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Sample records for diabetes risk factors

  1. Global prevalence and major risk factors of diabetic retinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yau, Joanne W Y; Rogers, Sophie L; Kawasaki, Ryo;

    2012-01-01

    To examine the global prevalence and major risk factors for diabetic retinopathy (DR) and vision-threatening diabetic retinopathy (VTDR) among people with diabetes.......To examine the global prevalence and major risk factors for diabetic retinopathy (DR) and vision-threatening diabetic retinopathy (VTDR) among people with diabetes....

  2. Risk factors for feline diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slingerland, L.I.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304830917

    2008-01-01

    The chapters of Part I of the thesis describe the development of techniques that can be used in the assessment of risk factors for the development of diabetes mellitus (DM) in cats. The hyperglycemic glucose clamp (HGC) was developed for use in conscious cats, equipped with arterial catheters for

  3. Risk factors for developing diabetic foot

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    Julia Estela Willrich Boell

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the present study is to identify the risk factors for developing diabetic foot. A cross-sectional study, with a convenience sample, developed with 70 individuals with diabetes mellitus (DM, registered in three basic health units in the municipality of Florianópolis/SC, Brazil, in the period from November 2010 to May 2011. Biometric data was collected regarding their sociodemographic, health and illness conditions. An assessment of the feet was also carried out. The average participant age was 66.17 years and time with diagnosed disease was under ten years (61.42%. The following risk factors were identified: advanced age; time of DM diagnosis; few years of schooling; overweight/obesity; inadequate diet; physical inactivity; inadequate metabolic control; lack of proper and specific foot care; and arterial hypertension. We conclude that the majority of the population presented one or more risk factors that favor the appearance of foot-related complications. doi: 10.5216/ree.v16i2.20460.

  4. Risk factors of diabetic retinopathy in type 2 diabetic patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI Xiao-ling; WANG Fang; JI Li-nong

    2006-01-01

    Background Advances in treatment have greatly reduced the risk of blindness from this disease, but because diabetes is so common, diabetic retinopathy remains an important problem. The purpose of this study is to investigate the risk factors of diabetic retinopathy (DR) in Chinese type 2 diabetic patients.Methods Totally 746 type 2 diabetic patients were selected for biochemical and clinical characteristics test and examined by the retina-camera for diabetic retinopathy and the average age was 55.9 years old.Results A total of 526 patients was classified as non-DR, 159 patients as non-proliferative-DR and 61 patients as proliferative-DR. Duration of diabetes [(66.09±72.51) months vs (143.71 ±93.27) months vs (174.30±81.91)months, P=0.00], systolic blood pressure [(131.95±47.20) mmHg vs (138.71 ±21.36) mmHg vs (147.58±24.10)mmHg, P=0.01], urine albumin [(32.79± 122.29) mg/L vs (190.96±455.65) mg/L vs (362.00±552.51) mg/L,P=0.00], glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) [(8.68 ± 2.26)% vs (9.42±1.84)% vs (9.42±1.96)%, P=0.04],C-reactive protein (CRP) [(3.19±7.37) mg/L vs (6.36± 23.59) mg/L vs (3.02±4.34) mg/L, P=0.03],high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) [(1.23±0.37) mmol/L vs (1.33±0.35) mmol/L vs (1.24±0.33)mmol/L, P=0.01], uric acid (UA) [(288.51 ±90.85) mmol/L vs (300.29±101.98) mmol/L vs (337.57±115.09)mmol/L, P=0.00], creatinine (CREA) [(84.22±16.31) μmol/L vs (89.35±27.45) μmol/L vs (103.28±48.64)μmol/L, P=0.00], blood urine nitrogen (BUN) [(5.62± 1.62) mmol/L vs (6.55±2.74) mmol/L vs (8.11±3.60)mmol/L, P=0.00] were statistically different among the three groups. Logistic regression analysis showed that diabetic duration and urine albumin were two independent risk factors of DR (the OR values were 1.010 and 1.003 respectively).Conclusions Diabetic duration and urine albumin are two independent risk factors of diabetic retinopathy in elderly type 2 diabetic patients.

  5. RISK FACTOR DIAGNOSTIC SCORE IN DIABETIC FOOT

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    Mohamed Shameem P. M

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Diabetic foot ulcers vary in their clinical presentation and nature of severity and therefore create a challenging problem to the treating surgeon regarding the prediction of the clinical course and the end result of the treatment. Clinical studies have shown that there are certain risk factors for the progression of foot ulcers in diabetics and it may therefore be possible to predict the course of an ulcer foot at presentation itself, thus instituting proper therapy without delay. Spoken otherwise clinical scoring may tell that this particular ulcer is having highest chance of amputation, then one may be able to take an early decision for the same and avoid the septic complications, inconvenience to the patient, long hospital stay and cost of treatments. AIM OF THE STUDY Aim of the study is to evaluate the above-mentioned scoring system in predicting the course the diabetic foot ulcers. MATERIALS AND METHODS 50 patients with Diabetic Foot attending the OPD of Department of Surgery of Government Hospital attached to Calicut Medical College are included in the present study. After thorough history taking and clinical examination, six risk factors like Age, pedal vessels, renal function, neuropathy, radiological findings and ulcers were observed in the patients by giving certain scoring points to each of them. The total number of points scored by the patients at the time of admission or OPD treatment was correlated with the final outcome in these patients, whether leading to amputation or conservative management. All the data was analysed using standard statistical methods. OBSERVATIONS AND RESULTS There were 12 females and 38 males with a female to male ratio 1:3.1. All were aged above 30 years. Twenty-four (48% of them were between 30-60 years and twenty six (52% were above 60 years. 10 patients were treated conservatively with risk score range: 10 to 35. Six had single toe loss with risk score: 25 to 35. Six had multiple toe loss

  6. Pre-Diabetes Non-Modifiable Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Pre-diabetes Non-modifiable Risk Factors Updated:Nov 9,2015 ... This content was last reviewed August 2015. Pre-diabetes • Introduction • About Pre-diabetes • What's the Problem? Intro ...

  7. Genetic risk factors for type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pociot, Flemming; Lernmark, Åke

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes is diagnosed at the end of a prodrome of β-cell autoimmunity. The disease is most likely triggered at an early age by autoantibodies primarily directed against insulin or glutamic acid decarboxylase, or both, but rarely against islet antigen-2. After the initial appearance of one...... of the three stages can differ. Type 1 diabetes could serve as a disease model for organ-specific autoimmune disorders such as coeliac disease, thyroiditis, and Addison's disease, which show similar early markers of a prolonged disease process before clinical diagnosis....... of these autoantibody biomarkers, a second, third, or fourth autoantibody against either islet antigen-2 or the ZnT8 transporter might also appear. The larger the number of β-cell autoantibody types, the greater the risk of rapid progression to clinical onset of diabetes. This association does not necessarily mean...

  8. Diabetic Nephropathy: New Risk Factors and Improvements in Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tziomalos, Konstantinos; Athyros, Vasilios G

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is the leading cause of end-stage renal disease. Patients with diabetic nephropathy have a high cardiovascular risk, comparable to patients with coronary heart disease. Accordingly, identification and management of risk factors for diabetic nephropathy as well as timely diagnosis and prompt management of the condition are of paramount importance for effective treatment. A variety of risk factors promotes the development and progression of diabetic nephropathy, including elevated glucose levels, long duration of diabetes, high blood pressure, obesity, and dyslipidemia. Most of these risk factors are modifiable by antidiabetic, antihypertensive, or lipid-lowering treatment and lifestyle changes. Others such as genetic factors or advanced age cannot be modified. Therefore, the rigorous management of the modifiable risk factors is essential for preventing and delaying the decline in renal function. Early diagnosis of diabetic nephropathy is another essential component in the management of diabetes and its complications such as nephropathy. New markers may allow earlier diagnosis of this common and serious complication, but further studies are needed to clarify their additive predictive value, and to define their cost-benefit ratio. This article reviews the most important risk factors in the development and progression of diabetic nephropathy and summarizes recent developments in the diagnosis of this disease.

  9. Risk factor control is key in diabetic nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Gareth; Maxwell, Alexander P

    2014-02-01

    Prolonged duration of diabetes, poor glycaemic control and hypertension are major risk factors for both diabetic nephropathy and cardiovascular disease. Optimising blood sugar control together with excellent control of blood pressure can reduce the risk of developing diabetic nephropathy. Diabetic nephropathy should be considered in any patient with diabetes when persistent albuminuria develops. Microalbuminuria is the earliest clinically detectable indicator of diabetic nephropathy risk. The majority of patients with diabetic nephropathy are appropriately diagnosed based on elevated urinary albumin excretion and/or reduced 0032-6518 renal function. Patients with type 2 diabetes should have annual urinary ACR measurements from the time of diabetes diagnosis while those with type 1 diabetes should commence five years after diagnosis. Blood pressure lowering to 130/80mmHg and reduction of proteinuria to diabetic nephropathy and reduces the number of cardiovascular events. Drugs that block the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) are effective in reducing proteinuria, managing hypertension and reducing cardiovascular risk. Unless there are clear contraindications or intolerance all patients with diabetic nephropathy should be prescribed an ACEI or ARB. Stopping an ACEI or ARB during intercurrent illness or times of volume depletion is critically important. Patients with diabetic nephropathy should have at least yearly measurements of blood pressure, renal function and urinary ACR.

  10. Potential risk factors for developing diabetes mellitus type 2

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    Živanović Dušica

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a common multifactorial genetic syndrome, which is determined by several genes and environmental factors. The aim of the present study was to investigate the presence of risk factors for developing diabetes type 2 among diabetic individuals and to compare the presence of risk factors among diabetic individuals with and without positive family history for type 2 diabetes. Material and methods This study was conducted in Cuprija during the period from February to June 2002. The case group included 137 individuals having diagnosis type 2 diabetes. The control group included 129 subjects having the following diagnoses: hypertension, angina pectoris, chronic obstructive lung disease, gastric ulcer or duodenal ulcer. All participants were interviewed at the Medical Center Cuprija using structural questionnaire. The data were collected regarding demographic characteristics, exposure to various chemical and physical agents, stress, smoking, obesity, physical inactivity and family history of diabetes. In the statistical analysis chi square test was used. Results The diabetic individuals were statistically significantly older (40 and more years old (p=0,000, and they came from rural areas more frequently (p=0,006 than the individuals without diabetes. Significantly more diabetics had lower educational level (p=0,000 and they were agriculture workers and housewives significantly more frequently (p=0,000 than nondiabetic individuals. Furthermore, obesity (p=0,000 and physical inactivity (p=0,003 were significantly more frequent among the diabetic individuals than the nondiabetics. The diabetic individuals had significanly (p=0,000 more numbers of relatives with diabetes mellitus type 2 than the nondiabetics. The diabetic individuals with positive family history of diabetes were significantly older (p=0,021 and more frequently from urban areas (p=0,018 than the diabetic individuals without the positive family history

  11. Risk factors for major amputation in hospitalised diabetic foot patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namgoong, Sik; Jung, Suyoung; Han, Seung-Kyu; Jeong, Seong-Ho; Dhong, Eun-Sang; Kim, Woo-Kyung

    2016-03-01

    Diabetic foot ulcers are the main cause of non-traumatic lower extremity amputation. The objective of this study was to evaluate the risk factors for major amputation in diabetic foot patients. Eight hundred and sixty diabetic patients were admitted to the diabetic wound centre of the Korea University Guro Hospital for foot ulcers between January 2010 and December 2013. Among them, 837 patients were successfully monitored until complete healing. Ulcers in 809 patients (96·7%) healed without major amputation and those in 28 patients (3·3%) healed with major amputation. Data of 88 potential risk factors including demographics, ulcer condition, vascularity, bioburden, neurology and serology were collected from patients in the two groups and compared. Among the 88 potential risk factors, statistically significant differences between the two groups were observed in 26 risk factors. In the univariate analysis, which was carried out for these 26 risk factors, statistically significant differences were observed in 22 risk factors. In a stepwise multiple logistic analysis, six of the 22 risk factors remained statistically significant. Multivariate-adjusted odds ratios were 11·673 for ulcers penetrating into the bone, 8·683 for dialysis, 6·740 for gastrointestinal (GI) disorders, 6·158 for hind foot ulcers, 0·641 for haemoglobin levels and 1·007 for fasting blood sugar levels. The risk factors for major amputation in diabetic foot patients were bony invasions, dialysis, GI disorders, hind foot locations, low levels of haemoglobin and elevated fasting blood sugar levels.

  12. Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Diseases among Diabetic Patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ethiopian Journal of Health Sciences ... BACKGROUND: Studies on cardiovascular risk factors among diabetic persons in Ethiopia are lacking. The objective of this study ... Female gender, hypertension and fasting blood glucose . 180mg/dl ...

  13. Gestational Diabetes a Risk Factor for Postpartum Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... html Gestational Diabetes a Risk Factor for Postpartum Depression: Study It found chances increased even more if woman had suffered an earlier bout of depression To use the sharing features on this page, ...

  14. A Multivariate Analysis of Risk Factors for Diabetic Nephropathy

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    Anthony Shannon

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper uses multivariate methods on actual data from 267 patients with noninsulin- dependent (Type 2 diabetes mellitus in order to see how the various risk factors can affect the progression of diabetic nephropathy. The approach succeeds in identifying preliminary risk factors such as smoking for males, although the females had higher fasting blood glucose at diagnosis. Not surprisingly, hypertension is common among patients of both sexes and it has an association with proteinuria in female patients in the sample.

  15. Diabetes mellitus type 2 - an independent risk factor for cancer?

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    Grote, V A; Becker, S; Kaaks, R

    2010-01-01

    Epidemiological findings have shown up to two-fold increases in the risks of cancers of the colorectum, breast, endometrium, kidney (renal cell tumours), liver and pancreas among diabetes patients. In the present review, we address the question whether, on the basis of these epidemiological observations, type 2 diabetes should be considered a specific and independent risk factor for these various forms of cancer, due to its particular metabolic characteristics of glucose intolerance and hyperinsulinemia. On the basis of further epidemiological evidence among non-diabetic individuals, as well as recent studies examining the effects of different types of diabetes treatment on cancer risks, we conclude that chronic elevations in fasting and non-fasting blood levels of glucose and/or insulin are plausible independent risk factors for cancer, but that much of the increase in cancer risks associated with these two metabolic factors may occur within the normoglycaemic and insulinemic (non-diabetic) ranges. Furthermore, for some tumour types (e. g. cancer of the endometrium) the associations of risk with type 2 diabetes may to a large extent be due to, and at least partially confounded by, other obesity-related alterations in (e. g. sex steroid) metabolism that in part are independent of glucose and/or insulin metabolism. Specifically for pancreatic cancer, a major question, addressed in detail by other reviews, is whether associations of risk with plasma glucose, insulin or overt type 2 diabetes could be either a cause, or possibly also a consequence of tumour development (or both).

  16. A Study Of Risk Factors Of Diabetes Mellitus

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    Banerjee P

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available A case control study of risk factors of Diabetes Mellitus was carried out among 75 diabetic cases attending the clinic, and an equal number of matched controls from inpatients of the surgical department of R .G Kar Medical College, Calcutta. Diabetes Mellitus was found significantly higher among those persons having family history of similar illness, belonging to the socio-economic class (Kuppuwami’s classification and non-vegetarian dietary habit.

  17. Lifestyle factors and mortality risk in individuals with diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sluik, Diewertje; Boeing, Heiner; Li, Kuanrong

    2014-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Thus far, it is unclear whether lifestyle recommendations for people with diabetes should be different from those for the general public. We investigated whether the associations between lifestyle factors and mortality risk differ between individuals with and without diabetes....... METHODS: Within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC), a cohort was formed of 6,384 persons with diabetes and 258,911 EPIC participants without known diabetes. Joint Cox proportional hazard regression models of people with and without diabetes were built for the following...... lifestyle factors in relation to overall mortality risk: BMI, waist/height ratio, 26 food groups, alcohol consumption, leisure-time physical activity, smoking. Likelihood ratio tests for heterogeneity assessed statistical differences in regression coefficients. RESULTS: Multivariable adjusted mortality risk...

  18. Metabolic factors and genetic risk mediate familial type 2 diabetes risk in the Framingham Heart Study

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    Raghavan, Sridharan; Porneala, Bianca; McKeown, Nicola; Fox, Caroline S.; Dupuis, Josée; Meigs, James B.

    2015-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Type 2 diabetes mellitus in parents is a strong determinant of diabetes risk in their offspring. We hypothesise that offspring diabetes risk associated with parental diabetes is mediated by metabolic risk factors. Methods We studied initially non-diabetic participants of the Framingham Offspring Study. Metabolic risk was estimated using beta cell corrected insulin response (CIR), HOMA-IR or a count of metabolic syndrome components (metabolic syndrome score [MSS]). Dietary risk and physical activity were estimated using questionnaire responses. Genetic risk score (GRS) was estimated as the count of 62 type 2 diabetes risk alleles. The outcome of incident diabetes in offspring was examined across levels of parental diabetes exposure, accounting for sibling correlation and adjusting for age, sex and putative mediators. The proportion mediated was estimated by comparing regression coefficients for parental diabetes with (βadj) and without (βunadj) adjustments for CIR, HOMA-IR, MSS and GRS (percentage mediated = 1 – βadj / βunadj). Results Metabolic factors mediated 11% of offspring diabetes risk associated with parental diabetes, corresponding to a reduction in OR per diabetic parent from 2.13 to 1.96. GRS mediated 9% of risk, corresponding to a reduction in OR per diabetic parent from 2.13 to 1.99. Conclusions/interpretation Metabolic risk factors partially mediated offspring type 2 diabetes risk conferred by parental diabetes to a similar magnitude as genetic risk. However, a substantial proportion of offspring diabetes risk associated with parental diabetes remains unexplained by metabolic factors, genetic risk, diet and physical activity, suggesting that important familial influences on diabetes risk remain undiscovered. PMID:25619168

  19. Potential risk factors for diabetic neuropathy: a case control study

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    Nooraei Mahdi

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diabetes mellitus type II afflicts at least 2 million people in Iran. Neuropathy is one of the most common complications of diabetes and lowers the patient's quality of life. Since neuropathy often leads to ulceration and amputation, we have tried to elucidate the factors that can affect its progression. Methods In this case-control study, 110 diabetic patients were selected from the Shariati Hospital diabetes clinic. Michigan Neuropathic Diabetic Scoring (MNDS was used to differentiate cases from controls. The diagnosis of neuropathy was confirmed by nerve conduction studies (nerve conduction velocity and electromyography. The multiple factors compared between the two groups included consumption of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI, blood pressure, serum lipid level, sex, smoking, method of diabetes control and its quality. Results Statistically significant relationships were found between neuropathy and age, gender, quality of diabetes control and duration of disease (P values in the order: 0.04, 0.04, Conclusion In this study, hyperglycemia was the only modifiable risk factor for diabetic neuropathy. Glycemic control reduces the incidence of neuropathy, slows its progression and improves the diabetic patient's quality of life. More attention must be paid to elderly male diabetic patients with poor diabetes control with regard to regular foot examinations and more practical education.

  20. Modifiable Lifestyle Risk Factors and Incident Diabetes in African Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Joshua J; Echouffo-Tcheugui, Justin B; Talegawkar, Sameera A; Effoe, Valery S; Okhomina, Victoria; Carnethon, Mercedes R; Hsueh, Willa A; Golden, Sherita H

    2017-08-14

    The associations of modifiable lifestyle risk factors with incident diabetes are not well investigated in African Americans (AAs). This study investigated the association of modifiable lifestyle risk factors (exercise, diet, smoking, TV watching, and sleep-disordered breathing burden) with incident diabetes among AAs. Modifiable lifestyle risk factors were characterized among 3,252 AAs in the Jackson Heart Study who were free of diabetes at baseline (2000-2004) using baseline questionnaires and combined into risk factor categories: poor (0-3 points), average (4-7 points), and optimal (8-11 points). Incidence rate ratios (IRR) for diabetes (fasting glucose ≥126 mg/dL, physician diagnosis, use of diabetes drugs, or glycosylated hemoglobin A1c ≥6.5%) were estimated using Poisson regression modeling adjusting for age, sex, education, occupation, systolic blood pressure, and BMI. Outcomes were collected 2005-2012 and data analyzed in 2016. Over 7.6 years, there were 560 incident diabetes cases (mean age=53.3 years, 64% female). An average or optimal compared to poor risk factor categorization was associated with a 21% (IRR=0.79, 95% CI=0.62, 0.99) and 31% (IRR=0.69, 95% CI=0.48, 1.01) lower risk of diabetes. Among participants with BMI <30, IRRs for average or optimal compared to poor categorization were 0.60 (95% CI=0.40, 0.91) and 0.53 (95% CI=0.29, 0.97) versus 0.90 (95% CI=0.67, 1.21) and 0.83 (95% CI=0.51, 1.34) among participants with BMI ≥30. A combination of modifiable lifestyle factors are associated with a lower risk of diabetes among AAs, particularly among those without obesity. Copyright © 2017 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Italian risk factor-based screening for gestational diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrado, F; Pintaudi, B; Di Vieste, G; Interdonato, M L; Magliarditi, M; Santamaria, A; D'Anna, R; Di Benedetto, A

    2014-09-01

    There is a debate about whether universal or risk factors-based screening is most appropriate for gestational diabetes diagnosis. The aim of our retrospective study was to compare in our population the universal screening test recommended by the International Association of Diabetes in Pregnancy Study Group (IADPSG) panel and the American Diabetes Association (ADA) versus the selective screening proposed by the United Kingdom National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence guidelines (NICE) but modified by the Italian National Institute of Health. From May 2010 to October 2011 all consecutive pregnant women were screened for gestational diabetes according to the IADPSG's panel criteria, while all the risk factors for each patient were registered. Of the 1015 pregnant women included in the study, 113 (11%) were diagnosed with gestational diabetes and 26 (23%) of them would not have been identified by the selective screening proposed by the Italian National Institute of Health. However, all the risk factors considered by the selective screening revealed a good predictive role except for maternal age ≥ 35 years (OR: 0.98). In the group without the risk factors considered, it was reported the predictive role for gestational diabetes of prepregnancy BMI and nulliparity. The selective risk factors-based screening proposed by the Italian National Institute of Health has detected 77% of gestational diabetes cases in our population, sparing the oral glucose tolerance test for more than 40% of pregnant women at the same time. More information on the clinical impact of this choice could be obtained by a strict analysis of treatment, perinatal outcome and follow-up of an adequate sample size of "missed" gestational diabetes.

  2. Retinopathy risk factors in type II diabetic patients using factor analysis and discriminant analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Tazhibi, Mahdi; Sarrafzade, Sheida; Amini, Masoud

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Diabetes is one of the most common chronic diseases in the world. Incidence and prevalence of diabetes are increasing in developing countries as well as in Iran. Retinopathy is the most common chronic disorder in diabetic patients. Materials and Methods: In this study, we used the information of diabetic patients’ reports that refer to endocrine and metabolism research center of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences to determine diabetic retinopathy risk factors. We used factor...

  3. Meat Consumption as a Risk Factor for Type 2 Diabetes

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    Neal Barnard

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Disease risk factors identified in epidemiological studies serve as important public health tools, helping clinicians identify individuals who may benefit from more aggressive screening or risk-modification procedures, allowing policymakers to prioritize intervention programs, and encouraging at-risk individuals to modify behavior and improve their health. These factors have been based primarily on evidence from cross-sectional and prospective studies, as most do not lend themselves to randomized trials. While some risk factors are not modifiable, eating habits are subject to change through both individual action and broader policy initiatives. Meat consumption has been frequently investigated as a variable associated with diabetes risk, but it has not yet been described as a diabetes risk factor. In this article, we evaluate the evidence supporting the use of meat consumption as a clinically useful risk factor for type 2 diabetes, based on studies evaluating the risks associated with meat consumption as a categorical dietary characteristic (i.e., meat consumption versus no meat consumption, as a scalar variable (i.e., gradations of meat consumption, or as part of a broader dietary pattern.

  4. Risk factors in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carolino, Idalina Diair Regla; Molena-Fernandes, Carlos Alexandre; Tasca, Raquel Soares; Marcon, Sonia Silva; Cuman, Roberto Kenji Nakamura

    2008-01-01

    This study was carried out to evaluate the risk factors of type 2 diabetic patients through sociodemographic data, habits of health, anthropometric and biochemist profiles, assisted at a basic public health care unit in Maringá, Paraná. Sixty-six patients, 56 women aged over than 50 years-old were interviewed. High prevalence factors for cardiovascular risk were observed, such as: overweight and obesity, hypertension, dyslipidemia, sedentariness and inadequate diet. Data suggested the need for multidisciplinary intervention programs in health care units associated to educative programs, adjusted diet intake and regular physical activity for these diabetic patients.

  5. Job strain as a risk factor for type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyberg, Solja T; Fransson, Eleonor I; Heikkilä, Katriina;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The status of psychosocial stress at work as a risk factor for type 2 diabetes is unclear because existing evidence is based on small studies and is subject to confounding by lifestyle factors, such as obesity and physical inactivity. This collaborative study examined whether stress...... at work, defined as "job strain," is associated with incident type 2 diabetes independent of lifestyle factors. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: We extracted individual-level data for 124,808 diabetes-free adults from 13 European cohort studies participating in the IPD-Work Consortium. We measured job strain...... with baseline questionnaires. Incident type 2 diabetes at follow-up was ascertained using national health registers, clinical screening, and self-reports. We analyzed data for each study using Cox regression and pooled the study-specific estimates in fixed-effect meta-analyses. RESULTS: There were 3,703 cases...

  6. Risk of diabetes according to male factor infertility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glazer, Clara Helene; Bonde, Jens Peter; Giwercman, Aleksander

    2017-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION: Is male factor infertility associated with an increased risk of developing diabetes? SUMMARY ANSWER: The study provides evidence that male factor infertility may predict later occurrence of diabetes mellitus with the risk being related to the severity of the underlying fertility...... problem. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY: Previous cross-sectional studies have shown an increased prevalence of comorbidities among infertile men when compared to controls. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION: In this prospective cohort study, 39 516 men who had since 1994 undergone fertility treatment with their female...... partner were identified from the Danish national IVF register, which includes data on assumed cause of couple infertility (male/female factor, mixed and unexplained infertility) and type of fertility treatment. With a median follow-up time of 5.6 years, each man was followed for diabetes occurrence from...

  7. Comparison of Some Risk Factors for Diabetes Across Different ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of these risk factors with diabetes mellitus among different age groups have also been .... nonparametric tests (Kruskal–Wllis) and parametric tests. (analysis of .... the corresponding values for females were 0.84 and 0.069. The breakdown in ...

  8. Bienestar: A Diabetes Risk-Factor Prevention Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevino, Robert P.; Pugh, Jacqueline A.; Hernandez, Arthur E.; Menchaca, Velma D.; Ramirez, Robert R.; Mendoza, Monica

    1998-01-01

    The Bienestar Health Program is a diabetes risk-factor prevention program targeting Mexican American fourth graders. Program goals are to decrease overweight and dietary fats. The program is based on social cognitive theory and uses culturally relevant material. Preliminary evaluation indicates the program significantly decreases dietary fat,…

  9. Bienestar: A Diabetes Risk-Factor Prevention Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevino, Robert P.; Pugh, Jacqueline A.; Hernandez, Arthur E.; Menchaca, Velma D.; Ramirez, Robert R.; Mendoza, Monica

    1998-01-01

    The Bienestar Health Program is a diabetes risk-factor prevention program targeting Mexican American fourth graders. Program goals are to decrease overweight and dietary fats. The program is based on social cognitive theory and uses culturally relevant material. Preliminary evaluation indicates the program significantly decreases dietary fat,…

  10. Prevalence and risk factors of gestational diabetes mellitus in Yemen

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    Ali AD

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abdullatif D Ali,1 Amat Al-Khaleq O Mehrass,2 Abdulelah H Al-Adhroey,3 Abdulqawi A Al-Shammakh,1 Adel A Amran4 1Department of Biochemistry, 2Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, 3Department of Basic Medical Sciences, 4Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Thamar University, Dhamar, Yemen Purpose: Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM continues to be a significant health disorder triggering harmful complications in pregnant women and fetuses. Our knowledge of GDM epidemiology in Yemen is largely based on very limited data. The aim of this study was, therefore, to determine the prevalence and risk factors of GDM among pregnant women in Dhamar governorate, Yemen.Patients and methods: A total of 311 subjects were randomly selected for this cross sectional survey. Health history data and blood samples were collected using a pretested questionnaire. To determine the prevalence of GDM, the fasting and random blood glucose techniques were applied according to the recommendations of the American Diabetes Association, using alternative methods that are more convenient to the targeted population. Poisson’s regression model incorporating robust sandwich variance was utilized to assess the association of potential risk factors in developing GDM.Results: The prevalence of GDM was found to be 5.1% among the study population. Multivariate analysis confirmed age ≥30 years, previous GDM, family history of diabetes, and history of polycystic ovary syndrome as independent risk factors for GDM prevalence. However, body mass index ≥30 kg/m2 and previous macrosomic baby were found to be dependent risk factors.Conclusion: This study reports new epidemiological information about the prevalence and risk factors of GDM in Yemen. Introduction of proper maternal and neonatal medical care and health education are important in order to save the mother and the baby. Keywords: gestational diabetes mellitus, alternative diagnostic criteria

  11. Risk factors for occurrence and recurrence of diabetic foot ulcers among Iraqi diabetic patients

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    Samer I. Mohammed

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available There are a few studies that discuss the medical causes for diabetic foot (DF ulcerations in Iraq, one of them in Wasit province. The aim of our study was to analyze the medical, therapeutic, and patient risk factors for developing DF ulcerations among diabetic patients in Baghdad, Iraq.

  12. Diabetes mellitus after renal transplantation: characteristics, outcome, and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesco, L; Busson, M; Bedrossian, J; Bitker, M O; Hiesse, C; Lang, P

    1996-05-27

    The incidence and risk factors of posttransplant diabetes mellitus were evaluated in 1325 consecutive renal transplant recipients. Thirty-three (2.5%) patients developed diabetes mellitus requiring insulin therapy. Onset occurred a mean of 5.7 +/- 1.5 months following transplantation. The patients were compared with 33 paired-control kidney recipients. The patients were significantly older than the controls (46.8 +/- 1.9 vs. 40.6 +/- 2.1 years) (Pdiabetes mellitus, the body mass index, ethnic origin, HLA phenotype, and the total doses of steroids and cyclosporine were similar in the two groups. The number of patients with at least one rejection episode was significantly higher among the diabetic patients (21 versus 9) but the number of episodes was similar. Diabetes occurred a mean of 1.1 +/- 0.3 months following rejection treatment. Intravenous pulsed prednisolone was always used for anti-rejection therapy. Insulin was withdrawn in 16 cases after a mean of 4 +/- 1 months, independently of steroid dosage reductions. Actuarial patient and graft survival rates were not significantly different, although 6-year outcome tended to be better in the controls (86% versus 93% for patient survival and 67% versus 93% for graft survival). This study suggests that pulsed steroid therapy might be the critical factor in the onset of posttransplant diabetes and that the risk is increased in older patients with chronic interstitial nephrititis.

  13. Diabetes and other vascular risk factors for dementia : Which factor matters most? A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kloppenborg, Raoul P.; van den Berg, Esther; Kappelle, L. Jaap; Biessels, Geert Jan

    2008-01-01

    Vascular risk factors, such as type 2 diabetes, hypertension, obesity and dyslipidaemia often co-occur. Each of these factors has been associated with an increased risk of dementia, but it is uncertain which factor imposes the greatest risk. Moreover, the effect of age at time of exposure may differ

  14. Diabetes and other vascular risk factors for dementia : Which factor matters most? A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kloppenborg, Raoul P.; van den Berg, Esther; Kappelle, L. Jaap; Biessels, Geert Jan

    2008-01-01

    Vascular risk factors, such as type 2 diabetes, hypertension, obesity and dyslipidaemia often co-occur. Each of these factors has been associated with an increased risk of dementia, but it is uncertain which factor imposes the greatest risk. Moreover, the effect of age at time of exposure may differ

  15. CARDIOVASCULAR RISK FACTORS IN CHILDREN WITH TYPE 1 DIABETES MELLITUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z ABDEYASDAN

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Diabetes melliuts is a chronic, metabolic disease that involves the macro and micro vascular complications and one of its maer ascular cowplications is the cardio vascular disease, as ,the risk of cardiovascular disease is 2-4 folds in diabetic patients in comparison with non diabetic individuals. The researches have demonstrated that the risk factors of the cardio vascular disease are formed at childhood. Therefore the preventive measures must begin from early childhood. So the present study was planned with the goals to determine and compare the cardia-vascular risk factors in the diabetic children with type 1 of diabetes mellitus. Method: This was an analytic, cross sectional study that has been done in two groups (case-control. In this research, 148 children, suffering from the typel diabetes mellitus being supported by the metabolism and endocrine research center, were chosen in the continues case manner and for the control group, 148 children, matched with the study group (according to the age and the sex, at 6-18 years old from the schools in Isfahan city randomly and at 2-6 years from the neiborhoods of the case group. The data-gathering tool was the questionnaires includes lipid profile, blood pressure, weight and height. To analyze the data we used the analytic (t student and logistic regression and descriptive (mean and standard deviation statistic methods and SPSS. Results: Findings revealed that the means of Lipid profile, systolic blood pressure and body mass index had not statistically significant differences in the two groups. But the mean of diastolic blood pressure and the mean arterial blood pressure in the control group were more than the case group and this difference was significant. The mean, 75 and 95 percentiles for cholesterol and LDL in all the age groups, mean, 75 and 95 percentile for triglyceride in all the age groups except the age group of 1-4 years in the diabetic and non diabetic groups were

  16. Relationship of food security with Type 2 diabetes and its risk factors in Tehranian adults

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    Majid Hasan-Ghomi

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: There were no significant differences in food security levels of diabetic and non-diabetic groups. However, some risk factors of type 2 diabetes including sex, marital status, educational level, and obesity were associated with food insecurity.

  17. A Univariate Analysis of Risk Factors for Diabetic Nephropathy

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    Yee Hung Choy

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper uses actual data from 267 patients with non-insulin-dependent (Type 2 diabetes mellitus in order to see how the various risk factors can affect the progression of diabetic nephropathy. Examination of each independent variable individually can only provide a preliminary idea of how important each variable is by itself. The relative importance of all the variables has to be examined simultaneously by multivariate methods. The approach succeeds in identifying preliminary risk factors such as smoking for males, although the females had higher fasting blood glucose at diagnosis. Not surprisingly, hypertension is common among patients of both sexes and it has an association with proteinuria in female patients in the sample.

  18. Diabetic retinopathy, duration of diabetes and risk factors of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Job, D; Eschwège, E; Tchobroutsky, G; Guyot-Argenton, C; Aubry, J P; Dérot, N

    1975-01-01

    The present study, concerning 145 insulin-dependent diabetics showed positive relationships between the severity of retinal disease on the one hand, and body weight, blood pressure, and serum cholesterol level on the other. These relationships remain significant when the duration of the clinical diabetes and the age of the patient are taken into account. Two interpretations are suggested. They are not incompatible. In diabetic subjects, either the increase in blood pressure and serum cholesterol level causes an aggravation of diabetic retinopathy or there exists a common factor at the origin of retinal lesions and of an increase in risk of cardiovascular disease through atherosclerosis.

  19. Mild gestational diabetes as a risk factor for congenital cryptorchidism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Virtanen, Helena E; Tapanainen, Anna E; Kaleva, Marko M

    2006-01-01

    of cryptorchidism, e.g. prematurity and weight for gestational age, abnormal maternal glucose metabolism was significantly more common in the group of cryptorchid boys [diet-treated gestational diabetes, P = 0.0001; odds ratio, 3.98 (95% confidence interval, 1.97-8.05); diet-treated gestational diabetes or only......CONTEXT: Cryptorchidism is the most common malformation in newborn boys. Maternal diabetes has previously been suggested to be a risk factor for this disorder in one epidemiological study. OBJECTIVE: Evaluation of the prevalence of maternal glucose metabolism disorders during pregnancy in newborn...... boys having normal testicular descent or congenital cryptorchidism. DESIGN: Postnatal analysis of maternal history concerning glucose metabolism abnormalities during pregnancy among cryptorchid and healthy Finnish boys. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: The material of this case-control study comprises 1163...

  20. Common familial risk factors for schizophrenia and diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Debra L; Mackinnon, Andrew; Morgan, Vera A; Watts, Gerald F; Castle, David J; Waterreus, Anna; Galletly, Cherrie A

    2016-05-01

    The co-occurrence of type 2 diabetes and psychosis is an important form of medical comorbidity within individuals, but no large-scale study has evaluated comorbidity within families. The aim of this study was to determine whether there is evidence for familial comorbidity between type 2 diabetes and psychosis. Data were analysed from an observational study of a nationally representative sample of 1642 people with psychosis who were in contact with psychiatric services at the time of survey (The 2010 Australian National Survey of Psychosis). Participants were aged 18-64 years and met World Health Organization's International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision diagnostic criteria for a psychotic disorder (857 with schizophrenia, 319 with bipolar disorder with psychotic features, 293 with schizoaffective disorder, 81 with depressive psychosis and 92 with delusional disorder or other non-organic psychoses). Logistic regression was used to estimate the association between a family history of diabetes and a family history of schizophrenia. A positive family history of diabetes was associated with a positive family history of schizophrenia in those with a psychotic disorder (odds ratio = 1.35, p = 0.01, adjusted for age and gender). The association was different in those with an affective versus non-affective psychosis (odds ratio = 0.613, p = 0.019, adjusted for age and gender) and was significant only in those with a non-affective psychosis, specifically schizophrenia (odds ratio = 1.58, p = 0.005, adjusted for age and sex). Adjustment for demographic factors in those with schizophrenia slightly strengthened the association (odds ratio = 1.74, p = 0.001, adjusted for age, gender, diagnosis, ethnicity, education, employment, income and marital status). Elevated risk for type 2 diabetes in people with schizophrenia is not simply a consequence of antipsychotic medication; type 2 diabetes and schizophrenia share familial risk factors. © The Royal Australian and New

  1. Knowledge of risk factors for diabetes or cardiovascular disease (CVD) is poor among individuals with risk factors for CVD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilkenny, Monique F; Dunstan, Libby; Busingye, Doreen; Purvis, Tara; Reyneke, Megan; Orgill, Mary; Cadilhac, Dominique A

    2017-01-01

    There is limited evidence on whether having pre-existing cardiovascular disease (CVD) or risk factors for CVD such as diabetes, ensures greater knowledge of risk factors important for motivating preventative behaviours. Our objective was to compare knowledge among the Australian public participating in a health check program and their risk status. Data from the Stroke Foundation 'Know your numbers' program were used. Staff in community pharmacies provided opportunistic health checks (measurement of blood pressure and diabetes risk assessment) among their customers. Participants were categorised: 1) CVD ± risk of CVD: history of stroke, heart disease or kidney disease, and may have risk factors; 2) risk of CVD only: reported having high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes or atrial fibrillation; and 3) CVD risk free (no CVD or risk of CVD). Multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed including adjustment for age and sex. Among 4,647 participants, 12% had CVD (55% male, 85% aged 55+ years), 47% were at risk of CVD (40% male, 72% 55+ years) and 41% were CVD risk free (33% male, 27% 55+ years). Participants with CVD (OR: 0.66; 95% CI: 0.55, 0.80) or risk factors for CVD (OR: 0.65; 95% CI: 0.57, 0.73) had poorer knowledge of the risk factors for diabetes/CVD compared to those who were CVD risk free. After adjustment, only participants with risk factors for CVD (OR: 0.80; 95% CI: 0.69, 0.93) had poorer knowledge. Older participants (55+ years) and men had poorer knowledge of diabetes/CVD risk factors and complications of diabetes. Participants with poorer knowledge of risk factors were older, more often male or were at risk of developing CVD compared with those who were CVD risk free. Health education in these high risk groups should be a priority, as diabetes and CVD are increasing in prevalence throughout the world.

  2. Diabetes Mellitus and Obesity as Risk Factors for Pancreatic Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eibl, Guido; Cruz-Monserrate, Zobeida; Korc, Murray; Petrov, Maxim S; Goodarzi, Mark O; Fisher, William E; Habtezion, Aida; Lugea, Aurelia; Pandol, Stephen J; Hart, Phil A; Andersen, Dana K

    2017-09-11

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is among the deadliest types of cancer. The worldwide estimates of its incidence and mortality in the general population are eight cases per 100,000 person-years and seven deaths per 100,000 person-years, and they are significantly higher in the United States than in the rest of the world. The incidence of this disease in the United States is more than 50,000 new cases in 2017. Indeed, total deaths due to PDAC are projected to increase dramatically to become the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths before 2030. Considering the failure to date to efficiently treat existing PDAC, increased effort should be undertaken to prevent this disease. A better understanding of the risk factors leading to PDAC development is of utmost importance to identify and formulate preventive strategies. Large epidemiologic and cohort studies have identified risk factors for the development of PDAC, including obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus. This review highlights the current knowledge of obesity and type 2 diabetes as risk factors for PDAC development and progression, their interplay and underlying mechanisms, and the relation to diet. Research gaps and opportunities to address this deadly disease are also outlined. Copyright © 2017 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF RISK FACTORS OF TYPE-II DIABETES IN RURAL AND URBAN POPULATION

    OpenAIRE

    Ch. Kiranmai; Sukhes; Rama Krishna; Preethi; Aruna

    2014-01-01

    : A study of effect of various risk factors on Type–II diabetes in Urban and rural population. Generally Indians seems to have great tendency to develop diabetes mellitus. In addition to this, unhealthy food habits, lack of physical activity, diabetic family history, age, obesity, smoking & alcoholism are the other causes for diabetes mellitus. AIM: To analyze the impact of different risk factors on Type – II diabetes in urban and rural population. METHODS: Total 160 subjects ...

  4. Cognition in type 2 diabetes: Association with vascular risk factors, complications of diabetes and depression

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    Iype Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : The role of variables like duration of diabetes, diabetic control and microvascular complications in the causation of cognitive decline in patients with type 2 diabetes is not well studied. The contribution of hypertension to the cognitive decline in nondemented diabetic patients is unclear. Aims: We wanted to see if cognition in patients with type 2 diabetes is associated with the duration of diabetes, control of diabetes, complications of diabetes, vascular risk factors, or depression. We also looked at association of noncompliance with cognition, and depression. Settings and Design: We recruited ambulant patients with type 2 diabetes who are 55 years or more in age from the weekly diabetic clinic. We excluded patients with past history of stroke. Methods and Material: We selected the time taken for the Trial A test, delayed recall on ten-word list from Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer′s Disease (CERAD, Rowland Universal Dementia Assessment Scale (RUDAS and Centre for Epidemiologic Studies Depression scale (CES-D screening instrument to assess these patients. Statistical Analysis Used: We utilized mean, standard deviation, Chi-square test and Pearson′s correlation for statistical analysis. We considered P < 0.05 to be significant. Results: RUDAS scores inversely correlated ( r = -0.360 with CES-D scores ( P = 0.002. Scores of the screening instrument for depression, the CES-D was associated with the duration of diabetes mellitus ( P = 0.018, fasting blood glucose ( P = 0.029 as well as with 2-hour post prandial blood glucose ( P = 0.017. Conclusions: There is correlation between depression and global cognitive score. Depression seems to be associated with duration of diabetes and control of diabetes.

  5. Job Strain as a Risk Factor for Type 2 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyberg, Solja T; Fransson, Eleonor I; Heikkilä, Katriina

    2014-01-01

    at work, defined as "job strain," is associated with incident type 2 diabetes independent of lifestyle factors. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: We extracted individual-level data for 124,808 diabetes-free adults from 13 European cohort studies participating in the IPD-Work Consortium. We measured job strain...... of incident diabetes during a mean follow-up of 10.3 years. After adjustment for age, sex, and socioeconomic status (SES), the hazard ratio (HR) for job strain compared with no job strain was 1.15 (95% CI 1.06-1.25) with no difference between men and women (1.19 [1.06-1.34] and 1.13 [1.00-1.28], respectively......). In stratified analyses, job strain was associated with an increased risk of diabetes among those with healthy and unhealthy lifestyle habits. In a multivariable model adjusted for age, sex, SES, and lifestyle habits, the HR was 1.11 (1.00-1.23). CONCLUSIONS: Findings from a large pan-European dataset suggest...

  6. Prevalence and Risk Factors for Gestational Diabetes Mellitus in Tehran

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    Ahia Garshasbi

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM and its risk factors in Tehran.Materials and Methods: From March 2002 to October 2004, screening for GDM was performed on 1804 women in Tehran. All pregnant women were referred for a 50 g oral glucose challenge test (OGCT between 24th and 28th week of gestation. All subjects with an abnormal GCT (blood glucose level ≥130 mg/dl underwent an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT within 1 week after the abnormal screening test. The prevalence of GDM was estimated.Results: The glucose challenge test was positive in 38.1% of cases .The prevalence of GDM for the whole cohort was 6.8%. About 78.6%   of our population were at medium or high risk for GDM and, therefore, would have been screened. The rate of GDM was significantly higher in women with a positive family history of diabetes, positive history of GDM, older age, multiparity, pre-pregnancy obesity, greater weight gain during pregnancy, history of infertility, chronic hypertension, history of stillbirth pregnancies and abortion. After logistic regression analysis, GDM diagnosis was significantly correlated with age (P<0.001, pre-pregnancy BMI (P=0.005, family history of diabetes (P<0.001, history of GDM (P=0. 002, chronic hypertension (P<0.001 and glucosuria during current pregnancy (P<0.001.Conclusion: In populations with medium/high risks for GDM (like the Iranian universal screening is recommended to identify women with diabetes mellitus.

  7. Novel Risk Factors for Type 2 Diabetes in African-Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Ranee; Maruthur, Nisa M; Edelman, David

    2015-12-01

    In the USA, compared to whites, African-Americans are disproportionately impacted by the diabetes epidemic. Traditional diabetes risk factors, such as obesity, are more common among African-Americans, but these traditional risk factors do not explain all of the disparity in diabetes risk. Recent research has identified novel environmental, lifestyle, physiologic, and genetic risk factors for diabetes, some of which appear to impact African-Americans more than whites. This manuscript reviews the recent literature to highlight some of these novel risk factors that may be contributing to the racial disparity in diabetes risk. Further study is needed of the modifiable risk factors for development of interventions to reduce the risk of diabetes in African-Americans, as well as other high-risk populations.

  8. Diabetes mellitus: an important risk factor for reactivation of tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernesto Solá

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus was identified as a risk factor for developing tuberculosis (TB infection, and relapse after therapy. The risk of acquiring TB is described as comparable to that of HIV population. The fact that diabetics are 3× times more prone to develop pulmonary TB than nondiabetics cannot be overlooked. With DM recognized as global epidemic, and TB affecting one-third of the world population, physicians must remain vigilant. We present a 45-year-old woman born in Dominican Republic (DR, with 10-year history of T2DM treated with metformin, arrived to our Urgency Room complaining of dry cough for the past 3months. Interview unveiled unintentional 15lbs weight loss, night sweats, occasional unquantified fever, and general malaise but denied bloody sputum. She traveled to DR 2years before, with no known ill exposure. Physical examination showed a thin body habitus, otherwise well appearing woman with stable vital signs, presenting solely right middle lung field ronchi. LDH, ESR, hsCRP and Hg A1C were elevated. Imaging revealed a right middle lobe cavitation. Sputum for AFB disclosed active pulmonary TB. Our case portrays that the consideration of TB as differential diagnosis in diabetics should be exercised with the same strength, as it is undertaken during the evaluation of HIV patients with lung cavitation. Inability to recognize TB will endanger the patient, hospital dwellers and staff, and perpetuate this global public health menace.

  9. Diabetes Risk Factors, Diabetes Risk Algorithms, and the Prediction of Future Frailty: The Whitehall II Prospective Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouillon, Kim; Kivimäki, Mika; Hamer, Mark; Shipley, Martin J.; Akbaraly, Tasnime N.; Tabak, Adam; Singh-Manoux, Archana; Batty, G. David

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine whether established diabetes risk factors and diabetes risk algorithms are associated with future frailty. Design Prospective cohort study. Risk algorithms at baseline (1997–1999) were the Framingham Offspring, Cambridge, and Finnish diabetes risk scores. Setting Civil service departments in London, United Kingdom. Participants There were 2707 participants (72% men) aged 45 to 69 years at baseline assessment and free of diabetes. Measurements Risk factors (age, sex, family history of diabetes, body mass index, waist circumference, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, antihypertensive and corticosteroid treatments, history of high blood glucose, smoking status, physical activity, consumption of fruits and vegetables, fasting glucose, HDL-cholesterol, and triglycerides) were used to construct the risk algorithms. Frailty, assessed during a resurvey in 2007–2009, was denoted by the presence of 3 or more of the following indicators: self-reported exhaustion, low physical activity, slow walking speed, low grip strength, and weight loss; “prefrailty” was defined as having 2 or fewer of these indicators. Results After a mean follow-up of 10.5 years, 2.8% of the sample was classified as frail and 37.5% as prefrail. Increased age, being female, stopping smoking, low physical activity, and not having a daily consumption of fruits and vegetables were each associated with frailty or prefrailty. The Cambridge and Finnish diabetes risk scores were associated with frailty/prefrailty with odds ratios per 1 SD increase (disadvantage) in score of 1.18 (95% confidence interval: 1.09–1.27) and 1.27 (1.17–1.37), respectively. Conclusion Selected diabetes risk factors and risk scores are associated with subsequent frailty. Risk scores may have utility for frailty prediction in clinical practice. PMID:24103860

  10. Prevalence of and risk factors for diabetic retinopathy among the patients with diabetes mellitus in Dharan municipality, Nepal

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    Shailesh Mani Pokharel

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives: The individuals with diabetes have 29 times higher chance of becoming blind due to diabetic retinopathy than non-diabetic of similar age and gender. The knowledge on the factors for it can help detect the disease in its early course. The study was conducted with objectives to study the prevalence of diabetic retinopathy and its risk factors in a diabetic population.Materials and Methods: A community based cross-sectional study that involved 418 subjects with type 2 diabetes, living in the Dharan municipality of Nepal was carried out using convenient sampling method.Results: The prevalence of diabetic retinopathy was 38.8%. Prevalence of mild, moderate, severe and very severe non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy was 9.1%, 16.3%, 6.2% and 17.2% respectively. Prevalence of proliferative diabetic retinopathy and clinically significant macular edema was 3.8% and 1.9% respectively. Among the risk factors studied age, hypoglycemic drug intake, family history and duration of diabetes mellitus had a significant association with the occurrence of diabetic retinopathy (p<0.05.Conclusions: The prevalence of diabetic retinopathy in patients with diabetes mellitus was 38.8% and increase risk factors for it are age, hypoglycemic drug intake, family history of diabetes, duration of diabetes.JCMS Nepal. 2015;11(1: 17-21

  11. Diabetes and age-related demographic differences in risk factor control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan, Brent M; Li, Jiexiang; Wolfman, Tamara E; Sinopoli, Angelo

    2014-06-01

    Disparate vascular outcomes in diabetes by race and/or ethnicity may reflect differential risk factor control, especially pre-Medicare. Assess concurrent target attainment for glycohemoglobin 2, P factor awareness and treatment were lower in Hispanics than whites. When treated, diabetes and hypertension control were greater in whites than blacks or Hispanics. Concurrent risk factor control is low in all diabetics and could improve with greater statin use. Insuring younger adults, especially Hispanic, could raise risk factor awareness and treatment. Improving treatment effectiveness in younger black and Hispanic diabetics could promote equitable risk factor control.

  12. Is Type 2 Diabetes a Risk Factor for Pancreatic Cancer?

    OpenAIRE

    Raffaele Pezzilli; Antonio Maria Morselli-Labate; Riccardo Casadei

    2009-01-01

    The relationship between diabetes mellitus and the risk of pancreatic cancer has been a matter of study for a long time. Taking into consideration diabetes mellitus irrespective of type, there is a lack of agreement regarding the data; in fact, some epidemiological studies have excluded this possibility whereas others have found a relationship between the presence of diabetes and the development of pancreatic cancer. On the other hand, a recent study has reported that metformin may have a pro...

  13. Identifying risk factors for clinically significant diabetic macula edema in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamoi, Kyuzi; Takeda, Keiji; Hashimoto, Kaoru; Tanaka, Reiko; Okuyama, Shinya

    2013-05-01

    It is known that clinic blood pressure (BP), gender, cigarette smoking, dyslipidemia, anemia and thiazolidenediones (TZD) treatment are predictors for clinically significant diabetic macula edema (CSDME). We examined a most risky factor for CSDME in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and diabetic retinopathy (DR) confirmed using optical coherence tomography by multiple regression analysis (MRA). As the risk factors, wakening-up BP was added to such factors. Seven diabetic Japanese patients with CSDME (group 1) and 124 subjects without CSDME (group 2) assonated with DR using optical coherence tomography were studied. The durations of T2DM in groups 1 and 2 were 15±10 years and 20±15 years, respectively. There was no statistically difference in means of gender, duration, age, body mass index (BMI), HbA1c, TC, LDL and TC/HDL, serum creatinine, urinary albumin excretion rate, and clinic BP between two groups. Morning systolic home BP (MSHBP), cigarette smoking and foveal thickness were significantly (ppioglitazone as TZD treatment were significantly positive predictors for CSDME, while BMI had a significantly negative predictor. Other variables were not significantly correlated to CSDME. The review summarizes a multiple regression analysis revealed that MSHBP makes an addition to predictive factors for CSDME among risk factors reported previously in patient with T2DM.

  14. Urban and rural prevalence of diabetes and pre-diabetes and risk factors associated with diabetes in Tanzania and Uganda

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    Faraja S. Chiwanga

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The increase in prevalence of diabetes and pre-diabetes in sub-Saharan Africa underlines the importance of understanding its magnitude and causes in different population groups. We analyzed data from the Africa/Harvard Partnership for Cohort Research and Training (PaCT studies to determine the prevalence of diabetes and pre-diabetes and risk factors associated with diabetes. Methodology: Participants were randomly selected from peri-urban (n=297 and rural (n=200 communities in Uganda, and teachers were recruited from schools (n=229 in urban Tanzania. We used a standardized questionnaire to collect socio-demographic and self-reported disease status including diabetes status. Blood glucose was also measured after participants fasted for 8 h. We used standard protocols for anthropometric and blood pressure measurement. Results: The overall prevalence of diabetes was 10.1% and was highest in rural Ugandan residents (16.1% compared to teachers in Tanzania (8.3% and peri-urban Ugandan residents (7.6%. The prevalence of pre-diabetes was 13.8%. The prevalence of self-reported diabetes was low across all sites, where 68% of participants with diabetes were not captured by self-report. In multivariable logistic regression analysis, family history (OR 2.5, 95% CI: 1.1, 5.6 and hypertension (OR 2.3, 95% CI: 1.1, 5.2 were significantly associated with diabetes. Conclusions: The prevalence of diabetes and pre-diabetes in Uganda and Tanzania is high, differs markedly between population groups, and remains undiagnosed in an alarmingly high proportion of individuals. These findings highlight the need for large-scale, prospective studies to accurately quantify the burden and identify effective intervention and treatment strategies across diverse African populations.

  15. Pruritus induced self injury behavior: an overlooked risk factor for amputation in diabetic neuropathy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorfman, David; George, Mary Catherine; Tamler, Ronald; Lushing, Julia; Nmashie, Alexandra; Simpson, David M

    2014-03-01

    Pruritus is a risk factor for self-injury behavior (SIB) in sensory polyneuropathies. Although diabetes patients have elevated risk for pruritus, there are no reports of SIB in diabetic neuropathy. We present the case of a diabetes patient with neuropathy, whose pruritus induced SIB, resulted in partial amputation of a toe.

  16. Risk factors for developing osteomyelitis in patients with diabetic foot wounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lavery, Lawrence A.; Peters, Edgar J. G.; Armstrong, David G.; Wendel, Christopher S.; Murdoch, Douglas P.; Lipsky, Benjamin A.

    2009-01-01

    Aims: Osteomyelitis worsens the prognosis in the diabetic foot, but predisposing factors remain largely undefined, In a prospectively followed cohort we assessed risk factors for developing osteomyelitis. Methods: We enrolled consecutive persons with diabetes who presented to a managed-care diabetes

  17. Prevalence and Risk Factors of Diabetic Nephropathy in Omani Type 2 Diabetics in Al-Dakhiliyah Region

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    Abdulhakeem Hamood Alrawahi

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the prevalence and risk factors of diabetic nephropathy among Omani type 2 diabetics in Al-Dakhiliyah region of the Sultanate of Oman.Methods: A cross-sectional and a case control study designs were used to assess the prevalence and risk factors respectively. For the prevalence study a sample of 699 diabetic subjects were selected randomly from two polyclinics in Al-Dakhiliyah region; Sumail and Nizwa polyclinics. For the case control study, a sample consisting of 215 cases and 358 controls were randomly selected from those who were included in the cross-sectional study. A well designed questionnaire has been used to collect data regarding the disease and risk factors. Data was analyzed using SPSS19 statistical program.Results: Total prevalence of diabetic nephropathy was calculated as 42.5% (95% C.I: 38.83% - 46.15%. The difference in the prevalence in the two polyclinic catchment area was not significant. The prevalence was significantly higher among males (51.6% compared to females (36.5%. Crude analysis of the risk factors showed significant association between diabetic nephropathy and the following factors; male gender, decreased literacy, long duration of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, retinopathy, neuropathy, family history of diabetic nephropathy, poor glycemic control (high HbA1c, and hypertriglyceridemia. Multivariate analysis showed the following factors to be independent risk factors; male gender, decreased literacy, long duration of diabetes, family history of diabetic nephropathy and poor glycaemic control (high HbA1c.Conclusion: The prevalence of diabetic nephropathy in this study was 42.5% and the significant risk factors associated with it included male gender, decreased literacy, long duration of diabetes, family history of diabetic nephropathy and poor glycemic control (high HbA1c.

  18. Incidence of diabetic macular edema and associated risk factors in a cohort of patients with type 1 diabetes in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Malin Lundberg

    for potential baseline risk factors: Sex, age, duration of diabetes, retinopathy (worst eye), blood pressure, nephropathy, MA and BMI. Results At baseline no retinopathy (ETDRS 10) was found in 32.8%, mild non-proliferative retinopathy (NPDR) (ETDRS 20-35) in 60.9% moderate NPDR (ETDRS 43-61) in 4......Incidence of diabetic macular edema and associated risk factors in a cohort of patients with type 1 diabetes in Denmark. Rasmussen M.L.1, Pedersen R.B. 1, Sjølie A.K. 1, Grauslund J1 1University of Southern Denmark, Department of ophthalmology, Odense University Hospital, Denmark Purpose......: To evaluate the 16-year incidence of diabetic macular edema (DME) in a cohort of type 1 diabetic patients and to investigate possible risk factors of developing DME. Methods: This was a prospective cohort study of Danish type 1 diabetic patients. A total of 131 patients were examined at baseline in 1995...

  19. Is Type 2 Diabetes a Risk Factor for Pancreatic Cancer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaele Pezzilli

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between diabetes mellitus and the risk of pancreatic cancer has been a matter of study for a long time. Taking into consideration diabetes mellitus irrespective of type, there is a lack of agreement regarding the data; in fact, some epidemiological studies have excluded this possibility whereas others have found a relationship between the presence of diabetes and the development of pancreatic cancer. On the other hand, a recent study has reported that metformin may have a protective effect on the development of pancreatic cancer [1]. Therefore, we would briefly revise the data both for and against the possibility that pancreatic cancer is a consequence of long-standing diabetes.

  20. Comparison of Cardiovascular Risk Factors Between Subjects With and Without Diabetes Mellitus: An Analytical Study

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    Mousavi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background Cardiovascular Disease (CVD is developing treacherously along industrialization and development of urbanization Objectives The aim of this study was to compare cardiovascular risk factors between subjects with and without diabetes mellitus in the Minoodar district of Qazvin. Patients and Methods This analytical study was conducted on 100 subjects with diabetes and 140 subjects without diabetes in Qazvin from September 2010 to April 2011. Standardized measurements were available for waist circumference (WC, blood pressure (BP, fasting serum cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL, and triglycerides (TGs. Cardiovascular risk factors were defined according to the diagnostic criteria proposed by the national cholesterol education program. Data were analyzed using the t-test, Mann-Whitney U test, and Chi-square test. Results Overall, 12% of subjects with diabetes and 17.9% of subjects without diabetes were smokers (P = 0.277. The WC, TGs, systolic and diastolic BP were significantly higher in subjects with diabetes compared to subjects without diabetes. The prevalence of high WC, high BP, low HDL, and high TGs were significantly higher in subjects with diabetes compared to subjects without diabetes. Conclusions Cardiovascular risk factors were higher in subjects with diabetes compared to subjects without diabetes. Lifestyle intervention programs should be focused on community education about reduction of CVD risk factors in patients with diabetes.

  1. Type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease: Have all risk factors the same strength?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Timón, Iciar; Sevillano-Collantes, Cristina; Segura-Galindo, Amparo; Del Cañizo-Gómez, Francisco Javier

    2014-08-15

    Diabetes mellitus is a chronic condition that occurs when the body cannot produce enough or effectively use of insulin. Compared with individuals without diabetes, patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus have a considerably higher risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, and are disproportionately affected by cardiovascular disease. Most of this excess risk is it associated with an augmented prevalence of well-known risk factors such as hypertension, dyslipidaemia and obesity in these patients. However the improved cardiovascular disease in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients can not be attributed solely to the higher prevalence of traditional risk factors. Therefore other non-traditional risk factors may be important in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Cardiovascular disease is increased in type 2 diabetes mellitus subjects due to a complex combination of various traditional and non-traditional risk factors that have an important role to play in the beginning and the evolution of atherosclerosis over its long natural history from endothelial function to clinical events. Many of these risk factors could be common history for both diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease, reinforcing the postulate that both disorders come independently from "common soil". The objective of this review is to highlight the weight of traditional and non-traditional risk factors for cardiovascular disease in the setting of type 2 diabetes mellitus and discuss their position in the pathogenesis of the excess cardiovascular disease mortality and morbidity in these patients.

  2. Is low birth weight a risk factor for the development of diabetic nephropathy in patients with type 1 diabetes?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eshoj, O; Vaag, A; Borch-Johnsen, K

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate if low birth weight as a consequence of intrauterine malnutrition is a risk factor for the later development of diabetic nephropathy. DESIGN AND SUBJECTS: In a case-control set-up a group of type 1 diabetic subjects with diabetic nephropathy (n = 51) and a matched control...... in the number of patients with nephropathy in the lower versus upper quartiles of birth weights. CONCLUSION: We found no evidence of low birth weight as a risk factor for the development of diabetic nephropathy....

  3. Persistent organic pollutants as risk factors for type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngwa, Elvis Ndonwi; Kengne, Andre-Pascal; Tiedeu-Atogho, Barbara; Mofo-Mato, Edith-Pascale; Sobngwi, Eugene

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a major and fast growing public health problem. Although obesity is considered to be the main driver of the pandemic of T2DM, a possible contribution of some environmental contaminants, of which persistent organic pollutants (POPs) form a particular class, has been suggested. POPs are organic compounds that are resistant to environmental degradation through chemical, biological, and photolytic processes which enable them to persist in the environment, to be capable of long-range transport, bio accumulate in human and animal tissue, bio accumulate in food chains, and to have potential significant impacts on human health and the environment. Several epidemiological studies have reported an association between persistent organic pollutants and diabetes risk. These findings have been replicated in experimental studies both in human (in-vitro) and animals (in-vivo and in-vitro), and patho-physiological derangements through which these pollutants exercise their harmful effect on diabetes risk postulated. This review summarizes available studies, emphasises on limitations so as to enable subsequent studies to be centralized on possible pathways and bring out clearly the role of POPs on diabetes risk.

  4. Preterm Birth—A Risk Factor for Type 2 Diabetes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajantie, Eero; Osmond, Clive; Barker, David J.P.; Eriksson, Johan G.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The association between low birth weight and type 2 diabetes is well established. We studied whether preterm birth carries a similar risk. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The Helsinki Birth Cohort includes 13,345 men and women born between 1934 and 1944. Of them, 12,813 had adequate data on length of gestation, which we linked with data on special reimbursement for diabetes medication. RESULTS Of the subjects, 5.1% had received special reimbursement after age 40. In subjects born before 35 weeks of gestation, the odds ratio for diabetes was 1.68 (95% CI 1.06–2.65) compared with that in those born at term. After adjustment for birth weight relative to length of gestation, the odds ratio was 1.59 (1.00–2.52). CONCLUSIONS Preterm birth before 35 weeks of gestation is associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes in adult life. The risk is independent of that associated with slow fetal growth. PMID:20823347

  5. Identifying Common Genetic Risk Factors of Diabetic Neuropathies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witzel, Ini-Isabée; Jelinek, Herbert F.; Khalaf, Kinda; Lee, Sungmun; Khandoker, Ahsan H.; Alsafar, Habiba

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a global public health problem of epidemic proportions, with 60–70% of affected individuals suffering from associated neurovascular complications that act on multiple organ systems. The most common and clinically significant neuropathies of T2DM include uremic neuropathy, peripheral neuropathy, and cardiac autonomic neuropathy. These conditions seriously impact an individual’s quality of life and significantly increase the risk of morbidity and mortality. Although advances in gene sequencing technologies have identified several genetic variants that may regulate the development and progression of T2DM, little is known about whether or not the variants are involved in disease progression and how these genetic variants are associated with diabetic neuropathy specifically. Significant missing heritability data and complex disease etiologies remain to be explained. This article is the first to provide a review of the genetic risk variants implicated in the diabetic neuropathies and to highlight potential commonalities. We thereby aim to contribute to the creation of a genetic-metabolic model that will help to elucidate the cause of diabetic neuropathies, evaluate a patient’s risk profile, and ultimately facilitate preventative and targeted treatment for the individual. PMID:26074879

  6. Correlation of hs-CRP with environmental risk factors of nephropathy in type 2 diabetes

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    Jay Prakash Sah

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to investigate the association of hs-CRP levels with environmental risk factors of diabetic nephropathy like smoking, drinking alcohol, diet, age of diabetic patient, duration of diabetes, medication of diabetes, and blood pressure medication. A hospital-based quantitative study was conducted at the Department of Clinical Biochemistry of Manipal Teaching Hospital (MTH Pokhara, Nepal, with 89 patients suffering from type 2 diabetes. Blood samples (n=89 from the patients were collected and the serums were separated. On the other hand, data on environmental risk factors of nephropathy were collected by using standard questionnaire. In this study, serum hs-CRP level was not found to be correlated with smoking (p=0.111, alcohol consumption (p=0.722, diet (p=0.496, duration of diabetes (p=0.519, age of diabetic patient (p=0.369, medication of diabetes (p=0.734, and blood pressure medication (p=0.625. Hence, our study concludes that serum hs-CRP value in type 2 diabetic patients is insignificantly correlated with the risk factors especially smoking, drinking alcohol, diet, duration of diabetes, age of diabetic patient, medication of diabetes, and medication of blood pressure.

