the quality of life of patients, the complexity and high cost of therapy for patients with terminal chronic renal failure were shown, ma­king it very important to prevent its development in patients with nephropathies. We outlined the main principles of pathogenetic therapy based on the analysis of domestic and foreign guidelines for the treatment of chronic kidney disease in children. The schemes of treatment for protein-energy insufficiency, arterial hypertension, anemia, correction of mi­neral metabolism disorders are given. We discussed the question of reducing the level of azotemia with various drugs, and the development of new drugs to initiate early treatment and to prevent the development of severe forms of chronic kidney disease in children. The search for necessary literature sources was performed in Scopus, MedLine, The Cochrane Library, CyberLeninka, RINC databases.

  15. Comprehensive mass spectrometry based biomarker discovery and validation platform as applied to diabetic kidney disease

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    Scott D. Bringans

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A protein biomarker discovery workflow was applied to plasma samples from patients at different stages of diabetic kidney disease. The proteomics platform produced a panel of significant plasma biomarkers that were statistically scrutinised against the current gold standard tests on an analysis of 572 patients. Five proteins were significantly associated with diabetic kidney disease defined by albuminuria, renal impairment (eGFR and chronic kidney disease staging (CKD Stage ≥1, ROC curve of 0.77. The results prove the suitability and efficacy of the process used, and introduce a biomarker panel with the potential to improve diagnosis of diabetic kidney disease.

  16. Metabolic syndrome, chronic kidney, and cardiovascular diseases: role of adipokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesauro, Manfredi; Canale, Maria Paola; Rodia, Giuseppe; Di Daniele, Nicola; Lauro, Davide; Scuteri, Angelo; Cardillo, Carmine

    2011-03-07

    Obesity is a chronic disease, whose incidence is alarmingly growing. It is associated with metabolic abnormalities and cardiovascular complications. These complications are clustered in the metabolic syndrome (MetS) leading to high cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Obesity predisposes to diabetic nephropathy, hypertensive nephrosclerosis, and focal and segmental glomerular sclerosis and represents an independent risk factor for the development and progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Albuminuria is a major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). Microalbuminuria has been described as early manifestation of MetS-associated kidney damage and diabetic nephropathy. Obesity and MetS affect renal physiology and metabolism through mechanisms which include altered levels of adipokines such as leptin and adiponectin, oxidative stress, and inflammation. Secretory products of adipose tissue also deeply and negatively influence endothelial function. A better understanding of these interactions will help in designing more effective treatments aimed to protect both renal and cardiovascular systems.

  17. Metabolic Syndrome, Chronic Kidney, and Cardiovascular Diseases: Role of Adipokines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manfredi Tesauro

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is a chronic disease, whose incidence is alarmingly growing. It is associated with metabolic abnormalities and cardiovascular complications. These complications are clustered in the metabolic syndrome (MetS leading to high cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Obesity predisposes to diabetic nephropathy, hypertensive nephrosclerosis, and focal and segmental glomerular sclerosis and represents an independent risk factor for the development and progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD. Albuminuria is a major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases (CVDs. Microalbuminuria has been described as early manifestation of MetS-associated kidney damage and diabetic nephropathy. Obesity and MetS affect renal physiology and metabolism through mechanisms which include altered levels of adipokines such as leptin and adiponectin, oxidative stress, and inflammation. Secretory products of adipose tissue also deeply and negatively influence endothelial function. A better understanding of these interactions will help in designing more effective treatments aimed to protect both renal and cardiovascular systems.

  18. Chronic kidney disease screening methods and its implication for Malaysia: an in depth review.

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    Almualm, Yasmin; Zaman Huri, Hasniza

    2015-01-01

    Chronic Kidney Disease has become a public health problem, imposing heath, social and human cost on societies worldwide. Chronic Kidney Disease remains asymptomatic till late stage when intervention cannot stop the progression of the disease. Therefore, there is an urgent need to detect the disease early. Despite the high prevalence of Chronic Kidney Disease in Malaysia, screening is still lacking behind. This review discusses the strengths and limitations of current screening methods for Chronic Kidney Disease from a Malaysian point of view. Diabetic Kidney Disease was chosen as focal point as Diabetes is the leading cause of Chronic Kidney Disease in Malaysia. Screening for Chronic Kidney Disease in Malaysia includes a urine test for albuminuria and a blood test for serum creatinine. Recent literature indicates that albuminuria is not always present in Diabetic Kidney Disease patients and serum creatinine is only raised after substantial kidney damage has occurred.  Recently, cystatin C was proposed as a potential marker for kidney disease but this has not been studied thoroughly in Malaysia.  Glomerular Filtration Rate is the best method for measuring kidney function and is widely estimated using the Modification of Diet for Renal Disease equation. Another equation, the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration Creatinine equation was introduced in 2009. The new equation retained the precision and accuracy of the Modification of Diet for Renal Disease equation at GFR 60ml/min/1.73m2. In Asian countries, adding an ethnic coefficient to the equation enhanced its performance. In Malaysia, a multi-ethnic Asian population, the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration equation should be validated and the Glomerular Filtration Rate should be reported whenever serum creatinine is ordered. Reporting estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate will help diagnose patients who would have been otherwise missed if only albuminuria and serum creatinine are measured.

  19. Primary Care of the Patient with Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, Meghan M; Ryan, Michael J

    2015-09-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is defined by reduced estimated glomerular filtration rate, increased proteinuria, or both. CKD affects more than 10% of US adults, or 20 million people, and the numbers are rising as the population ages. However, CKD remains underdiagnosed. Diabetes and hypertension are the most common causes of CKD. Although end-stage renal disease is a feared complication of CKD, patients with CKD have a much greater risk of dying of cardiovascular (CV) disease than progressing to kidney failure. Special effort should be made to address modifiable CV risk factors in patients with CKD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. SECRETED KLOTHO AND CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ming Chang; Kuro-o, Makoto; Moe, Orson W.

    2013-01-01

    Soluble Klotho (sKl) in the circulation can be generated directly by alterative splicing of the Klotho transcript or the extracellular domain of membrane Klotho can be released from membrane-anchored Klotho on the cell surface. Unlike membrane Klotho which functions as a coreceptor for fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF23), sKl, acts as hormonal factor and plays important roles in anti-aging, anti-oxidation, modulation of ion transport, and Wnt signaling. Emerging evidence reveals that Klotho deficiency is an early biomarker for chronic kidney diseases as well as a pathogenic factor. Klotho deficiency is associated with progression and chronic complications in chronic kidney disease including vascular calcification, cardiac hypertrophy, and secondary hyperparathyroidism. In multiple experimental models, replacement of sKl, or manipulated up-regulation of endogenous Klotho protect the kidney from renal insults, preserve kidney function, and suppress renal fibrosis, in chronic kidney disease. Klotho is a highly promising candidate on the horizon as an early biomarker, and as a novel therapeutic agent for chronic kidney disease. PMID:22396167

  1. Chronic kidney disease in the type 2 diabetic patients: prevalence and associated variables in a random sample of 2642 patients of a Mediterranean area

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    Coll-de-Tuero Gabriel

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Kidney disease is associated with an increased total mortality and cardiovascular morbimortality in the general population and in patients with Type 2 diabetes. The aim of this study is to determine the prevalence of kidney disease and different types of renal disease in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM. Methods Cross-sectional study in a random sample of 2,642 T2DM patients cared for in primary care during 2007. Studied variables: demographic and clinical characteristics, pharmacological treatments and T2DM complications (diabetic foot, retinopathy, coronary heart disease and stroke. Variables of renal function were defined as follows: 1 Microalbuminuria: albumin excretion rate & 30 mg/g or 3.5 mg/mmol, 2 Macroalbuminuria: albumin excretion rate & 300 mg/g or 35 mg/mmol, 3 Kidney disease (KD: glomerular filtration rate according to Modification of Diet in Renal Disease 2 and/or the presence of albuminuria, 4 Renal impairment (RI: glomerular filtration rate 2, 5 Nonalbuminuric RI: glomerular filtration rate 2 without albuminuria and, 5 Diabetic nephropathy (DN: macroalbuminuria or microalbuminuria plus diabetic retinopathy. Results The prevalence of different types of renal disease in patients was: 34.1% KD, 22.9% RI, 19.5% albuminuria and 16.4% diabetic nephropathy (DN. The prevalence of albuminuria without RI (13.5% and nonalbuminuric RI (14.7% was similar. After adjusting per age, BMI, cholesterol, blood pressure and macrovascular disease, RI was significantly associated with the female gender (OR 2.20; CI 95% 1.86–2.59, microvascular disease (OR 2.14; CI 95% 1.8–2.54 and insulin treatment (OR 1.82; CI 95% 1.39–2.38, and inversely associated with HbA1c (OR 0.85 for every 1% increase; CI 95% 0.80–0.91. Albuminuria without RI was inversely associated with the female gender (OR 0.27; CI 95% 0.21–0.35, duration of diabetes (OR 0.94 per year; CI 95% 0.91–0.97 and directly associated with HbA1c (OR 1.19 for every

  2. Recurrence of diabetic kidney disease in a type 1 diabetic patient after kidney transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyumura, Izumi; Honda, Kazuho; Babazono, Tetsuya; Horita, Shigeru; Murakami, Toru; Fuchinoue, Shohei; Uchigata, Yasuko

    2015-07-01

    Post-transplant hyperglycaemia of diabetic patients may cause recurrent diabetic kidney disease (DKD) in kidney allografts. We report a patient with slowly progressive DKD with calcineurin inhibitor toxicity (CNI) toxicity after the kidney transplantation. A 28-year-old female with type 1 diabetes mellitus underwent successful kidney transplantation from her mother in April 2003, and the kidney graft survived for more than 10 years. She was treated with combined immunosuppressive therapy consisting of cyclosporine and mycophenolate mofetil. After transplantation, she continued to take insulin injection four times per day, but her glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) was above 10%. Protocol allograft kidney biopsies performed 5 and 10 years after transplantation revealed the recurrence of slowly progressive diabetic kidney disease. In addition, arteriolar hyalinosis partly associated with calcineurin inhibitor toxicity (CNI) was detected with progression. Post-transplant hyperglycaemia causes recurrent diabetic kidney disease (DKD) in kidney allografts, but its progression is usually slow. For long-term management, it is important to prevent the progression of the calcineurin inhibitor arteriolopathy, as well as maintain favourable glycaemic control. © 2015 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  3. Human Kidney Tubule-Specific Gene Expression Based Dissection of Chronic Kidney Disease Traits

    OpenAIRE

    Pazit Beckerman; Chengxiang Qiu; Jihwan Park; Nora Ledo; Yi-An Ko; Ae-Seo Deok Park; Sang-Youb Han; Peter Choi; Matthew Palmer; Katalin Susztak

    2017-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has diverse phenotypic manifestations including structural (such as fibrosis) and functional (such as glomerular filtration rate and albuminuria) alterations. Gene expression profiling has recently gained popularity as an important new tool for precision medicine approaches. Here we used unbiased and directed approaches to understand how gene expression captures different CKD manifestations in patients with diabetic and hypertensive CKD. Transcriptome data from ni...

  4. Olmesartan/amlodipine/hydrochlorothiazide in participants with hypertension and diabetes, chronic kidney disease, or chronic cardiovascular disease: a subanalysis of the multicenter, randomized, double-blind, parallel-group TRINITY study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Patients with hypertension and cardiovascular disease (CVD), diabetes, or chronic kidney disease (CKD) usually require two or more antihypertensive agents to achieve blood pressure (BP) goals. Methods The efficacy/safety of olmesartan (OM) 40 mg, amlodipine besylate (AML) 10 mg, and hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ) 25 mg versus the component dual-combinations (OM 40/AML 10 mg, OM 40/HCTZ 25 mg, and AML 10/HCTZ 25 mg) was evaluated in participants with diabetes, CKD, or chronic CVD in the Triple Therapy with Olmesartan Medoxomil, Amlodipine, and Hydrochlorothiazide in Hypertensive Patients Study (TRINITY). The primary efficacy end point was least squares (LS) mean reduction from baseline in seated diastolic BP (SeDBP) at week 12. Secondary end points included LS mean reduction in SeSBP and proportion of participants achieving BP goal (<130/80 mm Hg) at week 12 (double-blind randomized period), and LS mean reduction in SeBP and BP goal achievement at week 52/early termination (open-label period). Results At week 12, OM 40/AML 10/HCTZ 25 mg resulted in significantly greater SeBP reductions in participants with diabetes (−37.9/22.0 mm Hg vs −28.0/17.6 mm Hg for OM 40/AML 10 mg, −26.4/14.7 mm Hg for OM 40/HCTZ 25 mg, and −27.6/14.8 mm Hg for AML 10/HCTZ 25 mg), CKD (−44.3/25.5 mm Hg vs −39.5/23.8 mm Hg for OM 40/AML 10 mg, −25.3/17.0 mm Hg for OM 40/HCTZ 25 mg, and −33.4/20.6 mm Hg for AML 10/HCTZ 25 mg), and chronic CVD (−37.8/20.6 mm Hg vs −31.7/18.2 mm Hg for OM 40/AML 10 mg, −30.9/17.1 mm Hg for OM 40/HCTZ 25 mg, and −27.5/16.1 mm Hg for AML 10/HCTZ 25 mg) (P<0.05 for all subgroups vs dual-component treatments). BP goal achievement was greater for participants receiving triple-combination treatment compared with the dual-combination treatments, and was achieved in 41.1%, 55.0%, and 38.9% of participants with diabetes, CKD, and chronic CVD on OM 40/AML 10/HCTZ 25 mg, respectively. At week 52, there was sustained BP lowering with the OM

  5. Prevalence estimates of chronic kidney disease in Canada: results of a nationally representative survey

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    Arora, Paul; Vasa, Priya; Brenner, Darren; Iglar, Karl; McFarlane, Phil; Morrison, Howard; Badawi, Alaa

    2013-01-01

    Background: Chronic kidney disease is an important risk factor for death and cardiovascular-related morbidity, but estimates to date of its prevalence in Canada have generally been extrapolated from the prevalence of end-stage renal disease. We used direct measures of kidney function collected from a nationally representative survey population to estimate the prevalence of chronic kidney disease among Canadian adults. Methods: We examined data for 3689 adult participants of cycle 1 of the Canadian Health Measures Survey (2007–2009) for the presence of chronic kidney disease. We also calculated the age-standardized prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors by chronic kidney disease group. We cross-tabulated the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) with albuminuria status. Results: The prevalence of chronic kidney disease during the period 2007–2009 was 12.5%, representing about 3 million Canadian adults. The estimated prevalence of stage 3–5 disease was 3.1% (0.73 million adults) and albuminuria 10.3% (2.4 million adults). The prevalence of diabetes, hypertension and hypertriglyceridemia were all significantly higher among adults with chronic kidney disease than among those without it. The prevalence of albuminuria was high, even among those whose eGFR was 90 mL/min per 1.73 m2 or greater (10.1%) and those without diabetes or hypertension (9.3%). Awareness of kidney dysfunction among adults with stage 3–5 chronic kidney disease was low (12.0%). Interpretation: The prevalence of kidney dysfunction was substantial in the survey population, including individuals without hypertension or diabetes, conditions most likely to prompt screening for kidney dysfunction. These findings highlight the potential for missed opportunities for early intervention and secondary prevention of chronic kidney disease. PMID:23649413

  6. The diabetic rat kidney mediates inosituria and selective urinary partitioning of D-chiro-inositol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hao-Han; Choong, Bernard; Phillips, Anthony R J; Loomes, Kerry M

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is a serious complication of diabetes mellitus with a pressing need for effective metabolic markers to detect renal impairment. Of potential significance are the inositol compounds, myo-inositol (MI), and the less abundant stereoisomer, D-chiro-inositol (DCI), which are excreted at increased levels in the urine in diabetes mellitus, a phenomenon known as inosituria. There is also a selective urinary excretion of DCI compared to MI. As the biological origins of altered inositol metabolism in diabetes mellitus are unknown, the aim of this study was to determine whether the diabetic kidney was directly responsible. Kidneys isolated from four-week streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats were characterized by a 3-fold reduction in glomerular filtration rate (GFR) compared to matched non-diabetic kidneys. When perfused with fixed quantities of MI (50 µM) and DCI (5 µM) under normoglycemic conditions (5 mM glucose), GFR-normalized urinary excretion of MI was increased by 1.7-fold in diabetic vs. non-diabetic kidneys. By comparison, GFR-normalized urinary excretion of DCI was increased by 4-fold. Perfusion conditions replicating hyperglycemia (20 mM glucose) potentiated DCI but not MI urinary excretion in both non-diabetic and diabetic kidneys. Overall, there was a 2.4-fold increase in DCI urinary excretion compared to MI in diabetic kidneys that was independent of glucose ambience. This increased urinary excretion of DCI and MI in diabetic kidneys occurred despite increased renal expression of the inositol transporters, sodium myo-inositol transporter subtype 1 and 2 (SMIT1 and SMIT2). These findings show that the diabetic kidney primarily mediates inosituria and altered urinary partitioning of MI and DCI. Urinary inositol levels might therefore serve as an indicator of impaired renal function in diabetes mellitus with wider implications for monitoring chronic kidney disease. © 2014 by the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine.

  7. Dyslipidemia, Kidney Disease, and Cardiovascular Disease in Diabetic Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Szu-chi; Tseng, Chin-Hsiao

    2013-01-01

    This article reviews the relationship between dyslipidemia, chronic kidney disease, and cardiovascular diseases in patients with diabetes. Diabetes mellitus is associated with complications in the cardiovascular and renal system, and is increasing in prevalence worldwide. Modification of the multifactorial risk factors, in particular dyslipidemia, has been suggested to reduce the rates of diabetes-related complications. Dyslipidemia in diabetes is a condition that includes hypertriglyceridemia, low high-density lipoprotein levels, and increased small and dense low-density lipoprotein particles. This condition is associated with higher cardiovascular risk and mortality in diabetic patients. Current treatment guidelines focus on lowering the low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level; multiple trials have confirmed the cardiovascular benefits of treatment with statins. Chronic kidney disease also contributes to dyslipidemia, and dyslipidemia in turn is related to the occurrence and progression of diabetic nephropathy. Different patterns of dyslipidemia are associated with different stages of diabetic nephropathy. Some trials have shown that treatment with statins not only decreased the risk of cardiovascular events, but also delayed the progression of diabetic nephropathy. However, studies using statins as the sole treatment of hyperlipidemia in patients on dialysis have not shown benefits with respect to cardiovascular risk. Diabetic patients with nephropathy have a higher risk of cardiovascular events than those without nephropathy. The degree of albuminuria and the reduction in estimated glomerular filtration rate are also correlated with the risk of cardiovascular events. Treatment with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers to reduce albuminuria in diabetic patients has been shown to decrease the risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. PMID:24380085

  8. Oral health in patients with chronic kidney disease - emphasis on periodontitis

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    Nylund, Karita

    2017-01-01

    ORAL HEALTH IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE - EMPHASIS ON PERIODONTITIS Background: Periodontitis is a common bacteria-induced chronic inflammatory disease with mild symptoms. It leads to destruction of the periodontium and finally to tooth loss in a susceptible patient. Periodontitis is associated with many systemic diseases such as diabetes, atherosclerosis, cardiovascular diseases, and chronic kidney disease (CKD) through low-grade systemic inflammation. However, no causality c...

  9. An Update on Coronary Artery Disease and Chronic Kidney Disease

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    Baris Afsar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the improvements in diagnostic tools and medical applications, cardiovascular diseases (CVD, especially coronary artery disease (CAD, remain the most common cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD. The main factors for the heightened risk in this population, beside advanced age and a high proportion of diabetes and hypertension, are malnutrition, chronic inflammation, accelerated atherosclerosis, endothelial dysfunction, coronary artery calcification, left ventricular structural and functional abnormalities, and bone mineral disorders. Chronic kidney disease is now recognized as an independent risk factor for CAD. In community-based studies, decreased glomerular filtration rate (GFR and proteinuria were both found to be independently associated with CAD. This paper will discuss classical and recent epidemiologic, pathophysiologic, and clinical aspects of CAD in CKD patients.

  10. Sexuality and Chronic Kidney Disease

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    ... Events Advocacy Donate A to Z Health Guide Sexuality and Kidney Disease Tweet Share Print Email Can ... It's something everyone needs. Many people think that sexuality refers only to sexual intercourse. But sexuality includes ...

  11. An observational, cross-sectional study to assess the prevalence of chronic kidney disease in type 2 diabetes patients in India (START -India

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    M Prasannakumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The primary objective of this study is to estimate the prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD among type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM patients in India. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional, observational, epidemiological, multi-center, study is enrolling T2DM patients of either gender aged 30 years or above. This study aimed to enroll a total of 3000 T2DM patients at 30 participating hospitals/clinics across India and the data from a planned interim analysis of 1500 patients are presented here. The primary endpoint of the study is to estimate proportion of T2DM patients with CKD (glomerular filtration rate [GFR] <60 ml/min/1.73 m 2 or albumin creatinine ratio [ACR] ≥30 mg/g or ≥3 mg/mmol or both. Routine treatment, as administered by the treating physician, was continued without any study specific intervention. Patients′ data pertaining to demographic characteristics, medical history, current medication and physical examination were recorded. The blood/plasma and urine samples, were collected for estimation of hemoglobin A1c, microalbuminuria, serum creatinine, urine creatinine, and routine urine analysis. ACR was calculated from urine creatinine and albumin while GFR was estimated by using a modification of diet in the renal disease equation. Results: Study recruited 1500 patients from 18 centers across India. The study population included 840 (56.05% males. Mean age, body mass index and systolic blood pressure were 55.1 years, 27.4 kg/m 2 and 134.5 mmHg respectively. The mean duration of diabetes was 102.2 months. History of co-morbid diseases such as dyslipidemia, hypertension, microvascular complications and macrovascular complications was present in 657 (43.8%, 655 (43.7%, 268 (17.9% and 104 (6.93%, respectively. This interim analysis revealed that about 46% of the T2DM patients had CKD (urinary albumin creatinine ratio (UACR ≥30 mg/g and/or estimated GFR [eGFR] <60 mL/min/1.73 m 2 . The renal dysfunction as per e

  12. Mechanisms of metabolic memory and renal hypoxia as a therapeutic target in diabetic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirakawa, Yosuke; Tanaka, Tetsuhiro; Nangaku, Masaomi

    2017-05-01

    Diabetic kidney disease (DKD) is a worldwide public health problem. The definition of DKD is under discussion. Although the term DKD was originally defined as 'kidney disease specific to diabetes,' DKD frequently means chronic kidney disease with diabetes mellitus and includes not only classical diabetic nephropathy, but also kidney dysfunction as a result of nephrosclerosis and other causes. Metabolic memory plays a crucial role in the progression of various complications of diabetes, including DKD. The mechanisms of metabolic memory in DKD are supposed to include advanced glycation end-products, deoxyribonucleic acid methylation, histone modifications and non-coding ribonucleic acid including micro ribonucleic acid. Regardless of the presence of diabetes mellitus, the final common pathway in chronic kidney disease is chronic kidney hypoxia, which influences epigenetic processes, including deoxyribonucleic acid methylation, histone modification, and conformational changes in micro ribonucleic acid and chromatin. Therefore, hypoxia and oxidative stress are appropriate targets of therapies against DKD. Prolyl hydroxylase domain inhibitor enhances the defensive mechanisms against hypoxia. Bardoxolone methyl protects against oxidative stress, and can even reverse impaired renal function; a phase 2 trial with considerable attention to heart complications is currently ongoing in Japan. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Diabetes Investigation published by Asian Association for the Study of Diabetes (AASD) and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  13. Implementation of a pragmatic randomized trial of screening for chronic kidney disease to improve care among non-diabetic hypertensive veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta, Carmen A; Frigaard, Martin; Rubinsky, Anna D; Rolon, Leticia; Lo, Lowell; Voora, Santhi; Seal, Karen; Tuot, Delphine; Chao, Shirley; Lui, Kimberly; Chiao, Phillip; Powe, Neil; Shlipak, Michael

    2017-04-12

    Whether screening for chronic kidney disease (CKD) can improve the care of persons at high risk for complications remains uncertain. We describe the design and early implementation experience of a pilot, cluster-randomized pragmatic trial to evaluate the feasibility, implementation, and effectiveness of a "triple marker" CKD screening program (creatinine, cystatin C and albumin to creatinine ratio) for improving care among hypertensive veterans seen in primary care at one Veterans Administration Hospital. Non-diabetic hypertensive veterans age 18-80 without known CKD were randomized in clusters determined by primary care provider (unit of randomization) into three arms. Usual care will be compared with two incrementally intensified treatment strategies: (1) screen for CKD followed by patient and provider education or (2) screen-educate plus a clinical pharmacist-led CKD and BP management program. The primary clinical outcome is systolic blood pressure (BP) change from baseline. Secondary clinical outcome is BP control. The primary process outcomes is triple marker screening (across three arms), and secondary process outcomes include use of inhibitors of the renin-angiotensin system (ACE/ARB) overall and in persons with albuminuria, CKD recognition by PCP, use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and NSAID education by PCP. The design uses the Veterans Health Administration electronic health record (EHR) to identify participants, deliver the interventions and ascertain study outcomes. Assessment of the program implementation will use the Reach, Effectiveness, Adoption, Implementation, and Maintenance (RE-AIM) framework. Study duration is 12 months. A total of 1,819 patients have been randomized within 41 provider clusters. The median age (interquartile range) is 68 years (61-72), and 99% of participants are male. Approximately 16% are Black, and 5% Hispanic. In the first 6 months of the trial, 434 triple marker screening tests have been ordered, and

  14. Allium vegetable intakes and the incidence of cardiovascular disease, hypertension, chronic kidney disease, and type 2 diabetes in adults: a longitudinal follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadoran, Zahra; Mirmiran, Parvin; Momenan, Amir A; Azizi, Fereidoun

    2017-09-01

    This study investigated the association between habitual consumption of allium vegetables (garlic and onion) and the incidence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) outcomes, hypertension (HTN), chronic kidney disease (CKD), and type 2 diabetes (T2D). Adult men and women, participated in the Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study (2006-2008 to 2012-2014), were recruited. Habitual dietary intakes were assessed using a validated semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire. Demographics, anthropometrics, blood pressure, and biochemical variables were evaluated at baseline and during follow-up examinations. Multivariate Cox proportional hazard regression models adjusted for potential confounders were used to estimate the development of CVD outcomes, HTN, CKD, and T2D in relation to allium vegetable intakes. Mean age of participants (44.2% men) was 40.3 ± 14.3 years, at baseline. During an average of 6 years of follow-up, the incidence rate of CVD outcomes, HTN, CKD, and T2D were 3.3, 15.5, 17.9, and 6.7%, respectively. A higher habitual intake of allium vegetables was associated with a 64% reduced risk of CVD outcomes (hazard ratio = 0.36, 95% confidence interval, CI = 0.18-0.71; P for trend = 0.011), 32% lower incidence of CKD (hazard ratio = 0.69, 95% CI = 0.46-0.98; P for trend = 0.11), and 26% decreased HTN development (hazard ratio = 0.74, 95% CI = 0.54-1.00; P for trend = 0.06). No significant association was observed between allium vegetable intakes and the risk of T2D. Allium vegetable intake was related to 6 years' changes of triglyceride levels (β = -0.81, P = 0.01) and creatinine clearance (β = 0.56, P = 0.01). Data of the current study support the available mechanistic findings regarding cardiorenal protective properties of allium vegetables.

  15. High-normal albuminuria and incident chronic kidney disease in a male nondiabetic population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashitani, Aki; Ueno, Toshinori; Nakashima, Ayumu; Doi, Shigehiro; Yamane, Kiminori; Masaki, Takao

    2017-12-26

    High-normal albuminuria is an important risk factor for incident chronic kidney disease in diabetic populations, in contrast to an uncertain association in nondiabetic populations. This study aimed to reveal the relationship between high-normal albuminuria and incident chronic kidney disease in a Japanese nondiabetic population. A 10-year follow-up retrospective cohort study was performed involving 1378 Japanese men (mean age 44 ± 5.3 years) without chronic kidney disease and diabetes mellitus. Chronic kidney disease was diagnosed as either estimated glomerular filtration rate chronic kidney disease over the 10-year follow-up period. Median annual estimated glomerular filtration rate decline showed a deterioration with increasing quartiles of baseline albumin-to-creatinine ratio (P = 0.004). Participants who had a baseline albumin-to-creatinine ratio in the highest quartile (5.9-28.9 mg/g) were more likely to develop micro- or macroalbuminuria (odds ratio: 16.23, 95% confidence interval 6.56-54.03), chronic kidney disease (odds ratio: 2.48, 95% confidence interval 1.64-3.82), and hypertension (odds ratio 2.06, 95% confidence interval 1.30-3.31), but not diabetes mellitus compared with those who had an albumin-to-creatinine ratio in the lowest quartile (1.3-3.6 mg/g) after adjustment for potential confounders. High-normal albuminuria was associated with incident chronic kidney disease in this Japanese nondiabetic male population.

  16. Allopurinol Against Progression of Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golmohammadi, Sima; Almasi, Afshin; Manouchehri, M; Omrani, Hamid Reza; Zandkarimi, Mohammad Reza

    2017-07-01

    Hyperuricemia is common in approximately 50% of patients with kidney failure due to decreased uric acid excretion, and it has been recently known as an independent factor in the progression of renal insufficiency. Allopurinol inhibits the production of uric acid. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of allopurinol on chronic kidney disease progression. In a clinical trial, patients with stages 3 and 4 of chronic kidney disease were divided into two groups to receive allopurinol, 100 mg, daily and placebo for 12 months. Patients' kidney function and serum uric acid levels were assessed at baseline and 3, 6, and 12 months after initial administration. Subgroups of patients with severe and mild glomerular filtration rate (GFR) impairment (GFR, 15 mL/min/1.73 m2 to 30 mL/min/1.73 m2 and 30 mL/min/1.73 m2 to 60 mL/min/1.73 m2, respectively), were compared between the groups. Serum uric acid levels decreased significantly during after 12 months of allopurinol administration (P = .004). In patients with severe GFR impairment, serum creatinine levels did not decrease significantly and there was no significant increase in GFR, but in those with mild GFR impairment, serum creatinine levels decreased and GFR increase significantly (P chronic kidney disease progression and could be administered with other effective medications for controlling the kidney disease.

  17. Recent Developments in Epigenetics of Acute and Chronic Kidney Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Marpadga A.; Natarajan, Rama

    2015-01-01

    The growing epidemic of obesity and diabetes, the aging population as well as prevalence of drug abuse has led to significant increases in the rates of the closely associated acute and chronic kidney diseases, including diabetic nephropathy. Furthermore, evidence shows that parental behavior and diet can affect the phenotype of subsequent generations via epigenetic transmission mechanisms. These data suggest a strong influence of the environment on disease susceptibility and that, apart from genetic susceptibility, epigenetic mechanisms need to be evaluated to gain critical new information about kidney diseases. Epigenetics is the study of processes that control gene expression and phenotype without alterations in the underlying DNA sequence. Epigenetic modifications, including cytosine DNA methylation and covalent post translational modifications of histones in chromatin are part of the epigenome, the interface between the stable genome and the variable environment. This dynamic epigenetic layer responds to external environmental cues to influence the expression of genes associated with disease states. The field of epigenetics has seen remarkable growth in the past few years with significant advances in basic biology, contributions to human disease, as well as epigenomics technologies. Further understanding of how the renal cell epigenome is altered by metabolic and other stimuli can yield novel new insights into the pathogenesis of kidney diseases. In this review, we have discussed the current knowledge on the role of epigenetic mechanisms (primarily DNA me and histone modifications) in acute and chronic kidney diseases, and their translational potential to identify much needed new therapies. PMID:25993323

  18. Recent developments in epigenetics of acute and chronic kidney diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Marpadga A; Natarajan, Rama

    2015-08-01

    The growing epidemic of obesity and diabetes, the aging population as well as prevalence of drug abuse has led to significant increases in the rates of the closely associated acute and chronic kidney diseases, including diabetic nephropathy. Furthermore, evidence shows that parental behavior and diet can affect the phenotype of subsequent generations via epigenetic transmission mechanisms. These data suggest a strong influence of the environment on disease susceptibility and that, apart from genetic susceptibility, epigenetic mechanisms need to be evaluated to gain critical new information about kidney diseases. Epigenetics is the study of processes that control gene expression and phenotype without alterations in the underlying DNA sequence. Epigenetic modifications, including cytosine DNA methylation and covalent post-translational modifications of histones in chromatin, are part of the epigenome, the interface between the stable genome and the variable environment. This dynamic epigenetic layer responds to external environmental cues to influence the expression of genes associated with disease states. The field of epigenetics has seen remarkable growth in the past few years with significant advances in basic biology, contributions to human disease, as well as epigenomics technologies. Further understanding of how the renal cell epigenome is altered by metabolic and other stimuli can yield novel new insights into the pathogenesis of kidney diseases. In this review, we have discussed the current knowledge on the role of epigenetic mechanisms (primarily DNAme and histone modifications) in acute and chronic kidney diseases, and their translational potential to identify much needed new therapies.

  19. Better recovery of kidney function in patients with de novo chronic kidney disease after partial nephrectomy compared with those with pre-existing chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Toshio; Kondo, Tsunenori; Iizuka, Junpei; Omae, Kenji; Kobayashi, Hirohito; Hashimoto, Yasunobu; Yoshida, Kazuhiko; Tanabe, Kazunari

    2014-06-01

    We compared kidney functional recovery between patients with pre-existing chronic kidney disease, those with de novo chronic kidney disease and those with normal kidney function, after partial nephrectomy. A total of 311 patients who underwent partial nephrectomy at Tokyo Women's Medical University Hospital, Tokyo, Japan, between January 2004 and July 2011 with sufficient kidney functional data participated in the study. Patients with pre-existing chronic kidney disease (group1: 78 patients) were defined as those with estimated glomerular filtration rate under 60 mL/min/m(2) before partial nephrectomy. Patients with de novo chronic kidney disease (group 2: 49) were defined as those with estimated glomerular filtration rate over 60 mL/min/m(2) before surgery and who developed estimated glomerular filtration rate under 60 mL/min/m(2) 3 months after partial nephrectomy. Normal patients (group 3: 184) were defined as those with estimated glomerular filtration rate over 60 mL/min/m(2) both before and after partial nephrectomy. Group 1 was associated with older age and higher comorbidity, including hypertension and diabetes mellitus, compared with other groups. R.E.N.A.L. score was not significantly different between the groups. Although the percent change of estimated glomerular filtration rate between the preoperative period and 3 months after partial nephrectomy in group 2 was significantly decreased compared with that in other groups (group 1: -6.8%, group 2: -18%, group 3: -7.3%), the renal functional recovery between 3 and 12 months after partial nephrectomy in group 2 was better than that in other groups (group 1: -0.5%, group 2: 5.6%, group 3: -0.4%). Patients with de novo chronic kidney disease had better kidney functional recovery than the other two groups, which might suggest that they were surgically assaulted and developed chronic kidney disease in the early postoperative period, and were essentially different from those with pre-existing chronic kidney

  20. Treatment and Prevention of Common Complications of Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheikh Salahuddin Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease (CKD is a worldwide public health problem with an increasing incidence and prevalence. Outcomes of CKD include not only complications of decreased kidney function and cardiovascular disease but also kidney failure causing increased morbidity and mortality. Unfortunately, CKD is often undetected and undertreated because of its insidious onset, variable progression, and length of time to overt kidney failure. Diabetes is now the leading cause of CKD requiring renal replacement therapy in many parts of the world, and its prevalence is increasing disproportionately in the developing countries. This review article outlines the current recommendations from various clinical guidelines and research studies for treatment, prevention and delaying the progression of both CKD and its common complications such as hypertension, anemia, renal osteodystrophy, electrolyte and acid-base imbalance, and hyperlipidemia. Recommendations for nutrition in CKD and measures adopted for early diabetic kidney disease to prevent further progression have also been reviewed. There is strong evidence that early detection and management of CKD can prevent or reduce disease progression, decrease complications and improve outcomes. Evidence supports that achieving optimal glucose control, blood pressure, reduction in albuminuria with a multifactorial intervention slows the progression of CKD. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin-II receptor antagonists are most effective because of their unique ability to decrease proteinuria, a factor important for the progression of CKD.

  1. Determinants of renal shape in chronic kidney disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakazato, Takashi; Ikehira, Hiroo; Imasawa, Toshiyuki

    2016-10-01

    The determinants of renal shape are not well established. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between the renal shape, as measured by ultrasound, and the clinical characteristics in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. The study included 121 CKD patients who had undergone kidney biopsy. The renal shape was defined by: (1) the renal shape index: renal length/(renal width + renal thickness) and (2) the renal width/length. IgA nephritis patients (excluding patients with diabetes), comprised the largest subgroup (n = 49) and were analyzed separately. The correlation analyses and two-sample Student's t test results showed that age, eGFR, BMI, cortex volume fraction measured by MRI (cortex volume/renal volume), percentage of global sclerosis, weight, sex, hypertension and diabetes were significantly correlated with the renal shape in both kidneys. In a stepwise multiple linear regression analysis, old age and high BMI were independently associated with plump kidney. As for the left renal shape index, low cortex volume fraction was also independently associated with plump kidney. In the IgA nephritis patient subgroup, the cortex volume fraction was the most significant factor contributing to the left renal shape index (r = 0.50, p renal shape than renal function in CKD patients. The left renal cortex volume fraction was also an independent determinant and a more important factor in IgA nephritis patients.

