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Sample records for diabetes mellitus risk

  1. Periodontitis and risk of diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurav, Abhijit; Jadhav, Varsha

    2011-03-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a complex disease with varying degrees of systemic and oral complications. The periodontium is also a target for diabetic damage. Diabetes is a pandemic in both developed and developing countries. In recent years, a link between periodontitis and diabetes mellitus has been postulated. The oral cavity serves as a continuous source of infectious agents that could further worsen the diabetic status of the patient and serve as an important risk factor deterioration of diabetes mellitus. The present review highlights the relationship between diabetes mellitus and periodontitis. The potential mechanisms involved in the deterioration of diabetic status and periodontal disease are also discussed. © 2011 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  2. Risk factors for feline diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slingerland, L.I.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304830917

    2008-01-01

    The chapters of Part I of the thesis describe the development of techniques that can be used in the assessment of risk factors for the development of diabetes mellitus (DM) in cats. The hyperglycemic glucose clamp (HGC) was developed for use in conscious cats, equipped with arterial catheters for

  3. Statins and risk of diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Tjan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Statins are competitive inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA reductase, which reduces HMG-CoA to mevalonate, the precursor of cholesterol via squalene. Inhibition of HMG-CoA reductase results in a decrease in cholesterol production. Since 1987, when the United States Federal Drug Administration (FDA approved lovastatin for clinical use,(1 statins have been widely used for secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease, particularly coronary heart disease (CHD, which is associated with high levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL cholesterol. Statins are also used in type 2 diabetes mellitus, since this carries a high risk of CHD. Statins have several adverse effects, to which must now be added new onset diabetes. In 2012 the FDA issued a warning about the risk of newly developed diabetes mellitus in older persons, such that statin labels now include information on glycemic effects, including diabetes and increases in hemoglobin A1c or fasting plasma glucose.(2 According to the results of a recent meta-analysis involving 13,966 40+-year patients newly treated with statins between 1 January 1977 and 31 March 2011, a moderate but significant increase was found in the risk of new onset diabetes within the first two years of using regular higher potency statins (rosuvastatin >10 mg, atorvastatin >20 mg, and simvastatin >40 mg, compared with lower potency drugs. Therefore these investigators caution clinicians regarding the use of higher potency statins in secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease.(2 The use of a new drug carries a “built-in time-bomb”, because nothing is known about its side effects, except for those revealed by animal tests and limited clinical trials. Even a multicenter clinical trial cannot be expected to reveal all possible adverse reactions associated with a new drug. As an illustration, in patients without diabetes mellitus, more than 345 000 cases were needed to detect an increase in fasting

  4. STATINS AND THE RISK OF DIABETES MELLITUS

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    O. M. Drapkina

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Randomized controlled trials have clearly demonstrated the efficacy of statins in reduction of serum low density lipoprotein cholesterol level by 25-50% from the baseline. Statins may increase the risk of diabetes mellitus (DM in long-term therapy and use of high doses. Diabetogenic action is statins class effect and does not depend on their hydrophobic or hydrophilic properties. However, the use of statins in patients with DM is obligatory. The statins diabetogenic  risk is exaggerated and we will continue to treat our patients with statins.

  5. [Diabetes mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahdi, M; Gerdes, V E A; Hoekstra, J B L; Meesters, E W

    2012-02-01

    Currently there are over 740,000 patients with diabetes mellitus in the Netherlands, and this number will increase further in the coming years. Approximately 90% of patients has type 2 diabetes, a metabolic disorder that is often associated with obesity, hypertension and increased cholesterol levels. Treatment of diabetes mellitus is essential to reduce the risk of severe complications with irreversible organ damage in the long-term. Gingivitis and periodontitis are more common in patients with diabetes mellitus and are now also considered as complications of diabetes. Collaboration among healthcare professionals is important for effective diabetes care.

  6. Gestational Diabetes Mellitus and Future Cardiovascular Risk: An Update

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    S. Burlina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus is increasing in parallel with the rising prevalence of type 2 diabetes and obesity around the world. Current evidence strongly suggests that women who have had gestational diabetes mellitus are at greater risk of cardiovascular disease later in life. Given the growing prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus, it is important to identify appropriate reliable markers of cardiovascular disease and specific treatment strategies capable of containing obesity, diabetes, and metabolic syndrome in order to reduce the burden of cardiovascular disease in the women affected.

  7. Risk of Diabetes Mellitus in Persons with and without HIV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Line D; Mathiesen, Elisabeth; Kronborg, Gitte;

    2012-01-01

    In a nationwide, population-based cohort study we assessed the risk of diabetes mellitus (DM) in HIV-infected individuals compared with the general population, and evaluated the impact of risk factors for DM in HIV-infected individuals.......In a nationwide, population-based cohort study we assessed the risk of diabetes mellitus (DM) in HIV-infected individuals compared with the general population, and evaluated the impact of risk factors for DM in HIV-infected individuals....

  8. A Study Of Risk Factors Of Diabetes Mellitus

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    Banerjee P

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available A case control study of risk factors of Diabetes Mellitus was carried out among 75 diabetic cases attending the clinic, and an equal number of matched controls from inpatients of the surgical department of R .G Kar Medical College, Calcutta. Diabetes Mellitus was found significantly higher among those persons having family history of similar illness, belonging to the socio-economic class (Kuppuwami’s classification and non-vegetarian dietary habit.

  9. Comment on: Statin use and risk of diabetes mellitus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mehmet; Ali; Eren; Tevfik; Sabuncu; Hüseyin; Karaaslan

    2016-01-01

    In manuscript named "Statin use and risk of diabetes mellitus" by Chogtu et al, authors defined that pravastatin 40 mg/dL reduced the risk of diabetes by 30% in West of Scotland Coronary Prevention study. In fact, pravastatin 40 mg/d L reduced coronary heart disease risk approximately 30% in mentioned study.

  10. Maternal fertility problems and risk for transient neonatal diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hargreave, Marie; Kjaer, Susanne Krüger; Jørgensen, Marit Eika

    2017-01-01

    AIMS: The study of imprinting disorders in the context of infertility and its treatment is important, as studies have indicated an increased risk. In this study, we evaluated the risk of transient neonatal diabetes mellitus (TNDM), defined here as diabetes mellitus presenting within the first six...... for TNDM, after adjustment for birth year, maternal age at birth and parental history of diabetes, although this was not statistically significant (HR = 1.49; 95% CI 0.73-3.03). The risk of children born in the period 1994-2010 (a period with more comprehensive information on maternal fertility problems...

  11. Risk of atrial fibrillation in diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pallisgaard, Jannik L.; Schjerning, Anne-Marie; Lindhardt, Tommi B.

    2016-01-01

    AIM: Diabetes has been associated with atrial fibrillation but the current evidence is conflicting. In particular knowledge regarding young diabetes patients and the risk of developing atrial fibrillation is sparse. The aim of our study was to investigate the risk of atrial fibrillation in patients...... with diabetes compared to the background population in Denmark. METHODS AND RESULTS: Through Danish nationwide registries we included persons above 18 years of age and without prior atrial fibrillation and/or diabetes from 1996 to 2012. The study cohort was divided into a background population without diabetes...... and a diabetes group. The absolute risk of developing atrial fibrillation was calculated and Poisson regression models adjusted for sex, age and comorbidities were used to calculate incidence rate ratios of atrial fibrillation. The total study cohort included 5,081,087 persons, 4,827,713 (95%) in the background...

  12. Influence of diabetes mellitus on heart failure risk and outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Belle Eric

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Our aim is to summarize and discuss the recent literature linking diabetes mellitus with heart failure, and to address the issue of the optimal treatment for diabetic patients with heart failure. The studies linking diabetes mellitus (DM with heart failure (HF The prevalence of diabetes mellitus in heart failure populations is close to 20% compared with 4 to 6% in control populations. Epidemiological studies have demonstrated an increased risk of heart failure in diabetics; moreover, in diabetic populations, poor glycemic control has been associated with an increased risk of heart failure. Various mechanisms may link diabetes mellitus to heart failure: firstly, associated comorbidities such as hypertension may play a role; secondly, diabetes accelerates the development of coronary atherosclerosis; thirdly, experimental and clinical studies support the existence of a specific diabetic cardiomyopathy related to microangiopathy, metabolic factors or myocardial fibrosis. Subgroup analyses of randomized trials demonstrate that diabetes is also an important prognostic factor in heart failure. In addition, it has been suggested that the deleterious impact of diabetes may be especially marked in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy. Treatment of heart failure in diabetic patients The knowledge of the diabetic status may help to define the optimal therapeutic strategy for heart failure patients. Cornerstone treatments such as ACE inhibitors or beta-blockers appear to be uniformly beneficial in diabetic and non diabetic populations. However, in ischemic cardiomyopathy, the choice of the revascularization technique may differ according to diabetic status. Finally, clinical studies are needed to determine whether improved metabolic control might favorably influence the outcome of diabetic heart failure patients.

  13. Diabetes mellitus and the risk of dementia - The Rotterdam Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ott, A; Stolk, RP; van Harskamp, F; Pols, HAP; Hofman, A; Breteler, MMB

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To determine the influence of type 2 diabetes mellitus on the risk of dementia and AD. Background: Both dementia and diabetes are frequent disorders in elderly people. Methods: Prospective population-based cohort study among 6,370 elderly subjects. At baseline study participants were exam

  14. Statin use and risk of diabetes mellitus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bharti Chogtu; Rahul Magazine; KL Bairy

    2015-01-01

    The 3-hydroxy-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductaseinhibitors, statins, are widely used in the primary andsecondary prevention of cardiovascular diseases tolower serum cholesterol levels. As type 2 diabetesmellitus is accompanied by dyslipidemia, statins havea major role in preventing the long term complicationsin diabetes and are recommended for diabetics withnormal low density lipoprotein levels as well. In 2012,United States Food and Drug Administration releasedchanges to statin safety label to include that statinshave been found to increase glycosylated haemoglobinand fasting serum glucose levels. Many studies doneon patients with cardiovascular risk factors have shownthat statins have diabetogenic potential and the effectvaries as per the dosage and type used. The variousmechanisms for this effect have been proposed and oneof them is downregulation of glucose transporters bythe statins. The recommendations by the investigatorsare that though statins can have diabetogenic risk,they have more long term benefits which can outweighthe risk. In elderly patients and those with metabolicsyndrome, as the risk of diabetes increase, the statinsshould be used cautiously. Other than a subset ofpopulation with risk for diabetes; statins still have longterm survival benefits in most of the patients.

  15. Association of GSTs polymorphisms with risk of gestational diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Li, Shaoru; Zhai, Qianqian; Hai, Jie; Wang, Di; Cao, Meng; Zhang, Qinggui

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a case-control study to investigate the association between GSTM1, GSTT1 and GSTP1 IIe105Val polymorphisms and development of gestational diabetes mellitus in a Chinese population. A total of 320 patients with gestational diabetes mellitus and 358 pregnancy subjects were consecutively collected between January 2013 and December 2014. Genotyping for detection of GSTM1, GSTT1 and GSTP1 IIe105Val was conducted by using PCR-RFLP (polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphisms) method. By Fisher's exact test, we found that the genotype distributions of GSTP1 IIe105Val were in line with the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in control subjects (P=0.57). By Chi-square test, we found significant differences in the genotype distributions of GSTM1 (χ(2)=11.49, P=0.001) and GSTT1 (χ(2)=18.50, Pgestational diabetes mellitus when compared with the present genotype, and the adjusted Ors (95% CI) were 1.71 (1.24-2.36) and 2.00 (1.44-2.79), respectively. However, the GSTP1 IIe105Val polymorphism was not associated with an elevated risk of gestational diabetes mellitus. In conclusion, we suggest that the GSTM1 null genotype and GSTT1 null genotype are correlated with an increased risk of gestational diabetes mellitus in a Chinese population.

  16. Potential risk factors for developing diabetes mellitus type 2

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    Živanović Dušica

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a common multifactorial genetic syndrome, which is determined by several genes and environmental factors. The aim of the present study was to investigate the presence of risk factors for developing diabetes type 2 among diabetic individuals and to compare the presence of risk factors among diabetic individuals with and without positive family history for type 2 diabetes. Material and methods This study was conducted in Cuprija during the period from February to June 2002. The case group included 137 individuals having diagnosis type 2 diabetes. The control group included 129 subjects having the following diagnoses: hypertension, angina pectoris, chronic obstructive lung disease, gastric ulcer or duodenal ulcer. All participants were interviewed at the Medical Center Cuprija using structural questionnaire. The data were collected regarding demographic characteristics, exposure to various chemical and physical agents, stress, smoking, obesity, physical inactivity and family history of diabetes. In the statistical analysis chi square test was used. Results The diabetic individuals were statistically significantly older (40 and more years old (p=0,000, and they came from rural areas more frequently (p=0,006 than the individuals without diabetes. Significantly more diabetics had lower educational level (p=0,000 and they were agriculture workers and housewives significantly more frequently (p=0,000 than nondiabetic individuals. Furthermore, obesity (p=0,000 and physical inactivity (p=0,003 were significantly more frequent among the diabetic individuals than the nondiabetics. The diabetic individuals had significanly (p=0,000 more numbers of relatives with diabetes mellitus type 2 than the nondiabetics. The diabetic individuals with positive family history of diabetes were significantly older (p=0,021 and more frequently from urban areas (p=0,018 than the diabetic individuals without the positive family history

  17. Diabetes mellitus after renal transplantation: characteristics, outcome, and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesco, L; Busson, M; Bedrossian, J; Bitker, M O; Hiesse, C; Lang, P

    1996-05-27

    The incidence and risk factors of posttransplant diabetes mellitus were evaluated in 1325 consecutive renal transplant recipients. Thirty-three (2.5%) patients developed diabetes mellitus requiring insulin therapy. Onset occurred a mean of 5.7 +/- 1.5 months following transplantation. The patients were compared with 33 paired-control kidney recipients. The patients were significantly older than the controls (46.8 +/- 1.9 vs. 40.6 +/- 2.1 years) (Pdiabetes mellitus, the body mass index, ethnic origin, HLA phenotype, and the total doses of steroids and cyclosporine were similar in the two groups. The number of patients with at least one rejection episode was significantly higher among the diabetic patients (21 versus 9) but the number of episodes was similar. Diabetes occurred a mean of 1.1 +/- 0.3 months following rejection treatment. Intravenous pulsed prednisolone was always used for anti-rejection therapy. Insulin was withdrawn in 16 cases after a mean of 4 +/- 1 months, independently of steroid dosage reductions. Actuarial patient and graft survival rates were not significantly different, although 6-year outcome tended to be better in the controls (86% versus 93% for patient survival and 67% versus 93% for graft survival). This study suggests that pulsed steroid therapy might be the critical factor in the onset of posttransplant diabetes and that the risk is increased in older patients with chronic interstitial nephrititis.

  18. Fertility problems and risk of gestational diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Signe; Kjær, Susanne K; Jørgensen, M. E.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine whether women with a history of fertility problems have a higher risk of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) than women without a history of fertility problems after adjustment for maternal factors. Design Nationwide population-based cohort study. Setting Not applicable...... of diabetes, level of education, and smoking during pregnancy. Result(s) In total, 7,433 (2%) pregnant women received a diagnosis of GDM. Multivariate analysis showed that pregnant women with a history of fertility problems had a statistically significantly higher risk of GDM than pregnant women without...

  19. Prepregnancy obesity and the risk of gestational diabetes mellitus

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    Phupong Vorapong

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prepregnancy obesity is associated with increased risk for adverse pregnancy outcome such as gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM, gestational hypertension, preeclampsia, fetal macrosomia and the need for cesarean delivery. The objectives of this study assessed whether Thai women classified as obese according to WHO's recommended body mass index (BMI for Asians were at risk for developing gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM and other complications such as preeclampsia, gestational hypertension and fetal macrosomia. Methods Two hundred and forty women participated in this study and followed prospectively until delivery. Half of the women (n = 120 were obese (BMI ≥ 27.5 kg/m2 and the other half (n = 120 had normal weight (BMI > 18.5-23 kg/m2. Maternal demographic data, obstetric and neonatal outcomes from both groups were compared to each other. Relative risk and 95% confidence interval (CI were calculated. Results Compared to normal weight women, obese Thai women were not at increased risk for gestational diabetes mellitus (RR = 0.9 [95% CI 0.6-1.4]. Relative risk of preeclampsia and fetal macrosomia in obese women were 0.7 [95% CI 0.2-3.3] and 1.4 [95% CI 0.5-4.3], respectively. Relative risk of gestational hypertension in obese women was 12 [95% CI 1.6-90.8]. Conclusion When WHO's classification of obesity was used for Asian populations, prepregnancy obesity without metabolic problems did not increase the risk for GDM, preeclampsia and fetal macrosomia in Thai women. But, prepregnancy obesity continued to increase the risk for developing gestational hypertension.

  20. Future risk of diabetes in mother and child after gestational diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damm, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is a common pregnancy complication with increased maternal and perinatal morbidity. However, significant long-term morbidity also exists for the mother and offspring. Women with previous GDM have a very high risk of developing overt diabetes, primarily type 2...... diabetes, later in life. Moreover, the risk of the metabolic syndrome is increased 3-fold in these women. Their offspring have an 8-fold risk of diabetes/prediabetes at 19-27 years of age. Thus, GDM is part of a vicious circle which increases the development of diabetes in the coming generations....

  1. Prevalence and risk factors of gestational diabetes mellitus in Yemen

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    Ali AD

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abdullatif D Ali,1 Amat Al-Khaleq O Mehrass,2 Abdulelah H Al-Adhroey,3 Abdulqawi A Al-Shammakh,1 Adel A Amran4 1Department of Biochemistry, 2Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, 3Department of Basic Medical Sciences, 4Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Thamar University, Dhamar, Yemen Purpose: Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM continues to be a significant health disorder triggering harmful complications in pregnant women and fetuses. Our knowledge of GDM epidemiology in Yemen is largely based on very limited data. The aim of this study was, therefore, to determine the prevalence and risk factors of GDM among pregnant women in Dhamar governorate, Yemen.Patients and methods: A total of 311 subjects were randomly selected for this cross sectional survey. Health history data and blood samples were collected using a pretested questionnaire. To determine the prevalence of GDM, the fasting and random blood glucose techniques were applied according to the recommendations of the American Diabetes Association, using alternative methods that are more convenient to the targeted population. Poisson’s regression model incorporating robust sandwich variance was utilized to assess the association of potential risk factors in developing GDM.Results: The prevalence of GDM was found to be 5.1% among the study population. Multivariate analysis confirmed age ≥30 years, previous GDM, family history of diabetes, and history of polycystic ovary syndrome as independent risk factors for GDM prevalence. However, body mass index ≥30 kg/m2 and previous macrosomic baby were found to be dependent risk factors.Conclusion: This study reports new epidemiological information about the prevalence and risk factors of GDM in Yemen. Introduction of proper maternal and neonatal medical care and health education are important in order to save the mother and the baby. Keywords: gestational diabetes mellitus, alternative diagnostic criteria

  2. Obesity and the risk of cardiovascular disease and diabetes mellitus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Matthew J. Sorrentino

    2006-01-01

    @@ The increasing prevalence of obesity worldwide has many experts concerned about the worsening health of a large proportion of the population. It is well recognized that obesity is associated with a higher mortality, an increased risk of hypertension and hyperlipidemia, cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus, osteoarthritis, gall bladder disease and possibly some cancers. Currently it is estimated that over two thirds of adults in the United States are overweight and nearly one third are clinically obese.1 Of special concern is the rapid increase in obesity among children. Other countries both developed and developing are experiencing similar trends.

  3. CARDIOVASCULAR RISK FACTORS IN CHILDREN WITH TYPE 1 DIABETES MELLITUS

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    Z ABDEYASDAN

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Diabetes melliuts is a chronic, metabolic disease that involves the macro and micro vascular complications and one of its maer ascular cowplications is the cardio vascular disease, as ,the risk of cardiovascular disease is 2-4 folds in diabetic patients in comparison with non diabetic individuals. The researches have demonstrated that the risk factors of the cardio vascular disease are formed at childhood. Therefore the preventive measures must begin from early childhood. So the present study was planned with the goals to determine and compare the cardia-vascular risk factors in the diabetic children with type 1 of diabetes mellitus. Method: This was an analytic, cross sectional study that has been done in two groups (case-control. In this research, 148 children, suffering from the typel diabetes mellitus being supported by the metabolism and endocrine research center, were chosen in the continues case manner and for the control group, 148 children, matched with the study group (according to the age and the sex, at 6-18 years old from the schools in Isfahan city randomly and at 2-6 years from the neiborhoods of the case group. The data-gathering tool was the questionnaires includes lipid profile, blood pressure, weight and height. To analyze the data we used the analytic (t student and logistic regression and descriptive (mean and standard deviation statistic methods and SPSS. Results: Findings revealed that the means of Lipid profile, systolic blood pressure and body mass index had not statistically significant differences in the two groups. But the mean of diastolic blood pressure and the mean arterial blood pressure in the control group were more than the case group and this difference was significant. The mean, 75 and 95 percentiles for cholesterol and LDL in all the age groups, mean, 75 and 95 percentile for triglyceride in all the age groups except the age group of 1-4 years in the diabetic and non diabetic groups were

  4. Diabetes mellitus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1993-01-01

    930047 Relationship between diabetic cardiacautonomic disturbances and Q-Tc interval pro-longation and its clinical significance.XIANGMingzhu(向明珠),et al.Dept Med,1st PeopleHosp,Shashi,Hubei Prov,Shashi,434000.Chin J Endocrinol & Metabol 1992;8(3):149-151.Autonomic cardiovascular function tests andelectrocardiograms were performed in 61 pa-tients with diabetes mellitus.The result showedthat Q-Tc interval in diabetic patients with ab-

  5. Prevalence and Risk Factors for Gestational Diabetes Mellitus in Tehran

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    Ahia Garshasbi

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM and its risk factors in Tehran.Materials and Methods: From March 2002 to October 2004, screening for GDM was performed on 1804 women in Tehran. All pregnant women were referred for a 50 g oral glucose challenge test (OGCT between 24th and 28th week of gestation. All subjects with an abnormal GCT (blood glucose level ≥130 mg/dl underwent an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT within 1 week after the abnormal screening test. The prevalence of GDM was estimated.Results: The glucose challenge test was positive in 38.1% of cases .The prevalence of GDM for the whole cohort was 6.8%. About 78.6%   of our population were at medium or high risk for GDM and, therefore, would have been screened. The rate of GDM was significantly higher in women with a positive family history of diabetes, positive history of GDM, older age, multiparity, pre-pregnancy obesity, greater weight gain during pregnancy, history of infertility, chronic hypertension, history of stillbirth pregnancies and abortion. After logistic regression analysis, GDM diagnosis was significantly correlated with age (P<0.001, pre-pregnancy BMI (P=0.005, family history of diabetes (P<0.001, history of GDM (P=0. 002, chronic hypertension (P<0.001 and glucosuria during current pregnancy (P<0.001.Conclusion: In populations with medium/high risks for GDM (like the Iranian universal screening is recommended to identify women with diabetes mellitus.

  6. Physical Activity and Sedentary Behaviors Associated With Risk of Progression From Gestational Diabetes Mellitus to Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bao, Wei; Tobias, Deirdre K; Bowers, Katherine

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE: Women with a history of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) are at substantially increased risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The identification of important modifiable factors could help prevent T2DM in this high-risk population. OBJECTIVE: To examine the role of physical...... their total physical activity levels, women who increased their total physical activity levels by 7.5 MET-h/wk or more (equivalent to 150 minutes per week of moderate-intensity physical activity) had a 47% lower risk of T2DM (RR, 0.53; 95% CI, 0.38-0.75); the association remained significant after additional...... activity and television watching and other sedentary behaviors, and changes in these behaviors in the progression from GDM to T2DM. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Prospective cohort study of 4554 women from the Nurses' Health Study II who had a history of GDM, as part of the ongoing Diabetes & Women...

  7. Diabetes mellitus, fasting glucose, and risk of cause-specific death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seshasai, Sreenivasa Rao Kondapally; Kaptoge, Stephen; Thompson, Alexander;

    2011-01-01

    The extent to which diabetes mellitus or hyperglycemia is related to risk of death from cancer or other nonvascular conditions is uncertain.......The extent to which diabetes mellitus or hyperglycemia is related to risk of death from cancer or other nonvascular conditions is uncertain....

  8. Screening for gestational diabetes mellitus by a model based on risk indicators: a prospective study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Dorte; Mølsted-Pedersen, Lars; Beck-Nielsen, Henning;

    2003-01-01

    This study was performed to prospectively evaluate a screening model for gestational diabetes mellitus on the basis of clinical risk indicators.......This study was performed to prospectively evaluate a screening model for gestational diabetes mellitus on the basis of clinical risk indicators....

  9. Evaluation of risk for type 2 diabetes mellitus in medical students using Indian diabetes risk score

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    Pranita Ashok

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: According to World Health Organisation, type 2 diabetes mellitus [type 2 D. M] has recently escalated in all age groups and is now being identified in younger age groups. This underscores the need for mass awareness and screening programs to detect diabetes at an early stage. For this purpose we have used a simplified Indian Diabetes Risk Score (IDRS for prediction of diabetes in undergraduate medical students. Objectives: To screen and to identify 1st MBBS students at risk for developing type 2 D. M using IDRS. Materials and Methods : 261 undergraduates (1st MBBS students were scored using IDRS which includes age, family history of diabetes, exercise status, and waist circumference. After scoring them, we assessed random capillary blood glucose (RCBG in students with high IDRS score. Students with RCBG ≥ 113 mg/dl are followed for definitive tests for diagnosis of prediabetes and diabetes. Results and Conclusion: We have assessed 261 students till now. It was observed that 5%, 55%, and 38% students in High, Moderate, and Low risk group, respectively, for developing type 2 D. M. The mean abdominal obesity in high risk students was 101.95 ± 5.76 as compared to 79.17 ± 11.08 in moderate and low risk students (P 113 mg/dl in which one student found to have prediabetic. Conclusion: This underscores the need for further investigations to detect diabetes at an early stage and to overcome the disease burden of diabetes in future. Prevention of obesity and promotion of physical activity have to be the future plan of action which can be suggested in the form of regular exercise and diet planning for the students as part of an integrated approach.

  10. Chemical substances as risk factors of nephropathy in diabetes mellitus

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    Zofia Marchewka

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Although diabetes mellitus, a metabolic disease, does not fall into the group of diseases induced by toxic substances or environmental pollution, there is much evidence that some chemicals have considerable importance in its development. Exposure to substances with potential renal toxicity is especially dangerous for diabetics because it accelerates and intensifies diabetic nephropathy. This paper discusses the relationship between the xenobiotics and the development of diabetes mellitus and diabetic nephropathy with particular emphasis on those substances that causes the greatest damage to the kidneys. These are cadmium, iron, lead, arsenic, polychlorinated organic compounds, nitrogen compounds, and contrast agents. In addition, the mechanisms of diabetes mellitus induction or kidney damage by these xenobiotics are described.

  11. Diabetes mellitus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1997-01-01

    970258 Relationship between non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus and lipoprotein(a)in aged patients.CHI Jiamin(迟家敏), et al. Dept Endocrinol, BeijingHosp, Beijing, 100730. Chin J Geriatr 1997; 16(1): 39-42.

  12. Diabetes mellitus: an important risk factor for reactivation of tuberculosis

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    Ernesto Solá

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus was identified as a risk factor for developing tuberculosis (TB infection, and relapse after therapy. The risk of acquiring TB is described as comparable to that of HIV population. The fact that diabetics are 3× times more prone to develop pulmonary TB than nondiabetics cannot be overlooked. With DM recognized as global epidemic, and TB affecting one-third of the world population, physicians must remain vigilant. We present a 45-year-old woman born in Dominican Republic (DR, with 10-year history of T2DM treated with metformin, arrived to our Urgency Room complaining of dry cough for the past 3months. Interview unveiled unintentional 15lbs weight loss, night sweats, occasional unquantified fever, and general malaise but denied bloody sputum. She traveled to DR 2years before, with no known ill exposure. Physical examination showed a thin body habitus, otherwise well appearing woman with stable vital signs, presenting solely right middle lung field ronchi. LDH, ESR, hsCRP and Hg A1C were elevated. Imaging revealed a right middle lobe cavitation. Sputum for AFB disclosed active pulmonary TB. Our case portrays that the consideration of TB as differential diagnosis in diabetics should be exercised with the same strength, as it is undertaken during the evaluation of HIV patients with lung cavitation. Inability to recognize TB will endanger the patient, hospital dwellers and staff, and perpetuate this global public health menace.

  13. Increased risk of common infections in patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muller, L M A J; Gorter, K J; Hak, E; Goudzwaard, W L; Schellevis, F G; Hoepelman, A I M; Rutten, G E H M

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Clinical data on the association of diabetes mellitus with common infections are virtually lacking, not conclusive, and often biased. We intended to determine the relative risks of common infections in patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM1 and DM2, respectively). METHODS

  14. Diabetes Mellitus and Obesity as Risk Factors for Pancreatic Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eibl, Guido; Cruz-Monserrate, Zobeida; Korc, Murray; Petrov, Maxim S; Goodarzi, Mark O; Fisher, William E; Habtezion, Aida; Lugea, Aurelia; Pandol, Stephen J; Hart, Phil A; Andersen, Dana K

    2017-09-11

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is among the deadliest types of cancer. The worldwide estimates of its incidence and mortality in the general population are eight cases per 100,000 person-years and seven deaths per 100,000 person-years, and they are significantly higher in the United States than in the rest of the world. The incidence of this disease in the United States is more than 50,000 new cases in 2017. Indeed, total deaths due to PDAC are projected to increase dramatically to become the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths before 2030. Considering the failure to date to efficiently treat existing PDAC, increased effort should be undertaken to prevent this disease. A better understanding of the risk factors leading to PDAC development is of utmost importance to identify and formulate preventive strategies. Large epidemiologic and cohort studies have identified risk factors for the development of PDAC, including obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus. This review highlights the current knowledge of obesity and type 2 diabetes as risk factors for PDAC development and progression, their interplay and underlying mechanisms, and the relation to diet. Research gaps and opportunities to address this deadly disease are also outlined. Copyright © 2017 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Risk Factors for Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus among Children and Adolescents in Basrah

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athar Abdul Samad Majeed

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Environmental factors play an important role in the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes mellitus, many of these factors have been uncovered despite much research. A case-control study was carried out to determine the potential maternal, neonatal and early childhood risk factors for type 1 diabetes mellitus in children and adolescents in Basrah.Methods: A total of 96 diabetic patients who have been admitted to the pediatric wards at 3 main hospitals in Basrah, and those who have visited primary health care centers over the period from the 4th of November 2006 to the end of May 2007 were recruited. In addition, 299 non-diabetic children were included, their age ranged from 18 months to 17 years.Results: Family history of type 1 diabetes mellitus and thyroid diseases in first and second degree relatives was found to be an independent risk factor for type 1 diabetes mellitus, (p<0.001. Regarding maternal habits and illnesses during pregnancy, the study has revealed that tea drinking during pregnancy is a risk factor for type 1 diabetes mellitus in their offspring, (p<0.05. In addition, maternal pre-eclampsia and infections were found to be significant risk factor for type 1 diabetes mellitus, (p<0.001. Neonatal infections, eczema and rhinitis during infancy were also significantly associated with development of type 1 diabetes mellitus. Moreover, the results revealed that duration of <6 months breast feeding is an important trigger of type 1 diabetes mellitus.Conclusion: Exposure to environmental risk factors during pregnancy (tea drinking, pre-eclampsia, and infectious diseases, neonatal period (respiratory distress, jaundice and infections and early infancy are thought to play an important role in triggering the immune process leading to B-cell destruction and the development of type 1 diabetes mellitus.

  16. diabetes mellitus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1995-01-01

    950257 Report of a case of glucagonoma misdiag-nosed as“eczema”and“hepatic angioma”for three yearsand review of literature.DAI Weixin(戴为信),et al.PUMC Hosp,Beijing,100730.Chin J Intern Med 1995;34(3):190-192.Glucagonoma is a rare pancreatic tumor,necrolyticmigratory erythema is its distinctive feature and it isoften associated with diabetes mellitus,weight loss.anemia,hypoaminoacidemia,glossitis and stomatitis.

  17. Different risk factor profiles for ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke in type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hägg, Stefanie; Thorn, Lena M; Forsblom, Carol M; Gordin, Daniel; Saraheimo, Markku; Tolonen, Nina; Wadén, Johan; Liebkind, Ron; Putaala, Jukka; Tatlisumak, Turgut; Groop, Per-Henrik

    2014-09-01

    Despite the fact that patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus have a markedly increased risk of experiencing a stroke, independent risk factors for stroke and its subtypes in these patients have remained unclear. A total of 4083 patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus from the Finnish Diabetic Nephropathy (FinnDiane) Study, without a history of stroke at baseline, were included. Strokes were classified based on medical files and brain imaging. At baseline, mean age was 37.4±11.8 years, duration of diabetes mellitus was 20.0 (11.0-30.0) years, and 51% were men. During 9.0±2.7 years (36 680 patient-years) of follow-up, 105 patients experienced an ischemic stroke and 44 a hemorrhagic stroke. Cox proportional hazards analyses were performed to determine independent risk factors. Independent risk factors for ischemic stroke were duration of diabetes mellitus, presence of diabetic nephropathy, higher hemoglobin A1c, higher systolic blood pressure, insulin resistance, and history of smoking, whereas sex, lipids, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, and the metabolic syndrome were not associated with an increased risk. Diabetic nephropathy, severe diabetic retinopathy, higher systolic blood pressure, and lower body mass index were independently associated with hemorrhagic stroke. The risk factor profile for ischemic stroke seems partly different from that of hemorrhagic stroke in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. Alcoholism and Diabetes Mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Soo-Jeong Kim; Dai-Jin Kim

    2012-01-01

    Chronic use of alcohol is considered to be a potential risk factor for the incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), which causes insulin resistance and pancreatic β-cell dysfunction that is a prerequisite for the development of diabetes. However, alcohol consumption in diabetes has been controversial and more detailed information on the diabetogenic impact of alcohol seems warranted. Diabetes, especially T2DM, causes dysregulation of various metabolic processes, which includes a defect i...

  19. Central obesity increases the risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus among urban adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julianty Pradono

    2016-04-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus prevalence in the population aged >15 years increased within 5 years. Lack of physical activity and central obesity were the major risk factors of T2DM prevalence in urban adults.

  20. Egg consumption and the risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radzevičienė, Lina; Ostrauskas, Rytas

    2012-08-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus appears to involve an interaction between susceptible genetic backgrounds and environmental factors including highly calorific diets. As it is important to identify modifiable risk factors that may help reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus, the aim of the present study was to determine the association between egg consumption and the risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus. A specifically designed questionnaire was used to collect information on possible risk factors of type 2 diabetes mellitus. The odds ratios and 95 % confidence intervals for type 2 diabetes mellitus were calculated by conditional logistic regression. A case-control study in a Lithuanian out-patient clinic was performed in 2001. A total of 234 cases with a newly confirmed diagnosis of type 2 diabetes mellitus and 468 controls free of the disease. Variables such as BMI, family history of diabetes, cigarette smoking, education, morning exercise and plasma TAG level were retained in multivariate logistic regression models as confounders because their inclusion changed the value of the odds ratio by more than 10 % in any exposure category. After adjustment for possible confounders more than twofold increased risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus was determined for individuals consuming 3-4·9 eggs/week (OR = 2·60; 95 % CI 1·34, 5·08) and threefold increased risk of the disease was determined for individuals consuming ≥5 eggs/week (OR = 3·02; 95 % CI 1·14, 7·98) compared with those eating risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  1. An Epidemiological Profile Of Diabetes Mellitus Amongst High Risk Age Group - A Community Based Study

    OpenAIRE

    Nadeem Ahmad; Suresh Chandra; R P Sharma; J P Srivastava; S C Saxena

    2004-01-01

    Research Question : What is the epidemiological profile of Diabetes mellitus amongst high-risk age group population in urban and rural areas of Kanpur.Objectives : To study the prevalence, magnitude, possible associates and socio demographic variables related to Diabetes mellitus amongst the high risk age group population in urban and rural areas of Kanpur.Study Design : Cross-sectional study.Setting : The study was performed on five thousand population each in urban and rural areas of Kanpur...

  2. Lifestyle interventions to reduce risk of diabetes among women with prior gestational diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chasan-Taber, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    While lifestyle interventions involving exercise and a healthy diet in high-risk adults have been found to reduce progression to type 2 diabetes by >50%, little attention has been given to the potential benefits of such strategies in women with a history of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). We conducted a literature search of PubMed for English language studies of randomized controlled trials of lifestyle interventions among women with a history of GDM. In total, nine studies were identified which fulfilled the eligibility criteria. The majority of randomized trials of lifestyle interventions in women with GDM have been limited to pilot or feasibility studies. However, preliminary findings suggest that such interventions can improve diabetes risk factors in women with a history of GDM. Larger, well-designed controlled randomized trials are needed to assess the effects of lifestyle interventions on preventing subsequent progression to type 2 diabetes among women with GDM.

  3. [Diabetic foot risk in patients with type II diabetes mellitus in a family medicine unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez-Godínez, S A; Zonana-Nacach, A; Anzaldo-Campos, M C; Muñoz-Martínez, J A

    2014-01-01

    To determine the risk of diabetic foot in patients with type II diabetes mellitus (DM) seen in a Family Medicine Unit. The study included type II DM patients with a disease duration ≥ 5 years seen in a Family Medicine Unit, Tijuana, Mexico, during September-December 2011. Neuropathy was assessed with the Diabetic Neuropathy Symptom questionnaire, and pressure sensation using a 10-g Semmes-Weinstein monofilament. A patient had a high risk of diabetic foot if there was sensitivity loss, foot deformities, and non-palpable pedal pulses. We studied 205 patients with an average (± SD) age and DM duration of 59 ± 10 years and 10.7 ± 6.7 years, respectively. Ninety one patients (44%) had a high risk of developing diabetic foot, and it was associated with; an education of less than 6 years (OR 2.3; 95%CI: 1-1-4.1), DM disease duration ≥ 10 years (OR 5.1; 95%CI: 2.8-9.4), female gender (OR 2.0; 95%CI: 1.1-3.6), monthly familiar income diabetic neuropathy, since they have a high risk of diabetic foot. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  4. Risk perception and unrecognized type 2 diabetes in women with previous gestational diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malcolm, Janine; Lawson, Margaret L; Gaboury, Isabelle; Keely, Erin

    2009-09-01

    Women with a history of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) have a high chance of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) following the index pregnancy, however, little is known of women's perception of this risk. The objectives were to (1) determine women's perception of risk of future development of T2DM following a GDM pregnancy and (2) describe the prevalence of undetected dysglycaemia in a Canadian population. The study was designed as a 9-11 year follow-up study of women previously enrolled in a randomized controlled trial of tight versus minimal intervention for GDM. Women's perception of future risk of diabetes was determined by questionnaire. Fasting lipid profile, height and weight were performed on all participants. Oral glucose tolerance tests were performed on all women without prior history of diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM2). The study was conducted at Ottawa Hospital General Campus and Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario, in Ottawa, Canada. Eighty-nine of 299 (30%) of the original cohort were recruited. Eighty-eight women completed the questionnaire and 77 women without known diabetes underwent two hour glucose tolerance testing. Twenty-three (30%) felt their risk was no different than other women or did not know, 27 (35%) felt risk was increased a little and 27 (35%) felt risk was increased a lot. Only 52% (40/77) had normal glucose tolerance. Of all, 25/88 (28%) patients had diabetes (11 previously diagnosed and 14 diagnosed within the study). Of those newly diagnosed with DM2, four (29%) were diagnosed by fasting glucose, six (42%) by two hour glucose tolerance test (GTT) alone and four (29%) by both. Twenty-four of the women (27%) had impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). Of those with IGT, 12 (57%) had a fasting food glucose perception group with newly diagnosed diabetes, two were overweight, seven were obese, four had a family history of DM2, and all had a waist circumference >88 cm. In conclusion the perception of being at high risk for T2DM

  5. Comment on: Statin use and risk of diabetes mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    In manuscript named “Statin use and risk of diabetes mellitus” by Chogtu et al, authors defined that pravastatin 40 mg/dL reduced the risk of diabetes by 30% in West of Scotland Coronary Prevention study. In fact, pravastatin 40 mg/dL reduced coronary heart disease risk approximately 30% in mentioned study.

  6. Does long-term coffee intake reduce type 2 diabetes mellitus risk?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pimentel Gustavo D

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This review reports the evidence for a relation between long-term coffee intake and risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Numerous epidemiological studies have evaluated this association and, at this moment, at least fourteen out of eighteen cohort studies revealed a substantially lower risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus with frequent coffee intake. Moderate coffee intake (≥4 cups of coffee/d of 150 mL or ≥400 mg of caffeine/d has generally been associated with a decrease in the risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Besides, results of most studies suggest a dose-response relation, with greater reductions in type 2 diabetes mellitus risk with higher levels of coffee consumption. Several mechanisms underlying this protective effect, as well as the coffee components responsible for this association are suggested. Despite positive findings, it is still premature to recommend an increase in coffee consumption as a public health strategy to prevent type 2 diabetes mellitus. More population-based surveys are necessary to clarify the long-term effects of decaffeinated and caffeinated coffee intake on the risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  7. Health Behaviors Among Pregnant Latina Women at Risk for Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), a common complication of pregnancy, increases the risk of subsequent diabetes and obesity. Latina women have over twice the risk for developing GDM as compared to non-Latina white women. Health-promoting practices during pregnancy may improve metabolic status an...

  8. KCNJ11: Genetic Polymorphisms and Risk of Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polin Haghvirdizadeh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus (DM is a major worldwide health problem and its prevalence has been rapidly increasing in the last century. It is caused by defects in insulin secretion or insulin action or both, leading to hyperglycemia. Of the various types of DM, type 2 occurs most frequently. Multiple genes and their interactions are involved in the insulin secretion pathway. Insulin secretion is mediated through the ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP channel in pancreatic beta cells. This channel is a heteromeric protein, composed of four inward-rectifier potassium ion channel (Kir6.2 tetramers, which form the pore of the KATP channel, as well as sulfonylurea receptor 1 subunits surrounding the pore. Kir6.2 is encoded by the potassium inwardly rectifying channel, subfamily J, member 11 (KCNJ11 gene, a member of the potassium channel genes. Numerous studies have reported the involvement of single nucleotide polymorphisms of the KCNJ11 gene and their interactions in the susceptibility to DM. This review discusses the current evidence for the contribution of common KCNJ11 genetic variants to the development of DM. Future studies should concentrate on understanding the exact role played by these risk variants in the development of DM.

  9. Maternal and perinatal outcomes in 143 Danish women with gestational diabetes mellitus and 143 controls with a similar risk profile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Dorte Møller; Sørensen, B; Feilberg-Jørgensen, N

    2000-01-01

    To assess maternal and fetal outcomes in pregnancies complicated by gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) compared to non-diabetic pregnancies with an otherwise similar risk profile and to study the association between different anti-diabetic treatments and fetal outcomes....

  10. Diabetes mellitus, insulin treatment, diabetes duration, and risk of biliary tract cancer and hepatocellular carcinoma in a European cohort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schlesinger, S.; Aleksandrova, K.; Pischon, T.; Jenab, M.; Fedirko, V.; Trepo, E.; Overvad, K.; Roswall, N.; Tjonneland, A.; Boutron-Ruault, M. C.; Fagherazzi, G.; Racine, A.; Kaaks, R.; Grote, V. A.; Boeing, H.; Trichopoulou, A.; Pantzalis, M.; Kritikou, M.; Mattiello, A.; Sieri, S.; Sacerdote, C.; Palli, D.; Tumino, R.; Peeters, P. H.; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. B.; Weiderpass, E.; Quiros, J. R.; Zamora-Ros, R.; Sanchez, M.J.; Arriola, L.; Ardanaz, E.; Tormo, M. J.; Nilsson, P.; Lindkvist, B.; Sund, M.; Rolandsson, O.; Khaw, K. T.; Wareham, N.; Travis, R. C.; Riboli, E.; Noethlings, U.

    2013-01-01

    Evidence on associations between self-reported diabetes mellitus, diabetes duration, age at diabetes diagnosis, insulin treatment, and risk of biliary tract cancer (BTC) and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), independent of general and abdominal obesity is scarce. We conducted a prospective analysis in

  11. Television viewing time and risk of incident diabetes mellitus: the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, L; Hamer, M

    2014-12-01

    To investigate the longitudinal association between television viewing time and risk of incident diabetes mellitus in an elderly sample of adults in England. Analyses of data from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing. At baseline (2008), participants reported their television viewing time and physical activity level. Diabetes mellitus was recorded from self-reported physician diagnosis at 2-year follow-up. Associations between television viewing time and combined television viewing time and physical activity level with risk of incident diabetes mellitus at follow-up were examined using adjusted logistic regression models. A total of 5964 participants (mean ± sd age 65 ± 9 years at baseline, 44% male) were included in the analyses. There was an association between baseline television viewing time and risk of incident diabetes mellitus at 2-year follow-up (≥ 6 h/day compared with diabetes mellitus at 2-year follow-up than those who were active/had low television viewing time (fully adjusted odds ratio 1.94, 95% CI 1.02, 3.68), although active participants reporting high television viewing were not at risk. Interventions to reduce the incidence of diabetes in the elderly that focus on both increasing physical activity and reducing television viewing time might prove useful. © 2014 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Diabetes UK.

  12. [Arterial calcification and risk of cardiovascular events in diabetes mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwai, Kunimitu; Morimoto, Shigeto

    2010-11-01

    The cohort studies reported the subclinical vascular calcification including atheroslerosis starts during prediabetic state characterized by impaired fasting glucose. In the cardiovascular systems of diabetes mellitus there is an original mechanism to induce the medial calcification other than intimal calcification observed in the classical atherosclerosis. This is characterized as the ectipic osteogenesis induced by paracrine signals from inflammatory lesions in the adventitia. On the other hand, many internal systems have been discovered to inhibit vascular calcification.

  13. [Relationship diabetes mellitus-periodontal disease: etiology and risk factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foia, Liliana; Toma, Vasilica; Ungureanu, Didona; Aanei, Carmen; Costuleanu, M

    2007-01-01

    The interrelation between diabetes mellitus and inflammatory periodontal disease has been intensively studied for more than 50 years, a real bidirectional influence existing between patient's glycemic level disorder and periodontal territories alteration. Several studies developed in this direction emerged to the evidences that reveal a general increase of prevalence, extent and severity of gingivitis and periodontitis. Inflammation plays an important role in this interrelation, orchestrating both the periodontal disease and diabetes mellitus pathogeny and complications. Conversely, periodontal disease--infectious disease characterized by a significant inflammatory component--can seriously impair metabolic control of some diabetic patient. Moreover, treatment of periodontal disease and reduction of oral signs of inflammation may have a beneficial result on the diabetic condition (1). Less clear are the mechanisms governing this interrelation (even the literature is abundant in this direction), and, very probably, periodontal diseases serve as initiators of insulin resistance (in a way similar to obesity), thereby aggravating glycemic control. Further research is so imposed in order to clarify this aspect of the relationship between diabetes and periodontal disease.

  14. Maternal and perinatal outcomes in 143 Danish women with gestational diabetes mellitus and 143 controls with a similar risk profile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Dorte Møller; Sørensen, B; Feilberg-Jørgensen, N

    2000-01-01

    To assess maternal and fetal outcomes in pregnancies complicated by gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) compared to non-diabetic pregnancies with an otherwise similar risk profile and to study the association between different anti-diabetic treatments and fetal outcomes.......To assess maternal and fetal outcomes in pregnancies complicated by gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) compared to non-diabetic pregnancies with an otherwise similar risk profile and to study the association between different anti-diabetic treatments and fetal outcomes....

  15. Diabetes mellitus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008025 Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-γ agonists improves arterial stiffness in type 2 diabetic patients with coronary artery disease. YU Jie(于婕), et al. Dept Cardiovasc Med, Peking Univ 3rd Hosp, Beijing 100083. Chin Cir J 2007;22(6):418-422. Objective Arterial stiffness is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular events in diabetic patients, and it may be assessed by measurement of pulse wave velocity(PWV).

  16. Study of the risk factors and complications of diabetes mellitus after live kidney donation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuelmagd, Mohammed M; Nagib, Ayman M; Abuelmagd, Megahed M; Refaie, Ayman F; Elhindi, Yasser A; Ahmed, Mohammed F; Ali, Mohammed H; Elmaghrabi, Hanzada M; Bakr, Mohammed A

    2015-04-01

    Kidney donors, similar to the general population, are at risk for development of type 2 diabetes mellitus. The course of donors who develop type 2 diabetes mellitus has not been well studied. This work is aimed at estimating the incidence of diabetes after kidney donation, and study some risk factors and some complications of diabetes mellitus after donation. The material of this record based work comprised the records 2267 donors who donated 1 of their kidneys between 1976 and 2014 in the Urology and Nephrology Center, Mansoura University, Egypt, and regularly followed-up at its outpatient clinic. There were 388 donors included in the study and their medical records were revised. Postdonation weight gain and family history of diabetes mellitus were statistically significant on both the development of diabetes mellitus, high, very high albuminuria, and/or decreased creatinine clearance. Metformin and insulin use seemed to significantly reduce the protein excretion, and creatinine clearance decline in the studied group. There is a significant effect of the family history of diabetes mellitus on the development of high, very high albuminuria, and/or decreased creatinine clearance.

  17. Diabetes mellitus type 2 - an independent risk factor for cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grote, V A; Becker, S; Kaaks, R

    2010-01-01

    Epidemiological findings have shown up to two-fold increases in the risks of cancers of the colorectum, breast, endometrium, kidney (renal cell tumours), liver and pancreas among diabetes patients. In the present review, we address the question whether, on the basis of these epidemiological observations, type 2 diabetes should be considered a specific and independent risk factor for these various forms of cancer, due to its particular metabolic characteristics of glucose intolerance and hyperinsulinemia. On the basis of further epidemiological evidence among non-diabetic individuals, as well as recent studies examining the effects of different types of diabetes treatment on cancer risks, we conclude that chronic elevations in fasting and non-fasting blood levels of glucose and/or insulin are plausible independent risk factors for cancer, but that much of the increase in cancer risks associated with these two metabolic factors may occur within the normoglycaemic and insulinemic (non-diabetic) ranges. Furthermore, for some tumour types (e. g. cancer of the endometrium) the associations of risk with type 2 diabetes may to a large extent be due to, and at least partially confounded by, other obesity-related alterations in (e. g. sex steroid) metabolism that in part are independent of glucose and/or insulin metabolism. Specifically for pancreatic cancer, a major question, addressed in detail by other reviews, is whether associations of risk with plasma glucose, insulin or overt type 2 diabetes could be either a cause, or possibly also a consequence of tumour development (or both).

  18. Diabetes Mellitus, Fasting Glucose, and Risk of Cause-Specific Death

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seshasai, Sreenivasa Rao Kondapally; Kaptoge, Stephen; Thompson, Alexander; Di Angelantonio, Emanuele; Gao, Pei; Sarwar, Nadeem; Whincup, Peter H.; Mukamal, Kenneth J.; Gillum, Richard F.; Holme, Ingar; Njolstad, Inger; Fletcher, Astrid; Nilsson, Peter; Lewington, Sarah; Collins, Rory; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Thompson, Simon G.; Sattar, Naveed; Selvin, Elizabeth; Hu, Frank B.; Danesh, John

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND The extent to which diabetes mellitus or hyperglycemia is related to risk of death from cancer or other nonvascular conditions is uncertain. METHODS We calculated hazard ratios for cause-specific death, according to baseline diabetes status or fasting glucose level, from individual-partic

  19. Diabetes mellitus, fasting glucose, and risk of cause-specific death

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kromhout, D.

    2011-01-01

    Background The extent to which diabetes mellitus or hyperglycemia is related to risk of death from cancer or other nonvascular conditions is uncertain. Methods We calculated hazard ratios for cause-specific death, according to baseline diabetes status or fasting glucose level, from individual-partic

  20. Cardiovascular risk factors and diseases precede oral hypoglycaemic therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erkens, JA; Herings, RMC; Stolk, RP; Spoelstra, JA; Grobbee, DE; Leufkens, HGM

    Although patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease share common risk factors, the link between these diseases remains largely unexplained. In this case-control study, the earlier use of cardiovascular drugs (before the diagnosis of diabetes) was investigated among cases with

  1. Diabetes mellitus prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allende-Vigo, Myriam Zaydee

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to review lifestyle modification interventions and pharmacological clinical studies designed to prevent diabetes and provide evidence-based recommendations for the prevention of Diabetes Mellitus. A review of relevant literature compiled via a literature search (PUBMED) of English-language publications between 1997 and 2010 was conducted. It is found that people at increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus can halt the development of the disease. Lifestyle modification intervention with reduction of 5%-10% of excess body weight and increase in moderate physical activity by 150 min/wk has consistently proven to reduce the appearance of diabetes in different at-risk populations. Pharmacologic interventions have also demonstrated the prevention of the appearance of diabetes in persons at risk. Bariatric surgery has decreased the appearance of diabetes patients in a select group of individuals. The progression from prediabetes to diabetes mellitus can be prevented. Lifestyle modification intervention changes with weight loss and increased physical activity are currently recommended for the prevention of diabetes.

  2. Lifestyle factors and mortality risk in individuals with diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sluik, Diewertje; Boeing, Heiner; Li, Kuanrong

    2014-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Thus far, it is unclear whether lifestyle recommendations for people with diabetes should be different from those for the general public. We investigated whether the associations between lifestyle factors and mortality risk differ between individuals with and without diabetes....... METHODS: Within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC), a cohort was formed of 6,384 persons with diabetes and 258,911 EPIC participants without known diabetes. Joint Cox proportional hazard regression models of people with and without diabetes were built for the following...... lifestyle factors in relation to overall mortality risk: BMI, waist/height ratio, 26 food groups, alcohol consumption, leisure-time physical activity, smoking. Likelihood ratio tests for heterogeneity assessed statistical differences in regression coefficients. RESULTS: Multivariable adjusted mortality risk...

  3. The Presence of Family History and the Development of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Risk Factors in Rural Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Marsha Howell; Barnett Lammon, Carol Ann

    2007-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is reaching epidemic proportions among children and adolescents. School health fairs offer an opportunity to identify children with risk factors for the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus. This study identified selected risk factors (i.e., high-risk racial/ethnic group, obesity, elevated blood pressure, elevated…

  4. Aspirin for Primary Cardiovascular Risk Prevention and Beyond in Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capodanno, Davide; Angiolillo, Dominick J

    2016-11-15

    Daily administration of low-dose aspirin has proved to be beneficial in preventing recurrent cardiovascular events. However, the role of aspirin for primary prevention in patients with no overt cardiovascular disease is more controversial. In fact, in lower risk patients, the modest benefit in reducing serious vascular events can be offset by the increased risk of bleeding, including intracranial and gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Diabetes mellitus has been associated with a substantially increased risk of both first and recurrent atherothrombotic events, which makes aspirin therapy of potential value in these subjects. Moving from general aspects of aspirin pharmacology and specific issues in diabetes mellitus, this article reviews the literature on the topic of aspirin for primary prevention in general, and in subjects with diabetes mellitus in particular, to culminate with arguments pro and con and a practical risk-based algorithm for aspirin initiation in daily practice. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. THE RISK FACTORS OF DIABETES MELLITUS IN ADOLESCENT SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL IN MALANG CITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dyah Widodo

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Diabetes mellitus is a disease caused by a hormonal disorder that affects insulin. 5.7% of the total population of Indonesia, including teenagers is a big challenge for the health sector to do the step in anticipation of the complexity of health problems caused by diabetes mellitus in Indonesia. This study aims to analyze the risk factors of diabetes mellitus in adolescent senior high school in the city of Malang. Method: This research was correlational research design, sampled in this study was partly teenagers is high school class in Malang city area drawn at random sampling with a large sample of 375 respondents. Research conducted at government senior high school 6 and 9 (SMU Negeri 6 and SMU Negeri 9 in the city of Malang, in May–August, 2011. Data collection techniques using questionnaires; measurements: weight, height, abdominal circumference/waist, blood pressure and food consumption survey (Recording of Present Food Intake of the diet for three days. Data was analyzed by descriptive and analytic Spearman Rho correlation with alpha 0.05. Result:  The results showed that a BMI (body mass index and waist circumference (central obesity related to the risk of diabetes mellitus in teens senior high school in Malang with 0.000 p-values < α 0.05. However, there is no relationship between blood pressure, physical activity, frequency of fruit and vegetable consumption, family history of diabetes mellitus and the risk of diabetes mellitus in teens senior high school in Malang. Discussion: Recommended for teens to pay attention to healthy eating and balanced, in order to awake the ideal body weight and abdominal circumference are normal, so that avoid the risk of diabetes mellitus.

  6. Prevalence of and risk factors for diabetic retinopathy among the patients with diabetes mellitus in Dharan municipality, Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shailesh Mani Pokharel

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives: The individuals with diabetes have 29 times higher chance of becoming blind due to diabetic retinopathy than non-diabetic of similar age and gender. The knowledge on the factors for it can help detect the disease in its early course. The study was conducted with objectives to study the prevalence of diabetic retinopathy and its risk factors in a diabetic population.Materials and Methods: A community based cross-sectional study that involved 418 subjects with type 2 diabetes, living in the Dharan municipality of Nepal was carried out using convenient sampling method.Results: The prevalence of diabetic retinopathy was 38.8%. Prevalence of mild, moderate, severe and very severe non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy was 9.1%, 16.3%, 6.2% and 17.2% respectively. Prevalence of proliferative diabetic retinopathy and clinically significant macular edema was 3.8% and 1.9% respectively. Among the risk factors studied age, hypoglycemic drug intake, family history and duration of diabetes mellitus had a significant association with the occurrence of diabetic retinopathy (p<0.05.Conclusions: The prevalence of diabetic retinopathy in patients with diabetes mellitus was 38.8% and increase risk factors for it are age, hypoglycemic drug intake, family history of diabetes, duration of diabetes.JCMS Nepal. 2015;11(1: 17-21

  7. An Epidemiological Profile Of Diabetes Mellitus Amongst High Risk Age Group - A Community Based Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadeem Ahmad

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Research Question : What is the epidemiological profile of Diabetes mellitus amongst high-risk age group population in urban and rural areas of Kanpur.Objectives : To study the prevalence, magnitude, possible associates and socio demographic variables related to Diabetes mellitus amongst the high risk age group population in urban and rural areas of Kanpur.Study Design : Cross-sectional study.Setting : The study was performed on five thousand population each in urban and rural areas of Kanpur. Participants : High risk age group population i.e. 45 years and above.Study variables: Age, sex, education, working status, social class. Impaired glucose tolerance. Body mass index, Hypertension, family history of diabetes mellitus.Statistical analysis : Chi-square test. Percentages.Results : The overall prevalence of Diabetes mellitus amongst high risk age group population was found to be 7.6% with 11.3% in urban areas and 3.6% in rural areas. The overall maximum prevalence was in the 56-60 years age group. Higher prevalence was observed amongst the graduates and onwards (30.1%, social class-1 (32.1%, sedentary lifestyle (62.5%, obese (19.7%. hypertensives (39.5%, family history of diabetes mellitus (31.5%. It was observed that 77.7% cases in rural areas and 26.9% cases in urban areas were newly diagnosed.

  8. Cardiovascular risk in Gullah African Americans with high familial risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus: project SuGAR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Kelly J; Kistner-Griffin, Emily; Spruill, Ida; Teklehaimanot, Abeba A; Garvey, W Timothy; Sale, Michèle; Fernandes, Jyotika

    2014-10-01

    To determine the prevalence of cardiovascular disease, levels of cardiovascular risk factors, and extent of preventive care in Gullah African Americans with a high familial risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Between 1995 and 2003, 1321 Gullah African Americans with a high prevalence of diabetes mellitus from the South Carolina Sea Islands consented to and enrolled in the Sea Islands Genetic African American Registry (Project SuGAR). A cross-sectional analysis of cardiometabolic risk, preventive care, and self-reported cardiovascular disease was conducted. Cardiometabolic risk factor levels were high and vascular disease was prevalent. Among the subjects with diabetes mellitus, the mean disease duration was 10.5 years; approximately one-third reported reduced vision or blindness; and >80% reported numbness, pain, or burning in their feet. Preventive diabetes care was limited, with level of cardiovascular risk in this population but also the pathophysiological mechanisms central to ancestral differences in cardiometabolic risk in the broader African American population.

  9. Diabetes mellitus: fatores de risco em trabalhadores de enfermagem Diabetes mellitus: factores de riesgo en trabajadores de enfermería Diabetes mellitus: risk factors for nursing workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Maria Fernandes Vilarinho

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Identificar os fatores de risco para o diabetes mellitus tipo 2, entre trabalhadores de enfermagem do Instituto Estadual de Diabetes e Endocrinologia Luiz Capriglione. MÉTODOS: Estudo transversal com aplicação de dois instrumentos de coleta de dados que incluíram questões abertas e fechadas relativas ao estado de saúde e estilo de vida de 100 trabalhadores de enfermagem dessa instituição de saúde. Foram ainda verificados dados de natureza bioquímica e antropométrica. RESULTADOS: Os resultados confirmaram a ocorrência de importantes fatores de risco de natureza reversível, destacando-se o sedentarismo e a obesidade. CONCLUSÃO: Considera-se a importância do desenvolvimento de ações visando a promoção da saúde com enfoque na prevenção de doenças crônicas, a serem realizadas no próprio ambiente de trabalho.OBJETIVOS: Identificar los factores de riesgo para la diabetes mellitus tipo 2 entre trabajadores de enfermería del Instituto Estatal de Diabetes e Endocrinología Luiz Capriglione. MÉTODOS: Se trata de un estudio transversal con aplicación de dos instrumentos de recolección de datos que incluyeron preguntas abiertas y cerradas relacionadas al estado de salud y estilo de vida de 100 trabajadores de enfermería de esa institución de salud. Fueron también verificados datos de naturaleza bioquímica y antropométrica. RESULTADOS: Los resultados confirmaron la ocurrencia de importantes factores de riesgo de naturaleza reversible, destacándose el sedentarismo y la obesidad. CONCLUSIÓN: Se considera importante desarrollar acciones que tengan por objetivo la promoción de la salude con enfoque en la prevención de enfermedades crónicas, a ser realizadas en el propio ambiente de trabajo.OBJECTIVES: To identify risk factors for type 2 diabetes mellitus, among nursing workers at the State Institute of Diabetes and Endocrinology Luiz Capriglione. METHODS: This is a cross-sectional study in which were applied two

  10. Type 2 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    DeFronzo, Ralph A; Ferrannini, Ele; Groop, Leif

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is an expanding global health problem, closely linked to the epidemic of obesity. Individuals with T2DM are at high risk for both microvascular complications (including retinopathy, nephropathy and neuropathy) and macrovascular complications (such as cardiovascular...

  11. Paraoxonase 1: a better atherosclerotic risk predictor than HDL in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Surajeet Kumar; Singh, Kamna; Singh, Ritu

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a state of glycative stress and oxidative stress. Lower level of serum PON 1 has been correlated to higher morbidity and mortality related to cardiovascular complications in type 2 diabetes mellitus. To estimate and compare the serum PON 1 levels in type 2 diabetes mellitus and controls and to predict which one is the better atherosclerotic risk predictor among HDL and PON 1 in T2DM patients. An observational analytical case-control study was conducted with a sample size of 30 in two groups like group I (30 cases of type 2 diabetes mellitus diagnosed by ADA 2010 criteria) and group II (30 age and sex matched controls). Human serum paroxonase 1 levels were measured by ELISA. Both HDL and PON 1 were negatively correlated with the various atherogenic indices (AIP, AC, CRI I, CRI II) but the strength of negative correlation is always greater for PON 1. In multiple linear regression analysis, we found that the regression coefficient (β) is always higher for PON 1 than for HDL while taking the atherogenic indices as outcome variable. PON 1 can be a better predictor than HDL for atherosclerotic risk in type 2 diabetes mellitus. Copyright © 2013 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Chocolate consumption and risk of diabetes mellitus in the Physicians’ Health Study1234

    OpenAIRE

    Matsumoto, Chisa; Petrone, Andrew B; Sesso, Howard D.; Gaziano, J. Michael; Djoussé, Luc

    2014-01-01

    Background: Previous studies reported beneficial effects of cocoa or chocolate on insulin resistance, oxidative stress, and inflammation, which are important risk factors of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). However, it is unclear whether chocolate consumption is associated with risk of DM.

  13. Is Diabetes Mellitus a Risk Factor for Open-Angle Glaucoma? The Rotterdam Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voogd, S. de; Ikram, M.K.; Wolfs. R.C.W., [No Value; Jansonius, N.M.; Witteman, J.C.M.; Hofman, A.; de Jong, P.T.V.M.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether diabetes mellitus is a risk factor for open-angle glaucoma (OAG). Design: Prospective population-based cohort study. Participants: Participants ages =55 years from the Rotterdam Study, The Netherlands. Methods: Participants at risk for incident OAG (iOAG) underwent at

  14. Risk of diabetes mellitus in long-term survivors of Hodgkin lymphoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nimwegen, F.A. van; Schaapveld, M.; Janus, C.P.; Krol, A.D.; Raemaekers, J.M.M.; Kremer, L.C.; Stovall, M.; Aleman, B.M.; Leeuwen, F.E. van

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: Recently, an increased risk of diabetes mellitus (DM) was observed after abdominal irradiation for childhood cancer. Because many Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) survivors have also been treated with infradiaphragmatic radiotherapy, we evaluated the association between HL treatment and DM risk. PATIE

  15. Is diabetes mellitus a risk factor for open-angle glaucoma? The Rotterdam Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Voogd, Simone; Ikram, M. Kamran; Wolfs, Roger C. W.; Jansonius, Nomdo M.; Witteman, Jacqueline C. M.; Hofman, Albert; de Jong, Paulus T. V. M.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether diabetes mellitus is a risk factor for open-angle glaucoma (OAG). Design: Prospective population-based cohort study. Participants: Participants ages >= 55 years from the Rotterdam Study, The Netherlands. Methods: Participants at risk for incident OAG (iOAG) underwent

  16. Diabetes mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Nessim Dayan, Edgard; Fundación Valle de Lili

    1996-01-01

    ¿Qué es la diabetes?/¿Cuantos tipos o formas de diabetes existen?/¿Cuáles son los síntomas de la diabetes?/¿cuál es la causa de la diabetes?/¿Quién tiene mayor riesgo de desarrollar diabetes?/¿Cómo se diagnostica la diabetes?/¿Cuál es el tratamiento de la diabetes?/¿Cuándo y cómo se controlan los niveles de glicemia?/¿Cuáles son las complicaciones de la diabetes?/Recomendaciones actuales y futuro de la diabetes.