  7. Different risk factor profiles for ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke in type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hägg, Stefanie; Thorn, Lena M; Forsblom, Carol M; Gordin, Daniel; Saraheimo, Markku; Tolonen, Nina; Wadén, Johan; Liebkind, Ron; Putaala, Jukka; Tatlisumak, Turgut; Groop, Per-Henrik

    2014-09-01

    Despite the fact that patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus have a markedly increased risk of experiencing a stroke, independent risk factors for stroke and its subtypes in these patients have remained unclear. A total of 4083 patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus from the Finnish Diabetic Nephropathy (FinnDiane) Study, without a history of stroke at baseline, were included. Strokes were classified based on medical files and brain imaging. At baseline, mean age was 37.4±11.8 years, duration of diabetes mellitus was 20.0 (11.0-30.0) years, and 51% were men. During 9.0±2.7 years (36 680 patient-years) of follow-up, 105 patients experienced an ischemic stroke and 44 a hemorrhagic stroke. Cox proportional hazards analyses were performed to determine independent risk factors. Independent risk factors for ischemic stroke were duration of diabetes mellitus, presence of diabetic nephropathy, higher hemoglobin A1c, higher systolic blood pressure, insulin resistance, and history of smoking, whereas sex, lipids, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, and the metabolic syndrome were not associated with an increased risk. Diabetic nephropathy, severe diabetic retinopathy, higher systolic blood pressure, and lower body mass index were independently associated with hemorrhagic stroke. The risk factor profile for ischemic stroke seems partly different from that of hemorrhagic stroke in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  8. Risk Factors for and Barriers to Control Type-2 Diabetes among Saudi Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alneami, Yahya Mari; Coleman, Christopher L.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The prevalence of Type-2 Diabetes is dramatically increasing in urban areas within Saudi Arabia. Hence, Type-2 Diabetes has now become the most common public health problem. Understanding the major risk factors for and barriers to control Type-2 Diabetes may lead to strategies to prevent, control, and reduce in the burden of disease cases. Objective: To describe risk factors for and barriers to control Type- 2 Diabetes in Saudi Arabia. Methods: The literature search was conducted on risk factors for and barriers to control Type- 2 Diabetes in Saudi Arabia using the databases PubMed, MEDLINE, and Google Scholar (2007-2015). The literature search yielded 80 articles, of which 70 articles were included in this review after excluding non-relevant articles. Results: The literature review revealed that obesity, physical inactivity, unhealthy diet, smoking, and aging are the major risk factors for Type-2 Diabetes in Saudi Arabia. Further, the review allocated a complex set of barriers including, lack of education, social support, and healthy environment. These barriers may hinder Saudis with Type-2 Diabetes from controlling their disease. Conclusion: The prevalence of Type-2 Diabetes is high among the Saudi population and represents a major public health problem. Effective research programs are needed to address the modifiable risk factors for and barriers to control Type-2 Diabetes among Saudi population. PMID:27157156

  9. Is Smoking a Risk Factor for Proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy in Type 1 Diabetes?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaedt Thorlund, Mie; Borg Madsen, Mette; Green, Anders

    2013-01-01

    Aim: The aim was to evaluate if smoking was a risk factor for proliferative retinopathy (PDR) in a 25-year follow-up study. Methods: 201 persons from a population-based cohort of Danish type 1 diabetic patients were examined at baseline and again 25 years later. At both examinations the patients...... were asked about their smoking habits. The level of retinopathy was evaluated by ophthalmoscopy at baseline and by nine 45-degree colour field fundus photos at the follow-up. Results: In multivariate analyses there was a trend that current smokers at baseline were more likely to develop PDR...

  10. Risk Factors for Thyroid Dysfunction among Type 2 Diabetic Patients in a Highly Diabetes Mellitus Prevalent Society

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    Metab Al-Geffari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes and thyroid dysfunction found to exist simultaneously. In this regard, the present study looked into the prevalence of different forms of thyroid dysfunction and their risk factors among Type 2 diabetic Saudi patients. Methodology. A cross-sectional retrospective randomized hospital-based study of 411 Type 2 diabetic Saudi patients of >25 years of age was conducted to test the prevalence of different types of thyroid dysfunction and their risk factors. Results. The prevalence of different types of thyroid dysfunction is 28.5%, of which 25.3% had hypothyroidism, where 15.3%, 9.5%, and 0.5% are clinical, subclinical, and overt hypothyroidism, respectively. The prevalence of hyperthyroidism is 3.2%, of which subclinical cases accounted for 2.7% and overt hyperthyroidism accounted for 0.5%. Risk factors for thyroid dysfunction among Saudi Type 2 diabetic patients are family history of thyroid disease, female gender, and duration of diabetes of >10 years, while the risk was not significant in patients with history of goiter and patients aged >60 years. Smoking and parity show a nonsignificant reduced risk. Conclusion. Thyroid dysfunction is highly prevalent among Saudi Type 2 diabetic patients, and the most significant risk factors are family history of thyroid disease, female gender, and >10 years duration of diabetes.

  11. A STUDY OF PATTERN OF DIABETIC RETINOPATHY AND ASSOCIATED RISK FACTORS IN DIABETIC PATIENTS : A HOSPITAL BASED STUDY

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    Manoj

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Diabetes mellitus has protean manifestations in an individual and affects virtually every organ of the body. Diabetic retinopathy remains a leading cause of vision loss and blindness in people of working age- group. The present study was a hospital- based study designed to study the pattern of diabetic retinopathy and associated risk factors in diabetic individuals. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Our study was a prospective, hospital- based study of 200 cases of diabetes mellitus attending the Eye OPD at R.D. Gardi Medical College, Ujjain. All patients suffering from diabetes, irrespective of the duration of the disease, were included in the study. Each patient was subjected to a comprehensive ocular examination and the results were recorded and analyzed in detail. RESULTS: Our study included 200 diabetic patients. Out of these 111 (55.5% were males and 89 (44.5% were females. 108 (54% patients were in the age group between 41- 60 years. 109 (54.5% patients in the study group had duration of diabetes > 5years. We found that 114 (28.5% eyes had mild non- proliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR, 36 (9% eyes had moderate non- proliferative diabetic retinopathy, and 14 (3.5% eyes showed proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR. 61 (30.5% patients had raised blood pressure in the study group which suggests hypertension as a significant risk factor for diabetic retinopathy. We found that 101 (50.5% patients in the study group had HbA1c levels > 8gm% and 55 (27.5% patients had dyslipidemia. 21 (10.5% patients had hemoglobin levels < 8gm%. The prevalence of blindness in our study group was found to be 10.3%. CONCLUSION: The results of our study show that pattern of diabetic retinopathy in an individual is directly associated with risk factors such as duration of diabetes, hypertension, poor glycemic control, dyslipidemia and anaemia.

  12. Diabetic nephropathy and its risk factors in a society with a type 2 diabetes epidemic: a Saudi National Diabetes Registry-based study.

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    Khalid Al-Rubeaan

    Full Text Available AIMS: The prevalence of diabetic nephropathy and its risk factors have not been studied in a society known to have diabetes epidemic like Saudi Arabia. Using a large data base registry will provide a better understanding and accurate assessment of this chronic complication and its related risk factors. METHODOLOGY: A total of 54,670 patients with type 2 diabetes aged ≥ 25 years were selected from the Saudi National Diabetes Registry (SNDR and analyzed for the presence of diabetic nephropathy. The American Diabetes Association (ADA criterion was used to identify cases with microalbuminuria, macroalbuminuria and end stage renal disease (ESRD for prevalence estimation and risk factor assessment. RESULTS: The overall prevalence of diabetic nephropathy was 10.8%, divided into 1.2% microalbuminuria, 8.1%macroalbuninuria and 1.5% ESRD. Age and diabetes duration as important risk factors have a strong impact on the prevalence of diabetic nephropathy, ranging from 3.7% in patients aged 25-44 years and a duration of >5 years, to 21.8% in patients ≥ 65 years with a diabetes duration of ≥ 15 years. Diabetes duration, retinopathy, neuropathy, hypertension, age >45 years, hyperlipidemia, male gender, smoking, and chronologically, poor glycemic control has a significantly high risk for diabetic nephropathy. CONCLUSION: The prevalence of diabetic nephropathy is underestimated as a result of a shortage of screening programs. Risk factors related to diabetic nephropathy in this society are similar to other societies. There is thus an urgent need for screening and prevention programs for diabetic nephropathy among the Saudi population.

  13. Risk factors for Type II diabetes and diabetic retinopathy in a mexican-american population: Proyecto VER.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Sheila K; Munoz, Beatriz; Klein, Ronald; Broman, Aimee T; Sanchez, Rosario; Rodriguez, Jorge; Snyder, Robert

    2002-09-01

    Risk factors for type II diabetes and diabetic retinopathy were determined in a population-based study of Mexican-Americans. Proyecto VER (Vision, Evaluation, and Research) is a cross-sectional study in a random sample of the self-described Hispanic populations in Tucson and Nogales, Arizona, age 40 and older. Of 6,659 eligible subjects, 4,774 (72%) participated in the home questionnaire and clinic visit. Diabetes was defined as self-report of a physician diagnosis or hemoglobin A(1c) value of > or = 7.0%. Only type II diabetes was included. Diabetic retinopathy was assessed on stereo fundus photographs of all persons with diabetes. Questions were asked about demographic, personal, socioeconomic, and diabetes related variables. 1023 (21.4%) of the sample had type II diabetes, and 68% were in the low-income group (annual income less than $20,000). Diabetes was associated with Native-American ancestry, higher acculturation, low income, less education, and increasing body mass index after age and gender adjustment. Persons with previously undiscovered diabetes were more likely to have no regular source of care, no insurance, and currently smoke compared with persons with known diabetes. Only low income was related to proliferative retinopathy, once adjusted for other factors (odds ratio [OR] = 3.93, 95%, confidence limitations [CL] = 1.31-11.80). Several socioeconomic and other factors were associated with diabetes, but few were related to diabetic retinopathy. Persons in the low-income group appeared to be at greater risk of diabetes and the ocular complications of diabetes compared with those with more income. Further longitudinal studies in this population are needed to confirm the associations.

  14. Physical inactivity as a risk factor for diabetic retinopathy? A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirani, Mohamed; Crowston, Jonathan G; van Wijngaarden, Peter

    2014-08-01

    Physical inactivity and sedentary behaviour have been identified as modifiable risk factors for diabetes. However, little is known of the associations between physical activity, sedentary behaviour and diabetic retinopathy. The development of diabetic retinopathy is associated with longer duration of diabetes, elevated blood pressure and poor glycaemic control. However these factors only explain a proportion of the risk of retinopathy in individuals with diabetes. Several studies have suggested a protective role for physical activity in diabetic retinopathy. Other work has shown that the time spent watching television is independently associated with abnormal retinal vascular signs. Limitations of the existing studies, such as the absence of objective measures of physical activity, a lack of sedentary behaviour measures, the inclusion of only those with type 1 diabetes and a lack of longitudinal data, make it difficult to draw firm conclusions about the strength of these associations.

  15. Academic Skills in Children with Early-Onset Type 1 Diabetes: The Effects of Diabetes-Related Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannonen, Riitta; Komulainen, Jorma; Riikonen, Raili; Ahonen, Timo; Eklund, Kenneth; Tolvanen, Asko; Keskinen, Paivi; Nuuja, Anja

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The study aimed to assess the effects of diabetes-related risk factors, especially severe hypoglycaemia, on the academic skills of children with early-onset type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Method: The study comprised 63 children with T1DM (31 females, 32 males; mean age 9y 11mo, SD 4mo) and 92 comparison children without diabetes (40…

  16. Risk factors for the development of diabetic nephropathy

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    Antić Miodrag

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Results of epidemiological analysis show that one third of patients with diabetes mellitus develop diabetic nephropathy (DN. Strategies used until now to slow down the progression of DN were initiated when the symptoms of DN were already present. Objective. Our objective was to analyze the prevalence and characteristics of DN and to determine the factors leading to DN. Methods. Fifty-two patients with diabetes mellitus (DM - 32 with type 1 aged 32 years and 20 with type 2 aged 59 years - were referred from the Institute of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolic Diseases to the Department of Nephrology for kidney function evaluation. Apart from routine laboratory analyses, glomerular filtration rate was calculated using the MDRD formula (modification of diet in renal disease, the size of the kidney was measured by ultrasound, and kidney volume was calculated using the ellipsoid formula. Results Thirty percent of the patients revealed normal (eight patients with DM type 1 or satisfactory kidney function (eight patients with DM type 1 with physiological proteinuria. Micro-albuminuria (MAU or pathological proteinuria (PRT were found in 10 and 9 patients, respectively, with DM type 1, while decreased kidney function was found in one patient without proteinuria. MAU or PRT were found in four and eight patients, respectively, with DM type 2 and decreased kidney function in four patients without proteinuria. Kidney function was significantly lower in patients with DM type 2 in comparison to DM type 1, while the patients with decreased kidney function had a higher PRT. Compared to DM type 2, in DM type 1 patients, the kidney was longer, and parenchymal artery resistance index was lower in DM type 1 patients compared to DM type 2. Factors associated with DN were patient's age, duration of diabetes, systolic blood pressure, HbA1c and kidney volume. Conclusion. The prevalence of DN among the studied patients was 70%. Treatable factors

  17. Type 2 diabetes in children: Clinical aspects and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, P V

    2015-04-01

    A strong link between obesity, insulin resistance, and metabolic syndrome has been reported with development of a new paradigm to type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), with some evidence suggesting that beta-cell dysfunction is present before the onset of impaired glucose tolerance. Differentiating type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) from T2DM is actually not very easy and there exists a number of overlapping characteristics. The autoantibody frequencies of seven antigens in T1DM patients may turn out to be actually having T2DM patients (pre-T2DM). T2DM patients generally have increased C-peptide levels (may be normal at time of diagnosis), usually no auto-antibodies, strong family history of diabetes, obese and show signs of insulin resistance (hypertension, acanthosis, PCOS). The American Academy of Paediatrics recommends lifestyle modifications ± metformin when blood glucose is 126-200 mg/dL and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) 200 mg/dL and HbA1c >8.5, with or without ketosis. Metformin is not recommended if the patient is ketotic, because this increases the risk of lactic acidosis. Metformin is currently the only oral hypoglycemic that has been approved for use in children. Knowing these subtle differences in mechanism, and knowing how to test patients for which mechanism (s) are causing their diabetes mellitus, may help us eventually tailor treatment programs on an individual basis.

  18. Type 2 diabetes in children: Clinical aspects and risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P V Rao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A strong link between obesity, insulin resistance, and metabolic syndrome has been reported with development of a new paradigm to type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM, with some evidence suggesting that beta-cell dysfunction is present before the onset of impaired glucose tolerance. Differentiating type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM from T2DM is actually not very easy and there exists a number of overlapping characteristics. The autoantibody frequencies of seven antigens in T1DM patients may turn out to be actually having T2DM patients (pre-T2DM. T2DM patients generally have increased C-peptide levels (may be normal at time of diagnosis, usually no auto-antibodies, strong family history of diabetes, obese and show signs of insulin resistance (hypertension, acanthosis, PCOS. The American Academy of Paediatrics recommends lifestyle modifications ± metformin when blood glucose is 126-200 mg/dL and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c 200 mg/dL and HbA1c >8.5, with or without ketosis. Metformin is not recommended if the patient is ketotic, because this increases the risk of lactic acidosis. Metformin is currently the only oral hypoglycemic that has been approved for use in children. Knowing these subtle differences in mechanism, and knowing how to test patients for which mechanism (s are causing their diabetes mellitus, may help us eventually tailor treatment programs on an individual basis.

  19. Risk factors for ulceration and amputation in diabetic foot: study in a cohort of 496 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura Neto, Arnaldo; Zantut-Wittmann, Denise Engelbrecht; Fernandes, Tulio Diniz; Nery, Marcia; Parisi, Maria Candida Ribeiro

    2013-08-01

    Treatment strategies for foot at risk and diabetic foot are mainly preventive. Studies describing demographic data, clinical and impacting factors continue to be, however, scarce. Our objective was to determine the epidemiological presentation of diabetic foot and understand whether there were easily assessable variables capable of predicting the development of diabetic foot. This was a retrospective study of 496 patients with established foot at risk or diabetic foot, who were evaluated based on age, gender, type and duration of diabetes, foot at risk classification, and the presence of deformities, ulceration, and amputation. The presence of deformities, ulceration, and amputation was recorded in 45.9, 25.3, and 12.9 % of patients, respectively. As for diabetic foot classification, the great majority of our cohort had diabetic neuropathy (92.9 %). Approximately 30 % had neuro-ischemic disease and only 7.1 % had ischemic disease alone. Sixty-two percent of patients presented neuropathy with no signs of arteriopathy. Foot classification was as a significant predictor for the presence of ulcer (p = 0.009; OR = 3.2; 95 % CI = 1.18-7.3). Only male gender was a significant predictor for ulceration (p diabetic foot (p diabetic foot were male gender and the presence of neuropathy. The combination of neuropathy and peripheral vascular disease adds significantly to the risk for amputation among patients with the diabetic foot syndrome. Men, presenting combined risk factors, should be a group receiving special attention and in the foot clinic, due to their potentially worse evolution.

  20. Metabolic Syndrome as a Risk Factor for Cardiovascular Disease, Mortality, and Progression of Diabetic Nephropathy in Type 1 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorn, Lena M.; Forsblom, Carol; Wadén, Johan; Saraheimo, Markku; Tolonen, Nina; Hietala, Kustaa; Groop, Per-Henrik

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess the predictive value of the metabolic syndrome in patients with type 1 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Patients were from the prospective Finnish Diabetic Nephropathy (FinnDiane) Study (n = 3,783): mean age 37 ± 12 years and diabetes duration 23 ± 12 years. Metabolic syndrome was defined according to World Health Organization (WHO), National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP), and International Diabetes Federation (IDF) definitions. Follow-up time was median 5.5 years (interquartile range 3.7–6.7). Mortality data were complete, whereas morbidity data were available in 69% of the patients. RESULTS The WHO definition was associated with a 2.1-fold increased risk of cardiovascular events and a 2.5-fold increased risk of cardiovascular- and diabetes-related mortality, after adjustment for traditional risk factors and diabetic nephropathy. The NCEP definition did not predict outcomes when adjusted for nephropathy but markedly added to the risk associated with elevated albuminuria alone (P < 0.001). The IDF definition did not predict outcomes. CONCLUSIONS The metabolic syndrome is a risk factor, beyond albuminuria, for cardiovascular morbidity and diabetes-related mortality in type 1 diabetes. PMID:19196885

  1. Risk Factors for Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus among Children and Adolescents in Basrah

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    Athar Abdul Samad Majeed

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Environmental factors play an important role in the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes mellitus, many of these factors have been uncovered despite much research. A case-control study was carried out to determine the potential maternal, neonatal and early childhood risk factors for type 1 diabetes mellitus in children and adolescents in Basrah.Methods: A total of 96 diabetic patients who have been admitted to the pediatric wards at 3 main hospitals in Basrah, and those who have visited primary health care centers over the period from the 4th of November 2006 to the end of May 2007 were recruited. In addition, 299 non-diabetic children were included, their age ranged from 18 months to 17 years.Results: Family history of type 1 diabetes mellitus and thyroid diseases in first and second degree relatives was found to be an independent risk factor for type 1 diabetes mellitus, (p<0.001. Regarding maternal habits and illnesses during pregnancy, the study has revealed that tea drinking during pregnancy is a risk factor for type 1 diabetes mellitus in their offspring, (p<0.05. In addition, maternal pre-eclampsia and infections were found to be significant risk factor for type 1 diabetes mellitus, (p<0.001. Neonatal infections, eczema and rhinitis during infancy were also significantly associated with development of type 1 diabetes mellitus. Moreover, the results revealed that duration of <6 months breast feeding is an important trigger of type 1 diabetes mellitus.Conclusion: Exposure to environmental risk factors during pregnancy (tea drinking, pre-eclampsia, and infectious diseases, neonatal period (respiratory distress, jaundice and infections and early infancy are thought to play an important role in triggering the immune process leading to B-cell destruction and the development of type 1 diabetes mellitus.

  2. Risk factors of type 2 diabetes in population of Jammu and Kashmir, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Ankit; Sharma, Swarkar; Dhar, Manoj K; Bamezai, Rameshwar N K

    2013-09-01

    We sought to identify risk factors for type 2 diabetes (T2D) in Jammu and Kashmir populations, India. A total of 424 diabetic and 226 non-diabetic subjects from Jammu, and 161 diabetic and 100 non-diabetic subjects from Kashmir were screened for various parameters including fasting blood glucose level, 2 hour glucose level, urea, creatinine, triglycerides, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL-C), uric acid, systolic and diastolic blood pressure level. We found that subjects aged 40-49 years had the highest rate of diabetes, with family income playing not much of a role. Kashmiri migrants or populations with rapid cultural, environmental, social or lifestyle change along with reduced physical activity, obesity and unhealthy lifestyle (smoking and alcohol consumption) were found to have higher rates of diabetes. High blood glucose, triglycerides and low HDL-C levels were found to be contributing to disease outcome. High blood pressure also contributed to a higher risk of developing T2D. Our study supports earlier reports confirming the contribution of comfortable life style, Western dietary habits and rapid life style change along with many other factors to the prevalence of diabetes. This may contribute to the epidemic proportion of diabetes in Jammu and Kashmir. Early diagnosis and routine screening for undiagnosed diabetes in obese subjects and subjects with parental diabetes history is expected to decrease the burden of chronic diabetic complications worldwide.

  3. Environmental toxins, a potential risk factor for diabetes among Canadian Aboriginals

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sharp, Donald

    2009-01-01

    To review the current literature to determine if there is a case for examining the presence of toxins in traditional foods and the environment as a possible risk factor for type 2 diabetes in Canadian...

  4. Medical and Psychological Risk Factors for Incident Hypertension in Type 1 Diabetic African-Americans

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    Monique S. Roy

    2011-01-01

    Conclusions. The development of hypertension in African-Americans living with type 1 diabetes appears to be multifactorial and includes both medical (overt proteinuria as well as psychological (high hostility risk factors.

  5. Risk factors for type 2 diabetes mellitus among patients attending a rural Kenyan hospital

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    Masemiano P. Chege

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Diabetes Management and Information Center in Nairobi has conducted population surveys among rural and urban Kenyans during the last decade. They have reported a rise in the prevalence of diabetes among rural Kenyans from 3% in 2003 to 7% in 2007. Our study was undertaken to investigate rural factors for type 2 diabetes and determine those that could be responsible for this rise in prevalence.Objectives: To describe the risk factors for type 2 diabetes mellitus among patients attending the outpatient clinics in a rural mission hospital in Kenya.Method: Forty-five diabetics and forty-five non-diabetics, resident in this rural hospital’s catchment area for at least 10 years, were randomly selected from patients attending outpatient clinics. Diabetics in a stable condition (not requiring hospitalisation, whose fasting blood sugars were below 6.1 mmol/L, were matched for age and gender with the non-diabetics who came to the hospital for outpatient services. A pilot-tested questionnaire on demography, current and past dietary habits, social habits, and family history was used to collect data. Waist circumference, height and weight were measured and BMI calculated. Data was analysed using SPSS for Windows. The Kruskal–Wallis test was used to compare the medians for the continuous variables, while the chi-squared test was used for the categorical variables. The z-test was used to calculate the relative risk.Results: Ninety participants (26 males, 64 females. The mean age was 61.8 for diabetics and 61.4 for non-diabetics. Childhood starvation (relative risk 2.08, p = 0.0090 and use of cassava for sustenance during childhood starvation (relative risk 3.12, p = 0.0090 were identified as risk factors. Diabetes in close relatives, another risk factor for this population (relative risk 2.2, p = 0.0131. Abdominal obesity was a risk factor for this population (in females relative risk 2.0, p = 0.0010.Conclusion: The risk factors for type 2

  6. Risk factors for type 2 diabetes mellitus among patients attending a rural Kenyan hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masemiano P. Chege

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Diabetes Management and Information Center in Nairobi has conducted population surveys among rural and urban Kenyans during the last decade. They have reported a rise in the prevalence of diabetes among rural Kenyans from 3% in 2003 to 7% in 2007. Our study was undertaken to investigate rural factors for type 2 diabetes and determine those that could be responsible for this rise in prevalence.Objectives: To describe the risk factors for type 2 diabetes mellitus among patients attending the outpatient clinics in a rural mission hospital in Kenya.Method: Forty-five diabetics and forty-five non-diabetics, resident in this rural hospital’s catchment area for at least 10 years, were randomly selected from patients attending outpatient clinics. Diabetics in a stable condition (not requiring hospitalisation, whose fasting blood sugars were below 6.1 mmol/L, were matched for age and gender with the non-diabetics who came to the hospital for outpatient services. A pilot-tested questionnaire on demography, current and past dietary habits, social habits, and family history was used to collect data. Waist circumference, height and weight were measured and BMI calculated. Data was analysed using SPSS for Windows. The Kruskal–Wallis test was used to compare the medians for the continuous variables, while the chi-squared test was used for the categorical variables. The z-test was used to calculate the relative risk.Results: Ninety participants (26 males, 64 females. The mean age was 61.8 for diabetics and 61.4 for non-diabetics. Childhood starvation (relative risk 2.08, p = 0.0090 and use of cassava for sustenance during childhood starvation (relative risk 3.12, p = 0.0090 were identified as risk factors. Diabetes in close relatives, another risk factor for this population (relative risk 2.2, p = 0.0131. Abdominal obesity was a risk factor for this population (in females relative risk 2.0, p = 0.0010.Conclusion: The risk factors for type 2

  7. Diabetic kidney disease: world wide difference of prevalence and risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gheith Osama

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic kidney disease – which is defined by elevated urine albumin excretion or reduced glomerular filtration rate (GFR or both – is a serious complication that occurs in 20% to 40% of all diabetics. In this review we try to highlight the prevalence of diabetic nephropathy which is not uncommon complication of diabetes all over the world. The prevalence of diabetes worldwide has extended epidemic magnitudes and is expected to affect more than 350 million people by the year 2035. There is marked racial/ethnic besides international difference in the epidemiology of diabetic kidney disease which could be explained by the differences in economic viability and governmental infrastructures. Approximately one-third of diabetic patients showed microalbuminuria after 15 years of disease duration and less than half develop real nephropathy. Diabetic kidney disease (DKD is more frequent in African-Americans, Asian-Americans, and Native Americans. Progressive kidney disease is more frequent in Caucasians patients with type 1 than type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM, although its overall prevalence in the diabetic population is higher in patients with type 2 DM while this type of DM is more prevalent. Hyperglycemia is well known risk factor for in addition to other risk factors like male sex, obesity, hypertension, chronic inflammation, resistance to insulin, hypovitaminosis D, and dyslipidemia and some genetic loci and polymorphisms in specific genes. Management of its modifiable risk factors might help in reducing its incidence in the nearby future.

  8. Diabetes in acromegaly, prevalence, risk factors, and evolution: data from the French Acromegaly Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fieffe, Sandrine; Morange, Isabelle; Petrossians, Patrick; Chanson, Philippe; Rohmer, Vincent; Cortet, Christine; Borson-Chazot, Françoise; Brue, Thierry; Delemer, Brigitte

    2011-06-01

    The French Acromegaly Registry records data of acromegalic patients' since 1992 in French, Belgian (Liège), and Swiss (Lausanne) centers. We studied the prevalence of diabetes in this population looking for risk factors. Patients from one of the centers (Reims) were then analyzed more thoroughly. This study has been conducted on all the patients recorded from 1999 until 2004 (519 patients). Evolution of cohorts' was reassessed in 2009. Of the different variables recorded in the registry: age, sex, body mass index (BMI), duration of acromegaly, GH, IGF1 and prolactin levels, pituitary tumor size, hormonal deficiencies, presence, duration and treatment of diabetes, hypertension, and rheumatological disease were analyzed. The prevalence of diabetes in the registry was 22.3%. Diabetic patients were older and had a higher BMI. Compared with the data of the French Social Security, acromegalic patients showed a more precocious apparition of diabetes and prevalence was higher in each age group. Compared with non-diabetic acromegalic subjects, diabetic patients had a more prolonged evolution of acromegaly before diagnosis. The levels of GH and IGF1 were not significantly different between the two groups. Only hypertension was significantly more frequent in diabetic patients. In our population, the prevalence of diabetes was estimated to be 22.3%. The GH and IGF1 levels did not appear as predictive factors for the presence of diabetes. On the contrary, age, BMI, and hypertension were significant risk factors as in the general population of type 2 diabetics.

  9. Risk factors of diabetic retinopathy and sight-threatening diabetic retinopathy: a cross-sectional study of 13 473 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in mainland China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; Yang, Jiarui; Tao, Liyuan; Lv, Huibin; Jiang, Xiaodan; Zhang, Mingzhou; Li, Xuemin

    2017-09-01

    To explore the risk factors of diabetic retinopathy (DR) and sight-threatening diabetic retinopathy (STDR) among Chinese patients with diabetes. A cross-sectional investigation was performed in eight screening clinics in six provinces across mainland China. Information about the risk factors was recorded in screening clinics. Some risk factors (sex, age, diagnosis age, diabetes duration, systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure, fasting blood glucose (FBG) and glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c)) were recorded in all eight clinics, while others were collected only in a subset of the clinics. The relationships between the risk factors and DR and between the risk factors and STDR were explored for the eight factors mentioned above and for all factors studied. Risk factors of DR and STDR were assessed, and a nomogram of the results was produced. Younger age, longer diabetes duration, higher SBP, higher FBG and higher HbA1c were found to be independent risk factors for both DR and STDR in the eight-factor analyses. In the all-factor analysis, younger age, longer diabetes duration, higher SBP, oral medicine use and insulin use were independent risk factors for both DR and STDR; higher postprandial blood glucose (PBG), HbA1c, triglyceride andlow-density lipoprotein were independent risk factors for DR only, and higher FBG was a risk factor for STDR only. In this cross-sectional investigation, several risk factors were found for DR and STDR. Notably, FBG, PBG and HbA1c were all risk factors for DR or STDR, suggesting that stricter blood glucose control in clinical practice is required. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  10. Relationship of Food Security with Type 2 Diabetes and Its Risk Factors in Tehranian Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan-Ghomi, Majid; Ejtahed, Hanieh-Sadat; Mirmiran, Parvin; Hosseini-Esfahani, Firozeh; Sarbazi, Narges; Azizi, Fereidoun; Sadeghian, Saeed

    2015-01-01

    As food insecurity has negative effects on health, the aim of this study was to determine tahe relationship between household food security and type 2 diabetes mellitus and its related risk factors. In this case-control study, 200 individuals with and 200 individuals without type 2 diabetes mellitus, aged over 40 years, were randomly selected from among participants of the Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study. The questionnaire on household food security proposed by the United States Department of Agriculture was completed for them by trained personnel. Logistic regression was used to determine the variable that had the most significant relationship with food security status. The average of food security score was 2.38 ± 2.0 in non-diabetic and 2.25 ± 2.0 in diabetic individuals (P = 0.6). In both groups, the risk for food insecurity in women was more than in men. In the diabetic group, being single and having education levels below high school increased the risk of food insecurity. In the non-diabetic group, the risk of food insecurity in obese individuals was 3.3 times higher than normal individuals (odds ratio = 2.1, 95% confidence interval: 1.2-4.1). There were no significant differences in food security levels of diabetic and non-diabetic groups. However, some risk factors of type 2 diabetes including sex, marital status, educational level, and obesity were associated with food insecurity.

  11. Diabetes among Turkish immigrants in Sweden : a study of prevalence and risk factors

    OpenAIRE

    Hjörleifsdóttir Steiner, Kristín

    2013-01-01

    Background Risk factors associated with the difference in susceptibility to diabetes in different ethnic groups are poorly understood. This thesis investigates differences in prevalence of, as well as risk factors for, diabetes, impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and impaired fasting glucose, and whether there is an effect of migration, in Turkish immigrants in Sweden. Methods Two data sets were used for this thesis, a survey from the Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare (the Immigra...

  12. Individual, Psycho-Social and Disease-Related Risk Factors in Diabetic Neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaac Rahimian-Boogar

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Neuropathy is the mostly prevalent of complications and the major cause of amputation, pain and disability in patients with diabetes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of individual, psycho-social, and disease-related risk factors in neuropathy of type 2 diabetes patients.Materials and Methods: In this retrospective cross-sectional study, 271 patients with type 2 diabetes were selected by convenience sampling in diabetic outpatient clinics of Tehran University of Medical Sciences and the Iranian Diabetic Association. The data were collected by demographical and disease characteristics questionnaires and DASS-42, QOLS, DSMS, and DKS scales. Then, the data were analyzed by r binary logistic regression along with PASW software.Results: Socio-economic status, glycosylated hemoglobin, body mass index, diabetes self-management, depression, quality of life, diabetes knowledge, and diabetes duration were significantly able to differentiate diabetic patients with neuropathy from diabetic patients without neuropathy (p0.05. The total regression model explained that 95.2% of cases were classified correctly.Conclusion: Inappropriate socio-economic status, glycosylated hemoglobin over 9%, being overweight and obesity, poor diabetes self-management, clinical depression, low quality of life, poor diabetes knowledge, and longer diabetes duration contribute to the incidence of neuropathy in patients with type 2 diabetes and attention must be paid to them for neuropathy prevention.

  13. Undiagnosed diabetes mellitus in rural communities in Sudan: prevalence and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, S K M; Bushara, S O E; Sulaiman, A A; Elmadhoun, W M Y; Ahmed, M H

    2015-05-19

    Undiagnosed diabetes constitutes a challenge for health providers, especially in rural areas. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of undiagnosed diabetes mellitus and glucose intolerance among adults in rural communities in River Nile State, north Sudan. In a cross-sectional community-based study, blood glucose, anthropometric, demographic and clinical history data were obtained from 1111 individuals from 35 villages. The prevalence of undiagnosed diabetes was 2.6% (29 individuals); glucose intolerance was detected in 1.3% (14 individuals). Classic symptoms (polydipsia, polyuria and weight loss) were present in around half of the participants but were not more prevalent in those with diabetes. Lower educational level, increasing age, hypertension and unexplained weight loss were significant risk factors for diabetes. Other variables (obesity, sex, occupation, alcohol consumption and cigarette smoking) were not significant risk factors. There is a low prevalence of undiagnosed diabetes and glucose intolerance in the rural population of River Nile State.

  14. Fatores de risco para retinopatia diabética Risk factors for diabetic retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cristina Boelter

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A retinopatia diabética (RD é uma complicação crônica do diabete melito (DM que, após 20 anos de duração de diabete melito, ocorre em 99% dos pacientes com diabete melito tipo 1 e em 60% dos pacientes com diabete melito tipo 2, sendo a principal causa de cegueira em adultos. Níveis de glicose e pressão arterial elevados, junto com longo tempo de duração do DM, são os principais fatores de risco. Os fatores de risco para retinopatia diabética podem ser classificados como genéticos e não genéticos, onde estão incluídos aqueles relacionados ou não ao diabete melito, ambientais e oculares. O controle dos fatores de risco conhecidos e o tratamento adequado são a principal base do manejo da retinopatia diabética. O objetivo desta revisão é fornecer ao oftalmologista uma informação atualizada destes fatores, com ênfase no aspecto preventivo de perdas visuais no paciente com diabete melito.Diabetic retinopathy (DR is a chronic complication of diabetes mellitus (DM. After 20 years of diabetes duration Diabetic retinopathy, occurs in 90% of the type 1 diabetes mellitus patients and in 60% of the type 2 diabetes mellitus patients, being the main cause of blindness in adults. High glicemia and blood pressure levels, along with the long diabetes mellitus duration, are the main risk factors for diabetes mellitus Diabetic retinopathy. Other factors can also be associated with the loss of vision that occurs in diabetes mellitus. The risk factors can be classified as genetical or non-genetical, the latter including factors related or not to diabetes mellitus, environmental and ocular. Control of the known risk factors and effective treatment are the main basis of the Diabetic retinopathy management. The aim of this review is to provide to the ophthalmologist an up to date information of these factors, with emphasis in the preventive aspects of the visual loss in the patients with diabetes mellitus.

  15. The prevalence of diabetes mellitus and associated risk factors in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    triplicate with Harpenden calipers. Fasting blood samples were drawn ... for diabetic and non-diabetic subjects are shown in Table 11. method.1 Diabetes and ... circumference, hip circumference, triceps skinfold thickness, physical activity and ...

  16. Cardiovascular risk factors and incident albuminuria in screen-detected type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Webb, D R; Zaccardi, F; Davies, M J

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It is unclear whether cardiovascular risk factor modification influences the development of renal disease in people with type 2 diabetes identified through screening. We determined predictors of albuminuria five years after a diagnosis of screen-detected diabetes within the ADDITION-E...

  17. Effects of Probiotic Yogurt Consumption on Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors in Subjects with Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F mohammadi

    2015-02-01

    Conclusion: Consumption of probiotic yogurt improved lipid profile and some inflammatory biomarkers in patients with type 2 diabetes. Also, probiotic yogurt caused significant decrease in HbA1c. It is suggested that probiotic yogurt may be used as an adjunct therapy to reduce the cardiovascular disease risk factors in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients

  18. Cardiovascular risk factors and diseases precede oral hypoglycaemic therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erkens, JA; Herings, RMC; Stolk, RP; Spoelstra, JA; Grobbee, DE; Leufkens, HGM

    Although patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease share common risk factors, the link between these diseases remains largely unexplained. In this case-control study, the earlier use of cardiovascular drugs (before the diagnosis of diabetes) was investigated among cases with

  19. Risk Factors for Foot Amputation in Patients Hospitalized for Diabetic Foot Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Teresa Verrone Quilici; Fernando de Sá Del Fiol; Alexandre Eduardo Franzin Vieira; Maria Inês de Toledo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify and quantify risk factors for amputation in diabetic patients hospitalized for foot infections. This cross-sectional study comprised 100 patients with diabetic infectious complications in the lower limbs. The variables investigated were related to diabetes, infection, and treatment compliance. Multiple Cox regression analysis was performed to identify the variables independently associated with the outcome of amputation. The most prevalent chronic complic...

  20. Frequency and risk factors of severe hypoglycaemia in insulin-treated Type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Akram, K; Pedersen-Bjergaard, U; Carstensen, B

    2006-01-01

    with insulin-treated Type 2 diabetes receiving currently recommended multifactorial intervention. METHODS: Consecutive patients with insulin-treated Type 2 diabetes (n = 401) completed a questionnaire about occurrence of hypoglycaemia in the past, hypoglycaemia awareness and socio-demographic factors. A zero......AIMS: The reported risk of severe hypoglycaemia in insulin-treated Type 2 diabetes is highly variable and few studies have evaluated the influence of risk factors. We assessed the incidence and the influence of potential risk factors for severe hypoglycaemia in a questionnaire survey in subjects......-inflated negative binomial model was used to assess the influence of potential risk factors on the rate of severe hypoglycaemia. RESULTS: The overall incidence of severe hypoglycaemia in the preceding year was 0.44 episodes/person year. Sixty-six (16.5%) patients had experienced at least one event. The risk of any...

  1. Relationship between amputation and risk factors in individuals with diabetes mellitus: A study with Brazilian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantovani, Alessandra M; Fregonesi, Cristina E P T; Palma, Mariana R; Ribeiro, Fernanda E; Fernandes, Rômulo A; Christofaro, Diego G D

    Individuals with diabetes develop lower extremity amputation for several reasons. Investigations into pathways to the development of complications are important both for treatment and prevention. To evaluate the relationship between amputation and risk factors in people with diabetes mellitus. All participants included in this study (n=165) were recruited from the Diabetic Foot Program, developed in a Brazilian University, over seven years (2007-2014) and all information for this study was extracted from their clinical records. The prevalence of amputation in patients with diabetes with four risk factors was up to 20% higher when compared to those with only one risk factor. The main predictive risk factors for amputation in this population were the presence of an ulcer and smoking. The risk factors for amputation can be predicted for people with diabetes mellitus and, in the present study, the main factors were the presence of an ulcer and the smoking habit. Copyright © 2016 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Assessment of knowledge, awareness, and self-reported risk factors for type II diabetes among adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajerin, Arash; Fras, Andrew; Vanhecke, Thomas E; Ledesma, Jeremiah

    2008-08-01

    This study assessed adolescents' level of knowledge of and self-reported risk factors for type II diabetes mellitus (T2DM). We found adolescents had a relatively high level of knowledge and perception of health consequences from T2DM, but also had a high rate of self-reported risk factors.

  3. Risk Factors For Diabetic Foot In Tetouan, Morocco - A Case-Control Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hicham AOUFI

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction  Diabetes is a globally major public health problem. Its evolution is insidious and silent before the appearance of serious complications as a consequence in terms of morbidity than of mortality.  Complications in the feet are among the most frequent and feared. This study helps identify factors associated with diabetic foot in diabetic patients in the province of Tetouan in public and private sector.Methods This is a case-control study in which 136 diabetic patients monitored in the public and private sector in the province of Tetouan were chosen. 68 patients had diabetic foot and 68 were diabetic patients without this complication. Data were collected from patients’ records and supplemented by interviews. The factors compared between the two groups were socio-demographic, biological and related to diabetes and lifestyle. These risk factors were determined by bivariate and multivariate analyses.Results Statistically significant associations were found between diabetic foot and several factors including: the irregular monitoring of patients: ORadjusted = 7.7 [1.9-23], the rate of glycated hemoglobin: ORadjusted = 1.7 [1.2-2.3], diabetes duration: ORadjusted = 1.2 [1.03-1.26], and physical activity ORadjusted = 1.1 [0.02-0.9]. However, no association was found between diabetic foot and the level of education or occupation.Conclusion To prevent the development of diabetic foot, more attention should be given to diabetic patients whose diabetes duration is long, patient monitoring should be regular and diabetes control should be optimal. In addition, physical activity is recommended for diabetic patients as part of promoting healthy lifestyles

  4. [Diabetes mellitus and aging as a risk factor for cerebral vascular disease: epidemiology, pathophysiology and prevention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantú-Brito, Carlos; Mimenza-Alvarado, Alberto; Sánchez-Hernández, Juan José

    2010-01-01

    Older patients with diabetes have a high risk of vascular complications. They have an increase of approximately 3 times for developing stroke compared with subjects without diabetes. In addition, up to 75-80% of deaths in diabetic patients are associated with major cardiovascular events including stroke. The risk of stroke is high within 5 years of diagnosis for type 2 diabetes is 9% (mortality 21%), that is more than doubles the rate for the general population. From observational registries in a collaborative stroke study in Mexico, we analyzed clinical data, risk factors, and outcome of 1182 diabetic patients with cerebral ischemia, with focus in elderly subjects. There was a high frequency of hyperglycemia during the acute phase of stroke: the median value was 140 mg/dL and 40% had values higher than 180 mg/dL. Clinical outcome was usually unfavorable in elderly stroke patients with diabetes: case fatality rate was 30% at 30 days and survivors had moderate to severe disability, usually as consequence of the propensity to develop more systemic medical complications during hospital stay. Primary stroke prevention studies in patients with diabetes reveal that tight control of glucose is not associated with reduction in stroke risk. Therefore, proper control of other vascular risk factors is mandatory in patients with diabetes, in particular of arterial hypertension.

  5. Effects of liraglutide on cardiovascular risk factors in patients with type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dejgaard, Thomas F; Johansen, Nanna B; Frandsen, Christian S;

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the short-term effect of adding liraglutide 1.8 mg once daily to insulin treatment on cardiovascular risk factors in patients with type 1 diabetes. In total, 100 overweight (BMI ≥25 kg/m(2) ) adult patients (age ≥18 years) with type 1 diabetes and HbA1c ≥8% (64 mmol/mol) were....... In conclusion, in patients with long-standing type 1 diabetes liraglutide as an add-on to insulin increased heart rate and did not improve other cardiovascular risk factors after 24 weeks of treatment....

  6. Coronary artery bypass surgery in diabetic patients – risk factors for sternal wound infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenz, Kristina

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of sternal wound infections (SWI after coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG as reported worldwide is low. However, it is associated with significant increase of postoperative mortality and treatment costs. The major risk factors discussed are diabetes mellitus and bilateral IMA harvesting of the internal mammary artery. This study analyses data of 590 patients receiving CABG concerning the risk factors for SWI. Sternal wound infections occur significantly more often in diabetic patients, one crucial and significant additional risk factor is obesity.

  7. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF RISK FACTORS OF TYPE-II DIABETES IN RURAL AND URBAN POPULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ch. Kiranmai

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available : A study of effect of various risk factors on Type–II diabetes in Urban and rural population. Generally Indians seems to have great tendency to develop diabetes mellitus. In addition to this, unhealthy food habits, lack of physical activity, diabetic family history, age, obesity, smoking & alcoholism are the other causes for diabetes mellitus. AIM: To analyze the impact of different risk factors on Type – II diabetes in urban and rural population. METHODS: Total 160 subjects of urban and rural population were included in this study and their detailed histories were taken by the questionnaire. In this study we compared the blood glucose levels, unhealthy food habits, lack of physical activity, age, obesity, smoking & alcoholism in urban and rural population. RESULT: The study showed that the blood glucose levels, unhealthy food habits, lack of physical activity, diabetic family history, age, obesity, smoking & alcoholism were found higher in urban than in rural population. CONCLUSION: The results showed that the fond of Type – II diabetes is very less in rural population when compared to urban population. This is because of, the rural population had more physical activity, intake of moderate calorie food, less diabetic family history and less obese. So, these factors help to overcome the increased effect of age, smoking and alcoholism on Type – II diabetes in rural population.

  8. Is autoimmune thyroid dysfunction a risk factor for gestational diabetes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual Corrales, Eider; Andrada, Patricia; Aubá, María; Ruiz Zambrana, Alvaro; Guillén Grima, Francisco; Salvador, Javier; Escalada, Javier; Galofré, Juan C

    2014-01-01

    Some recent studies have related autoimmune thyroid dysfunction and gestational diabetes (GD). The common factor for both conditions could be the existence of pro-inflammatory homeostasis. The study objective was therefore to assess whether the presence of antithyroid antibodies is related to the occurrence of GD. Fifty-six pregnant women with serum TSH levels ≥ 2.5 mU/mL during the first trimester were retrospectively studied. Antithyroid antibodies were measured, and an O'Sullivan test was performed. GD was diagnosed based on the criteria of the Spanish Group on Diabetes and Pregnancy. Positive antithyroid antibodies were found in 21 (37.50%) women. GD was diagnosed in 15 patients, 6 of whom (10.71%) had positive antibodies, while 9 (16.07%) had negative antibodies. Data were analyzed using exact logistic regression by LogXact-8 Cytel; no statistically significant differences were found between GD patients with positive and negative autoimmunity (OR = 1.15 [95%CI = 0.28-4.51]; P=1.00). The presence of thyroid autoimmunity in women with TSH above the recommended values at the beginning of pregnancy is not associated to development of GD. However, GD prevalence was higher in these patients as compared to the Spanish general population, suggesting the need for closer monitoring in pregnant women with TSH levels ≥ 2.5 mU/mL. Copyright © 2013 SEEN. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  9. Oxidative stress parameters as biomarkers of risk factor for diabetic foot among the patients with type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carla Pozzi Oliveira

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine whether plasma levels of carbonylated proteins, total antioxidant capacity (TAC and reduced protein thiols could be suitable biomarkers of risk factors for diabetic foot. Individuals with type 2 diabetes with normal protective sensation (normal foot group vs. loss of protective sensation and/or signs of peripheral arterial disease and/or foot deformities and/or history of ulcers and/or neuropathic fractures and/or amputation (diabetic foot group were compared. The diabetic foot group showed higher carbonylated protein levels (P = 0.0457 and lower levels of TAC (P = 0.0148 and reduced protein thiols (P = 0.0088, compared with the normal foot group. In general, several other parameters of risk of diabetes complication (blood levels of glycated hemoglobin, glucose and cholesterol, duration of diabetes, body mass index and waist circumference showed a tendency of higher values in the diabetic foot group. The results suggest that the plasma levels of carbonylated proteins, TAC and reduced protein thiols could furnish information about the risk of diabetic foot, considering that the changes in these biomarkers were associated with the loss of sensitivity and foot ulcerations.

  10. Who Gets Diabetic Macular Oedema; When; and Why? Pathogenesis and Risk Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banu Turgut Ozturk

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic macular oedema (DMO presents an enormous rise in the last decades with an increasing number of diabetic patients. It has a negative impact on the health-related quality of life beside the related visual loss. Additionally, it incurs more health centre visits, higher health costs, and lower working performance. Therefore, early diagnosis and preventive measures gain more and more importance in the management of DMO. Risk factors for DMO can be divided into systemic and ocular risk factors. The leading systemic risk factors include age, type and duration of diabetes, insulin use, and glucose regulation. Hypertension, nephropathy, hyperlipidaemia, anaemia, cardiovascular disease, smoking, and amputation are other risk factors reported. In addition, susceptibility in cases with endothelial nitric oxide synthase polymorphism and vascular endothelial growth factor C634-G polymorphism has been reported. The severity of diabetic retinopathy, microaneurysm turnover, cataract surgery, incomplete vitreous detachment, and peripheral retinal ischaemia are among ocular risk factors. Though avoiding changes in the metabolic memory related to hyperglycaemia in the early period seems to be the most efficient treatment, nowadays close follow-up of patients with high risk and effort to control the modifiable risk factors seems to be the ideal treatment.

  11. Diabetes is a risk factor for pulmonary tuberculosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faurholt-Jepsen, Daniel; Range, Nyagosya; PrayGod, George;

    2011-01-01

    Background Diabetes and TB are associated, and diabetes is increasingly common in low-income countries where tuberculosis (TB) is highly endemic. However, the role of diabetes for TB has not been assessed in populations where HIV is prevalent. Methods A case-control study was conducted in an urban...

  12. Cardiovascular Autonomic Neuropathy Is Associated With Macrovascular Risk Factors in Type 2 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fleischer, Jesper; Yderstraede, Knud; Gulichsen, Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    The objective was to identify the presence of cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN) in a cohort of individuals with diabetes in outpatient clinics from 4 different parts of Denmark and to explore the difference between type 1 and type 2 diabetes in relation to CAN. The DAN-Study is a Danish...... multicenter study focusing on diabetic autonomic neuropathy. Over a period of 12 months, 382 type 1 and 271 type 2 individuals with diabetes were tested for CAN. Patients were randomly recruited and tested during normal visits to outpatient clinics at 4 Danish hospitals. The presence of CAN was quantified......, whereas in type 2 CAN was associated with macrovascular risk factors....

  13. Pleiotropic effects of liraglutide treatment on renal risk factors in type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zobel, Emilie Hein; von Scholten, Bernt Johan; Lindhardt, Morten

    2017-01-01

    response by determining if high responders (highest reduction) in each risk factor also had high response in other renal risk factors (cross-dependency). METHODS: Open-label study: 31 type 2 diabetics treated with liraglutide for 7weeks. After 3weeks washout 23 re-started treatment and were followed for 1...... possesses pleiotropic effects on renal risk factors. On patient level, effect on the individual risk factor cannot be anticipated based on response in other risk factors. Response when re-starting treatment did not differ, indicating that our primary findings were not random.......AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Management of diabetic nephropathy includes reduction of albuminuria, blood pressure and weight. The GLP-1 receptor agonist liraglutide may possess these pleiotropic effects in addition to the glucose lowering effect. We aimed to elucidate the individual liraglutide treatment...

  14. Risk factors for Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus : Metabolic Syndrome, Insulin Resistance and Primary Prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Hydrie, Muhammad Zafar Iqbal

    2012-01-01

    Aims: The purpose of the study was to identify the extent of metabolic syndrome on the basis of ATP III and IDF definition in subjects aged 25 years and above from an urban population of Karachi. Also to see the association of risk factors related to diabetes and metabolic syndrome in this population. And finally to prove the hypothesis of intervention effect on the onset of type 2 diabetes in a high risk urban population and evaluate the rate of conversion of IGT to diabetes by these interve...

  15. Treatment-dependent and treatment-independent risk factors associated with the risk of diabetes-related events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilke, Thomas; Mueller, Sabrina; Groth, Antje

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to analyse which factors predict the real-world macro-/microvascular event, hospitalisation and death risk in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Furthermore, we aimed to investigate whether there exists both an under- and over-treatment risk...... of these patients. METHODS: We used a German claims/clinical data set covering the years 2010-12. Diabetes-related events were defined as (1) macro-, (2) microvascular events leading to inpatient hospitalisation, (3) other hospitalisations with type 2 diabetes mellitus as main diagnosis, (4) all-cause death and (5......) a composite outcome including all event categories 1-4. Factors associated with event risk were analysed by a Kaplan-Meier curve analysis and by multivariable Cox regression models. RESULTS: 229,042 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (mean age 70.2 years; mean CCI 6.03) were included. Among factors...

  16. Proteinuria is an independent risk factor for ischemic stroke among diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondol, G; Rahman, K M; Uddin, M J; Bhattacharjee, M; Dey, S K; Israil, A; Miah, A H; Sarkar, U K; Islam, S S; Rahman, M M; Hossain, F; Bhuiya, M M; Bhowmik, R; Chowdhury, A H; Kabir, M S; Uddin, M S

    2012-07-01

    This study was done to assess the relationship between proteinuria and ischemic stroke in subjects with diabetes mellitus, and to determine whether proteinuria is an independent risk factor for stroke. This comparative study was conducted in Mymensingh Medical College Hospital from January 2009 to June 2010. It was done to establish the relationship between proteinuria (Microalbuminuria) and ischemic stroke among diabetic patients. Other risk factors were also assessed. Patients were divided in Group A - diabetic patients with ischemic stroke (n=50) and Group B diabetic patients without stroke (n=50). Mean age of the Group A & B were 60.16±8.33 and 57.19±7.73 years (p=0.068). Mean Blood sugar (2 hours after Break Fast) was 14.68±4.32mmol/L in Group A and 14.75±4.02mmol/L in Group B (p>0.05). Albumin Creatinine ratio was abnormal in 84.0% in Group A and 22.0% in Group A (p=0.001) [Odds ratio (95%CI) = 18.61 (6.78-51.09)]. Logistic regression analysis has also shown that microalbuminuria (ACR) is an independent risk factor for ischemic stroke (p=0.001), [Odds ratio (95%CI) = 19.811(5.915-66.348)]. In diabetic patients increased urinary protein is a risk factor for stroke. Estimation of urinary protein (Microalbuminuria) may be used as a predictor for ischemic stroke in patients with diabetes.

  17. Chemical substances as risk factors of nephropathy in diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zofia Marchewka

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Although diabetes mellitus, a metabolic disease, does not fall into the group of diseases induced by toxic substances or environmental pollution, there is much evidence that some chemicals have considerable importance in its development. Exposure to substances with potential renal toxicity is especially dangerous for diabetics because it accelerates and intensifies diabetic nephropathy. This paper discusses the relationship between the xenobiotics and the development of diabetes mellitus and diabetic nephropathy with particular emphasis on those substances that causes the greatest damage to the kidneys. These are cadmium, iron, lead, arsenic, polychlorinated organic compounds, nitrogen compounds, and contrast agents. In addition, the mechanisms of diabetes mellitus induction or kidney damage by these xenobiotics are described.

  18. Is Diabetes Mellitus a Risk Factor for Open-Angle Glaucoma? The Rotterdam Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voogd, S. de; Ikram, M.K.; Wolfs. R.C.W., [No Value; Jansonius, N.M.; Witteman, J.C.M.; Hofman, A.; de Jong, P.T.V.M.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether diabetes mellitus is a risk factor for open-angle glaucoma (OAG). Design: Prospective population-based cohort study. Participants: Participants ages =55 years from the Rotterdam Study, The Netherlands. Methods: Participants at risk for incident OAG (iOAG) underwent at

  19. Noninvasive Screening for Risk Factors of Type 2 Diabetes in Young, Rural, Caucasian Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Sharon; Sheffer, Sarah; Long Roth, Sara; Bennett, Paul A.; Lloyd, Les

    2010-01-01

    School nurses play an important role in identifying students who are at risk for Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Few studies have screened Caucasian students, and none have targeted rural, low-income, elementary children. The five noninvasive risk factors used for this study were family history, high body mass index (BMI) for age/sex,…

  20. Is diabetes mellitus a risk factor for open-angle glaucoma? The Rotterdam Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Voogd, Simone; Ikram, M. Kamran; Wolfs, Roger C. W.; Jansonius, Nomdo M.; Witteman, Jacqueline C. M.; Hofman, Albert; de Jong, Paulus T. V. M.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether diabetes mellitus is a risk factor for open-angle glaucoma (OAG). Design: Prospective population-based cohort study. Participants: Participants ages >= 55 years from the Rotterdam Study, The Netherlands. Methods: Participants at risk for incident OAG (iOAG) underwent

  1. Maternal and neonatal risk factors for childhood type 1 diabetes: a matched case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harrild Kirsten

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An interaction between genetic susceptibility and environmental factors is thought to be involved in the aetiology of type 1 diabetes. The aim of this study was to investigate maternal and neonatal risk factors for type 1 diabetes in children under 15 years old in Grampian, Scotland. Methods A matched case-control study was conducted by record linkage. Cases (n = 361 were children born in Aberdeen Maternity Hospital from 1972 to 2002, inclusive, who developed type 1 diabetes, identified from the Scottish Study Group for the Care of Diabetes in the Young Register. Controls (n = 1083 were randomly selected from the Aberdeen Maternity Neonatal Databank, matched by year of birth. Exposure data were obtained from the Aberdeen Maternity Neonatal Databank. Conditional logistic regression was used to evaluate the association between various maternal and neonatal factors and the risk of type 1 diabetes. Results There was no evidence of statistically significant associations between type 1 diabetes and maternal age, maternal body mass index, previous abortions, pre-eclampsia, amniocentesis, maternal deprivation, use of syntocinon, mode of delivery, antepartum haemorrhage, baby's sex, gestational age at birth, birth order, birth weight, jaundice, phototherapy, breast feeding, admission to neonatal unit and Apgar score (P > 0.05. A significantly decreased risk of type 1 diabetes was observed in children whose mothers smoked at the booking appointment compared to those whose mothers did not, with an adjusted OR of 0.67, 95% CI (0.46, 0.99. Conclusions This case-control study found limited evidence of a reduced risk of the development of type 1 diabetes in children whose mothers smoked, compared to children whose mothers did not. No evidence was found of a significant association between other maternal and neonatal factors and childhood type 1 diabetes.

  2. Diabetes and cancer: two diseases with obesity as a common risk factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, S K; Maurer, H; Reed, K; Selagamsetty, R

    2014-01-01

    There is a growing body of evidence to support a connection between diabetes (predominantly type 2), obesity and cancer. Multiple meta-analyses of epidemiological data show that people with diabetes are at increased risk of developing many different types of cancers, along with an increased risk of cancer mortality. Several pathophysiological mechanisms for this relationship have been postulated, including insulin resistance and hyperinsulinaemia, enhanced inflammatory processes, dysregulation of sex hormone production and hyperglycaemia. In addition to these potential mechanisms, a number of common risk factors, including obesity, may be behind the association between diabetes and cancer. Indeed, obesity is associated with an increased risk of cancer and diabetes. Abdominal adiposity has been shown to play a role in creating a systemic pro-inflammatory environment, which could result in the development of both diabetes and cancer. Here, we examine the relationship between diabetes, obesity and cancer, and investigate the potential underlying causes of increased cancer risk in individuals with diabetes. Current treatment recommendations for reducing the overall disease burden are also explored and possible areas for future research are considered. PMID:23668396

  3. Population-Level Prediction of Type 2 Diabetes From Claims Data and Analysis of Risk Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razavian, Narges; Blecker, Saul; Schmidt, Ann Marie; Smith-McLallen, Aaron; Nigam, Somesh; Sontag, David

    2015-12-01

    We present a new approach to population health, in which data-driven predictive models are learned for outcomes such as type 2 diabetes. Our approach enables risk assessment from readily available electronic claims data on large populations, without additional screening cost. Proposed model uncovers early and late-stage risk factors. Using administrative claims, pharmacy records, healthcare utilization, and laboratory results of 4.1 million individuals between 2005 and 2009, an initial set of 42,000 variables were derived that together describe the full health status and history of every individual. Machine learning was then used to methodically enhance predictive variable set and fit models predicting onset of type 2 diabetes in 2009-2011, 2010-2012, and 2011-2013. We compared the enhanced model with a parsimonious model consisting of known diabetes risk factors in a real-world environment, where missing values are common and prevalent. Furthermore, we analyzed novel and known risk factors emerging from the model at different age groups at different stages before the onset. Parsimonious model using 21 classic diabetes risk factors resulted in area under ROC curve (AUC) of 0.75 for diabetes prediction within a 2-year window following the baseline. The enhanced model increased the AUC to 0.80, with about 900 variables selected as predictive (p type 2 diabetes, such as chronic liver disease (odds ratio [OR] 3.71), high alanine aminotransferase (OR 2.26), esophageal reflux (OR 1.85), and history of acute bronchitis (OR 1.45). Liver risk factors emerge later in the process of diabetes development compared with obesity-related factors such as hypertension and high hemoglobin A1c. In conclusion, population-level risk prediction for type 2 diabetes using readily available administrative data is feasible and has better prediction performance than classical diabetes risk prediction algorithms on very large populations with missing data. The new model enables intervention

  4. Risk factors for cost-related medication non-adherence among older patients with diabetes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    James; X; Zhang; Jhee; U; Lee; David; O; Meltzer

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To assess the risk factors for cost-related medication non-adherence(CRN) among older patients with diabetes in the United States. METHODS: We used data from the 2010 Health and Retirement Study to assess risk factors for CRN including age, drug insurance coverage, nursing home residence, functional limitations, and frequency of hospitalization. CRN was self-reported. We conducted multivariate regression analysis to assess the effect of each risk factor. RESULTS: Eight hundred and seventy-five(18%) of 4880 diabetes patients reported CRN. Age less than 65 years, lack of drug insurance coverage, and frequent hospitalization significantly increased risk for CRN. Limitation in both activities of daily living and instrumental activities of daily living were also generally associated with increased risk of CRN. Residence in a nursing home and Medicaid coverage significantly reduced risk.CONCLUSION: These results suggest that expandingprescription coverage to uninsured, sicker, and community-dwelling individuals is likely to produce the largest decreases in CRN.

  5. Diabetes prevalence and risk factors among ethnic minorities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ujcic-Voortman, J.K.; Schram, M.T.; Jacobs-van der Bruggen, M.A.; Verhoeff, A.P.; Baan, C.A.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Ethnic minorities living in Western societies may have a higher prevalence of diabetes. We investigated whether the prevalence of diabetes among Turkish and Moroccan migrants differs from the indigenous urban population in the Netherlands, and whether these differences can be explained b

  6. Gestational diabetes as a risk factor for pancreatic cancer: a prospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calderon R

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diabetes is known to be associated with cancer of the pancreas, though there is some debate as to whether it is a cause or a consequence of the disease. We investigated the incidence of pancreatic cancer in a cohort of 37926 Israeli women followed for 28–40 years for whom information on diabetes had been collected at the time they gave birth, in 1964–1976, in Jerusalem. There were 54 cases of pancreatic cancer ascertained from the Israel Cancer Registry during follow-up. Methods We used Cox proportional hazards models to adjust for age at baseline and explore effects of other risk factors, including ethnic groups, preeclampsia, birth order and birth weight of offspring. Results We observed no cases of pancreatic cancer in the women with insulin dependent diabetes; however, there were five cases in the women with gestational diabetes. The interval between the record of diabetes in pregnancy and the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer ranged from 14–35 years. Women with a history of gestational diabetes showed a relative risk of pancreatic cancer of 7.1 (95% confidence interval, 2.8–18.0. Conclusion We conclude that gestational diabetes is strongly related to the risk of cancer of the pancreas in women in this population, and that gestational diabetes can precede cancer diagnosis by many years.

  7. Type 2 diabetes mellitus as a risk factor for the onset of depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nouwen, Arie; Winkley, Kirsty; Twisk, Jos W R

    2010-01-01

    examined the association of diabetes and the onset of depression by reviewing the literature and conducting a meta-analysis of longitudinal studies on this topic. METHODS: EMBASE, MEDLINE and PsycInfo were searched for articles published up to September 2009. All studies that examined the relationship......AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: An earlier meta-analysis showed that diabetes is a risk factor for the development and/or recurrence of depression. Yet whether this risk is different for studies using questionnaires than for those relying on diagnostic criteria for depression has not been examined. This study...... between type 2 diabetes and the onset of depression were included. Pooled relative risks were calculated using fixed and random effects models. RESULTS: Eleven studies met our inclusion criteria for this meta-analysis. Based on the pooled data, including 48,808 cases of type 2 diabetes without depression...

  8. Low birth weight. A risk factor for development of diabetic nephropathy?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossing, P; Tarnow, L; Nielsen, F S

    1995-01-01

    for expression of renal disease after exposure to potentially injurious renal stimuli. The aim of this study was to determine if low birth weight is a risk factor for development of diabetic nephropathy. In a case-control study, we investigated 184 (110 men) insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) patients......It has been demonstrated that intrauterine growth retardation, defined as birth weight below the 10th percentile, gives rise to a reduction in nephron number. Oligonephropathy has been suggested to increase the risk for systemic and glomerular hypertension in adult life as well as enhance risk...... with diabetic nephropathy (persistent albuminuria > 300 mg/24 h) (age [mean +/- SD] 41.0 +/- 9.3 years, duration of diabetes 26.9 +/- 8.2 years) and 182 (111 men) normoalbuminuric (birth...

  9. The Presence of Family History and the Development of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Risk Factors in Rural Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Marsha Howell; Barnett Lammon, Carol Ann

    2007-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is reaching epidemic proportions among children and adolescents. School health fairs offer an opportunity to identify children with risk factors for the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus. This study identified selected risk factors (i.e., high-risk racial/ethnic group, obesity, elevated blood pressure, elevated…

  10. Plasma prekallikrein as a risk factor for diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedzierska, Karolina; Ciechanowski, Kazimierz; Gołembiewska, Edyta; Safranow, Krzysztof; Ciechanowicz, Andrzej; Domański, Leszek; Myślak, Marek; Róźański, Jacek

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the study was to verify the hypothesis that in diabetes there is an increased activation of coagulation system leading in consequence to diabetic retinopathy. Thirty three healthy subjects (controls, 16 males and 17 females) and 35 patients with diabetes type 1 (15 males and 20 females) were examined. We monitored plasma prekallikrein (PPK), glycemia, fructosamine, glycosylated hemoglobin, activated partial thromboplastin time (PTT), INR, fibrinolysis in euglobulins time (FET), level of antithrombin III (AT III), fibrinogen (Fb) and fibrinogen degradation products (FDP). In diabetic patients without retinopathy, PKK concentration was 16% higher (p PKK concentration was 50% higher (p <0.001) than in controls. In the subgroup of patients with proliferative retinopathy PTT was significantly shorter (p <0.001), and FET was significantly longer (p <0.001) than in control. In patients with diabetes higher FDP concentrations were found than in controls (p <0.05). Significant correlations were found between PPK and fructosamine levels in all diabetic patients (R(S)=+0.57 p <0.001), in diabetic patients without retinopathy (R(S)=+0.61, p <0.05), and in diabetic patients with retinopathy (R(S)=+0.62, p <0.005). We found negative correlation between PPK concentration and PTT (R(S)=-0.43, p <0.001) and positive correlation between PPK concentration and FET (R(S)=+0.59, p <0.00001) in the entire study group. The occurrence of diabetic retinopathy is connected with higher levels of plasma prekallikrein.