  2. Distribution of cardiovascular disease and retinopathy in patients with type 2 diabetes according to different classification systems for chronic kidney disease: a cross-sectional analysis of the renal insufficiency and cardiovascular events (RIACE) Italian multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugliese, Giuseppe; Solini, Anna; Bonora, Enzo; Orsi, Emanuela; Zerbini, Gianpaolo; Fondelli, Cecilia; Gruden, Gabriella; Cavalot, Franco; Lamacchia, Olga; Trevisan, Roberto; Vedovato, Monica; Penno, Giuseppe

    2014-03-13

    The National Kidney Foundation's Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative (NKF's KDOQI) staging system for chronic kidney disease (CKD) is based primarily on estimated GFR (eGFR). This study aimed at assessing whether reclassification of subjects with type 2 diabetes using two recent classifications based on both eGFR and albuminuria, the Alberta Kidney Disease Network (AKDN) and the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO), provides a better definition of burden from cardiovascular disease (CVD) and diabetic retinopathy (DR) than the NKF's KDOQI classification. This is a cross-sectional analysis of patients with type 2 diabetes (n = 15,773) from the Renal Insufficiency And Cardiovascular Events Italian Multicenter Study, consecutively visiting 19 Diabetes Clinics throughout Italy in years 2007-2008. Exclusion criteria were dialysis or renal transplantation. CKD was defined based on eGFR, as calculated from serum creatinine by the simplified Modification of Diet in Renal Disease Study equation, and albuminuria, as measured by immunonephelometry or immunoturbidimetry. DR was assessed by dilated fundoscopy. Prevalent CVD, total and by vascular bed, was assessed from medical history by recording previous documented major acute events. Though prevalence of complications increased with increasing CKD severity with all three classifications, it differed significantly between NKF's KDOQI stages and AKDN or KDIGO risk categories. The AKDN and KDIGO systems resulted in appropriate reclassification of uncomplicated patients in the lowest risk categories and a more graded independent association with CVD and DR than the NKF's KDOQI classification. However, CVD, but not DR prevalence was higher in the lowest risk categories of the new classifications than in the lowest stages of the NKF's KDOQI, due to the inclusion of subjects with reduced eGFR without albuminuria. CVD prevalence differed also among eGFR and albuminuria categories grouped into AKDN and KDIGO

  3. Hereditary Causes of Kidney Stones and Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edvardsson, Vidar O.; Goldfarb, David S.; Lieske, John C.; Beara-Lasic, Lada; Anglani, Franca; Milliner, Dawn S.; Palsson, Runolfur

    2013-01-01

    Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT) deficiency, cystinuria, Dent disease, familial hypomagnesemia with hypercalciuria and nephrocalcinosis (FHHNC) and primary hyperoxaluria (PH) are rare but important causes of severe kidney stone disease and/or chronic kidney disease in children. Recurrent kidney stone disease and nephrocalcinosis, particularly in pre-pubertal children, should alert the physician to the possibility of an inborn error of metabolism as the underlying cause. Unfortunately, the lack of recognition and knowledge of the five disorders has frequently resulted in an unacceptable delay in diagnosis and treatment, sometimes with grave consequences. A high index of suspicion coupled with early diagnosis may reduce or even prevent the serious long-term complications of these diseases. In this paper, we review the epidemiology, clinical features, diagnosis, treatment and outcome of patients with APRT deficiency, cystinuria, Dent disease, FHHNC and PH with emphasis on childhood manifestations. PMID:23334384

  4. Nighttime Systolic Blood-Pressure Load Is Correlated with Target-Organ Damage Independent of Ambulatory Blood-Pressure Level in Patients with Non-Diabetic Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Wang

    Full Text Available The impacts of blood pressure (BP load on target-organ damage in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD are largely unclear. We examined whether BP load is correlated with target-organ damage (TOD in Chinese CKD patients independent of BP level.We recruited 1219 CKD patients admitted to our hospital division in this cross-sectional study. The TOD were measured by estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR, proteinuria, left ventricular mass index (LVMI and carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT in this study. Univariate and multivariate linear analyses were used to evaluate the relationship between systolic blood pressure (SBP load, diastolic blood pressure (DBP load and these renal, cardiovascular parameters.In multivariable-adjusted models, BP load and ambulatory BP levels both independently correlated with LVMI, eGFR and proteinuria in all groups of CKD patients (p0.008, P<0.05 in multivariable-adjusted model which already including the 24-h BP. BP load did not refine this correlation based on the 24-h BP level in diabetic CKD patients.Night-time SBP load was correlated with TOD in patients with non-diabetic chronic kidney disease independent of BP level.

  5. Metformin in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes and Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inzucchi, Silvio E.; Lipska, Kasia J.; Mayo, Helen; Bailey, Clifford J.; McGuire, Darren K.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Metformin is widely viewed as the best initial pharmacological option to lower glucose concentrations in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. However, the drug is contraindicated in many individuals with impaired kidney function because of concerns of lactic acidosis. OBJECTIVE To assess the risk of lactic acidosis associated with metformin use in individuals with impaired kidney function. EVIDENCE ACQUISITION In July 2014, we searched the MEDLINE and Cochrane databases for English-language articles pertaining to metformin, kidney disease, and lactic acidosis in humans between 1950 and June 2014. We excluded reviews, letters, editorials, case reports, small case series, and manuscripts that did not directly pertain to the topic area or that met other exclusion criteria. Of an original 818 articles, 65 were included in this review, including pharmacokinetic/metabolic studies, large case series, retrospective studies, meta-analyses, and a clinical trial. RESULTS Although metformin is renally cleared, drug levels generally remain within the therapeutic range and lactate concentrations are not substantially increased when used in patients with mild to moderate chronic kidney disease (estimated glomerular filtration rates, 30-60 mL/min per 1.73 m2). The overall incidence of lactic acidosis in metformin users varies across studies from approximately 3 per 100 000 person-years to 10 per 100 000 person-years and is generally indistinguishable from the background rate in the overall population with diabetes. Data suggesting an increased risk of lactic acidosis in metformin-treated patients with chronic kidney disease are limited, and no randomized controlled trials have been conducted to test the safety of metformin in patients with significantly impaired kidney function. Population-based studies demonstrate that metformin may be prescribed counter to prevailing guidelines suggesting a renal risk in up to 1 in 4 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

  6. Children with Chronic Kidney Disease: Tips for Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Donate A to Z Health Guide Children With Chronic Kidney Disease: Tips for Parents Print Email If your child has been diagnosed with chronic kidney disease, you are no doubt feeling distressed and bewildered. ...

  7. Cholesterol Crystal Embolism and Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuezhu; Bayliss, George; Zhuang, Shougang

    2017-05-24

    Renal disease caused by cholesterol crystal embolism (CCE) occurs when cholesterol crystals become lodged in small renal arteries after small pieces of atheromatous plaques break off from the aorta or renal arteries and shower the downstream vascular bed. CCE is a multisystemic disease but kidneys are particularly vulnerable to atheroembolic disease, which can cause an acute, subacute, or chronic decline in renal function. This life-threatening disease may be underdiagnosed and overlooked as a cause of chronic kidney disease (CKD) among patients with advanced atherosclerosis. CCE can result from vascular surgery, angiography, or administration of anticoagulants. Atheroembolic renal disease has various clinical features that resemble those found in other kidney disorders and systemic diseases. It is commonly misdiagnosed in clinic, but confirmed by characteristic renal biopsy findings. Therapeutic options are limited, and prognosis is considered to be poor. Expanding knowledge of atheroembolic renal disease due to CCE opens perspectives for recognition, diagnosis, and treatment of this cause of progressive renal insufficiency.

  8. Epidemiology of chronic kidney disease in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harambat, Jérôme; van Stralen, Karlijn J.; Kim, Jon Jin; Tizard, E. Jane

    2012-01-01

    In the past 30 years there have been major improvements in the care of children with chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, most of the available epidemiological data stem from end-stage renal disease (ESRD) registries and information on the earlier stages of pediatric CKD is still limited. The

  9. Chronic Kidney Disease, Basal Insulin Glargine, and Health Outcomes in People with Dysglycemia: The ORIGIN Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papademetriou, Vasilios; Nylen, Eric S; Doumas, Michael; Probstfield, Jeff; Mann, Johannes F E; Gilbert, Richard E; Gerstein, Hertzel C

    2017-12-01

    Early stages of chronic kidney disease are associated with an increased cardiovascular risk in patients with established type 2 diabetes and macrovascular disease. The role of early stages of chronic kidney disease on macrovascular outcomes in prediabetes and early type 2 diabetes mellitus is not known. In the Outcome Reduction with an Initial Glargine Intervention (ORIGIN) trial, the introduction of insulin had no effect on cardiovascular outcomes compared with standard therapy. In this post hoc analysis of ORIGIN, we compared cardiovascular outcomes in subjects without to those with mild (Stages 1-2) or moderate chronic kidney disease (Stage 3). Τwo co-primary composite cardiovascular outcomes were assessed. The first was the composite end point of nonfatal myocardial infarction, nonfatal stroke, or death from cardiovascular causes; and the second was a composite of any of these events plus a revascularization procedure, or hospitalization for heart failure. Several secondary outcomes were prespecified, including microvascular outcomes, incident diabetes, hypoglycemia, weight, and cancers. Complete renal function data were available in 12,174 of 12,537 ORIGIN participants. A total of 8114 (67%) had no chronic kidney disease, while 4060 (33%) had chronic kidney disease stage 1-3. When compared with nonchronic kidney disease participants, the risk of developing the composite primary outcome (nonfatal myocardial infarction, nonfatal stroke, or cardiovascular death) in those with mild to moderate chronic kidney disease was 87% higher; hazard ratio (HR) 1.87; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.71-2.04 (P chronic kidney disease 1-3 was also associated with a greater than twofold higher risk for both all-cause mortality (HR 2.17; 95% CI, 1.98-2.38; P chronic kidney disease had significantly higher risk for nonfatal myocardial infarction (50%), nonfatal stroke (68%), any stroke (84%), the above composite primary end point plus revascularization or heart failure requiring

  10. Chronic kidney disease: an inherent risk factor for acute kidney injury?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Prabhleen; Rifkin, Dena E; Blantz, Roland C

    2010-09-01

    Epidemiologic evidence suggests that chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a risk factor for acute kidney injury (AKI) due to the prevalence of CKD in patients who have episodes of AKI. However, the high burden of comorbidities such as age, diabetes, peripheral vascular, cardiovascular, and liver disease accompanying CKD, and the difficulties of defining AKI in the setting of CKD make these observations difficult to interpret. These comorbidities not only could alter the course of AKI but also may be the driving force behind the epidemiologic association between CKD and AKI because of systemic changes and/or increased exposure to potential nephrotoxic risks. Here, we contend that studies suggesting that CKD is a risk factor for AKI may suffer from residual confounding and reflect an overall susceptibility to illness rather than biologic susceptibility of the kidney parenchyma to injury. In support of our argument, we discuss the clinical evidence from epidemiologic studies, and the knowledge obtained from animal models on the pathophysiology of AKI and CKD, demonstrating a preconditioning influence of the previously impaired kidneys against subsequent injury. We conclude that, under careful analysis, factors apart from the inherent pathophysiology of the diseased kidney may be responsible for the increased frequency of AKI in CKD patients, and the impact of CKD on the risk and severity of AKI needs further investigation. Moreover, certain elements in the pathophysiology of a previously injured kidney may, surprisingly, bear out to be protective against AKI.

  11. Adenosine contribution to normal renal physiology and chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyarzún, Carlos; Garrido, Wallys; Alarcón, Sebastián; Yáñez, Alejandro; Sobrevia, Luis; Quezada, Claudia; San Martín, Rody

    2017-06-01

    Adenosine is a nucleoside that is particularly interesting to many scientific and clinical communities as it has important physiological and pathophysiological roles in the kidney. The distribution of adenosine receptors has only recently been elucidated; therefore it is likely that more biological roles of this nucleoside will be unveiled in the near future. Since the discovery of the involvement of adenosine in renal vasoconstriction and regulation of local renin production, further evidence has shown that adenosine signaling is also involved in the tubuloglomerular feedback mechanism, sodium reabsorption and the adaptive response to acute insults, such as ischemia. However, the most interesting finding was the increased adenosine levels in chronic kidney diseases such as diabetic nephropathy and also in non-diabetic animal models of renal fibrosis. When adenosine is chronically increased its signaling via the adenosine receptors may change, switching to a state that induces renal damage and produces phenotypic changes in resident cells. This review discusses the physiological and pathophysiological roles of adenosine and pays special attention to the mechanisms associated with switching homeostatic nucleoside levels to increased adenosine production in kidneys affected by CKD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Diabetes Insipidus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Diabetes Inspidus Related Topics Section Navigation Kidney Disease Acquired Cystic Kidney Disease Amyloidosis & Kidney Disease Chronic Kidney ... nausea Severe dehydration can lead to seizures, permanent brain damage, and even death. Seek Immediate Care Usually, people ...

  13. Phosphorus Regulation in Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suki, Wadi N; Moore, Linda W

    2016-01-01

    Serum phosphorus levels stay relatively constant through the influence of multiple factors-such as parathyroid hormone, fibroblast growth factor 23, and vitamin D-on the kidney, bone, and digestive system. Whereas normal serum phosphorus ranges between 3 mg/dL to 4.5 mg/dL, large cross-sectional studies have shown that even people with normal kidney function are sometimes found to have levels ranging between 1.6 mg/dL and 6.2 mg/dL. While this may partially be due to diet and the factors mentioned above, total understanding of these atypical ranges of serum phosphorus remains uncertain. Risks for bone disease are high in people aged 50 and older, and this group comprises a large proportion of people who also have chronic kidney disease. Consuming diets low in calcium and high in phosphorus, especially foods with phosphate additives, further exacerbates bone turnover. Existing bone disease increases the risk for high serum phosphorus, and higher serum phosphorus has been associated with increased adverse events and cardiovascular-related mortality both in people with chronic kidney disease and in those with no evidence of disease. Once kidney function has deteriorated to end-stage disease (Stage 5), maintaining normal serum phosphorus requires dietary restrictions, phosphate-binding medications, and dialysis. Even so, normal serum phosphorus remains elusive in many patients with Stage 5 kidney disease, and researchers are testing novel targets that may inhibit intestinal transport of phosphorus to achieve better phosphate control. Protecting and monitoring bone health should also aid in controlling serum phosphorus as kidney disease advances.

  14. Renal resistive index and mortality in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledo, Clarisse; Thomas, George; Schold, Jesse D; Arrigain, Susana; Gornik, Heather L; Nally, Joseph V; Navaneethan, Sankar D

    2015-08-01

    Renal resistive index (RRI) measured by Doppler ultrasonography is associated with cardiovascular events and mortality in hypertensive, diabetic, and elderly patients. We studied the factors associated with high RRI (≥0.70) and its associations with mortality in chronic kidney disease patients without renal artery stenosis. We included 1962 patients with an estimated glomerular filtration rate of 15 to 59 mL/min per 1.73 m(2) who also had RRI measured (January 1, 2005, to October 2011) from an existing chronic kidney disease registry. Participants with renal artery stenosis (60%-99% or renal artery occlusion) were excluded. Multivariable logistic regression model was used to study factors associated with high RRI (≥0.70), and its association with mortality was studied using Kaplan-Meier plots and Cox proportional hazards model. Hypertension was prevalent in >90% of the patients. In the multivariable logistic regression, older age, female sex, diabetes mellitus, coronary artery disease, peripheral vascular disease, higher systolic blood pressure, and the use of β blockers were associated with higher odds of having RRI≥0.70. During a median follow-up of 2.2 years, 428 patients died. After adjusting for covariates, RRI≥0.70 was associated with increased mortality (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.29; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.65; Pchronic kidney disease. Noncardiovascular/non-malignancy-related deaths were higher in those with RRI≥0.70. RRI≥0.70 is associated with higher mortality in hypertensive chronic kidney disease patients without clinically significant renal artery stenosis after accounting for other significant risk factors. Its evaluation may allow early identification of those who are at risk thereby potentially preventing or delaying adverse outcomes. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. The Warburg Effect in Diabetic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guanshi; Darshi, Manjula; Sharma, Kumar

    2018-03-01

    Diabetic kidney disease (DKD) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in diabetic patients. Defining risk factors for DKD using a reductionist approach has proven challenging. Integrative omics-based systems biology tools have shed new insights in our understanding of DKD and have provided several key breakthroughs for identifying novel predictive and diagnostic biomarkers. In this review, we highlight the role of the Warburg effect in DKD and potential regulating factors such as sphingomyelin, fumarate, and pyruvate kinase muscle isozyme M2 in shifting glucose flux from complete oxidation in mitochondria to the glycolytic pathway and its principal branches. With the development of highly sensitive instruments and more advanced automatic bioinformatics tools, we believe that omics analyses and imaging techniques will focus more on singular-cell-level studies, which will allow in-depth understanding of DKD and pave the path for personalized kidney precision medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. [KIDNEY DISEASE IN DIABETIC PATIENTS – THE ROLE OF FAMILY MEDICINE PHYSICIAN].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, V Bralić; Baretić, Maja; Pavić, E

    2016-12-01

    The alarming rates of diabetes mellitus incidence and progression continue despite deployment of all current treatments. Kidney disease can be a particularly devastating complication, as it is associated with significant reductions in both length and quality of life. A variety of forms of kidney disease can be seen in people with diabetes, including diabetic nephropathy, ischemic damage related to vascular disease and hypertension, as well as other renal diseases that are unrelated to diabetes. Following an extensive PubMed search, this review provides a brief view on the screening for chronic kidney disease (CKD) in people with diabetes, how to treat them to slow down the progression of CKD and when to refer them to specialist care. This review also emphasizes the basic challenge in treating diabetic patients, which is to shift the main criterion from the disease-oriented to person-centered approach in the context of treating the patient as a whole.

  17. Epidemiology of diabetic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reutens, Anne T

    2013-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of diabetes has led to DKD becoming the leading cause of ESRD in many regions. The economic cost of DKD will grow to prohibitive amounts unless strategies to prevent its onset or progression are urgently implemented. In type 1 and type 2 diabetes, the presence of microalbuminuria and macroalbuminuria confers increased risk of developing ESRD and of death. Comparison of recent studies with earlier historical studies shows that the incidence of ESRD and death has decreased in DKD. Increased risk of albuminuria has been identified in certain non-European ethnic groups. However, the initial concept of progression of DKD as an albuminuric phenotype involving development of microalbuminuria, macroalbuminuria, and then ESRD has had to be modified. Albumin excretion frequently regresses, and GFR can decline without abnormality in albumin excretion. There is emerging evidence that changes in renal function occurring early in the course of diabetes predict future outcomes. The major challenges are to prevent DKD onset, to detect it early, and to improve DKD outcomes globally. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. At Risk for Kidney Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Heart Disease Mineral & Bone Disorder Causes of Chronic Kidney Disease Diabetes and high blood pressure are the most ... blood vessels in your kidneys. Other causes of kidney disease Other causes of kidney disease include a genetic ...

  19. Growth in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janjua, Halima S; Mahan, John D

    2011-09-01

    Poor growth is a common sequela of CKD in childhood. It not only affects the psychosocial development of a child but also has significant effects even in the adult life. The multifactorial etiology and severe consequences of growth failure in CKD warrant evaluation of all the modifiable and nonmodifiable causes. Treatment strategies must be directed toward the specific factors for each child with CKD. Among the various metabolic, nutritional, and hormonal disturbances complicating CKD, disordered growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor-1 axis are important contributors toward poor growth in children with CKD. CKD is recognized as a state of GH resistance rather than GH deficiency, with multiple mechanisms contributing to this GH resistance. Recombinant GH (rGH) therapy can be used in this population to accelerate growth velocity. Although its use has been shown to be effective and safe in children with CKD, there continues to be some uncertainty and reluctance among practitioners and families regarding its usage, thereby resulting in a surprisingly low use in children with CKD. This review focuses on the pathogenesis of growth failure, its effect, and management strategies in children with CKD. Copyright © 2011 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Rejuvenating of Kidney Tissues on Alloxan Induced Diabetic Mice under the Effect of Momordica charantia

    OpenAIRE

    Bhaskar Sharma; Mohd. Sufiyan Siddiqui; Gurudayal Ram; Ranjeet Kumar Yadav; Arti Kumari; Gaurav Sharma; Nakuleshwar Dut Jasuja

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disorder in human and responsible for different complications and also causes mortality and morbidity. A wide number of herbal products are employed in the treatment of diabetes for their better efficacy and safety compared to synthetic medicine. The present studies have established the antidiabetic potential and rejuvenating capacity of kidney tissues under the effect of extract. Diabetes was induced in the Swiss albino mice by injecting alloxan at the dose of...

  1. Dyslipidemia in children with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saland, Jeffrey M; Pierce, Christopher B; Mitsnefes, Mark M; Flynn, Joseph T; Goebel, Jens; Kupferman, Juan C; Warady, Bradley A; Furth, Susan L

    2010-12-01

    Dyslipidemia, a known risk factor for atherosclerosis, is frequent among both adults and children with chronic kidney disease. Here, we describe the prevalence and pattern of dyslipidemia from a cross-sectional analysis of 391 children aged 1-16 years, enrolled in the multicenter Chronic Kidney Disease in Children (CKiD) study, with a median glomerular filtration rate (GFR), measured by the plasma disappearance of iohexol, of 43 ml/min per 1.73 m2. Multivariate analysis was applied to adjust for age, gender, body mass index (BMI), GFR, and the urinary protein/creatinine ratio. Proteinuria was in the nephrotic range in 44 and the BMI exceeded the 95th percentile in 57 patients of this cohort. Baseline lipid analysis found a high prevalence of hypertriglyceridemia in 126, increased non-HDL-C in 62, and reduced HDL-C in 83. Overall, 177 children had dyslipidemia, of whom 79 had combined dyslipidemia. Lower GFR was associated with higher triglycerides, lower HDL-C, and higher non-HDL-C. Nephrotic-range proteinuria was significantly associated with dyslipidemia and combined dyslipidemia. Compared with children with a GFR>50, children with a GFRchildren with moderate chronic kidney disease, dyslipidemia is common and is associated with lower GFR, nephrotic proteinuria, and non-renal factors including age and obesity.

  2. Chronic kidney disease and cardiovascular risk : epidemiology, mechanisms, and prevention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gansevoort, Ron T.; Correa-Rotter, Ricardo; Hemmelgarn, Brenda R.; Jafar, Tazeen H.; Heerspink, Hiddo J. Lambers; Mann, Johannes F.; Matsushita, Kunihiro; Wen, Chi Pang

    2013-01-01

    Since the first description of the association between chronic kidney disease and heart disease, many epidemiological studies have confirmed and extended this finding. As chronic kidney disease progresses, kidney-specific risk factors for cardiovascular events and disease come into play. As a

  3. [DIAGNOSTIC APPROACH TO PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vučak, J; VučK, E; Balint, I

    2016-12-01

    According to consensus definition, chronic kidney disease (CKD) includes urinary excretion of albumin >30 mg/day and/ or reduction in kidney function defined as a decrease in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) <60 mL/min/1.73 m2 for a period longer than three months, in the presence of kidney tissue damage verified by imaging or histologic methods. In developed world, the first cause of CKD is diabetes, followed by arterial hypertension, and the less frequent causes are inflammatory disease (glomerulonephritis, interstitial nephritis) and congenital condition (polycystic kidney disease). Currently, there is valid classification under the acronym CGA, where C stands for the cause, G for glomerular filtration rate (GFR category) and A for the level of albuminuria category. In early stages, patients usually have no symptoms but there are changes in creatinine values, estimated GFR (eGFR) reduction and presence of albuminuria, especially in patients at risk. Determining the grade of renal impairment is important because of different approaches to treatment, monitoring, expected complications, and patient education. Due to improved diagnostic methods and population aging, CKD is diagnosed ever more increasingly. Family physicians should be familiar with the basic principles of screening and diagnosis of CKD to provide them with appropriate care in collaboration with secondary and tertiary health care.

  4. Chronic Disease and Childhood Development: Kidney Disease and Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Susan D.; Simmons, Roberta G.

    As part of a larger study of transplantation and chronic disease and the family, 124 children (10-18 years old) who were chronically ill with kidney disease (n=72) or were a year or more post-transplant (n=52) were included in a study focusing on the effects of chronic kidney disease and transplantation on children's psychosocial development. Ss…

  5. Chronic Kidney Disease and Lipid Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubovic, Sandra Vegar; Kristic, Spomenka; Prevljak, Sabina; Pasic, Irmina Sefic

    2016-06-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) represents a serious public health problem due to the increase in incidence and prevalence of this disease worldwide. Given the significant morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular disease (CVD) in the population of patients with CKD, and the fact that dyslipidemia itself is a risk factor for CVD, increases the importance of lipid metabolism study in patients with CKD. Evaluate the lipid status of patients with chronic kidney disease. A one-year prospective study included 150 adult patients who were in various stages of chronic renal failure (stage I to IV). Estimate of creatinine clearance was performed using Cockroft-Goult formula. The classification of patients according to stages of chronic renal insufficiency was performed in accordance with the criteria of Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative (K/DOQI). Of the total number of patients (N=150) there was 71 males and 79 females. The mean age of patients was 55.43 years. Average values of serum cholesterol were highest in patients with stage II renal disease and the lowest in patients classified as stage IV (5.76±1.60 mmol/L vs. 5.07±1.88 mmol/L). Analysis of the average value of triglycerides in blood show a slight increase through the stages of CKD in a manner that patients classified into stage I have low serum triglyceride levels (1.73±1.17 mmol/L (range 0.61 to 5.5 mmol/L), and patients classified in stage III the highest value 2.13±1.11 mmol/L (range 0.62 to 4.66 mmol/L). Average cholesterol levels does not statistically significantly change with progression of chronic renal disease. There is an almost linear increase in average triglyceride levels in chronic renal disease. Triglyceride levels in serum begins to increase in the early stage of chronic renal disease and reach the peak in stage IV.

  6. Extending Metformin Use in Diabetic Kidney Disease: A Pharmacokinetic Study in Stage 4 Diabetic Nephropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajith Munasinghe Dissanayake

    2017-07-01

    Discussion: In our patient cohorts with diabetes and stage 4 chronic kidney disease, treatment with 4 weeks of low-dose metformin was not associated with adverse safety outcomes and revealed stable pharmacokinetics. Our study supports the liberalization of metformin use in this population and supports the use of metformin assays for more individualized dosing.

  7. Kidney and Liver Function Parameters in Alloxan-Induced Diabetic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aloe barbadensis juice extract has been reported to possess hypoglycaemic property but the effects of its use on kidney and liver functions in diabetic animals have not been well investigated. This study investigated some biochemical parameters in the liver and kidney of alloxan-induced diabetic rats treated with Aloe ...

  8. Chronic kidney disease in HIV patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakri, S.; Rasyid, H.; Kasim, H.; Katu, S.

    2018-03-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a health problem in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) population. Prediction of CKD in HIV patients needsto have done. This study aimis to identify the prevalence of CKD in HIV patients.Thisis a cross-sectional studyofmale and female, age 18-60 years old, diagnosedHIVat Wahidin Sudirohusodo & Hasanuddin University Hospital Makassar. Diagnosed as CKD if estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) HIV patients included in the analyses. Distribution of CKD, showed 3 (3.5%) subjects with eGFRHIV populations in Makassar is still quite low.

  9. Male Sexual Dysfunction and Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edey, Matthew M.

    2017-01-01

    Male sexual dysfunction is common in chronic kidney disease (CKD), particularly in end-stage renal disease. Historically, this cause of considerable morbidity has been under-reported and under-recognized. The ideal approach to diagnosis and management remains unclear due to a paucity of good quality data, but an understanding of the pathophysiology is necessary in order to address the burden of this important complication of CKD. This paper will review the endocrine dysfunction that occurs in renal disease, particularly the hypothalamic–pituitary–gonadal axis, discuss the causes of erectile dysfunction, infertility, and altered body image and libido in these patients and suggest appropriate treatment interventions. PMID:28382300

  10. CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE RAAS blockade and diastolic heart failure in chronic kidney disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franssen, Casper F. M.; Navis, Gerjan

    New data from Ahmed et al. show that discharge prescriptions for renin-angiotensin-aldosterone inhibitor therapy are associated with a significant reduction in all-cause mortality in elderly patients with diastolic heart failure and chronic kidney disease (CKD). These observational data support the

  11. Sleep disorders and chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maung, Stephanie C; El Sara, Ammar; Chapman, Cherylle; Cohen, Danielle; Cukor, Daniel

    2016-05-06

    Sleep disorders have a profound and well-documented impact on overall health and quality of life in the general population. In patients with chronic disease, sleep disorders are more prevalent, with an additional morbidity and mortality burden. The complex and dynamic relationship between sleep disorders and chronic kidney disease (CKD) remain relatively little investigated. This article presents an overview of sleep disorders in patients with CKD, with emphasis on relevant pathophysiologic underpinnings and clinical presentations. Evidence-based interventions will be discussed, in the context of individual sleep disorders, namely sleep apnea, insomnia, restless leg syndrome and excessive daytime sleepiness. Limitations of the current knowledge as well as future research directions will be highlighted, with a final discussion of different conceptual frameworks of the relationship between sleep disorders and CKD.

  12. Chronic kidney disease in disadvantaged populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Garcia-Garcia

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The increased burden of chronic kidney disease (CKD in disadvantaged populations is due to both global factors and population-specific issues. Low socioeconomic status and poor access to care contribute to health care disparities and exacerbate the negative effects of genetic or biological predisposition. Provision of appropriate renal care to these populations requires a two-pronged approach: expanding the reach of dialysis through development of low-cost alternatives that can be practiced in remote locations, and implementation and evaluation of cost-effective prevention strategies. Kidney transplantation should be promoted by expansion of deceased donor transplant programs and use of inexpensive, generic immunosuppressive drugs. The message of World Kidney Day 2015 is that a concerted attack against the diseases that lead to end-stage renal disease, by increasing community outreach, better education, improved economic opportunity, and access to preventive medicine for those at highest risk, could end the unacceptable relationship between CKD and disadvantage in these communities.

  13. Healthy hair starts with a healthy body: hair stylists as lay health advisors to prevent chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madigan, Mary E; Smith-Wheelock, Linda; Krein, Sarah L

    2007-07-01

    Chronic kidney disease affects one in nine Americans. Diabetes and hypertension account for nearly three quarters of all kidney failure cases. Disproportionate rates of chronic kidney disease, diabetes, and hypertension have been observed among African Americans. More than 70% of all kidney failure cases caused by diabetes and hypertension could have been prevented or delayed with healthy lifestyles and medications. Approximately 14% of the population living in Michigan is African American. Despite this small proportion, 47% of patients on dialysis and 45% of those on the kidney transplant waiting list are African American. Risk of end-stage kidney failure is 4 times greater among African Americans than among whites. The National Kidney Foundation of Michigan developed the Healthy Hair Starts with a Healthy Body (Healthy Hair) campaign to educate African American men and women about their disease risks and to motivate prevention behaviors. The campaign trains African American hair stylists to promote healthy behaviors with their clients through a "health chat" and by providing diabetes and hypertension risk assessment information and incentives. Since 1999, Healthy Hair has trained nearly 700 stylists and reached more than 14,000 clients in eight Michigan cities. Information collected through a client "Chat Form" suggests a number of positive behavioral results. With nearly 60% of clients indicating that they have taken steps to prevent diabetes, hypertension, and chronic kidney disease or to seek a physician's advice, the Healthy Hair program appears to be effective in the short term in prompting attention to healthy behaviors and increasing risk awareness.

  14. Comorbidities as risk factors of chronic kidney disease in HIV-infected persons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zofia Marchewka

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Significant survival prolongation in HIV-infected patients due to effective antiretroviral therapy is connected with increasing prevalence of chronic non-infective diseases in this population, among them chronic kidney disease. The pathogenesis of kidney disease in the setting of HIV includes conditions specific for HIV infection: direct effect of the virus, stage of immunodeficiency and drug toxicity. Chronic comorbidities, such as diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia, are additional significant risk factors of kidney disease. In HIV-infected individuals some distinct features of these conditions are observed, which are partly related to the virus and antiretroviral therapy. The article summarizes the effect of comorbidities on kidney function in HIV-infected persons.

  15. The role of chronic kidney disease and atrial fibrillation on outcomes of ischaemic stroke patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khan, Ahsan A; Lip, Gregory Y H

    2018-01-01

    and diabetes mellitus lead to impairment of renal function and development of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Indeed, CKD is increasingly prevalent in the elderly population and is an independent predictor of stroke recurrence, mortality and poor clinical outcomes after acute ischaemic stroke (1). This article...

  16. Glucose-lowering drugs in patients with chronic kidney disease : a narrative review on pharmacokinetic properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arnouts, Paul; Bolignano, Davide; Nistor, Ionut; Bilo, Henk; Gnudi, Luigi; Heaf, James; van Biesen, Wim

    The achievement of a good glycaemic control is one of the cornerstones for preventing and delaying progression of microvascular and macrovascular complications in patients with both diabetes and chronic kidney disease (CKD). As for other drugs, the presence of an impaired renal function may

  17. Taming the chronic kidney disease epidemic: a global view of surveillance efforts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Radhakrishnan, Jai; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Saran, Rajiv; Williams, Desmond E.; Rios-Burrows, Nilka; Powe, Neil; Brück, Katharina; Wanner, Christoph; Stel, Vianda S.; Venuthurupalli, Sree K.; Hoy, Wendy E.; Healy, Helen G.; Salisbury, Anne; Fassett, Robert G.; O'Donoghue, Donal; Roderick, Paul; Matsuo, Seiichi; Hishida, Akira; Imai, Enyu; Iimuro, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease is now recognized to be a worldwide problem associated with significant morbidity and mortality and there is a steep increase in the number of patients reaching end-stage renal disease. In many parts of the world, the disease affects younger people without diabetes or

  18. Chronic kidney disease in patients admitted to the medical ward of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chronic kidney disease in patients admitted to the medical ward of Mbarara Regional Referral Hospital in southwestern Uganda: Prevalence and associated factors. ... We collected socio-demographic and clinical data including presenting symptoms, history of diabetes, hypertension, and use of nephrotoxic medication.

  19. Does Altered Uric Acid Metabolism Contribute to Diabetic Kidney Disease Pathophysiology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gul, Ambreen; Zager, Philip

    2018-03-01

    Multiple experimental and clinical studies have identified pathways by which uric acid may facilitate the development and progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in people with diabetes. However, it remains uncertain if the association of uric acid with CKD represents a pathogenic effect or merely reflects renal impairment. In contrast to many published reports, a recent Mendelian randomization study did not identify a causal link between uric acid and CKD in people with type 1 diabetes. Two recent multicenter randomized control trials, Preventing Early Renal Function Loss in Diabetes (PERL) and FEbuxostat versus placebo rAndomized controlled Trial regarding reduced renal function in patients with Hyperuricemia complicated by chRonic kidney disease stage 3 (FEATHER), were recently designed to assess if uric acid lowering slows progression of CKD. We review the evidence supporting a role for uric acid in the pathogenesis of CKD in people with diabetes and the putative benefits of uric acid lowering.

  20. Original Research Risk factors for chronic kidney disease among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    data in Nigeria have reported that kidney diseases account for six to 12 percent of medical ... Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is common and often goes undetected and undiagnosed until the disease is well advanced and kidney failure is imminent. .... urinary tract infection and history of cancer compared with the controls.

  1. [Chronic kidney disease in 5 708 people receiving physical examination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guo; Chen, Zhiheng; Zhang, Hao; Gong, Ni; Wang, Yan

    2014-04-01

    To investigate chronic kidney disease (CKD) and its risk factors in people receiving physical examination. This retrospective study included people over 20 years old who had physical examination in the Health Management Center of Third Xiangya Hospital from Janurary 2008 to June 2011. CKD and its risk factors as well as questionnaire were recorded. The risk factors were analyzed by multivariate logistic analysis. CKD was defined by kidney damage (microalbuminuria≥30 mg/L) and/or hematuria and/or reduced kidney function [evaluate glomerular filtration rate (eGFR)physical examination reports were included. The detection rate of albuminuria, reduced renal function and hematuria was 25.0%, 1.7% and 1.1%. The detection rate of CKD was 25.6%, and detection rate of CKD stage 1-5 was 17.8%, 6.7%, 1.1%, 0 and 0, respectively. Multivariate logistic analysis indicated that diabetes mellitus, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, male, age, and smoking were the risk factors for CKD. Increasing physical activity was the protective factor against CKD. High prevalence of CKD in people receiving physical examination is found in Changsha, especially stage 1 and 2 CKD. Physical examination is important to screen CKD. Stopping smoking, control of blood glucose, blood pressure, blood lipids and increasing physical activity may help reduce the prevalence of CKD.

  2. Insulin Resistance in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Tser Liao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome and its components are associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD development. Insulin resistance (IR plays a central role in the metabolic syndrome and is associated with increased risk for CKD in nondiabetic patients. IR is common in patients with mild-to-moderate stage CKD, even when the glomerular filtration rate is within the normal range. IR, along with oxidative stress and inflammation, also promotes kidney disease. In patients with end stage renal disease, IR is an independent predictor of cardiovascular disease and is linked to protein energy wasting and malnutrition. Systemic inflammation, oxidative stress, elevated serum adipokines and fetuin-A, metabolic acidosis, vitamin D deficiency, depressed serum erythropoietin, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and suppressors of cytokine signaling all cause IR by suppressing insulin receptor-PI3K-Akt pathways in CKD. In addition to adequate renal replacement therapy and correction of uremia-associated factors, thiazolidinedione, ghrelin, protein restriction, and keto-acid supplementation are therapeutic options. Weight control, reduced daily prednisolone dosage, and the use of cyclosporin decrease the risk of developing new-onset diabetes after kidney transplantation. Improved understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms underlying IR in CKD may lead to more effective therapeutic strategies to reduce uremia-associated morbidity and mortality.

  3. Patient activation with knowledge, self-management and confidence in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Michelle L; Zimmerman, Lani; Welch, Janet L; Hertzog, Melody; Pozehl, Bunny; Plumb, Troy

    2016-03-01

    Chronic kidney disease is a growing health problem on a global scale. The increasing prevalence of chronic kidney disease presents an urgent need to better understand the knowledge, confidence and engagement in self-managing the disease. This study examined group differences in patient activation and health-related quality of life, knowledge, self-management and confidence with managing chronic disease across all five stages of chronic kidney disease. The study employed a descriptive correlational design. Participants were recruited from five primary care, three nephrology clinics and one dialysis centre in two Midwestern cities in the United States. The convenience sample included 85 adults with hypertension, diabetes mellitus and chronic kidney disease, including kidney failure, who spoke English. Seven measurements were used to collect data via telephone interviews with participants not receiving haemodialysis, and face-to-face interviews with those receiving haemodialysis at the beginning of their treatment session. Analyses indicated that half the participants were female (50.58%), the mean age was 63.21 years (SD = 13.11), and participants with chronic kidney disease stage 3 were the most activated. Post hoc differences were significant in patient activation and blood pressure self-management and anxiety across chronic kidney disease stages, excluding stage 5. Engaging patients in the self-management of their health care and enhancing patients' ability to self-manage their blood pressure may work to preserve kidney health. Healthcare providers should collaborate with patients to develop strategies that will maintain patients' health-related quality of life, like reducing anxiety as kidney disease progress. © 2015 European Dialysis and Transplant Nurses Association/European Renal Care Association.