  17. Walking versus running for hypertension, cholesterol, and diabetes mellitus risk reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Paul T; Thompson, Paul D

    2013-05-01

    To test whether equivalent energy expenditure by moderate-intensity (eg, walking) and vigorous-intensity exercise (eg, running) provides equivalent health benefits. We used the National Runners' (n=33 060) and Walkers' (n=15 945) Health Study cohorts to examine the effect of differences in exercise mode and thereby exercise intensity on coronary heart disease (CHD) risk factors. Baseline expenditure (metabolic equivant hours per day [METh/d]) was compared with self-reported, physician-diagnosed incident hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, diabetes mellitus, and CHD during 6.2 years follow-up. Running significantly decreased the risks for incident hypertension by 4.2% (Pdiabetes mellitus by 12.1% (Phypertension; and (3) 43.5%, 44.1%, 47.7%, and 68.2% from running, and 34.1%, 44.2% and 23.6% from walking for diabetes mellitus (walking >5.4 METh/d excluded for too few cases). The risk reductions were not significantly different for running than walking for diabetes mellitus (P=0.94), hypertension (P=0.06), or CHD (P=0.26), and only marginally greater for walking than running for hypercholesterolemia (P=0.04). Equivalent energy expenditures by moderate (walking) and vigorous (running) exercise produced similar risk reductions for hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, diabetes mellitus, and possibly CHD.

  18. Risk factors in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carolino, Idalina Diair Regla; Molena-Fernandes, Carlos Alexandre; Tasca, Raquel Soares; Marcon, Sonia Silva; Cuman, Roberto Kenji Nakamura

    2008-01-01

    This study was carried out to evaluate the risk factors of type 2 diabetic patients through sociodemographic data, habits of health, anthropometric and biochemist profiles, assisted at a basic public health care unit in Maringá, Paraná. Sixty-six patients, 56 women aged over than 50 years-old were interviewed. High prevalence factors for cardiovascular risk were observed, such as: overweight and obesity, hypertension, dyslipidemia, sedentariness and inadequate diet. Data suggested the need for multidisciplinary intervention programs in health care units associated to educative programs, adjusted diet intake and regular physical activity for these diabetic patients.

  19. Identifying risk factors for clinically significant diabetic macula edema in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamoi, Kyuzi; Takeda, Keiji; Hashimoto, Kaoru; Tanaka, Reiko; Okuyama, Shinya

    2013-05-01

    It is known that clinic blood pressure (BP), gender, cigarette smoking, dyslipidemia, anemia and thiazolidenediones (TZD) treatment are predictors for clinically significant diabetic macula edema (CSDME). We examined a most risky factor for CSDME in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and diabetic retinopathy (DR) confirmed using optical coherence tomography by multiple regression analysis (MRA). As the risk factors, wakening-up BP was added to such factors. Seven diabetic Japanese patients with CSDME (group 1) and 124 subjects without CSDME (group 2) assonated with DR using optical coherence tomography were studied. The durations of T2DM in groups 1 and 2 were 15±10 years and 20±15 years, respectively. There was no statistically difference in means of gender, duration, age, body mass index (BMI), HbA1c, TC, LDL and TC/HDL, serum creatinine, urinary albumin excretion rate, and clinic BP between two groups. Morning systolic home BP (MSHBP), cigarette smoking and foveal thickness were significantly (ppioglitazone as TZD treatment were significantly positive predictors for CSDME, while BMI had a significantly negative predictor. Other variables were not significantly correlated to CSDME. The review summarizes a multiple regression analysis revealed that MSHBP makes an addition to predictive factors for CSDME among risk factors reported previously in patient with T2DM.

  20. Diabetes Mellitus and Risk of Bronchopleural Fistula After Pulmonary Resections: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuang-Jiang; Fan, Jun; Zhou, Jian; Ren, Yu-Tao; Shen, Cheng; Che, Guo-Wei

    2016-07-01

    We conducted this meta-analysis to evaluate the association between diabetes mellitus and the risk of bronchopleural fistula in patients undergoing pulmonary resection. The PubMed and EMBASE databases were searched, and 15 retrospective observational studies were included. The pooled analysis showed that diabetes mellitus was significantly associated with the formation of bronchopleural fistula after pulmonary resection (odds ratio = 1.97; 95% confidence interval = 1.39 to 2.80; p analysis, diagnoses and operative modes and in Asian patients. Therefore, diabetes mellitus can be an independent risk factor for bronchopleural fistula after pulmonary resection. Copyright © 2016 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Diabetes mellitus and pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fathi I Abourawi

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is the most common medical complication of pregnancy and it carries a significant risk to the foetus and the mother. Congenital malformations and perinatal morbidity remain common compared with the offspring of non diabetic pregnancies. Diabetic mothers are at risk of progression of micro-vascular diabetic complications as well as early pregnancy loss, pre-eclampsia, polyhydramnios and premature labour. Glycaemic control before and during pregnancy is critical and the benefit may result in a viable, healthy offspring. Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM which manifests for the first time during pregnancy is common and on the increase, its proper management will reduce the risk of neonatal macrosomia and hypoglycaemia. Post-partum evaluation of glucose tolerance and appropriate counselling in women with GDM may help decrease the high risk of subsequent type 2 diabetes in the long-term. The article will briefly review the changes in the carbohydrate metabolism that characterise normal pregnancy and will focus on a practical approach to the care of patients with pre-existing diabetes as well as GDM.

  2. Diabetes mellitus and risk of falls in older adults: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yu; Hu, Xinhua; Zhang, Qiang; Zou, Rui

    2016-11-01

    intensive or very loose glycemic control may contribute to the risk of falls in diabetic patients. However, studies on diabetes mellitus and the risk of falls have yielded conflicting results. Our objective was to investigate the effect of diabetes mellitus on the risk of falls in older adults by conducting a systematic review and meta-analysis. the PubMed and Embase databases were searched for relevant studies published until November 2015. Only prospective cohort studies reporting at least age-adjusted risk estimate of falls compared diabetic to non-diabetic individuals were selected. Diabetes mellitus was ascertained by a combination of medical history and laboratory tests or use of anti-diabetic drugs. a total of six studies involving 14,685 participants were identified. The number of falls in diabetic and non-diabetic individuals was 423 of 1,692 (25.0%) and 2,368 of 13,011 (18.2%), respectively. Diabetes mellitus was associated with an increased risk of falls (risk ratio [RR] = 1.64; 95% confidence intervals [CI] 1.27-2.11) in a random-effects model. Subgroup analyses showed that the risk of falls seemed more pronounced among both gender groups (RR = 1.81; 95% CI 1.19-2.76) than among women (RR = 1.52; 95% CI 1.04-2.21). Diabetes increased 94% (RR = 1.94; 95% CI 1.42-2.63) and 27% (RR = 1.27; 95% CI 1.06-1.52) risk of falls in insulin-treated and no-insulin-treated patients, respectively. this meta-analysis reveals that older adults with diabetes mellitus are associated with greater risk of falls, and this association is more pronounced in insulin-treated patients. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Geriatrics Society. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Screening for gestational diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, M.

    2012-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus is associated with increased risk of complications for mother and child. Along with the growing epidemic of obesity and type 2 diabetes, the prevalence of gestational diabetes is expected to rise. With adequate and timely treatment, the risk of complications is reduced.

  4. An epidemiological study of diabetes mellitus amongst high risk age group population in urban and Rural areas of kanpur

    OpenAIRE

    Nadeem Ahmad; Suresh Chandra; R P Sharma; J P Srivastava

    2003-01-01

    Research Question : - What is the magnitude of Diabetes mellitus in the urban and rural areas of Kanpur.Objectives:To study the prevalence of diabetes mellitus amongst high risk age group population in urban and rural areas of Kanpur.To compare the magnitude of problem of diabetes mellitus between urban and rural areas of Kanpur.To study the possible associates and socio-demographic variables related to diabetes mellitus.Study Design : Cross sectional study.Setting : The study was performed o...

  5. Effect of Depression and Diabetes Mellitus on the Risk for Dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katon, Wayne; Pedersen, Henrik Søndergaard; Ribe, Anette Riisgaard;

    2015-01-01

    Importance  Although depression and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) may independently increase the risk for dementia, no studies have examined whether the risk for dementia among people with comorbid depression and DM is higher than the sum of each exposure individually. Objective  To examine...... the risk for all-cause dementia among persons with depression, DM, or both compared with persons with neither exposure. Design, Setting, and Participants  We performed a national population-based cohort study of 2 454 532 adults, including 477 133 (19.4%) with depression, 223 174 (9.1%) with DM, and 95...... the Danish National Prescription Registry. Diabetes mellitus was identified using the National Diabetes Register. Main Outcomes and Measures  We estimated the risk for all-cause dementia associated with DM, depression, or both using Cox proportional hazards regression models that adjusted for potential...

  6. Common familial risk factors for schizophrenia and diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Debra L; Mackinnon, Andrew; Morgan, Vera A; Watts, Gerald F; Castle, David J; Waterreus, Anna; Galletly, Cherrie A

    2016-05-01

    The co-occurrence of type 2 diabetes and psychosis is an important form of medical comorbidity within individuals, but no large-scale study has evaluated comorbidity within families. The aim of this study was to determine whether there is evidence for familial comorbidity between type 2 diabetes and psychosis. Data were analysed from an observational study of a nationally representative sample of 1642 people with psychosis who were in contact with psychiatric services at the time of survey (The 2010 Australian National Survey of Psychosis). Participants were aged 18-64 years and met World Health Organization's International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision diagnostic criteria for a psychotic disorder (857 with schizophrenia, 319 with bipolar disorder with psychotic features, 293 with schizoaffective disorder, 81 with depressive psychosis and 92 with delusional disorder or other non-organic psychoses). Logistic regression was used to estimate the association between a family history of diabetes and a family history of schizophrenia. A positive family history of diabetes was associated with a positive family history of schizophrenia in those with a psychotic disorder (odds ratio = 1.35, p = 0.01, adjusted for age and gender). The association was different in those with an affective versus non-affective psychosis (odds ratio = 0.613, p = 0.019, adjusted for age and gender) and was significant only in those with a non-affective psychosis, specifically schizophrenia (odds ratio = 1.58, p = 0.005, adjusted for age and sex). Adjustment for demographic factors in those with schizophrenia slightly strengthened the association (odds ratio = 1.74, p = 0.001, adjusted for age, gender, diagnosis, ethnicity, education, employment, income and marital status). Elevated risk for type 2 diabetes in people with schizophrenia is not simply a consequence of antipsychotic medication; type 2 diabetes and schizophrenia share familial risk factors. © The Royal Australian and New

  7. Risk stratification for healthcare planning in women with gestational diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koning, S. H.; Scheuneman, K. A.; Lutgers, H. L.; Korteweg, F. J.; van den Berg, G.; Sollie, K. M.; Roos, A.; van Loon, A. J.; Links, T. P.; van Tol, K. M.; Hoogenberg, K.; Berg, van den Paul; Wolffenbuttel, B. H. R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: To identify relevant factors predicting the need for insulin therapy in women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and secondly to determine a potential 'low-risk' diet-treated group who are likely to have good pregnancy outcomes. Methods: A retrospective analysis between 2011-2014.

  8. Risk stratification for healthcare planning in women with gestational diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koning, S. H.; Scheuneman, K. A.; Lutgers, H. L.; Korteweg, F. J.; van den Berg, G.; Sollie, K. M.; Roos, A.; van Loon, A. J.; Links, T. P.; van Tol, K. M.; Hoogenberg, K.; Berg, van den Paul; Wolffenbuttel, B. H. R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: To identify relevant factors predicting the need for insulin therapy in women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and secondly to determine a potential 'low-risk' diet-treated group who are likely to have good pregnancy outcomes. Methods: A retrospective analysis between 2011-2014.

  9. Risk Factors for Overweight and Diabetes mellitus in Residential Psychiatric Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mookhoek, Evert J.; de Vries, Willem A.; Hovens, Johannes E. J. M.; Brouwers, Jacobus R. B. J.; Loonen, Anton J. M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the prevalence of and risk factors for overweight and diabetes mellitus in long-stay psychiatric inpatients. Method: Statistical analysis of data collected from medical, laboratory, and pharmacy files. Results: 80% of the 256 patients were suffering from schizophrenia or ot

  10. Risk Factors for Overweight and Diabetes mellitus in Residential Psychiatric Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mookhoek, Evert J.; de Vries, Willem A.; Hovens, Johannes E. J. M.; Brouwers, Jacobus R. B. J.; Loonen, Anton J. M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the prevalence of and risk factors for overweight and diabetes mellitus in long-stay psychiatric inpatients. Method: Statistical analysis of data collected from medical, laboratory, and pharmacy files. Results: 80% of the 256 patients were suffering from schizophrenia or

  11. Depression and risk of mortality in people with diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Dooren, Fleur E P; Nefs, Giesje; Schram, Miranda T

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the association between depression and all-cause and cardiovascular mortality in people with diabetes by systematically reviewing the literature and carrying out a meta-analysis of relevant longitudinal studies. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: PUBMED and PSYCINFO were searched...... for articles assessing mortality risk associated with depression in diabetes up until August 16, 2012. The pooled hazard ratios were calculated using random-effects models. RESULTS: Sixteen studies met the inclusion criteria, which were pooled in an overall all-cause mortality estimate, and five...... in a cardiovascular mortality estimate. After adjustment for demographic variables and micro- and macrovascular complications, depression was associated with an increased risk of all-cause mortality (HR = 1.46, 95% CI = 1.29-1.66), and cardiovascular mortality (HR = 1.39, 95% CI = 1.11-1.73). Heterogeneity across...

  12. Cardiovascular Risk Perception among Iranian Women with type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeidzadeh Seyedehtanaz

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Cardiovascular disease (CVD is one of the fatal complications of diabetes mellitus. The mortality of CVD is higher in diabetic persons. Women are at a higher risk for CVD. The purpose of this study is to determine the perception of CVD risk among women with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted among 58 diabetic women with type 2 diabetes in a Diabetes clinic in Qaen, South Khorasan province, Iran. The attitude of participants towards CVD was assessed by a modified RPS-DD questionnaire. Data were analyzed with SPSS version 20. Results: The participants aged from 31 to 66 years old. The mean duration of diabetic diagnosis was 7±4.88 years. Majority of them were literate (56.9%, married (89.7%, had low income (52% and were housekeepers (94.8%. Almost half the participants believed they had personal control over cardiovascular risk. 69% had optimistic attitude towards not getting CVD and 60.3% had a moderate level of concerns about cardiovascular risks. Also 80% had knowledge about the cardiovascular risks. Conclusion: Risk perception plays an important role in preventing CVD. A comprehensive educational program for changing the attitude toward CVD is recommended.

  13. Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Increased Risk for Malaria Infection

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-09-23

    This podcast describes research done in Ghana examining a correlation between type 2 diabetes and a possible increased risk for malaria infection in adults. Dr. Manoj Menon, a medical officer in the Division of Parasitic Diseases and Malaria in the Center for Global Health, discusses questions the study raises.  Created: 9/23/2010 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases; Center for Global Health.   Date Released: 9/23/2010.

  14. Comparison of Cardiovascular Risk Factors Between Subjects With and Without Diabetes Mellitus: An Analytical Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mousavi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background Cardiovascular Disease (CVD is developing treacherously along industrialization and development of urbanization Objectives The aim of this study was to compare cardiovascular risk factors between subjects with and without diabetes mellitus in the Minoodar district of Qazvin. Patients and Methods This analytical study was conducted on 100 subjects with diabetes and 140 subjects without diabetes in Qazvin from September 2010 to April 2011. Standardized measurements were available for waist circumference (WC, blood pressure (BP, fasting serum cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL, and triglycerides (TGs. Cardiovascular risk factors were defined according to the diagnostic criteria proposed by the national cholesterol education program. Data were analyzed using the t-test, Mann-Whitney U test, and Chi-square test. Results Overall, 12% of subjects with diabetes and 17.9% of subjects without diabetes were smokers (P = 0.277. The WC, TGs, systolic and diastolic BP were significantly higher in subjects with diabetes compared to subjects without diabetes. The prevalence of high WC, high BP, low HDL, and high TGs were significantly higher in subjects with diabetes compared to subjects without diabetes. Conclusions Cardiovascular risk factors were higher in subjects with diabetes compared to subjects without diabetes. Lifestyle intervention programs should be focused on community education about reduction of CVD risk factors in patients with diabetes.

  15. Predicting the Risk of Preeclampsia in Pregnant Women with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus and Concomitant Diabetic Nephropathy: the Role of Genetic Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.V. Avramenko

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions. In patients with diabetes mellitus type 1 and concomitant diabetic nephropathy without hypertension, we can recommend to study these polymorphic variants of genes to determine the risk of preeclampsia.

  16. Ponderal index at birth associates with later risk of gestational diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crusell, Mie; Damm, Peter; Hansen, Torben

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: Low birth weight (BW) and low ponderal index (PI) are associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus. This study has two purposes: first to investigate the influence of PI on the risk of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM); second, to study the association between glucose...... the original midwifery records. BW and PI were stratified into tertiles for analysis. RESULTS: PI in the lower tertiles was associated with an increased risk of GDM [odds ratio 1.59 (95% confidence interval 1.07-2.36, p = 0.021)]. Among women with previous GDM, the area under the curve (AUC) for plasma levels...... metabolism and BW in women with previous GDM. METHODS: GDM cohort: 185 women with GDM in 1978-1996, attending a follow-up study in 2000-2002. Control cohort: 1137 women from a population-based diabetes screening study (Inter99) in a neighbouring county in 1999-2001. BW and birth length were collected from...

  17. An epidemiological study of diabetes mellitus amongst high risk age group population in urban and Rural areas of kanpur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadeem Ahmad

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Research Question : - What is the magnitude of Diabetes mellitus in the urban and rural areas of Kanpur.Objectives:To study the prevalence of diabetes mellitus amongst high risk age group population in urban and rural areas of Kanpur.To compare the magnitude of problem of diabetes mellitus between urban and rural areas of Kanpur.To study the possible associates and socio-demographic variables related to diabetes mellitus.Study Design : Cross sectional study.Setting : The study was performed on three thousand population each in urban and rural areas of Kanpur.Participants : High risk age group population i.e. 45 years and above.Study variables : Age, Sex. impaired glucose tolerance. Body mass index, Education, Working status. Social class, family history of diabetes.Statistical analysis : Chi-square lest, percentagesResults From a total of 676 persons of high risk age group i.e. 45 years and above, the overall prevalence of diabetes mellitus in the study areas was observed lobe 7. l%with 9.94% in urban and 3.61% in rural areas, the maximum percetage of diabetes cases (41.66% was in the age group of 56-60 years. Higher prevalence of diabetes was observed in the obese (56.25% and sedentary (87.5% persons. The family history' of diabetes mellitus was present in (35.41% of diabetes mellitus cases.

  18. Diabetes mellitus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    2005179 The association of LMNA1908C/T polymorphism with insulin resistance and dyslipidemia in diabetic patients. SU Ben-li (苏本利), et al. Dept Endocrinol, 2nd Affili Hosp, Dalian Med Univ, Dalian 116027. Chin J Diabetes, 2005;13(1) :27-30. Objective: To study the association of LMhlA 1908 C/T polymorphism with insulin resistance and dyslipidemia in type 2 diabetic patients. Methods:

  19. Undiagnosed diabetes mellitus in rural communities in Sudan: prevalence and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, S K M; Bushara, S O E; Sulaiman, A A; Elmadhoun, W M Y; Ahmed, M H

    2015-05-19

    Undiagnosed diabetes constitutes a challenge for health providers, especially in rural areas. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of undiagnosed diabetes mellitus and glucose intolerance among adults in rural communities in River Nile State, north Sudan. In a cross-sectional community-based study, blood glucose, anthropometric, demographic and clinical history data were obtained from 1111 individuals from 35 villages. The prevalence of undiagnosed diabetes was 2.6% (29 individuals); glucose intolerance was detected in 1.3% (14 individuals). Classic symptoms (polydipsia, polyuria and weight loss) were present in around half of the participants but were not more prevalent in those with diabetes. Lower educational level, increasing age, hypertension and unexplained weight loss were significant risk factors for diabetes. Other variables (obesity, sex, occupation, alcohol consumption and cigarette smoking) were not significant risk factors. There is a low prevalence of undiagnosed diabetes and glucose intolerance in the rural population of River Nile State.

  20. Diabetes mellitus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008395 Evaluating the feature of hypoglycemia detected by continuous glucose monitoring system during temporary continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion in type 2 diabetes patients. LI Ming(李鸣), et al.Shanghai Diabet Clin Center, Dept Endocrinol & Metab, Shanghai Jiaotong Univ, Shanghai 200233. Natl Med J China 2008;88(24):1679-1682.

  1. Vitamin D analogue therapy, cardiovascular risk and kidney function in people with Type 1 diabetes mellitus and diabetic nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joergensen, C; Tarnow, L; Goetze, J P;

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effects of therapy with the vitamin D analogue paricalcitol on markers of cardiovascular risk and kidney function in people with Type 1 diabetes mellitus and diabetic nephropathy. METHODS: In a double-blind, randomized placebo-controlled, crossover trial, 48 participants...... filtration rate was reduced by 1.5 ml/min/1.73 m(2) (P = 0.2). CONCLUSIONS: Paricalcitol therapy did not affect plasma N-terminal probrain natriuretic peptide concentration in people with Type 1 diabetes and diabetic nephropathy; however, the urinary albumin excretion rate was significantly lowered....

  2. Modelling effective diagnosis of risk complications in gestational diabetes mellitus: an e-diabetic expert system for pregnant women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreedevi, E.; Vijaya Lakshmi, K.; Chaitanya Krishna, E.; Padmavathamma, M.

    2012-04-01

    Diabetes is a chronic illness that requires continuous medical care and patient self-management education to prevent acute complications and to reduce the risk of long-term complications. This paper deals with study and development of algorithm to develop an initial stage expert system to provide diagnosis to the pregnant women who are suffering from Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM) by means of Oral Glucose Tolerance Test (OGTT).

  3. Diabetes mellitus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008256 Role of heparanase in the pathogenesis of proteinuria in diabetic nephropathy rats.TANG Lin(唐琳),et al.Dept Nephrol,1st Affili Hosp,Zhengzhou Univ,Zhengzhou 450052.Chin J Nephrol 2008;24(4):277-281.Objective To observe the expression of heparanase (HPA)in kidney of diabetic nephropathy(DN)rats and to investigate the role of HPA in the pathogenesis of proteinuria in DN rats.Methods DM rat models induced

  4. Diabetes mellitus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    2010297 Effect of 4-phenylbutyric acid on diabetic nephropathy rats.LUO Zhifeng(罗志锋),et al.Dept Nephrol,Xinqiao Hosp,3rd Milit Med Univ,Chongqing 400037.Chin J Nephrol 2010;26(5):358-363. Objective To investigate the effect of 4-phenylbutyric acid (4-PBA) on the renal pathogenesis of rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes and its mechanism.Methods

  5. Relationship between amputation and risk factors in individuals with diabetes mellitus: A study with Brazilian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantovani, Alessandra M; Fregonesi, Cristina E P T; Palma, Mariana R; Ribeiro, Fernanda E; Fernandes, Rômulo A; Christofaro, Diego G D

    Individuals with diabetes develop lower extremity amputation for several reasons. Investigations into pathways to the development of complications are important both for treatment and prevention. To evaluate the relationship between amputation and risk factors in people with diabetes mellitus. All participants included in this study (n=165) were recruited from the Diabetic Foot Program, developed in a Brazilian University, over seven years (2007-2014) and all information for this study was extracted from their clinical records. The prevalence of amputation in patients with diabetes with four risk factors was up to 20% higher when compared to those with only one risk factor. The main predictive risk factors for amputation in this population were the presence of an ulcer and smoking. The risk factors for amputation can be predicted for people with diabetes mellitus and, in the present study, the main factors were the presence of an ulcer and the smoking habit. Copyright © 2016 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The prevalence of diabetes mellitus and associated risk factors in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    triplicate with Harpenden calipers. Fasting blood samples were drawn ... for diabetic and non-diabetic subjects are shown in Table 11. method.1 Diabetes and ... circumference, hip circumference, triceps skinfold thickness, physical activity and ...

  7. [Diabetes mellitus in teenagers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isla Pera, Pilar

    2010-01-01

    Diabetes Mellitus during infancy childhood or adolescence does not differ from adult diabetes mellitus in terms of basic principles nor therapeutic treatment methods but the characteristics patients have during those ages signify that diabetes has a special repercussion and becomes harder to treat in patients during those ages.

  8. Assessment of cardiovascular risk of new drugs for the treatment of diabetes mellitus: risk assessment vs. risk aversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zannad, Faiez; Stough, Wendy Gattis; Lipicky, Raymond J; Tamargo, Juan; Bakris, George L; Borer, Jeffrey S; Alonso García, Maria de Los Angeles; Hadjadj, Samy; Koenig, Wolfgang; Kupfer, Stuart; McCullough, Peter A; Mosenzon, Ofri; Pocock, Stuart; Scheen, André J; Sourij, Harald; Van der Schueren, Bart; Stahre, Christina; White, William B; Calvo, Gonzalo

    2016-07-01

    The Food and Drug Administration issued guidance for evaluating the cardiovascular risk of new diabetes mellitus drugs in 2008. Accumulating evidence from several completed trials conducted within this framework raises questions as to whether requiring safety outcome studies for all new diabetes mellitus therapies remains justified. Given the burden of cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes, the focus should shift towards cardiovascular outcome studies designed to evaluate efficacy (i.e. to determine the efficacy of a drug over placebo or standard care) rather than demonstrating that risk is not increased by a pre-specified safety margin. All stakeholders are responsible for ensuring that new drug approvals occur under conditions of appropriate safety and effectiveness. It is also a shared responsibility to avoid unnecessary hurdles that may compromise access to useful drugs and threaten the sustainability of health systems. It is critical to renew this debate so that stakeholders can collectively determine the optimal approach for developing new drugs to treat type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  9. Diabetes mellitus and risk of prostate cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsilidis, Konstantinos K; Allen, Naomi E; Appleby, Paul N; Rohrmann, Sabine; Nöthlings, Ute; Arriola, Larraitz; Gunter, Marc J; Chajes, Veronique; Rinaldi, Sabina; Romieu, Isabelle; Murphy, Neil; Riboli, Elio; Tzoulaki, Ioanna; Kaaks, Rudolf; Lukanova, Annekatrin; Boeing, Heiner; Pischon, Tobias; Dahm, Christina C; Overvad, Kim; Quirós, J Ramón; Fonseca-Nunes, Ana; Molina-Montes, Esther; Gavrila Chervase, Diana; Ardanaz, Eva; Khaw, Kay T; Wareham, Nick J; Roswall, Nina; Tjønneland, Anne; Lagiou, Pagona; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Palli, Domenico; Pala, Valeria; Tumino, Rosario; Vineis, Paolo; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; Malm, Johan; Orho-Melander, Marju; Johansson, Mattias; Stattin, Pär; Travis, Ruth C; Key, Timothy J

    2015-01-15

    The current epidemiologic evidence suggests that men with type 2 diabetes mellitus may be at lower risk of developing prostate cancer, but little is known about its association with stage and grade of the disease. The association between self-reported diabetes mellitus at recruitment and risk of prostate cancer was examined in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). Among 139,131 eligible men, 4,531 were diagnosed with prostate cancer over an average follow-up of 12 years. Multivariable hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using Cox proportional hazards models stratified by EPIC-participating center and age at recruitment, and adjusted for education, smoking status, body mass index, waist circumference, and physical activity. In a subset of men without prostate cancer, the cross-sectional association between circulating concentrations of androgens and insulin-like growth factor proteins with diabetes status was also investigated using linear regression models. Compared to men with no diabetes, men with diabetes had a 26% lower risk of prostate cancer (HR, 0.74; 95% CI, 0.63-0.86). There was no evidence that the association differed by stage (p-heterogeneity, 0.19) or grade (p-heterogeneity, 0.48) of the disease, although the numbers were small in some disease subgroups. In a subset of 626 men with hormone measurements, circulating concentrations of androstenedione, total testosterone and insulin-like growth factor binding protein-three were lower in men with diabetes compared to men without diabetes. This large European study has confirmed an inverse association between self-reported diabetes mellitus and subsequent risk of prostate cancer.

  10. Peroxiredoxin isoforms are associated with cardiovascular risk factors in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Eter, E. [Physiology Department, Faculty of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Cardiovascular Research Group, Faculty of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Physiology Department, Faculty of Medicine, Alexandria University, Alexandria (Egypt); Al-Masri, A.A. [Physiology Department, Faculty of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Cardiovascular Research Group, Faculty of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia)

    2015-03-03

    The production of oxygen free radicals in type 2 diabetes mellitus contributes to the development of complications, especially the cardiovascular-related ones. Peroxiredoxins (PRDXs) are antioxidant enzymes that combat oxidative stress. The aim of this study was to investigate the associations between the levels of PRDX isoforms (1, 2, 4, and 6) and cardiovascular risk factors in type 2 diabetes mellitus. Fifty-three patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (28F/25M) and 25 healthy control subjects (7F/18M) were enrolled. We measured the plasma levels of each PRDX isoform and analyzed their correlations with cardiovascular risk factors. The plasma PRDX1, -2, -4, and -6 levels were higher in the diabetic patients than in the healthy control subjects. PRDX2 and -6 levels were negatively correlated with diastolic blood pressure, fasting blood sugar, and hemoglobin A1c. In contrast, PRDX1 levels were positively correlated with low-density lipoprotein and C-reactive protein levels. PRDX4 levels were negatively correlated with triglycerides. In conclusion, PRDX1, -2, -4, and -6 showed differential correlations with a variety of traditional cardiovascular risk factors. These results should encourage further research into the crosstalk between PRDX isoforms and cardiovascular risk factors.

  11. Huntington's disease does not appear to increase the risk of diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesgaard, T W; Nielsen, T T; Josefsen, K;

    2009-01-01

    . This challenges the assumption of an increased risk of diabetes among HD patients, although our results do not exclude a changed glucose tolerance in end-stage HD patients or in patients with juvenile onset HD. It also raises the question of which extent transgenic mice models reflect the pathology of human HD......, the severity of the diabetic phenotype appears to correlate with the length of a polyglutamine expansion in the protein huntingtin. In the present study, we investigated the association between diabetes mellitus and HD by performing an oral glucose-tolerance test (OGTT) to evaluate the glucose-tolerance status...

  12. Risk factors for type 2 diabetes mellitus among patients attending a rural Kenyan hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masemiano P. Chege

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Diabetes Management and Information Center in Nairobi has conducted population surveys among rural and urban Kenyans during the last decade. They have reported a rise in the prevalence of diabetes among rural Kenyans from 3% in 2003 to 7% in 2007. Our study was undertaken to investigate rural factors for type 2 diabetes and determine those that could be responsible for this rise in prevalence.Objectives: To describe the risk factors for type 2 diabetes mellitus among patients attending the outpatient clinics in a rural mission hospital in Kenya.Method: Forty-five diabetics and forty-five non-diabetics, resident in this rural hospital’s catchment area for at least 10 years, were randomly selected from patients attending outpatient clinics. Diabetics in a stable condition (not requiring hospitalisation, whose fasting blood sugars were below 6.1 mmol/L, were matched for age and gender with the non-diabetics who came to the hospital for outpatient services. A pilot-tested questionnaire on demography, current and past dietary habits, social habits, and family history was used to collect data. Waist circumference, height and weight were measured and BMI calculated. Data was analysed using SPSS for Windows. The Kruskal–Wallis test was used to compare the medians for the continuous variables, while the chi-squared test was used for the categorical variables. The z-test was used to calculate the relative risk.Results: Ninety participants (26 males, 64 females. The mean age was 61.8 for diabetics and 61.4 for non-diabetics. Childhood starvation (relative risk 2.08, p = 0.0090 and use of cassava for sustenance during childhood starvation (relative risk 3.12, p = 0.0090 were identified as risk factors. Diabetes in close relatives, another risk factor for this population (relative risk 2.2, p = 0.0131. Abdominal obesity was a risk factor for this population (in females relative risk 2.0, p = 0.0010.Conclusion: The risk factors for type 2

  13. Risk factors for type 2 diabetes mellitus among patients attending a rural Kenyan hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masemiano P. Chege

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Diabetes Management and Information Center in Nairobi has conducted population surveys among rural and urban Kenyans during the last decade. They have reported a rise in the prevalence of diabetes among rural Kenyans from 3% in 2003 to 7% in 2007. Our study was undertaken to investigate rural factors for type 2 diabetes and determine those that could be responsible for this rise in prevalence.Objectives: To describe the risk factors for type 2 diabetes mellitus among patients attending the outpatient clinics in a rural mission hospital in Kenya.Method: Forty-five diabetics and forty-five non-diabetics, resident in this rural hospital’s catchment area for at least 10 years, were randomly selected from patients attending outpatient clinics. Diabetics in a stable condition (not requiring hospitalisation, whose fasting blood sugars were below 6.1 mmol/L, were matched for age and gender with the non-diabetics who came to the hospital for outpatient services. A pilot-tested questionnaire on demography, current and past dietary habits, social habits, and family history was used to collect data. Waist circumference, height and weight were measured and BMI calculated. Data was analysed using SPSS for Windows. The Kruskal–Wallis test was used to compare the medians for the continuous variables, while the chi-squared test was used for the categorical variables. The z-test was used to calculate the relative risk.Results: Ninety participants (26 males, 64 females. The mean age was 61.8 for diabetics and 61.4 for non-diabetics. Childhood starvation (relative risk 2.08, p = 0.0090 and use of cassava for sustenance during childhood starvation (relative risk 3.12, p = 0.0090 were identified as risk factors. Diabetes in close relatives, another risk factor for this population (relative risk 2.2, p = 0.0131. Abdominal obesity was a risk factor for this population (in females relative risk 2.0, p = 0.0010.Conclusion: The risk factors for type 2

  14. Skin autofluorescence provides additional information to the UK Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS) risk score for the estimation of cardiovascular prognosis in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lutgers, H. L.; Gerrits, E. G.; Graaff, R.; Links, T. P.; Sluiter, W. J.; Gans, R. O.; Bilo, H. J.; Smit, A. J.

    2009-01-01

    The UK Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS) risk engine has become a standard for cardiovascular risk assessment in type 2 diabetes mellitus. Skin autofluorescence was recently introduced as an alternative tool for cardiovascular risk assessment in diabetes. We investigated the prognostic value of ski

  15. Assessment of Risk Factors for the Early Detection of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Velusamy Sivakumar

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose; Gestational diabetes mellitus affects 1-14% of all pregnancy with results of many maternal and fetal problems. Early detection and treatment may reduce the complications in pregnancy outcome. The main aim of the study is to assess the risk factors causing gestational diabetes mellitus. Methods; Study was carried out in the multispecialty hospital in Tamilnadu, south India, for the period of 10 years from January 2003 to December 2012. Pregnant women diagnosed with GDM were included in the study. Diabetes mellitus, hypertension, renal disorder and autoimmune disease woman were not included in the study. Antenatal, perinatal and neonatal data were collected from patient, family members, patient medical records and hospital database. SPSS statistical package version 20.0 was used for the statistical analysis. Paired‘t’ test, ANOVA, were used for various data analysis. Results; Age, BMI, gravidity, primiparity and irregular menstrual cycle shows significant influence on the development of gestational diabetes mellitus(P<0.05. The mean age of GDM women was 27.75 ± 3.90 years. The mean BMI of GDM women was 27.71 ± 3.61 kg/m2. The average gravidity of GDM alone women was 1.91± 1.10, Conclusion; From our study we observed, Advancing age, increasing BMI, Multigravida, primiparity, family history of diabetes and irregular menstrual cycle shows an influence on the development of GDM. These risk factors are comparable with internationally documented risk factors. Assessing the risk factors and identifying those women as high risk group for GDM is important for the early diagnosis of GDM.

  16. Non classical risk factors for gestational diabetes mellitus: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dode, Maria Alice Souza de Oliveira; dos Santos, Iná S

    2009-01-01

    Age, obesity and family history of diabetes are well known risk factors for gestational diabetes mellitus. Others are more controversial. The objective of this review is to find evidence in the literature that justifies the inclusion of these other conditions among risk factors. The MEDLINE, Cochrane, LILACS and Pan American Health Organization databases were searched, covering articles dating from between 1992 and 2006. Keywords were used in combination (AND) with gestational diabetes mellitus separately and with each one of the risk factors studied. The methodological quality of the studies included was assessed, resulting in the selection of 41 papers. Most studies investigating maternal history of low birth weight, low stature, and low level of physical activity have found positive associations with gestational diabetes mellitus. Low socioeconomic levels, smoking during pregnancy, high parity, belonging to minority groups, and excessive weight gain during pregnancy presented conflicting results. Publication bias cannot be ruled out. Standardization of techniques, cutoff points for screening and diagnosis, as well as studies involving larger sample sizes would allow future meta-analyses.

  17. Diabetes Mellitus and Hyperglycemia and the Risk of Aseptic Loosening in Total Joint Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maradit Kremers, Hilal; Schleck, Cathy D; Lewallen, Eric A; Larson, Dirk R; Van Wijnen, Andre J; Lewallen, David G

    2017-09-01

    It is unknown to what extent diabetes mellitus modifies the long-term risk of aseptic loosening in total hip arthroplasty (THA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA). We examined the association between diabetes mellitus, perioperative hyperglycemia, and the likelihood of revisions for aseptic loosening. We studied 16,085 primary THA and TKA procedures performed at a large tertiary care hospital between 2002 and 2009. All blood glucose values around the time of surgery (within 1 week) were retrieved. Subsequent revision surgeries and the reasons for revision were ascertained through the institutional joint registry. Multivariate Cox models were used to estimate the hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for aseptic loosening associated with diabetes mellitus and hyperglycemia adjusting for age, gender, body mass index, and surgery type. A total of 2911 (18%) surgeries had a diagnosis of diabetes mellitus at the time of surgery. Glucose testing was performed at least once in 7055 (44%) procedures within ±1 week of surgery. Although diabetic patients did not experience a higher risk of revision for aseptic loosening (HR, 0.87; 95% CI, 0.55-1.38), higher preoperative glucose values on the day before surgery were significantly associated with both the overall risk of revisions (HR, 2.80; 95% CI, 1.00-7.85) and revisions for aseptic loosening (HR, 4.95; 95% CI, 1.26-19.54). High preoperative hyperglycemia is a potential risk factor for aseptic loosening in THA and TKA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Diabetes mellitus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1992-01-01

    920537 The urinary activity of N-acetyl-D-glucosaminidase and diabetic nephropa-thy. XU Dashun (徐大顺), et al. Shanghai 1stPeople Hosp, 200085. Shanghai Med J 1992;15(8): 439-442. Urinary activity of N-acetyl-β-D-glucosa-minidase (NAG) and NAG: Creatinine(NAGI)in 24-hour urine and NAG-I in a single random

  19. Reliability and validity of the Persian (Farsi) version of the Risk Perception Survey-Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltanipour, S; Heidarzadeh, A; Jafarinezhad, A

    2014-04-03

    Knowledge of patients' risk perceptions is essential for the management of chronic diseases. This study aimed to assess the reliability and validity of a Persian (Farsi) language translation of the Risk Perception Survey-Diabetes Mellitus. After forward-backward translation the RPS-DM was randomly administered to 106 adult patients with diabetes who were enrolled in a teaching referral clinic in the north of the Islamic Republic of Iran (Rasht). Internal consistency and exploratory factor analysis were applied. The minimum value for internal consistency was 0.50 for risk knowledge and the highest value was 0.88 on the optimistic bias subscale. Principal component analysis showed that the items of the composite risk score matched with the same items in the English language version, except for question numbers 16, 24 and 25. The Persian version of RPS-DM is the first standardized tool for measuring risk perception and knowledge about diabetes complications in the Islamic Republic of Iran.

  20. Triglyceride levels and risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus: a longitudinal large study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beshara, Amani; Cohen, Eytan; Goldberg, Elad; Lilos, Pearl; Garty, Moshe; Krause, Ilan

    2016-02-01

    The relationship between triglyceridemia and diabetes mellitus remains unclear. This study evaluated the risk of diabetes and impaired fasting glucose associated with a wide range of triglyceride levels. A longitudinal retrospective study was carried out employing data from a screening center between the years 2000 and 2012. Inclusion criteria were absence of diabetes at baseline and attendance at the center at least twice over a 5-year period. Participants were divided by fasting blood glucose level (normal/impaired) at the first visit. A total of 5085 participants were eligible for the study. Of the 4164 normoglycemic participants at baseline, 40 (0.96%) had diabetes and 998 (24%) had impaired fasting glucose by the end of the study. On stepwise logistic regression analysis, every 10 mg/dL increase in triglyceride level significantly increased the risk of diabetes by 4% and of impaired fasting glucose by 2% (plevels remained within the accepted normal range (level, even within the accepted normal range, are an independent risk factor for diabetes mellitus and impaired fasting glucose in normoglycemic participants. Copyright © 2016 American Federation for Medical Research.

  1. The impact of prenatal parental tobacco smoking on risk of diabetes mellitus in middle-aged women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Merrill, M A; Cirillo, P M; Krigbaum, N Y; Cohn, B A

    2015-06-01

    Growing evidence indicates that parental smoking is associated with risk of offspring obesity. The purpose of this study was to identify whether parental tobacco smoking during gestation was associated with risk of diabetes mellitus. This is a prospective study of 44- to 54-year-old daughters (n = 1801) born in the Child Health and Development Studies pregnancy cohort between 1959 and 1967. Their mothers resided near Oakland California, were members of the Kaiser Foundation Health Plan and reported parental tobacco smoking during an early pregnancy interview. Daughters reported physician diagnoses of diabetes mellitus and provided blood samples for hemoglobin A1C measurement. Prenatal maternal smoking had a stronger association with daughters' diabetes mellitus risk than prenatal paternal smoking, and the former persisted after adjustment for parental race, diabetes and employment (aRR = 2.4 [95% confidence intervals 1.4-4.1] P diabetes diagnosis (2.3 [95% confidence intervals 1.0-5.0] P diabetes mellitus among adult daughters, independent of known risk factors, providing further evidence that prenatal environmental chemical exposures independent of birth weight and current BMI may contribute to adult diabetes mellitus. While other studies seek to confirm our results, caution toward tobacco smoking by or proximal to pregnant women is warranted in diabetes mellitus prevention efforts.

  2. Diabetes mellitus, fasting blood glucose concentration, and risk of vascular disease: a collaborative meta-analysis of 102 prospective studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarwar, N; Gao, P; Seshasai, S R Kondapally;

    2010-01-01

    Uncertainties persist about the magnitude of associations of diabetes mellitus and fasting glucose concentration with risk of coronary heart disease and major stroke subtypes. We aimed to quantify these associations for a wide range of circumstances....

  3. Long-term risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus in relation to BMI and weight change among women with a history of gestational diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bao, Wei; Yeung, Edwina; Tobias, Deirdre K;

    2015-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Women with a history of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) are advised to control their weight after pregnancy. We aimed to examine how adiposity and weight change influence the long-term risk of developing type 2 diabetes after GDM. METHODS: We included 1,695 women who had...... pregnancy. We estimated HRs and 95% CIs using Cox proportional hazards models. RESULTS: We documented 259 incident cases of type 2 diabetes during up to 18 years of follow-up. The adjusted HRs of type 2 diabetes associated with each 1 kg/m(2) increase in BMI were 1.16 (95% CI 1.12, 1.19) for baseline BMI...... incident GDM between 1991 and 2001, as part of the Diabetes & Women's Health study, and followed them until the return of the 2009 questionnaire. Body weight and incident type 2 diabetic cases were reported biennially. We defined baseline as the questionnaire period when women reported an incident GDM...

  4. Association between type 1 diabetes mellitus and risk of epilepsy: A meta-analysis of observational studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Dandan; Zhao, Enfa; Zhang, Hong; Luo, Xiaohui; Du, Yajuan

    2017-01-01

    A potential association between type 1 diabetes mellitus and subsequent epilepsy emerged in recent studies. This study aimed to evaluate the possible relationship between type 1 diabetes mellitus and epilepsy using meta-analysis. Pubmed, ISI Web of Knowledge, Embase and Cochrane Library were searched for potential studies of the association between type 1 diabetes mellitus and epilepsy from inception to February 1, 2017. Two investigators independently screened studies for inclusion and extracted related data; discrepancies were solved by consensus. Random effects model of Hazard Ratio (HR) was used to estimate the strength of association. We identified 13 papers from potentially relevant articles of which 3 cohort studies met the inclusion criteria. Random effects meta-analysis showed that type 1 diabetes mellitus was associated with an increased risk of epilepsy with HR = 3.29 (95% CI: 2.61-4.14; I(2) = 0, p = 0.689). Similar results were observed in type 1 diabetes mellitus patents younger than 18-years-old with HR = 2.96 (95% CI: 2.28-3.84; I(2) = 0, p = 0.571). Meta-analysis of 2 studies that adjusted for potential confounders yielded an increased risk of epilepsy with HR = 2.89 (95% CI: 2.26-3.70; I(2) = 0, p = 0.831). The meta-analysis indicates that type 1 diabetes mellitus is associated with a statistically significant increased risk for epilepsy compared to those without type 1 diabetes mellitus.

  5. Higher direct bilirubin levels during mid-pregnancy are associated with lower risk of gestational diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chaoqun; Zhong, Chunrong; Zhou, Xuezhen; Chen, Renjuan; Wu, Jiangyue; Wang, Weiye; Li, Xiating; Ding, Huisi; Guo, Yanfang; Gao, Qin; Hu, Xingwen; Xiong, Guoping; Yang, Xuefeng; Hao, Liping; Xiao, Mei; Yang, Nianhong

    2017-01-01

    Bilirubin concentrations have been recently reported to be negatively associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus. We examined the association between bilirubin concentrations and gestational diabetes mellitus. In a prospective cohort study, 2969 pregnant women were recruited prior to 16 weeks of gestation and were followed up until delivery. The value of bilirubin was tested and oral glucose tolerance test was conducted to screen gestational diabetes mellitus. The relationship between serum bilirubin concentration and gestational weeks was studied by two-piecewise linear regression. A subsample of 1135 participants with serum bilirubin test during 16-18 weeks gestation was conducted to research the association between serum bilirubin levels and risk of gestational diabetes mellitus by logistic regression. Gestational diabetes mellitus developed in 8.5 % of the participants (223 of 2969). Two-piecewise linear regression analyses demonstrated that the levels of bilirubin decreased with gestational week up to the turning point 23 and after that point, levels of bilirubin were increased slightly. In multiple logistic regression analysis, the relative risk of developing gestational diabetes mellitus was lower in the highest tertile of direct bilirubin than that in the lowest tertile (RR 0.60; 95 % CI, 0.35-0.89). The results suggested that women with higher serum direct bilirubin levels during the second trimester of pregnancy have lower risk for development of gestational diabetes mellitus.

  6. Diabetes mellitus and cognitive impairments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Elham; Saedi[1; Mohammad; Reza; Gheini[2; Firoozeh; Faiz[3; Mohammad; Ali; Arami[4

    2016-01-01

    There is strong evidence that diabetes mellitus increases the risk of cognitive impairment and dementia. Insulin signaling dysregulation and small vessel disease in the base of diabetes may be important contributing factors in Alzheimer’s disease and vascular dementia pathogenesis, respectively. Optimal glycemic control in type 1 diabetes and identification of diabetic risk factors and prophylactic approach in type 2 diabetes are very important in the prevention of cognitive complications.In addition, hypoglycemic attacks in children and elderly should be avoided. Anti-diabetic medications especially Insulin may have a role in the management of cognitive dysfunction and dementia but further investigation is needed to validate these findings.

  7. Diabetes mellitus and cognitive impairments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saedi, Elham; Gheini, Mohammad Reza; Faiz, Firoozeh; Arami, Mohammad Ali

    2016-01-01

    There is strong evidence that diabetes mellitus increases the risk of cognitive impairment and dementia. Insulin signaling dysregulation and small vessel disease in the base of diabetes may be important contributing factors in Alzheimer’s disease and vascular dementia pathogenesis, respectively. Optimal glycemic control in type 1 diabetes and identification of diabetic risk factors and prophylactic approach in type 2 diabetes are very important in the prevention of cognitive complications. In addition, hypoglycemic attacks in children and elderly should be avoided. Anti-diabetic medications especially Insulin may have a role in the management of cognitive dysfunction and dementia but further investigation is needed to validate these findings. PMID:27660698

  8. [Risk factors for fetal macrosomia in patients without gestational diabetes mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-De la Torre, J I; Rodríguez-Valdez, A; Delgado-Rosas, A

    2016-03-01

    Fetal macrosomia is birth weight of 4,000 grams or more, regardless of gestational age, in Mexico representing about 5.4%. Associated with multiple demographic, physiological, metabolic and genetic factors of each population. Determine the risk factors associated with the development of fetal macrosomia in patients without gestational diabetes mellitus. Retrospective, descriptive and comparative study of patients who came to delivery from January 2012 to June 2014, 88 patients, 23 patients with diagnosis of macrosomia, and 65 patients without macrosomia without gestational diabetes mellitus were included. An incidence of fetal macrosomia of 18.6%. Risk factors such as parity, history of fetal macrosomia, maternal age, maternal height more to 1.70 meters showed no difference, the percentage of overweight 105% showed 69% vs 52% on the control group and gestational diabetes screening altered that present 30.4 vs 20%. Increased incidence of macrosomia was demonstrated in patients with metabolic factors such as the percentage of overweight and screening altered gestational diabetes mellitus, as they showed higher prevalence in the study group, all modifiable with preconception nutritional management and during pregnancy, to reduce initial weight and weight gain, improved fasting and postprandial blood glucose in patients with positive screening and negative tolerance curve carbohydrates to maintain fetal growth curve with in the percentiles.

  9. Diabetes mellitus type II as a risk factor for depression: a lower than expected risk in a general practice setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarts, S; van den Akker, M; van Boxtel, M P J; Jolles, J; Winkens, B; Metsemakers, J F M

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine whether a diagnosis of diabetes mellitus (DM) in a primary setting is associated with an increased risk of subsequent depression. A retrospective cohort design was used based on the Registration Network Family Practice (RNH) database. Patients diagnosed with diabetes mellitus at or after the age of 40 and who were diagnosed between 01-01-1980 and 01-01-2007 (N = 6,140), were compared with age-matched controls from a reference group (N = 18,416) without a history of diabetes. Both groups were followed for an emerging first diagnosis of depression (and/or depressive feelings) until January 1, 2008. 2.0% of the people diagnosed with diabetes mellitus developed a depressive disorder, compared to 1.6% of the reference group. After statistical correction for confounding factors diabetes mellitus was associated with an increased risk of developing subsequent depression (HR 1.26; 95% CI: 1.12-1.42) and/or depressive feelings (HR 1.33; 95% CI: 1.18-1.46). After statistical adjustment practice identification code, age and depression preceding diabetes, were significantly related to a diagnosis of depression. Patients with diabetes mellitus are more likely to develop subsequent depression than persons without a history of diabetes. Results from this large longitudinal study based on a general practice population indicate that this association is weaker than previously found in cross-sectional research using self-report surveys. Several explanations for this dissimilarity are discussed

  10. Diabetes mellitus, fasting blood glucose concentration, and risk of vascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarwar, N; Gao, P; Seshasai, S R Kondapally

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Uncertainties persist about the magnitude of associations of diabetes mellitus and fasting glucose concentration with risk of coronary heart disease and major stroke subtypes. We aimed to quantify these associations for a wide range of circumstances. METHODS: We undertook a meta......-analysis of individual records of diabetes, fasting blood glucose concentration, and other risk factors in people without initial vascular disease from studies in the Emerging Risk Factors Collaboration. We combined within-study regressions that were adjusted for age, sex, smoking, systolic blood pressure, and body......-mass index to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) for vascular disease. FINDINGS: Analyses included data for 698 782 people (52 765 non-fatal or fatal vascular outcomes; 8.49 million person-years at risk) from 102 prospective studies. Adjusted HRs with diabetes were: 2.00 (95% CI 1.83-2.19) for coronary heart...

  11. Screening for gestational diabetes mellitus by a model based on risk indicators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Dorte Møller; Mølsted-Pedersen, Lars; Beck-Nielsen, Henning

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study was performed to prospectively evaluate a screening model for gestational diabetes mellitus on the basis of clinical risk indicators. STUDY DESIGN: In a prospective multicenter study with 5235 consecutive pregnant women, diagnostic testing with a 2-hour 75-g oral glucose...... was comparable with universal screening by fasting glucose or a 1-hour 50-g glucose challenge test. Both screening and diagnostic testing could be avoided in two thirds of all pregnant women....

  12. The role of exercise in reducing the risks of gestational diabetes mellitus in obese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artal, Raul

    2015-01-01

    The global obesity epidemic continues unabated, now rapidly expanding to developing countries. Multiple comorbidities and premature mortality are associated with obesity, most frequently diabetes. The associated financial and economical burden is escalating as well. The sedentary lifestyle adopted by many pregnant women because of traditional practices and the current recommendation for gestational weight gain are contributing factors to the obesity and diabetes epidemic. Physical inactivity is recognized as an independent risk factor for obesity insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes; the physiological and hormonal changes associated with pregnancy magnify this risk. Conversely, evidence and accumulated experience indicate that antenatal lifestyle interventions that include physical activity and judicious dieting could improve the pregnancy outcome and reduce the risk of gestational diabetes and is effective as an adjunctive therapy for diabetes in pregnancy. All major professional organizations, among them American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG), American Diabetes Association (ADA), Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (RCOG), and Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada (SOGC), recommend lifestyle interventions that include diet and exercise to prevent or manage gestational diabetes or diabetes mellitus.

  13. Pharmacogenomics in diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Kaixin; Pedersen, Helle Krogh; Dawed, Adem Y.

    2016-01-01

    Genomic studies have greatly advanced our understanding of the multifactorial aetiology of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) as well as the multiple subtypes of monogenic diabetes mellitus. In this Review, we discuss the existing pharmacogenetic evidence in both monogenic diabetes mellitus and T2DM....... We highlight mechanistic insights from the study of adverse effects and the efficacy of antidiabetic drugs. The identification of extreme sulfonylurea sensitivity in patients with diabetes mellitus owing to heterozygous mutations in HNF1A represents a clear example of how pharmacogenetics can direct...... future pharmacogenomic findings could provide insights into treatment response in diabetes mellitus that, in addition to other areas of human genetics, facilitates drug discovery and drug development for T2DM....

  14. Diabetes mellitus and cancer risk: pooled analysis of eight cohort studies in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasazuki, Shizuka; Charvat, Hadrien; Hara, Azusa; Wakai, Kenji; Nagata, Chisato; Nakamura, Kozue; Tsuji, Ichiro; Sugawara, Yumi; Tamakoshi, Akiko; Matsuo, Keitaro; Oze, Isao; Mizoue, Tetsuya; Tanaka, Keitaro; Inoue, Manami; Tsugane, Shoichiro

    2013-11-01

    Although a growing body of evidence suggests a link between diabetes and cancer, it is not clear whether diabetes independently increases the risk of cancer. We conducted a comprehensive assessment of the association between pre-existing diabetes and total and site-specific cancer risk based on a pooled analysis of eight cohort studies in Japan (>330 000 subjects). We estimated a summary hazard ratio by pooling study-specific hazard ratios for total and site-specific cancer by using a random-effects model. A statistically increased risk was observed for cancers at specific sites, such as colon (hazard ratio; HR = 1.40), liver (HR = 1.97), pancreas (HR = 1.85) and bile duct (HR = 1.66; men only). Increased risk was also suggested for other sites, and diabetes mellitus was associated with an overall 20% increased risk in total cancer incidence in the Japanese population. The association between these two diseases has important implications for reiterating the importance of controlling lifestyle factors and may suggest a possible strategy for cancer screening among patients with diabetes. Studies continuously investigating the risk factors for diabetes are also important.

  15. Diabetes mellitus and alcohol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Wiel, Albert

    2004-01-01

    Alcohol influences glucose metabolism in several ways in diabetic patients as well as in non-diabetic patients. Since alcohol inhibits both gluconeogenesis and glycogenolysis, its acute intake without food may provoke hypoglycaemia, especially in cases of depleted glycogen stores and in combination with sulphonylurea. Consumed with a meal including carbohydrates, it is the preferred fuel, which may initially lead to somewhat higher blood glucose levels and hence an insulin response in type 2 diabetic patients. Depending on the nature of the carbohydrates in the meal, this may be followed by reactive hypoglycaemia. Moderate consumption of alcohol is associated with a reduced risk of atherosclerotic disorders. Diabetic patients benefit from this favourable effect as much as non-diabetic patients. Apart from effects on lipid metabolism, haemostatic balance and blood pressure, alcohol improves insulin sensitivity. This improvement of insulin sensitivity may also be responsible for the lower incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus reported to be associated with light-to-moderate drinking. In case of moderate and sensible use, risks of disturbances in glycaemic control, weight and blood pressure are limited. Excessive intake of alcohol, however, may not only cause loss of metabolic control, but also annihilate the favourable effects on the cardiovascular system.

  16. [Diabetes mellitus and pancreas cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Škrha, Jan; Škrha, Pavel; Frič, Přemysl

    2016-03-01

    Diabetes mellitus and pancreatic cancer establish both-side relationship, one disease may have influence a development of the other. Pathogenic mechanisms sharing their relationship are overviewed. Early diagnosis may contribute to better prognosis of the patients with malign tumor. The treatment by antidiabetic drugs offer to diabetic patients different risks of pancreatic cancer but lots of data are still lacking.

  17. Alcoholism and diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo-Jeong; Kim, Dai-Jin

    2012-04-01

    Chronic use of alcohol is considered to be a potential risk factor for the incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), which causes insulin resistance and pancreatic β-cell dysfunction that is a prerequisite for the development of diabetes. However, alcohol consumption in diabetes has been controversial and more detailed information on the diabetogenic impact of alcohol seems warranted. Diabetes, especially T2DM, causes dysregulation of various metabolic processes, which includes a defect in the insulin-mediated glucose function of adipocytes, and an impaired insulin action in the liver. In addition, neurobiological profiles of alcoholism are linked to the effects of a disruption of glucose homeostasis and of insulin resistance, which are affected by altered appetite that regulates the peptides and neurotrophic factors. Since conditions, which precede the onset of diabetes that are associated with alcoholism is one of the crucial public problems, researches in efforts to prevent and treat diabetes with alcohol dependence, receives special clinical interest. Therefore, the purpose of this mini-review is to provide the recent progress and current theories in the interplay between alcoholism and diabetes. Further, the purpose of this study also includes summarizing the pathophysiological mechanisms in the neurobiology of alcoholism.

  18. Alcoholism and Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo-Jeong Kim

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Chronic use of alcohol is considered to be a potential risk factor for the incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM, which causes insulin resistance and pancreatic β-cell dysfunction that is a prerequisite for the development of diabetes. However, alcohol consumption in diabetes has been controversial and more detailed information on the diabetogenic impact of alcohol seems warranted. Diabetes, especially T2DM, causes dysregulation of various metabolic processes, which includes a defect in the insulin-mediated glucose function of adipocytes, and an impaired insulin action in the liver. In addition, neurobiological profiles of alcoholism are linked to the effects of a disruption of glucose homeostasis and of insulin resistance, which are affected by altered appetite that regulates the peptides and neurotrophic factors. Since conditions, which precede the onset of diabetes that are associated with alcoholism is one of the crucial public problems, researches in efforts to prevent and treat diabetes with alcohol dependence, receives special clinical interest. Therefore, the purpose of this mini-review is to provide the recent progress and current theories in the interplay between alcoholism and diabetes. Further, the purpose of this study also includes summarizing the pathophysiological mechanisms in the neurobiology of alcoholism.

  19. Higher prevalence of risk factors for type 2 diabetes mellitus and subsequent higher incidence in men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almdal, T.; Scharling, H.; Jensen, J.S.

    2008-01-01

    Background: This study investigates risk factors and the incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (type 2 DM) in both sexes of a northern European population. Methods: A total of 14,223 randomly selected men and women were studied from 1976 to 1978. Patients with diabetes (self-reported type 2 DM or...... an OR of 0.4. Conclusion: In a randomly selected northern European population, significantly more men than women develop type 2 DM. (C) 2007 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved Udgivelsesdato: 2008/1...

  20. Association of Psoriasis With the Risk for Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lønnberg, Ann Sophie; Skov, Lone; Skytthe, Axel;

    2016-01-01

    and Relevance: This study determines the contribution of genetic and environmental factors to the interaction between obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and psoriasis. Psoriasis, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and obesity are also strongly associated in adults after taking key confounding factors, such as sex, age......Importance: Psoriasis has been shown to be associated with overweight and type 2 diabetes mellitus. The genetic association is unclear. Objective: To examine the association among psoriasis, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and body mass index (BMI) (calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height...... diagnoses of type 2 diabetes mellitus and self-reported BMI. Data were collected in the spring of 2002. Data were analyzed from January 1 to October 31, 2014. Main Outcomes and Measures: Crude and adjusted odds ratios (ORs) were calculated for psoriasis in relation to type 2 diabetes mellitus, increasing...

  1. Osteoporosis and diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Montagnani

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Diabetes mellitus (DM and osteoporotic fractures are major causes of mortality and morbidity in older subjects. Recent reports have revealed close association between fracture risk and DM types 1 and 2 (DM1 and DM2, respectively. Aim of this review is to highlight the importance of these diseases in the elderly and examine certain etiopathogenetic aspects of DM associated osteoporosis, which could be useful in management of diabetic patients. Materials and methods: We searched the Embase and PubMed databases using diabetes, osteoporosis, and bone mineral density (BMD as search terms and 1989-2009 as publication dates. Discussion: The risk of fractures seems to be increased in both types of DM although DM2 seems to be associated with normal-high BMDs compared with the normal population. This apparent paradox could reflect greater bone frailty in diabetic patients that are unrelated to adipose tissue, hyperinsulinemia, deposition of advanced glycosylation end products in collagen, reduced serum IGF-1 levels, hypercalciuria, renal failure, microangiopathy, and/or inflammation. Diabetic patients’ propensity to fall and multiple comorbidities might also explain their higher fracture rates. The effects of drugs that inhibit bone resorption in diabetic patients are probably similar to those obtained in nondiabetics although there is little information on this issue. In general, effective treatment of diabetes has positive effects on bone metabolism. Metformin acts directly on bone tissue, reducing AGE accumulation, and insulin has direct effects on osteoclast activity. In contrast, the thiazolidinediones seem to have negative effects since they orient mesenchymal progenitor cell differentiation toward adipose rather than bone tissue. Incretin therapy is a newer approach that appears to modify interactions between nutrition and bone turnover (e.g., postprandial suppression of bone resorption. Conclusions: Better understanding of how

  2. Diabetes mellitus with poor glycemic control increases bladder cancer recurrence risk in patients with upper urinary tract urothelial carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Yi-Sheng; Chen, Chung-Hsin; Huang, Chao-Yuan; Tai, Huai-Chin; Wang, Sho-Mon; Pu, Yeong-Shiau

    2015-03-01

    The association of diabetes mellitus and bladder cancer recurrence following radical nephroureterectomies (RNUs) in patients with upper urinary tract urothelial carcinoma (UTUC) was investigated. Between January 1996 and March 2009, 538 patients with UTUC who received RNU and had no previous bladder cancer histories were enrolled. The clinicopathological characteristics were obtained and used for the analysis of metachronous bladder recurrence by using Cox proportional hazard model. The diabetic patients (N = 104, 19.3%) were elderly (72 vs 67 years, p diabetic patients. There was no significant difference in the rest of clinicopathological characteristics between patient groups. During the median follow-up duration of 51 months, bladder recurrences were discovered in 47.1 and 33.1% of diabetic and non-diabetic patients with UTUC, respectively. Poorly controlled diabetic patients (HbA1c  ≥ 7.0%) exhibited a shorter duration of bladder cancer recurrence-free survival as compared with those with good glycemic controlled diabetes mellitus and without diabetes mellitus (log-rank test, p diabetes mellitus with poor glycemic control (HR = 2.10, p Diabetes mellitus with poor glycemic control (HbA1c  ≥ 7.0%) increases the risk of subsequent bladder cancer recurrence. These results underscore the need for intensive glycemic control and close follow-up for diabetic patients. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Diabetes mellitus and primary liver cancer: risk factor or real cause?

    OpenAIRE

    Liang, Jing; Han, Tao

    2017-01-01

    With an increasing prevalence all over the world, diabetes mellitus is considered as a potential cause of liver cancer in patients with non-viral hepatitis. Whether diabetes mellitus is the cause of liver cancer and related pathogenesis remain unknown. The article reviews recent large-sample cohort studies and confirms that diabetes mellitus increases the incidence rate of liver cancer and affects its prognosis. This article also investigates the association of hepatitis C, obesity, and nonal...