  11. Risk Factors Accompanied with Nephropathy in Patients with Type II Diabetes; Test of the Biopsychosocial Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Rahimian Boogar

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: The study of biopsychosocial factors influencing nephropathy as a most serious complication of type II diabetes is important. This study aimed to investigate risk factors accompanied with nephropathy in patients with type II diabetes based on the biopsychosocial model. Materials & Methods: In a cross-sectional descriptive study, 295 patients with type II diabetes were selected by convenience sampling in Tehran Shariati hospital outpatient clinics. The data were collected by demographical information questionnaire along with disease characteristics and depression anxiety stress scales (dass, quality of life scale (who- qol- bref, diabetes self-management scale (dsms, and diabetes knowledge scale (dks, then analyzed by chi-square, independent t-test and logistic regression with pasw software. Results: Hypertension (OR=3.841 & P0.05.Conclusion: It is important to pay attention to hypertension, glycated hemoglobin, body mass index, diabetes self-management, depression, quality of life, and diabetes knowledge for therapeutic intervention programming and diabetes complications control protocols for diabetic patients.(Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci 2012;19(2:44-53

  12. Trends for type 2 diabetes and other cardiovascular risk factors in Mexico from 1993-2006

    OpenAIRE

    Salvador Villalpando; Teresa Shamah-Levy; Rosalba Rojas; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos A.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the trends in the prevalence of type 2 diabetes (T2D), and other cardiovascular risk factors in three national health surveys (1993, 2000 and 2006). MATERIALS AND METHODS: The databases of three surveys: ENEC 1993, ENSA 2000 and ENSANUT 2006 were gathered. Calculations of published data were reprocessed to do appropriate adjustments to assure comparability among surveys. RESULTS: From 1993 to 2006 the prevalence of type 2 diabetes (6.7-14.4%), metabolic syndrome (26.6-3...

  13. The Prevalence of Diabetogenic Risk Factors in Newly Diagnosed Diabetic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitrache Marilena

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: The aim of this paper was the improvement of diabetes mellitus primary prevention through analysis of the prevalence of diabetogenic risk factors. Materials and Methods: The study group comprises 1590 newly diagnosed subjects with diabetes mellitus in a 24 month period in Ploiesti Municipal Hospital. We analyzed the prevalence in this population of some diabetogenic risk factors reported by different risk scores, including gender, age, body mass index (BMI, waist circumference (CA, physical activity at least 30 minutes a day, daily fruit and vegetable consumption, blood pressure history, family history of diabetes, etc. Results: Two-thirds of the patients declared a recent major stress. 74% had dyslipidemia at enrolment or hypolipidemic treatment. The presence of fetal macrosomia in the personal history was about 21%, from which 66% with a familial diabetes mellitus history. Conclusions: The risk factors` increased prevalence in diabetes mellitus detected in the analyzed sample population should determine an increased vigilance for an early screening of the people at risk, and to an early diagnosis of the disease.

  14. Risk factors of diabetic foot Charcot arthropathy: a case-control study at a Malaysian tertiary care centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauzi, Aishah Ahmad; Chung, Tze Yang; Latif, Lydia Abdul

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION This study aimed to determine the risk factors of diabetic Charcot arthropathy of the foot among diabetic patients with and without foot problems. METHODS This was a case-control study involving diabetic patients attending the Diabetic Foot Care and Wound Management Clinic at University Malaya Medical Centre, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, from June 2010 to June 2011. Data on sociodemographic profiles, foot factors and diabetes characteristics was collected and analysed. RESULTS A total of 48 diabetic patients with Charcot arthropathy of the foot were identified. Data from these 48 patients was compared with those of 52 diabetic patients without foot problems. Up to 83.3% of patients with diabetic Charcot arthropathy presented with unilateral Charcot foot, most commonly located at the midfoot (45.8%). Patients with a history of foot problems, including foot ulcer, amputation, surgery or a combination of problems, had the highest (26-time) likelihood of developing Charcot arthropathy (odds ratio 26.4; 95% confidence interval 6.4–109.6). Other significant risk factors included age below 60 years, more than ten years’ duration of diabetes mellitus and the presence of nephropathy. CONCLUSION A history of prior diabetic foot problems is the greatest risk factor for developing diabetic Charcot arthropathy, compared with other risk factors such as diabetes characteristics and sociodemographic profiles. Preventive management of diabetic foot problems in the primary care setting and multidisciplinary care are of paramount importance, especially among chronic diabetic patients. PMID:27075668

  15. Therapies for type 2 diabetes: lowering HbA1c and associated cardiovascular risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurukulasuriya L Romayne

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives To summarize data supporting the effects of antidiabetes agents on glucose control and cardiovascular risk factors in patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods Studies reporting on the effects of antidiabetes agents on glycemic control, body weight, lipid levels, and blood pressure parameters are reviewed and summarized for the purpose of selecting optimal therapeutic regimens for patients with type 2 diabetes. Results National guidelines recommend the aggressive management of cardiovascular risk factors in patients with type 2 diabetes, including weight loss and achieving lipid and blood pressure treatment goals. All antidiabetes pharmacotherapies lower glucose; however, effects on cardiovascular risk factors vary greatly among agents. While thiazolidinediones, sulfonylureas, and insulin are associated with weight gain, dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors are considered weight neutral and metformin can be weight neutral or associated with a small weight loss. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists and amylinomimetics (e.g. pramlintide result in weight loss. Additionally, metformin, thiazolidinediones, insulin, and glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists have demonstrated beneficial effects on lipid and blood pressure parameters. Conclusion Management of the cardiovascular risk factors experienced by patients with type 2 diabetes requires a multidisciplinary approach with implementation of treatment strategies to achieve not only glycemic goals but to improve and/or correct the underlying cardiovascular risk factors.

  16. Contribution of Environmental Risk Factors Including Lifestyle to Inequalities Noncommunicable (Chronic Diseases such as Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elzbieta Grochowska Niedworok

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Health inequalities: differences in health status or in the distribution of health determinants between different population groups. Some health inequalities are attributable to biological variations or free choice and others are attributable to the external environment and conditions mainly outside the control of the individuals concerned. 347 million people worldwide have diabetes. In 2012 an estimated 1.5 million deaths were directly caused by diabetes. More than 80% of diabetes deaths occur in low- and middle-income countries. WHO projects that diabetes will be the 7th leading cause of death in 2030. Healthy diet, regular physical activity and maintaining a normal body weight can prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes. Risk factors: 1. Age- the prevalence of diabetes rises steeply with age: *one in twenty people over the age of 65 have diabetes, *and this rises to one in five people over the age of 85 years. The diagnosis of diabetes may be delayed in older people, with symptoms of diabetes being wrongly attributed to ageing. 2. Ethnic: type 2 diabetes is up to six times more common in people of South Asian descent and up to three times more common in those of African and African-Caribbean descent then in the white population. It is also more common in people of Chinese descent and other non-Caucasian groups. 3. Gender: the frequency of diabetes usually is higher in men than in women. This may be because gender compounds other aspects of inequality- women often bear the brunt of poverty, and socio-economic differences in the prevalence of diabetes are more marked for women, probably because of differences in smoking rates, food choices and the prevalence of obesity. 4. Overweight/Obesity: every 1 kg/m2 more causes increase risk: cardiovascular diseases 2%, coronary artery disease- 3% , myocardial infarction- 5% , heart failure- 5% , peripheral vascular disease- 5%. Health inqualities important in diabetes -- modifiable:  social

  17. The Use of Major Risk Factors for Computer-Based Distinction of Diabetic Patients with Ischemic Stroke and Without Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    Features include age, gender, duration of diabetes , cholesterol, higher density lipoprotein (HDL), triglicerit levels, neuropathy, nephropathy ...THE USE of MAJOR RISK FACTORS for COMPUTER-BASED DISTINCTION of DIABETIC PATIENTS with ISCHEMIC STROKE and WITHOUT STROKE Sibel Oge Merey1...boun.edu.tr Abstract- This study proposes a computer-based decision support system to investigate the distinctive factors of diabetes mellitus (DM

  18. Footwear and foot care knowledge as risk factors for foot problems in Indian diabetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandalia, H B; Singh, D; Kapoor, V; Chandalia, S H; Lamba, P S

    2008-10-01

    We assessed 300 diabetic and 100 age- and sex-matched controls for correlating foot wear practices and foot care knowledge and the presence of foot complications. A structured questionnaire evaluated the knowledge about foot care, type of footwear used, education level, association of tobacco abuse, and any associated symptoms of foot disease. Clinical evaluation was done by inspection of feet for presence of any external deformities, assessment of sensory function (vibration perception threshold, VPT), vascular status (foot pulses and ankle brachial ratio) and presence of any infection.In the diabetes category, 44.7% patients had not received previous foot care education. 0.6% walked barefoot outdoors and 45% walked barefoot indoors. Fourteen (4.7%) patients gave history of foot ulceration in the past and comprised the high risk group; only 2 out of 14 had received foot care education, 6 gave history of tobacco abuse, 8 had symptoms of claudication, 9 had paresthesias, 2 walked barefoot indoors. Average duration of diabetes in the high-risk and low-risk diabetes group was 10.85 +/- 6.53 and 9.83 +/- 7.99 years, respectively. In the high- and low-risk diabetic groups, VPT was 19.57 +/- 11.26 and 15.20 +/- 10.21V (P practices were important risk factors for foot problems in diabetes.

  19. Combination of diabetes risk factors and hepatic steatosis in Chinese: the Cardiometabolic Risk in Chinese (CRC Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Liang

    Full Text Available AIMS: Hepatic steatosis has been related to insulin resistance and increased diabetes risk. We assessed whether combination of diabetes risk factors, evaluated by the Finnish Diabetes Risk Score, was associated with risk of hepatic steatosis in an apparently healthy Chinese population. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: The study samples were from a community-based health examination survey in central China. In total 1,780 men and women (18-64 y were included in the final analyses. Hepatic steatosis was diagnosed by ultrasonography. We created combination of diabetes risk factors score on basis of age, Body Mass Index, waist circumference, physical activity at least 4 h a week, daily consumption of fruits, berries or vegetables, history of antihypertensive drug treatment, history of high blood glucose. The total risk score is a simple sum of the individual weights, and values range from 0 to 20. RESULTS: Hepatic steatosis was present 18% in the total population. In multivariate models, the odds ratios of hepatic steatosis were 1.20 (95%CI 1.15-1.25 in men and 1.25 (95%CI 1.14-1.37 in women by each unit increase in the combination of diabetes risk factors score, after adjustment for blood pressure, liver enzymes, plasma lipids, and fasting glucose. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for hepatic steatosis was 0.78 (95%CI 0.76-0.80, 0.76 in men (95%CI 0.74-0.78 and 0.83 (95%CI 0.79-0.87 in women. CONCLUSIONS: Our data suggest that combination of major diabetes risk factors was significantly related to risk of hepatic steatosis in Chinese adults.

  20. Risk factor modification in diabetic patients following angiographic identification of multi-vessel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hee, Leia; Thomas, Liza; Ang, Xinhui; Yang, Lihua; Lo, Sidney; Juergens, Craig P; Mussap, Christian J; Dignan, Rebecca; French, John K

    2013-08-20

    There is little information on whether identification of multi-vessel disease (MVD) in patients with diabetic mellitus (DM) affects risk factor management. From 1125 consecutively screened patients between June 2006 and March 2010, we examined 227 diabetic patients with MVD on coronary angiography. Diabetic control and cholesterol levels were assessed by glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) and total cholesterol (TC) respectively which were evaluated at baseline and at 1-year follow-up. Patients were grouped by age into 75(n=44). Target levels were defined as HbA1cdiabetic patients, risk factor modification at 1-year was poor despite identification of MVD. Developing an effective education and monitoring programme to improve glycaemic control in this high risk group should be a priority.

  1. Prevalence and Risk Factors of Gestational Diabetes in Iran: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehri JAFARI-SHOBEIRI JAFARI-SHOBEIRI

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gestational Diabetes (GD is one of the major public health issues. The purpose of the present study was to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess the risk factors and prevalence rate of this disorder in Iran.Methods: This systematic review and meta- analysis article was prepared using the databases of Science Direct, Pub-Med, Scopus, Magiran, Iranmedex and SID, Google search engine, Gray Literature, reference lists check and hand searching using keywords such as "prevalence", "gestational diabetes mellitus", "GDM", "risk factor*", "Iran" and "Postpartum Diabetes". The selected papers were fully reviewed and the required information for the systematic re-view was extracted and summarized using extraction table in Microsoft Office Excel software.Results: Twenty-four of 1011 papers were quite relevant to the objectives of the review so they were included. The mean age of the participants was 29.43±4.97 yr and the prevalence of GDMwas 3.41% (the highest and the lowest prevalence rates were 18.6% and 1.3% respectively. Among the influential factors mentioned in the literature, poten-tial causes of GDM are gestational age, history of gestational diabetes, family history of diabetes, body mass index, abortions and parity, and history of macrosomia.Conclusion: Considering the high prevalence of postpartum diabetes and its related factors in Iran, strategic planning for disease prevention and reduction is inevitable.

  2. [Relationship diabetes mellitus-periodontal disease: etiology and risk factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foia, Liliana; Toma, Vasilica; Ungureanu, Didona; Aanei, Carmen; Costuleanu, M

    2007-01-01

    The interrelation between diabetes mellitus and inflammatory periodontal disease has been intensively studied for more than 50 years, a real bidirectional influence existing between patient's glycemic level disorder and periodontal territories alteration. Several studies developed in this direction emerged to the evidences that reveal a general increase of prevalence, extent and severity of gingivitis and periodontitis. Inflammation plays an important role in this interrelation, orchestrating both the periodontal disease and diabetes mellitus pathogeny and complications. Conversely, periodontal disease--infectious disease characterized by a significant inflammatory component--can seriously impair metabolic control of some diabetic patient. Moreover, treatment of periodontal disease and reduction of oral signs of inflammation may have a beneficial result on the diabetic condition (1). Less clear are the mechanisms governing this interrelation (even the literature is abundant in this direction), and, very probably, periodontal diseases serve as initiators of insulin resistance (in a way similar to obesity), thereby aggravating glycemic control. Further research is so imposed in order to clarify this aspect of the relationship between diabetes and periodontal disease.

  3. Risk Factors for Foot Amputation in Patients Hospitalized for Diabetic Foot Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quilici, Maria Teresa Verrone; Del Fiol, Fernando de Sá; Vieira, Alexandre Eduardo Franzin; Toledo, Maria Inês

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify and quantify risk factors for amputation in diabetic patients hospitalized for foot infections. This cross-sectional study comprised 100 patients with diabetic infectious complications in the lower limbs. The variables investigated were related to diabetes, infection, and treatment compliance. Multiple Cox regression analysis was performed to identify the variables independently associated with the outcome of amputation. The most prevalent chronic complications were neuropathy and hypertension. Most patients presented with a neuroischemic foot (86%). The Morisky test showed that 72% were not compliant with diabetes treatment. Regarding patient outcome, 61% progressed to amputation, 14% to debridement, and 9% to revascularization. The results showed a 42% higher risk for progression to amputation in patients with previous use of antimicrobials. Also, the amputation risk was 26% higher for those less compliant with diabetes treatment. An increase of one point in the Wagner ulcer classification criteria corresponded to a 65% increase in the risk of amputation. Undergoing conservative, nonsurgical procedures prior to admission provided a 63% reduction in the risk of amputation. Knowledge of these factors is critical to enable multidisciplinary teams to develop treatment plans for these patients so as to prevent the need for amputation.

  4. Frequency and risk factors of severe hypoglycemia in insulin-treated type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Akram, Kamran; Pedersen-Bjergaard, Ulrik; Borch-Johnsen, Knut

    2006-01-01

    . Only few studies looked into the impact of risk factors on the rate of SH. Impaired hypoglycemia awareness, high age, long duration of diabetes and insulin therapy increased the risk, while no association was found with HbA1c and insulin dose. The present knowledge of SH in insulin-treated type 2......Intensive treatment regimens including early initiation of insulin treatment are important to prevent late complications in type 2 diabetes. The assumed risk of severe hypoglycemia (SH) is a major barrier to initiation of insulin treatment. To assess the relevance of this risk we evaluated...... the frequency of SH as reported in the literature. Using Medline and Embase search we identified 11 studies (5 retrospective and 6 prospective) including at least 50 patients with insulin-treated type 2 diabetes followed for at least 6 months in which frequency of SH was reported. The incidence of SH...

  5. IMPACT OF VITAMINS IN PREVENTION OF RISK FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH TYPE-2 DIABETES MELLITUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.K. Gupta*, Asha Pathak , Manoj Gahlot , R.C. Verma and C.V. Singh

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Diabetes mellitus is one of the most common metabolic disorders that cause micro and macro vascular complications. Because of additive effects of hyperglycaemia and hyperlipidaemia for cardiovascular disease, serum lipid and glucose level should be closely monitored in diabetes. Chronic Hyperglycaemia resulting from diabetes has profound effects on nearly every system of the body. The toxic effects of hyperglycaemia may result from accumulation of nonenzymatically glycosylated products, increased sorbitol production in tissue, formation of diacylglycerol leading to activation of protein kinase C or by free radical generation. Since type 2 DM is a major public health problem, accounting for significant premature mortality and morbidity, every possible effort should be made to minimize its complications. Studies have shown that diabetes is accompa¬nied by an increased oxidative damage to all the bimolecules. Enhanced oxidative stress contributes to the development of the diabetic complications. Over the last 5 years, a number of large observational studies have suggested an association between the onset of type 2 diabetes and Vitamin deficiencies. As vitamins have important effects on insulin action, serum lipid and glucose and may have impact on a number of pathways which may be of importance in the development of type 2 diabetes. This article reviews the evidence linking role of Vitamins in the prevention of risk factors associated with type 2 diabetes, and suggests current recommendations for supplementation and the most pertinent research on the use of key vitamins in diabetes management.

  6. RISK FACTORS AND PREVALENCE OF DIABETIC FOOT ULCERS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    2003-01-01

    Jan 1, 2003 ... higher total cholesterol and diastolic blood pressure compared to other ulcer types. Wagner stage 2 ... Conclusion: The prevalence of diabetic foot ulcers was 4.6% in this tertiary clinic. The ..... The distribution and severity of ...

  7. Job Strain as a Risk Factor for Type 2 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyberg, Solja T; Fransson, Eleonor I; Heikkilä, Katriina

    2014-01-01

    with baseline questionnaires. Incident type 2 diabetes at follow-up was ascertained using national health registers, clinical screening, and self-reports. We analyzed data for each study using Cox regression and pooled the study-specific estimates in fixed-effect meta-analyses. RESULTS: There were 3,703 cases...

  8. Insulin-like growth factor axis and risk of type 2 diabetes in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajpathak, Swapnil N; He, Meian; Sun, Qi; Kaplan, Robert C; Muzumdar, Radhika; Rohan, Thomas E; Gunter, Marc J; Pollak, Michael; Kim, Mimi; Pessin, Jeffrey E; Beasley, Jeannette; Wylie-Rosett, Judith; Hu, Frank B; Strickler, Howard D

    2012-09-01

    IGF-I shares structural homology and in vitro metabolic activity with insulin. Laboratory models suggest that IGF-I and its binding proteins IGFBP-1 and IGFBP-2 have potentially beneficial effects on diabetes risk, whereas IGFBP-3 may have adverse effects. We therefore conducted a prospective nested case-control investigation of incident diabetes (n = 742 case subjects matched 1:1 to control subjects) and its associations with IGF-axis protein levels in the Nurses' Health Study, a cohort of middle-aged women. The median time to diabetes was 9 years. Statistical analyses were adjusted for multiple risk factors, including insulin and C-reactive protein. Diabetes risk was fivefold lower among women with baseline IGFBP-2 levels in the top versus bottom quintile (odds ratio [OR](q5-q1) = 0.17 [95% CI 0.08-0.35]; P trend < 0.0001) and was also negatively associated with IGFBP-1 levels (OR(q5-q1) = 0.37 [0.18-0.73]; P trend = 0.0009). IGFBP-3 was positively associated with diabetes (OR(q5-q1) = 2.05 [1.20-3.51]; P trend = 0.002). Diabetes was not associated with total IGF-I levels, but free IGF-I and diabetes had a significant association that varied (P interaction = 0.003) by insulin levels above the median (OR(q5-q1) = 0.48 [0.26-0.90]; P trend = 0.0001) versus below the median (OR(q5-q1) = 2.52 [1.05-6.06]; P trend < 0.05). Thus, this prospective study found strong associations of incident diabetes with baseline levels of three IGFBPs and free IGF-I, consistent with hypotheses that the IGF axis might influence diabetes risk.

  9. Soluble ST2 associates with diabetes but not established cardiovascular risk factors: a new inflammatory pathway of relevance to diabetes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley M Miller

    Full Text Available Preliminary data mostly from animal models suggest the sST2/IL-33 pathway may have causal relevance for vascular disease and diabetes and thus point to a potential novel inflammatory link to cardiometabolic disease. However, the characterisation of sST2 levels in terms of metabolic or vascular risk in man is completely lacking. We sought to address this gap via a comprehensive analysis of risk factor and vascular correlates of sST2 in a cross-sectional study (pSoBid. We measured sST2 in plasma in 639 subjects and comprehensively related it to cardiovascular and diabetes risk factors and imaged atherosclerosis measures. Circulating sST2 levels increased with age, were lower in women and in highest earners. After adjusting for age and gender, sST2 levels associated strongly with markers of diabetes, including triglycerides [effect estimate (EE per 1 standard deviation increase in sST2:1.05 [95%CI 1.01,1.10], liver function (alanine aminotransaminase [ALT] and γ-glutamyl transferase [GGT]: EE 1.05 [1.01,1.09] and 1.13 [1.07,1.19] respectively, glucose (1.02 [1.00,1.03] and sICAM-1 (1.05 [1.02,1.07]. However, sST2 levels were not related to smoking, cholesterol, blood pressure, or atheroma (carotid intima media thickness, plaque presence. These results suggest that sST2 levels, in individuals largely without vascular disease, are related principally to markers associated with diabetes and ectopic fat and add support for a role of sST2 in diabetes. Further mechanistic studies determining how sST2 is linked to diabetes pathways may offer new insights into the inflammatory paradigm for type 2 diabetes.

  10. Treatment and risk factor analysis of hypoglycemia in diabetic rhesus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Sirong; Chen, Younan; Wei, Lingling; Jin, Xi; Zeng, Li; Ren, Yan; Zhang, Jie; Wang, Li; Li, Hongxia; Lu, Yanrong; Cheng, Jingqiu

    2011-02-01

    In order to anticipate and promptly treat hypoglycemia in diabetic monkeys treated with insulin or other glucose-lowering drugs, the relationships between the incidence and symptoms of hypoglycemia in these animals, and many factors involved in model development and sustainment were analyzed. Different procedures were performed on 22 monkeys for the induction of diabetes. The monkey models were evaluated by blood glucose, insulin, C-peptide levels and intravenous glucose tolerance tests. A glucose treatment program for the diabetic monkeys was administered and laboratory tests were regularly performed. A standard procedure of hypoglycemia treatment was established and the risk factors of hypoglycemia were analyzed by a logistic regression model. Furthermore, the relationships between the four methods of diabetes induction, renal function, glycemic control and hypoglycemia were studied using one-way analysis of variance and t-test. We found that the hypoglycemic conditions of diabetic monkeys were improved rapidly by our treatment. The statistical analysis suggested that the modeling methods, renal function and glycemic control were related to the incidence of hypoglycemia. In detail, the progress of diabetes, effects of glycemic control and, particularly, the severity of the hypoglycemia differed according to the induction strategy used. The models induced by partial pancreatectomy with low-dose streptozotocin were not prone to hypoglycemia and their glycemic controls were stable. However, the models induced by total pancreatectomy were more vulnerable to severe hypoglycemia and their glycemic controls were the most unstable. Moreover, the levels of blood creatinine and triglyceride increased after the development of diabetes, which was related to the occurrence of hypoglycemia. In conclusion, we suggested that total pancreatectomy and renal impairment are two important risk factors for hypoglycemia in diabetic monkeys. More attention should be paid to daily care

  11. Range of Risk Factor Levels: Control, Mortality, and Cardiovascular Outcomes in Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawshani, Aidin; Rawshani, Araz; Franzén, Stefan; Eliasson, Björn; Svensson, Ann-Marie; Miftaraj, Mervete; McGuire, Darren K; Sattar, Naveed; Rosengren, Annika; Gudbjörnsdottir, Soffia

    2017-04-18

    Individuals with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) have a high risk of cardiovascular complications, but it is unknown to what extent fulfilling all cardiovascular treatment goals is associated with residual risk of mortality and cardiovascular outcomes in those with T1DM compared with the general population. We included all patients ≥18 years of age with T1DM who were registered in the Swedish National Diabetes Register from January 1, 1998, through December 31, 2014, a total of 33 333 patients, each matched for age and sex with 5 controls without diabetes mellitus randomly selected from the population. Patients with T1DM were categorized according to number of risk factors not at target: glycohemoglobin, blood pressure, albuminuria, smoking, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Risk of all-cause mortality, acute myocardial infarction, heart failure hospitalization, and stroke was examined in relation to the number of risk factors at target. The mean follow-up was 10.4 years in the diabetes group. Overall, 2074 of 33 333 patients with diabetes mellitus and 4141 of 166 529 controls died. Risk for all outcomes increased stepwise for each additional risk factor not at target. Adjusted hazard ratios for patients achieving all risk factor targets compared with controls were 1.31 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.93-1.85) for all-cause mortality, 1.82 (95% CI, 1.15-2.88) for acute myocardial infarction, 1.97 (95% CI, 1.04-3.73) for heart failure hospitalization, and 1.17 (95% CI, 0.51-2.68) for stroke. The hazard ratio for patients versus controls with none of the risk factors meeting target was 7.33 (95% CI, 5.08-10.57) for all-cause mortality, 12.34 (95% CI, 7.91-19.48) for acute myocardial infarction, 15.09 (95% CI, 9.87-23.09) for heart failure hospitalization, and 12.02 (95% CI, 7.66-18.85) for stroke. A steep-graded association exists between decreasing number of cardiovascular risk factors at target and major adverse cardiovascular outcomes among

  12. Preeclampsia as a risk factor for diabetes: a population-based cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denice S Feig

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Women with preeclampsia (PEC and gestational hypertension (GH exhibit insulin resistance during pregnancy, independent of obesity and glucose intolerance. Our aim was to determine whether women with PEC or GH during pregnancy have an increased risk of developing diabetes after pregnancy, and whether the presence of PEC/GH in addition to gestational diabetes (GDM increases the risk of future (postpartum diabetes. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We performed a population-based, retrospective cohort study for 1,010,068 pregnant women who delivered in Ontario, Canada between April 1994 and March 2008. Women were categorized as having PEC alone (n=22,933, GH alone (n=27,605, GDM alone (n=30,852, GDM+PEC (n=1,476, GDM+GH (n=2,100, or none of these conditions (n=925,102. Our main outcome was a new diagnosis of diabetes postpartum in the following years, up until March 2011, based on new records in the Ontario Diabetes Database. The incidence rate of diabetes per 1,000 person-years was 6.47 for women with PEC and 5.26 for GH compared with 2.81 in women with neither of these conditions. In the multivariable analysis, both PEC alone (hazard ratio [HR]=2.08; 95% CI 1.97-2.19 and GH alone (HR=1.95; 95% CI 1.83-2.07 were risk factors for subsequent diabetes. Women with GDM alone were at elevated risk of developing diabetes postpartum (HR=12.77; 95% CI 12.44-13.10; however, the co-presence of PEC or GH in addition to GDM further elevated this risk (HR=15.75; 95% CI 14.52-17.07, and HR=18.49; 95% CI 17.12-19.96, respectively. Data on obesity were not available. CONCLUSIONS: Women with PEC/GH have a 2-fold increased risk of developing diabetes when followed up to 16.5 years after pregnancy, even in the absence of GDM. The presence of PEC/GH in the setting of GDM also raised the risk of diabetes significantly beyond that seen with GDM alone. A history of PEC/GH during pregnancy should alert clinicians to the need for preventative counseling and more vigilant

  13. Risk factors for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in diabetic foot infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence A. Lavery

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate risk factors for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA in patients hospitalized for diabetic foot infections. Methods: We reviewed hospital admissions for foot infections in patients with diabetes which had nasal swabs, and anaerobic and aerobic tissue cultures at the time of admission. Data collected included patient characteristics and medical history to determine risk factors for developing an MRSA infection in the foot. Results: The prevalence of MRSA in these infections was 29.8%. Risk factors for MRSA diabetic foot infections were history of MRSA foot infection, MRSA nasal colonization, and multidrug-resistant organisms (p<0.05. Positive predictive value (PPV and negative predictive value (NPV of nasal colonization with MRSA to identify MRSA diabetic foot infections were 66.7% and 80.0% (sensitivity 41%, specificity 90%. Admission from a nursing home was not a significant risk factor. Conclusion: Positive nasal swabs are not predictive of the infecting agent; however, a negative nasal swab rules out MRSA as the infecting agent in foot wounds with 90% accuracy.

  14. Mexican American Parents' Perceptions of Childhood Risk Factors for Type 2 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head, Barbara J.; Barr, Kathleen L.; Baker, Sharon K.

    2011-01-01

    A study was conducted to identify the norms, values, and perceptions of urban immigrant Mexican American (MA) parents of school children relative to physical activity, healthy eating, and child risk factors for type 2 diabetes. Investigators facilitated five focus groups in an urban elementary school setting and analyzed data using qualitative…

  15. Risk Factors for Overweight and Diabetes mellitus in Residential Psychiatric Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mookhoek, Evert J.; de Vries, Willem A.; Hovens, Johannes E. J. M.; Brouwers, Jacobus R. B. J.; Loonen, Anton J. M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the prevalence of and risk factors for overweight and diabetes mellitus in long-stay psychiatric inpatients. Method: Statistical analysis of data collected from medical, laboratory, and pharmacy files. Results: 80% of the 256 patients were suffering from schizophrenia or ot

  16. Erythropoietin and vascular endothelial growth factor as risk markers for severe hypoglycaemia in type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, P L; Pedersen-Bjergaard, U; Schalkwijk, C

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Circulating erythropoietin (EPO) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) increase during hypoglycaemia and may represent protective hormonal counter-regulatory responses. We tested the hypothesis that low levels of EPO and VEGF are associated with a higher frequency of severe...... levels to determine future risk of severe hypoglycaemia in people with type 1 diabetes....

  17. Risk Factors for Overweight and Diabetes mellitus in Residential Psychiatric Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mookhoek, Evert J.; de Vries, Willem A.; Hovens, Johannes E. J. M.; Brouwers, Jacobus R. B. J.; Loonen, Anton J. M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the prevalence of and risk factors for overweight and diabetes mellitus in long-stay psychiatric inpatients. Method: Statistical analysis of data collected from medical, laboratory, and pharmacy files. Results: 80% of the 256 patients were suffering from schizophrenia or

  18. Peroxiredoxin isoforms are associated with cardiovascular risk factors in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Eter, E. [Physiology Department, Faculty of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Cardiovascular Research Group, Faculty of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Physiology Department, Faculty of Medicine, Alexandria University, Alexandria (Egypt); Al-Masri, A.A. [Physiology Department, Faculty of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Cardiovascular Research Group, Faculty of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia)

    2015-03-03

    The production of oxygen free radicals in type 2 diabetes mellitus contributes to the development of complications, especially the cardiovascular-related ones. Peroxiredoxins (PRDXs) are antioxidant enzymes that combat oxidative stress. The aim of this study was to investigate the associations between the levels of PRDX isoforms (1, 2, 4, and 6) and cardiovascular risk factors in type 2 diabetes mellitus. Fifty-three patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (28F/25M) and 25 healthy control subjects (7F/18M) were enrolled. We measured the plasma levels of each PRDX isoform and analyzed their correlations with cardiovascular risk factors. The plasma PRDX1, -2, -4, and -6 levels were higher in the diabetic patients than in the healthy control subjects. PRDX2 and -6 levels were negatively correlated with diastolic blood pressure, fasting blood sugar, and hemoglobin A1c. In contrast, PRDX1 levels were positively correlated with low-density lipoprotein and C-reactive protein levels. PRDX4 levels were negatively correlated with triglycerides. In conclusion, PRDX1, -2, -4, and -6 showed differential correlations with a variety of traditional cardiovascular risk factors. These results should encourage further research into the crosstalk between PRDX isoforms and cardiovascular risk factors.

  19. Does high sugar consumption exacerbate cardiometabolic risk factors and increase the risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease?

    OpenAIRE

    Sonestedt, Emily; Øverby, Nina Cecilie; David E Laaksonen; Birgisdottir, Bryndis Eva

    2012-01-01

    Consumption of sugar has been relatively high in the Nordic countries; the impact of sugar intake onmetabolic risk factors and related diseases has been debated. The objectives were to assess the effect of sugarintake (sugar-sweetened beverages, sucrose and fructose) on association with type 2 diabetes, cardiovasculardisease and related metabolic risk factors (impaired glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity, dyslipidemia, bloodpressure, uric acid, inflammation markers), and on all-cause morta...

  20. Study of the risk factors and complications of diabetes mellitus after live kidney donation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuelmagd, Mohammed M; Nagib, Ayman M; Abuelmagd, Megahed M; Refaie, Ayman F; Elhindi, Yasser A; Ahmed, Mohammed F; Ali, Mohammed H; Elmaghrabi, Hanzada M; Bakr, Mohammed A

    2015-04-01

    Kidney donors, similar to the general population, are at risk for development of type 2 diabetes mellitus. The course of donors who develop type 2 diabetes mellitus has not been well studied. This work is aimed at estimating the incidence of diabetes after kidney donation, and study some risk factors and some complications of diabetes mellitus after donation. The material of this record based work comprised the records 2267 donors who donated 1 of their kidneys between 1976 and 2014 in the Urology and Nephrology Center, Mansoura University, Egypt, and regularly followed-up at its outpatient clinic. There were 388 donors included in the study and their medical records were revised. Postdonation weight gain and family history of diabetes mellitus were statistically significant on both the development of diabetes mellitus, high, very high albuminuria, and/or decreased creatinine clearance. Metformin and insulin use seemed to significantly reduce the protein excretion, and creatinine clearance decline in the studied group. There is a significant effect of the family history of diabetes mellitus on the development of high, very high albuminuria, and/or decreased creatinine clearance.

  1. Prevalence and Risk Factors of Gestational Diabetes in Iran: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    JAFARI-SHOBEIRI, Mehri; GHOJAZADEH, Morteza; AZAMI-AGHDASH, Saber; NAGHAVI-BEHZAD, Mohammad; PIRI, Reza; POURALI-AKBAR, Yasmin; NASROLLAH-ZADEH, Raheleh; BAYAT-KHAJEH, Parvaneh; MOHAMMADI, Marzieh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Gestational Diabetes (GD) is one of the major public health issues. The purpose of the present study was to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess the risk factors and prevalence rate of this disorder in Iran. Methods: This systematic review and meta- analysis article was prepared using the databases of Science Direct, Pub-Med, Scopus, Magiran, Iranmedex and SID, Google search engine, Gray Literature, reference lists check and hand searching using keywords such as “prevalence”, “gestational diabetes mellitus”, “GDM”, “risk factor*”, “Iran” and “Postpartum Diabetes”. The selected papers were fully reviewed and the required information for the systematic review was extracted and summarized using extraction table in Microsoft Office Excel software. Results: Twenty-four of 1011 papers were quite relevant to the objectives of the review so they were included. The mean age of the participants was 29.43±4.97 yr and the prevalence of GDM was 3.41% (the highest and the lowest prevalence rates were 18.6% and 1.3% respectively). Among the influential factors mentioned in the literature, potential causes of GDM are gestational age, history of gestational diabetes, family history of diabetes, body mass index, abortions and parity, and history of macrosomia. Conclusion: Considering the high prevalence of postpartum diabetes and its related factors in Iran, strategic planning for disease prevention and reduction is inevitable. PMID:26587467

  2. Ischemic Stroke and Its Risk Factors in a Registry-Based Large Cross-Sectional Diabetic Cohort in a Country Facing a Diabetes Epidemic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid Al-Rubeaan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of this study is to determine the prevalence and risk factors of ischemic stroke among diabetic patients registered in the Saudi National Diabetes Registry (SNDR database. A cross-sectional sample of 62,681 diabetic patients aged ≥25 years was used to calculate ischemic stroke prevalence and its risk factors. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to assess the roles of different risk factors. The prevalence of ischemic stroke was 4.42% and was higher in the older age group with longer diabetes duration. Poor glycemic control and the presence of chronic diabetes complications were associated with a high risk of ischemic stroke. History of smoking and type 2 diabetes were more frequent among stroke patients. Obesity significantly decreased the risk for ischemic stroke. Regression analysis for ischemic stroke risk factors proved that age ≥45 years, male gender, hypertension, coronary artery disease (CAD, diabetes duration ≥10 years, insulin use, and hyperlipidemia were significant independent risk factors for ischemic stroke. We conclude that ischemic stroke is prevalent among diabetic individuals, particularly among those with type 2 diabetes. Good glycemic, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia control, in addition to smoking cessation, are the cornerstones to achieve a significant reduction in ischemic stroke risk.

  3. Incidence and risk factors for diabetes, hypertension and obesity after liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastácio, Lucilene Rezende; Ribeiro, Hélem de Sena; Ferreira, Livia García; Lima, Agnaldo Soares; Vilela, Eduardo García; Toulson Davisson Correia, María Isabel

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic disorders are widely described in patients after liver transplantation (LTx). Arterial hypertension, diabetes mellitus and obesity incidence and risk factors were assessed in 144 post-LTx patients at least one year after transplantation (59% male; median age 54 y; median time since transplantation 4 y). Risk factors were assessed using logistic regression analysis according to demographic, socioeconomic, lifestyle, clinical, anthropometric and dietetic variables. The incidence of hypertension was 18.9%; diabetes, 14.0% and obesity, 15.9%. Risk factors for the incidence of hypertension were abdominal obesity (OR: 2.36; CI: 1.02-5.43), family history of hypertension (OR: 2.75; CI: 1.06-7.19) and cyclosporine use (OR: 3.92; CI: 1.05-14.70). Risk factor for incidence of diabetes were greater fasting glucose levels (mg/dL) pre-LTx (OR: 1.04; CI: 1.01-1.06) and on the diagnosis of alcoholic cirrhosis as an indication of LTx (OR: 2.54; CI: 0.84-7.72). The incidence of obesity after LTx was related to lower milk consumption (mL) (OR: 1.01; CI: 1.001-1.01; P obesity. Furthermore, the incidences of these disorders were related to immunosuppressive therapy and have risk factors that are common in the general population. Copyright © AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2013. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  4. Lifestyle risk factors for cardiovascular disease and diabetic risk in a sedentary occupational group: the Galway taxi driver study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, W P; Sharif, F; Flaherty, G

    2016-05-01

    Taxi drivers are at increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), something which persists after correcting for the overrepresentation of traditional risk factors for CVD in this cohort. The contribution of lifestyle risk factors to this residually elevated CVD risk remains under-evaluated. We aimed to determine the prevalence of lifestyle risk factors for CVD, self-reported medical risk factors for CVD, and future risk of type 2 diabetes amongst Irish taxi drivers. Male taxi drivers with no history of CVD and type 2 diabetes and working in Galway city in the west of Ireland were invited to participate. Physical activity levels, dietary patterns, anthropometry, smoking, hypertension, hypercholesterolaemia, and Finnish Diabetes Risk Score (FINDRISC) values were recorded in a cross-sectional manner. 41 taxi drivers (mean age 56.7 ± 9.8 years) participated. 37 % were insufficiently active based on self-report, although only 8 % objectively achieved 10, 000 steps per day. Mean modified Mediterranean diet score (mMDS) was 4.6 ± 2.2, and only 13 % of participants had a normal body mass index (BMI) or waist circumference (WC). Those who worked for taxi companies tended to have a higher BMI (p = .07) and WC (p = .04) by multivariable regression. 22 % were current smokers, although a quit rate of 72 % was observed amongst the 78 % of taxi drivers who had ever smoked. 25 % were at high or very high risk of future type 2 diabetes. Lifestyle risk factors for CVD and dysglycaemia are prevalent amongst Irish taxi drivers.

  5. Weight loss before a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes mellitus is a risk factor for diabetes complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shanshan; Wang, Shuang; Yang, Bo; Zheng, Jinliang; Cai, Yuping; Yang, Zhengguo

    2016-12-01

    Our goal was to investigate the relationship between weight loss before a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and diabetic complications among hospitalized patients with T2DM.We conducted a cross-sectional study and evaluated 347 and 642 hospitalized patients with T2DM who experienced and did not experienced weight loss before T2DM diagnosis, respectively. We used propensity score matching to reduce the confounding bias between the groups. In addition, a logistic regression analysis of the matched data was performed to evaluate the risk of diabetic complications.A total of 339 patients who experienced weight loss were matched to 339 patients who did not experience weight loss. After adjusting for age, gender, origin, occupation, smoking history, alcohol use, and duration of diabetes, the logistic regression analysis showed that compared with patients who did not experience weight loss, patients who lost ≤5 kg had a higher risk of diabetic nephropathy (DN) (odds ratio [OR]: 2.05, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.35-3.10) and diabetic retinopathy (OR: 1.79, 95% CI: 1.11-2.87). However, we did not observe a dose-response relationship in terms of weight loss.We found that weight loss before a diagnosis of T2DM might serve as a risk factor for DN and diabetic retinopathy. Our findings demonstrate that we should strengthen the management and prevention of complications in patients who experience weight loss of ≤5 kg prior to a T2DM diagnosis, particularly those who are centrally obese.

  6. The effectiveness of screening for diabetes and cardiovascular disease risk factors in a community pharmacy setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Andrew; Rivers, Peter; Gray, Laura J; Davies, Melanie; Khunti, Kamlesh

    2014-01-01

    Risk factors for cardiovascular disease including diabetes have seen a large rise in prevalence in recent years. This has prompted interest in prevention through the identifying individuals at risk of both diabetes and cardiovascular disease and has seen increased investment in screening interventions taking place in primary care. Community pharmacies have become increasingly involved in the provision of such interventions and this systematic review and meta-analysis aims to gather and analyse the existing literature assessing community pharmacy based screening for risk factors for diabetes and those with a high cardiovascular disease risk. We conducted systematic searches of electronic databases using MeSH and free text terms from 1950 to March 2012. For our analysis two outcomes were assessed. They were the percentage of those screened who were referred for further assessment by primary care and the uptake of this referral. Sixteen studies fulfilled our inclusion criteria comprising 108,414 participants screened. There was significant heterogeneity for all included outcomes. Consequently we have not presented summary statistics and present forest plots with I2 and p values to describe heterogeneity. We found that all included studies suffered from high rates of attrition between pharmacy screening and follow up. We have also identified a strong trend towards higher rates for referral in more recent studies. Our results show that pharmacies are feasible sites for screening for diabetes and those at risk of cardiovascular disease. A significant number of previously unknown cases of cardiovascular disease risk factors such as hypertension, hypercholesterolemia and diabetes are identified, however a significant number of referred participants at high risk do not attend their practitioner for follow up. Research priorities should include methods of increasing uptake to follow up testing and early intervention, to maximise the efficacy of screening interventions based

  7. The effectiveness of screening for diabetes and cardiovascular disease risk factors in a community pharmacy setting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Willis

    Full Text Available Risk factors for cardiovascular disease including diabetes have seen a large rise in prevalence in recent years. This has prompted interest in prevention through the identifying individuals at risk of both diabetes and cardiovascular disease and has seen increased investment in screening interventions taking place in primary care. Community pharmacies have become increasingly involved in the provision of such interventions and this systematic review and meta-analysis aims to gather and analyse the existing literature assessing community pharmacy based screening for risk factors for diabetes and those with a high cardiovascular disease risk.We conducted systematic searches of electronic databases using MeSH and free text terms from 1950 to March 2012. For our analysis two outcomes were assessed. They were the percentage of those screened who were referred for further assessment by primary care and the uptake of this referral.Sixteen studies fulfilled our inclusion criteria comprising 108,414 participants screened. There was significant heterogeneity for all included outcomes. Consequently we have not presented summary statistics and present forest plots with I2 and p values to describe heterogeneity. We found that all included studies suffered from high rates of attrition between pharmacy screening and follow up. We have also identified a strong trend towards higher rates for referral in more recent studies.Our results show that pharmacies are feasible sites for screening for diabetes and those at risk of cardiovascular disease. A significant number of previously unknown cases of cardiovascular disease risk factors such as hypertension, hypercholesterolemia and diabetes are identified, however a significant number of referred participants at high risk do not attend their practitioner for follow up. Research priorities should include methods of increasing uptake to follow up testing and early intervention, to maximise the efficacy of screening

  8. Diabetic foot complications and their risk factors from a large retrospective cohort study.

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    Khalid Al-Rubeaan

    Full Text Available Foot complications are considered to be a serious consequence of diabetes mellitus, posing a major medical and economical threat. Identifying the extent of this problem and its risk factors will enable health providers to set up better prevention programs. Saudi National Diabetes Registry (SNDR, being a large database source, would be the best tool to evaluate this problem.This is a cross-sectional study of a cohort of 62,681 patients aged ≥ 25 years from SNDR database, selected for studying foot complications associated with diabetes and related risk factors.The overall prevalence of diabetic foot complications was 3.3% with 95% confidence interval (95% CI of (3.16%-3.44%, whilst the prevalences of foot ulcer, gangrene, and amputations were 2.05% (1.94%-2.16%, 0.19% (0.16%-0.22%, and 1.06% (0.98%-1.14%, respectively. The prevalence of foot complications increased with age and diabetes duration predominantly amongst the male patients. Diabetic foot is more commonly seen among type 2 patients, although it is more prevalent among type 1 diabetic patients. The Univariate analysis showed Charcot joints, peripheral vascular disease (PVD, neuropathy, diabetes duration ≥ 10 years, insulin use, retinopathy, nephropathy, age ≥ 45 years, cerebral vascular disease (CVD, poor glycemic control, coronary artery disease (CAD, male gender, smoking, and hypertension to be significant risk factors with odds ratio and 95% CI at 42.53 (18.16-99.62, 14.47 (8.99-23.31, 12.06 (10.54-13.80, 7.22 (6.10-8.55, 4.69 (4.28-5.14, 4.45 (4.05-4.89, 2.88 (2.43-3.40, 2.81 (2.31-3.43, 2.24 (1.98-2.45, 2.02 (1.84-2.22, 1.54 (1.29-1.83, and 1.51 (1.38-1.65, respectively.Risk factors for diabetic foot complications are highly prevalent; they have put these complications at a higher rate and warrant primary and secondary prevention programs to minimize morbidity and mortality in addition to economic impact of the complications. Other measurements, such as decompression of lower

  9. Perinatal risk factors increase the risk of being affected by both type 1 diabetes and coeliac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adlercreutz, Emma H; Wingren, Carl Johan; Vincente, Raquel P; Merlo, Juan; Agardh, Daniel

    2015-02-01

    This study investigated whether perinatal factors influenced the risk of a double diagnosis of type 1 diabetes and coeliac disease. We used multinomial logistic regression models to study the associations between perinatal factors, gender, mode of delivery, season of birth and the risk of type 1 diabetes, coeliac disease or both, in Swedish-born singleton children. We found that 4327 of the 768 395 children (0.6%) had been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, 3817 (0.5%) had been diagnosed with coeliac disease and 191 (0.02%) were affected by both diseases. If the children already had type 1 diabetes (n = 4518), the absolute risk of being affected by coeliac disease increased to 4.2% (n = 191). Children with both type 1 diabetes and coeliac disease were more likely to be female (OR = 1.48, 95% CI = 1.01-1.97), delivered by Caesarean section (OR = 1.60, 95% CI = 1.07-2.39), have native-born Swedish mothers (OR = 4.84, 95% CI = 1.96-11.97) or be born during the summer months (OR = 1.43, 95% CI = 1.07-1.92). The increased risk of being affected by a double diagnosis of type 1 diabetes and coeliac disease was modulated by perinatal risk factors. This suggests that early life events are important when it comes to children with type 1 diabetes also developing coeliac disease. ©2014 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Risk factors for periodontal diseases among Yemeni type II diabetic patients. A case-control study.

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    Anas Shamala

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic periodontal diseases are one of diabetes mellitus complications. The present study aims to compare the periodontal status of type II diabetic patients to a control group and assess the role of risk factors in both groups. Materials and methods: A case-control study was conducted of 270 individuals (132 type II diabetics and 138 non-diabetics. Full mouth periodontal examination including plaque index, gingival bleeding, gingival recession, clinical attachment loss (CAL, tooth mobility, furcation involvement and the number of missing teeth. The case group was subdivided according to glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c status (poorly controlled HbA1c >8 and well controlled HbA1c≤8 Likewise, the duration of diabetes mellitus as short or long duration (DM≤10 or >10. The diabetic group was also subdivided according to smoking and Khat chewing habits. Result: The severity of periodontal disease among type II diabetic patients were significantly higher compared to the control group regarding the plaque index 2.6 (1.6-4.3, bleeding on probing 3.5 (2.3-13.0, gingival recession 2.0 (1.2-3.4, furcation involvement 4.0 (2.3-6.7, clinical attachment loss 5.7 (3.1-10.5, tooth mobility 2.0 (1.2-3.4, and number of missing teeth 4.4 (2.3-8.5. In addition, poorly controlled type II DM and long duration had higher CAL and number of missing teeth than well-controlled DM and short duration. No significant differences were found between smokers/nonsmokers and Khat chewers/non-chewers among the diabetic group. Conclusion: Type II diabetic patients have severe periodontal destruction and tooth loss compared to non-diabetic people and there were no differences within the diabetic group in regards to smoking and Khat chewing habits.

  11. "It is not possible for me to have diabetes"-community perceptions on diabetes and its risk factors in Rural Purworejo District, Central Java, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujilestari, Cahya Utamie; Ng, Nawi; Hakimi, Mohammad; Eriksson, Malin

    2014-06-12

    Accumulating evidence suggests that negative perceptions towards diabetes can limit the management and prevention of the disease. The negative perceptions towards diabetes are prevalent in many different settings, especially among rural communities. Few qualitative studies have been performed to understand how the community views diabetes and its associated risk factors. This study aimed to explore general community perceptions of diabetes and its risk factors in rural Indonesia. A total of 68 participants were recruited to 12 focus group discussions (FGDs) comprised of different age groups and sexes. The FGDs were conducted in six villages in rural Purworejo District, Central Java, Indonesia, from 2011 to 2012. All FGDs were recorded and transcribed. Qualitative content analysis was performed to describe and analyse how the rural community perceived diabetes and its risk factors. Diabetes was perceived as a visible and scary sugar disease, and the affected individuals themselves were blamed for getting the disease. Recognised as 'sugar' or 'sweet-pee' disease with terrifying effects, diabetes was believed to be a disease with no cure. The participants seemed to have an unrealistic optimism with regards to the diabetes risk factors. They believed that diabetes would not affect them, only others, and that having family members with diabetes was necessary for one to develop diabetes. Our findings demonstrate that rural communities have negative perceptions about diabetes and at the same time individuals have unrealistic optimism about their own risk factors. Understanding how such communities perceive diabetes and its risk factors is important for planning prevention strategies. Health messages need to be tailored to health-related behaviours and the local culture's concepts of diseases and risk factors.

  12. Risk factors for mucocutaneous fungal infections in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

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    Düriye Deniz Demirseren

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and design: Mucocutaneous fungal infections are common in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM. However, fungal infections do not develop in every patient with DM. In this study, we aimed to determine the risk factors for developing mucocutaneous fungal infections in patients with type 2 DM. Materials and methods: A total of 302 type 2 DM patients with mucocutaneous fungal infections and 326 type 2 DM patients without mucocutaneous fungal infections were enrolled. Demographic and clinical features, HbA1c levels, DM durations, body mass indexes (BMIs, and DM related complications of patients were compared and risk factors for developing mucocutaneous fungal infections were determined. Results: Of the 302 patients with mucocutaneous fungal infections, 81.2% (n=245 had dermatophytosis, 16.9% (n=51 had candidal infections, 2.0% (n=6 had pityriasis versicolor. Frequency of male gender, diabetic nephropathy, neuropathy and retinopathy; DM durations and ages of patients were all significantly higher in diabetic patients with fungal infections than patients without fungal infections (all p<0.05. Male gender, age ≥ 50 years, nephropathy and neuropathy were independently associated with developing fungal infection in type 2 DM patients. In subgroup analyses, independent risk factors for dermatophytosis were male gender, age ≥ 50 years, DM duration ≥5 years, and nephropathy. For candidiasis, these factors were BMI≥30 and neuropathy. Conclusion: Elderly, male gender, diabetic neuropathy annd nephropathy are closely associated with developing mucocutaneous infections in patients with type 2 DM.

  13. WJD 5th Anniversary Special Issues(2): Type 2 diabetes Type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease: Have all risk factors the same strength?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Iciar; Martín-Timón; Cristina; Sevillano-Collantes; Amparo; Segura-Galindo; Francisco; Javier; del; Caizo-Gómez

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a chronic condition that occurs when the body cannot produce enough or effectively use of insulin.Compared with individuals without diabetes,patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus have a considerably higher risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality,and are disproportionately affected by cardiovascular disease.Most of this excess risk is it associated with an augmented prevalence of well-known risk factors such as hypertension,dyslipidaemia and obesity in these patients.However the improved cardiovascular disease in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients can not be attributed solely to the higher prevalence of traditional risk factors.Therefore other non-traditional risk factors may be important in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus.Cardiovascular disease is increased in type 2 diabetes mellitus subjects due to a complex combination of various traditional and non-traditional risk factors that have an important role to play in the beginning and the evolution of atherosclerosis over its long natural history from endothelial function to clinical events.Many of these risk factors could be common history for both di-abetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease,reinforcing the postulate that both disorders come independently from"common soil".The objective of this review is to highlight the weight of traditional and non-traditional risk factors for cardiovascular disease in the setting of type 2 diabetes mellitus and discuss their position in the pathogenesis of the excess cardiovascular disease mortality and morbidity in these patients.

  14. Environmental Risk Factors and Type 1 Diabetes: Past, Present, and Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butalia, Sonia; Kaplan, Gilaad G; Khokhar, Bushra; Rabi, Doreen M

    2016-12-01

    Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune condition that results from the destruction of the insulin-producing beta cells of the pancreas. The excess morbidity and mortality resulting from its complications, coupled with its increasing incidence, emphasize the importance of better understanding the causes of this condition. Over the past several decades, a substantive amount of work has been done and, although many advances have occurred in identifying disease-susceptibility genes, there has been a lag in understanding the environmental triggers. Several putative environmental risk factors have been proposed, including infections, dietary factors, air pollution, vaccines, location of residence, family environment and stress. However, most of these factors have been inconclusive, thus supporting the need for further study into the causes of type 1 diabetes. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Diabetes Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Assessment of Risk Factors for the Early Detection of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

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    Velusamy Sivakumar

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose; Gestational diabetes mellitus affects 1-14% of all pregnancy with results of many maternal and fetal problems. Early detection and treatment may reduce the complications in pregnancy outcome. The main aim of the study is to assess the risk factors causing gestational diabetes mellitus. Methods; Study was carried out in the multispecialty hospital in Tamilnadu, south India, for the period of 10 years from January 2003 to December 2012. Pregnant women diagnosed with GDM were included in the study. Diabetes mellitus, hypertension, renal disorder and autoimmune disease woman were not included in the study. Antenatal, perinatal and neonatal data were collected from patient, family members, patient medical records and hospital database. SPSS statistical package version 20.0 was used for the statistical analysis. Paired‘t’ test, ANOVA, were used for various data analysis. Results; Age, BMI, gravidity, primiparity and irregular menstrual cycle shows significant influence on the development of gestational diabetes mellitus(P<0.05. The mean age of GDM women was 27.75 ± 3.90 years. The mean BMI of GDM women was 27.71 ± 3.61 kg/m2. The average gravidity of GDM alone women was 1.91± 1.10, Conclusion; From our study we observed, Advancing age, increasing BMI, Multigravida, primiparity, family history of diabetes and irregular menstrual cycle shows an influence on the development of GDM. These risk factors are comparable with internationally documented risk factors. Assessing the risk factors and identifying those women as high risk group for GDM is important for the early diagnosis of GDM.

  16. Dietary factors, metabolic syndrome and risks of breast cancer and type II diabetes in the E3N cohort

    OpenAIRE

    Fagherazzi, Guy

    2011-01-01

    Breast cancer and type II diabetes are two of the main chronic diseases in women and are suspected to share common risk factors. But their etiologies are still partially unknown, in particular concerning some dietary factors and some parameters of the metabolic syndrome. If evidence is convincing that themetabolic syndrome is associated with an increased type II diabetes risk, questions remain unanswered regarding cholesterol level, anthropometric factors and breast cancer risk. The French E3...

  17. Does Microalbuminuria Affect Resistin and Cardiometabolic Risk Factors in Hypertensive Non-Diabetic Females?

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    Sena Ulu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Hypertension, obesity, insulin resistance and lipid levels are risk factors for cardiovascular disease. The association of cardiovascular risk with C-reactive protein and homocysteine has been debated for decades. Resistin and microalbuminuria are presumed to be associated with diabetes mellitus, insulin resistance and cardiovascular disease. The objective of our study was to investigate the relationship of microalbuminuria with antropometric and metabolic parameters, C-reactive protein, homocyteine and resistin in non-diabetic hypertensive females. Methods: We conducted a randomized study including 37 female non-diabetic hypertensives without microalbuminuria and 47 female non-diabetic hypertensive patients with microalbuminuria. We made comparisons of anthropometric and metabolic parameters, C-reactive protein, homocysteine, insulin resistance index and resistin between the groups. Results: C-reactive protein, homocysteine, resistin, insulin levels and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance were higher in hypertensives with microalbuminuria than in hypertensives without microalbuminuria (all p<0.05. Conclusion: We found that microalbuminuria may have an influence on C-reactive protein, homocysteine and resistin levels in non-diabetic hypertensives. We also think that insulin and insulin resistance may also be related with microalbuminuria in non-diabetic hypertensive female patients. (The Me­di­cal Bul­le­tin of Ha­se­ki 2014; 52: 172-6

  18. Diabetes is a risk factor for pulmonary tuberculosis: a case-control study from Mwanza, Tanzania.

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    Daniel Faurholt-Jepsen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Diabetes and TB are associated, and diabetes is increasingly common in low-income countries where tuberculosis (TB is highly endemic. However, the role of diabetes for TB has not been assessed in populations where HIV is prevalent. METHODS: A case-control study was conducted in an urban population in Tanzania among culture-confirmed pulmonary TB patients and non-TB neighbourhood controls. Participants were tested for diabetes according to WHO guidelines and serum concentrations of acute phase reactants were measured. The association between diabetes and TB, and the role of HIV as an effect modifier, were examined using logistic regression. Since blood glucose levels increase during the acute phase response, we adjusted for elevated serum acute phase reactants. RESULTS: Among 803 cases and 350 controls the mean (SD age was 34.8 (11.9 and 33.8 (12.0 years, and the prevalence of diabetes was 16.7% (95% CI: 14.2; 19.4 and 9.4% (6.6; 13.0, respectively. Diabetes was associated with TB (OR 2.2, 95% CI: 1.5; 3.4, p<0.001. However, the association depended on HIV status (interaction, p = 0.01 due to a stronger association among HIV uninfected (OR 4.2, 95% CI: 1.5; 11.6, p = 0.01 compared to HIV infected (OR 0.1, 95% CI: 0.01; 1.8, p = 0.13 after adjusting for age, sex, demographic factors and elevated serum acute phase reactants. CONCLUSION: Diabetes is a risk factor for TB in HIV uninfected, whereas the association in HIV infected patients needs further study. The increasing diabetes prevalence may be a threat to TB control.

  19. Non classical risk factors for gestational diabetes mellitus: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dode, Maria Alice Souza de Oliveira; dos Santos, Iná S

    2009-01-01

    Age, obesity and family history of diabetes are well known risk factors for gestational diabetes mellitus. Others are more controversial. The objective of this review is to find evidence in the literature that justifies the inclusion of these other conditions among risk factors. The MEDLINE, Cochrane, LILACS and Pan American Health Organization databases were searched, covering articles dating from between 1992 and 2006. Keywords were used in combination (AND) with gestational diabetes mellitus separately and with each one of the risk factors studied. The methodological quality of the studies included was assessed, resulting in the selection of 41 papers. Most studies investigating maternal history of low birth weight, low stature, and low level of physical activity have found positive associations with gestational diabetes mellitus. Low socioeconomic levels, smoking during pregnancy, high parity, belonging to minority groups, and excessive weight gain during pregnancy presented conflicting results. Publication bias cannot be ruled out. Standardization of techniques, cutoff points for screening and diagnosis, as well as studies involving larger sample sizes would allow future meta-analyses.

  20. THE RISK FACTORS OF DIABETES MELLITUS IN ADOLESCENT SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL IN MALANG CITY

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    Dyah Widodo

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Diabetes mellitus is a disease caused by a hormonal disorder that affects insulin. 5.7% of the total population of Indonesia, including teenagers is a big challenge for the health sector to do the step in anticipation of the complexity of health problems caused by diabetes mellitus in Indonesia. This study aims to analyze the risk factors of diabetes mellitus in adolescent senior high school in the city of Malang. Method: This research was correlational research design, sampled in this study was partly teenagers is high school class in Malang city area drawn at random sampling with a large sample of 375 respondents. Research conducted at government senior high school 6 and 9 (SMU Negeri 6 and SMU Negeri 9 in the city of Malang, in May–August, 2011. Data collection techniques using questionnaires; measurements: weight, height, abdominal circumference/waist, blood pressure and food consumption survey (Recording of Present Food Intake of the diet for three days. Data was analyzed by descriptive and analytic Spearman Rho correlation with alpha 0.05. Result:  The results showed that a BMI (body mass index and waist circumference (central obesity related to the risk of diabetes mellitus in teens senior high school in Malang with 0.000 p-values < α 0.05. However, there is no relationship between blood pressure, physical activity, frequency of fruit and vegetable consumption, family history of diabetes mellitus and the risk of diabetes mellitus in teens senior high school in Malang. Discussion: Recommended for teens to pay attention to healthy eating and balanced, in order to awake the ideal body weight and abdominal circumference are normal, so that avoid the risk of diabetes mellitus.

  1. Exposure to persistent organic pollutants as potential risk factors for developing diabetes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Persistent organic pollutants(POPs),such as dioxins,polychlorinated biphenyls(PCBs) ,and organochlorine pesticides(OCPs),which are synthetic chemicals or by-products with an intrinsic resistance to natural degradation processes,are released into the environment,resulting in the widespread dispersal and accumulation in the environment,as well as in human and ecological food chains.Due to their ubiquity in the environment and lipophilic properties,there is emerging concern over the potential risks of human exposure to POPs.Extensive growing evidence indicated that exposure to POPs might be strongly associated with increased risk of a worldwide epidemic of diabetes,especially type 2 diabetes,suggesting that POPs might play a key role in their pathogenesis.Based on summary of the related studies,this paper reviews the epidemiologic and experimental data that addresses the association between increased risk of diabetes and POP exposure,including dioxins,PCBs,OCPs,polybrominated flame retardants(PBFRs),and some environmental estrogens.The potential mechanisms whereby POPs cause diabetes were discussed,such as alterations in lipid metabolism,in glucose transport,in insulin signaling pathway,in steroid metabolism,and disruption of endocrine system,induction of tumor necrosis factor-α(TNF-α) .However,with respect to diabetes,some of the evidence on POPs linked to risk of diabetes was suggestive of a direct or indirect association but was limited or inconclusive.Future research is urgently needed for determining the relative contribution of POPs to diabetes and elucidating the exact mechanisms.

  2. Diabetes mellitus:a "true" independent risk factor for hepatocellular carcinoma?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun Gao; Shu-Kun Yao

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Diabetes mellitus (DM) is thought to be associated with an increased risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in some published studies. However, can we draw the conclusion that DM is a "true" independent risk factor for HCC based on these references? DATA  SOURCES: MEDLINE and PubMed searches were conducted for published studies (between January 1966 and June 2009) to identify relevant articles using the keywords"diabetes", "insulin resistance" and "hepatocellular carcinoma", including "primary liver cancer". Because of the very limited number of relevant articles most were reviewed. RESULTS: This systematic review was conducted from 4 aspects: (1) the significant synergy between DM, hepatitis virus infection, and heavy alcohol consumption in HCC;(2) the role of DM independently in HCC cases while other identified risk factors were controlled or excluded;(3) obesity, DM, and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in HCC patients; and (4) the impact of DM for the prognosis or surgical treatment in HCC patients with DM. No consensus has been reached among these studies and it is too early to draw the conclusion that DM is a "true"independent risk factor for HCC. CONCLUSIONS: DM can be regarded as a risk factor for HCC. However, whether DM itself directly predisposes to HCC or whether it is a "true" independent risk factor remains unclear. Related issues should be clarified by more research.

  3. Body Mass Index: A Risk Factor for Retinopathy in Type 2 Diabetic Patients

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    Snježana Kaštelan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to investigate whether body mass index (BMI independently or in correlation with other risk factors is associated with diabetic retinopathy (DR progression. The study included 545 patients with type 2 diabetes. According to DR status, they were divided into three groups: group 1 (no retinopathy; n=296, group 2 (mild/moderate nonproliferative DR; n=118, and group 3 (severe/very severe NPDR or proliferative DR; n=131. Patients without DR were younger than those with signs of retinopathy at time of diabetes onset whilst diabetes duration was longer in groups with severe NPDR and PDR. DR progression was correlated with diabetes duration, BMI, HbA1c, hypertension, and cholesterol. Statistical analyses showed that the progression of retinopathy increased significantly with higher BMI (gr. 1: 26.50 ± 2.70, gr. 2: 28.11 ± 3.00, gr. 3: 28.69 ± 2.50; P<0.01. We observed a significant deterioration of HbA1c and a significant increase in cholesterol and hypertension with an increase in BMI. Correlation between BMI and triglycerides was not significant. Thus, BMI in correlation with HbA1c cholesterol and hypertension appears to be associated with the progression of DR in type 2 diabetes and may serve as a predictive factor for the development of this important cause of visual loss in developed countries.

  4. Body Mass Index: A Risk Factor for Retinopathy in Type 2 Diabetic Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaštelan, Snježana; Tomić, Martina; Gverović Antunica, Antonela; Ljubić, Spomenka; Salopek Rabatić, Jasminka; Karabatić, Mirela

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate whether body mass index (BMI) independently or in correlation with other risk factors is associated with diabetic retinopathy (DR) progression. The study included 545 patients with type 2 diabetes. According to DR status, they were divided into three groups: group 1 (no retinopathy; n = 296), group 2 (mild/moderate nonproliferative DR; n = 118), and group 3 (severe/very severe NPDR or proliferative DR; n = 131). Patients without DR were younger than those with signs of retinopathy at time of diabetes onset whilst diabetes duration was longer in groups with severe NPDR and PDR. DR progression was correlated with diabetes duration, BMI, HbA1c, hypertension, and cholesterol. Statistical analyses showed that the progression of retinopathy increased significantly with higher BMI (gr. 1: 26.50 ± 2.70, gr. 2: 28.11 ± 3.00, gr. 3: 28.69 ± 2.50; P < 0.01). We observed a significant deterioration of HbA1c and a significant increase in cholesterol and hypertension with an increase in BMI. Correlation between BMI and triglycerides was not significant. Thus, BMI in correlation with HbA1c cholesterol and hypertension appears to be associated with the progression of DR in type 2 diabetes and may serve as a predictive factor for the development of this important cause of visual loss in developed countries. PMID:24347825

  5. [Risk factors for lower extremity amputation in patients with diabetic foot].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, B; Yang, C Z; Wu, S B; Zhang, D; Wang, L N; Xiao, L; Chen, Y; Wang, C R; Tong, A; Zhou, X F; Li, X H; Guan, X H

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To explore the risk factors for lower extremity amputation in patients with diabetic foot. Methods: The clinical data of 1 771 patients with diabetic foot at the Air Force General Hospital of PLA from November 2001 to April 2015 were retrospectively analyzed. The patients were divided into the non-amputation and amputation groups. Within the amputation group, subjects were further divided into the minor and major amputation subgroups. Binary logistic regression analyses were used to assess the association between risk factors and lower extremity amputation. Results: Among 1 771 patients with diabetic foot, 323 of them (18.24%) were in the amputation group (major amputation: 41; minor amputation: 282) and 1 448 (81.76%) in the non-amputation group. Compared with non-amputation patients, those in the amputation group had a longer hospital stay and higher estimated glomerular filtration rate(eGFR)levels. Fasting plasma glucose (FPG), glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), C-reaction protein (CRP), ESR, ferritin, fibrinogen and WBC levels of the amputation group were higher, while hemoglobin albumin, transferrin, TC, TG, HDL-C and LDL-C were lower than those of the non-amputation group (all Pamputation and non-amputation groups (all Pamputation in hospitalized patients with diabetic foot. Conclusion: Wagner's grade, ischemia of lower limbs and infection are closely associated with amputation of diabetic foot patients.