  4. Growth and nutrition in children with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furth, Susan L

    2005-10-01

    Growth failure remains an important problem for children with kidney disease secondary to medical kidney disease or urologic disorders. In children with chronic kidney disease, growth remains suboptimal even with energy intake above 80% of the recommend daily allowance. Adults who had chronic kidney disease as children frequently report dissatisfaction with final adult height. Additionally, growth failure in children with end-stage renal disease is associated with adverse clinical outcomes, including more frequent hospitalizations and increased mortality. This review describes the prevalence and morbidity associated with growth retardation in US children with chronic kidney disease. Additionally, available strategies to optimize growth and nutrition and current controversies in nutritional management and assessment of nutritional status in children with chronic kidney disease are discussed.

  5. Relationship between ultrasonographically determined kidney volume and progression of chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vegar Zubović, Sandra; Kristić, Spomenka; Sefić Pašić, Irmina

    2016-08-01

    Aim To investigate a correlation between calculated creatinine clearance as a measure of kidney's functional abilities and ultrasonographically determined kidney volume, which represents actual size of the kidney, in fact residual renal mass in chronic kidney disease, in order to determine possibilities of ultrasound as a diagnostic method in diagnosing and follow up of chronic renal disease. Methods Prospective study included 150 patients with registered demographic and anthropometric data, and also with relevant laboratory tests of renal function. Longitudinal diameter, thickness and width of the kidney and renal volume calculated according to the Dinkel's formula were measured by ultrasound. A correlation between the measured volume of the kidneys and calculated creatinine clearance was done by the Spearman method, with statistical significance of pkidney volume was found (pkidneys' volume showed a linear decrease with the progression of chronic kidney disease: the kidney volume in the control healthy group was 171.7 ± 32.6 mL (95.22- 229.59 mL), and in the subjects classified in stage IV it was 74.7 ± 24.6 mL (43.22-165.65 mL). Conclusion Calculated volume of kidney well correlated with creatinine clearance as a measure of functional ability of the kidneys and with the stage of chronic renal disease. It can be used in clinical practice for monitoring of chronic kidney disease in conjunction with other clinical and laboratory parameters. Copyright© by the Medical Assotiation of Zenica-Doboj Canton.

  6. Stage effect of chronic kidney disease in erectile function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Márcio Rodrigues; Ponciano, Viviane Campos; Costa, Théo Rodrigues; Gomes, Caio Pereira; de Oliveira, Enio Chaves

    2018-01-01

    The study aims to assess the influence of the stage of chronic kidney disease and glomerular filtration rate on prevalence and degree of erectile dysfunction. This transversal study, conducted from May 2013 to December 2015, included patients with chronic kidney disease in conservative treatment, stages III/IV/V. Erectile dysfunction was evaluated by the International Index of Erectile Function. Data classically associated with erectile dysfunction were obtained by medical record review. Erectile dysfunction, degree of erectile dysfunction, and other main variables associated with erectile dysfunction were compared between patients with chronic kidney disease on conservative treatment stages III versus IV/V using the Chi-square test. The relationship between score of the International Index of Erectile Dysfunction and glomerular filtration rate was established by Pearson correlation coefficient. Two hundred and forty five patients with chronic kidney disease in con-servative treatment participated of the study. The prevalence of erectile dysfunction in patients with chronic kidney disease in stages IV/V was greater than in stage III. Glomerular filtration rate positively correlated with score of the International Index of Erectile Dysfunction. The study suggests that chronic kidney disease progression (glomerular filtration rate decrease and advance in chronic kidney disease stages) worsen erectile function. Hypothetically, diagnosis and treatment of erectile dysfunction may be anticipated with the analysis of chronic kidney disease progression. Copyright® by the International Brazilian Journal of Urology.

  7. Prevalence of Chronic Kidney Disease in a Nigerian Family Practice ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a global public health problem, with a greater burden and prohibitive cost of care particularly in developing countries. This study determined the prevalence of chronic kidney disease and identified its associated risk factors in patients attending the Family Practice Clinic, Wesley ...

  8. Stage effect of chronic kidney disease in erectile function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcio Rodrigues Costa

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Purpose The study aims to assess the influence of the stage of chronic kidney disease and glomerular filtration rate on prevalence and degree of erectile dysfunction. Materials and Methods This transversal study, conducted from May 2013 to December 2015, included patients with chronic kidney disease in conservative treatment, stages III/IV/V. Erectile dysfunction was evaluated by the International Index of Erectile Function. Data classically associated with erectile dysfunction were obtained by medical record review. Erectile dysfunction, degree of erectile dysfunction, and other main variables associated with erectile dysfunction were compared between patients with chronic kidney disease on conservative treatment stages III versus IV/V using the Chi-square test. The relationship between score of the International Index of Erectile Dysfunction and glomerular filtration rate was established by Pearson correlation coefficient. Results Two hundred and forty five patients with chronic kidney disease in conservative treatment participated of the study. The prevalence of erectile dysfunction in patients with chronic kidney disease in stages IV/V was greater than in stage III. Glomerular filtration rate positively correlated with score of the International Index of Erectile Dysfunction. Conclusions The study suggests that chronic kidney disease progression (glomerular filtration rate decrease and advance in chronic kidney disease stages worsen erectile function. Hypothetically, diagnosis and treatment of erectile dysfunction may be anticipated with the analysis of chronic kidney disease progression.

  9. Correlates and management of anaemia of chronic kidney disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Anaemia is a common complication of chronic kidney disease. There is paucity of published local and regional data regarding its associated factors and management. Objective: To assess the correlates and management of anaemia in chronic kidney disease. Design: Cross sectional descriptive study

  10. Frailty in elderly people with chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Eugenia Portilla Franco

    2016-11-01

    Frailty can be reversed, which is why a study of frailty in patients with chronic kidney disease is of particular interest. This article aims to describe the association between ageing, frailty and chronic kidney disease in light of the most recent and relevant scientific publications.

  11. Cardiovascular risk factors in childhood chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Midhat Elmacı

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular diseases are the principal cause of morbidityand mortality among child and adults with chronicrenal disease. Recent data demonstrate a high incidenceand prevalence of traditional and uremia related cardiovascularrisk factors in children. This review summarizesthe current literature on cardiovascular risk factors, mortalityand morbidity in children with chronic kidney disease.Key words: Child, chronic kidney disease, cardiovascular

  12. Hypoxia — a Leading Factor of Chronic Kidney Disease Progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.Yu. Lysianska

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Recent data indicate the involvement of hypoxia in the formation of kidney fibrosis and progression of chronic renal disease. One of the main factors in the chain of damage in the tissue oxygen deficiency is a hypoxia-induced factor. Understanding the process of kidney damage during hypoxia can complement the concept of nephroprotection in patients with chronic kidney disease, will provide an opportunity to improve the guidelines on the management of this group of patients.

  13. Cerebral Small Vessel Disease and Chronic Kidney Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Toyoda, Kazunori

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease, defined by a decreased glomerular filtration rate or albuminuria, is recognized as a major global health burden, mainly because it is an established risk factor for cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. The magnitude of the effect of chronic kidney disease on incident stroke seems to be higher in persons of Asian ethnicity. Since the kidney and brain share unique susceptibilities to vascular injury due to similar anatomical and functional features of small arter...

  14. Modeling a Mobile Health Management Business Model for Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ying-Li; Chang, Polun

    2016-01-01

    In these decades, chronic kidney disease (CKD) has become a global public health problem. Information technology (IT) tools have been used widely to empower the patients with chronic disease (e.g., diabetes and hypertension). It is also a potential application to advance the CKD care. In this project, we analyzed the requirements of a mobile health management system for healthcare workers, patients and their families to design a health management business model for CKD patients.

  15. Cerebral small vessel disease and chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyoda, Kazunori

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease, defined by a decreased glomerular filtration rate or albuminuria, is recognized as a major global health burden, mainly because it is an established risk factor for cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. The magnitude of the effect of chronic kidney disease on incident stroke seems to be higher in persons of Asian ethnicity. Since the kidney and brain share unique susceptibilities to vascular injury due to similar anatomical and functional features of small artery diseases, kidney impairment can be predictive of the presence and severity of cerebral small vessel diseases. Chronic kidney disease has been reported to be associated with silent brain infarcts, cerebral white matter lesions, and cerebral microbleeds, independently of vascular risk factors. In addition, chronic kidney disease affects cognitive function, partly via the high prevalence of cerebral small vessel diseases. Retinal artery disease also has an independent relationship with chronic kidney disease and cognitive impairment. Stroke experts are no longer allowed to be ignorant of chronic kidney disease. Close liaison between neurologists and nephrologists can improve the management of cerebral small vessel diseases in kidney patients.

  16. Role of ultrasonographic chronic kidney disease score in the assessment of chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaprak, Mustafa; Çakır, Özgür; Turan, Mehmet Nuri; Dayanan, Ramazan; Akın, Selçuk; Değirmen, Elif; Yıldırım, Mustafa; Turgut, Faruk

    2017-01-01

    Ultrasonography (US) is an inexpensive, noninvasive and easy imaging procedure to comment on the kidney disease. Data are limited about the relation between estimated glomerular filtration rate (e-GFR) and all 3 renal US parameters, including kidney length, parenchymal thickness and parenchymal echogenicity, in chronic kidney disease (CKD). In this study, we aimed to investigate the association between e-GFR and ultrasonographic CKD score calculated via these ultrasonographic parameters. One hundred and twenty patients with stage 1-5 CKD were enrolled in this study. The glomerular filtration rate was estimated by the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration equation. US was performed by the same radiologist who was blinded to patients' histories and laboratory results. US parameters including kidney length, parenchymal thickness and parenchymal echogenicity were obtained from both kidneys. All 3 parameters were scored for each kidney, separately. The sum of the average scores of these parameters was used to calculate ultrasonographic CKD score. The mean age of patients was 63.34 ± 14.19 years. Mean kidney length, parenchymal thickness, ultrasonographic CKD score and median parenchymal echogenicity were found as 96.2 ± 12.3, 10.97 ± 2.59 mm, 6.28 ± 2.52 and 1.0 (0-3.5), respectively. e-GFR was positively correlated with kidney length (r = 0.343, p < 0.001), parenchymal thickness (r = 0.37, p < 0.001) and negatively correlated with CKD score (r = -0.587, p < 0.001) and parenchymal echogenicity (r = -0.683, p < 0.001). Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis for distinction of e-GFR lower than 60 mL/min showed that the ultrasonographic CKD score higher than 4.75 was the best parameter with the sensitivity of 81% and positive predictivity of 92% (AUC, 0.829; 95% CI, 0.74-0.92; p < 0.001). We found correlation between e-GFR and ultrasonographic CKD score via using all ultrasonographic parameters. Also, our study showed

  17. αKlotho and Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neyra, J.A.; Hu, M.C.

    2017-01-01

    Alpha-Klotho (αKlotho) protein is encoded by the gene, Klotho, and functions as a coreceptor for endocrine fibroblast growth factor-23. The extracellular domain of αKlotho is cleaved by secretases and released into the circulation where it is called soluble αKlotho. Soluble αKlotho in the circulation starts to decline in chronic kidney disease (CKD) stage 2 and urinary αKlotho in even earlier CKD stage 1. Therefore soluble αKlotho is an early and sensitive marker of decline in kidney function. Preclinical data from numerous animal experiments support αKlotho deficiency as a pathogenic factor for CKD progression and extrarenal CKD complications including cardiac and vascular disease, hyperparathyroidism, and disturbed mineral metabolism. αKlotho deficiency induces cell senescence and renders cells susceptible to apoptosis induced by a variety of cellular insults including oxidative stress. αKlotho deficiency also leads to defective autophagy and angiogenesis and promotes fibrosis in the kidney and heart. Most importantly, prevention of αKlotho decline, upregulation of endogenous αKlotho production, or direct supplementation of soluble αKlotho are all associated with attenuation of renal fibrosis, retardation of CKD progression, improvement of mineral metabolism, amelioration of cardiac function and morphometry, and alleviation of vascular calcification in CKD. Therefore in rodents, αKlotho is not only a diagnostic and prognostic marker for CKD but the enhancement of endogenous or supplement of exogenous αKlotho are promising therapeutic strategies to prevent, retard, and decrease the comorbidity burden of CKD. PMID:27125746

  18. Synergistic Interaction of Hypertension and Diabetes in Promoting Kidney Injury and the Role of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhen; do Carmo, Jussara M; Aberdein, Nicola; Zhou, Xinchun; Williams, Jan M; da Silva, Alexandre A; Hall, John E

    2017-05-01

    Diabetes mellitus and hypertension are major risk factors for chronic kidney injury, together accounting for >70% of end-stage renal disease. In this study, we assessed interactions of hypertension and diabetes mellitus in causing kidney dysfunction and injury and the role of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Hypertension was induced by aorta constriction (AC) between the renal arteries in 6-month-old male Goto-Kakizaki (GK) type 2 diabetic and control Wistar rats. Fasting plasma glucose averaged 162±11 and 87±2 mg/dL in GK and Wistar rats, respectively. AC produced hypertension in the right kidney (above AC) and near normal blood pressure in the left kidney (below AC), with both kidneys exposed to the same levels of glucose, circulating hormones, and neural influences. After 8 weeks of AC, blood pressure above the AC (and in the right kidney) increased from 109±1 to 152±5 mm Hg in GK rats and from 106±4 to 141±5 mm Hg in Wistar rats. The diabetic-hypertensive right kidneys in GK-AC rats had much greater increases in albumin excretion and histological injury compared with left kidneys (diabetes mellitus only) of GK rats or right kidneys (hypertension only) of Wistar-AC rats. Marked increases in ER stress and oxidative stress indicators were observed in diabetic-hypertensive kidneys of GK-AC rats. Inhibition of ER stress with tauroursodeoxycholic acid for 6 weeks reduced blood pressure (135±4 versus 151±4 mm Hg), albumin excretion, ER and oxidative stress, and glomerular injury, while increasing glomerular filtration rate in hypertensive-diabetic kidneys. These results suggest that diabetes mellitus and hypertension interact synergistically to promote kidney dysfunction and injury via ER stress. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. Thyroid Disorders and Chronic Kidney Disease

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    Mohamed Mohamedali

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid hormones play a very important role regulating metabolism, development, protein synthesis, and influencing other hormone functions. The two main hormones produced by the thyroid are triiodothyronine (T3 and thyroxine (T4. These hormones can also have significant impact on kidney disease so it is important to consider the physiological association of thyroid dysfunction in relation to chronic kidney disease (CKD. CKD has been known to affect the pituitary-thyroid axis and the peripheral metabolism of thyroid hormones. Low T3 levels are the most common laboratory finding followed by subclinical hypothyroidism in CKD patients. Hyperthyroidism is usually not associated with CKD but has been known to accelerate it. One of the most important links between thyroid disorders and CKD is uremia. Patients who are appropriately treated for thyroid disease have a less chance of developing renal dysfunction. Clinicians need to be very careful in treating patients with low T3 levels who also have an elevation in TSH, as this can lead to a negative nitrogen balance. Thus, clinicians should be well educated on the role of thyroid hormones in relation to CKD so that proper treatment can be delivered to the patient.

  20. Phosphorus and Nutrition in Chronic Kidney Disease

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    Emilio González-Parra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with renal impairment progressively lose the ability to excrete phosphorus. Decreased glomerular filtration of phosphorus is initially compensated by decreased tubular reabsorption, regulated by PTH and FGF23, maintaining normal serum phosphorus concentrations. There is a close relationship between protein and phosphorus intake. In chronic renal disease, a low dietary protein content slows the progression of kidney disease, especially in patients with proteinuria and decreases the supply of phosphorus, which has been directly related with progression of kidney disease and with patient survival. However, not all animal proteins and vegetables have the same proportion of phosphorus in their composition. Adequate labeling of food requires showing the phosphorus-to-protein ratio. The diet in patients with advanced-stage CKD has been controversial, because a diet with too low protein content can favor malnutrition and increase morbidity and mortality. Phosphorus binders lower serum phosphorus and also FGF23 levels, without decreasing diet protein content. But the interaction between intestinal dysbacteriosis in dialysis patients, phosphate binder efficacy, and patient tolerance to the binder could reduce their efficiency.

  1. Central blood pressure and chronic kidney disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Yoichi; Kanno, Yoshihiko; Takenaka, Tsuneo

    2016-01-01

    In this review, we focused on the relationship between central blood pressure and chronic kidney diseases (CKD). Wave reflection is a major mechanism that determines central blood pressure in patients with CKD. Recent medical technology advances have enabled non-invasive central blood pressure measurements. Clinical trials have demonstrated that compared with brachial blood pressure, central blood pressure is a stronger risk factor for cardiovascular (CV) and renal diseases. CKD is characterized by a diminished renal autoregulatory ability, an augmented direct transmission of systemic blood pressure to glomeruli, and an increase in proteinuria. Any elevation in central blood pressure accelerates CKD progression. In the kidney, interstitial inflammation induces oxidative stress to handle proteinuria. Oxidative stress facilitates atherogenesis, increases arterial stiffness and central blood pressure, and worsens the CV prognosis in patients with CKD. A vicious cycle exists between CKD and central blood pressure. To stop this cycle, vasodilator antihypertensive drugs and statins can reduce central blood pressure and oxidative stress. Even in early-stage CKD, mineral and bone disorders (MBD) may develop. MBD promotes oxidative stress, arteriosclerosis, and elevated central blood pressure in patients with CKD. Early intervention or prevention seems necessary to maintain vascular health in patients with CKD. PMID:26788468

  2. Next Step in Chronic Kidney Disease Therapy

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    D.D. Ivanov

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blockers are the basis of renoprotection therapy in chronic kidney disease. Parallel to decrease of glomerular filtration rate, there is an increase in the activity of the sympathetic nervous system, and the number of functio­ning nephrons reduces, which requires a change of treatment regimen. Reducing the risk of cardiovascular events on the background of increased hypertension probably dictates the need for a priority administration of sympatholytics, calcium channel blockers and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blockers withdrawal. ARAMONEL formula: ARAMONEL — AR(BA(CEIMO(xonidineNE(bivololL(ercandipine is changed to MNELD — M(oxonidineNE(bivololL(ercandipineD(iuretic that is used by us in recent years. Combined use of torsemide and xipamide is allowed. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blockers withdrawal requires evidence, which may be obtained in STOP-ACEi trial.

  3. Vitamin D therapy for chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhan, Ishir; Thadhani, Ravi

    2009-01-01

    Vitamin D has played a central role in the nephrologist's armamentarium, with active vitamin D analogues enjoying broad use for treatment of secondary hyperparathyroidism. Increasing data are now coming to light about the broader biological actions of vitamin D, including wide-ranging effects in several endocrine pathways, cardiovascular disease, infectious disease, and even the progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD). As additional agents are emerging to help with control of metabolic bone disease, these nontraditional pathways of vitamin D action will become increasingly important to consider when formulating a treatment plan. Although the only approved use for vitamin D analogues in CKD is the treatment of secondary hyperparathyroidism, well-conducted clinical trials may soon broaden the scope of this therapy. This article reviews the role of vitamin D therapy in CKD and looks to the answers that future research may bring.

  4. Dermatological Disorders in Chronic Kidney Disease

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    Aparna Shah

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Dermatological conditions are common complications of Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD affecting all most all patients. Present study aimed to evaluate the dermatological conditions and their association with age, sex and severity of CKD - without and with maintenance hemodialysis (MHD. Methods: It is a cross sectional and comparative study. Eighty-three patients with established CKD, without MHD (n=35 and with MHD (n= 48, attending nephrology unit, Bir Hospital and Shree Birendra Hospital from June 2008 to May 2009 were examined for dermatological disorders. Results: The mean age of patients were 46+15.6 years with male to female ratio of 1.8:1. Comparison of CKD without MHD and with MHD showed no statistical difference of age, sex, duration of treatment, blood urea and haemoglobin and significant difference of serum creatinine (5.3 + 3.0 mg/dl vs 9.1 + 4.5 mg/dl, p<0.001 respectively. Dermatological conditions were found in 100% CKD patients with pallor 91.5%, xerosis 75.9%, pigmentary changes 65%, pruritus 60.2%, skin infection 36.9%, vascular changes 16.8%, mucosal changes 67.4%, hair changes 59%, non -specific nail changes 81.9% and specific nail changes14.4%,. Specific (23.2% vs. 8.4%, p<0.03 and non- specific (91.4% vs 75%, p < 0.05 nail changes and hair abnormalities (74.3% vs. 47.9%, p<0.01 were significantly higher in CKD without MHD. Conclusions: Dermatological conditions are present in all CKD patients with or without MHD. A further prospective study is necessary to find out pathophysiology and beneficial effect of dialysis and transplantation in these conditions. Key words: chronic kidney disease, dermatological disorder, maintenance hemodialysis.

  5. Effect of green tea on kidney tubules of diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renno, Waleed M; Abdeen, Suad; Alkhalaf, Mousa; Asfar, Sami

    2008-09-01

    It has been documented that green tea (GT) and its catechin components improve renal failure and inhibit the growth of mesangial cells. In the present study we examined the long-term effect of GT extract on streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic nephropathy and on the glycogen accumulation in the kidney tubules. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to normal control groups (2, 6, 8 and 12 weeks) and five diabetic groups (n 10) of comparable age. A GT diabetic group received 16 % concentration of GT for 12 weeks post-diabetes induction as their sole source of drinking water. GT treatment significantly (P kidney tubules. These results indicate that in STZ diabetes, kidney function appears to be improved with GT consumption which also prevents glycogen accumulation in the renal tubules, probably by lowering blood levels of glucose. Therefore, GT could be beneficial additional therapy in the management of diabetic nephropathy.

  6. The Kidney-Vascular-Bone Axis in the Chronic Kidney Disease-Mineral Bone Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Michael E; Hruska, Keith A

    2016-03-01

    The last 25 years have been characterized by dramatic improvements in short-term patient and allograft survival after kidney transplantation. Long-term patient and allograft survival remains limited by cardiovascular disease and chronic allograft injury, among other factors. Cardiovascular disease remains a significant contributor to mortality in native chronic kidney disease as well as cardiovascular mortality in chronic kidney disease more than doubles that of the general population. The chronic kidney disease (CKD)-mineral bone disorder (MBD) is a syndrome recently coined to embody the biochemical, skeletal, and cardiovascular pathophysiology that results from disrupting the complex systems biology between the kidney, skeleton, and cardiovascular system in native and transplant kidney disease. The CKD-MBD is a unique kidney disease-specific syndrome containing novel cardiovascular risk factors, with an impact reaching far beyond traditional notions of renal osteodystrophy and hyperparathyroidism. This overview reviews current knowledge of the pathophysiology of the CKD-MBD, including emerging concepts surrounding the importance of circulating pathogenic factors released from the injured kidney that directly cause cardiovascular disease in native and transplant chronic kidney disease, with potential application to mechanisms of chronic allograft injury and vasculopathy.

  7. Chronic kidney disease among children in Guatemala

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    Alejandro Cerón

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To describe the distribution of pediatric chronic kidney disease (CKD in Guatemala, estimate incidence and prevalence of pediatric end-stage renal disease (ESRD, and estimate time to progress to ESRD. METHODS: This study analyzed the registry of the only pediatric nephrology center in Guatemala, from 2004-2013. Incidence and prevalence were calculated for annual periods. Moran's index for spatial autocorrelation was used to determine significance of geographic distribution of incidence. Time to progress to ESRD and associated risk factors were calculated with multivariate Cox regression. RESULTS: Of 1 545 patients from birth to less than 20 years of age, 432 had chronic renal failure (CRF. Prevalence and incidence of ESRD were 4.9 and 4.6 per million age-related population, respectively. Incidence was higher for the Pacific coast and Guatemala City. The cause of CRF was undetermined in 43% of patients. Average time to progress to ESRD was 21.9 months; factors associated with progression were: older age, diagnosis of glomerulopathies, and advanced-stage CKD at consultation. CONCLUSIONS: Prevalence and incidence of ESRD in Guatemala are lower than in other countries. This may reflect poor access to diagnosis. Areas with higher incidence and large proportion of CKD of undetermined cause are compatible with other studies from the geographic subregion. Findings on progression to ESRD may reflect delayed referral.

  8. OCULAR MANIFESTATIONS IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE- A HOSPITALBASED STUDY

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    Shobha Ponmudy

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Chronic kidney disease affects every organ system including the eye. The aim of the study is to conduct a thorough ocular examination and to study the occurrence of various ocular manifestations exhibited by patients with chronic kidney disease and to analyse the findings. MATERIALS AND METHODS 100 patients from Department of Nephrology, Stanley Medical College diagnosed with chronic kidney disease were examined for ocular manifestations at the Department of Ophthalmology, Stanley Medical College. This is a cross-sectional, descriptive, non-interventional, hospital-based study. The period of study was from August 2010 to October 2011. RESULTS The commonest cause of CKD was hypertension in 47 pts. (52.2% followed by both diabetes and hypertension in 30 patients. Patients with only diabetes were 6 patients (6.7% and with other causes were 7 patients (7.8%.10% of patients were legally blind with visual acuity <6/60. In this study, 65 patients belonged to less than 50 years. 49.3% of the presenile patients had cataract. A reduced Schirmer’s value was noted in 54 eyes of the 200 eyes. The incidence of ocular surface disease in the study was 27%. 92 eyes out of 200 eyes studied showed hypertensive retinopathy. Higher grades of hypertensive retinopathy was more in advanced stages of CKD, i.e. 24 eyes in stage IV and 23 eyes in stage V. 51 eyes out of 40 diabetics showed diabetic retinopathy changes of which a majority of 25 eyes belonged to stage V disease. Prevalence of diabetic retinopathy in CKD patients is significantly more when compared to diabetic patients without CKD. CONCLUSION Study demonstrates that routine ocular evaluation is necessary in all patients with chronic kidney disease irrespective of the presence of ocular symptoms. It also highlights the occurrence of a variety of treatable ocular manifestations, which can become vision threatening if not taken care of at the earliest.

  9. Cerebral Palsy and Intellectual Disability in the Children of Women With Chronic Kidney Disease.

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    Tsuchiyama, Fumika; Makino, Yasuo; Hirasawa, Kyoko; Nagata, Satoru; Matsui, Hideo

    2017-08-01

    This study examined the risk of adverse maternal and neonatal outcomes, especially cerebral palsy and intellectual disability, in pregnant women with and without chronic kidney disease and their children. In total, 156 pregnancies involving 139 women with chronic kidney disease who were treated at our center between 2001 and 2010 were identified. We also selected 3067 women without chronic kidney disease who delivered their infants without suffering any medical complications during the same period as control groups. Long-term neonatal prognosis was assessed based on the frequencies of cerebral palsy and/or intellectual disability. The pregnant women had the following types of chronic kidney disease: immunoglobulin A nephropathy (n = 54), glomerulonephritis (n = 17), chronic renal failure (n = 16), nephrotic syndrome (n = 12), nephritis (n = 11), diabetic nephropathy (n = 10), congenital malformations and deformations (n = 10), purpura nephritis (n = 7), and others (n = 19). Of the children who were born to mothers with chronic kidney disease, one developed cerebral palsy, and another developed cerebral palsy with intellectual disability. Seven of the children who were born to mothers without chronic kidney disease developed cerebral palsy. The posterior probability of these conditions was 0.01900 and 0.002610 in the children born to mothers with and without chronic kidney disease, respectively. A primiparous mother (odds ratio [OR]: 4.07, 95% confidence interval [CI]): 2.78 to 5.95), preeclampsia (OR: 6.44, 95% CI: 3.92 to 10.59), grade 1 to 4 intraventricular hemorrhaging (OR: 7.71, 95% CI: 2.05 to 28.92), and an Apgar score of less than 7 at five minutes (OR: 0.51, 95% CI: 0.27 to 0.96) were found to influence the risk of cerebral palsy and/or intellectual disability in children born to women with chronic kidney disease. We found that the incidence of cerebral palsy and/or intellectual disability is 7.2-fold higher in children born to women

  10. Impact of a 6-wk olive oil supplementation in healthy adults on urinary proteomic biomarkers of coronary artery disease, chronic kidney disease, and diabetes (types 1 and 2): a randomized, parallel, controlled, double-blind study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Sandra; Bronze, Maria R; Figueira, Maria E; Siwy, Justyna; Siwy, Justina; Mischak, Harald; Combet, Emilie; Mullen, William

    2015-01-01

    Olive oil (OO) consumption is associated with cardiovascular disease prevention because of both its oleic acid and phenolic contents. The capacity of OO phenolics to protect against low-density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation is the basis for a health claim by the European Food Safety Authority. Proteomic biomarkers enable an early, presymptomatic diagnosis of disease, which makes them important and effective, but understudied, tools for primary prevention. We evaluated the impact of supplementation with OO, either low or high in phenolics, on urinary proteomic biomarkers of coronary artery disease (CAD), chronic kidney disease (CKD), and diabetes. Self-reported healthy participants (n = 69) were randomly allocated (stratified block random assignment) according to age and body mass index to supplementation with a daily 20-mL dose of OO either low or high in phenolics (18 compared with 286 mg caffeic acid equivalents per kg, respectively) for 6 wk. Urinary proteomic biomarkers were measured at baseline and 3 and 6 wk alongside blood lipids, the antioxidant capacity, and glycation markers. The consumption of both OOs improved the proteomic CAD score at endpoint compared with baseline (mean improvement: -0.3 for low-phenolic OO and -0.2 for high-phenolic OO; P < 0.01) but not CKD or diabetes proteomic biomarkers. However, there was no difference between groups for changes in proteomic biomarkers or any secondary outcomes including plasma triacylglycerols, oxidized LDL, and LDL cholesterol. In comparison with low-phenolic OO, supplementation for 6 wk with high-phenolic OO does not lead to an improvement in cardiovascular health markers in a healthy cohort. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  11. Metabolic syndrome and chronic kidney disease

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    Anis Belarbia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To determine the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MS in chronic kidney disease (CKD patients as well as its effects on the progression of CKD, we conducted a prospective, longitudinal study including 180 patients with chronic renal failure followed at the outpatient service of Nephrology at the Saloul′s University Hospital of Sousse (Tunisia over six months. Our study population consisted of 101 men and 79 women. Chronic glomerulonephritis (36.6% was the most frequent nephropathy. The mean serum creatinine was 249 ± 200 mmol/L and the mean estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR was 55.8 ± 49.2 mL/min. Cardiovascular (CV impairment was found in 27.2% of the patients. The prevalence of MS was 42.2%. Women had significantly more abdominal obesity than men. Subjects with MS were significantly older and predominantly females who had higher blood pressure and body mass index (BMI. CV complications were more frequent among the MS subjects than among the controls. Glycemia, triglycerides, total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-c were significantly higher in the group of CKD patients with MS. However, the occurrence of MS was not influenced by the nature of nephropathy, the degree of the CKD and the use of renin-angiotensin blockers or statins. In multivariate analysis, predictors of occurrence of MS in our series included older age, female gender and higher BMI and LDL-c levels. The prevalence of MS in patients with CKD is higher than the general population. These patients should receive special multidisciplinary care to limit CV complications.

  12. Metabolic syndrome and chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belarbia, Anis; Nouira, Safa; Sahtout, Wissal; Guedri, Yosra; Achour, Abdellatif

    2015-09-01

    To determine the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MS) in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients as well as its effects on the progression of CKD, we conducted a prospective, longitudinal study including 180 patients with chronic renal failure followed at the outpatient service of Nephrology at the Saloul's University Hospital of Sousse (Tunisia) over six months. Our study population consisted of 101 men and 79 women. Chronic glomerulonephritis (36.6%) was the most frequent nephropathy. The mean serum creatinine was 249 ± 200 mmol/L and the mean estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was 55.8 ± 49.2 mL/min. Cardiovascular (CV) impairment was found in 27.2% of the patients. The prevalence of MS was 42.2%. Women had significantly more abdominal obesity than men. Subjects with MS were significantly older and predominantly females who had higher blood pressure and body mass index (BMI). CV complications were more frequent among the MS subjects than among the controls. Glycemia, triglycerides, total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-c) were significantly higher in the group of CKD patients with MS. However, the occurrence of MS was not influenced by the nature of nephropathy, the degree of the CKD and the use of renin-angiotensin blockers or statins. In multivariate analysis, predictors of occurrence of MS in our series included older age, female gender and higher BMI and LDL-c levels. The prevalence of MS in patients with CKD is higher than the general population. These patients should receive special multidisciplinary care to limit CV complications.

  13. Definition and classification of chronic kidney disease : A position statement from Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levey, Andrew S.; Eckardt, Kai Uwe; Tsukamoto, Yusuke; Levin, Adeera; Coresh, Josef; Rossert, Jerome; de Zeeuw, Dick; Hostetter, Thomas H.; Lameire, Norbert; Eknoyan, Garabed

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a worldwide public health problem, with adverse outcomes of kidney failure, cardiovascular disease (CVD), and premature death. A simple definition and classification of kidney disease is necessary for international development and implementation of clinical practice

  14. Ursolic Acid provides kidney protection in diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Chen; Jinping, Lu; Xia, Li; Renyong, Yang

    2013-12-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is one of the most serious microvascular complications of diabetes and the leading cause of end-stage renal failure. However, the treatment of DN is still a problem in the world. Inflammatory process plays a critical role in the development of DN. Therefore, anti-inflammatory treatment of DN is worth exploring now and in the future. The study aimed to evaluate the impact of ursolic acid (UA) on renal function in streptozotocin-induced diabetes. Rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes were treated with UA for 16 weeks. After 16 weeks, urine albumin excretion, serum creatinine, and blood urea nitrogen were measured. In addition, renal oxidative stress level, nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-κB) activity, P-selectin expression, and kidney histopathologic changes were evaluated. Sixteen weeks following streptozotocin injection, the rats produced significant alteration in renal function and increased oxidative stress, NF-κB activity, and P-selectin expression in the kidneys. Interestingly, UA significantly prevented biochemical and histopathologic changes in the kidneys associated with diabetes. Compared with untreated diabetic rats, UA treatment lowered urine albumin excretion, renal oxidative stress level, NF-κB activity, and P-selectin expression. Moreover, UA treatment also improved renal histopathologic changes in rats with diabetes. UA treatment exhibited a protective effect on kidneys in diabetic rats, implying that UA could be a potential treatment for diabetic nephropathy.

  15. Ursolic Acid Provides Kidney Protection in Diabetic Rats☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Chen; Jinping, Lu; Xia, Li; Renyong, Yang

    2013-01-01

    Background Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is one of the most serious microvascular complications of diabetes and the leading cause of end-stage renal failure. However, the treatment of DN is still a problem in the world. Inflammatory process plays a critical role in the development of DN. Therefore, anti-inflammatory treatment of DN is worth exploring now and in the future. Objective The study aimed to evaluate the impact of ursolic acid (UA) on renal function in streptozotocin-induced diabetes. Methods Rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes were treated with UA for 16 weeks. After 16 weeks, urine albumin excretion, serum creatinine, and blood urea nitrogen were measured. In addition, renal oxidative stress level, nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-κB) activity, P-selectin expression, and kidney histopathologic changes were evaluated. Results Sixteen weeks following streptozotocin injection, the rats produced significant alteration in renal function and increased oxidative stress, NF-κB activity, and P-selectin expression in the kidneys. Interestingly, UA significantly prevented biochemical and histopathologic changes in the kidneys associated with diabetes. Compared with untreated diabetic rats, UA treatment lowered urine albumin excretion, renal oxidative stress level, NF-κB activity, and P-selectin expression. Moreover, UA treatment also improved renal histopathologic changes in rats with diabetes. Conclusions UA treatment exhibited a protective effect on kidneys in diabetic rats, implying that UA could be a potential treatment for diabetic nephropathy. PMID:24465045

  16. Predialysis chronic kidney disease correlates with increased risk of pyogenic liver abscess: a population-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Shih-Wei; Lin, Cheng-Li; Liao, Kuan-Fu

    2017-10-01

    The incidence of pyogenic liver abscess in Taiwan appears to be much higher than that in western countries. However, little is known about the incidence of pyogenic liver abscess among patients with predialysis chronic kidney disease. The objective of this study was to assess the association between predialysis chronic kidney disease and the risk of pyogenic liver abscess in Taiwan. This population-based, retrospective, cohort study was conducted to analyse the database of the Taiwan National Health Insurance Program. There were 81118 subjects aged 20-84 years with newly diagnosed chronic kidney disease as the predialysis chronic kidney disease group since 2000-2010, and 81118 randomly selected subjects without chronic kidney disease as the nonchronic kidney disease group. The predialysis chronic kidney disease group and the nonchronic kidney disease group were matched with sex, age and comorbidities. The incidence of pyogenic liver abscess at the end of 2013 was calculated in both groups. Subjects who currently received dialysis therapy before the endpoint were excluded from the study. The multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to assess the hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for the risk of pyogenic liver abscess associated with predialysis chronic kidney disease and other comorbidities including alcohol-related disease, biliary stone, chronic liver disease and diabetes mellitus. The overall incidence of pyogenic liver abscess was 1·65-fold higher in the predialysis chronic kidney disease group than that in the nonchronic kidney disease group (1·38 vs. 0·83 per 1000 person-years, 95% CI 1·59, 1·71). After adjustment for covariables, the adjusted HR of pyogenic liver abscess was 1·51(95% CI 1·30, 1·76) for the predialysis chronic kidney disease group, comparing with the nonchronic kidney disease group. In addition, the adjusted HR would increase to 3·31 (95% CI 2·61, 4·19) for subjects with predialysis chronic

  17. Hormones and arterial stiffness in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gungor, Ozkan; Kircelli, Fatih; Voroneanu, Luminita; Covic, Adrian; Ok, Ercan

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease constitutes the major cause of mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease. Arterial stiffness is an important contributor to the occurrence and progression of cardiovascular disease. Various risk factors, including altered hormone levels, have been suggested to be associated with arterial stiffness. Based on the background that chronic kidney disease predisposes individuals to a wide range of hormonal changes, we herein review the available data on the association between arterial stiffness and hormones in patients with chronic kidney disease and summarize the data for the general population.