  4. Pregnancies After the Diagnosis of Mild Gestational Diabetes Mellitus and Risk of Cardiometabolic Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varner, Michael W; Rice, Madeline Murguia; Landon, Mark B; Casey, Brian M; Reddy, Uma M; Wapner, Ronald J; Rouse, Dwight J; Tita, Alan T N; Thorp, John M; Chien, Edward K; Saade, George R; Peaceman, Alan M; Blackwell, Sean C; Vandorsten, J Peter

    2017-02-01

    To assess the association of subsequent pregnancy with subsequent metabolic syndrome and type II diabetes mellitus after a pregnancy complicated by mild gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). We conducted a prospective observational follow-up study of women with mild GDM randomized from 2002 to 2007 to usual care or dietary intervention and glucose self-monitoring. Women were evaluated 5-10 years after the parent study. Participants were grouped according to the number of subsequent pregnancies (group A, none [reference]; group B, one; group C, two or greater). Serum triglycerides, glucose tolerance, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, blood pressure, and waist circumference were assessed. Metabolic syndrome was diagnosed by American Heart Association and National Heart Lung and Blood Institute criteria. Multivariable regression was used to estimate adjusted relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Of 905 eligible women from the original trial, 483 agreed to participate, 426 of whom were included in this analysis. Groups A, B, and C consisted of 212, 143, and 71 women, respectively. Of women with subsequent pregnancies, 32% (69/214) had another pregnancy complicated with GDM. No difference between groups was observed for metabolic syndrome (group A, 34%; group B, 33%; group C, 30%). Subsequent pregnancies were associated with diabetes mellitus outside of pregnancy (group A, 5.2%; group B, 10.5%, RR 2.62, 95% CI 1.16-5.91; group C, 11.3%, RR 2.83, 95% CI 1.06-7.59), and if complicated with GDM (no subsequent GDM pregnancy, RR 1.99, 95% CI 0.82-4.84; subsequent GDM pregnancy, RR 3.75, 95% CI 1.60-8.82). In women with prior mild GDM, subsequent pregnancies did not increase the frequency of metabolic syndrome, but subsequent pregnancies with GDM increased the risk of diabetes mellitus outside of pregnancy.

  5. IMPACT OF VITAMINS IN PREVENTION OF RISK FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH TYPE-2 DIABETES MELLITUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.K. Gupta*, Asha Pathak , Manoj Gahlot , R.C. Verma and C.V. Singh

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Diabetes mellitus is one of the most common metabolic disorders that cause micro and macro vascular complications. Because of additive effects of hyperglycaemia and hyperlipidaemia for cardiovascular disease, serum lipid and glucose level should be closely monitored in diabetes. Chronic Hyperglycaemia resulting from diabetes has profound effects on nearly every system of the body. The toxic effects of hyperglycaemia may result from accumulation of nonenzymatically glycosylated products, increased sorbitol production in tissue, formation of diacylglycerol leading to activation of protein kinase C or by free radical generation. Since type 2 DM is a major public health problem, accounting for significant premature mortality and morbidity, every possible effort should be made to minimize its complications. Studies have shown that diabetes is accompa¬nied by an increased oxidative damage to all the bimolecules. Enhanced oxidative stress contributes to the development of the diabetic complications. Over the last 5 years, a number of large observational studies have suggested an association between the onset of type 2 diabetes and Vitamin deficiencies. As vitamins have important effects on insulin action, serum lipid and glucose and may have impact on a number of pathways which may be of importance in the development of type 2 diabetes. This article reviews the evidence linking role of Vitamins in the prevention of risk factors associated with type 2 diabetes, and suggests current recommendations for supplementation and the most pertinent research on the use of key vitamins in diabetes management.

  6. Understanding the type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease risk paradox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Jennifer B

    2014-05-01

    Patients with diabetes have approximately a 2-fold increase in the risk for coronary heart disease, stroke, and death from vascular causes compared with patients who do not have diabetes. Interventions targeted at modifiable risk factors, such as smoking cessation and management of hypertension and dyslipidemia, reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Paradoxically, large randomized studies have failed to conclusively show that intensively lowering glucose reduces CVD event rates in patients with T2DM, despite pathophysiologic and epidemiologic evidence suggesting that hyperglycemia contributes to CVD. Although initiation of intensive glycemic control early in the disease course may be associated with a reduction in the long-term risk of cardiovascular (CV) events, this approach in those with long-standing or complicated T2DM is not of clear benefit and may even be harmful in some. Failure to mitigate risk with antihyperglycemic therapy and the potential for some treatments to increase CVD risk underlies a treatment paradox. New glucose-lowering therapies are now subject to close scrutiny for CV safety before and after drug approval. Results from the first trials designed to meet the recent CV regulatory requirements have shown no increased risk of major adverse CV events but also no CV benefit from dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor therapy, as well as a potentially increased risk of hospitalization for heart failure. Conclusive evidence of CV risk reduction with glucose-lowering therapy is still lacking and scrutiny of additional agents is necessary. Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a heterogeneous disease, for which patient-centered, individualized care, and goal-setting is appropriate. Interventions that focus on the management of CV risk factors and glucose lowering with medications that are not cardiotoxic represent an optimal and attainable treatment approach.

  7. Range of Risk Factor Levels: Control, Mortality, and Cardiovascular Outcomes in Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawshani, Aidin; Rawshani, Araz; Franzén, Stefan; Eliasson, Björn; Svensson, Ann-Marie; Miftaraj, Mervete; McGuire, Darren K; Sattar, Naveed; Rosengren, Annika; Gudbjörnsdottir, Soffia

    2017-04-18

    Individuals with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) have a high risk of cardiovascular complications, but it is unknown to what extent fulfilling all cardiovascular treatment goals is associated with residual risk of mortality and cardiovascular outcomes in those with T1DM compared with the general population. We included all patients ≥18 years of age with T1DM who were registered in the Swedish National Diabetes Register from January 1, 1998, through December 31, 2014, a total of 33 333 patients, each matched for age and sex with 5 controls without diabetes mellitus randomly selected from the population. Patients with T1DM were categorized according to number of risk factors not at target: glycohemoglobin, blood pressure, albuminuria, smoking, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Risk of all-cause mortality, acute myocardial infarction, heart failure hospitalization, and stroke was examined in relation to the number of risk factors at target. The mean follow-up was 10.4 years in the diabetes group. Overall, 2074 of 33 333 patients with diabetes mellitus and 4141 of 166 529 controls died. Risk for all outcomes increased stepwise for each additional risk factor not at target. Adjusted hazard ratios for patients achieving all risk factor targets compared with controls were 1.31 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.93-1.85) for all-cause mortality, 1.82 (95% CI, 1.15-2.88) for acute myocardial infarction, 1.97 (95% CI, 1.04-3.73) for heart failure hospitalization, and 1.17 (95% CI, 0.51-2.68) for stroke. The hazard ratio for patients versus controls with none of the risk factors meeting target was 7.33 (95% CI, 5.08-10.57) for all-cause mortality, 12.34 (95% CI, 7.91-19.48) for acute myocardial infarction, 15.09 (95% CI, 9.87-23.09) for heart failure hospitalization, and 12.02 (95% CI, 7.66-18.85) for stroke. A steep-graded association exists between decreasing number of cardiovascular risk factors at target and major adverse cardiovascular outcomes among

  8. Empagliflozin and Cerebrovascular Events in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus at High Cardiovascular Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinman, Bernard; Inzucchi, Silvio E; Lachin, John M; Wanner, Christoph; Fitchett, David; Kohler, Sven; Mattheus, Michaela; Woerle, Hans J; Broedl, Uli C; Johansen, Odd Erik; Albers, Gregory W; Diener, Hans Christoph

    2017-05-01

    In the EMPA-REG OUTCOME trial (Empagliflozin Cardiovascular Outcome Event Trial in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients), empagliflozin added to standard of care in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and high cardiovascular risk reduced the risk of 3-point major adverse cardiovascular events, driven by a reduction in cardiovascular mortality, with no significant difference between empagliflozin and placebo in risk of myocardial infarction or stroke. In a modified intent-to-treat analysis, the hazard ratio for stroke was 1.18 (95% confidence interval, 0.89-1.56; P=0.26). We further investigated cerebrovascular events. Patients were randomized to empagliflozin 10 mg, empagliflozin 25 mg, or placebo; 7020 patients were treated. Median observation time was 3.1 years. The numeric difference in stroke between empagliflozin and placebo in the modified intent-to-treat analysis was primarily because of 18 patients in the empagliflozin group with a first event >90 days after last intake of study drug (versus 3 on placebo). In a sensitivity analysis based on events during treatment or ≤90 days after last dose of drug, the hazard ratio for stroke with empagliflozin versus placebo was 1.08 (95% confidence interval, 0.81-1.45; P=0.60). There were no differences in risk of recurrent, fatal, or disabling strokes, or transient ischemic attack, with empagliflozin versus placebo. Patients with the largest increases in hematocrit or largest decreases in systolic blood pressure did not have an increased risk of stroke. In patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and high cardiovascular risk, there was no significant difference in the risk of cerebrovascular events with empagliflozin versus placebo. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01131676. © 2017 The Authors.

  9. Improving Blood Pressure Control in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus and High Cardiovascular Risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry L. Elliott

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with diabetes mellitus and symptomatic coronary artery disease are also likely to be hypertensive and, overall, are at very high cardiovascular (CV risk. This paper reports the findings of a posthoc analysis of the 1113 patients with diabetes mellitus in the ACTION trial: ACTION itself showed that outcomes in patients with stable angina and hypertension were significantly improved when a long-acting calcium channel blocking drug (nifedipine GITS was added to their treatment regimens. This further analysis of the ACTION database in those patients with diabetes has identified a number of practical therapeutic issues which are still relevant because of potential outcome benefits, particularly in relation to BP control. For example, despite background CV treatment and, specifically, despite the widespread use of ACE Inhibitor drugs, the addition of nifedipine GITS was associated with significant benefits: improvement in BP control by an average of 6/3 mmHg and significant improvements in outcome. In summary, this retrospective analysis has identified that the addition of nifedipine GITS resulted in improved BP control and significant outcome benefits in patients with diabetes who were at high CV risk. There is evidence to suggest that these findings are of direct relevance to current therapeutic practice.

  10. The impact of serum lipids on risk for microangiopathy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toth Peter P

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Few large-scale, real-world studies have assessed the relative associations of lipid fractions with diabetic microvascular events. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the association of the lipid profile components, high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C, low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C, triglycerides (TG, and non-high density lipoprotein cholesterol (non-HDL-C with microvascular complications (MVCs in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM patients. Methods This observational cohort study queried the HealthCore Integrated Research Database (HIRDSM for newly-diagnosed (Index Date 18-64-year-old patients with diabetes mellitus between 01/01/2005-06/30/2010. Inclusion required ≥12 months pre-index continuous health plan eligibility and ≥1 pre-index lipid profile result. Patients with polycystic ovary syndrome and prior MVCs were excluded. Incident complications were defined as the earliest occurrence of diabetic retinopathy, peripheral neuropathy, and/or nephropathy post-index. Cox proportional models and Kaplan-Meier (KM curves were used to evaluate associations among variables. Results Of the patients (N = 72,267, 50.05 % achieved HDL-C, 64.28 % LDL-C, 59.82 % TG, and 56.79 % non-HDL-C American Diabetes Association goals at baseline. During follow-up (mean, 21.74 months, there were 5.21 microvascular events per 1,000 patient-months. A 1-mg/dL increase in HDL-C was associated with 1 % decrease in any MVC risk (P P P P P P  Conclusion This study demonstrates significant independent associations among lipid fractions and risk for microangiopathy. These findings suggest that attaining established ADA goals for HDL-C, TG, and non-HDL-C may reduce risk for microvascular events among patients with diabetes.

  11. Diabetes Mellitus and Osteoporosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilek Durmuş

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Osteoporosis is a condition of bone fragility resulting from micro-architectural deterioration and decreased bone mass. Studies on the presence of a generalized osteoporosis related to diabetes mellitus (DM are few and controversial. Factors associated with osteoporosis diabetes in which may account for the patogenesis of diabetic bone loss have been studied. This article will review the relevant litarature relating to diabetes and osteoporosis including cellular and animal models. These studies include vascular and neuropathic mechanism, poor glisemic control, abnormalities of calcium and vitamin D metabolism and hypercalciuria with secondary increase in parathyroid hormone secretion, the role of insülin and insülin like growth factor I. It appears that there is a great deal of variability in the bone mineral density and fracture rates in both type I and type II DM. This may reflect multiple factors such as the population, age, duration of diabetes and insülin use. There is need for further longitudinal studies, including the incidence and risk factors for osteoporosis in DM.

  12. [Analysis of the effect of risk factors at gestational diabetes mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuang, Wang; Huixia, Yang

    2014-05-01

    To assesment the effect of risk factors at gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). We collected 427 pregnant women who had done 75 g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) between September 1(st), 2012 and April 19(th), 2013 in Peking University First Hospital, including 74 pregnant women diagnosed as GDM (GDM group) and 353 pregnant women undiagnosed (non-GDM group). Then we conducted a multiple logistic regression to analyze the clinical datas collected from two groups, which included age, pre-pregnancy body weight and body mass index (BMI), body weight during 11-12 weeks pregnancy, body weight during 23-24 weeks pregnancy; and fasting plasma glucose (FPG), triglyceride (TG) , total cholesterol (TCH) , high density lipoprotein (HDL) , low density lipoprotein (LDL), fasting insulin (FINS), homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) during early pregnancy; and family history of diabetes mellitus. (1) There were significant difference in age, pre-pregnancy BMI, and FPG, TG, FINS, HOMA-IR during early pregnancy, and family history of diabetes mellitus between two groups (P history of diabetes mellitus (OR:3.15, 95%CI:1.66-5.99), TG during early pregnancy (OR:2.13, 95%CI:1.17-3.87),BMI before pregnancy (OR:1.36, 95%CI:1.08-1.70), age ≥ 35 years (OR:1.15, 95%CI:1.05-1.26), early pregnancy weight gain (OR:1.20, 95%CI:1.06-1.35), mid pregnancy weight gain (OR:1.28, 95%CI:1.12-1.47), FINS during early pregnancy (OR:1.09, 95%CI:1.01-1.17). FPG, TG and FINS during early pregnancy, BMI before pregnancy, early and mid pregnancy weight gain, family history of diabetes mellitus and age ≥ 35 years are the indepadent risk factors for GDM. We should pay more attention to FPG and TG during early pregnancy, and put weight management into practise since early pregnancy and try to control pregnancy weight gain within reasonable limits.

  13. Diabetes Mellitus and Younger Age Are Risk Factors for Hyperphosphatemia in Peritoneal Dialysis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imtiaz, Rameez; Hawken, Steven; McCormick, Brendan B; Leung, Simon; Hiremath, Swapnil; Zimmerman, Deborah L

    2017-02-17

    Hyperphosphatemia has been associated with adverse outcomes in patients with end stage kidney disease (ESKD). The purpose of this study was to determine risk factors for hyperphosphatemia in ESKD patients treated with peritoneal dialysis (PD). This information will be used to develop a patient specific phosphate binder application to facilitate patient self-management of serum phosphate. Adult PD patients documented their food, beverage, and phosphate binder intake for three days using a dietitian developed food journal. Phosphate content of meals was calculated using the ESHA Food Processor SQL Software (ESHA Research, Salem, UT, USA). Clinic biochemistry tests and an adequacy assessment (Baxter Adequest program) were done. Univariate logistic regression was used to determine predictors of serum phosphate >1.78 mmol/L. A multivariable logistic regression model was then fit including those variables that achieved a significance level of p diabetes mellitus (DM) and 33% had hyperphosphatemia (PO₄ > 1.78 mmol/L). In univariate analysis, the variables associated with an increased risk of hyperphosphatemia with a p-value diabetes (OR 11.40, 95 CI 2.82 to 61.55; p = 0.0003), and measured GFR (OR 0.052 per mL/min decrease; 95% CI 0.0025 to 0.66) were associated with hyperphosphatemia. Our results support that younger age and diabetes mellitus are significant risk factors for hyperphosphatemia. These findings warrant further investigation to determine the potential mechanisms that predispose younger patients and those with DM to hyperphosphatemia.

  14. Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Its Association with the Risk of Pancreatic Carcinogenesis: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biadgo, Belete; Abebe, Molla

    2016-04-25

    The prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM) and associated diseases such as cancers are substantially increasing worldwide. About 80% of the patients with pancreatic cancer have glucose metabolism alterations. This suggests an association between type 2 DM and pancreatic cancer risk and progression. There are hypotheses that show metabolic links between the diseases, due to insulin resistance, hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, low grade chronic inflammation, and alteration in the insulin-insulin-like growth factor axis. The use of diabetes medications can influence the extent of carcinogenesis of the pancreas. This study briefly reviews recent literature on investigation of metabolic link of type 2 DM, risk of carcinogenesis of the pancreas and their association, as well as the current understanding of metabolic pathways implicated in metabolism and cellular growth. The main finding of this review, although there are discrepancies, is that according to most research long-term DM does not raise the risk of pancreatic cancer. The longest duration of DM may reflect hypoinsulinemia due to treatment for hyperglycemia, but recent onset diabetes was associated with increased risk for pancreatic cancer due to hyperinsulinemia and hyperglycemia. In conclusion, the review demonstrates that type 2 DM and the duration of diabetes pose a risk for pancreatic carcinogenesis, and that there is biological link between the diseases.

  15. Dietary fiber, carbohydrate quality and quantity, and mortality risk of individuals with diabetes mellitus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koert N J Burger

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dietary fiber, carbohydrate quality and quantity are associated with mortality risk in the general population. Whether this is also the case among diabetes patients is unknown. OBJECTIVE: To assess the associations of dietary fiber, glycemic load, glycemic index, carbohydrate, sugar, and starch intake with mortality risk in individuals with diabetes. METHODS: This study was a prospective cohort study among 6,192 individuals with confirmed diabetes mellitus (mean age of 57.4 years, and median diabetes duration of 4.4 years at baseline from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC. Dietary intake was assessed at baseline (1992-2000 with validated dietary questionnaires. Cox proportional hazards analysis was performed to estimate hazard ratios (HRs for all-cause and cardiovascular mortality, while adjusting for CVD-related, diabetes-related, and nutritional factors. RESULTS: During a median follow-up of 9.2 y, 791 deaths were recorded, 306 due to CVD. Dietary fiber was inversely associated with all-cause mortality risk (adjusted HR per SD increase, 0.83 [95% CI, 0.75-0.91] and CVD mortality risk (0.76[0.64-0.89]. No significant associations were observed for glycemic load, glycemic index, carbohydrate, sugar, or starch. Glycemic load (1.42[1.07-1.88], carbohydrate (1.67[1.18-2.37] and sugar intake (1.53[1.12-2.09] were associated with an increased total mortality risk among normal weight individuals (BMI≤25 kg/m(2; 22% of study population but not among overweight individuals (P interaction≤0.04. These associations became stronger after exclusion of energy misreporters. CONCLUSIONS: High fiber intake was associated with a decreased mortality risk. High glycemic load, carbohydrate and sugar intake were associated with an increased mortality risk in normal weight individuals with diabetes.

  16. Cardiovascular risk assessment in prediabetes and undiagnosed diabetes mellitus study: International collaboration research overview

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    Ezekiel Uba Nwose

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The study aims to develop a screening protocol for the risk of future cardiovascular disease and diabetes mellitus in people with prediabetes and undiagnosed diabetes; and to establish a framework for early identification and intervention of prediabetes including strategies for holistic management and monitoring of progression. The first phase is to identify prediabetes and undiagnosed diabetes in volunteers who are ≥18-years-old for 5 years. Point-of-care testing and questionnaire will be used to screen for prediabetes and cardiovascular disease. We anticipate screening more than 2000 individuals of both genders by the end of first phase. The second and third phases which shall run for 5-10 years will be longitudinal study involving participants identified in the first phase as having prediabetes without dyslipidaemia, or clinically established cardiovascular disease. The second phase shall focus on preventive management of risk of progress to diabetes with explicit diagnosis of cardiovascular disease. Oxidative stress measurements will be performed cum evaluation of the use of antioxidants, exercise, and nutrition. The third phase will include probing the development of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Binomial logistic regression would be performed to generate and propose a model chart for the assessment of cardiovascular disease risk in prediabetes.

  17. Themenheft 24 "Diabetes mellitus"

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    Bei etwa 5 % der Bevölkerung in Deutschland ist ein Diabetes mellitus, die sog. Zuckerkrankheit, diagnostiziert worden, rund 90 % davon haben einen Typ 2-Diabetes, der vorwiegend im höheren Lebensalter auftritt. 5 % der Diabeteskranken leiden am insulinpflichtigen Typ 1-Diabetes, der sich vorwiegend im Kindes- und Jugendalter manifestiert. Weitere Diabetesformen sind eher selten. Außerdem gibt es viele Menschen mit einem unentdeckten Diabetes.

  18. Higher body mass index in adults at diagnosis of the slowly progressive form of type 1 diabetes mellitus is associated with lower risk HLA genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fourlanos, S; Elkassaby, S; Varney, M D; Colman, P G; Harrison, L C

    2014-06-01

    We hypothesised that higher body weight, a proposed risk factor for type 1 diabetes mellitus, would be associated with increased penetrance of lower risk genes. In adults at diagnosis of the slowly progressive form of type 1 diabetes mellitus we found that higher body mass index was associated with the absence of the highest risk HLA genes.

  19. FACTORES DE RIESGOS ALIMENTARIOS Y NUTRICIONALES EN ADULTOS CON DIABETES MELLITUS Food and nutritional risk factors in adults suffering from diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María del Pilar Barrera

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Antecedentes. La diabetes mellitus causa gran morbimortalidad, su aparición se asocia con estilos de vida. Objetivo. Determinar factores de riesgo relacionados con alimentación y estado nutricional, medir variables metabólicas y brindar educación alimentaria a pacientes con diabetes mellitus hospitalizados en medicina interna segundo nivel. Material y métodos. Estudio descriptivo, transversal, octubre 2009-junio 2011, 221 pacientes con diabetes mellitus, mayores de 18 años. Se aplicó encuesta, consejería alimentaria y nutricional, valoración de antropometría, dinamometría y evaluación de hábitos alimentarios, laboratorios HbA1c y perfil lipídico. Resultados. 44,1% hombres, 55,9% mujeres; edad promedio 63,6, DE, 13,3; 39.4% no había recibido consejería por nutricionista. Antropometría-dinamometría: 58,9% presentaba malnutrición por exceso (preobesidad y obesidad. Correlación significativa: IMC y cintura punto medio (r=0,750, p=0,000; IMC y grasa corporal (r=0,586, p=0.000; cintura punto medio y grasa corporal (r=0,334, p=0,000; CMB y fuerza muscular (r=0,246, p=0.000. Hábitos alimentarios: 42,3% prefería alimentos fritos; bajo consumo de proteína de origen animal (12,7%, lácteos (31,8%, frutas (64,7% y verduras (57,9%; alto consumo de almidones (43,4%; el 35,3% adicionaba azúcar, panela o miel; 18,8% utilizaba salero. A cada paciente se entregó y explicó una cartilla educativa. Conclusión. Predominio de preobesidad y obesidad, asociadas con hábitos alimentarios que pueden ocasionar complicaciones de diabetes mellitus.Background. Diabetes mellitus causes large-scale morbimortality; its appearance is associated with a particular individual's life-style. Objective. Determining the risk factors related to feeding habits and nutritional state, measuring metabolic variables and providing nutrition education for patients suffering diabetes mellitus who have been hospitalised in second level internal medicine facilities

  20. Risk of Metabolic Syndrome and Diabetes Mellitus Among Young Twins and Singletons in Guinea-Bissau

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard-Andersen, Morten; Hansen, Lone; da Silva, Leontina I

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVETwins in Africa may be at increased risk of metabolic disorders due to strained conditions in utero, including high exposure to infections. We studied metabolic syndrome (MS) and diabetes mellitus (DM) among young twins and singletons in Guinea-Bissau.RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODSThe study...... was cross-sectional and occurred from October 2009 until August 2011 at the Bandim Health Project, a demographic surveillance site in the capital Bissau. Twins and singleton controls between 5 and 32 years were visited at home. Fasting blood samples for metabolic measurements were collected. Zygosity...

  1. Longitudinal Study of Hypertensive Subjects With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Overall and Cardiovascular Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safar, Michel E; Gnakaméné, Jean-Barthélémy; Bahous, Sola Aoun; Yannoutsos, Alexandra; Thomas, Frédérique

    2017-06-01

    Despite adequate glycemic and blood pressure control, treated type 2 diabetic hypertensive subjects have a significantly elevated overall/cardiovascular risk. We studied 244 816 normotensive and 99 720 hypertensive subjects (including 7480 type 2 diabetics) attending medical checkups between 1992 and 2011. We sought to identify significant differences in overall/cardiovascular risk between hypertension with and without diabetes mellitus. Mean follow-up was 12.7 years; 14 050 all-cause deaths were reported. From normotensive to hypertensive populations, a significant progression in overall/cardiovascular mortality was observed. Mortality was significantly greater among diabetic than nondiabetic hypertensive subjects (all-cause mortality, 14.05% versus 7.43%; and cardiovascular mortality, 1.28% versus 0.7%). No interaction was observed between hemodynamic measurements and overall/cardiovascular risk, suggesting that blood pressure factors, even during drug therapy, could not explain the differences in mortality rates between diabetic and nondiabetic hypertensive patients. Using cross-sectional regression models, a significant association was observed between higher education levels, lower levels of anxiety and depression, and reduced overall mortality in diabetic hypertensive subjects, while impaired renal function, a history of stroke and myocardial infarction, and increased alcohol and tobacco consumption were significantly associated with increased mortality. Blood pressure and glycemic control alone cannot reverse overall/cardiovascular risk in diabetics with hypertension. Together with cardiovascular measures, overall prevention should include recommendations to reduce alcohol and tobacco consumption and improve stress, education levels, and physical activity. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  2. Diabetes mellitus and hypertension: a dual threat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oktay, Ahmet Afşin; Akturk, Halis Kaan; Jahangir, Eiman

    2016-07-01

    The following is a review of the current concepts on the relationship between hypertension (HTN) and diabetes mellitus with a focus on the epidemiology and cardiovascular prognostic implications of coexistent HTN and diabetes mellitus, shared mechanisms underlying both conditions and pathophysiology of increased risk of cardiovascular disease, treatment of HTN in individuals with diabetes mellitus, and effects of anti-diabetic medications on blood pressure (BP). Diabetes mellitus and HTN often coexist in the same individual. They share numerous risk factors and underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms, most important of which are insulin resistance and inappropriate activation of the rennin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. Recently updated guidelines recommend a BP goal of 140/90 mmHg in most individuals with diabetes mellitus. A new class of anti-diabetic medications, sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 inhibitors, has shown favorable effects on BP. HTN affects the majority of individuals with diabetes mellitus. Coexistence of diabetes mellitus and HTN, especially if BP is not well controlled, dramatically increases the risk of morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular disease. BP control is an essential part of management of patients with diabetes mellitus, because it is one of the most effective ways to prevent vascular complications and death.

  3. Screening for gestational diabetes mellitus by a model based on risk indicators: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Dorte M; Mølsted-Pedersen, Lars; Beck-Nielsen, Henning; Westergaard, Jes G; Ovesen, Per; Damm, Peter

    2003-11-01

    This study was performed to prospectively evaluate a screening model for gestational diabetes mellitus on the basis of clinical risk indicators. In a prospective multicenter study with 5235 consecutive pregnant women, diagnostic testing with a 2-hour 75-g oral glucose tolerance test was routinely performed in women with risk indicators and offered to women without risk indicators as part of the study. Forty-four percent of the women underwent testing, 43% declined participation, 6% did not speak Danish, and 7% could not be contacted. By extrapolation of the results from tested women to the whole group in question, a 2.4% prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus was calculated. Sensitivity and specificity of the model was 80.6 (73.7-87.6) and 64.8 (63.5-66.1), respectively (95% CIs). Under ideal conditions, sensitivity of the model was comparable with universal screening by fasting glucose or a 1-hour 50-g glucose challenge test. Both screening and diagnostic testing could be avoided in two thirds of all pregnant women.

  4. Risk of Cardiovascular Events in Patients With Diabetes Mellitus on β-Blockers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimoto, Tetsuro; Sugiyama, Takehiro; Shapiro, Martin F; Noda, Mitsuhiko; Kajio, Hiroshi

    2017-07-01

    Although the use of β-blockers may help in achieving maximum effects of intensive glycemic control because of a decrease in the adverse effects after severe hypoglycemia, they pose a potential risk for the occurrence of severe hypoglycemia. This study aimed to evaluate whether the use of β-blockers is effective in patients with diabetes mellitus and whether its use is associated with the occurrence of severe hypoglycemia. Using the ACCORD trial (Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes) data, we performed Cox proportional hazards analyses with a propensity score adjustment. The primary outcome was the first occurrence of a cardiovascular event during the study period, which included nonfatal myocardial infarction, unstable angina, nonfatal stroke, and cardiovascular death. The mean follow-up periods (±SD) were 4.6±1.6 years in patients on β-blockers (n=2527) and 4.7±1.6 years in those not on β-blockers (n=2527). The cardiovascular event rate was significantly higher in patients on β-blockers than in those not on β-blockers (hazard ratio, 1.46; 95% confidence interval, 1.24-1.72; Pdiabetes mellitus was associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular events. © 2017 The Authors.

  5. Prevalência de diabetes mellitus tipo 2 e outros fatores de risco associados em pacientes com glaucoma Prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus and other associated risk factors in glaucoma patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline Coblentz

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a prevalência de diabéticos em uma amostra de pacientes com glaucoma; verificar se existe associação entre diabetes mellitus e glaucoma na amostra estudada; verificar outros fatores de risco associados. MÉTODOS: Foram analisados de forma retrospectiva os prontuários de 50 pacientes com diagnóstico de glaucoma. Os dados registrados foram sexo, idade, raça, história familiar de glaucoma e história pessoal de diabetes mellitus tipo 2. RESULTADOS: Do total de pacientes avaliados, 5 (10% apresentavam diabetes mellitus tipo 2. Destes, 3 eram mulheres e 2 eram homens, com mediana de idade de 81 anos (71-88. A prevalência de diabetes nos pacientes com glaucoma não mostrou diferenças significativas (OR: 1,476; Intervalo de Confiança 95%: 0,4438 a 4,910; p= 0,5352 quando comparada à prevalência de diabetes mellitus tipo 2 na população geral brasileira (7,6%. CONCLUSÃO: Nesta amostra de pacientes com glaucoma, a prevalência de diabetes mellitus tipo 2 foi pouco mais elevada que a da população. Entretanto, nenhuma associação foi encontrada entre diabetes mellitus e glaucoma.PURPOSE: To evaluate prevalence of diabetes mellitus in a group of patients with glaucoma; to verify if there is association between diabetes mellitus and glaucoma; to verify other associated risk factors. METHODS: Fifty(50 glaucoma patients had their medical records analyzed in a retrospective way. Registered data included sex, age, ethnic group, family history of glaucoma and personal history of type 2 diabetes mellitus. RESULTS: Five (10% of all evaluated patients had type 2 diabetes mellitus. 3 of them were female and 2 were male, median age of 81 years old (71-88. Prevalence of diabetes in glaucoma patients did not show significant differences. (OR: 1.476; 95% Confidence Interval: 0.4438 to 4.910; p= 0.5352 when compared to the prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus in general brazilian population (7.6%. CONCLUSION: In this group of patients

  6. The risk of myocardial infarction in rheumatoid arthritis and diabetes mellitus: a Danish nationwide cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindhardsen, Jesper; Ahlehoff, Ole; Gislason, Gunnar Hilmar

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: /st> To examine in a nationwide cohort whether the risk of myocardial infarction (MI) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is comparable to the risk in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). METHODS: /st> The study included the entire Danish population followed from 1 January 1997...... until 31 December 2006. Through individual level-linkage of nationwide administrative registers, the authors identified subjects who developed RA and DM. The risk of MI was analysed using multivariable Poisson regression models including data on cardioprotective drugs, comorbidity and socioeconomic...... status. RESULTS: /st> From a total of 4 311 022 individuals included in the cohort, 10 477 and 130 215 individuals developed RA and DM respectively. The overall incidence rate ratio (IRR) of MI in RA was 1.7 (95% CI 1.5 to 1.9), which was similar to the risk in DM (1.7 (1...

  7. Thiazolidinediones and Cardiovascular Events In High-Risk Patients with Type-2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaya, Fadia T.; Lu, Zhiqiang; Sohn, Kyongsei; Weir, Matthew R.

    2009-01-01

    Context. The use of thiazolidinediones (TZDs) in patients with type-2 diabetes mellitus appears to be associated with an increased risk of myocardial infarction (MI) compared with placebo or other oral antidiabetic drug regimens. Objective. We conducted a study to investigate whether there was a difference in the risk of acute MI and hemorrhagic and non-hemorrhagic stroke between specific TZDs, namely rosiglitazone maleate (Avandia) and pioglitazone (Actos), and other oral antidiabetic agents in a high-risk, largely underrepresented and largely minority Medicaid population. Study Design, Setting, and Patients. We analyzed patient encounter data using propensity-scoring methods and logistic regression to compare the risk of cardiovascular (CV) events in patients with type-2 diabetes in a high-risk population. Main Outcome Measures. Outcomes were identified through International Classification of Disease (ICD-9) codes 410–411 for acute MI; 430–438 for stroke; and revenue (emergency department) codes 450–459 in the case of MI. Results. Using retrospective medical encounter and prescription data analyses, we found that rosiglitazone, compared with other oral antidiabetic agents, was associated with an increased rate of CV events by 20% in a high-risk cohort of diabetic patients. Neither pioglitazone nor the TZD drug class as a whole was associated with an increased CV risk. Conclusion. Rosiglitazone was associated with a significant increase in CV events (MI and stroke) among high-risk patients with type-2 diabetes, whereas pioglitazone was not. We recommend further research to capture risk factors that were not observed in our encounter data. PMID:20140111

  8. Heart rate variability and increased risk for developing type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penčić-Popović Biljana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. To our knowledge there are no data about the relationship between elevated risk for developing type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2 and altered cardiac autonomic function. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between heart rate variability (HRV and slightly increased risk for DM2. Methods. We evaluated 69 subjects (50.0 ± 14.4 years; 30 male without DM2, coronary artery disease and arrhythmias. The subjects were divided into two groups according to the Finnish Diabetes Risk Score (FINDRISC: group I (n = 39 included subjects with 12 > FINDRISC ≥ 7; group II (n = 30 subjects with FINDRISC < 7. HRV was derived from 24-h electrocardiogram. We used time domain variables and frequency domain analysis performed over the entire 24-h period, during the day (06-22 h and overnight (22-06 h. Results. Standard deviation of the average normal RR intervals was significantly lower in the group with increased risk for DM2 compared to the group II (127.1 ± 26.6 ms vs 149.6 ± 57.6 ms; p = 0.035. Other time domain measures were similar in both groups. The group I demonstrated significantly reduced frequency domain measures, total power - TP (7.2 ± 0.3 ln/ms2 vs 7.3 ± 0.3 ln/ms2; p = 0.029, and low frequency - LF (5.9 ± 0.4 ln/ms2 vs 6.3 ± 0.6 ln/ms2; p = 0.006, over entire 24 h, as well as TP (7.1 ± 0.3 ln/ms2 vs 7.3 ± 0.3 ln/ms2; p = 0.004, very low frequency (6.2 ± 0.2 ln/ms2 vs 6.3 ± 0.2 ln/ms2; p = 0.030, LF (5.9 ± 0.4 ln/ms2 vs 6.2 ± 0.3 ln/ms2; p = 0.000 and high frequency (5.7 ± 0.4 ln/ms2 vs 5.9 ± 0.4 ln/ms2; p = 0.011 during the daytime compared to the group II. Nocturnal frequency domain analysis was similar between the groups. The low diurnal frequency was independently related to elevated risk for diabetes mellitus (beta = -0,331; p = 0.006. Conclusion. The obtained results suggest that even slightly elevated risk for developing diabetes mellitus may be related to impaired HRV.

  9. Risk factors for mucocutaneous fungal infections in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Düriye Deniz Demirseren

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and design: Mucocutaneous fungal infections are common in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM. However, fungal infections do not develop in every patient with DM. In this study, we aimed to determine the risk factors for developing mucocutaneous fungal infections in patients with type 2 DM. Materials and methods: A total of 302 type 2 DM patients with mucocutaneous fungal infections and 326 type 2 DM patients without mucocutaneous fungal infections were enrolled. Demographic and clinical features, HbA1c levels, DM durations, body mass indexes (BMIs, and DM related complications of patients were compared and risk factors for developing mucocutaneous fungal infections were determined. Results: Of the 302 patients with mucocutaneous fungal infections, 81.2% (n=245 had dermatophytosis, 16.9% (n=51 had candidal infections, 2.0% (n=6 had pityriasis versicolor. Frequency of male gender, diabetic nephropathy, neuropathy and retinopathy; DM durations and ages of patients were all significantly higher in diabetic patients with fungal infections than patients without fungal infections (all p<0.05. Male gender, age ≥ 50 years, nephropathy and neuropathy were independently associated with developing fungal infection in type 2 DM patients. In subgroup analyses, independent risk factors for dermatophytosis were male gender, age ≥ 50 years, DM duration ≥5 years, and nephropathy. For candidiasis, these factors were BMI≥30 and neuropathy. Conclusion: Elderly, male gender, diabetic neuropathy annd nephropathy are closely associated with developing mucocutaneous infections in patients with type 2 DM.

  10. Diabetes mellitus increases the risk of intrahepatic recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma after surgical resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yunseon; Choi, YoungKil; Choi, Chang Soo; Lee, Yun-Han

    2017-05-12

    The relationship between cancer and metabolism has recently been receiving attention. We investigated the prognostic influence of type 2 diabetes mellitus in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) treated with curative resection. The records of 58 patients who underwent curative resection for HCC pT1-2N0M0 between 2010 and 2014 were reviewed retrospectively. Fourteen patients (24.1%) had diabetes mellitus at diagnosis. Local control (LC) was defined as time to recurrence in the liver. The median follow-up was 23.3 months. Relapses occurred in 20 patients (34.5%) during the follow-up period; 17 of them developed intrahepatic recurrence, which was associated with diabetes mellitus (p = 0.013) and alpha fetoprotein (AFP) levels >500 ng/mL (p = 0.019). Overall relapses (n = 20) were related to T stage (p = 0.044), AFP level (p = 0.005), and diabetes (p = 0.044). The 3-year local control (intrahepatic control), disease-free survival, and overall survival rates were 56.7%, 50.5%, and 84.3%, respectively. LC was affected by diabetes mellitus (p = 0.046), Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer staging (pDiabetes was also associated with reduced LC in the subgroup with hepatitis B-related HCC (n = 44, p = 0.028). Diabetes mellitus is correlated with intrahepatic HCC recurrence after surgery. Greater attention should be paid to managing patients with HCC and diabetes mellitus.

  11. Congenital Heart Disease With and Without Cyanotic Potential and the Long-term Risk of Diabetes Mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Nicolas L; Marino, Bradley S; Woo, Jessica G

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Long-term survival for persons born with congenital heart disease (CHD) is improved, but limited knowledge exists of this growing population's acquired cardiovascular risk profile. This study's purpose was to assess CHD survivors' risk for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) with attention...

  12. Gestational diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landon, Mark B; Gabbe, Steven G

    2011-12-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) represents a heterogeneous group of metabolic disorders, which result in varying degrees of maternal hyperglycemia and pregnancy-associated risk. The frequency of GDM is rising globally and may also increase further as less-stringent criteria for the diagnosis are potentially adopted. The additional burden placed on the health care system by increasing cases of GDM requires consideration of diagnostic approaches and currently used treatment strategies. Debate continues to surround both the diagnosis and treatment of GDM despite several recent large-scale studies addressing these controversial issues. As many now have come to reassess their approach to the management of GDM, we provide information in this review to help guide this process. The goal for each health care practitioner should continue to be to provide optimum care for women discovered to have carbohydrate intolerance during pregnancy.

  13. The effect of oilseed consumption on appetite and on the risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Daniela Neves Ribeiro; Rita de Cassia Gonçalves Alfenas; Josefina Bressan; Neuza Maria Brunoro Costa

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM) has rapidly increased worldwide. Excess body fat is an important risk factor for the disease. Strategies have been indicated for the prevention and treatment of DM. Recent studies have associated the consumption of oilseeds resulting in a lower risk of developing obesity and diabetes. It is believed that this effect is associated with low glycemic index and the high fiber content, the unsaturated fatty acids and the magnesium oilseeds. However, the mec...

  14. Risk factors for Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in college students: association with sociodemographic variables1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Adman Câmara Soares; Araújo, Márcio Flávio Moura; de Freitas, Roberto Wagner Júnior Freire; Zanetti, Maria Lúcia; de Almeida, Paulo César; Damasceno, Marta Maria Coelho

    2014-01-01

    Objective identify the modifiable risk factors for type 2 diabetes mellitus in college students and associate these factors with their sociodemographic variables. Method cross-sectional study, involving 702 college students from Fortaleza-CE, Brazil. Sociodemographic, anthropometric, physical exercise data and blood pressure and fasting plasma glucose levels were collected. Results the most prevalent risk factor was sedentariness, followed by overweight, central obesity, high fasting plasma glucose and arterial hypertension. A statistically significant association was found between overweight and sex (p=0.000), age (p=0.004) and marital status (p=0.012), as well as between central obesity and age (p=0.018) and marital status (p=0.007) and between high fasting plasma glucose and sex (p=0.033). Conclusion distinct risk factors were present in the study population, particularly sedentariness and overweight. PMID:25029061

  15. Risk factors for Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in college students: association with sociodemographic variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adman Câmara Soares Lima

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: identify the modifiable risk factors for type 2 diabetes mellitus in college students and associate these factors with their sociodemographic variables.METHOD: cross-sectional study, involving 702 college students from Fortaleza-CE, Brazil. Sociodemographic, anthropometric, physical exercise data and blood pressure and fasting plasma glucose levels were collected.RESULTS: the most prevalent risk factor was sedentariness, followed by overweight, central obesity, high fasting plasma glucose and arterial hypertension. A statistically significant association was found between overweight and sex (p=0.000, age (p=0.004 and marital status (p=0.012, as well as between central obesity and age (p=0.018 and marital status (p=0.007 and between high fasting plasma glucose and sex (p=0.033.CONCLUSION: distinct risk factors were present in the study population, particularly sedentariness and overweight.

  16. Risk of pneumonia and pneumococcal disease in people hospitalized with diabetes mellitus: English record-linkage studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seminog, O O; Goldacre, M J

    2013-12-01

    The risk of invasive pneumococcal disease is higher in people with diabetes mellitus than those without. People with diabetes should be considered for routine pneumococcal immunization. This policy has been in place in England for more than a decade. We aimed to estimate, at the population level, the current scale of excess risk of pneumococcal disease in patients with diabetes, and whether the risks have decreased in recent years with the introduction of a pneumococcal vaccine. We used two data sets of linked hospital admission and death records-the Oxford Record Linkage Study (1963-1998) and all-England linked hospital episode statistics (1999-2011). As a measure of relative risk, we calculated the rate ratio of pneumococcal disease in cohorts of people hospitalized with diabetes compared with cohorts without a record of diabetes. The risk of pneumococcal disease in patients hospitalized with diabetes mellitus has declined a little, but it is still high. The all-ages rate ratio in England declined from 1.92 (95% CI 1.89-1.94) in 1999-2002 to 1.68 (95% CI 1.65-1.71) in 2007-2011. In people aged under 60 years, rate ratios were higher and their decline was more substantial: rate ratios declined from 3.37 (95% CI 3.28-3.46) in 1999-2002 to 2.33 (95% CI 2.21-2.45) in 2007-2011. Patients admitted to hospital with diabetes mellitus remain at increased risk of pneumococcal infection despite a national immunization policy. Possible explanations for the elevated risk include low vaccine uptake or low effectiveness of available vaccine. Clinicians should be aware of the risk of pneumococcal infection in people with diabetes. © 2013 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2013 Diabetes UK.

  17. Preventing type 2 diabetes mellitus: room for residual risk reduction after lifestyle changes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athyros, Vasilios G; Tziomalos, Konstantinos; Karagiannis, Asterios; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P

    2010-01-01

    It is well known that type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases (CVD). A predicted worldwide increase in the incidence of T2DM, taking the form of an epidemic, is expected to induce a substantial increase in CVD incidence. Impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and impaired fasting glucose (IFG) are related to an increased risk of developing T2DM, especially in obese people. Prevention of T2DM aiming to reversal of pre-diabetes to normal glucose tolerance seems to be a very attractive target, and favourably affects CVD risk factors. The Diabetes Prevention Program and the Finnish Diabetes Prevention studies showed that changes in lifestyle prevented or delayed the onset of new cases of T2DM in subjects with pre-diabetes by 58%. However, a fraction of participants still developed T2DM, suggesting a residual risk. Moreover, lifestyle changes are not usually followed on a long-term basis as shown in EUROASPIRE with an increase in new onset T2DM by 60% in subjects with CVD in just over a decade. T2DM is characterized by insulin resistance and/or β-cell dysfunction (impaired insulin secretion). Various interventions targeting those two mechanisms (e.g. metformin, thiazolidinediones, acarbose, orlistate, bariatric surgery, renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system axis inhibitors, fibrates, incretin mimetics or enhancers) can prevent or delay T2DM. Widespread application of these measures has, however, been limited by financial considerations, even though cost-effectiveness might be achieved at the population level. This review will investigate feasibility and usefulness of T2DM prevention, further to that achieved with lifestyle changes, in a cost-effective manner.

  18. Prevalence and risk factors of periodontitis among adults with or without diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Mihee; Kim, Hee Yeon; Seok, Hannah; Yeo, Chang Dong; Kim, Young Soo; Song, Jae Yen; Lee, Young Bok; Lee, Dong-Hee; Lee, Jae-Im; Lee, Tae-Kyu; Ahn, Hyo-Suk; Ko, Yoon Ho; Jeong, Seong Cheol; Chae, Hiun Suk; Sohn, Tae Seo

    2016-09-01

    This study examined prevalence and risk factors of periodontitis in representative samples of Korean adults, with and without diabetes mellitus (DM). Data from the 2012 Korean National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey were analyzed. A total of 4,477 adults (≥ 30 years old) were selected from 8,057 individuals who completed a nutrition survey, a self-reported general health behavior questionnaire, an oral examination, an oral hygiene behaviors survey, and laboratory tests. DM was defined as a fasting plasma glucose ≥ 126 mg/dL, or self-reported diagnosed diabetes, or current use of oral hypoglycemic agents and/or insulin. The community periodontal index was used to assess periodontitis status and comparisons between the periodontitis and the non-periodontitis group, were performed, according to the presence of DM. Risk factors for periodontitis in adults with DM and without DM were evaluated by multiple logistic regression analysis. The prevalence of periodontitis was significantly higher in adults with DM (43.7%) than in those without DM (25%, p periodontitis were older age, male, urban habitation, waist circumference, smoking, oral pain, and less frequent tooth brushing. Significant risk factors for periodontitis in adults with DM were the smoking, oral pain, and not-using an oral hygiene product. Adults with DM have an increased risk of periodontitis than those without DM. Current smoking and oral pain increase this risk. Using an oral hygiene product can reduce risk of periodontal disease in adults with DM.

  19. Weight loss before a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes mellitus is a risk factor for diabetes complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shanshan; Wang, Shuang; Yang, Bo; Zheng, Jinliang; Cai, Yuping; Yang, Zhengguo

    2016-12-01

    Our goal was to investigate the relationship between weight loss before a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and diabetic complications among hospitalized patients with T2DM.We conducted a cross-sectional study and evaluated 347 and 642 hospitalized patients with T2DM who experienced and did not experienced weight loss before T2DM diagnosis, respectively. We used propensity score matching to reduce the confounding bias between the groups. In addition, a logistic regression analysis of the matched data was performed to evaluate the risk of diabetic complications.A total of 339 patients who experienced weight loss were matched to 339 patients who did not experience weight loss. After adjusting for age, gender, origin, occupation, smoking history, alcohol use, and duration of diabetes, the logistic regression analysis showed that compared with patients who did not experience weight loss, patients who lost ≤5 kg had a higher risk of diabetic nephropathy (DN) (odds ratio [OR]: 2.05, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.35-3.10) and diabetic retinopathy (OR: 1.79, 95% CI: 1.11-2.87). However, we did not observe a dose-response relationship in terms of weight loss.We found that weight loss before a diagnosis of T2DM might serve as a risk factor for DN and diabetic retinopathy. Our findings demonstrate that we should strengthen the management and prevention of complications in patients who experience weight loss of ≤5 kg prior to a T2DM diagnosis, particularly those who are centrally obese.

  20. Age and family relationship accentuate the risk of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) in relatives of patients with IDDM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantor, A.B.; Krischer, J.P.; Cuthbertson, D.D. [Univ. of South Florida, Tampa, FL (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-01

    The international community of diabetologists is rapidly becomine involved in intervention trials aimed at preventing insulin-dependent diabetes in high risk relatives. Whereas age and relationship to a proband with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus interacting with detected islet cell autoantibodies (ICA) are risk factors, their independent contribution to that risk remains unclear. In a prospective study of 6851 nondiabetic relatives of 2742 probands conducted between 1979-1993, we found age, but not relationship, to be a dramatic risk variable in ICA-positive persons as estimated by the Cox regression model. The 5-yr risk of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus was 66% for those found to have ICA detectable before age 10 yr, falling progressively to less than 16% for ICA-positive relatives over age 40 yr. In ICA-negative relatives, age and relationship are independent prognostic variables. 15 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. A microalbuminuria threshold to predict the risk for the development of diabetic retinopathy in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haibing Chen

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To test the hypothesis that a microalbuminuria (MA threshold can help predict the risk for the development of diabetic retinopathy (DR in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM_ patients. DESIGN: We conducted a cross-sectional study of 4739 subjects with T2DM and a prospective study of 297 subjects with T2DM in China respectively. METHODS: Clinical and laboratory data were collected and biologic risk factors associated with any DR were analysed. RESULTS: In the cross-sectional study, we found that MA was an independent risk factor for DR development; further, when the patients were divided into MA deciles, odds ratio (ORs of DR for the patients in the sixth MA decile (10.7 mg/24 h was 1.579-fold (1.161-2.147 compared to that for patients in the first MA decile. Furthermore, the OR of DR increased with a gradual increase in MA levels. Similarly, in the prospective study, during a mean follow-up of 4.5 years, we found that 51 patients (29.0% of the 176 subjects with high MA level (10.7-30 mg/24 h developed DR, while 17 patients (14.1% of the 121 subjects with lower MA (<10.7 mg/24 h developed DR, and the relative risk ratio of the development of DR is 2.13(95% CI, 1.58-3.62, P<0.001. CONCLUSION: These data suggest that an MA threshold can predict the risk for the development of DR in type 2 diabetes mellitus, although it is still within the traditionally established normal range.

  2. A Microalbuminuria Threshold to Predict the Risk for the Development of Diabetic Retinopathy in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yan; Guo, Kaifeng; Lu, Junxi; Zhang, Lei; Yu, Haoyong; Bao, Yuqian; Jia, Weiping

    2012-01-01

    Objective To test the hypothesis that a microalbuminuria (MA) threshold can help predict the risk for the development of diabetic retinopathy (DR) in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM)_ patients. Design We conducted a cross-sectional study of 4739 subjects with T2DM and a prospective study of 297 subjects with T2DM in China respectively. Methods Clinical and laboratory data were collected and biologic risk factors associated with any DR were analysed. Results In the cross-sectional study, we found that MA was an independent risk factor for DR development; further, when the patients were divided into MA deciles, odds ratio (ORs) of DR for the patients in the sixth MA decile (10.7 mg/24 h) was 1.579-fold (1.161–2.147) compared to that for patients in the first MA decile. Furthermore, the OR of DR increased with a gradual increase in MA levels. Similarly, in the prospective study, during a mean follow-up of 4.5 years, we found that 51 patients (29.0%) of the 176 subjects with high MA level (10.7–30 mg/24 h) developed DR, while 17 patients (14.1%) of the 121 subjects with lower MA (<10.7 mg/24 h) developed DR, and the relative risk ratio of the development of DR is 2.13(95% CI, 1.58–3.62, P<0.001). Conclusion These data suggest that an MA threshold can predict the risk for the development of DR in type 2 diabetes mellitus, although it is still within the traditionally established normal range. PMID:22590593

  3. New-onset diabetes mellitus after heart transplantation in children - Incidence and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehgal, Swati; Bock, Matthew J; Louks Palac, Hannah; Brickman, Wendy J; Gossett, Jeffrey G; Marino, Bradley S; Backer, Carl L; Pahl, Elfriede

    2016-11-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a recognized complication of SOT in adults and is associated with decreased graft and patient survival. Little is known about NOD in pediatric HT recipients. We aimed to characterize the incidence and describe risk factors for development of NOD after HT in children. Children who developed diabetes after HT were identified from the OPTN database. Demographic and clinical data before and after transplant were compared between patients with and without NOD. A total of 2056 children were included, 56% were male, 54% were Caucasian, and 62% had cardiomyopathy prior to HT. NOD developed in 219 children (11%) after HT. The incidence of NOD was 2.4, 9.0, and 10.4% at one, five, and 10 yr after HT, respectively. Obesity (HR: 4.32), dialysis prior to transplant (HR: 2.38), African American race (HR: 1.86), transplant before year 2000 (HR: 1.82), female gender (HR: 1.68), and older age at transplant (HR: 1.28) were independent predictors of NOD. The major modifiable risk factor for NOD is obesity, imparting the maximum hazard. Improved surveillance for diabetes in high-risk patients and specific prevention and intervention strategies are imperative in this population. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Dyslipidemias in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients in Nnewi South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dyslipidemias in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients in Nnewi South-East Nigeria. ... of micro and macrovascular complications in diabetes mellitus patients. ... can be instituted to reduce the risk of macro and microvascular complications.

  5. [Gestational Diabetes Mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krejčí, Hana

    2016-01-01

    is taken over by specialist centres. The early and appropriate treatment of gestational diabetes demonstrably reduces the risk of complications. The base for therapy is formed by regimen-related measures: the therapeutic diet and increased physical activity. The best results of the dietary therapy are achieved with foods low on glycemic index and glycemic load that can also act as efficient prevention of GDM and subsequent development of T2DM. A small number of cases require adding of pharmacological therapy: insulin and newly also metformin. Metformin is the drug of choice primarily in obese patients, however in almost half of the cases insulin must be added. Medication, in particular with insulin, must be introduced carefully, following re-education and elimination of dietary mistakes. The aim of the treatment is not only to achieve normoglycemia, but also to improve, or at least to not further worsen insulin resistance. Insulin resistance alone without diabetes, e.g. due to obesity or a great weight gain, may lead to macrosomia and epigenetic changes. In this regard, the prevention within the whole population of pregnant women needs to be improved and the vicious circle of the causation of metabolic disorders among the population needs to be broken.Key words: recommended procedure - epigenetic changes - gestation diabetes mellitus - macrosomia - screening.

  6. Melatonin receptor 1 B polymorphisms associated with the risk of gestational diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Jae-Hyug

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Backgrounds Two SNPs in melatonin receptor 1B gene, rs10830963 and rs1387153 showed significant associations with fasting plasma glucose levels and the risk of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM in previous studies. Since T2DM and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM share similar characteristics, we suspected that the two genetic polymorphisms in MTNR1B may be associated with GDM, and conducted association studies between the polymorphisms and the disease. Furthermore, we also examined genetic effects of the two polymorphisms with various diabetes-related phenotypes. Methods A total of 1,918 subjects (928 GDM patients and 990 controls were used for the study. Two MTNR1B polymorphisms were genotyped using TaqMan assay. The allele distributions of SNPs were evaluated by x2 models calculating odds ratios (ORs, 95% confidence intervals (CIs, and corresponding P values. Multiple regressions were used for association analyses of GDM-related traits. Finally, conditional analyses were also performed. Results We found significant associations between the two genetic variants and GDM, rs10830963, with a corrected P value of 0.0001, and rs1387153, with the corrected P value of 0.0008. In addition, we also found that the two SNPs were associated with various phenotypes such as homeostasis model assessment of beta-cell function and fasting glucose levels. Further conditional analyses results suggested that rs10830963 might be more likely functional in case/control analysis, although not clear in GDM-related phenotype analyses. Conclusion There have been studies that found associations between genetic variants of other genes and GDM, this is the first study that found significant associations between SNPs of MTNR1B and GDM. The genetic effects of two SNPs identified in this study would be helpful in understanding the insight of GDM and other diabetes-related disorders.

  7. Time trends and risk factors for diabetes mellitus in cats presented to veterinary teaching hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prahl, Annalisa; Guptill, Lynn; Glickman, Nita W; Tetrick, Mark; Glickman, Larry T

    2007-10-01

    Veterinary Medical Data Base records of cats with diabetes mellitus (DM) from 1970 through 1999 were reviewed to identify trends in hospital prevalence of DM and potential host risk factors. Hospital prevalence increased from eight cases per 10,000 in 1970 to 124 per 10,000 in 1999 (P < 0.001). Case fatality percent at first visit decreased from 40% to 10% (P < 0.001). Hospital prevalence increased in all age groups (P < 0.002). There was no apparent seasonal pattern in hospital prevalence. Significant risk factors included male gender, increasing age for both genders (P < 0.001), increasing weight for males (P < 0.001), and mixed vs pure breed for females (P = 0.006).

  8. Prepregnancy low-carbohydrate dietary pattern and risk of gestational diabetes mellitus: a prospective cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bao, Wei; Bowers, Katherine; Tobias, Deirdre K

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Low-carbohydrate diets (LCDs) have been vastly popular for weight loss. The association between a low-carbohydrate dietary pattern and risk of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) remains unknown. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to prospectively examine the association of 3 prepregnancy low......-carbohydrate dietary patterns with risk of GDM. DESIGN: We included 21,411 singleton pregnancies in the Nurses' Health Study II. Prepregnancy LCD scores were calculated from validated food-frequency questionnaires, including an overall LCD score on the basis of intakes of carbohydrate, total protein, and total fat......, and it indicated closer adherence to a low-carbohydrate dietary pattern. RRs and 95% CIs were estimated by using generalized estimating equations with log-binomial models. RESULTS: We documented 867 incident GDM pregnancies during 10 y follow-up. Multivariable-adjusted RRs (95% CIs) of GDM for comparisons...

  9. Higher prevalence of risk factors for type 2 diabetes mellitus and subsequent higher incidence in men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almdal, T.; Scharling, H.; Jensen, J.S.;

    2008-01-01

    Background: This study investigates risk factors and the incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (type 2 DM) in both sexes of a northern European population. Methods: A total of 14,223 randomly selected men and women were studied from 1976 to 1978. Patients with diabetes (self-reported type 2 DM......, non-fasting blood glucose and triglycerides. Significantly more men (242, 5.4%) than women (152, 2.5%) developed type 2 DM. The odds ratio (OR) for developing diabetes with a BMI above 30 kg/m(2) compared to a BMI of 20-25 kg/m(2) was 8.1 in women and 6.3 in men; for a non-fasting plasma glucose of 8.......4-11.0 mmol/l compared to a plasma glucose of 5.5-6.4, the ORs were 7.8 in women and 4.7 in men. The OR for developing diabetes in persons with a non-fasting triglyceride level above 2.0 mmol/l compared to 1.0-2.0 mmol/l was 1.8 in both sexes; women with non -fasting triglycerides below 1.0 mmol/l had...

  10. Screening for type 2 diabetes mellitus in patients with mental illness: application of a self-assessment score for diabetes mellitus risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jinah K; Shortridge-Baggett, Lillie M; Sachmechi, Issac; Barron, Charles; Chiu, Ya-Lin; Bajracharya, Bhavana; Bang, Heejung

    2014-12-30

    Various methods for diabetes risk assessment have been developed over a decade, but they were not evaluated in patients with mental illness. This study examined the feasibility and utility of a self-assessment score for type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) risk among patients with mental illness. DM2 risk was assessed by patients with mental illness as well as clinicians via a self-assessment questionnaire, and the resulting scores were compared to each other as well as with actual diagnosis. Of 100 patients, nine patients were newly revealed to have DM2 and 34 patients have pre-DM2. Patients tended to underreport risk factors - obesity and physical activity - so perceived to have lower risk. Sensitivity of the self-assessment score was different when used by patients and by clinicians despite correlation coefficient of 0.82. Based on positive predictive values, we may expect one out of two patients who have high scores actually have DM2 or pre-DM2. Also, the discrimination capability was reasonably high (AUC=0.79), comparable to its performance observed in general populations. The self-assessment score has potential as a simple and adjunct tool to identify a high risk group of DM2/pre-DM2 among persons with mental illness, especially, when used together with health care providers.

  11. Early pregnancy maternal vitamin D concentrations and risk of gestational diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Dodie L; Enquobahrie, Daniel A; Qiu, Chungfang; Huang, Jonathan; Grote, Nancy; VanderStoep, Ann; Williams, Michelle A

    2015-05-01

    While associations of vitamin D deficiency with type 2 diabetes have been well demonstrated, investigations of vitamin D and risk of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) reported inconsistent findings. We examined associations of vitamin D status with GDM. In a nested case-cohort study (135 GDM cases and 517 non-GDM controls), we measured maternal serum vitamin D status (total 25[OH]D and 25[OH]D3 ) in early pregnancy (16 weeks on average) using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectroscopy. GDM was diagnosed according to the American Diabetes Association guidelines. We calculated adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) using logistic regression models. GDM cases had lower mean total 25[OH]D (27.3 vs. 29.3 ng/mL) and 25[OH]D3 (23.9 vs. 26.7 ng/mL) concentrations compared with women who did not develop GDM (both P-values pregnancy vitamin D status, particularly 25[OH]D3 , is inversely associated with GDM risk. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Risk factors for coronary heart disease and actual diagnostic criteria for diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitrović-Perišić Nataša

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Recent studies indicate that the prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM type 2 is increasing in the world. Chronic hyperglycemia in DM is associated with a long term damage, dysfunction and failure of various organs, especially retina, kidney, nerves and, in addition, with an increased risk of cardiovasclar disease. For a long time the illness has been unknown. Early diagnosis of diabetes could suspend the development of diabetic complications. The aim of the study was to establish risk for the development of coronary disease in the patients evaluated by the use of new diagnostic criteria for DM. Methods. The study included 930 participants without diagnosis of DM, hypertension, dyslipidemia, nor coronary heart disease two years before the study. The patients went through measuring of fasting plasma glycemia, erythrocytes, hematocrit, cholesterol, triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase. In the group with hyperglycemia the 2-hour oral glucose tolerance test was performed. We analyzed ECG and made blood pressure monitoring, and also measured body mass, height, waist and hip circumference. We analyzed life style, especially smoking, and exercise and family history. Results. Diabetes prevalence was 2.68%, and prevalences of impaired fasting glucose, impaired glucose tolerance and DM were 12.15%. Average age of males and females was 38 and 45 years, respectively. In the healthy population there was higher frequency of smokers (55% vs 42%, but in the population with hyperglycemia there were more obesity (23% vs 10.5%, hypertension (39% vs 9%, hypercholesterolemia (76% vs 44.1%, lower HDL-C (52.2% vs 25.7%. Cummulative risk factor in healthy subjects, and those with hyperglycemia were 5.6% and 14%, respectively. Conclusion. Subjects with hyperglicemia without diagnosis of DM have higher risk factors for coronary heart disease.

  13. Carotid artery intima media thickness in relation with atherosclerotic risk factors in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayathri, R; Chandni, R; Udayabhaskaran, V

    2012-09-01

    The present study was carried out to study the correlation between carotid artery intima media thickness (CIMT) with risk factors for atherosclerosis and atherosclerotic events in Type 2 Diabetes mellitus patients. The predictive value of CIMT as an indicator of early atherosclerosis was determined and the various atherosclerotic risk factors in type 2 diabetes mellitus were studied. Our study showed that CIMT was significantly higher in those type 2 diabetic patients who had atherosclerotic events than in those patients who had no atherosclerotic events. It was also found that waist hip ratio showed a significant positive correlation and independent association with CIMT emphasizing the emerging concept of central obesity. Duration of diabetes, urinary albumin excretion rate, hypertension and glycated hemoglobin had positive correlation with CIMT, but could not assume statistical significance. Age, smoking and dyslipidemia did not show any association with CIMT.

  14. AN EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDY OF TYPE 2 DIABETES MELLITUS AND ITS RISK FACTORS IN RURAL AREA OF KATIHAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Om Narayan Yadav

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a chronic, debilitating disease characterised by insulin resistance, impaired insulin secretion and hyperglycaemia. It is the most prevalent metabolic condition and one amongst major health and socioeconomic problems worldwide. It represents more than 90% of total prevalence of diabetes in the world and is responsible for 9% of the global mortality corresponding to four million deaths per year. The aim of the study is to- 1. Determine the prevalence of diabetes mellitus type 2 in a rural population of age 30 years and above. 2. Study the association of various risk factors with diabetes mellitus type 2. MATERIALS AND METHODS A community-based cross-sectional study was carried out in population 30 years and above at Hazipur village in the district of Katihar in Bihar. During the study period of 1 st January to 31 st December 2015, in which 910 persons aged 30 years or more living in this village were included in study. RESULTS Total sample size in this study was 910 and out of this, 37 (4.06% were found to have type 2 diabetes mellitus. The prevalence of type 2 diabetes was 45.94% among sedentary and only 13.52% among heavy worker subjects. According to literacy of subjects, the prevalence among illiterate, primary, middle, secondary, higher secondary and above was 24.33%, 32.43%, 16.22%, 13.51% and 13.51%, respectively. Among vegetarians and non-vegetarians, the prevalence was 18.91% and 81.09%, respectively. Among subjects with type 2 DM, 54.06% were overweight and 72.97% were hypertensive. Smoking habit was found among 54.05% subjects. CONCLUSION This study shows that the prevalence of diabetes is high in the subjects having sedentary lifestyle, poor literacy status, overweight, non-vegetarians, hypertension and smoking habit. Control of type 2 diabetes mellitus mandates lifestyle modification and control of risk factors.

