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Sample records for diabetes prediction lipid

  1. Maternal Lipids May Predict Fetal Growth in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Gestational Diabetes Mellitus Pregnancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krstevska, Brankica; Jovanovska, Sasha Misevska; Krstevska, Slagjana Simeonova; Nakova, Valentina Velkoska; Serafimoski, Vladimir

    2016-11-01

    During diabetic pregnancy, complex metabolic changes occur in the lipid profile. The aim of the study was to determine the predictive values of maternal serum lipid levels on large-for-gestational age newborns during the third trimester in pregnancies of women with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Data of forty three pregnancies of women with DM2 and two hundred women with GDM were analyzed. The analysis encompassed the following parameters: age, body mass index (BMI), lipid parameters, HbA1c in first, second and third trimester of pregnancy, preeclampsia and baby birth weight. DM2 and GDM groups showed statistically significant differences in the following variables: total lipids, triglycerides, total cholesterol, BMI, age, baby birth weight, incidence of SGA and preterm delivery (9.4 ± 2.3 vs. 11.0 ± 2.3 mmol/L, 2.4 ± 1.4 vs. 3.4 ± 1.6 mmol/L, 5.5 ± 1.2 vs. 6.4 ± 1.4 mmol/L, 30.6 ± 5.4 vs. 26.9 ± 5.2 kg/m2, 34 ± 7.8 vs. 31.5 ± 5.6 years, 3183 ± 972 vs. 3533 ± 699 g., 20% vs. 7.5%, 27.9 vs. 14%, respectively, p DM2 and GDM pregnancies. Thus, the maternal serum triglycerides and LDL-C levels determined in the maternal blood taken in the third trimester of pregnancy may indentify women who will give birth to LGA newborns.

  2. Lack of predictive power of plasma lipids or lipoproteins for gestational diabetes mellitus in Japanese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iimura, Yuko; Matsuura, Masaaki; Yao, Zemin; Ito, Satoru; Fujiwara, Mutsunori; Yoshitsugu, Michiyasu; Miyauchi, Akito; Hiyoshi, Toru

    2015-11-01

    To determine the diagnostic potential of plasma lipids and apolipoproteins in gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), we carried out a retrospective cohort study of 1,161 Japanese women at 20-28 weeks of gestation who underwent a glucose challenge test (GCT). A total of 1,161 Japanese women at 20-28 weeks of gestation underwent a GCT. Participants with a positive test (GCT[+]) underwent a subsequent oral glucose tolerance test. Clinical and biochemical parameters were determined and quantification of apolipoproteins (Apo), including ApoB, ApoB48, ApoA-I and ApoC-III, was carried out. The prevalence of GCT(+; with a 130 mg/dL glucose cut-off) and GDM was 20% and 4%, respectively. There was a trend for increased triglycerides and ApoC-III in GDM(+) participants. However, the difference in plasma triglycerides, ApoC-III or ApoB48 did not reach statistical significance between GDM(+) and GDM(-) women. Values of 1-h glucose (P < 0.001) and fasting glucose (P = 0.002) were significant risk factors for GDM. Prediction of GDM using only the ApoC-III value is not easy, although triglycerides and ApoC-III were higher in the GDM(+) group. The present findings show no significant difference in plasma lipid levels between women diagnosed with GDM and those with normal glucose tolerance.

  3. Plasma lipid oxidation predicts atherosclerotic status better than cholesterol in diabetic apolipoprotein E deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Karen Ekkelund; Lykkesfeldt, Jens; Raun, Kirsten

    2017-01-01

    Increased levels of oxidative stress have been suggested to play a detrimental role in the development of diabetes-related vascular complications. Here, we investigated whether the concentration of malondialdehyde, a marker of lipid oxidation correlated to the degree of aortic plaque lesions...... in a proatherogenic diabetic mouse model. Three groups of apolipoprotein E knockout mice were studied for 20 weeks, a control, a streptozotocin-induced diabetic, and a diabetic enalapril-treated group. Enalapril was hypothesized to lower oxidative stress level and thus the plaque burden. Both diabetic groups were...... significantly different from the control group as they had higher blood glucose, HbA1c, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, very low-density lipoprotein, together with a lower high-density lipoprotein concentration and body weight. Animals in the diabetic group had significantly higher plaque area...

  4. Lipid ratios and appropriate cut off values for prediction of diabetes: a cohort of Iranian men and women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadaegh Farzad

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dyslipidemia is a risk factor for incident type 2 diabetes; however, no study has specifically assessed the lipid ratios (i.e. total cholesterol (TC/high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C and triglyceride (TG/HDL-C as predictors of diabetes. We aimed to compare the independent association between the different lipid measures with incident diabetes over a median follow up of 6.4 years in Iranian men and women. Method The study population consisted of 5201 non diabetic (men = 2173, women = 3028 subjects, aged ≥20 years. The risk factor adjusted odds ratios (ORs for diabetes were calculated for every 1 standard deviation (SD change in TC, log-transformed TG, HDL-C, non-HDL-C, TC/HDL-C and log-transformed TG/HDL-C using multivariate logistic regression analysis. Receiver operator characteristic (ROC curve analysis was used to define the points of the maximum sum of sensitivity and specificity (MAXss of each lipid measure as a predictor of diabetes. Result We found 366 (146 men and 220 women new diabetes cases during follow-up. The risk-factor-adjusted ORs for a 1 SD increase in TG, TC/HDL-C and TG/HDL-C were 1.23, 1.27 and 1.25 in men; the corresponding risks in females were 1.36, 1.14, 1.39 respectively (all p Conclusion TC/HDL-C and TG/HDL-C showed similar performance for diabetes prediction in men population however; among women TG/HDL-C highlighted higher risk than did TC/HDL-C, although there was no difference in discriminatory power. Importantly, HDL-C had a protective effect for incident diabetes only among women.

  5. Lipid Profile in Sudanese Diabetic Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naway, L. M. Y.

    2011-04-01

    This study composes of two parts, the first one is an experiment to evaluate the level of blood glucose and lipid profile (TC, TG, LDL, HDL and VLDL) among diabetic patients and comparison of the result with non diabetic subjects and the second one is a survey to assess the standards of health care and patients knowledge. The subject were divided into two groups according to insulin requirement. Type 1 is insulin dependent diabetes mellitus and type 2 is non insulin dependent diabetes mellitus and then divided according to gender (males and female) subgroups. The study subjects selected for this study consist of one hundred Sudanese diabetic patients from Ribat University Hospital during January 2009 they had mean age (52±11.063) years,a mean height (165.82±8.573) cm and a mean weight of (70.20±11.203) kg. fifty healthy non diabetic subject were chosen as controls, their mean age (45.72±11.169) years, mean height (167.28±9.450) cm and mean weight (71.02±13.429) kg. Blood glucose and lipid profile total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), low density lipoprotein (LDL) and high density lipoprotein (HDL) were measured by enzymatic colorimetric methods in both groups, and very low density lipoprotein cholesterol were calculated for each sample. All patients were interviewed and filled out the questionnaire consisted of five parts. The result of the study found highly significant elevated level of blood glucose level among diabetic patients compared to non diabetic subjects. In addition to significant elevated level of serum lipids TC p=0.001, TG p=0.001, LDL p=0.001, and VLDL p=0.001. And decrease in HDL P=0.001 level in diabetic patient compared to non diabetic subjects. Among subgroups (type 1, type 2) diabetic patients glucose level and serum total cholesterol, triglycerides, LDL cholesterol and VLDL cholestrol were significantly higher (p<0.5) while HDL cholestrol was significantly lower when compared to non diabetic subjects. Non statistically variation

  6. Lipid Profile in Sudanese Diabetic Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naway, L M. Y. [Sudan Academy of Sciences, Atomic Energy Council, Khartoum (Sudan)

    2011-04-15

    This study composes of two parts, the first one is an experiment to evaluate the level of blood glucose and lipid profile (TC, TG, LDL, HDL and VLDL) among diabetic patients and comparison of the result with non diabetic subjects and the second one is a survey to assess the standards of health care and patients knowledge. The subject were divided into two groups according to insulin requirement. Type 1 is insulin dependent diabetes mellitus and type 2 is non insulin dependent diabetes mellitus and then divided according to gender (males and female) subgroups. The study subjects selected for this study consist of one hundred Sudanese diabetic patients from Ribat University Hospital during January 2009 they had mean age (52{+-}11.063) years,a mean height (165.82{+-}8.573) cm and a mean weight of (70.20{+-}11.203) kg. fifty healthy non diabetic subject were chosen as controls, their mean age (45.72{+-}11.169) years, mean height (167.28{+-}9.450) cm and mean weight (71.02{+-}13.429) kg. Blood glucose and lipid profile total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), low density lipoprotein (LDL) and high density lipoprotein (HDL) were measured by enzymatic colorimetric methods in both groups, and very low density lipoprotein cholesterol were calculated for each sample. All patients were interviewed and filled out the questionnaire consisted of five parts. The result of the study found highly significant elevated level of blood glucose level among diabetic patients compared to non diabetic subjects. In addition to significant elevated level of serum lipids TC p=0.001, TG p=0.001, LDL p=0.001, and VLDL p=0.001. And decrease in HDL P=0.001 level in diabetic patient compared to non diabetic subjects. Among subgroups (type 1, type 2) diabetic patients glucose level and serum total cholesterol, triglycerides, LDL cholesterol and VLDL cholestrol were significantly higher (p<0.5) while HDL cholestrol was significantly lower when compared to non diabetic subjects. Non statistically

  7. [The value of fasting plasma glucose and lipid profiles between 7 and 15 gestational weeks in the prediction of gestational diabetes mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, M; Li, G H

    2016-11-25

    Objective: To explore the value of using fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and lipid profiles between 7 and 15 gestational weeks to predict gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Methods: The medical records of 2 138 pregnant women who had prenatal care in Beijing Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital from August 2011 to February 2012 were analyzed retrospectively. According to results of the oral glucose tolerance tests, women were devided into the GDM group ( n =240) and the normal group ( n= 1 898). Maternal characteristics, FPG and lipid levels between 7 and 15 gestational weeks were compared between the two groups. Logistic regression analysis and receiver operator characteristics(ROC) curve were used in the analysis. Results: Potential markers for the prediction of GDM included total cholesterol, triglyceride (TG) , low-density lipoprotein cholesterol/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratios (LDL-C/HDL-C) , triglyceride to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratios (TG/HDL-C) and FPG. After adjustment of confounding factors, age ( OR= 1.046, 95% CI: 1.003-1.090), pre- pregnancy body mass index ( OR= 1.104, 95% CI: 1.049-1.161), gravidity>3 ( OR= 1.768, 95% CI: 1.071-2.920), FPG ( OR= 8.137, 95% CI: 5.412-12.236), TG ( OR= 1.460, 95% CI: 1.148-1.858) were independently associated with the risk of developing GDM. Equation, P GDM =1/{1+exp[-(-16.542+0.045×age+0.103×pre-pregnancy body mass index+0.551×gravidity>3+2.110×FPG+0.372×TG)]}, was constructed by the logistic regression analysis. Sensitivity (67.5%) and specificity (70.5%) were determined by the calculated risk score, with a cut-off value of 0.11 (area under the curve: 0.751, 95% CI: 0.718-0.783, P< 0.001). Conclusions: FPG and TG, together with clinical characteristics may have a better predictive value for the risk of GDM.

  8. Long-term associations between serum lipids and panretinal photocoagulation in type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jesper Skovlund; Mejnert Jørgensen, Trine; Green, Anders

    2013-01-01

    To examine the predictive value of serum lipids on the need for panretinal photocoagulation (PRP) treatment in a long-term follow-up of a cohort of Danish type 1 diabetic patients.......To examine the predictive value of serum lipids on the need for panretinal photocoagulation (PRP) treatment in a long-term follow-up of a cohort of Danish type 1 diabetic patients....

  9. Effect of tetrahydrocurcumin on lipid peroxidation and lipids in streptozotocin-nicotinamide-induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murugan, Pidaran; Pari, Leelavinothan

    2006-08-01

    Hyperlipidaemia is an associated complication of diabetes mellitus. We recently reported that tetrahydrocurcumin lowered the blood glucose in diabetic rats. In the present study, we have investigated the effect of tetrahydrocurcumin, one of the active metabolites of curcumin on lipid profile and lipid peroxidation in streptozotocin-nicotinamide-induced diabetic rats. Tetrahydrocurcumin 80 mg/kg body weight was administered orally to diabetic rats for 45 days, resulted a significant reduction in blood glucose and significant increase in plasma insulin in diabetic rats, which proved its antidiabetic effect. Tetrahydrocurcumin also caused a significant reduction in lipid peroxidation (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and hydroperoxides) and lipids (cholesterol, triglycerides, free fatty acids and phospholipids) in serum and tissues, suggesting its role in protection against lipid peroxidation and its antihyperlipidemic effect. Tetrahydrocurcumin showed a better effect when compared with curcumin. Results of the present study indicate that tetrahydrocurcumin showed antihyperlipidaemic effect in addition to its antidiabetic effect in type 2 diabetic rats.

  10. Lipid profile among diabetes patients in Gaborone, Botswana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lipid profile among diabetes patients in Gaborone, Botswana. ... in males, but there was no difference in LDL levels between type 1 and 2 DM patients. ... associated with exercise, smoking or alcohol consumption in the DM patients studied.

  11. Lipid-related markers and cardiovascular disease prediction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Angelantonio, Emanuele; Gao, Pei; Pennells, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    The value of assessing various emerging lipid-related markers for prediction of first cardiovascular events is debated.......The value of assessing various emerging lipid-related markers for prediction of first cardiovascular events is debated....

  12. SERUM MAGNESIUM, LIPID PROFILE AND GLYCATED HAEMOGLOBIN IN DIABETIC RETINOPATHY

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    Sunanda Vusikala

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Diabetic retinopathy is one of the important microvascular complications of diabetes mellitus of long duration. Alterations in trace metals like magnesium and lipid profile was observed in diabetic retinopathy with hyperglycaemic status. AIM The study was taken up to assess the role of magnesium, lipid profile and glycated haemoglobin in diabetic retinopathy. MATERIALS AND METHODS A total of 80 subjects between 40-65 years were included in the study. Group 1 includes 20 age and sex matched healthy controls. Group 2 includes 30 cases of Diabetes mellitus without retinopathy. Group 3 includes 30 cases of Diabetes mellitus with retinopathy. RESULTS Magnesium was found to be significantly low in the diabetic group with retinopathy. Serum cholesterol and triglycerides were significantly elevated in the diabetic group with retinopathy. Fasting and Postprandial plasma glucose and glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c levels confirmed the glycaemic status of each of the groups. CONCLUSIONS Hypomagnesemia, hypercholesterolaemia, hypertriglyceridemia was observed in diabetic retinopathy along with increased levels of glycated haemoglobin in our study.

  13. Impact of age, gender and diabetes on serum lipid levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adnan, M.; Shabbir, I.; Ali, Z.; Ali, S.F.; Rahat, T.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives:To see the effects of age, gender and diabetes on serum lipid levels. Study type, settings and duration:Cross sectional analytical study conducted at PMRC Research Centre, Fatima Jinnah Medical College,Lahore from Jun-Dec 2011. Materials and Methods: One hundred type 2 diabetes mellitus and equal numbers of gender matched healthy controls were randomly selected for the study. After an overnight fasting, blood specimens were drawn for lipid profile where total cholesterol,high density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglycerides were measured by standard enzymatic endpoint methods and LDL-cholesterol by Friedweld's formula. Statistical analysis was done using SPSS-15. Results Odd ratios of age for total cholesterol (OR 1.198); high density lipoprotein cholesterol (OR 1.144); and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (OR 1.576) revealed that subjects aged 45 years or more had greater risk of having deranged lipid levels. Female gender had higher high density lipoprotein cholesterol (p 0.000); and triglycerides (p 0.001). Odd ratios of men for total cholesterol (OR 0.775); high density lipoprotein cholesterol(OR 0.183); and low density lipoprotein Cholesterol (OR 0.683) illustrated that men were significantly less prone to dyslipidemia than women. Odd ratio of diabetes for high density lipoprotein cholesterol (OR 1.802) suggested that diabetics had 1.8 times more risk of having low high density lipoprotein cholesterol. Conclusions: Diabetic females over 45 years of age have significantly high chances of having disturbed or high lipid profile. Policy message:All persons in general and diabetics in particular over the age of 45 years should be screened for dyslipidemia and informed using behavior change communication to prevent disease complications. (author)

  14. Impact of age, gender and diabetes on serum lipid levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adnan, M.; Shabbir, I.; Ali, Z.; Ali, S. F.; Rahat, T. [Fatima Jinnah Medical College, Lahore (Pakistan)

    2013-01-15

    Objectives:To see the effects of age, gender and diabetes on serum lipid levels. Study type, settings and duration:Cross sectional analytical study conducted at PMRC Research Centre, Fatima Jinnah Medical College,Lahore from Jun-Dec 2011. Materials and Methods: One hundred type 2 diabetes mellitus and equal numbers of gender matched healthy controls were randomly selected for the study. After an overnight fasting, blood specimens were drawn for lipid profile where total cholesterol,high density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglycerides were measured by standard enzymatic endpoint methods and LDL-cholesterol by Friedweld's formula. Statistical analysis was done using SPSS-15. Results Odd ratios of age for total cholesterol (OR 1.198); high density lipoprotein cholesterol (OR 1.144); and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (OR 1.576) revealed that subjects aged 45 years or more had greater risk of having deranged lipid levels. Female gender had higher high density lipoprotein cholesterol (p 0.000); and triglycerides (p 0.001). Odd ratios of men for total cholesterol (OR 0.775); high density lipoprotein cholesterol(OR 0.183); and low density lipoprotein Cholesterol (OR 0.683) illustrated that men were significantly less prone to dyslipidemia than women. Odd ratio of diabetes for high density lipoprotein cholesterol (OR 1.802) suggested that diabetics had 1.8 times more risk of having low high density lipoprotein cholesterol. Conclusions: Diabetic females over 45 years of age have significantly high chances of having disturbed or high lipid profile. Policy message:All persons in general and diabetics in particular over the age of 45 years should be screened for dyslipidemia and informed using behavior change communication to prevent disease complications. (author)

  15. Development and Validation of a Model to Predict Absolute Vascular Risk Reduction by Moderate-Intensity Statin Therapy in Individual Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: The Anglo Scandinavian Cardiac Outcomes Trial, Antihypertensive and Lipid-Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial, and Collaborative Atorvastatin Diabetes Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaasenbrood, Lotte; Poulter, Neil R; Sever, Peter S; Colhoun, Helen M; Livingstone, Shona J; Boekholdt, S Matthijs; Pressel, Sara L; Davis, Barry R; van der Graaf, Yolanda; Visseren, Frank L J

    2016-05-01

    In this study, we aimed to translate the average relative effect of statin therapy from trial data to the individual patient with type 2 diabetes mellitus by developing and validating a model to predict individualized absolute risk reductions (ARR) of cardiovascular events. Data of 2725 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus from the Lipid Lowering Arm of the Anglo Scandinavian Cardiac Outcomes Trial (ASCOT-LLA) study (atorvastatin 10 mg versus placebo) were used for model derivation. The model was based on 8 clinical predictors including treatment allocation (statin/placebo). Ten-year individualized ARR on major cardiovascular events by statin therapy were calculated for each patient by subtracting the estimated on-treatment risk from the estimated off-treatment risk. Predicted 10-year ARR by statin therapy was 4% (median ARR, 3.2%; interquartile range, 2.5%-4.3%; 95% confidence interval for 3.2% ARR, -1.4% to 6.8%). Addition of treatment interactions did not improve model performance. Therefore, the wide distribution in ARR was a consequence of the underlying distribution in cardiovascular risk enrolled in these trials. External validation of the model was performed in data from the Antihypertensive and Lipid-Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial (ALLHAT-LLT; pravastatin 40 mg versus usual care) and Collaborative Atorvastatin Diabetes Study (CARDS; atorvastatin 10 mg versus placebo) of 3878 and 2838 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, respectively. Model calibration was adequate in both external data sets, discrimination was moderate (ALLHAT-LLT: c-statistics, 0.64 [95% confidence interval, 0.61-0.67] and CARDS: 0.68 [95% confidence interval, 0.64-0.72]). ARRs of major cardiovascular events by statin therapy can be accurately estimated for individual patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus using a model based on routinely available patient characteristics. There is a wide distribution in ARR that may complement informed decision making. URL: http

  16. Serum Lipids and Diabetic Retinopathy in Newly Diagnosed Type 2 Diabetic Subjects

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    Shahana Shermin

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetic retinopathy is the commonest and usually the first observable vascular complication of diabetes mellitus. Along with hyperglycaemia, dyslipidaemia is a contributing factor for the occurrence of diabetic retinopathy. It is postulated that dyslipidaemia results in formation of hard exudate by increasing blood viscosity and altering the fibrinolytic system. A case control study was carried out in the department of Biochemistry, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University, Dhaka during the period of January 2006 to December 2007 to evaluate the serum lipid profile in newly diagnosed type 2 diabetic subjects with diabetic retinopathy. Materials and Methods: Total 85 newly diagnosed type 2 diabetic subjects were included in this study, 40 were cases having retinopathy and 45 were age and sex matched controls without retinopathy. Serum triglyceride (TG, total cholesterol (TC, low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C and high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C were compared between cases and controls. Unpaired t-test and chi-square test were done between groups as tests of significance. Results: All the parameters of lipid profile showed dyslipidaemic trend both in cases and controls. In the cases TG was significantly higher and HDL-C was significantly lower than that of controls (p < 0.05 whereas no significant difference was found between cases and controls with respect to serum TC and LDL-C. Conclusion: It can be concluded that high TG and low HDL-C are associated with diabetic retinopathy in newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes.

  17. Lipid measures and cardiovascular disease prediction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wijk, D.F.; Stroes, E.S.G.; Kastelein, J.J.P.

    2009-01-01

    Traditional lipid measures are the cornerstone of risk assessment and treatment goals in cardiovascular prevention. Whereas the association between total, LDL-, HDL-cholesterol and cardiovascular disease risk has been generally acknowledged, the rather poor capacity to distinguish between patients

  18. Lipid control and use of lipid-regulating drugs for prevention of cardiovascular events in Chinese type 2 diabetic patients: a prospective cohort study

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    Tong Peter CY

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dyslipidaemia is an important but modifiable risk factor of cardiovascular disease (CVD in type 2 diabetes. Yet, the effectiveness of lipid regulating drugs in Asians is lacking. We examined the effects of lipid control and treatment with lipid regulating drugs on new onset of CVD in Chinese type 2 diabetic patients. Methods In this prospective cohort consisting of 4521 type 2 diabetic patients without history of CVD and naïve for lipid regulating treatment recruited consecutively from 1996 to 2005, 371 developed CVD after a median follow-up of 4.9 years. We used Cox proportional hazard regression to obtain the hazard ratios (HR of lipids and use of lipid regulating drugs for risk of CVD. Results The multivariate-adjusted HR (95% confidence interval of CVD in patients with high LDL-cholesterol (≥ 3.0 mmol/L was 1.36 (1.08 - 1.71, compared with lower values. Using the whole range value of HDL-cholesterol, the risk of CVD was reduced by 41% with every 1 mmol/L increase in HDL-cholesterol. Plasma triglyceride did not predict CVD. Statins use was associated with lower CVD risk [HR = 0.66 (0.50 - 0.88]. In sub-cohort analysis, statins use was associated with a HR of 0.60 (0.44 - 0.82 in patients with high LDL-cholesterol (≥ 3.0 mmol/L and 0.49 (0.28 - 0.88 in patients with low HDL-cholesterol. In patients with LDL-cholesterol Conclusions In Chinese type 2 diabetic patients, high LDL-cholesterol and low HDL-cholesterol predicted incident CVD. Overall, patients treated with statins had 40-50% risk reduction in CVD compared to non-users.

  19. In vivo postprandial lipid partitioning in liver and muscle of diabetic rats is disturbed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prompers, J.J.; Jonkers, R.A.M.; Loon, van L.J.C.; Nicolay, K.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To study in vivo lipid partitioning in insulin-resistant liver and muscle of diabetic rats using magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Methods: Four groups of n=6 male Zucker diabetic fatty rats were used for this study: obese, pre-diabetic fa/fa rats and lean, non-diabetic fa/+

  20. Computationally efficient prediction of area per lipid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chaban, Vitaly V.

    2014-01-01

    dynamics increases exponentially with respect to temperature. APL dependence on temperature is linear over an entire temperature range. I provide numerical evidence that thermal expansion coefficient of a lipid bilayer can be computed at elevated temperatures and extrapolated to the temperature of interest...

  1. Blood lipid levels and SPECT of myocardium perfusion to type 2 asymptomatic diabetic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pena Quian, Yamile; Fernandez-Britto Rodriguez, Jose; Coca Perez, Marco A; Batista Cuellar, Juan F; Rochela Vazquez, Luis Manuel

    2006-01-01

    SPECT, coronary angiography and laboratories test were performed on 31 asymptomatic type 2 diabetes patients, in order to determine the relationship among the lipid levels in blood and the results of the SPECT. Patients were classified in two groups (positive SPECT or negative SPECT). Simple descriptive statistics were calculated for all variables in both groups. Positive SPECT was detected in 35,5% of the patients and negative SPECT in 64,5%.The coronary angiography and SPECT showed good correlation. Low values of HDLc showed significant association with the positive results of the SPECT. The logistical regression showed an increment of the capacity to predict a positive SPECT if the values of HDLc are used. Conclusion: The present investigation demonstrated a significant association among the low levels of HDLc in blood and the positive results of the SPECT. The low values of HDLc could predict the possibility of a positive SPECT in asymptomatic diabetic type 2 patients (au)

  2. Prediction of body lipid change in pregnancy and lactation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friggens, N C; Ingvartsen, K L; Emmans, G C

    2004-04-01

    A simple method to predict the genetically driven pattern of body lipid change through pregnancy and lactation in dairy cattle is proposed. The rationale and evidence for genetically driven body lipid change have their basis in evolutionary considerations and in the homeorhetic changes in lipid metabolism through the reproductive cycle. The inputs required to predict body lipid change are body lipid mass at calving (kg) and the date of conception (days in milk). Body lipid mass can be derived from body condition score and live weight. A key assumption is that there is a linear rate of change of the rate of body lipid change (dL/dt) between calving and a genetically determined time in lactation (T') at which a particular level of body lipid (L') is sought. A second assumption is that there is a linear rate of change of the rate of body lipid change (dL/dt) between T' and the next calving. The resulting model was evaluated using 2 sets of data. The first was from Holstein cows with 3 different levels of body fatness at calving. The second was from Jersey cows in first, second, and third parity. The model was found to reproduce the observed patterns of change in body lipid reserves through lactation in both data sets. The average error of prediction was low, less than the variation normally associated with the recording of condition score, and was similar for the 2 data sets. When the model was applied using the initially suggested parameter values derived from the literature the average error of prediction was 0.185 units of condition score (+/- 0.086 SD). After minor adjustments to the parameter values, the average error of prediction was 0.118 units of condition score (+/- 0.070 SD). The assumptions on which the model is based were sufficient to predict the changes in body lipid of both Holstein and Jersey cows under different nutritional conditions and parities. Thus, the model presented here shows that it is possible to predict genetically driven curves of body

  3. Lipid abnormalities in streptozotocin-diabetes: Amelioration by Morus indica L. cv Suguna leaves

    OpenAIRE

    Andallu, B.; Vinay Kumar, A. V.; Varadacharyulu, N. Ch.

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To observe the influence of mulberry (Morus indica L. cv Suguna) leaves on lipid abnormalities in STZ-diabetic rats. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Treatment with dried mulberry leaf powder for a period of 8 weeks in hyperglycemic and hyperlipidemic STZ-diabetic rats. RESULTS: Mulberry leaves regulated fasting blood glucose, ameliorated the abnormalities in lipid profile as indicated by significant (P

  4. Reduced lipid oxidation in myotubes established from obese and type 2 diabetic subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaster, Michael

    2009-01-01

    To date, it is unknown whether reduced lipid oxidation of skeletal muscle of obese and obese type 2 diabetic (T2D) subjects partly is based on reduced oxidation of endogenous lipids. Palmitate (PA) accumulation, total oxidation and lipolysis were not different between myotubes established from lean...... both for endogenous and exogenous lipids. Thus myotubes established from obese and obese T2D subjects express a reduced complete oxidation of endogenous lipids. Two cardinal principles govern the reduced lipid oxidation in obese and diabetic myotubes; firstly, an impaired coupling between endogenous...... lipid and mitochondria in obese and obese diabetic myotubes and secondly, a mismatch between beta-oxidation and citric acid cycle in obese diabetic myotubes....

  5. [Severely increased serum lipid levels in diabetic ketoacidosis - case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefansson, Hrafnkell; Sigvaldason, Kristinn; Kjartansson, Hilmar; Sigurjonsdottir, Helga Águsta

    2017-01-01

    Severe hypertriglyceridemia is a known, but uncommon complication of diabetic ketoacidosis. We discuss the case of a 23-year-old, previously healthy, woman who initially presented to the emergency department with abdominal pain. Grossly lipemic serum due to extremely high triglyceride (38.6 mmol/L) and cholesterol (23.2 mmol/L) levels were observed with a high blood glucose (23 mmol/L) and a low pH of 7.06 on a venous blood gas. She was treated successfully with fluids and insulin and had no sequale of pancreatitis or cerebral edema. Her triglycerides and cholesterol was normalized in three days and she was discharged home on insulin therapy after five days. Further history revealed a recent change in diet with no meat, fish or poultry consumption in the last 12 months and concomitantly an increase in carbohydrate intake which might have contributed to her extremely high serum lipid levels. This case demonstrates that clinicians should be mindful of the different presentations of diabetic ketoacidosis. Key words: diabetic ketoacidosis, hypertriglyceridemia, hyperlipidemia, vegan diet, carbohydrate diet. Correspondence: Hrafnkell Stefansson, hrafnkell.stefans@gmail.com.

  6. Serum glucose and lipid levels in alloxan-induced diabetic rats ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of Aloe barbadensis Miller juice extract on serum glucose and lipids in alloxan-induced diabetic rats was investigated. Diabetes was induced by intraperitoneal injection of 150mg/kg alloxan in 5% solution. Diabetes was confirmed 72 hours after alloxan injection, if fasting blood glucose (FBG) was equal to or greater ...

  7. A strong association between lipid accumulation product and diabetes mellitus in japanese women and men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakabayashi, Ichiro; Daimon, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Lipid accumulation product (LAP) is a new continuous marker of lipid overaccumulation that predicts cardiovascular risk. The aim of this study was to determine the cutoff value for LAP and evaluate its usefulness. Using a database of results of health checkup examinations for 10,170 Japanese workers (35-40 years of age) conducted at their workplaces, the cutoff value for a high LAP was calculated by analyzing receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curves for the relationships of LAP with hyperglycemia and diabetes. The cutoff value for LAP was 21.1 for women and 37.2 for men. The values were similar when calculated by analyzing the ROC curves for the relationships with hyperglycemia and diabetes. Using these cutoff values, the prevalence of a high LAP was calculated to be 23.7% in women and 28.8% in men. The odds ratio for diabetes in the subjects with vs. those without a high LAP, calculated after adjusting for age, smoking, alcohol consumption and regular exercise, was 19.09 (95% CI: 6.57-55.50) in women and 7.40 (95% CI: 5.10-10.75) in men. High odds ratios for hypertension (10.66 [95% CI: 7.77-14.63] in women and 7.31 [95% CI: 6.20-8.62] in men) were also obtained in the subjects with vs. those without a high LAP. Cutoff values for a high LAP in women and men were determined, and high odds ratios for diabetes and hypertension were obtained using the cutoff values for LAP. Further studies are needed to elucidate whether the proposed cutoff values are applicable to people of other ages, races and ethnicities.

  8. Applying decision tree for identification of a low risk population for type 2 diabetes. Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramezankhani, Azra; Pournik, Omid; Shahrabi, Jamal; Khalili, Davood; Azizi, Fereidoun; Hadaegh, Farzad

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to create a prediction model using data mining approach to identify low risk individuals for incidence of type 2 diabetes, using the Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study (TLGS) database. For a 6647 population without diabetes, aged ≥20 years, followed for 12 years, a prediction model was developed using classification by the decision tree technique. Seven hundred and twenty-nine (11%) diabetes cases occurred during the follow-up. Predictor variables were selected from demographic characteristics, smoking status, medical and drug history and laboratory measures. We developed the predictive models by decision tree using 60 input variables and one output variable. The overall classification accuracy was 90.5%, with 31.1% sensitivity, 97.9% specificity; and for the subjects without diabetes, precision and f-measure were 92% and 0.95, respectively. The identified variables included fasting plasma glucose, body mass index, triglycerides, mean arterial blood pressure, family history of diabetes, educational level and job status. In conclusion, decision tree analysis, using routine demographic, clinical, anthropometric and laboratory measurements, created a simple tool to predict individuals at low risk for type 2 diabetes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Correlation of Lipid Profile and Risk of Developing Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in 10-14 Year Old Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habiba, Nusrath M; Fulda, Kimberly G; Basha, Riyaz; Shah, Deep; Fernando, Shane; Nguyen, Bao; Xiong, Yi; Franks, Susan F; Matches, Sarah J; Magie, Richard D; Bowman, W Paul

    2016-01-01

    The role of lipid profile in predicting the risk of Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in children is not clearly established. Our aim is to screen non-diabetic children aged 10-14 years for risk of developing T2DM and evaluate the association of abnormal lipids and socioeconomic status (SES). Data on race/ethnicity, family history, body mass index percentile, blood pressure and presence of neck pigmentation (acanthosis nigricans) were collected from 149 non-diabetic children. Using these factors, children were classified into low risk (risk factors) and high risk (>3 risk factors) groups. Logistic regression model and chi-square tests were used to evaluate the association of blood lipid profile and demographic variables. Independent t-test was used to compare the ratio of Total Cholesterol (TC) and High Density Lipids (HDL) with T2DM risk. 60% of children were at high risk for developing T2DM. HDL (prisk group. Low SES showed a marginal association with high risk group. There were no gender or age differences between high and low risk groups. The significant determinants associated with high risk group were modifiable factors providing an opportunity for early intervention and prevention. © 2016 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Maternal Diabetes Leads to Unphysiological High Lipid Accumulation in Rabbit Preimplantation Embryos

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schindler, Maria; Pendzialek, Mareike; Santos, Alexander Navarrete; Ploesch, Torsten; Seyring, Stefanie; Guerke, Jacqueline; Haucke, Elisa; Knelangen, Julia Miriam; Fischer, Bernd; Santos, Anne Navarrete

    According to the "developmental origin of health and disease" hypothesis, the metabolic set points of glucose and lipid metabolism are determined prenatally. In the case of a diabetic pregnancy, the embryo is exposed to higher glucose and lipid concentrations as early as during preimplantation

  11. Disorders of lipid metabolism in 3 patients with diabetes mellitus type 2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolffenbuttel, B.H.R.; Huijberts, M.S.P.

    2001-01-01

    Disorders of lipid metabolism in 3 patients with diabetes mellitus type 2] [Article in Dutch] Wolffenbuttel BH, Huijberts MS. Academisch Ziekenhuis, afd. Endocrinologie, Postbus 5800, 6202 AZ Maastrict. bwo@sint.azm.nl Three patients with diabetes mellitus (type 2) and cardiovascular disease had

  12. Lipid Profile and Thyroid Hormones in Types 1 and 2 Diabetics ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Literature describing relationship between thyroid hormones and lipid levels in Types 1 and 2 diabetics is scanty. Medications used in treating each of the two classes of diabetes differ and the effect of the various hypoglycemic agents on thyroid hormones varies, while thyroid hormone levels relate inversely with cholesterol ...

  13. Lessons learned from a lipid lowering trial in adolescents with type 1 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bishop Franziska K

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Herein, we describe recruitment efforts for a trial of lipid-lowering medications in adolescents with type 1 diabetes, age 12–21 years. Based on our experience, future studies will require multiple centers to enroll a sufficient number of participants for adequate data to direct dyslipidemia medication treatment guidelines for adolescents with type 1 diabetes.

  14. Effect of visfatin on lipid profile of obese and diabetic mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naz, R.; Hussain, M.M.; Aslam, M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To determine the effect of visfatin on blood lipid levels in balb/c strain of albino mice. Design: Quasi experimental study. Place and duration of study: The study was carried out at the department of Physiology, Army Medical College, Rawalpindi and National Institute of Health Sciences, Islamabad from April to December 2007. Material and Methods: One hundred and twenty balb/c strain albino mice were procured from NIH, Islamabad. After taking base line blood samples, mice were divided randomly into four groups. Animals in groups I and II were made obese by feeding high fat / high carbohydrate diet whereas mice in Groups III and IV were induced diabetes mellitus by injecting streptozotocin. Groups I (obese) and III (diabetic) served as controls whereas groups II (obese treated) and IV (diabetic treated) were administered visfatin injection. Terminal intracardiac blood sample was used to measure the serum lipid and visfatin levels. Results: Serum lipid levels were found increased in obese and diabetic groups as compared to healthy mice. The administration of recombinant-histidine soluble (mice) visfatin significantly (p< 0.01) decreased the serum lipid levels with concomitant increase in HDL levels (p< 0.01) in obese and diabetic groups of mice and were comparable with baseline normal values of healthy controls. Conclusion: Visfatin is a potential antilipidemic adipocytokine that probably modulates insulin sensitivity and decreases atherogenic lipids (triglycerides, cholesterol, LDL and VLDL) with concomitant increase in HDL in obesity and diabetes mellitus. (author)

  15. Development and Validation of a Model to Predict Absolute Vascular Risk Reduction by Moderate-Intensity Statin Therapy in Individual Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: The Anglo Scandinavian Cardiac Outcomes Trial, Antihypertensive and Lipid-Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial, and Collaborative Atorvastatin Diabetes Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaasenbrood, Lotte; Poulter, Neil R.; Sever, Peter S.; Colhoun, Helen M.; Livingstone, Shona J.; Boekholdt, S. Matthijs; Pressel, Sara L.; Davis, Barry R.; van der Graaf, Yolanda; Visseren, Frank L. J.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to translate the average relative effect of statin therapy from trial data to the individual patient with type 2 diabetes mellitus by developing and validating a model to predict individualized absolute risk reductions (ARR) of cardiovascular events. Data of 2725 patients

  16. Effect of Consumption of Tribulus Terrestris on Serum Glucose and Lipid Levels in Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Roghani

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The effect of Tribulus terrestris (TT on serum glucose and lipid levels was investigated in an experimental model of diabetes mellitus in rats. Methods: Female Wistar rats were divided into control, TT-treated control, diabetic, glibenclamide-treated, and TT-treated diabetic groups. For induction of diabetes, streptozotcin (STZ was administered (60 mg/Kg. Meanwhile, TT-treated groups received TT mixed with standard pelleted food at a weight ratio of 6.25% for 6 weeks. Serum glucose and lipid levels were determined before the study and at the 3rd and 4th week after the study. Results: Serum glucose was significantly lower in TT-treated diabetic rats at 3rd and 6th weeks as compared to untreated diabetics (p<0.01 and p<0.005, respectively. In addition, serum total cholesterol, triglyceride, and LDL-cholesterol showed a significant reduction in TT-treated diabetic rats as compared to untreated diabetics (p<0.05. On the other hand, HDL-cholesterol level did not change significantly in TT-treated diabetic group as compared to untreated diabetic group. Conclusions: Oral administration of TT has a significant hypoglycemic effect and in long term leads to appropriate changes in serum LDL-cholesterol, total cholesterol, and triglyceride levels, but does not affect HDL-cholesterol levels in diabetic rats.

  17. Jiao Tai Wan Attenuates Hepatic Lipid Accumulation in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaoyi Huang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Jiao Tai Wan (JTW, a Chinese herbal formula containing Rhizoma Coptidis and Cortex Cinnamomi, has been used for diabetic treatment for many years. The aim of this study was to determine the main components in JTW and to investigate the effects of JTW on hepatic lipid accumulation in diabetic rats and humans. JTW extract was prepared and the main components were assayed by HPLC. An animal model of diabetes mellitus was established and JTW was administered intragastrically. In the clinical study, diabetic patients with poor glycemic control were treated with JTW. Blood glucose and lipid parameters, liver histology, hepatic triglyceride content and lipogenic gene expression were examined. Our data demonstrated that JTW significantly improved hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia and hepatic lipid accumulation in diabetic rats. This was accompanied by the down-regulation of acetyl coenzyme A carboxylase (ACC and fatty acid synthase (FAS protein expressions, and the up-regulation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK and phosphorylated-ACC (pACC protein expressions in the liver tissues. Diabetic patients also exhibited decreases in their hepatic triglyceride content. The results suggest that JTW attenuates hepatic lipid accumulation in diabetic rats and humans. These beneficial effects are possibly associated with the inhibition of lipogenic gene expression in the liver.

  18. Distinct lipid profiles predict improved glycemic control in obese, nondiabetic patients after a low-caloric diet intervention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valsesia, Armand; Saris, Wim Hm; Astrup, Arne

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: An aim of weight loss is to reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D) in obese subjects. However, the relation with long-term glycemic improvement remains unknown. OBJECTIVE: We evaluated the changes in lipid composition during weight loss and their association with long-term glycemic...... improvement. DESIGN: We investigated the plasma lipidome of 383 obese, nondiabetic patients within a randomized, controlled dietary intervention in 8 European countries at baseline, after an 8-wk low-caloric diet (LCD) (800-1000 kcal/d), and after 6 mo of weight maintenance. RESULTS: After weight loss......: In this study, we report a lipid signature of LCD success (for weight and glycemic outcome) in obese, nondiabetic patients. Lipid changes during an 8-wk LCD allowed us to predict insulin-resistant patients after 6 mo of weight maintenance. The determination of the lipid composition during an LCD enables...

  19. Efficacy of Tribulus Terrestris Extract on the Serum Glucose and Lipids of Women with Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samani, Nasrin Babadai; Jokar, Azam; Soveid, Mahmood; Heydari, Mojtaba; Mosavat, Seyed Hamdollah

    2016-01-01

    Background: Considering folkloric use of Tribulus terrestris (T. terrestris) in diabetes and proven anti-hyperglycemic and anti-hyperlipidemic effects of T. terrestris in animal studies, we aimed to evaluate the efficacy of the hydro alcoholic extract of T. terrestris on the serum glucose and lipid profile of women with diabetes mellitus. Methods: Ninety-eight diabetic women were randomly allocated to receive the T. terrestris (1000 mg/day) or placebo for three months. The patients were evaluated in terms of the fasting blood glucose, 2-hour postprandial glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin and lipid profile. Results: T. terrestris showed a significant blood glucose lowering effect in diabetic women compared to placebo (Pterrestris group was significantly reduced compared with placebo, while no significant effect was observed in the triglyceride and high-density lipoprotein levels. Conclusion: This study showed preliminary promising hypoglycemic effect of T. terrestris in diabetic women. PMID:27840471

  20. Efficacy of Tribulus Terrestris Extract on the Serum Glucose and Lipids of Women with Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samani, Nasrin Babadai; Jokar, Azam; Soveid, Mahmood; Heydari, Mojtaba; Mosavat, Seyed Hamdollah

    2016-05-01

    Considering folkloric use of Tribulus terrestris (T. terrestris) in diabetes and proven anti-hyperglycemic and anti-hyperlipidemic effects of T. terrestris in animal studies, we aimed to evaluate the efficacy of the hydro alcoholic extract of T. terrestris on the serum glucose and lipid profile of women with diabetes mellitus. Ninety-eight diabetic women were randomly allocated to receive the T. terrestris (1000 mg/day) or placebo for three months. The patients were evaluated in terms of the fasting blood glucose, 2-hour postprandial glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin and lipid profile. T. terrestris showed a significant blood glucose lowering effect in diabetic women compared to placebo (Pterrestris group was significantly reduced compared with placebo, while no significant effect was observed in the triglyceride and high-density lipoprotein levels. This study showed preliminary promising hypoglycemic effect of T. terrestris in diabetic women.

  1. Genetic Modulation of Lipid Profiles following Lifestyle Modification or Metformin Treatment: The Diabetes Prevention Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jablonski, Kathleen A.; de Bakker, Paul I. W.; Taylor, Andrew; McAteer, Jarred; Pan, Qing; Horton, Edward S.; Delahanty, Linda M.; Altshuler, David; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Goldberg, Ronald B.; Florez, Jose C.; Bray, George A.; Culbert, Iris W.; Champagne, Catherine M.; Eberhardt, Barbara; Greenway, Frank; Guillory, Fonda G.; Herbert, April A.; Jeffirs, Michael L.; Kennedy, Betty M.; Lovejoy, Jennifer C.; Morris, Laura H.; Melancon, Lee E.; Ryan, Donna; Sanford, Deborah A.; Smith, Kenneth G.; Smith, Lisa L.; Amant, Julia A. St.; Tulley, Richard T.; Vicknair, Paula C.; Williamson, Donald; Zachwieja, Jeffery J.; Polonsky, Kenneth S.; Tobian, Janet; Ehrmann, David; Matulik, Margaret J.; Clark, Bart; Czech, Kirsten; DeSandre, Catherine; Hilbrich, Ruthanne; McNabb, Wylie; Semenske, Ann R.; Caro, Jose F.; Watson, Pamela G.; Goldstein, Barry J.; Smith, Kellie A.; Mendoza, Jewel; Liberoni, Renee; Pepe, Constance; Spandorfer, John; Donahue, Richard P.; Goldberg, Ronald B.; Prineas, Ronald; Rowe, Patricia; Calles, Jeanette; Cassanova-Romero, Paul; Florez, Hermes J.; Giannella, Anna; Kirby, Lascelles; Larreal, Carmen; McLymont, Valerie; Mendez, Jadell; Ojito, Juliet; Perry, Arlette; Saab, Patrice; Haffner, Steven M.; Montez, Maria G.; Lorenzo, Carlos; Martinez, Arlene; Hamman, Richard F.; Nash, Patricia V.; Testaverde, Lisa; Anderson, Denise R.; Ballonoff, Larry B.; Bouffard, Alexis; Calonge, B. Ned; Delve, Lynne; Farago, Martha; Hill, James O.; Hoyer, Shelley R.; Jortberg, Bonnie T.; Lenz, Dione; Miller, Marsha; Price, David W.; Regensteiner, Judith G.; Seagle, Helen; Smith, Carissa M.; Steinke, Sheila C.; VanDorsten, Brent; Horton, Edward S.; Lawton, Kathleen E.; Arky, Ronald A.; Bryant, Marybeth; Burke, Jacqueline P.; Caballero, Enrique; Callaphan, Karen M.; Ganda, Om P.; Franklin, Therese; Jackson, Sharon D.; Jacobsen, Alan M.; Jacobsen, Alan M.; Kula, Lyn M.; Kocal, Margaret; Malloy, Maureen A.; Nicosia, Maryanne; Oldmixon, Cathryn F.; Pan, Jocelyn; Quitingon, Marizel; Rubtchinsky, Stacy; Seely, Ellen W.; Schweizer, Dana; Simonson, Donald; Smith, Fannie; Solomon, Caren G.; Warram, James; Kahn, Steven E.; Montgomery, Brenda K.; Fujimoto, Wilfred; Knopp, Robert H.; Lipkin, Edward W.; Marr, Michelle; Trence, Dace; Kitabchi, Abbas E.; Murphy, Mary E.; Applegate, William B.; Bryer-Ash, Michael; Frieson, Sandra L.; Imseis, Raed; Lambeth, Helen; Lichtermann, Lynne C.; Oktaei, Hooman; Rutledge, Lily M.K.; Sherman, Amy R.; Smith, Clara M.; Soberman, Judith E.; Williams-Cleaves, Beverly; Metzger, Boyd E.; Johnson, Mariana K.; Behrends, Catherine; Cook, Michelle; Fitzgibbon, Marian; Giles, Mimi M.; Heard, Deloris; Johnson, Cheryl K.H.; Larsen, Diane; Lowe, Anne; Lyman, Megan; McPherson, David; Molitch, Mark E.; Pitts, Thomas; Reinhart, Renee; Roston, Susan; Schinleber, Pamela A.; Nathan, David M.; McKitrick, Charles; Turgeon, Heather; Abbott, Kathy; Anderson, Ellen; Bissett, Laurie; Cagliero, Enrico; Florez, Jose C.; Delahanty, Linda; Goldman, Valerie; Poulos, Alexandra; Olefsky, Jerrold M.; Carrion-Petersen, Mary Lou; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth; Edelman, Steven V.; Henry, Robert R.; Horne, Javiva; Janesch, Simona Szerdi; Leos, Diana; Mudaliar, Sundar; Polonsky, William; Smith, Jean; Vejvoda, Karen; Pi-Sunyer, F. Xavier; Lee, Jane E.; Allison, David B.; Aronoff, Nancy J.; Crandall, Jill P.; Foo, Sandra T.; Pal, Carmen; Parkes, Kathy; Pena, Mary Beth; Rooney, Ellen S.; Wye, Gretchen E.H. Van; Viscovich, Kristine A.; Marrero, David G.; Prince, Melvin J.; Kelly, Susie M.; Dotson, Yolanda F.; Fineberg, Edwin S.; Guare, John C; Hadden, Angela M.; Ignaut, James M.; Jackson, Marcia L.; Kirkman, Marion S.; Mather, Kieren J.; Porter, Beverly D.; Roach, Paris J.; Rowland, Nancy D.; Wheeler, Madelyn L.; Ratner, Robert E.; Youssef, Gretchen; Shapiro, Sue; Bavido-Arrage, Catherine; Boggs, Geraldine; Bronsord, Marjorie; Brown, Ernestine; Cheatham, Wayman W.; Cola, Susan; Evans, Cindy; Gibbs, Peggy; Kellum, Tracy; Levatan, Claresa; Nair, Asha K.; Passaro, Maureen; Uwaifo, Gabriel; Saad, Mohammed F.; Budget, Maria; Jinagouda, Sujata; Akbar, Khan; Conzues, Claudia; Magpuri, Perpetua; Ngo, Kathy; Rassam, Amer; Waters, Debra; Xapthalamous, Kathy; Santiago, Julio V.; Dagogo-Jack, Samuel; White, Neil H.; Das, Samia; Santiago, Ana; Brown, Angela; Fisher, Edwin; Hurt, Emma; Jones, Tracy; Kerr, Michelle; Ryder, Lucy; Wernimont, Cormarie; Saudek, Christopher D.; Bradley, Vanessa; Sullivan, Emily; Whittington, Tracy; Abbas, Caroline; Brancati, Frederick L.; Clark, Jeanne M.; Charleston, Jeanne B.; Freel, Janice; Horak, Katherine; Jiggetts, Dawn; Johnson, Deloris; Joseph, Hope; Loman, Kimberly; Mosley, Henry; Rubin, Richard R.; Samuels, Alafia; Stewart, Kerry J.; Williamson, Paula; Schade, David S.; Adams, Karwyn S.; Johannes, Carolyn; Atler, Leslie F.; Boyle, Patrick J.; Burge, Mark R.; Canady, Janene L.; Chai, Lisa; Gonzales, Ysela; Hernandez-McGinnis, Doris A.; Katz, Patricia; King, Carolyn; Rassam, Amer; Rubinchik, Sofya; Senter, Willette; Waters, Debra; Shamoon, Harry; Brown, Janet O.; Adorno, Elsie; Cox, Liane; Crandall, Jill; Duffy, Helena; Engel, Samuel; Friedler, Allison; Howard-Century, Crystal J.; Kloiber, Stacey; Longchamp, Nadege; Martinez, Helen; Pompi, Dorothy; Scheindlin, Jonathan; Violino, Elissa; Walker, Elizabeth; Wylie-Rosett, Judith; Zimmerman, Elise; Zonszein, Joel; Orchard, Trevor; Wing, Rena R.; Koenning, Gaye; Kramer, M. Kaye; Barr, Susan; Boraz, Miriam; Clifford, Lisa; Culyba, Rebecca; Frazier, Marlene; Gilligan, Ryan; Harrier, Susan; Harris, Louann; Jeffries, Susan; Kriska, Andrea; Manjoo, Qurashia; Mullen, Monica; Noel, Alicia; Otto, Amy; Semler, Linda; Smith, Cheryl F.; Smith, Marie; Venditti, Elizabeth; Weinzierl, Valarie; Williams, Katherine V.; Wilson, Tara; Arakaki, Richard F.; Latimer, Renee W.; Baker-Ladao, Narleen K.; Beddow, Ralph; Dias, Lorna; Inouye, Jillian; Mau, Marjorie K.; Mikami, Kathy; Mohideen, Pharis; Odom, Sharon K.; Perry, Raynette U.; Knowler, William C.; Cooeyate, Norman; Hoskin, Mary A.; Percy, Carol A.; Acton, Kelly J.; Andre, Vickie L.; Barber, Rosalyn; Begay, Shandiin; Bennett, Peter H.; Benson, Mary Beth; Bird, Evelyn C.; Broussard, Brenda A.; Chavez, Marcella; Dacawyma, Tara; Doughty, Matthew S.; Duncan, Roberta; Edgerton, Cyndy; Ghahate, Jacqueline M.; Glass, Justin; Glass, Martia; Gohdes, Dorothy; Grant, Wendy; Hanson, Robert L.; Horse, Ellie; Ingraham, Louise E.; Jackson, Merry; Jay, Priscilla; Kaskalla, Roylen S.; Kessler, David; Kobus, Kathleen M.; Krakoff, Jonathan; Manus, Catherine; Michaels, Sara; Morgan, Tina; Nashboo, Yolanda; Nelson, Julie A.; Poirier, Steven; Polczynski, Evette; Reidy, Mike; Roumain, Jeanine; Rowse, Debra; Sangster, Sandra; Sewenemewa, Janet; Tonemah, Darryl; Wilson, Charlton; Yazzie, Michelle; Bain, Raymond; Fowler, Sarah; Brenneman, Tina; Abebe, Solome; Bamdad, Julie; Callaghan, Jackie; Edelstein, Sharon L.; Gao, Yuping; Grimes, Kristina L.; Grover, Nisha; Haffner, Lori; Jones, Steve; Jones, Tara L.; Katz, Richard; Lachin, John M.; Mucik, Pamela; Orlosky, Robert; Rochon, James; Sapozhnikova, Alla; Sherif, Hanna; Stimpson, Charlotte; Temprosa, Marinella; Walker-Murray, Fredricka; Marcovina, Santica; Strylewicz, Greg; Aldrich, F. Alan; O'Leary, Dan; Stamm, Elizabeth; Rautaharju, Pentti; Prineas, Ronald J.; Alexander, Teresa; Campbell, Charles; Hall, Sharon; Li, Yabing; Mills, Margaret; Pemberton, Nancy; Rautaharju, Farida; Zhang, Zhuming; Mayer-Davis, Elizabeth; Moran, Robert R.; Ganiats, Ted; David, Kristin; Sarkin, Andrew J.; Eastman, R.; Fradkin, Judith; Garfield, Sanford; Gregg, Edward; Zhang, Ping; Herman, William; Florez, Jose C.; Altshuler, David; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Franks, Paul W.; Hanson, Robert L.; Jablonski, Kathleen; Knowler, William C.; McAteer, Jarred B.; Pollin, Toni I.; Shuldiner, Alan R.

    2012-01-01

    Weight-loss interventions generally improve lipid profiles and reduce cardiovascular disease risk, but effects are variable and may depend on genetic factors. We performed a genetic association analysis of data from 2,993 participants in the Diabetes Prevention Program to test the hypotheses that a genetic risk score (GRS) based on deleterious alleles at 32 lipid-associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms modifies the effects of lifestyle and/or metformin interventions on lipid levels and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) lipoprotein subfraction size and number. Twenty-three loci previously associated with fasting LDL-C, HDL-C, or triglycerides replicated (P = 0.04–1×10−17). Except for total HDL particles (r = −0.03, P = 0.26), all components of the lipid profile correlated with the GRS (partial |r| = 0.07–0.17, P = 5×10−5–1×10−19). The GRS was associated with higher baseline-adjusted 1-year LDL cholesterol levels (β = +0.87, SEE±0.22 mg/dl/allele, P = 8×10−5, P interaction = 0.02) in the lifestyle intervention group, but not in the placebo (β = +0.20, SEE±0.22 mg/dl/allele, P = 0.35) or metformin (β = −0.03, SEE±0.22 mg/dl/allele, P = 0.90; P interaction = 0.64) groups. Similarly, a higher GRS predicted a greater number of baseline-adjusted small LDL particles at 1 year in the lifestyle intervention arm (β = +0.30, SEE±0.012 ln nmol/L/allele, P = 0.01, P interaction = 0.01) but not in the placebo (β = −0.002, SEE±0.008 ln nmol/L/allele, P = 0.74) or metformin (β = +0.013, SEE±0.008 nmol/L/allele, P = 0.12; P interaction = 0.24) groups. Our findings suggest that a high genetic burden confers an adverse lipid profile and predicts attenuated response in LDL-C levels and small LDL particle number to dietary and physical activity interventions aimed at weight loss. PMID:22951888

  2. Genetic modulation of lipid profiles following lifestyle modification or metformin treatment: the Diabetes Prevention Program.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toni I Pollin

    Full Text Available Weight-loss interventions generally improve lipid profiles and reduce cardiovascular disease risk, but effects are variable and may depend on genetic factors. We performed a genetic association analysis of data from 2,993 participants in the Diabetes Prevention Program to test the hypotheses that a genetic risk score (GRS based on deleterious alleles at 32 lipid-associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms modifies the effects of lifestyle and/or metformin interventions on lipid levels and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR lipoprotein subfraction size and number. Twenty-three loci previously associated with fasting LDL-C, HDL-C, or triglycerides replicated (P = 0.04-1 × 10(-17. Except for total HDL particles (r = -0.03, P = 0.26, all components of the lipid profile correlated with the GRS (partial |r| = 0.07-0.17, P = 5 × 10(-5-1 10(-19. The GRS was associated with higher baseline-adjusted 1-year LDL cholesterol levels (β = +0.87, SEE ± 0.22 mg/dl/allele, P = 8 × 10(-5, P(interaction = 0.02 in the lifestyle intervention group, but not in the placebo (β = +0.20, SEE ± 0.22 mg/dl/allele, P = 0.35 or metformin (β = -0.03, SEE ± 0.22 mg/dl/allele, P = 0.90; P(interaction = 0.64 groups. Similarly, a higher GRS predicted a greater number of baseline-adjusted small LDL particles at 1 year in the lifestyle intervention arm (β = +0.30, SEE ± 0.012 ln nmol/L/allele, P = 0.01, P(interaction = 0.01 but not in the placebo (β = -0.002, SEE ± 0.008 ln nmol/L/allele, P = 0.74 or metformin (β = +0.013, SEE ± 0.008 nmol/L/allele, P = 0.12; P(interaction = 0.24 groups. Our findings suggest that a high genetic burden confers an adverse lipid profile and predicts attenuated response in LDL-C levels and small LDL particle number to dietary and physical activity interventions aimed at weight loss.

  3. The state of lipid control in patients with diabetes in a public health care centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, J S; Tan, F; Lee, P Y

    2007-01-01

    Achieving treatment targets has been difficult in treating diabetic patients. This cross-sectional study describes the lipid profiles of patients with diabetes mellitus at a public primary health care centre in Sarawak, Malaysia. The targets for lipid control were based on the International Diabetes Federation recommendation (2002). 1031 patients (98% Type 2 Diabetes) were studied. Fasting lipid profiles were available in 990 (96%) patients. The mean total cholesterol was 5.3 +/- 1.0 mmol/L, Triglycerides 1.90 +/- 1.26 mmol/L, HDL-C 1.28 +/- 0.33 mmol/L and LDL-C 3.2 +/- 0.9 mmol/L. Overall, 22% of patients achieved the treatment target for LDL-C level 1.1 mmol/L and 42% of patients had a target TG level below 1.5 mmol/L. Of the 40% of patients who received lipid-lowering drug, 17% achieved LDL-C target, 50% had LDL-C 2.6-4.4 mmol/ L and 33% have LDL-C > 4.0 mmol/L. For the remaining 60% not receiving any lipid lowering therapy, 68% had LDL-C between 2.6-4.0 mmol/L and 7% had LDL-C level > 4 mmol/L. Dyslipidemia is still under-treated despite the availability of effective pharmacological agents and the greatly increased risk of cardiovascular diseases in diabetic patients.

  4. Consistent Prediction of Properties of Systems with Lipids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cunico, Larissa; Ceriani, Roberta; Sarup, Bent

    Equilibria between vapour, liquid and/or solid phases, pure component properties and also the mixture-phase properties are necessary for synthesis, design and analysis of different unit operations found in the production of edible oils, fats and biodiesel. A systematic numerical analysis....... Lipids are found in almost all mixtures involving edible oils, fats and biodiesel. They are also being extracted for use in the pharma-industry. A database for pure components (lipids) present in these processes and mixtures properties has been developed and made available for different applications...... (model development, property verification, property prediction, etc.). The database has verified data for fatty acids, acylglycerols, fatty esters, fatty alcohols, vegetable oils, biodiesel and minor compounds as phospholipids, tocopherols, sterols, carotene and squalene, together with a user friendly...

  5. Assessment of serum lipids in nigerians with type-2 diabetes mellitus complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Idogun, E.S.; Unuigbe, E.I.

    2007-01-01

    To assess the serum lipids and lipoprotein cholesterol in patients with complicated type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (DM): Hypertensive diabetics and diabetic nephropathy. This is a cross-sectional study. A total of 52 type 2 DM patients and 20 healthy controls were studied. The patients' population consisted of 23 normotensive diabetics, 16 hypertensive diabetics and 13 patients with diabetic nephropathy. The serum total cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol and triglycerides were assayed in patients and controls, using standardized assay methods. The mean serum total cholesterol was higher in patients than controls. The normotensive diabetic patients had the lowest total cholesterol among the patients groups 4.01+-0.82 mmol/L compared to the hypertensive diabetics 6.01+-0.93 mmol/L and the diabetic nephropathy patients 6.90+-1.20 mmol/L, (P <0.0001). The prevalence of dyslipidaemia in the patients was between 25% - 69%, lowest in the normotensive diabetics and highest in the diabetic nephropathy patients. We hope that these findings will draw specific attention to the management of dyslipidaemia in patients with complicated type 2 DM especially diabetic nephropathy and hypertensive diabetics. (author)

  6. Prediction of Liquid Specific Heat Capacity of Food Lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaoyi; Phinney, David M; Paluri, Sravanti; Heldman, Dennis R

    2018-04-01

    Specific heat capacity (c p ) is a temperature dependent physical property of foods. Lipid-being a macromolecular component of food-provides some fraction of the food's overall heat capacity. Fats/oils are complex chemicals that are generally defined by carbon length and degree of unsaturation. The objective of this investigation was to use advanced specific heat capacity measurement to determine the effect of fatty acid chemical structure on specific heat capacity of food lipids. In this investigation, the specific heat capacity of a series of triacylglycerols were measured to quantify the influence of fatty acid composition on specific heat capacity based on two parameters; the -average carbon number (C) and the average number of double bonds (U). A prediction model for specific heat capacity of food lipids as a function of C, U and temperature (T) has been developed. A multiple linear regression to the three-parameter model (R 2 = 0.87) provided a good fit to the experimental data. The prediction model was evaluated by comparison with previously published specific heat capacity values of vegetable oils. It was found that the model provided a 0.53% error, while three other models from the literature predicted c p values with 0.85% to 1.83% average relative deviation from experimental data. The outcomes from this research confirm that the thermophysical properties of fat present in foods are directly related to the physical chemical properties. The specific heat capacity of food products is widely used in process design. Improvements of current models to predict specific heat capacity of food products will assist in the development of efficient processes and in the control of food quality and safety. Furthermore, the understanding of how changes in chemical structure of macromolecular components of foods effect thermophysical properties may begin to allude to models that are not just empirical, but represent portions of the differences in chemistry. © 2018

  7. Lipid Fingerprinting in Mild versus Severe Forms of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bárbara Yasmin Gueuvoghlanian-Silva

    Full Text Available The blood serum lipid profile of women with Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM is still under study. There are no data on the serum lipid profile of GDM patients with more severe (insulin treated compared to milder forms (diet treated GDM. The aim of our study was to analyze the blood serum lipid profile of patients with milder versus more severe forms of GDM and to compare these findings with those of healthy pregnant women. This cross-sectional analytical study included 30 insulin-treated GDM, 30 diet-only GDM and 30 healthy pregnant women. Serum lipid was extracted from the 90 participants and their lipid profiles were analyzed by lipid fingerprinting using liquid-chromatography-mass spectrometry. A total of 143 parent ions were differentially represented in each of the three groups, belonging to the following classes: Glycerophospholipids, Sterol Lipids, Sphingolipids, Prenol Lipids, Fatty Acyls and Glycerolipids. There were significant differences in the lipid profiles of healthy pregnant women compared to GDM patients and also between milder versus more severe forms of GDM. There are marked differences in lipid fingerprinting between healthy pregnant women compared to those with GDM in the third trimester. Moreover, the lipid profile of women with more severe forms of GDM differs considerably from that of women with milder forms of GDM. These findings may be useful to help clarify the pathogenesis of milder and more severe forms of GDM.

  8. Machine Learning Methods to Predict Diabetes Complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagliati, Arianna; Marini, Simone; Sacchi, Lucia; Cogni, Giulia; Teliti, Marsida; Tibollo, Valentina; De Cata, Pasquale; Chiovato, Luca; Bellazzi, Riccardo

    2018-03-01

    One of the areas where Artificial Intelligence is having more impact is machine learning, which develops algorithms able to learn patterns and decision rules from data. Machine learning algorithms have been embedded into data mining pipelines, which can combine them with classical statistical strategies, to extract knowledge from data. Within the EU-funded MOSAIC project, a data mining pipeline has been used to derive a set of predictive models of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) complications based on electronic health record data of nearly one thousand patients. Such pipeline comprises clinical center profiling, predictive model targeting, predictive model construction and model validation. After having dealt with missing data by means of random forest (RF) and having applied suitable strategies to handle class imbalance, we have used Logistic Regression with stepwise feature selection to predict the onset of retinopathy, neuropathy, or nephropathy, at different time scenarios, at 3, 5, and 7 years from the first visit at the Hospital Center for Diabetes (not from the diagnosis). Considered variables are gender, age, time from diagnosis, body mass index (BMI), glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), hypertension, and smoking habit. Final models, tailored in accordance with the complications, provided an accuracy up to 0.838. Different variables were selected for each complication and time scenario, leading to specialized models easy to translate to the clinical practice.

  9. Effect of aluminum chloride on blood glucose level and lipid profile in normal, diabetic and treated diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konda, Venugopala Rao; Eerike, Madhavi; Chary, R Prasanth; Arunachalam, Ruckmani; Yeddula, Venkata Ramana; Meti, Vinayak; Devi, T Sobita

    2017-01-01

    The objectives of the study were to assess evaluate the effects of aluminum chloride (AlCl 3 ) on blood glucose and lipid levels in normal, diabetic, and glibenclamide-treated diabetic rats. Forty-two male Wistar rats were divided into seven groups of six each. Group I was normal control, Groups II and III were given AlCl 3 50 and 100 mg/kg, and Group IV to VII were administered with streptozotocin (STZ) (60 mg/kg) intraperitoneally. Group IV was diabetic control, Group V in addition was given AlCl 3 50 mg/kg, Group VI glibenclamide (10 mg/kg), and Group VII glibenclamide and AlCl 3 (50 mg/kg) per-oral daily for 28 days. Blood glucose and lipid levels were estimated at base line, after diabetes was set in and on the last day of study. Histopathological changes in pancreas, liver, and kidney were studied. No significant change was observed in blood glucose and lipid levels in Group I. Group II and III showed a dose-dependent significant increase in blood glucose was observed. Group V had a reduction in blood glucose but not to the nondiabetic level. Group VI had significant reduction in blood sugar. In Group VII, treated with glibenclamide and AlCl 3 , there was no significant change in blood glucose reduction compared to Group VI. Lipid levels were reduced in groups treated with AlCl 3 and glibenclamide and not in other groups. Gross tissue damage was seen in pancreas in STZ group and in liver and kidney in AlCl 3 groups. AlCl 3 administration in Wistar rats caused in significant hyperglycemia in normal rats, hypoglycemia in diabetic rats, and did not influenced hypoglycemic effect of glibenclamide and in addition, resulted in reduction in lipid levels.

  10. Toxicological and safety evaluation of Nigella sativa lipid and volatile fractions in streptozotocin induced diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Tauseef Sultan

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the toxicological aspects of Nigella sativa (N. sativa lipid and volatile fractions in streptozotocin induced diabetes mellitus. Methods: National Institute of Health (NIH, Islamabad provided us thirty Sprague Dawley rats that were further divided into three groups, i.e. control, N. sativa lipid fraction (4% and N. sativa volatile fraction (0.3%, respectively. The serological and haematological indices were evaluated at 4-week intervals during 56 d study. Results: The results indicated that the diabetes mellitus imparted negative effects on various serological and haematological attributes. However, supplementation of the N. sativa lipid fraction and N. sativa volatile fraction ameliorated the adverse consequences of diabetes mellitus. The diabetes induced renal toxicity and imbalanced serum chemistry were slightly modulated by experimental diets. However, the impact of essential oil was more significant as compared to the fixed oil. Conclusions: In a nutshell, experimental diets containing N. sativa lipid fraction and N. sativa volatile fraction are effective without having any toxicological effects, and experimental diets reduced toxicological and adverse consequences of diabetes mellitus.

  11. Only a fraction of patients with ischaemic diseases or diabetes are treated to recommended target values for plasma lipids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siggaard-Andersen, Niels; Freiberg, Jacob J; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2012-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that individuals in the general population with and without ischaemic cardiovascular disease, or with diabetes, are treated to recommended target values for plasma lipids.......We tested the hypothesis that individuals in the general population with and without ischaemic cardiovascular disease, or with diabetes, are treated to recommended target values for plasma lipids....

  12. Predictive factors for the development of diabetes in women with previous gestational diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damm, P.; Kühl, C.; Bertelsen, Aksel

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of diabetes in women with previous dietary-treated gestational diabetes mellitus and to identify predictive factors for development of diabetes. STUDY DESIGN: Two to 11 years post partum, glucose tolerance was investigated in 241...... women with previous dietary-treated gestational diabetes mellitus and 57 women without previous gestational diabetes mellitus (control group). RESULTS: Diabetes developed in 42 (17.4%) women with previous gestational diabetes mellitus (3.7% insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and 13.7% non...... of previous patients with gestational diabetes mellitus in whom plasma insulin was measured during an oral glucose tolerance test in late pregnancy a low insulin response at diagnosis was found to be an independent predictive factor for diabetes development. CONCLUSIONS: Women with previous dietary...

  13. Erectile dysfunction and diabetes: Association with the impairment of lipid metabolism and oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belba, Arben; Cortelazzo, Alessio; Andrea, Giansanti; Durante, Jacopo; Nigi, Laura; Dotta, Francesco; Timperio, Anna Maria; Zolla, Lello; Leoncini, Roberto; Guerranti, Roberto; Ponchietti, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that exists an association of non-diabetic and diabetic patients suffering from erectile dysfunction (ED) with lipid metabolism and oxidative stress. Clinical and laboratory characteristics in non-diabetic (n = 30, middle age range: 41–55.5 years; n = 25, old age range: 55.5–73), diabetic ED patients (n = 30, age range: 55.5–75 years) and diabetic patients (n = 25, age range: 56–73.25), were investigated. Proteomic analysis was performed to identify differentially expressed plasma proteins and to evaluate their oxidative posttranslational modifications. A decreased level of high-density lipoproteins in all ED patients (P < 0.001, C.I. 0.046–0.10), was detected by routine laboratory tests. Proteomic analysis showed a significant decreased expression (P < 0.05) of 5 apolipoproteins (i.e. apolipoprotein H, apolipoprotein A4, apolipoprotein J, apolipoprotein E and apolipoprotein A1) and zinc-alpha-2-glycoprotein, 50% of which are more oxidized proteins. Exclusively for diabetic ED patients, oxidative posttranslational modifications for prealbumin, serum albumin, serum transferrin and haptoglobin markedly increased. Showing evidence for decreased expression of apolipoproteins in ED and the remarkable enhancement of oxidative posttranslational modifications in diabetes-associated ED, considering type 2 diabetes mellitus and age as independent risk factors involved in the ED pathogenesis, lipid metabolism and oxidative stress appear to exert a complex interplay in the disease.

  14. Supplementation of fenugreek leaves lower lipid profile in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annida, B; Stanely Mainzen Prince, P

    2004-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate the lipid-lowering effect of fenugreek leaves in diabetes mellitus. Albino Wistar rats were randomly divided into six groups: normal untreated rats; streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats; STZ-induced rats + fenugreek leaves (0.5 g/kg of body weight); STZ-induced rats + fenugreek leaves (1 g/kg of body weight); STZ-induced rats + glibenclamide (600 microg/kg of body weight); and STZ-induced rats + insulin (6 units/kg of body weight). Rats were made diabetic by STZ (40 mg/kg) injected intraperitoneally. Fenugreek leaves were supplemented in the diet daily to diabetic rats for 45 days, and food intake was recorded daily. Blood glucose, total cholesterol, triglycerides, and free fatty acids were determined in serum, liver, heart, and kidney. Our results show that blood glucose and serum and tissue lipids were elevated in STZ-induced diabetic rats. Supplementation of fenugreek leaves lowered the lipid profile in STZ-induced diabetic rats.

  15. Association between dietary patterns and blood lipid profiles in Korean adults with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jeong Hyun; Lee, Yeon-Sook; Chang, Hak Chul; Moon, Min Kyong; Song, YoonJu

    2011-09-01

    We aimed to explore the associations of dietary patterns with blood lipid profiles and obesity in adults with type 2 diabetes. The data were obtained from the Forth Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2007-2008. Adults 30 yr or older, from which had both biochemical and dietary data were obtained. Among them, 680 subjects were defined as having diabetes based on criteria of fasting glucose ≥ 126 mg/dL, anti-diabetic treatment, or previously diagnosed diabetes. Dietary data from a 24-hr recall were used to derive dietary patterns by factor analysis. Four dietary patterns by factor analysis were identified: 'Bread & Meat & Alcohol', 'Noodles & Seafood', 'Rice & Vegetables', and 'Korean Healthy' patterns. Serum cholesterol levels in the highest quartile of the 'Bread & Meat & Alcohol' pattern were significantly higher compared with those in the lowest quartile. In addition, total cholesterol and triglyceride levels in the highest quartile of the 'Korean Healthy' pattern were significantly lower after adjusting for potential confounders. Dietary patterns of adults with diabetes were found to be associated with blood lipid profiles. 'Korean Healthy' pattern including whole grains, legumes, vegetables, and fruits could thus improve lipid profiles among those with type 2 diabetes.

  16. The Effect of Trans-Chalcone on Amylase Activity, Blood Glucose and Lipid Levels in Diabetic and Non Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Najafian

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Alpha amylase is the most important decomposing enzyme in starch. Digestion and absorption of starch in the intestine can be prevented and also the blood sugar levels can be controlled by restrain and control of alpha amylase. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of trans-chalcone on amylase activity, blood glucose and lipid levels in diabetic and non diabetic rats. Materials & Methods: This experimental study was conducted in 1388 at Tehran University of Medical Sciences. Sixty rats were randomly divided to ten equal groups: non diabetic control, diabetic control, four non diabetic experiments and four diabetic experiments. Control groups received grape seed oil and experimental groups received 2, 8,16 and 32 mg/kg of body weight in a period of 24 days with a gastric cannula. Blood sugar, every two days, serum insulin levels in days 0,12, and 24 and at the end of the experiment, lipoproteins and alpha amylase activity were measured.The data were analyzed by one way analysis of variance, ANOVA, followed by Turkey,s test with SPSS soft ware . Results: On average Chalcone reduced 25.5% of blood sugar in normal and diabetic rats. IT also decreased the serum insulin level. On average, chalcone decreased 34.9% of alpha amylase activity in normal and diabetic rats. Following disturbances in lipids metabolism caused by diabetes, this drug improved lipoproteins metabolism and reduced water, food and urine volume. Conclusion: This study shows that trans-Chalcone reduces blood sugar and body weight via inhibition of alpha amylas. Moreover, improvement of lipoprotein metabolism may happen via the inhibitory effect of this drug on hydroxyl methyl glutaryl -COA reductase and phosphodiesterase.

  17. Effect of brewer’s yeast supplementation on serum glucose and lipids in type II diabetic patients with dislipidemia

    OpenAIRE

    Sh. Ravanshad; H. Khosvani Borujeni; M. Soveid; B. Zeighami

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose : Chromium deficiency leads to impaired glucose and lipid metabolism. Chromium supplementation in type II diabetic patients improves glucose and lipid profiles. Organic chromium, such as found in brewer’s yeast, is much better absorbed than inorganic chromium. In this study, the effect of chromium supplementation in the form of brewer’s yeast on glucose and lipid profile of diabetic patients were evaluated.Materials and methods : In a clinical trial study (before and af...

  18. [Overweight, obesity and lipids abnormalities in adolescents with type 1 diabetes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wysocka-Mincewicz, Marta; Kołodziejczyk, Honorata; Wierzbicka, Elżbieta; Szalecki, Mieczysław

    2016-02-18

    Overweight children are growing problem as in the pediatric, as well in the diabetic population. The aim of the study was to research the percentage of overweight and obesity in a group of adolescents with type 1 diabetes, and to analyzethe lipid parameters, as well risk factors of these abnormalities. The study group consist of 60 type 1 diabetic adolescents (including 32 girls, 53.3%), aged above 12 years (mean age for girls 14.6+/-0,3years, boys 15.6+/-0.4 years) with diabetes duration (girls 5.7+-0.6 years, boys 4.4+/-0.8 years). Statistical analysis was performed using Statistica v 9.0 and SPSS v20. The study revealed that boys with type 1 diabetes are significantly higher than healthy population, with weight, waist circumference and BMI comparable to the healthy counterparts. However, diabetic girls are more likely to be overweight and have bigger waist circumference, and higher BMI than the healthy population. Overweight were 12 adolescents (20%) using BMI ≥1SD criterion, and 10 (16%) using waist circumference as obesity parameter. Logistic regression revealed that the most important factors for obesity and abdominal obesity are female gender (OR=2.43 and OR=4.56for obesity and abdominal, respectively), diabetes duration above 5 years (respectively OR=1.96 and OR=3.27) and poor metabolic control (respectively OR=1.74 and OR=2.89). The most important risk factor for obesity in adolescents with type 1 diabetes is female gender. Lipids profile is closely dependent on metabolic control and mass excess. Diabetes duration, metabolic control and lipids profile are significant risk factors for overweight and abdominal obesity. © Polish Society for Pediatric Endocrinology and Diabetology.