  18. Impact of Type 2 Diabetes on Impaired Kidney Function in Sub-Saharan African Populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sally N Adebamowo

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available AbstractBackground: Diabetes is a leading risk factor for impaired kidney function, an indicator of chronic kidney disease. The aim of this study was to examine the association between type 2 diabetes (T2D and impaired kidney function among adults in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA. Methods: Participants were enrolled from Ghana, Kenya and Nigeria. Impaired kidney function was based on an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR < 60 ml/min/1·73m2. Using logistic regression models, we conducted case-control analyses to estimate the multivariate adjusted association of T2D and kidney function.Results: We used data from 4,815 participants for whom the mean (SD age was 48 (15 years, 41% were male and 46% had T2D. Those with T2D were more likely to have impaired kidney function (13·4% [95% CI: 11·9 - 14·7] compared to those without T2D (4·8% [95% CI:4·0 - 5·6], p-value <0·001. The multivariate odds ratio of impaired kidney function among those with type 2 diabetes was 1·50 (95% CI: 1·17 - 1·91 p-value = 0.001, compared to those without T2D. Also, individuals with T2D who were at least 60 years old, obese, hypertensive or dyslipidemic were more likely to have impaired kidney function, compared to those without T2D. Conclusions: T2D was associated with 50% increased risk of impaired kidney function in this sample of adults from SSA. Interventions targeted at prevention, early diagnosis and management of T2D are likely to reduce the burden of kidney disease in SSA.

  19. Chronic kidney disease management program in Shahreza, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barahimi, Hamid; Aghighi, Mohammad; Aghayani, Katayon; Rahimi Foroushani, Abbas

    2014-11-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a public health problem that needs an integrated program to be detected, monitored, and controlled. This study reports the results of a CKD program designed and implemented in Shahreza, Iran. After initial evaluation of CKD in Shahreza, a CKD management program was developed in the Ministry of Health and the pilot project was started in February 2011 in Shahreza rural areas. The patients at risk, including those with diabetes mellitus and hypertension, were tested with serum creatinine and urine albumin-creatinine ratio. The CKD management program included training, screening, monitoring, and controlling of weight, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, lipids, and vitamin D. This pilot program was organized in the rural population aged over 30 years who were suffering from hypertension, diabetes mellitus, or both, and resulted in the discovery of cases in various stages of CKD. The prevalence of CKD in this high-risk group was 21.5%. Persistent albuminuria and a glomerular filtration rate less than 60 mL/min/1.73 m(2) were 13% and 11%, respectively. The rate of CKD stages 1, 2, 3a, 3b, 4, and 5 were 2.75%, 6.82%, 10.08%, 0.92%, 0.31%, and 0.17% respectively. After 1 year of the program implemented, incidence rate of CKD was 24% and improvement rate was 21%. In diabetic patients, the mean of hemoglobin A1c decreased from 8.5 ± 1.9% to 7.5% ± 1.8%. Integration of CKD programs in primary health care is possible and results in improvement in management of CKD patients.

  20. The Prevalence of Chronic Kidney Disease and Associated Factors ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-06-27

    Jun 27, 2016 ... programs in high-risk populations (hypertensives, diabetes, and HIV) which aims to identify patients at early stages of CKD, and ... (HTN) and diabetes to be the two major causes of kidney disease worldwide.[7,9] Older age followed by HTN were ... AIDS and tuberculosis.[12] There has been no study done.

  1. Impact of Lifestyle Modification on Diabetic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onyenwenyi, Chijoke

    2016-01-01

    Kidney disease is common in patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus and is associated with adverse health outcomes, including progression to end-stage renal disease. In the general population, adherence to a healthy lifestyle is known to reduce the risk of cardiovascular events and death. Among individuals with diabetic kidney disease, modifications in lifestyle factors, including diet, physical activity, smoking habits and body mass index, represent a promising cost-effective therapeutic adjunct to pharmacologic treatment of kidney disease incidence and progression. PMID:26194155

  2. Contribution of stone size to chronic kidney disease in kidney stone formers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Farrokhlagha; Etemadi, Samira Motedayen; Lessan-Pezeshki, Mahbob; Mahdavi-Mazdeh, Mitra; Ayati, Mohsen; Mir, Alireza; Yazdi, Hadi Rokni

    2015-01-01

    To determine whether stone burden correlates with the degree of chronic kidney disease in kidney stone formers. A total of 97 extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy candidates aged 18 years and older were included. Size, number and location of the kidney stones, along with cumulative stone size, defined as the sum of diameters of all stones) were determined. Estimated glomerular filtration rate was determined using the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration cystatin C/creatinine equation, and chronic kidney disease was defined as estimated glomerular filtration rate chronic kidney disease. The relationship persisted even after adjustment for age, sex, body mass index, C-reactive protein, fasting plasma glucose, thyroid stimulating hormone, presence of microalbuminuria, history of renal calculi, history of extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy, number and location of the stones (odds ratio 1.24, 95% confidence interval 1.02-1.52). The same was not observed for individuals with a cumulative stone size ≥ 20 mm. In kidney stone formers with a cumulative stone size up to 20 mm, estimated glomerular filtration rate linearly declines with increasing cumulative stone size. Additionally, cumulative stone size is an independent predictor of chronic kidney disease in this group of patients. © 2014 The Japanese Urological Association.

  3. Developments in renal pharmacogenomics and applications in chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padullés A

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Ariadna Padullés,1 Inés Rama,2 Inés Llaudó,2 Núria Lloberas2 1Pharmacy Department, 2Nephrology Department, IDIBELL-Hospital Universitari Bellvitge, L'Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain Abstract: Chronic kidney disease (CKD has shown an increasing prevalence in the last century. CKD encompasses a poor prognosis related to a remarkable number of comorbidities, and many patients suffer from this disease progression. Once the factors linked with CKD evolution are distinguished, it will be possible to provide and enhance a more intensive treatment to high-risk patients. In this review, we focus on the emerging markers that might be predictive or related to CKD progression physiopathology as well as those related to a different pattern of response to treatment, such as inhibitors of the renin–angiotensin system (including angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers; the vitamin D receptor agonist; salt sensitivity hypertension; and progressive kidney-disease markers with identified genetic polymorphisms. Candidate-gene association studies and genome-wide association studies have analyzed the genetic basis for common renal diseases, including CKD and related factors such as diabetes and hypertension. This review will, in brief, consider genotype-based pharmacotherapy, risk prediction, drug target recognition, and personalized treatments, and will mainly focus on findings in CKD patients. An improved understanding will smooth the progress of switching from classical clinical medicine to gene-based medicine. Keywords: angiotensin-converting enzyme, diabetes, hypertension, renal treatment, gene polymorphisms, biomarkers

  4. Prevalence of chronic kidney disease in Peruvian primary care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Añazco, Percy; Taype-Rondan, Alvaro; Lazo-Porras, María; Alberto Quintanilla, E; Ortiz-Soriano, Victor Manuel; Hernandez, Adrian V

    2017-07-19

    Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) is a worldwide public health problem. There are few studies in Latin America, especially in primary care settings. Our objective was to determine the prevalence, stages, and associated factors of CKD in primary care setting. We did a retrospective secondary analysis of a database from the Diabetes and Hypertension Primary Care Center of the Peruvian Social Security System (EsSalud) in Lima, Peru. We defined CKD as the presence of eGFR 30 mg/day in 24 h, according to Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO). Factors associated with CKD were evaluated with Poisson Regression models; these factors included age, gender, type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2), hypertension (HTN), body mass index (BMI), and uric acid. Associations were described as crude and adjusted prevalence ratios (PR) and their 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). We evaluated 1211 patients (women [59%], mean age 65.8 years [SD: 12.7]). Prevalence of CKD was 18%. Using the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), the prevalence was 9.3% (95% CI 5.3 - 13.3) in patients without HTN or DM2; 20.2% (95% CI 17.6 - 22.8) in patients with HTN, and 23.9% (95% CI 19.4 - 28.4) in patients with DM2. The most common stages were 1 and 2 with 41.5% and 48%, respectively. Factors associated with CKD in the adjusted analysis were: age in years (PR = 1.03, 95% CI 1.01 - 1.04), DM2 (PR = 3.37, 95% CI 1.09 - 10.39), HTN plus DM2 (PR = 3.90, 95% CI 1.54 - 9.88), and uric acid from 5 to DM2, older age and hyperuricemia have higher prevalence of CKD.

  5. Chronic Kidney Disease in an Adult with Propionic Acidemia

    OpenAIRE

    Vernon, H. J.; Bagnasco, S.; Hamosh, A.; Sperati, C. J.

    2013-01-01

    We report an adult male with classic propionic acidemia (PA) who developed chronic kidney disease in the third decade of his life. This diagnosis was recognized by an increasing serum creatinine and confirmed by reduced glomerular filtration on a 99mTc-diethylenetriamine pentaacetate (DTPA) scan. Histopathology of the kidney showed moderate glomerulo- and tubulointerstitial fibrosis with very segmental mesangial IgA deposits. This is the second reported case of kidney disease in an individual...

  6. Serum 1,5-Anhydroglucitol Concentrations Remain Valid as a Glycemic Control Marker In Diabetes with Earlier Chronic Kidney Disease Stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuhuan; Bai, Yuanyuan; Yang, Ruihua; Song, Yanan

    2017-12-21

    To investigate the reliability of 1,5-anhydroglucitol (1,5-AG) in diabetes with mild or moderate renal dysfunction. 668 patients diagnosed with diabetes as DM group and 336 healthy controls as non-DM group were enrolled in this study. DM group was divided into four groups according to estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). Serum concentrations of 1,5-AG, fructosamine (FMN) and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) were assayed via the enzymatic method, the nitro reduction four nitrogen thiazole blue test,high performance liquid chromatography respectively. In diabetic Patients with eGFR≥30 mL/min, significant negative association still existed between logarithmic transformed 1,5-AG values (ln1,5-AG) and HbA1c (all PHOMA-β) (standard β=0.097, P=0.012). 1,5-AG values remain reliable as a glycemic control marker In diabetes with mild or moderate dysfunction. Serum UA was significantly and positively correlated with 1,5-AG levels. HbA1c may be a good biomarker for insulin resistance compared with 1,5-AG and FMN. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  7. Gut microbiota in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cigarran Guldris, Secundino; González Parra, Emilio; Cases Amenós, Aleix

    The intestinal microflora maintains a symbiotic relationship with the host under normal conditions, but its imbalance has recently been associated with several diseases. In chronic kidney disease (CKD), dysbiotic intestinal microflora has been reported with an increase in pathogenic flora compared to symbiotic flora. An enhanced permeability of the intestinal barrier, allowing the passage of endotoxins and other bacterial products to the blood, has also been shown in CKD. By fermenting undigested products that reach the colon, the intestinal microflora produce indoles, phenols and amines, among others, that are absorbed by the host, accumulate in CKD and have harmful effects on the body. These gut-derived uraemic toxins and the increased permeability of the intestinal barrier in CKD have been associated with increased inflammation and oxidative stress and have been involved in various CKD-related complications, including cardiovascular disease, anaemia, mineral metabolism disorders or the progression of CKD. The use of prebiotics, probiotics or synbiotics, among other approaches, could improve the dysbiosis and/or the increased permeability of the intestinal barrier in CKD. This article describes the situation of the intestinal microflora in CKD, the alteration of the intestinal barrier and its clinical consequences, the harmful effects of intestinal flora-derived uraemic toxins, and possible therapeutic options to improve this dysbiosis and reduce CKD-related complications. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Nefrología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Dietary protein intake and chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Gang Jee; Obi, Yoshitsugu; Tortorici, Amanda R; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar

    2017-01-01

    High-protein intake may lead to increased intraglomerular pressure and glomerular hyperfiltration. This can cause damage to glomerular structure leading to or aggravating chronic kidney disease (CKD). Hence, a low-protein diet (LPD) of 0.6-0.8 g/kg/day is often recommended for the management of CKD. We reviewed the effect of protein intake on incidence and progression of CKD and the role of LPD in the CKD management. Actual dietary protein consumption in CKD patients remains substantially higher than the recommendations for LPD. Notwithstanding the inconclusive results of the 'Modification of Diet in Renal Disease' (MDRD) study, the largest randomized controlled trial to examine protein restriction in CKD, several prior and subsequent studies and meta-analyses appear to support the role of LPD on retarding progression of CKD and delaying initiation of maintenance dialysis therapy. LPD can also be used to control metabolic derangements in CKD. Supplemented LPD with essential amino acids or their ketoanalogs may be used for incremental transition to dialysis especially on nondialysis days. The LPD management in lieu of dialysis therapy can reduce costs, enhance psychological adaptation, and preserve residual renal function upon transition to dialysis. Adherence and adequate protein and energy intake should be ensured to avoid protein-energy wasting. A balanced and individualized dietary approach based on LPD should be elaborated with periodic dietitian counseling and surveillance to optimize management of CKD, to assure adequate protein and energy intake, and to avoid or correct protein-energy wasting.

  9. Stroke and bleeding in atrial fibrillation with chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Jonas Bjerring; Lip, Gregory Y.H.; Kamper, Anne-Lise

    2012-01-01

    Both atrial fibrillation and chronic kidney disease increase the risk of stroke and systemic thromboembolism. However, these risks, and the effects of antithrombotic treatment, have not been thoroughly investigated in patients with both conditions....

  10. Diagnostic approach to chronic kidney disease | Naiker | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) can be considered to be present if a patient has a glomerular filtration rate 3 months. These include proteinuria, haematuria and radiological abnormalities. Regardless of the stage of CKD, the approach is mainly similar.

  11. End Stage and Chronic Kidney Disease: Associations with Renal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russo, Paul

    2012-01-01

    There is a well known association between end stage renal disease and the development of kidney cancer in the native kidney of patients requiring renal replacement therapy. There is now emerging evidence that lesser degrees of renal insufficiency (chronic kidney disease, CKD) are also associated with an increased likelihood of cancer in general and kidney cancer in particular. Nephropathological changes are commonly observed in the non-tumor bearing portions of kidney resected at the time of partial and radical nephrectomy (RN). In addition, patients with renal cancer are more likely to have CKD at the time of diagnosis and treatment than the general population. The exact mechanism by which renal insufficiency transforms normal kidney cells into tumor cells is not known. Possible mechanisms include uremic immune inhibition or increased exposure to circulating toxins not adequately cleared by the kidneys. Surgeons managing kidney tumors must have an increased awareness of their patient’s renal functional status as they plan their resection. Kidney sparing approaches, including partial nephrectomy (PN) or active surveillance in older and morbidly ill patients, can prevent CKD or delay the further decline in renal function which is well documented with RN. Despite emerging evidence that PN provides equivalent local tumor control to RN while at the same time preventing CKD, this operation remains under utilized in the United States and abroad. Increased awareness of the bi directional relationship between kidney function and kidney cancer is essential in the contemporary management of kidney cancer.

  12. [Risk factors for cardiovascular system damage in chronic kidney disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutyrina, I M; Rudenko, T E; Savel'eva, S A; Shvetsov, M Iu; Vasil'eva, M P

    2013-01-01

    To study the prevalence of and risk factors (RF) associated with cardiovascular system damage in patients with predialysis diabetic and nondiabetic chronic kidney disease (CKD). The investigation enrolled 317 patients with CKD of various etiologies. In Group 1 (165 patients with CKD: 54% of men, 46% of women; mean age 46 +/- 15 years), the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was 37.2 ml/min; the serum creatinine level was 2.9 mg/dl. Group 2 included 152 (41%) patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) (41% of men and 59% of women; mean age 57.3 +/- 7.1 years). The duration of DM averaged 10.4 +/- 7.1 years. All the patients underwent physical examination; the levels of glycated hemoglobin and adipose tissue hormones, urinary albumin excretion were additionally determined in the diabetic patients. Echocardiography was performed in 172 patients. The influence of populationwide and renal failure-associated RFs on the cardiovascular system was evaluated in CKD. Clinical and instrumental examinations of 165 patients with Stages II-IV nondiabetic CKD revealed atherosclerosis of the aorta and the vessels of the heart, brain, kidney, and lower extremities in 60 (37%), 35 (24%), 30 (18%), 23 (14%), and 8 (5%), respectively. As atherosclerotic vascular lesion progressed, the incidence of cardiovascular events (CVE) increased. Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) was diagnosed in 37.3% of the patients with nondiabetic CKD. Along with traditional cardiovascular RFs (age, smoking, gender, arterial hypertension), the renal dysfunction-related factors (anemia, diminished glomerular filtration rate, elevated creatitine levels, and abnormal phosphorus and calcium metabolism) are of importance. An association was found between LVH, atherosclerotic vascular lesion, and heart valve calcification. According to EchoCG data, 36% of the patients with type 2 DM were diagnosed as having LVH. The RFs of the latter were albuminuria, obesity, and abnormal carbohydrate and purine metabolisms. There

  13. Impaired vascular reactivity in patients with chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetzner, Fabian; Scholze, Alexandra; Wittstock, Antje

    2008-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) show increased cardiovascular morbidity. We hypothesized that vascular properties which can be routinely evaluated noninvasively are related to different stages of CKD and their clinical and biochemical characteristics.......Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) show increased cardiovascular morbidity. We hypothesized that vascular properties which can be routinely evaluated noninvasively are related to different stages of CKD and their clinical and biochemical characteristics....

  14. Human Kidney Tubule-Specific Gene Expression Based Dissection of Chronic Kidney Disease Traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckerman, Pazit; Qiu, Chengxiang; Park, Jihwan; Ledo, Nora; Ko, Yi-An; Park, Ae-Seo Deok; Han, Sang-Youb; Choi, Peter; Palmer, Matthew; Susztak, Katalin

    2017-10-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has diverse phenotypic manifestations including structural (such as fibrosis) and functional (such as glomerular filtration rate and albuminuria) alterations. Gene expression profiling has recently gained popularity as an important new tool for precision medicine approaches. Here we used unbiased and directed approaches to understand how gene expression captures different CKD manifestations in patients with diabetic and hypertensive CKD. Transcriptome data from ninety-five microdissected human kidney samples with a range of demographics, functional and structural changes were used for the primary analysis. Data obtained from 41 samples were available for validation. Using the unbiased Weighted Gene Co-Expression Network Analysis (WGCNA) we identified 16 co-expressed gene modules. We found that modules that strongly correlated with eGFR primarily encoded genes with metabolic functions. Gene groups that mainly encoded T-cell receptor and collagen pathways, showed the strongest correlation with fibrosis level, suggesting that these two phenotypic manifestations might have different underlying mechanisms. Linear regression models were then used to identify genes whose expression showed significant correlation with either structural (fibrosis) or functional (eGFR) manifestation and mostly corroborated the WGCNA findings. We concluded that gene expression is a very sensitive sensor of fibrosis, as the expression of 1654 genes correlated with fibrosis even after adjusting to eGFR and other clinical parameters. The association between GFR and gene expression was mostly mediated by fibrosis. In conclusion, our transcriptome-based CKD trait dissection analysis suggests that the association between gene expression and renal function is mediated by structural changes and that there may be differences in pathways that lead to decline in kidney function and the development of fibrosis, respectively. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by

  15. Prevalence and characteristics of chronic kidney disease among Danish adults with cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Kristina H; Ryom, Lene; Faurholt-Jepsen, Daniel

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: With improved prognosis of CF, comorbidities including chronic kidney disease (CKD) are becoming increasingly important. Identification of those at highest CKD risk is hence a priority. METHODS: In this cross-sectional study, adults with CF attending the Copenhagen CF Centre...... median duration of chronic pulmonary infection (28.3 (20.0-35.8) vs. 20.0 (9.9-34.7) years; p=0.008) and with longer intravenous aminoglycosides use (606 (IQR, 455-917) vs. 273 (IQR, 91-826) days, p=0.005). CONCLUSIONS: The CKD prevalence is high and related to age, diabetes, chronic infection...

  16. Combination of ACE inhibitor with nicorandil provides further protection in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraishi, Takeshi; Tamura, Yoshifuru; Taniguchi, Kei; Higaki, Masato; Ueda, Shuko; Shima, Tomoko; Nagura, Michito; Nakagawa, Takahiko; Johnson, Richard J; Uchida, Shunya

    2014-12-15

    An inhibition in the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is one of the most widely used therapies to treat chronic kidney disease. However, its effect is occasionally not sufficient and additional treatments may be required. Recently, we reported that nicorandil exhibited renoprotective effects in a mouse model of diabetic nephropathy. Here we examined if nicorandil can provide an additive protection on enalapril in chronic kidney disease. Single treatment with either enalapril or nicorandil significantly ameliorated glomerular and tubulointerstitial injury in the rat remnant kidney while the combination of these two compounds provided additive effects. In addition, an increase in oxidative stress in remnant kidney was also blocked by either enalapril or nicorandil while the combination of the drugs was more potent. A mechanism was likely due for nicorandil to preventing manganase superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) and sirtuin (Sirt)3 from being reduced in injured kidneys. A study with cultured podocytes indicated that the antioxidative effect could be mediated through sulfonylurea receptor (SUR) in the mitochondrial KATP channel since blocking SUR with glibenclamide reduced MnSOD and Sirt3 expression in podocytes. In conclusion, nicorandil may synergize with enalapril to provide superior protection in chronic kidney disease. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  17. Potential Deleterious Effects of Vasopressin in Chronic Kidney Disease and Particularly Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, E.; Boertien, W. E.; Zietse, R.; Gansevoort, R. T.

    2011-01-01

    The antidiuretic hormone vasopressin is crucial for regulating free water clearance in normal physiology. However, it has also been hypothesized that vasopressin has deleterious effects on the kidney. Vasopressin is elevated in animals and patients with chronic kidney disease. Suppression of

  18. Prevalence of Chronic Kidney Disease in Korea: the Korean National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey 2011-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ji In; Baek, Hyunjeong; Jung, Hae Hyuk

    2016-06-01

    Chronic kidney disease is a leading public health problem related to poor quality of life and premature death. As a resource for evidence-informed health policy-making, we evaluated the prevalence of chronic kidney disease using the data of non-institutionalized adults aged ≥ 20 years (n = 15,319) from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey in 2011-2013. Chronic kidney disease was defined as a urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio ≥ 30 mg/g or an estimated glomerular filtration rate Chronic Kidney Disease-Epidemiology Collaboration equation. The total prevalence estimate of chronic kidney disease for adults aged ≥ 20 years in Korea was 8.2%. By disease stage, the prevalence of chronic kidney disease was as follows: stage 1, 3.0%; stage 2, 2.7%; stage 3a, 1.9%; stage 3b, 0.4%; and stages 4-5, 0.2%. When grouped into three risk categories according to the 2012 Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes guidelines, the proportions for the moderately increased risk, high risk, and very high risk categories were 6.5%, 1.2%, and 0.5%, respectively. Factors including older age, diabetes, hypertension, cardiovascular disease, body mass indexes of ≥ 25 kg/m(2) and chronic kidney disease. Based on this comprehensive analysis, evidence-based screening strategies for chronic kidney disease in the Korean population should be developed to optimize prevention and early intervention of chronic kidney disease and its associated risk factors.

  19. Ficolin B in Diabetic Kidney Disease in a Mouse Model of Type 1 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Berg Holt

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The innate immune system may have adverse effects in diabetes and cardiovascular disease. The complement system seems to play a key role through erroneous complement activation via hyperglycaemia-induced neoepitopes. Recently mannan-binding lectin (MBL was shown to worsen diabetic kidney changes. We hypothesize that mouse ficolin B exerts detrimental effects in the diabetic kidney as seen for MBL. Methods. We induced diabetes with streptozotocin in female wild-type mice and ficolin B knockout mice and included two similar nondiabetic groups. Renal hypertrophy and excretion of urinary albumin and creatinine were quantified to assess diabetic kidney damage. Results. In the wild-type groups, the kidney weighed 24% more in the diabetic mice compared to the controls. The diabetes-induced increase in kidney weight was 29% in the ficolin B knockout mice, that is, equal to wild-type animals (two-way ANOVA, P=0.60. In the wild-type mice the albumin-to-creatinine ratio (ACR was 32.5 mg/g higher in the diabetic mice compared to the controls. The difference was 62.5 mg/g in the ficolin B knockout mice, but this was not significantly different from the wild-type animals (two-way ANOVA, P=0.21. Conclusions. In conclusion, the diabetes-induced effects on kidney weight and ACR were not modified by the presence or absence of ficolin B.

  20. Risk of chronic kidney disease in type 2 diabetes determined by polymorphisms in NOS3, APOB, KCNJ11, TCF7L2 genes as compound effect of risk genotypes combination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Viktorovna Zheleznyakova

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Genetic susceptibility plays an important role in the risk of developing chronic complications in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM.AimsIn this study, we evaluated the possible association of the polymorphic variants that encode key renal damage mediators (endothelial dysfunction, lipid metabolism and insulin secretion/sensitivity with the risk of chronic kidney disease (CKD in patients with T2DM.Materials and MethodsWe enrolled 435 patients with T2DM using case-control study design. In 253 patients, we used non-overlapping criteria to form groups with/without CKD (defined as GFR<60 ml/min/1.73 m2 according to the duration of T2DM (≤5 years/≥10 years (n=75 and 178, respectively and analysed the following 4 polymorphic markers: I/D in ACE, ecNOS4a/4b in NOS3, I/D in APOB and e2/e3/e4 in APOE genes. We then divided 182 patients in groups with/without CKD (n=38 and 144, respectively regardless of the duration of diabetes and studied pro12ala in PPARG2, rs5219 in KCNJ11, rs12255372 in TCF7L2 and rs13266634 in SLC30A8 genes. Statistical analysis was performed using the χ2 test, and data were expressed as odds ratios (ORs with 95% confidence intervals (CIs. Values of p <0.05 indicated statistical significance.ResultsFour genes were found to have a significant association with CKD occurrence. For the eNOS3 the allele 4a and 4a/4a genotype was associated with a twofold CKD risk (OR=2.2/9.88 and the allele 4b and 4b/4b polymorphism were protective regarding CKD development (OR=0.44/0.45. For APOB I/D, the genotype DD was associated with lower risk of CKD [OR for DD=0.2 (95% CI: 0.05–0.88]. In the second group, genotype TT of TCF7L2 predisposed to CKD (OR=3.03, 95% CI: 1.07–8.58. For KCNJ11 group genotype AA predisposed to CKD (OR=2.25, 95% CI: 1.02–4.97 compared to the allele G (OR=0,57, 95% CI: 0.34–0.96.ConclusionsIn conclusion, our findings indicate a significant role of functional genetic variants associated with genes of

  1. Vegetarian Diet in Chronic Kidney Disease—A Friend or Foe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Gluba-Brzózka

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Healthy diet is highly important, especially in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD. Proper nutrition provides the energy to perform everyday activities, prevents infection, builds muscle, and helps to prevent kidney disease from getting worse. However, what does a proper diet mean for a CKD patient? Nutrition requirements differ depending on the level of kidney function and the presence of co-morbid conditions, including hypertension, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. The diet of CKD patients should help to slow the rate of progression of kidney failure, reduce uremic toxicity, decrease proteinuria, maintain good nutritional status, and lower the risk of kidney disease-related secondary complications (cardiovascular disease, bone disease, and hypertension. It has been suggested that plant proteins may exert beneficial effects on blood pressure, proteinuria, and glomerular filtration rate, as well as results in milder renal tissue damage when compared to animal proteins. The National Kidney Foundation recommends vegetarianism, or part-time vegetarian diet as being beneficial to CKD patients. Their recommendations are supported by the results of studies demonstrating that a plant-based diet may hamper the development or progression of some complications of chronic kidney disease, such as heart disease, protein loss in urine, and the progression of kidney damage. However, there are sparse reports suggesting that a vegan diet is not appropriate for CKD patients and those undergoing dialysis due to the difficulty in consuming enough protein and in maintaining proper potassium and phosphorus levels. Therefore, this review will focus on the problem as to whether vegetarian diet and its modifications are suitable for chronic kidney disease patients.

  2. Vegetarian Diet in Chronic Kidney Disease-A Friend or Foe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluba-Brzózka, Anna; Franczyk, Beata; Rysz, Jacek

    2017-04-10

    Healthy diet is highly important, especially in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Proper nutrition provides the energy to perform everyday activities, prevents infection, builds muscle, and helps to prevent kidney disease from getting worse. However, what does a proper diet mean for a CKD patient? Nutrition requirements differ depending on the level of kidney function and the presence of co-morbid conditions, including hypertension, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. The diet of CKD patients should help to slow the rate of progression of kidney failure, reduce uremic toxicity, decrease proteinuria, maintain good nutritional status, and lower the risk of kidney disease-related secondary complications (cardiovascular disease, bone disease, and hypertension). It has been suggested that plant proteins may exert beneficial effects on blood pressure, proteinuria, and glomerular filtration rate, as well as results in milder renal tissue damage when compared to animal proteins. The National Kidney Foundation recommends vegetarianism, or part-time vegetarian diet as being beneficial to CKD patients. Their recommendations are supported by the results of studies demonstrating that a plant-based diet may hamper the development or progression of some complications of chronic kidney disease, such as heart disease, protein loss in urine, and the progression of kidney damage. However, there are sparse reports suggesting that a vegan diet is not appropriate for CKD patients and those undergoing dialysis due to the difficulty in consuming enough protein and in maintaining proper potassium and phosphorus levels. Therefore, this review will focus on the problem as to whether vegetarian diet and its modifications are suitable for chronic kidney disease patients.

  3. Vegetarian Diet in Chronic Kidney Disease—A Friend or Foe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluba-Brzózka, Anna; Franczyk, Beata; Rysz, Jacek

    2017-01-01

    Healthy diet is highly important, especially in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Proper nutrition provides the energy to perform everyday activities, prevents infection, builds muscle, and helps to prevent kidney disease from getting worse. However, what does a proper diet mean for a CKD patient? Nutrition requirements differ depending on the level of kidney function and the presence of co-morbid conditions, including hypertension, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. The diet of CKD patients should help to slow the rate of progression of kidney failure, reduce uremic toxicity, decrease proteinuria, maintain good nutritional status, and lower the risk of kidney disease-related secondary complications (cardiovascular disease, bone disease, and hypertension). It has been suggested that plant proteins may exert beneficial effects on blood pressure, proteinuria, and glomerular filtration rate, as well as results in milder renal tissue damage when compared to animal proteins. The National Kidney Foundation recommends vegetarianism, or part-time vegetarian diet as being beneficial to CKD patients. Their recommendations are supported by the results of studies demonstrating that a plant-based diet may hamper the development or progression of some complications of chronic kidney disease, such as heart disease, protein loss in urine, and the progression of kidney damage. However, there are sparse reports suggesting that a vegan diet is not appropriate for CKD patients and those undergoing dialysis due to the difficulty in consuming enough protein and in maintaining proper potassium and phosphorus levels. Therefore, this review will focus on the problem as to whether vegetarian diet and its modifications are suitable for chronic kidney disease patients. PMID:28394274

  4. Chronic kidney disease in an adult with propionic acidemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernon, H J; Bagnasco, S; Hamosh, A; Sperati, C J

    2014-01-01

    We report an adult male with classic propionic acidemia (PA) who developed chronic kidney disease in the third decade of his life. This diagnosis was recognized by an increasing serum creatinine and confirmed by reduced glomerular filtration on a (99m)Tc-diethylenetriamine pentaacetate (DTPA) scan. Histopathology of the kidney showed moderate glomerulo- and tubulointerstitial fibrosis with very segmental mesangial IgA deposits. This is the second reported case of kidney disease in an individual with propionic acidemia possibly indicating that chronic kidney disease may be a late-stage complication of propionic acidemia. Additionally, this is the first description of the histopathology of kidney disease in an individual with propionic acidemia. As more cases emerge, the clinical course and spectrum of renal pathology in this disorder will be better defined.

  5. Are pre-existing markers of chronic kidney disease associated with short-term mortality following acute community-acquired pneumonia and sepsis? A cohort study among older people with diabetes using electronic health records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Helen I; Nitsch, Dorothea; Millett, Elizabeth R C; Sinclair, Alan; Thomas, Sara L

    2015-06-01

    We aimed to examine whether pre-existing impaired estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and proteinuria were associated with mortality following community-acquired pneumonia or sepsis among people aged ≥ 65 years with diabetes mellitus, without end-stage renal disease. Patients were followed up from onset of first community-acquired pneumonia or sepsis episode in a cohort study using large, linked electronic health databases. Follow-up was for up to 90 days, unlimited by hospital discharge. We used generalized linear models with log link, normal distribution and robust standard errors to calculate risk ratios (RRs) for all-cause 28- and 90-day mortality according to two markers of chronic kidney disease: eGFR and proteinuria. All-cause mortality among the 4743 patients with pneumonia was 29.6% after 28 days and 37.4% after 90 days. Among the 1058 patients with sepsis, all-cause 28- and 90-day mortality were 35.6 and 44.2%, respectively. eGFR sepsis (RR 1.32: 95% CI 1.07-1.64), adjusted for age, sex, socio-economic status, smoking status and co-morbidities. Neither moderately impaired eGFR nor proteinuria were associated with short-term mortality following either infection. People with pre-existing low eGFR but not on dialysis are at higher risk of death following pneumonia and sepsis. This association was not explained by existing co-morbidities. These patients need to be carefully monitored to prevent modifiable causes of death. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA.

  6. Biomarker for early renal microvascular and diabetic kidney diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futrakul, Narisa; Futrakul, Prasit

    2017-11-01

    Recognition of early stage of diabetic kidney disease, under common practice using biomarkers, namely microalbuminuria, serum creatinine level above 1 mg/dL and accepted definition of diabetic kidney disease associated with creatinine clearance value below 60 mL/min/1.73 m 2 , is unlikely. This would lead to delay treatment associated with therapeutic resistance to vasodilator due to a defective vascular homoeostasis. Other alternative biomarkers related to the state of microalbuminuria is not sensitive to screen for early diabetic kidney disease (stages I, II). In this regard, a better diagnostic markers to serve for this purpose are creatinine clearance, fractional excretion of magnesium (FE Mg), cystatin C. Recently, renal microvascular disease and renal ischemia have been demonstrated to correlate indirectly with the development of diabetic kidney disease and its function. Among these are angiogenic and anti-angiogenic factors, namely VEGF, VEGF receptors, angiopoietins and endostatin. With respect to therapeutic prevention, implementation of treatment at early stage of diabetic and nondiabetic kidney disease is able to restore renal perfusion and function.

  7. Serum Beta Hydroxybutyrate Concentrations in Cats with Chronic Kidney Disease, Hyperthyroidism, or Hepatic Lipidosis

    OpenAIRE

    Gorman, L.; Sharkey, L.C.; Armstrong, P.J.; Little, K.; Rendahl, A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Ketones, including beta hydroxybutyrate (BHB), are produced in conditions of negative energy balance and decreased glucose utilization. Serum BHB concentrations in cats are poorly characterized in diseases other than diabetes mellitus. Hypothesis Serum BHB concentrations will be increased in cats with chronic kidney disease (CKD), hyperthyroidism (HT), or hepatic lipidosis (HL). Animals Twenty?eight client?owned cats with CKD, 34 cats with HT, and 15 cats with HL; 43 healthy cats. ...

  8. Diagnostic approach to chronic kidney disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The following are indications for a kidney biopsy: • Patients with CKD whose kidneys are normal or near normal in size, where the diagnosis cannot be made by other means. • Patients with a definite diagnosis, where the histology is essential for appropriate management and prognosis, e.g. lupus nephritis, vasculitis. Yes.

  9. 76 FR 9587 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Diabetes Mellitus Interagency...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-18

    ... ``Diabetes: A1c/Questions/ Diagnosis.'' Any member of the public interested in presenting oral comments to... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Diabetes Mellitus Interagency Coordinating Committee; Notice of...

  10. Rhein reverses Klotho repression via promoter demethylation and protects against kidney and bone injuries in mice with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qin; Liu, Lin; Lin, Wenjun; Yin, Shasha; Duan, Aiping; Liu, Zhihong; Cao, Wangsen

    2017-01-01

    Rhein is an anthraquinone compound isolated from the medicinal plant rhubarb and mainly used in the clinical treatment of diabetic nephropathy. Rhein exhibits various renoprotective functions, but the underlying mechanisms are not fully determined. However, its renoprotective properties recapitulate the role of Klotho, a renal-specific antiaging protein critical for maintaining kidney homeostasis. Here we explored the connections between rhein renoprotection and Klotho in a mouse model of adenine-induced chronic kidney disease. In addition to being an impressive Klotho upregulator, rhein remarkably reversed renal Klotho deficiency in adenine-treated mice. This effect was associated with significant improvement in disturbed serum biochemistry, profibrogenic protein expression, and kidney and bone damage. Further investigation of the molecular basis of Klotho loss revealed that these kidneys displayed marked inductions of DNA methyltransferase DNMT1/DNMT3a and Klotho promoter hypermethylation, whereas rhein treatment effectively corrected these alterations. The renal protective effects of rhein were largely abolished when Klotho was knocked-down by RNA interferences, suggesting that rhein reversal of Klotho deficiency is essential for its renoprotective actions. Thus, our study clarifies how rhein regulation of Klotho expression contributes to its renoprotection and brings new insights into Klotho-targeted strategy for the treatment of kidney diseases of various etiologies. Copyright © 2016 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Risk factors for chronic kidney disease among patients at Olabisi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Risk factors for chronic kidney disease among patients at Olabisi Onabanjo University Teaching Hospital in Sagamu, Nigeria: A retrospective cohort study. ... Sixty-four percent of the cases had history of chronic use of analgesic compared with 10.3% of the controls (p < 0.001). Conclusions: CKD is mostly found among men ...

  12. Plasma Nitration of High-Density and Low-Density Lipoproteins in Chronic Kidney Disease Patients Receiving Kidney Transplants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Bakillah

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Functional abnormalities of high-density lipoprotein (HDL could contribute to cardiovascular disease in chronic kidney disease patients. We measured a validated marker of HDL dysfunction, nitrated apolipoprotein A-I, in kidney transplant recipients to test the hypothesis that a functioning kidney transplant reduces serum nitrated apoA-I concentrations. Methods. Concentrations of nitrated apoA-I and apoB were measured using indirect sandwich ELISA assays on sera collected from each transplant subject before transplantation and at 1, 3, and 12 months after transplantation. Patients were excluded if they have history of diabetes, treatment with lipid-lowering medications or HIV protease inhibitors, prednisone dose > 15 mg/day, nephrotic range proteinuria, serum creatinine > 1.5 mg/dL, or active inflammatory disease. Sera from 18 transplanted patients were analyzed. Four subjects were excluded due to insufficient data. Twelve and eight patients had creatinine < 1.5 mg/dL at 3 and 12 months after transplantation, respectively. Results. Nitrated apoA-I was significantly reduced at 12 months after transplantation (p=0.039. The decrease in apoA-I nitration was associated with significant reduction in myeloperoxidase (MPO activity (p=0.047. In contrast to apoA-I, nitrated apoB was not affected after kidney transplantation. Conclusions. Patients with well-functioning grafts had significant reduction in nitrated apoA-I 12 months after kidney transplantation. Further studies are needed in a large cohort to determine if nitrated apoA-I can be used as a valuable marker for cardiovascular risk stratification in chronic kidney disease.