  15. Diabetes mellitus, fasting blood glucose concentration, and risk of vascular disease : a collaborative meta-analysis of 102 prospective studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sarwar, N.; Gao, P.; Seshasai, S. R. Kondapally; Gobin, R.; Kaptoge, S.; Di Angelantonio, E.; Ingelsson, E.; Lawlor, D. A.; Selvin, E.; Stampfer, M.; Stehouwer, C. D. A.; Lewington, S.; Pennells, L.; Thompson, A.; Sattar, N.; White, I. R.; Ray, K. K.; Danesh, J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Uncertainties persist about the magnitude of associations of diabetes mellitus and fasting glucose concentration with risk of coronary heart disease and major stroke subtypes. We aimed to quantify these associations for a wide range of circumstances. Methods We undertook a meta-analysis o

  16. Severity of diabetes mellitus and risk of total hip or knee replacement: A population based case-control study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nielen, Johannes T H; Van Den Bemt, B.; Lalmohamed, Arief; De Boer, A.; Boonen, A.; Dagnelie, P.C.; Emans, P.; De Vries, F.

    2015-01-01

    Background: It is generally thought that people with diabetes mellitus (DM) are more likely to suffer from OA due to an increased Body Mass Index (BMI), resulting in the mechanical destruction of cartilage. However, previous studies have shown that DM could also be an independent risk factor for OA,

  17. Use of fluorquinolones is associated with a reduced risk of coronary heart disease in diabetes mellitus type 2 patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erkens, JA; Klungel, OH; Herings, RMC; Stolk, RP; Spoelstra, JA; Grobbee, DE; Leufkens, HGM

    2002-01-01

    Aims The aim of the present study was to investigate whether use of specific antibiotic drugs decreases the risk of coronary heart disease in diabetes mellitus type 2 patients. Methods and Results Data were obtained from the PHARMO Record Linkage System comprising pharmacy records and

  18. Estimating the risk of gestational diabetes mellitus : a clinical prediction model based on patient characteristics and medical history

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, M.; Opmeer, B. C.; Zweers, E. J. K.; van Ballegooie, E.; ter Brugge, H. G.; de Valk, H. W.; Visser, G. H. A.; Mol, B. W. J.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To develop a clinical prediction rule that can help the clinician to identify women at high and low risk for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) early in pregnancy in order to improve the efficiency of GDM screening. Design We used data from a prospective cohort study to develop the clinic

  19. External validation of prognostic models to predict risk of gestational diabetes mellitus in one Dutch cohort : prospective multicentre cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamain-de Ruiter, Marije; Kwee, Anneke; Naaktgeboren, Christiana A; de Groot, Inge; Evers, Inge M; Groenendaal, Floris; Hering, Yolanda R; Huisjes, Anjoke J M; Kirpestein, Cornel; Monincx, Wilma M; Siljee, Jacqueline E; Van 't Zelfde, Annewil; van Oirschot, Charlotte M; Vankan-Buitelaar, Simone A; Vonk, Mariska A A W; Wiegers, Therese A; Zwart, Joost J; Franx, Arie; Moons, Karel G M; Koster, Maria P H

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To perform an external validation and direct comparison of published prognostic models for early prediction of the risk of gestational diabetes mellitus, including predictors applicable in the first trimester of pregnancy. DESIGN: External validation of all published prognostic models in

  20. Bipolar Disorder and Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sermin Kesebir

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Comorbid endocrine and cardiovascular situations with bipolar disorder usually result from the bipolar disorder itself or as a consequence of its treatment. With habits and lifestyle, genetic tendency and side effects, this situation is becoming more striking. Subpopulations of bipolar disorders patients should be considered at high risk for diabetes mellitus. The prevalence of diabetes mellitus in bipolar disorder may be three times greater than in the general population. Comorbidity of diabetes causes a pathophysiological overlapping in the neurobiological webs of bipolar cases. Signal mechanisms of glycocorticoid/insulin and immunoinflammatory effector systems are junction points that point out the pathophysiology between bipolar disorder and general medical cases susceptible to stress. Glycogen synthetase kinase (GSK-3 is a serine/treonine kinase and inhibits the transport of glucose stimulated by insulin. It is affected in diabetes, cancer, inflammation, Alzheimer disease and bipolar disorder. Hypoglycemic effect of lithium occurs via inhibiting glycogen synthetase kinase. When comorbid with diabetes, the other disease -for example bipolar disorder, especially during its acute manic episodes-, causes a serious situation that presents its influences for a lifetime. Choosing pharmacological treatment and treatment adherence are another important interrelated areas. The aim of this article is to discuss and review the etiological, clinical and therapeutic properties of diabetes mellitus and bipolar disorder comorbidity.

  1. Diabetes Mellitus and Risk of Bladder Cancer: A Meta-Analysis of Cohort Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Zhoujun; Zhong, Shan; Wang, Xianjin; Lu, Yingli; Xu, Chen

    2013-01-01

    Background Increasing evidence suggests that diabetes mellitus (DM) may be associated with an increased risk of bladder cancer. To provide a quantitative assessment of this association, we evaluated the relation between DM and incidence and mortality of bladder cancer in an updated meta-analysis of cohort studies. Methods We identified cohort studies by searching the EMBASE and MEDLINE databases, through 31 March 2012. Summary relative risks (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated with random-effects models. Results A total of 29 cohort studies (27 articles) were included in this meta-analysis. DM was associated with an increased incidence of bladder cancer (RR 1.29, 95% CI: 1.08–1.54), with significant evidence of heterogeneity among these studies (p<0.001, I2 = 94.9%). In stratified analysis, the RRs of bladder cancer were 1.36 (1.05–1.77) for diabetic men and 1.28 (0.75–2.19) for diabetic women, respectively. DM was also positively associated with bladder cancer mortality (RR 1.33, 95% CI: 1.14–1.55), with evident heterogeneity between studies (p = 0.002, I2 = 63.3%). The positive association was observed for both men (RR 1.54, 95% CI: 1.30–1.82) and women (RR 1.50, 95% CI: 1.05–2.14). Conclusion These findings suggest that compared to non-diabetic individuals, diabetic individuals have an increased incidence and mortality of bladder cancer. PMID:23437204

  2. A novel Rad gene polymorphism combined with obesity increases risk for type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王国英; 牛天华; 陈常忠; 李琼芳; 徐希平

    2004-01-01

    @@ The ras-associated diabetes (Rad) was initially identified by subtraction cloning from the skeletal muscle of humans with non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (type 2 DM).1 Rad mRNA expression is markedly increased in the skeletal muscle of type 2 DM patients compared with normal controls.

  3. Diabetes Mellitus as a Risk Factor in Glaucoma’s Physiopathology and Surgical Survival Time: A Literature Review

    OpenAIRE

    Costa, L.; Cunha, JP; Amado, D. (David); Abegão Pinto, L; Ferreira,J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Glaucoma is a multifactorial condition under serious influence of many risk factors. The role of diabetes mellitus (DM) in glaucoma etiology or progression remains inconclusive. Although, the diabetic patients have different healing mechanism comparing to the general population and it has a possible-negative role on surgical outcomes. This review article attempts to analyze the association of both diseases, glaucoma and DM, before and after the surgery. The epidemiological studies, b...

  4. Gestational diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiwani, Aliya; Marseille, Elliot; Lohse, Nicolai

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The association between gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), perinatal complications and long-term morbidity is gaining increased attention. However, the global burden of GDM and the existing responses are not fully understood. We aimed to assess country prevalence and to summarize...

  5. Diabetes mellitus and periodontal diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mealey, Brian L; Oates, Thomas W

    2006-08-01

    The purpose of this review is to provide the reader with practical knowledge concerning the relationship between diabetes mellitus and periodontal diseases. Over 200 articles have been published in the English literature over the past 50 years examining the relationship between these two chronic diseases. Data interpretation is often confounded by varying definitions of diabetes and periodontitis and different clinical criteria applied to prevalence, extent, and severity of periodontal diseases, levels of glycemic control, and complications associated with diabetes. This article provides a broad overview of the predominant findings from research published in English over the past 20 years, with reference to certain "classic" articles published prior to that time. This article describes current diagnostic and classification criteria for diabetes and answers the following questions: 1) Does diabetes affect the risk of periodontitis, and does the level of metabolic control of diabetes have an impact on this relationship? 2) Do periodontal diseases affect the pathophysiology of diabetes mellitus or the metabolic control of diabetes? 3) What are the mechanisms by which these two diseases interrelate? and 4) How do people with diabetes and periodontal disease respond to periodontal treatment? Diabetes increases the risk of periodontal diseases, and biologically plausible mechanisms have been demonstrated in abundance. Less clear is the impact of periodontal diseases on glycemic control of diabetes and the mechanisms through which this occurs. Inflammatory periodontal diseases may increase insulin resistance in a way similar to obesity, thereby aggravating glycemic control. Further research is needed to clarify this aspect of the relationship between periodontal diseases and diabetes.

  6. Diabetes mellitus and arthritis: is it a risk factor or comorbidity?: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Qing; Liu, Hua; Yang, Daren; Zhang, Yunyan

    2017-05-01

    Investigators have explored the association between diabetes mellitus and arthritis for a long time; however, there are uncertainties and inconsistencies among various studies. In this study, we tried to explore the relationship between diabetes mellitus and the overall risk of arthritis, as well as the potential modifiers for this relationship. We conducted a comprehensive literature search through PubMed and identified 36 eligible studies. The overall analyses, subgroup analyses, as well as sensitivity analyses, were conducted to illustrate the association between diabetes mellitus and arthritis. Study quality was evaluated using the Newcastle-Ottawa Quality Assessment Scale. All statistical analyses were conducted using STATA SE version 13.0. In our study, 36 eligible studies were identified and involved in the meta-analysis. The overall association between diabetes mellitus and arthritis is 1.61 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.14-2.28, P = .007). The association exists only in nongouty arthritis, where we observed the estimated odds ratio (OR) 1.33 (95% CI: 1.05-1.67, P arthritis rather than a risk factor; however, more studies will be helpful to increase the confidence of identifying the association between diabetes and arthritis.

  7. Diabetes mellitus: fatores de risco, ocorrência e cuidados entre trabalhadores de enfermagem Diabetes mellitus: factores de riesgo, ocurrencia y cuidados entre trabajadores de enfermería Diabetes mellitus: occurrence of risk factors and care among nursing workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darlene Mara dos Santos Tavares

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Identificar a ocorrência de Diabetes Mellitus (DM, os fatores de risco, o estresse e o cuidado com a saúde realizado pelos trabalhadores de enfermagem diabéticos. MÉTODOS: Estudo descritivo realizado com 418 profissionais de enfermagem de um hospital universitário. Os dados foram coletados por meio de instrumento semiestruturado e analisado, utilizando-se a distribuição de freqüência, teste qui-quadrado (pOBJETIVO: Identificar la ocurrencia de Diabetes Mellitus (DM, los factores de riesgo, el estrés y el cuidado con la salud realizado por los trabajadores de enfermería que son diabéticos. MÉTODOS: Estudio descriptivo realizado con 418 profesionales de enfermería de un hospital universitario. Los datos fueron recolectados - por medio de un instrumento semi-estructurado - y analizados, utilizando la distribución de frecuencias, prueba chi-cuadrado (pOBJECTIVE: To identify the occurrence of Diabetes Mellitus (DM, risk factors, stress and health-care activities performed by diabetic nursing workers. METHODS: This is a descriptive study with 418 professional nurses, working at a university hospital. Data were collected through a semi-structured instrument and were analyzed using the frequency distribution, the chi-square test (p <0.05 and the odds ratio. RESULTS: Most of the professionals were female and had between 20 and 30 years of age. All risk factors for DM were present, including the factors that can be modified. It was found a larger proportion of diabetic workers that had: overweight; arterial hypertension and capillary blood glucose altered, when compared to those without the disease. It was not found an increased likelihood of developing DM among nursing workers who reported stress. The workers with DM did not attend to the monthly follow up(69.2%; they were treated in private services (70%; and, they did not participate in educational activities (92.3%. CONCLUSION: It is necessary to develop health actions aimed

  8. Type 2 diabetes mellitus in Malaysia: current trends and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tee, E-S; Yap, R W K

    2017-07-01

    This review discussed the prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM) in Malaysia and the associated major risk factors, namely overweight/obesity, dietary practices and physical activity in both adults and school children. Detailed analyses of such information will provide crucial information for the formulation and implementation of programmes for the control and prevention of T2DM in the country. National studies from 1996-2015, and other recent nation-wide studies were referred to. The current prevalence of DM in 2015 is 17.5%, over double since 1996. Females, older age group, Indians, and urban residents had the highest risk of DM. The combined prevalence of overweight/obesity in 2015 is 47.7% for adults. Adults did not achieve the recommended intakes for majority of the foods groups in the Malaysian Food Pyramid especially fruits and vegetables. Adults also had moderate physical activity level. Three nation-wide studies showed a prevalence ranging from 27 to 31% for combined overweight/obesity in school children. The prevalence was higher among boys, primary school age, Indian ethnicity, and even rural children are not spared. Physical activity level was also low among school children. There must be serious systematic implementation of action plans to combat the high prevalence of diabetes and associated risk factors.

  9. Maternal TSH level and TPOAb status in early pregnancy and their relationship to the risk of gestational diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Hao; Tang, Yu-Ping; Bao, Yi-Rong; Su, Xiu-Juan; Cai, XueYa; Li, Yu-Hong; Wang, De-Fen

    2016-12-01

    Subclinical hypothyroidism is common in pregnant women and often related to adverse pregnancy outcomes, but its relationship with gestational diabetes remains controversial. In particular, the impact of thyroperoxidase antibodies status on the relationship between subclinical hypothyroidism and gestational diabetes is not clear. We investigated the association between combined thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) level and thyroperoxidase antibodies status in early pregnancy (diabetes mellitus. A total of 7084 pregnant women met the inclusion criteria, which included thyroperoxidase antibodies-positive subclinical hypothyroidism [TSH(H)TPOAb(+)] (n = 78), thyroperoxidase antibodies-negative subclinical hypothyroidism [TSH(H)TPOAb(-)] (n = 281), thyroperoxidase antibodies-positive euthyroidism [TSH(N)TPOAb(+)] (n = 648), and thyroperoxidase antibodies-negative euthyroidism [TSH(N)TPOAb(-)] (n = 6077). Of the 7084 cases included in our study, 1141 cases were diagnosed with gestational diabetes mellitus at 24-28 weeks of pregnancy. The prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus in TSH(N)TPOAb(-), TSH(H)TPOAb(-), TSH(N)TPOAb(+), and TSH(H)TPOAb(+) was 14.65, 19.57, 24.85, and 46.15 %, respectively. Compared with TSH(N)TPOAb(-) women, the risk of gestational diabetes mellitus was increased in all other groups of women in early pregnancy. After dividing early pregnancy into first and second trimesters, we found that TSH(H)TPOAb(-) women in the first trimester do not show this increase. Our study suggests that subclinical hypothyroidism and thyroperoxidase antibodies-positive euthyroidism in early pregnancy are associated with an increased risk of gestational diabetes mellitus.

  10. Beyond statin therapy: a review of the management of residual risk in diabetes mellitus.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Judge, Eoin P

    2010-09-01

    Total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol exhibit an independent, strong, continuous correlation with cardiovascular events. The effectiveness of hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins) in the treatment and prevention of atherosclerosis is well-established. However, despite the lowering of LDL targets and the increased use of statins, patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) continue to experience a higher proportion of adverse coronary artery disease events. This is as a result of an atherogenic dyslipidaemia, characterized by low levels of high-density lipoprotein and elevated plasma triglyceride concentrations, often with high levels of cholesterol-rich remnant particles. This article will review dyslipidaemia and its role in DM, and will discuss available treatment modalities that address residual cardiovascular risk in this disease.

  11. Type 2 diabetes mellitus and psychological stress - a modifiable risk factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackett, Ruth A; Steptoe, Andrew

    2017-09-01

    Psychological stress is common in many physical illnesses and is increasingly recognized as a risk factor for disease onset and progression. An emerging body of literature suggests that stress has a role in the aetiology of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) both as a predictor of new onset T2DM and as a prognostic factor in people with existing T2DM. Here, we review the evidence linking T2DM and psychological stress. We highlight the physiological responses to stress that are probably related to T2DM, drawing on evidence from animal work, large epidemiological studies and human laboratory trials. We discuss population and clinical studies linking psychological and social stress factors with T2DM, and give an overview of intervention studies that have attempted to modify psychological or social factors to improve outcomes in people with T2DM.

  12. Bioreactors addressing diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minteer, Danielle M; Gerlach, Jorg C; Marra, Kacey G

    2014-11-01

    The concept of bioreactors in biochemical engineering is a well-established process; however, the idea of applying bioreactor technology to biomedical and tissue engineering issues is relatively novel and has been rapidly accepted as a culture model. Tissue engineers have developed and adapted various types of bioreactors in which to culture many different cell types and therapies addressing several diseases, including diabetes mellitus types 1 and 2. With a rising world of bioreactor development and an ever increasing diagnosis rate of diabetes, this review aims to highlight bioreactor history and emerging bioreactor technologies used for diabetes-related cell culture and therapies.

  13. RETRACTED: Relationship between the angiotensinogen A1166C gene polymorphism and the risk of diabetes mellitus developing into diabetic nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chun-Hua; Zhou, Tian-Biao

    2015-12-01

    This article has been included in a multiple retraction: Chun-Hua Yang and Tian-Biao Zhou Relationship between the angiotensinogen A1166C gene polymorphism and the risk of diabetes mellitus developing into diabetic nephropathy Journal of Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System 1470320314566221, first published on February 1, 2015 doi: 10.1177/1470320314566221 This article has been retracted at the request of the Editors and the Publisher. After conducting a thorough investigation, SAGE found that the submitting authors of a number of papers published in the Journal of the Renin-Angiotensin Aldosterone System ( JRAAS) (listed below) had supplied fabricated contact details for their nominated reviewers. The Editors accepted these papers based on the reports supplied by the individuals using these fake reviewer email accounts. After concluding that the peer review process was therefore seriously compromised, SAGE and the journal Editors have decided to retract all affected articles. Online First articles (these articles will not be published in an issue) Wenzhuang Tang, Tian-Biao Zhou, and Zongpei Jiang Association of the angiotensinogen M235T gene polymorphism with risk of diabetes mellitus developing into diabetic nephropathy Journal of Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System 1470320314563426, first published on December 18, 2014 doi: 10.1177/1470320314563426 Tian-Biao Zhou, Hong-Yan Li, Zong-Pei Jiang, Jia-Fan Zhou, Miao-Fang Huang, and Zhi-Yang Zhou Role of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inhibitors in radiation nephropathy Journal of Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System 1470320314563424, first published on December 18, 2014 doi: 10.1177/1470320314563424 Weiqiang Zhong, Zongpei Jiang, and Tian-Biao Zhou Association between the ACE I/D gene polymorphism and T2DN susceptibility: The risk of T2DM developing into T2DN in the Asian population Journal of Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System 1470320314566019, first published on January 26, 2015 doi: 10

  14. RETRACTED: Association of the angiotensinogen M235T gene polymorphism with risk of diabetes mellitus developing into diabetic nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Wenzhuang; Zhou, Tian-Biao; Jiang, Zongpei

    2015-12-01

    This article has been included in a multiple retraction: Wenzhuang Tang, Tian-Biao Zhou, and Zongpei Jiang Association of the angiotensinogen M235T gene polymorphism with risk of diabetes mellitus developing into diabetic nephropathy Journal of Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System 1470320314563426, first published on December 18, 2014 doi: 10.1177/1470320314563426 This article has been retracted at the request of the Editors and the Publisher. After conducting a thorough investigation, SAGE found that the submitting authors of a number of papers published in the Journal of the Renin-Angiotensin Aldosterone System ( JRAAS) (listed below) had supplied fabricated contact details for their nominated reviewers. The Editors accepted these papers based on the reports supplied by the individuals using these fake reviewer email accounts. After concluding that the peer review process was therefore seriously compromised, SAGE and the journal Editors have decided to retract all affected articles. Online First articles (these articles will not be published in an issue) Wenzhuang Tang, Tian-Biao Zhou, and Zongpei Jiang Association of the angiotensinogen M235T gene polymorphism with risk of diabetes mellitus developing into diabetic nephropathy Journal of Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System 1470320314563426, first published on December 18, 2014 doi: 10.1177/1470320314563426 Tian-Biao Zhou, Hong-Yan Li, Zong-Pei Jiang, Jia-Fan Zhou, Miao-Fang Huang, and Zhi-Yang Zhou Role of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inhibitors in radiation nephropathy Journal of Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System 1470320314563424, first published on December 18, 2014 doi: 10.1177/1470320314563424 Weiqiang Zhong, Zongpei Jiang, and Tian-Biao Zhou Association between the ACE I/D gene polymorphism and T2DN susceptibility: The risk of T2DM developing into T2DN in the Asian population Journal of Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System 1470320314566019, first published on January 26, 2015 doi: 10

  15. Silent myocardial ischemia and related risk factors in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Zorlu

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency of silent myocardial ischemia (SMI in patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM who do not have ischemiccardiac disease.Materials and Methods: To examine the relationship between ischemic cardiac disease and related factors such as blood pressure, lipid profile, smoking, gender, family history, body mass index (BMI, microalbuminuria, hsCRP, 150 diabetic patients who have never had any known coroner artery disease, exertional or rest dyspnea and labored breathing, aged between 35 and 70 years were included. Effort testing (treadmill were performed to examine the existence of SMI.Results: Effort testing gave positive result for SMI in 20 patients and negative in 130 patients. Coronary angiographywas performed in 20 patients with positive effort testing results. The frequency of SMI was found as %13.3 by effort testing. The frequency of SMI (including non-criticalpatients was %10.6 (16 patients by using coronary angiography, which 13(8.6% had critical and 3(2% had non-critical coronary stenosis. No significant differences were found in age, gender, diabetic duration, trigliserid, HDL- cholesterol, blood pressure, BMI and hsCRP levels between positive and negative SMI patients with Type 2 DM.Conclusion: We determined that high LDL-Cholesterol and HbA1c and existence of microalbuminuria indicated significant SMI risk for patients with Type 2 DM.

  16. New-Onset Diabetes Mellitus After Heart Transplantation - Incidence, Risk Factors and Impact on Clinical Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ho Jin; Jung, Sung-Ho; Kim, Jae-Joong; Yun, Tae-Jin; Kim, Joon Bum; Choo, Suk Jung; Chung, Cheol Hyun; Lee, Jae Won

    2017-05-25

    New-onset diabetes mellitus (DM) can occur as a serious complication after heart transplantation, but the comparative data on its clinical impact on survival and on transplant-related adverse events are limited.Methods and Results:We reviewed a total of consecutive 391 patients aged ≥17 years undergoing isolated orthotopic heart transplantation at the present institution from 1992 to 2013. The entire cohort was divided into 3 groups: (1) no diabetes (n=257); (2) pre-existing DM (n=46); and (3) new-onset DM (n=88). Early and long-term clinical outcomes were compared across the 3 groups. Early death occurred in 8 patients (2.0%). Of the 345 non-diabetic patients before transplantation, 88 (25.5%) developed new-onset DM postoperatively. During follow-up, 83 (21.2%) died. On time-varying Cox analysis, new-onset DM was associated with increased risk for overall death (HR, 2.11; 95% CI: 1.26-3.55) and tended to have a greater risk for severe chronic kidney disease (HR, 1.77; 95% CI: 0.94-3.44). Compared with the no-diabetes group, the new-onset DM group had a worse survival rate (P=0.035), but a similar survival rate to that of the pre-existing DM group (P=0.364). New-onset DM has a negative effect on long-term survival and kidney function after heart transplantation. Further studies are warranted to evaluate the relevance of early diagnosis and timely control of new-onset DM to improve long-term survival.

  17. VEGF Genetic Polymorphisms May Contribute to the Risk of Diabetic Nephropathy in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus: A Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Sun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This meta-analysis aimed to investigate a comprehensive and reliable conclusion on the correlations of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF gene with the risk of diabetic nephropathy (DN in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM. Methods. We screened PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, CISCOM, CINAHL, Google Scholar, CBM, and CNKI databases for those relevant studies that investigated the association of 14,945 subjects with clinicopathological parameters in gastric cancer. Results. Eleven case-control studies that met all inclusion criteria were included in this meta-analysis. A total of 14,945 subjects were involved, including 3,049 DN patients and 11,896 DM patients. Our meta-analysis results revealed that VEGF rs2010963 and rs3025039 polymorphisms might contribute to the risk of DN in DM patients. Ethnicity-stratified analysis suggested that VEGF genetic polymorphisms were associated with an increased risk of DN among Asians. However, we found no correlations of VEGF genetic polymorphisms with susceptibility to DN among Caucasians. Conclusion. Our findings suggest that VEGF rs2010963 and rs3025039 polymorphisms may contribute to the risk of DN in DM patients, especially among Asians. Thus, VEGF genetic polymorphisms could be useful biomarkers for early diagnosis of DN in DM patients.

  18. Awareness and knowledge about diabetes mellitus and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Awareness and knowledge about diabetes mellitus and hypertension amongst ... and their risk factors through health educational programs over a three year period ... SPSS version 17 was used for data analysis, and the level of statistical ...

  19. Endothelial dysfunction in diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi AR Hadi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Hadi AR Hadi, Jassim Al SuwaidiDepartment of Cardiology and Cardiovascular Surgery, Hamad General Hospital – Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, State of Qatar; Department of Cardioscience, Sheikh Khalifa Medical City, Abu Dhabi, UAEAbstract: Diabetes mellitus is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, even in the presence of intensive glycemic control. Substantial clinical and experimental evidence suggest that both diabetes and insulin resistance cause a combination of endothelial dysfunctions, which may diminish the anti-atherogenic role of the vascular endothelium. Both insulin resistance and endothelial dysfunction appear to precede the development of overt hyperglycemia in patients with type 2 diabetes. Therefore, in patients with diabetes or insulin resistance, endothelial dysfunction may be a critical early target for preventing atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. Microalbuminuria is now considered to be an atherosclerotic risk factor and predicts future cardiovascular disease risk in diabetic patients, in elderly patients, as well as in the general population. It has been implicated as an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease and premature cardiovascular mortality for patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus, as well as for patients with essential hypertension. A complete biochemical understanding of the mechanisms by which hyperglycemia causes vascular functional and structural changes associated with the diabetic milieu still eludes us. In recent years, the numerous biochemical and metabolic pathways postulated to have a causal role in the pathogenesis of diabetic vascular disease have been distilled into several unifying hypotheses. The role of chronic hyperglycemia in the development of diabetic microvascular complications and in neuropathy has been clearly established. However, the biochemical or cellular links between elevated blood glucose levels, and the vascular lesions remain

  20. Pancreatic disorders and diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisterfeld, R; Ehehalt, F; Saeger, H D; Solimena, M

    2008-09-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a common disease among patients with pancreatic cancer and chronic pancreatitis, disorders of the exocrine pancreas. Different clinical features of diabetes are associated with these two conditions: hyperinsulinemia and peripheral insulin resistance are the prevailing diabetic traits in pancreatic cancer, whereas reduced islet cell mass and impaired insulin secretion are typically observed in chronic pancreatitis. Whether or not a causal relationship exists between diabetes and pancreatic carcinoma is an intriguing but unanswered question. Diabetes often precedes pancreatic cancer and is thus regarded as a potential risk factor for malignancy. Conversely, pancreatic cancer may secrete diabetogenic factors. Given these findings, there is increasing interest in whether close monitoring of the glycemic profile may aid early detection of pancreatic tumor lesions.

  1. Prediction of First Cardiovascular Disease Event in Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: The Steno Type 1 Risk Engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vistisen, Dorte; Andersen, Gregers Stig; Hansen, Christian Stevns; Hulman, Adam; Henriksen, Jan Erik; Bech-Nielsen, Henning; Jørgensen, Marit Eika

    2016-03-15

    Patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus are at increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD), but they are currently undertreated. There are no risk scores used on a regular basis in clinical practice for assessing the risk of CVD in type 1 diabetes mellitus. From 4306 clinically diagnosed adult patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus, we developed a prediction model for estimating the risk of first fatal or nonfatal CVD event (ischemic heart disease, ischemic stroke, heart failure, and peripheral artery disease). Detailed clinical data including lifestyle factors were linked to event data from validated national registers. The risk prediction model was developed by using a 2-stage approach. First, a nonparametric, data-driven approach was used to identify potentially informative risk factors and interactions (random forest and survival tree analysis). Second, based on results from the first step, Poisson regression analysis was used to derive the final model. The final CVD prediction model was externally validated in a different population of 2119 patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus. During a median follow-up of 6.8 years (interquartile range, 2.9-10.9) a total of 793 (18.4%) patients developed CVD. The final prediction model included age, sex, diabetes duration, systolic blood pressure, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, hemoglobin A1c, albuminuria, glomerular filtration rate, smoking, and exercise. Discrimination was excellent for a 5-year CVD event with a C-statistic of 0.826 (95% confidence interval, 0.807-0.845) in the derivation data and a C-statistic of 0.803 (95% confidence interval, 0.767-0.839) in the validation data. The Hosmer-Lemeshow test showed good calibration (P>0.05) in both cohorts. This high-performing CVD risk model allows for the implementation of decision rules in a clinical setting. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  2. Prevalence and risk factors of periodontitis among adults with or without diabetes mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Mihee; Kim, Hee Yeon; Seok, Hannah; Yeo, Chang Dong; Kim, Young Soo; Song, Jae Yen; Lee, Young Bok; Lee, Dong-Hee; Lee, Jae-Im; Lee, Tae-Kyu; Ahn, Hyo-Suk; Ko, Yoon Ho; Jeong, Seong Cheol; Chae, Hiun Suk; Sohn, Tae Seo

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: This study examined prevalence and risk factors of periodontitis in representative samples of Korean adults, with and without diabetes mellitus (DM). Methods: Data from the 2012 Korean National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey were analyzed. A total of 4,477 adults (≥ 30 years old) were selected from 8,057 individuals who completed a nutrition survey, a self-reported general health behavior questionnaire, an oral examination, an oral hygiene behaviors survey, and laboratory tests. DM was defined as a fasting plasma glucose ≥ 126 mg/dL, or self-reported diagnosed diabetes, or current use of oral hypoglycemic agents and/or insulin. The community periodontal index was used to assess periodontitis status and comparisons between the periodontitis and the non-periodontitis group, were performed, according to the presence of DM. Risk factors for periodontitis in adults with DM and without DM were evaluated by multiple logistic regression analysis. Results: The prevalence of periodontitis was significantly higher in adults with DM (43.7%) than in those without DM (25%, p periodontitis were older age, male, urban habitation, waist circumference, smoking, oral pain, and less frequent tooth brushing. Significant risk factors for periodontitis in adults with DM were the smoking, oral pain, and not-using an oral hygiene product. Conclusions: Adults with DM have an increased risk of periodontitis than those without DM. Current smoking and oral pain increase this risk. Using an oral hygiene product can reduce risk of periodontal disease in adults with DM. PMID:27604799

  3. Toxicity of Atorvastatin on Pancreas Mitochondria: A Justification for Increased Risk of Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadighara, Melina; Amirsheardost, Zahra; Minaiyan, Mohsen; Hajhashemi, Valiollah; Naserzadeh, Parvaneh; Salimi, Ahmad; Seydi, Enayatollah; Pourahmad, Jalal

    2017-02-01

    Statins (including atorvastatin) are a widely used class of drugs, and like all medications, they have a potential for adverse effects. Recently, it has been shown that statins also exert side effects on the pancreas. In vitro studies have suggested that this class of drugs induced a reduction in insulin secretion. Also, the use of statins is associated with a raised risk of diabetes mellitus (DM), but the mechanisms underlying statin-induced diabetes are poorly known. Literature data indicate that several statins are able to induce apoptosis signalling. This study was designed to examine the mechanism of atorvastatin on mitochondria obtained from rat pancreas. In our study, mitochondria were obtained from the pancreas and then exposed to atorvastatin and vehicle to investigate probable toxic effects. The results showed that atorvastatin (25, 50, 75, 100 and 125 μM) increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, mitochondrial swelling, collapse of mitochondrial membrane potential and cytochrome c release, the orchestrating factor for mitochondria-mediated apoptosis signalling. Atorvastatin also reduced the ATP levels. These results propose that the toxicity of atorvastatin on pancreas mitochondria is a key point for drug-induced apoptotic cell loss in the pancreas and therefore a justification for increased risk of DM. © 2016 Nordic Association for the Publication of BCPT (former Nordic Pharmacological Society).

  4. Are hypertension and diabetes mellitus risk factors for pelvic organ prolapse?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isık, Hatice; Aynıoglu, Oner; Sahbaz, Ahmet; Selimoglu, Refika; Timur, Hakan; Harma, Muge

    2016-02-01

    Pelvic organ prolapse (POP) is an important problem for women with multifactorial etiology. This study aims to determine the role of hypertension (HT) and diabetes mellitus (DM) in POP. The study included 586 women admitted to Bulent Ecevit University Hospital between September 2013 and April 2015 for hysterectomy, comprising 186 patients with POP and 400 patients without. The demographic characteristics, age, body mass index (BMI), obstetrical history, type of delivery, associated medical diseases, and benign gynecological diseases were recorded. HT, DM, or both together were particularly considered as coexisting medical diseases. Median gravida, parity, and live birth numbers were significantly higher in POP patients (4 vs. 3, 3 vs. 2, and 3 vs. 2 respectively, p0.05). There was a significant difference between groups regarding comorbid diseases (p<0.001). Logistic regression analysis for risk factors of POP revealed age, BMI, vaginal parturition, and co-morbidity with HT+DM together significantly increased POP risk (p<0.05). HT+DM together significantly increased risks with OR of 1.9 (1.1-3.16). In addition to multiple factors increasing POP risk, comorbidities as HT+DM together should be considered as risk factors. Patients with these comorbidities should be encouraged to change their lifestyles to prevent POP. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Diabetes Mellitus and Prediabetes on Kidney Transplant Waiting List- Prevalence, Metabolic Phenotyping and Risk Stratification Approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Guthoff

    Full Text Available Despite a significant prognostic impact, little is known about disturbances in glucose metabolism among kidney transplant candidates. We assess the prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM and prediabetes on kidney transplant waiting list, its underlying pathophysiology and propose an approach for individual risk stratification.All patients on active kidney transplant waiting list of a large European university hospital transplant center were metabolically phenotyped.Of 138 patients, 76 (55% had disturbances in glucose metabolism. 22% of patients had known DM, 3% were newly diagnosed. 30% were detected to have prediabetes. Insulin sensitivity and-secretion indices allowed for identification of underlying pathophysiology and risk factors. Age independently affected insulin secretion, resulting in a relative risk for prediabetes of 2.95 (95%CI 1.38-4.83 with a cut-off at 48 years. Body mass index independently affected insulin sensitivity as a continuous variable.The prevalence of DM or prediabetes on kidney transplant waiting list is as high as 55%, with more than one third of patients previously undiagnosed. Oral glucose tolerance test is mandatory to detect all patients at risk. Metabolic phenotyping allows for differentiation of underlying pathophysiology and provides a basis for early individual risk stratification and specific intervention to improve patient and allograft outcome.

  6. Long-Term Diabetes Mellitus Is Associated with an Increased Risk of Pancreatic Cancer: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Shanshan; Wang, Baosheng; Zhang, Xin; Hao, Liliang; Hu, Xianliang; Li, Zhongxiang; Sun, Shaolong

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have shown a bidirectional relationship between diabetes and pancreatic cancer (PC). In particular, new-onset diabetes might be induced by PC, and people with long-term diabetes might be at increased risk for the development of PC. The purpose of our study was to examine whether long-term diabetes represented an independent risk factor for PC development. A literature search was performed by searching electronic databases for studies published before July 1, 2014, and relative risks (RRs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. Data pertaining to diabetes were recorded at both individual and study levels, with RRs calculated separately to analyze the relationship between the duration of diabetes and the development of PC. Forty-four studies were included in this meta-analysis, including 18 studies with a case-control design, 5 with a nested case-control design and 21 with a cohort design. The overall summary estimate for the relationship between the population with a duration of diabetes ≥2 years and PC was 1.64 (1.52-1.78). The pooled RR (95% CI) of PC for the population with a duration of diabetes ≥5 years was 1.58 (1.42-1.75). For the population with a duration of diabetes ≥10 years, the RR (95% CI) of PC was 1.50 (1.28-1.75). Our study suggests that long-term diabetes mellitus is associated with an increased risk of PC. However, the level of risk is negatively correlated with increasing diabetes mellitus duration.

  7. Gestational diabetes mellitus and subsequent development of overt diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damm, P

    1998-01-01

    of diabetes: a high fasting glucose level at diagnosis of GDM, a delivery more than 3 weeks before term, and an abnormal OGTT 2 months postpartum. Low insulin secretion at diagnosis of GDM was also an independent risk factor. The presence of ICA and GAD-autoantibodies in pregnancy was associated with later...... of women with GDM. However, previous studies, in populations quite different from a Danish population, have shown that women with previous GDM have a high risk of developing overt diabetes mellitus later in life. Hence, we aimed to investigate the prognosis of women with previous GDM with respect...... population) 2-11 years after pregnancy. Abnormal glucose tolerance was found in 34.4% of the women (3.7% IDDM, 13.7% NIDDM, 17% IGT) in contrast to a control group where none had diabetes and 5.3% had IGT. Logistic regression analysis identified the following independent risk factors for later development...

  8. Risk factors for recurrent emergency department visits for hyperglycemia in patients with diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Justin W; Gushulak, Katherine M; Columbus, Melanie P; van Aarsen, Kristine; Hamelin, Alexandra L; Wells, George A; Stiell, Ian G

    2017-12-01

    Patients with poorly controlled diabetes mellitus may present repeatedly to the emergency department (ED) for management and treatment of hyperglycemic episodes, including diabetic ketoacidosis and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state. The objective of this study was to identify risk factors that predict unplanned recurrent ED visits for hyperglycemia in patients with diabetes within 30 days of initial presentation. We conducted a 1-year health records review of patients ≥18 years presenting to one of four tertiary care EDs with a discharge diagnosis of hyperglycemia, diabetic ketoacidosis, or hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state. Trained research personnel collected data on patient characteristics and determined if patients had an unplanned recurrent ED visit for hyperglycemia within 30 days of their initial presentation. Multivariate logistic regression models using generalized estimating equations to account for patients with multiple visits determined predictor variables independently associated with recurrent ED visits for hyperglycemia within 30 days. There were 833 ED visits for hyperglycemia in the 1-year period. 54.6% were male and mean (SD) age was 48.8 (19.5). Of all visitors, 156 (18.7%) had a recurrent ED visit for hyperglycemia within 30 days. Factors independently associated with recurrent hyperglycemia visits included a previous hyperglycemia visit in the past month (odds ratio [OR] 3.5, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.1-5.8), age 20 mmol/L (OR 2.2, 95% CI 1.3-3.7), having a family physician (OR 2.2, 95% CI 1.0-4.6), and being on insulin (OR 1.9, 95% CI 1.1-3.1). Having a systolic blood pressure between 90-150 mmHg (OR 0.53, 95% CI 0.30-0.93) and heart rate >110 bpm (OR 0.41, 95% CI 0.23-0.72) were protective factors independently associated with not having a recurrent hyperglycemia visit. This unique ED-based study reports five risk factors and two protective factors associated with recurrent ED visits for hyperglycemia within 30 days in patients

  9. Risk factors of gestational diabetes mellitus in the refugee population in Gaza Strip: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlKasseh, A S M; Zaki, N M; Aljeesh, Y I; Soon, L K

    2014-01-09

    To determine the risk factors of gestational diabetes mellitus in refugee populations in the Gaza Strip, a retrospective case-control study was performed between March and June 2011 in the United Nations Relief and Works Agency (UNRWA) primary health care clinics. Data were collected on maternal sociodemographics and the prevalence of diagnosed GDM according to World Health Organization criteria from clinics where postnatal Palestinian refugee women had been diagnosed with GDM during previous pregnancies, and non-GDM women were used as controls. Sociodemographic characteristics, pre-pregnancy body-mass index (BMI), obstetrics history and family history of diabetes were used as study variables. In total, 189 incident cases of GDM were identified. The most significant risk factors for GDM were: history of miscarriage more than once; overweight before pregnancy; history of stillbirth; history of caesarean birth; and positive family history of diabetes mellitus.

  10. Importance of cardiovascular disease risk management in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorber D

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Daniel Lorber Division of Endocrinology, New York Hospital Queens, Department of Medicine, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, NY, USA Abstract: Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM is commonly accompanied by other cardiovascular disease (CVD risk factors, such as hypertension, obesity, and dyslipidemia. Furthermore, CVD is the most common cause of death in people with T2DM. It is therefore of critical importance to minimize the risk of macrovascular complications by carefully managing modifiable CVD risk factors in patients with T2DM. Therapeutic strategies should include lifestyle and pharmacological interventions targeting hyperglycemia, hypertension, dyslipidemia, obesity, cigarette smoking, physical inactivity, and prothrombotic factors. This article discusses the impact of modifying these CVD risk factors in the context of T2DM; the clinical evidence is summarized, and current guidelines are also discussed. The cardiovascular benefits of smoking cessation, increasing physical activity, and reducing low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and blood pressure are well established. For aspirin therapy, any cardiovascular benefits must be balanced against the associated bleeding risk, with current evidence supporting this strategy only in certain patients who are at increased CVD risk. Although overweight, obesity, and hyperglycemia are clearly associated with increased cardiovascular risk, the effect of their modification on this risk is less well defined by available clinical trial evidence. However, for glucose-lowering drugs, further evidence is expected from several ongoing cardiovascular outcome trials. Taken together, the evidence highlights the value of early intervention and targeting multiple risk factors with both lifestyle and pharmacological strategies to give the best chance of reducing macrovascular complications in the long term. Keywords: cardiovascular risk, hypertension, obesity, dyslipidemia

  11. Diabetes mellitus carries a risk of esophageal cancer: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Bo; Zhou, Xiufang; Li, Xiaohong; Liu, Chaoyang; Yang, Caizhe

    2017-09-01

    Many studies have showed that diabetes mellitus (DM) might be a risk factor for certain types of cancers. However, there are still inconsistent results on the effects of DM on the risk of esophageal cancer (EC). The objective of this study is to investigate the association and to quantify the correlation between DM and EC by a meta-analysis. The initial search identified 339 articles. Those publications that did not report the exact number of EC cases were removed. Finally, 13 meaningful studies were extracted from the databases of PubMed, MEDLINE, and Web of Science. All pooled analyses of risk ratios (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were assessed by a random-effect or fixed-effect model. Subgroup analysis was implemented on the basis of the sex or ethnicity. I value was used to assess heterogeneity, and funnel plot analysis was for publication bias. The result showed that there was a positive correlation between type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and EC risk (RR = 1.28, 95% CI: 1.12-1.47, P < .001). Subgroup analysis based on gender showed that male was an important risk factor for EC (RR = 1.53, 95% CI: 1.44-1.62, P < .001), but female was not (RR = 1.23, 95% CI: 0.41-3.69, P = .71). In addition, subgroup analysis based on ethnicity showed that DM was significantly correlated to EC in North America subjects (RR = 1.39, 95% CI: 1.31-1.47, P < .001), and in Europe subjects (RR = 1.37, 95% CI: 1.02-1.83, P = .04), whereas no correlation was found in Asian subjects (RR = 0.98, 95% CI: 0.50-1.95, P = .96). Furthermore, DM had a correlation to an increased risk of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) (RR = 1.43, 95% CI: 1.35-1.51, P < .001). This meta-analysis indicates that DM is positively correlated to EC. However, the results should be interpreted with caution because of the limitations on potential clinical confounding factors in each study included in this meta-analysis.

  12. Type 1 diabetes mellitus and risk of incident epilepsy: a population-based, open-cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dafoulas, George E; Toulis, Konstantinos A; Mccorry, Dougall; Kumarendran, Balachadran; Thomas, G Neil; Willis, Brian H; Gokhale, Krishna; Gkoutos, George; Narendran, Parth; Nirantharakumar, Krishnarajah

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this research was to explore the relationship between incident epilepsy and type 1 diabetes in British participants. Using The Health Improvement Network database, we conducted a retrospective, open-cohort study. Patients who were newly diagnosed with type 1 diabetes mellitus at the age of ≤40 years were identified and followed-up from 1 January 1990 to 15 September 2015. These patients, identified as not suffering from epilepsy at the time of diagnosis, were randomly matched with up to four individuals without type 1 diabetes mellitus, based on age, sex and participating general practice. A Cox regression analysis was subsequently performed using Townsend deprivation index, cerebral palsy, head injury and learning disabilities as model covariates. The study population consisted of a total of 24,610 individuals (4922 with type 1 diabetes and 19,688 controls). These individuals were followed up for a mean of 5.4 years (approximately 132,000 person-years of follow up). Patients with type 1 diabetes were significantly more likely to be diagnosed with epilepsy during the observation period compared with controls (crude HR [95% CI]: 3.02 [1.95, 4.69]). The incidence rate was estimated to be 132 and 44 per 100,000 person-years in patients and controls, respectively. This finding persisted after adjusting for model covariates (adjusted HR [95% CI]: 3.01 [1.93, 4.68]) and was also robust to sensitivity analysis, excluding adult-onset type 1 diabetes mellitus. Patients with type 1 diabetes are at approximately three-times greater risk of developing epilepsy compared with matched controls without type 1 diabetes. This should be considered when investigating seizure-related disorders in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

  13. Soluble urokinase receptor (suPAR) predicts microalbuminuria in patients at risk for type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthoff, Martina; Wagner, Robert; Randrianarisoa, Elko; Hatziagelaki, Erifili; Peter, Andreas; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; Fritsche, Andreas; Heyne, Nils

    2017-01-01

    Early identification of patients at risk of developing diabetic nephropathy is essential. Elevated serum concentrations of soluble urokinase receptor (suPAR) associate with diabetes mellitus and predict onset and loss of renal function in chronic kidney disease. We hypothesize, that suPAR may be an early risk indicator for diabetic nephropathy, preceding microalbuminuria. The relationship of baseline suPAR and incident microalbuminuria was assessed in a prospective long-term cohort of subjects at increased risk for type 2 diabetes (TULIP, n = 258). Association with albuminuria at later stages of disease was studied in a cross-sectional cohort with manifest type 2 diabetes (ICEPHA, n = 266). A higher baseline suPAR was associated with an increased risk of new-onset microalbuminuria in subjects at risk for type 2 diabetes (hazard ratio 5.3 (95% CI 1.1–25.2, p = 0.03) for the highest vs. lowest suPAR quartile). The proportion of subjects with prediabetes at the end of observation was higher in subjects with new-onset microalbuminuria. suPAR consistently correlated with albuminuria in a separate cohort with manifest type 2 diabetes. Elevated baseline suPAR concentrations independently associate with new-onset microalbuminuria in subjects at increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes. suPAR may hence allow for earlier risk stratification than microalbuminuria. PMID:28091558

  14. Fetal sex and maternal risk of gestational diabetes mellitus: the impact of having a boy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retnakaran, Ravi; Kramer, Caroline K; Ye, Chang; Kew, Simone; Hanley, Anthony J; Connelly, Philip W; Sermer, Mathew; Zinman, Bernard

    2015-05-01

    Retrospective analyses of perinatal databases have raised the intriguing possibility of an increased risk of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) in women carrying a male fetus, but it has been unclear if this was a spurious association. We thus sought to evaluate the relationship between fetal sex and maternal glucose metabolism in a well-characterized cohort of women reflecting the full spectrum of gestational glucose tolerance from normal to mildly abnormal to GDM. A total of 1,074 pregnant women underwent metabolic characterization, including oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), at mean 29.5 weeks' gestation. The prevalence of GDM, its pathophysiologic determinants (β-cell function and insulin sensitivity/resistance), and its clinical risk factors were compared between women carrying a female fetus (n = 534) and those carrying a male fetus (n = 540). Women carrying a male fetus had lower mean adjusted β-cell function (insulinogenic index divided by HOMA of insulin resistance: 9.4 vs. 10.5, P = 0.007) and higher mean adjusted blood glucose at 30 min (P = 0.025), 1 h (P = 0.004), and 2 h (P = 0.02) during the OGTT, as compared with those carrying a female fetus. Furthermore, women carrying a male fetus had higher odds of developing GDM (odds ratio 1.39 [95% CI 1.01-1.90]). Indeed, male fetus further increased the relative risk of GDM conferred by the classic risk factors of maternal age >35 years and nonwhite ethnicity by 47 and 51%, respectively. Male fetus is associated with poorer β-cell function, higher postprandial glycemia, and an increased risk of GDM in the mother. Thus, fetal sex potentially may influence maternal glucose metabolism in pregnancy. © 2015 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  15. Risk of disseminated intravascular coagulation in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: retrospective cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogami, Kenichiro; Muraki, Isao; Imano, Hironori; Iso, Hiroyasu

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To determine quantitatively the association between type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). Design Retrospective cohort study using a claims database. Setting Medical care institutions representing 9% of all secondary hospitals (acute care hospitals) in Japan. Participants In total, 797 324 admissions, comprising 435 354 patients aged 18–79 years at the time of admission, were enrolled between January 2010 and September 2014. All patients were diagnosed with diabetes or admitted to hospitals that provided laboratory data. Main outcome measures Incidence of DIC reported by physicians in claims data. Results Logistic regression analysis found that the risk of DIC was significantly higher in T2DM patients than in non-DM patients (fully adjusted OR: 1.39 (95% CI 1.32 to 1.45)), independent of age, sex, admission year and potential underlying diseases. The higher risk of DIC in T2DM patients was apparent in those who were treated with insulin within the 30-day period prior to admission (1.53 (1.37 to 1.72)). When stratified by the potential underlying diseases, the risk of DIC was higher in T2DM patients with non-septic severe infection (1.67 (1.41 to 1.97)) and with solid tumour (1.59 (1.47 to 1.72)) than in non-DM patients with those underlying diseases. The risk was similar between T2DM and non-DM patients with sepsis (0.98 (0.90 to 1.08)) and lower in T2DM patients with acute leukaemia (0.70 (0.59 to 0.84)). Conclusions T2DM was associated with a higher risk of DIC, particularly when recently treated with insulin, as well as among admissions with solid tumour or non-septic severe infection. PMID:28122835

  16. Risk of cardiovascular and all-cause mortality in individuals with diabetes mellitus, impaired fasting glucose, and impaired glucose tolerance: the Australian Diabetes, Obesity, and Lifestyle Study (AusDiab)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Barr, Elizabeth L M; Zimmet, Paul Z; Welborn, Timothy A; Jolley, Damien; Magliano, Dianna J; Dunstan, David W; Cameron, Adrian J; Dwyer, Terry; Taylor, Hugh R; Tonkin, Andrew M; Wong, Tien Y; McNeil, John; Shaw, Jonathan E

    2007-01-01

    ..., as well as diabetes mellitus, increase the risk of all-cause and CVD mortality. In 1999 to 2000, glucose tolerance status was determined in 10,428 participants of the Australian Diabetes, Obesity, and Lifestyle Study (AusDiab...

  17. Correlates among Perceived Risk for Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus, Physical Activity, And Dietary Intake in Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischetti, Natalie

    2015-01-01

    In the last two decades, the number of new cases of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) among U.S. adolescents has increased (Fagot-Campagna et al., 2000; SEARCH Study Group, 2006), which may be related to the lack of health-promoting behaviors, such as a balanced diet and adequate physical exercise. This descriptive correlational study examined the relationship between perceived risk for T2DM, dietary intake, and physical activity in adolescents (N = 80) 13 to 18 years of age. The Children's Health Belief Model (Bush & lannotti, 1990) was the conceptual framework used for testing the theoretical relationships. Participants completed the following instruments: 1) Knowledge of Risk Factors for T2DM, 2) Health Beliefs for T2DM, 3) Godin-Shepard Leisure-Time Exercise Questionnaire (Godin & Shepard, 1997), and 4) the Demographic/Medical Questionnaire. Significant relationships were found between perceived risk, a subset of the Health Beliefs for T2DM scale, and the health promoting behaviors of dietary intake and physical activity. Implications for health-promoting nursing practice related to adolescent perception of risk and health-promoting behaviors of dietary intake and physical activity are addressed.

  18. Diabetes mellitus increases the risk of active tuberculosis: a systematic review of 13 observational studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christie Y Jeon

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Several studies have suggested that diabetes mellitus (DM increases the risk of active tuberculosis (TB. The rising prevalence of DM in TB-endemic areas may adversely affect TB control. We conducted a systematic review and a meta-analysis of observational studies assessing the association of DM and TB in order to summarize the existing evidence and to assess methodological quality of the studies. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We searched the PubMed and EMBASE databases to identify observational studies that had reported an age-adjusted quantitative estimate of the association between DM and active TB disease. The search yielded 13 observational studies (n = 1,786,212 participants with 17,698 TB cases. Random effects meta-analysis of cohort studies showed that DM was associated with an increased risk of TB (relative risk = 3.11, 95% CI 2.27-4.26. Case-control studies were heterogeneous and odds ratios ranged from 1.16 to 7.83. Subgroup analyses showed that effect estimates were higher in non-North American studies. CONCLUSION: DM was associated with an increased risk of TB regardless of study design and population. People with DM may be important targets for interventions such as active case finding and treatment of latent TB and efforts to diagnose, detect, and treat DM may have a beneficial impact on TB control.

  19. Post-transplant diabetes mellitus in lung transplant recipients: incidence and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollech, Jacob E; Kramer, Mordechai R; Peled, Nir; Ollech, Ayelet; Amital, Anat; Medalion, Benjamin; Saute, Milton; Shitrit, David

    2008-05-01

    Post-transplant diabetes mellitus (PTDM) is a common and potentially serious complication after solid organ transplantation. There are only a few data, however, about the incidence of DM in patients undergoing lung transplantation. The medical records of 119 consecutive patients who underwent lung transplantation from 1998 to September 2004 were reviewed. Patients were divided in three groups according to their diabetes status, including pre-transplant DM, the PTDM group and those without DM. Patient records and all laboratory data were reviewed and the clinical course of diabetes was monitored. All recipients were treated with tacrolimus based regimen. Mean follow-up for all patients was 25+/-10. Twenty-three patients had DM in the pre-lung transplantation (LTX) DM group. PTDM developed in 34 of the remaining 96 patients (35.4%) with an incidence of 20%, 23% after 6 months and 12 months post-transplant. No significant difference was noted between 12 and 24 months post-LTX. The patients who developed DM were older (57+/-15 vs 53+/-13 years, p=0.009), had increased BMI (26+/-5 vs 24+/-4, p=0.0001), shorter time from diagnosis to LTX (21+/-13 vs 28+/-18 months, p=0.007) more cytomegalovirus infection and more acute rejection and hyperglycemia in the first month after LTX. Four patients died in the PTDM group compared to nine patients in the no-DM group (12% vs 14%; p=0.72). Post-transplant diabetes is a common complication in lung transplant patients receiving tacrolimus-based immunosuppression. The risk for developing PTDM is greatest among older recipients, those obese, and among recipients with more rejections episodes.

  20. Preconception and early pregnancy air pollution exposures and risk of gestational diabetes mellitus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robledo, Candace A. [Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health, Division of Intramural Population Health Research, Epidemiology Branch, Rockville, MD 20892 (United States); Mendola, Pauline, E-mail: pauline.mendola@mail.nih.gov [Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health, Division of Intramural Population Health Research, Epidemiology Branch, Rockville, MD 20892 (United States); Yeung, Edwina; Männistö, Tuija [Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health, Division of Intramural Population Health Research, Epidemiology Branch, Rockville, MD 20892 (United States); Sundaram, Rajeshwari; Liu, Danping [Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health, Division of Intramural Population Health Research, Biostatistics and Bioinformatics Branch, Rockville, MD 20892 (United States); Ying, Qi [Texas A& M University, Zachary Department of Civil Engineering, College Station, TX 77845 (United States); Sherman, Seth [The EMMES Corporation, Rockville, MD 20852 (United States); Grantz, Katherine L. [Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health, Division of Intramural Population Health Research, Epidemiology Branch, Rockville, MD 20892 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    Background: Air pollution has been linked to gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) but no studies have evaluated impact of preconception and early pregnancy air pollution exposures on GDM risk. Methods: Electronic medical records provided data on 219,952 singleton deliveries to mothers with (n=11,334) and without GDM (n=208,618). Average maternal exposures to particulate matter (PM) ≤ 2.5 μm (PM{sub 2.5}) and PM{sub 2.5} constituents, PM ≤ 10 μm (PM{sub 10}), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), carbon monoxide, sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and ozone (O{sub 3}) were estimated for the 3-month preconception window, first trimester, and gestational weeks 1–24 based on modified Community Multiscale Air Quality models for delivery hospital referral regions. Binary regression models with robust standard errors estimated relative risks (RR) for GDM per interquartile range (IQR) increase in pollutant concentrations adjusted for study site, maternal age and race/ethnicity. Results: Preconception maternal exposure to NO{sub X} (RR=1.09, 95% CI: 1.04, 1.13) and SO{sub 2} (RR=1.05, 1.01, 1.09) were associated with increased risk of subsequent GDM and risk estimates remained elevated for first trimester exposure. Preconception O{sub 3} was associated with lower risk of subsequent GDM (RR=0.93, 0.90, 0.96) but risks increased later in pregnancy. Conclusion: Maternal exposures to NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} preconception and during the first few weeks of pregnancy were associated with increased GDM risk. O{sub 3} appeared to increase GDM risk in association with mid-pregnancy exposure but not in earlier time windows. These common exposures merit further investigation. - Highlights: • Air pollution may be related to gestational diabetes (GDM). • No prior studies have examined preconception exposure. • Maternal exposure to NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} before conception increased subsequent GDM risk. • NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} exposure in the first seven weeks of pregnancy also increased

  1. Glukagonomsyndrom uden diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Carsten Sauer; Mikkelsen, Dorthe Bisgaard; Vestergaard, Vibeke

    2008-01-01

    without diabetes. Glucagonoma syndrome is characterized by glucagon overproduction, diabetes, depression, deep venous thrombosis and necrolytic migrating erythema. Glucagonoma is frequently diagnosed late which increases the risk of metastases. It is important not to rule out glucagonoma in patients...... with a relevant clinical picture but without diabetes. Udgivelsesdato: 2008-Nov-17...

  2. Cardiovascular consequences of diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.A. Baan (Caroline)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractDiabetes mellitus comprises a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders that have one common feature: abnormally high levels of glucose in the blood. The most common form is non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NlDDM); about 80-90% of all diabetic patients has NlDDM

  3. Noise exposure during the first trimester and the risk of gestational diabetes mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Kyoung-Bok; Min, Jin-Young

    2017-07-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is a form of diabetes that affects pregnant women. GDM tends to resolve after delivery, but has an impact on the health of the mother and her offspring. Considering the potential association between noise and diabetes and the susceptibility of the pregnant state to diabetogenesis, noise pollution may be associated with the risk of GDM; however, there is no evidence of the effect of noise pollution on GDM. In this study, we investigated the association between residential exposure to noise during the first trimester and incidence of GDM using the National Health Insurance Service-National Sample Cohort (NHIS-NSC), a representative sample of South Koreans. We analyzed the National Health Insurance Service-National Sample Cohort (2002-2013), a population-wide health insurance claim data. Study population was a total of 18 165 pregnant women. GDM was defined as ICD-10 code O244, and noise exposure levels were categorized as daytime (07:00-19:00) and nighttime (23:00-7:00). Other known risk factors for GDM were age, income, residential area, physical activity, smoking, drinking, blood sugar levels, and body mass index before getting pregnant. The study population included 18 165 pregnant women, of which 8.8% developed gestational diabetes. After adjustment, the adjusted OR (95% CI) for GDM associated with 1 dB increase in nighttime noise was 1.07 (95% CI: 1.05-1.10). Compared with the reference group (Quartile 1), the adjusted ORs for GDM in those exposed to the highest quartile of noise exposure (Quartile 4) was 1.61 (95% CI: 1.38-1.87) at nighttime noise. However, no significant association was observed between daytime noise exposure (07:00-19:00) and the incidence of GDM. We observed that the odds of gestational diabetes during the first trimester was 1.6 times higher for pregnant women exposed to elevated nighttime noise compared to similar women exposed to normal baseline noise levels in South Korea. Although this finding

  4. Gestational diabetes mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is the most common medical complication of pregnancy. It is associated with maternal and neonatal adverse outcomes. Maintaining adequate blood glucose levels in GDM reduces morbidity for both mother and baby. There is a lack of uniform strategies for screening and diagnosing GDM globally. This review covers the latest update in the diagnosis and management of GDM. The initial treatment of GDM consists of diet and exercise. If these measures fail to achieve ...

  5. Cardiovascular Risk Factors and Distributions of the Ankle-Brachial Index among Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badaruddoza Doza

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The aim of present study is to observe the association between the levels of ankle-brachial index (ABI and cardiovascular risk factors among people with type 2 diabetes mellitus in north India. A cross-sectional study was carried out at a centre for heart and diabetic clinic in the state of Punjab on 1121 subjects (671 males and 450 females with type 2 diabetes mellitus. History of symptoms related to cardiovascular diseases was noted, and blood pressure and anthropometric measurements were recorded. Ankle-brachial index (ABI was measured using ultrasonic Doppler flow detector. Subjects with ABI ≤0.9 and ≥1.30 were classified as having low and high ABI, respectively. Females had a higher BMI and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (<0.001. Whereas, males had higher diastolic blood pressure and duration of type 2 diabetes mellitus. The differences of systolic blood pressure and ankle-brachial index were not found significant between the sexes. The prevalence of low ABI (<0.9 was 4.47% in men and 4.67% in women and high ABI (≥1.30 was prevalent in 14% of men and 10.45% of women. Age, BMI, baPWV, and blood pressures were significantly associated with ABI value in both sexes. The results suggested that the ABI might be used as a strong indicator for cardiovascular risk factors in type 2 diabetic subjects.

  6. OPTIMIZING LIFESTYLE IMPROVES GLYCEMIC PROFILE IN PATIENTS AT RISK FOR DIABETES MELLITUS

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    Rucsandra Dănciulescu Miulescu

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available There is a pandemic of type 2 diabetes mellitus due to urban and sedentary lifestyle, ageing and obesity.The most important means to prevent this disease is to optimize the lifestyle.Our study aimed to follow-up the effect of moderate caloric restriction and increase of physical activityon clinical and metabolic parameters in persons at risk to develop type 2 diabetes.Twenty-three overweight or obese patients with either altered fasting glucose or altered glucosetolerance were included in this study. They were followed up for 2 years for clinical progress and metabolicprofile, while on lifestyle counseling.The dietary and physical recommendations to improve lifestyle were followed by a small reduction inthe BMI, total cholesterol, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, together with an increase of HDL at 1 and 2years of dietary counseling. However there was a significant reduction in abdominal circumference, fastingglycemia and glycemia at 2 hours during oral glucose tolerance test.The small reduction in BMI indicates the need of a more intensive lifestyle conseling.

  7. Vascular risks and complications in diabetes mellitus: the role of helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamed, Sherifa Ahmed; Amine, Nabila F; Galal, Ghada M; Helal, Shaaban R; Tag El-Din, Lubna M; Shawky, Ola A; Ahmed, Eman A; Abdel Rahman, Mohamed S

    2008-01-01

    Patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) are at risk for Helicobacter pylori infection. This infection has been linked to atherosclerosis and its vascular complications. The aim of this study was to evaluate the: (1) prevalence of H pylori infection in patients with DM; (2) association between diabetic vascular complications and H pylori infection; and (3) influence of H pylori infection on atherosclerosis and inflammatory biomarkers. In this study, we evaluated 80 patients with DM for atherosclerosis; cardiac, cerebral, and peripheral vascular diseases; retinopathy; neuropathy; and nephropathy. We estimated the blood levels of glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin, complete blood cell count, erythrocytic sedimentation rate, lipid profile, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin (IL)-6, and anti-H pylori IgG antibodies. H pylori infection was detected in 85% of patients versus 76.7% for control subjects. Carotid artery intima-media thickness was significant in H pylori-infected patients. IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha were significantly associated with H pylori infection. In multivariate analysis, blood glucose, triglycerides, erythrocytic sedimentation rate, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha increased the odds for atherothrombotic cause of cerebral ischemia in H pylori infection. We concluded that H pylori infection is common in DM and seems to be linked to the presence of atherosclerosis and ischemic cerebrovascular stroke. This effect could be mediated by increasing cytokine levels.

  8. Low Carbohydrate-Diet Scores and Long-term Risk of Type 2 Diabetes Among Women With a History of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus: A Prospective Cohort Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bao, Wei; Li, Shanshan; Chavarro, Jorge E; Tobias, Deirdre K; Zhu, Yeyi; Hu, Frank B; Zhang, Cuilin

    2016-01-01

    ...), but the long-term effect on progression from GDM to type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is unknown. We aimed to examine the long-term risk of T2DM in association with a low-carbohydrate dietary pattern among women with a history of GDM...

  9. Risk for Gestational Diabetes Mellitus and Adverse Birth Outcomes in Chinese Women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

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    Qing Xiao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To examine the association of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS in early pregnancy with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM and adverse birth outcomes. Methods. In this retrospective cohort study including 2389 pregnant women, the medical records of 352 women diagnosed with PCOS were evaluated. Outcomes included GDM, preterm birth, low birth weight, macrosomia, and being small and large for gestational age. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to examine the association of the risk for GDM and adverse birth outcomes with PCOS after adjusting for confounders. Results. Women previously diagnosed with PCOS had a higher risk of GDM (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 1.55, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.14–2.09. A strong association was seen between PCOS and preterm birth (adjusted OR 1.69, 95% CI: 1.08–2.67. On stratified analysis, the adjusted OR for GDM among women with PCOS undergoing assisted reproductive technology was 1.44 (95% CI: 1.03–1.92 and among women with PCOS who conceived spontaneously was 1.60 (1.18–2.15. No increased risk for other adverse birth outcomes was observed. Conclusions. Women with PCOS were more likely to experience GDM and preterm birth.