  6. [Risk factors for fetal macrosomia in patients without gestational diabetes mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-De la Torre, J I; Rodríguez-Valdez, A; Delgado-Rosas, A

    2016-03-01

    Fetal macrosomia is birth weight of 4,000 grams or more, regardless of gestational age, in Mexico representing about 5.4%. Associated with multiple demographic, physiological, metabolic and genetic factors of each population. Determine the risk factors associated with the development of fetal macrosomia in patients without gestational diabetes mellitus. Retrospective, descriptive and comparative study of patients who came to delivery from January 2012 to June 2014, 88 patients, 23 patients with diagnosis of macrosomia, and 65 patients without macrosomia without gestational diabetes mellitus were included. An incidence of fetal macrosomia of 18.6%. Risk factors such as parity, history of fetal macrosomia, maternal age, maternal height more to 1.70 meters showed no difference, the percentage of overweight 105% showed 69% vs 52% on the control group and gestational diabetes screening altered that present 30.4 vs 20%. Increased incidence of macrosomia was demonstrated in patients with metabolic factors such as the percentage of overweight and screening altered gestational diabetes mellitus, as they showed higher prevalence in the study group, all modifiable with preconception nutritional management and during pregnancy, to reduce initial weight and weight gain, improved fasting and postprandial blood glucose in patients with positive screening and negative tolerance curve carbohydrates to maintain fetal growth curve with in the percentiles.

  7. Higher prevalence of risk factors for type 2 diabetes mellitus and subsequent higher incidence in men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almdal, T.; Scharling, H.; Jensen, J.S.

    2008-01-01

    Background: This study investigates risk factors and the incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (type 2 DM) in both sexes of a northern European population. Methods: A total of 14,223 randomly selected men and women were studied from 1976 to 1978. Patients with diabetes (self-reported type 2 DM or...... an OR of 0.4. Conclusion: In a randomly selected northern European population, significantly more men than women develop type 2 DM. (C) 2007 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved Udgivelsesdato: 2008/1...

  8. Liver cirrhosis and diabetes: Risk factors, pathophysiology, clinical implications and management

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Diego Garcia-Compean; Joel Omar Jaquez-Quintana; Jose Alberto Gonzalez-Gonzalez; Hector Maldonado-Garza

    2009-01-01

    About 30% of patients with cirrhosis have diabetes mellitus (DM). Nowadays, it is a matter for debate whether type 2 DM in the absence of obesity and hypertriglyceridemia may be a risk factor for chronic liver disease. DM,which develops as a complication of cirrhosis, is known as "hepatogenous diabetes". Insulin resistance in muscular and adipose tissues and hyperinsulinemia seem to be the pathophysiologic bases of diabetes in liver disease. An impaired response of the islet β-cells of the pancreas and hepatic insulin resistance are also contributory factors. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, alcoholic cirrhosis, chronic hepatitis C (CHC) and hemochromatosis are more frequently associated with DM. Insulin resistance increases the failure of the response to treatment in patients with CHC and enhances progression of fibrosis. DM in cirrhotic patients may be subclinical.Hepatogenous diabetes is clinically different from that of type 2 DM, since it is less frequently associated with microangiopathy and patients more frequently suffer complications of cirrhosis. DM increases the mortality of cirrhotic patients. Treatment of the diabetes is complex due to liver damage and hepatotoxicity of oral hypoglycemic drugs. This manuscript will review evidence that exists in relation to: type 2 DM alone or as part of the metabolic syndrome in the development of liver disease;factors involved in the genesis of hepatogenous diabetes;the impact of DM on the clinical outcome of liver disease; the management of DM in cirrhotic patients and the role of DM as a risk factor for the occurrence and exacerbation of hepatocellular carcinoma.

  9. Childhood maltreatment as a risk factor for diabetes: findings from a population-based survey of Canadian adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Margot E; Hovdestad, Wendy E; Pelletier, Catherine; Dykxhoorn, Jennifer L; O'Donnell, Siobhan C; Tonmyr, Lil

    2016-08-25

    It is well established that childhood maltreatment (CM) is a risk factor for various mental and substance use disorders. To date, however, little research has focused on the possible long-term physical consequences of CM. Diabetes is a chronic disease, for which an association with CM has been postulated. Based on data from a sample of 21,878 men and women from the 2012 Canadian Community Health Survey - Mental Health (CCHS - MH), this study examines associations between three types of CM (childhood physical abuse (CPA), childhood sexual abuse (CSA), and childhood exposure to intimate partner violence (CEIPV)) and diabetes in adulthood. Multiple logistic regression models were used to examine associations between CM and diabetes controlling for the effects of socio-demographic characteristics and risk factors for type 2 diabetes. When controlling socio-demographic characteristics, diabetes was significantly associated with reports of severe and frequent CPA (OR = 1.8) and severe and frequent CSA (OR = 2.2). A dose-response relationship was observed when co-occurrence of CSA and CPA was considered with the strongest association with diabetes being observed when both severe and frequent CSA and CPA were reported (OR = 2.6). Controlling for type 2 diabetes risk factors attenuated associations particularly for CPA. CEIPV was not significantly associated with having diabetes in adulthood. CPA and CSA are risk factors for diabetes. For the most part, associations between CPA and diabetes are mediated via risk factors for type 2 diabetes. Failure to consider severity and frequency of abuse may limit our understanding of the importance of CM as a risk factor for diabetes.

  10. Post-Renal Transplant Diabetes Mellitus in Korean Subjects: Superimposition of Transplant-Related Immunosuppressant Factors on Genetic and Type 2 Diabetic Risk Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun Chul Lee

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Postrenal transplantation diabetes mellitus (PTDM, or new-onset diabetes after organ transplantation, is an important chronic transplant-associated complication. Similar to type 2 diabetes, decreased insulin secretion and increased insulin resistance are important to the pathophysiologic mechanism behind the development of PTDM. However, β-cell dysfunction rather than insulin resistance seems to be a greater contributing factor in the development of PTDM. Increased age, family history of diabetes, ethnicity, genetic variation, obesity, and hepatitis C are partially accountable for an increased underlying risk of PTDM in renal allograft recipients. In addition, the use of and kinds of immunosuppressive agents are key transplant-associated risk factors. Recently, a number of genetic variants or polymorphisms susceptible to immunosuppressants have been reported to be associated with calcineurin inhibition-induced β-cell dysfunction. The identification of high risk factors of PTDM would help prevent PTDM and improve long-term patient outcomes by allowing for personalized immunosuppressant regimens and by managing cardiovascular risk factors.

  11. Incidence and related risk factors of diabetic ketoacidosis in Guangdong type 1 diabetics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    严晋华

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the incidence and the predictors of diabetes ketoacidosis(DKA)in Chinese type l diabetics so as to lay a foundation for better prevention and treatment.Methods For this cross-sectional study,a

  12. Hypovitaminosis D: a novel risk factor for coronary heart disease in type 2 diabetes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscogiuri, Giovanna; Nuzzo, Vincenzo; Gatti, Adriano; Zuccoli, Alfonso; Savastano, Silvia; Di Somma, Carolina; Pivonello, Rosario; Orio, Francesco; Colao, Annamaria

    2016-02-01

    Vitamin D (25(OH)D) levels have been associated with cardiovascular disease. Thus, the aim of our study was to investigate the association of 25(OH)D levels with coronary heart disease (CHD) in 698 consecutive type 2 diabetic outpatients. 698 consecutive type 2 diabetic outpatients (25.2 % men, age 66 ± 9 years) and 100 (90 % men, age 65 ± 13 years) age-matched non-diabetic volunteers were enrolled. 25(OH)D assay and the main cardiovascular risk factors were explored. 25(OH)D concentration was 22 ± 10 ng/ml in control subjects and 18.23 ± 10 ng/ml in diabetic patients (p hypovitaminosis D was higher in diabetic patients than in control subjects (90 vs. 83 %, p hypovitaminosis D had higher prevalence of high values of A1C (p < 0.01), BMI (p < 0.01), LDL cholesterol (p < 0.01), triglycerides (p < 0.01), and glycemia (p < 0.01) than their vitamin D-sufficient counterparts. 25(OH)D and HDL cholesterol were lower (p < 0.01), while BMI (p < 0.01), age (p < 0.01), systolic (p < 0.01) and diastolic blood pressure (p < 0.01), diabetes duration (p < 0.01), A1C (p < 0.01), glycemia (p < 0.01), fibrinogen (p < 0.01), triglycerides (p < 0.01), and total (p < 0.01) and LDL cholesterol (p < 0.01) were higher in diabetic subjects with CHD than diabetic subjects without CHD. At the logistic regression analysis, the association of vitamin D with CHD was lost, while sex (p = 0.026), diabetes duration (p = 0.023), and age (p = 0.024) were the most powerful predictors of CHD. The current study demonstrates that 25(OH)D does not have a direct effect on CHD but may have an indirect effect mediated by cardiovascular risk factors such as diabetes duration, age, and sex.

  13. Prevalence and risk factors of periodontitis among adults with or without diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Mihee; Kim, Hee Yeon; Seok, Hannah; Yeo, Chang Dong; Kim, Young Soo; Song, Jae Yen; Lee, Young Bok; Lee, Dong-Hee; Lee, Jae-Im; Lee, Tae-Kyu; Ahn, Hyo-Suk; Ko, Yoon Ho; Jeong, Seong Cheol; Chae, Hiun Suk; Sohn, Tae Seo

    2016-09-01

    This study examined prevalence and risk factors of periodontitis in representative samples of Korean adults, with and without diabetes mellitus (DM). Data from the 2012 Korean National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey were analyzed. A total of 4,477 adults (≥ 30 years old) were selected from 8,057 individuals who completed a nutrition survey, a self-reported general health behavior questionnaire, an oral examination, an oral hygiene behaviors survey, and laboratory tests. DM was defined as a fasting plasma glucose ≥ 126 mg/dL, or self-reported diagnosed diabetes, or current use of oral hypoglycemic agents and/or insulin. The community periodontal index was used to assess periodontitis status and comparisons between the periodontitis and the non-periodontitis group, were performed, according to the presence of DM. Risk factors for periodontitis in adults with DM and without DM were evaluated by multiple logistic regression analysis. The prevalence of periodontitis was significantly higher in adults with DM (43.7%) than in those without DM (25%, p periodontitis were older age, male, urban habitation, waist circumference, smoking, oral pain, and less frequent tooth brushing. Significant risk factors for periodontitis in adults with DM were the smoking, oral pain, and not-using an oral hygiene product. Adults with DM have an increased risk of periodontitis than those without DM. Current smoking and oral pain increase this risk. Using an oral hygiene product can reduce risk of periodontal disease in adults with DM.

  14. Obesity, Diabetes, and Other Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Native Populations of South America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingaramo, Roberto A

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of death in both developed and developing countries. In South America, the native population comprises a great number of different ethnic groups. The cardiovascular risk factors observed in these groups have proved similar to and even higher than those found in general non-native populations. Relatively recent epidemiologic information reveals that many native communities have healthy habits with low prevalence of risk factors such as hypertension and diabetes, while their prevalence is higher in those who have kept close contact with non-native populations and have westernized their habits. The differences in the presence of risk factors in these populations have been explained as the result of several interacting factors including genetic to environmental, socioeconomic, and cultural causes.

  15. Risk factors for Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in college students: association with sociodemographic variables1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Adman Câmara Soares; Araújo, Márcio Flávio Moura; de Freitas, Roberto Wagner Júnior Freire; Zanetti, Maria Lúcia; de Almeida, Paulo César; Damasceno, Marta Maria Coelho

    2014-01-01

    Objective identify the modifiable risk factors for type 2 diabetes mellitus in college students and associate these factors with their sociodemographic variables. Method cross-sectional study, involving 702 college students from Fortaleza-CE, Brazil. Sociodemographic, anthropometric, physical exercise data and blood pressure and fasting plasma glucose levels were collected. Results the most prevalent risk factor was sedentariness, followed by overweight, central obesity, high fasting plasma glucose and arterial hypertension. A statistically significant association was found between overweight and sex (p=0.000), age (p=0.004) and marital status (p=0.012), as well as between central obesity and age (p=0.018) and marital status (p=0.007) and between high fasting plasma glucose and sex (p=0.033). Conclusion distinct risk factors were present in the study population, particularly sedentariness and overweight. PMID:25029061

  16. Risk factors for Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in college students: association with sociodemographic variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adman Câmara Soares Lima

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: identify the modifiable risk factors for type 2 diabetes mellitus in college students and associate these factors with their sociodemographic variables.METHOD: cross-sectional study, involving 702 college students from Fortaleza-CE, Brazil. Sociodemographic, anthropometric, physical exercise data and blood pressure and fasting plasma glucose levels were collected.RESULTS: the most prevalent risk factor was sedentariness, followed by overweight, central obesity, high fasting plasma glucose and arterial hypertension. A statistically significant association was found between overweight and sex (p=0.000, age (p=0.004 and marital status (p=0.012, as well as between central obesity and age (p=0.018 and marital status (p=0.007 and between high fasting plasma glucose and sex (p=0.033.CONCLUSION: distinct risk factors were present in the study population, particularly sedentariness and overweight.

  17. Diabetes mellitus: fatores de risco em trabalhadores de enfermagem Diabetes mellitus: factores de riesgo en trabajadores de enfermería Diabetes mellitus: risk factors for nursing workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Maria Fernandes Vilarinho

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Identificar os fatores de risco para o diabetes mellitus tipo 2, entre trabalhadores de enfermagem do Instituto Estadual de Diabetes e Endocrinologia Luiz Capriglione. MÉTODOS: Estudo transversal com aplicação de dois instrumentos de coleta de dados que incluíram questões abertas e fechadas relativas ao estado de saúde e estilo de vida de 100 trabalhadores de enfermagem dessa instituição de saúde. Foram ainda verificados dados de natureza bioquímica e antropométrica. RESULTADOS: Os resultados confirmaram a ocorrência de importantes fatores de risco de natureza reversível, destacando-se o sedentarismo e a obesidade. CONCLUSÃO: Considera-se a importância do desenvolvimento de ações visando a promoção da saúde com enfoque na prevenção de doenças crônicas, a serem realizadas no próprio ambiente de trabalho.OBJETIVOS: Identificar los factores de riesgo para la diabetes mellitus tipo 2 entre trabajadores de enfermería del Instituto Estatal de Diabetes e Endocrinología Luiz Capriglione. MÉTODOS: Se trata de un estudio transversal con aplicación de dos instrumentos de recolección de datos que incluyeron preguntas abiertas y cerradas relacionadas al estado de salud y estilo de vida de 100 trabajadores de enfermería de esa institución de salud. Fueron también verificados datos de naturaleza bioquímica y antropométrica. RESULTADOS: Los resultados confirmaron la ocurrencia de importantes factores de riesgo de naturaleza reversible, destacándose el sedentarismo y la obesidad. CONCLUSIÓN: Se considera importante desarrollar acciones que tengan por objetivo la promoción de la salude con enfoque en la prevención de enfermedades crónicas, a ser realizadas en el propio ambiente de trabajo.OBJECTIVES: To identify risk factors for type 2 diabetes mellitus, among nursing workers at the State Institute of Diabetes and Endocrinology Luiz Capriglione. METHODS: This is a cross-sectional study in which were applied two

  18. Diabetes mellitus type II as a risk factor for depression: a lower than expected risk in a general practice setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarts, S; van den Akker, M; van Boxtel, M P J; Jolles, J; Winkens, B; Metsemakers, J F M

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine whether a diagnosis of diabetes mellitus (DM) in a primary setting is associated with an increased risk of subsequent depression. A retrospective cohort design was used based on the Registration Network Family Practice (RNH) database. Patients diagnosed with diabetes mellitus at or after the age of 40 and who were diagnosed between 01-01-1980 and 01-01-2007 (N = 6,140), were compared with age-matched controls from a reference group (N = 18,416) without a history of diabetes. Both groups were followed for an emerging first diagnosis of depression (and/or depressive feelings) until January 1, 2008. 2.0% of the people diagnosed with diabetes mellitus developed a depressive disorder, compared to 1.6% of the reference group. After statistical correction for confounding factors diabetes mellitus was associated with an increased risk of developing subsequent depression (HR 1.26; 95% CI: 1.12-1.42) and/or depressive feelings (HR 1.33; 95% CI: 1.18-1.46). After statistical adjustment practice identification code, age and depression preceding diabetes, were significantly related to a diagnosis of depression. Patients with diabetes mellitus are more likely to develop subsequent depression than persons without a history of diabetes. Results from this large longitudinal study based on a general practice population indicate that this association is weaker than previously found in cross-sectional research using self-report surveys. Several explanations for this dissimilarity are discussed

  19. Neighborhood level risk factors for type 1 diabetes in youth: the SEARCH case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liese Angela D

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background European ecologic studies suggest higher socioeconomic status is associated with higher incidence of type 1 diabetes. Using data from a case-control study of diabetes among racially/ethnically diverse youth in the United States (U.S., we aimed to evaluate the independent impact of neighborhood characteristics on type 1 diabetes risk. Data were available for 507 youth with type 1 diabetes and 208 healthy controls aged 10-22 years recruited in South Carolina and Colorado in 2003-2006. Home addresses were used to identify Census tracts of residence. Neighborhood-level variables were obtained from 2000 U.S. Census. Multivariate generalized linear mixed models were applied. Results Controlling for individual risk factors (age, gender, race/ethnicity, infant feeding, birth weight, maternal age, number of household residents, parental education, income, state, higher neighborhood household income (p = 0.005, proportion of population in managerial jobs (p = 0.02, with at least high school education (p = 0.005, working outside the county (p = 0.04 and vehicle ownership (p = 0.03 were each independently associated with increased odds of type 1 diabetes. Conversely, higher percent minority population (p = 0.0003, income from social security (p = 0.002, proportion of crowded households (0.0497 and poverty (p = 0.008 were associated with a decreased odds. Conclusions Our study suggests that neighborhood characteristics related to greater affluence, occupation, and education are associated with higher type 1 diabetes risk. Further research is needed to understand mechanisms underlying the influence of neighborhood context.

  20. Reduction of specific circulating lymphocyte populations with metabolic risk factors in patients at risk to develop type 2 diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Cucak

    Full Text Available Low-grade inflammation, characterized by increased pro-inflammatory cytokine levels, is present in patients with obesity-linked insulin resistance, hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia and considered to play a leading role to progression into type 2 diabetes (T2D. In adipose tissue in obese patients and in pancreatic islets in T2D patients cellular inflammation is present. However, the systemic leukocyte compartment and the circulating endothelial/precursor compartment in patients at risk to develop T2D has so far not been analyzed in detail. To address this, peripheral blood cells from a cohort of 20 subjects at risk to develop diabetes with normal to impaired glucose tolerance were analyzed by flow cytometry using a wide range of cellular markers and correlated to known metabolic risk factors for T2D i.e. fasting plasma glucose (FPG, 2 h plasma glucose (2 h PG, HbA1c, body mass index (BMI, homeostasis model assessment of β-cell function (HOMA-B, homeostasis model assessment of insulin sensitivity (HOMA-IS and fasting insulin (FI. The four highest ranked cell markers for each risk factor were identified by random forest analysis. In the cohort, a significant negative correlation between the number of TLR4(+ CD4 T cells and increased FPG was demonstrated. Similarly, with increased BMI the frequency of TLR4(+ B cells was significantly decreased, as was the frequency of IL-21R(+ CD4 T cells. Unlinked to metabolic risk factors, the frequency of regulatory T cells was reduced and TLR4(+ CD4 T cells were increased with age. Taken together, in this small cohort of subjects at risk to develop T2D, a modulation of the circulating immune cell pool was demonstrated to correlate with risk factors like FPG and BMI. This may provide novel insights into the inflammatory mechanisms involved in the progression to diabetes in subjects at risk.

  1. RISK FACTORS FOR DIABETIC RETINOPATHY IN DIABETICS SCREENED USING FUNDUS PHOTOGRAPHY AT A PRIMARY HEALTH CARE SETTING IN EAST MALAYSIA

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    MALLIKA PS

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This study reports on the prevalence of diabetic retinopathy (DR and risk factors among diabetic patients, who underwent fundus photography screening in a primary care setting of Borneo Islands, East Malaysia. We aimed to explore the preliminary data to help in the planning of more effective preventive strategies of DR at the primary health care setting. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study on 738 known diabetic patients aged 19-82 years was conducted in 2004. Eye examination consists of visual acuity testing followed by fundus photography for DR assessment. The fundus pictures were reviewed by a family physician and an ophthalmologist. Fundus photographs were graded as having no DR, NPDR, PDR and maculopathy. The data of other parameters was retrieved from patient’s record. Bi-variate and multivariate analysis was used toelucidate the factors associated with DR. Results: Any DR was detected in 23.7% (95% CI=21 to 27% of the patients and 3.2% had proliferative DR. The risk factors associated with any DR was duration of DM (OR =2.5, CI=1.6 to 3.9 for duration of five to 10 years when compared to <5 yearsand lower BMI (OR=1.8, CI=1.1 to 3.0. Moderate visual loss was associated with DR (OR=2.1, CI=1.2 to 3.7. Conclusions: This study confirms associations of DR with diabetic duration, body mass index and visual loss. Our data provide preliminary findings to help to improve the screening and preventive strategies of DR at the primary health care setting.

  2. Clinical risk factors, DNA variants, and the development of type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyssenko, Valeriya; Jonsson, Anna Elisabet; Almgren, Peter;

    2008-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is thought to develop from an interaction between environmental and genetic factors. We examined whether clinical or genetic factors or both could predict progression to diabetes in two prospective cohorts.......Type 2 diabetes mellitus is thought to develop from an interaction between environmental and genetic factors. We examined whether clinical or genetic factors or both could predict progression to diabetes in two prospective cohorts....

  3. Awareness of Gestational Diabetes and its Risk Factors among Pregnant Women in Samoa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Lucy Anne; Lock, Lauren Jade; Archer, Lucy Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is a subtype of diabetes mellitus defined as the development, or first recognition, of glucose intolerance during pregnancy. The risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is greater in mothers with GDM compared to the general population. Preventing the development of GDM could help lower the prevalence of T2DM and long-term morbidity in children of affected mothers. The purpose of this study was to investigate the awareness of GDM and its risk factors among pregnant women in Samoa, exploring where participants obtained information, and understanding their attitudes towards diet and physical activity. A quantitative cross-sectional study of 141 women attending Tupua Tamasese Meaole (TTM) hospital in Apia, Samoa in May 2015 was performed. Fifty-eight percent women were aware diabetes can occur for the first time during pregnancy. The greatest information source was from doctors (37%, n=44) followed by family members (22%, n=28), based on 118 respondents. Only one woman correctly identified all four risk factors for GDM. Most women recognized eating a healthy diet (79%) and regular physical activity (78%) to be appropriate lifestyle changes to help prevent GDM. These findings suggest awareness of GDM among pregnant women in Samoa is mixed, with a very small proportion having good knowledge (based on the number of risk factors identified). We conclude that increased education about GDM is necessary, both in hospital clinics and within the community. By increasing awareness of GDM, it may be possible to decrease the prevalence of T2DM in Samoa. PMID:28210529

  4. Risk factors for recurrent emergency department visits for hyperglycemia in patients with diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Justin W; Gushulak, Katherine M; Columbus, Melanie P; van Aarsen, Kristine; Hamelin, Alexandra L; Wells, George A; Stiell, Ian G

    2017-12-01

    Patients with poorly controlled diabetes mellitus may present repeatedly to the emergency department (ED) for management and treatment of hyperglycemic episodes, including diabetic ketoacidosis and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state. The objective of this study was to identify risk factors that predict unplanned recurrent ED visits for hyperglycemia in patients with diabetes within 30 days of initial presentation. We conducted a 1-year health records review of patients ≥18 years presenting to one of four tertiary care EDs with a discharge diagnosis of hyperglycemia, diabetic ketoacidosis, or hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state. Trained research personnel collected data on patient characteristics and determined if patients had an unplanned recurrent ED visit for hyperglycemia within 30 days of their initial presentation. Multivariate logistic regression models using generalized estimating equations to account for patients with multiple visits determined predictor variables independently associated with recurrent ED visits for hyperglycemia within 30 days. There were 833 ED visits for hyperglycemia in the 1-year period. 54.6% were male and mean (SD) age was 48.8 (19.5). Of all visitors, 156 (18.7%) had a recurrent ED visit for hyperglycemia within 30 days. Factors independently associated with recurrent hyperglycemia visits included a previous hyperglycemia visit in the past month (odds ratio [OR] 3.5, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.1-5.8), age 20 mmol/L (OR 2.2, 95% CI 1.3-3.7), having a family physician (OR 2.2, 95% CI 1.0-4.6), and being on insulin (OR 1.9, 95% CI 1.1-3.1). Having a systolic blood pressure between 90-150 mmHg (OR 0.53, 95% CI 0.30-0.93) and heart rate >110 bpm (OR 0.41, 95% CI 0.23-0.72) were protective factors independently associated with not having a recurrent hyperglycemia visit. This unique ED-based study reports five risk factors and two protective factors associated with recurrent ED visits for hyperglycemia within 30 days in patients

  5. Factors of cardiovascular risk in patients with type 2 diabetes and incipient nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelaj, E; Gjata, M; Lilaj, I; Burazeri, G; Sadiku, E; Collaku, L; Bare, O; Tase, M

    2008-01-01

    Microalbuminuria was originally established as a predictor of renal failure and an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes mellitus as well as in general population. The aim of our study is to assess the relationship between microalbuminuria and the other risk factors in diabetics and their prevalence. Sixty five patients, 22 men and 43 women with mean age 58.6+/-10.09, with type 2 diabetes, were hospitalized in the Department of Internal Medicine in the University Hospital Center "Mother Teresa" in Tirana, Albania, between March 2007 and February 2008. These patients with a mean duration of diabetes 6.09+/-5.41 were divided in two groups: with (Group A: 24 patients) and without (Group B: 41 patients) microalbuminuria and each group was evaluated for left ventricular mass index (LVMI), body mass index (BMI), glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1C), lipid profile and intima media thickness (IMT). The prevalence of microalbuminuria in our study was 32.3%. The prevalence of microalbuminuria in males was 37.5 and in females 62.5%. The microalbuminuric patients were older ( 59.71+/-9.87 vs 57.07+/-10.32) and had a longer duration of diabetes (7.74+/-5.74 vs 4.45+/-5.08) compared with normoalbuminuric patients (p=0.01). The Group A had significantly higher LVMI compared with Group B ( p=0.02). The prevalence of obesity (BMI>30 kg/m2) in our sample was 44.6%. In Group A the mean BMI (30.13+/-4.98) was significantly higher compared with Group B (28.00+/-3.72, p=0.04). Diabetic retinopathy was more frequent in Group A compared with Group B ( 33.3% vs 14.6%, p=0.05). The mean value of IMT was higher in Group A compared with Group B (1.28+/-0.35 vs 1.09+/-0.28, p=0.03). In patients with type 2 diabetes and microalbuminuria LVMI, IMT, BMI, duration of diabetes was significantly higher compared with patients with type 2 diabetes and normoalbuminuria.

  6. Is hypertension a major independent risk factor for retinopathy in type 1 diabetes?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, K; Feldt-Rasmussen, B; Deckert, T

    1991-01-01

    Hypertension is an established risk factor for retinopathy. Whether it is an independent risk factor or acts only by association with nephropathy is not known. Therefore, we studied 273 Type 1 diabetic patients. They were divided into four groups. Group 1 (n = 55) were normotensive and normoalbum......Hypertension is an established risk factor for retinopathy. Whether it is an independent risk factor or acts only by association with nephropathy is not known. Therefore, we studied 273 Type 1 diabetic patients. They were divided into four groups. Group 1 (n = 55) were normotensive...... and normoalbuminuric, group 2 (n = 51) had hypertension but were normoalbuminuric, group 3 (n = 33) had nephropathy but were normotensive, and group 4 (n = 134) had nephropathy and hypertension. Hypertensive patients with normoalbuminuria (blood pressure 146 +/- 19 (+/-SD)/87 +/- 12 mmHg) had the same prevalence...... of retinopathy as normoalbuminuric normotensive patients (123 +/- 12/75 +/- 5 mmHg). Hypertensive nephropathic patients (blood pressure 147 +/- 18/87 +/- 8 mmHg) had more retinopathy than hypertensive normoalbuminuric patients despite similar blood pressure (normal retina/advanced retinopathy: 3%/73% vs 46...

  7. A prospective study of risk factors for foot ulceration: The West of Ireland Diabetes Foot Study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hurley, L

    2013-09-25

    BackgroundThis is the first study to examine risk factors for diabetic foot ulceration in Irish general practice.AimTo determine the prevalence of established risk factors for foot ulceration in a community-based cohort, and to explore the potential for estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) to act as a novel risk factor.DesignA prospective observational study.MethodsPatients with diabetes attending 12 (of 17) invited general practices were invited for foot screening. Validated clinical tests were carried out at baseline to assess for vascular and sensory impairment and foot deformity. Ulcer incidence was ascertained by patient self-report and medical record. Patients were re-assessed 18 months later. ResultsOf 828 invitees, 563 (68%) attended screening. On examination 23-25% had sensory dysfunction and 18-39% had evidence of vascular impairment. Using the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network risk stratification system we found the proportion at moderate and high risk of future ulceration to be 25% and 11% respectively. At follow-up 16\\/383 patients (4.2%) developed a new foot ulcer (annual incidence rate of 2.6%). We observed an increasing probability of abnormal vascular and sensory test results (pedal pulse palpation, doppler waveform assessment, 10g monofilament, vibration perception and neuropathy disability score) with declining eGFR levels. We were unable to show an independent association between new ulceration and reduced eGFR [Odds ratio 1.01; p=0.64].ConclusionsOur data show the extent of foot complications in a representative sample of diabetes patients in Ireland. Use of eGFR did not improve identification of patients at risk of foot ulceration.

  8. Cardiovascular disease risk factors in a Nigerian population with impaired fasting blood glucose level and diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguoma, Victor M; Nwose, Ezekiel U; Ulasi, Ifeoma I; Akintunde, Adeseye A; Chukwukelu, Ekene E; Bwititi, Phillip T; Richards, Ross S; Skinner, Timothy C

    2017-01-06

    Diabetes is a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) and there are reports of increasing prevalence of prediabetes in Nigeria. This study therefore characterised CVDs risk factors in subjects with impaired fasting glucose (IFG) and diabetes. Data from 4 population-based cross-sectional studies on 2447 apparently healthy individuals from 18 - 89 years were analysed. Anthropometric, blood pressure and biochemical parameters were collected and classified. Individuals with IFG (prediabetes) and diabetes were merged each for positive cases of dyslipidaemia, high blood pressure (HBP) or obesity. Optimal Discriminant and Hierarchical Optimal Classification Tree Analysis (HO-CTA) were employed. Overall prevalence of IFG and diabetes were 5.8% (CI: 4.9 - 6.7%) and 3.1% (CI: 2.4 - 3.8%), respectively. IFG co-morbidity with dyslipidaemia (5.0%; CI: 4.1 - 5.8%) was the highest followed by overweight/obese (3.1%; CI: 2.5 - 3.8%) and HBP (1.8%; CI: 1.3 - 2.4%). The predicted age of IFG or diabetes and their co-morbidity with other CVD risk factors were between 40 - 45 years. Elevated blood level of total cholesterol was the most predictive co-morbid risk factor among IFG and diabetes subjects. Hypertriglyceridaemia was an important risk factor among IFG-normocholesterolaemic-overweight/obese individuals. The higher prevalence of co-morbidity of CVD risk factors with IFG than in diabetes plus the similar age of co-morbidity between IFG and diabetes highlights the need for risk assessment models for prediabetes and education of individuals at risk about factors that mitigate development of diabetes and CVDs.

  9. Does high sugar consumption exacerbate cardiometabolic risk factors and increase the risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David E. Laaksonen

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Consumption of sugar has been relatively high in the Nordic countries; the impact of sugar intake on metabolic risk factors and related diseases has been debated. The objectives were to assess the effect of sugar intake (sugar-sweetened beverages, sucrose and fructose on association with type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and related metabolic risk factors (impaired glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity, dyslipidemia, blood pressure, uric acid, inflammation markers, and on all-cause mortality, through a systematic review of prospective cohort studies and randomised controlled intervention studies published between January 2000 and search dates. The methods adopted were as follows: the first search was run in PubMed in October 2010. A second search with uric acid as risk marker was run in April 2011. The total search strategy was rerun in April 2011 in SveMed+. An update was run in PubMed in January 2012. Two authors independently selected studies for inclusion from the 2,743 abstracts according to predefined eligibility criteria. The outcome was that out of the 17 studies extracted, 15 were prospective cohort studies and two were randomised controlled crossover trials. All of the studies included only adults. With respect to incident type 2 diabetes (nine studies, four of six prospective cohort studies found a significant positive association for sugar-sweetened beverage intake. In general, larger cohort studies with longer follow-up more often reported positive associations, and BMI seemed to mediate part of the increased risk. For other metabolic or cardiovascular risk factors or outcomes, too few studies have been published to draw conclusions. In conclusion, data from prospective cohort studies published in the years 2000–2011 suggest that sugar-sweetened beverages probably increase the risk of type 2 diabetes. For related metabolic risk factors, cardiovascular disease or all-cause mortality and other types of sugars, too few studies

  10. Study on risk factors associated with diabetic retinopathy among the patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in South India

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    Senthilvel Vasudevan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To find the severities status of diabetic retinopathy(DRamong the patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and to determine the association of the severities of diabetic retinopathy with duration of DR, HbA1C levels, history of hypertension, age and gender in the study population.METHODS:Hospital based cross-sectional studies with sample of 100 patients with DR were selected by using simple random sampling technique with a structured questionnaire was conducted in May to June 2012. The study participants those who with DR aged ≥35 years were included in this study and an oral consent was also collected from the study participants. Descriptive statistics, univariate and multivariate ordinal logistic regression analysis were performed. MS Excel spread sheet was used for data entry and data analysis was done by using SPSS 21.0 version. Statistical significance was taken as PRESULTS:Out of 100 patients, mean age of the patient was found as 53.16±10.81(range 35-78y. By univariate analysis, there was a positive relationship between diabetic retinopathy severity and age(PPPPP>0.05 by Mann Whitney u-test. All these factors were found as independent risk factors with the severity of DR except the factor age.CONCLUSION:This study was concluded that the duration of DM, HbA1C levels, family history of DM, History of hypertension and gender were independently associated with severity of DR. However, the factors like age and HDL weren't significant with severity of DR in multivariate analysis. Therefore, by using the availability of the existing treatments and controlling in time, which can prevent and free from the vision threatening diseases or delay the occurrence of DR in their life.

  11. Diabetes Mellitus and Younger Age Are Risk Factors for Hyperphosphatemia in Peritoneal Dialysis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imtiaz, Rameez; Hawken, Steven; McCormick, Brendan B; Leung, Simon; Hiremath, Swapnil; Zimmerman, Deborah L

    2017-02-17

    Hyperphosphatemia has been associated with adverse outcomes in patients with end stage kidney disease (ESKD). The purpose of this study was to determine risk factors for hyperphosphatemia in ESKD patients treated with peritoneal dialysis (PD). This information will be used to develop a patient specific phosphate binder application to facilitate patient self-management of serum phosphate. Adult PD patients documented their food, beverage, and phosphate binder intake for three days using a dietitian developed food journal. Phosphate content of meals was calculated using the ESHA Food Processor SQL Software (ESHA Research, Salem, UT, USA). Clinic biochemistry tests and an adequacy assessment (Baxter Adequest program) were done. Univariate logistic regression was used to determine predictors of serum phosphate >1.78 mmol/L. A multivariable logistic regression model was then fit including those variables that achieved a significance level of p diabetes mellitus (DM) and 33% had hyperphosphatemia (PO₄ > 1.78 mmol/L). In univariate analysis, the variables associated with an increased risk of hyperphosphatemia with a p-value diabetes (OR 11.40, 95 CI 2.82 to 61.55; p = 0.0003), and measured GFR (OR 0.052 per mL/min decrease; 95% CI 0.0025 to 0.66) were associated with hyperphosphatemia. Our results support that younger age and diabetes mellitus are significant risk factors for hyperphosphatemia. These findings warrant further investigation to determine the potential mechanisms that predispose younger patients and those with DM to hyperphosphatemia.

  12. New-onset diabetes mellitus after heart transplantation in children - Incidence and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehgal, Swati; Bock, Matthew J; Louks Palac, Hannah; Brickman, Wendy J; Gossett, Jeffrey G; Marino, Bradley S; Backer, Carl L; Pahl, Elfriede

    2016-11-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a recognized complication of SOT in adults and is associated with decreased graft and patient survival. Little is known about NOD in pediatric HT recipients. We aimed to characterize the incidence and describe risk factors for development of NOD after HT in children. Children who developed diabetes after HT were identified from the OPTN database. Demographic and clinical data before and after transplant were compared between patients with and without NOD. A total of 2056 children were included, 56% were male, 54% were Caucasian, and 62% had cardiomyopathy prior to HT. NOD developed in 219 children (11%) after HT. The incidence of NOD was 2.4, 9.0, and 10.4% at one, five, and 10 yr after HT, respectively. Obesity (HR: 4.32), dialysis prior to transplant (HR: 2.38), African American race (HR: 1.86), transplant before year 2000 (HR: 1.82), female gender (HR: 1.68), and older age at transplant (HR: 1.28) were independent predictors of NOD. The major modifiable risk factor for NOD is obesity, imparting the maximum hazard. Improved surveillance for diabetes in high-risk patients and specific prevention and intervention strategies are imperative in this population. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Prevalence of self-reported diagnosis of diabetes mellitus and associated risk factors in a national survey in the US population: SHIELD (Study to Help Improve Early evaluation and management of risk factors Leading to Diabetes)

    OpenAIRE

    Reed Michael L; Lewis Sandra J; Green Andrew J; Gavin James R; Clark Nathaniel G; Bazata Debbra D; Bays Harold E; Stewart Walter; Chapman Richard H; Fox Kathleen M; Grandy Susan

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Studies derived from continuous national surveys have shown that the prevalence of diagnosed diabetes mellitus in the US is increasing. This study estimated the prevalence in 2004 of self-reported diagnosis of diabetes and other conditions in a community-based population, using data from the Study to Help Improve Early evaluation and management of risk factors Leading to Diabetes (SHIELD). Methods The initial screening questionnaire was mailed in 2004 to a stratified rando...

  14. Risk factors for coronary heart disease and actual diagnostic criteria for diabetes mellitus

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    Mitrović-Perišić Nataša

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Recent studies indicate that the prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM type 2 is increasing in the world. Chronic hyperglycemia in DM is associated with a long term damage, dysfunction and failure of various organs, especially retina, kidney, nerves and, in addition, with an increased risk of cardiovasclar disease. For a long time the illness has been unknown. Early diagnosis of diabetes could suspend the development of diabetic complications. The aim of the study was to establish risk for the development of coronary disease in the patients evaluated by the use of new diagnostic criteria for DM. Methods. The study included 930 participants without diagnosis of DM, hypertension, dyslipidemia, nor coronary heart disease two years before the study. The patients went through measuring of fasting plasma glycemia, erythrocytes, hematocrit, cholesterol, triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase. In the group with hyperglycemia the 2-hour oral glucose tolerance test was performed. We analyzed ECG and made blood pressure monitoring, and also measured body mass, height, waist and hip circumference. We analyzed life style, especially smoking, and exercise and family history. Results. Diabetes prevalence was 2.68%, and prevalences of impaired fasting glucose, impaired glucose tolerance and DM were 12.15%. Average age of males and females was 38 and 45 years, respectively. In the healthy population there was higher frequency of smokers (55% vs 42%, but in the population with hyperglycemia there were more obesity (23% vs 10.5%, hypertension (39% vs 9%, hypercholesterolemia (76% vs 44.1%, lower HDL-C (52.2% vs 25.7%. Cummulative risk factor in healthy subjects, and those with hyperglycemia were 5.6% and 14%, respectively. Conclusion. Subjects with hyperglicemia without diagnosis of DM have higher risk factors for coronary heart disease.

  15. Can Time Efficient Exercise Improve Cardiometabolic Risk Factors in Type 2 Diabetes? A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revdal, Anders; Hollekim-Strand, Siri M; Ingul, Charlotte B

    2016-06-01

    Exercise is considered a cornerstone in the prevention and treatment of type 2 diabetes, but few individuals with type 2 diabetes exercise according to guidelines. We investigated the effect of two time efficient high intensity exercise interventions on exercise capacity, glycemic control and other cardiometabolic risk factors in patients with type 2 diabetes. Twenty-one individuals with type 2 diabetes were randomly assigned to low volume high intensity interval exercise (HIIE; 27 minutes/bout; 10x1-minute at 90 % of HRmax; n = 10) or extremely low volume sprint interval exercise (SIE; 10 minutes/bout; 2x20 seconds at maximum achievable intensity; n = 11) 3 days/week for 12 weeks. Aerobic exercise capacity (VO2peak), glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), blood pressure and body composition were measured at baseline and post test. Both HIIE and SIE improved VO2peak (3.3 mL·min(-1)·kg(-1), 10.4 %), p heart rate recovery (11.0 bpm, p = 0.02). Neither HIIE nor SIE improved HbA1c. In conclusion, this study indicates that substantially lower exercise volumes than recommended in current guidelines can improve aerobic exercise capacity in individuals with type 2 diabetes. However, 12 weeks of time efficient high intensity exercise did not improve glycemic control, and interventions of longer duration should be investigated. Key pointsLow volume high-intensity interval exercise can improve peak oxygen uptake in previously sedentary individuals with type 2 diabetesThe weekly exercise volumes in the two intervention groups of 81 and 30 minutes respectively, is substantially lower than recommended in current exercise guidelines and could reduce the time-barrier associated with exercise among patients with type 2 diabetes.However, 12 weeks of structured, supervised low-volume exercise did not improve glycemic control, indicating a need for exercise volumes or longer intervention period.

  16. Is affluence a risk factor for bronchial asthma and type 1 diabetes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedeschi, Alberto; Airaghi, Lorena

    2006-11-01

    In the last decades, an increase in bronchial asthma and type 1 diabetes occurrence has been observed in affluent countries, and a positive association between the two disorders has been demonstrated at the population level. This association could be explained by common risk factors predisposing to both disorders. Altered environmental and lifestyle conditions, possibly related to socio-economic status, might account for the rising trend of the two disorders. To test this hypothesis, we calculated the correlation between the occurrence of type 1 diabetes and asthma, the gross national product (GNP) and the infant mortality rate, in several European and extra-European countries. GNP was positively correlated with the incidence of type 1 diabetes and with symptoms of asthma in European (r(sp): 0.53 and 0.69; p = 0.001 and p diabetes; r(sp):- 0.51, p = 0.01 for asthma). In extra-European countries, a significant relationship was found between infant mortality and asthma (r(sp): -0.46; p = 0.03); a trend towards a negative correlation between infant mortality and type 1 diabetes was also found, although no statistical significance was reached (r(sp): -0.21; p = 0.31). This analysis indicates that type 1 diabetes and asthma are positively associated with the GNP at the population level. Similarly, countries with low infant mortality rates tend to have a higher incidence of these immune-mediated diseases. Although GNP reflects many societal and lifestyle differences, it is notable that a high socio-economic status implies a reduced or delayed exposure to infectious agents. The reduced pressure of infectious agents on the immune system throughout life might contribute to increase the susceptibility to bronchial asthma and type 1 diabetes.

  17. Eating Disorders in children and adolescents with Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes: prevalence, risk factors, warning signs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racicka, Ewa; Bryńska, Anita

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is associated with increased risk for eating disorders, various dependent on type of diabetes. Binge eating disorder is more common in patient with type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Whereas, intentional omission of insulin doses for the purpose of weight loss occurs mainly in patient with type 1 diabetes (T1DM), however, in some patients with type 2 diabetes omission of oral hypoglycemic drugs can be present. Risk factors for the development of eating disorders in patients with diabetes include: age, female gender, greater body weight, body image dissatisfaction, history of dieting and history of depression. Poor glycemic control, recurrent episodes of ketoacidosis or recurrent episodes of hypoglycemia, secondary to intentional insulin overdose, missed clinical appointments, dietary manipulation and low self-esteem should raise concern. The consequence of eating disorders or disordered eating patterns in patients with diabetes is poor glycemic control and hence higher possibility of complications such as nephropathy, retinopathy and premature death.

  18. Eating Disorders in children and adolescents with Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes: prevalence, risk factors, warning signs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Racicka

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes is associated with increased risk for eating disorders, various dependent on type of diabetes. Binge eating disorder is more common in patient with type 2 diabetes (T2DM. Whereas, intentional omission of insulin doses for the purpose of weight loss occurs mainly in patient with type 1 diabetes (T1DM, however, in some patients with type 2 diabetes omission of oral hypoglycemic drugs can be present. Risk factors for the development of eating disorders in patients with diabetes include: age, female gender, greater body weight, body image dissatisfaction, history of dieting and history of depression. Poor glycemic control, recurrent episodes of ketoacidosis or recurrent episodes of hypoglycemia, secondary to intentional insulin overdose, missed clinical appointments, dietary manipulation and low self-esteem should raise concern. The consequence of eating disorders or disordered eating patterns in patients with diabetes is poor glycemic control and hence higher possibility of complications such as nephropathy, retinopathy and premature death.

  19. Heart Disease Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hearts® WISEWOMAN Program Other Chronic Disease Topics Diabetes Nutrition Obesity Physical Activity Stroke Heart Disease Risk Factors Recommend ... Hearts® WISEWOMAN Program Other Chronic Disease Topics Diabetes Nutrition Obesity Physical Activity Stroke File Formats Help: How do ...

  20. Factores de riesgos asociados a retinopatía diabética Risk factors associated to diabetic retinopathy

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    Julio César Molina Martín

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available La retinopatía diabética continúa siendo una de las causas de ceguera más frecuentes en el mundo. Es por eso que decidimos realizar una amplia revisión acerca de los factores de riesgos más importantes relacionados con ella, con el objetivo de actualizar los conocimientos existentes sobre este tema. En el trabajo se recoge que el tiempo de duración de la diabetes mellitus constituye el factor de riesgo más importante para desencadenar y desarrollar la retinopatía diabética. También se han descrito otros factores de gran significación: el control metabólico de la glicemia, las cifras de tensión arterial, los niveles de lípidos en sangre, la presencia de microalbuminuria y nefropatía, el tipo de tratamiento usado, entre otros. En la revisión se evidencia que con un estricto control y seguimiento de estos factores de riesgos, ayudaremos a prevenir o atenuar en gran medida la aparición y posterior desarrollo de es este tipo de retinopatíaDiabetic retinopathy is one of the most frequent cause of blindness in the word, this is the reason why we decided to make an extensive review on the most important risk factors associated to this illness in order to update our knowledge on this topic. The duration of diabetes is the most important factor to develop diabetic retinopathy. Other factors of great significance such as metabolic control of glycemia, blood pressure levels, serum lipid levels, microalbuminuria, nephropathy, treatment type, among others, have also been described. This review evidenced that the strict control and follow-up of these risk factors will help to prevent or greatly reduce the occurence and further development of this type of retinopathy

  1. Prevalence of cardiovascular disease and risk factors in a type 2 diabetic population of the North Catalonia diabetes study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurado, Jeronimo; Ybarra, Juan; Solanas, Pascual; Caula, Jacint; Gich, Ignasi; Pou, Jose M; Romeo, June Hart

    2009-03-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD), cardiovascular risk factors (CVRFs), and their control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) at primary care settings from the North Catalonia Diabetes Study (NCDS). In this multicentre cross-sectional descriptive study, data were collected from a random sample of 307 patients with T2DM. The prevalence of CVD, CVRF, metabolic syndrome (MS), coronary heart disease (CHD) risk at 10 years (Framingham Point Scores), and CVRF control was evaluated. MS and lipid profiles were established according to Adult Treatment Panel III criteria. CVD prevalence was 22.0% (CHD: 18.9% and peripheral ischemia: 4.5%) and more frequent in men. The prevalence of selected CVRF was: hypertension: 74.5%; dyslipidemia: 77.7%; smoking: 14.9%; obesity 44.9%, and familial CVD: 38.4%. Three or more CVRFs, including T2DM, were observed in 91.3%. MS prevalence was 68.7%. Framingham score was 10.0%, higher in men than in women. CVD prevalence was related to: age, number of CVRFs, duration of diabetes, familial history of CVD, waist circumference, hypertension, lipid profile, kidney disease, and Framingham score, but not to MS by itself. Correct lipid profiles and blood pressure were only observed in 18.9% and 24.0%, respectively, whereas platelet aggregation inhibitors were only recorded in 16.1% of the patient cohort. MS presence was not an independent risk factor of CVD in our study. The high prevalence of CVD and an inadequate control of CVRF, which were apparent in the NCDS population, would suggest that advanced practice nurses should consider incorporating specific cardiovascular assessment in their routine care of persons with T2DM.

  2. A Prelimenary Result of the Cardiovascular Risk factors Intervention Study (Pikom Study): Diabetes Mellitus, Hypertension and their Associated Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Mafauzy; Winn, Than; Rampal, Gr Lekhraj; Abdul Rashid, Ar; Mustaffa, Be

    2005-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) has been the number one cause of death since the last three decades in Malaysia and diabetes mellitus and hypertension are considered as major risk factors. A study to reduce risk factors for cardiovascular diseases in the community (PIKOM) through education and lifestyle changes was undertaken. The study population was from four different areas in Peninsular Malaysia - Kota Bharu and Bachok in Kelantan ; Raub in Pahang; Gunung Besout in Perak and Felda Palong in Negri Sembilan. The subjects invited to participate in this study ware aged between 30 - 65 years, did not have any debilitating illnesses and no known history of diabetes mellitus, hypertension or cardiovascular disease. Subjects were asked to come to the local clinic in a fasting state and after physical examination, blood was taken for plasma glucose and lipids. Oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was then performed. A total of 4,121 subjects participated in the study. The proportion of subjects with diabetes mellitus was highest in Felda Palong area (20.3%) and lowest in Raub area (7.1%). The proportion of subjects with hypertension was also highest in Felda Palong area (38.6%) and lowest in Raub area (29.1%). This could be attributable to the subjects in Felda Palong having the highest mean Body Mass Index (BMI) and Waist-to-Hip Ratio (WHR). There were significant associations between diabetes and hypertension with age and obesity. Subjects with diabetes mellitus and hypertension also had the highest mean age, BMI, WHR and plasma cholesterol.In conclusion, the proportion of patients with risk factors for CVD was high and intervention studies through education and lifestyle changes were being carried out to see their effectiveness.

  3. ADAMTS13 activity as a novel risk factor for incident type 2 diabetes mellitus: a population-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Paul S; van Herpt, Thijs T W; Ligthart, Symen; Hofman, Albert; Ikram, M Arfan; van Hoek, Mandy; Sijbrands, Eric J G; Franco, Oscar H; de Maat, Moniek P M; Leebeek, Frank W G; Dehghan, Abbas

    2017-02-01

    ADAMTS13 is a protease that breaks down von Willebrand factor (VWF) multimers into smaller, less active particles. VWF has been associated with an increased risk of incident type 2 diabetes mellitus. Here, we determine whether ADAMTS13 activity and VWF antigen are associated with incident diabetes. This study included 5176 participants from the Rotterdam Study, a prospective population-based cohort study. Participants were free of diabetes at baseline and followed up for more than 20 years. Cox proportional hazards models were used to examine the association of ADAMTS13 activity and VWF antigen with incident diabetes. ADAMTS13 activity was associated with an increased risk of incident diabetes (HR 1.17 [95% CI 1.08, 1.27]) after adjustment for known risk factors and VWF antigen levels. Although ADAMTS13 activity was positively associated with fasting glucose and insulin, the association with incident diabetes did not change when we adjusted for these covariates. ADAMTS13 activity was also associated with incident prediabetes (defined on the basis of both fasting and non-fasting blood glucose) after adjustment for known risk factors (HR 1.11 [95% CI 1.03, 1.19]), while the VWF antigen level was not. VWF antigen was associated with incident diabetes, but this association was attenuated after adjustment for known risk factors. ADAMTS13 activity appears to be an independent risk factor for incident prediabetes and type 2 diabetes. As the association between ADAMTS13 and diabetes did not appear to be explained by its cleavage of VWF, ADAMTS13 may have an independent role in the development of diabetes.

  4. Risk factors for development of critical limb ischemia -- a survey of diabetic vs. nondiabetic population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosevski, M; Meskovska, S; Tosev, S; Peovska, I; Asikov, I; Georgievska-Ismail, L J

    2006-12-01

    The aim of this study is to identify the risk factors for development of chronic critical limb ischemia (CLI) in diabetic and nondiabetic patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD). 127 patients (pts) with PAD (63 with type 2 diabetes and 64 nondiabetic) were randomly included in a cross sectional study. Out of them 17 were with CLI. Population was investigated for age, height, weight, sex, duration of PAD and diabetes, arterial hypertension, hyperlipidemia, smoking, obesity, systolic blood pressure, value of ankle-brachial index, previous claudicating distance and peripheral intervention, amputation, medical treatment with prostanoids, insulin and antiplatelet drugs and histories of cerebrovascular disease, coronary artery disease and other concomitant diseases. After adjudging linear correlation between mentioned variables and presence of CLI, logistic regression model was built. There were no significant differences in demographic data between both populations. Hyperlipidemia was more frequent in nondiabetic population. Multiple regression model show ankle-brachial index < 0,5, measured in previous 1-3 years (OR 3.39 CI 95% 0.28-40.78), microvascular complication retinopathy (OR 12.98 CI 95% 1.76-95.58), heart failure (OR 1.91 CI 95% 0.29-2.72) and previous prostanoids treatment (OR 15.92 CI 95% 0.53-476.58) as predictors of development of CLI in diabetic population with PAD. After heart failure exclusion of model of nondiabetic pts, previous surgery (OR 3.14 CI 95% 0.61-16.09) and smoking (OR 0.35 CI 95% 0.78-1.62) were presented as prognostic factors for CLI's onset. Our results indicate differences between predictors of CLI's onset in diabetic and nondiabetic population with PAD. Presence of retinopathy, previous measured ankle-brachial index and prostanoids treatment are predictors of development of CLI in diabetic population. Previous surgery is independent predictor for CLI'onset in nondiabetics. Treating concomitant heart failure for both populations

  5. Reduction of cardiovascular risk factors in subjects with type 2 diabetes by Pycnogenol supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zibadi, Sherma; Rohdewald, Peter J; Park, Danna; Watson, Ronald Ross

    2008-05-01

    Patients with type 2 diabetes are at considerable risk of excessive morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular disease (CVD). We investigated the clinical effectiveness of Pycnogenol, a flavonoid-rich dietary supplement, in reducing antihypertensive medication use and CVD risk factors in subjects with type 2 diabetes. Forty-eight individuals were enrolled in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial with parallel-group design. Patients were diagnosed with both type 2 diabetes and mild to moderate hypertension and were undergoing treatment with angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors. Subjects were randomly assigned to receive either Pycnogenol pill (125 mg daily) or matched placebo for 12 weeks. According to the values of blood pressure (BP) measured at 2-week intervals, the pretrial ACE inhibitor dosage was left unchanged, reduced by 50%, or brought back to the pretrial dosage until a stable BP was obtained. Fasting plasma glucose, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), serum endothelin-1, and urinary albumin were evaluated monthly. Pycnogenol treatment achieved BP control in 58.3% of subjects at the end of the 12 weeks with 50% reduction in individual pretrial dose of ACE-inhibitors (P Pycnogenol-treated group vs 0.5 pg/mL increase in control group (P Pycnogenol-treated group (P Pycnogenol-treated group vs 5.7 mg/dL in control group (P Pycnogenol-treated group, declining by 12.7 mg/dL (P Pycnogenol resulted in improved diabetes control, lowered CVD risk factors, and reduced antihypertensive medicine use vs controls.

  6. Sociodemographic Risk Factors to Intellectual and Academic Functioning in Children with Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overstreet, Stacy; Holmes, Clarissa S.; Dunlap, William P.; Frentz, Johnette

    1997-01-01

    The independent contributions of ethnicity and socioeconomic status to intellectual and academic functioning in children with diabetes were studied with 58 diabetic children and 58 comparisons. Findings indicate that black children with diabetes, regardless of social class, are at greater risk for intellectual deficits and learning problems than…

  7. Risk factors of foot ulceration in patients with Diabetes Mellitus type 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Bañuelos-Barrera

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Identify the risk factors for foot ulceration in patients with diabetes type 2 (DM2 who attended a primary care center in the city of Colima (Mexico. Methodology. This was a descriptive cross-sectional study conducted during 2012 with the participation of 87 patients with DM2 from both sexes and older than 30 years of age. Socio-demographic, anthropometric, clinical, and biochemical variables were measured. The study inquired about prior evaluation of the feet and prior education on diabetes by the healthcare team. Results. The mean age was 59 years and 70% were women. The average number of years since diagnosis was nine years; only 35% had good glycemia control; 66% engage in exercise; 51% wear open shoes; none had temperature differences in the feet; 82% had some type of dermatological abnormality; 50% had deformities in their feet. A total of 24% had been diagnosed with peripheral neuropathy and another 11% had peripheral vascular disease. Sixty percent of all the patients had risk of foot ulceration. Only 23% of the participants had had previous foot exams. One of every three diabetic patients had received education about the disease. Conclusion. An important proportion of the patients had risk of foot ulceration, contrary to the insufficient percentage of individuals with previous inspection and education about foot care. For nursing, it is an area of opportunity in this level of care to improve the inspection and education on diabetes, specifically on foot care, mainly in those patients with a prolonged evolution of the disease, deficient glycemia control, and risk of ulceration.

  8. Effect of population screening for type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular risk factors on mortality rate and cardiovascular events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simmons, Rebecca K; Griffin, Simon J; Witte, Daniel R

    2017-01-01

    -based screening for type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular risk factors on mortality rates and cardiovascular events. METHODS: This register-based, non-randomised, controlled trial included men and women aged 40-69 years without known diabetes who were registered with a general practice in Denmark (n = 1......,912,392). Between 2001 and 2006, 153,107 individuals registered with 181 practices participating in the Anglo-Danish-Dutch Study of Intensive Treatment in People with Screen-Detected Diabetes in Primary Care (ADDITION)-Denmark study were sent a diabetes risk score questionnaire. Individuals at moderate-to-high risk...... were invited to visit their GP for assessment of diabetes status and cardiovascular risk (screening group). The 1,759,285 individuals registered with all other general practices in Denmark constituted the retrospectively constructed no-screening (control) group. Outcomes were mortality rate...

  9. Identification of Risk Factors Affecting Impaired Fasting Glucose and Diabetes in Adult Patients from Northeast China

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    Yutian Yin

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Besides genetic factors, the occurrence of diabetes is influenced by lifestyles and environmental factors as well as trace elements in diet materials. Subjects with impaired fasting glucose (IFG have an increased risk of developing diabetes mellitus (DM. This study aimed to explore risk factors affecting IFG and diabetes in patients from Northeast China. Methods: A population-based, cross-sectional survey of chronic diseases and related risk factors was conducted in Jilin Province of Northeast China. All adult residents, aged 18–79, were invited to participate in this survey using the method of multistage stratified random cluster sampling. One hundred thirty-four patients with IFG or DM and 391 healthy control subjects were recruited. We compared demographic factors, body size measurements, healthy-related behaviors, and hair metallic element contents between IFG/diabetes patients and healthy individuals. Results: IFG/diabetes patients had a greater weight, waist, hip, and body mass index (BMI than control subjects. Significant differences in the content of zinc (Zn, potassium (K, copper (Ca, and sodium (Na as well as Cu/Zn ratios between IFG or DM patients and control subjects (p < 0.05 were also observed. Hair Cu, selenium (Se, and Na contents were positively correlated with blood glucose levels (Cu: rs = 0.135, p = 0.002; Se: rs = 0.110, p = 0.012; Na: rs = 0.091, p = 0.038. Polytomous logistic regression adjusting for age, sex, family history of diabetes and BMI, showed that subjects with high BMI were more likely to develop IFG and DM (IFG: OR = 1.15, OR 95% CI = 1.02–1.29; DM: OR = 1.15, OR 95% CI = 1.01–1.33. Moreover, rarely or never eating fruits was a risk factor for DM (OR = 5.46, OR 95% CI = 1.87–15.98 but not for IFG (OR = 1.70, OR 95% CI = 0.72–4.02. Subjects with abdominal obesity or DM history were more susceptible to DM (abdominal obesity: OR = 2.99, OR 95% CI = 1.07–8.37; DM history: OR = 2.69, OR 95

  10. Risk Factors for the Development and Progression of Diabetic Kidney Disease in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Advanced Diabetic Retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Kyung Jin; Kim, Hye Ji; Kim, Mee Kyoung; Kwon, Hyuk Sang; Baek, Ki Hyun; Roh, Young Jung; Song, Ki Ho

    2016-12-01

    Some patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) do not develop diabetic kidney disease (DKD) despite the presence of advanced diabetic retinopathy (DR). We aimed to investigate the presence of DKD and its risk factors in patients with T2DM and advanced DR. We conducted a cross-sectional study in 317 patients with T2DM and advanced DR. The phenotypes of DKD were divided into three groups according to the urine albumin/creatinine ratio (uACR, mg/g) and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR, mL/min/1.73 m²): no DKD (uACR HDL-C) ratio correlated positively with uACR and negatively with eGFR. Multiple linear regression analyses showed that the HbA1c-SD and TG/HDL-C ratio were significantly related with eGFR. Multiple logistic regression analyses after adjusting for several risk factors showed that HbA1c-SD and the TG/HDL-C ratio were significant risk factors for severe DKD. The prevalence of DKD was about 60% in patients with T2DM and advanced DR. HbA1c variability and TG/HDL-C ratio may affect the development and progression of DKD in these patients.

  11. HDL cholesterol as a residual risk factor for vascular events and all cause mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sharif, Shahnam; Van Der Graaf, Yolanda; Nathoe, Hendrik M.; de Valk, Harold W.; Visseren, Frank L J; Westerink, Jan

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate whether low HDL cholesterol (HDL-c) levels are a risk factor for cardiovascular disease and mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes and whether it remains a residual risk factor when attaining low LDL cholesterol (LDL-c) treatment goals or when LDL-c is treated with intensi

  12. The risk factors for abnormal ankle-brachial index in type 2 diabetic patients and clinical predictive value for diabetic foot

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张净

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the prevalence of diabetic foot (DF) and the normal,high and low ankle brachial index (ABI) in type 2 diabetic patients and explore the risk factor for abnormal ABI and the clinical predictive value for DF.Methods A total of 2 681 type 2 diabetic patients who visited our hospital between January,2007and December,2009 were enrolled in the study.The clinical data were analyzed and the risk factors for abnormal ABI were determined by logistic regression analysis.Results ABI was normal (0.9-<1.3) in 2 362 cases

  13. Prevalence and risk factors of periodontitis among adults with or without diabetes mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Mihee; Kim, Hee Yeon; Seok, Hannah; Yeo, Chang Dong; Kim, Young Soo; Song, Jae Yen; Lee, Young Bok; Lee, Dong-Hee; Lee, Jae-Im; Lee, Tae-Kyu; Ahn, Hyo-Suk; Ko, Yoon Ho; Jeong, Seong Cheol; Chae, Hiun Suk; Sohn, Tae Seo

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: This study examined prevalence and risk factors of periodontitis in representative samples of Korean adults, with and without diabetes mellitus (DM). Methods: Data from the 2012 Korean National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey were analyzed. A total of 4,477 adults (≥ 30 years old) were selected from 8,057 individuals who completed a nutrition survey, a self-reported general health behavior questionnaire, an oral examination, an oral hygiene behaviors survey, and laboratory tests. DM was defined as a fasting plasma glucose ≥ 126 mg/dL, or self-reported diagnosed diabetes, or current use of oral hypoglycemic agents and/or insulin. The community periodontal index was used to assess periodontitis status and comparisons between the periodontitis and the non-periodontitis group, were performed, according to the presence of DM. Risk factors for periodontitis in adults with DM and without DM were evaluated by multiple logistic regression analysis. Results: The prevalence of periodontitis was significantly higher in adults with DM (43.7%) than in those without DM (25%, p periodontitis were older age, male, urban habitation, waist circumference, smoking, oral pain, and less frequent tooth brushing. Significant risk factors for periodontitis in adults with DM were the smoking, oral pain, and not-using an oral hygiene product. Conclusions: Adults with DM have an increased risk of periodontitis than those without DM. Current smoking and oral pain increase this risk. Using an oral hygiene product can reduce risk of periodontal disease in adults with DM. PMID:27604799

  14. Urinary tract infections in Romanian patients with diabetes: prevalence, etiology, and risk factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiţă, Teodora; Timar, Bogdan; Muntean, Delia; Bădiţoiu, Luminiţa; Horhat, Florin; Hogea, Elena; Moldovan, Roxana; Timar, Romulus; Licker, Monica

    2017-01-01

    Aim Patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) have an increased risk of infections, especially urinary tract infections (UTIs). The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence and etiology of UTIs and identify the risk factors for their development in patients with DM. Patients and methods In this retrospective, noninterventional study, the medical records of 2,465 adult patients with DM who were hospitalized in a Diabetes Clinic were reviewed. Data regarding the presence of UTI and possible associated risk factors were collected and their possible relation was analyzed. The study protocol and procedures were approved by the Ethics Committee of Timișoara Emergency Hospital. All data were collected and analyzed using SPSS v.17 statistical software. Results The prevalence of UTIs in patients with DM was 12.0% (297 cases), being higher in females than in males and higher in patients with type 2 DM compared with patients with type 1 DM. In univariate logistic regression analysis, risk factors associated with UTIs were female gender, age, type 2 DM, longer duration of DM, and the presence of chronic kidney disease and coronary artery disease. Multivariate analysis identified age, duration of DM, and metabolic control (hemoglobin A1c levels) as independent risk factors for UTIs. The gram-negative bacilli from the Enterobacteriaceae family were predominant, with Escherichia coli being the most frequent of them (70.4%). Conclusion UTIs are a frequent condition associated with DM. It is necessary to improve the care and the screening of UTIs in patients with DM to prevent the occurrence of possible associated severe renal complications. PMID:28031715

  15. Relationship between cardiovascular risk factors and blood adiponectin in diabetic males

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Izadi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Obesity-related disorders characterized by insulin resistance such as metabolic syndrome, hypertension, coronary artery disease and type 2 diabetes are associated with decreased adiponectin levels. The purpose of the present study was to determine association of lipid profile and obesity markers with serum adiponectin in type 2 diabetes adult males. Methods: For this purpose, forty one adult males with type 2 diabetes were enrolled in this study randomly. Blood samples were collected after a 10-12 hour overnight fasting for measuring serum glucose and lipid profile and adiponectin. The anthropometrical indices were measured too. A multivariate linear regression analysis used to predict relation between variables. Results: The data analysis showed that circulatory adiponectin had significant negative association with glucose, triglyceride, total cholesterol, visceral fat and cholesterol/HDL ratio (P ≤0.05. There were no significant correlation between adiponectin level and HDL and LDL. Conclusion: Our findings support negative relationship between serum adiponectin and cardiovascular risk factors in diabetic patients.