  13. Star fruit toxicity: a cause of both acute kidney injury and chronic kidney disease: a report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeysekera, R A; Wijetunge, S; Nanayakkara, N; Wazil, A W M; Ratnatunga, N V I; Jayalath, T; Medagama, A

    2015-12-17

    Star fruit (Averrhoa carambola) is commonly consumed as a herbal remedy for various ailments in tropical countries. However, the dangers associated with consumption of star fruit are not commonly known. Although star fruit induced oxalate nephrotoxicity in those with existing renal impairment is well documented, reports on its effect on those with normal renal function are infrequent. We report two unique clinical presentation patterns of star fruit nephrotoxicity following consumption of the fruit as a remedy for diabetes mellitus-the first, in a patient with normal renal function and the second case which we believe is the first reported case of chronic kidney disease (CKD) due to prolonged and excessive consumption of star fruits. The first patient is a 56-year-old female diabetic patient who had normal renal function prior to developing acute kidney injury (AKI) after consuming large amount of star fruit juice at once. The second patient, a 60-year-old male, also diabetic presented with acute on chronic renal failure following ingestion of a significant number of star fruits in a short duration with a background history of regular star fruit consumption over the past 2-3 years. Both had histologically confirmed oxalate induced renal injury. The former had histological features of acute tubulo-interstitial disease whilst the latter had acute-on-chronic interstitial disease; neither had histological evidence of diabetic nephropathy. Both recovered over 2 weeks without the need for haemodialysis. These cases illustrate the importance of obtaining the patient's detailed history with respect to ingestion of herbs, traditional medication and health foods such as star fruits especially in AKI or CKD of unknown cause.

  14. Soluble CD163 predicts incident chronic lung, kidney and liver disease in HIV infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard-Klitbo, Ditte M; Mejer, Niels; Knudsen, Troels B

    2017-01-01

    .46] and incident chronic kidney disease (aHR, 10.94; 95% CI: 2.32; 51.35), when compared with lowest quartiles. Further, (every 1 mg) increase in plasma sCD163 was positively correlated with incident liver disease (aHR, 1.12; 95% CI: 1.05; 1.19). The sCD163 level was not associated with incident cancer......, cardiovascular disease or diabetes mellitus. CONCLUSION: sCD163 was independently associated with incident chronic kidney disease, chronic lung disease and liver disease in treated HIV-1-infected individuals, suggesting that monocyte/macrophage activation may be involved in the pathogenesis of non...

  15. Practical Approach to Detection and Management of Chronic Kidney Disease for the Primary Care Clinician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassalotti, Joseph A; Centor, Robert; Turner, Barbara J; Greer, Raquel C; Choi, Michael; Sequist, Thomas D

    2016-02-01

    A panel of internists and nephrologists developed this practical approach for the Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative to guide assessment and care of chronic kidney disease (CKD) by primary care clinicians. Chronic kidney disease is defined as a glomerular filtration rate (GFR) kidney damage for at least 3 months. In clinical practice the most common tests for CKD include GFR estimated from the serum creatinine concentration (eGFR) and albuminuria from the urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio. Assessment of eGFR and albuminuria should be performed for persons with diabetes and/or hypertension but is not recommended for the general population. Management of CKD includes reducing the patient's risk of CKD progression and risk of associated complications, such as acute kidney injury and cardiovascular disease, anemia, and metabolic acidosis, as well as mineral and bone disorder. Prevention of CKD progression requires blood pressure kidney injury. The ultimate goal of CKD management is to prevent disease progression, minimize complications, and promote quality of life. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Pregnancy across the spectrum of chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hladunewich, Michelle A; Melamad, Nir; Bramham, Kate

    2016-05-01

    Management of the pregnant woman with chronic kidney disease is difficult for both nephrologists and obstetricians. Prepregnancy counselling with respect to risk stratification, optimization of maternal health prior to pregnancy, as well as management of the many potential pregnancy-associated complications in this complex patient population remains challenging due to the paucity of large, well-designed clinical studies. Furthermore, the heterogeneity of disease and the relative infrequency of pregnancy, particularly in more advanced stages of chronic kidney disease, leaves many clinicians feeling ill prepared to manage these pregnancies. As such, counselling is imprecise and management varies substantially across centers. All pregnancies in women with chronic kidney disease can benefit from a collaborative multidisciplinary approach with a team that consists of nephrologists experienced in the management of kidney disease in pregnancy, maternal-fetal medicine specialists, high-risk pregnancy nursing staff, dieticians, and pharmacists. Further access to skilled neonatologists and neonatal intensive care unit support is essential given the risks for preterm delivery in this patient population. The goal of this paper is to highlight some of the data that currently exist in the literature, provide management strategies for the practicing nephrologist at all stages of chronic kidney disease, and explore some of the knowledge gaps where future multinational collaborative research efforts should concentrate to improve pregnancy outcomes in women with kidney disease across the globe. Copyright © 2016 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Stroke and cerebrovascular diseases in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyoda, Kazunori; Ninomiya, Toshiharu

    2014-08-01

    Chronic kidney disease, defined as a reduced glomerular filtration rate or increased urinary albumin excretion, is recognised as a rapidly growing global health burden, and increasing evidence suggests that it contributes to the risk and severity of cerebrovascular diseases. In particular, chronic kidney disease is an established risk factor for stroke and is also strongly associated with subclinical cerebrovascular abnormalities and cognitive impairment, partly because it shares several traditional and non-traditional risk factors, and sometimes uraemia-related and dialysis-related factors, with cerebrovascular diseases. The effect of chronic kidney disease on incident stroke differs among regions and races and is greater in Asian than in non-Asian people. Chronic kidney disease seems to be predictive of severe neurological deficits and poor vital and functional outcomes after both ischaemic and haemorrhagic strokes, which is partly due to the limitations of pharmacotherapies, including limited use and effects of novel oral anticoagulants, other antithrombotic treatments, and reperfusion treatment for hyperacute ischaemic stroke. In view of the strong two-way association between stroke and kidney disease, the pathophysiological interactions between the brain and kidney should be the subject of intensive study. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Musculoskeletal pain in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caravaca, Francisco; Gonzales, Boris; Bayo, Miguel Ángel; Luna, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    Chronic musculoskeletal pain (CMP) is a very common symptom in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), and is associated with a significant deterioration in quality of life. To determine the prevalence and clinical characteristics associated with CMP in patients with advanced CKD not on dialysis, and to analyse their relation with other uraemic symptoms and their prognosis significance. Cross-sectional study to analyse the uraemic symptoms of an unselected cohort of patients with CKD stage 4-5 pre-dialysis. In order to characterise patients with CMP, demographic and anthropometric data were collected, as well as data on comorbidities and kidney function. In addition, inflammatory parameters, uric parameters, bone mineral metabolism including 25-hydroxycholecalciferol (25-OHCC), creatine kinase and drugs of potential interest including allopurinol, statins and erythropoiesis-stimulating agents were recorded. The study group consisted of 1169 patients (mean age 65±15 years, 54% male). A total of 38% of patients complained of CMP, and this symptom was more prevalent in women than in men (49 vs. 28%; P<.0001). Muscle weakness, pruritus, muscle cramps, ecchymosis, insomnia, oedema and dyspnoea were the most common symptoms associated with CMP. There were no significant associations between serum levels of creatine kinase, 25-OHCC, treatment with allopurinol, statins or erythropoiesis-stimulating agents and CMP. The female gender, elderly age, obesity, comorbidity (mainly diabetes, heart failure or COPD), and elevated levels of inflammatory markers (C-reactive protein and non-neutrophilic leukocytes) were the best determinants of CMP. While patients with CMP showed a worse survival rate, a multivariate analysis adjusted for demographic data ruled out the independent association of CMP with mortality. CMP is highly prevalent in patients with advanced CKD and is associated with other common symptoms of chronic uraemia. As with the general population, elderly age, the

  19. New Onset Diabetes Mellitus after Kidney Transplantation in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hornum, Mette; Jørgensen, Kaj Anker; Hansen, Jesper Melchior

    2010-01-01

    Background and objectives: This study aimed to investigate the development of new-onset diabetes mellitus (NODM) in a prospective study of 97 nondiabetic uremic patients. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: Included were 57 kidney recipients (Tx group, age 39 13 years) and 40 uremic...... patients remaining on the waiting list for kidney transplantation (uremic controls, age 47 11 years). All were examined at baseline before possible transplantation and after 12 months. The prevalence of diabetes, prediabetes, insulin sensitivity index (ISI), and insulin secretion index (Isecr) were...

  20. 77 FR 2076 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-13

    ... of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Artificial Pancreas Review... Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the... Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; NIDDK DEM Fellowship Review. Date...

  1. 76 FR 60849 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-30

    ... Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel, FGF23 Physiology. Date: November 7, 2011... Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the..., [email protected] . Name of Committee:National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney...

  2. 76 FR 30370 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-25

    ... Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Meetings Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of... Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; NIDDK KUH-Fellowship Review....gov . Name of Committee: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Special...

  3. ECG abnormalities in patients with chronic kidney disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shafi, S.; Saleem, M.; Anjum, R.; Abdullah, W.; Shafi, T.

    2017-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Electrocardiographic (ECG) abnormalities are common in CKD patients. However, there is variation in literature regarding frequency of ECG abnormalities in CKD patients and limited information in local population. Methods: The study design was cross-sectional in nature. All patients between ages of 20-80 years with CKD not previously on renal replacement therapy who were admitted to nephrology ward at a tertiary care facility over a 6-month period were included. All patients underwent 12 lead electrocardiograms (ECG). ECG abnormalities were defined based on accepted standard criteria. Results: Total number of patients included in the study was 124. Mean age of all patients was 49.9+-13.8 years, 106 (84.8%) had hypertension, 84 (70%) had diabetes mellitus, and 35 (29.9%) had known cardiovascular disease. Mean serum creatinine was 7.2+-3.4 mg/dl, mean eGFR was 10.6+-9.2 ml/min/1.73 m/sup 2/. Overall 78.4% of all CKD patients have one or more ECG abnormality. Left ventricular hypertrophy (40%), Q waves (27.2%), ST segment elevation or depression (23.4%), prolonged QRS duration (19.2%), tachycardia (17.6%) and left and right atrial enlargement (17.6%) were the most common abnormalities. Conclusion: ECG abnormalities are common in hospitalized CKD patients in local population. All hospitalized CKD patients should undergo ECG to screen for cardiovascular disease. (author)

  4. Prevalence of chronic kidney disease in adults with metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P C Emem-Chioma

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The burden of chronic kidney disease (CKD and other non- communicable diseases continues to rise globally, and recent studies suggest that metabolic syndrome (MS may add to this burden by contributing to the development of CKD. Given that reports on the prevalence of CKD in patients with MS in this environment are scanty, this study was undertaken with the sole aim of determining the prevalence of CKD in subjects with MS as defined by the International Diabetes Federation (IDF and the National Cholesterol Education Project Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP ATP III. A total of 240 consenting adults (18-70 years attending the general out- patient clinic of the General Hospital Okrika for various ailments were studied. Subjects were screened for MS as per the above- mentioned criteria. Estimated GFR (eGFR was determined with Modification of Diet for Renal Disease (MDRD formula and CKD was defined as eGFR less than 60 mL/min/1.73 m2 . Data was analyzed using SPSS version 12.0 and Epi info version 4.06d; P 0.05. CKD was more common in subjects with MS compared with those without, although the difference was not statistically significant. The prevalence of CKD in subjects with MS in our study population did not differ significantly when the different MS definitions were employed.

  5. Metformin in chronic kidney disease: time for a rethink.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaf, James

    2014-06-01

    Metformin has traditionally been regarded as contraindicated in chronic kidney disease (CKD), though guidelines in recent years have been relaxed to permit therapy if the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is > 30 mL/min. The main problem is the perceived risk of lactic acidosis (LA). Epidemiological evidence suggests that this fear is disproportionate. Lactic acidosis is a rare complication to type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), with an incidence of 6/100,000 patient-years. The risk is not increased in metformin-treated patients. Metformin possesses a number of clinical effects independent of glucose reduction, including weight loss, which are beneficial to patients. The risk of death and cardiovascular disease is reduced by about a third in non-CKD patients. Since metformin intoxication undoubtedly causes LA, and metformin is renally excreted, inappropriate dosage of metformin will increase the risk of LA. It is suggested that introduction of metformin therapy to more advanced stages of CKD may bring therapeutic benefits that outweigh the possible risks. Copyright © 2014 International Society for Peritoneal Dialysis.

  6. Monitoring kidney function in diabetic nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossing, P; Astrup, A S; Smidt, U M

    1994-01-01

    (SD))(p kidney function ml.min-1.year-1 was 4.7 (3.3) measured and 4.8 (3.5) estimated (mean(SD)) (NS), but the 95% limits...... of decline in glomerular filtration rate are comparable, but the limits of agreement are wide, which make the Cockroft-Gault method unacceptable for clinical purposes, i.e. monitoring progression in kidney function in the individual patient.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)...

  7. Relationship between Plasma Leptin Level and Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anoop Shankar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Leptin is an adipose tissue-derived hormone shown to be related to several metabolic, inflammatory, and hemostatic factors related to chronic kidney disease. Recent animal studies have reported that infusion of recombinant leptin into normal rats for 3 weeks fosters the development of glomerulosclerosis. However, few studies have examined the association between leptin and CKD in humans. Therefore, we examined the association between plasma leptin levels and CKD in a representative sample of US adults. Methods. We examined the third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey participants >20 years of age (n=5820, 53.6% women. Plasma leptin levels were categorized into quartiles (≤4.3 Fg/L, 4.4–8.7 Fg/L, 8.8–16.9 Fg/L, >16.9 Fg/L. CKD was defined as a glomerular filtration rate of <60 mL/min/1.73 m2 estimated from serum creatinine. Results. Higher plasma leptin levels were associated with CKD after adjusting for age, sex, race/ethnicity, education, smoking, alcohol intake, body mass index (BMI, diabetes, hypertension, and serum cholesterol. Compared to quartile 1 of leptin (referent, the odds ratio (95% confidence interval of CKD associated with quartile 4 was 3.31 (1.41 to 7.78; P-trend = 0.0135. Subgroup analyses examining the relation between leptin and CKD by gender, BMI categories, diabetes, and hypertension status also showed a consistent positive association. Conclusion. Higher plasma leptin levels are associated with CKD in a representative sample of US adults.

  8. Renal function trajectory is more important than chronic kidney disease stage for managing patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosansky, Steven J

    2012-01-01

    Management of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) emphasizes a current level of function as calculated from the modification of diet in renal disease glomerulofiltration rate equations (eGFR) and proteinuria for staging of CKD. Change in a patient's eGFR over time (renal function trajectory) is an additional and potentially more important consideration in deciding which patients will progress to the point where they will require renal replacement therapy (RRT). Many patients with CKD 3-5 have stable renal function for years. Proteinuria/albuminuria is a primary determinant of renal trajectory which may be slowed by medications that decrease proteinuria and/or aggressively lower blood pressure. A renal trajectory of >3 ml/min/1.73 m(2)/year may relate to a need for closer renal follow-up and increased morbidity and mortality. Additional CKD population-based studies need to examine the relationship of renal trajectory to: baseline renal function; acute kidney injury episodes; age, race, sex and primary etiologies of renal disease; blood pressure control and therapies; dietary protein intake; blood glucose control in diabetics and the competitive risk of death versus the requirement for renal replacement therapy. In the elderly CKD 4 population with significant comorbidities and slow decline in renal function, the likelihood of death prior to the need for RRT should be considered before placing AV access for dialysis. Prediction models of renal progression must account for the competitive risk of death as well as stable or improved renal function to be clinically useful. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Exploring sleep disorders in patients with chronic kidney disease

    OpenAIRE

    Nigam, Gaurav; Camacho, Macario; Chang, Edward T; Riaz, Muhammad

    2018-01-01

    Kidney disorders have been associated with a variety of sleep-related disorders. Therefore, researchers are placing greater emphasis on finding the role of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in the development of obstructive sleep apnea and restless legs syndrome. Unfortunately, the presence of other sleep-related disorders with CKDs and non-CKDs has not been investigated with the same clinical rigor. Recent studies have revealed that myriad of sleep disorders are associated with CKDs. Furthermore,...

  10. Exploring sleep disorders in patients with chronic kidney disease

    OpenAIRE

    Nigam G; Camacho M; Chang ET; Riaz M

    2018-01-01

    Gaurav Nigam,1 Macario Camacho,2 Edward T Chang,2 Muhammad Riaz3 1Division of Sleep Medicine, Clay County Hospital, Flora, IL, 2Division of Otolaryngology, Sleep Surgery and Sleep Medicine, Tripler Army Medical Center, Honolulu, HI, 3Division of Sleep Medicine, Astria Health Center, Grandview, WA, USA Abstract: Kidney disorders have been associated with a variety of sleep-related disorders. Therefore, researchers are placing greater emphasis on finding the role of chronic kidney disease (CKD)...

  11. Mechanisms by Which Dehydration May Lead to Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roncal-Jimenez, C; Lanaspa, M A; Jensen, T; Sanchez-Lozada, L G; Johnson, R J

    2015-01-01

    Dehydration, a condition that characterizes excessive loss of body water, is well known to be associated with acute renal dysfunction; however, it has largely been considered reversible and to be associated with no long-term effects on the kidney. Recently, an epidemic of chronic kidney disease has emerged in Central America in which the major risk factor seems to be recurrent heat-associated dehydration. This has led to studies investigating whether recurrent dehydration may lead to permanent kidney damage. Three major potential mechanisms have been identified, including the effects of vasopressin on the kidney, the activation of the aldose reductase-fructokinase pathway, and the effects of chronic hyperuricemia. The discovery of these pathways has also led to the recognition that mild dehydration may be a risk factor in progression of all types of chronic kidney diseases. Furthermore, there is some evidence that increasing hydration, particularly with water, may actually prevent CKD. Thus, a whole new area of investigation is developing that focuses on the role of water and osmolarity and their influence on kidney function and health. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Chronic kidney disease of unknown etiology in agricultural communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almaguer, Miguel; Herrera, Raúl; Orantes, Carlos M

    2014-04-01

    In recent years, Central America, Egypt, India and Sri Lanka have reported a high prevalence of chronic kidney disease of unknown etiology in agricultural communities, predominantly among male farmworkers. This essay examines the disease's case definitions, epidemiology (disease burden, demographics, associated risk factors) and causal hypotheses, by reviewing published findings from El Salvador, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Sri Lanka, Egypt and India. The range of confirmed chronic kidney disease prevalence was 17.9%-21.1%. Prevalence of reduced glomerular filtration (homemade alcohol use and family history of chronic kidney disease. There is no strong evidence for a single cause, and multiple environmental, occupational and social factors are probably involved. Further etiological research is needed, plus interventions to reduce preventable risk factors.

  13. Lactate levels and risk of lactic acidosis with metformin in diabetic kidney disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P K Bipi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Metformin as an oral antidiabetic drug (OAD is not recommended in renal failure due to the presumed risk of lactic acidosis though it has advantages in cardiovascular protection with a low risk of hypoglycemia. Few studies have measured lactic acid blood levels in patients with diabetic kidney disease on metformin and demonstrated lactic acidosis. The aim of our study is to see if patients with diabetic kidney disease are at risk of elevated lactate blood levels and lactic acidosis. Lactate levels and blood pH were estimated in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus receiving metformin in different stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD and were compared with a similar group not receiving metformin. Patients with diabetic kidney disease, with estimated glomerular filtration rate <60 mL/min who were previously receiving metformin started in centers elsewhere and referred here were studied and compared with a similar group taking other OADs or insulin. Independent sample t-test or ANOVA were used to compare quantitative variables between groups. Pearson correlation was used to analyze association between quantitative variables and linear regression analysis and was employed to note the relationship between quantitative variables. Of 57 patients who received a mean dose of 1.134 grams of metformin, 33 (55.9% were in stage 3, 16 (28.1% in stage 4, and 8 (14% in stage 5 CKD. Mean serum pH (P = 0.572, bicarbonate (P = 0.978, and plasma lactate (P = 0.449 levels in those taking and not taking metformin were comparable. There was no difference in the plasma lactate levels in different stages of CKD in the metformin group (P = 0.498 although there was significant correlation with metformin dose (P <0.05. Blood lactate levels were not elevated in patients with diabetic kidney disease at a daily dose of metformin <1 g.

  14. Daily Intake of Grape Powder Prevents the Progression of Kidney Disease in Obese Type 2 Diabetic ZSF1 Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salwa M. K. Almomen

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Individuals living with metabolic syndrome (MetS such as diabetes and obesity are at high risk for developing chronic kidney disease (CKD. This study investigated the beneficial effect of whole grape powder (WGP diet on MetS-associated CKD. Obese diabetic ZSF1 rats, a kidney disease model with MetS, were fed WGP (5%, w/w diet for six months. Kidney disease was determined using blood and urine chemical analyses, and histology. When compared to Vehicle controls, WGP intake did not change the rat bodyweight, but lowered their kidney, liver and spleen weight, which were in parallel with the lower serum glucose and the higher albumin or albumin/globin ratio. More importantly, WGP intake improved the renal function as urination and proteinuria decreased, or it prevented kidney tissue damage in these diabetic rats. The renal protection of WGP diet was associated with up-regulation of antioxidants (Dhcr24, Gstk1, Prdx2, Sod2, Gpx1 and Gpx4 and downregulation of Txnip (for ROS production in the kidneys. Furthermore, addition of grape extract reduced H2O2-induced cell death of cultured podocytes. In conclusion, daily intake of WGP reduces the progression of kidney disease in obese diabetic rats, suggesting a protective function of antioxidant-rich grape diet against CKD in the setting of MetS.

  15. Role of the Immune System in Diabetic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, Fionnuala B; Martin, Finian

    2018-03-12

    The purpose of this review is to examine the proposed role of immune modulation in the development and progression of diabetic kidney disease (DKD). Diabetic kidney disease has not historically been considered an immune-mediated disease; however, increasing evidence is emerging in support of an immune role in its pathophysiology. Both systemic and local renal inflammation have been associated with DKD. Infiltration of immune cells, predominantly macrophages, into the kidney has been reported in a number of both experimental and clinical studies. In addition, increased levels of circulating pro-inflammatory cytokines have been linked to disease progression. Consequently, a variety of therapeutic strategies involving modulation of the immune response are currently being investigated in diabetic kidney disease. Although no current therapies for DKD are directly based on immune modulation many of the therapies in clinical use have anti-inflammatory effects along with their primary actions. Macrophages emerge as the most likely beneficial immune cell target and compounds which reduce macrophage infiltration to the kidney have shown potential in both animal models and clinical trials.

  16. Continuation of lithium after a diagnosis of chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessing, L V; Feldt-Rasmussen, B; Andersen, P K

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether continued lithium or anticonvulsant treatment after a first diagnosis of chronic kidney disease (CKD) was associated with progression to irreversible end-stage kidney disease. METHODS: Nationwide cohort study including all individuals in Denmark in a period from...... 1995 to 2012 with a diagnosis of CKD and (i) a history of lithium treatment (N = 754, among whom 238 patients had a diagnosis of bipolar disorder) or (ii) a history of anticonvulsant treatment (N = 5.004, among whom 199 patients had a diagnosis of bipolar disorder). End-stage CKD was defined as chronic...

  17. Nutrition in Children with Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... keep bones strong. When the kidneys don’t work normally, a child’s growth may slow down. The child’s health care team will work with the child’s caretakers to make sure the child gets the ...

  18. Bicarbonate therapy for prevention of chronic kidney disease progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łoniewski, Igor; Wesson, Donald E

    2014-03-01

    Kidney injury in chronic kidney disease (CKD) is likely multifactorial, but recent data support that a component is mediated by mechanisms used by the kidney to increase acidification in response to an acid challenge to systemic acid-base status. If so, systemic alkalization might attenuate this acid-induced component of kidney injury. An acid challenge to systemic acid-base status increases nephron acidification through increased production of endothelin, aldosterone, and angiotensin II, each of which can contribute to kidney inflammation and fibrosis that characterizes CKD. Systemic alkalization that ameliorates an acid challenge might attenuate the contributions of angiotensin II, endothelin, and aldosterone to kidney injury. Some small clinical studies support the efficacy of alkalization in attenuating kidney injury and slowing glomerular filtration rate decline in CKD. This review focuses on the potential that orally administered NaHCO₃ prevents CKD progression and additionally addresses its mechanism of action, side effects, possible complications, dosage, interaction, galenic form description, and contraindications. Current National Kidney Foundation guidelines recommend oral alkali, including NaHCO₃(-), in CKD patients with serum HCO₃(-) <22 mmol/l. Although oral alkali can be provided by other medications and by base-inducing dietary constituents, oral NaHCO₃ will be the focus of this review because of its relative safety and apparent efficacy, and its comparatively low cost.

  19. Dietary management of chronic kidney disease: protein restriction and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goraya, Nimrit; Wesson, Donald E

    2012-11-01

    More kidney protective strategies are needed to reduce the burden of complete kidney failure from chronic kidney disease (CKD). Clinicians sometimes use protein restriction as kidney protection despite its demonstrated lack of effectiveness in the only large-scale study. Small-scale studies support that dietary acid reduction is kidney-protective, including when done with base-inducing foods like fruits and vegetables. We review these studies in light of current kidney-protective recommendations. Animal models of CKD show that acid-inducing dietary protein exacerbates and base-inducing protein ameliorates nephropathy progression, and that increased intake of acid-inducing but not base-inducing dietary protein exacerbates progression. Clinical studies show that dietary acid reduction with Na-based alkali reduces kidney injury and slows nephropathy progression in patients with CKD and reduced glomerular filtration rate (GFR); base-inducing fruits and vegetables reduce kidney injury in patients with reduced GFR; and base-inducing fruits and vegetables improve metabolic acidosis in CKD. Protein type rather than amount might more importantly affect nephropathy progression. Base-inducing foods might be another way to reduce dietary acid, a strategy shown in small studies to slow nephropathy progression. Further studies will determine if CKD patients should be given base-inducing food as part of their management.

  20. Adiponectin is associated with early diabetic kidney disease in adults with type 1 diabetes: A Coronary Artery Calcification in Type 1 Diabetes (CACTI) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjornstad, Petter; Pyle, Laura; Kinney, Gregory L; Rewers, Marian; Johnson, Richard J; Maahs, David M; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K

    2017-02-01

    The associations between elevated adiponectin and end-stage renal disease are well recognized and thought to be at least partially explained by reduced renal clearance. Conversely, the relationship between adiponectin and early diabetic kidney disease (DKD) with preserved glomerular filtration rate (GFR), including rapid GFR decline and incident chronic kidney disease (CKD) is unclear. We hypothesized that elevated adiponectin would be associated with early DKD in adults with type 1 diabetes. Adults with type 1 diabetes (n=646 at baseline, n=525 at 6years) had adiponectin and renal function by estimated GFR (eGFR) by CKD-EPI creatinine and albumin-excretion rate (AER) evaluated at baseline and 6years. Linear and logistic models evaluated the associations of baseline adiponectin with AER, macroalbuminuria (AER ≥200μg/min), eGFR, CKD (3mL/min/1.73m 2 /year). Models adjusted for age, sex, duration, HbA1c, SBP, LDL-C and current smoking. Compared to non-diabetics, adults with type 1 diabetes had significantly higher adiponectin, and the difference remained significant after adjusting for AER and/or eGFR (ptherapy. Adults with type 1 diabetes have higher adiponectin than their non-diabetic peers, and elevated adiponectin at baseline is independently associated with greater odds of developing early DKD over 6years. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Diabetic Retinopathy and Clinical Parameters Favoring the Presence of Diabetic Nephropathy could Predict Renal Outcome in Patients with Diabetic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Chi-Chih; Lin, Hugo You-Hsien; Hwang, Daw-Yang; Kuo, I-Ching; Chiu, Yi-Wen; Lim, Lee-Moay; Hwang, Shang-Jyh; Chen, Hung-Chun

    2017-04-21

    Diabetes duration, diabetic retinopathy (DR), and a diagnostic model have been proposed as clinical parameters favoring the presence of diabetic nephropathy (DN) in biopsied patients with diabetic kidney disease. DN, compared with non-diabetic renal disease, had poorer renal outcomes. We tested whether these clinical parameters favoring DN are associated with poorer renal outcomes in non-biopsied patients. In this study, 1330 patients with type 2 diabetes and chronic kidney disease stages 1-4 were included and divided according to diabetes mellitus (DM) duration >8 years, DR, or a diagnostic model for DN. These clinical parameters favoring DN were found in 62-77% of patients and associated with higher levels of proteinuria. In a Cox survival analysis, DR and the diagnostic model favoring DN were associated with an increased risk for end-stage renal disease with adjusted hazard ratios of 1.69 (95% CI: 1.16-2.45, P = 0.006) and 1.66 (95% CI: 1.05-2.61, P = 0.029), respectively. DR was associated with an increased risk for rapid renal disease progression. DM >8 years was not associated with renal outcome. Propensity score-matched analyses also showed similar results. In conclusion, DR and the diagnostic model favoring DN were associated with poorer renal outcomes.

  2. Quality of chronic kidney disease management in primary care: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Gelder, Vincent A; Scherpbier-De Haan, Nynke D; De Grauw, Wim J C; Vervoort, Gerald M M; Van Weel, Chris; Biermans, Marion C J; Braspenning, Jozé C C; Wetzels, Jack F M

    2016-01-01

    Early detection and appropriate management of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in primary care are essential to reduce morbidity and mortality. To assess the quality of care (QoC) of CKD in primary healthcare in relation to patient and practice characteristics in order to tailor improvement strategies. Retrospective study using data between 2008 and 2011 from 47 general practices (207 469 patients of whom 162 562 were adults). CKD management of patients under the care of their general practitioner (GP) was qualified using indicators derived from the Dutch interdisciplinary CKD guideline for primary care and nephrology and included (1) monitoring of renal function, albuminuria, blood pressure, and glucose, (2) monitoring of metabolic parameters, and alongside the guideline: (3) recognition of CKD. The outcome indicator was (4) achieving blood pressure targets. Multilevel logistic regression analysis was applied to identify associated patient and practice characteristics. Kidney function or albuminuria data were available for 59 728 adult patients; 9288 patients had CKD, of whom 8794 were under GP care. Monitoring of disease progression was complete in 42% of CKD patients, monitoring of metabolic parameters in 2%, and blood pressure target was reached in 43.1%. GPs documented CKD in 31.4% of CKD patients. High QoC was strongly associated with diabetes, and to a lesser extent with hypertension and male sex. Room for improvement was found in all aspects of CKD management. As QoC was higher in patients who received structured diabetes care, future CKD care may profit from more structured primary care management, e.g. according to the chronic care model. Quality of care for chronic kidney disease patients in primary care can be improved. In comparison with guideline advice, adequate monitoring of disease progression was observed in 42%, of metabolic parameters in 2%, correct recognition of impaired renal function in 31%, and reaching blood pressure targets in 43% of chronic

  3. Use of Calcium Channel Blockers is Associated with Mortality in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominik G. Haider

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The use of antihypertensive medicines has been shown to reduce proteinuria, morbidity, and mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD. A specific recommendation for a class of antihypertensive drugs is not available in this population, despite the pharmacodynamic differences. We have therefore analysed the association between antihypertensive medicines and survival of patients with chronic kidney disease. Methods: Out of 2687 consecutive patients undergoing kidney biopsy a cohort of 606 subjects with retrievable medical therapy was included into the analysis. Kidney function was assessed by glomerular filtration rate (GFR estimation at the time point of kidney biopsy. Main outcome variable was death. Results: Overall 114 (18.7% patients died. In univariate regression analysis the use of alpha-blockers and calcium channel antagonists, progression of disease, diabetes mellitus (DM type 1 and 2, arterial hypertension, coronary heart disease, peripheral vascular disease, male sex and age were associated with mortality (all pConclusion: The use of calcium channel blockers but not of other antihypertensive medicines is associated with mortality in primarily GN patients with CKD.

  4. Functional genomics in renal transplantation and chronic kidney disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilflingseder, J.

    2010-01-01

    For the past decade, the development of genomic technology has revolutionized modern biological research. Functional genomic analyses enable biologists to study genetic events on a genome wide scale. Examples of applications are gene discovery, biomarker determination, disease classification, and drug target identification. Global expression profiles performed with microarrays enable a better understanding of molecular signature of human disease, including acute and chronic kidney disease. About 10 % of the population in western industrialized nations suffers from chronic kidney disease (CKD). Treatment of end stage renal disease, the final stage of CKD is performed by either hemo- or peritoneal dialysis or renal transplantation. The preferred treatment is renal transplantation, because of the higher quality of life. But the pathophysiology of the disease on a molecular level is not well enough understood and early biomarkers for acute and chronic kidney disease are missing. In my studies I focused on genomics of allograft biopsies, prevention of delayed graft function after renal transplantation, anemia after renal transplantation, biocompatibility of hemodialysis membranes and peritoneal dialysis fluids and cardiovascular diseases and bone disorders in CKD patients. Gene expression profiles, pathway analysis and protein-protein interaction networks were used to elucidate the underlying pathophysiological mechanism of the disease or phenomena, identifying early biomarkers or predictors of disease state and potentially drug targets. In summery my PhD thesis represents the application of functional genomic analyses in chronic kidney disease and renal transplantation. The results provide a deeper view into the molecular and cellular mechanisms of kidney disease. Nevertheless, future multicenter collaborative studies, meta-analyses of existing data, incorporation of functional genomics into large-scale prospective clinical trials are needed and will give biomedical

  5. A Comprehensive Study of Chronic Diabetes Complications in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinan MA Al-Mahmood

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The purpose of this study was to provide a reference of chronic diabetes complications by investigating the prolonged hyperglycemia effects on hematological, biochemical and histopathological changes (liver, kidney, spleen, cardiac muscle, adrenal gland, and endocrine pancreas in diabetic rats induced by streptozotocin. Methods: Ten adult female Sprague-Dawley of uniform age were divided into two Groups. Group 1 was made diabetic by single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (60 mg/kg/bw whereas Group 2 served as control. After six months, the rats were anesthetized using pentobarbital. Cardiac puncture was performed to get 3 ml of the blood sample; following 12 hours of an overnight fast. Serum chemistry test and complete blood analysis for lipid profile and blood glucose test; liver and renal functions were performed. Tissue specimens of liver, kidney, spleen, cardiac muscle, adrenal gland, and endocrine pancreas were fixed in 10% formal saline and processed for histological study. Results: There were severe histopathological changes in the affected organs; and the presence of a significant abnormality of lipid profile, liver, and renal functions. Conclusions: The presence of histopathological changes with abnormal biochemical changes is related to the chronic absence of insulin production in the destroyed β -cells which reflect the diabetic complications in a human being.

  6. Chronic kidney disease in children with unilateral renal tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozzi, Denis A; Ceccanti, Silvia; Frediani, Simone; Schiavetti, Amalia; Cozzi, Francesco

    2012-05-01

    In patients who have undergone nephrectomy lower stage chronic kidney disease may develop, which is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease and overall mortality. We investigated whether the prevalence of lower stage chronic kidney disease is related to the amount of renal parenchyma excised in children with unilateral renal tumor. A total of 15 patients treated with nephrectomy and 10 treated with nephron sparing surgery were enrolled at a single academic center. The Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative guidelines were used to classify patients by chronic kidney disease stage based on estimated glomerular filtration rate values. The Modification of Diet in Renal Disease study equation and Schwartz equation were used in patients older and younger than 17 years, respectively. At a mean followup of more than 12 years 8 patients who had undergone nephrectomy and 1 treated with bilateral nephron sparing surgery presented with stage II chronic kidney disease (estimated glomerular filtration rate 60 to 89 ml/min/1.73 m(2)). Sequential measurements from diagnosis to 12 to 17 years postoperatively showed that stage II chronic kidney disease in patients who had undergone nephrectomy manifested as a negligible postoperative increase in mean ± SD estimated glomerular filtration rate (75.7 ± 25.5 vs 79.4 ± 3.9 ml/min/1.73 m(2), p = 0.6). Five of the 8 patients presented with stage II chronic kidney disease even before nephrectomy. The other 7 patients who had undergone nephrectomy and those treated with nephron sparing surgery presented with a significant postoperative increase in mean ± SD estimated glomerular filtration rate (81.1 ± 24 vs 102.3 ± 3 ml/min/1.73 m(2), p = 0.02, and 88.7 ± 2 vs 107.4 ± 14 ml/min/1.73 m(2), p = 0.005, respectively). A subset of children with unilateral renal tumor presents before and/or after nephrectomy, and not after nephron sparing surgery, with stage II chronic kidney disease, probably due to a reduced renal

  7. A Genome-Wide Association Study of Diabetic Kidney Disease in Subjects With Type 2 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Zuydam, Natalie R; Ahlqvist, Emma; Sandholm, Niina

    2018-01-01

    Identification of sequence variants robustly associated with predisposition to diabetic kidney disease (DKD) has the potential to provide insights into the pathophysiological mechanisms responsible. We conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of DKD in type 2 diabetes (T2D) using eight...

  8. Screening for chronic kidney disease among the elderly in primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirović S.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The number of elderly with chronic kidney disease (CKD is constantly increasing worldwide, and irregular screening of CKD leads to disease discovering usually in advanced stages. The aim of the study was to examine the presence of CKD biomarkers in the elderly primary care patients, and to analyze whether the presence of diabetes and hypertension in elderly increases the risk for microalbuminuria and reduction of glomerular filtration rate (GFR. Cross-sectional study included 90 patients older than 65 years of age who are registered in the Family medicine teaching centre of Health centre Bijeljina. Patients were divided into three groups: first consisted of 30 patients who had neither hypertension nor diabetes nor other chronic disease, second of 30 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and third of 30 patients with arterial hypertension. Data on patients were obtained by interview, analysis of medical records and physical examinations. Serum and urine creatinine, proteinuria, microalbuminuria (MAU, turbidimetry, and urinary sediment were analyzed. Biomarkers of chronic kidney disease (GFR <60 mL / min / 1.73m2, proteinuria and mikroalbuminurija ¬MAU were found in 20 (22.2% patients. Among them, 14 had normal GFR and MAU (12 or MAU and proteinuria (2, whereas 6 had GFR <60 mL / min / 1.73m2 of which 3 had proteinuria and / or MAU. The group with diabetes had significantly more MAU compared to the other two groups, while the groups with diabetes and hypertension had slightly more proteinuria and erythrocyturia than control group. Hypertension and diabetes in the elderly may result in development of CKD biomarkers, so prevention and regular screening of CKD in the patients with these two diseases are necessary.