  10. Risk Factors for the Requirement of Antenatal Insulin Treatment in Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

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    Mayu Watanabe

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Poor maternal glycemic control increases maternal and fetal risk for adverse outcomes, and strict management of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM is recommended to prevent neonatal and maternal complications. However, risk factors for the requirement of antenatal insulin treatment (AIT are not well-investigated in the pregnant women with GDM. We enrolled 37 pregnant women with GDM and investigated the risk for AIT by comparing the patients with AIT (AIT group; n=10 and without insulin therapy (Diet group; n=27. The 1-h and 2-h plasma glucose levels and the number of abnormal values in 75 g OGTT were significantly higher in AIT group compared with Diet group. By logistic regression analysis, plasma glucose level at 1-h was significant predictor for AIT and the odds ratios were 1.115 (1.004–1.239 using forward selection method and 1.192 (1.006–1.413 using backward elimination method. There were no significant differences in obstetrical outcomes and neonatal complications. 1-h plasma glucose levels in 75 g OGTT are useful parameters in predicting the requirement for AIT in GDM. Both maternal and neonatal complications are comparable in GDM patients with and without insulin therapy.

  11. Is gestational diabetes mellitus an independent risk factor for macrosomia: a meta-analysis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiu-Jie; Qin, Feng-Yun; Hu, Chuan-Lai; Zhu, Meng; Tian, Chao-Qing; Li, Li

    2015-04-01

    The aim of our meta-analysis was to explore whether gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is an independent risk factor for macrosomia or not. Three databases were systematically reviewed and reference lists of relevant articles were checked. Meta-analysis of published epidemiological studies (cohort and case-control studies) comparing whether GDM was associated with macrosomia. Calculations of pooled estimates were conducted in random-effect models. Heterogeneity was tested by using Chi square test and I (2) statistics. Publication bias was estimated from Egger's test (linear regression method) and Begg's test (rank correlation method). Twelve studies met the inclusion criteria, including five cohort studies and seven case-control studies. The meta-analysis showed that GDM was associated with macrosomia independent of other risk factors. The adjusted odds ratio was 1.71, 95% CI (1.52, 1.94) in random-effect model, stratified analyses showed no differences regarding different study design, quality grade, definition of macrosomia, location of study and number of confounding factors adjusted for. There was no indication of a publication bias either from the result of Egger's test or Begg's test. Our findings indicate that GDM should be considered as an independent risk factor for newborn macrosomia. To adequately evaluate the clinical evolution of GDM need to be carefully assessed and monitored.

  12. External validation of a clinical scoring system for the risk of gestational diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, M.; Opmeer, B. C.; Zweers, E. J. K.; van Ballegooie, E.; ter Brugge, H. G.; de Valk, H. W.; Visser, G. H. A.; Mol, B. W. J.

    2009-01-01

    Aim: A prediction rule for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) could be helpful in early detection and increased efficiency of screening. A prediction rule by means of a clinical scoring system is available, but has never been validated externally. The aim of this study was to validate the scoring s

  13. Chronic kidney disease and mortality risk among older patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (ZODIAC-24).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drion, I.; Hateren, K.J. van; Joosten, H.; Alkhalaf, A.; Groenier, K.H.; Kleefstra, N.; Wetzels, J.F.M.; Bilo, H.J.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to investigate the association between a decreased estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), albuminuria and mortality in elderly patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). DESIGN: prospective observational cohort study. Setting: primary care. Subjects: eight hundred and ten

  14. [Diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular risk: Working group recommendations of Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease of the Spanish Society of Diabetes (SED, 2015)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrieta, Francisco; Iglesias, Pedro; Pedro-Botet, Juan; Tébar, Francisco Javier; Ortega, Emilio; Nubiola, Andreu; Pardo, Jose Luis; Maldonado, Gonzálo Fernando; Obaya, Juan Carlos; Matute, Pablo; Petrecca, Romina; Alonso, Nuria; Sarabia, Elena; Sánchez-Margalet, Victor; Alemán, José Juan; Navarro, Jorge; Becerra, Antonio; Duran, Santiago; Aguilar, Manuel; Escobar-Jiménez, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    The present paper updates the Clinical Practice Recommendations for the management of cardiovascular risk factors (CVRF) in diabetes mellitus. This is a medical consensus agreed by an independent panel of experts from the Spanish Society of Diabetes (SED). Several consensuses have been proposed by scientific and medical Societies to achieve clinical goals. However, the risk score for general population may lack sensitivity for individual assessment or for particular groups at risk, such as diabetics. Traditional risk factors together with non-traditional factors are reviewed throughout this paper. Intervention strategies for managing CVRF in the diabetic patient are reviewed in detail: balanced food intake, weight reduction, physical exercise, smoking cessation, reduction in HbA1c, therapy for high blood pressure, obesity, lipid disorders, and platelet anti-aggregation. It is hoped that these guidelines can help clinicians in the decisions of their clinical activity. This regular update by the SED Cardiovascular Disease Group of the most relevant concepts, and of greater practical and realistic clinical interest, is presented in order to reduce CVR of diabetics. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  15. [Diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular risk: Working group recommendations of Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease of the Spanish Society of Diabetes (SED, 2015)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrieta, Francisco; Iglesias, Pedro; Pedro-Botet, Juan; Tébar, Francisco Javier; Ortega, Emilio; Nubiola, Andreu; Pardo, Jose Luis; Maldonado, Gonzálo Fernando; Obaya, Juan Carlos; Matute, Pablo; Petrecca, Romina; Alonso, Nuria; Sarabia, Elena; Sánchez-Margalet, Victor; Alemán, José Juan; Navarro, Jorge; Becerra, Antonio; Duran, Santiago; Aguilar, Manuel; Escobar-Jiménez, Fernando

    2016-05-01

    The present paper updates the Clinical Practice Recommendations for the management of cardiovascular risk factors (CVRF) in diabetes mellitus. This is a medical consensus agreed by an independent panel of experts from the Spanish Society of Diabetes (SED). Several consensuses have been proposed by scientific and medical Societies to achieve clinical goals. However, the risk score for general population may lack sensitivity for individual assessment or for particular groups at risk, such as diabetics. Traditional risk factors together with non-traditional factors are reviewed throughout this paper. Intervention strategies for managing CVRF in the diabetic patient are reviewed in detail: balanced food intake, weight reduction, physical exercise, smoking cessation, reduction in HbA1c, therapy for high blood pressure, obesity, lipid disorders, and platelet anti-aggregation. It is hoped that these guidelines can help clinicians in the decisions of their clinical activity. This regular update by the SED Cardiovascular Disease Group of the most relevant concepts, and of greater practical and realistic clinical interest, is presented in order to reduce CVR of diabetics.

  16. Dementia and diabetes mellitus

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    Pavlović Dragan M.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Dementia and Diabetes mellitus (DM are major health problems nowadays. DM leads to a significant cognitive decline and increases the risk of dementia, mostly Alzheimer's Disease (AD and vascular dementia (VaD by 50-100% and 100-150%, respectively. Amyloid beta (Abeta, the main pathogenic factor in AD development, is eliminated by advanced glycation end products (AGEs and degraded by insulin degrading enzyme (IDE for which it competes with insulin. Insulin stimulates secretion of Abeta and promotes brain inflammation. DM I and II cause slowing down of mental speed, lowering of mental flexibility and DM II learning and memory disturbances. DM acts both directly by hyperglycaemia and hyperinsulinaemia and by the blood vessel changes. Hyperglycaemia changes synapse plasticity and leads to cognitive decline. AGEs disrupt the neuron function and bonding to Abeta increases its aggregability. Glycation of tau protein promotes production of neurofibrillary tangles (NFT, the main intracellular pathogenic factor in AD. AGE2 in DM causes pathological angiogenesis and apoptosis of neurons. AGE receptor (RAGE is also the specific Abeta receptor with which it produces reactive oxygen species that has, as a result, disruption of mitochondrial function and reduction of neuronal energy resources. Insulinoresistance is linked with the dysexecutive syndrome, and hyperinsulinaemia increases the risk of AD especially by enhancing phosphorylation of tau protein and formation of NFT. Application of insulin showed improvement of memory, behaviour and affect in AD patients. Good glycoregulation emerged as an important factor in dementia prevention, and a better insight in relations of DM and brain function will lead to new potential dementia therapies. .

  17. Diabetes Mellitus and Younger Age Are Risk Factors for Hyperphosphatemia in Peritoneal Dialysis Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imtiaz, Rameez; Hawken, Steven; McCormick, Brendan B.; Leung, Simon; Hiremath, Swapnil; Zimmerman, Deborah L.

    2017-01-01

    Hyperphosphatemia has been associated with adverse outcomes in patients with end stage kidney disease (ESKD). The purpose of this study was to determine risk factors for hyperphosphatemia in ESKD patients treated with peritoneal dialysis (PD). This information will be used to develop a patient specific phosphate binder application to facilitate patient self-management of serum phosphate. Adult PD patients documented their food, beverage, and phosphate binder intake for three days using a dietitian developed food journal. Phosphate content of meals was calculated using the ESHA Food Processor SQL Software (ESHA Research, Salem, UT, USA). Clinic biochemistry tests and an adequacy assessment (Baxter Adequest program) were done. Univariate logistic regression was used to determine predictors of serum phosphate >1.78 mmol/L. A multivariable logistic regression model was then fit including those variables that achieved a significance level of p 1.78 mmol/L). In univariate analysis, the variables associated with an increased risk of hyperphosphatemia with a p-value carbonate (0.08), higher parathyroid serum concentration (0.08), lower phosphate intake (0.03), lower measured glomerular filtration rate (0.15), higher phosphate excretion (0.11), and a higher body mass index (0.15). After multivariable logistic regression analysis, younger age (odds ratio (OR) 0.023 per decade, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.00065 to 0.455; p = 0.012), presence of diabetes (OR 11.40, 95 CI 2.82 to 61.55; p = 0.0003), and measured GFR (OR 0.052 per mL/min decrease; 95% CI 0.0025 to 0.66) were associated with hyperphosphatemia. Our results support that younger age and diabetes mellitus are significant risk factors for hyperphosphatemia. These findings warrant further investigation to determine the potential mechanisms that predispose younger patients and those with DM to hyperphosphatemia. PMID:28218647

  18. The risk factors and incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome in women with previous gestational diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valizadeh, Majid; Alavi, Nooshin; Mazloomzadeh, Saeideh; Piri, Zahra; Amirmoghadami, Hamidreza

    2015-04-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) affects nearly 5% of pregnancies. Significant proportion of the women with previous GDM develops type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in the next years, which indicates a higher risk in them than in the general population. We conducted this study to determine the risk factors and incidence of abnormal glucose level and metabolic syndrome (MetS) in women with a history of GDM in a long period after delivery in our region. We extracted the demographic characteristics of 110 women with GDM who had delivered during 2004 - 2010 in three main hospitals of Zanjan City, Iran. The patients were recalled to perform oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and other necessary tests for MetS diagnosis. Anthropometric measurements were recorded of all the participants. In this study, 110 women with a history of GDM were studied at one to six years since delivery. Among these women, 36 (32.7%) developed T2DM and 11 (10%) had impaired fasting glucose (IFG) or impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). Moreover, 22 women (20%) had developed MetS. among those with abnormal results in glycemic test, 93.6% had fasting blood sugar (FBS) ≥ 95 mg/dL (≥ 5.27 mmol/L)at the time of GDM diagnosis in the index pregnancy that was significantly higher than the normal glycemic test (NGT) group with 42.9% being affected (OR, 19.55; P discovered as a protective factor in women with a history of GDM (OR, 0.35; P = 0.01). Those with abnormal results were significantly different from NGT group in the number of parities (2.61 ± 1.4 vs. 2.05 ± 1.1, respectively; OR, 1.4; P = 0.03). The most common component of MetS among women with a history of GDM was FBS > 100 mg/dL (> 5.55 mmol/L). Regarding the high incidence of the T2DM and MetS among women with a history of GDM, they should be screened at a regular interval for diabetes and other cardiovascular risk factors.

  19. Maternal plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations and the risk for gestational diabetes mellitus.

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    Cuilin Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Evidence is accumulating for a role of vitamin D in maintaining normal glucose homeostasis. However, studies that prospectively examined circulating concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-[OH] D in relation to diabetes risk are limited. Our objective is to determine the association between maternal plasma 25-[OH] D concentrations in early pregnancy and the risk for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM. METHODS: A nested case-control study was conducted among a prospective cohort of 953 pregnant women. Among them, 57 incident GDM cases were ascertained and 114 women who were not diagnosed with GDM were selected as controls. Controls were frequency matched to cases for the estimated season of conception of the index pregnancy. RESULTS: Among women who developed GDM, maternal plasma 25-[OH] D concentrations at an average of 16 weeks of gestation were significantly lower than controls (24.2 vs. 30.1 ng/ml, P<0.001. This difference remained significant (3.62 ng/ml lower on average in GDM cases than controls (P value = 0.018 after the adjustment for maternal age, race, family history of diabetes, and pre-pregnancy BMI. Approximately 33% of GDM cases, compared with 14% of controls (P<0.001, had maternal plasma 25-[OH] D concentrations consistent with a pre-specified diagnosis of vitamin D deficiency (<20 ng/ml. After adjustment for the aforementioned covariates including BMI, vitamin D deficiency was associated with a 2.66-fold (OR (95% CI: 2.66 (1.01-7.02 increased GDM risk. Moreover, each 5 ng/ml decrease in 25-[OH] D concentrations was related to a 1.29-fold increase in GDM risk (OR (95% CI: 1.29 (1.05-1.60. Additional adjustment for season and physical activity did not change findings substantially. CONCLUSIONS: Findings from the present study suggest that maternal vitamin D deficiency in early pregnancy is significantly associated with an elevated risk for GDM.

  20. Type 2 diabetes mellitus and inflammation: Prospects for biomarkers of risk and nutritional intervention

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    Alaa Badawi

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Alaa Badawi1, Amira Klip2, Pierre Haddad3, David EC Cole4, Bibiana Garcia Bailo1,5, Ahmed El-Sohemy5, Mohamed Karmali11Office for Biotechnology, Genomics and Population Health, Public Health Agency of Canada, Toronto, ON, Canada; 2Cell Biology Program, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, Canada; 3Natural Health Products and Metabolic Diseases Laboratory, Department of Pharmacology and Montreal Diabetes Research Centre, Montreal, QC, Canada; 4Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology, 5Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, CanadaAbstract: Obesity is a major risk factor for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM, which is a significant health problem worldwide. Active disease is associated with low-grade chronic inflammation resulting in part from the activation of the innate immune system. In obesity, this activation leads to the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β and interleukin-6 that block major anabolic cascades downstream of insulin signaling and thus disrupt insulin homeostasis and action. Cytokines also trigger the production of acute-phase reactants such as C-reactive protein, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, serum amyloid-A, and haptoglobin. The elevated synthesis of pro-inflammatory cytokines and acute-phase proteins (inflammatory network characterizes the early (or pre-clinical stages of T2DM and exhibits a graded increase with the disease progression. Current evidence suggests that understanding inflammatory networks can point to new biomarkers that may permit capturing the interaction between genetic and environmental risk factors in the pathogenesis of T2DM. Such biomarkers have a significant public health potential in the prediction of disease occurrence beyond risk factors presently monitored, such as family history, lifestyle assessment and standard clinical chemistry profiles. Furthermore, inflammatory markers may assist in the

  1. Study on risk factors associated with diabetic retinopathy among the patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in South India

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    Senthilvel Vasudevan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To find the severities status of diabetic retinopathy(DRamong the patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and to determine the association of the severities of diabetic retinopathy with duration of DR, HbA1C levels, history of hypertension, age and gender in the study population.METHODS:Hospital based cross-sectional studies with sample of 100 patients with DR were selected by using simple random sampling technique with a structured questionnaire was conducted in May to June 2012. The study participants those who with DR aged ≥35 years were included in this study and an oral consent was also collected from the study participants. Descriptive statistics, univariate and multivariate ordinal logistic regression analysis were performed. MS Excel spread sheet was used for data entry and data analysis was done by using SPSS 21.0 version. Statistical significance was taken as PRESULTS:Out of 100 patients, mean age of the patient was found as 53.16±10.81(range 35-78y. By univariate analysis, there was a positive relationship between diabetic retinopathy severity and age(PPPPP>0.05 by Mann Whitney u-test. All these factors were found as independent risk factors with the severity of DR except the factor age.CONCLUSION:This study was concluded that the duration of DM, HbA1C levels, family history of DM, History of hypertension and gender were independently associated with severity of DR. However, the factors like age and HDL weren't significant with severity of DR in multivariate analysis. Therefore, by using the availability of the existing treatments and controlling in time, which can prevent and free from the vision threatening diseases or delay the occurrence of DR in their life.

  2. A Prelimenary Result of the Cardiovascular Risk factors Intervention Study (Pikom Study): Diabetes Mellitus, Hypertension and their Associated Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Mafauzy; Winn, Than; Rampal, Gr Lekhraj; Abdul Rashid, Ar; Mustaffa, Be

    2005-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) has been the number one cause of death since the last three decades in Malaysia and diabetes mellitus and hypertension are considered as major risk factors. A study to reduce risk factors for cardiovascular diseases in the community (PIKOM) through education and lifestyle changes was undertaken. The study population was from four different areas in Peninsular Malaysia - Kota Bharu and Bachok in Kelantan ; Raub in Pahang; Gunung Besout in Perak and Felda Palong in Negri Sembilan. The subjects invited to participate in this study ware aged between 30 - 65 years, did not have any debilitating illnesses and no known history of diabetes mellitus, hypertension or cardiovascular disease. Subjects were asked to come to the local clinic in a fasting state and after physical examination, blood was taken for plasma glucose and lipids. Oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was then performed. A total of 4,121 subjects participated in the study. The proportion of subjects with diabetes mellitus was highest in Felda Palong area (20.3%) and lowest in Raub area (7.1%). The proportion of subjects with hypertension was also highest in Felda Palong area (38.6%) and lowest in Raub area (29.1%). This could be attributable to the subjects in Felda Palong having the highest mean Body Mass Index (BMI) and Waist-to-Hip Ratio (WHR). There were significant associations between diabetes and hypertension with age and obesity. Subjects with diabetes mellitus and hypertension also had the highest mean age, BMI, WHR and plasma cholesterol.In conclusion, the proportion of patients with risk factors for CVD was high and intervention studies through education and lifestyle changes were being carried out to see their effectiveness.

  3. The Effects of Dipeptidyl Peptidase-4 Inhibitors on Cardiovascular Disease Risks in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

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    Pegah Yousefzadeh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To review the current literature investigating the effects of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4 inhibitors on the risk factors of cardiovascular disease (CVD. Methods. We conducted a search of PubMed and MEDLINE database, using the term DPP-4 inhibitor in combination with the following terms: metabolic syndrome, hypertension, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, obesity, and CVD. We reviewed 100 relevant studies out of 227 articles, excluding single case reports, studies using animal models, and reports not written in English. We included 38 references in this review article. Results. The majority of the recent clinical studies have demonstrated that DPP-4 inhibitors have beneficial effects on cardiovascular (CV system. These agents may have the potential to lower blood pressure, improve lipid profile and endothelial dysfunction, decrease the macrophage-mediated inflammatory response, and prevent myocardial injury. Conclusion. DPP-4 inhibitors have some CV protective effects in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM in addition to their antidiabetic actions. Long-term outcome clinical trials are under way to investigate the effects of the DPP-4 inhibitors on the elevated CV risks in patients with T2DM. Further investigation in a large cohort is warranted to assess the exact mechanisms of CV protective effects of DPP-4 inhibitors.

  4. Energy Therapies and Diabetes Mellitus

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Diana W. Guthrie; Maureen Gamble

    2001-01-01

    Energy Therapies and Diabetes Mellitus Diana W. Guthrie , PhD, FAAN, CDE and Maureen Gamble , BSN, MA, CHTP/I, CCAP, RM Abstract In Brief People with diabetes require multiple interventions to reach their glycemic goals...

  5. The Correlation of Age Factor, Administration, and Metformin Dose Against Risk of Side Effect on Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

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    Magdarita Riwu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Metformin is an antidiabetic oral medicine commonly recommended as first line treatment on type 2 diabetes mellitus. Metformin can caused drug related problems (DRPs such as gastrointestinal disorders, e.g. diarrhea, nausea, and flatulence. This study aimed to analyze correlation profiles on age, administration, and metformin dosage factors against risk of gastrointestinal disorders among newly diagnosed diabetic outpatients of National Health Insurance in RSAU Dr. M. Salamun Bandung. This study was an analytic observational study with a cross sectional method. The study was carried out in the internal medicine outpatient clinic and data were extracted from patients medical records from April to June 2014. Metformin-treated patients were interviewed using a form check. The number of patients were 65 with the median rate was 48 years old. Side effect reported were flatulence (58.46% and nausea (41.54%. Administration and metformin dosage factors were correlated to the risk of side effects such as nausea and flatulence on type 2 diabetes mellitus (p0.05. The administration of metformin is recommended after meals and with a lower initial dose titrated slowly to reduce and avoid the side effects of nausea and flatulence in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  6. Effects of Canagliflozin on Fracture Risk in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Nelson B; Bilezikian, John P; Usiskin, Keith; Edwards, Robert; Desai, Mehul; Law, Gordon; Meininger, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Canagliflozin is a sodium glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitor developed to treat type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The purpose of this study was to describe the effects of canagliflozin on bone fracture risk. This was a randomized phase 3 study in patients with T2DM. Canagliflozin doses of 100 and 300 mg were evaluated in the overall population of patients from 9 placebo- and active-controlled studies (N = 10 194), as well as in separate analyses of a single trial enriched with patients with a prior history/risk of cardiovascular disease (ie, the CANagliflozin cardioVascular Assessment Study [CANVAS]; N = 4327) and a pooled population of 8 non-CANVAS studies (N = 5867). The incidence of adjudicated fracture adverse events (AEs), fall-related AEs, and volume depletion-related AEs was assessed. The incidence of fractures was similar with canagliflozin (1.7%) and noncanagliflozin (1.5%) in the pooled non-CANVAS studies. In CANVAS, a significant increase in fractures was seen with canagliflozin (4.0%) vs placebo (2.6%) that was balanced between the upper and lower limbs. The incidence of fractures was higher with canagliflozin (2.7%) vs noncanagliflozin (1.9%) in the overall population, which was driven by the increase of fractures in CANVAS. The incidence of reported fall-related AEs was low, but significantly higher with canagliflozin in CANVAS, potentially related to volume depletion-related AEs, but not significantly different in the pooled non-CANVAS studies and the overall population. Fracture risk was increased with canagliflozin treatment, driven by CANVAS patients, who were older, with a prior history/risk of cardiovascular disease, and with lower baseline estimated glomerular filtration rate and higher baseline diuretic use. The increase in fractures may be mediated by falls; however, the cause of increased fracture risk with canagliflozin is unknown.

  7. Screening in high-risk group of gestational diabetes mellitus with its maternal and fetal outcomes

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    Angadi Rajasab Nilofer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM is a metabolic disorder defined as glucose intolerance with the onset or first recognition during pregnancy. Women with GDM are at increased risk for adverse obstetric and perinatal outcome. The complications associated with GDM can be prevented by early recognition, intense monitoring and proper treatment. Aims: The present study was done to screen the high-risk pregnancy group for GDM, to find the incidence of abnormal results on screening and to correlate the abnormal results with the maternal and fetal outcomes. The study was done in a tertiary care hospital and teaching institute. It was a prospective cohort study. Materials and Methods: Selective screening for GDM was done in 150 pregnant women with high-risk factors. Screening was done with 50 g glucose challenge test (GCT after 18 weeks, and if GCT was negative then the test was repeated after 28 weeks of pregnancy. The patients who were having an abnormal GCT were subjected to 100 g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT. All GDM patients were followed up and treated with diet and/or insulin therapy till delivery to know maternal and fetal outcomes. The period of study was from April 2008 to March 2009. Results: 7.3% of study population was OGCT positive. 6% of the study population was OGTT positive. Age >25 years, obesity, family history of DM, and past history of GDM were the risk factors significantly associated with GDM. One newborn had hypoglycemia and one had hyperbilirubinemia. The fetal and maternal outcome in GDM patients was good in our study due to early diagnosis and intervention. Conclusion: Women with GDM are at an increased risk for adverse obstetric and perinatal outcome. The increased morbidity in GDM is preventable by meticulous antenatal care.

  8. Aortic Stiffness and Cardiovascular Risk in Women with Previous Gestational Diabetes Mellitus.

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    Tove Lekva

    Full Text Available Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM is a significant risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD in later life, but the mechanism remains unclear. The aim of the study was to investigate indices of glucose metabolism, dyslipidemia, and arterial stiffness (as measured by pulse wave velocity (PWV, in women with and without a history of GDM, using both the old WHO and new IADPSG diagnostic criteria, at 5 years after the index pregnancy. Dyslipidemia and PWV were used as surrogate markers for CVD risk. The population-based prospective cohort included 300 women from the original STORK study. All participants had an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT during pregnancy. Five years later, the OGTT was repeated along with dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry, lipid analysis, and PWV analysis. Measurements were compared between those women who did and did not have GDM based on both the WHO and IADPSG criteria. We found that women with GDM based on the old WHO criteria had higher CVD risk at 5 years than those without GDM, with markedly elevated PWV and more severe dyslipidemia (higher triglycerides (TG/HDL cholesterol ratio. After adjusting for known risk factors, the most important predictors for elevated PWV and TG/HDL-C ratio at 5-year follow-up were maternal age, BMI, GDM, systolic blood pressure, and indices of glucose metabolism in the index pregnancy. In conclusion, we found a higher risk for CVD, based on the surrogate markers PWV and TG/HDL-C ratio, at 5-year follow-up in women diagnosed with GDM in the index pregnancy when using the old WHO diagnostic criteria.

  9. Gestational weight gain and risk of gestational diabetes mellitus among Chinese women

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Zheng; Ao Deng; Yang Huixia; Wang Yan

    2014-01-01

    Background Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is a common complication during pregnancy,and gestational weight gain is one of the major and modifiable risk factors.This study aims to estimate the relationship between the rate of gestational weight gain before diagnosis of GDM and the subsequent risk of GDM.Methods A case-control study was conducted with 90 GDM cases and 165 women in the control group from May 2012 to August 2012 at Peking University First Affiliated Hospital.GDM was diagnosed according to the standards issued by the Ministry of Health of China in 2011.The plasma glucose levels,weights,and covariate data of the women were obtained based on medical records.Univariate analysis and unconditional Logistic regression model were used to estimate the associations.Results After adjusting for age at delivery,parity,and pre-pregnancy body mass index,the risk of GDM increased with increasing rates of gestational weight gain.Compared with the lower rate of gestational weight gain (less than 0.28 kg per week),a rate of weight gain of 0.28 kg per week or more was associated with increased risk of GDM (odds ratio:2.03; 95% confidence interval:1.15 to 3.59).The association between the rate of gestational weight gain and GDM was primarily attributed to the increased weight gain in the first trimester.Conclusion High rates of gestational weight gain,particular during early pregnancy,may increase a woman's risk of GDM.

  10. Aortic Stiffness and Cardiovascular Risk in Women with Previous Gestational Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekva, Tove; Bollerslev, Jens; Norwitz, Errol R; Aukrust, Pål; Henriksen, Tore; Ueland, Thor

    2015-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is a significant risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD) in later life, but the mechanism remains unclear. The aim of the study was to investigate indices of glucose metabolism, dyslipidemia, and arterial stiffness (as measured by pulse wave velocity (PWV)), in women with and without a history of GDM, using both the old WHO and new IADPSG diagnostic criteria, at 5 years after the index pregnancy. Dyslipidemia and PWV were used as surrogate markers for CVD risk. The population-based prospective cohort included 300 women from the original STORK study. All participants had an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) during pregnancy. Five years later, the OGTT was repeated along with dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry, lipid analysis, and PWV analysis. Measurements were compared between those women who did and did not have GDM based on both the WHO and IADPSG criteria. We found that women with GDM based on the old WHO criteria had higher CVD risk at 5 years than those without GDM, with markedly elevated PWV and more severe dyslipidemia (higher triglycerides (TG)/HDL cholesterol ratio). After adjusting for known risk factors, the most important predictors for elevated PWV and TG/HDL-C ratio at 5-year follow-up were maternal age, BMI, GDM, systolic blood pressure, and indices of glucose metabolism in the index pregnancy. In conclusion, we found a higher risk for CVD, based on the surrogate markers PWV and TG/HDL-C ratio, at 5-year follow-up in women diagnosed with GDM in the index pregnancy when using the old WHO diagnostic criteria.

  11. Risk Factors for Diabetes Mellitus in Chronic Pancreatitis: A Cohort of 2,011 Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jun; Xin, Lei; Wang, Dan; Liao, Zhuan; Lin, Jin-Huan; Li, Bai-Rong; Du, Ting-Ting; Ye, Bo; Zou, Wen-Bin; Chen, Hui; Ji, Jun-Tao; Zheng, Zhao-Hong; Hu, Liang-Hao; Li, Zhao-Shen

    2016-04-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a common complication of chronic pancreatitis (CP) and increases the mortality. The identification of risk factors for DM development may contribute to the early detection and potential risk reduction of DM in patients with CP.Patients with CP admitted to Changhai Hospital (Shanghai, China) from January 2000 to December 2013 were enrolled. Cumulative rates of DM after the onset of CP were calculated by Kaplan-Meier method. Risk factors for DM development after the diagnosis of CP were identified by Cox proportional hazards regression model.A total of 2011 patients with CP were enrolled. During follow-up (median duration, 22.0 years), 564 patients developed DM. Cumulative rates of DM 20 and 50 years after the onset of CP were 45.8% (95% confidence interval [CI], 41.8%-50.0%) and 90.0% (95% CI, 75.4%-97.7%), respectively. Five risk factors for DM development after the diagnosis of CP were identified: male sex (hazard ratio [HR], 1.51; 95% CI, 1.08-2.11), alcohol abuse (HR, 2.00; 95% CI, 1.43-2.79), steatorrhea (HR, 1.46; 95% CI, 1.01-2.11), biliary stricture (HR, 2.25; 95% CI, 1.43-3.52), and distal pancreatectomy (HR, 3.41; 95% CI, 1.80-6.44).In conclusion, the risk of developing DM in patients with CP is not only influenced by the development of biliary stricture and steatorrhea indicating disease progression, and inherent nature of study subjects such as male sex, but also by modifiable factors including alcohol abuse and distal pancreatectomy.

  12. Estudios de intervención dirigidos a disminuir el riesgo de padecer diabetes mellitus tipo 2 Intervention studies aimed at lowering the risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus

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    José Luis Valenciaga Rodríguez

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Los estudios de intervención en población de riesgo, dirigidos a disminuir la frecuencia de la aparición de la diabetes mellitus tipo 2 (DM 2, son considerados orientadores para el enfoque del trabajo con esos pacientes. El objetivo del presente estudio es revisar los resultados de investigaciones dirigidas a disminuir el riesgo de padecer DM 2. Los sujetos estudiados presentaban alguna de las siguientes condiciones: glucosa alterada en ayunas (GAA o tolerancia a la glucosa alterada (TGA, antecedente personal de diabetes gestacional y síndrome metabólico. Se citan, entre otros, DPP (diabetes prevention program, DPS (diabetes prevention study, STOP-NIDDM (study to prevent non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, Hiperglucemia en ayunas, DAISI (dutch acarbose intervention trial, Da Quing (estudio chino, TRIPOD (troglitazone In the prevention of diabetes, intervención, XENDOS (xenical in the prevention of diabetes in obese subjects, WOSCOPS (west of scotland coronary prevention study, EDIT (early diabetes intervención trial, NAVIGATOR (nateglinide and valsartan in impaired glucose tolerance outcomes research, DREAM (diabetes reduction assessment with ramipril and rosiglitazone medication. Estos consistían en cambios de estilo de vida (fundamentalmente ejercicios físicos sistemáticos y orientaciones nutricionales y/o intervenciones terapéuticas. Se concluye que en personas con 25 o más años de edad de ambos sexos, con riesgo de padecer DM 2, la adopción de un estilo de vida saludable logra disminuir el riesgo de padecer el síndrome diabético. En sujetos con alto riesgo de DM 2, los fármacos que reportan mejores y más consistentes resultados son el metformin y la acarbosa. Otros como la nateglidina, rosiglitazona, ramipril y valsartan, se están investigando actualmente.Intervention studies on population at risk aimed at lowering the frequency of occurrence of type 2 diabetes mellitus(DM2 are considered as guiding lines for the work

  13. Pilot Study: Association of Traditional and Genetic Risk Factors and New-Onset Diabetes Mellitus Following Kidney Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakkera, H.A.; Hanson, R.L.; Raza, S.M.; DiStefano, J.K.; Millis, M.P.; Heilman, R.L.; Mulligan, D.C.; Reddy, K.S.; Mazur, M.J.; Hamawi, K.; Moss, A.A.; Mekeel, K.L.; Cerhan, J.R.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction New-onset diabetes mellitus, which occurs after kidney transplant and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), shares common risk factors and antecedents in impaired insulin secretion and action. Several genetic polymorphisms have been shown to be associated with T2DM. We hypothesized that transplant recipients who carry risk alleles for T2DM are “tipped over” to develop diabetes mellitus in the posttransplant milieu. Methods We investigated the association of genetic and traditional risk factors present before transplantation and the development of new-onset diabetes mellitus after kidney transplantation (NODAT). Markers in 8 known T2DM-linked genes were genotyped using either the iPLEX assay or allelic discrimination (AD)-PCR in the study cohort testing for association with NODAT. We used univariate and multivariate logistic regression models for the association of pretransplant nongenetic and genetic variables with the development of NODAT. Results The study cohort included 91 kidney transplant recipients with at least 1 year posttransplant follow-up, including 22 who developed NODAT. We observed that increased age, family history of T2DM, pretransplant obesity, and triglyceridemia were associated with NODAT development. In addition, we observed positive trends, although statistically not significant, for association between T2DM-associated genes and NODAT. Conclusions These findings demonstrated an increased NODAT risk among patient with a positive family history for T2DM, which, in conjunction with the observed positive predictive trends of known T2DM-associated genetic polymorphisms with NODAT, was suggestive of a genetic predisposition to NODAT. PMID:20005362

  14. Study of Pregnancy Course and Outcomes with Analysis of Possible Risk Factors in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus Type 1

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    М.Т. Rakhimdjamova

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available There were examined 53 pregnant patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus. When studying the course of pregnancy and its outcomes with analysis of possible risk factors it was established that they are not rare and first of all this is due to the fact that the pregnancy was not planned, level of glycemia decreased not enough, late admissions for specialized help was revealed, patients had comorbidities following iodine deficiency and impact of a number of other factors.

  15. The Relationship between Smoking as a Modifiable Risk Factor and Chronic Complications on Elderly with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Indang Trihandini

    2015-01-01

    Smoking is known as a variable that can be changed through a specific intervention activity. Recently in Indonesia, research related to chronic complication among elderly with type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (DM) was not available. This research has objective in exploring the risk of smoking towards chronic complication among elderly with type 2 DM. This research was using Riset Kesehatan Dasar (Riskesdas) in 2007. Riskesdas is a representative Indonesia Health Survey. 1,565 elderly (aged 60++ years...

  16. Dyslipidemia in Type 2 Diabetes mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Subarna Dhoj Thapa; Shiva Raj K.C.; Santosh Gautam; Deepika Gyawali

    2017-01-01

    Background: In type 2 diabetes mellitus lipid abnormalities are very common and is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular diseases.  This study was conducted to find association of type 2 diabetes and dyslipidemia.Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted at KISTMCTH. All the necessary data of patient with type 2 diabetes in the period between December 2016 and May 2017 were studied.Results: Out of 199 patients with diabetes mellitus 30.7% had total cholesterol...

  17. Prevalence and risk factors for the development of diabetes mellitus in Swedish cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallander, Marie; Eliasson, Johanna; Hedhammar, Ake

    2012-10-31

    The prevalence and risk factors for the development of feline diabetes mellitus (FDM) in Swedish cats have not previously been reported. The objective of the present pilot study was to indicate prevalence and possible risk factors for FDM in Swedish cats. Twenty diabetic cats from the database at the University Animal Hospital in Uppsala participated in the study, and these were matched with 20 healthy controls on sex and age. A mail-and-telephone questionnaire focusing on diet, activity and obesity was used. The prevalence of FDM during the years 2000-2004 based on the results of the hospital records in the present study was 21 per 10,000 cats. The diabetic cats were on average 9 years old when the disease signs were discovered (median, min-max 2-15). Among FDM cases, it was more common to be male (n=17 males vs n=3 females; P≤0.05). Ten out of twenty owners to cases (50%) reported their cats to be obese at the time of the diagnosis (median 9 years, min-max 2-15), as compared to five out of twenty (25%) controls at the same age. The median BW at the time for diagnosis was 5.5 kg (min-max 2.0-9.0) for cases, and 5.0 kg (min-max 3.0-8.0 kg) for controls, respectively. Despite that both cases and controls had the same median age at the time of the study (13 years, min-max 3-18), a significantly higher number of controls were alive at that age (n=16 controls vs 8 cases; P≤0.05). A significantly higher proportion of cases that were obese at the time of the FDM diagnosis were dead at the time of the study compared to the proportion of controls that were obese at a similar age (P≤0.05).The diets given at the time for diagnosis for cases compared to diet of the controls at a similar time were mainly commercial foods, and controls consumed a higher proportion of dry foods compared to cases (medians 79 vs 44% of DM intake/d, respectively; P≤0.05). Cases were less active compared to the controls (2.3 and 3.2 h/d, respectively; P≤0.05). The results indicate that the

  18. Chocolate consumption and risk of diabetes mellitus in the Physicians’ Health Study1234

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    Petrone, Andrew B; Sesso, Howard D; Gaziano, J Michael; Djoussé, Luc

    2015-01-01

    Background: Previous studies reported beneficial effects of cocoa or chocolate on insulin resistance, oxidative stress, and inflammation, which are important risk factors of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). However, it is unclear whether chocolate consumption is associated with risk of DM. Objective: We tested the hypothesis that chocolate consumption is inversely associated with incident DM in the Physicians’ Health Study (PHS). Design: We prospectively analyzed data on 18,235 PHS participants who were free of DM at baseline (1997–2001). Chocolate consumption was obtained from a baseline food-frequency questionnaire. Incident DM was ascertained via annual follow-up questionnaires and validated in a subsample by a review of medical records. We used Cox proportional hazards models to estimate HRs and 95% CIs of DM. Results: The mean (±SD) age at baseline was 66.3 ± 9.2 y. During a mean follow up of 9.2 y, 1123 men (6.2%) developed DM. For self-reported chocolate consumption of none, 1–3 servings/mo, 1 serving/wk, and ≥2 servings/wk, multivariable-adjusted HRs (95% CIs) of DM adjusted for lifestyle, clinical, and dietary risk factors including total energy intake were 1.00 (referent), 0.93 (0.79, 1.09), 0.86 (0.72, 1.04), and 0.83 (0.69, 0.99), respectively (P-trend = 0.047). In secondary analyses, the inverse association of chocolate consumption and risk of DM was slightly stronger in subjects without a history of cardiovascular disease or heart failure (P-trend = 0.023). In addition, both age and BMI modified the chocolate-DM relation (P chocolate intake with incident DM, which appears only to apply in younger and normal–body weight men after controlling for comprehensive life styles including total energy consumption. PMID:25646334

  19. Chocolate consumption and risk of diabetes mellitus in the Physicians' Health Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Chisa; Petrone, Andrew B; Sesso, Howard D; Gaziano, J Michael; Djoussé, Luc

    2015-02-01

    Previous studies reported beneficial effects of cocoa or chocolate on insulin resistance, oxidative stress, and inflammation, which are important risk factors of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). However, it is unclear whether chocolate consumption is associated with risk of DM. We tested the hypothesis that chocolate consumption is inversely associated with incident DM in the Physicians' Health Study (PHS). We prospectively analyzed data on 18,235 PHS participants who were free of DM at baseline (1997-2001). Chocolate consumption was obtained from a baseline food-frequency questionnaire. Incident DM was ascertained via annual follow-up questionnaires and validated in a subsample by a review of medical records. We used Cox proportional hazards models to estimate HRs and 95% CIs of DM. The mean (±SD) age at baseline was 66.3 ± 9.2 y. During a mean follow up of 9.2 y, 1123 men (6.2%) developed DM. For self-reported chocolate consumption of none, 1-3 servings/mo, 1 serving/wk, and ≥2 servings/wk, multivariable-adjusted HRs (95% CIs) of DM adjusted for lifestyle, clinical, and dietary risk factors including total energy intake were 1.00 (referent), 0.93 (0.79, 1.09), 0.86 (0.72, 1.04), and 0.83 (0.69, 0.99), respectively (P-trend = 0.047). In secondary analyses, the inverse association of chocolate consumption and risk of DM was slightly stronger in subjects without a history of cardiovascular disease or heart failure (P-trend = 0.023). In addition, both age and BMI modified the chocolate-DM relation (P chocolate intake with incident DM, which appears only to apply in younger and normal-body weight men after controlling for comprehensive life styles including total energy consumption. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  20. Lipoprotein(a as a risk factor for diabetic retinopathy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

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    Chopra Rupali

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To estimate serum lipoprotein(a [Lp(a] levels in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus with and without diabetic retinopathy and to determine the correlation, if any, between serum Lp(a levels and severity of diabetic retinopathy. Materials and Methods: The study included a total of 200 patients of type 2 diabetes mellitus out of which 100 patients who had no retinopathy served as the control group and 100 patients with diabetic retinopathy formed the study group. A detailed fundus examination was done with dilated pupil. The Lp(a levels were measured quantitatively in fasting venous samples by an immunoturbidimetric method using commercially available kits (Clonital. Statistical Analysis Used: Group comparisons involving qualitative measures were carried out using Chi square test. ANOVA procedure was applied for comparing group means. Logistic regression analysis was performed for independent factors associated with diabetic retinopathy. Results: The average Lp(a levels in the study group (68.5 mg/dl were significantly higher than in the control group (25.1 mg/dl ( P < 0.001. The Lp(a levels were found to increase with increasing severity of diabetic retinopathy. Conclusions: Serum Lp(a levels are significantly raised in patients with diabetic retinopathy as compared to those with no retinopathy.

  1. Diabetes mellitus and the risk of total knee replacement among Chinese in Singapore, the Singapore Chinese Health Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Ying-Ying; Allen, John Carson; Ang, Li-Wei; Yuan, Jian-Min; Koh, Woon-Puay

    2017-01-01

    Association between diabetes mellitus (diabetes) and risk of knee osteoarthritis (KOA) is confounded by high body mass index (BMI), a strong risk factor for both conditions. We evaluated the association between diabetes and incidence of total knee replacement (TKR) due to severe KOA in the Singapore Chinese Health Study, a prospective cohort of 63,257 Chinese men and women, aged 45–74 years at recruitment in 1993–1998, and re-interviewed in 1999–2004. Height, weight, lifestyle factors and history of diabetes were obtained through in-person interviews at recruitment and re-interview. Incident cases of TKR were identified via record linkage with nationwide hospital discharge database. Subjects with/without prevalent diabetes had comparable BMI (24.0 kg/m2 versus 23.0 kg/m2). After an average of 14-years, 1,973 subjects had TKR attributable to KOA. Compared to subjects without diabetes, hazard ratio (HR) of TKR for subjects with diabetes was 0.63 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.52–0.75] after controlling for BMI and other risk factors. An inverse association was also observed between incident diabetes at re-interview and subsequent risk of TKR (HR = 0.74; 95% CI = 0.58–0.94). The inverse diabetes-TKR risk association was similar by gender and across three categories of BMI. Our study does not support diabetes as a risk factor of KOA. PMID:28084472

  2. ADAMTS13 activity as a novel risk factor for incident type 2 diabetes mellitus: a population-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Paul S; van Herpt, Thijs T W; Ligthart, Symen; Hofman, Albert; Ikram, M Arfan; van Hoek, Mandy; Sijbrands, Eric J G; Franco, Oscar H; de Maat, Moniek P M; Leebeek, Frank W G; Dehghan, Abbas

    2017-02-01

    ADAMTS13 is a protease that breaks down von Willebrand factor (VWF) multimers into smaller, less active particles. VWF has been associated with an increased risk of incident type 2 diabetes mellitus. Here, we determine whether ADAMTS13 activity and VWF antigen are associated with incident diabetes. This study included 5176 participants from the Rotterdam Study, a prospective population-based cohort study. Participants were free of diabetes at baseline and followed up for more than 20 years. Cox proportional hazards models were used to examine the association of ADAMTS13 activity and VWF antigen with incident diabetes. ADAMTS13 activity was associated with an increased risk of incident diabetes (HR 1.17 [95% CI 1.08, 1.27]) after adjustment for known risk factors and VWF antigen levels. Although ADAMTS13 activity was positively associated with fasting glucose and insulin, the association with incident diabetes did not change when we adjusted for these covariates. ADAMTS13 activity was also associated with incident prediabetes (defined on the basis of both fasting and non-fasting blood glucose) after adjustment for known risk factors (HR 1.11 [95% CI 1.03, 1.19]), while the VWF antigen level was not. VWF antigen was associated with incident diabetes, but this association was attenuated after adjustment for known risk factors. ADAMTS13 activity appears to be an independent risk factor for incident prediabetes and type 2 diabetes. As the association between ADAMTS13 and diabetes did not appear to be explained by its cleavage of VWF, ADAMTS13 may have an independent role in the development of diabetes.

  3. Association of Geroprotective Effects of Metformin and Risk of Open-Angle Glaucoma in Persons With Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hsien-Chang; Stein, Joshua D; Nan, Bin; Childers, David; Newman-Casey, Paula Anne; Thompson, Debra A; Richards, Julia E

    2015-08-01

    Caloric restriction mimetic drugs have geroprotective effects that delay or reduce risks for a variety of age-associated systemic diseases, suggesting that such drugs might also have the potential to reduce risks of blinding ophthalmologic conditions for which age is a major risk factor. To determine whether the caloric restriction mimetic drug metformin hydrochloride is associated with reduced risk of open-angle glaucoma (OAG) in persons with diabetes mellitus. Retrospective cohort study of patients aged 40 years or older with diabetes mellitus and no preexisting record of OAG in a large US managed care network from January 1, 2001, through December 31, 2010. Quantity of metformin and other prescribed diabetes medications as captured from outpatient pharmacy records. Risk of developing OAG. Of 150 016 patients with diabetes mellitus, 5893 (3.9%) developed OAG. After adjusting for confounding factors, those prescribed the highest quartile of metformin hydrochloride (>1110 g in 2 years) had a 25% reduced OAG risk relative to those who took no metformin (hazard ratio = 0.75; 95% CI, 0.59-0.95; P = .02). Every 1-g increase in metformin hydrochloride use was associated with a 0.16% reduction in OAG risk (adjusted hazard ratio = 0.99984; 95% CI, 0.99969-0.99999; P = .04), which predicts that taking a standard dose of 2 g of metformin hydrochloride per day for 2 years would result in a 20.8% reduction in risk of OAG. After accounting for potential confounders, including metformin and diabetic medications, the risk of developing OAG was increased by 8% (hazard ratio = 1.08; 95% CI, 1.03-1.13; P = .003) for each unit of increase in glycated hemoglobin level. Metformin use is associated with reduction in risk of developing OAG, and risk is reduced even when accounting for glycemic control in the form of glycated hemoglobin level. Other diabetes medications did not confer a similar OAG risk reduction. This study suggests that metformin may be

  4. Amputation Risk in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus and Peripheral Artery Disease Using Statewide Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, Misty D; Brunson, Ann; Hedayati, Nasim; Romano, Patrick; Melnkow, Joy

    2016-01-01

    Conflicting data exist regarding changes in amputation rates in patients with ulcers because of diabetes mellitus (DM) and peripheral artery disease (PAD). This study focuses on how population-based amputation rates are changing in the current treatment era. Using the California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development Patient Discharge database, all patients who underwent major nontraumatic lower extremity (LE) amputation in 2005 through 2011 were identified. Age-adjusted population-based amputation risk was determined by year. Gender and age trends in amputation risk were estimated separately for diabetes-related amputations and PAD-related amputations, treating all California residents as the population at risk. From 2005 to 2011, 32,025 qualifying amputations were performed in California. Of these, 11,896 were DM-associated (n = 1,095), PAD-associated (n = 4,335), or associated with both conditions (n = 6,466). PAD-associated amputation rates and combined PAD/DM-associated amputation rates have changed little since 2009 after decreasing substantially over the prior 5 years, but DM-associated amputation rates have continuously increased since 2005. California residents older than the age of 80 years had the most dramatic decrease in PAD-associated amputation rates from 2005 to 2011 (i.e., from 317 to 175 per million Californians). Men with PAD/DM had amputation rate 1.5 times higher than those of patients with PAD alone and 5 times higher than rates of DM patients. In women the difference between patient with PAD and PAD/DM was not seen; however, these rates were 2.5 times higher than patients with DM alone. Preventable amputations associated with high-risk diseases are no longer decreasing despite continuing advances in care and education. Octogenarians with PAD represent the highest risk group for amputation, but DM-associated amputations have increased since 2005. Further research to understand treatment pathways for patient with LE wounds may shed

  5. Obesity, diabetes mellitus, and the risk of female breast cancer in Eastern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background This study was designed to explore the relationship between obesity, diabetes mellitus (DM), and female breast cancer in Eastern China. Methods A 1:3 matched case–control study was carried out, comprising 123 women with breast cancer and 369 controls. All of the 492 subjects were selected from a previous epidemiological survey of 122,058 women in Eastern China. Results There were significant differences between the case and control groups in waist circumference and body mass index (BMI), but not in waist to hip ratio or hip circumference. There was a significant difference between the two groups in BMI for post-menopausal women, and a significant difference in waist circumference for pre-menopausal women. After adjustment for other factors, BMI was still significantly associated with breast cancer (odds ratio (OR) = 1.58, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.14 to 2.19). DM was significantly associated with breast cancer (OR = 3.35, 95% CI 1.02 to 11.01) in the univariate analysis but not in the multivariate analysis (P = 0.059). Conclusions Obesity might be a risk factor for female breast cancer. We found different strengths of association for women with different menopausal status when we examined the relationship between obesity and breast cancer. The association between DM and female breast cancer should be further confirmed with larger sample sizes. PMID:23497298

  6. Risk factors for diabetes mellitus in women with primary ovarian insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulaksizoglu, Mustafa; Ipekci, Suleyman Hilmi; Kebapcilar, Levent; Kebapcilar, Ayse Gul; Korkmaz, Huseyin; Akyurek, Fikret; Baldane, Suleyman; Gonen, Mustafa Sait

    2013-09-01

    Primary ovarian insufficiency (POI) is not only a gynecological problem but also has serious effects on women's health such as changes in hormone levels that can trigger fluctuations in blood sugar level and inflammation status. The present study was designed to determine vitamin D, copper, zinc, metabolic parameters [insulin, homeostasis model of assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR)], inflammation parameters such as procalcitonin and high sensitivity C reactive protein (hs-CRP), and lipid profile in POI patients and control subjects with normal menstrual cycles. A total of 43 patients with nondiabetic POI were studied in order to evaluate and compare the findings with those of the control group, which comprised 33 women with normal menstrual cycles. The women with POI had higher levels of serum copper, serum insulin, glucose, LDL-cholesterol, total cholesterol, HOMA-IR, hs-CRP, and procalcitonin, whereas serum vitamin D and zinc levels were lower compared with the healthy control group. Follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) levels were positively correlated with insulin, glucose, HOMA-IR, hs-CRP, procalcitonin, and copper and negatively correlated with vitamin D and zinc levels. In multivariate statistic analyses with body mass index and FSH as dependent variables, FSH was positively associated with copper and HOMA-IR negatively with vitamin D levels. The present study demonstrated that women with POI have traditional risk factors for diabetes mellitus, including lower levels of vitamin D, whereas higher levels of copper and HOMA-IR.

  7. Gestational Diabetes Mellitus: A Positive Predictor of Type 2 Diabetes?

    OpenAIRE

    Rice, Gregory E.; Illanes, Sebastian E.; Murray D. Mitchell

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to consider the relative benefits of screening for type two diabetes mellitus in women with a previous pregnancy complicated by gestational diabetes mellitus. Recent studies suggest that women who experience GDM are at a greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes within 10–20 years of their index pregnancy. If considered as a stand-alone indicator of the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, GDM is a poor diagnostic test. Most women do not develop GDM during pregnancy a...

  8. Adding Salt to Meals as a Risk Factor of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Case-Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radzeviciene, Lina; Ostrauskas, Rytas

    2017-01-13

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is thought to arise from the complex interplay between genetic and environmental factors. It is important to identify modifiable risk factors that may help to reduce the risk of diabetes. Data on salt intake and the risk of type 2 diabetes are limited. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between adding salt to prepared meals and the risk of type 2 diabetes. In a case-control study, we included 234 cases, all of whom were patients aged 35-86 years with a newly confirmed diagnosis of T2DM, and 468 controls that were free of the disease. Cases and controls (ratio 1:2) were matched by gender and age (±5 years). A questionnaire was used to collect information on possible risk factors for diabetes. Adding salt to prepared meals was assessed according to: Never, when there was not enough, or almost every time without tasting. The odds ratios (OR), and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for type 2 diabetes was calculated using a conditional logistic regression. The cases had a higher body mass index and a significantly lower education level compared to the controls. Variables such as waist circumference, body mass index, eating speed, smoking, family history of diabetes, arterial hypertension, plasma triglycerides, educational level, occupational status, morning exercise, marital status, daily urine sodium excretion, and daily energy intake were retained in the models as confounders. After adjusting for possible confounders, an approximately two-fold increased risk of type 2 diabetes was determined in subjects who add salt to prepared meals when "it is not enough" or "almost every time without tasting" (1.82; 95% CI 1.19-2.78; p = 0.006) compared with never adding salt. Presented data suggest the possible relationship between additional adding of salt to prepared meals and an increased risk of type 2 diabetes.

  9. Adding Salt to Meals as a Risk Factor of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Case–Control Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina Radzeviciene

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM is thought to arise from the complex interplay between genetic and environmental factors. It is important to identify modifiable risk factors that may help to reduce the risk of diabetes. Data on salt intake and the risk of type 2 diabetes are limited. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between adding salt to prepared meals and the risk of type 2 diabetes. Methods: In a case–control study, we included 234 cases, all of whom were patients aged 35–86 years with a newly confirmed diagnosis of T2DM, and 468 controls that were free of the disease. Cases and controls (ratio 1:2 were matched by gender and age (±5 years. A questionnaire was used to collect information on possible risk factors for diabetes. Adding salt to prepared meals was assessed according to: Never, when there was not enough, or almost every time without tasting. The odds ratios (OR, and 95% confidence intervals (CI for type 2 diabetes was calculated using a conditional logistic regression. Results: The cases had a higher body mass index and a significantly lower education level compared to the controls. Variables such as waist circumference, body mass index, eating speed, smoking, family history of diabetes, arterial hypertension, plasma triglycerides, educational level, occupational status, morning exercise, marital status, daily urine sodium excretion, and daily energy intake were retained in the models as confounders. After adjusting for possible confounders, an approximately two-fold increased risk of type 2 diabetes was determined in subjects who add salt to prepared meals when “it is not enough” or “almost every time without tasting” (1.82; 95% CI 1.19–2.78; p = 0.006 compared with never adding salt. Conclusion: Presented data suggest the possible relationship between additional adding of salt to prepared meals and an increased risk of type 2 diabetes.

  10. [A cross-sectional study to assess cardiovascular risk in the children of parents with diabetes mellitus or arterial hypertension].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-García, A; Rangel-García, L; Alvarez-Aguilar, C

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease in adults is the first cause of death, and in adolescents under 15 years old, it is the third cause of death. The purpose of this study was to investigate which risk factors for cardiovascular disease have the children of parents with diabetes or hypertension. In a cross-sectional study conducted in the Family Medicine Unit No. 80 in Morelia, Michoacán, Mexico, were included 156 patients with diabetes mellitus, hypertension and without diabetes or hypertension (10 years of disease progression), and a biological child (age 7-15 years) to form pairs. Three groups were formed: child-parent with Diabetes; child-parent with Hypertension and child-parent without Diabetes or Hypertension. Medical history, body mass index, blood glucose, cholesterol, triglycerides, c-LDL, c-HDL and signs of metabolic syndrome were recorded. The frequency of signs of metabolic syndrome was higher in parents with Diabetes (28.8%), and in children of parents without either diabetes or hypertension (11.5%). In binomial children-parents with Diabetes, serum glucose (OR=4.50: 95% CI; 2.32-8.73, PHypertension it was total cholesterol (OR=4.143: 95% CI; 1.996-8.60, PDiabetes or Hypertension, the abdominal circumference (OR=3.429: 95% CI; 1.621-7.251, Pdiabetes mellitus or hypertension are at increased risk for developing cardiovascular disease. Longitudinal studies are required using non-pharmacological and pharmacological strategies that will have an impact on the most important risk factors for preventing cardiovascular disease. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier España, S.L. y SEMERGEN. All rights reserved.

  11. Frequent salad vegetable consumption is associated with a reduction in the risk of diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, D E; Wareham, N J; Cox, B D; Byrne, C D; Hales, C N; Day, N E

    1999-04-01

    This cross-sectional study was undertaken to investigate the association between the reported frequency of consumption of vegetables and fruits, the choice of staple carbohydrate, and glucose intolerance. One thousand one hundred twenty-two subjects aged 40-64 years in a population-based study underwent an oral glucose tolerance test, and their food consumption was assessed using a food-frequency questionnaire. The crude prevalence of undiagnosed non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) was 4.5%, and that of impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) 16.8%. The age-standardized prevalence rates were 2.3 and 11.2%, respectively. Frequent consumption of vegetables throughout the year was inversely associated with the risk of having NIDDM (odds ratio [OR] = 0.16; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.04-0.69). This association was maintained after adjustment for age, gender, and family history. Vegetable consumption during the summer months had a much weaker inverse association with the risk of having NIDDM that failed to reach statistical significance. A nonsignificant inverse association between frequent consumption of fruits and NIDDM was observed. Frequent self-reported pasta and rice consumption was associated with a reduction in the risk of having IGT and NIDDM. (OR = 0.62, 95% CI = 0.44-0.87, and OR = 0.51, 95% CI = 0.27-0.99, respectively) but this relationship was not independent of age. Whether these associations reflect specific effects of particular nutrients or are a reflection of the patterning of lifestyle factors remains to be determined.

  12. Integrative traditional Chinese medicine therapy reduces the risk of diabetic ketoacidosis in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lien, Angela Shin-Yu; Jiang, Yi-Der; Mou, Chih-Hsin; Sun, Mao-Feng; Gau, Bih-Shya; Yen, Hung-Rong

    2016-09-15

    Life-long insulin is the standard treatment for type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). The role of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) in T1DM is still not clear. The aim of this study is to explore the prescription pattern of TCM and its impact on the risk of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) in patients with T1DM. We retrieved samples from the registry for catastrophic illness patients from the National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD). Based on a frequency (1:4) matched case-control design, patients with T1DM in 2000-2011 were designated as cases (TCM users) and controls (non-TCM users). TCM treatment for patients with T1DM was analyzed. The incidence of DKA and the annual costs of emergency visits and hospitalizations were evaluated for all causes. Overall, 416 subjects were TCM users, whereas a total of 1608 matched subjects were classified as non-TCM users. The most common Chinese herbal formula and single herb is Liu-wei-di-huang-wan (Six-ingredient pill of Rehmannia) and Huang-qi (Radix Astragali; Astragalus membranaceus (Fisch.) Bunge, Astragalus membranaceus var. mongholicus (Bunge) P.K.Hsiao), respectively. Compared with non-TCM users, we found a 33% reduction in DKA incidence for all TCM users (aHR 0.67, 95% CI 0.56-0.81, p <0.000) and a 40% reduction for users receiving TCM treatment for more than 180 days (aHR 0.58, 95% CI 0.41-0.82, p <0.01). There were no significant differences between TCM users and non-users in the frequency and medical costs of emergency visits and hospitalizations. Integrative TCM use may reduce the risk of DKA in patients with T1DM. Our results suggest that TCM may have a substantial positive impact on the management of TIDM. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Den kliniske betydning af gestationel diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Dorte Møller; Beck-Nielsen, H; Westergaard, J G

    2000-01-01

    In Denmark, gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) develops in about 2% of all pregnant women. The discussion of GDM is complicated by lack of consensus regarding screening methods, diagnosis and treatment. Observational studies indicate that untreated GDM is associated with an increased risk...... of maternal and perinatal morbidity, and that the offspring of GDM mothers tend to be at increased risk of developing diabetes and adiposity as a result of an abnormal intrauterine environment. Several follow-up studies have shown that women with previous GDM run a considerable risk of developing diabetes...... (especially type 2 diabetes) later in life. Intervention strategies for this high risk group are suggested....

  14. Den kliniske betydning af gestationel diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Dorte Møller; Beck-Nielsen, H; Westergaard, J G

    1999-01-01

    In Denmark, gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) develops in about 2% of all pregnant women. The discussion of GDM is complicated by lack of consensus regarding screening methods, diagnosis and treatment. Observational studies indicate that untreated GDM is associated with an increased risk...... of maternal and perinatal morbidity, and that the offspring of GDM mothers tend to be at increased risk of developing diabetes and adiposity as a result of an abnormal intrauterine environment. Several follow-up studies have shown that women with previous GDM run a considerable risk of developing diabetes...... (especially type 2 diabetes) later in life. Intervention strategies for this high risk group are suggested....

  15. Den kliniske betydning af gestationel diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, D M; Beck-Nielsen, H; Westergaard, J G

    2000-01-01

    In Denmark, gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) develops in about 2% of all pregnant women. The discussion of GDM is complicated by lack of consensus regarding screening methods, diagnosis and treatment. Observational studies indicate that untreated GDM is associated with an increased risk...... of maternal and perinatal morbidity, and that the offspring of GDM mothers tend to be at increased risk of developing diabetes and adiposity as a result of an abnormal intrauterine environment. Several follow-up studies have shown that women with previous GDM run a considerable risk of developing diabetes...... (especially type 2 diabetes) later in life. Intervention strategies for this high risk group are suggested....

  16. Retinal microvascular calibre and risk of diabetes mellitus: a systematic review and participant-level meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabanayagam, Charumathi; Lye, Weng Kit; Klein, Ronald; Klein, Barbara E K; Cotch, Mary Frances; Wang, Jie Jin; Mitchell, Paul; Shaw, Jonathan E; Selvin, Elizabeth; Sharrett, A Richey; Wong, Tien Y

    2015-11-01

    The calibre of the retinal vessels has been linked to diabetes mellitus but studies have not shown consistent results. We conducted a participant-level meta-analysis to evaluate the association between retinal arteriolar and venular calibre and diabetes. We performed a systematic review on MEDLINE and EMBASE for articles published up to December 2014. We identified five population-based prospective cohort studies that provided individual-level data on 18,771 diabetes-free participants. We used discrete time proportional hazards models to estimate pooled HRs of diabetes associated with 1 SD (20 μm) change in retinal vascular calibre. We identified 2,581 incident cases of diabetes over a median follow-up period of 10 years (interquartile interval of 3.4-15.8 years). After adjustment for demographic, lifestyle and clinical factors, retinal venular calibre was significantly associated with incident diabetes (pooled HR 1.09 [95% CI 1.02, 1.15] per SD increase in venular calibre). This association persisted in analyses excluding individuals with diabetes (0.95 [0.86, 1.06] per SD decrease in arteriolar calibre). Wider retinal venules but not narrower retinal arterioles were associated with a modestly increased risk for diabetes. Knowledge of pathological mechanisms underlying wider retinal venule may provide further insights concerning microvascular alterations in diabetes.