  16. Higher prevalence of risk factors for type 2 diabetes mellitus and subsequent higher incidence in men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almdal, T.; Scharling, H.; Jensen, J.S.;

    2008-01-01

    Background: This study investigates risk factors and the incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (type 2 DM) in both sexes of a northern European population. Methods: A total of 14,223 randomly selected men and women were studied from 1976 to 1978. Patients with diabetes (self-reported type 2 DM......, non-fasting blood glucose and triglycerides. Significantly more men (242, 5.4%) than women (152, 2.5%) developed type 2 DM. The odds ratio (OR) for developing diabetes with a BMI above 30 kg/m(2) compared to a BMI of 20-25 kg/m(2) was 8.1 in women and 6.3 in men; for a non-fasting plasma glucose of 8.......4-11.0 mmol/l compared to a plasma glucose of 5.5-6.4, the ORs were 7.8 in women and 4.7 in men. The OR for developing diabetes in persons with a non-fasting triglyceride level above 2.0 mmol/l compared to 1.0-2.0 mmol/l was 1.8 in both sexes; women with non -fasting triglycerides below 1.0 mmol/l had...

  17. [Monitoring of cardiovascular risk factors in patients with diabetes type 2].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrlová, B; Rosolová, H; Simon, J; Sefrna, F; Sifalda, P; Sípová, I

    2009-09-01

    The control of basic cardiovascular risk factors was examined in a sample of 415 diabetes type 2 patients, aged 66 +/- 10 years, with a 9.4 +/- 8 years long history of diabetes, both genders represented proportionally; 95% of the sample were hypertensive. The recommended blood pressure value was achieved by 13% males and 17% females. Antihypertensive monotherapy was indicated in 40% of the sample. Renin-angiotensin-aldosteron system inhibitors were prescibed to 90% of the sample. The fasting glycaemia < or = 6 mmol/L were achieved in 10% males and 11% females; glycosilated hemoglobin < 4.5% in 20% males and 24% females; 60% of the sample had antidiabetic pharmacotherapy--44% males and 48% females used metformin. Total fasting plasma cholesterol < 4.5 mmol/L was achieved in 31% males and 23% females; LDL-cholesterol < 2.5 mmol/L was achieved in 31% males and 41% females. The target values for diabetics in secondary prevention of cardiovascular diseases or with subclinical atherosclerosis was achieved in 13% of the sample. Statins were prescribed in 60% of the sample, fibrates in 4%. Only 2 females achieved all the target values. Hypolipidemic and antihypertensive drug therapy is unsatisfactory; there is certainly a big potential in life style changes among the diabetic patients.

  18. Diabetes and Cirrhosis Are Risk Factors for Hepatocellular Carcinoma After Successful Treatment of Chronic Hepatitis C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedenstierna, Magnus; Nangarhari, Ali; Weiland, Ola; Aleman, Soo

    2016-09-15

    Successful treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection reduces the risk for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), but a risk remains. Current guidelines recommend continued HCC surveillance after sustained virologic response (SVR) has been achieved. This study aimed to investigate risk factors and incidence rates for HCC after SVR in HCV patients with pretreatment advanced liver disease (Metavir stage F3/F4). All patients with advanced liver disease successfully treated for HCV at Karolinska University Hospital during 1992-2013 (n = 399) were followed up for a median of 7.8 years. Data from national registries were used to minimize loss to follow-up. Incidence rates and hazard ratios (HRs) for development of HCC were calculated by Cox regression analysis. Seventeen patients developed HCC during 3366 person-years (PY) of follow-up. The HCC incidence rate was 0.95 (95% confidence interval [CI], .57-1.6) and 0.15 (95% CI, .05-.49) per 100 PY for patients with pretreatment F4 and F3, respectively. Patients with pretreatment cirrhosis and diabetes had a HR to develop HCC of 6.3, and an incidence rate of 7.9 per 100 PY (95% CI, 3.3-19) during the first 2 years of follow-up. The risk for HCC decreased significantly 2 years after SVR had been achieved. Diabetes mellitus and cirrhosis are strong risk factors for HCC development after SVR has been achieved. The risk to develop HCC diminishes significantly 2 years after SVR. Patients without cirrhosis have a low risk to develop HCC after SVR, and the benefit of HCC surveillance for this group is questionable. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Using Multistate Observational Studies to Determine Role of Hypertension and Diabetes as Risk Factors for Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mitasha; Raj, Des; Raina, Sunil Kumar; Gandhi, Manoj Kumar; Chander, Vishav

    2016-12-01

    Evidence suggests that modifiable risk factors which can be targeted by prevention are vascular diseases, such as diabetes, midlife hypertension (HTN), midlife obesity, midlife cholesterol, mid- and late-life depression as well as lifestyle factors such as smoking, physical inactivity, and poor diet. A comprehensive search of the National Library of Medicine's PubMed database and Google Scholar was conducted. A combinations of medical subject headings and free text words that included search terms related to the exposure (e.g., prevalence, HTN, raised BP, high BP, diabetes, high blood sugar, DM, India, state), were combined with search terms related to the outcomes (e.g., prevalence, disease burden, estimate, dementia, India). The filters included were English for the language category and humans for the study category. The PubMed search initially identified 269 references, and a total of 204 abstracts were screened by inclusion criteria. Full-text assessment of 136 articles on prevalence of dementia resulted in 20 relevant articles from which the different regions of the country were identified. Based on the search conducted according to the regions; 287abstracts of the prevalence of HTN and 577 on the prevalence of diabetes mellitus were screened. There were 43 full-text articles on the prevalence of HTN and diabetes from the regions where the prevalence of dementia was available. Of these potentially relevant articles were 14 in number. Despite the uncertainty in the role, the data analysis, therefore, points to a role in the prevention of HTN and diabetes to prevent dementia.

  20. Diabetes risk factors in children: a partnership between nurse practitioner and high school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipman, Terri H; Schucker, Mary McGrath; Ratcliffe, Sarah J; Holmberg, Tyler; Baier, Scott; Deatrick, Janet A

    2011-01-01

    This project was a 4-year university/community collaboration to (1) screen for diabetes risk factors in children from in an inner-city community; (2) assess children's knowledge of nutrition and measure their physical endurance; and (3) survey parents about barriers to healthy living. Descriptive cross-sectional study utilizing a community participatory-based research approach. For a 4-week period each year, nurse practitioner students and high school students partnered in an evaluation of elementary school children that included assessment of (1) height, weight, waist circumference, BMI, and acanthosis nigricans; (2) scores on a nutrition knowledge test; and (3) recovery heart rate after a dance activity. Parents of the children were surveyed regarding barriers to healthy eating and activity. A total of 240 African American children were evaluated: 25% were obese, 24% had a waist circumference >95th percentile, and 14% had acanthosis nigricans. The mean score of a nutrition knowledge test was 65%, and recovery heart rates were significantly higher than preexercise heart rates. Of 48 parents surveyed, the most common barrier to eating healthy reported was the children's picky eating (62%), and most common barrier to activity was lack of access to safe places to play (54%). Nurses working with children from inner-city communities should be especially aware of the children's many risk factors for diabetes. Clinicians who hope to make a difference in altering these risks should collaborate with the community to target high-risk populations for diabetes screening, promote good nutrition and exercise, and address barriers to healthy living. When developing plans of care for children, regardless of setting, it is critical to understand the community and incorporate the families as partners in developing culturally relevant interventions.

  1. Type 2 diabetes mellitus and psychological stress - a modifiable risk factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackett, Ruth A; Steptoe, Andrew

    2017-09-01

    Psychological stress is common in many physical illnesses and is increasingly recognized as a risk factor for disease onset and progression. An emerging body of literature suggests that stress has a role in the aetiology of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) both as a predictor of new onset T2DM and as a prognostic factor in people with existing T2DM. Here, we review the evidence linking T2DM and psychological stress. We highlight the physiological responses to stress that are probably related to T2DM, drawing on evidence from animal work, large epidemiological studies and human laboratory trials. We discuss population and clinical studies linking psychological and social stress factors with T2DM, and give an overview of intervention studies that have attempted to modify psychological or social factors to improve outcomes in people with T2DM.

  2. Profile, Bacteriology, and Risk Factors for Foot Ulcers among Diabetics in a Tertiary Hospital in Calabar, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akaninyene Asuquo Otu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic foot disease is a major medical, social, and economic problem. This retrospective study assessed the profile of diabetes mellitus patients with foot ulcers in the University of Calabar Teaching Hospital (UCTH, Nigeria. Admission records of all patients admitted unto the medical wards of UCTH over a 5 year period were analysed. The records of diabetic patients were retrieved. Data on patient characteristics and possible risk factors for diabetes mellitus foot ulcers was extracted. Of the 3,882 patients admitted, 297 (7% were on account of complications of diabetes mellitus. Foot ulcers accounted for 63 (21.2% of all diabetic admissions. The elderly constituted the majority of patients admitted with foot ulcers. The average duration of stay of diabetics with foot ulcers was 38.5 days. Diabetics admitted for other conditions had average duration of admission of 15.8 days. Staphylococcus aureus was the commonest organism isolated from swabs of foot ulcers. Most of the organisms identified from ulcer swab cultures were sensitive to quinolones and resistant to penicillins. These diabetic foot ulcers were significantly associated with peripheral sensory neuropathy, peripheral vascular disease, intermittent claudication, and walking barefoot. An effective diabetes foot programme is required to address these risk factors and reverse the current trend.

  3. The correlation between the Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) in non-diabetics and cardiovascular risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xinling; Zhao, Youmin; Chai, Jianwen; Hao, Dongqin

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to discuss the relativity between the glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) in non-diabetics and cardiovascular risk factors and definite the significance of predicting the cardiovascular risk factors through cross-sectional research method. There were 2007 cases volunteers (including 650 cases of male, 1357 cases of female) from city community with complete information involved in the research of diabetes. The value of HbA1c 6.5% was set as the diagnose boundary of the diabetes. Differences were considered to be statistically significant at Prisk factors. Then we analyzed the number of risk factors for individuals in different HbA1c groups. Meanwhile, patients were grouped into zero, one, two, three, four or more groups with reference to the number of risk factors they had in order to compare the values of risk factors in different groups through Logistic regression. The results showed that (1) For those people who had no less than three risk factors, the frequency of risk factors was on the rise with the increase of HbA1c levels. (2) The value of HbA1c in different groups of risk factors rose with the increasing number of risk factors. There was a significant difference (Prisk factors. HbA1c levels, which can be a prediction index for cardiovascular risk factors dependent from other cardiovascular risk factors for non-diabetics, and it were highly relevant with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and impaired fasting blood glucose (FBG).

  4. Polymorphism of Apolipoprotein A5 is a Risk Factor for Cerebral Infarction in Type 2 Diabetes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xuefeng LI; Yancheng XU; Yan DING; Chengming QIN; Zhe DAI; Li NIU

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the association of apolipoprotein A5 (apoAS) gene polymorphism at position -113 ITC with cerebral infarction in patients with type 2 diabetes. A total of 256 type 2 diabetic patients without cerebral infarction (T2DM), 220 type 2 diabetic patients with cerebral infarction (T2DMCI) and 340 healthy subjects were recruited from the same region (Hubei province,China). The genotype of apoA5 -1131TC was analyzed by polymerase chain reaction, followed by restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). Total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol,LDL-cholesterol and trigiycerides were quantitatively detected by using standard enzymatic techniques. The results showed that the prevalence of the apoA5 -1131C allele was significantly higher in T2DMCI group than that in control group (42.7% versus 31.2%, P<0.01). The carriers of rare C allele had higher TG levels as compared with carders of common allele in the three groups (P<0.01). Logistic regression models, which were adjusted for age, gender, blood pressure, BMI, FBS, smoking,LDL-C and HDL-C, revealed that patients carrying the apoA5 -1131C allele and CC homozygotes were at high risk for T2DMCI. It was concluded that the apoA5 -ll31C allele variant is an independent genetic risk factor for T2DMCI.

  5. Type 2 diabetes mellitus in Malaysia: current trends and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tee, E-S; Yap, R W K

    2017-07-01

    This review discussed the prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM) in Malaysia and the associated major risk factors, namely overweight/obesity, dietary practices and physical activity in both adults and school children. Detailed analyses of such information will provide crucial information for the formulation and implementation of programmes for the control and prevention of T2DM in the country. National studies from 1996-2015, and other recent nation-wide studies were referred to. The current prevalence of DM in 2015 is 17.5%, over double since 1996. Females, older age group, Indians, and urban residents had the highest risk of DM. The combined prevalence of overweight/obesity in 2015 is 47.7% for adults. Adults did not achieve the recommended intakes for majority of the foods groups in the Malaysian Food Pyramid especially fruits and vegetables. Adults also had moderate physical activity level. Three nation-wide studies showed a prevalence ranging from 27 to 31% for combined overweight/obesity in school children. The prevalence was higher among boys, primary school age, Indian ethnicity, and even rural children are not spared. Physical activity level was also low among school children. There must be serious systematic implementation of action plans to combat the high prevalence of diabetes and associated risk factors.

  6. Time trends and risk factors for diabetes mellitus in cats presented to veterinary teaching hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prahl, Annalisa; Guptill, Lynn; Glickman, Nita W; Tetrick, Mark; Glickman, Larry T

    2007-10-01

    Veterinary Medical Data Base records of cats with diabetes mellitus (DM) from 1970 through 1999 were reviewed to identify trends in hospital prevalence of DM and potential host risk factors. Hospital prevalence increased from eight cases per 10,000 in 1970 to 124 per 10,000 in 1999 (P < 0.001). Case fatality percent at first visit decreased from 40% to 10% (P < 0.001). Hospital prevalence increased in all age groups (P < 0.002). There was no apparent seasonal pattern in hospital prevalence. Significant risk factors included male gender, increasing age for both genders (P < 0.001), increasing weight for males (P < 0.001), and mixed vs pure breed for females (P = 0.006).

  7. Risk Factors and Plasma Glucose Profile of Gestational Diabetes in Omani Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitme, Havagiray R; Al Shibli, Sumaiya Abdallah Said; Al-Shamiry, Raya Mahmood

    2016-01-01

    Objectives We sought to conduct a detailed study on the risk factors of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) in Omani women to determine the actual and applicable risk factors and glucose profile in this population. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional case-control study using pregnant women diagnosed with GDM. Pregnant women without GDM were used as a control group. We collected information related to age, family history, prior history of pregnancy complications, age of marriage, age of first pregnancy, fasting glucose level, and oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) results from three hospitals in Oman through face-to-face interviews and hospital records. Results The median age of women with GDM was 33 years old (p 3 deliveries, height marriage at age family history, anthropometric profile, and age of first pregnancy and marriage should be considered while screening for GDM and determining the care needs of Omani women with GDM. PMID:27602192

  8. [Cardiovascular risk factor control in a population with longstanding diabetes attending endocrinology departments].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comi-Diaz, Cristina; Miralles-García, José M; Cabrerizo, Lucio; Pérez, María; Masramon, Xavier; De Pablos-Velasco, Pedro

    2010-12-01

    To determine the degree of control of cardiovascular risk factors (CVRF) in a sample of patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) attending Endocrinology and Nutrition Departments in Spain. An epidemiological, cross-sectional, multicenter and observational study involving 41 Departments of Endocrinology and Nutrition in Spain. Each department selected patients with DM with over 10 years of evolution, which were treated in outpatient settings. Demographic, anthropometric, clinical and biochemical data, including medication, were collected for each participant. 1159 patients who met the inclusion criteria were recruited. 52% of the participants were patients with type 2 DM. The mean duration of DM was 19.6 years. A proportion of 37%, 44%, 27.6% and 25.5% had good control of their blood pressure (BP), low density cholesterol (LDLc), lipids and glucose, respectively, and only 4.3% did well in all factors evaluated. The percentage of poorly controlled BP was four times higher in type 2 than in type 1 DM. Obesity, low cultural level and aggregation of cardiovascular risk factors were associated with poorer control. The degree of control of CVRF in diabetic patients with long disease duration is insufficient. Copyright © 2010 SEEN. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  9. Metabolic syndrome: psychosocial, neuroendocrine, and classical risk factors in type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, N G; Brunner, E J; Eriksson, J W; Robertson, R P

    2007-10-01

    This article summarizes some aspects of stress in the metabolic syndrome at the psychosocial, tissue, and cellular levels. The metabolic syndrome is a valuable research concept for studying population health and social-biological translation. The cluster of cardiovascular risk factors labeled the metabolic syndrome is linked with low socioeconomic status. Systematic differences in diet and physical activity contribute to social patterning of the syndrome. In addition, psychosocial factors including chronic work stress are linked with its development. Psychosocial factors could lead to metabolic perturbations and increase cardiovascular risk via activation of neuroendocrine responses, for example, in the autonomic nervous system and in several hormonal pathways. High glucocorticoid levels will promote lipid storage in visceral rather than subcutaneous adipose tissue. Adipocytes secrete several proinflammatory cytokines, which considered major contributors to increase in oxidants and cell injury. Upregulation of heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) and peroxidase in the early development of diabetes produces a decrease in oxidative-mediated injury. Increased HO activity is associated with a significant decrease in superoxide, endothelial cell shedding and blood pressure. Finally, it is proposed that overexpression of glutathione peroxidase in beta cells may protect beta cell deterioration from oxidative stress during development of diabetes and hyperglycemia and this may result in attenuation of beta cell failure. If this proves to be the case, then the scene will be set to develop glutathione peroxidase mimetics for use in preclinical and clinical trials.

  10. Are hypertension and diabetes mellitus risk factors for pelvic organ prolapse?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isık, Hatice; Aynıoglu, Oner; Sahbaz, Ahmet; Selimoglu, Refika; Timur, Hakan; Harma, Muge

    2016-02-01

    Pelvic organ prolapse (POP) is an important problem for women with multifactorial etiology. This study aims to determine the role of hypertension (HT) and diabetes mellitus (DM) in POP. The study included 586 women admitted to Bulent Ecevit University Hospital between September 2013 and April 2015 for hysterectomy, comprising 186 patients with POP and 400 patients without. The demographic characteristics, age, body mass index (BMI), obstetrical history, type of delivery, associated medical diseases, and benign gynecological diseases were recorded. HT, DM, or both together were particularly considered as coexisting medical diseases. Median gravida, parity, and live birth numbers were significantly higher in POP patients (4 vs. 3, 3 vs. 2, and 3 vs. 2 respectively, p0.05). There was a significant difference between groups regarding comorbid diseases (p<0.001). Logistic regression analysis for risk factors of POP revealed age, BMI, vaginal parturition, and co-morbidity with HT+DM together significantly increased POP risk (p<0.05). HT+DM together significantly increased risks with OR of 1.9 (1.1-3.16). In addition to multiple factors increasing POP risk, comorbidities as HT+DM together should be considered as risk factors. Patients with these comorbidities should be encouraged to change their lifestyles to prevent POP. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Adding Salt to Meals as a Risk Factor of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Case-Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radzeviciene, Lina; Ostrauskas, Rytas

    2017-01-13

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is thought to arise from the complex interplay between genetic and environmental factors. It is important to identify modifiable risk factors that may help to reduce the risk of diabetes. Data on salt intake and the risk of type 2 diabetes are limited. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between adding salt to prepared meals and the risk of type 2 diabetes. In a case-control study, we included 234 cases, all of whom were patients aged 35-86 years with a newly confirmed diagnosis of T2DM, and 468 controls that were free of the disease. Cases and controls (ratio 1:2) were matched by gender and age (±5 years). A questionnaire was used to collect information on possible risk factors for diabetes. Adding salt to prepared meals was assessed according to: Never, when there was not enough, or almost every time without tasting. The odds ratios (OR), and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for type 2 diabetes was calculated using a conditional logistic regression. The cases had a higher body mass index and a significantly lower education level compared to the controls. Variables such as waist circumference, body mass index, eating speed, smoking, family history of diabetes, arterial hypertension, plasma triglycerides, educational level, occupational status, morning exercise, marital status, daily urine sodium excretion, and daily energy intake were retained in the models as confounders. After adjusting for possible confounders, an approximately two-fold increased risk of type 2 diabetes was determined in subjects who add salt to prepared meals when "it is not enough" or "almost every time without tasting" (1.82; 95% CI 1.19-2.78; p = 0.006) compared with never adding salt. Presented data suggest the possible relationship between additional adding of salt to prepared meals and an increased risk of type 2 diabetes.

  12. Adding Salt to Meals as a Risk Factor of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Case–Control Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina Radzeviciene

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM is thought to arise from the complex interplay between genetic and environmental factors. It is important to identify modifiable risk factors that may help to reduce the risk of diabetes. Data on salt intake and the risk of type 2 diabetes are limited. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between adding salt to prepared meals and the risk of type 2 diabetes. Methods: In a case–control study, we included 234 cases, all of whom were patients aged 35–86 years with a newly confirmed diagnosis of T2DM, and 468 controls that were free of the disease. Cases and controls (ratio 1:2 were matched by gender and age (±5 years. A questionnaire was used to collect information on possible risk factors for diabetes. Adding salt to prepared meals was assessed according to: Never, when there was not enough, or almost every time without tasting. The odds ratios (OR, and 95% confidence intervals (CI for type 2 diabetes was calculated using a conditional logistic regression. Results: The cases had a higher body mass index and a significantly lower education level compared to the controls. Variables such as waist circumference, body mass index, eating speed, smoking, family history of diabetes, arterial hypertension, plasma triglycerides, educational level, occupational status, morning exercise, marital status, daily urine sodium excretion, and daily energy intake were retained in the models as confounders. After adjusting for possible confounders, an approximately two-fold increased risk of type 2 diabetes was determined in subjects who add salt to prepared meals when “it is not enough” or “almost every time without tasting” (1.82; 95% CI 1.19–2.78; p = 0.006 compared with never adding salt. Conclusion: Presented data suggest the possible relationship between additional adding of salt to prepared meals and an increased risk of type 2 diabetes.

  13. Albuminuria, cardiovascular risk factors and disease management in subjects with type 2 diabetes: a cross sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Landgraf Rüdiger

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epidemiological studies have shown that microalbuminuria is an important risk factor for arteriosclerosis, coronary heart disease and other vascular diseases in persons with type 2 diabetes. In the present study we examined the prevalence and risk factors for micro- and macroalbuminuria and examined glycemic control as well as treatment of modifiable cardiovascular risk factors in persons with known type 2 diabetes in Germany. Methods The presented data were derived from the 'KORA Augsburg Diabetes Family Study', conducted between October 2001 and September 2002. Participants were adults aged 29 years and older with previously diagnosed type 2 diabetes (n = 581. Microalbuminuria was defined as an albumin-creatinine ratio of 30 to 300 mg/g, and macroalbuminuria as an albumin-creatinine ratio of more than 300 mg/g. Results Microalbuminuria was revealed in 27.2% and macroalbuminuria in 9.0% of the 581 included diabetic persons. Multivariable regression analysis identified HBA1c, duration of diabetes, systolic blood pressure, serum creatinine, smoking and waist circumference as independent risk factors associated with albuminuria (micro- or macroalbuminuria. Relatively few persons with type 2 diabetes achieved treatment targets of HbA1c 45 mg/dl in men, > 55 mg/dl in women were found in 55.8%, and blood pressure values Conclusion Albuminuria is common among German persons with known type 2 diabetes. Despite evidence-based guidelines, only a small proportion of type 2 diabetic persons achieved the recommended levels of glycemic control and control of cardiovascular risk factors.

  14. The risk factors and incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome in women with previous gestational diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valizadeh, Majid; Alavi, Nooshin; Mazloomzadeh, Saeideh; Piri, Zahra; Amirmoghadami, Hamidreza

    2015-04-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) affects nearly 5% of pregnancies. Significant proportion of the women with previous GDM develops type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in the next years, which indicates a higher risk in them than in the general population. We conducted this study to determine the risk factors and incidence of abnormal glucose level and metabolic syndrome (MetS) in women with a history of GDM in a long period after delivery in our region. We extracted the demographic characteristics of 110 women with GDM who had delivered during 2004 - 2010 in three main hospitals of Zanjan City, Iran. The patients were recalled to perform oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and other necessary tests for MetS diagnosis. Anthropometric measurements were recorded of all the participants. In this study, 110 women with a history of GDM were studied at one to six years since delivery. Among these women, 36 (32.7%) developed T2DM and 11 (10%) had impaired fasting glucose (IFG) or impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). Moreover, 22 women (20%) had developed MetS. among those with abnormal results in glycemic test, 93.6% had fasting blood sugar (FBS) ≥ 95 mg/dL (≥ 5.27 mmol/L)at the time of GDM diagnosis in the index pregnancy that was significantly higher than the normal glycemic test (NGT) group with 42.9% being affected (OR, 19.55; P discovered as a protective factor in women with a history of GDM (OR, 0.35; P = 0.01). Those with abnormal results were significantly different from NGT group in the number of parities (2.61 ± 1.4 vs. 2.05 ± 1.1, respectively; OR, 1.4; P = 0.03). The most common component of MetS among women with a history of GDM was FBS > 100 mg/dL (> 5.55 mmol/L). Regarding the high incidence of the T2DM and MetS among women with a history of GDM, they should be screened at a regular interval for diabetes and other cardiovascular risk factors.

  15. Can Time Efficient Exercise Improve Cardiometabolic Risk Factors in Type 2 Diabetes? A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders Revdal, Siri M. Hollekim-Strand, Charlotte B. Ingul

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Exercise is considered a cornerstone in the prevention and treatment of type 2 diabetes, but few individuals with type 2 diabetes exercise according to guidelines. We investigated the effect of two time efficient high intensity exercise interventions on exercise capacity, glycemic control and other cardiometabolic risk factors in patients with type 2 diabetes. Twenty-one individuals with type 2 diabetes were randomly assigned to low volume high intensity interval exercise (HIIE; 27 minutes/bout; 10x1-minute at 90 % of HRmax; n = 10 or extremely low volume sprint interval exercise (SIE; 10 minutes/bout; 2x20 seconds at maximum achievable intensity; n = 11 3 days/week for 12 weeks. Aerobic exercise capacity (VO2peak, glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c, blood pressure and body composition were measured at baseline and post test. Both HIIE and SIE improved VO2peak (3.3 mL·min-1·kg-1, 10.4 %, p < 0.01, and 1.4 mL·min-1·kg-1 (4.6 %, p = 0.03, respectively. Only HIIE reduced body fat percentage (4.5 %, p = 0.04 and two minute heart rate recovery (11.0 bpm, p = 0.02. Neither HIIE nor SIE improved HbA1c. In conclusion, this study indicates that substantially lower exercise volumes than recommended in current guidelines can improve aerobic exercise capacity in individuals with type 2 diabetes. However, 12 weeks of time efficient high intensity exercise did not improve glycemic control, and interventions of longer duration should be investigated.

  16. Trends for type 2 diabetes and other cardiovascular risk factors in Mexico from 1993-2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalpando, Salvador; Shamah-Levy, Teresa; Rojas, Rosalba; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos A

    2010-01-01

    To describe the trends in the prevalence of type 2 diabetes (T2D), and other cardiovascular risk factors in three national health surveys (1993, 2000 and 2006). The databases of three surveys: ENEC 1993, ENSA 2000 and ENSANUT 2006 were gathered. Calculations of published data were reprocessed to do appropriate adjustments to assure comparability among surveys. From 1993 to 2006 the prevalence of type 2 diabetes (6.7-14.4%), metabolic syndrome (26.6-36.8%), hypertension (23.8-30.7%), hypercholesterolemia (27-43.6%), and high LDL-cholesterol (31.6-46%) increased rapidly. The prevalence of low HDL cholesterol was very high (60.5-63%) in all surveys and remained remarkably unchanged among surveys. This increasing trends for the prevalence of T2D and cardiovascular risk factors predicts larger increments in the near future for T2D and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Intensification of the preventive and remedy strategies is mandatory in order curve the foreseen dramatic increment in the disease burden.

  17. Dietary Magnesium and Genetic Interactions in Diabetes and Related Risk Factors: A Brief Overview of Current Knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adela Hruby

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Nutritional genomics has exploded in the last decade, yielding insights—both nutrigenomic and nutrigenetic—into the physiology of dietary interactions and our genes. Among these are insights into the regulation of magnesium transport and homeostasis and mechanisms underlying magnesium’s role in insulin and glucose handling. Recent observational evidence has attempted to examine some promising research avenues on interaction between genetics and dietary magnesium in relation to diabetes and diabetes risk factors. This brief review summarizes the recent evidence on dietary magnesium’s role in diabetes and related traits in the presence of underlying genetic risk, and discusses future potential research directions.

  18. Is gestational diabetes mellitus an independent risk factor for macrosomia: a meta-analysis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiu-Jie; Qin, Feng-Yun; Hu, Chuan-Lai; Zhu, Meng; Tian, Chao-Qing; Li, Li

    2015-04-01

    The aim of our meta-analysis was to explore whether gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is an independent risk factor for macrosomia or not. Three databases were systematically reviewed and reference lists of relevant articles were checked. Meta-analysis of published epidemiological studies (cohort and case-control studies) comparing whether GDM was associated with macrosomia. Calculations of pooled estimates were conducted in random-effect models. Heterogeneity was tested by using Chi square test and I (2) statistics. Publication bias was estimated from Egger's test (linear regression method) and Begg's test (rank correlation method). Twelve studies met the inclusion criteria, including five cohort studies and seven case-control studies. The meta-analysis showed that GDM was associated with macrosomia independent of other risk factors. The adjusted odds ratio was 1.71, 95% CI (1.52, 1.94) in random-effect model, stratified analyses showed no differences regarding different study design, quality grade, definition of macrosomia, location of study and number of confounding factors adjusted for. There was no indication of a publication bias either from the result of Egger's test or Begg's test. Our findings indicate that GDM should be considered as an independent risk factor for newborn macrosomia. To adequately evaluate the clinical evolution of GDM need to be carefully assessed and monitored.

  19. Relevance of hemostatic risk factors on coronary morphology in patients with diabetes mellitus type 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peters Ansgar J

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective The influence hemostatitc parameters on the morphological extent and severity of coronary artery disease were studied in patients with and without DM type 2. Background It is known that patients with diabetes (DM have abnormal metabolic and hemostatic parameters Methods Of 150 consecutive patients with angiographically proven coronary artery disease 29 presented with DM. Additionally to parameters of lipid-metabolism fibrinogen, tissue-plasminogenactivator (t-PA, plasminogen-activator-inhibitor (PAI, plasmin-a-antiplasmin (PAP, prothrombin-fragment 1+2 (F1+2, thrombin-antithrombin (TAT, von-willebrand-factor (vWF, platelet factor 4 (PF4, glykomembranproteine 140 (GMP140 and the rheologic parameters plasma viscosity and red blood cell aggregation were evaluated. The extent and severity of CAD was evaluated according to the criteria of the American Heart Association. Results Patients with DM presented with a higher number of conventional risk factors as compared to non-diabetic patients. Additionally there were significant differences for F1+2, red blood cell aggregation and PAI. Diabetic patients showed a more severe extent of coronary arteriosclerosis, which also could be found more distally. A significant relationship between blood-glucose, thrombocyte-activation (vWF, endogenous fibrinolysis (PAI and the severity of CAD and a more distal location of stenoses could be found (r = 0.6, p Conclusion Patients with coronary artery disease and DM type 2 showed marked alterations of metabolic, hemostatic, fibrinolytic and rheologic parameters, which can produce a prothrombogenic state. A direct association of thrombogenic factors on coronary morphology could be shown. This can be the pathophysiologic mechanism of more severe and distal pronounced coronary atherosclerosis in these patients.

  20. Silent myocardial ischemia and related risk factors in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Zorlu

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency of silent myocardial ischemia (SMI in patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM who do not have ischemiccardiac disease.Materials and Methods: To examine the relationship between ischemic cardiac disease and related factors such as blood pressure, lipid profile, smoking, gender, family history, body mass index (BMI, microalbuminuria, hsCRP, 150 diabetic patients who have never had any known coroner artery disease, exertional or rest dyspnea and labored breathing, aged between 35 and 70 years were included. Effort testing (treadmill were performed to examine the existence of SMI.Results: Effort testing gave positive result for SMI in 20 patients and negative in 130 patients. Coronary angiographywas performed in 20 patients with positive effort testing results. The frequency of SMI was found as %13.3 by effort testing. The frequency of SMI (including non-criticalpatients was %10.6 (16 patients by using coronary angiography, which 13(8.6% had critical and 3(2% had non-critical coronary stenosis. No significant differences were found in age, gender, diabetic duration, trigliserid, HDL- cholesterol, blood pressure, BMI and hsCRP levels between positive and negative SMI patients with Type 2 DM.Conclusion: We determined that high LDL-Cholesterol and HbA1c and existence of microalbuminuria indicated significant SMI risk for patients with Type 2 DM.

  1. Addressing risk factors, screening, and preventative treatment for diabetic retinopathy in developing countries: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Stephanie; Ramulu, Pradeep; Lamoureux, Ecosse L; Sabanayagam, Charumathi

    2016-05-01

    The number of people with diabetic retinopathy (DR) has increased with the increasing prevalence of diabetes mellitus worldwide, especially in developing countries. In recent years, the successful implementation of public health programs in developed countries has been thought to contribute to decreases in blindness from DR. Developing countries, however, have not seen the same improvements, and their public health interventions still face significant challenges. In this review we describe the current state of public health approaches including risk factor control, screening and treatment techniques for DR in developing countries, and suggest recommendations. While the awareness of DR is variable, specific knowledge about DR is low, such that many patients have already experienced vision loss by the time they are screened. Attempts to improve rates of screening, in particular through non-mydriatic cameras and tele-screening, are ongoing and promising, although challenges include collaboration with healthcare systems and technology failures. Laser treatment is the most readily available, with anti-VEGF therapy and vitreo-retinal surgery increasingly sought after and provided. Recommendations include the use of 'targeted mydriasis' for fundus imaging to address high rates of ungradable images, increased communication with diabetes management services to improve patient retention and mobilization of access to DR treatments.

  2. Pharmacogenomics and pharmacogenetics of thiazolidinediones: role in diabetes and cardiovascular risk factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della-Morte, David; Palmirotta, Raffaele; Rehni, Ashish K; Pastore, Donatella; Capuani, Barbara; Pacifici, Francesca; De Marchis, Maria Laura; Dave, Kunjan R; Bellia, Alfonso; Fogliame, Giuseppe; Ferroni, Patrizia; Donadel, Giulia; Cacciatore, Francesco; Abete, Pasquale; Dong, Chuanhui; Pileggi, Antonello; Roselli, Mario; Ricordi, Camillo; Sbraccia, Paolo; Guadagni, Fiorella; Rundek, Tatjana; Lauro, Davide

    2015-01-01

    The most important goal in the treatment of patients with diabetes is to prevent the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), the first cause of mortality in these subjects. Thiazolidinediones (TZDs), a class of antidiabetic drugs, act as insulin sensitizers increasing insulin-dependent glucose disposal and reducing hepatic glucose output. TZDs including pioglitazone, rosiglitazone and troglitazone, by activating PPAR-γ have shown pleiotropic effects in reducing vascular risk factors and atherosclerosis. However, troglitazone was removed from the market due to its hepatoxicity, and rosiglitazone and pioglitazone both have particular warnings due to being associated with heart diseases. Specific genetic variations in genes involved in the pathways regulated by TDZs have demonstrated to modify the variability in treatment with these drugs, especially in their side effects. Therefore, pharmacogenomics and pharmacogenetics are an important tool in further understand intersubject variability per se but also to assess the therapeutic potential of such variability in drug individualization and therapeutic optimization. PMID:25521362

  3. Pharmacogenomics and pharmacogenetics of thiazolidinediones: role in diabetes and cardiovascular risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della-Morte, David; Palmirotta, Raffaele; Rehni, Ashish K; Pastore, Donatella; Capuani, Barbara; Pacifici, Francesca; De Marchis, Maria Laura; Dave, Kunjan R; Bellia, Alfonso; Fogliame, Giuseppe; Ferroni, Patrizia; Donadel, Giulia; Cacciatore, Francesco; Abete, Pasquale; Dong, Chuanhui; Pileggi, Antonello; Roselli, Mario; Ricordi, Camillo; Sbraccia, Paolo; Guadagni, Fiorella; Rundek, Tatjana; Lauro, Davide

    2014-12-01

    The most important goal in the treatment of patients with diabetes is to prevent the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), the first cause of mortality in these subjects. Thiazolidinediones (TZDs), a class of antidiabetic drugs, act as insulin sensitizers increasing insulin-dependent glucose disposal and reducing hepatic glucose output. TZDs including pioglitazone, rosiglitazone and troglitazone, by activating PPAR-γ have shown pleiotropic effects in reducing vascular risk factors and atherosclerosis. However, troglitazone was removed from the market due to its hepatoxicity, and rosiglitazone and pioglitazone both have particular warnings due to being associated with heart diseases. Specific genetic variations in genes involved in the pathways regulated by TDZs have demonstrated to modify the variability in treatment with these drugs, especially in their side effects. Therefore, pharmacogenomics and pharmacogenetics are an important tool in further understand intersubject variability per se but also to assess the therapeutic potential of such variability in drug individualization and therapeutic optimization.

  4. [Analysis of the effect of risk factors at gestational diabetes mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuang, Wang; Huixia, Yang

    2014-05-01

    To assesment the effect of risk factors at gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). We collected 427 pregnant women who had done 75 g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) between September 1(st), 2012 and April 19(th), 2013 in Peking University First Hospital, including 74 pregnant women diagnosed as GDM (GDM group) and 353 pregnant women undiagnosed (non-GDM group). Then we conducted a multiple logistic regression to analyze the clinical datas collected from two groups, which included age, pre-pregnancy body weight and body mass index (BMI), body weight during 11-12 weeks pregnancy, body weight during 23-24 weeks pregnancy; and fasting plasma glucose (FPG), triglyceride (TG) , total cholesterol (TCH) , high density lipoprotein (HDL) , low density lipoprotein (LDL), fasting insulin (FINS), homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) during early pregnancy; and family history of diabetes mellitus. (1) There were significant difference in age, pre-pregnancy BMI, and FPG, TG, FINS, HOMA-IR during early pregnancy, and family history of diabetes mellitus between two groups (P history of diabetes mellitus (OR:3.15, 95%CI:1.66-5.99), TG during early pregnancy (OR:2.13, 95%CI:1.17-3.87),BMI before pregnancy (OR:1.36, 95%CI:1.08-1.70), age ≥ 35 years (OR:1.15, 95%CI:1.05-1.26), early pregnancy weight gain (OR:1.20, 95%CI:1.06-1.35), mid pregnancy weight gain (OR:1.28, 95%CI:1.12-1.47), FINS during early pregnancy (OR:1.09, 95%CI:1.01-1.17). FPG, TG and FINS during early pregnancy, BMI before pregnancy, early and mid pregnancy weight gain, family history of diabetes mellitus and age ≥ 35 years are the indepadent risk factors for GDM. We should pay more attention to FPG and TG during early pregnancy, and put weight management into practise since early pregnancy and try to control pregnancy weight gain within reasonable limits.

  5. Type 2 diabetes and cognition: Neuropsychological sequelae of vascular risk factors in the ageing brain

    OpenAIRE

    Van Den Berg, E.

    2009-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is associated with slowly progressive changes in the brain, a complication referred to as diabetic encephalopathy. Previous studies have shown that patients with T2DM show mild to moderate decrements in cognitive functioning and an increased risk of dementia. The central topic of the studies in this thesis was to examine at which stage of the diabetes these cognitive decrements start to develop and how they progress over time. In addition, the role of exposure ...

  6. Prevalence and risk factors for diabetic retinopathy in 17 152 patients from the island of Funen, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Morten B.; Henriksen, Jan Erik; Grauslund, Jakob

    2017-01-01

    ; 83.1% had T2DM. Prevalence of DR was 23.8% (T1DM: 54.3%, T2DM: 21.2%). T1/T2DM patients were statistically significantly different regarding age, duration of diabetes, BMI, systolic blood pressure (BP), cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, triglyceride, s-creatinine and u-albumin (p ...PURPOSE: This study aims to estimate the prevalence and risk factors of diabetic retinopathy (DR) in patients enrolled in a large Danish quality-assuring database for diabetes: the Funen Diabetes Database (FDDB). METHODS: All patients with type 1 (T1DM) and type 2 DM (T2DM) diabetes mellitus (DM.......001 for all). Increasing level of DR showed statistically significant association with age, duration of diabetes, systolic BP, HbA1c, s-creatinine and u-albumine with increasing level of DR (all are p

  7. Beneficial effects of a Paleolithic diet on cardiovascular risk factors in type 2 diabetes: a randomized cross-over pilot study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jönsson, Tommy; Granfeldt, Yvonne; Ahrén, Bo; Branell, Ulla-Carin; Pålsson, Gunvor; Hansson, Anita; Söderström, Margareta; Lindeberg, Staffan

    2009-01-01

    Our aim was to compare the effects of a Paleolithic ('Old Stone Age') diet and a diabetes diet as generally recommended on risk factors for cardiovascular disease in patients with type 2 diabetes not treated with insulin...

  8. Type 2 diabetes and cognition: Neuropsychological sequelae of vascular risk factors in the ageing brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van den Berg, E.

    2009-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is associated with slowly progressive changes in the brain, a complication referred to as diabetic encephalopathy. Previous studies have shown that patients with T2DM show mild to moderate decrements in cognitive functioning and an increased risk of dementia. The

  9. A Practical and Time-Efficient High-Intensity Interval Training Program Modifies Cardio-Metabolic Risk Factors in Adults with Risk Factors for Type II Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Phillips, Bethan E.; Kelly, Benjamin M.; Mats Lilja; Jesús Gustavo Ponce-González; Brogan, Robert J.; Morris, David L.; Thomas Gustafsson; Kraus, William E.; Atherton, Philip J.; Vollaard, Niels B. J.; Olav Rooyackers; Timmons, James A.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Regular physical activity (PA) can reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, but adherence to time-orientated (150?min week?1 or more) PA guidelines is very poor. A practical and time-efficient PA regime that was equally efficacious at controlling risk factors for cardio-metabolic disease is one solution to this problem. Herein, we evaluate a new time-efficient and genuinely practical high-intensity interval training (HIT) protocol in men and women with pre-existing risk fac...

  10. Challenges and Opportunities in the Management of Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Youth With Type 1 Diabetes: Lifestyle and Beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Michelle; Giani, Elisa; Laffel, Lori

    2015-12-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in persons with type 1 diabetes (T1D). Specific risk factors associated with diabetes, such as hyperglycemia and kidney disease, have been demonstrated to increase the incidence and progression of CVD. Nevertheless, few data exist on the effects of traditional risk factors such as dyslipidemia, obesity, and hypertension on CVD risk in youth with T1D. Improvements in understanding and approaches to the evaluation and management of CVD risk factors, specifically for young persons with T1D, are desirable. Recent advances in noninvasive techniques to detect early vascular damage, such as the evaluation of endothelial dysfunction and aortic or carotid intima-media thickness, provide new tools to evaluate the progression of CVD in childhood. In the present review, current CVD risk factor management, challenges, and potential therapeutic interventions in youth with T1D are described.

  11. Risk factors for amputation in patients with diabetic foot infection: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uysal, Serhat; Arda, Bilgin; Taşbakan, Meltem I; Çetinkalp, Şevki; Şimşir, Ilgın Y; Öztürk, Anıl M; Uysal, Ayşe; Ertam, İlgen

    2017-07-19

    There is a variety of diagnostic and therapeutic algorithms for diabetic foot infections (DFIs). Some of them are too difficult to be applied in routine clinical approach. In the routine clinical approach, it is necessary to find new risk factors and end up with a quick and easy assessment of DFIs. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the independent risk factors for osteomyelitis, amputation and major amputation in patients with DFI using standard scoring procedures. We prospectively studied 379 patients with DFI. The variables were analysed using logistic analysis. A total of 126 cases (33·2%) underwent amputation. The odds ratios in the amputation model were 3·09 for osteomyelitis (P ulcer duration >60 days (P = 0·001), 3·10 for ulcer depth > 15 mm (P fungal DFI (P = 0·015). In this study, the unusual result of well-known literature was fungal DFI as an independent risk factor for amputation in patients with DFI. © 2017 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Risk Factors for Diabetes Mellitus in Chronic Pancreatitis: A Cohort of 2,011 Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jun; Xin, Lei; Wang, Dan; Liao, Zhuan; Lin, Jin-Huan; Li, Bai-Rong; Du, Ting-Ting; Ye, Bo; Zou, Wen-Bin; Chen, Hui; Ji, Jun-Tao; Zheng, Zhao-Hong; Hu, Liang-Hao; Li, Zhao-Shen

    2016-04-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a common complication of chronic pancreatitis (CP) and increases the mortality. The identification of risk factors for DM development may contribute to the early detection and potential risk reduction of DM in patients with CP.Patients with CP admitted to Changhai Hospital (Shanghai, China) from January 2000 to December 2013 were enrolled. Cumulative rates of DM after the onset of CP were calculated by Kaplan-Meier method. Risk factors for DM development after the diagnosis of CP were identified by Cox proportional hazards regression model.A total of 2011 patients with CP were enrolled. During follow-up (median duration, 22.0 years), 564 patients developed DM. Cumulative rates of DM 20 and 50 years after the onset of CP were 45.8% (95% confidence interval [CI], 41.8%-50.0%) and 90.0% (95% CI, 75.4%-97.7%), respectively. Five risk factors for DM development after the diagnosis of CP were identified: male sex (hazard ratio [HR], 1.51; 95% CI, 1.08-2.11), alcohol abuse (HR, 2.00; 95% CI, 1.43-2.79), steatorrhea (HR, 1.46; 95% CI, 1.01-2.11), biliary stricture (HR, 2.25; 95% CI, 1.43-3.52), and distal pancreatectomy (HR, 3.41; 95% CI, 1.80-6.44).In conclusion, the risk of developing DM in patients with CP is not only influenced by the development of biliary stricture and steatorrhea indicating disease progression, and inherent nature of study subjects such as male sex, but also by modifiable factors including alcohol abuse and distal pancreatectomy.

  13. Depression as a risk factor for the onset of type 2 diabetes mellitus. A meta-analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knol, M J; Twisk, Jos W R; Beekman, Aartjan T F

    2006-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Evidence strongly suggests that depression and type 2 diabetes are associated, but the direction of the association is still unclear. Depression may occur as a consequence of having diabetes, but may also be a risk factor for the onset of type 2 diabetes. This study examined the ...... study is needed to test whether effective prevention or treatment of depression can reduce the incidence of type 2 diabetes and its health consequences.......AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Evidence strongly suggests that depression and type 2 diabetes are associated, but the direction of the association is still unclear. Depression may occur as a consequence of having diabetes, but may also be a risk factor for the onset of type 2 diabetes. This study examined...... the latter association by reviewing the literature and conducting a meta-analysis of longitudinal studies on this topic. METHODS: Medline and PsycInfo were searched for articles published up to January 2005. All studies that examined the relationship between depression and the onset of type 2 diabetes were...

  14. A Survey on Prevalence of Ocular Complications and It’s Risk Factors in Diabetic Patients of Diabetic Center of Nader Kazemi Clinic Shiraz- Iran 1998-2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SM Kashfi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objective: With respect to an increase in diabetes prevalence, and the likelihood of ocular complications among them, this study was conducted to investigate the prevalence and risk factors and incidence of the ocular complications in patients of Nader Kazemi, Shiraz Diabetic center from 1998 to 2010.Materials & Methods: In a cross sectional study , subjects were selected based on a systematic random sampling to investigate the incidence of the ocular complications and the influence of factors such as age, sex, types of diabetes, job, education, blood triglyceride (TG and cholesterol level, Family history of diabetes, history of hypertension, history of participation in educational classes, methods of treatment, duration of diabetes and fasting blood sugar were considered on them.Results: Ocular complications were found among 229 diabetic patients (32.6%. patients having type II diabetic have more ocular complications comparing with patients with type I diabetes (P<0. 005. Factors such as job (P=0. 022, history of participation in educational classes (P<0. 001, education (P<0. 001, family history of diabetes (P<0. 001, blood triglyceride (TG (P=0. 021, duration of diabetes(P<0. 001,age (P<0. 001, method of treatment(P<0. 001and fasting blood sugar (P<0. 001 had a significant relationship with the occurrence of ocular complication. However, other risk factors such as hypertension,gender and cholesterol levels were not statistically significant relationship with the occurrence of ocular complication.Conclusion: Given the prevalence of ocular complications, educating diabetics’ patients can have a significant influence in reducing the occurrence of ocular complications.

  15. Subclinical neuropathy in diabetic patients: a risk factor for bilateral lower limb neurological deficit following spinal anesthesia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angadi, Darshan S; Garde, Ajit

    2012-02-01

    Total knee arthroplasty performed under spinal or general anesthesia is a common successful orthopedic procedure. Nonetheless, in patients with diabetes mellitus this procedure can present unique challenges to orthopedic surgeon and anesthesiologist alike. We describe a case of an elderly male diabetic patient who developed bilaterally symmetrical lower limb neurological deficit following an uneventful total knee arthroplasty performed under spinal anesthesia. Postoperative nerve conduction study with electromyography confirmed symmetrical extensive denervation of lower limb muscles, including low-voltage fibrillation potentials and positive sharp waves. These findings were consistent with a preexisting neuropathy, thereby suggesting a subclinical neuropathy as a potential risk factor for this neurological complication. Our case highlights the fact that patients with longstanding comorbidities, namely peripheral vascular disease and diabetes mellitus, may be at an increased risk of neurological injury following regional anesthesia. Hence, we believe that preoperative evaluation of diabetic patients should include neurophysiological studies to identify subclinical neuropathy and minimize the risk of neurological injury.

  16. Carotid artery intima media thickness in relation with atherosclerotic risk factors in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayathri, R; Chandni, R; Udayabhaskaran, V

    2012-09-01

    The present study was carried out to study the correlation between carotid artery intima media thickness (CIMT) with risk factors for atherosclerosis and atherosclerotic events in Type 2 Diabetes mellitus patients. The predictive value of CIMT as an indicator of early atherosclerosis was determined and the various atherosclerotic risk factors in type 2 diabetes mellitus were studied. Our study showed that CIMT was significantly higher in those type 2 diabetic patients who had atherosclerotic events than in those patients who had no atherosclerotic events. It was also found that waist hip ratio showed a significant positive correlation and independent association with CIMT emphasizing the emerging concept of central obesity. Duration of diabetes, urinary albumin excretion rate, hypertension and glycated hemoglobin had positive correlation with CIMT, but could not assume statistical significance. Age, smoking and dyslipidemia did not show any association with CIMT.

  17. Diabetes Mellitus and Younger Age Are Risk Factors for Hyperphosphatemia in Peritoneal Dialysis Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imtiaz, Rameez; Hawken, Steven; McCormick, Brendan B.; Leung, Simon; Hiremath, Swapnil; Zimmerman, Deborah L.

    2017-01-01

    Hyperphosphatemia has been associated with adverse outcomes in patients with end stage kidney disease (ESKD). The purpose of this study was to determine risk factors for hyperphosphatemia in ESKD patients treated with peritoneal dialysis (PD). This information will be used to develop a patient specific phosphate binder application to facilitate patient self-management of serum phosphate. Adult PD patients documented their food, beverage, and phosphate binder intake for three days using a dietitian developed food journal. Phosphate content of meals was calculated using the ESHA Food Processor SQL Software (ESHA Research, Salem, UT, USA). Clinic biochemistry tests and an adequacy assessment (Baxter Adequest program) were done. Univariate logistic regression was used to determine predictors of serum phosphate >1.78 mmol/L. A multivariable logistic regression model was then fit including those variables that achieved a significance level of p 1.78 mmol/L). In univariate analysis, the variables associated with an increased risk of hyperphosphatemia with a p-value carbonate (0.08), higher parathyroid serum concentration (0.08), lower phosphate intake (0.03), lower measured glomerular filtration rate (0.15), higher phosphate excretion (0.11), and a higher body mass index (0.15). After multivariable logistic regression analysis, younger age (odds ratio (OR) 0.023 per decade, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.00065 to 0.455; p = 0.012), presence of diabetes (OR 11.40, 95 CI 2.82 to 61.55; p = 0.0003), and measured GFR (OR 0.052 per mL/min decrease; 95% CI 0.0025 to 0.66) were associated with hyperphosphatemia. Our results support that younger age and diabetes mellitus are significant risk factors for hyperphosphatemia. These findings warrant further investigation to determine the potential mechanisms that predispose younger patients and those with DM to hyperphosphatemia. PMID:28218647

  18. Prevalence, Risk Factors, and Complications of Diabetes in the Kilimanjaro Region: A Population-Based Study from Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makuka, Gerald Jamberi; Egger, Joseph R.; Maro, Venance; Maro, Honest; Karia, Francis; Patel, Uptal D.; Burton, Matthew J.

    2016-01-01

    Background In sub-Saharan Africa, diabetes is a growing burden, yet little is known about its prevalence, risk factors, and complications. To address these gaps and help inform public health efforts aimed at prevention and treatment, we conducted a community-based study assessing diabetes epidemiology. Methods and Findings We conducted a stratified, cluster-designed, serial cross-sectional household study from 2014–2015 in the Kilimanjaro Region, Tanzania. We used a three-stage cluster probability sampling method to randomly select individuals. To estimate prevalence, we screened individuals for glucose impairment, including diabetes, using hemoglobin A1C. We also screened for hypertension and obesity, and to assess for potential complications, individuals with diabetes were assessed for retinopathy, neuropathy, and nephropathy. We enrolled 481 adults from 346 urban and rural households. The prevalence of glucose impairment was 21.7% (95% CI 15.2–29.8), which included diabetes (5.7%; 95% CI 3.37–9.47) and glucose impairment with increased risk for diabetes (16.0%; 95% CI 10.2–24.0). Overweight or obesity status had an independent prevalence risk ratio for glucose impairment (2.16; 95% CI 1.39–3.36). Diabetes awareness was low (35.6%), and few individuals with diabetes were receiving biomedical treatment (33.3%). Diabetes-associated complications were common (50.2%; 95% CI 33.7–66.7), including renal (12.0%; 95% CI 4.7–27.3), ophthalmic (49.6%; 95% CI 28.6–70.7), and neurological (28.8%; 95% CI 8.0–65.1) abnormalities. Conclusions In a northern region of Tanzania, diabetes is an under-recognized health condition, despite the fact that many people either have diabetes or are at increased risk for developing diabetes. Most individuals were undiagnosed or untreated, and the prevalence of diabetes-associated complications was high. Public health efforts in this region will need to focus on reducing modifiable risk factors, which appear to include

  19. Type 2 diabetes in rural Uganda : prevalence, risk factors, perceptions and implications for the health system

    OpenAIRE

    Mayega, Roy William

    2014-01-01

    Background: Between 2010 and 2030, a 69% increase in type-2 diabetes is expected in low-income countries compared to a 20% increase in high income countries. Yet health system responsiveness to non-communicable diseases has been slow in sub-Saharan Africa. Data on the prevalence of type 2 diabetes and its associated factors in mainly rural settings is lacking, yet such data can guide planning for diabetes control. Objective: The aim of these studies was to assess the preval...

  20. Prevalence and risk factors for the development of diabetes mellitus in Swedish cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallander, Marie; Eliasson, Johanna; Hedhammar, Ake

    2012-10-31

    The prevalence and risk factors for the development of feline diabetes mellitus (FDM) in Swedish cats have not previously been reported. The objective of the present pilot study was to indicate prevalence and possible risk factors for FDM in Swedish cats. Twenty diabetic cats from the database at the University Animal Hospital in Uppsala participated in the study, and these were matched with 20 healthy controls on sex and age. A mail-and-telephone questionnaire focusing on diet, activity and obesity was used. The prevalence of FDM during the years 2000-2004 based on the results of the hospital records in the present study was 21 per 10,000 cats. The diabetic cats were on average 9 years old when the disease signs were discovered (median, min-max 2-15). Among FDM cases, it was more common to be male (n=17 males vs n=3 females; P≤0.05). Ten out of twenty owners to cases (50%) reported their cats to be obese at the time of the diagnosis (median 9 years, min-max 2-15), as compared to five out of twenty (25%) controls at the same age. The median BW at the time for diagnosis was 5.5 kg (min-max 2.0-9.0) for cases, and 5.0 kg (min-max 3.0-8.0 kg) for controls, respectively. Despite that both cases and controls had the same median age at the time of the study (13 years, min-max 3-18), a significantly higher number of controls were alive at that age (n=16 controls vs 8 cases; P≤0.05). A significantly higher proportion of cases that were obese at the time of the FDM diagnosis were dead at the time of the study compared to the proportion of controls that were obese at a similar age (P≤0.05).The diets given at the time for diagnosis for cases compared to diet of the controls at a similar time were mainly commercial foods, and controls consumed a higher proportion of dry foods compared to cases (medians 79 vs 44% of DM intake/d, respectively; P≤0.05). Cases were less active compared to the controls (2.3 and 3.2 h/d, respectively; P≤0.05). The results indicate that the

  1. Adiponectin and cardiovascular risk factors in relation with glycemic control in type 2 diabetics

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    Aniebetabasi S. Obot

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Adiponectin has been associated with insulin resistance and dyslipidemia in Type 2 diabetes, though the mechanism of association is still uncertain. The adiponectin levels and lipid profile in relation to glycemic control were investigated in type 2 diabetics. Methods: Forty two diabetic subjects (35-64 years and 33 age-matched non-diabetic subjects were recruited into this case control study. Socio-demographic characteristics, anthropometric indices and blood pressure were obtained. Total cholesterol (TC, triglyceride (TG, low density lipoprotein (LDL, high density lipoprotein, (HDL, fasting plasma glucose (FPG, and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c were estimated using colorimetric methods, atherogenic index (AI was calculated, while serum adiponectin was determined by ELISA method. Results: Adiponectin levels of type 2 diabetics were not significantly different from the non-diabetics studied (p>0.05. Higher TG levels were observed in diabetics with poor glycemic control compared with those with good glycemic control (p0.05. Conclusion: Type 2 diabetics do not have lower adiponectin levels. Gender, duration of diabetes and glycemic control does not seem to exert any influence on adiponectin levels in type 2 diabetes. Adiponectin may be associated with reduced risk of atherosclerosis through its effects on HDL cholesterol metabolism. [Int J Res Med Sci 2013; 1(4.000: 563-570

  2. Diabetes Mellitus as a Risk Factor in Glaucoma’s Physiopathology and Surgical Survival Time: A Literature Review

    OpenAIRE

    Costa, L.; Cunha, JP; Amado, D. (David); Abegão Pinto, L; Ferreira,J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Glaucoma is a multifactorial condition under serious influence of many risk factors. The role of diabetes mellitus (DM) in glaucoma etiology or progression remains inconclusive. Although, the diabetic patients have different healing mechanism comparing to the general population and it has a possible-negative role on surgical outcomes. This review article attempts to analyze the association of both diseases, glaucoma and DM, before and after the surgery. The epidemiological studies, b...

  3. Prevalence of diabetes and hypertension and association with various risk factors among different Muslim populations of Manipur, India

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Background Type 2 Diabetes mellitus (DM) and hypertension (HT) are among the most common non-communicable chronic diseases in developed and developing countries around the world. The study reports the prevalence of DM and HT and its influence from its possible risk factors. Methods Individuals of both sexes (Male-1099, Female-669) belonging to six different populations were randomly selected and screened for diabetes and hypertension following from different districts of Manipur, which is a s...

  4. Lipoprotein(a as a risk factor for diabetic retinopathy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chopra Rupali

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To estimate serum lipoprotein(a [Lp(a] levels in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus with and without diabetic retinopathy and to determine the correlation, if any, between serum Lp(a levels and severity of diabetic retinopathy. Materials and Methods: The study included a total of 200 patients of type 2 diabetes mellitus out of which 100 patients who had no retinopathy served as the control group and 100 patients with diabetic retinopathy formed the study group. A detailed fundus examination was done with dilated pupil. The Lp(a levels were measured quantitatively in fasting venous samples by an immunoturbidimetric method using commercially available kits (Clonital. Statistical Analysis Used: Group comparisons involving qualitative measures were carried out using Chi square test. ANOVA procedure was applied for comparing group means. Logistic regression analysis was performed for independent factors associated with diabetic retinopathy. Results: The average Lp(a levels in the study group (68.5 mg/dl were significantly higher than in the control group (25.1 mg/dl ( P < 0.001. The Lp(a levels were found to increase with increasing severity of diabetic retinopathy. Conclusions: Serum Lp(a levels are significantly raised in patients with diabetic retinopathy as compared to those with no retinopathy.

  5. A longitudinal analysis of the risk factors for diabetes and coronary heart disease in the Framingham Offspring Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhargava Alok

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The recent trends in sedentary life-styles and weight gain are likely to contribute to chronic conditions such as hypertension, diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases. The temporal sequence and pathways underlying these conditions can be modeled using the knowledge from the biomedical and social sciences. Methods The Framingham Offspring Study in the U.S. collected information on 5124 subjects at baseline, and 8, 12, 16, and 20 years after the baseline. Dynamic random effects models were estimated for the subjects' weight, LDL and HDL cholesterol, and blood pressure using 4 time observations. Logistic and probit models were estimated for the probability of diabetes and coronary heart disease (CHD events. Results The subjects' age, physical activity, alcohol consumption, and cigarettes smoked were important predictors of the risk factors. Moreover, weight and height were found to differentially affect the probabilities of diabetes and CHD events; body weight was positively associated with the risk of diabetes while taller individuals had lower risk of CHD events. Conclusion The results showed the importance of joint modeling of body weight, LDL and HDL cholesterol, and blood pressure that are risk factors for diabetes and CHD events. Lower body weight and LDL concentrations and higher HDL levels achieved via physical exercise are likely to reduce diabetes and CHD events.

  6. Modifiable lifestyle and social factors affect chronic kidney disease in high-risk individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunkler, Daniela; Kohl, Maria; Heinze, Georg; Teo, Koon K; Rosengren, Annika; Pogue, Janice; Gao, Peggy; Gerstein, Hertzel; Yusuf, Salim; Oberbauer, Rainer; Mann, Johannes F E

    2015-04-01

    This observational study examined the association between modifiable lifestyle and social factors on the incidence and progression of early chronic kidney disease (CKD) among those with type 2 diabetes. All 6972 people from the Ongoing Telmisartan Alone and in Combination with Ramipril Global Endpoint Trial (ONTARGET) with diabetes but without macroalbuminuria were studied. CKD progression was defined as decline in GFR of more than 5% per year, progression to end-stage renal disease, microalbuminuria, or macroalbuminuria at 5.5 years. Lifestyle/social factors included tobacco and alcohol use, physical activity, stress, financial worries, the size of the social network and education. Adjustments were made for known risks such as age, diabetes duration, GFR, albuminuria, gender, body mass index, blood pressure, fasting plasma glucose, and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin-receptor blockers use. Competing risk of death was considered. At study end, 31% developed CKD and 15% had died. The social network score (SNS) was a significant independent risk factor of CKD and death, reducing the risk by 11 and 22% when comparing the third to the first tertile of the SNS (odds ratios of CKD 0.89 and death 0.78). Education showed a significant association with CKD but stress and financial worries did not. Those with moderate alcohol consumption had a significantly decreased CKD risk compared with nonusers. Regular physical activity significantly decreased the risk of CKD. Thus, lifestyle is a determinant of kidney health in people at high cardiovascular risk with diabetes.

  7. Psychological risk factors of micro- and macrovascular outcomes in primary care patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nefs, Giesje; Pouwer, François; Denollet, Johan

    2010-01-01

    to contribute to the current understanding of the course of depression in primary care patients with type 2 diabetes and will also test whether depressed patients or those with Type D personality are at increased risk for (further) development of micro- and cardiovascular disease. More knowledge about......BACKGROUND: Depression is a common psychiatric complication of diabetes, but little is known about the natural course and the consequences of depressive symptoms in primary care patients with type 2 diabetes. While depression has been related to poor glycemic control and increased risk....... METHODS/DESIGN: This prospective cohort study will examine: (1) the course of depressive symptoms in primary care patients with type 2 diabetes; (2) whether depressive symptoms and Type D personality are associated with the development of microvascular and/or macrovascular complications and with the risk...

  8. Evaluation of a risk factor scoring model in screening for undiagnosed diabetes in China population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-jun DONG; Neng-jun LOU; Jia-jun ZHAO; Zhong-wen ZHANG; Lu-lu QIU; Ying ZHOU; Lin LIAO

    2011-01-01

    Objective:To develop a risk scoring model for screening for undiagnosed type 2 diabetes in Chinese population.Methods:A total of 5348 subjects from two districts of Jinan City,Shandong Province,China were enrolled.Group A (2985) included individuals from east of the city and Group B (2363) from west of the city.Screening questionnaires and a standard oral glucose tolerance test (OGTr) were completed by all subjects.Based on the stepwise logistic regression analysis of Group A,variables were selected to establish the risk scoring model.The validity and effectiveness of this model were evaluated in Group B.Results:Based on stepwise logistic regression analysis performed with data of Group A,variables including age,body mass index (BMI),waist-to-hip ratio (WHR),systolic pressure,diastolic pressure,heart rate,family history of diabetes,and history of high glucose were accepted into the risk scoring model.The risk for having diabetes increased along with aggregate scores.When Youden index was closest to 1,the optimal cutoff value was set up at 51.At this point,the diabetes risk scoring model could identify diabetes patients with a sensitivity of 83.3% and a specificity of 66.5%,making the positive predictive value 12.83%and negative predictive value 98.53%.We compared our model with the Finnish and Danish model and concluded that our model has superior validity in Chinese population.Conclusions:Our diabetes risk scoring model has satisfactory sensitivity and specificity for identifying undiagnosed diabetes in our population,which might be a simple and practical tool suitable for massive diabetes screening.

  9. Is the C677T polymorphism in methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene or plasma homocysteine a risk factor for diabetic peripheral neuropathy in Chinese individuals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongli; Fan, Dongsheng; Hong, Tianpei

    2012-10-25

    The present study enrolled 251 diabetic patients, including 101 with neuropathy and 150 without neuropathy. Of the 150 patients, 100 had no complications, such as retinopathy, nephropathy, or neuropathy. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis was used to identify methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene variants. Plasma homocysteine levels were also measured. Homocysteine levels and the frequency of hyperhomocysteinemia were significantly higher in patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy compared with diabetic patients without neuropathy (P diabetic peripheral neuropathy compared with patients without diabetic complications. Homocysteine levels were significantly higher in patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy carrying the 677T allele and low folic acid levels. In conclusion, hyperhomocysteinemia is an independent risk factor for diabetic neuropathy in Chinese patients with diabetes. The C677T polymorphism in methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase and low folic acid levels may be risk factors for diabetic peripheral neuropathy in Chinese patients with diabetes.