  19. In vitro study of (1-14C)-acetate incorporation into lipids of liver slices in experimental diabetes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greco, A.V.; Mingrone, G.; Peruzzi, E.; Orlando, P.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of insulin deficiency on lipid synthesis in the liver of normal rats, diabetic rats by alloxan and pancreatectomized rats was studied in vitro using (1- 14 C)-acetate as lipid precursor. Insulin deficiency induces an increased incorporation of (1- 14 C)-acetate into triglycerides in rat liver. This is particularly evident in pancreatectomized rats with respect to alloxan diabetic rats. It is concluded that in experimental diabetes an atherogenous metabolic pattern is elaborated by the liver. (author)

  20. In vitro study of (1-/sup 14/C)-acetate incorporation into lipids of liver slices in experimental diabetes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greco, A V; Mingrone, G; Peruzzi, E [Universita Cattolica S. Cuore, Roma (Italy). Ist. di Patologia Medica; Orlando, P [Universita Cattolica S. Cuore, Roma (Italy). Centre Radioisotopi

    1981-01-01

    The effect of insulin deficiency on lipid synthesis in the liver of normal rats, diabetic rats by alloxan and pancreatectomized rats was studied in vitro using (1-/sup 14/C)-acetate as lipid precursor. Insulin deficiency induces an increased incorporation of (1-/sup 14/C)-acetate into triglycerides in rat liver. This is particularly evident in pancreatectomized rats with respect to alloxan diabetic rats. It is concluded that in experimental diabetes an atherogenous metabolic pattern is elaborated by the liver.

  1. Lipid profile of type 2 diabetic and hypertensive patients in the Jamaican population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Gordon

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims : Previous studies have shown that diabetes mellitus (DM increases the risk of cardiovascular diseases in females to a greater extent than in males. In this cross-sectional study, we evaluated the lipid profiles of type 2 diabetic males and females. Materials and Methods : The study included 107 type 2 diabetic patients (41 males and 66 females, and 122 hypertensive type 2 diabetic patients (39 males and 83 females, aged 15 years and older. Total cholesterol (TC, triglycerides (TG, low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C, very low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (VLDL-C and high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C concentrations were assayed for each group using standard biochemical methods. Results : The mean TC, TG, VLDL-C, HDL-C and LDL-C concentrations, TG/HDL and LDL/HDL ratios were higher in type 2 diabetic and hypertensive type 2 diabetic patients compared with non-diabetic, and hypertensive non-diabetic control subjects, although these were not significant (P > 0.05. Hypertensive type 2 diabetic females had significantly higher serum TC (7.42 ± 1.63 mmol/L than hypertensive non-diabetic males (5.76±1.57 mmol/L; P 0.05. Conclusion : This study demonstrated that dyslipidemia exists in our type 2 diabetic population with greater TC in hypertensive type 2 diabetic females compared with hypertensive type 2 diabetic males. This suggests that hypertensive type 2 diabetic females are exposed more profoundly to risk factors including atherogenic dyslipidemia compared with males.

  2. Effect of opium on glucose metabolism and lipid profiles in rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sadeghian, Saeed; Boroumand, Mohammad Ali; Sotoudeh-Anvari, Maryam; Rahbani, Shahram; Sheikhfathollahi, Mahmood; Abbasi, Ali

    2009-01-01

    Background: This experimental study was performed to determine the impact of opium use on serum lipid profile and glucose metabolism in rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes. Material and methods: To determine the effect of opium, 20 male rats were divided into control (n = 10) and opium-treated

  3. Lipid profiles, inflammatory markers, and insulin therapy in youth with type 2 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Data regarding atherogenic dyslipidemia and the inflammation profile in youth with type 2 diabetes is limited and the effect of insulin therapy on these variables has not previously been studied in youth. We determined the impact of insulin therapy on lipid and inflammatory markers in youth with poo...

  4. Paparan Debu Batubara Subkronik pada Peroksidasi Lipid dan Kadar Gula Darah Tikus Diabetes Melitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agus Yuwono

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In South Kalimantan, prevalence of diabetes mellitus was 11.1%. South Kalimantan is a province with coal mine spread in all districts. This condition induce coal dust exposure on diabetes mellitus patients. Aim of this study was to measure lipid peroxidation by subchronic coal dust exposure and its effect on glucose level in Wistar rats model of diabetes mellitus. Group included diabetes mellitus Wistar rats (P1, diabetes mellitus + coal dust exposure at dose 12.5 mg/m3 1 hour/day for 28 days (P2 and diabetes mellitus + coal dust exposure at dose 25 mg/m3 1 hour/day for 28 days (P3 on 6 rats, respectively. This research was done from August–October 2010. Analysis of variance (ANOVA test concluded no significant differently on increased plasma malondialdehyde (MDA level between all groups (p>0.05. Percentage of blood glucose level decreased 23.6%, 16.9% and 9.3% for P1, P2, P3 group, respectively. Unpaired t test concluded that blood glucose level were not significant differently between pre and post treatment in all groups (p>0.05. There was no correlation between plasma MDA level and blood glucose level in all groups of exposure (p>0.05. In conclusions, that subchronic coal dust exposure doesn’t increase lipid peroxidation and no effect on blood glucose level in diabetes mellitus rats and no correlation between MDA dan blood glucose level.

  5. Air pollution and blood lipid markers levels: Estimating short and long-term effects on elderly hypertension inpatients complicated with or without type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Sanhua; Liu, Ranran; Wei, Youxiu; Feng, Lin; Lv, Xuemin; Tang, Fei

    2016-08-01

    With the development of society and the economy, many Chinese cities are shrouded in pollution haze for much of the year. Scientific studies have identified various adverse effects of air pollutants on human beings. However, the relationships between air pollution and blood lipid levels are still unclear. The objective of this study is to explore the short and long-term effects of air pollution on eight blood lipid markers among elderly hypertension inpatients complicated with or without type 2 diabetes (T2D). Blood lipid markers which met the pre-established inclusion criteria were exported from the medical record system. Air pollution data were acquired from the official environmental protection website. Associations between the air quality index and the blood lipid indexes were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and further Bonferroni correction. In an exposure time of 7 days or longer, blood lipid markers were somewhat affected by poor air quality. However, the results could not predict whether atherosclerosis would be promoted or inhibited by poorer air condition. Changes of blood lipid markers of hypertension inpatients with or without T2D were not completely the same, but no blood lipid markers had an opposite trend between the two populations. The air quality index was associated with changes to blood lipid markers to some extent in a population of hypertension inpatients with or without T2D. Further studies are needed to investigate the potential mechanism by which air pollutants induce blood lipids changes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. [Effect of autogenic training on glucose regulation and lipid status in non-insulin dependent diabetics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostić, N; Secen, S

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the benefits of autogenic training in patients with type 2 diabetes and 40 diabetics treated with oral antidiabetic agents were assigned to receive autogenic training. Treatment effects on GHb levels, glycemia, lipids and lipid peroxidases were evaluated after 12 weeks. Subjects demonstrated significant improvements of GHb level (8.94 +/- 2.21% vs. 7.9 +/- 2.395) (p autogenic training (1.21 +/- 0.11 vs. 1.36 +/- 1.42) (p training (6.63 +/- 1.66 mmol/l vs. 6.10 +/- 1.12 mmol/l) (p Autogenic training in selected patients, especially those who are most responsive to stress would provide benefits for glucosE control and lipid metabolism that are not always achieved by conventional treatment.

  7. The role of hepatic lipids in hepatic insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perry, Rachel J; Samuel, Varman T.; Petersen, Kitt Mia Falck

    2014-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and its downstream sequelae, hepatic insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, are rapidly growing epidemics, which lead to increased morbidity and mortality rates, and soaring health-care costs. Developing interventions requires a comprehensive understanding...... of the mechanisms by which excess hepatic lipid develops and causes hepatic insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Proposed mechanisms implicate various lipid species, inflammatory signalling and other cellular modifications. Studies in mice and humans have elucidated a key role for hepatic diacylglycerol...... activation of protein kinase Cε in triggering hepatic insulin resistance. Therapeutic approaches based on this mechanism could alleviate the related epidemics of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and type 2 diabetes....

  8. Modulatory effect of Scoparia dulcis in oxidative stress-induced lipid peroxidation in streptozotocin diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latha, M; Pari, L

    2003-01-01

    In light of evidence that diabetes mellitus is associated with oxidative stress and altered antioxidant status, we investigated the effect of Scoparia dulcis plant extracts (SPEt) (aqueous, ethanolic, and chloroform) in streptozotocin diabetic rats. Significant increases in the activities of insulin, superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione-S-transferase, reduced glutathione, vitamin C, and vitamin E were observed in liver, kidney, and brain on treatment with SPEt. In addition, the treated groups also showed significant decreases in blood glucose, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, and hydroperoxide formation in tissues, suggesting its role in protection against lipid peroxidation-induced membrane damage. Thus, the results of the present study indicate that extracts of S. dulcis, especially the aqueous extract, showed a modulatory effect by attenuating the above lipid peroxidation in streptozotocin diabetes.

  9. Lipid metabolism in streptozotocin induced experimental diabetes and it’s correction with niacin-oxyethylidendiphosphonatogermanate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Kresyun

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The development of approaches for effective control of diabetes-induced deterioration of lipid metabolism and plasma glucose level could be implemented by the applying of germanium-contained biologically active substances. Among others such compound as niacin – oxyethylidendiphosphonatogermanate (MIGU-4 should be mentioned, which is able to correct effectively the lipid layers of liver mitochondrial membranes on models of streptozotocin – induced diabetes. Aim. To investigate the dynamic changes of the total cholesterol, total phospholipids level along with their molar ratio; fractions of phospholipids of both erythrocyte membranes and liver mitochondria membranes in experimental diabetes mellitus and to investigate the mentioned indices under conditions of complex correction by MIGU-4 and insulin. Materials and Methods. Diabetes was induced in male Wistar rats with streptozotocin injection (50.0 mg/kg., i. p.. ED50 of MIGU-4 (25.0 mg/kg, i. p. was used. Cellular membranes were obtained from erythrocytes, and mitochondrial membranes were obtained through differential centrifugation of liver tissue. Lipid extracts were isolated from 1 g of erythrocyte mass and from 200 mg of liver tissue; phospholipids fractionation was carried out by method of ascending one-dimensional thin-layer chromatography. Content of certain phospholipids was estimated by method of spots “burning out” using the 72 % chloride acid at 200 0С up to their complete bleaching with the consequent determination of lipids phosphate. The level of total phospholipids was calculated by summing up all fractions content. Results. The total cholesterol level substantially elevated along with the decreasing of phospholipids content in both erythrocyte and mitochondrial membranes obtained from liver tissue in two weeks after experimental streptozotocin diabetes induction in rats. It resulted in an increase of the cholesterol/ phospholipids ratio. These changes

  10. The impact of serum lipids on risk for microangiopathy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toth Peter P

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Few large-scale, real-world studies have assessed the relative associations of lipid fractions with diabetic microvascular events. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the association of the lipid profile components, high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C, low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C, triglycerides (TG, and non-high density lipoprotein cholesterol (non-HDL-C with microvascular complications (MVCs in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM patients. Methods This observational cohort study queried the HealthCore Integrated Research Database (HIRDSM for newly-diagnosed (Index Date 18-64-year-old patients with diabetes mellitus between 01/01/2005-06/30/2010. Inclusion required ≥12 months pre-index continuous health plan eligibility and ≥1 pre-index lipid profile result. Patients with polycystic ovary syndrome and prior MVCs were excluded. Incident complications were defined as the earliest occurrence of diabetic retinopathy, peripheral neuropathy, and/or nephropathy post-index. Cox proportional models and Kaplan-Meier (KM curves were used to evaluate associations among variables. Results Of the patients (N = 72,267, 50.05 % achieved HDL-C, 64.28 % LDL-C, 59.82 % TG, and 56.79 % non-HDL-C American Diabetes Association goals at baseline. During follow-up (mean, 21.74 months, there were 5.21 microvascular events per 1,000 patient-months. A 1-mg/dL increase in HDL-C was associated with 1 % decrease in any MVC risk (P P P P P P  Conclusion This study demonstrates significant independent associations among lipid fractions and risk for microangiopathy. These findings suggest that attaining established ADA goals for HDL-C, TG, and non-HDL-C may reduce risk for microvascular events among patients with diabetes.

  11. Increased subsarcolemmal lipids in type 2 diabetes: effect of training on localization of lipids, mitochondria, and glycogen in sedentary human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Joachim; Hey-Mogensen, Martin; Vind, Birgitte F

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the effect of aerobic training and type 2 diabetes on intramyocellular localization of lipids, mitochondria, and glycogen. Obese type 2 diabetic patients (n = 12) and matched obese controls (n = 12) participated in aerobic cycling training for 10 wk....... Endurance-trained athletes (n = 15) were included for comparison. Insulin action was determined by euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp. Intramyocellular contents of lipids, mitochondria, and glycogen at different subcellular compartments were assessed by transmission electron microscopy in biopsies obtained...... from vastus lateralis muscle. Type 2 diabetic patients were more insulin resistant than obese controls and had threefold higher volume of subsarcolemmal (SS) lipids compared with obese controls and endurance-trained subjects. No difference was found in intermyofibrillar lipids. Importantly, following...

  12. CHARACTERISTICS OF LIPID METABOLISM IN PATIENTS WITH TYPE 1 DIABETES, DEPENDING ON THE AVAILABILITY OF DIABETIC MICROANGIOPATHY AND DIET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. G. Samoilova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Was investigated 67 children (36 boys and 31 girls in age from 6 to 18 years old, with type 1 diabetes patients who were treated at the Children's Hospital Endocrinology number 1 inTomsk, average age of the boys at the time of the survey amounted to (13.0 ± 0.4 years, girls – (13.5 ± 0.4 years. All children diagnosed with type 1 diabetes were under subcompensation. Clinical evaluation of patients included a medical history, physical examination, evaluation of physical development. A study of lipid profile (high-density lipoprotein (HDL cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL, cholesterol (TC, triglycerides (TG, atherogenic index. Screening for diabetic retinopathy was performed by examining the fundus by direct ophthalmoscopy after pupil dilation. Diagnosis of diabetic nephropathy, retinopathy performed according to the classification. Patients were divided into groups depending on the presence of complications, and the level of compensation lipid metabolism (children with satisfactory compensation of lipid metabolism (total cholesterol level less than 5.2 mmol / l, children with poor compensation lipid metabolism (total cholesterol above 5.2 mmol / l. Nature of the subjects studied nutrition using  a questionnaire drawn up on the basis of the standard dietary questionnaire program CINDI, allowing to evaluate the eating habits by examining the frequency of intake of various foods, food preferences and priorities. Products, according to the lipid-lowering diet on the recommendations of the European Society for atherosclerosis were combined and divided into groups according to frequency of use: commonly used products, and rarely use the products. Mathematical treatment of the results was performed using the software package Statistica 5.5 for Windows. In the first phase expected to total group performance statistics – the arithmetic mean value M and the error of the mean m, as well as visualization of the distribution of values

  13. Lipid Profile Of Alloxan-Induced Diabetic Wistar Rats Treated

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    most common serious metabolic disease in the world, affecting hundreds of millions and ... 1922, the treatment of diabetes mellitus relied mainly on dietary measures ..... In liver, the free fatty acids are catabolized to acetyl CoA, and the excess acetyl. CoA is converted to cholesterol, triglyceride and ketone bodies resulting in.

  14. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Associated Lipid Droplet Formation and Type II Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuebao Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus (DM, a metabolic disorder characterized by hyperglycemia, is caused by insufficient insulin production due to excessive loss of pancreatic β cells (type I diabetes or impaired insulin signaling due to peripheral insulin resistance (type II diabetes. Pancreatic β cell is the only insulin-secreting cell type that has highly developed endoplasmic reticulum (ER to cope with high demands of insulin synthesis and secretion. Therefore, ER homeostasis is crucial to the proper function of insulin signaling. Accumulating evidence suggests that deleterious ER stress and excessive intracellular lipids in nonadipose tissues, such as myocyte, cardiomyocyte, and hepatocyte, cause pancreatic β-cell dysfunction and peripheral insulin resistance, leading to type II diabetes. The excessive deposition of lipid droplets (LDs in specialized cell types, such as adipocytes, hepatocytes, and macrophages, has been found as a hallmark in ER stress-associated metabolic diseases, including obesity, diabetes, fatty liver disease, and atherosclerosis. However, much work remains to be done in understanding the mechanism by which ER stress response regulates LD formation and the pathophysiologic role of ER stress-associated LD in metabolic disease. This paper briefly summarizes the recent advances in ER stress-associated LD formation and its involvement in type II diabetes.

  15. ASSESSMENT OF SERUM LIPIDS IN TYPE II DIABETES MALE AND FEMALE PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annapurna

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Type II diabetes mellitus (T2DM often have both quantitative and qualitative abnormalities of lipoproteins that are responsible for increased incidence of microvascular and macrovascular complications. Incidence of coronary heart disease is three to four folds higher in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus compared to non - diabetics. It has been proposed that the composition of lipid particles in diabetic dyslipidemia is more atherogenic than other types of dyslipidemia. This study was conducted to asses s serum lipid profile in type diabetes male and female patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This study was conducted on 50 T2DM patients with history more than ten yrs diabetes. Diabetic patients with overt complications and patients on drugs like diuretics, s teroids, oral contraceptives and beta blockers etc are excluded from study. 5 ml of whole blood was collected via vena puncture with the help of a disposable syringe in between 7.00am and 8.00am. Fasting plasma glucose and different Lipid fractions were es timated using standard procedure. All values were expressed as mean ± S.D. Statistical significance of differences between control and study groups were evaluated by student’s t test. A p - value less than 0.05 were considered as significant. RESULTS: The se rum total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol and triglycerides were significantly raised in both males and females . CONCLUSION: Hyperlipidaemia is a common finding among DM patients. DM patients should be screened and appropriate management should be instituted to reduce the risk of CHD and atherosclerosis

  16. Effect of Kombucha Tea on Blood Sugar and Blood Lipid Profiles in Diabetic Rats: Short Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Malekaneh

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Kombucha tea is made through fermentation of sweet tea by Kombucha fungus. It has beneficial therapeutic effects in the treatment of many diseases. The present study aimed at examining the effect of Kombucha tea extract on blood sugar and blood lipid profiles in diabetes. Materials and Methods: Twenty-eight Wistar rats weighing about 250g were divided into 4 equal groups and then injected intraperitoneally (IP with alloxan to induce diabetes. The administered concentrations were 20 and 80 mg/kg of Kombucha tea and 20 mg/kg of black ordinary tea for one month. The rats’ blood sugar and weight were tested before and after the intervention period but blood lipid parameters per either administration were also assessed at the end of the period. Results: Mean blood sugar in the diabetic rats receiving Kombucha tea was reduced. Maximum reduction in blood sugar was observed in the group receiving Kombucha tea with concentration of 80 mg/kg. However, black tea significantly reduced blood sugar. Conclusion: Kombucha tea consumption for a month only reduced blood sugar levels in diabetic patients. But increased the weight and not have favorable effects on lipid profile.

  17. Effect of opium on glucose metabolism and lipid profiles in rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghian, Saeed; Boroumand, Mohammad Ali; Sotoudeh-Anvari, Maryam; Rabbani, Shahram; Sheikhfathollahi, Mahmood; Abbasi, Ali

    2009-01-01

    This experimental study was performed to determine the impact of opium use on serum lipid profile and glucose metabolism in rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes. To determine the effect of opium, 20 male rats were divided into control (n = 10) and opium-treated (n = 10) groups. After diabetes induction, the animals were investigated for daily glucose measurements for 35 days. Serum lipid profile and haemoglobin A1c (HbA(1c)) were assayed at the baseline (before induction of diabetes) and at 35-day follow-up. The glycaemia levels in the rats treated with opium were similar to the levels measured in the control rats (544.8 +/- 62.2 mg/dl v. 524.6 +/- 50.0 mg/dl, P = 0.434). In addition, there was no difference between the opium-treated rats and control rats in HbA(1c) (6.5 +/- 0.5% v. 6.6 +/- 0.2%, P = 0.714). Compared to the control rats, the serum total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein (HDL), triglyceride and lipoprotein (a) in the test animals were similar. Opium use has no significant effect on glucose metabolism and serum lipid profile in rats with induced diabetes.

  18. Lipids profile and thyroid parameters in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Yuzvenko

    2016-03-01

    Background Higher level of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH and lower thyroid hormone levels within the euthyroid range may adversely affect atherosclerosis. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential association between thyroid parameters and lipids profile in a cohort of euthyroid diabetic patients. Methods. Two hundred and thirty-one euthyroid patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (151 males and 80 females were consecutively recruited. Clinical and anthropometric data was collected from all participants. Whole blood samples were drawn in the morning after an overnight fasting for the measurement of serum TSH, free thyroxine (fT4, free triiothyronine (fT3, anti-thyroid peroxidase antibody (TPO-Ab levels, as well as lipid concentrations and glucose. Results TSH was higher in females than males. Stratified by TSH, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c level increased in subjects with TSH ≥2.5 uIU/mL (p = 0.003. In females, total cholesterol (TC and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c level was significant lower in subjects with TSH <2.5uIU/mL. TSH was significantly associated with TC and LDL-c. In a multiple linear regression analysis (stepwise, TSH was positive associated with TC and LDL-c. Among all patients 49 (21.2% were TPO antibody positive. The blood pressure and lipid levels were lower in TPO-Ab positive patients, however, the differences were not significantly. Conclusions. TSH was positively associated with serum TC and LDL-c in euthyroid women with type 2 DM. Analysis in the subgroup having TPO antibody assays demonstrating non-significantly lower TC levels among seropositive subjects was consistent with the above stated consideration for women as a whole. Further investigations are needed to understand the intimate mechanisms of lipid metabolism in type 2 diabetes with respect to thyroid function.   Key words: type 2 diabetes mellitus, thyroid parameters, lipids profile.

  19. Predictive models for conversion of prediabetes to diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokota, N; Miyakoshi, T; Sato, Y; Nakasone, Y; Yamashita, K; Imai, T; Hirabayashi, K; Koike, H; Yamauchi, K; Aizawa, T

    2017-08-01

    To clarify the natural course of prediabetes and develop predictive models for conversion to diabetes. A retrospective longitudinal study of 2105 adults with prediabetes was carried out with a mean observation period of 4.7years. Models were developed using multivariate logistic regression analysis and verified by 10-fold cross-validation. The relationship between [final BMI minus baseline BMI] (δBMI) and incident diabetes was analyzed post hoc by comparing the diabetes conversion rate for low (Prediabetes conversion to diabetes could be predicted with accuracy, and weight reduction during the observation was associated with lowered conversion rate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. GPS-Lipid: a robust tool for the prediction of multiple lipid modification sites

    OpenAIRE

    Xie, Yubin; Zheng, Yueyuan; Li, Hongyu; Luo, Xiaotong; He, Zhihao; Cao, Shuo; Shi, Yi; Zhao, Qi; Xue, Yu; Zuo, Zhixiang; Ren, Jian

    2016-01-01

    As one of the most common post-translational modifications in eukaryotic cells, lipid modification is an important mechanism for the regulation of variety aspects of protein function. Over the last decades, three classes of lipid modifications have been increasingly studied. The co-regulation of these different lipid modifications is beginning to be noticed. However, due to the lack of integrated bioinformatics resources, the studies of co-regulatory mechanisms are still very limited. In this...

  1. Increased lipids in non-lipogenic tissues are indicators of the severity of type 2 diabetes in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campbell-Tofte, J.; Hansen, H.S.; Mu, Huiling

    2007-01-01

    We hypothesised that the molecular changes triggered in type 2 diabetes might cause phenotypic changes in the lipid fraction of tissues. We compared tissue lipid profiles of inbred lean B6-Bom with those of the obese B6-ob/ob and diabetic BKS-db/db mice and found that genetically diabetic mice...... significantly accumulate fat (especially monounsaturated fatty acids, MUFA) in non-lipogenic tissues such as the eye (MUFA, 2-fold), skeletal muscle (MUFA, 13-fold) and pancreas (MUFA, 16-fold). In contrast, the B6-ob/ob mice which manifest a milder form of type 2 diabetes use the liver as their predominant...

  2. EFFECTS OF COOKED LENTILS ON GLYCEMIC CONTROL AND BLOOD LIPIDS OF PATIENTS WITH TYPE 2 DIABETES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamidreza Shams

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract    INTRODUCTION: Diabetes control is one of the main conflict issues in diabetes management. Scientists, recently, recommend [increasing low glycemic index (LGI foods in dietary regimen. The effects of cooked lentil as a low glycemic index food on serum blood glucose and lipid profile among type 2 diabetic patients has been investigated in this study.    METHODS: In a randomized cross-over clinical trial which was performed on 30 patients with type II diabetes mellitus, subjects were randomly divided into 2 groups. Group A followed the normal diet and Group B followed normal diet with 50gm cooked lentil and 6gm canula oil substitute of 30gm bread and 20gm cheese. After  6 weeks, groups stopped their diets and put on wash out period for 3 weeks and later the  diets where switched between the them. Diet continued for another 6 weeks. Anthropometric measurements, dietary intakes, serum lipids and glucose levels were determined at the beginning and the end of each test period. Data were analyzed by Food Processor II and SPSS-13.    RESULTS: BMI, LDL_C, HDL_C, TG and serum Fructozamine were not significantly affected by dietary regimens. But Total cholesterol and fasting blood glucose decreased significantly in regimen containing lentil (P<0.05.    CONCLUSION: Consumption of cooked lentil as a LGI food in breakfast led to reduction of FBS and TC and improvement of glycemic control in type 2 diabetic patients.      Keywords: Diabetes Mellitus, Lentil, Lipid profiles, Blood glucose, Glycemic index, Clinical Trial.

  3. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor ligands regulate lipid content, metabolism, and composition in fetal lungs of diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtz, M; Capobianco, E; Careaga, V; Martinez, N; Mazzucco, M B; Maier, M; Jawerbaum, A

    2014-03-01

    Maternal diabetes impairs fetal lung development. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand-activated transcription factors relevant in lipid homeostasis and lung development. This study aims to evaluate the effect of in vivo activation of PPARs on lipid homeostasis in fetal lungs of diabetic rats. To this end, we studied lipid concentrations, expression of lipid metabolizing enzymes and fatty acid composition in fetal lungs of control and diabetic rats i) after injections of the fetuses with Leukotriene B4 (LTB4, PPARα ligand) or 15deoxyΔ(12,14)prostaglandin J2 (15dPGJ2, PPARγ ligand) and ii) fed during pregnancy with 6% olive oil- or 6% safflower oil-supplemented diets, enriched with PPAR ligands were studied. Maternal diabetes increased triglyceride concentrations and decreased expression of lipid-oxidizing enzymes in fetal lungs of diabetic rats, an expression further decreased by LTB4 and partially restored by 15dPGJ2 in lungs of male fetuses in the diabetic group. In lungs of female fetuses in the diabetic group, maternal diets enriched with olive oil increased triglyceride concentrations and fatty acid synthase expression, while those enriched with safflower oil increased triglyceride concentrations and fatty acid transporter expression. Both olive oil- and safflower oil-supplemented diets decreased cholesterol and cholesteryl ester concentrations and increased the expression of the reverse cholesterol transporter ATP-binding cassette A1 in fetal lungs of female fetuses of diabetic rats. In fetal lungs of control and diabetic rats, the proportion of polyunsaturated fatty acids increased with the maternal diets enriched with olive and safflower oils. Our results revealed important changes in lipid metabolism in fetal lungs of diabetic rats, and in the ability of PPAR ligands to modulate the composition of lipid species relevant in the lung during the perinatal period.

  4. Inflammatory and Other Biomarkers: Role in Pathophysiology and Prediction of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abell, Sally K.; De Courten, Barbora; Boyle, Jacqueline A.; Teede, Helena J.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding pathophysiology and identifying mothers at risk of major pregnancy complications is vital to effective prevention and optimal management. However, in current antenatal care, understanding of pathophysiology of complications is limited. In gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), risk prediction is mostly based on maternal history and clinical risk factors and may not optimally identify high risk pregnancies. Hence, universal screening is widely recommended. Here, we will explore the literature on GDM and biomarkers including inflammatory markers, adipokines, endothelial function and lipids to advance understanding of pathophysiology and explore risk prediction, with a goal to guide prevention and treatment of GDM. PMID:26110385

  5. Betatrophin provides a new insight into diabetes treatment and lipid metabolism (Review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jin-Zhou; Yu, Chao-Hui; Li, You-Ming

    2014-07-01

    Replenishing the insulin-producing β-cell mass is considered to be a potential cure for diabetes. A recent study identified a secreted protein, known as betatrophin, which potently induces pancreatic β-cell proliferation. Notably, a number of studies reportedly identified betatrophin, which is also known as lipasin, atypical angiopoietin-like 8 and refeeding-induced fat and liver protein, and considered to be a novel regulator in lipid metabolism according to the studies. The identification of betatrophin was considered to create novel opportunities for potential diabetes therapy. In the present study, the current knowledge of betatrophin is reviewed, with regards to its character and function in lipid homeostasis and pancreatic β-cell proliferation.

  6. Application of adiponectin, TNF-α and ferrtin in type 2 diabetes with intrahepatic lipid infiltration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Cuiying; Zhou Huan; Han Yuan; Ling Liqun; Huang Gang

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to find and establish the serum marker which can reflect the degree of intrahepatic lipid infiltration in Type 2 diabetes patients and assess the therapeutic effect. It helps us to observe the improvement of intrahepatic lipid deposit under controlled serum glucose metabolism. Twenty-three Type 2 diabetes patients with obvious intrahepatic lipid infiltration diagnosed by CT scan were divided into two groups, one group took rosiglitazone orally (male: female 5:6), and the combined treatment group took rosiglitazone and metformin simultaneously (male: female 6:6), in daily therapeutic dose of 4 mg rosiglitazone and 2 g metformin for 24 weeks. Before and after treatment, we measured fasting serum glucose, glycated hemoglobin (GHb), insulin, insulin resistant index, plasma adiponectin, leptin, tumor necrotic factor α (TNF-α), ferrtin respectively. After the treatment, fasting serum glucose and GHb decreased obvious, especially the combined treatment group. Intrahepatic lipid content percent decreased, too, in both groups (the rosiglitazone group: 43.3±25.8 vs 29.1±18.7, P<0.01, the combined group: 43.4±21.8 vs 22.0±16.7, P<0.01). Plasma adiponectin and TNF-α had correlation to intrahepatic lipid contend percent change. Plasma adiponectin and TNF-α was obviously improved in the rosiglitazone group and the combined treatment group (Adiponectin: 11.96±7.3 vs 20.61±12.0 ng/mL, 12.76±6.7 vs 25.81±12.8 ng/mL; TNFα: 6.92±2.5 vs 5.89±1.9 pg/mL, 6.81±2.14 vs 5.45±2.0 pg/mL; P<0.01). In addition, serum ferrtin concentration decreased obviously, especially the combined treatment group (rosiglitazone group: 345±116 vs 288±71ng/mL, P<0.05, combined treatment group: 362±194 vs 258±109 ng/mL, P<0.01). It can be concluded that 1) rosiglitazone and metformin controls serum glucose metabolism and improves intrahepatic lipid infiltration by especially the combined treatment, 2) plasma adiponectic and TNF-α are effective markers to reflect

  7. Betatrophin provides a new insight into diabetes treatment and lipid metabolism (Review)

    OpenAIRE

    ZHU, JIN-ZHOU; YU, CHAO-HUI; LI, YOU-MING

    2014-01-01

    Replenishing the insulin-producing β-cell mass is considered to be a potential cure for diabetes. A recent study identified a secreted protein, known as betatrophin, which potently induces pancreatic β-cell proliferation. Notably, a number of studies reportedly identified betatrophin, which is also known as lipasin, atypical angiopoietin-like 8 and refeeding-induced fat and liver protein, and considered to be a novel regulator in lipid metabolism according to the studies. The identification o...

  8. Relationship of adiponectin level with lipid profile in type-2 diabetic men with coronary heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durrani, S.; Jan, M.R.; Shah, J.; Khan, M.A.

    2015-01-01

    Cerebro-vascular disease is a commonest long term complication of type-2 diabetes mellitus. The study was done to determine concentration of serum adiponectin and lipid profile in type-2 diabetic men with coronary heart disease (CHD) in the region of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (KPK), and to find possible relationship between them. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study comprising of randomly selected thirty six healthy adult males and thirty six type-2 diabetic males with coronary heart disease. Their fasting blood samples were analysed for serum adiponectin, fasting blood glucose, glycosylated haemoglobin and lipid profile which included total cholesterol (T-C), triglycerides (TG), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). The relationship of adiponectin with other variables in type-2 diabetic men with coronary heart disease was determined with Pearson correlations coefficient (r). Results: Type-2 diabetic males with coronary heart disease when compared to healthy males showed significantly low levels of serum adiponectin (p=<0.001) and HDL-C (p=<0.001) and significantly high level of FBG (p=<0.001), HbA1c (p=<0.001), TC (p=<0.05), TG (p=<0.05) and LDL-C (p=<0.05). Serum adiponectin level showed a significant negative correlation with FBG (r = -0.332; p= 0.04), HbA1c (r = -0.818; p=<0.01) and TG (r = -0.640; p=<0.01) in type-2 diabetic men with coronary heart disease. Adiponectin showed a significant positive association with HDL-C in controls (r = 0.948; p=<0.01) and patients of type-2 diabetes with CHD (r = 0.650; p=<0.01). Conclusion: Serum adiponectin concentration is markedly decreased in patients of type-2 diabetes with coronary heart disease. Hypoadiponectinemia is related with deranged lipid profile, i.e., high TG and low HDL-C levels in type-2 diabetic men with CHD. Moreover, adiponectin is associated positively with HDL-C and negatively with HbA1c and TG levels in the studied population. (author)

  9. Assessment of lipid profile in Saudi type 2 diabetic and non-diabetic periodontal patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Otaibi, Dalal H.; Babay, Nadir A.; Habib, Syed S.; Almas, K.

    2008-01-01

    Objective was to study the extent of periodontal disease in diabetic and non-diabetic periodontitis patients and to investigate the relationship of dyslipidemia and periodontal disease, in diabetic and non-diabetic periodontitis patients. This is a cross-sectional study at the Department of Preventive Dental Sciences College of Dentistry and Department of Physiology, College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, from February 2003 to June 2004. A total of 90 patients was recruited and divided into 3 equal groups of 30 subjects, with age and gender matched, and divided as follows: group 1 healthy group: periodontally and systemically healthy subjects, group 2 periodontitis group: chronic periodontitis patients with no systemic disease, group 3 diabetic group: chronic periodontitis patients with chronic type 2 diabetes mellitus. Plaque index, bleeding on probing, probing pocket depth PPD, and clinical attachment level CAL were measured at the time of initial examination. The glycated hemoglobin, total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein LDL, triglyceride, high density lipoprotein were also measured. Periodontal parameters PPD and CAL were of significantly higher value in the diabetic patients, when compared to the periodontitis patients p<0.05. The total cholesterol, LDL, and triglyceride were also found to be significantly higher among the periodontitis patients than the healthy subjects p<0.05. This study indicated that type 2 diabetic patients had a higher risk to developed advanced periodontal disease hat the non-diabetic subjects. It also highlighted the association of dyslipidemia in periodontitis patients. (author)

  10. Assessment of lipid profile in Saudi type 2 diabetic and non-diabetic periodontal patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Otaibi, Dalal H; Babay, Nadir A [Dept. of Preventive Dental Services, Coll. of Dentistry, King Saud Univ., Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Habib, Syed S [Dept. of Physiology, Habib Coll. of Medicine, King Khalid Univ. Hospital, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Almas, K [Dept. of Periodontology, Univ. of Connecticut (United States)

    2008-07-01

    Objective was to study the extent of periodontal disease in diabetic and non-diabetic periodontitis patients and to investigate the relationship of dyslipidemia and periodontal disease, in diabetic and non-diabetic periodontitis patients. This is a cross-sectional study at the Department of Preventive Dental Sciences College of Dentistry and Department of Physiology, College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, from February 2003 to June 2004. A total of 90 patients was recruited and divided into 3 equal groups of 30 subjects, with age and gender matched, and divided as follows: group 1 healthy group: periodontally and systemically healthy subjects, group 2 periodontitis group: chronic periodontitis patients with no systemic disease, group 3 diabetic group: chronic periodontitis patients with chronic type 2 diabetes mellitus. Plaque index, bleeding on probing, probing pocket depth PPD, and clinical attachment level CAL were measured at the time of initial examination. The glycated hemoglobin, total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein LDL, triglyceride, high density lipoprotein were also measured. Periodontal parameters PPD and CAL were of significantly higher value in the diabetic patients, when compared to the periodontitis patients p<0.05. The total cholesterol, LDL, and triglyceride were also found to be significantly higher among the periodontitis patients than the healthy subjects p<0.05. This study indicated that type 2 diabetic patients had a higher risk to developed advanced periodontal disease hat the non-diabetic subjects. It also highlighted the association of dyslipidemia in periodontitis patients. (author)

  11. Lipidome as a predictive tool in progression to type 2 diabetes in Finnish men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suvitaival, Tommi; Bondia-Pons, Isabel; Yetukuri, Laxman

    2018-01-01

    are not helpful at distinguishing progressors from non-progressors. BACKGROUND: There is a need for early markers to track and predict the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) from the state of normal glucose tolerance through prediabetes. In this study we tested whether the plasma molecular lipidome...... has biomarker potential to predicting the onset of T2DM. METHODS: We applied global lipidomic profiling on plasma samples from well-phenotyped men (107 cases, 216 controls) participating in the longitudinal METSIM study at baseline and at five-year follow-up. To validate the lipid markers......RESULTS: A persistent lipid signature with higher levels of triacylglycerols and diacyl-phospholipids as well as lower levels of alkylacyl phosphatidylcholines was observed in progressors to T2DM. Lysophosphatidylcholine acyl C18:2 (LysoPC(18:2)), phosphatidylcholines PC(32:1), PC(34:2e) and PC(36...

  12. EFFECT OF FERMENTED CHUB MACKEREL EXTRACT ON LIPID METABOLISM OF DIABETIC RATS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Santoso

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted to evaluate the effect of fermented chub mackerel extract(FCME on lipid metabolism in diabetic rats. Four week-old male Wistar rats were divided into threegroups based on weight. All rats were induced with diabetes mellitus by single intraperitoneal injectionof streptozotocin at 45 mg/kg body weight. Thereafter, they were randomly distributed to threetreatments with 7 rats assigned to each treatment. One group was the control with no additive, and twotreatmentgroups were given the purified diets supplemented with 1% or 2% FCME. Experimentalresults showed that in comparison to the control, diabetic rats fed FCME increased feed intake (P<0.01and body weight gain (P<0.05. FCME inclusion significantly reduced the activities of acetyl-CoAcarboxylase (P<0.01 and fatty acid synthetase (P<0.05 in diabetic rats. FCME significantly increasedcholesterol 7 -hydroxylase with no effect on HMG-CoA reductase activity. FCME had no effect onhepatic triglyceride, free cholesterol and phospholipid. FCME inclusion at 1% level significantlyreduced serum triglyceride. FCME significantly increased HDL-cholesterol (P<0.05 with no effect onLDL + VLDL-cholesterol, and significantly reduced atherogenic index. FCME did not significantlyaffect serum insulin and glucose concentration. In conclusion, FCME supplementation altered lipidmetabolism in diabetic rats. FCME supplementation reduced the risk of atherosclerosis in diabetic rats.

  13. Lipid and liver abnormalities in haemoglobin A1c-defined prediabetes and type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calanna, S; Scicali, R; Di Pino, A

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: We aimed to investigate lipid abnormalities and liver steatosis in patients with HbA1c-defined prediabetes and type 2 diabetes compared to individuals with HbA1c-defined normoglycaemia. METHODS AND RESULTS: Ninety-one subjects with prediabetes according to HbA1c, i.e. from 5...... of the liver, and BARD (body mass index, aspartate aminotransferase/alanine aminotransferase ratio, diabetes) score for evaluation of liver fibrosis, were performed in all subjects. In comparison to controls, subjects with prediabetes were characterised by: lower apolipoprotein AI and HDL cholesterol levels......, higher blood pressure, triglycerides levels and apolipoprotein B/apolipoprotein AI ratio, higher FLI, increased prevalence of and more severe hepatic steatosis, similar BARD score, and higher total body fat mass. In comparison to subjects with diabetes, subjects with prediabetes exhibited: similar blood...

  14. Positive Correlation of Resistin with Blood Lipids in Gestational Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z Zare

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background &Objective: Resistin is an important adipokin, secreted from adipocytes and causes insulin resistance. Gestational diabetes (GDM is characterized by insulin resistance in insulin target tissues. The goal of this research was to investigate whether there is a relationship among resistin and various clinical and metabolic parameters in GDM.Materials & Methods: 76 pregnant women who got the diagnosis of GDM were enrolled as the study group. 70 gestational age-matched pregnant women with normal glucose tolerance were recruited as the control group of the study. Serum resistin concentration, in addition to various metabolic and biochemical parameters, were measured in two groups.Results: Plasma resistin was not significantly different in GDM patients and subjects with normal glucose tolerance. Correlation analysis revealed that LDL cholesterol, total cholesterol and triglyceride were positively correlated with plasma resistin (P < 0.004, 0.01, and 0.02, respectively.Conclusion: Plasma resistin is correlated with insulin resistance, high serum LDL cholesterol, total cholesterol and TG in the Iranian GDM patients.

  15. ROLE OF PHYSICAL EXERCISE, FITNESS AND AEROBIC TRAINING IN TYPE 1 DIABETIC AND HEALTHY MEN IN RELATION TO THE LIPID PROFILE, LIPID PEROXIDATION AND THE METABOLIC SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David E. Laaksonen

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Dyslipidemia and possibly lipid peroxidation play important roles in the development of macro- and microvascular disease in type 1 diabetes mellitus. Little is known, however, of the role of aerobic exercise in dyslipidemia and resting and exercise-induced lipid peroxidation in type 1 diabetes. Despite the well-known effect of leisure-time physical activity (LTPA on components of the metabolic syndrome, little is known of the association of LTPA and cardiorespiratory fitness (maximal oxygen consumption, VO2max with development of the metabolic syndrome itself. A randomized controlled trial assessing the effect of a 12-16 week aerobic exercise program on VO2max and the lipid profile was carried out in otherwise healthy young men with type 1 diabetes. The effect of acute physical exercise on oxidative stress and antioxidant defenses and the relation to VO2max in men with type 1 diabetes was also evaluated. To test four recently proposed definitions by the World Health Organization (WHO and National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP of the metabolic syndrome, the sensitivity and specificity of the definitions for prevalent and incident diabetes were assessed in a population-based cohort of middle-aged men. We also studied the associations of LTPA and cardiorespiratory fitness with prevalent and incident cases of the metabolic syndrome. A 12-16 week endurance exercise program produced antiatherogenic changes in lipid, lipoprotein and apolipoprotein levels in 20 type 1 diabetic men who for the most part were already physically active at baseline. The most favorable training-induced changes in the high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL/low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL and apolipoprotein A-I/apolipoprotein B ratios were in patients with low baseline HDL/LDL levels, likely the group with the most benefit to be gained by such changes. Plasma thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS, a measure of lipid peroxidation, was higher in nine

  16. Type 1 diabetes: New horizons in prediction and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razack, Natasha N; Wherrett, Diane K

    2005-01-01

    Significant advances have been made in our understanding of the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes and our ability to predict risk for the condition. This knowledge is being used to develop new and innovative strategies to prevent type 1 diabetes or to prevent further destruction of beta cells in those who are newly diagnosed. Several multicentre studies are underway investigating the natural history of the disease, the genetics behind the disease and ways to stop the autoimmune reaction against beta cells (Type 1 Diabetes TrialNet, Type 1 Diabetes Genetics Consortium and the Trial to Reduce Diabetes in the Genetically at Risk [TRIGR] Study Group). The stage is set to find an agent or strategy to prevent type 1 diabetes or to preserve the residual beta cell mass in new-onset patients.

  17. The particular prediction of normal MPI in diabetic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Z.-F.; Li, S.-J.; Liu, H.-Y.; Liu, J.Z.; Li, X.F.; Cheng, Y.; Zhang, Y.W.; Wang, J.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Objectives: To explore the prognostic value of normal SPECT MPI in diabetic pts. Methods: 1371 consecutively registered pts suspected with CAD were studied using rest SPECT MPI, and 1047 cases (76.37%) were followed up successfully. The mean interval of following up was 33.25±14.95(1∼56) months, and even longer than 18 months for pts with no cardiac events (CE). Results: Of 1047 pts, 172 were diabetic. During the follow up period, there are 42 cardiac events in 172 diabetic patients, and 86 in 857 non-diabetics. Diabetic pts had significantly higher rates of cardiac events (24.4% versus 9.8%; chi-square 28.5, P<0.0001). In the 567 pts with normal MPI, there are 4 cardiac events in 54 diabetic pts and 6 cases in 513 nondiabetic pts. The diabetic pts had significantly higher rates of cardiac events compared with the non-diabetic pts (7.41% versus 1.17%, Fisher's Exact Test, P=0.01). Conclusions: A normal SPECT has a high negative predictive value, but diabetic patients had significantly higher cardiac events rate compared with non-diabetic patients, what ever the MPI is normal or abnormal. (author)

  18. A potential synbiotic product improves the lipid profile of diabetic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roselino Mariana N

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies showed that intake of yacon or some lactic acid bacteria was able to inhibit the development of diabetes mellitus, by reducing glucose and associated symptoms, for example, the lipid profile. Objective The purpose of this study was to assess the consumption influence of a potential symbiotic product of soybean and yacon extract and fermented Enterococcus faecium CRL 183 and Lactobacillus helveticus ssp jugurti 416 in reducing blood glucose and lipid levels in an animal model. Methods Diabetes mellitus was chemically induced by intraperitoneal administration of streptozotocin (50 mg/kg body weight. The rats were divided into four groups (n=10: GI – non-diabetic animals that received only a standard chow diet (negative control, GII – diabetic animals that received only chow diet (positive control, GIII – diabetic animals that received the chow diet + 1 mL/kg body weight/day of soybean and yacon unfermented product, GIV – diabetic rats that received the chow diet + 1 mL/kg body weight/day of soybean and yacon fermented product. There was a seven-week treatment period and the following parameters were evaluated: animal body weight, food and water intake, blood glucose, enzyme activities of aspartate aminotransferase (AST and alanine aminotransferase (ALT, triglycerides levels, total cholesterol, HDL-C, non-HDL-C. Cell viability of the fermented product was checked weekly for a seven-week period. Results The product average viable population was 108-109 CFU/mL, by ensuring both the rods and cocci regular intake. No difference was observed between the water and feed intake and body weight of groups that received unfermented and fermented products and the untreated diabetic group. The same was observed for the blood glucose and AST and ALT activities, while some improvement was observed for a lipid profile, represented by reduction of triglycerides level by 15.07% and 33.50% in groups III and IV

  19. Microbiological, lipid and immunological profiles in children with gingivitis and type 1 diabetes mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    DUQUE, Cristiane; JOÃO, Mariana Ferreira Dib; CAMARGO, Gabriela Alessandra da Cruz Galhardo; TEIXEIRA, Gláucia Schuindt; MACHADO, Thamiris Santana; AZEVEDO, Rebeca de Souza; MARIANO, Flávia Sammartino; COLOMBO, Natália Helena; VIZOTO, Natália Leal; MATTOS-GRANER, Renata de Oliveira

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective The aim of this study was to compare the prevalence of periodontal pathogens, systemic inflammatory mediators and lipid profiles in type 1 diabetes children (DM) with those observed in children without diabetes (NDM), both with gingivitis. Material and methods Twenty-four DM children and twenty-seven NDM controls were evaluated. The periodontal status, glycemic and lipid profiles were determined for both groups. Subgingival samples of periodontal sites were collected to determine the prevalence of periodontal microorganisms by PCR. Blood samples were collected for IL-1-β, TNF-α and IL-6 analysis using ELISA kits. Results Periodontal conditions of DM and NDM patients were similar, without statistical differences in periodontal indices. When considering patients with gingivitis, all lipid parameters evaluated were highest in the DM group; Capnocytophaga sputigena and Capnocytophaga ochracea were more prevalent in the periodontal sites of DM children. “Red complex” bacteria were detected in few sites of DM and NDM groups. Fusobacterium nucleatum and Campylobacter rectus were frequently found in both groups. Similar levels of IL-1-β, TNF-α and IL-6 were detected in DM and NDM children. Conclusion Clinical and immunological profiles are similar between DM and NDM children. The presence of Capnocytophaga sputigena and Capnocytophaga ochracea were associated with gingivitis in DM children. PMID:28403363

  20. Microbiological, lipid and immunological profiles in children with gingivitis and type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duque, Cristiane; João, Mariana Ferreira Dib; Camargo, Gabriela Alessandra da Cruz Galhardo; Teixeira, Gláucia Schuindt; Machado, Thamiris Santana; Azevedo, Rebeca de Souza; Mariano, Flávia Sammartino; Colombo, Natália Helena; Vizoto, Natália Leal; Mattos-Graner, Renata de Oliveira

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the prevalence of periodontal pathogens, systemic inflammatory mediators and lipid profiles in type 1 diabetes children (DM) with those observed in children without diabetes (NDM), both with gingivitis. Twenty-four DM children and twenty-seven NDM controls were evaluated. The periodontal status, glycemic and lipid profiles were determined for both groups. Subgingival samples of periodontal sites were collected to determine the prevalence of periodontal microorganisms by PCR. Blood samples were collected for IL-1-β, TNF-α and IL-6 analysis using ELISA kits. Periodontal conditions of DM and NDM patients were similar, without statistical differences in periodontal indices. When considering patients with gingivitis, all lipid parameters evaluated were highest in the DM group; Capnocytophaga sputigena and Capnocytophaga ochracea were more prevalent in the periodontal sites of DM children. "Red complex" bacteria were detected in few sites of DM and NDM groups. Fusobacterium nucleatum and Campylobacter rectus were frequently found in both groups. Similar levels of IL-1-β, TNF-α and IL-6 were detected in DM and NDM children. Clinical and immunological profiles are similar between DM and NDM children. The presence of Capnocytophaga sputigena and Capnocytophaga ochracea were associated with gingivitis in DM children.

  1. Trends of lipid abnormalities in Pakistani type-2 diabetes mellitus patients: a tertiary care centre data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatti, S.M.; Dhakam, S.; Khan, M.A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To ascertain trends of lipid abnormalities in Pakistani Type-2 Diabetes Mellitus patients. Methodology: Fasting lipid profiles of 328 outpatient adult type 2 diabetes mellitus patients visiting the Aga Khan University Hospital, from January 2005 to January 2006 were prospectively reviewed and abstracted on a pre-specified proforma. Demographic features, different patterns of dyslipidemia in accordance with specified risk categories, and the proportion of patients with none, one, two, or three lipid values outside clinical targets were noted. The influence of sex on dyslipidemia pattern was also assessed Results: Our patients had higher average HbA1c levels and higher total cholesterol, LDL and lower HDL levels. The triglycerides levels in our female patients were higher. The percentage of our patients with a high-, borderline-, or low-risk LDL cholesterol were 54, 29, and 16%, respectively (P = 0.51). On a percentage basis, 73% were in the high-risk HDL cholesterol group, 18% were in the borderline-risk group and 9% in the low-risk group, respectively (P 100mg/dl. Conclusion: Combination of high LDL and a low HDL cholesterol level was the commonest pattern of dyslipidemia found. Second was unfavorable levels of all three lipoproteins combined and the third was an isolated increase in LDL cholesterol. A greater proportion of women were found dyslipidemic. (author)

  2. Lipid and liver abnormalities in haemoglobin A1c-defined prediabetes and type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calanna, S; Scicali, R; Di Pino, A; Knop, F K; Piro, S; Rabuazzo, A M; Purrello, F

    2014-06-01

    We aimed to investigate lipid abnormalities and liver steatosis in patients with HbA1c-defined prediabetes and type 2 diabetes compared to individuals with HbA1c-defined normoglycaemia. Ninety-one subjects with prediabetes according to HbA1c, i.e. from 5.7 to 6.4% (39-46 mmol/mol), 50 newly diagnosed patients with HbA1c-defined type 2 diabetes (HbA1c ≥6.5% [≥48 mmol/mol]), and 67 controls with HbA1c lower than 5.7% (prediabetes were characterised by: lower apolipoprotein AI and HDL cholesterol levels, higher blood pressure, triglycerides levels and apolipoprotein B/apolipoprotein AI ratio, higher FLI, increased prevalence of and more severe hepatic steatosis, similar BARD score, and higher total body fat mass. In comparison to subjects with diabetes, subjects with prediabetes exhibited: similar blood pressure and apolipoprotein B/apolipoprotein AI ratio, similar FLI, reduced prevalence of and less severe hepatic steatosis, lower BARD score, increased percent fat and lower total body muscle mass. In comparison to controls, subjects with diabetes showed: lower apolipoprotein AI and HDL cholesterol levels, higher blood pressure and triglycerides levels, higher FLI, increased prevalence of and more severe hepatic steatosis, higher BARD score, and higher total body muscle mass. Moreover, HbA1c was correlated with BMI, HOMA-IR, triglycerides, HDL cholesterol, AST, and ALT. Subjects with HbA1c-defined prediabetes and type 2 diabetes, respectively, are characterised by abnormalities in lipid profile and liver steatosis, thus exhibiting a severe risk profile for cardiovascular and liver diseases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Association between Sleep Disruption and Levels of Lipids in Caucasians with Type 2 Diabetes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wan Mahmood, Wan Aizad

    2013-08-29

    Aim. To investigate the association between sleep quality and duration with lipid and glycaemic control in Caucasian subjects with type 2 diabetes. Methods. Sleep quality was assessed using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) in 114 type 2 diabetes (T2DM) subjects. Comparisons were made between subjects with different sleep quality and sleep duration. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses were used to determine contributors to metabolic parameters. Results. Subjects with poor sleep quality (PQ; PSQI ≥ 6) had higher systolic blood pressure, glycated haemoglobin, urine albumin : creatinine ratio (UAC), total cholesterol (TC), and triglycerides (TG) (P < 0.05 for all) compared to those with good sleep quality (GQ; PSQI ≤ 5). Long sleep duration (LSD) subjects had higher TC and short sleep duration (SSD) subjects had higher TG compared to those with medium sleep duration. Sleep duration and PSQI score were independent predictors of TC and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL), contributing to 14.0% and 6.1% of the total variance, respectively. Conclusions. In this Caucasian T2DM population, PQ is associated with adverse cardiovascular risk markers, and long and short sleep disruptions have an independent negative impact on lipids. Sleep assessment should be included as part of a diabetes clinic review.

  4. Effect of cinnamon extract on blood glucose level and lipid profile in alloxan induced diabetic rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmood, S.; Khurshid, R.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Cinnamon has been shown to potentiate the hypoglycaemic effect of insulin through up regulation of the glucose uptake in cultured adipocytes of rats. This study tried to find out the effect of Cinnamon alone or in combination with Insulin in diabetic albino rats. Methods: Thirty rats were divided into three groups, A and B. Group A were given cinnamon extract 200 mg/Kg body weight daily orally and group B rats were given cinnamon extract 400 mg/Kg body weight daily. After six weeks blood glucose and lipid profile levels were evaluated in all the groups. Results: Group of rats given 200 mg cinnamon extract showed significant decrease of blood glucose concentration but there was slight or no change in the level of lipid parameters including serum cholesterol, triglyceride and lipoproteins (HDL, LDL-chol). On the other hand group of rats given 400 mg extract of cinnamon showed a better but non significant change in level of lipid related parameter while blood glucose level was significantly decreased. Conclusion: The cinnamon at a dose of 400 mg showed same effects on blood glucose level but better effects on lipid profiles especially of serum cholesterol level of group of rats compared to 200 mg of cinnamon extract. Cinnamon may be recommended as hypoglycaemic herb but not as hypolipidaemic herb. (author)

  5. Do Psychosocial Factors Predict Readmission among Diabetic Elderly Patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alavi, Mousa; Baharlooei, Omeleila; AdelMehraban, Marzieh

    2017-01-01

    Despite advances in diabetes treatment, the rate of readmission is still relatively high among these patients, especially in older population. Various factors may predict readmission in these patients; hence, the aim of this study was to assess the role of psychosocial factors in predicting readmission among diabetic elderly hospitalized in selected hospitals of Isfahan. In this cross-sectional study conducted from January to September 2016, 150 diabetic elderly hospitalized in selected hospitals affiliated with Isfahan University of medical sciences were chosen using a convenient sampling method. The initial information was collected by a three-part questionnaire consisting of (a) demographic characteristics, (b) 21-item depression, anxiety, and stress scale (DASS-21), and (c) multidimensional scale of perceived social support (MSPSS). Further information about readmission was gathered 3 months after completing the questionnaires through a phone call follow-up. Descriptive and inferential statistics (discriminant function analysis test) were used to analyze the data. During 3 months after discharge, 44% of hospitalized diabetic elderly were readmitted. Analytical model predicted the readmission status of 109 individuals (of total 150 persons) in the studied units (success rate of 72.2%). Among predicting factors, depression and social support had the most and the least important roles in predicting readmission rate, respectively. Interventions to improve mental status (i.e., decreasing levels of depression, anxiety, and stress) and develop social support are suggested to reduce the risk of readmission among diabetic elderly patients. Nevertheless, future studies are needed to verify the value of such interventions.

  6. Study on the correlation of serum lipid metabolism and central retinal artery hemodynamics with diabetic retinopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ran-Yang Guo

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To explore the correlation of serum lipid metabolism and central retinal artery (CRA) hemodynamics with diabetic retinopathy (DR).Methods:A total of 120 patients with type 2 diabetes who were admitted in our hospital from May, 2015 to May, 2016 were included in the study and divided into NDR group (non-diabetic retinopathy), NPR group (non-proliferative retinopathy), and PR group (proliferative retinopathy) with 40 cases in each group according to DR clinical staging. Moreover, 50 healthy individuals who came for physical examinations were served as the control group. The full automatic biochemical analyzer was used to detect the levels of TG, TC, LDL-C, and HDL-C. The color Doppler flow imaging (CDFI) was used to detect EDV, PSV, RI, and PI of CRA and OA.Results:The levels of TG, TC, and LDL-C in NDG, NPR, and PR groups were gradually increased with the aggravation of retinopathy, HDL-C was reduced, the comparison among the three groups was statistically significant, and the comparison with the control group was statistically significant. EDV, PSV, and PI of CRA and OA in NDG, NPR, and PR groups were gradually increased with the aggravation of retinopathy, RI was reduced, the comparison among the three groups was statistically significant, and the comparison with the control group was statistically significant. Conclusions: The lipid metabolism disorder can promote the occurrence and development of DR. The change of CRA and OA hemodynamics is an important pathological basis for developing DR. Clinical detection of serum lipid level and monitoring of the changes of fundus artery hemocynamic parameters are of great significance in early detecting DR.

  7. The effects of aqueous extract of water cress on the glucose and lipid plasma in the streptozotocin induced diabetic rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahrokhi, N.; Hadad, K.

    2009-01-01

    For treating diabetic patients, different nutrients are being used in some areas of Kennan province, Nasturtium offsinallis (NF) is one of them. In current research work, effects of NF on plasma lipid and glucose levels have been assessed in diabetic rats. In this study, 60 male rats were used. All rats randomly divided into six groups, consisting of one intact non-diabetic group, and remaining 5 groups were injected subcutaneousloy of 55 mg/kg of streptozotocin to make them experimentally diabetic. Three groups of diabetic animals were eaten orally (via gavage) of low (25 mg/kg), and high (75 mg/kg) doses of aqueous extract of NF in a volume of 1.5 ml for short period (4 weeks)and long period (8-weeks) respectively. One group of diabetic animals was given 2-4U of NPH insulin intraperitoneally (IP). The last remaining group of five diabetics was given nothing at the end of each Experiment in all groups' blood glucose and lipid levels were measured. There was significant reduction of plasma glucose in treatment groups compared to diabetic group. The greatest decrease(9 6%) was observed by the high dose long term group for NF extract) that was significantly greater than the insulin group (49%) (p<0.001). There wasn't any change in diabetic animals' total cholesterol, and triglyceride levels of plasma. Both low and high doses of extracts increased LDL-cholesterol levels in diabetic animals (p<0.00 I). In diabetic animals, plasma H DL- cholesterol levels (33+-2.2) decreased by long term dose of extract. Both doses decreased plasma glucose in diabetic animal, whereas, it have not effect on plasma lipids or have negative effect, there fore this research suggested that NF extract is useful for control of blood glucose. (author)

  8. Effect of adjunct metformin treatment on levels of plasma lipids in patients with type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, S.S.; Tarnow, L.; Astrup, A.S.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In addition to its glucose-lowering effect, metformin treatment has been suggested to improve lipidaemia in patients with type 2 diabetes. In contrast, in patients with type 1 diabetes (T1DM), information about the effect of metformin treatment on lipidaemia is limited. In this study......, we report the effect of a 1-year treatment with metformin vs. placebo on plasma lipids in T1DM patients and persistent poor glycaemic control. METHODS: One hundred T1DM patients with haemoglobinA(1c) (HbA(1c)) > or =8.5% during the year before enrolment entered a 1-month run-in period on placebo...... treatment. Thereafter, patients were randomized (baseline) to treatment with either metformin (1000 mg twice daily) or placebo for 12 months (double masked). Patients continued ongoing insulin therapy and their usual outpatient clinical care. Outcomes were assessed at baseline and after 1 year. RESULTS...

  9. Comparison of lipid lowering effect of extra virgin olive oil and atorvastatin in dyslipidemia in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, T.M.

    2017-01-01

    Extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) is fruit oil with rich source of monounsaturated fats and powerful antioxidants. It acts as hypolipidemic agent and significant decrease of plasma lipids levelwas observed with EVOO use. Atorvastatin is hypolipidemic drug commonly used for treatment of hyperlipidaemia. The purpose of this study was to determine and compare the lipid lowering effect of EVOO with atorvastatin in type 2 diabetic dyslipidaemia which is leading cause of microvascular diseases. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 60 already diagnosed cases of type 2 diabetes mellitus with dyslipidaemia. All sixty subjects were divided into 2 groups. Atorvastatin 40mg was given to Group One and two tablespoons of extra virgin olive oil orally per day was given to Group Two. Blood was collected for estimation of plasma lipids level at base line, 4th week, and 6th weeks in two groups and was compared statistically. Results: The present study demonstrated 20-40% lipid lowering effect of atorvastatin on plasma lipids level with 9-16% increase in HDL while extra virgin olive oil showed 14 to 25% reduction in plasma lipids with 8-12% increase in HDL-cholesterol level. Conclusion: This study concludes that both atorvastatin and extra virgin olive oil are effective in reducing plasma lipids level in type 2 diabetic dyslipidaemia with more prominent effect of atorvastatin than EVOO. (author)

  10. Comparison Of Lipid Lowering Effect Of Extra Virgin Olive Oil And Atorvastatin In Dyslipidaemia In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Tariq Mahmood; Iqbal, Sohail; Rashid, Muhammad Adnan

    2017-01-01

    Extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) is fruit oil with rich source of monounsaturated fats and powerful antioxidants. It acts as hypolipidemic agent and significant decrease of plasma lipids level was observed with EVOO use. Atorvastatin is hypolipidemic drug commonly used for treatment of hyperlipidaemia. The purpose of this study was to determine & compare the lipid lowering effect of EVOO with atorvastatin in type 2 diabetic dyslipidaemia which is leading cause of microvascular diseases. This randomised controlled trial was conducted on 60 already diagnosed cases of type 2 diabetes mellitus with dyslipidaemia. All sixty subjects were divided randomly into 2 groups. Atorvastatin 40 mg was given to Group One and two tablespoons of extra virgin olive oil orally per day was given to Group Two. Blood was collected for estimation of plasma lipids level at base line, 4th week, and 6th weeks in two groups and was compared statistically. The present study demonstrated 20-40% lipid lowering effect of atorvastatin on plasma lipids level with 9-16% increase in HDL while extra virgin olive oil showed 14-25% reduction in plasma lipids with 8-12% increase in HDL-cholesterol level. This study concludes that both atorvastatin and extra virgin olive oil are effective in reducing plasma lipids level in type 2 diabetic dyslipidaemia with more prominent effect of atorvastatin than EVOO.

  11. Lipid profile abnormalities in Type II diabetics with and without microalbuminura

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qadoos, A.; Javaid, Q.U.A.; Shahzad, A.; Toor, I.

    2017-01-01

    To find the frequency of microalbuminemia in type II diabetic patients and to determine the frequency of different abnormalities of lipid profile in Type II diabetic patients with and without microalbuminuria. Methodology: Total 344 patients of type-II diabetes mellitus of both genders between the age of 35-70 years were enrolled in the study from Lahore General Hospital, Lahore, Pakistan. Blood sample for lipid profile was collected after 12 hours of fasting and spot mid stream early morning urine sample was collected in laboratory for microalbuminuria detection. Results: Out of 344 cases, 151 (43.90%) were male and 193 (56.10%) were females with male to female ratio of 2:1. 132 (38.37%) cases were between 35-50 years of age while 212 (61.63%) between 51-70 years of age (mean 53.18+9.32). Frequency of microalbuminuria was recorded in 32.56% (n=112) cases. Out of 112 cases of microalbuminuria, Hypertriglyceridemia was seen in 98 (87.5%) cases, increased LDL-C in 102 (91%) while decreased HDL-C was found in 95 (84.8%) cases (p=0.000). Out of 232 cases of without microalbuminuria, hypertriglyceridemia was found in 143 (61%) cases, increased LDL-C in 151 (65%) and decreased HDL-C was seen in 169 (72.8%) cases. Frequency of microalbuminuria was seen more in age group of 51-75 years (n=65) with disease duration of more than 3 years (n=71), HbA1c 6 (n=69) and BMI more than 30. Conclusion: The frequency of hypertriglyceridemia, increased LDL-C and decreased HDL-C is higher in type II diabetic patients with microalbuminuria as compare to patients without microalbuminuria and is dependent on advanced age, duration of disease and BMI. (author)

  12. Lipid Abnormalities in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients with Overt Nephropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Vijay

    2017-01-01

    Background Diabetic nephropathy is a major complication of diabetes and an established risk factor for cardiovascular events. Lipid abnormalities occur in patients with diabetic nephropathy, which further increase their risk for cardiovascular events. We compared the degree of dyslipidemia among type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) subjects with and without nephropathy and analyzed the factors associated with nephropathy among them. Methods In this retrospective study, T2DM patients with overt nephropathy were enrolled in the study group (n=89) and without nephropathy were enrolled in the control group (n=92). Both groups were matched for age and duration of diabetes. Data on total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), urea and creatinine were collected from the case sheets. TG/HDL-C ratio, a surrogate marker for small, dense, LDL particles (sdLDL) and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) were calculated using equations. Multivariate analysis was done to determine the factors associated with eGFR. Results Dyslipidemia was present among 56.52% of control subjects and 75.28% of nephropathy subjects (P=0.012). The percentage of subjects with atherogenic dyslipidemia (high TG+low HDL-C+sdLDL) was 14.13 among controls and 14.61 among nephropathy subjects. Though serum creatinine was not significantly different, mean eGFR value was significantly lower among nephropathy patients (P=0.002). Upon multivariate analysis, it was found that TC (P=0.007) and HDL-C (P=0.06) were associated with eGFR among our study subjects. Conclusion Our results show that dyslipidemia was highly prevalent among subjects with nephropathy. Regular screening for dyslipidemia may be beneficial in controlling the risk for adverse events among diabetic nephropathy patients. PMID:28447439

  13. The Effects of Capparis Spinosa Hydroalcoholic Extract on Blood Glucose and Lipids Serum in Diabetic and Normal Male Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Negahdarizadeh

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Diabetes mellitus is one of the most common endocrine disorders in the world which affects glucose metabolism in the body. Diabetes mellitus is due to lack of insulin secretion and/or failure in insulin action. Researches conducted in the last few decades on plants have reported anti-diabetic properties for some herbs and their traditional use for diabetes treatment. Capparis spinosa is one of these herbs which are used as an anti-diabetic treatment in tribal medicine. The objective of the present study was to examine the anti-diabetic effects of Capparis spinosa on blood glucose and serum lipids in streptozotocin induced diabetes in male rats. Materials & Methods: In this experimental study conducted at Yasouj University of Medical Sciences in 2010, five groups of animals were selected. Three groups out of five were administered with intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin to become diabetic. Group I were fed normal diet. Group II of animals received 20 mg/kg/day Capparis spinosa extract. Group III received no treatment (diabetic control and animals of groups IV and V were treated with capparis spinosa fruit extract 20 and 30 mg/kg body weight respectively for three weeks. Blood glucose, triglycerides, total cholesterol, LDL, HDL and body weight were measured in all animals. The collected data was analyzed by the SPSS software using one-way ANOVA. Results: Treatment with the 30 mg/kg/body weight of capparis spinosa fruit extract showed a significant decrease in blood glucose, triglycerides, total cholesterol and LDL, and a significant increase in HDL level. In addition, administration of 20 mg/kg/body weight of capparis spinosa extract decreased blood glucose and lipid levels in diabetic rats. Conclusion: It can be concluded that the oral administration of capparis spinosa extract at the dose of 30 mg/kg/body weight has glucose and lipids lowering activity in diabetic rats.

  14. Diosgenin reorganises hyperglycaemia and distorted tissue lipid profile in high-fat diet-streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidu, Parim Brahma; Ponmurugan, Ponnusamy; Begum, Mustapha Sabana; Mohan, Karthick; Meriga, Balaji; RavindarNaik, Ramavat; Saravanan, Ganapathy

    2015-12-01

    Diabetes is often connected with significant morbidity, mortality and also has a pivotal role in the development of cardiovascular diseases. Diet intervention, particularly naturaceutical antioxidants have anti-diabetic potential and avert oxidative damage linked with diabetic pathogenesis. The present study investigated the effects of diosgenin, a saponin from fenugreek, on the changes in lipid profile in plasma, liver, heart and brain in high-fat diet-streptozotocin (HFD-STZ)-induced diabetic rats. Diosgenin was administered to HFD-STZ induced diabetic rats by orally at 60 mg kg(-1) body weight for 30 days to assess its effects on body weight gain, glucose, insulin, insulin resistance and cholesterol, triglycerides, free fatty acids and phospholipids in plasma, liver, heart and brain. The levels of body weight, glucose, insulin, insulin resistance, cholesterol, triglycerides, free fatty acids, phospholipids, VLDL-C and LDL-C were increased significantly (P rats. Administration of diosgenin to HFD-STZ diabetic rats caused a decrease in body weight gain, blood glucose, insulin, insulin resistance and also it modulated lipid profile in plasma and tissues. The traditional plant fenugreek and its constituents mediate its anti-diabetic potential through mitigating hyperglycaemic status, altering insulin resistance by alleviating metabolic dysregulation of lipid profile in both plasma and tissues. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  15. Lipid metabolism and levels of proinflammatory cytokines in patients with type 2 diabetes with diabetic nephropathy depending on the stage of chronic kidney disease

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    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to study the role and relationship of lipid metabolism and levels of proinflammatory cytokines in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2 with diabetic nephropathy (DN, depending on the stage of chronic kidney disease (CKD. Materials and Methods: a total of 240 patients with type 2 diabetes in the early stages of DN and CKD were studied. Results: in patients with type 2 diabetes development of DN was associated with an increased level of proinflammatory cytokines and lipid abnormalities (hypertriglyceridemia. We found a negative correlation between the level of triglycerides (TG and glomerular filtration rate (GFR (r = -0,43 and a direct correlation between the level of IL-6 and TG (r = 0,48. Conclusions: increased levels of proinflammatory cytokines and triglycerides increase the risk of development and progression of DN and CKD.

  16. Evaluation of lipid peroxidation activity at intravenous administration of gold nanorods in rats with simulated diabetes and transplanted liver cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucharskaya, Alla B.; Dikht, Natalia I.; Afanasyeva, Galina A.; Terentyuk, Georgy S.; Maslyakova, Galina N.; Zaraeva, Nadezhda V.; Khlebtsov, Nikolai G.; Khlebtsov, Boris N.

    2014-01-01

    In the experiment the white outbred rats with transplanted liver cancer (cholangiocarcinoma line PC-1) and simulated alloxan diabetes were treated by single intravenous injection of gold nanorods. State of lipid peroxidation was evaluated by the following parameters: the malondialdehyde, lipid hydroperoxide, the average weght molecules in the serum of animals by conventional spectrophotometric methods study using a spectrofluorometer RF-5301 PC (Shimadzu, Japan). In both experimental groups of animals the significant increasing of levels of lipid peroxidation products was noted compared with control group. After intravenous administration of nanoparticles in the group of animals with alloxan diabetes the activation of a free radical oxidation was not observed, in group with transplanted liver cancer the increasing of levels of lipid hydroperoxide, malondialdehyde was established.

  17. Risk predictive modelling for diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kengne, Andre Pascal; Masconi, Katya; Mbanya, Vivian Nchanchou; Lekoubou, Alain; Echouffo-Tcheugui, Justin Basile; Matsha, Tandi E

    2014-02-01

    Absolute risk models or clinical prediction models have been incorporated in guidelines, and are increasingly advocated as tools to assist risk stratification and guide prevention and treatments decisions relating to common health conditions such as cardiovascular disease (CVD) and diabetes mellitus. We have reviewed the historical development and principles of prediction research, including their statistical underpinning, as well as implications for routine practice, with a focus on predictive modelling for CVD and diabetes. Predictive modelling for CVD risk, which has developed over the last five decades, has been largely influenced by the Framingham Heart Study investigators, while it is only ∼20 years ago that similar efforts were started in the field of diabetes. Identification of predictive factors is an important preliminary step which provides the knowledge base on potential predictors to be tested for inclusion during the statistical derivation of the final model. The derived models must then be tested both on the development sample (internal validation) and on other populations in different settings (external validation). Updating procedures (e.g. recalibration) should be used to improve the performance of models that fail the tests of external validation. Ultimately, the effect of introducing validated models in routine practice on the process and outcomes of care as well as its cost-effectiveness should be tested in impact studies before wide dissemination of models beyond the research context. Several predictions models have been developed for CVD or diabetes, but very few have been externally validated or tested in impact studies, and their comparative performance has yet to be fully assessed. A shift of focus from developing new CVD or diabetes prediction models to validating the existing ones will improve their adoption in routine practice.

  18. Argan Oil Exerts an Antiatherogenic Effect by Improving Lipids and Susceptibility of LDL to Oxidation in Type 2 Diabetes Patients

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    M. M. Ould Mohamedou

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigate the effect of argan oil consumption on serum lipids, apolipoproteins (AI and B, CRP, and LDL susceptibility to oxidation in type 2 diabetic patients which are known to have a high level of cardiovascular risk due to lipid abnormalities and lipid peroxidation. For that, 86 type 2 diabetic patients with dyslipidemia were randomized to one group consuming 25 mL/day of argan oil during 3 weeks and control group consuming 20 g/day of butter in breakfast. After argan oil intervention, serum triglycerides decreased by 11.84%, (P=0.001, total chol by 9.13%, (P=0.01, and LDL-chol by 11.81%, (P=0.02. However, HDL-chol and Apo AI increased (10.51%, P=0.01 and 9.40%,  P=0.045, resp.. Susceptibility of LDL to lipid peroxidation was significantly reduced by increasing of 20.95%, (P=0.038 in lag phase after argan oil consumption. In conclusion, we show for the first time that consumption of argan oil may have an antiatherogenic effect by improving lipids, and the susceptibility of LDL to oxidation in type 2 diabetes patients with dyslipidemia, and can therefore be recommended in the nutritional management of type 2 diabetes.

  19. GENDER-RELATED DIFFERENCES IN INFLAMMATORY AND LIPID PARAMETERS IN PATIENTS WITH DIABETES MELLITUS TYPE 2

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    Boris Djindjic

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM type 2 is one of the most common health problems worldwide. Diabetics have increased risk for development of wide spectrum of atherosclerotic complications, at the basis of which are inflammation and diabetic dyslipidemia. Increasing of relative risk for coronary artery disease development is higher in females with DM type 2.The aim of this study was determination of characteristic inflammatory and lipid disorders in type 2 diabetics and their association with patient gender.The study involved 35 patients with DM type 2 and stable angina pectoris. Besides anamnesis, all patients underwent clinical examinations (measure of blood pressure, body height and weight and calculation of body mass index. Inflammatory markers (sedimentation in I and II hour-SE I and SE II, C reactive protein - CRP, fibrinogen concentration and leukocyte count as well as lipid parameters (total cholesterol, LDL and HDL cholesterol concentration and triglycerides were determined in all the patients.Total cholesterol and triglycerides concentrations were higher in females with DM type 2 compared to males (p<0,05. There were not significant gender differences in HDL and LDL cholesterol concentration. All inflammatory markers (SE I and SE II, CRP, fibrinogen concentration and leukocyte count were higher in females with DM type 2 and CAD compared to men (p<0,05. In males, there was a strong positive correlation between SE I and SE II with total LDL (p<0,05 and HDL cholesterol concentrations (p<0,01. Concentration of CRP was only significantly connected with triglycerides concentration (p<0,05. There was a strong association between leukocyte count and increased triglycerides (p<0,05 and low HDL cholesterol concentration (p<0,01. In females, there was only a strong positive correlation between SE II (p<0,01 and CRP concentration (p<0,05 and triglycerides.Women with DM type 2 and clinically manifest CAD (stable angina pectoris are at higher risk for

  20. Severe combined hyperlipidaemia and retinal lipid infiltration in a patient with Type 2 diabetes mellitus

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    Rae Derek

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Severe combined hyperlipidaemia has occasionally been associated with infiltration of tissues in addition to arteries and the skin. We report a woman with Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM and severe combined hyperlipidaemia who developed retinal lipid infiltration, resulting in blindness. A 61-year-old woman with a 15-year history of Type 2 DM was admitted following a two-week history of progressive visual loss. Examination identified lipid infiltration into the retina. Phenotypically she had severe combined hyperlipidaemia with elevated IDL cholesterol and a broad beta band on lipoprotein electrophoresis, raising the possibility of familial dysbetalipoproteinaemia. However, gene sequencing analysis indicated that the patient was homozygous for the E3/E3 allele of the ApoE gene with no mutations detected in either the coding region or intron-exon boundaries. Her lipid profile improved following dietary therapy and gemfibrozil treatment, but this had little effect on either her fundal appearances or her visual acuity. Type 2 DM plays a vital role both in allowing expression of severe combined hyperlipoproteinaemia, in addition to serving as a risk factor for complications such as tissue infiltration.