  17. Risk of skin cancer in patients with diabetes mellitus: A nationwide retrospective cohort study in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Hui-Wen; Shiue, Yow-Ling; Tsai, Kuo-Wang; Huang, Wei-Chun; Tang, Pei-Ling; Lam, Hing-Chung

    2016-06-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that certain types of cancers are more common in people with diabetes mellitus (DM). This study aimed to investigate the risk of skin cancer in patients with DM in Taiwan. In this retrospective cohort study using data from the Taiwan Longitudinal Health Insurance Research Database, the risk of developing overall skin cancer, including nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) and melanoma, was compared by Poisson regression analysis and Cox regression analysis between the DM and non-DM cohorts. The DM cohort with newly diagnosed DM (n = 41,898) and a non-DM cohort were one-to-one matched by age, sex, index date, and comorbidities (coronary artery disease, hyperlipidemia, hypertension, chronic kidney disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and obesity). Compared with non-DM cohort statistically, for the people with DM aged ≥60 years, the incidence rates of overall skin cancer and NMSC were significantly higher (overall: DM/non-DM: number [n] = 99/76, incidence rate ratio [IRR] = 1.44, P = 0.02; NMSC: DM/non-DM: n = 94/66, IRR = 1.57, P = 0.005). By Cox regression analysis, the risk of developing overall skin cancer or NMSC was significantly higher after adjusting for sex, comorbidities, and overall diseases with immunosuppression status (overall: adjusted hazard ratio [AHR] = 1.46, P = 0.01; NMSC: AHR = 1.6, P = 0.003). Other significant risk factors were older males for skin cancer (overall: AHR = 1.68, P = 0.001; NMSC: AHR = 1.59, P = 0.004; melanoma: AHR = 3.25, P = 0.04), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease for NMSC (AHR = 1.44, P = 0.04), and coronary artery disease for melanoma (AHR = 4.22, P = 0.01). The risk of developing melanoma was lower in the DM cohort than in the non-DM cohort, but without significance (AHR = 0.56, P = 0.28; DM/non-DM: n = 5/10). The incidence rate and risk of developing overall skin cancer, including NMSC, was significantly higher in older adults with DM. Other significant risk factors for older adults

  18. The Role of Health Beliefs in Preventive Behaviors of Individuals at High- Risk of Type2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Mazloomy

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetes mellitus is an important health problem that leads to severe complications, is the cause of early death, and is showing an increase in frequency. Development of positive health behaviors is extremely important for prevention of diabetes in at high- risk individuals. This study aims to identify the relationship between health beliefs and diabetes preventive behaviors in individuals at high-risk for developing type2 diabetes mellitus in Taft city. Methods: A study using the Health Belief Model (HBM framework was undertaken with 114 subjects of both genders aged 30 years and above from three urban health centers who were diagnosed as at high risk for type2 diabetes during the screening program. Research tool was a 66-item questionnaire. Data was analyzed with descriptive statistics, Spearman correlation and Mann–Whitney U-test. Results: Of the total, 29.8% of subjects were male and 70.2% were female. Regarding education, 68.4% of the subjects had not completed high school and 89.4% of them was married. Mean score of knowledge and preventive behaviors was 5.80 ±2.87 and5.41 ±2.83, respectively such that subjects scored 30.05% of maximum obtainable score of preventive behaviors. There were significant correlations between preventive behaviors and perceived susceptibility, r=0.243(P<0.009, perceived severity, r=0.312(P<0.001, perceived barrier, r=0.245 (P<0.006 and perceived self-efficacy, r=0.497 (P<0.001. Conclusion: Preventive behaviors among the subjects at high- risk for developing type 2 diabetes despite the presence of risk factors was poor due to lack of susceptibility, severity, barriers and self-efficacy perception.

  19. Vitamin D and Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özlem Turhan İyidir

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent epidemiological data have established a link between vitamin D deficiency and type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM. Experimental evidence also supported the idea that vitamin D may play a role in the pathogenesis of DM. Additionally, it has been reported that vitamin D supplementation may decrease the risk of developing DM in long term period. The protective effects of vitamin D are mediated through the immune system and calcium metabolism. Vitamin D may also have a direct effect on pancreatic beta cells. Turk Jem 2012; 16: 89-94

  20. Minimizing tacrolimus decreases the risk of new-onset diabetes mellitus after liver transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jiu-Lin; Gao, Wei; Zhong, Yan; Yan, Lu-Nan; Yang, Jia-Yin; Wen, Tian-Fu; Li, Bo; Wang, Wen-Tao; Wu, Hong; Xu, Ming-Qing; Chen, Zhe-Yu; Wei, Yong-Gang; Jiang, Li; Yang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the impact of minimum tacrolimus (TAC) on new-onset diabetes mellitus (NODM) after liver transplantation (LT). METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed the data of 973 liver transplant recipients between March 1999 and September 2014 in West China Hospital Liver Transplantation Center. Following the exclusion of ineligible recipients, 528 recipients with a TAC-dominant regimen were included in our study. We calculated and determined the mean trough concentration of TAC (cTAC) in the year of diabetes diagnosis in NODM recipients or in the last year of the follow-up in non-NODM recipients. A cutoff of mean cTAC value for predicting NODM 6 mo after LT was identified using a receptor operating characteristic curve. TAC-related complications after LT was evaluated by χ2 test, and the overall and allograft survival was evaluated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Risk factors for NODM after LT were examined by univariate and multivariate Cox regression. RESULTS: Of the 528 transplant recipients, 131 (24.8%) developed NODM after 6 mo after LT, and the cumulative incidence of NODM progressively increased. The mean cTAC of NODM group recipients was significantly higher than that of recipients in the non-NODM group (7.66 ± 3.41 ng/mL vs 4.47 ± 2.22 ng/mL, P 50 years), hypertension pre-LT, and high mean cTAC (≥ 5.89 ng/mL) after 6 mo after LT were independent risk factors for developing NODM. Concurrently, recipients with a low cTAC (< 5.89 ng/mL) were less likely to become obese (21.3% vs 30.2%, P < 0.05) or to develop dyslipidemia (27.5% vs 44.8%, P <0.05), chronic kidney dysfunction (14.6% vs 22.7%, P < 0.05), and moderate to severe infection (24.7% vs 33.1%, P < 0.05) after LT than recipients in the high mean cTAC group. However, the two groups showed no significant difference in the incidence of acute and chronic rejection, hypertension, cardiovascular events and new-onset malignancy. CONCLUSION: A minimal TAC regimen can decrease the risk of long

  1. Response to comment on: Statin use and risk of diabetes mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    In letter to the editor “Comment on: Statin use and risk of diabetes mellitus” authors found the statement “pravastatin 40 mg/d reduced the risk of diabetes by 30% in West of Scotland Coronary Prevention study” erroneous. As per our opinion the statement is right but had been referenced incorrectly.

  2. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor Pro12Ala polymorphism and the risks of gestational diabetes mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lihong; Xu, Wenting; Wang, Xu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors-λ (PPAR-λ) is a member of nuclear receptor superfamily and acts as a ligand-dependent transcription factor often found in the adrenal gland, the spleen, and adipose tissue. The Pro12Ala polymorphism of PPAR-λ has been associated with the risks of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM); however, association studies have provided conflicting results. The aim of this Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) compliant meta-analysis is to reach a more up-to-date and accurate estimation of the relationship between Pro12Ala genetic polymorphisms and the risks of GDM. Methods: Eligible studies were retrieved by searching PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, Ovid, WanFang, and Chinese National Knowledge Databases and selected according to a pre-defined inclusion criterion. The risk of bias was assessed using the Newcastle-Ottawa quality assessment scale. The per-allele odds ratio (OR) of risk allele proline (Pro) was compared between cases and controls in each study to describe the association between the Pro allele and an individual's risk of GDM. The ORs were pooled using both the random-effects model (the DerSimonian and Laird method) and the fixed effects model (the Mantel-Haenszel method) and the 95% confidence interval (95% CI) was calculated using Woolf method. Results: The final meta-analysis included a total of 11 articles of 12 data sets consisting of 7054 controls and 2980 GDM cases. Our results demonstrate that the Pro allele is not associated with GDM [OR: across multiple populations, 95% CI: 0.98–1.24; P(Z) = 0.01; P(Q) = 0.003]. In the stratified analysis by ethnicity, significantly increased risks were found for the Chinese (OR = 2.36; 95% CI: 1.47–3.78) and Korean (OR = 1.39; 95% CI: 1.00–1.93) populations. Conclusion: These data suggest the potential role of Pro allele in the pathogenesis of GDM in Asian populations. Although the funnel plot

  3. Periodontal pathogens and gestational diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasanayake, A P; Chhun, N; Tanner, A C R; Craig, R G; Lee, M J; Moore, A F; Norman, R G

    2008-04-01

    In previous cross-sectional or case-control studies, clinical periodontal disease has been associated with gestational diabetes mellitus. To test the hypothesis that, in comparison with women who do not develop gestational diabetes mellitus, those who do develop it will have had a greater exposure to clinical and other periodontal parameters, we measured clinical, bacteriological (in plaque and cervico-vaginal samples), immunological, and inflammatory mediator parameters 7 weeks before the diagnosis of gestational diabetes mellitus in 265 predominantly Hispanic (83%) women in New York. Twenty-two cases of gestational diabetes mellitus emerged from the cohort (8.3%). When the cases were compared with healthy control individuals, higher pre-pregnancy body mass index (p=0.004), vaginal levels of Tannerella forsythia (p=0.01), serum C-reactive protein (p=0.01), and prior gestational diabetes mellitus (p=0.006) emerged as risk factors, even though the clinical periodontal disease failed to reach statistical significance (50% in those with gestational diabetes mellitus vs. 37.3% in the healthy group; p=0.38).

  4. Preconception care and the risk of congenital anomalies in the offspring of women with diabetes mellitus: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, J G; O'Brien, T E; Chan, W S

    2001-08-01

    Offspring of women with pregestational diabetes mellitus are at increased risk for congenital malformations, largely attributable to poor periconceptional glycaemic control. We assessed the effect of preconception care in reducing congenital malformations, in a meta-analysis of published studies of preconception care in women with diabetes mellitus. Articles were retrieved from Medline (1970 to June 2000) and Embase (1980 to June 2000), and data abstracted by two independent reviewers. The rates and relative risks (RR) for major and minor congenital malformations were pooled from all eligible studies using a random effects model, as were early first-trimester glycosylated haemoglobin values. In 14 cohort studies, major congenital malformations were assessed among 1192 offspring of mothers who had received preconception care, and 1459 offspring of women who had not. The pooled rate of major anomalies was lower among preconception care recipients (2.1%) than non-recipients (6.5%) (RR 0.36, 95%CI 0.22-0.59). In nine studies, the risk for major and minor anomalies was also lower among women who received preconception care (RR 0.32, 95%CI 0.17-0.59), as were the early first-trimester mean glycosylated haemoglobin values (pooled mean difference: 2.3%, 95%CI 2.1-2.4). Women who received preconception care were, on average, 1.8 years older than non-recipients, and fewer smoked (19.6% vs. 30.2%). Only one study described the routine use of periconception folic acid. Out-patient preconception care probably reduces the risk of major congenital anomalies among the offspring of women with pregestational diabetes mellitus. Because many women with diabetes neither plan their pregnancy nor achieve adequate glycaemic control before conception, strategies are needed to improve access to these programs, and to maximize those interventions associated with improved pregnancy outcome, such as smoking cessation and folic acid use.

  5. Type 2 diabetes mellitus as a disorder of galanin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Penghua; Shi, Mingyi; Zhu, Yan; Bo, Ping; Zhang, Zhenwen

    2016-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus with its high morbidity and mortality becomes an important health problem. The multifactorial etiology of type 2 diabetes mellitus is relative to many gene and molecule alterations, and increased insulin resistance. Besides these, however, there are still other predisposing and risk factors accounting for type 2 diabetes mellitus not to be identified and recognized. Emerging evidence indicated that defects in galanin function played a crucial role in development of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Galanin homeostasis is tightly relative to insulin resistance and is regulated by blood glucose. Hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinism, enhanced plasma galanin levels and decreased galanin receptor activities are some of the characters of type 2 diabetes mellitus. The discrepancy between high insulin level and low glucose handling is named as insulin resistance. Similarly, the discrepancy between high galanin level and low glucose handling may be denominated as galanin resistance too. In this review, the characteristic milestones of type 2 diabetes mellitus were condensed as two analogical conceptual models, obesity-hyper-insulin-insulin resistance-type 2 diabetes mellitus and obesity-hyper-galanin-galanin resistance-type 2 diabetes mellitus. Both galanin resistance and insulin resistance are correlative with each other. Conceptualizing the etiology of type 2 diabetes mellitus as a disorder of galanin resistance may inspire a new concept to deepen our knowledge about pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus, eventually leading to novel preventive and therapeutic interventions for type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  6. Glukagonomsyndrom uden diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Carsten Sauer; Mikkelsen, Dorthe Bisgaard; Vestergaard, Vibeke

    2008-01-01

    without diabetes. Glucagonoma syndrome is characterized by glucagon overproduction, diabetes, depression, deep venous thrombosis and necrolytic migrating erythema. Glucagonoma is frequently diagnosed late which increases the risk of metastases. It is important not to rule out glucagonoma in patients......A patient developed depression, weight loss, ulcers and a migrating, denuded erythematous skin area. Punch biopsy revealed necrolytic migrating erythema. Computerised tomography and endoscopic ultrasound showed a solid tumour of the pancreas. A blood sample showed an increased level of glucagon...... with a relevant clinical picture but without diabetes. Udgivelsesdato: 2008-Nov-17...

  7. Association of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms of Adiponectin Gene with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus, and Their Influence on Cardiovascular Risk Markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momin, A A; Bankar, M P; Bhoite, G M

    2017-03-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a genetically heterogeneous condition, characterized by insulin deficiency and/or insulin resistance. The etiology of type 2 diabetes is complex, with involvement of genetic and environmental factors. The adipose tissue protein 'adiponectin' is known to increase insulin sensitivity with decreased risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus. The gene for adiponectin is present on chromosome 3q27, the association of number of single nucleotide polymorphisms of adiponectin gene with type 2 diabetes and its complications have been reported. In the present study the two most common SNPs +45T/G & +276G/T, and their association with type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular markers were studied. The significant difference in genotype frequencies of +45T/G & +276G/T was found in type 2 diabetic patients and controls, with odds ratio of 1.13 & 1.26 respectively. BMI, Fasting blood glucose, fasting insulin, HOMA IR, triglyceride and VLDL cholesterol levels were increased, and HDL cholesterol level was decreased in patients carrier for +45T/G SNP than the wild type. While only decrease in the HDL cholesterol was reported in carriers for SNP +276G/T than the wild type. The logistic regression analysis revealed the positive association of SNP +45T/G with total cholesterol & LDL cholesterol. And negative association of HDL cholesterol was found with SNPs +45T/G and +276G/T. The haplotype analysis shows the alterations in means of biochemical markers in the patients having haplotype (GG) for mutant allele of SNP +45T/G and wild allele for SNP +276G/T.

  8. Validity and reproducibility of an interviewer-administered food frequency questionnaire in Austrian adults at risk of or with overt diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farukuoye, Michaela; Strassburger, Klaus; Kacerovsky-Bielesz, Gertrud; Giani, Guido; Roden, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Food frequency questionnaires (FFQs) provide an inexpensive tool for dietary assessment. Given the scarcity of data on their validity for nutritional analysis in persons with overt diabetes mellitus or with increased risk of diabetes (relatives of patients with diabetes), this study tests the hypothesis that an FFQ, adapted to local dietary habits, yields a reliable estimate of nutrient intake when compared with 7-day food record (7DR) in healthy, prediabetes, and diabetes cohorts. One hundred three volunteers (50 persons with overt diabetes mellitus, 24 relatives of patients with diabetes, and 29 nondiabetic individuals without a family history of diabetes) completed both FFQ and 7DR. A second FFQ was completed by 100 of these volunteers after 3 months to evaluate its reproducibility. Data were compared by correlation and Bland-Altman analyses. Across the entire group, estimates for gram intakes of nutrients and total energy were associated with wide limits of agreement between FFQ and 7DR (correlation coefficients, 0.23-0.72; P diabetes mellitus (+7.6 ± 15 g; P diabetes mellitus and relatives of patients with diabetes than in nondiabetic individuals without a family history of diabetes. Hence, the FFQ allows measuring intakes of total energy and macronutrients in prediabetes and diabetes cohorts but reveals limitations when assessing dietary composition.

  9. [Mental disorders and diabetes mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahamian, Heidemarie; Kautzky-Willer, Alexandra; Rießland-Seifert, Angelika; Fasching, Peter; Ebenbichler, Christoph; Hofmann, Peter; Toplak, Hermann

    2016-04-01

    Psychiatric disorders and psychological problems are common in patients with diabetes mellitus. There is a twofold increase in depression which is associated with suboptimal glycemic control and increased morbidity and mortality. Other psychiatric disorders with a higher incidence of diabetes mellitus are cognitive impairment, dementia, disturbed eating behaviour, anxiety disorders, schizophrenia, bipolar disorders and borderline personality disorder. The coincidence of mental disorders and diabetes mellitus has unfavourable influences on metabolic control and micro- and macroangiopathic late complications. Improvement of therapeutic outcome is a challenge in the modern health care system. The intentions behind this position paper are to rise awareness of this special set of problems, to intensify cooperation between involved health care providers and to reduce incidence of diabetes mellitus as well as morbidity and mortality from diabetes in this patient group.

  10. Risk Factors for the Development and Progression of Diabetic Kidney Disease in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Advanced Diabetic Retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Kyung Jin; Kim, Hye Ji; Kim, Mee Kyoung; Kwon, Hyuk Sang; Baek, Ki Hyun; Roh, Young Jung; Song, Ki Ho

    2016-12-01

    Some patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) do not develop diabetic kidney disease (DKD) despite the presence of advanced diabetic retinopathy (DR). We aimed to investigate the presence of DKD and its risk factors in patients with T2DM and advanced DR. We conducted a cross-sectional study in 317 patients with T2DM and advanced DR. The phenotypes of DKD were divided into three groups according to the urine albumin/creatinine ratio (uACR, mg/g) and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR, mL/min/1.73 m²): no DKD (uACR HDL-C) ratio correlated positively with uACR and negatively with eGFR. Multiple linear regression analyses showed that the HbA1c-SD and TG/HDL-C ratio were significantly related with eGFR. Multiple logistic regression analyses after adjusting for several risk factors showed that HbA1c-SD and the TG/HDL-C ratio were significant risk factors for severe DKD. The prevalence of DKD was about 60% in patients with T2DM and advanced DR. HbA1c variability and TG/HDL-C ratio may affect the development and progression of DKD in these patients.

  11. Incongruence in body image and body mass index: A surrogate risk marker in Black women for type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rynal Devanathan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Excess weight contributes to the development and progression of Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. Distorted body image amongst urban Black women and the perception that thinness is linked with HIV, may however be compounding the problem, particularly in areas with a high HIV burden.Objectives: This study aimed to compare the perception of body image in urban Black women with and without T2DM.Methods: A cross-sectional comparative study was conducted on 328 Black women systematically sampled into two groups (with and without T2DM. Body mass index (BMI (weight [kg]/height[m2] was determined and the adapted Stunkard Body Image Silhouettes for Black women was used to determine perceived body image (PBI.Results: Seventy-two per cent had T2DM and in this group 89% were obese, with a mean BMI of 39.5 kg/m2 (s.d. ± 8.5. In the non-diabetes group (NDG 44% were obese, with a mean BMIof 31.3 kg/m2 (s.d. ± 9.0 Black women underestimated their body image across all weight categories (p < 0.05. Both groups (99% of the study group also perceived thinness as being associated with HIV.Conclusions: This study identified an incongruence between PBI and actual BMI amongst urban Black women. This, combined with their belief that thinness is associated with HIV, places those with T2DM at risk of secondary complications arising from diabetes mellitus, and those without diabetes mellitus at a higher risk of developing T2DM. A discrepancy between PBI and BMI may therefore serve as a risk marker to alert clinicians to use a more ethno-cultural specific approach in engaging with urban Black women regarding weight loss strategies in the future.

  12. Diabetes mellitus is associated with increased risk of surgical site infections: A meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Zheng, Qiu-Jian; Wang, Sheng; Zeng, Shi-Xing; Zhang, You-Ping; Bai, Xue-Jiao; Hou, Tie-Ying

    2015-08-01

    Observational studies have suggested an association between diabetes mellitus and the risk of surgical site infections (SSIs), but the results remain inconclusive. We conducted a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies to elucidate the relationship between diabetes mellitus and SSIs. We searched PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science databases and reviewed the reference lists of the retrieved articles to identify relevant studies. Associations were tested in subgroups representing different patient characteristics and study quality criteria. The random-effect model was used to calculate the overall relative risk (RR). Fourteen prospective cohort studies (N = 91,094 participants) were included in this meta-analysis, and the pooled crude RR was 2.02 (95% confidence interval, 1.68-2.43) with significant between-study heterogeneity observed (I(2) = 56.50%). Significant association was also detected after we derived adjusted RRs for studies not reporting the adjusted RRs and calculated the combined adjusted RR of the 14 studies (RR, 1.69; 95% confidence interval, 1.33-2.13). Results were consistent and statistically significant in all subgroups. Stratified analyses found the number of confounders adjusted for, sample size, and method of diabetes case ascertainment might be the potential sources of heterogeneity. Sensitivity analysis further demonstrated the robustness of the result. This meta-analysis suggests diabetes mellitus is significantly associated with increased risk of SSIs. Future studies are encouraged to reveal the mechanisms underlying this association. Copyright © 2015 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Fatores de risco para diabetes mellitus gestacional na coorte de nascimentos de Pelotas, Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil, 2004 Risk factors for gestational diabetes mellitus in the birth cohort in Pelotas, Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil, 2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Alice Souza de Oliveira Dode

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Consensos de diversos países referem idade, obesidade e história familiar de diabetes mellitus como fatores de risco para diabetes mellitus gestacional. Outros fatores permanecem controversos. O objetivo deste estudo foi investigar fatores associados ao diabetes mellitus gestacional entre mães dos recém-nascidos da coorte de nascimentos de Pelotas, Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil, em 2004. Foram entrevistadas 4.243 puérperas no hospital, havendo 0,5% de recusas. O diagnóstico de diabetes mellitus gestacional foi auto-referido. A prevalência de diabetes mellitus gestacional foi 2,95% (IC95%: 2,53-3,64. Análise bruta realizada por meio de testes qui-quadrado mostrou associação direta com aumento da idade, escolaridade, nível econômico e índice de massa corporal (IMC e inversa com altura materna. Cor não branca, história familiar de diabetes mellitus, tabagismo no primeiro e segundo trimestres e atividade física antes da gestação e no primeiro trimestre mostraram-se associados. A análise ajustada hierarquizada realizada através de regressão logística mostrou associação com maior idade, cor não branca, maior escolaridade, história familiar de diabetes mellitus e maior IMC. A altura ficou no limiar da significância. Tabagismo no primeiro e segundo trimestres foi protetor.Consensus statements by various countries have reported age, obesity, and family history of diabetes mellitus as risk factors for gestational diabetes mellitus. Other factors remain controversial. The aim of this study was to investigate factors associated with gestational diabetes among mothers of newborns from the birth cohort in Pelotas, Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil, in 2004. We interviewed 4,243 postpartum women in hospital, with a 0.5% refusal rate. Diagnosis of gestational diabetes was self-reported. Prevalence of gestational diabetes was 2.95% (95%CI: 2.53-3.64. Crude analysis using the chi-square test showed a direct association with age, schooling

  14. Risk factors in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus Factores de riesgo en pacientes con diabetes mellitus tipo 2 Fatores de risco em pacientes com diabetes mellitus tipo 2

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    Idalina Diair Regla Carolino

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to evaluate the risk factors of type 2 diabetic patients through sociodemographic data, habits of health, anthropometric and biochemist profiles, assisted at a basic public health care unit in Maringá, Paraná. Sixty-six patients, 56 women aged over than 50 years-old were interviewed. High prevalence factors for cardiovascular risk were observed, such as: overweight and obesity, hypertension, dyslipidemia, sedentariness and inadequate diet. Data suggested the need for multidisciplinary intervention programs in health care units associated to educative programs, adjusted diet intake and regular physical activity for these diabetic patients.El objetivo de este estudio fue verificar los factores de riesgo de las complicaciones de la diabetes mellitus tipo 2, por medio del levantamiento de datos sociodemográficos, hábitos de salud, perfil antropométrico y bioquímico, de pacientes diabéticos tipo 2 atendidos en una Unidad Básica de Salud en la ciudad de Maringá, Paraná. Fueron entrevistados y evaluados 66 pacientes con más de 50 años; 56 eran del sexo femenino. Se verificó una elevada presencia de factores de riesgo cardiovascular en los pacientes investigados: sobrepeso y obesidad, hipertensión, dislipidemia, sedentarismo y dieta no saludable. Los resultados indican la necesidad de la implantación de programas de intervención multidisciplinares en unidades básicas de la salud asociada a prácticas educativas, estimulando la adopción de una dieta saludable y la práctica de actividad física regular para estos pacientes.O objetivo deste estudo foi verificar os fatores de risco das complicações do diabetes mellitus tipo 2, por meio de levantamento de dados sociodemográficos, hábitos de saúde, perfil antropométrico e bioquímico de pacientes diabéticos tipo 2, atendidos em Unidade Básica de Saúde, na cidade de Maringá, Paraná. Foram entrevistados e avaliados 66 pacientes acima de 50 anos, sendo 56

  15. Monocyte functions in diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geisler, C; Almdal, T; Bennedsen, J

    1982-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the functions of monocytes obtained from 14 patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) compared with those of monocytes from healthy individuals. It was found that the total number of circulating monocytes in the 14 diabetic patients was lower than that from...... for the elucidation of concomitant infections in diabetic patients are discussed....

  16. [The geography of diabetes mellitus in Portugal: how context influence the risk of dying].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, Paula; Costa, Cláudia; Loureiro, Adriana; Raposo, João; Boavida, José Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Introdução: A Diabetes Mellitus é um problema de saúde pública em crescimento em todo o mundo e também em Portugal. Pretendemos identificar a evolução do padrão geográfico desta causa de morte e a associação com a privação sociomaterial, em Portugal. Material e Métodos: Estudo ecológico transversal dos óbitos por Diabetes Mellitus ocorridos nos municípios portugueses em três períodos (1989-1993, 1999-2003 e 2006-2010). Aplicámos um modelo hierárquico bayesiano, de modo a obter a Razão Padronizada de Mortalidade Suavizada e o Risco Relativo, de mortalidade por diabetes associado à privação sociomaterial. Resultados: Observámos os valores da Razão Padronizada de Mortalidade Suavizada mais elevados, em 1989-1993, nos municípios urbanos do litoral (80% dos municípios com Razão Padronizada de Mortalidade Suavizada ≥ 161, sendo 60% urbanos); em 2006-2010 verificámos o oposto, destacando-se, pelos valores de Razão Padronizada de Mortalidade Suavizada elevados, as áreas rurais localizadas no interior sul do país (76,9% dos municípios com Razão Padronizada de Mortalidade Suavizada ≥ 161 sendo 69,2% rurais), principalmente no Alentejo. O Risco Relativo de mortalidade por Diabetes Mellitus aumenta com o aumento da vulnerabilidade associada às condições sociais e económicas da área de residência, principalmente nos dois últimos períodos (Risco Relativo: 1,00; IC95%: 0,98-1,02). Discussão: A Diabetes Mellitus apresenta um padrão geográfico marcado pela assimetria litoral-interior e urbano-rural, que tem vindo a alterar-se ao longo dos últimos vinte anos, verificando-se uma transição geográfica: 48% da população reside em municípios em que a Razão Padronizada de Mortalidade Suavizada aumentou nos últimos vinte anos, com destaque para as áreas rurais do interior de Portugal. Conclusão: As Razões Padronizadas de Mortalidade Suavizada mais elevadas verificam-se, actualmente, em municípios rurais, com índice de priva

  17. A MicroRNA Signature in Gestational Diabetes Mellitus Associated with Risk of Macrosomia

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    Jiandong Li

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: MicroRNA (miRNA is a small non-coding RNA molecule that functions in regulation of gene expression by targeting mRNA to affect its stability and/or translation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the miRNAs involvement in gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM, a well known risk factor for fetal overgrowth. Methods: Differential microRNA expression in placental tissues of normal controls and women with GDM were identified by miRNA micorarray analysis and further confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR on an independent set of normal and GDM placental tissues. Target genes of microRNAs were bioinformatically predicted and verified in vitro by Western blotting. Results: Our results uncovered 9 miRNAs that were significantly deregulated in GDM samples: miR-508-3p was up-regulated and miR-27a, miR-9, miR-137, miR-92a, miR-33a, miR-30d, miR-362-5p and miR-502-5p were down-regulated. Bioinformatic approaches revealed that the microRNAs signature identifies gene targets involved in EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor-PI3K (phosphoinositide 3-Kinase-Akt (also known as protein kinase B pathway, a signal cascade which plays important roles in placental development and fetal growth. We found that the protein levels of EGFR, PI3K and phospho-Akt were up-regulated and PIKfyve (a FYVE finger-containing phosphoinositide kinase, a negative regulator of EGFR signaling, was down-regulated significantly in GDM tissues. We also confirmed PIKfyve was a direct target of miR-508-3p. Conclusion: Our data identified a miRNA signature involvement in GDM which may contribute to macrosomia through enhancing EGFR signaling.

  18. [Diabetes mellitus and aging as a risk factor for cerebral vascular disease: epidemiology, pathophysiology and prevention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantú-Brito, Carlos; Mimenza-Alvarado, Alberto; Sánchez-Hernández, Juan José

    2010-01-01

    Older patients with diabetes have a high risk of vascular complications. They have an increase of approximately 3 times for developing stroke compared with subjects without diabetes. In addition, up to 75-80% of deaths in diabetic patients are associated with major cardiovascular events including stroke. The risk of stroke is high within 5 years of diagnosis for type 2 diabetes is 9% (mortality 21%), that is more than doubles the rate for the general population. From observational registries in a collaborative stroke study in Mexico, we analyzed clinical data, risk factors, and outcome of 1182 diabetic patients with cerebral ischemia, with focus in elderly subjects. There was a high frequency of hyperglycemia during the acute phase of stroke: the median value was 140 mg/dL and 40% had values higher than 180 mg/dL. Clinical outcome was usually unfavorable in elderly stroke patients with diabetes: case fatality rate was 30% at 30 days and survivors had moderate to severe disability, usually as consequence of the propensity to develop more systemic medical complications during hospital stay. Primary stroke prevention studies in patients with diabetes reveal that tight control of glucose is not associated with reduction in stroke risk. Therefore, proper control of other vascular risk factors is mandatory in patients with diabetes, in particular of arterial hypertension.

  19. Smoking Cessation Carries a Short-Term Rising Risk for Newly Diagnosed Diabetes Mellitus Independently of Weight Gain: A 6-Year Retrospective Cohort Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Ting Sung

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The effects of smoking on human metabolism are complex. Although smoking increases risk for diabetes mellitus, smoking cessation was also reported to be associated with weight gain and incident diabetes mellitus. We therefore conducted this study to clarify the association between smoking status and newly diagnosed diabetes mellitus. Methods. An analysis was done using the data of a mass health examination performed annually in an industrial park from 2007 to 2013. The association between smoking status and newly diagnosed diabetes mellitus was analyzed with adjustment for weight gain and other potential confounders. Results. Compared with never-smokers, not only current smokers but also ex-smokers in their first two years of abstinence had higher odds ratios (ORs for newly diagnosed diabetes mellitus (never-smokers 3.6%, OR as 1; current smokers 5.5%, OR = 1.499, 95% CI = 1.147–1.960, and p=0.003; ex-smokers in their first year of abstinence 7.5%, OR = 1.829, 95% CI = 0.906–3.694, and p=0.092; and ex-smokers in their second year of abstinence 9.0%, OR = 2.020, 95% CI = 1.031–3.955, and p=0.040. Conclusion. Smoking cessation generally decreased risk for newly diagnosed diabetes mellitus. However, increased odds were seen within the first 2 years of abstinence independently of weight gain.

  20. A cross-sectional survey on prevalence and risk factors for abnormal plasma liver enzymes in overweight or obese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王娇

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the prevalence and risk factors for abnormal plasma liver enzymes in patients with type 2diabetes mellitus.Methods Overweight or obese patients with type 2 diabetes were recruited from 60 tertiary and secondary hospitals in Guangdong Province between August 2011 and March 2012.The abnormal plasma liver

  1. Incident diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease risk in exercising hypercholesterolemic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Paul T; Franklin, Barry A

    2015-11-15

    Exercise may be an important treatment for hypercholesterolemic patients, particularly in statin users who are at increased diabetes risk. We therefore used Cox proportional hazard analyses to compare running and walking dose (metabolic equivalent hours/day [MET-h/d]) to diabetes, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk in hypercholesterolemic patients. There were 60 diabetic- and 373 CVD-related deaths during a 10.1-year mortality surveillance of 6,688 hypercholesterolemic patients. In addition, there were 177 incident nonfatal diabetes, 815 incident nonfatal hypertensions, and 323 incident nonfatal CVD events during a 6.4-year follow-up of 6,971 hypercholesterolemic patients who supplied follow-up questionnaires. Fatal and nonfatal diabetes risk decreased 26% (p = 0.002) and 19% (p ≤0.0001) per MET-h/d, respectively, and relative to hypertension risk decreased 4% (p = 0.01) per MET-h/d, and relative to diabetes, hypertension, and CVD risk in hypercholesterolemic patients and should more than compensate for the purported 9% increase in diabetes risk from statin use. By preventing morbidity and mortality for a specific existing medical condition, some exercise expenses may qualify for flexible spending account expenditures in hypercholesterolemic patients when prescribed by a physician. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. [Nutritional therapy in diabetes mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toeller, M

    1993-03-01

    Most aspects of the nutritional therapy of diabetes mellitus apply equally to IDDM and NIDDM patients and are also appropriate for people with high risk of cardiovascular diseases. A restriction of energy, a reduction of saturated fatty acids as well as of alcoholic drinks and simple sugars are the most important measures. This modification of nutritional intake together with increased fibre consumption is not only appropriate to avoid hyperglycaemia in diabetic patients but has also its benefits in patients presenting with the metabolic syndrome (possible reduction of hyperinsulinaemia, hypertension and hyperlipoproteinaemia). Diabetic patients should have regular screening for microalbuminuria. At first signs of an early stage of nephropathy patients should be advised to restrict their protein intake. About 50% of daily energy intake should be derived from carbohydrates and fat intake should be no more than 35% of total energy (saturated fatty acids less than 10% of energy). Carbohydrate exchange units are usually not necessary in NIDDM patients. In addition diabetes specialty foods are not an essential part of the nutritional therapy. The success of the nutritional therapy in diabetic patients is substantially dependent upon qualified counselling and education of the patients by the physician (as far as possible with the assistance of a dietitian).

  3. Non classical risk factors for gestational diabetes mellitus: a systematic review of the literature Fatores de risco não clássicos para diabetes mellitus gestacional: uma revisão sistemática da literatura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Alice Souza de Oliveira Dode

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Age, obesity and family history of diabetes are well known risk factors for gestational diabetes mellitus. Others are more controversial. The objective of this review is to find evidence in the literature that justifies the inclusion of these other conditions among risk factors. The MEDLINE, Cochrane, LILACS and Pan American Health Organization databases were searched, covering articles dating from between 1992 and 2006. Keywords were used in combination (AND with gestational diabetes mellitus separately and with each one of the risk factors studied. The methodological quality of the studies included was assessed, resulting in the selection of 41 papers. Most studies investigating maternal history of low birth weight, low stature, and low level of physical activity have found positive associations with gestational diabetes mellitus. Low socioeconomic levels, smoking during pregnancy, high parity, belonging to minority groups, and excessive weight gain during pregnancy presented conflicting results. Publication bias cannot be ruled out. Standardization of techniques, cutoff points for screening and diagnosis, as well as studies involving larger sample sizes would allow future meta-analyses.Idade, obesidade e história familiar de diabetes são fatores de risco bem conhecidos para diabetes mellitus gestacional. Outros são controversos. O objetivo desta revisão é encontrar evidências na literatura que justifiquem a inclusão dessas condições entre os fatores de risco. Bases de dados MEDLINE, Cochrane, LILACS e Organização Pan-Americana da Saúde foram procuradas. A revisão incluiu artigos de 1992 a 2006. Palavras-chave foram usadas em combinação com diabetes mellitus gestacional separadamente e com cada um dos fatores de risco estudados. A qualidade metodológica dos estudos incluídos foi medida, totalizando 41 estudos. A maioria dos trabalhos que investigaram história materna de baixo peso, baixa estatura e baixa atividade f

  4. Prevalence and risk factors for the development of diabetes mellitus in Swedish cats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sallander Marie

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevalence and risk factors for the development of feline diabetes mellitus (FDM in Swedish cats have not previously been reported. The objective of the present pilot study was to indicate prevalence and possible risk factors for FDM in Swedish cats. Twenty diabetic cats from the database at the University Animal Hospital in Uppsala participated in the study, and these were matched with 20 healthy controls on sex and age. A mail-and-telephone questionnaire focusing on diet, activity and obesity was used. Results The prevalence of FDM during the years 2000–2004 based on the results of the hospital records in the present study was 21 per 10,000 cats. The diabetic cats were on average 9 years old when the disease signs were discovered (median, min-max 2–15. Among FDM cases, it was more common to be male (n=17 males vs n=3 females; P≤0.05. Ten out of twenty owners to cases (50% reported their cats to be obese at the time of the diagnosis (median 9 years, min-max 2–15, as compared to five out of twenty (25% controls at the same age. The median BW at the time for diagnosis was 5.5 kg (min-max 2.0-9.0 for cases, and 5.0 kg (min-max 3.0-8.0 kg for controls, respectively. Despite that both cases and controls had the same median age at the time of the study (13 years, min-max 3–18, a significantly higher number of controls were alive at that age (n=16 controls vs 8 cases; P≤0.05. A significantly higher proportion of cases that were obese at the time of the FDM diagnosis were dead at the time of the study compared to the proportion of controls that were obese at a similar age (P≤0.05. The diets given at the time for diagnosis for cases compared to diet of the controls at a similar time were mainly commercial foods, and controls consumed a higher proportion of dry foods compared to cases (medians 79 vs 44% of DM intake/d, respectively; P≤0.05. Cases were less active compared to the controls (2.3 and 3.2 h

  5. Genetic risk of progression to type 2 diabetes and response to intensive lifestyle or metformin in prediabetic women with and without a history of gestational diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Shannon D; Jablonski, Kathleen A; Florez, Jose C; Dabelea, Dana; Franks, Paul W; Dagogo-Jack, Sam; Kim, Catherine; Knowler, William C; Christophi, Costas A; Ratner, Robert

    2014-04-01

    OBJECTIVE The Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) trial investigated rates of progression to diabetes among adults with prediabetes randomized to treatment with placebo, metformin, or intensive lifestyle intervention. Among women in the DPP, diabetes risk reduction with metformin was greater in women with prior gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) compared with women without GDM but with one or more previous live births. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We asked if genetic variability could account for these differences by comparing β-cell function and genetic risk scores (GRS), calculated from 34 diabetes-associated loci, between women with and without histories of GDM. RESULTS β-Cell function was reduced in women with GDM. The GRS was positively associated with a history of GDM; however, the GRS did not predict progression to diabetes or modulate response to intervention. CONCLUSIONS These data suggest that a diabetes-associated GRS is associated with development of GDM and may characterize women at risk for development of diabetes due to β-cell dysfunction.

  6. Risk factors for type 2 diabetes mellitus among out-patients in Ho, the Volta regional capital of Ghana: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudjinu, Horlali Yao; Sarfo, Bismark

    2017-07-26

    The prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus in developing countries like Ghana continues to rise. This study seeks to assess the risk factors of type 2 diabetes mellitus in a Ghanaian setting. An unmatched case-control study among patients receiving care at the out-patient departments of the two major hospitals in the Ho Municipality. Patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus were recruited. Appropriate controls with similar ages who were also patients receiving care at the out-patient department of these hospitals were recruited. Both cases and controls were administered a questionnaire that comprises of standardized and validated tools. These tools include WHO STEPs instrument, general practice physical activity questionnaire and rapid eating and activity assessment for patients. Additionally, the research participants were made to undergo physical examinations for weight, height, waist circumference and laboratory testing of fasting venous blood to assess the biochemical factors of interest namely fasting blood glucose and fasting lipids. Analysis of data was done using STATA version 11. A total of 136 (48 cases and 88 controls) participants of which 95 [39 (81.25%) cases and 56 (63.64%) controls] respondents underwent laboratory testing for fasting blood glucose and fasting blood lipid (total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol and triglycerides). Participants were aged between 35 and 62 years. This study reveals a number of risk factors for type 2 diabetes mellitus. Individuals in the middle socio-economic class have a greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus with an OR of 5.03 (p diabetes mellitus. A low physical activity level is a valid determinant of type 2 diabetes mellitus irrespective of body mass index, socio-economic level or place of residence. Individuals within the middle socio-economic level, who are physically inactive and do not consume large amounts of fruit are at greatest risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus. Living in a

  7. Association between maternal diabetes mellitus and the risk of congenital malformations: A meta-analysis of cohort studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Enfa; Zhang, Yafei; Zeng, Xianling; Liu, Baomin

    2015-08-01

    Increasing studies suggest that gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and pre-gestational diabetes mellitus (PGDM) may be associated with an increased risk of major congenital malformations (MCM) in the offspring. To determine whether GDM or PGDM is associated with an increased risk of congenital malformations, we performed a meta-analysis of cohort studies. We systematically searched the PubMed, Web of Science and Cochrane Library (from January, 1990 to October, 2014) and reviewed the reference lists of included papers to search for additional studies. Meta-analysis tools were used to summarize results. Summary relative risks (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated with random-effects models or fixed-effects models. Study quality was assessed using the Newcastle-Ottawa scale. A total of 21 cohort studies were included in the meta-analysis. Analysis of all studies showed that both PGDM and GDM were associated with an increased risk of MCM (RR=2.44, 95% CI=1.92-3.10, I2=78.3%, p=0.342; RR=1.11, 95% CI=1.11-1.27, I2=9.9%, pcohort studies are needed to test the effect of PGDM and GDM on specific congenital malformations risk.

  8. Screening strategies for gestational diabetes mellitus at the Aga ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Screening strategies for gestational diabetes mellitus at the Aga Khan University ... both strategies and the prevalence of risk factors for gestational diabetes. ... significant for fasting glucose levels (Pearson correlation coefficient, r = -0.06, ...

  9. Gestational diabetes mellitus in South Asia: Epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jawad, Fatema; Ejaz, Kiran

    2016-09-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus, is defined by the American Diabetes Association as "diabetes diagnosed in the second or third trimester of pregnancy that is not clearly overt diabetes". WHO has further classified the period of diagnosis as Hyperglycaemia in Pregnancy and Gestational Diabetes Mellitus. The former term is applicable in the early period of gestation and GDM is detected after 24 weeks. Irrespective of the guidelines followed, the presence of Diabetes Mellitus during pregnancy, has to be taken seriously as it is an important metabolic derangement and can prove to be harmful for the mother and dangerous for the foetus. The rising incidence of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in the world along with obesity, is a major contributing factor for GDM. The trend of this rise is more steep in the low and middle income countries thus proportionately increasing the risk for GDM. South Asia falls in this bracket and the responsible factors have to be identified and corrected. Management should begin from primordial prevention for which education is a key factor. Every woman should be taught the way to follow a healthy life style. Identification of the contributing factors and universal screening facilities for all pregnant women living in both rural and urban areas, should be given prime importance. On detecting Hyperglycaemia in Pregnancy or GDM, monitoring and health care facilities should be provided. This review provides some available figures of GDM in South Asia, the risk factors in this population and the steps for prevention.

  10. Prevalence of self-reported diagnosis of diabetes mellitus and associated risk factors in a national survey in the US population: SHIELD (Study to Help Improve Early evaluation and management of risk factors Leading to Diabetes)

    OpenAIRE

    Reed Michael L; Lewis Sandra J; Green Andrew J; Gavin James R; Clark Nathaniel G; Bazata Debbra D; Bays Harold E; Stewart Walter; Chapman Richard H; Fox Kathleen M; Grandy Susan

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Studies derived from continuous national surveys have shown that the prevalence of diagnosed diabetes mellitus in the US is increasing. This study estimated the prevalence in 2004 of self-reported diagnosis of diabetes and other conditions in a community-based population, using data from the Study to Help Improve Early evaluation and management of risk factors Leading to Diabetes (SHIELD). Methods The initial screening questionnaire was mailed in 2004 to a stratified rando...

  11. Hypoglycemia in Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeland, Barbara

    2017-09-01

    Hypoglycemia is a serious acute complication of diabetes treatment. Recognizing the risk factors and taking steps to prevent low blood glucose should be a part of self-management education for all people taking glucose-lowering medications. It is important for home care clinicians to evaluate their patient's understanding of hypoglycemia and the appropriate treatment options.

  12. Gastrointestinal complications of diabetes mellitus

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Babu Krishnan Shithu Babu Jessica Walker Adrian B Walker Joseph M Pappachan

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus affects virtually every organ system in the body and the degree of organ involvement depends on the duration and severity of the disease,and other co-morbidities.Gastrointestinal(GI...

  13. Managing hypertension in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horr, Samuel; Nissen, Steven

    2016-06-01

    Hypertension is a common problem in the diabetic population with estimates suggesting a prevalence exceeding 60%. Comorbid hypertension and diabetes mellitus are associated with high rates of macrovascular and microvascular complications. These two pathologies share overlapping risk factors, importantly central obesity. Treatment of hypertension is unequivocally beneficial and improves all-cause mortality, cardiovascular mortality, major cardiovascular events, and microvascular outcomes including nephropathy and retinopathy. Although controversial, current guidelines recommend a target blood pressure in the diabetic population of diabetes. Management of blood pressure in patients with diabetes includes both lifestyle modifications and pharmacological therapies. This article reviews the evidence for management of hypertension in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, and provides a recommended treatment strategy based on the available data. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Haptoglobin2-2 phenotype is an additional risk factor of retinopathy in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukund R Mogarekar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The aim of this study was to investigate the association between haptoglobin (Hp phenotypes and risk of the development of diabetic retinopathy (DR in patients of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study included 45 normotensive type 2 diabetic patients (duration more than 5 years admitted in the hospital divided into two groups (with and without DR on the basis of fundus examination by direct ophthalmoscopy. Serum samples of all patients were subjected for Hp phenotyping by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Results: DR was associated significantly in diabetic patients with Hp2-2 phenotype (79.31% than diabetic patients with Hp2-1 phenotype (43.75% and Hp2-2 had higher odds ratio (OR for DR in univariate analysis (OR 4.929, [95% confidence interval [CI] (1.297-18.733], P = 0.016 and multivariate analysis (OR 7.704 [95% CI (0.887-66.945], P = 0.064. Furthermore, Hp2-2 was associated significantly with severe forms of DR. Conclusion: Hp2-2 phenotype is associated with susceptibility to DR showing a graded risk relationship to the number of Hp2 alleles. Determination of Hp phenotype may be useful in the risk assessment and management of DR.

  15. Residential Proximity to Major Roadways and Risk of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiqing Zhao

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Research indicates that higher levels of traffic-related pollution exposure increase the risk of diabetes, but the association between road proximity and diabetes risk remains unclear. To assess and quantify the association between residential proximity to major roadways and type 2 diabetes, a systematic review and meta-analysis was performed. Embase, Medline, and Web of Science were searched for eligible studies. Using a random-effects meta-analysis, the summary relative risks (RRs were calculated. Bayesian meta-analysis was also performed. Eight studies (6 cohort and 2 cross-sectional with 158,576 participants were finally included. The summary unadjusted RR for type 2 diabetes associated with residential proximity to major roadways was 1.24 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.07–1.44, p = 0.001, I2 = 48.1%. The summary adjusted RR of type 2 diabetes associated with residential proximity to major roadways was 1.12 (95% CI: 1.03–1.22, p = 0.01, I2 = 17.9%. After excluding two cross-sectional studies, the summary results suggested that residential proximity to major roadways could increase type 2 diabetes risk (Adjusted RR = 1.13; 95% CI: 1.02–1.27, p = 0.025, I2 = 36.6%. Bayesian meta-analysis showed that the unadjusted RR and adjusted RR of type 2 diabetes associated with residential proximity to major roadways were 1.22 (95% credibility interval: 1.06–1.55 and 1.13 (95% credibility interval: 1.01–1.31, respectively. The meta-analysis suggested that residential proximity to major roadways could significantly increase risk of type 2 diabetes, and it is an independent risk factor of type 2 diabetes. More well-designed studies are needed to further strengthen the evidence.

  16. Correlation of Lipid Profile and Risk of Developing Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in 10-14 Year Old Children

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    Nusrath M. Habiba

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The role of lipid profile in predicting the risk of Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM in children is not clearly established. Our aim is to screen non-diabetic children aged 10-14 years for risk of developing T2DM and evaluate the association of abnormal lipids and socioeconomic status (SES. Methods: Data on race/ethnicity, family history, body mass index percentile, blood pressure and presence of neck pigmentation (acanthosis nigricans were collected from 149 non-diabetic children. Using these factors, children were classified into low risk (3 risk factors groups. Logistic regression model and chi-square tests were used to evaluate the association of blood lipid profile and demographic variables. Independent t-test was used to compare the ratio of Total Cholesterol (TC and High Density Lipids (HDL with T2DM risk. Results: 60% of children were at high risk for developing T2DM. HDL (pp=0.02 and TC/HDL ratio (pConclusions: The significant determinants associated with high risk group were modifiable factors providing an opportunity for early intervention and prevention.

  17. Risk factors for Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus : Metabolic Syndrome, Insulin Resistance and Primary Prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Hydrie, Muhammad Zafar Iqbal

    2012-01-01

    Aims: The purpose of the study was to identify the extent of metabolic syndrome on the basis of ATP III and IDF definition in subjects aged 25 years and above from an urban population of Karachi. Also to see the association of risk factors related to diabetes and metabolic syndrome in this population. And finally to prove the hypothesis of intervention effect on the onset of type 2 diabetes in a high risk urban population and evaluate the rate of conversion of IGT to diabetes by these interve...

  18. Increased risk of Parkinson disease with diabetes mellitus in a population-based study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yu-Wan; Hsieh, Teng-Fu; Li, Chia-Ing; Liu, Chiu-Shong; Lin, Wen-Yuan; Chiang, Jen-Huai; Li, Tsai-Chung; Lin, Cheng-Chieh

    2017-01-01

    Abstract This nationwide population-based study investigated the risk of Parkinson disease (PD) in relation to diabetes mellitus (DM) through the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan. A retrospective study was conducted, consisting of 36,294 patients who were newly diagnosed with DM between January 1, 2000 and December 31, 2006 and 108,882 individuals without DM as healthy controls from insurance claims data from Taiwan's National Health Research Institutes Dataset. The subjects were followed up until December 31, 2011 or until the first manifestation of PD. The hazard ratio (HR) of DM for PD incidence was estimated by Cox proportional hazard regression model. Compared with the non-DM cohort, the incidence density rate of PD was 1.36-fold higher in the DM cohort (1.53 vs 2.08 per 1000 person-years) with an adjusted HR of 1.19 (95% confidence interval = 1.08–1.32) after adjusting for age, sex, comorbidities, and medication use. The adjusted HR of PD for DM with a larger magnitude was observed in females (1.29, 1.12–1.49); individuals age 65 years and older (1.20, 1.06–1.35); those without schizophrenia (1.20, 1.08–1.33), bipolar disorder (1.20, 1.08–1.33), hypertension (1.18, 1.06–1.32), hyperlipidemia (1.21, 1.09–1.34), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (1.19, 1.06–1.32), coronary artery disease (1.22, 1.09–1.36), stroke (1.23, 1.10–1.37), asthma (1.20, 1.08–1.34), flunarizine use (1.21, 1.08–1.35), zolpidem use (1.16, 1.04–1.30), Charlson comorbidity index score of 0 (1.23, 1.08–1.40), and those using metoclopramide (1.35, 1.14–1.60) and zolpidem (1.46, 1.12–1.90). DM increased the risk of PD during a mean follow-up of 7.3 years. Further mechanistic research on the effect of DM on PD is needed. PMID:28099356

  19. Dietary Patterns during Pregnancy Are Associated with Risk of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Dayeon; Lee, Kyung Won; Song, Won O

    2015-11-12

    Maternal dietary patterns before and during pregnancy play important roles in the development of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). We aimed to identify dietary patterns during pregnancy that are associated with GDM risk in pregnant U.S. women. From a 24 h dietary recall of 253 pregnant women (16-41 years) included in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2003-2012, food items were aggregated into 28 food groups based on Food Patterns Equivalents Database. Three dietary patterns were identified by reduced rank regression with responses including prepregnancy body mass index (BMI), dietary fiber, and ratio of poly- and monounsaturated fatty acids to saturated fatty acid: "high refined grains, fats, oils and fruit juice", "high nuts, seeds, fat and soybean; low milk and cheese", and "high added sugar and organ meats; low fruits, vegetables and seafood". GDM was diagnosed using fasting plasma glucose levels ≥5.1 mmol/L for gestation education, family poverty income ratio, marital status, prepregnancy BMI, gestational weight gain, energy intake, physical activity, and log-transformed C-reactive protein (CRP). All statistical analyses accounted for the appropriate survey design and sample weights of the NHANES. Of 249 pregnant women, 34 pregnant women (14%) had GDM. Multivariable AOR (95% CIs) of GDM for comparisons between the highest vs. lowest tertiles were 4.9 (1.4-17.0) for "high refined grains, fats, oils and fruit juice" pattern, 7.5 (1.8-32.3) for "high nuts, seeds, fat and soybean; low milk and cheese" pattern, and 22.3 (3.9-127.4) for "high added sugar and organ meats; low fruits, vegetables and seafood" pattern after controlling for maternal sociodemographic variables, prepregnancy BMI, gestational weight gain, energy intake and log-transformed CRP. These findings suggest that dietary patterns during pregnancy are associated with risk of GDM after controlling for potential confounders. The observed connection between a high

  20. Dietary Patterns during Pregnancy Are Associated with Risk of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayeon Shin

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Maternal dietary patterns before and during pregnancy play important roles in the development of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM. We aimed to identify dietary patterns during pregnancy that are associated with GDM risk in pregnant U.S. women. From a 24 h dietary recall of 253 pregnant women (16–41 years included in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES 2003–2012, food items were aggregated into 28 food groups based on Food Patterns Equivalents Database. Three dietary patterns were identified by reduced rank regression with responses including prepregnancy body mass index (BMI, dietary fiber, and ratio of poly- and monounsaturated fatty acids to saturated fatty acid: “high refined grains, fats, oils and fruit juice”, “high nuts, seeds, fat and soybean; low milk and cheese”, and “high added sugar and organ meats; low fruits, vegetables and seafood”. GDM was diagnosed using fasting plasma glucose levels ≥5.1 mmol/L for gestation <24 weeks. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to estimate adjusted odds ratio (AOR and 95% confidence intervals (CIs for GDM, after controlling for maternal age, race/ethnicity, education, family poverty income ratio, marital status, prepregnancy BMI, gestational weight gain, energy intake, physical activity, and log-transformed C-reactive protein (CRP. All statistical analyses accounted for the appropriate survey design and sample weights of the NHANES. Of 249 pregnant women, 34 pregnant women (14% had GDM. Multivariable AOR (95% CIs of GDM for comparisons between the highest vs. lowest tertiles were 4.9 (1.4–17.0 for “high refined grains, fats, oils and fruit juice” pattern, 7.5 (1.8–32.3 for “high nuts, seeds, fat and soybean; low milk and cheese” pattern, and 22.3 (3.9–127.4 for “high added sugar and organ meats; low fruits, vegetables and seafood” pattern after controlling for maternal sociodemographic variables, prepregnancy BMI, gestational

  1. History of infertility and risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobias, Deirdre K; Gaskins, Audrey J; Missmer, Stacey A; Hu, Frank B; Manson, JoAnn E; Buck Louis, Germaine M; Zhang, Cuilin; Chavarro, Jorge E

    2015-04-01

    We sought to evaluate the relationship between delayed conception and type 2 diabetes risk, given that there are plausible underlying mechanisms linking the two, including inflammation and insulin resistance. Participants of the Nurses' Health Study II prospective cohort were included if they were free of chronic disease (cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, cancer) at baseline. Biennial questionnaires updated information on infertility status (>12 months attempted pregnancy), lifestyle characteristics and several health-related outcomes. Self-reported cases of diabetes were confirmed using a follow-up questionnaire. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards models were used to compute the HRs and 95% CIs. Incident type 2 diabetes occurred in 5,993 of the 112,106 participants over 24 years of follow-up (1989-2013). A history of infertility was reported in 27,774 (24.8%) women and was associated with a 20% greater risk of developing diabetes, compared with those never reporting infertility (HR 1.20 [95% CI 1.14, 1.28]), after adjusting for age, lifestyle factors, marital status, oral contraceptive use, family history of diabetes and BMI. Compared with women without a history of infertility, the causes of infertility associated with a higher diabetes risk were ovulation disorders (HR 1.43 [95% CI 1.29, 1.58]) and tubal factor (HR 1.34 [95% CI 1.13, 1.58]). Cervical factor (HR 1.06 [95% CI 0.81, 1.40]) and endometriosis (HR 1.06 [95% CI 0.89, 1.27]) were not associated, while male factor infertility was associated with a modestly higher diabetes risk (HR 1.15 [95% CI 1.00, 1.33]). These novel findings suggest a history of infertility, particularly that related to ovulation disorders and tubal blockage, is significantly associated with a higher risk of type 2 diabetes.

  2. High risk of neonatal complications in children of mothers with gestational diabetes mellitus in their first pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wielandt, Hanne Benedicte; Schønemann-Rigel, Helena; Holst, Charlotte Blunck

    2015-01-01

    intensive care unit. CONCLUSION: The present study supports the notion of high-risk pregnancy among GDM patients. Compared with nulliparous in general, the offspring were more likely to be delivered by emergency CS. Despite the prophylactic procedures, one in six had neonatal hypoglycaemia.......INTRODUCTION: THE study presents the neonatal outcome from a cohort of women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) in their first pregnancy. METHODS: During a five-year period (2009-2013), a prospective follow-up study was performed at the Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Lillebaelt...

  3. Alcohol and HCV Chronic Infection Are Risk Cofactors of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus for Hepatocellular Carcinoma in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimiliano Balbi

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2 has been associated with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC development. To study this relationship, we enrolled 465 HCC patients compared with 618 Cirrhotic cases and 490 Controls. The prevalence of DM2 is significantly higher in HCC patients with an Odds Ratio of 3.12 versus Controls. In HCC cases with alcohol abuse, the frequency of DM2 is the highest. In our HCC patients, when HCV infection is associated with alcohol abuse, the liver cancer develops earlier. In addition, multivariate analysis shows that alcohol consumption is an independent risk factor for HCC more relevant than HCV infection.

  4. Characteristics of men classified at high-risk for type 2 diabetes mellitus using the AUSDRISK screening tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiar, Elroy J; Morgan, Philip J; Collins, Clare E; Plotnikoff, Ronald C; Callister, Robin

    2015-04-01

    The primary aim was to describe characteristics of men identified at high-risk for Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) using the Australian diabetes risk assessment (AUSDRISK) tool. Secondary aims were to determine the prevalence of pre-diabetes and metabolic syndrome in these men. Men (n=209) completed the AUSDRISK tool, with 165 identified as high-risk for T2DM (score ≥ 12, maximum 38). Demographic, anthropometric, physiological and behavioural outcomes were assessed for 101 men. Comparisons (one-way ANOVA) among three AUSDRISK score groups (12-15, 16-19, ≥ 20) were performed (significance level, Prisk factors (percentages) among high-risk men were waist circumference (>90 cm; 93%), age (>44 years; 79%), physical activity level (diabetes (39%) and previously high blood glucose levels (32%). Men with AUSDRISK scores ≥ 20 had higher (mean ± SD) HbA1C (6.0 ± 0.4% [42 ± 4.4 mmol.mol(-1)], Pdiabetes prevalence was 70% and metabolic syndrome prevalence was 62%. The AUSDRISK tool identified men who were mostly older than 44, and had large waist circumferences and elevated HbA1C. These findings provide evidence supporting the usefulness of the AUSDRISK screening tool for T2DM screening in clinical and research settings. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Type 2 diabetes mellitus as a risk factor for the onset of depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nouwen, Arie; Winkley, Kirsty; Twisk, Jos W R

    2010-01-01

    examined the association of diabetes and the onset of depression by reviewing the literature and conducting a meta-analysis of longitudinal studies on this topic. METHODS: EMBASE, MEDLINE and PsycInfo were searched for articles published up to September 2009. All studies that examined the relationship......AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: An earlier meta-analysis showed that diabetes is a risk factor for the development and/or recurrence of depression. Yet whether this risk is different for studies using questionnaires than for those relying on diagnostic criteria for depression has not been examined. This study...... between type 2 diabetes and the onset of depression were included. Pooled relative risks were calculated using fixed and random effects models. RESULTS: Eleven studies met our inclusion criteria for this meta-analysis. Based on the pooled data, including 48,808 cases of type 2 diabetes without depression...

  6. Endogenous and Antipsychotic-Related Risks for Diabetes Mellitus in Young People With Schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rajkumar, Anto P; Horsdal, Henriette Thisted; Wimberley, Theresa

    2017-01-01

    treatment in people with schizophrenia. METHOD: The study followed all people born in Denmark on or after Jan. 1, 1977, until Jan. 1, 2013 (N=2,736,510). The Danish Psychiatric Central Research Register ascertained schizophrenia diagnoses. The Danish National Prescription Registry provided data......-line treatment with either first-generation antipsychotics (adjusted hazard ratio, 3.06; 95% CI, 1.32-7.05) or second-generation antipsychotics (adjusted hazard ratio, 3.44; 95% CI, 1.73-6.83) increased the risk for diabetes without a statistically significant difference. Appropriate sensitivity analyses limited...... to type 2 diabetes corroborated these results. CONCLUSIONS: Schizophrenia confers a high endogenous risk for diabetes, and the risk is further increased by both first-generation and second-generation antipsychotics. Early detection and effective treatment of diabetes should be an integral part...

  7. Does breastfeeding influence the risk of developing diabetes mellitus in children? A review of current evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Feliciano Pereira

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to perform a review to investigate the influence of breastfeeding as a protective agent against the onset of diabetes in children. SOURCES: Non-systematic review of SciELO, LILACS, MEDLINE, Scopus, and VHL databases, and selection of the 52 most relevant studies. A total of 21 articles, specifically on the topic, were analyzed (nine related to type 1 diabetes and 12 to type 2 diabetes. DATA SYNTHESIS: The duration and exclusivity of breastfeeding, as well as the early use of cow's milk, have been shown to be important risk factors for developing diabetes. It is believed that human milk contains substances that promote the maturation of the immune system, which protect against the onset of type 1 diabetes. Moreover, human milk has bioactive substances that promote satiety and energy balance, preventing excess weight gain during childhood, thus protecting against the development of type 2 diabetes. Although the above mentioned benefits have not been observed by some researchers, inaccuracies on dietary habit reports during childhood and the presence of interfering factors have been considered responsible for the lack of identification of beneficial effects. CONCLUSION: Given the scientific evidence indicated in most published studies, it is believed that the lack of breastfeeding can be a modifiable risk factor for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Strategies aiming at the promotion and support of breastfeeding should be used by trained healthcare professionals in order to prevent the onset of diabetes.

  8. TSH increment and the risk of incident type 2 diabetes mellitus in euthyroid subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Ji Eun; Jin, Sang-Man; Jee, Jae Hwan; Bae, Ji Cheol; Hur, Kyu Yeon; Lee, Moon-Kyu; Kim, Sun Wook; Kim, Jae Hyeon

    2017-03-01

    Thyroid function is known to influence glucose metabolism, and thyroid-stimulating hormone is the most useful parameter in screening for thyroid dysfunction. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the incidence of type 2 diabetes according to baseline thyroid-stimulating hormone level and thyroid-stimulating hormone change in euthyroid subjects. We identified and enrolled 17,061 euthyroid subjects without diabetes among participants who had undergone consecutive thyroid function tests between 2006 and 2012 as a part of yearly health check-up program. Thyroid-stimulating hormone changes were determined by subtracting baseline thyroid-stimulating hormone level from thyroid-stimulating hormone level at 1 year before diagnosis of diabetes or at the end of follow-up in subjects who did not develope diabetes. During 84,595 person-years of follow-up, there were 956 new cases of type 2 diabetes. Cox proportional hazards models showed the risk of incident type 2 diabetes was significantly increased with each 1 μIU/mL increment in TSH after adjustment for multiple confounding factors (hazard ratio = 1.13, 95% confidence interval: 1.07-1.20, P risk for incident type 2 diabetes (hazard ratio = 1.25, 95% confidence interval: 1.05-1.48, P for trend = 0.011). However, baseline thyroid-stimulating hormone level and tertile were not associated with the risk for diabetes. Prominent increase in thyroid-stimulating hormone concentration can be an additional risk factor for the development of type 2 diabetes in euthyroid subjects.

  9. Risk Factors for Thyroid Dysfunction among Type 2 Diabetic Patients in a Highly Diabetes Mellitus Prevalent Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metab Al-Geffari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes and thyroid dysfunction found to exist simultaneously. In this regard, the present study looked into the prevalence of different forms of thyroid dysfunction and their risk factors among Type 2 diabetic Saudi patients. Methodology. A cross-sectional retrospective randomized hospital-based study of 411 Type 2 diabetic Saudi patients of >25 years of age was conducted to test the prevalence of different types of thyroid dysfunction and their risk factors. Results. The prevalence of different types of thyroid dysfunction is 28.5%, of which 25.3% had hypothyroidism, where 15.3%, 9.5%, and 0.5% are clinical, subclinical, and overt hypothyroidism, respectively. The prevalence of hyperthyroidism is 3.2%, of which subclinical cases accounted for 2.7% and overt hyperthyroidism accounted for 0.5%. Risk factors for thyroid dysfunction among Saudi Type 2 diabetic patients are family history of thyroid disease, female gender, and duration of diabetes of >10 years, while the risk was not significant in patients with history of goiter and patients aged >60 years. Smoking and parity show a nonsignificant reduced risk. Conclusion. Thyroid dysfunction is highly prevalent among Saudi Type 2 diabetic patients, and the most significant risk factors are family history of thyroid disease, female gender, and >10 years duration of diabetes.

  10. Diabetes mellitus and cancer risk in a network of case-control studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosetti, Cristina; Rosato, Valentina; Polesel, Jerry; Levi, Fabio; Talamini, Renato; Montella, Maurizio; Negri, Eva; Tavani, Alessandra; Zucchetto, Antonella; Franceschi, Silvia; Corrao, Giovanni; La Vecchia, Carlo

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes has been associated to the risk of a few cancer sites, though quantification of this association in various populations remains open to discussion. We analyzed the relation between diabetes and the risk of various cancers in an integrated series of case-control studies conducted in Italy and Switzerland between 1991 and 2009. The studies included 1,468 oral and pharyngeal, 505 esophageal, 230 gastric, 2,390 colorectal, 185 liver, 326 pancreatic, 852 laryngeal, 3,034 breast, 607 endometrial, 1,031 ovarian, 1,294 prostate, and 767 renal cell cancer cases and 12,060 hospital controls. The multivariate odds ratios (OR) for subjects with diabetes as compared to those without-adjusted for major identified confounding factors for the cancers considered through logistic regression models-were significantly elevated for cancers of the oral cavity/pharynx (OR = 1.58), esophagus (OR = 2.52), colorectum (OR = 1.23), liver (OR = 3.52), pancreas (OR = 3.32), postmenopausal breast (OR = 1.76), and endometrium (OR = 1.70). For cancers of the oral cavity, esophagus, colorectum, liver, and postmenopausal breast, the excess risk persisted over 10 yr since diagnosis of diabetes. Our data confirm and further quantify the association of diabetes with colorectal, liver, pancreatic, postmenopausal breast, and endometrial cancer and suggest forthe first time that diabetes may also increase the risk of oral/pharyngeal and esophageal cancer.