  10. Prevalence of self-reported diagnosis of diabetes mellitus and associated risk factors in a national survey in the US population: SHIELD (Study to Help Improve Early evaluation and management of risk factors Leading to Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reed Michael L

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies derived from continuous national surveys have shown that the prevalence of diagnosed diabetes mellitus in the US is increasing. This study estimated the prevalence in 2004 of self-reported diagnosis of diabetes and other conditions in a community-based population, using data from the Study to Help Improve Early evaluation and management of risk factors Leading to Diabetes (SHIELD. Methods The initial screening questionnaire was mailed in 2004 to a stratified random sample of 200,000 households in the US, to identify individuals, age ≥ 18 years of age, with diabetes or risk factors associated with diabetes. Follow-up disease impact questionnaires were then mailed to a representative, stratified random sample of individuals (n = 22,001 in each subgroup of interest (those with diabetes or different numbers of risk factors for diabetes. Estimated national prevalence of diabetes and other conditions was calculated, and compared to prevalence estimates from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES 1999–2002. Results Response rates were 63.7% for the screening, and 71.8% for the follow-up baseline survey. The SHIELD screening survey found overall prevalence of self-reported diagnosis of diabetes (either type 1 or type 2 was 8.2%, with increased prevalence with increasing age and decreasing income. In logistic regression modeling, individuals were more likely to be diagnosed with type 2 diabetes if they had abdominal obesity (odds ratio [OR] = 3.50; p 2 (OR = 4.04; p Conclusion The SHIELD design allowed for a very large, community-based sample with broad demographic representation of the population of interest. When comparing results from the SHIELD screening survey (self-report only to those from NHANES 1999–2002 (self-report, clinical and laboratory evaluations, the prevalence of diabetes was similar. SHIELD allows the identification of respondents with and without a current diagnosis of the

  11. Potential Explanatory Factors for Higher Incident Hip Fracture Risk in Older Diabetic Adults

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    Elsa S. Strotmeyer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes is associated with higher fracture risk. Diabetes-related conditions may account for this risk. Cardiovascular Health Study participants (N=5641; 42.0% men; 15.5% black; 72.8±5.6 years were followed 10.9 ± 4.6 years. Diabetes was defined as hypoglycemic medication use or fasting glucose (FG ≥126 mg/dL. Peripheral artery disease (PAD was defined as ankle-arm index <0.9. Incident hip fractures were from medical records. Crude hip fracture rates (/1000 person-years were higher for diabetic vs. non-diabetic participants with BMI <25 (13.6, 95% CI: 8.9–20.2 versus 11.4, 95% CI: 10.1–12.9 and BMI ≥25 to <30 (8.3, 95% CI: 5.7–11.9 versus 6.6, 95% CI: 5.6–7.7, but similar for BMI ≥30. Adjusting for BMI, sex, race, and age, diabetes was related to fractures (HR = 1.34; 95% CI: 1.01–1.78. PAD (HR = 1.25 (95% CI: 0.92–1.57 and longer walk time (HR = 1.07 (95% CI: 1.04–1.10 modified the fracture risk in diabetes (HR = 1.17 (95% CI: 0.87–1.57. Diabetes was associated with higher hip fracture risk after adjusting for BMI though this association was modified by diabetes-related conditions.

  12. Additive effect of pretransplant obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular risk factors on outcomes after liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dare, Anna J; Plank, Lindsay D; Phillips, Anthony R J; Gane, Edward J; Harrison, Barry; Orr, David; Jiang, Yannan; Bartlett, Adam S J R

    2014-03-01

    The effects of pretransplant obesity, diabetes mellitus (DM), coronary artery disease (CAD), and hypertension (HTN) on outcomes after liver transplantation (LT) are controversial. Questions have also been raised about the appropriateness of the body mass index (BMI) for assessing obesity in patients with end-stage liver disease. Both issues have implications for organ allocation in LT. To address these questions, we undertook a cohort study of 202 consecutive patients (2000-2010) undergoing LT at a national center in New Zealand. BMI and body fat percentage (%BF) values (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry) were measured before transplantation, and the methods were compared. The influence of pretransplant risk variables (including obesity, DM, CAD, and HTN) on the 30-day postoperative event rate, length of hospital stay, and survival were analyzed. There was agreement between the calculated BMI and the measured %BF for 86.0% of the study population (κ coefficient = 0.73, 95% confidence interval = 0.61-0.85), and this was maintained across increasing Model for End-Stage Liver Disease scores. Obesity was an independent risk factor for the postoperative event rate [count ratio (CR) = 1.03, P Obesity with concomitant DM was the strongest predictor of the postoperative event rate (CR = 1.75, P risk factors had no effect on 30-day, 1-year, or 5-year patient survival. In conclusion, BMI is an adequate tool for assessing obesity-associated risk in LT. Early post-LT morbidity is highest for patients with concomitant obesity and DM, although these factors do not appear to influence recipient survival. © 2014 American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  13. Joint effect of genetic and lifestyle risk factors on type 2 diabetes risk among Chinese men and women.

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    Raquel Villegas

    Full Text Available More than 40 genetic susceptibility loci have been reported for type 2 diabetes (T2D. Recently, the combined effect of genetic variants has been investigated by calculating a genetic risk score. We evaluated 36 genome-wide association study (GWAS identified SNPs in 2,679 T2D cases and 3322 controls in middle-age Han Chinese. Fourteen SNPs were significantly associated with T2D in analysis adjusted for age, sex and BMI. We calculated two genetic risk scores (GRS (GRS1 with all the 36 SNPs and GRS2 with the 14 SNPs significantly associated with T2D. The odds ratio for T2D with each GRS point (per risk allele was 1.08 (95% CI: 1.06-1.09 for GRS1 and 1.15 (95% CI: 1.13-1.18 for GRS2. The OR for quintiles were 1.00, 1.26, 1.69, 1.95 and 2.18 (P<0.0001 for GRS1 and 1.00, 1.33, 1.60, 2.03 and 2.80 (P<0.001 for GRS2. Participants in the higher tertile of GRS1 and the higher BMI category had a higher risk of T2D compared to those on the lower tertiles of the GRS1 and of BMI (OR = 11.08; 95% CI: 7.39-16.62. We found similar results when we investigated joint effects between GRS1 and WHR terciles and exercise participation. We finally investigated the joint effect between tertiles of GRSs and a composite high risk score (no exercise participation and high BMI and WHR on T2D risk. We found that compared to participants with low GRS1 and no high risk factors for T2D, those with high GRS1 and three high risk factors had a higher risk of T2D (OR = 13.06; 95% CI: 8.65-19.72 but the interaction factor was of marginal significance. The association was accentuated when we repeated analysis with the GRS2. In conclusion we found an association between GRS and lifestyle factors, alone and in combination, contributed to the risk of and T2D among middle age Chinese.

  14. Improved survival and renal prognosis of patients with type 2 diabetes and nephropathy with improved control of risk factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andrésdóttir, Gudbjörg; Jensen, Majken; Carstensen, Bendix

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate long-term survival, development of renal end points, and decline in glomerular filtration rate (GFR) in patients with type 2 diabetes and diabetic nephropathy (DN) after renin-angiotensin system (RAS) inhibition and multifactorial treatment of cardiovascular risk factors have...... and lower GFR were predictors of mortality, whereas albuminuria, HbA1c, and low GFR predicted ESRD. CONCLUSIONS: Overall prognosis has improved considerably with current multifactorial treatment of DN in type 2 diabetes, including long-term RAS inhibition....... become standard of care. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: All patients with type 2 diabetes and DN (n = 543) at the Steno Diabetes Center were followed during 2000-2010. GFR was measured yearly with 51Cr-EDTA plasma clearance. Annual decline in GFR was determined in patients with at least three measurements...

  15. Contribution of the Nurses’ Health Studies to Uncovering Risk Factors for Type 2 Diabetes: Diet, Lifestyle, Biomarkers, and Genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ley, Sylvia H.; Ardisson Korat, Andres V.; Sun, Qi; Tobias, Deirdre K.; Zhang, Cuilin; Qi, Lu; Willett, Walter C.; Manson, JoAnn E.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To review the contribution of the Nurses’ Health Study (NHS) and the NHS II to addressing hypotheses regarding risk factors for type 2 diabetes. Methods. We carried out a narrative review of 1976 to 2016 NHS and NHS II publications. Results. The NHS and NHS II have uncovered important roles in type 2 diabetes for individual nutrients, foods, dietary patterns, and physical activity independent of excess body weight. Up to 90% of type 2 diabetes cases are potentially preventable if individuals follow a healthy diet and lifestyle. The NHS investigations have also identified novel biomarkers for diabetes, including adipokines, inflammatory cytokines, nutrition metabolites, and environmental pollutants, offering new insights into the pathophysiology of the disease. Global collaborative efforts have uncovered many common genetic variants associated with type 2 diabetes and improved our understanding of gene–environment interactions. Continued efforts to identify epigenetic, metagenomic, and metabolomic risk factors for type 2 diabetes have the potential to reveal new pathways and improve prediction and prevention. Conclusions. Over the past several decades, the NHS and NHS II have made major contributions to public health recommendations and strategies designed to reduce the global burden of diabetes. PMID:27459454

  16. Prevalence and related risk factors of peripheral arterial disease in elderly patients with type 2 diabetes in Wuhan, Central China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Li; DU Fan; MAO Hong; WANG Hong-xiang; ZHAO Shi

    2011-01-01

    Bsckground The investigations of prevalence and risk factors of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) in type 2 diabetic patients have been carried out in many countries and regions,except for Central China.In this study,we determined the prevalence of PAD in type 2 diabetic patients and the related factors that gave rise to increasing of the risk of PAD development in Wuhan,China.Methods The study enrolled 2010 patients aged 60 years and older who were regularly visiting the Central Hospital of Wuhan that is a public hospital from 2005 to 2010,where all residents of the city were offered the medical services.PAD was defined as an ankle-brachial index <0.90 in either leg.To evaluate the role of various risk factors in PAD development,uniformed interviews,clinical examinations and laboratory investigation of all of participants were performed in this study.The correlation between potential risk factors and PAD was analyzed.Results In Wuhan,the prevalence rate of PAD was 24.1% in elderly diabetic patients.Totally,291 patients with PAD had at least one weak but not absent dorsalis pedis pulse in both feet,while 541 patients without PAD showed this way.At least one absent dorsalis pedis pulse was found in 192 patients with PAD as well as 10 patients without PAD.The results of multivariate regression analysis suggested that the age,smoking history,hypertension,diabetic neuropathy and macroangiopathy gave rise to significant increase of PAD development in type 2 diabetic diseases.Conclusions The prevalence of PAD in elderly patients with type 2 diabetes in Wuhan was close to the prevalence that was reported in other regions of China and other Asian countries.Control of the related risk factors and early diagnosis of PAD may play a role in PAD prevention and improving prognosis.

  17. Diabetes as a risk factor for hepatic encephalopathy in cirrhosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Peter; Watson, Hugh; Andersen, Per Kragh

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: It remains unclear whether diabetes increases the risk for hepatic encephalopathy (HE) in cirrhotic patients. We examined this question using data from three randomized trials of satavaptan, a vasopressin receptor antagonist that does not affect HE risk, in cirrhotic patients w...

  18. Diabetes Status and Being Up-to-Date on Colorectal Cancer Screening, 2012 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Nancy R; Eberth, Jan M; Samson, Marsha E; Garcia-Dominic, Oralia; Lengerich, Eugene J; Schootman, Mario

    2016-02-04

    Although screening rates for colorectal cancer are increasing, 22 million Americans are not up-to-date with recommendations. People with diabetes are an important and rapidly growing group at increased risk for colorectal cancer. Screening status and predictors of being up-to-date on screening are largely unknown in this population. This study used logistic regression modeling and data from the 2012 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System to examine the association between diabetes and colorectal cancer screening predictors with being up-to-date on colorectal cancer screening according to criteria of the US Preventive Services Task Force for adults aged 50 or older. State prevalence rates of up-to-date colorectal cancer screening were also calculated and mapped. The prevalence of being up-to-date with colorectal cancer screening for all respondents aged 50 or older was 65.6%; for respondents with diabetes, the rate was 69.2%. Respondents with diabetes were 22% more likely to be up-to-date on colorectal cancer screening than those without diabetes. Among those with diabetes, having a routine checkup within the previous year significantly increased the odds of being up-to-date on colorectal cancer screening (odds ratio, 1.90). Other factors such as age, income, education, race/ethnicity, insurance status, and history of cancer were also associated with up-to-date status. Regardless of diabetes status, people who had a routine checkup within the past year were more likely to be up-to-date than people who had not. Among people with diabetes, the duration between routine checkups may be of greater importance than the frequency of diabetes-related doctor visits. Continued efforts should be made to ensure that routine care visits occur regularly to address the preventive health needs of patients with and patients without diabetes.

  19. Risk Factors for the Requirement of Antenatal Insulin Treatment in Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayu Watanabe

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Poor maternal glycemic control increases maternal and fetal risk for adverse outcomes, and strict management of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM is recommended to prevent neonatal and maternal complications. However, risk factors for the requirement of antenatal insulin treatment (AIT are not well-investigated in the pregnant women with GDM. We enrolled 37 pregnant women with GDM and investigated the risk for AIT by comparing the patients with AIT (AIT group; n=10 and without insulin therapy (Diet group; n=27. The 1-h and 2-h plasma glucose levels and the number of abnormal values in 75 g OGTT were significantly higher in AIT group compared with Diet group. By logistic regression analysis, plasma glucose level at 1-h was significant predictor for AIT and the odds ratios were 1.115 (1.004–1.239 using forward selection method and 1.192 (1.006–1.413 using backward elimination method. There were no significant differences in obstetrical outcomes and neonatal complications. 1-h plasma glucose levels in 75 g OGTT are useful parameters in predicting the requirement for AIT in GDM. Both maternal and neonatal complications are comparable in GDM patients with and without insulin therapy.

  20. Associated risk factors and management of chronic diabetic foot ulcers exceeding 6 months’ duration

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    Hassan Gubara Musa

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The management of chronic diabetic foot ulcers (DFU poses a great challenge to the treating physician and surgeon. The aim of this study was to identify the risk factors, clinical presentation, and outcomes associated with chronic DFU > 6 months’ duration. Methods: This prospective study was performed in Jabir Abu Eliz Diabetic Centre (JADC, Khartoum, Sudan. A total of 108 patients who had DFU for >6 months were included. Recorded data included patient's demographics, DFU presentation, associated comorbidities, and outcomes. DFU description included size, depth, protective sensation, perfusion, and presence of infection. Comorbidities assessed included eye impairment, renal and heart disease. All patients received necessary local wound care with sharp debridement of any concomitant necrotic and infected tissues and off-loading with appropriate shoe gear and therapeutic devices. Results: The mean age of the studied patients was 56+SD 9 years with a male to female ratio of 3:3.3. The mean duration of DFU was 18±SD 17 months (ranging from 6 to 84 months. Ulcer healing was significantly associated with off-loading, mainly the use of total contact cast (TCC (p=0.013. Non-healing ulcerations were significantly associated with longer duration of the chronic DFU > 12 months (p=0.002, smoking (p=0.000, poor glycemic control as evidenced by an elevated HbA1c (>7%, large size (mean SD 8+4 cm, increased depth (p<0.001, presence of skin callus (p<0.000, impaired limb perfusion (p=0.001, impaired protective sensation as measured by 10 g monofilament (p=0.002, neuroischemia (p=0.002, and Charcot neuroarthropathy (p=0.017. Discussion: Risk factors associated with chronic DFU of > 6 months’ duration included the presentation of an ulcer with increased size and depth, with associated skin callus and neuroischemia, in a diabetic patient with a history of smoking and increased HbA1c >7%. Off-loading mainly with the use of TCC is an effective method

  1. Type 2 diabetes is not a risk factor for asymptomatic ischemic brain lesion. The Funagata study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saitoh, Tamotsu; Daimon, Makoto; Eguchi, Hideyuki; Hosoya, Takaaki; Kawanami, Toru; Kurita, Keiji; Tominaga, Makoto; Kato, Takeo [Yamagata Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    2002-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to clarify whether type 2 diabetes (DM) is a risk factor for asymptomatic (silent) ischemic brain lesion, which is controversial at present. The subjects (n=187), who showed normal results on both neurological and neuropsychological examinations, underwent a 75-g OGTT and were examined by brain MRI on T1-weighted, T2-weighted, and FLAIR (fluid-attenuated inversion recovery) images. Their brain MRIs were evaluated quantitatively with the ischemia rating scale defined here. The subjects were grouped based on their glucose tolerance: normal glucose tolerance (NGT) (n=48), impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) (n=62), and DM (n=65). The subjects with DM were further divided based on their duration of illness: 20 with short duration (short DM: 1.3{+-}0.8 years) and 45 with long duration (long DM; 8.9{+-}5.4 years). Ages were matched among the groups. The percentages of individuals with asymptomatic ischemic brain lesion were 81% in NGT, 74% in IGT, 65% in short DM, and 78% in long DM. No significant difference was observed among the groups in terms of the percentage. Namely, even in individuals with a long history of DM without clinical stroke, the prevalence of asymptomatic ischemic brain lesion was not different from that of the other groups. Multiple regression and multiple logistic regression analyses showed that age and hypertension were significant independent risk factors for asymptomatic ischemic brain lesion, whereas hypercholesterolemia, smoking, and glucose intolerance, including IGT, short DM and long DM, were not. DM is not a risk factor for asymptomatic ischemic brain lesion. (author)

  2. Waist circumference and metabolic risk factors have seperate and additive effects on the risk of future type 2 diabetes in patients with vascular diseases. A cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wassink, A.M.; Graaf, van der Y.; Haeften, van T.W.; Spiering, W.; Soedamah-Muthu, S.S.; Visseren, F.L.

    2011-01-01

    Aims To assess the effect of various measures of adiposity and of metabolic risk factors, both separately and in combination, on the risk of future Type 2 diabetes in patients with manifest vascular diseases. Methods This was a prospective cohort study in 2924 patients (mean age 59 ± 12 years) with

  3. Waist circumference and metabolic risk factors have seperate and additive effects on the risk of future type 2 diabetes in patients with vascular diseases. A cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wassink, A.M.; Graaf, van der Y.; Haeften, van T.W.; Spiering, W.; Soedamah-Muthu, S.S.; Visseren, F.L.

    2011-01-01

    Aims To assess the effect of various measures of adiposity and of metabolic risk factors, both separately and in combination, on the risk of future Type 2 diabetes in patients with manifest vascular diseases. Methods This was a prospective cohort study in 2924 patients (mean age 59 ± 12 years) with

  4. [A study on risk factors and perceptions of diabetes among urban and suburban residents from six provinces in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yinghua; Li, Li; Nie, Xueqiong; Sun, Siwei; Huang, Xianggang; Shi, Mingfei; Li, Fangbo; Wei, Wei

    2014-07-01

    To study the epidemiological status of diabetes' risk factors among urban and suburban residents and their perceptions of their own health status and risk of diabetes. Stratified multi-stage sampling method was used to conduct the survey among 18-60 years old residents from Zhejiang, Jiangsu, Shanxi, Henan, Yunnan, and Qinghai provinces in China from March to May in 2013. The Questionnaire of Health Literacy of Diabetes Mellitus of the Public in China was used to conduct the survey, and then the data were analyzed. The main contents of the questionnaire included diabetes mellitus knowledge, diabetes mellitus risk factors and diabetes mellitus risk self-assessment. The results of the survey were standardized by the 6(th) national census data. A total of 4 416 respondents were surveyed, and 4 282 valid questionnaires were successfully collected during the survey and the response rate was 97.0%. After weighted adjustment, the overweight and obesity rate of the residents in 6 provinces was 35.3%, abdominal obesity rate was 54.7%. 77.8% of the residents without diabetes had more than one risk factor, but only 8.5% thought they might got diabetes. The residents with high risk behavior possessing rates of diabetes were in eastern areas (79.7%), urban areas (80.7%), men (84.1%), aged from 45 to 60(100.0%), below primary school education level (83.4%) and enterprise personnel (79.7%). The residents with high risk consciousness of getting diabetes were in eastern areas (11.0%), urban areas (9.7%), men (9.7%), aged from 45 to 60 (12.3%), over college education level (12.7%) and the offices (14.7%). The results of logistic regression showed that residents in the middle areas (OR = 2.148, 95% CI: 1.633-2.920), urban residents (OR = 2.100, 95% CI: 1.611-2.738), male (OR = 2.488, 95% CI: 1.962-3.154), the older (OR = 1.102, 95% CI: 1.090-1.115) had a higher risk behavior rate of diabetes mellitus. Urban residents (OR = 2.784, 95% CI: 1.497-5.175), male (OR = 1.522, 95% CI: 1

  5. Diabetes and pre-diabetes are associated with cardiovascular risk factors and carotid/femoral intima-media thickness independently of markers of insulin resistance and adiposity

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    Paccaud Fred

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Impaired glucose regulation (IGR is associated with detrimental cardiovascular outcomes such as cardiovascular disease risk factors (CVD risk factors or intima-media thickness (IMT. Our aim was to examine whether these associations are mediated by body mass index (BMI, waist circumference (waist or fasting serum insulin (insulin in a population in the African region. Methods Major CVD risk factors (systolic blood pressure, smoking, LDL-cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, were measured in a random sample of adults aged 25–64 in the Seychelles (n = 1255, participation rate: 80.2%. According to the criteria of the American Diabetes Association, IGR was divided in four ordered categories: 1 normal fasting glucose (NFG, 2 impaired fasting glucose (IFG and normal glucose tolerance (IFG/NGT, 3 IFG and impaired glucose tolerance (IFG/IGT, and 4 diabetes mellitus (DM. Carotid and femoral IMT was assessed by ultrasound (n = 496. Results Age-adjusted levels of the major CVD risk factors worsened gradually across IGR categories (NFG Conclusion We found graded relationships between IGR categories and both major CVD risk factors and carotid/femoral IMT. These relationships were only partly accounted for by BMI, waist and insulin. This suggests that increased CVD-risk associated with IGR is also mediated by factors other than the considered markers of adiposity and insulin resistance. The results also imply that IGR and associated major CVD risk factors should be systematically screened and appropriately managed.

  6. Metoclopramida, factor de riesgo para hiperglucemia postprandial en diabetes tipo 2 Metoclopramide as a risk factor for postprandial hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes

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    H. Gutiérrez-Hermosillo

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available La diabetes mellitus (DM es una patología que ha crecido ampliamente a nivel mundial en las ultimas décadas. La hiperglucemia postprandial (HP ha tomado importancia en los últimos años, ya que se ha visto se relaciona de manera directa con un aumento en el riesgo de eventos cardiovasculares. A la fecha, no se ha determinado la asociación entre el empleo de metoclopramida y los niveles de glucemia postprandial. Material y métodos: Se realizó un estudio de tipo cohorte, con objeto de determinar si la metoclopramida es factor de riesgo para hiperglucemia postprandial. Se incluyeron pacientes diabéticos tipo 2, se catalogó a los pacientes en expuestos, aquellos manejados con metoclopramida preprandial 10 mg intravenosa (IV y no expuestos, se determinó glucemia preprandial y 30, 60, 90 y 120 minutos postprandiales. Resultados: 80 pacientes por grupo se incluyeron siendo sus características basales similares. Las glucemia postprandial fue más elevada en aquellos tratados con metoclopramida que sin esta (p = Diabetes mellitus is a pathology that has widely spread througout the world in the past decades. Postprandial hyperglycemia plays an important role in the progress of the disease due to the fact that increases the risk for cardiovascular events. This study's aim was to determine if the use of intravenous metoclopramide in patients with Diabetes Mellitus increases the postprandial glycemia. Material and methods: A cohort of patients hospitalized with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Patients were classified as exposed (metoclopramide 10 mg IV and not exposed, and glycemia preprandial and postprandial at 30, 60 and 120 minutes was measured. Results: There were 80 patients in each group, and in both groups the general characteristics were homogeneous. The postprandial glycemia in the exposed group was higher at 30, 60, 90 and 120 minutes, being only statistically significant at 120 minutes postprandial (p = < 0,001. Conclusions: In conclusion

  7. Risk factors of impaired fasting glucose and type 2 diabetes in Yaounde, Cameroon : a cross sectional study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kufe, Clement Nyuyki; Klipstein-Grobusch, Kerstin; Leopold, Fezeu; Assah, Felix; Ngufor, George; Mbeh, George; Mbanya, Vivian Nchanchou; Mbanya, Jean Claude

    2015-01-01

    Background: The prevalence of diabetes is increasing worldwide, particularly in low and middle income countries, where treatment and control are often unavailable and inaccessible. Information on risk factors at local and regional levels is of utmost importance for tailored prevention programmes to

  8. Risk factors of impaired fasting glucose and type 2 diabetes in Yaounde, Cameroon : a cross sectional study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kufe, Clement Nyuyki; Klipstein-Grobusch, Kerstin; Leopold, Fezeu; Assah, Felix; Ngufor, George; Mbeh, George; Mbanya, Vivian Nchanchou; Mbanya, Jean Claude

    2015-01-01

    Background: The prevalence of diabetes is increasing worldwide, particularly in low and middle income countries, where treatment and control are often unavailable and inaccessible. Information on risk factors at local and regional levels is of utmost importance for tailored prevention programmes to

  9. Associations of Symptoms of Anxiety and Depression with Diabetes and Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Older People with Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, C. F.; Hermans, H.; Evenhuis, H. M.; Echteld, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Depression, anxiety, diabetes and cardiovascular risk factors are frequent health problems among older people with intellectual disability (ID). These conditions may be bidirectionally related. Depression and anxiety may have biological effects causing glucose intolerance, fat accumulation and also lifestyle changes causing metabolic…

  10. Associations of Symptoms of Anxiety and Depression with Diabetes and Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Older People with Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, C. F.; Hermans, H.; Evenhuis, H. M.; Echteld, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Depression, anxiety, diabetes and cardiovascular risk factors are frequent health problems among older people with intellectual disability (ID). These conditions may be bidirectionally related. Depression and anxiety may have biological effects causing glucose intolerance, fat accumulation and also lifestyle changes causing metabolic…

  11. Sex differences in risk factors for retinopathy in non-diabetic men and women: The Tromso Eye Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, G.; Peto, T.; Lindekleiv, H.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the prevalence and risk factors for retinopathy in a nondiabetic population. Methods: The study population included 5869 participants without diabetes aged 38-87years from the TromsO Eye Study, a substudy of the population-based TromsO Study in Norway. Retinal images from bo...

  12. Risk factors and pain status due to diabetic neuropathy in chronic long-term diabetic patients in a Chinese urban population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JI Na; ZHANG Nan; REN Zhan-jie; JIA Ke-bao; WANG Li; NI Jia-xiang; MA Jun

    2012-01-01

    Background With economic growth and urbanization there have been significant changes in the life style and diet of urban residents in large cities of China,which is experiencing a rapid increase in the prevalence of diabetes.While high prevalence of diabetes has been reported,little is known of the long-term effects of diabetes in such a large population.The aim of this study was to estimate the morbidity rate of diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) in a Chinese urban diabetic population with more than 10 years' disease duration,and evaluate the relevant risk factors.The clinical manifestation of DPN and pain status was also assessed.Methods Five hundred and sixty-five diabetes patients were recruited into the study.Symptoms and examination helped diagnose neuropathy.The clinical manifestation of DPN was assessed with a visual analog pain score (VAS).Diabetic complication status was determined from medical records.Serum lipids and lipoproteins,glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c),and the urinary albumin excretion rate were measured.Results The morbidity rate of DPN was 46.6%.HbA1c,hyperlipidemia,and retinopathy were significantly associated with neuropathy,and these risk factors were correlated with other diabetic micro and/or macrovascular complications.The average VAS pain score of the DPN patients was 4.12±2.07.Severe and moderate pain was experienced by 11.4% and 40.5% respectively of DPN patients.About 3.7% of diabetic subjects had lower limb ulcer or amputation.Conclusions The morbidity rate of DPN for diabetic patients with >10 years duration is very high compared to the range reported for other populations in the world.The risk factors for DPN include HbA1c,hyperlipidemia,and retinopathy.In long-standing diabetic patients,DPN was not associated with diabetic duration,and half of the DPN patients experienced considerable daily suffering.

  13. Diabetes as a risk factor to cancer: Functional role of fermented papaya preparation as phytonutraceutical adjunct in the treatment of diabetes and cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aruoma, Okezie I., E-mail: oaruoma@auhs.edu [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy, American University of Health Sciences, Signal Hill, CA (United States); Somanah, Jhoti [ANDI Center for Biomedical and Biomaterials Research, University of Mauritius, MSIRI Building, Réduit (Mauritius); Bourdon, Emmanuel; Rondeau, Philippe [Groupe d’Etude sur l’Inflammation Chronique et l’Obésité (GEICO), Université de La Réunion, Plateforme CYROI, Saint Denis (France); Bahorun, Theeshan, E-mail: tbahorun@uom.ac.mu [ANDI Center for Biomedical and Biomaterials Research, University of Mauritius, MSIRI Building, Réduit (Mauritius)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Cancer incidence and mortality is linked to hyperglycemia and some anti-diabetes drugs. • FPP is a safe nutraceutical adjunct for augmenting therapeutic regimens in diabetes and cancer management. • FPP through its hypoglycemic and antioxidant sensing may impact and mitigate the side effects of anticancer drugs. • FPP can diminish the intensity of side effects associated with acute radiation therapy. • FPP can maintain the integrity of erythrocyte during cancer chemotherapy augmenting compliance of treatment. - Abstract: Oncologists and diabetologists quote scientific data from epidemiological and in vitro studies to show that high levels of insulin and glucose, in combination with oxidative stress and chronic inflammation, can heighten the risk of developing cancer amongst patients with diabetes. Although the cancers that have been consistently associated with type 2 diabetes include pancreatic, colorectal, breast and liver cancer, the preponderance of the disease risk factors such as obesity, inflammation, hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinaemia (as a result of insulin resistance and oxidative β-cell damage) and the indirect influence of anti-diabetic medications are increasingly being defined. Fermented papaya preparation (FPP) has defined antioxidant and immune-modulating potentials. The ability of FPP influence signaling cascades associated with cell growth and survival presents a rational for chemopreventive adjunct that can be used in combination with traditional redox based therapies that target oxidative stress in the cancer micro environment. It is further suggested that the demonstrated efficacy FPP to control blood glucose, excessive inflammation and modulate free radical-induced oxidative damage which are triggers of liver, bladder, breast and prostate cancers in type 2 diabetics, may favorably mitigate the side effects of ensuing diabetes and cancer therapy. What remains paramount is early cancer detection and early determination of

  14. Beverage-consumption patterns and associations with metabolic risk factors among low-income Latinos with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Monica L; Lemon, Stephenie C; Olendzki, Barbara; Rosal, Milagros C

    2013-12-01

    In the United States, Latinos experience disproportionately higher rates of type 2 diabetes and diabetes-related complications than non-Latino whites. Sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) consumption is strongly associated with increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Reducing caloric intake, particularly from energy-dense, low-nutrient foods or beverages, can be an effective and key strategy for metabolic and weight control. However, little is known about the contribution of various types of beverages, including but not limited to SSBs, to total caloric intake among Latinos with type 2 diabetes. Low-income Latinos (87.7% Puerto Rican) participating in a diabetes self-management intervention trial (N=238) provided cross-sectional, descriptive data on beverage-consumption patterns, anthropometric outcomes, and metabolic characteristics. Beverages accounted for one fifth of the total daily caloric intake. SSBs and milk beverages, respectively, contributed 9.6% of calories to overall daily caloric intake. Interventions directed at diabetes risk factors among low-income Latinos with diabetes can benefit from consideration of beverage-consumption behaviors as an important strategy to reduce caloric and sugar intake.

  15. Small dense low-density lipoprotein as a potential risk factor of nephropathy in type 2 diabetes mellitus

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    Essam Abd-Allha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The risk for diabetic nephropathy in type 2 diabetes is about 30-40%, and it is considered the leading cause of end-stage renal disease. Small dense low-density lipoprotein (sdLDL particles are believed to be atherogenic, and its predominance has been accepted as an emerging cardiovascular risk factor. This study aimed to assess small dense LDL as a potential risk factor and a possible predictor for diabetic nephropathy in type 2 diabetic patients. Patients and Methods: According to microalbuminuria test, 40 diabetic patients were categorized into two groups: Diabetic patients without nephropathy (microalbuminuria negative group and diabetic patients with nephropathy (microalbuminuria positive group, each group consists of 20 patients and all were non-obese and normotensive. The patients were re-classified into three sub-groups depending on the glomerular filtration rate (GFR. Results: The mean of small dense LDL level in the microalbuminuria positive group was higher than that in the microalbuminuria negative group, but without statistical significance. It was significantly higher in patients with either mild or moderate decrease in estimated GFR than in patients with normal estimated GFR. There was statistically significant correlation between small dense LDL and albuminuria and significant inverse correlation between small dense LDL and estimated GFR in all patients in the study. Based on microalbuminuria, the sensitivity and specificity of small dense LDL in the diagnosis of diabetic nephropathy was 40% and 80%, respectively, with cutoff values of small dense LDL >55.14 mg/dl. On the other hand, based on GFR, the sensitivity and specificity were 88.24% and 73.91% respectively, with cutoff values of small dense LDL >41.89 mg/dl. Conclusion: Small dense LDL is correlated with the incidence and severity of diabetic nephropathy in type 2 diabetic patients. It should be considered as a potential risk factor and as a diagnostic

  16. Risk factors of gestational diabetes mellitus in the refugee population in Gaza Strip: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlKasseh, A S M; Zaki, N M; Aljeesh, Y I; Soon, L K

    2014-01-09

    To determine the risk factors of gestational diabetes mellitus in refugee populations in the Gaza Strip, a retrospective case-control study was performed between March and June 2011 in the United Nations Relief and Works Agency (UNRWA) primary health care clinics. Data were collected on maternal sociodemographics and the prevalence of diagnosed GDM according to World Health Organization criteria from clinics where postnatal Palestinian refugee women had been diagnosed with GDM during previous pregnancies, and non-GDM women were used as controls. Sociodemographic characteristics, pre-pregnancy body-mass index (BMI), obstetrics history and family history of diabetes were used as study variables. In total, 189 incident cases of GDM were identified. The most significant risk factors for GDM were: history of miscarriage more than once; overweight before pregnancy; history of stillbirth; history of caesarean birth; and positive family history of diabetes mellitus.

  17. Melatonin ameliorates metabolic risk factors, modulates apoptotic proteins, and protects the rat heart against diabetes-induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Ali H; El-Missiry, Mohamed A; Othman, Azza I

    2015-01-15

    The present study investigated the ability of melatonin in reducing metabolic risk factors and cardiac apoptosis induced by diabetes. Streptozotocin (60 mg/kg, i.p.) was injected into male rats, and after diabetic induction melatonin (10mg/kg i.g.) was administered orally for 21 days. Diabetic hearts showed increased number of apoptotic cells with downregulation of Bcl-2 and activation of p53 and CD95 as well as the caspases 9, 8 and 3. In addition, there was a significant decrease in insulin level, hyperglycemia, elevated HOMA-IR, glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), total lipids, triglycerides, total cholesterol, low and very low-density lipoprotein and decreased high-density lipoprotein. These changes were coupled with a significant increase in the activities of creatin kinase-MB (CK-MB) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in the serum of the diabetic rats indicating myocardium injury. Oral administration of melatonin for 3 weeks after diabetes induction ameliorated the levels of hyperglycemia, insulin, HbA1c, lipids profile and HOMA-IR. The oral melatonin treatment of diabetic rats significantly decreased the number of apoptotic cells in the heart compared to diabetic rats. It enhanced Bcl-2 expression and blocked the activation of CD95 as well as caspases 9, 8 and 3. These changes were accompanied with significant improvement of CK-MB and LDH in the serum indicating the ameliorative effect of melatonin on myocardium injury. Melatonin effectively ameliorated diabetic myocardium injury, apoptosis, reduced the metabolic risk factors and modulated important steps in both extrinsic and intrinsic pathways of apoptosis. Thus, melatonin may be a promising pharmacological agent for ameliorating potential cardiomyopathy associated with diabetes.

  18. PREVALENCE AND RISK FACTORS OF PERIPHERAL ARTERIAL DISEASE IN DIABETIC PATIENTS OVER 50 YEARS OLD IN CHINA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Heng Guan; Zheng-yan Sheng; Hao-ming Tian; Da-long Zhu; De-min Yu; Wei-te Zhuang; Lu-lu Chen; Jian-ping Weng; Yong-jun Li; Zhang-rong Xu; Guang-wei Li; Xiao-hui Guo; Zhi-min Liu; Da-jin Zou; Hui-li Xing; Wei Liu

    2007-01-01

    Objective To investigate the prevalence of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) in China type 2 diabetic patients and to demonstrate the relationships between putative risk factors and PAD.Methods In total 1 397 type 2 diabetic patients aged 50 years and older were enrolled and determined ankle-brachial index (ABI) and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) in 15 Class HI Grade A hospitals in 7 major cities of China.Results Mean patient age was 63. 7 ± 8. 2 years and mean duration of diabetes mellitus was 9. 39 ± 7. 4 years. Two hundreds and seventy-two (19. 47% ) patients were diagnosed as PAD by ABI< 0. 9, 122 (18. 37% ) in male and 150 (20. 46% ) in female. PAD patients had a significantly longer duration of diabetes mellitus, higher hemoglobin Ale, and a significantly lower mean body mass index than non-PAD ones. Aging, smoking, and systolic blood pressure were found to be positively related with the prevalence of PAD. In terms of lipid profiles, no variable was found to relate with PAD. Notably, baPWV showed as the same significant guiding index for PAD, almost matched with ABI.Conclusions PAD is a common complication in China type 2 diabetic patients. Therefore, PAD screening and treatment should be emphasized for diabetic patients with high risk factors.

  19. Work Disability among Employees with Diabetes: Latent Class Analysis of Risk Factors in Three Prospective Cohort Studies.

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    Marianna Virtanen

    Full Text Available Studies of work disability in diabetes have examined diabetes as a homogeneous disease. We sought to identify subgroups among persons with diabetes based on potential risk factors for work disability.Participants were 2,445 employees with diabetes from three prospective cohorts (the Finnish Public Sector study, the GAZEL study, and the Whitehall II study. Work disability was ascertained via linkage to registers of sickness absence and disability pensions during a follow-up of 4 years. Study-specific latent class analysis was used to identify subgroups according to prevalent comorbid disease and health-risk behaviours. Study-specific associations with work disability at follow-up were pooled using fixed-effects meta-analysis.Separate latent class analyses for men and women in each cohort supported a two-class solution with one subgroup (total n = 1,086; 44.4% having high prevalence of chronic somatic diseases, psychological symptoms, obesity, physical inactivity and abstinence from alcohol and the other subgroup (total n = 1,359; 55.6% low prevalence of these factors. In the adjusted meta-analyses, participants in the 'high-risk' group had more work disability days (pooled rate ratio = 1.66, 95% CI 1.38-1.99 and more work disability episodes (pooled rate ratio = 1.33, 95% CI 1.21-1.46. These associations were similar in men and women, younger and older participants, and across occupational groups.Diabetes is not a homogeneous disease in terms of work disability risk. Approximately half of people with diabetes are assigned to a subgroup characterised by clustering of comorbid health conditions, obesity, physical inactivity, abstinence of alcohol, and associated high risk of work disability; the other half to a subgroup characterised by a more favourable risk profile.

  20. Prevalence and related risk-factors of peripheral neuropathy in children with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus

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    Nasibeh Hasani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetes mellitus (DM is a common metabolic disorder that can cause various complications including, peripheral neuropathy (PNP. Some possible risk-factors such as blood glucose level, hyperglycemia, duration of diabetes, and lipid profiles are assumed to be important in diabetic PNP incidence. The aim of this study is to evaluate the prevalence and possible risk-factors of PNP in children with insulin dependent DM. Materials and Methods: Among diabetic children, 146 patients (up to 18-years old were evaluated in this cross-sectional study. All patients were examined for signs and symptoms of neuropathy and nerve conduction studies were performed. Blood level of glucose and lipid profiles were also tested. The relation between variables was compared by independent t-test and logistic regression test. Results: The mean age of diabetic children was 11.9 ± 3.3 years whereas mean diabetes duration was 3.8 ± 2.9 years. PNP was detected in 40 patients (27.4% that 62.5% of them have subclinical and 37.5% have clinical neuropathy. According to logistic regression analysis, duration of diabetes was the most important factor in prevalence of PNP (5.7 ± 3.5 and 3.1 ± 2.5 years in patients with and without neuropathy respectively, P < 0.001, 95% confidence interval [1.15-1.54]. Conclusion: As most of the patients had subclinical PN, neurological assessment is recommended to detect subclinical neuropathy in asymptomatic type 1 diabetic children and it seems that the best way to prevent this complication is still rigid blood glucose control and periodic evaluations.

  1. A study of prevalence and association of risk factors for diabetic vasculopathy in an urban area of Gujarat

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    Jayesh D Solanki

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Peripheral arterial disease (PAD is an aftermath of type 2 diabetes posing a significant health problem in developing countries. Its silent progression warrants presymptomatic screening by ankle brachial index (ABI, which cannot be applied to the whole population. We tried to measure the burden of PAD in diabetics of this region correlating various risk factors for it quantitatively and qualitatively. Materials and Methods: From various out-patient departments, 110 known under treatment type 2 diabetics were recruited. They underwent thorough assessment for general, symptomatic, medical history and risk factor screening that included 11 well-known risk factors. ABI was measured by Versadop instrument using the standard protocol with ABI <0.9 being considered as abnormal. Results: There was a high prevalence of asymptomatism, hypertension, positive family history and age <52 years in the study group. Relative risk was highest for asymptomatism followed by high body mass index, hyperlipidemia, cardiovascular disease and smoking, but less significant for age, gender, fasting sugar level, family history. More adverse ABI profile was noticed with the increase in number of five modifiable risk factors cumulatively. Conclusion: There was a high prevalence of low ABI in our region that is an evidence of PAD mainly affected by risk factors many of which were modifiable. Defining those who are at risk to develop PAD in Diabetes, one can use ABI better in early screening and prompt treatment of this complication to stop its further progression and primary prevention can be served as felt the need for health-care effectively.

  2. Family History, Diabetes, and Other Demographic and Risk Factors Among Participants of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999–2002

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    Debra Duquette, MS, CGC

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Family history of diabetes has been recognized as an important risk factor of the disease. Family medical history represents valuable genomic information because it characterizes the combined interactions between environmental, behavioral, and genetic factors. This study examined the strength and effect of having a family history of diabetes on the prevalence of self-reported, previously diagnosed diabetes among adult participants of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999–2002. Methods The study population included data from 10,283 participants aged 20 years and older. Gender, age, race/ethnicity, poverty income ratio, education level, body mass index, and family history of diabetes were examined in relation to diabetes status. Diabetes prevalence estimates and odds ratios of diabetes were calculated based on family history and other factors. Results The prevalence of diabetes among individuals who have a first-degree relative with diabetes (14.3% was significantly higher than that of individuals without a family history (3.2%, corresponding to a crude odds ratio of five. Both prevalence and odds ratio estimates significantly increased with the number of relatives affected with diabetes. Family history was also associated with several demographic and risk factors. Conclusion Family history of diabetes was shown to be a significant predictor of diabetes prevalence in the adult U.S. population. We advocate the inclusion of family history assessment in public health prevention and screening programs as an inexpensive and valuable source of genomic information and measure of diabetes risk.

  3. A longitudinal study of structural risk factors for obesity and diabetes among American Indian young adults, 1994-2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marley, Tennille L; Metzger, Molly W

    2015-05-07

    American Indian young adults have higher rates of obesity and type 2 diabetes than the general US population. They are also more likely than the general population to have higher rates of structural risk factors for obesity and diabetes, such as poverty, frequent changes of residence, and stress. The objective of this study was to investigate possible links between these 2 sets of problems. Data from the American Indian subsample of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health) were used to examine potential links between obesity and type 2 diabetes and structural risk factors such as neighborhood poverty, housing mobility, and stress. We used logistic regression to explore explanatory factors. American Indians in the subsample had higher rates of poor health, such as elevated hemoglobin A1c levels, self-reported high blood glucose, self-reported diabetes, and overweight or obesity. They also had higher rates of structural risk factors than non-Hispanic whites, such as residing in poorer and more transient neighborhoods and having greater levels of stress. Self-reported stress partially mediated the increased likelihood of high blood glucose or diabetes among American Indians, whereas neighborhood poverty partially mediated their increased likelihood of obesity. Neighborhood poverty and stress may partially explain the higher rates of overweight, obesity, and type 2 diabetes among American Indian young adults than among non-Hispanic white young adults. Future research should explore additional neighborhood factors such as access to grocery stores selling healthy foods, proximity and safety of playgrounds or other recreational space, and adequate housing.

  4. Smoking, radiotherapy, diabetes and osteoporosis as risk factors for dental implant failure: a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There are conflicting reports as to the association between smoking, radiotherapy, diabetes and osteoporosis and the risk of dental implant failure. We undertook a meta-analysis to evaluate the association between smoking, radiotherapy, diabetes and osteoporosis and the risk of dental implant failure. METHODS: A comprehensive research on MEDLINE and EMBASE, up to January 2013, was conducted to identify potential studies. References of relevant studies were also searched. Screening, data extraction and quality assessment were conducted independently and in duplicate. A random-effects meta-analysis was used to pool estimates of relative risks (RRs with 95% confidence intervals (CIs. RESULTS: A total of 51 studies were identified in this meta-analysis, with more than 40,000 dental implants placed under risk-threatening conditions. The pooled RRs showed a direct association between smoking (n = 33; RR = 1.92; 95% CI, 1.67-2.21 and radiotherapy (n = 16; RR = 2.28; 95% CI, 1.49-3.51 and the risk of dental implant failure, whereas no inverse impact of diabetes (n = 5; RR = 0.90; 95% CI, 0.62-1.32 on the risk of dental implant failure was found. The influence of osteoporosis on the risk of dental implant failure was direct but not significant (n = 4; RR = 1.09; 95% CI, 0.79-1.52. The subgroup analysis indicated no influence of study design, geographical location, length of follow-up, sample size, or mean age of recruited patients. CONCLUSIONS: Smoking and radiotherapy were associated with an increased risk of dental implant failure. The relationship between diabetes and osteoporosis and the risk of implant failure warrant further study.

  5. Prevalence and risk factors for the development of diabetes mellitus in Swedish cats

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    Sallander Marie

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevalence and risk factors for the development of feline diabetes mellitus (FDM in Swedish cats have not previously been reported. The objective of the present pilot study was to indicate prevalence and possible risk factors for FDM in Swedish cats. Twenty diabetic cats from the database at the University Animal Hospital in Uppsala participated in the study, and these were matched with 20 healthy controls on sex and age. A mail-and-telephone questionnaire focusing on diet, activity and obesity was used. Results The prevalence of FDM during the years 2000–2004 based on the results of the hospital records in the present study was 21 per 10,000 cats. The diabetic cats were on average 9 years old when the disease signs were discovered (median, min-max 2–15. Among FDM cases, it was more common to be male (n=17 males vs n=3 females; P≤0.05. Ten out of twenty owners to cases (50% reported their cats to be obese at the time of the diagnosis (median 9 years, min-max 2–15, as compared to five out of twenty (25% controls at the same age. The median BW at the time for diagnosis was 5.5 kg (min-max 2.0-9.0 for cases, and 5.0 kg (min-max 3.0-8.0 kg for controls, respectively. Despite that both cases and controls had the same median age at the time of the study (13 years, min-max 3–18, a significantly higher number of controls were alive at that age (n=16 controls vs 8 cases; P≤0.05. A significantly higher proportion of cases that were obese at the time of the FDM diagnosis were dead at the time of the study compared to the proportion of controls that were obese at a similar age (P≤0.05. The diets given at the time for diagnosis for cases compared to diet of the controls at a similar time were mainly commercial foods, and controls consumed a higher proportion of dry foods compared to cases (medians 79 vs 44% of DM intake/d, respectively; P≤0.05. Cases were less active compared to the controls (2.3 and 3.2 h

  6. Type 2 diabetes as a risk factor for cognitive impairment: current insights

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    Umegaki H

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Hiroyuki Umegaki Department of Community Healthcare and Geriatrics, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya, Japan Abstract: Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM is a risk factor for cognitive dysfunction and dementia in the elderly. T2DM has been thought to be associated with vascular diseases, eventually leading to vascular dementia, but recent studies have established that T2DM is also associated with Alzheimer’s disease (AD. With the increase in the number of elderly individuals with T2DM, the number of diabetic patients with cognitive dysfunction has been increasing. T2DM may accelerate AD-associated pathologies through insulin resistance. Vascular pathologies may also be associated with cognitive dysfunction and dementia in T2DM subjects. Several other mechanisms also seem to be involved in T2DM-related cognitive dysfunction. More investigations to clarify the association of T2DM with cognitive impairment are warranted. These investigations may help to increase our understanding of AD and open a new door to the development of therapeutics. Recent pharmaceutical advancement in T2DM treatment has resulted in the availability of a wide range of antidiabetics. Some evidence has suggested that antidiabetic therapies help to prevent cognitive dysfunction. At present, however, the optimal level of blood glucose control and the best combination of medications to achieve it in terms of cognitive preservation have not been established. More investigation is warranted. Cognitive dysfunction is an emerging new complication of T2DM that requires further study. Keywords: insulin resistance, dementia, blood glucose, amyloid ß, tau, small vascular disease

  7. Marine food pollutants as a risk factor for hypoinsulinemia and type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grandjean, Philippe; Henriksen, Jan Erik; Choi, Anna L

    2011-01-01

    Some persistent environmental chemicals are suspected of causing an increased risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus, a disease particularly common after the age of 70. This concern was examined in a cross-sectional study of elderly subjects from a fishing population with elevated contaminant exposures...

  8. Investigation of Factors Contributing to Diabetes Risk in American Indian/Alaska Native Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam-Zwart, Kayleen; Cawston, Alvina

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between family history, sedentary behaviors, and childhood risk for type 2 diabetes. Participants were 480 students attending schools on or near an American Indian reservation. Data were collected through survey and BMI measurement. Children who frequently watched television or played video games did not…

  9. FACTORES DE RIESGOS ALIMENTARIOS Y NUTRICIONALES EN ADULTOS CON DIABETES MELLITUS Food and nutritional risk factors in adults suffering from diabetes mellitus

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    María del Pilar Barrera

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Antecedentes. La diabetes mellitus causa gran morbimortalidad, su aparición se asocia con estilos de vida. Objetivo. Determinar factores de riesgo relacionados con alimentación y estado nutricional, medir variables metabólicas y brindar educación alimentaria a pacientes con diabetes mellitus hospitalizados en medicina interna segundo nivel. Material y métodos. Estudio descriptivo, transversal, octubre 2009-junio 2011, 221 pacientes con diabetes mellitus, mayores de 18 años. Se aplicó encuesta, consejería alimentaria y nutricional, valoración de antropometría, dinamometría y evaluación de hábitos alimentarios, laboratorios HbA1c y perfil lipídico. Resultados. 44,1% hombres, 55,9% mujeres; edad promedio 63,6, DE, 13,3; 39.4% no había recibido consejería por nutricionista. Antropometría-dinamometría: 58,9% presentaba malnutrición por exceso (preobesidad y obesidad. Correlación significativa: IMC y cintura punto medio (r=0,750, p=0,000; IMC y grasa corporal (r=0,586, p=0.000; cintura punto medio y grasa corporal (r=0,334, p=0,000; CMB y fuerza muscular (r=0,246, p=0.000. Hábitos alimentarios: 42,3% prefería alimentos fritos; bajo consumo de proteína de origen animal (12,7%, lácteos (31,8%, frutas (64,7% y verduras (57,9%; alto consumo de almidones (43,4%; el 35,3% adicionaba azúcar, panela o miel; 18,8% utilizaba salero. A cada paciente se entregó y explicó una cartilla educativa. Conclusión. Predominio de preobesidad y obesidad, asociadas con hábitos alimentarios que pueden ocasionar complicaciones de diabetes mellitus.Background. Diabetes mellitus causes large-scale morbimortality; its appearance is associated with a particular individual's life-style. Objective. Determining the risk factors related to feeding habits and nutritional state, measuring metabolic variables and providing nutrition education for patients suffering diabetes mellitus who have been hospitalised in second level internal medicine facilities

  10. Study of Pregnancy Course and Outcomes with Analysis of Possible Risk Factors in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus Type 1

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    М.Т. Rakhimdjamova

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available There were examined 53 pregnant patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus. When studying the course of pregnancy and its outcomes with analysis of possible risk factors it was established that they are not rare and first of all this is due to the fact that the pregnancy was not planned, level of glycemia decreased not enough, late admissions for specialized help was revealed, patients had comorbidities following iodine deficiency and impact of a number of other factors.

  11. AN EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDY OF TYPE 2 DIABETES MELLITUS AND ITS RISK FACTORS IN RURAL AREA OF KATIHAR

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    Om Narayan Yadav

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a chronic, debilitating disease characterised by insulin resistance, impaired insulin secretion and hyperglycaemia. It is the most prevalent metabolic condition and one amongst major health and socioeconomic problems worldwide. It represents more than 90% of total prevalence of diabetes in the world and is responsible for 9% of the global mortality corresponding to four million deaths per year. The aim of the study is to- 1. Determine the prevalence of diabetes mellitus type 2 in a rural population of age 30 years and above. 2. Study the association of various risk factors with diabetes mellitus type 2. MATERIALS AND METHODS A community-based cross-sectional study was carried out in population 30 years and above at Hazipur village in the district of Katihar in Bihar. During the study period of 1 st January to 31 st December 2015, in which 910 persons aged 30 years or more living in this village were included in study. RESULTS Total sample size in this study was 910 and out of this, 37 (4.06% were found to have type 2 diabetes mellitus. The prevalence of type 2 diabetes was 45.94% among sedentary and only 13.52% among heavy worker subjects. According to literacy of subjects, the prevalence among illiterate, primary, middle, secondary, higher secondary and above was 24.33%, 32.43%, 16.22%, 13.51% and 13.51%, respectively. Among vegetarians and non-vegetarians, the prevalence was 18.91% and 81.09%, respectively. Among subjects with type 2 DM, 54.06% were overweight and 72.97% were hypertensive. Smoking habit was found among 54.05% subjects. CONCLUSION This study shows that the prevalence of diabetes is high in the subjects having sedentary lifestyle, poor literacy status, overweight, non-vegetarians, hypertension and smoking habit. Control of type 2 diabetes mellitus mandates lifestyle modification and control of risk factors.

  12. TRC150094 attenuates progression of nontraditional cardiovascular risk factors associated with obesity and type 2 diabetes in obese ZSF1 rats

    OpenAIRE

    Shitalkumar P Zambad; Munshi, Siralee; Dubey, Amita; Gupta, Ram; Busiello, Rosa Anna; Lanni, Antonia; Goglia, Fernando; Gupta, Ramesh C.; Chauthaiwale, Vijay; Dutt, Chaitanya

    2011-01-01

    Chronic overnutrition and consequential visceral obesity is associated with a cluster of risk factors for cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Moreover, individuals who have a triad of hypertension, dysglycemia, and elevated triglycerides along with reduced high-density lipoprotein cholesterol have a greater residual cardiovascular risk even after factoring for the traditional risk factors such as age, smoking, diabetes, and elevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. In our...

  13. Admixture in Mexico City: implications for admixture mapping of type 2 diabetes genetic risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Marignac, Veronica L; Valladares, Adan; Cameron, Emily; Chan, Andrea; Perera, Arjuna; Globus-Goldberg, Rachel; Wacher, Niels; Kumate, Jesús; McKeigue, Paul; O'Donnell, David; Shriver, Mark D; Cruz, Miguel; Parra, Esteban J

    2007-02-01

    Admixture mapping is a recently developed method for identifying genetic risk factors involved in complex traits or diseases showing prevalence differences between major continental groups. Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is at least twice as prevalent in Native American populations as in populations of European ancestry, so admixture mapping is well suited to study the genetic basis of this complex disease. We have characterized the admixture proportions in a sample of 286 unrelated T2D patients and 275 controls from Mexico City and we discuss the implications of the results for admixture mapping studies. Admixture proportions were estimated using 69 autosomal ancestry-informative markers (AIMs). Maternal and paternal contributions were estimated from geographically informative mtDNA and Y-specific polymorphisms. The average proportions of Native American, European and, West African admixture were estimated as 65, 30, and 5%, respectively. The contributions of Native American ancestors to maternal and paternal lineages were estimated as 90 and 40%, respectively. In a logistic model with higher educational status as dependent variable, the odds ratio for higher educational status associated with an increase from 0 to 1 in European admixture proportions was 9.4 (95%, credible interval 3.8-22.6). This association of socioeconomic status with individual admixture proportion shows that genetic stratification in this population is paralleled, and possibly maintained, by socioeconomic stratification. The effective number of generations back to unadmixed ancestors was 6.7 (95% CI 5.7-8.0), from which we can estimate that genome-wide admixture mapping will require typing about 1,400 evenly distributed AIMs to localize genes underlying disease risk between populations of European and Native American ancestry. Sample sizes of about 2,000 cases will be required to detect any locus that contributes an ancestry risk ratio of at least 1.5.

  14. Influence of Age at Diagnosis and Time-Dependent Risk Factors on the Development of Diabetic Retinopathy in Patients with Type 1 Diabetes

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    Luis Forga

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To determine the influence of age at onset of type 1 diabetes and of traditional vascular risk factors on the development of diabetic retinopathy, in a cohort of patients who have been followed up after onset. Methods. Observational, retrospective study. The cohort consists of 989 patients who were followed up after diagnosis for a mean of 10.1 (SD: 6.8 years. The influence of age at diagnosis, glycemic control, duration of diabetes, sex, blood pressure, lipids, BMI, and smoking is analyzed using Cox univariate and multivariate models with fixed and time-dependent variables. Results. 135 patients (13.7% developed diabetic retinopathy. The cumulative incidence was 0.7, 5.9, and 21.8% at 5-, 10-, and 15-year follow-up, respectively. Compared to the group with onset at age 44 years, respectively. During follow-up we also observed an association between diabetic retinopathy and HbA1c levels, HDL-cholesterol, and diastolic blood pressure. Conclusion. The rate of diabetic retinopathy is higher in patients who were older at type 1 diabetes diagnosis. In addition, we confirmed the influence of glycemic control, HDL-cholesterol, and diastolic blood pressure on the occurrence of retinopathy.

  15. Relationship between serum leptin level and cardiovascular, nutrtional risk factors in non-diabetic hemodialysis.

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    Hyung-Jong Kim

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Many studies showed that obesity was associated with high level of serum leptin, hyperhomocysteinemia, and insulin resistance in general population. Obesity is associated with various cardiovascular and metabolic complications. However, in end stage renal failure, it has been reported that obesity is associated with a favorable survival of patients. The purpose of this observational study was to investigate the relationship between serum leptin level increased at obesity and cardiovascular, nutritional traditional markers, and the comparison of patient’s survival for 5 years according to obesity in non-diabetic hemodialysis. A cross-sectional study was performed in obese and non-obese subjects according to body mass index. Fifteen obese patients (BMI≥25 kg/m2 and 29 non-obese patients (BMI<25 kg/m2 were studied. For each subject, blood was sampled for measurement of serum leptin, insulin resistance, C-reactive protein (CRP and nutritional parameters before hemodialysis. Insulin resistance was calculated by HOMA-IR. Linear regression analysis was performed to determine the relationship among insulin resistance, serum leptin level and nutritional parameters. In results, serum leptin level was significant positive correlated with BMI, nPCR, pre-albumin and HOMA-IR (p<0.05. Serum leptin level was significant negative correlated with tCO2 and CRP (p<0.05. Five years survival by Kaplan-Meier analysis was more favorable in obese group but did not show statistical significance (p=0.053. In conclusion, serum leptin level was associated with obesity and good nutrition status. But in view of positive correlation of HOMA-IR, serum leptin level may be associated with cardiovascular complication in non-diabetic hemodialysis patients. Therefore, we thought that serum leptin level may be a good nutritional marker and a cardiovascular risk factor. We thought that the further study for the proper leptin level will be needed and help the improvement of

  16. Alteraciones electrocardiográficas y factores de riesgo cardiovascular en pacientes con diabetes tipo 2 Electrocardiographic abnormalities and cardiovascular risk factors in patients with type 2 diabetes

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    Martha Rodríguez-Morán

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo. Determinar cuáles son las alteraciones del ritmo y la conducción cardiaca más frecuentes en pacientes con diabetes tipo 2 sin cardiopatía previa y establecer su asociación con los factores de riesgo cardiovascular. Material y métodos. Se incluyeron pacientes con diabetes tipo 2 sin presencia o antecedentes de cardiopatía. Se determinaron los factores de riesgo cardiovascular, el índice de masa corporal y los niveles séricos de glucosa, colesterol y triglicéridos. Se registró electrocardiograma convencional en reposo. La asociación de las variables en estudio con la ocurrencia de arritmias se calculó con un modelo de análisis multivariado ajustado por sexo. Resultados. Se integraron 199 pacientes: 113 mujeres (56.8% y 86 hombres (43.2%, y se identificó algún tipo de alteración electrocardiográfica en 29.1% de los sujetos. El hemibloqueo fascicular anterior (HFA y el bloqueo completo de rama derecha del Haz de His (BRDHH, constituyeron 75.9% de las alteraciones identificadas. Los pacientes con trastornos del ritmo y la conducción tienen niveles más elevados de colesterol y triglicéridos. La aparición de arritmias se relaciona directamente con el incremento de la edad (r= 0.75, p= 0.01. En el análisis multivariado ajustado por sexo la hipercolesterolemia y la edad se asociaron significativamente con las alteraciones del ritmo y la conducción: RM 1.5, IC95% 1.1-4.6, pObjective. To determine the most frequent alterations in rhythm and cardiac conduction in patients with type 2 diabetes without previous cardiopathy, and to establish the association of this disease with cardiovascular risk factors. Material and methods. Subjects with type 2 diabetes, without cardiopathy antecedents were included in the study. Cardiovascular risk factors, body mass index and serum glucose, cholesterol and trygliceride levels were determined. A resting electrocardiogram was recorded. The association between the variables under study and

  17. A prospective cohort study of modifiable risk factors for gestational diabetes among Hispanic women: design and baseline characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chasan-Taber, Lisa; Fortner, Renée Turzanski; Gollenberg, Audra; Buonnaccorsi, John; Dole, Nancy; Markenson, Glenn

    2010-01-01

    Women diagnosed with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) are at high risk for future diabetes, with rates of GDM consistently higher in Hispanic than non-Hispanic white women. Currently recognized risk factors for GDM are absent in up to half of affected women, and studies addressing modifiable risk factors for GDM in Hispanic women are sparse. Proyecto Buena Salud is an ongoing prospective cohort study of Hispanic women in Massachusetts designed to assess physical activity, psychosocial stress, and GDM risk. Bilingual interviewers recruit prenatal care patients early in pregnancy and assess activity, trait anxiety, perceived stress, and depressive symptoms using validated questionnaires. Baseline characteristics of the first 632 participants are presented. Women were predominantly young (69% Buena Salud represents a high-risk population of pregnant Hispanic women who are predominantly inactive, with higher levels of perceived stress, trait anxiety, and depressive symptoms compared to predominantly non-Hispanic white cohorts studied earlier. Therefore, Proyecto Buena Salud provides a unique opportunity to prospectively evaluate modifiable risk factors for GDM. Findings will inform prenatal behavioral intervention programs designed to address modifiable GDM risk factors.

  18. Cardiovascular Risk Factors and Distributions of the Ankle-Brachial Index among Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients

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    Badaruddoza Doza

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The aim of present study is to observe the association between the levels of ankle-brachial index (ABI and cardiovascular risk factors among people with type 2 diabetes mellitus in north India. A cross-sectional study was carried out at a centre for heart and diabetic clinic in the state of Punjab on 1121 subjects (671 males and 450 females with type 2 diabetes mellitus. History of symptoms related to cardiovascular diseases was noted, and blood pressure and anthropometric measurements were recorded. Ankle-brachial index (ABI was measured using ultrasonic Doppler flow detector. Subjects with ABI ≤0.9 and ≥1.30 were classified as having low and high ABI, respectively. Females had a higher BMI and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (<0.001. Whereas, males had higher diastolic blood pressure and duration of type 2 diabetes mellitus. The differences of systolic blood pressure and ankle-brachial index were not found significant between the sexes. The prevalence of low ABI (<0.9 was 4.47% in men and 4.67% in women and high ABI (≥1.30 was prevalent in 14% of men and 10.45% of women. Age, BMI, baPWV, and blood pressures were significantly associated with ABI value in both sexes. The results suggested that the ABI might be used as a strong indicator for cardiovascular risk factors in type 2 diabetic subjects.

  19. Risk factors for diabetes mellitus in women with primary ovarian insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulaksizoglu, Mustafa; Ipekci, Suleyman Hilmi; Kebapcilar, Levent; Kebapcilar, Ayse Gul; Korkmaz, Huseyin; Akyurek, Fikret; Baldane, Suleyman; Gonen, Mustafa Sait

    2013-09-01

    Primary ovarian insufficiency (POI) is not only a gynecological problem but also has serious effects on women's health such as changes in hormone levels that can trigger fluctuations in blood sugar level and inflammation status. The present study was designed to determine vitamin D, copper, zinc, metabolic parameters [insulin, homeostasis model of assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR)], inflammation parameters such as procalcitonin and high sensitivity C reactive protein (hs-CRP), and lipid profile in POI patients and control subjects with normal menstrual cycles. A total of 43 patients with nondiabetic POI were studied in order to evaluate and compare the findings with those of the control group, which comprised 33 women with normal menstrual cycles. The women with POI had higher levels of serum copper, serum insulin, glucose, LDL-cholesterol, total cholesterol, HOMA-IR, hs-CRP, and procalcitonin, whereas serum vitamin D and zinc levels were lower compared with the healthy control group. Follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) levels were positively correlated with insulin, glucose, HOMA-IR, hs-CRP, procalcitonin, and copper and negatively correlated with vitamin D and zinc levels. In multivariate statistic analyses with body mass index and FSH as dependent variables, FSH was positively associated with copper and HOMA-IR negatively with vitamin D levels. The present study demonstrated that women with POI have traditional risk factors for diabetes mellitus, including lower levels of vitamin D, whereas higher levels of copper and HOMA-IR.