  1. Glycated haemoglobin: A marker of circulating lipids in patients with type 2 diabetes

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    Sheikh Ishaq

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM is a group of metabolic disorder and is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease and dyslipidaemia. Patients with T2DM have dyslipidaemia at wavering degrees, characterised by increased levels of triglyceride and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol and decreased levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL-cholesterol. In the present study, we evaluated glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c as a marker of circulating lipids in patients with T2DM. Methods: Two hundred and thirty-nine patients with T2DM were enrolled for the study. A detailed biochemical and lipid profile was done for all patients. Results: Of 239 cases, 96 (40% were male and 143 (60% were female. Of 239 patients, 53 (22% patients with T2DM had controlled glycaemia (HbA1c <6.5 and 186 (78% patients had uncontrolled glycaemia (HbA1c ≥6.5. Pearson's correlation of HbA1c with all lipid parameters was statistically significant. HbA1c, however, had an inverse correlation with HDL and had a significant direct correlation with fasting blood glucose. Conclusion: The study reveals that HbA1c is not only a reliable glycaemic index but can also be used as an important indicator of dyslipidaemia in patients with T2DM.

  2. Is There a Role for Bioactive Lipids in the Pathobiology of Diabetes Mellitus?

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    Undurti N. Das

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation, decreased levels of circulating endothelial nitric oxide (eNO and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, altered activity of hypothalamic neurotransmitters (including serotonin and vagal tone and gut hormones, increased concentrations of free radicals, and imbalance in the levels of bioactive lipids and their pro- and anti-inflammatory metabolites have been suggested to play a role in diabetes mellitus (DM. Type 1 diabetes mellitus (type 1 DM is due to autoimmune destruction of pancreatic β cells because of enhanced production of IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α and other pro-inflammatory cytokines released by immunocytes infiltrating the pancreas in response to unknown exogenous and endogenous toxin(s. On the other hand, type 2 DM is due to increased peripheral insulin resistance secondary to enhanced production of IL-6 and TNF-α in response to high-fat and/or calorie-rich diet (rich in saturated and trans fats. Type 2 DM is also associated with significant alterations in the production and action of hypothalamic neurotransmitters, eNO, BDNF, free radicals, gut hormones, and vagus nerve activity. Thus, type 1 DM is because of excess production of pro-inflammatory cytokines close to β cells, whereas type 2 DM is due to excess of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the systemic circulation. Hence, methods designed to suppress excess production of pro-inflammatory cytokines may form a new approach to prevent both type 1 and type 2 DM. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and similar surgeries ameliorate type 2 DM, partly by restoring to normal: gut hormones, hypothalamic neurotransmitters, eNO, vagal activity, gut microbiota, bioactive lipids, BDNF production in the gut and hypothalamus, concentrations of cytokines and free radicals that results in resetting glucose-stimulated insulin production by pancreatic β cells. Our recent studies suggested that bioactive lipids, such as arachidonic acid, eicosapentaneoic acid, and docosahexaenoic

  3. Trends of lipid abnormalities in Pakistani type-2 diabetes mellitus patients: a tertiary care centre data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhatti, S M; Dhakam, S; Khan, M.A., E-mail: drsehran@yahoo.co

    2009-10-15

    Objective: To ascertain trends of lipid abnormalities in Pakistani Type-2 Diabetes Mellitus patients. Methodology: Fasting lipid profiles of 328 outpatient adult type 2 diabetes mellitus patients visiting the Aga Khan University Hospital, from January 2005 to January 2006 were prospectively reviewed and abstracted on a pre-specified proforma. Demographic features, different patterns of dyslipidemia in accordance with specified risk categories, and the proportion of patients with none, one, two, or three lipid values outside clinical targets were noted. The influence of sex on dyslipidemia pattern was also assessed Results: Our patients had higher average HbA1c levels and higher total cholesterol, LDL and lower HDL levels. The triglycerides levels in our female patients were higher. The percentage of our patients with a high-, borderline-, or low-risk LDL cholesterol were 54, 29, and 16%, respectively (P = 0.51). On a percentage basis, 73% were in the high-risk HDL cholesterol group, 18% were in the borderline-risk group and 9% in the low-risk group, respectively (P< 0.0001). Regarding triglyceride concentrations, 16% had high-risk triglyceride levels, 34% were in the borderline-risk category, whereas 50% had a low-risk triglyceride levels (P< 0.0001). Patient proportion with None, One, Two, or Three Values outside clinical targets on percentage basis were 2, 16, 48, and 34%, respectively (P< 0.0001). Women were found to have greater odds of having LDL cholesterol above the target level i.e. >100mg/dl. Conclusion: Combination of high LDL and a low HDL cholesterol level was the commonest pattern of dyslipidemia found. Second was unfavorable levels of all three lipoproteins combined and the third was an isolated increase in LDL cholesterol. A greater proportion of women were found dyslipidemic. (author)

  4. Predicting diabetic nephropathy in insulin-dependent patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, C E; Christensen, Cramer

    1984-01-01

    We studied whether microalbuminuria (urinary albumin excretion rates of 15 to 150 micrograms per minute) would predict the development of increased proteinuria in Type I diabetes. We also studied the influence of glomerular filtration rate, renal blood flow, and blood pressure on the later...... development of proteinuria. Forty-four patients who had had Type I diabetes for at least seven years and who had albumin excretion rates below 150 micrograms per minute were studied from 1969 to 1976, and 43 were restudied in 1983. Of the 14 who initially had albumin excretion rates at or above 15 micrograms...... was not elevated in these patients. We conclude that microalbuminuria predicts the development of diabetic nephropathy and that elevated glomerular filtration rates and increased blood pressure may also contribute to this progression....

  5. Lipid Mediators Are Critical in Resolving Inflammation: A Review of the Emerging Roles of Eicosanoids in Diabetes Mellitus

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    Fernando H. G. Tessaro

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The biosynthesis pathway of eicosanoids derived from arachidonic acid, such as prostaglandins and leukotrienes, relates to the pathophysiology of diabetes mellitus (DM. A better understanding of how lipid mediators modulate the inflammatory process may help recognize key factors underlying the progression of diabetes complications. Our review presents recent knowledge about eicosanoid synthesis and signaling in DM-related complications, and discusses eicosanoid-related target therapeutics.

  6. Effect of Miglitol, an α-Glucosidase Inhibitor, on Postprandial Glucose and Lipid Metabolism in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    KANEKO Yukiyo; KUBOKI Koji; HIROI Naoki; WATANABE Takehiko; NISHIMURA Chiaki; YOSHINO Gen

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The effects of miglitol on postprandial glucose and lipid metabolism were investigated in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) treated with diet alone. Subjects and Methods: A meal tolerance test (MTT) was performed in 26 diabetic patients before and 2 weeks after 150 mg/day miglitol treatment, with the second MTT performed in patients after they had taken a dose of 50 mg miglitol. Results: Miglitol treatment decreased postprandial blood glucose and serum insulin levels 30...

  7. Co-administration of trientine and flaxseed oil on oxidative stress, serum lipids and heart structure in diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei, Ali; Heidarian, Esfandiar

    2013-08-01

    The administration of flaxseed oil or flaxseed oil plus trientine in diabetic rats reduced triglyceride, very low density lipoprotein, and total cholesterol. Furthermore, the combined treatment significantly increased superoxide dismutase activity and attenuated serum Cu2+. The results suggest that the administration of flaxseed oil plus trientine is useful in controlling serum lipid abnormalities, oxidative stress, restoring heart structure, and reducing serum Cu2+ in diabetic rats.

  8. Do treatment quality indicators predict cardiovascular outcomes in patients with diabetes?

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    Grigory Sidorenkov

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Landmark clinical trials have led to optimal treatment recommendations for patients with diabetes. Whether optimal treatment is actually delivered in practice is even more important than the efficacy of the drugs tested in trials. To this end, treatment quality indicators have been developed and tested against intermediate outcomes. No studies have tested whether these treatment quality indicators also predict hard patient outcomes. METHODS: A cohort study was conducted using data collected from >10.000 diabetes patients in the Groningen Initiative to Analyze Type 2 Treatment (GIANTT database and Dutch Hospital Data register. Included quality indicators measured glucose-, lipid-, blood pressure- and albuminuria-lowering treatment status and treatment intensification. Hard patient outcome was the composite of cardiovascular events and all-cause death. Associations were tested using Cox regression adjusting for confounding, reporting hazard ratios (HR with 95% confidence intervals. RESULTS: Lipid and albuminuria treatment status, but not blood pressure lowering treatment status, were associated with the composite outcome (HR = 0.77, 0.67-0.88; HR = 0.75, 0.59-0.94. Glucose lowering treatment status was associated with the composite outcome only in patients with an elevated HbA1c level (HR = 0.72, 0.56-0.93. Treatment intensification with glucose-lowering but not with lipid-, blood pressure- and albuminuria-lowering drugs was associated with the outcome (HR = 0.73, 0.60-0.89. CONCLUSION: Treatment quality indicators measuring lipid- and albuminuria-lowering treatment status are valid quality measures, since they predict a lower risk of cardiovascular events and mortality in patients with diabetes. The quality indicators for glucose-lowering treatment should only be used for restricted populations with elevated HbA1c levels. Intriguingly, the tested indicators for blood pressure-lowering treatment did not predict patient

  9. Prediction of Wound Healing in Diabetic Foot Ulcers: an Observational Study in Tertiary Hospital in Indonesia

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    Pradana Soewondo

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to evaluate the role of clinical characteristics, functional markers of vasodilation, inflammatory response, and atherosclerosis in predicting wound healing in diabetic foot ulcer. Methods: a cohort study (February – October 2010 was conducted from 40 subjects with acute diabetic foot ulcer at clinical ward of Dr. Cipto Mangunkusumo National Central General Hospital, Jakarta, Indonesia. Each subject underwent at least two variable measurements, i.e. during inflammatory phase and proliferation phase. The studied variables were clinical characteristics, complete peripheral blood count (CBC and differential count, levels of HbA1c, ureum, creatinine, lipid profile, fasting blood glucose (FBG, marker of endothelial dysfunction (asymmetric dimethylarginine/ADMA, endothelin-1/ET-1, and flow-mediated dilation/FMD of brachial artery, and marker of vascular calcification (osteoprotegerin/OPG. Results: median of time achieving 50% granulation tissue in our study was 21 days. There were nine factors that contribute in the development of 50% granulation tissue, i.e. family history of diabetes mellitus (DM, previous history of wound, wound area, duration of existing wound, captopril and simvastatin medications, levels of ADMA, ET-1, and OPG. There were three out of the nine factors that significantly correlated with wound healing, i.e. wound area, OPG levels, and simvastatin medications. Conclusion: in acute diabetic foot ulcers, wound area and OPG levels had positive correlation with wound healing, whereas simvastatin medications had negative correlation with wound healing.

  10. Prediction of Wound Healing in Diabetic Foot Ulcers: an Observational Study in Tertiary Hospital in Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soewondo, Pradana; Suyono, Slamet; Sastrosuwignyo, Mpu Kanoko; Harahap, Alida R; Sutrisna, Bambang; Makmun, Lukman H

    2017-01-01

    to evaluate the role of clinical characteristics, functional markers of vasodilation, inflammatory response, and atherosclerosis in predicting wound healing in diabetic foot ulcer. a cohort study (February - October 2010) was conducted from 40 subjects with acute diabetic foot ulcer at clinical ward of Dr. Cipto Mangunkusumo National Central General Hospital, Jakarta, Indonesia. Each subject underwent at least two variable measurements, i.e. during inflammatory phase and proliferation phase. The studied variables were clinical characteristics, complete peripheral blood count (CBC) and differential count, levels of HbA1c, ureum, creatinine, lipid profile, fasting blood glucose (FBG), marker of endothelial dysfunction (asymmetric dimethylarginine/ADMA, endothelin-1/ET-1, and flow-mediated dilation/FMD of brachial artery), and marker of vascular calcification (osteoprotegerin/OPG). median of time achieving 50% granulation tissue in our study was 21 days. There were nine factors that contribute in the development of 50% granulation tissue, i.e. family history of diabetes mellitus (DM), previous history of wound, wound area, duration of existing wound, captopril and simvastatin medications, levels of ADMA, ET-1, and OPG. There were three out of the nine factors that significantly correlated with wound healing, i.e. wound area, OPG levels, and simvastatin medications. in acute diabetic foot ulcers, wound area and OPG levels had positive correlation with wound healing, whereas simvastatin medications had negative correlation with wound healing.

  11. Beneficial effects of aloe vera leaf gel extract on lipid profile status in rats with streptozotocin diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajasekaran, Subbiah; Ravi, Kasiappan; Sivagnanam, Karuran; Subramanian, Sorimuthu

    2006-03-01

    The effect of diabetes mellitus on lipid metabolism is well established. The association of hyperglycaemia with an alteration of lipid parameters presents a major risk for cardiovascular complications in diabetes. Many secondary plant metabolites have been reported to possess lipid-lowering properties. The present study was designed to examine the potential anti-hyperlipidaemic efficacy of the ethanolic extract from Aloe vera leaf gel in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. 2. Oral administration of Aloe vera gel extract at a dose of 300 mg/kg bodyweight per day to STZ-induced diabetic rats for a period of 21 days resulted in a significant reduction in fasting blood glucose, hepatic transaminases (aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase), plasma and tissue (liver and kidney) cholesterol, triglycerides, free fatty acids and phospholipids and a significant improvement in plasma insulin. 3. In addition, the decreased plasma levels of high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol and increased plasma levels of low-density lipoprotein-and very low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol in diabetic rats were restored to near normal levels following treatment with the extract. 4. The fatty acid composition of the liver and kidney was analysed by gas chromatography. The altered fatty acid composition in the liver and kidney of diabetic rats was restored following treatment with the extract. 5. Thus, the results of the present study provide a scientific rationale for the use of Aloe vera as an antidiabetic agent.

  12. Study of the Effect of Garlic on Serum Lipids and Blood Glucose Levels in Type 2 Diabetic Patients

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    M Afkhami - Ardekani

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hyperlipidemia and diabetes are common risk factors for ischemic heart disease, which is the main cause of mortality in diabetic patients. Strict control of blood glucose and other risk factors in diabetics has led to prevention of complications. Garlic has received particular attention for control of blood glucose and decrease in blood lipid levels. At present, several studies have been carried out in order to prove advantages of garlic. Methods: In this study, effects of garsin (a derivative of garlic present in our country on serum lipids and blood glucose levels in diabetes mellitus type 2 patients was observed. Forty-five type 2 diabetics who had hyperlipidemia were selected. These patients were kept on treatment with 3 tablets of Garsin / day for 4 weeks. Serum lipids and blood glucose levels were measured prior to and at the end of treatment. Results: Relationship between sex and response to treatment in this study was meaningful, such that Gsarsin led to decrease in LDL-C and increase in HDL in females. Conclusion: Therefore, Garsin can be used as an adjunct to treatment in diabetes type 2 patients with hyperlipidemia.

  13. Cardiac lipid content is unresponsive to a physical activity training intervention in type 2 diabetic patients, despite improved ejection fraction

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    Leiner Tim

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increased cardiac lipid content has been associated with diabetic cardiomyopathy. We recently showed that cardiac lipid content is reduced after 12 weeks of physical activity training in healthy overweight subjects. The beneficial effect of exercise training on cardiovascular risk is well established and the decrease in cardiac lipid content with exercise training in healthy overweight subjects was accompanied by improved ejection fraction. It is yet unclear whether diabetic patients respond similarly to physical activity training and whether a lowered lipid content in the heart is necessary for improvements in cardiac function. Here, we investigated whether exercise training is able to lower cardiac lipid content and improve cardiac function in type 2 diabetic patients. Methods Eleven overweight-to-obese male patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (age: 58.4 ± 0.9 years, BMI: 29.9 ± 0.01 kg/m2 followed a 12-week training program (combination endurance/strength training, three sessions/week. Before and after training, maximal whole body oxygen uptake (VO2max and insulin sensitivity (by hyperinsulinemic, euglycemic clamp was determined. Systolic function was determined under resting conditions by CINE-MRI and cardiac lipid content in the septum of the heart by Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy. Results VO2max increased (from 27.1 ± 1.5 to 30.1 ± 1.6 ml/min/kg, p = 0.001 and insulin sensitivity improved upon training (insulin stimulated glucose disposal (delta Rd of glucose improved from 5.8 ± 1.9 to 10.3 ± 2.0 μmol/kg/min, p = 0.02. Left-ventricular ejection fraction improved after training (from 50.5 ± 2.0 to 55.6 ± 1.5%, p = 0.01 as well as cardiac index and cardiac output. Unexpectedly, cardiac lipid content in the septum remained unchanged (from 0.80 ± 0.22% to 0.95 ± 0.21%, p = 0.15. Conclusions Twelve weeks of progressive endurance/strength training was effective in improving VO2max, insulin sensitivity

  14. Skeletal muscle lipid quantification in lean and diabetic subjects using in vivo proton MR spectroscopy

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    Sunil K Valaparla

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To quantify and compare the intramyocellular (IMCL, extramyocellular (EMCL lipids and total fat fraction in human vastus lateralis muscle between lean and type 2 diabetic (T2DM subjects using long echo time (TE STEAM proton MR spectroscopy (1H-MRS. Methods: 1H-MRS using single voxel (15 × 15 × 15 mm3 stimulated acquisition mode (STEAM was performed in right vastus lateralis m. on 10 lean controls (age: 28.3 ± 3.94 yo, BMI: 24.25 ± 3.20 kg/m2 and 7 type 2 diabetic (age: 54.28 ± 6.42 yo, BMI: 31.34 ± 3.13 kg/m2 subjects with Siemens 3T MRI and a four-channel flex coil. Unsuppressed water spectra (NSA = 16 with TR/TE = 3000/30 ms, TM = 10 ms BW = 2000 Hz, and water-suppressed spectra (NSA = 128 with TR/TE = 3000/270 ms, TM = 10 ms, fixed water suppression BW = 50 Hz were acquired. Spectral intensity ratios of IMCL-CH2, EMCL-CH2 and total lipid (IMCL + EMCL with unsuppressed water signal (W were converted into absolute concentrations expressed in mmol/kg. Fat fraction (100 × F/(W+F was also calculated, where F includes the signal intensities of IMCL and EMCL methylene (CH2n, peaks only.Results: Comparison of IMCL (controls: 11.70 ± 6.7, T2DM: 21.74 ± 10.2, p < 0.01, EMCL (controls: 22.89 ± 18.42, T2DM: 77.21 ± 33.4, p < 0.001 and total lipid (64.35 mmol/kg less in controls, p < 0.001 showed statistical significance using two-tailed student’s t-test. Mean fat fraction (% exhibited considerable inter-individual variability for controls (3.14 ± 2.09; range: 1.34 – 7.04 and T2DM (9.34 ± 2.88; range: 4.15 – 13.67 and deemed significant (p < 0.05. Conclusion: Single voxel STEAM 1H-MRS at long TE provides a robust non-invasive method for characterizing lipids within localized muscle regions, with well-resolved IMCL/EMCL peak separation. Regional lipid estimate and fat fraction in vastus lateralis muscle is significantly different in T2DM compared to normal lean controls.------------------------------Cite this article as

  15. [Diabetes and predictive medicine--parallax of the present time].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybka, J

    2010-04-01

    Predictive genetics uses genetic testing to estimate the risk in asymptomatic persons. Since in the case of multifactorial diseases predictive genetic analysis deals with findings which allow wider interpretation, it has a higher predictive value in expressly qualified diseases (monogenous) with high penetration compared to multifactorial (polygenous) diseases with high participation of environmental factors. In most "civilisation" (multifactorial) diseases including diabetes, heredity and environmental factors do not play two separate, independent roles. Instead, their interactions play a principal role. The new classification of diabetes is based on the implementation of not only ethiopathogenetic, but also genetic research. Diabetes mellitus type 1 (DM1T) is a polygenous multifactorial disease with the genetic component carrying about one half of the risk, the non-genetic one the other half. The study of the autoimmune nature of DM1T in connection with genetic analysis is going to bring about new insights in DM1T prediction. The author presents new pieces of knowledge on molecular genetics concerning certain specific types of diabetes. Issues relating to heredity in diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM2T) are even more complex. The disease has a polygenous nature, and the phenotype of a patient with DM2T, in addition to environmental factors, involves at least three, perhaps even tens of different genetic variations. At present, results at the genom-wide level appear to be most promising. The current concept of prediabetes is a realistic foundation for our prediction and prevention of DM2T. A multifactorial, multimarker approach based on our understanding of new pathophysiological factors of DM2T, tries to outline a "map" of prediabetes physiology, and if these tests are combined with sophisticated methods of genetic forecasting of DM2T, this may represent a significant step in our methodology of diabetes prediction. So far however, predictive genetics is limited by the

  16. Monyet Ekor Panjang (Macaca fascicularis sebagai Model Diabetes Melitus: Pengaruh Hiperglikemia pada Lipid Darah, Serum Oksida Nitrik, dan Tingkah Laku Klinis (THE LONG TAILED MACAQUE (MACACA FASCICULARIS AS A MODEL OF DIABETES MELITUS : EFFECT OF HYPE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Kayati Widyastuti

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Monyet Ekor Panjang (Macaca fascicularis sebagai Model Diabetes Melitus: Pengaruh Hiperglikemia pada Lipid Darah, Serum Oksida Nitrik, dan Tingkah Laku Klinis   (THE LONG TAILED MACAQUE (MACACA FASCICULARIS AS A MODEL OF DIABETES MELITUS : EFFECT OF HYPERGLICEMIA ON BLOOD LIPID, SERUM NITRIC OXIDE, AND CLINICAL BEHAVIOUR

  17. Rauwolfia serpentina improves altered glucose and lipid homeostasis in fructose-induced type 2 diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azmi, Muhammad Bilal; Qureshi, Shamim A

    2016-09-01

    Rauwolfia serpentina is well-reported in traditional medicines for the treatment of hypertensive and neurological disorders. However, its antidiabetic potential has been currently described in both alloxan-treated and normoglycemic mice. Present effort was carried out to investigate the effect of methanol root extract (MREt) of R.serpentina in fructose-induced type 2 diabetic mice. Experimental mice were grouped into normal control (distilled water 1ml/kg) and fructose-induced type 2 diabetic groups (10% fructose 1 ml/kg).The second group sub-divided into negative (0.05% DMSO 1ml/kg) control, positive (pioglitazone 15mg/kg) control and three test groups (MREt 10, 30 & 60 mg/kg). Each treatment was given orally for 14 days consecutively then mice were sacrificed in order to collect serum and liver samples to analyze physical, biochemical as well as hematological markers. MREt significantly improved percent body weight and glycemic change along with serum insulin, total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), low density lipoprotein (LDL-c), very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL-c), high-density lipoprotein-cholesterols (HDL-c), total hemoglobin, glycosylated hemoglobin, hepatic glycogen, coronary risk and fasting insulin resistance indices while suppressed down the activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl Coenzyme A reductase enzyme in test groups when compared with diabetic controls. The present findings conclude that MREt of R. serpentina can effectively betters the carbohydrate and lipid homeostasis by either inhibiting fructose absorption in intestine or decreasing insulin resistance in fructose-induced type 2 diabetic mice.

  18. Accounting for clinical action reduces estimates of gender disparities in lipid management for diabetic veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vimalananda, Varsha G; Miller, Donald R; Hofer, Timothy P; Holleman, Robert G; Klamerus, Mandi L; Kerr, Eve A

    2013-07-01

    Women with diabetes have higher low-density lipoprotein (LDL) levels than men, resulting in apparent disparities between genders on quality indicators tied to LDL thresholds. To investigate whether gender disparities persist when accounting for clinical action with statins or cardiovascular risk. Retrospective cohort study. Veterans Health Administration patients (21,780 women and 646,429 men) aged 50-75 with diabetes. Threshold measure: LDL < 100 mg/dL; clinical action measure: LDL < 100 mg/dL; or LDL ≥ 100 mg/dL and the patient was prescribed a moderate or high-dose statin at the time of the test; or LDL ≥ 100 mg/dL and the patient received other appropriate clinical action within 90 days; adherence: continuous multiple interval measure of gaps in dispensed medication (CMG). Women were much less likely to have LDL < 100 mg/dL than were men (55 % vs. 68 %). This disparity narrowed from 13 % to 6 % for passing the clinical action measure (79 % vs. 85 %). These gender differences persisted among those with ischemic heart disease (IHD). Women had a lower odds of passing the clinical action measure (odds ratio 0.68, 95 % confidence interval 0.66-0.71). Among those with IHD, the gender gap increased with age. Differences in pass rates were explained by women's higher LDL levels, but not by their slightly worse adherence (3 % higher CMG). Women and men veterans receive more similar quality of care for lipids in diabetes than previously indicated. Less reassuringly, the remaining gender differences appear to be as common in women at high cardiovascular risk as in those at low risk. Rather than focus on simply improving LDL levels in all women with diabetes, future efforts should ensure that patients with high cardiovascular risk are appropriately treated with statins when clinically indicated, feasible, and concordant with patient preferences.

  19. Predictive power of the grace score in population with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeza-Román, Anna; de Miguel-Balsa, Eva; Latour-Pérez, Jaime; Carrillo-López, Andrés

    2017-12-01

    Current clinical practice guidelines recommend risk stratification in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) upon admission to hospital. Diabetes mellitus (DM) is widely recognized as an independent predictor of mortality in these patients, although it is not included in the GRACE risk score. The objective of this study is to validate the GRACE risk score in a contemporary population and particularly in the subgroup of patients with diabetes, and to test the effects of including the DM variable in the model. Retrospective cohort study in patients included in the ARIAM-SEMICYUC registry, with a diagnosis of ACS and with available in-hospital mortality data. We tested the predictive power of the GRACE score, calculating the area under the ROC curve. We assessed the calibration of the score and the predictive ability based on type of ACS and the presence of DM. Finally, we evaluated the effect of including the DM variable in the model by calculating the net reclassification improvement. The GRACE score shows good predictive power for hospital mortality in the study population, with a moderate degree of calibration and no significant differences based on ACS type or the presence of DM. Including DM as a variable did not add any predictive value to the GRACE model. The GRACE score has an appropriate predictive power, with good calibration and clinical applicability in the subgroup of diabetic patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Reasons of general practitioners for not prescribing lipid-lowering medication to patients with diabetes : a qualitative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ab, Elisabeth; Denig, Petra; van Vliet, Ton; Dekker, Janny H.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Lipid-lowering medication remains underused, even in high-risk populations. The objective of this study was to determine factors underlying general practitioners' decisions not to prescribe such drugs to patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods: A qualitative study with semi-structured

  1. Status of carbohydrate and lipid metabolism in obese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus after biliopancreatic diversion surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We examined 70 patients with obesity and diabetes mellitus type 2 before and within 5 years after BPD: these patients showed a significant improvement in the status of carbohydrate and lipid metabolism within 3 months after surgery. This improvement has remained stable along with the reduced body weight during the whole observation period of up to 5 years.

  2. Effect of Vaccinium bracteatum Thunb. leaves extract on blood glucose and plasma lipid levels in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Zhang, Xue Tong; Zhang, Hai Yan; Yao, Hui Yuan; Zhang, Hui

    2010-08-09

    To investigate the hypoglycemic effects of Vaccinium bracteatum Thunb. leaves (VBTL) extract in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice. After administration of VBTL extract for 4 weeks, the body weight, organ weight, blood glucose (BG), insulin and plasma lipid levels of streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice were measured. Body weights of diabetic mice treated with VBTL extract were partly recovered. The BG levels of AEG (diabetic mice treated with VBTL aqueous extract) were reduced to 91.52 and 85.82% at week 2 and week 4, respectively (P0.05). The insulin levels of AEG and EEG were obviously higher (P<0.05) than those of MC (diabetic mice in model control group). Comparing with MC, AEG and EEG had significantly lower (P<0.05) TC or TG levels and similar HDL-cholesterol or LDL-cholesterol levels. In comparison with non-diabetic control mice, AEG had similar plasma lipid levels except higher LDL-cholesterol level, while EEG had higher TC, TG and LDL-cholesterol levels and lower HDL-cholesterol levels. Both aqueous and ethanolic extract of VBTL possess a potential hypoglycemic effect in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Evaluation of Glycemic and Lipid Profile of Offspring of Diabetic Wistar Rats Treated with Malpighia emarginata Juice

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    Sandra M. Barbalho

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Knowing that maternal diabetes is related to hyperglycemia and fetal hyperinsulinemia, which affect the lipid metabolism, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of Malpighia emarginata (acerola juice on the glycemic and lipid profile of offspring of diabetic and nondiabetic Wistar rats. The adult offspring of non-diabetic dams and of dams with severe streptozotocin-induced diabetes were divided into groups: G1, offspring (of control dams treated with water, G2, offspring (of diabetic dams treated with water, G3, male offspring (of control dams treated with acerola juice, and G4, male offspring (of diabetic dams treated with acerola juice. The offspring of diabetic dams treated with acerola juice showed significantly decreased levels of glucose, cholesterol, triglycerides, and increased HDL-c. The use of acerola juice is a potential strategy to aid in the prevention of DM and dyslipidemia and its complications or to act as an auxiliary in the treatment of these diseases.

  4. Automatically explaining machine learning prediction results: a demonstration on type 2 diabetes risk prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Predictive modeling is a key component of solutions to many healthcare problems. Among all predictive modeling approaches, machine learning methods often achieve the highest prediction accuracy, but suffer from a long-standing open problem precluding their widespread use in healthcare. Most machine learning models give no explanation for their prediction results, whereas interpretability is essential for a predictive model to be adopted in typical healthcare settings. This paper presents the first complete method for automatically explaining results for any machine learning predictive model without degrading accuracy. We did a computer coding implementation of the method. Using the electronic medical record data set from the Practice Fusion diabetes classification competition containing patient records from all 50 states in the United States, we demonstrated the method on predicting type 2 diabetes diagnosis within the next year. For the champion machine learning model of the competition, our method explained prediction results for 87.4 % of patients who were correctly predicted by the model to have type 2 diabetes diagnosis within the next year. Our demonstration showed the feasibility of automatically explaining results for any machine learning predictive model without degrading accuracy.

  5. Lipid peroxide levels of serum lipoprotein fractions of diabetic patients with angiopathy and 60Co-irradiated rabbit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsunekawa, Hiroshi

    1982-01-01

    For a better understanding of the relationship between lipid peroxide (LPO) and vascular diseases, the author determined LPO levels and lipid contents of serum lipoprotein fractions of diabetics with angiopathy. The LPO level in high density lipoprotein (HDL) fraction of diabetic serum was significantly higher than that of normal serum whereas no significant increase was observed in the levels of very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) and low density lipoprotein (LDL) fractions of diabetic serum. As to the ratios of LPO to total lipids in these lipoprotein fractions, it was found that the ratio in HDL fraction of the diabetics was markedly higher than that of the normals. These results suggest that the increase in LPO levels in the sera of diabetic patiens is due to that in HDL fraction. To study further this problem, the author employed 60 Co-irradiated rabbit as a model, since it was already reported that radiation affects lipid metabolism and LPO formation, and that it induces the development of atherosclerosis. Upon irradiation with 60 Co ranging from 100R to 700R, serum LPO level of rabbit was significantly increased. Although elevation of LPO level was found in each serum lipoprotein fraction of VLDL, LDL and HDL, LPO level per lipid content was significantly increased only in HDL fraction. In the irradiated rabbit, significant elevation of the level of LPO was also observed in the liver, while no significant increase was found in the kidney and spleen. These results indicate that high level of LPO observed in the serum of irradiated rabbit would be the reflection of the increased LPO in the liver. (J.P.N.)

  6. Effect of combined gliclazide/metformin treatment on oxidative stress, lipid profile, and hepatorenal functions in type 2 diabetic patients

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    Mansour Alsharidah

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Type 2 diabetes is a chronic condition that requires pharmacotherapy interventions. Metformin and gliclazide are widely used drugs in monotherapy. However, their complementary action made utilization of the combination of these drugs an appealing approach. Aims: The study compared major therapeutic potentials of combined metformin/gliclazide treatment over metformin monotherapy based on the following parameters: oxidative stress, lipid profile, and hepatorenal functions. Subjects and methods: This is a comparative study was conducted from March 2015 to March 2016. The study screened 80 type 2 diabetic patients, of which 40 patients underwent combined metformin + gliclazide therapy (500 mg BD + 80 mg OD, respectively. The other 40 were matched for age and duration of diabetes mellitus with the previous group and received metformin monotherapy (500 mg BD. The levels of fasting blood glucose (FBG, total glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c, lipid peroxidation, total antioxidant capacity, serum creatinine, aspartate and alanine transaminases, total cholesterol, triglycerides, high-density lipoproteins, and low-density lipoproteins were measured according to the standard methods. Results: Oxidative stress, lipid profile, and hepatorenal functions were comparable in patients of both groups. However, patients on metformin treatment showed significantly lower levels of FBG [7.61 (6.70–8.89 mmol/L vs. 9.00 (7.30–10.68 mmol/L; P = .022] and HBA1c [7.00 (6.40–7.65% vs. 8.20 (7.20–9.75%; P < .001] compared to those on combined therapy. Conclusion: Oxidative stress, lipids profile, and hepatorenal functions were not different in patients who were on combined metformin/gliclazide therapy and compared to those metformin alone. In contrast, glycemic control was poor in the diabetic patients undergoing combined therapy. Keywords: Diabetes mellitus, Gliclazide, Glucose, Lipids, Metformin, Oxidative stress

  7. Lipid peroxide levels of serum lipoprotein fractions of diabetic patients with angiopathy and /sup 60/Co-irradiated rabbit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsunekawa, Hiroshi [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1982-09-01

    For a better understanding of the relationship between lipid peroxide (LPO) and vascular diseases, the author determined LPO levels and lipid contents of serum lipoprotein fractions of diabetics with angiopathy. The LPO level in high density lipoprotein (HDL) fraction of diabetic serum was significantly higher than that of normal serum whereas no significant increase was observed in the levels of very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) and low density lipoprotein (LDL) fractions of diabetic serum. As to the ratios of LPO to total lipids in these lipoprotein fractions, it was found that the ratio in HDL fraction of the diabetics was markedly higher than that of the normals. These results suggest that the increase in LPO levels in the sera of diabetic patients is due to that in HDL fraction. To study further this problem, the author employed /sup 60/Co-irradiated rabbit as a model, since it was already reported that radiation affects lipid metabolism and LPO formation, and that it induces the development of atherosclerosis. Upon irradiation with /sup 60/Co ranging from 100R to 700R, serum LPO level of rabbit was significantly increased. Although elevation of LPO level was found in each serum lipoprotein fraction of VLDL, LDL and HDL, LPO level per lipid content was significantly increased only in HDL fraction. In the irradiated rabbit, significant elevation of the level of LPO was also observed in the liver, while no significant increase was found in the kidney and spleen. These results indicate that high level of LPO observed in the serum of irradiated rabbit would be the reflection of the increased LPO in the liver.

  8. Effect of Ramadan Fasting on Serum Glucose and Lipid Profile Among Algerian Type 2 Diabetes Patients

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    Tiboura Ghania

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims: We designed this study to assess the effect of Ramadan fasting on serum lipid profile among type 2 diabetic patients. Material and Methods: The study was carried out in July 2014 (Ramadan 1421. The total duration of fasting was 17 hours a day. The investigation involved 80 patients. The mean age of the patients was 56± 8 years. The dietary survey lasting three days was recorded. The anthropometric and the biochemical parameters were measured in all subjects before (T1 and during (T2 the fasting month of Ramadan and results were compared using student t-test. Results: There was a significant decrease in high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c levels during T2 (0.35±0,08 g/L compared to T1 (0.38±0,11 g/L. Apolipoprotein A1 (Apo A1 decreased significantly during fasting compared to pre-fasting days while apo B increased during T2 (p˂0.05. The dietary fat consumption increased during Ramadan; especially for the saturated one (p<0.05. Conclusion: The present study suggests that fasting month of Ramadan could be beneficial for some patients with type 2 diabetes who are well controlled and balanced. However, some of them may be at risk of cardiovascular complications in which dyslipidemia can be the leading cause.

  9. The potential role of biomarkers in predicting gestational diabetes

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    Huguette S Brink

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Gestational diabetes (GD is a frequent complication during pregnancy and is associated with maternal and neonatal complications. It is suggested that a disturbing environment for the foetus, such as impaired glucose metabolism during intrauterine life, may result in enduring epigenetic changes leading to increased disease risk in adult life. Hence, early prediction of GD is vital. Current risk prediction models are based on maternal and clinical parameters, lacking a strong predictive value. Adipokines are mainly produced by adipocytes and suggested to be a link between obesity and its cardiovascular complications. Various adipokines, including adiponectin, leptin and TNFα, have shown to be dysregulated in GD. This review aims to outline biomarkers potentially associated with the pathophysiology of GD and discuss the role of integrating predictive biomarkers in current clinical risk prediction models, in order to enhance the identification of those at risk.

  10. The Effect of Aspalathin on Levels of Sugar and Lipids in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic and Normal Rats

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    Mahmood Najafian

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background Flavonoids have been reported as mammalian alpha-amylase inhibitors, a property which could be useful in the management of postprandial hyperglycemia in diabetes and its related disorders. Objectives In the present study the inhibitory effect of aspalathin as a flavonoid on alpha amylase activity and levels of sugar and lipids in rats, has been investigated. Methods In this experimental study, type inhibition of aspalatin on amylase and in the part of in vivo, the effect of aspalathin orally doses 5, 10, 20 and 40 mg/kg body weight on sugar and lipids levels was tested in a streptozotocin-induced model of diabetes and normal rats. The data were analyzed by one-sample Kolmogrov-Smirnov, Levene and ANOVA tests through SPSS version 22. Results The results showed that aspalathin is a competitive inhibitor for alpha amylase with Ki = 37.0 μM. In both diabetic and normal groups in all doses nearly dose dependent manner reduced blood glucose levels and beneficial effect on dyslipidemia were observed in diabetic rats, as well as reduction of disturbing consequences of diabetes such as high urine volume and water intake. Aspalathin was observed to have a weight loss-inductive effect, alongside with a reduction in food intake. Conclusions It seems that, this compound could be proposed as an antihyperglycemic and antihyperlipidemic agent in diabetes and potential therapeutic in obesity.

  11. Diosmin, a Citrus Nutrient, Activates Imidazoline Receptors to Alleviate Blood Glucose and Lipids in Type 1-Like Diabetic Rats

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    Chia-Chen Hsu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Diosmin is a nutrient that is widely contained in citrus and that has been indicated to improve glucose metabolism in diabetic disorders. Recently, we demonstrated that diosmin induces β-endorphin to lower hyperglycemia in diabetic rats. However, the mechanisms of diosmin in opioid secretion were unclear. Therefore, we focused on the secretion of opioids from isolated adrenal glands induced by diosmin. The changes in the released β-endorphin-like immunoreactivity (BER were determined using ELISA. Diosmin increased the BER level in a dose-dependent manner, and this effect was markedly reduced in the absence of calcium ions. Activation of the imidazoline I-2 receptor (I-2R has been introduced to induce opioid secretion. Interestingly, we observed that diosmin activates CHO cells expressing I-R. Additionally, diosmin-increased BER was inhibited by the blockade of I-2R in isolated adrenal glands. Additionally, an antagonist of I-2R blocked diosmin-induced effects, including the reduction in hyperglycemia and the increase in plasma BER in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats (STZ-diabetic rats. Repeated treatment of STZ-diabetic rats with diosmin for one week induced changes in hepatic glycogen, lipid levels, and the expression of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK. Furthermore, an antagonist of I-2R blocked the diosmin-induced changes. Additionally, plasma lipids modified by diosmin were also reversed by the blockade of I-2R in STZ-diabetic rats. Taken together, we suggest that diosmin may activate I-2R to enhance the secretion of β-endorphin from adrenal glands and to influence metabolic homeostasis, resulting in alleviation of blood glucose and lipids in STZ-diabetic rats.

  12. Characteristics Predicting Dyslipidemia in Drug-naïve Type 2 Diabetes Patients

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    Shi-Dou Lin

    2006-09-01

    Conclusion: We recommend a more intensive monitoring of lipid levels in drug-naïve diabetic patients who possess the characteristics of alcohol consumption or older age (men, long duration of diabetes (women, and higher BMI or WHR (both genders.

  13. Fasting and nonfasting lipid levels: influence of normal food intake on lipids, lipoproteins, apolipoproteins, and cardiovascular risk prediction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langsted, A.; Freiberg, J.J.; Nordestgaard, Børge

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Lipid profiles are usually measured after fasting. We tested the hypotheses that these levels change only minimally in response to normal food intake and that nonfasting levels predict cardiovascular events. METHODS AND RESULTS: We cross-sectionally studied 33 391 individuals 20 to 95...... to HDL cholesterol, and ratio of apolipoprotein B to apolipoprotein A1 did not change in response to normal food intake. The maximum changes after normal food and fluid intake from fasting levels were -0.2 mmol/L for total cholesterol, -0.2 mmol/L for low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, -0.1 mmol...... years of age from the Copenhagen General Population Study. We also studied 9319 individuals 20 to 93 years of age from the Copenhagen City Heart Study, 1166 of whom developed cardiovascular events during 14 years of follow-up. Compared with fasting levels, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein...

  14. Common and rare genetic markers of lipid variation in subjects with type 2 diabetes from the ACCORD clinical trial

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    Skylar W. Marvel

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background Individuals with type 2 diabetes are at an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Alterations in circulating lipid levels, total cholesterol (TC, low-density lipoprotein (LDL, high-density lipoprotein (HDL, and triglycerides (TG are heritable risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Here we conduct a genome-wide association study (GWAS of common and rare variants to investigate associations with baseline lipid levels in 7,844 individuals with type 2 diabetes from the ACCORD clinical trial. Methods DNA extracted from stored blood samples from ACCORD participants were genotyped using the Affymetrix Axiom Biobank 1 Genotyping Array. After quality control and genotype imputation, association of common genetic variants (CV, defined as minor allele frequency (MAF ≥ 3%, with baseline levels of TC, LDL, HDL, and TG was tested using a linear model. Rare variant (RV associations (MAF < 3% were conducted using a suite of methods that collapse multiple RV within individual genes. Results Many statistically significant CV (p < 1 × 10−8 replicate findings in large meta-analyses in non-diabetic subjects. RV analyses also confirmed findings in other studies, whereas significant RV associations with CNOT2, HPN-AS1, and SIRPD appear to be novel (q < 0.1. Discussion Here we present findings for the largest GWAS of lipid levels in people with type 2 diabetes to date. We identified 17 statistically significant (p < 1 × 10−8 associations of CV with lipid levels in 11 genes or chromosomal regions, all of which were previously identified in meta-analyses of mostly non-diabetic cohorts. We also identified 13 associations in 11 genes based on RV, several of which represent novel findings.

  15. Preventive and Protective Properties of Zingiber officinale (Ginger in Diabetes Mellitus, Diabetic Complications, and Associated Lipid and Other Metabolic Disorders: A Brief Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiming Li

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Zingiber officinale (ginger has been used as herbal medicine to treat various ailments worldwide since antiquity. Recent evidence revealed the potential of ginger for treatment of diabetes mellitus. Data from in vitro, in vivo, and clinical trials has demonstrated the antihyperglycaemic effect of ginger. The mechanisms underlying these actions are associated with insulin release and action, and improved carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. The most active ingredients in ginger are the pungent principles, gingerols, and shogaol. Ginger has shown prominent protective effects on diabetic liver, kidney, eye, and neural system complications. The pharmacokinetics, bioavailability, and the safety issues of ginger are also discussed in this update.

  16. Preventive and Protective Properties of Zingiber officinale (Ginger) in Diabetes Mellitus, Diabetic Complications, and Associated Lipid and Other Metabolic Disorders: A Brief Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yiming; Tran, Van H.; Duke, Colin C.; Roufogalis, Basil D.

    2012-01-01

    Zingiber officinale (ginger) has been used as herbal medicine to treat various ailments worldwide since antiquity. Recent evidence revealed the potential of ginger for treatment of diabetes mellitus. Data from in vitro, in vivo, and clinical trials has demonstrated the antihyperglycaemic effect of ginger. The mechanisms underlying these actions are associated with insulin release and action, and improved carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. The most active ingredients in ginger are the pungent principles, gingerols, and shogaol. Ginger has shown prominent protective effects on diabetic liver, kidney, eye, and neural system complications. The pharmacokinetics, bioavailability, and the safety issues of ginger are also discussed in this update. PMID:23243452

  17. Effect of Ganoderma lucidum spores intervention on glucose and lipid metabolism gene expression profiles in type 2 diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fang; Zhou, Zhongkai; Ren, Xiaochong; Wang, Yuyang; Yang, Rui; Luo, Jinhua; Strappe, Padraig

    2015-05-22

    The fruiting body of Ganoderma lucidum has been used as a traditional herbal medicine for many years. However, to the date, there is no detailed study for describing the effect of G. lucidum spores on oxidative stress, blood glucose level and lipid compositions in animal models of type 2 diabetic rats, in particular the effect on the gene expression profiles associated with glucose and lipid metabolisms. G. lucidum spores powder (GLSP) with a shell-broken rate >99.9 % was used. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into three groups (n = 8/group). Group 1: Normal control, normal rats with ordinary feed; Group 2: Model control, diabetic rats with ordinary feed without intervention; Group 3: GLSP, diabetic rats with ordinary feed, an intervention group utilizing GLSP of 1 g per day by oral gavages for 4 consecutive weeks. Type 2 diabetic rats were obtained by streptozocin (STZ) injection. The changes in the levels of glucose, triglycerides, total cholesterol and HDL-cholesterol in blood samples were analyzed after GLSP intervention. Meanwhile, gene expressions associated with the possible molecular mechanism of GLSP regulation were also investigated using a quantitative RT-PCR. The reduction of blood glucose level occurred within the first 2 weeks of GLSP intervention and the lipid synthesis in the diabetic rats of GLSP group was significantly decreased at 4 weeks compared to the model control group. Furthermore, it was also found that GLSP intervention greatly attenuated the level of oxidative stress in the diabetic rats. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed up-regulation of lipid metabolism related genes (Acox1, ACC, Insig-1 and Insig-2) and glycogen synthesis related genes (GS2 and GYG1) in GLSP group compared to model control group. Additionally, there were no significant changes in the expression of other genes, such as SREBP-1, Acly, Fas, Fads1, Gpam, Dgat1, PEPCK and G6PC1. This study might indicate that GLSP consumption could provide a

  18. Evaluation of treadmill exercise effect on muscular lipid profiles of diabetic fatty rats by nanoflow liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong Cheol; Kim, Il Yong; Son, Yeri; Byeon, Seul Kee; Yoon, Dong Hyun; Son, Jun Seok; Song, Han Sol; Song, Wook; Seong, Je Kyung; Moon, Myeong Hee

    2016-07-01

    We compare comprehensive quantitative profiling of lipids at the molecular level from skeletal muscle tissues (gastrocnemius and soleus) of Zucker diabetic fatty rats and Zucker lean control rats during treadmill exercise by nanoflow liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Because type II diabetes is caused by decreased insulin sensitivity due to excess lipids accumulated in skeletal muscle tissue, lipidomic analysis of muscle tissues under treadmill exercise can help unveil the mechanism of lipid-associated insulin resistance. In total, 314 lipid species, including phospholipids, sphingolipids, ceramides, diacylglycerols (DAGs), and triacylglycerols (TAGs), were analyzed to examine diabetes-related lipid species and responses to treadmill exercise. Most lysophospholipid levels increased with diabetes. While DAG levels (10 from the gastrocnemius and 13 from the soleus) were >3-fold higher in diabetic rats, levels of most of these decreased after exercise in soleus but not in gastrocnemius. Levels of 5 highly abundant TAGs (52:1 and 54:3 in the gastrocnemius and 48:2, 50:2, and 52:4 in the soleus) displaying 2-fold increases in diabetic rats decreased after exercise in the soleus but not in the gastrocnemius in most cases. Thus, aerobic exercise has a stronger influence on lipid levels in the soleus than in the gastrocnemius in type 2 diabetic rats.

  19. Effect of Cucurbita ficifolia and Probiotic Yogurt Consumption on Blood Glucose, Lipid Profile, and Inflammatory Marker in Type 2 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayat, Azade; Azizi-Soleiman, Fatemeh; Heidari-Beni, Motahar; Feizi, Awat; Iraj, Bijan; Ghiasvand, Reza; Askari, Gholamreza

    2016-01-01

    Control of blood sugar, hypertension, and dyslipidemia are key factors in diabetes management. Cucurbita ficifolia (pumpkin) is a vegetable which has been used traditionally as a remedy for diabetes in Iran. In addition, consumption of probiotics may have beneficial effects on people with Type 2 diabetes. The aim of this study was an investigation of the effects of C. ficifolia and probiotic yogurt consumption alone or at the same time on blood glucose and serum lipids in diabetic patients. Eighty eligible participants randomly were assigned to four groups: 1 - green C. ficifolia (100 g); 2 - probiotic yogurt (150 g); 3 - C. ficifolia plus probiotic yogurt (100 g C. ficifolia plus 150 g yogurt); and 4 -control (dietary advice) for 8 weeks. Blood pressure, glycemic response, lipid profile, and high-sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP) were measured before and after the intervention. Total cholesterol (TC) decreased significantly in yogurt and yogurt plus C. ficifolia groups (within groups P = 0.010, and P consumption resulted in a decrease in triglyceride (TG) and an increase in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) (within groups P consumption of C. ficifolia and probiotic yogurt may help treatment of diabetic patients.

  20. Body macronutrient composition is predicted by lipid and not protein content of the diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moatt, Joshua P; Hambly, Catherine; Heap, Elizabeth; Kramer, Anna; Moon, Fiona; Speakman, John R; Walling, Craig A

    2017-12-01

    Diet is an important determinant of fitness-related traits including growth, reproduction, and survival. Recent work has suggested that variation in protein:lipid ratio and particularly the amount of protein in the diet is a key nutritional parameter. However, the traits that mediate the link between dietary macronutrient ratio and fitness-related traits are less well understood. An obvious candidate is body composition, given its well-known link to health. Here, we investigate the relationship between dietary and body macronutrient composition using a first-generation laboratory population of a freshwater fish, the three-spine stickleback ( Gasterosteus aculeatus ). Carbohydrate is relatively unimportant in the diet of predatory fish, facilitating the exploration of how dietary protein-to-lipid ratio affects their relative deposition in the body. We find a significant effect of lipid intake, rather than protein, on body protein:lipid ratio. Importantly, this was not a result of absorbing macronutrients in relation to their relative abundance in the diet, as the carcass protein:lipid ratios differed from those of the diets, with ratios usually lower in the body than in the diet. This indicates that individuals can moderate their utilization, or uptake, of ingested macronutrients to reach a target balance within the body. We found no effect of diet on swimming endurance, activity, or testes size. However, there was an effect of weight on testes size, with larger males having larger testes. Our results provide evidence for the adjustment of body protein:lipid ratio away from that of the diet. As dietary lipid intake was the key determinant of body composition, we suggest this occurs via metabolism of excess protein, which conflicts with the predictions of the protein leverage hypothesis. These results could imply that the conversion and excretion of protein is one of the causes of the survival costs associated with high-protein diets.

  1. Stronger relationship of serum apolipoprotein A-1 and B with diabetic retinopathy than traditional lipids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B S Ankit

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Diabetic retinopathy (DR is the most common preventable cause of blindness where early detection and treatment can be sight-saving. Search for biomarkers of the disease has been relentless. We aimed to determine whether lipoproteins apolipoproteins A1 and B1 (Apo-A1 and Apo-B1 have stronger associations with DR in contrast to conventionally measured low-density lipoprotein (LDL and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. Materials and Methods: We performed a cross-sectional study and studied 117 patients. Serum lipid profile was assessed by autoanalyzer. Serum Apo-A1 and Apo-B were measured using immunoturbidimetric kit on an autoanalyzer. Apo-B/A1 ratio was calculated. Retinopathy was graded from the digital retinal photographs, taken with nonmydriatic auto fundus camera and classified according to International Clinical DR Disease Severity Scale. Results: Mean Apo-A1 for mild, moderate, severe retinopathy, and proliferative DR (PDR shows a significant negative correlation (P = 0.001 with severity of retinopathy. Mean Apo-B for mild, moderate, severe, PDR displayed a significant positive correlation with severity of retinopathy (P = 0.001. Mean Apo-B/A1 for mild, moderate, severe, PDR showed highly significant positive correlation with severity of retinopathy (P < 0.001. In contrast, mean LDL for mild, moderate, severe, PDR showed insignificant association with severity of DR (P = 0.081. Conclusion: Apo-A1 and Apo-B have a stronger association with the development of DR than traditional lipids and can thus facilitate early detection and treatment of the disease.

  2. Lipid, lipoproteins, C-reactive protein, and hemostatic factors at baseline in the diabetes prevention program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-10-01

    Individuals with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) appear to be at increased risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) due at least in part to an increased prevalence of risk factors. We evaluated lipid, lipoprotein, C-reactive protein (CRP), fibrinogen, and tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) levels at study entry in the largest multiethnic cohort of participants with IGT described, namely in the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP). Measurements were performed at the baseline visit of 3,819 randomized participants of the DPP. Among 3,622 participants who were not taking lipid-lowering medicines, cardiovascular risk factors were analyzed in relation to demographic, anthropometric, and metabolic measures. Major determinants of risk factors were assessed in multivariate analysis. Over 40% of participants had elevated triglyceride, LDL cholesterol, and CRP levels and reduced HDL cholesterol levels. Men had higher triglyceride and tPA and lower HDL cholesterol concentrations and smaller LDL particle size than women, whereas women had higher CRP and fibrinogen levels. African Americans had less dyslipidemia but higher fibrinogen levels, and Asian Americans had lower CRP and fibrinogen levels than Caucasians and Hispanics. The surrogate measure of insulin resistance (homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance [HOMA-IR]) had the strongest association with HDL cholesterol, triglyceride, and tPA levels and LDL particle size. BMI had the greatest influence on CRP and fibrinogen levels. Using median splits of indexes of insulin resistance and insulin secretion (insulin-to-glucose ratio), participants with greater insulin resistance had a more adverse CVD risk-factor profile, whereas insulin secretion had little influence on risk factors. The pattern of CVD risk factors in participants with IGT in the DPP exhibits substantial heterogeneity and is significantly influenced by race, sex, and age, as well as by obesity, glucose, and insulin measures. The degree of insulin

  3. Ameliorative potential of S-allylcysteine: effect on lipid profile and changes in tissue fatty acid composition in experimental diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saravanan, Ganapathy; Ponmurugan, Ponnusamy

    2012-09-01

    Hyperlipidemia is an associated complication of diabetes mellitus. The association of hyperglycemia with an alteration of lipid parameters presents a major risk for cardiovascular complications in diabetes. The present study was designed to examine the antihyperlipidemic effect of S-allylcysteine (SAC) in STZ induced diabetic rats. The levels of blood glucose, cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), free fatty acids, phospholipids and fatty acid composition were estimated in the liver and kidneys of control and experimental groups of rats. Oral administration of SAC at a dose of 150 mg/kg bodyweight per day to STZ-induced diabetic rats for a period of 45 days resulted in a significant reduction in fasting blood glucose, TC, TG, free fatty acids, phospholipids, LDL-C, VLDL-C and elevation of HDL-C in comparison with diabetic control group. Oral administration of SAC to diabetic rats also decreased the concentrations of fatty acids, viz., palmitic, stearic (16:1), and oleic acid (18:1), whereas linolenic (18:3) and arachidonic acid (20:4) were elevated. The antihyperlipidemic effect of SAC was compared with glyclazide; a well-known antihyperglycemic drug. The result of the present study indicates that SAC showed an antihyperlipidemic effect in addition to its antidiabetic effect in experimental diabetes. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  4. Effect of acacia nilotica leaves extract on hyperglycaemia, lipid profile and platelet aggregation in streptozotocin induced diabetic rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asad, M.; Munir, T.A.; Nadeem, A.

    2011-01-01

    To consider new hypoglycaemic, anti-hyperlipidaemic and anti-platelet aggregation sources, aqueous methanol extract of Acacia Nilotica (AN) leaves was investigated in streptozotocin induced diabetic rats. Methods: Diabetes mellitus was induced in 90 out of 120 male albino rats by administering 50 mg/Kg body weight (bw) streptozotocin intraperitoneal y, and was confirmed by measuring fasting blood glucose level >200 mg/dL on fourth post-induction day. The rats were equally divided into 4 groups, A (normal control), B (diabetic control), C (diabetics rats treated with plant extract) and group D (diabetics rats treated with glyburide). The rats of group C and D were given single dose of 300 mg/Kg bw, An extract, and 900 micro g/Kg bw glyburide respectively for 3 weeks. Blood glucose levels were measured by gluco meter, platelet aggregation by Dia Med method, beta-thrombo globulin and insulin by ELISA technique, and lipid components were measured by enzymatic calorimetric method. Results: Significant differences (p<0.05) were noticed in blood glucose, serum insulin, platelet aggregation and triglyceride levels in diabetic rats treated with AN extract and glyburide as compared to diabetic controlled rats. A significant difference (p<0.05) in beta-thrombo globulin and LDL levels was also noticed in rats treated with glyburide than the diabetic controlled rats. The levels of fasting blood glucose, beta-thrombo globulin and platelet aggregation were significantly reduced (p<0.05) in diabetic rats treated with glyburide than AN extract treated rats. Conclusions: Administration of AN leaves extract showed hypoglycaemic and anti-platelet aggregation activity in diabetic rats as that of glyburide. (author)

  5. HUBUNGAN ANTARA KENDALI GLIKEMIK DENGAN PROFIL LIPID PADA PENDERITA DIABETES MELITUS TIPE 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rheza Priyadi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Penyebab terbanyak morbiditas dan mortalitas pada pasien diabetes melitus tipe 2 (DM tipe 2 adalah penyakit kardiovaskuler. Banyak faktor risiko yang terlibat dalam kejadian PJK pada pasien DM tipe 2, salah satunya adalah profil lipid. Berdasarkan penelitian sebelumnya ditemukan bahwa kondisi hiperglikemik memiliki efek langsung dan tidak langsung terhadap kondisi pembuluh darah. Efek tidak langsung kondisi hiperglikemik diperkirakan melalui pengaruhnya terhadap profil lipid. Penelitian ini ingin mengetahui hubungan antara kendali glikemik dengan profil lipid. Sampel diambil dari rekam medis yang memenuhi kriteria inklusi dan eksklusi. Pada penelitian ini dipakai 77 sampel yang terdiri dari  42 pria (54,5% dan 35 wanita (45,5%. Usia rata-rata sampel adalah 54 tahun dengan tujuh data yang belum diketahui usianya. Rata-rata HbA1c pasien adalah 10,194%. 16 pasien (20,8% memiliki kontrol glikemik yang baik (HbA1c <7 %, sedangkan 61 (79,2% pasien memiliki kontrol glikemik yang buruk (HbA1c ?7 %. 26 pasien (33,8% mengalami peningkatan kadar trigliserida (?150 mg/dl. 60 pasien (77,9% mengalami penurunan kadar HDL (<40 mg/dl. Penelitian ini menggunakan rancangan penelitian analisa potong lintang. Sampel diambil dari pasien-pasien rawat jalan dengan diagnosis DM tipe 2 yang memeriksakan dirinya di RSUP Sanglah Denpasar periode Juli 2010 sampai Mei 2012. Analisis statistik yang digunakan adalah korelasi spearman satu arah. Berdasarkan hasil uji analitik korelatif satu arah terdapat hubungan yang bermakna antara kendali glikemik dengan kadar trigliserida darah dan antara kadar trigliserida dengan kadar HDL. Korelasi antara kendali glikemik dengan kadar trigliserida darah menunjukkan korelasi yang lemah dengan nilai korelasi 0,342 (p < 0,005; 95% CI.  Korelasi antara antara kadar trigliserida dengan kadar HDL menunjukkan korelasi lemah dengan kadar HDL, dengan nilai korelasi - 0,310 (p < 0,005; 95% CI. Korelasi antara antara kadar trigliserida dengan

  6. Protective role of 20-OH ecdysone on lipid profile and tissue fatty acid changes in streptozotocin induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naresh Kumar, Rajendran; Sundaram, Ramalingam; Shanthi, Palanivelu; Sachdanandam, Panchanatham

    2013-01-05

    Hyperlipidemia is an associated complication of diabetes mellitus. The association of hyperglycemia with an alteration of lipid parameters presents a major risk for cardiovascular complications in diabetes. The present study was designed to examine the antihyperlipidemic effect of 20-OH ecdysone on lipid profile and tissue fatty acid changes in streptozotocin induced diabetic rats. The levels of blood glucose, cholesterol, triglycerides, free fatty acids, phospholipids, low density lipoprotein, very low density lipoprotein, high density lipoprotein, lipoprotein lipase, lecithin cholesterol acyl transferase, 3-hydroxy 3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase and fatty acid composition were estimated in plasma, liver and kidneys of control and experimental groups of rats. Oral administration of 20-OH ecdysone at a dose of 5mg/kg bodyweight per day to STZ-induced diabetic rats for a period of 30 days resulted in a significant reduction in fasting blood glucose, cholesterol, triglycerides, free fatty acids, phospholipids, low density lipoprotein, very low density lipoprotein, 3-hydroxy 3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase and elevation of high density lipoprotein, lipoprotein lipase and lecithin cholesterol acyl transferasein comparison with diabetic untreated rats. Moreover, administration of 20-OH ecdysone to diabetic rats also decreased the concentrations of fatty acids, viz., palmitic, stearic (16:1) and oleic acid (18:1), whereas linolenic (18:3) and arachidonic acid (20:4) were elevated. The antihyperlipidemic effect of 20-OH ecdysone was compared with glibenclamide a well-known antihyperglycemic drug. The result of the present study indicates that 20-OH ecdysone showed an antihyperlipidemic effect in addition to its antidiabetic effect in experimental diabetes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Effect of Urtica Dioica Decoction on Serum Glucose and Lipid Profile in Stereptozotocin Induced Diabetic Male Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Sahraki

    Full Text Available Background: Since Urtica dioica is a traditional treatment plant and is used for antihypertensive, antilipidemic and antidiabetic agents, this survey was carried out to evaluate the effect of Urtica dioica decoction on serum glucose and lipid profile in diabetic male rats induced by stereptozotocin (STZ. Materials and Methods: This experiment was performed on 30 Wistar-Albino male rats, weighing 200-250 g, which were divided in sham control (A, diabetic control (B and diabetic test groups (C randomly (N=10. Type I diabetes was induced by single intraperitoneal injection of STZ (65 mg/kg. Test group received 0.40-0.60 ml of Urtica dioica decoction for a month by gavages, control group (B received the same volume of distill water. Group (A did not receive any agent during the experiment period. Finally, animals were anesthetized, sacrificed and blood samples were collected from the cervical vein. Then, serum glucose and lipid profiles were measured by ordinary methods. Data were analyzed by SPSS-11, using ANOVA and post hoc Tukey tests. Results were expressed as mean±SD, and statistical difference was considered significant by p<0.05.Results: Results in the present study showed that fasting blood glucose (FBS, total cholesterol (TCho, triglyceride (TG, LDL, food and water intake were significantly decreased in group C compared with those of group B, but body weight gain was significantly increased compared with that of control group (B.Conclusion: These results indicated that Urtica dioica decoction caused decreased FBS and improved serum lipids in diabetic male rats. Some more studies have shown the same mechanism.

  8. [IMPACT OF DIETARY FATTY ACIDS ON LIPID PROFILE, INSULIN SENSITIVITY AND FUNCTIONALITY OF PANCREATIC β CELLS IN TYPE 2 DIABETIC SUBJECTS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sambra Vásquez, Verónica; Rojas Moncada, Pamela; Basfi-Fer, Karen; Valencia, Alejandra; Codoceo, Juana; Inostroza, Jorge; Carrasco, Fernando; Ruz Ortiz, Manuel

    2015-09-01

    the quality of fats could influence the metabolic control of patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (DM2). to determine the relationship between intake and quality of dietary fatty acids to lipid profile, metabolic control, functionality of pancreatic cells and insulin sensivity in subjects with DM2. we studied 54 subjects with DM2, anthropometric measurements were performed, body composition and dietary lipid intake, saturated fatty acids (SFA), trans, monounsaturated, polyunsaturated, omega 3, omega 6 and dietary cholesterol. Laboratory parameters related to their metabolic control were determined (fasting blood glucose, glycated hemoglobin, and lipid profile). The insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity was determined with the insulin-modified intravenous glucose tolerance test according to the Bergman's minimal model. 28 men and 26 women were studied (BMI of 29.5 ± 3.7 kg/m2; age 55.6 ± 6.8 y.), 48% had LDL-C 40 mg/dL and 7.4% of women c-HDL > 50 mg/dL. 32% consumed > 10% of AGS and > 300 mg/day of dietary cholesterol. The SFA intake and percentage of calories from fat (G%) were significantly associated with insulin resistance and fasting plasma glucose concentration. The G% predicted 84% variability on c-VLDL. in patients with DM2 a greater intake of fat and saturated fatty acids it associated with greater fasting glycemia and insulin resistance. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  9. A Predictive Metabolic Signature for the Transition From Gestational Diabetes Mellitus to Type 2 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allalou, Amina; Nalla, Amarnadh; Prentice, Kacey J; Liu, Ying; Zhang, Ming; Dai, Feihan F; Ning, Xian; Osborne, Lucy R; Cox, Brian J; Gunderson, Erica P; Wheeler, Michael B

    2016-09-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) affects 3-14% of pregnancies, with 20-50% of these women progressing to type 2 diabetes (T2D) within 5 years. This study sought to develop a metabolomics signature to predict the transition from GDM to T2D. A prospective cohort of 1,035 women with GDM pregnancy were enrolled at 6-9 weeks postpartum (baseline) and were screened for T2D annually for 2 years. Of 1,010 women without T2D at baseline, 113 progressed to T2D within 2 years. T2D developed in another 17 women between 2 and 4 years. A nested case-control design used 122 incident case patients matched to non-case patients by age, prepregnancy BMI, and race/ethnicity. We conducted metabolomics with baseline fasting plasma and identified 21 metabolites that significantly differed by incident T2D status. Machine learning optimization resulted in a decision tree modeling that predicted T2D incidence with a discriminative power of 83.0% in the training set and 76.9% in an independent testing set, which is far superior to measuring fasting plasma glucose levels alone. The American Diabetes Association recommends T2D screening in the early postpartum period via oral glucose tolerance testing after GDM, which is a time-consuming and inconvenient procedure. Our metabolomics signature predicted T2D incidence from a single fasting blood sample. This study represents the first metabolomics study of the transition from GDM to T2D validated in an independent testing set, facilitating early interventions. © 2016 by the American Diabetes Association.

  10. Using hemoglobin A1C as a predicting model for time interval from pre-diabetes progressing to diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Ling Huang

    Full Text Available The early identification of subjects at high risk for diabetes is essential, thus, random rather than fasting plasma glucose is more useful. We aim to evaluate the time interval between pre-diabetes to diabetes with anti-diabetic drugs by using HbA1C as a diagnostic tool, and predicting it using a mathematic model.We used the Taipei Medical University Affiliated Hospital Patient Profile Database (AHPPD from January-2007 to June-2011. The patients who progressed and were prescribed anti-diabetic drugs were selected from AHPPD. The mathematical model used to predict the time interval of HbA1C value ranged from 5.7% to 6.5% for diabetes progression.We predicted an average overall time interval for all participants in between 5.7% to 6.5% during a total of 907 days (standard error, 103 days. For each group found among 5.7% to 6.5% we determined 1169.3 days for the low risk group (i.e. 3.2 years, 1080.5 days (i.e. 2.96 years for the increased risk group and 729.4 days (i.e. 1.99 years for the diabetes group. This indicates the patients will take an average of 2.49 years to reach 6.5%.This prediction model is very useful to help prioritize the diagnosis at an early stage for targeting individuals with risk of diabetes. Using patients' HbA1C before anti-diabetes drugs are used we predicted the time interval from pre-diabetes progression to diabetes is 2.49 years without any influence of age and gender. Additional studies are needed to support this model for a long term prediction.

  11. Extended-release niacin/laropiprant significantly improves lipid levels in type 2 diabetes mellitus irrespective of baseline glycemic control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bays HE

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Harold E Bays,1 Eliot A Brinton,2 Joseph Triscari,3 Erluo Chen,3 Darbie Maccubbin,3 Alexandra A MacLean,3 Kendra L Gibson,3 Rae Ann Ruck,3 Amy O Johnson-Levonas,3 Edward A O’Neill,3 Yale B Mitchel3 1Louisville Metabolic & Atherosclerosis Research Center (L-MARC, Louisville, KY, USA; 2Utah Foundation for Biomedical Research, Salt Lake City, UT, USA; 3Merck & Co, Inc., Whitehouse Station, NJ, USA Background: The degree of glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM may alter lipid levels and may alter the efficacy of lipid-modifying agents. Objective: Evaluate the lipid-modifying efficacy of extended-release niacin/laropiprant (ERN/LRPT in subgroups of patients with T2DM with better or poorer glycemic control. Methods: Post hoc analysis of clinical trial data from patients with T2DM who were randomized 4:3 to double-blind ERN/LRPT or placebo (n=796, examining the lipid-modifying effects of ERN/LRPT in patients with glycosylated hemoglobin or fasting plasma glucose levels above and below median baseline levels. Results: At Week 12 of treatment, ERN/LRPT significantly improved low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C, non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, and lipoprotein (a, compared with placebo, with equal efficacy in patients above or below median baseline glycemic control. Compared with placebo, over 36 weeks of treatment more patients treated with ERN/LRPT had worsening of their diabetes and required intensification of antihyperglycemic medication, irrespective of baseline glycemic control. Incidences of other adverse experiences were generally low in all treatment groups. Conclusion: The lipid-modifying effects of ERN/LRPT are independent of the degree of baseline glycemic control in patients with T2DM (NCT00485758. Keywords: lipid-modifying agents, hyperglycemia, LDL, HDL, triglycerides

  12. Prediction of non-alcoholic fatty-liver disease and liver fat content by serum molecular lipids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orešic, Matej; Hyötyläinen, Tuulia; Kotronen, Anna

    2013-01-01

    We examined whether analysis of lipids by ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) coupled to MS allows the development of a laboratory test for non-alcoholic fatty-liver disease (NAFLD), and how a lipid-profile biomarker compares with the prediction of NAFLD and liver-fat content based...

  13. Balanced pan-PPAR activator bezafibrate in combination with statin: comprehensive lipids control and diabetes prevention?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tenenbaum Alexander

    2012-11-01

    , induced atherosclerotic plaque regression in thoracic and abdominal aorta and improved endothelial function. In addition, bezafibrate has important fibrinogen-related properties and anti-inflammatory effects. In clinical trials bezafibrate was highly effective for cardiovascular risk reduction in patients with metabolic syndrome and atherogenic dyslipidemia. The principal differences between bezafibrate and other fibrates are related to effects on glucose level and insulin resistance. Bezafibrate decreases blood glucose level, HbA1C, insulin resistance and reduces the incidence of T2DM compared to placebo or other fibrates. Currently statins are the cornerstone of the treatment and prevention of cardiovascular diseases related to atherosclerosis. However, despite the increasing use of statins as monotherapy for low density lipoprotein- cholesterol (LDL-C reduction, a significant residual cardiovascular risk is still presented in patients with atherogenic dyslipidemia and insulin resistance, which is typical for T2DM and metabolic syndrome. Recently, concerns were raised regarding the development of diabetes in statin-treated patients. Combined bezafibrate/statin therapy is more effective in achieving a comprehensive lipid control and residual cardiovascular risk reduction. Based on the beneficial effects of pan-PPAR agonist bezafibrate on glucose metabolism and prevention of new-onset diabetes, one could expect a neutralization of the adverse pro-diabetic effect of statins using the strategy of a combined statin/fibrate therapy.

  14. Balanced pan-PPAR activator bezafibrate in combination with statin: comprehensive lipids control and diabetes prevention?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenenbaum, Alexander; Fisman, Enrique Z

    2012-11-14

    atherosclerotic plaque regression in thoracic and abdominal aorta and improved endothelial function. In addition, bezafibrate has important fibrinogen-related properties and anti-inflammatory effects. In clinical trials bezafibrate was highly effective for cardiovascular risk reduction in patients with metabolic syndrome and atherogenic dyslipidemia. The principal differences between bezafibrate and other fibrates are related to effects on glucose level and insulin resistance. Bezafibrate decreases blood glucose level, HbA1C, insulin resistance and reduces the incidence of T2DM compared to placebo or other fibrates. Currently statins are the cornerstone of the treatment and prevention of cardiovascular diseases related to atherosclerosis. However, despite the increasing use of statins as monotherapy for low density lipoprotein- cholesterol (LDL-C) reduction, a significant residual cardiovascular risk is still presented in patients with atherogenic dyslipidemia and insulin resistance, which is typical for T2DM and metabolic syndrome. Recently, concerns were raised regarding the development of diabetes in statin-treated patients. Combined bezafibrate/statin therapy is more effective in achieving a comprehensive lipid control and residual cardiovascular risk reduction. Based on the beneficial effects of pan-PPAR agonist bezafibrate on glucose metabolism and prevention of new-onset diabetes, one could expect a neutralization of the adverse pro-diabetic effect of statins using the strategy of a combined statin/fibrate therapy.

  15. Blood lipid levels in relation to glucose status in European men and women without a prior history of diabetes: the DECODE Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, L.; Qiao, Q.; Tuomilehto, J.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Dyslipidaemia is present not only in diabetic but also in prediabetic subjects. The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between lipid and glucose levels in a large European population without a prior history of diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Data from....... RESULTS: In subjects without a prior history of diabetes, positive relationships were shown between fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and total cholesterol (TC) (beta=0.06 and 0.03, respectively for men and women, p

  16. Predictions of type 2 diabetes and complications in Greenland in 2014

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinsen, Nina; Jørgensen, Marit E; Bjerregaard, Peter

    2006-01-01

    population in 2014. RESULTS: The prevalence of type 2 diabetes was not predicted to increase by 2014 under the 1st assumption. It was predicted to increase from 11% to 23% for women, but not for men under the 2nd assumption. Approximately half of the cases of cardiovascular disease and cardiovascular risk......OBJECTIVES: The objective of this study was to predict the prevalence of type 2 diabetes and the associated burden to the health care system in Greenland posed by diabetic complications by 2014. The predictions were based on changes in demographic variables and obesity. STUDY DESIGN: Projection...... 2 diabetes was predicted under these assumptions and based on the observed association between BMI and type 2 diabetes. The prevalence of complications was estimated using the 2nd assumption, as was the prevalence of hypertension, dyslipidemia, Ischemic Heart Disease (IHD) and stroke in the non-diabetic...

  17. Effects of probiotic yogurt consumption on lipid profile in type 2 diabetic patients: A randomized controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamadshahi, Majid; Veissi, Masoud; Haidari, Fatemeh; Javid, Ahmad Zare; Mohammadi, Fatemeh; Shirbeigi, Esmat

    2014-06-01

    Alteration in plasma lipid and lipoprotein profile has been documented in diabetic patients. The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of probiotic and conventional yogurt on lipid profile in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients. A total of 44 patients with type 2 diabetes aged 30-60 years old who had low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c) ≥100 mg/dl enrolled in this randomized, double - blind controlled trial and were assigned to two intervention and control groups. The subjects in the intervention group consumed 300 g/d probiotic yogurt containing Lactobacillus acidophilus La-5 and Bifidobacterium lactis Bb-12 and subjects in the control group consumed 300 g/d conventional yogurt for 8 weeks. Anthropometric indices, dietary intake, and serum lipid profile were evaluated at the beginning and end of the intervention. Independent-sample t-test, paired sample t-test, ANCOVA, and repeated measures were used for statistical analysis. The consumption of probiotic yogurt caused significant decrease in LDL-c/high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c) ratio (3.13 ± 1.00-2.07 ± 0.71, P = 0.016). The levels of HDL-c were increased significantly (43.66 ± 6.80-50.42 ± 6.64, P = 0.023) in the intervention group postintervention. However, there were no significant differences in triglyceride and total cholesterol levels between two groups postintervention (P consumption may be used as an alternative prevention approach and treatment method to improve dyslipidemia in patients with type 2 diabetes.

  18. Which is the best lipid-modifying strategy in metabolic syndrome and diabetes: fibrates, statins or both?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tenenbaum Alexander

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Although less clinical intervention studies have been performed with fibrates than with statins, there are evidences indicating that fibrates may reduce risk of cardiovascular events. The potential clinical benefit of the fenofibrate will be specified by the ongoing Fenofibrate Intervention and Event Lowering in Diabetes (FIELD study, which rationale, methods and aims have been just published. Controlled clinical trials show similar or even greater cardiovascular benefits from statins-based therapy in patient subgroups with diabetes compared with overall study populations. Therefore, statins are the drug of first choice for aggressive lipid lowering actions and reducing risk of coronary artery disease in these patients. However, current therapeutic use of statins as monotherapy is still leaving many patients with mixed atherogenic dyslipidemia at high risk for coronary events. A combination statin/fibrate therapy may be often necessary to control all lipid abnormalities in patients with metabolic syndrome and diabetes adequately, since fibrates provide additional important benefits, particularly on triglyceride and HDL-cholesterol levels. Thus, this combined therapy concentrates on all the components of the mixed dyslipidemia that often occurs in persons with diabetes or metabolic syndrome, and may be expected to reduce cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Safety concerns about some fibrates such as gemfibrozil may lead to exaggerate precautions regarding fibrate administration and therefore diminish the use of the seagents. However, other fibrates, such as bezafibrate and fenofibrate appear to be safer and better tolerated. We believe that a proper co-administration of statins and fibrates, selected on basis of their safety, could be more effective in achieving a comprehensive lipid control as compared with monotherapy.