  11. Association between the PPARγ Pro12Ala polymorphism and risk of gestational diabetes mellitus: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuai, H L; Lin, X Z; Chen, D L; Li, P; Luo, X

    2016-11-03

    The relationship between the Pro12Ala polymorphism of PPARγ and the risk of gestational diabetes mellitus remains unresolved. Here, we attempted to resolve this inconsistency. Case-control studies pertaining to the effect of the Pro12Ala polymorphism in the PPARγ protein and risk of gestational diabetes mellitus were extracted from the HuGE, PubMed, Web of Science, CNKI, and SinoMed databases after an extensive literature search. The studies were statistically analyzed using STATA (v.12.0) software. Twelve case-control studies composed of 2968 GDM cases and 5576 controls that fulfilled the inclusion criteria were included in this meta-analysis. We identified no significant relation between the Pro12Ala polymorphism of PPAR-γ and risk of GDM, when analyzed by the allele [G vs C: odds ratio (OR) = 0.85; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.71-1.01] and dominant (CG+GG vs CC: OR = 0.86; 95% CI: 0.72-1.03) models. Subgroup analysis by ethnicity revealed that East Asian and Middle Eastern females expressing the A allele showed reduced susceptibility to GDM. Additionally, we observed significant differences between the East Asian, Middle Eastern, and Caucasian females (P = 0.008) with respect to GDM susceptibility. The results of this meta-analysis indicated the influence of ethnicity in determining GDM susceptibility, in the presence of a Pro12Ala polymorphism in PPARγ.

  12. Prevalence and related risk-factors of peripheral neuropathy in children with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasibeh Hasani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetes mellitus (DM is a common metabolic disorder that can cause various complications including, peripheral neuropathy (PNP. Some possible risk-factors such as blood glucose level, hyperglycemia, duration of diabetes, and lipid profiles are assumed to be important in diabetic PNP incidence. The aim of this study is to evaluate the prevalence and possible risk-factors of PNP in children with insulin dependent DM. Materials and Methods: Among diabetic children, 146 patients (up to 18-years old were evaluated in this cross-sectional study. All patients were examined for signs and symptoms of neuropathy and nerve conduction studies were performed. Blood level of glucose and lipid profiles were also tested. The relation between variables was compared by independent t-test and logistic regression test. Results: The mean age of diabetic children was 11.9 ± 3.3 years whereas mean diabetes duration was 3.8 ± 2.9 years. PNP was detected in 40 patients (27.4% that 62.5% of them have subclinical and 37.5% have clinical neuropathy. According to logistic regression analysis, duration of diabetes was the most important factor in prevalence of PNP (5.7 ± 3.5 and 3.1 ± 2.5 years in patients with and without neuropathy respectively, P < 0.001, 95% confidence interval [1.15-1.54]. Conclusion: As most of the patients had subclinical PN, neurological assessment is recommended to detect subclinical neuropathy in asymptomatic type 1 diabetic children and it seems that the best way to prevent this complication is still rigid blood glucose control and periodic evaluations.

  13. Diabetes Mellitus amp Its Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KusumaNeela Bolla

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Diabetes Mellitus has been known for centuries as a disease related to sweetness. even though several million people all over the world are effected with diabetes not all are well informed about the nature of the disease. in diabetes there is excessive glucose in blood and urine due to inadequate production of insulin or insulin resistance. diabetics can lead a normal life provided they take prescribed durgs and make certain changes in their lifestyle particularly in their diet and physical activity. uncontrolled diabetes leads to some of the complication so some of the home remedies also play a major role to prevent the diabetes.

  14. [Autonomic neuropathy: a high risk complication for type 1 diabetes mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foss-Freitas, Maria Cristina; Marques Junior, Wilson; Foss, Milton Cesar

    2008-03-01

    The pathological alteration of the nervous system in diabetic patients is extensive and frequently severe. The prevalence of the diabetic neuropathy reach high levels with the evolution of the diabetes, often showing frequencies higher than 50% in several groups of patients. The neurological lesion in this pathological situation is extensive in the diabetic patient, including widely the peripheral nervous system with its components sensory, motor and autonomic: with typical symptoms and in accordance with the pathogenesis of metabolic origin and/or microvascular disease. The autonomic nervous system is a main regulator of many systems in the human body. Then its lesion can promote significant alterations in the function of the cardiovascular, respiratory, gastrointestinal, urogenital system, that can be related to increased motality. This review anlyses the abnormalities related to lesion of the autonomic nervous system, particularly in type 1 diabetic patients, trying to characterize the risk of morbidity and mortality.

  15. 妊娠糖尿病的危险因素%Risk factors for gestational diabetes mellitus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘晓云; 刘超

    2009-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is one of the unique classifications of diabetes mellitus. It has been established that risk factors for GDM includes age over 25, pre-pregnancy body mass index over 25 kg/m2, non-Caucasian ethnicity and family history of diabetes. Recently, several studies have confirmed other risk factors for GDM which have been less commonly mentioned including polycystic ovary syndrome, short stature, HBsAg carrier, hypertension, etc. Early detect and modify essential risk factors for GDM is very important to improve the outcomes of pregnancy and to decrease the prevalence of diabetes.%妊娠糖尿病是糖尿病分型中的一种独立类型.目前,妊娠糖尿病公认的危险因素包括年龄大于25岁、孕前体重指数大于25 kg/m2、非高加索白人、糖尿病家族史等.近年研究证实,妊娠糖尿病还与其他一些因素相关,如多囊卵巢综合征、身高偏矮、携带HBsAg、高血压等.及早的发现和干预这些高危因素,对于改善孕妇及子代的预后,减少人群中糖尿病的发病率有深远影响.

  16. [Coffee drinking and risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Optimistic scientific data].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wierzejska, Regina; Jarosz, Mirosław

    2012-01-01

    An alarming increase the prevalence of type 2 diabetes is forcing to constant analysis the lifestyle factors which can affect the risk of this illness. The research in the last ten years revealed new knowledge concerning the inverse association between habitual coffee drinking and risk of type 2 diabetes. The study indicate that people who drink at least 3 cups of coffee per day more seldom have diabetes and positive effect of coffee is rising along with the amount of the coffee in the diet. It is not clear what mechanism may be responsible for such association but the attention is focus mainly on caffeine, polyphenols, magnesium. Because of the fact that high coffee consumption can cause other adverse health effects coffee should not be treat as a public health strategy to prevent type 2 diabetes, but collected data have scientific character at the moment.

  17. [Diabetes mellitus and periodontal disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliz, Monika; Olszewska-Czyz, Iwona; Kantorowicz, Malgorzata; Chomyszyn-Gajewska, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Scientific studies confirm correlation between periodontitis and systemic diseases such as: arteriosclerosis, diabetes, heart diseases, stroke, diseases of the respiratory system, kidney diseases, osteoporosis, rheumatoid arthritis, premature birth and low birth weight. The interaction between periodontitis and diabetes mellitus is described, based on the literature.

  18. Endogenous Fusarium Endophthalmitis in Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Balamurugan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Endogenous endophthalmitis accounts for 2% to 8% of cases of endophthalmitis. Immunocompromised state and intravenous drug use are the 2 most common causes of endogenous endophthalmitis due to molds fungi. Aspergillus, Fusarium, and Scedosporium are the common organisms in mold endophthalmitis. We report a case of Fusarium endophthalmitis in a patient with uncontrolled diabetes. While diabetes mellitus is a well-known risk factor for endogenous endophthalmitis, we did not find any reported case of Fusarium endophthalmitis in a case of diabetes mellitus. The patient presented with granulomatous uveitis masquerading as noninfectious uveitis with a very good response to steroids. The characteristic clinical features were established late in the clinical course associated with poor outcome. This case highlights the significance of uncontrolled diabetes as a risk factor for Fusarium endophthalmitis and also the presentation of endophthalmitis as a masquerade syndrome. The clinician should have high index of suspicion as these cases have poor outcomes.

  19. Endogenous Fusarium Endophthalmitis in Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balamurugan, S; Khodifad, Ashish

    2016-01-01

    Endogenous endophthalmitis accounts for 2% to 8% of cases of endophthalmitis. Immunocompromised state and intravenous drug use are the 2 most common causes of endogenous endophthalmitis due to molds fungi. Aspergillus, Fusarium, and Scedosporium are the common organisms in mold endophthalmitis. We report a case of Fusarium endophthalmitis in a patient with uncontrolled diabetes. While diabetes mellitus is a well-known risk factor for endogenous endophthalmitis, we did not find any reported case of Fusarium endophthalmitis in a case of diabetes mellitus. The patient presented with granulomatous uveitis masquerading as noninfectious uveitis with a very good response to steroids. The characteristic clinical features were established late in the clinical course associated with poor outcome. This case highlights the significance of uncontrolled diabetes as a risk factor for Fusarium endophthalmitis and also the presentation of endophthalmitis as a masquerade syndrome. The clinician should have high index of suspicion as these cases have poor outcomes.

  20. Erythropoietin and diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiese, Kenneth

    2015-10-25

    Erythropoietin (EPO) is a 30.4 kDa growth factor and cytokine that governs cell proliferation, immune modulation, metabolic homeostasis, vascular function, and cytoprotection. EPO is under investigation for the treatment of variety of diseases, but appears especially suited for the treatment of disorders of metabolism that include diabetes mellitus (DM). DM and the complications of this disease impact a significant portion of the global population leading to disability and death with currently limited therapeutic options. In addition to its utility for the treatment of anemia, EPO can improve cardiac function, reduce fatigue, and improve cognition in patients with DM as well as regulate cellular energy metabolism, obesity, tissue repair and regeneration, apoptosis, and autophagy in experimental models of DM. Yet, EPO can have adverse effects that involve the vasculature system and unchecked cellular proliferation. Critical to the cytoprotective capacity and the potential for a positive clinical outcome with EPO are the control of signal transduction pathways that include protein kinase B, the mechanistic target of rapamycin, Wnt signaling, mammalian forkhead transcription factors of the O class, silent mating type information regulation 2 homolog 1 (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), and AMP activated protein kinase. Therapeutic strategies that can specifically target and control EPO and its signaling pathways hold great promise for the development of new and effective clinical treatments for DM and the complications of this disorder.

  1. Erythropoietin and diabetes mellitus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kenneth; Maiese

    2015-01-01

    Erythropoietin(EPO) is a 30.4 k Da growth factor and cytokine that governs cell proliferation, immune modulation, metabolic homeostasis, vascular function, and cytoprotection. EPO is under investigation for the treatment of variety of diseases, but appears especially suited for the treatment of disorders of metabolism that include diabetes mellitus(DM). DM and the com-plications of this disease impact a significant portion of the global population leading to disability and death with currently limited therapeutic options. In addition to its utility for the treatment of anemia, EPO can improve cardiac function, reduce fatigue, and improve cognition in patients with DM as well as regulate cellular energy metabolism, obesity, tissue repair and regeneration, apoptosis, and autophagy in experimental models of DM. Yet, EPO can have adverse effects that involve the vasculature system and unchecked cellular proliferation. Critical to the cytoprotective capacity and the potential for a positive clinical outcome with EPO are the control of signal transduction pathways that include protein kinase B, the mechanistic target of rapamycin, Wnt signaling, mammalian forkhead transcription factors of the O class, silent mating type information regulation 2 homolog 1(Saccharomyces cerevisiae), and AMP activated protein kinase. Therapeutic strategies that can specifically target and control EPO and its signaling pathways hold great promise for the development of new and effective clinical treatments for DM and the complications of this disorder.

  2. Serum markers for type II diabetes mellitus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metz, Thomas O; Qian, Wei-Jun; Jacobs, Jon M; Polpitiya, Ashoka D; Camp, II, David G; Smith, Richard D

    2014-03-18

    A method for identifying persons with increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus utilizing selected biomarkers described hereafter either alone or in combination. The present invention allows for broad based, reliable, screening of large population bases and provides other advantages, including the formulation of effective strategies for characterizing, archiving, and contrasting data from multiple sample types under varying conditions.

  3. Gastric Helicobacter pylori infection associated with risk of diabetes mellitus, but not prediabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Gi-Hua; Wu, Jin-Shang; Yang, Yi-Ching; Huang, Ying-Hsiang; Lu, Feng-Hwa; Chang, Chih-Jen

    2014-10-01

    The association between Helicobacter pylori infection and diabetes was inconsistent in previous studies. Moreover, there are no studies on the relationship between H. pylori infection and prediabetes in the literature. The aim of this study is thus to assess the association of Helicobacter infection, diagnosed by pathology from gastric biopsy, with diabetes and prediabetes. This cross-sectional study included 1285 subjects aged 19-85 who underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy and gastric biopsy during health examinations at National Cheng Kung University Hospital from 2000 to 2009. Subjects were divided into three groups, including normal glucose tolerance, prediabetes, and diabetes. Diabetes and prediabetes were assessed according to the American Diabetes Association diagnostic criteria. Gastric Helicobacter infection was an independent variable. Chi-square tests, analysis of variance, and multinomial logistic regression models were used to analyze the effects of Helicobacter infection on the risk of diabetes and prediabetes while controlling for age, lifestyle, pathological conditions, and laboratory variables. There were significant differences in the prevalence of gastric Helicobacter infection among the three groups. The results of multivariate analysis showed that age, obesity, family history of diabetes, hypertension, and hypertriglyceridemia were significantly related to both prediabetes and diabetes. Helicobacter pylori infection was positively associated with diabetes (odds ratio [OR] 1.42, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.01-2.01), but not prediabetes (OR 1.02, 95% CI 0.77-1.36), in addition to male gender, education level (≤ 9 vs > 12 years), pre-hypertension, and low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Gastric H. pylori infection is associated with diabetes, but not prediabetes. © 2014 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  4. Diabetes mellitus and the skin*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Adriana Lucia; Miot, Helio Amante; Haddad Junior, Vidal

    2017-01-01

    Several dermatoses are routinely associated with diabetes mellitus, especially in patients with chronic disease. This relationship can be easily proven in some skin disorders, but it is not so clear in others. Dermatoses such necrobiosis lipoidica, granuloma annulare, acanthosis nigricans and others are discussed in this text, with an emphasis on proven link with the diabetes or not, disease identification and treatment strategy used to control those dermatoses and diabetes. PMID:28225950

  5. Accumulation of Major Life Events in Childhood and Adult Life and Risk of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jolene Lee Masters; Rod, Naja Hulvej; Andersen, Ingelise

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aim of the study was to estimate the effect of the accumulation of major life events(MLE) in childhood and adulthood, in both the private and working domains, on risk of type2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Furthermore, we aimed to test the possible interaction betweenchildhood and adult.......27). The accumulationof MLE in adult private (p-trend = 0.016) and work life (p-trend = 0.049) was associatedwith risk of T2DM in a dose response manner. There was no evidence that experiencingMLE in both childhood and adult life was more strongly associated with T2DM thanexperiencing events at only one time point....... Conclusions: Findings from this study suggest that the accumulation of MLE in childhood, private adultlife and work life, respectively, are risk factors for developing T2DM....

  6. Diabetes Mellitus: fatores de risco em uma instituição de ensino na área da saúde Los factores de riesgo para los Diabetes Mellitus tipo 2 de institución de enseñanza Type-2 Diabetes Mellitus: risk factors in a school in the health field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Carolina Alves Ortiz

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste estudo é identificar os fatores de risco para o diabetes mellitus tipo 2. Os resultados indicam a necessidade de programa educativo junto às instituições, visando despertar nos sujeitos a busca de estilos de vida saudáveis a fim de prevenir os fatores de risco para o diabetes tipo 2.El objetivo del estudio es identificar los factores de riesgo para la diabetes mellitus de tipo 2. Los resultados muestran la necesidad de un programa educativo junto con las instituciones, buscando despertar en los sujetos la necesidad de buscar un estilo de vida saludable con el fin de prevenir los factores de riesgo para la diabetes tipo 2.This work aims at identifying the risks factors of type-2 diabetes mellitus. The results show the need of an education program in institutions aiming at making the subjects aware of the necessity to look for healthy life styles in order to prevent the risks factors of type-2 diabetes.

  7. Diabetes mellitus and sudden cardiac death: what are the data?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergner, Daniel W; Goldberger, Jeffrey J

    2010-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus has long been linked to an increased risk of sudden cardiac death. However, the magnitude of this association, and the mechanism accounting for this phenomenon, have not been precisely defined. In this review, we evaluate the epidemiological data pertaining to the association between diabetes mellitus and sudden cardiac death and discuss various proposed mechanisms that may account for this relationship. Potential factors contributing to the increased risk of sudden cardiac death observed in patients with diabetes mellitus include silent myocardial ischemia, autonomic nervous system dysfunction, abnormal cardiac repolarization, hypoglycemia, a hypercoaguable state secondary to diabetes mellitus, diabetic cardiomyopathy, and impaired respiratory response to hypoxia and hypercapnea. We conclude that diabetes mellitus does appear to be associated with an increased risk of sudden cardiac death. Although this increased risk is relatively modest, given the large number of diabetic patients worldwide, the absolute number of sudden cardiac deaths attributable to diabetes mellitus remains significant. Little evidence exists to support any specific mechanism(s) accounting for this association. Further investigation into the pathophysiology of sudden cardiac death in diabetes mellitus may yield improved risk stratification tools as well as identify novel therapeutic targets.

  8. Mechanisms of diabetes mellitus-induced bone fragility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Napoli, Nicola; Chandran, Manju; Pierroz, Dominique D

    2017-01-01

    The risk of fragility fractures is increased in patients with either type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) or type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Although BMD is decreased in T1DM, BMD in T2DM is often normal or even slightly elevated compared with an age-matched control population. However, in both T1DM ...

  9. Peptide and protein biomarkers for type 1 diabetes mellitus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Qibin; Metz, Thomas O.

    2016-08-30

    A method for identifying persons with increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes mellitus, or having type I diabetes mellitus, utilizing selected biomarkers described herein either alone or in combination. The present disclosure allows for broad based, reliable, screening of large population bases. Also provided are arrays and kits that can be used to perform such methods.

  10. Peptide and protein biomarkers for type 1 diabetes mellitus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Qibin; Metz, Thomas O.

    2014-06-10

    A method for identifying persons with increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes mellitus, or having type I diabetes mellitus, utilizing selected biomarkers described herein either alone or in combination. The present disclosure allows for broad based, reliable, screening of large population bases. Also provided are arrays and kits that can be used to perform such methods.

  11. Does breastfeeding influence the risk of developing diabetes mellitus in children? A review of current evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Patrícia Feliciano; Alfenas, Rita de Cássia G; Araújo, Raquel Maria A

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to perform a review to investigate the influence of breastfeeding as a protective agent against the onset of diabetes in children. non-systematic review of SciELO, LILACS, MEDLINE, Scopus, and VHL databases, and selection of the 52 most relevant studies. A total of 21 articles, specifically on the topic, were analyzed (nine related to type 1 diabetes and 12 to type 2 diabetes). The duration and exclusivity of breastfeeding, as well as the early use of cow's milk, have been shown to be important risk factors for developing diabetes. It is believed that human milk contains substances that promote the maturation of the immune system, which protect against the onset of type 1 diabetes. Moreover, human milk has bioactive substances that promote satiety and energy balance, preventing excess weight gain during childhood, thus protecting against the development of type 2 diabetes. Although the above mentioned benefits have not been observed by some researchers, inaccuracies on dietary habit reports during childhood and the presence of interfering factors have been considered responsible for the lack of identification of beneficial effects. Given the scientific evidence indicated in most published studies, it is believed that the lack of breastfeeding can be a modifiable risk factor for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Strategies aiming at the promotion and support of breastfeeding should be used by trained healthcare professionals in order to prevent the onset of diabetes. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  12. Type 2 diabetes mellitus, insulin-use and risk of bladder cancer in a large cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Christina C; Gapstur, Susan M; Campbell, Peter T; Jacobs, Eric J

    2013-05-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is associated with increased bladder cancer incidence in some, but not all, studies. Many studies had limited statistical power and few examined risk by insulin-use, duration of diabetes or cancer stage. We examined the association between T2DM and bladder cancer incidence in the Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort, a large prospective study with information on insulin-use and duration of diabetes. Diabetes and insulin-use were ascertained from a questionnaire at study enrollment in 1992 or 1993 and updated in 1997 and every 2 years thereafter. During follow-up through 2007, 1,852 cases of incident bladder cancer were identified among 172,791 participants. Multivariable adjusted relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using extended Cox regression modeling. There were no associations of T2DM with the risk of bladder cancer overall (RR = 1.01, 95% CI: 0.87-1.17), noninvasive disease (RR = 0.93, 95% CI: 0.76-1.14) or invasive disease (RR = 1.13, 95% CI: 0.91-1.40). Compared to participants without T2DM, risk of invasive bladder cancer was higher among participants who had had T2DM for >15 years (RR = 1.63, 95% CI: 1.09-2.43) and among those using insulin (RR = 1.64, 95% CI: 1.18-2.27). These results do not support an association of T2DM with overall bladder cancer incidence, but do suggest positive associations of long-term T2DM and insulin-use or other factors correlated with severe diabetes, with invasive bladder cancer incidence.

  13. Effects of contraceptive steroids on cardiovascular risk factors in women with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, K R; Skouby, S O; Sidelmann, Johannes Jakobsen

    1994-01-01

    mellitus, allocated to treatment with a monophasic combination of 30 micrograms ethinyl estradiol and 75 micrograms gestodene (treatment group, n = 12) or with nonhormonal contraception (control group, n = 13), were prospectively followed up for 12 months. Nonparametric methods were used for statistical...... evaluation. RESULTS: No statistical differences in the biochemical risk markers were noted between the two groups at the start of the study. In the treatment group serum levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol decreased, whereas the concentrations of total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein...

  14. How to screen obese children at risk for type 2 diabetes mellitus?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Aa, Marloes P; Fazeli Farsani, Soulmaz; Kromwijk, Lisa A J; de Boer, Anthonius; Knibbe, Catherijne A J; van der Vorst, Marja M J

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recommended screening to identify children at risk for diabetes and its precursors impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and insulin resistance (IR) is fasted plasma glucose (FPG). This study evaluates the added value of fasted plasma insulin (FPI). METHODS: This study analyzed routinely coll

  15. Risk factors associated with metabolic syndrome in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients according to World Health Organization, Third Report National Cholesterol Education Program, and International Diabetes Federation definitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel Rodríguez

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Angel Rodríguez1, Helena Delgado-Cohen1, Jesús Reviriego1, Manuel Serrano-Ríos21Clinical Research Department, Eli Lilly and Company, Madrid, Spain; 2Department of Internal Medicine II, Hospital Clinico San Carlos, Madrid, SpainBackground: The availability of several definitions of the metabolic syndrome has created potential confusion concerning its prognostic utility. At present, little data exist about the risk factors associated with metabolic syndrome in diabetic patients.Aim: To identify risk factors associated with metabolic syndrome in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus according to three diagnostic criteria: World Health Organization (WHO, Third Report of the National Cholesterol Education Program Expert Panel on Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Cholesterol in Adults – Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP-ATP III, and International Diabetes Federation (IDF.Subjects and methods: A logistic regression model was used to identify demographic, clinical, and lifestyle variables related with metabolic syndrome (N = 1259.Results: Hypertension, dyslipidemia, and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c ≥7% were associated with increased risk of WHO-defined metabolic syndrome (odds ratio [OR], 2.33; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.60–3.40; OR, 1.79 95% CI: 1.25–2.55; and OR, 1.58; 95% CI: 1.12–2.22, respectively. The risk of presenting metabolic syndrome according to NCEP-ATP III criteria was increased in female patients (OR, 2.02; 95% CI: 1.37–2.97, elevated fasting glucose levels (OR, 5.99; 95% CI: 3.56–10.07, dyslipidemia (OR, 2.28; 95% CI: 1.57–3.32, hypertension (OR, 2.36; 95% CI: 1.59–3.53, and endocrine disorders (OR, 1.64; 95% CI: 1.06–2.57. For the IDF criteria, female patients and patients with left ventricular hypertrophy or insulin treatment were at higher risk of metabolic syndrome (OR, 4.00; 95% CI: 2.35–6.80; OR, 2.72 95% CI: 1.22–6.04; and OR, 1.96 95% CI: 1.24–3.11, respectively.Conclusions: The

  16. Disturbances of Haemostasis in Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed A. Fattah

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is associated with disturbances in haemostasis that could contribute to the development of thrombotic complications.The present study was undertaken to determine the behavior of coagulation variables and fibrinolytic system in diabetes mellitus. Forty five diabetic patients and forty five matched controls were evaluated by doing the following haemostatic parameter, prothrombin time, partial thromboplastin time, thrombin time, coagulation factors assay II, VII, IX, & plasma fibrinogen, ADP-induced platelet aggregation, protein C, a2- antiplasmin, PAI and FDPs. Generally diabetic patients have high levels of fibrinogen, a2- antiplasmin, & PAI and lower level of protein C. Other haemostatic parameters did not show statistically significant difference between diabetic patients and control group. Significantally elevated levels of PAI, a2- antiplasmin together with low protein C level in diabetic patients may result in the disturbance of haemostatic balance favoring thrombotic events. Conclusion: High levels of plasma fibrinogen, a2A- antiplasmin with low plasma protein C activity could lead to a prothrombotic tendency in insulin dependent diabetic patients. Moreover, in non-insulin dependent diabetic patients, the above mentioned parameters together with high levels of ADP-induced platelet aggregation and plasminogen activator inhibitor may increase the risk of thrombotic complications. Obesity can be considered as an additional risk factor for development of thrombosis in diabetic patients.

  17. 76 FR 69795 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-09

    ... diabetes in 1970 because several risk studies indicated that drivers with diabetes had a higher rate of... exempting these applicants from the diabetes standard in 49 CFR 391.41(b)(3) is likely to achieve a level of...; Diabetes Mellitus AGENCY: Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of final...

  18. Achieving target SBP for lowering the risk of major adverse cardiovascular events in persons with diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ó Hartaigh, Bríain; Szymonifka, Jackie; Okin, Peter M

    2017-08-21

    To test the efficacy of achieving target SBP less than 120 mmHg, or less than 140 mmHg, for lowering the risk of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) in persons with diabetes mellitus. The study comprised 4732 [mean ± SD age: 63 ± 7 years; 2258 (48%) women] persons with advanced diabetes mellitus. Participants randomly assigned to achieve intensive (<120 mmHg) or standard (<140 mmHg) SBP control were grouped according to whether or not they achieved their respective SBP goal. MACE consisted of nonfatal myocardial infarction, nonfatal stroke, and death from cardiovascular causes. During a median 5.0 (interquartile range: 4.2-5.7) years, 1939 (82%) and 2038 (86%) persons achieved SBP targets less than 120 and less than 140 mmHg in each treatment arm, respectively. Overall, 208 (9%) and 237 (10%) persons in the intensive and standard treatment arms experienced MACE. In the intensive treatment arm, multivariable Cox regression revealed no significant reduction in risk of MACE for those who achieved a target SBP less than 120 mmHg. In the standard treatment arm, those who achieved a target SBP less than 140 mmHg displayed a substantial reduction in risk of MACE (hazard ratio = 0.65, P = 0.005), all-cause death (hazard ratio = 0.64, P = 0.02), and nonfatal stroke (hazard ratio = 0.47, P = 0.02) as compared with those whose achieved SBP was 140 mmHg or higher. Achieving a standard SBP goal between 120 and 140 mmHg may prove useful for lowering cardiovascular risk in persons with diabetes mellitus. Achieving a target SBP less than 120 mmHg does not appear to mitigate risk. ClinicalTrials.gov # NCT00000620 (https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/results?term=NCT00000620&Search=Search).

  19. Impact on offspring methylation patterns of maternal gestational diabetes mellitus and intrauterine growth restraint suggest common genes and pathways linked to subsequent type 2 diabetes risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quilter, Claire R; Cooper, Wendy N; Cliffe, Kerry M; Skinner, Benjamin M; Prentice, Philippa M; Nelson, LaTasha; Bauer, Julien; Ong, Ken K; Constância, Miguel; Lowe, William L; Affara, Nabeel A; Dunger, David B

    2014-11-01

    Size at birth, postnatal weight gain, and adult risk for type 2 diabetes may reflect environmental exposures during developmental plasticity and may be mediated by epigenetics. Both low birth weight (BW), as a marker of fetal growth restraint, and high birth weight (BW), especially after gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), have been linked to increased risk of adult type 2 diabetes. We assessed DNA methylation patterns using a bead chip in cord blood samples from infants of mothers with GDM (group 1) and infants with prenatal growth restraint indicated by rapid postnatal catch-up growth (group 2), compared with infants with normal postnatal growth (group 3). Seventy-five CpG loci were differentially methylated in groups 1 and 2 compared with the controls (group 3), representing 72 genes, many relevant to growth and diabetes. In replication studies using similar methodology, many of these differentially methylated regions were associated with levels of maternal glucose exposure below that defined by GDM [the Hyperglycemia and Adverse Pregnancy Outcome (HAPO) study] or were identified as changes observed after randomized periconceptional nutritional supplementation in a Gambian cohort characterized by maternal deprivation. These studies provide support for the concept that similar epigenetic modifications may underpin different prenatal exposures and potentially increase long-term risk for diseases such as type 2 diabetes.

  20. PSEUDOSCLERODERMAL SYNDROME IN DIABETES MELLITUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. Nevskaya

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Skin thicking simulating scleroderma is not rare in diabetes mellitus (about 2% among patients with diabetes mellitus, however it is not well known to rheumatologists and endocrinologists. The basis of the syndrome are the abnormalities of collagen and glycosaminoglycans metabolism accompanying by the acid mucopolysaccharides accumulation in the deep part of the reticular dermis. Three cases of pseudosclerodrma in patients with long-standing complicated insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus are presented. The main clinical manifestations of pseudoscleroderma were marked cutaneous induration of the neck, body and proximal parts of extremities liked that of scleredema of Buschke ( 2 patients, and primary paraarticular induration leaded to the flexion contractures liked that of paraneoplastic scleroderma ( I patient. Possible mechanisms of development, clinical and morphological peculiarities and treatment for this syndrome are discussed.

  1. Micro-RNA Binding Site Polymorphisms in the WFS1 Gene Are Risk Factors of Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elek, Zsuzsanna; Németh, Nóra; Nagy, Géza; Németh, Helga; Somogyi, Anikó; Hosszufalusi, Nóra; Sasvári-Székely, Mária; Rónai, Zsolt

    2015-01-01

    The absolute or relative lack of insulin is the key factor in the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus. Although the connection between loss of function mutations of the WFS1 gene and DIDMOAD-syndrome including diabetes mellitus underpins the significance of wolframin in the pathogenesis, exact role of WFS1 polymorphic variants in the development of type 1 and type 2 diabetes has not been discovered yet. In this analysis, 787 patients with diabetes and 900 healthy people participated. Genotyping of the 7 WFS1 SNPs was carried out by TaqMan assays. Association study was performed by χ2-test in combination with correction for multiple testing. For functional analysis, the entire 3' UTR of the WFS1 gene was subcloned in a pMIR-Report plasmid and relative luciferase activities were determined. Linkage disequilibrium analysis showed a generally high LD within the investigated region, however the rs1046322 locus was not in LD with the other SNPs. The two miR-SNPs, rs1046322 and rs9457 showed significant association with T1DM and T2DM, respectively. Haplotype analysis also confirmed the association between the 3' UTR loci and both disease types. In vitro experiments showed that miR-185 reduces the amount of the resulting protein, and rs9457 miRSNP significantly influences the rate of reduction in a luciferase reporter assay. Genetic variants of the WFS1 gene might contribute to the genetic risk of T1DM and T2DM. Furthermore demonstrating the effect of rs9457 in binding of miR-185, we suggest that the optimal level of wolframin protein, potentially influenced by miR-regulation, is crucial in normal beta cell function.

  2. Micro-RNA Binding Site Polymorphisms in the WFS1 Gene Are Risk Factors of Diabetes Mellitus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zsuzsanna Elek

    Full Text Available The absolute or relative lack of insulin is the key factor in the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus. Although the connection between loss of function mutations of the WFS1 gene and DIDMOAD-syndrome including diabetes mellitus underpins the significance of wolframin in the pathogenesis, exact role of WFS1 polymorphic variants in the development of type 1 and type 2 diabetes has not been discovered yet. In this analysis, 787 patients with diabetes and 900 healthy people participated. Genotyping of the 7 WFS1 SNPs was carried out by TaqMan assays. Association study was performed by χ2-test in combination with correction for multiple testing. For functional analysis, the entire 3' UTR of the WFS1 gene was subcloned in a pMIR-Report plasmid and relative luciferase activities were determined. Linkage disequilibrium analysis showed a generally high LD within the investigated region, however the rs1046322 locus was not in LD with the other SNPs. The two miR-SNPs, rs1046322 and rs9457 showed significant association with T1DM and T2DM, respectively. Haplotype analysis also confirmed the association between the 3' UTR loci and both disease types. In vitro experiments showed that miR-185 reduces the amount of the resulting protein, and rs9457 miRSNP significantly influences the rate of reduction in a luciferase reporter assay. Genetic variants of the WFS1 gene might contribute to the genetic risk of T1DM and T2DM. Furthermore demonstrating the effect of rs9457 in binding of miR-185, we suggest that the optimal level of wolframin protein, potentially influenced by miR-regulation, is crucial in normal beta cell function.

  3. Serum 1,5-anhydroglucitol level as a screening tool for diabetes mellitus in a community-based population at high risk of diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yao; Yuan, Yuexing; Zhang, Yanli; Lei, Chenghao; Zhou, Yi; He, Jiajia; Sun, Zilin

    2017-05-01

    Early diagnosis of diabetes yields significant clinical benefits; however, currently available diagnostic tools for community-based population are limited. This study aimed to assess the value of serum 1,5-anhydroglucitol (1,5-AG) for the diagnosis and screening of diabetes mellitus in a community-based population at high risk of diabetes. In this diagnostic test, 1170 participants underwent a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test. Venous blood samples were collected for fasting blood glucose (FBG), 2-h postprandial blood glucose (PBG), and glycosylated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) measurements. Serum 1,5-AG levels were detected by the GlycoMark assay, and a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was generated to assess their diagnostic value for diabetes. A total of 298 adults were diagnosed with diabetes, indicating a prevalence of 25.47%. Partial Pearson correlation analysis adjusted for age and body mass index showed that serum 1,5-AG level was negatively correlated with FBG, PBG, and HbA1c (all P diabetes were 0.920, 0.874, 0.933, and 0.887, respectively. According to the ROC curve, the optimal cutoff value of serum 1,5-AG for diagnosing diabetes was 11.18 μg/ml, which yielded a sensitivity of 92.6% and a specificity of 82.3%, respectively. Comparisons between 1,5-AG and HbA1c showed that both the AUC and sensitivity of 1,5-AG were higher than those of HbA1c (both P diabetes in populations at high risk of diabetes.

  4. A risk score to predict type 2 diabetes mellitus in an elderly Spanish Mediterranean population at high cardiovascular risk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Guasch-Ferré

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: To develop and test a diabetes risk score to predict incident diabetes in an elderly Spanish Mediterranean population at high cardiovascular risk. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A diabetes risk score was derived from a subset of 1381 nondiabetic individuals from three centres of the PREDIMED study (derivation sample. Multivariate Cox regression model ß-coefficients were used to weigh each risk factor. PREDIMED-personal Score included body-mass-index, smoking status, family history of type 2 diabetes, alcohol consumption and hypertension as categorical variables; PREDIMED-clinical Score included also high blood glucose. We tested the predictive capability of these scores in the DE-PLAN-CAT cohort (validation sample. The discrimination of Finnish Diabetes Risk Score (FINDRISC, German Diabetes Risk Score (GDRS and our scores was assessed with the area under curve (AUC. RESULTS: The PREDIMED-clinical Score varied from 0 to 14 points. In the subset of the PREDIMED study, 155 individuals developed diabetes during the 4.75-years follow-up. The PREDIMED-clinical score at a cutoff of ≥6 had sensitivity of 72.2%, and specificity of 72.5%, whereas AUC was 0.78. The AUC of the PREDIMED-clinical Score was 0.66 in the validation sample (sensitivity = 85.4%; specificity = 26.6%, and was significantly higher than the FINDRISC and the GDRS in both the derivation and validation samples. DISCUSSION: We identified classical risk factors for diabetes and developed the PREDIMED-clinical Score to determine those individuals at high risk of developing diabetes in elderly individuals at high cardiovascular risk. The predictive capability of the PREDIMED-clinical Score was significantly higher than the FINDRISC and GDRS, and also used fewer items in the questionnaire.

  5. A Risk Score to Predict Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in an Elderly Spanish Mediterranean Population at High Cardiovascular Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guasch-Ferré, Marta; Bulló, Mònica; Costa, Bernardo; Martínez-Gonzalez, Miguel Ángel; Ibarrola-Jurado, Núria; Estruch, Ramon; Barrio, Francisco; Salas-Salvadó, Jordi

    2012-01-01

    Introduction To develop and test a diabetes risk score to predict incident diabetes in an elderly Spanish Mediterranean population at high cardiovascular risk. Materials and Methods A diabetes risk score was derived from a subset of 1381 nondiabetic individuals from three centres of the PREDIMED study (derivation sample). Multivariate Cox regression model ß-coefficients were used to weigh each risk factor. PREDIMED-personal Score included body-mass-index, smoking status, family history of type 2 diabetes, alcohol consumption and hypertension as categorical variables; PREDIMED-clinical Score included also high blood glucose. We tested the predictive capability of these scores in the DE-PLAN-CAT cohort (validation sample). The discrimination of Finnish Diabetes Risk Score (FINDRISC), German Diabetes Risk Score (GDRS) and our scores was assessed with the area under curve (AUC). Results The PREDIMED-clinical Score varied from 0 to 14 points. In the subset of the PREDIMED study, 155 individuals developed diabetes during the 4.75-years follow-up. The PREDIMED-clinical score at a cutoff of ≥6 had sensitivity of 72.2%, and specificity of 72.5%, whereas AUC was 0.78. The AUC of the PREDIMED-clinical Score was 0.66 in the validation sample (sensitivity = 85.4%; specificity = 26.6%), and was significantly higher than the FINDRISC and the GDRS in both the derivation and validation samples. Discussion We identified classical risk factors for diabetes and developed the PREDIMED-clinical Score to determine those individuals at high risk of developing diabetes in elderly individuals at high cardiovascular risk. The predictive capability of the PREDIMED-clinical Score was significantly higher than the FINDRISC and GDRS, and also used fewer items in the questionnaire. PMID:22442692

  6. The accuracy of polyuria, polydipsia, polyphagia, and Indian Diabetes Risk Score in adults screened for diabetes mellitus type-II

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    Shivshakti D Pawar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: The World Health Organization report suggests that over 19% of the world's diabetic population currently resides in India. Unfortunately, >50% of the diabetics in India are unaware about their diabetic status. In the poor income country like India, it is essential to use cost-effective methods for screening for diabetes, and traditionally using three classical symptoms and Indian Diabetes Risk Score (IDRS tool is helpful but, data regarding their diagnostic accuracy is very less. Objective: (1 To assess the diagnostic accuracy of polyuria, polydipsia, polyphagia, and IDRS for detecting diabetes. Settings and Design: Six hundred and seventy-seven adult individuals> 20 years of age were screened for diabetes and assessed polyuria, polydipsia, polyphagia, and IDRS score. All were subjected for postprandial blood glucose level. Subjects and Methods: For diagnostic accuracy sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, likelihood ratios (LRs, for positive and negative tests, and accuracy was calculated for each symptom. Similarly, by receiver operative curve (ROC curve analysis, we carried out sensitivity and specificity of IDRS. Results: There was statistically significant association between these three classical symptoms and diabetes status of individuals. When present, all these three symptoms carried 7.34% sensitivity and 98.42% specificity with positive predictive value 47.06% and NPV 84.70%, LR+4.36, LR−0.94 with accuracy of 85%. The optimum cutoff value of IDRS score was> 50, which carried sensitivity 73%, specificity 58.7%, and area under curve for ROC was 68% (P < 0.001. Conclusions: This study has shown highest specificity for these three classical symptoms in diagnosing diabetes, but these symptoms were insensitive to detect all diabetic subjects.

  7. Coronary Calcium Scoring and Cardiovascular Risk in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Cuantificación del calcio coronario y riesgo cardiovascular en pacientes con diabetes mellitus tipo 2

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    Elodia M. Rivas Alpízar

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetes mellitus is considered as an independent cardiovascular risk factor. Coronary calcium scoring has proved to be a useful tool for stratifying cardiovascular risk. Objective: To quantify coronary calcium in patients with diabetes mellitus type 2 in order to estimate cardiovascular risk. Methods: A descriptive observational study was conducted. The sample included 33 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus admitted in the Center for Diabetes Care and Education of Cienfuegos from April to July 2009. Variables studied: age, sex, nutritional assessment, illness duration, history of hypertension, hyperlipidemia and smoking. Coronary calcium was determined with multislice helical CT scanner. Results: females were predominant. Most patients were between 41 and 70 years old. More than half were from 2 to 11 years of evolution and had fasting glucose levels higher than 7.0 mmol / L. In 40.0% of diabetic patients three or more risk factors and average and high coronary calcium values were present. Out of the total, 21.7% (5 patients has less than three risk factors and average and high values. Conclusions: Performing coronary calcium quantification can reclassify cardiovascular risk in a high percentage of estimated cases.Fundamento: la diabetes mellitus es considerada como un factor de riesgo cardiovascular independiente. La cuantificación de calcio coronario ha demostrado ser una herramienta útil para estratificar el riesgo cardiovascular. Objetivo: cuantificar el calcio coronario en pacientes con diabetes mellitus tipo 2 para estimar el riesgo cardiovascular. Métodos: estudio descriptivo observacional que incluyó 33 pacientes con diabetes mellitus tipo 2 que ingresaron en el Centro de Atención al Diabético de Cienfuegos de abril a julio del 2009. Variables estudiadas: edad, sexo, evaluaci

  8. Post-Renal Transplant Diabetes Mellitus in Korean Subjects: Superimposition of Transplant-Related Immunosuppressant Factors on Genetic and Type 2 Diabetic Risk Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun Chul Lee

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Postrenal transplantation diabetes mellitus (PTDM, or new-onset diabetes after organ transplantation, is an important chronic transplant-associated complication. Similar to type 2 diabetes, decreased insulin secretion and increased insulin resistance are important to the pathophysiologic mechanism behind the development of PTDM. However, β-cell dysfunction rather than insulin resistance seems to be a greater contributing factor in the development of PTDM. Increased age, family history of diabetes, ethnicity, genetic variation, obesity, and hepatitis C are partially accountable for an increased underlying risk of PTDM in renal allograft recipients. In addition, the use of and kinds of immunosuppressive agents are key transplant-associated risk factors. Recently, a number of genetic variants or polymorphisms susceptible to immunosuppressants have been reported to be associated with calcineurin inhibition-induced β-cell dysfunction. The identification of high risk factors of PTDM would help prevent PTDM and improve long-term patient outcomes by allowing for personalized immunosuppressant regimens and by managing cardiovascular risk factors.

  9. Baroreceptor sensitivity and diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowaiye, Olumide Olatubosun; Jankowska, Ewa Anita; Ponikowska, Beata

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a disease of increasing incidence and prevalence. Arterial baroreceptors are stretch-sensitive receptors, which in a reflex manner are involved in the homeostatic control of arterial blood pressure. Diabetic subjects have depressed baroreflex sensitivity (BRS), although the exact pathomechanisms are unclear. In this review, we discuss the features, clinicaland prognostic implications of reduced BRS for diabetic patients and the potential involvement of cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy and atherosclerosis. Finally, we demonstrate evidence on interventions (e.g. pioglitazone, alpha-lipoic acid, leptin, fluvastatin, physicaltraining etc.) which could improve BRS and ameliorate cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction in diabetic patients.

  10. Opium consumption in men and diabetes mellitus in women are the most important risk factors of premature coronary artery disease in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghian, Saeed; Graili, Pooyeh; Salarifar, Mojtaba; Karimi, Abbas Ali; Darvish, Soodabeh; Abbasi, Seyed Hesameddin

    2010-05-14

    We performed this study to compare of CAD risk factors in young male and female in Iran. In an analytic cross-sectional study, two groups of patients were evaluated with and without Coronary artery disease. The result of study suggests that there is a relationship between CAD and diabetes mellitus, increasing level of LDL and lipoprotein A in women, While CAD in men had more relation with smoking and opium use. High prevalence and uncontrolled diabetes mellitus in females and relatively high prevalence of opium consumption in males result in different premature CAD patterns.

  11. Risk of cardiovascular and all-cause mortality in individuals with diabetes mellitus, impaired fasting glucose, and impaired glucose tolerance: the Australian Diabetes, Obesity, and Lifestyle Study (AusDiab).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Elizabeth L M; Zimmet, Paul Z; Welborn, Timothy A; Jolley, Damien; Magliano, Dianna J; Dunstan, David W; Cameron, Adrian J; Dwyer, Terry; Taylor, Hugh R; Tonkin, Andrew M; Wong, Tien Y; McNeil, John; Shaw, Jonathan E

    2007-07-10

    Diabetes mellitus increases the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and all-cause mortality. The relationship between milder elevations of blood glucose and mortality is less clear. This study investigated whether impaired fasting glucose and impaired glucose tolerance, as well as diabetes mellitus, increase the risk of all-cause and CVD mortality. In 1999 to 2000, glucose tolerance status was determined in 10,428 participants of the Australian Diabetes, Obesity, and Lifestyle Study (AusDiab). After a median follow-up of 5.2 years, 298 deaths occurred (88 CVD deaths). Compared with those with normal glucose tolerance, the adjusted all-cause mortality hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for known diabetes mellitus and newly diagnosed diabetes mellitus were 2.3 (1.6 to 3.2) and 1.3 (0.9 to 2.0), respectively. The risk of death was also increased in those with impaired fasting glucose (HR 1.6, 95% CI 1.0 to 2.4) and impaired glucose tolerance (HR 1.5, 95% CI 1.1 to 2.0). Sixty-five percent of all those who died of CVD had known diabetes mellitus, newly diagnosed diabetes mellitus, impaired fasting glucose, or impaired glucose tolerance at baseline. Known diabetes mellitus (HR 2.6, 95% CI 1.4 to 4.7) and impaired fasting glucose (HR 2.5, 95% CI 1.2 to 5.1) were independent predictors for CVD mortality after adjustment for age, sex, and other traditional CVD risk factors, but impaired glucose tolerance was not (HR 1.2, 95% CI 0.7 to 2.2). This study emphasizes the strong association between abnormal glucose metabolism and mortality, and it suggests that this condition contributes to a large number of CVD deaths in the general population. CVD prevention may be warranted in people with all categories of abnormal glucose metabolism.

  12. Periodontitis and Diabetes Mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Straka, Michal; Straka-Trapezanlidis, Michaela

    2007-01-01

    There is general agreement that there is a significant relationship between diabetes and periodontitis. Many studies have shown a high prevalence of periodontitis in diabetic patients. In addition a higher prevalence and more aggressive periodontitis are found in patients with poorly controlled diabetes. The duration of having diabetes is an important factor that affects the progression and severity of periodontitis. Alterations in the host response in diabetics to existing periodontal pa...

  13. Diabetes mellitus and drug abuse during pregnancy and the risk for orofacial clefts and related abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trindade-Suedam, Ivy Kiemle; Kostrisch, Lília Maria von; Pimenta, Luiz André Freire; Negrato, Carlos Antônio; Franzolin, Solange Braga; Trindade, Alceu Sergio

    2016-08-08

    to assessed the prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM) and drug abuse in mothers of children with orofacial clefts (OFC). 325 women who had children (0-3y) with clefts were interviewed. Data regarding type of diabetes, use of legal/illegal drugs during pregnancy, waist girth and fasting blood sugar at the first prenatal consult were collected. twenty seven percent of the women had DM, out of these, 89% had gestational DM, 5,5% type 1 DM and 5,5% type 2 DM. The prevalence of DM in mothers of children with OFC was 27%, it is significantly higher than the average Brazilian population which is 7.6% (pabuso de drogas en madres de niños con malformaciones creaneofaciales (MCF). 325 mujeres que tuvieron hijos (0-3 años) con malformaciones fueron entrevistadas. Se obtuvieron datos referentes a: tipo de diabetes; uso de drogas lícitas o ilícitas durante el embarazo; circunferencia de la cintura; y, glucemia en ayunas en la primera consulta prenatal. el veintisiete por ciento de las mujeres tenían DM. Entre estas, el 89% tuvieron DM gestacional, el 5,5% DM tipo 1 y el 5,5% DM tipo 2. La prevalencia de DM en madres de hijos con MCF fue de 27%. Esto es significativamente más alto que el promedio de la población brasileña afectada por esa enfermedad, que es de 7,6% (pabuso de drogas durante el embarazo, el 32% de las madres había utilizado drogas y una correlación positiva significativa fue observada entre el abuso de drogas y la ocurrencia de hendiduras y otras malformaciones craneofaciales (p=0,028) (OR=2,87; 95%IC=1,1-7,4). la DM y el abuso de drogas durante el embarazo aumentan el riesgo de MCF y de anomalías relacionadas; se enfatiza la importancia del diagnóstico precoz de DM y la prevención del abuso de drogas, especialmente entre las mujeres embarazadas. avaliar a prevalência de diabetes mellitus (DM) e o uso de drogas em mães de crianças com fissuras orofaciais (FOF). 325 mulheres que tiveram filhos (0-3 anos) com fissuras foram entrevistadas. Os dados

  14. Predictive factors for the development of diabetes in women with previous gestational diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damm, P; Kühl, C; Bertelsen, C A

    1992-01-01

    -insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus). Diabetes did not develop in any of the controls. Predictive factors for diabetes development were fasting glucose level at diagnosis (high glucose, high risk), preterm delivery, and an oral glucose tolerance test result that showed diabetes 2 months post partum. In a subgroup......-treated gestational diabetes mellitus have a considerably increased risk of later having diabetes. Follow-up investigations are therefore important, especially in those women with previous gestational diabetes mellitus in whom the identified predictive factors are present.......OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of diabetes in women with previous dietary-treated gestational diabetes mellitus and to identify predictive factors for development of diabetes. STUDY DESIGN: Two to 11 years post partum, glucose tolerance was investigated in 241...

  15. Risk of esophagus cancer in diabetes mellitus: a population-based case-control study in Taiwan

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    Cheng Kao-Chi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diabetes mellitus (DM has been associated with the cancer risk. This study investigated relationship between DM and esophageal cancer using Taiwan’s insurance data. Methods We identified 549 patients with esophageal cancer newly diagnosed in 2000-2009 and randomly selected 2196 controls without any cancer, frequency matched by sex, age and diagnosis year of cases. Logistic regression model estimated odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CI of esophageal cancer associated with DM, sex, age. co-morbidities and medications. Results Cases were more prevalent than controls for alcoholism and esophageal disorders and using nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs and cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors but not DM. Esophageal cancer had no association with DM (OR 0.99, 95% CI 0.71-1.37, but significantly associated with alcoholism (OR 14.1, 95% CI 7.87-25.4, esophageal ulcer (OR 10.1, 95% CI 5.70-17.9, esophageal reflux (OR 3.47, 95% CI 2.14-5.26 and uses of NSAIDs (OR 2.73, 95% CI 1.80-4.13. An elevated risk of esophageal cancer appeared in DM patients taking insulin (OR 2.57, 95% CI 1.08-6.15 or sulfonyurea (OR 3.80, 95% CI 1.16-12.5. Conclusions Patients with DM are not at higher risk for esophagus cancer. However, esophageal disorders and anti-diabetic drugs are associated with the risk of the disease.

  16. Stroke Risk among Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Zhejiang: A Population-Based Prospective Study in China

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    Lihua Guo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This study aimed to explore the incidence of stroke and stroke subtypes among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM based on the long-term surveillance data in Zhejiang, China, during 2007 to 2013. Materials and Methods. During January 1, 2007, and December 31, 2013, a total of 327,268 T2DM and 307,984 stroke patients were registered on Diabetes and Stroke Surveillance System, respectively. Stroke subtypes were classified according to standard definitions of subarachnoid hemorrhage, intracerebral hemorrhage, and ischemic stroke. The incidence of stroke and stroke subtypes was calculated by standardized incidence ratio (SIRs with 95% confidence intervals (CIs compared with general population. Results. The incidence of stroke and stroke subtypes among patients with T2DM was significantly higher than in general population. Stroke risk was found significantly increased with an SIR of 3.87 (95% CI 3.76–3.99 and 3.38 (95% CI 3.27–3.48 in females and males, respectively. The excess risk of stroke was mainly attributable to the significantly higher risk of cerebral infarctions with the risk for T2DM being four times that for general population. Conclusions. The relationship between stroke and T2DM was strong, especially in female. The incidence of stroke and stroke subtypes among patients with T2DM was up to 3-fold higher than in general population in Zhejiang province, especially the subtype of cerebral infarctions.

  17. Adolescents’ knowledge and awareness of diabetes mellitus in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Maryam Al-Hussaini

    2015-05-14

    May 14, 2015 ... different aspects of diabetes mellitus, namely General knowledge about diabetes, Knowledge of risk ... diabetic retinopathy6, neuropathy, and cardiovascular disease. .... Insulin is available as a drug for diabetic patients. 71.3.

  18. Incidental Risk of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus among Patients with Confirmed and Unconfirmed Prediabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly D Brunisholz

    Full Text Available To determine the risk of type 2 diabetes (T2DM diagnosis among patients with confirmed and unconfirmed prediabetes (preDM relative to an at-risk group receiving care from primary care physicians over a 5-year period.Utilizing data from the Intermountain Healthcare (IH Enterprise Data Warehouse (EDW from 2006-2013, we performed a prospective analysis using discrete survival analysis to estimate the time to diagnosis of T2DM among groups.Adult patients who had at least one outpatient visit with a primary care physician during 2006-2008 at an IH clinic and subsequent visits through 2013. Patients were included for the study if they were (a at-risk for diabetes (BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2 and one additional risk factor: high risk ethnicity, first degree relative with diabetes, elevated triglycerides or blood pressure, low HDL, diagnosis of gestational diabetes or polycystic ovarian syndrome, or birth of a baby weighing >9 lbs; or (b confirmed preDM (HbA1c ≥ 5.7-6.49% or fasting blood glucose 100-125 mg/dL; or (c unconfirmed preDM (documented fasting lipid panel and glucose 100-125 mg/dL on the same day.Of the 33,838 patients who were eligible for study, 57.0% were considered at-risk, 38.4% had unconfirmed preDM, and 4.6% had confirmed preDM. Those with unconfirmed and confirmed preDM tended to be Caucasian and a greater proportion were obese compared to those at-risk for disease. Patients with unconfirmed and confirmed preDM tended to have more prevalent high blood pressure and depression as compared to the at-risk group. Based on the discrete survival analyses, patients with unconfirmed preDM and confirmed preDM were more likely to develop T2DM when compared to at-risk patients.Unconfirmed and confirmed preDM are strongly associated with the development of T2DM as compared to patients with only risk factors for disease.

  19. Incidental Risk of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus among Patients with Confirmed and Unconfirmed Prediabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunisholz, Kimberly D.; Joy, Elizabeth A.; Hashibe, Mia; Gren, Lisa H.; Savitz, Lucy A.; Hamilton, Sharon; Cannon, Wayne; Kim, Jaewhan

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the risk of type 2 diabetes (T2DM) diagnosis among patients with confirmed and unconfirmed prediabetes (preDM) relative to an at-risk group receiving care from primary care physicians over a 5-year period. Study Design Utilizing data from the Intermountain Healthcare (IH) Enterprise Data Warehouse (EDW) from 2006–2013, we performed a prospective analysis using discrete survival analysis to estimate the time to diagnosis of T2DM among groups. Population Studied Adult patients who had at least one outpatient visit with a primary care physician during 2006–2008 at an IH clinic and subsequent visits through 2013. Patients were included for the study if they were (a) at-risk for diabetes (BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2 and one additional risk factor: high risk ethnicity, first degree relative with diabetes, elevated triglycerides or blood pressure, low HDL, diagnosis of gestational diabetes or polycystic ovarian syndrome, or birth of a baby weighing >9 lbs); or (b) confirmed preDM (HbA1c ≥ 5.7–6.49% or fasting blood glucose 100–125 mg/dL); or (c) unconfirmed preDM (documented fasting lipid panel and glucose 100–125 mg/dL on the same day). Principal Findings Of the 33,838 patients who were eligible for study, 57.0% were considered at-risk, 38.4% had unconfirmed preDM, and 4.6% had confirmed preDM. Those with unconfirmed and confirmed preDM tended to be Caucasian and a greater proportion were obese compared to those at-risk for disease. Patients with unconfirmed and confirmed preDM tended to have more prevalent high blood pressure and depression as compared to the at-risk group. Based on the discrete survival analyses, patients with unconfirmed preDM and confirmed preDM were more likely to develop T2DM when compared to at-risk patients. Conclusions Unconfirmed and confirmed preDM are strongly associated with the development of T2DM as compared to patients with only risk factors for disease. PMID:27427913

  20. First trimester coffee and tea intake and risk of gestational diabetes mellitus: a study within a national birth cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkle, S N; Laughon, S K; Catov, J M; Olsen, J; Bech, B H

    2015-02-01

    Coffee and tea consumption is associated with a decreased type 2 diabetes risk in non-pregnant adults. We examined the relation between first trimester coffee and tea consumption and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) risk. Population-based cohort study. Denmark 1996-2002. Non-diabetic women with singleton pregnancies in the Danish National Birth Cohort (n = 71,239). Estimated adjusted relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) for the association between first trimester coffee and tea or estimated total caffeine and GDM. GDM ascertained from the National Hospital Discharge Register or maternal interview. Coffee or tea intake was reported in 81.2% (n = 57,882) and 1.3% (n = 912) of pregnancies were complicated by GDM. Among non-consumers, 1.5% of pregnancies were complicated by GDM. Among coffee drinkers, GDM was highest among women who drank ≥8 cups/day (1.8%) with no significant difference across intake levels (P = 0.10). Among tea drinkers, there was no difference in GDM across intake levels (1.2%; P = 0.98). After adjustment for age, socio-occupational status, parity, pre-pregnancy body mass index, smoking, and cola, there was suggestion of a protective, but non-significant association with increasing coffee (RR ≥8 versus 0 cups/day = 0.89 [95%CI 0.64-1.25]) and tea (RR ≥8 versus 0 cups/day = 0.77 [95%CI 0.55-1.08]). Results were similar by smoking status, except a non-significant 1.45-fold increased risk with ≥8 coffee cups/day for non-smokers. There was a non-significant reduced GDM risk with increasing total caffeine. Our results suggest that moderate first trimester coffee and tea intake were not associated with GDM increased risk and possibly may have a protective effect. © 2014 Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  1. Results From a European Multicenter Randomized Trial of Physical Activity and/or Healthy Eating to Reduce the Risk of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simmons, David; Jelsma, Judith G M; Galjaard, Sander

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Ways to prevent gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) remain unproven. We compared the impact of three lifestyle interventions (healthy eating [HE], physical activity [PA], and both HE and PA [HE+PA]) on GDM risk in a pilot multicenter randomized trial. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS...

  2. Evaluation of Jump into Action: A Program to Reduce the Risk of Non-Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus in School Children on the Texas-Mexico Border.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcomb, J. David; Lira, Juanita; Kingery, Paul M.; Smith, D. W.; Lane, Dorothy; Goodway, Jackie

    1998-01-01

    Evaluated Jump into Action, a non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM)-prevention program that encouraged students to eat well and exercise regularly to reduce NIDDM risks. Surveys of predominantly Hispanic fifth graders and their teachers at Texas-Mexico border schools indicated that the program increased NIDDM-prevention knowledge and…

  3. External validation of prognostic models to predict risk of gestational diabetes mellitus in one Dutch cohort: prospective multicentre cohort study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamain-de Ruiter, M.; Kwee, A.; Naaktgeboren, C.A.; Groot, I. de; Evers, I.M.; Groenendaal, F.; Hering, Y.R.; Huisjes, A.J.M.; Kirpestein, C.; Monincx, W.M.; Siljee, J.E.; Zelfde, A. van't; Oirschot, C.M. van; Vankan-Buitelaar, S.A.; Vonk, M.A.A.W.; Wiegers, T.A.; Zwart, J.J.; Franx, A.; Moons, K.G.M.; Koster, M.P.H.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To perform an external validation and direct comparison of published prognostic models for early prediction of the risk of gestational diabetes mellitus, including predictors applicable in the first trimester of pregnancy. Design: External validation of all published prognostic models in

  4. Diagnosis of coronary artery disease using myocardial perfusion SPECT in patients with diabetes mellitus: analysis of risk factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Ji Hyoung; Kang, Seong Min; Bae, Jin Ho; Jeong, Shin Young; Lee, Sang Woo; Yoo, Jeong Soo; Ahn, Byeong Cheol; Lee, Jae Tae [Kyungpook National University, Daegu, (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-06-15

    Diabetes mellitus is a critical disease with higher rates of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality due to myocardial ischemia and infarction. There is growing interest in how to determine high-risk patients who are candidates for screening testing. This study was performed to evaluate the incidence of coronary artery disease (CAD) in diabetic patients detected by Tc-99m MIBI myocardial perfusion SPECT (MPS) and to assess risk factors of CAD and cardiac hard events. 203 diabetic patients (64 male, mean age 64.1 {+-} 9.0 years) who underwent MPS were included between Jan 2000 and July 2004. Cardiac death and nonfatal myocardial infarction (MI) were considered as hard events, and coronary angioplasty and bypass surgery >60 days after testing were considered as soft events. The mean follow-up period was 36 {+-} 18 months. Patients underwent exercise (n=6) or adenosine stress (n=197) myocardial perfusion SPECT. Perfusion defects on MPS were detected in 28.6% (58/203) of the patients. There was no cardiac death but 11 hard events were observed. The annual cardiac hard event rate was 1.1%. In univariate analysis of clinical factors, typical anginal pain, peripheral vascular disease, peripheral polyneuropathy, and resting ECG abnormality were significantly associated with the occurrence of hard events. Anginal pain, peripheral vascular disease, and resting ECG abnormality remained independent predictors of nonfatal MIs with multivariate analysis. Abnormal SPECT results were significantly associated with high prevalence of hard events but not independent predictors on uni- and multivariate analyses. patients who were male, had longer diabetes duration (especially over 20 years), peripheral vascular disease, peripheral polyneuropathy, or resting ECG abnormality had higher incidence of CAD. Among clinical factors in diabetic patients, typical angina, peripheral vascular disease, peripheral polyneuropathy, and resting ECG abnormality were strong predictors of hard events.

  5. The diagnosis of gestational diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Metzger, Boyd E; Gabbe, Steven G; Persson, Bengt

    2012-01-01

    . In this review, we provide details regarding some points that were considered by the IADPSG Consensus Panel but not published and address the following issues: 1) what should be the frequency of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM); 2) were appropriate outcomes and odds ratios used to define diagnostic thresholds......The Hyperglycemia and Adverse Pregnancy Outcome (HAPO) Study showed significant perinatal risks at levels of maternal hyperglycemia below values that are diagnostic for diabetes. A Consensus Panel of the International Association of Diabetes and Pregnancy Study Groups (IADPSG) reviewed HAPO Study...

  6. Periodontitis exposure within one year before anti-diabetic treatment and the risk of rheumatoid arthritis in diabetes mellitus patients: a population-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsin-Hua; Chen, Der-Yuan; Lin, Shih-Yi; Lai, Kuo-Lung; Chen, Yi-Ming; Chou, Yiing-Jenq; Chou, Pesus; Lin, Ching-Heng; Huang, Nicole

    2014-01-01

    To examine whether a history of periodontitis (PD) before anti-diabetic treatment is associated with risk of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) development in newly-treated diabetes mellitus (DM) patients. We conducted a population-based retrospective cohort study using the 1997-2009 National Health Insurance (NHI) claims data of one million representative individuals from all NHI enrollees. Adults with DM (aged ≥ 20 years) starting anti-diabetic treatment during 2001-2009 were classified as newly-treated DM patients. We identified 7097 DM subjects with PD history within one year before initiating anti-diabetes treatment (index date). By matching these 7097 subjects for age on the index date, sex, and year of the index date, we randomly extracted 14,194 DM subjects without PD history within one year before antidiabetic treatment. Adjusted hazard ratios (aHRs) with a 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated by applying Cox proportional hazards models to quantify the association between PD history and RA risk. Compared with DM patients without PD exposure within one year before anti-diabetic treatment, crude HR and adjusted HR of RA among DM patients with PD exposure within one year before anti-diabetic treatment were 4.51 (95% CI, 1.39-14.64) and 3.77 (95% CI, 1.48-9.60). PD exposure within one year before anti-diabetic treatment was associated with increased RA risk in newly treated DM patients. The lack of knowledge about individual smoking status is a major limitation of this study.