  9. CT of the kidney in chronic renal failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojima, Kanji

    1988-01-01

    The transverse size of the kidneys was measured by CT, and CT findings of the kidneys were studied in 94 patients with chronic renal failure under hemodialysis (HD), 58 patients with chronic renal failure not under hemodialysis (CRF) and 100 controls. The transverse size of the kidneys decreased according to the deterioration of renal function. The ratio of the maximal renal transverse size to the minimal vertebral size, which the author proposed as a new criterion for renal atrophy, was 1.8 in controls, 1.2 in CRF and 0.8 in HD. A kidney smaller than the vertebral body indicated chronic renal failure. Characteristic CT features in CRF were mild renal atrophy and cystic changes (41.4 %). In HD, renal atrophy was more advanced, the occurrence of cystic changes was more frequent (64.9 %), and there were frequent renal (68.1 %) and aortic calcifications. Furthermore acquired cystic disease of the kidney (ACD) was observed (27.7 %) only in HD. In this study no renal neoplasm was found in ACD. However, several complications in HD, one perirenal hematoma and six hydronephroses, were observed. (author)

  10. Motivational Interviewing to Engage Patients in Chronic Kidney Disease Management

    OpenAIRE

    Martino, Steve

    2011-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) must manage numerous medical treatments and lifestyle changes that strain their treatment adherence. An important strategy to improve adherence is to activate the patients’ motivation to manage their CKD. This article describes an approach for enhancing patients’ motivation for change, called motivational interviewing (MI), a treatment that is increasingly being used in health care settings to counsel patients with chronic diseases. Its basic princip...

  11. Inflammation and nutrition in children with chronic kidney disease

    OpenAIRE

    Tu, Juan; Cheung, Wai W; Mak, Robert H

    2016-01-01

    Chronic inflammation and nutritional imbalance are important comorbid conditions that correlate with poor clinical outcomes in children with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Nutritional disorders such as cachexia/protein energy wasting, obesity and growth retardation negatively impact the quality of life and disease progression in children with CKD. Inadequate nutrition has been associated with growth disturbances in children with CKD. On the other hand, over-nutrition and obesity are associated...

  12. Personalizing Longitudinal Care Coordination for Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, Theresa A; Kasthurirathne, Suranga N; Norton, Jenna M; Narva, Andrew S

    2017-01-01

    Chronic care coordination efforts often focus on the needs of the healthcare team and not on the individual needs of each patient. However, developing a personalized care plan for patients with Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) requires individual patient engagement with the health care team. We describe the development of a CKD e-care plan that focuses on patient specific needs and life goals, and can be personalized according to provider needs.

  13. Diet in chronic kidney disease in a Mediterranean African country

    OpenAIRE

    Kammoun, Khawla; Chaker, Hanen; Mahfoudh, Hichem; Makhlouf, Nouha; Jarraya, Faical; Hachicha, Jamil

    2017-01-01

    Background Mediterranean diet is characterized by low to moderate consumption of animal protein and high consumption of fruits, vegetables, bread, beans, nuts, seeds and other cereals. It has been associated with reduced risk of cardiovascular disease. However, it is not suitable for chronic kidney disease because of high potassium intake. Discussion Tunisia is an emerging Mediterranean country with limited resources, a high prevalence of chronic hemodialysis treatment and high dialysis expen...

  14. Planning for Emergencies: A Guide for People with Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planning for Emergencies A Guide for People with Chronic Kidney Disease Contents Planning for Emergencies .................................................................. 3 How can I ... Planning for Emergencies: A Guide for People With Chronic Kidney Disease ■ Planning for Emergencies: A Guide for Dialysis Facilities ■ ...

  15. Intestinal Regulation of Urinary Sodium Excretion and the Pathophysiology of Diabetic Kidney Disease: A Focus on GLP-1 and DPP-4

    OpenAIRE

    Vallon, Volker; Docherty, Neil G

    2014-01-01

    The tubular hypothesis of glomerular filtration and nephropathy in diabetes is a pathophysiological concept that assigns a critical role to the tubular system, including proximal tubular hyperreabsorption and growth, which is relevant for early glomerular hyperfiltration and later chronic kidney disease. Here we focus on how harnessing the bioactivity of hormones released from the gut may ameliorate the early effects of diabetes on the kidney in part by attenuating proximal tubular hyperreabs...

  16. Endocrine Abnormalities in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuczera, Piotr; Adamczak, Marcin; Wiecek, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    In patients with chronic kidney disease the alterations of the endocrine system may arise from several causes. The kidney is the site of degradation as well as synthesis of many different hormones. Moreover, a number of concomitant pathological conditions such as inflammation, metabolic acidosis and malnutrition may participate in the pathogenesis of endocrine abnormalities in this group of patients. The most pronounced endocrine abnormalities in patients with chronic kidney disease are the deficiencies of: calcitriol, testosterone, insulin-like growth factor and, erythropoietin (EPO). Additionally accumulation of several hormones, such as: prolactin, growth hormone and insulin frequently also occur. The clinical consequences of the abovementioned endocrine abnormalities are among others: anemia, infertility and bone diseases.

  17. Chronic kidney disease in sub-Saharan Africa: Hypothesis for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    diseases are now considerably the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in ... is an underrated cause of poverty and hampers the economic growth of ... health problem is chronic kidney disease (CKD),[4] which recently has an increased prevalence in sub-. Saharan Africa.[5] CKD is defined according to the presence or ...

  18. Effect of chronic kidney disease on serum resistin level | Dan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... between two groups was statistically significant. Conclusion: Our study is probably the first study in India comparing serum resistin levels of CKD patients vis-à-vis control subjects. Further cellular research may be needed to explore this relation. Key words: Chronic kidney disease, HOMA-IR, insulin resistance, resistin ...

  19. a potential cause of cardiovascular diseases in chronic kidney ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF-23) has been identified as one of the risk factors for the development of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Although FGF-23 is necessary for the maintenance of phosphate balance, it has been implicated in the pathogenesis of left ventricular ...

  20. Lipid profile in sickle cell disease patients with chronic kidney ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Dyslipidaemia is reported to occur in patients with sickle cell disease as well as patients with chronic kidney disease irrespective of the haemoglobin genotype. This study aimed at evaluating lipid profile in subjects with sickle cell anaemia (HbSS), sickle cell trait (HbAS) and normal haemoglobin genotype ...

  1. Epidemiology of chronic kidney disease in northern region of Senegal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is an emerging worldwide epidemic but few data are available in African populations. We aimed to assess prevalence of CKD in adult populations of Saint-Louis (northern Senegal). Methods: In a population-based survey between January and May 2012, we included 1,037 adults ...

  2. The epidermal growth factor receptor pathway in chronic kidney diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harskamp, Laura R.; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Goor, van Harry; Meijer, Esther

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) pathway has a critical role in renal development, tissue repair and electrolyte handling. Numerous studies have reported an association between dysregulation of this pathway and the initiation and progression of various chronic kidney diseases such as

  3. Cell-based therapies for chronic kidney disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Koppen, A.N.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314088350

    2013-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) may lead to end-stage renal failure, requiring renal replacement strategies. Development of new therapies to reduce progression of CKD is therefore a major global public health target. The aim of this thesis was to investigate whether cell-based therapies have the

  4. Elevated potassium levels in patients with chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Reimar W; Nicolaisen, Sia K; Hasvold, Pål

    2018-01-01

    Background: Data on the true burden of hyperkalemia (HK) in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) in a real-world setting are scarce. Methods: The incidence rate of HK [first blood test with an elevated blood potassium level level >5.0 mmol/L] in primary or hospital care was assessed...

  5. Paediatric chronic kidney disease | van Biljon | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Doctors use various guidelines on paediatric chronic kidney disease (CKD) for managing their patients according to the availability of resources. As with adolescent and adult patients, CKD in children can also progress to end-stage renal failure – the time course being influenced by several modifiable factors. Decline in ...

  6. Natural History of Progression of Chronic Kidney Disease in Stages ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) often continue to progress spontaneously towards end stage renal disease (ESRD). In this report we studied the natural history of progression of CKD in a cohort of patients with stage 4 and 5 CKD. Methods: We retrospectively studied a cohort of patients in stage 4 ...

  7. Recent important strategies in the management of chronic kidney ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The burden of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is considerably higher in low- and middle-income countries, which are less able than the developed world to cope with treating advanced renal failure owing to financial constraints. Prevention, early diagnosis and implementation of existing knowledge can improve outcomes.

  8. Chronic kidney disease screening: Results of the 2013 World ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is on the rise globally due to the increase in prevalence of common risk factors. Screening for CKD risk factors is important for early detection and institution of measures to retard its progression. This study aimed to determine the markers of CKD and its risk factors in a selected ...

  9. Chronic kidney disease in rheumatoid arthritis at Kenyatta National ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the prevalence of chronic kidney disease among patients with rheumatoid arthritis on follow up at the rheumatology outpatient clinic at Kenyatta National Hospital. Design: Descriptive, cross-sectional study. Setting: Rheumatology outpatient clinic at the Kenyatta National Hospital, a public national ...

  10. Clinical Course of Acute Pancreatitis in Chronic Kidney Disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to assess the clinical course, etiology and complications of acute pancreatitis among chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients in a tertiary care renal center in Karachi. Methods: We retrospectively evaluated the clinical course of CKD patients who presented to our emergency room with ...

  11. Left ventricular hypertrophy among chronic kidney disease patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: The presence of left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) in patients with Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) is associated with worsening cardiovascular outcomes. There is a dearth of data on LVH in Ghanaian CKD patients. Methods: This was a cross sectional study carried out at the Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital ...

  12. Guest Editorial: Chronic kidney disease | Motsoaledi | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Medical Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 105, No 4 (2015) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Guest Editorial: Chronic kidney disease. A Motsoaledi. Abstract. No abstract ...

  13. Guest Editorial: Chronic kidney disease | Meyers | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Medical Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 105, No 3 (2015) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Guest Editorial: Chronic kidney disease. AM Meyers. Abstract. No abstract.

  14. Chronic kidney disease: sonographic/clinical findings at the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Kidney disease arises from various causes which can lead to death, especially if it progresses to chronic renal disease. Some of these patients can be managed by the use of conservative management, drugs, dialysis or renal transplantation depending on several factors. Amongst several investigative methods ...

  15. Guest Editorial: Chronic kidney disease | Meyers | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Medical Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 107, No 9 (2017) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Guest Editorial: Chronic kidney disease. A.M. Meyers. Abstract. No Abstract ...

  16. Clinical aspects of chronic kidney disease | van Rensburg | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Any patient seeking any form of medical advice at any clinic or hospital, or from a doctor or other healthcare worker, should have their blood pressure recorded and a urine dipstick test done. The most useful indication of a diagnosis of any stage of chronic kidney disease, is the presence of either hypertension, urinary ...

  17. Hyperparathyroidism in chronic kidney disease: complexities within the commonplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Michael M; McMahon, Lawrence P; Smith, Edward R; Williams, David S; Holt, Stephen G

    2012-08-01

    Secondary hyperparathyroidism in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) is common and usually caused by associated metabolic abnormalities, in particular, hypocalcaemia and hyperphosphataemia. Nevertheless, other causes of hyperparathyroidism can exist concurrently with CKD, challenging diagnostic interpretation and therapeutic intervention. We present four cases of hyperparathyroidism in patients with CKD that highlight some of these dilemmas.

  18. Management of patients with chronic kidney disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    (GFR <30 - 60 mL/min) or with rapidly rising serum creatinine. • resistant hypertension, typically requiring ≥3 ... put people at risk of CKD, i.e. hypertension, type 2 diabetes mellitus and HIV. Prevention of progression of ... least 6-monthly. • Monitoring of serum potassium is also important in CKD patients, especially those on ...

  19. The risk factors for diabetes mellitus after kidney transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effat Razeghi; Monireh Amerian; Peimaneh Heydarian

    2010-01-01

    Post-transplant diabetes mellitus (PTDM) is an adverse complication of kidney transplantation, associated with decreased graft and patient survival. We investigated the risk factors for PTDM and their relation to graft rejection in our kidney transplant recipients. We prospectively included 109 consecutive first kidney transplant recipients transplanted at the Sina Hospital in Tehran from June 2003 to May 2004. Patients were excluded if they had diabetes at the time of transplantation either as the cause of kidney failure or as a comorbidity. PTDM was defined by fasting blood sugar =126 mg/dL or random blood sugar =200 mg/dL on two occasions and the need for insulin therapy and/or oral hypoglycemic drugs for at least two weeks. Thirty non-diabetic transplant recipients were diagnosed as having PTDM during the six month followup period after transplantation. Sixty non-PTDM controls, matched for age, sex and immun suppressive regimen, and transplanted as closely as possible to the PTDM cases, were randomly selected. The risk factors for PTDM were investigated in these 90 transplant recipients. Age older than 50 years (P = 0.04), history of hypertension (P = 0.02), polycystic kidney disease (P = 0.015), duration on dialysis more than one year (P < 0.0001), family history of diabetes mellitus (P < 0.0001), mean daily dose of prednisolone =15 mg/day (P < 0.0001) and cyclosporine =240 mg/day (P < 0.0001) were all more in the PTDM group. Also, the mean serum triglycerides was higher (P = 0.019) and there was an increased risk of graft rejection (P < 0.0001) in the PTDM group (Author).

  20. The evolution of diabetic chronic complications after pancreas transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Sá João R

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Pancreas transplantation is an invasive procedure that can restore and maintain normoglycemic level very successfully and for a prolonged period in DM1 patients. The procedure elevates the morbimortality rates in the first few months following the surgery if compared to kidney transplants with living donors, but it offers a better quality of life to patients. Although controversial, several studies have shown the stabilization or the improvement of some of the chronic complications related to diabetes, as well as the extra number of years of life that patients submitted to a double pancreas-kidney transplantation may gain. Recent studies have demonstrated clashing outcomes regarding isolated pancreas transplantations, a fact which reinforces the need for a more discerning selection of patients for this procedure.

  1. Diet in chronic kidney disease in a Mediterranean African country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammoun, Khawla; Chaker, Hanen; Mahfoudh, Hichem; Makhlouf, Nouha; Jarraya, Faical; Hachicha, Jamil

    2017-01-23

    Mediterranean diet is characterized by low to moderate consumption of animal protein and high consumption of fruits, vegetables, bread, beans, nuts, seeds and other cereals. It has been associated with reduced risk of cardiovascular disease. However, it is not suitable for chronic kidney disease because of high potassium intake. Tunisia is an emerging Mediterranean country with limited resources, a high prevalence of chronic hemodialysis treatment and high dialysis expenditures. In order to limit dialysis cost, primary and secondary prevention of chronic renal disease are of paramount importance. In addition to drugs, secondary prevention includes diet measures (e.g. salt diet, protein diet). The aims of diet practice in chronic kidney disease are to slow chronic renal failure progression and to prevent its complications like hyperphosphatemia and hyperkaliemiae. A few decades ago, a Tunisian diet was exclusively Mediterranean, and protein consumption was not excessive. However, today, protein consumption is more comparable to western countries. Salt consumption is also excessive. Some Tunisian diets still include food with high potassium intake, which are not suitable for patients with chronic kidney disease. Therefore, the role of the dietician is extremely important to help calculate and create a dietary regimen tailored to each of our patients. Advice about diets should be adapted to both the patient and population habits to improve adherence rate. As such, the purpose of this article is to provide our own experience regarding medical nutrition therapy in patients with chronic kidney disease in Tunisia, with some changes in food habits. Prevention is far better than treatment. In this perspective, dietary measures must be at the core of our intervention.

  2. Kidney Cadmium Toxicity, Diabetes and High Blood Pressure: The Perfect Storm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satarug, Soisungwan; Vesey, David A; Gobe, Glenda C

    2017-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is an environmental toxicant of widespread exposure and pervasive toxicity. Absorption, systemic transport and uptake of Cd are mediated by metal transporters that the body uses for acquisition of physiologically-essential elements, notably of iron, zinc and calcium. Currently, human exposure to Cd is known to damage the kidneys, especially the proximal tubular cells that actively reabsorb Cd along with zinc, glucose and amino acids in the glomerular filtrate. Severe kidney damage, glycosuria and proteinuria are known outcomes after high dietary Cd intake (> 200 µg/day). Dietary Cd intake of 10-30 µg/day has been linked with reduced tubular reabsorption, chronic kidney disease, hypertension, coronary arterial and peripheral arterial diseases, macular degeneration, obesity-independent diabetes, and cancer. The links between diabetes, hypertension and end stage kidney disease (ESKD) are indisputable. ESKD requires dialysis or kidney transplant, an immense health care cost. This review adds to these connections by presenting the synergism of kidney Cd toxicity on blood pressure control and glucose homeostasis. Blood pressure control is mediated at least in part by cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes such as CYP4A11 and CYP4F2 that produce 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE), involved in salt balance in the kidney, and all are known to be altered during Cd exposure. The potential effects of Cd exposure on glucose reabsorption, inflammation, oxidative stress, and heme oxygenase activity are highlighted. The information presented offers strategies for mitigation of toxic effects of Cd through minimization of the food-chain transfer of Cd, and modulation of mechanistic pathways altered by Cd exposure.

  3. Renal oxygenation and hemodynamics in acute kidney injury and chronic kidney disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Prabhleen; Ricksten, Sven-Erik; Bragadottir, Gudrun; Redfors, Bengt; Nordquist, Lina

    2013-01-01

    Summary 1. Acute kidney injury (AKI) puts a major burden on health systems that may arise from multiple initiating insults, including ischemia-reperfusion injury, cardiovascular surgery, radio-contrast administration as well as sepsis. Similarly, the incidence and prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) continues to increase with significant morbidity and mortality. Moreover, an increasing number of AKI patients survive to develop CKD and end-stage kidney disease (ESRD). 2. Although the mechanisms for development of AKI and progression of CKD remain poorly understood, initial impairment of oxygen balance is likely to constitute a common pathway, causing renal tissue hypoxia and ATP starvation that will in turn induce extracellular matrix production, collagen deposition and fibrosis. Thus, possible future strategies for one or both conditions may involve dopamine, loop-diuretics, inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitors and atrial natriuretic peptide, substances that target kidney oxygen consumption and regulators of renal oxygenation such as nitric oxide and heme oxygenase-1. PMID:23360244

  4. Ectopic Kidney

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for a Child with Kidney Disease Nutrition for Chronic Kidney Disease in Children Growth Failure in Children with Chronic Kidney Disease Ectopic Kidney Medullary Sponge Kidney Kidney Dysplasia Ectopic ...

  5. A modified elliptical formula to estimate kidney collagen content in a model of chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto, Jake A; Zhu, Janice; Duan, Bin; Li, Jingsong; Zhou, Ping; Paka, Latha; Yamin, Michael A; Goldberg, Itzhak D; Narayan, Prakash

    2018-01-01

    The extent of scarring or renal interstitial collagen deposition in chronic kidney disease (CKD) can only be ascertained by highly invasive, painful and sometimes risky, tissue biopsy. Interestingly, while CKD-related abnormalities in kidney size can often be visualized using ultrasound, not only does the ellipsoid formula used today underestimate true renal size, but the calculated renal size does not inform tubulointerstitial collagen content. We used coronal kidney sections from healthy mice and mice with kidney disease to develop a new formula for estimating renal parenchymal area. While treating the kidney as an ellipse with the major axis (a) the polar distance, this technique involves extending the minor axis (b) into the renal pelvis to obtain a new minor axis, be. The calculated renal parenchymal area is remarkably similar to the true or measured area. Biochemically determined kidney collagen content revealed a strong and positive correlation with the calculated renal parenchymal area. Picrosirius red staining for tubulointerstitial collagen also correlated with calculated renal parenchymal area. The extent of renal scarring, i.e. kidney interstitial collagen content, can now be computed by making just two axial measurements which can easily be accomplished via noninvasive imaging of this organ.

  6. Thyroid function and cardiovascular events in chronic kidney disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afsar, Baris; Yilmaz, Mahmut Ilker; Siriopol, Dimitrie; Unal, Hilmi Umut; Saglam, Mutlu; Karaman, Murat; Gezer, Mustafa; Sonmez, Alper; Eyileten, Tayfun; Aydin, Ibrahim; Hamcan, Salih; Oguz, Yusuf; Covic, Adrian; Kanbay, Mehmet

    2017-04-01

    Abnormalities of thyroid function are commonly seen in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. They are associated with adverse clinical conditions such as atherosclerosis, endothelial dysfunction, inflammation and abnormal blood pressure variability. We investigated the association between thyroid disorders and endothelial function, assessed by flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) and carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT), and cardiovascular events (CVE) in CKD patients. This observational cohort study included 305 CKD (stages 1-5) patients. Routine biochemistry, including free T3, free T4 and thyroid stimulating hormone, fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF-23) and FMD, CIMT were measured. We divided patients into four groups according to thyroid hormone status: euthyroidism, subclinical hyperthyroidism, subclinical hypothyroidism, and euthyroid sick syndrome. Fatal and composite CVE were recorded for a median 29 months. Patients with subclinical hypothyroidism had a higher prevalence of hypertension and diabetes and also were more likely to have higher values of systolic CIMT, phosphorus, intact parathormone (iPTH), FGF-23, homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance and lower levels of FMD than euthyroid patients. In the unadjusted survival analysis, subclinical hypothyroidism and euthyroid sick syndrome were associated with an increased risk for the outcome as compared with euthyroidism [hazard ratio 30.63 (95 % confidence interval 12.27-76.48) and 12.17 (3.70-39.98), respectively]. The effects of subclinical hypothyroidism and euthyroid sick syndrome were maintained even in fully adjusted models. We demonstrated that subclinical hypothyroidism and euthyroid sick syndrome are associated with increased CVE in CKD patients. Further studies are needed to explore these issues.

  7. Refusal of dialysis amongst patients of chronic kidney disease (CKD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anees, M.; Khan, J.A.

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the refusal of dialysis amongst patients of chronic kidney disease presenting for the first time for dialysis in uremic condition. Study Design: Cross sectional Study. Place and Duration of the Study: Outpatient department of Nephrology, Mayo Hospital, Lahore from 1 st Jan 2012 to 31 st December 2012. Patients and Methods: Patients of CKD due to any cause presenting with uremia for the first time for dialysis were included in the study. History and physical examination was done and demographic data was collected in pre designed form. Patients were offered for dialysis while explaining to them the advantages of getting and disadvantages of not getting dialysis. Patient's response on the offer was recorded and the reason for the refusal were noted. Results: According to the criteria 150 patients were included in the study. Most of the patients were male 92 (61.3%) and illiterate 78 (52.0%). Major cause of CKD was diabetes mellitus 58 (38.7%) followed by hypertension 38 (25.3%). Mean age of the patients was 42.59 ± 13.72 year and income of themost of the patients 126 (84%) was less than US$100/-month. Most of the patients 126 (77.0%) were asked about the need of dialysis in less than three months, 61 (41.3%) offered for the first time and amongst them 85 (54.0%) were offered dialysis already. Majority of the patients 101 (67.3%) refused dialysis when it was offered to them for the first time. Major reason of the refusal was fear of dialysis procedure in 76 (76%) patients followed by treatment by spiritual 14 (14%) and alternative ways and others 11 (11 %). Middle age persons refused dialysis significantly. (author)

  8. Cytokine ratios in chronic periodontitis and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Anirudh B; Thakur, Srinath; Muddapur, M V; Kulkarni, Raghavendra D

    Chronic periodontitis may influence systemic cytokines in type 2 diabetes. This study aimed to evaluate the cytokine ratios in type 2 diabetes with, and without chronic periodontitis. Gingival status, periodontal, glycemic parameters and serum cytokines were evaluated in participants grouped as healthy, chronic periodontitis, and type 2 diabetes with, and without chronic periodontitis. Cytokine ratios showed significant differences in type 2 diabetes and chronic periodontitis, were highest in participants having both type 2 diabetes and chronic periodontitis, with a statistically significant cut-off point and area under curve by receiver operating characteristic. Copyright © 2016 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Inflammatory Factors and Exercise in Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurice Dungey

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with chronic kidney disease frequently present with chronic elevations in markers of inflammation, a condition that appears to be exacerbated by disease progression and onset of haemodialysis. Systemic inflammation is interlinked with malnutrition and muscle protein wasting and is implicated in a number of morbidities including cardiovascular disease: the most common cause of mortality in this population. Research in the general population and other chronic disease cohorts suggests that an increase in habitual activity levels over a prolonged period may help redress basal increases in systemic inflammation. Furthermore, those populations with the highest baseline levels of systemic inflammation appear to have the greatest improvements from training. On the whole, the activity levels of the chronic kidney disease population reflect a sedentary lifestyle, indicating the potential for increasing physical activity and observing health benefits. This review explores the current literature investigating exercise and inflammatory factors in the chronic kidney disease population and then attempts to explain the contradictory findings and suggests where future research is required.

  10. Dietary Treatment of Metabolic Acidosis in Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siener, Roswitha

    2018-04-20

    Chronic kidney disease and reduced glomerular filtration rate are risk factors for the development of chronic metabolic acidosis. The prevention or correction of chronic metabolic acidosis has been found to slow progression of chronic kidney disease. Dietary composition can strongly affect acid⁻base balance. Major determinants of net endogenous acid production are the generation of large amounts of hydrogen ions, mostly by animal-derived protein, which is counterbalanced by the metabolism of base-producing foods like fruits and vegetables. Alkali therapy of chronic metabolic acidosis can be achieved by providing an alkali-rich diet or oral administration of alkali salts. The primary goal of dietary treatment should be to increase the proportion of fruits and vegetables and to reduce the daily protein intake to 0.8⁻1.0 g per kg body weight. Diet modifications should begin early, i.e., even in patients with moderate kidney impairment, because usual dietary habits of many developed societies contribute an increased proportion of acid equivalents due to the high intake of protein from animal sources.

  11. Dietary Treatment of Metabolic Acidosis in Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roswitha Siener

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease and reduced glomerular filtration rate are risk factors for the development of chronic metabolic acidosis. The prevention or correction of chronic metabolic acidosis has been found to slow progression of chronic kidney disease. Dietary composition can strongly affect acid–base balance. Major determinants of net endogenous acid production are the generation of large amounts of hydrogen ions, mostly by animal-derived protein, which is counterbalanced by the metabolism of base-producing foods like fruits and vegetables. Alkali therapy of chronic metabolic acidosis can be achieved by providing an alkali-rich diet or oral administration of alkali salts. The primary goal of dietary treatment should be to increase the proportion of fruits and vegetables and to reduce the daily protein intake to 0.8–1.0 g per kg body weight. Diet modifications should begin early, i.e., even in patients with moderate kidney impairment, because usual dietary habits of many developed societies contribute an increased proportion of acid equivalents due to the high intake of protein from animal sources.

  12. Role of the Renal Microcirculation in Progression of Chronic Kidney Injury in Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chade, Alejandro R; Hall, John E

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is largely responsible for the growing incidence and prevalence of diabetes, cardiovascular and renal diseases. Current strategies to prevent and treat obesity and its consequences have been insufficient to reverse the ongoing trends. Lifestyle modification or pharmacological therapies often produce modest weight loss which is not sustained and recurrence of obesity is frequently observed, leading to progression of target organ damage in many obese subjects. Therefore, research efforts have focused not only on the factors that regulate energy balance, but also on understanding mechanisms of target organ injury in obesity. Summary and Key Message: Microvascular (MV) disease plays a pivotal role in progressive kidney injury from different etiologies such as hypertension, diabetes, and atherosclerosis, which are all important consequences of chronic obesity. The MV networks are anatomical units that are closely adapted to specific functions of nutrition and removal of waste in every organ. Damage of the small vessels in several tissues and organs has been reported in obesity and may increase cardio-renal risk. However, the mechanisms by which obesity and its attendant cardiovascular and metabolic consequences interact to cause renal MV injury and chronic kidney disease are still unclear, although substantial progress has been made in recent years. This review addresses potential mechanisms and consequences of obesity-induced renal MV injury as well as current treatments that may provide protection of the renal microcirculation and slow progressive kidney injury in obesity. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. ROLE OF THE RENAL MICROCIRCULATION IN PROGRESSION OF CHRONIC KIDNEY INJURY IN OBESITY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chade, Alejandro R.; Hall, John E.

    2016-01-01

    Background Obesity is largely responsible for the growing incidence and prevalence of diabetes, cardiovascular, and renal disease. Current strategies to prevent and treat obesity and its consequences have been insufficient to reverse the ongoing trends. Lifestyle modification or pharmacological therapies often produce modest weight loss which is not sustained and recurrence of obesity is frequently observed, leading to progression of target organ damage in many obese subjects. Therefore, research efforts have focused not only on the factors that regulate energy balance, but also on understanding mechanisms of target organ injury in obesity. Summary and Key message Microvascular disease plays a pivotal role in progressive kidney injury from different etiologies such as hypertension, diabetes, and atherosclerosis, which are all important consequences of chronic obesity. The microvascular networks are anatomical units that are closely adapted to specific functions of nutrition and removal of waste in every organ. Damage of the small vessels in several tissues and organs has been reported in obesity and may increase cardio-renal risk. However, the mechanisms by which obesity and its attendant cardiovascular and metabolic consequences interact to cause renal microvascular injury and chronic kidney disease are still unclear, although substantial progress has been made in recent years. This review addresses potential mechanisms and consequences of obesity-induced renal microvascular injury as well as current treatments that may provide protection of the renal microcirculation and slow progressive kidney injury in obesity. PMID:27771702

  14. A Novel Type 2 Diabetes Mouse Model of Combined Diabetic Kidney Disease and Atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornfeldt, Karin E; Kramer, Farah; Batorsky, Anna; Choi, Jinkuk; Hudkins, Kelly L; Tontonoz, Peter; Alpers, Charles E; Kanter, Jenny E

    2018-02-01

    Diabetic kidney disease and atherosclerotic disease are major causes of morbidity and mortality associated with type 2 diabetes (T2D), and diabetic kidney disease is a major cardiovascular risk factor. The black and tan, brachyury (BTBR) mouse strain with leptin deficiency (Lep ob ) has emerged as one of the best models of human diabetic kidney disease. However, no T2D mouse model of combined diabetic kidney disease and atherosclerosis exists. Our goal was to generate such a model. To this end, the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor was targeted for degradation via inducible degrader of the LDL receptor (IDOL) overexpression, using liver-targeted adenoassociated virus serotype DJ/8 (AAV-DJ/8) in BTBR wild-type and BTBR Lep ob mice. Liver-targeted IDOL-AAV-DJ/8 increased plasma LDL cholesterol compared with the control enhanced green fluorescent protein AAV-DJ/8. IDOL-induced dyslipidemia caused formation of atherosclerotic lesions of an intermediate stage, which contained both macrophages and smooth muscle cells. BTBR Lep ob mice exhibited diabetic kidney disease. IDOL-induced dyslipidemia worsened albuminuria and glomerular macrophage accumulation but had no effect on mesangial expansion or podocyte numbers. Thus, by inducing hepatic degradation of the LDL receptor, we generated a T2D model of combined kidney disease and atherosclerosis. This model provides a new tool to study mechanisms, interactions, and treatment strategies of kidney disease and atherosclerosis in T2D. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The beneficial effects of zinc on diabetes-induced kidney damage in murine rodent model of type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fan; Li, Bing; Dong, Xiaoming; Cui, Wenpeng; Luo, Ping

    2017-07-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a chronic multi-factorial metabolic disorder resulting from impaired glucose homeostasis. Zinc is a key co-factor for the correct functioning of anti-oxidant enzymes. Zinc deficiency therefore, impairs their synthesis, leading to increased oxidative stress within cells. Zinc deficiency occurs commonly in diabetic patients. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of varying concentrations of zinc on diabetic nephropathy (DN) and the underlying mechanisms involved. FVB male mice aged 8 weeks were injected intraperitoneally with multiple low-dose streptozotocin at a concentration of 50mg/kg body weight daily for 5 days. Diabetic and age-matched control mice were treated with special diets supplemented with zinc at varying concentrations (0.85mg/kg, 30mg/kg, 150mg/kg) for 3 months. The mice were fed with zinc diets to mimic the process of oral administration of zinc in human. Zinc deficiency to some extent aggravated the damage of diabetic kidney. Feeding with normal (30mg/kg zinc/kg diet) and especially high (150mg/kg zinc/kg diet) concentration zinc could protect the kidney against diabetes-induced damage. The beneficial effects of zinc on DN are achieved most likely due to the upregulation of Nrf2 and its downstream factors NQO1, SOD1, SOD2. Zinc upregulated the expression of Akt phosphorylation and GSK-3β phosphorylation, resulting in a reduction in Fyn nuclear translocation and export of Nrf2 to the cytosol. Thus, regular monitoring and maintaining of adequate levels of zinc are recommended in diabetic individuals in order to delay the development of DN. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  16. 78 FR 52937 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-27

    ... Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Artificial Pancreas. Date: October 11, 2013. Time: 2:00 p.m. to 4... Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the... Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Time-Sensitive Obesity Research. Date...

  17. 78 FR 36554 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-18

    ... and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Artificial Pancreas SBIR Applications. Date... Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the... Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Gene-Environment Interactions in TEDDY...

  18. 78 FR 23771 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-22

    ... Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Artificial Pancreas. Date: July 10-11... Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the... and Nutrition Research; 93.849, Kidney Diseases, Urology and Hematology Research, National Institutes...

  19. 77 FR 29676 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Disorders; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-18

    ... Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Disorders; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the... Digestive and Kidney Diseases. Date: June 21, 2012. Time: 3:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m. Agenda: To evaluate requests... Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, Building 2DEM, Room 788B, 6707 Democracy Boulevard, Bethesda...

  20. 75 FR 4830 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases;

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-29

    ... Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel. Predictors of Genitourinary Disorders... Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the... Digestive and Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Small Grant Program. Date: March 12, 2010. Time: 2 p.m...

  1. Ethnic/Race Diversity and Diabetic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasantha Muthu Muthuppalaniappan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Ethnicity and race are often used interchangeably in the literature. However, the traditional definition of race and ethnicity is related to biological (bone structure and skin, hair, or eye color and sociological factors (nationality, regional culture, ancestry, and language respectively. Diabetes mellitus (DM is a huge global public health problem. As the number of individuals with Type 2 DM grows, the prevalence of diabetic kidney disease (DKD, which is one of the most serious complications, is expected to rise sharply. Many ethnic and racial groups have a greater risk of developing DM and its associated macro and micro-vascular complications.

  2. Role of leptin in reverse epidemiology in chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scholze, Alexandra; Tepel, Martin

    2007-01-01

    , indicating leptin resistance. In healthy subjects increased leptin concentration constitutes a biomarker for increased cardiovascular risk. On the other hand, a recent prospective long-term study in patients with chronic kidney disease stage 5 on hemodialysis therapy showed that reduced serum leptin......Leptin is mainly produced by adipocytes and metabolized in the kidney. Leptin is taken up into the central nervous system by a saturable transport system, and controls appetite in rodents and in healthy subjects. Leptin acts on peripheral tissue and increases the inflammatory response...

  3. The role of SIRT1 in diabetic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabi eYacoub

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Sirtuins (SIRTs are members of the silent information regulator 2 (Sir2 family. In mammals, of the seven known SIRTs, SIRT1 function is most studied and has been shown to regulate wide range of cellular functions that affect metabolic homeostasis and aging. SIRT1 exerts anti-apoptotic, anti-oxidative, and anti-inflammatory effects against cellular injury, and protects the cells through the regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis, autophagy, and metabolism in response to the cellular energy and redox status. SIRT1 also promotes vasodilation and protects vascular tissues. In humans and animal models with diabetic kidney disease, its expression tends to be decreased in renal cells, and increased expression of SIRT1 was found to play a renal protective role in animal models with diabetic kidney disease. In this review we discuss the role and potential mechanisms by which SIRT1 protects against DKD.

  4. [Chronic kidney disease in Primary Health Care: prevalence and associated risk factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvador González, Betlem; Rodríguez Pascual, Mercedes; Ruipérez Guijarro, Laura; Ferré González, Antonia; Cunillera Puertolas, Oriol; Rodríguez Latre, Luisa M

    2015-04-01

    To determine the prevalence of chronic kidney disease and associated risk factors in subjects over 60 years of age, as well as its staging by determining the glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Cross-sectional observational study. Primary Health Care. Patients≥60 years of age who were seen in 40 Primary Health Care centres with serum creatinine measured in a central laboratory between January 1 and December 31, 2010. kidney transplant, home care. Social-demographic and anthropometric data, cardiovascular risk factors, and diseases established according to electronic clinical records. Serum creatinine was measured using standardised Jaffe kinetic method, and GFR estimated with MDRD-4-IDMS and CKD-EPI. A total of 97,665 subjects (57.3% women, median age 70.0 years [Q1: 65.0, Q3: 77.0]). GFR-MDRD prevalencedisease (OR=1.40; 95% CI 1.30 to 1.50), peripheral arterial disease (OR=1.31; 95% CI 1.09 to 1.57), dyslipidaemia (OR=1.28; 95% CI 1.23 to 1.33), diabetes (OR=1.26; 95% CI 1.17 to 1.34), and stroke (OR=1.17; 95% CI 1.09 to 1.25). The GFR-CKD-EPI model showed an increase in OR with age and male sex, that became significant as a chronic kidney disease risk factor. Chronic kidney disease has considerable prevalence in subjects≥60 years seen in Primary Health Care, more in women, and increasing with age. Hypertension, more than diabetes, was the main associated cardiovascular risk factor. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Diet and Diabetic Kidney Disease: Plant Versus Animal Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorthi, Ranjani N; Vorland, Colby J; Hill Gallant, Kathleen M

    2017-03-01

    The goal of this review is to present an overview of the evidence on the effectiveness of plant-based diets in delaying progression of diabetic kidney disease (DKD). The ideal quantity of dietary protein has been a controversial topic for patients with DKD. Smaller studies have focused on protein source, plant versus animal, for preventing progression. Limited evidence suggests that dietary patterns that focus on plant-based foods, those that are lower in processed foods, or those that are lower in advanced glycation end products (AGE) may be useful in prevention of DKD progression. Increasing plant-based foods, incorporating diet patterns that limit processed foods, or potentially lowering AGE contents in diets may be beneficial for dietary management of DKD. However, dietary studies specifically targeted at DKD treatment are sparse. Further, large trials powered to assess outcomes including changes in kidney function, end-stage kidney disease, and mortality are needed to provide more substantial evidence for these diets.