  19. Effect of combined gliclazide/metformin treatment on oxidative stress, lipid profile, and hepatorenal functions in type 2 diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsharidah, Mansour; Algeffari, Metab; Abdel-Moneim, Abdel-Moneim Hafez; Lutfi, Mohamed Faisal; Alshelowi, Haila

    2018-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a chronic condition that requires pharmacotherapy interventions. Metformin and gliclazide are widely used drugs in monotherapy. However, their complementary action made utilization of the combination of these drugs an appealing approach. The study compared major therapeutic potentials of combined metformin/gliclazide treatment over metformin monotherapy based on the following parameters: oxidative stress, lipid profile, and hepatorenal functions. This is a comparative study was conducted from March 2015 to March 2016. The study screened 80 type 2 diabetic patients, of which 40 patients underwent combined metformin + gliclazide therapy (500 mg BD + 80 mg OD, respectively). The other 40 were matched for age and duration of diabetes mellitus with the previous group and received metformin monotherapy (500 mg BD). The levels of fasting blood glucose (FBG), total glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), lipid peroxidation, total antioxidant capacity, serum creatinine, aspartate and alanine transaminases, total cholesterol, triglycerides, high-density lipoproteins, and low-density lipoproteins were measured according to the standard methods. Oxidative stress, lipid profile, and hepatorenal functions were comparable in patients of both groups. However, patients on metformin treatment showed significantly lower levels of FBG [7.61 (6.70-8.89) mmol/L vs. 9.00 (7.30-10.68) mmol/L; P = .022] and HBA1c [7.00 (6.40-7.65)% vs. 8.20 (7.20-9.75)%; P metformin/gliclazide therapy and compared to those metformin alone. In contrast, glycemic control was poor in the diabetic patients undergoing combined therapy.

  20. Almond consumption improved glycemic control and lipid profiles in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sing-Chung; Liu, Yen-Hua; Liu, Jen-Fang; Chang, Wen-Hsin; Chen, Chiao-Ming; Chen, C-Y Oliver

    2011-04-01

    adiposity, glycemic control, and the lipid profile, thereby potentially decreasing the risk for cardiovascular disease in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Reasons of general practitioners for not prescribing lipid-lowering medication to patients with diabetes: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AB Elisabeth

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lipid-lowering medication remains underused, even in high-risk populations. The objective of this study was to determine factors underlying general practitioners' decisions not to prescribe such drugs to patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods A qualitative study with semi-structured interviews using real cases was conducted to explore reasons for not prescribing lipid-lowering medication after a guideline was distributed that recommended the use of statins in most patients with type 2 diabetes. Seven interviews were conducted with general practitioners (GPs in The Netherlands, and analysed using an analytic inductive approach. Results Reasons for not-prescribing could be divided into patient and physician-attributed factors. According to the GPs, some patients do not follow-up on agreed medication and others object to taking lipid-lowering medication, partly for legitimate reasons such as expected or perceived side effects. Furthermore, the GPs themselves perceived reservations for prescribing lipid-lowering medication in patients with short life expectancy, expected compliance problems or near goal lipid levels. GPs sometimes postponed the start of treatment because of other priorities. Finally, barriers were seen in the GPs' practice organisation, and at the primary-secondary care interface. Conclusion Some of the barriers mentioned by GPs seem to be valid reasons, showing that guideline non-adherence can be quite rational. On the other hand, treatment quality could improve by addressing issues, such as lack of knowledge or motivation of both the patient and the GP. More structured management in general practice may also lead to better treatment.

  2. The effect of ginger consumption on glycemic status, lipid profile and some inflammatory markers in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arablou, Tahereh; Aryaeian, Naheed; Valizadeh, Majid; Sharifi, Faranak; Hosseini, AghaFatemeh; Djalali, Mahmoud

    2014-06-01

    To assess the effect of ginger consumption on glycemic status, lipid profile and some inflammatory markers in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. In a double-blinded, placebo-controlled clinical trial, 70 type 2 diabetic patients were enrolled. They allocated randomly into ginger group and control group. They consumed 1600 mg ginger versus 1600 mg wheat flour placebo daily for 12 weeks. Serum sugar, lipids, CRP, PGE2 and TNFα were measured before and after intervention. Ginger reduced fasting plasma glucose, HbA1C, insulin, HOMA, triglyceride, total cholesterol, CRP and PGE₂ significantly compared with placebo group (p  0.05). Ginger improved insulin sensitivity and some fractions of lipid profile, and reduced CRP and PGE₂ in type 2 diabetic patients. Therefore ginger can be considered as an effective treatment for prevention of diabetes complications.

  3. Genetic prediction of type 2 diabetes using deep neural network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J; Kim, J; Kwak, M J; Bajaj, M

    2018-04-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2DM) has strong heritability but genetic models to explain heritability have been challenging. We tested deep neural network (DNN) to predict T2DM using the nested case-control study of Nurses' Health Study (3326 females, 45.6% T2DM) and Health Professionals Follow-up Study (2502 males, 46.5% T2DM). We selected 96, 214, 399, and 678 single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs) through Fisher's exact test and L1-penalized logistic regression. We split each dataset randomly in 4:1 to train prediction models and test their performance. DNN and logistic regressions showed better area under the curve (AUC) of ROC curves than the clinical model when 399 or more SNPs included. DNN was superior than logistic regressions in AUC with 399 or more SNPs in male and 678 SNPs in female. Addition of clinical factors consistently increased AUC of DNN but failed to improve logistic regressions with 214 or more SNPs. In conclusion, we show that DNN can be a versatile tool to predict T2DM incorporating large numbers of SNPs and clinical information. Limitations include a relatively small number of the subjects mostly of European ethnicity. Further studies are warranted to confirm and improve performance of genetic prediction models using DNN in different ethnic groups. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Effects of Sesame Oil on Blood Glucose and Lipid Profile in Type II Diabetic Patients Referring to The Yazd Diabetes Research Center.

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    F Hoseini

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Type II Diabetes is one of the most prevalent endocrine diseases in the world that results from a combination of insulin resistance and ß-cell failure. Regarding importance of nutritional factors in management of diabetes, this study was designed to explore the effect of sesame oil on blood glucose and lipid profile in type II diabetic patients at Yazd Diabetes Research Center in 2007. Methods: A quasi-experimental study was conducted on 25 patients with type II diabetes mellitus (age: 51.5±6.28y; BMI:27.3±3kg/m2; disease duration:7.08±5.03y; Fasting blood glucose level: 181±51.9mg/dl. Subjects received 30 g/day sesame oil for 6 weeks. Sesame oil was supplied to the patients, who were instructed to use it in place of other cooking oils for 42 days. Plasma glucose, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c, lipid profiles [Total cholesterol (TC, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C and triglycerides (TG] were measured at baseline and after 45 days of sesame oil substitution. 24 hours dietary recalls were obtained at the start , middle and end of study. Data was analyzed using analysis of variance with repeated measures and paired t-test. Results: Following 42 days intake of sesame oil, there were significant decrease in FBS (181±51.93 vs 154±39.65 mg/dl, HbA1c (9.64 ± 2 vs 8.4 ± 1.74 percent, TC (226.68 ± 31.4 vs 199.8 ± 37.87 mg/dl, LDL-c (123.9 ± 34.56 vs 95.53 ± 32.54 mg/dl compared to pre-treatment values. (P <0.05 . Blood TG level decreased after intake of sesame oil but this difference was not significant (P=0.2.Also, the changes of HDL-c levels were not significant (P=0.1. Conclusion: Sesame oil consumption results in considerable decrease in blood sugar, HbA1c and blood lipid levels (TC and LDL-C in type II diabetics.

  5. Comparative plasma lipidome between human and cynomolgus monkey: are plasma polar lipids good biomarkers for diabetic monkeys?

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    Guanghou Shui

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Non-human primates (NHP are now being considered as models for investigating human metabolic diseases including diabetes. Analyses of cholesterol and triglycerides in plasma derived from NHPs can easily be achieved using methods employed in humans. Information pertaining to other lipid species in monkey plasma, however, is lacking and requires comprehensive experimental analysis. METHODOLOGIES/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We examined the plasma lipidome from 16 cynomolgus monkey, Macaca fascicularis, using liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (LC/MS. We established novel analytical approaches, which are based on a simple gradient elution, to quantify polar lipids in plasma including (i glycerophospholipids (phosphatidylcholine, PC; phosphatidylethanolamine, PE; phosphatidylinositol, PI; phosphatidylglycerol, PG; phosphatidylserine, PS; phosphatidic acid, PA; (ii sphingolipids (sphingomyelin, SM; ceramide, Cer; Glucocyl-ceramide, GluCer; ganglioside mannoside 3, GM3. Lipidomic analysis had revealed that the plasma of human and cynomolgus monkey were of similar compositions, with PC, SM, PE, LPC and PI constituting the major polar lipid species present. Human plasma contained significantly higher levels of plasmalogen PE species (p<0.005 and plasmalogen PC species (p<0.0005, while cynomolgus monkey had higher levels of polyunsaturated fatty acyls (PUFA in PC, PE, PS and PI. Notably, cynomolgus monkey had significantly lower levels of glycosphingolipids, including GluCer (p<0.0005 and GM(3 (p<0.0005, but higher level of Cer (p<0.0005 in plasma than human. We next investigated the biochemical alterations in blood lipids of 8 naturally occurring diabetic cynomolgus monkeys when compared with 8 healthy controls. CONCLUSIONS: For the first time, we demonstrated that the plasma of human and cynomolgus monkey were of similar compositions, but contained different mol distribution of individual molecular species. Diabetic monkeys

  6. Liver X receptor antagonist reduces lipid formation and increases glucose metabolism in myotubes from lean, obese and type 2 diabetic individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kase, E T; Thoresen, G H; Westerlund, S

    2007-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Liver X receptors (LXRs) play important roles in lipid and carbohydrate metabolism. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate effects of the endogenous LXR agonist 22-R-hydroxycholesterol (22-R-HC) and its stereoisomer 22-S-hydroxycholesterol (22-S-HC), in comparison...... with the synthetic agonist T0901317 on lipid and glucose metabolism in human skeletal muscle cells (myotubes). METHODS: Myotubes established from lean and obese control volunteers and from obese type 2 diabetic volunteers were treated with LXR ligands for 4 days. Lipid and glucose metabolisms were studied...... with labelled precursors, and gene expression was analysed using real-time PCR. RESULTS: Treatment with T0901317 increased lipogenesis (de novo lipid synthesis) and lipid accumulation in myotubes, this increase being more pronounced in myotubes from type 2 diabetic volunteers than from lean volunteers...

  7. Curcumin restores mitochondrial functions and decreases lipid peroxidation in liver and kidneys of diabetic db/db mice

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    María G Soto-Urquieta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nitrosative and oxidative stress play a key role in obesity and diabetes-related mitochondrial dysfunction. The objective was to investigate the effect of curcumin treatment on state 3 and 4 oxygen consumption, nitric oxide (NO synthesis, ATPase activity and lipid oxidation in mitochondria isolated from liver and kidneys of diabetic db/db mice. RESULTS: Hyperglycaemia increased oxygen consumption and decreased NO synthesis in liver mitochondria isolated from diabetic mice relative to the control mice. In kidney mitochondria, hyperglycaemia increased state 3 oxygen consumption and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS levels in diabetic mice relative to control mice. Interestingly, treating db/db mice with curcumin improved or restored these parameters to normal levels; also curcumin increased liver mitochondrial ATPase activity in db/db mice relative to untreated db/db mice. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that hyperglycaemia modifies oxygen consumption rate, NO synthesis and increases TBARS levels in mitochondria from the liver and kidneys of diabetic mice, whereas curcumin may have a protective role against these alterations.

  8. Utility of Childhood Glucose Homeostasis Variables in Predicting Adult Diabetes and Related Cardiometabolic Risk Factors

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Quoc Manh; Srinivasan, Sathanur R.; Xu, Ji-Hua; Chen, Wei; Kieltyka, Lyn; Berenson, Gerald S.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This study examines the usefulness of childhood glucose homeostasis variables (glucose, insulin, and insulin resistance index [homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance {HOMA-IR}]) in predicting pre-diabetes and type 2 diabetes and related cardiometabolic risk factors in adulthood. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS This retrospective cohort study consisted of normoglycemic (n = 1,058), pre-diabetic (n = 37), and type 2 diabetic (n = 25) adults aged 19–39 years who were followed o...

  9. Lipidomic profiling reveals distinct differences in plasma lipid composition in healthy, prediabetic, and type 2 diabetic individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Huanzi; Fang, Chao; Fan, Yanqun; Lu, Yan; Wen, Bo; Ren, Huahui; Hou, Guixue; Yang, Fangming; Xie, Hailiang; Jie, Zhuye; Peng, Ye; Ye, Zhiqiang; Wu, Jiegen; Zi, Jin; Zhao, Guoqing; Chen, Jiayu; Bao, Xiao; Hu, Yihe; Gao, Yan; Zhang, Jun; Yang, Huanming; Wang, Jian; Madsen, Lise; Kristiansen, Karsten

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The relationship between dyslipidemia and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) has been extensively reported, but the global lipid profiles, especially in the East Asia population, associated with the development of T2D remain to be characterized. Liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry was applied to detect the global lipidome in the fasting plasma of 293 Chinese individuals, including 114 T2D patients, 81 prediabetic subjects, and 98 individuals with normal glucose tolerance (NGT). Both qualitative and quantitative analyses revealed a gradual change in plasma lipid features with T2D patients exhibiting characteristics close to those of prediabetic individuals, whereas they differed significantly from individuals with NGT. We constructed and validated a random forest classifier with 28 lipidomic features that effectively discriminated T2D from NGT or prediabetes. Most of the selected features significantly correlated with diabetic clinical indices. Hydroxybutyrylcarnitine was positively correlated with fasting plasma glucose, 2-hour postprandial glucose, glycated hemoglobin, and insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR). Lysophosphatidylcholines such as lysophosphatidylcholine (18:0), lysophosphatidylcholine (18:1), and lysophosphatidylcholine (18:2) were all negatively correlated with HOMA-IR. The altered plasma lipidome in Chinese T2D and prediabetic subjects suggests that lipid features may play a role in the pathogenesis of T2D and that such features may provide a basis for evaluating risk and monitoring disease development. PMID:28505362

  10. Clinical Significance of Hemostatic Parameters in the Prediction for Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Diabetic Nephropathy

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    Lianlian Pan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available It would be important to predict type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM and diabetic nephropathy (DN. This study was aimed at evaluating the predicting significance of hemostatic parameters for T2DM and DN. Plasma coagulation and hematologic parameters before treatment were measured in 297 T2DM patients. The risk factors and their predicting power were evaluated. T2DM patients without complications exhibited significantly different activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT, platelet (PLT, and D-dimer (D-D levels compared with controls (P<0.01. Fibrinogen (FIB, PLT, and D-D increased in DN patients compared with those without complications (P<0.001. Both aPTT and PLT were the independent risk factors for T2DM (OR: 1.320 and 1.211, P<0.01, resp., and FIB and PLT were the independent risk factors for DN (OR: 1.611 and 1.194, P<0.01, resp.. The area under ROC curve (AUC of aPTT and PLT was 0.592 and 0.647, respectively, with low sensitivity in predicting T2DM. AUC of FIB was 0.874 with high sensitivity (85% and specificity (76% for DN, and that of PLT was 0.564, with sensitivity (60% and specificity (89% based on the cutoff values of 3.15 g/L and 245 × 109/L, respectively. This study suggests that hemostatic parameters have a low predicting value for T2DM, whereas fibrinogen is a powerful predictor for DN.

  11. Plasma concentration of asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) predicts cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in type 1 diabetic patients with diabetic nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lajer, Maria Stenkil; Tarnow, Lise; Jorsal, Anders

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether circulating asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) levels are predictive of cardiovascular events, decline in glomerular filtration rate (GFR), end-stage renal disease (ESRD), and all-cause mortality in type 1 diabetic patients. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: We...... performed a prospective observational follow-up study including 397 type 1 diabetic patients with overt diabetic nephropathy (243 men aged 42.1 +/- 10.5 years, GFR 76 +/- 34 ml/min per 1.73 m(2)) and a control group of 175 patients with longstanding type 1 diabetes and persistent normoalbuminuria (104 men...... aged 42.7 +/- 9.7 years, duration of diabetes 27.7 +/- 8.3 years). Patients were followed for a median 11.3 years (range 0.0-12.9) with yearly measurements of GFR ((51)Cr-EDTA plasma clearance) in patients with diabetic nephropathy. Endpoints were fatal and nonfatal cardiovascular disease (CVD...

  12. Phytopharmacological evaluation of Byesukar for hypoglycaemic activity and its effect on lipid profile and hepatic enzymes of glucose metabolism in diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guruvayoorappan, C; Sudha, G

    2008-01-01

    Many anti-diabetic herbal preparations have been recommended in alternative systems of medicine for the treatment of diabetes. No systematic study has been done on the anti-diabetic efficacy of Byesukar, a polyherbal formulation to treat diabetes. The anti-diabetic efficacy of byesukar ethanol extract was evaluated in an animal model of diabetes induced by alloxan. Male Wistar rats were divided in to four groups. Group 1 was normal control group; group 2 and 3 received alloxan. After inducing experimental diabetes group 2 served as diabetic control; group 3 received byesukar (500 mg/kg body weight) orally for 30 consecutive days. Group 4 were normal rats which received byesukar extract alone. The effect of byesukar on glucose level in diabetic rats was studied and the level of glucose metabolizing enzymes (Hexokinase, glucose-6-phosphatase and fructose 1, 6-bisphosphatase) in the liver and kidney were estimated. The effect of byesukar on the serum and tissue lipid profile (Cholesterol, triglycerides, phospholipids and free fatty acids) were also estimated in diabetic rats. Our results indicate that treatment with byesukar resulted in significant reduction of blood glucose, tissue glucose-6-phosphatase and fructose 1, 6- bisphosphatase activity. The decreased tissue hexokinase activity in diabetes state was found to be significantly increased by byesukar treatment. Also the byesukar treated diabetic rats showed a significant decrease in the tissue lipid profile compared to the diabetic rats. In conclusion the decreased blood glucose accompanied with decreased lipid profile and changes in the activities of the glucose metabolizing enzymes shows the antidiabetic effect of byesukar.

  13. Effects of cinnamon consumption on glycemic status, lipid profile and body composition in type 2 diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vafa, Mohammadreza; Mohammadi, Farhad; Shidfar, Farzad; Sormaghi, Mohammadhossein Salehi; Heidari, Iraj; Golestan, Banafshe; Amiri, Fatemehsadat

    2012-08-01

    Type 2 diabetes is the most common metabolic disorder worldwide. Traditional herbs and spices can be used to control blood glucose concentrations. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of the daily intake of three grams cinnamon over eight weeks on glycemic status, lipid profiles and body composition in type 2 diabetic patients. A double blind, randomized, placebo controlled clinical trial was conducted on 44 patients with type 2 diabetes. Participants were randomly assigned to take either a three g/day cinnamon supplement (n=22) or a placebo (n=22) for eight weeks. Weight, height, body fat mass and systolic and diastolic blood pressure were measured at baseline and after intervention. The fasting blood glucose, insulin, HbA1c, total cholesterol, LDL C, HDL C, Apo lipoprotein A I and B were measured at baseline and endpoint. From 44 subjects participated in this study 37 completed the study. There were no significant differences in baseline characteristics, dietary intake and physical activity between groups. In the treatment group, the levels of fasting blood glucose, HbA1c, triglyceride, weight, BMI and body fat mass decreased significantly compared to baseline, but not in placebo group. No significant differences were observed in glycemic status indicators, lipid profile and anthropometric indicators between the groups at the end of intervention. These data suggest that cinnamon may have a moderate effect in improving glycemic status indicators.

  14. Comparative evaluation of the influence of diabetic retinopathy progression factors on indices of lipid metabolism in metabolic syndrome

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    L.Yu. Pуlуpenko

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background. The search and study of new risk factors for the development and progression of diabetic retinopathy (DRP and their modifying influence on the components of metabolic syndrome in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM remain relevant. The purpose was to conduct a comparative evaluation of the impact of certain DRP development factors on indices of lipid metabolism in metabolic syndrome. Materials and methods. The research was carried out in 64 patients (95 eyes with T2DM, metabolic syndrome and DRP (males and females, average age 61.55 ± 2.37 years, average duration of diabetes 11.23 ± 2.11 years, average level of HbA1c 9.89 ± 0.78 %, average body mass index 34.55 ± 3.75 kg/m2, who were divided into 3 groups depending on the stage of DRP. Results. Results had showed that the following factors have modifying influence on the level of total cholesterol in the blood of patients with T2DM and DRP: age of patients (under 60 years, duration of diabetes (less than 10 years, decompensation of carbohydrates metabolism — for the 3rd stage of DRP, features of therapy for T2DM (oral hypoglycemic drugs — for the 2nd stage of DRP; on the level of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol: younger age of patients, decompensation of diabetes — for the 3rd stage of DRP, features of hypoglycemic therapy (insulin therapy, shorter duration of diabetes — for the 2nd stage of DRP; on the level of triglycerides: age of patients (under 60 years, duration of diabetes (less than 10 years and insulin therapy — for the 1st and 3rd stages of DRP. Conclusions. It is concluded that features of hypoglycemic therapy can be a new modifying factor for the risk of DRP progression.

  15. Predictors of incident heart failure in patients after an acute coronary syndrome: The LIPID heart failure risk-prediction model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driscoll, Andrea; Barnes, Elizabeth H; Blankenberg, Stefan; Colquhoun, David M; Hunt, David; Nestel, Paul J; Stewart, Ralph A; West, Malcolm J; White, Harvey D; Simes, John; Tonkin, Andrew

    2017-12-01

    Coronary heart disease is a major cause of heart failure. Availability of risk-prediction models that include both clinical parameters and biomarkers is limited. We aimed to develop such a model for prediction of incident heart failure. A multivariable risk-factor model was developed for prediction of first occurrence of heart failure death or hospitalization. A simplified risk score was derived that enabled subjects to be grouped into categories of 5-year risk varying from 20%. Among 7101 patients from the LIPID study (84% male), with median age 61years (interquartile range 55-67years), 558 (8%) died or were hospitalized because of heart failure. Older age, history of claudication or diabetes mellitus, body mass index>30kg/m 2 , LDL-cholesterol >2.5mmol/L, heart rate>70 beats/min, white blood cell count, and the nature of the qualifying acute coronary syndrome (myocardial infarction or unstable angina) were associated with an increase in heart failure events. Coronary revascularization was associated with a lower event rate. Incident heart failure increased with higher concentrations of B-type natriuretic peptide >50ng/L, cystatin C>0.93nmol/L, D-dimer >273nmol/L, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein >4.8nmol/L, and sensitive troponin I>0.018μg/L. Addition of biomarkers to the clinical risk model improved the model's C statistic from 0.73 to 0.77. The net reclassification improvement incorporating biomarkers into the clinical model using categories of 5-year risk was 23%. Adding a multibiomarker panel to conventional parameters markedly improved discrimination and risk classification for future heart failure events. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Predictive Risk Factors in the Treatment of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

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    Lebriz Hale Aktun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective This study aims to investigate predictive risk factors in the treatment of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM. Patients and Methods A total of 256 pregnant women who underwent 75 g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT during 24–28 weeks of pregnancy were included according to the World Health Organization criteria. Demographic characteristics of the patients, including age, parity, family history of diabetes, body weight before pregnancy, and body weight at the diagnosis of GDM, were recorded. Fasting insulin and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c values at the time of diagnosis were evaluated. The patients were divided into two groups: those requiring insulin treatment (insulin group, n = 89 and those receiving diet therapy (diet group, n = 167 during pregnancy according to the American Diabetes Association recommendations. Results A total of 34.76% of the pregnant women with GDM required insulin treatment. The mean age of these patients was significantly higher compared to the diet group (34.9 ± 0.6 years vs. 31.9 ± 0.6 years; P = 0.004. Body mass index before pregnancy was also significantly higher in the insulin group than that in the diet group (32 ± 0.9 kg/m 2 vs. 29 ± 0.7 kg/m 2 ; P = 0.004. Fasting blood glucose (FBG during OGTT was 105.6 ± 2.1 mg/dL and 96.7 ± 1.1 mg/dL in the insulin group and diet group, respectively ( P < 0.001. There was no significant difference in fasting plasma glucose during OGTT between the groups ( P = 0.069, while plasma glucose at two hours was 161.1 ± 6.8 mg/dL in the insulin group and 145.1 ± 3.7 mg/dL in the diet group ( P = 0.027. At the time of diagnosis, HbA1c values were significantly higher in the insulin group compared to the diet group (5.3 ± 0.1 vs. 4.9 ± 0.1; P = 0.001. There was no significant difference in FBG and homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance values between the groups ( P = 0.908, P = 0.073. Conclusion Our study results suggest that age, family history of diabetes, body

  17. Factors associated with diabetes mellitus prediction among pregnant Arab subjects with gestational diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljohani, Naji; Al Serehi, Amal; Ahmed, Amjad M; Buhary, Badr Aldin M; Alzahrani, Saad; At-Taras, Eeman; Almujally, Najla; Alsharqi, Maha; Alqahtani, Mohammed; Almalki, Mussa

    2015-01-01

    There is scarcity of available information on the possible significant risk factors related to diabetes mellitus (DM) prediction among expectant Saudi mothers with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). The present study is the first to identify such risk factors in the Arab cohort. A total of 300 pregnant subjects (mean age 33.45 ± 6.5 years) were randomly selected from all the deliveries registered at the Obstetrics Department of King Fahad Medical City, Riyadh Saudi Arabia from April 2011 to March 2013. Demographic and baseline glycemic information were collected. A total of 7 highly significant and independent risk factors were identified: age, obesity, and family history of DM, GDM < 20 weeks, macrosomia, insulin therapy and recurrent GDM. Among these factors, subjects who had insulin therapy use are 5 times more likely to develop DMT2 (p-value 3.94 × 10(-14)) followed by recurrent GDM [odds-ratio 4.69 (Confidence Interval 2.34-4.84); P = 1.24 × 10(-13)). The identification of the risk factors mentioned with their respective predictive powers in the detection of DMT2 needs to be taken seriously in the post-partum assessment of Saudi pregnant patients at highest risk.

  18. Predicting glycated hemoglobin levels in the non-diabetic general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rauh, Simone P; Heymans, Martijn W; Koopman, Anitra D M

    2017-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: To develop a prediction model that can predict HbA1c levels after six years in the non-diabetic general population, including previously used readily available predictors. METHODS: Data from 5,762 initially non-diabetic subjects from three population-based cohorts (Hoorn Study, I...

  19. Effect of Combined Exercise Versus Aerobic-Only Training on Skeletal Muscle Lipid Metabolism in a Rodent Model of Type1 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotzert, Michelle S; McDonald, Matthew W; Murray, Michael R; Nickels, J Zachary; Noble, Earl G; Melling, C W James

    2017-12-04

    Abnormal skeletal muscle lipid metabolism is associated with insulin resistance in people with type 1 diabetes. Although lipid metabolism is restored with aerobic exercise training, the risk for postexercise hypoglycemia is increased with this modality. Integrating resistance and aerobic exercise is associated with reduced hypoglycemic risk; however, the effects of this exercise modality on lipid metabolism and insulin resistance remain unknown. We compared the effects of combined (aerobic + resistance) versus aerobic exercise training on oxidative capacity and muscle lipid metabolism in a rat model of type 1 diabetes. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 4 groups: sedentary control (C), sedentary control + diabetes (CD), diabetes + high-intensity aerobic exercise (DAE) and diabetes + combined aerobic and resistance exercise (DARE). Following diabetes induction (20 mg/kg streptozotocin over five days), DAE rats ran for 12 weeks (5 days/week for 1 hour) on a motorized treadmill (27 m/min at a 6-degree grade), and DARE rats alternated daily between running and incremental weighted ladder climbing. After training, DAE showed reduced muscle CD36 protein content and lipid content compared to CD (p≤0.05). DAE rats also had significantly increased citrate synthase (CS) activity compared to CD (p≤0.05). DARE rats showed reduced CD36 protein content compared to CD and increased CS activity compared to CD and DAE rats (p≤0.05). DARE rats demonstrated increased skeletal muscle lipid staining, elevated lipin-1 protein content and insulin sensitivity (p≤0.05). Integration of aerobic and resistance exercise may exert a synergistic effect, producing adaptations characteristic of the "athlete's paradox," including increased capacity to store and oxidize lipids. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The effects of date consumption on serumic levels of glucose, lipids and lipoproteins in diabetic rats

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    B Amouoghli Tabrizi

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is an important problem amongst human and animals. In veterinary medicine too, diabetes mellitus occurs in many animals particularly household pets. This study was conducted in order to evaluate the effect of date consumption on serumic levels of glucose, triglyceride, cholesterol, LDL, VLDL and HDL in rats suffering from experimental diabetes mellitus. Thirty male wistar rats with the age of 8 weeks and mean body weight of 200±20 gr were selected and divided into 5 groups so that there were 6 rats per group. The groups consisted of day one healthy control, final day healthy control, healthy treatment consuming date, diabetic treatment consuming date and diabetic control group. Diabetic treatment and control groups received 100 mg/kg of alloxan subcutaneously to create experimental diabetes. The two healthy control groups also received equal amounts of normal saline solution subcutaneously. The injections were repeated a week later in all groups. After observing the diabetes symptoms including polydipsia, polyuria, glucosuria and hyperglycemia in groups that were given alloxan, feeding of healthy and diabetic treatment groups with equal ratio of date and pellet was initiated. Final day healthy control group and diabetic control group were fed only with pellet. The groups were fed for 10 days following the start of diabetes symptoms. Blood samples were collected from all groups on day 10. Evaluation of the serumic levels of glucose, cholesterol and LDL revealed statistically significant increase in diabetic control group in comparison with the healthy control groups and also in healthy and  diabetic treatment groups consuming date as compared with diabetic control and healthy groups (p

  1. Caloric restriction and intermittent fasting alter hepatic lipid droplet proteome and diacylglycerol species and prevent diabetes in NZO mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumeier, Christian; Kaiser, Daniel; Heeren, Jörg; Scheja, Ludger; John, Clara; Weise, Christoph; Eravci, Murat; Lagerpusch, Merit; Schulze, Gunnar; Joost, Hans-Georg; Schwenk, Robert Wolfgang; Schürmann, Annette

    2015-05-01

    Caloric restriction and intermittent fasting are known to improve glucose homeostasis and insulin resistance in several species including humans. The aim of this study was to unravel potential mechanisms by which these interventions improve insulin sensitivity and protect from type 2 diabetes. Diabetes-susceptible New Zealand Obese mice were either 10% calorie restricted (CR) or fasted every other day (IF), and compared to ad libitum (AL) fed control mice. AL mice showed a diabetes prevalence of 43%, whereas mice under CR and IF were completely protected against hyperglycemia. Proteomic analysis of hepatic lipid droplets revealed significantly higher levels of PSMD9 (co-activator Bridge-1), MIF (macrophage migration inhibitor factor), TCEB2 (transcription elongation factor B (SIII), polypeptide 2), ACY1 (aminoacylase 1) and FABP5 (fatty acid binding protein 5), and a marked reduction of GSTA3 (glutathione S-transferase alpha 3) in samples of CR and IF mice. In addition, accumulation of diacylglycerols (DAGs) was significantly reduced in livers of IF mice (P=0.045) while CR mice showed a similar tendency (P=0.062). In particular, 9 DAG species were significantly reduced in response to IF, of which DAG-40:4 and DAG-40:7 also showed significant effects after CR. This was associated with a decreased PKCε activation and might explain the improved insulin sensitivity. In conclusion, our data indicate that protection against diabetes upon caloric restriction and intermittent fasting associates with a modulation of lipid droplet protein composition and reduction of intracellular DAG species. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Conditioned pain modulation predicts duloxetine efficacy in painful diabetic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarnitsky, David; Granot, Michal; Nahman-Averbuch, Hadas; Khamaisi, Mogher; Granovsky, Yelena

    2012-06-01

    This study aims to individualize the selection of drugs for neuropathic pain by examining the potential coupling of a given drug's mechanism of action with the patient's pain modulation pattern. The latter is assessed by the conditioned pain modulation (CPM) and temporal summation (TS) protocols. We hypothesized that patients with a malfunctioning pain modulation pattern, such as less efficient CPM, would benefit more from drugs augmenting descending inhibitory pain control than would patients with a normal modulation pattern of efficient CPM. Thirty patients with painful diabetic neuropathy received 1 week of placebo, 1 week of 30 mg/d duloxetine, and 4 weeks of 60 mg/d duloxetine. Pain modulation was assessed psychophysically, both before and at the end of treatment. Patient assessment of drug efficacy, assessed weekly, was the study's primary outcome. Baseline CPM was found to be correlated with duloxetine efficacy (r=0.628, P<.001, efficient CPM is marked negative), such that less efficient CPM predicted efficacious use of duloxetine. Regression analysis (R(2)=0.673; P=.012) showed that drug efficacy was predicted only by CPM (P=.001) and not by pretreatment pain levels, neuropathy severity, depression level, or patient assessment of improvement by placebo. Furthermore, beyond its predictive value, the treatment-induced improvement in CPM was correlated with drug efficacy (r=-0.411, P=.033). However, this improvement occurred only in patients with less efficient CPM (16.8±16.0 to -1.1±15.5, P<.050). No predictive role was found for TS. In conclusion, the coupling of CPM and duloxetine efficacy highlights the importance of pain pathophysiology in the clinical decision-making process. This evaluative approach promotes personalized pain therapy. Copyright © 2012 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Predictive isotopic biogeochemistry of lipids from the Black Sea and Cariaco Trench

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeman, K.H.; Hayes, J.M.; Wakeham, S.G.

    1991-01-01

    Carbon isotopic compositions of autotrophic organisms can be predicted based on recently established relationships between [CO 2 (aq)] and var-epsilon p , the isotopic fractionation accompanying carbon fixation. In both the Black Sea and the Cariaco Trench, where [CO 2 (aq)] values are known and δ values for hydrocarbons were recently determined, predicted biomass δ values can be compared to those of biomarkers extracted from POM and sediment samples. The agreement is good, although a 5 per-thousand range in δ values is observed for the lipids, which may be due to ecological factors or to contributions from organisms that assimilate HCO 3 -. Lycopane and pentamethyleicosane apparently derive from planktonic organisms. Diploptene in the Black Sea apparently is derived from chemoautotrophic bacteria living at the oxic/anoxic interface. Some odd-C, long-chain n-alkanes have planktonic δ values, and the authors suggest they are not strict terrestrial indicators

  4. {sup 1}H NMR-based metabolomics reveals sub-lethal toxicity of a mixture of diabetic and lipid-regulating pharmaceuticals on amphibian larvae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melvin, Steven D., E-mail: s.melvin@griffith.edu.au [Australian Rivers Institute, Griffith University, Southport, QLD 4222 (Australia); Habener, Leesa J. [Griffith School of Environment, Griffith University, Southport, QLD 4222 (Australia); Leusch, Frederic D.L. [Australian Rivers Institute, Griffith University, Southport, QLD 4222 (Australia); Griffith School of Environment, Griffith University, Southport, QLD 4222 (Australia); Carroll, Anthony R. [Griffith School of Environment, Griffith University, Southport, QLD 4222 (Australia)

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • Pharmaceutical pollutants are a concern for eliciting adverse effects in wildlife. • Diabetes and lipid regulating drugs are widely used and poorly removed from sewage. • We explored the toxicity of a mixture of metformin, atorvastatin and bezafibrate on tadpoles. • Exposure caused increased growth and development but no effects on lipids or cholesterol. • {sup 1}H NMR-based metabolomics reveal increased lactic acid and BCAAs in exposed animals. - Abstract: Pharmaceuticals are widely used for the treatment of various physical and psychological ailments. Due to incomplete removal during sewage treatment many pharmaceuticals are frequently detected in aquatic waterways at trace concentrations. The diversity of pharmaceutical contaminants and potential for complex mixtures to occur makes it very difficult to predict the toxicity of these compounds on wildlife, and robust methods are therefore needed to explore sub-lethal effects. Metabolic syndrome is one of the most widespread health concerns currently facing the human population, and various drugs, including anti-diabetic medications and lipid- and cholesterol-lowering fibrates and statins, are widely prescribed as treatment. In this study, we exposed striped marsh frog (Limnodynastes peronii) tadpoles to a mixture of the drugs metformin, atorvastatin and bezafibrate at 0.5, 5, 50 and 500 μg/L to explore possible effects on growth and development, energy reserves (triglycerides and cholesterol), and profiles of small polar metabolites extracted from hepatic tissues. It was hypothesised that exposure would result in a general reduction in energy reserves, and that this would subsequently correspond with reduced growth and development. Responses differed from expected outcomes based on the known mechanisms of these compounds in humans, with no changes to hepatic triglycerides or cholesterol and a general increase in mass and condition with increasing exposure concentration. Deviation from the

  5. "1H NMR-based metabolomics reveals sub-lethal toxicity of a mixture of diabetic and lipid-regulating pharmaceuticals on amphibian larvae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melvin, Steven D.; Habener, Leesa J.; Leusch, Frederic D.L.; Carroll, Anthony R.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Pharmaceutical pollutants are a concern for eliciting adverse effects in wildlife. • Diabetes and lipid regulating drugs are widely used and poorly removed from sewage. • We explored the toxicity of a mixture of metformin, atorvastatin and bezafibrate on tadpoles. • Exposure caused increased growth and development but no effects on lipids or cholesterol. • "1H NMR-based metabolomics reveal increased lactic acid and BCAAs in exposed animals. - Abstract: Pharmaceuticals are widely used for the treatment of various physical and psychological ailments. Due to incomplete removal during sewage treatment many pharmaceuticals are frequently detected in aquatic waterways at trace concentrations. The diversity of pharmaceutical contaminants and potential for complex mixtures to occur makes it very difficult to predict the toxicity of these compounds on wildlife, and robust methods are therefore needed to explore sub-lethal effects. Metabolic syndrome is one of the most widespread health concerns currently facing the human population, and various drugs, including anti-diabetic medications and lipid- and cholesterol-lowering fibrates and statins, are widely prescribed as treatment. In this study, we exposed striped marsh frog (Limnodynastes peronii) tadpoles to a mixture of the drugs metformin, atorvastatin and bezafibrate at 0.5, 5, 50 and 500 μg/L to explore possible effects on growth and development, energy reserves (triglycerides and cholesterol), and profiles of small polar metabolites extracted from hepatic tissues. It was hypothesised that exposure would result in a general reduction in energy reserves, and that this would subsequently correspond with reduced growth and development. Responses differed from expected outcomes based on the known mechanisms of these compounds in humans, with no changes to hepatic triglycerides or cholesterol and a general increase in mass and condition with increasing exposure concentration. Deviation from the

  6. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Associated Lipid Droplet Formation and Type II Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Xuebao; Zhang, Kezhong

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM), a metabolic disorder characterized by hyperglycemia, is caused by insufficient insulin production due to excessive loss of pancreatic β cells (type I diabetes) or impaired insulin signaling due to peripheral insulin resistance (type II diabetes). Pancreatic β cell is the only insulin-secreting cell type that has highly developed endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to cope with high demands of insulin synthesis and secretion. Therefore, ER homeostasis is crucial to the proper fu...

  7. Assessment of serum lipid metabolism index and cytokine levels in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus complicated by coronary heart disease after telmisartan combined with lipid-lowering drug treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Wang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the effect of telmisartan combined with lipid-lowering drug therapy on serum lipid metabolism index and cytokine levels in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus complicated by coronary heart disease. Methods: A total of 106 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus complicated by coronary heart disease who were treated in our hospital between September 2013 and October 2016 were collected and then divided into the control group (n=55 who received conventional treatment + lipid-lowering drug treatment and the observation group (n=51 who received conventional treatment + lipid-lowering drug + telmisartan treatment after the therapies were reviewed. Before and after treatment, serum levels of lipid metabolism indexes, inflammatory mediators and oxidative stress indexes were compared between two groups of patients. Results: Before treatment, the differences in serum levels of lipid metabolism indexes, inflammatory mediators and oxidative stress indexes were not statistically significant between two groups of patients. After treatment, serum TG and LDL-C levels in observation group were lower than those in control group while HDL-C level was higher than that in control group; serum inflammatory mediators IL-6, IL-8, HMGB1 and TNF-α levels were lower than those in control group; serum oxidative stress indexes MDA and ROS levels were lower than those in control group while GSH-Px level was higher than that in control group. Conclusion: Telmisartan combined with lipid-lowering drug therapy can effectively optimize the lipid metabolism and reduce the systemic inflammatory response and oxidative stress response in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus complicated by coronary heart disease.

  8. Prevalence and predictive value of islet cell antibodies and insulin autoantibodies in women with gestational diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damm, P; Kühl, C; Buschard, K

    1994-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the predictive value of islet cell antibodies (ICA) and insulin autoantibodies (IAA) for development of diabetes in women with previous gestational diabetes (GDM). Two hundred and forty-one previous diet-treated GDM patients and 57 women without...... for ICA were ICA-positive and three of these had Type 1 diabetes at follow-up, as well as three ICA-negative patients. The sensitivity, specificity, and predictive value of ICA-positivity for later development of diabetes were 50%, 99%, and 75%, respectively. None of the women was IAA-positive during...

  9. Development of a simple tool to predict the risk of postpartum diabetes in women with gestational diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, M; Ziegler, A G; Beyerlein, A

    2016-06-01

    Women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) have an increased risk of diabetes postpartum. We developed a score to predict the long-term risk of postpartum diabetes using clinical and anamnestic variables recorded during or shortly after delivery. Data from 257 GDM women who were prospectively followed for diabetes outcome over 20 years of follow-up were used to develop and validate the risk score. Participants were divided into training and test sets. The risk score was calculated using Lasso Cox regression and divided into four risk categories, and its prediction performance was assessed in the test set. Postpartum diabetes developed in 110 women. The computed training set risk score of 5 × body mass index in early pregnancy (per kg/m(2)) + 132 if GDM was treated with insulin (otherwise 0) + 44 if the woman had a family history of diabetes (otherwise 0) - 35 if the woman lactated (otherwise 0) had R (2) values of 0.23, 0.25, and 0.33 at 5, 10, and 15 years postpartum, respectively, and a C-Index of 0.75. Application of the risk score in the test set resulted in observed risk of postpartum diabetes at 5 years of 11 % for low risk scores ≤140, 29 % for scores 141-220, 64 % for scores 221-300, and 80 % for scores >300. The derived risk score is easy to calculate, allows accurate prediction of GDM-related postpartum diabetes, and may thus be a useful prediction tool for clinicians and general practitioners.

  10. Fiber in Diet Is Associated with Improvement of Glycated Hemoglobin and Lipid Profile in Mexican Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lubia Velázquez-López

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To assess the association of dietary fiber on current everyday diet and other dietary components with glycated hemoglobin levels (HbA1c, glucose, lipids profile, and body weight body weight, in patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods. A cross-sectional survey of 395 patients with type 2 diabetes was performed. HbA1c, fasting glucose, triglycerides, and lipids profile were measured. Weight, waist circumference, blood pressure, and body composition were measured. Everyday diet with a semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire was evaluated. ANOVA, Kruskal-Wallis, chi-square tests and multivariate logistic regression were used in statistical analysis. Results. Higher fiber intake was associated with a low HbA1c, high HDL-c levels, low weight, and waist circumference. The highest tertile of calories consumption was associated with a higher fasting glucose level and weight. The highest tertile of carbohydrate consumption was associated with a lower weight. The lowest tertile of total fat and saturated fat was associated with the highest tertile of HDL-c levels, and lower saturated fat intake was associated with lower weight (p<0.05. Conclusions. A higher content of fiber in the diet reduces HbA1c and triglycerides, while improving HDL-c levels. Increasing fiber consumption while lowering calorie consumption seems to be an appropriate strategy to reduce body weight and promote blood glucose control.

  11. Substantial proportion of MODY among multiplex families participating in a Type 1 diabetes prediction programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petruzelkova, L; Dusatkova, P; Cinek, O; Sumnik, Z; Pruhova, S; Hradsky, O; Vcelakova, J; Lebl, J; Kolouskova, S

    2016-12-01

    Patients with maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY) might be over-represented in families with histories of Type 1 diabetes. Our aim was to re-evaluate families participating in the Czech T1D Prediction Programme (PREDIA.CZ) with at least two members affected with diabetes to assess the proportion of MODY among these families and determine its most significant clinical predictors. Of the 557 families followed up by the PREDIA.CZ, 53 (9.5%) had two or more family members with diabetes. One proband with diabetes from these families was chosen for direct sequencing of the GCK, HNF1A, HNF4A and INS genes. Non-parametric tests and a linear logistic regression model were used to evaluate differences between MODY and non-MODY families. MODY was genetically diagnosed in 24 of the 53 families with multiple occurrences of diabetes (45%). Mutations were detected most frequently in GCK (58%), followed by HNF1A (38%) and INS (4%). MODY families were more likely to have a parent with diabetes and had a higher proportion of females with diabetes than non-MODY families. Higher age (P MODY families already presenting with diabetes. A prediction programme for Type 1 diabetes would provide a useful new source of patients with MODY most likely to benefit from an accurate diagnosis. This identification has implications for patient treatment and disease prognosis. © 2015 Diabetes UK.

  12. Evaluation of serum lipid profile, body mass index, and waistline in Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Rongtao; Qi, Zhiming; Zhou, Lin; Li, Zuohong; Li, Qing; Zhang, Junyong

    2016-01-01

    People with type 2 diabetes are at an increased risk of hypertension, arteriosclerosis, heart disease, and stroke. Glucose intolerance (insulin resistance) is the main feature of type 2 diabetes. Obesity leads to insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, etc. The aim of this study was to assess the biochemical parameters and measures of obesity in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). A total of 2,273 males and 6,547 females previously healthy volunteers (aged 41-95 years old) were recruited by open invitation. The basic information, including age, sex, height, weight, body mass index (BMI), waistline, hipline, menstrual cycle, and medical history, was collected by questionnaire survey and physical examination. Serum lipid profile, liver transaminase, blood glucose, postprandial blood glucose, and hemoglobin A1c were obtained after 12 hours of fasting. According to our results, diabetic patients presented serum lipid abnormality. Elevated triglyceride (TG) levels (≥1.7 mmol/L) were noted in 19.69% of males and 20.40% of females, and reduced high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels (≤1.15 mmol/L) were noted in 21.96% of males and 15.74% of females. The combination of elevated TG and reduced HDL-C was the most prevalent of the combined lipid abnormalities. In contrast, no differences were observed in the levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and total cholesterol. Moreover, there were statistically significant differences in the levels of BMI and waistline between T2DM and non-T2DM participants. After adjustment for BMI, logistic regression analysis revealed that the subjects with BMI ≤20 kg/m(2) and >30 kg/m(2) had a significantly elevated hazard ratio of T2DM compared with participants having a BMI range of 20-30 kg/m(2) in both males and females. However, there was a significant difference between T2DM patients and non-T2DM patients in waistline (χ (2)=8.57, P<0.001) than in BMI parameter (χ (2)=6.29, P<0.001). The present study shows for the first

  13. Early Antenatal Prediction of Gestational Diabetes in Obese Women: Development of Prediction Tools for Targeted Intervention.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara L White

    Full Text Available All obese women are categorised as being of equally high risk of gestational diabetes (GDM whereas the majority do not develop the disorder. Lifestyle and pharmacological interventions in unselected obese pregnant women have been unsuccessful in preventing GDM. Our aim was to develop a prediction tool for early identification of obese women at high risk of GDM to facilitate targeted interventions in those most likely to benefit. Clinical and anthropometric data and non-fasting blood samples were obtained at 15+0-18+6 weeks' gestation in 1303 obese pregnant women from UPBEAT, a randomised controlled trial of a behavioural intervention. Twenty one candidate biomarkers associated with insulin resistance, and a targeted nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR metabolome were measured. Prediction models were constructed using stepwise logistic regression. Twenty six percent of women (n = 337 developed GDM (International Association of Diabetes and Pregnancy Study Groups criteria. A model based on clinical and anthropometric variables (age, previous GDM, family history of type 2 diabetes, systolic blood pressure, sum of skinfold thicknesses, waist:height and neck:thigh ratios provided an area under the curve of 0.71 (95%CI 0.68-0.74. This increased to 0.77 (95%CI 0.73-0.80 with addition of candidate biomarkers (random glucose, haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c, fructosamine, adiponectin, sex hormone binding globulin, triglycerides, but was not improved by addition of NMR metabolites (0.77; 95%CI 0.74-0.81. Clinically translatable models for GDM prediction including readily measurable variables e.g. mid-arm circumference, age, systolic blood pressure, HbA1c and adiponectin are described. Using a ≥35% risk threshold, all models identified a group of high risk obese women of whom approximately 50% (positive predictive value later developed GDM, with a negative predictive value of 80%. Tools for early pregnancy identification of obese women at risk of GDM are described

  14. Protective effects of tocotrienols against lipid-induced nephropathy in experimental type-2 diabetic rats by modulation in TGF-β expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siddiqui, Shabeena [Department of Biochemistry, Lipid Metabolism Laboratory, Jamia Hamdard (Hamdard University), New Delhi 110062 (India); Ahsan, Haseeb [Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Dentistry, Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi 110025 (India); Khan, Mohammad Rashid [Department of Biochemistry, Lipid Metabolism Laboratory, Jamia Hamdard (Hamdard University), New Delhi 110062 (India); Siddiqui, Waseem A., E-mail: wasiddiqui01@gmail.com [Department of Biochemistry, Lipid Metabolism Laboratory, Jamia Hamdard (Hamdard University), New Delhi 110062 (India)

    2013-12-01

    Dyslipidemia is common in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) and is considered a risk factor for the progression of diabetic nephropathy (DN). Hyperlipidemia and hyperglycemia act synergistically to induce renal injury. The present study was designed to investigate the protective effects of tocotrienols as tocotrienol-rich fraction (TRF) extracted from palm (PO) and rice bran oils (RBO) against lipid induced nephropathy in type-2 diabetic rats and its probable molecular mechanism. Male Wistar rats (175–200 g) were divided into four groups. The first group served as diabetic control, while the second and third groups received PO-TRF and RBO-TRF, respectively by gavage over a period of sixteen weeks post-induction of diabetes. The fourth group comprised of age-matched rats that served as normal control. The effects of TRF on serum lipid profile, oxidative stress markers, expression of TGF-β, fibronectin and collagen type IV were analyzed in the kidney of diabetic rats. Treatment with PO-TRF and RBO-TRF significantly improved glycemic status, serum lipid profile and renal function in type-2 diabetic rats. In addition, TRF supplementation down-regulated the expression of TGF-β, fibronectin and collagen type IV in the kidney of diabetic rats. Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) plays a critical role in progression of DN, but its modulation by tocotrienols in DN remains unexplored. TRF ameliorated lipid induced nephropathy in type-2 diabetes by its hypoglycemic, hypolipidemic and antioxidant activities as well as by modulation of TGF-β to prevent increased expression of collagen type IV and fibrinogen. We finally propose a mechanism for the expression of molecular markers that are significant in the events leading to diabetic nephropathy and its modulation by tocotrienols/TRF. - Highlights: • The nephroprotective effect of TRF in type-2 diabetic rats was investigated. • Treatment with TRF improved glycemic status, lipid profile and renal functions in rats

  15. Protective effects of tocotrienols against lipid-induced nephropathy in experimental type-2 diabetic rats by modulation in TGF-β expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siddiqui, Shabeena; Ahsan, Haseeb; Khan, Mohammad Rashid; Siddiqui, Waseem A.

    2013-01-01

    Dyslipidemia is common in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) and is considered a risk factor for the progression of diabetic nephropathy (DN). Hyperlipidemia and hyperglycemia act synergistically to induce renal injury. The present study was designed to investigate the protective effects of tocotrienols as tocotrienol-rich fraction (TRF) extracted from palm (PO) and rice bran oils (RBO) against lipid induced nephropathy in type-2 diabetic rats and its probable molecular mechanism. Male Wistar rats (175–200 g) were divided into four groups. The first group served as diabetic control, while the second and third groups received PO-TRF and RBO-TRF, respectively by gavage over a period of sixteen weeks post-induction of diabetes. The fourth group comprised of age-matched rats that served as normal control. The effects of TRF on serum lipid profile, oxidative stress markers, expression of TGF-β, fibronectin and collagen type IV were analyzed in the kidney of diabetic rats. Treatment with PO-TRF and RBO-TRF significantly improved glycemic status, serum lipid profile and renal function in type-2 diabetic rats. In addition, TRF supplementation down-regulated the expression of TGF-β, fibronectin and collagen type IV in the kidney of diabetic rats. Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) plays a critical role in progression of DN, but its modulation by tocotrienols in DN remains unexplored. TRF ameliorated lipid induced nephropathy in type-2 diabetes by its hypoglycemic, hypolipidemic and antioxidant activities as well as by modulation of TGF-β to prevent increased expression of collagen type IV and fibrinogen. We finally propose a mechanism for the expression of molecular markers that are significant in the events leading to diabetic nephropathy and its modulation by tocotrienols/TRF. - Highlights: • The nephroprotective effect of TRF in type-2 diabetic rats was investigated. • Treatment with TRF improved glycemic status, lipid profile and renal functions in rats

  16. Protective effects of tocotrienols against lipid-induced nephropathy in experimental type-2 diabetic rats by modulation in TGF-β expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siddiqui, Shabeena [Department of Biochemistry, Lipid Metabolism Laboratory, Jamia Hamdard (Hamdard University), New Delhi 110062 (India); Ahsan, Haseeb [Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Dentistry, Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi 110025 (India); Khan, Mohammad Rashid [Department of Biochemistry, Lipid Metabolism Laboratory, Jamia Hamdard (Hamdard University), New Delhi 110062 (India); Siddiqui, Waseem A., E-mail: wasiddiqui01@gmail.com [Department of Biochemistry, Lipid Metabolism Laboratory, Jamia Hamdard (Hamdard University), New Delhi 110062 (India)

    2013-12-01

    Dyslipidemia is common in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) and is considered a risk factor for the progression of diabetic nephropathy (DN). Hyperlipidemia and hyperglycemia act synergistically to induce renal injury. The present study was designed to investigate the protective effects of tocotrienols as tocotrienol-rich fraction (TRF) extracted from palm (PO) and rice bran oils (RBO) against lipid induced nephropathy in type-2 diabetic rats and its probable molecular mechanism. Male Wistar rats (175–200 g) were divided into four groups. The first group served as diabetic control, while the second and third groups received PO-TRF and RBO-TRF, respectively by gavage over a period of sixteen weeks post-induction of diabetes. The fourth group comprised of age-matched rats that served as normal control. The effects of TRF on serum lipid profile, oxidative stress markers, expression of TGF-β, fibronectin and collagen type IV were analyzed in the kidney of diabetic rats. Treatment with PO-TRF and RBO-TRF significantly improved glycemic status, serum lipid profile and renal function in type-2 diabetic rats. In addition, TRF supplementation down-regulated the expression of TGF-β, fibronectin and collagen type IV in the kidney of diabetic rats. Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) plays a critical role in progression of DN, but its modulation by tocotrienols in DN remains unexplored. TRF ameliorated lipid induced nephropathy in type-2 diabetes by its hypoglycemic, hypolipidemic and antioxidant activities as well as by modulation of TGF-β to prevent increased expression of collagen type IV and fibrinogen. We finally propose a mechanism for the expression of molecular markers that are significant in the events leading to diabetic nephropathy and its modulation by tocotrienols/TRF. - Highlights: • The nephroprotective effect of TRF in type-2 diabetic rats was investigated. • Treatment with TRF improved glycemic status, lipid profile and renal functions in rats

  17. The ABCs of diabetes: diabetes self-management education program for African Americans affects A1C, lipid-lowering agent prescriptions, and emergency department visits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magee, Michelle; Bowling, Andrea; Copeland, James; Fokar, Ali; Pasquale, Patricia; Youssef, Gretchen

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the feasibility and impact of a concise community-based program on diabetes self-management education (DSME), according to frequency of emergency department visits and knowledge of, prescriptions for, and control of A1C, blood pressure, and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol. A free community-based DSME program was placed in a public library. Adults with diabetes (N, 360) consented to participate in this prospective nonrandomized cohort study with preintervention-postintervention design. The small-group interactive DSME (two 2.5-hour classes) focused on improving cardiovascular disease risk factors and facilitating communication with the primary care physician. An increase in knowledge of American Diabetes Association-recommended targets for A1C, blood pressure, and LDL cholesterol from baseline to postintervention was seen among participants. Significant clinical outcomes included reduction in self-reported emergency department visits and reduction in mean A1C. However, despite an increase in prescriptions written for lipid-lowering drugs, blood pressure and LDL cholesterol did not change. Participants who started on insulin were more likely to achieve or maintain A1C location for offering DSME programs.

  18. Glycemic control and lipid profile of children and adolescents undergoing two different dietetic treatments for type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalsgaard, Haline; Saunders, Cláudia; Padilha, Patrícia de C; Luescher, Jorge Luiz; Szundy Berardo, Renata; Accioly, Elizabeth

    2014-03-01

    To compare the glycemic control and lipid profile of children and adolescents undergoing two different dietetic treatments for type 1 Diabetes Mellitus assisted at the Children and Adolescent's Diabetes Mellitus Health Center-UFRJ. A retrospective longitudinal study conducted between 2002 and 2006. We evaluated the same subjects in two different periods: after 1 year in TD and subsequently after 1 year in CCHO. The evolution of the nutritional status during the dietary treatments was evaluated using Body Mass Index (BMI) for age. The lipid panel was evaluated according to the 1st Guideline for Prevention of Atherosclerosis in Childhood and Adolescence, used in Brazil, and the glycemic control was evaluated by measuring glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c). We evaluated 93 individuals, 38.7% children and 61.3% adolescents. The mean age at study entry was 11.1 (± 2.66) years and the mean disease duration was 6.1 (± 3.2) years. A significant difference in the percentage of adequacy of HbA1c (p = 0.000) and in the values of total plasma cholesterol (p = 0.043) was found after 1 year of CCHO diet, which did not happen during the observation time of TD. The evolution of anthropometric nutritional status showed no significant difference between the beginning and the end of both dietary treatments. The results of this study suggest that a more flexible food orientation program can contribute to the improvement of blood glucose levels without causing deterioration of the lipid profile when compared to TD. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  19. Proliferative retinopathy and proteinuria predict mortality rate in type 1 diabetic patients from Fyn County, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grauslund, J; Green, A; Sjølie, A K

    2008-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: We evaluated the effect of diabetic retinopathy on 25 year survival rate among a population-based cohort of type 1 diabetic patients from Fyn County, Denmark. METHODS: In 1973 all diabetic patients from Fyn County, Denmark with onset before the age of 30 years as of 1 July 1973...... were identified (n=727). In 1981, only 627 patients were still alive and resident in Denmark. Of these, 573 (91%) participated in a clinical baseline examination, in which diabetic retinopathy was graded and other markers of diabetes measured. Mortality rate was examined in a 25 year follow....../INTERPRETATION: Proliferative retinopathy and proteinuria predict mortality rate in a population-based cohort of type 1 diabetic patients. In combination they act even more strongly. Non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy did not affect survival rate....

  20. Exercise Training and Grape Seed Extract Co-Administration Improves Lipid Profile, Weight Loss, Bradycardia, and Hypotension of STZ-Induced Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Badavi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background:: Exercise Training (ET and Grape Seed Extract (GSE as an antioxidant have many positive effects on controlling diabetes mellitus and its complications. Objectives:: This study aimed to determine the effects of GSE alone or combined with ET on body weight, plasma lipid profile, blood pressure, and heart rate in STZ-induced diabetic rats. Methods:: In this study, male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to five groups: sedentary control, sedentary diabetic, trained diabetic, GSE treated sedentary diabetic, and GSE treated trained diabetic. ET was conducted on the treadmill daily for 8 weeks. One way ANOVA followed by LSD test was used for statistical analysis. Results:: Reduction of body weight, high density lipoproteins, heart rate, and systolic blood pressure and increment of total cholesterol, triglyceride, low density lipoprotein, and very low density lipoproteins were observed after STZ injection. Co-administration of GSE and ET had more positive effects on lipid profile compared to each method alone. In addition, GSE and ET modified heart rate partially, while their combination was more effective in improvement of heart rat in conscious rats. On the other hand, administration of ET or GSE alone did not affect systolic blood pressure and body weight, while their combination restored systolic blood pressure completely and improved body weight partially. Conclusions:: The study findings indicated that ET combined with GSE had more beneficial effects compared to each one alone on the complications of STZ induced diabetes. This may constitute a convenient and inexpensive therapeutic approach to diabetic complications.

  1. Tryptophan Predicts the Risk for Future Type 2 Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Tianlu; Zheng, Xiaojiao; Ma, Xiaojing; Bao, Yuqian; Ni, Yan; Hu, Cheng; Rajani, Cynthia; Huang, Fengjie; Zhao, Aihua; Jia, Weiping; Jia, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Recently, 5 amino acids were identified and verified as important metabolites highly associated with type 2 diabetes (T2D) development. This report aims to assess the association of tryptophan with the development of T2D and to evaluate its performance with existing amino acid markers. A total of 213 participants selected from a ten-year longitudinal Shanghai Diabetes Study (SHDS) were examined in two ways: 1) 51 subjects who developed diabetes and 162 individuals who remained metabolically h...

  2. Effect of Cucurbita ficifolia and Probiotic Yogurt Consumption on Blood Glucose, Lipid Profile, and Inflammatory Marker in Type 2 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayat, Azade; Azizi-Soleiman, Fatemeh; Heidari-Beni, Motahar; Feizi, Awat; Iraj, Bijan; Ghiasvand, Reza; Askari, Gholamreza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Control of blood sugar, hypertension, and dyslipidemia are key factors in diabetes management. Cucurbita ficifolia (pumpkin) is a vegetable which has been used traditionally as a remedy for diabetes in Iran. In addition, consumption of probiotics may have beneficial effects on people with Type 2 diabetes. The aim of this study was an investigation of the effects of C. ficifolia and probiotic yogurt consumption alone or at the same time on blood glucose and serum lipids in diabetic patients. Methods: Eighty eligible participants randomly were assigned to four groups: 1 - green C. ficifolia (100 g); 2 - probiotic yogurt (150 g); 3 - C. ficifolia plus probiotic yogurt (100 g C. ficifolia plus 150 g yogurt); and 4 -control (dietary advice) for 8 weeks. Blood pressure, glycemic response, lipid profile, and high-sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP) were measured before and after the intervention. Results: Total cholesterol (TC) decreased significantly in yogurt and yogurt plus C. ficifolia groups (within groups P = 0.010, and P < 0.001, respectively). C. ficifolia plus yogurt consumption resulted in a decrease in triglyceride (TG) and an increase in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) (within groups P < 0.001 and P = 0.001, respectively). All interventions led to a significant decrease in blood sugar, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), hsCRP, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) level within groups. Blood pressure decreased significantly in Cucurbita group and yogurt group (within groups P < 0.001, and P = 0.001 for systolic blood pressure [SBP] and P < 0.001, and P = 0.004 for diastolic blood pressure [DBP], respectively). All variables changed between groups significantly except LDL-C level. Conclusions: Variables including TG, HDL-C, TC, fasting blood sugar, HbA1c, SBP, DBP, and hsCRP changed beneficially between groups. It seems that consumption of C. ficifolia and probiotic yogurt may help treatment of diabetic patients. PMID:26955460

  3. Glycemic and lipid control in hospitalized type 2 diabetic patients: evaluation of 2 enteral nutrition formulas (low carbohydrate-high monounsaturated fat vs high carbohydrate).

    Science.gov (United States)

    León-Sanz, Miguel; García-Luna, Pedro P; Sanz-París, Alejandro; Gómez-Candela, Carmen; Casimiro, César; Chamorro, José; Pereira-Cunill, José L; Martin-Palmero, Angeles; Trallero, Roser; Martínez, José; Ordóñez, Francisco Javier; García-Peris, Pilar; Camarero, Emma; Gómez-Enterría, Pilar; Cabrerizo, Lucio; Perez-de-la-Cruz, Antonio; Sánchez, Carmen; García-de-Lorenzo, Abelardo; Rodríguez, Nelly; Usán, Luis

    2005-01-01

    Type 2 diabetic patients may need enteral nutrition support as part of their treatment. The objective was to compare glycemic and lipid control in hospitalized patients with type 2 diabetes requiring feeding via nasogastric tube using enteral feedings with either a highcarbohydrate or a high-monounsaturated-fat content. This trial included type 2 diabetes patients admitted to the hospital for neurologic disorders or head and neck cancer surgery who received either a low-carbohydrate-high-mono-unsaturated-fat (Glucerna) or a high-carbohydrate diet (Precitene Diabet). Glycemic and lipid control was determined weekly. Safety and gastrointestinal tolerance were also assessed. A total of 104 patients were randomized and 63 were evaluable according to preestablished protocol criteria. Median duration of therapy was 13 days in both groups. Mean glucose was significantly increased at 7 days of treatment (p = .006) in the Precitene arm, with no significant variations in the Glucerna arm. Mean weekly blood triglycerides levels in the Precitene arm were increased without reaching statistical significance, whereas patients in the Glucerna arm showed a stable trend. Patients in the Precitene arm showed a significantly higher incidence of diarrhea than patients in Glucerna arm (p = .008), whereas the incidence of nausea was smaller in the Precitene arm than in the Glucerna arm (p = .03). An enteral formula with lower carbohydrate and higher monounsaturated fat (Glucerna) has a neutral effect on glycemic control and lipid metabolism in type 2 diabetic patients compared with a high-carbohydrate and a lower-fat formula (Precitene Diabet).

  4. Long-term ketogenic diet contributes to glycemic control but promotes lipid accumulation and hepatic steatosis in type 2 diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoyu; Qin, Juliang; Zhao, Yihan; Shi, Jueping; Lan, Rong; Gan, Yunqiu; Ren, Hua; Zhu, Bing; Qian, Min; Du, Bing

    2016-04-01

    The ketogenic diet (KD) has been widely used in weight and glycemic control, although potential side effects of long-term KD treatment have caused persistent concern. In this study, we hypothesized that the KD would ameliorate the progression of diabetes but lead to disruptions in lipid metabolism and hepatic steatosis in a mouse model of diabetes. In type 2 diabetic mouse model, mice were fed a high-fat diet and administered streptozotocin treatment before given the test diets for 8 weeks. Subsequently, ameliorated glucose and insulin tolerance in KD-fed diabetic mice was found, although the body weight of high-fat diet- and KD-fed mice was similar. Interestingly, the weight of adipose tissue in KD mice was greater than in the other groups. The KD diet resulted in higher serum triacylglycerol and cholesterol levels in diabetic mice. Moreover, the KD-fed mice showed greater hepatic lipid accumulation. Mice fed the KD showed significant changes in several key genes such as sterol regulatory element-binding protein, fibroblast growth factor 21, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α, which are all important in metabolism. In summary, KD ameliorates glucose and insulin tolerance in a mouse model of diabetes, but severe hepatic lipid accumulation and hepatic steatosis were observed, which should be considered carefully in the long-term application of KD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. ColoLipidGene: signature of lipid metabolism-related genes to predict prognosis in stage-II colon cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Teodoro; Moreno-Rubio, Juan; Herranz, Jesús; Cejas, Paloma; Molina, Susana; González-Vallinas, Margarita; Mendiola, Marta; Burgos, Emilio; Aguayo, Cristina; Custodio, Ana B.; Machado, Isidro; Ramos, David; Gironella, Meritxell; Espinosa-Salinas, Isabel; Ramos, Ricardo; Martín-Hernández, Roberto; Risueño, Alberto; De Las Rivas, Javier; Reglero, Guillermo; Yaya, Ricardo; Fernández-Martos, Carlos; Aparicio, Jorge; Maurel, Joan; Feliu, Jaime; de Molina, Ana Ramírez

    2015-01-01

    Lipid metabolism plays an essential role in carcinogenesis due to the requirements of tumoral cells to sustain increased structural, energetic and biosynthetic precursor demands for cell proliferation. We investigated the association between expression of lipid metabolism-related genes and clinical outcome in intermediate-stage colon cancer patients with the aim of identifying a metabolic profile associated with greater malignancy and increased risk of relapse. Expression profile of 70 lipid metabolism-related genes was determined in 77 patients with stage II colon cancer. Cox regression analyses using c-index methodology was applied to identify a metabolic-related signature associated to prognosis. The metabolic signature was further confirmed in two independent validation sets of 120 patients and additionally, in a group of 264 patients from a public database. The combined analysis of these 4 genes, ABCA1, ACSL1, AGPAT1 and SCD, constitutes a metabolic-signature (ColoLipidGene) able to accurately stratify stage II colon cancer patients with 5-fold higher risk of relapse with strong statistical power in the four independent groups of patients. The identification of a group of 4 genes that predict survival in intermediate-stage colon cancer patients allows delineation of a high-risk group that may benefit from adjuvant therapy, and avoids the toxic and unnecessary chemotherapy in patients classified as low-risk group. PMID:25749516

  6. Genome-wide linkage scan to identify loci associated with type 2 diabetes and blood lipid phenotypes in the Sikh Diabetes Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dharambir K Sanghera

    Full Text Available In this investigation, we have carried out an autosomal genome-wide linkage analysis to map genes associated with type 2 diabetes (T2D and five quantitative traits of blood lipids including total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL cholesterol, very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL cholesterol, and triglycerides in a unique family-based cohort from the Sikh Diabetes Study (SDS. A total of 870 individuals (526 male/344 female from 321 families were successfully genotyped using 398 polymorphic microsatellite markers with an average spacing of 9.26 cM on the autosomes. Results of non-parametric multipoint linkage analysis using S(all statistics (implemented in Merlin did not reveal any chromosomal region to be significantly associated with T2D in this Sikh cohort. However, linkage analysis for lipid traits using QTL-ALL analysis revealed promising linkage signals with p≤0.005 for total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and HDL cholesterol at chromosomes 5p15, 9q21, 10p11, 10q21, and 22q13. The most significant signal (p = 0.0011 occurred at 10q21.2 for HDL cholesterol. We also observed linkage signals for total cholesterol at 22q13.32 (p = 0.0016 and 5p15.33 (p = 0.0031 and for LDL cholesterol at 10p11.23 (p = 0.0045. Interestingly, some of linkage regions identified in this Sikh population coincide with plausible candidate genes reported in recent genome-wide association and meta-analysis studies for lipid traits. Our study provides the first evidence of linkage for loci associated with quantitative lipid traits at four chromosomal regions in this Asian Indian population from Punjab. More detailed examination of these regions with more informative genotyping, sequencing, and functional studies should lead to rapid detection of novel targets of therapeutic importance.

  7. Molecular Structure-Based Methods of Property Prediction in Application to Lipids: A Review and Refinement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cunico, Larissa; Hukkerikar, Amol; Ceriani, Roberta

    2013-01-01

    The paper is a review of the combined group contribution (GC)–atom connectivity index (CI) approachfor prediction of physical and thermodynamic properties of organic chemicals and their mixtures withspecial emphasis on lipids. The combined approach employs carefully selected datasets of different...... dependent, have been developed. For mixtures, properties related to phase equilibria aremodeled with GE-based models (UNIQUAC, UNIFAC, NRTL, and combined UNIFAC-CI method). The col-lected phase equilibrium data for VLE and SLE have been tested for thermodynamic consistency togetherwith a performance...... evaluation of the GE-models. The paper also reviews the role of the databases andthe mathematical and thermodynamic consistency of the measured/estimated data and the predictivenature of the developed models....

  8. Effects of High Performance Inulin Supplementation on Glycemic Status and Lipid Profile in Women with Type 2 Diabetes: A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvin Dehghan

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Type 2 diabetes mellitus, as a noncommunicable disease, is the main public health challenge in the 21st century. The prevalence of di¬abetes mellitus adjusted for the world population in Iran was 8% until the year 2010. Lipid levels are considered as important parameters to be eva¬luated, as high serum lipid levels are often reported as a complication in patients with diabetes mellitus. It is claimed that functional foods may im¬prove complications of diabetes mellitus, so this study was designed to evaluate the effects of high performance inulin on glycemic status and lipid profile of women with type 2 diabetes.Methods: The study was a randomized controlled clinical trial. Forty-nine type 2 diabetic females (fiber intake <30g/d, 25lipid profile indices were measured pre and post intervention. Data were analyzed using SPSS software (verision11.5. Paired, unpaired t-test and ANCOVA were used to compare quantitative variables.Results: Supplementation with inulin caused a significant reduction in FBS (8.50%, HbA1c (10.40%, total cholesterol (12.90%, triglyceride (23.60 %, LDL-c (35.30 %, LDL-c/HDL-c ratio (16.25% and TC/HDL-c ratio (25.20% and increased HDL-c (19.90%. The changes for the control group parameters were not significant at the end of study. Conclusion: Inulin may help to control diabetes and its complications via improving glycemic and lipid parameters.

  9. The paradox of high apolipoprotein A-I levels independently predicting incident type-2 diabetes among Turks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onat, A; Hergenç, G; Bulur, S; Uğur, M; Küçükdurmaz, Z; Can, G

    2010-06-25

    Predictive value of apolipoprotein (apo) A-I for incident hypertension, metabolic syndrome (MetS), type 2 diabetes (DM) and coronary heart disease (CHD) needs further exploration. A representative sample of Turkish adults was studied with this purpose prospectively. Sex-specific apoA-I tertiles were examined regarding cardiometabolic risk. A total of 1044 men and 1067 women (aged 49+/-12 years at baseline) were followed up over 7.4 years. High serum apoA-I levels were significantly associated in multivariable analysis with female sex, aging, alcohol intake, (inversely) cigarette smoking and, in women, with systolic blood pressure. Risk of diabetes was predicted in logistic regression in both genders by top versus bottom apoA-I tertile (RR 1.98; [95%CI 1.31; 3.0]), additive to age, body mass index (BMI), C-reactive protein (CRP), HDL-cholesterol and lipid lowering drugs. By adding sex hormone-binding globulin to the model in a subset of the sample, the association between high apoA-I and incident diabetes was attenuated only in women. ApoA-I tertiles tended to be positively associated also with hypertension and CHD only in women but this did not reach significance. High compared with low serum apoA-I levels nearly double the risk for incident diabetes, additively to age, BMI, CRP, HDL-cholesterol among Turks. Systemic inflammation concomitant with prevailing MetS might turn apoA-I into proinflammatory particles. Copyright 2008 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Lipid profile of alloxan-induced diabetic wistar rats treated with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    weeks; Group 2, diabetes control rats, induced with 150 mg/kg b.w., i.p. administration of alloxan and thereafter given 0.2 ml distilled water throughout the study period; Groups 3, 4 and 5, diabetic (i.p., 150 mg/kg b.w. alloxan) rats were given single oral dose of MAD (100, 200 and 300 mg/kg b.w. respectively) for 4 weeks; ...

  11. Serial fetal abdominal circumference measurements in predicting normal birth weight in gestational diabetes mellitus.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Neff, Karl J

    2013-06-24

    To construct a clinical management matrix using serial fetal abdominal circumference measurements (ACMs) that will predict normal birth weight in pregnancies complicated by gestational diabetes (GDM) and reduce unnecessary ultrasound examination in women with GDM.

  12. The value of polymorphism RRO12ALA gene PPARG in violation of lipid peroxidation and antioxidant protection in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Ziablytsev

    2016-09-01

      Resume. The incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus is increasing in Ukraine and worldwide. The severity of this disease is determined by the number of complications, which are based on lipid peroxidation (LPO. Today, the influence of gene polymorphisms Pro12Ala PPARG on oxidative and antioxidant processes is not in doubt. We studied the association between gene polymorphism Pro12Ala rs1801282 PPARG and intensification of lipid peroxidation and antioxidant systems (AOS in 88 patients with type 2 diabetes, using analysis of variance. In the 12Pro allele carriers male found probable increased intensification of lipid peroxidation than in women, with increasing levels of DC (p=0,034 and MDA (p=0,001. Reducing the enzyme catalase level of AOC in patients with type 2 diabetes was observed in the case of genotype Pro12Pro gene PPARG on 21.7% compared with heterozygotes (F=8,17; p=0,005 and the presence of the allele 12Pro (F=6,28 , p=0,013. Found significantly higher activity of AOC in the form of increasing the level of α-TF (p=0,016 and catalase activity (p=0,034 among male patients with gene polymorphism Pro12Ala PPARG, than homozygotes for allele 12Pro.   Key words: lipid peroxidation; antioxidant system; type 2 diabetes mellitus; polymorphism Pro12Ala rs1801282 of gene PPARG

  13. Extracts of black and brown rice powders improve hepatic lipid accumulation via the activation of PPARα in obese and diabetic model mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felix, Angelina Dr; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Takahashi, Mami; Katsumata-Tsuboi, Rie; Satoh, Ryo; Soon Hui, Teoh; Miyajima, Katsuhiro; Nakae, Dai; Inoue, Hirofumi; Uehara, Mariko

    2017-11-01

    Rice powder extract (RPE) from black and brown rice (Oryza sativa L. indica) improves hepatic lipid accumulation in obese and diabetic model mice via peroxisomal fatty acid oxidation. RPE showed PPARα agonistic activity which did not differ between black and brown RPE despite a higher anthocyanin content in black RPE.