  7. Risk factors of foot ulceration in patients with Diabetes Mellitus type 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Bañuelos-Barrera

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Identify the risk factors for foot ulceration in patients with diabetes type 2 (DM2 who attended a primary care center in the city of Colima (Mexico. Methodology. This was a descriptive cross-sectional study conducted during 2012 with the participation of 87 patients with DM2 from both sexes and older than 30 years of age. Socio-demographic, anthropometric, clinical, and biochemical variables were measured. The study inquired about prior evaluation of the feet and prior education on diabetes by the healthcare team. Results. The mean age was 59 years and 70% were women. The average number of years since diagnosis was nine years; only 35% had good glycemia control; 66% engage in exercise; 51% wear open shoes; none had temperature differences in the feet; 82% had some type of dermatological abnormality; 50% had deformities in their feet. A total of 24% had been diagnosed with peripheral neuropathy and another 11% had peripheral vascular disease. Sixty percent of all the patients had risk of foot ulceration. Only 23% of the participants had had previous foot exams. One of every three diabetic patients had received education about the disease. Conclusion. An important proportion of the patients had risk of foot ulceration, contrary to the insufficient percentage of individuals with previous inspection and education about foot care. For nursing, it is an area of opportunity in this level of care to improve the inspection and education on diabetes, specifically on foot care, mainly in those patients with a prolonged evolution of the disease, deficient glycemia control, and risk of ulceration.

  8. Maternal serum heme-oxygenase-1 (HO-1 concentrations in early pregnancy and subsequent risk of gestational diabetes mellitus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunfang Qiu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 concentrations have been recently reported to be elevated in impaired glucose tolerance and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. However, no study has examined the association between HO-1 concentrations and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM. METHODS: In a case-control study, nested within a prospective cohort of pregnant women (186 GDM cases and 191 women who remained eu-glycemic through pregnancy, we assessed the association of maternal serum HO-1 concentrations, measured in samples collected at 16 weeks gestation, on average, with subsequent risk of GDM. Maternal serum HO-1 concentrations were determined using ELISA. We fitted multivariate logistic regression models to derive estimates of odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs. RESULTS: Median serum HO-1 concentrations in early pregnancy were lower in women who subsequently developed GDM compared with those who did not (1.60 vs. 1.80 ng/mL, p-value=0.002. After adjusting for maternal age, race, family history of T2DM and pre-pregnancy body mass index, women with HO-1 ≥ 3.05 ng/mL (highest decile experienced a 74% reduction of GDM risk (95% CI; 0.09-0.77 compared with women whose concentrations were<1.23 ng/mL (lowest quartile. CONCLUSION: Serum HO-1 concentrations were inversely associated with subsequent GDM risk. These findings underscore the role of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of GDM. Additional studies are warranted to confirm the clinical utility of serum HO-1 in diagnosis of GDM, particularly in the early pregnancy.

  9. Hemorheological Disorders in Diabetes Mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Young I.; Mooney, Michael P.; Cho, Daniel J.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the present study is to review hemorheological disorders in diabetes mellitus. Several key hemorheological parameters, such as whole blood viscosity, erythrocyte deformability, and aggregation, are examined in the context of elevated blood glucose level in diabetes. The erythrocyte deformability is reduced, whereas its aggregation increases, both of which make whole blood more viscous compared to healthy individuals. The present paper explains how the increased blood viscosit...

  10. Rheumatological manifestations in diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Rosso, Angela; Cerinic, Marco Matucci; De Giorgio, Francesca; Minari, Chiara; Rotella, Carlo Maria; Seghieri, Giuseppe

    2006-11-01

    Rheumatological manifestations of Diabetes Mellitus may be classified in: non articular, articular and bone conditions. Among non articular conditions, diabetic cheiroarthropathy, frequent in type I diabetes, the most important disorder related to limited joint mobility, results in stiff skin and joint contractures. Adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder, flexor tenosynovitis, and Duputryen's and Peyronie's diseases are also linked to limited joint mobility. Diffuse skeletal hyperostosis, due to calcification at entheses, is frequent and early, particularly in type 2 diabetes. Neuropathies cause some non articular conditions, mainly neuropathic arthritis, a destructive bone and joint condition more common in type I diabetes. Algodistrophy, shoulder-hand and entrapment syndromes are also frequent. Mononeuropathy causes diabetic amyotrophy, characterised by painless muscle weakness. Among muscle conditions, diabetic muscle infarction is a rare, sometimes severe, condition. Among articular conditions, osteoarthritis is frequent and early in diabetes, in which also chondrocalcinosis and gout occur. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and diabetes I have a common genetic background and the presence of diabetes gives to RA an unfavourable prognosis. Among bone conditions, osteopenia and osteoporosis may occur early in type 1 diabetes. Contrarily, in type 2 diabetes, bone mineral density is similar or, sometimes, higher than in non diabetic subjects, probably due to hyperinsulinemia.

  11. Diabetes mellitus and pancreatitis--cause or effect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davison, L J

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus and pancreatitis are two distinct diseases encountered commonly in small animal practice. Whilst the clinical signs of diabetes mellitus are usually unmistakeable, a firm diagnosis of pancreatitis can prove more elusive, as clinical signs are often variable. Over the past 10 to 15 years, despite the fact that the clinical signs of diabetes mellitus are remarkably consistent, it has become more apparent that the underlying pathology of diabetes mellitus in dogs and cats is heterogeneous, with exocrine pancreatic inflammation accompanying diabetes mellitus in a number of cases. However, the question remains as to whether the diabetes mellitus causes the pancreatitis or whether, conversely, the pancreatitis leads to diabetes mellitus--as there is evidence to support both scenarios. The concurrence of diabetes mellitus and pancreatitis has clinical implications for case management as such cases may follow a more difficult clinical course, with their glycaemic control being "brittle" as a result of variation in the degree of pancreatic inflammation. Problems may also arise if abdominal pain or vomiting lead to anorexia. In addition, diabetic cases with pancreatitis are at risk of developing exocrine pancreatic insufficiency in the following months to years, which can complicate their management further.

  12. Insulin secretagogues for prevention or delay of type 2 diabetes mellitus and its associated complications in persons at increased risk for the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmingsen, Bianca; Sonne, David Peick; Metzendorf, Maria-Inti; Richter, Bernd

    2016-10-17

    The projected rise in the incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) could develop into a substantial health problem worldwide. Whether insulin secretagogues (sulphonylureas and meglitinide analogues) are able to prevent or delay T2DM and its associated complications in people at risk for the development of T2DM is unknown. To assess the effects of insulin secretagogues on the prevention or delay of T2DM and its associated complications in people with impaired glucose tolerance, impaired fasting blood glucose, moderately elevated glycosylated haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) or any combination of these. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, PubMed, Embase, ClinicalTrials.gov, the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform, and the reference lists of systematic reviews, articles and health technology assessment reports. We asked investigators of the included trials for information about additional trials. The date of the last search of all databases was April 2016. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) with a duration of 12 weeks or more comparing insulin secretagogues with any pharmacological glucose-lowering intervention, behaviour-changing intervention, placebo or no intervention in people with impaired fasting glucose, impaired glucose tolerance, moderately elevated HbA1c or combinations of these. Two review authors read all abstracts and full-text articles/records, assessed quality and extracted outcome data independently. One review author extracted data which were checked by a second review author. We resolved discrepancies by consensus or the involvement of a third review author. For meta-analyses we used a random-effects model with investigation of risk ratios (RRs) for dichotomous outcomes and mean differences (MDs) for continuous outcomes, using 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for effect estimates. We carried out trial sequential analyses (TSAs) for all outcomes that could be meta

  13. Accumulation of Major Life Events in Childhood and Adult Life and Risk of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolene Masters Pedersen

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to estimate the effect of the accumulation of major life events (MLE in childhood and adulthood, in both the private and working domains, on risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. Furthermore, we aimed to test the possible interaction between childhood and adult MLE and to investigate modification of these associations by educational attainment.The study was based on 4,761 participants from the Copenhagen City Heart Study free of diabetes at baseline and followed for 10 years. MLE were categorized as 0, 1, 2, 3 or more events. Multivariate logistic regression models adjusted for age, sex, education and family history of diabetes were used to estimate the association between MLE and T2DM.In childhood, experiencing 3 or more MLE was associated with a 69% higher risk of developing T2DM (Odds Ratio (OR 1.69; 95% Confidence Interval (CI 1.60, 3.27. The accumulation of MLE in adult private (p-trend = 0.016 and work life (p-trend = 0.049 was associated with risk of T2DM in a dose response manner. There was no evidence that experiencing MLE in both childhood and adult life was more strongly associated with T2DM than experiencing events at only one time point. There was some evidence that being simultaneously exposed to childhood MLE and short education (OR 2.28; 95% C.I. 1.45, 3.59 and work MLE and short education (OR 2.86; 95% C.I. 1.62, 5.03 was associated with higher risk of T2DM, as the joint effects were greater than the sum of their individual effects.Findings from this study suggest that the accumulation of MLE in childhood, private adult life and work life, respectively, are risk factors for developing T2DM.

  14. Diabetes Mellitus and Colorectal Neoplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo, Alejandro; Diaz, Yaritza; Perez, Cynthia M.; Garau, Maria; Baron, John

    2012-01-01

    Background Many studies have provided evidence for an association between obesity, physical inactivity, and western diet as risk factors for colorectal cancer (CRC). Few studies directly address the association between type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (DM) and the risk of colorectal lesions at specific anatomic locations. Methods 2,663 subjects with a previous history of adenoma(s) and removal of all current adenomas at study entry were followed for a mean time of three years across three different chemoprevention clinical trials. The primary endpoint was colorectal adenoma recurrence and number of lesions during the treatment phase; the secondary endpoints were presence of advanced colorectal neoplasia (CRN) and location of CRN. Using log linear regression, the effect of DM status on the relative risk (RR) of CRN recurrence, advanced CRN, and location of CRN was assessed. Results DM status was not significantly associated with incidence of colorectal adenomas, incidence of advanced colorectal lesions, or left-sided colorectal neoplastic lesions. Subjects with DM had a marginally increased risk of right-sided (p= 0.06) colorectal adenomas and a significant increased risk of multiple right-sided adenomas (p=0.03) in the unadjusted model; this association was not significant after adjusting for age and other potential confounders (RR=1.22, 95% CI: 0.85–1.76). Conclusion We did not observe a statistically significant increased risk in CRN recurrence for overall neoplasia, advanced neoplasia or location of neoplasia in individuals with DM compared to non-DM individuals. However, given the patterns observed in this investigation, future studies with longer follow-up time and longer DM exposure, incorporating objective measurements of type 2 DM might help elucidate the risk of CRN among individuals with DM. PMID:23560242

  15. Studies on childhood diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.J. Bruining

    1984-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis consists of a number of collaborative studies aimed at the improvement of the diagnosis and care of children with diabetes mellitus. For the reader, who is not familiar with medical problems, a brief account is given of the clinical "behavior" of the disease ( 1) . It is perh

  16. Gestational diabetes mellitus in Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Michael Lynge; Olesen, Jesper; Jørgensen, M. E.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Within the last 20 years, the prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) has been reported to be increasing worldwide in correlation with ethnic and geographic variations. The actual prevalence of GDM throughout all of Greenland remains unknown. Objective. The aim of this study...

  17. Brain MRI of diabetes Mellitus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araki, Yutaka; Tanaka, Hisashi; Ohtani, Masatoshi; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Tadashi; Tsukaguchi, Isao (Osaka Rosai Hospital, Sakai (Japan))

    1993-11-01

    One hundred and fifty-nine patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) and 2,566 patients without DM were studied on brain MRI. The results taught us that the incidence of cerebral atrophy was significantly higher in DM patients than in controls. Unexpectedly, the incidence of cerebral infarction showed no significant difference between the two groups. (author).

  18. Gestational diabetes mellitus in Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Michael Lynge; Olesen, Jesper; Jørgensen, Marit Eika

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Within the last 20 years, the prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) has been reported to be increasing worldwide in correlation with ethnic and geographic variations. The actual prevalence of GDM throughout all of Greenland remains unknown. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study...

  19. Vitamin D and diabetes mellitus

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Harinarayan, Chittari Venkata

    2014-01-01

    .... Both forms of immunity, namely adaptive and innate, are regulated by 1,25(OH)2D3. The immune-modulatory properties of vitamin D suggest that it could play a potential therapeutic role in prevention of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM...

  20. Influence of diabetes mellitus and risk factors in activating latent tuberculosis infection: a case for targeted screening in malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swarna Nantha, Y

    2012-10-01

    A review of the epidemiology of tuberculosis, its contributing risk factors (excluding HIV) and the role of screening latent tuberculosis infection in Malaysia was done. Despite the global and domestic decrease in prevalence rates of tuberculosis in the past decade, there is an alarming increase in the trend of non communicable diseases in the country. High prevalence rates of major risk factors leading to reactivation of tuberculosis were seen within the population, with diabetes mellitus being in the forefront. The rising numbers in the ageing population of Malaysia poses a further threat of re-emergence of tuberculosis in the years to come. Economically, screening of diabetic patients with comorbidities for latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) using two major techniques, namely tuberculin sensitivity (TST) and Interferon gamma release assay tests (IGRA) could be a viable option. The role of future research in the detection of LTBI in the Malaysian setting might be necessary to gauge the disease reservoir before implementing prophylactic measures for high risk groups involved.

  1. Mean Daily Dosage of Aspirin and the Risk of Incident Alzheimer’s Dementia in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Nationwide Retrospective Cohort Study in Taiwan

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    Cheng-Wei Chang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Type 2 diabetes mellitus patients are known to have higher risk of developing dementia while aspirin use has been shown to prevent incident dementia. This study was conducted to evaluate the potential benefits of aspirin use on dementia in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and identify the appropriate dosage of aspirin that provides the most benefit. Method. A Taiwan nationwide, population-based retrospective 8-year study was employed to analyze the association between the use of aspirin and incidence of dementia including Alzheimer’s disease and non-Alzheimer’s dementia using multivariate Cox-proportional hazards regression model and adjusting for several potential confounders. Results. Regular aspirin use in mean daily dosage of within 40 mg was associated with a decreased risk of developing incident Alzheimer’s dementia in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (adjusted HR of 0.51 with 95% CI of 0.27–0.97, p value 0.041. Conclusion. A mean daily dosage of aspirin use within 40 mg might decrease the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  2. Rare types of diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihai, B; Mihai, Cătălina; Cijevschi-Prelipcean, Cristina; Lăcătuşu, Cristina

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a heterogenous disorder characterized by chronic hyperglycemia and induced by a large number of etiopathogenic conditions. Beside type 1 and type 2 diabetes, which account for almost 90% of all cases, practitioners may encounter patients with more infrequent forms of diabetes, as those induced by mutations of a single gene, atypical immune disorders or neonatal diabetes. Monogenic diabetes is represented by genetic disorders in the structure of the beta-cell (the MODY syndromes and the mutations of mitochondrial DNA) or in the insulin's action (type A insulin resistance syndrome, Rabson-Mendenhall syndrome, leprechaunism, lipodystrophies). The rare forms of immune diabetes are determined by antibodies against insulin or insulin receptor or appear as a component of the "stiff man syndrome". Neonatal diabetes is induced by mutations in genes that control beta-cell development and function and may have a transient or permanent nature. Knowledge of the uncommon forms of diabetes mellitus enables physicians to apply the optimal treatment, to estimate the evolution of the patient and to apply a complete family screening in order to diagnose all other blood relatives as soon as possible.

  3. Diabetes Mellitus in Outpatients in Debre Berhan Referral Hospital, Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tesfa Dejenie Habtewold

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Diabetes mellitus is a group of metabolic diseases characterized by hyperglycemia resulting from defects in insulin secretion, insulin action, or both. Most people with diabetes live in low- and middle-income countries and these will experience the greatest increase in cases of diabetes over the next 22 years. Objective. To assess the prevalence and associated factors of diabetes mellitus among outpatients of Debre Berhan Referral Hospital. Methods and Materials. A cross-sectional study was conducted from April to June 2015 among 385 patients. Random quota sampling technique was used to get individual patients and risk factors assessment. Patients diabetes status was ascertained by World Health Organization Diabetes Mellitus Diagnostic Criteria. The collected data were entered, cleaned, and analyzed and Chi-square test was applied to test any association between dependent and independent variable. Result. Out of the total 385 study patients, 368 have participated in the study yielding a response rate of 95.3%. Concerning clinical presentation of diabetes mellitus, 13.3% of patients reported thirst, 14.4% of patients declared polyurea, and 14.9% of patients ascertained unexplained weight loss. The statistically significant associated factors of diabetes mellitus were hypertensive history, obesity, the number of parities, and smoking history. Conclusion. The prevalence of diabetes mellitus among outpatients in Debre Berhan Referral Hospital was 0.34% and several clinical and behavioral factors contribute to the occurrence of diabetes mellitus which impose initiation of preventive, promotive, and curative strategies.

  4. Análise comparativa do risco de quedas entre pacientes com e sem diabetes mellitus tipo 2 Comparative analysis of risk for falls in patients with and without type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Pereira de Oliveira

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Comparar a frequência e o risco de quedas baseado em teste de mobilidade funcional entre diabéticos e não diabéticos. MÉTODOS: Estudo transversal envolvendo pacientes com e sem diabetes mellitus tipo 2 (DM2 selecionados por amostra de conveniência. Foram incluídos homens e mulheres entre 50 e 65 anos, sendo divididos em: grupo 1 (G1 - com diagnóstico de DM2 200 mg/dL no momento da inclusão e prévia; e grupo 2 (G2 - sem diabetes, de mesma faixa etária, e glicemia de jejum OBJECTIVE: To compare frequency and risk of falls based on a functional mobility test in diabetic and non-diabetic individuals. METHODS: Cross-sectional study involving patients with and without type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2 selected by convenience sampling. Men and women between the ages of 50 and 65 were included and divided as group 1 (G1 - with DM2 diagnosis for 200 mg/dL; and group 2 (G2 - no diabetes, same age group, and fasting blood glucose < 100 mg/dL. Both groups responded to a structured questionnaire about their health, fall risk, and underwent a physical exam and a mobility assessment test (Timed Up and Go - TUG. The results were analyzed by the software SPSS, with TUG being categorized in ranges of risk for fall. We considered that the risk was positive for all those who fit into medium- and high-risk range. RESULTS: Fifty patients with DM2 and 68 patients without DM2 were assessed. There were no statistical differences in the number of falls between the groups, however non-diabetic subjects obtained a higher performance in TUG test (p = 0.003 as the risk categories were observed. Reduced visual acuity and difficulty in getting up were more frequently reported in G1 (p < 0.05. CONCLUSION: There appears to be an association between hyperglycemic status and poorer mobility, with an increased fall risk even in younger patients and in those with shorter disease duration.

  5. Diabetes mellitus increases the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma in treatment-naïve chronic hepatitis C patients in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xu; Xu, Hongqin; Gao, Yang; Pan, Meng; Wang, Le; Gao, Pujun

    2017-01-01

    Abstract We investigated the link between diabetes mellitus (DM) and hepatitis C virus (HCV)-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) risk in treatment-naïve chronic hepatitis C (CHC) patients in China. To examine the association between DM and HCC, we conducted a case–control study of 300 Chinese CHC patients with HCC, compared to an age- and sex-matched control group of 517 CHC patients not diagnosed with HCC. We found that DM was more prevalent in the HCC patient group (18.7%) than in the CHC-only patient group (10.8%). We conducted logistic regression analyses adjusting for demographics features and other HCC risk factors and found that DM increased the risk of HCC development nearly 2-fold [adjusted odds ratio (AOR), 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 1.80 (1.17–2.75)]. Meanwhile, the proportion of HCC patients and CHC-only patients with liver cirrhosis were 79.3% and 46.2%, respectively, yielding an AOR of 4.62 (95% CI, 3.31–6.46). Multivariate analyses comparing the risk of HCV-related HCC development in DM patients with and without liver cirrhosis revealed that the estimated AOR (95% CI) for those with liver cirrhosis was 5.60 (2.25–13.96). However, the HCC risk decreased significantly with a later age of diabetes onset (AOR [95% CI], 0.94 [0.89–0.99]). DM was associated with an increased risk for HCC development in treatment-naïve CHC patients in China. Furthermore, liver cirrhosis and an early DM diagnoses further increased the risks of HCC development in patients diagnosed with both CHC and DM. PMID:28353605

  6. Type 2 diabetes mellitus is associated with increased risks of sarcopenia and pre-sarcopenia in Chinese elderly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Taotao; Feng, Xiao; Zhou, Jingjing; Gong, Hongyan; Xia, Song; Wei, Qing; Hu, Xu; Tao, Ran; Li, Lei; Qian, Frank; Yu, Li

    2016-01-01

    Sarcopenia is a condition characterized by progressive and generalized loss of skeletal muscle mass and function. In this study, we used a cross-sectional study with 1090 community-dwelling Chinese citizens aged 60 years and older to evaluate the association of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) with the risk of sarcopenia and pre-sarcopenia. Sarcopenia was defined using the Asian Working Group for Sarcopenia (AWGS) criteria that include both muscle mass and muscle function/physical activity. Pre-sarcopenia was defined as having low skeletal muscle index but with normal muscle/physical activity. The prevalence of sarcopenia and pre-sarcopenia was significantly higher in T2DM patients than in healthy controls (14.8% vs. 11.2%, p = 0.035 for sarcopenia, and 14.4% vs. 8.4%, p = 0.002 for pre-sarcopenia). In multivariate logistic regression analyses adjusting by age, gender, anti-diabetic medication, energy intake, protein intake, physical activity, and visceral fat area, we found that Chinese elderly with T2DM exhibited significantly increased risks of sarcopenia (OR = 1.37, 95% CI = 1.02–2.03) and pre-sarcopenia (OR = 1.73, 95% CI = 1.10–2.83) compared to non-diabetic individuals. This is the first study to evaluate the association of T2DM with the risks of sarcopenia and pre-sarcopenia in China. Among a group of community-dwelling Chinese elderly, T2DM was significantly associated with increased risks of sarcopenia and pre-sarcopenia. PMID:27958337

  7. Calpain-10 gene polymorphisms and risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus in Mexican mestizos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picos-Cárdenas, V J; Sáinz-González, E; Miliar-García, A; Romero-Zazueta, A; Quintero-Osuna, R; Leal-Ugarte, E; Peralta-Leal, V; Meza-Espinoza, J P

    2015-03-27

    The calpain-10 gene is expressed primarily in tissues important in glucose metabolism; thus, some of its polymorphisms have been associated with type 2 diabetes. In this study, we examined the association between the calpain-10 single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-43, SNP-19, and SNP-63 and type 2 diabetes in Mexican mestizos. We included 211 patients and 152 non-diabetic subjects. Polymerase chain reaction was used to identify alleles. We compared allele, genotype, haplotype, and diplotype frequencies between both groups and used the chi-square test to calculate the risk. The allele frequency of SNP-43 allele 1 was 70% in controls and 72% in patients; the GG, GA, and AA genotype frequencies were 48.7, 42.8, and 8.5% in controls and 51.2, 41.7, and 7.1% in patients, respectively. For SNP- 19, the prevalence of allele 1 (2R) was 32% in controls and 39% in patients. In controls, homozygosity (2R/2R) was 10.5%, heterozygosity was 42.8%, and 3R/3R was 46.7%; in cases, these values were 13.3, 50.7, and 36.0%, respectively. For SNP-63, the frequency of allele 1 was 87% in controls and 83% in patients; genotype frequencies in controls were 75.7% (CC), 23% (CT), and 1.3% (TT), and were 69.7, 27.5, and 2.8%, respectively for the cases. Genotype distributions were consistent with Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. No significant intergroup differences for allele, genotype, haplotype, or diplotype frequencies were observed. We found no association between these polymorphisms and diabetes. However, our sample size was small, so the role of calpain-10 risk alleles should be further examined.

  8. Increased risk of cancer in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: A retrospective cohort study in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Pian-Hong

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies indicated that type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM might be associated with the risk of cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between T2DM and the risk of developing common cancers in a Chinese population. Methods A population-based retrospective cohort study was carried out in the Nan-Hu district of Jiaxing city, Zhejiang province, China. The incidence of cancer cases among type 2 diabetic patients were identified through record-linkage of the Diabetic Surveillance and Registry Database with the Cancer Database from January 2002 to June 2008. The standardized incidence ratio (SIR and 95% confidence interval (CI were estimated for the risk of cancer among the patients with type 2 diabetes. Results The overall incidence of cancer was 1083.6 per 105 subjects in male T2DM patients and 870.2 per 105 in females. Increased risk of developing cancer was found in both male and female T2DM patients with an SIR of 1.331 (95% CI = 1.143-1.518 and 1.737 (1.478-1.997, respectively. As for cancer subtypes, both male and female T2DM patients had a significantly increased risk of pancreatic cancer with the SIRs of 2.973 (1.73-4.21 and 2.687 (1.445-3.928, respectively. Elevated risk of liver and kidney cancers was only found in male T2DM patients with SIRs of 1.538 (1.005-2.072 and 4.091 (1.418-6.764, respectively. Increased risks of developing breast cancer [2.209 (1.487-2.93] and leukemia SIR: [4.167 (1.584- 6.749 ] were found in female patients. Conclusions These findings indicated that patients with T2DM have an increased risk of developing cancer. Additional cancer screening should be employed in the management of patients with T2DM.

  9. Use of drugs related to the treatment of diabetes mellitus and other cardiovascular risk factors in the Spanish population. The Di@bet.es study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojo-Martínez, Gemma; Valdés, Sergio; Colomo, Natalia; Lucena, M Isabel; Gaztambide, Sonia; Gomis, Ramón; Casamitjana, Roser; Carmena, Rafael; Catalá, Miguel; Martínez-Larrad, María T; Serrano-Ríos, Manuel; Castaño, Luis; Vendrell, Joan; Girbés, Juan; Franch, Josep; Vázquez, José A; Mora-Peces, Inmaculada; Urrutia, Inés; Pascual-Manich, Gemma; Ortega, Emilio; Menéndez, Edelmiro; Delgado, Elias; Bordiú, Elena; Castell, Conxa; López-Alba, Alfonso; Goday, Alberto; Calle, Alfonso; Bosch-Comas, Anna; Soriguer, Federico

    2013-11-01

    To assess the patterns of use of 8 therapeutic drug groups for the treatment of diabetes mellitus and other cardiovascular risk factors, and to identify sociodemographic and health determinants of their use in the overall Spanish population. A representative sample of the Spanish population within the Di@bet.es study, a cross-sectional population-based survey, was included. sociodemographic, clinical, and lifestyle data; physical examination, and an oral glucose tolerance test in patients without known diabetes mellitus. Furthermore, patients were systematically queried about current medication use, and 8 pharmacotherapeutic groups were evaluated: lipid-lowering therapy, antihypertensives, oral hypoglycemic agents, insulin, thyroid hormone, uricosurics, psychoactive drugs, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Sixty-six percent of the Spanish population was taking at least one medication. Therapeutic drug use was associated with age, independently of the higher prevalence of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, or hyperlipidemia in older patients. Sex disparities were found in the use of lipid-lowering agents, allopurinol, levothyroxine, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and psychoactive drugs. Use of psychoactive drugs was related to education level, work status, physical activity, smoking, and alcohol consumption. Almost 30% of patients with diabetes mellitus were taking 6 or more medications daily. Diabetes mellitus was associated with greater use of antihypertensives, lipid-lowering agents, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Age and sex are the most important factors determining therapeutic drug use. Lifestyle patterns and sociocultural factors have an impact only on psychoactive drug use. Diabetes mellitus is associated with greater use of antihypertensives, lipid-lowering agents, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  10. Monocyte functions in diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisler, C; Almdal, T; Bennedsen, J; Rhodes, J M; Kølendorf, K

    1982-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the functions of monocytes obtained from 14 patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) compared with those of monocytes from healthy individuals. It was found that the total number of circulating monocytes in the 14 diabetic patients was lower than that from the healthy individuals. Phagocytosis of Candida albicans was decreased in the monocytes from the patients, whereas pinocytosis of acridine and phagocytosis of latex and sheep red blood cells were normal. The chemotactic response towards casein was enhanced. The possible consequences of these findings for the elucidation of concomitant infections in diabetic patients are discussed.

  11. Type 2 diabetes mellitus in children and adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinehr, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is emerging as a new clinical problem within pediatric practice. Recent reports indicate an increasing prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus in children and adolescents around the world in all ethnicities, even if the prevalence of obesity is not increasing any more. The majority of young people diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus was found in specific ethnic subgroups such as African-American, Hispanic, Asian/Pacific Islanders and American Indians. Clinicians should be aware of the frequent mild or asymptomatic manifestation of type 2 diabetes mellitus in childhood. Therefore, a screening seems meaningful especially in high risk groups such as children and adolescents with obesity, relatives with type 2 diabetes mellitus, and clinical features of insulin resistance (hypertension, dyslipidemia, polycystic ovarian syndrome, or acanthosis nigricans). Treatment of choice is lifestyle intervention followed by pharmacological treatment (e.g., metformin). New drugs such as dipeptidyl peptidase inhibitors or glucagon like peptide 1 mimetics are in the pipeline for treatment of youth with type 2 diabetes mellitus. However, recent reports indicate a high dropout of the medical care system of adolescents with type 2 diabetes mellitus suggesting that management of children and adolescents with type 2 diabetes mellitus requires some remodeling of current healthcare practices. PMID:24379917

  12. Genetic Counseling for Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Stephanie A.; Maloney, Kristin L.; Pollin, Toni I.

    2014-01-01

    Most diabetes is polygenic in etiology, with (type 1 diabetes, T1DM) or without (type 2 diabetes, T2DM) an autoimmune basis. Genetic counseling for diabetes generally focuses on providing empiric risk information based on family history and/or the effects of maternal hyperglycemia on pregnancy outcome. An estimated one to five percent of diabetes is monogenic in nature, e.g., maturity onset diabetes of the young (MODY), with molecular testing and etiology-based treatment available. However, recent studies show that most monogenic diabetes is misdiagnosed as T1DM or T2DM. While efforts are underway to increase the rate of diagnosis in the diabetes clinic, genetic counselors and clinical geneticists are in a prime position to identify monogenic cases through targeted questions during a family history combined with working in conjunction with diabetes professionals to diagnose and assure proper treatment and familial risk assessment for individuals with monogenic diabetes. PMID:25045596

  13. [Selenium supplementation trials for cancer prevention and the subsequent risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus: selenium and vitamin E cancer prevention trial and after].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Hiroshi; Mutakin; Abdulah, Rizky; Yamazaki, Chiho; Kameo, Satomi

    2013-01-01

    The essential trace element selenium has long been considered to exhibit cancer-preventive, antidiabetic and insulin-mimetic properties. However, recent epidemiological studies have indicated that supranutritional selenium intake and high plasma selenium levels are not necessarily preventive against cancer, and are possible risk factors for developing type 2 diabetes mellitus. The results of the SELECT, Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial, in which it is hypothesized that the supplementations with selenium and/or vitamin E decrease the prostate cancer incidence among healthy men in the U.S., showed that the supplementation did not prevent the development of prostate cancer and that the incidence of newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus increased among the selenium-supplemented participants. The Nutritional Prevention of Cancer (NPC) trial showed a decreased risk of prostate cancer among participants taking 200 μg of selenium daily for 7.7 years. However, the results of the NPC trial also showed an increased risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus in the participants with plasma selenium levels in the top tertile at the start of the study. Recently, the association of serum selenium with adipocytokines, such as TNF-α, VCAM-1, leptin, FABP-4, and MCP-1, has been observed. Selenoprotein P has been reported to associated with adiponectin, which suggests new roles of selenoprotein P in cellular energy metabolism, possibly leading to the increased risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus and also the development of cancer. Further studies are required to elucidate the relationship between selenium and adipocytokines and the role of selenoprotein P in the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus and cancer at high levels of selenium.

  14. Metabolic syndrome in hemodialysis patients as a risk factor for new-onset diabetes mellitus after renal transplant: a prospective observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonet J

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Josep Bonet1, Albert Martinez-Castelao2, Beatriz Bayés11Department of Nephrology, Hospital Universitari Germans Trias i Pujol, Badalona, Spain; 2Department of Nephrology, Hospital Universitari de Bellvitge, IDIBELL, Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona, SpainPurpose: Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of biochemical abnormalities including cardiovascular and diabetes risk factors. The development of diabetes mellitus after renal transplant represents a major posttransplant complication that may adversely affect graft/patient survival. The aim of this study was to assess the role of metabolic syndrome in patients on hemodialysis as a risk factor for the incidence of new-onset diabetes mellitus after renal transplant.Patients and methods: This was a prospective observational epidemiologic study carried out in adult nondiabetic patients undergoing chronic hemodialysis and on the renal transplant waiting list between November 2008 and April 2009. Patients were followed up from Visit 1 (baseline to 6 months after the renal transplant. The analysis of the role of metabolic syndrome in hemodialysis patients as a risk factor for the incidence of new-onset diabetes mellitus after renal transplant included the estimation of relative risk and its 95% confidence interval (CI.Results: A total of 383 evaluable patients were entered into the study (mean age, 52.7 years; male, 57.7%; Caucasian, 90.1%. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome on hemodialysis was 30.4% (95% CI, 25.8%–35.4%. Hypertension was the most prevalent criterion for metabolic syndrome (65.0%, followed by low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (52.7%, abdominal obesity (36.2%, hypertriglyceridemia (32.4%, and impaired glucose (8.9%. After the renal transplant, the prevalence of metabolic syndrome was still 25.8%. During the posttransplant period, the incidence of new-onset diabetes mellitus reached 13.0% (95% CI, 7.8%–20.6% and patients with pretransplant metabolic syndrome were 2

  15. Management of gestational diabetes mellitus at secondary health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Management of gestational diabetes mellitus at secondary health care level: a survey of ... It is amenable to risk reduction measures and if properly managed, ... the Medical Doctors and Nurses have poor knowledge and practice concerning ...

  16. Knowledge, Attitude and Practice of Patients with Diabetes Mellitus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Health education is a combination of activities aimed at facilitating changes in behaviour and adoption of practices that should decrease the risk of disease and illness, ... by many clinicians in the management of people with Diabetes mellitus.

  17. Prevalence of diabetes mellitus in the rural southern Free State ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prevalence of diabetes mellitus in the rural southern Free State. ... the contribution of risk factors such as age, physical activity, body mass index (BMI), ... Methods: Fasting venous plasma glucose (FVPG) levels were obtained from a total of ...

  18. Screening for gestational diabetes mellitus in a South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Screening for gestational diabetes mellitus in a South African population: Prevalence, comparison of diagnostic criteria and the role of risk factors. ... Methods. This was a prospective cohort observational study carried out at a level 1 clinic in ...

  19. Soluble CD163, adiponectin, C-reactive protein and progression of dysglycaemia in individuals at high risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deichgræber, Pia; Witte, Daniel R; Møller, Holger J

    2016-01-01

    for baseline waist circumference and smoking. Adjustment for CRP did not change the associations for sCD163 or adiponectin. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: Our findings indicate that mechanisms related to inflammation, including macrophage activation and adipocyte metabolism, may play a role in changes in glucose......AIM/HYPOTHESIS: Our aim was to investigate the association between the macrophage-activation marker soluble CD163 (sCD163), adiponectin, C-reactive protein (CRP) and changes in glycaemia, insulin resistance and insulin secretion in individuals at high risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus. METHODS......: This prospective study included 1014 individuals at high risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus participating in the Danish arm of the Anglo-Danish-Dutch study of Intensive Treatment In PeOple with ScreeN-detected Diabetes in Primary Care (ADDITION-Europe trial) baseline examination in 2001-2006 and follow...

  20. Type 2 diabetes mellitus and obesity are independent risk factors for poor outcome in patients with high-grade glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambless, Lola B; Parker, Scott L; Hassam-Malani, Laila; McGirt, Matthew J; Thompson, Reid C

    2012-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) and obesity are known risk factors for poor outcomes in patients with systemic malignancies but are not well-studied in the brain tumor population. In this study we asked if type 2 DM and elevated body mass index (BMI) are independent risk factors for poor prognosis in patients with high-grade glioma (HGG.). We conducted a retrospective cohort study of 171 patients surgically treated for HGG at a single institution. BMI and records of pre-existing type 2 DM were obtained from medical histories. Variables associated with survival in a univariate analysis were included in the multivariate Cox model if P 0.05 were then removed from the multivariate model in a step-wise fashion. Mean age at diagnosis was 55.0 ± 17.3 years. Fifteen (8.8%) patients had a history of type 2 DM. Fifty-eight (35.8%) patients had a BMI 30. Radiation therapy, temozolomide, and higher KPS score were independently associated with prolonged survival while increasing age was associated with decreased survival. DM (P = 0.001) and increasing BMI (P = 0.003) were found to be independently associated with decreased survival. Diabetics had a decreased median overall survival (312 vs. 470 days, P = 0.003) and PFS (106 vs. 166 days, P = 0.04) compared to non-diabetics. Increasing BMI (30) was also associated with decreased median PFS: 195 vs. 165 vs. 143 days, respectively. Pre-existing DM and elevated BMI are independent risk factors for poor outcome in patients with HGG.

  1. Risikostratificering af patienter med diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvist, Peter; Glintborg, Dorte; Andries, Alin

    2008-01-01

    with diabetes mellitus. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We included patients with diabetes from the catchment areas of four diabetes out-patient clinics in southern Denmark. Patients were risk-stratified to 3 follow-up levels (level 1 - follow-up only by their GP, level 2 - intensified follow-up by GP and/or shared care...... schemes, level 3 - follow-up only in out-patient clinics). The results were subsequently compared with the patients' actual follow-up status. RESULTS: A total of 647 patients (563 type 2 diabetes and 84 type 1 diabetes) were included from 15 GPs. Among these, 139 were stratified to level 1, 409 to level 2...

  2. Entrapment neuropathies in diabetes mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rota, Eugenia; Morelli, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathy is a common complication of diabetes mellitus (DM) with a wide clinical spectrum that encompasses generalized to focal and multifocal forms. Entrapment neuropathies (EN), which are focal forms, are so frequent at any stage of the diabetic disease, that they may be considered a neurophysiological hallmark of peripheral nerve involvement in DM. Indeed, EN may be the earliest neurophysiological abnormalities in DM, particularly in the upper limbs, even in the absence of a generalized polyneuropathy, or it may be superimposed on a generalized diabetic neuropathy. This remarkable frequency of EN in diabetes is underlain by a peculiar pathophysiological background. Due to the metabolic alterations consequent to abnormal glucose metabolism, the peripheral nerves show both functional impairment and structural changes, even in the preclinical stage, making them more prone to entrapment in anatomically constrained channels. This review discusses the most common and relevant EN encountered in diabetic patient in their epidemiological, pathophysiological and diagnostic features. PMID:27660694

  3. Entrapment neuropathies in diabetes mellitus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eugenia; Rota[1; Nicola; Morelli[1

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathy is a common complication of diabetes mellitus (DM) with a wide clinical spectrum that encompasses generalized to focal and multifocal forms. Entrapment neuropathies (EN), which are focal forms,are so frequent at any stage of the diabetic disease, that they may be considered a neurophysiological hallmark of peripheral nerve involvement in DM. Indeed, EN may be the earliest neurophysiological abnormalities in DM,particularly in the upper limbs, even in the absence of a generalized polyneuropathy, or it may be superimposed on a generalized diabetic neuropathy. This remarkable frequency of EN in diabetes is underlain by a peculiar pathophysiological background. Due to the metabolic alterations consequent to abnormal glucose metabolism, the peripheral nerves show both functional impairment and structural changes, even in the preclinical stage, making them more prone to entrapment in anatomically constrained channels. This review discusses the most common and relevant EN encountered in diabetic patient in their epidemiological, pathophysiological and diagnostic features.

  4. Diabetes mellitus and electrolyte disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liamis, George; Liberopoulos, Evangelos; Barkas, Fotios; Elisaf, Moses

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic patients frequently develop a constellation of electrolyte disorders. These disturbances are particularly common in decompensated diabetics, especially in the context of diabetic ketoacidosis or nonketotic hyperglycemic hyperosmolar syndrome. These patients are markedly potassium-, magnesium- and phosphate-depleted. Diabetes mellitus (DM) is linked to both hypo- and hyper-natremia reflecting the coexistence of hyperglycemia-related mechanisms, which tend to change serum sodium to opposite directions. The most important causal factor of chronic hyperkalemia in diabetic individuals is the syndrome of hyporeninemic hypoaldosteronism. Impaired renal function, potassium-sparing drugs, hypertonicity and insulin deficiency are also involved in the development of hyperkalemia. This article provides an overview of the electrolyte disturbances occurring in DM and describes the underlying mechanisms. This insight should pave the way for pathophysiology-directed therapy, thus contributing to the avoidance of the several deleterious effects associated with electrolyte disorders and their treatment. PMID:25325058

  5. Diabetes mellitus and oral health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Radhika

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is a group of metabolic disorders characterized by abnormal secretion and metabolic action of insulin. Hyperglycemia, the key feature of this endocrine disorder causes multisystem damage leading to untoward effects in various tissues collectively referred to as "Diabetic complications". Diabetes alters the oral health to a great extent. Indeed, periodontitis has been reported as the sixth complication of this disease. This article gives an overview of the oral effects of diabetes with an emphasis on periodontal disease and its relationship with cardiovascular disorders and pre-term birth. Dental considerations for management of these patients and recent advances in the dental field with respect to diabetes are also highlighted.

  6. Rehabilitation of tendon problems in patients with diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rees, Jonathan; Gaida, Jamie E.; Silbernagel, Karin Grävare; Zwerver, Johannes; Anthony, Joseph S.; Scott, Alex; Ackermann, PW; Hart, DA

    2016-01-01

    Exercise is crucial in the management of diabetes mellitus and its associated complications. However, individuals with diabetes have a heightened risk of musculoskeletal problems, including tendon pathologies. Diabetes has a significant impact on the function of tendons due to the accumulation of

  7. 77 FR 59450 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-27

    ... Applicants The Agency established the current requirement for diabetes in 1970 because several risk studies... from the diabetes requirement in 49 CFR 391.41(b)(3) is likely to achieve a level of safety equal to... [FMCSA Docket No. FMCSA-2012-0164] Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus...

  8. Rehabilitation of tendon problems in patients with diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rees, Jonathan; Gaida, Jamie E.; Silbernagel, Karin Grävare; Zwerver, Johannes; Anthony, Joseph S.; Scott, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Exercise is crucial in the management of diabetes mellitus and its associated complications. However, individuals with diabetes have a heightened risk of musculoskeletal problems, including tendon pathologies. Diabetes has a significant impact on the function of tendons due to the accumulation of ad

  9. Rehabilitation of tendon problems in patients with diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rees, Jonathan; Gaida, Jamie E.; Silbernagel, Karin Grävare; Zwerver, Johannes; Anthony, Joseph S.; Scott, Alex; Ackermann, PW; Hart, DA

    2016-01-01

    Exercise is crucial in the management of diabetes mellitus and its associated complications. However, individuals with diabetes have a heightened risk of musculoskeletal problems, including tendon pathologies. Diabetes has a significant impact on the function of tendons due to the accumulation of ad

  10. Cardiovascular risk assessment in type 2 diabetes mellitus: comparison of the World Health Organization/International Society of Hypertension risk prediction charts versus UK Prospective Diabetes Study risk engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herath, Herath M Meththananda; Weerarathna, Thilak Priyantha; Umesha, Dilini

    2015-01-01

    Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are at higher risk of developing cardiovascular diseases, and assessment of their cardiac risk is important for preventive strategies. The Ministry of Health of Sri Lanka has recommended World Health Organization/International Society of Hypertension (WHO/ISH) charts for cardiac risk assessment in individuals with T2DM. However, the most suitable cardiac risk assessment tool for Sri Lankans with T2DM has not been studied. This study was designed to evaluate the performance of two cardiac risk assessments tools; WHO/ISH charts and UK Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS) risk engine. Cardiac risk assessments were done in 2,432 patients with T2DM attending a diabetes clinic in Southern Sri Lanka using the two risk assessment tools. Validity of two assessment tools was further assessed by their ability to recognize individuals with raised low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and raised diastolic blood pressure in a cohort of newly diagnosed T2DM patients (n=332). WHO/ISH charts identified 78.4% of subjects as low cardiac risk whereas the UKPDS risk engine categorized 52.3% as low cardiac risk (Prisk categories of 10%-risk engine identified higher proportions of patients (28%) compared to WHO/ISH charts (7%). Approximately 6% of subjects were classified as low cardiac risk (risk of >20%. Agreement between the two tools was poor (κ value =0.144, Prisk by WHO/ISH had higher LDL cholesterol than the therapeutic target of 100 mg/dL. There is a significant discrepancy between the two assessment tools with WHO/ISH risk chart recognizing higher proportions of patients having low cardiac risk than the UKPDS risk engine. Risk assessment by both assessment tools demonstrated poor sensitivity in identifying those with treatable levels of LDL cholesterol and diastolic blood pressure.

  11. The obesity, metabolic syndrome, and type 2 diabetes mellitus pandemic: Part I. Increased cardiovascular disease risk and the importance of atherogenic dyslipidemia in persons with the metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginsberg, Henry N; MacCallum, Paul R

    2009-01-01

    Both the metabolic syndrome (MS) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) confer an increased risk of coronary heart disease and cardiovascular disease (CVD). As MS and T2DM become more prevalent, there will be an associated rise in the number of individuals with or at risk for CVD and its related disorders. One major underlying cause of CVD in patients with MS or T2DM is a characteristic form of atherogenic dyslipidemia. This article reviews the evidence that demonstrates that individuals with MS or T2DM are at increased risk for CVD and highlights atherogenic dyslipidemia as an important risk factor for the development of CVD in these individuals. In an accompanying article, current pharmacotherapies available for the management of atherogenic dyslipidemia in individuals with MS or T2DM are discussed.

  12. Insulin response dysregulation explains abnormal fat storage and increased risk of diabetes mellitus type 2 in Cohen Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limoge, Floriane; Faivre, Laurence; Gautier, Thomas; Petit, Jean-Michel; Gautier, Elodie; Masson, David; Jego, Gaëtan; El Chehadeh-Djebbar, Salima; Marle, Nathalie; Carmignac, Virginie; Deckert, Valérie; Brindisi, Marie-Claude; Edery, Patrick; Ghoumid, Jamal; Blair, Edward; Lagrost, Laurent; Thauvin-Robinet, Christel; Duplomb, Laurence

    2015-12-01

    Cohen Syndrome (CS) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder, with defective glycosylation secondary to mutations in the VPS13B gene, which encodes a protein of the Golgi apparatus. Besides congenital neutropenia, retinopathy and intellectual deficiency, CS patients are faced with truncal obesity. Metabolism investigations showed abnormal glucose tolerance tests and low HDL values in some patients, and these could be risk factors for the development of diabetes mellitus and/or cardiovascular complications. To understand the mechanisms involved in CS fat storage, we used two models of adipogenesis differentiation: (i) SGBS pre-adipocytes with VPS13B invalidation thanks to siRNA delivery and (ii) CS primary fibroblasts. In both models, VPS13B invalidation led to accelerated differentiation into fat cells, which was confirmed by the earlier and increased expression of specific adipogenic genes, consequent to the increased response of cells to insulin stimulation. At the end of the differentiation protocol, these fat cells exhibited decreased AKT2 phosphorylation after insulin stimulation, which suggests insulin resistance. This study, in association with the in-depth analysis of the metabolic status of the patients, thus allowed us to recommend appropriate nutritional education to prevent the occurrence of diabetes mellitus and to put forward recommendations for the follow-up of CS patients, in particular with regard to the development of metabolic syndrome. We also suggest replacing the term obesity by abnormal fat distribution in CS, which should reduce the number of inappropriate diagnoses in patients who are referred only on the basis of intellectual deficiency associated with obesity.

  13. Cancer risk among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: a population-based prospective study in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Meng; Hu, Ru-Ying; Wu, Hai-Bin; Pan, Jin; Gong, Wei-Wei; Guo, Li-Hua; Zhong, Jie-Ming; Fei, Fang-Rong; Yu, Min

    2015-06-17

    Evidence indicates an increased cancer risk among type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients, yet studies in mainland China are scarce. Based on Diabetes Surveillance System linking to Cancer Surveillance System of Zhejiang Province in China, we explored the cancer risk among T2DM patients. Totally, 327,268 T2DM patients were identified and followed from January 1, 2007 to December 31, 2013. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were reported. Overall cancer risk was found significantly increased with an SIR of 1.15 (95% CI 1.12-1.19) and 1.25 (95% CI 1.21-1.30) in males and females, respectively. Regarding specific cancer sites, risks of liver, colon, rectum, pancreas, and kidney were significantly increased with SIRs of 1.26 (95% CI 1.16-1.36), 1.47 (95% CI 1.29-1.67), 1.25 (95% CI 1.09-1.43), 2.81 (95% CI 2.50-3.16) and 1.61 (95% CI 1.28-2.03) in males, 1.53 (95% CI 1.35-1.73), 1.33 (95% CI 1.15-1.54), 1.29 (95% CI 1.10-1.51), 3.62 (95% CI 3.20-4.09) and 1.71 (95% CI 1.28-2.29) in females, respectively. A significant increased SIR was noted for prostate (1.80, 95% CI 1.58-2.06). Significant increased SIRs for lung (1.32, 95% CI 1.20-1.44) and stomach (1.16, 95% CI 1.03-1.30) were observed in females. We suggested an increased cancer risk among T2DM patients.

  14. Impact of dietary fiber intake on glycemic control, cardiovascular risk factors and chronic kidney disease in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: the Fukuoka Diabetes Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Hiroki; Iwase, Masanori; Ohkuma, Toshiaki; Ogata-Kaizu, Shinako; Ide, Hitoshi; Kikuchi, Yohei; Idewaki, Yasuhiro; Joudai, Tamaki; Hirakawa, Yoichiro; Uchida, Kazuhiro; Sasaki, Satoshi; Nakamura, Udai; Kitazono, Takanari

    2013-12-11

    Dietary fiber is beneficial for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus, although it is consumed differently in ethnic foods around the world. We investigated the association between dietary fiber intake and obesity, glycemic control, cardiovascular risk factors and chronic kidney disease in Japanese type 2 diabetic patients. A total of 4,399 patients were assessed for dietary fiber intake using a brief self-administered diet history questionnaire. The associations between dietary fiber intake and various cardiovascular risk factors were investigated cross-sectionally. Body mass index, fasting plasma glucose, HbA1c, triglyceride and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein negatively associated with dietary fiber intake after adjusting for age, sex, duration of diabetes, current smoking, current drinking, total energy intake, fat intake, saturated fatty acid intake, leisure-time physical activity and use of oral hypoglycemic agents or insulin. The homeostasis model assessment insulin sensitivity and HDL cholesterol positively associated with dietary fiber intake. Dietary fiber intake was associated with reduced prevalence of abdominal obesity, hypertension and metabolic syndrome after multivariate adjustments including obesity. Furthermore, dietary fiber intake was associated with lower prevalence of albuminuria, low estimated glomerular filtration rate and chronic kidney disease after multivariate adjustments including protein intake. Additional adjustments for obesity, hypertension or metabolic syndrome did not change these associations. We demonstrated that increased dietary fiber intake was associated with better glycemic control and more favorable cardiovascular disease risk factors including chronic kidney disease in Japanese type 2 diabetic patients. Diabetic patients should be encouraged to consume more dietary fiber in daily life.

  15. Surprisingly low compliance to local guidelines for risk factor based screening for gestational diabetes mellitus - A population-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winkvist Anna

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Screening for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM is routine during pregnancy in many countries in the world. The screening programs are either based on general screening offered to all pregnant women or risk factor based screening stipulated in local clinical guidelines. The aims of this study were to investigate: 1 the compliance with local guidelines of screening for GDM and 2 the outcomes of pregnancy and birth in relation to risk factors of GDM and whether or not exposed to oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT. Methods This study design was a population-based retrospective cross-sectional study of 822 women. A combination of questionnaire data and data collected from medical records was applied. Compliance to the local guidelines of risk factor based screening for GDM was examined and a comparison of outcomes of pregnancy and delivery in relation to risk factor groups for GDM was performed. Results Of the 822 participants, 257 (31.3% women fulfilled at least one criterion for being exposed to screening for GDM according to the local clinical guidelines. However, only 79 (30.7% of these women were actually exposed to OGTT and of those correctly exposed for screening, seven women were diagnosed with GDM. Women developing risk factors for GDM during pregnancy had a substantially increased risk of giving birth to an infant with macrosomia. Conclusion Surprisingly low compliance with the local clinical guidelines for screening for GDM during pregnancy was found. Furthermore, the prevalence of the risk factors of GDM in our study was almost doubled compared to previous Swedish studies. Pregnant women developing risk factors of GDM during pregnancy were found to be at substantially increased risk of giving birth to an infant with macrosomia. There is a need of actions improving compliance to the local guidelines.

  16. Periodontitis as a possible early sign of diabetes mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Teeuw, Wijnand J.; Kosho, Madeline X F; Poland, Dennis C. W.; Gerdes, Victor E A; Loos, Bruno G

    2017-01-01

    Objective The early diagnosis of (pre)diabetes mellitus is essential for the prevention of diabetes complications. It has been suggested that gum disease (periodontitis) might be an early complication of diabetes and may be a useful risk indicator for diabetes screening. Therefore, a dental office could be a good location for screening for (pre)diabetes in patients with periodontitis using a validated glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) dry spot analysis. Research design and methods A total of 313 in...

  17. The History of Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manjeet Singh

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes has been recognised since antiquity. The first description that resembles the features of the disease is found in Ebers papyrus (1550 BC. The term ";diabetes"; was first coined by Aretaeus of Cappadocia. Galen described it as a disease specific to the kidneys because of a weakness in their retentive faculties. Word mellitus was added by Thomas Willis in 1675 after rediscovering the sweetness of urine and blood of patients (first noticed by the ancient Indians, Chinese and Japanese. He later noticed that some urine samples were sweet (diabetes mellitus whereas others were tasteless (diabetes insipidus. Later Cullen and John Rollo confirmed these two types. It was only in 1776 that Dobson firstly confirmed the presence of excess sugar in urine and blood as a cause of their sweetness. Claude Bernard discovered in 1857 that liver releases a substance i.e. glycogen which affects blood sugar level. The role of the pancreas in pathogenesis of diabetes was discovered by Mering and Minkowski in 1889. In 1909, Jean De Meyer named glucose lowering hormone as insulin whose existence was hypothetical at that time. Banting and Macleod got Noble prize for isolating insulin in 1923. Discovery of insulin for the treatment of diabetes represents one of the major humanitarian and scientific milestones of the 20th century. Oral hypoglycemic drugs were introduced later. Today researchers are working on insulin patch, implantable pump, insulin-sensitizers, pancreatic or islet cell transplantation and oral insulin solution.

  18. Evaluation of the Finnish Diabetes Risk Score to predict type 2 diabetes mellitus in a Colombian population: A longitudinal observational study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Diego; Gomez-Arbelaez; Laura; Alvarado-Jurado; Miguel; Ayala-Castillo; Leonardo; Forero-Naranjo; Paul; Anthony; Camacho; Patricio; Lopez-Jaramillo

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To assess the performance of the Finnish Diabetes Risk Score(FINDRISC) questionnaire for detecting and predicting type 2 diabetes mellitus(DM2) in a Colombian population.METHODS: This is a longitudinal observational study conducted in Floridablanca, Colombia. Adult subjects(age ≥ 35 years) without known diabetes, were included. A modified version of FINDRISC was completed, and the glycemia values from all the subjects were collected from the hospital’s database. Firstly, a cross-sectional analysis was performed and then, the subsample of prediabetic participants was followed for diabetes incidence. RESULTS: A total of 772 subjects were suitable for the study. The overall prevalence of undiagnosed DM2 was 2.59%, and the incidence of DM2 among the prediabetic participants was 7.5 per 100 person-years after a total of 265257 person-years follow-up. The FINDRISC at baseline was significantly associated with undiagnosed and incident DM2. The area under receiver operating characteristics curve of the FINDRISC score for detecting undiagnosed DM2 in both men and women was 0.7477 and 0.7175, respectively; and for predicting the incidence of DM2 among prediabetics was 71.99% in men and 67.74% in women. CONCLUSION: The FINDRISC questionnaire is a useful screening tool to identify cross-sectionally unknown DM2 and to predict the incidence of DM2 among prediabetics in the Colombian population.

  19. Evaluating the impact of type 2 diabetes mellitus on cardiovascular risk in persons with metabolic syndrome using the UKPDS risk engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogedengbe OS

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available O Stephen Ogedengbe,1 Ignatius U Ezeani,2 Ijezie I Chukwuonye,3 Ndukaife Anyabolu,4,5 Ikemefuna I Ozor,6 Aihanuwa Eregie1 1Department of Internal Medicine, University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City, 2Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine, Federal Medical Center, Umuahia, 3Division of Nephrology, Department of Internal Medicine, Federal Medical Center, Umuahia, 4Division of Nephrology, Department of Internal Medicine, Imo State University Teaching Hospital, Orlu, 5Division of Nephrology, Department of Internal Medicine, Federal Medical Centre, Owerri, 6Division of Neurosurgery, Department of Surgery, University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Enugu, NigeriaBackground: The aim of this study is to evaluate the impact of coexistence of metabolic syndrome (MS and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM on the estimated cardiovascular risk as calculated using the United Kingdom Prospective Diabetic Study risk engine (UKPDS-RE and also to determine the impact of the coexistence of MS and T2DM on the 10-year risk of developing coronary heart disease and stroke.Methodology: This is a cross-sectional study in which convenience sampling technique was used to recruit 124 consecutive persons with T2DM and 96 controls using a questionnaire administered technique. The World Health Organization (WHO criterion was used to define MS and the UKPDS-RE was used to identify persons with increased risk for stroke and those with increased risk for coronary heart disease. The data obtained were analyzed using SPSS version 16. Statistical comparisons were made with chi-square for comparison of proportions. A P-value of less than 0.05 was taken as statistically significant.Results: Fifteen subjects were identified as having an increased 10-year risk for stroke and ten as having an increased risk for a coronary event. The odds of a T2DM subject with MS having an increased risk for stroke compared with a T2DM subject without MS

  20. Plasma Leptin in Patients at Intermediate to High Cardiovascular Risk With and Without Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montagnana, Martina; Fava, Cristiano; Targher, Giovanni; Franchini, Massimo; Danese, Elisa; Bonafini, Sara; De Cata, Angela; Salvagno, Gian Luca; Ruzzenente, Orazio; Guidi, Gian Cesare; Lippi, Giuseppe

    2017-03-01

    A number of clinical studies have demonstrated that leptin concentrations are related to the metabolic disturbances that constitute the metabolic syndrome (MetS) and to diabetes mellitus (DM). To investigate possible determinants of leptin concentrations in a sample of patients at high cardiovascular (CV) risk carrying two or more features of the MetS and to investigate if any difference exist between at risk patients with or without DM. Serum leptin concentrations were measured in 60 consecutive male patients affected by at least two CV risk factors which belong to the National Cholesterol Education Program/Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP/ATP III) definition of MetS: 30 patients affected by type 2 DM (T2DM) and 30 nondiabetic patients (non-T2DM). Nineteen healthy subjects were included in the study as a control group (HC). Leptin was significantly higher in patients carrying two or more features of the MetS compared with HC (P = 0.02). Stratifying MetS patients for DM, we found that leptin level was higher in non-T2DM patients (7.8 ng/ml), intermediate in T2DM (6.2 ng/ml), and lower in HC (4.6 ng/ml). In MetS patients, a positive correlation was found between leptin and waist, triglycerides, and number of MetS criteria. After stratification for T2DM, the correlations were still significant in the non-T2DM but not in the T2DM group. In our sample of moderate-to-high-risk patients, leptin level is positively associated with waist circumference and triglycerides but only in non-T2DM patients. Our data suggest that diabetic subjects could modulate leptin production in a different way compared with patients carrying other MetS-related anomalies. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Diabetes mellitus and drug abuse during pregnancy and the risk for orofacial clefts and related abnormalities 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trindade-Suedam, Ivy Kiemle; von Kostrisch, Lília Maria; Pimenta, Luiz André Freire; Negrato, Carlos Antônio; Franzolin, Solange Braga; Trindade, Alceu Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: to assessed the prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM) and drug abuse in mothers of children with orofacial clefts (OFC). Methods: 325 women who had children (0-3y) with clefts were interviewed. Data regarding type of diabetes, use of legal/illegal drugs during pregnancy, waist girth and fasting blood sugar at the first prenatal consult were collected. Results: twenty seven percent of the women had DM, out of these, 89% had gestational DM, 5,5% type 1 DM and 5,5% type 2 DM. The prevalence of DM in mothers of children with OFC was 27%, it is significantly higher than the average Brazilian population which is 7.6% (p<0.01) (OR=4.5, 95%CI=3.5-5.8). Regarding drug abuse during pregnancy, 32% of the mothers used drugs and a significant positive correlation was observed between drug abuse and the occurrence of clefts and other craniofacial anomalies (p=0.028) (OR=2.87; 95%CI=1.1-7.4). Conclusions: DM and drug abuse during pregnancy increases the risk for OFC and related anomalies and early diagnosis of DM and prevention of drug abuse, especially in pregnant women, should be emphasized. PMID:27508899

  2. Relevance of hemostatic risk factors on coronary morphology in patients with diabetes mellitus type 2

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    Peters Ansgar J

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective The influence hemostatitc parameters on the morphological extent and severity of coronary artery disease were studied in patients with and without DM type 2. Background It is known that patients with diabetes (DM have abnormal metabolic and hemostatic parameters Methods Of 150 consecutive patients with angiographically proven coronary artery disease 29 presented with DM. Additionally to parameters of lipid-metabolism fibrinogen, tissue-plasminogenactivator (t-PA, plasminogen-activator-inhibitor (PAI, plasmin-a-antiplasmin (PAP, prothrombin-fragment 1+2 (F1+2, thrombin-antithrombin (TAT, von-willebrand-factor (vWF, platelet factor 4 (PF4, glykomembranproteine 140 (GMP140 and the rheologic parameters plasma viscosity and red blood cell aggregation were evaluated. The extent and severity of CAD was evaluated according to the criteria of the American Heart Association. Results Patients with DM presented with a higher number of conventional risk factors as compared to non-diabetic patients. Additionally there were significant differences for F1+2, red blood cell aggregation and PAI. Diabetic patients showed a more severe extent of coronary arteriosclerosis, which also could be found more distally. A significant relationship between blood-glucose, thrombocyte-activation (vWF, endogenous fibrinolysis (PAI and the severity of CAD and a more distal location of stenoses could be found (r = 0.6, p Conclusion Patients with coronary artery disease and DM type 2 showed marked alterations of metabolic, hemostatic, fibrinolytic and rheologic parameters, which can produce a prothrombogenic state. A direct association of thrombogenic factors on coronary morphology could be shown. This can be the pathophysiologic mechanism of more severe and distal pronounced coronary atherosclerosis in these patients.

  3. Diabetes mellitus related bone metabolism and periodontal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ying-Ying; Xiao, E; Graves, Dana T

    2015-06-26

    Diabetes mellitus and periodontal disease are chronic diseases affecting a large number of populations worldwide. Changed bone metabolism is one of the important long-term complications associated with diabetes mellitus. Alveolar bone loss is one of the main outcomes of periodontitis, and diabetes is among the primary risk factors for periodontal disease. In this review, we summarise the adverse effects of diabetes on the periodontium in periodontitis subjects, focusing on alveolar bone loss. Bone remodelling begins with osteoclasts resorbing bone, followed by new bone formation by osteoblasts in the resorption lacunae. Therefore, we discuss the potential mechanism of diabetes-enhanced bone loss in relation to osteoblasts and osteoclasts.

  4. Diabetes mellitus related bone metabolism and periodontal disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ying-Ying; Xiao, E; Graves, Dana T

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus and periodontal disease are chronic diseases affecting a large number of populations worldwide. Changed bone metabolism is one of the important long-term complications associated with diabetes mellitus. Alveolar bone loss is one of the main outcomes of periodontitis, and diabetes is among the primary risk factors for periodontal disease. In this review, we summarise the adverse effects of diabetes on the periodontium in periodontitis subjects, focusing on alveolar bone loss. Bone remodelling begins with osteoclasts resorbing bone, followed by new bone formation by osteoblasts in the resorption lacunae. Therefore, we discuss the potential mechanism of diabetes-enhanced bone loss in relation to osteoblasts and osteoclasts. PMID:25857702

  5. Diabetes mellitus related bone metabolism and periodontal disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying-Ying Wu; E Xiao; Dana T Graves

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus and periodontal disease are chronic diseases affecting a large number of populations worldwide. Changed bone metabolism is one of the important long-term complications associated with diabetes mellitus. Alveolar bone loss is one of the main outcomes of periodontitis, and diabetes is among the primary risk factors for periodontal disease. In this review, we summarise the adverse effects of diabetes on the periodontium in periodontitis subjects, focusing on alveolar bone loss. Bone remodelling begins with osteoclasts resorbing bone, followed by new bone formation by osteoblasts in the resorption lacunae. Therefore, we discuss the potential mechanism of diabetes-enhanced bone loss in relation to osteoblasts and osteoclasts.

  6. Periodontal disease and diabetes mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Negrato, Carlos Antonio; TARZIA, Olinda; Jovanovic, Lois; Chinellato, Luiz Eduardo Montenegro

    2013-01-01

    Periodontal disease (PD) is one of the most commonly known human chronic disorders. The relationship between PD and several systemic diseases such as diabetes mellitus (DM) has been increasingly recognized over the past decades. Objective The purpose of this review is to provide the reader with knowledge concerning the relationship between PD and DM. Many articles have been published in the English and Portuguese literature over the last 50 years examining the relationship between the...

  7. Management of gestational diabetes mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Annunziata Lapolla, Maria Grazia Dalfrà, Domenico FedeleDepartment of Medical and Surgical Sciences, Padova University, ItalyAbstract: The incidence of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is on the increase and, if not diagnosed, managed and treated adequately, can have unfavorable maternal and fetal outcomes. Several studies have shown that glycemic values considered as adequate in the past when monitoring GDM failed to contain these adverse outcomes and randomized trials are need...