  20. 糖尿病性视网膜病的危险因素%The Risk Factors of Diabetic Retinopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王永武

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess the risk factors for retinopathy in patients with type 2 diabetes .Methods 52 patients with type 2 diabetes were enrolled in this study .The diagnosis of diabetic retinopathy was diagnosed by ophthalmoscopy and fundus fluorescein angiography .We collected data on risk factors exposure from questionnaires ,clinical examinations and laboratory measurements ,then conducted a comparision between the diabetic patients with or without diabetic retinopathy .Results The prevalence rate of diabetic retinopathy was 26 .8% .Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that longer diabetes duration (OR 1 .07 ,95% CI 1 .03 ~ 1 . 11) ,insulin treatment (OR 2 .14 ,95% CI 1 .19 ~ 3 .85) ,nonfasting glucose levels (OR 1 .07 ,95% CI 1 .00 ~ 1 .15) and microal-buminuria (OR 1 .89 ,95% CI 1 .28 ~ 2 .81) were the independent risk factors for the occurrence of diabetic retinopathy in patients with type 2 diabetes .Further analyses showed that even low levels of microalbuminuria were significantly independent related with the risk of diabetic retinopathy .Conclusions Diabetes duration ,insulin treatment ,increased blood glucose levels and presence of mi -croalbuminuria are proved to be associated with retinopathy in patients with type 2 diabetes ,and extremely low levels of microalbu-minuria may be a useful risk predictor for identifying patients with diabetes at high risk of retinopathy .%  目的评估2型糖尿病患者视网膜病的危险因素.方法纳入257例2型糖尿病患者,通过眼底检查以及眼底荧光素造影诊断视网膜病,通过问卷调查、临床检查和实验室化验确定各种危险因素暴露情况,对伴和不伴视网膜病的糖尿病患者进行比较.结果糖尿病性视网膜病的患病率为26.8%.多变量 logistic 回归分析显示,糖尿病病程更长(OR 1.07,95% CI 1.03~1.11)、接受胰岛素治疗(OR 2.14,95% CI 1.19~3.85)、非空腹血糖增高(OR 1.07,95% CI 1.00~1.15)和微量白蛋白尿(OR 1.89,95% CI

  1. Study of differences in presentation, risk factors and management in diabetic and nondiabetic patients with acute coronary syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishna Kumar Sharma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To compare clinical characteristics, treatment, and utilization of evidence-based medicines at discharge from hospital in acute coronary syndrome (ACS patients with or without diabetes at a tertiary care cardiac center in India. Methods: We performed an observational study in consecutive patients discharged following management of ACS. We obtained demographic details, comorbid conditions, and cardiovascular risk factors, physical and biochemical parameters, and management. Descriptive statistics are reported. Results: We enrolled 100 patients (diabetics = 28 with mean age of 59.0 ± 10.8 years (diabetics 59.3 ± 11.6, nondiabetics 58.9 ± 8.5. Forty-nine patients had ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI (diabetics = 14, 28.7% while 51 had nonSTEMI/unstable angina (diabetics = 14, 27.4% (P = nonsignificant. Among diabetics versus nondiabetics there was greater prevalence (% of hypertension (78.6% vs. 44.4%, obesity (25.0% vs. 8.3%, abdominal obesity (85.7% vs. 69.4% and sedentary activity (89.2% vs. 77.8%, and lower prevalence of smoking/tobacco use (10.7% vs. 25.0% (P < 0.05. In STEMI patients 28 (57.1% were thrombolysed (diabetes 17.8% vs. 31.9%, percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI was in 67.8% diabetics versus 84.7% nondiabetics and coronary bypass surgery in 21.4% versus 8.3%. At discharge, in diabetics versus nondiabetics, there was similar use of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (67.9% vs. 69.4% and statins (100.0% vs. 98.6% while use of dual antiplatelet therapy (85.7% vs. 95.8% and beta-blockers (64.3% vs. 73.6% was lower (P < 0.05. Conclusions: Diabetic patients with ACS have greater prevalence of cardiometabolic risk factors (obesity, abdominal obesity, and hypertension as compared to nondiabetic patients. Less diabetic patients undergo PCIs and receive lesser dual anti-platelet therapy and beta-blockers.

  2. Study of differences in presentation, risk factors and management in diabetic and nondiabetic patients with acute coronary syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Krishna Kumar; Mathur, Mukul; Lodha, Sailesh; Sharma, Surendra Kumar; Sharma, Niharika; Gupta, Rajeev

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To compare clinical characteristics, treatment, and utilization of evidence-based medicines at discharge from hospital in acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients with or without diabetes at a tertiary care cardiac center in India. Methods: We performed an observational study in consecutive patients discharged following management of ACS. We obtained demographic details, comorbid conditions, and cardiovascular risk factors, physical and biochemical parameters, and management. Descriptive statistics are reported. Results: We enrolled 100 patients (diabetics = 28) with mean age of 59.0 ± 10.8 years (diabetics 59.3 ± 11.6, nondiabetics 58.9 ± 8.5). Forty-nine patients had ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) (diabetics = 14, 28.7%) while 51 had nonSTEMI/unstable angina (diabetics = 14, 27.4%) (P = nonsignificant). Among diabetics versus nondiabetics there was greater prevalence (%) of hypertension (78.6% vs. 44.4%), obesity (25.0% vs. 8.3%), abdominal obesity (85.7% vs. 69.4%) and sedentary activity (89.2% vs. 77.8%), and lower prevalence of smoking/tobacco use (10.7% vs. 25.0%) (P < 0.05). In STEMI patients 28 (57.1%) were thrombolysed (diabetes 17.8% vs. 31.9%), percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) was in 67.8% diabetics versus 84.7% nondiabetics and coronary bypass surgery in 21.4% versus 8.3%. At discharge, in diabetics versus nondiabetics, there was similar use of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (67.9% vs. 69.4%) and statins (100.0% vs. 98.6%) while use of dual antiplatelet therapy (85.7% vs. 95.8%) and beta-blockers (64.3% vs. 73.6%) was lower (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Diabetic patients with ACS have greater prevalence of cardiometabolic risk factors (obesity, abdominal obesity, and hypertension) as compared to nondiabetic patients. Less diabetic patients undergo PCIs and receive lesser dual anti-platelet therapy and beta-blockers. PMID:27186553

  3. Methyltetrahydrofolate reductase C677T gene mutation and hyperhomocysteinemia as a novel risk factor for diabetic nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukinc, Kubilay; Ersoz, Halil Onder; Karahan, Caner; Erem, Cihangir; Eminagaoglu, Selcuk; Hacihasanoglu, Arif Bayram; Yilmaz, Mustafa; Kocak, Mustafa

    2009-10-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia is a well-defined risk factor for endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis. A point mutation (677 C-T) of MTHFR gene results in a significant increase at plasma homocysteine levels. In this study we aimed to evaluate the effects of MTHFR gene mutation and consequent hyperhomocysteinemia on the development of diabetic microvascular complications in comparison with the other defined risk factors. Diabetic patients without a history of macrovascular complication or overt nephropathy enrolled into the study. The presence of MTHFR 677 C-T point mutation was evaluated by Real-Time PCR technique by using a LightCycler. MTHFR heterozygous mutation was present in 24 patients over 52. Patients with diabetes were divided into two groups according to the presence of MTHFR gene mutation. Both groups were well matched regarding age and diabetes duration. Metabolic parameters, plasma homocysteine, microalbuminuria, folic acid, and vitamin B12 levels were also studied. Presence of neuropathy and retinopathy were evaluated by specific tests. Duration of diabetes, BMI, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, plasma CRP, HbA1c, and lipid levels were not different between the two groups. Plasma homocysteine (12.89 +/- 1.74 and 8.98 +/- 1.91 micromol/l; P diabetic nephropathy had MTHFR gene mutation, while this was only 27% (8 over 30) in normoalbuminuric patients (P = 0.017). There was a significant correlation of plasma homocysteine level with microalbuminuria (r = 0.54; P = 0.031) in the patients with diabetic nephropathy who had C677T polymorphism. We did not find any specific association of MTHFR gene mutation and hyperhomocysteinemia with retinopathy or neuropathy.

  4. Racial and ethnic disparities in the control of cardiovascular disease risk factors in Southwest American veterans with type 2 diabetes: the Diabetes Outcomes in Veterans Study

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    Duckworth William C

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Racial/ethnic disparities in cardiovascular disease complications have been observed in diabetic patients. We examined the association between race/ethnicity and cardiovascular disease risk factor control in a large cohort of insulin-treated veterans with type 2 diabetes. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional observational study at 3 Veterans Affairs Medical Centers in the American Southwest. Using electronic pharmacy databases, we randomly selected 338 veterans with insulin-treated type 2 diabetes. We collected medical record and patient survey data on diabetes control and management, cardiovascular disease risk factors, comorbidity, demographics, socioeconomic factors, psychological status, and health behaviors. We used analysis of variance and multivariate linear regression to determine the effect of race/ethnicity on glycemic control, insulin treatment intensity, lipid levels, and blood pressure control. Results The study cohort was comprised of 72 (21.3% Hispanic subjects (H, 35 (10.4% African Americans (AA, and 226 (67% non-Hispanic whites (NHW. The mean (SD hemoglobin A1c differed significantly by race/ethnicity: NHW 7.86 (1.4%, H 8.16 (1.6%, AA 8.84 (2.9%, p = 0.05. The multivariate-adjusted A1c was significantly higher for AA (+0.93%, p = 0.002 compared to NHW. Insulin doses (unit/day also differed significantly: NHW 70.6 (48.8, H 58.4 (32.6, and AA 53.1 (36.2, p Conclusion In our cohort, insulin-treated minority veterans, particularly AA, had poorer glycemic control and received lower doses of insulin than NHW. However, we found no differences for control of other cardiovascular disease risk factors. The diabetes treatment disparity could be due to provider behaviors and/or patient behaviors or preferences. Further research with larger sample sizes and more geographically diverse populations are needed to confirm our findings.

  5. Impact of early psychosocial factors (childhood socioeconomic factors and adversities on future risk of type 2 diabetes, metabolic disturbances and obesity: a systematic review

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    Tamayo Teresa

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Psychological factors and socioeconomic status (SES have a notable impact on health disparities, including type 2 diabetes risk. However, the link between childhood psychosocial factors, such as childhood adversities or parental SES, and metabolic disturbances is less well established. In addition, the lifetime perspective including adult socioeconomic factors remains of further interest. We carried out a systematic review with the main question if there is evidence in population- or community-based studies that childhood adversities (like neglect, traumata and deprivation have considerable impact on type 2 diabetes incidence and other metabolic disturbances. Also, parental SES was included in the search as risk factor for both, diabetes and adverse childhood experiences. Finally, we assumed that obesity might be a mediator for the association of childhood adversities with diabetes incidence. Therefore, we carried out a second review on obesity, applying a similar search strategy. Methods Two systematic reviews were carried out. Longitudinal, population- or community-based studies were included if they contained data on psychosocial factors in childhood and either diabetes incidence or obesity risk. Results We included ten studies comprising a total of 200,381 individuals. Eight out of ten studies indicated that low parental status was associated with type 2 diabetes incidence or the development of metabolic abnormalities. Adjustment for adult SES and obesity tended to attenuate the childhood SES-attributable risk but the association remained. For obesity, eleven studies were included with a total sample size of 70,420 participants. Four out of eleven studies observed an independent association of low childhood SES on the risk for overweight and obesity later in life. Conclusions Taken together, there is evidence that childhood SES is associated with type 2 diabetes and obesity in later life. The database on the role of

  6. Independent risk factors for endometrial polyps:diabetes, hypertension, and obesity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hikmet Hassa; Engin Korkmazer; V Yavuz Tokgz; Tufan ge

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To study the role of diabetes, hypertension and obesity in etiology of endometrial polyps. Methods: A total of 250 patients with endometrial polyp and 256 patients normal endometrial cavity were included, who applied to our outpatient clinic. We recorded the age, fertility state, body mass index, number of polyps, hypertension and diabetes status of the patients by using SPSS Windows 16.0. All patients in polyp group were verified by post-operative pathology report. Results:No significant difference was found in patients with diabetes and obesity, but hypertension was a significant factor in patients who had endometrial polyp comparing to total patient population (n=526). Conclusions:This finding may alert the physician to consider the endometrial cavity in hypertensive patients who applied with abnormal uterine bleeding.

  7. Prevalence and clustering of metabolic risk factors for type 2 diabetes among Chinese adults in Shanghai, China

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    Greenland Sander

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Type 2 diabetes is becoming an epidemic in China. To evaluate the prevalence, clustering of metabolic risk factors and their impact on type 2 diabetes, we conducted a population-based study in Shanghai, China's largest metropolitan area. Methods From 2006 to 2007, 2,113 type 2 diabetes cases and 2,458 comparable controls of adults aged 40 to 79 years were enrolled. Demographic, lifestyle, and dietary factors were assessed via standardized questionnaires. Plasma, red and white blood cells were collected and stored for future studies. Anthropometric indices and biochemical intermediates (including blood pressure, fasting glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin, and blood lipids were measured. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome were also compared following two criteria recommended by the Chinese Diabetes Society (CDS, 2004 and the National Cholesterol Education Program's Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP III, 2002. Results Prevalence of metabolic syndrome (62% vs. 15% using CDS criteria and its individual components, including obesity (51% vs. 42%, hypertension (54% vs. 41%, hypertriglyceridemia (42% vs. 32%, and low high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL levels (36% vs. 25% were higher in diabetes cases than controls. Regardless of criteria used, those with impaired fasting glucose (IFG had similarly high prevalence of metabolic syndrome as did diabetes cases. In a multiple logistic regression model adjusted for demographics and lifestyle risk factors, the odds ratios of diabetes (95% CI were 1.23 (1.04-1.45 for overweight (28 >= BMI >= 24, 1.81 (1.45-2.25 for obesity (BMI > 28, 1.53 (1.30-1.80 for central obesity (waist circumference > 80 cm for woman or waist circumference > 85 cm for man, 1.36 (1.17-1.59 for hypertension (sbp/dbp >= 140/90 mmHg, 1.55 (1.32-1.82 for high triglycerides (triglycerides > 1.70 mmol/l and 1.52 (1.23-1.79 for low HDL-C (HDL-C Conclusions These data indicate that multiple metabolic risk factors

  8. Evaluation of Frequency and Risk Factors of Soft Tissue Rheumatism of Upper Limbs in Diabetic Patients in Kerman in 2001

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    M.R. Shakibi

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that affect different systems in human. Wide range of musculoskeletal syndromes have been described in association with diabetes. To determine the prevalence of upper limb soft tissue rheumatism in diabetes patients. In a cross sectional study 300 diabetic patients was examined by COPCORD questionnaire. The examination was performed by internist and rheumatologist . Data was analyzed by logistic regression. 73.3% of patients were female. Average age of cases was 51.2±13.7 years and mean of duration of disease was 7±6.4 years. 152 cases (50.7% had soft tissue rheumatism in upper limbs. 66 cases had carpal tannel syndrome, 23 cases with Dupuytren’s disease, 23 cases with Flexortenosynovitis, 91 cases with shoulder periarthritis, 4 cases had limited joint mobility and 12 had Elbow Epicandititis. Logestic regression analysis showed that type 2 diabetes, weak control of blood sugur and duration of disease>5years were risk factors for incidence of soft tissue rheumatism in upper limbs. Results have showed the high prevalence of soft tissue rheumatism in diabetic patients.

  9. Myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88-deficiency increases risk of diabetes in mice.

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    Toru Hosoi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Multiple lines of evidence suggest innate immune response pathways to be involved in the development of obesity-associated diabetes although the molecular mechanism underling the disease is unknown. Recent observations suggest that saturated fatty acids can act as a ligand for toll-like receptor (TLR 4, which is thought to mediate obesity-associated insulin resistance. Myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88 is an adapter protein for TLR/IL-1 receptor signaling, which is involved in the activation of inflammatory pathways. To evaluate molecular mechanisms linking obesity-associated diabetes down-stream of TLR4, we investigated physiological role of MyD88 in high-fat diet (HFD-induced obesity. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the present study, we found MyD88-deficient mice fed a HFD had increased circulating levels of insulin, leptin and cholesterol, as well as liver dysfunction (increased induction of ALT levels, increased activation of JNK and cleavage of PARP, which were linked to the onset of severe diabetes. On the other hand, TNF-alpha would not be involved in HFD-induced diabetes in MyD88-deficient mice, because TNF-alpha level was attenuated in MyD88-deficient mice fed with HFD. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The present finding of an unexpected role for MyD88 in preventing diabetes may provide a potential novel target/strategy for treating metabolic syndrome.

  10. Severe hypoglycaemia in type 1 diabetes: impact of the renin-angiotensin system and other risk factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen-Bjergaard, Ulrik

    2009-01-01

    unawareness - only account for a limited part of this variation. Results from a case-series suggest that the use of psychoactive substances may be as significant as alcohol for promotion of risk of severe hypoglycaemia - a finding which needs to be confirmed by case-control studies. We identified elevated...... and the need for assistance from other persons in order to manage the situation. Such episodes represent the most feared side effect to insulin treatment and are regarded as the major limiting factor for achievement of recommended glycaemic targets in type 1 diabetes. The series of studies that constitute...... this thesis was conducted to assess the significance of severe hypoglycaemia as a clinical problem in the type 1 diabetic population, to evaluate the impact of known risk factors on occurrence of severe hypoglycaemia, and to identify new markers that could contribute to improved prediction of, and inspire...

  11. Diabetes mellitus and arthritis: is it a risk factor or comorbidity?: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

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    Dong, Qing; Liu, Hua; Yang, Daren; Zhang, Yunyan

    2017-05-01

    Investigators have explored the association between diabetes mellitus and arthritis for a long time; however, there are uncertainties and inconsistencies among various studies. In this study, we tried to explore the relationship between diabetes mellitus and the overall risk of arthritis, as well as the potential modifiers for this relationship. We conducted a comprehensive literature search through PubMed and identified 36 eligible studies. The overall analyses, subgroup analyses, as well as sensitivity analyses, were conducted to illustrate the association between diabetes mellitus and arthritis. Study quality was evaluated using the Newcastle-Ottawa Quality Assessment Scale. All statistical analyses were conducted using STATA SE version 13.0. In our study, 36 eligible studies were identified and involved in the meta-analysis. The overall association between diabetes mellitus and arthritis is 1.61 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.14-2.28, P = .007). The association exists only in nongouty arthritis, where we observed the estimated odds ratio (OR) 1.33 (95% CI: 1.05-1.67, P arthritis rather than a risk factor; however, more studies will be helpful to increase the confidence of identifying the association between diabetes and arthritis.

  12. Cardiovascular disease, chronic kidney disease, and diabetes mortality burden of cardio-metabolic risk factors between 1980 and 2010: comparative risk assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Elevated blood pressure and glucose, serum cholesterol, and body mass index (BMI) are risk factors for cardiovascular diseases (CVDs); some of these factors also increase the risk of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and diabetes. We estimated CVD, CKD, and diabetes mortality attributable to these four cardio-metabolic risk factors for all countries and regions between 1980 and 2010. Methods We used data on risk factor exposure by country, age group, and sex from pooled analysis of population-based health surveys. Relative risks for cause-specific mortality were obtained from pooling of large prospective studies. We calculated the population attributable fractions (PAF) for each risk factor alone, and for the combination of all risk factors, accounting for multi-causality and for mediation of the effects of BMI by the other three risks. We calculated attributable deaths by multiplying the cause-specific PAFs by the number of disease-specific deaths from the Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors 2010 Study. We propagated the uncertainties of all inputs to the final estimates. Findings In 2010, high blood pressure was the leading risk factor for dying from CVDs, CKD, and diabetes in every region, causing over 40% of worldwide deaths from these diseases; high BMI and glucose were each responsible for about 15% of deaths; and cholesterol for 10%. After accounting for multi-causality, 63% (10.8 million deaths; 95% confidence interval 10.1–11.5) of deaths from these diseases were attributable to the combined effect of these four metabolic risk factors, compared with 67% (7.1 million deaths; 6.6–7.6) in 1980. The mortality burden of high BMI and glucose nearly doubled between 1980 and 2010. At the country level, age-standardised death rates attributable to these four risk factors surpassed 925 deaths per 100,000 among men in Belarus, Mongolia, and Kazakhstan, but were below 130 deaths per 100,000 for women and below 200 for men in some

  13. Impact of dietary fiber intake on glycemic control, cardiovascular risk factors and chronic kidney disease in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: the Fukuoka Diabetes Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Hiroki; Iwase, Masanori; Ohkuma, Toshiaki; Ogata-Kaizu, Shinako; Ide, Hitoshi; Kikuchi, Yohei; Idewaki, Yasuhiro; Joudai, Tamaki; Hirakawa, Yoichiro; Uchida, Kazuhiro; Sasaki, Satoshi; Nakamura, Udai; Kitazono, Takanari

    2013-12-11

    Dietary fiber is beneficial for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus, although it is consumed differently in ethnic foods around the world. We investigated the association between dietary fiber intake and obesity, glycemic control, cardiovascular risk factors and chronic kidney disease in Japanese type 2 diabetic patients. A total of 4,399 patients were assessed for dietary fiber intake using a brief self-administered diet history questionnaire. The associations between dietary fiber intake and various cardiovascular risk factors were investigated cross-sectionally. Body mass index, fasting plasma glucose, HbA1c, triglyceride and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein negatively associated with dietary fiber intake after adjusting for age, sex, duration of diabetes, current smoking, current drinking, total energy intake, fat intake, saturated fatty acid intake, leisure-time physical activity and use of oral hypoglycemic agents or insulin. The homeostasis model assessment insulin sensitivity and HDL cholesterol positively associated with dietary fiber intake. Dietary fiber intake was associated with reduced prevalence of abdominal obesity, hypertension and metabolic syndrome after multivariate adjustments including obesity. Furthermore, dietary fiber intake was associated with lower prevalence of albuminuria, low estimated glomerular filtration rate and chronic kidney disease after multivariate adjustments including protein intake. Additional adjustments for obesity, hypertension or metabolic syndrome did not change these associations. We demonstrated that increased dietary fiber intake was associated with better glycemic control and more favorable cardiovascular disease risk factors including chronic kidney disease in Japanese type 2 diabetic patients. Diabetic patients should be encouraged to consume more dietary fiber in daily life.

  14. Bacterial genus is a risk factor for major amputation in patients with diabetic foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Natália Anício; Cisneiros, Lígia DE Loiola; Machado, Carla Jorge; Cenedezi, Juliana Merlin; Procópio, Ricardo Jayme; Navarro, Túlio Pinho

    2017-01-01

    to evaluate whether bacterial genus is a risk factor for major amputation in patients with diabetic foot and infected ulcer. we conducted a case-control, observational study of 189 patients with infected ulcers in diabetic feet admitted to the Vascular Surgery Service of the Risoleta Tolentino Neves Hospital, from January 2007 to December 2012. The bacteriological evaluation was performed in deep tissue cultures from the lesions and amputation was considered major when performed above the foot'smiddle tarsus. the patients'mean age was 61.9±12.7 years; 122 (64.6%) were men. The cultures were positive in 86.8%, being monomicrobial in 72% of the cases. In patients with major amputation, Acinetobacter spp. (24.4%), Morganella spp. (24.4%), Proteus spp. (23.1%) and Enterococcus spp. (19.2%) were the most frequent types of bacteria. The most commonly isolated species were Acinetobacter baumannii, Morganella morganii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Proteus mirabilis. As predictors of major amputation, we identified the isolation of the generaAcinetobacter spp. and Klebsiella spp., serum creatinine ≥1.3mg/dl and hemoglobin cultura de tecido profundo das lesões e a amputação foi considerada como maior quando realizada acima do médio tarso do pé. a média de idade dos pacientes foi 61,9±12,7 anos e 122 (64,6%) eram homens. As culturas foram positivas em 86,8%, sendo monomicrobianas em 72% dos casos. Nos pacientes com amputação maior, os gêneros de bactérias mais frequentes foram Acinetobacter spp. (24,4%), Morganella spp. (24,4%), Proteus spp. (23,1%) e Enterococcus spp. (19,2%) e as espécies mais isoladas foram Acinetobacter baumannii, Morganella morganii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa e Proteus mirabilis. Identificou-se como fatores preditivos para amputação maior o isolamento dos gêneros Acinetobacter spp. e Klebsiella spp.,e níveis séricos de creatinina ≥1,3mg/dl e de hemoglobina <11g/dl. os gêneros bacterianos Acinetobacter spp. e Klebsiella spp

  15. Serum omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and risk of incident type 2 diabetes in men: the Kuopio Ischemic Heart Disease Risk Factor study.

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    Virtanen, Jyrki K; Mursu, Jaakko; Voutilainen, Sari; Uusitupa, Matti; Tuomainen, Tomi-Pekka

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The relationship between fish or omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and type 2 diabetes is inconclusive. Even contaminants in fish, such as mercury, may modify the effects. We investigated the associations between serum omega-3 PUFAs eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), docosapentaenoic acid (DPA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), α-linolenic acid (ALA), hair mercury, and risk of incident type 2 diabetes in middle-aged and older Finnish men. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS A total of 2,212 men from the prospective, population-based Kuopio Ischemic Heart Disease Risk Factor study, aged 42-60 years and free of type 2 diabetes at baseline in 1984-1989, were investigated. Serum PUFA and hair mercury were used as biomarkers for exposure. Dietary intakes were assessed with 4-day food recording. Type 2 diabetes was assessed by self-administered questionnaires and fasting and 2-h oral glucose tolerance test blood glucose measurement at re-examination rounds 4, 11, and 20 years after the baseline and by record linkage to hospital discharge registry and reimbursement register on diabetes medication expenses. Cox proportional hazards models were used to analyze associations. RESULTS During the average follow-up of 19.3 years, 422 men developed type 2 diabetes. Men in the highest versus the lowest serum EPA + DPA + DHA quartile had 33% lower multivariate-adjusted risk for type 2 diabetes (95% CI 13-49; P trend 0.01). No statistically significant associations were observed with serum or dietary ALA, dietary fish or EPA + DHA, or hair mercury. CONCLUSIONS Serum long-chain omega-3 PUFA concentration, an objective biomarker for fish intake, was associated with long-term lower risk of type 2 diabetes.

  16. Are blood pressure and diabetes additive or synergistic risk factors? outcome in 8494 subjects randomly recruited from 10 populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sehestedt, Thomas; Hansen, Tine W; Li, Yan

    2011-01-01

    It remains unknown whether diabetes and high blood pressure (BP) are simply additive risk factors for cardiovascular outcome or whether they act synergistically and potentiate one another. We performed 24-h ambulatory BP monitoring in 8494 subjects (mean age, 54.6 years; 47.0% women; 6.9% diabeti.......Hypertension Research advance online publication, 10 February 2011; doi:10.1038/hr.2011.6....

  17. Low plasma levels of brain derived neurotrophic factor are potential risk factors for diabetic retinopathy in Chinese type 2 diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shao-Yi; Du, Xiao-Fang; Ma, Xiang; Guo, Jian-Lian; Lu, Jian-Min; Ma, Lu-Sheng

    2016-01-15

    Previous studies suggested that neurotrophins play a role in the diabetic retinopathy (DR). We therefore evaluated the role of plasma brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels in Chinese type 2 diabetic patients with and without diabetic retinopathy (DR). Plasma levels of BDNF were determined in type 2 diabetic patients (N=344). At baseline, the demographical and clinical data were taken. Multivariate analyses were performed using logistic regression models. Receiver operating characteristic curves (ROC) was used to test the overall predict accuracy of BDNF and other markers. Diabetic patients with DR and vision-threatening diabetic retinopathy (VTDR) had significantly lower BDNF levels on admission (Pdiabetes duration for DR from 0.76 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.71-0.82) to 0.89 (95% CI, 0.82-0.95; Prisk factors showed that plasma BDNF levels≤12.4 ng/mL(1(rd) quartiles) was an independent marker of DR (OR=3.92; 95%CI: 2.31-6.56) and VTDR (OR=4.88; 95%CI: 2.21-9.30). The present study demonstrated that decreased plasma levels of BDNF were independent markers for DR and VDTR in Chinese type 2 diabetic patients, suggesting a possible role of BDNF in the pathogenesis of DR complications.

  18. Prevalance and risk factors for yeast colonization in adult diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Idris; Oksuz, Sukru; Sencan, Irfan; Gulcan, Aynur; Karabay, Oguz; Gulcan, Erim; Yildiz, Ozcan

    2005-04-01

    The aim of this study is to describe the associations between various host characteristics and yeast colonization; biofilm and phospholipase production in diabetic patients. The study was conducted between January 2003 and June 2003 in Abant Izzet Baysal University, Duzce, Turkey. One hundred and fourty five diabetic patients were included to the study. All oral and faecal specimens were placed on Sabourand dextrose agar with chloramphenicol and gentamicin. All isolates were identified with classic methods and carbohydrate assimilation patterns using API 20 CAUX. C. dubliniensis isolates were identified by CHROM agar Candida and chlamydospore formation according to the referral to the literature. Biofilm and phospholipase production was assessed by using previously described methods. The most common colonized species were C. albicans in oral and faecal cultures. C. dubliniensis was isolated in four oral cultures of the patients. Dental prosthesis, tooth brushing, older age, antibiotic use in the previous two weeks were found to be the significant factors for the oral yeast colonization. Younger age, smoking, shorter duration of diabetes, hospitalization in the last year and antibiotic use in the previous two weeks were found to be the significant factors for the faecal yeast colonization. Biofilm production was found to be positive in nine cases of oral and seven of faecal isolates. Phospholipase production was determined to be positive in 18 cases oral and 14 of faecal isolates. In conclusion, glycaemia control and other diabetic factors are not effective for yeast colonlizing. There was not any significant correlation between biofilm and phospholipase production and host characteristics in yeast colonization. Oral hygiene may be an effetive for decreasing the oral colonization in diabetic patients.

  19. Risk factors associated with metabolic syndrome in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients according to World Health Organization, Third Report National Cholesterol Education Program, and International Diabetes Federation definitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel Rodríguez

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Angel Rodríguez1, Helena Delgado-Cohen1, Jesús Reviriego1, Manuel Serrano-Ríos21Clinical Research Department, Eli Lilly and Company, Madrid, Spain; 2Department of Internal Medicine II, Hospital Clinico San Carlos, Madrid, SpainBackground: The availability of several definitions of the metabolic syndrome has created potential confusion concerning its prognostic utility. At present, little data exist about the risk factors associated with metabolic syndrome in diabetic patients.Aim: To identify risk factors associated with metabolic syndrome in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus according to three diagnostic criteria: World Health Organization (WHO, Third Report of the National Cholesterol Education Program Expert Panel on Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Cholesterol in Adults – Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP-ATP III, and International Diabetes Federation (IDF.Subjects and methods: A logistic regression model was used to identify demographic, clinical, and lifestyle variables related with metabolic syndrome (N = 1259.Results: Hypertension, dyslipidemia, and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c ≥7% were associated with increased risk of WHO-defined metabolic syndrome (odds ratio [OR], 2.33; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.60–3.40; OR, 1.79 95% CI: 1.25–2.55; and OR, 1.58; 95% CI: 1.12–2.22, respectively. The risk of presenting metabolic syndrome according to NCEP-ATP III criteria was increased in female patients (OR, 2.02; 95% CI: 1.37–2.97, elevated fasting glucose levels (OR, 5.99; 95% CI: 3.56–10.07, dyslipidemia (OR, 2.28; 95% CI: 1.57–3.32, hypertension (OR, 2.36; 95% CI: 1.59–3.53, and endocrine disorders (OR, 1.64; 95% CI: 1.06–2.57. For the IDF criteria, female patients and patients with left ventricular hypertrophy or insulin treatment were at higher risk of metabolic syndrome (OR, 4.00; 95% CI: 2.35–6.80; OR, 2.72 95% CI: 1.22–6.04; and OR, 1.96 95% CI: 1.24–3.11, respectively.Conclusions: The

  20. The association of patient-physician gender concordance with cardiovascular disease risk factor control and treatment in diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmittdiel, Julie A; Traylor, Ana; Uratsu, Connie S; Mangione, Carol M; Ferrara, Assiamira; Subramanian, Usha

    2009-12-01

    Gender concordance between patients and their physicians is related to prevention screening and other quality indicators. Research suggests female physicians may place greater emphasis on preventive care than male physicians; however, little is known about whether physician gender and patient-physician gender concordance are associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factor levels and treatment. Our objective was to examine associations between patient gender, physician gender, and their interaction with CVD risk factor control, medication adherence, and treatment intensification in diabetes. In this study, 157,458 Kaiser Permanente Northern California adult diabetes patients with a primary care physician (PCP) were assessed for above target levels of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) (>or=8%), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) (>or=100 mg/dL), and systolic blood pressure (SBP>or=130 mm Hg) in 2005. Medication adherence and appropriate CVD treatment intensification were assessed using pharmacy data. Probit models assessed the adjusted marginal effects of patient gender, PCP gender, and their interaction on control, adherence, and intensification. Female patients had lower adjusted rates of LDL-C (46% vs. 55%, pgender dyads (70% vs. 66%-68%, pintensification for high SBP (60% vs. 57%, pgender and gender concordance are modestly associated with CVD risk factor control and treatment in diabetes. Further understanding of these differences could lead to improved CVD outcomes for women.

  1. The Correlation of Age Factor, Administration, and Metformin Dose Against Risk of Side Effect on Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

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    Magdarita Riwu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Metformin is an antidiabetic oral medicine commonly recommended as first line treatment on type 2 diabetes mellitus. Metformin can caused drug related problems (DRPs such as gastrointestinal disorders, e.g. diarrhea, nausea, and flatulence. This study aimed to analyze correlation profiles on age, administration, and metformin dosage factors against risk of gastrointestinal disorders among newly diagnosed diabetic outpatients of National Health Insurance in RSAU Dr. M. Salamun Bandung. This study was an analytic observational study with a cross sectional method. The study was carried out in the internal medicine outpatient clinic and data were extracted from patients medical records from April to June 2014. Metformin-treated patients were interviewed using a form check. The number of patients were 65 with the median rate was 48 years old. Side effect reported were flatulence (58.46% and nausea (41.54%. Administration and metformin dosage factors were correlated to the risk of side effects such as nausea and flatulence on type 2 diabetes mellitus (p0.05. The administration of metformin is recommended after meals and with a lower initial dose titrated slowly to reduce and avoid the side effects of nausea and flatulence in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  2. Low Physical Activity and Its Association with Diabetes and Other Cardiovascular Risk Factors: A Nationwide, Population-Based Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brugnara, Laura; Murillo, Serafín; Novials, Anna; Rojo-Martínez, Gemma; Soriguer, Federico; Goday, Albert; Calle-Pascual, Alfonso; Castaño, Luis; Gaztambide, Sonia; Valdés, Sergio; Franch, Josep; Castell, Conxa; Vendrell, Joan; Casamitjana, Roser; Bosch-Comas, Anna; Bordiú, Elena; Carmena, Rafael; Catalá, Miguel; Delgado, Elias; Girbés, Juan; López-Alba, Alfonso; Martínez-Larrad, Maria Teresa; Menéndez, Edelmiro; Mora-Peces, Inmaculada; Pascual-Manich, Gemma; Serrano-Ríos, Manuel; Gomis, Ramon; Ortega, Emilio

    2016-01-01

    Low physical activity (PA), or sedentary lifestyle, is associated with the development of several chronic diseases. We aimed to investigate current prevalence of sedentariness and its association with diabetes and other cardiovascular risk factors. PA was evaluated in a population-based, cross-sectional, randomly sampled study conducted in 2009–2010 in Spain. International Physical Activity Questionnaire (SF-IPAQ) was used to assess PA. 4991 individuals (median age 50 years, 57% women) were studied. Prevalence of sedentariness was 32.3% for men and 39% for women (p < 0.0001). Sex differences were particularly notable (age*sex interaction, p = 0.0024) at early and older ages. Sedentary individuals had higher BMI (28 vs. 27 kg/m2) and obesity prevalence (37 vs. 26%). Low PA was present in 44, 43, and 38% of individuals with known diabetes (KDM), prediabetes/unknown-diabetes (PREDM/UKDM), and normal glucose regulation (p = 0.0014), respectively. No difference between KDM and PREDM/UKDM (p = 0.72) was found. Variables independently associated (p < 0.05) with sedentariness were age, sex, BMI, central obesity, Mediterranean diet adherence, smoking habit, HDL-cholesterol, triglycerides and dyslipidemia. Low PA is on the rise in Spain, especially among women. Sedentariness is associated with several cardiovascular risk factors and may be responsible for the increasing prevalence of obesity and diabetes in this country. PMID:27532610

  3. Low Physical Activity and Its Association with Diabetes and Other Cardiovascular Risk Factors: A Nationwide, Population-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brugnara, Laura; Murillo, Serafín; Novials, Anna; Rojo-Martínez, Gemma; Soriguer, Federico; Goday, Albert; Calle-Pascual, Alfonso; Castaño, Luis; Gaztambide, Sonia; Valdés, Sergio; Franch, Josep; Castell, Conxa; Vendrell, Joan; Casamitjana, Roser; Bosch-Comas, Anna; Bordiú, Elena; Carmena, Rafael; Catalá, Miguel; Delgado, Elias; Girbés, Juan; López-Alba, Alfonso; Martínez-Larrad, Maria Teresa; Menéndez, Edelmiro; Mora-Peces, Inmaculada; Pascual-Manich, Gemma; Serrano-Ríos, Manuel; Gomis, Ramon; Ortega, Emilio

    2016-01-01

    Low physical activity (PA), or sedentary lifestyle, is associated with the development of several chronic diseases. We aimed to investigate current prevalence of sedentariness and its association with diabetes and other cardiovascular risk factors. PA was evaluated in a population-based, cross-sectional, randomly sampled study conducted in 2009-2010 in Spain. International Physical Activity Questionnaire (SF-IPAQ) was used to assess PA. 4991 individuals (median age 50 years, 57% women) were studied. Prevalence of sedentariness was 32.3% for men and 39% for women (p obesity prevalence (37 vs. 26%). Low PA was present in 44, 43, and 38% of individuals with known diabetes (KDM), prediabetes/unknown-diabetes (PREDM/UKDM), and normal glucose regulation (p = 0.0014), respectively. No difference between KDM and PREDM/UKDM (p = 0.72) was found. Variables independently associated (p obesity, Mediterranean diet adherence, smoking habit, HDL-cholesterol, triglycerides and dyslipidemia. Low PA is on the rise in Spain, especially among women. Sedentariness is associated with several cardiovascular risk factors and may be responsible for the increasing prevalence of obesity and diabetes in this country.

  4. Nutritional status, glycemic control and its associated risk factors among a sample of type 2 diabetic individuals, a pilot study

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    Somayyeh Firouzi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The prevalence of type 2 diabetes is increasing in Malaysia, with most patients poorly controlled. Hence, this study aimed to determine nutritional and metabolic status as well as blood pressure of Malaysian patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and identify associated risk factors for poor glycemic control. Materials and Methods: A total of 104 type 2 diabetic patients were recruited and completed a questionnaire covering socio-demographic status, 3-day diet records, and physical activity. Anthropometry and glycemic control parameters, lipid profile and blood pressure were also measured. Results: Subjects were on average 56.7±9.9 years old with a mean duration of diabetes of 6.5 ± 5.0 years. The mean hemoglobin A1c of the subjects was 7.6% ± 1.4%, with only 20.2% achieving the target goal of <6.5% with no significant differences between genders. The mean body mass index was 26.9 ± 4.7 kg/m 2 , with 86.5% either were overweight or obese. Only 10.6% of the subjects exercised daily. The proportions of macronutrients relative to total energy intake were consistent with the recommendations of most diabetes associations. The adjusted odds of having poor glycemic control were 3.235 (1.043-10.397 (P < 0.05 higher among those who had high density lipoprotein cholesterol levels below the normal range. Those taking one or two types of oral anti-diabetic drugs had 19.9 (2.959-87.391 (P < 0.01 and 14.3 (2.647-77.500 (P < 0.01 higher odds of poor glycemic control respectively compared to those who were being treated by diet alone. Conclusion: Poor glycemic control was prevalent among Malaysian diabetic patients, and this could be associated with low levels of HDL and being treated with oral anti-diabetes agents.

  5. Sugar-sweetened and diet beverage consumption is associated with cardiovascular risk factor profile in youth with type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortsov, Andrey V; Liese, Angela D; Bell, Ronny A; Dabelea, Dana; D'Agostino, Ralph B; Hamman, Richard F; Klingensmith, Georgeanna J; Lawrence, Jean M; Maahs, David M; McKeown, Robert; Marcovina, Santica M; Thomas, Joan; Williams, Desmond E; Mayer-Davis, Elizabeth J

    2011-12-01

    The prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors among youth with type 1 diabetes is high and associated with age, gender, and race/ethnicity. It has also been shown that youth with type 1 diabetes often do not follow dietary recommendations. The objective of this cross-sectional observational study was to explore the association of sugar-sweetened and diet beverage intake with A1c, plasma lipids, adiponectin, leptin, systolic, and diastolic blood pressure in youth with type 1 diabetes. We examined data from 1,806 youth age 10-22 years with type 1 diabetes, of which 22% were minority (10% Hispanic, 8% African Americans, 4% other races) and 48% were female. Sugar-sweetened beverage, diet beverage, and mineral water intake was assessed with a food frequency questionnaire. After adjustment for socio-demographic and clinical covariates, physical activity and total energy intake, high sugar-sweetened beverage intake (at least one serving per day vs. none), was associated with higher levels of total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and plasma triglycerides, but not with A1c. High diet beverage intake was associated with higher A1c, total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and triglycerides. These associations were partially confounded by body mass index, saturated fat and total fiber intake. High sugar-sweetened beverage intake may have an adverse effect on CVD risk in youth with type 1 diabetes. Diet beverage intake may be a marker of unhealthy lifestyle which, in turn, is associated with worse metabolic control and CVD risk profile in these youth. Youth with diabetes should be encouraged to minimize sugar-sweetened beverage intake.

  6. Risk factors for cerebral oedema in children and adolescents with diabetic ketoacidosis

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    Natasha Y. Yaneva

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral oedema (CO is a rare life-threatening complication of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA in children. We analysed the biochemical and therapeutic risk factors for CO in DKA by a retrospective review of 256 children hospitalized for DKA between February 2003 and March 2015. The demographic characteristics, biochemical variables and therapeutic interventions were compared between the patients with and without CO. CO was observed in 22 (8.6% of the 256 subjects included in the study. One of these patients (5% had a fatal outcome and two patients (9% survived with neurological consequences. CO was significantly associated with severe DKA: lower initial venous pH (p < 0.001 and bicarbonate (p < 0.001, higher initial blood glucose (p < 0.01, urea level (p < 0.05 and baseline serum osmolality (р < 0.05. During the treatment of DKA, low serum phosphate level was found to be significantly associated with CO (p < 0.05. We also found significant dependence between the development of CO and the initiation of treatment for DKA in another facility before hospitalization in our hospital (p < 0.05, bicarbonate application (p < 0.001, higher fluid volume infused initially (p < 0.01 and delayed potassium substitution (p < 0.01. Severe ketoacidosis, hyperglycaemia and dehydration at presentation, and low serum phosphate during treatment are significantly related to CO formation in children with DKA. The initial severe acidosis and hyperglycaemia probably cause brain injury which progresses into CO in the course of developing hypophosphatemia and cerebral hypervolemia.

  7. Insulin resistance: an additional risk factor in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease in type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Tushar P; Rawal, Komal; Bagchi, Ashim K; Akolkar, Gauri; Bernardes, Nathalia; Dias, Danielle da Silva; Gupta, Sarita; Singal, Pawan K

    2016-01-01

    Sedentary life style and high calorie dietary habits are prominent leading cause of metabolic syndrome in modern world. Obesity plays a central role in occurrence of various diseases like hyperinsulinemia, hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia, which lead to insulin resistance and metabolic derangements like cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) mediated by oxidative stress. The mortality rate due to CVDs is on the rise in developing countries. Insulin resistance (IR) leads to micro or macro angiopathy, peripheral arterial dysfunction, hampered blood flow, hypertension, as well as the cardiomyocyte and the endothelial cell dysfunctions, thus increasing risk factors for coronary artery blockage, stroke and heart failure suggesting that there is a strong association between IR and CVDs. The plausible linkages between these two pathophysiological conditions are altered levels of insulin signaling proteins such as IR-β, IRS-1, PI3K, Akt, Glut4 and PGC-1α that hamper insulin-mediated glucose uptake as well as other functions of insulin in the cardiomyocytes and the endothelial cells of the heart. Reduced AMPK, PFK-2 and elevated levels of NADP(H)-dependent oxidases produced by activated M1 macrophages of the adipose tissue and elevated levels of circulating angiotensin are also cause of CVD in diabetes mellitus condition. Insulin sensitizers, angiotensin blockers, superoxide scavengers are used as therapeutics in the amelioration of CVD. It evidently becomes important to unravel the mechanisms of the association between IR and CVDs in order to formulate novel efficient drugs to treat patients suffering from insulin resistance-mediated cardiovascular diseases. The possible associations between insulin resistance and cardiovascular diseases are reviewed here.

  8. Cardiovascular disease, diabetes and established risk factors among populations of sub-Saharan African descent in Europe: a literature review

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    de Graft Aikins Ama

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most European countries are ethnically and culturally diverse. Globally, cardiovascular disease (CVD is the leading cause of death. The major risk factors for CVD have been well established. This picture holds true for all regions of the world and in different ethnic groups. However, the prevalence of CVD and related risk factors vary among ethnic groups. Methods This article provides a review of current understanding of the epidemiology of vascular disease, principally coronary heart disease (CHD, stroke and related risk factors among populations of Sub-Sahara African descent (henceforth, African descent in comparison with the European populations in Europe. Results Compared with European populations, populations of African descent have an increased risk of stroke, whereas CHD is less common. They also have higher rates of hypertension and diabetes than European populations. Obesity is highly prevalent, but smoking rate is lower among African descent women. Older people of African descent have more favourable lipid profile and dietary habits than their European counterparts. Alcohol consumption is less common among populations of African descent. The rate of physical activity differs between European countries. Dutch African-Suriname men and women are less physically active than the White-Dutch whereas British African women are more physically active than women in the general population. Literature on psychosocial stress shows inconsistent results. Conclusion Hypertension and diabetes are highly prevalent among African populations, which may explain their high rate of stroke in Europe. The relatively low rate of CHD may be explained by the low rates of other risk factors including a more favourable lipid profile and the low prevalence of smoking. The risk factors are changing, and on the whole, getting worse especially among African women. Cohort studies and clinical trials are therefore needed among these groups to

  9. Effect of high- versus low-intensity supervised aerobic and resistance training on modifiable cardiovascular risk factors in type 2 diabetes; the Italian Diabetes and Exercise Study (IDES).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balducci, Stefano; Zanuso, Silvano; Cardelli, Patrizia; Salvi, Laura; Bazuro, Alessandra; Pugliese, Luca; Maccora, Carla; Iacobini, Carla; Conti, Francesco G; Nicolucci, Antonio; Pugliese, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    While current recommendations on exercise type and volume have strong experimental bases, there is no clear evidence from large-sized studies indicating whether increasing training intensity provides additional benefits to subjects with type 2 diabetes. To compare the effects of moderate-to-high intensity (HI) versus low-to-moderate intensity (LI) training of equal energy cost, i.e. exercise volume, on modifiable cardiovascular risk factors. Pre-specified sub-analysis of the Italian Diabetes and Exercise Study (IDES), a randomized multicenter prospective trial comparing a supervised exercise intervention with standard care for 12 months (2005-2006). Twenty-two outpatient diabetes clinics across Italy. Sedentary patients with type 2 diabetes assigned to twice-a-week supervised progressive aerobic and resistance training plus exercise counseling (n = 303). Subjects were randomized by center to LI (n = 142, 136 completed) or HI (n = 161, 152 completed) progressive aerobic and resistance training, i.e. at 55% or 70% of predicted maximal oxygen consumption and at 60% or 80% of predicted 1-Repetition Maximum, respectively, of equal volume. Hemoglobin (Hb) A(1c) and other cardiovascular risk factors; 10-year coronary heart disease (CHD) risk scores. Volume of physical activity, both supervised and non-supervised, was similar in LI and HI participants. Compared with LI training, HI training produced only clinically marginal, though statistically significant, improvements in HbA(1c) (mean difference -0.17% [95% confidence interval -0.44,0.10], P = 0.03), triglycerides (-0.12 mmol/l [-0.34,0.10], P = 0.02) and total cholesterol (-0.24 mmol/l [-0.46, -0.01], P = 0.04), but not in other risk factors and CHD risk scores. However, intensity was not an independent predictor of reduction of any of these parameters. Adverse event rate was similar in HI and LI subjects. Data from the large IDES cohort indicate that, in low-fitness individuals such as sedentary subjects with type 2

  10. Effect of high- versus low-intensity supervised aerobic and resistance training on modifiable cardiovascular risk factors in type 2 diabetes; the Italian Diabetes and Exercise Study (IDES.

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    Stefano Balducci

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: While current recommendations on exercise type and volume have strong experimental bases, there is no clear evidence from large-sized studies indicating whether increasing training intensity provides additional benefits to subjects with type 2 diabetes. OBJECTIVE: To compare the effects of moderate-to-high intensity (HI versus low-to-moderate intensity (LI training of equal energy cost, i.e. exercise volume, on modifiable cardiovascular risk factors. DESIGN: Pre-specified sub-analysis of the Italian Diabetes and Exercise Study (IDES, a randomized multicenter prospective trial comparing a supervised exercise intervention with standard care for 12 months (2005-2006. SETTING: Twenty-two outpatient diabetes clinics across Italy. PATIENTS: Sedentary patients with type 2 diabetes assigned to twice-a-week supervised progressive aerobic and resistance training plus exercise counseling (n = 303. INTERVENTIONS: Subjects were randomized by center to LI (n = 142, 136 completed or HI (n = 161, 152 completed progressive aerobic and resistance training, i.e. at 55% or 70% of predicted maximal oxygen consumption and at 60% or 80% of predicted 1-Repetition Maximum, respectively, of equal volume. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S: Hemoglobin (Hb A(1c and other cardiovascular risk factors; 10-year coronary heart disease (CHD risk scores. RESULTS: Volume of physical activity, both supervised and non-supervised, was similar in LI and HI participants. Compared with LI training, HI training produced only clinically marginal, though statistically significant, improvements in HbA(1c (mean difference -0.17% [95% confidence interval -0.44,0.10], P = 0.03, triglycerides (-0.12 mmol/l [-0.34,0.10], P = 0.02 and total cholesterol (-0.24 mmol/l [-0.46, -0.01], P = 0.04, but not in other risk factors and CHD risk scores. However, intensity was not an independent predictor of reduction of any of these parameters. Adverse event rate was similar in HI and LI subjects

  11. A Practical and Time-Efficient High-Intensity Interval Training Program Modifies Cardio-Metabolic Risk Factors in Adults with Risk Factors for Type II Diabetes

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    Bethan E. Phillips

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionRegular physical activity (PA can reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, but adherence to time-orientated (150 min week−1 or more PA guidelines is very poor. A practical and time-efficient PA regime that was equally efficacious at controlling risk factors for cardio-metabolic disease is one solution to this problem. Herein, we evaluate a new time-efficient and genuinely practical high-intensity interval training (HIT protocol in men and women with pre-existing risk factors for type 2 diabetes.Materials and methodsOne hundred eighty-nine sedentary women (n = 101 and men (n = 88 with impaired glucose tolerance and/or a body mass index >27 kg m−2 [mean (range age: 36 (18–53 years] participated in this multi-center study. Each completed a fully supervised 6-week HIT protocol at work-loads equivalent to ~100 or ~125% V˙O2 max. Change in V˙O2 max was used to monitor protocol efficacy, while Actiheart™ monitors were used to determine PA during four, weeklong, periods. Mean arterial (blood pressure (MAP and fasting insulin resistance [homeostatic model assessment (HOMA-IR] represent key health biomarker outcomes.ResultsThe higher intensity bouts (~125% V˙O2 max used during a 5-by-1 min HIT protocol resulted in a robust increase in V˙O2 max (136 participants, +10.0%, p < 0.001; large size effect. 5-by-1 HIT reduced MAP (~3%; p < 0.001 and HOMA-IR (~16%; p < 0.01. Physiological responses were similar in men and women while a sizeable proportion of the training-induced changes in V˙O2 max, MAP, and HOMA-IR was retained 3 weeks after cessation of training. The supervised HIT sessions accounted for the entire quantifiable increase in PA, and this equated to 400 metabolic equivalent (MET min week−1. Meta-analysis indicated that 5-by-1 HIT matched the efficacy and variability of a time-consuming 30-week PA program on V˙O2 max, MAP, and HOMA-IR.ConclusionWith a total time-commitment of

  12. New-Onset Diabetes Mellitus After Heart Transplantation - Incidence, Risk Factors and Impact on Clinical Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ho Jin; Jung, Sung-Ho; Kim, Jae-Joong; Yun, Tae-Jin; Kim, Joon Bum; Choo, Suk Jung; Chung, Cheol Hyun; Lee, Jae Won

    2017-05-25

    New-onset diabetes mellitus (DM) can occur as a serious complication after heart transplantation, but the comparative data on its clinical impact on survival and on transplant-related adverse events are limited.Methods and Results:We reviewed a total of consecutive 391 patients aged ≥17 years undergoing isolated orthotopic heart transplantation at the present institution from 1992 to 2013. The entire cohort was divided into 3 groups: (1) no diabetes (n=257); (2) pre-existing DM (n=46); and (3) new-onset DM (n=88). Early and long-term clinical outcomes were compared across the 3 groups. Early death occurred in 8 patients (2.0%). Of the 345 non-diabetic patients before transplantation, 88 (25.5%) developed new-onset DM postoperatively. During follow-up, 83 (21.2%) died. On time-varying Cox analysis, new-onset DM was associated with increased risk for overall death (HR, 2.11; 95% CI: 1.26-3.55) and tended to have a greater risk for severe chronic kidney disease (HR, 1.77; 95% CI: 0.94-3.44). Compared with the no-diabetes group, the new-onset DM group had a worse survival rate (P=0.035), but a similar survival rate to that of the pre-existing DM group (P=0.364). New-onset DM has a negative effect on long-term survival and kidney function after heart transplantation. Further studies are warranted to evaluate the relevance of early diagnosis and timely control of new-onset DM to improve long-term survival.

  13. Diagnosis of coronary artery disease using myocardial perfusion SPECT in patients with diabetes mellitus: analysis of risk factors

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    Seo, Ji Hyoung; Kang, Seong Min; Bae, Jin Ho; Jeong, Shin Young; Lee, Sang Woo; Yoo, Jeong Soo; Ahn, Byeong Cheol; Lee, Jae Tae [Kyungpook National University, Daegu, (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-06-15

    Diabetes mellitus is a critical disease with higher rates of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality due to myocardial ischemia and infarction. There is growing interest in how to determine high-risk patients who are candidates for screening testing. This study was performed to evaluate the incidence of coronary artery disease (CAD) in diabetic patients detected by Tc-99m MIBI myocardial perfusion SPECT (MPS) and to assess risk factors of CAD and cardiac hard events. 203 diabetic patients (64 male, mean age 64.1 {+-} 9.0 years) who underwent MPS were included between Jan 2000 and July 2004. Cardiac death and nonfatal myocardial infarction (MI) were considered as hard events, and coronary angioplasty and bypass surgery >60 days after testing were considered as soft events. The mean follow-up period was 36 {+-} 18 months. Patients underwent exercise (n=6) or adenosine stress (n=197) myocardial perfusion SPECT. Perfusion defects on MPS were detected in 28.6% (58/203) of the patients. There was no cardiac death but 11 hard events were observed. The annual cardiac hard event rate was 1.1%. In univariate analysis of clinical factors, typical anginal pain, peripheral vascular disease, peripheral polyneuropathy, and resting ECG abnormality were significantly associated with the occurrence of hard events. Anginal pain, peripheral vascular disease, and resting ECG abnormality remained independent predictors of nonfatal MIs with multivariate analysis. Abnormal SPECT results were significantly associated with high prevalence of hard events but not independent predictors on uni- and multivariate analyses. patients who were male, had longer diabetes duration (especially over 20 years), peripheral vascular disease, peripheral polyneuropathy, or resting ECG abnormality had higher incidence of CAD. Among clinical factors in diabetic patients, typical angina, peripheral vascular disease, peripheral polyneuropathy, and resting ECG abnormality were strong predictors of hard events.

  14. Sandy Lake Health and Diabetes Project: A community-based intervention targeting type 2 diabetes and its risk factors in a First Nations community

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    Kara Elizabeth Kakekagumick

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The Sandy Lake Health and Diabetes Project (SLHDP was initiated in 1991 as a partnership between Sandy Lake First Nation and researchers interested in addressing the high rates of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM in the community. Following the expressed wishes of the community, the SLHDP has encompassed a variety of community-wide interventions and activities including: community surveys to document T2DM prevalence and risk factors, the Northern Store program aimed at increasing the availability and knowledge of healthy food options, a home visit program for the prevention and management of T2DM, a local diabetes radio show, a school diabetes curriculum for grades 3 and 4, a community-wide walking trail to encourage increased physical activity, youth diabetes summer camps, and a variety of community events focusing on nutrition and physical activity. Over the twenty-two year existence of the SLHDP, the community has taken ownership of the program and activities have evolved in alignment with community needs and priorities. This paper discusses the history, implementation, evaluation and outcomes of the SLHDP and describes its sustainability. The SLHDP is a model of culturally appropriate participatory research that is iterative, with reciprocal capacity building for both key community stakeholders and academic partners.

  15. Pilot Study: Association of Traditional and Genetic Risk Factors and New-Onset Diabetes Mellitus Following Kidney Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakkera, H.A.; Hanson, R.L.; Raza, S.M.; DiStefano, J.K.; Millis, M.P.; Heilman, R.L.; Mulligan, D.C.; Reddy, K.S.; Mazur, M.J.; Hamawi, K.; Moss, A.A.; Mekeel, K.L.; Cerhan, J.R.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction New-onset diabetes mellitus, which occurs after kidney transplant and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), shares common risk factors and antecedents in impaired insulin secretion and action. Several genetic polymorphisms have been shown to be associated with T2DM. We hypothesized that transplant recipients who carry risk alleles for T2DM are “tipped over” to develop diabetes mellitus in the posttransplant milieu. Methods We investigated the association of genetic and traditional risk factors present before transplantation and the development of new-onset diabetes mellitus after kidney transplantation (NODAT). Markers in 8 known T2DM-linked genes were genotyped using either the iPLEX assay or allelic discrimination (AD)-PCR in the study cohort testing for association with NODAT. We used univariate and multivariate logistic regression models for the association of pretransplant nongenetic and genetic variables with the development of NODAT. Results The study cohort included 91 kidney transplant recipients with at least 1 year posttransplant follow-up, including 22 who developed NODAT. We observed that increased age, family history of T2DM, pretransplant obesity, and triglyceridemia were associated with NODAT development. In addition, we observed positive trends, although statistically not significant, for association between T2DM-associated genes and NODAT. Conclusions These findings demonstrated an increased NODAT risk among patient with a positive family history for T2DM, which, in conjunction with the observed positive predictive trends of known T2DM-associated genetic polymorphisms with NODAT, was suggestive of a genetic predisposition to NODAT. PMID:20005362

  16. 妊娠糖尿病的危险因素%Risk factors for gestational diabetes mellitus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘晓云; 刘超

    2009-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is one of the unique classifications of diabetes mellitus. It has been established that risk factors for GDM includes age over 25, pre-pregnancy body mass index over 25 kg/m2, non-Caucasian ethnicity and family history of diabetes. Recently, several studies have confirmed other risk factors for GDM which have been less commonly mentioned including polycystic ovary syndrome, short stature, HBsAg carrier, hypertension, etc. Early detect and modify essential risk factors for GDM is very important to improve the outcomes of pregnancy and to decrease the prevalence of diabetes.%妊娠糖尿病是糖尿病分型中的一种独立类型.目前,妊娠糖尿病公认的危险因素包括年龄大于25岁、孕前体重指数大于25 kg/m2、非高加索白人、糖尿病家族史等.近年研究证实,妊娠糖尿病还与其他一些因素相关,如多囊卵巢综合征、身高偏矮、携带HBsAg、高血压等.及早的发现和干预这些高危因素,对于改善孕妇及子代的预后,减少人群中糖尿病的发病率有深远影响.

  17. Diet, intermediate risk markers and risk of type 2 diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sluijs, I.

    2011-01-01

    This thesis aimed to study the relation of diet with risk of type 2 diabetes and intermediate risk markers of diabetes. We investigated the effect of cis9, trans11 conjugated linoleic acid (c9,t11 CLA) supplementation on pulse wave velocity and cardiovascular risk factors in a randomized, controlled

  18. Surprisingly low compliance to local guidelines for risk factor based screening for gestational diabetes mellitus - A population-based study

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    Winkvist Anna

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Screening for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM is routine during pregnancy in many countries in the world. The screening programs are either based on general screening offered to all pregnant women or risk factor based screening stipulated in local clinical guidelines. The aims of this study were to investigate: 1 the compliance with local guidelines of screening for GDM and 2 the outcomes of pregnancy and birth in relation to risk factors of GDM and whether or not exposed to oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT. Methods This study design was a population-based retrospective cross-sectional study of 822 women. A combination of questionnaire data and data collected from medical records was applied. Compliance to the local guidelines of risk factor based screening for GDM was examined and a comparison of outcomes of pregnancy and delivery in relation to risk factor groups for GDM was performed. Results Of the 822 participants, 257 (31.3% women fulfilled at least one criterion for being exposed to screening for GDM according to the local clinical guidelines. However, only 79 (30.7% of these women were actually exposed to OGTT and of those correctly exposed for screening, seven women were diagnosed with GDM. Women developing risk factors for GDM during pregnancy had a substantially increased risk of giving birth to an infant with macrosomia. Conclusion Surprisingly low compliance with the local clinical guidelines for screening for GDM during pregnancy was found. Furthermore, the prevalence of the risk factors of GDM in our study was almost doubled compared to previous Swedish studies. Pregnant women developing risk factors of GDM during pregnancy were found to be at substantially increased risk of giving birth to an infant with macrosomia. There is a need of actions improving compliance to the local guidelines.

  19. Factors Motivating Individuals to Consider Genetic Testing for Type 2 Diabetes Risk Prediction.

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    Jennifer Wessel

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to identify attitudes and perceptions of willingness to participate in genetic testing for type 2 diabetes (T2D risk prediction in the general population. Adults (n = 598 were surveyed on attitudes about utilizing genetic testing to predict future risk of T2D. Participants were recruited from public libraries (53%, online registry (37% and a safety net hospital emergency department (10%. Respondents were 37 ± 11 years old, primarily White (54%, female (69%, college educated (46%, with an annual income ≥$25,000 (56%. Half of participants were interested in genetic testing for T2D (52% and 81% agreed/strongly agreed genetic testing should be available to the public. Only 57% of individuals knew T2D is preventable. A multivariate model to predict interest in genetic testing was adjusted for age, gender, recruitment location and BMI; significant predictors were motivation (high perceived personal risk of T2D [OR = 4.38 (1.76, 10.9]; family history [OR = 2.56 (1.46, 4.48]; desire to know risk prior to disease onset [OR = 3.25 (1.94, 5.42]; and knowing T2D is preventable [OR = 2.11 (1.24, 3.60], intention (if the cost is free [OR = 10.2 (4.27, 24.6]; and learning T2D is preventable [OR = 5.18 (1.95, 13.7] and trust of genetic testing results [OR = 0.03 (0.003, 0.30]. Individuals are interested in genetic testing for T2D risk which offers unique information that is personalized. Financial accessibility, validity of the test and availability of diabetes prevention programs were identified as predictors of interest in T2D testing.

  20. Diabetes is an independent risk factor for severe nocturnal hypoxemia in obese patients. A case-control study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Lecube

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM and obesity have become two of the main threats to public health in the Western world. In addition, obesity is the most important determinant of the sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (SAHS, a condition that adversely affects glucose metabolism. However, it is unknown whether patients with diabetes have more severe SAHS than non-diabetic subjects. The aim of this cross-sectional case-control study was to evaluate whether obese patients with T2DM are more prone to severe SAHS than obese non-diabetic subjects. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Thirty obese T2DM and 60 non-diabetic women closely matched by age, body mass index, waist circumference, and smoking status were recruited from the outpatient Obesity Unit of a university hospital. The exclusion criteria included chronic respiratory disease, smoking habit, neuromuscular and cerebrovascular disease, alcohol abuse, use of sedatives, and pregnancy. Examinations included a non-attended respiratory polygraphy, pulmonary function testing, and an awake arterial gasometry. Oxygen saturation measures included the percentage of time spent at saturations below 90% (CT90. A high prevalence of SAHS was found in both groups (T2DM:80%, nondiabetic:78.3%. No differences in the number of sleep apnea-hypopnea events between diabetic and non-diabetic patients were observed. However, in diabetic patients, a significantly increase in the CT90 was detected (20.2+/-30.2% vs. 6.8+/-13,5%; p = 0.027. In addition, residual volume (RV was significantly higher in T2DM (percentage of predicted: 79.7+/-18.1 vs. 100.1+/-22.8; p<0.001. Multiple linear regression analyses showed that T2DM but not RV was independently associated with CT90. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: T2DM adversely affects breathing during sleep, becoming an independent risk factor for severe nocturnal hypoxemia in obese patients. Given that SAHS is a risk factor of cardiovascular disease, the screening for SAHS in T2DM

  1. Post-transplant diabetes mellitus in lung transplant recipients: incidence and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollech, Jacob E; Kramer, Mordechai R; Peled, Nir; Ollech, Ayelet; Amital, Anat; Medalion, Benjamin; Saute, Milton; Shitrit, David

    2008-05-01

    Post-transplant diabetes mellitus (PTDM) is a common and potentially serious complication after solid organ transplantation. There are only a few data, however, about the incidence of DM in patients undergoing lung transplantation. The medical records of 119 consecutive patients who underwent lung transplantation from 1998 to September 2004 were reviewed. Patients were divided in three groups according to their diabetes status, including pre-transplant DM, the PTDM group and those without DM. Patient records and all laboratory data were reviewed and the clinical course of diabetes was monitored. All recipients were treated with tacrolimus based regimen. Mean follow-up for all patients was 25+/-10. Twenty-three patients had DM in the pre-lung transplantation (LTX) DM group. PTDM developed in 34 of the remaining 96 patients (35.4%) with an incidence of 20%, 23% after 6 months and 12 months post-transplant. No significant difference was noted between 12 and 24 months post-LTX. The patients who developed DM were older (57+/-15 vs 53+/-13 years, p=0.009), had increased BMI (26+/-5 vs 24+/-4, p=0.0001), shorter time from diagnosis to LTX (21+/-13 vs 28+/-18 months, p=0.007) more cytomegalovirus infection and more acute rejection and hyperglycemia in the first month after LTX. Four patients died in the PTDM group compared to nine patients in the no-DM group (12% vs 14%; p=0.72). Post-transplant diabetes is a common complication in lung transplant patients receiving tacrolimus-based immunosuppression. The risk for developing PTDM is greatest among older recipients, those obese, and among recipients with more rejections episodes.