  14. Persistent lipid abnormalities in statin-treated patients with diabetes mellitus in Europe and Canada: results of the Dyslipidaemia International Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leiter, L. A.; Lundman, P.; da Silva, P. M.; Drexel, H.; Jünger, C.; Gitt, A. K.; Absenger, Guun; Albrich, Ernst; Allinger, Berndt; Allinger, Stephan; Anacher, Gerald; Angermayr, Gertraud; Angermeier, Hermann; Anzengruber, Aneas; Archimanitis, Gabriele; Arnsteiner, Patricia; Auberger, Wolfgang; Azhary, Mawaheb; Barfuss, Michael; Bauer, Christian; Bauer, Birgit Elisabeth; Beclin, Thomas; Binder, Thomas; Binder, Gabriele; Böhler, Dietmar; Brändle, Johann; Breslmair, Jörg; Brettlecker, Marlis; Bürger, Michael; Calvi, Inge; Dorfinger, Werner; Doringer-Schnepf, Elisabeth; Eer, Anton; Eckmayr, Christine; Eder, Franz; Egermann, Margit; Erath, Michael; Etzinger, Michael; Etzinger, Claudia; Fiedler, Lothar; Filip, Wolfgang; Filip, Michaela; Föchterle, Johann; Fodor, Anita; Frieden, Thomas; Gareiss, Mertens; Gföllner, Peter; Ghamarian, Thomas; Goritschan, Michael; Haar, Klaus; Habeler, Gerhard; Hadjiivanov, Valery; Haiböck, Christian; Hammer, Regina; Hartmann, Siegfried; Haschkovitz, Herbert; Hauer, Walter; Hauer, Josef; Haunschmidt, Christian; Heimayr, Christine; Hengl, Wolfgang; Hengl, Gunter; Hermann, Rudolf; Herrmann, Rainer; Hillebrand, Roswitha; Hintersteininger, Otto; Hirsch, Michael; Hitzinger, Martin; Hochegger, Tanja; Hockl, Wolfgang; Hoi, Michael; Hörmann, Jan; Hudler, Brigitte; Imb, Gerhard; Joichl, Anea; Jungbauer, Karl; Kapl, Gerlinde; Kerschbaum, Margit; Kienesberger, Franz; Killinger, Gerhard; Kitzler, Gerhard; Klein, Franz; Kleinbichler, Dietmar; Kohr, Anton; Kopetzky, Michael; Korthals, Christian; Kortschak, Werner; Koschutnik, Martin; Kraus, Werner A.; Kurzemann, Susanne; Lavicka, Claus; Lehner, Guido; Lenz, Jürgen; Lepuschütz, Sabine; Lichtenwallner, Michael; Lober, Reinhard; Loidl, Christine; Lopatka, Eduard; Ludwig, Rudolf; Maca, Thomas; Mair, Anneliese; Mandak, Michael; Margreiter, Maria; Margreiter, Anea; Markovics, Michael; Matejicek, Frieich; Mohilla, Maximillian; Moll, Christian; Mörz, Beate; Mörz, Reinhard; Nagl, Heinz; Neumayr, Günther; Oberroitmair, Helmut; Oberzinner, Michael; Pallamar, Walter; Pangratz, Sibylle; Parandian, Laurenz; Paulus, Alexana; Pfaffenwimmer, Christoph; Plaichinger, Peter; Pokorn, Thomas; Polanec, Helmuth; Pöll-Weiss, Barbara; Pralea, Doralina; Puttinger, Johann; Quinton, Thomas; Ranegger, Matthias; Rass, Sepp; Rauch, Heribert; Riehs, Manfred; Robetin, Erich; Rohringer, Jörg; Rupprechter, Josef; Sadjed, Eduard; Schimbach, Johann Alois; Schmid, Jutta; Schneiderbauer, Rotraud; Schopper, Wolfgang; Schulze-Bauer, Alfred; Schuster, Gottfried; Schwarz, Johann; Schwarz, Maria; Schweighofer, Christoph; Schwelle, Franz; Simma, Hanspeter; Sock, Renate; Sock, Reinhard; Sprenger, Fritz; Stiglmayr, Thomas; Stocker, Ilse; Stütz, Pia; Tama, Mustafa; Teleky, Ursula; Tschauko, Werner; Veits, Martin; Vikydal, Gerhard; Vlaschitz, Karl; Wais, Elisabeth; Wais, Adam; Wegmann, Robert; Wehle, Franz; Weindl, Manfred; Weinhandl, Manuela; Wendt, Ursula; Wendt, Klaus; Werner-Tutschku, Volker; Werner-Tutschku, Christine; Wilscher, Josef; Wind, Norbert; Winter, Aneas; Wolfschütz, Gerald; Wolfsgruber, Markus; Wolfsgruber, Brigitte; Wurm, Renate; Ziebart-Schroth, Arno; Zimmermann, Maximillian; Zinnagl, Aneas; Zirm, Anea; Zirm Canada, Bernhard; Bokenfohr, Grace Mary; Liu, Edmond K. H.; Melling, Gordon W.; Papp, Edward William; Sachdeva, Ashok K.; Snyman, Ernst Retief; Varma, Sonya; Ward, Richard A.; Tiong Wong, Anew Pak; Basson, Paul J.; Brodie, Brian D.; Chahal, Sukhjiwan Jeevyn; Chan, William Y.; Chow, John C.; Cormack, Maura; Eddy, Donald H. J.; Ezekiel, Daniel; Farquhar, Anew; Gu, Shian; Hii, Ting H.; Ho-Asjoe, Marianne P. K.; Hosie, Anew; Jaffer, Shahin; Jakubowski, Anew T.; Karim, Mandy; Kiai, Cristina; Kooy, Jacobus; Lytle, Craig R.; Mcleod, Kevin Lain; Morgan, David C.; Myckatyn, Michael M.; Ng, John P. Y.; Schriemer, Ronnald; Schumacher, Gerhard; Grey Stopforth, James; Hoo Tsui, Winston Wai; Wilson, Robin T.; Wong, Danny; Wong, Wilfred T.; Yeung, Margaret M. W.; Cram, David Harvey; Kumari Dissanayake, Dilani Tamara; Gerber, Johan Daniel W.; Haligowski, David; Hrabarchuk, Blair; Kroczak, Tadeusz J.; Lipson, Alan H.; Mahay, Raj K.; Wessels Mare, Abraham Carel; Mohamdee, Feisal John; Olynyk, Frederick Theodore; Pieterse, Wickus; Ramgoolam, Rajenanath; Rothova, Anna; Saunders, Kevin Kenneth; Szajkowski, Stanley; van Gend, Richard F.; van Rensburg, Nicolaas Marthinus Jansen; Anand, Sanjiv; Baer, Carolyn E. H.; Basque, Eric J. Y.; Benaya, Sebastian; Bessoudo, Ricardo; Bhalla, Jaswinder; Chettiar, Nataraj V.; Craig, Brian N.; Desrosiers, France; Ranjani Imbulgoda, Manel; Morgan, Gareth M.; Nowak, Zbigniew J.; Scott, Daniel G.; Searles, Gregory R.; Slorach, J. Ninian; Stevenson, Robert N.; Browne, Noel John; Bruff, Karl Joseph; Collingwood, John Maurice; Collins, Wayne; Over, Aidan; Gabriel, Anthony M.; Govender, Moonsamy; Hart, David G.; Hatcher, Lydia B.; Janes, John; Kielty, John F.; Krisdaphongs, Michoke; Lush, Richard Boyd; Moulton, William Bertram; Riche, Cyril R.; Rideout, Gary M.; Roberts, Bernard C.; Walsh, Paul E.; Wight, Harold G.; Woodland, K. Heather; Woodland, Robert C.; Atkinson, Bradley Charles; Chow, Carlyle S. H. A.; Collins, James A.; Graham, Robert D.; Hosein, Jalal; Machel, Teresa M.; Mahaney, Gordon Ralston; Mclean, James Robert Bruce; Murray, Michael R.; Myatt, Gregory Alexander; Ozere, Christopher P.; Saha, Amal Krishna; Sanders, David Herbert; Seaman, Donald Maxwell; Seaman, James Gordon; Swinamer, Deanna; Voon Yee, Kenny Yew; Ali, Mohamed Mustapha; Bankay, Clarence D. C.; Beduhn, Eitel Erich Reinhold; Callaghan, Denis J.; Chan, Yun Kai; Chaudhri, Arif R.; Chen, Richard Y. Y.; Conway, James Robin; Cunningham, William L.; Cusimano, Steven Lawrence; Souza, Eleanor De; de Souza, Selwyn X.; Deyoung, John Paul; Epstein, Ralph; Faiers, Alan Arthur; Figurado, Victor John; Forbes, F. Basil Trayer; Gabor, Zsuzsanna; Gallardo, Rodolfo Canonizado; Gaur, Shiva K.; George, Elizabeth; Hartford, Brian J.; Shiu-Chung Ho, Michael; Ho, Chung; Ismail, Shiraz H.; Bhushan Kalra, Bharat; Koprowicz, Kinga; Kumar, Naresh; Lam, Clement; Lau, Ming-Jarm; Law, Hugo Kwok Cheung; Fung, Max Leung Sui; Liutkus, Joanne Frances; Lotfallah, Talaat K.; Luton, Robert G.; Meneses, Gloria S.; Miller, Mark Lee; Nagji, Noorbegum; Ng, Ken H. M.; Ng Thow Hing, Roland E.; Pandey, Amritanshu Shekhar; Petrov, Ivan; Rosenthall, Wendy; Rudner, Howard; Russell, Alan Douglas; Sanchez, Zenia A.; Shaban, Joseph A.; Shariff, Shiraz B. K.; Shih, Chung Ming; Sinclair, Duncan W.; Spink, Donald Richard; Tung, Tommy Hak Tsun; Vizel, Saul; Yanover, David Frederick; Zavodni, Louis S.; Cusack, Paul; Dewar, Charles M.; Hooley, Peter; Kassner, Rachel Anne; Mackinnon, Randy James; Molyneaux, Harold W.; Shetty, Karunakara Naduhithlu; Barrière, Ginette; Berjat, Maria B.; Bernucci, Bruno; Bérubé, Claude; Boueau, Ghyslain; Chehayeb, Raja; Ciricillo, Domenico; Constance, Christian M.; Côté, Gilles; Desroches, Jacques; Gagnon, Robert; Gaueau, Gilles; Godbout, Jean Louis; Harvey, Pierre; Hassan, Youssef; Hoang, Ngoc Vinh; Houde, Danielle; Lalonde, Alain-Paul; Lavoie, Régis; Leclair, Normand; Meagher, Luc; Ouimet, Alain; Plourde, Simon; Rioux, Denis W.; Roberge, Claude; Roy, Bruno; Sasseville, Richard; Serfaty, Samuel; Theriault, Lyne; Timothée, Jean R.; Tjia, Sabine; Tremblay, Bruno; Turcotte, Jean; Bose, Sabyasachi; Aletta Bouwer, Hester; Chernesky, Patricia A.; Johnson, Mervin Louis; Kemp, David R.; Lai, Raymond Pong-Che; Lee, Frank R.; Lipsett, William G. C.; Lombard, Schalk J.; Majid, Falah S.; Malan, Johannes J.; Maree, Narinda; Nayar, Arun; Nel, Mandi; Oduntan, Oluwole O.; Rajakumar, Alphonsus R. J.; Baraka Ramadan, Fauzi; Shamsuzzaman, Mohammed; Vermeulen, Abraham P. M.; Fred, C.; Anthonsen, Birgitte; Ardest, Steen Pennerup; Arnold-Larsen, Susanne Kajsa; Axelsen, Allan; Barfoed, Klaus; Birkler, Niels Erik; Blokkebak, Jens; Boserup, Jørgen; Kettrup Brassøe, Jens Ole; Chovanec, Martin; Lykke Christensen, Bendt; Christensen, Micael; Skjøth Christensen, Randi; Eidner, Per Olav; Eisbo, Jørn; Elsvor, Jan; Engmann, Ida Veng-Christensen; Eriksen, Rene Milling; Frederiksen, Thorkil; Frølund, Hanne Charlotte; Garne, Susanne; Giørtz, Agnete; Gregersen, Bettina; Halkier, Merete Lundbye; Hansen, Jens Georg; Harder, Jan; Jørgen, Hans; Henriksen, O.; Kirkeby Hoffmann, Michael; Holk, Erik; Hollensen, Jan; Jacobsen, Rune; Jakobsen, Lotte; Jensen, Christian; Jensen, Morten; Jensen, Vibeke; Jepsen, Peter; Johannsen, Jens Arne; Verner Johansen, Lars; Johansen, Ole Steen; Juul, Kristian; Jørgensen, Arvid Frank; Jørgensen, Peter; Jørgensen, Ulrik Miilmann; Kensmark, Lars; Kjellerup, Carsten; Kjaer, Ejner; Kjaersgaard, Morten; Klubien, Peter; Kolby, Peter; Korsgaard Thomsen, Kristian; Krebs, Peter; Kristiansen, Tom; Lyng, Flemming; Madsen, Natalia V.; Meyer-Christensen, Jesper; Mogensen, Ole; Mortensen, Finn; Nielsen, Lotta Marie; Nielsen, Per Schiwe; Nielsen, Søren Kjærem; Ommen, Henrik; Juhl Otte, Jens; Østergaard Paridon, Volle; Parm, Michael; Peampour, Kian; Petersen, Kirsten; Pilgaard, Peder Jensen; Poulsen, Svend Erik; Preisler, Thomas; Hast Prins, Søren Ulrik; Randløv, Annette; Rasmussen, Birgit Reindahl; Elmegaard Rasmussen, Peter; Rasmussen, Regnar; Roed, Søren Flemming; Sander, Kirsten Foltmar; Schmidt, Ejnar Ørum; Jørgen Schultz, Paul; Smidemann, Margit; Solgaard, Jørgen; Stripp, Tommy; Søderlund, Michael Rene M.; Søgaard, Henning; Søndergaard, Dorte E.; Sørensen, Birgitte H.; Sørensen, Gerhard Seth; Thøgersen, Niels; Toftdahl, Hans; Uggerhøj, Hanne; Uhrenholt, Bjarne; Veronika Ullisch, Eva; Valentiner-Branth, Christian; Vinberg, Jørgen; Vinter, Svend Aage; Vittrup, Preben; Winther-Pedersen, Niels; Wøldike, Anne Grete; Zederkof, Jørgen M.; Thue Østergaard, Merete; Abiven, Patrick; Abraham, Dominique; de Beaumais, Philippe Adam; Ado, Jean Pierre; Affres, Helene; Agache, Regis; Airault Leman, Anne Marie; Moussarih, Abdallah Al; Albaric, Christian; Allaouchiche, Thierry; Allignol, Christian; Ammor, Mohammed; Ammoun Bourdelas, Corinne; Amsallem, Luc; Anquez, Denis; Antonini, Jean Michel; Assuied, Virginia; Attia, Gerard; Audebert, Olivier; Audibert, Henri; Ayach, Claude; Bagdadlian, Serge; Bagni, Marina; Baillet, Jean; Ballivian Cardozo, Fernando; Baranes, Robert; Barbier, Patricia; Barousse, Francoise; Bas, Sylvie; Battaglia, Jean Marc; Baudonnat, Bruno; Bauple, Jean Louis; Domengetroy, Frederic Baylac; Beard, Thierry; Beaumier, Eric; Beaumont, Jean Francois; Baylac Domengetroy, Frederic; Beck, Christian; Behar, Michel; Behr, Bernard; Benady, Richard; Benghanem, Mohamed Mounir; Benichou, Herve; Bensoussan, Jean Marc; Bensussan, Pierre; Bercegeay, Pascal; Berneau, Jean Baptiste; Bertolotti, Alexane; Bertrand, Sylviane; Besson, Alain; Bezanson, Christophe; Bezier, Christophe; Bezzina, Remy; Bichon, Herve; Bickar, Pierre; Billot, Pierre; Billot Belmere, Marie Claude; Bisson, Francois; Blanc, Dominique; Bloch, Jean Luc; Bloch, Bernard; Blondin, Hyacinthe; Blot, Jacques; Bloud, Raymond; Blouin, Pascal; Boesch, Christophe; Boiteux, Jean Luc; Bonnafous, Pierre; Bonneau, Yanick; Bonnefoy, Laurent; Borg, Bernard; Borys, Jean Michel; Brunehaut Petaut, Myriam; Boschmans, Sabine; Said, Rami Bou; Bouallouche, Abderrahmane; Bouchet, Jacques; Bouchlaghem, Khaled; Boulen, Yvon; Bouline, Benoit; Bounekhla, Mohamed Salah; Bouquin, Vincent; Bourgeois, Marie Brigitte; Bourgois, Didier; Brandily, Christian; Brandt, Pierre; Branquart, Frederic; Breilh, Patrick; Brilleman, Fabrice; Brisson, Thierry; Brocard, Francis; Bruel, Pierre; Brun, Jean Pierre; Buisson, Jean Gabriel; Buisson Virmoux, Isabelle; Bur, Christian; Cabal Malville, Elodie; Cabantous, Serge; Cabrol, Pierre; Cagnoli Gromovoi, Sylviane; Caillaux, Bruno Xavier; Caillot, Didier; Canchon Ottaviani, Isabelle; Canu, Philippe; Caramella, Alexana; Caramella, Alexane; Cardaillac, Christian; Carrivale, Alain; Cartal, Jean Pierre; Cassany, Bernard; Cauon, Bernard; Causeret, Jean Marie; Caye, Philippe; Cayet, Jean Paul; Cazor, Gilles; Cesarini, Joel; Chakra, Georges; Chambeau, Bernadette; Chambon, Valerie; Chanas, Jack; Chapuzot, Patrick; Charon, Ane; Charpin, Eric; Charton, Frederic; Cheikel, Jean; Chemin, Philippe; Chennouf, Kamel; Chequel, Henri; Chevrier, Denis; Ciroux, Patrick; Cissou, Yves; Claeys, Jean Luc; Clariond, Yves; Classen, Olivier; Cloerec, Ane; Clouet, Sophie; Cloup Lefeuvre, Anne Marie; Cochet, Chantal; Cocuau, Didier; Cohen, Henri; Cohen Presberg, Pascale Cohen; Colin, Stephane; Colin, Remy; Colucci, Robert; Come, Philippe; Condouret, Pierre; Conturie, Agnes; Corbin, Ane; Corticelli, Paola; Coste, Daniel; Cotrel, Olivier; Coueau, Sylvie; Coulon, Paul; Courdy, Christian; Courtin, Marc; Courtot, Pierre; Coutrey, Laurent; Couval, Rene; Cravello, Patrick; Cressey, Olivier; Cuisinier, Yves; Cunin, Bernard; Cunnington, Bernard; Cusseau, Herve; Cuvelier, Christian; Arailh, Bruno D.; Dabboura, Adib; Dages, Laurence; Dahmani, Noureddine; Dandignac, Jean Christophe; Daney, Dominique; Dannel, Bernard; Darbois, Dominique; Dareths, Philippe; Daubin, Daniel; David, Jean Claude; de Foiard, Patrick; de Mallmann Guyot, Veronique De; de Wit, Marie Astrid; Debast, Francoise; Deboute, Eric; Debuc, Jean Pierre; Dechoux, Edouard; Decloux, Olivier; Decruyenaere, Yannick; Dejans, Jacques Maurice; Delarue, Michel; Delattre, Xavier; Delmaire, Patrick; Denis, Lucien; Deschamps Ben Ayed, Myriam; Devins, Pascal; Dezou, Sylvie; Dieuzaide, Pierre; Dirheimer, Bertrand; Dominguez, Paul; Donadille, Florence; Dondain, Benoit; Doridan, Pierre; Ouhet, Pascal; Dubois, Arnaud; Dubois, Ane; Ducharme, Pascal; Duchez, Paul; Dulard, Catherine; Dumoulin, Marc; Duprey, Georges; Durand, Jacques; Mohamed, Ibrahim; Chehab, El; Emery, Bernard; Emmanuel, Georges; Ashari, Ghazaleh Esna; Evrard, Eric; Fargeot Lamy, Aleth; Farges, Jean Louis; Faucher, Patrick; Faucie, Alain; Faure, Yves; Favre, Jean Jacques; Felipe, Jean Louis; Feret, Daniel; Ferragu, Alain; Ferrandin, Gerard; Ferriot, Francois; Finelle, Laurent; Flond, Jacques; Foieri, Jean; Fol, Stephane; Fontaine, Brigitte; Forichon, Dominique; Foucry, Michel; Fournier, Jean Francois; Fregeac, Bernard; Fuchs, Martin; Gabriel, Franck; Gaimard, Didier; Gallois, Stephane; Garapon, Georges; Garas, Mamdouh; Garcia, Pierre; Garcia, Jean Michel; Garcia, Marie Pierre; Garman, Waddah; Garzuel, Dominique; Gaspard, Jean Marc; Gauci, Laurent; Gautheron, Patrick; Gauthier, Jacques; Gauthier Lafaye, Pierre Yves; Gay, Michel Charles; Gay Duc, Bernadette; Gayout, Olivier; Gegu, Yann; Gentile, Francois; Germain, Emmanuel; Gharbi, Gerard; Gigandet Tamarelle, Catherine; Gilardie, Alain; Gilles Verliat, Martine; Gillet, Thierry; Gnana, Philippe; Goguey, Alain; Gombert, Alain; Gonin, Bernard; Gonzales, Philippe; Goulesque, Xavier; Graba, Jean Marc; Granier, Alain; Greiner, Olivier; Groboz, Martial; Gromoff, Serge; Grossemy, Xavier; Grossi, Christian; Guenin, Frederic; Gueranger, Pierre; Guerin, Patrick; Guerineau, Jean Pierre; Guessous Zghal, Fathia; Guicheux, Dominique; Guillere, Jacqueline; Guyonnet, Gilles; Haddad, Samir; Hadj, Nordine; Hamani, Djamel; Hamm, Jacky; Hammoudi, Djamal; Harle, Xavier; Harnie Coussau, Pierre; Hazen, Richard; Hembert, Francois; Hemon, Pierre; Hergue, Michel; Hestin, Christian; Heyraud, Luc; Hindennach, Dieter; Hirot, Etienne; Ho Wang Yin, Chan Shing; Hocquelet Denis, Catherine; Hoppe, Patrice; Horovitz, Daniel; Hours, Jean Michel; Houta, Benjamin; Hua, Gerard; Hui Bon Hoa, Nicole; Humez, Philippe; Hurier, Michel; Husson, Gerald; Hyvernat, Guy; Ichard, Jean Francois; Impens, Claude; Iovescu, Decebal; Jacob, Philippe; Jacob, Gildas; Jacquemart, Jean Pierre; Jacquier, Philippe; Jahanshahi Honorat, Shideh; Jalladeau, Jean Francois; Jan, Luc; Jannel, Yves; Jarrige, Vincent; Jeremiasz, Richard; Annick Jestin Depond, Marie; Joseph, Michel; Joseph Henri Fargue, Helene; Joubrel, Alain; Jouet, Alain; Julien, Bruno; Jullien, Francois; Jullien, Jean Louis; Kadoche, David; Kahl, Etienne; Kanawati, Aiman; Khalife, Sami; Khettou, Christophe; Kiers, Jean Paul; Kissel, Christian; Klein, Jean Claude; Klopfenstein, Samuel; Koch, Alexis; Koenig, Georges; Kohler, Philippe; Koriche, Abdelmalek; Labernardiere, Nicole; Labet, Philippe; Lablanche, Fabien; Laborde Laulhe, Vincent; Lagorce, Xavier; Laine, Eric; Lalague, Pascal; Laleu, Jean Noel; Lambert, Michel; Lambert Ledain, Mireille Lambert; Lambertyn, Xavier; Lame, Jean Francois; Langlois, Frederic; Lanoix, Eric; Laprade, Michel; Lasseri, Charaf; Laterrade, Bernard; Laurent, Jean Claude; Laurier, Bernard; Laval, Laurent; Le Borgne, Patrick; Le Franc, Pierre; Le Henaff, Patrick; Le Noir de Carlan, Herve; Le Roy, Jean Pierre; Le Roy Hennion, Florence; Lebon, Louis; Lecler, Olivier; Leclerc, Philippe; Ledieu, Christian; Lefebvre, Bernard; Lefevre, Philippe; Lehujeur, Catherine; Leiber, Christian; Leick, Gerard; Lemberthe, Thierry; Lenevez, Norbert; Lenoble, Patrick; Leriche, Philippe; Leroux, Eric; Leroy, Jean Michel; Leroy, Christian; Lescaillez, Dominique; Leurele, Christian; Lhermann, Sophie; Libermann, Pierre; Licari, Gilbert; Lo Re, Antoine; Long, Philippe; Long, Jean Louis; Lormeau, Boris; Louchart, Jean Christophe; Lucas, Jean Pierre; Luquet, Thierry; Lussato, Philippe; Maarouf, Moustapha; Mabilais, Francois; Magnier Sinclair, Christine; Mahot Moreau, Pascale; Malafosse, Denis; Mandirac, Jean Paul; Manolis, Jerome; Mante, Jean Pierre; Maquaire, Claude; Marchal, Thierry; Marchand, Guillaume; Marillesse, Olivier; Marmier, Gabriel; Herve Maron, Yves; Marrachelli, Nadine; Marsaux, Michel; Martin, Bruno; Martin, Michel; Deiss, Pascale Martin; Masson, Arnaud; Mativa, Bruno; Matton, Jean Francois; Mauffrey, Jean; Mauriere, Serge; Maurois, Georges; Maury, Joceline; Mayer, Frederic; Menu, Pierre; Mercier, Bernard; Messmer, Daniel; Mestiri, Sami; Meyer, Gilles; Michaelides, Michael; Michaud, Gilles; Michenaud, Bernard; Mielot, Stephane; Millory Marco, Jerry Anne; Mingam, Stephane; Mira, Reginald; Mius, Stephane; Monnier Meteau, Marie Paule; Mora, Francis; Morbois Trabut, Louise; Morosi, Laurent; Mougeolle, Jean Luc; Mouget, Jean Louis; Mouroux, Daniel; Mouthon, Jean Marie; Muller, Jacques; Nakache, Ane; Narbonne, Herve; Navarranne Roumec, Anne; Navarro, Pierre; Neubrand, Jean Yves; Nguyen, Quang Thieu; Nguyen Quang, Guy; Nguyen Xuan, Thong; Niot, Patrice; Oudart, Jean Maurice; Outteryck, Alain; Pages, Jean Marie; Paillet, Charles; Pain, Jean Marie; Pangaud de Gouville, Patricia; Paquin, Olivier; Parent, Vincent; Parer Richard, Claire; Parrot, Francine; Parthenay, Pascal; Pascariello, Jean Claude; Passebon, Jean Claude; Pere, Alain; Perelstein, Laurent; Perot, Michel; Petit, Richard; Petit, Philippe; Petit, Francois; Petruzzi, Philippe; Phelipeau, Denis; Philippon, Jean Claude; Philippon, Gilles; Picard, Bruno; Picard, Jean Claude; Picot, Bernard; Piera, Jean Francois; Pieri, Alain; Piffoux, Eric; Pilard, Patrick; Pillet, Alain; Pinot, Philippe; Pinzani, Alain; Pleskof, Alain; Plessier, Jean Claude; Plisson, Alain; Pochon, Claude; Poggi, Valerie; Poirat, Alain; Poiree, Maurice; Polleux, Janick; Noel Pontecaille, Jean; Posocco, Regis; Pospiech, Jean Claude; Pradies, Felix; Prevot, Remi; Pueyo, Jean Bernard; Quaelli, Jacques; Rabbia, Michel; Rabemananjara, Aimery; Rami, Saad; Rapin, Jean Jacques; Rasquin, Corinne; Ratinaud, Didier; Reboud, Bruno; Reboul, Philippe; Reichman, Jean Jacques; Reinhardt, Patrick; Renard Houta, Catherine Renard; Reverdy, Olivier; Revol, Michel; Rey, Pierre Alain; Richardeau, Yves; Rives, Bernard; Robida, Christine; Rochez Fraiberg, Muriel; Rodet, Jean Pierre; Rolland, Jean Francois; Romand, Bruno; Romano, Jean Paul; Rosati Gretere, Chantal; Rosey, Alain; Rosset, Martial; Rossi, Jean Pierre; Rouquette, Georges; Rousseau, Michel; Rousselon, Xavier; Roy, Christophe; Royer, Denis; Ruetsch, Marcel; Saade, Maurice; Saby Kuchler, Nicolas; Samar, Guy; Sanchez, Pierre Yves; Sane, Alain; Sanz, Jean Paul; Sardon, Michel; Sarrazin, Marc Eric; Sasportes, Gilbert; Saudou, Francis; Sauze, Elisabeth; Savary, Pascal; Schenowitz, Alain; Schmartz, Pierre; Schoepfer, Marc Olivier; Seewagen, Jacques; Serramoune, Denis; Serre, Christian; Sicard Guroo, Helene; Sichãc, Jean Philippe; Sifaoui, Sylvain; Simoncello, Marc; Simonin, Marie Jeanne; Simonnet, Jean Francois; Spindler, Didier; Steier, Alain; Sultan, Charles Raphael; Taghipour, Kouroch; Talayrach, Bruno; Talbot, Francois; Talhouarn, Vanessa; Tallec, Yves; Tarasco Schenrey, Elisabeth; Tarrene, Michel; Tater, Dominique; Tessier, Bernard; Teste, Marie; Thierry, Dominique; Thiollier, Patrice; Thoreau, Frederic; Thual, Jean; Traen, Vincent; Trigano, Jacques Alexane; Troussier, Jean Bernard; Truong Ky Minh, Bernard; van Melckebeke, Gerard; Vaque, Philippe; Vaucelle, Celine; Vedel, Eric; Venu, Didier; Verdavoine, Patrick; Vergeron, Jean; Viallon, Philippe; Viault, Dominique; Vieules, Jean Max; Vigier, Jean Paul; Vilain, Jean Marie; Villard, Bruno; Vitoux, Jean Francois; Viviand, Paul; Vivien, Olivier; Walter, Patrice; Waquier, Patrick; Waszkiewicz, Jean Marc; Weidich, Stephane; Westerfeld, Raymond; Weynachter, Gerald; Wilhelm, Pierre; Wolff, Claude; Wursthorn, Marc; Zammattio, Didier; Zylinski, Bernard; Lauer, Peter; Kühn, Uwe; Weltzel, Wolfgang; Mohr, Hella; Weyland, Klaus; Spittel, Bärbel; Böhm, Günter; Ferdowsy, Said; Hanusch, Peter; Spiekermann, Josef; Albert, Edwin; Stuff, Karl; Jungmair, Wolfgang; Koller, Sabine; Schubert, Wilhelm; Schlehahn, Fred; Bormann, Gundula; Graf, Kristof; Stiehler, Gisela; Bock, Manfred; Müller, Angelika; Haufe, Michael; Nielsen, Lorenz; Raum, Doris; Rogler, Karin; Bürstner, Joachim; Völk, Hans-Jörg; Sachse, Michael; Escher, Torsten; Doumit, Adel; O'dey, Hildegard; Holzmann, Ulrike; Sauer, Hermann; Schellenberg, Gottfried; Carius, Jürgen; Dänschel, Wilfried; Kopf, Aneas; Zerr, Elena; Tatalovic, Ratko; Rupp, Heiun; Anders, Elfriede; Mende, Marion; Volk, Ulrich; Hagenow, Aneas; Lang, Thomas; Schmitz, Karl-Heinz; Gössling, Jan-Henik; Mutsch, Günther; Steidel, Joachim; Osten, Klaus; Giokoglu, Kiriakos; Bellisch, Sabine; Füll, Katja; Walther, Wolfgang; Flick, Sabine; Dünnebier, Rosemarie; Dharmawan, Ichsan; Schönmehl, Wolfgang; Hoss, Valentin; Kipping, Stephan; Wolf, Hans-Joachim; Wolf, Hans-Frieich; Willmann, Volker; Bugarski, Bruno; Hoffschröer, Josef; Von Wallfeld, Siegrun; Ruhland, Guun; Bulling, Daniel; Häusler, Maren; Haustein, Gabriele; Kallenbach, Cornelia; Schwemmler, Claudia; Frank, Antje; Lodder-Bender, Ulrike; Rawe, Klaus; Reinert, Hans-Ferdinand; Schönhof, Petra; Fahrenschon, Klaus; Schorcht, Elisabeth; Etzold, Erika; Brehm, Michael; Paust, Wolf-Dieter; Schulte-Kemna, Achim; Pötter, Klaus-Werner; Ott-Voigtländer, Ulrike; Schwenke, Reto; Thinesse-Mallwitz, Manuela; Siml, Steffi; Stern, Hirene; Roelen, Harald; Scherhag, Klaus-Peter; Matulla, Petra; Herrmann, Hans Joachim; Neumann, Gerhard; Barbuia, Marius; Vormann, Reinhold; Hitzler, Karl; Linum, Aneas; Hanke, Klaus; Hohberg, Hans-Joachim; Klingel, Roger; Hohnstädter, Rainer; Klasen, Hartmut; Aschermann, Peter; Grau, Wilfried; Killinger, Paul; Gross, Kathrin; Naus, Rainer; Todoroff, Karin; Zühlke, Wolfgang; Kellner, Hanns-Ulrich; Hager, Eva; Thieme, Jochen; Kornitzky, Michael; Rösch, Volker; Heinze, Elke; Hiederer, Wolfgang; Konz, Karl-Heinz; Köhler, Michael; Diekmann, Martin; Junghans, Edith; Dietermann, Friedgard; Kerp, Ekkehard; Schäfer-Lehnhausen, Silvia; Kruck, Irmtraut; Ettelt, Rolf; Hölscher, Aneas; Kittler, Sybil; Jung, Heiun; Mailänder, Albert; Nowara, Peter; Ritschl, Harald; Mödl, Bernhard; Gallwitz, Torsten; Meyer, Stephan; Peter, Anton; Peters, Otto; Pflaum, Petra; Fröhlich, Karl-Heinz; Mertens, Hans-Jürgen; Merlin-Sprünken, Verena; Erpenbach, Klaus; Fervers, Frank; Kuhl, Ulrike; Halsig, Friedemann; Rein, Wilfried; Hauser, Ernst-Richard; Laubenthal, Florin; Richard, Frank; Langer, Claus; Lange, Rainer; Eska, Jan; Mohanty, George; Lange, Isengard; Eltges, Nicole; Kuntz, Christoph; Mechery, Thomas; Vöckl, Josef; Viergutz, Christoph; Stähle-Klose, Claudia; Sohr, Katja; Böhler, Steffen; Brecke, Georg; Burls, Malcolm; Werner, Karl-Michael; Vorpahl, Ralf; Stahl-Weigert, Beate; Bunge, Gerd; Thomsen, Jutta; Blessing, Erwin; Bengel, Bengel; Buhlmann, Ulla; Tröger, Tröger; Sippel, Sippel; Vossschulte, Vossschulte; Wilms, Wilms; Appelt, Appelt; Dauterstedt, Dauterstedt; Witte, Witte; Böttger, Uta; Wyborski, Waltraud; Strache, Sabine; Böttger, Werner; Zeiner, Luise; Wuttke, Wanda; Stoidner- Amann, Annette; Stoermer, Brigitte; Bock, Stephan; Groos-März, Cornelia; Thamm, Maria-Elisabeth; Meier, Josef; Schneider, Martin; Niessen, Ulrich; Storm, Gernot-Rainer; Streitbürger, Elmar; Münkel, Thomas; Palfi, Mihai; Naumann, Ulrich; Tannhof, Gabriele; Streibhardt, Frank; Gebhardt, Wolfgang; Nieswandt, Gerhard; Gerke, Ulrich; Nöhring, Axel; Bott, Jochen; Goertz, Jutta; Winkler, Dietmar; Lotter, Edith; Kraaz, Katja; Bärwinkel, Petra; Hildebrandt, Diana; Weyers, Georg; Kubin-Siring, Birgit; Baier, Eduard; Weber, Thomas; Holz, Dirk-Egbert; Wolfers, Johannes; Kihm, Wolfgang; Kamali-Ernst, Schirin; Amann, Wolfgang; Kaase, Hans-Jürgen; Banning, Ottmar; Voigt, Thomas; Grünert, Frank; Gürtler, Michael; Pferdmenges, Karin; van Treek, Heiko; Möller, Bernd; Weigel, Sybille; Jun Hassler, Normann; Mauer, Helmuth; Beckers, Erwin; Weber, Clemens-August; Hawash, Hana; Ladke, Dietrich; Labitzky, Gerlinde; Kunkel, Petra; Hartung, Wolfgang; Pomykaj, Thomas; Prokop, Heiun; Schleif, Thomas; Cascino, Luisa; Exner, Petra; Daelman, Eric; Dietrich, Aneas; Prasse, Thomas; Brundisch, Stefanie; Schipper, Ralf; Duderstaedt, Bernd; de Haan, Fokko; Schmidt-Reinwald, Astrid; Seidel, Peter; Schmitz, Joachim; Bülent, Ergec; Ja Pique, Pyoong; Ding, Roland; Eggeling, Thomas; Duderstaedt, Elvira; Ferchland, Hans-Peter; Kruth, Renate; Gralla, Dieter; Köhler, Angelika; Laborge, Joachim Rene; Hammer, Harald; Richter, Ilona; Sauldie, Happy; Valk-Denkema, Inge Van Der; van der Valk, Leo; Feely, John; Dunne, Liam; Cox, John; Doyle, Michael; O'Gorman, Mary; Kennedy, John; Maher, Brian; Forde, Derek; Harrington, Peter; Cronin, Brian; Coady, Anew; Craig, John; O'Dowd, Caroline; O'Doherty, Brian; O'Connor, Patrick; Ling, Roland; Perry, Majella; Crowley, James; Keaveney, Lynda; Townley, Eadaoin; O'Shea, Eamonn; Regan, Michael; Cunningham, Seamus; Bluett, Desmond; Whyte, Oliver; Casey, Michael; Ruane, Fergal; Fitzgerald, Eleanor; O'Beirn, Eugene; Faller, Eamonn; Moffatt, Sean; Coleman, Michael; Day, Brendan; Mcadam, Brendan; O'Neill, Daragh; Mac Mahon, Conor; Wheeler, Mark; Byrne, Sheila; Fulcher, Kieran; CAREY, Owen; O'Connell, Kieran; Keane, Jack; Almarsomi, Laith; Vaughan, Carl; O'Callaghan, Tom; Grufferty, Tadgh; Shanahan, Eamon; Crowley, Brendan; Moran, Joe; Cotter, Jeremy; Healy, Colin; Curtin, Tom; Dillon, Joe; Dennehy, Thomas; Murphy, Elaine; Kennedy, Michael; Coffey, Donal; Carroll, Paul O.; Oliver, Barry; Mccarthy, Shane; Joyce, Peter; O'Shea, Gerard; Apperloo, A. J.; Basart, D. C. G.; Bax, M.; Beysens, P. A. J.; Breed, J. G. S.; Derks, A.; Eijgenraam, J. W.; Hermann, J. P. R.; Janus, C. L.; Kaasjager, H. A. H.; Klomps, H. C.; Koole, M. A. C.; Koster, T.; Kroon, C.; Lieverse, A. G.; Massaar-Hagen, B. E. M.; Moghaddam, F.; Oldenburg-Ligtenberg, P. C.; Potter van Loon, B. J.; Stroes, E. S. G.; Twickler, Th B.; van Asperdt, F. G. M. H.; van Asseldonk, J. P. M.; van der Loos, T. L. J. M.; van der Velde, R. Y.; van der Vring, J. A. F.; van Dorp, W. T.; van Essen, G. G.; van Kalmthout, P. M.; van Liebergen, R. A. M.; van Wissem, S.; Waanders, H.; Withagen, A. J. A. M.; Andersen, Per Vidar Klemet; Andersen, Randi F.; Andersson, Egil; Arnstad, Asle; Belguendouz, Larbi; Birkeland, Inge Arve; Bjørkum, Kari; Bredvold, Thor; Brevig, Leif Harald; Buchman, Erik; Burkeland-Matre, Rune; Burski, Krzysztoft; Byre, Roald; Bø, Per Erik; Dahl, Erik; Duch, Anna; Duong, Khoa; Dvergsdal, Peter; Edvardsen, Magne; Ernø, Asbjørn; Fredwall, Svein Otto; Glasø, Morten; Glasø, Jan; Grini, Asbjørn; Hallaråker, Arne; Normann Hansen, Age Normann; Haugland, Helge Haugland; Henrichsen, Svein Høegh; Hestnes, Atle; Idehen, Norman I. E.; Jacobsen, Kristin Løland; Johansen, Ture; Johnsen, Roald; Jonasmo, Kåre; Kirknes, Svetalana; Kjetså, Arild; Kjaer, Peter; Knoph, Erik; Knutssøn, Carl; Koss, Arne; Kravtchenko, Oleg; Krogsæter, Dagfinn; Langaker, Kåre; Lind, Knut W.; Lund, Kjell Rømyhr; Madsbu, Sverre; Mehlum, Yvonne E. Mazurek; Moon, Philipp; Movafagh, Aram; Myhrer, Kurt; Nørager, Dan Michael; Ore, Stephan; Rafat, Hooshang B.; Rød, Reinert; Schmidt-Melbye, Torgeir; Singh, Navneet; Singsås, Tore; Skjelvan, Gunnar; Smet, Arthur; Staalesen, Staale; Storeheier, Espen; Storhaug, Sidsel; Storm-Larsen, Ane; Sundby, Jon Eivind; Syverstad, Dag Eivind; Sørensen, Anne Sissel; Torjusen, Trygve B.; Torkelsen, Arne; Tunby, Jan Reidar; Vanberg, Pål Johan; Vevatne, Audun; Vikse, Arild; Wahlstrøm, Viktor; Walaas, Kirsten; Walløe, Arne Eyolf; Wear-Hansen, Hans-Gunnar; Ole Ystgaard, Ole Aneas; Zimmermann, Birgit; Øvsthus, Knut; Aião, Julio; Albuquerque, Mario; Alves, Fernando; Esteves, Antonio; Amaral, Maria Fatima; Amaral, Fátima; Amorim, Helena; Anade, Benilde; Anade, Maria Benilde; Antonio, Godinho; Araujo, Francisco; Arriaga, Antonio; Baeta, Sonia; Afonso, Francisca Banha; Beato, Vitor; Beirão, Paula; Martins, Ausenda Belo; Bernardes, Jose; Botas, Luis; Baeta, Antonio; Ramos, Manuel Braga; Brandão, Peo; Brandão, Antonio G.; Brandão, Antonio; Raposo, Antonio Caetano; Carrilho, Francisco; Carvalho, Isabel; Carvalho, Patricia; Castel-Branco, Ana; Castellano, Maria Desamparados; Corredoura, Ana; Corredoura, Ana Sofia; Costa, Vitor; Coutinho, João; Crujo, Francisco; Cunha, Damião; Dias, Manuela; Fernandes, Maria Emilia; Ferreira, Gustavo; Ferreira, Dirce; Ferreira, Jorge; Ferreira, Antonio M.; Fonseca, Antonio; Freitas, Paula; Gago, Amandio; Galego, Rosa; Garrett, Antonio Viriato; Gavina, Cristina; Simões, José Geraldes; Gomes, Maria Fatima; Gomes, Norberto; Gomez, Brigitte; Graça, Peo; Gravato, Antonio; Guedes, Nuno Filipe; Guerra, Fernanda; Issa, Custódio; João, Isabel Fernandes; João, Isabel; Jorge, Vasco; Leite, Maria Salome; Lousada, Nuno; Macedo, Filipe M.; Madeira Lopes, João; Magalhães, Jorge; Marinho, Jose Carlos; Marques, Carlos; Marques, Jose Augusto; Marques Ferreira, Antonio; Martins, Jose Carlos; Martins, J. Belo; Matos, Alice; Melo, Miguel; Miguel, Antonia; Monteiro, Filomena; Monteiro, Francisco; Monteiro, Filomena B.; Sarmento, João Morais; Morato Sá, Maria José; Mota, Joana; Moura, Luis; Moura, Brenda; Neves, Lena; Neves, Celestino; Oliveira, Maria; Oliveira Ramos, Manuel; Osorio, Ramos; Pacheco, Joao; Palma, Isabel; Peixoto, Maria Cristina; Pereira, Helder; Pestana, João; Pignatelli, Duarte; Pinho, Hernani; Puig, Jorge; Raindo, Maria; Ramos, Helena; Rebelo, Marta; Roigues, Antonio; Roigues, Alvaro; Roigues, Elisabete; Rola, José; Rovytchcva, Milena; Sa, João; Santos, Fernando; Santos, João Cesar; Sequeira Duarte, Joao; Serra E Silva, Polybio; Silva, Bernardino; Silva, Paula; Silva, Maria; Silva, Francisco; Silva, Dora; Silva, José; Silvestre, Isabel; Simões, Heleno; Soares, Manuela; Sousa, Nelson; Sousa, Antonio; Souto, Delfina; Teixeira, Esmeralda; Torres, Isabel; Valle, Tahydi; Ventura, Carlos; Vicente, Ana; Vieira, Muriel; Alfaro, Rafael; Alonso, Roigo; Alvarez, Juan Carlos; Allut, Germán; Amado, Jose A.; Ampuero, Javier; Angel, Luis Fernando; Antolín, Eduardo; Anton, Javier; Aranda, Jose Luis; Argimon, Jordi; Arques, Francesc; Arribas, Jose Peo; Arroya, Concepción; Arroyo, Jose Antonio; Auladell, Maria Antonia; Bajo, Julian; BALVIN, Alberto; Ballester, Jose Vicente; Barreda Glez, Maria Jesus; Becerra, Antonio; Bermejo, Juan Carlos; Bernacer, Luis; Besada, Ricardo; Blasco, Jesús; Bravo, Manuel; Bueno, Francisco Manuel; Campo, Ignacio; Carrasco, Jose Luis; Catalán, José Ignacio; Cobo, Jose; Coello, Ignacio; Combarro, Jesús; Contreras, Juan A.; Correa, Julian; Cortilla, Alberto; Cuatrecasas, Guillem; Chicharro, Sana; de Dios, Juan; de Los Arcos, Enrique; de Portugal, Jose; del Cañizo, Francisco; del Molino, Fatima; Díaz, Jose Luis; Domingo, Javier; Escobar, Carlos; Escoda, Jaume; Espinosa, Eugenio; Ester, Francisco; Fernandez, Antonio; Ferreiro, Manuel; Fondas, Jose Maria; Fraile, Angel Luis; Franco, Miguel; Fuentes, Francisco; Garcia, Jose Antonio; Garcia, Domingo; Garcia, Manuel Enrique; García, Luis; Garcia, Jesus; Gilabert, Rosa; Goiria, Begoña; Gomez, Purificación; Gomez-Calcerrada, David; Gonzalez, Manuel; Gonzalez, Jose Manuel; Guijarro, Carlos; Guirao Gujarro, Victor; Herrera, Carlos; Herrera, Maria Carmen; Herrero, Miguel; Ibarguren, Amaya; Irigoyen, Luis; Jimenez, Blas; Lamelas, Jose Antonio; Laplaza, Ismael; Laporta, Felix; Lazo, Victor; Leal, Mariano; Ledesma, Vicente; Lopez, Peo; Lopez, Pablo; Lopez, Alberto; López, Maria Jose; Lopez-Cepero, Eduardo; Lorenzo, Francisco; Lucena, Javier; Luquín, Rafael; Lloveras, Ariadna; Maceda, Teresa; Macia, Ramon; Marti, Cristina; Martin, Jose Maria; Martin, Isodoro; Martín Lesende, Iñaki; Martinez, Mercedes; Martinez, Juan Alberto; Martinez, Peo; Martinez, Angel; Mato, Fernando; Medel, Federico; Mederos, Ana Maria; Mediavilla, Javier; Mediavilla, Gregorio; Mestron, Antonio; Michans, Antonio; Millán, Jesús; Molina, Carlos; Monroy, Carmelo; Monte, Inés; Montes, Jose Maria; Morales, Clotilde; Morales, Francisco J.; Morata, Carmen; Mori, Carlos; Muñoz, Jaime; Muñoz, Maria Jose; Núnez, Julio; Nuñez, Alfonso; Ocaña, Fermin; Olaz, Fernando; Ollero Artigas, Anes; Ortega, Juan; Oteo, Olga; Pascual, Jose Maria; Paya, Jose Antonio; Pechuan, Joaquín; Penedo Suarez, Ramón; Perez, Eugenia; Pesquera, Carlos; Pia, Gonzalo; Piea, Maria; Pinilla, Martin; Pita, Alejano; Pose, Antonio; Prieto Díaz, Miguel Angel; Quesada, Carmen; Ramirez, Francisco; Ramirez, Carmen; Ramirez, Luisa; Reinares, Leonardo; Rey, Salvador; Ribas, Montse; Ridaura, Amparo; Ridocci, Francisco; Rigueiro, Peo; Rivera, Salomón; Robles, Antonio; Rodero, Estrella; Roiguez, Jose Angel; Romero, Fernando; Romero Hernandez, Franklin; Romeu, Regina; Rubio Buisán, Lorenzo; Salas, Fernando; Sánchez, Carlos; Sánchez, Jesus; Saponi, Jose Maria; Serres, Miguel; Suarez, Saturnino; Suarez, Carmen; Tato, Maria; Tebar, Francisco Javier; Toda, Maria Roca; Tofe, Santiago; Urdiain, Raquel; Vaamonde, Leopoldo; Valderrama, Javier; Vazquez, Jose Antonio; Velazquez, Osvaldo; Venell, Federico; Vilariño, Ruben; Villa, Maria Jesus; Villar, Maria Dolores; Zarauza, Jesus; Zuñiga, Manuel; Abab, Jose Luis; Abad, Eduardo; Abad, Rafael; Afonso, Carmen; Aguilar, Gerardo; Alberiche, Maria Del Pino; Alcolea, Rosa; Alegria, Eduardo; Almagro, Fátima; Almenara, Africa; Almenos, Maria Cruz; Alonso, Javier; Alvarez, Manuel; Ampudia, Javier; Andia, Victor Manuel; Anglada, Jordi; Aranda, Miguel Ángel; Arbelo, Lorenzo; Armengol, Francesc; Arnau, Asunción; Arrarte, Vicente; Arribas, Bienvenido; Artiñano, Yolanda; Avilés, Benjamín; Ayensa, Javier; Ballestar, Enric; Ballester, Javier; Barcelo, Bartolome; Barcena, Felix; Barranco, Mercedes; Barrena, Isabel; Barriales, Vicente; Barrot, Joan; Bartolome, Jose A.; Belmonte, Joan; Bellés, Amadeo; Benito, Josefina; Bernad, Antonio; Biendicho, Armando; Blanco, Rubén; Boix, Evangelina; Bonora, Carlos; Boxó, Jose Ramon; Brea, Angel; Caballero, Peo; Cabrera, Peo; Cabrero, Juan Jose; Calduch, Lourdes; Calero, Francisco; Calvo Garcia, Jose Javier; Camacho, Jose; Canales, Juan Jose; Caparros, Jorge; Carbonell, Francisco; Caro, Manuel; Castilla, Miguel Angel; Castillo, Luis; Cepero, Daniel; Cerdan, Miguel; Cimbora, Antonio; Civera, Miguel; Colchero, Justo; Comas Fuentes, Angel; Corpas, Clara; Corrales, Juan Antonio; Cotobal, Eusebio; Cruz, Carmen; Cruz, Inmaculada; de La Flor, Manuel D.; de Luis, Alberto; del Alamo, Alberto; del Rosario, Victor; Diego, Carlos; D'Lacoste, Marta; Doganis Peppas, Constantino; Dominguez, Jose Ramon; Durá, Francisco Javier; Durand, Jose L.; Ena, Javier; Encinas, Ana Rosa; Erdozain, Juan Peo; Escribano, Jose; Escriva, Blanca; Esteve, Eduardo; Facila, Lorenzo; Fenoll, Federico; Fernandez, Eugenio; Fernandez, Celia; Fernandez, Maria Jesus; Fernandez, Antonia; Fernandez, Jacinto; Fernandez, Severo; Fernandez, Jose Manuel; Fernandez, Jose Manuel Fernandez; Ferrer, Juan Carlos; Ferrer, Peo; Ferrer Bascuñana, Peo; Fierro, Maria Jose; Flores, Julio; Fuentes, Fernando; Fuertes, Jorge; Galgo, Alberto; Galvez, Angel; Gallego, Anea; Garcia, Maria Angeles; Garcia, Jose; Garcia, Maria Luisa; Garcia, Peo; Garcia, Javier; García, Francisco; Garrido, Nícolas Garrido; Gil, Manuel Gil; Ginés Gascón, Ramón; Godoy, Diego; Gomez, Carlos Manuel; Gonzalez, Miguel; Gonzalez, Rosa; Gonzalez, Rocío; Gonzalez, Enrique; Gonzalez, Juan Jose; Gonzalez, Joaquin; Gonzalez Huambos, Adan; Guerrero, Jordi; Guillen, Rosario; Guirao, Lorenzo; Gutierrez, Fernando; Gutierrez, Diego; Hernandez, Alberto; Hernandez, Antonio; Hernandis, Vicenta; Herrero, Jose Vicente; Herreros, Benjamin; Hevia Roiguez, Eduardo; Horgue, Antonio; Illan, Fatima; Inigo, Pilar; Ibrahim Jaber, Ali; Jimenez, Manuel; Jornet, Agusti; Juanola, Ester; Laguna, Alfonso; Latorre, Juan; Lebron, Jose Antonio; Lecube, Albert; Ledesma, Claudio; Ligorria, Cristina; Lima, Joan; López, Jose Enrique; Lopez, Manuel; López, José Antonio; López, Jaime; López, Isio; Lozano, Jose Vicente; Mangas, Miguel Angel; Mangas, Alipio; Manzano, Antonio; Maraver, Juan; Marco, Maria Dolores; Marchán, Enrique; Marchante, Francisco; Marin, Fernando; Marreo, Josefa Esther; Martin, Manuel; Martin, Alberto; Martin, Francisco Javier; Martinez, Antonio; Martinez, Guillermo; Martínez, Luis; Martinez Barselo, Antonio Pablo; Mas, Emili; Mascareño, Isabel; Mascarós, Enrique; Massa, Rita; Mazón, Pilar; Mediavilla, Juan Diego; Mena, Candido; Mendez, Jose; Mendez, Jose Maria; Mezquita Raya, Peo; Millan, Jose Maria; Millaruelo, Jose; Minguela, Ester; Miret, Pere; Molina, Mariano; Molina, Carmen; Montagud, Blanca; Montalban, Coral; Montiel, Angel; Montoro, Javier; Monze, Bernardo; Moreno, Francisco Luis; Morillas, Antonio; Moro, Jose Antonio; Moya, Ana; Muñiz, Ovidio; Muñoz, Manuel; Navarro, Vicente Luis; Nerin, Jesus; Nicolas, Ricardo; Nogueiras, Concepción; Ojeda, Benito; Olmerilla, Javier; Oller, Guillermo; Ortega, Antonio; Ortega, Manuel; Ortega, Miguel; Ortiz, Maria Jose; Otegui Alarduya, Luis; Palet, Jordi; Palomo, Jesus; Paytubí, Carlos; Peiro, Rafael; Pelaez, Carmen; Peña, Peo; Peñafiel, Javier; Perez, Antonia; Perez, Elvira; Perez, Tomas; Peso, Miguel; Pilar, Juan Manuel; Piñeiro, Carlos; Plaza, Jose Antonio; Polo, Noelia; Portal, Maria; Prieto, Jesus; Prieto, Luis; Prieto Novo, Manuel; Puñal, Peo; Quesada, Miguel; Quindimil, Jose Antonio; Rabade, Jose Manuel; Ramila Beraza, Luis Antonio; Ramirez, José Manuel; Ramos, Jose Antonio; Ramos, Francisco; Rayo, Manuel; Reixa Vizoso, Sol; Reyes, Antonio; Rico, Miguel Angel; Ripoll, Tomas; Rivera, Antonio; Robres, Mariano; Rodilla, Enrique; Roiguez, Miguel Angel; Roiguez, Zoilo Jesus; Roiguez, Carlos; Roiguez, Pilar; Roiguez, Melchor; Roiguez, Alfonso; Rojas, Domingo; Rosell, Luis; Rossignoli, Carlos; Rueda, Antonio; Rueda, Eloy; Ruix, Anes; Ruiz, Jose Antonio; Ruiz, Luis; Saban, Jose; Saez, Francisco Jose; Salleras, Narcis; Sánchez, Gerardo; Sanchez, Gloria; Sanchez, Angel; Sanfeliu, Josep Maria; Sangros Gonzalez, Javier; Santos, Francisco; Santus, Eufrosina; Sebastian, Alfredo; Seguro, Maria Eugenia; Selles, David; Serrano, Daniel; Serrano, Soledad; Serrano, Adalberto; Sestorain, Francisco; Solbes, Ruben; Soriano, Cristina; Suárez, Héctor; Surroca, Maria Luisa; Tarabini, Ada; Tarraga, Peo; Teixido, Eulalia; Terron, Raquel; Torres, Antonio; Tortosa, Jose Maria; Tortosa, Frederic; Valdés, Carmen; Valdés, Peo; Valiente, Jose Ignacio; Varo, Antonio; Vazquez, Enrique; Vázquez, Luis; Vela Ruiz de Morales, Jose Manuel; Vericat, Antonio; Vicioso, Peo; Vilaplana, Carlos; Villazón, Francisco; Lidia Viñas, Lidia Viñas; Zuagoitia, Jose Felix; Nörgaard, Faris; Dziamski, Ryszard; Haglund, Lars; Holm, Daniela; Sars, Mikael; Jagunic, Ivica; Östgård, Per; Kumlin, Lars; Jacobsson, Michael; Hamad, Yousef; Jäger, Wanje; Särhammar, Lars; Olsson, Anders; Boldt-Christmas, Antonina; Nyborg, Karin; Kjellström, Thomas; Ghazal, Faris; Wikström, Lene; Holby, Torulf; Bhiladvala, Pallonji; Kynde, Sara Maria; Eizyk, Enrique Julio; Tengblad, Anders; Christoffersson, Ole; Sjöström, Astrid; Kynde, Christian; Katzman, Per; Tenhunen, Anita; Lennermo, Klas; Lindholm, Carl-Johan; Löndahl, Magnus; Elfstrand, Aino; Grönlund-Brown, Inger; Ziedén, Bo; Minnhagen, Karin; Lindvall, Peter; Fant, Kristina; Kaczynski, Jacek; Wallmark, Anders; Wallén, Carl-Erik; Wallberg, Håkan; Grönquist, Lennart; Hansen, John Albert; Björkander, Inge; Timberg, Ingar; Rosenqvist, Ulf; Fries, Robert; Carlsson, Jan-Erik; Rautio, Aslak Tauno; Sjöberg, Lennart; Wirdby, Alexander; Höök, Peter; Larsson, Åsa; Bergström, Catharina Lysell; Jwayed, Addnan; Smolowicz, Adam; Lindman, Anne-Christine; Nilsson, Per; Tarrach, Gerrit; Carlsson, Ingolf; Wieloch, Mattias; Rindevall, Peter; Strömblad, Gunnar; Holmberg, Göran; Shahnazarian, Henrik; Melchior, Jan; Younan, Kamal; Hansson, Anders; Bjurklint, Dag; Borgencrantz, Bertil; Sjöström, Malin; Mullaart, Mikael; Munoz, Marjatta; Jakkola, Vallentina; Romot, Jaan; Dash, Rabinarayan; Magnusson, Jan-Olof; Ahmed, Saman; Jonsson, Christina; Pipkorn, Owe; Bray, Edward; Wolff, Aneas; Black, Iain; Head, Christopher; Allan, Anthony

    2011-01-01

    To assess the prevalence of persistent lipid abnormalities in statin-treated patients with diabetes with and without the metabolic syndrome. This was a cross-sectional study of 22,063 statin-treated outpatients consecutively recruited by clinicians in Canada and 11 European countries. Patient

  15. The relationship between vegetables and fruits intake and glycosylated hemoglobin values, lipids profiles and nitrogen status in type II inactive diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjan Tabesh

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions : Intake of vegetables and fruits may reduce the glycosylated hemoglobin, therefore choosing the appropriate diet with high fruits and vegetables may help to develop antioxidant defense and reduce the HbA1C in diabetic patients but it did not have any impact on lipids profiles, BUN/creatinine and urine protein 24 h.

  16. Influence of a mini-trampoline rebound exercise program on insulin resistance, lipid profile and central obesity in individuals with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuhu, Jibril M; Maharaj, Sonill S

    2018-04-01

    Exercises are important as an adjuvant for managing diabetes but due to fatigue and time constraints, individuals with diabetes may not engage in them. Jumping on a mini-trampoline referred to as rebound exercise is an aerobic activity used for exercise training benefits but only little research is available on its effects in diabetes. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of mini-trampoline rebound exercise on insulin resistance, lipid profile and central obesity in type 2 diabetics. Sixty non-insulin dependent type 2 diabetics (median age: 39.0 years, median body mass index: 25.2 kg/m2) recruited using convenience sampling were randomized to a rebound exercise group (N.=30) or a control group (N.=30). The control group read health magazines or watched television while the rebound exercise group jumped on a mini-trampoline at moderate intensity for 30 minutes three times per week for 12 weeks. Postrebound exercise, significant improvements in insulin resistance, lipid profile and waist circumference were noted when compared to the control (Ptrampoline rebound exercise is beneficial for individuals with type 2 diabetes and can serve as a useful exercise approach in the management of cardiovascular risk in diabetes.

  17. Heterogeneous behavior of lipids according to HbA1c levels undermines the plausibility of metabolic syndrome in type 1 diabetes: data from a nationwide multicenter survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuffrida Fernando MA

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiovascular risk factors (CVRF may cluster in type 1 diabetes, analogously to the metabolic syndrome described in type 2 diabetes. The threshold of HbA1c above which lipid variables start changing behavior is unclear. This study aims to 1 assess the behavior of dyslipidemia according to HbA1c values; 2 detect a threshold of HbA1c beyond which lipids start to change and 3 compare the clustering of lipids and other non-lipid CVRF among strata of HbA1c individuals with type 1 diabetes. Methods Effects of HbA1c quintiles (1st: ≤7.4%; 2nd: 7.5-8.5%; 3rd: 8.6-9.6%; 4th: 9.7-11.3%; and 5th: >11.5% and covariates (gender, BMI, blood pressure, insulin daily dose, lipids, statin use, diabetes duration on dyslipidemia were studied in 1275 individuals from the Brazilian multi-centre type 1 diabetes study and 171 normal controls. Results Body size and blood pressure were not correlated to lipids and glycemic control. OR (99% CI for high-LDL were 2.07 (1.21-3.54 and 2.51 (1.46-4.31, in the 4th and 5th HbA1c quintiles, respectively. Hypertriglyceridemia increased in the 5th quintile of HbA1c, OR 2.76 (1.20-6.37. OR of low-HDL-cholesterol were 0.48 (0.24-0.98 and 0.41 (0.19-0.85 in the 3rd and 4th HbA1c quintiles, respectively. HDL-cholesterol correlated positively (0.437 with HbA1c in the 3rd quintile. HDL-cholesterol and insulin dose correlated inversely in all levels of glycemic control. Conclusions Correlation of serum lipids with HbA1c is heterogeneous across the spectrum of glycemic control in type 1 diabetes individuals. LDL-cholesterol and triglycerides worsened alongside HbA1c with distinct thresholds. Association of lower HDL-cholesterol with higher daily insulin dose is consistent and it points out to a role of exogenous hyperinsulinemia in the pathophysiology of the CVRF clustering. These data suggest diverse pathophysiological processes depending on HbA1c, refuting a unified explanation for cardiovascular risk in type 1

  18. Urine and plasma metabolites predict the development of diabetic nephropathy in individuals with Type 2 diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pena, M. J.; Lambers Heerspink, H. J.; Hellemons, M. E.; Friedrich, T.; Dallmann, G.; Lajer, M.; Bakker, S. J. L.; Gansevoort, R. T.; Rossing, P.; de Zeeuw, D.; Roscioni, S. S.

    Aims Early detection of individuals with Type 2 diabetes mellitus or hypertension at risk for micro- or macroalbuminuria may facilitate prevention and treatment of renal disease. We aimed to discover plasma and urine metabolites that predict the development of micro-or macroalbuminuria. Methods

  19. Positive effects of football on fitness, lipid profile, and insulin resistance in Brazilian patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Sousa, M V; Fukui, R; Krustrup, Peter

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of recreational football training combined with calorie-restricted diet (football + diet) vs calorie-restricted diet alone (diet) on aerobic fitness, lipid profile, and insulin resistance indicators in type 2 diabetes (T2D) patients. Forty-four T2D patients aged 48-68 years...... (27 females, 17 males) were randomly allocated to the football + diet group (FDG; n = 22) or to the diet group (DG; n = 22), of whom 19 FDG and 15 DG subjects completed the study. The football training was performed for 3 × 40 min/week for 12 weeks. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scanning, treadmill...... testing, and fasting blood samplings were performed pre and post-intervention. After 12 weeks, maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max ) was elevated (P 

  20. Development of a Coronary Heart Disease Risk Prediction Model for Type 1 Diabetes: The Pittsburgh CHD in Type 1 Diabetes Risk Mode

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zgibor, J.C.; Ruppert, K.; Orchard, T.J.; Soedamah-Muthu, S.S.; Fuller, J.H.; Chaturvedi, N.; Roberts, M.S.

    2010-01-01

    Aim - To create a coronary heart disease (CHD) risk prediction model specific to type 1 diabetes. Methods - Development of the model used data from the Pittsburgh Epidemiology of Diabetes Complications Study (EDC). EDC subjects had type 1 diabetes diagnosed between 1950 and 1980, received their

  1. TNF Receptor 1/2 Predict Heart Failure Risk in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ping, Zhang; Aiqun, Ma; Jiwu, Li; Liang, Shao

    2017-04-06

    Inflammation plays an important role in heart failure and diabetes mellitus. Traditional serum markers have limited predictive value in heart failure and diabetes. TNFR1 and TNFR2 (TNFR1/2) have been proven to be strongly associated with heart failure and diabetes complications. This study aimed to assess the association of sTNFR1 and sTNFR2 levels and incidental HF risk in diabetes patients.We detected the mRNA, protein, and serum expression of TNFR1/2, their downstream signaling pathway protein NF-kB, and JNK expression and some traditional serum inflammatory markers in a heart failure group without diabetes mellitus or abnormal glucose tolerance (n = 84), a diabetes mellitus group without heart failure (n = 86), and a heart failure with diabetes mellitus group (n = 86).TNFR1/2 were significantly higher in patients with heart failure and diabetes mellitus based on mRNA expression to protein expression and serum expression. However, there were no differences in mRNA, protein, and serum levels of TNFR1/2 between the HF group and DM group. Furthermore, there were no differences between the groups in some traditional serum inflammatory markers.This study demonstrated higher expressions of TNFR, NF-kB, and JNK in patients with heart failure and diabetes mellitus. Compared with traditional serum markers, TNFR1 and TNFR2 are associated with heart failure risk in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients.

  2. Neural network and SVM classifiers accurately predict lipid binding proteins, irrespective of sequence homology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhtiarizadeh, Mohammad Reza; Moradi-Shahrbabak, Mohammad; Ebrahimi, Mansour; Ebrahimie, Esmaeil

    2014-09-07

    Due to the central roles of lipid binding proteins (LBPs) in many biological processes, sequence based identification of LBPs is of great interest. The major challenge is that LBPs are diverse in sequence, structure, and function which results in low accuracy of sequence homology based methods. Therefore, there is a need for developing alternative functional prediction methods irrespective of sequence similarity. To identify LBPs from non-LBPs, the performances of support vector machine (SVM) and neural network were compared in this study. Comprehensive protein features and various techniques were employed to create datasets. Five-fold cross-validation (CV) and independent evaluation (IE) tests were used to assess the validity of the two methods. The results indicated that SVM outperforms neural network. SVM achieved 89.28% (CV) and 89.55% (IE) overall accuracy in identification of LBPs from non-LBPs and 92.06% (CV) and 92.90% (IE) (in average) for classification of different LBPs classes. Increasing the number and the range of extracted protein features as well as optimization of the SVM parameters significantly increased the efficiency of LBPs class prediction in comparison to the only previous report in this field. Altogether, the results showed that the SVM algorithm can be run on broad, computationally calculated protein features and offers a promising tool in detection of LBPs classes. The proposed approach has the potential to integrate and improve the common sequence alignment based methods. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Lipid Raft Size and Lipid Mobility in Non-raft Domains Increase during Aging and Are Exacerbated in APP/PS1 Mice Model of Alzheimer's Disease. Predictions from an Agent-Based Mathematical Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Guido; Díaz, Mario; Torres, Néstor V.

    2016-01-01

    A connection between lipid rafts and Alzheimer's disease has been studied during the last decades. Mathematical modeling approaches have recently been used to correlate the effects of lipid composition changes in the physicochemical properties of raft-like membranes. Here we propose an agent based model to assess the effect of lipid changes in lipid rafts on the evolution and progression of Alzheimer's disease using lipid profile data obtained in an established model of familial Alzheimer's disease. We have observed that lipid raft size and lipid mobility in non-raft domains are two main factors that increase during age and are accelerated in the transgenic Alzheimer's disease mouse model. The consequences of these changes are discussed in the context of neurotoxic amyloid β production. Our agent based model predicts that increasing sterols (mainly cholesterol) and long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) (mainly DHA, docosahexaenoic acid) proportions in the membrane composition might delay the onset and progression of the disease. PMID:27014089

  4. Diabetes that impacts on routine activities predicts slower recovery after total knee arthroplasty: an observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurudeen Amusat

    2014-12-01

    . Physiotherapists could institute closer monitoring within the hospital and community settings for people undergoing TKA who perceive that diabetes impacts on their routine activities. [Amusat N, Beaupre L, Jhangri GS, Pohar SL, Simpson S, Warren S, Jones CA (2014 Diabetes that impacts on routine activities predicts slower recovery after total knee arthroplasty: an observational study. Journal of Physiotherapy 60: 217–223

  5. Muscle Weakness Thresholds for Prediction of Diabetes in Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Mark D; Zhang, Peng; Choksi, Palak; Markides, Kyriakos S; Al Snih, Soham

    2016-05-01

    Despite the known links between weakness and early mortality, what remains to be fully understood is the extent to which strength preservation is associated with protection from cardiometabolic diseases, such as diabetes. The purposes of this study were to determine the association between muscle strength and diabetes among adults, and to identify age- and sex-specific thresholds of low strength for detection of risk. A population-representative sample of 4066 individuals, aged 20-85 years, was included from the combined 2011-2012 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) data sets. Strength was assessed using a handheld dynamometer, and the single highest reading from either hand was normalized to body mass. A logistic regression model was used to assess the association between normalized grip strength and risk of diabetes, as determined by haemoglobin A1c levels ≥6.5 % (≥48 mmol/mol), while controlling for sociodemographic characteristics, anthropometric measures and television viewing time. For every 0.05 decrement in normalized strength, there were 1.26 times increased adjusted odds for diabetes in men and women. Women were at lower odds of having diabetes (odds ratio 0.49; 95 % confidence interval 0.29-0.82). Age, waist circumference and lower income were also associated with diabetes. The optimal sex- and age-specific weakness thresholds to detect diabetes were 0.56, 0.50 and 0.45 for men at ages of 20-39, 40-59 and 60-80 years, respectively, and 0.42, 0.38 and 0.33 for women at ages of 20-39, 40-59 and 60-80 years, respectively. We present thresholds of strength that can be incorporated into a clinical setting for identifying adults who are at risk of developing diabetes and might benefit from lifestyle interventions to reduce risk.

  6. Effects of acute exercise on lipid content and dietary lipid uptake in liver and skeletal muscle of lean and diabetic rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssens, Sharon; Jonkers, Richard A. M.; Groen, Albert K.; Nicolay, Klaas; van Loon, Luc J. C.; Prompers, Jeanine J.

    2015-01-01

    Insulin resistance is associated with ectopic lipid accumulation. Physical activity improves insulin sensitivity, but the impact of exercise on lipid handling in insulin-resistant tissues remains to be elucidated. The present study characterizes the effects of acute exercise on lipid content and

  7. A supply-demand model of fetal energy sufficiency predicts lipid profiles in male but not female Filipino adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzawa, C W; Adair, L S

    2004-03-01

    To test the hypothesis that the balance between fetal nutritional demand and maternal nutritional supply during pregnancy will predict lipid profiles in offspring measured in adolescence. A total of 296 male and 307 female Filipino offspring (aged 14-16 y) and mothers enrolled in a longitudinal birth cohort study (begun in 1983-84) had lipid profiles measured. Data on maternal height (as a proxy for offspring growth potential and thus fetal nutritional demand) and third trimester maternal arm fat area (as a proxy for maternal supply) were used to create four groups hypothesized to reflect a gradient of fetal energy sufficiency. As fetal energy sufficiency increased among males, there was a decrease in total cholesterol (TC) (Psupply-demand model did not predict any lipid outcome or clinical risk criteria. Our findings in males support the hypothesis that the balance between fetal nutritional demand and maternal nutritional supply has implications for future lipid profiles. The lack of significant associations in females adds to mounting evidence for sex differences in lipid metabolism programming, and may reflect sex differences in fetal nutritional demand. The National Science Foundation, the Mellon Foundation, the Nestle Foundation, and the Emory University Internationalization Program.

  8. Use of Readily Accessible Inflammatory Markers to Predict Diabetic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren Winter

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic kidney disease is a common complication of type 1 and type 2 diabetes and is the primary cause of end-stage renal disease in developed countries. Early detection of diabetic kidney disease will facilitate early intervention aimed at reducing the rate of progression to end-stage renal disease. Diabetic kidney disease has been traditionally classified based on the presence of albuminuria. More recently estimated glomerular filtration rate has also been incorporated into the staging of diabetic kidney disease. While albuminuric diabetic kidney disease is well described, the phenotype of non-albuminuric diabetic kidney disease is now widely accepted. An association between markers of inflammation and diabetic kidney disease has previously been demonstrated. Effector molecules of the innate immune system including C-reactive protein, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α are increased in patients with diabetic kidney disease. Furthermore, renal infiltration of neutrophils, macrophages, and lymphocytes are observed in renal biopsies of patients with diabetic kidney disease. Similarly high serum neutrophil and low serum lymphocyte counts have been shown to be associated with diabetic kidney disease. The neutrophil–lymphocyte ratio is considered a robust measure of systemic inflammation and is associated with the presence of inflammatory conditions including the metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance. Cross-sectional studies have demonstrated a link between high levels of the above inflammatory biomarkers and diabetic kidney disease. Further longitudinal studies will be required to determine if these readily available inflammatory biomarkers can accurately predict the presence and prognosis of diabetic kidney disease, above and beyond albuminuria, and estimated glomerular filtration rate.

  9. Gene-specific function prediction for non-synonymous mutations in monogenic diabetes genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quan Li

    Full Text Available The rapid progress of genomic technologies has been providing new opportunities to address the need of maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY molecular diagnosis. However, whether a new mutation causes MODY can be questionable. A number of in silico methods have been developed to predict functional effects of rare human mutations. The purpose of this study is to compare the performance of different bioinformatics methods in the functional prediction of nonsynonymous mutations in each MODY gene, and provides reference matrices to assist the molecular diagnosis of MODY. Our study showed that the prediction scores by different methods of the diabetes mutations were highly correlated, but were more complimentary than replacement to each other. The available in silico methods for the prediction of diabetes mutations had varied performances across different genes. Applying gene-specific thresholds defined by this study may be able to increase the performance of in silico prediction of disease-causing mutations.

  10. Population-Level Prediction of Type 2 Diabetes From Claims Data and Analysis of Risk Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razavian, Narges; Blecker, Saul; Schmidt, Ann Marie; Smith-McLallen, Aaron; Nigam, Somesh; Sontag, David

    2015-12-01

    We present a new approach to population health, in which data-driven predictive models are learned for outcomes such as type 2 diabetes. Our approach enables risk assessment from readily available electronic claims data on large populations, without additional screening cost. Proposed model uncovers early and late-stage risk factors. Using administrative claims, pharmacy records, healthcare utilization, and laboratory results of 4.1 million individuals between 2005 and 2009, an initial set of 42,000 variables were derived that together describe the full health status and history of every individual. Machine learning was then used to methodically enhance predictive variable set and fit models predicting onset of type 2 diabetes in 2009-2011, 2010-2012, and 2011-2013. We compared the enhanced model with a parsimonious model consisting of known diabetes risk factors in a real-world environment, where missing values are common and prevalent. Furthermore, we analyzed novel and known risk factors emerging from the model at different age groups at different stages before the onset. Parsimonious model using 21 classic diabetes risk factors resulted in area under ROC curve (AUC) of 0.75 for diabetes prediction within a 2-year window following the baseline. The enhanced model increased the AUC to 0.80, with about 900 variables selected as predictive (p differences between AUCs). Similar improvements were observed for models predicting diabetes onset 1-3 years and 2-4 years after baseline. The enhanced model improved positive predictive value by at least 50% and identified novel surrogate risk factors for type 2 diabetes, such as chronic liver disease (odds ratio [OR] 3.71), high alanine aminotransferase (OR 2.26), esophageal reflux (OR 1.85), and history of acute bronchitis (OR 1.45). Liver risk factors emerge later in the process of diabetes development compared with obesity-related factors such as hypertension and high hemoglobin A1c. In conclusion, population-level risk

  11. Dipeptidyl-peptidase-IV inhibition augments postprandial lipid mobilization and oxidation in type 2 diabetic patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boschmann, M.; Engeli, S.; Dobberstein, K.; Budziarek, P.; Strauss, A.; Boehnke, J.; Sweep, F.C.; Luft, F.C.; He, Y.; Foley, J.E.; Jordan, J.

    2009-01-01

    CONTEXT: Dipeptidyl-peptidase-IV (DPP-4) inhibition increases endogenous GLP-1 activity, resulting in improved glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The metabolic response may be explained in part by extrapancreatic mechanisms. OBJECTIVE: We tested the hypothesis that DPP-4

  12. Grapefruit Derived Flavonoid Naringin Improves Ketoacidosis and Lipid Peroxidation in Type 1 Diabetes Rat Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfred N Murunga

    Full Text Available Hypoglycemic effects of grapefruit juice are well known but the effects of naringin, its main flavonoid on glucose intolerance and metabolic complications in type 1 diabetes are not known.To investigate the effects of naringin on glucose intolerance, oxidative stress and ketonemia in type 1 diabetic rats.Sprague-Dawley rats divided into 5 groups (n = 7 were orally treated daily with 3.0 ml/kg body weight (BW/day of distilled water (group 1 or 50 mg/kg BW of naringin (groups 2 and 4, respectively. Groups 3, 4 and 5 were given a single intra-peritoneal injection of 60 mg/kg BW of streptozotocin to induce diabetes. Group 3 was further treated with subcutaneous insulin (4.0 IU/kg BW twice daily, respectively.Stretozotocin (STZ only-treated groups exhibited hyperglycemia, polydipsia, polyuria, weight loss, glucose intolerance, low fasting plasma insulin and reduced hepatic glycogen content compared to the control group. Furthermore they had significantly elevated Malondialdehyde (MDA, acetoacetate, β-hydroxybutyrate, anion gap and significantly reduced blood pH and plasma bicarbonate compared to the control group. Naringin treatment significantly improved Fasting Plasma Insulin (FPI, hepatic glycogen content, malondialdehyde, β-hydroxybutyrate, acetoacetate, bicarbonate, blood pH and anion gap but not Fasting Blood Glucose (FBG compared to the STZ only-treated group.Naringin is not hypoglycemic but ameliorates ketoacidosis and oxidative stress. Naringin supplements could therefore mitigate complications of diabetic ketoacidosis.