  6. Effect of Redox Modulating NRF2 Activators on Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo-hyun Choi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease (CKD is featured by a progressive decline of kidney function and is mainly caused by chronic diseases such as diabetes mellitus and hypertension. CKD is a complex disease due to cardiovascular complications and high morbidity; however, there is no single treatment to improve kidney function in CKD patients. Since biological markers representing oxidative stress are significantly elevated in CKD patients, oxidative stress is receiving attention as a contributing factor to CKD pathology. Nuclear factor erythroid-2 related factor 2 (NRF2 is a predominant transcription factor that regulates the expression of a wide array of genes encoding antioxidant proteins, thiol molecules and their generating enzymes, detoxifying enzymes, and stress response proteins, all of which can counteract inflammatory and oxidative damages. There is considerable experimental evidence suggesting that NRF2 signaling plays a protective role in renal injuries that are caused by various pathologic conditions. In addition, impaired NRF2 activity and consequent target gene repression have been observed in CKD animals. Therefore, a pharmacological intervention activating NRF2 signaling can be beneficial in protecting against kidney dysfunction in CKD. This review article provides an overview of the role of NRF2 in experimental CKD models and describes current findings on the renoprotective effects of naturally occurring NRF2 activators, including sulforaphane, resveratrol, curcumin, and cinnamic aldehyde. These experimental results, coupled with recent clinical experiences with a synthetic triterpenoid, bardoxolone methyl, have brought a light of hope for ameliorating CKD progression by preventing oxidative stress and maintaining cellular redox homeostasis.

  7. [Prevalence of chronic kidney disease in community-dwelling elderly and associated cardiovascular risk factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almirall, J; Vaqueiro, M; Antón, E; Baré, M L; González, V; Jaimez, E; Gimeno, C

    2005-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease is a major public health problem in developed countries. The incidence of patients on dialysis is increasing progressively in the last years. The ageing population and increasing incidence of diabetes and hypertension are the main causes. Moreover, the level of kidney function is now recognised as a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease, even in mild cases. There is a great unaware about the prevalence of mild to moderate chronic kidney disease in the general population. The aim of the present study was to know the kidney function level in our general population over 64 years old, and the associated cardiovascular risk. This is an epidemiological descriptive cross-sectional study, obtained by a representative random sampling of the population over 64 years living in the reference area of our Hospital. The glomerular filtration rate was estimated by the Cockroft-Gault formula and the MDRD equations. Kidney function has been classified by the K/DOQI stages. We examined the univariate and multivariate association between the estimated glomerular filtration rate and the presence of cardiovascular events. We analysed 253 subjects aged 65 to 93 years (mean 72 +/- 5.4). Present comorbidities were: HTA 64%, dislipemia 29%, diabetes 14%, active smokers: 10% of men, 1,5% of women. A previous cardiovascular event was present in 11% of patients (15% of men; 6,8% of women). A serum creatinin level over 1,3 and 1,5 mg/dl was present in 3,8% of women and 8% of men respectively. Nevertheless, chronic kidney insufficiency (estimated clreatinie clearance less than 60 mix') was present in 31-49% relying on the utilised formula. In addition to age, sex, and diabetes, an independent graded association was observed between reduced glomerular filtration rate and the existence of cardiovascular events. We have confirmed a high prevalence of renal insufficiency among elderly people, usually not detected by the isolated plasma creatinin concentration This

  8. Vascular function assessed with cardiovascular magnetic resonance predicts survival in patients with advanced chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steedman Tracey

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increased arterial stiffness is associated with mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR permits assessment of the central arteries to measure aortic function. Methods We studied the relationship between central haemodynamics and outcome using CMR in 144 chronic kidney disease patients with estimated glomerular filtration rate Results Median follow up after the scan was 24 months. There were no significant differences in aortic distensibilty or aortic volumetric arterial strain between pre-dialysis and dialysis patients. Aortic distensibilty and volumetric arterial strain negatively correlated with age. Aortic distensibilty and volumetric arterial strain were lower in diabetics, patients with ischaemic heart disease and peripheral vascular disease. During follow up there were 20 deaths. Patients who died had lower aortic distensibilty than survivors. In a survival analysis, diabetes, systolic blood pressure and aortic distensibilty were independent predictors of mortality. There were 12 non-fatal cardiovascular events during follow up. Analysing the combined end point of death or a vascular event, diabetes, aortic distensibilty and volumetric arterial strain were predictors of events. Conclusion Deranged vascular function measured with CMR correlates with cardiovascular risk factors and predicts outcome. CMR measures of vascular function are potential targets for interventions to reduce cardiovascular risk.

  9. Non-Diabetic Kidney Disease in Type 2 Diabetic Patients: Prevalence, Clinical Predictors and Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siyar  Erdogmus

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Diabetic kidney disease (DKD is one of the most frequent microvascular complications of diabetes and is the leading cause of end-stage kidney disease worldwide. In patients with diabetes, non-diabetic kidney disease (NDKD can also occur. NDKD can be either alone or superimposed with the DKD. In this study, we aimed to investigate the utility of kidney biopsy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM and the predictability of diagnosing DKD versus NDKD from clinical and laboratory data. We also evaluated the prevalence and etiology of NDKD in patients with T2DM. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed type 2 diabetic patients who had kidney biopsy in the last 10 years for diagnosing possible NDKD in our center. In all patients kidney biopsies were performed because of atypical clinical features and biopsy samples were examined by light and immunofluorescence microscopy. Clinical parameters, laboratory workup and office blood pressures were recorded for each patient at the time of biopsy. Results: Eight patients were excluded due to missing data. A total of 48 patients (female/male: 26/22 and mean age: 59±8 years were included in the study. According to the biopsy findings, 24 (50% patients had NDKD alone, 20 (41.7% had DKD alone and 4 (8.3% had coexisting DKD and NDKD. The most common NDKD diagnoses were membranous nephropathy (29.2%, tubulointerstitial nephritis (20.8% and IgA nephropathy (12.5%. There were no significant differences in three groups with respect to the duration of diabetes, proteinuria, hematuria and glycated hemoglobin A1c levels. Diabetic retinopathy (DR was the most significant finding, which was associated with DKD. Positive and negative predictive values of DR for DKD were 88 and 81%, respectively. Conclusion: This study demonstrated a high prevalence of NDKD in patients with T2DM. The absence of DR strongly predicted NDKD. Clinical decision alone can lead to wrong diagnosis and delay in appropriate

  10. [USE OF STATINS IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE TO PREVENT CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavidić, T; Lodeta, B; Lovrinić, Đ

    2016-12-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is one of the leading public health issues due to frequent and serious complications. Once the function of kidneys is disrupted, regardless of etiology, there are numerous factors that can speed up decrease of glomerular filtration rate, including hypertension, proteinuria and dyslipidemia. Statins are widely used in primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular diseases in general population. Clinical advantages of statins in CKD patients are not as clear. The aim of this paper is to present lipid status in CKD patients and indications for statin therapy with the aim to reduce cardiovascular risk in this group of patients. CKD is a well-known independent risk factor in cardiovascular events, but professional associations issuing guidelines differ in the approach to treatment of dyslipidemia. The results of some studies indicate that treatment with statins may slow down the rate of kidney function reduction in patients with mild to moderate kidney damage, whereas other studies deny this effect. Furthermore, CKD patients have a higher risk of side effects, in part due to the reduced kidney excretion, polypharmacy, and numerous other comorbidities. Family physician has the role of providing preventive measures, with focus on appropriate treatment of patients with hypertension or diabetes, as the most common cause of CKD, and timely detection of CKD in initial stage.

  11. 77 FR 3479 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-24

    ... Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Initial Review Group; Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolic... Program Nos. 93.847, Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolic Research; 93.848, Digestive Diseases and Nutrition Research; 93.849, Kidney Diseases, Urology and Hematology Research, National Institutes of Health...

  12. 76 FR 33322 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-08

    ... Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel, Infant Feeding and Child... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and...

  13. 78 FR 3903 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-17

    ... Diseases Advisory Council, Diabetes, Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases Subcommittee. Date: February 13, 2013... Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal... Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Advisory Council. The meetings will be open to the public as...

  14. Dual Blockade of the Renin-angiotensin-aldosterone System in Type 2 Diabetic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-Huan Feng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To examine the efficacy and safety of dual blockade of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS among patients with type 2 diabetic kidney disease. Data Sources: We searched the major literature repositories, including the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE and EMBASE, for randomized clinical trials published between January 1990 and October 2015 that compared the efficacy and safety of the use of dual blockade of the RAAS versus the use of monotherapy, without applying any language restrictions. Keywords for the searches included "diabetic nephropathy," "chronic kidney disease," "chronic renal insufficiency," "diabetes mellitus," "dual therapy," "combined therapy," "dual blockade," "renin-angiotensin system," "angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor," "angiotensin-receptor blocker," "aldosterone blockade," "selective aldosterone blockade," "renin inhibitor," "direct renin inhibitor," "mineralocorticoid receptor blocker," etc. Study Selection: The selected articles were carefully reviewed. We excluded randomized clinical trials in which the kidney damage of patients was related to diseases other than diabetes mellitus. Results: Combination treatment with an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor supplemented by an angiotensin II receptor blocking agent is expected to provide a more complete blockade of the RAAS and a better control of hypertension. However, existing literature has presented mixed results, in particular, related to patient safety. In view of this, we conducted a comprehensive literature review in order to explain the rationale for dual blockade of the RAAS, and to discuss the pros and cons. Conclusions: Despite the negative results of some recent large-scale studies, it may be immature to declare that the dual blockade is a failure because of the complex nature of the RAAS surrounding its diversified functions and utility. Further trials are warranted to study the combination therapy as an

  15. 78 FR 31950 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-28

    ... Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Time-Sensitive Obesity Prevention. Date... Digestive and Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Causes and Consequences of Neutrophil Dysfunction in...

  16. 76 FR 72425 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-23

    ... Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Hemodialysis and Markers of Heart...; 93.848, Digestive Diseases and Nutrition Research; 93.849, Kidney Diseases, Urology and Hematology...

  17. Vascular Stiffness in Children With Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savant, Jonathan D; Betoko, Aisha; Meyers, Kevin E C; Mitsnefes, Mark; Flynn, Joseph T; Townsend, Raymond R; Greenbaum, Larry A; Dart, Allison; Warady, Bradley; Furth, Susan L

    2017-05-01

    Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV) is a measure of arterial stiffness associated with cardiovascular events in the general population and in adults with chronic kidney disease. However, few data exist regarding cfPWV in children with chronic kidney disease. We compared observed cfPWV assessed via applanation tonometry in children enrolled in the CKiD cohort study (Chronic Kidney Disease in Children) to normative data in healthy children and examined risk factors associated with elevated cfPWV. cfPWV Z score for height/gender and age/gender was calculated from and compared with published pediatric norms. Multivariable linear regression was used to assess the relationship between cfPWV and age, gender, race, body mass index, diagnosis, urine protein-creatinine ratio, mean arterial pressure, heart rate, number of antihypertensive medications, uric acid, and serum low-density lipoprotein. Of the 95 participants with measured cfPWV, 60% were male, 19% were black, 46% had glomerular cause of chronic kidney disease, 22% had urine protein-creatinine ratio 0.5 to 2.0 mg/mg and 9% had >2.0 mg/mg, mean age was 15.1 years, average mean arterial pressure was 80 mm Hg, and median glomerular filtration rate was 63 mL/min per 1.73 m 2 Mean cfPWV was 5.0 m/s (SD, 0.8 m/s); mean cfPWV Z score by height/gender norms was -0.1 (SD, 1.1). cfPWV increased significantly with age, mean arterial pressure, and black race in multivariable analysis; no other variables, including glomerular filtration rate, were independently associated with cfPWV. In this pediatric cohort with mild kidney dysfunction, arterial stiffness was comparable to that of normal children. Future research is needed to examine the impact of chronic kidney disease progression on arterial stiffness and associated cardiovascular parameters in children. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. Finerenone : third-generation mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist for the treatment of heart failure and diabetic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Licette C Y; Schutte, Elise; Gansevoort, Ron T; van der Meer, Peter; Voors, Adriaan A

    2015-01-01

    The mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists (MRAs) spironolactone and eplerenone reduce the risk of hospitalizations and mortality in patients with heart failure (HF) with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF), and attenuate progression of diabetic kidney disease. However, their use is limited by the fear of inducing hyperkalemia, especially in patients with renal dysfunction. Finerenone is a novel nonsteroidal MRA, with higher selectivity toward the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) compared to spironolactone and stronger MR-binding affinity than eplerenone. This paper discusses the chemistry, pharmacokinetics, clinical efficacy and safety of finerenone. The selectivity and greater binding affinity of finerenone to the MR may reduce the risk of hyperkalemia and renal dysfunction and thereby overcome the reluctance to start and uptitrate MRAs in patients with HF and diabetic kidney disease. Studies conducted in patients with HFrEF and moderate chronic kidney disease and diabetic kidney disease, showed promising results. Phase III trials will have to show whether finerenone might become the third-generation MRA for the treatment of HF and diabetic kidney disease.

  19. Podocytes, Signaling Pathways, and Vascular Factors in Diabetic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosius, Frank C.; Coward, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Alterations and injury to glomerular podocytes play a key role in the initiation and early progression of diabetic kidney disease. Multiple factors in the diabetic milieu cause abnormalities in podocyte signaling that lead to podocyte foot process effacement, hypertrophy, detachment, loss and death. Alterations in insulin action and mTOR activation have been well documented to lead to pathology. For example, reduced insulin action directly leads to albuminuria, increased glomerular matrix accumulation, thickening of the glomerular basement membrane, podocyte apoptosis and glomerulosclerosis. In addition, the podocyte generates factors that alter signaling in other glomerular cells. Prominent among these is VEGF-A which plays a complex role in maintaining glomerular endothelium viability but causes endothelial cell pathology when generated at too high a level. Finally, circulating vascular factors, such as activated protein C have a profound effect on podocyte stability and survival. This cytoprotective factor is critical for podocyte health and its deficiency promotes podocyte injury and apoptosis. Thus, the podocyte sits in the center of a network of paracrine and hormonal signaling systems that in health keep the podocyte adaptable and viable, but in diabetes can lead to pathologic changes, detachment and death. This podocyte injury is a critical determinant of the progression of diabetic kidney disease. PMID:24780459

  20. Milk alkali syndrome in an infant with chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kari JA

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Jameela A Kari, Sherif M El DesokyDepartment of Pediatrics and Pediatric Nephrology Unit, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi ArabiaAbstract: We report a case of milk alkali syndrome in a 15-month-old infant who had chronic kidney disease. His kidney function worsened, with creatinine raised from 1.11 mg/dL (98 µmol/L to 3.98 mg/dL (350.3 µmol/L, normal 0.4–1.0 mg/dL (35–91 µmol. He had hypercalcemia, serum calcium level 3.11 (normal 2.1–2.6 mmol/L, and metabolic alkalosis, HCO3 48.7 (normal 21–26 mmol/L. His kidney function returned to its base level and his calcium and bicarbonate levels normalized with adjustment of calcium carbonate and sodium bicarbonate doses. We report this case to highlight an unusual complication and to review the literature on milk alkali syndrome which is rare in children.Keywords: milk alkali syndrome, infants, chronic kidney disease

  1. Exploring sleep disorders in patients with chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigam G

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Gaurav Nigam,1 Macario Camacho,2 Edward T Chang,2 Muhammad Riaz3 1Division of Sleep Medicine, Clay County Hospital, Flora, IL, 2Division of Otolaryngology, Sleep Surgery and Sleep Medicine, Tripler Army Medical Center, Honolulu, HI, 3Division of Sleep Medicine, Astria Health Center, Grandview, WA, USA Abstract: Kidney disorders have been associated with a variety of sleep-related disorders. Therefore, researchers are placing greater emphasis on finding the role of chronic kidney disease (CKD in the development of obstructive sleep apnea and restless legs syndrome. Unfortunately, the presence of other sleep-related disorders with CKDs and non-CKDs has not been investigated with the same clinical rigor. Recent studies have revealed that myriad of sleep disorders are associated with CKDs. Furthermore, there are a few non-CKD-related disorders that are associated with sleep disorders. In this narrative review, we provide a balanced view of the spectrum of sleep disorders (as identified in International Classification of Sleep disorders-3 related to different types of renal disorders prominently including but not exclusively limited to CKD. Keywords: kidney disease, sleep disorders, obstructive sleep apnea, parasomnias, restless legs syndrome, chronic kidney disease, insomnia

  2. Indian chronic kidney disease study: Design and methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vivek; Yadav, Ashok Kumar; Gang, Sishir; John, Oommen; Modi, Gopesh K; Ojha, Jai Prakash; Pandey, Rajendra; Parameswaran, Sreejith; Prasad, Narayan; Sahay, Manisha; Varughese, Santosh; Baid-Agarwal, Seema; Jha, Vivekanand

    2017-04-01

    The rate and factors that influence progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in developing countries like India are unknown. A pan-country prospective, observational cohort study is needed to address these knowledge gaps. The Indian Chronic Kidney Disease (ICKD) study will be a cohort study of approximately 5000 patients with mild to moderate CKD presenting to centres that represent different geographical regions in India. Time to 50% decline in baseline estimated glomerular filtration rate, need of renal replacement therapy or any new cardiovascular disease (CVD) event or death from CVD are the primary end points. This study will provide the opportunity to determine risk factors for CKD progression and development of CVD in Indian subjects and perform international comparisons to determine ethnic and geographical differences. A bio-repository will provide a chance to discover biomarkers and explore genetic risk factors. © 2016 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  3. Sexual and gonadal dysfunction in chronic kidney disease: Pathophysiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Rathi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Sexual and gonadal dysfunction/infertility are quite common in patients with chronic kidney disease. Forty percent of male and 55% of female dialysis patients do not achieve orgasm. The pathophysiology of gonadal dysfunction is multifactorial. It is usually a combination of psychological, physiological, and other comorbid factors. Erectile dysfunction in males is mainly due to arterial factors, venous leakage, psychological factors, neurogenic factors, endocrine factors, and drugs. Sexual dysfunction in females is mainly due to hormonal factors and manifests mainly as menstrual irregularities, amenorrhea, lack of vaginal lubrication, and failure to conceive. Treatment of gonadal dysfunction in chronic kidney disease is multipronged and an exact understanding of underlying pathology is essential in proper management of these patients.

  4. Use of sevelamer in chronic kidney disease: beyond phosphorus control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Osorio, Laura; Zambrano, Diana Pazmiño; Gracia-Iguacel, Carolina; Rojas-Rivera, Jorge; Ortiz, Alberto; Egido, Jesus; González Parra, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    Sevelamer is a non-calcium phosphate binder used in advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD) and in dialysis for hyperphosphataemia control. Several experimental, observational studies and clinical trials have shown that sevelamer has pleiotropic effects, beyond hyperphosphataemia control, including actions on inflammation, oxidative stress, lipid profile and atherogenesis, vascular calcification, endothelial dysfunction and the reduction of several uremic toxins. This is the biological basis for its global effect on cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease. This review focuses on these pleiotropic actions of sevelamer and their impact on cardiovascular health, with the experience published after more than ten years of clinical expertise. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  5. Bone marrow cytological evaluation in dogs with chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Borin-Crivellenti

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Since anemia is indicated as an important compromising factor for the quality of life of dogs with chronic kidney disease (CKD, bone marrow cytological analysis may provide more information on the hematological profile these dogs and, therefore, allow clinicians to not only choose the most adequate treatment but also monitor the response to therapy. The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility with sternal bone marrow puncture in chronic kidney disease (CKD using only local anesthesia and check if the cytological analysis is helpful to determine the hematological status. We found that erythroid hypoplasia occurred only in terminal CKD patients, and that the bone marrows of dogs with CKD stages 2 and 3 were quantitatively similar to those of elderly dogs. All dogs tolerated the bone marrow puncture using only local anesthesia with lidocaine and bone marrow cytological evaluation may be a useful tool for hematopoietic evaluation of anemic dogs with CKD.

  6. Diagnosis and treatment of diabetes mellitus in chronic pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Ewald, Nils; Hardt, Philip D

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes secondary to pancreatic diseases is commonly referred to as pancreatogenic diabetes or type 3c diabetes mellitus. It is a clinically relevant condition with a prevalence of 5%-10% among all diabetic subjects in Western populations. In nearly 80% of all type 3c diabetes mellitus cases, chronic pancreatitis seems to be the underlying disease. The prevalence and clinical importance of diabetes secondary to chronic pancreatitis has certainly been underestimated and underappreciated so fa...

  7. Dietary Approaches in the Management of Diabetic Patients with Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Gang Jee; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Goldstein-Fuchs, Jordi; Rhee, Connie M

    2017-07-31

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is one of the most prevalent complications of diabetes, and patients with diabetic kidney disease (DKD) have a substantially higher risk of cardiovascular disease and death compared to their non-diabetic CKD counterparts. In addition to pharmacologic management strategies, nutritional and dietary interventions in DKD are an essential aspect of management with the potential for ameliorating kidney function decline and preventing the development of other end-organ complications. Among DKD patients with non-dialysis dependent CKD, expert panels recommend lower dietary protein intake of 0.8 g/kg of body weight/day, while higher dietary protein intake (>1.2 g/kg of body weight/day) is advised among diabetic end-stage renal disease patients receiving maintenance dialysis to counteract protein catabolism, dialysate amino acid and protein losses, and protein-energy wasting. Carbohydrates from sugars should be limited to less than 10% of energy intake, and it is also suggested that higher polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fat consumption in lieu of saturated fatty acids, trans-fat, and cholesterol are associated with more favorable outcomes. While guidelines recommend dietary sodium restriction to less than 1.5-2.3 g/day, excessively low sodium intake may be associated with hyponatremia as well as impaired glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity. As patients with advanced DKD progressing to end-stage renal disease may be prone to the "burnt-out diabetes" phenomenon (i.e., spontaneous resolution of hypoglycemia and frequent hypoglycemic episodes), further studies in this population are particularly needed to determine the safety and efficacy of dietary restrictions in this population.

  8. Dietary sodium in chronic kidney disease: a comprehensive approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Julie A; Cavanaugh, Kerri L

    2010-01-01

    Despite existing guidelines, dietary sodium intake among people worldwide often exceeds recommended limits. Research evidence is growing in both animal and human studies showing indirect and direct adverse consequences of high dietary sodium on the kidney. In patients with kidney disease, dietary sodium may have important effects on proteinuria, efficacy of antiproteinuric pharmacologic therapy, hypertension control, maintaining an optimal volume status, and immunosuppressant therapy. Dietary sodium intake is an important consideration in patients with all stages of chronic kidney disease, including those receiving dialysis therapy or those who have received a kidney transplant. We review in detail the dietary sodium recommendations suggested by various organizations for patients with kidney disease. Potential barriers to successfully translating current sodium intake guidelines into practice include poor knowledge about the sodium content of food among both patients and providers, complex labeling information, patient preferences related to taste, and limited support for modifications in public policy. Finally, we offer existing and potential solutions that may assist providers in educating and empowering patients to effectively manage their dietary sodium intake.

  9. Plant phosphates, phytate and pathological calcifications in chronic kidney disease

    OpenAIRE

    Juan Manuel Buades Fuster; Pilar Sanchís Cortés; Joan Perelló Bestard; Félix Grases Freixedas

    2017-01-01

    Phytate, or myo-inositol 1,2,3,4,5,6-hexakis dihydrogen phosphate (InsP6), is a naturally occurring phosphorus compound that is present in many foods, mainly legumes, whole grains and nuts. Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have cardiovascular disease mortality up to 30 times higher than the general population. Vascular calcifications (VCs) directly contribute to overall morbidity and mortality, especially in CKD. In part, this high mortality is due to elevated levels of phosphorus i...

  10. Depressed cardiac autonomic modulation in patients with chronic kidney disease

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira, Carlos Alberto de; Brito Junior, Helio Lima de; Bastos, Marcus Gomes; Oliveira, Felipe Gomes de; Casali, Thais Gomes; Bignoto, Tiago Costa; Fernandes, Natalia Maria da Silva; Beraldo, Antonio Fernando de Castro Alves; Paula, Rogério Baumgratz de

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: A dysfunctional autonomic nervous system (ANS) has also been recognized as an important mechanism contributing to the poor outcome in CKD patients, with several studies reporting a reduction in heart rate variability (HRV). Objective: Evaluate the sympathovagal balance in patients with chronic kidney disease on conservative treatment. Methods: In a cross-sectional study, patients with CKD stages 3, 4 and 5 not yet on dialysis (CKD group) and age-matched healthy subjects (CON...

  11. Exercise as an Adjunct Therapy In Chronic Kidney Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Kirkman, Danielle L.; Edwards, David G.; Lennon-Edwards, Shannon

    2014-01-01

    Physical activity levels are low in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Evidence indicates that a sedentary lifestyle contributes to increased morbidity and mortality risk; thus, increasing physical activity is an undeniable aspect of a healthy lifestyle. Despite the myriad of health benefits associated with exercise, as well as clinical guidelines in its favor, exercise is still not prescribed as part of routine care in the CKD patient population. This article briefly discusses the b...

  12. The evolving world of chronic kidney disease mineral bone disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Bellasi, A.; Galassi, A.; Cozzolino, M.; Di Iorio, B.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease – mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD) is associated with a significant morbidity and mortality. In vitro and animal models suggest that phosphorous, calcium, parathyroid hormone, and vitamin D abnormalities, mediate the cardiovascular and bone diseases that characterise CKD-MBD and increase the risk of death. Currently, mineral abnormalities are corrected through phosphorous restriction, phosphate binders, calcimimetics and vitamin D administration. Nonetheless, data in...

  13. Important causes of chronic kidney disease in South Africa | Moosa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In hypertensive patients without chronic kidney disease (CKD) the goal is to keep blood pressure (BP) at ≤140/90 mmHg. When CKD is present, especially where there is proteinuria of ≥0.5 g/day, the goal is a BP of ≤130/80 mmHg. Lifestyle measures are mandatory, especially limitation of salt intake, ingestion of ...

  14. Make Precision Medicine Work for Chronic Kidney Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Ling; Zou, Lu-Xi; Chen, Mao-Jie

    2016-01-01

    Precision medicine is based on accurate diagnosis and tailored intervention through the use of omics and clinical data together with epidemiology and environmental exposures. Precision medicine should be achieved with minimum adverse events and maximum efficacy in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). In this review, the breakthroughs of omics in CKD and the application of systems biology are reviewed. The potential role of transforming growth factor-β1 in the targeted intervention of r...

  15. Assessment of diet in chronic kidney disease female predialysis patients

    OpenAIRE

    Dariusz Włodarek; Dominika Głąbska; Jadwiga Rojek-Trębicka

    2014-01-01

    [b]introduction and objective[/b]. Nutrition is important in the therapy of predialysis patients. The aim of the presented single-centre descriptive study was to assess the diet in chronic kidney disease female predialysis patients with no previous dietary intervention, in comparison with recommendations, as well as the analysis of the energy, protein and phosphate intake in correlation with chosen laboratory measurements. [b]materials and methods.[/b] The research was carried out in 31...

  16. Ambulatory blood pressure patterns in children with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuels, Joshua; Ng, Derek; Flynn, Joseph T; Mitsnefes, Mark; Poffenbarger, Tim; Warady, Bradley A; Furth, Susan

    2012-07-01

    Ambulatory blood pressure (BP) monitoring (ABPM) is the best method of detecting abnormal BP in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), whose hypertension may be missed with casual BP measurements. We report ABPM findings in 332 children 1 year after entry in the Chronic Kidney Disease in Children cohort study. All of the subjects underwent casual and ambulatory BP measurement. BP was categorized based on casual and ABPM results into normal (42%), white-coat (4%), masked (35%), and ambulatory (14%) hypertension. Only half of the subjects had a normal ABPM. BP load was elevated (>25%) in 52% (n = 172), whereas mean BP was elevated in 32% (n = 105). In multivariate analysis, those using an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor were 89% more likely to have a normal ABPM than those who did not report using an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (odds ratio, 1.89 [95% CI, 1.17-3.04]). For every 20% faster decline in annualized glomerular filtration rate change, the odds of an abnormal ABPM increased 26% (odds ratio, 1.26 [95% CI, 0.97-1.64]). A 2.25-fold increase in urine protein:creatinine ratio annualized change was associated with a 39% higher odds of an abnormal ABPM (odds ratio, 1.39 [95% CI, 1.06-1.82]). Abnormalities on ABPM are common in children with chronic kidney disease and are strongly associated with known risk factors for end-stage renal disease. Individuals on angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors were less likely to have abnormal ABPM, suggesting a possible therapeutic intervention. ABPM should be used to monitor risk and guide therapy in children with chronic kidney disease.

  17. Linking acute kidney injury to chronic kidney disease: the missing links.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaballo, Mohammed A; Elsayed, Mohamed E; Stack, Austin G

    2017-08-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is considered to be a major public health problem around the globe, and it is associated with major adverse clinical outcomes and significant health care costs. There is growing evidence suggesting that AKI is associated with the subsequent development of chronic kidney disease (CKD). While recovery of kidney function occurs in the majority of patients surviving an AKI episode, a large number of patients do not recover completely. Similarly, CKD is a well-known risk factor for the development of AKI. Recent studies suggest that both AKI and CKD are not separate disease entities but are in fact components of a far more closely interconnected disease continuum. However, the true nature of this relationship is complex and poorly understood. This review explores potential relationships between AKI and CKD, and seeks to uncover a number of "missing links" in this tentative emerging relationship.

  18. New oral anticoagulants in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belmar Vega, Lara; de Francisco, A L M; Bada da Silva, Jairo; Galván Espinoza, Luis; Fernández Fresnedo, Gema

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) develop bleeding and thrombotic tendencies, so the indication of anticoagulation at the onset of atrial fibrillation (AF) is complex. AF is the most common chronic cardiac arrhythmia, and thromboembolism and ischemic stroke in particular are major complications. In recent years, new oral anticoagulant drugs have been developed, and they have shown superiority over the classical AVK in preventing stroke, systemic embolism and bleeding risk, constituting an effective alternative to those resources. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Nefrología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. The Cerebrovascular-Chronic Kidney Disease Connection: Perspectives and Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Wei Ling; Huisa, Branko N; Fisher, Mark

    2017-02-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is an independent risk factor for the development of cerebrovascular disease, particularly small vessel disease which can manifest in a variety of phenotypes ranging from lacunes to microbleeds. Small vessel disease likely contributes to cognitive dysfunction in the CKD population. Non-traditional risk factors for vascular injury in uremia include loss of calcification inhibitors, hyperphosphatemia, increased blood pressure variability, elastinolysis, platelet dysfunction, and chronic inflammation. In this review, we discuss the putative pathways by which these mechanisms may promote cerebrovascular disease and thus increase risk of future stroke in CKD patients.

  20. Diabetic Kidney Disease: From Epidemiology to Clinical Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheol Whee Park

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available With worldwide epidemic of diabetes mellitus, diabetic nephropathy which is one of the major causes of microvascular complication has become a serious concern in Korea as well as the rest of the world. In view of its significance, there is an urgent and paramount need for proper managements that could either deter or slow the progression of diabetic nephropathy. Despite advances in care, ever increasing number of patients suffering from diabetic kidney disease and from end-stage renal disease implies that the current management is not adequate in many aspects. The reasons for these inadequacies compromise lack of early diagnosis, failure to intervene with timely and aggressive manner, and lack of understanding on the kind of interventions required. Another issue equally important for the adequate care of patients with diabetic nephropathy is an understanding of past, present and future epidemiology of diabetic nephropathy which serves, especially in Korea, as a material determining standard diagnosis and treatment and a national health-policy decision.

  1. Renal Tissue Oxygenation in Essential Hypertension and Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menno Pruijm

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Animal studies suggest that renal tissue hypoxia plays an important role in the development of renal damage in hypertension and renal diseases, yet human data were scarce due to the lack of noninvasive methods. Over the last decade, blood oxygenation level-dependent magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD-MRI, detecting deoxyhemoglobin in hypoxic renal tissue, has become a powerful tool to assess kidney oxygenation noninvasively in humans. This paper provides an overview of BOLD-MRI studies performed in patients suffering from essential hypertension or chronic kidney disease (CKD. In line with animal studies, acute changes in cortical and medullary oxygenation have been observed after the administration of medication (furosemide, blockers of the renin-angiotensin system or alterations in sodium intake in these patient groups, underlining the important role of renal sodium handling in kidney oxygenation. In contrast, no BOLD-MRI studies have convincingly demonstrated that renal oxygenation is chronically reduced in essential hypertension or in CKD or chronically altered after long-term medication intake. More studies are required to clarify this discrepancy and to further unravel the role of renal oxygenation in the development and progression of essential hypertension and CKD in humans.

  2. Depressive Symptoms in Children with Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogon, Amy J; Matheson, Matthew B; Flynn, Joseph T; Gerson, Arlene C; Warady, Bradley A; Furth, Susan L; Hooper, Stephen R

    2016-01-01

    To assess depression in children with chronic kidney disease and to determine associations with patient characteristics, intellectual and educational levels, and health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Subjects aged 6-17 years from the Chronic Kidney Disease in Children cohort study completed the Children's Depression Inventory (CDI), Wechsler Abbreviated Scales of Intelligence, Wechsler Individual Achievement Test-II-Abbreviated, and the Pediatric Inventory of Quality of Life Core Scales 4.0. Regression analyses determined associations of CDI score and depression status with subject characteristics, intellectual and educational levels, and HRQoL. A joint linear mixed model and Weibull model were used to determine the effects of CDI score on longitudinal changes in glomerular filtration rate and time to renal replacement therapy. A total of 344 subjects completed the CDI. Eighteen (5%) had elevated depressive symptoms, and another 7 (2%) were being treated for depression. In adjusted analyses, maternal education beyond high school was associated with 5% lower CDI scores (estimate, 0.95; 95% CI, 0.92-0.99). Depression status was associated with lower IQ (99 vs 88; P = .053), lower achievement (95 vs 77.5; P Children with depression had lower psychoeducational skills and worse HRQoL. Identifying and treating depression should be evaluated as a means of improving the academic performance and HRQoL of children with chronic kidney disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Diabetes mellitus, pulmonary tuberculosis and chronic calcific ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The prevalence of chronic calcific pancreatitis (CCP) was determined in 25 successive patients with both diabetes mellitus and newly diagnosed pulmonary tuberculosis. Twenty patients (80%) were alcoholics and all were black. Of these, 9 (45%) had CCP. In only 3 of these 9 patients was the history compatible with the ...

  4. 75 FR 39699 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-12

    ..., Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolic Research; 93.848, Digestive Diseases and Nutrition Research; 93.849... Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel, Digestive Diseases and Nutrition Mentored Applications Review...

  5. 78 FR 63994 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-25

    .... 93.847, Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolic Research; 93.848, Digestive Diseases and Nutrition... Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Nutrition and Metabolism-Related Ancillary Studies. Date...

  6. Tinospora cordifolia consumption ameliorates changes in kidney chondroitin sulphate/dermatan sulphate in diabetic rats

    OpenAIRE

    Joladarashi, Darukeshwara; Chilkunda, Nandini D.; Salimath, Paramahans V.

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes is known to alter kidney extracellular matrix (ECM) components. Chondroitin sulphate (CS)/dermatan sulphate (DS), an ECM component, which plays an essential role in kidney is altered during diabetes. The focus of this study has been to examine the effect of Tinospora cordifolia (TC) consumption, a potent plant widely used to treat diabetes, on kidney CS/DS. Experimentally induced diabetic rats were fed with diet containing TC at 2·5 and 5 % levels and the effect of it on kidney CS/DS...

  7. The definition, classification, and prognosis of chronic kidney disease : a KDIGO Controversies Conference report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levey, Andrew S.; de Jong, Paul E.; Coresh, Josef; El Nahas, Meguid; Astor, Brad C.; Matsushita, Kunihiro; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Kasiske, Bertram L.; Eckardt, Kai-Uwe

    The definition and classification for chronic kidney disease was proposed by the National Kidney Foundation Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative (NKF-KDOQI) in 2002 and endorsed by the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) in 2004. This framework promoted increased attention to

  8. Neurocognitive Outcomes in Children with Chronic Kidney Disease: Current Findings and Contemporary Endeavors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerson, Arlene C.; Butler, Robert; Moxey-Mims, Marva; Wentz, Alicia; Shinnar, Shlomo; Lande, Marc B.; Mendley, Susan R.; Warady, Bradley A.; Furth, Susan L.; Hooper, Stephen R.

    2006-01-01

    Given the rise in chronic kidney disease (CKD) in both children and adults, CKD has recently been targeted as a public health priority. Childhood onset kidney disease is generally a noncurable and progressive condition that leads to kidney failure by early adulthood. Fortunately, improved identification of kidney problems allows for early…

  9. K/DOQI clinical practice guidelines for chronic kidney disease: Evaluation, classification, and stratification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levey, Andrew S.; Coresh, Josef; Bolton, Kline; Culleton, Bruce; Harvey, Kathy Schiro; Ikizler, T. Alp; Johnson, Cynda Ann; Kausz, Annamaria; Kimmel, Paul L.; Kusek, John; Levin, Adeera; Minaker, Kenneth L.; Nelson, Robert; Rennke, Helmut; Steffes, Michael; Witten, Beth; Hogg, Ronald J.; Furth, Susan; Lemley, Kevin V.; Portman, Ronald J.; Schwartz, George; Lau, Joseph; Balk, Ethan; Perrone, Ronald D.; Karim, Tauqeer; Rayan, Lara; Al-Massry, Inas; Chew, Priscilla; Astor, Brad C.; De Vine, Deirdre; Eknoyan, Garabed; Levin, Nathan; Burrows-Hudson, Sally; Keane, William; Kliger, Alan; Latos, Derrick; Mapes, Donna; Oberley, Edith; Willis, Kerry; Bailie, George; Becker, Gavin; Burrowes, Jerrilynn; Churchill, David; Collins, Allan; Couser, William; de Zeeuw, Dick; Garber, Alan; Golper, Thomas; Gotch, Frank; Gotto, Antonio; Greer, Joel W.; Grimm Jr., Richard; Hannah, Ramon G.; Acosta, Jaime Herrera; Hogg, Ronald; Hunsicker, Lawrence; Klag, Michael; Klahr, Saulo; Lewis, Caya; Lowrie, Edmund; Matas, Arthur; McCulloch, Sally; Michael, Maureen; Nally, Joseph V.; Newmann, John M.; Nissenson, Allen; Norris, Keith; Owen Jr., William; Patel, Thakor G.; Payne, Glenda; Rivera-Mizzoni, Rosa A.; Smith, David; Star, Robert; Steinman, Theodore; Valderrabano, Fernando; Walls, John; Wauters, Jean-Pierre; Wenger, Nanette; Briggs, Josephine

    2002-01-01

    Introduction: Chronic kidney disease as a public health problem. Chronic kidney disease is a worldwide public health problem. In the United States, there is a rising incidence and prevalence of kidney failure, with poor outcomes and high cost. There is an even higher prevalence of earlier stages of

  10. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging of kidneys in patients with chronic kidney disease: initial study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Xueqin; Fang, Wenqiang; Ling, Huawei; Chai, Weimin; Chen, Kemin

    2010-01-01

    To prospectively evaluate the feasibility of diffusion-weighted (DW) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the assessment of renal function in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Seventy-two healthy volunteers and 43 patients underwent coronal echo-planar DW MR imaging of the kidneys with a single breath-hold time of 16 s. The patients were grouped according to five stages as indicated by the K/DOQI CKD (kidney disease outcome quality initiative). The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value of the kidneys was calculated with high b values (b = 500 s/mm 2 ). The ADC values were compared between patients and healthy volunteers, and among different stages. For statistical analysis, Student's t tests, ANOVA, Pearson's correlation tests, and Spearman's correlation tests were used. No difference between the cortex and medulla could be observed on DW images of all volunteers. Patients with CKD had significantly lower renal ADC (t = -4.383, P = 0.000) than volunteers. The ADC values of kidneys were significantly lower than normal at most stages of CKD, except CKD1. There was a negative correlation between the ADCs and serum creatinine (sCr) level (P = 0.000) amongst the patients. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging is feasible in the assessment of renal function, especially in the detection of early stage renal failure of CKD. (orig.)