  2. Factors associated with increased risk of insulin pump discontinuation in pediatric patients with type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Liat; Grushka, Yael; Lebenthal, Yael; Shalitin, Shlomit; Phillip, Moshe

    2011-08-01

    There are few reports on rates and predictors for pump discontinuation in the pediatric population. To study the rate of and predictors for insulin pump discontinuation among pediatric patients with type 1 diabetes. Medical chart review of 530 patients with type 1 diabetes who had started pump therapy between 2000 and 2008 in our center revealed that 11.3% had discontinued pump use after 3 d to 5 yr; of these, 9.1% discontinued pump use at least 3 months after initiation. Relevant data were retrieved from the files of these patients and from those of 100 randomly assigned pump-treated patients. The pump discontinuation group had a significantly higher proportion of female patients (75 vs. 46%, p = 0.001) and patients above 10 yr of age (93.8 vs. 80%, p = 0.03) than the reference group. Comparable findings were noted for age at diagnosis, pubertal stage, anthropometric data and duration of diabetes at pump initiation, rate of severe hypoglycemic and diabetic ketoacidosis episodes. There were no between-group differences in number of daily insulin injections and blood glucose measurements before pump treatment. At pump initiation, HbA(1c) was significantly higher in patients discontinuing pump therapy than in the controls (8.6 ± 1.4 vs. 8.1 ± 1.0, p = 0.02). This difference was maintained at the last follow-up visit recorded. Almost 90% of our cohort maintained pump therapy. Female gender, age older than 10 years in girls and poor metabolic control at pump initiation were associated with higher risk for pump discontinuation - for such patients intensified individual and family support may serve to maximize persistent pump therapy. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  3. Prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors in middle-aged type 2 diabetic automobile employees assessed at the workplace--the Praeford study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Christian A; Herold, Gerd; Gysan, Detlev; Albus, Christian; Bjarnason-Wehrens, Birna; Predel, Hans-Georg

    2007-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide contemporary data on the prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors in middle-aged diabetic employees in Germany. Cardiovascular risk factors were assessed at the workplace in employees of the automobile industry who identified themselves as having type 2 diabetes mellitus. The proportion of subjects reaching the target values for hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), systolic blood pressure, and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol was analyzed. Among 4234 employees, 91 employees with diabetes were identified (mean age, 52 years). Only 7 of 91 (8%) diabetic employees achieved all three recommended target values. Blood pressure targets were achieved by 26%, HbA1c target value by 54%, and LDL target value by 31% of employees. Only a negligible proportion of working people with diabetes achieve the recommended target values. This sobering result questions current management modalities and calls for new treatment and monitoring strategies for working people with diabetes.

  4. Risk Factors for Macro- and Microvascular Complications among Older Adults with Diagnosed Type 2 Diabetes: Findings from The Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tracey, Marsha L

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To explore risk factors for macro- and microvascular complications in a nationally representative sample of adults aged 50 years and over with type 2 diabetes in Ireland. Methods. Data from the first wave of The Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing (TILDA) (2009-2011) was used in cross-sectional analysis. The presence of doctor diagnosis of diabetes, risk factors, and macro- and microvascular complications were determined by self-report. Gender-specific differences in risk factor prevalence were assessed with the chi-squared test. Binomial regression analysis was conducted to explore independent associations between established risk factors and diabetes-related complications. Results. Among 8175 respondents, 655 were classified as having type 2 diabetes. Older age, being male, a history of smoking, a lower level of physical activity, and a diagnosis of high cholesterol were independent predictors of macrovascular complications. Diabetes diagnosis of 10 or more years, a history of smoking, and a diagnosis of hypertension were associated with an increased risk of microvascular complications. Older age, third-level education, and a high level of physical activity were protective factors (p < 0.05). Conclusions. Early intervention to target modifiable risk factors is urgently needed to reduce diabetes-related morbidity in the older population in Ireland.

  5. Changes in diet, cardiovascular risk factors and modelled cardiovascular risk following diagnosis of diabetes: 1-year results from the ADDITION-Cambridge trial cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savory, L A; Griffin, S J; Williams, K M; Prevost, A T; Kinmonth, A-L; Wareham, N J; Simmons, R K

    2014-01-01

    Aims To describe change in self-reported diet and plasma vitamin C, and to examine associations between change in diet and cardiovascular disease risk factors and modelled 10-year cardiovascular disease risk in the year following diagnosis of Type 2 diabetes. Methods Eight hundred and sixty-seven individuals with screen-detected diabetes underwent assessment of self-reported diet, plasma vitamin C, cardiovascular disease risk factors and modelled cardiovascular disease risk at baseline and 1 year (n = 736) in the ADDITION-Cambridge trial. Multivariable linear regression was used to quantify the association between change in diet and cardiovascular disease risk at 1 year, adjusting for change in physical activity and cardio-protective medication. Results Participants reported significant reductions in energy, fat and sodium intake, and increases in fruit, vegetable and fibre intake over 1 year. The reduction in energy was equivalent to an average-sized chocolate bar; the increase in fruit was equal to one plum per day. There was a small increase in plasma vitamin C levels. Increases in fruit intake and plasma vitamin C were associated with small reductions in anthropometric and metabolic risk factors. Increased vegetable intake was associated with an increase in BMI and waist circumference. Reductions in fat, energy and sodium intake were associated with reduction in HbA1c, waist circumference and total cholesterol/modelled cardiovascular disease risk, respectively. Conclusions Improvements in dietary behaviour in this screen-detected population were associated with small reductions in cardiovascular disease risk, independently of change in cardio-protective medication and physical activity. Dietary change may have a role to play in the reduction of cardiovascular disease risk following diagnosis of diabetes. PMID:24102972

  6. Diabetes is a risk factor for pulmonary tuberculosis: a case-control study from mwanza, Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faurholt-Jepsen, Daniel; Range, Nyagosya; Praygod, George Amani;

    2011-01-01

    Diabetes and TB are associated, and diabetes is increasingly common in low-income countries where tuberculosis (TB) is highly endemic. However, the role of diabetes for TB has not been assessed in populations where HIV is prevalent.......Diabetes and TB are associated, and diabetes is increasingly common in low-income countries where tuberculosis (TB) is highly endemic. However, the role of diabetes for TB has not been assessed in populations where HIV is prevalent....

  7. The association of alcohol and alcohol metabolizing gene variants with diabetes and coronary heart disease risk factors in a white population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husemoen, Lise Lotte N; Jørgensen, Torben; Borch-Johnsen, Knut

    2010-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown a J- or U-shaped relation between alcohol and type 2 diabetes and coronary heart disease (CHD). The underlying mechanisms are not clear. The aim was to examine the association between alcohol intake and diabetes and intermediate CHD risk factors in relation...

  8. A cross-sectional survey on prevalence and risk factors for abnormal plasma liver enzymes in overweight or obese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王娇

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the prevalence and risk factors for abnormal plasma liver enzymes in patients with type 2diabetes mellitus.Methods Overweight or obese patients with type 2 diabetes were recruited from 60 tertiary and secondary hospitals in Guangdong Province between August 2011 and March 2012.The abnormal plasma liver

  9. Risk Factors of Gestational Diabetes in Pregnant Women%妊娠期糖尿病的危险因素分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙贺; 李霞

    2011-01-01

    [目的]探讨妊娠期糖尿病(GDM)的危险因素.[方法]采用病例对照研究对引发GDM可能的15项危险因素,进行单因素、多因素Logistic回归分析.[结果]11项因素与GDM有关,其中有意识体育锻炼为保护因素,其他均为危险因素.[结论]高龄妊娠等是GDM发病的常见社会危险因素;孕妇有糖尿病家族史等是GDM的生理危险因素.%[Objective]To explore the risk factors of gestational diabetes. [Methods]The case controlstudy was used for univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis of 15 possible risk factors of gestational diabetes. [Results] Eleven factors were related to gestational diabetes, in which conscious physical exercise was the protective factor and the others were risk factors. [Conclusion] Pregnancy with advanced age andso on are the common social risk factors of gestational diabetes, and the family history of diabetes in pregnantwomen and so on are the physiological risk factors of gestational diabetes.

  10. Why Is Diabetes Mellitus a Risk Factor for Contrast-Induced Nephropathy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel N. Heyman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN remains a leading cause of iatrogenic acute kidney injury, as the usage of contrast media for imaging and intravascular intervention keeps expanding. Diabetes is an important predisposing factor for CIN, particularly in patients with renal functional impairment. Renal hypoxia, combined with the generation of reactive oxygen species, plays a central role in the pathogenesis of CIN, and the diabetic kidney is particularly susceptible to intensified hypoxic and oxidative stress following the administration of contrast media. The pathophysiology of this vulnerability is complex and involves various mechanisms, including a priori enhanced tubular transport activity, oxygen consumption, and the generation of reactive oxygen species. The regulation of vascular tone and peritubular blood flow may also be altered, particularly due to defective nitrovasodilation, enhanced endothelin production, and a particular hyperresponsiveness to adenosine-related vasoconstriction. In addition, micro- and macrovascular diseases and chronic tubulointerstitial changes further compromise regional oxygen delivery, and renal antioxidant capacity might be hampered. A better understanding of these mechanisms and their control in the diabetic patient may initiate novel strategies in the prevention of contrast nephropathy in these susceptible patients.

  11. The risk factors associated with ultrasonic tissue characterization of carotid plaque in type 2 diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irie, Yoko; Katakami, Naoto; Kaneto, Hideaki; Takahara, Mitsuyoshi; Sakamoto, Ken'ya; Kosugi, Keisuke; Shimomura, Iichiro

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about the related factors of plaque echogenicity in diabetic subjects. This was a single-center, retrospective, study investigating a subgroup of patients of a previously published trial. We enrolled 179 middle-aged and older Japanese type 2 diabetic patients with carotid plaque, and examined the parameters related with echogenicity of carotid plaque evaluated by gray-scale median (GSM). Proportion of males and body mass index (BMI) were significantly higher and HDL-cholesterol was significantly lower in the patients with low GSM (HDL-cholesterol as independent variables and the presence of low GSM plaques as an objective variable showed that male (odds ratio (OR) 2.36, 95%CI 1.05-5.31, p = 0.037) and BMI (OR 1.12 [1.01-1.24], p = 0.029) were independently associated with low GSM plaques. Another multiple logistic regression analysis with gender, BMI, and low-HDL-cholesterolemia (HDL-C HDL-cholesterolemia (OR 2.30 [1.03-5.13], p = 0.042) and BMI (OR 1.11 [1.00-1.22], p = 0.046) were independently associated with low GSM plaques. Our study suggests that gender, BMI and low-HDL-cholesterol are important determinants of the content of the vascular wall in diabetic subjects. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. 老年糖尿病住院患者感染危险因素分析%Infectious risk factors analysis to senile patients with diabetes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘铁迎; 马小英; 陈树春; 霍丽梅

    2003-01-01

    @@ INTRODUCTION Incidence of diabetes combined with infection was very high,disease condition was serious,course of disease was long which made treatment very difficult[1- 3].Senile diabetes were more easy to be infected because of bad control effect of blood glucose and decreased immune function and the infection was difficult to control.Corresponding risk factors about senile diabetes combined with infection were analyzed in this article to make timely diagnosis and treatment.

  13. Obesity, islet cell autoimmunity, and cardiovascular risk factors in youth at onset of type 1 autoimmune diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cedillo, Maribel; Libman, Ingrid M; Arena, Vincent C; Zhou, Lei; Trucco, Massimo; Ize-Ludlow, Diego; Pietropaolo, Massimo; Becker, Dorothy J

    2015-01-01

    The current increase in childhood type 1 diabetes (T1D) and obesity has led to two conflicting hypotheses and conflicting reports regarding the effects of overweight on initiation and spreading of islet cell autoimmunity vs earlier clinical manifestation of preexisting autoimmune β-cell damage driven by excess weight. The objective of the study was to address the question of whether the degree of β-cell autoimmunity and age are related to overweight at diabetes onset in a large cohort of T1D youth. This was a prospective cross-sectional study of youth with autoimmune T1D consecutively recruited at diabetes onset. The study was conducted at a regional academic pediatric diabetes center. Two hundred sixty-three consecutive children younger than 19 years at onset of T1D participated in the study. Relationships between body mass index and central obesity (waist circumference and waist to height ratio) and antigen spreading (islet cell autoantibody number), age, and cardiovascular (CVD) risk factors examined at onset and/or 3 months after the diagnosis were measured. There were no significant associations between number of autoantibodies with measures of adiposity. Age relationships revealed that a greater proportion of those with central obesity (21%) were in the youngest age group (0-4 y) compared with those without central obesity (6%) (P = .001). PATIENTS with central obesity had increased CVD risk factors and higher onset C-peptide levels (P obesity accelerates progression of autoantibody spreading once autoimmunity, marked by standard islet cell autoantibody assays, is present. Central obesity was present in almost one-third of the subjects and was associated with early CVD risk markers already at onset.

  14. Disparities in Cardiovascular Disease and Type 2 Diabetes Risk Factors in Blacks and Whites: Dissecting Racial Paradox of Metabolic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwame Osei

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular diseases (CVD remain as the leading cause of mortality in the western world and have become a major health threat for developing countries. There are several risk factors that account for the CVD and the associated mortality. These include genetics, type 2 diabetes (T2DM, obesity, physical inactivity, hypertension, and abnormal lipids and lipoproteins. The constellation of these risk factors has been termed metabolic syndrome (MetS. MetS varies among racial and ethnic populations. Thus, race and ethnicity account for some of the differences in the MetS and the associated CVD and T2DM. Furthermore, the relationships among traditional metabolic parameters and CVD differ, especially when comparing Black and White populations. In this regard, the greater CVD in Blacks than Whites have been partly attributed to other non-traditional CVD risk factors, such as subclinical inflammation (C-reactive protein, homocysteine, increased low-density lipoprotein oxidation, lipoprotein a, adiponectin, and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, etc. Thus, to understand CVD and T2DM differences in Blacks and Whites with MetS, it is essential to explore the contributions of both traditional and non-traditional CVD and T2DM risk factors in Blacks of African ancestry and Whites of Europoid ancestry. Therefore, in this mini review, we propose that non-traditional risk factors should be integrated in defining MetS as a predictor of CVD and T2DM in Blacks in the African diaspora in future studies.

  15. Underreporting of energy intake and associated factors in a Latino population at risk of developing type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olendzki, Barbara C; Ma, Yunsheng; Hébert, James R; Pagoto, Sherry L; Merriam, Philip A; Rosal, Milagros C; Ockene, Ira S

    2008-06-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the extent of underreporting of total energy intake and associated factors in a low-income, low-literacy, predominantly Caribbean Latino community in Lawrence, MA. Two hundred fifteen Latinos participated in a diabetes prevention study, for which eligibility included a >or=30% risk of developing diabetes in 7.5 years. Dietary self-reported energy intake was assessed using three randomly selected days of 24-hour diet recalls. Basal metabolic rate (BMR) was estimated using the Mifflin-St Jeor equation. Underreporting was determined by computing a ratio of energy intake to BMR, with a ratio of 1.55 expected for sedentary populations. Linear regression analyses were used to identify factors associated with underreporting (energy intake:BMR ratio). The population was predominately women (77%), middle-aged (mean 52+/-11 years), obese (78% had a body mass index >or=30); low-literate (62% diabetes (37% had siblings with diabetes). Reported total daily energy intake was 1,540+/-599 kcal, whereas estimated BMR was 1,495.7+/-245.1 kcal/day. When multiplied by an activity factor (1.20 for sedentariness), expected energy intake was 1,794+/-294.0 per day, indicating underreporting by an average of 254 kcal/day. Mean energy intake:BMR was 1.03+/-0.37, and was lower for participants with higher body mass index, siblings with diabetes, sedentary lifestyle, and those who were unemployed. Energy intake underreporting is prevalent in this low-income, low-literacy Caribbean Latino population. Future studies are needed to develop dietary assessment measures that minimize underreporting in this population.

  16. Diabetes mellitus: fatores de risco, ocorrência e cuidados entre trabalhadores de enfermagem Diabetes mellitus: factores de riesgo, ocurrencia y cuidados entre trabajadores de enfermería Diabetes mellitus: occurrence of risk factors and care among nursing workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darlene Mara dos Santos Tavares

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Identificar a ocorrência de Diabetes Mellitus (DM, os fatores de risco, o estresse e o cuidado com a saúde realizado pelos trabalhadores de enfermagem diabéticos. MÉTODOS: Estudo descritivo realizado com 418 profissionais de enfermagem de um hospital universitário. Os dados foram coletados por meio de instrumento semiestruturado e analisado, utilizando-se a distribuição de freqüência, teste qui-quadrado (pOBJETIVO: Identificar la ocurrencia de Diabetes Mellitus (DM, los factores de riesgo, el estrés y el cuidado con la salud realizado por los trabajadores de enfermería que son diabéticos. MÉTODOS: Estudio descriptivo realizado con 418 profesionales de enfermería de un hospital universitario. Los datos fueron recolectados - por medio de un instrumento semi-estructurado - y analizados, utilizando la distribución de frecuencias, prueba chi-cuadrado (pOBJECTIVE: To identify the occurrence of Diabetes Mellitus (DM, risk factors, stress and health-care activities performed by diabetic nursing workers. METHODS: This is a descriptive study with 418 professional nurses, working at a university hospital. Data were collected through a semi-structured instrument and were analyzed using the frequency distribution, the chi-square test (p <0.05 and the odds ratio. RESULTS: Most of the professionals were female and had between 20 and 30 years of age. All risk factors for DM were present, including the factors that can be modified. It was found a larger proportion of diabetic workers that had: overweight; arterial hypertension and capillary blood glucose altered, when compared to those without the disease. It was not found an increased likelihood of developing DM among nursing workers who reported stress. The workers with DM did not attend to the monthly follow up(69.2%; they were treated in private services (70%; and, they did not participate in educational activities (92.3%. CONCLUSION: It is necessary to develop health actions aimed

  17. Regional differences of undiagnosed type 2 diabetes and prediabetes prevalence are not explained by known risk factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Tamayo

    Full Text Available We have previously found regional differences in the prevalence of known type 2 diabetes between northeastern and southern Germany. We aim to also provide prevalence estimates for prediabetes (isolated impaired fasting glucose (i-IFG, isolated glucose intolerance (i-IGT, combined IFG and IGT and unknown type 2 diabetes for both regions.Prevalence (95%CI of prediabetes (i-IFG: fasting glucose 5.6-6.9 mmol/l; i-IGT: 2 h postchallenge glucose 7.8-11.0 mmol/l, oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT, ≥ 8 h overnight fasting and unknown diabetes were analyzed in two regional population-based surveys (age group 35-79 years: SHIP-TREND (Study of Health in Pomerania (northeast, 2008-2012 and KORA F4 (Cooperative Health Research in the region of Augsburg (south, 2006-2008. Both studies used similar methods, questionnaires, and identical protocols for OGTT. Overall, 1,980 participants from SHIP-TREND and 2,617 participants from KORA F4 were included.Age-sex-standardized prevalence estimates (95%CI of prediabetes and unknown diabetes were considerably higher in the northeast (SHIP-TREND: 43.1%; 40.9-45.3% and 7.1%; 5.9-8.2% than in the south of Germany (KORA F4: 30.1%; 28.4-31.7% and 3.9%; 3.2-4.6%, respectively. In particular, i-IFG (26.4%; 24.5-28.3% vs. 17.2%; 15.7-18.6% and IFG+IGT (11.2%; 9.8-12.6% vs. 6.6%; 5.7-7.5% were more frequent in SHIP-TREND than in KORA. In comparison to normal glucose tolerance, the odds of having unknown diabetes (OR, 95%CI: 2.59; 1.84-3.65 or prediabetes (1.98; 1.70-2.31 was higher in the northeast than in the south after adjustment for known risk factors (obesity, lifestyle.The regional differences of prediabetes and unknown diabetes are in line with the geographical pattern of known diabetes in Germany. The higher prevalences in the northeast were not explained by traditional risk factors.

  18. Regional Differences of Undiagnosed Type 2 Diabetes and Prediabetes Prevalence Are Not Explained by Known Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamayo, Teresa; Schipf, Sabine; Meisinger, Christine; Schunk, Michaela; Maier, Werner; Herder, Christian; Roden, Michael; Nauck, Matthias; Peters, Annette; Völzke, Henry; Rathmann, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Background We have previously found regional differences in the prevalence of known type 2 diabetes between northeastern and southern Germany. We aim to also provide prevalence estimates for prediabetes (isolated impaired fasting glucose (i-IFG), isolated glucose intolerance (i-IGT), combined IFG and IGT) and unknown type 2 diabetes for both regions. Methods Prevalence (95%CI) of prediabetes (i-IFG: fasting glucose 5.6–6.9 mmol/l; i-IGT: 2 h postchallenge gluose 7.8–11.0 mmol/l, oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), ≥8 h overnight fasting) and unknown diabetes were analyzed in two regional population-based surveys (age group 35–79 years): SHIP-TREND (Study of Health in Pomerania (northeast), 2008–2012) and KORA F4 (Cooperative Health Research in the region of Augsburg (south), 2006–2008). Both studies used similar methods, questionnaires, and identical protocols for OGTT. Overall, 1,980 participants from SHIP-TREND and 2,617 participants from KORA F4 were included. Results Age-sex-standardized prevalence estimates (95%CI) of prediabetes and unknown diabetes were considerably higher in the northeast (SHIP-TREND: 43.1%; 40.9–45.3% and 7.1%; 5.9–8.2%) than in the south of Germany (KORA F4: 30.1%; 28.4–31.7% and 3.9%; 3.2–4.6%), respectively. In particular, i-IFG (26.4%; 24.5–28.3% vs. 17.2%; 15.7–18.6%) and IFG+IGT (11.2%; 9.8–12.6% vs. 6.6%; 5.7–7.5%) were more frequent in SHIP-TREND than in KORA. In comparison to normal glucose tolerance, the odds of having unknown diabetes (OR, 95%CI: 2.59; 1.84–3.65) or prediabetes (1.98; 1.70–2.31) was higher in the northeast than in the south after adjustment for known risk factors (obesity, lifestyle). Conclusions The regional differences of prediabetes and unknown diabetes are in line with the geographical pattern of known diabetes in Germany. The higher prevalences in the northeast were not explained by traditional risk factors. PMID:25402347

  19. An IGF-I promoter polymorphism modifies the relationships between birth weight and risk factors for cardiovascular disease and diabetes at age 36

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    te Velde, S.J.; van Rossum, E.F.; Voorhoeve, P.G.; Twisk, J.W.; van de Delemarre Waal, H.A.; Stehouwer, C.D.A.; van Mechelen, W.; Lamberts, S.W.; Kemper, H.C.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether IGF-I promoter polymorphism was associated with birth weight and risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD) and type 2 diabetes (T2DM), and whether the birth weight--risk factor relationship was the same for each genotype. DESIGN AND PARTICIPANTS: 264 subjects (m

  20. Frequency of fetal macrosomia and the associated risk factors in pregnancies without gestational diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usta, Akin; Usta, Ceyda Sancakli; Yildiz, Ayla; Ozcaglayan, Ruhsen; Dalkiran, Eylem Sen; Savkli, Aydin; Taskiran, Meryem

    2017-01-01

    There has been an increased incidence of macrosomic newborns in the world and most of the macrosomic newborns are born from non-GDM pregnant women. The objective of this study was to determine the frequency and the associated risk factors of fetal macrosomia in non-GDM pregnant women. A total 4246 consequtive pregnant women who had no GDM was included the study population. Data was collected from hospital database of Balikesir State Hospital between January 2014 and January 2015. Statistical analysis was carried out using the independent samples t-test and chi-squared test. Logistic regression analysis was used to determine the relationships between associated risk factors and the presence of fetal macrosomia. In this analysis, fetal macrosomia was taken as the dependent variable and associated risk factors were taken as independent variables. Results are shown as odds ratios (ORs) (95% CI) in the logistic regression analysis. 366 of the 4246 pregnant women were diagnosed with fetal macrosomia (8.6%). Compared the control women, a statistically significant correlation between fetal macrosomia and pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI), gestational weight gain (GWG), parity, advanced maternal age, and male fetal sex was found. Maternal BMI, and GWG were the two risk factors most strongly associated with macrosomia. The prevalance of fetal macrosomia is rising among Turkish women. High pre-pregnancy BMI and GWG represent main modifiable risk factors for macrosomia and need more attention from health care providers.

  1. Urinary albumin excretion rate: a risk factor for retinal hard exudates in macular region in type 2 diabetic patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Shaocheng; Lin Siyong; Cao Xi; Zheng Yuezhong; Wang Jinyang; Lu Na; Yang Jinkui

    2014-01-01

    Background The various risk factors for retinal hard exudates are still poorly understood in type 2 diabetic patients.The aim of this study was to determine the association between urinary albumin excretion rate (UAER) and hard exudates in macular region in north Chinese patients.Methods A total of 272 patients (272 eyes) were enrolled for this study,including 154 subjects from group 1 (mild hard exudates),91 subjects from group 2 (moderate hard exudates) and 27 subjects from group 3 (severe hard exudates) confirmed using colour fundus photography,optical coherence tomography (OCT) as well as slit-lamp biomicroscopy with 78 diopter (D) lens.Each participant underwent a comprehensive assessment that included biochemical,clinical characteristics test and detailed ophthalmic evaluation.One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) test and chi-square test were performed to analyze the fasting blood glucose (FBG),glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c),total cholesterol (TC),low density lipoprotein (LDL),high density lipoprotein (HDL),triglycerides (TG),full blood counts,urinary albumin excretion rate (UAER),blood creatinine (CREA),duration of diabetes,body mass index (BMI),systolic blood pressures (SBP) and diastolic blood pressures (DBP) between groups.Ordinal logistic regression analysis was further performed in order to eliminating the possible confounding factors.Results Three groups were matched in terms of age and gender.Risk factors which showed significant difference between groups include FBG (P <0.001),HbA1c (P <0.001),LDL (P <0.001),UAER (P <0.001),duration of diabetes (P=0.001),TC (P=0.005),SBP (P=0.026),CREA (P=0.004) and haemoglobin (Hb) (P=0.012).There was no significant difference between groups for the TG,HDL,DBP,platelet,total white blood cells and BMI.Using ordinal Logistic regression analyses,of all the variables,HbA1c,LDL and UAER which were independent risk factor for hard exudates showed a significantly odds ratio of 1.25,3.07,and 1.39,respectively

  2. [The role of the diet as a risk factor for the development and progression of diabetic nephropathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mello, Vanessa D F de; Azevedo, Mirela J de; Zelmanovitz, Themis; Gross, Jorge L

    2005-08-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is the leading cause of kidney disease in patients starting renal replacement therapy, and affects up to 40% of type 1 and type 2 diabetic patients. Diet seems to play an important role in the development of the disease. There are evidences supporting the concept that not only the amount but also the origin of dietary protein are associated with DN. Few studies analyzed the role of dietary lipids. A low-protein diet slows down the decline of renal function and ameliorates the DN prognosis and death in patients with type 1 diabetes with micro- and macroalbuminuria. Studies in type 2 diabetic patients are scanty but short-term studies suggest that this approach decreases albuminuria. However, the use of low-protein diet for long periods is compromised by poor compliance and its long-term safety is not firmly established. Enthusiastic results come up when comparing the effect of different sources of animal protein on renal function and lipid profile in patients with DN, which may represent an alternative strategy for low-protein diet on medical nutritional therapy in patients with DN and in cardiovascular risk factors and endothelial function.

  3. Clinical decisions in patients with diabetes and other cardiovascular risk factors. A statement of the Spanish Society of Internal Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Huelgas, R; Pérez-Jiménez, F; Serrano-Ríos, M; González-Santos, P; Román, P; Camafort, M; Conthe, P; García-Alegría, J; Guijarro, R; López-Miranda, J; Tirado-Miranda, R; Valdivielso, P

    2014-05-01

    Although the mortality associated to cardiovascular diseases (CVD) has been reduced in the last decades, CVD remains the main cause of mortality in Spain and they are associated with an important morbidity and a huge economic burden. The increasing prevalence of obesity and diabetes could be slowing down the mortality reduction in Spain. Clinicians have often difficulty making clinical decisions due to the multiple clinical guidelines available. Moreover, in the current context of economic crisis it is critical to promote an efficient use of diagnostic and therapeutic proceedings to ensure the viability of public health care systems. The Spanish Society of Internal Medicine (SEMI) has coordinated a consensus document to answer questions of daily practice with the aim of facilitating physicians' decision-making in the management of diabetes and cardiovascular risk factors from a cost-efficiency point of view. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  4. Diabetes type II: a risk factor for depression-Parkinson-Alzheimer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riederer, Peter; Bartl, Jasmin; Laux, Gerd; Grünblatt, Edna

    2011-02-01

    There is ample evidence that impairments in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis are of etiopathobiochemical importance in a subgroup of patients with "depression", causing hypercortisolaemia as major metabolic effect. Chronic hypercortisolaemia causes insulin resistance. Therefore, it is not surprising that epidemiological studies demonstrate an association of "depression" with diabetes type II and vice versa. Chronic stress and hypercortisolaemia are conditions, which have been suggested to be causal for Alzheimer's disease (AD) as brain insulin resistance is associated with β-Amyloid-accumulation and hyperphosphorylation of tau-protein. Depression is one of the significant symptomatology preceding AD. It is however, not known whether "depression" associated with hypercortisolaemia is the subgroup at risk for AD. In contrast to a subgroup of "depression" and to AD, in Parkinson's disease (PD) there is only weak evidence for an association with diabetes type II and insulin resistance. As "depression" is preceding PD in up to half of such patients, it remains to be elucidated whether this is a subgroup of depressed patients, which is not associated with disturbances of the HPA axis and hypercortisolaemia. Improved clinical and biochemical/molecular knowledge about "depression" associated with AD and PD in comparison to "pure" depression might lead to improved therapeutic strategies and even drug development focusing subtypes of "depression".

  5. Type 2 diabetes mellitus and obesity are independent risk factors for poor outcome in patients with high-grade glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambless, Lola B; Parker, Scott L; Hassam-Malani, Laila; McGirt, Matthew J; Thompson, Reid C

    2012-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) and obesity are known risk factors for poor outcomes in patients with systemic malignancies but are not well-studied in the brain tumor population. In this study we asked if type 2 DM and elevated body mass index (BMI) are independent risk factors for poor prognosis in patients with high-grade glioma (HGG.). We conducted a retrospective cohort study of 171 patients surgically treated for HGG at a single institution. BMI and records of pre-existing type 2 DM were obtained from medical histories. Variables associated with survival in a univariate analysis were included in the multivariate Cox model if P 0.05 were then removed from the multivariate model in a step-wise fashion. Mean age at diagnosis was 55.0 ± 17.3 years. Fifteen (8.8%) patients had a history of type 2 DM. Fifty-eight (35.8%) patients had a BMI 30. Radiation therapy, temozolomide, and higher KPS score were independently associated with prolonged survival while increasing age was associated with decreased survival. DM (P = 0.001) and increasing BMI (P = 0.003) were found to be independently associated with decreased survival. Diabetics had a decreased median overall survival (312 vs. 470 days, P = 0.003) and PFS (106 vs. 166 days, P = 0.04) compared to non-diabetics. Increasing BMI (30) was also associated with decreased median PFS: 195 vs. 165 vs. 143 days, respectively. Pre-existing DM and elevated BMI are independent risk factors for poor outcome in patients with HGG.

  6. Demographic, clinical and psychosocial factors identify a high-risk group for depression screening among predominantly Hispanic patients with Type 2 diabetes in safety net care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ell, Kathleen; Katon, Wayne; Lee, Pey-Jiuan; Guterman, Jeffrey; Wu, Shinyi

    2015-01-01

    Identify biopsychosocial factors associated with depression for patients with Type 2 diabetes. A quasi-experimental clinical trial of 1293 patients was predominantly Hispanic (91%) female (62%), mean age 53 and average diabetes duration 10 years; 373 (29%) patients were depressed and assessed by Patient Health Questionnaire-9. Demographic, baseline clinical and psychosocial variables were compared between depressed and nondepressed patients. Bivariate analyses found depression significantly associated (pidentified six key risk factors: greater disability, diabetes symptoms and regimen distress, female gender, less diabetes self-care and lack of A1C. In addition, after controlling for identified six factors, the number of psychosocial stressors significantly associated with increased risk of depression (adjusted odds ratio=1.37, 95% confidence intervals: 1.18-1.58, pidentify a high-risk group of patients needing depression screening. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Is the C677T polymorphism in methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene or plasma homocysteine a risk factor for diabetic peripheral neuropathy in Chinese individuals?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongli Wang; Dongsheng Fan; Tianpei Hong

    2012-01-01

    The present study enrolled 251 diabetic patients,including 101 with neuropathy and 150 without neuropathy.Of the 150 patients,100 had no complications,such as retinopathy,nephropathy,or neuropathy.Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis was used to identify methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene variants.Plasma homocysteine levels were also measured.Homocysteine levels and the frequency of hyperhomocysteinemia were significantly higher in patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy compared with diabetic patients without neuropathy (P < 0.05).In logistic regression analysis with neuropathy as the dependent variable,the frequency of C677T in methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase was significantly higher in patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy compared with patients without diabetic complications.Homocysteine levels were significantly higher in patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy carrying the 677T allele and low folic acid levels.In conclusion,hyperhomocysteinemia is an independent risk factor for diabetic neuropathy in Chinese patients with diabetes.The C677T polymorphism in methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase and low folic acid levels may be risk factors for diabetic peripheral neuropathy in Chinese patients with diabetes.

  8. Impact of walking on glycemic control and other cardiovascular risk factors in type 2 diabetes: a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanhu Qiu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Walking is the most popular and most preferred exercise among type 2 diabetes patients, yet compelling evidence regarding its beneficial effects on cardiovascular risk factors is still lacking. The aim of this meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs was to evaluate the association between walking and glycemic control and other cardiovascular risk factors in type 2 diabetes patients. METHODS: Three databases were searched up to August 2014. English-language RCTs were eligible for inclusion if they had assessed the walking effects (duration ≥8 weeks on glycemic control or other cardiovascular risk factors among type 2 diabetes patients. Data were pooled using a random-effects model. Subgroup analyses based on supervision status and meta-regression analyses of variables regarding characteristics of participants and walking were performed to investigate their association with glycemic control. RESULTS: Eighteen studies involving 20 RCTs (866 participants were included. Walking significantly decreased glycosylated haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c by 0.50% (95% confidence intervals [CI]: -0.78% to -0.21%. Supervised walking was associated with a pronounced decrease in HbA1c (WMD -0.58%, 95% CI: -0.93% to -0.23%, whereas non-supervised walking was not. Further subgroup analysis suggested non-supervised walking using motivational strategies is also effective in decreasing HbA1c (WMD -0.53%, 95% CI: -1.05% to -0.02%. Effects of covariates on HbA1c change were generally unclear. For other cardiovascular risk factors, walking significantly reduced body mass index (BMI and lowered diastolic blood pressure (DBP, but non-significantly lowered systolic blood pressure (SBP, or changed high-density or low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. CONCLUSIONS: This meta-analysis supports that walking decreases HbA1c among type 2 diabetes patients. Supervision or the use of motivational strategies should be suggested when prescribed walking to ensure

  9. Influence of diabetes mellitus and risk factors in activating latent tuberculosis infection: a case for targeted screening in malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swarna Nantha, Y

    2012-10-01

    A review of the epidemiology of tuberculosis, its contributing risk factors (excluding HIV) and the role of screening latent tuberculosis infection in Malaysia was done. Despite the global and domestic decrease in prevalence rates of tuberculosis in the past decade, there is an alarming increase in the trend of non communicable diseases in the country. High prevalence rates of major risk factors leading to reactivation of tuberculosis were seen within the population, with diabetes mellitus being in the forefront. The rising numbers in the ageing population of Malaysia poses a further threat of re-emergence of tuberculosis in the years to come. Economically, screening of diabetic patients with comorbidities for latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) using two major techniques, namely tuberculin sensitivity (TST) and Interferon gamma release assay tests (IGRA) could be a viable option. The role of future research in the detection of LTBI in the Malaysian setting might be necessary to gauge the disease reservoir before implementing prophylactic measures for high risk groups involved.

  10. Is the number of fast-food outlets in the neighbourhood related to screen-detected type 2 diabetes mellitus and associated risk factors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodicoat, Danielle H; Carter, Patrice; Comber, Alexis; Edwardson, Charlotte; Gray, Laura J; Hill, Sian; Webb, David; Yates, Thomas; Davies, Melanie J; Khunti, Kamlesh

    2015-06-01

    We investigated whether a higher number of fast-food outlets in an individual's home neighbourhood is associated with increased prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus and related risk factors, including obesity. Cross-sectional study. Three UK-based diabetes screening studies (one general population, two high-risk populations) conducted between 2004 and 2011. The primary outcome was screen-detected type 2 diabetes. Secondary outcomes were risk factors for type 2 diabetes. In total 10 461 participants (mean age 59 years; 53% male; 21% non-White ethnicity). There was a higher number of neighbourhood (500 m radius from home postcode) fast-food outlets among non-White ethnic groups (Pdiabetes (OR=1.02; 95% CI 1.00, 1.04) and obesity (OR=1.02; 95% CI 1.00, 1.03). This suggests that for every additional two outlets per neighbourhood, we would expect one additional diabetes case, assuming a causal relationship between the fast-food outlets and diabetes. These results suggest that increased exposure to fast-food outlets is associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes and obesity, which has implications for diabetes prevention at a public health level and for those granting planning permission to new fast-food outlets.

  11. Relationships Among Conventional Cardiovascular Risk Factors and Lifestyle Habits With Arterial Stiffness in Type 2 Diabetic Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamamura, Misako; Mita, Tomoya; Osonoi, Yusuke; Osonoi, Takeshi; Saito, Miyoko; Tamasawa, Atsuko; Nakayama, Shiho; Someya, Yuki; Ishida, Hidenori; Gosho, Masahiko; Kanazawa, Akio; Watada, Hirotaka

    2017-01-01

    Background While conventional cardiovascular risk factors and certain lifestyle habits are associated with arterial stiffness in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), it is still unknown whether they are actually associated with arterial stiffness even after adjustment for conventional cardiovascular risk factors and lifestyle habits. The aim of this study was to identify variables that are associated with brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV). Methods The study participants comprised 724 Japanese T2DM outpatients free of history of cardiovascular diseases. Lifestyle habits were analyzed using self-reported questionnaires. The associations among conventional cardiovascular risk factors and lifestyle habits with baPWV were investigated by multivariable linear regression analysis. Results The mean age of the study subjects was 57.8 ± 8.6 years, and 62.8% of those were males. The mean HbA1c was 7.0±1.0%, and the estimated duration of T2DM was 9.9 ± 7.2 years. Multiple linear regression analysis that included age and gender demonstrated that age and male sex were positively associated with baPWV. In a model adjusted for numerous conventional cardiovascular risk factors and lifestyle habits, age, duration of T2DM, systolic blood pressure, serum uric acid, urinary albumin excretion and poor sleep quality were positively associated with baPWV, while body mass index was negatively associated with baPWV. Conclusions In Japanese T2DM, in addition to several conventional cardiovascular risk factors, poor sleep quality was associated with baPWV even after adjustment for numerous conventional cardiovascular risk factors and lifestyle habits. PMID:28270889

  12. Birth weight--a risk factor for progression in diabetic nephropathy?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, P; Rossing, P; Tarnow, L

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Intrauterine growth retardation, as seen in individuals with low weight at birth, may give rise to a reduction in nephron number. Oligonephropathy has been linked to hypertension and renal disease in adult life. We tested the concept that low weight at birth acts as a risk factor for ...

  13. Prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus in antenatal women and its associated risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila J. Gracelyn

    2016-02-01

    Conclusions: Prevalence of GDM is progressively increasing and it was significantly associated with multiple risk factors. Universal screening should be done for all pregnant women for better maternal and fetal outcome. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2016; 5(2.000: 285-291

  14. Genetic sharing with cardiovascular disease risk factors and diabetes reveals novel bone mineral density loci

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Reppe (Sjur); Y. Wang (Yunpeng); W.K. Thompson (Wesley K.); L.K. McEvoy (Linda K.); N.J. Schork (Nicholas); V. Zuber (Verena); M. Leblanc (Marissa); F. Bettella (Francesco); I.G. Mills (Ian G.); R.S. Desikan (Rahul S.); S. Djurovic (Srdjan); K.M. Gautvik (Kaare); A.M. Dale (Anders); O.A. Andreassen (Ole A.); K. Estrada Gil (Karol); U. Styrkarsdottir (Unnur); E. Evangelou (Evangelos); Y.-H. Hsu (Yi-Hsiang); E.L. Duncan (Emma); E.E. Ntzani (Evangelia); L. Oei (Ling); O.M.E. Albagha (Omar M.); N. Amin (Najaf); J.P. Kemp (John); D.L. Koller (Daniel); G. Li (Guo); C.-T. Liu (Ching-Ti); R.L. Minster (Ryan); A. Moayyeri (Alireza); L. Vandenput (Liesbeth); D. Willner (Dana); S.-M. Xiao (Su-Mei); L.M. Yerges-Armstrong (Laura); H.-F. Zheng (Hou-Feng); N. Alonso (Nerea); J. Eriksson (Joel); C.M. Kammerer (Candace); S. Kaptoge (Stephen); P.J. Leo (Paul); G. Thorleifsson (Gudmar); S.G. Wilson (Scott); J.F. Wilson (James F); V. Aalto (Ville); M. Alen (Markku); A.K. Aragaki (Aaron); T. Aspelund (Thor); J.R. Center (Jacqueline); Z. Dailiana (Zoe); C. Duggan; M. Garcia (Melissa); N. Garcia-Giralt (Natàlia); S. Giroux (Sylvie); G. Hallmans (Göran); L.J. Hocking (Lynne); L.B. Husted (Lise Bjerre); K. Jameson (Karen); R. Khusainova (Rita); G.S. Kim (Ghi Su); C. Kooperberg (Charles); T. Koromila (Theodora); M. Kruk (Marcin); M. Laaksonen (Marika); A.Z. Lacroix (Andrea Z.); S.H. Lee (Seung Hun); P.C. Leung (Ping C.); J.R. Lewis (Joshua); L. Masi (Laura); S. Mencej-Bedrac (Simona); T.V. Nguyen (Tuan); X. Nogues (Xavier); M.S. Patel (Millan); J. Prezelj (Janez); L.M. Rose (Lynda); S. Scollen (Serena); K. Siggeirsdottir (Kristin); G.D. Smith; O. Svensson (Olle); S. Trompet (Stella); O. Trummer (Olivia); N.M. van Schoor (Natasja); J. Woo (Jean); K. Zhu (Kun); S. Balcells (Susana); M.L. Brandi; B.M. Buckley (Brendan M.); S. Cheng (Sulin); C. Christiansen; C. Cooper (Charles); G.V. Dedoussis (George); I. Ford (Ian); M. Frost (Morten); D. Goltzman (David); J. González-Macías (Jesús); M. Kähönen (Mika); M. Karlsson (Magnus); E.K. Khusnutdinova (Elza); J.-M. Koh (Jung-Min); P. Kollia (Panagoula); B.L. Langdahl (Bente); W.D. Leslie (William D.); P. Lips (Paul); O. Ljunggren (Östen); R. Lorenc (Roman); J. Marc (Janja); D. Mellström (Dan); B. Obermayer-Pietsch (Barbara); D. Olmos (David); U. Pettersson-Kymmer (Ulrika); D.M. Reid (David); J.A. Riancho (José); P.M. Ridker (Paul); M.F. Rousseau (Francois); P.E. Slagboom (Eline); N.L.S. Tang (Nelson L.S.); R. Urreizti (Roser); W. Van Hul (Wim); J. Viikari (Jorma); M.T. Zarrabeitia (María); Y.S. Aulchenko (Yurii); M.C. Castaño Betancourt (Martha); E. Grundberg (Elin); L. Herrera (Lizbeth); T. Ingvarsson (Torvaldur); H. Johannsdottir (Hrefna); T. Kwan (Tony); R. Li (Rui); R.N. Luben (Robert); M.C. Medina-Gomez (Carolina); S.T. Palsson (Stefan Th); J.I. Rotter (Jerome I.); G. Sigurdsson (Gunnar); J.B.J. van Meurs (Joyce); D.J. Verlaan (Dominique); F.M. Williams (Frances); A.R. Wood (Andrew); Y. Zhou (Yanhua); T. Pastinen (Tomi); S. Raychaudhuri (Soumya); J.A. Cauley (Jane); D.I. Chasman (Daniel); G.R. Clark (Graeme); S.R. Cummings (Steven R.); P. Danoy (Patrick); E.M. Dennison (Elaine); R. Eastell (Richard); J.A. Eisman (John); V. Gudnason (Vilmundur); A. Hofman (Albert); R.D. Jackson (Rebecca); G. Jones (Graeme); J.W. Jukema (Jan Wouter); K.T. Khaw; T. Lehtimäki (Terho); Y. Liu (Yongmei); M. Lorentzon (Mattias); E. McCloskey (Eugene); B.D. Mitchell (Braxton); K. Nandakumar (Kannabiran); G.C. Nicholson (Geoffrey); B.A. Oostra (Ben); M. Peacock (Munro); H.A.P. Pols (Huibert A. P.); R.L. Prince (Richard); O. Raitakari (Olli); I.R. Reid (Ian); J. Robbins (John); P.N. Sambrook (Philip); P.C. Sham (Pak Chung); A.R. Shuldiner (Alan); F.A. Tylavsky (Frances); C.M. van Duijn (Cock); N.J. Wareham (Nicholas J.); L.A. Cupples (Adrienne); M.J. Econs (Michael); D.M. Evans (David); T.B. Harris (Tamara B.); A.W.C. Kung (Annie Wai Chee); B.M. Psaty (Bruce); J. Reeve (Jonathan); T.D. Spector (Timothy); E.A. Streeten (Elizabeth); M.C. Zillikens (Carola); U. Thorsteinsdottir (Unnur); C. Ohlsson (Claes); D. Karasik (David); J.B. Richards (J. Brent); M.A. Brown (Matthew); J-A. Zwart (John-Anker); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); S.H. Ralston (Stuart); J.P.A. Ioannidis (John P.A.); D.P. Kiel (Douglas P.); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBone Mineral Density (BMD) is a highly heritable trait, but genome-wide association studies have identified few genetic risk factors. Epidemiological studies suggest associations between BMD and several traits and diseases, but the nature of the suggestive comorbidity is still unknown. W

  15. The Impact of Dietary and Metabolic Risk Factors on Cardiovascular Diseases and Type 2 Diabetes Mortality in Brazil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia C de Oliveira Otto

    Full Text Available Trends in food availability and metabolic risk factors in Brazil suggest a shift toward unhealthy dietary patterns and increased cardiometabolic disease risk, yet little is known about the impact of dietary and metabolic risk factors on cardiometabolic mortality in Brazil.Based on data from Global Burden of Disease (GBD Study, we used comparative risk assessment to estimate the burden of 11 dietary and 4 metabolic risk factors on mortality due to cardiovascular diseases and diabetes in Brazil in 2010. Information on national diets and metabolic risks were obtained from the Brazilian Household Budget Survey, the Food and Agriculture Organization database, and large observational studies including Brazilian adults. Relative risks for each risk factor were obtained from meta-analyses of randomized trials or prospective cohort studies; and disease-specific mortality from the GBD 2010 database. We quantified uncertainty using probabilistic simulation analyses, incorporating uncertainty in dietary and metabolic data and relative risks by age and sex. Robustness of findings was evaluated by sensitivity to varying feasible optimal levels of each risk factor.In 2010, high systolic blood pressure (SBP and suboptimal diet were the largest contributors to cardiometabolic deaths in Brazil, responsible for 214,263 deaths (95% uncertainty interval [UI]: 195,073 to 233,936 and 202,949 deaths (95% UI: 194,322 to 211,747, respectively. Among individual dietary factors, low intakes of fruits and whole grains and high intakes of sodium were the largest contributors to cardiometabolic deaths. For premature cardiometabolic deaths (before age 70 years, representing 40% of cardiometabolic deaths, the leading risk factors were suboptimal diet (104,169 deaths; 95% UI: 99,964 to 108,002, high SBP (98,923 deaths; 95%UI: 92,912 to 104,609 and high body-mass index (BMI (42,643 deaths; 95%UI: 40,161 to 45,111.suboptimal diet, high SBP, and high BMI are major causes of

  16. Pay attention to individualized intensive glycemic control and reducing multiple risk factors of diabetes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Xiao-hui

    2008-01-01

    @@ As is well known,diabetes is becoming a significant burden for public health in China.Diabetes mellitus has become an epidemic in recent years in China.Studies indicate that the prevalence of diabetes has increasedrapidly in many difierent areas of China.

  17. High cumulative insulin exposure : a risk factor of atherosclerosis in type 1 diabetes?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muis, MJ; Bots, ML; Bilo, HJG; Hoogma, RPLM; Hoekstra, JBL; Grobbee, DE; Stolk, RP

    Background: Since insulin therapy might have an atherogenic effect, we studied the relationship between cumulative insulin dose and atherosclerosis in type 1 diabetes. We have focused on patients with type 1 diabetes instead of type 2 diabetes to minimise the effect of insulin resistance as a

  18. Beneficial effects of a Paleolithic diet on cardiovascular risk factors in type 2 diabetes: a randomized cross-over pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Hansson Anita; Pålsson Gunvor; Branell Ulla-Carin; Ahrén Bo; Granfeldt Yvonne; Jönsson Tommy; Söderström Margareta; Lindeberg Staffan

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Our aim was to compare the effects of a Paleolithic ('Old Stone Age') diet and a diabetes diet as generally recommended on risk factors for cardiovascular disease in patients with type 2 diabetes not treated with insulin. Methods In a randomized cross-over study, 13 patients with type 2 diabetes, 3 women and 10 men, were instructed to eat a Paleolithic diet based on lean meat, fish, fruits, vegetables, root vegetables, eggs and nuts; and a Diabetes diet designed in accorda...

  19. Beneficial effects of a Paleolithic diet on cardiovascular risk factors in type 2 diabetes: a randomized cross-over pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Hansson Anita; Pålsson Gunvor; Branell Ulla-Carin; Ahrén Bo; Granfeldt Yvonne; Jönsson Tommy; Söderström Margareta; Lindeberg Staffan

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Our aim was to compare the effects of a Paleolithic ('Old Stone Age') diet and a diabetes diet as generally recommended on risk factors for cardiovascular disease in patients with type 2 diabetes not treated with insulin. Methods In a randomized cross-over study, 13 patients with type 2 diabetes, 3 women and 10 men, were instructed to eat a Paleolithic diet based on lean meat, fish, fruits, vegetables, root vegetables, eggs and nuts; and a Diabetes diet designed in accorda...

  20. Prevalence and risk factors for type 2 diabetes mellitus with Prader-Willi syndrome: a single center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Aram; Kim, Jinsup; Cho, Sung Yoon; Jin, Dong-Kyu

    2017-08-30

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is often related to severe obesity and type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). However, few studies, and none in Korea, have examined prevalence of T2DM and other variables in PWS. The aim of this study was to identify the prevalence and associated risk factors for T2DM in Korean patients with PWS. We performed a retrospective cohort study of the 84 PWS patients aged 10 or over (10.3-35.8 years of age) diagnosed with PWS at Samsung Medical Center from 1994 to 2016. We estimated occurrence of T2DM according to age (10-18 years versus >18 years), body mass index (BMI), genotype, history of growth hormone therapy, homeostasis model of assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), and the presence of dyslipidemia, hypogonadism, or central precocious puberty. Additionally, we investigated cutoff values of risk factors for development of T2DM. Twenty-nine of a total 211 patients, diagnosed with PWS over the study period, were diagnosed as having T2DM (13.7%, mean age 15.9 ± 3.6 years). In the >18 years group, obesity, HOMA-IR, and presence of dyslipidemia, hypogonadism, or central precocious puberty were associated with the occurrence of T2DM in univariate analysis. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, only obesity (p = 0.001) and HOMA-IR (p 2.7 and >28.49 kg/m(2), respectively. Of the 29 patients, seven had ≥1 microvascular complication, with non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy in 6 of 7 cases. Advanced age and HOMA-IR were positively correlated with diabetic microvascular complications (p < 0.05, Spearman correlation coefficient 0.393 and 0.434, respectively). The prevalence of diabetes in Korean PWS was similar to that in previous results. BMI and HOMA-IR were strong predictive factors for the development of T2DM in PWS. We specifically suggest the regular monitoring of glucose homeostasis parameters through a detailed settlement of ethnically specific cutoff values for BMI and HOMA-IR in PWS to prevent progression of T2DM

  1. Is poor glycaemic control in diabetic patients a risk factor of myopia?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, N.; Jensen, H.; Lund-Andersen, H.

    2008-01-01

    haemoglobin (HbA(1c)), insulin dosage and myopia in diabetic patients. Methods: All type 1 diabetic patients aged 16-26 years [mean age 22.0, standard deviation (SD) 2.9] attending the eye clinic at Steno Diabetes Center, Copenhagen, in 1995-1997 were included in the study (n = 393). The following data were...... collected from the medical records from baseline to 2005: age at diabetes onset, age at baseline, sex, weight, HbA(1c), insulin dosage, refractive error, visual acuity and ocular diabetes complications. Results: The prevalence of myopia [spherical equivalent (SE)

  2. The characteristics of pre-diabetic patients associated with body composition and cardiovascular disease risk factors in the Iranian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Gholi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Different populations have shown various patterns of association between impaired fasting glucose (IFG and body composition parameters and risk factors of cardiovascular disease (CVD. The current study aimed at investigating the differences between persons with prediabetes and healthy people in terms of CVD risk factors including body composition parameters, blood pressure, and lipid profile in a sample of the Iranian population. Materials and Methods: In a case-control setting, a sample containing 386 (193 prediabetic subjects and 193 normal subjects of the first-degree relatives of diabetic patients aged 35-55 years were investigated. Samples were assessed using glucose tolerance categories. Prediabetes was defined according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA criteria. Body composition parameters, blood pressure, glucose parameters, and lipid profile were measured and compared between the two groups. Results: Prediabetic patients had higher body mass index (BMI, waist circumference (WC, and body fat (BF in comparison to the control group (P < 0.05. In addition, prediabetic subject had a higher intake of energy, carbohydrate, protein, fat, and cholesterol and it seems that these patients had an unhealthy dietary intake (P < 0.05. Fasting blood glucose (FBG (P < 0.001, total cholesterol (P = 0.007, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C, and triglyceride (P = 0.021 were higher in prediabetic patients (P < 0.05 than in the controls. Conclusion: Both the risk factors of CVD and body composition parameters were different between the prediabetic and normal groups; total cholesterol (TC, triglyceride (TG, and FBS were predictors of the risk of prediabetes.

  3. The characteristics of pre-diabetic patients associated with body composition and cardiovascular disease risk factors in the Iranian population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholi, Zahra; Heidari-Beni, Motahar; Feizi, Awat; Iraj, Bijan; Askari, Gholamreza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Different populations have shown various patterns of association between impaired fasting glucose (IFG) and body composition parameters and risk factors of cardiovascular disease (CVD). The current study aimed at investigating the differences between persons with prediabetes and healthy people in terms of CVD risk factors including body composition parameters, blood pressure, and lipid profile in a sample of the Iranian population. Materials and Methods: In a case-control setting, a sample containing 386 (193 prediabetic subjects and 193 normal subjects) of the first-degree relatives of diabetic patients aged 35-55 years were investigated. Samples were assessed using glucose tolerance categories. Prediabetes was defined according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA) criteria. Body composition parameters, blood pressure, glucose parameters, and lipid profile were measured and compared between the two groups. Results: Prediabetic patients had higher body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), and body fat (BF) in comparison to the control group (P < 0.05). In addition, prediabetic subject had a higher intake of energy, carbohydrate, protein, fat, and cholesterol and it seems that these patients had an unhealthy dietary intake (P < 0.05). Fasting blood glucose (FBG) (P < 0.001), total cholesterol (P = 0.007), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), and triglyceride (P = 0.021) were higher in prediabetic patients (P < 0.05) than in the controls. Conclusion: Both the risk factors of CVD and body composition parameters were different between the prediabetic and normal groups; total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG), and FBS were predictors of the risk of prediabetes. PMID:27904566

  4. Angiogenin gene polymorphism: A risk factor for diabetic peripheral neuropathy in the northern Chinese Han population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongli; Fan, Dongsheng; Zhang, Yingshuang

    2013-12-25

    Angiogenin is associated with the pathogenesis of diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Here, we quenced the coding region of the angiogenin gene in genomic DNA from 207 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (129 diabetic peripheral neuropathy patients and 78 diabetic non-neuropathy patients) and 268 healthy controls. All subjects were from the Han population of northern China. No mutations were found. We then compared the genotype and allele frequencies of the angiogenin synonymous single nucleotide polymorphism rs11701 between the diabetic peripheral neuropathy patients and controls, and between the diabetic neuropathy and non-neuropathy patients, using a case-control design. We detected no statistically significant genetic associations. Angiogenin may not be associated with genetic susceptibility to diabetic peripheral neuropathy in the Han population of northern China.

  5. Fasting-mimicking diet and markers/risk factors for aging, diabetes, cancer, and cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Min; Brandhorst, Sebastian; Shelehchi, Mahshid; Mirzaei, Hamed; Cheng, Chia Wei; Budniak, Julia; Groshen, Susan; Mack, Wendy J; Guen, Esra; Di Biase, Stefano; Cohen, Pinchas; Morgan, Todd E; Dorff, Tanya; Hong, Kurt; Michalsen, Andreas; Laviano, Alessandro; Longo, Valter D

    2017-02-15

    Calorie restriction or changes in dietary composition can enhance healthy aging, but the inability of most subjects to adhere to chronic and extreme diets, as well as potentially adverse effects, limits their application. We randomized 100 generally healthy participants from the United States into two study arms and tested the effects of a fasting-mimicking diet (FMD)-low in calories, sugars, and protein but high in unsaturated fats-on markers/risk factors associated with aging and age-related diseases. We compared subjects who followed 3 months of an unrestricted diet to subjects who consumed the FMD for 5 consecutive days per month for 3 months. Three FMD cycles reduced body weight, trunk, and total body fat; lowered blood pressure; and decreased insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1). No serious adverse effects were reported. After 3 months, control diet subjects were crossed over to the FMD program, resulting in a total of 71 subjects completing three FMD cycles. A post hoc analysis of subjects from both FMD arms showed that body mass index, blood pressure, fasting glucose, IGF-1, triglycerides, total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and C-reactive protein were more beneficially affected in participants at risk for disease than in subjects who were not at risk. Thus, cycles of a 5-day FMD are safe, feasible, and effective in reducing markers/risk factors for aging and age-related diseases. Larger studies in patients with diagnosed diseases or selected on the basis of risk factors are warranted to confirm the effect of the FMD on disease prevention and treatment.

  6. Therapeutic potential of green tea on risk factors for type 2 diabetes in obese adults - a review.

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    Ferreira, M A; Silva, D M; de Morais, A C; Mota, J F; Botelho, P B

    2016-12-01

    Green tea has been associated with positive effects in the treatment of obesity and other associated comorbidities such as type 2 diabetes. These benefits are thought to be related to the anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects of green tea and to the reduction in body fat percentage exhibited by its bioactive compounds. The predominant active compounds in green tea are flavonoid monomers known as catechins, in particular epigallocatechin-3-gallate, which is the most abundant and most effective catechin in metabolic care, particularly among obese patients. The objective of this review was to investigate the effects of green tea on body composition, oxidative stress, inflammation and insulin resistance, risk factors for the development of type 2 diabetes in obese individuals and the mechanisms that underlie the modulatory actions of green tea compounds on these risk factors. Although green tea has therapeutic potential in the treatment of obese individuals, the findings of this review demonstrate the need for a greater number of studies to confirm the positive effects of green tea, especially regarding the modulation of obesity. © 2016 World Obesity Federation.

  7. Incidence and risk factors of different phenotypes of pre-diabetes in the Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study with a 9-year follow up

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    Hossein Ghahvehchian

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pre-diabetes is a high risk condition for developing type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease. The target of this study is evaluation of incidence rate of pre-diabetes and its risk factors in a long- term follow up in the Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study. Methods: The Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study is a prospective study being accomplished on a characteristic sample of the Tehranian residents at District 13, targeted determining the prevalence and incidence of non-communicable diseases and their risk factors. Four phases of the study have been implemented, including three-year periods from 1999 to 2011. From an overall of 12808, twenty years old and older people at baseline, after excluding participants who did not have the necessary conditions, analyses were accompanied on a 2597 male and 3282 female to estimate pre-diabetes incidence and detect their risk factors. Results: In men with incident pre-diabetes, age, fasting plasma glucose, 2-hour post-challenge plasma glucose and body mass index in addition to a positive family history of diabetes and <12 years of education were associated to a developed risk of rising pre-diabetes, but intervention and being single had a significant caring effect. In women with pre-diabetes, 2-hour post-challenge plasma glucose, triglycerides to high density lipoprotein-cholesterol ratio, waist-to-height ratio, fasting plasma glucose and a helpful family history of diabetes increased risk of pre-diabetes, however being divorced/widowed had a slighter risk. Potential risk factors for evolving combined impaired fasting glucose and impaired glucose tolerance were higher fasting plasma glucose, 2-hour post-challenge plasma glucose, body mass index and triglycerides to high density lipoprotein-cholesterol ratio, but bigger hip circumference had a caring effect. Pre-diabetes incidence rate was computed 46.1 per 1000 person-years in men and 36.8 per 1000 person-years in women. Conclusion: The study

  8. Risk factors for mortality in children with diabetic keto acidosis from developing countries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Varadarajan; Poovazhagi

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic keto acidosis(DKA) is the major cause for mortality in children with Diabetes mellitus(DM). With increasing incidence of type 1 DM worldwide, there is an absolute increase of DM among children between 0-14 year age group and overall incidence among less than 30 years remain the same. This shift towards younger age group is more of concern especially in developing countries where mortality in DKA is alarmingly high. Prior to the era of insulin, DKA was associated with 100% mortality and subsequently mortality rates have come down and is now, 0.15%-0.31% in developed countries. However the scenario in developing countries like India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh are very different and mortality is still high in children with DKA. Prospective studies on DKA in children are lacking in developing countries. Literature on DKA related mortality are based on retrospective studies and are very recent from countries like India, Pakistan and Bangladesh. There exists an urgent need to understand the differences between developed and developing countries with respect to mortality rates and factors associated with increased mortality in children with DKA. Higher mortality rates, increased incidence of cerebral edema, sepsis, shock and renal failure have been identified among DKA in children from developing countries.Root cause for all these complications and increased mortality in DKA could be delayed diagnosis in children from developing countries. This necessitates creating awareness among parents, public and physicians by health education to identify symptoms of DM/DKA in children, in order to decrease mortality in DKA. Based on past experience in Parma, Italy it is possible to prevent occurrence of DKA both in new onset DM and in children with established DM, by simple interventions to increase awareness among public and physicians.

  9. Risk factors for mortality in children with diabetic keto acidosis from developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poovazhagi, Varadarajan

    2014-12-15

    Diabetic keto acidosis (DKA) is the major cause for mortality in children with Diabetes mellitus (DM). With increasing incidence of type 1 DM worldwide, there is an absolute increase of DM among children between 0-14 year age group and overall incidence among less than 30 years remain the same. This shift towards younger age group is more of concern especially in developing countries where mortality in DKA is alarmingly high. Prior to the era of insulin, DKA was associated with 100% mortality and subsequently mortality rates have come down and is now, 0.15%-0.31% in developed countries. However the scenario in developing countries like India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh are very different and mortality is still high in children with DKA. Prospective studies on DKA in children are lacking in developing countries. Literature on DKA related mortality are based on retrospective studies and are very recent from countries like India, Pakistan and Bangladesh. There exists an urgent need to understand the differences between developed and developing countries with respect to mortality rates and factors associated with increased mortality in children with DKA. Higher mortality rates, increased incidence of cerebral edema, sepsis, shock and renal failure have been identified among DKA in children from developing countries. Root cause for all these complications and increased mortality in DKA could be delayed diagnosis in children from developing countries. This necessitates creating awareness among parents, public and physicians by health education to identify symptoms of DM/DKA in children, in order to decrease mortality in DKA. Based on past experience in Parma, Italy it is possible to prevent occurrence of DKA both in new onset DM and in children with established DM, by simple interventions to increase awareness among public and physicians.

  10. Hepatitis C as a risk factor for diabetes type 2: lack of evidence in a hospital in central-west Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luce Marina Freires Corrêa da Costa

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available In order to assess the importance of HCV infection as a possible risk factor for type 2 diabetes mellitus, a case-control study was conducted, comparing the prevalence of HCV infection among diabetic and non-diabetic patients. Diabetic outpatients attending to a University Hospital in Central-West Brazil were evaluated between April and October 2005. A control group composed by patients from the same institution was matched by gender and age. Candidates to control group were included only if fasting glucose measures were under 100 mg/dL. Diabetics and controls had blood samples taken in order to test for antibodies against HCV (anti-HCV by enzyme-immunoassay. Polymerase chain reaction and immunoblot were performed to confirm the anti-HCV status. Each group included 206 participants. Despite of the groups were in general comparable. The diabetics had a greater body mass average and smaller family income. The prevalence of confirmed anti-HCV in the diabetic group was of 1.4%, which was similar to the controls (1%. Finding statistical difference may have been hampered by the low frequency of HCV infection in both groups. It was not possible to demonstrate a role of HCV as an etiologic factor in type 2 diabetes, since HCV infected patients represented a small portion of the overall diabetes cases. This finding does not allow to recommend regular screening for HCV infection in type 2 diabetics in this region.

  11. Poor adherence with ACE inhibitors is a risk factor of CVA with oral hypoglycemic agents in diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aftab, Muhammad Tariq; Dharamshi, Hasnain Abbas; Faraz, Ahmed; Shakeel, Saba; Shakeel, Osama

    2017-03-01

    Poor adherence with medicine declines the clinical outcome of pharmacotherapy. It may carry serious sequelae especially in case of antihypertensive drugs like cerebrovascular accident (CVA). This study has been planned to find the association of poor adherence with anti-hypertensive with CVA in diabetic and non- diabetic patients. One hundred CVA patients who were admitted through Emergency in Abbasi Shaheed hospital, a tertiary care hospital in Karachi, were recruited from Jun 2013 till Dec 2013. The criteria of inclusion was, diagnosed case of CVA, with primary hypertension, availability of patient's therapeutic record, consent of the patient or legal successor/heir. The criteria of exclusion was, secondary hypertension, newly diagnosed primary hypertensive patients and complete adherence with medication. Morisky medication adherence scale was applied. Therapeutic record was accessed. The mean age was 62.15 years with 3:1 male to female ratio. Adherence to medicine was graded 0.05) was seen in any combination (p>0.05). Thus it is concluded that poor adherence with ACE inhibitors may be a risk factor of CVA in diabetic patients using oral hypoglycemic agents.

  12. Severe hypoglycaemia in type 1 diabetes: impact of the renin-angiotensin system and other risk factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen-Bjergaard, Ulrik

    2009-01-01

    unawareness - only account for a limited part of this variation. Results from a case-series suggest that the use of psychoactive substances may be as significant as alcohol for promotion of risk of severe hypoglycaemia - a finding which needs to be confirmed by case-control studies. We identified elevated...... - with major contribution from hypoglycaemia unawareness - only account for a limited part of this variation. Results from a case-series suggest that the use of psychoactive substances may be as significant as alcohol for promotion of risk of severe hypoglycaemia - a finding which needs to be confirmed by case...... and the need for assistance from other persons in order to manage the situation. Such episodes represent the most feared side effect to insulin treatment and are regarded as the major limiting factor for achievement of recommended glycaemic targets in type 1 diabetes. The series of studies that constitute...

  13. Serum endogenous secretory RAGE level is an independent risk factor for the progression of carotid atherosclerosis in type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katakami, Naoto; Matsuhisa, Munehide; Kaneto, Hideaki; Matsuoka, Taka-aki; Sakamoto, Ken'ya; Yasuda, Tetsuyuki; Umayahara, Yutaka; Kosugi, Keisuke; Yamasaki, Yoshimitsu

    2009-05-01

    Advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) and the receptor for AGEs (RAGE) system plays an important role in the development of atherosclerosis. It has been recently reported that endogenous secretory RAGE (esRAGE) and total soluble RAGE (sRAGE) levels are associated with diabetic complications. The aim of the present study is to longitudinally evaluate the association between esRAGE and sRAGE levels and the progression of carotid