  13. H2RM: A Hybrid Rough Set Reasoning Model for Prediction and Management of Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahman Ali

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes is a chronic disease characterized by high blood glucose level that results either from a deficiency of insulin produced by the body, or the body’s resistance to the effects of insulin. Accurate and precise reasoning and prediction models greatly help physicians to improve diagnosis, prognosis and treatment procedures of different diseases. Though numerous models have been proposed to solve issues of diagnosis and management of diabetes, they have the following drawbacks: (1 restricted one type of diabetes; (2 lack understandability and explanatory power of the techniques and decision; (3 limited either to prediction purpose or management over the structured contents; and (4 lack competence for dimensionality and vagueness of patient’s data. To overcome these issues, this paper proposes a novel hybrid rough set reasoning model (H2RM that resolves problems of inaccurate prediction and management of type-1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM and type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. For verification of the proposed model, experimental data from fifty patients, acquired from a local hospital in semi-structured format, is used. First, the data is transformed into structured format and then used for mining prediction rules. Rough set theory (RST based techniques and algorithms are used to mine the prediction rules. During the online execution phase of the model, these rules are used to predict T1DM and T2DM for new patients. Furthermore, the proposed model assists physicians to manage diabetes using knowledge extracted from online diabetes guidelines. Correlation-based trend analysis techniques are used to manage diabetic observations. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed model outperforms the existing methods with 95.9% average and balanced accuracies.

  14. H2RM: A Hybrid Rough Set Reasoning Model for Prediction and Management of Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Rahman; Hussain, Jamil; Siddiqi, Muhammad Hameed; Hussain, Maqbool; Lee, Sungyoung

    2015-07-03

    Diabetes is a chronic disease characterized by high blood glucose level that results either from a deficiency of insulin produced by the body, or the body's resistance to the effects of insulin. Accurate and precise reasoning and prediction models greatly help physicians to improve diagnosis, prognosis and treatment procedures of different diseases. Though numerous models have been proposed to solve issues of diagnosis and management of diabetes, they have the following drawbacks: (1) restricted one type of diabetes; (2) lack understandability and explanatory power of the techniques and decision; (3) limited either to prediction purpose or management over the structured contents; and (4) lack competence for dimensionality and vagueness of patient's data. To overcome these issues, this paper proposes a novel hybrid rough set reasoning model (H2RM) that resolves problems of inaccurate prediction and management of type-1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). For verification of the proposed model, experimental data from fifty patients, acquired from a local hospital in semi-structured format, is used. First, the data is transformed into structured format and then used for mining prediction rules. Rough set theory (RST) based techniques and algorithms are used to mine the prediction rules. During the online execution phase of the model, these rules are used to predict T1DM and T2DM for new patients. Furthermore, the proposed model assists physicians to manage diabetes using knowledge extracted from online diabetes guidelines. Correlation-based trend analysis techniques are used to manage diabetic observations. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed model outperforms the existing methods with 95.9% average and balanced accuracies.

  15. HLA is not predictive of posttransplant diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Romero, L F; Santiago-Delpín, E A; de Echegaray, Sally; Solis, D R; Rodriguez-Trinidad, A T; Gonzalez-Caraballo, Z A; Morales-Otero, L A

    2006-04-01

    New-onset posttransplant diabetes mellitus (PTDM) is a frequent complication of kidney transplantation. The goal of this study was to identify if the tendency to develop PTDM was associated to the HLA, as is seen in the general population. A retrospective study was made of 525 patients who underwent renal transplantation between 1997 and 2004. They were divided into three categories depending on the diabetic status before and after kidney transplantation. The HLA profile of each patient was identified for class 1 and class 2 antigens including HLA-A, HLA-B, and DR-R. Antigen frequencies were calculated and gene frequencies derived. These were compared among the three groups and with the published data for the Puerto Rico population. Other variables studied included weight, age, gender, and family history. Seventy-two of 526 (13.7%) were diabetic before transplantation; 92/453 (20.3%) developed PTDM after kidney transplantation. Pretransplant diabetics showed a higher incidence of A3 (0.1102 vs 0.0869 vs 0.0361), DR4 (0.3334 vs 0.1932 vs 0.2124), and DR-13 (0.1835 vs 0.1115 vs 0.1175) than nondiabetics and the normal Puerto Rican population. Posttransplant diabetics showed a higher A3 (0.1154) and a higher DR3 (0.0675 vs 0.0295 vs 0.0022) than nondiabetics and normal population. PTDM was not associated statistically with the HLA in this group of transplant recipients, although A3 and DR3 were higher. Patients with the phenotype that is related to diabetes in the normal population did not have a higher incidence of diabetes in this series.

  16. Effect of Sitagliptin on Glycemic Control, Body Weight, Blood Pressure and Serum Lipid Profile in Type 2 Diabetic Hyperlipidemic Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, M.; Atif, M. A.; Akhtar, L.; Ali, B.; Tunio, A. G.; Serwar, G.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Dyslipidaemia is a global health issue in developed as well as in developing countries. People with type 2 Diabetes mellitus are more susceptible to develop dyslipidaemia and its related complications. The objective of the study was to assess the effect of sitagliptin a (DPP-4 inhibitor) oral antidiabetic drug on blood sugar, body weight, blood pressure and dyslipidaemia in type 2 diabetic patients. Methods: This 12 weeks open label observational study was conducted at outdoor of diabetic clinic of Sheikh Zayed Medical College/Hospital, Rahim Yar Khan in which newly diagnosed type 2 diabetic patients (n=78) with poor glycaemic control(HbA1c >7.2 percent) were selected. The patient received sitagliptin 50 mg twice daily for 12 weeks. Results: After 12 weeks treatment with sitagliptin, there was a significant reduction in the value of HbA1c from 8.184 percent±0.467 at baseline to 7.0200 percent±0.459 at 12 weeks (p<0.05). Body weight also decreased significantly from 80.21kg±7.156 at baseline to 71.74 kg±6.567 at 12 weeks (p<0.05).Systolic blood pressure decreased (SBP) decreased significantly from 138.17±6.050 mmHg at baseline to 131.22±6.311 mmHg at 12 weeks (p<0.05). Significant changes were also seen in diastolic blood pressure which decreased from 83.14±6.714 mmHg at baseline to 75.28±6.481 mmHg at 12 weeks (p<0.05). Significant reduction in the serum level of total Cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG) and Low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) were detected (TC: 222.09±13.538 to 209.41±13.475 mg/dl, p<0.05; TG: 170.99±6.940 to 143.45±8.279 mg/dl, p<0.05; LDL-C 120.00±5.804 to 109.06±6.278 mg/dl, p<0.05). High density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) increased significantly from 42.99±4.836 mg/dl at baseline to 49.97±3.490 mg/dl at 12 weeks. Conclusion: Sitagliptin not only improves blood glucose control but also body weight, blood pressure and lipid profile in type 2 diabetic hyperlipidaemia patients. (author)

  17. The relationship between arterial elasticity and lipid profile in people with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rondó, Patricia Helen Carvalho; Freire, Maria Beatriz S; D'Abronzo, Francisco Homero; Macedo, Ivan; Chavez-Jauregui, Rosa Nilda; Luzia, Liania Alves

    2010-09-01

    A cross-sectional study was carried out to assess small (SAEI) and large (LAEI) arterial elasticity indexes of individuals with T1DM, and its relationship with their lipid profile. There were associations between SAEI and total cholesterol and waist-hip ratio (R(2)=0.29). Most of the individuals investigated showed low measures of SAEI. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Hemoglobin A1c can be helpful in predicting progression to diabetes after Whipple procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Lisa; Jeyarajah, D Rohan

    2007-01-01

    Normoglycemic patients undergoing pancreaticoduodenectomy (Whipple procedure) often inquire whether they will be diabetic postoperatively. There is limited information on this issue. We therefore looked at a more subtle measurement of long-term glycemic control, hemoglobin A1c (HgbA1c), as a prognostic tool in predicting progression to diabetes post Whipple. A retrospective review over a 6-year period of all patients undergoing Whipple procedures at a single institution was conducted. In all, 27 patients had no prior history of diabetes, complete follow-up, and measured preoperative HgbA1c values. Postoperative diabetes was defined as the need for oral hypoglycemic agents or insulin. These charts were analyzed for progression to diabetes after Whipple. Of the 27 patients, 10 were considered to have postoperative diabetes. The average preoperative HgbA1c value for these patients was 6.3+/-0.66. This was statistically different from the 17 patients without postoperative diabetes (average HgbA1c 5.2+/-0.39, pWhipple operation if the preoperative HgbA1c value is in the normal range. The apparent utility of HgbA1c in predicting postoperative diabetes in this small study suggests that this laboratory test may be very helpful in counseling patients for Whipple operation.

  19. Aortic lipid and 125I-albumin accumulation in streptozotocin-diabetic guinea pigs: prevention by insulin treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlosser, M.J.; Bannon, A.W.; Verlangieri, A.J.

    1986-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus, a major risk factor of atherosclerosis, is associated with the aortic accumulation of macromolecules. The authors have examined this relationship in the streptozotocin (STZ)-diabetic guinea pig, a species (like man) unable to synthesize ascorbic acid and susceptible to atherosclerosis. Male Dunkin-Hartley guinea pigs received STZ (150 mg/kg, i.c.) or vehicle (control). After 5 days, insulin (10 U/kg/day) was given to half the STZ animals (STZ-INS0 while the remaining half (STZ-SAL) and controls received saline. 25 days later, animals were given 125 I-albumin (100 μCi/kg, i.a.). Activity was determined in plasma at 5 (C/sub p5), 15 and 30 minutes, and in the upper thoracic aorta after 30 minutes. Histopathological changes were evaluated in the lower aorta. Aortic albumin permeability defined as cpm/cm 2 /sec, cpm/cm 2 /sec/C/sub p5/, or cpm/C/sub p5//g tissue was significantly elevated in the STZ-SAL group compared to both STZ-INS and control groups; these latter two groups were not significantly different from each other. Oil-Red-O positive material (lipid) occurred at multifocal areas within the intima of the STZ-SAL animals only. This study demonstrates (1) an abnormal increase in aortic permeability to albumin, (2) histological evidence of early atherosclerotic lesions, and (3) that insulin treatment can prevent these angiopathies in this STZ-diabetic animal model

  20. Predicted impact of extending the screening interval for diabetic retinopathy: the Scottish Diabetic Retinopathy Screening programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Looker, H C; Nyangoma, S O; Cromie, D T; Olson, J A; Leese, G P; Philip, S; Black, M W; Doig, J; Lee, N; Briggs, A; Hothersall, E J; Morris, A D; Lindsay, R S; McKnight, J A; Pearson, D W M; Sattar, N A; Wild, S H; McKeigue, P; Colhoun, H M

    2013-08-01

    The aim of our study was to identify subgroups of patients attending the Scottish Diabetic Retinopathy Screening (DRS) programme who might safely move from annual to two yearly retinopathy screening. This was a retrospective cohort study of screening data from the DRS programme collected between 2005 and 2011 for people aged ≥12 years with type 1 or type 2 diabetes in Scotland. We used hidden Markov models to calculate the probabilities of transitions to referable diabetic retinopathy (referable background or proliferative retinopathy) or referable maculopathy. The study included 155,114 individuals with no referable diabetic retinopathy or maculopathy at their first DRS examination and with one or more further DRS examinations. There were 11,275 incident cases of referable diabetic eye disease (9,204 referable maculopathy, 2,071 referable background or proliferative retinopathy). The observed transitions to referable background or proliferative retinopathy were lower for people with no visible retinopathy vs mild background retinopathy at their prior examination (respectively, 1.2% vs 8.1% for type 1 diabetes and 0.6% vs 5.1% for type 2 diabetes). The lowest probability for transitioning to referable background or proliferative retinopathy was among people with two consecutive screens showing no visible retinopathy, where the probability was <0.3% for type 1 and <0.2% for type 2 diabetes at 2 years. Transition rates to referable diabetic eye disease were lowest among people with type 2 diabetes and two consecutive screens showing no visible retinopathy. If such people had been offered two yearly screening the DRS service would have needed to screen 40% fewer people in 2009.

  1. Evidence that multiple defects in lipid regulation occur before hyperglycemia during the prodrome of type-2 diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon G Anderson

    Full Text Available Blood-vessel dysfunction arises before overt hyperglycemia in type-2 diabetes (T2DM. We hypothesised that a metabolomic approach might identify metabolites/pathways perturbed in this pre-hyperglycemic phase. To test this hypothesis and for specific metabolite hypothesis generation, serum metabolic profiling was performed in young women at increased, intermediate and low risk of subsequent T2DM.Participants were stratified by glucose tolerance during a previous index pregnancy into three risk-groups: overt gestational diabetes (GDM; n = 18; those with glucose values in the upper quartile but below GDM levels (UQ group; n = 45; and controls (n = 43, below the median glucose values. Follow-up serum samples were collected at a mean 22 months postnatally. Samples were analysed in a random order using Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography coupled to an electrospray hybrid LTQ-Orbitrap mass spectrometer. Statistical analysis included principal component (PCA and multivariate methods.Significant between-group differences were observed at follow-up in waist circumference (86, 95%CI (79-91 vs 80 (76-84 cm for GDM vs controls, p<0.05, adiponectin (about 33% lower in GDM group, p = 0.004, fasting glucose, post-prandial glucose and HbA1c, but the latter 3 all remained within the 'normal' range. Substantial differences in metabolite profiles were apparent between the 2 'at-risk' groups and controls, particularly in concentrations of phospholipids (4 metabolites with p ≤ 0.01, acylcarnitines (3 with p ≤ 0.02, short- and long-chain fatty acids (3 with p<  = 0.03, and diglycerides (4 with p ≤ 0.05.Defects in adipocyte function from excess energy storage as relatively hypoxic visceral and hepatic fat, and impaired mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation may initiate the observed perturbations in lipid metabolism. Together with evidence from the failure of glucose-directed treatments to improve cardiovascular outcomes, these data and those of others indicate

  2. Sex-dependent independent prediction of incident diabetes by depressive symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbaş-Şimşek, Tuğba; Onat, Altan; Kaya, Adnan; Tusun, Eyyup; Yüksel, Hüsniye; Can, Günay

    2017-12-01

    To study the predictive value of depressive symptoms (DeprSs) in a general population of Turkey for type 2 diabetes. Responses to three questions served to assess the sense of depression. Cox regression analyses were used regarding risk estimates for incident diabetes, after exclusion of prevalent cases of diabetes. Mean follow-up consisted of 5.15 (±1.4) years. Depressive symptoms were present at baseline in 16.2% of the whole study sample, threefold in women than men. Reduced physical activity grade was the only significant covariate at baseline in men, while younger age and lower blood pressure were significantly different in women compared with those without DeprS. In men, presence of DeprS predicted incident diabetes at a significant 2.58-fold relative risk (95% confidence interval 1.03; 6.44), after adjustment for age, systolic blood pressure, and antidepressant drug usage. When further covariates were added, waist circumference remained the only significant predictor, while DepS was attenuated to a relative risk of 2.12 (95% confidence interval 0.83; 5.40). DeprS was not associated with diabetes in women, whereas antidepressant drug usage only tended to be positively associated. Gender difference existed in the relationship between DeprS and incident diabetes. DeprS predicted subsequent development of diabetes in men alone, not in women. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Antidiabetic effect of Scoparia dulcis: effect on lipid peroxidation in streptozotocin diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pari, L; Latha, M

    2005-03-01

    Oxidative damage has been suggested to be a contributory factor in the development and complications of diabetes. The antioxidant effect of an aqueous extract of Scoparia dulcis, an indigenous plant used in Ayurvedic medicine in India was studied in rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes. Oral administration of Scoparia dulcis plant extract (SPEt) (200 mg/kg body weight) for 3 weeks resulted in a significant reduction in blood glucose and an increase in plasma insulin. The aqueous extract also resulted in decreased free radical formation in tissues (liver and kidney) studied. The decrease in thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and hydroperoxides (HPX) and increase in the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), reduced glutathione (GSH) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) clearly show the antioxidant properties of SPEt in addition to its antidiabetic effect. The effect of SPEt at 200 mg/kg body weight was better than glibenclamide, a reference drug.

  4. Acylation stimulating protein, complement C3 and lipid metabolism in ketosis-prone diabetic subjects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Liu

    Full Text Available Ketosis-prone diabetes (KPDM is new-onset diabetic ketoacidosis without precipitating factors in non-type 1 diabetic patients; after management, some are withdrawn from exogenous insulin, although determining factors remain unclear.Twenty KPDM patients and twelve type 1 diabetic patients (T1DM, evaluated at baseline, 12 and 24 months with/without insulin maintenance underwent a standardized mixed-meal tolerance test (MMTT for 2 h.At baseline, triglyceride and C3 were higher during MMTT in KPDM vs. T1DM (p<0.0001 with no differences in non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA while Acylation Stimulating Protein (ASP tended to be higher. Within 12 months, 11 KPDM were withdrawn from insulin treatment (KPDM-ins, while 9 were maintained (KPDM+ins. NEFA was lower in KPDM-ins vs. KPDM+ins at baseline (p = 0.0006, 12 months (p<0.0001 and 24 months (p<0.0001 during MMTT. NEFA in KPDM-ins decreased over 30-120 minutes (p<0.05, but not in KPDM+ins. Overall, C3 was higher in KPDM-ins vs KPDM+ins at 12 months (p = 0.0081 and 24 months (p = 0.0019, while ASP was lower at baseline (p = 0.0024 and 12 months (p = 0.0281, with a decrease in ASP/C3 ratio.Notwithstanding greater adiposity in KPDM-ins, greater NEFA decreases and lower ASP levels during MMTT suggest better insulin and ASP sensitivity in these patients.

  5. The effect of pomegranate juice (no added sugar consumption on fast blood sugar, lipid profile, antioxidant factors in Type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samira Babaeian amini

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background : Diabetes mellitus is one of the prevalence metabolic disorders in the worldwide. Studies have shown that fruits, vegetables and drinks that are rich in phenolic and antioxidants components may reduce cardiovascular and diabetes diseases. One of these fruits is Pomegranate that is rich in phelavonoid. Therefore, this study was designed to determine pomegranate juice effect on fast blood sugar, lipid profile, anthropometry, total antioxidant capacity and blood pressure in diabetic patients. Materials and Methods: In the present study, 50 patients with diabetes aged 30-50 were recruited into the study and randomly assigned into 2 groups:1 intervention group (n=25 that fed 240cc pomegranate juice daily, 2 control group (n=25 that fed 240cc water daily. Weight, hip circumstance, waist circumstance, lipid profile (HDL-C, LDL-C, TG, TC glucose, HbA1C, GPX, total antioxidant capacity, systolic and diastolic blood pressure were measured at the baseline and end of 8 weeks. Results: Insulin resistance, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, body weight, hip circumstance, waist circumstance decreased significantly and GPX increased in intervention group whereas pomegranate juice had no significant effect on glucose, HbA1C, lipid profile and total antioxidant capacity. Conclusion: These findings indicate that beneficial effect of pomegranate juice on insulin resistance, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, body weight, hip circumstance, waist circumstance, GPX

  6. Patterns of type 2 diabetes monitoring in rural towns: How does frequency of HbA1c and lipid testing compare with existing guidelines?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Christine L; Piterman, Leon; Shaw, Jonathan E; Kirby, Catherine; Barker, Daniel; Robinson, Jennifer; Forshaw, Kristy L; Sikaris, Kenneth A; Bisquera, Alessandra; Sanson-Fisher, Robert W

    2016-12-01

    To indicate levels of monitoring of type 2 diabetes in rural and regional Australia by examining patterns of glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) and blood lipid testing. Retrospective analysis of pathology services data from twenty regional and rural towns in eastern Australia over 24 months. Of 13 105 individuals who had either a single HbA1c result ≥7.0% (53 mmol mol -1 ); or two or more HbA1c tests within the study period. Frequency of testing of HbA1c and blood lipids (cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and triglycerides) were compared with guideline recommendations. About 58.3% of patients did not have the recommended 6-monthly HbA1c tests and 30.6% did not have annual lipid testing. For those who did not receive tests at the recommended interval, the mean between-test interval was 10.5 months (95% CI = 7.5-13.5) rather than 6 months for HbA1c testing; and 15.7 (95% CI = 13.3-18.1) months rather than annually for blood lipids. For those with at least one out-of-range test result, 77% of patients failed to receive a follow-up HbA1c test and 86.5% failed to receive a follow-up blood lipid test within the recommended 3 months. Patients less than 50 years of age, living in a more remote area and with poor diabetes control were less likely to have testing at the recommended intervals (P < 0.0001). Although poor diabetes testing is not limited to rural areas, more intensive diabetes monitoring is likely to be needed for patients living in non-metropolitan areas, particularly for some subgroups. © 2016 National Rural Health Alliance Inc.

  7. Liver function tests and risk prediction of incident type 2 diabetes : evaluation in two independent cohorts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbasi, Ali; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Corpeleijn, Eva; van der A, Daphne L.; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Gans, Rijk O. B.; Peelen, Linda M.; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Stolk, Ronald P.; Navis, Gerjan; Spijkerman, Annemieke M. W.; Beulens, Joline W. J.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Liver function tests might predict the risk of type 2 diabetes. An independent study evaluating utility of these markers compared with an existing prediction model is yet lacking. Methods and Findings: We performed a case-cohort study, including random subcohort (6.5%) from 38,379

  8. Body mass index for predicting hyperglycemia and serum lipid changes in Brazilian adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Ana Carolina R; Alvarez, Marlene M; Kanaan, Salim; Sichieri, Rosely; Veiga, Gloria V

    2009-02-01

    To determine the best cut-offs of body mass index for identifying alterations of blood lipids and glucose in adolescents. A probabilistic sample including 577 adolescent students aged 12-19 years in 2003 (210 males and 367 females) from state public schools in the city of Niterói, Southeastern Brazil, was studied. The Receiver Operating Characteristic curve was used to identify the best age-adjusted BMI cut-off for predicting high levels of serum total cholesterol (> or =150 mg/dL), LDL-C (> or =100 mg/dL), serum triglycerides (> or =100 mg/dL), plasma glucose (> 100 mg/dL) and low levels of HDL-C (international and two American. The most prevalent metabolic alterations (>50%) were: high total cholesterol and low HDL-C. BMI predicted high levels of triglycerides in males, high LDL-C in females, and high total cholesterol and the occurrence of three or more metabolic alterations in both males and females (areas under the curve range: 0.59 to 0.67), with low sensitivity (57%-66%) and low specificity (58%-66%). The best BMI cut-offs for this sample (20.3 kg/m(2) to 21.0 kg/m(2)) were lower than those proposed in the references studied. Although BMI values lower than the International cut-offs were better predictor of some metabolic abnormalities in Brazilian adolescents, overall BMI is not a good predictor of these abnormalities in this population.

  9. New Zealand Diabetes Cohort Study cardiovascular risk score for people with Type 2 diabetes: validation in the PREDICT cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Tom; Elley, C Raina; Wells, Sue; Robinson, Elizabeth; Kenealy, Tim; Pylypchuk, Romana; Bramley, Dale; Arroll, Bruce; Crengle, Sue; Riddell, Tania; Ameratunga, Shanthi; Metcalf, Patricia; Drury, Paul L

    2012-09-01

    New Zealand (NZ) guidelines recommend treating people for cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk on the basis of five-year absolute risk using a NZ adaptation of the Framingham risk equation. A diabetes-specific Diabetes Cohort Study (DCS) CVD predictive risk model has been developed and validated using NZ Get Checked data. To revalidate the DCS model with an independent cohort of people routinely assessed using PREDICT, a web-based CVD risk assessment and management programme. People with Type 2 diabetes without pre-existing CVD were identified amongst people who had a PREDICT risk assessment between 2002 and 2005. From this group we identified those with sufficient data to allow estimation of CVD risk with the DCS models. We compared the DCS models with the NZ Framingham risk equation in terms of discrimination, calibration, and reclassification implications. Of 3044 people in our study cohort, 1829 people had complete data and therefore had CVD risks calculated. Of this group, 12.8% (235) had a cardiovascular event during the five-year follow-up. The DCS models had better discrimination than the currently used equation, with C-statistics being 0.68 for the two DCS models and 0.65 for the NZ Framingham model. The DCS models were superior to the NZ Framingham equation at discriminating people with diabetes who will have a cardiovascular event. The adoption of a DCS model would lead to a small increase in the number of people with diabetes who are treated with medication, but potentially more CVD events would be avoided.

  10. Genetics of Type 2 Diabetes: association, interaction, prediction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van Hoek (Mandy)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractType 2 Diabetes is a common chronic disease that results from an imbalance between the bodies insulin need and the production of insulin. It is a heterogeneous disorder in which the relative contributions of insulin resistance and defects in insulin secretion are highly variable between

  11. Can macrocirculation changes predict nonhealing diabetic foot ulcers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ye-Na; Kim, Hyon-Surk; Kang, Jeong-A; Han, Seung-Kyu

    2014-01-01

    Transcutaneous partial oxygen tension (TcpO2) is considered the gold standard for assessment of tissue oxygenation, which is an essential factor for wound healing. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the association between macrocirculation and TcpO2 in persons with diabetes mellitus. Ninety-eight patients with diabetic foot ulcers participated in the study (61 men and 37 women). The subjects had a mean age of 66.6 years (range, 30-83 years) and were treated at the Diabetic Wound Center of Korea University Guro Hospital, Seoul, Republic of Korea. Macrocirculation was evaluated using 2 techniques: computed tomographic angiography and Doppler ultrasound. Macrocirculation scores were based on the patency of the two tibial arteries in 98 patients. Computed tomographic angiography and Doppler ultrasound scores (0-4 points) were given according to intraluminal filling defects and arterial pulse waveform of each vessel, respectively. Tissue oxygenation was measured by TcpO2. Macrocirculation scores were statistically analyzed as a function of the TcpO2. Statistical analysis revealed no significant linear trend between the macrocirculation status and TcpO2. Biavariate analysis using the Fisher exact test, Mantel-Haenszel tests, and McNemar-Bowker tests also found no significant relationship between macrocirculation and TcpO2. Computed tomographic angiography and Doppler ultrasound are not sufficiently reliable substitutes for TcpO2 measurements in regard to determining the optimal treatment for diabetic patients.

  12. Chromium level in prediction of diabetes in pre-diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahmatollah Rafiei

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chromium supplementations (Cr have been shown to exert beneficial effects in the management of type-2 diabetes. Prevalence of Cr deficiency in pre-diabetic patients is not well-understood, therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the extent of this prevalence. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional descriptive study, 132 pre-diabetic patients were recruited. The participants were randomly selected from those who referred to the Shariati Hospital in Isfahan, Iran. Blood samples are collected for measurement of Cr, insulin, fasting blood sugar (FBS, and two-hour post-load plasma glucose. The body mass index (BMI was calculated. Determination of Cr was carried out by atomic absorption spectrometry. Results: Thirty-four (31.5% patients had Cr deficiency and 74 (68.5% patients had normal Cr. There was no significant difference between sex, age groups (<50 years and ≥50 years and between patients with and without a family history of diabetes in both the groups. No significant differences in age, BMI, FBS or insulin were observed between two groups. In the group with a normal level of Cr, there was a significant reversed correlation between the Cr level and age, but no significant correlation existed between the Cr level and other factors in both groups. Conclusion: The levels of Cr deficiency are relatively common in patients with pre-diabetes, and it is necessary to screen patients with diabetes and pre-diabetes according to the American Diabetes Association guidelines, with regard to the Cr level and action should be taken to eliminate the Cr deficiency in these patients.

  13. Associations of Low-Intensity Resistance Training with Body Composition and Lipid Profile in Obese Patients with Type 2 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamasaki, Hidetaka; Kawashima, Yu; Tamada, Yoshiki; Furuta, Masashi; Katsuyama, Hisayuki; Sako, Akahito; Yanai, Hidekatsu

    2015-01-01

    Resistance training to increase muscle mass and functional capacity is an integral part of diet and exercise programs for the management of obesity and type 2 diabetes. Low-intensity resistance training with slow movement and tonic force generation (LST) may be a practical and safe regimen for elderly obese individuals but the health benefits are uncertain. This study investigated the effects of LST on body composition and metabolic parameters in obese patients with type 2 diabetes. Twenty-six obese patients with type 2 diabetes engaged in LST training during hospitalization and were advised to maintain this regimen for 12 weeks after discharge. We compared lipid profile, arterial stiffness, and body composition before and after LST training. After 12 weeks of LST training, the ratio of lower extremity muscle mass to body weight increased significantly (0.176 ± 0.028 to 0.184 ± 0.023, mean ± SD), while body fat mass and body fat percentage decreased significantly (36.2 ± 10.9 kg to 34.3 ± 9.4 kg and 41.2 ± 8.6% to 40.1 ± 7.7%, respectively). Moreover, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol was significantly increased (42.2 ± 14 mg/dl to 46.3 ± 12.4 mg/dl) and both free fatty acids and lipoprotein(a) were decreased (665.2 ± 212.1 μEq/l to 525.4 ± 231.3 μEq/l and 15.4 ± 18 mg/dl to 13.8 ± 18 mg/dl, respectively). No significant change was observed in arterial stiffness. Although this study was a non-controlled investigation and some confounding factors including dietary intake, medication and compliance with training might affect the study result, a brief (12-week) LST training program may be a safe and effective strategy for the management of obesity and type 2 diabetes.

  14. Associations of Low-Intensity Resistance Training with Body Composition and Lipid Profile in Obese Patients with Type 2 Diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidetaka Hamasaki

    Full Text Available Resistance training to increase muscle mass and functional capacity is an integral part of diet and exercise programs for the management of obesity and type 2 diabetes. Low-intensity resistance training with slow movement and tonic force generation (LST may be a practical and safe regimen for elderly obese individuals but the health benefits are uncertain. This study investigated the effects of LST on body composition and metabolic parameters in obese patients with type 2 diabetes. Twenty-six obese patients with type 2 diabetes engaged in LST training during hospitalization and were advised to maintain this regimen for 12 weeks after discharge. We compared lipid profile, arterial stiffness, and body composition before and after LST training. After 12 weeks of LST training, the ratio of lower extremity muscle mass to body weight increased significantly (0.176 ± 0.028 to 0.184 ± 0.023, mean ± SD, while body fat mass and body fat percentage decreased significantly (36.2 ± 10.9 kg to 34.3 ± 9.4 kg and 41.2 ± 8.6% to 40.1 ± 7.7%, respectively. Moreover, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol was significantly increased (42.2 ± 14 mg/dl to 46.3 ± 12.4 mg/dl and both free fatty acids and lipoprotein(a were decreased (665.2 ± 212.1 μEq/l to 525.4 ± 231.3 μEq/l and 15.4 ± 18 mg/dl to 13.8 ± 18 mg/dl, respectively. No significant change was observed in arterial stiffness. Although this study was a non-controlled investigation and some confounding factors including dietary intake, medication and compliance with training might affect the study result, a brief (12-week LST training program may be a safe and effective strategy for the management of obesity and type 2 diabetes.

  15. Lipidomic analysis of epidermal lipids: a tool to predict progression of inflammatory skin disease in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shan; Ganguli-Indra, Gitali; Indra, Arup K

    2016-05-01

    Lipidomics is the large-scale profiling and characterization of lipid species in a biological system using mass spectrometry. The skin barrier is mainly comprised of corneocytes and a lipid-enriched extracellular matrix. The major skin lipids are ceramides, cholesterol and free fatty acids (FFA). Lipid compositions are altered in inflammatory skin disorders with disrupted skin barrier such as atopic dermatitis (AD). Here we discuss some of the recent applications of lipidomics in human skin biology and in inflammatory skin diseases such as AD, psoriasis and Netherton syndrome. We also review applications of lipidomics in human skin equivalent and in pre-clinical animal models of skin diseases to gain insight into the pathogenesis of the skin disease. Expert commentary: Skin lipidomics analysis could be a fast, reliable and noninvasive tool to characterize the skin lipid profile and to monitor the progression of inflammatory skin diseases such as AD.

  16. The product of fasting plasma glucose and triglycerides improves risk prediction of type 2 diabetes in middle-aged Koreans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joung-Won; Lim, Nam-Kyoo; Park, Hyun-Young

    2018-05-30

    Screening for risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is an important public health issue. Previous studies report that fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and triglyceride (TG)-related indices, such as lipid accumulation product (LAP) and the product of fasting glucose and triglyceride (TyG index), are associated with incident T2DM. We aimed to evaluate whether FPG or TG-related indices can improve the predictive ability of a diabetes risk model for middle-aged Koreans. 7708 Koreans aged 40-69 years without diabetes at baseline were eligible from the Korean Genome and Epidemiology Study. The overall cumulative incidence of T2DM was 21.1% (766 cases) in men and 19.6% (797 cases) in women. Therefore, the overall cumulative incidence of T2DM was 20.3% (1563 cases). Multiple logistic regression analysis was conducted to compare the odds ratios (ORs) for incident T2DM for each index. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AROC), continuous net reclassification improvement (cNRI), and integrated discrimination improvement (IDI) were calculated when each measure was added to the basic risk model for diabetes. All the TG-related indices and FPG were more strongly associated with incident T2DM than WC in our study population. The adjusted ORs for the highest quartiles of WC, TG, FPG, LAP, and TyG index compared to the lowest, were 1.64 (95% CI, 1.13-2.38), 2.03 (1.59-2.61), 3.85 (2.99-4.97), 2.47 (1.82-3.34), and 2.79 (2.16-3.60) in men, and 1.17 (0.83-1.65), 2.42 (1.90-3.08), 2.15 (1.71-2.71), 2.44 (1.82-3.26), and 2.85 (2.22-3.66) in women, respectively. The addition of TG-related parameters or FPG, but not WC, to the basic risk model for T2DM (including age, body mass index, family history of diabetes, hypertension, current smoking, current drinking, and regular exercise) significantly increased cNRI, IDI, and AROC in both sexes. Adding either TyG index or FPG into the basic risk model for T2DM increases its prediction and reclassification ability

  17. The Impact of Oversampling with SMOTE on the Performance of 3 Classifiers in Prediction of Type 2 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramezankhani, Azra; Pournik, Omid; Shahrabi, Jamal; Azizi, Fereidoun; Hadaegh, Farzad; Khalili, Davood

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of the synthetic minority oversampling technique (SMOTE) on the performance of probabilistic neural network (PNN), naïve Bayes (NB), and decision tree (DT) classifiers for predicting diabetes in a prospective cohort of the Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study (TLGS). . Data of the 6647 nondiabetic participants, aged 20 years or older with more than 10 years of follow-up, were used to develop prediction models based on 21 common risk factors. The minority class in the training dataset was oversampled using the SMOTE technique, at 100%, 200%, 300%, 400%, 500%, 600%, and 700% of its original size. The original and the oversampled training datasets were used to establish the classification models. Accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, precision, F-measure, and Youden's index were used to evaluated the performance of classifiers in the test dataset. To compare the performance of the 3 classification models, we used the ROC convex hull (ROCCH). Oversampling the minority class at 700% (completely balanced) increased the sensitivity of the PNN, DT, and NB by 64%, 51%, and 5%, respectively, but decreased the accuracy and specificity of the 3 classification methods. NB had the best Youden's index before and after oversampling. The ROCCH showed that PNN is suboptimal for any class and cost conditions. To determine a classifier with a machine learning algorithm like the PNN and DT, class skew in data should be considered. The NB and DT were optimal classifiers in a prediction task in an imbalanced medical database. © The Author(s) 2014.

  18. Chemical characterization of Centaurium erythrea L. and its effects on carbohydrate and lipid metabolism in experimental diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefkov, Gjoshe; Miova, Biljana; Dinevska-Kjovkarovska, Suzana; Stanoeva, Jasmina Petreska; Stefova, Marina; Petrusevska, Gordana; Kulevanova, Svetlana

    2014-02-27

    Centaurium erythrea L. fam. Gentianaceae (CE) has been traditionally used for centuries in folk medicine of Balkans as a bitter medicinal herb for digestive complications and for treating febrile conditions and diabetes. The aim of this study was to gain insight into the chemical composition and underlying biochemical mechanism of action of the antihyperglycemic and antilipidemic activities of the dry extract of Centaurium erythrea L., wildly growing and traditionally used medicinal plant in the Republic of Macedonia. An ultrasonic methanol maceration of the aerial parts of the dried plant was performed and the extract was freeze-dried. HPLC-DAD-ESI-MS(n) was carried out on 150 mm × 4.6mm, 5 μm RP-18 Eclipse XDB column, at 40 °C. Mobile phase: water with 1% formic acid (A) and methanol (B) with linear gradient starting with 10% B was used to reach 15% at 5 min, 40% B at 25 min, 55% of B at 50 min and 100% at 60 min, with flow rate of 0.4 mL min(-1). Normal and streptozotocin (STZ) hyperglycemic Wistar rats were used for assessment of the antihyperglycemic and antilipidemic activity by measurement of the key carbohydrate-related enzymes and substrates, as well as lipid state of the organism. HPLC-DAD-ESI-MS(n) analyses revealed presence of four different secoiridoids, seven flavonoid glycosides and seven xanthones in the freeze-dried extract of CE representing 53%, 25% and 22% of all compounds, respectively. The short-term (12 days) treatment of the STZ-diabetic rats with CE-extracts resulted in a 74% reduction of the produced hyperglycemia, which is only 6% less than the reduction caused by glibeclamide (GLB, positive control). The CE-extract had a significant impact on the hepatic carbohydrate metabolism enhancing the direct synthesis of glycogen, normalizing phosphorylase a activity and reducing the activity of glucose-6-phosphatase, which further causes reduction in production of blood glucose level. The long-term (45 days) treatment showed that the HbA1c in

  19. Lipid changes and their relationship with vitamin D levels in children under 18 years with type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambrana-Calví, Gabriela D R; Palomo-Atance, Enrique; Gourdet, Marie E; León-Martín, Alberto; Ballester-Herrera, María José; Giralt-Muiña, Patricio

    2016-03-01

    To analyze lipid changes and their relationship with 25-hydroxy vitamin D3 (25-OH-D) levels in patients under 18 years old with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). A cross-sectional, descriptive study. Patients under 18 years with T1DM were enrolled by consecutive, nonrandomized sampling. Data collected included sex, age, pubertal stage, time since T1DM onset, weight, height, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), 25-OH-D, total cholesterol (TC), LDL cholesterol (LDL-C), HDL cholesterol (HDL-C), and triglycerides (TG). Results were stratified by sex, age, and pubertal stage. Data were analyzed using SPSS(®). Ninety patients with a mean age of 11.7 ± 3.6 years (51.1% males) and mean HbA1c levels of 7.5 ± 1.3% were enrolled. Of these, 26.6% had 25-OH-D levelsC levelsC levels ≥ 100 mg/dL, and 2.2% had TG levels ≥ 150 mg/dL. Patients with 25-OH-Dc. A correlation was found between 25-OH-D and TG levels (-0.230; P=.029). Patients in our population with vitamin D deficiency had higher TG levels. Long-term follow-up should be performed to understand the potential impact of such levels on diabetes-related complications. Copyright © 2015 SEEN. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. A diet rich in conjugated linoleic acid and butter increases lipid peroxidation but does not affect atherosclerotic, inflammatory, or diabetic risk markers in healthy young men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raff, Marianne; Tholstrup, Tine; Basu, Samar

    2008-01-01

    Intake of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) has been demonstrated to beneficially affect risk markers of atherosclerosis and diabetes in rats. CLA is naturally found in milk fat, especially from cows fed a diet high in oleic acid, and increased CLA intake can occur concomitantly with increased milk...... fat intake. Our objective was to investigate the effect of CLA as part of a diet rich in butter as a source of milk fat on risk markers of atherosclerosis, inflammation, diabetes type 11, and lipid peroxidation. A total of 38 healthy young men were given a diet with 115g/d of CLA-rich fat (5.5 g/d CLA...... esters, and phospholipids reflected that of the intervention diets. The CLA diet resulted in increased lipid peroxidation measured as an 83% higher 8-iso-prostaglandin F-2 alpha concentration compared with the control, P...

  1. Long-Term Prediction of Severe Hypoglycemia in Type 1 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Marie Moth; Færch, Louise; Thorsteinsson, Birger

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Prediction of risk of severe hypoglycemia (SH) in patients with type 1 diabetes is important to prevent future episodes, but it is unknown if it is possible to predict the long-term risk of SH. The aim of the study is to assess if long-term prediction of SH is possible in type 1...... diabetes. METHODS: A follow-up study was performed with 98 patients with type 1 diabetes. At baseline and at follow-up, the patients filled in a questionnaire about diabetes history and complications, number of SH in the preceding year and state of awareness, and HbA1c and C-peptide levels were measured......-up. CONCLUSIONS: Long-term prediction of severe hypoglycemia in type 1 diabetes was not possible, although baseline hypoglycemia unawareness tended to remain a predictor for risk of SH at follow-up. Therefore, it is important repeatedly to assess the different risk factors of SH to determine the actual risk....

  2. Toward Big Data Analytics: Review of Predictive Models in Management of Diabetes and Its Complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cichosz, Simon Lebech; Johansen, Mette Dencker; Hejlesen, Ole

    2015-10-14

    Diabetes is one of the top priorities in medical science and health care management, and an abundance of data and information is available on these patients. Whether data stem from statistical models or complex pattern recognition models, they may be fused into predictive models that combine patient information and prognostic outcome results. Such knowledge could be used in clinical decision support, disease surveillance, and public health management to improve patient care. Our aim was to review the literature and give an introduction to predictive models in screening for and the management of prevalent short- and long-term complications in diabetes. Predictive models have been developed for management of diabetes and its complications, and the number of publications on such models has been growing over the past decade. Often multiple logistic or a similar linear regression is used for prediction model development, possibly owing to its transparent functionality. Ultimately, for prediction models to prove useful, they must demonstrate impact, namely, their use must generate better patient outcomes. Although extensive effort has been put in to building these predictive models, there is a remarkable scarcity of impact studies. © 2015 Diabetes Technology Society.

  3. Improvement of predictive tools for vapor-liquid equilibrium based on group contribution methods applied to lipid technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damaceno, Daniela S.; Perederic, Olivia A.; Ceriani, Roberta

    2017-01-01

    structures that the first-order functional groups are unable to handle. In the particular case of fatty systems these models are not able to adequately predict the non-ideality in the liquid phase. Consequently, a new set of functional groups is proposed to represent the lipid compounds, requiring thereby....... There are rather small differences between the models and no single model is the best in all cases....

  4. A1C predicts type 2 diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance in a population at risk: the community diabetes prevention project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leite Silmara AO

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aims In a population at risk for type 2 diabetes (T2DM, we assessed early physical and metabolic markers that predict progression from normal to impaired glucose tolerance (IGT and T2DM. Methods A total of 388 individuals (22% male, age 46 + 11 years at risk for T2DM were randomized to Standard (n = 182 or Intervention (n = 206 care and evaluated at baseline and 5 annual follow-up visits, including blood pressure, BMI, A1C, lipids, urine albumin/creatinine ratio, VO2max, fasting glucose, insulin and C-peptide. The Standard group received results of annual lab tests and quarterly newsletters, while the Intervention group received quarterly newsletters and detailed discussions of lab results, routine self-directed activities, semi-annual group meetings and monthly telephone calls for ongoing support. Results Overall, 359 (93% returned for at least one follow-up visit and 272 (70% completed the final 5-year assessment. Return rates, changes in measures and incidence of IGT/T2DM were similar between groups. Low cardiorespiratory fitness (VO2max was the most prevalent baseline abnormality. A1C and BMI were significant predictors of IGT/T2DM after controlling for other factors. The risk of IGT/T2DM within 5 years was 17.16 (95% CL: 6.169, 47.736 times greater for those with baseline A1C>=5.8% as compared to those Conclusion Baseline A1C>=5.8% was a significant predictor of IGT/T2DM within 5 years in a population at high risk for T2DM. A1C is routinely performed among patients with diabetes, however these data and other evidence suggest that it may also be a useful tool for risk assessment and screening.

  5. Pomegranate Polyphenols Lower Lipid Peroxidation in Adults with Type 2 Diabetes but Have No Effects in Healthy Volunteers: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arpita Basu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. To examine the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects of pomegranate polyphenols in obese patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM (n=8 and in healthy nondiabetic controls (n=9. Methods. Participants received 2 capsules of pomegranate polyphenols (POMx, 1 capsule = 753 mg polyphenols daily for 4 weeks. Blood draws and anthropometrics were performed at baseline and at 4 weeks of the study. Results. Pomegranate polyphenols in healthy controls and in T2DM patients did not significantly affect body weight and blood pressure, glucose and lipids. Among clinical safety profiles, serum electrolytes, renal function tests, and hematological profiles were not significantly affected by POMx supplementation. However, aspartate aminotransferase (AST showed a significant increase in healthy controls, while alanine aminotransferase (ALT was significantly decreased in T2DM patients at 4 weeks (P<0.05, though values remained within the normal ranges. Among the biomarkers of lipid oxidation and inflammation, oxidized LDL and serum C-reactive protein (CRP did not differ at 4 weeks in either group, while pomegranate polyphenols significantly decreased malondialdehyde (MDA and hydroxynonenal (HNE only in the diabetic group versus baseline (P<0.05. Conclusions. POMx reduces lipid peroxidation in patients with T2DM, but with no effects in healthy controls, and specifically modulates liver enzymes in diabetic and nondiabetic subjects. Larger clinical trials are merited.

  6. Maximal lipid oxidation in patients with type 2 diabetes is normal and shows an adequate increase in response to aerobic training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, M; Vind, B F; Højlund, K

    2009-01-01

    AIM: Insulin resistance in subjects with type 2 diabetes (T2D) and obesity is associated with an imbalance between the availability and the oxidation of lipids. We hypothesized that maximal whole-body lipid oxidation during exercise (FATmax) is reduced and that training-induced metabolic adaptation...... in response to aerobic training in obese subjects with and without T2D. These metabolic adaptations to training seem to be unrelated to changes in insulin sensitivity and indicate that an impaired capacity for lipid oxidation is not a major cause of insulin resistance in T2D....... subjects after training (all p Insulin-stimulated glucose disappearance rate (Rd) was lower in T2D vs. control subjects both before and after training. Rd increased...

  7. The Aqueous Extract of Gynura divaricata (L. DC. Improves Glucose and Lipid Metabolism and Ameliorates Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinnan Li

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM is a chronic disease characterized by hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia caused by impaired insulin secretion and resistance of the peripheral tissues. A major pathogenesis of T2DM is obesity-associated insulin resistance. Gynura divaricata (L. DC. (GD is a natural plant and has been reported to have numerous health-promoting effects on both animals and humans. In this study, we aimed to elucidate the regulatory mechanism of GD improving glucose and lipid metabolism in an obesity animal model induced by high-fat and high-sugar diet in combination with low dose of streptozocin and an insulin-resistant HepG2 cell model induced by dexamethasone. The study showed that the water extract of GD (GD extract A could significantly reduce fasting serum glucose, reverse dyslipidemia and pancreatic damage, and regulate the body weight of mice. We also found that GD extract A had low toxicity in vivo and in vitro. Furthermore, GD extract A may increase glucose consumption in insulin-resistant HepG2 cells, markedly inhibit NF-κB activation, and decrease the impairment in signaling molecules of insulin pathway, such as IRS-1, AKT, and GLUT1. Overall, the results indicate that GD extract A is a promising candidate for the prevention and treatment of T2DM.

  8. Carbohydrate and lipid metabolism indices dynamic in patients with postinfarction cardiosclerosis, type 2 diabetes and obesity in 6 months and 1 year after myocardial revascularization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. P. Kravchun

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays conservative therapy and reperfusion techniques, which include thrombolytic therapy and percutaneous coronary intervention considered as the main strategies for the acute coronary syndrome treatment. Aim. To assess carbohydrate and lipid metabolism in patients with postinfarction cardiosclerosis, type 2 diabetes and obesity in 6 months and 1 year after myocardial revascularization. Methods and results. 58 patients who underwent thrombolytic therapy and 32 patients who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention were examined. Glucose level was determined by glucose oxidation method, insulin – by ELISA and lipid profile – according to the standard biochemical methods. It was established that in patients with postinfarction cardiosclerosis, type 2 diabetes and obesity positive effect was defined in carbohydrate and lipid metabolism by reducing of serum glucose level, insulin, total cholesterol, low and very low-density lipoproteins, triglycerides and increasing of high density lipoproteins, cholesterol in 6 months and 1 year after reperfusion therapy. Significant differences in carbohydrate and lipid metabolism in the examined patients, depending on the type of reperfusion therapy, have not been detected in 6 months and 1 year after revascularization. Conclusion. Comparative analysis of different methods of myocardial revascularization did not show any advantages of them.

  9. Predicting the 6-month risk of severe hypoglycemia among adults with diabetes: Development and external validation of a prediction model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Emily B; Xu, Stan; Goodrich, Glenn K; Nichols, Gregory A; O'Connor, Patrick J; Steiner, John F

    2017-07-01

    To develop and externally validate a prediction model for the 6-month risk of a severe hypoglycemic event among individuals with pharmacologically treated diabetes. The development cohort consisted of 31,674 Kaiser Permanente Colorado members with pharmacologically treated diabetes (2007-2015). The validation cohorts consisted of 38,764 Kaiser Permanente Northwest members and 12,035 HealthPartners members. Variables were chosen that would be available in electronic health records. We developed 16-variable and 6-variable models, using a Cox counting model process that allows for the inclusion of multiple 6-month observation periods per person. Across the three cohorts, there were 850,992 6-month observation periods, and 10,448 periods with at least one severe hypoglycemic event. The six-variable model contained age, diabetes type, HgbA1c, eGFR, history of a hypoglycemic event in the prior year, and insulin use. Both prediction models performed well, with good calibration and c-statistics of 0.84 and 0.81 for the 16-variable and 6-variable models, respectively. In the external validation cohorts, the c-statistics were 0.80-0.84. We developed and validated two prediction models for predicting the 6-month risk of hypoglycemia. The 16-variable model had slightly better performance than the 6-variable model, but in some practice settings, use of the simpler model may be preferred. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Predicting Health Resilience in Pediatric Type 1 Diabetes: A Test of the Resilience Model Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohan, Jennifer M; Huang, Bin; Pendley, Jennifer Shroff; Delamater, Alan; Dolan, Lawrence; Reeves, Grafton; Drotar, Dennis

    2015-10-01

    This research examined whether individual and family-level factors during the transition from late childhood to early adolescence protected individuals from an increased risk of poor glycemic control across time, which is a predictor of future diabetes-related complications (i.e., health resilience). This longitudinal, multisite study included 239 patients with type 1 diabetes and their caregivers. Glycemic control was based on hemoglobin A1c. Individual and family-level factors included: demographic variables, youth behavioral regulation, adherence (frequency of blood glucose monitoring), diabetes self-management, level of parental support for diabetes autonomy, level of youth mastery and responsibility for diabetes management, and diabetes-related family conflict. Longitudinal mixed-effects logistic regression indicated that testing blood glucose more frequently, better self-management, and less diabetes-related family conflict were indicators of health resilience. Multiple individual and family-level factors predicted risk for future health complications. Future research should develop interventions targeting specific individual and family-level factors to sustain glycemic control within recommended targets, which reduces the risk of developing future health complications during the transition to adolescence and adulthood. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Pediatric Psychology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. HbA1c and the Prediction of Type 2 Diabetes in Children and Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayakumar, Pavithra; Nelson, Robert G; Hanson, Robert L; Knowler, William C; Sinha, Madhumita

    2017-01-01

    Long-term data validating glycated hemoglobin (HbA 1c ) in assessing the risk of type 2 diabetes in children are limited. HbA 1c , fasting plasma glucose (FPG), and 2-h postload plasma glucose (2hPG) concentrations were measured in a longitudinal study of American Indians to determine their utility in predicting incident diabetes, all of which is thought to be type 2 in this population. Incident diabetes (FPG ≥126 mg/dL [7.0 mmol/L], 2hPG ≥200 mg/dL [11.1 mmol/L], HbA 1c ≥6.5% [8 mmol/mol], or clinical diagnosis) was determined in 2,095 children without diabetes ages 10-19 years monitored through age 39, and in 2,005 adults ages 20-39 monitored through age 59. Areas under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve for HbA 1c , FPG, and 2hPG in predicting diabetes within 10 years were compared. During long-term follow-up of children and adolescents who did not initially have diabetes, the incidence rate of subsequent diabetes was fourfold (in boys) as high and more than sevenfold (in girls) as high in those with HbA 1c ≥5.7% as in those with HbA 1c ≤5.3%-greater rate ratios than experienced by adults in the same HbA 1c categories. Analyses of ROCs revealed no significant differences between HbA 1c , FPG, and 2hPG in sensitivity and specificity for identifying children and adolescents who later developed diabetes. HbA 1c is a useful predictor of diabetes risk in children and can be used to identify prediabetes in children with other type 2 diabetes risk factors with the same predictive value as FPG and 2hPG. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  12. Predicting readmission risk of patients with diabetes hospitalized for cardiovascular disease: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Daniel J; Golden, Sherita Hill; McDonnell, Marie E; Zhao, Huaqing

    2017-08-01

    To develop and validate a tool that predicts 30d readmission risk of patients with diabetes hospitalized for cardiovascular disease (CVD), the Diabetes Early Readmission Risk Indicator-CVD (DERRI-CVD™). A cohort of 8189 discharges was retrospectively selected from electronic records of adult patients with diabetes hospitalized for CVD. Discharges of 60% of the patients (n=4950) were randomly selected as a training sample and the remaining 40% (n=3219) were the validation sample. Statistically significant predictors of all-cause 30d readmission risk were identified by multivariable logistic regression modeling: education level, employment status, living within 5miles of the hospital, pre-admission diabetes therapy, macrovascular complications, admission serum creatinine and albumin levels, having a hospital discharge within 90days pre-admission, and a psychiatric diagnosis. Model discrimination and calibration were good (C-statistic 0.71). Performance in the validation sample was comparable. Predicted 30d readmission risk was similar in the training and validation samples (38.6% and 35.1% in the highest quintiles). The DERRI-CVD™ may be a valid tool to predict all-cause 30d readmission risk of patients with diabetes hospitalized for CVD. Identifying high-risk patients may encourage the use of interventions targeting those at greatest risk, potentially leading to better outcomes and lower healthcare costs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Effects of aerobic training on FBS, HbA1C, Fructosamine and plasma lipid profile in male with type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akbar Ghalavand

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Regular exercise represents an effective strategy to prevent and treat type 2 Diabetes.The present study examined the effects of aerobic exercise on glycemic control and serum lipid profile in men with type 2 diabetes.20 men with type 2 diabetes (age:45.05 ± 3.8 were randomly div ided into aerobic exercise group (n=10 and control group(n=10. Exercise Group participated in aerobic training program at 50 -70 % HRR for 8 weeks and 3 sessions per week. Fasting blood sugar (FBS,Fructosamine, HbA1C, Triglyceride (TG, cholesterol (TC, high density lipoproteins (HDL, low density lipoproteins (LDL and very low density lipoprotein(VLDL were measured before and after 8 weeks. Paired and independent t tests were used for data analysis ( P0.05.Also there was a significant difference in FBS (p=0.03 and HDL levels (p=0.04 between 2 groups.Aerobic trainings effectively improve lipid profile and lead to better glycemic control in men with type 2 diabetes.

  14. Weight gain is associated with improved glycaemic control but with adverse changes in plasma lipids and blood pressure isn Type 1 diabetes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ferriss, J B

    2012-02-03

    AIMS: To assess the effects of weight gain on metabolic control, plasma lipids and blood pressure in patients with Type 1 diabetes. METHODS: Patients in the EURODIAB Prospective Complications Study (n = 3250) were examined at baseline and 1800 (55%) were re-examined a mean of 7.3 years later. Patients had Type 1 diabetes, defined as a diagnosis made before age 36 years and with a need for continuous insulin therapy within a year of diagnosis. Patients were aged 15-60 years at baseline and were stratified for age, sex and duration of diabetes. RESULTS: The change in HbA(1c) from baseline to follow-up examination was significantly more favourable in those who gained 5 kg or more during follow-up (\\'marked weight gain\\') than in patients who gained less or no weight or lost weight (\\'less or no weight gain\\'). In those with marked weight gain, there was a significantly greater rise in plasma triglycerides and total cholesterol and significantly less favourable changes in low-density lipoprotein and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol compared with those with less or no weight gain, with or without adjustment for HbA(1c). Systolic and diastolic blood pressure also rose significantly more in the group with marked weight gain. CONCLUSION: Weight gain in patients with Type 1 diabetes has adverse effects on plasma lipids and blood pressure, despite a small improvement in glycaemic control.

  15. Effects of Urtica dioica supplementation on blood lipids, hepatic enzymes and nitric oxide levels in type 2 diabetic patients: A double blind, randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiri Behzadi, Alidad; Kalalian-Moghaddam, Hamid; Ahmadi, Amir Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in the development of diabetic complications including metabolic abnormality-induced diabetic micro-vascular and macro-vascular complications. Urtica dioica L. ( U. dioica ) has been traditionally used in Iranian medicine as an herbal remedy for hypoglycemic or due to its anti-inflammatory properties. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of hydro-alcoholic extract of U. dioica on blood lipids, hepatic enzymes and nitric oxide levels in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. 50 women with type 2 diabetes participated in this study and were randomly divided into two groups namely, control and intervention groups. Control group received placebo and intervention group received hydro-alcoholic extract of U. dioica . Before and after 8 weeks of continuous treatment, some biochemical serum levels including FPG, TG, SGPT, SGOT, HDL, LDL, SOD and NO were measured. The results indicated that after 8 weeks, in the intervention group, FPG, TG, and SGPT levels significantly decreased and HDL, NO and SOD levels significantly increased as compared to the control group. Our results encourage the use of hydro-alcoholic extract of U. dioica as an antioxidant agent for additional therapy of diabetes as hydro-alcoholic extract of U. dioica may decrease risk factors of cardiovascular incidence and other complications in patients with diabetes mellitus.

  16. Effects of Urtica dioica supplementation on blood lipids, hepatic enzymes and nitric oxide levels in type 2 diabetic patients: A double blind, randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alidad Amiri Behzadi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Oxidative stress plays an important role in the development of diabetic complications including metabolic abnormality-induced diabetic micro-vascular and macro-vascular complications. Urtica dioica L. (U. dioica has been traditionally used in Iranian medicine as an herbal remedy for hypoglycemic or due to its anti-inflammatory properties. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of hydro-alcoholic extract of U. dioica on blood lipids, hepatic enzymes and nitric oxide levels in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Materials and Methods: 50 women with type 2 diabetes participated in this study and were randomly divided into two groups namely, control and intervention groups. Control group received placebo and intervention group received hydro-alcoholic extract of U. dioica. Before and after 8 weeks of continuous treatment, some biochemical serum levels including FPG, TG, SGPT, SGOT, HDL, LDL, SOD and NO were measured. Results: The results indicated that after 8 weeks, in the intervention group, FPG, TG, and SGPT levels significantly decreased and HDL, NO and SOD levels significantly increased as compared to the control group. Conclusion: Our results encourage the use of hydro-alcoholic extract of U. dioica as an antioxidant agent for additional therapy of diabetes as hydro-alcoholic extract of U. dioica may decrease risk factors of cardiovascular incidence and other complications in patients with diabetes mellitus.

  17. Daily consumption of banana marginally improves blood glucose and lipid profile in hypercholesterolemic subjects and increases serum adiponectin in type 2 diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cressey, Ratchada; Kumsaiyai, Warunee; Mangklabruks, Ampika

    2014-12-01

    In this study, we explored the effects of consumption of banana in thirty hypercholesterolemic and fifteen type 2 diabetic subjects. They were given a daily dose of 250 or 500 grams of banana for breakfast for 12 weeks. Fasting serum lipid, glucose and insulin levels were measured initially as well as every 4 weeks. Daily consumption of banana significantly lowered fasting blood glucose (from 99 ± 7.7 to 92 ± 6.9 and 102 ± 7.3 to 92 ± 5.7 mg x dL(-1) (p profile in diabetic patients were not statistically significant, but for plasma levels of adiponectin, there were significantly increased (from 37.5 ± 9.36 to 48.8 ± 7.38 ngnml1, p consumption of banana (@ 250 g/day) is harmless both in diabetic and hypercholesterolemic volunteers and marginally beneficial to the later.

  18. First-trimester multimarker prediction of gestational diabetes mellitus using targeted mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravnsborg, Tina; Andersen, Lise Lotte T; Trabjerg, Natacha D.

    2016-01-01

    –control study was performed on first-trimester serum samples from 199 GDM cases and 208 controls, each divided into an obese group (BMI ≥27 kg/m2) and a non-obese group (BMI 2). Based on their biological relevance to GDM or type 2 diabetes mellitus or on their previously reported potential as biomarkers......Aims/hypothesis: Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is associated with an increased risk of pre-eclampsia, macrosomia and the future development of type 2 diabetes mellitus in both mother and child. Although an early and accurate prediction of GDM is needed to allow intervention and improve...... perinatal outcome, no single protein biomarker has yet proven useful for this purpose. In the present study, we hypothesised that multimarker panels of serum proteins can improve first-trimester prediction of GDM among obese and non-obese women compared with single markers. Methods: A nested case...

  19. Prediction of Excessive Weight Gain in Insulin Treated Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cichosz, Simon Lebech; Lundby-Christensen, Louise; Johansen, Mette D

    2017-01-01

    of this study was to identify predictors of weight gain in insulin treated patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus. METHODS: A total of 412 individuals with Type 2 diabetes mellitus were, in addition to metformin or placebo, randomized into 18-month treatment groups with three different insulin analogue......AIMS: Weight gain is an ongoing challenge when initiating insulin therapy in patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus. However, if prediction of insulin associated weight gain was possible on an individualized level, targeted initiatives could be implemented to reduce weight gain. The objective...... treatment regimens. Participants with excessive weight gain were defined as the group with weight gain in the 4(th) quartile. We developed a pattern classification method to predict individuals prone to excessive weight gain. RESULTS: The median weight gain among all patients (n = 412) was 2.4 (95...

  20. A Bayesian network model for predicting type 2 diabetes risk based on electronic health records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jiang; Liu, Yan; Zeng, Xu; Zhang, Wu; Mei, Zhen

    2017-07-01

    An extensive, in-depth study of diabetes risk factors (DBRF) is of crucial importance to prevent (or reduce) the chance of suffering from type 2 diabetes (T2D). Accumulation of electronic health records (EHRs) makes it possible to build nonlinear relationships between risk factors and diabetes. However, the current DBRF researches mainly focus on qualitative analyses, and the inconformity of physical examination items makes the risk factors likely to be lost, which drives us to study the novel machine learning approach for risk model development. In this paper, we use Bayesian networks (BNs) to analyze the relationship between physical examination information and T2D, and to quantify the link between risk factors and T2D. Furthermore, with the quantitative analyses of DBRF, we adopt EHR and propose a machine learning approach based on BNs to predict the risk of T2D. The experiments demonstrate that our approach can lead to better predictive performance than the classical risk model.

  1. Lipid profiles of non-diabetic healthy and ischaemic heart disease patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahzad, F.; Tawwab, S.; Ahsan, U.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To find any difference in the fasting lipid profile in patients with history of ischaemic heart disease (IHD) and established atherosclerotic plaques on angiography and in subjects with no known history of IHD. Study Design: Observational, cross-sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: Immunology Department of University of Health Sciences, Lahore, from January 2007 to January 2009. Methodology: In this study, 200 male subjects, between 40 and 60 years of age were recruited. Serum cholesterol and triglycerides were determined by enzymatic CHOD-PAP and GPO-PAP calorimetric method, HDL-C by accelerator selective detergent method and LDL-C by direct homogeneous enzymatic method. Serum ox-LDL contents were determined by using quantitative sandwich enzyme immuno-assay kits. Results: The total serum cholesterol, triglyceride and LDL-C levels were within the normal range in control and patient groups whereas HDL-C levels were significantly higher in the control group compared to the patient group (p = 0.001). A significant difference (p = 0.001) for HDL-C levels was observed between smokers and non-smokers. Serum ox-LDL levels were higher in patient group as compared to the control group but the difference was not statistically significant. Conclusion: The significantly lower HDL levels in patient group with normal cholesterol, LDL and triglyceride levels may suggest low HDL-C has a greater role in IHD. Raising plasma HDL-cholesterol through weight loss, healthy diet, increased physical activity and by proper pharmacotherapy is, therefore, a legitimate therapeutic target for the optimal prevention of CHD in native population. (author)

  2. Salacia oblonga root improves cardiac lipid metabolism in Zucker diabetic fatty rats: Modulation of cardiac PPAR-α-mediated transcription of fatty acid metabolic genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Tom H.-W.; Yang Qinglin; Harada, Masaki; Uberai, Jasna; Radford, Jane; Li, George Q.; Yamahara, Johji; Roufogalis, Basil D.; Li Yuhao

    2006-01-01

    Excess cardiac triglyceride accumulation in diabetes and obesity induces lipotoxicity, which predisposes the myocytes to death. On the other hand, increased cardiac fatty acid (FA) oxidation plays a role in the development of myocardial dysfunction in diabetes. PPAR-α plays an important role in maintaining homeostasis of lipid metabolism. We have previously demonstrated that the extract from Salacia oblonga root (SOE), an Ayurvedic anti-diabetic and anti-obesity medicine, improves hyperlipidemia in Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats (a genetic model of type 2 diabetes and obesity) and possesses PPAR-α activating properties. Here we demonstrate that chronic oral administration of SOE reduces cardiac triglyceride and FA contents and decreases the Oil red O-stained area in the myocardium of ZDF rats, which parallels the effects on plasma triglyceride and FA levels. Furthermore, the treatment suppressed cardiac overexpression of both FA transporter protein-1 mRNA and protein in ZDF rats, suggesting inhibition of increased cardiac FA uptake as the basis for decreased cardiac FA levels. Additionally, the treatment also inhibited overexpression in ZDF rat heart of PPAR-α mRNA and protein and carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1, acyl-CoA oxidase and 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase mRNAs and restored the downregulated acetyl-CoA carboxylase mRNA. These results suggest that SOE inhibits cardiac FA oxidation in ZDF rats. Thus, our findings suggest that improvement by SOE of excess cardiac lipid accumulation and increased cardiac FA oxidation in diabetes and obesity occurs by reduction of cardiac FA uptake, thereby modulating cardiac PPAR-α-mediated FA metabolic gene transcription

  3. Whole-body MR imaging including angiography: Predicting recurrent events in diabetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertheau, Robert C.; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Weckbach, Sabine; Schlett, Christopher L. [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Bamberg, Fabian [Ludwig Maximilians University, Klinikum Grosshadern, Department of Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); University Hospital Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Lochner, Elena [Ludwig Maximilians University, Klinikum Grosshadern, Department of Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Findeisen, Hannes M. [University Hospital Muenster, Department of Cardiology and Angiology, Muenster (Germany); Parhofer, Klaus G. [Ludwig Maximilians University, Klinikum Grosshadern, Department of Internal Medicine II, Munich (Germany); Schoenberg, Stefan O. [University Medical Center Mannheim, Department of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Mannheim (Germany)

    2016-05-15

    Whether whole-body MRI can predict occurrence of recurrent events in patients with diabetes mellitus. Whole-body MRI was prospectively applied to 61 diabetics and assessed for arteriosclerosis and ischemic cerebral/myocardial changes. Occurrence of cardiocerebral events and diabetic comorbidites was determined. Patients were stratified whether no, a single or recurrent events arose. As a secondary endpoint, events were stratified into organ system-specific groups. During a median follow-up of 70 months, 26 diabetics developed a total of 39 events; 18 (30 %) developed one, 8 (13 %) recurrent events. Between diabetics with no, a single and recurrent events, a stepwise higher burden was observed for presence of left ventricular (LV) hypo-/akinesia (3/28/75 %, p < 0.0001), myocardial delayed-contrast-enhancement (17/33/63 %, p = 0.001), carotid artery stenosis (11/17/63 %, p = 0.005), peripheral artery stenosis (26/56/88 %, p = 0.0006) and vessel score (1.00/1.30/1.76, p < 0.0001). After adjusting for clinical characteristics, LV hypo-/akinesia (hazard rate ratio = 6.57, p < 0.0001) and vessel score (hazard rate ratio = 12.29, p < 0.0001) remained independently associated. Assessing organ system risk, cardiac and cerebral MR findings predicted more strongly events in their respective organ system. Vessel-score predicted both cardiac and cerebral, but not non-cardiocerebral, events. Whole-body MR findings predict occurrence of recurrent events in diabetics independent of clinical characteristics, and may concurrently provide organ system-specific risk. (orig.)

  4. Whole-body MR imaging including angiography: Predicting recurrent events in diabetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertheau, Robert C.; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Weckbach, Sabine; Schlett, Christopher L.; Bamberg, Fabian; Lochner, Elena; Findeisen, Hannes M.; Parhofer, Klaus G.; Schoenberg, Stefan O.

    2016-01-01

    Whether whole-body MRI can predict occurrence of recurrent events in patients with diabetes mellitus. Whole-body MRI was prospectively applied to 61 diabetics and assessed for arteriosclerosis and ischemic cerebral/myocardial changes. Occurrence of cardiocerebral events and diabetic comorbidites was determined. Patients were stratified whether no, a single or recurrent events arose. As a secondary endpoint, events were stratified into organ system-specific groups. During a median follow-up of 70 months, 26 diabetics developed a total of 39 events; 18 (30 %) developed one, 8 (13 %) recurrent events. Between diabetics with no, a single and recurrent events, a stepwise higher burden was observed for presence of left ventricular (LV) hypo-/akinesia (3/28/75 %, p < 0.0001), myocardial delayed-contrast-enhancement (17/33/63 %, p = 0.001), carotid artery stenosis (11/17/63 %, p = 0.005), peripheral artery stenosis (26/56/88 %, p = 0.0006) and vessel score (1.00/1.30/1.76, p < 0.0001). After adjusting for clinical characteristics, LV hypo-/akinesia (hazard rate ratio = 6.57, p < 0.0001) and vessel score (hazard rate ratio = 12.29, p < 0.0001) remained independently associated. Assessing organ system risk, cardiac and cerebral MR findings predicted more strongly events in their respective organ system. Vessel-score predicted both cardiac and cerebral, but not non-cardiocerebral, events. Whole-body MR findings predict occurrence of recurrent events in diabetics independent of clinical characteristics, and may concurrently provide organ system-specific risk. (orig.)

  5. Hypertriglyceridemic-waist phenotype predicts diabetes: a cohort study in Chinese urban adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Meilin

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hypertriglycedemic-waist (HTGW phenotype is a simple and inexpensive screening parameter to identify people at increased risk for cardiovascular disease. We evaluated whether the HTGW phenotype predicts prediabetes and diabetes in Chinese urban adults. Methods Two thousand nine hundred and eight (2908 subjects including 1957 men and 951 women, aged 20 years and older, free of prediabetes and diabetes at baseline were enrolled in 2008 and followed for 3 years. Meanwhile, new cases of prediabetes and diabetes were identified via annual physical examination. Cox proportional hazards models were used to assess the association of HTGW phenotype with the incidence of prediabetes and diabetes. Results One thousand five hundred and thirty-three (1533 new prediabetes and 90 new diabetes cases were diagnosed during the follow-up period. The accumulated incidence of prediabetes and diabetes was 52.7% and 3.1%, respectively. Compared with the normal waist normal triglyceride (NWNT group, those in the HTGW group had higher incidence of prediabetes and diabetes for both men and women. The hazard ratio (HR for developing prediabetes in the presence of HTGW phenotype at baseline was 1.51 (95% confidence interval [CI] =1.04-2.19 in women, not in men (HR=1.01; 95% CI = 0.82-1.24, after adjusting for age, body mass index, systolic blood pressure, total cholesterol and low density lipoprotein-cholesterol. The HR for developing diabetes were 4.46 (95% CI = 1.88-10.60 in men and 4.64 (95% CI = 1.20-17.97 in women for people who were HTGW phenotype at baseline, after adjusting for age, body mass index, systolic blood pressure, total cholesterol and low density lipoprotein-cholesterol. Conclusions The HTGW phenotype can be used as a simple screening approach to predict diabetes. By using this approach, it is possible to identify individuals at high-risk for diabetes, which is of great significance in reducing the incidence of diabetes among Chinese

  6. Risk score prediction model for dementia in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chia-Ing; Li, Tsai-Chung; Liu, Chiu-Shong; Liao, Li-Na; Lin, Wen-Yuan; Lin, Chih-Hsueh; Yang, Sing-Yu; Chiang, Jen-Huai; Lin, Cheng-Chieh

    2018-03-30

    No study established a prediction dementia model in the Asian populations. This study aims to develop a prediction model for dementia in Chinese type 2 diabetes patients. This retrospective cohort study included 27,540 Chinese type 2 diabetes patients (aged 50-94 years) enrolled in Taiwan National Diabetes Care Management Program. Participants were randomly allocated into derivation and validation sets at 2:1 ratio. Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to identify risk factors for dementia in the derivation set. Steps proposed by Framingham Heart Study were used to establish a prediction model with a scoring system. The average follow-up was 8.09 years, with a total of 853 incident dementia cases in derivation set. Dementia risk score summed up the individual scores (from 0 to 20). The areas under curve of 3-, 5-, and 10-year dementia risks were 0.82, 0.79, and 0.76 in derivation set and 0.84, 0.80, and 0.75 in validation set, respectively. The proposed score system is the first dementia risk prediction model for Chinese type 2 diabetes patients in Taiwan. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  7. Systems Biology-Derived Biomarkers to Predict Progression of Renal Function Decline in Type 2 Diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mayer, Gert; Heerspink, Hiddo J. L.; Aschauer, Constantin; Heinzel, Andreas; Heinze, Georg; Kainz, Alexander; Sunzenauer, Judith; Perco, Paul; de Zeeuw, Dick; Rossing, Peter; Pena, Michelle; Oberbauer, Rainer

    OBJECTIVE: Chronic kidney disease (CKD) in diabetes has a complex molecular and likely multifaceted pathophysiology. We aimed to validate a panel of biomarkers identified using a systems biology approach to predict the individual decline of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) in a large

  8. High serum ACE activity predicts severe hypoglycaemia over time in patients with type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Færch, Louise; Pedersen-Bjergaard, Ulrik; Thorsteinsson, Birger

    2011-01-01

    High serum angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) activity is associated with increased risk of severe hypoglycaemia (SH) within 1 year in type 1 diabetes. We wanted to find out whether ACE activity is stable over time and predicts SH beyond 1 year, and if gender differences exist in the association...

  9. Health Communication in Social Media: Message Features Predicting User Engagement on Diabetes-Related Facebook Pages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rus, Holly M; Cameron, Linda D

    2016-10-01

    Social media provides unprecedented opportunities for enhancing health communication and health care, including self-management of chronic conditions such as diabetes. Creating messages that engage users is critical for enhancing message impact and dissemination. This study analyzed health communications within ten diabetes-related Facebook pages to identify message features predictive of user engagement. The Common-Sense Model of Illness Self-Regulation and established health communication techniques guided content analyses of 500 Facebook posts. Each post was coded for message features predicted to engage users and numbers of likes, shares, and comments during the week following posting. Multi-level, negative binomial regressions revealed that specific features predicted different forms of engagement. Imagery emerged as a strong predictor; messages with images had higher rates of liking and sharing relative to messages without images. Diabetes consequence information and positive identity predicted higher sharing while negative affect, social support, and crowdsourcing predicted higher commenting. Negative affect, crowdsourcing, and use of external links predicted lower sharing while positive identity predicted lower commenting. The presence of imagery weakened or reversed the positive relationships of several message features with engagement. Diabetes control information and negative affect predicted more likes in text-only messages, but fewer likes when these messages included illustrative imagery. Similar patterns of imagery's attenuating effects emerged for the positive relationships of consequence information, control information, and positive identity with shares and for positive relationships of negative affect and social support with comments. These findings hold promise for guiding communication design in health-related social media.

  10. Prediction of morbidity and mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian J. Wells

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The objective of this study was to create a tool that accurately predicts the risk of morbidity and mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes according to an oral hypoglycemic agent.Materials and Methods. The model was based on a cohort of 33,067 patients with type 2 diabetes who were prescribed a single oral hypoglycemic agent at the Cleveland Clinic between 1998 and 2006. Competing risk regression models were created for coronary heart disease (CHD, heart failure, and stroke, while a Cox regression model was created for mortality. Propensity scores were used to account for possible treatment bias. A prediction tool was created and internally validated using tenfold cross-validation. The results were compared to a Framingham model and a model based on the United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS for CHD and stroke, respectively.Results and Discussion. Median follow-up for the mortality outcome was 769 days. The numbers of patients experiencing events were as follows: CHD (3062, heart failure (1408, stroke (1451, and mortality (3661. The prediction tools demonstrated the following concordance indices (c-statistics for the specific outcomes: CHD (0.730, heart failure (0.753, stroke (0.688, and mortality (0.719. The prediction tool was superior to the Framingham model at predicting CHD and was at least as accurate as the UKPDS model at predicting stroke.Conclusions. We created an accurate tool for predicting the risk of stroke, coronary heart disease, heart failure, and death in patients with type 2 diabetes. The calculator is available online at http://rcalc.ccf.org under the heading “Type 2 Diabetes” and entitled, “Predicting 5-Year Morbidity and Mortality.” This may be a valuable tool to aid the clinician’s choice of an oral hypoglycemic, to better inform patients, and to motivate dialogue between physician and patient.

  11. APOA II genotypes frequency and their interaction with saturated fatty acids consumption on lipid profile of patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noorshahi, Neda; Sotoudeh, Gity; Djalali, Mahmoud; Eshraghian, Mohamad Reza; Keramatipour, Mohammad; Basiri, Marjan Ghane; Doostan, Farideh; Koohdani, Fariba

    2016-08-01

    Several studies have suggested that APOA II-265T/C polymorphism affect lipid profile. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of -265T/C APOA II polymorphism and saturated fatty acids (SFA) intake interaction on lipid profile in diabetic population who are at risk for lipid disorders. In this cross sectional study, 697 type 2 diabetic patients participated. Food consumption data were collected using validated semi-quantitative FFQ during the last year. Realtime-PCR was used to determine APOA II-265T/C genotypes. The interaction between the genotypes and SFA intake with lipid profile was tested using analysis of covariance (ANCOVA). According to APOA II-265T/C (rs5082) genotype distribution results, CC genotype with a frequency of 12.9% and TC with that of 47.7% showed the lowest and highest frequency in our population, respectively. CC genotype subjects had significantly lower total cholesterol, triglyceride, Cholesterol/HDL-c ratio and non-HDL cholesterol than T allele carriers (p = 0.009, p = 0.02, p = 0.02 and p = 0.002, respectively). The interaction between genotype and SFA intake contributed to significant higher levels of LDL-c and LDL/HDL in CCs (p = 0.05 and p = 0.01), suggesting vulnerability of these individuals to high intake of SFA in the diet. APOA II polymorphism may influence the saturated fatty acid intake required to prevent dyslipidemia in the type 2 diabetic population. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  12. Prospective validation of American Diabetes Association risk tool for predicting pre-diabetes and diabetes in Taiwan-Taichung community health study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Ing Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A simple diabetes risk tool that does not require laboratory tests would be beneficial in screening individuals at higher risk. Few studies have evaluated the ability of these tools to identify new cases of pre-diabetes. This study aimed to assess the ability of the American Diabetes Association Risk Tool (ADART to predict the 3-year incidence of pre-diabetes and diabetes in Taiwanese. METHODS: This was a 3-year prospective study of 1021 residents with normoglycemia at baseline, gathered from a random sample of residents aged 40-88 years in a metropolitan city in Taiwan. The areas under the curve (AUCs of three models were compared: ADART only, ADART plus lifestyle behaviors at baseline, and ADART plus lifestyle behaviors and biomarkers at baseline. The performance of ADART was compared with that of 16 tools that had been reported in the literature. RESULTS: The AUCs and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs were 0.60 (0.54-0.66 for men and 0.72 (0.66-0.77 for women in model 1; 0.62 (0.56-0.68 for men and 0.74 (0.68-0.80 for women in model 2; and 0.64 (0.58-0.71 for men and 0.75 (0.69-0.80 for women in model 3. The AUCs of these three models were all above 0.7 in women, but not in men. No significant difference in either women or men (p = 0.268 and 0.156, respectively was observed in the AUC of these three models. Compared to 16 tools published in the literature, ADART had the second largest AUC in both men and women. CONCLUSIONS: ADART is a good screening tool for predicting the three-year incidence of pre-diabetes and diabetes in females of a Taiwanese population. The performance of ADART in men was similar to the results with other tools published in the literature. Its performance was one of the best among the tools reported in the literature.