  11. Chronic Kidney Disease Awareness Among Individuals with Clinical Markers of Kidney Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plantinga, Laura C.; Hsu, Chi-yuan; Jordan, Regina; Burrows, Nilka Ríos; Hedgeman, Elizabeth; Yee, Jerry; Saran, Rajiv; Powe, Neil R.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Awareness of chronic kidney disease (CKD) among providers and patients is low. Whether clinical cues prompt recognition of CKD is unknown. We examined whether markers of kidney disease that should trigger CKD recognition among providers are associated with higher individual CKD awareness. Design, setting, participants, & measurements CKD awareness was assessed in 1852 adults with an estimated GFR kidneys?” Participants were grouped by distribution of the following abnormal markers of CKD: hyperkalemia, acidosis, hyperphosphatemia, elevated blood urea nitrogen, anemia, albuminuria, and uncontrolled hypertension. Odds of CKD awareness associated with each abnormal marker and groupings of markers were estimated by multivariable logistic regression. Results Among individuals with kidney disease, only those with albuminuria had greater odds of CKD awareness (adjusted odds ratio, 4.0, P disease. Conclusions Although individuals who manifest many markers of kidney dysfunction are more likely to be aware of their CKD, their CKD awareness remains low. A better understanding of mechanisms of awareness is required to facilitate earlier detection of CKD and implement therapy to minimize associated complications. PMID:21784832

  12. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging of kidneys in patients with chronic kidney disease: initial study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Xueqin; Fang, Wenqiang; Ling, Huawei; Chai, Weimin; Chen, Kemin [Ruijin Hospital Shanghai, Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Shanghai (China)

    2010-04-15

    To prospectively evaluate the feasibility of diffusion-weighted (DW) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the assessment of renal function in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Seventy-two healthy volunteers and 43 patients underwent coronal echo-planar DW MR imaging of the kidneys with a single breath-hold time of 16 s. The patients were grouped according to five stages as indicated by the K/DOQI CKD (kidney disease outcome quality initiative). The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value of the kidneys was calculated with high b values (b = 500 s/mm{sup 2}). The ADC values were compared between patients and healthy volunteers, and among different stages. For statistical analysis, Student's t tests, ANOVA, Pearson's correlation tests, and Spearman's correlation tests were used. No difference between the cortex and medulla could be observed on DW images of all volunteers. Patients with CKD had significantly lower renal ADC (t = -4.383, P = 0.000) than volunteers. The ADC values of kidneys were significantly lower than normal at most stages of CKD, except CKD1. There was a negative correlation between the ADCs and serum creatinine (sCr) level (P = 0.000) amongst the patients. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging is feasible in the assessment of renal function, especially in the detection of early stage renal failure of CKD. (orig.)

  13. Nonsteroidal Mineralocorticoid Receptor Antagonist Finerenone Protects Against Acute Kidney Injury-Mediated Chronic Kidney Disease: Role of Oxidative Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lattenist, Lionel; Lechner, Sebastian M; Messaoudi, Smail; Le Mercier, Alan; El Moghrabi, Soumaya; Prince, Sonia; Bobadilla, Norma A; Kolkhof, Peter; Jaisser, Frédéric; Barrera-Chimal, Jonatan

    2017-05-01

    Acute kidney injury induced by ischemia/reperfusion (IR) is a frequent complication in hospitalized patients. Mineralocorticoid receptor antagonism has shown to be helpful against renal IR consequences; however, the potential benefit of novel nonsteroidal mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists such as finerenone has to be further explored. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of finerenone to prevent the acute and chronic consequences of ischemic acute kidney injury. For the acute study (24 hours), 18 rats were divided into sham, bilateral renal ischemia of 25 minutes, and rats that received 3 doses of finerenone at 48, 24, and 1 hour before the ischemia. For the chronic study (4 months), 23 rats were divided into sham, rats that underwent 45 minutes of bilateral ischemia, and rats treated with finerenone at days 2 and 1 and 1 hour before IR. We found that after 24 hours of reperfusion, the untreated IR rats presented kidney dysfunction and tubular injury. Kidney injury molecule-1 and neutrophil gelatinase associated to lipolacin mRNA levels were increased. In contrast, the rats treated with finerenone displayed normal kidney function and significantly lesser tubular injury and kidney injury molecule-1 and neutrophil gelatinase associated to lipolacin levels. After 4 months, the IR rats developed chronic kidney disease, evidenced by kidney dysfunction, increased proteinuria and renal vascular resistance, tubular dilation, extensive tubule-interstitial fibrosis, and an increase in kidney transforming growth factor-β and collagen-I mRNA. The transition from acute kidney injury to chronic kidney disease was fully prevented by finerenone. Altogether, our data show that in the rat, finerenone is able to prevent acute kidney injury induced by IR and the chronic and progressive deterioration of kidney function and structure. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. The Promise of Systems Biology for Diabetic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosius, Frank C; Ju, Wenjun

    2018-03-01

    Diabetic kidney disease (DKD) has a complex and prolonged pathogenesis involving many cell types in the kidney as well as extrarenal factors. It is clinically silent for many years after the onset of diabetes and usually progresses over decades. Given this complexity, a comprehensive and unbiased molecular approach is best suited to help identify the most critical mechanisms responsible for progression of DKD and those most suited for targeted intervention. Systems biological investigations provide such an approach since they examine the entire network of molecular changes that occur in a disease process in a comprehensive way instead of focusing on a single abnormal molecule or pathway. Systems biological studies can also start with analysis of the disease in humans, not in animal or cell culture models that often poorly reproduce the changes in human DKD. Indeed, in the last decade, systems biological approaches have led to the identification of critical molecular abnormalities in DKD and have directly led to development of new biomarkers and potential treatments for DKD. Copyright © 2017 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Australian general practitioners’ current practice for chronic kidney disease (CKD detection and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Ludlow

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Guidelines for early detection of chronic kidney disease (CKD emphasise regular testing of kidney health in high-risk individuals. However, evidence suggests that CKD is not being adequately detected or appropriately managed in primary care. Aims Assess Australian general practitioners’ (GP current practice in relation to CKD detection and management. Methods This was a cross-sectional study utilising a random sample of GPs identified by interrogation of the national online telephone directory, and stratified by geographical location. Data collection occurred between October 2014 and January 2015. Of 2,815 eligible contacts, the final response rate was 23 per cent. Results Of the 656 respondents, over 90 per cent assessed kidney health at least annually in people with diabetes or high blood pressure, and 71 per cent correctly assessed kidney health every 3–6 months in a patient with Stage 3b CKD. The tests most commonly used to assess kidney health were serum creatinine (with eGFR, blood pressure and urine albumin creatinine ratio. The most commonly reported CKD management strategies were ‘blood pressure reduction using pharmacological agents’ (81 per cent and ‘glycaemic control if diabetes present’ (64 per cent. Knowledge testing highlighted that 32 per cent of respondents were not able to correctly identify how to properly assess absolute cardiovascular risk, and this was significantly more common in more experienced GPs (p=0.003. Conclusion The results indicate that Australian GPs are mainly practising in accordance with current guidelines for detection and management of patients with CKD, but with room for improvement in some areas

  16. Diagnostic accuracy of contrast-enhanced ultrasound for characterization of kidney lesions in patients with and without chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Emily Hueywen; Chong, Wui Kheong; Kasoji, Sandeep Kumar; Fielding, Julia Rose; Altun, Ersan; Mullin, Lee B; Kim, Jung In; Fine, Jason Peter; Dayton, Paul Alexander; Rathmell, Wendy Kimryn

    2017-08-09

    Patients with chronic kidney disease are at increased risk of cystic kidney disease that requires imaging monitoring in many cases. However, these same patients often have contraindications to contrast-enhanced computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. This study evaluates the accuracy of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS), which is safe for patients with chronic kidney disease, for the characterization of kidney lesions in patients with and without chronic kidney disease. We performed CEUS on 44 patients, both with and without chronic kidney disease, with indeterminate or suspicious kidney lesions (both cystic and solid). Two masked radiologists categorized lesions using CEUS images according to contrast-enhanced ultrasound adapted criteria. CEUS designation was compared to histology or follow-up imaging in cases without available tissue in all patients and the subset with chronic kidney disease to determine sensitivity, specificity and overall accuracy. Across all patients, CEUS had a sensitivity of 96% (95% CI: 84%, 99%) and specificity of 50% (95% CI: 32%, 68%) for detecting malignancy. Among patients with chronic kidney disease, CEUS sensitivity was 90% (95% CI: 56%, 98%), and specificity was 55% (95% CI: 36%, 73%). CEUS has high sensitivity for identifying malignancy of kidney lesions. However, because specificity is low, modifications to the classification scheme for contrast-enhanced ultrasound could be considered as a way to improve contrast-enhanced ultrasound specificity and thus overall performance. Due to its sensitivity, among patients with chronic kidney disease or other contrast contraindications, CEUS has potential as an imaging test to rule out malignancy. This trial was registered in clinicaltrials.gov, NCT01751529 .

  17. Prevalence of chronic kidney disease among patients undergoing transradial percutaneous coronary interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Mohammad A; Quinlan, Amy; Heck-Kanellidis, Jennifer; Calderon, Dawn; Patel, Tejas; Gandhi, Bhavika; Patel, Shrinil; Hetavi, Mahida; Costanzo, Eric J; Cosentino, James; Patel, Chirag; Dewan, Asa; Kuo, Yen-Hong; Salman, Loay; Vachharajani, Tushar J

    2018-03-01

    While transradial approach to conduct percutaneous coronary interventions offers multiple advantages, the procedure can cause radial artery damage and occlusion. Because radial artery is the preferred site for the creation of an arteriovenous fistula to provide dialysis, patients with chronic kidney disease are particularly dependent on radial artery for their long-term survival. In this retrospective study, we investigated the prevalence of chronic kidney disease in patients undergoing coronary interventions via radial artery. Stage of chronic kidney disease was based on estimated glomerular filtration rate and National Kidney Foundation - Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative guidelines. A total of 497 patients undergoing transradial percutaneous coronary interventions were included. Over 70.4% (350/497) of the patients had chronic kidney disease. Stage II chronic kidney disease was observed in 243 (69%) patients (estimated glomerular filtration rate = 76.0 ± 8.4 mL/min). Stage III was observed in 93 (27%) patients (estimated glomerular filtration rate = 49 ± 7.5 mL/min). Stage IV chronic kidney disease was observed in 5 (1%) patients (estimated glomerular filtration rate = 25.6 ± 4.3 mL/min) and Stage V chronic kidney disease was observed in 9 (3%) patients (estimated glomerular filtration rate = 9.3 ± 3.5 mL/min). Overall, 107 of 350 patients (30%) had advanced chronic kidney disease, that is, stage III-V chronic kidney disease. Importantly, 14 of the 107 (13%) patients had either stage IV or V chronic kidney disease. This study finds that nearly one-third of the patients undergoing transradial percutaneous coronary interventions have advanced chronic kidney disease. Because many of these patients may require dialysis, the use of radial artery to conduct percutaneous coronary interventions must be carefully considered in chronic kidney disease population.

  18. Glycaemic changes in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De'Marziani, Guillermo; Soler Pujol, Gervasio; Obregón, Liliana Miriam; Morales, Elisa Mabel; Gonzalez, Claudio Daniel; Gonzalez Paganti, Luciana; Cacciagiú, Leonardo; Lopez, Graciela; Schreier, Laura; Elbert, Alicia

    2016-01-01

    In Argentina, there have been no studies aimed at establishing the prevalence of dysglycaemia (impaired fasting glucose [IFG], impaired glucose tolerance [IGT] and diabetes mellitus [DM]) in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Our group decided to conduct an observational study to evaluate the frequency with oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in CKD patients with no previous data for dysglycaemia in their medical records. OGTT was performed in 254 patients (60.62% male) with stage 3, 4 and 5 CKD under conservative treatment, haemodialysis or transplantation. Results for DM were found in 10 patients according to fasting glucose alone (3.94%; 95% CI: 1.35-6.53%), 11 patients with exclusively the second hour criterion (4.33%; 95% CI: 1.63-7.03%), 15 with both criteria (5.91%; 95% CI: 2.81-9.00%) and 36 patients with at least one criteria (14.17%; 95% CI: 9.69-18.66%). In a multivariate analysis, DM was associated with waist circumference (OR=1.033 per cm; 95% CI, 1.005 to 1.062; P=.019) and with conservative treatment vs. replacement therapy (OR=0.41; 95% CI: 0.19-0.92; P=.028). IGT was evident in 24.6% and 20.3 on conservative vs. replacement therapy, with no statistically significant difference. IFG (ADA criteria) was 19.75 vs. 9.24% in conservative vs. replacement therapy, with a statistically significant difference. OGTT is suggested for all CKD patients since it is able to detect the full range of unknown dysglycaemias, which avoids underdiagnoses and favours performing treatments to prevent progression in DM risk groups (IFG and/or IGT). It also aids in the selection of the most appropriate medication for transplantation or treatment initiation in new cases of undiagnosed DM to decrease morbidity and mortality. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Nefrología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. The Intron 4 Polymorphism in the Calcium-Sensing Receptor Gene in Diabetes Mellitus and its Chronic Complications, Diabetic Nephropathy and Non-Diabetic Renal Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viera Železníková

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Calcium-Sensing Receptor (CaSR significantly affects calcium-phosphate metabolism in kidneys, and it is implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus (DM due to its expression in pancreatic F-cells. The role of CaSR as one of the players in pathogenesis of chronic kidney disease (CKD has been speculated. Methods: 158 Type 2 diabetic patients divided into three groups according to occurrence and type of kidney complications, 66 nondiabetic patients CKD, and 93 healthy subjects were enrolled into the study to analyze the role of two CaSR polymorphisms (in the codon 990 and in the intron 4 in ethiopathogenesis of DM and CKD. The Type 2 diabetic groups consisted of 48 patients without any kidney abnormalities, 58 patients with diabetic nephropathy (DN, and 52 patients with nondiabetic renal disease (NDRD. The distribution of genotype and allele frequencies was studied using PCR with the TaqMan Discrimination Assay or followed by the Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism method, respectively. Results: We have found that the intron 4 polymorphism is a risk factor for the development of DM and CKD, except DN, while the codon 990 does not show any disease association. Conclusion: We conclude that CaSR is a general factor in pancreas and kidney pathologies. i 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel

  20. Chronic kidney disease: identification and management in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Simon Ds; Blakeman, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is an important and common noncommunicable condition globally. In national and international guidelines, CKD is defined and staged according to measures of kidney function that allow for a degree of risk stratification using commonly available markers. It is often asymptomatic in its early stages, and early detection is important to reduce future risk. The risk of cardiovascular outcomes is greater than the risk of progression to end-stage kidney disease for most people with CKD. CKD also predisposes to acute kidney injury - a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Although only a small proportion of people with CKD progress to end-stage kidney disease, renal replacement therapy (dialysis or transplantation) represents major costs for health care systems and burden for patients. Efforts in primary care to reduce the risks of cardiovascular disease, acute kidney injury, and progression are therefore required. Monitoring renal function is an important task, and primary care clinicians are well placed to oversee this aspect of care along with the management of modifiable risk factors, particularly blood pressure and proteinuria. Good primary care judgment is also essential in making decisions about referral for specialist nephrology opinion. As CKD commonly occurs alongside other conditions, consideration of comorbidities and patient wishes is important, and primary care clinicians have a key role in coordinating care while adopting a holistic, patient-centered approach and providing continuity. This review aims to summarize the vital role that primary care plays in predialysis CKD care and to outline the main considerations in its identification, monitoring, and clinical management in this context.

  1. How do primary care doctors in England and Wales code and manage people with chronic kidney disease? Results from the National Chronic Kidney Disease Audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Lois G; Cleary, Faye; Wheeler, David C; Caplin, Ben; Nitsch, Dorothea; Hull, Sally A

    2017-10-16

    In the UK, primary care records are electronic and require doctors to ascribe disease codes to direct care plans and facilitate safe prescribing. We investigated factors associated with coding of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in patients with reduced kidney function and the impact this has on patient management. We identified patients meeting biochemical criteria for CKD (two estimated glomerular filtration rates 90 days apart) from 1039 general practitioner (GP) practices in a UK audit. Clustered logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with coding for CKD and improvement in coding as a result of the audit process. We investigated the relationship between coding and five interventions recommended for CKD: achieving blood pressure targets, proteinuria testing, statin prescription and flu and pneumococcal vaccination. Of 256 000 patients with biochemical CKD, 30% did not have a GP CKD code. Males, older patients, those with more severe CKD, diabetes or hypertension or those prescribed statins were more likely to have a CKD code. Among those with continued biochemical CKD following audit, these same characteristics increased the odds of improved coding. Patients without any kidney diagnosis were less likely to receive optimal care than those coded for CKD [e.g. odds ratio for meeting blood pressure target 0.78 (95% confidence interval 0.76-0.79)]. Older age, male sex, diabetes and hypertension are associated with coding for those with biochemical CKD. CKD coding is associated with receiving key primary care interventions recommended for CKD. Increased efforts to incentivize CKD coding may improve outcomes for CKD patients. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA.

  2. Natural course of kidney function in Type 2 diabetic patients with diabetic nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, P K; Rossing, P; Nielsen, F S

    1999-01-01

    AIMS: To determine the natural course of kidney function and to evaluate the impact of putative progression promoters in Caucasian Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) patients with diabetic nephropathy who had never received any antihypertensive treatment. METHODS: A long-term observational study of 13...... normotensive to borderline hypertensive Type 2 DM patients with diabetic nephropathy. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was measured approximately every year (51Cr-EDTA plasma clearance technique). Albuminuria, blood pressure (BP) and haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) was determined 2-4 times per year and serum...

  3. Role of TGF-alpha in the progression of diabetic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuer, Josef G; Harlan, Shannon M; Yang, Derek D; Jaqua, Dianna L; Boyles, Jeffrey S; Wilson, Jonathan M; Heinz-Taheny, Kathleen M; Sullivan, John M; Wei, Tao; Qian, Hui-Rong; Witcher, Derrick R; Breyer, Matthew D

    2017-06-01

    Transforming growth factor-alpha (TGFA) has been shown to play a role in experimental chronic kidney disease associated with nephron reduction, while its role in diabetic kidney disease (DKD) is unknown. We show here that intrarenal TGFA mRNA expression, as well as urine and serum TGFA, are increased in human DKD. We used a TGFA neutralizing antibody to determine the role of TGFA in two models of renal disease, the remnant surgical reduction model and the uninephrectomized (uniNx) db/db DKD model. In addition, the contribution of TGFA to DKD progression was examined using an adeno-associated virus approach to increase circulating TGFA in experimental DKD. In vivo blockade of TGFA attenuated kidney disease progression in both nondiabetic 129S6 nephron reduction and Type 2 diabetic uniNx db/db models, whereas overexpression of TGFA in uniNx db/db model accelerated renal disease. Therapeutic activity of the TGFA antibody was enhanced with renin angiotensin system inhibition with further improvement in renal parameters. These findings suggest a pathologic contribution of TGFA in DKD and support the possibility that therapeutic administration of neutralizing antibodies could provide a novel treatment for the disease. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  4. Association Between Inflammatory Markers and Progression to Kidney Dysfunction: Examining Different Assessment Windows in Patients With Type 1 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Nathaniel L; Hunt, Kelly J; Stevens, Danielle R; Jarai, Gabor; Rosen, Glenn D; Klein, Richard L; Virella, Gabriel; Lopes-Virella, Maria F

    2018-01-01

    To determine whether biomarkers of inflammation and endothelial dysfunction are associated with the development of kidney dysfunction and the time frame of their association. Biomarkers were measured at four time points during 28 years of treatment and follow-up in patients with type 1 diabetes in the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial/Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications (DCCT/EDIC) cohort. In addition to traditional biomarkers of inflammation (C-reactive protein and fibrinogen), we measured interleukin-6 (IL-6) and soluble tumor necrosis factor receptors 1 and 2 (sTNFR-1/2), markers of endothelial dysfunction (soluble intracellular adhesion molecule-1, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, and E-selectin [sE-selectin]), and fibrinolysis (total and active plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 [PAI-1]). Renal outcomes were defined as progression to incident chronic kidney disease (stage 3 or more severe) or macroalbuminuria (albumin excretion rate ≥300 mg/24 h). Prospective multivariate event-time analyses were used to determine the association of each biomarker with each subsequent event within prespecified intervals (3-year and 10-year windows). Multivariate event-time models indicated that several markers of inflammation (sTNFR-1/2), endothelial dysfunction (sE-selectin), and clotting/fibrinolysis (fibrinogen and PAI-1) are significantly associated with subsequent development of kidney dysfunction. Although some markers showed variations in the associations between the follow-up windows examined, the results indicate that biomarkers (sTNFR-1/2, sE-selectin, PAI-1, and fibrinogen) are associated with progression to chronic kidney disease in both the 3-year and the 10-year windows. Plasma markers of inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, and clotting/fibrinolysis are associated with progression to kidney dysfunction in type 1 diabetes during both short-term and long-term follow-up. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  5. Hospital specific factors affect quality of blood pressure treatment in chronic kidney disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuilen, A.D. van; Blankestijn, P.J.; Buren, M. van; Dam, M.A. ten; Kaasjager, K.A.; Ligtenberg, G.; Sijpkens, Y.W.; Sluiter, H.E.; Ven, P.J. van der; Vervoort, G.M.M.; Vleming, L.; Bots, M.L.; Wetzels, J.F.M.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Blood pressure (BP) is the most important modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular (CV) disease and progression of kidney dysfunction in patients with chronic kidney disease. Despite extensive antihypertensive treatment possibilities, adequate control is notoriously hard to achieve.

  6. Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Kidney Cancer Risk: A Retrospective Cohort Analysis of the National Health Insurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Chin-Hsiao

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the association between incidence of any kidney cancer and type 2 diabetes mellitus. A random sample of 1,000,000 subjects covered by the National Health Insurance was recruited. A total of 998728 people (115655 diabetes and 883073 non-diabetes) without kidney cancer at recruitment were followed from 2003 to 2005. The cumulative incidence of kidney cancer from 2003 to 2005 in diabetic patients and non-diabetic people in all ages and in age kidney cancer with regards to diabetes status and diabetes duration (as a continuous variable or categorized into subgroups of non-diabetes, diabetes duration kidney cancer in the diabetic patients and the non-diabetic people was 166.9 and 33.1 per 100,000 person-years, respectively. The incidence increased with regards to increasing age in both the diabetic patients and the non-diabetic people, but a higher risk of kidney cancer for the diabetic patients compared to the non-diabetic people was consistently observed in different age groups. After multivariable adjustment, the odds ratio for diabetic patients versus non-diabetic people was 1.7 (95% confidence interval: 1.3-2.1, Pkidney cancer. Additionally, living in metropolitan Taipei region might also be associated with a higher risk of kidney cancer in the non-diabetic people, indicating a potential link between kidney cancer and some factors related to urbanization. Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus have a significantly higher risk of kidney cancer.

  7. Clinical characteristics of chronic kidney disease of nontraditional causes in Salvadoran farming communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Raúl; Orantes, Carlos M; Almaguer, Miguel; Alfonso, Pedro; Bayarre, Héctor D; Leiva, Irma M; Smith, Magaly J; Cubias, Ricardo A; Torres, Carlos G; Almendárez, Walter O; Cubias, Francisco R; Morales, Fabrizio E; Magaña, Salvador; Amaya, Juan C; Perdomo, Edgard; Ventura, Mercedes C; Villatoro, Juan F; Vela, Xavier F; Zelaya, Susana M; Granados, Delmy V; Vela, Eduardo; Orellana, Patricia; Hevia, Reynaldo; Fuentes, E Jackeline; Mañalich, Reinaldo; Bacallao, Raymed; Ugarte, Mario; Arias, María I; Chávez, Jackelin; Flores, Nelson E; Aparicio, Claudia E

    2014-04-01

    Chronic kidney disease is a serious health problem in El Salvador. Since the 1990s, there has been an increase in cases unassociated with traditional risk factors. It is the second leading cause of death in men aged >18 years. In 2009, it was the first cause of in-hospital death for men and the fifth for women. The disease has not been thoroughly studied. Characterize clinical manifestations (including extrarenal) and pathophysiology of chronic kidney disease of nontraditional causes in Salvadoran farming communities. A descriptive clinical study was carried out in 46 participants (36 men, 10 women), identified through chronic kidney disease population screening of 5018 persons. Inclusion criteria were age 18-59 years; chronic kidney disease at stages 2, 3a and 3b, or at 3a and 3b with diabetes or hypertension and without proteinuria; normal fundoscopic exam; no structural abnormalities on renal ultrasound; and HIV-negative. Examinations included social determinants; psychological assessment; clinical exam of organs and systems; hematological and biochemical parameters in blood and urine; urine sediment analysis; markers of renal damage; glomerular and tubular function; and liver, pancreas and lung functions. Renal, prostate and gynecological ultrasound; and Doppler echocardiography and peripheral vascular and renal Doppler ultrasound were performed. Patient distribution by chronic kidney disease stages: 2 (32.6%), 3a (23.9%), 3b (43.5%). Poverty was the leading social determinant observed. Risk factor prevalence: agrochemical exposure (95.7%), agricultural work (78.3%), male sex (78.3%), profuse sweating during work (76.3%), malaria (43.5%), NSAID use (41.3%), hypertension (36.9%), diabetes (4.3%). General symptoms: arthralgia (54.3%), asthenia (52.2%), cramps (45.7%), fainting (30.4). Renal symptoms: nycturia (65.2%), dysuria (39.1%), foamy urine (63%). Markers of renal damage: macroalbuminuria (80.4%), ß2 microglobulin (78.2%), NGAL (26.1%). Renal function

  8. Intermittent hemodialysis in dogs with chronic kidney disease stage III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Melchert

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Intermittent hemodialysis (IHD is a form of renal replacement that is used in veterinary medicine for cases involving drug removal, electrolyte imbalance, acute kidney injury, and chronic kidney disease (CKD. The aim of the present study was to verify the efficacy of IHD in dogs with CKD staged at grade III and to evaluate the effect of IHD on quality of life. Twelve dogs with CKD at stage III met the inclusion criteria and were divided equally into two groups. The control group (n=6 received only clinical treatment and intravenous fluid therapy, and the hemodialysis group (n=6 received clinical and IHD treatments. Blood samples were collected before and after treatments in both groups. We evaluated complications and clinical parameters of IHD every 30 minutes. Hemodialysis decreased serum urea, creatinine, and phosphorus. Despite the evident removal of nitrogen compounds, dialysis treatment did not increase survival time in these patients. The results of this study do not support the early use of dialysis in dogs with chronic kidney disease stage III.

  9. Vitamin D deficiency aggravates chronic kidney disease progression after ischemic acute kidney injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janaína Garcia Gonçalves

    Full Text Available Despite a significant improvement in the management of chronic kidney disease (CKD, its incidence and prevalence has been increasing over the years. Progressive renal fibrosis is present in CKD and involves the participation of several cytokines, including Transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1. Besides cardiovascular diseases and infections, several studies show that Vitamin D status has been considered as a non-traditional risk factor for the progression of CKD. Given the importance of vitamin D in the maintenance of essential physiological functions, we studied the events involved in the chronic kidney disease progression in rats submitted to ischemia/reperfusion injury under vitamin D deficiency (VDD.Rats were randomized into four groups: Control; VDD; ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI; and VDD+IRI. At the 62 day after sham or IRI surgery, we measured inulin clearance, biochemical variables and hemodynamic parameters. In kidney tissue, we performed immunoblotting to quantify expression of Klotho, TGF-β, and vitamin D receptor (VDR; gene expression to evaluate renin, angiotensinogen, and angiotensin-converting enzyme; and immunohistochemical staining for ED1 (macrophages, type IV collagen, fibronectin, vimentin, and α-smooth mucle actin. Histomorphometric studies were performed to evaluate fractional interstitial area.IRI animals presented renal hypertrophy, increased levels of mean blood pressure and plasma PTH. Furthermore, expansion of the interstitial area, increased infiltration of ED1 cells, increased expression of collagen IV, fibronectin, vimentin and α-actin, and reduced expression of Klotho protein were observed. VDD deficiency contributed to increased levels of plasma PTH as well as for important chronic tubulointerstitial changes (fibrosis, inflammatory infiltration, tubular dilation and atrophy, increased expression of TGF-β1 and decreased expression of VDR and Klotho protein observed in VDD+IRI animals.Through inflammatory

  10. Monitoring kidney function in type 2 diabetic patients with incipient and overt diabetic nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossing, Peter; Rossing, Kasper; Gaede, Peter

    2006-01-01

    -EDTA. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: We followed a cohort of 156 microalbuminuric type 2 diabetic patients for 8 years with four measurements of GFR and another cohort of 227 type 2 diabetic patients with overt diabetic nephropathy for 6.5 (range 3-17) years with seven (3-22) measurements of GFR. RESULTS...... is also significantly underestimated with both equations. This makes GFR estimations based upon these equations unacceptable for monitoring kidney function in type 2 diabetic patients with incipient and overt diabetic nephropathy.......OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to assess agreement between glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and the decline in GFR estimated with the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) Study Group equation or the Cockcroft-Gault formula and measured by the plasma clearance of 51Cr...

  11. Diagnosis and Management of Type 2 Diabetic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doshi, Simit M; Friedman, Allon N

    2017-08-07

    Type 2 diabetic kidney disease (DKD) is the most common cause of CKD and ESRD worldwide, and carries with it enormous human and societal costs. The goal of this review is to provide an update on the diagnosis and management of DKD based on a comprehensive review of the medical literature. Topics addressed include the evolving presentation of DKD, clinical differentiation of DKD from non-DKD, a state-of-the-art evaluation of current treatment strategies, and promising emerging treatments. It is expected that the review will help clinicians to diagnose and manage patients with DKD. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  12. Management of Chronic Kidney Disease Patients in the Intensive Care Unit: Mixing Acute and Chronic Illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Rosa, Silvia; Samoni, Sara; Villa, Gianluca; Ronco, Claudio

    2017-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are at high risk for developing critical illness and for admission to intensive care units (ICU). 'Critically ill CKD patients' frequently develop an acute worsening of renal function (i.e. acute-on-chronic, AoC) that contributes to long-term kidney dysfunction, potentially leading to end-stage kidney disease (ESKD). An integrated multidisciplinary effort is thus necessary to adequately manage the multi-organ damage of those kidney patients and contemporaneously reduce the progression of kidney dysfunction when they are critically ill. The aim of this review is to describe (1) the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the development of AoC kidney dysfunction and its role in the progression toward ESKD; (2) the most common clinical presentations of critical illness among CKD/ESKD patients; and (3) the continuum of care for CKD/ESKD patients from maintenance hemodialysis/peritoneal dialysis to acute renal replacement therapy performed in ICU and, vice-versa, for AoC patients who develop ESKD. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Serum Bicarbonate and Kidney Disease Progression and Cardiovascular Outcome in Patients With Diabetic Nephropathy : A Post Hoc Analysis of the RENAAL (Reduction of End Points in Non-Insulin-Dependent Diabetes With the Angiotensin II Antagonist Losartan) Study and IDNT (Irbesartan Diabetic Nephropathy Trial)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schutte, Elise; Heerspink, Hiddo J. Lambers; Lutgers, Helen L.; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Vart, Priya; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H. R.; Umanath, Kausik; Lewis, Julia B.; de Zeeuw, Dick; Gansevoort, Ron T.

    Background: Low serum bicarbonate level has been reported to be an independent predictor of kidney function decline and mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease. Mechanisms underlying low serum bicarbonate levels may differ in patients with and without diabetes. We aimed to specifically

  14. Extracellular microRNA signature in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muralidharan, Jagdeesan; Ramezani, Ali; Hubal, Monica; Knoblach, Susan; Shrivastav, Shashi; Karandish, Sara; Scott, Richard; Maxwell, Nirmal; Ozturk, Savas; Beddhu, Srinivasan; Kopp, Jeffrey B; Raj, Dominic S

    2017-06-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are noncoding RNAs that regulate posttranscriptional gene expression. In this study we characterized the circulating and urinary miRNA pattern associated with reduced glomerular filtration rate, using Affymetrix GeneChip miR 4.0 in 28 patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Top miRNA discoveries from the human studies were validated in an Alb/TGFβ mouse model of CKD, and in rat renal proximal tubular cells (NRK52E) exposed to TGFβ1. Plasma and urinary levels of procollagen III N-terminal propeptide and collagen IV were elevated in patients with decreased estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). Expression of 384 urinary and 266 circulatory miRNAs were significantly different between CKD patients with eGFR ≥30 vs. kidney fibrosis, and specific urinary and plasma miRNA profile may have diagnostic and prognostic utility in CKD. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  15. Pubertal development in children with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haffner, Dieter; Zivicnjak, Miroslav

    2017-06-01

    Impairment of pubertal growth and sexual maturation resulting in reduced adult height is an significant complication in children suffering from chronic kidney disease (CKD). Delayed puberty and reduced pubertal growth are most pronounced in children with pre-existing severe stunting before puberty, requiring long-term dialysis treatment, and in transplanted children with poor graft function and high glucocorticoid exposure. In pre-dialysis patients, therapeutic measures to improve pubertal growth are limited and mainly based on the preservation of renal function and the use of growth hormone treatment. In patients with end-stage CKD, early kidney transplantation with steroid withdrawal within 6 months of renal transplantation allows for normal pubertal development in the majority of patients. This review focuses on the underlying pathophysiology and strategies for improving height and development in these patients.

  16. Exploring sleep disorders in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigam, Gaurav; Camacho, Macario; Chang, Edward T; Riaz, Muhammad

    2018-01-01

    Kidney disorders have been associated with a variety of sleep-related disorders. Therefore, researchers are placing greater emphasis on finding the role of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in the development of obstructive sleep apnea and restless legs syndrome. Unfortunately, the presence of other sleep-related disorders with CKDs and non-CKDs has not been investigated with the same clinical rigor. Recent studies have revealed that myriad of sleep disorders are associated with CKDs. Furthermore, there are a few non-CKD-related disorders that are associated with sleep disorders. In this narrative review, we provide a balanced view of the spectrum of sleep disorders (as identified in International Classification of Sleep disorders-3) related to different types of renal disorders prominently including but not exclusively limited to CKD.

  17. Altered magnesium transport in slices of kidney cortex from chemically-induced diabetic rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoskins, B.

    1981-01-01

    The uptake of magnesium-28 was measured in slices of kidney cortex from rats with alloxan-diabetes and from rats with streptozotocin-diabetes of increasing durations. In both forms of chemically-induced diabetes, magnesium-28 uptake by kidney cortex slices was significantly increased over uptake measured in kidney cortex slices from control rats. Immediate institution of daily insulin therapy to the diabetic rats prevented the diabetes-induced elevated uptake of magnesium without controlling blood glucose levels. Late institution of daily insulin therapy was ineffective in restoring the magnesium uptake to control values. These alterations in magnesium uptake occurred prior to any evidence of nephropathy (via the classic indices of proteinuria and increased BUN levels). The implications of these findings, together with our earlier demonstrations of altered calcium transport by kidney cortex slices from chemically-induced diabetic rats, are discussed in terms of disordered divalent cation transport being at least part of the basic pathogenesis underlying diabetic nephropathy

  18. Late Diabetic Complications in Patients with Type 1 Diabetes who Received Simultaneous Pancreas-Kidney Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Mikhaylovna Glazunova

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The aim of this study was to investigate late diabetic complications in patients with Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM who received simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplantation (SPK.Materials and Methods. The study included 16 patients with T1DM who received SPK. All patients underwent clinical examination and diagnostic investigation.Results. After SPK, 93.75% of the patients had a functioning pancreas transplant, and 100% had a functioning kidney transplant within 4–48 months [mean 21 months (10 is revealed; 36. All patients had euglycaemia according to daily monitoring. The mean level of glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c before surgery was 9.1% (range 8.7%–11% and was 5.7% after surgery (5.55%–5.9%; p < 0.0001. The baseline level of insulin was 12.5 μIU/ml (11.4–15.3 μIU/ml and the baseline level of C-peptide was 2.02 ng/ml (1.07–2.77 ng/ml. Normal renal function was observed (glomerular filtration rate 76 ml/min/1.73 m2 (68–90 ml/min/1.73 m2. Other laboratory findings included haemoglobin 127 g/l (120–130 g/l, serum parathyroid hormone 77.5 pg/ml (61–85 pg/ml, serum phosphate 1.2 mmol/l (1.07–1.3 mmol/l and blood pressure 110(100–120/70(64–80 mmHg. In 37.5% of the patients, vitrectomy and additional laser panretinal photocoagulation were performed for proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Other ophthalmological disorders included newly diagnosed cataract (81.25%, secondary cataract (25% that required YAG discission in three pa