  13. Abnormal ankle brachial indices may predict cardiovascular disease among diabetic patients without known heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fine, Jeffrey J; Hopkins, Christie B; Hall, Patrick Ax

    2005-07-01

    Cardiovascular disease remains the primary cause of diabetes-associated morbidity and mortality. Previous studies have failed to provide accurate, inexpensive, screening techniques to detect cardiovascular disease in diabetics. Ankle brachial indices (ABI) testing may be an effective screening technique for diabetics. The aim of this 100-subject clinical study was to determine cardiovascular disease prevalence, via perfusion stress testing, in diabetic patients having abnormal ABI (<0.90) and without known heart disease who were referred to the South Carolina Heart Center, Columbia, SC for nuclear perfusion stress testing. Study data were analyzed using frequency and descriptive statistics and 2-sample T-testing. Mean subject age was 62+/-11 years, ABI 0.76+/-13, and ejection fraction 60+/-12%. Perfusion stress testing detected 49 abnormal electrocardiograms, 36 subjects with coronary ischemia, 20 with diminished left ventricular function, and 26 subjects having significant thinning of the myocardium. There were 71 subjects who tested positive for at least one form of cardiovascular disease. The sole predictive variable reaching significance for the presence of cardiovascular disease was an ABI score <0.90 (p< or =0.0001). Cardiovascular disease may be predicted among diabetic patients via ABI scores and confirmed by nuclear perfusion testing.

  14. Significance of Measuringigf- Levels in Adolescent Patients with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus as a Prognostic Marker of Glycemic and Lipid Profile Control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahim, I.; Fathy, H.; Tawfik, M.S.; Elesseily, E.S.

    2016-01-01

    The study aimed at evaluating the effect of elevated serum insulin-like growth factor-1( IGF-1), which is a by-product of growth hormone in the body on glycemic control (assessed by measuring HbA1c) and lipid profiles in adolescent patients (aged between 12 and 18 years) suffering from diabetes mellitus Type 1 (childhood onset diabetes mellitus ). Thirty patients with diabetes mellitus type one were enrolled in the study within the age range mentioned (mean age was 15.2 ± 3). These patients had high-normal IGF-1 levels according to the normal standard range for their age group). A second group of thirty patients with diabetes mellitus type 1 with normal IGF-1 levels (mean age was 14.6 ± 2.5) were also enrolled for this study. A third group included thirty age and sex matched healthy controls. HbA1-c was measured in all of the patients involved in the study as well as serum IGF-1. Lipid profiles were as sassed and they included total cholesterol, low density lipoproteins (LDL) High density lipoproteins (HDL) and serum triglycerides. A significant elevation in HbA1c levels was observed in diabetes mellitus type 1 patients with normal levels of IGF-1 as compared to patients with diabetes mellitus type 1 with high normal IGF-1 levels or normal control subjects (mean HbA1c levels for group 2 as compared to groups 1 and 3 were 9.20 ±0.64 vs. 7.01 ±0.56 vs. 5.11 ±0.57 respectively, p<0.01). A significant negative correlation was established between serum IGF levels and HbA1c (r= - 0.46, p=0.0 2). These results required the reassessment of management protocols for patients be longing to Group 2. Serum total cholesterol levels, LDL-C, and triglycerides were significantly higher in the second group as compared to the other groups while HDL levels in the same group were found to be significantly lower. A significant negative correlation was established between serum LDL-C levels and IGF- levels measured in all participants (r= - 0.41, p=0.02). This study concluded that

  15. "Predictability of body mass index for diabetes: Affected by the presence of metabolic syndrome?"

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    Khalili Davood

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Metabolic syndrome (MetS and body mass index (BMI, kg.m-2 are established independent risk factors in the development of diabetes; we prospectively examined their relative contributions and joint relationship with incident diabetes in a Middle Eastern cohort. Method participants of the ongoing Tehran lipid and glucose study are followed on a triennial basis. Among non-diabetic participants aged≥ 20 years at baseline (8,121 those with at least one follow-up examination (5,250 were included for the current study. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to estimate sex-specific adjusted odd ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs of baseline BMI-MetS categories (normal weight without MetS as reference group for incident diabetes among 2186 men and 3064 women, aged ≥ 20 years, free of diabetes at baseline. Result During follow up (median 6.5 years; there were 369 incident diabetes (147 in men. In women without MetS, the multivariate adjusted ORs (95% CIs for overweight (BMI 25-30 kg/m2 and obese (BMI≥30 participants were 2.3 (1.2-4.3 and 2.2 (1.0-4.7, respectively. The corresponding ORs for men without MetS were 1.6 (0.9-2.9 and 3.6 (1.5-8.4 respectively. As compared to the normal-weight/without MetS, normal-weight women and men with MetS, had a multivariate-adjusted ORs for incident diabetes of 8.8 (3.7-21.2 and 3.1 (1.3-7.0, respectively. The corresponding ORs for overweight and obese women with MetS reached to 7.7 (4.0-14.9 and 12.6 (6.9-23.2 and for men reached to 3.4(2.0-5.8 and 5.7(3.9-9.9, respectively. Conclusion This study highlights the importance of screening for MetS in normal weight individuals. Obesity increases diabetes risk in the absence of MetS, underscores the need for more stringent criteria to define healthy metabolic state among obese individuals. Weight reduction measures, thus, should be encouraged in conjunction with achieving metabolic targets not addressed by current definition of

  16. Prediction of diabetes based on baseline metabolic characteristics in individuals at high risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defronzo, Ralph A; Tripathy, Devjit; Schwenke, Dawn C; Banerji, Maryann; Bray, George A; Buchanan, Thomas A; Clement, Stephen C; Henry, Robert R; Kitabchi, Abbas E; Mudaliar, Sunder; Ratner, Robert E; Stentz, Frankie B; Musi, Nicolas; Reaven, Peter D; Gastaldelli, Amalia

    2013-11-01

    Individuals with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) are at high risk for developing type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). We examined which characteristics at baseline predicted the development of T2DM versus maintenance of IGT or conversion to normal glucose tolerance. We studied 228 subjects at high risk with IGT who received treatment with placebo in ACT NOW and who underwent baseline anthropometric measures and oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) at baseline and after a mean follow-up of 2.4 years. In a univariate analysis, 45 of 228 (19.7%) IGT individuals developed diabetes. After adjusting for age, sex, and center, increased fasting plasma glucose, 2-h plasma glucose, G0-120 during OGTT, HbA1c, adipocyte insulin resistance index, ln fasting plasma insulin, and ln I0-120, as well as family history of diabetes and presence of metabolic syndrome, were associated with increased risk of diabetes. At baseline, higher insulin secretion (ln [I0-120/G0-120]) during the OGTT was associated with decreased risk of diabetes. Higher β-cell function (insulin secretion/insulin resistance or disposition index; ln [I0-120/G0-120 × Matsuda index of insulin sensitivity]; odds ratio 0.11; P < 0.0001) was the variable most closely associated with reduced risk of diabetes. In a stepwise multiple-variable analysis, only HbA1c and β-cell function (ln insulin secretion/insulin resistance index) predicted the development of diabetes (r = 0.49; P < 0.0001).

  17. The clinical utility of lipid profile and positive troponin in predicting future cardiac events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun Kumar

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the usefulness of traditional lipid profile levels in screening subjects who had developed chest pain due to cardiac event as indicated by a positive troponin I (TnI test. Methods: In this retrospective study data of the 740 patients presented to the emergency department with symptoms of cardiac ischemia that underwent both troponin and lipid profiles tests were compared with the lipid profiles of 411 normal healthy subjects (controls. The troponin was detected qualitatively when a specimen contains TnI above the 99th percentile (TnI >0.5 ng/ mL. The total cholesterol (TC, high density lipoproteins (HDL, very low density lipoproteins (VLDL, and triacyl glycerol (TG levels were also analyzed and low density lipoprotein level (LDL was calculated using Friedewald ’s formula. Results: Patients with chest pain and positive troponin test (with confirmed cardiac event were found to have significantly elevated levels of TC, TG, LDL and significantly reduced HDL levels when compared to the patients who experienced only chest pain (negative troponin and healthy controls. Conclusions: Traditional lipid profile levels still can be used in screening populations to identify the subjects with high risk of developing cardiac event which is identified by highly sensitive and specific positive troponin test.

  18. Lipid Effects of Icosapent Ethyl in Women with Diabetes Mellitus and Persistent High Triglycerides on Statin Treatment: ANCHOR Trial Subanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinton, Eliot A; Ballantyne, Christie M; Guyton, John R; Philip, Sephy; Doyle, Ralph T; Juliano, Rebecca A; Mosca, Lori

    2018-03-27

    High triglycerides (TG) and diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM2) are stronger predictors of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in women than in men, but few randomized, controlled clinical trials have investigated lipid-lowering interventions in women and none have reported results specifically in women with high TG and DM2. Icosapent ethyl (Vascepa) is pure prescription eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) ethyl ester approved at 4 g/day as an adjunct to diet to reduce TG ≥500 mg/dL. The 12-week ANCHOR trial randomized 702 statin-treated patients (73% with DM; 39% women) at increased CVD risk with TG 200-499 mg/dL despite controlled low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C; 40-99 mg/dL) to receive icosapent ethyl 2 g/day, 4 g/day, or placebo. This post hoc analysis included 146 women with DM2 (97% white, mean age 62 years) randomized to icosapent ethyl 4 g/day (n = 74) or placebo (n = 72). Icosapent ethyl significantly reduced TG (-21.5%; p women with DM2 at high CVD risk with persistently high TG on statins, icosapent ethyl 4 g/day reduced potentially atherogenic parameters with safety and tolerability comparable to placebo. Potential CVD benefits of icosapent ethyl are being tested in ∼8000 men and women at high CVD risk with high TG on statins in the ongoing Reduction of Cardiovascular Events with Icosapent Ethyl - Intervention Trial (REDUCE-IT) cardiovascular (CV) outcome trial.

  19. Insulin resistance and lipid profile during an oral glucose tolerance test in women with and without gestational diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zx; Wu, Y; Zhu, Xy; Fang, Q; Chen, Dq

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to compare changes in insulin levels during an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) between women with normal glucose tolerance (NGT) during pregnancy and those with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Overall, 105 pregnant women between 24 and 28 weeks' gestation, 50 with NGT and 55 with GDM according to NDDG standard, were enrolled into the study. The levels of fasting blood glucose, insulin, triglyceride (TG) and total cholesterol (TC) and the insulin levels, blood glucose levels at 1, 2 and 3 hours post oral glucose administration during an OGTT (5.8, 10.6, 9.2 and 8.1 mmol/L, respectively) were measured. Then, insulin resistance (IR) index was calculated. There was no significant difference in fasting, 3-h insulin levels and 3-h blood glucose levels between those with NGT and those with GDM (P > 0.05). However, 1-h and 2-h insulin levels, fasting and 1-h and 2-h blood glucose levels in women with GDM were significantly higher than those in the NGT group (P < 0.05). Fasting TC and TG levels in the GDM group were significantly higher than those with NGT (P = 0.031 and P = 0.025, respectively). Correlation analysis showed that TG and TC levels were positively correlated with homoeostasis model assessment-IR (HOMA-IR) (r = 0.67 and r = 0.78, respectively; P < 0.05). Our findings suggest that insulin sensitivity in women with GDM was significantly lower than that observed in those with NGT. Reducing IR and blood lipids in women with GDM could potentially improve maternal and foetal outcomes.

  20. A Study of Effects of Pioglitazone and Rosiglitazone on Various Parameters in Patients of Type-2 Diabetes Mellitus with Special Reference to Lipid Profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, S K; Verma, S H

    2016-09-01

    To study the complete fasting lipid profile and other parameters (weight, body mass index, HbA1c, fasting blood sugar and postprandial blood sugar)in Type 2 diabetes mellitus patients on OHA/insulin, to study the effect of addition of pioglitazone on lipid profile and other parameters in Type 2 diabetes mellitus patients on OHA/insulin, to study the effect of addition of rosiglitazone on lipid profile and other parameters in Type 2 diabetes mellitus patients on OHA/insulin and to compare the effect of pioglitazone and rosiglitazone on lipid profile and other parameters in Type 2 diabetes mellitus patients on OHA/insulin. In the study, 100 Type 2 diabetes cases on oral hypoglycemic agent/insulin with deranged lipid profile were chosen and divided into 2 groups 50 and 50 in group A and group B respectively.Pioglitazone was given initially 15mg/day then if required increasing upto 45mg/day in group A for period of 18 weeks and rosiglitazone was given initially 2 mg/day then if required increasing upto 8 mg/day in group B for period of 18 weeks. Detailed clinical history was obtained and thorough physical examination was done and following parameters were established-Age, Height, Weight, Body mass index, Fasting and Postprandial blood sugar, HbA1c levels and fasting complete lipid profile done at 0 and 18 weeks. Each patient itself served as a control for this study. Maximum no. of patients were in sixth decade (53.30%) and minimum patients were in seventh decade (6.6%). Males were 63.3% and females were 36.8%. Fasting blood sugar levels decreased by 23% with pioglitazone in group A and 14.07% with rosiglitazone in group B. The postprandial blood sugar levels decreased by 29.9% with pioglitazone in group A and 20.17% with rosiglitazone in group B.The mean HbA1c decreased by 2.13 % pioglitazone in group A and 3.8% with rosiglitazone in group B after 18 weeks of therapy. The effects of both drugs on BMI and weight were not significant. In group A the total cholesterol

  1. Retinal Vessel Calibers Predict Long-term Microvascular Complications in Type 1 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broe, Rebecca; Rasmussen, Malin L; Frydkjaer-Olsen, Ulrik

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic neuropathy, nephropathy, and retinopathy cause significant morbidity in patients with type 1 diabetes, even though improvements in treatment modalities delay the appearance and reduce the severity of these complications. To prevent or further delay the onset, it is necessary to better.......5-1 disc diameter from the disc margin were measured and summarized as the central artery and vein equivalents. In multiple regression analyses, we found wider venular diameters and smaller arteriolar diameters were both predictive of the 16-year development of nephropathy, neuropathy, and proliferative...

  2. Meta-analysis of studies on the effect of vitamin D supplementation on blood glucose, lipid profile and inflammatory markers in patients with diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Fallahzadeh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Vitamin D deficiency and type 2 diabetes are both common diseases. Numerous studies have examined the relationship between the two. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of vitamin D supplementation on glycemic status, lipid profile and inflammatory markers in patients with diabetes. Method: Type of systematic review and meta-analysis, which is actually a review on the studies available. Beginning a search extensively on electronic resources English, including EMBASE, Web of science, Medline Scopus and Who and electronic resources Persian including SID and Google scholar for diabetes-related research papers do. Result: The test of heterogeneity, studies with significant heterogeneity in vitamin D, HOMA-IR and insulin sensitivity were the random effects model was used and the mean difference and 95% confidence intervals between the two groups in the vitamin D , 1.87 and (-5.49,9.23, HOMA-IR 0.09 and (-.023,0.05 and insulin sensitivity, 0.24 and (-0.75,0.26, respectively. Discussion: The overall results of this study showed that the meta-analysis, vitamin D and insulin sensitivity in diabetic patients is effective and HOMA-IR is not effective on patients with diabetes.

  3. A comparison of effects of DPP-4 inhibitor and SGLT2 inhibitor on lipid profile in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Seon-Ah; Park, Yong-Moon; Yun, Jae-Seung; Lim, Tae-Seok; Song, Ki-Ho; Yoo, Ki-Dong; Ahn, Yu-Bae; Ko, Seung-Hyun

    2017-04-13

    Previous studies suggest that dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors and sodium glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors have different effects on the lipid profile in patients with type 2 diabetes. We investigated the effects of DPP-4 inhibitors and SGLT2 inhibitors on the lipid profile in patients with type 2 diabetes. From January 2013 to December 2015, a total of 228 patients with type 2 diabetes who were receiving a DPP-4 inhibitor or SGLT2 inhibitor as add-on therapy to metformin and/or a sulfonylurea were consecutively enrolled. We compared the effects of DPP-4 inhibitors and SGLT2 inhibitors on the lipid profile at baseline and after 24 weeks of treatment. To compare lipid parameters between the two groups, we used the analysis of covariance (ANCOVA). A total of 184 patients completed follow-up (mean age: 53.1 ± 6.9 years, mean duration of diabetes: 7.1 ± 5.7 years). From baseline to 24 weeks, HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) levels were increased by 0.5 (95% CI, -0.9 to 2.0) mg/dl with a DPP-4 inhibitor and by 5.1 (95% CI, 3.0 to 7.1) mg/dl with an SGLT2 inhibitor (p = 0.001). LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C) levels were reduced by 8.4 (95% CI, -14.0 to -2.8) mg/dl with a DPP-4 inhibitor, but increased by 1.3 (95% CI, -5.1 to 7.6) mg/dl with an SGLT2 inhibitor (p = 0.046). There was no significant difference in the mean hemoglobin A1c (8.3 ± 1.1 vs. 8.0 ± 0.9%, p = 0.110) and in the change of total cholesterol (TC) (p = 0.836), triglyceride (TG) (p = 0.867), apolipoprotein A (p = 0.726), apolipoprotein B (p = 0.660), and lipoprotein (a) (p = 0.991) between the DPP-4 inhibitor and the SGLT2 inhibitor. The SGLT2 inhibitor was associated with a significant increase in HDL-C and LDL-C after 24 weeks of SGLT2 inhibitor treatment in patients with type 2 diabetes compared with those with DPP-4 inhibitor treatment in this study. This study was conducted by retrospective medical record review.

  4. Whole-Body MR Imaging Including Angiography: Predicting Recurrent Events in Diabetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertheau, Robert C; Bamberg, Fabian; Lochner, Elena; Findeisen, Hannes M; Parhofer, Klaus G; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Schoenberg, Stefan O; Weckbach, Sabine; Schlett, Christopher L

    2016-05-01

    Whether whole-body MRI can predict occurrence of recurrent events in patients with diabetes mellitus. Whole-body MRI was prospectively applied to 61 diabetics and assessed for arteriosclerosis and ischemic cerebral/myocardial changes. Occurrence of cardiocerebral events and diabetic comorbidites was determined. Patients were stratified whether no, a single or recurrent events arose. As a secondary endpoint, events were stratified into organ system-specific groups. During a median follow-up of 70 months, 26 diabetics developed a total of 39 events; 18 (30%) developed one, 8 (13%) recurrent events. Between diabetics with no, a single and recurrent events, a stepwise higher burden was observed for presence of left ventricular (LV) hypo-/akinesia (3/28/75%, p < 0.0001), myocardial delayed-contrast-enhancement (17/33/63%, p = 0.001), carotid artery stenosis (11/17/63%, p = 0.005), peripheral artery stenosis (26/56/88%, p = 0.0006) and vessel score (1.00/1.30/1.76, p < 0.0001). After adjusting for clinical characteristics, LV hypo-/akinesia (hazard rate ratio = 6.57, p < 0.0001) and vessel score (hazard rate ratio = 12.29, p < 0.0001) remained independently associated. Assessing organ system risk, cardiac and cerebral MR findings predicted more strongly events in their respective organ system. Vessel-score predicted both cardiac and cerebral, but not non-cardiocerebral, events. Whole-body MR findings predict occurrence of recurrent events in diabetics independent of clinical characteristics, and may concurrently provide organ system-specific risk. • Patients with long-standing diabetes mellitus are at high risk for recurrent events. • Whole-body MRI predicts occurrence of recurrent events independently of clinical characteristics. • The vessel score derived from whole-body angiography is a good general risk-marker. • Whole-body MRI may also provide organ-specific risk assessment. • Current findings may indicate benefits of

  5. The effect of nano-curcumin on HbA1c, fasting blood glucose, and lipid profile in diabetic subjects: a randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Reza Rahimi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Diabetes mellitus is defined as a group of metabolic diseases characterized by hyperglycemia resulting from defects in insulin secretion, insulin action, or both or insulin resistance. Curcumin inhibits NF-κB signaling pathway. The aim of this study is evaluation of the effect of Nano-curcumin on HbA1C, fast blood glucose and lipid profile in diabetic patients. Materials and Methods: Seventy type-2 diabetic patients (fasting blood glucose (FBG ≥ 126 mg/dL or 2-hr postprandial blood glucose ≥200 mg/dl randomly receivedeither Curcumin (as nano-micelle 80 mg/day or placebo for 3 months in a double blind randomized clinical trial. Fasting blood glucose, HbA1C, and lipids profile were checked before and after the intervention. Data analyses, including parametric and nonparametric tests were done using the SPSS 11.5 software. A p value < 0.05 was regarded as statistically significant. (RCT registration code: IRCT2013081114330N1 Results: Mean age, BMI, FBG, total cholesterol (TC, triglyceride (TG, LDL, HDL, HbA1c , and  sex and had no significant difference at the baseline between the groups. In Nano-curcumin group, a significant decrease was found in HbA1C, FBG, TG, and BMI comparing results of each subject before and after the treatment (p

  6. Predictions of Phase Separation in Three-Component Lipid Membranes by the MARTINI Force Field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davis, Ryan S.; Sunil Kumar, P. B.; Sperotto, Maria Maddalena

    2013-01-01

    The phase behavior of the coarse-grained MARTINI model for three-component lipid bilayers composed of dipalmytoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC), cholesterol (Chol), and an unsaturated phosphatidylcholine (PC) was systematically investigated by molecular dynamics simulations. The aim of this study...... is to understand which types of unsaturated PC induce the formation of thermodynamically stable coexisting phases when added to mixtures of DPPC and Chol and to unravel the mechanisms that drive phase separation in such three-component mixtures. Our simulations indicate that the currently used MARTINI force field...... PCs, such as dilinoleyl-phosphatidylcholine (DUPC) and diarachidonoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DAPC). Through systematic tweaking of the interactions between the hydrophobic groups of the PC molecules, we show that the appearance of phase separation in three-component lipid bilayers, as modeled through...

  7. Lipid technology: Property prediction and process design/analysis in the edible oil and biodiesel industries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Díaz Tovar, Carlos Axel; Gani, Rafiqul; Sarup, Bent

    2011-01-01

    acid methyl esters); their representation and classification in terms of molecular structures; the collection of available experimental data of their pure component physical properties; the adoption of appropriate property-process models for the design and analysis of production processes through......In this work some of the property related issues in lipid processing technology employed in edible oil and biodiesel production are highlighted. This includes the identification of the most representative chemical species (acylglycerides, free fatty acids, tocopherols, sterols, carotenes, and fatty...

  8. Effect of metformin monotherapy on serum lipid profile in statin-naïve individuals with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus: a cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szu Han Lin

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background Cardiovascular disease is a major cause of mortality and morbidity in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. Studies have consistently identified dyslipidemia as an important risk factor for the development of macrovascular disease. The landmark United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study has shown that metformin therapy reduces cardiovascular events in overweight people with T2DM. This study investigates the effect of metformin monotherapy on serum lipid profile in statin-naïve individuals with newly diagnosed T2DM, and whether the effect, if any, is dosage-related. Methods This cohort study enrolled individuals exceeding 20 years of age, with recent onset T2DM, who received at least 12 months of metformin monotherapy and blood tests for serum lipid at 6-month intervals. Exclusion criteria involved people receiving any additional antidiabetic medication or lipid-lowering drug therapy. Lipid-modifying effect of metformin was recorded as levels of serum triglycerides (TG, high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C, and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C measured at six month intervals. Results The study enrolled 155 participants with a mean age of 58.6 years and average glycosylated hemoglobin A1c of 8%. After initiating metformin therapy, LDL-C was significantly reduced from 111 mg/dl to 102 mg/dL at 6 months (P < 0.001, TG was reduced from 132 mg/dl to 122 mg/dL at 12 months (P = 0.046, and HDL-C increased from 45.1 mg/dL to 46.9 mg/dL at 12 months (P = 0.02. However, increasing the dosage of metformin yielded no significant effect on its lipid-lowering efficacy. Discussion Metformin monotherapy appreciably improves dyslipidemia in statin-naive people with T2DM. Its lipid-modifying effect may be attributable to insulin sensitization, reduction of irreversibly glycated LDL-C, and weight loss. In practice, people with dyslipidemia who are ineligible for lipid-lowering agents may benefit from metformin therapy

  9. Non-Cholesterol Sterol Levels Predict Hyperglycemia and Conversion to Type 2 Diabetes in Finnish Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cederberg, Henna; Gylling, Helena; Miettinen, Tatu A.; Paananen, Jussi; Vangipurapu, Jagadish; Pihlajamäki, Jussi; Kuulasmaa, Teemu; Stančáková, Alena; Smith, Ulf; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laakso, Markku

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the levels of non-cholesterol sterols as predictors for the development of hyperglycemia (an increase in the glucose area under the curve in an oral glucose tolerance test) and incident type 2 diabetes in a 5-year follow-up study of a population-based cohort of Finnish men (METSIM Study, N = 1,050) having non-cholesterol sterols measured at baseline. Additionally we determined the association of 538,265 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) with non-cholesterol sterol levels in a cross-sectional cohort of non-diabetic offspring of type 2 diabetes (the Kuopio cohort of the EUGENE2 Study, N = 273). We found that in a cross-sectional METSIM Study the levels of sterols indicating cholesterol absorption were reduced as a function of increasing fasting glucose levels, whereas the levels of sterols indicating cholesterol synthesis were increased as a function of increasing 2-hour glucose levels. A cholesterol synthesis marker desmosterol significantly predicted an increase, and two absorption markers (campesterol and avenasterol) a decrease in the risk of hyperglycemia and incident type 2 diabetes in a 5-year follow-up of the METSIM cohort, mainly attributable to insulin sensitivity. A SNP of ABCG8 was associated with fasting plasma glucose levels in a cross-sectional study but did not predict hyperglycemia or incident type 2 diabetes. In conclusion, the levels of some, but not all non-cholesterol sterols are markers of the worsening of hyperglycemia and type 2 diabetes. PMID:23840693

  10. Risk Prediction Using Genome-Wide Association Studies on Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sungkyoung Choi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The success of genome-wide association studies (GWASs has enabled us to improve risk assessment and provide novel genetic variants for diagnosis, prevention, and treatment. However, most variants discovered by GWASs have been reported to have very small effect sizes on complex human diseases, which has been a big hurdle in building risk prediction models. Recently, many statistical approaches based on penalized regression have been developed to solve the “large p and small n” problem. In this report, we evaluated the performance of several statistical methods for predicting a binary trait: stepwise logistic regression (SLR, least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO, and Elastic-Net (EN. We first built a prediction model by combining variable selection and prediction methods for type 2 diabetes using Affymetrix Genome-Wide Human SNP Array 5.0 from the Korean Association Resource project. We assessed the risk prediction performance using area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC for the internal and external validation datasets. In the internal validation, SLR-LASSO and SLR-EN tended to yield more accurate predictions than other combinations. During the external validation, the SLR-SLR and SLR-EN combinations achieved the highest AUC of 0.726. We propose these combinations as a potentially powerful risk prediction model for type 2 diabetes.

  11. Efficacy of the Hydroalcoholic Extract of Tribulus terrestris on the Serum Glucose and Lipid Profile of Women With Diabetes Mellitus: A Double-Blind Randomized Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samani, Nasrin Babadaei; Jokar, Azam; Soveid, Mahmood; Heydari, Mojtaba; Mosavat, Seyed Hamdollah

    2016-10-01

    Considering traditional use of Tribulus terrestris in diabetes and proven antihyperglycemic and antihyperlipidemic effects of T terrestris in animal studies, we aimed to evaluate the efficacy of the hydroalcoholic extract of T terrestris on the serum glucose and lipid profile of women with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Ninety-eight women with diabetes mellitus type 2 were randomly allocated to receive the T terrestris (1000 mg/d) or placebo for 3 months. The patients were evaluated in terms of the fasting blood glucose, 2-hour postprandial glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin, and lipid profile. Tribulus terrestris showed a significant blood glucose-lowering effect in diabetic women compared to placebo (P terrestris group was significantly reduced compared with placebo, while no significant effect was observed in the triglyceride and high-density lipoprotein levels. The study showed preliminary promising hypoglycemic effect of T terrestris in women with diabetes mellitus type 2. © The Author(s) 2016.

  12. Relationship between insulin resistance and blood lipid and sport in patients with type II diabetes mellitus complicated with hypertension%2型糖尿病合并高血压患者胰岛素低抗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭丽艳; 杨红玉; 柴国禄; 沈凌元

    2001-01-01

    Objective To study the relationship between insulin resistance and blood pressure and blood lipid in patients with type II diabetes mellitus complicated with hypertension.Methods The serum concentration of fasting glucose,insulin,lipids and the level of blood pressure were measured in 56 patients with type II diabetes mellitus complicated with hypertension.Results The insulin sensitivity index(ISI) decreased in patients with type II diabetes mellitus complicated with hypertension compared with the patients with type II diabetes mellitus with normal blood pressure(P< 0.05).A negative correlation with hypertension was found between ISI and SBP,DBP,TG,ApoB in patients with type II diabetes mellitus complicated with hypertension(P<0.05).There was a positive correlation between ISI and HDL in patients with type II diabetes mellitus complicated with hypertension(P<0.05).Conclusion Insulin resistance presents in patients of type II diabetes mellitus complicated with hypertension.Insulin resistance is the major cause of hypertension and lipid metabolic disturbance in patients with type II diabetes mellitus complicated with hypertension.

  13. Temporal changes in concentrations of lipids and apolipoprotein B among adults with diagnosed and undiagnosed diabetes, prediabetes, and normoglycemia: findings from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1988–1991 to 2005–2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ford Earl S

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diabetes is characterized by profound lipid abnormalities. The objective of this study was to examine changes in concentrations of lipids and apolipoprotein B among participants stratified by glycemic status (diabetes, undiagnosed diabetes, prediabetes, and normoglycemia in the United States from 1988–1991 to 2005–2008. Methods We used data from 3202 participants aged ≥20 years from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III (1988–1991 and 3949 participants aged ≥20 years from NHANES 2005–2008. Results Among participants of all four groups, unadjusted and adjusted mean concentrations of total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and apolipoprotein B, but not triglycerides, decreased significantly. Among participants with prediabetes and normoglycemia, unadjusted and adjusted mean concentrations of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol increased significantly. Adjusted mean log-transformed concentrations of triglycerides decreased in adults with undiagnosed diabetes and prediabetes. During 2005–2008, unadjusted concentrations of apolipoprotein B ≥80 mg/dl were observed in 72.8% of participants with diagnosed diabetes, 87.9% of participants with undiagnosed diabetes, 86.6% of participants with prediabetes, and 77.2% of participants with normoglycemia. The unadjusted use of cholesterol-lowering medications rose rapidly, especially among participants with diabetes (from ~1% to ~49%, P Conclusion Lipid profiles of adults with diabetes improved during the approximately 16-year study period. Nevertheless, large percentages of adults continue to have elevated concentrations of apolipoprotein B.

  14. Pengaruh jamur tiram putih (pleurotus ostreatus terhadap kadar glukosa darah, profil lipid dan kadar MDA pada tikus (rattus norvegicus diabetes melitus

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    Purbowati Purbowati

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background : Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease caused by acquired deficiency in insulin production by the pancreas, or by the ineffectiveness of using the produced insulin. Oyster mushroom (Pleurotus ostreatus can help lower blood glucose levels, improve lipid profile and reduce levels of MDA. Objective : to analyze the effect of oyster mushroom on blood glucose levels, lipid profile and MDA levels in STZ induced rats as type 1 DM model. Methods : thirty Sprague Dawley rats were randomly divided into 3 groups: one positive group (1 and two treated group which received 100 mg/kgBB (2 and 200 mg/kgBB (3 oyster mushroom extract, respectively. The interventions were carried out for 30 days. The examination of blood glucose levels, lipid profile and MDA levels was before and after the intervention. The differences inthe datapre-post interventions were analyzed by paired t-test, whereas the differences between the groups were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and kruskal wallis followed by post hoc analysis. Results : the treatment group experienced a decrease in blood glucose levels, total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, triglycerides, MDA and an increase in HDL cholesterol levels post-intervention (p < 0,001. Oyster mushroom extract with the dose of 200 mg/kg was more effective in lowering blood glucose levels, MDA levels and improving lipid profiles (p < 0,001. Conclusion : Oyster mushrooms administration lowers blood glucose levels, total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, triglycerides, MDA and increases HDL cholesterol levels.

  15. Genetic Variants in HSD17B3, SMAD3, and IPO11 Impact Circulating Lipids in Response to Fenofibrate in Individuals With Type 2 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotroff, Daniel M; Pijut, Sonja S; Marvel, Skylar W; Jack, John R; Havener, Tammy M; Pujol, Aurora; Schluter, Agatha; Graf, Gregory A; Ginsberg, Henry N; Shah, Hetal S; Gao, He; Morieri, Mario-Luca; Doria, Alessandro; Mychaleckyi, Josyf C; McLeod, Howard L; Buse, John B; Wagner, Michael J; Motsinger-Reif, Alison A

    2018-04-01

    Individuals with type 2 diabetes (T2D) and dyslipidemia are at an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Fibrates are a class of drugs prescribed to treat dyslipidemia, but variation in response has been observed. To evaluate common and rare genetic variants that impact lipid responses to fenofibrate in statin-treated patients with T2D, we examined lipid changes in response to fenofibrate therapy using a genomewide association study (GWAS). Associations were followed-up using gene expression studies in mice. Common variants in SMAD3 and IPO11 were marginally associated with lipid changes in black subjects (P < 5 × 10 -6 ). Rare variant and gene expression changes were assessed using a false discovery rate approach. AKR7A3 and HSD17B13 were associated with lipid changes in white subjects (q < 0.2). Mice fed fenofibrate displayed reductions in Hsd17b13 gene expression (q < 0.1). Associations of variants in SMAD3, IPO11, and HSD17B13, with gene expression changes in mice indicate that transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) and NRF2 signaling pathways may influence fenofibrate effects on dyslipidemia in patients with T2D. © 2017 American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  16. Dietary self-efficacy predicts AHEI diet quality in women with previous gestational diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferranti, Erin Poe; Narayan, K M Venkat; Reilly, Carolyn M; Foster, Jennifer; McCullough, Marjorie; Ziegler, Thomas R; Guo, Ying; Dunbar, Sandra B

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the association of intrapersonal influences of diet quality as defined by the Health Belief Model constructs in women with recent histories of gestational diabetes. A descriptive, correlational, cross-sectional design was used to analyze relationships between diet quality and intrapersonal variables, including perceptions of threat of type 2 diabetes mellitus development, benefits and barriers of healthy eating, and dietary self-efficacy, in a convenience sample of 75 community-dwelling women (55% minority; mean age, 35.5 years; SD, 5.5 years) with previous gestational diabetes mellitus. Diet quality was defined by the Alternative Healthy Eating Index (AHEI). Multiple regression was used to identify predictors of AHEI diet quality. Women had moderate AHEI diet quality (mean score, 47.6; SD, 14.3). Only higher levels of education and self-efficacy significantly predicted better AHEI diet quality, controlling for other contributing variables. There is a significant opportunity to improve diet quality in women with previous gestational diabetes mellitus. Improving self-efficacy may be an important component to include in nutrition interventions. In addition to identifying other important individual components, future studies of diet quality in women with previous gestational diabetes mellitus are needed to investigate the scope of influence beyond the individual to potential family, social, and environmental factors. © 2014 The Author(s).

  17. HBA1C AND LIPID PROFILE LEVELS IN THE KNOWN TYPE 2 DIABETIC GROUP IN THE RURAL REGION OF VIDARBHA, MAHARASHTRA, INDIA

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    Sarmistha Sarkar

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Diabetes Mellitus (DM is a group of metabolic diseases in which there is high blood sugar levels over a prolonged period of time, and if early interventions are not taken, then it can cause many life-threatening complications like heart disease, stroke, kidney failure, damage to eyes, etc. Our aim is to determine HbA1c and Lipid profile level in the known type 2 diabetic group in the rural region of Vidarbha, Maharashtra, India, to see that as our study is a rural-based study and there is less pollution and stress factor compared to the cities whether it effects out study result or not. MATERIALS AND METHODS FBS, HbA1c, TC, HDL, LDL, VLDL, TG levels were evaluated. Total sample size 60 in between 30-40 years including males and females divided into two groups. 30 patients study group with known history of type 2 DM who attended the Medicine OPD and 30 age, sex matched healthy controls. Statistical analysis was done by using SPSS 17.0 version. RESULTS Results of serum lipid profile showed that mean values for TC, TG, HDL, LDL and VLDL in study group were 227.76±30.72, 152.23 ± 40.94, 40.5 ± 6.43, 153.30 ± 27.70 and 33.00 ± 9.94 mg/dL. FBS showed significant positive correlation with HbA1c (p<0.002. HDL has significant negative correlation with HbA1c (p<0.008. CONCLUSION Early detection in the abnormalities of serum lipid profile and HbA1c can minimise the risk for micro and macroangiopathies in the known type 2 diabetic patients.

  18. The 10-year trend of adult diabetes, prediabetes and associated risk factors in Tehran: Phases 1 and 4 of Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahtab, Niroomand; Farzad, Hadaegh; Mohsen, Bahaeddini; Nakisa, Darvishi

    Type 2 diabetes is a global problem with significant morbidity and healthcare costs. In this study, we aimed to determine the 10-year trend of diabetes, prediabetes and their risk factors in the adult urban population of Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study (TLGS). In this cross-sectional study, we included all patients above 20 years of age who were registered in phases 1 and 4 of TLGS. Each phase had a 3-year duration. 4580 patients were recruited in each phase (916 patients in each age-group, including 3772 males and 5145 females). Random cluster sampling was used in phase 1 and convenience sampling was used in phase 4. Diabetes and glucose tolerance status were determined according to the 1991 criteria of the American Diabetes Association. In our five age groups, risk factors were compared, which included physical activity, waist circumference, body mass index, education, smoking, lipid profile and family history. Exclusion criteria were placement of an individual in the same age-group in the two phases and pregnancy. We calculated the prevalence of diabetes and dysglycemia in each age-group. Age-specific prevalence rates were determined. Prevalence of risk factors in the two phases were compared using chi-square test and Student t-test. Mann-Whitney U test was used to analyze the variables with non-normal distribution. In this study, 3976 individuals were recruited in phase 1 (2308 women and 1668 men; female to male ratio 1.38) and 4941 individuals were recruited in phase 4 (2837 women and 2104 men; female to male ratio 1.35). Prevalence of prediabetes in all age groups (except for the 30-39 years age-group) were increased in phase 4 compared to phase 1. Prevalence of known diabetes in all age groups were increased in phase 4 compared to phase 1, yet, the increase was significant only in the 30-39 and 60-69 years age groups (1.8% vs. 0.7% and 19.0% vs. 10.2%, respectively). Newly diagnosed diabetes was decreased in all age groups in phase 4, except for the 60

  19. Common variants in SOCS7 gene predict obesity, disturbances in lipid metabolism and insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellechea, M L; Steinhardt, A Penas; Rodriguez, G; Taverna, M J; Poskus, E; Frechtel, G

    2013-05-01

    Specific Suppressor of Cytokine Signaling (SOCS) members, such as SOCS7, may play a role in the development of insulin resistance (IR) owing to their ability to inhibit insulin signaling pathways. The objective was to explore the association between common variants and related haplotypes in SOCS7 gene and metabolic traits related to obesity, lipid metabolism and IR. 780 unrelated men were included in a cross-sectional study. We selected three tagged SNPs that capture 100% of SNPs with minor allele frequency ≥ 0.10. Analyses were done separately for each SNP and followed up by haplotype analysis. rs8074124C was associated with both obesity (p = 0.005) and abdominal obesity (p = 0.002) and allele C carriers showed, in comparison with TT carriers, lower BMI (p = 0.001) and waist circumference (p = 0.001). rs8074124CC- carriers showed lower fasting insulin (p = 0.017) and HOMA-IR (p = 0.018) than allele T carriers. rs12051836C was associated with hypertriglyceridemia (p = 0.009) and hypertriglyceridemic waist (p = 0.006). rs12051836CC- carriers showed lower fasting insulin (p = 0.043) and HOMA-IR (p = 0.042). Haplotype-based association analysis (rs8074124 and rs12051836 in that order) showed associations with lipid and obesity -related phenotypes, consistent with single locus analysis. Haplotype analysis also revealed association between haplotype CT and both decreased HDL-C (p = 0.026) and HDL-C (p = 0.014) as a continuous variable. We found, for the first time, significant associations between SOCS7 common variants and related haplotypes and obesity, IR and lipid metabolism disorders. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Prediction of five-year all-cause mortality in Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus - A population-based retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Eric Yuk Fai; Fong, Daniel Yee Tak; Fung, Colman Siu Cheung; Yu, Esther Yee Tak; Chin, Weng Yee; Chan, Anca Ka Chun; Lam, Cindy Lo Kuen

    2017-06-01

    This study aimed to develop and validate an all-cause mortality risk prediction model for Chinese primary care patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus(T2DM) in Hong Kong. A population-based retrospective cohort study was conducted on 132,462 Chinese patients who had received public primary care services during 2010. Each gender sample was randomly split on a 2:1 basis into derivation and validation cohorts and was followed-up for a median period of 5years. Gender-specific mortality risk prediction models showing the interaction effect between predictors and age were derived using Cox proportional hazards regression with forward stepwise approach. Developed models were compared with pre-existing models by Harrell's C-statistic and calibration plot using validation cohort. Common predictors of increased mortality risk in both genders included: age; smoking habit; diabetes duration; use of anti-hypertensive agents, insulin and lipid-lowering drugs; body mass index; hemoglobin A1c; systolic blood pressure(BP); total cholesterol to high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol ratio; urine albumin to creatinine ratio(urine ACR); and estimated glomerular filtration rate(eGFR). Prediction models showed better discrimination with Harrell"'s C-statistics of 0.768(males) and 0.782(females) and calibration power from the plots than previously established models. Our newly developed gender-specific models provide a more accurate predicted 5-year mortality risk for Chinese diabetic patients than other established models. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. A Predictive Metabolic Signature for the Transition From Gestational Diabetes Mellitus to Type 2 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allalou, Amina; Nalla, Amarnadh; Prentice, Kacey J

    2016-01-01

    to non-case patients by age, prepregnancy BMI, and race/ethnicity. We conducted metabolomics with baseline fasting plasma and identified 21 metabolites that significantly differed by incident T2D status. Machine learning optimization resulted in a decision tree modeling that predicted T2D incidence...

  2. Biomarkers for predicting type 2 diabetes development-Can metabolomics improve on existing biomarkers?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otto Savolainen

    Full Text Available The aim was to determine if metabolomics could be used to build a predictive model for type 2 diabetes (T2D risk that would improve prediction of T2D over current risk markers.Gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry metabolomics was used in a nested case-control study based on a screening sample of 64-year-old Caucasian women (n = 629. Candidate metabolic markers of T2D were identified in plasma obtained at baseline and the power to predict diabetes was tested in 69 incident cases occurring during 5.5 years follow-up. The metabolomics results were used as a standalone prediction model and in combination with established T2D predictive biomarkers for building eight T2D prediction models that were compared with each other based on their sensitivity and selectivity for predicting T2D.Established markers of T2D (impaired fasting glucose, impaired glucose tolerance, insulin resistance (HOMA, smoking, serum adiponectin alone, and in combination with metabolomics had the largest areas under the curve (AUC (0.794 (95% confidence interval [0.738-0.850] and 0.808 [0.749-0.867] respectively, with the standalone metabolomics model based on nine fasting plasma markers having a lower predictive power (0.657 [0.577-0.736]. Prediction based on non-blood based measures was 0.638 [0.565-0.711].Established measures of T2D risk remain the best predictor of T2D risk in this population. Additional markers detected using metabolomics are likely related to these measures as they did not enhance the overall prediction in a combined model.

  3. Patient characteristics do not predict poor glycaemic control in type 2 diabetes patients treated in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goudswaard, AN; Stolk, RP; Zuithoff, P; Rutten, GEHM

    Many diabetic patients in general practice do not achieve good glycaemic control. The aim of this study was to assess which characteristics of type 2 diabetes patients treated in primary care predict poor glycaemic control (HbA(1c) greater than or equal to7%). Data were collected from the medical

  4. Predictive properties of plasma amino acid profile for cardiovascular disease in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinji Kume

    Full Text Available Prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD is an important therapeutic object of diabetes care. This study assessed whether an index based on plasma free amino acid (PFAA profiles could predict the onset of CVD in diabetic patients. The baseline concentrations of 31 PFAAs were measured with high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry in 385 Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes registered in 2001 for our prospective observational follow-up study. During 10 years of follow-up, 63 patients developed cardiovascular composite endpoints (myocardial infarction, angina pectoris, worsening of heart failure and stroke. Using the PFAA profiles and clinical information, an index (CVD-AI consisting of six amino acids to predict the onset of any endpoints was retrospectively constructed. CVD-AI levels were significantly higher in patients who did than did not develop CVD. The area under the receiver-operator characteristic curve of CVD-AI (0.72 [95% confidence interval (CI: 0.64-0.79] showed equal or slightly better discriminatory capacity than urinary albumin excretion rate (0.69 [95% CI: 0.62-0.77] on predicting endpoints. A multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression analysis showed that the high level of CVD-AI was identified as an independent risk factor for CVD (adjusted hazard ratio: 2.86 [95% CI: 1.57-5.19]. This predictive effect of CVD-AI was observed even in patients with normoalbuminuria, as well as those with albuminuria. In conclusion, these results suggest that CVD-AI based on PFAA profiles is useful for identifying diabetic patients at risk for CVD regardless of the degree of albuminuria, or for improving the discriminative capability by combining it with albuminuria.

  5. Predictive Properties of Plasma Amino Acid Profile for Cardiovascular Disease in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kume, Shinji; Araki, Shin-ichi; Ono, Nobukazu; Shinhara, Atsuko; Muramatsu, Takahiko; Araki, Hisazumi; Isshiki, Keiji; Nakamura, Kazuki; Miyano, Hiroshi; Koya, Daisuke; Haneda, Masakazu; Ugi, Satoshi; Kawai, Hiromichi; Kashiwagi, Atsunori; Uzu, Takashi; Maegawa, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD) is an important therapeutic object of diabetes care. This study assessed whether an index based on plasma free amino acid (PFAA) profiles could predict the onset of CVD in diabetic patients. The baseline concentrations of 31 PFAAs were measured with high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry in 385 Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes registered in 2001 for our prospective observational follow-up study. During 10 years of follow-up, 63 patients developed cardiovascular composite endpoints (myocardial infarction, angina pectoris, worsening of heart failure and stroke). Using the PFAA profiles and clinical information, an index (CVD-AI) consisting of six amino acids to predict the onset of any endpoints was retrospectively constructed. CVD-AI levels were significantly higher in patients who did than did not develop CVD. The area under the receiver-operator characteristic curve of CVD-AI (0.72 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.64–0.79]) showed equal or slightly better discriminatory capacity than urinary albumin excretion rate (0.69 [95% CI: 0.62–0.77]) on predicting endpoints. A multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression analysis showed that the high level of CVD-AI was identified as an independent risk factor for CVD (adjusted hazard ratio: 2.86 [95% CI: 1.57–5.19]). This predictive effect of CVD-AI was observed even in patients with normoalbuminuria, as well as those with albuminuria. In conclusion, these results suggest that CVD-AI based on PFAA profiles is useful for identifying diabetic patients at risk for CVD regardless of the degree of albuminuria, or for improving the discriminative capability by combining it with albuminuria. PMID:24971671

  6. Activity test of various mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana pericarp extract fractions to decrease fasting blood cholesterol levels and lipid peroxidation activity in diabetic mice

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    Saikhu Akhmad Husen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were to determine the effect of various fractions of mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana pericarp extract to the changes of the fasting blood cholesterol and serum malondialdehyde (MDA levels on diabetic mice (Mus musculus. Thirty 3-4 months old male mice strain BALB/c, weight 20-30 g were divided into six groups. The first group was KN as a non diabetic control group, KD as a diabetic control, KM as a group of diabetic mice treated with metformin, and NP, SP, and P as the treatment groups that were treated by using three different fractions from mangosteen pericarp extract, non polar, semi polar, and polar respectively. The induction of Diabetes mellitus was done by the injection of STZ, and the mice were given a high fat diet treatment to induce the hiperlipidemia condition using lard for three weeks. The blood cholesterol levels were measured in all groups before and after the injection of lard, and day 1, 7, and 14 of treatment as well. The serum MDA level as the indicator of lipid peroxidation were measured by using QuantiChrom TBARS Assay Kit (DTBA-100. The data of cholesterol levels were statistically analyzed by t-test, while the data of serum MDA levels were analyzed by variance analysis followed by Duncan test. The results showed that the polar fraction of mangosteen pericarp had effect to decrease the fasting blood cholesterol level in mice, however the non polar and semi polar fraction had no simmilar effect. All of the fractions has shown significant effect to decrease the serum MDA level in mice. Key words: cholesterol, diabetes mellitus, Garcinia mangostana, malondialdehyde (mda, obesity.

  7. Effects of xylitol on blood glucose, glucose tolerance, serum insulin and lipid profile in a type 2 diabetes model of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Md Shahidul; Indrajit, Mitesh

    2012-01-01

    The present study was conducted to examine the antidiabetic effects of xylitol in a type 2 diabetes rat model. Six-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into 3 groups: normal control (NC), diabetic control (DBC) and xylitol (XYL). Diabetes was induced only in the DBC and XYL animal groups by feeding them a 10% fructose solution for 2 weeks followed by an injection (i.p.) of streptozotocin (40 mg/kg body weight). One week after the streptozotocin injection, the animals with a nonfasting blood glucose level of >300 mg/dl were considered to be diabetic. The XYL group was fed further with a 10% xylitol solution, whereas the NC and DBC groups were supplied with normal drinking water. After 5 weeks of intervention, food and fluid intake, body weight, blood glucose, serum fructosamine and most of the serum lipids were significantly decreased, and serum insulin concentration and glucose tolerance ability was significantly increased in the XYL group compared to the DBC group. Liver weight, liver glycogen and serum triglycerides were not influenced by feeding with xylitol. The data of this study suggest that xylitol can be used not only as a sugar substitute but also as a supplement to antidiabetic food and other food products. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Effect of exogenous leptin on serum levels of lipids, glucose, renal and hepatic variables in both genders of obese and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats

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    Parichehr Hayatdavoudi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Leptin exerts various effects on appetite and body weight. Disruption of the obesitygene is precedent to fatness. Insulin or glucose elevates leptin, but streptozotocin reduces it. However, controversial data exist for the effects of leptin on diabetes and leptin level in each gender. Leptin can damage the kidney function but little evidence exists for its hepatic effects. The aim of this study was to investigate the probable sex-dependent differences in blood sugar levels, lipid profile, and renal and hepatic biochemical factors in the obesity and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats after leptin administration. Materials and Methods: Wistar rats of both sexes were randomly divided into two groups, namely obese and diabetic rats. Each group was further divided into male and female subgroups. Extra fat and carbohydrate was added to the diet to induce obesity. Furthermore, streptozotocin (55 mg/kg, IP was injected to induce diabetes. The treatment groups received leptin (0.1 mg/kg SC for 10 days, and then, blood samples were taken from the orbital sinus for laboratory evaluations. Results: Leptin resulted in a significant weight loss in both sexes (P

  9. Effects of Cinnamon, Cardamom, Saffron, and Ginger Consumption on Markers of Glycemic Control, Lipid Profile, Oxidative Stress, and Inflammation in Type 2 Diabetes Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azimi, Paria; Ghiasvand, Reza; Feizi, Awat; Hariri, Mitra; Abbasi, Behnoud

    2014-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) may be caused by elevated oxidative stress, inflammation, and hyperglycemia. The phytochemicals in several herbal medicines are reported to effectively improve diabetes and to ameliorate diabetic complications. The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of cinnamon, cardamom, saffron, and ginger as supplementary remedies in T2D. This randomized controlled, clinical trial included 204 T2D patients. The participants were randomly assigned to four intervention groups receiving 3 glasses of black tea and either 3 g cardamom, or cinnamon, or ginger, or 1 g saffron and one control group which consumed only 3 tea glasses without any herbal medicine for 8 weeks. Markers of inflammation, oxidative stress, fasting blood sugar, lipid profile, and anthropometric measures were evaluated at baseline and after 8 weeks of intervention. After 8 weeks of intervention, cinnamon, cardamom, ginger, and saffron consumption had significant effects on total cholesterol, LDL, and HDL levels (p < 0.05) compared with controls. However, the herbal products did not have significant effects on measures of glycemic control, anthropometry, inflammation, and oxidative stress. In within-group comparisons only, cinnamon intake significantly decreased fasting blood sugar (FBS). The herbal remedies examined had significantly beneficial effects on cholesterol, but not on measures of glycemic control, oxidative stress, and inflammation. Based on the contradictory results reported in the literature, the effects of herbal medicine in diabetic patients should undergo further detailed investigation.

  10. Endothelial dysfunction and inflammation predict development of diabetic nephropathy in the Irbesartan in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes and Microalbuminuria (IRMA 2) study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, Frederik; Rossing, Peter; Hovind, Peter

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate risk factors for progression from persistent microalbuminuria to diabetic nephropathy in the Irbesartan in Patients with Type 2 diabetes and Microalbuminuria (IRMA 2) study, including biomarkers of endothelial dysfunction, chronic low-grade inflammation, growth factors...... and advanced glycation end products (AGE peptides). METHODS: IRMA 2 was a 2-year multicentre, randomized, double-blind trial comparing irbesartan (150 and 300 mg once daily) versus placebo. The primary end-point was time to onset of diabetic nephropathy. Samples from a subgroup from the placebo and the 300 mg...... and vWf predicted the end-point. In addition, endothelial Z-score was associated with progression of albuminuria (p = 0.038). CONCLUSION: Endothelial dysfunction and possibly inflammation are novel predictors of progression to diabetic nephropathy in patients with type 2 diabetes and microalbuminuria...

  11. Serum adiponectin predicts all-cause mortality and end stage renal disease in patients with type I diabetes and diabetic nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorsal, A.; Tarnow, L.; Frystyk, J.

    2008-01-01

    Adiponectin levels are increased in patients with type I diabetes especially in the presence of microangiopathy. Here we determined the predictive value of serum adiponectin levels and 8 adiponectin gene polymorphisms for mortality, cardiovascular events and end-stage renal disease in type I...... diabetic patients. This prospective, observational follow-up study of type I diabetics consisted of 438 patients with overt diabetic nephropathy that were compared to 440 type I patients with normal albumin excretion. These two groups were followed an average of 8 years and generally matched for gender......, age and duration of diabetes. Cox regression analysis of 373 patients showed a covariate-adjusted hazard ratio for all-cause mortality of 1.46 for a change of one standard deviation in log10 of serum adiponectin. There was no association with cardiovascular events; however, serum adiponectin levels...

  12. Retinal microaneurysm count predicts progression and regression of diabetic retinopathy. Post-hoc results from the DIRECT Programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjølie, A K; Klein, R; Porta, M; Orchard, T; Fuller, J; Parving, H H; Bilous, R; Aldington, S; Chaturvedi, N

    2011-03-01

    To study the association between baseline retinal microaneurysm score and progression and regression of diabetic retinopathy, and response to treatment with candesartan in people with diabetes. This was a multicenter randomized clinical trial. The progression analysis included 893 patients with Type 1 diabetes and 526 patients with Type 2 diabetes with retinal microaneurysms only at baseline. For regression, 438 with Type 1 and 216 with Type 2 diabetes qualified. Microaneurysms were scored from yearly retinal photographs according to the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) protocol. Retinopathy progression and regression was defined as two or more step change on the ETDRS scale from baseline. Patients were normoalbuminuric, and normotensive with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes or treated hypertensive with Type 2 diabetes. They were randomized to treatment with candesartan 32 mg daily or placebo and followed for 4.6 years. A higher microaneurysm score at baseline predicted an increased risk of retinopathy progression (HR per microaneurysm score 1.08, P diabetes; HR 1.07, P = 0.0174 in Type 2 diabetes) and reduced the likelihood of regression (HR 0.79, P diabetes; HR 0.85, P = 0.0009 in Type 2 diabetes), all adjusted for baseline variables and treatment. Candesartan reduced the risk of microaneurysm score progression. Microaneurysm counts are important prognostic indicators for worsening of retinopathy, thus microaneurysms are not benign. Treatment with renin-angiotensin system inhibitors is effective in the early stages and may improve mild diabetic retinopathy. Microaneurysm scores may be useful surrogate endpoints in clinical trials. © 2011 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2011 Diabetes UK.

  13. Effects of different fractions of whey protein on postprandial lipid and hormone responses in type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, L.S.; Holmer-Jensen, Jens; Hartvigsen, Merete

    2012-01-01

    Background/Objectives:Exacerbated postprandial lipid responses are associated with an increased cardiovascular risk. Dietary proteins influence postprandial lipemia differently, and whey protein has a preferential lipid-lowering effect. We compared the effects of different whey protein fractions .......European Journal of Clinical Nutrition advance online publication, 16 May 2012; doi:10.1038/ejcn.2012.48....

  14. Statistical analysis of solid lipid nanoparticles produced by high-pressure homogenization: a practical prediction approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duran-Lobato, Matilde, E-mail: mduran@us.es [Universidad de Sevilla, Dpto. Farmacia y Tecnologia Farmaceutica, Facultad de Farmacia (Espana) (Spain); Enguix-Gonzalez, Alicia [Universidad de Sevilla, Dpto. Estadistica e Investigacion Operativa, Facultad de Matematicas (Espana) (Spain); Fernandez-Arevalo, Mercedes; Martin-Banderas, Lucia [Universidad de Sevilla, Dpto. Farmacia y Tecnologia Farmaceutica, Facultad de Farmacia (Espana) (Spain)

    2013-02-15

    Lipid nanoparticles (LNPs) are a promising carrier for all administration routes due to their safety, small size, and high loading of lipophilic compounds. Among the LNP production techniques, the easy scale-up, lack of organic solvents, and short production times of the high-pressure homogenization technique (HPH) make this method stand out. In this study, a statistical analysis was applied to the production of LNP by HPH. Spherical LNPs with mean size ranging from 65 nm to 11.623 {mu}m, negative zeta potential under -30 mV, and smooth surface were produced. Manageable equations based on commonly used parameters in the pharmaceutical field were obtained. The lipid to emulsifier ratio (R{sub L/S}) was proved to statistically explain the influence of oil phase and surfactant concentration on final nanoparticles size. Besides, the homogenization pressure was found to ultimately determine LNP size for a given R{sub L/S}, while the number of passes applied mainly determined polydispersion. {alpha}-Tocopherol was used as a model drug to illustrate release properties of LNP as a function of particle size, which was optimized by the regression models. This study is intended as a first step to optimize production conditions prior to LNP production at both laboratory and industrial scale from an eminently practical approach, based on parameters extensively used in formulation.

  15. Statistical analysis of solid lipid nanoparticles produced by high-pressure homogenization: a practical prediction approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durán-Lobato, Matilde; Enguix-González, Alicia; Fernández-Arévalo, Mercedes; Martín-Banderas, Lucía

    2013-01-01

    Lipid nanoparticles (LNPs) are a promising carrier for all administration routes due to their safety, small size, and high loading of lipophilic compounds. Among the LNP production techniques, the easy scale-up, lack of organic solvents, and short production times of the high-pressure homogenization technique (HPH) make this method stand out. In this study, a statistical analysis was applied to the production of LNP by HPH. Spherical LNPs with mean size ranging from 65 nm to 11.623 μm, negative zeta potential under –30 mV, and smooth surface were produced. Manageable equations based on commonly used parameters in the pharmaceutical field were obtained. The lipid to emulsifier ratio (R L/S ) was proved to statistically explain the influence of oil phase and surfactant concentration on final nanoparticles size. Besides, the homogenization pressure was found to ultimately determine LNP size for a given R L/S , while the number of passes applied mainly determined polydispersion. α-Tocopherol was used as a model drug to illustrate release properties of LNP as a function of particle size, which was optimized by the regression models. This study is intended as a first step to optimize production conditions prior to LNP production at both laboratory and industrial scale from an eminently practical approach, based on parameters extensively used in formulation.

  16. Utility of the triglyceride level for predicting incident diabetes mellitus according to the fasting status and body mass index category: the Ibaraki Prefectural Health Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujihara, Kazuya; Sugawara, Ayumi; Heianza, Yoriko; Sairenchi, Toshimi; Irie, Fujiko; Iso, Hiroyasu; Doi, Mikio; Shimano, Hitoshi; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Sone, Hirohito; Ota, Hitoshi

    2014-01-01

    The levels of lipids, especially triglycerides (TG), and obesity are associated with diabetes mellitus (DM). Although typically measured in fasting individuals, non-fasting lipid measurements play an important role in predicting future DM. This study compared the predictive efficacy of lipid variables according to the fasting status and body mass index (BMI) category. Data were collected for 39,196 nondiabetic men and 87,980 nondiabetic women 40-79years of age who underwent health checkups in Ibaraki-Prefecture, Japan in 1993 and were followed through 2007. The hazard ratios (HRs) for DM in relation to sex, the fasting status and BMI were estimated using a Cox proportional hazards model. A total of 8,867 participants, 4,012 men and 4,855 women, developed DM during a mean follow-up of 5.5 years. TG was found to be an independent predictor of incident DM in both fasting and non-fasting men and non-fasting women. The multivariable-adjusted HR for DM according to the TG quartile (Q) 4 vs. Q1 was 1.18 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.05, 1.34) in the non-fasting men with a normal BMI (18.5-24.9). This trend was also observed in the non-fasting women with a normal BMI. That is, the multivariable-adjusted HRs for DM for TG Q2, Q3 and Q4 compared with Q1 were 1.07 (95% CI: 0.94, 1.23), 1.17 (95%CI: 1.03, 1.34) and 1.48 (95%CI: 1.30, 1.69), respectively. The fasting and non-fasting TG levels in men and non-fasting TG levels in women are predictive of future DM among those with a normal BMI. Clinicians must pay attention to those individuals at high risk for DM.

  17. Predictive validity of different definitions of hypertension for type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulliford, Martin C; Charlton, Judith; Latinovic, Radoslav

    2006-01-01

    Models to predict diabetes or pre-diabetes often incorporate the assessment of hypertension, but proposed definitions for 'hypertension' are inconsistent. We compared the classifications obtained using different definitions for 'hypertension'. We compared records for 5158 cases from 181 family practices, who were later diagnosed with diabetes and prescribed oral hypoglycaemic drugs, with 5158 controls, matched for age, sex and family practice, who were never diagnosed with diabetes. We compared classifications obtained using definitions of hypertension based on medical diagnoses, prescription of blood pressure lowering drugs or both. We compared family practices where diagnosis or prescribing varied systematically. Classification of hypertension based on recorded medical diagnoses gave a sensitivity of 32.2% for diabetes (95% confidence interval from 30.4 to 34.1%). Prescription of blood pressure lowering drugs in the 12 months before diagnosis gave a sensitivity of 47.2% (45.7 to 48.7%). Combining either a medical diagnosis or a blood pressure lowering prescription gave a sensitivity of 52.8% (51.3 to 54.3%). In family practices where hypertension was least frequently recorded, a diagnosis of hypertension gave a sensitivity of 19.5% for diabetes (17.4 to 21.6%) compared with 50.8% (46.3 to 55.3%) in the highest quintile. Prescription of blood pressure lowering drugs gave a sensitivity of 36.1% (33.1 to 39.0%) in the lowest prescribing practices but 58.2% (55.5 to 61.0%) in the highest quintile. Misclassification errors depend on the definition of hypertension and its implementation in practice. Definitions of hypertension that depend on access or quality in health care should be avoided.

  18. Predicted consequences of diabetes and SGLT inhibition on transport and oxygen consumption along a rat nephron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallon, Volker; Edwards, Aurélie

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes increases the reabsorption of Na+ (TNa) and glucose via the sodium-glucose cotransporter SGLT2 in the early proximal tubule (S1-S2 segments) of the renal cortex. SGLT2 inhibitors enhance glucose excretion and lower hyperglycemia in diabetes. We aimed to investigate how diabetes and SGLT2 inhibition affect TNa and sodium transport-dependent oxygen consumption QO2active along the whole nephron. To do so, we developed a mathematical model of water and solute transport from the Bowman space to the papillary tip of a superficial nephron of the rat kidney. Model simulations indicate that, in the nondiabetic kidney, acute and chronic SGLT2 inhibition enhances active TNa in all nephron segments, thereby raising QO2active by 5–12% in the cortex and medulla. Diabetes increases overall TNa and QO2active by ∼50 and 100%, mainly because it enhances glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and transport load. In diabetes, acute and chronic SGLT2 inhibition lowers QO2active in the cortex by ∼30%, due to GFR reduction that lowers proximal tubule active TNa, but raises QO2active in the medulla by ∼7%. In the medulla specifically, chronic SGLT2 inhibition is predicted to increase QO2active by 26% in late proximal tubules (S3 segments), by 2% in medullary thick ascending limbs (mTAL), and by 9 and 21% in outer and inner medullary collecting ducts (OMCD and IMCD), respectively. Additional blockade of SGLT1 in S3 segments enhances glucose excretion, reduces QO2active by 33% in S3 segments, and raises QO2active by SGLT2 blockade in diabetes lowers cortical QO2active and raises medullary QO2active, particularly in S3 segments. PMID:26764207

  19. Effects of hydroalcoholic extract of Rhus coriaria seed on glucose and insulin related biomarkers, lipid profile, and hepatic enzymes in nicotinamide-streptozotocin-induced type II diabetic male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahangarpour, Akram; Heidari, Hamid; Junghani, Majid Salehizade; Absari, Reza; Khoogar, Mehdi; Ghaedi, Ehsan

    2017-10-01

    Type 2 diabetes often leads to dislipidemia and abnormal activity of hepatic enzymes. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the antidiabetic and hypolipidemic properties of Rhus coriaria ( R. coriaria ) seed extrac on nicotinamide-streptozotocin induced type 2 diabetic mice. In this experimental study, 56 male Naval Medical Research Institute mice (30-35 g) were randomly separated into seven groups: control, diabetic group, diabetic mice treated with glibenclamide (0.25 mg/kg, as standard antidiabetic drug) or R. coriaria seed extract in doses of 200 and 300 mg/kg, and control groups received these two doses of extract orally for 28 days. Induction of diabetes was done by intraperitoneal injection of nicotinamide and streptozotocin. Ultimately, body weight of mice, blood levels of glucose, insulin, hepatic enzymes, leptin, and lipid profile were assayed. After induction of type 2 diabetes, level of glucose, cholesterol, low density lipoprotein, serum glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase, and serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase increased and level of insulin and high density lipoprotein decreased remarkably. Administration of both doses of extract decreased level of glucose and cholesterol significantly in diabetic mice. LDL level decreased in treated group with dose of 300 mg/kg of the extract. Although usage of the extract improved level of other lipid profiles, insulin and hepatic enzymes, changes weren't significant. This study showed R. coriaria seeds administration has a favorable effect in controlling some blood parameters in type 2 diabetes. Therefore it may be beneficial in the treatment of diabetes.

  20. The importance of different frequency bands in predicting subcutaneous glucose concentration in type 1 diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yinghui; Gribok, Andrei V; Ward, W Kenneth; Reifman, Jaques

    2010-08-01

    We investigated the relative importance and predictive power of different frequency bands of subcutaneous glucose signals for the short-term (0-50 min) forecasting of glucose concentrations in type 1 diabetic patients with data-driven autoregressive (AR) models. The study data consisted of minute-by-minute glucose signals collected from nine deidentified patients over a five-day period using continuous glucose monitoring devices. AR models were developed using single and pairwise combinations of frequency bands of the glucose signal and compared with a reference model including all bands. The results suggest that: for open-loop applications, there is no need to explicitly represent exogenous inputs, such as meals and insulin intake, in AR models; models based on a single-frequency band, with periods between 60-120 min and 150-500 min, yield good predictive power (error bands produce predictions that are indistinguishable from those of the reference model as long as the 60-120 min period band is included; and AR models can be developed on signals of short length (approximately 300 min), i.e., ignoring long circadian rhythms, without any detriment in prediction accuracy. Together, these findings provide insights into efficient development of more effective and parsimonious data-driven models for short-term prediction of glucose concentrations in diabetic patients.

  1. Role of heterogeneity of lipids in predicting risk of atheroma formation in metabolic syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asim, M.; Ahmad, M.; Hasan, S.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Assessing impact of heterogeneous lipids in predisposing cardiovascular (CV) atheroma formation in adolescents with metabolic syndrome (MS). Study Design: Cross-sectional analytical. Place and Duration of Study: Educational Institutes of Lahore. Six months Material and Methods: A total of 193, 17-25 year old subjects, 106 males and 87 females were recruited. A record regarding each subject's personal, socioeconomic, educational, dietary and family histories was taken. They underwent the following anthropometric measurements: waist circumference/WC (cm), hip circumference/HC (cm), height (inches), weight (kg), waist hip ratio/WHR, body mass index/BMI and blood pressure. Laboratory investigations included fasting blood samples for glucose and lipids; including total cholesterol (TC), high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-c), low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-c) and triglycerides (TG). Calculations for TG/HDL ratio and TC/HDL ratio were made. Results: Metabolic syndrome (MS) was present in 26 (13.5%) individuals. Male to female ratio was 3:1. Values of waist circumference, blood pressure, fasting plasma glucose, triglyceride and HDL-c, were all high. On comparison of fasting lipid profile, TC/HDL ratio and TG/HDL ratio, it was observed that the average total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, TCL/HDL ratio were insignificant. The average triglyceride level and TG/HDL ratio were all high. The ROC curve for total cholesterol, HDL-c, TG, TC/HDL and TG/HDL ratio yielded 0.555, 0.526, 0.912, 0.548 and 0.913 areas under the curve. Plasma TG, TG/HDL ratio produced significant p-values < 0.001. Abnormal triglycerides and TG/HDL ratio at a cutoff of 3.98 was diagnosed with high sensitivity and specificity. Conclusion: Fasting triglyceride and HDL-c play a major role in the pathogenesis of MS at an early age. Triglyceride level and TG/HDL ratio as opposed to HDL-c and TC/HDL-c clearly define the risk for development of atheroma formation in our adolescent

  2. Prediction of the solubility in lipidic solvent mixture: Investigation of the modeling approach and thermodynamic analysis of solubility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Shruti V; Patel, Sarsvatkumar

    2015-09-18

    Self-micro emulsifying drug delivery system (SMEDDS) is one of the methods to improve solubility and bioavailability of poorly soluble drug(s). The knowledge of the solubility of pharmaceuticals in pure lipidic solvents and solvent mixtures is crucial for designing the SMEDDS of poorly soluble drug substances. Since, experiments are very time consuming, a model, which allows for solubility predictions in solvent mixtures based on less experimental data is desirable for efficiency. Solvents employed were Labrafil® M1944CS and Labrasol® as lipidic solvents; Capryol-90®, Capryol-PGMC® and Tween®-80 as surfactants; Transcutol® and PEG-400 as co-solvents. Solubilities of both drugs were determined in single solvent systems at temperature (T) range of 283-333K. In present study, we investigated the applicability of the thermodynamic model to understand the solubility behavior of drugs in the lipiodic solvents. By using the Van't Hoff and general solubility theory, the thermodynamic functions like Gibbs free energy, enthalpy and entropy of solution, mixing and solvation for drug in single and mixed solvents were understood. The thermodynamic parameters were understood in the framework of drug-solvent interaction based on their chemical similarity and dissimilarity. Clotrimazole and Fluconazole were used as active ingredients whose solubility was measured in single solvent as a function of temperature and the data obtained were used to derive mathematical models which can predict solubility in multi-component solvent mixtures. Model dependent parameters for each drug were calculated at each temperature. The experimental solubility data of solute in mixed solvent system were measured experimentally and further correlated with the calculates values obtained from exponent model and log-linear model of Yalkowsky. The good correlation was observed between experimental solubility and predicted solubility. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Fatty Liver Index and Lipid Accumulation Product Can Predict Metabolic Syndrome in Subjects without Fatty Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-Lung Cheng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Fatty liver index (FLI and lipid accumulation product (LAP are indexes originally designed to assess the risk of fatty liver and cardiovascular disease, respectively. Both indexes have been proven to be reliable markers of subsequent metabolic syndrome; however, their ability to predict metabolic syndrome in subjects without fatty liver disease has not been clarified. Methods. We enrolled consecutive subjects who received health check-up services at Taipei Veterans General Hospital from 2002 to 2009. Fatty liver disease was diagnosed by abdominal ultrasonography. The ability of the FLI and LAP to predict metabolic syndrome was assessed by analyzing the area under the receiver operating characteristic (AUROC curve. Results. Male sex was strongly associated with metabolic syndrome, and the LAP and FLI were better than other variables to predict metabolic syndrome among the 29,797 subjects. Both indexes were also better than other variables to detect metabolic syndrome in subjects without fatty liver disease (AUROC: 0.871 and 0.879, resp., and the predictive power was greater among women. Conclusion. Metabolic syndrome increases the cardiovascular disease risk. The FLI and LAP could be used to recognize the syndrome in both subjects with and without fatty liver disease who require lifestyle modifications and counseling.

  4. The Evaluation of Screening and Early Detection Strategies for Type 2 Diabetes and Impaired Glucose Tolerance (DETECT-2) update of the Finnish diabetes risk score for prediction of incident type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alssema, M; Vistisen, D; Heymans, M W

    2011-01-01

    the ROC curve to 0.766 (95% CI 0.750-0.783). Additional items such as male sex, smoking and family history of diabetes (parent, sibling or both) improved the area under the ROC curve and net reclassification. Bootstrapping showed good internal validity. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: The predictive value...... of the original Finnish risk questionnaire could be improved by adding information on sex, smoking and family history of diabetes. The DETECT-2 update of the Finnish diabetes risk questionnaire is an adequate and robust predictor for future screen-detected and clinically diagnosed type 2 diabetes in Europid...

  5. Basic fibroblast growth factor predicts cardiovascular disease occurrence in participants from the Veterans Affairs Diabetes Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark B Zimering

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Cardiovascular disease is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The aim of the present study was to test whether plasma basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF levels predict future cardiovascular disease (CVD occurrence in adults from the Veterans Affairs Diabetes Trial. Methods: Nearly four- hundred veterans, 40 years of age or older, having a mean baseline diabetes duration of 11.4 years were recruited from outpatient clinics at six geographically distributed sites in the Veterans Affairs Diabetes Trial (VADT. Within the VADT, they were randomly assigned to intensive or standard glycemic treatment, with follow-up as much as seven and one-half years. Cardiovascular disease occurrence was examined at baseline in the patient population and during randomized treatment. Plasma bFGF was determined with a sensitive, specific two-site enzyme-linked immunoassay at the baseline study visit in all 399 subjects. Results: One hundred-five first cardiovascular events occurred in these 399 subjects. The best fit model of risk factors associated with the time to first cardiovascular disease occurrence (in the study over a seven and one-half year period had as significant predictors: prior cardiovascular event, (hazard ratio [HR] 3.378; 95% confidence intervals [CI] 3.079- 3.807; P < .0001, baseline plasma bFGF (HR 1.008; 95% CI 1.002-1.014; P =.01, age, (HR 1.027; 95% CI 1.004-1.051; P =.019, baseline plasma triglycerides, (HR 1.001; 95% CI 1.000-1.002; P =.02 and diabetes duration-treatment interaction (P =.03. Intensive glucose-lowering was associated with significantly decreased hazard ratios for CVD occurrence (0.38-0.63 in patients with known diabetes duration of 0-10 years, and non-significantly increased hazard ratios for CVD occurrence (0.82-1.78 in patients with longer diabetes duration. Conclusion: High level ofplasma basic fibroblast growth factor is a predictive biomarker of future cardiovascular

  6. The role of novel biomarkers in predicting diabetic nephropathy: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uwaezuoke SN

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Samuel N Uwaezuoke Pediatric Nephrology Firm, Department of Pediatrics, University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Ituku-Ozalla, Enugu, Nigeria Abstract: Diabetic nephropathy (DN is one of the microvascular complications of the kidney arising commonly from type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM, and occasionally from type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. Microalbuminuria serves as an early indicator of DN risk and a predictor of its progression as well as cardiovascular disease risk in both T1DM and T2DM. Although microalbuminuria remains the gold standard for early detection of DN, it is not a sufficiently accurate predictor of DN risk due to some limitations. Thus, there is a paradigm shift to novel biomarkers which would help to predict DN risk early enough and possibly prevent the occurrence of end-stage kidney disease. These new biomarkers have been broadly classified into glomerular biomarkers, tubular biomarkers, biomarkers of inflammation, biomarkers of oxidative stress, and miscellaneous biomarkers which also include podocyte biomarkers, some of which are also considered as tubular and glomerular biomarkers. Although they are potentially useful for the evaluation of DN, current data still preclude the routine clinical use of majority of them. However, their validation using high-quality and large longitudinal studies is of paramount importance, as well as the subsequent development of a biomarker panel which can reliably predict and evaluate this renal microvascular disease. This paper aims to review the predictive role of these biomarkers in the evaluation of DN. Keywords: type 1 diabetes mellitus, renal microvascular complication, microalbuminuria, end-stage kidney disease, biomarker panel

  7. Nine-year incident diabetes is predicted by fatty liver indices: the French D.E.S.I.R. study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vol Sylviane

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fatty liver is known to be linked with insulin resistance, alcohol intake, diabetes and obesity. Biopsy and even scan-assessed fatty liver are not always feasible in clinical practice. This report evaluates the predictive ability of two recently published markers of fatty liver: the Fatty Liver Index (FLI and the NAFLD fatty liver score (NAFLD-FLS, for 9-year incident diabetes, in the French general-population cohort: Data from an Epidemiological Study on the Insulin Resistance syndrome (D.E.S.I.R. Methods At baseline, there were 1861 men and 1950 women, non-diabetic, aged 30 to 65 years. Over the follow-up, 203 incident diabetes cases (140 men, 63 women were identified by diabetes-treatment or fasting plasma glucose ≥ 7.0 mmol/l. The FLI includes: BMI, waist circumference, triglycerides and gamma glutamyl transferase, and the NAFLD-FLS: the metabolic syndrome, diabetes, insulin, alanine aminotransferase, and asparate aminotransferase. Logistic regression was used to determine the odds ratios for incident diabetes associated with categories of the fatty liver indices. Results In comparison to those with a FLI Conclusions These fatty liver indexes are simple clinical tools for evaluating the extent of liver fat and they are predictive of incident diabetes. Physicians should screen for diabetes in patients with fatty liver.

  8. Risk prediction of major complications in individuals with diabetes: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrinello, C M; Matsushita, K; Woodward, M; Wagenknecht, L E; Coresh, J; Selvin, E

    2016-09-01

    To develop a prediction equation for 10-year risk of a combined endpoint (incident coronary heart disease, stroke, heart failure, chronic kidney disease, lower extremity hospitalizations) in people with diabetes, using demographic and clinical information, and a panel of traditional and non-traditional biomarkers. We included in the study 654 participants in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study, a prospective cohort study, with diagnosed diabetes (visit 2; 1990-1992). Models included self-reported variables (Model 1), clinical measurements (Model 2), and glycated haemoglobin (Model 3). Model 4 tested the addition of 12 blood-based biomarkers. We compared models using prediction and discrimination statistics. Successive stages of model development improved risk prediction. The C-statistics (95% confidence intervals) of models 1, 2, and 3 were 0.667 (0.64, 0.70), 0.683 (0.65, 0.71), and 0.694 (0.66, 0.72), respectively (p < 0.05 for differences). The addition of three traditional and non-traditional biomarkers [β-2 microglobulin, creatinine-based estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), and cystatin C-based eGFR] to Model 3 significantly improved discrimination (C-statistic = 0.716; p = 0.003) and accuracy of 10-year risk prediction for major complications in people with diabetes (midpoint percentiles of lowest and highest deciles of predicted risk changed from 18-68% to 12-87%). These biomarkers, particularly those of kidney filtration, may help distinguish between people at low versus high risk of long-term major complications. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Effects of Low-Molecular-Weight Fucoidan and High Stability Fucoxanthin on Glucose Homeostasis, Lipid Metabolism, and Liver Function in a Mouse Model of Type II Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Ting Victor Lin

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The combined effects of low-molecular-weight fucoidan (LMF and fucoxanthin (Fx in terms of antihyperglycemic, antihyperlipidemic, and hepatoprotective activities were investigated in a mouse model of type II diabetes. The intake of LMF, Fx, and LMF + Fx lowered the blood sugar and fasting blood sugar levels, and increased serum adiponectin levels. The significant decrease in urinary sugar was only observed in LMF + Fx supplementation. LMF and Fx had ameliorating effects on the hepatic tissue of db/db mice by increasing hepatic glycogen and antioxidative enzymes, and LMF was more effective than Fx at improving hepatic glucose metabolism. As for glucose and lipid metabolism in the adipose tissue, the expression of insulin receptor substrate (IRS-1, glucose transporter (GLUT, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ, and uncoupling protein (UCP-1 mRNAs in the adipose tissue of diabetic mice was significantly upregulated by Fx and LMF + Fx, and levels of inflammatory adipocytokines, such as adiponectin, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, and interleukin-6 (IL-6, were significantly modulated only by LMF + Fx supplementation. The efficacy of LMF + Fx supplementation on the decrease in urinary sugar and on glucose and lipid metabolism in the white adipose tissue of db/db mice was better than that of Fx or LMF alone, indicating the occurrence of a synergistic effect of LMF and Fx.

  10. Type 2 Diabetic Rats on Diet Supplemented With Chromium Malate Show Improved Glycometabolism, Glycometabolism-Related Enzyme Levels and Lipid Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Weiwei; Zhao, Ting; Mao, Guanghua; Wang, Wei; Feng, Yun; Li, Fang; Zheng, Daheng; Wu, Huiyu; Jin, Dun; Yang, Liuqing; Wu, Xiangyang

    2015-01-01

    Our previous study showed that chromium malate improved the regulation of blood glucose in mice with alloxan-induced diabetes. The present study was designed to evaluate the effect of chromium malate on glycometabolism, glycometabolism-related enzymes and lipid metabolism in type 2 diabetic rats. Our results showed that fasting blood glucose, serum insulin level, insulin resistance index and C-peptide level in the high dose group had a significant downward trend when compared with the model group, chromium picolinate group and chromium trichloride group. The hepatic glycogen, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, glucokinase, Glut4, phosphor-AMPKβ1 and Akt levels in the high dose group were significantly higher than those of the model, chromium picolinate and chromium trichloride groups. Chromium malate in a high dose group can significantly increase high density lipoprotein cholesterol level while decreasing the total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglyceride levels when compared with chromium picolinate and chromium trichloride. The serum chromium content in chromium malate and chromium picolinate group is significantly higher than that of the chromium trichloride group. The results indicated that the curative effects of chromium malate on glycometabolism, glycometabolism-related enzymes and lipid metabolism changes are better than those of chromium picolinate and chromium trichloride. Chromium malate contributes to glucose uptake and transport in order to improved glycometabolism and glycometabolism-related enzymes. PMID:25942313

  11. Effect of Topical Tetracycline Gel with Non Surgical Periodontal Therapy on Hba1c and Lipid Profile in Type 2 Diabetic Patients: A Clinico- Biochemical Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Haerian-Ardakani

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The present study aimed to evaluate the Effect of topical tetracycline gel application with non surgical periodontal therapy on HbA1c and lipid profile in type 2 diabetic patients. Methods: A total of 30 type 2 diabetic patients were randomly divided into two groups. The first group received scaling and root planning, whereas the second group received scaling and root planning with topically applied tetracycline gel. Clinical factors such as GI, PI, PPD and biochemical factors such as HbA1c and lipid profile were assessed in beginning of study and 3 months later. Results: Comparing the clinical factors between the two groups revealed that periodontal pocket depth significantly reduced in tetracycline-received group. Regarding the biochemical factors, triglyceride levels decreased significantly in tetracycline-received group. No significant difference was observed between the two groups in regard with other clinical and biochemical factors. Conclusion: The study findings demonstrated that clinical and biochemical parameters have been improved after non surgical periodontal treatment in both groups. Although it seems that application of topical tetracycline gel combined with non-surgical periodontal therapy is effective in improvement of some clinical and biochemical factors like PPD and TG, it doesn’t offer any superiority in regard with other factors compared to mere non surgical periodontal therapy.

  12. Random glucose is useful for individual prediction of type 2 diabetes: results of the Study of Health in Pomerania (SHIP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowall, Bernd; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Giani, Guido; Schipf, Sabine; Baumeister, Sebastian; Wallaschofski, Henri; Nauck, Matthias; Völzke, Henry

    2013-04-01

    Random glucose is widely used in routine clinical practice. We investigated whether this non-standardized glycemic measure is useful for individual diabetes prediction. The Study of Health in Pomerania (SHIP), a population-based cohort study in north-east Germany, included 3107 diabetes-free persons aged 31-81 years at baseline in 1997-2001. 2475 persons participated at 5-year follow-up and gave self-reports of incident diabetes. For the total sample and for subjects aged ≥50 years, statistical properties of prediction models with and without random glucose were compared. A basic model (including age, sex, diabetes of parents, hypertension and waist circumference) and a comprehensive model (additionally including various lifestyle variables and blood parameters, but not HbA1c) performed statistically significantly better after adding random glucose (e.g., the area under the receiver-operating curve (AROC) increased from 0.824 to 0.856 after adding random glucose to the comprehensive model in the total sample). Likewise, adding random glucose to prediction models which included HbA1c led to significant improvements of predictive ability (e.g., for subjects ≥50 years, AROC increased from 0.824 to 0.849 after adding random glucose to the comprehensive model+HbA1c). Random glucose is useful for individual diabetes prediction, and improves prediction models including HbA1c. Copyright © 2012 Primary Care Diabetes Europe. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Health risk factor modification predicts incidence of diabetes in an employee population: results of an 8-year longitudinal cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolando, Lori; Byrne, Daniel W; McGown, Paula W; Goetzel, Ron Z; Elasy, Tom A; Yarbrough, Mary I

    2013-04-01

    To understand risk factor modification effect on Type 2 diabetes incidence in a workforce population. Annual health risk assessment data (N = 3125) in years 1 through 4 were used to predict diabetes development in years 5 through 8. Employees who reduced their body mass index from 30 or more to less than 30 decreased their chances of developing diabetes (odds ratio = 0.22, 95% confidence interval: 0.05 to 0.93), while those who became obese increased their diabetes risk (odds ratio = 8.85, 95% confidence interval: 2.53 to 31.0). Weight reduction observed over a long period can result in clinically important reductions in diabetes incidence. Workplace health promotion programs may prevent diabetes among workers by encouraging weight loss and adoption of healthy lifestyle habits.

  14. Trends in lipid profiles and descriptive characteristics of U.S. adults with and without diabetes and cholesterol-lowering medication use-National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2003-2012, United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercado, Carla I; Gregg, Edward; Gillespie, Cathleen; Loustalot, Fleetwood

    2018-01-01

    With a cholesterol-lowering focus for diabetic adults and in the age of polypharmacy, it is important to understand how lipid profile levels differ among those with and without diabetes. Investigate the means, differences, and trends in lipid profile measures [TC, total cholesterol; LDL-c, low-density lipoprotein; HDL-c, high-density lipoprotein; and TG, triglycerides] among US adults by diabetes status and cholesterol-lowering medication. Population number and proportion of adults aged ≥21 years with diabetes and taking cholesterol-lowering medication were estimated using data on 10,384 participants from NHANES 2003-2012. Age-standardized means, trends, and differences in lipid profile measures were estimated by diabetes status and cholesterol medication use. For trends and differences, linear regression analysis were used adjusted for age, gender, and race/ethnicity. Among diabetic adults, 52% were taking cholesterol-lowering medication compared to the 14% taking cholesterol-lowering medication without diabetes. Although diabetic adults had significantly lower TC and LDL-c levels than non-diabetic adults [% difference (95% confidence interval): TC = -5.2% (-6.8 --3.5), LDL-c = -8.0% (-10.4 --5.5)], the percent difference was greater among adults taking cholesterol medication [TC = -8.0% (-10.3 --5.7); LDL-c = -13.7% (-17.1 --10.2)] than adults not taking cholesterol medication [TC = -3.5% (-5.2 --1.6); LDL-c = -4.3% (-7.1 --1.5)] (interaction p-value: TC = <0.001; LDL-c = <0.001). From 2003-2012, mean TC and HDL-c significantly decreased among diabetic adults taking cholesterol medication [% difference per survey cycle (p-value for linear trend): TC = -2.3% (0.003) and HDL-c = -2.3% (0.033)]. Mean TC, HDL-c, and LDL-c levels did not significantly change from 2003 to 2012 in non-diabetic adults taking cholesterol medication or for adults not taking cholesterol medications. Diabetic adults were more likely to have lower lipid levels, except for triglyceride

  15. A Randomized Double-Blinded, Placebo-Controlled Trial Investigating the Effect of Fish Oil Supplementation on Gene Expression Related to Insulin Action, Blood Lipids, and Inflammation in Gestational Diabetes Mellitus-Fish Oil Supplementation and Gestational Diabetes

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    Mehri Jamilian

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM is a common complication of pregnancy, and it is mostly associated with postpartum diabetes, insulin resistance, and dyslipidemia. Fish oil (omega-3 supplementation has been shown to reduce the risk of different chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, and cancers, though the evidence of its impact on gestational diabetes is scarce. Our goal in this study was to determine the effect of fish oil administration on gene expression related to insulin action, blood lipids, and inflammation in women with GDM. Participants with GDM (n = 40, aged 18–40 years, were randomized to take either 1000 mg fish oil capsules, containing 180 mg eicosapentaenoic acid and 120 mg docosahexaenoic acid (n = 20, or placebo (n = 20 twice a day for 6 weeks. Gene expression related to insulin, lipids, and inflammation was quantified in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs of GDM women using Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR method. Results of RT-PCR indicated that omega-3 supplementation upregulated gene expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR-γ (P = 0.04 in PBMCs of patients with GDM, compared with the placebo. In addition, gene expression of the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR (P < 0.001, interleukin-1 (IL-1 (P = 0.007, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α (P = 0.01 was downregulated in PBMCs of women with GDM, following omega-3 supplementation. No significant effect of omega-3 supplementation was indicated on gene expression of IL-8 in PBMCs of patients with GDM. Overall, fish oil supplementation for 6 weeks in women with GDM significantly improved gene expression of PPAR-γ, IL-1, and TNF-α, but not gene expression of IL-8.

  16. Lipid profiles and serum visfatin concentrations in patients with type II diabetes in comparison with healthy controls

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    Hossein Hajianfar

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: This study documented an inverse relationship between circulating level of visfatin and fasting blood glucose. This finding may suggest the role of increased visfatin level and increase in synthesis and secretion of the cytokines from adipocytes. These findings may be useful for primary and secondary preventive issues in diabetic and pre-diabetic individuals.

  17. Effects of Estrogen Replacement Therapy on Lipid Peroxidation and Antioxidant Enzyme Activities of Ovariectomized and Ovariectomized-Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aslı F. Ceylan-Işık

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Menopause and diabetes are conditions producing free radicals independently from each other. Estrogen replacement therapy which widely used in postmenopausal period has beneficial effects because of its antioxidant property. The study groups were as follows: ovariectomy (n=8, ovariectomy+17-östradiol (n=8, ovariectomy+diabetes (n=10 and ovariectomy+diabetes+17-östradiol (n=8. Diabetes was induced by streptozotocin (45 mg/kg i.p. and the treatment with 17-östradiol (0.1 mg/kg/day was started a week after ovariectomy. After–week long experimental period aortic and uterine tissues were collected from the animals and the malondialdehyde concentration, glutathione peroxidase and catalase activities were quantified. The treatment did not effect blood glucose concentrations, but increased plasma estradiol concentrations. Increased malondialdehyde concentrations were reduced by the treatment in aorta from diabetics and nondiabetics, but the treatment increased malondialdehyde concentrations in nondiabetic uterine while were reducing in diabetic uterine. The treatment also reduced the increased activities of catalase and glutathione peroxidase in aorta from diabetics and nondiabetics, on the other hand the treatment increased the activities of those enzymes in uterine from diabetics and nondiabetics. Our results suggested that estrogen acts as an antioxidant or prooxidant depending on the tissues.

  18. Over Time, Do Anthropometric Measures Still Predict Diabetes Incidence in Chinese Han Nationality Population from Chengdu Community?

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    Kai Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To examine whether anthropometric measures could predict diabetes incidence in a Chinese population during a 15-year follow-up. Design and Methods. The data were collected in 1992 and then again in 2007 from the same group of 687 individuals. Waist circumference, body mass index, waist to hip ratio, and waist to height ratio were collected based on a standard protocol. To assess the effects of baseline anthropometric measures on the new onset of diabetes, Cox's proportional hazards regression models were used to estimate the hazard ratios of them, and the discriminatory power of anthropometric measures for diabetes was assessed by the area under the receiver operating curve (AROC. Results. Seventy-four individuals were diagnosed with diabetes during a 15-year follow-up period (incidence: 10.8%. These anthropometric measures also predicted future diabetes during a long follow-up (. At 7-8 years, the AROC of central obesity measures (WC, WHpR, WHtR were higher than that of general obesity measures (BMI (. But, there were no significant differences among the four anthropometric measurements at 15 years. Conclusions. These anthropometric measures could still predict diabetes with a long time follow-up. However, the validity of anthropometric measures to predict incident diabetes may change with time.

  19. A Phytosterol-Enriched Spread Improves Lipid Profile and Insulin Resistance of Women with Gestational Diabetes Mellitus: A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Double-Blind Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qin; Xing, Baoheng

    2016-08-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) has become a serious health risk among pregnant women throughout the world. Phytosterol-enriched margarines are capable of lowering total cholesterol (TC) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL), but little is known about its effects on GDM. We aimed to examine the effects of daily consumption of a phytosterol-enriched spread on insulin resistance and lipid profile in pregnant GDM women. Pregnant women suffering from GDM in their second trimester were recruited and randomly assigned to consume a margarine spread either with or without phytosterols daily for 16 weeks. Serum lipid profile and glucose and insulin metabolisms were assessed at week 0 (baseline) and week 16 (end of trial). After 16 weeks, levels of triacylglycerol, TC, and LDL were significantly decreased, while high-density lipoprotein was significantly increased, compared with the baseline in the phytosterol group. In addition, in the same treatment group, glucose metabolic parameters, including fasting plasma glucose, serum insulin levels, the quantitative insulin check index, homeostasis model of assessment of insulin resistance, and β-cell function, were also significantly improved. Daily consumption of a phytosterol-enriched spread improved insulin resistance and lipid profile in women with GDM.

  20. TU-C-12A-01: Measurement of Skeletal Muscle Lipids in Type 2 Diabetes Using in Vivo Proton MR Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valaparla, S; Boone, G; Ripley, E; Abdul-Ghani, M; Duong, T; Clarke, G

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify and compare the intramyocellular (IMCL), extramyocellular (EMCL) lipids and total fat fraction in human vastus lateralis (VL) muscle between lean controls and type 2 diabetic (T2DM) subjects using long echo time in vivo proton MR spectroscopy ( 1 H-MRS) Methods: 1 H-MRS single voxel (15 × 15 × 15 mm 3 ) stimulated acquisition mode (STEAM) was performed in right vastus lateralis m. on 10 lean controls (age: 28.3±3.94 yrs, BMI: 24.25±3.20 kg/m 2 ) and 7 type 2 diabetic (age: 54.28±6.42 yrs, BMI: 31.34±3.13 kg/m 2 ) subjects with Siemens 3T MRI and four-channel flex coil. Unsuppressed water spectra (NSA = 16) with TR/TE = 3000/30 msec, TM = 10 msec, BW = 2000 Hz, and water-suppressed spectra (NSA = 128) with TR/TE = 3000/270 msec, TM = 10 msec, and fixed water suppression BW = 50 Hz were acquired. Spectral intensity ratios of IMCL-CH 2 , EMCL-CH 2 and total lipid (IMCL + EMCL) with unsuppressed water signal (W) were converted into absolute concentrations expressed in mmol/kg. Fat fraction (100 × F/(W+F)) was calculated, where F includes the signal intensities of IMCL and EMCL methylene (CH 2 )n, peaks only. Results: Comparison of IMCL (controls: 11.70 ± 6.7, T2DM: 21.74 ± 10.2, p ≤ 0.01), EMCL (controls: 22.89 ± 18.42, T2DM: 77.21 ± 33.4, p ≤ 0.001) and total lipid (64.35 mmol/kg less in controls, p ≤ 0.001) showed statistical significance using two-tailed student t-test. Fat fraction (%) exhibited considerable inter-individual variability for controls (3.14 ± 2.09; range: 1.34 - 7.04) and T2DM (9.34 ± 2.88; range: 4.15 - 13.67) and deemed significant (p ≤ 0.05 Conclusion: Single voxel STEAM 1 H-MRS at long TE provides a robust non-invasive method for characterizing lipids within localized muscle regions, with well-resolved IMCL/EMCL peak separation. Regional lipid estimate and fat fraction in VL m. was significantly different in T2DM compared to lean controls. American Heart Association Southwest Affiliate Pre

  1. TU-C-12A-01: Measurement of Skeletal Muscle Lipids in Type 2 Diabetes Using in Vivo Proton MR Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valaparla, S; Boone, G; Ripley, E; Abdul-Ghani, M; Duong, T; Clarke, G [UT Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To quantify and compare the intramyocellular (IMCL), extramyocellular (EMCL) lipids and total fat fraction in human vastus lateralis (VL) muscle between lean controls and type 2 diabetic (T2DM) subjects using long echo time in vivo proton MR spectroscopy ({sup 1}H-MRS) Methods: {sup 1}H-MRS single voxel (15 × 15 × 15 mm{sup 3}) stimulated acquisition mode (STEAM) was performed in right vastus lateralis m. on 10 lean controls (age: 28.3±3.94 yrs, BMI: 24.25±3.20 kg/m{sup 2}) and 7 type 2 diabetic (age: 54.28±6.42 yrs, BMI: 31.34±3.13 kg/m{sup 2}) subjects with Siemens 3T MRI and four-channel flex coil. Unsuppressed water spectra (NSA = 16) with TR/TE = 3000/30 msec, TM = 10 msec, BW = 2000 Hz, and water-suppressed spectra (NSA = 128) with TR/TE = 3000/270 msec, TM = 10 msec, and fixed water suppression BW = 50 Hz were acquired. Spectral intensity ratios of IMCL-CH{sub 2}, EMCL-CH{sub 2} and total lipid (IMCL {sub +} EMCL) with unsuppressed water signal (W) were converted into absolute concentrations expressed in mmol/kg. Fat fraction (100 × F/(W+F)) was calculated, where F includes the signal intensities of IMCL and EMCL methylene (CH{sub 2})n, peaks only. Results: Comparison of IMCL (controls: 11.70 ± 6.7, T2DM: 21.74 ± 10.2, p ≤ 0.01), EMCL (controls: 22.89 ± 18.42, T2DM: 77.21 ± 33.4, p ≤ 0.001) and total lipid (64.35 mmol/kg less in controls, p ≤ 0.001) showed statistical significance using two-tailed student t-test. Fat fraction (%) exhibited considerable inter-individual variability for controls (3.14 ± 2.09; range: 1.34 - 7.04) and T2DM (9.34 ± 2.88; range: 4.15 - 13.67) and deemed significant (p ≤ 0.05 Conclusion: Single voxel STEAM {sup 1}H-MRS at long TE provides a robust non-invasive method for characterizing lipids within localized muscle regions, with well-resolved IMCL/EMCL peak separation. Regional lipid estimate and fat fraction in VL m. was significantly different in T2DM compared to lean controls. American Heart

  2. Effects of Omega-3 Fatty Acid Supplementation on Glucose Control and Lipid Levels in Type 2 Diabetes: A Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cai Chen

    Full Text Available Many studies assessed the impact of marine omega-3 fatty acids on glycemic homeostasis and lipid profiles in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM, but reported controversial results. Our goal was to systematically evaluate the effects of omega-3 on glucose control and lipid levels.Medline, Pubmed, Cochrane Library, Embase, the National Research Register, and SIGLE were searched to identify eligible randomized clinical trials (RCTs. Extracted data from RCTs were analyzed using STATA 11.0 statistical software with fixed or random effects model. Effect sizes were presented as weighted mean differences (WMD with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI. Heterogeneity was assessed using the Chi-square test with significance level set at p < 0.1.20 RCT trials were included into this meta-analysis. Among patients with omega-3 supplementation, triglyceride (TG levels were significantly decreased by 0.24 mmol/L. No marked change in total cholesterol (TC, HbA1c, fasting plasma glucose, postprandial plasma glucose, BMI or body weight was observed. High ratio of EPA/DHA contributed to a greater decreasing tendency in plasma insulin, HbAc1, TC, TG, and BMI measures, although no statistical significance was identified (except TG. FPG levels were increased by 0.42 mmol/L in Asians. No evidence of publication bias was observed in this meta-analysis.The ratio of EPA/DHA and early intervention with omega 3 fatty acids may affect their effects on glucose control and lipid levels, which may serve as a dietary reference for clinicians or nutritionists who manage diabetic patients.

  3. Effect of Probiotics on Glucose and Lipid Metabolism in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Meta-Analysis of 12 Randomized Controlled Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Kecheng; Zeng, Linghai; He, Qian; Wang, Wei; Lei, Jiao; Zou, Xiulan

    2017-06-22

    BACKGROUND It has been unclear whether supplemental probiotics therapy improves clinical outcomes in type 2 diabetic patients. This meta-analysis aimed to summarize the effect of probiotics on glucose and lipid metabolism and C-reactive protein (CRP) from 12 randomized controlled trials (RCTs). MATERIAL AND METHODS An up-to-date search was performed for all relevant RCTs up to April 2016 from PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane Library. Standardized mean difference (SMD) and weighted mean difference (WMD) were calculated for a fixed-effect and random-effect meta-analysis to assess the impact of supplemental probiotics on fasting plasma glucose (FPG), glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), fasting insulin, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), lipid profile, and CRP level. RESULTS A total of 12 studies (684 patients) were entered into the final analysis. The effect of probiotics was significant on reducing HbA1c level (standardized mean difference [SMD], -0.38; confidence interval [CI], -0.62 to -0.14, P=0.002; I²=0%, P=0.72 for heterogeneity), fasting insulin level (SMD, -0.38; CI -0.59 to -0.18, P=0.0003; I²=0%, P=0.81 for heterogeneity), and HOMA-IR (SMD, -0.99; CI -1.52 to -0.47, P=0.0002; I²=86%, Pprobiotics on FPG, CRP, or lipid profile were either non-significant or highly heterogeneous. CONCLUSIONS This meta-analysis demonstrated that probiotics supplementation was associated with significant improvement in HbA1c and fasting insulin in type 2 diabetes patients. More randomized placebo-controlled trials with large sample sizes are warranted to confirm our conclusions.

  4. Streptozotocin-Treated High Fat Fed Mice: A New Type 2 Diabetes Model Used to Study Canagliflozin-Induced Alterations in Lipids and Lipoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Tian; Sungelo, Mitchell J; Goldberg, Ira J; Wang, Hong; Eckel, Robert H

    2017-05-01

    The pharmacological effects of type 2 diabetes (T2DM) medications on lipoprotein metabolism are difficult to assess in preclinical models because those created failure to replicate the human condition in which insulin deficiency is superimposed on obesity-related insulin resistance. To create a better model, we fed mice with high fat (HF) diet and treated the animals with low dose streptozotocin (STZ) to mimic T2DM. We used this model to evaluate the effects of canagliflozin (CANA), a drug that reduces plasma glucose by inhibiting the sodium-glucose transporter 2 (SGLT2), which mediates ~90% of renal glucose reabsorption] on lipid and lipoprotein metabolism. After 6 weeks of CANA (30 mg/kg/day) treatment, the increase in total plasma cholesterol in HF-STZ diabetic mice was reversed, but plasma triglycerides were not affected. Lipoprotein fractionation and cholesterol distribution analysis showed that CANA kept HDL-Cholesterol, LDL-Cholesterol, and IDL-Cholesterol levels steady while these lipoprotein species were increased in placebo- and insulin-treated control groups. CANA treatment of HF-STZ mice reduced post-heparin plasma lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity at 2 (-40%) and 5 (-30%) weeks compared to placebo. Tissue-specific LPL activity following CANA treatment showed similar reduction. In summary, CANA prevented the total cholesterol increase in HF-STZ mice without effects on plasma lipids or lipoproteins, but did decrease LPL, implying a potential role of LPL-dependent lipoprotein metabolism in CANA action. These effects did not recapitulate the effect of SGLT2 inhibitors on lipids and lipoproteins in human, suggesting that a better murine T2DM model (such as the ApoB100 humanized CETP-overexpressing mouse) is needed next. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  5. Prediction of Declining Renal Function and Albuminuria in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes by Metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solini, Anna; Manca, Maria Laura; Penno, Giuseppe; Pugliese, Giuseppe; Cobb, Jeff E; Ferrannini, Ele

    2016-02-01

    Renal disease in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is associated with excess morbidity/mortality. Although estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and albuminuria are routine for assessing renal impairment, novel biomarkers could improve risk stratification and prediction. To identify specific biomarkers of progression of renal dysfunction. Prospective observational. Academic diabetes clinics. A total of 286 T2DM patients (age, 62 ± 8 y; glycosylated hemoglobin, 7.2 ± 0.9%; eGFR, 85 ± 20 mL · min(-1) · 1.73 m(2)). None. Progression of eGFR and albuminuria. We performed screening metabolomics in serum and urine samples by gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy (MS) and ultra-high performance liquid chromatography/MS/MS. Biomarker identification was performed by random forest using an eGFR cutoff of fasting glucose, and baseline eGFR) predicted outcome, with receiver operator characteristics curve (ROC) = 0.671. The five serum metabolites best correlated with either eGFR < 60 or ACR ≥ 30 at baseline were tested for their ability to improve clinical prediction. The sum of C-glycosyl tryptophan, pseudouridine, and N-acetylthreonine (MetIndex) raised the ROC to 0.739 (P < .0001). eGFR decline was predicted by the top MetIndex quartile (odds ratio = 5.48 [95% confidence interval, 2.23-14.47]). MetIndex also predicted an ACR increase with an odds ratio of 2.82 [1.20-7.03] and a ROC of 0.750. Top urine metabolites did not add significant predictivity. A limited number of circulating intermediates of amino acid and nucleotide pathways carry clinically significant predictivity for deterioration of renal function in well-controlled T2DM.

  6. Effects of supervised exercise on lipid profiles and blood pressure control in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashino, Yasuaki; Jackson, Jeffrey L; Fukumori, Norio; Nakamura, Fumiaki; Fukuhara, Shunichi

    2012-12-01

    Our study's purpose was to perform a systematic review to assess the effect of supervised exercise interventions on lipid profiles and blood pressure control. We searched electronic databases and selected studies that evaluated the effect of supervised exercise intervention on cardiovascular risk factors in adult people with type 2 diabetes. We used random effect models to derive weighted mean differences of exercise on lipid profiles and blood pressure control. Forty-two RCTs (2808 subjects) met inclusion criteria and are included in our meta-analysis. Structured exercise was associated with a change in systolic blood pressure (SBP) of -2.42 mmHg (95% CI, -4.39 to -0.45 mmHg), diastolic blood pressure (DBP) of -2.23 mmHg (95% CI, -3.21 to -1.25 mmHg), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) of 0.04 mmol/L (95% CI, 0.02-0.07 mmol/L), and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) of -0.16 mmol/L (95% CI, -0.30 to -0.01 mmol/L). Heterogeneity was partially explained by age, dietary co-intervention and the duration and intensity of the exercise. Supervised exercise is effective in improving blood pressure control, lowering LDL-C, and elevating HDL-C levels in people with diabetes. Physicians should recommend exercise for their adult patients with diabetes who can safely do so. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Validation of a multi-marker model for the prediction of incident type 2 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyssenko, Valeriya; Jørgensen, Torben; Gerwien, Robert W

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To assess performance of a biomarker-based score that predicts the five-year risk of diabetes (Diabetes Risk Score, DRS) in an independent cohort that included 15-year follow-up. Method: DRS was developed on the Inter99 cohort, and validated on the Botnia cohort. Performance...... was benchmarked against other risk-assessment tools comparing calibration, time to event analysis, and net reclassification. Results: The area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUC) was 0.84 for the Inter99 cohort and 0.78 for the Botnia cohort. In the Botnia cohort, DRS provided better...... discrimination than fasting plasma glucose (FPG), homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, oral glucose tolerance test or risk scores derived from Framingham or San Antonio Study cohorts. Overall reclassification with DRS was significantly better than using FPG and glucose tolerance status (p

  8. Plasma proteomics classifiers improve risk prediction for renal disease in patients with hypertension or type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pena, Michelle J; Jankowski, Joachim; Heinze, Georg

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Micro and macroalbuminuria are strong risk factors for progression of nephropathy in patients with hypertension or type 2 diabetes. Early detection of progression to micro and macroalbuminuria may facilitate prevention and treatment of renal diseases. We aimed to develop plasma...... proteomics classifiers to predict the development of micro or macroalbuminuria in hypertension or type 2 diabetes. METHODS: Patients with hypertension (n = 125) and type 2 diabetes (n = 82) were selected for this case-control study from the Prevention of REnal and Vascular ENd-stage Disease cohort....... RESULTS: In hypertensive patients, the classifier improved risk prediction for transition in albuminuria stage on top of the reference model (C-index from 0.69 to 0.78; P diabetes, the classifier improved risk prediction for transition from micro to macroalbuminuria (C-index from 0...

  9. Electrochemiluminescence assays for insulin and glutamic acid decarboxylase autoantibodies improve prediction of type 1 diabetes risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Dongmei; Steck, Andrea K; Zhang, Li; Guyer, K Michelle; Jiang, Ling; Armstrong, Taylor; Muller, Sarah M; Krischer, Jeffrey; Rewers, Marian; Yu, Liping

    2015-02-01

    We recently developed new electrochemiluminescence (ECL) insulin autoantibody (IAA) and glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 autoantibody (GADA) assays that discriminate high-affinity, high-risk diabetes-specific autoantibodies from low-affinity, low-risk islet autoantibodies (iAbs) detected by radioassay (RAD). Here, we report a further validation of the ECL-IAA and -GADA assays in 3,484 TrialNet study participants. The ECL assay and RAD were congruent in those with prediabetes and in subjects with multiple autoantibodies, but only 24% (P<0.0001) of single RAD-IAA-positive and 46% (P<0.0001) of single RAD-GADA-positive were confirmed by the ECL-IAA and -GADA assays, respectively. During a follow-up (mean, 2.4 years), 51% of RAD-IAA-positive and 63% of RAD-GADA-positive subjects not confirmed by ECL became iAb negative, compared with only 17% of RAD-IAA-positive (P<0.0001) and 15% of RAD-GADA-positive (P<0.0001) subjects confirmed by ECL assays. Among subjects with multiple iAbs, diabetes-free survival was significantly shorter if IAA or GADA was positive by ECL and negative by RAD than if IAA or GADA was negative by ECL and positive by RAD (P<0.019 and P<0.0001, respectively). Both positive and negative predictive values in terms of progression to type 1 diabetes mellitus were superior for ECL-IAA and ECL-GADA, compared with RADs. The prevalence of the high-risk human leukocyte antigen-DR3/4, DQB1*0302 genotype was significantly higher in subjects with RAD-IAA or RAD-GADA confirmed by ECL. In conclusion, both ECL-IAA and -GADA are more disease-specific and better able to predict the risk of progression to type 1 diabetes mellitus than the current standard RADs.

  10. The metabolic syndrome: validity and utility of clinical definitions for cardiovascular disease and diabetes risk prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Adrian

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of clinical definitions of the metabolic syndrome is frequently misunderstood. While the metabolic syndrome as a physiological process describes a clustering of numerous age-related metabolic abnormalities that together increase the risk for cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes, clinical definitions include obesity which is thought to be a cause rather than a consequence of metabolic disturbance, and several elements that are routinely measured in clinical practice, including high blood pressure, high blood glucose and dyslipidaemia. Obesity is frequently a central player in the development of the metabolic syndrome and should be considered a key component of clinical definitions. Previous clinical definitions have differed in the priority given to obesity. Perhaps more importantly than its role in a clinical definition, however, is obesity in isolation before the hallmarks of metabolic dysfunction that typify the syndrome have developed. This should be treated seriously as an opportunity to prevent the consequences of the global diabetes epidemic now apparent. Clinical definitions were designed to identify a population at high lifetime CVD and type 2 diabetes risk, but in the absence of several major risk factors for each condition, are not optimal risk prediction devices for either. Despite this, the metabolic syndrome has several properties that make it a useful construct, in conjunction with short-term risk prediction algorithms and sound clinical judgement, for the identification of those at high lifetime risk of CVD and diabetes. A recently published consensus definition provides some much needed clarity about what a clinical definition entails. Even this, however, remains a work in progress until more evidence becomes available, particularly in the area of ethnicity-specific waist cut-points. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Coupling of the Functional Stability of Rat Myocardium and Activity of Lipid Peroxidation in Combined Development of Postinfarction Remodeling and Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Afanasiev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Coupling of the functional stability of rat myocardium and activity of lipid peroxidation processes in combined development of postinfarction remodeling and diabetes mellitus has been studied. The functional stability of myocardium was studied by means of the analysis of inotropic reaction on extrasystolic stimulus, the degree of left ventricular hypertrophy, and the size of scar zone. It was shown that in combined development of postinfarction cardiac remodeling of heart (PICR with diabetes mellitus (DM animal body weight decreased in less degree than in diabetic rats. Animals with combined pathology had no heart hypertrophy. The amplitude of extrasystolic contractions in rats with PICR combined with DM had no differences compared to the control group. In myocardium of rats with PICR combined with DM postextrasystolic potentiation was observed in contrast with the rats with PICR alone. The rats with combined pathology had the decreased value of TBA-active products. Thus, the results of study showed that induction of DM on the stage of the development of postinfarction remodeling increases adaptive ability of myocardium. It is manifested in inhibition of increase of LPO processes activity and maintaining of force-interval reactions of myocardium connected with calcium transport systems of sarcoplasmic reticulum of cardiomyocytes.

  12. Systems Biology-Derived Biomarkers to Predict Progression of Renal Function Decline in Type 2 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mayer, Gert; Heerspink, Hiddo J L; Aschauer, Constantin

    2017-01-01

    hormone 1, hepatocyte growth factor, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) 2, MMP7, MMP8, MMP13, tyrosine kinase, and tumor necrosis factor receptor-1. These biomarkers were measured in baseline serum samples from 1,765 patients recruited into two large clinical trials. eGFR decline was predicted based...... on molecular markers, clinical risk factors (including baseline eGFR and albuminuria), and both combined, and these predictions were evaluated using mixed linear regression models for longitudinal data. RESULTS: The variability of annual eGFR loss explained by the biomarkers, indicated by the adjusted R2 value......, combined with clinical variables, enhances the prediction of renal function loss over a wide range of baseline eGFR values in patients with type 2 diabetes and CKD....

  13. Prediction of Adolescents’ Glycemic Control 1 Year After Diabetes-Specific Family Conflict

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilliard, Marisa E.; Guilfoyle, Shanna M.; Dolan, Lawrence M.; Hood, Korey K.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To test adherence to blood glucose monitoring (BGM) as a mediator between diabetes-specific family conflict and glycemic control (hemoglobin A1c [HbA1c] levels) for 1 year. Design Three waves of prospective data spanning 1 year. Setting Diabetes clinic in a large tertiary care children’s hospital in the Midwestern United States. Participants One hundred forty-five dyads composed of an adolescent (aged 13–18 years) with type 1 diabetes mellitus and a parent. Main Exposures Adolescent- and parent-rated diabetes-specific family conflict and mean daily BGM frequency obtained through meter downloads. Main Outcome Measure Levels of HbA1c, abstracted from the medical record. Results In separate general linear models, higher adolescent-rated family conflict scores at baseline predicted less frequent BGM at 6 months (β=−0.08 [P=.01]) and higher HbA1c levels at 12 months (β=0.08 [P=.02]). In the multivariate model including baseline conflict and BGM as predictors of HbA1c levels, BGM was a significant predictor (β=−0.24 [P=.007]) and conflict was no longer significant (β=0.05 [P=.11]), supporting the mediation hypothesis. Post hoc probing showed that BGM explained 24% of the variance in the conflict-HbA1c link. The mediation between parent-reported conflict andHbA1c levels via BGM adherence was partially supported (conflict predicting HbA1c in the zero-order equation, β=−0.24 [P=.004]; multivariate equation, β=0.06 [P=.02]), and BGM frequency explained 16% of the conflict-HbA1c link. Conclusions Diabetes-specific family conflict in adolescence predicts deteriorations in BGM and subsequent glycemic control for at least 1 year. Results support ongoing intervention research designed to reduce family conflict and thus prevent a trajectory of declining adherence and glycemic control across adolescence. PMID:21727273

  14. The influence of a selenium-chromium-lipid complex obtained from Chlorella vulgaris on the energy metabolism in rats with experimental diabetes

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    O. Y. Lukashiv

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available One of the leading roles in treating diabetes mellitus belongs to chrome ions therapy (III, especially in the complex with selenium (IV. Currently selenium is obtained from unicellular algae, which contain biologically active substances and which are capable of accumulating exogenous microelements. By incubating unicellular algae Chlorella vulgaris Biej. in the conditions of aquaculture with sodium selenite (IV and chromium (III chloride, we obtained a biologically active lipid substance which contains selenium and chromium. The substance was tested for the impact on energy metabolism of animals exposed to experimentally induced diabetes mellitus. The diabetes was caused by modeling obesity of the animals with further injection of streptozotocin in the amount of 65 mg/kg and nicotinamide at the dose of 230 mg/kg. The rats were intragastrically injected with 1 ml of 1% starch solution which contained a selenium-chrome-lipid complex extracted from the Chlorella containing 0.6 µg of selenium, 1.05 µg of chrome and 0.5 mg of lipids for prophylactic, therapeutic and prophylactic-therapeutic purposes; the other group of rats for therapeutic purposes was injected with starch solution with the same composition of microelements in inorganic form – sodium selenite (IV and chromium chloride (III. This paper presents the results of our study of the impact of organic and inorganic compounds of chrome and selenium on the energetic metabolism of rats exposed to experimental diabetes mellitus. The analysis determined that in the rats’ organism, the selenium-chrome-lipid complex from the Chlorella improved the indicators of the energetic metabolism – in the group of rats which received it for therapeutic purposes, we observed an up to 7.5 fold increase in the activity of succinate dehydrogenase compared to the rats which did not receive therapeutic treatment. The increase in the activity of succinate dehydrogenase corresponded to the increase in the

  15. Neck circumference might predict gestational diabetes mellitus in Han Chinese women: A nested case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Fang; He, Hua; Liu, Wenqi; Lin, Junyu; Chen, Bingjun; Lin, Yucong; Zhao, Yitao; Tao, Wen; Xia, Xuefeng

    2017-03-01

    A large neck circumference might be an indicator of metabolic syndrome and its components, and for certain patients is more practical as an index than waist circumference. The demarcation value for neck circumference that suggests metabolic syndrome appears to vary by ethnic group. Gestational diabetes mellitus is considered a component of metabolic syndrome in pregnant women. We investigated whether neck circumference in Han Chinese women is associated with gestational diabetes mellitus in early pregnancy, and determined a predictive demarcation value. A nested case-control study was carried out with 255 women aged 18-35 years. Gestational diabetes mellitus was diagnosed according to the criteria of the American Diabetes Association through a 2-h, 75-g oral glucose tolerance test. Of the total population, 41 (16%) women developed gestational diabetes mellitus by 24-28 weeks of gestation. Neck circumference at gestational week 16 positively correlated with pre-pregnancy waist circumference, bodyweight and body mass index, and maternal age (P = 0.029) and hemoglobin A1c at gestational week 24 (P ≤ 0.001). By binary logistic regression, neck circumference was an independent predictor of gestational diabetes mellitus (odds ratio 1.840, 95% confidence interval 1.040-3.254; P = 0.036). According to the receiver operating characteristic curve, for predicting gestational diabetes mellitus the optimal demarcation for neck circumference at gestational week 16 was 35.15 cm. Neck circumference is a viable tool to screen for gestational diabetes mellitus. In this population of pregnant Han Chinese women, a neck circumference of ≥35.15 cm was a predictor of gestational diabetes mellitus. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Diabetes Investigation published by Asian Association for the Study of Diabetes (AASD) and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  16. Twelve-Year Cardiovascular and Mortality Risk in Relation to Smoking Habits in Type 2 Diabetic and Non-Diabetic Men: Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadaegh, Farzad; Derakhshan, Arash; Mozaffary, Amirhossein; Hasheminia, Mitra; Khalili, Davood; Azizi, Fereidoun

    2016-01-01

    To examine the associations between smoking and cardiovascular disease (CVD) / coronary heart disease (CHD) and all-cause mortality events in men with and without type 2 diabetes (T2D) in a Middle Eastern cohort during a median follow-up of 12 years. The study population included 2230 subjects aged ≥ 40 years, free from CVD, comprised of 367 participants with diabetes (21.2% current smokers) and 1863 without (27.3% current smokers). Multivariate Hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated for smoking (considering different definitions) for those with and without diabetes. Potential confounding factors including age, body mass index, estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia and educational level were entered in the multivariate analysis. In men with diabetes, the HR (95% CI) of comparing current and non-smokers was 1.25 (0.74-2.12) for incident CHD, 1.52 (0.96-2.40) for CVD and 2.10 (1.27-3.47) for mortality events; the corresponding values for men without diabetes were 1.65 (1.24-2.20), 1.70 (1.30-2.22) and 1.72 (1.14-2.58), respectively (all P values for interactions > 0.46). After pooling past smokers with current smokers, among diabetic individuals there was no significant risk for CVD [1.29 (0.89-1.86)] or mortality events [1.25 (0.81-1.92)]; however, among non-diabetic individuals the HRs of current/past smokers reached significant levels for CVD [1.53 (1.23-1.91)] but not for mortality outcomes (all P values for interactions > 0.51). The strength of the associations between smoking habits and incident CVD/CHD and mortality events from all causes did not differ significantly among diabetic and non-diabetic participants. Therefore, a comprehensive community-based smoking prevention program is important, given the increasing trend of smoking among the Iranian population regardless of diabetes status.

  17. Inhibition of key enzymes linked to type 2 diabetes and sodium nitroprusside-induced lipid peroxidation in rat pancreas by water extractable phytochemicals from some tropical spices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adefegha, Stephen Adeniyi; Oboh, Ganiyu

    2012-07-01

    active phytochemicals such as phenolics and some non-phenolic constituents of the spices. Furthermore, these spices may exert their anti-diabetic properties through the mechanism of enzyme inhibition, free radicals scavenging ability and prevention of lipid peroxidation.

  18. Association of diabetes-related distress, depression, medication adherence, and health-related quality of life with glycated hemoglobin, blood pressure, and lipids in adult patients with type 2 diabetes: a cross-sectional study

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    Chew BH

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Boon-How Chew,1 Mohd-Sidik Sherina,2 Noor-Hasliza Hassan3 1Department of Family Medicine, 2Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Serdang; 3Klinik Kesihatan Dengkil, Jalan Dengkil, Malaysia Abstract: This study examined the associations of diabetes-related distress (DRD, depressive symptoms, health-related quality of life (HRQoL, and medication adherence with glycemia, blood pressure (BP, and lipid biomarkers in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D. This cross-sectional study was conducted in three Malaysian public health clinics in 2012–2013, recruited adult patients (aged ≥30 years with T2D who had been diagnosed for more than one year, were on active follow-up, and had recent blood test results. Univariable and multivariable analyses were performed to identify significant associated factors for glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c BP, and lipids. The response rate was 93.1% (700/752. The majority were females (52.8%, Malay (52.4%, and married (78.7%. DRD correlated with systolic BP (r= -0.16; depressive symptoms correlated with low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (r=0.12 and total cholesterol (r=0.13; medication adherence correlated with HbA1c (r= -0.14 and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (r= -0.11; and HRQoL correlated with casual blood glucose (r= -0.11, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (r= -0.13, and total cholesterol (r= -0.08. Multivariable analyses showed that HRQoL was significantly associated with casual blood glucose (adjusted B= -0.06, P=0.024; DRD was associated with systolic BP (adjusted B= -0.08, P=0.066; depressive symptoms were associated with low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (adjusted B=0.02, P=0.061, and medication adherence was associated with HbA1c (adjusted B= -0.11, P=0.082 and total cholesterol (adjusted B= -0.06, P=0.086. There were significant and distinctive associations of DRD, depressive symptoms, HRQoL, and medication adherence with

  19. Predicting Insulin Absorption and Glucose Uptake during Exercise in Type 1 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Spencer; Hinshaw, Ling; Basu, Rita; Szeri, Andrew; Basu, Ananda

    2017-11-01

    A dose of insulin infused into subcutaneous tissue has been shown to absorb more quickly during exercise, potentially causing hypoglycemia in persons with type 1 diabetes. We develop a model that relates exercise-induced physiological changes to enhanced insulin-absorption (k) and glucose uptake (GU). Drawing on concepts of the microcirculation we derive a relationship that reveals that k and GU are mainly determined by two physiological parameters that characterize the tissue: the tissue perfusion rate (Q) and the capillary permeability surface area (PS). Independently measured values of Q and PS from the literature are used in the model to make predictions of k and GU. We compare these predictions to experimental observations of healthy and diabetic patients that are given a meal followed by rest or exercise. The experiments show that during exercise insulin concentrations significantly increase and that glucose levels fall rapidly. The model predictions are consistent with the experiments and show that increases in Q and PS directly increase k and GU. This mechanistic understanding provides a basis for handling exercise in control algorithms for an artificial pancreas. Now at University of British Columbia.

  20. Predictive Factors for Efficacy of Dipeptidyl Peptidase-4 Inhibitors in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

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    Shusuke Yagi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundPredictive factors for the efficacy of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4 inhibitors for lowering glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c remain unclear in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The aim of this study is therefore to clarify predictive factors of the efficacy of DPP-4 inhibitors for lowering HbA1c after 12 months of treatment.MethodsA total of 191 consecutive type 2 diabetic patients (male sex 55%, mean age, 68.3±35.8 years, who had been treated with DPP-4 inhibitors for 12 months, were enrolled in this study and evaluated retrospectively.ResultsAfter 12 months of DPP-4 inhibitor treatment, random blood glucose level, and HbA1c level, decreased from 167±63 to 151±49 mg/dL (P<0.01, and from 7.5%±1.3% to 6.9%±0.9% (P<0.01 respectively, without severe side effects. Multiple regression analysis showed that predictors of DPP-4 inhibitor treatment efficacy in lowering HbA1c level after 12 months were a decrease in HbA1c level after 3 months of treatment, a high baseline HbA1c level, a low baseline body mass index, and the absence of coronary artery disease.ConclusionMost suitable candidates for treatment with DPP-4 inhibitors are diabetics who are not obese and do not have coronary artery disease. In addition, long-term efficacy of DPP-4 inhibitors can be predicted by decrement of HbA1c after 3 months of treatment.

  1. Simple Prediction of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus via Decision Tree Modeling

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    Mehrab Sayadi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM is one of the most important risk factors in cardiovascular disorders considered as a common clinical and public health problem. Early diagnosis can reduce the burden of the disease. Decision tree, as an advanced data mining method, can be used as a reliable tool to predict T2DM. Objectives: This study aimed to present a simple model for predicting T2DM using decision tree modeling. Materials and Methods: This analytical model-based study used a part of the cohort data obtained from a database in Healthy Heart House of Shiraz, Iran. The data included routine information, such as age, gender, Body Mass Index (BMI, family history of diabetes, and systolic and diastolic blood pressure, which were obtained from the individuals referred for gathering baseline data in Shiraz cohort study from 2014 to 2015. Diabetes diagnosis was used as binary datum. Decision tree technique and J48 algorithm were applied using the WEKA software (version 3.7.5, New Zealand. Additionally, Receiver Operator Characteristic (ROC curve and Area Under Curve (AUC were used for checking the goodness of fit. Results: The age of the 11302 cases obtained after data preparation ranged from 18 to 89 years with the mean age of 48.1 ± 11.4 years. Additionally, 51.1% of the cases were male. In the tree structure, blood pressure and age were placed where most information was gained. In our model, however, gender was not important and was placed on the final branch of the tree. Total precision and AUC were 87% and 89%, respectively. This indicated that the model had good accuracy for distinguishing patients from normal individuals. Conclusions: The results showed that T2DM could be predicted via decision tree model without laboratory tests. Thus, this model can be used in pre-clinical and public health screening programs.

  2. Lay perceptions of predictive testing for diabetes based on DNA test results versus family history assessment: a focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijdenes-Pijl, Miranda; Dondorp, Wybo J; Timmermans, Danielle Rm; Cornel, Martina C; Henneman, Lidewij

    2011-07-05

    This study assessed lay perceptions of issues related to predictive genetic testing for multifactorial diseases. These perceived issues may differ from the "classic" issues, e.g. autonomy, discrimination, and psychological harm that are considered important in predictive testing for monogenic disorders. In this study, type 2 diabetes was used as an example, and perceptions with regard to predictive testing based on DNA test results and family history assessment were compared. Eight focus group interviews were held with 45 individuals aged 35-70 years with (n = 3) and without (n = 1) a family history of diabetes, mixed groups of these two (n = 2), and diabetes patients (n = 2). All interviews were transcribed and analysed using Atlas-ti. Most participants believed in the ability of a predictive test to identify people at risk for diabetes and to motivate preventive behaviour. Different reasons underlying motivation were considered when comparing DNA test results and a family history risk assessment. A perceived drawback of DNA testing was that diabetes was considered not severe enough for this type of risk assessment. In addition, diabetes family history assessment was not considered useful by some participants, since there are also other risk factors involved, not everyone has a diabetes family history or knows their family history, and it might have a negative influence on family relations. Respect for autonomy of individuals was emphasized more with regard to DNA testing than family history assessment. Other issues such as psychological harm, discrimination, and privacy were only briefly mentioned for both tests. The results suggest that most participants believe a predictive genetic test could be used in the prevention of multifactorial disorders, such as diabetes, but indicate points to consider before both these tests are applied. These considerations differ with regard to the method of assessment (DNA test or obtaining family history) and also differ from

  3. Lay perceptions of predictive testing for diabetes based on DNA test results versus family history assessment: a focus group study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornel Martina C

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study assessed lay perceptions of issues related to predictive genetic testing for multifactorial diseases. These perceived issues may differ from the "classic" issues, e.g. autonomy, discrimination, and psychological harm that are considered important in predictive testing for monogenic disorders. In this study, type 2 diabetes was used as an example, and perceptions with regard to predictive testing based on DNA test results and family history assessment were compared. Methods Eight focus group interviews were held with 45 individuals aged 35-70 years with (n = 3 and without (n = 1 a family history of diabetes, mixed groups of these two (n = 2, and diabetes patients (n = 2. All interviews were transcribed and analysed using Atlas-ti. Results Most participants believed in the ability of a predictive test to identify people at risk for diabetes and to motivate preventive behaviour. Different reasons underlying motivation were considered when comparing DNA test results and a family history risk assessment. A perceived drawback of DNA testing was that diabetes was considered not severe enough for this type of risk assessment. In addition, diabetes family history assessment was not considered useful by some participants, since there are also other risk factors involved, not everyone has a diabetes family history or knows their family history, and it might have a negative influence on family relations. Respect for autonomy of individuals was emphasized more with regard to DNA testing than family history assessment. Other issues such as psychological harm, discrimination, and privacy were only briefly mentioned for both tests. Conclusion The results suggest that most participants believe a predictive genetic test could be used in the prevention of multifactorial disorders, such as diabetes, but indicate points to consider before both these tests are applied. These considerations differ with regard to the method of assessment

  4. Effect of symbiotic supplementation on glycemic control, lipid profiles and microalbuminuria in patients with non-obese type 2 diabetes: a randomized, double-blind, clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Zarin Sadat; Nasli-Esfahani, Ensieh; Nadjarzade, Azadeh; Mozaffari-Khosravi, Hassan

    2017-01-01

    The prevalent raise of type 2 diabetes (T2D) around the globe, are creating higher risk for cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) and increasing strain on each country's health care budget in the world. Microalbuminuria has appeared as a key parameter in diabetic patients. Microalbuminuria is also related to increased cardiovascular morbidity in people who are non-obese diabetic. Some studies have suggested that consumption of symbiotic foods might help improve the metabolic profile, inflammatory factors and biomarkers of oxidative stress. The aim of trial was to determine the effect of symbiotic supplementation on glycemic control, lipid profiles and microalbuminuria in non-obese T2D. In this randomized, double-blind, clinically controlled trial, 70 patients with T2D (28 females, 42 males) were randomly divided into two groups ( n  = 35 for each group). The symbiotic group (SG) consumed 500 mg/d of symbiotic supplementations containing probiotics (Lactobacillus family, Bifidobacterium family, Streptococus thermophilus), Prebiotics (Fructo oligosaccharide) and B group vitamins (1 mg), lactose (0.5 mg), malt-dextrin, magnesium saturate and the placebo group (PG) consumed capsules filled with row starch and also B group vitamins (1 mg), lactose (0.5 mg), malt-dextrin, magnesium saturate for 9 weeks. Fasting blood glucose (FBG), hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), blood lipid profiles, 24-h dietary recalls, and anthropometric measurements were measured at the baseline and at the end of trial. SPSS software, version 16 was used to test the data and the results were expressed as mean ± standard deviation. Paired samples T-Test were used to compare continuous variables within groups. Comparison between different groups was performed through two independent samples T-Test. In the absence of normal distribution, the comparison between the groups was made using non-parametric Wilcoxon on signed ranks and Mann-Whitney tests. P values Symbiotic supplementation decreased

  5. Predicting the short-term risk of diabetes in HIV-positive patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petoumenos, Kathy; Worm, Signe W; Fontas, Eric

    2012-01-01

    HIV-positive patients receiving combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) frequently experience metabolic complications such as dyslipidemia and insulin resistance, as well as lipodystrophy, increasing the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and diabetes mellitus (DM). Rates of DM and other...... glucose-associated disorders among HIV-positive patients have been reported to range between 2 and 14%, and in an ageing HIV-positive population, the prevalence of DM is expected to continue to increase. This study aims to develop a model to predict the short-term (six-month) risk of DM in HIV...

  6. Effects of Satureja khuzestanica on Serum Glucose, Lipids and Markers of Oxidative Stress in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Double-Blind Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanaz Vosough-Ghanbari

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Satureja khuzestanica is an endemic plant of Iran that is widely distributed in the Southern part of the country. It has antioxidant properties and thus it seems to be useful in diseases related to oxidative stress such as diabetes and hyperlipidemia. The present study investigates the effect of S. khuzestanica supplement in metabolic parameters of hyperlipidemic patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Twenty-one hyperlipidemic patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus were randomized in a double blind, placebo controlled clinical trial to receive either S. khuzestanica (tablets contain 250 mg dried leaves or placebo once a day for 60 days. Blood samples were obtained at baseline and at the end of the study. Samples were analyzed for levels of glucose, total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, triglyceride, creatinine, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS as marker of lipid peroxidation and ferric reducing ability (total antioxidant power, TAP. Treatment of patients by S. khuzestanica for 60 days induced significant decrease in total cholesterol (P = 0.008 and LDL-cholesterol (P = 0.03 while increased HDL-cholesterol (P = 0.02 and TAP (P = 0.007 in comparison with the baseline values. S. khuzestanica did not alter blood glucose, triglyceride, creatinin and TBARS levels. In comparison with baseline values, no significant change was observed in blood glucose, total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, triglyceride, creatinine, TBARS and TAP in placebo-treated group. Usage of S. khuzestanica as a supplement to drug regimen of diabetic type 2 patients with hyperlipidemia is recommended.

  7. Predictive value of neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio in diabetic wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatankhah, Nasibeh; Jahangiri, Younes; Landry, Gregory J; McLafferty, Robert B; Alkayed, Nabil J; Moneta, Gregory L; Azarbal, Amir F

    2017-02-01

    The neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) has been used as a surrogate marker of systemic inflammation. We sought to investigate the association between NLR and wound healing in diabetic wounds. The outcomes of 120 diabetic foot ulcers in 101 patients referred from August 2011 to December 2014 were examined retrospectively. Demographic, patient-specific, and wound-specific variables as well as NLR at baseline visit were assessed. Outcomes were classified as ulcer healing, minor amputation, major amputation, and chronic ulcer. The subjects' mean age was 59.4 ± 13.0 years, and 67 (66%) were male. Final outcome was complete healing in 24 ulcers (20%), minor amputation in 58 (48%) and major amputation in 16 (13%), and 22 chronic ulcers (18%) at the last follow-up (median follow-up time, 6.8 months). In multivariate analysis, higher NLR (odds ratio, 13.61; P = .01) was associated with higher odds of nonhealing. NLR can predict odds of complete healing in diabetic foot ulcers independent of wound infection and other factors. Copyright © 2016 Society for Vascular Surgery. All rights reserved.

  8. Low dose organochlorine pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls predict obesity, dyslipidemia, and insulin resistance among people free of diabetes.

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    Duk-Hee Lee

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available There is emerging evidence that background exposure to persistent organic pollutants (POPs are important in the development of conditions predisposing to diabetes as well as of type 2 diabetes itself. We recently reported that low dose POPs predicted incident type 2 diabetes in a nested case-control study. The current study examined if low dose POPs predicted future adiposity, dyslipidemia, and insulin resistance among controls without diabetes in that study.The 90 controls were diabetes-free during 20 years follow-up. They were a stratified random sample, enriched with overweight and obese persons. POPs measured in 1987-88 (year 2 sera included 8 organochlorine (OC pesticides, 22 polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs, and 1 polybrominated biphenyl (PBB. Body mass index (BMI, triglycerides, HDL-cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, and homeostasis model assessment value for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR were study outcomes at 2005-06 (year 20. The evolution of study outcomes during 18 years by categories of serum concentrations of POPs at year 2 was evaluated by adjusting for the baseline values of outcomes plus potential confounders. Parallel to prediction of type 2 diabetes, many statistically significant associations of POPs with dysmetabolic conditions appeared at low dose, forming inverted U-shaped dose-response relations. Among OC pesticides, p,p'-DDE most consistently predicted higher BMI, triglycerides, and HOMA-IR and lower HDL-cholesterol at year 20 after adjusting for baseline values. Oxychlordane, trans-nonachlor, and hexachlorobenzene also significantly predicted higher triglycerides. Persistent PCBs with ≥7 chlorides predicted higher BMI, triglycerides, and HOMA-IR and lower HDL-cholesterol at year 20 with similar dose-response curves.Simultaneous exposure to various POPs in the general population may contribute to development of obesity, dyslipidemia, and insulin resistance, common precursors of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases

  9. A risk score to predict type 2 diabetes mellitus in an elderly Spanish Mediterranean population at high cardiovascular risk.

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    Marta Guasch-Ferré

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: To develop and test a diabetes risk score to predict incident diabetes in an elderly Spanish Mediterranean population at high cardiovascular risk. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A diabetes risk score was derived from a subset of 1381 nondiabetic individuals from three centres of the PREDIMED study (derivation sample. Multivariate Cox regression model ß-coefficients were used to weigh each risk factor. PREDIMED-personal Score included body-mass-index, smoking status, family history of type 2 diabetes, alcohol consumption and hypertension as categorical variables; PREDIMED-clinical Score included also high blood glucose. We tested the predictive capability of these scores in the DE-PLAN-CAT cohort (validation sample. The discrimination of Finnish Diabetes Risk Score (FINDRISC, German Diabetes Risk Score (GDRS and our scores was assessed with the area under curve (AUC. RESULTS: The PREDIMED-clinical Score varied from 0 to 14 points. In the subset of the PREDIMED study, 155 individuals developed diabetes during the 4.75-years follow-up. The PREDIMED-clinical score at a cutoff of ≥6 had sensitivity of 72.2%, and specificity of 72.5%, whereas AUC was 0.78. The AUC of the PREDIMED-clinical Score was 0.66 in the validation sample (sensitivity = 85.4%; specificity = 26.6%, and was significantly higher than the FINDRISC and the GDRS in both the derivation and validation samples. DISCUSSION: We identified classical risk factors for diabetes and developed the PREDIMED-clinical Score to determine those individuals at high risk of developing diabetes in elderly individuals at high cardiovascular risk. The predictive capability of the PREDIMED-clinical Score was significantly higher than the FINDRISC and GDRS, and also used fewer items in the questionnaire.

  10. Differential alterations of the concentrations of endocannabinoids and related lipids in the subcutaneous adipose tissue of obese diabetic patients

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    Verde Roberta

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The endocannabinoids, anandamide and 2-AG, are produced by adipocytes, where they stimulate lipogenesis via cannabinoid CB1 receptors and are under the negative control of leptin and insulin. Endocannabinoid levels are elevated in the blood of obese individuals and nonobese type 2 diabetes patients. To date, no study has evaluated endocannabinoid levels in subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT of subjects with both obesity and type 2 diabetes (OBT2D, characterised by similar adiposity and whole body insulin resistance and lower plasma leptin levels as compared to non-diabetic obese subjects (OB. Design and Methods The levels of anandamide and 2-AG, and of the anandamide-related PPARα ligands, oleoylethanolamide (OEA and palmitoylethanolamide (PEA, in the SAT obtained by abdominal needle biopsy in 10 OBT2D, 11 OB, and 8 non-diabetic normal-weight (NW subjects, were measured by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. All subjects underwent a hyperinsulinaemic euglycaemic clamp. Results As compared to NW, anandamide, OEA and PEA levels in the SAT were 2-4.4-fold elevated (p Conclusions The observed alterations emphasize, for the first time in humans, the potential different role and regulation of adipose tissue anandamide (and its congeners and 2-AG in obesity and type 2 diabetes.

  11. Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you, discussing your symptoms, and going over your health history, your doctor may test for diabetes if he or she suspects you are at risk. To check for diabetes, your doctor may request the following tests: Fasting blood sugar test. This test is usually done ...

  12. Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damm, Peter; Mathiesen, Elisabeth R

    2015-01-01

    For >30 years, insulin has been the drug of choice for the medical treatment of gestational diabetes mellitus. However, the use of oral hypoglycaemic agents has increased during the past 1–2 decades, so a recent comparison of treatment with glibenclamide, metformin or insulin in women...... with gestational diabetes mellitus is highly relevant....

  13. Lifestyle and precision diabetes medicine: will genomics help optimise the prediction, prevention and treatment of type 2 diabetes through lifestyle therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franks, Paul W; Poveda, Alaitz

    2017-05-01

    Precision diabetes medicine, the optimisation of therapy using patient-level biomarker data, has stimulated enormous interest throughout society as it provides hope of more effective, less costly and safer ways of preventing, treating, and perhaps even curing the disease. While precision diabetes medicine is often framed in the context of pharmacotherapy, using biomarkers to personalise lifestyle recommendations, intended to lower type 2 diabetes risk or to slow progression, is also conceivable. There are at least four ways in which this might work: (1) by helping to predict a person's susceptibility to adverse lifestyle exposures; (2) by facilitating the stratification of type 2 diabetes into subclasses, some of which may be prevented or treated optimally with specific lifestyle interventions; (3) by aiding the discovery of prognostic biomarkers that help guide timing and intensity of lifestyle interventions; (4) by predicting treatment response. In this review we overview the rationale for precision diabetes medicine, specifically as it relates to lifestyle; we also scrutinise existing evidence, discuss the barriers germane to research in this field and consider how this work is likely to proceed.

  14. Predicting the short-term risk of diabetes in HIV-positive patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petoumenos, Kathy; Worm, Signe Westring; Fontas, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: HIV-positive patients receiving combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) frequently experience metabolic complications such as dyslipidemia and insulin resistance, as well as lipodystrophy, increasing the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and diabetes mellitus (DM). Rates of DM ......). Factors predictive of DM included higher glucose, body mass index (BMI) and triglyceride levels, and older age. Among HIV-related factors, recent CD4 counts of...... and other glucose-associated disorders among HIV-positive patients have been reported to range between 2 and 14%, and in an ageing HIV-positive population, the prevalence of DM is expected to continue to increase. This study aims to develop a model to predict the short-term (six-month) risk of DM in HIV...

  15. A probability score for preoperative prediction of type 2 diabetes remission following RYGB surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Still, Christopher D.; Wood, G. Craig; Benotti, Peter; Petrick, Anthony T.; Gabrielsen, Jon; Strodel, William E.; Ibele, Anna; Seiler, Jamie; Irving, Brian A.; Celaya, Melisa P.; Blackstone, Robin; Gerhard, Glenn S.; Argyropoulos, George

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a metabolic disease with significant medical complications. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery is one of the few interventions that remit T2D in ~60% of patients. However, there is no accurate method for predicting preoperatively the probability for T2D remission. METHODS A retrospective cohort of 2,300 RYGB patients at Geisinger Clinic was used to identify 690 patients with T2D and complete electronic data. Two additional T2D cohorts (N=276, and N=113) were used for replication at 14 months following RYGB. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used in the primary cohort to create survival curves until remission. A Cox proportional hazards model was used to estimate the hazard ratios on T2D remission. FINDINGS Using 259 preoperative clinical variables, four (use of insulin, age, HbA1c, and type of antidiabetic medication) were sufficient to develop an algorithm that produces a type 2 diabetes remission (DiaRem) score over five years. The DiaRem score spans from 0 to 22 and was divided into five groups corresponding to five probability-ranges for T2D remission: 0–2 (88%–99%), 3–7 (64%–88%), 8–12 (23%–49%), 13–17 (11%–33%), 18–22 (2%–16%). The DiaRem scores in the replication cohorts, as well as under various definitions of diabetes remission, conformed to the DiaRem score of the primary cohort. INTERPRETATION The DiaRem score is a novel preoperative method for predicting the probability (from 2% to 99%) for T2D remission following RYGB surgery. FUNDING This research was supported by the Geisinger Health System and the National Institutes of Health. PMID:24579062

  16. Predicting health-promoting self-care behaviors in people with pre-diabetes by applying Bandura social learning theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mei-Fang; Wang, Ruey-Hsia; Hung, Shu-Ling

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to apply Bandura social learning theory in a model for identifying personal and environmental factors that predict health-promoting self-care behaviors in people with pre-diabetes. The theoretical basis of health-promoting self-care behaviors must be examined to obtain evidence-based knowledge that can help improve the effectiveness of pre-diabetes care. However, such behaviors are rarely studied in people with pre-diabetes. This quantitative, cross-sectional survey study was performed in a convenience sample of two hospitals in southern Taiwan. Two hundred people diagnosed with pre-diabetes at a single health examination center were recruited. A questionnaire survey was performed to collect data regarding personal factors (i.e., participant characteristics, pre-diabetes knowledge, and self-efficacy) and data regarding environmental factors (i.e., social support and perceptions of empowerment process) that may have associations with health-promoting self-care behaviors in people with pre-diabetes. Multiple linear regression showed that the factors that had the largest influence on the practice of health-promoting self-care behaviors were self-efficacy, diabetes history, perceptions of empowerment process, and pre-diabetes knowledge. These factors explained 59.3% of the variance in health-promoting self-care behaviors. To prevent the development of diabetes in people with pre-diabetes, healthcare professionals should consider both the personal and the environmental factors identified in this study when assessing health promoting self-care behaviors in patients with pre-diabetes and when selecting the appropriate interventions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The effect of aggressive versus standard lipid lowering by atorvastatin on diabetic dyslipidemia - The DALI Study : a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial in patients with type 2 diabetes and diabetic dyslipidemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkplanken, [No Value; Hoogerbrugge, N; Jansen, H; Jansen, H; Princen, HMG; Huisman, MV; van de Ree, MA; Stolk, RP; van Venrooij, FV; Banga, JD; Dallinga-Thie, G

    OBJECTIVE - In patients with type 2 diabetes, intensive glucose regulation, although effective for microangiopathy, has not been shown to have unambiguous preventive effects on the occurrence of cardiovascular disease. Patients with diabetes show a characteristic dyslipidermia (high triglyceride

  18. Positive Correlation of Serum Adiponectin with Lipid Profile in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus is Affected by Metabolic Syndrome Status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eslamian, Mohammad; Mohammadinejad, Payam; Aryan, Zahra; Nakhjavani, Manouchehr; Esteghamati, Alireza

    2016-04-01

    Type-2 diabetes mellitus (DM) and Metabolic syndrome (MetS) are both associated with dyslipidemia which may lead to development of vascular complications. Adiponectin is an anti-inflammatory protein synthesized by the adipose tissue. There is controversy regarding the association of adiponectin with lipid profile. To evaluate the correlation between serum adiponectin concentration and metabolic profile in patients with type-2 DM. A single center cross-sectional study was conducted on 173 patients with type-2 DM (82 males and 91 females). Plasma adiponectin concentration, lipid profile, glucose profile, and anthropometric features were investigated. Insulin resistance was determined using Homeostasis model assessment (HOMA). Correlation of serum adiponectin with lipid profile of patients with type-2 DM was assessed. Adiponectin was negatively correlated with waist circumference (r = -0.16, P = 0.06) and positively with HbA1c (r = 0.19, P = 0.032), total cholesterol (r = 0.23, P = 0.017), LDL (r = 0.30, P = 0.001), SD-LDL (r = 0.41, P < 0.001), and SD-LDL/LDL (r = 0.22, P = 0.023). We found a positive correlation between adiponectin and total cholesterol (r = 0.27, P = 0.055), LDL (r = 0.34, P = 0.026) and SD-LDL (r = 0.41, P = 0.006) in patients with at least 3 components of MetS criteria. Correlation of adiponectin with LDL and SD-LDL remained positively significant with increasing the number of MetS components. In patients with 5 components of MetS, serum adiponectin was significantly correlated with serum triglyceride (r = 0.89). Significant interaction was observed between adiponectin and metabolic syndrome in relation to serum lipid profile. The results of the present study suggest that in patients with type-2 DM and MetS, lipid profile is strongly correlated with blood concentration of adiponectin. The strongest association was observed between serum adiponectin and LDL.

  19. Better lipid target achievement for secondary prevention through disease management programs for diabetes mellitus and coronary heart disease in clinical practice in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gitt, Anselm K; Sonntag, Frank; Jannowitz, Christina; Weizel, Achim; Karmann, Barbara; Schaefer, Juergen R; Pittrow, David; Hildemann, Steven K

    2016-01-01

    Disease management programs (DMP) for diabetes mellitus (DM) or coronary heart disease (CHD) address the treatment of lipid disorders. The current registry aimed to compare drug utilization, lipid lowering effects and further outcomes of outpatients at high cardiovascular risk in DMP for DM or CHD compared to patients in routine care (no-DMP). This was a prospective non-interventional registry with a 1 year follow-up which enrolled consecutive patients with known DM and/or any vascular disease on simvastatin 40 mg monotherapy, to document lipid target achievement in clinical practice in Germany according to existing guidelines. Drug use (maintenance, add-on, switch, discontinuation) and other components of care were upon the discretion of the treating physician. Of a total of 12,154 patients (mean age 65.8 years, 61.2% males), 3273 were in DMP CHD, 3265 in DMP DM and 1760 in DMP CHD + DM. In DMP patients compared to no-DMP patients, comorbidities/risk factors were more frequent. More patients in the DMP groups attained the target level of low density lipoprotein (LDL-C) <70 mg/dl (1.8 mmol/l) at baseline (8.5% DMP vs. 5.7% no-DMP), at 6 month (10.3% vs. 7.4%) and 12 month follow-up (10.1% vs. 7.1%). Cholesterol absorption inhibitors were added in 16% of the patients at the end of the baseline or at the follow-up visits, while statin treatment (including mean dose) remained largely unchanged. Target achievement rates were highest for all time points in the DMP CHD + DM group. With respect to limitations, this study was restricted to lipid disorders as qualifying diagnosis and simvastatin as qualifying treatment, which is a potential cause of selection bias. Information on non-pharmacological measures was not collected, and the 12-month follow-up period was relatively short. Patients in DMP compared to those not in DMP achieved better LDL-C lowering and higher control rates, but overall lipid target achievement rates need to be improved. Longer

  20. A systematic review and meta-analysis of tests to predict wound healing in diabetic foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhen; Hasan, Rim; Firwana, Belal; Elraiyah, Tarig; Tsapas, Apostolos; Prokop, Larry; Mills, Joseph L; Murad, Mohammad Hassan

    2016-02-01

    This systematic review summarized the evidence on noninvasive screening tests for the prediction of wound healing and the risk of amputation in diabetic foot ulcers. We searched MEDLINE In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations, MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and Scopus from database inception to October 2011. We pooled sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic odds ratio (DOR) and compared test performance. Thirty-seven studies met the inclusion criteria. Eight tests were used to predict wound healing in this setting, including ankle-brachial index (ABI), ankle peak systolic velocity, transcutaneous oxygen measurement (TcPo2), toe-brachial index, toe systolic blood pressure, microvascular oxygen saturation, skin perfusion pressure, and hyperspectral imaging. For the TcPo2 test, the pooled DOR was 15.81 (95% confidence interval [CI], 3.36-74.45) for wound healing and 4.14 (95% CI, 2.98-5.76) for the risk of amputation. ABI was also predictive but to a lesser degree of the risk of amputations (DOR, 2.89; 95% CI, 1.65-5.05) but not of wound healing (DOR, 1.02; 95% CI, 0.40-2.64). It was not feasible to perform meta-analysis comparing the remaining tests. The overall quality of evidence was limited by the risk of bias and imprecision (wide CIs due to small sample size). Several tests may predict wound healing in the setting of diabetic foot ulcer; however, most of the available evidence evaluates only TcPo2 and ABI. The overall quality of the evidence is low, and further research is needed to provide higher quality comparative effectiveness evidence. Copyright © 2016 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. New Advanced Technology to Improve Prediction & Prevention of Type 1 Diabetes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Trucco, Massimo

    2004-01-01

    The research hypothesis on which our project is based is that there is a genetic contribution associated with increased risk for developing diabetic complications, specifically diabetic-nephropathy...

  2. Serum aspirin esterase is strongly associated with glucose and lipids in healthy subjects: different association patterns in subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotani Kazuhiko

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aspirin esterase (AE activity can account for part of aspirin pharmacokinetics in the circulation, possibly being associated with the impairment of aspirin effectiveness as an inhibitor of platelet aggregation. Aims The study was aimed at investigating the correlations of serum AE activity with cholinesterase (ChE and metabolic variables in healthy subjects in comparison to subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. Methods In cardiovascular disease-free T2DM subjects and healthy controls, the AE activity levels and/or the correlation patterns between AE and the other variables were analyzed. Results Neither AE nor ChE activities were higher in the subjects with T2DM. Serum AE activity strongly correlated with ChE as well as glucose/lipids variables such as total cholesterol and triglyceride in healthy subjects, while the correlations between AE and glucose/lipids variables were not present in T2DM subjects. Conclusions These data may reflect the pathophysiological changes between healthy and T2DM subjects. Our data may thus provide the basis for future studies to unravel the mechanisms.

  3. Evaluation of the Finnish Diabetes Risk Score to predict type 2 diabetes mellitus in a Colombian population: A longitudinal observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Arbelaez, Diego; Alvarado-Jurado, Laura; Ayala-Castillo, Miguel; Forero-Naranjo, Leonardo; Camacho, Paul Anthony; Lopez-Jaramillo, Patricio

    2015-12-10

    To assess the performance of the Finnish Diabetes Risk Score (FINDRISC) questionnaire for detecting and predicting type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) in a Colombian population. This is a longitudinal observational study conducted in Floridablanca, Colombia. Adult subjects (age ≥ 35 years) w